Science.gov

Sample records for nurse practitioner workforce

  1. Neonatal nurse practitioner workforce survey executive summary.

    PubMed

    Timoney, Paula; Sansoucie, Debra

    2012-06-01

    The Neonatal Nurse Practitioner Workforce Survey, led by Paula Timoney, DNP, ARNP, NNP-BC, and Debra Sansoucie, EdD, RN, NNP-BC, with the National Association of Neonatal Nurse Practitioners (NANNP), provides data collected from more than 600 neonatal nurse practitioners to examine workforce characteristics and needs. NANNP commissioned the survey because no comprehensive data existed for the neonatal nurse practitioner workforce. The executive summary given in this article highlights some of the survey's key findings in the areas of demographics, practice environment, scope of responsibilities, and job satisfaction. Readers are encouraged to review the complete text of the Neonatal Nurse Practitioner Workforce Survey for more in-depth data and recommendations regarding NNP education, scope of practice, and scope of responsibility in the ever-changing health care environment. The report will be available for purchase at http://www.nannstore.org in summer 2012.

  2. 2016 Neonatal Nurse Practitioner Workforce Survey: Report of Findings.

    PubMed

    Staebler, Suzanne; Bissinger, Robin

    2017-10-01

    The National Association of Neonatal Nurse Practitioners (NANNP) conducted its second workforce survey of certified neonatal nurse practitioners in the fall of 2016. National Association of Neonatal Nurse Practitioners partnered with the National Certification Corporation and the American Association of Nurse Practitioners to conduct this electronic survey, containing 69 questions and focusing on practice sites and total compensation packages (including benefits) and workforce deficits.Findings indicate a rising neonatal nurse practitioners (NNPs) position vacancy rate across the country. Regional salary data indicated that the southeast had lower compensation rates for NNPs, with regions 4 and 11 (South) having the lowest rates. A promising trend indicated that new graduate NNPs with a doctorate are earning more. The study findings indicate that tailoring benefit packages to the age and years of experience for the individual NNP may aid in recruiting and retaining NNPs in practice. For experienced NNPs, altered shift lengths (shorter), higher employer matching rates in retirement plans, and less employee cost sharing for health insurance benefits are more appealing strategies.It is critical for NNPs to continually evaluate the profession's workforce data. There are more than 205,000 nurse practitioners practicing in the United States, with neonatal NPs making up approximately 3% of the larger whole. Increased participation in future surveys will assist in creating sustainable solutions to the workforce crisis facing the profession.

  3. National Association of Neonatal Nurse Practitioners (NANNP) Workforce Survey.

    PubMed

    Kaminski, Mary M; Meier, Susan; Staebler, Suzanne

    2015-06-01

    As an integral member of a healthcare team, neonatal nurse practitioners (NNPs) provide care in a variety of settings that include but are not limited to all levels of inpatient care, transport, acute and chronic care settings; delivery rooms; and outpatient care settings. Anecdotal evidence indicates that responsibilities, practice environment, and workload vary widely between regions and practice settings. Historically, the supply of neonatal nurse practitioners has rarely met the demand for services, although needs vary by region at any given time. Because the NNP role is a collaborative one, a shortage of NNPs leaves a gap in the team approach to care. In 2011, the National Association of Neonatal Nurse Practitioners (NANNP) commissioned the first national study of the current NNP workforce in the United States and Canada. In an effort to further explore the NNP workforce population, the NANNP Council partnered with the National Certification Corporation to perform a second workforce survey of NNPs in the spring of 2014. The online survey was conducted between March and April 2014. The goal of the study was to describe the demographics, practice environment, scope of responsibilities, benefits and reimbursement, and job satisfaction for the current NNP workforce. Key areas of concern identified by the 2014 Neonatal Nurse Practitioner Workforce Survey include an aging workforce; the need for NNP faculty; inadequate staffing ratios; the lack of downtime during prolonged shifts; and the need to assisting practices in developing competency and mentoring programs.

  4. Nurse practitioner workforce: a substantial supply of primary care providers.

    PubMed

    Poghosyan, Lusine; Lucero, Robert; Rauch, Lindsay; Berkowitz, Bobbie

    2012-01-01

    For about 5 decades, nurse practitioners (NPs) have been utilized to deliver primary care, traditionally in underserved areas or to vulnerable populations. However, over the years, this workforce has experienced a steady growth and has expanded its reach to provide primary care in diverse settings. An additional 32 million patients will have access to primary care with full implementation of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. It is unlikely that the scarce supply of primary care physicians will be able to properly meet the demand and the health care needs of the nation. NPs face challenges but practice, policy, and research recommendations for better utilizing NPs in primary care can mediate the workforce shortages and meet the demand for care.

  5. Strategic modeling of the pediatric nurse practitioner workforce.

    PubMed

    Schell, Greggory J; Lavieri, Mariel S; Li, Xiang; Toriello, Alejandro; Martyn, Kristy K; Freed, Gary L

    2015-02-01

    To assess the current pediatric nurse practitioner (PNP) workforce and to investigate the impact of potential policy changes to address forecasted shortages. We modeled the admission of students into nursing bachelor's programs and followed them through advanced clinical programs. Prediction models were combined with optimal decision-making to determine best-case scenario admission levels. We computed 2 measures: (1) the absolute shortage and (2) the expected number of years until the PNP workforce will be able to fully satisfy PNP demand (ie, self-sufficiency). There is a forecasted shortage of PNPs in the workforce over the next 13 years. Under the best-case scenario, it would take at least 13 years for the workforce to fully satisfy demand. Our analysis of potential policy changes revealed that increasing the specialization rate for PNPs by 4% would decrease the number of years required until there are enough PNPs from 13 years to 5 years. Increasing the certification examination passing rate to 96% from the current average of 86.9% would lead to self-sufficiency in 11 years. In addition, increasing the annual growth rate of master's programs to 36% from the current maximum of 10.7% would result in self-sufficiency in 5 years. Current forecasts of demand for PNPs indicate that the current workforce will be incapable of satisfying the growing demand. Policy changes can result in a reduction in the expected shortage and potentially improve access to care for pediatric patients. Copyright © 2015 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  6. Strategic modeling of the neonatal nurse practitioner workforce.

    PubMed

    Schell, Greggory J; Lavieri, Mariel S; Jankovic, Filip; Li, Xiang; Toriello, Alejandro; Martyn, Kristy K; Freed, Gary L

    2016-01-01

    Neonatal nurse practitioners (NNPs) play a vital role in the medical care of newborns and infants. There is expected to be a shortage of NNPs in the near future. To assess the present NNP workforce and study the impact of potential policy changes to alleviate forecasted shortages. We modeled the education and workforce system for NNPs. Forecasting models were combined with optimal decision-making to derive best-case scenario admission levels for graduate and undergraduate programs. Under the best-case scenario for the current system, the shortage of NNPs is expected to last 10 years. We analyzed the impact of improving the certification examination passing rate, increasing the annual growth rate of master's programs, and reducing the workforce annual attrition rate. We found that policy changes may reduce the forecasted shortage to 4 years. Present forecasts of demand for NNPs indicate that the existing workforce and education system will be unable to satisfy the growing demand. Policy changes may reduce the expected shortage and potentially improve access to care for newborns and infants. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. A scoping review of the nurse practitioner workforce in oncology.

    PubMed

    Coombs, Lorinda A; Hunt, Lauren; Cataldo, Janine

    2016-08-01

    The quality of cancer care may be compromised in the near future because of work force issues. Several factors will impact the oncology health provider work force: an aging population, an increase in the number of cancer survivors, and expansion of health care coverage for the previously uninsured. Between October 2014 and March 2015, an electronic literature search of English language articles was conducted using PubMed(®) , the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Sciences (CINAHL(®) ), Web of Science, Journal Storage (JSTOR(®) ), Google Scholar, and SCOPUS(®) . Using the scoping review criteria, the research question was identified "How much care in oncology is provided by nurse practitioners (NPs)?" Key search terms were kept broad and included: "NP" AND "oncology" AND "workforce". The literature was searched between 2005 and 2015, using the inclusion and exclusion criteria, 29 studies were identified, further review resulted in 10 relevant studies that met all criteria. Results demonstrated that NPs are utilized in both inpatient and outpatient settings, across all malignancy types and in a variety of roles. Academic institutions were strongly represented in all relevant studies, a finding that may reflect the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) duty work hour limitations. There was no pattern associated with state scope of practice and NP representation in this scoping review. Many of the studies reviewed relied on subjective information, or represented a very small number of NPs. There is an obvious need for an objective analysis of the amount of care provided by oncology NPs.

  8. Federal Polices Influence Access to Primary Care and Nurse Practitioner Workforce.

    PubMed

    Carthon, J Margo Brooks; Barnes, Hilary; Sarik, Danielle Altares

    2015-05-01

    Although most nurse practitioners (NPs) are aware of state-level regulations that influence practice, many are unaware of the ways that federal policies affect NP workforce supply and the delivery of primary care. In this investigation we provide an overview of federal initiatives enacted through the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act that impact the NP workforce. We explore how the law supports NP workforce supply and settings in which NPs provide care. We then describe challenges that may prevent full utilization of the NP workforce. Examining both federal policies and state-level regulations is essential to achieving an increased NP workforce supply and improved access to care.

  9. The primary healthcare nurse practitioner in Ontario: a workforce study.

    PubMed

    van Soeren, Mary; Hurlock-Chorostecki, Christina; Goodwin, Sharon; Baker, Elizabeth

    2009-01-01

    The role of the primary healthcare nurse practitioner (NP-PHC) has a long history in Ontario. In this paper, we describe the evolution of the role with a focus on geographic distribution, a profile of client populations and the services provided by NP-PHCs. Comparisons will be made to findings from previous studies and reports on the NP-PHC role in Ontario. In 2004 and 2005, two-thirds of the nurse practitioners registered with the College of Nurses of Ontario responded to a descriptive self-reporting survey. The data collected revealed that NP-PHCs work throughout the healthcare system, including with underserviced and marginalized populations, in community health centres and in outpatient areas within acute care hospitals. They provide the entire spectrum of primary healthcare services. Barriers to fully enacting the role are related to restrictive legislation that limits NP prescribing and diagnosing, and the ability to work to full scope of practice in hospitals (for example, in emergency departments). Targeted funding has promoted the role throughout the province. However, inadequate and insecure pilot funding continues to be a concern. Findings from this study indicate that policy decisions to support the NP role in rural and remote areas have resulted in expansion of the role across the province. Yet, NPs perceive that legislation has lagged and inhibits their ability to meet patient and health systems needs.

  10. Workforce characteristics of privately practicing nurse practitioners in Australia: Results from a national survey.

    PubMed

    Currie, Jane; Chiarella, Mary; Buckley, Thomas

    2016-10-01

    Australian private practice nurse practitioner (PPNP) services have grown since legislative changes in 2010 enabled eligible nurse practitioners (NPs) to access reimbursement for care delivered through the Medicare Benefits Schedule (MBS) and Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme (PBS). This article provides data from a national survey on the workforce characteristics of PPNPs in Australia. PPNPs in Australia were invited to complete an electronic survey. Quantitative data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and qualitative data using thematic analysis. There were 73 completed surveys. One of the intentions of expanding access to MBS and PBS for patients treated by NPs was to increase patients' access to health care through greater flexibility in the healthcare workforce. The results of this survey confirm that the workforce characteristics of PPNPs provide a potentially untapped resource to meet current primary healthcare demand. The findings of this study allow us to understand the characteristics of PPNP services, which are significant for workforce planning. The focus of PPNP practice is toward primary health care with PPNPs working predominantly in general practice settings. The largest age group of PPNPs is over 50 years and means a proportion will be retiring in the next 15 years. ©2016 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  11. The Untapped Potential of the Nurse Practitioner Workforce in Reducing Health Disparities.

    PubMed

    Poghosyan, Lusine; Carthon, J Margo Brooks

    2017-01-01

    The growing nurse practitioner (NP) workforce represents a significant supply of primary care providers, who if optimally utilized, are well-positioned to improve access to health care for racial and ethnic minorities. However, many barriers affect the optimal utilization of NPs in primary care delivery. These barriers may also prevent NPs from maximally contributing to efforts to reduce racial and ethnic health disparities. Our review of the empirical and health policy literature sought to elucidate factors that affect NPs' potential and ability to narrow or eliminate health disparities. We found that restrictive state scope of practice regulations, disparate reimbursement policies, lack of NP workforce diversity, and poor organizational structures in NP practices may limit NPs' contributions to current efforts to reduce disparities. Our results led to the development of the nurse practitioner health disparities model which identifies barriers to and opportunities for optimal use of NPs in reducing racial and ethnic disparities. State and federal policymakers and administrators in health-care settings should take actions to remove legislative and organizational barriers to enable NPs to deliver high-quality care to racial and ethnic minorities. Researchers can use the nurse practitioner health disparities model to produce empirical evidence to reduce health disparities and improve population health.

  12. Musculoskeletal Workforce Needs: Are Physician Assistants and Nurse Practitioners the Solution? AOA Critical Issues.

    PubMed

    Day, Charles S; Boden, Scott D; Knott, Patrick T; O'Rourke, Nancy C; Yang, Brian W

    2016-06-01

    Growth estimates and demographic shifts of the population of the United States foreshadow a future heightened demand for musculoskeletal care. Although many articles have discussed this growing demand on the musculoskeletal workforce, few address the inevitable need for more musculoskeletal care providers. As we are unable to increase the number of orthopaedic surgeons because of restrictions on graduate medical education slots, physician assistants (PAs) and nurse practitioners (NPs) represent one potential solution to the impending musculoskeletal care supply shortage. This American Orthopaedic Association (AOA) symposium report investigates models for advanced practice provider integration, considers key issues affecting PAs and NPs, and proposes guidelines to help to assess the logistical and educational possibilities of further incorporating NPs and PAs into the orthopaedic workforce in order to address future musculoskeletal care needs.

  13. Novice Nurse Practitioner Workforce Transition Into Primary Care: A Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Faraz, Asefeh

    2016-05-18

    The purpose of this integrative review was to analyze the current state of the science related to the novice nurse practitioner (NP) transition into primary care. A systematic review of the literature was conducted using the databases Pubmed, MEDLINE, Ovid, and Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) with the terms nurse practitioner, role, and transition to search articles published after 1997. Three major themes emerged from the literature related to the novice NP transition into primary care. These themes were categorized as "experiencing role ambiguity," "quality of professional and interpersonal relationships," and "facing intrinsic and extrinsic obstacles." Strategies to reduce role ambiguity, improve the quality of professional relationships, and mitigate extrinsic obstacles faced by novice NPs may improve their transition into the primary care workforce. Educational institutions, employers, and novice NPs all have a stake in the successful transition from student to primary care practitioner and should be engaged in developing effective NP transition-to-practice programs. © The Author(s) 2016.

  14. Redesigning a School Health Workforce for a New Health Care Environment: Training School Nurses as Nurse Practitioners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brindis, Claire D.; Sanghvi, Rupal; Melinkovich, Paul; Kaplan, David W.; Ahlstrand, Karin R.; Phibbs, Stephanie L.

    1998-01-01

    School nurses trained as nurse practitioners can help resolve the problems of ready access to and appropriate use of primary care, early detection of medical problems, and efficient use of school staff. This paper describes a project in which Denver's school nurses received training as nurse practitioners, suggesting ways to solve problems in role…

  15. Redesigning a School Health Workforce for a New Health Care Environment: Training School Nurses as Nurse Practitioners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brindis, Claire D.; Sanghvi, Rupal; Melinkovich, Paul; Kaplan, David W.; Ahlstrand, Karin R.; Phibbs, Stephanie L.

    1998-01-01

    School nurses trained as nurse practitioners can help resolve the problems of ready access to and appropriate use of primary care, early detection of medical problems, and efficient use of school staff. This paper describes a project in which Denver's school nurses received training as nurse practitioners, suggesting ways to solve problems in role…

  16. The HIV Primary Care Workforce of Tomorrow: The UCSF Integrated HIV/AIDS Primary Care Capacity Nurse Practitioner Program.

    PubMed

    Portillo, Carmen J; Stringari-Murray, Suzan; Fox, Christopher B; Monasterio, Erica; Rose, Carol Dawson

    2016-01-01

    The increasing demand for primary care services and the current health care workforce shortage is predicted to cause drastic reductions in the number of clinicians who are competent to provide HIV care. For the past decade, the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) School of Nursing has provided HIV specialty education for Advanced Practice Nursing students in the Master's curriculum. In 2013, UCSF was funded by the Health Resources Services Administration to establish a nurse practitioner (NP) HIV primary care education program to expand the number of NPs prepared to provide culturally appropriate comprehensive HIV primary care. To this end, UCSF faculty have developed and validated a set of HIV Primary Care entry-level NP competencies, integrated general HIV knowledge into the NP curriculum, and enhanced our current HIV Specialty curriculum and clinical training. Described herein is UCSF's Integrated HIV/AIDS Primary Care Capacity Nurse Practitioner Program.

  17. Descriptive, cross-country analysis of the nurse practitioner workforce in six countries: size, growth, physician substitution potential

    PubMed Central

    Maier, Claudia B; Barnes, Hilary; Aiken, Linda H; Busse, Reinhard

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Many countries are facing provider shortages and imbalances in primary care or are projecting shortfalls for the future, triggered by the rise in chronic diseases and multimorbidity. In order to assess the potential of nurse practitioners (NPs) in expanding access, we analysed the size, annual growth (2005–2015) and the extent of advanced practice of NPs in 6 Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) countries. Design Cross-country data analysis of national nursing registries, regulatory bodies, statistical offices data as well as OECD health workforce and population data, plus literature scoping review. Setting/participants NP and physician workforces in 6 OECD countries (Australia, Canada, Ireland, the Netherlands, New Zealand and USA). Primary and secondary outcome measures The main outcomes were the absolute and relative number of NPs per 100 000 population compared with the nursing and physician workforces, the compound annual growth rates, annual and median percentage changes from 2005 to 2015 and a synthesis of the literature on the extent of advanced clinical practice measured by physician substitution effect. Results The USA showed the highest absolute number of NPs and rate per population (40.5 per 100 000 population), followed by the Netherlands (12.6), Canada (9.8), Australia (4.4), and Ireland and New Zealand (3.1, respectively). Annual growth rates were high in all countries, ranging from annual compound rates of 6.1% in the USA to 27.8% in the Netherlands. Growth rates were between three and nine times higher compared with physicians. Finally, the empirical studies emanating from the literature scoping review suggested that NPs are able to provide 67–93% of all primary care services, yet, based on limited evidence. Conclusions NPs are a rapidly growing workforce with high levels of advanced practice potential in primary care. Workforce monitoring based on accurate data is critical to inform educational capacity

  18. Addressing the primary care workforce: a study of nurse practitioner students' plans after graduation.

    PubMed

    Budd, Geraldine M; Wolf, Andrea; Haas, Richard Eric

    2015-03-01

    Primary care is a growing area, and nurse practitioners (NPs) hold promise for meeting the need for additional providers. This article reports on the future plans of more than 300 primary care NP students in family, adult, and adult gerontology programs. The sample was obtained through NP faculty, and data were collected via an online survey. Results indicated that although these students chose primary care, only 48% anticipated working in primary care; 26% planned to practice in rural areas, and 16% planned to work in an inner city. Reasons cited as important for pursuing a primary care position included the long-term patient relationship, faculty and preceptor mentors from the NP program, and clinical experiences as a student. Implications include providing more intensive faculty mentoring to increase the number of individuals seeking primary care positions after graduation and help with future career planning to meet personal career and nursing profession needs.

  19. Practice environments and job satisfaction and turnover intentions of nurse practitioners: Implications for primary care workforce capacity.

    PubMed

    Poghosyan, Lusine; Liu, Jianfang; Shang, Jingjing; D'Aunno, Thomas

    Health care professionals, organizations, and policy makers are calling for expansion of the nurse practitioner (NP) workforce in primary care to assure timely access and high-quality care. However, most efforts promoting NP practice have been focused on state level scope of practice regulations, with limited attention to the organizational structures. We examined NP practice environments in primary care organizations and the extent to which they were associated with NP retention measures. Data were collected through mail survey of NPs practicing in 163 primary care organizations in Massachusetts in 2012. NP practice environment was measured by the Nurse Practitioner Primary Care Organizational Climate Questionnaire, which has four subscales: Professional Visibility, NP-Administration Relations, NP-Physician Relations, and Independent Practice and Support. Two global items measured job satisfaction and NPs' intent to leave their job. We aggregated NP level data to organization level to attain measures of practice environments. Multilevel logistic regression models were used. NPs rated the relationship between NPs and physicians favorably, contrary to the relationship between NPs and administrators. All subscales measuring NP practice environment had similar influence on the outcome variables. With every unit increase in each standardized subscale score, the odds of job satisfaction factors increased about 20% whereas the odds of intention of turnover decreased about 20%. NPs from organizations with higher mean scores on the NP-Administration subscale had higher satisfaction with their jobs (OR = 1.24, 95% CI [1.12, 1.39]) and had lower intent to leave (OR = 0.79, 95% CI [0.70, 0.90]). NPs were more likely to be satisfied with their jobs and less likely to report intent to leave if their organizations support NP practice, favorable relations with physicians and administration, and clear role visibility. Creating productive practice environments that can retain NPs

  20. Nursing: What's a Nurse Practitioner?

    MedlinePlus

    ... nurses, or APNs) have a master's degree in nursing (MS or MSN) and board certification in their ... Nurse Practitioners (NAPNAP) and through local hospitals or nursing schools. Also, many doctors share office space with ...

  1. Nurse Practitioner Research Agenda Roundtable, October 2015.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Mary Ellen; Goolsby, Mary Jo

    2017-01-01

    This is a report of the 2015 nurse practitioner (NP) Research Agenda Roundtable hosted by the Fellows of the American Association of Nurse Practitioners. A consensus was reached on four major categories where the need for research is greatest: 1) policy and regulation, 2) practice models, 3) education, and 4) workforce. Specific gaps in the existing body of research on NPs as essential elements of the broader health care environment were identified. ©2016 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  2. Capacity of, and Demand for, Neonatal Nurse Practitioner Educational Programs: A Missing Piece of the Workforce Puzzle.

    PubMed

    Freed, Gary L; Moran, Lauren M; Dunham, Kelly M; Nantais-Smith, Leanne; Martyn, Kristy K

    2015-01-01

    Studies have demonstrated a dramatic increase in the number of new nurse practitioners (NPs) overall completing NP education each year. However, NPs who provide specialized care to children have not experienced increases in their pipeline at all. This has resulted in shortages of neonatal nurse practitioners (NNPs). The aim of this study was to gain a greater understanding of the NNP pipeline and potential for increasing the number of new NNPs graduating each year. Telephone survey of all NNP educational programs. Approximately one fourth of all NNP education programs had closed over the past several years. This is despite a strong job market, planned increases in hiring NNPs, and a seemingly growing shortage of NNPs. Problems with the NNP pipeline are not due to a lack of capacity of existing programs, but rather to difficulties in increasing the enrollment demand. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Capacity of, and Demand for, Pediatric Nurse Practitioner Educational Programs: A Missing Piece of the Workforce Puzzle.

    PubMed

    Freed, Gary L; Moran, Lauren M; Dunham, Kelly M; Hawkins-Walsh, Elizabeth; Martyn, Kristy K

    2015-01-01

    In contrast to family nurse practitioners and other adult nurse practitioners, the percentage of new pediatric nurse practitioners (PNPs) graduating each year has not increased. The aim of this study was to determine whether the marginal increase in the pipeline for PNPs is related to a limit in the capacity of educational programs or whether unfilled student openings exist. Self-administered survey of program directors at all recognized PNP educational programs in the United States. Approximately 10% of PNP programs in the United States were either closed, put on hold, or did not have new graduates in the last 3 years. Even with these closures, over 25% of active programs did not fill all available positions for the class entering in 2012. Despite evidence that demonstrates plans by employers to hire a greater number of PNPs in a variety of clinical venues including pediatric hospitals, primary care and subspecialty pediatric practices, the PNP pipeline has remained relatively stagnant. More than one third of program directors do not believe that their PNP program is currently at capacity, indicating that underutilized capacity to educate PNPs is a hindrance to meeting the current and future demands for these professionals. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Nursing: What's a Nurse Practitioner?

    MedlinePlus

    ... is a big part of the pediatric NP's role. Pediatric and family practice NPs can treat acute ( ... Nurse Practitioners (NAPNAP) and through local hospitals or nursing schools. Also, many doctors share office space with ...

  5. Role of Geography and Nurse Practitioner Scope-of-Practice in Efforts to Expand Primary Care System Capacity: Health Reform and the Primary Care Workforce.

    PubMed

    Graves, John A; Mishra, Pranita; Dittus, Robert S; Parikh, Ravi; Perloff, Jennifer; Buerhaus, Peter I

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about the geographic distribution of the overall primary care workforce that includes both physician and nonphysician clinicians--particularly in areas with restrictive nurse practitioner scope-of-practice laws and where there are relatively large numbers of uninsured. We investigated whether geographic accessibility to primary care clinicians (PCCs) differed across urban and rural areas and across states with more or less restrictive scope-of-practice laws. An observational study. 2013 Area Health Resource File (AHRF) and US Census Bureau county travel data. The measures included percentage of the population in low-accessibility, medium-accessibility, and high-accessibility areas; number of geographically accessible primary care physicians (PCMDs), nurse practitioners (PCNPs), and physician assistants (PCPAs) per 100,000 population; and number of uninsured per PCC. We found divergent patterns in the geographic accessibility of PCCs. PCMDs constituted the largest share of the workforce across all settings, but were relatively more concentrated within urban areas. Accessibility to nonphysicians was highest in rural areas: there were more accessible PCNPs per 100,000 population in rural areas of restricted scope-of-practice states (21.4) than in urban areas of full practice states (13.9). Despite having more accessible nonphysician clinicians, rural areas had the largest number of uninsured per PCC in 2012. While less restrictive scope-of-practice states had up to 40% more PCNPs in some areas, we found little evidence of differences in the share of the overall population in low-accessibility areas across scope-of-practice categorizations. Removing restrictive scope-of-practice laws may expand the overall capacity of the primary care workforce, but only modestly in the short run. Additional efforts are needed that recognize the locational tendencies of physicians and nonphysicains.

  6. Nurse Practitioner Pharmacology Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waigandt, Alex; Chang, Jane

    A study compared the pharmacology training of nurse practitioner programs with medical and dental programs. Seventy-three schools in 14 states (40 nurse practitioner programs, 19 schools of medicine, and 14 schools of dentistry) were surveyed by mailed questionnaire about the number of hours devoted to the study of pharmacology. The major findings…

  7. Nurse Practitioner Pharmacology Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waigandt, Alex; Chang, Jane

    A study compared the pharmacology training of nurse practitioner programs with medical and dental programs. Seventy-three schools in 14 states (40 nurse practitioner programs, 19 schools of medicine, and 14 schools of dentistry) were surveyed by mailed questionnaire about the number of hours devoted to the study of pharmacology. The major findings…

  8. A comparison of job descriptions for nurse practitioners working in out-of-hours primary care services: implications for workforce planning, patients and nursing.

    PubMed

    Teare, Jean; Horne, Maria; Clements, Gill; Mohammed, Mohammed A

    2017-03-01

    To compare and contrast job descriptions for nursing roles in out-of-hours services to obtain a general understanding of what is required for a nurse working in this job. Out-of-hours services provide nursing services to patients either through telephone or face-to-face contact in care centres. Many of these services are newly created giving job opportunities to nurses working in this area. It is vital that nurses know what their role entails but also that patients and other professionals know how out-of-hours nurses function in terms of competence and clinical role. Content analysis of out-of-hours job descriptions. Content analysis of a convenience sample of 16 job descriptions of out-of-hours nurses from five out-of-hours care providers across England was undertaken. The findings were narratively synthesised, supported by tabulation. Key role descriptors were examined in terms of job titles, managerial skills, clinical skills, professional qualifications and previous experience. Content analysis of each out-of-hours job description revealed a lack of consensus in clinical competence and skills required related to job title although there were many similarities in skills across all the roles. This study highlights key differences and some similarities between roles and job titles in out-of-hours nursing but requires a larger study to inform workforce planning. Out-of-hours nursing is a developing area of practice which requires clarity to ensure patient safety and quality care. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Nurse practitioners & reimbursement.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, E M

    1992-05-01

    Nursing's Agenda for Health Care Reform (1991) embraces primary health care as the focus of a restructured health care system. As part of this reformed system, consumers would access the most cost-effective providers in community-based settings. Removal of financial and regulatory barriers that limit consumer access to providers, such as lack of direct reimbursement by Medicare for nurse practitioners, should be eliminated according to this plan. Senate bills S2103 and S2104 have been recently introduced to the U.S. Senate mandating reimbursement for services provided by nurse practitioners, clinical nurse specialists, nurse midwives, and physician assistants at 97% of physician payment. The aim of this global legislation is to eliminate the current piecemeal mechanisms for nurse practitioner reimbursement and remove financial disincentives. Case examples presented in this article illustrate how obstacles to reimbursement limit access to care for consumers. Quality of care, opportunities for autonomous practice, and control of nursing practice issues have been highlighted as well by the case format. It is intended that these cases would be useful to support changes in patterns of nurse practitioner reimbursement.

  10. The School Nurse Practitioner

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Igoe, Judith Bellaire

    1975-01-01

    Denver's four-month intensive course in primary health care for experienced nurses serving in disadvantaged areas, followed by inservice training with regular consultation available from a local physician, has produced school nurse practitioners who extend the traditional role to include comprehensive evaluations, management of minor illnesses,…

  11. The role of nurse practitioners in reinventing primary care.

    PubMed

    Naylor, Mary D; Kurtzman, Ellen T

    2010-05-01

    Nurse practitioners are the principal group of advanced-practice nurses delivering primary care in the United States. We reviewed the current and projected nurse practitioner workforce, and we summarize the available evidence of their contributions to improving primary care and reducing more costly health resource use. We recommend that nurse practice acts--the state laws governing how nurses may practice--be standardized, that equivalent reimbursement be paid for comparable services regardless of practitioner, and that performance results be publicly reported to maximize the high-quality care that nurse practitioners provide.

  12. Establishing a Viable Workforce Pipeline of Primary Care Nurse Practitioners: Benefits of a Health System and Academic Partnership.

    PubMed

    Madler, Billie; Helland, Mary

    Maldistribution and shortages of primary care providers, changing reimbursement structures, movement from inpatient to community-based models of care, an aging population, and health care reform lead to increased numbers of patients seeking care. All of these phenomena have a part in creating a health care landscape that requires industry leaders enlist innovative strategies to meet the health care needs of their communities. Delivery of high-quality, efficient care by qualified providers is essential for the success of any health care system. Partnerships between health systems and academic centers of learning to develop a pipeline of providers is one inventive approach that can address primary care workforce needs. The purpose of this article was to share an example of an academic/health care system partnership to address primary care workforce needs in a rural Midwestern region.

  13. Find a Nurse Practitioner

    MedlinePlus

    Find a Nurse Practitioner AANP Home MyAANP Contact Us Find an NP near me or near Search Reset I accept AANP's Terms of Use Overall Focus All Primary ... practice site(s) to NP Finder, and enjoy many more member benefits.

  14. Nurse practitioner reimbursement.

    PubMed

    Wriston, S

    1981-01-01

    The Rural Health Clinics Act demonstrates the current trend in reimbursement of nurse practitioners: Congress intends to move slowly and continuously with mid-level practitioner reimbursement, limiting NP practice first to rural underserved areas, and reimbursing at a cost-related rate to avoid unnecessarily inflating costs. The Act's recognition of the NP as a reimbursable provider of traditional medical services, needing only indirect supervision, is important, especially with regard to the mandatory Medicaid coverage of "rural health clinic services." All states which do not explicitly prohibit NPs have been affected by this mandate, precipitating state legislative efforts to more clearly define NP scope of practice. There is still a need to clarify the ambiguity surrounding NP Medicaid reimbursement policies; Medicaid plans are frequently not well coordinated with nurse practice statutes. Altering third-party payor practices to permit reimbursement for services of nurse practitioners would alleviate some of the current restrictions on NP practice. However, medical society opposition also plays a significant role in such restriction. Antitrust courts, free of the tremendous lobbying power of medical interest groups, may be able to provide remedies which will facilitate greater competition and innovation in the health care industry. Legal test cases are necessary to begin contesting obstacles to the implementation of the Rural Health Clinic Services Act. The aggregate surplus of physicians projected for 1990 will continue to be an issue in the development of new financial programs concerning NP services. Demonstration projects which utilize various reimbursement strategies should evaluate the effect on health manpower of reimbursement for medical services provided by nurse practitioners.

  15. Nurse practitioner malpractice data: Informing nursing education.

    PubMed

    Sweeney, Casey Fryer; LeMahieu, Anna; Fryer, George E

    Nurse practitioners (NPs) are often identified in medical malpractice claims. However, the use of malpractice data to inform the development of nursing curriculum is limited. The purpose of this study is to examine medical errors committed by NPs. Using National Practitioner Data Bank public use data, years 1990 to 2014, NP malpractice claims were classified by event type, patient outcome, setting, and number of practitioners involved. The greatest proportion of malpractice claims involving nurse practitioners were diagnosis related (41.46%) and treatment related (30.79%). Severe patient outcomes most often occurred in the outpatient setting. Nurse practitioners were independently responsible for the event in the majority of the analyzed claims. Moving forward, nurse practitioner malpractice data should be continuously analyzed and used to inform the development of nurse practitioner education standards and graduate program curriculum to address areas of clinical weakness and improve quality of care and patient safety. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Measuring nurse practitioner productivity.

    PubMed

    Rhoads, Jacqueline; Ferguson, Laurie Anne; Langford, Cynthia A

    2006-02-01

    As the role of the nurse practitioner (NP) evolves, the need to demonstrate productivity becomes more important. Productivity data provides NPs with practice statistics to generate business or use in contract negotiations with potential clients such as employers, managed care organizations, and insurance companies. However, beyond the numbers of patients seen per day or amount of reimbursement a provider brings to the practice, NPs may provide additional benefit that is not captured with physician productivity measures. Information to acquaint NPs with key aspects of recording productivity and ways NPs can organize productivity data within their practice to determine worth of service are presented.

  17. Whither the "Nurse" in Nurse Practitioner?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weston, Jerry L.

    1975-01-01

    The author sees a need for the nursing profession to evaluate the extended role of the nurse to determine differences in the patient care provided by nurse practitioners and physician's assistants. From the data, appropriate nursing education and nursing practice planning can follow. (EA)

  18. General practitioners and district nurses

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, I. M.

    1974-01-01

    Variation between Aberdeen general practitioners in referral rates for home and surgery nursing care is shown to be substantial and is related to the proportion of elderly patients in the practice, inversely to list size, to the doctor's experience, and to practice attachment of nurses. There is, however, a large unexplained variation which, it is suggested, reflects differing general practitioner perception of nursing need and nursing skill, a situation that could be improved by joint training. PMID:4413552

  19. The work of nurse practitioners.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Glenn; Gardner, Anne; Middleton, Sandy; Della, Phillip; Kain, Victoria; Doubrovsky, Anna

    2010-10-01

    This paper is a report of a study of variations in the pattern of nurse practitioner work in a range of service fields and geographical locations, across direct patient care, indirect patient care and service-related activities. The nurse practitioner role has been implemented internationally as a service reform model to improve the access and timeliness of health care. There is a substantial body of research into the nurse practitioner role and service outcomes, but scant information on the pattern of nurse practitioner work and how this is influenced by different service models. We used work sampling methods. Data were collected between July 2008 and January 2009. Observations were recorded from a random sample of 30 nurse practitioners at 10-minute intervals in 2-hour blocks randomly generated to cover 2 weeks of work time from a sampling frame of 6 weeks. A total of 12,189 individual observations were conducted with nurse practitioners across Australia. Thirty individual activities were identified as describing nurse practitioner work, and these were distributed across three categories. Direct care accounted for 36.1% of how nurse practitioners spend their time, indirect care accounted for 32.0% and service-related activities made up 31.9%. These findings provide useful baseline data for evaluation of nurse practitioner positions and the service effect of these positions. However, the study also raises questions about the best use of nurse practitioner time and the influences of barriers to and facilitators of this model of service innovation. © 2010 The Authors. Journal of Advanced Nursing © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  20. CAM practitioners in the Australian health workforce: an underutilized resource

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background CAM practitioners are a valuable but underutilizes resource in Australian health care. Despite increasing public support for complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) little is known about the CAM workforce. Apart from the registered professions of chiropractic, osteopathy and Chinese medicine, accurate information about the number of CAM practitioners in the workforce has been difficult to obtain. It appears that many non-registered CAM practitioners, although highly qualified, are not working to their full capacity. Discussion Increasing public endorsement of CAM stands in contrast to the negative attitude toward the CAM workforce by some members of the medical and other health professions and by government policy makers. The marginalisation of the CAM workforce is evident in prejudicial attitudes held by some members of the medical and other health professions and its exclusion from government policy making. Inconsistent educational standards has meant that non-registered CAM practitioners, including highly qualified and competent ones, are frequently overlooked. Legitimising their contribution to the health workforce could alleviate workforce shortages and provide opportunities for redesigned job roles and new multidisciplinary teams. Priorities for better utilisation of the CAM workforce include establishing a guaranteed minimum education standard for more CAM occupation groups through national registration, providing interprofessional education that includes CAM practitioners, developing courses to upgrade CAM practitioners' professional skills in areas of indentified need, and increasing support for CAM research. Summary Marginalisation of the CAM workforce has disadvantaged those qualified and competent CAM practitioners who practise evidence-informed medicine on the basis of many years of university training. Legitimising and expanding the important contribution of CAM practitioners could alleviate projected health workforce shortages

  1. Professionalism in Nursing Behaviors of Nurse Practitioners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Donna; Miller, Barbara K.

    2001-01-01

    A survey of 502 nurse practitioners found that more than half had written research proposals or participated in research projects recently; nearly 50% wrote their own job descriptions; 93% belonged to the American Academy of Nurse Practitioners; and maintaining certification was the motivation for some professional behaviors. (Contains 29…

  2. Evolving role of pediatric nurse practitioners.

    PubMed

    Aruda, Mary M; Griffin, Valerie J; Schartz, Kathryn; Geist, Melissa

    2016-02-01

    To report and interpret findings from national pediatric nurse practitioner (PNP) job analysis surveys reflecting the changes in the knowledge and skills required for advanced practice. National role delineation studies (RDS) conducted by American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) in 2003, 2008, and 2011. Since the first nurse practitioner (NP) program was established in 1965 to train pediatric nurses for advanced practice, the role of the PNP has continued to develop. The RDS results demonstrate the increased autonomy of PNP's prescription of medication as the top work activity category identified, followed by the reporting of suspected abuse, exploitation, and/or neglect and immunizing based on current recommendations. Analysis of the changes in role or work activities, tied to the knowledge and skills required to perform those activities, can provide content for educators updating curriculum, for clinicians to remain current in their practice and impact healthcare policy. The current PNP role has evolved to meet the workforce demands of providing primary care to the pediatric population with increasing complex social and healthcare needs. Role analysis is important as NPs move forward to practice to the full extent of their education and training. ©2015 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  3. Nurse practitioners and intent to retire.

    PubMed

    Falk, Nancy L; Rudner, Nancy; Chapa, Deborah; Greene, Jessica

    2017-03-01

    Demand for primary care services is rising. Nurse practitioners (NPs) serve vital roles in meeting primary care demands. Workforce planning requires understanding NP retirement intentions. This study examines factors that relate to NPs, aged 55 years and older, and their intent to retire within 5 years. We used the 2012 National Sample Survey of Nurse Practitioners to examine the relationship between NP demographic characteristics (gender, race/ethnicity, marital status, nursing degree), work environment characteristics (part-time vs. full-time status, primary or specialty care, earnings, job satisfaction), and intent to retire. Descriptive, bivariate, and multivariate analyses were conducted. A total of 3171 working NPs, 55 years of age and older, were included. Fifty-nine percent of NPs 60 years and older and 15% of NPs 55-59 intend to retire in the next 5 years. Working part-time and having less than a master's degree were associated with intent to retire. Being "very satisfied" with one's job was related to lower odds of intent to retire versus being "satisfied." Being "dissatisfied" with one's job and working in primary care were related to intending to retire for the NPs 55-59. Given the relationship between higher job satisfaction and lower intent to retire, efforts to increase NPs' job satisfaction may result in less early retirement. ©2016 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  4. The High School Nurse Practitioner

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nader, Philip R.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Expanding the role of the high school nurse through pediatric nurse practitioner training, the addition of a full-time health aide, and the use of clinic management holds promise as one method of improving total health care for adolescents. (MJB)

  5. Informatics competencies for nurse practitioners.

    PubMed

    Curran, Christine R

    2003-08-01

    Informatics knowledge and skills are essential if clinicians are to master the large volume of information generated in healthcare today. Thus, it is vital that informatics competencies be defined for nursing and incorporated into both curricula and practice. Staggers, Gassert, and Curran have defined informatics competencies for four general levels of nursing practice. However, informatics competencies by role (eg, those specific for advanced practice nursing) have not been defined and validated. This article presents an initial proposed list of informatics competencies essential for nurse practitioner education and practice. To this list, derived from the work of Staggers et al., 1 has been added informatics competencies related to evidence-based practice. Two nurse informaticists and six nurse practitioners, who are program directors, were involved in the development of the proposed competencies. The next step will be to validate these competencies via research.

  6. Pediatric nurse practitioners: influences on career choice.

    PubMed

    Freed, Gary L; Dunham, Kelly M; Martyn, Kristy; Martin, Jean; Moran, Lauren M; Spera, Laura

    2014-01-01

    The demand for hiring pediatric nurse practitioners (PNPs) is strong. However, the number of newly educated PNPs has remained relatively flat during the past several years. Understanding the rationale and timing for the decision to pursue this profession is essential to having a positive impact on increasing the future workforce. A mail survey of all new PNPs certified between January 2009 and July 2011 (N = 1040) was conducted. The response rate was 79.9%. Nearly half of all respondents (45%, N = 314) reported that they work in outpatient general pediatrics, 26% (N = 184) in outpatient subspecialty pediatrics, and 22% (N = 152) in inpatient settings. More than one third (36%, N = 253) spend most of their time in a private practice. Forty percent (N = 307) reported that they decided to pursue education as an advanced practice nurse while in practice as a registered nurse (RN), and 38% (N = 289) made the decision before pursuing RN education. Efforts to increase the PNP pipeline will need to be directed both to students during their RN education and to creating opportunities for current RNs to pursue advanced practice nurse education that is focused on children. Copyright © 2014 National Association of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Advanced practice nursing role: nurse practitioner.

    PubMed

    Pastorino, C

    1998-01-01

    Nurse Practitioners are advanced practice nurses (APNs) who provide primary and acute care to individuals in many settings. The NP diagnoses and treats medical and surgical conditions that require acute, short-term management and chronic, long-term treatment. States vary in regulating processes regarding collaborative agreements, prescriptive authority, medical staff privileges, and insurance/third party reimbursement.

  8. Identifying advanced practice: A national survey of a nursing workforce.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Glenn; Duffield, Christine; Doubrovsky, Anna; Adams, Margaret

    2016-03-01

    The size and flexibility of the nursing workforce has positioned nursing as central to the goals of health service improvement. Nursing's response to meeting these goals has resulted in proliferation of advanced practice nursing with a confusing array of practice profiles, titles and roles. Whilst numerous models and definitions of advanced practice nursing have been developed there is scant published research of significant scope that supports these models. Consequently there is an ongoing call in the literature for clarity and stability in nomenclature, and confusion in the health industry on how to optimise the utility of advanced practice nursing. To identify and delineate advanced practice from other levels of nursing practice through examination of a national nursing workforce. A cross-sectional electronic survey of nurses using the validated Advanced Practice Role Delineation tool based on the Strong Model of Advanced Practice. Study participants were registered nurses employed in a clinical service environment across all states and territories of Australia. A sample of 5662 registered nurses participated in the study. Domain means for each participant were calculated then means for nursing position titles were calculated. Position titles were grouped by delineation and were compared with one-way analysis of variance on domain means. The alpha for all tests was set at 0.05. Significant effects were examined with Scheffe post hoc comparisons to control for Type 1 error. The survey tool was able to identify position titles where nurses were practicing at an advanced level and to delineate this cohort from other levels of nursing practice, including nurse practitioner. The results show that nurses who practice at an advanced level are characterised by high mean scores across all Domains of the Strong Model of Advanced Practice. The mean scores of advanced practice nurses were significantly different from nurse practitioners in the Direct Care Domain and

  9. Development of a Family Nurse Practitioner Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Januska, Charlotte; And Others

    1973-01-01

    The family nurse practitioner is a generalist who combines the basic skills of the pediatric and medical nurse practitioner with the orientation and approach of the public health nurse. This article outlines the task of preparing the family nurse practitioner. (Author)

  10. Development of a Family Nurse Practitioner Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Januska, Charlotte; And Others

    1973-01-01

    The family nurse practitioner is a generalist who combines the basic skills of the pediatric and medical nurse practitioner with the orientation and approach of the public health nurse. This article outlines the task of preparing the family nurse practitioner. (Author)

  11. Rural nurse to nurse practitioner: an ad hoc process.

    PubMed

    Carryer, Jenny; Boddy, Julie; Budge, Claire

    2011-03-01

    Despite a 10-year history of nurse practitioner (NP) development in New Zealand (NZ) there is no formalised or universal process for ensuring the transition of willing nurses to NP status. This unmet need is of particular interest in the rural context where workforce issues are paramount. The aim of this study was to explore the transition from rural nurse to NP in NZ. A qualitative descriptive survey was sent to all NZ nurses with a rural address. Ninety-two questionnaires were returned, of which 21 respondents were working in a rural location and aiming to become an NP. Data analysis included description of demographic data and thematic analysis of open-ended question responses. Four themes encompassed the experiences of the 21 potential NP candidates: uncertainty about opportunities for employment as an NP and legislative and funding barriers for NP practice; support or resistance from GPs and nurse colleagues, self-doubt, and the importance of mentoring; difficulties with the NP authorisation process; and meeting the NP competencies within the challenges imposed by rural location. At the systems level of workforce design, stronger linkages between policy development, investment, employment creation, funding streams, professional regulation and overall communication require attention.

  12. Nurse practitioner employment, unemployment, reemployment.

    PubMed

    Roos, P D

    1979-01-01

    An estimate for nurse practitioner unemployment is attempted, based on responses of 260 graduates of a single program and published data. Reasons for not working are examined. The activity of NPs is compared to registered nurses. Job changers are compared to those who remained in the same job since graduation. Some of the reasons for unemployment and nonparticipation in the labor force are examined. Suggestive evidence on job changing is reviewed. Finally, policy implications are discussed.

  13. The discursive practices of nurse practitioner legislation in Australia.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Clare; Driscoll, Andrea; Keyzer, Dirk

    2011-11-01

    The aim of this paper was to examine the nurse practitioner legislative framework in Australia from a critical social theory perspective. National regulation for nurses and midwives has superseded all previous state legislation with effect from July 2010. The aim of this change was to streamline regulation processes across all health professionals requiring regulation, in order to eliminate diverse state-based regulatory policies that were identified as hindering transferability of the workforce across Australia. This paper explores the changes with reference to nurse practitioners. Since their introduction to Australia different legislative practices between states have presented difficult endorsement procedures which have affected employment. Information for the paper is drawn from a doctoral study which examined the politics of advancing nursing in Australia, with particular reference to the discourses of nurse practitioners. This is augmented by more recent legislative documents and policies, as well as media reports, to examine the process of change in legislation and the unfolding discourses on employment and practice. IMPLICATIONS TO NURSING: Nurse practitioner endorsement may be more complicated, defeating the original premise of transferability of a skilled workforce across state jurisdictions. This paper exposes the influence that powerful discourses can have on a major change to professional practice. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  14. [Nurse practitioners as counselors].

    PubMed

    Hulskers, H; Niederer-Frei, I

    1997-04-01

    Giving advice is among the most important tasks of the clinical nurse specialist. In this article, the authors examine various aspects of counselling in order to contribute to the further analysis and development of the specialist's professional agenda. Starting out with a brief discussion of recent changes in nursing, the authors analyse the main activities of the clinical nurse specialist on the basis of their respective areas of expertise. The actual process of counselling is examined against the background of the acquired level of professional counselling skills. The article sums up a thesis completed at the end of a course on organizational development, team counselling, supervision, and coaching under the auspices of the Swiss Association for Applied Psychology (SAAP).

  15. Missing Links in Nurse Practitioner Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brower, H. Terri; And Others

    1988-01-01

    A survey of 136 nurse practitioners in southeastern Florida assessed the learning needs of that group. Results indicate that most of southeastern Florida's nurse practitioners are practice-oriented. Results are broken down into six groups of nurse practitioners and 11 educational content areas. (CH)

  16. Work hazards for an aging nursing workforce.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Jennan A; Miltner, Rebecca

    2015-09-01

    To discuss selected work hazards and safety concerns for aging nurses. Greater numbers of older nurses remain in the workforce. Projections suggest that one-third of the nursing workforce will be over age 50 years by 2015. Employers will struggle to find ways to protect the health and safety of their aging workforce and prevent a massive loss of intellectual and human resources when these experienced nurses exit the workforce. Review of recent relevant literature in English language journals. Repetitive motion injuries, fatigue and slips, trips and falls are three major work hazards older nurses face. We discuss several factors for each hazard, including: the normal physiological aging effects of diminished strength, hearing and vision; workplace variables of work schedules, noise and clutter; and personal characteristics of sleep disturbances, overexertion and fatigue. Inconclusive evidence exists to guide best practices for designing safe workplace environments and shift patterns for nursing work. There are at least two areas administrators can reduce work hazards for older workers: (1) modification of the workplace, and (2) creating the infrastructure to support the aging workforce to encourage healthy behaviours. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Integrating Nurse Practitioners Into Intensive Care Units.

    PubMed

    Simone, Shari; McComiskey, Carmel A; Andersen, Brooke

    2016-12-01

    As demand for nurse practitioners in all types of intensive care units continues to increase, ensuring successful integration of these nurses into adult and pediatric general and specialty intensive care units poses several challenges. Adding nurse practitioners requires strategic planning to define critical aspects of the care delivery model before the practitioners are hired, develop a comprehensive program for integrating and training these nurses, and create a plan for implementing the program. Key strategies to ensure successful integration include defining and implementing the role of nurse practitioners, providing options for orientation, and supporting and training novice nurse practitioners. Understanding the importance of appropriate role utilization, the depth of knowledge and skill expected of nurse practitioners working in intensive care units, the need for a comprehensive training program, and a commitment to continued professional development beyond orientation are necessary to fully realize the contributions of these nurses in critical care. ©2016 American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

  18. Variation in job titles within the nursing workforce.

    PubMed

    Leary, Alison; Maclaine, Katrina; Trevatt, Paul; Radford, Mark; Punshon, Geoffrey

    2017-09-07

    The work of specialist nursing has been under scrutiny for many years in the UK due to a perception that it is not cost-effective. A common issue is the lack of consistency of job titles, which causes confusion to the public, employing organisations, colleagues and commissioners of services. Lack of consistency has implications for the wider perception of advanced specialist practice in the worldwide community and the workforce more generally. This study aims to understand the variation in job titles in the UK population. A pre-existing data set of accrued studies into the work of nurses working in specialisms was mined for insight (N = 17,960). This study used knowledge discovery through data and descriptive statistics to perform secondary analysis. Mining these data revealed 595 job titles in use in 17,960 specialist posts once the specialism had been removed. The most commonly used titles were Clinical Nurse Specialist, Nurse Specialist/Specialist Nurse, Advanced Nurse Practitioner and Nurse Practitioner. There were three other primary groupings. These were variants with a specialist or technical prefix of suffix, for example Nurse Endoscopist, variants of seniority such as trainee, senior nurse for [specialism] or variants of function such as Nurse Prescriber. The clustering was driven primarily by pay band. A total of 323 posts were recorded as holding titles such as Advanced Nurse Practitioner or Specialist Nurse who were not registered with the Nursing & Midwifery Council. In this data set, there is a large array of titles, which appear to have little relationship with other factors like education. This is confusing to the public, employers and those commissioning services. It also demonstrates that the previous assumptions by Council for Healthcare Regulatory Excellence that advanced practice labels are associated with career progression are unsound and should be addressed by the regulator. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Cost-Effective School Nurse Practitioner Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sobolewski, Susan D.

    1981-01-01

    A broader utilization of school nurse practitioners by school districts represents a cost-effective approach in meeting educational goals. School nurse practitioners provide extended nursing services to high risk children, assist in coordinating health services between the school and the child's parents, participate in classroom presentations on…

  20. [The New Era of the Nurse Practitioner].

    PubMed

    Chiu, Hui-Ju; Tsay, Shiow-Luan; Tung, Heng-Hsin

    2017-02-01

    The scope of practice of nurse practitioners is not defined by law but by the administrative directives of the Ministry of Health and Welfare. Prior to promulgation of Article 24, Paragraphs 3 and 4 of the "Nursing Personnel Act" and of the "Regulation of the Scope of Practice of Nurse Practitioners", the scope of practice of nurse practitioners was defined in accordance with relevant laws and regulations. Since promulgation, nurse practitioners have been authorized to practice medical interventions under the supervision of physicians and in accordance with physician-established protocols. These changes have made the scope of practice of nurse practitioners clearer and more specific. Today, nurse practitioners are authorized to perform 21 invasive procedures and 9 non-invasive procedures, which represents a new milestone in establishing the professionalism of nurse practitioners. The purpose of this article is to describe these new regulations governing the scope of practice of nurses and their legislative background and process. It is hoped that nurses may better understand the scope of practice of nurse practitioners and the importance of legislation in promoting and protecting the rights of nurses.

  1. The aging nursing workforce: How to retain experienced nurses.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Jeremye D

    2006-01-01

    In the face of an anticipated nursing shortage, healthcare organizations must evaluate their culture, operations, and compensation system to ensure that these elements align with organizational efforts to retain nurses who are approaching retirement age. Management should focus on enhancing elements of job satisfaction and job embeddedness that will motivate nurses to remain both in the workforce and with their employer. Although much of this responsibility falls on the nurse manager, nurse managers are often not provided the necessary support by top management and are neither recognized nor held accountable for nurse turnover. Other retention initiatives can include altering working conditions to reduce both physical and mental stress and addressing issues of employee health and safety. As for compensation, organizations may be well-served by offering senior nursing staff flexible working hours, salary structures that reward experience, and benefit programs that hold value for an aging workforce.

  2. Development of the New Zealand nursing workforce: historical themes and current challenges.

    PubMed

    Gage, Jeffrey D; Hornblow, Andrew R

    2007-12-01

    Development of the New Zealand nursing workforce has been shaped by social, political, scientific and interprofessional forces. The unregulated, independent and often untrained nurses of the early colonial period were succeeded in the early 1900s by registered nurses, with hospital-based training, working in a subordinate role to medical practitioners. In the mid/late 1900s, greater specialisation within an expanding workforce, restructuring of nursing education, health sector reform, and changing social and political expectations again reshaped nursing practice. Nursing now has areas of increasing autonomy, expanding opportunities for postgraduate education and leadership roles, and a relationship with medicine, which is more collaborative than in the past. Three current challenges are identified for nursing in New Zealand's rapidly evolving health sector; development of a nursing-focused knowledge culture, strengthening of research capacity, and dissemination of new nursing knowledge.

  3. A scoping review of nursing workforce planning and forecasting research.

    PubMed

    Squires, Allison; Jylhä, Virpi; Jun, Jin; Ensio, Anneli; Kinnunen, Juha

    2017-09-10

    This study will critically evaluate forecasting models and their content in workforce planning policies for nursing professionals and to highlight the strengths and the weaknesses of existing approaches. Although macro-level nursing workforce issues may not be the first thing that many nurse managers consider in daily operations, the current and impending nursing shortage in many countries makes nursing specific models for workforce forecasting important. A scoping review was conducted using a directed and summative content analysis approach to capture supply and demand analytic methods of nurse workforce planning and forecasting. The literature on nurse workforce forecasting studies published in peer-reviewed journals as well as in grey literature was included in the scoping review. Thirty six studies met the inclusion criteria, with the majority coming from the USA. Forecasting methods were biased towards service utilization analyses and were not consistent across studies. Current methods for nurse workforce forecasting are inconsistent and have not accounted sufficiently for socioeconomic and political factors that can influence workforce projections. Additional studies examining past trends are needed to improve future modelling. Accurate nursing workforce forecasting can help nurse managers, administrators and policy makers to understand the supply and demand of the workforce to prepare and maintain an adequate and competent current and future workforce. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Does State Legislation Improve Nursing Workforce Diversity?

