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  1. The image of male nurses and nursing leadership mobility.

    PubMed

    McMurry, Timothy B

    2011-01-01

    Research consistently reveals that white men maintain an advantage over other status groups such as women in positions of authority pertaining to human capital. This paper examines male underrepresentation in the nursing profession, including difficulties such as discrimination and advantages for them determined by their gender. The literature suggests that men are given fair, if not preferential, treatment in hiring and promotion decisions, are accepted by supervisors and colleagues, and are well integrated into the workplace subculture. PMID:21306392

  2. The image of male nurses and nursing leadership mobility.

    PubMed

    McMurry, Timothy B

    2011-01-01

    Research consistently reveals that white men maintain an advantage over other status groups such as women in positions of authority pertaining to human capital. This paper examines male underrepresentation in the nursing profession, including difficulties such as discrimination and advantages for them determined by their gender. The literature suggests that men are given fair, if not preferential, treatment in hiring and promotion decisions, are accepted by supervisors and colleagues, and are well integrated into the workplace subculture.

  3. Male Nurses: More Like John Doe Than Jane Doe.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCutcheon, Lynn E.

    A study of 66 female and 56 male nurses employed in central Florida investigated the relationship between nursing experience and sex-role orientation and values. Nursing experience and degrees were similarly distributed across genders in the sample of nurses. The Bem Sex Role Inventory, a checklist of stereotypically feminine and masculine…

  4. Faculty notions regarding caring in male nursing students.

    PubMed

    Grady, Carole A; Stewardson, Gary A; Hall, Janice L

    2008-07-01

    Men are entering the field of nursing in increasing numbers. As men enter nursing programs, they may encounter role stereotyping and gender bias through the faculty's assumption of stereotypical notions of caring. The purpose of this interpretive phenomenological study was to describe the ways faculty perceive and respond to caring in male nursing students to better understand how to facilitate it. The central question for this study was: What are the essences and meaning of nursing faculty notions regarding caring in male nursing students? Six faculty members in a nursing program with a large percentage of male student enrollment were interviewed. Applying a phenomenological data analysis method, the researchers identified six themes: altruism, antecedents, attainment, ambiguity, agency, and anecdotes. Implications for nursing education and practice are made, including the need to recognize, allow, and support male nursing student ways of caring.

  5. Teaching Problems and Strategies with Male Nursing Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tumminia, Patricia A.

    1981-01-01

    Male student nurses encounter unique conflicts in the nursing education process that can interfere with their learning abilities and ultimately their success. This article examines these conflicts and offers a variety of teaching strategies to combat them. (Author/CT)

  6. Women Nurses and Male Physicians: Their Educational Relationships.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bullough, Vern; Bullough, Bonnie

    The implications for nursing education of the fact that nursing started as a woman's occupation in a field dominated by the male physician are considered. Although in 1873 nursing represented a real educational opportunity for large numbers of women, none of the prestigious women's colleges were interested in educating women for careers. In the…

  7. Learning to care: gender issues for male nursing students.

    PubMed

    Paterson, B L; Tschikota, S; Crawford, M; Saydak, M; Venkatesh, P; Aronowitz, T

    1996-01-01

    The following article is a description of one aspect of a phenomenological research study designed to investigate the lived experience of male nursing students as they learned to care as nurses. Data-collection strategies included paradigm case narratives and interviews. Data analysis was characterized by four major strategies: analysis, synthesis, criticism, and understanding. These strategies were used to identify meanings of the text of transcribed interviews and to generate interpretive commentary. Learning to care was described by the participants as a complex entity that incorporates the gender of the student, the patient, the teacher, and the nurse. As students progressed through the program, their experience of gender issues in learning to care was shaped by personal experiences, the expectations of a predominantly female faculty and nursing staff, and their evolving understanding of the ways of caring that are gender based.

  8. Image of Nursing Profession as Perceived by Egyptian and Jordanian Undergraduate Male Nursing Students: A Comparative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ibrahim, Azza Fathi; Akel, Dalal Talat; Alzghoul, Husam Wasil Mohammed

    2015-01-01

    The hiring and maintaining of male nurses in the nursing field is a very apparent issue nowadays. Hence, there is an urgent need to promote a professional nursing image and enhance its standing in the community, especially for men. Although they have an important position in nursing, men are still proportionately in the minority. This study aimed…

  9. Is nursing's image a deterrent to recruiting men into the profession? Male high school students respond.

    PubMed

    Barkley, T W; Kohler, P A

    1992-01-01

    The extremely small number of men choosing the nursing profession as a career, coupled with the continuing shortage of nurses, prompted an investigation of male high school students' opinions about nursing. Kohler and Edwards' Career Questionnaire was administered to 126 male high school students representing grades 9-12 from three area public schools. Findings show that although the majority of subjects have a positive perception of nurses and nursing, the vast majority are not planning on entering the profession. Analysis of subjects' beliefs about nurses' financial status offers a possible explanation.

  10. Differences in job stress experienced by female and male Japanese psychiatric nurses.

    PubMed

    Yada, Hironori; Abe, Hiroshi; Omori, Hisamitsu; Matsuo, Hisae; Masaki, Otsubo; Ishida, Yasushi; Katoh, Takahiko

    2014-10-01

    In psychiatric nursing, female nurses tend to spend more time building rapport with patients and developing cooperative working relationships with colleagues; they encounter more sexual harassment by patients. In contrast, male nurses respond to aggressive patients and tend to resist physically caring for female patients; they encounter more physical and verbal assault from patients. These gender differences might result in differences in job-related stress. We quantitatively examined gender differences in psychiatric nurses' job stress. The Psychiatric Nurse Job Stressor Scale and the Stress Reaction Scale of the Brief Job Stress Questionnaire were administered to 159 female and 85 male Japanese psychiatric nurses. The results indicated that female nurses had significantly higher stress levels than males related to psychiatric nursing ability, attitude towards nursing, and stress reactions of fatigue and anxiety. Moreover, the factors affecting stress reactions differed somewhat between sexes. In particular, male nurses reported that greater irritability was affected by patients' attitudes. Their anxiety and somatic symptoms were affected by their attitude towards nursing, and depressed mood was affected by psychiatric nursing ability. Knowledge of these differences can lead to better mental health-care interventions for psychiatric nurses. PMID:24894127

  11. Self-image of male nursing students in Hong Kong: multi-qualitative approaches.

    PubMed

    Chan, Zenobia C Y; Lo, Kelvin K L; Tse, Kris C Y; Wong, William W

    2014-01-01

    The image of male nurses is closely related to the development of a female-driven nursing occupation. As a minority group in the nursing industry, male nursing students may have a negative self-image in their learning and clinical practicum. This may affect their psychological health and mental status. This study explored the positive and negative self-image of male nursing students. Eighteen participants were recruited from a local nurse-training institute. The participants were undergraduate bachelor's and master's students of nursing. The experience and opinions of the participants were collected by multiple methods. The participants' drawings and audio diaries representing their self-image as nurses were collected in advance of a discussion of ideas raised in the focus group interview. The findings were categorized into three themes: (a) self-roles, functions, and identities; (b) awareness of gender differences; and (c) the future of professional development. The findings of this study provide information on the nurse role, identity, gender differences, and professional development of male nursing students, which will drive the direction of the development of a positive image for male nurses in the future.

  12. Conscious Engagement in Undergraduate Male Nursing Students: Facilitating Voice through an Action Research Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maykut, Colleen A.; Lee, Andrew; Argueta, Nelson Garcia; Grant, Sean; Miller, Cole

    2016-01-01

    Although women have made significant progress into traditionally male-dominated professions, such as medicine and engineering, the same cannot be said of men in the nursing profession. Utilizing a critical social theory perspective, an action research project was designed to encourage participants, current male nursing students and alumni of…

  13. Being a male nurse in Portugal during Salazar's dictatorship (1940-70).

    PubMed

    da Silva, Helena

    2013-06-01

    In several western countries, nursing was clearly seen as an occupation for women. With the creation of the first nursing schools, the gendering of the profession was accelerated. Male nurses' contribution to the development of the profession was limited in comparison with women's. However, the situation was slightly different in Portugal. This article aims at demonstrating a specific example of the gendering of the nursing profession, by simply copying the western model--considered the most developed--without questioning the consequences or even whether it was adapted to the country that had a different nursing tradition. Because the consequences of this gendering are still felt nowadays, this article opens a reflection on how complex it is to follow a foreign nursing model and on the issues associated with such a copy. Qualitative and quantitative analysis of several historical documents and interviews with several retired nurses contributed to an understanding of how men became nurses and how they worked in Portugal, despite gender discrimination, between 1940 and 1970. With different nursing training and job opportunities, Portuguese male nurses still managed to contribute, even beyond that of female nurses, to the improvement of the nursing profession.

  14. Masculinity and nursing care: A narrative analysis of male students' stories about care.

    PubMed

    Jordal, Kristin; Heggen, Kristin

    2015-11-01

    Nursing education programmes and the nursing curriculum have been criticised for presenting an outdated and feminised description of care, which has had the effect of marginalising men, as well as hindering a more modern outlook for the profession. This article uses interview-based data from a qualitative study on Norwegian students' experiences in the first year of training. Using a narrative analysis method, the paper explores how male nursing students use stories to describe care and shows how their storytelling illustrates a way for men to negotiate their role in a feminised profession. The paper aims to deepen our understanding of the ways in which male students can challenge this historically female profession to broaden itself by including male-based caregiving as part of nursing care. In addition, the paper highlights the potential of stories and storytelling as a teaching and learning strategy in nursing education.

  15. A study of role stress, organizational commitment and intention to quit among male nurses in southern Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Lou, Jiunn-Horng; Yu, Hsing-Yi; Hsu, Hsiu-Yueh; Dai, Hung-Da

    2007-03-01

    Gender and sex role stereotyping are recognized as having the potential to limit the professional development of males within the nursing profession. The purpose of this study was to understand the relationships between demographic data and the dimensions of role stress, organizational commitment, and intentions to quit among male nurses in southern Taiwan. Research also investigated the correlations with three dependent variables and identified best predictors of male nurse intentions to quit the nursing profession. A total of 91 male nurses volunteered to participate in this cross-sectional research. Research results were based on data collected from questionnaires sent by mail to participants. A total of 76 valid questionnaires were returned and used in analysis (response rate = 83.5%). Findings pointed to patients, colleagues and society as the major sources of role stress for male nurses. These sources of stress, and the resultant intention to quit on the part of male nurses, are due in significant part to the widespread stereotyping of the profession of nursing as a "woman's occupation". Such stress pressures male nurses to consider quitting to take jobs in other professional fields. Role stress is correlated to intention to quit among male nurses. Role stress and years of service are highly relevant predictors of male nurse intention to quit and leave the nursing profession, explaining 33.8% of variability. We suggest that at various levels of education and society, promotion of male and female equality should be increased. There is also a need for psychological consultation as well as the promotion of male nurse role models to prevent male nurses turning away from nursing careers. PMID:17370232

  16. Warming the nursing education climate for traditional-age learners who are male.

    PubMed

    Bell-Scriber, Marietta J

    2008-01-01

    For nurse educators to facilitate student learning and the achievement of desired cognitive, affective, and psychomotor outcomes, they need to be competent in recognizing the influence of gender, experience, and other factors on teaching and learning. A study was conducted in one academic institution to describe how traditional-age male learners' perceptions of the nursing education climate compare to perceptions of female learners. Interviews were conducted with a sample of four male and four female learners. Additional data from interviews with nurse educators, classroom observations, and a review of textbooks provided breadth and depth to their perceptions. Findings support a nursing education climate that is cooler to traditional-age male learners and warmer to traditional-age female learners. The main cooling factor for men was caused by nurse educators' characteristics and unsupportive behaviors. Additional factors inside and outside the education environment contributed to a cooler climate for the male learners. Based on these findings, strategies for nurse educators to warm the education climate for traditional-age male learners are presented. PMID:18575237

  17. Comparison of masculine and feminine traits in a national sample of male and female nursing students.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Kenny; Glenn, L Lee; Vertein, Daren

    2011-11-01

    The stereotype that male nurses are less masculine has existed for generations and spans all age groups. Several studies have investigated masculinity and femininity in nurses using the Bem Sex-Role Inventory, but the results are conflicting and inconclusive. Therefore, a nationwide survey was conducted across the United States that examined the sex-role identity of individuals who chose nursing as a career path. Twenty-eight males and 81 females from 37 states completed the survey. The males and females in the study both had higher mean scores on masculinity and femininity scales when compared with previous studies. The greatest percentage of participants were classified as androgynous, as opposed to masculine, feminine, or undifferentiated, with half of the males and nearly half of the females falling into this category.

  18. Exploring masculinity and marginalization of male undergraduate nursing students' experience of belonging during clinical experiences.

    PubMed

    Sedgwick, Monique G; Kellett, Peter

    2015-03-01

    Aggressive recruitment strategies used in Canadian undergraduate nursing programs have enjoyed only moderate success, given that male students represent a small percentage of the student population. To determine whether there were gender differences in their sense of belonging, undergraduate nursing students (n = 462) in southern Alberta were surveyed using the Belongingness Scale-Clinical Placement Experience questionnaire. No significant gender differences were found on two of the subscales. However, male students demonstrated significantly lower scores on the efficacy subscale (p = 0.02). This finding suggests that some men experience feelings of marginalization and discrimination. Nurse educators and students are encouraged to explore their worldviews related to gendered performances and teaching practices that create bias. Practice environments are encouraged to deinstitutionalize policies and procedures that accentuate femininities of care. Finally, men entering into the nursing profession are encouraged to reflect on how their gender performance may facilitate or detract from their feelings of belonging.

  19. A Study of the Impostor Phenomenon among Male Nurse Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pierce, Stephanie S.

    2011-01-01

    The Clance Impostor Phenomenon Scale and the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale continue to be used to measure impostor characteristics and levels of self-esteem in aggregate populations in corporate and academic environments. Previous studies have focused on females or female dominate populations. A correlational study of nursing educators that are male…

  20. Human Papillomavirus and Vaccination Of Males: Knowledge and Attitudes Of Registered Nurses.

    PubMed

    White, Leah; Waldrop, Julee; Waldrop, Cabe

    2016-01-01

    The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine for all 11 to 12-year olds as part of the adolescent immunization platform. However, this vaccine has not been universally accepted by health care providers, parents, or the public, and has lower vaccination coverage rates than other recommended vaccines for the same age group. The purpose of this study was to determine registered nurses' knowledge and attitudes about HPV and associated HPV vaccine for males. One hundred eleven (111) RNs participated in a descriptive exploratory study using a survey method. Nurses were knowledgeable about specific HPV information but were less knowledgeable about the extent of HPV infection seen in males or the availability or indications of HPV vaccine for males. This study demonstrates that nurses need more education about HPV and HPV vaccine. PMID:27019938

  1. Comparative Cost of Early Infant Male Circumcision by Nurse-Midwives and Doctors in Zimbabwe

    PubMed Central

    Mangenah, Collin; Mavhu, Webster; Hatzold, Karin; Biddle, Andrea K; Ncube, Getrude; Mugurungi, Owen; Ticklay, Ismail; Cowan, Frances M; Thirumurthy, Harsha

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: The 14 countries that are scaling up voluntary male medical circumcision (VMMC) for HIV prevention are also considering early infant male circumcision (EIMC) to ensure longer-term reductions in HIV incidence. The cost of implementing EIMC is an important factor in scale-up decisions. We conducted a comparative cost analysis of EIMC performed by nurse-midwives and doctors using the AccuCirc device in Zimbabwe. Methods: Between August 2013 and July 2014, nurse-midwives performed EIMC on 500 male infants using AccuCirc in a field trial. We analyzed the overall unit cost and identified key cost drivers of EIMC performed by nurse-midwives and compared these with costing data previously collected during a randomized noninferiority comparison trial of 2 devices (AccuCirc and the Mogen clamp) in which doctors performed EIMC. We assessed direct costs (consumable and nonconsumable supplies, device, personnel, associated staff training, and waste management costs) and indirect costs (capital and support personnel costs). We performed one-way sensitivity analyses to assess cost changes when we varied key component costs. Results: The unit costs of EIMC performed by nurse-midwives and doctors in vertical programs were US$38.87 and US$49.77, respectively. Key cost drivers of EIMC were consumable supplies, personnel costs, and the device price. In this cost analysis, major cost drivers that explained the differences between EIMC performed by nurse-midwives and doctors were personnel and training costs, both of which were lower for nurse-midwives. Conclusions: EIMC unit costs were lower when performed by nurse-midwives compared with doctors. To minimize costs, countries planning to scale up EIMC should consider using nurse-midwives, who are in greater supply than doctors and are the main providers at the primary health care level, where most infants are born. PMID:27413085

  2. Breaking the Boundaries: Decision Factors That Lead Male Students to Enroll in Associate Degree Nursing Programs in Illinois Community Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Resurreccion, Leandro Alcovendaz

    2013-01-01

    Male nurses are but a small percentage of the total nurse population in the United States, and most certainly have potential to increase in numbers if the profession appeared more attractive as a career option for men. The purpose of this research was to discover the decision factors used by males that led them to enroll in Associate Degree…

  3. Promoting Career Opportunities in Nursing to the Minority and Male Population of Galveston.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garcia, Viola Ruth

    In 1991, a project was undertaken to increase the number of minority and male students entering and completing the Associate Degree Nursing (ADN) program at Galveston College (GC) in Texas. The goal of the project was achieved in three interrelated phases. The initial phase focused on establishing an outreach program within the community. The…

  4. Institutional Factors Contributing to Hispanic Male Nursing Degree Attainment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rios, Deidre M.

    2013-01-01

    President Obama's 2009 graduation initiative has emphasized the shift in the national academic focus from access to higher education to graduation, making degree attainment one of the most important factors of measurement and accountability for institutions of higher education. Students of color, in particular, Hispanic males, have not fared well…

  5. [Health in peril: repercussions of ageism on the psychological disengagement of male nurses aged 45 years and older].

    PubMed

    Lagacé, Martine; Tougas, Francine; Laplante, Joelle; Neveu, Jean-François

    2008-01-01

    These two studies are designed to evaluate the reactions of male nurses aged 45 years and older toward ageism. The goal of the first study is to test the prestigious work domain model of psychological disengagement resulting from a previous study conducted among female nurses. This model has been confirmed through path analyses conducted on a sample of 236 male nurse technicians; by the same token, it has been shown to apply in the case of lower-status employees working in a prestigious field. In particular, the more a male nurse aged 45 and older experiences relative personal deprivation, the more he discredits feedback from his co-workers and superiors; such discrediting, in turn, leads to devaluation of the domain of work, which in turn lowers self-esteem. The goal of the second study is three-fold, namely: (a) testing the disengagement model among 419 male nurse clinicians; (b) extending this model through the addition of ageist communication as a variable triggering personal relative deprivation; and (c) constructing a scale of ageist communication. Path analyses have again confirmed that the way a domain is appreciated influences the negative impact that devaluation can produce on self-esteem, regardless of the gender or status of the employee working in that field. In addition, these results demonstrate the central role played by communication in the workplace as a vehicle of ageism and as a precursor of ageing employees' discomfort. The discussion covers the implications of ageing employees' reactions toward ageism as well as the consequences of depreciatory language and exclusionary communication practices in the workplace. PMID:19158044

  6. Relation between hand grip strength, respiratory muscle strength and spirometric measures in male nursing home residents.

    PubMed

    Bahat, Gulistan; Tufan, Asli; Ozkaya, Hilal; Tufan, Fatih; Akpinar, Timur Selçuk; Akin, Sibel; Bahat, Zumrut; Kaya, Zuleyha; Kiyan, Esen; Erten, Nilgün; Karan, Mehmet Akif

    2014-09-01

    Adverse-outcomes related to sarcopenia are mostly mentioned as physical disability. As the other skeletal muscles, respiratory muscles may also be affected by sarcopenia. Respiratory muscle strength is known to affect pulmonary functions. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the relations between extremity muscle strength, respiratory muscle strengths and spirometric measures in a group of male nursing home residents. Among a total of 104 male residents, residents with obstructive measures were excluded and final study population was composed of 62 residents. Mean age was 70.5 ± 6.7 years, body mass index: 27.7 ± 5.3 kg/m2 and dominant hand grip strength: 29.7 ± 6.5 kg. Hand grip strength was positively correlated with maximal inspiratory pressure (MIP) and maximal expiratory pressure (MEP) (r = 0.35, p < 0.01 and r = 0.26, p < 0.05, respectively). In regression analysis, the only factor related to MIP was hand grip strength; among spirometric measures only parameter significantly related to grip strength was peak cough flow (PCF). The association of PCF with grip strength disappeared when MIP alone or "MIP and MEP" were included in the regression analysis. In the latter case, PCF was significantly associated only with MIP. We found peripheric muscle strength be associated with MIP and PCF but not with MEP or any other spirometric parameters. The relation between peripheral muscle strength and PCF was mediated by MIP. Our findings suggest that sarcopenia may affect inspiratory muscle strength earlier or more than the expiratory muscle strength. Sarcopenia may cause decrease in PCF in the elderly, which may stand for some common adverse respiratory complications.

  7. Evidence of Allomaternal Nursing across One-Male Units in the Yunnan Snub-Nosed Monkey (Rhinopithecus Bieti)

    PubMed Central

    Garber, Paul A.; Li, Ming

    2012-01-01

    Background Allomaternal nursing, common in several species of social mammals, also has been reported in nonhuman primates. However, the function of this behavior in enhancing infant survivorship remains poorly understood. Methodology and Principal Findings The study was conducted on a free-ranging group of the Yunnan snub-nosed monkey (Rhinopithecus bieti) in the Baimaxueshan Natural Reserve. Direct observation and ad libitum sampling were used to record allocare behavior during a 20 month field study. R. bieti exhibits a multilevel social organization in which a large single troop, consisting of over 100 individuals, is divided into many one-male units (OMUs: 6∼41). These OMUs coordinate their daily activities, and feed, forage, travel, and rest together. Here we report on one case of infant temporary adoption in which an adult female from one OMU engaged in allomaternal nursing and cared for an infant from a different OMU of the same troop. This event began when the mother and her five-month-old infant were found to became separated accidentally. The victim infant was observed staying in another OMU. Over the next several days we observed a lactating female in the new OMU to care for and nurse both her infant and the immigrant infant, who also was tolerated by and cared for by the harem male. Conclusions and Significance Our findings suggest that lactating primate females are primed to care for young infants and, that the misdirected parental care hypothesis may offer the strongest explanation for allomaternal nursing in R. bieti. PMID:22253869

  8. Maternal Transfer of Bisphenol A During Nursing Causes Sperm Impairment in Male Offspring.

    PubMed

    Kalb, Ana Cristina; Kalb, Ana Luiza; Cardoso, Tainã Figueiredo; Fernandes, Cristina Gevehr; Corcini, Carine Dahl; Varela Junior, Antonio Sergio; Martínez, Pablo Elías

    2016-05-01

    The health effects of environmental chemicals on animals and humans are of growing concern. Human epidemiological and animal study data indicate that reproductive disorders and diseases begin early during prenatal and postnatal development. An increase of human male reproductive disturbance in the past several decades was associated to chemicals called endocrine disruptors (ED). Bisphenol A (BPA) is a ubiquitous organic environmental contaminant with ED activity. This study verified the effect of BPA exposure via breast milk during the lactation (early postnatal) period in male mice. Dams were exposed to oral BPA (300, 900, and 3000 µg/kg/BW/day) during the breastfeeding period (21 days). BPA at all concentrations significantly impaired sperm parameters in adult mice (8 months old), but mitochondrial functionality was more affected at BPA 3000. The acrosome membrane parameter was affected by BPA concentrations from 900 to 3000, and DNA integrity showed pronounced impairment at BPA 900 and 3000. BPA 3000 treatment also induced testicular degeneration and complete aplasia in some seminiferous tubules. Testicular oxidative damage was observed, and the total antioxidant capacity was impaired in BPA 900 and 3000 treatment groups. Taken together, the present study demonstrated long-term adverse effects of BPA in male mice, including reduced sperm quality, antioxidant capacity, and changes in testicular tissue. Our results clearly demonstrate the danger of BPA transferred via lactation on sperm quality registered even after a long time-elapsed from exposure to this harmful chemical. PMID:26250451

  9. Gender-Based Barriers Experienced by Male Students in an Online RN-to-BSN Nursing Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirk, John R.

    2012-01-01

    This quantitative survey-based research study examined the experiences of 49 men through a comparative analysis of their traditional classroom-based Diploma or Associate Degree in Nursing program and their subsequent experiences in the University of Phoenix online Registered Nurse to Bachelor of Science in Nursing (RN-to-BSN) degree completion…

  10. Safety, Acceptability, and Feasibility of Early Infant Male Circumcision Conducted by Nurse-Midwives Using the AccuCirc Device: Results of a Field Study in Zimbabwe

    PubMed Central

    Mavhu, Webster; Larke, Natasha; Hatzold, Karin; Ncube, Getrude; Weiss, Helen A; Mangenah, Collin; Chonzi, Prosper; Mugurungi, Owen; Mufuka, Juliet; Samkange, Christopher A; Gwinji, Gerald; Cowan, Frances M; Ticklay, Ismail

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: For prevention of HIV, early infant male circumcision (EIMC) needs to be scaled up in countries with high HIV prevalence. Routine EIMC will maintain the HIV prevention gains anticipated from current adult male circumcision initiatives. We present here the results of a field study of EIMC conducted in Zimbabwe. Methods: The study was observational and based on the World Health Organization (WHO) framework for clinical evaluation of male circumcision devices. We recruited parents of newborn male infants between August 2013 and July 2014 from 2 clinics. Nurse-midwives used the AccuCirc device to circumcise eligible infants. We followed participants for 14 days after EIMC. Outcome measures were EIMC safety, acceptability, and feasibility. Results: We enrolled 500 male infants in the field study (uptake 11%). The infants were circumcised between 6 and 60 days postpartum. The procedure took a median of 17 minutes (interquartile range of 5 to 18 minutes). Mothers’ knowledge of male circumcision was extensive. Of the 498 mothers who completed the study questionnaire, 91% knew that male circumcision decreases the risk of HIV acquisition, and 83% correctly stated that this prevention is partial. Asked about their community’s perception of EIMC, 40% felt that EIMC will likely be viewed positively in their community; 13% said negatively; and 47% said the perception could be both ways. We observed 7 moderate or severe adverse events (1.4%; 95% confidence interval, 0.4% to 2.4%). All resolved without lasting effects. Nearly all mothers (99%) reported great satisfaction with the outcome, would recommend EIMC to other parents, and would circumcise their next sons. Conclusion: This first field study in sub-Saharan Africa of the AccuCirc device for EIMC demonstrated that EIMC conducted by nurse-midwives with this device is safe, feasible, and acceptable to parents. PMID:27413083

  11. Barriers Identified by Swedish School Nurses in Giving Information about Testicular Cancer and Testicular Self-Examination to Adolescent Males

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rudberg, Lennart; Nilsson, Sten; Wikblad, Karin; Carlsson, Marianne

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate to what extent school nurses in Sweden inform adolescent men about testicular cancer (TC) and testicular self-examination (TSE). A questionnaire was completed by 129 school nurses from 29 randomly selected municipalities. All respondents were women, with a mean age of 42 years. The results showed that…

  12. Being in a safe haven and struggling against alcohol dependency. The meaning of caring for male patients in advanced addiction nursing.

    PubMed

    Thurang, Anna; Rydström, Jens; Bengtsson Tops, Anita

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to explore and illuminate the meaning of advanced nursing caring for men with alcohol dependency, as narrated by the men themselves. Ten male patients were interviewed in-depth and data were subjected to a phenomenological-hermeneutic analysis. Caring meant having the opportunity to rest in a safe haven together with professional caregivers, to struggle for liberation from dependency, and to expand the life-sphere by starting to accept oneself and broaden social participation. The findings illuminate various patterns of masculinity and point to the importance for caregivers to be open to challenging stereotypical gender assumptions.

  13. Psoriasis: Pregnancy and Nursing

    MedlinePlus

    ... to find out more! Email * Zipcode Pregnancy and Nursing In general, psoriasis does not affect the male ... psoriasis and birth » Treating psoriasis while pregnant or nursing There is little research on the impact of ...

  14. The Prediction of Physical Activity Intention and Behavior in Elderly Male Residents of a Nursing Home: A Comparison of Two Behavioral Theories

    PubMed Central

    Ghahremani, Leila; Niknami, Shamsaddin; Nazari, Mahin

    2012-01-01

    Background: Regular physical activity is ranked as a leading health indicator. Despite the extensive benefits of physical activity, elder people are much less active than desired. Using Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) and the self-efficacy construct, this study examined the prediction of physical activity intention and behavior in a sample of elderly male resident of a nursing home. Methods: In a cross-sectional study of the residents of Kahrizak Nursing Home in Tehran, Iran, elderly men who were 60 years or older, capable of independent living, mobility, and verbal communication were asked to complete measures of the TPB, self-efficacy and physical activity behavior. Results: A hierarchical step-wise multiple regression analysis indicated that affective/instrumental attitude, subjective norm, and perceived behavioral control (PBC) explained 32.8% of the variance in physical activity intention, and self-efficacy provided an additional 2.7%. In a reverse step regression, the TPB variables explained an additional 12.2% of physical activity intention. In a multiple regression analysis on physical activity behavior, affective/instrumental attitude, subjective norm, perceived behavioral control (PBC) and intention explained 15.7% of the variance in physical activity behavior while self-efficacy contributed an additional 5.6%. In the reverse step regression, TPB predictors contributed an additional 3.0% in explaining the variance in physical activity behavior. Conclusion: The results indicate that in addition to the TPB, self-efficacy may also play an important role in the prediction of behavior, and should be included in the design of physical activity programs for elderly men of nursing home residents. PMID:23115427

  15. [Demands on professional nursing staff in institutions for dialysis from the view of male and female patients--the results of a survey by means of Critical Incident Technique].

