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  1. The image of nursing, as perceived by Iranian male nurses.

    PubMed

    Valizadeh, Leila; Zamanzadeh, Vahid; Fooladi, Marjaneh M; Azadi, Arman; Negarandeh, Reza; Monadi, Morteza

    2014-09-01

    The stereotypical public image of nursing is a major concern for male nurses around the world. In this study, we explored how Iranian male nurses perceived the public view of nurses, and their perceptions of themselves. A qualitative descriptive design and content analysis were used to obtain data from 18 purposely-selected male hospital nurses with a baccalaureate nursing degree in Tabriz, Iran. Semistructured interviews were conducted and analyzed. Two main themes emerged: (i) the outsider's view of nursing, which referred to the participants' perceptions of their public image; and (ii) the insider's view, which related to the male nurses' perceptions of themselves. Results included personal transition into a positive professional self-image through the educational process, and continued public perception of nursing as a female profession ill-suited for a man. Strategies to improve the insider's and outsider's views of nursing are listed to help recruit and retain more Iranian male nurses.

  2. Nursing instructors' and male nursing students' perceptions of undergraduate, classroom nursing education.

    PubMed

    Dyck, Jeff M; Oliffe, John; Phinney, Alison; Garrett, Bernie

    2009-08-01

    Attrition rates of male nursing students exceed those of females yet the experiences of male students in nursing school are poorly understood. This interpretive ethnographic study explored the experiences of male nursing students and female nursing instructors in the context of classroom education. Data collection consisted of participant observation of classroom teaching sessions followed by interviews with six male nursing students who were participants in the classes and six female nursing instructors who taught the classes. Themes resulting from data analysis addressed men's roles in the nursing classroom and the culture of nursing education. The theme of "nursing like a real man" was characterized by men's reliance on roles and behaviours associated with traditional masculinities including leadership, assertiveness and risk-taking. The theme of "masculinities in a feminine place" captured the gendered culture of nursing education which manifested in stereotypes and a sexualized identity, where men saw themselves as accommodated but not integrated. "Diversity between masculine and feminine" communicated the incongruity between men's educational preferences and the techniques that predominate in nursing education. These findings suggest that nursing instructors need to consider gender in their teaching practice, avoid parody or stereotypes of masculinities, and reject assumptions that male students are homogeneous.

  3. Caring for female patients: The experiences of male nurses.

    PubMed

    Keogh, Brian; Gleeson, Madeline

    This article presents the results of two small qualitative studies, which examined the experiences of six male registered psychiatric nurses (RPN) and five male registered general nurses (RGN) when caring for patients of the opposite sex. Semi-structured interviews were used to collect the data. The focus of the interviews was an attempt to describe the male nurses' experiences of caring for women with a particular emphasis on interventions that involved physical touch. Themes were generated from both studies and the common themes are presented here. Male nurses in this study were often apprehensive about using physical touch and they used coping strategies in response to their fears of being accused of using touch inappropriately. Several factors also influenced the male nurses when using physical touch as an intervention. These findings suggest that learning about caring for female patients needs to be included in the undergraduate curriculum and that further research on the experience of men as nurses is required.

  4. Women Nurses and Male Physicians: Their Educational Relationships.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bullough, Vern; Bullough, Bonnie

    The implications for nursing education of the fact that nursing started as a woman's occupation in a field dominated by the male physician are considered. Although in 1873 nursing represented a real educational opportunity for large numbers of women, none of the prestigious women's colleges were interested in educating women for careers. In the…

  5. Male Nurses in Israel: Barriers, Motivation, and How They Are Perceived by Nursing Students.

    PubMed

    Ashkenazi, Liat; Livshiz-Riven, Ilana; Romem, Pnina; Grinstein-Cohen, Orli

    The current worldwide nursing shortage remains a challenge for the nursing profession. Encouraging men to become nurses and, thereby, increasing the number of practitioners are crucial factors in facing this challenge. The historiography of nursing presents nursing as "women's work," based on the assumption that it is inherently appropriate for women only. Although men were employed as nurses even before nursing was recognized as a profession, male nurses were always a minority in the field. Over the years, the proportion of male nurses has increased, but they still comprise only 5 to 10% of the nursing workforce in the western world. This study examined men's motives for a career choice of nursing, how male nurses are perceived, and the barriers that they face. The study was conducted among 336 nursing students studying in a co-educational program in various academic tracks at a public, nonsectarian university in the south of Israel. Participants completed the following questionnaires in one study session: sociodemographic questionnaire; Attitudes Towards Men in Nursing Scale; motives for career choice questionnaire; and the questionnaire of the perceptions of the professional status of nursing. Study findings revealed that men tended to choose nursing because of financial constraints significantly more frequently than women (P=.001). Among the participants, there was no significant between-sex difference in the perception nursing as women's work (P=.002) or in perception of male nurses as homosexuals. Results of the study showed that the status of the nursing profession is considered low, and the low status deters men from choosing nursing as a career. The motivation for men's career choice must be understood, and men must be empowered to improve their work conditions and financial remuneration in order to recruit men to the field and to improve the perception of the profession and its public status.

  6. Attitudes of Female and Male Nurses Toward Men in Nursing: A Replication and Comparison Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-05-01

    more positive attitudes toward men in nursing than does the female I sample. The multiple regression between the total sample Overall mean total score...registered I nurses still hold more negative attitudes toward men in the profession? Third, to what extent do female registered nurses hold the perception...anticipate that pay and working * conditions will improve. ( ) 45. Any competition between male and female nurses is founded on the men being paid more

  7. Relationships among social support, professional empowerment, and nursing career development of male nurses: a cross-sectional analysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Sheng-Hwang; Fu, Chou-Mei; Li, Ren-Hau; Lou, Jiunn-Horng; Yu, Hsing-Yi

    2012-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore the relationships among social support, professional empowerment, and nursing career development and to identify the significant factors that affect nursing career development among male nurses. A cross-sectional survey design was used with 314 male nurses in Taiwan. Social support and professional empowerment were significantly and positively correlated with nursing career development among male nurses. Social support, professional empowerment, salary, type of institution, type of clinical level, and nursing discipline were identified as factors that significantly influenced nursing career development. Together, they accounted for 55.9% of the total variation. Professional empowerment was the most critical predictor of nursing career development and accounted for 47.7% of the variation. Nursing managers should follow male nurses' empowerment with interest and specifically address professional empowerment to promote male nurses' career development.

  8. Image of Nursing Profession as Perceived by Egyptian and Jordanian Undergraduate Male Nursing Students: A Comparative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ibrahim, Azza Fathi; Akel, Dalal Talat; Alzghoul, Husam Wasil Mohammed

    2015-01-01

    The hiring and maintaining of male nurses in the nursing field is a very apparent issue nowadays. Hence, there is an urgent need to promote a professional nursing image and enhance its standing in the community, especially for men. Although they have an important position in nursing, men are still proportionately in the minority. This study aimed…

  9. Self-image of male nursing students in Hong Kong: multi-qualitative approaches.

    PubMed

    Chan, Zenobia C Y; Lo, Kelvin K L; Tse, Kris C Y; Wong, William W

    2014-01-01

    The image of male nurses is closely related to the development of a female-driven nursing occupation. As a minority group in the nursing industry, male nursing students may have a negative self-image in their learning and clinical practicum. This may affect their psychological health and mental status. This study explored the positive and negative self-image of male nursing students. Eighteen participants were recruited from a local nurse-training institute. The participants were undergraduate bachelor's and master's students of nursing. The experience and opinions of the participants were collected by multiple methods. The participants' drawings and audio diaries representing their self-image as nurses were collected in advance of a discussion of ideas raised in the focus group interview. The findings were categorized into three themes: (a) self-roles, functions, and identities; (b) awareness of gender differences; and (c) the future of professional development. The findings of this study provide information on the nurse role, identity, gender differences, and professional development of male nursing students, which will drive the direction of the development of a positive image for male nurses in the future.

  10. Gender-based barriers for male students in nursing education programs: prevalence and perceived importance.

    PubMed

    O'Lynn, Chad Ellis

    2004-05-01

    To meet the recent call to increase the number of nurses by recruiting men, nursing education programs will need to reduce gender-based barriers. No study found has adequately quantified the prevalence and perceived importance of barriers to men in nursing education programs. These barriers create an academic environment that is unfriendly to men. As such, I defined a new construct, "male friendliness," as a function of the presence and importance of these barriers. The aims of this study were to describe the prevalence and perceived importance of barriers and to develop a tool to measure male friendliness in nursing programs. A pilot tool addressing 33 barriers, which were obtained from the literature, my experience, and a panel of nurse educators, was mailed to 200 male nurses. The findings revealed that seven barriers were importantly different in prevalence between different subsamples of male nurses, and no barrier was rated unimportant by more than 20% of respondents. The similarities in findings between groups of male nurses, diverse in geography, school attendance, and graduation dates, suggest that the barriers men face in nursing school are pervasive, consistent, and have changed little over time. From the findings, the Inventory of Male Friendliness in Nursing Programs (IMFNP) was developed.

  11. Conscious Engagement in Undergraduate Male Nursing Students: Facilitating Voice through an Action Research Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maykut, Colleen A.; Lee, Andrew; Argueta, Nelson Garcia; Grant, Sean; Miller, Cole

    2016-01-01

    Although women have made significant progress into traditionally male-dominated professions, such as medicine and engineering, the same cannot be said of men in the nursing profession. Utilizing a critical social theory perspective, an action research project was designed to encourage participants, current male nursing students and alumni of…

  12. Nurse practice issues regarding sperm banking in adolescent male cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Reebals, Jeri F; Brown, Richard; Buckner, Ellen B

    2006-01-01

    The impressive increase in the survival rate of childhood cancer patients has produced increased interest in quality of life issues. This research addresses nurse practice issues in determining whether the newly diagnosed adolescent male patient is offered the option of sperm banking before undergoing chemotherapy treatment. Questionnaires were distributed to nurses and nurse practitioners on 3 inpatient and outpatient units who care for adolescent male cancer patients at the time of diagnosis, during chemotherapy, and during follow-up care. Findings indicate that 96.3% of respondents agreed that all male patients undergoing cancer treatment with infertility as a potential side effect should be offered sperm banking. Respondents viewed oncologists and nurse practitioners as appropriate professionals to discuss the option. Lack of knowledge regarding sperm banking could be limiting nurses' willingness to introduce the topic, and education regarding cryopreservation may improve their knowledge and practice.

  13. Masculinity and nursing care: A narrative analysis of male students' stories about care.

    PubMed

    Jordal, Kristin; Heggen, Kristin

    2015-11-01

    Nursing education programmes and the nursing curriculum have been criticised for presenting an outdated and feminised description of care, which has had the effect of marginalising men, as well as hindering a more modern outlook for the profession. This article uses interview-based data from a qualitative study on Norwegian students' experiences in the first year of training. Using a narrative analysis method, the paper explores how male nursing students use stories to describe care and shows how their storytelling illustrates a way for men to negotiate their role in a feminised profession. The paper aims to deepen our understanding of the ways in which male students can challenge this historically female profession to broaden itself by including male-based caregiving as part of nursing care. In addition, the paper highlights the potential of stories and storytelling as a teaching and learning strategy in nursing education.

  14. Warming the nursing education climate for traditional-age learners who are male.

    PubMed

    Bell-Scriber, Marietta J

    2008-01-01

    For nurse educators to facilitate student learning and the achievement of desired cognitive, affective, and psychomotor outcomes, they need to be competent in recognizing the influence of gender, experience, and other factors on teaching and learning. A study was conducted in one academic institution to describe how traditional-age male learners' perceptions of the nursing education climate compare to perceptions of female learners. Interviews were conducted with a sample of four male and four female learners. Additional data from interviews with nurse educators, classroom observations, and a review of textbooks provided breadth and depth to their perceptions. Findings support a nursing education climate that is cooler to traditional-age male learners and warmer to traditional-age female learners. The main cooling factor for men was caused by nurse educators' characteristics and unsupportive behaviors. Additional factors inside and outside the education environment contributed to a cooler climate for the male learners. Based on these findings, strategies for nurse educators to warm the education climate for traditional-age male learners are presented.

  15. Comparison of masculine and feminine traits in a national sample of male and female nursing students.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Kenny; Glenn, L Lee; Vertein, Daren

    2011-11-01

    The stereotype that male nurses are less masculine has existed for generations and spans all age groups. Several studies have investigated masculinity and femininity in nurses using the Bem Sex-Role Inventory, but the results are conflicting and inconclusive. Therefore, a nationwide survey was conducted across the United States that examined the sex-role identity of individuals who chose nursing as a career path. Twenty-eight males and 81 females from 37 states completed the survey. The males and females in the study both had higher mean scores on masculinity and femininity scales when compared with previous studies. The greatest percentage of participants were classified as androgynous, as opposed to masculine, feminine, or undifferentiated, with half of the males and nearly half of the females falling into this category.

  16. A Study of the Impostor Phenomenon among Male Nurse Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pierce, Stephanie S.

    2011-01-01

    The Clance Impostor Phenomenon Scale and the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale continue to be used to measure impostor characteristics and levels of self-esteem in aggregate populations in corporate and academic environments. Previous studies have focused on females or female dominate populations. A correlational study of nursing educators that are male…

  17. Comparative Cost of Early Infant Male Circumcision by Nurse-Midwives and Doctors in Zimbabwe

    PubMed Central

    Mangenah, Collin; Mavhu, Webster; Hatzold, Karin; Biddle, Andrea K; Ncube, Getrude; Mugurungi, Owen; Ticklay, Ismail; Cowan, Frances M; Thirumurthy, Harsha

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: The 14 countries that are scaling up voluntary male medical circumcision (VMMC) for HIV prevention are also considering early infant male circumcision (EIMC) to ensure longer-term reductions in HIV incidence. The cost of implementing EIMC is an important factor in scale-up decisions. We conducted a comparative cost analysis of EIMC performed by nurse-midwives and doctors using the AccuCirc device in Zimbabwe. Methods: Between August 2013 and July 2014, nurse-midwives performed EIMC on 500 male infants using AccuCirc in a field trial. We analyzed the overall unit cost and identified key cost drivers of EIMC performed by nurse-midwives and compared these with costing data previously collected during a randomized noninferiority comparison trial of 2 devices (AccuCirc and the Mogen clamp) in which doctors performed EIMC. We assessed direct costs (consumable and nonconsumable supplies, device, personnel, associated staff training, and waste management costs) and indirect costs (capital and support personnel costs). We performed one-way sensitivity analyses to assess cost changes when we varied key component costs. Results: The unit costs of EIMC performed by nurse-midwives and doctors in vertical programs were US$38.87 and US$49.77, respectively. Key cost drivers of EIMC were consumable supplies, personnel costs, and the device price. In this cost analysis, major cost drivers that explained the differences between EIMC performed by nurse-midwives and doctors were personnel and training costs, both of which were lower for nurse-midwives. Conclusions: EIMC unit costs were lower when performed by nurse-midwives compared with doctors. To minimize costs, countries planning to scale up EIMC should consider using nurse-midwives, who are in greater supply than doctors and are the main providers at the primary health care level, where most infants are born. PMID:27413085

  18. Breaking the Boundaries: Decision Factors That Lead Male Students to Enroll in Associate Degree Nursing Programs in Illinois Community Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Resurreccion, Leandro Alcovendaz

    2013-01-01

    Male nurses are but a small percentage of the total nurse population in the United States, and most certainly have potential to increase in numbers if the profession appeared more attractive as a career option for men. The purpose of this research was to discover the decision factors used by males that led them to enroll in Associate Degree…

  19. Promoting Career Opportunities in Nursing to the Minority and Male Population of Galveston.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garcia, Viola Ruth

    In 1991, a project was undertaken to increase the number of minority and male students entering and completing the Associate Degree Nursing (ADN) program at Galveston College (GC) in Texas. The goal of the project was achieved in three interrelated phases. The initial phase focused on establishing an outreach program within the community. The…

  20. [Nursing care in males with spinal cord injury and sexual dysfunction].

    PubMed

    Cobo-Cuenca, Ana Isabel; Martín-Espinosa, Noelia M; Píriz Campos, Rosa M

    2013-01-01

    The impact of spinal cord injury and its sequels requires important efforts of adaptation. In several studies, people with spinal cord injury claim to have covered most of their needs at physical, emotional and social level, but they are not yet fully satisfied with their sexual life. Sexual function is usually impaired in men with spinal cord injuries, and is sometimes related to problems of erection, ejaculation and/or orgasm. This issue is not a priority in the first phase, but it appears over the subsequent periods when patients often ask for a solution to this problem. A case-study is presented of a 25 year old male with chronic complete spinal cord injury (ASIA A), L4-L5 level, who reported sexual dysfunction and attended an annual review in the National Hospital for Paraplegics. After performing a nursing assessment using the functional health patterns of Gordon, the team proposed a nursing care plan according to the taxonomy of NANDA (North American Nursing Association), NOC (Nursing Outcome Classification) and NIC (Nursing Intervention Classification). Nurses are the healthcare professionals who have more direct and continuous contact with these patients. Specific programs need to be designed to provide them with the sexual education, which should contain adequate emotional and sexual information. We believe that an appropriate and systematic assessment of patient's sexuality, as well as the application of the (NANDA, NOC, NIC) nurse methodology, may be very helpful in improving the outcomes of these specific interventions.

  1. Institutional Factors Contributing to Hispanic Male Nursing Degree Attainment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rios, Deidre M.

    2013-01-01

    President Obama's 2009 graduation initiative has emphasized the shift in the national academic focus from access to higher education to graduation, making degree attainment one of the most important factors of measurement and accountability for institutions of higher education. Students of color, in particular, Hispanic males, have not fared well…

  2. Stability and change in work values among male and female nurses and engineers.

    PubMed

    Hagström, Tom; Kjellberg, Anders

    2007-04-01

    Gender related changes of work values were analyzed in a longitudinal questionnaire study of 173 male and 48 female engineers and 353 female and 31 male nurses at three measurement occasions covering about four and half years from the end of their vocational education. At all occasions, Social relations were rated as more important by women than by men and Altruism was given higher ratings by the nurses than by the engineers. Within both occupations women's mean Altruism ratings were higher than men's mean ratings, and in all groups except male engineers the mean ratings dropped between the three occasions. Women's ratings of Benefits and career and Influence were strengthened in both occupations, thereby eliminating an initial gender difference. The stability of work values is discussed in terms of challenges and norms in working life.

  3. Sex differences in gender characteristics of Australian nurses and male engineers: a comparative cross-sectional survey.

    PubMed

    J Fisher, Murray

    2011-08-01

    There continue to be assumptions within the nursing literature that nursing is synonymous with a feminine sex role identity. A comparative cross-sectional survey consisting of the Bem Sex Role Inventory and the Australian sex role scale was used to determine sex difference in gender characteristics of Australian nurses and with male engineers. A statistically significant difference in femininity was found between all the samples (F((2,908)) = 20.24, p < 0.00001; F((2,908)) = 60.13, p < 0.00001). A statistical difference in masculinity was found between female nurses and the two male samples on the two masculine scales (F((2,908)) = 12.48, p < 0.000001; F((2,908)) = 6.94, p = 0.001). Path analysis found strong significant direct relationships between the samples and expressive orientation (t = 27.67) and self display (t = 12.42). Whilst differences in expressive characteristics were found between male and female nurses, a similar difference was found between male nurses and male engineers, supporting the notion that male nurses perceive themselves as having feminine characteristics essentially required for nursing.

  4. Males in Dietetics, What Can Be Learned from the Nursing Profession? A Narrative Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Gheller, Brandon; Lordly, Daphne

    2015-12-01

    In Canada 95% of dietitians are female despite serving a sex-diverse population. Literature examining why there are so few male dietitians is limited. However, nursing, like dietetics, is female dominated but has a large body of literature examining sex diversity within the profession. Therefore, a narrative literature review was conducted to find articles that examined the following questions: (i) What are the barriers and motivating factors for prospective male nursing students? and (ii) What are the perceived sex-based challenges that male nursing students encounter during their education? A total of 38 articles were included in the final review and the results are presented under the following headings: barriers, motivators, and educational experiences both in the classroom and during clinical rotations. The review outlines the current state of knowledge regarding sex as it relates to nursing and how this information compares with the current dietetics literature. Conclusions and recommendations are drawn about what changes could be made in dietetic education immediately and how further research could provide insight towards reducing the barriers and facilitating easier access to dietetics education for males.

  5. Evaluation of a safer male circumcision training programme for traditional surgeons and nurses in the Eastern Cape, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Peltzer, Karl; Nqeketo, Ayanda; Petros, George; Kanta, Xola

    2008-06-18

    Training designed to improve circumcision knowledge, attitude and practice was delivered over 5 days to 34 traditional surgeons and 49 traditional nurses in the Eastern Cape, South Africa. Training included the following topics: initiation rites; statutory regulation of traditional male circumcision and initiation into Manhood (TCIM); structure and function of the male sex organs; procedure of safe circumcision, infection control; sexually transmitted infections (STIs); HIV/AIDS; infection control measures; aftercare of the initiate including after care of the circumcision wound and initiate as a whole; detection and early management of common complications of circumcision; nutrition and fluid management; code of conduct and ethics; and sexual health education. The evaluation of the training consisted of a prospective assessment of knowledge and attitude immediately prior to and after training. Significant improvement in knowledge and/or attitudes was observed in legal aspects, STI, HIV and environmental aspects, attitudes in terms of improved collaboration with biomedical health care providers, normal and abnormal anatomy and physiology, sexually transmitted infections and including HIV, circumcision practice and aftercare of initiates. We concluded that safer circumcision training can be successfully delivered to traditional surgeons and nurses.

  6. Maternal Transfer of Bisphenol A During Nursing Causes Sperm Impairment in Male Offspring.

    PubMed

    Kalb, Ana Cristina; Kalb, Ana Luiza; Cardoso, Tainã Figueiredo; Fernandes, Cristina Gevehr; Corcini, Carine Dahl; Varela Junior, Antonio Sergio; Martínez, Pablo Elías

    2016-05-01

    The health effects of environmental chemicals on animals and humans are of growing concern. Human epidemiological and animal study data indicate that reproductive disorders and diseases begin early during prenatal and postnatal development. An increase of human male reproductive disturbance in the past several decades was associated to chemicals called endocrine disruptors (ED). Bisphenol A (BPA) is a ubiquitous organic environmental contaminant with ED activity. This study verified the effect of BPA exposure via breast milk during the lactation (early postnatal) period in male mice. Dams were exposed to oral BPA (300, 900, and 3000 µg/kg/BW/day) during the breastfeeding period (21 days). BPA at all concentrations significantly impaired sperm parameters in adult mice (8 months old), but mitochondrial functionality was more affected at BPA 3000. The acrosome membrane parameter was affected by BPA concentrations from 900 to 3000, and DNA integrity showed pronounced impairment at BPA 900 and 3000. BPA 3000 treatment also induced testicular degeneration and complete aplasia in some seminiferous tubules. Testicular oxidative damage was observed, and the total antioxidant capacity was impaired in BPA 900 and 3000 treatment groups. Taken together, the present study demonstrated long-term adverse effects of BPA in male mice, including reduced sperm quality, antioxidant capacity, and changes in testicular tissue. Our results clearly demonstrate the danger of BPA transferred via lactation on sperm quality registered even after a long time-elapsed from exposure to this harmful chemical.

  7. Gender-Based Barriers Experienced by Male Students in an Online RN-to-BSN Nursing Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirk, John R.

    2012-01-01

    This quantitative survey-based research study examined the experiences of 49 men through a comparative analysis of their traditional classroom-based Diploma or Associate Degree in Nursing program and their subsequent experiences in the University of Phoenix online Registered Nurse to Bachelor of Science in Nursing (RN-to-BSN) degree completion…

  8. Safety, Acceptability, and Feasibility of Early Infant Male Circumcision Conducted by Nurse-Midwives Using the AccuCirc Device: Results of a Field Study in Zimbabwe

    PubMed Central

    Mavhu, Webster; Larke, Natasha; Hatzold, Karin; Ncube, Getrude; Weiss, Helen A; Mangenah, Collin; Chonzi, Prosper; Mugurungi, Owen; Mufuka, Juliet; Samkange, Christopher A; Gwinji, Gerald; Cowan, Frances M; Ticklay, Ismail

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: For prevention of HIV, early infant male circumcision (EIMC) needs to be scaled up in countries with high HIV prevalence. Routine EIMC will maintain the HIV prevention gains anticipated from current adult male circumcision initiatives. We present here the results of a field study of EIMC conducted in Zimbabwe. Methods: The study was observational and based on the World Health Organization (WHO) framework for clinical evaluation of male circumcision devices. We recruited parents of newborn male infants between August 2013 and July 2014 from 2 clinics. Nurse-midwives used the AccuCirc device to circumcise eligible infants. We followed participants for 14 days after EIMC. Outcome measures were EIMC safety, acceptability, and feasibility. Results: We enrolled 500 male infants in the field study (uptake 11%). The infants were circumcised between 6 and 60 days postpartum. The procedure took a median of 17 minutes (interquartile range of 5 to 18 minutes). Mothers’ knowledge of male circumcision was extensive. Of the 498 mothers who completed the study questionnaire, 91% knew that male circumcision decreases the risk of HIV acquisition, and 83% correctly stated that this prevention is partial. Asked about their community’s perception of EIMC, 40% felt that EIMC will likely be viewed positively in their community; 13% said negatively; and 47% said the perception could be both ways. We observed 7 moderate or severe adverse events (1.4%; 95% confidence interval, 0.4% to 2.4%). All resolved without lasting effects. Nearly all mothers (99%) reported great satisfaction with the outcome, would recommend EIMC to other parents, and would circumcise their next sons. Conclusion: This first field study in sub-Saharan Africa of the AccuCirc device for EIMC demonstrated that EIMC conducted by nurse-midwives with this device is safe, feasible, and acceptable to parents. PMID:27413083

  9. Barriers Identified by Swedish School Nurses in Giving Information about Testicular Cancer and Testicular Self-Examination to Adolescent Males

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rudberg, Lennart; Nilsson, Sten; Wikblad, Karin; Carlsson, Marianne

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate to what extent school nurses in Sweden inform adolescent men about testicular cancer (TC) and testicular self-examination (TSE). A questionnaire was completed by 129 school nurses from 29 randomly selected municipalities. All respondents were women, with a mean age of 42 years. The results showed that…

  10. Coping and Its Relation to Retention among Male Minority Nursing Students in an Associate Degree Nursing Program in a South Texas Community College: An Explanatory Sequential Mixed Methods Inquiry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diggs, Gwendolyn Smith

    2013-01-01

    In Texas, there is an increase in the enrollment of men of various ethnicities in nursing schools, especially Associate Degree Nursing (ADN) programs. As these men strive to complete the nursing education, they face many concerns that center on barriers that are encountered in what is still a predominately Caucasian and female environment. In…

  11. Male catheterization.

    PubMed

    Hadfield-Law, L

    2001-10-01

    The insertion of catheters into male emergency patients is fairly common practice and is associated with a worryingly high rate of infection. Everyday pressures within the department, along with the added stress of resuscitation can result in inappropriately trained or skilled staff undertaking this procedure. The issue of gender and whether female nurses should catheterize male patients may also affect this vulnerable group of patients. Acquiring the psychomotor skills of inserting a urethral catheter is only one part of preparation for practice. Emergency nurses must know when and when not to resort to catheterization. Choosing the type and size of catheter requires careful judgment. What will you do if insertion proves difficult? Prevention of infection is of paramount importance and there are an increasing number of evidence-based sources of information, which are crucial to formulating procedures and informing every day practice. In the pressured surroundings of A&E departments, it is easy to ignore the vulnerability of men requiring catheterization, both from a physical and psychological point of view. Making the effort to explain the procedure, listen to questions and concerns and record relevant details in the notes, will take only a few extra moments. There is no doubt that urinary catheterization is not without complications. It is associated with significant morbidity and occasionally, mortality.

  12. [Homophobia among nursing students].

    PubMed

    Campo-Arias, Adalberto; Herazo, Edwin; Cogollo, Zuleima

    2010-09-01

    Homophobia is defined as a general negative attitude towards homosexual persons, with implications on public health. This fact has been less investigated among nursing students. The objective of this review was to learn about the prevalence of homophobia and its associated variables among nursing students. A systematic review was performed on original articles published in EBSCO, Imbiomed, LILACS, MEDLINE, Ovid, and ProQuest, including articles published between 1998 and 2008 in English, Portuguese and Spanish. Keywords used were homophobia, homosexuality, and nursing students. Descriptive analysis was performed. Eight studies were analyzed. The incidence of homophobia in nursing students is between 7% and 16%. Homophobia is more common among males and religious conservatism people. Homophobia is quite frequent in nursing students. This negative attitude toward homosexuality may affect services and care giving by nursing professions and could have negative implications in nursing practice.

  13. Nurses who do not nurse: factors that predict non-nursing work in the U.S. registered nursing labor market.

    PubMed

    Black, Lisa; Spetz, Joanne; Harrington, Charlene

    2010-01-01

    Registered nurses (RNs) who work outside of nursing have seldom been examined. This aim of this study was to compare the 122,178 (4%) of RNs who are employed outside of nursing to those who work in nursing jobs in terms of sociodemographic, market, and political variables to determine if these groups are substantively different from one another. Using a logit regression model, wages were a significant predictor of working outside of nursing for unmarried nurses but not for married nurses. Married and unmarried male nurses were more likely to work outside of nursing. Baccalaureate education, children under age 6, higher family income, and years since graduation increased the odds of working outside of nursing for married nurses. Ultimately, identifying characteristics on which these groups differ may inform future policy directions that could target nurses who may leave nursing at a time when retention efforts might be effective to alter their trajectory away from the profession.

  14. Male circumcision.

    PubMed

    2012-09-01

    Male circumcision consists of the surgical removal of some, or all, of the foreskin (or prepuce) from the penis. It is one of the most common procedures in the world. In the United States, the procedure is commonly performed during the newborn period. In 2007, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) convened a multidisciplinary workgroup of AAP members and other stakeholders to evaluate the evidence regarding male circumcision and update the AAP's 1999 recommendations in this area. The Task Force included AAP representatives from specialty areas as well as members of the AAP Board of Directors and liaisons representing the American Academy of Family Physicians, the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The Task Force members identified selected topics relevant to male circumcision and conducted a critical review of peer-reviewed literature by using the American Heart Association's template for evidence evaluation. Evaluation of current evidence indicates that the health benefits of newborn male circumcision outweigh the risks; furthermore, the benefits of newborn male circumcision justify access to this procedure for families who choose it. Specific benefits from male circumcision were identified for the prevention of urinary tract infections, acquisition of HIV, transmission of some sexually transmitted infections, and penile cancer. Male circumcision does not appear to adversely affect penile sexual function/sensitivity or sexual satisfaction. It is imperative that those providing circumcision are adequately trained and that both sterile techniques and effective pain management are used. Significant acute complications are rare. In general, untrained providers who perform circumcisions have more complications than well-trained providers who perform the procedure, regardless of whether the former are physicians, nurses, or traditional religious providers. Parents are entitled to factually correct

  15. Gender-Based Wage Differentials in a Predominantly Female Profession: Observations from Nursing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Cheryl, Bland; Gates, Michael

    2004-01-01

    Despite numerous studies examining nursing wages, very little attention has focused on nursing wage differentials. We build on previous research by modeling nursing wages and examining male-female wage differences within the context of the current nursing shortage. Our results show that male nurses do earn a wage premium, largely explained by…

  16. Nursing Supplies

    MedlinePlus

    ... Stages Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Nursing Supplies Page Content Article Body Throughout most of ... budget. (Nursing equipment also makes wonderful baby gifts.) Nursing Bras A well-made nursing bra that comfortably ...

  17. Nursing and the "F" word.

    PubMed

    Kane, D; Thomas, B

    2000-01-01

    This article uses a set of strategies designed by Abigail Stewart to guide the generation of knowledge about women and gender to revisit the relationship between nursing and feminism. It is important that nurses be aware of the valuable feminist contributions made by their predecessors in order to uncover the hidden links that exist between nursing and feminism. As long as the relationship between nursing and feminism remains invisible, the gender, problems in nursing that are systemic to a woman's occupation in a male-dominated society will continue.

  18. Nursing a fine line: patient privacy and sex discrimination.

    PubMed

    Hawke, C

    1998-10-01

    Recent court decisions provide the only parameters for applying Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 to male nurse hiring and assignment. As the male nursing student population climbs toward 10%, nurses and health care providers struggle to define their employment rights.

  19. Nursing, Nursing Education, and Anxiety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biggers, Thompson; And Others

    In response to the current crisis in the field of nursing, a study examined nursing students' perceived work-related stress and differences among associate degree, diploma, and baccalaureate nursing programs in their preparation of nursing students. The 171 subjects, representing the three different nursing programs, completed a questionnaire…

  20. Nursing Homes

    MedlinePlus

    ... our e-newsletter! Aging & Health A to Z Nursing Homes Basic Facts & Information Nursing homes have changed ... physical health and/or mental disabilities. Is a Nursing Home Right for You? Almost half of all ...

  1. Undergraduate nursing students' compatibility with the nursing profession

    PubMed Central

    Adib-Hajbaghery, Mohsen; Dianati, Mansur

    2005-01-01

    Background The high rate of attrition among nursing students has caused some nursing leaders to think about the necessity of considering students' personality during the process of admission into nursing schools. Due to the lack of studies on Iranian nursing students' personality traits, this study was designed to assess freshmen nursing students' personality characteristics and their compatibility with the demands of the nursing profession. Methods A descriptive study was conducted at Tehran and kashan medical universities and one of the branches of Azad University. Convenience sampling was used and 52 freshmen nursing students were assessed using Holland's Vocational Interests Inventory. Results From the total participants 63.5% were females and 36.5% were males. Based on the Holland's Vocational Interests Inventory 44% did not have appropriate personality characteristics for the nursing profession. 77% of the nursing students participating in the study reported that they lacked information about nursing. Conclusion It seems that personality tests can help to select the best students for nursing schools from those who show good academic capabilities. This would decrease the rate of attrition and could improve the quality of care. PMID:16011800

  2. Nursing: What's a Nurse Practitioner?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Your 1- to 2-Year-Old What's a Nurse Practitioner? KidsHealth > For Parents > What's a Nurse Practitioner? ... United States. continue Should My Kids See a Nurse Practitioner? Pediatric NPs can deliver much of the ...

  3. American Nurses Association Nursing World

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ethics Ethics Topics and Articles About The Center Code of Ethics Health & Safety Healthy Nurse, Healthy Nation™ ... VIEWED 2017 Year of the Healthy Nurse About Code of Ethics Join What is Nursing? Career Center ...

  4. Nurses Behave Differentially to Neonates in Terms of Their True Gender Compared to Their Ascribed Gender.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hollenbeck, Albert R.; And Others

    Response patterns of 24 female nurses to 2-day-old neonates who had been arbitrarily labeled male or female were studied. A total of 17 reliable behaviors of nurses were scored from videotapes of nurse-infant interaction. Nurses responded differentially to neonates based on true gender rather than ascribed gender. Nurses held boys more by their…

  5. Nurse manager who did not take any action over 'bad' nurse.

    PubMed

    Castledine, George

    2003-02-13

    Brenda was the nurse in charge of a continuing care ward for elderly people. Most of the residents, all of whom were male, had a dementing illness. The ward itself was a 24-bedded facility consisting of several four-bedded bays and single units, together with a large lounge/dining area. The ward was staffed by Beryl, a junior sister, four E-grade staff nurses three D-grade staff nurses, and several nursing assistants.

  6. Nursing as career choice: perceptions of Turkish nursing students.

    PubMed

    Başkale, Hatice; Serçekuş, Pınar

    2015-01-01

    Students' perceptions of nursing influence their choice of nursing as a career and whether they remain in the profession. The aim of this study was to explore the perceptions of entry-level male and female nursing students and the reasons for choosing nursing as a career. A qualitative approach was used by focus group interviews with 31 nursing students, and socio-demographic data were collected by questionnaire. Thematic content analysis was used to analyse the data, and findings were grouped into categories and themes. The first category was 'choosing', which included the themes of 'desire to help', 'satisfactory income, and guaranteed employment', 'influence of family and friends' and 'being in a health-related profession'. The second category was 'others' reactions, which included the single theme 'response'. The third category was 'the image of nursing' which included the themes of 'job description' and 'gender'. The study concluded that although a growing amount of male students are enrolling in nursing programs, stereotypical ideas persist, and nursing is considered a female-dominated profession. There is further need to track student experiences during or after clinical practice and explore whether students' perceptions change over time.

  7. Views on nurse prescribing: a survey of community mental health nurses in the Republic of Ireland.

    PubMed

    Wells, J; Bergin, M; Gooney, M; Jones, A

    2009-02-01

    A nurse prescribing scheme has recently been implemented within the Republic of Ireland. This paper reports on the views of community mental health nurses on nurse prescribing just prior to the implementation of the scheme. Data were gathered through a 13-item questionnaire administered to 103 members of the Association of Community Mental Health Nurses in Ireland. Results indicated a distinct difference of view between male and female community mental health nurses, with female nurses having greater reservations towards the desirability of nurse prescribing in relation to educational preparation and impact on professional relationships. Overall, only 17% of respondents favoured being supervised in their prescribing practice by their consultant psychiatrist. The paper concludes that there is ambivalence towards prescribing in this important group of nurses which may need to be taken into account if nurse prescribing is to be successfully implemented within the Irish mental health service context.

  8. Counseling Males.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scher, Murray, Ed.

    1981-01-01

    Contains 16 articles about counseling males including: (1) gender role conflict; (2) sex-role development; (3) counseling adolescent, adult, and gay males; (4) teenage fathers; (5) female therapists and male clients; (6) career development; (7) hypermasculinity; (8) counseling physically abusive men, uncoupling men; (9) group therapy, men's…

  9. Nursing Home Checklist

    MedlinePlus

    Nursing home checklist Name of nursing home: ____________________________________________________ Address: ________________________________________________________________ Phone number: __________________________________________________________ Date of visit: _____________________________________________________________ Basic information Yes No Notes Is the nursing home Medicare certified? Is the nursing ...

  10. Kamikaze nurses.

    PubMed

    1988-01-02

    In Japan nurses have found a somewhat drastic way of ensuring high standards of professional practice it would seem. For, according to a report in the current edition of the International Nursing Review, Fumiko Ohmori, retiring President of the Japanese Nursing Association, is famed for a number of visable achievements.

  11. Nursing: What's a Nurse Practitioner?

    MedlinePlus

    ... is a big part of the pediatric NP's role. Pediatric and family practice NPs can treat acute ( ... Nurse Practitioners (NAPNAP) and through local hospitals or nursing schools. Also, many doctors share office space with ...

  12. Counseling Chinese Patients about Cigarette Smoking: The Role of Nurses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Han Zao; Zhang, Yu; MacDonell, Karen; Li, Xiao Ping; Chen, Xinguang

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The main purpose of this study is to determine the cigarette smoking rate and smoking cessation counseling frequency in a sample of Chinese nurses. Design/methodology/approach: At the time of data collection, the hospital had 260 nurses, 255 females and five males. The 200 nurses working on the two daytime shifts were given the…

  13. Nutrition for Nurses: Nursing 245.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palermo, Karen R.

    A description is presented of "Nutrition for Nurses," a prerequisite course for students anticipating entrance into the junior level of a state university registered nursing program. Introductory material highlights the course focus (i.e., the basics of good nutrition; nutrition through the life cycle; nursing process in nutritional care; and…

  14. The California Nurse Mentor Project: every nurse deserves a mentor.

    PubMed

    Mills, Joyce F; Mullins, Anna C

    2008-01-01

    In the rush to fill positions, newly hired and transitioning RNs are increasingly put into demanding roles without adequate clinical or organizational preparation. One approach that has shown promising preliminary success in enhancing nursing job satisfaction and increasing long-term retention is the use of trained nurse mentors who are paired with newly hired or new graduate nurses to provide ongoing support, guidance, and assistance. The California Nurse Mentor Project was a 3-year pilot project whose goal was to create a replicable program designed to improve the quality, sensitivity, and effectiveness of patient care through enhanced retention of nurses, including multicultural, multilingual, and male nurses. The pilot implementation of the California Nurse Mentor project has been extremely successful. Attrition rates are lower for nurses who are enrolled in the program than those who did not. Both mentors and mentees report that the program has impacted several areas, including their job satisfaction and professional confidence. Preceptor training, according to participant feedback, shows lasting effects on their pedagogy even a year after attending the training.

  15. Sexual harassment in nursing.

    PubMed

    Robbins, I; Bender, M P; Finnis, S J

    1997-01-01

    Sexual harassment is a problem faced by women in the workplace which can lead to adverse psychological consequences as well as impaired work performance. Sexual harassment is about the abuse of power and status rather then merely being about sex per se and has to be viewed in the context of institutionalized male power. Although there is a relative dearth of research, there is increasing evidence that sexual harassment of nurses is common and that it can have adverse effects on nurses physical and psychological health as well as a direct impact on patient care. Nursing, by its very nature of having to care for patients bodily needs, transgresses normal social rules regarding bodily contact. This is exploited by the perpetrator who relies on nurses' caring attitude to be able to harass. A descriptive model of the processes involved in harassment is presented which offers the possibility of being able to intervene at a number of points in the process. Interventions need to be aimed at both individual and organizational levels if there is to be a prospect of reducing a major occupational stressor for nurses.

  16. Sexual harassment of nurses: an occupational hazard?

    PubMed

    Finnis, S J; Robbins, I

    1994-03-01

    A questionnaire was administered to qualified and student nurses to assess the prevalence and consequences of sexual harassment. There was a 56% completion rate. Of these 43 (66%) of the registered nurses and nine (35%) of the student nurses reported having experienced sexual harassment. The incidence of harassment for registered nurses in the year prior to the study was 46%. Patients were most likely to be the harasser for both student and registered nurses but there was an increased likelihood that other staff were involved in the harassment of registered nurses with doctors and male nursing staff being the predominant perpetrators. Dimensions of assertiveness and sex role identity did not predict the likelihood of harassment. Results are discussed in the context of attribution theory and gender power relationships.

  17. Psychiatric Nursing in Integrated Wards Accommodating Both Female and Male Patients: A Historic Pioneering Reform Initiative Implemented by the Institute of Psychiatry, a Unit of the Federal University of Rio De Janeiro, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Bandeira, Paloma Mello; Haddad P Souza, Cynthia; da Silva Guimarães, Juliana C; de Almeida Filho, Antonio José; de Almeida Peres, Maria Angélica

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to analyze aspects of the sexuality of people with mental disorders, an issue that influenced nursing care in the mixed nursing wards of the Institute of Psychiatry at the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro between 1996-2002. A qualitative Historical Social Study methodology used written and oral texts that were analyzed drawing on Michel Foucault's ideas about sexuality. Results of the study indicate that a rupture occurred in the distribution model according to gender at the Psychiatric Hospitalization Unit. This, in turn, influenced nursing care. From this study, we conclude that accommodating patients in mixed wards better facilitates the psychosocial rehabilitation process and changes nursing teams' conceptions about the sexuality of people with mental disorders.

  18. Nursing students assess nursing education.

    PubMed

    Norman, Linda; Buerhaus, Peter I; Donelan, Karen; McCloskey, Barbara; Dittus, Robert

    2005-01-01

    This study assessed the characteristics of nursing students currently enrolled in nursing education programs, how students finance their nursing education, their plans for clinical practice and graduate education, and the rewards and difficulties of being a nursing student. Data are from a survey administered to a national sample of 496 nursing students. The students relied on financial aid and personal savings and earnings to finance their education. Parents, institutional scholarships, and government loans are also important sources, but less than 15% of the students took out bank loans. Nearly one quarter of the students, particularly younger and minority students, plan to enroll in graduate school immediately after graduation and most want to become advanced nursing practitioners. Most of the nursing students (88%) are satisfied with their nursing education and nearly all (95%) provided written answers to two open-ended questions. Comments collapsed into three major categories reflecting the rewards (helping others, status, and job security) and three categories reflecting the difficulties (problems with balancing demands, quality of nursing education, and the admissions process) of being a nursing student. Implications for public policymaking center on expanding the capacity of nursing education programs, whereas schools themselves should focus on addressing the financial needs of students, helping them strike a balance among their school, work, and personal/family responsibilities and modifying certain aspects of the curriculum.

  19. Predictors of a Desire to be Helpful to Professional Nurses Among Japanese Nursing Assistants in Small- to Medium-Sized Hospitals.