    PubMed

    Travers, Jasmine; Smaldone, Arlene; Cohn, Elizabeth Gross

    2015-08-01

    A health-care workforce representative of our nation's diversity is a health and research priority. Although racial and ethnic minorities represent 37% of Americans, they comprise only 16% of the nursing workforce. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of state legislation on minority recruitment to nursing. Using data from the National Conference of State Legislatures, American Association of Colleges of Nursing, and U.S. census, we compared minority enrollment in baccalaureate nursing programs of states (Texas, Virginia, Michigan, California, Florida, Connecticut, and Arkansas) before and 3 years after enacting legislation with geographically adjacent states without legislation. Data were analyzed using descriptive and chi-square statistics. Following legislation, Arkansas (13.8%-24.5%), California (3.3%-5.4%), and Michigan (8.0%-10.0%) significantly increased enrollment of Blacks, and Florida (11.8%-15.4%) and Texas (11.2%-13.9%) significantly increased enrollment of Hispanic baccalaureate nursing students. States that tied legislation to funding, encouragement, and reimbursement had larger enrollment gains and greater minority representation. © The Author(s) 2015.

  5. Examining lateral violence in the nursing workforce.

    PubMed

    Stanley, Karen M; Martin, Mary M; Nemeth, Lynne S; Michel, Yvonne; Welton, John M

    2007-11-01

    The decision to examine the phenomenon of lateral violence within the nursing workforce of a Southeastern tertiary care medical center evolved from the strong response of attendees to a nursing presentation on lateral violence. This paper describes the development and testing of the Lateral Violence in Nursing Survey. This questionnaire, designed to measure perceived incidence and severity of lateral violence, was administered online to 663 nursing staff participants. Forty-six percent of the study participants reported lateral violence as a "very serious" or "somewhat serious" problem, and 65% reported frequently observing lateral violence behaviors among coworkers. Education and effective leadership were found to mediate oppressive and negative behaviors, whereas ineffective leadership was found to exacerbate lateral violence.

  6. Employment and salary characteristics of nurse practitioners.

    PubMed

    Rogers, B; Sweeting, S; Davis, B

    1989-09-01

    Nurse practitioners provide high-quality, cost-effective care to health care consumers, yet they continue to experience low economic compensation and salary compression. The nursing literature is limited with respect to data regarding salaries, benefits and trends in compensation for nurse practitioners. In order to provide baseline data for nurse practitioners to use in negotiating compensation benefits and packages, 459 certified nurse practitioners in North Carolina were surveyed regarding demographic and employment characteristics and job satisfaction. Of the 83 percent who responded, nearly two-thirds earned less than $30,000 per year. Benefits and salary adjustment for certification are reported, and techniques for compensation negotiation are discussed. Although information obtained is specific to North Carolina, geographic similarities may be apparent.

  7. Reimbursement for acute care nurse practitioner services.

    PubMed

    Richmond, T S; Thompson, H J; Sullivan-Marx, E M

    2000-01-01

    Until the passage of the Balanced Budget Act of 1997, acute care nurse practitioners could not be directly reimbursed for inpatient services provided to Medicare patients. With the enactment of this legislation, acute care nurse practitioners may now be directly compensated for care provided. The historical and contextual issues that surround reimbursement for nursing and advanced practice nursing services are reviewed to serve as a foundation for understanding the current Medicare reimbursement regulations. The implications of the Balanced Budget Act of 1997 for acute care nurse practitioners and their professional colleagues are critically examined. The language of the Balanced Budget Act of 1997 and the subsequent rules and regulations issued by the Health Care Financing Administration are reviewed with specific focus on implications for acute care nurse practitioners. The opportunities for reimbursement for services provided by acute care nurse practitioners are more extensive than ever before. Acute care nurse practitioners and their physician colleagues will be wise to become fully conversant with the changes in Medicare reimbursement regulations.

  8. The value of workforce data in shaping nursing workforce policy: A case study from North Carolina.

    PubMed

    Fraher, Erin P

    In 2015, the Institute of Medicine's Committee for Assessing Progress on Implementing the Future of Nursing recommendations noted that little progress has been made in building the data infrastructure needed to support nursing workforce policy. This article outlines a case study from North Carolina to demonstrate the value of collecting, analyzing, and disseminating state-level workforce data. Data were derived from licensure renewal information gathered by the North Carolina Board of Nursing and housed at the North Carolina Health Professions Data System at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. State-level licensure data can be used to inform discussions about access to care, evaluate progress on increasing the number of baccalaureate nurses, monitor how well the ethnic and racial diversity in the nursing workforce match the population, and investigate the educational and career trajectories of licensed practical nurses and registered nurses. At the core of the IOM's recommendations is an assumption that we will be able to measure progress toward a "Future of Nursing" in which 80% of the nursing workforce has a BSN or higher, the racial and ethnic diversity of the workforce matches that of the population, and nurses currently employed in the workforce are increasing their education levels through lifelong learning. Without data, we will not know how fast we are reaching these goals or even when we have attained them. This article provides concrete examples of how a state can use licensure data to inform nursing workforce policy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. The Experience and Effectiveness of Nurse Practitioners in Orthopaedic Settings: A Comprehensive Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Anita; Staruchowicz, Lynda

    2012-01-01

    informed by the experiences of the United States and United Kingdom and for the most part there exists a parallel between the international experience and the Australian experience of nurse practitioners.This review will focus on orthopaedic nurse practitioners in an international context. However the local context of the primary reviewer which informs this review is Australian. Australia has mirrored the trends around nurse practitioner practice found elsewhere. In the last 20 years (post implementation of the 1986 Australian nursing career structure), the debate around advanced nursing practice and nurse practitioners, in an Australian context, has developed. The inaugural 'legal & policy' nurse practitioner framework was developed in New South Wales (NSW) in 1998, with the first Australian nurse practitioner authorised to practise in NSW in 2000. It is posited that evaluation of emerging roles began to be seen in the research literature from 1990 onwards. In response to a need for creative workforce re-engineering and against a context of limited health resources, nurse practitioners in Australia over the last 20 years have emerged as an alternative model of health care delivery. For the last 10 years there has been a proliferation of influential 'reports' written by nurse researchers, generated to review the progress of Australia's nurse practitioners, commissioned by the health departments of respective state governments and other service planners to guide health workforce planning.In a national context the Australian Nursing & Midwifery Council (ANMC) as the peak national nursing body, defines a nurse practitioner as a Registered Nurse (RN) who is educated and authorised to practice autonomously and collaboratively in an advanced and extended clinical role. The ANMC Competency Standards for the Nurse Practitioner encompass three generic standards which are further defined by nine competencies. The competency standards provide a framework for practice and licensure of

  10. 77 FR 36549 - Nursing Workforce Diversity Invitational Summit-“Nursing in 3D: Workforce Diversity, Health...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-19

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Nursing Workforce Diversity Invitational Summit--``Nursing in 3D: Workforce Diversity, Health Disparities, and Social Determinants of Health...). ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: HRSA's Bureau of Health Professions, Division of Nursing, will host...

  11. Reimbursement for nurse practitioner services.

    PubMed

    Buppert, C

    1998-01-01

    Whether a nurse practitioner (NP) is employed by a medical practice or is self-employed, the reimbursement policies of third-party payers will determine whether an NP continues to provide care on a long-term basis. The payers--Medicare, Medicaid, indemnity insurers, and managed care organizations--each have their own reimbursement policies and fee schedules, and each operates under a separate body of law. Some payers have a history of reimbursing for NP services in the same manner as they reimburse for physician services. On the other hand, some payers have recently begun to reimburse NPs directly, either as separate and apart from an employment relationship with a physician practice or following NP-specific rules and policies regarding reimbursement. This article offers basic information necessary to communicate with practice managers, billing experts, and the payers about reimbursement mechanisms and problems. It covers how to set up provider relationships with the various payers, how to submit bills, and how to deal with denial of reimbursement when it occurs.

  12. Japanese nurse practitioner practice and outcomes in a nursing home.

    PubMed

    Ono, M; Miyauchi, S; Edzuki, Y; Saiki, K; Fukuda, H; Tonai, M; Magilvy, J K; Murashima, S

    2015-06-01

    By describing the practice of a Japanese nurse practitioner, this descriptive case study discusses role development and outcomes before and after the intervention. One of the first Japanese nurse practitioners intervened at a nursing home during the government-designated trial period for nurse practitioner practice. Because of the nurse practitioner's meticulous observation and timely care provision to the residents in collaboration with the physician and the other staff in the facility, comparative data showed improvement in daily health status management of every resident and decreased deterioration of residents' health conditions requiring ambulance transfer and hospitalization. © 2014 The Authors. International Nursing Review published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of International Council of Nurses.

  13. 42 CFR 440.166 - Nurse practitioner services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS SERVICES: GENERAL PROVISIONS Definitions § 440.166 Nurse practitioner services. (a) Definition of nurse practitioner services. Nurse practitioner services means services that... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Nurse practitioner services. 440.166 Section...

  14. 42 CFR 441.22 - Nurse practitioner services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Nurse practitioner services. 441.22 Section 441.22... General Provisions § 441.22 Nurse practitioner services. With respect to nurse practitioner services that... State plan must meet the following requirements: (a) Provide that nurse practitioner services...

  15. 42 CFR 441.22 - Nurse practitioner services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Nurse practitioner services. 441.22 Section 441.22... General Provisions § 441.22 Nurse practitioner services. With respect to nurse practitioner services that... State plan must meet the following requirements: (a) Provide that nurse practitioner services...

  16. 42 CFR 441.22 - Nurse practitioner services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Nurse practitioner services. 441.22 Section 441.22... General Provisions § 441.22 Nurse practitioner services. With respect to nurse practitioner services that... State plan must meet the following requirements: (a) Provide that nurse practitioner services...

  17. 42 CFR 441.22 - Nurse practitioner services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Nurse practitioner services. 441.22 Section 441.22... General Provisions § 441.22 Nurse practitioner services. With respect to nurse practitioner services that... State plan must meet the following requirements: (a) Provide that nurse practitioner services...

  18. 42 CFR 441.22 - Nurse practitioner services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Nurse practitioner services. 441.22 Section 441.22... General Provisions § 441.22 Nurse practitioner services. With respect to nurse practitioner services that... State plan must meet the following requirements: (a) Provide that nurse practitioner services are...

  19. Validation of Nurse Practitioner Primary Care Organizational Climate Questionnaire: A New Tool to Study Nurse Practitioner Practice Settings.

    PubMed

    Poghosyan, Lusine; Chaplin, William F; Shaffer, Jonathan A

    2017-04-01

    Favorable organizational climate in primary care settings is necessary to expand the nurse practitioner (NP) workforce and promote their practice. Only one NP-specific tool, the Nurse Practitioner Primary Care Organizational Climate Questionnaire (NP-PCOCQ), measures NP organizational climate. We confirmed NP-PCOCQ's factor structure and established its predictive validity. A crosssectional survey design was used to collect data from 314 NPs in Massachusetts in 2012. Confirmatory factor analysis and regression models were used. The 4-factor model characterized NP-PCOCQ. The NP-PCOCQ score predicted job satisfaction (beta = .36; p < .001) and intent to leave job (odds ratio = .28; p = .011). NP-PCOCQ can be used by researchers to produce new evidence and by administrators to assess organizational climate in their clinics. Further testing of NP-PCOCQ is needed.

  20. Promoting visibility for the nurse practitioner role.

    PubMed

    Edmunds, M W

    1988-03-01

    In promoting greater public awareness of nurse practitioners' contributions to health care, two major strategies may be used. Creating broad-based visibility through the use of the basic media and marketing strategies, and utilizing individual client encounters to educate clients about the NP role are both effective. NPs should assume the initiative in seeking out opportunities to create positive images for the nurse practitioner.

  1. Practice Management Skills for the Nurse Practitioner.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sportsman, Susan; Hawley, Linda J.; Pollock, Susan; Varnell, Gayle

    2001-01-01

    An expert panel identified 20 business concepts important for a family nurse practitioner curriculum. A focus group of practitioners verified the concepts and clarified relevant information to be taught. The business concepts center on management and operations of a clinical practice. (SK)

  2. Practice Management Skills for the Nurse Practitioner.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sportsman, Susan; Hawley, Linda J.; Pollock, Susan; Varnell, Gayle

    2001-01-01

    An expert panel identified 20 business concepts important for a family nurse practitioner curriculum. A focus group of practitioners verified the concepts and clarified relevant information to be taught. The business concepts center on management and operations of a clinical practice. (SK)

  3. Advanced Health Assessment in Nurse Practitioner Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelley, Frances J.; Kopac, Catharine

    2001-01-01

    Responses from 140 nursing schools indicated that most taught health assessment to nurse practitioners as a separate course; public institutions were more involved in computer-assisted instruction. Faculty cited scarce resources and limited time to develop new teaching strategies. Most agreed that graduate courses should focus on differential…

  4. Nurse Practitioner Residency Programs: An Educational Journey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rys, Gregory P.

    2016-01-01

    Primary care is in a state of crisis due to the lack of clinicians and increasing numbers of insured patients. Encouraging more students to go directly through school for their doctor of nursing practice degree and nurse practitioner (NP) certifications is one proposal to alleviate this crisis. However, this approach would deliver graduates with…

  5. Nurse Practitioner Residency Programs: An Educational Journey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rys, Gregory P.

    2016-01-01

    Primary care is in a state of crisis due to the lack of clinicians and increasing numbers of insured patients. Encouraging more students to go directly through school for their doctor of nursing practice degree and nurse practitioner (NP) certifications is one proposal to alleviate this crisis. However, this approach would deliver graduates with…

  6. A model of succession planning for mental health nurse practitioners.

    PubMed

    Hampel, Sally; Procter, Nicholas; Deuter, Kate

    2010-08-01

    This paper reviews current literature on succession planning for mental health nurse practitioners (NPs) and discusses a model of succession planning that is underpinned by principals of leadership development, workforce participation and client engagement. The paper identifies succession planning as a means of managing a present and future workforce, while simultaneously addressing individual and organizational learning and practice development needs. A discussion of the processes attendant upon sustainable succession planning - collegial support, career planning and development, information exchange, capacity building, and mentoring is framed within the potential interrelationships between existing NP, developing NP and service directors and/or team managers. Done effectively and in partnership with wider clinical services, succession planning has the potential to build NP leadership development and leadership transition more broadly within mental health services.

  7. Nurse practitioner roles in Australian healthcare settings.

    PubMed

    Lowe, Grainne; Plummer, Virginia; Boyd, Leanne

    2013-05-01

    There is evidence of support for nurse practitioner (NP) roles in national and international literature. However, despite this, and numerous Australian government feasibility and evaluation studies, barriers to implementing NP roles in mainstream health care and developing them to their full potential remain. A study was undertaken to explore nurse practitioners', managers' and nurse policymakers' perceptions of the roles in general, and this article reports on the findings from the initial survey phase. The article also discusses barriers to full integration and development of NPs.

  8. Mapping the literature of nurse practitioners

    PubMed Central

    Shams, Marie-Lise Antoun

    2006-01-01

    Objectives: This study was designed to identify core journals for the nurse practitioner specialty and to determine the extent of their indexing in bibliographic databases. Methods: As part of a larger project for mapping the literature of nursing, this study followed a common methodology based on citation analysis. Four journals designated by nurse practitioners as sources for their practice information were selected. All cited references were analyzed to determine format types and publication years. Bradford's Law of Scattering was applied to identify core journals. Nine bibliographic databases were searched to estimate the index coverage of the core titles. Results: The findings indicate that nurse practitioners rely primarily on journals (72.0%) followed by books (20.4%) for their professional knowledge. The majority of the identified core journals belong to non-nursing disciplines. This is reflected in the indexing coverage results: PubMed/MEDLINE more comprehensively indexes the core titles than CINAHL does. Conclusion: Nurse practitioners, as primary care providers, consult medical as well as nursing sources for their information. The implications of the citation analysis findings are significant for collection development librarians and indexing services. PMID:16710457

  9. Mentoring Nurse Scientists to Meet Nursing Faculty Workforce Needs

    PubMed Central

    Nies, Mary A.; Troutman-Jordan, Meredith

    2012-01-01

    Research indicates that mentoring has been highly effective in promoting faculty success. Strong mentors in the area of scholarship are extremely valuable for junior faculty, not only because of their research and academic expertise but also for their role modeling behaviors. This paper highlights key components of research mentoring used by a senior nursing faculty member. The senior faculty mentor and junior faculty mentee developed a common vision, relating to research interests in health promotion for vulnerable populations. Impact at the individual, school, university, and society level is discussed, and benefits of mentoring to meet nursing faculty workforce needs are emphasized. PMID:22448130

  10. A literature review of the Dutch debate on the nurse practitioner role: efficiency vs. professional development.

    PubMed

    ter Maten-Speksnijder, A; Grypdonck, M; Pool, A; Meurs, P; van Staa, A L

    2014-03-01

    To explore the debate on the development of the nurse practitioner profession in the Netherlands. In the Netherlands, the positives and negatives of nurse practitioners working in the medical domain have been debated since the role was introduced in 1997. The outcome of the debate is crucial for nurse practitioners' professional development and society's justification of their tasks. Review of 14 policy documents, 35 opinion papers from nurses, 363 opinion articles from physicians and 24 Dutch research papers concerning nurse practitioners from 1995 to 2012. Two discourses were revealed: one related to efficiency and one to the development of the profession. In both, the nurse practitioner role was presented as a solution for healthcare and workforce problems, while arguments differed. The efficiency discourse seemed most influential. Opinions of nurse practitioners were underrepresented; taking up new responsibilities was driven by the wish to improve patient care. While most physicians were willing to delegate tasks to nurse practitioners, they wished to retain final responsibility for medical care. All available publications were extensively studied, which could not include unpublished policy documents from the government or influential parties. This may have led to some selectivity. The case of the Netherlands shows that nurses in developing their advanced role are facing barriers, similar to those in other countries. The dominance of efficiency arguments combined with protection of medical autonomy undermines the development towards nursing care that really benefits patients. Nurse practitioners should strive to obtain positions in which they are allowed to make their own decisions and wise use of healthcare resources for the good of patients and society. Nurse practitioners should aim to become members of influential healthcare Boards in their countries, in which they can raise their voices and be involved in policy making. © 2013 International Council of

  11. Nurse Practitioners and Men's Primary Health Care.

    PubMed

    Rosu, Marina B; Oliffe, John L; Kelly, Mary T

    2017-09-01

    Though life expectancy sex differences are decreasing in many Western countries, men experience higher mortality rates at all ages. Men are often reluctant to seek medical care because health help-seeking is strongly linked to femininity, male weakness, and vulnerability. Many men are also more likely to access emergency care services in response to injury and/or severe pain instead of engaging primary health care (PHC) services. Nurse practitioners are well positioned to increase men's engagement with PHC to waylay the pressure on emergency services and advance the well-being of men. This article demonstrates how nurse practitioners can work with men in PHC settings to optimize men's self-health and illness prevention and management. Four recommendations are discussed: (1) leveling the hierarchies, (2) talking it through, (3) seeing diversity within patterns, and (4) augmenting face-to-face PHC services. In terms of leveling the hierarchies nurse practitioners can engage men in effectual health decision making. Within the interactions detailed in the talking it through section are strategies for connecting with male patients and mapping their progress. In terms of seeing diversity with in patterns and drawing on the plurality of masculinities, nurse practitioners are encouraged to adapt a variety of age sensitive assessment tools to better intervene and guide men's self-health efforts. Examples of community and web based men's health resources are shared in the augmenting face-to-face PHC services section to guide the work of nurse practitioners. Overall, the information and recommendations shared in this article can proactively direct the efforts of nurse practitioners working with men.

  12. Cyberbullying: implications for the psychiatric nurse practitioner.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, Lindsey M; Hubbard, Grace B

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of this article is to inform and educate psychiatric nurse practitioners about the pervasiveness of the rapidly increasing problem of cyberbullying. As more children and adolescents obtain access to the Internet, mobile devices, and social networking sites, the exposure to bullying in the virtual format increases. Cyberbullying is a growing public health concern and can affect mental health and school performance. Cyberbullying often results in a range of psychiatric symptoms and has been linked to suicide attempts and completions. The psychiatric nurse practitioner is uniquely prepared to provide a range of interventions for patients, families, and communities who have experienced cyberbullying. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Blueprint for development of the advanced practice psychiatric nurse workforce.

    PubMed

    Hanrahan, Nancy P; Delaney, Kathleen R; Stuart, Gail W

    2012-01-01

    The mental health system is inefficient and ineffective in providing behavioral health care services to the 1 in 4 Americans who have a mental illness or a substance abuse problem. Current health care reform initiatives present a significant opportunity for advanced practice psychiatric nurses-psychiatric mental health (APRN-PMH) to develop action-oriented recommendations for developing their workforce and thereby increasing access to high-quality and full-spectrum behavioral health care services. If endorsed by the professional nursing associations and the APRN-PMH workforce, the strategies presented in this paper provide a blueprint for developing the APRN-PMH workforce. Achieving these goals will significantly reform the APRN-PMH workforce, thereby contributing to the overall goal of supporting an integrated model of behavioral health care. No change has as much potential to influence the APRN-PMH workforce as the uniting of all APRN-PMHs in a "Blueprint for APRN-PMH Workforce Development."

  14. Nurse Practitioners, Physician Assistants and Certified Nurse Midwives in California.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Univ., San Francisco. Center for California Health Workforce Studies.

    Surveys were mailed to all nurse practitioners (NPs), physician assistants (PAs) and certified nurse midwives (CNMs) registered in California, asking questions about education, labor force participation, specialty, and location and type of practice site, as well as the demographic characteristics of these professionals and their patients. Response…

  15. Pediatric Nurse Practitioner Program: Theories for Extended Pediatric Nursing Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brady, Margaret A.

    A description is provided of "Theories for Extended Pediatric Nursing Practice," a required course for pediatric and family nurse practitioner students in a California state university program. The course description presents information on the curricular placement of the course, prerequisites, in-class time allotments, and the focus of the course…

  16. Nurse Practitioners: A Decade of Change--Part III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sultz, Harry A.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    This is the third report of the findings of the longitudinal studies of nurse practitioners in the United States. It compares the characteristics and motivations of students in nurse practitioner programs in 1973 and 1980. (JOW)

  17. A Missed Opportunity: Master's Education for Certified Nurse Practitioners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vessey, Judith A.; Morrison, Candis

    1997-01-01

    Describes Johns Hopkins's Nurse Practitioner Certificate to Master's Program for certified nurse practitioners who lacked master's-level credentials. the program features challenge mechanisms whereby students can acquire credits by examination or portfolio development. (SK)

  18. Nurse Practitioners: A Decade of Change--Part IV.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sultz, Harry A.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Highlights trends in nurse practitioner employment from 1974-1982. The data illustrate that the nurse practitioner movement has grown and stablized and is now an integral part of the health care program. (JOW)

  19. Nurse Practitioners: A Decade of Change--Part III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sultz, Harry A.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    This is the third report of the findings of the longitudinal studies of nurse practitioners in the United States. It compares the characteristics and motivations of students in nurse practitioner programs in 1973 and 1980. (JOW)

  20. Ethnic diversity in the nurse workforce: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Otto, Laureen A; Gurney, Cindy

    2006-01-01

    In the 2000-2003 New York State Nurses Association Strategic Plan, the Board of Directors called for an assessment of the progress made toward achieving an ethnically diverse nursing workforce as reflected in the literature. In this paper the authors have responded to that request and offer a snapshot of progress as well as standstills in the journey toward diversity. Although the literature has tended to focus on cultural competency of the healthcare worker, and includes numerous calls for action to diversify the nurse workforce, very little scholarly work has been conducted that rigorously evaluates such diversification activities. The purpose of this literature review is to explore existing scholarly work in ethnic diversity at three levels: in the general workforce, the healthcare workforce, and the nursing workforce. The authors explored the literature as it addresses two aspects: academic and career factors influencing diversity; and recruitment, retention, and other strategies employed to diversify the workforce. By exploring the existing research, gaps can be identified in order to either direct further research, or target funding to recruitment strategies to effectively enhance a more ethnically diverse nurse workforce.

  1. Recommendations for nurse practitioner residency programs.

    PubMed

    Brown, Kameka; Poppe, Anne; Kaminetzky, Catherine; Wipf, Joyce; Woods, Nancy Fugate

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify and prioritize critical aspects needed in the design and execution of new nurse practitioner (NP) residency programs. Subjects answered a series of questions on formulating residency programs and on key outcomes and cost measures related to their sustainability. These results serve as potential guideposts for future work in NP residency standardization and sustainability development.

  2. Psychological Characteristics of the Nurse Practitioner

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Martha Sturm

    1975-01-01

    A review of research pertaining to the nurse practitioner reveals most research to be of a descriptive nature. More theoretical research is needed--multi-criteria for measuring success and effectiveness, predictions from different personality and developmental theories, and more complex variables. (Author/EA)

  3. Nurse Practitioner Research: Some Neglected Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Carolyn A.

    1975-01-01

    Two current evaluation projects of the Family Nurse Practitioner Training Program at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill compare the utilization or quality of services provided by graduates practicing in different care settings. Clinical trial studies are essential first steps in assessing an innovation in health care delivery. (EA)

  4. Nurse practitioner prescribing practices: the most frequently prescribed medications.

    PubMed

    Buckley, Thomas; Cashin, Andrew; Stuart, Meg; Browne, Graeme; Dunn, Sandra V

    2013-07-01

    To explore which medications Australian nurse practitioners most frequently prescribe. Although nurse practitioners in Australia have prescriptive authority, little is known about which specific medications nurse practitioners are prescribing and how frequently they do so. Descriptive electronic survey. A total of 209 nurse practitioners reported current prescribing practices. Medications reported were categorised according to the Australian Medicines Handbook major drug classifications and frequencies presented. Seventy-eight per cent of respondents reported prescribing medications as part of their Nurse Practitioner practice. In total, participants reported prescribing 234 separate medications from most Australian Medicines Handbook major drug classifications. Medications from the classification anti-infective drugs were most frequently prescribed followed by medications from analgesic, psychotropic, cardiovascular, musculoskeletal, genitourinary and gastrointestinal classifications. The majority of nurse practitioners in Australia prescribe medications in their clinical practice, although the proportion of nurse practitioners prescribing has not changed significantly in the past four years. The medications prescribed are comparable with those most frequently prescribed by all prescribers in Australia and highlight the diversity in scope of practice among nurse practitioners. Findings highlight the importance of Nurse Practitioner's a capacity to prescribe wide variety of medications, especially in practice areas such acute, primary and emergency care. The unique role nurse practitioners in relation to management of patients with infective processes and patients requiring pain relief is highlighted. Insight into current Nurse Practitioner prescribing trends informs future Nurse Practitioner curricular and future continuing education programmes. Findings give unique insight for future service planning, especially service providers considering introducing nurse

  5. Family nurse practitioners: "value add" in outpatient chronic disease management.

    PubMed

    Stephens, Lynn

    2012-12-01

    Nurse practitioners are capable leaders in primary care design as practices nationwide move to consider and adopt the patient-centered medical home. The chronic care model provides a structure to enhance the care of chronic illness. Nurse practitioners are instrumental in many areas of this model as both leaders and caregivers. Safety and quality are basic medical home goals; nurse practitioners enhance both. The addition of a nurse practitioner to a practice is an effective "value add" in every way.

  6. The rural nurse-practitioner: concepts and issues.

    PubMed

    Roberts, K L

    1996-08-01

    This paper reviews concepts, issues and research findings related to the role of the nurse-practitioner; in particular, findings related to the role of the rural nurse-practitioner are considered. Issues related to the nurse-practitioner, including effectiveness, physician acceptance, client acceptance, models of practice, legal issues, reimbursement, licensure and educational implications are discussed. It is concluded that the nurse-practitioner is a valuable profession.

  7. Integration of nurse practitioners using a change management framework: the way forward.

    PubMed

    Lowe, Grainne; Plummer, Virginia; Boyd, Leanne

    2016-10-07

    Objective The aim of the present study was to investigate and describe the application of a change management theoretical framework in relation to nurse practitioner (NP) role integration.Methods A survey formed Phase 1 of a broader mixed-methods study to explore perceptions of the change process involved with integrating NPs into Australian health care settings. The stakeholder participants were NPs, nurse managers and nurse policy advisers.Results Key themes were identified adding information about how NPs, nurse managers and nurse policy advisers perceive the integration of NPs into Australian healthcare. The themes correlate to the components of organisational change management necessary to embed NPs into the healthcare workforce.Conclusions Healthcare reform is a complex organisational change. Alignment of several key elements is required for the process to be successful. A change management proposal for reframing organisations provides an apt framework for use in the Australian context of reforming workforce to integrate NPs into healthcare teams. The theoretical framework proposes that multiple lenses be applied to change processes, to integrate NPs into the workforce and highlights the need for exceptional leadership throughout such endeavours.What is known about the topic? NPs provide safe and efficient care to patients, often in settings where access to health care is limited. NPs have been identified as a key strategic workforce reform initiative to address some of the known healthcare gaps.What does this paper add? This paper adds information about how NPs, nurse managers and nurse policy advisers perceive progress of the integration of NPs into healthcare settings. The findings are contextualised within an organisational change framework and highlight the complexity of healthcare reform.What are the implications for practitioners? The findings provide a novel approach for managing workforce reform and identify the components of change management

  8. Nurse Practitioners in College Health--Where Are They Now?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Donna J.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    A controlled, computerized study of graduates of the Brigham Young University College Health Nurse Practitioner Course was conducted to determine the level of job satisfaction and professional acceptance of nurse practitioners. Findings suggest that nurse practitioners show a high degree of self-acceptance and physician and peer acceptance. (JN)

  9. 42 CFR 410.75 - Nurse practitioners' services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Nurse practitioners' services. 410.75 Section 410... Nurse practitioners' services. (a) Definition. As used in this section, the term “physician” means a... Medicare Part B coverage of his or her services, a nurse practitioner must be a registered...

  10. 42 CFR 410.75 - Nurse practitioners' services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Nurse practitioners' services. 410.75 Section 410... Nurse practitioners' services. (a) Definition. As used in this section, the term “physician” means a... Medicare Part B coverage of his or her services, a nurse practitioner must be a registered...

  11. 42 CFR 410.75 - Nurse practitioners' services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Nurse practitioners' services. 410.75 Section 410... Nurse practitioners' services. (a) Definition. As used in this section, the term “physician” means a... Medicare Part B coverage of his or her services, a nurse practitioner must be a registered...

  12. 42 CFR 410.75 - Nurse practitioners' services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Nurse practitioners' services. 410.75 Section 410... Nurse practitioners' services. (a) Definition. As used in this section, the term “physician” means a... Medicare Part B coverage of his or her services, a nurse practitioner must be a registered...

  13. 42 CFR 410.75 - Nurse practitioners' services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Nurse practitioners' services. 410.75 Section 410... Nurse practitioners' services. (a) Definition. As used in this section, the term “physician” means a... Medicare Part B coverage of his or her services, a nurse practitioner must be a registered professional...

  14. Nursing workforce in very remote Australia, characteristics and key issues.

    PubMed

    Lenthall, Sue; Wakerman, John; Opie, Tess; Dunn, Sandra; Macleod, Martha; Dollard, Maureen; Rickard, Greg; Knight, Sabina

    2011-02-01

    To describe the nursing workforce in very remote Australia, characteristics and key issues. Data were collected from four main sources: the refined CRANAplus database of remote health facilities; the 2006 census which provided population and percentage of Indigenous people in communities in very remote Australia; a national survey on occupational stress among nurses and an earlier study into violence and remote area nurses conducted in 1995. A descriptive analysis of the data was conducted. Health facilities in very remote Australia.   The registered nursing workforce in very remote Australia is mostly female (89%) and ageing, with 40.2% 50 years or over, compared to 33% nationally. Many (43%) are in remote Indigenous communities. Over the last decade, there has been a significant decrease in registered nurses with midwifery qualifications (55%) and in child health nurses (39%) in very remote Australia. Only 5% have postgraduate qualifications in remote health practice. The nursing workforce in very remote areas of Australia is in trouble. The workforce is ageing, the numbers of nurses per population has fallen and the numbers of midwives and child health nurses have dropped significantly over the last 15 years. As many of these nurses work in Indigenous communities, if these trends continue it is likely to have a negative effect on 'closing the gap' in Indigenous health outcomes. © 2011 The Authors. Australian Journal of Rural Health © National Rural Health Alliance Inc.

  15. Maine's nursing workforce legislation: lessons from a rural state.

    PubMed

    Kirschling, Jane Marie; Harvey-McPherson, Lisa; Curley, Darlene

    2008-01-01

    As the aging baby boom generation begins to place additional pressures on the health care system and the nursing workforce of the same generation begins to retire, the worsening nursing shortage has the potential to seriously impact the delivery of health care in the United States and is receiving considerable attention nationwide. Although federal initiatives such as the Nurse Reinvestment Act are critical, issues of supply and demand for registered nurses must also be addressed at the state level. In Maine, nursing leadership has partnered with state policy makers and health care industry leaders in a multi-year initiative that has included the nursing community's envisioning its "preferred future," formal data collection on the nursing workforce, ongoing education of the Maine State Legislature about the nursing shortage, and legislative initiatives.

  16. The first nurse practitioner graduate programme in Japan.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, H; Miyauchi, S; Tonai, M; Ono, M; Magilvy, J K; Murashima, S

    2014-12-01

    This paper describes the establishment of the first Japanese nurse practitioner graduate programme and legislative activities to institutionalize nurse practitioners in Japan. To address the super-ageing population, Oita University of Nursing and Health Sciences initiated the first academic graduate level nurse practitioner programme in Japan, based upon the global standard defined by the International Council of Nurses. In 2010, Oita University of Nursing and Health Sciences graduated the first nurse practitioner. We believe that nurse practitioners will be highly valued in Japan for thoughtful nursing care to the fragile elders living in rural and urban Japan. © 2014 The Authors. International Nursing Review published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of International Council of Nurses.

  17. 42 CFR 440.166 - Nurse practitioner services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... are furnished by a registered professional nurse who meets a State's advanced educational and clinical... registered nurses. (b) Requirements for certified pediatric nurse practitioner. The practitioner must be a registered professional nurse who meets the requirements specified in either paragraphs (b)(1) or (b)(2)...

  18. 42 CFR 440.166 - Nurse practitioner services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... are furnished by a registered professional nurse who meets a State's advanced educational and clinical... registered nurses. (b) Requirements for certified pediatric nurse practitioner. The practitioner must be a registered professional nurse who meets the requirements specified in either paragraphs (b)(1) or (b)(2)...

  19. 42 CFR 440.166 - Nurse practitioner services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... are furnished by a registered professional nurse who meets a State's advanced educational and clinical... registered nurses. (b) Requirements for certified pediatric nurse practitioner. The practitioner must be a registered professional nurse who meets the requirements specified in either paragraphs (b)(1) or (b)(2)...

  20. 42 CFR 440.166 - Nurse practitioner services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... are furnished by a registered professional nurse who meets a State's advanced educational and clinical... registered nurses. (b) Requirements for certified pediatric nurse practitioner. The practitioner must be a registered professional nurse who meets the requirements specified in either paragraphs (b)(1) or (b)(2)...

  1. Nurse practitioner perceptions of the impact of physician oversight on quality and safety of nurse practitioner practice.

    PubMed

    Lowery, Bobby; Scott, Elaine; Swanson, Mel

    2016-08-01

    Nurse practitioner (NP) regulation and physician oversight (PO) of NP practice are inextricably intertwined. A flexible, well-prepared workforce is needed to meet consumer healthcare needs. All outcome studies have revealed that NPs provide safe, effective, quality care with outcomes equal to or better than that of physicians or physician assistants. Variability in state regulation of NP practice limits the full deployment of these proven healthcare providers, threatens the quality and safety of NP-delivered care, and limits consumer choice in healthcare access. The purpose of this study was to document NP perceptions of the impact of PO on the safety and quality of NP practice. A total of 1139 NP respondents completed an exploratory survey, Impact of Regulatory Requirements for Physician Oversight on Nurse Practitioner Practice. Participants were asked their perceptions of the impact of PO on patient care and NP practice. Descriptive statistics on the state of residence regulatory requirements and personal demographics were also collected. NP perceptions of the impact of PO on the safety and quality of NP practice were predicted by NP experience and state regulatory environment ranking. The results of this study have implications for educators, policy makers, and nursing advocacy groups seeking to increase access to care in U.S. Study participants perceived that requirements for PO impacted their practice and may jeopardize patient safety. An understanding of the impact of influences on regulatory processes is critical to ensuring full deployment of NPs as interprofessional leaders to meet current and future healthcare access. ©2015 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  2. Academics and practitioners: nurses as intellectuals.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Colin A

    2002-06-01

    Academics and practitioners: nurses as intellectuals In the author's experience, nurse educators working in universities generally accept that they are 'academics', but dismiss suggestions that they are 'intellectuals' because they see it as a pretentious description referring to a small number of academics and aesthetes who inhabit a conceptual world beyond the imaginative capacity of most other people. This paper suggests that the concept of the 'intellectual', if not the word itself, be admitted into nursing discourse through the adoption of a non-élitist Gramscian understanding, similar to the more recently formulated conception of the reflective practitioner. According to the Italian Marxist scholar Antonio Gramsci, intellectuals are those people who develop ways in which to construct the conditions of their own existence, a possibility he believed was open to all. It is suggested that, from a Gramscian perspective, all nurses are intellectuals to varying degrees, and nurse educators should not only be nurturing their own intellectualism but also the potential for intellectualism as it exists within each individual. The ways in which this project are related to Habermasian critical theory are also briefly outlined.

  3. Transitioning from physician to nurse practitioner

    PubMed Central

    Flowers, Monica; Olenick, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Foreign-educated physicians (FEPs), also known as “international medical graduates”, represent a rich source of potential primary-care providers. Despite their high level of medical knowledge and skills as well as ethnic and cultural diversity suited to meet the demands of patients, FEPs face many barriers in their attempt to continue to practice medicine in the USA. The program of study at Florida International University’s Nicole Wertheim College of Nursing and Health Sciences provides FEPs the opportunity to have an impact on health care and continue to practice medicine in the USA by becoming nurse practitioners. PMID:24489472

  4. The Initiative to Move Toward a More Highly Educated Nursing Workforce: Findings from the Kansas Registered Nurse Workforce Survey.

    PubMed

    Shen, Qiuhua; Peltzer, Jill; Teel, Cynthia; Pierce, Janet

    2015-01-01

    The Institute of Medicine report, The Future of Nursing: Leading Change, Advancing Health, recommends increasing the proportion of registered nurses (RNs) with a baccalaureate in nursing (BSN) to 80% by 2020. Kansas lacks a central mechanism to collect current data on the RN workforce; therefore, detailed information about the RN workforce, including current educational level, is unknown. The purposes of the survey were to (a) describe the Kansas RN workforce, (b) examine the relationship between nursing education and employment, (c) compare and contrast the workforce to other states and national data and (d) discuss implications of strategic planning and policy making for nursing education. The on-line Kansas RN Workforce Survey link was sent to 44,568 RNs by e-mail, and the response rate was 15.6% (n = 6,948). The survey consisted of 34 questions on demographics, education, licensing, and employment. Kansas RNs were predominately women (92%) and Caucasian with an average age of 47.7 years. Approximately 46.3% of RNs obtained a BSN as their initial education. Analysis of highest level of nursing education showed that 60.5% of Kansas RNs were at least baccalaureate prepared, with 14.9% obtaining a master's degree or higher. More than 50% of RNs worked in hospitals as staff nurses. RNs with advanced education were more likely to be employed, tended to work in academic settings or ambulatory clinics, and were more likely to be faculty or in management/leadership positions. Overall, the Kansas RN workforce is closer to reaching the 80% baccalaureate-prepared goal recommended by the Future of Nursing report than has been reported. Educational level was closely related to RNs' choices of work settings and positions. Additional work such as promoting academic progression needs to continue to build a more highly educated RN workforce.

  5. Growing ambulatory care nurse leaders in a multigenerational workforce.

    PubMed

    Moye, Janet P; Swan, Beth Ann

    2009-01-01

    Ambulatory care faces challenges in sustaining a nursing workforce in the future as newly licensed nurses are heavily recruited to inpatient settings and retirements will impact ambulatory care sooner than other areas. Building a diverse team by recruiting nurses of different ages (generations) and skills may result in a more successful and robust organization. Knowledge about generational characteristics and preferences will aid nurse leaders and recruiters in attracting high-quality, talented nurses. Nurses of Generations X and Y can increase their likelihood of success in ambulatory care by better understanding intergenerational issues.

  6. Bringing magic to the nursing workforce of the future.

    PubMed

    Sorrell, Jeanne M; Cangelosi, Pamela R

    2004-01-01

    How can nursing education respond to the ominous signs of a serious shortage of nurses in the future? One answer to this question is a focus on reclaiming nurses' stories of the "real-world" of nursing practice. In the process of creating a childrens book, The Magic Stethoscope, a group of nurse authors found a new appreciation for the stories of their practice and the need to share these stories with children. The authors hope that these stories will inspire children to consider the exciting career opportunities for the nursing workforce of the future.

  7. Cognitive dissonance experienced by nurse practitioner faculty.

    PubMed

    Fontenot, Holly B; Hawkins, Joellen W; Weiss, Josie A

    2012-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to explicate the concept of cognitive dissonance as experienced and reported by nurse practitioner (NP) faculty members. Responses from NP faculty members to an online survey about their experiences with cognitive dissonance. The respondents detailed their experiences with cognitive dissonance, citing differences between expectations for which they are rewarded and those for which they are paid. Expecting all faculty members to excel in practice, research, teaching, and service may create unrealistic workloads for NP faculty members. Examining expectations and considering creation of a clinical track for faculty who practice may be options administrators of NP programs might explore. ©2012 The Author(s) Journal compilation ©2012 American Academy of Nurse Practitioners.

  8. Decreasing barriers for nurse practitioner social entrepreneurship.

    PubMed

    Sharp, Dayle B; Monsivais, Diane

    2014-10-01

    To describe difficulties associated with the business-related aspects of practice in role transition of rural nurse practitioners (NPs), and to give practice implications. This focused ethnographic study derived data from semi-structured interviews. Participants provided information about rural NP practice ownership and barriers. The sample consisted of 24 rural NPs living throughout the United States. The majority were 51-60 years of age (45%) and females (93%) who had been in rural practice for 1 to over 20 years. NP social entrepreneurs experience difficulties related to scope of practice, business skills, and role conflict. To decrease barriers for NP clinic ownership and management, NPs need to receive education related to financing a rural practice, legal/regulatory practices, strategic planning, leadership, and clinic management. ©2014 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  9. Assisted suicide: nurse practitioners as providers?

    PubMed

    Hall, J K

    1996-10-01

    Changes in the law of death are being made. Nurse practitioners will be asked to help their patients commit suicide, and to help euthanize their patients. Currently most nurse practitioners have legal authority to prescribe the drugs that can potentially kill patients. NPs may be more likely than physicians to be asked for these drugs. Assisted suicide, euthanasia, and related terms are defined. The specific changes in the law of causing death are provided. Collective payment for illness care may be one reason that changes in the law are now being made. Society projects that dying people do not want to live; but that assumption is wrong. NPs in the future may choose to act at the lowest standard of behavior (the law) or they may behave in accord with a higher standard, their personal ethics. NPs should assert that their professional duty is to do good for the patient, not to help kill the patient.

  10. Factors affecting the integration of immigrant nurses into the nursing workforce: A double hermeneutic study.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Lily Dongxia; Willis, Eileen; Jeffers, Lesley

    2014-04-01

    Variations in nursing practice and communication difficulties pose a challenge for the successful integration into the workforce of immigrant nurses. Evidence for this is found in cultural clashes, interpersonal conflicts, communication problems, prejudiced attitudes and discrimination towards immigrant nurses. While the evidence shows that integrating immigrant nurses into the nursing workforce is shaped by factors that are socially constructed, studies that examine social structures affecting workforce integration are sparse. The aim of this study was to examine interplaying relationships between social structures and nurses' actions that either enabled or inhibited workforce integration in hospital settings. Giddens' Structuration Theory with double hermeneutic methodology was used to interpret 24 immigrant and 20 senior nurses' perceptions of factors affecting workforce integration. Four themes were identified from the data. These were: (1) employer-sponsored visa as a constraint on adaptation, (2) two-way learning and adaptation in multicultural teams, (3) unacknowledged experiences and expertise as barriers to integration, and (4) unquestioned sub-group norms as barriers for group cohesion. The themes presented a critical perspective that unsuitable social structures (policies and resources) constrained nurses' performance in workforce integration in the context of nurse immigration. The direction of structural changes needed to improve workforce integration is illustrated throughout the discussions of policies and resources required for workforce integration at national and organisational levels, conditions for positive group interactions and group cohesion in organisations. Our study reveals inadequate rules and resources used to recruit, classify and utilise immigrant nurses at national and healthcare organisational levels can become structural constraints on their adaptation to professional nursing practice and integration into the workforce in a host

  11. New Health Practitioners: The Nurse Practitioner and the Physician's Assistant. Extension Studies 80.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woolley, Barbara H.

    Based on the trend toward greater reliance on new health practitioners, this book focuses on the nurse practitioner and the physician's assistant. The first of four sections describes the nurse practitioner and the physician's assistant and what their functions are in the delivery of health care services. Discussing why new health practitioners…

  12. Leading a multigenerational nursing workforce: issues, challenges and strategies.

    PubMed

    Sherman, Rose O

    2006-05-31

    Today's nursing workforce is made up of staff and nursing leaders from four different generational cohorts. Generational diversity, including workforce differences in attitudes, beliefs, work habits, and expectations, has proven challenging for nursing leaders. The purpose of this article is to assist nursing leaders to reframe perceptions about generational differences and to view these differences in attitudes and behaviors as potential strengths. Developing the skill to view generational differences through a different lens will allow the leader to flex their leadership style, enhance quality and productivity, reduce conflict, and maximize the contributions of all staff. This article provides an overview of the generational cohorts and presents strategies which nursing leaders can use to coach and motivate, communication with, and reduce conflict for each generational cohort of nurses.

  13. Achieving partnership: the contribution of nursing education to the production of a flexible workforce.

    PubMed

    Flanagan, J

    1998-05-01

    This paper examines education's contribution to labour force reform in the nursing profession within the United Kingdom. In a globalized society there is increasing demand for more flexible forms of working. Nursing faces radical change in its employment characteristics if it is to continue to meet the health care needs of the population in the new century. ORIGINS OF INFORMATION AND DATA ANALYSIS: Key sociological texts and contemporary analysis of nursing skill have been analysed and synthesized to identify the dynamic of change in nursing and nursing education's contribution to these changes. Patterns of upskilling and multiskilling are leading to the breakdown of professional role boundaries in the broader workforce. These patterns can also be seen in nursing. Upskilling is associated with increased stress and 'risk' for the individual, therefore achievement of flexibility is not without cost. Changes in the skill level in nursing lead many to conclude that the profession will become divided into a core and periphery distinction. This simplistic analysis does not account for the complexities of nursing and nursing skill although there is clearly a growing need for a 'knowledge and technical elite'. The core-periphery distinction is too simplistic to analyse nursing skills and the dynamic of change in the workforce. A radical perspective of nursing characterized by workers with a range of skills and competencies is less likely to lead to rigid professional boundaries. There is a clear need for multiskilled and knowledgeable workers; the 'technical and knowledge elite'. These nurses may be recognized as advanced practice nurses. High quality education is required to prepare these practitioners. Adaptation of nursing to the postmodern world needs to be facilitated by changes in current educational policy and practice.

  14. Nurse practitioner role transition: a concept analysis.

    PubMed

    MacLellan, Lorna; Levett-Jones, Tracy; Higgins, Isabel

    2015-07-01

    Transitioning from registered nurse to nurse practitioner (NP) can be challenging personally and professionally. Insight into transition experiences may help validate the experiences of new NPs and provide greater understanding of the challenges faced during their professional journey. The purpose of this article is to report a concept analysis of transition from registered nurse to NP. The article provides new knowledge, understanding, and clarity about the concept of transition. Walker and Avants' framework for concept analysis was used to identify the attributes, antecedents, and consequences of the concept. A literature review of refereed journals was undertaken. Model cases from an ethnographic study conducted in Australia provide real life examples of the attributes of transition. Transitioning to the role of NP is complex and dependent on the individual and the attitudes of healthcare colleagues. Change and adaptation are required of both the NP and members of the healthcare team. Failure to adapt by either party undermines the potential for NPs to deliver improved health care. Mentorship along with a nurturing environment may be effective strategies for increasing the NP's self-confidence and ensuring a smooth and successful transition period. ©2014 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  15. Nurse Practitioner Role Transition: A Concept Analysis.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Hilary

    2015-01-01

    A concept analysis of nurse practitioner (NP) role transition. The Affordable Care Act is expected to provide 32 million Americans with health insurance, and NPs are gaining attention in addressing this increasing demand for healthcare providers. However, there is limited analysis of the transition from registered nurse to NP. Oftentimes, during this transition, there is a shift from an experienced, expert status to an inexperienced, novice status, with a subsequent loss of confidence in one's ability and competence. This can hinder successful role development and affect employment continuity within the first year of practice. NP role transition was examined using Walker and Avant's method of concept analysis. Electronic databases were searched using the terms role transition and nurse practitioner. Thirty articles from nursing, psychology, and business were included. The four defining attributes of NP role transition are absorption of the role, the shift from provider of care to prescriber of care, straddling two identities, and mixed emotions. Personal and environmental antecedents and consequences of the concept are identified. The development of empirical knowledge on NP role transition through further research is important in order for new-to-practice NPs to become high-quality, full-functioning providers. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. A protocol for a pragmatic randomized controlled trial evaluating outcomes of emergency nurse practitioner service.

    PubMed

    Jennings, Natasha; Gardner, Glenn; O'Reilly, Gerard

    2014-09-01

    To evaluate emergency nurse practitioner service effectiveness on outcomes related to quality of care and service responsiveness. Increasing service pressures in the emergency setting have resulted in the adoption of service innovation models; the most common and rapidly expanding of these is the emergency nurse practitioner. The delivery of high quality patient care in the emergency department is one of the most important service indicators to be measured in health services today. The rapid uptake of emergency nurse practitioner service in Australia has outpaced the capacity to evaluate this model in outcomes related to safety and quality of patient care. Pragmatic randomized controlled trial at one site with 260 participants. This protocol describes a definitive prospective randomized controlled trial, which will examine the impact of emergency nurse practitioner service on key patient care and service indicators. The study control will be standard emergency department care. The intervention will be emergency nurse practitioner service. The primary outcome measure is pain score reduction and time to analgesia. Secondary outcome measures are waiting time, number of patients who did not wait, length of stay in the emergency department and representations within 48 hours. Scant research enquiry evaluating emergency nurse practitioner service on patient effectiveness and service responsiveness exists currently. This study is a unique trial that will test the effectiveness of the emergency nurse practitioner service on patients who present to the emergency department with pain. The research will provide an opportunity to further evaluate emergency nurse practitioner models of care and build research capacity into the workforce. Trial registration details: Australian and New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry dated 18th August 2013, ACTRN12613000933752. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Team Development Manual. Family Nurse Practitioner/Physician Assistant Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dostal, Lori

    A manual is presented to help incorporate team development into training programs for nurse practitioners, physician assistants, and primary care physicians. It is also directed to practitioners who wish to improve teamwork and is designed to improve the utilization of the nurse practitioners and physician assistants. A group of one or more…

  18. Team Development Manual. Family Nurse Practitioner/Physician Assistant Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dostal, Lori

    A manual is presented to help incorporate team development into training programs for nurse practitioners, physician assistants, and primary care physicians. It is also directed to practitioners who wish to improve teamwork and is designed to improve the utilization of the nurse practitioners and physician assistants. A group of one or more…

  19. Challenges facing internationalisation of nursing practice, nurse education and nursing workforce in Australia.

    PubMed

    Parker, Vicki; McMillan, Margaret

    2007-04-01

    This paper examines factors that have lead to increasing internationalisation in nursing workforce and nursing education and contends that education and support for nurse managers and nurse academics is required in order to better prepare them for the challenges they will face. There are many benefits to be gained from internationalisation of nursing, the most significant being greater cross-cultural understanding and improved practices in workplaces across countries. However, the way in which nursing and nurses contribute to the international agenda is crucial to maintaining standards of education and nursing care in Australia and in countries with whom Australians collaborate. Internationalisation poses numerous challenges that need to be carefully thought through. This paper seeks to unravel and scrutinize some of the issues central to internationalisation in nursing, particularly in the Australian context.

  20. The diversity imperative: strategies to address a diverse nursing workforce.

    PubMed

    Noone, Joanne

    2008-01-01

    There has been a call to action for the need to create a more diverse nursing workforce. The purpose of this article is to outline and review strategies that schools of nursing education can use to increase the recruitment, retention, and success of a diverse nursing student body. A review of the nursing literature was performed using CINAHL and hand-searching references. Abstracts were reviewed and articles included if the topic of the article referred to strategies to increase the diversity of nursing students. A variety of strategies are being used to address this issue. A multifaceted approach is recommended.

  1. How nurse practitioners obtained provider status: lessons for pharmacists.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, John Michael

    2003-11-15

    The history of nurse practitioners, their efforts to achieve provider status, and lessons learned from their activism are discussed. The nurse practitioner profession arose out of a need to meet a rising demand for primary care services, especially in rural areas. Some nurses and physicians vehemently opposed the nurse practitioner model, but studies documented the value of nurse practitioner services, and the utilization of these practitioners continued to grow. Compensation was provided via salary or per-member-per-month agreements. Nurse practitioners recognized that direct federal reimbursement (provider status) was needed to recognize them as independent health care providers and assign specific monetary values to their services, so they undertook an aggressive lobbying campaign. Contacts on Capitol Hill were exploited, and nursing organizations encouraged nurse practitioners to get involved in grass-roots activism. Nurse practitioners discussed their patients during meetings with their representatives in Congress, and legislators were invited to make site visits. In 1993, the American College of Nurse Practitioners was formed to unite the profession and move the campaign forward. Ultimately, the Balanced Budget Act of 1997 granted nurse practitioners provider status and authorized them to bill Medicare directly for services furnished in any setting. The key strategies that contributed to this victory were (1) gaining recognition that nursing had the potential to expand its role, (2) documenting nurse practitioners' value, (3) establishing standards in education and credentialing, (4) using professional organizations to empower individuals, and (5) being willing to accept small, incremental gains over time. The experience of nurse practitioners in obtaining Medicare provider status offers valuable lessons for pharmacists as they pursue the same goal.

  2. The Development of an HIV Training Program for Nurse Practitioners.

    PubMed

    McGee, Kara S; Relf, Michael; Harmon, James L

    2016-01-01

    Responding to a national need for a new workforce of HIV care providers as the first generation of providers decrease their practices or retire, the Duke University School of Nursing, with funding from the Health Resources and Services Administration, developed and implemented a program to train nurse practitioners (NP) to assume the full spectrum of primary care services needed by people living with HIV infection and various co-morbidities. The 12-credit program includes course work in HIV-related epidemiology; pathogenesis; psychosocial, political, ethical, and legal issues; and pharmacology and clinical management. Students complete 392 hours of HIV-specific clinical practice in addition to clinical hours required of all NP students. The program is the only distance-based program of its kind in the United States. Online didactic instruction is complemented by campus-based sessions with interprofessional faculty. We describe the 5 overarching goals that frame the program, and challenges and progress toward achieving those goals. Copyright © 2016 Association of Nurses in AIDS Care. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. 42 CFR 414.56 - Payment for nurse practitioners' and clinical nurse specialists' services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Payment for nurse practitioners' and clinical nurse... AND OTHER HEALTH SERVICES Physicians and Other Practitioners § 414.56 Payment for nurse practitioners' and clinical nurse specialists' services. (a) Rural areas. For services furnished beginning January...