    PubMed

    Reuschenbach, Bernd; Mohr, Tina

    2005-04-01

    Contemporary models of competence in nursing are usually based on the questioning of nursing staff and therefore reflect their professional self-image. Our research focuses on the views of male and female patients on the relevant competencies of professional nursing staff. The "Critical Incident Techniqu" (CIT) (Flanagan, 1954) was applied to reveal relevant demands according to the patients' point of view. This technique has proven to be a suitable method for the reflection of nursing practice in this field of research and has provided realistic descriptions of staff behaviour. Nursing in the field of dialysis was chosen because of the specialized qualifications on staff needed and the high expectations assumed in this care. The CIT-interviews of one female and five male patients were transcribed and the content was analysed. Two main fields of demands were identified: "soft skills" and "hard skills". The patients especially stressed the demands on communicative and empathic competence ("soft skills"). Further research may be useful to validate the results with a larger sample. PMID:15869015

  16. [Demands on professional nursing staff in institutions for dialysis from the view of male and female patients--the results of a survey by means of Critical Incident Technique].

    PubMed

    Reuschenbach, Bernd; Mohr, Tina

    2005-04-01

    Contemporary models of competence in nursing are usually based on the questioning of nursing staff and therefore reflect their professional self-image. Our research focuses on the views of male and female patients on the relevant competencies of professional nursing staff. The "Critical Incident Techniqu" (CIT) (Flanagan, 1954) was applied to reveal relevant demands according to the patients' point of view. This technique has proven to be a suitable method for the reflection of nursing practice in this field of research and has provided realistic descriptions of staff behaviour. Nursing in the field of dialysis was chosen because of the specialized qualifications on staff needed and the high expectations assumed in this care. The CIT-interviews of one female and five male patients were transcribed and the content was analysed. Two main fields of demands were identified: "soft skills" and "hard skills". The patients especially stressed the demands on communicative and empathic competence ("soft skills"). Further research may be useful to validate the results with a larger sample.

  17. Coping and Its Relation to Retention among Male Minority Nursing Students in an Associate Degree Nursing Program in a South Texas Community College: An Explanatory Sequential Mixed Methods Inquiry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diggs, Gwendolyn Smith

    2013-01-01

    In Texas, there is an increase in the enrollment of men of various ethnicities in nursing schools, especially Associate Degree Nursing (ADN) programs. As these men strive to complete the nursing education, they face many concerns that center on barriers that are encountered in what is still a predominately Caucasian and female environment. In…

  18. Issues and challenges in nursing and nursing education in Japan.

    PubMed

    Turale, Sue; Ito, Misae; Nakao, Fujiko

    2008-01-01

    In this editorial we discuss the challenges and issues in nursing and nurse education in Japan. These include a rapid growth in the number of universities offering nursing programs without sufficient time for preparation of faculty; issues in the traditional ways of teaching in classrooms; the appearance of nursing shortages in a country with the highest rate of longevity in the world; and the position of nursing faculty in a society that is largely male dominated. PMID:17719851

  19. [Homophobia among nursing students].

    PubMed

    Campo-Arias, Adalberto; Herazo, Edwin; Cogollo, Zuleima

    2010-09-01

    Homophobia is defined as a general negative attitude towards homosexual persons, with implications on public health. This fact has been less investigated among nursing students. The objective of this review was to learn about the prevalence of homophobia and its associated variables among nursing students. A systematic review was performed on original articles published in EBSCO, Imbiomed, LILACS, MEDLINE, Ovid, and ProQuest, including articles published between 1998 and 2008 in English, Portuguese and Spanish. Keywords used were homophobia, homosexuality, and nursing students. Descriptive analysis was performed. Eight studies were analyzed. The incidence of homophobia in nursing students is between 7% and 16%. Homophobia is more common among males and religious conservatism people. Homophobia is quite frequent in nursing students. This negative attitude toward homosexuality may affect services and care giving by nursing professions and could have negative implications in nursing practice. PMID:20964066

  20. Good nurse, bad nurse....

    PubMed

    Alavi, C; Cattoni, J

    1995-02-01

    The construction of the nursing subject is discussed. The paper takes a historical perspective, arguing that the range of speaking positions available to the nurse is limited by gender, class and education. It evaluates the position of nursing in the university, showing how this also has propensity to limit the development of the nursing profession.

  1. Gender-Based Wage Differentials in a Predominantly Female Profession: Observations from Nursing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Cheryl, Bland; Gates, Michael

    2004-01-01

    Despite numerous studies examining nursing wages, very little attention has focused on nursing wage differentials. We build on previous research by modeling nursing wages and examining male-female wage differences within the context of the current nursing shortage. Our results show that male nurses do earn a wage premium, largely explained by…

  2. Nursing Supplies

    MedlinePlus

    ... Stages Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Nursing Supplies Page Content Article Body Throughout most of ... budget. (Nursing equipment also makes wonderful baby gifts.) Nursing Bras A well-made nursing bra that comfortably ...

  3. Nursing: What's a Nurse Practitioner?

    MedlinePlus

    ... nurses, or APNs) have a master's degree in nursing (MS or MSN) and board certification in their ... Nurse Practitioners (NAPNAP) and through local hospitals or nursing schools. In addition, many doctors share office space ...

  4. Nurses executive characteristics. Gender differences.

    PubMed

    Rozier, C K

    1996-12-01

    Do male nurse executives working in a female-dominated profession adopt more of the female leadership characteristics? A study investigates gender differences of nurse executives on a variety of managerial attributes: sex role, supervision, power, career commitment and work/family conflict. Results also were compared to executives of other professions.

  5. Nursing, Nursing Education, and Anxiety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biggers, Thompson; And Others

    In response to the current crisis in the field of nursing, a study examined nursing students' perceived work-related stress and differences among associate degree, diploma, and baccalaureate nursing programs in their preparation of nursing students. The 171 subjects, representing the three different nursing programs, completed a questionnaire…

  6. Nursing Homes

    MedlinePlus

    ... our e-newsletter! Aging & Health A to Z Nursing Homes Basic Facts & Information Nursing homes have changed ... physical health and/or mental disabilities. Is a Nursing Home Right for You? Almost half of all ...

  7. Nursing Positions

    MedlinePlus

    ... Story" 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Nursing Positions KidsHealth > For Parents > Nursing Positions Print A ... and actually needs to feed. Getting Comfortable With Breastfeeding Nursing can be one of the most challenging ...

  8. Gender and class tensions between psychiatric nurses and the general nursing profession in mid-twentieth century New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Prebble, Kate; Bryder, Linda

    2008-10-01

    Abstract Histories of twentieth century nursing usually present 'general nursing' as the norm and make the assumption that nursing was a female-dominated profession in which men were a marginalised minority. In this article, we argue that in New Zealand, psychiatric nursing had developed a distinct culture from general nursing, was more an occupation than a profession, and was one in which men held a central and powerful position. We explore the tensions that developed between male psychiatric nurses (attendants) and professional nursing leaders when general nursing began to gain authority over mental hospital nursing in the period 1939 to 1959. We argue that rather than being marginalised, the male nurses used their strength as unionised, working-class men to resist the incremental control by general nursing, a profession underpinned by middle-class values. Some battles were lost, but overall the men retained a powerful position in the mental health system during this period.

  9. Nursing: Registered Nurses

    MedlinePlus

    ... nurses for jobs in health planning and development, marketing, consulting, policy development, and quality assurance. Some RNs ... workers was $36,200. Recommend this page using: Facebook Twitter LinkedIn tools Areas at a Glance Industries ...

  10. Attitudes toward Older People among Nursing Students and Registered Nurses in Sweden.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soderhamn, Olle; Lindencrona, Catharina; Gustavsson, Siw Merit

    2001-01-01

    A survey of 151 undergraduate nursing students and 41 registered nurses in Sweden found that those who were under 25, male, or had limited prior experience caring for older people had less favorable attitudes toward the elderly. First-year students were more negative than third-year students. No differences among nurses in different practice…

  11. Nurses Behave Differentially to Neonates in Terms of Their True Gender Compared to Their Ascribed Gender.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hollenbeck, Albert R.; And Others

    Response patterns of 24 female nurses to 2-day-old neonates who had been arbitrarily labeled male or female were studied. A total of 17 reliable behaviors of nurses were scored from videotapes of nurse-infant interaction. Nurses responded differentially to neonates based on true gender rather than ascribed gender. Nurses held boys more by their…

  12. Anthroposophical nursing.

    PubMed

    Therkleson, Tessa

    2005-10-01

    Anthroposophical nursing evolved out of a striving to maintain the human caring and loving warmth of nursing practice whilst having cognisance of academic rigor and scientific nursing research. It is an extension of traditional nursing requiring inner personal development to accompany a modern scientific approach. PMID:19175263

  13. [The development and current status of men in the nursing profession].

    PubMed

    Huang, Chun-Che; Kuo, Ying-Ling

    2011-12-01

    Nursing has been a quintessentially female-dominated occupation throughout much of its history. Today, educational developments, changes in healthcare service models and promotion of gender equality in education and employment have opened the doors to males to play increasingly important roles in the healthcare services as nursing professionals. The responsibilities of male nursing staff are expected to continue to increase. It remains difficult for male nurses to escape traditional gender stereotypes in nursing. The impact of personal characteristics, occupational roles, and professional identification in real practice are major issues of concern. This study reviewed relevant literature to identify factors of influence on male nursing staff professional practice. We hope this study can be a reference for future research on male nursing staff development, and that male nurses will increasingly create personal core values in a multi-discipline, cross-professional healthcare team, and exercise their abilities as a complement to female nurses.

  14. Image of nursing held by nursing students according to gender: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Karabacak, Ükke; Uslusoy, Esin; Alpar, Şule Ecevit; Bahçecik, Nefise

    2012-12-01

    This paper is a report of a study to determine the nursing images of female and male nursing students. The study used a qualitative research design to determine nursing images of male (n = 20) and female (n = 20) nursing students. To analyse the data, the method used content analysis. Statements were organized under three categories and seven themes after content analysis. The first category, nursing concept, incorporates the two themes of: (i) female or sister; (ii) job definition. The second category, choosing, incorporates the four themes of: (i) Desire of Others; (ii) Guarantee of Work; (iii) Being Helpful to Others; and (iv) Limited to Academic Achievement. The third category, Gender, incorporates the one theme of: (i) Gendered Approach. Male students have started to take part in nursing programs relatively recently; therefore, more research is needed in the fields of academic accomplishments of male students.

  15. Nursing Reclaims its Role.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diers, Donna

    1982-01-01

    An attempt is made to explain the nurses' role: what the nurse is, what the nurse does, how the nurse is viewed by society, why nurses suffer burnout, nursing costs, and health care system reform. (CT)

  16. Nursing Home Checklist

    MedlinePlus

    Nursing home checklist Name of nursing home: ____________________________________________________ Address: ________________________________________________________________ Phone number: __________________________________________________________ Date of visit: _____________________________________________________________ Basic information Yes No Notes Is the nursing home Medicare certified? Is the nursing ...

  17. Feminist methodology in nursing research.

    PubMed

    Webb, C

    1984-05-01

    In this paper the author discusses her experiences as a feminist, nurse and sociologist carrying out a study of hysterectomy. Difficulties in setting up the research, carrying out interviews and publishing reports result from masculine models of sociological research and from the fact that nursing work, including research, is carried out in a context of medical domination. These experiences are analysed in terms of feminist research methodology in sociology, and it is argued that in the case of nursing and women's health a feminist perspective offers opportunities for mutual consciousness-raising and for working together to challenge male medical control over these aspects of women's lives.

  18. Nursing resilience: a nursing opportunity.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Ellarene Duis

    2015-01-01

    Resilience is a concept that has been explored in many other professions and cultures. Nurses experience many difficult and unanticipated adverse situations that can negatively impact them. Resilience can be cultivated to aid individual nurses and nursing work groups to bounce back from these situations and integrate them into context of their practice. Practices such as meditation and education can support development of resilience.

  19. Nutrition for Nurses: Nursing 245.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palermo, Karen R.

    A description is presented of "Nutrition for Nurses," a prerequisite course for students anticipating entrance into the junior level of a state university registered nursing program. Introductory material highlights the course focus (i.e., the basics of good nutrition; nutrition through the life cycle; nursing process in nutritional care; and…

  20. Counseling Chinese Patients about Cigarette Smoking: The Role of Nurses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Han Zao; Zhang, Yu; MacDonell, Karen; Li, Xiao Ping; Chen, Xinguang

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The main purpose of this study is to determine the cigarette smoking rate and smoking cessation counseling frequency in a sample of Chinese nurses. Design/methodology/approach: At the time of data collection, the hospital had 260 nurses, 255 females and five males. The 200 nurses working on the two daytime shifts were given the…

  1. Nursing students assess nursing education.

    PubMed

    Norman, Linda; Buerhaus, Peter I; Donelan, Karen; McCloskey, Barbara; Dittus, Robert

    2005-01-01

    This study assessed the characteristics of nursing students currently enrolled in nursing education programs, how students finance their nursing education, their plans for clinical practice and graduate education, and the rewards and difficulties of being a nursing student. Data are from a survey administered to a national sample of 496 nursing students. The students relied on financial aid and personal savings and earnings to finance their education. Parents, institutional scholarships, and government loans are also important sources, but less than 15% of the students took out bank loans. Nearly one quarter of the students, particularly younger and minority students, plan to enroll in graduate school immediately after graduation and most want to become advanced nursing practitioners. Most of the nursing students (88%) are satisfied with their nursing education and nearly all (95%) provided written answers to two open-ended questions. Comments collapsed into three major categories reflecting the rewards (helping others, status, and job security) and three categories reflecting the difficulties (problems with balancing demands, quality of nursing education, and the admissions process) of being a nursing student. Implications for public policymaking center on expanding the capacity of nursing education programs, whereas schools themselves should focus on addressing the financial needs of students, helping them strike a balance among their school, work, and personal/family responsibilities and modifying certain aspects of the curriculum.

  2. Women and nurse executives. Finally, some advantages.

    PubMed

    Borman, J S

    1993-10-01

    How do chief nurse executives (CNEs) and chief executive officers (CEOs) compare on selected components of organizational socialization, and do differences exist between genders? To answer these questions, the author compared 127 male CEOs, 127 female CEOs, 232 female CNEs, and 117 male CNEs on their self-reported leadership styles, managerial values, and skills. The differences found between both genders and positions on all measures are largely advantageous to women and nurses in healthcare administration. PMID:8410326

  3. Women and nurse executives. Finally, some advantages.

    PubMed

    Borman, J S

    1993-10-01

    How do chief nurse executives (CNEs) and chief executive officers (CEOs) compare on selected components of organizational socialization, and do differences exist between genders? To answer these questions, the author compared 127 male CEOs, 127 female CEOs, 232 female CNEs, and 117 male CNEs on their self-reported leadership styles, managerial values, and skills. The differences found between both genders and positions on all measures are largely advantageous to women and nurses in healthcare administration.

  4. Nursing the Nursing Shortage Back to Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weisbord, Anne

    1992-01-01

    Discusses shortage of nurses, improved compensation, and other benefits for nurses. Discusses effects of institutional reputation. Describes move to retention programs by nurse recruiters. Concludes image of nursing has developed into professional status. (ABL)

  5. Men Nursing Students: How They Perceive Their Situation...A Student Surveys His Classmates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogness, Hal

    1976-01-01

    Men nurse stereotypes (former corpsmen, homosexuals, or those seeking administrative positions) were challenged by results of an open-ended questionnaire survey of 15 male nursing students. In addition to the role conflicts all nurses experience, men in nursing face: isolation and loneliness, lack of role models, and others' stereotyped ideas.…

  6. Predictors of a Desire to be Helpful to Professional Nurses Among Japanese Nursing Assistants in Small- to Medium-Sized Hospitals.

    PubMed

    Kudo, Yasushi; Kono, Keiko; Toyoshima, Yasuko; Sugisaki, Hitomi; Matsuhashi, Ayako; Tsutsumi, Akizumi

    2016-06-01

    Registered nurses and licensed practical nurses have been educated as professional nurses. Professional nurses can concentrate on their jobs requiring a high degree of expertise with help they get from nursing assistants.If professional nurses have improper attitudes toward nursing assistants, it is most likely that the nursing assistants will not help them to the best of their ability. We investigated nursing assistants' impressions regarding professional nurses' attitudes, and what effects nursing assistants' impressions have on their "desire to be helpful to professional nurses." The study design was a cross sectional study. Twenty-five small- to medium-sized hospitals with 55 to 458 beds were included in this study. The analyzed subjects were 642 nursing assistants (96 males, 546 females). Factor analyses were conducted to extract the factors of nursing assistants' impressions regarding professional nurses' attitudes. Multiple linear regression analysis was conducted to investigate the predictors of "desire to be helpful to professional nurses." We discovered 5 factors: 1. professional nurses' model behavior, 2. manner dealing with nursing assistants, 3. respect for nursing assistants' passion for their work, 4. respect for nursing assistants' work, and 5. enhancing the ability of nursing assistants to do their work. The "desire to be helpful to professional nurses" was significantly associated with "professional nurses' model behavior," "manner dealing with nursing assistants" and "respect for nursing assistants' passion for their work." Factors 1 to 3 are fundamental principles when people establish appropriate relationships. Professional nurses must consider these fundamentals in their daily work in order to get complete cooperation from nursing assistants. PMID:27302725

  7. Male contraception

    PubMed Central

    Mathew, Vivek; Bantwal, Ganapathi

    2012-01-01

    Contraception is an accepted route for the control of population explosion in the world. Traditionally hormonal contraceptive methods have focused on women. Male contraception by means of hormonal and non hormonal methods is an attractive alternative. Hormonal methods of contraception using testosterone have shown good results. Non hormonal reversible methods of male contraception like reversible inhibition of sperm under guidanceare very promising. In this article we have reviewed the current available options for male contraception. PMID:23226635

  8. Condoms - male

    MedlinePlus

    ... Rubbers; Male condoms; Contraceptive - condom; Contraception - condom; Barrier method - condom ... infections.) Latex rubber Polyurethane Condoms are the only method of birth control for men that are not ...

  9. Nursing resilience: a nursing opportunity.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Ellarene Duis

    2015-01-01

    Resilience is a concept that has been explored in many other professions and cultures. Nurses experience many difficult and unanticipated adverse situations that can negatively impact them. Resilience can be cultivated to aid individual nurses and nursing work groups to bounce back from these situations and integrate them into context of their practice. Practices such as meditation and education can support development of resilience. PMID:25714950

  10. [Feminist strategies in nursing science].

    PubMed

    Gendron, C

    1993-05-01

    This article is the first of a two-part series that will be completed in next month's issue. The article illustrates through examples how nursing has the potential for sexual bias. It also demonstrates how the feminist movement can contribute to improving nursing practice. This month, the views of Peggy Chinn are discussed, outlining myths that limit the development or hinder the progress of non-sexist education in nursing. Myths that have become traditional, scientific male-centred methodologies now solidly rooted in the health care community are identified. The author explains that once the myths are identified, they should be extracted and isolated from the context of nursing. This is the way feminist research can be useful. Next month the author will define the feminist approach and how it applies to specific aspects of women's health.

  11. [Anthropology, gender, and contemporary nursing].

    PubMed

    Lillo Crespo, Manuel

    2002-12-01

    We live in an age when decisive changes occur. Social changes in the field of Genre and Work Cultures will take on a crucial role regarding the development of Nursing. New technological advances, and a higher degree of specialization in the Nursing field, as well as the increase in the number of nursing professionals coming from the male genere, enter into conflict with traditional social structures and act as intellectual tools which are necessary to acquire a critical understanding of the times in which we live, where an anthropological evaluation of the Genre factor is essential as a beginning principle in order to explain the subordination of nursing professionals as this has existed up until our times.

  12. American Nurses Association Nursing World

    MedlinePlus

    ... Culture of Safety Professional Standards Nursing Quality Ethics / Genetics & Genomics Code of Ethics Workplace Safety / Safe Patient Handling Needlestick Prevention Environmental Health Policy & Advocacy / Take Action ...

  13. Licensed Practical Nurses' Sex Role Stereotypes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallston, Barbara Strudler; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Examined whether sex-role stereotypes would affect nurses' (N=32) attitudes toward simulations of male and female patients. Emotional style and patients' diagnosis were manipulated. Results showed significant sex-role differences and stereotypical attitudes. Male patients were rated more positively, and were more likely to possess traditional male…

  14. Hate crimes against gay males: an overview.

    PubMed

    Willis, Danny G

    2004-03-01

    As the United States has become more multicultural and diverse, there has been an increase in violence motivated by hate. Hate crimes against gay males are the most prevalent of the hate crimes based on sexual orientation. Hate crimes have their roots in normative, individual, and societal attitudes and ideologies that lead to intimidation, bullying, teasing, physical assault, rape, and murder. This paper provides an overview of the issues specific to hate crime assaults against gay males. Mental health nurses may find this knowledge useful in developing further nursing inquiry, education, and clinical practice related to hate crime and violence prevention.

  15. Naturalistic nursing.

    PubMed

    Hussey, Trevor

    2011-01-01

    Where nurse education aims to provide an overarching intellectual framework, this paper argues that it should be the framework of naturalism. After an exposition of the chief features of naturalism and its relationship to science and morality, the paper describes naturalistic nursing, contrasting it with some other perspectives. There follows a defence of naturalism and naturalistic nursing against several objections, including those concerning spirituality, religion, meaning, morality, and alternative sources of knowledge. The paper ends with some of the advantages of the naturalistic approach. PMID:21143577

  16. Nursing Homes

    MedlinePlus

    ... up like a hospital. The staff provides medical care, as well as physical, speech and occupational therapy. ... relationships with residents. Some nursing homes have special care units for people with serious memory problems such ...

  17. Sex-Role Stereotyping of Nurses and Physicians on Prime-Time Television: A Dichotomy of Occupational Portrayals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalisch, Philip A; Kalisch, Beatrice J.

    1984-01-01

    Analysis of prime-time television portrayals of nurses and physicians (1950-80) shows extreme levels of both sexual and occupational stereotyping. TV nurses are 99 percent female; TV physicians are 95 percent male. The TV image of female professional nurses is of total dependence on and subservience to male physicians. (Author/CMG)

  18. Working experiences of Iranian retired nurses: a content analysis study.

    PubMed

    Nobahar, Monir; Ahmadi, Fazlollah; Alhani, Fatemah; Fallahi Khoshknab, Masood

    2013-10-01

    Understanding the experiences of retired nurses can be useful in increasing self-confidence, motivation to work and work enthusiasm among nurses. The purpose of this study was to explore the work experiences of Iranian retired nurses. A qualitative design was conducted using a content analysis approach. Purposive sampling was used to choose the study participants. Semi-structured interviews were held to collect the perspectives of 20 retired nurses (10 female and 10 male). Two main themes emerged in the data analysis: 'work problems and unpleasant experiences in a sense' with subthemes 'exhausting work', 'insufficient salary', 'inappropriate relation' and 'unsuitable social position'; and 'job satisfaction and pleasant experiences in a sense' with subthemes 'divine satisfaction and religious belief', 'satisfaction of patients and their companions' and 'love of nursing profession and relaxation experience'. The findings indicate the challenges that nurses face after retirement. These experiences will help nurse managers to adopt appropriate measures to support nurses after retirement. PMID:24093736

  19. Nursing beyond the Crossroads.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Gloria R.

    1980-01-01

    Nurses should not be too optimistic about the future of nursing. Problems still exist: government regulations which limit nurses' direct access to clients and physicians' views of nurses' abilities. Nurses must explore their current roles and propose new structures to enhance the nurses' impact on the health care system. (CT)

  20. Nurse executives: new roles, new opportunities.

    PubMed

    Kleinman, C S

    1999-01-01

    As women have been nursing since the earliest days of recorded civilization, so nurses have been associated with health care since the earliest days of recorded medical history. Gender and function have been inextricably woven in ways that created a struggle for success within a male-dominated industry. Nurses, as women, have been undervalued as, until recently, their role in health care has been similarly undervalued. Changing realities in the health care environment have created an opportunity for women's unique skills and talents to be revalued in a way that offers new opportunities for nurses. Teamwork, global thinking, multitasking, creativity, and flexibility are characteristics that have assumed new importance in the marketplace. Nursing leaders possess these attributes, along with a strong clinical foundation that is integrated with knowledge of sound business principles. This combination now positions nurse executives to reach the highest levels of heath care administration. Critical to this achievement is the professional credibility obtained through education at the master's degree level in health care and nursing administration programs that provide the essential tools for professional success. New opportunities for nurse executives afford educators in health care and nursing administration similar opportunities to develop and market programs to this large group of health care professionals who are seeking graduate education in increasing numbers. PMID:10538547

  1. Nurse executives: new roles, new opportunities.

    PubMed

    Kleinman, C S

    1999-01-01

    As women have been nursing since the earliest days of recorded civilization, so nurses have been associated with health care since the earliest days of recorded medical history. Gender and function have been inextricably woven in ways that created a struggle for success within a male-dominated industry. Nurses, as women, have been undervalued as, until recently, their role in health care has been similarly undervalued. Changing realities in the health care environment have created an opportunity for women's unique skills and talents to be revalued in a way that offers new opportunities for nurses. Teamwork, global thinking, multitasking, creativity, and flexibility are characteristics that have assumed new importance in the marketplace. Nursing leaders possess these attributes, along with a strong clinical foundation that is integrated with knowledge of sound business principles. This combination now positions nurse executives to reach the highest levels of heath care administration. Critical to this achievement is the professional credibility obtained through education at the master's degree level in health care and nursing administration programs that provide the essential tools for professional success. New opportunities for nurse executives afford educators in health care and nursing administration similar opportunities to develop and market programs to this large group of health care professionals who are seeking graduate education in increasing numbers.

  2. School nursing.

    PubMed

    Igoe, J B

    1994-09-01

    School nursing has been in a process of transition since its inception. This role evolution parallels the growing complexity of the health, education, and social needs of America's youth. The workplace within which school nurses practice is equally complicated because health and education administrators often hold differing philosophies of management, and school health programs are ill-defined. Fortunately, there is growing support for an integrated services approach and the development of school health systems with nurses joining an interdisciplinary team rather than continuing to function as "boundary dwellers." The roles of the school nurse as primary care provider, school health coordinator, case manager, and epidemiologist are emerging and replacing outdated nursing functions. As the role of the school nurse shifts and expands, it produces a cascade effect. The role of the school health assistant to aid the nurse surfaces as the next logical step in planning. Numerous model school health programs exist today. The emphasis, and rightfully so, is preventive in nature and should be targeted at the preparation of a new generation of health consumers who are more self-reliant than their predecessors. Unfortunately, all these programs are plagued with financing problems that could be alleviated with the right plan for health care reform, such as an expansion of maternal and child health funds (Title V) to health departments and the introduction of school nursing leadership into the DASH office at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, a health education unit largely run by health educators, to reallocate some of these resources to the clinical preventive services needed in schools to reduce health risk behaviors. Finally, total quality management is the next issue on the horizon for this nursing specialty; benchmarking would be the place to start. In summary, systems development in the school health field is now underway, and it will not be easy, but this

  3. Nursing Leadership.

    PubMed

    Crisp, Carol

    2016-01-01

    Nurse transformational leaders can serve in academic settings and at local, national, international professional nursing organizations and community-based groups. As a transformational leader, nurses can lead in any workplace. According to a study by Stanley (2012), clinical leaders are not sought for their capacity to outline a vision, but for their values and beliefs on display that are easily recognized in their actions. This encompasses the moral component of transformational leadership. It is the APRNs duty to continue to strive towards a better vision for the well-being of all nurses, patients, and colleagues. Autonomous APRNs are happier, healthier, and better prepared to provide the best patient care to their patients. We should not be happy to sit back and let others fight this fight. APRNs need to be on the frontline, leading the way. This is only an insight that I have gained after many frustrating years of cheering our profession and then being made to feel inferior at the same time. Only nurses, who have that nurturing spirit, would hold back if they felt it might hurt others. Don't back off or hold back! It might hurt those that follow!