    PubMed

    Kudo, Yasushi; Kono, Keiko; Toyoshima, Yasuko; Sugisaki, Hitomi; Matsuhashi, Ayako; Tsutsumi, Akizumi

    2016-06-01

    Registered nurses and licensed practical nurses have been educated as professional nurses. Professional nurses can concentrate on their jobs requiring a high degree of expertise with help they get from nursing assistants.If professional nurses have improper attitudes toward nursing assistants, it is most likely that the nursing assistants will not help them to the best of their ability. We investigated nursing assistants' impressions regarding professional nurses' attitudes, and what effects nursing assistants' impressions have on their "desire to be helpful to professional nurses." The study design was a cross sectional study. Twenty-five small- to medium-sized hospitals with 55 to 458 beds were included in this study. The analyzed subjects were 642 nursing assistants (96 males, 546 females). Factor analyses were conducted to extract the factors of nursing assistants' impressions regarding professional nurses' attitudes. Multiple linear regression analysis was conducted to investigate the predictors of "desire to be helpful to professional nurses." We discovered 5 factors: 1. professional nurses' model behavior, 2. manner dealing with nursing assistants, 3. respect for nursing assistants' passion for their work, 4. respect for nursing assistants' work, and 5. enhancing the ability of nursing assistants to do their work. The "desire to be helpful to professional nurses" was significantly associated with "professional nurses' model behavior," "manner dealing with nursing assistants" and "respect for nursing assistants' passion for their work." Factors 1 to 3 are fundamental principles when people establish appropriate relationships. Professional nurses must consider these fundamentals in their daily work in order to get complete cooperation from nursing assistants.

  20. Condoms - male

    MedlinePlus

    Prophylactics; Rubbers; Male condoms; Contraceptive - condom; Contraception - condom; Barrier method - condom ... rubber Polyurethane Condoms are the only method of birth control for men that are not permanent. They can ...

  1. [Feminist strategies in nursing science].

    PubMed

    Gendron, C

    1993-05-01

    This article is the first of a two-part series that will be completed in next month's issue. The article illustrates through examples how nursing has the potential for sexual bias. It also demonstrates how the feminist movement can contribute to improving nursing practice. This month, the views of Peggy Chinn are discussed, outlining myths that limit the development or hinder the progress of non-sexist education in nursing. Myths that have become traditional, scientific male-centred methodologies now solidly rooted in the health care community are identified. The author explains that once the myths are identified, they should be extracted and isolated from the context of nursing. This is the way feminist research can be useful. Next month the author will define the feminist approach and how it applies to specific aspects of women's health.

  2. [Anthropology, gender, and contemporary nursing].

    PubMed

    Lillo Crespo, Manuel

    2002-12-01

    We live in an age when decisive changes occur. Social changes in the field of Genre and Work Cultures will take on a crucial role regarding the development of Nursing. New technological advances, and a higher degree of specialization in the Nursing field, as well as the increase in the number of nursing professionals coming from the male genere, enter into conflict with traditional social structures and act as intellectual tools which are necessary to acquire a critical understanding of the times in which we live, where an anthropological evaluation of the Genre factor is essential as a beginning principle in order to explain the subordination of nursing professionals as this has existed up until our times.

  3. Hate crimes against gay males: an overview.

    PubMed

    Willis, Danny G

    2004-03-01

    As the United States has become more multicultural and diverse, there has been an increase in violence motivated by hate. Hate crimes against gay males are the most prevalent of the hate crimes based on sexual orientation. Hate crimes have their roots in normative, individual, and societal attitudes and ideologies that lead to intimidation, bullying, teasing, physical assault, rape, and murder. This paper provides an overview of the issues specific to hate crime assaults against gay males. Mental health nurses may find this knowledge useful in developing further nursing inquiry, education, and clinical practice related to hate crime and violence prevention.

  4. Male contraception.

    PubMed

    Wang, Christina; Swerdloff, Ronald S

    2002-04-01

    Currently approved male-directed contraceptive methods include condoms and vas occlusion. Vas occlusion is very effective but is intended to be non-reversible. Condoms have a relatively high failure rate, at least partially due to compliance problems and are not accepted by many couples. The only other male-oriented methods in clinical trials utilize the administration of testosterone alone or its combination with another gonadotropin-suppressing agent such as a progestin or a gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonist. Studies published in the 1990s demonstrated that a testosterone-containing hormonal contraceptive method suppressed spermatogenesis to azoospermia in most men and severe oligozoospermia in the remaining. The contraceptive efficacy after treatment with testosterone alone was comparable to that of female hormonal methods. Having proven that reversible male contraception is a reality, present trials are attempting to identify the best androgen delivery system and the most effective androgen plus progestin preparation. It is likely that the first marketed male hormonal contraceptive method will be a long-acting (injectable or implant) combination of an androgen plus a progestin. Research is continuing to identify other target areas for male contraceptive development, including agents with post-testicular and epididymal sites of action.

  5. Canadian-trained nurses in North Carolina.

    PubMed

    Pink, George H; Hall, Linda McGillis; Leatt, Peggy

    2004-01-01

    Little is known about nurses who leave Canada to work in the US. The main purpose of this study is to gain some insight into the emigration component of nursing supply and demand by comparing characteristics of nurses who left Canada to nurses who stayed. Specifically, Canadian-trained RNs who work in the state of North Carolina are compared to RNs who work in Canada. Results show that there are 40% more Canadian-trained RNs in North Carolina than there are in Prince Edward Island. A higher percentage of Canadian-trained RNs in North Carolina are male, under 40 years of age, have baccalaureate training and graduated less than 10 years ago. Canadian-trained nurses in both countries have very low rates of unemployment. The loss of Canadian-trained RNs to the US is a significant problem, and there is an urgent need to obtain a better understanding of why nurses leave the country.

  6. Whither the "Nurse" in Nurse Practitioner?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weston, Jerry L.

    1975-01-01

    The author sees a need for the nursing profession to evaluate the extended role of the nurse to determine differences in the patient care provided by nurse practitioners and physician's assistants. From the data, appropriate nursing education and nursing practice planning can follow. (EA)

  7. Certified nurse-midwife

    MedlinePlus

    ... United States. The first program used public health registered nurses who had been educated in England. These nurses ... Applicants for nurse-midwife programs usually must be registered nurses and have at least 1 to 2 years ...

  8. Primary Nurse - Role Evolution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mundinger, Mary O'Neil

    1973-01-01

    Primary nursing means that each patient has an individual nurse who is responsible for assessing his nursing needs and planning and evaluating his nursing care. The article describes the advantages and problems connected with this approach to patient care. (AG)

  9. Exploring nurses' confirmed expectations regarding health IT: a phenomenological study.

    PubMed

    Zadvinskis, Inga M; Chipps, Esther; Yen, Po-Yin

    2014-02-01

    Health information technology (IT) benefits both patients and providers with respect to health care quality and perceived usefulness. Although existing research provides a preliminary understanding of nurses' perception of health IT, perceptions do not guide actions. This phenomenological study explored nurses' perceptions regarding electronic health records and bar code medication administration four months post implementation on a medical-surgical unit in an academic medical center. Ten staff nurses (8 females and 2 males) participated. We categorized the results into five themes from personal-level to organizational-level confirmed expectations: (1) nurses' interaction with computer, (2) nursing performance regarding task accomplishment, (3) unit-specific teamwork, (4) interdisciplinary teamwork, and (5) quality of care. We discovered that effective health IT must be congruent with nursing expectations. IT professionals, nursing and organizational leaders may use findings to structure an environment supportive of effective health IT in nursing practice.

  10. Working experiences of Iranian retired nurses: a content analysis study.

    PubMed

    Nobahar, Monir; Ahmadi, Fazlollah; Alhani, Fatemah; Fallahi Khoshknab, Masood

    2013-10-01

    Understanding the experiences of retired nurses can be useful in increasing self-confidence, motivation to work and work enthusiasm among nurses. The purpose of this study was to explore the work experiences of Iranian retired nurses. A qualitative design was conducted using a content analysis approach. Purposive sampling was used to choose the study participants. Semi-structured interviews were held to collect the perspectives of 20 retired nurses (10 female and 10 male). Two main themes emerged in the data analysis: 'work problems and unpleasant experiences in a sense' with subthemes 'exhausting work', 'insufficient salary', 'inappropriate relation' and 'unsuitable social position'; and 'job satisfaction and pleasant experiences in a sense' with subthemes 'divine satisfaction and religious belief', 'satisfaction of patients and their companions' and 'love of nursing profession and relaxation experience'. The findings indicate the challenges that nurses face after retirement. These experiences will help nurse managers to adopt appropriate measures to support nurses after retirement.

  11. Nursing Positions

    MedlinePlus

    ... and actually needs to feed. Getting Comfortable With Breastfeeding Nursing can be one of the most challenging ... a mother. As you become more used to breastfeeding your baby, you can try different positions or ...

  12. Applying nursing theory to perioperative nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Gillette, V A

    1996-08-01

    The perioperative nursing role has evolved from that of task-oriented specialists to patient-centered professionals. The concept of caring is significant to perioperative nurses and is manifested by the many caring behaviors perioperative nurses demonstrate toward surgical patients. This article describes how the element of caring is an essential function of perioperative nursing and relates the perioperative nursing role to the work of three nursing theorists (le, Florence Nightingale; Virginia Henderson, RN, AM; Carol L. Montgomery, RN, PhD).

  13. [Male contraception].

    PubMed

    Demery, A

    1987-05-01

    Except for condoms, male contraception is very slightly utilized in France. Several male experimental methods are under study. A synthetic luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) analog has been used successfully in women and offers promise in men of blocking LHRH and thus blocking spermatogenesis. Several nonsteroid substances such an hypertensives and adrenaline would suppress follicle stimulating hormone and luteinizing hormone release, but are too toxic for use. The combination of 40 mcg ethinyl estradiol and 20 mg of methyltestosterone inhibits gonadotropin release and produces azoospermia in men, but at the risk of loss of libido, constant gynecomastia, and testicular atrophy. Several combinations of androgens and progestins have been evaluated. Percutaneous testosterone and medroxyprogesterone acetate appears to be the most effective, with good metabolic tolerance and maintenance of libido and sexual performance. Injections of inhibine, a testicular factor that controls secretion of follicle stimulating hormone by feedback, offer promise of suppressing spermatogenesis without affecting other systems. Numerous substances are known to inhibit spermatogenesis but are to toxic for use or entail an unacceptable loss of libido. Gossypol has been employed as a contraceptive by the Chinese for its action in inhibiting protein synthesis, but it is known to have serious secondary effects. Among male methods currently in use, the condom had a Pearl index of .4-1.6 in the most recent British studies. Coitus interruptus can seriously interfere with sexual pleasure and has a failure rate of 25-30%. Vasectomy is safe, effective, and easy to perform, but is not a reversible method. The combination of 20 mg of medroxyprogesterone acetate in 2 daily doses and 100 mg of testosterone applied in an abdominal spray has given very promising results in 2 small studies in France and merits further development and diffusion.

  14. Nurse executives: new roles, new opportunities.

    PubMed

    Kleinman, C S

    1999-01-01

    As women have been nursing since the earliest days of recorded civilization, so nurses have been associated with health care since the earliest days of recorded medical history. Gender and function have been inextricably woven in ways that created a struggle for success within a male-dominated industry. Nurses, as women, have been undervalued as, until recently, their role in health care has been similarly undervalued. Changing realities in the health care environment have created an opportunity for women's unique skills and talents to be revalued in a way that offers new opportunities for nurses. Teamwork, global thinking, multitasking, creativity, and flexibility are characteristics that have assumed new importance in the marketplace. Nursing leaders possess these attributes, along with a strong clinical foundation that is integrated with knowledge of sound business principles. This combination now positions nurse executives to reach the highest levels of heath care administration. Critical to this achievement is the professional credibility obtained through education at the master's degree level in health care and nursing administration programs that provide the essential tools for professional success. New opportunities for nurse executives afford educators in health care and nursing administration similar opportunities to develop and market programs to this large group of health care professionals who are seeking graduate education in increasing numbers.

  15. Nursing Leadership.

    PubMed

    Crisp, Carol

    2016-01-01

    Nurse transformational leaders can serve in academic settings and at local, national, international professional nursing organizations and community-based groups. As a transformational leader, nurses can lead in any workplace. According to a study by Stanley (2012), clinical leaders are not sought for their capacity to outline a vision, but for their values and beliefs on display that are easily recognized in their actions. This encompasses the moral component of transformational leadership. It is the APRNs duty to continue to strive towards a better vision for the well-being of all nurses, patients, and colleagues. Autonomous APRNs are happier, healthier, and better prepared to provide the best patient care to their patients. We should not be happy to sit back and let others fight this fight. APRNs need to be on the frontline, leading the way. This is only an insight that I have gained after many frustrating years of cheering our profession and then being made to feel inferior at the same time. Only nurses, who have that nurturing spirit, would hold back if they felt it might hurt others. Don't back off or hold back! It might hurt those that follow!

  16. Is the School Nurse a Nurse? Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cowell, Julia Muennich

    1998-01-01

    To cut costs, many districts are replacing certified school nurses with uncertified nurses or undereducated health aides. Never has the role of school nurse been more important. Besides attending to sick children and handling emergencies, today's school nurses are active in health education, physical fitness programs, and disease prevention.…

  17. Reframing the Field of Gender and Nursing Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solbraekke, Kari Nyheim; Solvoll, Betty-Ann; Heggen, Kristin M.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this article is to explore how male students learn to practice nursing and the role of technology in their training process. The study is inspired by Bruno Latour's understanding of social interaction as an interplay between humans and technology. The students' use of the washcloth and the stethoscope, two significant nursing tools, is…

  18. Camp Nursing: Student Internships.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harwood, Catherine Hoe; Van Hofwegen, Lynn

    2002-01-01

    Camps can meet or supplement their health care delivery needs by using student nurses. Three models for student nurse internships, basic information about nursing education, and tips for negotiating student nurse internships are described. Sidebars present resources for camp health centers, nursing student competence characteristics, types of…

  19. Public health nursing: an autonomous career for World War II nurse veterans.

    PubMed

    Barnum, Nancy C

    2011-01-01

    The 1944 G.I. Bill increased accessibility of higher education to male veterans. Less is known about how its availability affected opportunities for female veterans. The purpose of this study was to examine nurse veterans' use of the G. I. Bill at one large public university. Primary sources included archival documents of one large public university as well as articles published in professional nursing and medical journals of the 1940s and 1950s. Secondary sources addressing nursing and nursing education history, and the history of the G. I. Bill provided further context. Historical research methodology was conducted. Findings demonstrate that nurse veterans desired more independence in practice following the war. Archival documents of one large public university show that nurse veterans used G. I. Bill funds to seek degrees in public health nursing. The specialty of public health provided increased independence and autonomy of practice not experienced in hospital based care. G.I. Bill educational funds provided these nurse veterans the means to attain degrees in public health nursing, providing them the opportunity for more autonomous practice.

  20. [Male contraception].

    PubMed

    Demoulin, A

    1984-04-01

    Among the reasons why male hormonal contraception has lagged behind female methods are the necessity of preserving virility, the fact that spermatogenesis is a continuous process, the need to control secondary effects and toxicity, and the requirement that modes of administration be acceptable to both partners. Among currently available reversible mehtods, withdrawal is undoubtedly the most ancient. It is still widespread but cannot be recommended because of its limited effectiveness. The condom is used by about 10% of couples worldwide as a principal or temporary method, but its inter-ference with sensation has limited its acceptance. Condoms are nevertheless highly effective when used with a spermicide. Various androgens are currently under investigation. High doses of testosterone can induce azoospermia without affecting libido but their side effects may be serious. The use of combinations of steroids permits doses to be reduced and offers promise for the future. The combination of oral medroxyprogesterone acetate and percutaneous testosterone is one of the better approaches; the combination is effective and nontoxic but has the disadvantage of percutaneous administration. Gossypol, a pigment extracted from the cotton plant, has been used as a contraceptive in China with a reported efficacy of 99.89%, recovery of fertility within 3 months, and no effect on future fertility. However, its toxicity appears to be significant in the animal and its reversibility is uncertain. A search is on for analogs which would preserve the contraceptive effects while eliminating toxic effects. Several gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) analogs under investigation for their interference with spermatogenesis have given promising results. Several chemicals tested for contraceptive effects have had unacceptably high toxicity. Chinese investigators have reported good results with various physical methods of interfering with sperm production, but their reversibility and innocuity

  1. International Transplant Nurses Society

    MedlinePlus

    ... and professional practice in nursing." Demonstration of professional development support and clinical advancement programs are hallmarks of a professional nursing practice environment and critical components of Nursing Magnet status. The ...

  2. [Assessing nursing workload].

    PubMed

    Princiaux, Danielle

    2012-01-01

    Healthcare managers must monitor the nursing workload and back up their arguments when requesting resources. A study was carried out based on a tool which measures whether nursing staff provision meets the nursing care workload.

  3. The Colorado Collaborative for Nursing Research: nurses shaping nursing's future.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Karen H; Weiss, Jason; Welton, John; Reeder, Blaine; Ozkaynak, Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    Nurses in the present health care environment have been reduced too often to being providers of safe, competent care rather than quality care. In response, the Institute of Medicine has recommended that nurses become more involved in making changes to the health care system and use data more effectively. If nursing intends to follow these recommendations, the profession needs (a) fresh perspectives to assist in making health care system changes, (b) partnerships between nurse scientists and nurse clinicians to generate and implement data, and (c) capture of the proper value of nursing as distinct from other elements of health care delivery. The Colorado Collaborative for Nursing Research is an effort to meet the recommendations of the Institute of Medicine. The Colorado Collaborative for Nursing Research has a three-arm structure: a research forum where nurse academicians and nurse clinicians can launch collaborative projects; a research support services arm from which nurse collaborators can obtain help with modeling, statistics, writing, and funding; and a data extraction/data sharing mechanism to inform the decision making of nurse leaders.

  4. From Nurse to Nurse Anesthetist: The Influence of Age and Gender on Professional Socialization and Career Commitment of Advanced Practice Nurses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waugaman, Wynne R.; Lohrer, Donna J.

    2000-01-01

    A survey of 1,106 student nurse anesthetists (40% male) showed that increasing age was negatively correlated with socioeconomic rewards. Male gender was positively correlated with administrative/supervisory roles, female gender with holistic patient care. Men achieved socialization more readily in occupational orientation. (SK)

  5. Cancer nursing in Ontario: defining nursing roles.

    PubMed

    Fitch, Margaret I; Mings, Deborah

    2003-01-01

    The delivery of cancer care in Ontario is facing unprecedented challenges. Shortages in nursing, as in all professional disciplines, are having an impact on the delivery of cancer care. Oncology nurses have a major role to play in the delivery of optimum cancer care. Oncology nursing, when adequately defined and supported, can benefit the cancer delivery system, patients, and families. A primary nursing model is seen as being key to the delivery of optimum cancer care. Primary nursing as a philosophy facilitates continuity of care, coordination of a patient's care plan, and a meaningful ongoing relationship with the patient and his/her family. Primary nursing, when delivered in the collaboration of a nurse-physician team, allows for medical resources to be used appropriately. Defined roles enable nurses to manage patients within their scope of practice in collaboration with physicians. Enacting other nursing roles, such as nurse practitioners and advanced practice nurses, can also enable the health care system to manage a broader number of patients with more complex needs. This article presents a position paper originally written as the basis for an advocacy and education initiative in Ontario. It is shared in anticipation that the work may be useful to oncology nurses in other jurisdictions in their efforts to advance oncology nursing and improvement of patient care.

  6. [The Spanish influence in Colombian nursing].

    PubMed

    Velandia, A L

    1993-06-01

    Four statements inferenced from: religious traditions, gender or woman status, military heritage and ethnic inheritance, and their influence in nursing, are presented in this article. The ethnic inheritance analyses the issue based upon the cultural influences of the native-indigenous groups and the spanish and mediterranean attributes in nursing development. The religious tradition began with Pedro Claver's J.C. presence between 1610 and 1617. His presence is followed by the "Hermanos Hospitalarios de San Juan de Dios" in 1768, and further with the presence of the sisters of Charity in 1873. Lastly, the article compares the Barcelona's Santa Cruz hospital organization, where at that time, seems to appear a new type of nursing arrangement; with present functions and charges, currently utilized in colombian hospitals (administrator of patient rooms, "servidor", women in charge of female patients and sick children, "ecónoma", chief in charge, and senior male nurse).

  7. What nurses want: the nurse incentives project.

    PubMed

    Wieck, K Lynn; Dols, Jean; Northam, Sally

    2009-01-01

    Today's nurse executives are struggling with leadership challenges of managing the multigenerational workforce, financial imperatives to deliver better care for lower costs, and competition to provide the optimal work environment to retain nurses. The purpose of the Nurse Incentives Project was to determine satisfaction with current employment incentives and potential managerial actions which might decrease or delay turnover by registered nurses. This study spawned recommendations regarding the role of incentives in designing an environment where benefits and perks will be seen as incentives to stay and thrive in the current nursing workplace. The results show that nurses know what they want. Attention to generational priorities and flexible benefits programs may help to create the cohesive work environment that nurses seek. Investment into creating delivery arenas where satisfied nurses are caring for satisfied patients is a worthwhile goal.

  8. Parish nursing: an innovative community nursing service.

    PubMed

    Laming, Eleanor; Stewart, Angela

    2016-07-13

    This article explains the concept of parish nursing and provides a historical perspective of this service. It describes the development of a parish nursing service in Heartsease, Norwich, which complements community nursing practice by focusing on the importance of providing spiritual care alongside physical, psychological and social care. Case studies are provided to illustrate the benefits of a parish nursing service to individuals and the community.

  9. Nursing Jobs in Nursing Homes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Torpey, Elka Maria

    2011-01-01

    The need for practical nurses who focus on caring for older people is growing. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the number of people ages 65 and older is expected to increase from 40 million to 72 million between 2010 and 2030. And the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) projects that this increasing population will result in job growth for…

  10. Male to male transmission of supernumerary nipples.

    PubMed

    Tsukahara, M; Uchida, M; Uchino, S; Fujisawa, R; Kamei, T; Itoh, T

    1997-03-17

    We report on a father and his son with supernumerary nipples. No male-to-male transmission has previously been described with this trait. This observation confirms that this trait is inherited in an autosomal dominant fashion.

  11. Joining the nursing profession in Qatar: motives and perceptions.

    PubMed

    Okasha, M S; Ziady, H H

    2001-11-01

    We aimed to identify why female students in Qatar decide to become nurses and how the students perceived the community attitude towards nursing. A self-administered anonymous questionnaire was distributed to all (57) female students of the four academic classes of the Nursing Unit, University of Qatar for the academic year 1999-2000. The two commonest reasons for joining the nursing profession were an interest in medical services and the humanitarian nature of nursing. There were 33 (57.89%) students who considered there was a negative community attitude towards nursing mainly due to the presence of male patients and colleagues and the working hours. A mass media campaign and govemmental support were two strategies suggested to change this.

  12. Transnational spaces of care: migrant nurses in Norway.

    PubMed

    Isaksen, Lise Widding

    2012-01-01

    This article argues that international nurse recruitment from Latvia to Norway is not a win–win situation. The gains and losses of nurse migration are unevenly distributed between sender and receiver countries. On the basis of empirical research and interviews with Latvian nurses and families they left behind, this article argues that nurse migration transforms families and communities and that national health services now become global workplaces. Some decades ago feminist research pointed to the fact that the welfare state was based on a male breadwinner family and women’s unpaid production of care work at home. Today this production of unpaid care is “outsourced” from richer to poorer countries and is related to an emergence of transnational spaces of care. International nurse recruitment and global nurse care chains in Norway increasingly provide the labor that prevents the new adult worker model and gender equality politics from being disrupted in times where families are overloaded with elder care loads.

  13. Nursing's Image on Campus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woolley, Alma S.

    1981-01-01

    In studying the nurse's image at a liberal arts college, it was found that faculty and administrators view nurses as long-suffering drones. On the whole, the image of nursing was positive, with those who had the most contact with the nursing program having a more enlightened image. (CT)

  14. Nurses' Attitudes towards Alcoholics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Speer, Rita D.

    Nurses' attitudes toward the alcoholic can have a profound impact on the person suffering from alcoholism. These attitudes can affect the alcoholic's care and even whether the alcoholic chooses to recover. This study investigated attitudes of approximately 68 nurses employed in hospitals, 49 nurses in treatment facilities, 58 nursing students, and…

  15. Measuring Nursing Care Value.

    PubMed

    Welton, John M; Harper, Ellen M

    2016-01-01

    The value of nursing care as well as the contribution of individual nurses to clinical outcomes has been difficult to measure and evaluate. Existing health care financial models hide the contribution of nurses; therefore, the link between the cost and quality o nursing care is unknown. New data and methods are needed to articulate the added value of nurses to patient care. The final results and recommendations of an expert workgroup tasked with defining and measuring nursing care value, including a data model to allow extraction of key information from electronic health records to measure nursing care value, are described. A set of new analytic metrics are proposed.

  16. [Introduction to nursing aesthetics].

    PubMed

    Chen, Chen-Jung; Tsai, Chuan-Hsiu; Chen, Yi-Chang

    2011-04-01

    Empirical, aesthetic, ethical, and personal knowing are the four fundamental patterns of knowledge inquiry. Of these, the aesthetic knowing pattern is least discussed in nursing literature. This article discusses the definition of nursing aesthetics; its utilization in practice; and correlations between aesthetics and clinical practice. One of the advantages inherent to nursing is its ability to deliver skillful care directly to patients. Skillful performance is essential to reduce discrepancies between goals and patterns. Aesthetic nursing addresses more than the form of nursing. It further addresses the crucial elements of nursing knowledge. The science of nursing is influential in its ability to attain harmony among abundant empiric content, power of beneficence, and pleasure of aesthetic experience. In clinical practice, nurses can employ aesthetic nursing through various channels to create meaning and promote the professional image of nurses. Concepts listed in this article may be utilized in clinical supervision, practice and education.

  17. Advanced urology nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Crowe, Helen

    2014-03-01

    Urology nursing has developed as a specialty over the past few decades in response to several factors, workload demands being a prime reason. Nurses are taking on additional roles and activities including procedures such as cystoscopy and prostate biopsy, and running nurse-led clinics for a variety of urological conditions. Audits of advanced urological nursing practice have shown this care to be of a high standard and investigative procedures performed by these nurses match the diagnostic quality of existing services. Professional urological nursing organizations support the professional needs of these nurses, but the provision of education and training for advanced practice activities remains an unaddressed need. A range of confusing advanced urology nursing titles exists, and uncertainty regarding the roles and scope of practice for these nurses remains a concern. Acceptance and support from medical colleagues is required for the success of advanced urological nursing practice, but opinions on these roles remain divided.

  18. Nursing Home Registered Nurses' and Licensed Practical Nurses' Knowledge of Causes of Falls.

    PubMed

    Gray-Miceli, Deanna; de Cordova, Pamela B; Crane, Giles L; Quigley, Patricia; Ratcliffe, Sarah J

    2016-01-01

    Reducing falls in nursing homes requires a knowledgeable nursing workforce. To test knowledge, 8 validated vignettes representing multifactorial fall causes were administered to 47 nurses from 3 nursing homes. Although licensed practical nurses scored higher than registered nurses in individual categories of falls, when we computed the average score of all 8 categories between groups of registered nurses and licensed practical nurses, registered nurses scored higher (F = 4.106; P < .05) in identifying 8 causal reasons for older adults to fall.

  19. Nursing in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Baumann, Steven L

    2006-10-01

    The current discussion on the nursing shortage needs to focus as much on nursing job satisfaction and retention as on nursing recruitment and education. Selected aspects of the motivational psychology of Abraham Maslow, Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi, and Frederick Hertzberg are here discussed in light of the challenges-opportunities of nursing in Turkey and elsewhere. Also discussed is an innovative program to support the application of nursing theory and professional development in Toronto, Canada.

  20. District nurses prescribing as nurse independent prescribers.

    PubMed

    Downer, Frances; Shepherd, Chew Kim

    2010-07-01

    Nurse prescribing has been established in the UK since 1994, however, limited focus has been placed on the experiences of district nurses adopting this additional role. This phenomenological study explores the experiences of district nurses prescribing as nurse independent prescribers across the West of Scotland. A qualitative Heideggarian approach examined the every-day experiences of independent prescribing among district nurses. A purposive sample was used and data collected using audio taped one-to-one informal interviews. The data was analysed thematically using Colaizzi's seven procedural steps. Overall these nurses reported that nurse prescribing was a predominantly positive experience. Participants identified improvements in patient care, job satisfaction, level of autonomy and role development. However, some of the participants indicated that issues such as support, record keeping, confidence and ongoing education are all major influences on prescribing practices.

  1. Acts of caring: nurses caring for nurses.

    PubMed

    Longo, Joy

    2011-01-01

    Caring behaviors displayed toward nurses by nurse managers and nurse peers play a significant role in establishing relationships that promote a healthy work environment. A qualitative study was done to identify behaviors perceived to be caring toward nurses. The theoretical background used for the study was Nursing as Caring by Boykin and Schoenhofer. Data were collected from focus groups consisting of registered nurses currently employed in the practice setting. Content analysis was used for the analysis. The overarching category that was identified was tending to a caring environment. The following emergent categories were also found: caring through helping and supporting, caring through appreciating, and acknowledging unappreciated caring. The findings suggest that nurses demonstrate caring behaviors toward their colleagues by coming to know them on both a professional and a personal level. These behaviors form the foundation for an environment that supports a consistent demonstration of caring.

  2. Is graduate entry education a solution to increasing numbers of men in nursing?

    PubMed

    McKenna, Lisa; Vanderheide, Rebecca; Brooks, Ingrid

    2016-03-01

    Males have traditionally constituted a very small proportion of the nursing workforce in many countries, including Australia. Together with a need to address the gender imbalance, nursing workforce shortages require strategies for recruiting new nurses, including males. This study examined characteristics of males entering one accelerated graduate entry masters pre-registration nursing program in Victoria, Australia. A quantitative survey gathered a variety of demographic data and factors relating to participants' decisions to undertake nursing. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics including frequencies and distributions. Forty-three male nursing students from four cohorts of the Master of Nursing Practice (MNP) course from 2009 to 2011 completed the survey. The proportion of males (30%) was considerably greater than traditional nursing courses and the profession generally. Participants demonstrated wide distributions in age ranges, professional backgrounds and previous years in the workforce. Graduate entry appears attractive to males of varying ages, personal and professional backgrounds. More research is needed to examine this phenomenon on a larger scale.

  3. Hospice and Palliative Nurses Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... Press Release Patients & Families About Serious Illness Certified Nurses are Everywhere Advocacy Palliative Nursing Summit Recent Activity ... Principles State Ambassadors Advocacy Resources Healthcare Resources Certified Nurses Day Certified Nurses are Everywhere Certification is Transformational ...

  4. Nursing and Nursing Education: Public Policies and Private Actions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Institute of Medicine (NAS), Washington, DC.

    Results are presented of a study of nursing and nursing education that focused on the need for continued federal support of nursing education, ways to attract nurses to medically underserved areas, and approaches to encourage nurses to stay in the profession. Findings are presented on whether the aggregate supply of generalist nurses will be…

  5. Nursing Home Work Practices and Nursing Assistants' Job Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bishop, Christine E.; Squillace, Marie R.; Meagher, Jennifer; Anderson, Wayne L.; Wiener, Joshua M.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To estimate the impact of nursing home work practices, specifically compensation and working conditions, on job satisfaction of nursing assistants employed in nursing homes. Design and Methods: Data are from the 2004 National Nursing Assistant Survey, responses by the nursing assistants' employers to the 2004 National Nursing Home Survey,…

  6. Using Nursing Languages in School Nursing Practice. Second Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denehy, Janice

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this updated manual is to define and describe standardized nursing languages, highlight how nursing languages are a part of the nursing process, and illustrate through case examples how nursing languages are used in school nursing practice. This manual also summarizes the history and development of three nursing classifications, the…

  7. Addressing the nursing shortage.

    PubMed

    Wilder, Karen S; Halcomb, Kathy; Grubbs, Vicki

    2002-01-01

    Support is essential for students and new nurses to develop confidence in their practice (Oermann & Moffitt-Wolf, 1997). Caring, empowerment and team building are essential in helping affirm the choice of nursing as a profession. Students and new nurses will stay in nursing if they are supported (Meissner, 1986). The nursing community needs to nurture, encourage and inspire its members to learn and to grow; nurses need to treat each other with respect and patience. As Moccia (1990) so aptly stated. "The goal of nursing is to enable others so they might enable still others; to nurse, to teach and to learn with each other in caring ways." "What is modeled for nurses today will shape future practice" (Christensen, 1999).

  8. Value of intensified nursing

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Wilhelm; Konta, Brigitte; Prusa, Nina; Raymann, Cornelia

    2006-01-01

    The concept "intensified nursing" is mentioned in differentiation to concepts of "nursing care" or "nursing" which intensifies resources or patient contact. Especially psychic and social needs of patients are very appreciated in nursing. A similar type of nursing is known under the concept "advanced nursing practice" (ANP) which means, that a specialised, academically trained nurse offers an extended nursing care in which a focus on the published knowledge of evidence based research is made. From the thin literature to this topic a selection of predetermined topics was analysed where at least two articles with a sufficient high methodical quality were available. The selected topic groups were: „Infant and paediatric nursing", "gerontology" and "oncology". Generally the five publications concerning infant and paediatric nursing could conclusive show a benefit of intensified nursing. Further research is still needed to prove intensified nursing care. Two publications could be found to the gerontological intensified nursing; both used an extended nursing model and an enlarged use of resources. Both studies demonstrated a measurable success in the applied parameters. Two studies also could be analysed in the oncological field in which successes were also provable by the applied parameters. The success was given especially in a higher patient satisfaction, one study showed an improved scheduling (time planning) of nurses. There was not one article concerning economic questions of intensified nursing care. It has to be taken into account that the financial resources have to be used effectively also in nursing nowadays. It has to be assumed that the costs are driven by increased use of resources. Savings can be achieved, however, in the form of avoided therapies and days in hospital by intensified nursing. The intensified nursing can be considered as similar cost-effective as conventional models of nursing. Ethically it is necessary to consider that the possibilities of

  9. Male Reproductive System

    MedlinePlus

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Male Reproductive System KidsHealth > For Parents > Male Reproductive System Print A ... understand your son's reproductive health. continue About the Male Reproductive System Most species have two sexes: male and female. ...

  10. Nurse attendee purchasing patterns.

    PubMed

    Weiss, M D; Savik, K; Kjervik, D K

    1993-01-01

    Retention of nursing professionals is crucial in responding to the increasing demand for and complexity of nursing care. Augmenting the decision-making role of nurses is one important retention-related strategy. Purchasing patterns reflect one aspect of nurses' decision-making role. National meetings provide nurses with an opportunity to investigate educational and employment options, as well as to preview technological advances in patient care products and supplies. Yet, the purchasing patterns of nurses related to the marketing of patient care supplies, or educational material at national meetings have rarely been acknowledged or researched. This study investigated the purchasing patterns of nurse attendees as revealed at a national meeting and how attendance influenced purchasing input following the meeting. The study addressed differences in purchasing patterns between specific groups of nurse attendees, as well as the relationship between meeting attendance motivators and purchasing patterns. A descriptive methodology utilizing participant observation at four national nursing meetings and mail survey in four phases was used to determine if there were: (1) identifiable purchasing patterns for nurses attending specific nursing-organization sponsored national meetings, (2) differences in purchasing patterns between nurse attendees from these meetings, (3) differences in self-reported post-meeting purchase input, and (4) relationships between meeting attendance motivators and purchasing patterns. The findings demonstrate that nurse attendee purchasing patterns can be identified and do vary among nursing groups. Nurse attendees at specialty meetings were more likely to act as specifiers, have a more dominant role in purchasing and were more likely to influence product purchases than were nurse attendees from generalist meetings. Self-reports of post-meeting purchasing input demonstrated that nurse attendees utilized information gained at national meetings in

  11. Cross border nursing.

    PubMed

    Cutshall, P

    1993-01-01

    In 1989, the Canadian Nurses Association asked a professional nurse from British Columbia to help nurses in Nepal develop their association an work on nursing legislation. Nepal had about 3000 nurses, including assistant nurse-midwives, 500 of whom were members of the Trained Nurses Association of Nepal (TNAN). It wanted to expand nursing's contribution to health care in Nepal. The nurses wanted to increase the visibility of the association, to become a self-sustaining organization, to establish a licensing law, and to improve the availability of continuing education. The Canadian nurse helped the Nepalese nurses with a workshop on association management covering record keeping and meeting plans. She helped a newly formed committee with licensing law and with decision factors in pursuing self-regulation for nursing. She discussed a work plan and a lobby strategy. She helped another committee develop objectives for the next year. A follow-up visit the next year revealed that the office was operating well and the association was keeping good records. TNAN sponsored workshops on professionalism and leadership. This visit yielded further progress on a licensing law and on identifying ways to become self-sufficient. The nurses discussed the Norwegian Nurses Association's (NNA) interest in providing funds to buy a building for TNAN use and to derive income from rent. NNA eventually donated the funds. By the 1992 visit, the nurses had revised and registered their constitution and bylaws. They had sponsored workshops on HIV/AIDS and mental health. The name was now the Nursing Association of Nepal (NAN). The newly created executive council had met frequently. NAN had expanded from 6 to 11 local branches. It had created 5 committees: fund raising, research, international coordination, nurses welfare, and publications. A workshop in western Nepal centered on quality nursing care. NAN had a role in the government's progress in primary health care and mental health services.

  12. Nursing informatics competences still challenging nurse educators.

    PubMed

    Rajalahti, Elina; Saranto, Kaija

    2012-01-01

    In recent years nursing documentation has been one of the most important development areas of nursing informatics (NI) in Finland. The purpose of this study is to describe the development of the nurse educators' competences in nursing documentation during a project called eNNI. The eNNI project (2008-2010) was a cooperative project by nurse educators and working life experts. The goal of the project was to implement the national documentation model and thereby improve operational processes at workplaces. The study includes pre- and post-test questioning of NI applications with a web-based questionnaire (n=136). The data were analyzed with distribution, cross-tabulations and average tests and descriptive statistic multivariate method. According to the results, the ICT skills of the nurse educators were good at the end of the project, and they had good information literacy competence. On the other hand, their advanced NI skills left room for improvement.

  13. The nurse match instrument: Exploring professional nursing identity and professional nursing values for future nurse recruitment.

    PubMed

    Mazhindu, Deborah M; Griffiths, Lauren; Pook, Carol; Erskine, Allen; Ellis, Roger; Smith, Fleur

    2016-05-01

    From April 1st 2015 it will be mandatory for Higher Education Institutions (HEI) in the United Kingdom (UK) providing pre-qualifying health care higher education to use a Values Based Recruitment (VBR) tool, to ensure only the candidates with the "right" personal identity and values commensurate with the Professional Identity of Nursing (PIN) are accepted for nurse education. "Nurse Match" instrument was developed to enhance the recruitment and selection of candidates for pre-qualifying nursing. Action Research into PIN commenced with voluntary, purposive, convenience samples of qualified nurses (n = 30), Service Users (N = 10), postgraduate diploma nurses in mental health (N = 25), third year mental health branch students (N = 20) and adult and child student nurses in years 2 and 3 (N = 20) in Focus Groups. Data collection and analysis occurred concomitantly between July 2013 and October 2014, aided by NVivo 10 software and revealed Key Quality Indicators (KQIs) of the social construction of PIN. Construct development included a literature review spanning the last fifteen years, which identified four main themes; 1. Nursing's ethics and values. 2. Nursing's professional identity and caring. 3. Nursing's emotional intelligence. 4. Nursing's professionalism. Nurse Match offers an evidence-based enhancement to VBR, for future nurse recruitment locally, nationally and internationally.

  14. Call to Action for Nurses/Nursing

    PubMed Central

    Premji, Shahirose S.; Hatfield, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    The 13 million nurses worldwide constitute most of the global healthcare workforce and are uniquely positioned to engage with others to address disparities in healthcare to achieve the goal of better health for all. A new vision for nurses involves active participation and collaboration with international colleagues across research practice and policy domains. Nursing can embrace new concepts and a new approach—“One World, One Health”—to animate nursing engagement in global health, as it is uniquely positioned to participate in novel ways to improve healthcare for the well-being of the global community. This opinion paper takes a historical and reflective approach to inform and inspire nurses to engage in global health practice, research, and policy to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals. It can be argued that a colonial perspective currently informs scholarship pertaining to nursing global health engagement. The notion of unidirectional relationships where those with resources support training of those less fortunate has dominated the framing of nursing involvement in low- and middle-income countries. This paper suggests moving beyond this conceptualization to a more collaborative and equitable approach that positions nurses as cocreators and brokers of knowledge. We propose two concepts, reverse innovation and two-way learning, to guide global partnerships where nurses are active participants. PMID:27144160

  15. Opportunities to promote health to vulnerable male teenagers.

    PubMed

    Wildbore, Amanda

    Forty years ago an increase in 'juvenile delinquency' led to a large prison-building programme for young offenders. Today, the emphasis is on community sentencing and a reduction in prison places. The secondment of nurses into youth offending teams makes it possible to offer primary health services to a group of mainly male, vulnerable people.

  16. Individual Potentials Related to Evidence-Based Nursing among Nurses in Teaching Hospitals Affiliated to Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Seyyedrasooli, Alehe; Zamanzadeh, Vahid; Valizadeh, Leila; Tadaion, Farideh

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Knowledge, attitude, and skills of nurses regarding evidence-based medicine are some of the important individual potentials in the implementation of these cares. There is no evidence indicating Iranian nurses to have these individual potentials. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determination the perceptions of nurses about individual potentials in evidence-based nursing and its related factors. Methods: In this descriptive correlational study, all nurses (n = 600) working in teaching hospitals affiliated to Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran were included. Valid and reliable translated questionnaires were used to collect data. Descriptive and inferential statistics were employed in SPSS to analyze the data. Results: Based on our findings, moderate levels of knowledge, attitude, and skills were possessed by 274 (45.7%), 394 (65.7%), and 411 (68.5%) nurses, respectively. In addition, male nurses (p = 0.002) and those with a master's degree (p = 0.001) were more knowledgeable. Likewise, more positive attitudes were demonstrated by females (p = 0.004) and nurses with a master's degree (p = 0.04). A statistically significant difference was found between skills and employment status of nurses (p = 0.002). Conclusion: The moderate level of attitude among nurses can provide a good potential in promoting evidence-based nursing in teaching hospitals affiliated to Tabriz University of Medical Sciences. Therefore, more attention should be paid to enhance the awareness and skills of nurses toward evidence-based care. PMID:25276682

  17. National Nursing Home Survey

    Cancer.gov

    The National Nursing Home Survey provides includes characteristics such as size of nursing home facilities, ownership, Medicare/Medicaid certification, occupancy rate, number of days of care provided, and expenses.

  18. Emergency Nurses Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ribbon Commands Skip to main content ENA - Emergency Nurses Association - Safe Practice, Safe Care Sign In Join ... Wiley, MSN, RN, CEN, Takes Office as Emergency Nurses Association President 01-04-17 ENA Applauds VA’s ...

  19. American Nephrology Nurses' Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... Join/Renew Jobs Contact Corporate Shop American Nephrology Nurses Association About ANNA Association About ANNA Strategic Plan ... CExpress Events National Events Chapter / Local Events Nephrology Nurses Week ANNA Education Modules CKD Modules Education Services ...

  20. Exploring improvisation in nursing.

    PubMed

    Hanley, Mary Anne; Fenton, Mary V

    2007-06-01

    Improvisation has long been considered a function of music, dance, and the theatre arts. An exploration of the definitions and characteristics of this concept in relation to the art and practice of nursing provide an opportunity to illuminate related qualities within the field of nursing. Nursing has always demonstrated improvisation because it is often required to meet the needs of patients in a rapidly changing environment. However, little has been done to identify improvisation in the practice of nursing or to teach improvisation as a nursing knowledge-based skill. This article strives to explore the concept of improvisation in nursing, to describe the characteristics of improvisation as applied to nursing, and to utilize case studies to illustrate various manifestations of improvisation in nursing practice.

  1. Nursing's Preferred Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aydelotte, Myrtle K.

    1987-01-01

    The author discusses future trends for society and relates them to future roles and characteristics of nursing. She presents strategies that nursing professionals should use to be prepared for the stated trends. (CH)

  2. Needed: Nursing Administration Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blair, Eunice M.

    1976-01-01

    A master's program that synthesizes clinical nursing knowledge with management theory and skills is one way to prepare nursing service administrators capable of exerting an influence on today's complex health care system. (Editor)

  3. [Nursing motivation leadership].