  4. 42 CFR 414.56 - Payment for nurse practitioners' and clinical nurse specialists' services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Payment for nurse practitioners' and clinical nurse... AND OTHER HEALTH SERVICES Physicians and Other Practitioners § 414.56 Payment for nurse practitioners' and clinical nurse specialists' services. (a) Rural areas. For services furnished beginning January...

  5. 42 CFR 414.56 - Payment for nurse practitioners' and clinical nurse specialists' services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Payment for nurse practitioners' and clinical nurse... HEALTH SERVICES Physicians and Other Practitioners § 414.56 Payment for nurse practitioners' and clinical nurse specialists' services. (a) Rural areas. For services furnished beginning January 1, 1992 and...

  6. The Impact of Out-Migration on the Nursing Workforce in Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Gross, Jessica M; Rogers, Martha F; Teplinskiy, Ilya; Oywer, Elizabeth; Wambua, David; Kamenju, Andrew; Arudo, John; Riley, Patricia L; Higgins, Melinda; Rakuom, Chris; Kiriinya, Rose; Waudo, Agnes

    2011-01-01

    Objective To examine the impact of out-migration on Kenya's nursing workforce. Study Setting This study analyzed deidentified nursing data from the Kenya Health Workforce Informatics System, collected by the Nursing Council of Kenya and the Department of Nursing in the Ministry of Medical Services. Study Design We analyzed trends in Kenya's nursing workforce from 1999 to 2007, including supply, deployment, and intent to out-migrate, measured by requests for verification of credentials from destination countries. Principle Findings From 1999 to 2007, 6 percent of Kenya's nursing workforce of 41,367 nurses applied to out-migrate. Eighty-five percent of applicants were registered or B.Sc.N. prepared nurses, 49 percent applied within 10 years of their initial registration as a nurse, and 82 percent of first-time applications were for the United States or United Kingdom. For every 4.5 nurses that Kenya adds to its nursing workforce through training, 1 nurse from the workforce applies to out-migrate, potentially reducing by 22 percent Kenya's ability to increase its nursing workforce through training. Conclusions Nurse out-migration depletes Kenya's nursing workforce of its most highly educated nurses, reduces the percentage of younger nurses in an aging nursing stock, decreases Kenya's ability to increase its nursing workforce through training, and represents a substantial economic loss to the country. PMID:21413982

  7. The primary healthcare nurse practitioner role in Canada.

    PubMed

    Donald, Faith; Martin-Misener, Ruth; Bryant-Lukosius, Denise; Kilpatrick, Kelley; Kaasalainen, Sharon; Carter, Nancy; Harbman, Patricia; Bourgeault, Ivy; DiCenso, Alba

    2010-12-01

    Primary healthcare nurse practitioners (PHCNPs), also known as family or all-ages nurse practitioners, are the fastest growing advanced practice nursing role in Canada. All 10 provinces and three territories now have legislation that authorizes their role. Their introduction is linked to countrywide health reform efforts to improve the accessibility and quality of primary healthcare.

  8. [Development trends and future challenges in community nurse practitioner].

    PubMed

    Chen, Ching-Min

    2012-04-01

    Community health nursing is an innovative aspect of healthcare that has grown in response to changing environmental and social structure changes into a worldwide movement. Taiwan's fast growing elderly population, improving health technologies and rising healthcare costs impact significantly upon the development and definition of the scope of practice for community health nurse nurses. This paper explores the innovative community care model development experiences of several countries and reviews the scope of practice of community health nurse practitioners in each. We further explore the current situation of nurse practitioners in Taiwan and suggest a future path for Taiwan community health nurse practitioners development and policymaking.

  9. The journey to independent nurse practitioner practice.

    PubMed

    Rigolosi, Rebecca; Salmond, Susan

    2014-12-01

    The aim is to achieve a comprehensive understanding of the journey of states that achieved independent nurse practitioner (NP) practice from 2007 to 2011. Qualitative, retrospective, descriptive study with interviews of NP state leaders in those states as well as literature review. There are key strategies that should be utilized by states when attempting to pass independent NP practice legislation. Strategies that have been tried and tested by states that have successfully passed legislation are collated and presented. Data from key national movements and legislation with release of the 2010 Institute of Medicine Report The Future of Nursing and the passage of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act add weight and supportive context to the independent NP legislative process, and were used in addition to and as groundwork for arguments and evidence of a national trend toward increasing access to primary care services and decreasing barriers to practice. Kingdon's model illustrates these research findings and suggests the open window for policy change is now. ©2014 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  10. Gerontological nurse practitioners (GNPs) for the first time in Israel: Physicians' and nurses' attitudes.

    PubMed

    Yafa, Haron; Dorit, Rubinstein; Shoshana, Riba

    2016-08-01

    Nurse practitioners (NPs) have recently been partially introduced by the Israel Ministry of Health. This study examines the attitudes among gerontological physicians and nurses toward the scope of practice and effects on healthcare quality of the new role of gerontological NPs (GNPs). A descriptive survey methodology, with a cross-sectional design, was used. According to about 50% of the respondents, GNPs would be expected to have various positive effects on health care, such as reducing the number of referrals to emergency care, as well as readmissions. Despite the overall positive attitude to the GNPs' role, nurses and physicians perceived its scope of practice somewhat differently. Implementing the NP role involves multiple challenges and provides insights into this complex new function. Especially in these early stages, identified intentions for the NP role and value of the role by healthcare teams are expected to be useful to policy makers for planning effective utilization of NPs in healthcare workforce. This role is also a new role in other countries, so these findings should be relevant beyond Israel. ©2016 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  11. Nurse practitioners, certified nurse midwives, and physician assistants in physician offices.

    PubMed

    Park, Melissa; Cherry, Donald; Decker, Sandra L

    2011-08-01

    The expansion of health insurance coverage through health care reform, along with the aging of the population, are expected to strain the capacity for providing health care. Projections of the future physician workforce predict declines in the supply of physicians and decreasing physician work hours for primary care. An expansion of care delivered by nurse practitioners (NPs), certified nurse midwives (CNMs), and physician assistants (PAs) is often cited as a solution to the predicted surge in demand for health care services and calls for an examination of current reliance on these providers. Using a nationally based physician survey, we have described the employment of NPs, CNMs, and PAs among office-based physicians by selected physician and practice characteristics.

  12. Preceptorship and the Nurse Practitioner Student: Navigating the Liminal Space.

    PubMed

    Billay, Diane; Myrick, Florence; Yonge, Olive

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the process occurring in preceptorship to prepare nurse practitioner students for their future role in professional practice. The researchers examined this process through the eyes of the preceptors, nurse practitioner students, and faculty. A grounded theory method was used to explore the process involved in preceptorship to prepare nurse practitioner students in the clinical setting. The process of navigating the liminal space emerged from the data to explain what actually was occurring throughout the nurse practitioner student preceptorship. This process was reflected on three levels: (a) positioning in preceptorship, (b) repositioning on the threshold of nurse practitioner, and (c) embracing the new nurse practitioner role. As the data emerged, the researchers uncovered a multidimensional process that was occurring in preceptorship. This process was identified as navigating the liminal space. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  13. The attitudes of GPs towards the nurse-practitioner role.

    PubMed

    Carr, J; Bethea, J; Hancock, B

    2001-09-01

    In recent years, nursing and health-care policy have promoted the advanced role of the nurse -- that of nurse practitioner. But such a role has not been integrated widely into the primary health-care team. This study investigates the knowledge and attitudes of GPs who do not employ nurse practitioners to find out what prevents them doing so. Ten GPs who did not already employ a nurse practitioner took part in semi-structured interviews. Our findings show that GPs, although confused about the role, were generally supportive of advanced nursing practice. Skills identified with the role were prescribing, disease diagnosis and minor-illness management. GPs thought that protocols and guidelines should govern practice, which differs fundamentally from the Royal College of Nursing definition. None of the GPs had encountered the role in primary care, and the lack of professional regulation and role definition for practice nurses and nurse practitioners who work in primary care may have affected GPs' perceptions.

  14. Anabolic steroids: implications for the nurse practitioner.

    PubMed

    Duncan, D J; Shaw, E B

    1985-12-01

    Anabolic steroids are being used by athletes in a wide variety of sports in efforts to enhance their athletic performances. Steroid abuse is complex to evaluate due to the highly emotional subject matter and the limitations in researching anabolic steroids. This article has been written to heighten the practitioner's awareness of the problem of "sports doping" with anabolic steroids. It will provide practical information on possible consequences of steroid use and outline essential information to obtain through the history, physical exam and laboratory studies. Intervention strategies based on the three levels of prevention are described. With awareness of the problem of sports doping and knowledge of how to deal with it in primary care, the nurse practitioner can enhance the health care provided to aspiring athletes, athletes and retired athletes.

  15. An Exemplar Interprofessional Academic Emergency Nurse Practitioner Program: A Blueprint for Success.

    PubMed

    Evans, Dian Dowling; Ashooh, Meredith Pollock; Kimble, Laura P; Heilpern, Katherine L

    Emergency department census rates and manpower gaps have continued to rise over the past decade, creating a demand for well-prepared emergency nurse practitioners (ENPs). The implementation of the consensus model for advanced practice nurses has brought acknowledgment by leading health care, physician, and nursing organizations of the ENP specialty as critical to building a high-quality emergency care workforce. Recognition of the ENP's unique skill set, and therefore need of specialty certification, has led to a growing interest in the expansion of nurse practitioner curricula in emergency care. This article describes a novel approach for ENP education based on an interprofessional training model, with an in-depth discussion of curriculum development and clinical placement, as well as program outcomes and implications.

  16. Development of The Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing Adult/Geriatric Primary Care Nurse Practitioner Program in HIV Prevention, Treatment, and Care.

    PubMed

    Farley, Jason E; Stewart, Jennifer; Kub, Joan; Cumpsty-Fowler, Carolyn; Lowensen, Kelly; Becker, Kathleen

    2016-01-01

    In response to the call to create an AIDS Education and Training Center for Nurse Practitioner Education by the Health Resources and Services Administration, The Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing embarked on a transformative curriculum overhaul to integrate HIV prevention, treatment, and care into the Adult/Geriatric Nurse Practitioner Program. A six-step process outlined in the Curriculum Development for Medical Education was followed. A pilot cohort of Adult/Geriatric Nurse Practitioner students were enrolled, including 50% primary care setting and 50% HIV-focused primary care through a 12-month HIV continuity clinic experience. Through this pilot, substantive changes to the program were adopted. Programmatic outcomes were not compromised with the modification in clinical hours. The model of a 12-month HIV continuity clinical experience reduced the number of required preceptors. This model has important implications for the HIV workforce by demonstrating successful integration of HIV and primary care training for nurse practitioners.

  17. Nurse Practitioner Management of Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Gail Carr; Derouin, Anne L; Vorderstrasse, Allison A; Hipkens, James; Thompson, Julie A

    2014-01-01

    Context Multifactorial barriers prevent primary care clinicians from helping their adult patients with type 2 diabetes achieve good control of hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels. Patients’ depression and low self-efficacy can complicate diabetes management by impairing tasks needed for effective disease self-management. Objectives: To evaluate whether nurse practitioners in collaborative practices with primary care clinicians are effective in helping improve control of HbA1c, blood pressure (BP), and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) in adults with uncontrolled hyperglycemia, and to assess whether nurse practitioner-guided care affects depression and self-efficacy in these patients. Design: De-identified preintervention and postintervention data were collected from prospective review of medical charts of patients in a managed care organization’s primary care clinics. Main Outcome Measures: Preintervention and postintervention HbA1c values were evaluated as the primary outcome measure. Preintervention and postintervention values for BP, LDL-C, body weight, and depression and self-efficacy scores were secondary outcome measures. Results: After intervention, 50% of 26 patients achieved HbA1c benchmarks, 95.6% achieved systolic and diastolic BP benchmarks, and 57.8% achieved LDL-C benchmarks. Wilcoxon paired samples tests showed significantly increased self-efficacy (z = −3.42, p < 0.001) from preintervention to postintervention. Depression scores decreased slightly from preintervention (mean = 0.44, standard deviation = 1.34, median < 0.001) to postintervention values (mean = 0.18, standard deviation = 0.73, median < 0.001), but this decrease was not significant. Conclusion: Integrating nurse practitioners into primary care teams to provide innovative methods of support to adults with uncontrolled hyperglycemia improves clinical outcomes and self-efficacy for patients with type 2 diabetes. PMID:24867560

  18. The globalization of the nursing workforce: Pulling the pieces together.

    PubMed

    Jones, Cheryl B; Sherwood, Gwen D

    2014-01-01

    The "globalization" of health care creates an increasingly interconnected workforce spanning international boundaries, systems, structures, and processes to provide care to and improve the health of peoples around the world. Because nurses comprise a large sector of the global health workforce, they are called upon to provide a significant portion of nursing and health care and thus play an integral role in the global health care economy. To meet global health care needs, nurses often move within and among countries, creating challenges and opportunities for the profession, health care organizations, communities, and nations. Researchers, policy makers, and industry and academic leaders must, in turn, grapple with the impacts of globalization on the nursing and health care workforce. Through this special issue, several key areas for discussion are raised. Although far from exhaustive, our intent is to expand and stimulate intra- and interprofessional conversations raising awareness of the issues, uncover unanticipated consequences, and offer solutions for shaping the nursing and health care workforce of the future.

  19. Building an engaged and certified nursing workforce.

    PubMed

    Callicutt, Dale; Norman, Karen; Smith, Lesa; Nichols, Audrey; Kring, Daria

    2011-03-01

    Professional certification has been linked to positive patient, system, and nurse outcomes. However, certification rates among nurses remain low. Using tenets from employee engagement theory, we designed strategies to fully engage nurses within our nursing division to pursue certification. After 1 year, certification rates more than doubled in our cardiac departments.

  20. The role of the nurse practitioner in congenital heart surgery.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Patricia

    2007-01-01

    Pediatric nurse practitioners are often members of the interdisciplinary team caring for children with congenital heart disease. The collaborative practice model, in which a physician-led team of physicians, nurse practitioners, and other clinicians work together to provide comprehensive, quality patient care, has had positive benefits for patients and their families, physicians, and nurses. The acute care pediatric nurse practitioner combines advanced training in assessment, diagnosis, and management of common pediatric health problems with advanced nursing expertise in patient education, counseling, and health promotion to meet the specialized needs of children with complex acute and chronic illnesses. This article focuses on the development and current practice of pediatric nurse practitioners in acute care settings and concludes with a discussion of the role of nurse practitioners on the postoperative cardiac surgery service at Children's Hospital, Boston.

  1. A supply model for nurse workforce projection in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Abas, Zuraida Abal; Ramli, Mohamad Raziff; Desa, Mohamad Ishak; Saleh, Nordin; Hanafiah, Ainul Nadziha; Aziz, Nuraini; Abidin, Zaheera Zainal; Shibghatullah, Abdul Samad; Rahman, Ahmad Fadzli Nizam Abdul; Musa, Haslinda

    2017-08-18

    The paper aims to provide an insight into the significance of having a simulation model to forecast the supply of registered nurses for health workforce planning policy using System Dynamics. A model is highly in demand to predict the workforce demand for nurses in the future, which it supports for complete development of a needs-based nurse workforce projection using Malaysia as a case study. The supply model consists of three sub-models to forecast the number of registered nurses for the next 15 years: training model, population model and Full Time Equivalent (FTE) model. In fact, the training model is for predicting the number of newly registered nurses after training is completed. Furthermore, the population model is for indicating the number of registered nurses in the nation and the FTE model is useful for counting the number of registered nurses with direct patient care. Each model is described in detail with the logical connection and mathematical governing equation for accurate forecasting. The supply model is validated using error analysis approach in terms of the root mean square percent error and the Theil inequality statistics, which is mportant for evaluating the simulation results. Moreover, the output of simulation results provides a useful insight for policy makers as a what-if analysis is conducted. Some recommendations are proposed in order to deal with the nursing deficit. It must be noted that the results from the simulation model will be used for the next stage of the Needs-Based Nurse Workforce projection project. The impact of this study is that it provides the ability for greater planning and policy making with better predictions.

  2. Retaining an aging nurse workforce: perceptions of human resource practices.

    PubMed

    Palumbo, Mary Val; McIntosh, Barbara; Rambur, Betty; Naud, Shelly

    2009-01-01

    The expected retirement of the largest cohort of nurses will push the RN workforce below projected need by 2020. The challenges of managing a nursing workforce with the majority of nurses over 45 years of age are now necessitating attention to polices for recruitment and retention of older nurses, particularly in rural areas. This convenience sample study employed a mailed survey to investigate perceptions of nurses in 12 institutions (four hospitals, seven home health agencies, and one nursing home serving a small rural state). The goal was to explore rural RNs' perceptions of intent to stay in their current position, with their organization, and employment as a nurse; organizational and unit-level culture regarding older nurses in the workplace; importance of specific human resource practices/policies to their own intention to stay; and extent to which these human resource practices/policies are currently done. The results indicate that although there are similarities across age cohorts, important differences exist that can be addressed to create career-span sensitive policies and practices. This study provides an indicator of progress or lack of progress in addressing older nurse recruitment and retention, and also offers guidance for differentiating policies and practices for younger and older nurses.

  3. Promoting the nurse practitioner by using a marketing approach.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, S M

    1996-03-01

    Being good at what you do is not enough. Despite strong evidence that the nurse practitioner delivers cost-efficient and outcome-based care, few consumers really understand the nurse practitioner's scope of practice. With the current rapidly changing status of health care, the nurse practitioner is presented with many opportunities. Strategies that ensure survival and growth are critical to longevity. Marketing strategies can offer solutions to these challenges. The 4 P's of marketing are discussed as an approach to promote the role of the nurse practitioner.

  4. Nurse practitioner services: content and relative work value.

    PubMed

    Sullivan-Marx, E M; Happ, M B; Bradley, K J; Maislin, G

    2000-01-01

    The resource-based relative value scale is used to quantify work for reimbursement of services in the Medicare Fee Schedule. This pilot study explored use of the resource-based relative value scale for services provided by nurse practitioners. Estimation of relative work values for office visits by nurse practitioners was consistent with the Medicare Fee Schedule. Content analysis revealed that nurse practitioners provide additional services including comprehensive patient evaluation and education and attendance to social factors. Future research is needed to examine systems that identify and reimburse nurse practitioners for their services.

  5. Pediatric Nurse Practitioners in a School-Based CHDP Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dungy, Claibourne I.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    The California Child Health Disability Prevention (CHDP) program provides direct patient care by pediatric nurse practitioners in a school setting. Guidelines for instituting similar programs are provided. (JMF)

  6. Mary Grant Seacole: the first nurse practitioner.

    PubMed

    Messmer, P R; Parchment, Y

    1998-01-01

    Mary Grant Seacole was born in 1805, in Kingston, Jamaica, to a Jamaican doctress (medicine woman) and a Scottish naval officer. Later Seacole became a doctress, nursing British soldiers during epidemics of cholera, dysentery, and yellow fever in Jamaica, Cuba, and Panama. After refusals by both the British government and Florence Nightingale to be allowed to practice in Scutari, she financed her own way to the scene of the Crimean War and then established the British Hotel to serve both the comfort and medical needs of the wounded soldiers. At night, Seacole worked side by side with Nightingale at Scutari as a volunteer nurse. Seacole's fame grew proportionately after she was seen helping wounded soldiers on the battlefields even while the battles were still raging. Seacole died on May 14, 1881, in London. One hundred years later, many members of the London black community, a few members of the Nurses Association of Jamaica and the Friends of Mary Seacole marched to her grave, honoring her as one of the greatest women of all times. Mary Grant Seacole rose above the barriers of racial prejudice and demonstrated the determinism, compassion, and caring that have became the hallmark of nurse practitioners.

  7. Challenges to the Identity Formation of the School Nurse Practitioner.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Donoghue, Patricia Drogos; Hogan, Eleanor Phipps

    1980-01-01

    The problems arising in using nurse practitioners as school nurses are discussed, including the training program involved, the individual's self-concept within the position, and the faculty's attitude. (JMF)

  8. Nurse practitioner faculty research: Results from the 2012 National Organization of Nurse Practitioner Faculties Survey.

    PubMed

    Buchholz, Susan Weber; Bloch, Joan Rosen; Westrin, David; Fogg, Louis

    2015-12-01

    To better understand the research capacity and productivity of nurse practitioner (NP) faculty, a study was conducted to describe the types of research that have been and are being completed by National Organization of Nurse Practitioner Faculties (NONPF) members. A web-based survey was developed with input from members of the NONPF Research Special Interest Group and the NONPF Board. This 23-question survey included demographic, academic degree, NP population focus, and research-related questions. Three e-mails were sent to NONPF members over a 10-week period of time (late December 2012 to early February 2013). Respondents (N = 344) in the sample were Advanced Practice Registered Nurses with either a Masters, Doctor of Nursing Practice, DNS or PhD as their highest academic degree. Study results demonstrated that current NP faculty research includes a wide breadth of clinical areas studied, types of methodologies used, variety of funding mechanisms, and successful publication records. Because NP faculty conduct a wide array of research on clinically relevant topics, and demonstrate successful funding and publication track records, they are poised to continue to be leaders in healthcare research. ©2015 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  9. General practice nursing: who is cherishing this workforce?

    PubMed Central

    Webley-Brown, Carol

    2017-01-01

    The remodelling of the NHS requires a strong general practice nurse (GPN) workforce within general practice. The challenges facing general practice nursing are set within the current policy context and recent available evidence and illustrated by drawing upon the experience of a current GPN working in London. It is argued that there is a need to support the professional development of GPNs and nurture the next generation of potential GPNs if the current shortage of GPNs is to be addressed. PMID:28356920

  10. Quality measures for nurse practitioner practice evaluation.

    PubMed

    Kleinpell, Ruth; Kapu, April N

    2017-08-01

    Evaluating the impact of nurse practitioner (NP) practice has become a priority area of focus for demonstrating outcomes. A number of quality measures are available to enable practice-specific evaluation of NP roles and initiatives. This article reviews sources of quality measures that can be used to facilitate quantifying the outcomes of NP practice as part of an overall evaluation agenda. National resources and published literature on NP quality measures were reviewed. Various resources and toolkits exist to assist NPs in identifying outcomes of practice using quality measures. The need to demonstrate outcomes of NP practice remains an ongoing priority area regardless of the clinical practice setting. A variety of sources of quality measures exist that can be used to showcase the effect of NP care. The use of quality measures can be effectively integrated into evaluation of NP role and NP-directed initiatives to demonstrate impact, and enhance the conduct of an NP outcomes assessment. The use of organizational, NP-specific, and national-related quality measures can help to showcase how NP care improves the quality, safety, and costs of health care. ©2017 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  11. Sustaining the Rural Workforce: Nursing Perspectives on Worklife Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunsberger, Mabel; Baumann, Andrea; Blythe, Jennifer; Crea, Mary

    2009-01-01

    Context: Concerns have been raised about the sustainability of health care workforces in rural settings. According to the literature, rural nurses' work satisfaction varies with the resources and supports available to respond to specific challenges. Given the probable effects of stressors on retention, it is essential to understand the unique…

  12. Sustaining the Rural Workforce: Nursing Perspectives on Worklife Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunsberger, Mabel; Baumann, Andrea; Blythe, Jennifer; Crea, Mary

    2009-01-01

    Context: Concerns have been raised about the sustainability of health care workforces in rural settings. According to the literature, rural nurses' work satisfaction varies with the resources and supports available to respond to specific challenges. Given the probable effects of stressors on retention, it is essential to understand the unique…

  13. An integrative review of global nursing workforce issues.

    PubMed

    Nichols, Barbara L; Davis, Catherine R; Richardson, Donna R

    2010-01-01

    Migration has been a way of life since the beginning of time, with migrants seeking other lands for personal and professional betterment. Today, in an era of globalization, trade agreements and technological advances, an increase in migration is inevitable. All professions have been affected, but the migration of health professionals, particularly nurses, has been the most dramatic. However, the migration of nurses across national and international borders comes with many challenges: systematic tracking of migration flows, harmonization of standards, recognition of professional credentials, fair and equitable distribution of the global health care workforce, and the effect of migration on the health care infrastructure of both source and destination countries. The international migration of nurses to address shortages in developed countries has, in some instances, left source countries with insufficient resources to address their own health care needs. The increasing complexity of health care delivery, aging of the population and the nursing workforce, and the escalating global demand for nurses create on-going challenges for policy makers. Strategically addressing global nursing workforce issues is paramount to sustaining the health of nations.

  14. The business management preceptorship within the nurse practitioner program.

    PubMed

    Wing, D M

    1998-01-01

    Changes in health care reimbursement practices have affected the way in which primary health care is provided. To be successful, nurse practitioners must have a proficient understanding of basic business functions, including accounting, finance, economics, marketing, and reimbursement practices. Yet, many graduates of nurse practitioner programs are not adequately prepared to make fundamental business decisions. Therefore, it is essential that nurse practitioner faculty provide learning experiences on primary practice business. Because the preceptor experience is an integral aspect of nurse practitioner education, a business preceptorship provides students with pragmatic knowledge of the clinical practice within a business framework. The University of Indianapolis School of Nursing offers a nurse practitioner business preceptorship. The implementation, challenges, and positive outcomes of the course are discussed in this article.

  15. A nurse practitioner patient care team: implications for pediatric oncology.

    PubMed

    Golden, Julia Rose

    2014-01-01

    The role of the pediatric advanced practice registered nurse continues to evolve within the ever-changing field of health care. In response to increased demand for health care services and because of a variety of changes in the health care delivery system, nurse practitioner patient care teams are an emerging trend in acute care settings. Care provided by nurse practitioner teams has been shown to be effective, efficient, and comprehensive. In addition to shorter hospital stays and reduced costs, nurse practitioner teams offer increased quality and continuity of care, and improved patient satisfaction. Nurse practitioner patient care teams are well suited to the field of pediatric oncology, as patients would benefit from care provided by specialized clinicians with a holistic focus. This article provides health care professionals with information about the use of nurse practitioner patient care teams and implications for use in pediatric oncology.

  16. A nursing career lattice pilot program to promote racial/ethnic diversity in the nursing workforce.

    PubMed

    Sporing, Eileen; Avalon, Earlene; Brostoff, Marcie

    2012-03-01

    The nursing career lattice program (NCLP) at Children's Hospital Boston has provided employees with social, educational, and financial assistance as they begin or advance their nursing careers. At the conclusion of a pilot phase, 35% of employees in the NCLP were enrolled in nursing school and 15% completed nursing school. The NCLP exemplifies how a workforce diversity initiative can lead to outcomes that support and sustain a culture rich in diversity and perpetuate excellence in nursing in one organization.

  17. Clinical productivity of primary care nurse practitioners in ambulatory settings.

    PubMed

    Xue, Ying; Tuttle, Jane

    Nurse practitioners are increasingly being integrated into primary care delivery to help meet the growing demand for primary care. It is therefore important to understand nurse practitioners' productivity in primary care practice. We examined nurse practitioners' clinical productivity in regard to number of patients seen per week, whether they had a patient panel, and patient panel size. We further investigated practice characteristics associated with their clinical productivity. We conducted cross-sectional analysis of the 2012 National Sample Survey of Nurse Practitioners. The sample included full-time primary care nurse practitioners in ambulatory settings. Multivariable survey regression analyses were performed to examine the relationship between practice characteristics and nurse practitioners' clinical productivity. Primary care nurse practitioners in ambulatory settings saw an average of 80 patients per week (95% confidence interval [CI]: 79-82), and 64% of them had their own patient panel. The average patient panel size was 567 (95% CI: 522-612). Nurse practitioners who had their own patient panel spent a similar percent of time on patient care and documentation as those who did not. However, those with a patient panel were more likely to provide a range of clinical services to most patients. Nurse practitioners' clinical productivity was associated with several modifiable practice characteristics such as practice autonomy and billing and payment policies. The estimated number of patients seen in a typical week by nurse practitioners is comparable to that by primary care physicians reported in the literature. However, they had a significantly smaller patient panel. Nurse practitioners' clinical productivity can be further improved. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Re-envisioning clinical education for nurse practitioner programs: themes from a national leaders' dialogue.

    PubMed

    Giddens, Jean Foret; Lauzon-Clabo, Laurie; Morton, Patricia Gonce; Jeffries, Pamela; McQuade-Jones, Bambi; Ryan, Sandra

    2014-01-01

    As the need for primary care providers increases, nursing education programs face significant challenges to meet future workforce needs. A more resource-efficient approach for the clinical education of nurse practitioner students is needed. A think tank involving 20 thought leaders representing multiple disciplines was convened to discuss this issue. This article presents seven themes that emerged from this national leaders' dialog: academic practice co-design, standardized preclinical preparation, standardized student assessment, entrustable professional activities, immersive clinical experiences, interprofessional education for team-based care, and innovative education practices.

  19. Nursing workforce policy and the economic crisis: a global overview.

    PubMed

    Buchan, James; O'May, Fiona; Dussault, Gilles

    2013-09-01

    To assess the impact of the global financial crisis on the nursing workforce and identify appropriate policy responses. This article draws from international data sources (Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development [OECD] and World Health Organization), from national data sources (nursing regulatory authorities), and the literature to provide a context in which to examine trends in labor market and health spending indicators, nurse employment, and nurse migration patterns. A variable impact of the crisis at the country level was shown by different changes in unemployment rates and funding of the health sector. Some evidence was obtained of reductions in nurse staffing in a small number of countries. A significant and variable change in the patterns of nurse migration also was observed. The crisis has had a variable impact; nursing shortages are likely to reappear in some OECD countries. Policy responses will have to take account of the changed economic reality in many countries. This article highlights key trends and issues for the global nursing workforce; it then identifies policy interventions appropriate to the new economic realities in many OECD countries. © 2013 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  20. Mentoring Nurse Practitioners in a Hospital Setting.

    PubMed

    Pop, Rodica S

    2016-06-15

    Nursing philosophy is the foundation of nurse practitioner (NP) training. However, NP practice is based on the medical care model. Thus, the necessity of mediating between these two approaches is often problematic for new NPs who are transitioning into their new roles. Mentoring has been used successfully to facilitate role transition and role understanding for nurses, NPs, and physicians. However, mentoring has been rarely studied in NPs. The purpose of this study was to develop a theory of mentoring for new NPs in a hospital setting. Grounded theory methodology was used. The sampling approach was initially purposive and was then shifted to theoretical to ensure the collection of meaningful data. Semistructuredinterviews were recorded and transcribed into Word documents for analysis. The three-phase analysis developed by Corbin and Strauss was initiated after the second interview. Sixteen participants (eight mentors and eight mentees) were interviewed between February and June 2011. The core category that emerged from the data was "defining self," and the main categories were forming the relationship, developing the relationship, and mentoring outcomes. A well-designed formal mentoring program may greatly improve the transition of NPs into a new role. The theory generated by the data from these study participants provides clearly defined categories that may be operationally defined and utilized to develop evaluation tools for mentoring programs.

  1. Mentoring Nurse Practitioners in a Hospital Setting.

    PubMed

    Pop, Rodica S

    2017-08-01

    Nursing philosophy is the foundation of nurse practitioner (NP) training. However, NP practice is based on the medical care model. Thus, the necessity of mediating between these two approaches is often problematic for new NPs who are transitioning into their new roles. Mentoring has been used successfully to facilitate role transition and role understanding for nurses, NPs, and physicians. However, mentoring has been rarely studied in NPs. The purpose of this study was to develop a theory of mentoring for new NPs in a hospital setting. Grounded theory methodology was used. The sampling approach was initially purposive and was then shifted to theoretical to ensure the collection of meaningful data. Semistructuredinterviews were recorded and transcribed into Word documents for analysis. The three-phase analysis developed by Corbin and Strauss was initiated after the second interview. Sixteen participants (eight mentors and eight mentees) were interviewed between February and June 2011. The core category that emerged from the data was "defining self," and the main categories were forming the relationship, developing the relationship, and mentoring outcomes. A well-designed formal mentoring program may greatly improve the transition of NPs into a new role. The theory generated by the data from these study participants provides clearly defined categories that may be operationally defined and utilized to develop evaluation tools for mentoring programs.

  2. Making "cents" of the business side of nurse practitioner practice.

    PubMed

    Luster-Tucker, AtNena

    2016-03-15

    Nurse practitioners produce excellent patient outcomes and should be allowed to practice to the full extent of their education and training. In addition to clinical skills, nurse practitioners need to understand the business side of practice in order to ensure fair and equitable compensation.

  3. Practice environment for nurse practitioners in California. Identifying barriers.

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, A L; Gilliss, C L; Yoder, L

    1996-01-01

    Barriers exist that prevent nurse practitioners from using their primary health care knowledge and skills. We present the incidence of and specific barriers experienced by nurse practitioner respondents in California, the state with the largest number of nurse practitioners in the nation. A January 1995 survey was sent to all nurse practitioners certified in California to elicit their experiences regarding legal or social barriers in their practice, with space for an open-ended response. Of an estimated 3,895 nurse practitioners in California, 2,741 (70%) returned surveys. Most nurse practitioner (65%) respondents in California are providing primary care. Perceived barriers to practice are lack of prescriptive authority, lack of support from physicians, reimbursement difficulties, and lack of public awareness. Current barriers to nurse practitioner practice in California are similar to national barriers discovered in 1992 data. The development of interprofessional dialogue and the recognition of the contributions of all primary care professionals are some of the steps that can be taken to reduce these barriers and increase the use and effectiveness of nurse practitioners in primary care. PMID:8987426

  4. Evaluating the Outcomes of Advanced Neonatal Nurse Practitioner Programmes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Redshaw, Margaret; Hart, Bev; Harvey, Merryl; Harris, Anne

    The outcomes of advanced neonatal nurse practitioner (ANNP) programs in the United Kingdom were examined. The different programs of education currently available for nurses wishing to become ANNPs were compared, and the outcomes of ANNP programs, as demonstrated in the levels of performance of practitioners undertaking different programs, were…

  5. Team Development Curriculum. Family Nurse Practitioner/Physician Assistant Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dostal, Lori

    A curriculum consisting of four modules is presented to help nurse practitioners, physician assistants, and physicians develop team practices and improve and increase the utilization of nurse practitioners and physician assistants in primary care settings. The curriculum was prepared in 1981-1982 by the California Area Health Education Center…

  6. A Cooperative Education Program for Nurse Practitioners/Physician's Assistants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fowkes, Virginia; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Traditionally, nurse practitioners and physician's assistants have been trained separately. In l977, the Family Nurse Practitioner Program at the University of California, Davis, and the Primary Care Associate Program at Stanford University merged clinical curricula. The cooperative program is described and its first year evaluated. (Author/JMD)

  7. Competence and Commitment: The Making of a Nurse Practitioner.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Martha Sturm; Highley, Betty L.

    Data were gathered on 134 maternity and pediatric nurse practitioners to determine what types of work experience, educational backgrounds, and personality traits were most conducive to successful orientation and commitment to the nurse practitioner role. The study population, comprising six separate groups trained in six-month continuing education…

  8. Casualisation of the teaching workforce: implications for nursing education.

    PubMed

    Halcomb, Elizabeth J; Andrew, Sharon; Peters, Kath; Salamonson, Yenna; Jackson, Debra

    2010-08-01

    Internationally, nursing faculty shortages have been reported and there is a potential for them to worsen into the next decade as existing faculty age. To, in part, address this issue, across disciplines there is clearly an international trend towards the increasing casualisation of the higher education workforce. Despite the potential impact of this two-tiered workforce structure, there has been limited examination of the discipline specific issues related to the employment of a growing number of sessional nursing staff. This paper provides a critical review of the literature related to the employment of sessional teachers in higher education. The paper advances the discourse around the role and implications of employing sessional teachers in undergraduate nursing schools. Recommendations for supporting sessional staff and further research are presented.

  9. Impact of nurse practitioners on workload of general practitioners: randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Laurant, Miranda G H; Hermens, Rosella P M G; Braspenning, Jozé C C; Sibbald, Bonnie; Grol, Richard P T M

    2004-01-01

    Objective To examine the impact on general practitioners' workload of adding nurse practitioners to the general practice team. Design Randomised controlled trial with measurements before and after the introduction of nurse practitioners. Setting 34 general practices in a southern region of the Netherlands. Participants 48 general practitioners. Intervention Five nurses were randomly allocated to general practitioners to undertake specific elements of care according to agreed guidelines. The control group received no nurse. Main outcome measures Objective workload, derived from 28 day diaries, included the number of contacts per day for each of three conditions (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or asthma, dementia, cancer), by type of consultation (in practice, telephone, home visit), and by time of day (surgery hours, out of hours). Subjective workload was measured by using a validated questionnaire. Outcomes were measured six months before and 18 months after the intervention. Results The number of contacts during surgery hours increased in the intervention group compared with the control group (P < 0.06), particularly for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or asthma (P < 0.01). The number of consultations out of hours declined slightly in the intervention group compared with the control group, but this difference did not reach significance. No significant changes became apparent in subjective workload. Conclusion Adding nurse practitioners to general practice teams did not reduce the workload of general practitioners, at least in the short term. This implies that nurse practitioners are used as supplements, rather than substitutes, for care given by general practitioners. PMID:15069024

  10. Occupational health nurse practitioners' roles in workers' compensation.

    PubMed

    Foster, Donna

    2008-05-01

    The occupational health nurse practitioner is an integral part of coordinating care for the injured or ill worker. Decisions regarding whether an injury or illness is related to work are based on the practitioner's diagnosis and reports of the worker's progress. Understanding workers' compensation laws will enable the practitioner to provide efficient care for the worker.

  11. Primary care nurse practitioner clinical education: challenges and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Sroczynski, Maureen; Dunphy, Lynne M

    2012-12-01

    The Institute of Medicine report and the passage of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act present significant opportunities for the nursing profession. As the largest group of primary care providers, nurse practitioners are the critical element in the provision of comprehensive primary care, and a critical element to the success of the redesigned health care system. Nurse practitioners can bridge the gap between coverage and access and provide the patient-centered innovative approaches needed. There are, however, significant barriers that need to be addressed. This article presents a framework for creating innovative approaches to the redesign of nurse practitioner clinical education. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. 42 CFR 405.2415 - Services and supplies incident to nurse practitioner, physician assistant, certified nurse...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Services and supplies incident to nurse practitioner, physician assistant, certified nurse midwife, clinical psychologist, or clinical social worker... nurse practitioner, physician assistant, certified nurse midwife, clinical psychologist, or...

  13. Role of advanced paediatric nurse practitioners.

    PubMed

    Lisa, Egerton

    2012-07-01

    Children's attendance at emergency departments (EDs) is increasing every year, yet many children present with minor, self-limiting illnesses that could be managed at home. In light of Williams et al (2009) suggestion that healthcare professionals should improve the care available to patients at point of contact rather than try to change their health-seeking behaviours, this article describes how Tameside and Glossop Primary Care Trust has developed an advanced paediatric nurse practitioner (APNP) service in the ED to improve the care of children, and to reduce the number of admissions. The APNPs treat children in the ED then divert them to more appropriate services where support is given to the families to care for their children at home. The role contributes to meeting ED clinical quality indicators, frees up medical staff to deal with more seriously ill patients, and makes financial savings for the trust.

  14. Workforce Development in Nursing: Priming the Pipeline.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heller, Barbara R.; Nichols, Mary A.

    2001-01-01

    The University of Maryland School of Nursing is addressing the nursing shortage through public-private partnerships and alliances with the health care industry. Strategies include increasing public awareness through marketing, supporting legislation, expanding articulation agreements, and working with secondary schools to recruit students. (SK)

  15. Job satisfaction of Slovenian hospital nursing workforce.

    PubMed

    Prosen, Mirko; Piskar, Franka

    2015-03-01

    To test the psychometric properties of the McCloskey-Mueller Satisfaction Scale and to assess which of the McCloskey-Mueller Satisfaction Scale dimensionalities have a considerable impact on job satisfaction of nursing employees in three public Slovenian hospitals. Job satisfaction of nurses is linked to productivity, turnover, absenteeism and patient outcomes. Little is known about the factors contributing to job satisfaction among Slovenian hospital nurses. Understanding the contributing factors could help nurse managers to take appropriate measures. A cross-sectional survey study was used to obtain a sample of 169 registered nursing assistants and 74 registered nurses working in three public hospitals in Slovenia, from which data was obtained using the McCloskey-Mueller Satisfaction Scale. Dimensionality was tested using exploratory factor analysis. A seven-factor structure of 29 items was obtained, which accounted for 54.3% of the total variance in job satisfaction, and was internally consistent (Cronbach's alpha coefficient of the instrument was 0.78). The first factor 'Satisfaction with Interaction Opportunities', which is a component of the social rewards dimension in the McCloskey-Mueller Satisfaction Scale, explained 30.6% of the variation. The registered nursing assistants' job dissatisfaction was higher than that of the registered nurses. Both were mostly dissatisfied with professional opportunities. Using the factor analysis, a seven-factor structure was found instead of the originally introduced eight-factor model, which suggests a need for further redevelopment of the McCloskey-Mueller Satisfaction Scale. The results suggest that operational management needs to revitalize the work environment by ensuring proactive leadership and allowing participation in the decision-making process, while health-care organisations need to support the professional development of registered nursing assistants and registered nurses in order to achieve sustainable effects

  16. Physician Assistant and Nurse Practitioner Malpractice Trends.

    PubMed

    Brock, Douglas M; Nicholson, Jeffrey G; Hooker, Roderick S

    2016-07-25

    Trends in malpractice awards and adverse actions (e.g., revocation of provider license) following an act or omission constituting medical error or negligence were examined. The National Practitioner Data Bank was used to compare rates of malpractice reports and adverse actions for physicians, physician assistants (PAs), and nurse practitioners (NPs). During 2005 through 2014, there ranged from 11.2 to 19.0 malpractice payment reports per 1,000 physicians, 1.4 to 2.4 per 1,000 PAs, and 1.1 to 1.4 per 1,000 NPs. Physician median payments ranged from 1.3 to 2.3 times higher than PAs or NPs. Diagnosis-related malpractice allegations varied by provider type, with physicians having significantly fewer reports (31.9%) than PAs (52.8%) or NPs (40.6%) over the observation period. Trends in malpractice payment reports may reflect policy enactments to decrease liability. © The Author(s) 2016.

  17. Reflections on independence in nurse practitioner practice.

    PubMed

    Weiland, Sandra A

    2008-07-01

    To examine factors that influence the ability of nurse practitioners (NPs) to practice as independent primary care providers. Extensive literature search on CINAHL, OVID, MEDLINE, Internet journal sources, and professional association Web sites. The legal authority for NPs to practice independently is recognized; however, the ability to put that authority into practice is undermined by the historical failure of political, professional, and social entities to recognize NPs as providers capable of providing primary care autonomously. Nonrecognition is responsible for complex reimbursement policies (both federal and state) that economically and professionally restrain the NP role; hence, NPs remain in a financially dependent relationship despite 40 years of proven safe practice. NPs must articulate their independence as practitioners more vociferously in order to meet society's healthcare requirements, as well as to attain professional fulfillment and forge collegial relationships. NPs will never be seen as members of a profession by either themselves or others without the practicality of independence and autonomy. Although legal independence is a fact, real practice independence in the pragmatic sense is contingent upon reimbursement. Without fiscal sustainability, practice independence is an impossibility. And, without professional autonomy, NPs will have only an employee's voice in the dynamic healthcare system in which they are really key players in providing healthcare services to the poor and undeserved populations.

  18. Exploring the transition from registered nurse to family nurse practitioner.

    PubMed

    Poronsky, Cathlin Buckingham

    2013-01-01

    There is limited information available regarding the transition from registered nurse (RN) to family nurse practitioner (FNP). Several authors described this transition as taking place in 4 stages, and others described it as a 2-phase process. However, there is a lack of consensus about the definition of these stages and phases and at what point they occur for nurses who are making the transition from an RN to an FNP. From what is known, this multistage/2-phase transition is accompanied by feelings of anxiety, stress, role confusion, and emotional turmoil. As a nurse faculty member, the author theorized that nurse faculty might be in a position to provide support for graduate students making this transition in role. However, there was little information available about the transition phases, stages, and needs of students during graduate school. The search for a framework to explore transition yielded transition theory, which is described and applied to FNP transition in this article. Transition theory may be useful for examining more fully the phases and stages of RN-to-FNP transition. In this time of increased need for qualified primary care providers, it is essential that graduates of FNP programs transition into practice following graduation.

  19. A qualitative study of advanced nurse practitioners' use of physical assessment skills in the community: shifting skills across professional boundaries.

    PubMed

    Raleigh, Mary; Allan, Helen

    2017-07-01

    To explore multiple perspectives on the use of physical assessment skills by advanced nurse practitioners in the UK. Physical assessment skills practices are embedded in advanced nursing practice roles in the UK. There is little evidence on how these skills are used by advanced nurse practitioners in the community. Case study. A qualitative interpretative single-embedded case study of 22 participants from South of England. A framework method analysed interview data collected by the researcher between March-August 2013. Participants included nurses, doctors, nurse educators and managers. Physical assessment skills education at universities is part of a policy shift to develop a flexible workforce in the UK. Shared physical assessment practices are less to do with role substitution and more about preparing practitioners with skills that are fit for purpose. Competence, capability and performance with physical assessment skills are an expectation of advanced nursing practice. These skills are used successfully by community advanced nurse practitioners to deliver a wide range of services in response to changing patient need. The introduction of physical assessment skills education to undergraduate professional preparation would create a firm foundation to develop these skills in postgraduate education. Physical assessment education prepares nurses with the clinical competencies to carry out healthcare reforms in the UK. Shared sets of clinical assessment competencies between disciplines have better outcomes for patients. Levels of assessment competence can depend on the professional attributes of individual practitioners. Unsupportive learning cultures can hinder professional development of advanced nursing practice. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Diffusion of a nursing education innovation: nursing workforce development through promotion of RN/BSN education.

    PubMed

    Diaz Swearingen, Connie; Clarke, Pamela N; Gatua, Mary Wairimu; Sumner, Christa Cooper

    2013-01-01

    Despite state, national, and organizational objectives to increase the proportion of nurses with a bachelor's degree or higher, a majority of nurses hold an associate's degree in nursing. To address the need for a better-prepared nursing workforce in this rural state, an RN/BSN recruitment and retention project was implemented. The authors discuss the Leadership Education to Advance Practice project and its outcomes.

  1. Using Simulation to Improve Communication Skills in Nurse Practitioner Preceptors.

    PubMed

    Murray, Linda Aveni; Buckley, Kathleen

    Role transitions in nursing may lead to stress and anxiety or the novice, which can be decreased with appropriate mentoring by preceptors. However, preceptors commonly describe having a lack of mentoring skills. This project focused on nurse practitioner preceptors and their gap in mentoring communication skills when handling difficult communications with novice nurse practitioners. The use of a simulation as a means for learning communication skills was evaluated for its effect on increasing preceptor skill level in mentoring.

  2. Cooperative m-learning with nurse practitioner students.

    PubMed

    Wyatt, Tami H; Krauskopf, Patricia B; Gaylord, Nan M; Ward, Andrew; Huffstutler-Hawkins, Shelley; Goodwin, Linda

    2010-01-01

    New technologies give nurse academicians the opportunity to incorporate innovative teaching-learning strategies into the nursing curricula. Mobile technology for learning, or m-learning, has considerable potential for the nursing classroom but lacks sufficient empirical evidence to support its use. Based on Mayer's multimedia learning theory, the effect of using cooperative and interactive m-learning techniques in enhancing classroom and clinical learning was explored. The relationship between m-learning and students' learning styles was determined through a multimethod educational research study involving nurse practitioner students at two mid-Atlantic universities. During the 16-month period, nurse practitioner students and their faculty used personal digital assistants (PDAs) to participate in various m-learning activities. Findings from focus group and survey responses concluded that PDAs, specifically the Pocket PC, are useful reference tools in the clinical setting and that all students, regardless of learning style, benefited from using PDAs. It was also demonstrated that connecting students with classmates and other nurse practitioner students at distant universities created a cooperative learning community providing additional support and knowledge acquisition. The authors concluded that in order to successfully prepare nurse practitioner graduates with the skills necessary to function in the present and future health care system, nurse practitioner faculty must be creative and innovative, incorporating various revolutionary technologies into their nurse practitioner curricula.

  3. 42 CFR 405.2414 - Nurse practitioner and physician assistant services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Nurse practitioner and physician assistant services... Clinic and Federally Qualified Health Center Services § 405.2414 Nurse practitioner and physician... nurse practitioner, physician assistant, nurse midwife, or specialized nurse practitioner who...

  4. 42 CFR 405.2414 - Nurse practitioner and physician assistant services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Nurse practitioner and physician assistant services... Clinic and Federally Qualified Health Center Services § 405.2414 Nurse practitioner and physician... nurse practitioner, physician assistant, nurse midwife, or specialized nurse practitioner who...

  5. 42 CFR 405.2414 - Nurse practitioner and physician assistant services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Nurse practitioner and physician assistant services... Clinic and Federally Qualified Health Center Services § 405.2414 Nurse practitioner and physician... nurse practitioner, physician assistant, nurse midwife, or specialized nurse practitioner who...

  6. Patient Perspectives on Nurse Practitioner Care in Oncology in Canada.

    PubMed

    Stahlke, Sarah; Rawson, Krista; Pituskin, Edith

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to add to what is known about patient satisfaction with nurse practitioner (NP) care, from the perspective of breast cancer patients who were followed by an NP. This study utilized Interpretive Description, a qualitative method aimed at making sense of the experiential aspects of health care and developing practical knowledge for improved care. Nine patients receiving NP-led care in an outpatient breast cancer clinic were interviewed about their perspectives on and experiences with NP-led care. Interview transcripts were thematically analyzed. The NP role has long been regarded as a way of addressing many contemporary health system problems, although there continue to be barriers to the effective utilization of the role, including public and patient misunderstandings. This study revealed that, despite persistent traditional role understandings about health professionals, the patient participants appreciated the benefits of NP care and were highly satisfied with both the physical care and holistic support they received during the course of their treatment. Today's healthcare system is characterized by accessibility issues, unmet patient need, workforce issues, and funding pressures. This research supports and enriches what is known about the benefits and usefulness of NP-provided care from the viewpoint of those receiving the care. The findings offer guidance to NPs in the clinical setting regarding patient needs and optimal care strategies. © 2017 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  7. Pediatric nurse practitioners: roles and scope of practice.

    PubMed

    Freed, Gary L; Dunham, Kelly M; Lamarand, Kara E; Loveland-Cherry, Carol; Martyn, Kristy K

    2010-11-01

    There are ∼ 13,000 pediatric nurse practitioners (PNPs) in the United States. PNPs have been suggested as professionals who could provide care to the growing cadre of children with chronic illnesses and expand the pool of subspecialty care providers. Little is known about current roles of PNPs in primary or subspecialty care. To gain a better understanding of the roles, focus of practice, professional setting, and professional responsibilities of PNPs. We conducted a mail survey of a random national sample of 1200 PNPs stratified according to states that license NPs to practice independently. χ(2) statistics were used to assess responses from PNPs in states that allow independent practice versus those that do not and on PNPs in primary versus specialty care. The overall response rate was 82.4%. Ninety-six percent (n = 636) of the PNPs were female. More than half of all the respondents (59% [n = 391]) worked in primary care, and almost two-thirds (64% [n = 394]) did not provide care in inpatient settings. Only 11% of the PNPs in states that allow independent practice, practiced independently. The majority of PNPs currently work in primary care, and most do not have any inpatient roles. It does not seem that independent PNP practices are responsible for a significant portion of pediatric visits. For those who posit that PNPs will help alleviate the currently perceived shortage of pediatric subspecialists, our findings indicate that it likely will not occur without a significant change in the PNP workforce distribution.

  8. The Psychiatric Family Nurse Practitioner: A Collaborator in Family Practice

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, Patricia D.

    1999-01-01

    The potential of the psychiatric family nurse practitioner (Psych.F.N.P.) to contribute to family practice through physical care and mental health care exists in the here and now. This role is a synthesis of 2 advanced practice roles, the psychiatric clinical nurse specialist (Psych.C.N.S.) and family nurse practitioner (F.N.P.), both of which continue to have great utility independently. This synthesis is a practical application of concepts that have evolved to meet the changing patterns of health care delivery. At this time, dual certification as a Psych.C.N.S. and F.N.P. best reflects the broad practice expertise of the psychiatric family nurse practitioner. The experienced psychiatric family nurse practitioner provides direct care for both physical and psychological needs of patients in a family practice setting. PMID:15014701

  9. Nurse practitioner-led surgical spine consultation clinic.

    PubMed

    Sarro, Angela; Rampersaud, Yoga Raja; Lewis, Stephen

    2010-12-01

    This study is a report of a study of patient satisfaction with non-surgical nurse practitioner management of pre-selected spinal referrals. Nurse practitioners are linked to particular patient populations or specific physicians in a medical setting. In a universal healthcare delivery system, patients are often faced with long and anxiety-provoking waiting times, particularly for sub-specialized consultations such as spinal surgery. A nurse practitioner-led spine consultation ambulatory clinic was implemented at a Canadian neuroscience centre. A prospective patient satisfaction and clinical accuracy study was performed in 2008. All patients assessed by the nurse practitioner completed a post-consultation validated patient satisfaction questionnaire. All patients were reviewed with the surgeon for confirmation of diagnosis and management. A total of 177 pre-selected patients (disc-herniations, spinal stenosis, degenerative disc disease) were assessed by the nurse practitioner. Mean time from referral to nurse practitioner clinic assessment was 12 weeks (range: 9·8-21 weeks) compared with 10-52 weeks if seen in a conventional clinic. Nurse practitioner clinical diagnosis and management plan were in agreement with those of the surgeon (100% and 95% respectively). Patient satisfaction was 97% with the consultation and 94% and with examination thoroughness. Preference for a longer waiting period for direct consultation with the surgeon was 26%. Nurse practitioners can play an effective and efficient role in providing care to patients requiring specific disease management in a specialty setting. The nurse practitioner-run clinic offers accurate and earlier assessment, thus facilitating a timelier diagnosis and management plan. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  10. Comparison of the work of a nurse practitioner with that of a general practitioner

    PubMed Central

    Salisbury, Christopher J.; Tettersell, Monica J.

    1988-01-01

    The work of a nurse practitioner was compared with that of a general practitioner. Both were equally available to the same patient population over the same period. The nurse practitioner saw a similar age and sex distribution of patients to the doctor but saw different types of problems. More of the patients she saw were for followup of chronic diseases, health advice and screening measures while fewer were acutely ill. The doctor dealt with four times as many patients. The nurse practitioner managed 78% of her consultations without referral to a doctor, and 89% without resorting to prescribed drugs. There was a high level of patient satisfaction with her work and 97% of the patients who saw the nurse would choose to consult her again. The role of the nurse practitioner in our practice has developed differently from a similar post in another setting, thus emphasizing the need for flexibility when defining the role. Nurse practitioners are a valuable extra resource for the development of new areas of care, rather than a cheaper substitute for a general practitioner. PMID:3255828

  11. Hospital nursing workforce costs, wages, occupational mix, and resource utilization.

    PubMed

    Welton, John M

    2011-01-01

    : The objective of the study was to better understand how hospitals use different types of RNs, LPNs, and nurse aides in proprietary (for-profit), nonprofit, and government-owned hospitals and to estimate the wages, cost, and intensity of nursing care using a national data set. : This is a cross-sectional observational study of 3,129 acute care hospitals in all 50 states and District of Columbia using data from the 2008 Occupational Mix Survey administered by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS). Nursing skill mix, hours, and labor costs were combined with other CMS hospital descriptive data, including type of hospital ownership, urban or rural location, hospital beds, and case-mix index. : RN labor costs make up 25.5% of all hospital expenditures annually, and all nursing labor costs represent 30.1%, which is nearly a quarter trillion dollars ($216.7 billion) per year for inpatient nursing care. On average, proprietary hospitals employ 1.3 RNs per bed and 1.9 nursing personnel per bed in urban hospitals compared with 1.7 RNs per bed and 2.3 nursing personnel per bed for nonprofit and government-owned hospitals (P < .05). States with higher ratios of RN compared with LPN licenses used fewer LPNs in the inpatient setting. : The findings from this study can be helpful in comparing nursing care across different types of hospitals, ownership, and geographic locations and used as a benchmark for future nursing workforce needs and costs.