  4. Nursing Leadership.

    PubMed

    Crisp, Carol

    2016-01-01

    Nurse transformational leaders can serve in academic settings and at local, national, international professional nursing organizations and community-based groups. As a transformational leader, nurses can lead in any workplace. According to a study by Stanley (2012), clinical leaders are not sought for their capacity to outline a vision, but for their values and beliefs on display that are easily recognized in their actions. This encompasses the moral component of transformational leadership. It is the APRNs duty to continue to strive towards a better vision for the well-being of all nurses, patients, and colleagues. Autonomous APRNs are happier, healthier, and better prepared to provide the best patient care to their patients. We should not be happy to sit back and let others fight this fight. APRNs need to be on the frontline, leading the way. This is only an insight that I have gained after many frustrating years of cheering our profession and then being made to feel inferior at the same time. Only nurses, who have that nurturing spirit, would hold back if they felt it might hurt others. Don't back off or hold back! It might hurt those that follow! PMID:27089563

  5. The effects of patient weight and sex on nurses' perceptions: a proposed model of nurse withdrawal.

    PubMed

    Peternelj-Taylor, C A

    1989-09-01

    This investigation challenged the premise that nurses adhere to affective neutrality in their practice of nursing, and examined the effect of patient weight and sex on evaluations, attributions and care delivery decisions formed by nurses. The phenomenon of mutual withdrawal originally identified by Tudor in psychiatric nursing was adapted to the general nursing milieu and served as the conceptual framework. Emphasis in this study was given to the phenomenon of nurse withdrawal. A volunteer sample of 100 senior female baccalaureate students was randomly assigned to one of four conditions in a 2 X 2 factorial design with the following factors: (a) weight of the stimulus patient (normal versus obese); and (b) sex of the stimulus patient (male versus female). These independent variables were presented through descriptive vignettes and visual stimuli to participants completing a self-administered questionnaire. Dependent variables included evaluation, attribution and care delivery. Analysis of the questionnaire demonstrated that obese patients were evaluated more negatively than normal weight patients, F = 2.82, P less than 0.05, but were not held more responsible for an alleged transgression, nor did nurses indicate withdrawal. The phenomenon of social attractiveness was identified as an intervening variable lending support to the proposed model of nurse withdrawal. This finding is examined within the context of affective neutrality in the nurse-patient relationship. Implications for nursing practice, theory and research are discussed.

  6. Male hypogonadism.

    PubMed

    Isidori, Andrea M; Giannetta, Elisa; Lenzi, Andrea

    2008-01-01

    The hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis regulates the development, endocrine and reproductive function of the gonads throughout all phases of life. Male hypogonadism is defined an inadequate gonadal function, as manifested by deficiency in gametogenesis and/or secretion of gonadal hormones. In most cases, male hypogonadism is diagnosed through detailed history, physical examination and a few basic hormonal evaluations. In selected cases, however, additional tests are needed to define the aetiology and the extent of HPG axis dysfunction. These include semen analysis, pituitary imaging studies, genetic studies, bone densitometry, testicular ultrasonography, testicular biopsy and hormonal dynamic testing. The stimulation tests of the HPG are of particular importance in the differential diagnosis of congenital delayed puberty versus pre-pubertal hypogonadism in children. This review will focus on the methods, indications and limitations of endocrine testing in the characterisation and differential diagnosis of male hypogonadism at various ages. A practical hands-on guide on how to perform these tests is also provided.

  7. Deciding to Pursue Nurse Education: Sources of Information, Influence and Encouragement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murrells, Trevor; And Others

    1995-01-01

    In a survey of 1,164 British nurses (87% responded), written information, discussions with educators, and personal or family member involvement in health care were positive influences on the decision to become a nurse. Family members, especially mothers, were supportive; secondary school teachers and fathers of male nurses were less encouraging.…

  8. [Homage to the Righteous Among the Nations French nurses].

    PubMed

    Halioua, Bruno; Halioua, Bethsabée; Ichou, Alexandre; Prasquier, Richard

    2014-10-01

    Thirty five nurses and one male nurse received the Righteous Among the Nations title awarded by the Yad Vashem remembrance authority in Jerusalem for having rescued or assisted Jews during the Holocaust. This article looks back on their heroic actions. PMID:26050407

  9. Characteristics Students View as Important in Nurse Faculty Role Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Geneva

    Nursing students' views concerning the behavior of faculty role models were studied. The sample consisted of 75 senior-level baccalaureate nursing students, 69 females and 6 males. The theoretical framework for the research was role theory and Bandura's social learning and modeling theory. The Clinical Instructor Characteristics Ranking Scale…

  10. Clinical decision making of nurses working in hospital settings.

    PubMed

    Bjørk, Ida Torunn; Hamilton, Glenys A

    2011-01-01

    This study analyzed nurses' perceptions of clinical decision making (CDM) in their clinical practice and compared differences in decision making related to nurse demographic and contextual variables. A cross-sectional survey was carried out with 2095 nurses in four hospitals in Norway. A 24-item Nursing Decision Making Instrument based on cognitive continuum theory was used to explore how nurses perceived their CDM when meeting an elective patient for the first time. Data were analyzed with descriptive frequencies, t-tests, Chi-Square test, and linear regression. Nurses' decision making was categorized into analytic-systematic, intuitive-interpretive, and quasi-rational models of CDM. Most nurses reported the use of quasi-rational models during CDM thereby supporting the tenet that cognition most often includes properties of both analysis and intuition. Increased use of intuitive-interpretive models of CDM was associated with years in present job, further education, male gender, higher age, and working in predominantly surgical units.

  11. Retaining Men in Nursing Programs Designed for Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brady, Marilyn S.; Sherrod, Dennis R.

    2003-01-01

    A literature review suggested differences in men's and women's ways of knowing that may influence recruitment of male nursing students. Retention strategies include critical thinking, gender-neutral classrooms, learning styles, role models, and counseling. (Contains 30 references.) (SK)

  12. Leaders from Nursing's History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fondiller, Shirley H.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Looks at the lives and accomplishments of four leaders in professional nursing: (1) Loretta Ford, who championed the cause of nurse practitioners; (2) Mable Staupers, a pioneer in community health and nursing; (3) Janet Geister, a leader in private nursing; and (4) Isabel Stewart, who led the movement to standardize nursing education. (JOW)

  13. How do perioperative nurses cope with stress?

    PubMed

    Gillespie, Brigid M; Kermode, Steven

    In recent years there has been broad discussion on the nature of stressors experienced by members of "high risk" occupations and professions, for instance nursing and emergency workers, whose role is to support others through traumatic scenarios (Lam et al, 1999:23). Perioperative nursing is a major specialization in nursing practice in which there is an increased risk of exposure to traumatic events (Schwann, 1998:645). Moreover, the cumulative nature of critical events, if left undealt with that will potentiate attrition among nurses in the perioperative environment (Michael and Jenkins, 2001:39). This triangulated study using self-administered questionaires focused on how theatre nurses coped with contextual stressors in the work milieu. A purposive sample of 46 registered and enrolled nurses who worked at a major Brisbane hospital were asked to describe a recent stressful workplace event, and rate it using Horowitz's (1993) Impact of Event Scale (IES). Results indicated that nurses with the least general theatre experience, demonstrated the highest negative impacts. 25% of females demonstrated avoidance tendencies when stressed, while 83% of males used problem-solving strategies. Reactions following trauma among the nurses were predominantly negative, and included feelings of frustration and self-doubt. These findings support the eminent need for hospital organizations to take a more person-centered approach when dealing with workplace stress. PMID:14994893

  14. Nurse educators and the future of nursing.

    PubMed

    Ashton, Kathleen S

    2012-03-01

    Calls for transformation in nursing education and practice abound. Nurses are part of a trusted profession, but they have been under-represented in conversations about health care compared with other, more vocal professionals. Nurses may not consider that they already have many leadership skills, and nurse educators in staff development roles are positioned to foster growth in other nurses. The relationship between nurse educators and their constituents provides the context for support that can motivate staff nurses to move beyond their concerns and accept challenges that may cause them some discomfort, such as writing for publication or public speaking. The leadership of nurse educators is essential to support colleagues who will shape the future of nursing.

  15. The story of nurse licensure.

    PubMed

    Benefiel, Diane

    2011-01-01

    The evolution of nurse licensure is representative of the heroic efforts of nurses to enhance the value and impact of the nursing profession. This literature review presents a historical account of the advancement of nursing through the nurse licensure process.

  16. Capturing Nursing's Future Leaders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Linda A.

    1989-01-01

    Strategies for recruiting students into undergraduate nursing programs are discussed, including high school honors programs, high school independent study with nurse researchers, direct admission into a nursing major, more flexible curricula, and cooperative and evening programs. (MSE)

  17. International Transplant Nurses Society

    MedlinePlus

    ... and professional practice in nursing." Demonstration of professional development support and clinical advancement programs are hallmarks of a professional nursing practice environment and critical components of Nursing Magnet status. The ...

  18. The beginning of baccalaureate nursing education at the University of Kansas: a midwestern experience.

    PubMed

    Veith, S

    1990-07-01

    An issue in the historiography of nursing is whether nurses desired baccalaureate education for their occupation, and were unable to accomplish this, or whether they preferred diploma schools. Examination of resource materials at a midwestern university revealed that nurses were neither victims nor heroines of a male-dominated system. Although the evidence supports the oppressor/victim model of women in the professions, it also shows that nurses were instrumental in challenging the university to respond to the need for upgraded nursing education. Particularly striking in the resource material was the effect student nurses had on the development of the occupation at this institution.

  19. Male contraception.

    PubMed

    Chao, Jing; Page, Stephanie T; Anderson, Richard A

    2014-08-01

    Clear evidence shows that many men and women would welcome new male methods of contraception, but none have become available. The hormonal approach is based on suppression of gonadotropins and thus of testicular function and spermatogenesis, and has been investigated for several decades. This approach can achieve sufficient suppression of spermatogenesis for effective contraception in most men, but not all; the basis for these men responding insufficiently is unclear. Alternatively, the non-hormonal approach is based on identifying specific processes in sperm development, maturation and function. A range of targets has been identified in animal models, and targeted effectively. This approach, however, remains in the pre-clinical domain at present. There are, therefore, grounds for considering that safe, effective and reversible methods of contraception for men can be developed. PMID:24947599

  20. Male contraception

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Jing; Page, Stephanie T.; Anderson, Richard A.

    2015-01-01

    Clear evidence shows that many men and women would welcome new male methods of contraception, but none have become available. The hormonal approach is based on suppression of gonadotropins and thus of testicular function and spermatogenesis, and has been investigated for several decades. This approach can achieve sufficient suppression of spermatogenesis for effective contraception in most men, but not all; the basis for these men responding insufficiently is unclear. Alternatively, the nonhormonal approach is based on identifying specific processes in sperm development, maturation and function. A range of targets has been identified in animal models, and targeted effectively. This approach, however, remains in the pre-clinical domain at present. There are, therefore, grounds for considering that safe, effective and reversible methods of contraception for men can be developed. PMID:24947599

  1. Male hypogonadism.

    PubMed

    Basaria, Shehzad

    2014-04-01

    Male hypogonadism is a clinical syndrome that results from failure to produce physiological concentrations of testosterone, normal amounts of sperm, or both. Hypogonadism may arise from testicular disease (primary hypogonadism) or dysfunction of the hypothalamic-pituitary unit (secondary hypogonadism). Clinical presentations vary dependent on the time of onset of androgen deficiency, whether the defect is in testosterone production or spermatogenesis, associated genetic factors, or history of androgen therapy. The clinical diagnosis of hypogonadism is made on the basis of signs and symptoms consistent with androgen deficiency and low morning testosterone concentrations in serum on multiple occasions. Several testosterone-replacement therapies are approved for treatment and should be selected according to the patient's preference, cost, availability, and formulation-specific properties. Contraindications to testosterone-replacement therapy include prostate and breast cancers, uncontrolled congestive heart failure, severe lower-urinary-tract symptoms, and erythrocytosis. Treatment should be monitored for benefits and adverse effects. PMID:24119423

  2. Nursing agency: the link between practical nursing science and nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Banfield, Barbara E

    2011-01-01

    The relationship of nursing science and nursing practice has been the topic of numerous discussions over the past decades. According to Orem, nursing science is a practical science, meaning that knowledge is developed for the sake of nursing practice. Within Orem's self-care deficit nursing theory, the concept of nursing agency links nursing science and nursing practice. Nursing agency refers to the power or ability of the nurse to design and produce systems of care. The relationship of practical nursing science, nursing practice, and nursing agency is examined in this article. Suggestions for further work related to nursing agency are provided.

  3. [French military nurses during the First World War (1914-1918)].

    PubMed

    Garcia, Julien; Lefort, Hugues; Lamache, Christophe; Tabbagh, Xavier; Olier, François

    2014-06-01

    In 1914, beingthe heirs of the ambulance soldiers who had been created during the time of the Empire, the military males-nurses were overwhelmed by the armies huge needs in paramedics. Facing both the callings of commandment which demanded the recruitment of soldiers and the necessity--which had been set up as a duty by the health service--to attend the doctors, the military male-nurse gave way, in 1918 to a new comer: the female military nurse.

  4. Recruiting and retaining men in nursing: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Villeneuve, M J

    1994-01-01

    A review of literature published primarily since 1980 was conducted to identify (1) historical events that have influenced the sex imbalance in the nursing workforce, (2) the existence and types of barriers affecting the recruitment of male nurses, and (3) feasible strategies that might form the basis of intervention studies in the future. Nursing continues to be undervalued as an end-point career by some, and most potential candidates lack exposure to male nurses and nursing in general. Family resistance and salary remain concerns, but they may be as important a deterrent for some women as for men. Significant barriers to men exist in nursing education and practice, and the language and history of nursing have sexualized nursing practice itself by labeling it as women's work. The latter pattern has influenced legal decisions affecting the clinical practice of male nurses and has contributed to perhaps the most significant barrier to the recruitment of male candidates: the job title and its associated images. Proactive recruitment from selected target groups, the use of role models, and the exploitation of appropriate media sources are but three feasible strategies identified from the literature review that might be considered if nurses really would value changing the sex imbalance in the nursing workforce. PMID:7930168

  5. Shift work in nursing: is it really a risk factor for nurses' health and patients' safety?

    PubMed

    Admi, Hanna; Tzischinsky, Orna; Epstein, Rachel; Herer, Paula; Lavie, Peretz

    2008-01-01

    There is evidence in the scientific literature of the adverse physiological and psychological effects of shift work, including disruption to biological rhythm, sleep disorders, health problems, diminished performance at work, job dissatisfaction, and social isolation. In this study, the results of health problems and sleep disorders between female and male nurses, between daytime and shift nurses, and between sleep-adjusted and non-sleep-adjusted shift nurses were compared. Also the relationship between adjustment to shift work and organizational outcomes (errors and incidents and absenteeism from work) was analyzed. Gender, age, and weight were more significant factors than shift work in determining the well-being of nurses. Shift work by itself was not found to be a risk factor for nurses' health and organizational outcomes in this study. Moreover, nurses who were identified as being "non-adaptive" to shift work were found to work as effectively and safely as their adaptive colleagues in terms of absenteeism from work and involvement in professional errors and accidents. This research adds two additional findings to the field of shift work studies. The first finding is that female shift workers complain significantly more about sleep disorders than male shift workers. Second, although high rates of nurses whose sleep was not adapted to shift work were found, this did not have a more adverse impact on their health, absenteeism rates, or performance (reported errors and incidents), compared to their "adaptive" and "daytime" colleagues. PMID:18777974

  6. From Nurse to Nurse Anesthetist: The Influence of Age and Gender on Professional Socialization and Career Commitment of Advanced Practice Nurses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waugaman, Wynne R.; Lohrer, Donna J.

    2000-01-01

    A survey of 1,106 student nurse anesthetists (40% male) showed that increasing age was negatively correlated with socioeconomic rewards. Male gender was positively correlated with administrative/supervisory roles, female gender with holistic patient care. Men achieved socialization more readily in occupational orientation. (SK)

  7. Nursing Jobs in Nursing Homes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Torpey, Elka Maria

    2011-01-01

    The need for practical nurses who focus on caring for older people is growing. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the number of people ages 65 and older is expected to increase from 40 million to 72 million between 2010 and 2030. And the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) projects that this increasing population will result in job growth for…

  8. Professional Transition: Nurse to Nurse-Midwife

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulligan, Joan E.

    1976-01-01

    The article focuses on one nurse's experience in the nurse-midwife program at a large New York medical center. Terming the learning process a painful transition from academe to reality, the author discusses skills learned, conflicts with physicians' belief systems, rewards and frustrations, and the need for nurse-midwife identity. (Author/MS)

  9. Transnational spaces of care: migrant nurses in Norway.

    PubMed

    Isaksen, Lise Widding

    2012-01-01

    This article argues that international nurse recruitment from Latvia to Norway is not a win–win situation. The gains and losses of nurse migration are unevenly distributed between sender and receiver countries. On the basis of empirical research and interviews with Latvian nurses and families they left behind, this article argues that nurse migration transforms families and communities and that national health services now become global workplaces. Some decades ago feminist research pointed to the fact that the welfare state was based on a male breadwinner family and women’s unpaid production of care work at home. Today this production of unpaid care is “outsourced” from richer to poorer countries and is related to an emergence of transnational spaces of care. International nurse recruitment and global nurse care chains in Norway increasingly provide the labor that prevents the new adult worker model and gender equality politics from being disrupted in times where families are overloaded with elder care loads.

  10. Joining the nursing profession in Qatar: motives and perceptions.

    PubMed

    Okasha, M S; Ziady, H H

    2001-11-01

    We aimed to identify why female students in Qatar decide to become nurses and how the students perceived the community attitude towards nursing. A self-administered anonymous questionnaire was distributed to all (57) female students of the four academic classes of the Nursing Unit, University of Qatar for the academic year 1999-2000. The two commonest reasons for joining the nursing profession were an interest in medical services and the humanitarian nature of nursing. There were 33 (57.89%) students who considered there was a negative community attitude towards nursing mainly due to the presence of male patients and colleagues and the working hours. A mass media campaign and govemmental support were two strategies suggested to change this. PMID:15332745

  11. Joining the nursing profession in Qatar: motives and perceptions.

    PubMed

    Okasha, M S; Ziady, H H

    2001-11-01

    We aimed to identify why female students in Qatar decide to become nurses and how the students perceived the community attitude towards nursing. A self-administered anonymous questionnaire was distributed to all (57) female students of the four academic classes of the Nursing Unit, University of Qatar for the academic year 1999-2000. The two commonest reasons for joining the nursing profession were an interest in medical services and the humanitarian nature of nursing. There were 33 (57.89%) students who considered there was a negative community attitude towards nursing mainly due to the presence of male patients and colleagues and the working hours. A mass media campaign and govemmental support were two strategies suggested to change this.

  12. Nursing's Image on Campus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woolley, Alma S.

    1981-01-01

    In studying the nurse's image at a liberal arts college, it was found that faculty and administrators view nurses as long-suffering drones. On the whole, the image of nursing was positive, with those who had the most contact with the nursing program having a more enlightened image. (CT)

  13. Nursing's Scientific Quest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Jean

    1981-01-01

    Examines nursing's changing research practices. Discusses changes in the philosophy of science, dichotomies within nursing, and nursing's changing research tradition. Concludes that a new research tradition can provide nursing with the scientific and social freedom and openness to solve both conceptual and empirical problems. (CT)

  14. Nurses' Attitudes towards Alcoholics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Speer, Rita D.

    Nurses' attitudes toward the alcoholic can have a profound impact on the person suffering from alcoholism. These attitudes can affect the alcoholic's care and even whether the alcoholic chooses to recover. This study investigated attitudes of approximately 68 nurses employed in hospitals, 49 nurses in treatment facilities, 58 nursing students, and…

  15. [Male contraception].

    PubMed

    Demoulin, A

    1984-04-01

    Among the reasons why male hormonal contraception has lagged behind female methods are the necessity of preserving virility, the fact that spermatogenesis is a continuous process, the need to control secondary effects and toxicity, and the requirement that modes of administration be acceptable to both partners. Among currently available reversible mehtods, withdrawal is undoubtedly the most ancient. It is still widespread but cannot be recommended because of its limited effectiveness. The condom is used by about 10% of couples worldwide as a principal or temporary method, but its inter-ference with sensation has limited its acceptance. Condoms are nevertheless highly effective when used with a spermicide. Various androgens are currently under investigation. High doses of testosterone can induce azoospermia without affecting libido but their side effects may be serious. The use of combinations of steroids permits doses to be reduced and offers promise for the future. The combination of oral medroxyprogesterone acetate and percutaneous testosterone is one of the better approaches; the combination is effective and nontoxic but has the disadvantage of percutaneous administration. Gossypol, a pigment extracted from the cotton plant, has been used as a contraceptive in China with a reported efficacy of 99.89%, recovery of fertility within 3 months, and no effect on future fertility. However, its toxicity appears to be significant in the animal and its reversibility is uncertain. A search is on for analogs which would preserve the contraceptive effects while eliminating toxic effects. Several gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) analogs under investigation for their interference with spermatogenesis have given promising results. Several chemicals tested for contraceptive effects have had unacceptably high toxicity. Chinese investigators have reported good results with various physical methods of interfering with sperm production, but their reversibility and innocuity

  16. [Introduction to nursing aesthetics].

    PubMed

    Chen, Chen-Jung; Tsai, Chuan-Hsiu; Chen, Yi-Chang

    2011-04-01

    Empirical, aesthetic, ethical, and personal knowing are the four fundamental patterns of knowledge inquiry. Of these, the aesthetic knowing pattern is least discussed in nursing literature. This article discusses the definition of nursing aesthetics; its utilization in practice; and correlations between aesthetics and clinical practice. One of the advantages inherent to nursing is its ability to deliver skillful care directly to patients. Skillful performance is essential to reduce discrepancies between goals and patterns. Aesthetic nursing addresses more than the form of nursing. It further addresses the crucial elements of nursing knowledge. The science of nursing is influential in its ability to attain harmony among abundant empiric content, power of beneficence, and pleasure of aesthetic experience. In clinical practice, nurses can employ aesthetic nursing through various channels to create meaning and promote the professional image of nurses. Concepts listed in this article may be utilized in clinical supervision, practice and education.

  17. Professional Behavior in Nursing.

    PubMed

    Kowalski, Karren

    2016-04-01

    Being clear about what constitutes professional behavior is a pathway to effective leadership. Not all nurses come out of educational programs with an understanding about what aspects of behavior signal true professionalism. This article uses the American Organization of Nurse Executives' Nurse Executive Competency for Processional Behavior to help professional development nurse faculty identify role modeling behavior and other aspects that new nurses can use to help them advance in their careers, while improving care to patients and families. PMID:27031029

  18. User Expectations: Nurses' Perspective.

    PubMed

    Gürsel, Güney

    2016-01-01

    Healthcare is a technology-intensive industry. Although all healthcare staff needs qualified computer support, physicians and nurses need more. As nursing practice is an information intensive issue, understanding nurses' expectations from healthcare information systems (HCIS) is a must issue to meet their needs and help them in a better way. In this study perceived importance of nurses' expectations from HCIS is investigated, and two HCIS is evaluated for meeting the expectations of nurses by using fuzzy logic methodologies. PMID:27332398

  19. Nursing in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Baumann, Steven L

    2006-10-01

    The current discussion on the nursing shortage needs to focus as much on nursing job satisfaction and retention as on nursing recruitment and education. Selected aspects of the motivational psychology of Abraham Maslow, Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi, and Frederick Hertzberg are here discussed in light of the challenges-opportunities of nursing in Turkey and elsewhere. Also discussed is an innovative program to support the application of nursing theory and professional development in Toronto, Canada. PMID:16982724

  20. Value of intensified nursing

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Wilhelm; Konta, Brigitte; Prusa, Nina; Raymann, Cornelia

    2006-01-01

    The concept "intensified nursing" is mentioned in differentiation to concepts of "nursing care" or "nursing" which intensifies resources or patient contact. Especially psychic and social needs of patients are very appreciated in nursing. A similar type of nursing is known under the concept "advanced nursing practice" (ANP) which means, that a specialised, academically trained nurse offers an extended nursing care in which a focus on the published knowledge of evidence based research is made. From the thin literature to this topic a selection of predetermined topics was analysed where at least two articles with a sufficient high methodical quality were available. The selected topic groups were: „Infant and paediatric nursing", "gerontology" and "oncology". Generally the five publications concerning infant and paediatric nursing could conclusive show a benefit of intensified nursing. Further research is still needed to prove intensified nursing care. Two publications could be found to the gerontological intensified nursing; both used an extended nursing model and an enlarged use of resources. Both studies demonstrated a measurable success in the applied parameters. Two studies also could be analysed in the oncological field in which successes were also provable by the applied parameters. The success was given especially in a higher patient satisfaction, one study showed an improved scheduling (time planning) of nurses. There was not one article concerning economic questions of intensified nursing care. It has to be taken into account that the financial resources have to be used effectively also in nursing nowadays. It has to be assumed that the costs are driven by increased use of resources. Savings can be achieved, however, in the form of avoided therapies and days in hospital by intensified nursing. The intensified nursing can be considered as similar cost-effective as conventional models of nursing. Ethically it is necessary to consider that the possibilities of

  1. Using Nursing Languages in School Nursing Practice. Second Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denehy, Janice

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this updated manual is to define and describe standardized nursing languages, highlight how nursing languages are a part of the nursing process, and illustrate through case examples how nursing languages are used in school nursing practice. This manual also summarizes the history and development of three nursing classifications, the…

  2. Nursing Home Work Practices and Nursing Assistants' Job Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bishop, Christine E.; Squillace, Marie R.; Meagher, Jennifer; Anderson, Wayne L.; Wiener, Joshua M.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To estimate the impact of nursing home work practices, specifically compensation and working conditions, on job satisfaction of nursing assistants employed in nursing homes. Design and Methods: Data are from the 2004 National Nursing Assistant Survey, responses by the nursing assistants' employers to the 2004 National Nursing Home Survey,…

  3. Leadership and nurse retention: the pivotal role of nurse managers.

    PubMed

    Anthony, Mary K; Standing, Theresa S; Glick, JoAnn; Duffy, Martha; Paschall, Fran; Sauer, Mary R; Sweeney, Denise Kosty; Modic, Mary Beth; Dumpe, Michelle L

    2005-03-01

    As the link between executives and bedside nurses, nurse managers assume roles that bridge both organizational and professional goals. Nurse retention is one of the many responsibilities that characterize the nurse manager's work. To better understand the pivotal role of nurse managers, the authors describe the views of 32 nurse managers regarding their roles and the characteristics they need to promote retention.

  4. The nursing crisis.

    PubMed

    McVEAGH, T C

    1949-06-01

    Three concrete proposals are made for the improvement of the present nursing situation:1. Make nursing education more easily available by holding the prerequisites to a minimum and concentrating upon the real essentials of nursing, granting the student the R.N. degree when she has completed this basic and essential training.2. Utilize more fully the principles of group nursing as applied to "specialing" whether in the home or in the hospital.3. Completely avoid the use of sub-standard nurses, while furnishing to the nurse such non-technical service (through the use of maid assistants or others) as shall make practicable the complete utilization of her skill and training.

  5. Nursing Education for College Graduates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slavinsky, Ann T.; Diers, Donna

    1982-01-01

    Describes the masters programs for nonnurse college graduates at Yale School of Nursing which offers both basic and advanced nursing preparation in a single three-year curriculum sequence. The program prepares nurses who can function in advanced-practice specialty roles as nurse-midwives, nurse practitioners, or clinical nurse specialists. (CT)

  6. Nurse Against Nurse: Horizontal Bullying in the Nursing Profession.

    PubMed

    Granstra, Katherine

    2015-01-01

    Healthcare professionals are not immune to bullying; in fact, they experience bullying at an alarming rate. Sometimes the bullying is passed down from superiors, but frequently bullying occurs between coworkers. This is known as "horizontal bullying," and it has become a serious issue within the nursing profession. Horizontal bullying between nurses can cause negative consequences for everyone involved, in particular the nurses, patients, and the entire organization. To fully address and resolve horizontal bullying in the nursing profession, we must consider many factors. The first step is to establish what constitutes bullying and to develop a clear process for dealing with it when it occurs. Before it is possible to eliminate the problem, we need to understand why bullying takes place. To be effective, solutions to the problem of horizontal bullying in the nursing profession must include the entire healthcare industry.

  7. The nurse match instrument: Exploring professional nursing identity and professional nursing values for future nurse recruitment.

    PubMed

    Mazhindu, Deborah M; Griffiths, Lauren; Pook, Carol; Erskine, Allen; Ellis, Roger; Smith, Fleur

    2016-05-01

    From April 1st 2015 it will be mandatory for Higher Education Institutions (HEI) in the United Kingdom (UK) providing pre-qualifying health care higher education to use a Values Based Recruitment (VBR) tool, to ensure only the candidates with the "right" personal identity and values commensurate with the Professional Identity of Nursing (PIN) are accepted for nurse education. "Nurse Match" instrument was developed to enhance the recruitment and selection of candidates for pre-qualifying nursing. Action Research into PIN commenced with voluntary, purposive, convenience samples of qualified nurses (n = 30), Service Users (N = 10), postgraduate diploma nurses in mental health (N = 25), third year mental health branch students (N = 20) and adult and child student nurses in years 2 and 3 (N = 20) in Focus Groups. Data collection and analysis occurred concomitantly between July 2013 and October 2014, aided by NVivo 10 software and revealed Key Quality Indicators (KQIs) of the social construction of PIN. Construct development included a literature review spanning the last fifteen years, which identified four main themes; 1. Nursing's ethics and values. 2. Nursing's professional identity and caring. 3. Nursing's emotional intelligence. 4. Nursing's professionalism. Nurse Match offers an evidence-based enhancement to VBR, for future nurse recruitment locally, nationally and internationally. PMID:27235564

  8. Call to Action for Nurses/Nursing

    PubMed Central

    Premji, Shahirose S.; Hatfield, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    The 13 million nurses worldwide constitute most of the global healthcare workforce and are uniquely positioned to engage with others to address disparities in healthcare to achieve the goal of better health for all. A new vision for nurses involves active participation and collaboration with international colleagues across research practice and policy domains. Nursing can embrace new concepts and a new approach—“One World, One Health”—to animate nursing engagement in global health, as it is uniquely positioned to participate in novel ways to improve healthcare for the well-being of the global community. This opinion paper takes a historical and reflective approach to inform and inspire nurses to engage in global health practice, research, and policy to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals. It can be argued that a colonial perspective currently informs scholarship pertaining to nursing global health engagement. The notion of unidirectional relationships where those with resources support training of those less fortunate has dominated the framing of nursing involvement in low- and middle-income countries. This paper suggests moving beyond this conceptualization to a more collaborative and equitable approach that positions nurses as cocreators and brokers of knowledge. We propose two concepts, reverse innovation and two-way learning, to guide global partnerships where nurses are active participants. PMID:27144160

  9. Alternatives to Nursing Homes

    MedlinePlus

    ... this website may not be available. Alternatives to nursing homes Before you make any decisions about long ... live and what help you may need. A nursing home may not be your only choice. Discharge ...