    PubMed

    Chen, Ia-Ling; Hung, Chich-Hsiu

    2007-02-01

    The concept of "patients treated as guests" is emphasized in today's medical service and patient-center nursing care. However, with rapid changes in health insurance and hospital accreditation systems as well as increasing consumer awareness, the nurse manager must both efficiently relieve the working pressure of nurses and motivate them. However, it would be an extreme challenge for nurse managers to build a team in which each member works in a self-fulfilling work environment and achieves a high quality of care. This article presents several theories and techniques that relate to motivation strategies. These strategies can serve as a guide and a reference for nurse managers to inspire teamwork and raise morale. It can be expected that increasing nurse satisfaction, performance, and care quality will decrease turnover and desertion rates. Hopefully, this article will assist nurse managers to become better leaders and to achieve success in providing efficient services and good of nursing care quality.

  4. Iranian nursing students' perspectives of educational equity.

    PubMed

    Ghiyasvandian, Shahrzad; Nikbakht-Nasrabadi, Alireza; Mohammadpour, Ali; Abbasi, Mahmoud; Javadi, Mostafa

    2014-01-01

    Around the world there is a growing consensus that students' rights must be protected, regardless of race, creed, color, sex, religion, and socioeconomic status. One of these rights is the educational equity. However, little is known about these phenomena in nursing education. The aim of this study was to explore the educational equity from the perspective of nursing students. A qualitative study was conducted. Thus, we purposefully recruited for in-depth interviews 13 nursing students (8 female and 5 male). All interviews were transcribed verbatim and analyzed by thematic analysis approach to identify categories and themes. Four main themes emerged from the data: Fair Educational Opportunity, fair evaluation, attempts to combat discrimination, and employing qualified teachers.  It is argued that educational equity should be developed in higher education. Principles of equity and students' rights may form the most basic rationale for all formal and informal efforts to extend the right of equal access to education.

  5. Is there gender bias in nursing research?

    PubMed

    Polit, Denise F; Beck, Cheryl Tatano

    2008-10-01

    Using data from a consecutive sample of 259 studies published in four leading nursing research journals in 2005-2006, we examined whether nurse researchers favor females as study participants. On average, 75.3% of study participants were female, and 38% of studies had all-female samples. The bias favoring female participants was statistically significant and persistent. The bias was observed regardless of funding source, methodological features, and other participant and researcher characteristics, with one exception: studies that had male investigators had more sex-balanced samples. When designing studies, nurse researchers need to pay close attention to who will benefit from their research and to whether they are leaving out a specific group about which there is a gap in knowledge.

  6. Research Issues: Nursing & Professionalization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenfeld, Peri

    Nursing has always been viewed as a "women's profession" as evidenced by the fact that 97 percent of the 1.9 million registered nurses in the United States are female. The values of helping others, altruism, compassion, and sacrifice are associated with women and with nursing. However, because many young people today do not view these values as…

  7. Nursing students and Haiku.

    PubMed

    Anthony, M L

    1998-01-01

    The emphasis in nursing education is frequently on facts, details, and linear issues. Students need more encouragement to use the creative abilities which exist in each of them. The use of haiku, a simple unrhymed Japanese verse, is one method which stimulates nursing students to use their creativity. A haiku exercise worked well in encouraging a group of nursing students to express their feelings.

  8. Nursing Research: Position Statement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Copp, Laurel; And Others

    The role of the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) in encouraging research through the programs and activities of the member schools is discussed. It is suggested that the dean or administrative head of a college of nursing is in a position to influence nursing research activities. The principal role of the academic dean in…

  9. Nursing in Crisis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fulcher, Roxanne

    2007-01-01

    Both the nation's health-care and nursing education systems are in crisis. While the care provided by registered nurses (RNs) is essential to patients' recovery from acute illness and to the effective management of their chronic conditions, the United States is experiencing a nursing shortage that is anticipated to increase as baby boomers age and…

  10. Nursing in Virginia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Virginia State Council of Higher Education, Richmond.

    Prefacing its comments with an explanatory note concerning the reason for its organization, purpose, and procedure, the Committee utilizes half its report statistically documenting various factors in nursing practice and nursing education in Virginia. The statistics are based on a study, "Nursing and Health Care in Virginia", by Thomas…

  11. Meals in nursing homes.

    PubMed

    Kofod, Jens; Birkemose, Anna

    2004-06-01

    Undernutrition is present among 33% of nursing home residents in Denmark. Hence, it is relevant to examine the meal situation at nursing homes to single out factors that may increase or reduce the residents' food intake. In the ongoing Danish nursing home debate it is claimed that a new type of nursing home improves the residents' meal situation with a positive effect on nutrition. The aim of this work is to test the general hypothesis that (i) residents appreciate the meal situation in these nursing homes and (ii) nutritional status of the residents is improved in this type of nursing home. This study was carried out in four Danish nursing homes at various locations in Denmark. The methods used are qualitative interviews and observations at four nursing homes in combination with measurement of body mass index (BMI) at two of the four nursing homes. Undernutrition is defined as a BMI below 20. The study could not confirm the general hypothesis, as a consistent improvement in the meal situation was not found in the nursing homes studied. But an indication of improved nutritional status was found in two of the nursing homes where the degree of undernutrition was lower than generally found in Denmark. Furthermore, the study indicated that the staff and the residents conceived the nursing homes differently.

  12. Nursing Role Transition Preceptorship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Batory, Susan M.

    2014-01-01

    The preceptorship clinical experience in a practical nursing (PN) program at a Midwestern community college is considered crucial to the PN students' transition from novice nurse to professional nurse. However, no research has been available to determine whether the preceptorship clinical accomplishes its purpose. A case study was conducted to…

  13. Identifying Nursing's Future Leaders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gunning, Carolyn S.; Hawken, Patty L.

    1990-01-01

    A study determined that encouraging and supporting students in professional activities while they were still in school would lead those students to participate in professional nursing organizations after they graduated. Organized nursing needs to identify the factors that influence nurses to join organizations and concentrate on these factors to…

  14. Nursing home staff--nursing student partnership.

    PubMed

    Karam, S E; Nies, D M

    1995-10-01

    A partnership between a nursing home and a school of nursing provides both staff and students with creative opportunities for solving clinical problems. Through collaborative efforts of senior baccalaureate students and the staff administration of a long-term care facility in eastern Virginia, a successful bowel management program was developed and implemented.

  15. Nursing 436A: Pediatric Oncology for Nurses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackman, Cynthia L.

    A description is provided of "Pediatric Oncology for Nurses," the first in a series of three courses offered to fourth-year nursing students in pediatric oncology. The first section provides a course overview, discusses time assignments, and describes the target student population. Next, a glossary of terms, and lists of course goals, long-range…

  16. [Training for nurse coordinators in nursing homes].

    PubMed

    Martin, Jean-René

    2016-01-01

    For the last three years, the Poitou-Charentes regional health agency has organised and funded training for nurse coordinators in nursing homes. The training programme, created in partnership with the Poitiers healthcare manager training institute, enables professionals with multiple responsibilities and missions, who deserve greater recognition, to acquire the necessary skills.

  17. Patient Education for Nurses: Nursing 200A.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirsch, Maureen

    A description is provided of "Patient Education for Nurses," a required course for second-year nursing students which focuses on the assessment of the learning needs of adults, and the planning and and implemention of formal patient education. First, general information on the significance of the course and its place in the School of Nursing…

  18. Male pattern baldness (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Male pattern baldness is a sex-linked characteristic that is passed from mother to child. A man can more accurately predict his chances of developing male pattern baldness by observing his mother's father than by looking ...

  19. Standardization of Korean nursing terminology.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyeoun-Ae; Kim, Ji-Hyun; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Lee, Hyang-Yeon; Kim, Jeong-Wha; Kim, Won-Ock; Kim, Ok-Soo; Lee, Young-Whee; Park, Ho-Ran; Choi-Kwon, Smi; Kim, In-Sook; Park, Young-Joo; Park, Young-Im

    2006-01-01

    Korean nursing terminology was standardized to improve sharing and exchange of nursing data and information. English nursing terms were collected from existing nursing terminology, journal articles, nursing records, text books, and nursing/medical dictionaries, translated into Korean and were tested for their validity. More than 9000 terms were standardized and published on a website for further feedback from the users. This study will contribute to communication within the nursing community and with other health care professionals.

  20. The opinions of Polish nurses and patients on nursing protests.

    PubMed

    Binkowska-Bury, Monika; Marc, Malgorzata; Nagorska, Malgorzata; Januszewicz, Pawel; Ryzko, Jozef

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this study is to explore nurses' and patients' opinions about nurses in Poland going on strike. The study was carried out in Poland between January and June 2009, using 150 nurses and 150 hospitalized patients. The study was conducted using two questionnaire surveys. The main reasons why nursing strikes are organized, in the opinions of nurses, are: higher wages, the improvement of working conditions and the improvement of the image of the nursing profession. The main reasons why nursing strikes are organized, in the opinions of patients, are: higher wages, not abiding standards of employment by government and the improvement of the image of the nursing profession. The main reasons for a lack of active participation in strikes are holidays and occupational and economic matters. Patients and nurses support nursing strikes. Both nurses (53.3%) and patients (42%) said that organizing nursing strikes is right and might improve the occupational situation of nurses.

  1. Wildfire Disasters and Nursing.

    PubMed

    Hanes, Patricia Frohock

    2016-12-01

    Multiple factors contribute to wildfires in California and other regions: drought, winds, climate change, and spreading urbanization. Little has been done to study the multiple roles of nurses related to wildfire disasters. Major nursing organizations support disaster education for nurses. It is essential for nurses to recognize their roles in each phase of the disaster cycle: mitigation, preparedness, response, and recovery. Skills learned in the US federal all-hazards approach to disasters can then be adapted to more specific disasters, such as wildfires, and issues affecting health care. Nursing has an important role in each phase of the disaster cycle.

  2. Community Health Nursing Curriculum. Components in Baccalaureate Nursing Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Catell, Grace Manion

    Community health nursing curriculum components in a sample of baccalaureate nursing programs were investigated. Questionnaires were sent to a sample of 12 National League of Nursing (NLN) accredited, generic, baccalaureate nursing programs representative of the four NLN regions in the United States. Community health nursing content in theory…

  3. Development of a Nursing Data Set for School Nursing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fahrenkrug, Mary Ann

    2003-01-01

    School nurses need to clearly identify how they promote the health and educational achievement of children. School nurses contribute to student health by providing health assessment and nursing interventions, advocating for healthy living, and contributing to prevention of illness and disease management. A Nursing Data Set for School Nursing can…

  4. Gender bias and discrimination in nursing education: can we change it?

    PubMed

    Anthony, Ann Strong

    2004-01-01

    Gender bias in nursing education impedes recruitment and retention of males into the profession. Nurse educators who are unaware of men's historical contributions to the profession may unknowingly perpetuate gender bias. The author describes how traditional stereotypes can be challenged and teaching/learning strategies can be customized to gender-driven learning styles.

  5. Psychosocial Factors as Predictors of Mentoring among Nurses in Southwestern Nigeria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salami, Samuel O.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine the psychosocial factors that predict mentoring among nurses. Design/methodology/approach: This study adopted a survey research design. Questionnaires were used to collect data on self-esteem, locus of control, emotional intelligence and demographic factors from 480 nurses (males 230; females = 250)…

  6. Economics of nursing.

    PubMed

    Aiken, Linda H

    2008-05-01

    Pay-for-performance initiatives have renewed interest in payment reform as a vehicle for improving nurse staffing and working conditions in hospitals because of research linking investments in nursing and better patient outcomes. This article addresses the economics of nursing from a broad perspective that considers how both national policies such as hospital prospective payment and managerial decisions within institutions impact the outcomes of nurses and patients. Cost offsets are considered from the perspective of savings in patient-care resources that accrue from investments in nursing. Cost offsets are also considered from the perspective of the interactions among different strategies for investing in nursing, including the impact of staffing levels on patient outcomes with varying educational levels of nurses and varying quality of practice environments.

  7. Development of aerospace nursing.

    PubMed

    Barron, N J

    1975-04-01

    In the initial development, the primary purpose of the USAF aerospace nursing program was to prepare the nurse to function as an integral member of the aerospace medical team in support of bioastronautics, occupational health and aerospace medical research programs. The absence of an expanded manned space program has required the aerospace nurse to redirect her energies toward the immediate needs of the aerospace medicine program. Many of the aerospace nurse's more specific functions are dependent upon the mission objectives of the command and military base to which she is assigned. Aerospace nursing reflects a concern for the total health needs of the Air Force community and the application of a holistic approach. It includes all aspects of health and all environmental hazards which alter health. The development of aerospace nursing paves the way for this expanded view of nursing practice.

  8. Lifestyle and Depression among Hong Kong Nurses

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Teris; Yip, Paul S.F.

    2016-01-01

    Recent longitudinal data suggest a close association between depression and lifestyle. Little work to date has estimated the prevalence of depression in the nursing workforce in China, nor considered what lifestyle factors might be correlated with it—a gap filled by the present study. The study’s web-based cross-sectional survey solicited data from qualified nurses aged between 21 and 65 registered with the Hong Kong Nursing Council. The Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale 21 was used to measure 850 nurses for depression, anxiety and symptoms of stress; a generalized linear regression model examined associations between lifestyle factors and depression. Mean depression symptom scores show a downward linear trend for male and female participants. Gender and age, however, did not emerge as significant predictors of depression. Three lifestyles factors (sleep, entertainment and hobbies) showed a significant association with depression. Nurses should make therapeutic lifestyle changes to improve their work-life balance and safeguard their functioning at work and personal well-being. PMID:26784216

  9. Is Nurses' Professional Competence Related to Their Personality and Emotional Intelligence? A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Heydari, Abbas; Kareshki, Hossein; Armat, Mohammad Reza

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Nurses' professional competence is a crucial factor in clinical practice. Systematic evaluation of nurses’ competence and its related factors are essential for enhancing the quality of nursing care. This study aimed to assess the nurses’ competence level and its possible relationship with their personality and emotional intelligence. Methods: Using a cross-sectional survey design, three instruments including Nurse Competence Scale, short form of Schutte Self Report Emotional Intelligence Test, and the short 10-item version of Big Five Factor Inventory, were administered simultaneously to a randomized stratified sample of 220 nurses working in hospitals affiliated to Mashhad University of Medical Sciences. Data analysis was performed using SPSS 11.5. Results: Majority of nurses rated themselves as "good" and "very good", with the highest scores in "managing situations" and "work role" dimensions of nurse competence. A relatively similar pattern of scores was seen in competence dimensions, personality and emotional intelligence, among male and female nurses. Emotional intelligence and personality scores showed a significant relationship with nurses’ competence, explaining almost 20% of variations in nurse competence scores. Conclusion: Iranian nurses evaluated their overall professional competence at similar level of the nurses in other countries. Knowledge about the nurses’ competence level and its related factors, including personality and emotional intelligence, may help nurse managers in enhancing nurses' professional competence through appropriate task assignments and conducting in-service educational programs, thus improving the health status of patients. PMID:27354976

  10. Academic Incivility in Nursing Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marlow, Sherri

    2013-01-01

    A well-documented and growing problem impacting the nursing shortage in the United States is the increasing shortage of qualified nursing faculty. Many factors contribute to the nursing faculty shortage such as retirement, dissatisfaction with the nursing faculty role and low salary compensation (American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN),…

  11. Nurse Reinvestment Act. Public Law.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC.

    This document contains the text of the Nurse Reinvestment Act, which amends the Public Health Service Act to address the increasing shortage of registered nurses by instituting a series of policies to improve nurse recruitment and nurse retention. Title I details two initiatives to boost recruitment of nurses. The first initiative includes the…

  12. An overview of male intermittent self-catheterisation.

    PubMed

    Logan, Karen

    Since the early 1970s intermittent self-catheterisation (ISC) has become increasingly popular and is now considered the method of choice for draining retained urine from the bladder and to treat urethral strictures in men. It is the preferred option for this kind of bladder dysfunction management instead of an indwelling urinary catheter. Learning ISC can be a challenging time for men, but with the support of knowledgeable experienced nurses in teaching ISC it can be successfully achieved. This article outlines the anatomy of the male urinary tract, offers practical tips for nurses who teach it, and highlights issues important to men when learning and living with ISC.

  13. Competency of Graduate Nurses as Perceived by Nurse Preceptors and Nurse Managers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wise, Vanessa

    2013-01-01

    As newly graduated associate degree nurses (ADN) and baccalaureate degree nurses (BSN) enter into the workforce, they must be equipped to care for a complex patient population; therefore, the purpose of this study was to address the practice expectations and clinical competency of new nurses as perceived by nurse preceptors and nurse managers.…

  14. Perceptions of "Nursing" and "Nursing Care" in the United States by Dutch Nursing Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haloburdo, Esther P.; Thompson, Mary Ann

    2001-01-01

    In the opinions of 11 Dutch nursing students on a study tour of the United States, the U.S. emphasizes technical aspects of nursing and medical over nursing care, lacks team nursing and collegiality, and has a litigious environment. These negative images have implications for the use of U.S. nursing as a benchmark for global education and…

  15. The future of nursing: understanding who nurses are.

    PubMed

    Wyatt, David A

    2013-09-01

    The Institute of Medicine report The Future of Nursing: Leading Change, Advancing Health highlights the need for more information about the nursing workforce. Without attention to the problem, OR nursing is likely to continue to experience the nursing shortage more acutely than other practice areas. By changing how they acquire and use nursing data, and by advocating for improved exchange of data between federal and state governments and nursing schools, facilities can be better prepared for future workforce challenges.

  16. [Response of Taiwan nursing education to today's nursing shortage].

    PubMed

    Chou, Shieu-Ming

    2012-10-01

    The shortage of nursing manpower has recently attracted significant attention from Taiwan society. Government efforts to improve the nursing practice environment have challenged the quality of current domestic nursing education. This article provides an overview of Taiwan nursing education in terms of its development under current nursing shortage conditions and in light of Taiwan's low birthrate, ageing society. A few suggestions for nursing education are listed at the end of the article.

  17. A Review and Critique of Advances in Nursing Science Articles That Focus on Sexual Health and Sexual Rights: A Call to Leadership and Policy Development.

    PubMed

    Rew, Lynn; Thurman, Whitney; McDonald, Kari

    Sexual health and sexual rights are integral to nursing science but ignored in nursing publications. We searched Advances in Nursing Science for prevalence of these topics. Fifteen articles (1.3%) met our criteria. No nursing theories were used as frameworks, and few concrete suggestions were made for further theory development. Discussion of sociopolitical influences on sexual health and/or sexual rights was limited, mostly unrelated to health care. Information to influence nursing practice, theory development, further research, or policy across the life span, for both males and females, and for variant-gender individuals, was limited. We urge authors to contribute further to this field of discourse in nursing.

  18. All the young men gone: losing men in the gentrification of Australian nursing circa 1860-1899.

    PubMed

    Barber, J

    1996-12-01

    Men played an important role in nursing in colonial Australia. However the number of men undertaking nursing duties declined dramatically in the second half of the nineteenth century. Reasons for this are explored in relation to ramifications of the introduction of the Nightingale pattern of nurse training in Australia, which occurred within the Victorian ethos of gentility and decorum. In this context, nursing came to be seen as a calling that was natural and appropriate for women. The controlled, decorous ambience of nursing, its subservient relationship to medicine and the attractiveness to employers of female pay rates are all associated with the decline in male participation over this period.

  19. Nursing: Licensed Practical and Licensed Vocational Nurses

    MedlinePlus

    ... Outlook Occupational Outlook Handbook Handbook of Methods Research Papers Copyright Information Contact & Help Economic Releases Latest Releases » ... and licensed vocational nurses may advance to supervisory positions. Some LPNs and LVNs advance to other healthcare ...

  20. From staff nurse to nurse consultant.

    PubMed

    Fowler, John

    John Fowler Independent education consultant, continues his series for clinical nurses hoping to share their experiences with a wider audience, with advice on developing a potential article for a professional journal.

  1. Ethics and Transcultural Nursing Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eliason, Michele J.

    1993-01-01

    Argues that nursing practice and theory cannot be ethical unless cultural factors are taken into consideration and that ethical/transcultural nursing is central to the philosophy and practice of nursing. (Author)

  2. Ensuring Quality Nursing Home Care

    MedlinePlus

    Ensuring Quality Nursing Home Care Before you choose a nursing home Expert information from Healthcare Professionals Who Specialize in the Care ... Nearly 1.6 million older Americans live in nursing homes in the United States. The move to ...

  3. Military nursing competencies.

    PubMed

    Ross, Mary Candice

    2010-06-01

    Competencies for military nurses are much broader in scope than their civilian counterparts. Not only must they be proficient at basic nursing skills, but they must also quickly master such military skills as protecting themselves and others during attack or threat of attack, caring for major trauma victims under austere conditions, and preparing such patients for transport through the military system of evacuation. This requires consistent and specialized training. This article describes the competencies necessary for practice by military nurses.

  4. Spirituality in nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Melanie; Wattis, John

    2015-05-27

    Spirituality is an important aspect of holistic care that is frequently overlooked. This is because of difficulties in conceptualising spirituality and confusion about how it should be integrated into nursing care. This article explores what is meant by spirituality and spiritually competent practice. It examines attitudes to spirituality, describes factors that might affect the integration of spirituality into nursing care and offers practical guidance to equip nurses to incorporate spirituality into their practice.

  5. Best nursing practice.

    PubMed

    2016-09-01

    As part of this year's centenary celebrations, the RCN is showcasing the best nursing practice, focusing on that which often goes unobserved. Nurses, healthcare assistants and nursing students are asked to share ideas and innovations for improving practice and patient care. These will contribute to the development of a library of good practice and the RCN will invest in a small number of the successful projects. The closing date is 31 December.

  6. Nursing is the room rate.

    PubMed

    Rutherford, Marcella M

    2012-01-01

    Shrinking dollars increase the need for health care stakeholders to clearly understand nursing's worth. For nursing to assure an adequate investment in nurses, it needs to articulate its value drivers. Nursing revenue offers a data source that reflects stakeholder choices and patient needs. The daily nursing billing supports hospital payment and provides cost data, important for hospital financial decision making. This revenue is a tangible asset reflecting nursing value and can be used to justify an investment in the profession. Nursing leadership can use this daily nursing charge data to monitor and measure the impact of efficiencies related to patient care.

  7. The shortage of nurses and nursing faculty: what critical care nurses can do.

    PubMed

    Siela, Debra; Twibell, K Renee; Keller, Vicki

    2008-01-01

    Nurses are needed more than ever to support the healthcare needs of every American. Nurses make up the greatest single component of hospital staff. In 2004, of the almost 3 million nurses in the United States, 83% were employed in nursing, and 58% of those were employed full-time. However, a severe shortage of nurses exists nationwide, putting the safe, effective healthcare of Americans in jeopardy. The concurrent shortage of nursing faculty has significant impact on the potential for admitting and graduating sufficient numbers of nursing students to address the shortage of prepared nurses. A close examination of the demographics of the 3 million nurses provides a context for an in-depth discussion of strategies that critical care nurses can employ to help alleviate the nursing and nurse faculty shortages.

  8. Modelling district nurse expertise.

    PubMed

    Burke, Michelle

    2014-12-01

    As changes in society and health provision mean that one in four people over the age of 75 will require nursing care at home, pre-registration adult nurse education increasingly prepares student nurses for a future career within the community. District nurses undertake complex, multidimensional health and social assessments and care in a non-clinical setting and work in partnership with patients and their significant others to promote practical and psychological coping mechanisms and self-care. The district nurse's first assessment visit is key to developing a therapeutic partnership and it is often during this visit that expertise in district nursing practice emerges. The holistic, contextual and dynamic aspects of nursing in the home setting can make district nursing expertise difficult to illustrate and demonstrate within the classroom setting. This article explores the ways in which an understanding of expertise development theory can enable the tacit expertise that occurs within the first assessment visit to be made visible to student nurses, using simulation and expert narrative as a pedagogical strategy.

  9. Communication in Nursing Practice

    PubMed Central

    Kourkouta, Lambrini; Papathanasiou, Ioanna V.

    2014-01-01

    Good communication between nurses and patients is essential for the successful outcome of individualized nursing care of each patient. To achieve this, however, nurses must understand and help their patients, demonstrating courtesy, kindness and sincerity. Also they should devote time to the patient to communicate with the necessary confidentiality, and must not forget that this communication includes persons who surround the sick person, which is why the language of communication should be understood by all those involved in it. Good communication also is not only based on the physical abilities of nurses, but also on education and experience. PMID:24757408

  10. Nursing at the forefront.

    PubMed

    Hunt, L P

    2000-06-01

    The Government sees nurses at the forefront of the drive for improvement in healthcare delivery. In this article, Lord Hunt, the Government spokesperson on nursing, spells out the role that nurses are expected to play in this process. Clinical governance has undoubtedly already been mentioned if not enacted in your Trust, and maybe some of you have applied for the discretionary points now on offer. Whatever the outcome of these and other strategies, the future is going to be different for perioperative nurses, whether we like it or not. Your views, as ever, are welcome....

  11. [Family oriented nursing care].

    PubMed

    Lima-Rodríguez, Joaquin Salvador; Lima-Serrano, Marta; Sáez-Bueno, Africa

    2009-01-01

    Nursing has experienced an important methodological development, in which it gives priority to the individual, although at a socioeconomic level a marked interest is seen in the health care of the family unit and the NANDA (North American Nursing Diagnosis Association), NIC (Nursing Interventions Classification) and NOC (Nursing Outcomes Classification) nursing guidelines, using diagnoses, criteria of results and interventions orientated towards this aim. We consider to the family as an opened system consisted of human elements, with a common history, which they form a functional unit been ruled by own procedure. In this paper we look at those aspects that must be taken into account in nursing assessment of families from a systemic perspective, including some tools for data collection and analysis of information. In addition, we identify specific areas of intervention. We believe that the family must be studied from a nursing care point of view with its own characteristics as opposed to those possessed individually by each of its members. We also believe that, when assessment is centred on the Henderson unaided activities study or the Gordon functional health patterns, they are not useful in assessing the family unit. This work offers an assessment method centred on the family unit, which helps to identify the nursing diagnoses applicable to it. Our proposal, which has been successfully used by nursing students over the last few years, hopes to contribute to quality clinical practice with a tool orientated towards the family.

  12. [Nurses in print].

    PubMed

    1990-01-01

    The paper presents an analysis of the articles on nursing personnel published from September 1989 till June 1990 in the two most widespread newspapers: II Corriere della Sera and La Republica. The nursing profession has been a very important object of nation as well as local chronicles, specifically during the nationwide "nursing emergency." It is striking however to see that nurses themselves are absent as subjects from the debate on the crisis of the profession. It is further underlined that journalists are very rough in their analyses of the cause of professional malaise and in the formulation and discussion of hypotheses for solution.

  13. Work motivation for Japanese nursing assistants in small- to medium-sized hospitals.

    PubMed

    Kudo, Yasushi; Kido, Shigeri; Shahzad, Machiko Taruzuka; Yoshimura, Emiko; Shibuya, Akitaka; Aizawa, Yoshiharu

    2011-01-01

    Nursing assistants can work without a professional certification to help registered nurses and licensed practical nurses. Nursing assistants engage in various tasks, e.g., washing laundry, cleaning up, and clerk tasks regarding nursing. Enhancing work motivation among nursing assistants is essential for every hospital, because when nursing assistants do their jobs well, it allows registered nurses and licensed practical nurses to complete their own specialized jobs. We examined the predictors significantly associated with nursing assistants' work motivation. For those predictors, we produced items to examine job satisfaction. Those items are classified into intrinsic and extrinsic facets. The subjects for this study were Japanese nursing assistants working in 26 hospitals with 62-376 beds (4 public and 22 private hospitals). A total of 516 nursing assistants were analyzed, with the average age and standard deviation of 42.7 ± 12.9 years; the age of 456 female subjects was 43.8 ± 12.7 years and that of 60 male subjects was 34.3 ± 11.0 years. Our results show that "work motivation" is significantly associated with "free time to do one's own things," "nursing assistants as important partners on the job," "feeling helpful to patients," "participating in decision making," and "job-skill improvement." Free time to do one's own things is an extrinsic item. Hospital administrators must monitor the workload and their quality of life among nursing assistants. All the other significant items are intrinsic. Nursing assistants are not only motivated by money. They highly value the intrinsic nature and experience of their jobs.

  14. Gender, gender roles and completion of nursing education: a longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    McLaughlin, Katrina; Muldoon, Orla T; Moutray, Marianne

    2010-05-01

    The current worldwide nursing shortage and high attrition of nursing students remain a challenge for the nursing profession. The aim of this paper was to investigate how key psychological attributes and constructions differentiate between completers and non-completers of nursing education. A questionnaire including measures of gender role identity and perceived gender appropriateness of careers was administered to 384 students early in the first year of the course. At the end of the programme attrition rates were obtained. The findings indicate that males were more likely to leave the course than females. Furthermore, those who completed the course tended to view nursing as more appropriate for women, in contrast to the non-completers who had less gender typed views. The female-dominated nature of nursing, prevalent stereotypes and gender bias inherent in nursing education seem to make this an uncomfortable place for males and those with less gendered typed views. Whilst it is acknowledged that attrition is undoubtedly a complex issue with many contributing factors, the nursing profession need to take steps to address this bias to ensure their profession is open equally to both female and male recruits.

  15. Nurse codependency: instrument development and validation.

    PubMed

    Allison, Sarah

    2004-01-01

    This study developed and evaluated the Nurse Codependency Questionnaire (NCQ) and generated initial estimates of the stability and internal consistency of responses for the questionnaire. An initial pool of 95 items, reflective of four domains of codependency, was generated from the codependency literature using a domain-referenced approach. Seven expert judges from the nursing and codependency fields calculated the content validity index (CVI) as > .80. Items were critiqued for relevance, clarity, and predicted direction of each item's correlation with the total codependency score. A convenience sample of 547 male and female nurses from Texas was recruited from a variety of professional settings to test the NCQ. Evidence of reliability and validity was sought through the use of principal factor analysis (PFA) techniques and correlation analysis. The specific domains of "codependent caretaking" and "lack of voice" represented two of the four hypothesized domains that were supported by factor analysis. Data screening and item analysis resulted in a final sample of 24 items. Test-retest reliability was .90 and internal consistency reliability was .80 for the entire scale. Reliability estimates for the "codependent caretaking" and "lack of voice" scales were .65 and .59, respectively for test-retest; and .81 and .64, respectively for internal consistency. Known groups validity was supported by each of the factors' ability to discriminate between binge and nonbinge eaters. The NCQ may be useful for identifying codependency within the nursing profession. Research is needed to determine the external factors that influence the overt expression of nurse codependency. Screening for nurse codependency may contribute to the health of the profession by providing a means for anticipatory guidance and early intervention.

  16. Nurse reactions to a prototype home telemedicine system.

    PubMed

    Whitten, P; Collins, B

    1998-01-01

    We have studied nurse reactions to a prototype home health telemedicine system. The system used interactive video through the local cable television network. Six nurses were directly involved with telecare video-visits. There were 54 patients. The average age of the patients was 76 years (range 21-101). Thirty-six (67%) patients were female and 18 (33%) were male. The patients had an average of 4.6 different diagnoses (range 1-16). They were also on a very wide range of medications (mean 9.9, range 2-23). Nurses overwhelmingly felt the system was effective for what this particular project was trying to accomplish. They were enthusiastic about the prospects of practising nursing by telemedicine, even though they had reservations about aspects of the particular system being used. Their main complaints were about limitations of the software and limitations of the telecommunication system that linked them to the patients.

  17. [Acute care nursing pathology: case report of odynophagia].

    PubMed

    Hernández-Fabà, Eva; Sanfeliu-Julià, Cristina

    2010-01-01

    Since 2008, the Institut Catala de la Salut (ICS) introduced the nurses management plan for acute pathology, in primary care centres. In the implementation of this system of organization, the ICS introduced various diseases protocols with performance algorithms. To raise awareness of the the practice of acute pathology, we present a clinical case. An urgent consultation of a 30 year-old male, with fever, sore throat and cough, which was managed and resolved by a nurse. The aim of this new management plan is that nursing is the first health professional to take care of patient coming to primary care centre without a scheduled visit, to avoid saturating the general clinic or hospital emergencies. This new organisational system involves an increase in the responsibilities of nursing in the diagnosis and treatment of patients.

  18. Assessing new graduate nurse performance.

    PubMed

    Berkow, Steven; Virkstis, Katherine; Stewart, Jennifer; Conway, Lindsay

    2008-11-01

    New graduate nurses now comprise more than 10% of a typical hospital's nursing staff, with this number certain to grow given the increasing numbers of entrants into the nurse workforce. Concomitantly, only 10% of hospital and health system nurse executives believe their new graduate nurses are fully prepared to provide safe and effective care. As part of a multipronged research initiative on bridging the preparation-practice gap, the Nursing Executive Center administered a national survey to a cross section of frontline nurse leaders on new graduate nurse proficiency across 36 nursing competencies deemed essential to safe and effective nursing practice. Based on survey data analysis, the authors discuss the most pressing and promising opportunities for improving the practice readiness of new graduate nurses.

  19. What's funny about nursing?

    PubMed

    Pierlot, D; Warelow, P J

    1999-12-01

    The authors examine the topic of humour and argue that humour is needed as one of many skills within the nurse patient relationship. We advance the view that humour has been well researched as an agent of therapeutic value and as a communication tool which helps to relieve stress, but, to date is not used to its fullest potential and tends therefore to be underestimated in both general and psychiatric nursing areas. Humour has benefits for both the nurse and the patient having psychological benefits and a vast array of physiological advantages and is regarded by those who use it as a social lubricant acting as a positive in nurse patient relationships. We also argue that it is essential that nurses know when to use humour as timing and appropriateness is imperative in order for it to be most effective. Humour can be used in all areas of clinical nursing practice and may prove useful in being a reliable predictor over the course of a patient's illness. The use of humour can help improve the nurse-patient relationship by initially breaking the ice between nurse and patient. This alternative mode of delivery can then be foundational to other areas of the nurse patient relationship such as self-disclosure, the enhancement of learning and relieving stress. Furthermore, it helps to facilitate and promote mutual health and well being for both the patient and the nurse. The usage of humour in psychiatric nurse settings is discussed and the benefits to both the patients and their staff are outlined as being of immense therapeutic value. The literature perhaps tends to skirt around these benefits somewhat, as psychiatry and laughter in partnership are not really considered important discursive topics.

  20. Nunavut: building nursing capacity.

    PubMed

    Malott, Misty

    2012-03-01

    Recruitment and retention issues associated with the growing nursing shortage in Canada are magnified in Nunavut, where the scope of nursing practice is much broader than in urban settings. The Qikiqtani General Hospital (QGH), a 35-bed hospital in Nunavut's capital, Iqaluit, was the home base for this multi-pronged pilot project that spanned 16 months to March 2011. The goals of the project included creating opportunities for front-line nurses to develop new clinical skills and knowledge and expand their competencies; offering enhanced critical care training relevant to the needs of nurses; and providing a smooth transition to entry to practice in a hospital setting for new graduate nurses. An in-house mentorship program was developed, and contracts were made with three outside parties: the Critical Care Education Network (CRI), the Ottawa Hospital and the Perinatal Partnership Program of Eastern and Southeastern Ontario. A number of professional development opportunities were provided – for example, 26 nurses participated in the CRI's critical care training, and six nurses were trained as CRI trainers.Overall, nurses were satisfied with the accessibility, delivery and applicability of the RTA education opportunities, and all nurses agreed that these opportunities increased their professional skills. A plan for the sustainability of the critical care portion of the Nunavut RTA project is currently in place, and the QGH is in the process of hiring a nurse educator for the hospital. This hiring will be a key piece to sustain the project initiatives. If the mentorship program is to continue, it will be essential to hire someone dedicated to the orientation of new graduates and new nurses.

  1. The health-related behaviors and attitudes of student nurses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vowell, Maribeth

    Nurses are an important component of primary medical care, and patient education is a common and important role of most nurses. Patient education and positive role modeling by nurses have the potential to influence patients' life style choices and the serious diseases that may be affected by those choices. A greater understanding of the ways nurses think about their own health could help facilitate healthier choices for them and in their patients. The purpose of this inquiry was to examine the experiences, attitudes and beliefs of student nurses related to their personal health, and to investigate those experiences, attitudes and beliefs as they relate to their education, relationships, values and career choice. The purpose was achieved through phenomenological interviews with eleven senior nursing students, nine females and two males, encouraging them to provide in as much detail as possible their attitudes and values about their personal health. The interviews were tape recorded, transcribed verbatim, and phenomenologically analyzed. A thematic structure emerged such that the nursing students experiences were represented by the four interrelated themes of caring for myself/caring for others ; I control my health/my world controls my health; I have energy/I'm tired; and feeling good/looking good. The contextual grounds for the themes that emerged during the analysis were the Body and Time. This structure was presented in terms of its relationship to health education, other research and to current theory.

  2. Registered Nurse Education and the Registered Nurse Job Market.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunt, Howard Allan

    This effort compares the graduates of the three types of Registered Nurse (RN) education programs (three-year Diploma in Nursing, two-year Associate Degree in Nursing (ADN), and four-year Bachelor of Science Degree in Nursing). The basic objective is to determine whether they are perfect substitutes, especially whether ADN graduates can adequately…

  3. Current Nursing Research Grants Supported by the Division of Nursing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Institutes of Health (DHEW), Bethesda, MD. Div. of Nursing.

    The United States Public Health Service Nursing Research Project Grants established in 1955, support studies dealing with all aspects of nursing practice, organization and delivery of nursing services to the patient, nursing as an occupation, and ways of communicating research findings. Intended as a means of sharing information about ongoing…

  4. How do nursing students perceive substance abusing nurses?

    PubMed

    Boulton, Martha A; Nosek, Laura J

    2014-02-01

    Substance abuse among nurses was recognized by nurse leaders and professional nursing organizations as a growing threat to patient safety and to the health of the abusing nurse more than 30years ago. Although numerous studies on nurse impairment were published in the 1980s and 1990s, there was minimal focus on student nurses' perceptions about impaired nurses and less research has been published more recently, despite a growing rate of substance abuse. A quasi-experimental study to explore the perceptions of student nurses toward nurses who are chemically dependent was conducted using a two-group, pretest-posttest design. The Perception of Nurse Impairment Inventory (PNII) was completed by student nurses at the beginning of their junior course work, prior to formal education about substance abuse. The PNII was repeated after the students received substance abuse education. The PNII was also completed by a control group of sophomore student nurses who did not receive the formal substance abuse education. A repeated measures analysis of variance was used to measure the differences between the two groups of students. Students who received the education chose more compassionate responses on the PNII and were more likely to respond that an impaired nurse's supervisor is responsible for supporting and guiding the impaired nurse to access professional care. Discrepancies in study findings about the efficacy of education for effecting positive attitudes of student nurses toward impaired nurses may be related to the length and type of the education.

  5. AACC Nursing Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Association of Community Colleges, Washington, DC.

    This document, presented in the form of PowerPoint print outs, indicates a total of 420 (nearly 60%) associate degree nursing (ADN) programs responded to a survey conducted by the American Association of Community Colleges' (AACC) Nursing and Allied Health Initiative (NAHI) for 2003. The sample is representative based on urbanicity and region.…

  6. The School Nurse Practitioner

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Igoe, Judith Bellaire

    1975-01-01

    Denver's four-month intensive course in primary health care for experienced nurses serving in disadvantaged areas, followed by inservice training with regular consultation available from a local physician, has produced school nurse practitioners who extend the traditional role to include comprehensive evaluations, management of minor illnesses,…

  7. Brokerage in multicultural nursing.

    PubMed

    Chalanda, M

    1995-01-01

    Nurses in contact with clients from different cultures often encounter beliefs at appear inconsistent with conventional Western medicine, resulting in the need for the nurse to act as a broker--i.e. translating and processing messages, instructions and belief systems from one group to a another.

  8. School Nurse Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borja, Mary C.; Amidon, Christine; Spellings, Diane; Franzetti, Susan; Nasuta, Mary

    2009-01-01

    This article features school nurses from across the country who are championing for school-located influenza immunization within their communities. These nurses are: (1) Mary C. Borja; (2) Christine Amidon; (3) Diane Spellings; (4) Susan Franzetti; and (5) Mary Nasuta. (Contains 6 figures.)

  9. Hospital Nurse Aide. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iowa Univ., Iowa City. Coll. of Education.

    This report presents results of a project to revise the current 120-hour advanced nurse aide course to include all recommended minimum competencies. A three-page description of project objectives, activities, and outcomes is followed by a list of the competencies for the 75-hour nurse aide course for long-term care and for the 120-hour advanced…

  10. Comparison of Nursing Roles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macdonough, Georgia P.

    2001-01-01

    This 1972 paper presents 12 comparisons of the nurse's role in the school versus in the hospital. For example, in the hospital, patients know they are ill and want to get well, while in school patients may not recognize that they need help. In the hospital, the nurse's workload is determined for her, while in school, it is self-determined. (SM)

  11. Registered Nurse (Associate Degree).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center on Education and Training for Employment.

    This document, which is designed for use in developing a tech prep competency profile for the occupation of registered nurse (with an associate degree), lists technical competencies and competency builders for 19 units pertinent to the health technologies cluster in general and 5 units specific to the occupation of registered nurse. The following…

  12. Nurse Practitioner Pharmacology Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waigandt, Alex; Chang, Jane

    A study compared the pharmacology training of nurse practitioner programs with medical and dental programs. Seventy-three schools in 14 states (40 nurse practitioner programs, 19 schools of medicine, and 14 schools of dentistry) were surveyed by mailed questionnaire about the number of hours devoted to the study of pharmacology. The major findings…

  13. Reference Sources for Nursing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nursing Outlook, 1978

    1978-01-01

    The tenth revision of a list of reference works for nurses, revised by a committee of the Interagency Council on Library Resources for Nursing, listed by type of publication as abstract journals, audiovisuals, bibliographies, books, dictionaries, directories, pharmacologies, indexes, guides, and so on. (MF)

  14. Continuing Education in Nursing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curtis, Frieda Smith; And Others

    This book is planned to provide guidance for nurses in planning, conducting, and evaluating programs of continuing education; content is built on the collective experiences and thinking of a regional group of nurse educators engaged in developing a coordinated program for a large geographical area. After discussion of changing patterns of health…

  15. School Nursing Certification Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Selekman, Janice; Wolfe, Linda C.

    2010-01-01

    The 2010 update to the resource you have been waiting for to help you prepare to take the National School Nurse Certification Exam. Dr. Janice Selekman DNSc, RN, NCSN, a recognized expert in pediatric nursing, and NASN Past President Linda C. Wolfe MEd, BSN, RN, NCSN, FNASN are the authors. This text was created in response to many years of…

  16. School Nursing in Illinois.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Endicott, Bettye; And Others

    This handbook for pupil personnel workers traces the historical development of school nursing and its establishment in Illinois. The role and function of school nurses are described, including planning and implementing optimum school health standards, protecting student health, and promoting well-being through the use of an interdisciplinary…

  17. Clinical Nursing Records Study (Executive Summary)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-08-01

    assessments received praise for those records completed during testing, issues surrounding identification and prioritizing nursing care problems and...of inpatient treatment and the patient’s responses. Nursing documentation reflects nursing practice patterns based on planned nursing care , which, in...Nursing History/Nursing Assessment/ Nursing Care Plans); the necessity of transcribing all orders appearing on physician order sheets to allow for

  18. [Masculinity and femininity in self-perceptions and ideals of registered nurses].

    PubMed

    Kada, Olivia; Brunner, Eva

    2010-08-01

    Despite of intensive professionalisation efforts and changed legal frameworks the public image of nursing is still full of gender-stereotypes. This study investigates to what extend public stereotypes of "typically female" and "typically male" are reflected in the self-concept and ideals of nurses. Using a cross-sectional research design 174 female nurses were surveyed regarding their sex-role orientation and ideals (femininity and masculinity) using a standardized questionnaire (BSRI). Contrary to stereotypes the respondents indentified more with masculine traits. Masculine attributes predominated especially in ideas about the ideal nurse. No differences between nurses who work in different areas could be revealed. In all endeavors regarding autonomy and masculinity the significance of the feminine function of "caring" must not be forgotten. Teachers in healthcare and nursing play a central role in sensibilising students for gender issues.