  12. Workforce utilization of visible and linguistic minorities in Canadian nursing.

    PubMed

    Premji, Stephanie; Etowa, Josephine B

    2014-01-01

    Aim  This study seeks to develop a diversity profile of the nursing workforce in Canada and its major cities. Background  There is ample evidence of ethnic and linguistic segregation in the Canadian labour market. However, it is unknown if there is equitable representation of visible and linguistic minorities in nursing professions. Methods  We cross-tabulated aggregate data from Statistics Canada's 2006 Census. Analyses examined the distribution of visible and linguistic minorities, including visible minority sub-groups, among health managers, head nurses, registered nurses, licensed nurses and nurse aides for Canada and major cities as well as by gender. Results  In Canada and its major cities, a pyramidal structure was found whereby visible and linguistic minorities, women in particular, were under-represented in managerial positions and over-represented in lower ranking positions. Blacks and Filipinos were generally well represented across nursing professions; however, other visible minority sub-groups lacked representation. Conclusions  Diversity initiatives at all levels can play a role in promoting better access to and quality of care for minority populations through the increased cultural and linguistic competence of care providers and organizations. Implications for Nursing Management  Efforts to increase diversity in nursing need to be accompanied by commitment and resources to effectively manage diversity within organizations. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Engaging a wider public health workforce for the future: a public health practitioner in residence approach.

    PubMed

    Pilkington, P; Marco, E; Grant, M; Orme, J

    2013-05-01

    This paper outlines and assesses a project that sought to use a studio residency (a public health practitioner in residence) as a vehicle to introduce public health issues and concepts into the curricula of a studio cohort of fifth and sixth year architecture students. The practitioner delivered workshops, group tutorials and one-to-one guidance on individual design projects whose aim was to improve the health and well-being of the local population. Students reported being enthused by the practitioner and developed a broader understanding of their role as future architects in the promotion and protection of the health of the public. The public health practitioner in residence model may offer an exciting way of educating and inspiring the future wider public health workforce in the built environment design focused professions. Such an approach could transform the way in which such professionals construct their societal role in terms of their future impact on population health and their contribution as members of the wider public health workforce. Copyright © 2013 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Ambulatory care centers: a unique opportunity for nurse practitioners.

    PubMed

    Henne, S J; Warner, N E; Frank, K J

    1988-10-01

    Nurse practitioners continue to struggle to find avenues for professional fulfillment. Urgent care or ambulatory care centers (ACCs) may, because of their need to respond to consumer demands for more comprehensive services, offer nurse practitioners a unique opportunity to establish productive primary care practices based on the concepts of total patient care. A model for such a practice has operated successfully since 1983, establishing that both professional and business success can result from the collaborative efforts of nurse practitioners and physicians in an ACC setting.

  15. Defining the unique role of the specialist district nurse practitioner.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Anne; Latham, Dinah; Levermore, Joy

    2007-10-01

    Due to the reorganization of primary care trusts across the country, certain trusts proposed a reduction in the specialist district nurse practitioner numbers in favour of less qualified community nurses and health care assistants. Such proposals in one PCT were blocked, partly in response to documentation compiled by practitioners at the sharp end of nursing practice. With the new agenda of practice based commissioning, it is imperative that commissioners and management alike are aware of the scope of specialist district nurse practitioners. This is the first of a series of articles looking at specific case histories where the role of the district nurse is highlighted. It is the intention to stress the importance of the clinical expertise and confidence required by the district nurse to care for patients with complex needs in the community.

  16. What do nurse practitioners do? Analysis of a skills survey of nurse practitioners.

    PubMed

    Laustsen, Gary

    2013-01-01

    To report findings from a survey, analysis, and evaluation of the frequency and criticality of clinical skills and procedures (CSPs) used by nurse practitioners (NPs). In addition, data regarding NP demographic, geographic, and educational preparation were also obtained. Participants were a convenience sample of 452 NPs in Oregon (31% response rate). Findings point to the importance of assessing both frequency and criticality of practice skills. Demographic and geographic data reflected significant dichotomies between urban and rural practice. Rural NPs face challenges of providing care with more distant physician specialists and reported the use of a greater number of CSPs. A majority of participants reported learning most of the CSPs used in practice outside of their NP educational programs. The frequency and criticality of CSPs utilized in practice are both important considerations for NP clinicians and educators. NPs planning to practice in rural areas may need broader exposure and training in CSPs. An understanding of CSPs used by NPs may better inform administrative, reimbursement, licensure, and certification issues for advanced practice nursing. NP clinicians and faculty involved in NP education should seek to promote improved congruence between the CSPs taught in programs and those used in clinical practice. ©2012 The Author(s) Journal compilation ©2012 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  17. Nurse practitioner job satisfaction: looking for successful outcomes.

    PubMed

    Pasarón, Raquel

    2013-09-01

    To examine overall job satisfaction and its association with extrinsic and intrinsic characteristics of job satisfaction among nurse practitioners at the chosen practice site. The objectives were to identify relevant retention and recruitment strategies, from the nurse practitioners perspective, by examining (1) what role aspects are most satisfying, and (2) approaches for successful, professional development and integration in the role. Supportive professional practice environments are particularly important to nurses' satisfaction with their work and the quality of patient care provided. Hence, research that examines nurse practitioners practice implications and barriers in today's healthcare system is essential. A descriptive-correlational design using survey methodology. A nonprobability sample of convenience was used. The outcome measures were: The Misener Nurse Practitioner Job Satisfaction Scale and two investigator-developed surveys. Participants expressed dissatisfaction with professional and monetary recognition, assertive influence, administrative support and collegial relationships. Interaction of subscale factors on overall job satisfaction and demographic survey findings has important implications for health administrators and nurse practitioners in similar organisations. Stakeholders in healthcare milieus need to be fully engaged in the redesign of the American healthcare system heeding the recommendations of the Institute of Medicine to provide safer health systems to the public. By doing this, issues related to frustration by nurse practitioners related to job satisfaction will be addressed. The need for cooperation, participation, collaboration and instrumental communication are essential in the delivery of safe, quality patient care. A better understanding of intrinsic professional rewards needs to be learned by nurse practitioners who want to seek professional satisfaction and engage in the survival and growth of the profession. Nurse

  18. An Analysis of Nursing Education in Ghana: Priorities for Scaling-up the Nursing Workforce

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Sue Anne; Rominski, Sarah; Bam, Victoria; Donkor, Ernestina; Lori, Jody

    2012-01-01

    The cross-sectional study sought to describe the strengths, challenges and current status of baccalaureate nursing education in Ghana, using a descriptive design. The World Health Organization Global Standards for the Initial Education of Nurses and Midwives standards were used as the organizing framework, with baseline data on the status of nursing education from two state funded universities in Ghana presented. A serious shortage of qualified faculty was identified, along with the need for significant upgrading to the existing infrastructure. Additionally, the number of qualified applicants far exceeds the available training slots. Faculty and infrastructure shortages are common issues in nursing education and workforce expansion, however in low resource countries such as Ghana, these issues are compounded by high rates of preventable disease and injury. An understanding of the strengths and challenges of nursing education in Ghana can inform the development of strategies for nursing workforce expansion for other low resource countries. PMID:23347003

  19. Analysis of nursing education in Ghana: Priorities for scaling-up the nursing workforce.

    PubMed

    Bell, Sue Anne; Rominski, Sarah; Bam, Victoria; Donkor, Ernestina; Lori, Jody

    2013-06-01

    In this cross-sectional study, the strengths, challenges and current status of baccalaureate nursing education in Ghana were described using a descriptive design. The World Health Organization Global Standards for the Initial Education of Nurses and Midwives were used as the organizing framework, with baseline data on the status of nursing education from two state-funded universities in Ghana presented. A serious shortage of qualified faculty was identified, along with the need for significant upgrading to the existing infrastructure. Additionally, the number of qualified applicants far exceeds the available training slots. Faculty and infrastructure shortages are common issues in nursing education and workforce expansion; however, in low-resource countries, such as Ghana, these issues are compounded by high rates of preventable disease and injury. An understanding of the strengths and challenges of nursing education in Ghana can inform the development of strategies for nursing workforce expansion for other low-resource countries. © 2013 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  20. Global nurse leader perspectives on health systems and workforce challenges.

    PubMed

    Gantz, Nancy Rollins; Sherman, Rose; Jasper, Melanie; Choo, Chua Gek; Herrin-Griffith, Donna; Harris, Kathy

    2012-05-01

    As part of the 2011 annual American Organization of Nurse Executives conference held in San Diego, California, a session was presented that focused on nursing workforce and health systems challenges from a global perspective. This article includes content addressed during the session representing nurse leader perspectives from the UK, Singapore and the USA. Recent events in global economic markets have highlighted the interdependence of countries. There is now a global focus on health-care costs and quality as government leaders struggle to reduce budgets and remain solvent. Finding solutions to these complex problems requires that nurse leaders adopt more of a world view and network with one another as they look for best practices and creative strategies. Nursing leadership challenges such as staffing, competency development, ageing populations, reduced health-care funding and maintaining quality are now common global problems. There is a need for innovation in nursing practice to accommodate the enormous challenges facing nursing's future. Opportunities on an international scale for nurse leaders to have dialogue and network, such as the conference presentation discussed in this article, will become increasingly more important to facilitate the development of innovative leadership strategies. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  1. 42 CFR 405.520 - Payment for a physician assistant's, nurse practitioner's, and clinical nurse specialists...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Payment for a physician assistant's, nurse practitioner's, and clinical nurse specialists' services and services furnished incident to their professional... for Determining Reasonable Charges § 405.520 Payment for a physician assistant's, nurse practitioner's...

  2. Nurse practitioner prescribing practice in Australia.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Sandra V; Cashin, Andrew; Buckley, Thomas; Newman, Claire

    2010-03-01

    In Australia, nurse practitioner (NP) services are a relatively new development with little being known about the prescribing practices of Australian NPs. The aim of this study was to conduct the first national study of Australian NP prescribing practices. Focus groups were conducted to inform construction of an electronic survey that was available for all NPs and NP candidates across Australia to complete. Seventy-two percent of authorized NPs and 39% of NP candidates reported that their practice involved prescribing pharmaceutical agents. Of those respondents who did prescribe during the course of their practice, 59% (n = 29) of the authorized NPs and 64% (n = 16) of the NP candidates reported that they usually prescribe at least once a day. The results from this study suggest that fewer Australian NPs prescribe than do NPs in the United States, and those who do prescribe do so less frequently. The current health policy framework in Australia while creating space for the role of the NP is restricting the role's utility and potential contribution to the health care of Australians.

  3. Tort reform: an issue for nurse practitioners.

    PubMed

    Klutz, Diane L

    2004-02-01

    To inform nurse practitioners (NPs) about the issues related to tort reform and its relationship to malpractice insurance costs. Current journals, newspapers, professional newsletters, and Internet sites. NPs are paying more for their malpractice premiums, and many are losing their places of employment as clinics close due to the increased cost of premiums. One method proposed for curbing the flow of monies spent on premiums and litigation is tort law reform. California serves as an example; its Medical Injury Compensation Reform Act (MICRA) tort reform law was passed 25 years ago, and it has maintained stable malpractice premiums. Other states have proposed similar laws, but some have not had similar success. To curb litigation costs, not only should tort laws be reformed, but NPs and physicians should keep abreast of current practice standards in order to provide quality medical care. Like physicians, NPs are affected directly by tort laws. These laws hold NPs accountable at the same level as physicians. In addition, many states limit NPs' practice to delegation of authority by a physician. Liability is therefore transferred from the NP to the physician and vice versa in cases of injury or wrongful act. In addition, many NPs are finding it increasingly difficult to locate insurers who will write policies for medical liability.

  4. The Business Management Preceptorship within the Nurse Practitioner Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wing, Donna Marie

    1998-01-01

    A nurse practitioner business preceptorship provides students with knowledge of basic business, accounting, finance, economics, marketing, and reimbursement. A lack of qualified faculty can be offset with adjunct business faculty. Selection of placement sites should provide challenging management experiences. (SK)

  5. The evolving role of the nurse practitioner in neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Rimel, R W; Langfitt, T W

    1980-12-01

    The authors examine the many important roles for the nurse practitioner in neurosurgery, including patient care in academic departments and private practice, and research and scholarship. The responsibilities of nurse practitioners in a hospital can be varied: they may take some responsibility for all patients on the neurosurgery service, or their assignment may be more specific, such as to the intensive care unit; or they may be assigned to all patients with a specified neurosurgical disorder, such as head injury of intractable pain. Nurse practitioners can become coordinators of clinical research programs, with responsibility for collecting and collating the data and assisting in data analysis and manuscript preparation. Detailed clinical protocols must be developed for nurse practitioners, and those protocols then become the basis for their employment and legal status. Licensure requirements vary greatly among states, and are continuing to change.

  6. The Business Management Preceptorship within the Nurse Practitioner Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wing, Donna Marie

    1998-01-01

    A nurse practitioner business preceptorship provides students with knowledge of basic business, accounting, finance, economics, marketing, and reimbursement. A lack of qualified faculty can be offset with adjunct business faculty. Selection of placement sites should provide challenging management experiences. (SK)

  7. A New Teacher in Medical Education: The Family Nurse Practitioner

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrus, Len Hughes; And Others

    1977-01-01

    At the University of California, Davis, family nurse practitioners who are faculty members in the Department of Family Practice have proven to be effective teachers of medical students and family practice residents. (Author/LBH)

  8. Development and psychometric testing of the Nurse Practitioner Primary Care Organizational Climate Questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Poghosyan, Lusine; Nannini, Angela; Finkelstein, Stacey R; Mason, Emanuel; Shaffer, Jonathan A

    2013-01-01

    Policy makers and healthcare organizations are calling for expansion of the nurse practitioner (NP) workforce in primary care settings to assure timely access and high-quality care for the American public. However, many barriers, including those at the organizational level, exist that may undermine NP workforce expansion and their optimal utilization in primary care. This study developed a new NP-specific survey instrument, Nurse Practitioner Primary Care Organizational Climate Questionnaire (NP-PCOCQ), to measure organizational climate in primary care settings and conducted its psychometric testing. Using instrument development design, the organizational climate domain pertinent for primary care NPs was identified. Items were generated from the evidence and qualitative data. Face and content validity were established through two expert meetings. Content validity index was computed. The 86-item pool was reduced to 55 items, which was pilot tested with 81 NPs using mailed surveys and then field-tested with 278 NPs in New York State. SPSS 18 and Mplus software were used for item analysis, reliability testing, and maximum likelihood exploratory factor analysis. Nurse Practitioner Primary Care Organizational Climate Questionnaire had face and content validity. The content validity index was .90. Twenty-nine items loaded on four subscale factors: professional visibility, NP-administration relations, NP-physician relations, and independent practice and support. The subscales had high internal consistency reliability. Cronbach's alphas ranged from.87 to .95. Having a strong instrument is important to promote future research. Also, administrators can use it to assess organizational climate in their clinics and propose interventions to improve it, thus promoting NP practice and the expansion of NP workforce.

  9. The role of internationally educated nurses in a quality, safe workforce.

    PubMed

    D Sherwood, Gwen; Shaffer, Franklin A

    2014-01-01

    Migration and globalization of the nursing workforce affect source countries and destination countries. Policies and regulations governing the movement of nurses from one country to another safeguard the public by ensuring educational comparability and competence. The global movement of nurses and other health care workers calls for quality and safety competencies that meet standards such as those defined by the Institute of Medicine. This article examines nurse migration and employment of internationally educated nurses (IENs) in the context of supporting and maintaining safe, quality patient care environments. Migration to the United States is featured as an exemplar to consider the following key factors: the impact of nurse migration on the nursing workforce; issues in determining educational comparability of nursing programs between countries; quality and safety concerns in transitioning IENs into the workforce; and strategies for helping IENs transition as safe, qualified members of the nursing workforce in the destination country. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Primary Care Nurse Practitioner Practice Characteristics: Barriers and Opportunities for Interprofessional Teamwork.

    PubMed

    Poghosyan, Lusine; Norful, Allison A; Martsolf, Grant R

    Developing team-based care models and expanding nurse practitioner (NP) workforce in primary care are recommended by policy makers to meet demand. Little is known how to promote interprofessional teamwork. Using a mixed-methods design, we analyzed qualitative interview and quantitative survey data from primary care NPs to explore practice characteristics important for teamwork. The Interprofessional Teamwork for Health and Social Care Framework guided the study. We identified NP-physician and NP-administration relationships; organizational support and governance; time and space for teamwork; and regulations and economic impact as important. Practice and policy change addressing these factors is needed for effective interprofessional teamwork.

  11. The Acute Care Nurse Practitioner: challenging existing boundaries of emergency nurses in the United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    Norris, Tracey; Melby, Vidar

    2006-03-01

    This study explored the opinions of nurses and doctors working in emergency departments towards the development of the Acute Care Nurse Practitioner service in the United Kingdom. Studies carried out in the United States and Canada suggest that the Acute Care Nurse Practitioner can have a positive impact on the critically ill or injured patients' experiences in the emergency department. This role is well developed in the United States and Canada, but is still in its infancy in the United Kingdom. A descriptive, exploratory design incorporating questionnaires (n = 98) and semi-structured interviews (n = 6) was employed. The sample included nurses and doctors from seven emergency departments and minor injury units. Respondents felt it was important for the Acute Care Nurse Practitioner to have obtained a specialist nurse practitioner qualification and that the Acute Care Nurse Practitioner should retain a clinical remit. While participants seemed comfortable with nurses undertaking traditional advanced skills such as suturing, reluctance was displayed with other advanced skills such as needle thoracocentesis. Three main themes were identified from the interviews: inter-professional conflict, autonomy and the need for the Acute Care Nurse Practitioner. Doctors were reluctant to allow nurses to practise certain additional advanced skills and difficulties appear to be centred on the autonomy and other associated inter-professional conflicts with the role of the Acute Care Nurse Practitioner. Nurses and doctors identified a need for the Acute Care Nurse Practitioner, but the blurring of boundaries between doctors and nurses can result in inter-professional conflict unless this is addressed prior to the introduction of such advanced practitioners. Relevance to clinical practice. As the role of the emergency nurse diversifies and expands, this study re-affirms the importance of inter-professional collaboration when seeking approval for role expansions in nursing.

  12. Supplementing Intensivist Staffing With Nurse Practitioners: Literature Review.

    PubMed

    White, Tracie; Kokiousis, Justin; Ensminger, Stephanie; Shirey, Maria

    2017-01-01

    In the United States, providing health care to critically ill patients is a challenge. An increase in patients older than 65 years, a decrease in critical care physicians, and a decrease in work hours for residents cause intensivist staffing issues. In this article, use of nurse practictioners to fill the intensive care unit intensivist staffing gap is assessed and evidence-based recommendations are identified to better incorporate nurse practitioners as part of intensive care unit intensivist staffing. The literature reveals that when nurse practitioners are part of a staffing model, outcomes are either positively impacted or no different from physician outcomes. However, successfully integrating nurse practitioners into an intensive care unit team is not adequately discussed in the literature. This gap is addressed and 3 mechanisms to integrate nurse practitioners into the intensive care unit are identified: (1) use of a multidisciplinary staffing model, (2) completion of onboarding programs, and (3) evaluation of nurse practitioner productivity. ©2017 American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

  13. Cultural similarity, cultural competence, and nurse workforce diversity.

    PubMed

    McGinnis, Sandra L; Brush, Barbara L; Moore, Jean

    2010-11-01

    Proponents of health workforce diversity argue that increasing the number of minority health care providers will enhance cultural similarity between patients and providers as well as the health system's capacity to provide culturally competent care. Measuring cultural similarity has been difficult, however, given that current benchmarks of workforce diversity categorize health workers by major racial/ethnic classifications rather than by cultural measures. This study examined the use of national racial/ethnic categories in both patient and registered nurse (RN) populations and found them to be a poor indicator of cultural similarity. Rather, we found that cultural similarity between RN and patient populations needs to be established at the level of local labor markets and broadened to include other cultural parameters such as country of origin, primary language, and self-identified ancestry. Only then can the relationship between cultural similarity and cultural competence be accurately determined and its outcomes measured.

  14. Pilot survey of NICU nurses' interest in the neonatal nurse practitioner role.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Lynn B; Vargo, Lyn E; Reavey, Daphne A; Hunter, Kim S

    2005-02-01

    This descriptive, qualitative pilot study explored the interest and perceptions of neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) nurses regarding the neonatal nurse practitioner (NNP) role. Motivating factors to become an NNP, challenges facing NNPs, and rewards of the NNP role from the perspectives of NICU nurses were explored. The convenience sample was obtained using 2 survey techniques. The first sample group included nurses who were employed in Level III NICUs located within 2 major Midwestern cities. In order to confirm the data and to expand the scope, the second sample group was recruited from NICU nurses who were attending a regional educational conference. All participants were currently employed NICU nurses and were therefore potential NNP students. Combining the participants of both enrollment techniques resulted in a potential of 696 subjects. A simple self-administered survey was used to collect data. Narrative data were qualitatively analyzed. Demographic data and categorical items were quantified. This study achieved a total 30% response rate (n = 209). Of the total participants, only 32% of Level III NICU nurses were interested in becoming an NNP. Analysis of the data revealed 6 major categories (themes) of reasons why nurses were not interested in the NNP role. The themes most often mentioned by the participants were (1) obligations to family and/or work (46%) and (2) too much responsibility in the NNP role (30%). The data also revealed several different rewards and challenges for those in the NNP role as well as factors that may motivate nurses to become an NNP. Given the current NNP shortage, an increase in the supply of NNPs for the workforce is imperative. Current enrollment in NNP academic programs does not appear to be meeting the demand. Exploring the factors that influence enrollment in NNP programs from the perspective of potential NNP students is the first step towards increasing the supply of NNPs. The majority of participants were not interested

  15. Qualitative Distinctions and Similarities in the Practice of Clinical Nurse Specialists and Nurse Practitioners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fenton, Mary V.; Brykczynski, Karen A.

    1993-01-01

    A comparison of results of two studies regarding the actual practice of clinical nurse specialists and nurse practitioners revealed a shared core of advanced practice competencies as well as distinct differences between practice roles. (JOW)

  16. Toward a Narrative-Centered Curriculum for Nurse Practitioners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swenson, Melinda M.; Sims, Sharon L.

    2000-01-01

    A narrative-centered nurse practitioner curriculum combines case study analysis, problem-based learning, and a teaching philosophy focused on narrative pedagogy and interpretive research. The curriculum challenges the medical model and develops clinical reasoning skills as well as skills for individualized nursing care. (SK)

  17. A joint course for general practitioner and practice nurse trainers.

    PubMed Central

    Bolden, K J; Lewis, A P

    1990-01-01

    An experimental multidisciplinary course for prospective general practitioner and practice nurse trainers is described. Factual knowledge and attitudes were measured before and after the course and some of the changes measured emphasized the importance of multidisciplinary training. The ideas generated by the group of nurse trainers in terms of their future professional development were identified. PMID:2265007

  18. Reiki therapy: the benefits to a nurse/Reiki practitioner.

    PubMed

    Whelan, Kathleen M; Wishnia, Gracie S

    2003-01-01

    This study evaluates how nurses who gave Reiki therapy perceived the benefit of this therapy on their clients and on themselves concurrently as providers of the therapy. As an adjunct, the study's purpose was to enhance the understanding and credibility of nurse/Reiki practitioners.

  19. Visualizing nursing workforce distribution: policy evaluation using geographic information systems.

    PubMed

    Courtney, Karen L

    2005-12-01

    Health services literature suggests that geographic information systems (GIS) are useful policy evaluation tools when policy success is dependent on location. Nursing workforce distribution is an inherently local issue and nursing shortages present serious concerns for local, state and national governments. In 1991, Missouri enacted a nurse recruitment and retention policy targeting underserved (HPSA-designated) counties. Following Institutional Review Board approval, policy effectiveness was explored using a combination of GIS data visualization, spatial and classic statistics. Results of both data visualization and statistical methods do not demonstrate an expected trend of decreasing group differences between HPSA and non-HPSA-designated counties over time. Only two of the five time periods studied had significant group differences. Between 1993 and 1995, the loss in nurse to population ratios in HPSA counties was significant (U=1020, p<0.001); however, between 1999 and 2001, the growth in nurse to population ratio changes in HPSA counties was significant (U=1032, p=0.001). The GIS data visualization and statistical techniques performed suggest that current policy definitions of underserved areas may not be effective in defining areas of nursing shortages and the existing policy implementation may not be achieving the stated goals.

  20. Specialty distribution of physician assistants and nurse practitioners in North Carolina.

    PubMed

    Fraher, Erin P; Morgan, Perri; Johnson, Anna

    2016-04-01

    Physician workforce projections often include scenarios that forecast physician shortages under different assumptions about the deployment of physician assistants (PAs) and nurse practitioners (NPs). These scenarios generally assume that PAs and NPs are an interchangeable resource and that their specialty distributions do not change over time. This study investigated changes in PA and NP specialty distribution in North Carolina between 1997 and 2013. The data show that over the study period, PAs and NPs practiced in a wide range of specialties, but each profession had a specific pattern. The proportion of PAs-but not NPs-reporting practice in primary care dropped significantly. PAs were more likely than NPs to report practice in urgent care, emergency medicine, and surgical subspecialties. Physician workforce models need to account for the different and changing specialization trends of NPs and PAs.

  1. Optimizing full scope of practice for nurse practitioners in primary care: A proposed conceptual model.

    PubMed

    Poghosyan, Lusine; Boyd, Donald R; Clarke, Sean P

    2016-01-01

    Nurse practitioners (NPs), if utilized to their optimal potential, could play a key role in meeting the growing demand for primary care. The purpose of this study was to propose a comprehensive model for maximizing NP contributions to primary care which includes the factors affecting NP care and patient outcomes and explains their interrelated impact. We synthesized the results of the published literature to develop a model, which emphasizes NP scope of practice regulations, institutional policies, NP practice environment, and NP workforce outcomes as determinants of NP care and patient outcomes. Our model provides a framework to help explain how variations in scope of practice regulations at the state-level and institutional policies within organizations directly and indirectly influence the practice environment of NPs, NP workforce outcomes, and patient care and outcomes. Aligning policy change, organizational innovations, and future research are critical to NP optimal utilization and patient care and outcomes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Achieving workforce growth in UK nursing: policy options and implications.

    PubMed

    Buchan, James

    2009-01-01

    This paper examines how the National Health Service (NHS) in the UK achieved significant nursing workforce growth during the period between 2000 and 2006 and discusses the policy implications of the methods used to achieve this staffing growth. Data analysis, literature review and policy analysis. NHS nurse staffing growth was approximately 25% over the period 1997-2007, with most growth occurring in the years between 1999 and 2005. Whilst increases in intakes to home-based pre-registration education was a factor in achieving growth, the pace and level of growth which occurred was only possible by using active international recruitment, which was adopted as a deliberate national policy. The numbers of nurses and midwives entering the UK from other countries increased rapidly from 1999 onwards, to a peak in 2002, and then reduced markedly in the period from 2005 onwards. The policy of supporting international recruitment shifted rapidly in late 2005/2006 when financial difficulties hit the NHS and staffing growth was curtailed. Active international recruitment can contribute to health sector staffing growth, assuming the recruiting country has the resources to recruit and can tap into international markets, but it may not be effective in addressing all types of skills shortages. If it is not well linked to other components of workforce planning it may cause difficulties of over expansion, as well as raising broader issues of the ethics and impact.

  3. The advance nurse practitioner in critical care: a workload evaluation.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Audrey; Carberry, Martin

    2015-03-01

    The Advanced Nurse Practitioner in Critical Care role was developed to support the critical care team by undertaking specific roles traditionally associated with medical staff in the intensive care unit and high dependency unit. The rationale for the evaluation was to establish the specific tasks undertaken and scope of workload of these newly created posts. To report on an evaluation of the specific activities, workload and patterns of prescribing of advanced nursing practice posts within a critical care settings A data collection form was designed to capture clinically and patient-related activities of these post-holders. Data from 1 week were recorded on one post-holder and subsequently analysed. During the evaluation the nurse practitioners worked with the consultant anaesthetist. Data were entered into Microsoft Excel and analysed using descriptive statistics. The intensive care and high dependency unit ward round attributed to 46% of the nurse practitioners weekly activity and mainly consisted of patient assessments and prescribing. The rest of the time was mainly split between documentation and unsupervised patient assessments. The nurse practitioners contributed to the majority of interventions traditionally performed by anaesthetic trainees. Independent patient assessment was highlighted as a significant part of that workload (12%). The evaluation also highlighted the broad nature required of nurse practitioner prescribing and thus reinforced the strategic decision not to introduce a restricted formulary. Advanced nurse practitioners in critical care effectively carried out the traditional medical tasks in which they were trained. As already experienced nurses with new enhanced skills they successfully contributed to and enhanced the delivery of care to the critically ill. © 2014 British Association of Critical Care Nurses.

  4. International family-planning training for nurse practitioners.

    PubMed

    Vansintejan, G A; Purdy, P J

    1986-01-01

    Since the mid-1970s, the Margaret Sanger Center of Planned Parenthood of New York City has prepared nurses and nurse midwives from less developed countries to be family-planning nurse practitioners. These nurse practitioners then provide services to patients, train other staff, and manage integrated family-planning clinics. More than 120 nurses and nurse midwives have arrived in groups of 10 at the Sanger Center, with 72 attending since 1981. Each course lasts 10 weeks. The core curriculum provides trainees with skills in women's health care including contraception, in training and advocacy, and in management of clinics. Whether, in the current period of scarce resources, cross-cultural training programs of this type remain a worthwhile investment, and if so, which of their components are most important to this success, is assessed.

  5. Developing ambulatory care clinics: nurse practitioners as primary providers.

    PubMed

    Lamper-Linden, C; Goetz-Kulas, J; Lake, R

    1983-12-01

    While hospitals evaluate ambulatory clinics as a revenue-generating service alternative, nursing executives develop new areas for nursing practice in nurse-managed clinics. The authors describe the five-year growth of a nurse-managed ambulatory clinic providing primary health care to those aged 55 and older. The discussion explains nurse practitioner leadership and practice, and accountability between professions. The concept and structure of services and marketing strategies are elated to the people served. Financial feasibility, cost containment, and other factors demonstrate the clinic's contribution to its sponsoring hospital.

  6. The role of the nurse practitioner in psychiatric/mental health nursing: exploring consumer satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Wortans, J; Happell, B; Johnstone, H

    2006-02-01

    There is a substantial body of literature pertaining to the role of the nurse practitioner. Research directed towards consumer satisfaction suggests that the care provided by nurse practitioners is perceived as at least equal to that provided by a medical practitioner. However, there is a paucity of literature examining the nurse practitioner role in the psychiatric/mental health field. An evaluation of a Nurse Practitioner demonstration model has recently been undertaken in the Crisis, Assessment and Treatment Team in Victoria, Australia. This article presents the findings of a qualitative, exploratory study. Individual interviews were conducted with consumers (n = 7) who had received care and treatment provided by the nurse practitioner candidate. Data analysis revealed two main themes: the quality of the service provided, and the unique role of the nurse. The findings supported the available literature in articulating the specific aspects of the nurse practitioner role that are favourably perceived by consumers of services. This study contributes to the limited body of knowledge in the psychiatric/mental health nursing field and specifically emphasizes the importance of the relationship between nurse practitioner and consumer in facilitating the provision of effective care and treatment.

  7. Remote nursing certified practice: viewing nursing and nurse practitioner practice through a social justice lens.

    PubMed

    Tarlier, Denise S; Browne, Annette J

    2011-06-01

    Remote Nursing Certified Practice (RNCP) was introduced in 2010 to regulate nursing practice in remote, largely First Nations communities in British Columbia, Canada. These are communities that often experience profound health and health-care inequities. Typically nurses are the main health-care providers. Using a critical social justice lens, the authors explore the clinical and ethical implications of RNCP in terms of access to equitable, high-quality primary health care.They examine the fit between the level and scope of health services provided by registered nurses working under RNCP and the health needs of remote First Nations communities. In doing so, they draw comparisons between nurse practitioners (NPs) and outpost nurses working in NP roles who historically were employed to provide health care in these communities.The authors conclude by calling for nursing regulations that support equitable, high-quality primary care for all British Columbians.

  8. Physician Assistants and Nurse Practitioners in Rural Washington Emergency Departments.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Scott C; Hooker, Roderick S

    2016-06-01

    One role of physician assistants (PAs) and nurse practitioners (NPs) is to meet the growing demand for access to rural health care. Critical Access Hospitals, those with less than 25 beds, are usually located in rural communities, often providing continuity of care that clinics cannot deliver. Because little is known about staffing in these small hospital emergency departments, an exploratory study was undertaken using a mixed-methods approach. In Washington State, 18 of the 39 Critical Access Hospitals staff their emergency departments with PAs and NPs. Utilization data were collected through structured interviews by phone or in person on site. Most PAs and NPs lived within the community and staffing tended to be either 24 hours in-house or short notice if they lived or worked nearby. Emergency department visits ranged from 200 to 25,000 per year. All sites were designated level V or IV trauma centers and often managed cardiac events, significant injuries and, in some larger settings, obstetrics. In most instances, PAs were the sole providers in the emergency departments, albeit with physician backup and emergency medical technician support if a surge of emergency cases arose. Two-thirds of the PAs had graduated within the last 5 years. Most preferred the autonomy of the emergency department role and all expressed job satisfaction. Geographically, the more remote a Washington State Critical Access Hospital is, the more likely it will be staffed by PAs/NPs. The diverse utilization of semiautonomous PAs and NPs and their rise in rural hospital employment is a new workforce observation that requires broader investigation.

  9. The acute care nurse practitioner in collaborative practice.

    PubMed

    Buchanan, L

    1996-01-01

    Nurse-physician relationships remain, for the most part, hierarchical in nature. A hierarchical structure allows the person at the top, most notably the physician, the highest level of authority and power for decision making. Other health care providers are delegated various tasks related to the medical plan of care. One role of nonmedical health care providers, including nurses, is to support the medical plan of care and increase the productivity of physicians. Medical centers have house staff, usually interns and residents, who work collaboratively with the attending physicians in care delivery. At one medical center, a shortage of medical house staff for internal medicine prompted the development and evaluation of an alternative service. The alternative service utilized master prepared, certified nurse practitioners on a nonteaching service to provide care for selected types of medical patients. Physicians consulted with nurse practitioners, but retained decision-making authority concerning patient admission to the service. This paper describes the development and evaluation of an alternative service based on a collaborative practice model and the role of nurse practitioners working under such a model. Discussion includes suggestions for process guideline development for organizations that want to improve collaborative practice relationships between unit nursing staff, nurse practitioners, and physicians.

  10. Nurse practitioners' perceptions and participation in pharmaceutical marketing.

    PubMed

    Crigger, Nancy; Barnes, Kristen; Junko, Autumn; Rahal, Sarah; Sheek, Casey

    2009-03-01

    This paper reports on a study conducted to describe family nurse practitioners' perceptions towards and participation in pharmaceutical marketing and to explore the relationships among related variables. The pharmaceutical industry's intense global marketing strategies have resulted in widespread concern in healthcare professionals and professional groups, sectors of the public in many countries, and in the World Health Organization. Research on healthcare providers' participation in pharmaceutical marketing indicates that these relationships are conflicts of interests and compromise healthcare providers' prescribing practices and trust. Nursing, as a discipline, appears to be slow to address the impact of pharmaceutical marketing on nursing practice. Questionnaires about perceptions and participation in pharmaceutical marketing were completed by a random sample of 84 licensed family nurse practitioners in the United States of America in 2007. Family nurse practitioners viewed pharmaceutical company marketing uncritically as educational and beneficial. They also perceived other providers but not themselves as influenced by pharmaceutical marketing. The findings supported those found in previous research with nurses and physicians. Lack of education, participation in marketing and psychological and social responses may impede family nurse practitioners' ability to respond critically and appropriately to marketing strategies and the conflict of interest it creates.

  11. Nurse Practitioners and the Expanded Role of the Nurse: A Bibliography. Nurse Planning Information Series No. 5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Health Resources Administration (DHEW/PHS), Hyattsville, MD. Div. of Nursing.

    This bibliography brings together much of the literature prepared by individuals, organizations, and agencies on nurse practitioners and the expanded role of the nurse. Section I on expanded role includes citations and abstracts to documents that provide general information about the nurse practitioner's role and specific information on the…

  12. A regional approach to the education of nurse practitioner candidates to meet the health needs of rural Australians.

    PubMed

    Francis, Karen; Boyd, Michal; Latham, Heather; Anderson, Judith; Bradley, Angela; Manners, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Local health services expressed interest in supporting a nurse practitioner (NP) program specifically designed for rural practice environments. To develop and deliver a generalist NP program that prepares candidates for practice in rural contexts. The Master of Clinical Nursing (Nurse Practitioner) program was designed with an understanding of the burden of disease impacting on rural Australians, application of the national health priorities, the Australian Government's refocus on preventative health care and rural health workforce shortages. This program offers nurses who work in rural and remote settings an opportunity to advance their careers. Increasing the numbers of rural NPs will improve rural populations access to healthcare and potentially improve health outcomes. This program will equip those seeking endorsement as a NP to effectively work in rural contexts.

  13. The Washington State Nurse Anesthetist Workforce: a case study.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Louise; Brown, Marie-Annette; Andrilla, Holly; Hart, L Gary

    2007-02-01

    The purposes of this study were to describe the Washington State Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetist (CRNA) workforce and analyze selected dimensions of their clinical practice. We developed the 31-item CRNA Practice Questionnaire. After receiving institutional review board approval, the questionnaire was mailed in 2003 to CRNAs licensed in Washington with an address in Washington, Oregon, and Idaho. Statistical analysis included descriptive statistics for all variables and was performed by University of Washington Center for Health Workforce Studies staff. Results indicate that the typical Washington State CRNA is 50.7 years old, white, and equally likely to be a man or woman. More than half of the Washington State CRNAs are master's educated and have an average of 19 years of CRNA experience. Most work at least 40 hours a week, take call, and earn more than 100,000 dollars per year. Almost all have hospital privileges, but only 30% believe they are equal colleagues with physicians. A chi2 analysis comparing urban and rural respondents yielded few differences except that rural CRNAs reported seeking significantly less consultation and were more likely to take call. Workforce data may assist CRNAs when negotiating with employers and institutions and in resolving interprofessional conflicts and can have implications for scope of practice, policy, and legislative issues.

  14. Mobile learning: a workforce development strategy for nurse supervisors.

    PubMed

    Mather, Carey; Cummings, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Digital technology provides opportunities for using mobile learning strategies in healthcare environments. To realise the vision of the National Workforce Development Strategy there needs to be innovation of health professionals to further develop knowledge and skills of clinical supervisors to access and gain an understanding of the value of mobile learning at the workplace. The use of digital technology by clinical supervisors was explored in 2012 as part of a teaching development grant to evaluate the use of Web 2.0 technology to develop a community of practice about clinical supervision. Prior to developing the virtual network of clinical supervisors, feedback about the use of Web 2.0 technology by clinicians was sought via an online survey. Over 90% of respondents used social media, 85% understood what a blog and wiki were and approximately half of the respondents used smart phones. More than one-third indicated they would participate in a virtual community of practice and would like to receive information about clinical facilitation at least once per week. Findings indicate both inhibitors and opportunities for workforce development within healthcare environments that need to be addressed. Support of graduate-ready nurses can be achieved through an integrated outlook that enables health professionals within organisations to undertake mobile learning in situ. A flexible and collaborative approach to continuing professional development within organisations could enhance practice development and could positively impact on workforce development.

  15. Developing an advanced nurse practitioner service in emergency care: attitudes of nurses and doctors.

    PubMed

    Griffin, Miriam; Melby, Vidar

    2006-11-01

    This paper reports a study to determine the attitudes of nurses, doctors and general medical practitioners towards the development of an advanced nurse practitioner service within an emergency department. The role of advanced nurse practitioner in emergency care has emerged in a number of countries, and has brought with it confusion about titles, role boundaries, clinical accountability and educational requirements. Initially, the role resulted from a need for healthcare professionals to provide a service to the increased numbers of patients presenting to hospital with less urgent problems. Since then, the service has evolved to one where nurse practitioners provide high-quality and cost-effective care to persons who seek help for non-urgent, urgent or emergent conditions in a variety of emergency care settings. However, little research could be identified on the attitudes of relevant nursing and medical staff towards the development of this role. A questionnaire survey was carried out, and a 29-item Likert rating scale was developed to measure attitudes. Along with some demographic variables, two open-ended questions were added to allow respondents to elaborate on what they perceived as benefits and difficulties associated with an advanced nurse practitioner service. All general practitioners, emergency nurses and emergency doctors in one health board in the Republic of Ireland were targeted, and 25 emergency nurses, 13 emergency doctors and 69 general practitioners were approached to take part. Data were collected in February 2004. An overall response rate of 74.8% was achieved. All respondents were positive towards the development of an advanced nurse practitioner service, with general practitioners being less positive. The principal differences appeared between general practitioners and hospital emergency care staff. There is a need for a multidisciplinary approach to the planning of advanced nurse practitioner services. To achieve multiprofessional acceptance

  16. Creating Quality Online Materials for Specialty Nurse Practitioner Content: Filling a Need for the Graduate Nurse Practitioner.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Rosemary L; Klein, Sara Jo; Rosenzweig, Margaret Q

    2016-01-18

    Nurse practitioners are entering specialized areas of practice immediately after graduation from nurse practitioner (NP) education and certification and are finding employment in specialized areas such as oncology. Rapidly achieving a knowledge base in this highly specialized area of medicine coupled with the stress of the new nurse practitioner role can lead to a very difficult orientation and transition period. There are several methods to provide specialized education to NPs during their orientation period. Unfortunately, limitations such as a lack of motivated mentors, limited opportunities to practice the desired skill set or a lack of structure in regards to curriculum quality, and the learning needs of the new nurse hinder the NP's transition to practice. In response to either inadequate or non-standardized orientation to the specialty role of the oncology NP (ONP), a web-enhanced educational tool, funded through the National Cancer Institute, was developed for use in the USA: Oncology Nurse Practitioner Web Education Resource (ONc-PoWER). The development of ONc-PoWER was based upon essential education for NPs new to cancer care, adult learning theory, Bloom's Taxonomy, and foundations of quality online education. The five interactive web-based modules provide specialized education for the nurse practitioner new to oncology along with an on-site mentor to assist the NP in applying the course content to clinical practice.

  17. Current Status of Fellowship Programs for Advanced Practice Registered Nurses in the Nurse Practitioner Role.

    PubMed

    Camal Sanchez, Carlos Alberto

    2017-05-31

    Students completing an advanced practice RN program for practice as a nurse practitioner may seek options for further advancement. Although postgraduate clinical fellowship programs exist, information about such programs is not readily available. This article offers a resource for faculty to assist graduate students in finding advanced practice RN nurse practitioner fellowship programs in the United States.

  18. Understanding the nursing workforce: a longitudinal study of Australian nurses six years after graduate study.

    PubMed

    Pelletier, Dianne; Donoghue, Judith; Duffield, Christine

    2005-01-01

    The challenge posed by the worldwide nursing shortage is significant not only for workforce and facility planners, but also for those who educate nurses for practice and nurses themselves. The provision of skilled and competent advanced nurses is clearly a goal of postgraduate education. An increasing shortage of skilled and qualified nursing staff to provide the required level of care is evident in Australia. To determine the impact of graduate education on registered nurses' personal and professional development. A longitudinal descriptive and co-relational study of postgraduate nursing students using postal survey. Five cohorts (1998-2002) of nurses who had graduated from university with a graduate diploma or master of nursing qualification were all surveyed over six years post graduation (n=151). The study showed the greatest motivator to change jobs was greater job satisfaction; self esteem and their ability to carry out their role exceeded their job satisfaction; one quarter wanted to change their career and the strongest facilitator and the strongest barrier to careeradvancement were their personal situation. This paper focuses on recent career moves, motivation, intentions and influencing factors six years after completion of their tertiary studies. This information is critical in choosing retention strategies and workforce planning.

  19. Neonatal nurse practitioners provide quality, cost-effective care.

    PubMed

    Geiss, Donna M; Cavaliere, Terri A

    2003-09-01

    Loretta Ford, the pioneer of nurse practitioners, was the recipient of the Crystal Trailblazer Award from the American College of Nurse Practitioners in February 2003. In her acceptance speech, the stated that "in some ways, the profession had expanded beyond my wildest dreams," but cautioned against the medicalization of the NP role: "The profession is rooted in nursing ... and we enhance, advance, and influence through nursing." She added: "Medical and nursing interdependency sets the stage for the highest level of care. No one profession can deliver comprehensive health care themselves." NNPs, functioning collaboratively with neonatologists as part of a multidisciplinary team, illustrate the truth of Ford's words. They have clearly and unequivocally made significant strides during the past 20 years. Their achievements and contributions have been many but their potential has yet to be reached.

  20. The workforce trends of nurses in Lebanon (2009–2014): A registration database analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chamoun, Nariman; Btaiche, Rachel; El Arnaout, Nour; Richa, Nathalie; Samaha-Nuwayhid, Helen

    2017-01-01

    Background Analysis of the nursing registration databases is a highly informative approach that provides accurate and reliable information supporting evidence based decisions relevant to the nursing workforce planning, management and development. This study presents the first systematic analysis of the nursing registration database in Lebanon. It Reports on the workforce distribution and trends using an updated version of the Order of Nurses in Lebanon (ONL) databases. Methods This study presents a secondary data analysis of a de-identified subset of the updated ONL registration database. The workforce participation status of ONL registered nurses was categorized as active and eligible. For active nurses sectors and sub-sectors of employment were defined. Eligible nurses were categorized as unemployed, working outside nursing and working abroad. SPSS was used to conduct descriptive analysis to present workforce trends of Lebanese nurses for year 2009–2014 as frequencies, percentages and percentage changes. Results Increases in the size of the Active (35%) and Eligible (86%) nurses were observed over the past six years. The majority of nurses fell in the below 35 years age group (60% in 2014). The hospital sector remained the principle employer, with 87% of Lebanese nurses working in hospitals in 2014. A 173% increases was reported for nurses working abroad. Discussion Despite the growth of the Active nursing workforce, the skewed distribution of nurses in the below 35 age group and the growth in the Eligible category, especially for nurses living abroad, raise concerns on the longevity of nurses in the profession and the reasons for their attrition from the workforce. Conclusion There is a need to investigate the push and pull factors that are affecting nurses and the design of policies and interventions that would encourage nurses to remain active in Lebanon. Furthermore, policies and interventions that would create employment opportunities outside hospitals

  1. Expanding rural access to mental health care through online postgraduate nurse practitioner education.

    PubMed

    Kverno, Karan; Kozeniewski, Kate

    2016-12-01

    Workforce shortages in mental health care are especially relevant to rural communities. People often turn to their primary care providers for mental healthcare services, yet primary care providers indicate that more education is needed to fill this role. Rural primary care nurse practitioners (NPs) are ideal candidates for educational enhancement. Online programs allow NPs to continue living and working in their communities while developing the competencies to provide comprehensive and integrated mental healthcare services. This article presents a review of current online postgraduate psychiatric mental health NP (PMHNP) options. Website descriptions of online PMHNP programs were located using keywords: PMHNP or psychiatric nurse practitioner, postgraduate or post-master's, and distance or online. Across the United States, 15 online postgraduate certificate programs were located that are designed for primary care NPs seeking additional PMHNP specialization. For rural primary care NPs who are ready, willing, and able, a postgraduate PMHNP specialty certificate can be obtained online in as few as three to four semesters. The expected outcome is a cadre of dually credentialed NPs capable of functioning in an integrated role and of increasing rural access to comprehensive mental healthcare services. ©2016 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  2. General practitioners' experiences as nursing home medical consultants.

    PubMed

    Kirsebom, Marie; Hedström, Mariann; Pöder, Ulrika; Wadensten, Barbro

    2017-03-01

    To describe general practitioners' experiences of being the principal physician responsible for a nursing home. Fifteen general practitioners assigned to a nursing home participated in semi-structured qualitative interviews. Data were analysed using systematic text condensation. Medical assessment is the main duty of general practitioners. Advance care planning together with residents and family members facilitates future decisions on medical treatment and end-of-life care. Registered Nurses' continuity and competence are perceived as crucial to the quality of care, but inadequate staffing, lack of medical equipment and less-than-optimal IT systems for electronic healthcare records are impediments to patient safety. The study highlights the importance of advance care planning together with residents and family members in facilitating future decisions on medical treatment and end-of-life care. To meet the increasing demands for more complex medical treatment at nursing homes and to provide high-quality palliative care, there would seem to be a need to increase Registered Nurses' staffing and acquire more advanced medical equipment, as well as to create better possibilities for Registered Nurses and general practitioners to access each other's healthcare record systems. © 2016 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  3. The Public Health Nurse Workforce in U.S. State and Local Health Departments, 2012

    PubMed Central

    Boulton, Matthew L.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Public health nurses (PHNs) represent the single largest group of public health practitioners working in U.S. state and local health departments. Despite the important role of PHNs in the delivery and administration of public health services, little research has been conducted on this group and relatively little is known about PHN education, training, and retirement intentions. We describe the findings of a nationally representative survey of PHNs working in state and local health departments by characterizing their educational background and plans for retirement. Methods An advisory committee convened by the University of Michigan Center of Excellence in Public Health Workforce Studies developed the Public Health Nurse Workforce Survey and disseminated it in 2012 to 50 U.S. state and 328 local health departments. Results The 377 responding state and local health departments reported an estimated 34,521 full-time equivalent registered nurses in their employ, with PHNs or community health nurses as the largest group of workers (63%). Nearly 20% of state health department PHNs and 31% of local health department PHNs were educated at the diploma or associate's degree level. Approximately one-quarter of PHNs were determined to be eligible for retirement by 2016. Professional development and promotion opportunities, competitive benefits and salary, and hiring procedures were among the recruitment and retention issues reported by health departments. Conclusion PHNs were reported to have highly variable occupational classifications and educational backgrounds in health departments. Additional training opportunities are needed for PHNs with diploma and associate's degrees. A shortage of PHNs is possible due to retirement eligibility and administrative barriers to recruitment and retention. PMID:26843680

  4. Nurse Workforce Challenges in the United States: Implications for Policy. OECD Health Working Papers, No. 35

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aiken, Linda H.; Cheung, Robyn

    2008-01-01

    The United States has the largest professional nurse workforce in the world numbering close to 3 million but does not produce enough nurses to meet its growing demand. A shortage of close to a million professional nurses is projected to evolve by 2020. An emerging physician shortage will further exacerbate the nurse shortage as the boundaries in…

  5. Nurse Workforce Challenges in the United States: Implications for Policy. OECD Health Working Papers, No. 35

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aiken, Linda H.; Cheung, Robyn

    2008-01-01

    The United States has the largest professional nurse workforce in the world numbering close to 3 million but does not produce enough nurses to meet its growing demand. A shortage of close to a million professional nurses is projected to evolve by 2020. An emerging physician shortage will further exacerbate the nurse shortage as the boundaries in…

  6. Cost Implications of Organizing Nursing Home Workforce in Teams

    PubMed Central

    Mukamel, Dana B; Cai, Shubing; Temkin-Greener, Helena

    2009-01-01

    Objective To estimate the costs associated with formal and self-managed daily practice teams in nursing homes. Data Sources/Study Setting Medicaid cost reports for 135 nursing homes in New York State in 2006 and survey data for 6,137 direct care workers. Study Design A retrospective statistical analysis: We estimated hybrid cost functions that include team penetration variables. Inference was based on robust standard errors. Data Collection Formal and self-managed team penetration (i.e., percent of staff working in a team) were calculated from survey responses. Annual variable costs, beds, case mix-adjusted days, admissions, home care visits, outpatient clinic visits, day care days, wages, and ownership were calculated from the cost reports. Principal Findings Formal team penetration was significantly associated with costs, while self-managed teams penetration was not. Costs declined with increasing penetration up to 13 percent of formal teams, and increased above this level. Formal teams in nursing homes in the upward sloping range of the curve were more diverse, with a larger number of participating disciplines and more likely to include physicians. Conclusions Organization of workforce in formal teams may offer nursing homes a cost-saving strategy. More research is required to understand the relationship between team composition and costs. PMID:19486181

  7. The first Australian nurse practitioner census: A protocol to guide standardized collection of information about an emergent professional group.

    PubMed

    Middleton, Sandy; Gardner, Glenn; Gardner, Anne; Della, Phillip; Gibb, Michelle; Millar, Lynne

    2010-10-01

    Internationally, collection of reliable data on new and evolving health-care roles is crucial. We describe a protocol for design and administration of a national census of an emergent health-care role, namely nurse practitioners in Australia using databases held by regulatory authorities. A questionnaire was developed to obtain data on the role and scope of practice of Australian nurse practitioners. Our tool comprised five sections and included a total of 56 questions, using 28 existing items from the National Nursing and Midwifery Labour Force Census and nine items recommended in the Nurse Practitioner Workforce Planning Minimum Data Set. Australian Nurse Registering Authorities (n = 6) distributed the survey on our behalf. This paper outlines our instrument and methods. The survey was administered to 238 authorized Australian nurse practitioners (85% response rate). Rigorous collection of standardized items will ensure health policy is informed by reliable and valid data. We will re-administer the survey 2 years following the first survey to measure change over time. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  8. The nurse practitioner in family planning services: law and practice.

    PubMed

    Roemer, R

    1977-06-01

    Before 1971, when Idaho became the 1st state to authorize expanded scope of functions for registered nurses, nearly all states made it illegal for any nurse to perform diagnosis or prescribe treatment, creating an ambiguity as more and more nurses were equipped by education and technology to perform new tasks. Today 30 states have liberalized the scope of nursing functions, making it possible for nurses and nurse-midwives to assume, among other tasks, family planning functions. A table gives the status of legislation and regulations governing nurse practitioners and nurse-midwives in each state. The area of greatest controversy is the prescription of oral contraceptives. In some states it is allowed under doctor's supervision or in rural areas or in areas where clear need exists for a nurse to dispense such medication. Usually this dispensing is limited to a single course of treatment. Nurse-midwives are rapidly being accepted as extensions of scarce medical facilities. Generally nurse-midwives are authorized to provide prenatal and postpartum care, to handle normal deliveries, and do family planning work including fitting diaphragms and inserting and removing IUDs. An innovation is the family planning nurse practitioner. Several courses for such practitioners have been set up across the U.S. Graduates may, with medical direction, perform bimanual pelvic examinations and breast examinations, take blood pressure, prescribe contraception, fit diaphragms, insert IUDs, examine vaginal secretions microscopically, and refer patients with problems to physicians. In a California program both registered and nonregistered nurses are being trained as women's health specialists who may make routine examinations in both pregnant and nonpregnant women and give family planning advice. Non-RN family planning specialists being trained include licensed vocational nurses, baccalaureate degree holders in nonnursing fields, and qualified persons with less formal education. The 24-week

  9. DEVELOPING AND IMPLEMENTING A CULTURAL AWARENESS WORKSHOP FOR NURSE PRACTITIONERS.

    PubMed

    Elminowski, Nerfis Sanchez

    2015-01-01

    The results of a needs assessment showed that nurse practitioners want additional education on culture and related concepts. Subsequently, a 3-hour cultural education workshop was developed to address this need. The purpose of this study is to determine the impact and effectiveness of a cultural education workshop on the participant's cultural knowledge and cultural competency resulting from the application of that knowledge. Eighteen nurse practitioners and 45 graduate students participated in the study. The results of the study revealed that the cultural awareness workshop had a positive effect on the participants' cultural knowledge and cultural competence.