  10. Nursing's Preferred Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aydelotte, Myrtle K.

    1987-01-01

    The author discusses future trends for society and relates them to future roles and characteristics of nursing. She presents strategies that nursing professionals should use to be prepared for the stated trends. (CH)

  11. Nurses at the Table.

    PubMed

    Ulrich, Connie M

    2016-09-01

    Few bioethicists are educated with a view into nursing. Thus, much of the conceptual and empirical research on ethical issues in nursing practice has been conducted by nurse ethicists themselves and, to a lesser degree, by individuals with a strong interest in nursing ethics. Although this work has internally shaped nursing practice, education, and policy, the broader field of bioethics has seldom examined and acknowledged the everyday ethical concerns of practicing nurses and their important contributions to bioethics discourse. In this special report of the Hastings Center Report -the first to focus on nursing-Christine Grady, Ann Hamric, and I, along with consulting editor Nancy Berlinger, strive to give voice to the contributions of nurses in addressing some of our obstinate everyday ethics and health policy challenges. PMID:27649914

  12. National Nursing Home Survey

    Cancer.gov

    The National Nursing Home Survey provides includes characteristics such as size of nursing home facilities, ownership, Medicare/Medicaid certification, occupancy rate, number of days of care provided, and expenses.

  13. Falls in Nursing Homes

    MedlinePlus

    ... for health care providers. Learn More Falls in Nursing Homes Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir On ... 5 Why do falls occur more often in nursing homes? Falling can be a sign of other ...

  14. Selected Publications of the Division of Nursing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Public Health Service (DHEW), Arlington, VA. Div. of Nursing.

    Publications are organized under the following topics: (1) Division of Nursing Program, (2) Nurse Training Act of 1964, (3) Nursing (general interest), (4) Nursing Manpower, (5) Nursing Services in Hospitals, (6) Public Health Nursing, (7) Nursing Education, (8) Nursing Research and Research Training, and (9) Nurse Training Manuals. Single copies…

  15. Gender, politics, and regionalism: factors in the evolution of registered psychiatric nursing in Manitoba, 1920-1960.

    PubMed

    Hicks, Beverly

    2011-01-01

    In Canada, psychiatric nursing care is provided by two kinds of nurses. East of Manitoba, it is provided by registered nurses who may or may not have specialized psychiatric nursing education. In the four western provinces, a distinct professional group, registered psychiatric nurses, also provide care. Saskatchewan was the first province to achieve distinct legislation, in 1948, followed by British Columbia in 1951, Alberta in 1955, and Manitoba in 1960. Several factors coalesced to sway Manitoba to adopt the distinct profession model. First, there was little interest by the general nursing body in mental hospital nursing. Second, the other three western provinces had formed a Canadian Council of Psychiatric Nursing that encouraged mental hospital attendants and nurses in Manitoba. Third, a group of male attendants took on leadership roles supported by the mental hospital superintendents. Finally, Manitoba was culturally and geographically more aligned with western than eastern Canada.

  16. Nursing informatics: the future now.

    PubMed

    Mamta

    2014-01-01

    Technological advancements in the health care field have always impacted the health care practices. Nursing practice has also been greatly influenced by the technology. In the recent years, use of information technology including computers, handheld digital devices, internet has advanced the nursing by bridging the gap from nursing as an art to nursing as science. In every sphere of nursing practice, nursing research, nursing education and nursing informatics play a very important role. If used properly it is a way to save time, helping to provide quality nursing care and increases the proficiency of nursing personnel. PMID:25924417

  17. Stepping up, stepping back, stepping forward: Student nurses' experiences as peer mentors in a pre-nursing scholarship.

    PubMed

    Smith, Annetta; Beattie, Michelle; Kyle, Richard G

    2015-11-01

    Mentorship is an essential part of the registered nurse's role, yet few opportunities exist for student nurses to mentor others during pre-registration programmes. This paper reports student nurses' experiences of mentoring school pupils during a pre-nursing scholarship. Focus groups were conducted with fifteen final year student nurses (14 female, 1 male) in two university campuses in Scotland. Discussions were audio recorded and transcribed verbatim, and data analysed thematically. Three interconnected themes emerged: 1) stepping up; 2) stepping back; 3) stepping forward. 'Stepping up' was a process through which student nurses rapidly assumed responsibility for mentoring pupils, facilitated through the attitudes and actions of students' mentors and students' control over pupils' practice experiences. 'Stepping back' encapsulated attitudes and behaviours that enabled student nurses to mentor pupils that involved considerable judgement around how unfolding events in practice could provide learning and development opportunities, and emotional acuity to support pupils through, sometimes challenging, practice situations. 'Stepping forward' described how students' mentoring experience allowed them to appraise and affirm nursing knowledge and skills, and gain greater appreciation of the reality and complexity of mentorship in clinical practice. Peer mentoring may prepare student nurses for future mentoring roles and aid their transition into clinical practice.

  18. Nurses at war.

    PubMed

    Dean, Erin

    The first world war opened up nursing to a wider range of women and earned new status for the profession. Nursing service records from the conflict, available online for the first time at www.national archives.gov.uk, provide a detailed insight into the lives of nurses who were the first to handle war casualties on an industrial scale.

  19. Nursing Role Transition Preceptorship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Batory, Susan M.

    2014-01-01

    The preceptorship clinical experience in a practical nursing (PN) program at a Midwestern community college is considered crucial to the PN students' transition from novice nurse to professional nurse. However, no research has been available to determine whether the preceptorship clinical accomplishes its purpose. A case study was conducted to…

  20. Nursing Research: Position Statement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Copp, Laurel; And Others

    The role of the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) in encouraging research through the programs and activities of the member schools is discussed. It is suggested that the dean or administrative head of a college of nursing is in a position to influence nursing research activities. The principal role of the academic dean in…

  1. Technology and Nursing Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neighbors, Marianne; Eldred, Evelyn E.

    1993-01-01

    A study to isolate some of the complex skills that nurses are expected to perform in current practice identified 54 skills and surveyed 167 staff nurses and 53 nurse executives to classify the expected level of performance for a new graduate. Results indicated that educators bear responsibility for learning about technology and incorporating it…

  2. Surviving Nursing's Enrollment Slump.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geach, Barbara

    1989-01-01

    The author suggests that nursing faculty who are facing declining enrollments in nursing programs may want to consider volunteering to teach in university remedial programs. Benefits of such service are discussed, as are the difficulties. The author reveals how her teaching experience has improved her nursing classes. (CH)

  3. Marginalization and School Nursing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Julia Ann

    2004-01-01

    The concept of marginalization was first analyzed by nursing researchers Hall, Stevens, and Meleis. Although nursing literature frequently refers to this concept when addressing "at risk" groups such as the homeless, gays and lesbians, and those infected with HIV/AIDS, the concept can also be applied to nursing. Analysis of current school nursing…

  4. Distress in cancer patients and primary nurses' empathy skills.

    PubMed

    Reid-Ponte, P

    1992-08-01

    This descriptive, correlational study was designed to explore the relationship between the empathy skills of primary nurses and the distress level of their primary patients. Data on empathy skills were generated from the La Monica Empathy Profile. Data on patient distress were generated from the Profile of Mood State Inventory and a Visual Analogue Scale. A nonprobability convenience sample of 65 primary nurses employed on surgical primary nursing care units of a large teaching hospital participated in the study. Sixty-five cancer patients assigned to the participating primary nurses also took part in the study. Descriptive statistics of each variable were examined. Pearson product-moment correlations were used to examine the hypothesis and the demographic variables for nurses and patients. Analysis of variance was used to assess relationships among many of the demographic variables. A significant correlation (but not in the expected direction) was found between the perceiving/feeling/listening empathy skill and patient distress. Nurses' age, years of experience, and education were significantly correlated with some empathy skills. Distress levels of female patients were higher than those of male patients. In general, nurses scored low in the use of empathy skills, and patients scored low in distress. The complex nature of defining and measuring communication skills and relating these skills to outcomes in patient care, such as distress, requires more study. Research questions exploring how and why nurses' interpersonal skills make a difference to patients and their health care outcomes must be generated by nurse administrators, nurse educators, nurse researchers, and practicing nurses.

  5. Is there gender bias in nursing research?

    PubMed

    Polit, Denise F; Beck, Cheryl Tatano

    2008-10-01

    Using data from a consecutive sample of 259 studies published in four leading nursing research journals in 2005-2006, we examined whether nurse researchers favor females as study participants. On average, 75.3% of study participants were female, and 38% of studies had all-female samples. The bias favoring female participants was statistically significant and persistent. The bias was observed regardless of funding source, methodological features, and other participant and researcher characteristics, with one exception: studies that had male investigators had more sex-balanced samples. When designing studies, nurse researchers need to pay close attention to who will benefit from their research and to whether they are leaving out a specific group about which there is a gap in knowledge. PMID:18324681

  6. The neonatal nurse: advocating for breastfeeding mothers.

    PubMed

    Darby, Colm; Nurse, Sharon

    2016-02-01

    Accurate information and support from healthcare professionals as well as respect for parental choice are all factors which contribute to effective breastfeeding in the neonatal unit; with this in mind, Colm Darby and Sharon Nurse discuss the potential problems in expressing breast milk and the interventions which might be effective in avoiding them. Advocacy is an inherent part of neonatal nurses' role whilst caring for sick, vulnerable babies. Colm Darby is a male neonatal nurse working in a predominantly female environment and passionately believes in supporting and advocating for mothers who want to provide breast milk for their babies. In this article, CoIm uses Borton's model of reflection to discuss how he acted as an effective advocate for such a mother. PMID:27008754

  7. The neonatal nurse: advocating for breastfeeding mothers.

    PubMed

    Darby, Colm; Nurse, Sharon

    2016-02-01

    Accurate information and support from healthcare professionals as well as respect for parental choice are all factors which contribute to effective breastfeeding in the neonatal unit; with this in mind, Colm Darby and Sharon Nurse discuss the potential problems in expressing breast milk and the interventions which might be effective in avoiding them. Advocacy is an inherent part of neonatal nurses' role whilst caring for sick, vulnerable babies. Colm Darby is a male neonatal nurse working in a predominantly female environment and passionately believes in supporting and advocating for mothers who want to provide breast milk for their babies. In this article, CoIm uses Borton's model of reflection to discuss how he acted as an effective advocate for such a mother.

  8. Professionalism in Nursing Behaviors of Nurse Practitioners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Donna; Miller, Barbara K.

    2001-01-01

    A survey of 502 nurse practitioners found that more than half had written research proposals or participated in research projects recently; nearly 50% wrote their own job descriptions; 93% belonged to the American Academy of Nurse Practitioners; and maintaining certification was the motivation for some professional behaviors. (Contains 29…

  9. Nursing 436A: Pediatric Oncology for Nurses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackman, Cynthia L.

    A description is provided of "Pediatric Oncology for Nurses," the first in a series of three courses offered to fourth-year nursing students in pediatric oncology. The first section provides a course overview, discusses time assignments, and describes the target student population. Next, a glossary of terms, and lists of course goals, long-range…

  10. Graduating Black Males

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Edward Earl

    2010-01-01

    Background: The graduation numbers for Black males are dismal, chilling, and undeniably pathetic. The nation graduates only 47% of Black males who enter the 9th grade. The infusion of federal dollars and philanthropic support will not stop the trajectory of Black males who drop out of school. Black males face an upheaval educational battle;…

  11. Postpartal nursing diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Gorrie, T M

    1986-01-01

    The responsibility of nurses for postpartal patients has changed greatly in the past few years. No longer is it adequate to assess and manage only those physical problems that occur during the hospital stay. Today, potential psychosocial problems and consequences of parental knowledge deficit are part of nursing's domain of diagnosis and management. A review of the purpose of nursing diagnosis is important. Clarifying the difference between medical diagnosis and nursing diagnosis is also essential if one is to be comfortable with the process. Careful scrutiny of the unique needs of new parents will form the basis for formulating meaningful postpartal nursing diagnosis.

  12. Developing a virtual nurses' station for community-based nurses.

    PubMed

    Kiel, Joan M; Resick, Lenore K

    2013-01-01

    Nurses who work throughout the community need a nurses' station, just as nurses who work in a hospital. The nurses' station is the area where communication, information sharing, and documentation occur. This article describes how a virtual nurses' station was created using Blackboard technology to meet the needs of nurses who are scattered throughout a geographic area. These nurses work in several urban neighborhoods to conduct the outreach services offered through an academic nurse-managed wellness center to community-dwelling older adults. Results have been positive as the virtual nurses' station provides the nurses an area to exchange data and information, print patient health care information, and access nursing policies. Satisfaction surveys from the nurses give valuable input on the design and use of the virtual nurses' station.

  13. The opinions of Polish nurses and patients on nursing protests.

    PubMed

    Binkowska-Bury, Monika; Marc, Malgorzata; Nagorska, Malgorzata; Januszewicz, Pawel; Ryzko, Jozef

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this study is to explore nurses' and patients' opinions about nurses in Poland going on strike. The study was carried out in Poland between January and June 2009, using 150 nurses and 150 hospitalized patients. The study was conducted using two questionnaire surveys. The main reasons why nursing strikes are organized, in the opinions of nurses, are: higher wages, the improvement of working conditions and the improvement of the image of the nursing profession. The main reasons why nursing strikes are organized, in the opinions of patients, are: higher wages, not abiding standards of employment by government and the improvement of the image of the nursing profession. The main reasons for a lack of active participation in strikes are holidays and occupational and economic matters. Patients and nurses support nursing strikes. Both nurses (53.3%) and patients (42%) said that organizing nursing strikes is right and might improve the occupational situation of nurses. PMID:24308205

  14. Male Teacher, Female Students: A Novice Teacher Reflects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kenny, Gerard

    2002-01-01

    A male teacher working with female nursing students reflects on the following issues: (1) extent to which his presence reflects sociocultural dynamics; (2) the complexity of gender dynamics and the need for openness to multiple perspectives; (3) ethical challenges of implementing an empowerment approach; and (4) the search for alternatives to…

  15. Development of a Nursing Data Set for School Nursing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fahrenkrug, Mary Ann

    2003-01-01

    School nurses need to clearly identify how they promote the health and educational achievement of children. School nurses contribute to student health by providing health assessment and nursing interventions, advocating for healthy living, and contributing to prevention of illness and disease management. A Nursing Data Set for School Nursing can…

  16. Moral reckoning in nursing.

    PubMed

    Nathaniel, Alvita K

    2006-06-01

    Analysis of qualitative data resulted in an original substantive grounded theory of moral reckoning in nursing, a three-stage process. After a novice period, the nurse experiences a stage of ease in which there is comfort in the workplace and congruence of internal and external values. Unexpectedly, a situational bind occurs in which the nurse's core beliefs come into irreconcilable conflict with external forces. This compels the nurse into the stage of resolution, in which he or she either gives up or makes a stand. The nurse then moves into the stage of reflection in which he or she lives with the consequences and iteratively examines beliefs, values, and actions. The nurse tries to make sense of experiences through remembering, telling the story, and examining conflicts. This study sets the stage for further investigation of moral distress. The theory of moral reckoning challenges nurses to tell their stories, examine conflicts, and participate as partners in moral decision making. PMID:16672631

  17. Nursing and Biobanking.

    PubMed

    Sanner, Jennifer; Yu, Erica; Nomie, Krystle

    2015-01-01

    Nurses are a pivotal component of the translational research movement and apply scientific discoveries to the healthcare and clinical practice fields. Biobanking is also an important factor in furthering translational research by providing biospecimens and related clinical data to the research community. The effectiveness of any biobanking effort necessitates the enrollment of large numbers of diverse participants, which signifies a need for the nursing profession to secure the knowledge necessary to impact biobanking practices and to promote participant advocacy. In addition, biobanks provide the volume, variety, veracity, and velocity of data that can address the challenges of nursing research. Nurse scientists, research nurse coordinators and clinical research and practice nurses must be informed about the various benefits and risks associated with biobanking in addition to ethical issues surrounding informed consent, participant privacy, and the release of research results. Ultimately, nurses need to possess competencies to facilitate biobanking practices both at the research bench and at the point of care.

  18. Lifestyle and Depression among Hong Kong Nurses.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Teris; Yip, Paul S F

    2016-01-01

    Recent longitudinal data suggest a close association between depression and lifestyle. Little work to date has estimated the prevalence of depression in the nursing workforce in China, nor considered what lifestyle factors might be correlated with it-a gap filled by the present study. The study's web-based cross-sectional survey solicited data from qualified nurses aged between 21 and 65 registered with the Hong Kong Nursing Council. The Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale 21 was used to measure 850 nurses for depression, anxiety and symptoms of stress; a generalized linear regression model examined associations between lifestyle factors and depression. Mean depression symptom scores show a downward linear trend for male and female participants. Gender and age, however, did not emerge as significant predictors of depression. Three lifestyles factors (sleep, entertainment and hobbies) showed a significant association with depression. Nurses should make therapeutic lifestyle changes to improve their work-life balance and safeguard their functioning at work and personal well-being. PMID:26784216

  19. Lifestyle and Depression among Hong Kong Nurses

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Teris; Yip, Paul S.F.

    2016-01-01

    Recent longitudinal data suggest a close association between depression and lifestyle. Little work to date has estimated the prevalence of depression in the nursing workforce in China, nor considered what lifestyle factors might be correlated with it—a gap filled by the present study. The study’s web-based cross-sectional survey solicited data from qualified nurses aged between 21 and 65 registered with the Hong Kong Nursing Council. The Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale 21 was used to measure 850 nurses for depression, anxiety and symptoms of stress; a generalized linear regression model examined associations between lifestyle factors and depression. Mean depression symptom scores show a downward linear trend for male and female participants. Gender and age, however, did not emerge as significant predictors of depression. Three lifestyles factors (sleep, entertainment and hobbies) showed a significant association with depression. Nurses should make therapeutic lifestyle changes to improve their work-life balance and safeguard their functioning at work and personal well-being. PMID:26784216

  20. Psychosocial Factors as Predictors of Mentoring among Nurses in Southwestern Nigeria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salami, Samuel O.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine the psychosocial factors that predict mentoring among nurses. Design/methodology/approach: This study adopted a survey research design. Questionnaires were used to collect data on self-esteem, locus of control, emotional intelligence and demographic factors from 480 nurses (males 230; females = 250)…

  1. The Relationship between Nurse Characteristics and Perceptions of Psychotropic Medications in Residential Facilities for the Retarded.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aman, Michael G.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Nurses (N=227) were surveyed regarding attitudes, perceptions, and knowledge about the uses of psychotropic drugs. In general, greater age, male sex, status, and higher qualifications tended to covary and were associated with perception of greater involvement by senior nurses in drug-related decisions for institutionalized retarded persons.…

  2. Is Nurses' Professional Competence Related to Their Personality and Emotional Intelligence? A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Heydari, Abbas; Kareshki, Hossein; Armat, Mohammad Reza

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Nurses' professional competence is a crucial factor in clinical practice. Systematic evaluation of nurses’ competence and its related factors are essential for enhancing the quality of nursing care. This study aimed to assess the nurses’ competence level and its possible relationship with their personality and emotional intelligence. Methods: Using a cross-sectional survey design, three instruments including Nurse Competence Scale, short form of Schutte Self Report Emotional Intelligence Test, and the short 10-item version of Big Five Factor Inventory, were administered simultaneously to a randomized stratified sample of 220 nurses working in hospitals affiliated to Mashhad University of Medical Sciences. Data analysis was performed using SPSS 11.5. Results: Majority of nurses rated themselves as "good" and "very good", with the highest scores in "managing situations" and "work role" dimensions of nurse competence. A relatively similar pattern of scores was seen in competence dimensions, personality and emotional intelligence, among male and female nurses. Emotional intelligence and personality scores showed a significant relationship with nurses’ competence, explaining almost 20% of variations in nurse competence scores. Conclusion: Iranian nurses evaluated their overall professional competence at similar level of the nurses in other countries. Knowledge about the nurses’ competence level and its related factors, including personality and emotional intelligence, may help nurse managers in enhancing nurses' professional competence through appropriate task assignments and conducting in-service educational programs, thus improving the health status of patients. PMID:27354976

  3. Nurse Reinvestment Act. Public Law.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC.

    This document contains the text of the Nurse Reinvestment Act, which amends the Public Health Service Act to address the increasing shortage of registered nurses by instituting a series of policies to improve nurse recruitment and nurse retention. Title I details two initiatives to boost recruitment of nurses. The first initiative includes the…

  4. Academic Incivility in Nursing Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marlow, Sherri

    2013-01-01

    A well-documented and growing problem impacting the nursing shortage in the United States is the increasing shortage of qualified nursing faculty. Many factors contribute to the nursing faculty shortage such as retirement, dissatisfaction with the nursing faculty role and low salary compensation (American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN),…

  5. Beliefs and attitudes of final-year nursing students on honour crimes: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Can, M; Edirne, T

    2011-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate perceptions of nursing students about honour crimes and examine their beliefs about inquiring information from the victims of honour crimes. A questionnaire including demographic data was administered to a sample of 225 male and female final-year students in a nursing school. Among them, we found that significantly more male students than female students justify honour crimes. Although the majority of both male and female nursing students believed that asking for honour crimes is useful, significantly more male than female nursing students were against screening for honour crimes. This study supports the belief that gender has an influence on nurses' perceptions, attitudes and tolerance of honour crimes.

  6. Standardized Nursing Documentation Supports Evidence-Based Nursing Management.

    PubMed

    Mykkänen, Minna; Miettinen, Merja; Saranto, Kaija

    2016-01-01

    Nursing documentation is crucial to high quality, effective and safe nursing care. According to earlier studies nursing documentation practices vary and nursing classifications used in electronic patient records (EPR) are not yet standardized internationally nor nationally. A unified national model for documenting patient care improves information flow in nursing practice, management, research and development toward evidence-based nursing care. Nursing documentation quality, accuracy and development requires follow-up and evaluation. An audit instrument is used in the Kuopio University Hospital (KUH) when evaluating nursing documentation. The results of the auditing process suggest that the national nursing documentation model fulfills nurses' expectations of electronic tools, facilitating their important documentation duty. This paper discusses the importance of using information about nursing documentation and how we can take advantage of structural information in evidence-based nursing management. PMID:27332244

  7. The nurse engineer: a way to better nursing information systems.

    PubMed

    Hendrickson, M F

    1993-01-01

    Currently, there are few significant nursing information systems that can meet the basic needs of nursing (Zielstorff, McHugh, & Clinton, 1988). Some factors that may relate to this problem include the amount of nurse input, the effectiveness of communications between nurses and engineers, and the state of nursing practice. One method that may address this problem is to involve nurse engineers, nurses with technical degrees, in the development process. As a key member of the development team, the nurse engineer can encourage intensive use of nurse input, function as a translator and clarifier, thereby reducing communication problems, and assist the development team to analyze the diversity in nursing practice. Using nurse engineers in the development process may result in better nursing information systems.

  8. Why a well-paid nurse is a better nurse.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Julie A; Folbre, Nancy

    2006-01-01

    In an article subtitled "Why is a Badly Paid Nurse a Good Nurse?" economist Anthony Heyes argues that nursing wages should be kept low. Counter arguments are provided based on what the authors consider more adequate economic analysis.

  9. Competency of Graduate Nurses as Perceived by Nurse Preceptors and Nurse Managers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wise, Vanessa

    2013-01-01

    As newly graduated associate degree nurses (ADN) and baccalaureate degree nurses (BSN) enter into the workforce, they must be equipped to care for a complex patient population; therefore, the purpose of this study was to address the practice expectations and clinical competency of new nurses as perceived by nurse preceptors and nurse managers.…

  10. [Response of Taiwan nursing education to today's nursing shortage].

    PubMed

    Chou, Shieu-Ming

    2012-10-01

    The shortage of nursing manpower has recently attracted significant attention from Taiwan society. Government efforts to improve the nursing practice environment have challenged the quality of current domestic nursing education. This article provides an overview of Taiwan nursing education in terms of its development under current nursing shortage conditions and in light of Taiwan's low birthrate, ageing society. A few suggestions for nursing education are listed at the end of the article.

  11. Nursing research fellowship: building nursing research infrastructure in a hospital.

    PubMed

    Latimer, Renee; Kimbell, Jennifer

    2010-02-01

    The largest private hospital in Hawaii was recently awarded Magnet Recognition, partly due to its exemplary nursing research culture. The hospital fostered and sustained a strong research environment through the establishment of a nursing institute, nursing research council, and, most recently, a nursing research fellowship. The authors describe the fellowship that was designed to educate nurses on the research process and enable nurses to lead research projects.

  12. Nursing reality as reflected in nurses' poetry.

    PubMed

    Oiler, C

    1983-01-01

    In this discussion, the author has described a technique used in a pilot study where the research aim was to enhance understanding of nurses and their experiences--an understanding achieved from attention to nurses' expressions in poetry. There is a growing interest in qualitative approaches to the study of nursing phenomena and the development of nursing theory (Simms, 1981; Munhall, 1982; Oiler, 1982; Omery, 1983; Swanson and Chenitz, 1982). In fact, many of the techniques and strategies used by helping professionals to know their clients can be adapted in qualitative research procedures. For persons in the helping professions, a qualitative approach is consistent with the therapeutic process of coming to know a client. Human behavior is understood to be an expression of how individuals interpret their worlds. The task of the qualitative researcher is to capture this very process of interpretation in the subject's words, gestures, expressions, acts, and creations.

  13. The relationship between effective nurse managers and nursing retention.

    PubMed

    Force, Mary VanOyen

    2005-01-01

    Hospital executives are challenged to recruit and retain clinical nurses in a time when the national hospital nurse turnover rates are averaging above 20%. This literature review outlines nursing research that studied characteristics of nurse managers' leadership styles that enhance hospital nurse retention. Five consistent themes provided evidence of leadership traits that lead to job satisfaction and nurse retention. These were transformational leadership style, extroverted personality traits, magnet hospital organizational structures that support nurse empowerment, autonomy and group cohesion, tenure, and graduate education. Data from these studies provide a foundation for directing strategic plans to increase nurse retention and job satisfaction. PMID:16077275

  14. The relationship between effective nurse managers and nursing retention.

    PubMed

    Force, Mary VanOyen

    2005-01-01

    Hospital executives are challenged to recruit and retain clinical nurses in a time when the national hospital nurse turnover rates are averaging above 20%. This literature review outlines nursing research that studied characteristics of nurse managers' leadership styles that enhance hospital nurse retention. Five consistent themes provided evidence of leadership traits that lead to job satisfaction and nurse retention. These were transformational leadership style, extroverted personality traits, magnet hospital organizational structures that support nurse empowerment, autonomy and group cohesion, tenure, and graduate education. Data from these studies provide a foundation for directing strategic plans to increase nurse retention and job satisfaction.

  15. Ethics and Transcultural Nursing Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eliason, Michele J.

    1993-01-01

    Argues that nursing practice and theory cannot be ethical unless cultural factors are taken into consideration and that ethical/transcultural nursing is central to the philosophy and practice of nursing. (Author)

  16. Causes of Male Infertility

    MedlinePlus

    ... Professional Societies and Organizations Home › Causes of Male Infertility Dr. Roger Lobo of the American Society for Reproductive Medicine covers causes of male infertility. "Understanding Infertility - The Basics" is a series of ...

  17. Male pattern baldness (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Male pattern baldness is a sex-linked characteristic that is passed from mother to child. A man can more accurately predict his chances of developing male pattern baldness by observing his mother's father than by looking ...

  18. District nursing in Dominica.

    PubMed

    Kolkman, P M; Luteijn, A J; Nasiiro, R S; Bruney, V; Smith, R J; Meyboom-de Jong, B

    1998-10-01

    District nurses constitute the basis of the primary health care services in Dominica. All encounters of three district nurses were registered using the international classification of primary care. Information on other aspects of district nursing was collected by participating observation and the use of a questionnaire. Check-ups for hypertension, diabetes, pregnancy and immunisations constituted 40% of all reasons for encounter. The district nurses dealt with 80% of all contacts; only 20% of all patients were referred to the district medical officer. There are several discouragements to the motivation of the nurses. In addition to being a nurse, all have their family and other obligations. Postgraduate training with diversified certification and upgrading of wages could contribute to a continued high motivation and increased job satisfaction.