  19. The exposure of the nursing profession in online and print media

    PubMed Central

    Cardoso, Rodrigo José Martins; Graveto, João Manuel Garcia de Nascimento; Queiroz, Ana Maria Correia Albuquerque

    2014-01-01

    Objective to describe the coverage of news concerning the nursing profession in the Portuguese media: informative sites on the Internet and in print media. Method a total of 1,271 health news items were collected in September and October of 2011 (956 online news items and 325 news items originating from the press review of the Portuguese Order of Nurses). Statistical analysis was used to characterize the variables. Results nurses were the sources of information in 6.6% of cases, suggesting limited media exposure. The health news collected is characterized by a production based on limited information sources, that is, male and official sources, on information disseminated by news agencies focused on economic and political issues in the health field. Conclusion the presence of nurses in the news concerning nursing health is reduced. We suggest that nurses develop public communication skills to disseminate the importance of their profession in society and their relationship with the media. PMID:24553715

  20. Nurses working outside of nursing: societal trend or workplace crisis?

    PubMed

    Black, Lisa; Spetz, Joanne; Harrington, Charlene

    2008-08-01

    The phenomenon of career inactivity in professional nursing has been historically portrayed in the literature as a major cause of disequilibrium in the registered nurse labor market. However, there remains a general lack of understanding of the diverse forces that shape the inactive nurse pool and the likelihood that this population will return to nursing. The purpose of this study was to examine the population of registered nurses who are active in the labor market but work in nonnursing employment. Specifically, this study sought to determine the relative importance of nonworkplace- and workplace-related reasons for working outside of nursing. The results demonstrate that dissatisfaction with the nursing workplace is the key reason cited by actively licensed nurses for working outside of nursing employment. These findings suggest that policy and employer remedies are needed to improve the nursing workplace.

  1. Nurses across borders: foregrounding international migration in nursing history.

    PubMed

    Choy, Catherine Ceniza

    2010-01-01

    Although the international migration of nurses has played a formative role in increasing the racial and ethnic diversity of the health care labor force, nursing historians have paid very little attention to the theme of international migration and the experiences of foreign-trained nurses, A focus on international migration complements two new approaches in nursing history: the agenda to internationalize its frameworks, and the call to move away from "great women, great events" and toward the experiences of "ordinary" nurses. This article undertakes a close reading of the life and work of Filipino American nurse Ines Cayaban to reconceptualize nursing biography in an international framework that is attentive to issues of migration, race, gender, and colonialism. It was a Hannah keynote lecture delivered by the author on June 5, 2008, as part of the CAHN/ACHN (Canadian Association for the History of Nursing/Association Canadienne pour l'Histoire du Nursing) International Nursing History Conference.

  2. [Nurse anesthetist in France].

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Ju; Yann, Douchy; De Almeida, Sylvie; Deckert, Christine; Gauss, Tobias; Bonneville, Claire Tae; Merckx, Paul; Mantz, Jean

    2006-12-01

    We present the system of nurse anesthetist (Infirmier Anesthésiste Diplômé d'Etat: IADE) in France to the community of Japanese anesthesiologists. This French system with 70 years' history is older than the Japan Society of Anesthesiologists itself. There are 7000 nurse anesthetists in France now and the number of nurse anesthetists increases by 450-500 each year. Training to become a nurse anesthetist requires at least two years' experience as a general nurse and the general nurse must pass an examination after two years' special training in an anesthetistic nurse school to acquire the national certification. The nurse anesthetist's profession is regulated by French law. They work in a team with certified anesthesiologists. They can perform many kinds of anesthetic tasks including tracheal intubation and insertion of arterial catheter under the responsibility and supervision of certified anesthesiologists. The nurse anesthetists are not allowed to perform spinal, epidural, conduction and local anesthesia, although they can maintain these anesthesia and control these methods, e.g., by injecting local anesthetic agents through epidural catheter, following a specified prescription. The nurse anesthetists are not allowed to insert central venous and pulmonary artery catheters, although they can manage them. They are allowed to administer inhalation anesthetic agents, and inject venous anesthetic agents, muscle relaxants, their antagonists, and opioids by their own initiatives, but the decision for the use of catecholamine and emergency drugs is reserved to certified anesthesiologists. The nurse anesthetists perform other tasks preparing and checking anesthetic agents and equipment such as anesthetic machine, monitor, and defibrillator everyday, and sometimes use autologous blood recovery systems. The relationship between the certified anesthesiologist and the nurse anesthetist is marked by mutual respect, confidence and cooperation at each step of the anesthetic

  3. Characteristics of intuitive nurses.

    PubMed

    Miller, V G

    1995-06-01

    A description is provided of the process used to verify characteristics of intuitive nurses that had been reported in the literature. These characteristics supplied the framework for construction of the Miller Intuitiveness Instrument (MII) reported earlier (Miller, 1993). Evidence for validity of the MII was provided in the Miller (1993) study by examining factor analyses and correlations with the intuitive component of the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI). The following characteristics were subsequently verified: Intuitive nurses are willing to act on their intuitions, are skilled clinicians, and incorporate a spiritual component in their practices. In addition, intuitive nurses express an interest in the abstract nature of things and are risk takers. Intuitive nurses prefer intuition to sensing (as reflected by the MBTI) as a way to take in information. They are extroverted and express confidence in their intuitions. Likewise, nurses who delay making decisions until all the information is in are more intuitive than those who make decisions abruptly.

  4. [Gender mainstreaming and nursing].

    PubMed

    Wang, Hsiu-Hung

    2011-12-01

    Gender mainstreaming is one of the most important strategies in promoting global gender equality. The Taiwan government launched policies on gender mainstreaming and gender impact assessment in 2007 in response to strong public and academic advocacy work. With rising awareness of gender issues, nursing professionals in Taiwan should keep pace with global trends and become actively involved in advancing gender-mainstreaming policies. This article shows that nursing professionals should prepare themselves by cultivating gender competence, understanding gender-related regulations, recognizing the importance of gender impact assessment implementation, integrating gender issues into nursing education, conducting gender-related research and participating in decision-making processes that promote gender mainstreaming. Nursing professionals should enhance their knowledge and understanding of gender mainstreaming-related issues and get involved in the gender-related decision-making process in order to enhance gender awareness and women's health and further the professional development of nurses.

  5. Workplace bullying in nurses.

    PubMed

    Quine, L

    2001-01-01

    The article reports a study of workplace bullying in community nurses in an NHS trust. The aims were to determine the prevalence of bullying, to examine the association between bullying and occupational health outcomes, and to investigate whether support at work could moderate the effects of bullying. Forty-four percent of nurses reported experiencing one or more types of bullying in the previous 12 months, compared to 35 percent of other staff. Fifty percent of nurses had witnessed the bullying of others. Nurses who had been bullied reported significantly lower levels of job satisfaction and significantly higher levels of anxiety, depression and propensity to leave. They were also more critical of aspects of the organizational climate of the trust. Support at work was able to protect nurses from some of the damaging effects of bullying.

  6. Male teacher female students: a novice teacher reflects.

    PubMed

    Kenny, Gerard

    2002-10-01

    This paper seeks to explore the gender dynamics of being a novice male teacher working with female nursing students. Using a reflective framework it examines the gender dynamics within the classroom setting. Educational, social, feminist and political theory are discussed to give some insight into teaching and learning strategies that can perpetuate or circumvent unhelpful gender dynamics. Implications for learning and teaching are evaluated, and further topics for investigation are acknowledged.

  7. Leveraging data to transform nursing care: insights from nurse leaders.

    PubMed

    Jeffs, Lianne; Nincic, Vera; White, Peggy; Hayes, Laureen; Lo, Joyce

    2015-01-01

    A study was undertaken to gain insight into how nurse leaders are influencing the use of performance data to improve nursing care in hospitals. Two themes emerged: getting relevant, reliable, and timely data into the hands of nurses, and the leaders' ability to "connect the dots" in working with different stakeholders. Study findings may inform nurse leaders in their efforts to leverage data to transform nursing care.

  8. Fund-raising tips for nurse leaders and nurse executives.

    PubMed

    Fitzpatrick, Joyce J

    2014-01-01

    Fund-raising may be new to most nurse leaders and executives. This article focuses on dispelling the myths and mystery that surrounds nursing philanthropy. Key myths are addressed with supporting information to dispel them. Several practical tips are presented to enhance nurse leaders' involvement in philanthropy. Two recent gifts to hospital nursing departments are described as exemplars of relationship building and of nurses investing in their own future and that of the profession.

  9. Consistent male-male paternity differences across female genotypes.

    PubMed

    Sherman, Craig D H; Wapstra, Erik; Olsson, Mats

    2009-04-23

    In a recent paper, we demonstrated that male-female genetic relatedness determines male probability of paternity in experimental sperm competition in the Peron's tree frog (Litoria peronii), with a more closely related male outcompeting his rival. Here, we test the hypothesis that a male-male difference in siring success with one female significantly predicts the corresponding difference in siring success with another female. With male sperm concentration held constant, and the proportion of viable sperm controlled statistically, the male-male difference in siring success with one female strongly predicted the corresponding difference in siring success with another female, and alone explained more than 62 per cent of the variance in male-male siring differences. This study demonstrates that male siring success is primarily dictated by among-male differences in innate siring success with less influence of male-female relatedness.

  10. Nurse-Faculty Census, 1968.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National League for Nursing, New York, NY. Research and Development.

    This is the 1968 biennial census of nurse-faculty members teaching in nursing programs and in cooperating institutions providing clinical experiences for students in nursing. It is intended as an overview of current conditions and a basis for future estimates and planning. As of January 1968, 20,077 full-time and 3,554 part-time nurse-faculty…

  11. Who Will Teach the Nurses?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaRocco, Susan A.

    2006-01-01

    In 1999, most deans of nursing schools that belonged to the American Association of Colleges of Nursing reported that they did not have a faculty shortage. By 2005, however, 75 percent of U.S. nursing schools cited faculty shortages as the major reason for denying admission to qualified students. The average age of nurse educators holding PhDs is…

  12. Transforming Articulation Barriers in Nursing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waters, Verle

    Barriers to educational mobility for nurses have existed since the mid-1960s. In 1963, the National League for Nursing (NLN) adopted a position that ruled out articulation of any kind between associate degree in nursing (ADN) and bachelors in science in nursing (BSN) programs. In the mid-1970s, a countermovement took shape, supporting open…

  13. Role of the School Nurse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maryland State Dept. of Health and Mental Hygiene, Baltimore.

    These guidelines on Maryland school nursing are based on recommendations of a Maryland committee composed of representatives from state and local health and education agencies, schools of nursing, the Board of Nursing, Maryland State School Health Council, directors of nursing, and a physician. The standards established by the American Nurses…

  14. Reflective writing and nursing education.

    PubMed

    Craft, Melissa

    2005-02-01

    Reflective writing is a valued tool for teaching nursing students and for documentation, support, and generation of nursing knowledge among experienced nurses. Expressive or reflective writing is becoming widely accepted in both professional and lay publications as a mechanism for coping with critical incidents. This article explores reflective writing as a tool for nursing education.

  15. Bladder catheterization, male (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... kept empty (decompressed) and urinary flow assured. The balloon holds the catheter in place for a duration of time. Catheterization in males is slightly more difficult and uncomfortable than in females because of the longer urethra.

  16. Chlamydial infections - male

    MedlinePlus

    ... Have sex without wearing a male or female condom Have more than one sexual partner Use drugs ... to have sexual contact, use latex or polyurethane condoms. Remember to: Use condoms for all vaginal, anal, ...

  17. Male Reproductive System

    MedlinePlus

    ... gamete, the egg or ovum, meet in the female's reproductive system to create a baby. Both the male and female reproductive systems are essential for reproduction. Humans pass certain characteristics ...

  18. Oxidative stress & male infertility.

    PubMed

    Makker, Kartikeya; Agarwal, Ashok; Sharma, Rakesh

    2009-04-01

    The male factor is considered a major contributory factor to infertility. Apart from the conventional causes for male infertility such as varicocoele, cryptorchidism, infections, obstructive lesions, cystic fibrosis, trauma, and tumours, a new and important cause has been identified: oxidative stress. Oxidative stress is a result of the imbalance between reactive oxygen species (ROS) and antioxidants in the body. It is a powerful mechanism that can lead to sperm damage, deformity and eventually, male infertility. This review discusses the physiological need for ROS and their role in normal sperm function. It also highlights the mechanism of production and the pathophysiology of ROS in relation to the male reproductive system and enumerate the benefits of incorporating antioxidants in clinical and experimental settings.

  19. Male Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... hasn't spread beyond your breast tissue. Radiation therapy Radiation therapy uses high-energy beams to kill ... option for men with advanced breast cancer. Hormone therapy Most men with male breast cancer have tumors ...

  20. Nursing and nursing education in Haiti.

    PubMed

    Garfield, Richard M; Berryman, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Haiti has long had the largest proportion of people living in poverty and the highest mortality level of any country in the Americas. On January 12, 2010, the most powerful earthquake to hit Haiti in 200 years struck. Before the earthquake, half of all Haitians lacked any access to modern medical care services. Health care professionals in Haiti number around one-fourth of the world average and about one-tenth the ratio present in North America. The establishment of new primary care services in a country where half of the people had no access to modern health care prior to the earthquake requires advanced practice roles for nurses and midwives. With a high burden of infectious, parasitic, and nutritional conditions, Haiti especially needs mid-level community health workers and nurses who can train and supervise them for public health programs. As in many other developing countries, organized nursing lacks many of the management and planning skills needed to move its agenda forward. The public schools prepare 3-year diploma graduates. These programs have upgraded the curriculum little in decades and have mainly trained for hospital service. Primary care, public health program management, and patient education had often not been stressed. Specializations in midwifery and HIV care exist, while only informal programs of specialization exist in administration, surgery, and pediatrics. An advanced practice role, nonetheless, is not yet well established. Nursing has much to contribute to the recovery of Haiti and the revitalization if its health system. Professional nurses are needed in clinics and hospitals throughout the country to care for patients, including thousands in need of rehabilitation and mental health services. Haitian nursing colleagues in North America have key roles in strengthening their profession. Ways of supporting our Haitian colleagues are detailed.

  1. My Daughter Wants to Be a Nurse: Occupational Stereotyping in Health Textbooks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holcomb, Carol Ann

    1981-01-01

    An evaluation of the illustrations in elementary and secondary education textbooks reveals that: (1) Males dominate occupations illustrated in contemporary health textbooks; and (2) females are generally portrayed as assistants (nurses, technicians, dental hygienists) to males in higher-level roles or in occupations with low levels of power,…

  2. Doctorate in nursing practice: a survey of massachusetts nurses.

    PubMed

    DeMarco, Rosanna F; Pulcini, Joyce; Haggerty, Lois A; Tang, Trinh

    2009-01-01

    Recently, the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) resolved that a new practice degree, the doctorate in nursing practice (DNP), is to become the terminal practice degree and minimum education standard for advanced practice nurses by the year 2015(American Association of Colleges of Nursing. (2004). AACN position statement on the practice doctorate in nursing. Retrieved July 1, 2007, from http://www.aacn.nche.edu.html). The DNP will have a clinical-intensive focus. Advanced practice nurses potentially impacted by this resolution will include nurse practitioners, nurse anesthetists, nurse midwives, and clinical nurse specialists. A task force at the William F. Connell School of Nursing at Boston College conducted an electronic survey in 2006 in an attempt to understand nurses' thoughts about doctoral preparation and the interest of nurses in Massachusetts in pursuing doctoral study. A self-selected group of 376 nurses participated in the study. Nurses identified both positive and negative perceptions related to the degree's viability and practicality, with a majority (55%) preferring the DNP as an educational option.

  3. Nursing student attitudes toward statistics.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Lizy; Aktan, Nadine M

    2014-04-01

    Nursing is guided by evidence-based practice. To understand and apply research to practice, nurses must be knowledgeable in statistics; therefore, it is crucial to promote a positive attitude toward statistics among nursing students. The purpose of this quantitative cross-sectional study was to assess differences in attitudes toward statistics among undergraduate nursing, graduate nursing, and undergraduate non-nursing students. The Survey of Attitudes Toward Statistics Scale-36 (SATS-36) was used to measure student attitudes, with higher scores denoting more positive attitudes. The convenience sample was composed of 175 students from a public university in the northeastern United States. Statistically significant relationships were found among some of the key demographic variables. Graduate nursing students had a significantly lower score on the SATS-36, compared with baccalaureate nursing and non-nursing students. Therefore, an innovative nursing curriculum that incorporates knowledge of student attitudes and key demographic variables may result in favorable outcomes.

  4. Critical care nursing.

    PubMed

    Dracup, K

    1987-01-01

    The research pertaining to the delivery of nursing care in the ICU was reviewed to describe: the impact of the unit structure and organization, including policies and procedures, on patients, nurses, and families; the process of critical care nursing; the outcomes of critical care nursing; some of the ethical issues germane to the care of the critically ill patient. Although these areas of inquiry are quite diverse, a number of similarities can be identified. The most obvious of the similarities was that, with few exceptions, the studies pertaining to delivery of nursing care were performed by researchers from a variety of disciplines other than nursing, including medicine, psychology, public health, and economics. In many instances, such as the studies of patients' stress experiences in ICUs, these efforts enhanced our knowledge of the phenomena and complemented or replicated the efforts of nurse researchers. Unfortunately, in some areas nurse researchers were quite absent, with the result that the studies lacked a nursing perspective. For example, the large body of knowledge related to the effects of critical care on patient outcome reflected medicine's orientation toward cure. While it is important to measure the effect of nursing care in the ICU on patient survival, the effect of nursing efforts on short- and long-term quality of life, functional status, and health maintenance is also critical and remains unknown. Nurse researchers need to build on the data base already acquired about critical care. Even more important, they need to fashion programs of research focused on the concepts central to the discipline of nursing. A second similarity relates to the increasing quality of the reported research over the past decade. In general, early descriptive studies were conducted in a single critical care unit with a small and often biased sample. These gave way to more carefully designed, multicenter studies, although lack of randomization procedures continued to be

  5. The nursing shortage crisis in Québec's McGill University affiliated teaching hospitals: strategies that can work.

    PubMed

    Ferrante, A

    1993-01-01

    A frequently recurring theme expressed in both the professional health literature and other multimedia sources is the current nursing shortage crisis. This shortage is an ever present reality that is of serious concern and that will continue to escalate unless innovative and creative strategies are implemented. This article will specifically address one hospital's approach to the nursing shortage crisis in Québec's McGill University affiliated teaching hospitals. The pivotal issues of retention, recruitment and attraction of nursing as a profession are examined. Recommendations for dealing with these issues include: 1) restructuring nursing salaries, 2) redefining the types of nursing personnel resources, 3) flexibility in work schedule, 4) recognition, 5) providing an accurate public image of nursing, and 6) recruitment of males and mature persons. This article provides nursing administrators in the hospital, community, and educational settings with potential strategies that they can explore and apply in their own settings.

  6. Child maltreatment: every nurse's business.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Julie; Bradbury-Jones, Caroline

    2015-03-18

    Every nurse has a responsibility for protecting children, even nurses who do not work directly with children. However, nurses may be reluctant to deal with child maltreatment issues because they do not want to get things wrong or make a situation worse. The aim of this article is to assist nurses in their child protection role. It describes the different types of child maltreatment, the risk factors and potential consequences. The nurse's role in recognising and responding to suspected child maltreatment is discussed.

  7. Nursing and the next millennium.

    PubMed

    Huch, M H

    1995-01-01

    On March 19, 1993, in Toronto, Canada, at Discovery International, Inc.'s, Biennnial Nurse Theorist Conference, five theorists participated in a panel discussion on: caring as an essence of nursing; the value of continuing to develop nursing theory; what constitutes nursing research; the role of advanced practice nurses. The theorists were Imogene M. King, Madeleine M. Leininger, Rosemarie Rizzo Parse, Hildegard E. Peplau, and Martha E. Rogers. Marlaine C. Smith was the moderator and presented the questions to the panel.

  8. Nursing Practice Environment and Registered Nurses' Job Satisfaction in Nursing Homes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choi, JiSun; Flynn, Linda; Aiken, Linda H.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Recruiting and retaining registered nurses (RNs) in nursing homes is problematic, and little research is available to guide efforts to make nursing homes a more attractive practice environment for RNs. The purpose of this study was to examine relationships between aspects of the nursing practice environment and job satisfaction among RNs…

  9. My Name is Nurse.

    PubMed

    2016-05-01

    : Editor's note: From its first issue in 1900 through to the present day, AJN has unparalleled archives detailing nurses' work and lives over more than a century. These articles not only chronicle nursing's growth as a profession within the context of the events of the day, but they also reveal prevailing societal attitudes about women, health care, and human rights. Today's nursing school curricula rarely include nursing's history, but it's a history worth knowing. To this end, From the AJN Archives offers articles selected to fit today's topics and times.This month's article, from the May 1993 issue, is a tongue-in-cheek editorial by former editor-in-chief Mary B. Mallison. In it, she introduces us to the "PerceptoPhone"-an imaginary device that allows the wearer to access the thoughts of nurses. PerceptoPhones are used to educate hospital trustees on nurses' essential but often invisible abilities: to identify early warning signs of complications; teach and encourage; and carefully assess, soothe, and heal-abilities that are "hard to quantify with usual accounting methods." More than 20 years later, we still look for better ways to teach the public about nursing.

  10. Wanted-nurses. Ethical issues and the nursing shortage.

    PubMed

    Erlen, Judith A

    2004-01-01

    The persistent nursing shortage is challenging the values and beliefs of the nursing profession and causing nurses to ask how they can fulfill their ethical responsibilities to patients when there are an insufficient number and a maldistribution of nurses. Nurses are expressing job dissatisfaction, experiencing moral distress, and wondering about their inability to provide quality patient care. In this article, the author addresses the commitment to care for patients and the ethical dilemma with which nurses are grappling: caring for self versus caring for others. Recommendations for possible action include reenvisioning the profession of nursing, empowering nurses, providing support, and restructuring the work environment. Taken together, these actions have the potential to reduce the moral distress that nurses are experiencing and to enable them to honor their commitment to patient care.

  11. Swedish forensic nursing care: nurses' professional contributions and educational needs.

    PubMed

    Rask, Mikael; Aberg, Jonas

    2002-10-01

    Nurses (registered nurses, RN, and licensed mental nurses, LMN) working in five Swedish forensic psychiatric units filled in a questionnaire designed for general psychiatric nursing, but modified for forensic use. In this report, data regarding how nursing care could contribute to improved care and the organizational changes needed and what knowledge the nurses need, in order to be able to meet the demands in the future, were analysed by means of content analysis. The salient findings were: (i) an interpersonal patient-nurse relationship based on trust, empathy, respect and responsibility for the patients' personal resources and knowledge seems to be the essence of nursing care and a way to improve care; and (ii) the nurses' educational needs emanate from different treatment modalities, how to perform different treatments, how to establish developing relationships and in-service training adapted to the ward-specific problems.

  12. Presentation skills for nurses.

    PubMed

    Foulkes, Mark

    2015-02-20

    This article emphasises the importance of effective presentation skills. Such skills allow nurses to share knowledge and expertise and to communicate clearly in a range of workplace scenarios. Nurses are increasingly being asked to present in formal and informal situations, such as conferences, poster presentations, job interviews, case reports and ward-based teaching. This article explores the principles underpinning the development of these skills, discusses the situations in which they could be applied and demonstrates how nurses might improve and develop as presenters.

  13. Crisis intervention for nurses.

    PubMed

    Chase, Emily

    2013-06-01

    Cancer diagnoses and treatments can be crisis-causing events that overwhelm the usual coping abilities of patients and their families. Oncology nurses constantly are observing and attending to patients' diverse needs, ranging from biomedical to emotional, social, and psychological. Nurses have the chance to be first responders in times of patient crises, as they are in the position to recognize the crisis, respond effectively, and transform the crisis into a pivotal learning experience. This article discusses a way to think about patient and family crises that empowers nurses to respond in a manner appropriate to the cultural context and respectful of the individual space of the patient.

  14. Emotional intelligence and nursing performance among nursing students.

    PubMed

    Beauvais, Audrey M; Brady, Noreen; O'Shea, Eileen R; Griffin, Mary T Quinn

    2011-05-01

    Some scholars have proposed that the educational preparation of nurses can be improved by incorporating emotional intelligence lessons into the nursing curricula. However, the relationship between emotional intelligence and nursing performance in nursing students is unknown. The purpose of the study was to examine this relationship among nursing students. A descriptive correlational design with non-probability sampling methods of 87 nursing students in a university setting was conducted. The variables of focus were emotional intelligence and nursing performance. Emotional intelligence was measured with the Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test (MSCEIT). Nursing performance was measured using the Six Dimension Scale of Nursing Performance (6-D Scale). The sample was predominately Caucasian (91%), female (93%), mean age 24 years. The mean score for emotional intelligence was 0.53, SD ± 0.06 indicating moderate emotional intelligence. The mean score for nursing performance was 3.14, SD ± 0.40 indicating moderate nursing performance. Emotional intelligence was related to nursing performance. Four of the six nursing performance subscale scores were significantly correlated with the total emotional intelligence scores. Implications for nursing education and clinical practice are discussed.

  15. Techniques of male circumcision.

    PubMed

    Abdulwahab-Ahmed, Abdullahi; Mungadi, Ismaila A

    2013-01-01

    Male circumcision is a controversial subject in surgical practice. There are, however, clear surgical indications of this procedure. The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommends newborn male circumcision for its preventive and public health benefits that has been shown to outweigh the risks of newborn male circumcision. Many surgical techniques have been reported. The present review discusses some of these techniques with their merits and drawbacks. This is an attempt to inform the reader on surgical aspects of male circumcision aiding in making appropriate choice of a technique to offer patients. Pubmed search was done with the keywords: Circumcision, technique, complications, and history. Relevant articles on techniques of circumcision were selected for the review. Various methods of circumcision including several devices are in use for male circumcision. These methods can be grouped into three: Shield and clamp, dorsal slit, and excision. The device methods appear favored in the pediatric circumcision while the risk of complications increases with increasing age of the patient at surgery.

  16. Hyperprolactinaemia in male diabetics.

    PubMed Central

    Mooradian, A. D.; Morley, J. E.; Billington, C. J.; Slag, M. F.; Elson, M. K.; Shafer, R. B.

    1985-01-01

    We recently investigated two patients with diabetes and elevated serum prolactin levels in whom no cause of hyperprolactinaemia could be found. For this reason we measured fasting serum prolactin levels in 72 diabetic males and compared the results with those of 63 healthy males and 90 nondiabetic males attending an Impotence Clinic. The diabetic group had significantly higher serum prolactin levels (13.1 +/- 0.9 ng/ml) than the two control groups (9.9 +/- 0.6 ng/ml for normal males and 7.7 +/- 0.3 ng/ml for the non-diabetic impotent group). Eighteen percent of the diabetics studied had serum prolactin levels above the normal range for males (greater than 20 ng/ml). There was no correlation between serum prolactin levels and duration of diabetes, glycosylated haemoglobin level or presence of clinically apparent retinopathy. The correlation between serum prolactin level and fasting plasma glucose was weak though statistically significant (r = 0.26, P less than 0.05). PMID:3991396

  17. The link between nursing discourses and nurses' silence: implications for a knowledge-based discourse for nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Canam, Connie J

    2008-01-01

    Much emphasis has been placed on the importance of nurses' articulating what they do to counteract the invisibility of nursing practice. Yet there has been minimal focus on why nurses are silent. This article explores the link between technical and caring discourses and nurses' silence and suggests an alternative discourse that conceptualizes nursing as a knowledge-driven enterprise that shifts the focus from what nurses do to what nurses know by promoting nurses' practice knowledge as a language for articulating their practice.

  18. Assessment of Male Reproductive Toxicity##

    EPA Science Inventory

    This review covers all aspects of male reproductive toxicology. It begins with an overview of male reproductive biology and then transitions to the considerations of conducting male reproductive toxicology studies. We discuss multigenerational study as proposed in EPAs harmoniz...

  19. Stages of Male Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Male Breast Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information about Male Breast Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Male ...

  20. The impact and perception of nursing certification in pediatric nursing.

    PubMed

    Straka, Kristen L; Ambrose, Heather L; Burkett, Marnie; Capan, Michelle; Flook, Donna; Evangelista, Tonya; Houck, Patty; Lukanski, Amy; Schenkel, Kathleen; Thornton, Michelle

    2014-01-01

    Nursing certification is an assessment and formal recognition of specialized knowledge, and is awarded through achievement of standards identified by a nursing specialty (Niebuhr & Biel, 2007). This recognition is a method of not only assessing competency, but knowledge and skills, and has been linked to an increase in patient satisfaction and nurse retention (Kleinpell, 2009). For these reasons, a heightened focus has been on identifying the value of nursing certification and outcomes related to patient care. This study explored nurse perception of certification and measured response to a high fidelity simulated scenario by certified and non-certified pediatric nurses to a deteriorating patient through simulation and self-assessment.

  1. Administrators: Nursing Home Administrator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahl, Anne

    1976-01-01

    Responsibilities, skills needed, training needed, earnings, employment outlook, and sources of additional information are outlined for the administrator who holds the top management job in a nursing home. (JT)

  2. The future of nursing.

    PubMed

    Moores, Y

    1999-01-01

    The White paper, "The New NHS, Modern-Dependable" has marked a turning point for the National Health Service and Nursing, replacing the internal market with integrated care, and sets out a vision of health service that meets the full range of patients' needs in all care settings. Assuring quality is an underpinning theme of the White paper, with nursing having a vital role in driving this agenda forward. Quality encompasses the environment of care, the professionalism, skill and compassion of staff, the effectiveness of treatments and respect and dignity of patients. This is an exciting time for nursing with many challenges, as the recognition and value for nursing grows. The profession has the ability to rise to these challenges and make a real difference to people's health and well being.

  3. Nursing and spirituality.

    PubMed

    Hussey, Trevor

    2009-04-01

    Those matters that are judged to be spiritual are seen as especially valuable and important. For this reason it is claimed that nurses need to be able to offer spiritual care when appropriate and, to aid them in this, nurse theorists have discussed the nature of spirituality. In a recent debate John Paley has argued that nurses should adopt a naturalistic stance which would enable them to employ the insights of modern science. Barbara Pesut has criticized this thesis, especially as it is applied to palliative care. This paper re-examines this debate with particular attention to the meaning of 'spirituality' and the justification for accepting spiritual and religious theories. It is argued that when we take into consideration the great diversity among religious and spiritual ideas, the lack of rational means of deciding between them when they conflict, and the practicalities of nursing, we find that a spiritual viewpoint is less useful than a naturalistic one, when offering palliative care.

  4. [Nursing care wall planning].

    PubMed

    Moreau, Véronique

    2013-01-01

    Nursing care wall planners are not a tool for assessing workload, but a means of providing coherence and individualised monitoring of care. Its application is focused not only on team organisation, but also on the patient's needs.

  5. Dysthanasia: nursing professionals' perception.

    PubMed

    de Menezes, Milene Barcellos; Selli, Lucilda; de Souza Alves, Joseane

    2009-01-01

    Dysthanasia means slow and painful death without quality of life. This study aimed to know whether nurses identify dysthanasia as part of the final process of the lives of terminal patients hospitalized at an adult ICU. This is an exploratory-qualitative study. Data were collected through semi-structured interviews with ten nurses with at least one year of experience in an ICU, and interpreted through content analysis. Results indicate that nurses understand and identify dysthanasia, do not agree with it and recognize elements of orthonasia as the adequate procedure for terminal patients. We conclude that nurses interpret dysthanasia as extending life with pain and suffering, while terminal patients are submitted to futile treatments that do not benefit them. They also identify dysthanasia using elements of orthonasia to explain it.

  6. The drama of nursing.

    PubMed

    Holmes, C A

    1992-08-01

    This exploratory paper considers a few possibilities for conceiving nursing as a form of aesthetic praxis. More specifically, drawing on the works of Erving Goffman on dramaturgy, and Elizabeth Burns on theatre, it makes some suggestions concerning nursing as a form of dramatic performance, and briefly attempts to relate this to concepts of praxis drawn from the writings of Hannah Arendt and critical social theorists. In contrast to Goffman's dramaturgy, which stresses the artifice of social relations and suggests a cynical view of human interactions, a critical theory of dramatic praxis introduces a normative dimension in which performance may become self-realizing and emancipatory as it aspires to the status of aesthetic praxis. Conceived in such terms, nursing practice becomes a powerful form of self-expression which has the potential to become liberating for the nurse and the patient.

  7. Restructuring registered nurse curricula.

    PubMed

    Hegge, M

    1995-01-01

    National initiatives in higher education, health reform, and the nursing curriculum revolution are applied to five curricular patterns for registered nurse (RN) upward mobility baccalaureate education. American Association of Higher Education principles for quality baccalaureate education are applied to the curricular models. The patterns described are: community model, health promotion model, nursing diagnosis model, case management model, and caring model. Three educational strategies for prompting paradigm shifts in RNs who return to school are discussed: collaborative learning, portfolios, and self-assessments. These learning strategies are designed to move the adult student through Perry's phases of cognitive development from duality to relativism. The combination of fresh new curriculum patterns and collaborative learning strategies can empower nurses to discover new paradigms with which to transform the profession.

  8. [Associationism and nursing].

    PubMed

    Martínez Riera, José Ramón

    2009-01-01

    Author personal reflection on the importance of association in the nurse profession as one of the most important tools of development; also that notices the necessity to use mass media like bridge of connection with the society.

  9. Male Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yalaza, Metin; İnan, Aydın; Bozer, Mikdat

    2016-01-01

    Male breast cancer (MBC) is a rare disease, accounting for less than 1% of all breast cancer diagnoses worldwide. Although breast carcinomas share certain characteristics in both genders, there are notable differences. Most studies on men with breast cancer are very small. Thus, most data on male breast cancer are derived from studies on females. However, when a number of these small studies are grouped together, we can learn more from them. This review emphasizes the incidence, etiology, clinical features, diagnosis, treatment, pathology, survival, and prognostic factors related to MBC.

  10. Practice of preventive dentistry for nursing staff in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Acuña-Reyes, Raquel; Cigarroa-Martínez, Didier; Ureña-Bogarín, Enrique; Orgaz-Fernández, Jose David

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Determine the domain of preventive dentistry in nursing personnel assigned to a primary care unit. Methods: Prospective descriptive study, questionnaire validation, and prevalence study. In the first stage, the questionnaire for the practice of preventive dentistry (CPEP, for the term in Spanish) was validated; consistency and reliability were measured by Cronbach's alpha, Pearson's correlation, factor analysis with intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC). In the second stage, the domain in preventive dental nurses was explored. Results: The overall internal consistency of CPEP is α= 0.66, ICC= 0.64, CI95%: 0.29-0.87 (p >0.01). Twenty-one subjects in the study, average age 43, 81.0% female, average seniority of 12.5 were included. A total of 71.5% showed weak domain, 28.5% regular domain, and there was no questionnaire with good domain result. The older the subjects were, the smaller the domain; female nurses showed greater mastery of preventive dentistry (29%, CI95%: 0.1-15.1) than male nurses. Public health nurses showed greater mastery with respect to other categories (50%, CI95%: 0.56-2.8). Conclusions: The CDEP has enough consistency to explore the domain of preventive dentistry in health-care staff. The domain of preventive dentistry in primary care nursing is poor, required to strengthen to provide education in preventive dentistry to the insured population. PMID:25386037

  11. Social responsibility of nursing: a global perspective.

    PubMed

    Tyer-Viola, Lynda; Nicholas, Patrice K; Corless, Inge B; Barry, Donna M; Hoyt, Pamela; Fitzpatrick, Joyce J; Davis, Sheila M

    2009-05-01

    This study addresses social responsibility in the discipline of nursing and implications for global health. The concept of social responsibility is explicated and its relevance for nursing is examined, grounded in the American Nurses Association Code of Ethics and the International Council of Nurses Code of Ethics. Social justice, human rights, nurse migration, and approaches to nursing education are discussed within the framework of nursing's social responsibility. Strategies for addressing nursing workforce issues and education within a framework of social responsibility are explored.

  12. Perception of nursing students towards internship.

    PubMed

    Suresh, Hema

    2012-04-01

    The study, undertaken to assess the perception of students regarding integrated internship in the preparation of staff nurse position among the BSc (N) final year undergraduate students included 43 students (21, 47% female and 22, 53% male) in the hospital setting of Chennai (TN). Majority of students (96%) perceived that there was significant enrichment in preparation in the three aspects: knowledge, skill and attitude and that due to their learning in the internship period, they would confidently function independently in the ward in discharge of their duties.

  13. [Nursing care in prison].

    PubMed

    Aujard, Ségolène; de Brisoult, Béatrice; Broussard, Daniel; Petitclerc-Roche, Solenne; Lefort, Hugues

    2016-03-01

    In France, nurses practising in the prison environment work in a health care unit, for somatic care, or in a regional medical-psychological unit for large facilities and psychological care. These units belong to the regional hospitals. Located at the heart of the prison, they cater for prisoner-patients. On the frontline, the nurse has specific autonomy and responsibility in this unique context.

  14. Handbook of clinical nursing practice

    SciTech Connect

    Asheervath, J.; Blevins, D.R.

    1986-01-01

    Written in outline format, this reference will help nurses further their understanding of advanced nursing procedures. Information is provided on the physiological, psychological, environmental, and safety considerations of nursing activities associated with diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. Special consideration is given to the areas of pediatric nursing, nursing assessment, and selected radiologic and nuclear medicine procedures for each system. Contents: Clinical Introduction. Clinical Nursing Practice: Focus on Basics. Focus on Cardiovascular Function. Focus on Respiratory Function. Focus on Gastrointestinal Function. Focus on Renal and Genito-Urological Function. Focus on Neuro-Skeletal and Muscular Function. Appendices.

  15. Nursing research methodology: transcending Cartesianism.

    PubMed

    Walters, A J

    1996-06-01

    Nurses involved in research are concerned with methodological issues. This paper explores the Cartesian debate that has polarized the discourse on nursing research methodology. It is argued that methodologies exclusively based on objectivism, one pole of the Cartesian debate, or subjectivism, the other, do not provide nurses with adequate research foundations to understand the complexity of the lifeworld of nursing practice. This paper provides nurse researchers with an alternative methodological perspective, Gadamerian hermeneutics, which is in harmony with the clinical world of nursing practice.

  16. Nurse administrators: leading environmental change.

    PubMed

    Tullai-McGuinness, Susan; Ballard, Karen A; Gallagher, Rita Munley; Carpenter, Holly

    2010-01-01

    Evidence is building about the impact of environmental contaminants on patients and health care providers. The nurse administrator has a professional responsibility to provide leadership in assuring that the health care organization does not have a negative impact on health. This article presents critical environmental health concerns and an overview of the nursing profession efforts to improve the environment, which includes development of the American Nurses Association's Principles of Environmental Health for Nursing Practice with Implementation Strategies. An example is provided as to how the nurse administrator can use Appreciative Inquiry to harness the nurses collaborative energy for an environmentally healthy organization.

  17. Sickening nurses: fever nursing, nurses' illness, and the anatomy of blame, New Zealand 1903-1923.

    PubMed

    Wood, Pamela J

    2011-01-01

    In the early twentieth century, patients with infectious fevers represented a danger to the health of others including their nurses. This research describes the training New Zealand nurses received in fever nursing during the period 1903-1923, and considers how they applied hospital cross-infection principles in emergency tent fever camps in remote rural areas. It examines the reaction of nurses, hospital boards, and physicians to nurses who succumbed with their patients' fevers. It therefore reveals attitudes to nurses, prevailing ideas about responsibility for nurses' health, and elements in the emerging professional culture of nursing. Although some measures protected them against epidemic fevers, nurses were held responsible for their own health. A complex anatomy of blame is evident against those who sickened; the nature of the blame shifted, depending on the observer, disease, and practice setting. Physicians blamed nurses, especially when they sickened with typhoid fever. The country's chief nurse and other nurses blamed those who jeopardized their health through ill-spent leisure time. Sick nurses could be absolved from blame for the lax discipline evident through their failure to observe cross-infection principles if their practice setting was the fever camp. Willingness to work in difficult circumstances showed they embodied the ideal of sacrifice that, like discipline, was part of the emerging nursing culture.

  18. Quantifying male attractiveness.

    PubMed Central

    McNamara, John M; Houston, Alasdair I; Marques Dos Santos, Miguel; Kokko, Hanna; Brooks, Rob

    2003-01-01

    Genetic models of sexual selection are concerned with a dynamic process in which female preference and male trait values coevolve. We present a rigorous method for characterizing evolutionary endpoints of this process in phenotypic terms. In our phenotypic characterization the mate-choice strategy of female population members determines how attractive females should find each male, and a population is evolutionarily stable if population members are actually behaving in this way. This provides a justification of phenotypic explanations of sexual selection and the insights into sexual selection that they provide. Furthermore, the phenotypic approach also has enormous advantages over a genetic approach when computing evolutionarily stable mate-choice strategies, especially when strategies are allowed to be complex time-dependent preference rules. For simplicity and clarity our analysis deals with haploid mate-choice genetics and a male trait that is inherited phenotypically, for example by vertical cultural transmission. The method is, however, easily extendible to other cases. An example illustrates that the sexy son phenomenon can occur when there is phenotypic inheritance of the male trait. PMID:14561306

  19. Eating Disordered Adolescent Males.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eliot, Alexandra O.; Baker, Christina Wood

    2001-01-01

    Described a sample of eating disordered adolescent males who were seen for treatment at Boston Children's Hospital Outpatient Eating Disorders Clinic. Findings suggest the idea that clinicians, coaches, peers, and family should encourage young men to share concerns about body image and weight at an earlier, less severe juncture, with the assurance…

  20. Lycopene and male infertility

    PubMed Central

    Durairajanayagam, Damayanthi; Agarwal, Ashok; Ong, Chloe; Prashast, Pallavi

    2014-01-01

    Excessive amounts of reactive oxygen species (ROS) cause a state of oxidative stress, which result in sperm membrane lipid peroxidation, DNA damage and apoptosis, leading to decreased sperm viability and motility. Elevated levels of ROS are a major cause of idiopathic male factor infertility, which is an increasingly common problem today. Lycopene, the most potent singlet oxygen quencher of all carotenoids, is a possible treatment option for male infertility because of its antioxidant properties. By reacting with and neutralizing free radicals, lycopene could reduce the incidence of oxidative stress and thus, lessen the damage that would otherwise be inflicted on spermatozoa. It is postulated that lycopene may have other beneficial effects via nonoxidative mechanisms in the testis, such as gap junction communication, modulation of gene expression, regulation of the cell cycle and immunoenhancement. Various lycopene supplementation studies conducted on both humans and animals have shown promising results in alleviating male infertility—lipid peroxidation and DNA damage were decreased, while sperm count and viability, and general immunity were increased. Improvement of these parameters indicates a reduction in oxidative stress, and thus the spermatozoa is less vulnerable to oxidative damage, which increases the chances of a normal sperm fertilizing the egg. Human trials have reported improvement in sperm parameters and pregnancy rates with supplementation of 4–8 mg of lycopene daily for 3–12 months. However, further detailed and extensive research is still required to determine the dosage and the usefulness of lycopene as a treatment for male infertility. PMID:24675655

  1. Minority Male Afterschool Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dalton, Herbert F., Jr.

    Through a program called the Minority Male Afterschool Program (MMAP), college students at Mississippi Valley State University in Itta Bena (Mississippi) are working one-on-one with high school students. The MMAP is an enrichment program that encourages at-risk African American students aged 12 to 19 to complete high school and pursue…

  2. Male breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Reis, Leonardo Oliveira; Dias, Fernando Gf; Castro, Marcos As; Ferreira, Ubirajara

    2011-06-01

    Male breast cancer (MBC) is a rare disease. However, as global populace ages, there is a trend to MBC increasing. Although aetiology is still unclear, constitutional, environmental, hormonal (abnormalities in estrogen/androgen balance) and genetic (positive family history, Klinefelter syndrome, mutations in BRCA1 and specially BRCA2) risk factors are already known. Clinic manifestation is painless hard and fixed nodule in the subareolar region in 75% of cases, with nipple commitment earlier than in women. Breast cancer has similar prognostic factors in males and females, among which axillary adenopathy (present in 40-55% cases) is the most important one. Although mammography, ultrasonography and scintigraphy can be useful tools in diagnosis; clinical assessment, along with a confirmatory biopsy, remains the main step in the evaluation of men with breast lesions. Infiltrating ductal carcinoma is the most frequent histological type. The established standard of care is modified radical mastectomy followed by tamoxifen for endocrine-responsive positive disease, although other options are being explored. While similarities between breast cancer in males and females exist, it is not appropriate to extrapolate data from female disease to the treatment of male. There is a need for specific multi-institutional trials to better understanding of clinicopathologic features and establishment of optimal therapy for this disease.