  10. Professional organization membership: Advancing the nurse practitioner role.

    PubMed

    Goolsby, Mary Jo; DuBois, Janet C

    2017-08-01

    With a paucity of literature on professional organization membership by nurse practitioners (NPs), the authors base the discussion of the personal benefits associated with membership on literature focusing on clinicians other than NPs and their personal experiences as members of multiple organizations. Membership is described as related to NP socialization, engagement, networking, mentorship, advocacy, policy, leadership development, research dissemination, professional development, and volunteerism. In addition to encouraging active participation in one or more professional organizations, the need for research into factors influencing the degree to which NPs participate in organizations and the associated benefits is identified. ©2017 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  11. A Nursing Workforce Diversity Project: Strategies for Recruitment, Retention, Graduation, and NCLEX-RN Success.

    PubMed

    Murray, Ted A; Pole, David C; Ciarlo, Erica M; Holmes, Shearon

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe a collaborative project designed to recruit and retain students from underrepresented minorities and disadvantaged backgrounds into nursing education. Ethnic minorities remain underrepresented in the nursing workforce in comparison to the general population. The numbers of minorities enrolled in nursing education programs are insufficient to meet the health care workforce diversity needs of the future. High school students were provided with a preprofessional education program to prepare them for admission into a nursing program. Retention strategies were implemented for newly admitted and enrolled nursing education students. Twenty-one high school students enrolled in a nursing education program. The students enrolled in the nursing education program graduated and passed the licensure examination. Early recruitment and multiprong retention programs can be successful in diversifying the registered nurse workforce.

  12. Practice patterns and organizational commitment of inpatient nurse practitioners.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Janet; Brennan, Mary; Musil, Carol M; Fitzpatrick, Joyce J

    2016-07-01

    Nurse practitioners (NPs) deliver a wide array of healthcare services in a variety of settings. The purpose of this study was to examine the practice patterns and organizational commitment of inpatient NPs. A quantitative design was used with a convenience sample (n = 183) of NPs who attended the American Association of Nurse Practitioners (AANP) national conference. The NPs were asked to complete a demographic questionnaire, the Practice Patterns of Acute Nurse Practitioners tool and the Organizational Commitment Questionnaire. Over 85% of inpatient practice time consists of direct and indirect patient care activities. The remaining nonclinical activities of education, research, and administration were less evident in the NP's workweek. This indicates that the major role of inpatient NPs continues to be management of acutely ill patients. Moderate commitment was noted in the Organizational Commitment Questionnaire. Supportive hospital/nursing leadership should acknowledge the value of the clinical and nonclinical roles of inpatient NPs as they can contribute to the operational effectiveness of their organization. By fostering the organizational commitment behaviors of identification, loyalty, and involvement, management can reap the benefits of these professionally dedicated providers. ©2015 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  13. Exploring the mental health nurse practitioner scope of practice in youth early psychosis: an anecdotal account.

    PubMed

    Baker, Neville

    2010-01-01

    The development of the Victorian mental health nurse practitioner youth early psychosis, is a pioneer advance in clinical psychiatric/mental health nursing. This paper will explore and describe the scope of practice for the youth early psychosis mental health nurse practitioner candidate, and how the model is informed by relevant literature. The role description and context of the nurse practitioner candidate, which is synonymous with the role of the endorsed nurse practitioner, is described. Advanced practice nursing is discussed in terms of what the nurse practitioner literature says and contrasted with perceptions of a clinical nurse's everyday practice. Inherent challenges and issues are highlighted that need to sit in the background of any picture being painted of the mental health nurse practitioner role in Victoria into the future. An alternative perspective in the mental health care of the young person is proposed for the nurse practitioner scope of practice.

  14. 42 CFR 405.520 - Payment for a physician assistant's, nurse practitioner's, and clinical nurse specialists...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Payment for a physician assistant's, nurse practitioner's, and clinical nurse specialists' services and services furnished incident to their professional... for Determining Reasonable Charges § 405.520 Payment for a physician assistant's, nurse...

  15. Supporting staff nurses to train as community specialist district nurse practitioners.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Lorraine

    The removal of district nurses from the Nursing and Midwifery Council's recognised specialist practitioner list has resulted in many employers not commissioning district nurse courses and a lack of clarity about the skills required to be a team leader. This article discusses a practice development initiative to support learning through a practice based competency programme, to develop skills of local staff members.

  16. 42 CFR 405.520 - Payment for a physician assistant's, nurse practitioner's, and clinical nurse specialists...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Payment for a physician assistant's, nurse practitioner's, and clinical nurse specialists' services and services furnished incident to their professional... for Determining Reasonable Charges § 405.520 Payment for a physician assistant's, nurse...

  17. 42 CFR 405.520 - Payment for a physician assistant's, nurse practitioner's, and clinical nurse specialists...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Payment for a physician assistant's, nurse practitioner's, and clinical nurse specialists' services and services furnished incident to their professional... for Determining Reasonable Charges § 405.520 Payment for a physician assistant's, nurse...

  18. 42 CFR 405.520 - Payment for a physician assistant's, nurse practitioner's, and clinical nurse specialists...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Payment for a physician assistant's, nurse practitioner's, and clinical nurse specialists' services and services furnished incident to their professional... for Determining Reasonable Charges § 405.520 Payment for a physician assistant's, nurse...

  19. Personality Traits of Nurses in Anesthesia and Family Nurse Practitioner Masters Degree Programs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-02-01

    are known, faculty can initiate programs to help the students better understand the methods of teaching, test taking, and communicating . This...anesthesia, family nurse practitioner or nurse midwifery . Nurses are drawn to specific career fields because they are interested in the job...the methods of teaching, test taking, and communicating . This valuable information could then be integrated into the educational curriculum and

  20. The Employment of Nurse Practitioners and Physician Assistants in U.S. Nursing Homes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Intrator, Orna; Feng, Zhanlian; Mor, Vince; Gifford, David; Bourbonniere, Meg; Zinn, Jacqueline

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: Nursing facilities with nurse practitioners or physician assistants (NPs or PAs) have been reported to provide better care to residents. Assuming that freestanding nursing homes in urban areas that employ these professionals are making an investment in medical infrastructure, we test the hypotheses that facilities in states with higher…

  1. The Employment of Nurse Practitioners and Physician Assistants in U.S. Nursing Homes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Intrator, Orna; Feng, Zhanlian; Mor, Vince; Gifford, David; Bourbonniere, Meg; Zinn, Jacqueline

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: Nursing facilities with nurse practitioners or physician assistants (NPs or PAs) have been reported to provide better care to residents. Assuming that freestanding nursing homes in urban areas that employ these professionals are making an investment in medical infrastructure, we test the hypotheses that facilities in states with higher…

  2. Creating a successful environment for neonatal nurse practitioners.

    PubMed

    Maguire, D; Carr, R; Beal, J A

    1995-12-01

    Factors that contribute to the neonatal nurse practitioner (NNP) practice environment have emerged from research grounded in the results of a nonexperimental, descriptive, and correlational study that described the role and nursing identity of 258 NNPs. These factors may be used as prescriptions for developing successful NNP environments or to strengthen a current practice. Nursing management has a responsibility to identify factors that enhance nursing identity of NNPs and to plan strategies to operationalize those factors to provide an optimal environment in which NNPs can practice to their fullest potential. Implications are raised for nursing administration and education to address the issues of role differentiation, socialization, and identity of advanced practice nurses in tertiary care.

  3. Economic evaluation of nurse practitioner and clinical nurse specialist roles: A methodological review.

    PubMed

    Lopatina, Elena; Donald, Faith; DiCenso, Alba; Martin-Misener, Ruth; Kilpatrick, Kelley; Bryant-Lukosius, Denise; Carter, Nancy; Reid, Kim; Marshall, Deborah A

    2017-07-01

    Advanced practice nurses (e.g., nurse practitioners and clinical nurse specialists) have been introduced internationally to increase access to high quality care and to tackle increasing health care expenditures. While randomised controlled trials and systematic reviews have demonstrated the effectiveness of nurse practitioner and clinical nurse specialist roles, their cost-effectiveness has been challenged. The poor quality of economic evaluations of these roles to date raises the question of whether current economic evaluation guidelines are adequate when examining their cost-effectiveness. To examine whether current guidelines for economic evaluation are appropriate for economic evaluations of nurse practitioner and clinical nurse specialist roles. Our methodological review was informed by a qualitative synthesis of four sources of information: 1) narrative review of literature reviews and discussion papers on economic evaluation of advanced practice nursing roles; 2) quality assessment of economic evaluations of nurse practitioner and clinical nurse specialist roles alongside randomised controlled trials; 3) review of guidelines for economic evaluation; and, 4) input from an expert panel. The narrative literature review revealed several challenges in economic evaluations of advanced practice nursing roles (e.g., complexity of the roles, variability in models and practice settings where the roles are implemented, and impact on outcomes that are difficult to measure). The quality assessment of economic evaluations of nurse practitioner and clinical nurse specialist roles alongside randomised controlled trials identified methodological limitations of these studies. When we applied the Guidelines for the Economic Evaluation of Health Technologies: Canada to the identified challenges and limitations, discussed those with experts and qualitatively synthesized all findings, we concluded that standard guidelines for economic evaluation are appropriate for economic

  4. Are "part-time" general practitioners workforce idlers or committed professionals?

    PubMed

    Dwan, Kathryn M; Douglas, Kirsty A; Forrest, Laura E

    2014-09-19

    The traditional view of general practice holds that only general practitioners (GPs) in full-time clinical practice can provide quality patient care. Nevertheless, increasing numbers of GPs are choosing to work sessionally, that is, ostensibly "part-time". There are concerns about the health workforce's ability to meet demand and also fears that patient care may be compromised. We sought answers to a) what activities do GPs undertake when not consulting patients, b) why do they choose to work sessionally, and c) does sessional general practice reflect a lack of commitment to patients and the profession? Semi-structured interviews were conducted with GPs who worked sessionally, (i.e. six or fewer sessions a week in clinical general practice, where a session comprises four consecutive hours of patient care). These data were analysed qualitatively and saturation was reached. The majority of participants were in full-time paid employment, while part-time in clinical general practice. They reported that consultations increasingly required the management of patients with complex, chronic conditions who also required psychological management. Coupled with unrealistic patient expectations, these factors led GPs to be concerned about maintaining the quality patient care they considered professionally desirable. Many diversified their work activities to ensure that they retained their professional standards. "Part-time" general practice is a misnomer that masks the contribution these GPs make as part of the health workforce. Sessional practice more accurately describes the nature of our participants' clinical work. Their choice of sessional work is a professional response to the increasing demands within the consultation. It enables GPs to maintain their commitment to quality patient care and their profession, while attenuating the challenges of demanding consultations. Sessional general practitioners demonstrate strong commitment to their patients and the profession.

  5. It's More Than the Money: The Relationship between Social Values and Demographic Change in Sustaining a Rural General Practitioner Workforce

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheney, Helen; Willetts, Juliet; Wilson, Erin

    2004-01-01

    Historically, rural General Practitioners (GPs) in Australia tended to be male, Anglo, middle-class and in nuclear family structures, whereas the contemporary workforce demographic is increasingly female and of diverse ethnicity. Demographic trends and changing social values of university-educated professionals directly affect services in rural…

  6. United States registered nurse workforce report card and shortage forecast.

    PubMed

    Juraschek, Stephen P; Zhang, Xiaoming; Ranganathan, Vinoth; Lin, Vernon W

    2012-01-01

    Registered nurses (RNs) play a critical role in health care delivery. With an aging US population, health care demand is growing at an unprecedented pace. Using projected changes in population size and age, the authors developed demand and supply models to forecast the RN job shortage in each of the 50 states. Letter grades were assigned based on projected RN job shortage ratios. The number of states receiving a grade of "D" or "F" for their RN shortage ratio will increase from 5 in 2009 to 30 by 2030, for a total national deficit of 918 232 (725,619 - 1,112,112) RN jobs. There will be significant RN workforce shortages throughout the country in 2030; the western region will have the largest shortage ratio of 389 RN jobs per 100,000. Increased efforts to understand shortage dynamics are warranted.

  7. Enhancing computer literacy and information retrieval skills: A rural and remote nursing and midwifery workforce study.

    PubMed

    Mills, Jane; Francis, Karen; McLeod, Margaret; Al-Motlaq, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Nurses and midwives collectively, represent the largest workforce category in rural and remote areas of Australia. Maintaining currency of practice and attaining annual licensure with the Australian Health Practitioners Regulatory Authority (AHPRA) present challenges for individual nurses and midwives and for their health service managers. Engagement with information and communication technologies, in order for geographically isolated clinicians to access ongoing education and training, is considered a useful strategy to address such challenges. This paper presents a pre- and post-test study design. It examines the impact of an online continuing professional development (CPD) program on Australian rural nurses and midwives. The aims of the program were to increase basic skill acquisition in the utilisation of common computer software, the use of the Internet and the enhancement of email communication. Findings from the study demonstrate that participants who complete a relevant CPD program gain confidence in the use of information and communication technologies. Further, increased confidence leads to increased access to contemporary, reliable and important health care information on the Internet, in addition to clinicians adopting email as a regular method of communication. Health care employers commonly assume employees are skilled users of information and communication technologies. However, findings from this study contradict such assumptions. It is argued in the recommendations that health care employees should be given regular access to CPD programs designed to introduce them to information and communication technologies. Developing knowledge and skills in this area has the potential to improve staff productivity, raise health care standards and improve patient outcomes.

  8. Effective leadership, teamwork and mentoring--essential elements in promoting generational cohesion in the nursing workforce and retaining nurses.

    PubMed

    Nelsey, Lorraine; Brownie, Sonya

    2012-01-01

    Despite recent increases in nurse recruitment in Australia, the current nursing workforce is still below the predicted numbers for the future demands. The combination of an ageing workforce, high nursing staff turnover and an inability to attract and retain nurses is eroding the capacity of the health care sector to appropriately respond to the care needs of the community. Currently, the nursing workforce may have as many as four generations working together. Differences in employment needs and values, work ethics, attitudes towards authority, and professional aspirations, contribute to some of the cross-generational problems that emerge and the turnover of nursing staff. Strategies to improve the retention rates of nurses need to focus on building a cohesive workforce by utilising the strengths and skill sets that characterise different generations of nurses, and creating the conditions in which nurses across all generations feel supported and valued. The aim of this article is to explain how effective leadership, teamwork and mentoring can assist efforts to promote generational cohesion and address the decline in the number of nurses in the workforce.

  9. Exploring the Links Between Macro-Level Contextual Factors and Their Influence on Nursing Workforce Composition

    PubMed Central

    Squires, Allison; Beltrán-Sánchez, Hiram

    2012-01-01

    Research that links macro-level socioeconomic development variables to healthcare human resources workforce composition is scarce at best. The purpose of this study was to explore the links between non-nursing factors and nursing workforce composition through a secondary, descriptive analysis of year 2000, publicly available national nursing human resources data from Mexico. Building on previous research, the authors conducted multiple robust regression analysis by federal typing of nursing human resources from 31 Mexican states against macro-level socioeconomic development variables. Average education in a state was significantly associated in predicting all types of formally educated nurses in Mexico. Other results suggest that macro level indicators have a different association with each type of nurse. Context may play a greater role in determining nursing workforce composition than previously thought. Further studies may help to explain differences both within and between countries. PMID:22513839

  10. Workforce Integration of New Graduate Nurses: Evaluation of a Health Human Resources Employment Policy

    PubMed Central

    Baumann, Andrea; Hunsberger, Mabel; Crea-Arsenio, Mary

    2011-01-01

    Historically, economic changes have negatively affected the nursing workforce in Ontario. The trend towards part-time and casual employment emerged from healthcare restructuring in the 1990s. The severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) outbreak in 2003 alerted the Ontario government to the issue of part-time and casual nursing. In 2007, the Nursing Graduate Guarantee (NGG), a health human resources employment policy, was developed as a financial incentive for employers to hire and mentor new graduate nurses for a six-month period. The purpose of this study was to examine facilitators and barriers to policy implementation and assess the impact of the NGG on full-time employment and workforce integration of new graduate nurses in Ontario. A mixed-methods approach was used and included surveys, interviews and focus groups. Results indicated that full-time employment of new graduate nurses increased during the study period and that mentorship facilitated workforce integration of new graduate nurses. PMID:23115569

  11. Workforce integration of new graduate nurses: evaluation of a health human resources employment policy.

    PubMed

    Baumann, Andrea; Hunsberger, Mabel; Crea-Arsenio, Mary

    2011-11-01

    Historically, economic changes have negatively affected the nursing workforce in Ontario. The trend towards part-time and casual employment emerged from healthcare restructuring in the 1990s. The severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) outbreak in 2003 alerted the Ontario government to the issue of part-time and casual nursing. In 2007, the Nursing Graduate Guarantee (NGG), a health human resources employment policy, was developed as a financial incentive for employers to hire and mentor new graduate nurses for a six-month period. The purpose of this study was to examine facilitators and barriers to policy implementation and assess the impact of the NGG on full-time employment and workforce integration of new graduate nurses in Ontario. A mixed-methods approach was used and included surveys, interviews and focus groups. Results indicated that full-time employment of new graduate nurses increased during the study period and that mentorship facilitated workforce integration of new graduate nurses.

  12. National nursing workforce survey of nursing attitudes, knowledge and practice in genomics

    PubMed Central

    Calzone, Kathleen A; Jenkins, Jean; Culp, Stacey; Bonham, Vence L; Badzek, Laurie

    2013-01-01

    Aim Genomics has the potential to improve personalized healthcare. Nurses are vital to the utilization of genomics in practice. This study assessed nursing attitudes, receptivity, confidence, competency, knowledge and practice in genomics to inform education efforts. Materials & methods Cross-sectional study of registered nurses who completed an online Genetic/Genomic Nursing Practice Survey posted on a national nursing organization website. Results A total of 619 registered nurses participated. The largest proportion of education level were nurses with a baccalaureate degree (39%). Most (67.5%) considered genomics very important to nursing practice. However, 57% reported their genomic knowledge base to be poor or fair. The mean total knowledge score correct response rate was 75%. Yet 60% incorrectly answered that diabetes and heart disease are caused by a single gene variant. Most (64%) had never heard of the Essential Nursing Competencies and Curricula Guidelines in Genomics. Higher academic education or post licensure genetic education increased family history collection in practice. Conclusion Most nurses are inadequately prepared to translate genomic information into personalized healthcare. Targeted genomic education is needed to assure optimal workforce preparation for genomics practice integration. PMID:24363765

  13. Nurse practitioner prescribing in Australia: A comprehensive literature review.

    PubMed

    Fong, Jacqueline; Buckley, Thomas; Cashin, Andrew; Pont, Lisa

    2017-09-01

    In Australia, the nurse practitioner (NP) obtained prescriptive authority in some jurisdictions in 2001. One of the key aspects in which the scope of NPs differs from Registered Nurses (RNs) relates to the legal privilege to prescribe medications. Although NPs have had prescriptive authority in Australia since 2001, with access to the Commonwealth subsidy scheme (PBS) since 2010, little is known about NPs prescriptive patterns or outcomes of prescriptive practice. The aim of this scoping review was to examine the extent, range and nature of research conducted in relation to NP prescribing in the Australian health context as well as identify gaps in the existing literature. Whilst considerable research has been undertaken on medical prescribing, to date there is no published review of studies regarding NP prescribing in the Australian context. A structured search of the literature was undertaken using permutations of the following key words 'nurse practitioner prescribing Australia', 'nurse practitioner and prescribing', 'advanced practice nurse and prescribing', 'nurse practitioner and Australia'. Databases where searched from January 2000 to January 2016. Databases searched include PsycInfo, Pubmed, CINAHL and Medline. There are a number of distinguishing features of NP prescribing practices in the Australian context. Little is known about the prescribing behaviours of critical care NPs in both the international and Australian context. Key themes identified were: barriers to prescribing, attitudes to NP prescribing, frequency of prescribing, types of medications prescribed, prescribing practice behaviours and confidence in prescribing. The impact of legislative changes on Australian NPs clinical practice and service delivery is still evolving. This review should create impetus for further research to determine the outcomes of NP prescribing on both patient and health service outcomes in the Australian healthcare context including critical care settings. Copyright

  14. Oral health education for pediatric nurse practitioner students.

    PubMed

    Golinveaux, Jay; Gerbert, Barbara; Cheng, Jing; Duderstadt, Karen; Alkon, Abbey; Mullen, Shirin; Lin, Brent; Miller, Arthur; Zhan, Ling

    2013-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate whether an interdisciplinary, multifaceted oral health education program delivered to pediatric nurse practitioner students at the University of California, San Francisco, would improve their knowledge, confidence, attitudes, and behaviors regarding the provision of oral health assessments, consultations, referrals, and services to young children during well-child visits. Thirty pediatric nurse practitioner students were included in the study. Participants completed a written survey before and after receiving an interdisciplinary educational intervention that included didactic education, simulation exercises, and clinical observation by a pediatric dental resident. Between pre-intervention and post-intervention, a significant improvement was seen in the pediatric nurse practitioners' knowledge of oral health topics (p<0.001), confidence when providing oral health counseling (p<0.001), and attitudes about including oral health counseling in their examinations (p=0.006). In the post-intervention survey, 83 percent of the subjects reported having incorporated oral examinations into their well-child visits. Our study suggests that providing an interdisciplinary oral health educational program for pediatric nurse practitioner students can improve their knowledge, confidence, attitudes, and behaviors regarding the incorporation of oral health care services during routine well-child visits.

  15. Physician Assistant and Nurse Practitioner Prescribing: 1997-2002

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hooker, Roderick S.; Cipher, Daisha J.

    2005-01-01

    Context: Physician assistants (PAs) and nurse practitioners (NPs) have licensure to practice in all states and they have prescriptive authority in 47 and 40 states, respectively. However, there have been no published studies from a national standpoint comparing urban and rural settings. Purpose: The objective of this study was to describe the…

  16. An Evaluation of Nurse Practitioner Student Experiences with Online Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heale, Roberta; Gorham, Robyn; Fournier, Jennifer

    2010-01-01

    Many nurse practitioner (NP) education programs have embraced distance education opportunities. A comparison of the experiences of NP students in one course delivered across nine sites was undertaken. Some sites offer traditional face-to-face sessions and others provide tutorials online. A survey of all the students evaluated barriers with respect…

  17. Complementary and Alternative Medicine: Core Competencies for Family Nurse Practitioners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burman, Mary E.

    2003-01-01

    Directors of family nurse practitioner education programs (n=141) reported inclusion of some complementary/alternative medicine content (CAM), most commonly interviewing patients about CAM, critical thinking, evidence-based medicine, laws, ethics, and spiritual/cultural beliefs. Definition of CAM was medically, not holistically based. More faculty…

  18. Evaluation of Medical Nurse Practitioner Program: Participant Instrument No. 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rott, Robert K.

    This instrument was designed to provide a goal-free evaluation of a pilot training program for Medical Nurse Practitioners. With minor modification, the instrument can be applied to programs at several educational levels: secondary, college, adult, and continuing. The instrument uses 5-point Likert-type scales (with positive and negative…

  19. Complementary and Alternative Medicine: Core Competencies for Family Nurse Practitioners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burman, Mary E.

    2003-01-01

    Directors of family nurse practitioner education programs (n=141) reported inclusion of some complementary/alternative medicine content (CAM), most commonly interviewing patients about CAM, critical thinking, evidence-based medicine, laws, ethics, and spiritual/cultural beliefs. Definition of CAM was medically, not holistically based. More faculty…

  20. Perceived Barriers to Nurse Practitioner Practice in Rural Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindeke, Linda E.; Jukkala, Angela; Tanner, Mary

    2005-01-01

    Rural residents experience the same incidence of acute illness as urban populations and have higher levels of chronic illness. Overall, access to adequate rural health care is limited. Nurse practitioners (NPs) have been identified as safe, cost-effective providers in meeting these challenges in rural settings. This replication study was conducted…

  1. Systematic review of oncology nurse practitioner navigation metrics.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Frances

    2015-06-01

    Nurse practitioners should become more active in patient navigation and its subcomponent, care coordination, because research has shown that these roles are influential in improving patient care at all levels of an organization. Well-defined process and outcome measures, as well as educational initiatives, are critical to these programs because they serve as the structure for program evaluation. This article aims to assess and define metrics that nurse practitioners in the oncology setting can use to evaluate navigation programs, which is essential for the evolution of research pertaining to the navigation field. The current article is a systematic review that describes oncology nurse practitioner navigation metrics using the PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses) format for the systematic literature review process. These metrics are then compared to current standards of care. Seven studies met the criteria for this review. Research is emerging that shows benefit in using an oncology nurse practitioner navigator for ensuring timely care and patient and staff satisfaction. These metrics are in line with expert consensus recommendations. The need for more research identifying sound research tools that have been rigorously tested has been identified.

  2. Physician Assistant and Nurse Practitioner Prescribing: 1997-2002

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hooker, Roderick S.; Cipher, Daisha J.

    2005-01-01

    Context: Physician assistants (PAs) and nurse practitioners (NPs) have licensure to practice in all states and they have prescriptive authority in 47 and 40 states, respectively. However, there have been no published studies from a national standpoint comparing urban and rural settings. Purpose: The objective of this study was to describe the…

  3. An Evaluation of Nurse Practitioner Student Experiences with Online Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heale, Roberta; Gorham, Robyn; Fournier, Jennifer

    2010-01-01

    Many nurse practitioner (NP) education programs have embraced distance education opportunities. A comparison of the experiences of NP students in one course delivered across nine sites was undertaken. Some sites offer traditional face-to-face sessions and others provide tutorials online. A survey of all the students evaluated barriers with respect…

  4. The Transition to First Position as Nurse Practitioner.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Norma R.; Mathews, Maureen

    2001-01-01

    Focus groups of 21 recent nurse practitioner graduates revealed that, as they begin practice, they experience loss of time and privacy, changed relationships, isolation, and role ambiguity. Although they felt adequately prepared, they felt anxiety, inadequacy, and uncertainty. Mentoring and other ways to assist transition were recommended. (SK)

  5. Open carpal tunnel decompression by specialist versus nurse practitioner.

    PubMed

    Patel, Nimesh; Roberton, Andy; Batten, Timothy; Millyard, Cathy; Birdsall, Paul

    2015-12-01

    To compare the outcome after open carpal tunnel decompression by specialists versus a nurse practitioner. Of 1361 cases of open carpel tunnel decompression under local anaesthesia from 1996 to 2008, 807 were performed by specialists (consultant, specialist registrar, or specialty and associate specialist) and 554 by a nurse practitioner (since May 2006). The 2 groups were compared in terms of surgical time, total theatre time, postoperative pain, and patient satisfaction with the service. The mean surgical time was shorter in cases performed by specialists (13 vs. 18 minutes, p<0.0001), as was the mean total theatre time (26 vs. 29 minutes, p=0.0154). The rate of postoperative pain was higher in cases performed by specialists (31.5% vs. 24.5%, p=0.0125), as was the rate of patient dissatisfaction (1.6% vs. 0.18%, 0.0113). Nonetheless, since May 2006, outcome was comparable for specialists and the nurse practitioner. This could be due to the change from short-acting to long-acting/mixed local anaesthetic, and the technique for infiltration. The waiting time for surgery reduced from a mean of 16 to 3 weeks. Specialists and the nurse practitioner achieved comparable outcome after open carpal tunnel decompression.

  6. Advanced nurse practitioner-led abdominal therapeutic paracentesis.

    PubMed

    Aplin, Neal

    2017-03-10

    Liver disease is a common cause of death in England and Wales, and ascites is associated with a 50% mortality rate. Most patients who present with ascites have underlying liver cirrhosis, and often require therapeutic paracentesis for symptomatic relief. This article describes a competency framework that was developed to enable advanced nurse practitioners to perform therapeutic paracentesis in an ambulatory care unit.

  7. Acute Care Pediatric Nurse Practitioner: The 2014 Practice Analysis.

    PubMed

    Reuter-Rice, Karin; Madden, Maureen A; Gutknecht, Sarah; Foerster, Adele

    2016-01-01

    Practice research serves as the certification framework for validating advanced practice roles and updating national qualifying examinations. This national study describes the current practice of the acute care pediatric nurse practitioner (AC PNP) to inform an update of the Certified Pediatric Nurse Practitioner-Acute Care (CPNP-AC) examination content outline. A descriptive analysis was performed of the responses of 319 pediatric nurse practitioners, practicing in an acute care role, who completed a practice survey in 2014. Respondents were primarily White women with a mean age of 40 years; 75% had been formally educated as AC PNPs, compared with 48% in 2009. Regional practice was most heavily concentrated in the Southeast (28%) and Midwest (27%). Most respondents (81%) practiced in urban areas. Respondents reported spending 75% of practice time in inpatient settings. The most frequently cited areas of practice were critical care (36%), followed by emergency department (9%) and subspecialty practices. This third analysis of AC PNP practice 10 years after initiation of the CPNP-AC certification examination demonstrates changes in clinical practice and educational preparation. Copyright © 2016 National Association of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Universe of Goals. Pediatric Nurse Practitioner/Associate Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taunton, Roma Lee; Soptick, John M.

    Goals for the Pediatric Nurse Practitioner Associate Programs (PNP/A) are provided for the following areas: health care delivery systems; role responsibility; legal base for PNP/A role; growth and development; family-cultural factors; common childhood problems/illnesses/accidents; communication; assessment; recording; evaluation/interpretation;…

  9. Pediatricians' Attitudes Toward Pediatric Nurse Practitioners in South Carolina

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holzemer, William L.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Results of a survey support the statement that pediatricians have a negative attitude toward the pediatric nurse practitioner (PNP) in South Carolina, generally due to the physicians' feelings that the PNP is not competent at child illness management. Implications for pediatric residencies are discussed. (LBH)

  10. Clinical Knowledge of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners, Medical Students, and Residents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davidson, Margaret H.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    An extensive written examination in pediatric clinical knowledge has been used to compare pediatric nurse practitioners with medical students and residents in pediatrics. Results of the study indicate that the PNPs were comparable in most areas except clinical pathology to the students and residents, sometimes even surpassing them. (LBH)

  11. Defining the characteristics of the nurse practitioner role.

    PubMed

    Eve, Lisa

    The role of the nurse practitioner (NP) has recently expanded and is now recognised in a range of health care delivery settings including primary care. In addition, the last few years have seen a proliferation of use of the NP title. This article outlines a set of competencies that aim to bring clarity to the role.

  12. The rural pipeline: building a strong nursing workforce through academic and service partnerships.

    PubMed

    Murray, Maureen Fitzgerald; Havener, Jeanne-Marie; Davis, Patricia S; Jastremski, Connie; Twichell, Martha L

    2011-03-01

    Nurse recruitment and the retention of a high-quality workforce are challenging issues facing rural hospitals and health centers. The Bassett Healthcare Network has met these challenges by building a supportive framework to develop and support nurses at every level of their professional careers. The organization has partnered with local colleges to help staff nurses further their education. These and other partnership endeavors, such as the organization's clinical ladder and collaborative continuing nursing education opportunities, are helping Bassett sustain and grow the nursing workforce across 8 counties in rural upstate New York and develop stronger ties with academic partners.

  13. Utilization of Nurse Practitioners in Emergency Medical Treatment.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-05-01

    study protocol as described in this report was submitted forSr- v’ew to nurse researchers familiar to and with the ANC and to e0mergency cure...Emergency Department Nurses’ Association in their published Core Curriculum. If the ENP concept is still considered a researchable question, recommend the...and Fo>, .. 1 c c Vi. , and Nurse Practitioners: A Survey of Baltimore Urban Residents. Vedical Care, 1979, 17:5 (May) 526-35 18. Waeckerle, J.F

  14. Nurse practitioner caseload in primary health care: Scoping review.

    PubMed

    Martin-Misener, Ruth; Kilpatrick, Kelley; Donald, Faith; Bryant-Lukosius, Denise; Rayner, Jennifer; Valaitis, Ruta; Carter, Nancy; Miller, Patricia A; Landry, Véronique; Harbman, Patricia; Charbonneau-Smith, Renee; McKinlay, R James; Ziegler, Erin; Boesveld, Sarah; Lamb, Alyson

    2016-10-01

    To identify recommendations for determining patient panel/caseload size for nurse practitioners in community-based primary health care settings. Scoping review of the international published and grey literature. The search included electronic databases, international professional and governmental websites, contact with experts, and hand searches of reference lists. Eligible papers had to (a) address caseload or patient panels for nurse practitioners in community-based primary health care settings serving an all-ages population; and (b) be published in English or French between January 2000 and July 2014. Level one testing included title and abstract screening by two team members. Relevant papers were retained for full text review in level two testing, and reviewed by two team members. A third reviewer acted as a tiebreaker. Data were extracted using a structured extraction form by one team member and verified by a second member. Descriptive statistics were estimated. Content analysis was used for qualitative data. We identified 111 peer-reviewed articles and grey literature documents. Most of the papers were published in Canada and the United States after 2010. Current methods to determine panel/caseload size use large administrative databases, provider work hours and the average number of patient visits. Most of the papers addressing the topic of patient panel/caseload size in community-based primary health care were descriptive. The average number of patients seen by nurse practitioners per day varied considerably within and between countries; an average of 9-15 patients per day was common. Patient characteristics (e.g., age, gender) and health conditions (e.g., multiple chronic conditions) appear to influence patient panel/caseload size. Very few studies used validated tools to classify patient acuity levels or disease burden scores. The measurement of productivity and the determination of panel/caseload size is complex. Current metrics may not capture

  15. Comparison of nurse practitioner and family physician relative work values.

    PubMed

    Sullivan-Marx, E M; Maislin, G

    2000-01-01

    With the enactment of the Balanced Budget Act of 1997, American nurse practitioners were granted direct Medicare reimbursement for Part B services. Payment structures in fee-for-service and managed care systems are physician-based, leading to difficulties in constructing payments for other health care professionals. The purpose of this pilot study was to examine the feasibility of using nurse practitioner data for specifying relative work values in the Medicare Fee Schedule for three office-visit codes. An exploratory survey was designed to establish relative work values using magnitude-estimation scaling. Nurse practitioners (N = 43) responded to a structured questionnaire in a national mail survey. Physician data (N = 46) were obtained from a computerized database from the American Academy of Family Physicians. The methods used in this study were the same as the process used by the American Medical Association and the Health Care Financing Administration to establish relative work values in the Medicare Fee Schedule. Respondents established relative work values for three Current Procedural Terminology (CPT) codes for office visits (99203, 99213, 99215) commonly billed in primary care practice. Each CPT code descriptor and associated vignette were compared with reference services germane to the practice of nurse practitioners and family physicians, using magnitude-estimation scaling. To establish relative work values for each code, respondents were asked to consider the time to provide the service and intensity of the work involved for each CPT code. No significant differences between nurse practitioners and family physicians were found in the three CPT codes for relative work values and intensity. Nurse practitioners estimated significantly (p < .01) higher intraservice (face to face) time with patients than did family physicians, and family physicians estimated significantly (p < .05) higher pre-service time for two codes and significantly (p < .05) higher

  16. Where is family in the family nurse practitioner program? Results of a U.S. family nurse practitioner program survey.

    PubMed

    Nyirati, Christina M; Denham, Sharon A; Raffle, Holly; Ware, Lezlee

    2012-08-01

    Though recent progress in family nursing science can serve the family nurse practitioner (FNP) to intervene in the regulation of family health, whether those advances are taught to FNP students has been unclear. All 266 FNP programs in the United States were invited to participate in a survey to assess the content and clinical application of family nursing theories in the curriculum. The majority of FNP programs frame family as the context of care for the individual. Though FNP students receive a foundation in family nursing theory in core courses, they are not usually expected to use family assessment methods in clinical practicum courses or to plan interventions for the family as the unit of care. The authors challenge educators to consider family nursing science as an essential component of the FNP program as the Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) evolves and becomes requisite for entry into advanced practice.

  17. Radical or routine? Nurse practitioners, nurse-midwives, and physician assistants as abortion providers.

    PubMed

    Freedman, Lori; Battistelli, Molly Frances; Gerdts, Caitlin; McLemore, Monica

    2015-05-01

    In 2013 California passed legislation that expanded the pool of eligible aspiration abortion providers to include advanced practice nurses, nurse-midwives, and physician-assistants. This law, enacted in 2014, is based on evidence generated by the Health Workforce Pilot Project #171, which examined the safety and effectiveness of aspiration abortion care provided by these clinicians as well as patient acceptability and satisfaction. This evidence and the resulting policy change build on international research and established workforce strategies used to expand access to safe abortion services for women worldwide, representing a radical departure from the legislative trend of constricting access in the United States. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Ensuring the availability of the nursing workforce through philanthropy: a case study.

    PubMed

    Bolton, Linda Burnes; Swanson, Jane; Zamora, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    The Institute of Medicine report on the Future of Nursing identified the need to increase the preparation of nurses, create pathways for nurses to lead as partners to improve health by promoting interprofessional education and practice, and to remove barriers to full practice of nurses across the continuum. This case study shares the experience of large systems and their creativity using philanthropy in their quest to ensure the availability of a qualified nursing workforce.

  19. Nursing Service Innovation: a case study examining emergency nurse practitioner service sustainability.

    PubMed

    Fox, Amanda; Gardner, Glenn; Osborne, Sonya

    2017-09-14

    This research aimed to explore factors that influence sustainability of health service innovation, specifically emergency nurse practitioner service. Planning for cost effective provision of healthcare services is a concern globally. Reform initiatives are implemented often incorporating expanding scope of practice for health professionals and innovative service delivery models. Introducing new models is costly in both human and financial resources and therefore understanding factors influencing sustainability is imperative to viable service provision. This research used case study methodology (Yin, 2014). Data were collected during 2014 from emergency nurse practitioners, emergency department multidisciplinary team members and documents related to nurse practitioner services. Collection methods included telephone and semi-structured interviews, survey and document analysis. Pattern matching techniques were used to compare findings with study propositions. In this study, emergency nurse practitioner services did not meet factors that support health service sustainability. Multidisciplinary team members were confident that emergency nurse practitioner services were safe and helped to meet population health needs. Organizational support for integration of nurse practitioner services was marginal and led to poor understanding of service capability and underuse. This research provides evidence informing sustainability of nursing service models but more importantly raises questions about this little explored field. The findings highlight poor organizational support, excessive restrictions and underuse of the service. This is in direct contrast to contemporary expanding practice reform initiatives. Organizational support for integration is imperative to future service sustainability. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  20. Shaping an Australian nursing and midwifery specialty framework for workforce regulation: criteria development.

    PubMed

    King, Susan Jane; Ogle, Kaye Robyn; Bethune, Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    One of the biggest obstacles identified in achieving Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) was the lack of available qualified health personal to meet the health needs of the global population. With nurses being the main workforce component in health systems, the human resource challenge for most countries is to address the reported shortage of nurses. Skill mix is one suggestion. In Australia, workforce projections indicated a shortage of 40,000 nurses by 2010. Toward the reform of the Australian health workforce, one project aimed to develop a nationally consistent framework for nursing and midwifery specialization based on knowledge and skills to generate the first national database iteration for designated specialties. A literature review looked at the way nursing specialty practices were defined in the United Kingdom, the United States of America and Canada. Three international and three national sources of criteria for specialty nursing practice were mapped against each other. The result was six criteria synthesized to define nursing practice groups as Australian nursing specialties. Each criterion was operationalized with criteria indicators to meet Australian expectations. The nurses in Australia commented on the criteria before they were finalized. An audit of national workforce databases identified nursing practice groups. The criteria were applied to identify nursing specialties and practice strands that would form a national nursing framework. This paper reports on the criteria developed to assess specialty practice at a national level in Australia.

  1. Nurse Practitioner Care Improves Renal Outcome in Patients with CKD

    PubMed Central

    van Zuilen, Arjan D.; van den Brand, Jan A.J.G.; Bots, Michiel L.; van Buren, Marjolijn; ten Dam, Marc A.G.J.; Kaasjager, Karin A.H.; Ligtenberg, Gerry; Sijpkens, Yvo W.J.; Sluiter, Henk E.; van de Ven, Peter J.G.; Vervoort, Gerald; Vleming, Louis-Jean; Blankestijn, Peter J.; Wetzels, Jack F.M.

    2014-01-01

    Treatment goals for patients with CKD are often unrealized for many reasons, but support by nurse practitioners may improve risk factor levels in these patients. Here, we analyzed renal endpoints of the Multifactorial Approach and Superior Treatment Efficacy in Renal Patients with the Aid of Nurse Practitioners (MASTERPLAN) study after extended follow-up to determine whether strict implementation of current CKD guidelines through the aid of nurse practitioners improves renal outcome. In total, 788 patients with moderate to severe CKD were randomized to receive nurse practitioner support added to physician care (intervention group) or physician care alone (control group). Median follow-up was 5.7 years. Renal outcome was a secondary endpoint of the MASTERPLAN study. We used a composite renal endpoint of death, ESRD, and 50% increase in serum creatinine. Event rates were compared with adjustment for baseline serum creatinine concentration and changes in estimated GFR were determined. During the randomized phase, there were small but significant differences between the groups in BP, proteinuria, LDL cholesterol, and use of aspirin, statins, active vitamin D, and antihypertensive medications, in favor of the intervention group. The intervention reduced the incidence of the composite renal endpoint by 20% (hazard ratio, 0.80; 95% confidence interval, 0.66 to 0.98; P=0.03). In the intervention group, the decrease in estimated GFR was 0.45 ml/min per 1.73 m2 per year less than in the control group (P=0.01). In conclusion, additional support by nurse practitioners attenuated the decline of kidney function and improved renal outcome in patients with CKD. PMID:24158983

  2. Continuity of care by cardiothoracic nurse practitioners: impact on outcome.

    PubMed

    Southey, Dawn; Mishra, Pankaj Kumar; Nevill, Alan; Aktuerk, Dincer; Luckraz, Heyman

    2014-10-01

    There have been recent reports on increased mortality in British National Health Service hospitals during weekends. This study aimed to assess the impact on patient care following the introduction of nurse practitioner cover for the cardiothoracic ward, including weekends. Prospectively collected and validated data of patients operated on from January 2005 to October 2011 were analyzed. The patients were grouped according to era: before (n = 2385) and after (n = 3910) the introduction of nurse practitioners in October 2007. There were no significant differences in preoperative patient characteristics such as age, logistic EuroSCORE, sex, smoking, and extracardiac vascular problems. There were more patients from an Asian background (p < 0.01), more with noninsulin-dependent diabetes (p < 0.01), and more requiring urgent cardiac surgery (p < 0.01) in the later era. Following the introduction of nurse practitioner grade, there was a decrease in the rate of cardiac intensive care unit readmission from 2.6% to 1.9% (p = 0.05) and length of hospital stay from 10 to 8 days (p < 0.01). There was a significant improvement in overall survival after cardiac surgery from 96.5% to 98.0% (p < 0.01). Logistic regression analysis confirmed that the presence of nurse practitioners on the ward was the strongest predictor of survival with an odds ratio of 1.9 (95% confidence interval: 1.23-3.01). The introduction of the nurse practitioner grade to provide continuity in patient care including at weekends has been confirmed to improve patient outcomes including survival after cardiac surgery. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  3. Development of the Nurse Practitioner Standards for Practice Australia.

    PubMed

    Cashin, Andrew; Buckley, Thomas; Donoghue, Judith; Heartfield, Marie; Bryce, Julianne; Cox, Darlene; Waters, Donna; Gosby, Helen; Kelly, John; Dunn, Sandra V

    2015-01-01

    This article describes the context and development of the new Nurse Practitioner Standards for Practice in Australia, which went into effect in January 2014. The researchers used a mixed-methods design to engage a broad range of stakeholders who brought both political and practice knowledge to the development of the new standards. Methods included interviews, focus groups, surveys, and work-based observation of nurse practitioner practice. Stakeholders varied in terms of their need for detail in the standards. Nonetheless, they invariably agreed that the standards should be clinically focussed attributes. The pillars common in many advanced practice nursing standards, such as practice, research, education, and leadership, were combined and expressed in a new and unique clinical attribute. © The Author(s) 2015.

  4. Nurse practitioner education: greater demand, reduced training opportunities.

    PubMed

    Forsberg, Ingrid; Swartwout, Kathryn; Murphy, Marcia; Danko, Katie; Delaney, Kathleen R

    2015-02-01

    To document the factors that are increasing the tension between nurse practitioner (NP) educational programs and the clinical training sites needed for NP students. Literature and the faculty experiences garnered over years of placing NP students for clinical training. Several conditions converge to create a situation where sites are increasingly reluctant to precept NP students. The underlying dynamics are diverse and include factors related to the electronic health record, productivity expectations, and the increasing demand for sites as a result of increasing NP enrollments and competing healthcare provider programs. The nursing community should approach this issue strategically and devise an action and policy agenda to support NP training, including federal monies to support NP training in a design that parallels the Graduate Medical Education; recognition of NPs as licensed professionals in advanced training; and identification of meaningful incentives for NP preceptors. ©2014 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  5. Development of the Nurse Practitioner Standards for Practice Australia

    PubMed Central

    Buckley, Thomas; Donoghue, Judith; Heartfield, Marie; Bryce, Julianne; Cox, Darlene; Waters, Donna; Gosby, Helen; Kelly, John; Dunn, Sandra V.

    2015-01-01

    This article describes the context and development of the new Nurse Practitioner Standards for Practice in Australia, which went into effect in January 2014. The researchers used a mixed-methods design to engage a broad range of stakeholders who brought both political and practice knowledge to the development of the new standards. Methods included interviews, focus groups, surveys, and work-based observation of nurse practitioner practice. Stakeholders varied in terms of their need for detail in the standards. Nonetheless, they invariably agreed that the standards should be clinically focussed attributes. The pillars common in many advanced practice nursing standards, such as practice, research, education, and leadership, were combined and expressed in a new and unique clinical attribute. PMID:26162455

  6. 42 CFR 418.304 - Payment for physician and nurse practitioner services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Payment for physician and nurse practitioner... Payment for physician and nurse practitioner services. (a) The following services performed by hospice physicians and nurse practitioners are included in the rates described in § 418.302: (1) General...

  7. 42 CFR 418.304 - Payment for physician and nurse practitioner services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Payment for physician and nurse practitioner... § 418.304 Payment for physician and nurse practitioner services. (a) The following services performed by hospice physicians and nurse practitioners are included in the rates described in § 418.302: (1)...

  8. 42 CFR 418.304 - Payment for physician and nurse practitioner services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Payment for physician and nurse practitioner... § 418.304 Payment for physician and nurse practitioner services. (a) The following services performed by hospice physicians and nurse practitioners are included in the rates described in § 418.302: (1)...

  9. 42 CFR 418.304 - Payment for physician and nurse practitioner services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Payment for physician and nurse practitioner... § 418.304 Payment for physician and nurse practitioner services. (a) The following services performed by hospice physicians and nurse practitioners are included in the rates described in § 418.302: (1)...

  10. Nurse Practitioner Primary Care Competencies in Specialty Areas: Adult, Family, Gerontological, Pediatric, and Women's Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crabtree, M. Katherine; Stanley, Joan; Werner, Kathryn E.; Schmid, Emily

    This document presents the nurse practitioner primary care competencies that a national panel of representatives of nine national organizations of the five primary care nurse practitioner specialties--adult, family, gerontological, pediatric, and women's health--identified as necessary for entry-level primary care nurse practitioners. Section 1…

  11. [The making and development of policy concerning nurse practitioners in Taiwan].

    PubMed

    Tsay, Shwu-Feng; Wang, Hsiu-Hung

    2007-12-01

    The purpose of this article is to guide nurses towards an understanding of current policy making and policy development concerning nurse practitioners. The article outlines the planned blueprints for the establishment of nurse practitioners through a systematic analysis of the developmental context surrounding nurse practitioners in Taiwan, and discusses Taiwan's current nurse practitioner policy from the perspective of participation and observation. It is hoped that an understanding of the processes by which policy is formed will provide nurses with the knowledge and skills to participate in policy-making and raise the influence of the professional commitment involved in nursing.

  12. Nurse Practitioners’ Experience With Herbal Therapy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-05-01

    Nursing Services Approval Letter APPENDIX B: USUHS IRB Approval Letter APPENDIX C: Malcolm Grow IRB Approval Letter APPENDIX D: Research Study...schools are beginning to recognize the growing trend of patients resorting to complementary and non-traditional therapies, including the use of herbal...response to this growing trend has not been well documented. Because patients are at an increased risk for medication-herb interactions, adverse side

  13. Nurses for Wisconsin: A Collaborative Initiative to Enhance the Nurse Educator Workforce.

    PubMed

    Young, Linda K; Adams, Jan L; Lundeen, Sally; May, Katharyn A; Smith, Rosemary; Wendt, L Elaine

    2016-01-01

    Wisconsin, like much of the nation, is currently suffering from a growing nursing shortage. The University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire College of Nursing and Health Sciences, in partnership with the University of Wisconsin-Madison, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, and University of Wisconsin Oshkosh nursing programs, took advantage of a University of Wisconsin System Incentive Grant for economic and workforce development to address this problem. With a $3.2 million award, the Nurses for Wisconsin goal is to increase the number of baccalaureate registered nurses by expanding the nursing education capacity within the University of Wisconsin System. Nurses for Wisconsin is accelerating the preparation of nursing faculty by supporting nurses to enroll in doctor of nursing practice or nursing doctor of philosophy programs with pre- and postdoctoral fellowship awards ranging from $21,500 to $90,000 and the recruitment of faculty with a loan repayment program of up to $50,000. In exchange for the financial support, fellows and faculty must make a 3-year commitment to teach in a UW System nursing program. Two conferences for program participants are also funded through the award. The first conference was held in October 2014. The second conference is scheduled for summer 2015. With the first year of the 2-year project completed, this article describes Nurses for Wisconsin from inception to implementation and midterm assessment with a focus on lessons learned. A follow-up article addressing final outcomes and next steps is planned. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Globalisation, localisation and implications of a transforming nursing workforce in New Zealand: opportunities and challenges.

    PubMed

    Callister, Paul; Badkar, Juthika; Didham, Robert

    2011-09-01

    Severe staff and skill shortages within the health systems of developed countries have contributed to increased migration by health professionals. New Zealand stands out among countries in the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development in terms of the high level of movements in and out of the country of skilled professionals, including nurses. In New Zealand, much attention has been given to increasing the number of Māori and Pacific nurses as one mechanism for improving Māori and Pacific health. Against a backdrop of the changing characteristics of the New Zealand nursing workforce, this study demonstrates that the globalisation of the nursing workforce is increasing at a faster rate than its localisation (as measured by the growth of the Māori and New Zealand-born Pacific workforces in New Zealand). This challenges the implementation of culturally appropriate nursing programmes based on the matching of nurse and client ethnicities.

  15. The complexities of defining nurse practitioner scope of practice in the Australian context.

    PubMed

    Scanlon, Andrew; Cashin, Andrew; Bryce, Julianne; Kelly, John G; Buckely, Tom

    2016-01-01

    To explore the legislative and regulatory constraints that defines nurse practitioner scope of practice within the Australian context. Nurse practitioners have been endorsed to practice in Australia for over 13 years. However, despite this lengthy period, there still remains confusion amongst newly endorsed nurse practitioners and their employers as to what determines the scope of their practice in Australia. A review of available policy and regulatory documents related to the Australian operational requirements for nurse practitioner scope of practice cited within or referred to by the Nursing and Midwifery Board of Australia. Data were collected over a 2-month period in 2013. This utilized the current standards, codes and guidelines cited by the Nursing and Midwifery Board of Australia related to scope of practice and nurse practitioner, as well as legislation and regulation referred to in relation to nurse practitioner practice. Information was also obtained through government health and professional organization websites. All information in the literature regarding current and past status, and nomenclature of advanced practice nursing was considered relevant. Implications for nursing: Providing a means of interpreting the determinants of nurse practitioner scope of practice within Australia. The factors that determine nurse practitioner scope of practice, education, clinical experience, and competence leading to endorsement, are straightforward. However, the context of clinical practice, including jurisdictional restrictions, is major barriers to the expression of nurse practitioner scope of practice. These restrictions, although not insurmountable, continue to hinder nurse practitioners from practicing to their full scope of practice.

  16. Investigating the nursing practitioners perspectives about undergraduate nursing internship and apprenticeship courses: is renewing required?

    PubMed

    Jamalmohammadi, Ali; Asghari, Mohammad; Shajari, Jila; Modares, Maryam

    2013-06-23

    Nurses' professional capacity plays an important role in the health system to achieve their mission. This study aimed to investigate the perspectives of nursing practitioners about undergraduate nursing internship and apprenticeship courses and possible ways of renewing the courses. This cross sectional survey was performed over 258 bachelors and practitioners of nursing graduates of Alborz University of medical sciences in the second half of 2012. Based on a multi-stage sampling schedule, questionnaires were used to collect data about the perspectives of nursing practitioners about undergraduate nursing internship and apprenticeship courses. There were 81.4% of females and 80.6%, 17.1% and 2.3% of organizational post of participants were nurse, head nurse and supervisor respectively. The occupied posts for 60.1%, 25.6% and 14.1% of subjects, respectively were nurse, head nurse and the supervisor. The application of the internship and apprenticeship courses in bachelor of nursing were in moderate to high levels. The highest percentages of responses for internship and apprenticeship training courses were in internal surgery nursing and special nursing and the minimum percentage of responses were for community hygiene nursing and mental health nursing. Due to observing moderate to high levels of fulfillment and lack of compliance of training courses, renewing to improve the quality and effectiveness of training programs are highly recommended. This can be effective in the future of nursing career and provide a practical training environment to achieve the goals of theoretical training and can lead nurses to become specialized in their field.

  17. Articulating nurse practitioner practice using King's theory of goal attainment.

    PubMed

    de Leon-Demare, Kathleen; MacDonald, Jane; Gregory, David M; Katz, Alan; Halas, Gayle

    2015-11-01

    To further understand the interactions between nurse practitioners (NPs) and patients, King's nursing theory of goal attainment was applied as the conceptual framework to describe the interactions between NPs and patients in the primary care setting. Six dyads of NPs and their patients were video- and audio-taped over three consecutive clinic visits. For the purposes of this arm of the study, the audio-taped interactions were transcribed and then coded using King's concepts in her theory of goal attainment. King's theory was applicable to describe NP practice. King's concepts and processes of nurse-patient interactions, such as disturbances, mutual goal setting, and transactions, were observed in NP-patient interactions. Disturbances during clinical encounters were essential in the progression toward goal attainment. Elements, such as social exchange, symptom reporting, role explanation, and information around clinical processes facilitated relationship building. NPs as practitioners need to be reflective of their own practice, embrace disturbances in the clinical encounter, and attend to these as opportunities for mutual goal setting. ©2015 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  18. Educating neonatal nurse practitioners in the 21st century.

    PubMed

    LeFlore, Judy; Thomas, Patricia E; Zielke, Marjorie A; Buus-Frank, Madge E; McFadden, Barbara E; Sansoucie, Debra A

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this education project is to prepare neonatal nurse practitioners using a nonlinear (random exposure to information delivered in context rather than abstracting information as is done in a traditional lecture), asynchronous approach. The Internet-based 3-dimensional virtual "living world" classroom will have a living textbook and a virtual neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). Deploying the program within a virtual living world will enhance program accessibility and overcome the challenges of nurses returning to school. Greater accessibility can help to alleviate the shortage of neonatal providers, which are needed to meet the needs of the growing population.A Neonatal Curriculum Consortium comprising expert neonatal nurse practitioners and faculty are developing multimedia learning modules for core content defined by national organizations and certifying bodies. Our Internet-based, multisite, nonlinear, asynchronous universal neonatal curriculum has at its core a 3-dimensional virtual "living text book" for didactic instruction and a "living world" NICU for "deliberate practice." The NICU will feature an interactive virtual infant patient. Our "Virtual NICU" will assist students to transition from the classroom, to the simulation laboratory, and ultimately to the clinical area. Providing clinical learning experiences in the virtual NICU will enhance the students' opportunities to learn to care for the culturally diverse populations they will serve as neonatal nurse practitioners.