  19. Prostatitis and male infertility.

    PubMed

    Alshahrani, Saad; McGill, John; Agarwal, Ashok

    2013-11-01

    The prostate gland plays an important role in male reproduction. Inflammation of the prostate gland (prostatitis) is a common health problem affecting many young and middle aged men. Prostatitis is considered a correctable cause of male infertility, but the pathophysiology and appropriate treatment options of prostatitis in male infertility remain unclear. This literature review will focus on current data regarding prostatitis and its impact on male infertility.

  20. All the young men gone: losing men in the gentrification of Australian nursing circa 1860-1899.

    PubMed

    Barber, J

    1996-12-01

    Men played an important role in nursing in colonial Australia. However the number of men undertaking nursing duties declined dramatically in the second half of the nineteenth century. Reasons for this are explored in relation to ramifications of the introduction of the Nightingale pattern of nurse training in Australia, which occurred within the Victorian ethos of gentility and decorum. In this context, nursing came to be seen as a calling that was natural and appropriate for women. The controlled, decorous ambience of nursing, its subservient relationship to medicine and the attractiveness to employers of female pay rates are all associated with the decline in male participation over this period. PMID:9117770

  1. Spirituality in nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Melanie; Wattis, John

    2015-05-27

    Spirituality is an important aspect of holistic care that is frequently overlooked. This is because of difficulties in conceptualising spirituality and confusion about how it should be integrated into nursing care. This article explores what is meant by spirituality and spiritually competent practice. It examines attitudes to spirituality, describes factors that might affect the integration of spirituality into nursing care and offers practical guidance to equip nurses to incorporate spirituality into their practice.

  2. Best nursing practice.

    PubMed

    2016-09-01

    As part of this year's centenary celebrations, the RCN is showcasing the best nursing practice, focusing on that which often goes unobserved. Nurses, healthcare assistants and nursing students are asked to share ideas and innovations for improving practice and patient care. These will contribute to the development of a library of good practice and the RCN will invest in a small number of the successful projects. The closing date is 31 December. PMID:27581898

  3. Hospice and Palliative Nurses Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... Everywhere Advocacy Call To Action Recent Activity Public Policy Guiding Principles State Ambassadors Advocacy Resources Healthcare Resources Certified Nurses Day Certified Nurses are Everywhere ...

  4. Communication in Nursing Practice

    PubMed Central

    Kourkouta, Lambrini; Papathanasiou, Ioanna V.

    2014-01-01

    Good communication between nurses and patients is essential for the successful outcome of individualized nursing care of each patient. To achieve this, however, nurses must understand and help their patients, demonstrating courtesy, kindness and sincerity. Also they should devote time to the patient to communicate with the necessary confidentiality, and must not forget that this communication includes persons who surround the sick person, which is why the language of communication should be understood by all those involved in it. Good communication also is not only based on the physical abilities of nurses, but also on education and experience. PMID:24757408

  5. Nephrology Nursing and Education.

    PubMed

    Richards, Cindy

    2016-01-01

    Professional nephrology nurses are responsible for their ongoing education and competency in their area of practice. ANNA has an additional opportunity for education for nephrology nurses at the 47th National Symposium to be held May 1-4, 2016, in Louisville, Kentucky. The Janel Parker Memorial Opening Session keynote speaker for the meeting will be Suzanne Miyamoto, PhD, RN, Senior Director of Government Affairs and Health Policy with the American Association of Colleges of Nursing. Her topic will be "Are We Practicing to the Fullest Extent? Licensure, Certification, and Education?" This session will help address educational competence in nephrology nursing.

  6. [Being a nurse today].

    PubMed

    Tomás Pérez, M S

    2001-05-01

    This article was presented as a conference in Soria as part of the celebration of International Nursing Day 2000. The topic of this conference was the contribution Florence Nightingale made to the definition of the real essence of the nursing profession, and its evolution over the course of the century. The author included a discussion of these topics: What do nurses want? What do business managers want? What does society want and need? Finally, the author concluded that nursing is a lively profession which has tremendous desires to improve itself. PMID:12033044

  7. Nurses: advocating, leading, caring!

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Stephanie L

    2013-01-01

    This speech was delivered on 27 October at the 2012 Conference and general meeting of the Italian Nurses Association CNAI (Consociazione nazionale delle Associazioni infermiere/i) held in Rome from 25 to 27 October 2012. The theme of the conference was "No Nurses No Future". The "No Nurses No Future" is a national campaign developed by the nurses of the Italian Nurses Association to fight for the rights of the profession to sustain not only the practice of the nurse, strong nursing education, research and regulation, but more importantly to ensure that in the future there will be enough nurses in the healthcare workforce to advocate, lead and care for the citizens of Italy.Italian nurses took advantage of the presence of prof. Ferguson and, before travelling to Rome, the Region Lombardy IPASVI Colleges (Coordinamento dei Collegi IPASVI della regione Lombardia) invited her to talk on the same topic during a jointed Conference with CNAI at Circolo della Stampa of Milan on 23rd October.

  8. Developing emergency nursing competence.

    PubMed

    Proehl, Jean A

    2002-03-01

    Developing and maintaining the competence emergency nurses need is an important function of emergency clinical nurse specialists (CNS), educators, and other members of the emergency department (ED) leadership team. A thorough orientation is the first and most important step in developing the competence of emergency nurses. After orientation, the challenge is to maintain currency of practice in the face of incessant change such as new medications, new equipment, and new therapies in emergency care. This article focuses on the orientation of emergency nurses. A related article in this issue addresses assessment of competency. PMID:11818264

  9. Modelling district nurse expertise.

    PubMed

    Burke, Michelle

    2014-12-01

    As changes in society and health provision mean that one in four people over the age of 75 will require nursing care at home, pre-registration adult nurse education increasingly prepares student nurses for a future career within the community. District nurses undertake complex, multidimensional health and social assessments and care in a non-clinical setting and work in partnership with patients and their significant others to promote practical and psychological coping mechanisms and self-care. The district nurse's first assessment visit is key to developing a therapeutic partnership and it is often during this visit that expertise in district nursing practice emerges. The holistic, contextual and dynamic aspects of nursing in the home setting can make district nursing expertise difficult to illustrate and demonstrate within the classroom setting. This article explores the ways in which an understanding of expertise development theory can enable the tacit expertise that occurs within the first assessment visit to be made visible to student nurses, using simulation and expert narrative as a pedagogical strategy. PMID:25475676

  10. Work motivation for Japanese nursing assistants in small- to medium-sized hospitals.

    PubMed

    Kudo, Yasushi; Kido, Shigeri; Shahzad, Machiko Taruzuka; Yoshimura, Emiko; Shibuya, Akitaka; Aizawa, Yoshiharu

    2011-01-01

    Nursing assistants can work without a professional certification to help registered nurses and licensed practical nurses. Nursing assistants engage in various tasks, e.g., washing laundry, cleaning up, and clerk tasks regarding nursing. Enhancing work motivation among nursing assistants is essential for every hospital, because when nursing assistants do their jobs well, it allows registered nurses and licensed practical nurses to complete their own specialized jobs. We examined the predictors significantly associated with nursing assistants' work motivation. For those predictors, we produced items to examine job satisfaction. Those items are classified into intrinsic and extrinsic facets. The subjects for this study were Japanese nursing assistants working in 26 hospitals with 62-376 beds (4 public and 22 private hospitals). A total of 516 nursing assistants were analyzed, with the average age and standard deviation of 42.7 ± 12.9 years; the age of 456 female subjects was 43.8 ± 12.7 years and that of 60 male subjects was 34.3 ± 11.0 years. Our results show that "work motivation" is significantly associated with "free time to do one's own things," "nursing assistants as important partners on the job," "feeling helpful to patients," "participating in decision making," and "job-skill improvement." Free time to do one's own things is an extrinsic item. Hospital administrators must monitor the workload and their quality of life among nursing assistants. All the other significant items are intrinsic. Nursing assistants are not only motivated by money. They highly value the intrinsic nature and experience of their jobs. PMID:22112922

  11. Work motivation for Japanese nursing assistants in small- to medium-sized hospitals.

    PubMed

    Kudo, Yasushi; Kido, Shigeri; Shahzad, Machiko Taruzuka; Yoshimura, Emiko; Shibuya, Akitaka; Aizawa, Yoshiharu

    2011-01-01

    Nursing assistants can work without a professional certification to help registered nurses and licensed practical nurses. Nursing assistants engage in various tasks, e.g., washing laundry, cleaning up, and clerk tasks regarding nursing. Enhancing work motivation among nursing assistants is essential for every hospital, because when nursing assistants do their jobs well, it allows registered nurses and licensed practical nurses to complete their own specialized jobs. We examined the predictors significantly associated with nursing assistants' work motivation. For those predictors, we produced items to examine job satisfaction. Those items are classified into intrinsic and extrinsic facets. The subjects for this study were Japanese nursing assistants working in 26 hospitals with 62-376 beds (4 public and 22 private hospitals). A total of 516 nursing assistants were analyzed, with the average age and standard deviation of 42.7 ± 12.9 years; the age of 456 female subjects was 43.8 ± 12.7 years and that of 60 male subjects was 34.3 ± 11.0 years. Our results show that "work motivation" is significantly associated with "free time to do one's own things," "nursing assistants as important partners on the job," "feeling helpful to patients," "participating in decision making," and "job-skill improvement." Free time to do one's own things is an extrinsic item. Hospital administrators must monitor the workload and their quality of life among nursing assistants. All the other significant items are intrinsic. Nursing assistants are not only motivated by money. They highly value the intrinsic nature and experience of their jobs.

  12. The public sector nursing workforce in Kenya: a county-level analysis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Kenya’s human resources for health shortage is well documented, yet in line with the new constitution, responsibility for health service delivery will be devolved to 47 new county administrations. This work describes the public sector nursing workforce likely to be inherited by the counties, and examines the relationships between nursing workforce density and key indicators. Methods National nursing deployment data linked to nursing supply data were used and analyzed using statistical and geographical analysis software. Data on nurses deployed in national referral hospitals and on nurses deployed in non-public sector facilities were excluded from main analyses. The densities and characteristics of the public sector nurses across the counties were obtained and examined against an index of county remoteness, and the nursing densities were correlated with five key indicators. Results Of the 16,371 nurses in the public non-tertiary sector, 76% are women and 53% are registered nurses, with 35% of the nurses aged 40 to 49 years. The nursing densities across counties range from 1.2 to 0.08 per 1,000 population. There are statistically significant associations of the nursing densities with a measure of health spending per capita (P value = 0.0028) and immunization rates (P value = 0.0018). A higher county remoteness index is associated with explaining lower female to male ratio of public sector nurses across counties (P value <0.0001). Conclusions An overall shortage of nurses (range of 1.2 to 0.08 per 1,000) in the public sector countrywide is complicated by mal-distribution and varying workforce characteristics (for example, age profile) across counties. All stakeholders should support improvements in human resources information systems and help address personnel shortages and mal-distribution if equitable, quality health-care delivery in the counties is to be achieved. PMID:24467776

  13. AIDS nursing care and standardized nursing language: an application of the nursing intervention classification.

    PubMed

    Davis, K A

    1995-01-01

    Standardized nursing language is recommended increasingly as a method to describe the work of nursing, adapt to computerized documentation, and establish a place for nursing in national data bases. Nursing diagnosis has become a standard label for assessment data. The Iowa Interventions Project Research Team proposes that Nursing Interventions Classification (NIC) be adopted to label nursing interventions. The author applies NIC to HIV/AIDS nursing care guidelines from the literature and concludes that NIC can be an important tool as HIV/AIDS nurses develop and describe their knowledge base.

  14. Nursing as textually mediated reality.

    PubMed

    Cheek, J; Rudge, T

    1994-11-01

    Nursing and nursing practice both construct and are in turn constructed by the context in which they operate. Texts plays a central part in that construction. As such, nursing and nursing practice can be considered to represent a reality that is textually mediated. This paper explores the notion of nursing as a textually mediated reality and offers the reader the possibility of engaging in reflection on what implications this has for nursing and their own nursing practice. The analyses provided draw on aspects of the work of both Foucault and Derrida. Foucault's notion of discourse provides a vehicle for the exploration of nursing as textually mediated, as does Derrida's concept of binary oppositions. The paper thus illustrates some of the possibilities afforded nursing by poststructural analyses. In particular it does this by exploring one of the central textual constructions, impacting on the way that nursing and nursing practice are conceptualized, the mind/body binary opposition. PMID:7850620

  15. Assessing new graduate nurse performance.

    PubMed

    Berkow, Steven; Virkstis, Katherine; Stewart, Jennifer; Conway, Lindsay

    2008-11-01

    New graduate nurses now comprise more than 10% of a typical hospital's nursing staff, with this number certain to grow given the increasing numbers of entrants into the nurse workforce. Concomitantly, only 10% of hospital and health system nurse executives believe their new graduate nurses are fully prepared to provide safe and effective care. As part of a multipronged research initiative on bridging the preparation-practice gap, the Nursing Executive Center administered a national survey to a cross section of frontline nurse leaders on new graduate nurse proficiency across 36 nursing competencies deemed essential to safe and effective nursing practice. Based on survey data analysis, the authors discuss the most pressing and promising opportunities for improving the practice readiness of new graduate nurses.

  16. [Mental health support for nurses].

    PubMed

    Fukushima, Yoshie

    2012-01-01

    Burnout specific to human service workers has been reported in the U.S. in the 1970s. Since then, such burnout has become widely known and the mental health of nurses has attracted attention. Stressors in the work environment and complexity have increased with advancement in increasingly complicated medical care. One of the major roles of a psychiatric liaison nurse is to provide support to improve the mental health of nurses. In our hospital, a psychiatric liaison nurse has a staff position under the direct supervision of the director of the nursing department but operates outside the chain of command. A psychiatric liaison nurse is not involved in the performance review of nurses. Thus, the nursing staff and the nursing manager can discuss their problems with the psychiatric liaison nurse without risks. Psychiatric liaison nurses provide support as counselors through individual and group interviews so that nurses can become re-energized about their work. In addition, psychiatric liaison nurses provide consultations and education. They perform coordination function to organize an environment to promote consultations regarding nurse support to the staff nurses and the nursing manager and to promote support by supervisors. For support after reinstatement of a nurse following a medical leave, it is particularly important to work with not only the individual nurse but also the entire nursing team. In our hospital, newly graduated nurses are given the GHQ-28 after one month of employment to assess the support they might need. In our study, nurses with high risks were divided into a group with a score of at least 6 points but less than 10 points and a group with a score of at least 10 points. The group with at least 10 points had significantly higher rates of leave of absence and resignation. Thus, early intervention was thought to be necessary in newly graduated nurses with a score of at least 10 points in the GHQ.

  17. Virtual power: gendering the nurse-technology relationship.

    PubMed

    Fairman, J; D'Antonio, P

    1999-09-01

    To date, studies of the relationship between technology and its consumers have used the constructs of traditional paradigms of production and consumption as the foundation for analysis. These studies have served to reinforce traditional concepts of gender and hierarchy in the nursing-technology dichotomy. To propose a new and more relevant framework for analysing the technology-nursing relationship, the analysis of gender within the methodology of the social history of technology will be used. Healthcare will be viewed as a technologic network, and within that network multiple knowledge domains reside and interact. These domains, in turn, are socially constructed and historically contingent. This paper operationalizes this argument by examining the domain of the early nurse practitioner movement of the 1960s as part of a gendered technologic system. The findings of this study illuminate the agency of nurses in the shaping of traditionally male knowledge domains and as a crucial factor for understanding the evolution of not only the particularities of the nurse-technology relationship, but also the generalities of the gendered ways of knowing within the healthcare-technology relationship. Perhaps most importantly, different sets of questions can be formulated to analyse the history of the nurse practitioner movement from a technologic perspective that will provide new standpoints for the nursing-technology dichotomy in the millennium.

  18. The health-related behaviors and attitudes of student nurses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vowell, Maribeth

    Nurses are an important component of primary medical care, and patient education is a common and important role of most nurses. Patient education and positive role modeling by nurses have the potential to influence patients' life style choices and the serious diseases that may be affected by those choices. A greater understanding of the ways nurses think about their own health could help facilitate healthier choices for them and in their patients. The purpose of this inquiry was to examine the experiences, attitudes and beliefs of student nurses related to their personal health, and to investigate those experiences, attitudes and beliefs as they relate to their education, relationships, values and career choice. The purpose was achieved through phenomenological interviews with eleven senior nursing students, nine females and two males, encouraging them to provide in as much detail as possible their attitudes and values about their personal health. The interviews were tape recorded, transcribed verbatim, and phenomenologically analyzed. A thematic structure emerged such that the nursing students experiences were represented by the four interrelated themes of caring for myself/caring for others ; I control my health/my world controls my health; I have energy/I'm tired; and feeling good/looking good. The contextual grounds for the themes that emerged during the analysis were the Body and Time. This structure was presented in terms of its relationship to health education, other research and to current theory.

  19. Views of Student Nurses on Caring and Technology in Nursing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brodell, Elizabeth Becky

    2009-01-01

    Nurses entering the workforce are faced with many challenges, but today the multiple demands of patient care are complicated by a nurse's need to keep abreast of fast-changing technology. This research is universally relevant to nursing practice in educational settings and practice areas because nursing education needs to develop strategies to…

  20. Registered Nurse Education and the Registered Nurse Job Market.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunt, Howard Allan

    This effort compares the graduates of the three types of Registered Nurse (RN) education programs (three-year Diploma in Nursing, two-year Associate Degree in Nursing (ADN), and four-year Bachelor of Science Degree in Nursing). The basic objective is to determine whether they are perfect substitutes, especially whether ADN graduates can adequately…

  1. Computers in Hospital Clinical Nursing: Implications for Nursing Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    St. Thomas, Sister

    The use of computers in hospital clinical nursing and implications for the education of nurses were studied with a sample of 130 hospitals. Of concern was how computers were used, which hospital personnel used computers in health care, costs to educate staff nurses, and who teaches nurses about computers. Questionnaires completed by hospital data…

  2. A Behavioral Intervention to Increase Exercise Among Nursing Home Residents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perkins, Kenneth A.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Used a behavioral intervention of goal-setting with feedback and contingent reinforcement to increase stationary bike riding in eight male nursing home residents with multiple major medical and psychiatric disorders. A consistent increase in riding resulted among all participants. Findings support the effectivenes of behavioral strategies in…

  3. Doctor or Nurse: Children's Perceptions of Sex Typed Occupations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cordua, Glenn D.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Examines children's relabeling of roles when confronted with counter-stereotypical occupational portrayals. A total of 128 children between the ages of five and six years were shown four films depicting all possible combinations of female and male physicians and nurses. They were then questioned with regard to the sex and occupational roles of the…

  4. Reframing the Field of Gender and Nursing Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solbraekke, Kari Nyheim; Solvoll, Betty-Ann; Heggen, Kristin M.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this article is to explore how male students learn to practice nursing and the role of technology in their training process. The study is inspired by Bruno Latour's understanding of social interaction as an interplay between humans and technology. The students' use of the washcloth and the stethoscope, two significant nursing…

  5. School Nursing Certification Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Selekman, Janice; Wolfe, Linda C.

    2010-01-01

    The 2010 update to the resource you have been waiting for to help you prepare to take the National School Nurse Certification Exam. Dr. Janice Selekman DNSc, RN, NCSN, a recognized expert in pediatric nursing, and NASN Past President Linda C. Wolfe MEd, BSN, RN, NCSN, FNASN are the authors. This text was created in response to many years of…

  6. The New Nurse Influentials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinsey, Dianne C.

    1986-01-01

    Reports on a survey of 42 nurse leaders, which is compared to a 1977 survey that used the same questionnaire with 71 nurse leaders. Results report the current trends in occupational positions, location, habits, travel, career emphasis, mentor activity, sources of influence, publishing, activism, and research. (CH)

  7. Professional values and nursing.

    PubMed

    Sellman, Derek

    2011-05-01

    The values of nursing arise from a concern with human flourishing. If the desire to become a nurse is a reflection of an aspiration to care for others in need then we should anticipate that those who choose to nurse have a tendency towards the values we would normally associate with a caring profession (care, compassion, perhaps altruism, and so on). However, these values require a secure base if they are not to succumb to the corrupting pressures of the increasingly instrumental nature of the values of the institutions in which healthcare in general and nursing in particular takes place. One way of securing a base for withstanding the corrupting influences of the institution is to understand nursing as a practice in the sense in which Alasdair MacIntyre uses that term. In this brief paper I will outline ways in which the managerial imperative of meeting targets is both distorting practice and undermining nursing's values. I conclude that understanding nursing as a MacIntyrean practice provides a refuge from what might otherwise be overwhelming pressures for nurses to adopt instrumental values to the detriment of professional caring values. PMID:21061069

  8. Pediatric Endocrinology Nurses Society

    MedlinePlus

    ... for PENS Minneapolis 2017! Wednesday, April 26, 2017 ​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​ Journal of Pediatric Nursing The Journal of Pediatric Nursing provides original, peer-reviewed research ...

  9. Nursing in the South.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flitter, Hessel H.

    National needs for 1975 have been projected at 450 nurses per 100,000 population. For the South to reach a goal of 300 would require that graduations be increased by 1975 to nearly four times the number graduated in 1966. Practical nurse programs have nearly doubled since 1960; in the last six years, the number of associate degree programs has…

  10. Professional values and nursing.

    PubMed

    Sellman, Derek

    2011-05-01

    The values of nursing arise from a concern with human flourishing. If the desire to become a nurse is a reflection of an aspiration to care for others in need then we should anticipate that those who choose to nurse have a tendency towards the values we would normally associate with a caring profession (care, compassion, perhaps altruism, and so on). However, these values require a secure base if they are not to succumb to the corrupting pressures of the increasingly instrumental nature of the values of the institutions in which healthcare in general and nursing in particular takes place. One way of securing a base for withstanding the corrupting influences of the institution is to understand nursing as a practice in the sense in which Alasdair MacIntyre uses that term. In this brief paper I will outline ways in which the managerial imperative of meeting targets is both distorting practice and undermining nursing's values. I conclude that understanding nursing as a MacIntyrean practice provides a refuge from what might otherwise be overwhelming pressures for nurses to adopt instrumental values to the detriment of professional caring values.

  11. STATEMENT ON NURSING EDUCATION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National League for Nursing, New York, NY.

    IN 1965, THE LEAGUE, IN CONVENTION, ADOPTED A RESOLUTION ENCOURAGING ORDERLY MOVEMENT OF NURSING EDUCATION INTO INSTITUTIONS OF HIGHER LEARNING, CLEAR INTERPRETATION OF THE KINDS OF EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMS, AND EDUCATIONAL PLANNING AT ALL LEVELS FOR A DESIRABLE BALANCE OF NURSING PERSONNEL WITH VARIOUS KINDS OF PREPARATION. IN 1967, THE BOARD OF…

  12. AACC Nursing Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Association of Community Colleges, Washington, DC.

    This document, presented in the form of PowerPoint print outs, indicates a total of 420 (nearly 60%) associate degree nursing (ADN) programs responded to a survey conducted by the American Association of Community Colleges' (AACC) Nursing and Allied Health Initiative (NAHI) for 2003. The sample is representative based on urbanicity and region.…

  13. Registered Nurse (Associate Degree).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center on Education and Training for Employment.

    This document, which is designed for use in developing a tech prep competency profile for the occupation of registered nurse (with an associate degree), lists technical competencies and competency builders for 19 units pertinent to the health technologies cluster in general and 5 units specific to the occupation of registered nurse. The following…

  14. Nurse Practitioner Pharmacology Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waigandt, Alex; Chang, Jane

    A study compared the pharmacology training of nurse practitioner programs with medical and dental programs. Seventy-three schools in 14 states (40 nurse practitioner programs, 19 schools of medicine, and 14 schools of dentistry) were surveyed by mailed questionnaire about the number of hours devoted to the study of pharmacology. The major findings…

  15. The School Nurse Practitioner

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Igoe, Judith Bellaire

    1975-01-01

    Denver's four-month intensive course in primary health care for experienced nurses serving in disadvantaged areas, followed by inservice training with regular consultation available from a local physician, has produced school nurse practitioners who extend the traditional role to include comprehensive evaluations, management of minor illnesses,…

  16. School Nurse Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borja, Mary C.; Amidon, Christine; Spellings, Diane; Franzetti, Susan; Nasuta, Mary

    2009-01-01

    This article features school nurses from across the country who are championing for school-located influenza immunization within their communities. These nurses are: (1) Mary C. Borja; (2) Christine Amidon; (3) Diane Spellings; (4) Susan Franzetti; and (5) Mary Nasuta. (Contains 6 figures.)

  17. nursing.standard.com.

    PubMed

    2016-08-10

    1 Nurses who have taken part in Widening Access Training scheme courses may be eligible for national insurance and tax rebates. One nurse received a rebate of £6,000, according to Moneysavingexpert.com . Read more: rcni.com/tax-rebate. PMID:27507360

  18. [Ethnography and nursing research].

    PubMed

    Chuang, Yeu-Hui; Abbey, Jennifer

    2005-12-01

    Ethnography, a qualitative research method developed within the field of anthropology, has been increasingly applied to a variety of fields, including sociology, education, and nursing. Ethnography works to understand the behavior and views of a particular cultural group from that group's own perspective. Traditionally, ethnography has been differentiated into classic ethnography, systematic ethnography, interpretive ethnography, and critical ethnography. A recently developed focused ethnography studies specific issues within a single culture or social situation among a limited number of people within a specific period of time. Focused ethnography is particularly relevant to the field of health sciences and holds significant potential to contribute to nursing knowledge and to help improve nursing practice. A search of Medline, CINAHL, Eric, PsycINFO, and the Index to Chinese Periodical Literature database found that ethnography has seldom been applied or discussed in the nursing literature in Taiwan. Therefore, the aim of this article is focused on introducing ethnography and understanding the applications of ethnography in nursing research. Relevant nursing literature published between 2000 and 2005 is summarized and the authors hope that this paper will give Taiwanese nursing professionals a better appreciation of this methodology and encourage its wider application in nursing research.

  19. [Gerontology and nursing care].

    PubMed

    Brandenburg, H

    2001-04-01

    This paper focuses on questions of the philosophy of science and the scientific development of gerontology and nursing science. First, some aspects of the scientific development in gerontology and nursing science (autonomy, inter- and multidisciplinarity as well as the theory debates) are summarized. In gerontology, problems of the philosophy of science are often neglected. The main focus is on empirical research and the establishment of an scientific infrastructure. In nursing science are questions of the philosophy of science, especially debates about the discipline, are significant. In Germany nursing research and the establishment of a scientific infrastructure are still in the initial stages. Second, on the basis of a content analysis the relevance and status of "nursing/need of care/frailty" in two leading journals ("Zeitschrift für Gerontologie und Geriatrie" and the "Pflege") is shown. Main result is that in nursing science publications regarding the status of the discipline, studies of the motivation, attitudes and behavior of nurses as well as investigations of the professionalization are dominant. In gerontology, the main emphasis is on studies of the changing health service structure, geriatric assessment and qualification. Finally chances of an interdisciplinary exchange between gerontology and nursing science are discussed.

  20. The Impaired Nurse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris County Vocational Technical School District, Denville, NJ.

    This mini-course for nurses is intended to establish an atmosphere conducive to the development of personal awareness of the ramifications of alcohol/substance abuse involving the nurse. Contents include the mini-course's goals and objectives, a course outline, copies of 11 handouts and a booklet written to provide information about nurse…

  1. Incorporating nursing theory into a nursing department strategic plan.

    PubMed

    Brooks, B A; Rosenberg, S

    1995-01-01

    Corporations, including health care organizations, have used the strategic planning process as a means to plan, coordinate, and direct activities of the organization. Research has shown that nursing departments that conduct strategic planning perform better. But few nursing departments develop strategic plans. Our nursing department recently developed a strategic plan, but the unique aspect of our department's plan is the incorporation of nursing theory. This article will review the strategic planning process, describe the selection of a nursing theory to incorporate into a nursing department strategic plan, and give examples of the integration of strategic planning and nursing theory.

  2. Portrayal of nurses in advertisements in medical and nursing journals.

    PubMed

    Aber, C S; Hawkins, J W

    1992-01-01

    This investigation examined the content of advertisements in medical and nursing journals to determine if the images of nurses reflect the roles nurses play in health care. The method used was content analysis. Thirty-five nursing journals and 48 medical journals yielded 313 different advertisements picturing nurses. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, chi-square, correlation coefficients, and interpreted for overall impressions of the portrayals. Nurses are portrayed as sex objects, ornaments and as handmaidens to physicians. The findings demonstrate a freezing of the image of nurses in the print media.

  3. Nurses across borders: foregrounding international migration in nursing history.

    PubMed

    Choy, Catherine Ceniza

    2010-01-01

    Although the international migration of nurses has played a formative role in increasing the racial and ethnic diversity of the health care labor force, nursing historians have paid very little attention to the theme of international migration and the experiences of foreign-trained nurses, A focus on international migration complements two new approaches in nursing history: the agenda to internationalize its frameworks, and the call to move away from "great women, great events" and toward the experiences of "ordinary" nurses. This article undertakes a close reading of the life and work of Filipino American nurse Ines Cayaban to reconceptualize nursing biography in an international framework that is attentive to issues of migration, race, gender, and colonialism. It was a Hannah keynote lecture delivered by the author on June 5, 2008, as part of the CAHN/ACHN (Canadian Association for the History of Nursing/Association Canadienne pour l'Histoire du Nursing) International Nursing History Conference.