  3. Understanding African American Males

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Edward Earl

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the socialization skills, self-esteem, and academic readiness of African American males in a school environment. Discussions with students and the School Perceptions Questionnaire provided data for this investigation. The intended targets for this investigation were African American students; however, there…

  4. Educating African American Males

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Edward E.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Schools across America spend money, invest in programs, and sponsor workshops, offer teacher incentives, raise accountability standards, and even evoke the name of Obama in efforts to raise the academic achievement of African American males. Incarceration and college retention rates point to a dismal plight for many African American…

  5. Male rat sexual behavior.

    PubMed

    Agmo, A

    1997-05-01

    The male rat's sexual behavior constitutes a highly ordered sequence of motor acts involving both striate and smooth muscles. It is spontaneously displayed by most adult made rats in the presence of a sexually receptive female. Although the behavior is important for the survival of the species it is not necessary for survival of the individual. In that way it is different from other spontaneous behaviors such as eating, drinking, avoidance of pain, respiration or thermoregulation. Among other things, this means that it is difficult to talk about sexual deprivation or need. Nevertheless, studies of male sex behavior distinguish sexual motivation (the ease by which behavior is activated, "libido") from the execution of copulatory acts (performance, "potency") (Meisel, R.L. and Sachs, B.D., The physiology of male sexual behavior. In: E. Knobil and J.D. Neill (Eds.), The Physiology of Reproduction, 2nd Edn., Vol. 2, Raven Press, New York, 1994, pp. 3-105 [13]). The hormonal control of male sexual behavior has been extensively studied. It is clear that steroid hormones, androgens and estrogens, act within the central nervous system, modifying neuronal excitability. The exact mechanism by which these hormones activate sex behavior remains largely unknown. However, there exists a considerable amount of knowledge concerning the brain structures important for sexual motivation and for the execution of sex behavior. The modulatory role of some non-steroid hormones is partly known, as well as the consequences of manipulations of several neurotransmitter systems.

  6. Empowering Young Black Males

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kafele, Baruti K.

    2012-01-01

    Of all the challenges we face in education today, the author can think of none greater than the challenge of motivating, educating, and empowering black male learners. The fact that this group of students is in crisis is evident on multiple levels, starting with graduation rates. According to the Schott Foundation (2008), the U.S. high school…

  7. Doctoral education for WOC nurses considering advanced practice nursing.

    PubMed

    Pieper, Barbara; Colwell, Janice

    2012-01-01

    Advanced practice nursing education is at a crossroads. Societal changes, increased health care demands, and leadership nursing organizations have identified the need of a doctor of nursing practice (DNP) degree as the advanced practice degree. WOC nurses need to examine DNP programs when considering returning for an advanced practice degree. This article explores nursing education at the doctorate level and areas the WOC nurse should consider when making a decision about attending a program. The WOC nurse needs to understand the similarities and differences of the doctor of philosophy and the DNP, issues about each program and its completion, personal factors, and the application process. Although selecting a doctoral program is a daunting experience, the education will provide opportunities for the WOC nurse to excel as a scholar, thus influencing the profession and the practice.

  8. Rewards in Nursing: The Case of Nurse Preceptors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turnbull, Ellie

    1983-01-01

    Using nursing preceptorship programs as an example, the author illustrates how nursing administrators can develop and implement specific reward mechanisms that increase role satisfaction for preceptors and benefit both the service and the institution. (Author/SK)

  9. Religion and Gender in a Men’s Hospital and School of Nursing, 1866–1969

    PubMed Central

    Wall, Barbra Mann

    2009-01-01

    Objectives This article explores religious beliefs, practices, and representations of the Alexian Brothers, a religious order of Catholic nursing brothers, and the role of gender in this discourse. Background Nursing in the United States developed within a cultural framework of caring as part of women’s roles in families and communities. Yet, a study of the Alexian Brothers challenges the dominance of the “female” in most gender analyses of nursing. Methods Historical methodology is used to evaluate and interpret data within the broader framework of historiographical literature on gender, religion, and nursing. In analyzing nursing, religion, and gender, attention has been paid to representations, mainly of women, through photographs and written literature. In this article, the same sources are used for men. Results The story of the Alexian Brothers and the men they educated is a testament to the power of gender and religion in nursing history. These men carved out a system of caring that recognized it as a responsibility not only of women but also of men. As they asserted that their paid work was a Christian calling, they renegotiated dominant notions of masculinity. In doing so, male nurses navigated among an array of representations, from nurse, to school administrator, to military soldier, to religious person, to professional practitioner of scientific medicine. These self-representations in the masculine spaces of the hospital and nursing school were designed to debunk stereotypes of feminine men, and they challenged traditional spatial boundaries. PMID:19448519

  10. Nursing in Malawi: nursing theory in the movement to professionalize nursing.

    PubMed

    Bultemeier, Kaye I

    2012-04-01

    Nursing in Malawi has been predominately a technical trade and only recently has begun the transition to a profession with autonomy and advanced degree preparation. Nursing theories provide a framework for the evolution of nursing to an independent profession. Theories provide a means for the articulation of the nursing role to other members of the healthcare team including consumers. Healthcare and human needs are basic and the guidance provided by nursing theories, including Nightingale's, gives language and structure to the education of nurses as the profession moves into advanced practice in a developing country.

  11. Nursing information systems: applications in nursing curricula.

    PubMed

    Poirrier, G P; Wills, E M; Broussard, P C; Payne, R L

    1996-01-01

    America's healthcare system is being transformed to meet a new set of priorities: cost-effectiveness, quality, and access. To meet these priorities, health practitioners of the 21st century will rely heavily on computer information systems to provide complete, easily accessed patient data. Incorporation of this technology in nursing programs will enhance the quality of the graduates who will then strengthen the availability of a qualified work force to employers.

  12. Nursing Home Staffing Standards: Their Relationship to Nurse Staffing Levels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mueller, Christine; Arling, Greg; Kane, Robert; Bershadsky, Julie; Holland, Diane; Joy, Annika

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: This study reviews staffing standards from the 50 states and the District of Columbia to determine if these standards are related to nursing home staffing levels. Design and Methods: Rules and regulations for states' nursing home staffing standards were obtained for the 50 states and the District of Columbia. Nurse staffing data were…

  13. Clinical Nursing Knowledge Research; Implications for Nursing Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diekelmann, Nancy L.; And Others

    A new way to view the nursing curriculum is presented based on Heideggerian phenomenology and clinical nursing knowledge research. A restructuring of the nursing curriculum based on this approach allows researchers to generate new research questions and has implications for alternative curricular and instructional practices. In addition, this…

  14. Health Instruction Packages: Humanistic Nursing--Nurse/Patient Relations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carpenter, Wanda L.; And Others

    Text, illustrations, and exercises are utilized in this set of four learning modules to instruct nurses and nursing students in humanistic, non-technical aspects of patient care. The first module, "Introduction to Humanistic Nursing Practice Theory" by Wanda L. Carpenter, draws upon the theories of existentialism and phenomenology to…

  15. Infusing gerontological nursing content into advanced practice nursing education.

    PubMed

    Kohlenberg, Eileen; Kennedy-Malone, Laurie; Crane, Patricia; Letvak, Susan

    2007-01-01

    The inclusion of gerontology content in the nursing curriculum is paramount as our population of older adults grows. As one of 10 recipients of the John A. Hartford Foundation/AACN awards for Enhancing Gerontological and Geriatric Nursing Education for Advanced Practice Nursing Programs, we successfully integrated gerontological/ geriatric content throughout core courses for all concentrations taught at the master's level. The Nurse Practitioner and Clinical Nurse Specialist Competencies for Older Adult Care were used as a guide to integrate gerontological nursing content across the core courses. We present examples of content, strategies, and evaluation methods that demonstrate infusion of gerontology in a nursing theory course, research course, and healthcare law and policy course. Twenty-two of the competencies are addressed in these core courses and provide a foundation for further development in the support and specialty courses for the nurse practitioner, clinical nurse specialist, nursing administrator, nurse educator, and nurse anesthetist. We also present helpful Web-based resources for older adult care.

  16. The impact of the 9-21 earthquake experiences of Taiwanese nurses as rescuers.

    PubMed

    Shih, Fu-Jin; Liao, Yen-Chi; Chan, Shiu-Mei; Duh, Bau-Ruei; Gau, Meei-Ling

    2002-08-01

    The powerful earthquake of September 21, 1999 wrought incalculable havoc on lives and properties in Taiwan. Although the scars of the earthquake can never be erased, the calamity can lead to a more full understanding of the experiences, perceptions and reflections of nurses involved directly in post-rescue situations. The purpose of this study was to compare the impacts of rescue experiences on Taiwanese female and male nurses who worked as rescuers following the earthquake of 21 September. A purposive sample of 46 nurses (40 women, 6 men) (mean age 26) who worked in a renowned hospital with a reputation for high quality of emergency care in Northern Taiwan was obtained. Data were collected by in-depth semi-structured interviews and analyzed by a unique mode of between-method triangulation. The majority of the subjects (38 female, 6 male) reported various impacts from their rescue experiences. They are: (a) recognition of the impermanence of life and wishing to lead a more significant life (32 female, 3 male); (b) more caring relationships with others and for their homeland (19 female, 5 male); (c) a clearer concept of disaster care (19 female, 4 male); (d) a better appreciation of the value of nursing and their own self-worth (11 female, 3 male); (e) enhanced knowledge of the survivors' needs (3 female); and (f) enhanced ability to identify the factors hindering rescue operations (1 female, 2 male). However, one female nurse complained of having been bothered by feelings of fear of earthquake disasters resulting from her rescue experience. Rescue experiences help to strengthen most Taiwanese nurses' professional competency, reinforce their commitment to nursing, and lead them to have positive life goals. The relative weight of the impacts for male and female nurses were somewhat different. The vulnerability of nurses, which was manifested in the post-rescue stage, requires attention and long-term follow-up. A comprehensive and organized pre-rescue training program

  17. Comparable Worth: Implications for Nursing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bellocq, Jeanne A.

    1985-01-01

    A historical overview of the doctrine of equal pay for comparable worth is provided, related cases and legislation involving nurses and nonnurses are analyzed, and the implications of comparable worth for the nursing profession are discussed. (MSE)

  18. Nurse! What's Taking So Long?

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_164577.html Nurse! What's Taking So Long? Study at a children's ... in a child's hospital room, anxious parents expect nurses to respond pronto. That rarely happens, however, and ...

  19. American Association of Nurse Anesthetists

    MedlinePlus

    ... us in Seattle on Sept. 8-12 for nurse anesthesia's premier educational, professional, and social event! Register ... on health policy research that will validate the nurse anesthesia profession and advance patient safety. 150 AANA ...

  20. Nursing and health in Russia.

    PubMed

    1998-01-01

    There are over one million nurses in Russia, and they work in a crippled healthcare system facing a dramatic increase in infectious diseases. But nurses are valiantly coping with the country's health crisis and becoming a recognized profession.

  1. Nursing malpractice: cause for consideration.

    PubMed

    Fiesta, J

    1999-02-01

    Because so many factors influence a patient's health, it's difficult to know with certainty that a nurse's error actually caused the negative outcome. In nursing malpractice cases, causation can be a successful defense strategy.

  2. Gilligan: a voice for nursing?

    PubMed Central

    Harbison, J

    1992-01-01

    The current reform of nursing education is resulting in major changes in the curricula of colleges of nursing. For the first time, ethical and moral issues are being seen as an important theme underpinning the entire course. The moral theorist with whose work most nurse teachers are acquainted is Kohlberg. In this paper, it is suggested that his work, and the conventions of morality which he exemplifies, may not be the most appropriate from which to address the moral issues facing the nurse. The author suggests that the work of Carol Gilligan of Harvard university is of great significance, not only for nurses involved in the teaching of ethics, but for all nurses. Gilligan's emphasis on caring and relationships accords with the common experience of the nurse, and echoes the current revival of interest within nursing in examining, and valuing, the phenomenon of caring. PMID:1460649

  3. Applying talent management to nursing.

    PubMed

    Haines, Sue

    To deliver the chief nursing officer for England's vision for compassionate care and embed the 6Cs effectively, the NHS must attract, develop and retain talented nurses with a diverse range of skills. This is particularly important given the predicted shortage of nurses and evidence that NHS providers need to increase skill mix ratios to deliver safe patient care. "Talent management" is increasingly discussed within the health service; we recently asked nurses and student nurses to identify their priorities for talent development. They highlighted the importance of strong ward leadership, effective personal appraisal, clearer career pathways, increased staff engagement and involvement in decision making, as well as a need for greater emphasis on the recognition and reward of nursing achievements. We concluded that these factors are crucial to attracting, retaining and developing talent in nursing. Nurse leaders can learn approaches to developing talent from business and wider healthcare settings.

  4. National Institute of Nursing Research

    MedlinePlus

    ... Life Care in the ICU Because of Nursing Research: Supporting Technologies for Healthy Independent Living Genomic Science For the ... Life Care in the ICU Because of Nursing Research: Supporting Technologies for Healthy Independent Living Genomic Science For the ...

  5. A Curriculum Framework for Nursing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webber, Pamela Bayliss

    2002-01-01

    Presents a framework for nursing curricula based on five conceptual cornerstones: nursing knowledge, skills, values, meanings, and experience. Outlines desired outcomes for each cornerstone for associate, bachelor's and master's degree programs. (Contains 47 references.) (SK)

  6. A State Nurses' Association Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyer, Cheryl M.

    1983-01-01

    Discusses the accreditation and evolution of continuing education programs developed by state nurses' associations and other nursing organizations and the value of the accreditation. Also relates current accreditation system to the future of professional continuing education. (JOW)

  7. Rapid intervention and treatment zone: redesigning nursing services to meet increasing emergency department demand.

    PubMed

    Considine, Julie; Lucas, Elspeth; Martin, Roslyn; Stergiou, Helen E; Kropman, Matthew; Chiu, Herman

    2012-02-01

    The impact of emergency nursing roles in demand management systems is poorly understood. The aim of this study was to evaluate emergency nurses' role in a specific emergency department (ED) demand management system: rapid intervention and treatment zone (RITZ). A descriptive exploratory approach was used. Data were collected from audit of 193 randomly selected patient records and 12 h of clinical practice observation. The median age of participants was 31 years, 51.8% were males and 99.5% were discharged home. Nurse qualifications or seniority had no significant effect on waiting time or length of stay (LOS). There were disparities between documented and observed nursing practice. The designation and qualifications of RITZ nurses made little difference to waiting times and ED LOS. Specific documentation and communication systems for areas of the ED that manage large numbers of low complexity patients warrant further research.

  8. Male Zuska's disease.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Shepard P; Kaoutzanis, Christodoulos; Schaub, George A

    2014-04-04

    Subareolar abscess of the male breast is a rare condition, which can be complicated by a fistula from the areolar skin into a lactiferous duct. In 1951, Zuska et al first characterised this entity in women. Literature on mammillary fistulas in men is scarce and therefore standardisation of treatment does not exist. We present two cases of recurrent subareolar abscesses with draining fistulas. Both patients were successfully treated by complete excision of the lactiferous duct fistula, and continue to do well with no evidence of disease recurrence. When male patients present with a draining subareolar abscess, one should have a high index of suspicion for a mammillary fistula. Failure to identify and surgically excise the fistula may lead to recurrence of the abscess and prolonged morbidity. The most effective management of this uncommon entity includes complete excision of the lactiferous duct fistula.

  9. Newborn male circumcision

    PubMed Central

    Sorokan, S Todd; Finlay, Jane C; Jefferies, Ann L

    2015-01-01

    The circumcision of newborn males in Canada has become a less frequent practice over the past few decades. This change has been significantly influenced by past recommendations from the Canadian Paediatric Society and the American Academy of Pediatrics, who both affirmed that the procedure was not medically indicated. Recent evidence suggesting the potential benefit of circumcision in preventing urinary tract infection and some sexually transmitted infections, including HIV, has prompted the Canadian Paediatric Society to review the current medical literature in this regard. While there may be a benefit for some boys in high-risk populations and circumstances where the procedure could be considered for disease reduction or treatment, the Canadian Paediatric Society does not recommend the routine circumcision of every newborn male. PMID:26435672

  10. Male Genital Lichen Sclerosus

    PubMed Central

    Bunker, Christopher Barry; Shim, Tang Ngee

    2015-01-01

    Male genital lichen sclerosus (MGLSc) is a chronic inflammatory skin disease responsible for male sexual dyspareunia and urological morbidity. An afeared complication is squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the penis. The precise etiopathogenesis of MGLSc remains controversial although genetic, autoimmune and infective (such as human papillomavirus (HPV) hepatitis C (HCV), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and Borrelia) factors have been implicated: Consideration of all the evidence suggests that chronic exposure of susceptible epithelium to urinary occlusion by the foreskin seems the most likely pathomechanism. The mainstay of treatment is topical ultrapotent corticosteroid therapy. Surgery is indicated for cases unresponsive to topical corticosteroid therapy, phimosis, meatal stenosis, urethral stricture, carcinoma in situ (CIS) and squamous cell carcinoma. PMID:25814697

  11. Engaging nurses in research utilization.

    PubMed

    Wintersgill, Wendy; Wheeler, Erlinda C

    2012-01-01

    Research skills education is needed for nurses at all levels: novice, intermediate, and advanced. Nurse educators can help novice nurse researchers develop skills such as performing literature searches and critiquing research articles, which are necessary to develop and update clinical practice guidelines and implement evidence-based practice. The purpose of this article is to describe an innovative approach to encourage nurses to perform literature searches and critique research articles as a means to eventually engage in evidence-based practice.

  12. Development management for nursing administration.

    PubMed

    Heyden, R; Luyas, G; Henry, B

    1990-04-01

    What are the needs of a nurse administrator in a developing country? For that matter, what are the requirements for a nurse administrator in areas of lesser developed delivery in this country (e.g., care of the homeless, care of indigent populations)? Heyden, Luyas, and Henry look at the educational needs of these nurse managers and compare the needs to the typical education received in nursing administration programs.

  13. [Guidelines for nursing methodology implantation].

    PubMed

    Alberdi Castell, Rosamaría; Artigas Lelong, Berta; Cuxart Ainaud, Núria; Agüera Ponce, Ana

    2003-09-01

    The authors introduce three guidelines as part of the process to implant the nursing methodology based on the Virginia Henderson Conceptual Model; they propose to help nurses adopt the aforementioned method in their daily practice. These three guidelines shall be published in successive articles: Guidelines to identify attitudes and aptitudes related to the nursing profession; Guidelines to implant the nursing methodology based on the Virginia Henderson Conceptual Model; and Guidelines to plan areas for improvement.

  14. Nursing homes in China.

    PubMed

    Chu, Leung-Wing; Chi, Iris

    2008-05-01

    China will face a dramatic transition from a young to an aged society in the coming 30 to 40 years. In 2000, there were 88,110,000 persons aged 65 years and older, which represented 7% of the population. This percentage is projected to increase to 23% in 2050. Regarding health and long-term care for older adults, the current challenge is to build a comprehensive system of care for older adults. Nursing home care is an inevitable care model for frail older adults in China, which is largely sponsored by the government of China with contributions from some nongovernment organizations and private investors. China is a large country. Within the country, long-term care varies greatly between rural and urban areas, and among the different economic developing areas. In urban and better-developed areas, the range of services exists; however, in rural and less-developed areas, the range of services is limited. The "Star Light Program" and "Beloved Care Engineering" were recent government initiatives to improve aged care. They were launched in 2001 and have dramatically increased the number of both senior centers and nursing homes for older adults. While the quantity of nursing homes is still inadequate with an additional mismatch problem between the supply and demand, the quality of care in most nursing homes is suboptimal. At present, most administrative and frontline workers in nursing homes have received little training in elder care. There is a need for good-quality structured training in long-term care for all types of staff. Moreover, quality standard for care, including standard setting, assessment, and monitoring, is an important issue and needs substantial improvement for nursing homes in China. Currently, 1.5% of older people live in nursing homes and apartments for older people. Because of the peculiar 4-2-1 family structure in China, we expect the prevalence of nursing home placement of older adults will increase in the coming years. The government of China has

  15. Male only Systemic Lupus

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Rachna; Namjou, Bahram; Li, Shibo; D'Souza, Anil; Tsao, Betty P; Bruner, Ben; James, Judith A.; Scofield, R. Hal

    2010-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is more common among women than men with a ratio of about 10 to 1. We undertook this study to describe familial male SLE within a large cohort of familial SLE. SLE families (two or more patients) were obtained from the Lupus Multiplex Registry and Repository. Genomic DNA and blood samples were obtained using standard methods. Autoantibodies were determined by multiple methods. Medical records were abstracted for SLE clinical data. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) was performed with X and Y centromere specific probes, and a probe specific for the toll-like receptor 7 gene on the X chromosome. Among 523 SLE families, we found five families in which all the SLE patients were male. FISH found no yaa gene equivalent in these families. SLE-unaffected primary female relatives from the five families with only-male SLE patients had a statistically increased rate of positive ANA compared to SLE-unaffected female relatives in other families. White men with SLE were 5 times more likely to have an offspring with SLE than were White women with SLE but there was no difference in this likelihood among Black men. These data suggest genetic susceptibility factors that act only in men. PMID:20472921

  16. Adolescent male health

    PubMed Central

    Westwood, Michael; Pinzon, Jorge

    2008-01-01

    Although adolescent males have as many health issues and concerns as adolescent females, they are much less likely to be seen in a clinical setting. This is related to both individual factors and the health care system itself, which is not always encouraging and set up to provide comprehensive male health care. Working with adolescent boys involves gaining the knowledge and skills to address concerns such as puberty and sexuality, substance use, violence, risk-taking behaviours and mental health issues. The ability to engage the young male patient is critical, and the professional must be comfortable in initiating conversation about a wide array of topics with the teen boy, who may be reluctant to discuss his concerns. It is important to take every opportunity with adolescent boys to talk about issues beyond the presenting complain, and let them know about confidential care. The physician can educate teens about the importance of regular checkups, and that they are welcome to contact the physician if they are experiencing any concerns about their health or well-being. Parents of preadolescent and adolescent boys should be educated on the value of regular health maintenance visits for their sons beginning in their early teen years. PMID:19119350

  17. Melatonin and male reproduction.

    PubMed

    Li, Chunjin; Zhou, Xu

    2015-06-15

    Melatonin is a neurohormone secreted by the pineal gland whose concentrations in the body are regulated by both the dark-light and seasonal cycles. The reproductive function of seasonal breeding animals is clearly influenced by the circadian variation in melatonin levels. Moreover, a growing body of evidence indicates that melatonin has important effects in the reproduction of some non-seasonal breeding animals. In males, melatonin affects reproductive regulation in three main ways. First, it regulates the secretion of two key neurohormones, GnRH and LH. Second, it regulates testosterone synthesis and testicular maturation. Third, as a potent free radical scavenger that is both lipophilic and hydrophilic, it prevents testicular damage caused by environmental toxins or inflammation. This review summarizes the existing data on the possible biological roles of melatonin in male reproduction. Overall, the literature data indicate that melatonin affects the secretion of both gonadotropins and testosterone while also improving sperm quality. This implies that it has important effects on the regulation of testicular development and male reproduction.

  18. Rural nurses. Part II, Surviving the nurse shortage.

    PubMed

    Fuszard, B; Slocum, L I; Wiggers, D E

    1990-05-01

    Cost containment and the nurse shortage have impacted rural hospitals and their nursing staffs. This impact did not appreciably affect burnout levels among the rural nurses, but did evidence itself in the reports of the directors of nursing and their nurses. Cost containment brought with it layoffs of colleagues in the work setting who were neighbors or relatives. This occurred while the rural areas were already filled with the unemployed and underemployed. Unfamiliar recordkeeping increased two- and three-fold, and the 23-hour admit caused unequal work flow. Downsizing, elimination of some services and reports of rural hospital closings were threatening to the nurses, who were often the sole support of their families. The rural nurse shortage was seen to be different from the national nurse shortage in significant ways. Except for the few study hospitals that were close to population centers, nurses could not be recruited from outside the geographic area. Suggestions from the Secretary's Commission on Nursing are not all appropriate for the rural hospital nurse shortage. Rural hospitals changed in the face of cost containment, and nursing personnel also worked to contain costs. However the nurses have worked within cost and salary constraints for so long that they predict loyalty to their community hospitals can be coming to an end. The nurse shortage is being approached by minor alterations in staffing and mode of care delivery. Federal support is desperately needed by the rural hospitals to permit equitable salaries, and to support financial aid to permanent residents of the rural areas for entrance into or advancement in nursing education.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. Husserl, phenomenology and nursing.

    PubMed

    Paley, J

    1997-07-01

    Discussions of phenomenological research in nursing consistently appeal to either Husserl or Heidegger in justifying the technical and conceptual resources they deploy. This paper focuses on Husserl, and examines the relationship between his phenomenology and the accounts of it that are to be found in the nursing literature. Three central ideas are given particular attention: the phenomenological reduction, phenomena, and essence. It is argued that nurse researchers largely misunderstand these concepts and that, as a result, their version of Husserl's philosophy bears little resemblance to the original. A further consequence is that the project of identifying the 'essential structure' of a phenomenon, typically adopted by the nurse researchers who cite Husserl as an authority, comes close to being unintelligible. It is suggested that, while the methods used in 'phenomenological' nursing research may still have some legitimacy, they cannot achieve what they are alleged to achieve, and they should be detached from the framework of Husserlian ideas and terminology which is supposed to justify them.

  20. [Nursing, simply complicated].

    PubMed

    Martínez Riera, José Ramón

    2005-04-01

    From a very young age, we played doctors and nurses. Back then, society was positive that a nursing profession existed. Now, is society's vision adequate? Evidently not. But, Why does this distortion exist? Fundamentally this occurs because the professionals themselves do not have a clear identity regarding their profession. And Why is this? Because the education transmitted has important lacks, the sanitary system dampens innovation and creativity, there are no appropriate leaders, lobbies transform into "wolves", and neither do we have a tradition which facilitates association and cooperation amongst professionals. These are some of the factors which the author develops in this deep, brave analysis about the reality of the nursing profession in order to arrive at the conclusion that we must have clear in our minds what nursing power is, a power which interacts with the community, and that this is important not only as a power in itself but rather as a means to increase the intrinsic value of nursing, none other than providing care.

  1. Source Book--Nursing Personnel.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spencer, William E.

    This book, organized in six chapters and a bibliography, presents historical and current statistics and references on the supply of nursing personnel within the United States. Chapter 1 includes a discussion of national estimates of the active nurse supply and the distribution of these nurses by field of practice and by academic preparation.…

  2. Competency Based Refresher Nurse Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lombardo, Mary C.

    This competency-based course is designed to update the skills and knowledge of inactive nurses desiring to return to active practice. Focus of the course is on organizing and managing patient care using the nursing process; performing nursing procedures, including medication administration; and reintegrating oneself into the professional…

  3. The computer-literate nurse.

    PubMed

    Bryson, D M

    1991-01-01

    This study investigated the perceptions of nursing educators concerning the amount and kinds of computer training that should occur in the nursing degree program. Data were collected in two phases: a semi-structured interview of experts in the application of the computer to nursing and a random sample of nursing educators in 2-year and 4-year nursing degree programs. The panel of experts identified objectives within each of seven domains: programming and algorithms, skills in computer usage, major uses and applications, limitations of computers, personal and social aspects, and relevant values and attitudes. The responses of this panel were used to generate an universe of computer literacy objectives. The sample of nursing educators then identified a subset of objectives within the universe that they felt nursing students should master in order to be computer literate. The survey found that nursing educators desire graduates of nursing degree programs to understand how a computer works and to develop skills in using application programs. They do not expect nursing graduates to acquire programming skills, however, they do expect the graduates to acquire skills in using the computer as a tool in nursing. These skills include using a word processor for writing nursing care plans, using computer-aided instruction as a learning tool, using a hospital computer information system, using a computerized library database, and using software for statistical computations.

  4. Advancing leadership capacity in nursing.

    PubMed

    Scott, Elaine S; Miles, Jane

    2013-01-01

    To address the potential shortage of nurse leaders, the profession must evaluate current strategies in both education and practice. While many new graduates dream of becoming a nurse practitioner or nurse anesthetist, few transition into practice with the goal of becoming a nurse leader. To increase the number of nurses capable of leadership, the profession must address 2 critical issues. First, effort must be made to augment faculty and students' conceptualization of nursing such that leadership is seen as a dimension of practice for all nurses, not just those in formal leadership roles. In so doing, leadership identity development would be seen as a part of becoming an expert nurse. Second, a comprehensive conceptual framework for lifelong leadership development of nurses needs to be designed. This framework should allow for baseline leadership capacity building in all nurses and advanced leadership development for those in formal administrative and advanced practice roles. The knowledge and skill requirements for quality improvement and patient safety have been explored and recommendations made for Quality and Safety Education for Nurses, but parallel work needs to be done to outline educational content, objectives, and effective pedagogy for advancing leadership development in nursing students at all levels.

  5. Being Human: Transdisciplinarity in Nursing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Timmons, Stephen; Edgley, Alison; Meal, Andy; Narayanasamy, Aru

    2016-01-01

    Nursing as an academic discipline typically draws on a wide range of other disciplines. There is debate about whether this is a sound basis for the discipline, or whether nursing needs to develop a distinctive body of knowledge. The concept of transdisciplinarity, though little discussed in nursing, is of considerable value in understanding…

  6. Social bullying in nursing academia.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Earl; Beitz, Janice; Wieland, Diane; Levine, Ciara

    2013-01-01

    Social bullying has gained attention in the contemporary literature and increasing scrutiny in nursing academia. With a paucity of research on the topic in nursing, the authors asked nursing faculty about the phenomenon of being bullied by faculty colleagues or academic administrators. They discuss their study and its outcomes and implications for academic work lives, recruitment, and retention.

  7. Innovating Traditional Nursing Administration Challenges.

    PubMed

    Joseph, M Lindell; Fowler, Debra

    2016-03-01

    The evolving and complex practice environment calls for new mindsets among nurse leaders, academics, and nurse innovators to envision innovative ways to manage and optimize traditional tasks and processes in nursing administration. The purpose of this article is to present 3 case studies that used linear programming and simulation to innovate staffing enterprises, financial management of healthcare systems, and curricula development.

  8. Psychiatric-Mental Health Nursing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reighley, Joan

    A description is provided of a course, "Psychiatric-Mental Health Nursing," designed to teach students at Level 3 of a two-year college nursing program about the role of the nurse in a psychiatric setting and about concepts of mental health and psychiatric disorders, using both classroom and clinical instruction. The first section of the course…

  9. Legal Issues in Nursing Homes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kapp, Marshall B.

    This paper examines the variety of legal rules and processes which have been established to assess and ensure that the quality of care provided in nursing homes satisfies an acceptable level. It begins with a general overview of nursing home law. Areas discussed in this section include: (1) sources of nursing home law; (2) theories of liability;…

  10. Quality Assurance in Nursing Homes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balgopal, Pallassana R.; And Others

    This manual, developed for the nursing home employee, examines the concept of quality assurance in nursing homes, describes the benefits of an effective quality assurance program, and provides guidelines to aid nursing homes in developing an appropriate quality assurance program. After a brief introduction, a working definition of quality…

  11. STATEWIDE PLANNING FOR NURSING EDUCATION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LEONE, LUCILE PETRY

    NEEDS IN NURSING EDUCATION ARE OUTLINED IN 5 IMPERATIVES--(1) AN IMMEDIATE NEED FOR COMPREHENSIVE PLANNING (BECAUSE OF UP TO 50 PERCENT VACANCIES IN NURSING POSITIONS IN SOME HOSPITALS, USE OF SUBPROFESSIONALS EXCEEDING THE SAFETY LEVEL, AND EXTREME SHORTAGE OF NURSES FOR POSITIONS OF HIGHEST RESPONSIBILITY, AND FUTURE OVERTAXING OF THE SUPPLY DUE…

  12. Enhancing cancer nursing education through school of nursing partnerships: the Cancer Nursing Faculty Fellows Program.

    PubMed

    Hermann, Carla P; Conner, April L; Mundt, Mary H

    2008-06-01

    This article describes the Cancer Nursing Faculty Fellows Program, an innovative program designed to provide nurse educators with state-of-the-art cancer knowledge to enhance their ability to teach cancer content. The Faculty Fellows Program was developed at the University of Louisville School of Nursing and was part of a multifaceted educational intervention to improve cancer nursing education. This intervention included comprehensive curriculum reviews, conferences with national consultants, cancer-specific faculty seminars, and funded instructional projects. The Faculty Fellows Program consisted of a mentored experience attending the Oncology Nursing Society Congress and a month-long intensive program to provide faculty with exposure to cancer experts, researchers, and clinical and community resources. By providing a forum for nurse educators to obtain this knowledge and provide the resources they need to change the way they educate nursing students, the program can significantly affect cancer-related nursing education and, ultimately, the care of patients with cancer and survivors.

  13. [Opinions of nursing students about various sexual practices].

    PubMed

    Egry, E Y

    1985-04-01

    This study sought to determine the beliefs of nursing students on human sexuality, their information sources, and persons influencing their opinion. A survey conducted December 1983 to January 1985 targeted female graduating students in Nursing and Obstetrics at the University of Sao Paulo (USP) School of Nursing; its findings were then compared to similar studies conducted among the general population. The findings show that the target population and general population opinions differ little, reflecting fear and prejudice about sexual practices. Also, the professional training of Brazil's nurses failed to include a fundamental understanding of human sexuality. The 42 respondents are characterized as follows: age 21 to 36 years; 95.2% single; 88% childless; 59.5% born in the city of Sao Paulo; 88% born in the state of Sao Paulo; 85.7% with long term residence in urban areas and state capitals; and 92.5% attended 4 years of nursing school at USP. Results showed: 47.6% favored premarital sex; 26.2% espoused premarital virginity for men and 19% for women; roughly 60% disapproved of extramarital relations for both sexes. 75% considered masturbation normal for both sexes; about 90% approved of contraceptive practices for men and women; 90.5% favored family planning; 26% were strictly against abortion; nearly 60% found prostitution unacceptable for both sexes; and homosexuality in both sexes was considered taboo by 42.8%, and acceptable by 14%. The vast majority favored sexual education at all levels. Regarding sources of sexual infomation: books, magazines and encyclopedias comprised 25%; male friends, 10%; girlfriends, 9.4%; boyfriends 8%; and, the University of Sao Paulo School of Nursing, a mere 6.5%. The persons who influenced their opinions were: first, boyfriend (23.7%) followed by mother, girlfriends and male friends; second, girlfriend (28.5%) followed by boyfriend and male friend; third, girlfriend, boyfriend, male friend, and teachers (7.1% each); fourth

  14. Images of flight nursing in Australia: A study using institutional ethnography.

    PubMed

    Brideson, Genevieve; Willis, Eileen; Mayner, Lidia; Chamberlain, Diane J

    2016-03-01

    Pictures speak a thousand words. The traditional romantic image of an Australian aeromedical service is a male doctor and male pilot, out to rescue the male stockman from the red dust of the Australian outback. However, the reality is considerably different, particularly in the current context of the Australian healthcare system. This paper examines the images of flight nursing using a critical lens. The images are derived from popular literature sources from the early 1940s through to the present. A textual analysis of the images of flight nursing using the methodology of institutional ethnography reveals a number of themes including the glamorous, the romantic, and the heroic nurse. This study illustrates that the way these nurses are portrayed within popular literature mirrors the Australian cultural ethic of heroic bush pioneer, yet at the same time the work these nurses do is undervalued by various omissions and misrepresentations. The results from this study have the potential to significantly improve recognition of the work performed by flight nurses and to challenge incorrect cultural myths.

  15. Emancipatory Nursing Praxis: A Theory of Social Justice in Nursing.

    PubMed

    Walter, Robin R

    2016-10-28

    Emancipatory nursing praxis (ENP) is a middle-range nursing theory of social justice developed from an international, grounded theory study of the critical factors influencing nurses' perceptions of their role in social justice. The ENPs implementing processes (becoming, awakening, engaging, and transforming) and 2 conditional contexts (relational and reflexive) provide an in-depth understanding of the transformative learning process that determines nurse engagement in social justice. Interpretive findings include the voice of Privilege primarily informed ENP theory, the lack of nursing educational and organizational support in social justice role development, and the advocate role should expand to include the role of an ally.

  16. [The nursing shortage and nursing retention strategies in Taiwan].

    PubMed

    Lin, Chiou-Fen; Huang, Chung-I; Kao, Ching-Chiu; Lu, Meei-Shiow

    2013-06-01

    A chronic shortage of working nurses has led hospitals in Taiwan to close wards and reduce bed numbers. Work overload and job stress are major causes of this shortage. The purpose of this study is to propose a solution to improve the nursing workload situation. We reviewed literature articles and conference presentations to synthesize relevant measures, which included reforming the current care model; using innovation to simplify nursing practice; and creating a culture of workplace respect and inter-team cooperation. Based on this, we proposed our nursing retention strategy after reviewing national Department of Health development policies on nursing manpower.

  17. The culture of war: a study of women military nurses in Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Scannell-Desch, E

    2000-04-01

    Many books and studies have described the male Vietnam War culture, whereas similar literature about women is almost nonexistent. This study describes the culture of war nursing as experienced by 24 U.S. women military nurses. Data were generated using a core question and in-depth interviews. Phenomenology served as the research method, incorporating data analysis procedures of Colaizzi and Lincoln and Guba. Nine theme categories were identified to describe the culture of war nursing. Core values of the military culture were threaded throughout descriptions, and activities to make their environment more homelike embodied the positive values of their culture.

  18. Evaluation of the psychoeducation given to the elderly at nursing homes for a healthy lifestyle and developing life satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Tambağ, Hatice; Öz, Fatma

    2013-12-01

    The research was carried out as a pre-test, post-test patterned intervention with one group in order to evaluate the psychoeducation given to older people at nursing homes for a healthy lifestyle and developing life satisfaction. The research was done with 21 female and 21 male older people staying at the state-owned Seyran Bağlari Nursing Home/Elderly Caring Rehabilitation Center and the Ümitköy Nursing Home. In the psychoeducation program, each session was conducted for a duration of 60-90 min in the nursing homes' education classrooms. After the psychoeducation program, the life satisfaction index, the health promotion lifestyle profile total, and the subscale (nutrition, health responsibility, self realization, stress management, interpersonal support, and exercise) mean scores, significantly increased statistically. It is suggested that the nursing homes' health workers, and especially nurses who work full-time, should promote such psychoeducation.

  19. Job stressors and job stress among teachers engaged in nursing activity.

    PubMed

    Muto, Shigeki; Muto, Takashi; Seo, Akihiko; Yoshida, Tsutomu; Taoda, Kazushi; Watanabe, Misuzu

    2007-01-01

    Teachers and staff members engaged in nursing activity experience more stress than other workers. However, it is unknown whether teachers engaged in nursing activity in schools for handicapped children experience even greater stress. This study evaluated job stressors and job stress among such teachers using a cross-sectional study design. The subjects were all 1,461 teachers from all 19 prefectural schools for handicapped children in Shizuoka Prefecture, Japan. We used a brief job stress questionnaire for the survey and 831 teachers completed the questionnaire. Job stressors among teachers engaged in nursing activity were compared with those among teachers not engaged in nursing activity. Job stress among such teachers was estimated by the score for total health risk, and was compared with the score in the Japanese general population. Male and female teachers engaged in nursing activity had a significantly higher level of job stressors for physical work load and job control compared with those not engaged in nursing activity. The scores for total health risk among male and female teachers engaged in nursing activity were 102 points and 98 points, respectively. These scores were not markedly above 100 points which is the mean score in the Japanese general population.

  20. Investigation of risk factors of psychological acceptance and burnout syndrome among nurses in China.

    PubMed

    Yao, Yongcheng; Yao, Wu; Wang, Wei; Li, Hong; Lan, Yajia

    2013-10-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine reliability of Chinese version of Acceptance and Action Questionnaire-II (AAQ-II), the relationship between psychological acceptance (PA), and burnout syndrome and their risk factors among nurses in China. The reliability of AAQ-II in Chinese was evaluated first by testing on 111 doctors and 108 nurses in China. On the number of 845 nurses selected from nine city hospitals by using stratified cluster sampling method, the Maslach Burnout Inventory-General Survey was administered to establish the presence of burnout, and the AAQ-II was used to measure their PA. Results showed that the AAQ-II in Chinese had a good test-retest reliability. PA was statistically significantly negatively correlated to the three dimensionalities of burnout among nurses in China. Male and female nurses had a significant difference in PA. Risk factors for burnout were age (25-44 years), marital status (married), gender (male), hospital department (emergency) and position (primary title) as well as PA. The findings provide insights into the risk factors of burnout in Chinese nurses and may have clinical implications in preventing burnout in Chinese nurses.

  1. Does Faculty Incivility in Nursing Education Affect Emergency Nursing Practice?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stokes, Pamela

    Incivility in nursing education is a complicated problem which causes disruptions in the learning process and negatively affects future nursing practice. This mixed method research study described incivility as well as incivility's effects through extensive literature review and application of a modified Incivility in Nursing Education (INE) survey. The INE included six demographic items, four quantitative sections, and five open-ended questions. The survey examined emergency nurses' perceptions of incivility and how the experience affected their personal nursing practice. The INE was initially tested in a 2004 pilot study by Dr. Cynthia Clark. For this research study, modifications were made to examine specifically emergency nurse's perceptions of incivility and the effects on their practice. The population was a group of nurses who were members of the emergency nurses association in a Midwestern state. In the quantitative component of the Incivility in Nursing Education (INE) survey, the Likert scale questions indicated that the majority of the participants reported witnessing or experiencing the uncivil behaviors. In the qualitative section of the INE survey, the participants reported that although they have not seen incivility within their own academic career, they had observed faculty incivility with nursing students when the participants were assigned as preceptors as part of their emergency nursing practice.

  2. Foreign nurse importation and the supply of native nurses.

    PubMed

    Cortés, Patricia; Pan, Jessica

    2014-09-01

    The importation of foreign registered nurses has been used as a strategy to ease nursing shortages in the United States. The effectiveness of this policy depends critically on the long-run response of native nurses. We examine the effects of immigration of foreign-born registered nurses on the long-run employment and occupational choice of native nurses. Using a variety of empirical strategies that exploit the geographical distribution of immigrant nurses across US cities, we find evidence of large displacement effects - over a ten-year period, for every foreign nurse that migrates to a city, between 1 and 2 fewer native nurses are employed in the city. We find similar results using data on nursing board exam-takers at the state level - an increase in the flow of foreign nurses significantly reduces the number of natives sitting for licensure exams in more dependent states relative to less dependent states. Using data on self-reported workplace satisfaction among a sample of California nurses, we find suggestive evidence that part of the displacement effects could be driven by a decline in the perceived quality of the workplace environment.

  3. Developing nurse educators' computer skills towards proficiency in nursing informatics.

    PubMed

    Rajalahti, Elina; Heinonen, Jarmo; Saranto, Kaija

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to assess nurse educators' competence development in nursing informatics (NI) and to compare their competence to the NI competence of other healthcare professionals. Electronic health records (EHR) have been in use for many years. However, the adoption of the nursing care plan finally made it possible for nurses in Finland to develop a model for structured documentation with nursing terminology. A total of n = 124 (n = 85 pre-test and n = 39 post-test) participants from Universities of Applied Sciences (UAS), hospitals, hospitals' information management and health centres were surveyed with a e-questionnaire designed to assess the development of their NI competences during the nursing documentation development project. The questionnaire included 145 structured questions and 6 open questions. Data analysis focused on classification and comparison of NI competences through data description and statistical parameters using figures and tables. The basic NI competences of the nurse educators were good at the end of project and the nurse educators had better information literacy and information management competences than other participants. The information retrieval skills varied greatly, but they improved evenly towards the end. The nurse educators mastered better evidence-based nursing and use of nursing process models in their work.

  4. Exploring clinical nursing experiences: listening to student nurses.

    PubMed

    Pearcey, Patricia; Draper, Peter

    2008-07-01

    Student nurses spend one half of their educational programme in the clinical area. The success of an educationally sound clinical placement is crucial to forming a professional nursing identity that will encompass the seen and 'unseen' aspects of the nurses' role. The aim of this study was to explore the clinical nursing environment through the perceptions of first year student nurses. Semi-structured interviews were used to collect data from 12 student nurses who each had four weeks clinical experience, representing 21 wards and five hospitals. Results suggest that these student nurses were disillusioned with the reality of clinical nursing and that their expectations of nursing were not realised. They perceived that paperwork, completing tasks and meeting targets were dominant features of nursing work at the expense of patient contact and communication. A majority indicated that nursing was not as caring as they expected and vowed to hold on to their personal values of caring about patients and forming communicative, interpersonal relationships with them.