  19. Oral Health Education for Pediatric Nurse Practitioner Students

    PubMed Central

    Golinveaux, Jay; Gerbert, Barbara; Cheng, Jing; Duderstadt, Karen; Alkon, Abbey; Mullen, Shirin; Lin, Brent; Miller, Arthur; Zhan, Ling

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate whether an interdisciplinary, multifaceted oral health education program delivered to pediatric nurse practitioner students at the University of California, San Francisco, would improve their knowledge, confidence, attitudes, and behaviors regarding the provision of oral health assessments, consultations, referrals, and services to young children during well-child visits. Thirty pediatric nurse practitioner students were included in the study. Participants completed a written survey before and after receiving an interdisciplinary educational intervention that included didactic education, simulation exercises, and clinical observation by a pediatric dental resident. Between pre-intervention and post-intervention, a significant improvement was seen in the pediatric nurse practitioners’ knowledge of oral health topics (p<0.001), confidence when providing oral health counseling (p<0.001), and attitudes about including oral health counseling in their examinations (p=0.006). In the post-intervention survey, 83 percent of the subjects reported having incorporated oral examinations into their well-child visits. Our study suggests that providing an interdisciplinary oral health educational program for pediatric nurse practitioner students can improve their knowledge, confidence, attitudes, and behaviors regarding the incorporation of oral health care services during routine well-child visits. PMID:23658403

  20. A clinical internship model for the nurse practitioner programme.

    PubMed

    Lee, Geraldine A; Fitzgerald, Les

    2008-11-01

    Nurse practitioners in Victoria, Australia must be prepared to Masters level before seeking nurse practitioner (NP) endorsement. The challenge from a university curriculum development perspective was to develop a programme that prepares the NP theoretically and clinically for their advanced practice role. The aim of this discussion paper is to outline how the internship model was developed and report the students' opinions on the model. The NP students complete the internship with a suitably qualified mentor which requires them to work together to develop and maintain a clinical learning plan, keep a log of the weekly meetings that shows how the objectives have been achieved. The internship includes advanced clinical assessment, prescribing, diagnostic and treatment skills and knowledge related to the nurse's specialty. The clinical assessment tool incorporates the National Competency Standards for the Nurse Practitioner and allows students and mentors to identify the level of practice and set clinical objectives. Students were asked to give feedback on the clinical internship and overall their comments were favourable, reporting benefits of a clinical mentor in their work and the clinical case presentations. The clinical internship allows the acquisition of knowledge and clinical skills in the clinical specialty with an expert clinical mentor in this innovative programme.

  1. The nurse practitioner role in pain management in long-term care.

    PubMed

    Kaasalainen, Sharon; Martin-Misener, Ruth; Carter, Nancy; Dicenso, Alba; Donald, Faith; Baxter, Pamela

    2010-03-01

    This paper is a report of a study exploring the perceptions of long-term care team members and nurse managers about barriers and facilitators to optimal use of nurse practitioners to manage residents' pain in long-term care settings. Considering the high rates of pain in long-term care, research is needed to explore innovations in health-services delivery, including the emerging nurse practitioner role. For this study, an exploratory descriptive design was used to collect data in spring 2007 from five focus groups of nurses and 14 individual interviews with other healthcare team members and nurse managers. Data were analysed using thematic content analysis. Five pain management activities performed by nurse practitioners were identified, including assessing pain, prescribing pain medications, monitoring pain levels and side effects of pain medications, consulting and advocating for staff and patients, and leading and educating staff related to pain management. Factors that influenced the implementation of the nurse practitioner role included the availability of the nurse practitioner, scope of practice, role clarity, perceived added value of nurse practitioner role, terms of employment, nurse practitioner-physician relationship. Perceived outcomes of the nurse practitioner role were also described. The findings from this study contribute to our understanding of how the nurse practitioner role is perceived by other healthcare professionals, particularly in pain management. Stronger interprofessional collaborative relationships need to be facilitated within a model of care that includes a nurse practitioner, with the ultimate goal of improving pain management services in long-term care.

  2. Collaboration among nurse practitioners and registered nurses in outpatient oncology settings in Canada.

    PubMed

    Moore, Jane; Prentice, Dawn

    2013-07-01

    This article is a report on a case study that described and analysed the collaborative process among nurse practitioners and registered nurses in oncology outpatient settings to understand and improve collaborative practice among nurses. Changes in the health system have created new models of care delivery, such as collaborative nursing teams. This has resulted in the increased opportunity for enhanced collaboration among nurse practitioners and registered nurses. The study was guided by Corser's Model of Collaborative Nurse-Physician Interactions (1998). Embedded single case design with multiple units of analysis. Qualitative data were collected in 2010 using direct participant observations and individual and joint (nurse dyads) interviews in four outpatient oncology settings at one hospital in Ontario, Canada. Thematic analysis revealed four themes: (1) Together Time Fosters Collaboration; (2) Basic Skills: The Brickworks of Collaboration; (3) Road Blocks: Obstacles to Collaboration; and (4) Nurses' Attitudes towards their Collaborative Work. Collaboration is a complex process that does not occur spontaneously. Collaboration requires nurses to not only work together but also spend time socially interacting away from the clinical setting. While nurses possess the conceptual knowledge of the meaning of collaboration, findings from this study showed that nurses struggle to understand how to collaborate in the practice setting. Strategies for improving nurse-nurse practitioner collaboration should include: the support and promotion of collaborative practice among nurses by hospital leadership and the development of institutional and organizational education programmes that would focus on creating innovative opportunities for nurses to learn about intraprofessional collaboration in the practice setting. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  3. Investigating the Nursing Practitioners Perspectives about Undergraduate Nursing Internship and Apprenticeship Courses: Is Renewing Required?

    PubMed Central

    Jamalmohammadi, Ali; Jafarabadi, Mohammad Asghari; Shajari, Jila; Modares, Maryam

    2013-01-01

    Nurses’ professional capacity plays an important role in the health system to achieve their mission. This study aimed to investigate the perspectives of nursing practitioners about undergraduate nursing internship and apprenticeship courses and possible ways of renewing the courses. This cross sectional survey was performed over 258 bachelors and practitioners of nursing graduates of Alborz University of medical sciences in the second half of 2012. Based on a multi-stage sampling schedule, questionnaires were used to collect data about the perspectives of nursing practitioners about undergraduate nursing internship and apprenticeship courses. There were 81.4% of females and 80.6%, 17.1% and 2.3% of organizational post of participants were nurse, head nurse and supervisor respectively. The occupied posts for 60.1%, 25.6% and 14.1% of subjects, respectively were nurse, head nurse and the supervisor. The application of the internship and apprenticeship courses in bachelor of nursing were in moderate to high levels. The highest percentages of responses for internship and apprenticeship training courses were in internal surgery nursing and special nursing and the minimum percentage of responses were for community hygiene nursing and mental health nursing. Due to observing moderate to high levels of fulfillment and lack of compliance of training courses, renewing to improve the quality and effectiveness of training programs are highly recommended. This can be effective in the future of nursing career and provide a practical training environment to achieve the goals of theoretical training and can lead nurses to become specialized in their field. PMID:23985116

  4. Postgraduate nurse practitioner residency programs: supporting transition to practice.

    PubMed

    Wiltse Nicely, Kelly L; Fairman, Julie

    2015-06-01

    The 2010 Institute of Medicine report The Future of Nursing recommended residency programs for nurses. The number of such postgraduate residencies for nurse practitioners (NPs) is increasing in community settings; still, the Institute of Medicine's recommendation departs from the tradition of direct entry into practice after the completion of a formal nursing program. Research shows that residencies support NPs' transition to practice, but very few data support their impact on patient care. Postgraduate residencies are controversial, and the authors of this Commentary discuss the naming, funding mechanisms, and possible mandating of these programs.The authors believe that residencies should not be mandated but encouraged for new NPs and for those moving to new clinical settings. Team-based residencies provide both an opportunity to improve collaboration and a model of patient-centered care.

  5. An integrative review of facilitators and barriers influencing collaboration and teamwork between general practitioners and nurses working in general practice.

    PubMed

    McInnes, Susan; Peters, Kath; Bonney, Andrew; Halcomb, Elizabeth

    2015-09-01

    To identify facilitators and barriers influencing collaboration and teamwork between general practitioners and nurses working in general (family) practice. Internationally, a shortage of doctors entering and remaining in general practice and an increasing burden of chronic disease has diversified the nurse's role in this setting. Despite a well-established general practice nursing workforce, little attention has been paid to the ways doctors and nurses collaborate in this setting. Integrative literature review. CINAHL, Scopus, Web of Life, Cochrane Library, Joanna Briggs Institute Library of Systematic Reviews and Trove (dissertation and theses) were searched for papers published between 2000 and May 2014. This review was informed by the approach of Whittemore and Knafl (2005). All included papers were assessed for methodological quality. Findings were extracted, critically examined and grouped into themes. Eleven papers met the inclusion criteria. Thematic analysis revealed three themes common to the facilitators of and barriers to collaboration and teamwork between GPs in general practice: (1) roles and responsibilities; (2) respect, trust and communication; and (3) hierarchy, education and liability. This integrative review has provided insight into issues around role definition, communication and organizational constraints which influence the way nurses and general practitioners collaborate in a team environment. Future research should investigate in more detail the ways doctors and nurses work together in general practice and the impact of collaboration on nursing leadership and staff retention. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. A comparative study of physicians' and nurses' conceptions of the role of the nurse practitioner.

    PubMed Central

    Burkett, G L; Parken-Harris, M; Kuhn, J C; Escovitz, G H

    1978-01-01

    Attempts to define the role of the nurse practitioner as a new health care provider raise questions about the traditional health care division of labor. In order to determine nurses' and physicians' conceptions of the NP's role, parallel surveys were conducted among registered nurses and primary care physicians in southeastern Pennsylvania (including Philadelphia). Respondents (679 nurses and 597 physicians) indicated their opinions on the issue of autonomy for NPs and on the issue of specific tasks appropriate to the NP's role. There were significant differences between nurses and physicians with respect to both of the issues under consideration, but there were also important differences within each of these groups. Nurses were more likely to assert that an NP might practice independently, and also had a higher conception of the NP's capabilities. Physicians who were interested in employing a nurse practitioner had opinions which were closest to those of nurses. These findings suggest that conflict between nurses and physicians might be minimal as long as the nurse practitioner movement remains relatively small, but that there may be latent conflict inherent in any large scale attempt to change the health care division of labor at the present time. PMID:717617

  7. A Study of Family Nurse Practitioners: Perceived Competencies and Some of Their Implications for Nursing Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ward, Mary Jane Morrow

    This study was designed to determine the most common health needs and problems that family nurse practitioners (FNP) deal with, to determine how competent FNPs judge themselves to be, to determine what sources in nursing education FNPs judge to be most valuable, and to determine whether or not there were significant differences in the level of…

  8. 42 CFR 405.2414 - Nurse practitioner, physician assistant, and certified nurse midwife services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Nurse practitioner, physician assistant, and certified nurse midwife services. 405.2414 Section 405.2414 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID... AND DISABLED Rural Health Clinic and Federally Qualified Health Center Services § 405.2414...

  9. Attitudes toward nurse practitioner-led chronic disease management to improve outpatient quality of care.

    PubMed

    Sciamanna, Christopher N; Alvarez, Kristy; Miller, Judith; Gary, Tiffany; Bowen, Mary

    2006-01-01

    To understand the acceptability for a model of chronic disease management, in which primary care patients see nurse practitioners for structured visits using an evidence-based encounter form, the authors sent a mailed survey to primary care physicians and nurse practitioners. A total of 212 subjects completed the survey, for a total response rate of 53% (physicians, 44%; nurse practitioners, 61%). Most physicians (79.5%) reported that nurse practitioners saw patients in their practice. Most physicians (80.0%) and nurse practitioners (95.7%) believed that the proposed model of care would improve the control of chronic illnesses. In addition, most physicians (73.8%) and nurse practitioners (87.6%) believed that the model of care would be of interest to similar providers. Overall, the high level of support for the model and the presence of nurse practitioners in most physician offices suggests that future studies are warranted to understand how best to implement this.

  10. A workforce profile comparison of practising and non-practising midwives in Australia: baseline data from the Midwives and Nurses e-Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Bogossian, Fiona E; Long, Maryann H; Benefer, Christine; Humphreyes Reid, Lindy J; Kellett, Susan E M; Zhao, Isabella; Turner, Catherine

    2011-06-01

    Existing workforce data, as an estimate of the current capability of the midwifery workforce to provide midwifery care, is confounded by systematic reporting issues that may overestimate the potential of the existing midwifery workforce. This paper reports the characteristics of qualified Australian midwives who responded to the baseline data collection in the Midwives and Nurses e-Cohort Study and compares those who are currently practising in midwifery with those who are not. Currently practising midwives represented only 52% of those respondents who identified as midwives and the profile of the typical midwife is female, aged over 40 years, Australian, married or in a de facto relationship. She has been registered for over 10 years, educated to postgraduate diploma level and currently works in a clinical midwifery role in a hospital for less than 35 hours per week. Specific deficits in the Australian midwifery workforce namely low numbers of indigenous midwives, independent practitioners and midwives suitably qualified to teach and undertake research in academia are identified. Drawing on the nationally representative e-cohort data, this cross-sectional analysis identifies for the first time the real face of the Australian midwifery workforce and provides an evidence-based foundation for future workforce planning and a methodology for other countries interested in accurately monitoring their actual and potential midwifery workforce.

  11. Testing a Multi-Group Model of Culturally Competent Behaviors Among Underrepresented Nurse Practitioners

    PubMed Central

    Benkert, Ramona; Templin, Thomas; Schim, Stephanie Myers; Doorenbos, Ardith Z.; Bell, Sue Ellen

    2011-01-01

    Diversifying the health professional workforce and enhancing cultural competence are recommended for decreasing health disparities. We tested a structural equation model of the predictors of culturally competent behaviors in a mailed survey of three groups of underrepresented nurse practitioners (n = 474). Our model had good fit and accounted for 29% of the variance in culturally competent behaviors. Life experiences with diversity had direct effects on awareness/sensitivity and behaviors, and diversity training had a direct effect on behaviors. Cultural awareness/sensitivity mediated the relationship between life experiences with diversity and culturally competent behaviors; all paths remained after controlling for covariates. For unique experiences that contribute to work-place diversity, life experiences with diversity, and diversity training are important for culturally competent behaviors. PMID:21656784

  12. Experience of Psychiatric Mental Health Nurse Practitioners in Public Mental Health.

    PubMed

    Phoenix, Bethany J; Hurd, Manton; Chapman, Susan A

    2016-01-01

    Expansion of health insurance coverage under the Accountable Care Act has meant that millions of people are now insured for mental health treatment, but with no significant increase in the mental health workforce. Services of psychiatric mental health nurse practitioners (PMHNPs) may be best utilized to improve access to and quality of public mental health services if the financial, political, scope of practice, and treatment model barriers that limit their ability or willingness to practice in these settings are better understood. This article reports qualitative results from a study that assessed barriers and best practices in the use of PMHNPs in county mental health services in California. Results indicate that PMHNPs are valued for their "whole person" perspective, collaborative approach, and interpersonal communication skills, but that significant knowledge gaps, regulatory constraints, and bureaucratic barriers in public mental health systems inhibit PMHNPs from practicing at the top of their scope.

  13. The future of nurse practitioner practice: a world of opportunity.

    PubMed

    Aleshire, Mollie E; Wheeler, Kathy; Prevost, Suzanne S

    2012-06-01

    Health care is transforming at a rapid pace. Nurses should be leading change and advancing health in this increasingly complex health system. The multiple systemic health care changes occurring secondary to the 2010 Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act make this an optimal time for full use of nurse practitioners (NPs). This article describes the evolution and future of the NP role, explores the practice in relation to regulation and policy; primary care; acute care; international, global, and cultural issues; and public image, and addresses how NPs must prepare for changing health care environments and consumer demands. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Exploring the Factors that Influence Nurse Practitioner Role Transition.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Hilary

    2015-02-01

    The transition from registered nurse (RN) to nurse practitioner (NP) is often a stressful career change. Data are lacking on the factors affecting NP role transition. This study examined the relationships between NP role transition, prior RN experience, and a formal orientation. From a sample of 352 NPs, only a formal orientation contributed significantly to the regression model indicating a positive relationship with NP role transition (b = 6.24, p < .001). Knowledge of the factors that explain NP role transition is important to inform the discipline how best to support NPs during entry into practice.

  15. [Paediatric emergency: creation of an independent nurse practitioner consultation].

    PubMed

    Rey-Bellet Gasser, C; Gehri, M; Yersin, C

    2015-01-14

    Consultations in the Paediatric Emergency Department (PED) continue to climb regularly. Emergency Nurse Practitioner consultations have long been created in the English speaking countries. Since January 2013, an indepen- dent nurse consultation, under delegated medical responsibility, exists in the multidisciplinary PED of the Children's Hospital of Lausanne. The mean consultation time is the same as the medical consultation and the overall waiting time hasn't decreased yet. But a well definite working frame, a systematic approach, as well as the continual medical supervision possibility, make it a safe, efficient and appreciated consultation, by both patients and professionals.

  16. The role of ICT in supporting disruptive innovation: a multi-site qualitative study of nurse practitioners in emergency departments.

    PubMed

    Li, Julie; Westbrook, Johanna; Callen, Joanne; Georgiou, Andrew

    2012-04-02

    The disruptive potential of the Nurse Practitioner (NP) is evident in their ability to offer services traditionally provided by primary care practitioners and their provision of a health promotion model of care in response to changing health trends. No study has qualitatively investigated the role of the Emergency NP in Australia, nor the impact of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) on this disruptive workforce innovation. This study aimed to investigate ways in which Nurse Practitioners (NP) have incorporated the use of ICT as a mechanism to support their new clinical role within Emergency Departments. A cross-sectional qualitative study was undertaken in the Emergency Departments (EDs) of two large Australian metropolitan public teaching hospitals. Semi-structured, in-depth interviews were conducted with five nurse practitioners, four senior physicians and five senior nurses. Transcribed interviews were analysed using a grounded theory approach to develop themes in relation to the conceptualisation of the ED nurse practitioner role and the influences of ICT upon the role. Member checking of results was achieved by revisiting the sites to clarify findings with participants and further explore emergent themes. The role of the ENP was distinguished from those of Emergency nurses and physicians by two elements: advanced practice and holistic care, respectively. ICT supported the advanced practice dimension of the NP role in two ways: availability and completeness of electronic patient information enhanced timeliness and quality of diagnostic and therapeutic decision-making, expediting patient access to appropriate care. The ubiquity of patient data sourced from a central database supported and improved quality of communication between health professionals within and across sites, with wider diffusion of the Electronic Medical Record holding the potential to further facilitate team-based, holistic care. ICT is a facilitator through which the disruptive

  17. A historical perspective of the women's health nurse practitioner.

    PubMed

    Kass-Wolff, Jane H; Lowe, Nancy K

    2009-09-01

    There are more than 12,000 women's health nurse practitioners (WHNPs) currently certified by the National Certification Corporation (NCC) and practicing in a wide range of roles. The purpose of this article is to describe the historical development of the WHNP specialty, and to review the evolution of the specialty from an initially very focused practice in the area of family planning into obstetric and gynecologic care to today's more diffuse role inclusive of primary care. Women's health nurse practitioners must broaden their educational background to include the lifespan of women, not just the reproductive years. With the inclusion of chronic disease management of the middle-aged and elderly woman, WHNPs will provide more comprehensive and integrative health care to women in all areas of the United States.

  18. Patient satisfaction with nurse practitioner service in a rural setting.

    PubMed

    Knudtson, N

    2000-10-01

    To determine the level of patient satisfaction with service provided by nurse practitioners (NP) to rural patients. Original research utilizing the Nurse Practitioner Satisfaction Instrument (NPSI), developed by the researcher and completed by a convenience sample of 93 rural patients. Overall there was a high level of patient satisfaction with NP service. Significant relationships (p < or = .05) were identified between patient satisfaction and the subject's age, educational level, familiarity with the NP seen, overall health, satisfaction with expectations of service being met, and likelihood to recommend the NP to others. These findings can be used to support the effectiveness of NP providers and the need for less restriction in reimbursement policies, which in turn, may improve access to care in rural and underserved areas.

  19. Autonomy of nurse practitioners in primary care: An integrative review.

    PubMed

    Choi, Min; De Gagne, Jennie C

    2016-03-01

    This integrative review of the existing literature was conducted to identify dimensions related to nurse practitioner (NP) autonomy and to recommend future areas of research related to the important topic of NP autonomy in this era of cost-conscious healthcare reform. Articles were identified from the following databases: CINAHL, MEDLINE, PubMed, Ovid, Scopus, Google Scholar, and EBSCO. Over 24 articles were found; 12 peer-reviewed articles met the inclusion criteria of research conducted with NPs, physicians, and patients. The results revealed three categories of association with regard to NP autonomy: job satisfaction, patient satisfaction, and physician-NP collaboration. This review was undertaken to advance understanding of autonomy among NPs and the dynamics involved in their delivery of care. Further research into the associations between NP autonomy and its dimensions are necessary to indicate a future direction to the NP role. ©2015 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  20. Preparation and Evolving Role of the Acute Care Nurse Practitioner.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Leslie A; Guttendorf, Jane

    2017-08-18

    Acute care nurse practitioners (ACNPs) are increasingly being employed as members of critical care teams, an outcome driven by increasing demand for intensive care services, a mandated reduction in house officer hours, and evidence supporting the ability of ACNPs to provide high-quality care as collaborative members of critical care teams. Integration of adult ACNPs into critical care teams is most likely to be successful when practitioners have appropriate training, supervision, and mentoring to facilitate their ability to practice efficiently and effectively. Accomplishing this goal requires understanding the educational preparation and skill set potential hires bring to the position as well as the development of an orientation program designed to integrate the practitioner into the critical care team. Pediatric ACNPs are also commonly employed in critical care settings; however, this commentary focuses on the adult ACNP role. Copyright © 2017 American College of Chest Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. New tool for patient evaluation of nurse practitioner in primary care settings.

    PubMed

    Klemenc-Ketis, Zalika; Kravos, Andrej; Poplas-Susič, Tonka; Svab, Igor; Kersnik, Janko

    2014-05-01

    To validate a tool for patient evaluation of nurse practitioners. The roles of nurse practitioners in family practice settings are health promotion and routine follow-up of patients with chronic diseases. So far, several tools for patient evaluation of nurse practitioners have been developed. They revealed several dimensions of nurse practitioners' work and high levels of patient satisfaction with their work. The studies also reported conflicting data on the associations between demographic and other variables and the level of nurse practitioners' evaluation by patients. A cross-sectional study. This study was performed in a sample of seven model family medicine practices in Slovenia. We included 30 consecutive adult patients in each model family practice aiming at the final sample of 210 respondents. Patient evaluation of nurse practitioners was assessed using a Nurse Practitioner Evaluation Scale. The response rate was 80·9%. Mean total score on Nurse Practitioner Evaluation Scale was 87·9 ± 12·4 points. Cronbach's alpha of Nurse Practitioner Evaluation Scale was 0·941. Factor analyses revealed three factors: clinical approach factor, comprehensive approach factor and patient-centred approach factor. Nurse Practitioner Evaluation Scale proved to be a reliable tool for patient evaluations of nurse practitioners in primary care settings. Nurse Practitioner Evaluation Scale can be used in terms of a whole scale as well as in terms of three separate subscales. This newly developed tool can be used to monitor quality performance of nurse practitioners and to plan quality improvement actions in nurse practitioners' performance in primary care settings. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Nurse practitioner private practice: three legal pitfalls to avoid.

    PubMed

    Buppert, C

    1996-04-01

    Private practice is now a viable option for nurse practitioners. NPs who open their own practice will be wise if they anticipate, consider, and act to prevent certain potential legal problems. Awareness and avoidance of these problems--risk avoidance--is the legal equivalent of preventive medicine. This article gives NPs an attorney's perspective on setting up a practice and some of the legal pitfalls to avoid.

  3. Clinical mentoring of nurse practitioners: the doctors' experience.

    PubMed

    Barton, Thomas David

    The clinical development of nurse practitioners (NPs) has historically been dependent on mentorship from medical practitioners, yet their experience of this mentorship is generally unexplored. NPs have an ambiguous relationship with medicine as they have been dependent on medical mentorship to develop clinical skills, and they substitute into roles traditionally associated with medical practice. Consequently, NPs challenge professional boundaries and present particular concerns to their medical mentors. Practitioner ethnography examined the experiences of medical mentors, nurse practitioner students and academic staff during a clinical degree programme. This paper reports specifically on the medical mentors, focusing primarily on their professional authority relationship with their students and on their experience of imparting and sharing clinical knowledge. These experiences fell into three perspective stages, the provisional perspective, transitional perspective, and final perspective. Medical mentors were instrumental to the advanced clinical role of the student NP. This resulted in a conflicting experience of promoting a clinical role that challenged traditional medical authority. The effect of this was a cautious re-negotiation of professional boundaries. In future NP students (and their academic teachers) need to acknowledge this if they are to mutually gain the most from their relationship with their medical mentors.

  4. Reconceptualizing the core of nurse practitioner education and practice.

    PubMed

    Burman, Mary E; Hart, Ann Marie; Conley, Virginia; Brown, Julie; Sherard, Pat; Clarke, Pamela N

    2009-01-01

    The movement to the doctor of nursing practice (DNP) is progressing rapidly with new programs emerging and curricular documents being developed. We argue that the implementation of the DNP is a good move for nursing, provided that we use the opportunity to reconceptualize the core of advanced practice nursing, especially nurse practitioner (NP) practice. Theory and research articles from nursing focused on advanced practice nursing, NPs, and doctoral education. The foundation of NP education is currently based essentially on borrowed or shared content in assessment, pharmacology, and pathophysiology. We argue that the heart and soul of nursing is in health promotion, both in healthy persons and in those dealing with chronic illness. Current master's programs do not prepare NPs to assume high-level practice focused on health promotion and disease management using the latest theoretical developments in health behavior change, behavioral sciences, exercise physiology, nutrition, and medical anthropology. Although these are touched upon in most NP programs, they do not represent the core science of NP education and need to be a critical part of any DNP program. Ultimately, our vision is for NP care to be consistently "different," yet just as essential as physician care, leading to positive outcomes in health promotion and disease management.

  5. Nurse Practitioner and Physician's Assistant Clinics in Rural California

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Walter A.; Sullivan, Nancy D.

    1980-01-01

    The primary health care needs of at least 26 rural California communities are being served by nurse practitioners (NP's) or physician's assistants (PA's). All of these have physician supervision and support. NP's and PA's have proved to be acceptable and effective. With 230 rural areas in California identified as having unmet health care needs, this type of service is likely to increase and should be supported. NP/PA clinics serve total populations or concentrate on Indians, Chicanos or the poor. Many barriers have been overcome, especially over the past four years, to allow these clinics to flourish and increase in number. The availability of nurse practitioners and physician's assistants has increased due to support to schools and to school policies. Clinic funding has greatly improved; federal funds for general rural clinics, Indians, migrants, family planning and maternalchild health have been greatly supplemented by California state funds. Beginning in 1978, rural NP and PA services can be reimbursed by Medicare and Medi-Cal (California's Medicaid program). Since 1975 state laws have defined PA and NP roles broadly, and these roles are more precisely defined at the local level. Although nurse practitioners and physician's assistants generally cannot prescribe or dispense drugs (a major problem in many clinics), demonstration legislation allows special pilot projects to do both. As remaining funding and legal problems are corrected, NP's and PA's will serve an even greater role in rural areas. PMID:6104383

  6. Collaborative arrangements for Australian nurse practitioners: a policy analysis.

    PubMed

    Cashin, Andrew

    2014-10-01

    In Australia in 2010, nurse practitioners (NPs) were granted legislated access to the Medical Benefits Scheme (MBS) and Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme (PBS) as providers. These schemes are the federal schemes for third-party reimbursement for health care and medications. As a condition of access to the schemes, it was determined that collaborative arrangements needed to be in place as part of eligibility criteria for NPs. This article is the first published policy analysis of this determination. Published literature and available grey literature (including meeting minutes), and media content, was accessed and analyzed. The policy that was the National Health Collaborative arrangements for Nurse Practitioners Determination to amend the Australian National Health Act 1953 was a success. The policy led to NP access as providers to the MBS and PBS in Australia. Understanding the policy process as it relates to the determination of the need for collaborative arrangements demystifies the process and origins of the policy for NPs in Australia. Understanding the determination means NPs in Australia will not artificially reduce scope of practice based on recommendations from the medical lobby. Clear research direction is provided that may inform the next policy cycle. ©2014 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  7. [An advanced nurse practitioner in general medicine in the United Kingdom].

    PubMed

    Aston, Jenny

    2015-01-01

    In the United Kingdom, an advanced nurse practitioner can carry out consultations and write prescriptions in the same way as a general practitioner. Jenny Aston, a nurse for more than 30 years, works in a GP surgery in Cambridge. Here, she explains the role of nurses in the organisation of health care in the UK, and talks about her career and her missions as an advanced nurse practitioner. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Online tutors as a solution to the shortage of nurse practitioner educators.

    PubMed

    Bruce, T Joyce

    2007-01-01

    The shortage of nursing faculty in Canada, particularly those qualified to teach students in nurse practitioner programs, has contributed to the use of adjunct teachers and online methodologies. The author discusses 1 nurse practitioner online program's use of nurse practitioners who work in full-time clinical roles as tutors. Learning through experience, the author shares how the online tutor role was developed to assist those who are considering using tutors as a program delivery strategy.

  9. Vacant hospitals and under-employed nurses: a qualitative study of the nursing workforce management situation in Nepal.

    PubMed

    Adhikari, Radha

    2015-04-01

    It is vital for all healthcare systems to have a sufficient number of suitably trained health professionals including nurses at all levels of health services to deliver effective healthcare. An ethnographic, qualitative method was chosen for this study, which included open-ended, in-depth interviews with a range of stakeholders including student nurses, qualified nurses, nurse managers and lecturers, and the human resource co-ordinator in the Ministry of Health and Population. Available records and policy documents were also analysed. Study findings suggest that there is a severe mal-distribution of the nursing workforce in rural and urban healthcare centres in Nepal. Although there is an oversupply of newly qualified nurses in hospitals in Kathmandu, the staffing situation outside the valley is undesirable. Additionally, the turnover of junior nursing staff remains high in major urban hospitals. Most qualified nurses aspire to work in developed countries, such as the UK, North America, Australia and New Zealand. Between 2000 and 2008, as many as 3000 nurses have left Nepal for jobs in the developed west. There is no effective management strategy in place to retain a nursing workforce, particularly in rural Nepal. This article concludes by proposing some suggestions for a nursing workforce retention policy to address this critical issue.

  10. Humanbecoming theory in practice: a case for theory-guided nurse practitioner education.

    PubMed

    Karnick, Paula M

    2012-04-01

    The age-old battle of what to include in nursing education continues. Now this battle extends itself into nurse practitioner education with a slightly different twist. Abandoning nursing theory-guided education for the medical model leaves nurse practitioner education flat. In this author's academic experience, nursing theory was included in the curriculum. The exemplar presented is testament to the distinction and significance of including nursing theory-guided education. The unique difference between nurse practitioners and physicians is the use of theory in practice.

  11. Implementing two nurse practitioner models of service at an Australian male prison: A quality assurance study.

    PubMed

    Wong, Ides; Wright, Eryn; Santomauro, Damian; How, Raquel; Leary, Christopher; Harris, Meredith

    2017-06-21

    To examine the quality and safety of nurse practitioner services of two newly implemented nurse practitioner models of care at a correctional facility. Nurse practitioners could help to meet the physical and mental health needs of Australia's growing prison population; however, the nurse practitioner role has not previously been evaluated in this context. A quality assurance study conducted in an Australian prison where a primary health nurse practitioner and a mental health nurse practitioner were incorporated into an existing primary healthcare service. The study was guided by Donabedian's structure, processes and outcomes framework. Routinely collected information included surveys of staff attitudes to the implementation of the nurse practitioner models (n = 21 staff), consultation records describing clinical processes and time use (n = 289 consultations), and a patient satisfaction survey (n = 29 patients). Data were analysed descriptively and compared to external benchmarks where available. Over the two-month period, the nurse practitioners provided 289 consultations to 208 prisoners. The presenting problems treated indicated that most referrals were appropriate. A significant proportion of consultations involved medication review and management. Both nurse practitioners spent more than half of their time on individual patient-related care. Overall, multidisciplinary team staff agreed that the nurse practitioner services were necessary, safe, met patient need and reduced treatment delays. Findings suggest that the implementation of nurse practitioners into Australian correctional facilities is acceptable and feasible and has the potential to improve prisoners' access to health services. Structural factors (e.g., room availability and limited access to prisoners) may have reduced the efficiency of the nurse practitioners' clinical processes and service implementation. Results suggest that nurse practitioner models can be successfully integrated into a

  12. Preparing the Workforce for the 21st Century: The Nurse Educator's Challenge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southern Regional Education Board, Atlanta, GA. Council on Collegiate Education for Nursing.

    This document consists of synopses of selected presentations on the nurse educator's challenge in preparing the workforce for the 21st century that were made during the 1998 meeting of the Council on Collegiate Education for Nursing. In her paper "Redesigning Health Care Delivery," Karlene Kerfoot described changes in health care…

  13. Acute care nurse practitioners in transplantation: adding value to your program.

    PubMed

    Tedesco, Janel

    2011-12-01

    Nurse practitioners are nurses who are prepared at the graduate level. They exercise autonomy in clinical decision making, perform physical examinations and obtain health histories, diagnose and treat a variety of illnesses, provide education and counseling to patients, perform procedures, and ultimately provide cost-effective care. The role of the nurse practitioner evolved in the 1960s, when nurse practitioners filled a void in response to the nationwide shortage of physicians. Today, nurse practitioners specialize both by degree and by certification examination. There are several types of nurse practitioners, including acute care, adult, family practice, and pediatric. The incorporation of acute care nurse practitioners (ACNPs) in transplant programs is an emerging field and varies across the country from center to center. The goals of this article are to (1) identify implications for ACNPs in transplant, (2) discuss the value of using ACNPs in practice, and (3) explore billing and regulatory aspects of ACNPs in transplant programs.

  14. Transformation by design: nursing workforce innovation and reduction strategies in turbulent times of change.

    PubMed

    Palazzo, Mary O

    2015-01-01

    The evolution of care delivery from an acute care and inpatient standard to the outpatient setting and health promotion model is generating the need for innovative workforce and infrastructure adjustments to meet the new paradigm of population health management. Successful transformation of the nursing workforce necessitates a positive style of thinking that addresses rational concerns during times of difficult transition. Nurse leaders are called to recognize and appreciate the strengths of the nursing workforce by involving them in the course of change through collaboration, planning, and discussion. One unique way to plan and develop new care delivery models is to adopt the framework used in health facility planning and design for new services, units, or hospitals. This framework is flexible and can be adjusted easily to meet the objectives of a small nursing workforce innovation project or expanded to encompass the needs of a large-scale hospital transformation. Structured questioning further helps the team to identify barriers to care and allows for the development of new concepts that are objective and in accord with evidence-based practice and data. This article explores the advantages and disadvantages of implementing innovative workforce redesign and workforce reduction strategies.

  15. An exploration of the correlates of nurse practitioners' clinical decision-making abilities.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shiah-Lian; Hsu, Hsiu-Ying; Chang, Chin-Fu; Lin, Esther Ching-Lan

    2016-04-01

    This study investigated nurse practitioners' clinical decision-making abilities and the factors that affect these abilities. Nurse practitioners play an important role in clinical care decision-making; however, studies exploring the factors that affect their decision-making abilities are lacking. A cross-sectional descriptive survey was employed. A purposive sample of 197 nurse practitioners was recruited from a medical centre in central Taiwan. Structured questionnaires consisting of the Knowledge Readiness Scale, the Critical Thinking Disposition Inventory and the Clinical Decision-Making Model Inventory were used to collect data. The intuitive-analytical type was the most commonly used decision-making model, and the intuitive type was the least frequently used model. The decision-making model used was significantly related to the nurse practitioners' work unit. Significant differences were noted between the nurse practitioners' clinical decision-making models and their critical thinking dispositions (openness and empathy). The nurse practitioners' years of work experience, work unit, professional knowledge and critical thinking disposition (openness and empathy as well as holistic and reflective dispositions) predicted the nurse practitioners' analytical decision-making scores. Age, years of nurse practitioner work experience, work unit and critical thinking disposition (holistic and reflective) predicted the nurse practitioners' intuitive decision-making scores. This study contributes to the topic of clinical decision-making by describing various types of nurse practitioner decision-making. The factors associated with analytic and intuitive decision-making scores were identified. These findings might be beneficial when planning continuing education programmes to enhance the clinical decision-making abilities of nurse practitioners. The study results showed that nurse practitioners demonstrated various clinical decision-making types across different work units

  16. Nurse practitioner succession planning: forward thinking or just an after-thought?

    PubMed

    Raftery, Chris

    2013-11-01

    This paper examines the concept of backfill and succession planning for an elite speciality nursing group, nurse practitioners. Nurse practitioners work in many public, private, inpatient and outpatient settings across the country. This discussion is relevant to all practicing nurse practitioners, but especially those with their own specific patient group. A nurse practitioner is an elite nursing specialist with specific speciality skills. While present, nurse practitioners can be most effective at holistically managing their patient group. However, if an endorsed nurse practitioner is no longer present, for a short or long interval, their specific skills and abilities cannot be easily substituted or replaced in the short term. This potential compromise in patient care can be detrimental to the developing reputation of the role of the nurse practitioner. In order to address the shortage of specifically skilled nurse practitioners across the country in all specialties, there is a need to forward plan and consider contingencies for succession in the event of short- or long-term absences from the clinical environment. Succession planning is the key to patient safety and the successful implementation of the role of the nurse practitioner.

  17. Nurse practitioner practice and deployment: electronic mail Delphi study.

    PubMed

    Marsden, Janet; Dolan, Brian; Holt, Lynda

    2003-09-01

    The nature of modern government and needs of policy-makers demand accurate information that is delivered quickly. This study was part of a larger project for the Department of Health relating to nurse practitioner (NP) education and practice in UK. The aim of the study was to identify the principal factors that help or hinder the development of NP roles in the National Health Service. In order to facilitate a rapid response, a Delphi study was undertaken using electronic mail (e-mail) and was completed within 4 weeks. Key stakeholders in NP practice, education and research and (non-governmental) policy-making were invited to participate. Key themes relating to the deployment and practice of NPs were generated. These were refined and collated by the research team and then rated by the respondents. This approach generated valuable expert consensus data around NP deployment and practice. Nurse practitioners' practice is recognized as an integral part of health care that needs to be recognized by regulatory bodies to promote understanding of their potential at local levels. Nurse practitioners need freedom to innovate, adequate support and appropriate education to allow true autonomy. Limited prescribing and local restrictions on requesting investigations hinder practice. Although this was a small-scale study, the expert panel was wide-ranging and achieved substantial consensus. The organisational and cultural changes that are required to foster the development of practice and deployment of NPs have yet to be instigated, according to the comments of the key stakeholders in this study. There appears to be a clear message that the government needs to take a more interventionist role in supporting nursing developments, rather than leaving this to local arrangements.

  18. The core role of the nurse practitioner: practice, professionalism and clinical leadership.

    PubMed

    Carryer, Jenny; Gardner, Glenn; Dunn, Sandra; Gardner, Anne

    2007-10-01

    To draw on empirical evidence to illustrate the core role of nurse practitioners in Australia and New Zealand. Enacted legislation provides for mutual recognition of qualifications, including nursing, between New Zealand and Australia. As the nurse practitioner role is relatively new in both countries, there is no consistency in role expectation and hence mutual recognition has not yet been applied to nurse practitioners. A study jointly commissioned by both countries' Regulatory Boards developed information on the core role of the nurse practitioner, to develop shared competency and educational standards. Reporting on this study's process and outcomes provides insights that are relevant both locally and internationally. This interpretive study used multiple data sources, including published and grey literature, policy documents, nurse practitioner program curricula and interviews with 15 nurse practitioners from the two countries. Data were analysed according to the appropriate standard for each data type and included both deductive and inductive methods. The data were aggregated thematically according to patterns within and across the interview and material data. The core role of the nurse practitioner was identified as having three components: dynamic practice, professional efficacy and clinical leadership. Nurse practitioner practice is dynamic and involves the application of high level clinical knowledge and skills in a wide range of contexts. The nurse practitioner demonstrates professional efficacy, enhanced by an extended range of autonomy that includes legislated privileges. The nurse practitioner is a clinical leader with a readiness and an obligation to advocate for their client base and their profession at the systems level of health care. A clearly articulated and research informed description of the core role of the nurse practitioner provides the basis for development of educational and practice competency standards. These research findings provide

  19. Developing the children's nursing workforce: profile, first jobs and future plans of newly qualified diplomates.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Sarah; Cox, Susanne; Murrells, Trevor

    2006-03-01

    Concerns regarding the number of children's nurses persist despite initiatives designed to reverse this trend. Recruiting and retaining a diverse nursing workforce is high on the policy agenda, particularly since the publication of the National Service Framework for Children, Young People and Maternity Services. This article reports findings from the first phase of a longitudinal study investigating the careers of child branch diplomates, focusing on the cohort's profile, first jobs and future plans. Findings suggest there is considerable scope to increase diversity in the children's nursing workforce. Child health diplomates indicate little sign of early attrition from nursing at qualification. Continuing professional development is a high priority for many child health nurses at the outset of their careers. These findings provide an important benchmark for later stages of child branch nurses' careers.

  20. 42 CFR 405.2415 - Services and supplies incident to nurse practitioner and physician assistant services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Services and supplies incident to nurse... Services and supplies incident to nurse practitioner and physician assistant services. (a) Services and supplies incident to a nurse practitioner's or physician assistant's services are reimbursable under...

  1. 42 CFR 405.2415 - Services and supplies incident to nurse practitioner and physician assistant services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Services and supplies incident to nurse... Services and supplies incident to nurse practitioner and physician assistant services. (a) Services and supplies incident to a nurse practitioner's or physician assistant's services are reimbursable under...

  2. 42 CFR 405.2415 - Services and supplies incident to nurse practitioner and physician assistant services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Services and supplies incident to nurse... Services and supplies incident to nurse practitioner and physician assistant services. (a) Services and supplies incident to a nurse practitioner's or physician assistant's services are reimbursable under...

  3. The graduate nursing workforce: does an international perspective have relevance for New Zealand?

    PubMed

    Scott, Susan; Huntington, Annette; Baker, Heather; Dickinson, Annette

    2011-11-01

    A key focus of concern in relation to the future shape of the nursing workforce internationally and nationally has been the perceived high attrition rate of graduates. This concern has been accompanied by a plethora of literature on graduate transition to practice. Many of the studies have been carried out from the perspective of the employing organisation and look at graduates turnover intent and retention strategies within the first year of practice. In recent years New Zealand has responded with some success to these concerns by introducing graduate programmes covering the first twelve months of practice. There are fewer published studies that have used local, regional or national populations of nursing graduates to explore actual turnover for periods longer than the first twelve months transition. This paper reviews these latter studies and shows that the most likely reasons for mobility, both within nursing or out of the profession, have been found to be related to the work environment and family responsibilities. Although some graduates leave the nursing profession early in their career, many more have made an employment move within nursing, and younger mobile graduates in particular are interested in career promotion. These findings suggest that ongoing innovation in roles and skills within the professional work context is required to ensure longer term retention of graduates. As New Zealand is now collecting graduate nursing workforce data these international findings have implications which should be considered in the development of New Zealand nursing workforce strategy. Encouraging graduate stability depends on a graduate workforce strategy which

  4. Nurse practitioner organizational climate in primary care settings: implications for professional practice.

    PubMed

    Poghosyan, Lusine; Nannini, Angela; Stone, Patricia W; Smaldone, Arlene

    2013-01-01

    The expansion of the nurse practitioner (NP) workforce in primary care is key to meeting the increased demand for care. Organizational climates in primary care settings affect NP professional practice and the quality of care. This study investigated organizational climate and its domains affecting NP professional practice in primary care settings. A qualitative descriptive design, with purposive sampling, was used to recruit 16 NPs practicing in primary care settings in Massachusetts. An interview guide was developed and pretested with two NPs and in 1 group interview with 7 NPs. Data collection took place in spring of 2011. Individual interviews lasted from 30-70 minutes, were audio recorded, and transcribed. Data were analyzed using Atlas.ti 6.0 software by 3 researchers. Content analysis was applied. Three previously identified themes, NP-physician relations, independent practice and autonomy, and professional visibility, as well as two new themes, organizational support and resources and NP-administration relations emerged from the analyses. NPs reported collegial relations with physicians, challenges in establishing independent practice, suboptimal relationships with administration, and lack of support. NP contributions to patient care were invisible. Favorable organizational climates should be promoted to support the expanding of NP workforce in primary care and to optimize recruitment and retention efforts.

  5. Clinical residency training: Is it essential to the Doctor of Nursing Practice for nurse practitioner preparation?

    PubMed

    Harper, Doreen C; McGuinness, Teena M; Johnson, Jean

    The Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) degree positions nurse practitioners (NPs) and other advanced practice registered nurses, with clinical competencies similar to other disciplines requiring doctoral education (medicine, physical therapy, psychology, and pharmacy). In addition, all these disciplines also offer residencies. However, nursing is the only discipline that does not require a doctoral degree and/or have a systematic approach to residency training for advanced practice roles. The authors posit that there are critical policy issues to resolve within the nursing profession to clarify the role that clinical residencies should play in transition to DNP practice specifically related to NPs. The purpose of this article was to (a) describe the context of NP residency models within NP curricula that strengthen the DNP Essentials with an emphasis on Essential VIII and a focus on distinctive clinical specialization, (b) describe the history and policy implications of NP residency programs as well as existing programs that assist transition to practice, and (c) recommend policies for consideration related to DNP NP residencies. Literature on nurse practitioner residencies was reviewed. While nurse practitioner residencies continue to grow, research is needed regarding outcomes of job satisfaction, clinical competencies, and patient satisfaction. The first year of practice for nurse practitioners is a critical period of professional development. It is important to further clarify the need, direction, and program standards. Academically affiliated residencies will facilitate the development and standardization of curricula and competencies to enhance clinical rigor. The partnership between academic units and clinical agencies will pool resources and strengthen nursing in both settings. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Nurse practitioner-led transitional care interventions: An integrative review.

    PubMed

    Mora, Kathlyen; Dorrejo, Xiomara M; Carreon, Kimberly Mae; Butt, Sadia

    2017-08-28

    Chronically ill patients 65 and above have an increased risk of preventable readmission within 30 days of discharge from the hospital. The Transitional Care Model (TCM) introduced by Naylor and colleagues was implemented to improve the transition between hospital and home while decreasing readmissions. This article examines whether nurse practitioner (NP)- led TCM interventions as compared to standard care decrease hospital readmission rates in older adults. A literature review was conducted from June 2016 to March 2017 using Cochrane Library, PubMed, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Health Literature (CINAHL) PLUS, Joanna Briggs Institute, and ProQuest Central to seek out the highest level of evidence. Search results were refined to focus on randomized control trials (RTCs) containing NP-led TCM interventions with older adults. Synthesis of three RTCs, one meta-analysis, and four nonrandomized studies reviewed TCM interventions that included these interventions: follow-up phone calls post discharge, home visits, and handoff of information to the patient's primary care provider. These interventions, although not exclusively led by NPs, decreased hospital readmission rates. NP-led TCM interventions have the potential to decrease readmissions, but the level of evidence is insufficiently high to allow for generalizability, warranting further study. ©2017 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  7. Essential nurse practitioner business knowledge: An interprofessional perspective.

    PubMed

    LaFevers, David; Ward-Smith, Peggy; Wright, Wendy

    2015-04-01

    To describe business practice knowledge from the perspectives of nurse practitioners (NPs) who are practicing clinicians, academic instructors, and clinic managers. Using the eight domains of business practice attitudes identified by the Medical Group Management Associations Body of Knowledge (MGMA), which are supported by the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN), a study-specific survey was developed. Data, which describe the knowledge and attitudes with respect to business practices, were obtained from 370 participants. Regardless of their job classification, these participants described (1) quality management, (2) risk management, and (3) patient care systems as critical business practice knowledge. Consensus was also achieved when ranking the content for business practice knowledge: (1) patient care systems, (2) business operation, and (3) financial management. These data identify gaps in business practice knowledge and content that should be included in educational programs. Business practice knowledge is essential for a successful clinical practice and should be a professional practice skill for the NP. ©2015 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  8. The public sector nursing workforce in Kenya: a county-level analysis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Kenya’s human resources for health shortage is well documented, yet in line with the new constitution, responsibility for health service delivery will be devolved to 47 new county administrations. This work describes the public sector nursing workforce likely to be inherited by the counties, and examines the relationships between nursing workforce density and key indicators. Methods National nursing deployment data linked to nursing supply data were used and analyzed using statistical and geographical analysis software. Data on nurses deployed in national referral hospitals and on nurses deployed in non-public sector facilities were excluded from main analyses. The densities and characteristics of the public sector nurses across the counties were obtained and examined against an index of county remoteness, and the nursing densities were correlated with five key indicators. Results Of the 16,371 nurses in the public non-tertiary sector, 76% are women and 53% are registered nurses, with 35% of the nurses aged 40 to 49 years. The nursing densities across counties range from 1.2 to 0.08 per 1,000 population. There are statistically significant associations of the nursing densities with a measure of health spending per capita (P value = 0.0028) and immunization rates (P value = 0.0018). A higher county remoteness index is associated with explaining lower female to male ratio of public sector nurses across counties (P value <0.0001). Conclusions An overall shortage of nurses (range of 1.2 to 0.08 per 1,000) in the public sector countrywide is complicated by mal-distribution and varying workforce characteristics (for example, age profile) across counties. All stakeholders should support improvements in human resources information systems and help address personnel shortages and mal-distribution if equitable, quality health-care delivery in the counties is to be achieved. PMID:24467776

  9. Attitudes of paediatric intensive care nurses to development of a nurse practitioner role for critical care transport.

    PubMed

    Davies, Joanna; Bickell, Fiona; Tibby, Shane M

    2011-02-01

    This paper is a report of a descriptive study of the attitudes and opinions of nurses before and after the introduction of independent Retrieval Nurse Practitioners into a critical care transport service for children. Little is known about nurses' attitudes to advanced practice roles, particularly when these function as part of a team in a high-risk, remote setting (distant to the base hospital). Increasing knowledge in this area may give insight into ways of improving team working and enhancing quality of patient care. A qualitative questionnaire was sent to nurses pre- (June 2006) and post- (July 2007) retrieval nurse practitioner introduction. Questionnaires were analysed using an adapted phenomenological method. The response rates were 62% (2006) and 48% (2007). The main themes that emerged included fear, communication, trust, team working, role conflict, role division and role boundaries. In the first survey, most nurses anticipated difficulties during retrieval with retrieval nurse practitioners and felt anxious about the prospect of being part of a team with an independent retrieval nurse practitioner. However, by the second survey (after retrieval nurse practitioner introduction), the majority reported confidence in the retrieval nurse practitioners' knowledge and skills. This advanced practice development has been a challenge for the nurses and the retrieval nurse practitioners, but initial anxieties and fears of a host of anticipated problems have been largely dispelled as enhanced communication and team working were reported. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  10. Healthcare workforce development through an international workshop series: nursing care of older adults.

    PubMed

    Schoessler, Mary Theresa; Van Son, Catherine; Overall, Judith W; Koleva, Yordanka; Ostrovskaya, Irina; Marriott, Dedre; Surma, Mariya

    2009-01-01

    A critical need exists to educate the international healthcare workforce on the care of the older adult. This article describes an interdisciplinary program to address the nursing needs of older adults via a series of workshops in Russia. Strategies to bridge international healthcare and educational cultures are demonstrated. Implications for international workforce development, such as establishing collaborative partnerships, creating culturally appropriate materials, and modeling active learning strategies, are discussed.

  11. Overcoming barriers to the employment and utilization of the nurse practitioner.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, J A; Dachelet, C Z; Sultz, H A; Henry, M; Carrol, H D

    1978-11-01

    A national longitudinal cohort study of nurse practitioners and their employers conducted during 1973--1976 provided data on barriers to the development of the nurse practitioner role in primary care. Nearly 90 per cent of the 500 primary care nurse practitioners responding and 75 per cent of the 407 employers responding reported encountering one or more barriers to the role development of the nurse practitioner in their practice setting. Nurse practitioners identified an average of 2.2 barriers and employers identified an average of 1.6 barriers each. Specific barriers identified by 20 per cent or more of the nurse practitioners and employers were legal restrictions, limitations of space and facilities, and resistance from other providers. The data and other evidence suggest that these barriers are not insurmountable and that progress is being made in overcoming these obstacles.

  12. Overcoming barriers to the employment and utilization of the nurse practitioner.

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, J A; Dachelet, C Z; Sultz, H A; Henry, M; Carrol, H D

    1978-01-01

    A national longitudinal cohort study of nurse practitioners and their employers conducted during 1973--1976 provided data on barriers to the development of the nurse practitioner role in primary care. Nearly 90 per cent of the 500 primary care nurse practitioners responding and 75 per cent of the 407 employers responding reported encountering one or more barriers to the role development of the nurse practitioner in their practice setting. Nurse practitioners identified an average of 2.2 barriers and employers identified an average of 1.6 barriers each. Specific barriers identified by 20 per cent or more of the nurse practitioners and employers were legal restrictions, limitations of space and facilities, and resistance from other providers. The data and other evidence suggest that these barriers are not insurmountable and that progress is being made in overcoming these obstacles. PMID:717618

  13. Role and quality of nurse practitioner practice: a policy issue.

    PubMed

    Mullinix, Connie; Bucholtz, Dawn P

    2009-01-01

    Nurse practitioners (NPs) are at a crucial period in the development of their profession. The increasing demand for primary care practitioners is changing the environment in which they practice. As they face both increased opportunity and continuing opposition to independent practice, NPs must define their role in healthcare delivery and establish their capabilities. The debate around what is and is not an appropriate role for the NP often focuses on quality of care; however, the real issues may be turf and economic defensiveness in an increasingly competitive market. This article discusses the challenges NPs face in establishing the quality of care they provide, and it reviews the literature on the subject, identifying its strengths and weaknesses and recommending policy changes.

  14. Planning and creating a new bi-state nursing workforce center through unique partnerships.

    PubMed

    Lacey, Susan R; McEniry, Mary; Cox, Karen S; Olney, Adrienne

    2009-09-01

    Multiple strategies are needed to address the complex issues related to the nursing shortage. It is not enough to focus on increasing the number of students in the pipeline unless this is met with complimentary work to improve the professional practice environments of nursing staff. In addition, nurse-driven improvement projects that address specific patient and organizational outcomes will elevate the role of nurses from trusted professional to quality agents. The authors describe a partnership that has launched a new type of workforce center with core missions to create work environment improvements and point-of-care change led by staff nurses.

  15. The costs of training a nurse practitioner in primary care: the importance of allowing for the cost of education and training when making decisions about changing the professional-mix.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Lesley; Netten, Ann

    2007-05-01

    What is already known on this topic * Cost containment through the most effective mix of staff achievable within available resources and organisational priorities is of increasing importance in most health systems. However, there is a dearth of information about the full economic implications of changing skill mix. * In the UK a major shift in the primary care workforce is likely in response to the rapidly developing role of nurse practitioners and policies aimed to encourage GP practices to transfer some of their responsibilities to other, less costly, professionals. * Previous research has developed an approach to incorporating the costs of qualifications, and thus the investment required to develop a skilled workforce, for a variety of health service professionals including GPs. What this study adds * This paper describes a methodology of costing nurse practitioners that incorporates the human capital cost implications of developing a skilled nurse practitioner workforce. With appropriate sources of data the method could be adapted for use internationally. * Including the full cost of qualifications results in nearly a 24 per cent increase in the unit cost of a Nurse Practitioner. * Allowing for all investment costs and adjusting for length of consultation, the cost of a GP consultation was nearly 60 per cent higher than that of a Nurse Practitioner.