  4. Nurses working outside of nursing: societal trend or workplace crisis?

    PubMed

    Black, Lisa; Spetz, Joanne; Harrington, Charlene

    2008-08-01

    The phenomenon of career inactivity in professional nursing has been historically portrayed in the literature as a major cause of disequilibrium in the registered nurse labor market. However, there remains a general lack of understanding of the diverse forces that shape the inactive nurse pool and the likelihood that this population will return to nursing. The purpose of this study was to examine the population of registered nurses who are active in the labor market but work in nonnursing employment. Specifically, this study sought to determine the relative importance of nonworkplace- and workplace-related reasons for working outside of nursing. The results demonstrate that dissatisfaction with the nursing workplace is the key reason cited by actively licensed nurses for working outside of nursing employment. These findings suggest that policy and employer remedies are needed to improve the nursing workplace.

  5. Community nurses & discharge planning.

    PubMed

    Worth, A; Tierney, A; Lockerbie, L

    The role of community nurses in discharge planning for elderly patients leaving hospital is of increasing importance in the wake of the NHS and Community Care Act 1990. Community nurses can play a key role in contributing to pre-discharge assessments and in providing continuing post-discharge assessment and care. The Nursing Research Unit at the University of Edinburgh conducted a survey early in 1993, just prior to implementation of the Community Care Act in Scotland, to ascertain the views and experiences of a national 1 in 3 sample of community nurses relating to the discharge of elderly people from acute hospitals. This article presents the results of that survey and offers recommendations regarding the role of community nurses in discharge planning for elderly patients.

  6. Computer Experience of Nurses.

    PubMed

    Schleder Gonçalves, Luciana; Cândida Castro, Talita; Fialek, Soraya

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to identify the computing experience of nurses in southern Brazil, through exploratory survey research. The results, which were obtained from the application of The Staggers Nursing Computer Experience Questionnaire®, were analyzed by statistical tests. The survey was conducted with nurses working both in hospitals, as in public health, in a capital in southern Brazil. There is the predominance of novice nurses in the application of computer tools in their practices but most often declare the use the computers to develop their professional and also personal life activities. We conclude that the computer and health information systems are part of the working reality of the participants, being considered indispensable resources his activity, while noting limitations on the potential use of these tools. This study reflects on how the issue has been addressed in educational schools and the challenges of inclusion of the theme of Nursing Informatics in the curricula in Brazil. PMID:26262313

  7. [Humanization and nursing work].

    PubMed

    Collet, Neusa; Rozendo, Célia Alves

    2003-01-01

    In this work we have as our objective to reflect on the theme of the 63rd. Annual Nursing Week "Humanization and Work: reason and meaning in Nursing". We discuss the relationship between humanization/work in nursing, differentiating the aspects related to the humanization of nursing work to those of the humanized work in nursing. The challenges of the process of humanization of assistance and of work relationships imply on the overcoming of the relevance given to the technical scientific competence, routine patterns which are crystallized, conventional models of management, corporativism of the different professional categories in favor of interdependence and the complementarity in health actions; construction of an utopia of the humanization as collective process which can be reached and implemented.

  8. Neuroscience nursing elective for senior nursing students.

    PubMed

    Barker, E L

    1985-10-01

    In response to baccalaureate student requests for additional clinical experience and expanded opportunities in neurological and neurosurgical nursing, an experimental course was designed for the winter session semester in cooperation with a local teaching hospital. A three-credit elective, "Discovering Neuroscience Nursing," was offered to senior students for five weeks. The course included thirty hours of lecture and laboratory, field trips, and over 200 hours of clinical experience. A student stipend was provided by the hospital. Goals for the course centered on providing an opportunity for the student to gain competence and confidence in caring for patients with neurological dysfunctions and providing family support. Students were assigned staff nurse preceptors as they rotated to every clinical setting caring for patients with alterations to the nervous system. Evaluations from students and staff preceptors indicated the successful acceptance of the program which will be modified and continued as a senior elective.

  9. The exposure of the nursing profession in online and print media

    PubMed Central

    Cardoso, Rodrigo José Martins; Graveto, João Manuel Garcia de Nascimento; Queiroz, Ana Maria Correia Albuquerque

    2014-01-01

    Objective to describe the coverage of news concerning the nursing profession in the Portuguese media: informative sites on the Internet and in print media. Method a total of 1,271 health news items were collected in September and October of 2011 (956 online news items and 325 news items originating from the press review of the Portuguese Order of Nurses). Statistical analysis was used to characterize the variables. Results nurses were the sources of information in 6.6% of cases, suggesting limited media exposure. The health news collected is characterized by a production based on limited information sources, that is, male and official sources, on information disseminated by news agencies focused on economic and political issues in the health field. Conclusion the presence of nurses in the news concerning nursing health is reduced. We suggest that nurses develop public communication skills to disseminate the importance of their profession in society and their relationship with the media. PMID:24553715

  10. [Masculinity and femininity in self-perceptions and ideals of registered nurses].

    PubMed

    Kada, Olivia; Brunner, Eva

    2010-08-01

    Despite of intensive professionalisation efforts and changed legal frameworks the public image of nursing is still full of gender-stereotypes. This study investigates to what extend public stereotypes of "typically female" and "typically male" are reflected in the self-concept and ideals of nurses. Using a cross-sectional research design 174 female nurses were surveyed regarding their sex-role orientation and ideals (femininity and masculinity) using a standardized questionnaire (BSRI). Contrary to stereotypes the respondents indentified more with masculine traits. Masculine attributes predominated especially in ideas about the ideal nurse. No differences between nurses who work in different areas could be revealed. In all endeavors regarding autonomy and masculinity the significance of the feminine function of "caring" must not be forgotten. Teachers in healthcare and nursing play a central role in sensibilising students for gender issues.

  11. Fund-raising tips for nurse leaders and nurse executives.

    PubMed

    Fitzpatrick, Joyce J

    2014-01-01

    Fund-raising may be new to most nurse leaders and executives. This article focuses on dispelling the myths and mystery that surrounds nursing philanthropy. Key myths are addressed with supporting information to dispel them. Several practical tips are presented to enhance nurse leaders' involvement in philanthropy. Two recent gifts to hospital nursing departments are described as exemplars of relationship building and of nurses investing in their own future and that of the profession. PMID:25208146

  12. Reinstating nursing administration graduate study in federal nurse traineeships.

    PubMed

    Kersbergen, A L

    1994-01-01

    In 1992, the federal guidelines for funding nurse traineeships were amended to exclude nurses who pursue advanced degrees in nursing administration. This legislation expires soon, and final drafting of new legislation will be completed during the summer of 1994. The author presents information to use in advocating for reinstatement of nursing administration students as potential recipients of federal nurse traineeship dollars for advanced education. PMID:8057165

  13. A concept analysis of holistic nursing care in paediatric nursing.

    PubMed

    Tjale, A A; Bruce, J

    2007-12-01

    Holistic nursing care is widely advocated and is espoused in the philosophy of the South African Nursing Council. This concept is unclear, variously interpreted and poorly understood in paediatric nursing. This study was undertaken to examine the meaning of holistic nursing care and to develop a framework for holistic nursing care, which can be utilised in nurse education settings and in clinical nursing practice in the context of paediatric nursing. A qualitative, interpretive, explorative and contextual research design was used. An evolutionary concept analysis was undertaken to clarify the concept "holistic nursing care" in paediatric nursing in three Johannesburg hospitals. Rodgers' (1989, 2000) evolutionary method was utilised to analyse the concept. The study objectives were formulated in two phases to: --Conduct an analysis of the concept "holistic nursing care" --Obtain an emic viewpoint of holistic nursing care from paediatric nurses working in the academic hospitals. --Identify the characteristics and dimensions of "holistic nursing care" and develop a framework of holistic nursing care for paediatric nurses working in the academic hospitals. Attributes of holistic nursing care yielded two dimensions; whole person and mind-body-Spirit dimension. The decriptors of whole-person include physical, mental, emotional, spirit and spitual being. Spirituality is the predominant antecedent. Holistic nursing care is initiated by the recognition of the individual as a spiritual being with a mind-body-spirit dimension. Spirituality is an ever-present force pervading all human experience. Complimentary alternative medicine (CAM) was identified as a surrogate term. The connection of CAM with holistic nursing care is the focus of therapeutic interventions that are directed to the mind-body-spirit dimension. Therapeutic interventions are designed to meet the needs of the whole-person. Caution is advocated in the use of CAM therapies in child nursing, as CAM efficacy has

  14. Reflective writing and nursing education.

    PubMed

    Craft, Melissa

    2005-02-01

    Reflective writing is a valued tool for teaching nursing students and for documentation, support, and generation of nursing knowledge among experienced nurses. Expressive or reflective writing is becoming widely accepted in both professional and lay publications as a mechanism for coping with critical incidents. This article explores reflective writing as a tool for nursing education.

  15. Transforming Articulation Barriers in Nursing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waters, Verle

    Barriers to educational mobility for nurses have existed since the mid-1960s. In 1963, the National League for Nursing (NLN) adopted a position that ruled out articulation of any kind between associate degree in nursing (ADN) and bachelors in science in nursing (BSN) programs. In the mid-1970s, a countermovement took shape, supporting open…

  16. Nursing and nursing education in Haiti.

    PubMed

    Garfield, Richard M; Berryman, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Haiti has long had the largest proportion of people living in poverty and the highest mortality level of any country in the Americas. On January 12, 2010, the most powerful earthquake to hit Haiti in 200 years struck. Before the earthquake, half of all Haitians lacked any access to modern medical care services. Health care professionals in Haiti number around one-fourth of the world average and about one-tenth the ratio present in North America. The establishment of new primary care services in a country where half of the people had no access to modern health care prior to the earthquake requires advanced practice roles for nurses and midwives. With a high burden of infectious, parasitic, and nutritional conditions, Haiti especially needs mid-level community health workers and nurses who can train and supervise them for public health programs. As in many other developing countries, organized nursing lacks many of the management and planning skills needed to move its agenda forward. The public schools prepare 3-year diploma graduates. These programs have upgraded the curriculum little in decades and have mainly trained for hospital service. Primary care, public health program management, and patient education had often not been stressed. Specializations in midwifery and HIV care exist, while only informal programs of specialization exist in administration, surgery, and pediatrics. An advanced practice role, nonetheless, is not yet well established. Nursing has much to contribute to the recovery of Haiti and the revitalization if its health system. Professional nurses are needed in clinics and hospitals throughout the country to care for patients, including thousands in need of rehabilitation and mental health services. Haitian nursing colleagues in North America have key roles in strengthening their profession. Ways of supporting our Haitian colleagues are detailed.

  17. Updating the nurse's bedside manner.

    PubMed

    Campbell-Heider, N; Hart, C A

    1993-01-01

    The current tendency for nurses to be on a first name basis with their patients and to wear less professional clothing provides new metaphors for interpreting nurses' work status. We argue that this prevailing social informality in communications and dress perpetuates themes that diminish the professional image of nurses, masks the cognitive nature of their work, threatens nurses' therapeutic effectiveness, and continues to reinforce the hierarchical relationship between nurses and physicians. Strategies are presented to help nurse educators, administrators, and clinicians transform nurses' work environments into clinical settings that enhance their professional presentation. PMID:8340122

  18. Nurses' Own Recordkeeping: The Nursing Minimum Data Set Revisited.

    PubMed

    Halloran, Edward J; Halloran, Diane C

    2015-11-01

    There is no consistent, standardized, concise method for nurses to record information about their patients and clients that is conducive to store, retrieve, and use in patient and client care; to improve professional self-development; and to use in collaboration with patients and clients, their families, other nurses, doctors, hospitals, and health systems. Nurses gauge the health status of their patients and clients every day and are now in a position both to record their impressions for their own use and to share them with colleagues who care for the same patients and clients. What is now needed is a way to record these clinical impressions within an authoritative format that is related to the depth and breadth of the clinical literature related to nursing and the needs of the patients and clients nurses serve. The International Council of Nurses' Nurse-Patient Summary is proposed here to fill the gulf between narrative nurses' notes, proprietary and widely varying electronic health record systems, and information from nurses about their patiens and clients human needs. The International Council of Nurses' Nurse-Patient Summary could replace nursing diagnosis items in the Nursing Minimum Data Set and serve as a substitute for the World Health Organization's International Classification of Function, Disability and Health, a seldom used instrument derived from the International Council of Nurses' Basic Principles of Nursing Care. PMID:26554810

  19. Nursing student attitudes toward statistics.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Lizy; Aktan, Nadine M

    2014-04-01

    Nursing is guided by evidence-based practice. To understand and apply research to practice, nurses must be knowledgeable in statistics; therefore, it is crucial to promote a positive attitude toward statistics among nursing students. The purpose of this quantitative cross-sectional study was to assess differences in attitudes toward statistics among undergraduate nursing, graduate nursing, and undergraduate non-nursing students. The Survey of Attitudes Toward Statistics Scale-36 (SATS-36) was used to measure student attitudes, with higher scores denoting more positive attitudes. The convenience sample was composed of 175 students from a public university in the northeastern United States. Statistically significant relationships were found among some of the key demographic variables. Graduate nursing students had a significantly lower score on the SATS-36, compared with baccalaureate nursing and non-nursing students. Therefore, an innovative nursing curriculum that incorporates knowledge of student attitudes and key demographic variables may result in favorable outcomes.

  20. Growing our future nursing leaders.

    PubMed

    Sherman, Rose O

    2005-01-01

    The need for strong nursing leadership to meet the future challenges of the healthcare delivery system is widely acknowledged, yet many of today's nursing leaders express concern about a lack of interest in leadership among their younger nurses. This article reports on a qualitative research study that involved focus groups with 48 younger nurses under the age of 40 who were not currently in formal leadership positions. Using a ConCensus process, participants were asked questions to identify and prioritize the factors that influence their decisions to accept or reject nursing leadership positions. In this study, participants did see a potential in the nursing leadership role to make a difference for both patients and staff. Adequate compensation for the role and true decision-making power were factors of concern for younger nurses. Feedback from current leaders about nursing leadership positions is not positive. Strategies that current nursing leaders will need to consider to encourage interest in nursing leadership will be discussed.

  1. Child maltreatment: every nurse's business.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Julie; Bradbury-Jones, Caroline

    2015-03-18

    Every nurse has a responsibility for protecting children, even nurses who do not work directly with children. However, nurses may be reluctant to deal with child maltreatment issues because they do not want to get things wrong or make a situation worse. The aim of this article is to assist nurses in their child protection role. It describes the different types of child maltreatment, the risk factors and potential consequences. The nurse's role in recognising and responding to suspected child maltreatment is discussed.

  2. Capital punishment and professional nursing.

    PubMed

    Carroll, L A

    1993-01-01

    This paper examines the issue of capital punishment and whether a professional nurse has the right to choose to participate in it. Capital punishment is an extremely emotional ethical issue, and there is abundant literature to support both viewpoints. Professional nursing upholds values and special moral obligations, as expressed in its code. The American Nurses Association Code for Nurses guides conduct in carrying out nursing responsibilities consistent with the ethical obligations of the profession.

  3. Nursing in Canada: a profession.

    PubMed

    Kopinak, J K

    1990-01-01

    The headlines scream out: "Hospitals alarmed as disgruntled nurses flee profession". "Living with death; the strains of daily tragedy feed chronic shortage of nurses". "Ministry should encourage alternative health care". "BC nurses set to withdraw services". As the provincial health care system falters and nurses, the very core of health care, flee the profession, politicians scramble to find answers. And so is Janice Kopinak, who takes a deep look at the current nurses' revolution and sees a glimmer of hope for change.

  4. On the humanities of nursing.

    PubMed

    Lazenby, Mark

    2013-01-01

    The author contends that the present state of nursing research, as focused on studies that produce the sort of positivistic evidence espoused by the evidence-based medicine movement, emphasizes something other than the goals of nursing. This emphasis has distorted nursing practice by focusing on the ostensibly quantifiable. Using Virginia Henderson's classic definition of nursing and the work of the philosopher Martha Nussbaum, the author argues for the centrality of the human experience in the practice and the research of nursing.

  5. Nursing Practice Environment and Registered Nurses' Job Satisfaction in Nursing Homes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choi, JiSun; Flynn, Linda; Aiken, Linda H.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Recruiting and retaining registered nurses (RNs) in nursing homes is problematic, and little research is available to guide efforts to make nursing homes a more attractive practice environment for RNs. The purpose of this study was to examine relationships between aspects of the nursing practice environment and job satisfaction among RNs…

  6. My Daughter Wants to Be a Nurse: Occupational Stereotyping in Health Textbooks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holcomb, Carol Ann

    1981-01-01

    An evaluation of the illustrations in elementary and secondary education textbooks reveals that: (1) Males dominate occupations illustrated in contemporary health textbooks; and (2) females are generally portrayed as assistants (nurses, technicians, dental hygienists) to males in higher-level roles or in occupations with low levels of power,…

  7. My Name is Nurse.

    PubMed

    2016-05-01

    : Editor's note: From its first issue in 1900 through to the present day, AJN has unparalleled archives detailing nurses' work and lives over more than a century. These articles not only chronicle nursing's growth as a profession within the context of the events of the day, but they also reveal prevailing societal attitudes about women, health care, and human rights. Today's nursing school curricula rarely include nursing's history, but it's a history worth knowing. To this end, From the AJN Archives offers articles selected to fit today's topics and times.This month's article, from the May 1993 issue, is a tongue-in-cheek editorial by former editor-in-chief Mary B. Mallison. In it, she introduces us to the "PerceptoPhone"-an imaginary device that allows the wearer to access the thoughts of nurses. PerceptoPhones are used to educate hospital trustees on nurses' essential but often invisible abilities: to identify early warning signs of complications; teach and encourage; and carefully assess, soothe, and heal-abilities that are "hard to quantify with usual accounting methods." More than 20 years later, we still look for better ways to teach the public about nursing. PMID:27123629

  8. Designing nursing interventions.

    PubMed

    Aranda, Sanchia

    2008-01-01

    The development of nursing interventions that demonstrate the link between nursing actions and patient outcomes is a high priority for nursing research. The development of intervention research frequently focuses on the methods used to test the intervention while less attention is placed on rigor in intervention development and design. The purpose of this paper is to provide thinking points for researchers considering the development of nursing interventions. The thinking points were developed from the limited literature on this topic in synthesis with the authors own experiences of designing nursing interventions. Adoption of a systematic approach to intervention testing is advocated along with a step-wise intervention development process. This process calls for attention to problem definition, conceptual underpinnings, desired outcomes and measures and evidence-based content along with careful consideration of delivery methods, dose and attention to protecting the integrity of the intervention during testing. The approach advocated will help to ensure that nursing intervention research makes a useful contribution to the development of nursing practice.

  9. Burnout in transplant nurses.

    PubMed

    Jesse, Michelle T; Abouljoud, Marwan S; Hogan, Kathy; Eshelman, Anne

    2015-09-01

    Context-Burnout is a response to chronic strain within the workplace and is common across nursing professions. Little has been published about burnout in organ transplant nurses. Objective-To report the prevalence of the 3 main components of burnout (emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and reduced personal accomplishment) in organ transplant nurses and to examine factors that contribute to the development of burnout in transplant nurses. Design-Cross-sectional survey of transplant nurses (recruited via listservs) on professional and personal demographics, decisional authority, psychological job demands, supervisor and coworker support, frequency and comfort with difficult patient interactions, and burnout. Participants-369 transplant nurses. Results-About half reported high levels of emotional exhaustion, 15.7% reported high levels of depersonalization, and 51.8% reported low levels of personal accomplishment. Working more hours per week, lower decisional authority, greater psychological job demands, lower perceived supervisor support, and greater frequency and discomfort with difficult patient interactions were significant predictors of emotional exhaustion. Greater frequency and discomfort with difficult patient interactions were significant predictors of depersonalization. Younger age, lower decisional authority, and greater discomfort with difficult patient interactions were predictors of low personal accomplishment. Conclusions-The study provides strong evidence of the presence of burnout in transplant nurses and opportunities for focused and potentially very effective interventions aimed at reducing burnout. PMID:26308777

  10. Burnout in transplant nurses.

    PubMed

    Jesse, Michelle T; Abouljoud, Marwan S; Hogan, Kathy; Eshelman, Anne

    2015-09-01

    Context-Burnout is a response to chronic strain within the workplace and is common across nursing professions. Little has been published about burnout in organ transplant nurses. Objective-To report the prevalence of the 3 main components of burnout (emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and reduced personal accomplishment) in organ transplant nurses and to examine factors that contribute to the development of burnout in transplant nurses. Design-Cross-sectional survey of transplant nurses (recruited via listservs) on professional and personal demographics, decisional authority, psychological job demands, supervisor and coworker support, frequency and comfort with difficult patient interactions, and burnout. Participants-369 transplant nurses. Results-About half reported high levels of emotional exhaustion, 15.7% reported high levels of depersonalization, and 51.8% reported low levels of personal accomplishment. Working more hours per week, lower decisional authority, greater psychological job demands, lower perceived supervisor support, and greater frequency and discomfort with difficult patient interactions were significant predictors of emotional exhaustion. Greater frequency and discomfort with difficult patient interactions were significant predictors of depersonalization. Younger age, lower decisional authority, and greater discomfort with difficult patient interactions were predictors of low personal accomplishment. Conclusions-The study provides strong evidence of the presence of burnout in transplant nurses and opportunities for focused and potentially very effective interventions aimed at reducing burnout.

  11. Male Adolescent Contraceptive Utilization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finkel, Madelon Lubin; Finkel, David J.

    1978-01-01

    The contraceptive utilization of a sample of sexually active, urban, high school males (Black, Hispanic, and White) was examined by anonymous questionnaire. Contraceptive use was haphazard, but White males tended to be more effective contraceptors than the other two groups. Reasons for nonuse were also studied. (Author/SJL)

  12. Presentation skills for nurses.

    PubMed

    Foulkes, Mark

    2015-02-20

    This article emphasises the importance of effective presentation skills. Such skills allow nurses to share knowledge and expertise and to communicate clearly in a range of workplace scenarios. Nurses are increasingly being asked to present in formal and informal situations, such as conferences, poster presentations, job interviews, case reports and ward-based teaching. This article explores the principles underpinning the development of these skills, discusses the situations in which they could be applied and demonstrates how nurses might improve and develop as presenters.

  13. Presentation skills for nurses.

    PubMed

    Foulkes, Mark

    2015-02-20

    This article emphasises the importance of effective presentation skills. Such skills allow nurses to share knowledge and expertise and to communicate clearly in a range of workplace scenarios. Nurses are increasingly being asked to present in formal and informal situations, such as conferences, poster presentations, job interviews, case reports and ward-based teaching. This article explores the principles underpinning the development of these skills, discusses the situations in which they could be applied and demonstrates how nurses might improve and develop as presenters. PMID:25690236

  14. Crisis intervention for nurses.

    PubMed

    Chase, Emily

    2013-06-01

    Cancer diagnoses and treatments can be crisis-causing events that overwhelm the usual coping abilities of patients and their families. Oncology nurses constantly are observing and attending to patients' diverse needs, ranging from biomedical to emotional, social, and psychological. Nurses have the chance to be first responders in times of patient crises, as they are in the position to recognize the crisis, respond effectively, and transform the crisis into a pivotal learning experience. This article discusses a way to think about patient and family crises that empowers nurses to respond in a manner appropriate to the cultural context and respectful of the individual space of the patient.

  15. The chief of nursing practice: a model for nursing leadership.

    PubMed

    Ross, E; MacDonald, C; McDermott, K; Veldhorst, G

    1996-01-01

    The role and structure of the Canadian Health Care System and its facilities are changing rapidly. Regionalization, decentralization, and flattening of hierarchical structures have occurred in governments and institutions. Traditional management roles, including the Vice President/Director of Nursing have been eliminated. There is a need to create a new model of nursing leadership if nurses are to continue to provide quality patient care. This article describes the initiative at Women's College Hospital to meet the expressed needs of nurses by developing a unique nursing role. The development of the chief of nursing practice role is defined within the context of the changing environment and Kanter's theory of empowerment. The position of the chief of nursing practice is a role model for nursing leadership and one that is pivotal for the professional identity of nursing, and for the provision of high quality patient care.

  16. Establishing roles in genetic nursing: interviews with Canadian nurses.

    PubMed

    Bottorff, Joan L; McCullum, Mary; Balneaves, Lynda G; Esplen, Mary Jane; Carroll, June; Kelly, Mary; Kieffer, Stephanie

    2005-12-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to describe nurses' roles in providing clinical genetic services related to adult onset hereditary disease and factors that influence genetic nursing practice in Canada. The study involved semi-structured telephone interviews with 22 nurses from 5 Canadian provinces with full-time or part-time roles in providing genetic services. The interviews included open-ended questions to elicit descriptions of genetic nursing roles and factors that support and limit opportunities in genetic nursing practice. Thematic analysis of the transcribed interviews revealed that, in addition to genetic counselling, the nurses reported a wide range of roles and responsibilities related to the provision of genetic services that drew directly on their nursing background (e.g., patient assessment, health promotion). Factors identified as supporting genetic nursing roles included nursing background, being part of a multidisciplinary team, and receiving mentorship. Challenges in establishing roles in genetic nursing were related to role ambiguity, lack of recognition of nursing expertise, limited availability of genetics education, isolation, and instability of nursing positions. Recommendations to support the development and expansion of genetic nursing practice were identified. A coordinated national effort among all stakeholders is needed to provide the resources necessary to support the appropriate and effective use of nursing expertise as genetics is integrated into the Canadian health-care system. PMID:16541821

  17. Leadership and ethics in nurse-nurse relationships.

    PubMed

    Milton, Constance L

    2009-04-01

    Qualities of nursing leadership may be reflected in the patterns of relating illuminated through communications between interdependent members of a discipline and interdisciplinary professional healthcare relationships. Authority and responsibility in leading-following reside with the designated leader. However, there is power with person in situation with the ever-present possibility of conflict. The author in this column will begin a discussion of conflict in nurse-nurse relationships and offer questions for straight thinking regarding the ethics of leading-following situations with nurse-nurse relationships from a humanbecoming nursing theoretical perspective.

  18. Predictors of male microchimerism.

    PubMed

    Kamper-Jørgensen, Mads; Mortensen, Laust Hvas; Andersen, Anne-Marie Nybo; Hjalgrim, Henrik; Gadi, Vijayakrishna K; Tjønneland, Anne

    2012-01-01

    The association between microchimerism acquired primarily through pregnancy and later disease is of increasing scientific interest. Because this line of research is new and little is known about the nature of microchimerism, studies of microchimerism are potentially vulnerable to error from confounding and reverse causation. To address the issue of confounding, we conducted an analysis of predictors of male microchimerism in 272 female participants of the Danish Diet, Cancer and Health cohort. Buffy coat DNA was tested for Y chromosome presence as a marker of male microchimerism. First, we used logistic regression and thereafter random forest modeling to evaluate the ability of a range of reproductive, lifestyle, hospital or clinic visit history, and other variables to predict whether women tested positive for male microchimerism. We found some indication that current use of contraceptive pills and hormone replacement therapy reduced the odds of testing positive for male microchimerism. However, prediction of male microchimerism presence was poor based on the available variables. Studies of the possible role of male microchimerism in maternal health and disease are therefore unlikely to be heavily confounded by the variables examined in the present investigation. More research focused on acquisition, retention and clearing of male cells in the maternal circulation is needed. PMID:22926759

  19. Predictors of male microchimerism.

    PubMed

    Kamper-Jørgensen, Mads; Mortensen, Laust Hvas; Andersen, Anne-Marie Nybo; Hjalgrim, Henrik; Gadi, Vijayakrishna K; Tjønneland, Anne

    2012-01-01

    The association between microchimerism acquired primarily through pregnancy and later disease is of increasing scientific interest. Because this line of research is new and little is known about the nature of microchimerism, studies of microchimerism are potentially vulnerable to error from confounding and reverse causation. To address the issue of confounding, we conducted an analysis of predictors of male microchimerism in 272 female participants of the Danish Diet, Cancer and Health cohort. Buffy coat DNA was tested for Y chromosome presence as a marker of male microchimerism. First, we used logistic regression and thereafter random forest modeling to evaluate the ability of a range of reproductive, lifestyle, hospital or clinic visit history, and other variables to predict whether women tested positive for male microchimerism. We found some indication that current use of contraceptive pills and hormone replacement therapy reduced the odds of testing positive for male microchimerism. However, prediction of male microchimerism presence was poor based on the available variables. Studies of the possible role of male microchimerism in maternal health and disease are therefore unlikely to be heavily confounded by the variables examined in the present investigation. More research focused on acquisition, retention and clearing of male cells in the maternal circulation is needed.

  20. Certified nurse-midwife

    MedlinePlus

    ... trained to provide a broad range of health care services for women and newborns. Certified nurse-midwife (CNM) functions include: Taking a medical history, and doing a physical exam Ordering laboratory tests ...