  5. The "old internationals": Canadian nurses in an international nursing community.

    PubMed

    Lapeyre, Jaime; Nelson, Sioban

    2010-12-01

    The vast devastation caused by both the First World War and the influenza pandemic of 1918 led to an increased worldwide demand for public health nurses. In response to this demand, a number of new public health training programs for nurses were started at both national and international levels. At the international level, one of two influential programs in this area included a year-long public health nursing course offered by the League of Red Cross Societies, in conjunction with Bedford College in London, England. In total, 341 nurses from 49 different countries have been documented as participants in this initiative throughout the interwar period, including 20 Canadians. Using archival material from the Canadian Nurses Association and the Royal College of Nursing, as well as articles from the journals Canadian Nurse, American Journal of Nursing and British Journal of Nursing, this paper examines these nurses' commitment to internationalism throughout their careers and explores the effect of this commitment on the development of nursing education and professionalization at the national level.

  6. The nurses are innocent.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, G

    1993-12-01

    In 1980-81, the nursing and medical staff of Toronto's Hospital for Sick Children (HSC) were agonizing over an increased death rate on cardiac wards 4A and 4B and groping for the cause. The key to this diagnostic puzzle appeared to surface when hospital radioimmunoassay tests revealed very high autopsy readings of digoxin on four babies who died during this period, Janice Estrella, Justin Cook, Kevin Pacsai and Allana Miller. Since one nursing team was present during each of these infants' final hours, it was assumed that one or more of the nurses had intentionally poisoned the infants with digoxin. A web of circumstantial evidence entrapped team member Susan Nelles, who was charged with murder.

  7. Marketing in nursing organizations.

    PubMed

    Chambers, S B

    1989-05-01

    The purpose of chapter 3 is to provide a conceptual framework for understanding marketing. Although it is often considered to be, marketing is not really a new activity for nursing organizations. What is perhaps new to most nursing organizations is the conduct of marketing activities as a series of interrelated events that are part of a strategic marketing process. The increasingly volatile nursing environment requires a comprehensive approach to marketing. This chapter presents definitions of marketing, the marketing mix, the characteristics of nonprofit marketing, the relationship of strategic planning and strategic marketing, portfolio analysis, and a detailed description of the strategic marketing process. While this chapter focuses on marketing concepts, essential components, and presentation of the strategic marketing process, chapter 4 presents specific methods and techniques for implementing the strategic marketing process.

  8. Prehospital Nursing in Maryland - Legal Considerations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-01-01

    midwifery . In Massachusetts, the Board of Registration in Nursing is authorized to establish conditions and regulations for nursing practice in the...because as a registered nurse, she could orly practice midwifery after complying with the Prehospital Nursing 41 Board’s rules and regulations regarding...standards for the practice of Certified Nurse Practitioner and Nurse Midwifery (Md. Health Occu. Code Ann. §8-306 & §§8-601-603, 1991). Prehospital nursing

  9. Nursing assistant turnover in nursing homes and need satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Caudill, M; Patrick, M

    1989-06-01

    1. Level of Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs is basic physiological needs measured by salary, adequate housing, and food. Attainment of these needs increased the length of stay of nursing assistants in nursing homes. 2. Safety and security (level 2) influenced length of stay of nursing assistants. Those with benefits of retirement, vacation, and holiday pay tended to have less turnover. 3. Praise by the patient and family was most important to nursing assistants. Belonging to a peer group and praise by charge nurse also decreased turnover of nursing assistants (level 3). 4. Level 4, self-esteem measured by input into decisions and being able to criticize, increased length of stay of nursing assistants.

  10. [Nursing care in the perspective of complexity for nursing professors].

    PubMed

    Piexak, Diéssica Roggia; Backes, Dirce Stein; Santos, Silvana Sidney Costa

    2013-06-01

    The complex nursing care is essential for understanding the human being as unique and multidimensional. This study aimed at knowing what nursing care means to nurse-teachers in the perspective of complexity. It is a qualitative research, carried out with seven nurse-teachers of a nursing school from central Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. Data were collected in November 2011, through focus group,from three meetings, systematized with themes which considered the objective of this study. Discursive text analysis was used for data analysis. Results evinced nursing care as unique construction that goes beyond a technical-prescriptive, punctual and linear care. It is concluded that nursing care cannot be conceived as a reductionist action, but as a unique construction, which involves interactions, reflections and self-knowledge.

  11. Nursing: the hospital's competitive edge.

    PubMed

    Shaffer, F A; Preziosi, P

    1988-09-01

    The health care marketplace is becoming increasingly competitive. The hospital has a built-in marketing force with the nursing department, because nurses are in constant, direct contact with the customer. Nursing must identify the case mix profile of the community and focus the hospital product lines to meet community needs. The nursing department should decentralize, change, measure, and innovate the staff mix needed to operationalize these product lines. The development of nursing practice standards for the case mix will help to identify the staff mix needed and create systems to efficiently manage the product lines. Nursing management must become aware of cross-subsidization and downward skill substitution of nursing personnel. Nursing information systems must generate quality reports that invoke cost consciousness on the part of nursing staff. Quality assurance programs must become unit based and complete with frequent audits to correlate length of stay with nursing quality. Correlations must be determined between nursing productivity and case mix to determine the hospital's niche in the marketplace. The transformation of health care into a competitive business industry has created many opportunities for nursing. The health care industry's incentives for efficiency along with the decreasing demand for inpatient hospital services will be the forces driving health care toward a competitive marketplace. The hospital's nursing department should be strategically positioned to become accountable for increasing market share and enhancing quality patient outcomes. The focus has shifted from the theoretical to the tactical, which is a step in the right direction, particularly for nursing. Nursing, if strategically positioned, will not only thrive but will also excel in this chaotic environment by capturing the opportunities and being innovative.

  12. Comparing Perceptions of the Nursing Profession among Associate and Baccalaureate Nursing Students and Registered Nurses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lovan, Sherry R.

    2009-01-01

    The inconsistencies between the perception of the profession of nursing and the reality of practice can lead to problems in student attrition or result in disillusionment with a career in nursing after a new graduate enters practice. With the nursing shortage reaching critical levels, it is important to examine possible discrepancies that exist…

  13. Nursing students' attitudes toward science in the nursing curricula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maroo, Jill Deanne

    The nursing profession combines the art of caregiving with scientific concepts. Nursing students need to learn science in order to start in a nursing program. However, previous research showed that students left the nursing program, stating it included too much science (Andrew et al., 2008). Research has shown a correlation between students' attitudes and their performance in a subject (Osborne, Simon, & Collins, 2003). However, little research exists on the overall attitude of nursing students toward science. At the time of my study there existed no large scale quantitative study on my topic. The purpose of my study was to identify potential obstacles nursing students face, specifically, attitude and motivation toward learning science. According to research the nation will soon face a nursing shortage and students cite the science content as a reason for not completing the nursing program. My study explored nursing students' attitudes toward science and reasons these students are motivated to learn science. I ran a nationwide mixed methods approach with 1,402 participants for the quantitative portion and 4 participants for the qualitative portion. I validated a questionnaire in order to explore nursing students' attitudes toward science, discovered five different attitude scales in that questionnaire and determined what demographic factors provided a statistically significant prediction of a student's score. In addition, I discovered no statistical difference in attitude exists between students who have the option of taking nursing specific courses and those who do not have that option. I discovered in the qualitative interviews that students feel science is necessary in nursing but do not feel nurses are scientists. My study gives a baseline of the current attitude of nursing students toward science and why these students feel the need to learn the science.

  14. The task of nursing ethics.

    PubMed Central

    Melia, K M

    1994-01-01

    This paper raises the questions: 'What do we expect from nursing ethics?' and 'Is the literature of nursing ethics any different from that of medical ethics?' It is suggested that rather than develop nursing ethics as a separate field writers in nursing ethics should take a lead in making the patient the central focus of health care ethics. The case is made for empirical work in health care ethics and it is suggested that a good way of setting about this is to ask practising nurses about the real ethical problems they encounter. PMID:8035446

  15. The future roles of nurses.

    PubMed

    Perla, Lisa

    2002-01-01

    Healthcare delivery in the United States is changing because of managed care and capitation. The future of hospital nursing is being reshaped because of the economic pressures of managed care and market-led health reforms. A variety of new healthcare job opportunities for nurses will now present themselves. Nurse leader roles will evolve to complement the new managed healthcare structure. Because of the organizational redesign of managed care, nurses will need to develop additional skills and education for these roles. This article discusses potential new roles nurses will occupy in a managed care environment.

  16. Mentoring practices benefiting pediatric nurses.

    PubMed

    Weese, Meghan M; Jakubik, Louise D; Eliades, Aris B; Huth, Jennifer J

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies examining predictors of pediatric nurse protégé mentoring benefits demonstrated that protégé perception of quality was the single best predictor of mentoring benefits. The ability to identify the mentoring practices that predict specific benefits for individual nurses provides a better understanding of how mentoring relationships can be leveraged within health care organizations promoting mutual mentoring benefits. This descriptive correlational, non-experimental study of nurses at a northeast Ohio, Magnet® recognized, free-standing pediatric hospital advances nursing science by demonstrating how mentoring practices benefit pediatric nurse protégés.

  17. Addressing the mental health nurse shortage: undergraduate nursing students working as assistants in nursing in inpatient mental health settings.

    PubMed

    Browne, Graeme; Cashin, Andrew; Graham, Iain; Shaw, Warren

    2013-10-01

    The population of mental health nurses is ageing and in the next few years we can expect many to retire. This paper makes an argument for the employment of undergraduate nursing students as Assistants in Nursing (AINs) in mental health settings as a strategy to encourage them to consider a career in mental health nursing. Skill mix in nursing has been debated since at least the 1980s. It appears that the use of AINs in general nursing is established and will continue. The research suggests that with the right skill mix, nursing outcomes and safety are not compromised. It seems inevitable that assistants in nursing will increasingly be part of the mental health nursing workforce; it is timely for mental health nurses to lead these changes so nursing care and the future mental health nursing workforce stay in control of nursing.

  18. Male breast carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Meguerditchian, Ari-Nareg; Falardeau, Maurice; Martin, Ginette

    2002-01-01

    Objective To review the epidemiology, presentation, diagnosis, molecular genetics, treatment and prognosis of male breast cancer. Data sources Articles, written in English or French, selected from the Medline database (1966 to January 2001), corresponding to the key words “male breast cancer,” according to the following criteria: covering institutional experience or comparing diagnostic and treatment modalities, and epidemiologic or general reviews. Study selection Of 198 articles found 50 fulfilled the review criteria. Data synthesis Risk factors included advanced age, a positive family history, Jewish origin, black race, excess exposure to female hormones (Klinefelter’s syndrome), environmental exposure (irradiation), alcohol, obesity, higher socioeconomic or higher educational status and childlessness. Gynecomastia remains a controversial factor, this term being used for both a histologic reality and a physical finding. Advanced disease is characterized by pain, bloody discharge and skin ulceration. There is no definitive diagnostic algorithm. Experience with male breast mammography is limited, and imaging is less informative for patients under 50 years of age. Fine-needle aspiration tends to overestimate the rate of malignancy. The commonest histologic finding is infiltrating ductal adenocarcinoma. Treatment includes modified radical mastectomy, followed by cyclophosphamide–methotrexate–5-fluo-rouracil or 5-fluorouracil–Adriamycin–cyclophosphamide chemotherapy for disease of stage II or greater. Radiotherapy does not seem to add any benefit. The disease is highly receptor-positive; however, many patients discontinue tamoxifen due to side effects. The most important prognostic factors are tumour size, lymphatic invasion and axillary node status. Conclusions Because of the low incidence of male breast cancer, advances will be obtained mainly with the rapid transfer of newly gained knowledge in female mammary neoplasia. The increased use of adjuvant

  19. Ethical concerns in nurse migration.

    PubMed

    McElmurry, Beverly J; Solheim, Karen; Kishi, Rieko; Coffia, Marcia A; Woith, Wendy; Janepanish, Poolsuk

    2006-01-01

    International nurse migration is natural and to be expected. Recently, however, those who have fostered nurse migration believe that it will solve nursing shortages in developed countries and offer nurse migrants better working conditions and an improved quality of life. Whether natural or manipulated, migration flow patterns largely occur from developing to developed countries. In this article, nurse migration is examined using primary health care (PHC) as an ethical framework. The unmanaged flow of nurse migrants from developing to developed countries is inconsistent with "health for all" principles. Removing key health personnel from countries experiencing resource shortages is contrary to PHC equity. Often, nurse migrants are placed in vulnerable, inequitable work roles, and employing nurse migrants fails to address basic causes of nurse shortages in developed countries, such as dissatisfaction with work conditions and decreased funding for academic settings. Nurse migration policies and procedures can be developed to satisfy PHC ethics criteria if they (1) leave developing countries enhanced rather than depleted, (2) contribute to country health outcomes consistent with essential care for all people, (3) are based on community participation, (4) address common nursing labor issues, and (5) involve equitable and clear financial arrangements.

  20. Nurse therapists in behavioural psychotherapy.

    PubMed Central

    Marks, I M; Hallam, R S; Philpott, R; Connolly, J C

    1975-01-01

    Five registered mental nurses (R.M.N.s) were trained over two years to become behavioural psychotherapists for adult neurotic disorders. They achieved results comparable to those obtained with similar patients and methods by psychologists and psychiatrists. Similar results were maintained when over a third year the therapists were seconded to work in four hospitals and a general practice. Patients were satisfied at being treated by nurses. After initial teething difficulties nurse therapists became valuable members of treatment teams during both training and secondment, becoming accepted by most nurses, psychologists, and psychiatrists with whom they came into contact. The training of further nurse therapists would facilitate treatment of many disabled neurotics who would otherwise go without effective treatment. Training nurse therapists takes less time and money than training psychologists and psychiatrists because less of their education is redundant to the skills involved. The pool of R.M.N.s suitable for training is much larger than that of psychiatrists and psychologists. The nurse therapists can be integrated relatively easily into treatment teams. The present nursing structure imposes restrictions on the advancement of clinical nurse specialists and a clinical tree is badly needed parallel with present administrative and teaching hierarchies. An 18-month course in adult behavioural psychotherapy has been recognized by the Joint Board of Clinical Nursing Studies for England and Wales so that nurse therapists seem destined to be a lasting feature of future treatment teams. PMID:1139262

  1. The Contribution of Death-Related Experiences to Health Care Providers' Attitudes toward Dying Patients: II. Medical and Nursing Students with No Professional Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brent, Sandor B.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Compared attitudes toward care of dying patients of beginning medical and nursing students with no professional death-related experience. On five of six attitude measures, female nursing students expressed more positive attitude than either male or female medical students. Hours of death-and-dying coursework and general life experience exerted…

  2. Nursing perspectives for intensive care.

    PubMed

    Woodrow, P

    1997-06-01

    Within health care, market forces increasingly determine what services have economic value. For nursing to survive this economic onslaught, nurses must clarify their values and roles. While nurses working in intensive care develop useful technical skills and normally work within a constructive multi-disciplinary team framework, they have a potentially unique contribution to care, focusing on the patient as a whole person rather than intervening to solve a problem. The need for both physiological and psychological care creates a need for holistic values, best achieved through humanistic perspectives. Humanistic nursing places patients as people at the centre of nursing care, as illustrated by the limitations of reality orientation compared with the potentials of validation therapy. Intensive care nurses asserting and developing such patient-centred roles offer a valuable way forward for nursing to develop into the 21st century.

  3. An integrative nursing theoretical framework.

    PubMed

    Schmieding, N J

    1990-04-01

    The use of an integrative nursing theoretical framework for both clinical and administrative practice has recently been suggested. The author developed a theoretical framework which incorporates key concepts from the writings of Ida J. Orlando and Virginia Henderson and proposes it to be used as an integrative framework. The rationale for using a framework is discussed along with clinical and administrative examples of how to integrate concepts from the proposed framework. The reasons for using an integrative theoretical framework are that it: serves as a guide for both clinical and administrative decisions; forms the basis of the nursing philosophy; facilitates communication with patients and colleagues; helps identify congruent supporting theories and concepts; provides a basis for educational programmes; helps to differentiate nursing from non-nursing activities; and enhances nurse unity and self-esteem. The premise of the article is that benefits are derived from the use of a nursing theoretical framework because it provides a specific vision of nursing.

  4. Clinical nurses' expressions of the emotions related to caring and coping with cancer patients in Pakistan: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Banning, M; Gumley, V A

    2012-11-01

    Nursing in Pakistan is a developing profession. This was the first study to examine nurses' views and emotions related to nursing cancer patients in an oncology hospital in Pakistan. Semi-structured interviews explored the concept of emotions and their interpretation by nurses. A purposive sample of nurses was recruited from hospital departments and wards. Twenty nurses were interviewed. Data were analysed using thematic analysis. Four themes emerged from the data. These were: the importance of expressing empathy, feelings of helplessness, developing emotions and tailoring moods to match the patient environment. The significance of the patients' cancer journey was multilayered with highs and lows that were imbued with the hope of cure and remission and by an emotional catalogue of feelings; joy at nursing patients in remission to helplessness for patients in advanced stage. Male domination and a negative public perception of cancer were significant issues that nurses acknowledged. The strategies nurses use to manage emotional situations needs further research with workshops to enhance nurse's skills in emotional intelligence when caring for cancer patients.

  5. [Patient profile and nursing workload at the nephrology unit].

    PubMed

    Trepichio, Priscilla Branco; Guirardello, Edinêis de Brito; Duran, Erika Christiane Marocco; de Brito, Ana Paula

    2013-06-01

    Chronic kidney failure (CKF), which is frequently silent, can lead to considerable changes in the lives of patients. Depending on the stage, hospitalization and hours of nursing care are required to ensure medical and surgical treatment. The aim of this descriptive and quantitative study is to measure nursing workload at a nephrology unit based on daily application of the Nursing Activities Score (NAS) for 47 consecutive days. Patients were mostly young male adults in the chronic stage of the disease or admitted for kidney transplant. A total of 833 observations were obtained from 62 patients. The resulting NAS workload upon admission was 52%, corresponding to 12.5 hours of care per patient for 24 hours, which is similar to the workload found in intensive care units. This profile allows calculation of nursing work hours required for each patient and is a valuable tool for nursing managers when determining the number of staff members required to ensure assistance. Other studies should be conducted for clinical validation.

  6. Implementation and evaluation of Nursing Interventions Classification and Nursing Outcomes Classification in a patient education plan.

    PubMed

    Hajewski, C; Maupin, J M; Rapp, D A; Sitterding, M; Pappas, J

    1998-06-01

    Nursing Interventions Classification (NIC) and Nursing Outcomes Classification (NOC) are recognized examples of standardized nursing languages used to describe the contribution nursing makes to patient care. Columbus Regional Hospital nursing leadership recognized the need to use standardized nursing interventions and nursing-sensitive patient outcomes to describe the unique contribution nursing makes to patient education. In collaboration with the University of Iowa, NIC/NOC languages were implemented in the development of a patient education plan for a clinical pathway population.

  7. Internal migration of nurses in the United States: migratory prompts and difference in job satisfaction between migrants and non-migrants.

    PubMed

    Siow, Elaine; Ng, Jeffrey

    2013-01-01

    In the United States, nurses are highly mobile due to a nursing shortage and the transferability of their skills. Despite the importance of internal migration (inter-state movement) of nurses in the distribution of the supply nurses, little is known about such migration. Researchers used data from the 2004 and 2008 National Sample Survey of Registered Nurses to examine the factors associated with nurses' internal migration as well as the difference in job satisfaction for migrant and non-migrant nurses. Factors associated with a higher likelihood of internal migration were: a change in employer, higher earnings, not foreign-educated, less nursing experience, a younger age, being male, being single, having no children, the Nursing Licensure Compact, and not being employed in the state where the first RN license was obtained. Migrant nurses had lower job satisfaction than non-migrant nurses; higher job satisfaction is noted with higher earnings levels. The development of policies such as relocation and social support to help migrant nurses cope and adjust to a new working environment are proposed.

  8. The Value of Trust to Nursing.

    PubMed

    Rutherford, Marcella M

    2014-01-01

    Trust, one of nursing's intangible assets, impacts nurses' ability to form meaningful relationships with patients and this connection positively impacts health outcomes. Linking trust to the fabric of nursing and investing in its measurement will become essential to nursing's valuation and the resulting investment in nursing. Trust, as nursing's core value, should be fostered by nurse educators as they prepare the next generation of nurses. Nurse administrators should connect the trust a patient has for his or her nurse and patient cooperation and honest transparent communication between providers and the patient. Banking trust as a valuable nursing asset will substantiate nursing's marketing and support its worth. Nursing's trustworthiness is an intangible asset that warrants protection, as trust once lost is hard to recapture.

  9. Statement on nursing: a personal perspective.

    PubMed

    McCutcheon, Tonna

    2004-01-01

    Contemporary nursing is based on a conglomerate of theoretical nursing models. These models each incorporate four central concepts: person, health, environment, and nursing. By defining these concepts, nurses develop an individual framework from which they base their nursing practice. As an aspiring nurse practitioner in the gastroenterology field, I have retrospectively assessed my personal definitions of person, health, environment, and nursing. From these definitions, I am able to incorporate specific theoretical frameworks into my personal belief system, thus formulating a basis for my nursing practice. This foundation is comprised of the influence of nursing theorists Jean Watson, Sister Callista Roy, Kolcaba, Florence Nightingale, and Ida J. Orlando; the Perioperative Patient-Focused Model; Watson's Theory of Human Caring; theories regarding transpersonal human caring and healing; and feminist theories. Therefore, this article describes self-examination of nursing care by defining central nursing concepts, acknowledging the influence of nursing theorists and theories, and developing a personal framework from which I base my nursing practice.

  10. [Orchitis and male infertility].

    PubMed

    Schuppe, H-C; Pilatz, A; Hossain, H; Meinhardt, A; Bergmann, M; Haidl, G; Weidner, W

    2010-05-01

    Infections and inflammations of the genital tract are considered the most frequent causes of reduced male fertility, but conclusive epidemiological data are not available. In view of the exposure of germ cells to pathogenic components as well as the cells and mediators involved in the inflammatory processes, irreversible damage to spermatogenesis and corresponding decline of ejaculate quality are to be expected, particularly in cases of chronic orchitis. While the consequences of orchitis and epididymo-orchitis that exhibit clinical symptoms due to systemic or local infections are well known, including testicular atrophy and complete loss of fertility, those cases of inflammatory reactions of the testicles that manifest an asymptomatic or subclinical course, or are not even due to an infection, have received little attention until now. However, systematic histopathological analyses have shown a high prevalence of asymptomatic inflammatory reactions in testicular biopsies from infertile men. The mostly focal lymphocytic infiltrates correlate with the degree of damage to spermatogenesis and corresponding clinical and endocrinological parameters of testicular function. Noninvasive diagnostic techniques are not yet available so that chronic asymptomatic inflammations of the testicles as the primary cause or cofactor of male fertility disorders are underestimated. Except for administration of pathogen-specific antibiotics, treatment recommendations are to a large extent still lacking.

  11. Male hormonal contraceptives.

    PubMed

    Amory, J K

    2006-06-01

    Efforts are underway to develop additional forms of contraception for men. The most promising approach to male contraceptive development involves the administration of exogenous testosterone (T). When administered to a man, T functions as a contraceptive by suppressing the secretion of luteinizing hormone and follicle-stimulating hormone from the pituitary, thereby depriving the testes of the signals required for spermatogenesis. After 2-3 months of treatment, low levels of these gonadotropins lead to markedly decreased sperm counts and effective contraception in a majority of men. Hormonal contraception with exogenous T has proven to be free from serious adverse effects and is well tolerated by men. In addition, sperm counts uniformly normalize when the exogenous T is discontinued. Thus, male hormonal is safe, effective and reversible; however, spermatogenesis is not suppressed to zero in all men, meaning that some diminished potential for fertility persists. Because of this recent studies have combined T with progestogens and/or gonadotropin-releasing antagonists to further suppress pituitary gonadotropins and optimize contraceptive efficacy. Current combinations of T and progestogens completely suppress spermatogenesis without severe side effects in 80-90% of men, with significant suppression in the remainder of individuals. Recent trials with newer, long-acting forms of injectable T, which can be administered every 8 weeks, combined with progestogens, administered either orally or by long-acting implant, have yielded promising results and may soon result in the marketing of a safe, reversible and effective hormonal contraceptive for men.

  12. A magnetic strategy for new graduate nurses.

    PubMed

    Halfer, Diana

    2007-01-01

    With the shortfall of nurses, more health care organizations are actively recruiting new graduate nurses. To translate active recruitment to successful retention, however, these newest nurses need support to make the adjustment from the security of a protected academic environment to the demands of a professional nursing career. Nursing turnover occurs when their role transition is unsuccessful. A unique model implemented in 2003 transformed new graduate nurses into confident staff nurses in an acute care setting. The insights gained and the investments required for a "magnetic" strategy to make new graduate nurses successful new staff nurses who stay with the organization are revealed.

  13. Nurses' willingness and readiness to report for duty in a disaster.

    PubMed

    Fung, Olivia Wai Man; Loke, Alice Yuen

    2013-01-01

    Inadequate healthcare workforce during a disaster affects the survival and health outcome of victims. During disaster strikes, nurses may face a dilemma regarding whether or not to report for duty, facing professional duty and their personal and/or family safety that may be at stake. This is a cross-sectional descriptive study. This study seeks for a better understanding of the factors affecting nurses' willingness and readiness to report for duty in a disaster. A total of 269 currently practicing registered nurses completed the questionnaire. Results showed that only 68.7 percent and 53.2 percent of nurses were willing to report to work during a disaster. Male nurses were more likely to report to work than females during disaster (p = 0.007) and infection outbreak (p = 0.002) situations. Nurses with young children were less likely to report to work during an infectious disease outbreak (34.5 percent vs 55.4 percent, p = 0.033). It is concluded that about one-third of nurses indicated that they would not report to work when a disaster strikes. This raises a warning signal for healthcare managers that they need to plan ahead to maintain an adequate workforce when disasters strike. Managers are urged to do more to understand the factors leading to nurses' unwillingness to report to work and to undertake realistic staffing planning to cope with the extra demand.

  14. The management of breakthrough cancer pain--educational needs a European nursing survey.

    PubMed

    Wengström, Y; Rundström, C; Geerling, J; Pappa, T; Weisse, I; Williams, S C; Zavratnik, B; Rustøen, T

    2014-01-01

    Poorly managed cancer pain is well known to profoundly impact the patient's daily life and interfere with quality of life. Nurses who cared for patients with cancer from 12 European countries participated in a survey of breakthrough cancer pain practice. The purpose was to investigate how nurses assess breakthrough cancer pain, use of standardised tools, confidence in supporting patients and awareness of medications. Responses from 1241 participants showed country variations. The majority of the sample was female, Germany had the highest proportion of male nurses (21.0%), followed by Greece (15.8%). A significantly larger proportion of nurses with longer experience and more education (78.8%) used a comprehensive definition of breakthrough cancer pain. Significant variations in training were found; 71% of Finnish nurses had received training compared with 6% of Greek nurses. Training and using a standardised assessment tool was associated with a significant increase in the nurses' perceived ability to distinguish between breakthrough and background pain. Nurses in countries with the highest proportion of training were most confident in supporting patients. In conclusion, there still exists problems with effective management of patients' breakthrough cancer pain, continuing inability to define the difference between background and breakthrough cancer pain leads to poor treatment.

  15. Relationship between burnout and communication skill training among Japanese hospital nurses: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Takashi; Mizoue, Tetsuya; Kubota, Shinya; Mishima, Norio; Nagata, Shoji

    2003-05-01

    We investigated the relationship between burnout and communication skill training among Japanese hospital nurses to improve the mental health of human service workers. The subjects were forty-five registered nurses referred to a self-expression skill intervention program by their section superiors, with each superior choosing from two to five nurses. The hospital was located in the Kyushu area and staffed by about four hundred nurses. The subjects were divided into an intervention group (19 nurses) and a reference group (26 nurses). The intervention group received the communication skill training in July and August, 2001. The communication skill training was carried out in accordance with the assertiveness training (AsT) precepts of Anne Dickson. In June, 2001, we delivered a set of questionnaires including age, gender, working years, a burnout scale, and a communication skill check-list as a baseline survey. The baseline questionnaires were returned at the end of June, 2001. In January, 2002, we delivered the same questionnaire again to the two groups and collected them at the end of the month. Excluding the only male and insufficient answers, twenty-six nurses (58%) returned complete answers in the initial and subsequent surveys. We found that the personal accomplishment and the two communication skills such as "accepting valid criticisms" and "negotiation" of the intervention group had improved significantly five months after the training as compared with that of the reference. Our results implied that communication skill training might have a favorable effect on burnout among Japanese hospital nurses.

  16. Innovation in transformative nursing leadership: nursing informatics competencies and roles.

    PubMed

    Remus, Sally; Kennedy, Margaret Ann

    2012-12-01

    In a recent brief to the Canadian Nurses Association's National Expert Commission on the Health of Our Nation, the Academy of Canadian Executive Nurses (ACEN) discussed leadership needs in the Canadian healthcare system, and promoted the pivotal role of nursing executives in transforming Canada's healthcare system into an integrated patient-centric system. Included among several recommendations was the need to develop innovative leadership competencies that enable nurse leaders to lead and advance transformative health system change. This paper focuses on an emerging "avant-garde executive leadership competency" recommended for today's health leaders to guide health system transformation. Specifically, this competency is articulated as "state of the art communication and technology savvy," and it implies linkages between nursing informatics competencies and transformational leadership roles for nurse executive. The authors of this paper propose that distinct nursing informatics competencies are required to augment traditional executive skills to support transformational outcomes of safe, integrated, high-quality care delivery through knowledge-driven care. International trends involving nursing informatics competencies and the evolution of new corporate informatics roles, such as chief nursing informatics officers (CNIOs), are demonstrating value and advanced transformational leadership as nursing executive roles that are informed by clinical data.

  17. Nursing needs of hospitalized older adults. Consumer and nurse perceptions.

    PubMed

    Chang, Esther; Chenoweth, Lynn; Hancock, Karen

    2003-09-01

    The proportion of older adults is increasing in Australia, and the proportion of older adults requiring medical care is expected to increase in the future. At the same time, budget restrictions are a reality for Australia's health system. Increasing need and decreasing resources suggest the need to focus on the quality aspect of treatment and care for older adults. Little research has been conducted in the area of perceived nursing needs of elderly patients during hospitalization. This is an important area of research because it is increasingly recognized that elderly patients have specialized needs and are the major consumers of health care. Even less research has compared patient and carer perceptions with those of nursing staff. This article is a literature review and an investigation of the quality of care elderly patients receive, and of patient and nurse perceptions of the importance of various nursing activities. Quality of care is reviewed in terms of perceptions of nursing care priorities and elderly patients' satisfaction with the quality of nursing care they receive. Research examining nurses' perceptions related to why they are unable to consistently provide quality nursing care to all elderly patients is also reviewed. By identifying the nursing needs of elderly patients and educating nursing staff about these needs, professional practice can be guided and improvements in quality of care, patient satisfaction, and patient outcomes may occur.

  18. Care: what nurses say and what nurses do.

    PubMed

    Warelow, Philip; Edward, Karen-Leigh; Vinek, Jeanette

    2008-01-01

    Caring is neither simply a set of attitudes or theories, nor does it comprise all that nurses do. Nursing care is determined by the way nurses use knowledge and skills to appreciate the uniqueness of the person they are caring for (changing the care noun into a caring verb). The purpose of this article is to present a range of contemporary nurse theorists' ideas on caring and to examine these ideas using the backdrop of nursing as practiced in both Australia and Canada to demonstrate a range of national and international similarities and theoretical beliefs. Caring relationships set up the conditions of trust that enable the one receiving the care to accept the help offered, underpinning the nurse-patient relationship or the therapeutic relationship. Caring is always specific and relational such as that found in the nurse-patient relationship. We believe that caring theory has much to offer nursing practice worldwide. Caring must be considered in the caring context because the nature of the caring relationship is central to most nursing interventions. Nurses need to be able to actually practice caring rather than just theorize about it-using caring theories to inform their practice.

  19. Rationalisation of nursing education in Limpopo province : nurse educators' perspectives.

    PubMed

    Makhuvha, T R; Davhana-Maselesele, M; Netshandama, V O

    2007-12-01

    Nursing education institutions are facing a challenge of realigning its functioning according to the changes that are taking place within the country. The intention of the government post apartheid was to correct the imbalances which were brought about by the apartheid government and the following regulations and policies influenced the change in nursing education, that is, Reconstruction and Development Programme (RDP), White Paper on Higher Education (WPHE), and the National Qualification Framework (NQF) (South Africa, 1995:6). In 1996 the government introduced the first democratic constitution of the Republic of South Africa (RSA) according toAct 108 of 1996. In the light of those increasing changes in nursing education, led by political change, the experiences of nurse educators is a critical issue facing nursing campuses. The purpose of this study was two-fold; namely: to explore and describe the experiences of nurse educators with regard to the rationalisation of nursing education and to use information obtained to describe guidelines for the effective rationalisation of a nursing college in the Limpopo Province. A qualitative, exploratory, descriptive and contextual research design was used. Qualitative interviews were conducted with nurse educators who worked in nursing colleges before and after 1994. Measures to ensure trustworthiness were applied and ethical issues were adhered to throughout the research process. Data was analysed following Tesch's method (Creswell 1994:154-155). The research established that nurse educators experienced dissatisfaction in several areas relating to the rationalization of nursing education. Support was also expected from bureaucracy at higher level. This study developed guidelines to policy makers and nurse educators to ensure effective rationalisation process.

  20. Incivility in the hospital environment: the nurse educator-staff nurse relationship.

    PubMed

    Danque, Cynthia T; Serafica, Reimund; Lane, Susan Hayes; Hodge, Mary Alice

    2014-01-01

    Occurrences of incivility in nurse educator-staff nurse relationship studies are limited. A qualitative methodology (n = 6) was used to investigate nurse educators' perceptions of the main stressors for nurses during educational experiences. Identification of uncivil traits as seen by nurse educators and perceived role of nursing leaders in addressing incivility in the workplace were also identified.

  1. Nursing Faculty Members' Perspectives of Faculty-to-Faculty Workplace Incivility among Nursing Faculty Members

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amos, Kimberly S.

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, nursing faculty incivility has been a searing topic of research. Nursing research included studies on incivility among nursing students, incivility between nursing students and nursing faculty, and incivility in the clinical setting. However, literature specifically on nursing faculty incivility was limited. This descriptive,…

  2. Building Trust Relationships in Nursing. Midwest Alliance in Nursing Program Meeting (Des Moines, Iowa, April 1983).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minckley, Barbara B., Ed.; Walters, Mary Dale, Ed.

    Focusing on issues concerning trust relationships within the nursing field, the papers in these proceedings consider relationships between nursing service and nursing education, staff or faculty and nursing administration, rural and urban nursing agencies, and among intercultural nursing groups. The proceedings contain: (1) "Trust: An Idealistic…

  3. The Lived Experience of Nurses Working with Student Nurses in the Clinical Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hathorn, Donna; Machtmes, Krisanna; Tillman, Ken

    2009-01-01

    One response to the nursing shortage is to increase promotion and retention in nursing programs: However, negative attitudes of nurses threaten student progression and retention. A phenomenological study explored the lived experience of nurses who worked with student nurses to discover "what" attitudes nurses had toward student nurses…

  4. Strategies for Maintaining Associate Degree Nursing Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tilton, Theodore

    As part of the national campaign of the American Nurses Association (ANA) to create two levels of nursing, one for bachelor of science nurses (BSN's) and one for associate degree nurses (ADN's), Illinois has been targeted for a legislative push to change the laws governing nurse licensure, which, if successful, would signal the beginning of the…

  5. 38 CFR 52.130 - Nursing services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... comprehensive plans of care, of all participants in the program. (a) There must be at least one registered nurse on duty each day of operation of the adult day health care program. This nurse must be currently... that this nurse be a geriatric nurse practitioner or a clinical nurse specialist. (b) The number...

  6. 38 CFR 51.130 - Nursing services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... service must be under the direction of a full-time registered nurse who is currently licensed by the State... nurses 24 hours per day, 7 days per week. (c) The director of nursing service must designate a registered nurse as a supervising nurse for each tour of duty. (1) Based on the application and results of the...

  7. School Nurse Intention to Pursue Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broussard, Lisa; White, Debra

    2014-01-01

    In 2011, the Institute of Medicine recommended that 80% of the nurses possess a minimum of a bachelor of science in nursing by 2020 and double the number of doctorally prepared nurses. This has prompted a significant number of registered nurses to advance their educational level. School nurses in Louisiana are not required to have a bachelor's…

  8. 20 CFR 404.1029 - Student nurses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Student nurses. 404.1029 Section 404.1029... Student nurses. If you are a student nurse, your work for a hospital or nurses training school is excluded from employment if you are enrolled and regularly attending classes in a nurses training school...

  9. Nurses' Perceptions on the Shortage of Nurses and Enrollment Decline in Nursing Programs and Means to Increase Student Nurse Enrollment in Arizona.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, A. Louise

    A case study investigated three specific concerns related to the shortage of nurses and the decline in enrollment in nursing programs: (1) identification of reasons for the nursing shortage and enrollment decline; (2) identification of weaknesses in nursing that have contributed to the shortage of nurses and enrollment decline; and (3)…

  10. 20 CFR 404.1029 - Student nurses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Student nurses. 404.1029 Section 404.1029... Student nurses. If you are a student nurse, your work for a hospital or nurses training school is excluded from employment if you are enrolled and regularly attending classes in a nurses training school...

  11. 20 CFR 404.1029 - Student nurses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Student nurses. 404.1029 Section 404.1029... Student nurses. If you are a student nurse, your work for a hospital or nurses training school is excluded from employment if you are enrolled and regularly attending classes in a nurses training school...

  12. 20 CFR 404.1029 - Student nurses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Student nurses. 404.1029 Section 404.1029... Student nurses. If you are a student nurse, your work for a hospital or nurses training school is excluded from employment if you are enrolled and regularly attending classes in a nurses training school...

  13. 20 CFR 404.1029 - Student nurses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Student nurses. 404.1029 Section 404.1029... Student nurses. If you are a student nurse, your work for a hospital or nurses training school is excluded from employment if you are enrolled and regularly attending classes in a nurses training school...

  14. 38 CFR 51.130 - Nursing services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Nursing services. 51.130... FOR NURSING HOME CARE OF VETERANS IN STATE HOMES Standards § 51.130 Nursing services. The facility management must provide an organized nursing service with a sufficient number of qualified nursing...

  15. 38 CFR 51.130 - Nursing services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Nursing services. 51.130... FOR NURSING HOME CARE OF VETERANS IN STATE HOMES Standards § 51.130 Nursing services. The facility management must provide an organized nursing service with a sufficient number of qualified nursing...

  16. 38 CFR 51.130 - Nursing services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Nursing services. 51.130... FOR NURSING HOME CARE OF VETERANS IN STATE HOMES Standards § 51.130 Nursing services. The facility management must provide an organized nursing service with a sufficient number of qualified nursing...

  17. Standardized Nursing Languages. Position Statement. Revised

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duff, Carolyn; Endsley, Patricia; Chau, Elizabeth; Morgitan, Judith

    2012-01-01

    It is the position of the National Association of School Nurses (NASN) that standardized nursing languages (SNL) are essential communication tools for registered professional school nurses (hereinafter, school nurses) to assist in planning, delivery, and evaluation of quality nursing care. SNL help identify, clarify and document the nature and…

  18. 38 CFR 51.130 - Nursing services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Nursing services. 51.130... FOR NURSING HOME CARE OF VETERANS IN STATE HOMES Standards § 51.130 Nursing services. The facility management must provide an organized nursing service with a sufficient number of qualified nursing...

  19. Disabled nurses discover new career paths.

    PubMed

    Bemis, Patricia Ann

    2009-06-01

    When confronted with a disability, the steps learned from the nursing process help nurses maintain employability. The nursing process teaches nurses to gather information, evaluate the information, develop a plan, implement the plan, evaluate the outcome, modify the plan, implement again, etc. By following the process to modify their career paths and/or implement adaptive devices, nurses maintain their employability.

  20. Introducing ADN students to nursing research.

    PubMed

    Thorpe, R; Smutko, P W

    1998-01-01

    Every nurse, regardless of educational preparation, should be involved in and benefit from nursing research. The research process needs to become an integral part of nursing practice. In this article, the authors emphasize the importance of nursing research in the associate degree nursing curriculum, emphasizing strategies that enable the ADN graduate to appreciate research reports and use the knowledge in the clinical practice setting.

  1. Nursing: Supply and Demand through 2020

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carnevale, Anthony P.; Smith, Nicole; Gulish, Artem

    2015-01-01

    This report analyzes the growing need for qualified nurses. The study projects that the economy will create 1.6 million job openings for nurses through 2020. Yet, there will not be enough nurses to fill those openings. this report projects that the nursing workforce will be facing a shortfall of roughly 200,000 nursing professionals by 2020. One…

  2. Determinants of Smoking Behavior among Nurses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rausch, Judith Cartledge; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Reviews literature on determinants of smoking behavior among nurses, examining history and current trends of cigarette use among nurses. Cites national and international studies showing nurses to smoke more than any other health professionals. Discusses stress as primary theory of smoking causation among nurses. Considers role of nursing education…

  3. Public Health Interventions for School Nursing Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaffer, Marjorie A.; Anderson, Linda J. W.; Rising, Shannon

    2016-01-01

    School nurses (SNs) use public health nursing knowledge and skills to provide nursing services to school populations. The Public Health Intervention Wheel is a practice framework that can be used to explain and guide public health nursing interventions. SNs who were also members of the National Association of School Nurses completed an electronic…

  4. Bibliography of Nursing Monographs, 1970-1978.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ewens, Wilma A., Comp.; And Others

    This list consists of titles published since 1970 on nursing, grouping them into five broad categories: (1) nursing practice, including clinical nursing, communication, community health, emergency care, family health, obstetrics, and universal self care; (2) nursing as a profession; (3) educational aspects of nursing; (4) basic health science…

  5. Perceptions of Novice Clinical Adjunct Nursing Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Himmelberg, Layna

    2011-01-01

    The anticipated nursing shortage in the United States is well documented and continues to be a topic of discussion. A nationwide solution has been for nursing programs to increase their enrollment of nursing students. This could be difficult for many nursing schools; as many have a shortage of qualified nursing faculty with which to instruct…

  6. An Assessment of North American Nursing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Commission on Graduates of Foreign Nursing Schools, Philadelphia, PA.

    This document, prepared under the auspices of the Trilateral Initiative for North American Nursing, a professional organization of nursing, examines and compares nursing standards in Canada, Mexico, and the United States. The report focuses on first-level, general nurses and advanced or specialty practice nurses, and is organized in four parts:…

  7. Strengthening Preceptors' Competency in Thai Clinical Nursing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mingpun, Renu; Srisa-ard, Boonchom; Jumpamool, Apinya

    2015-01-01

    The problem of lack of nurses can be solved by employing student nurses. Obviously, nurse instructors and preceptors have to work extremely hard to train student nurses to meet the standard of nursing. The preceptorship model is yet to be explored as to what it means to have an effective program or the requisite skills to be an effective…

  8. Sexual Harassment in Nursing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duldt, Bonnie W.

    1982-01-01

    Sexual harassment in the workplace, specifically in nursing, is discussed. The impact of sexual harassment, characteristics of those commonly involved, the need for changing attitudes of men and women in the workplace, the factor of power in relationships, and ways to avoid legal suits are all examined. (CT)

  9. Consultancy pay for nurses.

    PubMed

    1998-01-01

    Nurses working for NHS Direct could be paid at medical consultant level based on equal pay for equal work initiatives, according to Rob Crouch, Deputy Director and Research Fellow (A&E), Centre for the Advancement of Clinical Practice, University of Surrey.

  10. Nursing Telehealth Applications Initiative

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    doses with you. The list should include your prescription meds, vitamins, over the counter meds and herbal supplements . Also include your medication...undergraduate nursing students [Abstract]. Telemedicine and e-Health, 15, supplement 1, 63. 92 INVITED: 2010 Videoconferencing for Clinical Learning and

  11. A Nursing School Cooperative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fraser, Carolyn; Polacsek, Barbara K.