  16. Continuing challenges for the mental health consumer workforce: a role for mental health nurses?

    PubMed

    Cleary, Michelle; Horsfall, Jan; Hunt, Glenn E; Escott, Phil; Happell, Brenda

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this paper is to discuss issues impacting on consumer workforce participation and challenges that continue to arise for these workers, other service providers, and the mental health system. The literature identifies the following issues as problematic: role confusion and role strain; lack of support, training, and supervision structures; job titles that do not reflect actual work; poor and inconsistent pay; overwork; limited professional development; insufficient organizational adaptation to expedite consumer participation; staff discrimination and stigma; dual relationships; and the need to further evaluate consumer workforce contributions. These factors adversely impact on the emotional well-being of the consumer workforce and might deprive them of the support required for the consumer participation roles to impact on service delivery. The attitudes of mental health professionals have been identified as a significant obstacle to the enhancement of consumer participation and consumer workforce roles, particularly in public mental health services. A more comprehensive understanding of consumer workforce roles, their benefits, and the obstacles to their success should become integral to the education and training provided to the mental health nursing workforce of the future to contribute to the development of a more supportive working environment to facilitate the development of effective consumer roles. © 2011 The Authors. International Journal of Mental Health Nursing © 2011 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  17. Cost-effectiveness of nurse practitioners in primary and specialised ambulatory care: systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Martin-Misener, Ruth; Harbman, Patricia; Donald, Faith; Reid, Kim; Kilpatrick, Kelley; Carter, Nancy; Bryant-Lukosius, Denise; Kaasalainen, Sharon; Marshall, Deborah A; Charbonneau-Smith, Renee; DiCenso, Alba

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine the cost-effectiveness of nurse practitioners delivering primary and specialised ambulatory care. Design A systematic review of randomised controlled trials reported since 1980. Data sources 10 electronic bibliographic databases, handsearches, contact with authors, bibliographies and websites. Included studies Randomised controlled trials that evaluated nurse practitioners in alternative and complementary ambulatory care roles and reported health system outcomes. Results 11 trials were included. In four trials of alternative provider ambulatory primary care roles, nurse practitioners were equivalent to physicians in all but seven patient outcomes favouring nurse practitioner care and in all but four health system outcomes, one favouring nurse practitioner care and three favouring physician care. In a meta-analysis of two studies (2689 patients) with minimal heterogeneity and high-quality evidence, nurse practitioner care resulted in lower mean health services costs per consultation (mean difference: −€6.41; 95% CI −€9.28 to −€3.55; p<0.0001) (2006 euros). In two trials of alternative provider specialised ambulatory care roles, nurse practitioners were equivalent to physicians in all but three patient outcomes and one health system outcome favouring nurse practitioner care. In five trials of complementary provider specialised ambulatory care roles, 16 patient/provider outcomes favouring nurse practitioner plus usual care, and 16 were equivalent. Two health system outcomes favoured nurse practitioner plus usual care, four favoured usual care and 14 were equivalent. Four studies of complementary specialised ambulatory care compared costs, but only one assessed costs and outcomes jointly. Conclusions Nurse practitioners in alternative provider ambulatory primary care roles have equivalent or better patient outcomes than comparators and are potentially cost-saving. Evidence for their cost-effectiveness in alternative provider

  18. How do nurse practitioners in acute care affect perceptions of team effectiveness?

    PubMed

    Kilpatrick, Kelley

    2013-09-01

    To describe how acute care nurse practitioners affect perceptions of team effectiveness. Acute care nurse practitioners provide safe and effective care to patients. There is limited evidence of the effects of acute care nurse practitioner roles on healthcare teams, and many of the findings are contradictory. Research is lacking to describe how nurse practitioners affect perceptions of team effectiveness. A descriptive multiple-case study undertaken in two university-affiliated teaching hospitals in Canada. Data were collected from March-May 2009. Data sources included interviews (n = 59), time and motion study, non-participant observations, documents and field notes. Interviews were conducted individually or in groups using a semi-structured interview guide. Data were analysed within and across the cases to identify similarities and differences in perceptions of team effectiveness. Team members believed the nurse practitioners improved the team's effectiveness. They identified six team processes they believed were improved by the addition of the nurse practitioners to the teams. The processes included decision-making, communication, cohesion, care coordination, problem-solving and focus on patients and families. The study contributes to our understanding of how nurse practitioners affect perceptions of team effectiveness. Improved team communication and care coordination were believed to be particularly important. Nurse practitioner can facilitate patient- and family-centred care in healthcare teams. Nurse practitioners improve perceptions of team effectiveness. Further work is needed in different contexts and with patients and families to determine their perceptions of team effectiveness. The nurse practitioner role was believed to be particularly important to improve team communication and care coordination. This constitutes an added value of acute care nurse practitioners roles in healthcare teams. Nurse practitioner roles contribute to patient-centred care

  19. Predicting the future of the adult nurse practitioner.

    PubMed

    Glynn, P M

    1998-05-01

    In the late 1980s, the future of the adult nurse practitioner (ANP) was less than certain. This study, conducted in 1987, explored the opinions of ANPs, physicians, and healthcare administrators regarding the future of the ANP in 1995. A sociological framework was used to identify factors potentially affecting the ANPs future and to assess the ANP's functionality vis-à-vis the healthcare delivery system. Findings are discussed within the context of the healthcare delivery system as it emerged by 1995, and recommendations are made for ensuring the future viability of the ANP role.

  20. Racial and ethnic diversity of the U.S. national nurse workforce 1988-2013.

    PubMed

    Xue, Ying; Brewer, Carol

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this article is to examine the racial and ethnic diversity profile of the nurse workforce over time and by geographic region. We conducted survey analysis using the National Sample Survey of Registered Nurses from 1988 to 2008, and further supplemented our trend analysis using published findings from the 2013 National Workforce Survey of Registered Nurses. The gap in racial/ethnic minority representation between the RN workforce and the population has been persistent and has widened over time. This diversity gap is primarily due to underrepresentation of Hispanics and Blacks in the RN workforce, which varied across states and regions, with the largest gaps occurring for Hispanics in the South and West and for Blacks in the South. Greater levels of sustained and targeted support to increase nurse workforce diversity are needed and should be geared not only to specific underrepresented groups but also to the regions and states with the greatest needs. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  1. State regulatory board structure, regulations, and nurse practitioner availability.

    PubMed

    Wilken, M

    1995-10-01

    State boards of nursing (BON) and medicine (BOM) promulgate regulations that affect nurse practitioners (NPs). Certain characteristics of board structure have an impact on two potential barriers to NP practice: the absence of direct third-party reimbursement and authority to prescribe. The percentage of consumers on BONs and BOMs increases the likelihood of direct third-party reimbursement for NPs. The presence of an NP committee providing input to a board increases the likelihood of authority to prescribe for NPs. The availability of NPs is enhanced by the presence of NP educational programs in the state, the level of effort by the state related to NP recruitment and retention, and the presence of direct third-party reimbursement.

  2. Leadership styles and outcome patterns for the nursing workforce and work environment: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Cummings, Greta G; MacGregor, Tara; Davey, Mandy; Lee, How; Wong, Carol A; Lo, Eliza; Muise, Melanie; Stafford, Erin

    2010-03-01

    Numerous policy and research reports call for leadership to build quality work environments, implement new models of care, and bring health and wellbeing to an exhausted and stretched nursing workforce. Rarely do they indicate how leadership should be enacted, or examine whether some forms of leadership may lead to negative outcomes. We aimed to examine the relationships between various styles of leadership and outcomes for the nursing workforce and their work environments. The search strategy of this multidisciplinary systematic review included 10 electronic databases. Published, quantitative studies that examined leadership behaviours and outcomes for nurses and organizations were included. Quality assessments, data extractions and analysis were completed on all included studies. 34,664 titles and abstracts were screened resulting in 53 included studies. Using content analysis, 64 outcomes were grouped into five categories: staffsatisfaction with work, role and pay, staff relationships with work, staff health and wellbeing, work environment factors, and productivity and effectiveness. Distinctive patterns between relational and task focused leadership styles and their outcomes for nurses and their work environments emerged from our analysis. For example, 24 studies reported that leadership styles focused on people and relationships (transformational, resonant, supportive, and consideration) were associated with higher nurse job satisfaction, whereas 10 studies found that leadership styles focused on tasks (dissonant, instrumental and management by exception) were associated with lower nurse job satisfaction. Similar trends were found for each category of outcomes. Our results document evidence of various forms of leadership and their differential effects on the nursing workforce and work environments. Leadership focused on task completion alone is not sufficient to achieve optimum outcomes for the nursing workforce. Efforts by organizations and individuals to

  3. Scaling up the global nursing health workforce: contributions of an international organization.

    PubMed

    Rukholm, Ellen E; Stamler, Lynnette Leeseberg; Talbot, Lise R; Bednash, Geraldine; Raines, Fay; Potempa, Kathleen; Nugent, Pauline; Clark, Dame Jill Macleod; Bernhauser, Sue; Parfitt, Barbara

    2009-01-01

    In this paper key highlights of the scholarly work presented at the Toronto 2008 Global Alliance for Nursing Education & Scholarship (GANES) conference are summarized, challenges opportunities and issues facing nursing education globally arising from the conference discourse are outlined and initial steps are suggested as a way forward to a shared global view of baccalaureate and graduate nursing education and scholarship. This shared view arises from beginning understandings of the issues and opportunities we face globally starting with and building upon the lessons learned from the literature and from the experiences of nursing educators and nursing education organization locally, regionally, nationally and internationally. The theme of the groundbreaking GANES Toronto conference was "Educating the future nursing and health workforce: A global challenge". One hundred seventy delegates from 17 countries attended the event, with over 80 papers presented. A primary focus of GANES is the contribution of a strategic alliance of national nursing education organizations to contribute to nursing education leading practices and policy that address the scaling up of global nursing and health workforce. The founding members of GANES see a clear link between a strong educational infrastructure and strong scholarship activities in nursing and the ability of a society to be healthy and prosperous. Evidence presented at the recent GANES conference supports that belief. Through the strength of partnerships and other capacity-building efforts, member countries can support each other to address the global nursing education and health challenges while respecting the local issues.

  4. For Elderly Needing Home Medical Care, Are Nurse Practitioners the Answer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Virginia Medical School's department of public health sciences. Nurse practitioners are nurses with advanced training. In some states, they can prescribe medicine and practice without direct supervision of a doctor the study authors noted. ...

  5. Reliability and validity of the Nurse Practitioners' Roles and Competencies Scale.

    PubMed

    Lin, Li-Chun; Lee, Sheuan; Ueng, Steve Wen-Neng; Tang, Woung-Ru

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to test the reliability and construct validity of the Nurse Practitioners' Roles and Competencies Scale. The role of nurse practitioners has attracted international attention. The advanced nursing role played by nurse practitioners varies with national conditions and medical environments. To date, no suitable measurement tool has been available for assessing the roles and competencies of nurse practitioners in Asian countries. Secondary analysis of data from three studies related to nurse practitioners' role competencies. We analysed data from 563 valid questionnaires completed in three studies to identify the factor structure of the Nurse Practitioners' Roles and Competencies Scale. To this end, we performed exploratory factor analysis using principal component analysis extraction with varimax orthogonal rotation. The internal consistency reliabilities of the overall scale and its subscales were examined using Cronbach's alpha coefficient. The scale had six factors: professionalism, direct care, clinical research, practical guidance, medical assistance, as well as leadership and reform. These factors explained 67·5% of the total variance in nurse practitioners' role competencies. Cronbach's alpha coefficient for the overall scale was 0·98, and those of its subscales ranged from 0·83-0·97. The internal consistency reliability and construct validity of the Nurse Practitioners' Roles and Competencies Scale were good. The high internal consistency reliabilities suggest item redundancy, which should be minimised by using item response theory to enhance the applicability of this questionnaire for future academic and clinical studies. The Nurse Practitioners' Roles and Competencies Scale can be used as a tool for assessing the roles and competencies of nurse practitioners in Taiwan. Our findings can also serve as a reference for other Asian countries to develop the nurse practitioner role. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Alcohol Abuse Curriculum Guide for Nurse Practitioner Faculty. Health Professions Education Curriculum Resources Series. Nursing 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hasselblad, Judith

    The format for this curriculum guide, written for nurse practitioner faculty, consists of learning objectives, content outline, teaching methodology suggestions, references and recommended readings. Part 1 of the guide, Recognition of Early and Chronic Alcoholism, deals with features of alcoholism such as epidemiological data and theories,…

  7. Determined persistence: achieving and sustaining job satisfaction among nurse practitioners.

    PubMed

    Shea, Mary L

    2015-01-01

    Job satisfaction of nurse practitioners (NPs) has been studied using quantitative methods. A grounded theory approach was used in this study to understand the contextual nature of the NPs' description of job satisfaction from a personal perspective. A grounded theory approach as described by Glaser and Strauss was used in this study. The study took place in a rural northeastern state. The researcher conducted face-to-face interviews using open-ended questions with 15 participants. Constant comparative method was utilized to analyze data culminating in a basic social process. The participants described holistic care as the foundation of their work and their relationship with patients as determining factors of job satisfaction. When NPs felt as though patient care was compromised, they became dissatisfied. NPs were highly satisfied when providing holistic care and within an environment that respected their professional values. In order to maintain accessibility to high-quality health care, it is imperative to understand the factors that contribute to job satisfaction of NPs. As the healthcare system evolves, healthcare policymakers and healthcare organizations must develop strategies to ensure job satisfaction among NPs. ©2014 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  8. Methamphetamine use among suburban women: implications for nurse practitioners.

    PubMed

    Bairan, Annette; Boeri, Miriam; Morian, Janice

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide nurse practitioners (NPs) with more effective strategies to diagnose methamphetamine (MA) use and assess healthcare needs of MA-using women. The researchers collected data from 65 suburban women who were MA users living in the suburbs of a large southeastern city in the United States. We conducted in-depth interviews and focus groups examining their life history, drug history, risk behaviors, and access to health care. The qualitative findings are examined here. Three main themes emerged from the data: (a) gendered stigmatization of MA use; (b) MA-related health risk behaviors; and (c) barriers to health and social services, which resulted in a domino effect that led to further life and health complications. When these factors are not effectively addressed, the result is more serious health problems for the women and their children. This article offers awareness and assessment tools to provide NPs adequate knowledge about the factors associated with MA use in order to treat patients holistically. NPs are strategically positioned to effectively assess, diagnose, treat, and provide linkage to health and social services, especially for suburban females who are a hidden population of drug users. ©2014 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  9. Ethical conflict associated with managed care: views of nurse practitioners.

    PubMed

    Ulrich, Connie M; Soeken, Karen L; Miller, Nancy

    2003-01-01

    Ethical conflict of nurse practitioners (NPs) practicing within a managed care environment has not been systematically examined, yet like physician practitioners, NPs are confronted with daily ethical conflicts. To determine perceptions toward ethical conflict in practice espoused by NPs affiliated with managed care systems and to identify the relationship between selected individual, organizational, and societal/market contextual factors and ethical conflict in practice. Descriptive, cross-sectional, correlational survey of a stratified random sample of 700 NPs licensed and certified to practice in the state of Maryland, conducted from November 2000 to January 2001. A majority of respondents reported being moderately to extremely concerned with managed care. Eighty percent of the sample perceived that it was sometimes necessary to bend managed care guidelines with 61% agreeing that the practitioner must weigh the patient's interest against managed care organizations' interests. The NPs in a staff/group model health maintenance organization (a) were less ethically concerned (p <.001); (b) perceived the ethical environment more positively (p <.001); and (c) had lower ethical conflict scores (p <.001) than NPs in other types of practice settings. Results from this study indicate that NPs are experiencing ethical conflict associated with practicing within a managed care environment; however, NPs in a staff/group model health maintenance organization report these concerns less. Ethical support through intervening strategies (i.e., ethics education and interdisciplinary ethics support systems) may help mitigate the conflict associated with this system of care.

  10. Australian Nurse Practitioner Practice: Value Adding through Clinical Reflexivity

    PubMed Central

    Woods, Michelle; Murfet, Giuliana

    2015-01-01

    The role of the Australian Nurse Practitioner (NP) is in its infancy and at a crossroads where extensive research demonstrates effective quality care and yet the role remains underrecognised and underutilised. The translation of practice into “value” is critical for the sustainability of NP roles and requires the practitioner to adopt a systematic method of inquiry. Kim's (1999) “Critical Reflective Inquiry” (CRI) method was adapted by two Australian NPs who specialise in diabetes and chronic disease management. Kim highlights the intent of CRI as understanding the meaning of practice, delivering improvements to practice through self-reflection, and the critique of practice that can lead to practice changes and development of new models of care translated to “products” of value. Based on the thematically analysis of 3 years of CRI application, the authors formed 5 headings that represented the NP's practice as Specialised Care Access, Complications and Diagnostics Interventions, Pharmaceutical Treatment, Vulnerable Populations, and Leadership. The utility of CRI demonstrates how NP practice is integral to a continuous cycle of addressing health care services gaps, and the conversion of “products” into “value” and positions the NP to assimilate the role of the practitioner-researcher. PMID:25705517

  11. Is it economically viable to employ the nurse practitioner in general practice?

    PubMed

    Dierick-van Daele, Angelique T M; Steuten, Lotte M G; Romeijn, Arla; Derckx, Emmy W C C; Vrijhoef, Hubertus J M

    2011-02-01

    This article provides insight into the potential economic viability of nurse practitioner employment in Dutch general practices. General practitioners face the challenging task of finding the most efficient and effective mix of professionals in general practice to accommodate future care demands within scarce health care budgets. To enable informed decision-making about skill mix issues, economic information is needed. Discursive paper. A descriptive and explorative design was chosen to study the economic viability of nurse practitioner employment in general practice. The conditions under which the nurse practitioner is able to earn back his/her own cost of employment were identified. Preferences and expectations of general practitioners and health insurers about nurse practitioner reimbursement were made transparent. Although general practitioners and health insurers acknowledge the importance of the nurse practitioner in accommodating primary care demands, they have polarised views about reimbursement. The employment of nurse practitioners is seldom economically viable in current practices. It requires a reallocation of (80% of) the general practitioner's freed up time towards practice growth (12% number of patients). The economic viability of the nurse practitioner has proven difficult to achieve in every day health care practice. This study provided insight into the complex interaction of the (cost) parameters that result in economic viability and feeds a further discussion about the content of the nurse practitioner role in general practice based on optimal quality of care vs. efficiency. Effective and efficient health care can only be provided if the actual care needs of a population provide the basis for deciding which mix of professionals is best equipped to deal with the changing and increasing demand of care. A macro-level intervention is needed to help a broad-scale introduction of the nurse practitioner in general practice. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing

  12. Strategic Workforce Planning for Health Human Resources: A Nursing Case Analysis.

    PubMed

    Baumann, Andrea; Crea-Arsenio, Mary; Akhtar-Danesh, Noori; Fleming-Carroll, Bonnie; Hunsberger, Mabel; Keatings, Margaret; Elfassy, Michael David; Kratina, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Background Health-care organizations provide services in a challenging environment, making the introduction of health human resources initiatives especially critical for safe patient care. Purpose To demonstrate how one specialty hospital in Ontario, Canada, leveraged an employment policy to stabilize its nursing workforce over a six-year period (2007 to 2012). Methods An observational cross-sectional study was conducted in which administrative data were analyzed to compare full-time status and retention of new nurses prepolicy and during the policy. The Professionalism and Environmental Factors in the Workplace Questionnaire® was used to compare new nurses hired into the study hospital with new nurses hired in other health-care settings. Results There was a significant increase in full-time employment and a decrease in part-time employment in the study hospital nursing workforce. On average, 26% of prepolicy new hires left the study hospital within one year of employment compared to 5% of new hires during policy implementation. The hospital nurses scored significantly higher than nurses employed in other health-care settings on 5 out of 13 subscales of professionalism. Conclusions Decision makers can use these findings to develop comprehensive health human resources guidelines and mechanisms that support strategic workforce planning to sustain and strengthen the health-care system.

  13. The Key Role of Nurse Researchers in the Evaluation of Nurse Practitioner Models of Practice.

    PubMed

    Hungerford, Catherine; Prosser, Brenton; Davey, Rachel

    2015-01-01

    The Nurse Practitioner-Aged Care Models of Practice Program involved diverse models of practice comprising multiple stakeholders located in more than 30 locations across Australia, in remote, rural, urban, and metropolitan settings. Funded by the Australian government, the aims of the program included supporting development of effective, economically viable, and sustainable aged care nurse practitioner models of practice; and enabling improvements in access to primary health care for people aged older than 65 years. This article describes the process by which a framework was developed to support the evaluation of this program. A particular challenge for the nurse researchers involved in the evaluation was to ensure the unique values of the nursing profession were upheld alongside economic, biomedical, and empirical imperatives in the diverse processes involved in collecting and interpreting data. The evaluation framework developed provides an important means of enabling research teams who undertake complex evaluations of diverse nursing models of practice to maintain a common goal--to unify the various stakeholders involved, while at the same time upholding what is most important to the profession of nursing. This article highlights how nurses can play an influential role when involved in the multidisciplinary evaluation of new andinnovative approaches to practice.

  14. Job satisfaction and perceived autonomy for nurse practitioners working in nurse-managed health centers.

    PubMed

    Pron, Ann Linguiti

    2013-04-01

    More primary care providers are needed to deliver health care to Americans living in poverty and those soon to be insured under the Affordable Care Act. Nurse practitioners (NPs) in nurse-managed health centers (NMHCs) are poised to meet this need. This research study examined the characteristics of NPs working in NMHCs and measured job satisfaction and perceived level of autonomy. No studies about job satisfaction or autonomy for NPs working in NMHCs had been previously reported. This descriptive, quantitative study surveyed primary care NPs working in NMHCs that are part of the National Nursing Centers Consortium (NNCC). NP e-mail addresses were obtained from NNCC center directors. Of 198 NPs invited to the electronic survey, 99 completed the Misener Nurse Practitioner Job Satisfaction Scale, demographic questionnaire, questions about perceived autonomy, and whether they would recommend working in an NMHC. Participants came from 16 states and 46 NMHCs. NPs working in NMHCs have job satisfaction, perceive their role as autonomous, and are satisfied with the autonomy they have. NMHCs can provide access to primary health care for many Americans. More NPs may choose employment in NMHCs for job satisfaction and autonomy. ©2012 The Author(s) Journal compilation ©2012 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  15. Work environment and workforce problems: a cross-sectional questionnaire survey of hospital nurses in Belgium.

    PubMed

    Milisen, Koen; Abraham, Ivo; Siebens, Kaat; Darras, Elisabeth; Dierckx de Casterlé, Bernadette

    2006-08-01

    This study investigated Belgian hospital nurses' perceptions on work environment and workforce issues, quality of care, job satisfaction and professional decision making. All eligible nurses in a selection of 22 hospitals received the BELIMAGE questionnaire for a total of 13,958 potential respondents. Of these, 9941 returned study materials (response rate=71.2%) of which 9638 were valid and useable for statistical analysis (valid response rate=69.1%). The study identified several areas of tension in the nursing profession. The commitment to being competent providers of quality care was remarkably strong among the nurses, but they also perceived the barriers in the work environment to be multiple and complex. Concerns about the quality of leadership and management, insufficient staff, time demands and stressful work environment are experienced as obstacles in providing good nursing care. Four out of ten nurses (39.2%) would not choose nursing again as a career and more than half of the nurses (54.3%) have contemplated leaving the profession at some point in time. To effectively tackle the professional and workforce issues in nursing, investments should focus on redesigning a work environment that supports nurses in providing comprehensive professional care.

  16. Development and testing of an instrument to measure holistic nursing values in nurse practitioner care.

    PubMed

    Kinchen, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    As primary care delivery evolves in the United States with nurse practitioners (NPs) as key providers, exploring the patient's perception of the nature and quality of NPs' care is of critical importance to healthcare consumers, providers, educators, policy makers, and underwriters. The aim of this study was to describe the development and testing of the Nurse Practitioner Holistic Caring Instrument, a new, investigator-developed measure of the preservation of holistic nursing values in NP care. Results suggest that NPs provide patient-centered, comprehensive, and clinically competent care, rendering them ideally suited to leading primary health care delivery. However, further testing in more diverse populations and settings is needed to strengthen preliminary findings.

  17. Understanding acute care nurse practitioner communication and decision-making in healthcare teams.

    PubMed

    Kilpatrick, Kelley

    2013-01-01

    This paper aims to describe communication and decision-making in healthcare teams following the introduction of an acute care nurse practitioner role. Healthcare teams need to establish clear processes for communication and decision-making about patient care to be effective. Little is known about how acute care nurse practitioners affect these team processes. Observational/descriptive study. Structured non-participant observations of acute care nurse practitioners and healthcare team members during routine patient care activities were completed to identify the verbal and non-verbal behaviours. Data were collected in two hospitals in one Canadian province from March-May 2009 for a total of 17 hours and 23 minutes. Descriptive statistics were generated. Differences in communication and decision-making were noted between the cases. The acute care nurse practitioners in Case 1 spoke most frequently with physicians when making patient care decisions while the acute care nurse practitioners in Case 2 spoke most frequently with the nurses. The acute care nurse practitioners needed to validate all patient care decisions if prescriptive authority had not been transferred to them. Much of the potential of acute care nurse practitioner roles rests on the ability to enact the full scope of their role. Acute care nurse practitioner scope of practice depends on the legislation, the transfer of decision-making authority in the organisation, and the messages received form the medical and nursing leadership group. This appears to be the first in-depth description of communication and decision-making in healthcare teams following the introduction of acute care nurse practitioners and furthers our understanding of how system-level imperatives filter down to healthcare teams. The transfer of prescriptive authority to acute care nurse practitioners affected communication and decision-making and changed the way routine activities were conducted. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  18. Contradicting fears, California's nurse-to-patient mandate did not reduce the skill level of the nursing workforce in hospitals.

    PubMed

    McHugh, Matthew D; Kelly, Lesly A; Sloane, Douglas M; Aiken, Linda H

    2011-07-01

    When California passed a law in 1999 establishing minimum nurse-to-patient staffing ratios for hospitals, it was feared that hospitals might respond by disproportionately hiring lower-skill licensed vocational nurses. This article examines nurse staffing ratios for California hospitals for the period 1997-2008. It compares staffing levels to those in similar hospitals in the United States. We found that California's mandate did not reduce the nurse workforce skill level as feared. Instead, California hospitals on average followed the trend of hospitals nationally by increasing their nursing skill mix, and they primarily used more highly skilled registered nurses to meet the staffing mandate. In addition, we found that the staffing mandate resulted in roughly an additional half-hour of nursing per adjusted patient day beyond what would have been expected in the absence of the policy. Policy makers in other states can look to California's experience when considering similar approaches to improving patient care.

  19. The acute care nurse practitioner role in Canada.

    PubMed

    Kilpatrick, Kelley; Harbman, Patricia; Carter, Nancy; Martin-Misener, Ruth; Bryant-Lukosius, Denise; Donald, Faith; Kaasalainen, Sharon; Bourgeault, Ivy; DiCenso, Alba

    2010-12-01

    The acute care nurse practitioner (ACNP) role was developed in Canada in the late 1980s to offset rapidly increasing physician workloads in acute care settings and to address the lack of continuity of care for seriously ill patients and increased complexity of care delivery. These challenges provided an opportunity to develop an advanced practice nursing role to care for critically ill patients with the intent of improving continuity of care and patient outcomes. For this paper, we drew on the ACNP-related findings of a scoping review of the literature and key informant interviews conducted for a decision support synthesis on advanced practice nursing. The synthesis revealed that ACNPs are working in a range of clinical settings. While ACNPs are trained at the master's level, there is a gap in specialty education for ACNPs. Important barriers to the full integration of ACNP roles into the Canadian healthcare system include lack of full utilization of role components, limitations to scope of practice, inconsistent team acceptance and funding issues. Facilitators to ACNP role implementation include clear communication about the role, with messages tailored to the specific information needs of various stakeholder groups; supportive leadership of healthcare managers; and stable and predictable funding. The status of ACNP roles continues to evolve across Canada. Ongoing leadership and continuing research are required to enhance the integration of these roles into our healthcare system.

  20. The potential for nurse practitioners in health care reform.

    PubMed

    Archibald, Mandy M; Fraser, Kimberly

    2013-01-01

    In Canada, health care reform is underway to address escalating costs, access and quality of care issues, and existing personnel shortages in various health disciplines. One response of the nursing profession to these stimuli has been the development of the advanced practice nurse, namely, the nurse practitioner (NP). NPs are in an excellent position to address current shortcomings through increasing points of access to the health care system, providing an emphasis on education and disease prevention, and delivering high-quality, cost-effective care in a multitude of practice settings. With an emphasis on the social determinants of health, NPs are in a prime position to provide care to underserved and vulnerable populations across Canada. Despite the potential for NPs to be instrumental in health care reform, there is a lack of support and regulation necessary for their optimal use. Barriers to mobilizing NPs in Canada exist and impede the integration of NPs into the Canadian health care system, which has both quality of care and social justice implications.

  1. Healthy work environments for the ageing nursing workforce.

    PubMed

    Stichler, Jaynelle F

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this article is to describe the physical challenges that ageing nurses experience and the facility design features that can promote healthy work environments to motivate nurses to continue working. Older nurses are working longer and beyond the usual retirement age. They often experience chronic fatigue and the usual physical and cognitive changes associated with aging. Nursing is a physically demanding profession and many older nurses work in pain while providing direct patient care. The literature is replete with studies focusing on the organisational factors that retain older nurses, but little research addresses design factors that facilitate nurses working longer and more safely in direct patient care. Electronic databases in medicine, nursing, psychology, and architecture were searched and evidence-based, non-evidence-based, and review articles and government and organisational newsletters were evaluated. Hospital design can help address the physical work challenges that older nurses experience. Older nurses have a wealth of knowledge and expertise, and the design of nursing units can optimize their work experience. Nurse Managers must participate in design efforts and advocate designs that support aging nurses. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Physical activity prescriptions in healthy populations: resources for Canadian nurse practitioners.

    PubMed

    Turin, Rochelle

    2015-02-15

    Canadian nurse practitioners' use of physical activity prescriptions is examined. Nurse practitioners use unstructured counseling techniques; have more opportunities with older adults; experience barriers; and want more education. Barriers are lack of time, lack of knowledge, and patient disinterest. Canadian resources are suggested to support physical activity prescriptions.

  3. Hospital-based nurse practitioner roles and interprofessional practice: a scoping review.

    PubMed

    Hurlock-Chorostecki, Christina; Forchuk, Cheryl; Orchard, Carole; van Soeren, Mary; Reeves, Scott

    2014-09-01

    This scoping review provides current global understanding of the rapidly evolving nurse practitioner role within hospital settings, and considers the level of understanding of its enactment within interprofessional teamwork. Arksey and O'Malley's framework was used to explore recent primary research, reviews, and gray literature in two ways. First, hospital-based nurse practitioner literature was mapped to country of origin, and thematically summarized. Second, clearly developed and consistently defined key interprofessional concepts were identified in the interprofessional literature then conceptually mapped to the nurse practitioner studies by their operationalization. The nurse practitioner review located 103 abstracts. Twenty-nine, originating from four countries, met the inclusion criteria. The interprofessional concept review identified a total of 137 relevant abstracts, however, only ten met the inclusion criteria. Understanding the nurse practitioner role within hospital teams remains limited due to a small number of countries producing evidence, the lack of nurse practitioner role title standardization hindering consistent knowledgebase development, and limited application and inconsistent operationalization of concepts within nurse practitioner research. Research focused on role enactment is needed to understand the uniqueness of the hospital-based nurse practitioner role. © 2013 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  4. 42 CFR Appendix B to Part 130 - Confidential Physician or Nurse Practitioner Affidavit

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Confidential Physician or Nurse Practitioner Affidavit B Appendix B to Part 130 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... 130—Confidential Physician or Nurse Practitioner Affidavit ER31MY00.002 ER31MY00.003...

  5. 42 CFR Appendix B to Part 130 - Confidential Physician or Nurse Practitioner Affidavit

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Confidential Physician or Nurse Practitioner Affidavit B Appendix B to Part 130 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... 130—Confidential Physician or Nurse Practitioner Affidavit ER31MY00.002 ER31MY00.003...

  6. 42 CFR Appendix B to Part 130 - Confidential Physician or Nurse Practitioner Affidavit

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Confidential Physician or Nurse Practitioner Affidavit B Appendix B to Part 130 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... 130—Confidential Physician or Nurse Practitioner Affidavit ER31MY00.002 ER31MY00.003...

  7. 42 CFR Appendix B to Part 130 - Confidential Physician or Nurse Practitioner Affidavit

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Confidential Physician or Nurse Practitioner Affidavit B Appendix B to Part 130 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... 130—Confidential Physician or Nurse Practitioner Affidavit ER31MY00.002 ER31MY00.003...

  8. 42 CFR Appendix B to Part 130 - Confidential Physician or Nurse Practitioner Affidavit

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Confidential Physician or Nurse Practitioner Affidavit B Appendix B to Part 130 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... 130—Confidential Physician or Nurse Practitioner Affidavit ER31MY00.002 ER31MY00.003...

  9. Nurse practitioner knowledge of child sexual abuse in children with cognitive disabilities.

    PubMed

    Koetting, Cathy; Fitzpatrick, Joyce J; Lewin, Linda; Kilanowski, Jill

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the knowledge level of nurse practitioners regarding symptoms of child sexual abuse in children with cognitive disabilities. A total sample of 43 nurse practitioners from two professional nurse practitioner organizations was surveyed to assess child sexual abuse symptoms identification in intellectually disabled children using a revised edition of the Child Sexual Abuse Knowledge Survey. Data collected showed nurse practitioners have deficits in identifying various parts of prepubescent female genitalia. The majority of nurse practitioners did not check genitalia in regular physical exams, did not feel competent to perform this type of evaluation, and were not aware of their professional organizations' position regarding checking for child sexual abuse. When assessing a child with an intellectual disability, nurse practitioners must accurately assess physical symptoms and behaviors that could have resulted from sexual abuse. Examining children for sexual abuse is a required duty of the nurse practitioner as evidenced by the position statements of the various professional organizations and nurse practitioners must be aware of their required scope of practice.

  10. Physician assistants and nurse practitioners: rural-urban settings and reimbursement for services.

    PubMed

    Anderson, D M; Hampton, M B

    1999-01-01

    Evidence based on productivity measures, salaries and costs of medical education indicates that physician assistants and nurse practitioners are cost-effective. Managed care suggests that health maintenance organizations (HMOs) would seek to utilize these professionals. Moreover, underserved rural areas would utilize physician assistants and nurse practitioners to provide access. This study examined the role of payment sources in the utilization of physician assistants and nurse practitioners using the 1994 National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NHAMCS) conducted by the National Center for Health Statistics, U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Rural vs. urban results were compared. The study found that significant rural-urban differences exist in the relationships between payment sources and the utilization of physician assistants and nurse practitioners. The study also found that payment source affects varied for physicians, physician assistants and nurse practitioners who saw outpatients in hospital settings. Surprisingly, prepaid and HMO types of reimbursements are shown to have no relationship with physician assistant and nurse practitioner utilization, and this finding is the same for both rural and urban patient visits. After controlling for other influences, the study shows that physicians, physician assistants and nurse practitioners are each as likely as the other to be present at a rural managed care visit. However, physicians are much more likely than physician assistants and nurse practitioners to be present at an urban managed care visit.

  11. Workforce issues in nursing in Queensland: 2001 and 2004.

    PubMed

    Hegney, Desley; Eley, Robert; Plank, Ashley; Buikstra, Elizabeth; Parker, Victoria

    2006-12-01

    The aim of the study was to identify the factors having an impact upon nursing work and to use the results to inform strategic planning of the Queensland Nurses Union. In 2001 and 2004, a study was undertaken to gather data on the level of satisfaction of nurses with their working life. This paper reports the 2004 results on workload, skill mix, remuneration and morale. Where applicable, the results are compared with 2001 data. A questionnaire was mailed to 3000 Assistants-in-Nursing, Enrolled and Registered Nurses in October 2004. All participants were members of the Queensland Nurses Union. The results are reported in three sectors - public, private and aged care. A total of 1349 nurses responded to the survey, a response rate of 45%. Nurses in the 2004 study believed: their workload was heavy; their skills and experience poorly rewarded; work stress was high; morale was perceived to be poor and, similar to 2001, deteriorating; the skill mix was often inadequate; and the majority of nurses were unable to complete their work in the time available. Nursing morale was found to be associated with autonomy, workplace equipment, workplace safety, teamwork, work stress, the physical demand of nursing work, workload, rewards for skills and experience, career prospects, status of nursing and remuneration. Overall the findings of the study are consistent with those determined by the 2001 survey. The findings of this study indicate the importance of factors such as workplace autonomy, teamwork, the levels of workplace stress, workload and remuneration on nursing morale. The data also indicate that workplace safety and workplace morale are linked. These findings provide information for policy makers and nurse managers on areas that need to be addressed to retain nurses within aged care, acute hospital and community nursing.

  12. Praxis and the role development of the acute care nurse practitioner.

    PubMed

    Kilpatrick, Kelley

    2008-06-01

    Acute care nurse practitioner roles have been introduced in many countries. The acute care nurse practitioner provides nursing and medical care to meet the complex needs of patients and their families using a holistic, health-centred approach. There are many pressures to adopt a performance framework and execute activities and tasks. Little time may be left to explore domains of advanced practice nursing and develop other forms of knowledge. The primary objective of praxis is to integrate theory, practice and art, and facilitate the recognition and valuing of different types of knowledge through reflection. With this framework, the acute care nurse practitioner assumes the role of clinician and researcher. Praxis can be used to develop the acute care nurse practitioner role as an advanced practice nursing role. A praxis framework permeates all aspects of the acute care nurse practitioner's practice. Praxis influences how relationships are structured with patients, families and colleagues in the work setting. Decision-makers at different levels need to recognize the contribution of praxis in the full development of the acute care nurse practitioner role. Different strategies can be used by educators to assist students and practitioners to develop a praxis framework.

  13. Reducing Readmissions After Stroke With a Structured Nurse Practitioner/Registered Nurse Transitional Stroke Program.

    PubMed

    Condon, Christina; Lycan, Sarah; Duncan, Pamela; Bushnell, Cheryl

    2016-06-01

    Our aim was to determine whether a standardized Transitional Stroke Clinic (TSC) led by nurse practitioners could reduce 30-day and 90-day readmissions for stroke or transient ischemic attack patients discharged home. Phase I consisted of nurse practitioners calling only high-risk patients discharged home within 7 days and performing an office visit within 2 to 4 weeks of discharge. Phase II consisted of all patients discharged home receiving both a 2-day follow-up phone call by a registered nurse and a follow-up visit with a nurse practitioner within 7 to 14 days. Differences in process metrics and readmissions across the 2 phases and overall were assessed. Increasing complexity with multiple chronic conditions (diabetes mellitus, coronary artery disease, and congestive heart failure) was represented in a continuous variable from 0 to 3. Multivariable logistic regression models for 30-day and 90-day readmissions were performed with adjustment for National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) and previous hospitalizations. From October 2012 through September 2015, 510 patients were enrolled. From phase I to II, a higher proportion of follow-up calls were made and days from discharge to TSC decreased. Patients readmitted within 30 days were less likely to show for TSC visits (60.85% versus 76.3%; P=0.021). Multivariable modeling showed that TSC visit was associated with a 48% reduction in 30-day readmission (odds ratio, 0.518; 95% confidence interval, 0.272-0.986), whereas multiple chronic conditions and previous stroke/transient ischemic attack increased the risk. TSC visit did not impact 90-day readmissions. Evaluation in a nurse practitioner-led structured clinic is a model that may reduce readmissions at 30 days for stroke patients discharged home. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  14. Views and experiences of nurse practitioners and medical practitioners with collaborative practice in primary health care – an integrative review

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background This integrative review synthesises research studies that have investigated the perceptions of nurse practitioners and medical practitioners working in primary health care. The aggregation of evidence on barriers and facilitators to working collaboratively and experiences about the processes of collaboration is of value to understand success factors and factors that impede collaborative working relationships. Methods An integrative review, which used systematic review processes, was undertaken to summarise qualitative and quantitative studies published between 1990 and 2012. Databases searched were the Cochrane Library, the Joanna Briggs Institute Library, PubMed, Medline, CINAHL, Informit and ProQuest. Studies that met the inclusion criteria were assessed for quality. Study findings were extracted relating to a) barriers and facilitators to collaborative working and b) views and experiences about the process of collaboration. The findings were narratively synthesised, supported by tabulation. Results 27 studies conducted in seven different countries met the inclusion criteria. Content analysis identified a number of barriers and facilitators of collaboration between nurse practitioners and medical practitioners. By means of data comparison five themes were developed in relation to perceptions and understanding of collaboration. Nurse practitioners and medical practitioners have differing views on the essentials of collaboration and on supervision and autonomous nurse practitioner practice. Medical practitioners who have a working experience with NPs express more positive attitudes towards collaboration. Both professional groups report concerns and negative experiences with collaborative practice but also value certain advantages of collaboration. Conclusions The review shows that working in collaboration is a slow progression. Exposure to working together helps to overcome professional hurdles, dispel concerns and provide clarity around roles and the

  15. Nurse Practitioner Autonomy and Satisfaction in Rural Settings.

    PubMed

    Spetz, Joanne; Skillman, Susan M; Andrilla, C Holly A

    2016-01-29

    Rural primary care shortages may be alleviated if more nurse practitioners (NPs) practiced there. This study compares urban and rural primary care NPs (classified by practice location in urban, large rural, small rural, or isolated small rural areas) using descriptive analysis of the 2012 National Sample Survey of NPs. A higher share of rural NPs worked in states without physician oversight requirements, had a DEA (drug enforcement administration) number, hospital admitting privileges, and billed using their own provider identifier. Rural NPs more often reported they were fully using their NP skills, practicing to the fullest extent of the legal scope of practice, satisfied with their work, and planning to stay in their jobs. We found lower per capita NP supply in rural areas, but the proportion in primary care increased with rurality. To meet rural primary care needs, states should support rural NP practice, in concert with support for rural physician practice.

  16. Developing a strategic plan for a neonatal nurse practitioner service.

    PubMed

    Lee, Laurie A; Jones, Luann R

    2004-10-01

    Neonatal nurse practitioners (NNPs) have been in practice for over 3 decades. More recently, NNPs have begun to take ownership for building their group practice models. The purpose of this article is to present a detailed case study demonstrating how one NNP group used a 4-phase strategic planning process to turn a crisis into an opportunity. The article describes data obtained during the strategic planning process from an informal national survey of NNP managers that focused on key benchmarks, such as role definition, responsibilities, protected nonclinical time, NNP salary and benefits, and educational and professional development support. Using the strategic planning process, the group defined mutually agreed upon minimum safe staffing levels for NNPs, interns, residents and neonatologists in their setting. Based on the data generated, the group successfully justified additional NNP positions and organizational support for 10% protected nonclinical time. A sample operational budget, comparison of 3 staffing scenarios, and a timeline are also provided.

  17. Interpersonal styles of nurse practitioner students during simulated patient encounters.

    PubMed

    Miller, A M; Wilbur, J; Dedhiya, S; Talashek, M L; Mrtek, R

    1998-05-01

    Evaluation methods are needed to assess nurse practitioners' (NPs') interpersonal skills and provide students with systematic, qualitative feedback. The purpose of this study was to identify characteristics and styles of students' interpersonal behavior from patients' perspectives during simulated encounters. The 29-item Clinical Encounter Q-Set for NPs was generated pertaining to patients' perceptions of their interactions with NP students. Using Q-methodology, simulated patients (SPs) sorted the items immediately after each of their encounters with 45 NP students. Items were rank-ordered along a continuum, ranging from "most like my feelings regarding the encounter" to "least like my feelings." Three interpersonal styles were identified. "Nonjudgmental professionalism" characterized student behavior during the simulation portraying a patient with a sexually transmitted disease. "Competence/confidence" and "empathy/respect" were predominant styles exhibited during the hypertension simulation. The potential value of this method for teaching and evaluation is discussed.

  18. Tips for starting your own nurse practitioner practice.

    PubMed

    Calmelat, A

    1993-04-01

    The decision to open a nurse practitioner practice is often difficult to make. Success depends on the possession of specific resources, such as adequate skills, finances, emotional support and the desire to be one's own boss. These skills will be critical as the NP develops a business plan and a budget, and makes important decisions, such as the form the business will take: sole proprietorship, partnership or corporation. Using external resources such as attorneys and accountants is also useful, especially when tackling issues of licenses, taxes and insurance. Start-up costs can be kept to a minimum with creativity and used equipment. In-house laboratories and reference laboratories must conform to strict regulations. A practice without established patients will need to market services aggressively through a successful mix of product, price, place and promotion. Patients' acceptance of the NP office will be enhanced by smooth patient flow, adequate space and cleanliness.

  19. Physician assistant and nurse practitioner utilization in academic medical centers.

    PubMed

    Moote, Marc; Krsek, Cathleen; Kleinpell, Ruth; Todd, Barbara

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to collect information on the utilization of physician assistants (PAs) and nurse practitioners (NPs) in academic health centers. Data were gathered from a national sample of University HealthSystem Consortium member academic medical centers (AMCs). PAs and NPs have been integrated into most services of respondent AMCs, where they are positively rated for the value they bring to these organizations. The primary reason cited by most AMCs for employing PAs and NPs was Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education resident duty hour restrictions (26.9%). Secondary reasons for employing PAs and NPs include increasing patient throughput (88%), increasing patient access (77%), improving patient safety/quality (77%), reducing length of stay (73%), and improving continuity of care (73%). However, 69% of AMCs report they have not successfully documented the financial impact of PA/NP practice or outcomes associated with individual PA or NP care.

  20. Nurse practitioners on the cutting edge of leadership.

    PubMed

    Kodiath, M F

    1995-01-01

    For the past 10 to 15 years nurse practitioners (NPs) have been pioneers in the development of their roles within the health care system. My journey over the past 8 years has been to develop an interdependent role as the co-founder of a chronic pain rehabilitation program. Now, I believe, it is no longer sufficient to be an effective pioneer. The pioneer stage is over. We need to stop practicing from an industrial paradigm that views leadership as great men and great women who have certain preferred traits influencing followers to do what leaders want (Rost, 1994). NPs need interdependent team-based practices with the patient as a team member. We need to experience influential relationships between leaders and collaborators intending real change for mutual purposes.

  1. Simulation Design: Engaging Large Groups of Nurse Practitioner Students.

    PubMed

    Garnett, Susan; Weiss, Josie A; Winland-Brown, Jill E

    2015-09-01

    Little has been written about using human patient simulation to teach primary care management to large groups of nurse practitioner (NP) students. This article describes an innovative design for simulated clinical experiences based on a game show format. This large-group design was conceived as a way to overcome several challenges, particularly limited faculty resources, to integrating simulation into NP education. Progressive variations evolved from this foundation, including the use of observer-participant groups; initial and follow-up visits on the same simulated patient; and mentor-mentee collaborations. Student comments, while consistently positive about the simulated clinical experiences, have been used to guide revisions to strengthen the simulation program. The innovative large-group design enabled faculty to use simulation to enhance students' skills in primary care management. Faculties with similar challenges might find these strategies useful to replicate or adapt. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  2. Nurse practitioners and physician assistants in the intensive care unit: an evidence-based review.

    PubMed

    Kleinpell, Ruth M; Ely, E Wesley; Grabenkort, Robert

    2008-10-01

    Advanced practitioners including nurse practitioners and physician assistants are contributing to care for critically ill patients in the intensive care unit through their participation on the multidisciplinary team and in collaborative physician practice roles. However, the impact of nurse practitioners and physician assistants in the intensive care unit setting is not well known. To identify published literature on the role of nurse practitioners and physician assistants in acute and critical care settings; to review the literature using nonquantitative methods and provide a summary of the results to date incorporating studies assessing the impact and outcomes of nurse practitioner and physician assistant providers in the intensive care unit; and to identify implications for critical care practice. We conducted a systematic search of the English-language literature of publications on nurse practitioners and physician assistants utilizing Ovid MEDLINE, PubMed, and the Cumulative Index of Nursing and Allied Health Literature databases from 1996 through August 2007. None. Over 145 articles were reviewed on the role of the nurse practitioner and physician assistant in acute and critical care settings. A total of 31 research studies focused on the role and impact of these practitioners in the care of acute and critically ill patients. Of those, 20 were focused on nurse practitioner care, six focused on both nurse practitioner and physician assistant care, and five were focused on physician assistant care in acute and critical care settings. Fourteen focused on intensive care unit care, and 17 focused on acute care including emergency room, trauma, and management of patients with specific acute care conditions such as stroke, pneumonia, and congestive heart failure. Most studies used retrospective or prospective study designs and nonprobability sampling techniques. Only two randomized control trials were identified. The majority examined the impact of care on patient

  3. Psychological empowerment and structural empowerment among nurse practitioners.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Julie G; McNulty, Rita; Griffin, Mary T Quinn; Fitzpatrick, Joyce J

    2010-01-01

    Empowering workplaces provide practitioners with access to information, support, resources, and opportunities to learn and grow. Empowerment is also a psychological process, which occurs when one has a sense of motivation in relation to the workplace environment. There is no previous research on the relationship of psychological empowerment and structural empowerment in nurse practitioner (NP) practice. Structural empowerment was measured using the conditions of work effectiveness questionnaire-II (CWEQ-II), and psychological empowerment was measured using Spreitzer's psychological empowerment scale. The sample consisted of 74 NPs in the state of Connecticut. The correlational scores for the instruments were derived with n = 72 as two subjects had extreme scores on multiple variables and were excluded. There were significant correlations between psychological and structural empowerment for total scores, and within 10 of these tools' subscales. The NPs who participated in this study scored high on perceptions of structural empowerment and psychological empowerment. The results of the psychological empowerment instrument indicated that the NPs value their work and find meaning in what they do. The relationships between psychological empowerment and structural empowerment have been linked to work effectiveness, quality patient care, cost-effectiveness, and retention. Study results support an implication that it is of critical importance for the organization or practice setting to facilitate both psychological and structural empowerment to the NP to ensure successful practice.

  4. Current Directions in Family Nurse Practitioner Curricula. Proceedings of a National Conference of Representatives from Family Nurse Practitioner Programs (Chapel Hill, North Carolina, January 29-31, 1976)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pickard, C. Glenn, Jr., Ed.; Watkins, Julia D., Ed.

    The conference reported here was held for nurse faculty and physicians from twenty-five family nurse practitioner (FNP) programs based in twenty-one states to provide the participants with an opportunity to consider their common curriculum problems and successes in FNP education. The first half of this booklet contains five paper presentations…

  5. Continuing Professional Development for a Diverse VET Practitioner Workforce. Occasional Paper

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tyler, Mark; Dymock, Darryl

    2017-01-01

    This occasional paper provides a stocktake of recent developments in continuing professional development for VET practitioners. It explores issues such as industry currency, the debate around a professional association for VET and the Certificate IV in Training and Assessment as the minimum qualification for VET practitioners. Through synthesising…

  6. Answering the Call for a Bachelors-Prepared Nursing Workforce: An Innovative Model for Academic Progression.

    PubMed

    Giddens, Jean; Keller, Teresa; Liesveld, Judy

    2015-01-01

    Forces that have produced national reform of a fragmented, inefficient, and expensive health care services sector have also set the stage for reform of a fragmented, inefficient, and expensive system for nursing education. Changes in health care, health policy, education policy, and funding for public higher education have led to the development of new nursing education models designed to increase the number of baccalaureate-prepared nurses entering the workforce. This article describes the development and implementation of one such model that features a common concept-based curriculum and university-community college partnerships at its core. This plan increases access for nursing students across the state to earn a prelicensure bachelor of science in nursing degree and preserves the integrity and accessibility of associate degree nursing education. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Addressing the Shortage of Geriatricians: What Medical Educators Can Learn From the Nurse Practitioner Training Model.

    PubMed

    Golden, Adam G; Silverman, Michael A; Issenberg, S Barry

    2015-09-01

    Physicians' career interest in geriatric medicine continues to wane at a time when the health care needs of older adults are increasing. Nurse practitioners have helped fill the U.S. physician gap by delivering outpatient care to older adults and can practice with full autonomy in many states. Nursing graduate school programs are preparing adult-gerontology primary care nurse practitioners to successfully deliver outpatient care services using a model of training with fewer requirements that is more flexible and of shorter duration compared with the training model for geriatricians. Nurse practitioners can also obtain initial certification and recertification with less time commitment and at lower cost than geriatricians. Whether the outpatient care provided by nurse practitioners is comparable to the care provided by physicians remains a subject of debate. However, as nurse practitioners' scope of practice expands, the perception exists that the outpatient clinical roles of adult-gerontology primary care nurse practitioners and geriatricians are similar. This raises questions about whether there are too many educational and certification requirements for geriatricians. The authors encourage medical educators to learn from the success of the nurse practitioner education model for training large numbers of primary care providers. They propose decreasing the duration of medical school and graduate medical education training for geriatricians and providing educational debt repayment programs as potential incentives to stimulate career interest in geriatric medicine.

  8. Paediatric nurse practitioner managed cardiology clinics: patient satisfaction and appointment access.

    PubMed

    Evangelista, Juli-Anne K; Connor, Jean Anne; Pintz, Christine; Saia, Teresa; O'Connell, Cheryl; Fulton, David R; Hickey, Patricia

    2012-10-01

    This article summarizes a comparative study of patient/family satisfaction and appointment wait times in physician managed vs. paediatric nurse practitioner managed cardiology clinics. Appointment wait times exceeded 40 days in the outpatient cardiology department at a children's hospital. To address the gap in available appointments, paediatric nurse practitioner managed cardiology clinics were implemented. A sample of 128 patients who presented concurrently in physician or paediatric nurse practitioner managed cardiology clinics from December 2009 through February 2010 was recruited for participation. The hospital's ambulatory patient satisfaction survey was utilized to measure level of patient satisfaction with care. Survey responses were evaluated using Fisher's exact test. Appointment wait times were compared pre and post implementation of paediatric nurse practitioner managed clinics. Sixty-five physician families and 63 paediatric nurse practitioner families completed the satisfaction survey. There was no statistically significant difference in patient satisfaction between clinic types. Appointment wait time decreased from 46 to 43 days, which was not statistically significant. Paediatric nurse practitioner clinics included a statistically higher percentage total of urgent appointments compared to that in physician clinics. Paediatric nurse practitioner managed cardiology clinics are a strategic solution for improving patient access and facilitating high quality patient care while earning high levels of patient satisfaction. This healthcare delivery model illustrates the potential for expanded utilization of advanced practice nurses. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  9. Measuring job satisfaction of advanced nurse practitioners and advanced midwife practitioners in the Republic of Ireland: a survey.

    PubMed

    O'Keeffe, Anne Paula; Corry, Margarita; Moser, Debra K

    2015-01-01

    To describe the level of job satisfaction of advanced nurse practitioners (ANP) and advanced midwife practitioners in the Republic of Ireland (RoI). Job satisfaction is related to productivity, performance, turnover and health, and thus is a challenge for nursing and healthcare organisations. Job satisfaction data were collected from 47 ANPs using the Misener Nurse Practitioner Job Satisfaction Scale. High levels of global job satisfaction were reported. All ANPs reported satisfaction with autonomy, sense of accomplishment, challenge, social interaction and status in the organisation. Lower levels of job satisfaction were attributed to the amount of involvement in research (55%), opportunities to receive compensation for services provided outside normal working hours (55%), the amount (44%) and the quality of administrative support (51%), and the opportunity to negotiate bonuses and resources in return for productivity (36%). Advanced nurse practitioners in RoI have high levels of job satisfaction with areas relating to clinical practice but are dissatisfied with areas that lead to empowerment within organisations. Efforts to improve the negotiating and leadership skills of ANPs may improve job satisfaction. Enhancing inter-professional collegial relationships and improving managerial recognition of the role within nursing are key areas to be targeted to promote job satisfaction of ANPs. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Clarifying, affirming, and preserving the nurse in nurse practitioner education and practice.