  1. The drama of nursing.

    PubMed

    Holmes, C A

    1992-08-01

    This exploratory paper considers a few possibilities for conceiving nursing as a form of aesthetic praxis. More specifically, drawing on the works of Erving Goffman on dramaturgy, and Elizabeth Burns on theatre, it makes some suggestions concerning nursing as a form of dramatic performance, and briefly attempts to relate this to concepts of praxis drawn from the writings of Hannah Arendt and critical social theorists. In contrast to Goffman's dramaturgy, which stresses the artifice of social relations and suggests a cynical view of human interactions, a critical theory of dramatic praxis introduces a normative dimension in which performance may become self-realizing and emancipatory as it aspires to the status of aesthetic praxis. Conceived in such terms, nursing practice becomes a powerful form of self-expression which has the potential to become liberating for the nurse and the patient.

  2. Nursing victims of violence.

    PubMed

    Sekula, Kathleen

    2016-09-01

    Nurse executives are key to providing quality care to patients affected by violence, with the growth in crime being a critical consideration in designing patient care and fostering collaboration across teams. PMID:27581907

  3. About Critical Care Nursing

    MedlinePlus

    ... Join Now Our Community Value of Belonging Member Benefits and Savings Awards Certification Apply Online Renew Your ... and traveling critical care nurses to fill staffing gaps in every part of the U.S. These requests ...

  4. Nursing by numbers.

    PubMed

    Hurst, Keith

    In the face of NHS budget cuts, nurses are being asked to justify their workforce numbers. Keith Hurst reviews some of the tools available for calculating staffing levels, examines their pros and cons, and discusses their application. PMID:17087410

  5. [Smoking among nursing students].

    PubMed

    Kolleck, Bernd

    2004-04-01

    Smoking as a major public-health concern is still a widespread habit among nurses and young students of nursing. The hypothesis however, that professional environment positively influences smoking habit, could not be supported: smoking is less influenced by vocational training and practice than by the social environment of the students. The results of the survey also show, that a great part of the smokers have a critical attitude towards their habit and would agree to counteractions. Nursing schools could play an important role therein. The conception of nursing as a responsible health profession would demand to take over a more active part in considering the consequences, in smoking prevention and in supporting cessation. PMID:15137673

  6. Emergency Nurses Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... sex with someone infected with Zika, examine the importance of screening protocols, and understand likely symptoms, such ... Job Center ENA provides opportunity for education and leadership as well as resources to advance nursing careers. ...

  7. Dysthanasia: nursing professionals' perception.

    PubMed

    de Menezes, Milene Barcellos; Selli, Lucilda; de Souza Alves, Joseane

    2009-01-01

    Dysthanasia means slow and painful death without quality of life. This study aimed to know whether nurses identify dysthanasia as part of the final process of the lives of terminal patients hospitalized at an adult ICU. This is an exploratory-qualitative study. Data were collected through semi-structured interviews with ten nurses with at least one year of experience in an ICU, and interpreted through content analysis. Results indicate that nurses understand and identify dysthanasia, do not agree with it and recognize elements of orthonasia as the adequate procedure for terminal patients. We conclude that nurses interpret dysthanasia as extending life with pain and suffering, while terminal patients are submitted to futile treatments that do not benefit them. They also identify dysthanasia using elements of orthonasia to explain it.

  8. Taking personal responsibility: Nurses' and assistant nurses' experiences of good nursing practice in psychiatric inpatient care.

    PubMed

    Gabrielsson, Sebastian; Sävenstedt, Stefan; Olsson, Malin

    2016-10-01

    Therapeutic nurse-patient relationships are considered essential for good nursing practice in psychiatric inpatient care. Previous research suggests that inpatient care fails to fulfil patients' expectations in this regard, and that nurses might experience the reality of inpatient care as an obstruction. The aim of the present study was to explore nurses' and assistant nurses' experiences of good nursing practice in the specific context of psychiatric inpatient care. Qualitative interviews were conducted with 12 skilled, relationship-oriented nurses and assistant nurses in order to explore their experiences with nursing practice related to psychiatric inpatient care. Interviews were transcribed and analysed using an interpretive descriptive approach. Findings describe good nursing practice as a matter of nurses and assistant nurses taking personal responsibility for their actions and for the individual patient as a person. Difficulties in providing dignified nursing care and taking personal responsibility cause them to experience feelings of distress and frustration. Shared values and nursing leadership supports being moral and treating patients with respect, having enough time supports being present and connecting with patients, and working as a part of a competent team with critical daily discussions and diversity supports being confident and building trust. The findings suggest that taking personal responsibility is integral to good nursing practice. If unable to improve poor circumstances, nurses might be forced to promote their own survival by refuting or redefining their responsibility. Nurses need to prioritize being with patients and gain support in shaping their own nursing practice. Nursing leadership should provide moral direction and defend humanistic values. PMID:27378375

  9. Taking personal responsibility: Nurses' and assistant nurses' experiences of good nursing practice in psychiatric inpatient care.

    PubMed

    Gabrielsson, Sebastian; Sävenstedt, Stefan; Olsson, Malin

    2016-10-01

    Therapeutic nurse-patient relationships are considered essential for good nursing practice in psychiatric inpatient care. Previous research suggests that inpatient care fails to fulfil patients' expectations in this regard, and that nurses might experience the reality of inpatient care as an obstruction. The aim of the present study was to explore nurses' and assistant nurses' experiences of good nursing practice in the specific context of psychiatric inpatient care. Qualitative interviews were conducted with 12 skilled, relationship-oriented nurses and assistant nurses in order to explore their experiences with nursing practice related to psychiatric inpatient care. Interviews were transcribed and analysed using an interpretive descriptive approach. Findings describe good nursing practice as a matter of nurses and assistant nurses taking personal responsibility for their actions and for the individual patient as a person. Difficulties in providing dignified nursing care and taking personal responsibility cause them to experience feelings of distress and frustration. Shared values and nursing leadership supports being moral and treating patients with respect, having enough time supports being present and connecting with patients, and working as a part of a competent team with critical daily discussions and diversity supports being confident and building trust. The findings suggest that taking personal responsibility is integral to good nursing practice. If unable to improve poor circumstances, nurses might be forced to promote their own survival by refuting or redefining their responsibility. Nurses need to prioritize being with patients and gain support in shaping their own nursing practice. Nursing leadership should provide moral direction and defend humanistic values.

  10. Nurse-physician collaboration.

    PubMed

    Taylor-Seehafer, M

    1998-09-01

    The literature indicates that collaboration between nurses and physicians has become more sophisticated as these relationships have become collegial in nature and as nurses have become assertive, autonomous, and accountable. On an individual level, physicians and nurses now entering collaborative relationships are successful at minimizing the obstacles of turf and territoriality as well as at managing practice boundaries. However, both need to consciously examine their patterns of communication in order to effect clinical interaction styles that maintain unequal or hierarchical relationships. Studies of interprofessional communication, including style of clinical interaction, conflict resolution, use of humor, and negotiation, contribute support for nurses and physicians in collaborative relationships (Balzer, 1993; Campbell, Mauksch, Neikirk, & Hosokawa, 1990; Feiger & Schmitt, 1979; Lenkman & Gribbins, 1994; Pike, 1991). Research on differences in health outcomes of patients cared for in the traditional and collaborative models of health care delivery, identification of the unique product of collaborative practice models, and further identification of the type of attitudinal climate in which collaborative relationships can be nurtured should be undertaken if the elusive nature of collaboration is to be captured (Siegler, Whitney, & Schmitt, 1994). Providing collaborative, interdisciplinary clinical experiences for students, as well as role modeling of collaborative relationships in nurse-physician faculty practice, can contribute to a greater understanding and acceptance of each professional's role in health care delivery (Campbell, 1993; Forbes & Fitzsimons, 1993; Larson, 1995). Tradition and professionalism and progressive concern about practice boundaries continue to be obstacles to collaborative practice. These need to be addressed by medical and nursing professionals on the institutional level and in the political arena. Collaboration between nurses and

  11. Missouri nurses' bioterrorism preparedness.

    PubMed

    Rebmann, Terri; Mohr, Lisa Buettner

    2008-09-01

    Nurses are the largest group of healthcare providers and will be at the forefront during a response to a bioterrorism attack in the U.S. However, nurses' bioterrorism risk perceptions and their participation in bioterrorism preparedness activities, such as bioterrorism-related exercises or drills, have not been evaluated. We mailed a survey to all members of the Missouri Nurses Association in July 2006, consisting of 1,528 registered nurses. The instrument measured risk perception, perceived susceptibility, perceived seriousness, bioterrorism education received, participation in exercises/drills, and personal response plan thoroughness. The response rate was 31% (474/1,528). Most respondents believe that a bioterrorism attack will occur in the U.S. (82.3%; n = 390), but few (21.3%; n = 101) believe that one will occur in their community. The majority of nurses reported that they believe that a bioterrorism attack would have serious consequences (96.1%, n = 448), including having a serious impact on U.S. citizens' safety (90.7%, n = 446) and on their own safety (84.3%, n = 379). Most (60%, n = 284) reported that they had not received any bioterrorism-related education nor participated in any drills/exercises (82.7%, n = 392). Of those who had received education, most had participated in 3 or fewer programs and in only 1 drill. Few nurses (3.6%, n = 15) reported having all aspects of a personal bioterrorism response plan; approximately 20% (19.4%, n = 81) did not have any components of a plan. Most of the registered nurses in Missouri who were surveyed are not receiving bioterrorism education, participating in bioterrorism exercises, or developing thorough personal response plans. Nurses need to be aware of and encouraged to participate in the many education and training opportunities on bioterrorism and infectious disease disasters.

  12. [Nursing care in prison].

    PubMed

    Aujard, Ségolène; de Brisoult, Béatrice; Broussard, Daniel; Petitclerc-Roche, Solenne; Lefort, Hugues

    2016-03-01

    In France, nurses practising in the prison environment work in a health care unit, for somatic care, or in a regional medical-psychological unit for large facilities and psychological care. These units belong to the regional hospitals. Located at the heart of the prison, they cater for prisoner-patients. On the frontline, the nurse has specific autonomy and responsibility in this unique context.

  13. Practice of preventive dentistry for nursing staff in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Acuña-Reyes, Raquel; Cigarroa-Martínez, Didier; Ureña-Bogarín, Enrique; Orgaz-Fernández, Jose David

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Determine the domain of preventive dentistry in nursing personnel assigned to a primary care unit. Methods: Prospective descriptive study, questionnaire validation, and prevalence study. In the first stage, the questionnaire for the practice of preventive dentistry (CPEP, for the term in Spanish) was validated; consistency and reliability were measured by Cronbach's alpha, Pearson's correlation, factor analysis with intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC). In the second stage, the domain in preventive dental nurses was explored. Results: The overall internal consistency of CPEP is α= 0.66, ICC= 0.64, CI95%: 0.29-0.87 (p >0.01). Twenty-one subjects in the study, average age 43, 81.0% female, average seniority of 12.5 were included. A total of 71.5% showed weak domain, 28.5% regular domain, and there was no questionnaire with good domain result. The older the subjects were, the smaller the domain; female nurses showed greater mastery of preventive dentistry (29%, CI95%: 0.1-15.1) than male nurses. Public health nurses showed greater mastery with respect to other categories (50%, CI95%: 0.56-2.8). Conclusions: The CDEP has enough consistency to explore the domain of preventive dentistry in health-care staff. The domain of preventive dentistry in primary care nursing is poor, required to strengthen to provide education in preventive dentistry to the insured population. PMID:25386037

  14. Transnational spaces of care: migrant nurses in Norway.

    PubMed

    Isaksen, Lise Widding

    2012-01-01

    This article argues that international nurse recruitment from Latvia to Norway is not a win–win situation. The gains and losses of nurse migration are unevenly distributed between sender and receiver countries. On the basis of empirical research and interviews with Latvian nurses and families they left behind, this article argues that nurse migration transforms families and communities and that national health services now become global workplaces. Some decades ago feminist research pointed to the fact that the welfare state was based on a male breadwinner family and women’s unpaid production of care work at home. Today this production of unpaid care is “outsourced” from richer to poorer countries and is related to an emergence of transnational spaces of care. International nurse recruitment and global nurse care chains in Norway increasingly provide the labor that prevents the new adult worker model and gender equality politics from being disrupted in times where families are overloaded with elder care loads. PMID:22611573

  15. Language and nursing research.

    PubMed

    Munhall, P L

    1993-08-01

    The intent of this chapter can be summarized by borrowing Paterson's (1978) words: For responsible, effective existence the professional requires language [emphasis added] to relate authentically the purposes, beliefs, concerns, and events experienced continually in the nursing world. (p. 51). The noumenal exists in those phenomena listed by practicing nurses, but each seems to be a thing in itself--something waiting for description to bring it into our everyday awareness and to give it significance. It is as though we need to assert these events as nursing's, articulate our authentic experience with patients, claim what we believe is paramount to health (i.e., good nursing), and conceptualize what is uniquely the abstract and the concrete, the enduring and the relevant meanings of shared human experience between patient and nurse. We believe that qualitative research methods have much to offer as a research paradigm that is congruent with nursing's larger worldview, paradigm, or model. We close this chapter with Table 1-9, an illustration of the language of the qualitative research methods, and leave our readers to draw their own conclusions.

  16. Allomaternal nursing in humans.

    PubMed

    Hewlett, Barry S; Winn, Steve

    2014-04-01

    Few studies exist of allomaternal nursing in humans. It is relatively common among some cultures, such as the Aka and Efé hunter-gatherers of the Congo Basin, but it does not occur in other foragers such as the !Kung and Hadza of Southern and East Africa. This paper utilizes focal follow observations of Aka and Efé infants, interviews with Aka mothers, ethnographic reports from researchers working with hunter-gatherers, and a survey of the eHRAF cultures to try to answer the following questions: how often does allomaternal nursing occur, who provides it, and under what contexts does it take place? The study indicates that it occurs in many cultures (93% of cultures with data) but that it is normative in relatively few cultures; biological kin, especially grandmothers, frequently provide allomaternal nursing and that infant age, mother's condition, and culture (e.g., cultural models about if and when women other than the mother can nurse an infant or colostrum taboos) impact the nature and frequency of allomaternal nursing. The empirical results of this exploratory study are discussed in the context of existing hypotheses used to explain allomaternal nursing. PMID:24991682

  17. Perception of nursing students towards internship.

    PubMed

    Suresh, Hema

    2012-04-01

    The study, undertaken to assess the perception of students regarding integrated internship in the preparation of staff nurse position among the BSc (N) final year undergraduate students included 43 students (21, 47% female and 22, 53% male) in the hospital setting of Chennai (TN). Majority of students (96%) perceived that there was significant enrichment in preparation in the three aspects: knowledge, skill and attitude and that due to their learning in the internship period, they would confidently function independently in the ward in discharge of their duties.

  18. Caring in Nursing Professional Development.

    PubMed

    Martin, Mary Brigid

    2015-01-01

    Caring science has been identified and examined in the discipline of nursing for over 40 years. Within this period, the topic has been analyzed and studied resulting in theories, models, books, and articles published nationally and internationally. Although advancements have been made in caring knowledge development, opportunities to integrate caring science into all aspects of nursing abound, including the specialty of nursing professional development. The focus of this article is to present ways in which nursing professional development specialists may incorporate caring science into practice, using Ray's (2010) Transcultural Caring Dynamics in Nursing and Health Care model as an exceptional exemplar for understanding, awareness, and choice for nurses and patients. PMID:26381337

  19. Synchronous connections: nursing's little secret.

    PubMed

    Krejci, J W

    1995-07-01

    As nurses prepare for their place in health care reform, it is becoming more important than ever to be clear about the unique contribution nurses make to health care outcomes. In our technology-driven society, however, some of nursing's most powerful contributions go unacknowledged. An unexpected finding of a study on nurse experts' perceptions of synchrony revealed that nurses themselves frequently do not document or even dialog about important contributions if they cannot be captured within the dominant paradigm of high-technology care. The article describes nurses "little secret" that must be exposed.

  20. Handbook of clinical nursing practice

    SciTech Connect

    Asheervath, J.; Blevins, D.R.

    1986-01-01

    Written in outline format, this reference will help nurses further their understanding of advanced nursing procedures. Information is provided on the physiological, psychological, environmental, and safety considerations of nursing activities associated with diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. Special consideration is given to the areas of pediatric nursing, nursing assessment, and selected radiologic and nuclear medicine procedures for each system. Contents: Clinical Introduction. Clinical Nursing Practice: Focus on Basics. Focus on Cardiovascular Function. Focus on Respiratory Function. Focus on Gastrointestinal Function. Focus on Renal and Genito-Urological Function. Focus on Neuro-Skeletal and Muscular Function. Appendices.

  1. Challenges facing internationalisation of nursing practice, nurse education and nursing workforce in Australia.

    PubMed

    Parker, Vicki; McMillan, Margaret

    2007-04-01

    This paper examines factors that have lead to increasing internationalisation in nursing workforce and nursing education and contends that education and support for nurse managers and nurse academics is required in order to better prepare them for the challenges they will face. There are many benefits to be gained from internationalisation of nursing, the most significant being greater cross-cultural understanding and improved practices in workplaces across countries. However, the way in which nursing and nurses contribute to the international agenda is crucial to maintaining standards of education and nursing care in Australia and in countries with whom Australians collaborate. Internationalisation poses numerous challenges that need to be carefully thought through. This paper seeks to unravel and scrutinize some of the issues central to internationalisation in nursing, particularly in the Australian context.

  2. Curriculum Development for Part-Time Programs for Certified Nurse Assistant to Licensed Vocational Nurse; and Licensed Vocational Nurse to Associate Degree Nurse Program (CNA-VN-RN).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saxe, Ellen; And Others

    This report describes the Imperial Valley College nursing program, a program developed to provide for the nursing needs of Imperial County, California. The program provides part-time education to help train nursing assistants and to allow nursing assistants to upgrade their skills to vocational nurse level and vocational nurses to become…

  3. Bladder catheterization, male (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... kept empty (decompressed) and urinary flow assured. The balloon holds the catheter in place for a duration of time. Catheterization in males is slightly more difficult and uncomfortable than in females because of the longer urethra.

  4. Male Reproductive System

    MedlinePlus

    ... Surveillance Modules » Anatomy & Physiology » Reproductive System » Male Reproductive System Cancer Registration & Surveillance Modules Anatomy & Physiology Intro to the Human Body Body Functions & Life Process Anatomical Terminology Review Quiz ...

  5. Male Reproductive System

    MedlinePlus

    ... gamete, the egg or ovum , meet in the female's reproductive system to create a new individual. Both the male and female reproductive systems are essential for reproduction. Humans, like other organisms, ...

  6. Male Reproductive System

    MedlinePlus

    ... gamete, the egg or ovum, meet in the female's reproductive system to create a baby. Both the male and female reproductive systems are essential for reproduction. Humans pass certain characteristics ...

  7. Males and Eating Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Males and Eating Disorders Past Issues / Spring 2008 Table of Contents For ... this page please turn Javascript on. Photo: PhotoDisc Eating disorders primarily affect girls and women, but boys and ...

  8. Breast enlargement in males

    MedlinePlus

    Gynecomastia; Breast enlargement in a male ... The condition may occur in one or both breasts. It begins as a small lump beneath the nipple, which may be tender. One breast may be larger than the other. Enlarged breasts ...

  9. Chlamydial infections - male

    MedlinePlus

    Chlamydia infection in males is an infection of the urethra (the tube that drains urine from the ... and passes through the penis). This type of chlamydia infection is passed from one person to another ...

  10. Sickening nurses: fever nursing, nurses' illness, and the anatomy of blame, New Zealand 1903-1923.

    PubMed

    Wood, Pamela J

    2011-01-01

    In the early twentieth century, patients with infectious fevers represented a danger to the health of others including their nurses. This research describes the training New Zealand nurses received in fever nursing during the period 1903-1923, and considers how they applied hospital cross-infection principles in emergency tent fever camps in remote rural areas. It examines the reaction of nurses, hospital boards, and physicians to nurses who succumbed with their patients' fevers. It therefore reveals attitudes to nurses, prevailing ideas about responsibility for nurses' health, and elements in the emerging professional culture of nursing. Although some measures protected them against epidemic fevers, nurses were held responsible for their own health. A complex anatomy of blame is evident against those who sickened; the nature of the blame shifted, depending on the observer, disease, and practice setting. Physicians blamed nurses, especially when they sickened with typhoid fever. The country's chief nurse and other nurses blamed those who jeopardized their health through ill-spent leisure time. Sick nurses could be absolved from blame for the lax discipline evident through their failure to observe cross-infection principles if their practice setting was the fever camp. Willingness to work in difficult circumstances showed they embodied the ideal of sacrifice that, like discipline, was part of the emerging nursing culture. PMID:21329145

  11. An Investigation of Sex-Related Slang Vocabulary and Sex-Role Orientation Among Male and Female University Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kutner, Nancy G.; Brogan, Donna

    1974-01-01

    Undergraduate males, undergraduate females, and graduate student nurses (female) were asked to list all the slang expressions they knew for 17 sex-related stimulus words. Males listed a significantly larger total number of slang expressions than either female group. (Author)

  12. The Lived Experience of Nurses Working with Student Nurses in the Clinical Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hathorn, Donna; Machtmes, Krisanna; Tillman, Ken

    2009-01-01

    One response to the nursing shortage is to increase promotion and retention in nursing programs: However, negative attitudes of nurses threaten student progression and retention. A phenomenological study explored the lived experience of nurses who worked with student nurses to discover "what" attitudes nurses had toward student nurses and "how"…

  13. The continuing quest for parity: HBCU nursing students' perspectives on nursing and nursing education.

    PubMed

    Talley, Costellia; Talley, Henry; Collins-McNeil, Janice

    2016-08-01

    The benefits of a diverse nursing workforce are well-recognized, yet, the attainment of a sustainable, competent and diverse nursing workforce continues to be a global challenge. In this qualitative study, we describe nursing students' perceptions on nursing and nursing education at a Historically Black College/University (HBCU). Focus groups were conducted with 16 graduate and undergraduate nursing students. Four themes emerged: communication, lack of resources, support systems and professional socialization. Mentoring and civility were identified as factors important to enhance a diverse workforce. PMID:27286940

  14. The internationally educated nurse.

    PubMed

    McGuire, Marion; Murphy, Sandra

    2005-01-01

    Internationally educated nurses (IENs) come from a wide range of educational programs around the world and bring a variety of skills and abilities to Canada. This article highlights what is known about this group of diverse individuals, includingdemographic information, in an effort to help nursing colleagues understand and acknowledgethe challengesthat IENs face, as well as the contributions they can make to our healthcare system. There are many IENs already resident in Canada whose skills and experience are not being used to their potential. They face a number of challenges as they prepare for licensure. Language and cultural differences often complicate this process. However, studies show that IENs, on the whole, tend to be an experienced group of nurses with good retention and job satisfaction rates, which ultimately contribute to their success as employees. Balanced against our obligations to these nurses to smooth the path to licensure is the important commitment that our professional colleges and associations have to ensure that practitioners of nursing are in the best position to practise safely. The process of integration and transition into practice in a new culture can be overwhelming for the IEN. Unfamiliar technology differences in cultural behaviours, attitudes and roles, as well as the often significant differences in healthcare systems, and adjustments to language expectations and the specialized language of nursing make the process of integration and adjustment difficult. Programs are needed that introduce IENs to the culture of nursing in Canada, incorporate well-integrated language training satisfy theory and practice deficiencies and bridge, where necessary, to the baccalaureate entry to practice requirement. In addition, important psychosocial, economic and personal supports, aswell as links to educational and employment opportunities, are important components of any program.

  15. Religion and Gender in a Men’s Hospital and School of Nursing, 1866–1969

    PubMed Central

    Wall, Barbra Mann

    2009-01-01

    Objectives This article explores religious beliefs, practices, and representations of the Alexian Brothers, a religious order of Catholic nursing brothers, and the role of gender in this discourse. Background Nursing in the United States developed within a cultural framework of caring as part of women’s roles in families and communities. Yet, a study of the Alexian Brothers challenges the dominance of the “female” in most gender analyses of nursing. Methods Historical methodology is used to evaluate and interpret data within the broader framework of historiographical literature on gender, religion, and nursing. In analyzing nursing, religion, and gender, attention has been paid to representations, mainly of women, through photographs and written literature. In this article, the same sources are used for men. Results The story of the Alexian Brothers and the men they educated is a testament to the power of gender and religion in nursing history. These men carved out a system of caring that recognized it as a responsibility not only of women but also of men. As they asserted that their paid work was a Christian calling, they renegotiated dominant notions of masculinity. In doing so, male nurses navigated among an array of representations, from nurse, to school administrator, to military soldier, to religious person, to professional practitioner of scientific medicine. These self-representations in the masculine spaces of the hospital and nursing school were designed to debunk stereotypes of feminine men, and they challenged traditional spatial boundaries. PMID:19448519

  16. From salvation to civics: service to the sick in nursing discourse.

    PubMed

    Nelson, S

    2001-11-01

    This paper explores the emergence of civics discourse in early 20th-century nursing. It foregrounds this discussion with an analysis of the attempt to secularise nursing that occurred in 1789 during the French Revolution. It then examines the discursive displacement of religious vocational fervour by civic and patriotic imperatives during the first two decades of the 20th century. Contemporary scholars have portrayed nursing's professional development as characterised by tension between the professional elitist agenda of the nursing leadership, and the rank and file positioning of nursing as a female occupation. By contrast, this paper focuses on the porosity of nursing to broader trends such as civic discourse, the labour movement, feminism and socialism, and works to shift our understanding of nursing's professional history from a dialectical model (professional versus industrial), to one of multiplicity in political and ethical values. It argues that civic and patriotic discourse provided the framing for the secular nurse's subjectivity and the mechanism by which nurses negotiated the moral dangers of care of the sick and male bodies without the protection of vow or veil. PMID:11556611

  17. TV nurses: promoting a positive image of nursing?

    PubMed

    Spear, Hila J

    2010-01-01

    It's understood that medical dramas are meant to entertain, not serve as documentaries. Nevertheless, media-driven messages are powerful, influencing the culture and collective mindset. This article evaluates current images of nurses in the media and challenges nurses to engage in professional and public service designed to promote a positive media and public image of nursing. PMID:20949871

  18. Health Instruction Packages: Humanistic Nursing--Nurse/Patient Relations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carpenter, Wanda L.; And Others

    Text, illustrations, and exercises are utilized in this set of four learning modules to instruct nurses and nursing students in humanistic, non-technical aspects of patient care. The first module, "Introduction to Humanistic Nursing Practice Theory" by Wanda L. Carpenter, draws upon the theories of existentialism and phenomenology to define…

  19. Nurse Career-Pattern Study. Part I: Practical Nursing Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tate, Barbara L.; Knopf, Lucille

    The overall nurse career-patterns study actually consists of four concurrent longitudinal studies relating to the four kinds of nursing programs in which, if possible, each subject will be followed from the time of entrance through a 15-year period after graduation. The practical nurse study seeks to determine whether certain biographical data or…

  20. Parish nursing: holistic nursing care in faith communities.

    PubMed

    King, Michalene A

    2011-01-01

    Modern-day parish nursing is a specialized practice in professional nursing that addresses the spiritual, physical, and emotional health needs of clients within a faith community. Parish nursing care has been described as holistic care; however, few studies have focused on the holistic nature of parish nursing care. A qualitative study was conducted with the clients of parish nurses. Seventeen clients utilizing the services of 3 parish nurses in Christian faith communities participated in the study. Following the institutional review board approval, the clients were recruited with the assistance of the parish nurses. The clients completed a 7-item demographic questionnaire, followed by a face-to-face interview with the author who used a semistructured interview tool. The interview questions encompassed 6 aspects of parish nursing: education, personal counseling, health screenings, spiritual support, referrals, and health advocacy. The interviews were transcribed and analyzed by the author. The results of the study indicated that the clients in all 3 churches received holistic care from their parish nurses. The care they received addressed their spiritual, physical, and emotional health needs. Recommendations for future research and implications for the clinical practice of parish nursing, using a holistic approach, are included. The findings of future research and the holistic interventions of parish nurses could influence the funding and positions for parish nurses in the future.

  1. Nurse Educators' Leadership Styles and Nurse Graduates' Licensure Passage Rates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Dianna Bailey

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this quantitative correlational research study was to examine the relationship between leadership styles of community college nurse educators in Texas and licensure passage rates of nursing community college graduates in Texas. Surveys were conducted to obtain the nurse educators' demographic data. The Multifactor Leadership…

  2. Clinical ethics and nursing: "yes" to caring, but "no" to a female ethics of care.

    PubMed

    Kuhse, Helga

    1995-07-01

    According to a contemporary school of thought there is a specific female approach to ethics which is based not on abstract "male" ethical principles or rules, but on "care". Nurses have taken a keen interest in these female approaches to ethics. Drawing on the views expounded by Carol Gilligan and Nel Noddings, nurses claim that a female "ethics of care" better captures their moral experiences than a traditional male "ethics of justice". This paper argues that "care" is best understood in a dispositional sense, that is, as sensitivity and responsiveness to the particularities of a situation and the needs of "concrete" others. While "care", in this sense, is necessary for ethics, it is not sufficient. Ethics needs "justice" as well as "care". If women and nurses excessively devalue principles and norms, they will be left without the theoretical tools to condemn some actions or practices, and to defend others. They will, like generations of nurses before them, be condemned to silence.