    1975-01-01

    Faculty in five suburban Chicago nursing programs successfully joined together to share inservice programs and curtail duplication of resources and costs, through newsletters, computerized inventories of instructional materials and media owned by each, and inservice training luncheons. Coordinating the scheduling of students' clinical time at…

  12. Nurse Assistant Instructor Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connecticut State Dept. of Education, Hartford. Div. of Vocational, Technical, and Adult Education.

    This document is designed to assist the teacher in a nurse assistant certification program. The program is intended to prepare students for entry-level employment in a long-term care facility or with a licensed home health care agency. The 135-hour course teaches basic skills in patient care that will qualify the student to assist the licensed…

  13. [The transport nurse].

    PubMed

    Le Gal, Ludovic

    2015-01-01

    Caring, reassuring, supporting and repatriating people in medical distress from anywhere in the world: such is the day-to-day work of the repatriation nurses at Mondial Assistance. Ludovic Le Gal has been doing this job for the last eleven years with a passion which has remained undiminished.

  14. Academic Inbreeding in Nursing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Michael H.

    1977-01-01

    Academic inbreeding, the employment for faculty positions of persons who receive their graduate training at the same academic institution, is considered detrimental to an institution's academic environment. Results of a study conducted at 54 universities revealed that almost half the faculty (48 percent) in collegiate nursing programs are drawn…

  15. Enhanced nurse call systems.

    PubMed

    2001-04-01

    This Evaluation focuses on high-end computerized nurse call systems--what we call enhanced systems. These are highly flexible systems that incorporate microprocessor and communications technologies to expand the capabilities of the nurse call function. Enhanced systems, which vary in configuration from one installation to the next, typically consist of a basic system that provides standard nurse call functionality and a combination of additional enhancements that provide the added functionality the facility desires. In this study, we examine the features that distinguish enhanced nurse call systems from nonenhanced systems, focusing on their application and benefit to healthcare facilities. We evaluated seven systems to determine how well they help (1) improve patient care, as well as increase satisfaction with the care provided, and (2) improve caregiver efficiency, as well as increase satisfaction with the work environment. We found that all systems meet these objectives, but not all systems perform equally well for all implementations. Our ratings will help facilities identify those systems that offer the most effective features for their intended use. The study also includes a Technology Management Guide to help readers (1) determine whether they'll benefit from the capabilities offered by enhanced systems and (2) target a system for purchase and equip the system for optimum performance and cost-effective operation.

  16. Reference Sources for Nursing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nursing Outlook, 1976

    1976-01-01

    The ninth revision (including a Canadian supplement) of a list of nursing reference works lists items in the following sections: abstract journals, audiovisuals, bibliographies, dictionaries, directories, drug lists and pharmacologies, educational programs, histories, indexes, legal guides, library administration and organization, research grants,…

  17. RX for School Nursing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smolkin, Rachel

    2003-01-01

    Describes how some districts are coping with nursing shortages and tight budgets by employing several approaches to providing health services to students, including requesting additional services from existing staff, establishing partnerships with local health agencies and hospitals, and obtaining information about school-health programs from…

  18. Nurse prescribing in Poland

    PubMed Central

    Binkowska-Bury, Monika; Więch, Paweł; Bazaliński, Dariusz; Marć, Małgorzata; Bartosiewicz, Anna; Januszewicz, Paweł

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to identify and examine the differences in opinions held by health care professionals and the general public concerning the right to administer and prescribe medication which has been awarded to nurses and midwives in Poland. The study was conducted from December 1, 2014 to July 1, 2015, in randomly selected primary health care clinics, among 2227 individuals, including 849 subjects representing medical personnel of primary health care and 1378 patients receiving primary care services. The study used 2 versions of a questionnaire. The relationships were examined with χ2 test for independence and Kruskal–Wallis test. Health professionals do not believe the new rights awarded to nurses and midwives will reduce the waiting time for medical consultations (P < 0.001). Nurses’ qualifications for the new tasks were most highly rated by patients, whereas the least favorable opinion was expressed by doctors (P < 0.001). To introduce nurse prescribing it is necessary to develop a suitable strategy enabling implementation of the government's initiative and facilitating the process of taking up the new task by nurses. PMID:27537573

  19. Using advanced mobile devices in nursing practice--the views of nurses and nursing students.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Pauline; Petersson, Göran; Saveman, Britt-Inger; Nilsson, Gunilla

    2014-09-01

    Advanced mobile devices allow registered nurses and nursing students to keep up-to-date with expanding health-related knowledge but are rarely used in nursing in Sweden. This study aims at describing registered nurses' and nursing students' views regarding the use of advanced mobile devices in nursing practice. A cross-sectional study was completed in 2012; a total of 398 participants replied to a questionnaire, and descriptive statistics were applied. Results showed that the majority of the participants regarded an advanced mobile device to be useful, giving access to necessary information and also being useful in making notes, planning their work and saving time. Furthermore, the advanced mobile device was regarded to improve patient safety and the quality of care and to increase confidence. In order to continuously improve the safety and quality of health care, advanced mobile devices adjusted for nursing practice should be further developed, implemented and evaluated in research.

  20. Remote nursing certified practice: viewing nursing and nurse practitioner practice through a social justice lens.

    PubMed

    Tarlier, Denise S; Browne, Annette J

    2011-06-01

    Remote Nursing Certified Practice (RNCP) was introduced in 2010 to regulate nursing practice in remote, largely First Nations communities in British Columbia, Canada. These are communities that often experience profound health and health-care inequities. Typically nurses are the main health-care providers. Using a critical social justice lens, the authors explore the clinical and ethical implications of RNCP in terms of access to equitable, high-quality primary health care.They examine the fit between the level and scope of health services provided by registered nurses working under RNCP and the health needs of remote First Nations communities. In doing so, they draw comparisons between nurse practitioners (NPs) and outpost nurses working in NP roles who historically were employed to provide health care in these communities.The authors conclude by calling for nursing regulations that support equitable, high-quality primary care for all British Columbians.

  1. Practices of self-medication with antibiotics among nursing students of Institute of Nursing, Dow University of Health Sciences, Karachi, Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Ali, Akbar Shoukat; Ahmed, Javed; Ali, Akbar Shoukat; Sonekhi, Gomand Beekho; Fayyaz, Nargis; Zainulabdin, Zeeshan; Jindani, Rahim

    2016-02-01

    Self-medication practice among nursing students is of growing concern. Access to drugs and handling them in their future practices make nursing students susceptible to self-prescription and self-medication. This cross-sectional study assesses the prevalence and pattern of self-medication with antibiotics among nursing students of Institute of Nursing, Dow University of Health Sciences, Karachi, Pakistan. A random sample of convenience of 160 nursing students underwent a predesigned questionnaire. More than half of nursing students 79 (52.7%) experienced self-medication with antibiotics. It was more prevalent among males 49 (62%) . Knowledge about the drug 59 (74.7%) and convenience 13 (16.5%) were the key reasons to self-medicate. Fever 37 (46.8%) and sore throat 27 (34.2%) were the common symptoms predisposing to self-medication. Beta-lactam group of antibiotics 35 (44.3%) was most frequent used. Only 26 (32.9%) respondents completed the entire antibiotic course. Efforts must be directed towards educating nursing students about responsible and informed self-medication practices.

  2. Meiosis in male Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    McKee, Bruce D.; Yan, Rihui; Tsai, Jui-He

    2012-01-01

    Meiosis entails sorting and separating both homologous and sister chromatids. The mechanisms for connecting sister chromatids and homologs during meiosis are highly conserved and include specialized forms of the cohesin complex and a tightly regulated homolog synapsis/recombination pathway designed to yield regular crossovers between homologous chromatids. Drosophila male meiosis is of special interest because it dispenses with large segments of the standard meiotic script, particularly recombination, synapsis and the associated structures. Instead, Drosophila relies on a unique protein complex composed of at least two novel proteins, SNM and MNM, to provide stable connections between homologs during meiosis I. Sister chromatid cohesion in Drosophila is mediated by cohesins, ring-shaped complexes that entrap sister chromatids. However, unlike other eukaryotes Drosophila does not rely on the highly conserved Rec8 cohesin in meiosis, but instead utilizes two novel cohesion proteins, ORD and SOLO, which interact with the SMC1/3 cohesin components in providing meiotic cohesion. PMID:23087836

  3. Sport and male sexuality.

    PubMed

    Sgrò, P; Di Luigi, L

    2017-03-22

    The relationships between sport and sexuality in males are of great social and clinical interest, because of sports and motor activities that highly promote social and sexual relationships. Even if few literature exist, two main questions should be taken into account: whether and how physical exercise and sport positively or negatively influence sexual health and behavior and/or whether and how sexual behavior may affect a sub-sequent sport performance. Physical exercise and sport per se can influence, positively or negatively, the hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular axis function and, consequently, the individual's reproductive and/or sexual health. This depends on individual factors such as genetic and epigenetic ones and on different variables involved in the practice of sport activities (type of sport, intensity and duration of training, doping and drug use and abuse, nutrition, supplements, psychological stress, allostatic load, etc.). If well conducted, motor and sport activities could have beneficial effects on sexual health in males. Among different lifestyle changes, influencing sexual health, regular physical activity is fundamental to antagonize the onset of erectile dysfunction (ED). However, competitive sport can lead both reproductive and/or sexual tract damages and dysfunctions, transient (genital pain, hypoesthesia of the genitalia, hypogonadism, DE, altered sexual drive, etc.) or permanent (hypogonadism, DE, etc.), by acting directly (traumas of the external genitalia, saddle-related disorders in cyclists, etc.) or indirectly (exercise-related hypogonadism, drug abuse, doping, stress, etc.). Sexual activities shortly performed before a sport competition could differently influence sport performance. Due to the few existing data, it is advisable to avoid an absolute pre-competition sexual abstinence.

  4. [Obesity and male fertility].

    PubMed

    Martini, Ana C; Molina, Rosa I; Ruiz, Rubén D; Fiol de Cuneo, Marta

    2012-01-01

    Obesity and male infertility have increased in the last decades; therefore, a possible association between these pathologies has been explored. Studies inform that obesity may affect fertility through different mechanisms, which alltogether could exert erectile dysfunction and/or sperm quality impairment. These include: 1) hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular (HPG) axis malfunction: obese hormonal profile is characterized by reduction of testosterone, gonadotrophins, SHBG and/or inhibin B concentrations (marker of Sertoli cells function) and hyperestrogenemy (consequence of aromatase overactivity ascribed to adipose tissue increase); 2) increased release of adipose-derived hormones: leptin increase could be responsible for some of the alterations on the HPG axis and could also exert direct deleterious effects on Leydig cells physiology, spermatogenesis and sperm function; 3) proinflammatory adipokines augmentation, higher scrotal temperature (due to fat accumulation in areas surrounding testes) and endocrine disruptors accumulation in adiposites, all of these responsible for the increase in testes oxidative stress and 4) sleep apnea, frequent in obese patients, suppresses the nocturnal testosterone rise needed for normal spermatogenesis. Finally, although controversial, all the above mentioned factors could comprise gametes quality; i.e. decrease sperm density and motility and increase DNA fragmentation, probably disturbing spermatogenesis and/or epididymal function. In summary, although obesity may impair male fertility by some/all of the described mechanisms, the fact is that only a small proportion of obese men are infertile, probably those genetically predisposed or morbidly obese. Nevertheless, it is likely that because the incidence of obesity is growing, the number of men with reduced fertility will increase as well.

  5. Staff nurses and their solutions to the nursing shortage.

    PubMed

    Lynn, Mary R; Redman, Richard W

    2006-10-01

    Nurses in acute care hospitals report that situations in their work setting and profession are in dire need of repair. Although they waiver on their intention to remain in their institution and nursing, they do not waiver on their selected resolution to nursing's shortage. A total of 787 staff nurses in eight geographically and demographically diverse states responded and were asked to select the "Top 5" actions they thought would improve nursing and decrease the shortage. Creating career ladders was endorsed by most respondents (85%) with increasing pay endorsed by the fewest (33%). When selecting the single most important action, they reversed the order--increased pay was the most endorsed (26%), and creating career ladders and increased educational opportunities were endorsed by less than 1%. Nurses appeared to be concerned about the profession in general; however, when asked the "most important" thing to do, an age-old action was selected--increase pay.

  6. Coalitions and male-male behavior in Alouatta palliata.

    PubMed

    Dias, Pedro Américo D; Rangel-Negrin, Ariadna; Veà, Joaquim J; Canales-Espinosa, Domingo

    2010-01-01

    Coalitions influence the establishment and maintenance of social relationships among males in primate species. In this study, we compare the social behavior of males between two groups of Alouatta palliata: a group that was recently taken over by a coalition of two males (Mt), and a group that had a stable composition for at least 9 months (Rh). We predicted that coalition partners would be more cooperative and less competitive than dyads formed by immigrant and long-term resident males, and dyads formed by long-term resident males. Additionally, we predicted that these dyadic trends should be reflected in more competition and less cooperation in the group that was taken over. As predicted, the coalition partners of Mt showed the highest levels of cooperation among all dyads and the second lowest rate of agonism. Cooperation was higher in the group that had a stable composition. Results from this study suggest that the social relationships of male mantled howlers vary as a function of familiarity between males and that in the context of coalitionary takeovers, coalitionary males are highly cooperative. Cooperation is lower in groups recently taken over and competition is more intense, perhaps as a consequence of the process of establishment and reorganization of power relationships within some dyads. In the future, we must determine the frequency of coalitionary takeovers in this population and assess its ultimate consequences for male-male social relationships.

  7. Filipino Nurses' Spirituality and Provision of Spiritual Nursing Care.

    PubMed

    Labrague, Leodoro J; McEnroe-Petitte, Denise M; Achaso, Romeo H; Cachero, Geifsonne S; Mohammad, Mary Rose A

    2016-12-01

    This study was to explore the perceptions of Filipino nurses' spirituality and the provision of spiritual nursing care. A descriptive, cross-sectional, and quantitative study was adopted for this study. The study was conducted in the Philippines utilizing a convenience sample of 245 nurses. Nurses' Spirituality and Delivery of Spiritual Care (NSDSC) was used as the main instrument. The items on NSDSC with higher mean scores related to nurses' perception of spirituality were Item 7, "I believe that God loves me and cares for me," and Item 8, "Prayer is an important part of my life," with mean scores of 4.87 (SD = 1.36) and 4.88 (SD = 1.34), respectively. Items on NSDSC with higher mean scores related to the practice of spiritual care were Item 26, "I usually comfort clients spiritually (e.g., reading books, prayers, music, etc.)," and Item 25, "I refer the client to his/her spiritual counselor (e.g., hospital chaplain) if needed," with mean scores of 3.16 (SD = 1.54) and 2.92 (SD = 1.59). Nurse's spirituality correlated significantly with their understanding of spiritual nursing care (r = .3376, p ≤ .05) and delivery of spiritual nursing care (r = .3980, p ≤ .05). Positive significant correlations were found between understanding of spiritual nursing care and delivery of spiritual nursing care (r = .3289, p ≤ .05). For nurses to better provide spiritual nursing care, they must care for themselves through self-awareness, self-reflection, and developing a sense of satisfaction and contentment.

  8. 42 CFR 409.21 - Nursing care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... professional nurse. (b) Exception. Medicare does not pay for the services of a private duty nurse or attendant. An individual is not considered to be a private duty nurse or attendant if he or she is an...

  9. Nurse Discontent: The Search for Realistic Solutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ginzberg, Eli; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Following a report on the findings of a survey of North Florida nurses, the authors present several approaches for nursing administrators to consider when searching for more productive strategies to improve retention of hospital nurses. (CT)

  10. Training Advanced Practice Palliative Care Nurses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherman, Deborah Witt

    1999-01-01

    Describes the role and responsibilities of advanced-practice nurses in palliative care and nursing's initiative in promoting high-quality care through the educational preparation of these nurses. (JOW)

  11. Educating Nurse Administrators: One Program's Answer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCloskey, Joanne C.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Describes the master's program in nursing at the University of Iowa, which uses experienced nurse administrators as adjunct faculty members. Discusses core course content, the two-course sequence in nursing administration, and problems with the present curriculum. (CT)

  12. The making of a nurse entrepreneur.

    PubMed

    Porter-O'Grady, T

    1998-03-01

    Nursing provides many opportunities for professional and career advancement. The entrepreneurial pathway is especially benefited by a nursing background. Focusing on the opportunities that nursing provides for the entrepreneur opens almost any door in health care.

  13. Defining professional nursing accountability: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Krautscheid, Lorretta C

    2014-01-01

    Professional nursing accountability is described by both professional nursing organizations and nursing education credentialing agencies as a core aspect that underpins professional nursing practice. Although accountability is foundational to professional practice, a review of the literature revealed no consistent language or definition regarding professional nursing accountability. Instead, the literature itself reveals that professional nursing accountability is challenging to both describe and define. The ambiguity surrounding how to define professional nursing accountability contributes to challenges associated with both teaching and evaluating student nurse accountability within nursing education curricula. This article provides a reliable and comprehensive definition of professional nursing accountability derived from a synthesis of the literature. Recommendations for nursing education practice and recommendations for nursing education research are proposed.

  14. Evaluating nursing collections with the ICIRN's Essential Nursing Resources list.

    PubMed

    Raszewski, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    This study examines libraries' nursing collections using the Interagency Council on Information Resources in Nursing's Essential Nursing Resources' (ENR) 26th edition. An inventory of the online collections of 235 libraries was assembled and compared to free, government, or National Library of Medicine resources and licensed resources from the ENR. The top five resources listed on library websites in descending order were MEDLINE, CINAHL, ERIC, PsycINFO, and Google Scholar. The availability of specialized resources varied, based on factors such as the level of nursing degree at each institution or the libraries' National Network of Libraries of Medicine membership statuses.

  15. [Nursing ethics and the access to nursing care].

    PubMed

    Monteverde, Settimio

    2013-08-01

    The increasing number of ethical issues highlighted in everyday nursing care demonstrates the connectedness between nursing ethics and nursing practice. However, what is the role of ethical theories in this context? This question will be examined in this article by analysing the contribution made by the ethics of care, in particular in understandings of gender roles, asymmetries of power, professional knowledge and experience. The adoption and criticism of an emergent nursing ethics is discussed and stated from different viewpoints. The actuality of the caring approach is affirmed by a new reading of the given situation. This article first describes the traditional perception of nurses as marginalised actors in the health sector. By making reference to the current and growing global scarcity of nursing care, it contends that nursing will no longer be marginalised, but instead at the centre of public health attention and reputation. Nevertheless, marginalisation will persist by increasingly affecting the care receivers, especially those groups that are pushed to the fringes by the consequences of the healthcare market, such as persons of extreme old age, suffering from multiple morbidities, or with poor health literacy. Whereas the "classical" understanding of the ethics of care focuses on the nurse-patient relationship and on individual care and understanding of ethics, the new understanding confirms the classical, but adds an understanding of social ethics: caring for the access to care is seen as a main ethical goal of social justice within a nursing ethic.

  16. Differentiating between a consultant nurse and a clinical nurse specialist.

    PubMed

    Maylor, Miles

    With the introduction of nurse consultants, and regulation of the use of the designation 'specialist nurse', experienced practitioners such as clinical nurse specialists have seen their position eroded. Nurse consultants are a new NHS-employment category, and are expected to be at the top rank of the profession both in status and in salary. However, this article argues that nurses at various levels have the same core functions, and that these do not differ for nurse consultants. Distinguishing between practitioners that might have the same job description could be better done by measuring outcomes. More care needs to be taken over the use of words such as 'expert', which is used differently in different contexts, and it is suggested that competencies be developed by which to measure the effects of expertise. Although nurse consultant appointments are often driven by various political directives and they are employed to meet local and national priorities, difficult issues need to be faced. First, if nurse consultant jobs are the top of the clinical career ladder, will clinical nurse specialists (CNSs) need to accept a lower rung on it? Further, perhaps the title CNS should become obsolete or be regulated? Can CNSs claim parity of pay using the 'Agenda for Change' framework?

  17. Towards understanding the unpresentable in nursing: some nursing philosophical considerations.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Brenda L

    2006-01-01

    While nursing practice embodies certain observable and sometimes habitual actions, much inheres in these actions that is not immediately discernible. Taking on Lyotard's exegesis of the unpresentable, I undertake an analysis of the unpresentable as it occurs in nursing practices. The unpresentable is a place of alterity often excluded from dominant discourses. Yet this very alterity is what practising nurses face day after day. Drawing from two nursing situations, one from a hermeneutic phenomenological study and the other from the literature, I elucidate the unpresentable from a nursing point of view. Evoking Lyotard as well as selected philosophers from the continental philosophical tradition, I also question whether nursing in its present discourse is capable of responding to the unpresentable in nursing situations. Through the philosophical stance of presentation and representation, I delineate the urgent need to bring the otherness of the unpresentable into our nursing discourse. Nurses in practice confront a wide array of human differences and diversities and come to the realization that no framework alone can ever really have primacy over the multiform presentations of human suffering that so strikingly evoke alterity.

  18. California's minimum-nurse-staffing legislation and nurses' wages.

    PubMed

    Mark, Barbara; Harless, David W; Spetz, Joanne

    2009-01-01

    In 2004, California became the first state to implement minimum-nurse-staffing ratios in acute care hospitals. We examined the wages of registered nurses (RNs) before and after the legislation was enacted. Using four data sets-the National Sample Survey of Registered Nurses, the Current Population Survey, the National Compensation Survey, and the Occupational Employment Statistics Survey-we found that from 2000 through 2006, RNs in California metropolitan areas experienced real wage growth as much as twelve percentage points higher than the growth in the wages of nurses employed in metropolitan areas outside of California.

  19. The National Stroke Nursing Council: a nursing call for action.

    PubMed

    Hardy-Joel, Rhonda; Green, Teri

    2007-01-01

    Nursing is fundamental to the care of stroke patients. From the acute setting all the way to rehabilitation and community reintegration, nursing is there. Having well-educated and highly skilled nurses to monitor and care for stroke patients is crucial. Equally important is the collaboration of colleagues at a national level to facilitate and disseminate research and best practice guidelines across Canada. The National Stroke Nursing Council aims to fill this role. Stroke nurses from across Canada were invited to a national forum in 2005, hosted by the Canadian Stroke Network. The focus of this forum was to elucidate issues of concern to nurses across the stroke care continuum in relation to a Canadian Stroke Strategy. Subsequent to this forum, a cadre of nurses, after undergoing a rigorous screening process, were selected to form the inaugural National Stroke Nursing Council (NSNC). With ongoing support from the Canadian Stroke Network, the mandate of the NSNC is to promote leadership, communication, advocacy, education and nursing research in the field of stroke.

  20. Nursing practice environment: a strategy for mental health nurse retention?

    PubMed

    Redknap, Robina; Twigg, Di; Rock, Daniel; Towell, Amanda

    2015-06-01

    Historically, mental health services have faced challenges in their ability to attract and retain a competent nursing workforce in the context of an overall nursing shortage. The current economic downturn has provided some respite; however, this is likely to be a temporary reprieve, with significant nursing shortages predicted for the future. Mental health services need to develop strategies to become more competitive if they are to attract and retain skilled nurses and avoid future shortages. Research demonstrates that creating and maintaining a positive nursing practice environment is one such strategy and an important area to consider when addressing nurse retention. This paper examines the impact the nursing practice environment has on nurse retention within the general and mental health settings. Findings indicate, that while there is a wealth of evidence to support the importance of a positive practice environment on nurse retention in the broader health system, there is little evidence specific to mental health. Further research of the mental health practice environment is required.

  1. Nurses' and Nursing Students' Knowledge and Attitudes regarding Pediatric Pain

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz, Mario I.; Ponce-Monter, Héctor A.; Rangel-Flores, Eduardo; Castro-Gamez, Blanca; Romero-Quezada, Luis C.; O'Brien, Jessica P.; Romo-Hernández, Georgina; Escamilla-Acosta, Marco A.

    2015-01-01

    Nursing staff spend more time with patients with pain than any other health staff member. For this reason, the nurse must possess the basic knowledge to identify the presence of pain in patients, to measure its intensity and make the steps necessary for treatment. Therefore, a prospective, descriptive, analytical, and cross-sectional study was conducted to investigate the knowledge and attitudes regarding pediatric pain in two different populations. The questionnaire, Pediatric Nurses Knowledge and Attitudes Survey Regarding Pain (PKNAS), was applied to 111 hospital pediatric nurses and 300 university nursing students. The final scores for pediatric nurses and nursing students were 40.1 ± 7.9 and 40.3 ± 7.5, respectively. None of the sociodemographic variables predicted the scores obtained by the participants (P > 0.05). There was a high correlation between the PKNAS scores of pediatric nurses and nursing students (r = 0.86, P < 0.001). It was observed that the degree of knowledge about pain and its treatment was very low in both groups. Due to this deficiency, pain in children remains inadequately managed, which leads to suffering in this population. It is necessary to increase the continued training in this subject in both areas. PMID:26543643

  2. Nurses' and Nursing Students' Knowledge and Attitudes regarding Pediatric Pain.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, Mario I; Ponce-Monter, Héctor A; Rangel-Flores, Eduardo; Castro-Gamez, Blanca; Romero-Quezada, Luis C; O'Brien, Jessica P; Romo-Hernández, Georgina; Escamilla-Acosta, Marco A

    2015-01-01

    Nursing staff spend more time with patients with pain than any other health staff member. For this reason, the nurse must possess the basic knowledge to identify the presence of pain in patients, to measure its intensity and make the steps necessary for treatment. Therefore, a prospective, descriptive, analytical, and cross-sectional study was conducted to investigate the knowledge and attitudes regarding pediatric pain in two different populations. The questionnaire, Pediatric Nurses Knowledge and Attitudes Survey Regarding Pain (PKNAS), was applied to 111 hospital pediatric nurses and 300 university nursing students. The final scores for pediatric nurses and nursing students were 40.1 ± 7.9 and 40.3 ± 7.5, respectively. None of the sociodemographic variables predicted the scores obtained by the participants (P > 0.05). There was a high correlation between the PKNAS scores of pediatric nurses and nursing students (r = 0.86, P < 0.001). It was observed that the degree of knowledge about pain and its treatment was very low in both groups. Due to this deficiency, pain in children remains inadequately managed, which leads to suffering in this population. It is necessary to increase the continued training in this subject in both areas.

  3. [Reading nursing Literature in English: new inputs for practicing nurses].

    PubMed

    von Klitzing, Waltraut; Stoll, Hansruedi; Trachsel, Edith; Aldorf, Kurt; Bernhard, Annelis; Eze, Germaine; Spirig, Rebecca

    2007-02-01

    A prerequisite to providing evidence-based care is the ability to comprehend the nursing research literature, most of which is published in English. To facilitate this understanding, a course on "reading the research literature for evidence-based practice in English" was developed by an interdisciplinary team for staff nurses at the University Hospital Basel. The pilot course was offered to nurses who specialized in cancer care. It was led by the oncology Advanced Practice Nurse (APN) from the Department of Medicine. Research articles focusing on the management of chronic illness and cancer pain management were assigned and read. The course consisted of ten 90 minute lessons. The evaluation was designed to address the following questions: 1. Did participation in the course improve the oncology related knowledge of the nurses? 2. Did participation in the course improve the nurses' English language skills? 3. At what level of difficulty did the nurse participants perceive the course to be? 4. Were course participants able to use their newly acquired knowledge to teach their nursing colleagues on the ward? The course evaluation demonstrated that the 15 participants significantly improved their oncology knowledge through this process but that their English skills did not improve. The participants were able to present lectures on their wards based on the course literature, which were positively evaluated by their colleagues and the APN course leader. The participants perceived the course as being sophisticated but also effective at demonstrating the use of English-language research literature for one's own nursing practice.

  4. Contracting for nurse education: nurse leader experiences and future visions.

    PubMed

    Moule, P

    1999-02-01

    The integration of nurse education into higher education establishments following Working for Patients, Working Paper 10 (DOH 1989a) has seen changes to the funding and delivery of nurse education. The introduction of contracting for education initiated a business culture which subsumed previous relationships, affecting collaborative partnerships and shared understanding. Discourse between the providers and purchasers of nurse education is vital to achieve proactive curriculum planning, which supports the development of nursing practitioners who are fit for award and fit for purpose. Research employed philosophical hermeneutics to guide the interviewing of seven nurse leaders within one region. Data analysis occurred within a hermeneutic circle and was refined using NUDIST. Two key themes were seen as impacting on the development of an effective educational strategy. Firstly, the development of collaborative working was thought to have been impeded by communication difficulties between the Trusts and higher education provider. Secondly, there was concern that curriculum developments would support the future evolution of nursing, acknowledging the professional issues impacting on nursing roles. The research findings suggest purchasers and providers of nurse education must move towards achieving mutual understanding and collaborate in developing a curriculum which will prepare nurses for practice and for award.

  5. Informatics competencies for nurse practitioners.

    PubMed

    Curran, Christine R

    2003-08-01

    Informatics knowledge and skills are essential if clinicians are to master the large volume of information generated in healthcare today. Thus, it is vital that informatics competencies be defined for nursing and incorporated into both curricula and practice. Staggers, Gassert, and Curran have defined informatics competencies for four general levels of nursing practice. However, informatics competencies by role (eg, those specific for advanced practice nursing) have not been defined and validated. This article presents an initial proposed list of informatics competencies essential for nurse practitioner education and practice. To this list, derived from the work of Staggers et al., 1 has been added informatics competencies related to evidence-based practice. Two nurse informaticists and six nurse practitioners, who are program directors, were involved in the development of the proposed competencies. The next step will be to validate these competencies via research.

  6. Big Data and Perioperative Nursing.

    PubMed

    Westra, Bonnie L; Peterson, Jessica J

    2016-10-01

    Big data are large volumes of digital data that can be collected from disparate sources and are challenging to analyze. These data are often described with the five "Vs": volume, velocity, variety, veracity, and value. Perioperative nurses contribute to big data through documentation in the electronic health record during routine surgical care, and these data have implications for clinical decision making, administrative decisions, quality improvement, and big data science. This article explores methods to improve the quality of perioperative nursing data and provides examples of how these data can be combined with broader nursing data for quality improvement. We also discuss a national action plan for nursing knowledge and big data science and how perioperative nurses can engage in collaborative actions to transform health care. Standardized perioperative nursing data has the potential to affect care far beyond the original patient.

  7. The globalization of nursing knowledge.

    PubMed

    Holt, J; Barrett, C; Clarke, D; Monks, R

    2000-08-01

    External influences placed upon nurses working in universities and in clinical practice require them to attract research funding, carry out research, generate new knowledge and publish in national and international journals. While there does not appear to be an agreed, unified body of nursing knowledge, critical and scholarly debate is essential to generate knowledge, but this is not an activity in which the majority of nurses can effectively participate. Nevertheless, nurses in the Western world are free to communicate their research, theories or ideas, essentially uncensored, to a vast invisible audience, and there is global dissemination through a vast array of literature and educational materials. This paper challenges nurses to examine the implications of globalization and suggests that the continuing debate on the nature of nursing knowledge should be updated to include consideration of both a change in philosophical stance and the far reaching effects of global dissemination of information.

  8. Education of nurses in genetics.

    PubMed Central

    Forsman, I

    1988-01-01

    The need for education of nurses in genetics was articulated more than 25 years ago. This article reviews the knowledge of practicing nurses about genetics as well as the content of genetics in nursing curricula. Implementation of federal legislation that mandated increased availability of genetic services and genetics education provided support for the examination of genetics content in curricula for health professionals, including nurses, and for the development of model programs to expand this content. Recent efforts to begin to develop a pool of nurse faculty who are well prepared in genetics will be described, as well as programs to provide the necessary content through continuing-education efforts. These efforts are expected to substantially improve the capability of nurses to contribute more effectively in the delivery of genetic services. PMID:3177390

  9. Nursing informatics competencies: bibliometric analysis.

    PubMed

    Kokol, Peter; Blažun, Helena; Vošner, Janez; Saranto, Kaija

    2014-01-01

    Information and communication technology is developing rapidly and it is incorporated in many health care processes, but in spite of that fact we can still notice that nursing informatics competencies had received limited attention in basic nursing education curricula in Europe and especially in Eastern European countries. The purpose of the present paper is to present the results of a bibliometric analysis of the nursing informatics competencies scientific literature production. We applied the bibliometrics analysis to the corpus of 332 papers found in SCOPUS, related to nursing informatics competencies. The results showed that there is a positive trend in the number of published papers per year, indicating the increased research interest in nursing informatics competencies. Despite the fact that the first paper was published in Denmark, the most prolific country regarding the research in nursing informatics competencies is United States as are their institutions and authors.

  10. Critical thinking in nurse managers.

    PubMed

    Zori, Susan; Morrison, Barbara

    2009-01-01

    Formal education and support is needed for nurse managers to effectively function in their role in the current health care environment. Many nurse managers assume their positions based on expertise in a clinical role with little expertise in managerial and leadership skills. Operating as a manager and leader requires ongoing development of critical thinking skills and the inclination to use those skills. Critical thinking can have a powerful influence on the decision making and problem solving that nurse managers are faced with on a daily basis. The skills that typify critical thinking include analysis, evaluation, inference, and deductive and inductive reasoning. It is intuitive that nurse managers require both the skills and the dispositions of critical thinking to be successful in this pivotal role at a time of transformation in health care. Incorporating critical thinking into education and support programs for the nurse manager is necessary to position the nurse manager for success.

  11. Radiofrequency Ablation: A Nursing Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Locklin, Julia K.; Wood, Bradford J.

    2008-01-01

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) has emerged as a safe and predictable technology for treating certain patients with cancer who otherwise have few treatment options. Nurses need to be familiar with all phases of the RFA procedure to create an optimal environment for patients. This article offers a brief review of the RFA procedure and nurses' responsibilities in caring for these patients. Before RFA, nurses should focus on patient education and aggressive hydration. During the procedure, nurses can prevent injury by placing grounding pads appropriately, monitoring vital signs, and medicating patients as needed. After RFA, nurses should assess the skin puncture site, provide adequate pain relief, and, again, hydrate patients. Nurses who care appropriately for RFA recipients may help to improve patient outcomes and make an otherwise frightening procedure more comfortable. PMID:15973845

  12. Changing how nurses spend their time.

    PubMed

    Prescott, P A; Phillips, C Y; Ryan, J W; Thompson, K O

    1991-01-01

    The results of work sampling studies are used to examine how nurses spend their time and to relate nurses' time to the shortage of nursing practice in hospitals. Four types of proposals for improving the delivery of nursing care in hospitals are discussed. The likely impact of these proposals on how nurses spend their time and the consequences of increasing the effectiveness of professional nursing practice are explored.

  13. Retention in the Navy Nurse Corps

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-12-01

    earner and brought many inactive nurses back into the labor force. Rapid salary growth for nurses and nursing education subsidies also boosted the...income maximizers. The economic return on investment in nursing education has never been high relative to other occupations. Quality of working life is...end of the percentage scale most likely represents nurses in administrative or nursing education positions, where patient contact is often minimal. The

  14. Medical authority and nursing integrity

    PubMed Central

    de Raeve, L

    2002-01-01

    This paper explores the respective legitimacy or illegitimacy of medical authority over nursing work. The analysis makes use of Joseph Raz's ideas concerning the nature of authority. Various scenarios are considered which lend themselves to differing interpretations, and the conclusion reached is that acting in accordance with legitimate medical authority enhances rather than compromises the nurse's professional integrity. Difficulties, however, may lie in disentangling legitimate from illegitimate attempts to control nursing work. PMID:12468653

  15. Nurses' Perceptions of Quality Care.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Catherine; Powlesland, Jean; Phillips, Cynthia; Raszewski, Rebecca; Johnson, Alexia; Banks-Enorense, Kelly; Agoo, Victor C; Nacorda-Beltran, Rosalind; Halloway, Shannon; Martin, Kathleen; Smith, Lenore D; Walczak, Debra; Warda, Jane; Washington, Barbara J; Welsh, Julie

    Limited research has been conducted on how nurses define or perceive "quality nursing care." We conducted focus groups to identify nurses' perceptions of quality care at a Midwestern academic medical center. Transcripts of the focus group sessions were analyzed using thematic analysis techniques, and 11 themes emerged: Leadership, Staffing, Resources, Timeliness, Effective Communication/Collaboration, Professionalism, Relationship-Based Care, Environment/Culture, Simplicity, Outcomes, and Patient Experience.

  16. Nursing faculty shortage in 2009.

    PubMed

    Sims, Jennifer M

    2009-01-01

    As everyone is well aware, we are in the midst of a nursing shortage-one with no end in sight at the present time. But are you aware that we also have a shortage of nursing faculty? This article will briefly describe the current and predicted shortage of faculty, potential reasons for the shortage, current ways of coping, and the future for nursing faculty.

  17. The Nurse Reinvestment Act revisited.

    PubMed

    Luther, Ann P

    2007-01-01

    The United States is in the midst of a widely recognized critical nursing shortage. In 2002 the "Nurse Reinvestment Act" was passed with overwhelming bipartisan support in an effort to address this serious public health threat. The Act is due for reauthorization of funding in 2007. This paper provides a brief overview of the programs contained within the Act and describes practical ways in which members of the nursing community can take action to insure renewed support for the Act.

  18. Genomics Nursing Faculty Champion Initiative

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, Jean; Calzone, Kathleen A.

    2016-01-01

    Nurse faculty are challenged to keep up with the emerging and fast-paced field of genomics and the mandate to prepare the nursing workforce to be able to translate genomic research advances into routine clinical care. Using Faculty Champions and other options, the initiative stimulated curriculum development and promoted genomics curriculum integration. The authors summarize this yearlong initiative for undergraduate and graduate nursing faculty. PMID:24300251

  19. [Clinical activity in nursing education].

    PubMed

    Brignon, Béatrice

    2009-12-01

    The purpose of this research is to enlight the actual nursing act of the student in order to search for what makes sense in his (her) self nursing becoming and to reinterpret what is said regarding what is done. Up till, researchs were focused on declarative intentions; instead here, we go beyond using an innovative approach based on the clinical activity research method applied to the nursing education field.

  20. Patient cues that predict nurses' triage decisions for acute coronary syndromes.

    PubMed

    Arslanian-Engoren, Cynthia

    2005-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the patient cues that emergency department (ED) nurses use to triage male and female patients with complaints suggestive of acute coronary syndromes (ACSs) and to determine if cues used by ED nurses to make clinical inferences varied by patient sex or nurses' demographic characteristics. Using clinical vignette questionnaires with different patient characteristics, ED nurses' triage decisions were evaluated to determine the patient cues used to predict ACS. Men and women were equally likely to be given an ACS triage decision and this was not affected by nurses' demographic characteristics. However, nurses used different cues to triage men and women with complaints suggestive of ACS, although by receiver operating characteristic curves, the differences between sexes were small. In addition, female vignette patients were more likely than male vignette patients to be assigned a suspected cause of cholecystitis for their presentation in a small subset of 13 (11:2; odds ratio, 1.653; 95% confidence interval, 1.115-24.47; p=.036). This study provides insight into the complex phenomenon of triage decision making and warrants further exploration.

  1. The male experience of ISC with a silicone catheter.

    PubMed

    Logan, Karen

    Since its introduction in the 1970s, intermittent self-catheterisation (ISC) has become more common and should be considered the method of choice for draining retained urine. The realisation for male patients that they require catheterisation can be associated with a significant physical and psychological burden (Shaw and Logan, 2013). This article describes a UK multi-centre patient satisfaction survey evaluating the features of a male ISC silicone catheter. The survey was aimed at determining patient preferences and perceptions of learning ISC with the intermittent catheter to evaluate if a silicone catheter is acceptable and user friendly. This information is intended to be used to expand the knowledge base around catheter selection and help guide nurses who offer a choice of catheters when teaching ISC to patients.

  2. Male-male interactions and mating kinetics in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Wallace, B

    1990-05-01

    Male-male interaction (K) has been estimated from data on the attrition rate of virgin females per minute in a study of the mating kinetics in Drosophila. K is expressed as the time males expend on other males relative to that expended while searching for, courting, and copulating with females. The value of K in these studies ranged from 0 (approximately) to .695; it was affected both by strain (sepia or ebony D. melanogaster and wild-type D. simulans) and by size of the mating chamber. Host-parasitoid models of ecologists appear to be appropriate for examining mating kinetics in Drosophila.

  3. Mating and male pheromone kill Caenorhabditis males through distinct mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Cheng; Runnels, Alexi M; Murphy, Coleen T

    2017-01-01

    Differences in longevity between sexes is a mysterious yet general phenomenon across great evolutionary distances. To test the roles of responses to environmental cues and sexual behaviors in longevity regulation, we examined Caenorhabditis male lifespan under solitary, grouped, and mated conditions. We find that neurons and the germline are required for male pheromone-dependent male death. Hermaphrodites with a masculinized nervous system secrete male pheromone and are susceptible to male pheromone killing. Male pheromone-mediated killing is unique to androdioecious Caenorhabditis, and may reduce the number of males in hermaphroditic populations; neither males nor females of gonochoristic species are susceptible to male pheromone killing. By contrast, mating-induced death, which is characterized by germline-dependent shrinking, glycogen loss, and ectopic vitellogenin expression, utilizes distinct molecular pathways and is shared between the sexes and across species. The study of sex- and species-specific regulation of aging reveals deeply conserved mechanisms of longevity and population structure regulation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.23493.001 PMID:28290982

  4. The Impact of State Nursing Home Staffing Standards on Nurse Staffing Levels.

    PubMed

    Paek, Seung Chun; Zhang, Ning J; Wan, Thomas T H; Unruh, Lynn Y; Meemon, Natthani

    2016-02-01

    This study investigated the impact of state nursing home staffing standards on nurse staffing levels for the year 2011. Specifically, the study attempted to measure state staffing standards at facility level (i.e., nurse staffing levels that each individual nursing home must retain by its state staffing standards) and analyzed the policy impact. The study findings indicated that state staffing standards for the categories of registered nurse, licensed nurse, or total nurse are positively related to registered nurse, licensed nurse, or total nurse staffing levels, respectively. Nursing homes more actively responded to licensed staffing requirements than total staffing requirements. However, nursing homes did not increase their staffing levels as much as those required by state staffing standards. It is possibly because the quality-oriented inspection allows flexibility in nursing homes' control of nurse staffing levels.

  5. The Air Force Nurse Intern Program.

    PubMed

    Smith, R H

    1991-08-01

    The Air Force Nurse Intern Program is a 5-month-long introduction to Air Force nursing for BSN-prepared graduate nurses. The program is designed to facilitate the transition from civilian nursing student to practicing Air Force Nurse Corps Officer. After attending Military Indoctrination for Medical Service Officers, newly commissioned nurses attend the program at one of 10 Air Force medical centers before going to their permanent duty stations. Preceptors guide and instruct the interns at each of four clinical rotation sites. The author, a former nurse intern, describes some of the many opportunities available to nurse interns.

  6. Enhancing geriatric nursing scholarship: specialization versus generalization.

    PubMed

    Mezey, M; Fulmer, T; Fairchild, S

    2000-07-01

    This article explores the relative merits of encouraging preparation of more nurses with specialization in geriatrics as compared to encouraging geriatric preparation among nurses whose major field of study is outside geriatrics. The article explores two approaches to examining capacity for geriatric nursing scholarship among nurse scholars not involved in geriatrics, and in schools of nursing with strength in research but with little geriatric research. The findings show an ongoing need to strengthen geriatric nursing as an area of specialization. Faculty prepared in geriatric nursing are underrepresented in schools of nursing, and only a small number of doctoral students specialize in geriatric nursing. Academic nursing programs with strength in geriatric nursing need ongoing support to maintain and expand current geriatric programs. Data support that encouraging individual non-geriatric nurse faculty and doctoral candidates to focus their work on areas of concern to geriatric nursing, and strengthening geriatrics in research-intensive schools of nursing that have not heavily invested in geriatric scholarship are viable options for strengthening academic geriatric nursing. Establishing mechanisms to attract nurse scholars working outside the scope of geriatric nursing to address clinical issues of concern to older adults offers promise in rapidly attracting new scholars to geriatric nursing.

  7. Developing Global Nurse Influencers.

    PubMed

    Spies, Lori A

    2016-01-01

    How can universities create engaged citizens and global leaders? Each year, a select group of advanced practice nursing students at Baylor University Louise Herrington School of Nursing travel to Africa for a month-long clinical mission experience. Students work alongside local and missionary healthcare providers in a comprehensive Christian outreach to the community at a high-volume clinic. Creating rich learning experiences in a global setting in significant and sustainable ways is difficult, but intentionally focusing on what we are called to do and who we serve provides ballast for faculty and students. The success of the trip in preparing students to be global influencers is evident by the work graduates elect to do around the world, following graduation.