    PubMed

    Brykczynski, Karen

    2012-09-01

    This work responds to the need for maintaining an ethic of care in the face of increased demands for cost effectiveness and efficiency. Findings are presented from a qualitative study describing how nurse practitioner (NP) faculty teach NP students about holistic nursing dimensions of NP practice. Data collection consisted of face to face or telephone interviews with 24 experienced NP faculty members teaching in 22 NP programs across the country. Data were analyzed using the interpretive phenomenological approach. Aspects of scientific merit were addressed through reviewing transcripts for accuracy, consensual validation sessions, and member checking. The most common approaches used for teaching holistic nursing dimensions of NP practice were role modeling and sharing narratives of actual cases. Other approaches included: incorporation of holistic complementary diagnoses along with medical diagnoses into assessments, use of case scenarios and standardized patients, a rite of passage ceremony, and an entire narrative curriculum. NP faculty advocate incorporating a holistic mind-body-spirit perspective into assessment and intervention and broadening the diagnostic process to include complementary components of nursing and medicine. Findings have implications for teaching/learning, curriculum planning, and evaluation as NP programs transition from the master's to the doctoral level. ©2012 The Author(s) Journal compilation ©2012 American Academy of Nurse Practitioners.

  11. The Roles of Nurse Practitioners and Physician Assistants in Rheumatology Practices in the US

    PubMed Central

    Solomon, Daniel H.; Bitton, Asaf; Fraenkel, Liana; Brown, Erika; Tsao, Peter; Katz, Jeffrey N.

    2014-01-01

    Background A recent workforce study of rheumatology in the US suggests that during the next several decades the demand for rheumatology services will outstrip the supply of rheumatologists. Mid-level providers such as nurse practitioners (NPs) and physician assistants (PAs) may be able to alleviate projected shortages. Methods We administered a nation-wide survey of mid-level providers during 2012. Invitations with the survey were sent with one follow-up reminder. The survey contained questions regarding demographics, training, level of practice independence, responsibilities, drug prescribing, use of objective outcome measures, and knowledge and use of treat to target (TTT) strategies. Results The invitation was sent to 482 eligible mid-level providers via e-mail and 90 via US mail. We received a total of 174 (30%) responses. The mean age was 46 years and 83% were female. Nearly 75% had ≤10 years of experience, 53% had received formal training in rheumatology. Almost two-thirds reported having their own panel of patients. The top three practice responsibilities described were performing patient education (98%), adjusting medication dosages (97%), and conducting physical exams (96%). Over 90% felt very or somewhat comfortable diagnosing rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and a similar percentage prescribed DMARDs. Three-quarters reported using disease activity measures for RA and 56% reported that their practices used TTT strategies. Conclusion Most respondents reported they they had substantial patient care responsibilities, used disease activity measures for RA, and incorporated TTT in their practice. These data suggest mid-level providers may help to reduce shortages in the rheumatology workforce and conform with recommendations to employ TTT strategies in RA treatment. PMID:24339154

  12. The role of ICT in supporting disruptive innovation: a multi-site qualitative study of nurse practitioners in emergency departments

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The disruptive potential of the Nurse Practitioner (NP) is evident in their ability to offer services traditionally provided by primary care practitioners and their provision of a health promotion model of care in response to changing health trends. No study has qualitatively investigated the role of the Emergency NP in Australia, nor the impact of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) on this disruptive workforce innovation. This study aimed to investigate ways in which Nurse Practitioners (NP) have incorporated the use of ICT as a mechanism to support their new clinical role within Emergency Departments. Methods A cross-sectional qualitative study was undertaken in the Emergency Departments (EDs) of two large Australian metropolitan public teaching hospitals. Semi-structured, in-depth interviews were conducted with five nurse practitioners, four senior physicians and five senior nurses. Transcribed interviews were analysed using a grounded theory approach to develop themes in relation to the conceptualisation of the ED nurse practitioner role and the influences of ICT upon the role. Member checking of results was achieved by revisiting the sites to clarify findings with participants and further explore emergent themes. Results The role of the ENP was distinguished from those of Emergency nurses and physicians by two elements: advanced practice and holistic care, respectively. ICT supported the advanced practice dimension of the NP role in two ways: availability and completeness of electronic patient information enhanced timeliness and quality of diagnostic and therapeutic decision-making, expediting patient access to appropriate care. The ubiquity of patient data sourced from a central database supported and improved quality of communication between health professionals within and across sites, with wider diffusion of the Electronic Medical Record holding the potential to further facilitate team-based, holistic care. Conclusions ICT is a

  13. Training and Education in Practice Nursing: The Perspectives of the Practice Nurse, Employing General Practitioner and Family Health Service Authority.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atkin, Karl; Lunt, Neil

    1995-01-01

    Interviews with 56 practice nurses, 29 general practitioners (GPs), 23 health administrators, and 1 government official revealed that nurses use a variety of education and training opportunities; GPs largely let nurses take responsibility for their continuing education. The informal nature of training opportunities and lack of funding were…

  14. Registered nurses are delaying retirement, a shift that has contributed to recent growth in the nurse workforce.

    PubMed

    Auerbach, David I; Buerhaus, Peter I; Staiger, Douglas O

    2014-08-01

    The size of the registered nurse (RN) workforce has surpassed forecasts from a decade ago, growing to 2.7 million in 2012 instead of peaking at 2.2 million. Much of the difference is the result of a surge in new nursing graduates. However, the size of the RN workforce is particularly sensitive to changes in retirement age, given the large number of baby-boomer RNs now in the workforce. We found that in the period 1969-90, for a given number of RNs working at age fifty, 47 percent were still working at age sixty-two and 9 percent were working at age sixty-nine. In contrast, in the period 1991-2012 the proportions were 74 percent at age sixty-two and 24 percent at age sixty-nine. This trend, which largely predates the recent recession, extended nursing careers by 2.5 years after age fifty and increased the 2012 RN workforce by 136,000 people. Because many RNs tend to shift out of hospital settings as they age, employers seeking RNs for nonhospital roles may welcome (and seek to capitalize on) the growing numbers of experienced RNs potentially able to fill these positions.

  15. Consumer perspectives on nurse practitioners and independent practice.

    PubMed

    Brown, Deonne J

    2007-10-01

    The purposes of this study were to report the results of a survey for determining the feasibility and sustainability of independently managed nurse practitioner (NP) practices, to identify the characteristics of consumers who would likely choose an independent NP practice, to assess consumer needs, and to define a target market for competitively positioning NPs. An anonymous electronic survey of 1000 employees (response rate = 21%) at a large nonprofit organization in King County, Washington. This organization employs persons in a wide range of socioeconomic and vocational situations. Descriptive statistics and chi-square analyses were applied to determine associations between demographic characteristics and having used an NP or having the intent to use an independent NP practice. Most respondents knew about NPs, and the majority had seen an NP for their care. Most were satisfied or very satisfied with NP care. A much larger percentage (90%) than previous studies knew about NPs; 58% had seen an NP for their care, making NPs the most used practitioner alternative to physicians. Evidence suggests that NP users are more likely to be female and younger. Eighty-two percent of NP users were satisfied or very satisfied with the care they had received compared to a 70% satisfaction rate for current providers. Women, relatively younger respondents, those who had seen a physician assistant or NP, and those who considered NPs to provide quality and more personalized care were significantly more likely to indicate that they would choose an independent NP practice in their community. Based on a standard marketing formula, 30% of the sample in this study would be expected to change their health care to such a practice. This is the first descriptive study to suggest widespread acceptance of NPs as independent practitioners. Compared to a 1985 study of Seattle residents, consumers are far more likely to know about NPs. Consumer studies such as this one identify the characteristics

  16. The productivity of physician assistants and nurse practitioners and health work force policy in the era of managed health care.

    PubMed

    Scheffler, R M; Waitzman, N J; Hillman, J M

    1996-01-01

    Managed care is spreading rapidly in the United States and creating incentives for physician practices to find the most efficient combination of health professionals to deliver care to an enrolled population. Given these trends, it is appropriate to reexamine the roles of physician assistants (PAs) and nurse practitioners (NPs) in the health care workforce. This paper briefly reviews the literature on PA and NP productivity, managed care plans' use of PAs and NPs, and the potential impact of PAs and NPs on the size and composition of the future physician workforce. In general, the literature supports the idea that PAs and NPs could have a major impact on the future health care workforce. Studies show significant opportunities for increased physician substitution and even conservative assumptions about physician task delegation imply a large increase in the number of PAs and NPs that can be effectively deployed. However, the current literature has certain limitations that make it difficult to quantify the future impact of PAs and NPs. Among these limitations is the fact that virtually all formal productivity studies were conducted in fee-for-service settings during the 1970s, rather than managed care settings. In addition, the vast majority of PA and NP productivity studies have viewed PAs and NPs as physician substitutes rather than as members of interdisciplinary health care teams, which may become the dominant health care delivery model over the next 10-20 years.

  17. Preparing the emerging nursing and health care workforce: a case study.

    PubMed

    Pipe, Teri Britt

    2014-01-01

    How do we prepare the nursing and health workforce of the future to meet the challenges of the US health system and equip graduates with problem-solving strategies that are scientific, compassionate, and agile? This article provides examples of several approaches for nursing health professions education, including innovation, interprofessionalism, and multiple, simultaneous community collaboratives. Specific examples highlight ways academic nursing programs and practice organizations are working together to provide stimulating, realistic, safe, and effective education while exposing students to the challenges inherent in the health system.

  18. Connecting the Dots: The Labor Market Information View of Workforce Development. Essays for the Practitioner.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Froeschle, Richard, Ed.

    This monograph is comprised of 12 essays related to the federal Workforce Investment Act of 1998 (WIA), each of which serves as a generic primer on a topic relevant to work force development staff and researchers nationwide. The essays are "Learning the Language of LMI (Labor Market Information): Basic Labor Market Information Terms and…

  19. Connecting the Dots: The Labor Market Information View of Workforce Development. Essays for the Practitioner.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Froeschle, Richard, Ed.

    This monograph is comprised of 12 essays related to the federal Workforce Investment Act of 1998 (WIA), each of which serves as a generic primer on a topic relevant to work force development staff and researchers nationwide. The essays are "Learning the Language of LMI (Labor Market Information): Basic Labor Market Information Terms and…

  20. Knowing the nurse practitioner: dominant discourses shaping our horizons.

    PubMed

    Rashotte, Judy

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to examine the various discourses, particularly the dominant instrumental and economic discourses that have brought the phenomena of the nurse practitioner (NP) into being. It is proposed that NPs have been constituted as an object of nature and therefore understood metaphorically as a tool or instrument within the health care system to be used efficiently and effectively. Heidegger's philosophical analysis of the question concerning technology is used to argue that our current ways of knowing the NP through these discourses, with their emphasis on calculative logic, have resulted from our modern view of the essence of technology. It is also argued that there is now a need to shape our horizons concerning the NP in new and different ways. There is a need to engage in dialogical forms of research in order to evoke the richness and depth of what it means to be an NP, that is, to reveal the other modes of expression by which we define ourselves, understand others and nursing.

  1. Pediatric nurse practitioner practice patterns and compensation in Ohio.

    PubMed

    Schaffner, Barbara; Vogt, Marjorie

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to describe practice patterns and compensation patterns of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners (PNPs) in Ohio. A survey, including open-ended and forced choice questions, was sent to all members of Ohio's chapter of NAPNAP. The resultant sample included 200 female PNPs. Over half had practiced as NPs between 5-29 years, holding at least a Master's degree. Fifty percent worked full-time in a variety of practice settings; 71% held prescriptive privileges. Most saw patients with a physician on-site and billed for services with the physician's name; few had "on call" responsibilities. The majority spent most of their clinical time with acute visits and providing preventative services. Only 29% had a contract with a collaborating physician and the components of the contract varied greatly. Compensation for services mimicked national rates, annual salaries from $35,000-$90,000/year and hourly rates $19-$40/hour. Salary bonuses were reported by 23%. Two-thirds of the PNPs received benefits. Practice patterns of the Ohio PNPs were found to be consistent with the practice patterns of advanced practice nurses nationally. Most PNPs remain largely uninformed about reimbursement issues. Negotiation of employment contracts with potential employers will be enhanced by demonstration of the positive impact of the NP on the number and type of patients seen, reimbursement possibilities, and quality of care. Future studies need to focus on quantifying the value of the NP.

  2. Nursing Workforce in Hubei China: Implications for the Development of Traditional Chinese Medicine Education.

    PubMed

    Cai, Yi; Mao, Zongfu; Corazzini, Kirsten; Petrini, Marcia A; Wu, Bei

    2015-01-01

    Research evidence suggests that educating nurses about traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) significantly improves their nursing care practice and the health care outcomes of community residents. The purpose of this study was to describe the current use of TCM by China's nursing workforce, as well as the typical nurse to physician ratio and types of TCM education that nurses receive in health care facilities. A large retrospective survey was conducted in Hubei Province, China, in 2010. The sample included 620 non-TCM hospitals, 120 TCM hospitals, and 1254 community health centers (CHCs). Descriptive analysis and 1-way analysis of variance were used to test statistical differences. There were 79 447 nurses employed, of which 1527 had a TCM degree and 5689 had on-the-job TCM education. Non-TCM hospitals employed more nurses than TCM hospitals and CHCs, and TCM hospitals employed more TCM nurses than non-TCM hospitals and CHCs. The median nurse to physician ratio varied by level of urbanization and type of health care facility, from 0.6 in rural CHCs to 1.3 in rural non-TCM hospitals. Differences in TCM education preparation of nurses were significantly different in the urban and rural settings and by type of health care facility. The study suggested a shortage of nurses educated in TCM in Hubei Province China, as well as uneven TCM workforce distribution. More opportunities for TCM education are needed for nurses, especially in CHCs where health promotion and chronic disease management are the most important and mandated functions.

  3. Building leadership capacity in advanced nurse practitioners - the role of organisational management.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Naomi

    2017-01-01

    To highlight the organisation-level management's role in building leadership capacity in advanced nurse practitioners and the need for appropriate supports to increase their becoming leaders. Little is published about the role of organisation-level management in building leadership capacity and in developing the next generation of nurse leaders. In times of economic constraint, organisations need to focus their efforts on targeted leadership initiatives. Advanced nurse practitioners are ideally positioned to act as leaders both within and beyond the health care organisation. From the available research evidence, several support structures and mechanisms are identified as enablers for advanced nurse practitioners to enact their leadership role. Health care organisations need to include building leadership capacity as a priority in their strategic plan and take action to build-up the level of advanced nurse practitioner leadership. Nurse executives have a vital role in influencing the organisation's strategic plan and making a business case for prioritising leadership capacity building within advanced nurse practitioners. A challenge for nurse executives faced with competing service and leadership development demands, involves strategic decision-making regarding whether the advanced nurse practitioner's role is limited to service delivery or its potential in leading health care reforms is realised. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Demystifying the role of nurse practitioners in hospice: nurse practitioners as an integral part of the hospice plan of care.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    Beginning January 1, 2011, as a result of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act healthcare-reform law that was signed in March 2010, Medicare requires that all patients entering their third or later hospice benefit period must have a face-to-face encounter with a hospice physician or nurse practitioner (NP) to validate hospice eligibility. Medicare has allowed NPs to function as a patient's hospice attending physician since 2003, but they may not certify or recertify a patient's terminal illness or function in the role of the hospice physician in the hospice interdisciplinary team. The allowance of Medicare for the NP to complete the hospice face-to-face encounter allows a greater role for a NP in the realm of hospice care.

  5. Open arms, conflicted hearts: nurse-practitioner's attitudes towards working with lesbian, gay and bisexual patients.

    PubMed

    Dorsen, Caroline; Van Devanter, Nancy

    2016-12-01

    To explore nurse-practitioner's attitudes towards working with lesbian, gay and bisexual patients. Literature suggests that lesbians, gay men and bisexuals have significant health disparities compared to heterosexuals. Although the reasons are multifactorial, research suggests that attitudes of healthcare providers (HCPs) may be a contributing factor in both accessing and receiving care. There is currently no literature exploring the attitudes of the approximately 300,000 nurse-practitioners in the United States. Thus, nurse-practitioners strengths and challenges in providing care to sexual minorities are unknown. As part of a larger study, Corbin & Strauss' grounded theory methodology was used to explore the attitudes towards lesbian, gay and bisexual patients among primary care nurse-practitioners in NYC. Data were collected via individual semi-structured interviews with nurse-practitioners currently in practice in primary or outpatient care in NYC (n = 19). Data were evaluated using the three-step constant comparison method. Nurse-practitioners in this study had varied, often overlapping and sometimes conflicting, attitudes about working with lesbian, gay and bisexual patients. The main theme identified was 'open arms, conflicted hearts' with three major subthemes - feeling at home, struggling to maintain professionalism and finding comfort under the umbrella of diversity. Nurse-practitioner participants in this study had varied attitudes about working with lesbian, gay and bisexual patients, ranging from open, confident and comfortable to ambivalent, cautious and unsure about working with lesbian, gay and bisexual patients generally and specifically regarding the health needs of this population. This study highlights the inadequate didactic and clinical preparation most nurse-practitioners feel they have to care for lesbian, gay and bisexual patients. There is a need for increased education for registered nurses and nurse-practitioners regarding lesbian, gay

  6. A study examining senior nursing students' expectations of work and the workforce.

    PubMed

    Saber, Deborah A; Anglade, Debbie; Schirle, Lori M

    2016-03-01

    This study explored traditional and accelerated Bachelor of Science nursing students' expectations of nursing work and the workforce. Role transition difficulty is blamed for much of the 15-60% newly licensed registered nurse turnover in their first 3 years of employment. This qualitative study consisted of 14 focus groups (n = 98) to determine Bachelor of Science nursing students' expectations of work as newly licensed registered nurses. Two overriding themes for accelerated and traditional students emerged: stressors and coping strategies. Students believe four stressors will affect their progression into the newly licensed registered nurse role and have developed coping strategies. This study suggests that students have experienced stressors in the clinical environment and anticipate them in the newly licensed registered nurse role. During transition, strategies such as 'fitting in' and 'staying safe' will be employed to ensure work success. Younger generations value a healthy work-life balance and a positive working environment. These nurses will not tolerate positions that do not align with their values. With the aging of citizens in the USA and the predicted nursing shortage, nursing management needs to employ strategies to retain newly licensed registered nurses. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Why nurses chose to remain in the workforce: Portraits of resilience.

    PubMed

    Cope, Vicki; Jones, Bronwyn; Hendricks, Joyce

    2016-01-01

    This study explored why nurses chose to remain in the Western Australian workforce and to develop insights into the role of resilience of nurses and to identify the key characteristics of resilience displayed by these nurses. Nursing is a stressful profession. Prolific quantitative research which measures job stress and resilience has been implemented; however, there is a dearth of qualitative studies which hear the personal narratives as to why nurses remain and thrive in a stressful workplace. Vignettes of nursing resilience reveal underlying themes of resilience where personal stories and events are presented as narrative. Portraiture recognises the inherent value of the nurses' stories giving attention to the nature of their resilience. Interpretation illuminates the portraits or verbal canvasses of the told experience, reflecting success and positivity despite disarray in healthcare settings. Eight themes were identified. The portraits highlight a sometimes imperceptible theme of resilience within nursing. Nurses are resilient; they rely on the social support of colleagues, family and friends to continue to bear their mantle of responsibility. They take pride in their work and accomplishments and give to others altruistically. They laugh, they love nursing and they keep the needs of their patients, clients, residents or students foremost. This paper describes the hallmarks of resilience demonstrated by nurses. Resilience and its relationship to coping in times of adversity are captured within the portraits presented.

  8. An exploration of clinical practice in sites with and without clinical nurse or midwife specialists or advanced nurse practitioners, in Ireland.

    PubMed

    Coyne, Imelda; Comiskey, Catherine M; Lalor, Joan G; Higgins, Agnes; Elliott, Naomi; Begley, Cecily

    2016-04-26

    Clinical specialist (CS) and advanced practitioner (AP) roles have increased in nursing and midwifery internationally. This study explored clinical practice in sites with and without clinical nurse or midwife specialists or advanced nurse practitioners in Ireland. Using a case study design, interview, observational and documentary data from postholding sites (CSs or APs employed) were compared with data from non-postholding sites (no CSs or APs employed). Interviews and observations were conducted with postholders (n = 23), and compared with data from healthcare professionals (nurses or midwives, doctors) (n = 23) in matched services. Interviews were held with Directors of Nursing and Midwifery (n = 23), healthcare professionals (n = 41), service users (n = 41) with experience of receiving care or working with postholders, and non-postholders in matched services. The data were analysed using Nvivo (Version 8). The findings suggest that postholders' practice appeared to differ from non-postholders' in relation to case management and service provision. Postholders were seen as having an impact on readmission rates, waiting lists/times, collaborative decision-making, continuity of care and workload management. Postholders' autonomy to manage caseloads was perceived to lead to smoother transition of patients/clients through the healthcare system. Service-users' self-reports appeared to appreciate the individualised holistic care provided by postholders. Postholders' role in facilitating person-centred care and promoting interprofessional team working, are essential elements in quality care provision and in global healthcare workforce planning. To meet changing healthcare demands, promote person-centred care, and improve service delivery, more specialist and advanced practice posts in nursing and midwifery should be developed and supported within healthcare.

  9. Impact of state nurse practitioner scope-of-practice regulation on health care delivery: Systematic review.

    PubMed

    Xue, Ying; Ye, Zhiqiu; Brewer, Carol; Spetz, Joanne

    2016-01-01

    One proposed strategy to expand primary care capacity is to use nurse practitioners (NPs) more effectively in health care delivery. However, the ability of NPs to provide care to the fullest extent of their education is moderated by state scope-of-practice (SOP) regulations. The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of state SOP regulations on the following three key issues: (a) NP workforce, (b) access to care and health care utilization, and (c) health care costs. Systematic review. States granting NPs greater SOP authority tend to exhibit an increase in the number and growth of NPs, greater care provision by NPs, and expanded health care utilization, especially among rural and vulnerable populations. Our review indicates that expanded NP practice regulation can impact health care delivery by increasing the number of NPs in combination with easing restrictions on their SOP. Findings show promise that removing restrictions on NP SOP regulations could be a viable and effective strategy to increase primary care capacity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Nurse practitioners and physician assistants employed by general and subspecialty pediatricians.

    PubMed

    Freed, Gary L; Dunham, Kelly M; Loveland-Cherry, Carol; Martyn, Kristy K; Moote, Marc J

    2011-10-01

    There is little nationally representative information describing the current manner in which nurse practitioners (NPs) and physician assistants (PAs) work in pediatric practices and their professional activities. To understand better the current NP and PA workforce in pediatric primary and subspecialty care, we conducted a national survey of pediatricians. A survey study of a random national sample of 498 pediatric generalists and 1696 subspecialists in the United States was performed by using a structured questionnaire administered by mail. The survey focused on practice settings, employment, and scope of work of NPs and PAs. Response rates were 72% for generalists and 77% for subspecialists. More than one-half (55%) of generalists reported that they do not currently work with NPs or PAs, compared with only one-third of subspecialists who do not. Many generalists and subspecialists intend to increase the number of NPs and PAs in their practices in the next 5 years. More generalist and subspecialty practices work with NPs than with PAs. There was great variability between generalists and subspecialists and among different subspecialties in the proportions that worked with NPs and PAs. The scope of work of NPs and PAs also varied between generalists and subspecialists. Planned increases in the number of NPs hired and expansion of their scope of work might put subspecialists and general pediatricians in competition with regard to recruitment and hiring of a limited pool of new pediatric NPs. Similar issues might arise with PAs.

  11. Self-determination, end-of-life decisions, and the role of nurse practitioners.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Heather

    2015-01-01

    Nurse practitioners should be aware that societal changes could lead to their being asked to actively assist terminally ill patients who wish to end their lives, as opposed to their current supportive role in palliative care. With physician staff shortages and the need for nurse practitioners to fill the gaps, end-of-life responsibilities could be placed in the hands of nurse practitioners, rather than being reserved for physicians alone (Sagon, 2013). End-of-life matters raise uncertainties about the nurse practitioner role because it differs state by state, relates to ethics, reflects the religious beliefs of those involved, and concerns the conflict of nurses simultaneously caring for their patients while advocating for their right to self-determination in choosing to end their lives.

  12. The role of mentoring in public health nutrition workforce development. Perspectives of advanced-level practitioners.

    PubMed

    Palermo, Claire; McCall, Louise

    2008-08-01

    To explore the nature, role and utility of mentoring in the development of competence in advanced-level Australian public health nutritionists. Qualitative study using in-depth interviews. Eighteen advanced-level public health nutritionists working in academic and practice settings in Australia. The attributes and career pathways of the subjects were consistent with previous findings. Dissatisfaction with clinical practice was a key reason for choosing a career in public health. Experiential learning, postgraduate education and mentoring from both peers and senior colleagues were the most significant contributors to competency development. The subjects supported mentoring as an important strategy for public health nutrition workforce development and articulated the characteristics and models important for mentoring relationships in public health nutrition. The present study suggests mentoring was an important part of competency development for advanced-level public health and community nutritionists in Australia. Mentoring programmes based on experiential learning may assist in developing public health nutrition workforce competence.

  13. Boundary work and the introduction of acute care nurse practitioners in healthcare teams.

    PubMed

    Kilpatrick, Kelley; Lavoie-Tremblay, Mélanie; Ritchie, Judith A; Lamothe, Lise; Doran, Diane

    2012-07-01

    This article is a report of a study of boundary work following the introduction of an acute care nurse practitioner role in healthcare teams. Acute care nurse practitioners enacting their roles in healthcare teams have faced a number of challenges including a mix of positive and negative views of the acute care nurse practitioner role from healthcare team members and acute care nurse practitioner roles crossing the boundaries between the medical and nursing professions. Understanding the process by which the boundaries between professions changed following the introduction of an acute care nurse practitioner role was important since this could affect scope of practice and the team's ability to give patient care. The study was conducted in two university-affiliated teaching hospitals in Canada. A descriptive multiple case study design was used. Data were collected from March to May 2009. Participants (N = 59) described boundary work as a process that included: (1) creating space; (2) loss of a valued function; (3) trust; (4) interpersonal dynamics; and (5) time. The development of trust among team members was essential. The co-location of team members working on common projects, and medical and nursing leadership facilitated boundary work. The micro-level processes of boundary work in healthcare teams have important implications for the development of full scope of practice for acute care nurse practitioners, effective inter-professional teamwork and the integration of new roles in healthcare systems. Future research needs to be undertaken in different contexts, and with patients and families. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  14. Workforce Characteristics, Perceptions, Stress, and Satisfaction among Staff in Green House and Other Nursing Homes.

    PubMed

    Brown, Patrick B; Hudak, Sandra L; Horn, Susan D; Cohen, Lauren W; Reed, David Allen; Zimmerman, Sheryl

    2016-02-01

    To compare workforce characteristics and staff perceptions of safety, satisfaction, and stress between Green House (GH) and comparison nursing homes (CNHs). Primary data on staff perceptions of safety, stress, and satisfaction from 13 GHs and 8 comparison NHs in 11 states; secondary data from human resources records on workforce characteristics, turnover, and staffing from 01/01/2011-06/30/2012. Observational study. Workforce data were from human resources offices; staff perceptions were from surveys. Few significant differences were found between GH and CNHs. Exceptions were GH direct caregivers were older, provided twice the normalized hours per week budgeted per resident than CNAs in CNHs or Legacy NHs, and trended toward lower turnover. GH environment may promote staff longevity and does not negatively affect worker's stress, safety perceptions, or satisfaction. Larger studies are needed to confirm findings. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  15. Psychiatric Mental Health Nursing Advanced Practice Workforce: Capacity to Address Shortages of Mental Health Professionals.

    PubMed

    Delaney, Kathleen R

    2017-09-01

    There is a recognized shortage of mental health professionals licensed to provide the full scope of mental health services, including assessment, diagnosis, and prescribing. Psychiatric mental health advanced practice nurses (PMH APNs) have the education and licensure to provide these services, address provider shortages and increase access to services. Unfortunately, federal reports and mental health workforce studies inaccurately depict important characteristics of PMH APNs, particularly their scope of practice, a situation that creates misunderstanding and impedes workforce planning. This Open Forum provides an accurate depiction of the PMH APN workforce, its size, scope of practice, and its capacity to increase access to mental health services. Also considered are the implications of using integrated care to increase access to mental health treatment. PMH APNs could increase the reach of these collaborative care models, which require constructing interprofessional teams in which each provider practices to the top of his or her license.

  16. Effect of Prior Health-Related Employment on the Registered Nurse Workforce Supply.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Byung-kwan; Lin, Tzu-chun; Kim, Minchul; Sasaki, Tomoko; Spetz, Joanne

    2016-01-01

    Registered nurses (RN) who held prior health-related employment in occupations other than licensed practical or vocational nursing (LPN/LVN) are reported to have increased rapidly in the past decades. Researchers examined whether prior health-related employment affects RN workforce supply. A cross-sectional bivariate probit model using the 2008 National Sample Survey of Registered Nurses was esti- mated. Prior health-related employment in relatively lower-wage occupations, such as allied health, clerk, or nursing aide, was positively associated with working s an RN. ~>Prior health-related employ- ment in relatively higher-wage categories, such as a health care manager or LPN/LVN, was positively associated with working full-time as an RN. Policy implications are to promote an expanded career ladder program and a nursing school admission policy that targets non-RN health care workers with an interest in becoming RNs.

  17. The nurse practitioner and policy in end-of-life care.

    PubMed

    DuBois, Janet C; Reed, Pamela G

    2014-01-01

    The focus of this column is the interface between policy and end-of-life care, particularly as provided by advanced nurse practitioners. The complexities of end-of-life along with barriers in practice can diminish quality of life for patients and their families. Changes in policy are needed to enable nurse practitioners their full scope of practice in a way that benefits patients and families at end-of-life. Three areas particularly relevant to policy for nursing practitioners and end-of-life care are addressed: scope of practice, reimbursement, and prescribing practices. Other recommendations for policy and end-of-life care are discussed.

  18. Steering a course towards advanced nurse practitioner: a critical care perspective.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Elizabeth; Carberry, Martin

    2011-01-01

    This article is a report of a study of the experiences of expert critical care nurses in their transition to the role of advanced nurse practitioner within an intensive care unit (ICU) setting. The advanced nurse practitioner role was developed to support the ICU team and to undertake many of the roles traditionally associated with junior medical staff in this specialized area. The impetus for this study therefore was generated from the need to explore the role development experiences of trainee advanced nurse practitioners to inform future developments and practice. This study used grounded theory methodology to conduct and analyse data from 25 participants. The data were collected between March 2010 and August 2010, using interview format. Data collection and analysis was conducted simultaneously using methods associated with grounded theory, theoretical sampling and the constant comparative method. 'Staying the course to advanced nursing practice' emerged as the core category, with four related major categories and substantive codes. In conjunction, the substantive theory explaining the essential processes involved comprised of three inextricably linked processes: situational, development and conceptual meaning. The developed conceptual model captures the unique experiences of expert critical care nurses during their transition to confident and competent advanced nurse practitioners. This study provides an account of the role transition from expert critical care nurse to advanced nurse practitioner, specifically the synthesis of expert nursing practice with traditional medical values. The conceptual model has the potential to be utilized as a framework for others embarking upon similar projects, informing advanced nurse practitioner roles within and out with critical care settings. © 2011 The Authors. Nursing in Critical Care © 2011 British Association of Critical Care Nurses.

  19. A community college model to support nursing workforce diversity.

    PubMed

    Colville, Janet; Cottom, Sherry; Robinette, Teresa; Wald, Holly; Waters, Tomi

    2015-02-01

    Community College of Allegheny County (CCAC), Allegheny Campus, is situated on the North Side of Pittsburgh. The neighborhood is 60% African American. At the time of the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) application, approximately one third of the students admitted to the program were African American, less than one third of whom successfully completed it. With the aid of HRSA funding, CCAC developed a model that significantly improved the success rate of disadvantaged students. Through the formation of a viable cohort, the nursing faculty nurtured success among the most at-risk students. The cohort was supported by a social worker, case managers who were nursing faculty, and tutors. Students formed study groups, actively participated in community activities, and developed leadership skills through participation in the Student Nurse Association of Pennsylvania. This article provides the rationale for the Registered Nurse (RN) Achievement Model, describes the components of RN Achievement, and discusses the outcomes of the initiative.

  20. Florida public health nurse workforce initiative: opportunity through crisis.

    PubMed

    2005-06-01

    The National Public Health Leadership Institute (NPHLI), a partnership between the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill invites public health professionals to participate in a 2 year leadership program. Three Florida nurses participated in the NPHLI along with a cadre of 40 to 50 participants from the United States and foreign countries. Part of the commitment involved implementing a leadership project. This team chose to address the nursing shortage by developing and piloting mentorship program. Baseline research included a basic review of the literature and involvement in several work groups addressing various aspects of employing and retaining qualified public health nurses in Florida. During their NPHLI scholar year, team members sought input from a variety of professional sources on the reasons for the shortage of public health nurses in Florida. Based on responses from nurses, professional association members, and employees in the Florida Department of Health, team members developed a nursing mentorship project designed to address public health nursing retention and education. The goal was to develop a two-pronged mentorship program, which supported the attainment of clinical competence and workplace confidence while also improving the public health theoretical knowledge base of more experienced nurses. Nursing leadership at both the state and local levels agreed and embraced the concept. The Florida Team developed a Mentorship Handbook, which contains recruitment criteria, baseline, midterm and end of project assessment tools, and numerous other documents. The Team gained endorsement for the project and a commitment to see it through from the Department of Health's Nursing Office. The Florida Nurses Association partnered with the team to initiate the kickoff and involve team members in important discussion groups. In effecting change it is vital to have engaged and included the targeted "community" in

  1. Journey to Becoming a Neonatal Nurse Practitioner: Making the Decision to Enter Graduate School.

    PubMed

    Brand, M Colleen; Cesario, Sandra K; Symes, Lene; Montgomery, Diane

    2016-04-01

    Neonatal nurse practitioners (NNPs) play an important role in caring for premature and ill infants. Currently, there is a shortage of NNPs to fill open positions. Understanding how nurses decide to become NNPs will help practicing nurse practitioners, managers, and faculty encourage and support nurses in considering the NNP role as a career choice. To describe how nurses decide to enter graduate school to become nurse practitioners. A qualitative study using semistructured interviews to explore how 11 neonatal intensive care unit nurses decided to enter graduate school to become NNPs. Key elements of specialization, discovery, career decision, and readiness were identified. Conditions leading to choosing the NNP role include working in a neonatal intensive care unit and deciding to stay in the neonatal area, discovering the NNP role, deciding to become an NNP, and readiness to enter graduate school. Important aspects of readiness are developing professional self-confidence and managing home, work, and financial obligations and selecting the NNP program. Neonatal nurse practitioners are both positive role models and mentors to nurses considering the role. Unit managers are obligated to provide nurses with opportunities to obtain leadership skills. Faculty of NNP programs must be aware of the impact NNP students and graduates have on choices of career and schools. Exploring the decision to become an NNP in more geographically diverse populations will enhance understanding how neonatal intensive care unit nurses decide to become NNPs.

  2. Healthcare context and nursing workforce in a main city of Angola.

    PubMed

    Costa Mendes, I A; Marchi-Alves, L M; Mazzo, A; Nogueira, M S; Trevizan, M A; de Godoy, S; Bistafa Pereira, M J; Leonardo de Oliveira Gaioli, C C; Arena Ventura, C A

    2013-03-01

    Angola is one of the largest African countries with continuing levels of insecurity, considerable weakness in terms of respect for human rights, destroyed infrastructure and low transparency and social accountability levels. The health system displays gaps and nursing represents the main contingent among human resources in health. This research aims to understand the healthcare context in Angola from the perspective of Brazilian nurses who were involved in helping their Angolan colleagues. This general view of health services is followed by a description of nursing workforce particularities at a tertiary health service in the province of Luanda. Data were extracted from the database of the Global Network of World Health Organization Collaborating Centres for Nursing and Midwifery Development, constructed based on technical visits to Angola in 2009. Information related to health service characteristics was used, focusing on nursing human resource activities at two tertiary, one secondary and one primary health institutions located in the province of Luanda. The study data were analysed through descriptive statistics. Among the problems the nursing workforce faces, the lack of human, material and financial resources stands out, as well as insufficient professional qualification, excessive work journeys, low remunerations, non-valuation of professionals, leading to unsatisfactory work environments and discouraged human resources. Nursing in Angola is conquering its professional space. Therefore, regulatory policies are fundamental, defining the rights and obligations of all categories involved, with a view to determining nurses' function in the health team, including respect for and acknowledgement of their role in the community. © 2012 The Authors. International Nursing Review © 2012 International Council of Nurses.

  3. Third-party reimbursement for nurse practitioners' services on trauma teams: working through a maze of issues.

    PubMed

    Buppert, Carolyn

    2005-01-01

    Third-party payers reimburse for physician services performed by nurse practitioners, if the services are within the scope of practice of a nurse practitioner and the payers' rules are followed. However, some hospitals and trauma services have been reluctant to bill the services of nurse practitioners they employ or to hire nurse practitioners, because the rules are complex, vary from payer to payer, can be difficult to find, and because operations are not always set up so that nurse practitioners' services are bundled in ways which conform to the rules. Medicare has developed detailed rules on billing nurse practitioners' services, but neither Medicaid nor commercial payers necessarily follow Medicare's rules. The situation is further complicated by wide variations in state law governing nurse practitioner scope of practice and requirements for physician collaboration. Despite all of these variables, it may be worth the time and effort to sort out the requirements for utilizing nurse practitioners and billing for their services, considering the limitations on residents' hours, the data on quality of nurse practitioners' clinical services and the potential for generating revenue. This article describes the legal and business issues, provides the general rules for billing nurse practitioners' services, and provides a plan for obtaining third-party payment for nurse practitioners' services on trauma teams.

  4. The Role of Organizational Culture in Retaining Nursing Workforce

    PubMed Central

    Banaszak-Holl, Jane; Castle, Nicholas G.; Lin, Michael K.; Shrivastwa, Nijika; Spreitzer, Gretchen

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of the Study: We examined how organizational culture in nursing homes affects staff turnover, because culture is a first step to creating satisfactory work environments. Design and Methods: Nursing home administrators were asked in 2009 to report on facility culture and staff turnover. We received responses from 419 of 1,056 administrators contacted. Respondents reported the strength of cultural values using scales from a Competing Values Framework and percent of staff leaving annually for Registered Nurse (RN), Licensed Practice Nurse (LPN), and nursing aide (NA) staff. We estimated negative binomial models predicting turnover.  Results: Turnover rates are lower than found in past but remain significantly higher among NAs than among RNs or LPNs. Facilities with stronger market values had increased turnover among RNs and LPNs, and among NAs when turnover was adjusted for facilities with few staff. Facilities emphasizing hierarchical internal processes had lower RN turnover. Group and developmental values focusing on staff and innovation only lowered LPN turnover. Finally, effects on NA turnover become insignificant when turnover was adjusted if voluntary turnover was reported. Implications: Organizational culture had differential effects on the turnover of RN, LPN, and NA staff that should be addressed in developing culture-change strategies. More flexible organizational culture values were important for LPN staff only, whereas unexpectedly, greater emphasis on rigid internal rules helped facilities retain RNs. Facilities with a stronger focus on customer needs had higher turnover among all staff. PMID:24218146

  5. Managing and sustaining an ageing nursing workforce: identifying opportunities and best practices within collective agreements in Canada.

    PubMed

    Kwok, Cara; Bates, Kimberly A; Ng, Eddy S

    2016-05-01

    This paper seeks to identify gaps within nursing collective agreements for opportunities to implement practices to sustain the nursing workforce. Since the majority of nurses in Canada are unionised, some of the strategies recommended in the literature to cope with nursing shortage may not apply to unionised nurses, making collective agreements a potential source for designing practices that can mitigate the impact of ageing nurses. Nine major collective agreements for registered nurses in each province governing the nursing employment relationship were analysed to see if different practices were already addressed in the collective agreements. Five such practices were identified, including: providing more mentorship opportunities; encouraging nurses who are eligible to retire to remain in the nursing workforce; attracting internationally trained nurses; implementing operational changes that include process improvements or new technologies; and empowering nurses through flexibility in work schedules. If collective agreements are silent in any of the strategies identified in the literature, health-care organisations can adopt these practices without violating the collective agreements. Non-unionised health-care organisations can also benefit from learning about these policies and practices to assist in managing and sustaining an ageing nursing workforce. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Flexible working and the contribution of nurses in mid-life to the workforce: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Harris, Ruth; Bennett, Janette; Davey, Barbara; Ross, Fiona

    2010-04-01

    With the changing demographic profile of the nursing workforce, retaining the skill and experience of nurses in mid-life is very important. Work-life balance is a concept that is gaining increasing prominence in today's society. However, little is known about older nurses' experience of family friendly policies and flexible working. This study explored the organisational, professional and personal factors that influence perceptions of commitment and participation in the workforce for nurses working in mid-life (aged 45 and over). A qualitative study using a range of methods including biographical methods, semi-structured face-to-face interviews, focus groups and telephone interviews. Data were analysed using constant comparative method. A large inner city acute teaching hospital and an inner city mental health and social care trust providing both community and inpatient health and social care. 34 nurses and 3 health care assistants participated in individual interviews, 10 nurses participated in two focus groups and 17 managers participated in individual telephone interviews. Four themes emerged: the nature of nursing poses a challenge to the implementation of flexible working, differences in perceptions of the availability of flexible working, ward managers have a crucial role in the implementation of flexible working policies and the implementation of flexible working may be creating an inflexible workforce. The findings suggest that there are limits to the implementation of flexible working for nurses. In some areas there is evidence that the implementation of flexible working may be producing an inflexible workforce as older nurses are required to compensate for the flexible working patterns of their colleagues. Ward managers have a key role in the implementation of family friendly policies and require support to fulfil this role. There is a need for creative solutions to address implementation of flexible working for all nurses to ensure that workforce policy

  7. Nurse practitioner and physician assistant interest in prescribing buprenorphine.

    PubMed

    Roose, Robert J; Kunins, Hillary V; Sohler, Nancy L; Elam, Rashiah T; Cunningham, Chinazo O

    2008-06-01

    Office-based buprenorphine places health care providers in a unique position to combine HIV and drug treatment in the primary care setting. However, federal legislation restricts nurse practitioners (NPs) and physician assistants (PAs) from prescribing buprenorphine, which may limit its potential for uptake and inhibit the role of these nonphysician providers in delivering drug addiction treatment to patients with HIV. This study aimed to examine the level of interest in prescribing buprenorphine among nonphysician providers. We anonymously surveyed providers attending HIV educational conferences in six large U.S. cities about their interest in prescribing buprenorphine. Overall, 48.6% (n = 92) of nonphysician providers were interested in prescribing buprenorphine. Compared to infectious disease specialists, nonphysician providers (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 2.89, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.22-6.83) and generalist physicians (AOR = 2.04, 95% CI = 1.09-3.84) were significantly more likely to be interested in prescribing buprenorphine. NPs and PAs are interested in prescribing buprenorphine. To improve uptake of buprenorphine in HIV settings, the implications of permitting nonphysician providers to prescribe buprenorphine should be further explored.

  8. Treating vasomotor symptoms of menopause: the nurse practitioner's perspective.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Ivy M; Moore, Anne

    2007-03-01

    This article reviews the pathophysiology of vasomotor symptoms (VMS) of menopause and current management options. Current scientific literature. In most menopausal women, loss of ovarian function results in VMS, including hot flashes, night sweats, and mood and sleep disturbances. Hormone therapy (HT) has been the mainstay of VMS treatment for many years, but safety concerns raised by publication of the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) results have dramatically reduced the use of this treatment. Since the WHI published its findings, attention has focused on other novel treatments for menopausal symptoms, including low-dose oral or transdermal HT and agents such as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors, gabapentin, and clonidine. Many women also use complementary and alternative medications to manage VMS, but little evidence from controlled clinical trials supports their efficacy. The increasing number of alternative treatments for VMS requires improvement in patient-provider communication about treatment risks and benefits, individualization of treatment to meet patient needs and attitudes, and careful follow-up to ensure adherence to potentially effective therapy. Nurse practitioners play a leading role in patient evaluation, discussions, and management to help women achieve control over bothersome VMS that dramatically impact their quality of life.

  9. Clients' understanding of the role of nurse practitioners.

    PubMed

    Allnutt, Jane; Allnutt, Nissa; McMaster, Rose; O'Connell, Jane; Middleton, Sandy; Hillege, Sharon; Della, Phillip R; Gardner, Glenn E; Gardner, Anne

    2010-03-01

    Nurse practitioners (NPs) have an emerging role in the Australian health care system. However, there remains a dearth of data about public understanding of the NP role. The aim of this study was to evaluate clients' understanding of the role of the NP and their satisfaction with education received, quality of care and NP knowledge and skill. All authorised NPs working in a designated NP position in Western Australia and those working in three area health services in New South Wales were invited to recruit five consecutive clients to complete the self-administered survey. Thirty-two NPs (NP response rate 93%) recruited 129 clients (client response rate 90%). Two-thirds of clients (63%) were aware they were consulting an NP. The majority rated the following NP-related outcomes as 'excellent' or 'very good': education provided (89%); quality of care (95%); and knowledge and skill (93%). Less than half reported an understanding that NPs could prescribe medications (40.5%) or interpret X-rays (33.6%). Clients of NPs practising in a rural or remote setting were more likely than those in an urban setting to have previously consulted an NP (P = 0.005), and where applicable would to prefer to see an NP rather than a doctor (P = 0.022). Successful implementation and expansion of the NP role requires NP visibility in the community. Despite high levels of satisfaction, more awareness of the scope of the NP role is required.

  10. Methamphetamine use among suburban women: Implications for nurse practitioners

    PubMed Central

    Bairan, Annette; Boeri, Miriam; Morian, Janice

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this article is to provide nurse practitioners (NPs) with more effective strategies to diagnose methamphetamine (MA) use and assess healthcare needs of MA-using women. Data Sources The researchers collected data from 65 suburban women who were MA users living in the suburbs of a large southeastern city in the US. We conducted in-depth interviews and focus groups examining their life history, drug history, risk behaviors, and access to healthcare. The qualitative findings are examined here. Conclusions Three main themes emerged from the data: 1) gendered stigmatization of MA use; 2) MA related health risk behaviors; and 3) barriers to health and social services, which resulted in a domino effect that led to further life and health complications. When these factors are not effectively addressed, the result is more serious health problems for the women and their children. Implications for Practice This article offers awareness and assessment tools to provide NPs adequate knowledge about the factors associated with MA use in order to treat patients holistically. NPs are strategically positioned to effectively assess, diagnose, treat, and provide linkage to health and social services, especially for suburban females who are a hidden population of drug users. PMID:24510626

  11. The transition of nurse practitioners to changes in prescriptive authority.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Louise; Brown, Marie-Annette

    2007-01-01

    To understand nurse practitioners' (NPs) decisions about whether to obtain prescriptive authority for controlled substances, to describe NPs' experiences with providing or prescribing controlled substances, and to describe the relationship between perceived autonomy and prescriptive authority for controlled substances. Twelve focus groups were conducted with approximately 100 NPs who attended continuing education conferences. Discussions were audiotaped and transcribed verbatim. Grounded theory approaches were used for data collection and analysis. A core category of Letting go and taking hold characterized Washington State NPs' experience of the transition to prescribing schedule II-IV medications. Three dimensions of the NPs' transition were Resisting change, Ambivalent about change, and Embracing change. The core category, Letting go and taking hold, indicated how transition to a new scope of practice extended beyond successful passage of legislation, the importance of examining the nature of professional transition that accompanies successful legislative change, and role development as an ongoing process throughout one's career in response to changes in scope of practice. NPs need preparation for a new scope of practice long before legislation actually passes. Revealing and examining this process can facilitate the goal of achieving fully autonomous NP practice.

  12. Nurse Practitioner and Physician's Assistant Clinics in Rural California

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Walter A.

    1980-01-01

    Twenty-six rural California clinics have employed nurse practitioners (NP's) or physician's assistants (PA's) to meet the primary health care needs of local communities. Of the 24 NP's and 5 PA's involved, 11 were men and 18 were women. Their average age was 37, and all but five were trained in California. The clinics, with less than 50 percent on-site physician supervision, averaged 19 miles in distance from the nearest physician (ranging up to 63 miles). More than half the clinics were satellites of central, physician-staffed, nonprofit clinics, a third were community-administered and two were private. Half served a whole community, a quarter were established to serve Indians and a quarter to serve Chicanos. Each NP or PA saw an average of 13 patients a day. All nonprivate clinics received subsidies from a variety of local, state and federal funds. Four of the clinics had closed or had no medical staff at the time of our survey. NP/PA clinics are proving to be a feasible and valuable means of offering essential health care needs to remote communities. PMID:6103602

  13. The rural nurse practitioner: a challenge and a response.

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, J A; Dachelet, C Z; Sultz, H A; Henry, M

    1978-01-01

    From a cohort of 525 employed nurse practitioners (NPs) who graduated between May 1975 and June 1976, 85 (16 per cent) reported practicing in rural areas. While 91 per cent of the rural NPs chose the short-term certificate programs rather than the master's degree for their NP preparation, 47 per cent had already earned a baccalaureate or master's degree prior to NP training. Family NPs comprised the most frequent specialty area chosen, followed by pediatric and adult specialties. Of the 85, 99 per cent were actually providing a broad array of primary care services to clients over a wide age range. Physicians were periodically available on site in about 80 per cent of the practices, by telephone in 97 per cent of the practices, and in 60 per cent of the practices provided additional consulation by record review. Major motivations of the NPs for entering rural practice were to participate in a creative approach to health care delivery (50 per cent of the practice setting were less than five years old), and for the opportunity for role autonomy. Over 95 per cent of these NPs and employers were satisfied with the NP role. PMID:717607

  14. Project to expand diversity in the nursing workforce.

    PubMed

    Georges, Catherine

    2012-05-01

    The Bronx, one of the five boroughs of New York City, has a diverse population, but the largest ethnic group is Hispanic, or Latino. More than half (53 per cent) of the students at Lehman College of the City University of New York are from this group, reflecting the population demographic of the borough, but in 2006 Hispanic students comprised just 8 per cent of those enrolled in the department of nursing. To address this disparity, the department undertook a project to increase recruitment, retention and graduation of Hispanic nursing students. The project involved several activities in collaboration with a Bronx high school, Lehman College's baccalaureate nursing programme, and a partner hospital that serves thousands of people of Hispanic origin. This article describes the project and the lessons learnt.

  15. Canada's First Nurse Practitioner-Led Clinic: A Case Study in Healthcare Innovation.

    PubMed

    Heale, Roberta; Butcher, Marilyn

    2010-09-01

    Canada's first nurse practitioner-led clinic opened in 2007 after a period of intense lobbying. The development of this clinic has received a great deal of attention in the nursing world and among the general public, but the factors that enabled it have not been examined. The antecedents outlined in healthcare innovation concept analysis - including leadership, financial considerations, idea generation, teamwork, culture and demand - provide a framework for examination of the campaign for the nurse practitioner-led clinic. This review demonstrates the complex interplay of factors that drive healthcare innovation and expands understanding of the leadership and change competencies of the advanced practice nurse.

  16. Classroom to clinic: incorporating adolescent spiritual/faith assessment into nurse practitioner education & practice.

    PubMed

    Haley, Janice M

    2014-01-01

    Although nursing is well grounded in the conceptualization of person as body-mind-spirit, there is little evidence that advanced practice nurses routinely address the spirit in giving patient care, especially with adolescents in the outpatient setting. The neglect of spiritual aspects of care may be related to lack of a framework, or education/incorporation into nurse practitioner preparation. This article describes one method of integrating adolescent spiritual/faith assessment into a nurse practitioner clinical course. Readings, assignments, and a grading rubric are offered.

  17. The relative geographic immobility of new registered nurses calls for new strategies to augment that workforce.

    PubMed

    Kovner, Christine T; Corcoran, Sean P; Brewer, Carol S

    2011-12-01

    Little is known about registered nurses' geographic mobility after they earn their first professional degree and become licensed to practice. Through a cross-sectional mailed survey of newly licensed registered nurses in fifteen states, we found that 52.5 percent work within forty miles of where they attended high school. Our complementary analysis of Census Bureau data shows that next to teaching, nursing is one of the least mobile professions for women, for reasons that remain unclear. To ensure that underserved areas have an adequate workforce of registered nurses, policy makers should expand the number of educational programs in these areas; fund programs that provide incentives to young people from these areas to attend nursing programs; consider supporting extension programs from accredited nursing schools; and review admission policies for nursing programs and the financial aid they offer. If states find it difficult to retain out-of-state graduates, giving preference to in-state applicants may make sense. Finally, programs and policies that offer financial incentives to attract registered nurses to underserved areas, such as the National Health Service Corps and the Area Health Education Centers, are critically important. When sufficiently funded, such programs could serve to offset the low mobility of new registered nurses that we observed.

  18. Hospital Nursing Workforce Costs, Wages, Occupational Mix,and Resource Utilization.

    PubMed

    Welton, John M

    2015-10-01

    The objective of the study was to better understand how hospitals use different types of RNs, LPNs, and nurse aides in proprietary (for-profit), nonprofit, and government-owned hospitals and to estimate the wages, cost, and intensity of nursing care using a national data set. This is a cross-sectional observational study of 3,129 acute care hospitals in all 50 states and District of Columbia using data from the 2008 Occupational Mix Survey administered by the Centers for Medicare &Medicaid Services (CMS). Nursing skill mix, hours, and labor costs were combined with other CMS hospital descriptive data, including type of hospital ownership, urban or rural location, hospital beds, and case-mix index. RN labor costs make up 25.5% of all hospital expenditures annually, and all nursing labor costs represent 30.1%, which is nearly a quarter trillion dollars ($216.7 billion) per year for inpatient nursing care. On average, proprietary hospitals employ 1.3 RNs per bed and 1.9 nursing personnel per bed in urban hospitals compared with 1.7 RNs per bed and 2.3 nursing personnel per bed for nonprofit and government-owned hospitals (P G .05). States with higher ratios of RN compared with LPN licenses used fewer LPNs in the inpatient setting. The findings from this study can be helpful in comparing nursing care across different types of hospitals, ownership, and geographic locations and used as a benchmark for future nursing workforce needs and costs.

  19. An Undergraduate Research Fellowship Program to Prepare Nursing Students for Future Workforce Roles.

    PubMed

    Slattery, Mary Jo; Logan, Bridget Linehan; Mudge, Bridget; Secore, Karen; von Reyn, Linda J; Maue, Robert A

    It is important for nurses today and for those joining the workforce in the future to have familiarity and training with respect to interprofessional research, evidence-based practice, and quality improvement. In an effort to address this need, we describe a 10-week summer research program that immerses undergraduate nursing students in a broad spectrum of clinical and translational research projects as part of their exposure to advanced nursing roles. In doing so, the program increases the ability of the students to participate in research, effectively interact with academic medical center researchers, and incorporate elements of evidence-based practice into future nursing interventions. Their mentors are nurses practicing in roles as nurse researcher, advanced practice nurses involved in evidence-based practice or quality improvement, and clinical trials research nurses. Each student is matched with 3 of these mentors and involved in 3 different projects. Through this exposure, the students benefit from observing multiple nursing roles, taking an active role in research-related activities participating in interdisciplinary learning experiences. Overall, the program provides benefits to the students, who demonstrate measured improvement with respect to the program objectives, and to their mentors and each of the participating organizations.

  20. Trends in State Regulation of Nurse Practitioners and Physician Assistants, 2001 to 2010

    PubMed Central

    Gadbois, Emily A.; Miller, Edward Alan; Tyler, Denise; Intrator, Orna

    2016-01-01

    Nurse practitioners and physician assistants can alleviate some of the primary care shortage facing the United States, but their scope-of-practice is limited by state regulation. This study reports both cross-sectional and longitudinal trends in state scope-of-practice regulations for nurse practitioners and physician assistants over a 10-year period. Regulations from 2001 to 2010 were compiled and described with respect to entry-to-practice standards, physician involvement in treatment/diagnosis, prescriptive authority, and controlled substances. Findings indicate that most states loosened regulations, granting greater autonomy to nurse practitioners and physician assistants, particularly with respect to prescriptive authority and physician involvement in treatment and diagnosis. Many states also increased barriers to entry, requiring high levels of education before entering practice. Knowledge of state trends in nurse practitioner and physician assistant regulation should inform current efforts to standardize scope-of-practice nationally. PMID:25542195