  8. Moral realism in nursing.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Steven D

    2014-04-01

    For more than 15 years Professor Per Nortvedt has been arguing the case for moral realism in nursing and the health-care context more generally. His arguments focus on the clinical contexts of nursing and medicine and are supplemented by a series of persuasive examples. Following a description of moral realism, and the kinds of considerations that support it, criticisms of it are developed that seem persuasive. It is argued that our moral responses are explained by our beliefs as opposed to moral realities. In particular, two key arguments presented by Nortvedt are challenged: the so-called argument from convergence and the argument from clinical sensitivity. Both of these key planks in the case for moral realism are rejected, and an alternative 'social conditioning' account briefly sketched, which, it is claimed, has the same explanatory power as Nortvedt's thesis but does not rest on an appeal to independently existing moral properties.

  9. Suicide in Guyana: Nurses' Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Anthony, Maureen; Groh, Carla; Gash, Jean

    Guyana, an English-speaking country on the north coast of South America, has the highest suicide rate in the world. Nurses are an integral part of the healthcare team working with patients experiencing psychological distress and are uniquely qualified to add to the discourse on factors contributing to the high suicide rate in Guyana. The purpose of this study was to explore the attitudes and experiences of nurses and nurse assistants in Guyana related to suicide. Nine registered nurses and nurse assistants who worked at a private hospital in Georgetown, Guyana, were recruited to participate in a focus group. The focus group lasted approximately 70 minutes and was recorded. The audio recordings were later transcribed word for word. Four themes emerged from the data: family issues as they relate to the high suicide rate, suicide attempts as a cry for help, lack of support, and coping mechanisms used by nurses when caring for victims of attempted suicide. Nurses are uniquely positioned to intervene with families in crisis, whether it be suicide, suicide attempts, or the underlying factors of family dysfunction, child maltreatment, poverty, or alcoholism. Establishing forensic nursing as a specialty in Guyana would validate this important role through education and certification of nurses.

  10. An agenda for nurse leaders.

    PubMed

    1994-04-20

    The health service's new ' chief executive, Alan Langlands, is now in place. Also in place, perhaps surprisingly, is his broad strategy for the future of nursing management. Mr Langlands officially took up his post as Chief Executive of the NHS Management Executive (ME) on the first of this montli and has given every indication of his enthusiasm to stop nursing drifting into the policy doldrums that have threatened it over recent years. While there have been nursing initiatives aplenty since the beginning of the NHS marketplace changes, many now languish on forgotten shelves through lack of central will, pushed aside by the latest 'urgent' ministerial agenda. Remember the original Strategy for Nursing?

  11. Strategies for retaining midcareer nurses.

    PubMed

    McGillis Hall, Linda; Lalonde, Michelle; Dales, Lorraine; Peterson, Jessica; Cripps, Lauren

    2011-12-01

    One method of reducing predicted shortages because of the aging nursing workforce is to increase retention. Few studies have examined the unique needs of midcareer nurses. A mixed-method approach including surveys and focus groups was used to identify key retention strategies and desires for midcareer nurses. Salary, benefits, positive working relationships, flexible scheduling, and the opportunity for continued education were identified as key retention strategies from this study. Registered nurses in this study reported higher perceptions of their work and work environment than licensed practical nurses did. Differences in work outcomes were evident across sectors, with community nurses reporting higher levels of job satisfaction and perceptions of work quality than nurses in acute and long-term care. Findings suggest that recruitment opportunities may exist with midcareer nurses seeking employment to return to work after time off to have a family. Proactive retention policies that focus on the needs of midcareer nurses would demonstrate a commitment and interest in keeping them in their work positions and in the profession.

  12. Nursing students with latex allergy.

    PubMed

    Katrancha, Elizabeth D; Harshberger, Lorri A

    2012-11-01

    Latex allergy affects millions of people in the general population and a higher percentage of health care workers. Nursing students with a latex sensitivity pose a unique challenge for the nurse educator. Students may enter the program with pre-existing latex allergy or develop the allergy during the educational process. This manuscript explores the implications of latex allergies exhibited by the nursing student. It addresses the responsibilities of the educator in the skills or simulation laboratory and during clinical learning experiences. It also offers suggestions for ensuring the safety of the student while reducing the legal liabilities of the educational program. The article addresses possible policy ramifications for nursing schools.

  13. Empowering Nurses for Professional Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlson-Catalano, Judy

    1992-01-01

    Empowering teaching strategies encourage leadership, critical thinking, problem solving, and collegiality and discourage passivity, isolation, and subordination. Empowerment prepares nurses for professional practice in hospitals. (SK)

  14. Nurses' knowledge of inadvertent hypothermia.

    PubMed

    Hegarty, Josephine; Walsh, Ella; Burton, Aileen; Murphy, Sheila; O'gorman, Fionuala; McPolin, Gráinne

    2009-04-01

    Inadvertent hypothermia can have significant consequences in the perioperative setting. Knowing how to recognize and manage inadvertent hypothermia is an important aspect of perioperative nursing. A quantitative, descriptive study was conducted at an annual perioperative nursing conference to evaluate nurses' knowledge regarding the prevention of inadvertent perioperative hypothermia. Significant variations in responses regarding definitions of hypothermia and normothermia were noted. In addition, nurses identified a plethora of factors that prevent them from maintaining normothermia in their patients. These factors mandate a need for educational interventions and the adoption of practice guidelines in the clinical area.

  15. Knowledge-based nursing diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Claudette; Hay, D. Robert

    1991-03-01

    Nursing diagnosis is an integral part of the nursing process and determines the interventions leading to outcomes for which the nurse is accountable. Diagnoses under the time constraints of modern nursing can benefit from a computer assist. A knowledge-based engineering approach was developed to address these problems. A number of problems were addressed during system design to make the system practical extended beyond capture of knowledge. The issues involved in implementing a professional knowledge base in a clinical setting are discussed. System functions, structure, interfaces, health care environment, and terminology and taxonomy are discussed. An integrated system concept from assessment through intervention and evaluation is outlined.

  16. [Postmodernism and nursing knowledge development].

    PubMed

    Yeh, Lily; Chen, Ching-Huey

    2008-08-01

    Postmodernism is a philosophical and social movement which stresses that ideas are temporary, research data should be considered only in context, reality is transcendent, grand theories are invalid, problems are deconstructed, and findings should have practical value. Manifestations of the postmodern paradigm are reflected in the epistemological shifts of nursing science and knowledge development in the professional community of nurses in Western countries. This article explores the context within which this movement emerged, delineates how it has deconstructed "language" and "subject" to frame a new paradigm and outlines related implications on nursing knowledge development. Both challenges and opportunities face the nursing profession as it evolves into a postmodern paradigm.

  17. [Discourses on the nursing and psychiatric nurse models, published in the Annals of Nursing (1933-1951)].

    PubMed

    Pereira, Michelle de Macedo; Padilha, Maria Itayra; de Oliveira, Alexandre Barbosa; Santos, Tânia Cristina Franco; Filho, Antonio José de Almeida; Peres, Maria Angélica de Almeida

    2014-06-01

    Social-historical study aimed at discussing the nursing and psychiatric nurse models, from the discourses published in the Annals of Nursing.The historical sources were articles published in the Annals of Nursing journal, from 1933 to 1951. An analysis of the discourse was subsidized by the genealogy of power by Michel Foucault.The analysis showed that the discourse on nursing and the psychiatric nurse, in the first half of the 20th century, is set, on one side, by the propositions used by psychiatrists, who sought to reiterate stereotypes and vocations to practice nursing, and, on the other side, by the active participation of nurses seeking to legitimize expertise for psychiatric nursing. It was concluded that the discourses analyzed defined a psychiatric care focused on the nurse and not the rest of the nursing staff, at that time.

  18. [Aromatherapy in nursing homes].

    PubMed

    Barré, Lucile

    2015-01-01

    Pierre Delaroche de Clisson hospital uses essential oils as part of its daily organisation for the treatment of pain and the development of palliative care. The setting up of this project, in nursing homes and long-term care units, is the fruit of a complex mission carried out by a multidisciplinary team, which had to take into account the risks involved and overcome a certain amount of reluctance.

  19. What do nurses know?

    PubMed

    Luntley, Michael

    2011-01-01

    This paper defends an epistemic conservatism - propositional knowing-that suffices for capturing all the fine details of the knowledge of experienced nurses that depends on the complex ways in which they are embedded in shared fields of activity. I argue against the proliferation of different ways of knowing associated with the work of Dreyfus and Benner. I show how propositional knowledge can capture the detail of the phenomenology that motivates the Dreyfus/Benner proliferation.

  20. Job satisfaction among primary health care physicians and nurses in Al-madinah Al-munawwara.

    PubMed

    Al Juhani, Abdullah M; Kishk, Nahla A

    2006-01-01

    Job satisfaction is the affective orientation that an employee has towards his work. Greater physician satisfaction is associated with greater patient adherence and satisfaction. Nurses' job satisfaction, have great impact on the organizational success. Knowing parts of job dissatisfaction among physicians and nurses is important in forming strategies for retaining them in primary health care (PHC) centers. Therefore, this study aimed at assessing the level of job satisfaction among PHC physicians and nurses in Al- Madina Al- Munawwara. Also, to explore the relationship of their personal and job characteristics with job satisfaction. A descriptive cross- sectional epidemiological approach was adopted. A self completion questionnaire was distributed to physicians and nurses at PHC centers. A multi-dimensional job scale adopted by Traynor and Wade (1993) was modified and used. The studied sample included 445 health care providers, 23.6% were physicians and 76.4% were nurses. Job dissatisfaction was highly encountered where 67.1% of the nurses & 52.4% of physicians were dissatisfied. Professional opportunities, patient care and financial reward were the most frequently encountered domains with which physicians were dissatisfied. The dissatisfying domains for majority of nurses were professional opportunities, workload and appreciation reward. Exploring the relation between demographic and job characteristics with job satisfaction revealed that older, male, non-Saudi, specialists physicians had insignificantly higher mean score of job satisfaction than their counterparts. While older, female, non-Saudi, senior nurses had significantly higher mean score than their counterparts. It is highly recommended to reduce workload for nurses and provision of better opportunities promotional for PHC physicians and nurses.

  1. Determinants of hospital-to-nursing home placement delays: a pilot study.

    PubMed Central

    Weissert, W G; Cready, C M

    1988-01-01

    Estimates of hospital-to-nursing home placement delays have always been varied, and given Medicare's new Prospective Payment System (PPS) based on diagnosis-related groups (DRGs), they are likely to have changed again. Theory and previous research suggest that four patient characteristics are the main causes of delays: Medicaid as the patient's nursing home payer source; need for heavy care due to major physical or mental problems; admission to the hospital from a nursing home; and lack of social support. A pilot study of all 1,016 elderly awaiting nursing home placement in two admission cohorts (pre- and post-PPS) from the three largest hospitals in the county surrounding Charlotte, North Carolina--where nursing home beds are in short supply--indicates that other factors are more important. While most placements were delayed, delays were short. Multiple regression results show that Medicaid patients' delays were only about a day longer than those of private-pay patients. Of the many heavy-care conditions studied, only three were associated with delay. Patients without social support and patients admitted from a nursing home, discharged to a hospital-affiliated facility, or placed after PPS had shorter delays. Long delays were found among patients who had applied for Medicaid coverage but had not yet been certified as financially eligible. Nonwhites and males were also delayed. These findings, if replicated in other areas with perceived nursing home bed shortages, appear to have important implications not only for the usefulness of nursing home case-mix reimbursement and subacute levels of nursing home care, but for nursing home bed-need estimates, too, as well as for Medicaid eligibility determination practices and civil rights law enforcement. PMID:3060449

  2. The Nurse's Medication Day

    PubMed Central

    Jennings, Bonnie Mowinski; Sandelowski, Margarete; Mark, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    The medication administration stage of the medication-use process is especially vulnerable to error because errors are least likely to be caught before reaching the patient. Medication administration, however, remains poorly understood. In this article we describe medication administration as observed in an ethnographic study conducted on one medical and one surgical unit. A central finding was that medication administration entailed a complex mixture of varied and often competing demands that temporally structured the nurses' entire workday. Articulation work was evident in time management strategies nurses used to handle demands from institutional policies, technical devices, patients, the physical environment, and the medications themselves. The average number of doses of medication per patient was more than double the number policy groups have indicated. Medication administration is neither simply the giving of drugs nor does it have clearly defined temporal boundaries. Because of its inseparability from other nurses' work, medication administration inherently entails interruption, thereby calling into question the current emphasis on reducing interruptions as a tactic to decrease medication errors. PMID:21693688

  3. Attachment styles as predictors of empathy in nursing students.

    PubMed

    Khodabakhsh, Mohammadreza

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies have traced a relationship between the attachment styles of nurses working as in healthcare teams and their empathy which is an essential characteristic required of people concerned with managing relationships, supporting social events, and improving the of nurse-patient relationships. Since determining the effective variables in the quality of nurse-patient relationships in clinical settings is of paramount importance, current investigation is an effort to examine the relationship between attachment styles and empathy in nursing students. 260 university students (male = 130 and female = 130) were chosen as the sample of the study based upon specific inclusion criteria. All participants completed the Attachment Style Questionnaire (ASQ) and the Interpersonal Reactivity Index (IRI). Data was collected and analyzed using Pearson correlation coefficient and regression analysis with SPSS (v.18). The results showed that secure and insecure attachment styles have significant positive and negative correlation with empathy respectively. Based on the results of regression analysis, it was shown that secure attachment style is predicting 53% of the variance empathy variable, whereas insecure attachment styles are explaining up to 76% of the variance empathy variable collectively. The increase of attention to instructions that focus on empathetic relationships with patients and that are based upon the secure attachment style can result in positive changes in the area of nurse-patient relations and in increasing attention to medical ethics. Findings are consistent with prediction derived from attachment theory and add to our understanding of relationship between attachment styles with empathy in nursing students. The meaning and limitations of this study and suggestions for further research are also discussed.

  4. Dermatoglyphic pattern in male infertility.

    PubMed

    Sontakke, B R; Talhar, S; Ingole, I V; Shende, M R; Pal, A K; Bhattacharaya, T

    2013-06-01

    Dermatoglyphics in infertile male patients were studied and compared with that of age matched controls to see whether any specific dermatoglyphic pattern exists in infertile male patients. Infertile male patients with abnormal semen profile were referred to Cytogenetic Laboratory for karyotyping. We selected twenty-four infertile male patients with abnormal semen profile. Out of twenty-four infertile male patients, nineteen were with normal Karyotype and five patients were with abnormal Karyotype. Loop was the commonest pattern observed in the infertile male patients. All these fingertip and palmar dermatoglyphic findings were compared with that of result on finger and palmar dermatoglyphics of equal number of age matched controls. Statistical evaluation was done with software "EPI- info, version-6.04 d". Infertile males had reduced number of loops as compared to that of controls which was statistically significant. Total whorls were increased in infertile male patients as compared to that of controls which was statistically insignificant. Percentage of true palmar pattern in I 3 and I 4 areas was reduced in infertile male patients as compared to that of controls which was statistically insignificant.

  5. Coaching the alpha male.

    PubMed

    Ludeman, Kate; Erlandson, Eddie

    2004-05-01

    Highly intelligent, confident, and successful, alpha males represent about 70% of all senior executives. Natural leaders, they willingly take on levels of responsibility most rational people would find overwhelming. But many of their quintessential strengths can also make alphas difficult to work with. Their self-confidence can appear domineering. Their high expectations can make them excessively critical. Their unemotional style can keep them from inspiring their teams. That's why alphas need coaching to broaden their interpersonal tool kits while preserving their strengths. Drawing from their experience coaching more than 1,000 senior executives, the authors outline an approach tailored specifically for the alpha. Coaches get the alpha's attention by inundating him with data from 360-degree feedback presented in ways he will find compelling--both hard-boiled metrics and vivid verbatim comments from colleagues about his strengths and weaknesses. A 360-degree assessment is a wake-up call for most alphas, providing undeniable proof that their behavior doesn't work nearly as well as they think it does. That paves the way for a genuine commitment to change. In order to change, the alpha must venture into unfamiliar--and often uncomfortable--psychological territory. He must admit vulnerability, accept accountability not just for his own work for others', connect with his underlying emotions, learn to motivate through a balance of criticism and validation, and become aware of unproductive behavior patterns. The goal of executive coaching is not simply to treat the alpha as an individual problem but to improve the entire team dynamic. Initial success creates an incentive to persevere, and the virtuous cycle reverberates throughout the entire organization.

  6. Gendered spaces, gendered pages: Union women in Civil War nurse narratives.

    PubMed

    Telford, Jennifer Casavant; Long, Thomas Lawrence

    2012-12-01

    This interdisciplinary analysis joins literary and culture studies with history using Daphne Spain's theory of gendered spaces. Specifically, we examine the reconfiguration of the spaces of military medical work and of book publishing that produced popular literary representations of those medical spaces. As a social historian of nursing and a scholar of American literature and culture, we argue that the examination of Civil War narratives by or about Northern female nurses surveys a landscape in which women penetrated the masculine spaces of the military hospital and the literary spaces of the wartime narrative. In so doing, these women transformed these spaces into places acknowledging and even relying upon what had been traditionally considered male domains. Like many historiographical papers written about nurses and the impact of their practice over time, this work is relevant to those practicing nursing today, specifically those issues related to professional authority and professional autonomy.

  7. Is the experience of meaningful activities understood in nursing homes? A qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Palacios-Ceña, Domingo; Gómez-Calero, Cristina; Cachón-Pérez, José Miguel; Velarde-García, Juan Francisco; Martínez-Piedrola, Rosa; Pérez-De-Heredia, Marta

    2016-01-01

    Lack of occupation can lead to boredom, apathy, social exclusion and solitude. Occupation should incorporate meaningful activities. The aim of this study is to describe how Spanish Nursing Home residents experienced and made sense of meaningful activities. A qualitative phenomenological approach was followed. Data were collected over an 18-month period between 2012 and 2014. Purposeful sampling was conducted with Spanish residents in nursing homes in Madrid. Data were collected using unstructured and semi-structured interviews. The data were analyzed using the Giorgi proposal. Thirty-eight residents (20 female and 18 male) participated. Three main themes describing the significance of meaningful activity in nursing homes emerged from the data: Feeling the passage of time, Seeking an occupation, and Living with restrictions. Nursing homes should strive to develop diverse and meaningful activity programs for residents in order to occupy their time and provide them with a greater sense of purpose.

  8. Nursing in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit, Nursing 205.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Varton, Deborah M.

    A description is provided of a course, "Nursing in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit," offered for senior-level baccalaureate degree nursing students. The first section provides information on the place of the course within the curriculum, the allotment of class time, and target student populations. The next section looks at course content in…

  9. Nursing Effort and Quality of Care for Nursing Home Residents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arling, Greg; Kane, Robert L.; Mueller, Christine; Bershadsky, Julie; Degenholtz, Howard B.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between nursing home staffing level, care received by individual residents, and resident quality-related care processes and functional outcomes. Design and Methods: Nurses recorded resident care time for 5,314 residents on 156 units in 105 facilities in four states (Colorado,…

  10. Beyond "Hot Lips" and "Big Nurse": Creative Writing and Nursing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Sandra

    2005-01-01

    This essay describes a special topics creative writing course designed for nursing students, and argues that creative writing strategies work to improve nurses' compositional skills. Also discussed are other potential benefits from creatively writing patients' lives, notably, the blending of arts and sciences, and the ways in which medical schools…

  11. The Nurse as Patient Advocate: Implications for Nurse Education Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banja, John D.

    This essay examines ethical considerations in the nurse patient relationship, in particular the relationship between "professional morality" and the nurse's professional identity in the role of advocate for doctors, patients, and hospitals. A discussion of ethics and professionals explores professional ethics, the need for such ethics,…

  12. Professional nursing values among baccalaureate nursing students in Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Lui, May H L; Lam, Lai Wah; Lee, Iris F K; Chien, Wai Tong; Chau, Janita P C; Ip, Wan Yim

    2008-01-01

    The development of a nursing code of professional conduct is to guide nurses to make appropriate clinical decision, in particular when facing ethical dilemma. It is of paramount importance that nurse educators understand baccalaureate nursing students' perceptions of the importance of the code of professional conduct and the level of difficulties in implementing this code while preparing them for future practicing nurses. The Code of Professional Conduct in Hong Kong has been developed to guide nursing practice for over two decades. Nevertheless, no study has examined Hong Kong baccalaureate nursing students' perception about this professional code. The aim of this paper was to examine the perceptions of 263 baccalaureate nursing students about this professional code using a cross sectional survey design. The results indicated that most items in the professional code were rated as important and "provide safe and competent care" was rated as the most important one. A few areas that the students perceived as difficult to implement were discussed and future research was recommended. The significant differences identified among students from different years of study also highlighted areas for consideration in planning educational program to further equip students with the ability to deal with challenges in professional practice.

  13. Pediatric Nurse Practitioner Program: Theories for Extended Pediatric Nursing Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brady, Margaret A.

    A description is provided of "Theories for Extended Pediatric Nursing Practice," a required course for pediatric and family nurse practitioner students in a California state university program. The course description presents information on the curricular placement of the course, prerequisites, in-class time allotments, and the focus of the course…

  14. Using Computerized Clinical Nursing Data Bases for Nursing Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nail, Lillian M.; Lange, Linda L.

    1996-01-01

    Addresses the recognition of differences between clinical and research data in using computerized clinical nursing databases and the issues of privacy and confidentiality for patients whose records are involved. Describes procedures for assessing the quality and usability of these data for nursing research. (SK)

  15. Nurse learners--do nurse tutors know them?

    PubMed

    Moule, P

    1995-04-01

    Research was undertaken to establish the social profile of Project 2000 (Diploma) learners, and to determine when, and with whose influence, learners make decisions to enter nursing. The image of nursing held by the group was sought and nurse tutors perceptions of the group were obtained, using a questionnaire method. Results analysed using statistical measures and content analysis showed that the majority of learners came from middle socio-economic backgrounds, generally decided to enter nursing whilst at school, and were influenced by nursing role models and the media. The learners perceptions and expectations of nursing were influenced by their experiences and showed some differences when compared with tutor responses. The findings from this small study imply the need for the dissemination of accurate and appropriate recruitment information to school personnel and career advisors. Effective marketing which addresses influences of the media and nursing role models should be employed, and finally nurse tutors need to be conversant with course content and learner expectations to facilitate effective recruitment policies and curriculum development.

  16. Seminar: Legal Perspectives of Nursing Practice. Nursing 89.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willis, Odette P.

    This course outline provides information to be used by students in conjunction with Nursing 89, a seminar on the legal aspects of nursing to be offered starting in Spring 1982 at Diablo University (California). General information is provided first, including a class calendar, a statement defining the purpose of the course, an outline of…

  17. Partnership nursing: recovering lost threads of the nursing story.

    PubMed

    Potter, Teddie M

    2012-01-01

    Nursing has been challenged to claim full partnership with other health care providers. To reach this goal nurse educators must ensure that curriculum and textbooks provide appropriate content on the nature and use of power, how to collaborate, and how to develop partnerships.

  18. The Naïve nurse: revisiting vulnerability for nursing

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Nurses in the Western world have given considerable attention to the concept of vulnerability in recent decades. However, nurses have tended to view vulnerability from an individualistic perspective, and have rarely taken into account structural or collective dimensions of the concept. As the need grows for health workers to engage in the global health agenda, nurses must broaden earlier works on vulnerability, noting that conventional conceptualizations and practical applications on the notion of vulnerability warrant extension to include more collective conceptualizations thereby making a more complete understanding of vulnerability in nursing discourse. Discussion The purpose of this paper is to examine nursing contributions to the concept of vulnerability and consider how a broader perspective that includes socio-political dimensions may assist nurses to reach beyond the immediate milieu of the patient into the dominant social, political, and economic structures that produce and sustain vulnerability. Summary By broadening nurse’s conceptualization of vulnerability, nurses can obtain the consciousness needed to move beyond a peripheral role of nursing that has been dominantly situated within institutional settings to contribute in the larger arena of social, economic, political and global affairs. PMID:22520841

  19. Eliciting nursing knowledge from practice: the dualism of nursing.

    PubMed

    Ramprogus, Vince

    2002-01-01

    Nursing knowledge has traditionally been examined and developed through the main research approaches based on the positivist, interpretive or phenomenological philosophies. These approaches are used either from a single and individual stance or combined to address particular research questions. They all, however, retain a focus that deals primarily or exclusively with what can be measured, observed or expressed as a fundamental unit of analysis to reconstruct, interpret and explain nursing practice. In this paper, Vince Ramprogus challenges the traditional approach to how nursing knowledge is defined and the common understanding of the purpose of nursing research. It is argued that adhering to empirical rigour while investigating or measuring nursing practice interferes with the very act and experience of nursing. Indeed, it becomes an either/or situation. It is also argued that nursing is not an empirical subject, and, therefore, the purpose of researching nursing is not about seeking the truth but about improving practice to achieve better patient care. The arguments are intended to provoke discussion and debate rather than to present a set position.

  20. "Promotores'" Perspectives on a Male-to-Male Peer Network

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macia, Laura; Ruiz, Hector Camilo; Boyzo, Roberto; Documet, Patricia Isabel

    2016-01-01

    Little documentation exists about male community health workers ("promotores") networks. The experiences of "promotores" can provide input on how to attract, train, supervise and maintain male "promotores" in CHW programs. We present the experience and perspectives of "promotores" who participated in a male…

  1. International nurse migration: lessons from the Philippines.

    PubMed

    Brush, Barbara L; Sochalski, Julie

    2007-02-01

    Developed countries facing nursing shortages have increasingly turned to aggressive foreign nurse recruitment, primarily from developing nations, to offset their lagging domestic nurse supplies and meet growing health care demands. Few donor nations are prepared to manage the loss of their nurse workforce to migration. The sole country with an explicit nurse export policy and the world's leading donor of nurse labor - the Philippines - is itself facing serious provider maldistribution and countrywide health disparities. Examining the historical roots of Philippines nurse migration provides lessons from which other nurse exporting countries may learn. The authors discuss factors that have predicated nurse migration and policies that have eased the way. Furthermore, the authors analyze how various stakeholders influence migratory patterns, the implications of migration for nurses and the public in their care, and the challenges that future social policy and political systems face in addressing global health issues engendered by unfettered recruitment of nurses and other health workers.

  2. Bullying in undergraduate clinical nursing education.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Colette M; Kane, Deborah J; Rajacich, Dale L; Lafreniere, Kathryn D

    2012-05-01

    Although a limited number of studies have focused on bullying in nursing education to date, all of those studies demonstrate the existence of bullying in clinical settings, where nursing students undertake a significant amount of their nursing education. The purpose of this study was to examine the state of bullying in clinical nursing education among Canadian undergraduate nursing students (N = 674) in all 4 years of their nursing program. Results suggest that nursing students experience and witness bullying behaviors at various frequencies, most notably by clinical instructors and staff nurses. Third-year and fourth-year students experience more bullying behaviors than first-year and second-year students. Implications for practice include ensuring that clinical instructors are well prepared for their role as educators. Policies must be developed that address the issue of bullying within nursing programs and within health care facilities where nursing students undertake their clinical nursing education.

  3. Who provides nursing services in Cambodian hospitals?

    PubMed Central

    Sakurai-Doi, Yukie; Mochizuki, Noriko; Phuong, Keat; Sung, Chao; Visoth, Pheng; Sriv, Bun; Amara, Sar Rath; Murakami, Hitoshi; Komagata, Tomoko; Fujita, Noriko

    2014-01-01

    In Cambodia, the number of nurses is insufficient and details of nursing services are unknown and undocumented. This research explored who provides nursing service activities in Cambodia. The study was conducted at nine hospitals in Cambodia. Findings indicate that non-invasive medical care such as vital signs taking was designated to nurses. In performing more complex medical interventions, nurses shared the tasks with medical doctors. Conversely, simpler nursing tasks, including maintaining bedside environment/hygiene and supporting patient activities, tasks were shared by nurses with patients' family. This study elucidated an optimal personnel mix and task shared between nurses, doctors and patients' families. There are important implications for nursing legislation related to streamlining the production of nurses to provide an adequate and qualified nursing service in Cambodia. PMID:24661282

  4. Results from the Nurse Manifest 2003 study: nurses' perspectives on nursing.

    PubMed

    Jarrín, Olga F

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to raise awareness, inspire action, and open dialogue about professional values and workplace conditions. Results of the Nurse Manifest 2003 Study are presented through meta-synthesis of group summaries answering the questions: What is it like to practice nursing? and, What changes do nurses desire to support practice? The results illuminate the underlying framework of professional values that splits our profession, nursing units, and educational institutions. An analysis of the similarities and differences within and between groups reflect values which are rooted in the history of our profession and affected by present working conditions.

  5. Licensed Nurse and Nursing Assistant Recognition of Delirium in Nursing Home Residents With Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Steis, Melinda R; Behrens, Liza; Colancecco, Elise M; Mogle, Jacqueline; Mulhall, Paula M; Hill, Nikki L; Fick, Donna M; Kolankowski, Ann M

    2016-01-01

    Many nursing home residents experience delirium. Nursing home personnel, especially nursing assistants, have the opportunity to become familiar with residents’ normal cognitive function and to recognize changes in a resident’s cognitive function over time. The purpose of this study was to determine the accuracy of delirium recognition by licensed nurses and nursing assistants from eight nursing homes over a 12-month period. Participants were asked to complete five case vignette assessments at three different time points (in 6-month intervals) to test their ability to identify different subtypes of delirium and delirium superimposed on dementia (DSD). A total of 760 case vignettes were completed across the different time points. Findings reveal that staff recognition of delirium was poor. The case vignette describing hyperactive DSD was correctly identified by the greatest number participants, and the case vignette describing hypoactive DSD was correctly identified by the least number of participants. Recognition of the case vignette describing hypoactive delirium improved over time. Nursing assistants performed similarly to the licensed nurses, indicating that all licensed nursing home staff require further education to correctly recognize delirium in older adults. PMID:28042285

  6. Measuring nursing informatics competencies of practicing nurses in Korea: Nursing Informatics Competencies Questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Chung, Seon Yoon; Staggers, Nancy

    2014-12-01

    Informatics competencies are a necessity for contemporary nurses. However, few researchers have investigated informatics competencies for practicing nurses. A full set of Informatics competencies, an instrument to measure these competencies, and potential influencing factors have yet to be identified for practicing nurses. The Nursing Informatics Competencies Questionnaire was designed, tested for psychometrics, and used to measure beginning and experienced levels of practice. A pilot study using 54 nurses ensured item comprehension and clarity. Internal consistency and face and content validity were established. A cross-sectional survey was then conducted on 230 nurses in Seoul, Korea, to determine construct validity, describe a complete set of informatics competencies, and explore possible influencing factors on existing informatics competencies. Principal components analysis, descriptive statistics, and multiple regression were used for data analysis. Principal components analysis gives support for the Nursing Informatics Competencies Questionnaire construct validity. Survey results indicate that involvement in a managerial position and self-directed informatics-related education may be more influential for improving informatics competencies, whereas general clinical experience and workplace settings are not. This study provides a foundation for understanding how informatics competencies might be integrated throughout nurses' work lives and how to develop appropriate strategies to support nurses in their informatics practice in clinical settings.

  7. Nursing students’ perceptions of their educational environment in the bachelor’s programs of the Shifa College of Nursing, Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The objective of this study was to evaluate nursing students’ perceptions of their educational environment in a private college. Perceptions were compared between genders and 2 bachelor’s programs. Methods A total of 219 students participated in this study, drawn from the Generic Bachelor of Science in Nursing (GBSN) and the Post-Registered Nurse Bachelor of Science in Nursing (PRBSN) programs of the Shifa College of Nursing, Islamabad, Pakistan. The Dundee Ready Education Environment Measure was utilized for data collection. Descriptive statistics were used to calculate total scores, as well as means and standard deviations, and the t-test was applied for comparisons according to program and gender. Results The overall total mean score (119 of 200) is suggestive of more positive than negative perceptions of the educational environment. The mean score of 13 of 28 on the social self-perception subscale suggests that the social environment was felt to be ‘not a nice place.’ The t-test revealed more positive perceptions among students enrolled in the PRBSN program (P<0.0001) than among those enrolled in the GBSN program and more positive perceptions among female students than among male students (P<0.0001). Conclusion Commonalities and differences were found in the perceptions of the nursing students. Both positive and negative perceptions were reported; the overall sense of a positive environment was present, but the social component requires immediate attention, along with other unsatisfactory components. Establishing a supportive environment conducive to competence-based learning would play an important role in bringing desirable changes to the educational environment. PMID:28013314

  8. The rights of Christian women in nursing.

    PubMed

    Parfitt, B

    1996-01-01

    In this paper I have attempted to suggest that the Christian nurse who recognises the importance and significance of their personal characteristics as a woman and as a nurse is able to practice a model of care which enables rather than disables individuals and communities. A disabling model is one where we have a false perception of who we are and what our rights and responsibilities are. This approach perpetuates the passivity of women. Women have a unique view of the world and are able to contribute in a way that men are not able to do. We must not allow ourselves to be defined by men but in understanding ourselves we can fulfil our potential. This is not contrary to Christian teaching but rather corrects a cultural view which has been imposed on us about the nature of women in the profession and in the church. The essence of the Christian faith is that Christ died for all; without this belief there is no Christianity. Christ did not die for men alone who in turn represent women. In Christ there is no male or female Jew nor Greek, In Christianity there can be no sexism and no racism. We have rights as women and as Christians. Let us not neglect to use them.

  9. Nurse Migration: A Canadian Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Little, Lisa

    2007-01-01

    Objective To synthesize information about nurse migration in and out of Canada and analyze its role as a policy lever to address the Canadian nursing shortage. Principal Findings Canada is both a source and a destination country for international nurse migration with an estimated net loss of nurses. The United States is the major beneficiary of Canadian nurse emigration resulting from the reduction of full-time jobs for nurses in Canada due to health system reforms. Canada faces a significant projected shortage of nurses that is too large to be ameliorated by ethical international nurse recruitment and immigration. Conclusions The current and projected shortage of nurses in Canada is a product of health care cost containment policies that failed to take into account long-term consequences for nurse workforce adequacy. An aging nurse workforce, exacerbated by layoffs of younger nurses with less seniority, and increasing demand for nurses contribute to a projection of nurse shortage that is too great to be solved ethically through international nurse recruitment. National policies to increase domestic nurse production and retention are recommended in addition to international collaboration among developed countries to move toward greater national nurse workforce self sufficiency. PMID:17489918

  10. The emotional labor of nurses working in her Majesty's (HM) prison service.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Elizabeth

    2009-01-01

    In this study, a qualitative, reflexive methodology was adopted with a postmodern philosophical foundation in order to examine the emotional labor of nurses working in prisons in England and Wales. Phase 1 of the study involved semistructured interviews with nine qualified, registered nurses from three adult prisons: two male establishments and one female. In phase 2 of the study, two of these nurses entered into a supervisory relationship with the researcher, with the researcher as clinical supervisor. Monthly clinical supervision sessions were held with both nurses over 6 months. Findings from this study suggest that the nurse working in prison experiences emotional labor as a consequence of four key relationships: the relationship with the prisoner patient, the relationship with officer colleagues, and the relationship with the Institution; the fourth relationship centers on the contradictory discourses the nurse engages with internally, and is referred to as the "intranurse" relationship. This relationship involves on-going internal dialogue between the two selves of the nurse: the professional self and the emotional "feeling" self. In order to manage the emotion work inherent in prison work, it is suggested that the development of emotional intelligence through clinical supervision and reflective practice is of significant benefit to both healthcare and discipline staff.

  11. Enhancing nursing as a career choice with fifth-grade students.

    PubMed

    Turner, Pamela L

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the influence of a career education program on children's interest in nursing as a career choice, especially related to gender in fifth-grade students. A within-subjects design compared interest in nursing as a career of 70 fifth-grade students before and after participation in a 4-week career education program about nursing. There was a 61% (N = 70, p < 0.001) increase of students expressing they would consider nursing as a career after participating in the career education program. This positive effect was discovered among both male and female students. Further results provided a pre and post-career assessment of the students' development that was congruent with findings from previous vocational studies. The results underscore the positive effect career education can have on children's career interests and substantiate the importance of exposing students to practicing nurses as a key strategy to stimulate interest in nursing to help maintain a steady recruitment of young people into the future nursing workforce.

  12. Perioperative Nurses' Work Experience With Robotic Surgery: A Focus Group Study.

    PubMed

    Kang, Min Jung; De Gagne, Jennie C; Kang, Hee Sun

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the work experience of perioperative nurses involved in robotic surgery. A qualitative descriptive study was conducted. Participants were 15 nurses who had been on a robotic surgery team at one of five major university hospitals in Seoul, South Korea. Participants were one male and 14 female nurses (mean age, 31.33 [SD, 4.19] years; range, 25-41 years). Their experience as robotic surgery nurses ranged from 8 months to 6 years. Nurses' experiences with robotic surgery were categorized within four main themes: (1) constant checking on patients' safety and the robot's functions; (2) unexpected robotic machine errors or malfunctions; (3) feelings of burden in a robotic surgical team; and (4) need and desire for more information and education. This study showed that there are common concerns about patient safety and the possibility of emergencies related to robot system failure among nurses. Offering more support for nurses involved in robotic surgery should be a priority to empower them to play an extended role in robotic surgery.

  13. Factors Affecting Minor Psychiatric Disorder in Southern Iranian Nurses: A Latent Class Regression Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Jamali, Jamshid; Roustaei, Narges; Ayatollahi, Seyyed Mohammad Taghi; Sadeghi, Erfan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Mental health is one of the most important dimensions of life and its quality. Minor Psychiatric Disorder as a type of mental health problem is prevalent among health workers. Nursing is considered to be one of the most stressful occupations. Objectives: This study aimed to evaluate the prevalence of minor psychiatric disorder and its associated factors among nurses in southern Iran. Patients and Methods: A cross-sectional study was carried out on 771 nurses working in 20 cities of Bushehr and Fars provinces in southern Iran. Participants were recruited through multi-stage sampling during 2014. The General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12) was used for screening of minor psychiatric disorder in nurses. Latent Class Regression was used to analyze the data. Results: The prevalence of minor psychiatric disorder among nurses was estimated to be 27.5%. Gender and sleep disorders were significant factors in determining the level of minor psychiatric disorder (P Values of 0.04 and < 0.001, respectively). Female nurses were 20% more likely than males to be classified into the minor psychiatric disorder group. Conclusions: The results of this study provide information about the prevalence of minor psychiatric disorder among nurses, and factors, which affect the prevalence of such disorders. These findings can be used in strategic planning processes to improve nurses’ mental health. PMID:26339670

  14. Patient satisfaction with nursing care and its relationship with patient characteristics.

    PubMed

    Findik, Ummu Yildiz; Unsar, Serap; Sut, Necdet

    2010-06-01

    The aim of this study was to assess patient satisfaction with nursing care and the relationship between patient satisfaction and patient characteristics. This cross-sectional study was conducted at a 1100-bed tertiary care teaching hospital in Turkey. Data were collected using the Newcastle Satisfaction with Nursing Care Scales and a patient information form. Overall, data indicated a high level of patient satisfaction. Hospitalization affected the Experience of Nursing Care Scale independently, while the type of ward, sex, income, and education independently affected the Satisfaction with Nursing Care Scale. Patients who underwent surgical procedures, male patients, the 40-59-year-old age group, those who had low levels of education or income, and patients who were hospitalized for long periods were most satisfied. Patients' sex, age, income, duration of hospitalization, and ward type were important factors that affected their satisfaction with nursing care. The characteristics of patients who have a low level of satisfaction with nursing care should be assessed and taken into consideration by nurses.

  15. Measuring nursing care and compassion: the McDonaldised nurse?

    PubMed

    Bradshaw, A

    2009-08-01

    In June 2008 the UK government, supported by the Royal College of Nursing, stated that nursing care would be measured for compassion. This paper considers the implications of this statement by critically examining the relationship of compassion to care from a variety of perspectives. It is argued that the current market-driven approaches to healthcare involve redefining care as a pale imitation, even parody, of the traditional approach of the nurse as "my brother's keeper". Attempts to measure such parody can only measure artificial techniques and give rise to a McDonald's-type nursing care rather than heartfelt care. The arguments of this paper, although applied to nursing, also apply to medicine and healthcare generally.

  16. Ending disruptive behavior: staff nurse recommendations to nurse educators.

    PubMed

    Lux, Kathleen M; Hutcheson, Jane B; Peden, Ann R

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative descriptive study was to identify educational strategies that can prepare new graduates to manage disruptive behavior (DB) in the workplace. DB is any inappropriate behavior, confrontation, or conflict - ranging from verbal abuse to sexual harassment - that harms or intimidates others to the extent that quality of care or patient safety could be compromised. Individual interviews were conducted with nine staff nurses currently in practice in acute care settings in the United States. Staff nurses recommended educational strategies that focused on communication skills for professional practice. These included learning how to communicate with hostile individuals, and giving and receiving constructive criticism. Descriptions that participants provided about their work culture were an unexpected finding that has relevance for nurse educators as they prepare students for transition to practice Nurses described lack of management support and intervention for DB situations, personality clashes with coworkers, and devaluation of nursing work as affecting professional practice.

  17. The leadership role of nurse educators in mental health nursing.

    PubMed

    Sayers, Jan; Lopez, Violeta; Howard, Patricia B; Escott, Phil; Cleary, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    Leadership behaviors and actions influence others to act, and leadership in clinical practice is an important mediator influencing patient outcomes and staff satisfaction. Indeed, positive clinical leadership has been positioned as a crucial element for transformation of health care services and has led to the development of the Practice Doctorate Movement in the United States. Nurse educators in health care have a vital leadership role as clinical experts, role models, mentors, change agents, and supporters of quality projects. By enacting these leadership attributes, nurse educators ensure a skilled and confident workforce that is focused on optimizing opportunities for students and graduates to integrate theory and practice in the workplace as well as developing more holistic models of care for the consumer. Nurse educators need to be active in supporting staff and students in health care environments and be visible leaders who can drive policy and practice changes and engage in professional forums, research, and scholarship. Although nurse educators have always been a feature of the nursing workplace, there is a paucity of literature on the role of nurse educators as clinical leaders. This discursive article describes the role and attributes of nurse educators with a focus on their role as leaders in mental health nursing. We argue that embracing the leadership role is fundamental to nurse educators and to influencing consumer-focused care in mental health. We also make recommendations for developing the leadership role of nurse educators and provide considerations for further research such as examining the impact of clinical leaders on client, staff, and organizational outcomes.

  18. School nurse perspectives of challenges and how they perceive success in their professional nursing roles.

    PubMed

    Smith, Shirley G; Firmin, Michael W

    2009-04-01

    This is a phenomenological study of 25 school nurses employed in a large, urban school district in the midwestern section of the United States. In addition to school nursing, the participants also had professional work experience in other nursing specialties. Thematic analysis of the data focused on the challenges faced by the school nurses, their views of school nursing success, and elements of job satisfaction. Overall, the school nurses reported the positive aspects of school nursing outweigh the negative aspects of their jobs. Developmental changes were reported among the school nurses in this study as they reflected on how they perceived their nursing career over time and during different seasons of their lives.

  19. Review: Pediatric nursing status and its application analysis based on high quality nursing theory.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Junling; Zhang, Ying; Liu, Yufang; Shang, Xin'ai; Shi, Zhen; Ma, Xiang'an

    2015-03-01

    children's health concerns the revitalization and future of countries and nations. Pediatric nursing management is always the research hotspot of the international nursing field, and also the weak step in nursing management of China. China is now in a severe situation, i.e., shortage and loss of pediatric nursing staffs. In addition, a huge gap lies in the subject development between China and developed countries. This paper discussed the problems existing in the development of pediatric nursing as well as the application effect of high quality nursing in pediatric nursing, in order to promote the development of pediatric nursing and provide reference for nursing managers.

  20. Filling the gaps: immersing student nurses in specialty nursing and professional associations.

    PubMed

    Vioral, Anna N

    2011-09-01

    The national nursing shortage demands innovative strategies to attract students to the nursing profession. This article provides a potential solution for recruiting and retaining nurses for specialty areas of nursing as well as professional nursing associations by pairing student nurses with professional nurses who belong to nursing associations. An immersion program such as the one described in this article provides a strategy that addresses the nursing work force shortage and professional association membership. The experiential knowledge gained through this type of program may advance the profession throughout the country.