  3. Self-confidence, gender and academic achievement of undergraduate nursing students.

    PubMed

    Kukulu, K; Korukcu, O; Ozdemir, Y; Bezci, A; Calik, C

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the self-confidence levels of nursing students and the factors related to such self-confidence. Data were obtained via a questionnaire for socio-demographic characteristics and a 'Self-Confidence Scale' prepared by the researchers. High self-confidence levels were noted in 78.6% of female students and 92.3% of male students. While 84.5% of second-year students had high self-confidence levels, this rate was 76% in fourth-year students. Female nursing students were significantly less self-confident than male students. Self-confidence should be nurtured in a caring nursing curriculum; however, there is a lack of clarity as to what confidence means, how it is perceived by students and what educators can do to instil self-confidence in nursing students.

  4. Applying talent management to nursing.

    PubMed

    Haines, Sue

    To deliver the chief nursing officer for England's vision for compassionate care and embed the 6Cs effectively, the NHS must attract, develop and retain talented nurses with a diverse range of skills. This is particularly important given the predicted shortage of nurses and evidence that NHS providers need to increase skill mix ratios to deliver safe patient care. "Talent management" is increasingly discussed within the health service; we recently asked nurses and student nurses to identify their priorities for talent development. They highlighted the importance of strong ward leadership, effective personal appraisal, clearer career pathways, increased staff engagement and involvement in decision making, as well as a need for greater emphasis on the recognition and reward of nursing achievements. We concluded that these factors are crucial to attracting, retaining and developing talent in nursing. Nurse leaders can learn approaches to developing talent from business and wider healthcare settings.

  5. Gilligan: a voice for nursing?

    PubMed Central

    Harbison, J

    1992-01-01

    The current reform of nursing education is resulting in major changes in the curricula of colleges of nursing. For the first time, ethical and moral issues are being seen as an important theme underpinning the entire course. The moral theorist with whose work most nurse teachers are acquainted is Kohlberg. In this paper, it is suggested that his work, and the conventions of morality which he exemplifies, may not be the most appropriate from which to address the moral issues facing the nurse. The author suggests that the work of Carol Gilligan of Harvard university is of great significance, not only for nurses involved in the teaching of ethics, but for all nurses. Gilligan's emphasis on caring and relationships accords with the common experience of the nurse, and echoes the current revival of interest within nursing in examining, and valuing, the phenomenon of caring. PMID:1460649

  6. Retrenchment. How nurse executives cope.

    PubMed

    Feldman, J; Daly-Gawenda, D

    1985-06-01

    Changing economic, technicologic, and political conditions have created the need for readjustments in the number of nursing personnel employed by hospitals. The authors examined how nurse executives conducted themselves and managed their personnel during layoffs.

  7. Skilled nursing or rehabilitation facilities

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000435.htm Skilled nursing or rehabilitation facilities To use the sharing features ... facility. Who Needs to go to a Skilled Nursing or Rehabilitation Facility? Your health care provider may ...

  8. Gilligan: a voice for nursing?

    PubMed

    Harbison, J

    1992-12-01

    The current reform of nursing education is resulting in major changes in the curricula of colleges of nursing. For the first time, ethical and moral issues are being seen as an important theme underpinning the entire course. The moral theorist with whose work most nurse teachers are acquainted is Kohlberg. In this paper, it is suggested that his work, and the conventions of morality which he exemplifies, may not be the most appropriate from which to address the moral issues facing the nurse. The author suggests that the work of Carol Gilligan of Harvard university is of great significance, not only for nurses involved in the teaching of ethics, but for all nurses. Gilligan's emphasis on caring and relationships accords with the common experience of the nurse, and echoes the current revival of interest within nursing in examining, and valuing, the phenomenon of caring.

  9. Nursing and health in Russia.

    PubMed

    1998-01-01

    There are over one million nurses in Russia, and they work in a crippled healthcare system facing a dramatic increase in infectious diseases. But nurses are valiantly coping with the country's health crisis and becoming a recognized profession. PMID:9638513

  10. Applying talent management to nursing.

    PubMed

    Haines, Sue

    To deliver the chief nursing officer for England's vision for compassionate care and embed the 6Cs effectively, the NHS must attract, develop and retain talented nurses with a diverse range of skills. This is particularly important given the predicted shortage of nurses and evidence that NHS providers need to increase skill mix ratios to deliver safe patient care. "Talent management" is increasingly discussed within the health service; we recently asked nurses and student nurses to identify their priorities for talent development. They highlighted the importance of strong ward leadership, effective personal appraisal, clearer career pathways, increased staff engagement and involvement in decision making, as well as a need for greater emphasis on the recognition and reward of nursing achievements. We concluded that these factors are crucial to attracting, retaining and developing talent in nursing. Nurse leaders can learn approaches to developing talent from business and wider healthcare settings. PMID:24380172

  11. Targeting the adolescent male.

    PubMed

    Pitt, E

    1986-01-01

    The National Urban League regards too early parenting among adolescents as an issue requiring high level, active attention from all segments of the Black community. Poverty, single parent households and adolescent pregnancies are not exclusively female problems. The role that males play has been missing from too many studies of these phenomena. In light of the fact that most sexual activity is male initiated, and most sexual behavior is male influenced, it becomes clear that there will be no resolution of the problem of teenage pregnancy without directing greater attention to the male. The issue of male responsibility is skirted too often due to parental pride on the part of mothers and fathers when their male children seek sexual relations with female partners. It is viewed as a sign that they are developing sexually within the norm. This is especially true, in many instances, in female headed households where the mother is concerned that she may not be providing her son with an adequate male role model. Sexual activity by female adolescents, however, is generally not condoned. This confusing double standard is further compounded by the disjointed fashion in which American society responds to adolescent sexuality on the whole. Although the home should be the focal point, many parents reluctantly admit an inability to communicate effectively about sex with their pre-adolescent children. Thus, the school, church, community and social agencies have all been enlisted in this task. The National Urban League's initiative in this area is expected to have significant impact on the course of adolescent sexuality and reproductive responsibility.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. The elusive profession called nursing.

    PubMed

    Karnick, Paula M

    2014-10-01

    As a discipline, nursing continues the struggle to be recognized by others as a profession. Despite the fact that nursing has a unique body of knowledge with theory, scientific inquiry, practice, and a code of ethics, the litmus test for defining the profession remains elusive. The discipline is not valued. Much of the struggle is in part due to the criteria developed by non- nurses regarding what the nursing profession should be, not what it truly is.

  13. Development of the nurse practitioner.

    PubMed

    Howie, P

    1992-03-25

    In the first of two articles on the development of the emergency nurse practitioner, Peter Howie reports on a new scheme in Lincoln where all first-level nurses have been trained as nurse practitioners. The initiative was introduced following a study in the theoretical management of patients by experienced accident and emergency sisters. The author outlines the training course provided and the protocols within which nurse practitioners work. PMID:27236949

  14. Development of the nurse practitioner.

    PubMed

    Howie, P

    1992-03-25

    In the first of two articles on the development of the emergency nurse practitioner, Peter Howie reports on a new scheme in Lincoln where all first-level nurses have been trained as nurse practitioners. The initiative was introduced following a study in the theoretical management of patients by experienced accident and emergency sisters. The author outlines the training course provided and the protocols within which nurse practitioners work. PMID:1392461

  15. Nursing homes in China.

    PubMed

    Chu, Leung-Wing; Chi, Iris

    2008-05-01

    China will face a dramatic transition from a young to an aged society in the coming 30 to 40 years. In 2000, there were 88,110,000 persons aged 65 years and older, which represented 7% of the population. This percentage is projected to increase to 23% in 2050. Regarding health and long-term care for older adults, the current challenge is to build a comprehensive system of care for older adults. Nursing home care is an inevitable care model for frail older adults in China, which is largely sponsored by the government of China with contributions from some nongovernment organizations and private investors. China is a large country. Within the country, long-term care varies greatly between rural and urban areas, and among the different economic developing areas. In urban and better-developed areas, the range of services exists; however, in rural and less-developed areas, the range of services is limited. The "Star Light Program" and "Beloved Care Engineering" were recent government initiatives to improve aged care. They were launched in 2001 and have dramatically increased the number of both senior centers and nursing homes for older adults. While the quantity of nursing homes is still inadequate with an additional mismatch problem between the supply and demand, the quality of care in most nursing homes is suboptimal. At present, most administrative and frontline workers in nursing homes have received little training in elder care. There is a need for good-quality structured training in long-term care for all types of staff. Moreover, quality standard for care, including standard setting, assessment, and monitoring, is an important issue and needs substantial improvement for nursing homes in China. Currently, 1.5% of older people live in nursing homes and apartments for older people. Because of the peculiar 4-2-1 family structure in China, we expect the prevalence of nursing home placement of older adults will increase in the coming years. The government of China has

  16. Stages of Male Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Male Breast Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information about Male Breast Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Male ...

  17. Assessment of Male Reproductive Toxicity##

    EPA Science Inventory

    This review covers all aspects of male reproductive toxicology. It begins with an overview of male reproductive biology and then transitions to the considerations of conducting male reproductive toxicology studies. We discuss multigenerational study as proposed in EPAs harmoniz...

  18. Husserl, phenomenology and nursing.

    PubMed

    Paley, J

    1997-07-01

    Discussions of phenomenological research in nursing consistently appeal to either Husserl or Heidegger in justifying the technical and conceptual resources they deploy. This paper focuses on Husserl, and examines the relationship between his phenomenology and the accounts of it that are to be found in the nursing literature. Three central ideas are given particular attention: the phenomenological reduction, phenomena, and essence. It is argued that nurse researchers largely misunderstand these concepts and that, as a result, their version of Husserl's philosophy bears little resemblance to the original. A further consequence is that the project of identifying the 'essential structure' of a phenomenon, typically adopted by the nurse researchers who cite Husserl as an authority, comes close to being unintelligible. It is suggested that, while the methods used in 'phenomenological' nursing research may still have some legitimacy, they cannot achieve what they are alleged to achieve, and they should be detached from the framework of Husserlian ideas and terminology which is supposed to justify them.

  19. Benchmarking occupational stressors and strain levels for rural nurses and other health sector workers.

    PubMed

    Albion, Majella J; Fogarty, Gerard J; Machin, M Anthony

    2005-09-01

    This study was conducted with 1097 employees (866 females, 217 males, 14 did not indicate gender) in a regional Health Service District who completed the Queensland Public Agency Staff Survey in 2002. Nurses' results on measures of organizational climate and psychological outcomes were compared with those of other employees in the Health Service District. Nurses reported less favourable outcomes on all but one of the organizational climate scales, and also were found to have more distress (strain), and lower levels of morale, Job Satisfaction and Quality of Worklife than others. Results were generally less favourable for nurses working in the large regional hospital and in mental health than for nurses in other facilities. The study has implications for recruiting and retaining nurses at a time when shortages within the profession are chronic. PMID:16108779

  20. Factors Influencing Men Entering the Nursing Profession, and Understanding the Challenges Faced by Them: Iranian and Developed Countries’ Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Zamanzadeh, Vahid; Valizadeh, Leila; Negarandeh, Reza; Monadi, Morteza; Azadi, Arman

    2013-01-01

    Context: Men entering the nursing profession have been investigated from several different perspectives. Due to male gender characteristics and existing public image, nursing is often not considered as a career choice by men. Whether nursing would benefit from increased number of men is a key question in the literature. The purpose of this integrative review of the literature was to identify factors influencing men to enter the nursing profession. In addition, it sought to understand the challenges they are confronted within this profession. Evidence Acquisition: A systematic search of the existing literature was performed using an Internet search with broad keywords to access related articles in both Persian and English databases. Finally, 34 studies (written between 2000 and early 2013) were selected and surveyed. Results: Most of the studies were conducted in developed counties. The review identified reasons why males choose nursing, and other challenges facing men entering and working in nursing. Themes that emerged from the literature include educational and societal barriers experienced by men in nursing, recruitment, career choice, and role strain. Conclusions: Regarding men’s influences on professional development, and also the importance of gender-based caring, policies for recruitment and retention of men in nursing must be followed hastily. However, there is a need for further research regarding the challenges faced by men entering nursing, in both Iran and other developing countries. PMID:25414879

  1. Teaching Spiritual Care to Nurses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Linda A.

    1996-01-01

    Spiritual care that enhances patient well-being should be taught to nurses, but it is unclear how or if it is being taught, according to a survey of 685 Scottish nurses. Nurses should be aware of the spiritual dimension of their own lives, have experience and learning from crises, and collaborate with clergy in meeting patients' spiritual needs.…

  2. Competency Based Refresher Nurse Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lombardo, Mary C.

    This competency-based course is designed to update the skills and knowledge of inactive nurses desiring to return to active practice. Focus of the course is on organizing and managing patient care using the nursing process; performing nursing procedures, including medication administration; and reintegrating oneself into the professional…

  3. [Bioethics applied to nursing care].

    PubMed

    Lunardi, V L

    1998-01-01

    From the Foucault governability concept as a theme articulated to the concepts of authonomy, freedom and ethic, in this text, the author discusses the ethic conflict situations confrontation, which are presents in the nursing quotidian and specially in the nephrology nursing. The author defends the need of the nurse, in her practice, to decide to advocate in favor of the client rights.

  4. Telehealth Education in Nursing Curricula.

    PubMed

    Ali, Nagia S; Carlton, Kay Hodson; Ali, Omar S

    2015-01-01

    Telehealth care is a fast-growing avenue of providing health care services at a distance. A descriptive study was conducted to identify trends of telehealth education in 43 schools of nursing. Findings reflected inadequate integration of telehealth in classroom content, simulation, and clinical experiences. Interviews with 4 nursing leaders of telehealth provided some recommendations on how to integrate telehealth education in nursing curricula.

  5. Advancing leadership capacity in nursing.

    PubMed

    Scott, Elaine S; Miles, Jane

    2013-01-01

    To address the potential shortage of nurse leaders, the profession must evaluate current strategies in both education and practice. While many new graduates dream of becoming a nurse practitioner or nurse anesthetist, few transition into practice with the goal of becoming a nurse leader. To increase the number of nurses capable of leadership, the profession must address 2 critical issues. First, effort must be made to augment faculty and students' conceptualization of nursing such that leadership is seen as a dimension of practice for all nurses, not just those in formal leadership roles. In so doing, leadership identity development would be seen as a part of becoming an expert nurse. Second, a comprehensive conceptual framework for lifelong leadership development of nurses needs to be designed. This framework should allow for baseline leadership capacity building in all nurses and advanced leadership development for those in formal administrative and advanced practice roles. The knowledge and skill requirements for quality improvement and patient safety have been explored and recommendations made for Quality and Safety Education for Nurses, but parallel work needs to be done to outline educational content, objectives, and effective pedagogy for advancing leadership development in nursing students at all levels.

  6. Nursing Education Update: Computer Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gothler, Ann M.

    1985-01-01

    A survey of nursing faculty showed that 91 percent of nursing education programs had faculty members who had attended or participated in a conference on computers during 1983 and 1984. Other survey responses concerned computer applications integrated into nursing courses, required courses in computer technology, and computer-assisted instruction.…

  7. Innovating Traditional Nursing Administration Challenges.

    PubMed

    Joseph, M Lindell; Fowler, Debra

    2016-03-01

    The evolving and complex practice environment calls for new mindsets among nurse leaders, academics, and nurse innovators to envision innovative ways to manage and optimize traditional tasks and processes in nursing administration. The purpose of this article is to present 3 case studies that used linear programming and simulation to innovate staffing enterprises, financial management of healthcare systems, and curricula development.

  8. Complexity compression: nurses under fire.

    PubMed

    Krichbaum, Kathleen; Diemert, Carol; Jacox, Lynn; Jones, Ann; Koenig, Patty; Mueller, Christine; Disch, Joanne

    2007-01-01

    It has been documented that up to 40% of the workday of nurses is taken up by meeting the ever-increasing demands of the systems of healthcare delivery in which nurses are employed. These demands include the need for increasing documentation, for learning new and seemingly ever-changing procedures, and for adapting to turnover in management and administration. Attention to these issues also means that 40% of that workday is not available to patients. Believing that these increasing demands are affecting nurses' decisions to remain in nursing or to leave, a group of Minnesota nurses and nurse educators examined the work environments of nurses and the issues related to those environments. The result of this examination was discovery of a phenomenon affecting all nurses that may be central to the projected shortage of nurses. The phenomenon is complexity compression-what nurses experience when expected to assume additional, unplanned responsibilities while simultaneously conducting their multiple responsibilities in a condensed time frame. The phenomenon was validated by a group of 58 nurses who participated in focus groups that led to the identification of factors influencing the experience of complexity compression. These factors were clustered into six major themes: personal, environmental, practice, systems and technology, administration/management, and autonomy/control. Further validation studies are planned with the population of practicing professional nurses in the state of Minnesota.

  9. Being Human: Transdisciplinarity in Nursing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Timmons, Stephen; Edgley, Alison; Meal, Andy; Narayanasamy, Aru

    2016-01-01

    Nursing as an academic discipline typically draws on a wide range of other disciplines. There is debate about whether this is a sound basis for the discipline, or whether nursing needs to develop a distinctive body of knowledge. The concept of transdisciplinarity, though little discussed in nursing, is of considerable value in understanding…

  10. 'Nursing is a privileged role'.

    PubMed

    2016-09-28

    Since qualifying in 1990, major trauma nurse specialist Amanda Burston has spent her career working in emergency care. She is trauma co-ordinator for the emergency department at Royal Stoke University Hospital. She became Nursing Standard's Nurse of the Year 2015 for the Safer Steps programme, a service for victims of domestic violence. PMID:27682566

  11. Innovating Traditional Nursing Administration Challenges.

    PubMed

    Joseph, M Lindell; Fowler, Debra

    2016-03-01

    The evolving and complex practice environment calls for new mindsets among nurse leaders, academics, and nurse innovators to envision innovative ways to manage and optimize traditional tasks and processes in nursing administration. The purpose of this article is to present 3 case studies that used linear programming and simulation to innovate staffing enterprises, financial management of healthcare systems, and curricula development. PMID:26906516

  12. Nursing Principles & Skills. Teacher Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This curriculum guide contains 14 units for a course on nursing principles and skills needed by practical nurses. The 14 units of instruction cover the following: (1) using medical terminology; (2) practicing safety procedures; (3) using the nursing process for care planning; (4) using infection control techniques; (5) preparing a patient…

  13. Occupational stressors, burnout and coping strategies between hospital and community psychiatric nurses in a Dublin region.

    PubMed

    McTiernan, K; McDonald, N

    2015-04-01

    Burnout negatively impacts the delivery of mental health services. Psychiatric nurses face stressors that are distinct from other nursing specialities. The research was conducted in Ireland and captured a relatively large sample of respondents. The results compared the stressors, coping strategies and burnout levels between hospital and community-based psychiatric nurses. Occupational stress can negatively impact on the well-being of psychiatric nurses, which in turn can lead to poor client care. There is a dearth of published research conducted in Ireland that examines stress within the discipline. A between-groups study, undertaken in February 2011, investigated stressors, burnout and coping strategies between hospital and community-based psychiatric nurses in a Dublin region. Sixty-nine participants (8 males and 61 females), aged between 18 to 60 years voluntarily completed the Mental Health Professional Stress Scale, the Maslach Burnout Inventory and the PsychNurse Methods of Coping Scale. The findings revealed that nurses were operating in a moderately stressful environment. Stressors focused on organizational issues as opposed to client issues. The main stressors identified were lack of resources, workload and organizational structures/processes. Both groups reported average levels of emotional exhaustion, low levels of depersonalization and average levels of personal accomplishment. A Mann-Whitney U-test and Independent Samples t-test found significant differences between hospital and community-based nurses regarding depersonalization and personal accomplishment, respectively. Hospital nurses reported higher depersonalization scores, and community nurses had a greater sense of personal accomplishment. The personal accomplishment scores of hospital nurses were below mental health professional norms. No significant differences emerged regarding coping strategies. Avoidant coping strategies were favoured by both groups. It is recommended that interventions

  14. Stressors, academic performance, and learned resourcefulness in baccalaureate nursing students.

    PubMed

    Goff, Anne-Marie

    2011-01-01

    High stress levels in nursing students may affect memory, concentration, and problem-solving ability, and may lead to decreased learning, coping, academic performance, and retention. College students with higher levels of learned resourcefulness develop greater self-confidence, motivation, and academic persistence, and are less likely to become anxious, depressed, and frustrated, but no studies specifically involve nursing students. This explanatory correlational study used Gadzella's Student-life Stress Inventory (SSI) and Rosenbaum's Self Control Scale (SCS) to explore learned resourcefulness, stressors, and academic performance in 53 baccalaureate nursing students. High levels of personal and academic stressors were evident, but not significant predictors of academic performance (p = .90). Age was a significant predictor of academic performance (p = < .01) and males and African-American/Black participants had higher learned resourcefulness scores than females and Caucasians. Studies in larger, more diverse samples are necessary to validate these findings.

  15. Legal issues in neonatal nursing: considerations for staff nurses and advanced practice nurses.

    PubMed

    Enzman Hagedorn, M I; Gardner, S L

    1999-01-01

    A neonatal nurse is a professional with special training, skill, and knowledge in the care of newborns and their families. The neonatal nurse is accountable to the patient, profession, and employer. Failure of the neonatal nurse to meet these obligations can result in liability in the profession, liability in the employment, a civil suit, or a criminal conviction. Regardless of the health care setting, professional nurses, whether at the bedside or in advanced practice, are morally, ethically, and legally accountable for their nursing judgments and actions. Although most nurses assume they will never be named in a lawsuit, and it is true that few are, their professional actions can be the focus of a suit. An overview of the legal implications found within neonatal nursing practice is presented. Two recent legal cases are presented and discussed to illustrate neonatal nursing and advanced practice liability.

  16. Dementia, personhood, and nursing: learning from a nursing situation.

    PubMed

    Touhy, Theris A

    2004-01-01

    Appreciation of the personhood of people with dementia calls for care that looks beyond the disease to the person within. In this column the author discusses the concept of personhood for people with dementia and presents a method of teaching person-centered care developed within the theoretical framework of nursing as caring. The study of an aesthetic expression of a nursing situation, written by a nurse who cares for people with Alzheimer's disease in a nursing home, is presented to assist nurses to learn to see beyond the disease to the person and to develop relationships that nurture personhood. PMID:14752952

  17. Osteopenia and Male Hypogonadism

    PubMed Central

    Dupree, Kendall; Dobs, Adrian

    2004-01-01

    A 34-year-old male, with a history of chronic myelogenous lymphoma (CML) previously successfully treated 20 years earlier with chemotherapy, bone marrow transplants, and donor lymphocyte infusion therapy, presented with fatigue and low serum testosterone level. Evaluation revealed male hypogonadism from primary testicular failure due to prior CML therapy in addition to osteopenia. The patient received supplementary calcium, vitamin D, and testosterone; improvement in serum testosterone level was noted in 6 weeks, along with increased energy level and good libido and erectile function. Dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) scan showed improvement in bone status. Male hypogonadism is associated with increased risk for osteopenia and osteoporosis. Supplemental testosterone therapy, because of its direct effect and its aromatization to estrogen, can improve bone density in these patients. PMID:16985910

  18. Male contraceptives under trial.

    PubMed

    1975-02-01

    The International Planned Parenthood Federation held its 4th biological workshop in New Delhi on October 17-19, 1974. The topic of this meeting was "Agents affecting fertility in the male." 10 internationally known experts in the field of male reproductive physiology attended and each presented an up-to-the-minute account of their work in the field, followed by a full discussion. Much basic work was described, and the results of the latest human trials of male contraceptives were reported. Dr. F. Neumann of the Schering Company, Berlin, reported on clinical trials of the drug cyproterone acetate. This drug has been in the news for some time as a possible male contraceptive. It is found that small doses prevent sperm from maturing in the epididymis. This drug is already on the British market as Androcur. In large doses it is useful for curbing libido, and in this format it is used to control "sexual offenders." In the small doses at which it is useful as a contraceptive, the effects on libido are negligible, and the drug is at present undergoing human trials as a contraceptive agent. However, much work has still be done on, for example, long-term side effects. Another approach described by Dr. J. Frick from Innsbruck, Austria, is that of giving men a progestagen combined with testosterone. Whereas the progestagen has the effect of inhibiting sperm production in the testis, the testosterone compensates for androgen loss and maintains libido and male characteristics. Dr. Frick reported studies using 15 progestagen combinations, including a new drug provisionally titled R2323. The overall conclusion of the meeting was that there are still many problems to be solved, and it will be some years before a male contraceptive will be commercially available. PMID:12333962

  19. Testosterone and Male Infertility.

    PubMed

    Ohlander, Samuel J; Lindgren, Mark C; Lipshultz, Larry I

    2016-05-01

    Hypogonadism and its therapies have a significant impact on male fertility potential. It is necessary to determine the etiology to treat and counsel the patient appropriately on therapeutic options. For the hypogonadal male on exogenous testosterone, management should begin with cessation of the exogenous testosterone and supplemental subcutaneous human chorionic gonadotropin and an oral follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH)-inducing agent to allow reestablishment of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis and spermatogenesis. Further supplemental therapy with recombinant FSH in some patients may be necessary to achieve optimal semen parameters.

  20. Testosterone and Male Infertility.

    PubMed

    Ohlander, Samuel J; Lindgren, Mark C; Lipshultz, Larry I

    2016-05-01

    Hypogonadism and its therapies have a significant impact on male fertility potential. It is necessary to determine the etiology to treat and counsel the patient appropriately on therapeutic options. For the hypogonadal male on exogenous testosterone, management should begin with cessation of the exogenous testosterone and supplemental subcutaneous human chorionic gonadotropin and an oral follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH)-inducing agent to allow reestablishment of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis and spermatogenesis. Further supplemental therapy with recombinant FSH in some patients may be necessary to achieve optimal semen parameters. PMID:27132576

  1. Male hormonal contraception.

    PubMed

    Nieschlag, E

    2010-01-01

    The principle of hormonal male contraception based on suppression of gonadotropins and spermatogenesis has been established over the last three decades. All hormonal male contraceptives use testosterone, but only in East Asian men can testosterone alone suppress spermatogenesis to a level compatible with contraceptive protection. In Caucasians, additional agents are required of which progestins are favored. Current clinical trials concentrate on testosterone combined with norethisterone, desogestrel, etonogestrel, DMPA, or nestorone. The first randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial performed by the pharmaceutical industry demonstrated the effectiveness of a combination of testosterone undecanoate and etonogestrel in suppressing spermatogenesis in volunteers. PMID:20839093

  2. Genetics of Male Infertility.

    PubMed

    Neto, Filipe Tenorio Lira; Bach, Phil Vu; Najari, Bobby Baback; Li, Philip Shihua; Goldstein, Marc

    2016-10-01

    While 7 % of the men are infertile, currently, a genetic etiology is identified in less than 25 % of those men, and 30 % of the infertile men lack a definitive diagnosis, falling in the "idiopathic infertility" category. Advances in genetics and epigenetics have led to several proposed mechanisms for male infertility. These advances may result in new diagnostic tools, treatment approaches, and better counseling with regard to treatment options and prognosis. In this review, we focus on clinical aspects of male infertility and the role of genetics in elucidating etiologies and the potential of treatments. PMID:27502429

  3. Smartphones in nursing education.

    PubMed

    Phillippi, Julia C; Wyatt, Tami H

    2011-08-01

    Smartphones are a new technology similar to PDAs but with expanded functions and greater Internet access. This article explores the potential uses and issues surrounding the use of smartphones in nursing education. While the functions of smartphones, such as sending text messages, viewing videos, and access to the Internet, may seem purely recreational, they can be used within the nursing curriculum to engage students and reinforce learning at any time or location. Smartphones can be used for quick access to educational materials and guidelines during clinical, class, or clinical conference. Students can review instructional videos prior to performing skills and readily reach their clinical instructor via text message. Downloadable applications, subscriptions, and reference materials expand the smartphone functions even further. Common concerns about requiring smartphones in nursing education include cost, disease transmission, and equipment interference; however, there are many ways to overcome these barriers and provide students with constant access to current clinical evidence. PMID:21107240

  4. Nurses resisting information technology.

    PubMed

    Timmons, Stephen

    2003-12-01

    Resistance in the workplace, by nurses, has not been extensively studied from a sociological perspective. In this paper, nurses' resistance to the implementation and use of computer systems is described and analysed, on the basis of semistructured interviews with 31 nurses in three UK NHS hospitals. While the resistance was not "successful", in that it did not prevent the implementation of the systems, it nonetheless persisted. Resistance took a wide variety of forms, including attempts to minimise or "put off" use of the systems, and extensive criticism of the systems, though outright refusal to use them was very rare. Resistance was as much about the ideas and ways of working that the systems embodied as it was about the actual technology being used. The patterns of resistance can best be summed up by the phrase "resistive compliance". PMID:14622372

  5. Marketing in nursing organizations.

    PubMed

    Chambers, S B

    1989-05-01

    The purpose of chapter 3 is to provide a conceptual framework for understanding marketing. Although it is often considered to be, marketing is not really a new activity for nursing organizations. What is perhaps new to most nursing organizations is the conduct of marketing activities as a series of interrelated events that are part of a strategic marketing process. The increasingly volatile nursing environment requires a comprehensive approach to marketing. This chapter presents definitions of marketing, the marketing mix, the characteristics of nonprofit marketing, the relationship of strategic planning and strategic marketing, portfolio analysis, and a detailed description of the strategic marketing process. While this chapter focuses on marketing concepts, essential components, and presentation of the strategic marketing process, chapter 4 presents specific methods and techniques for implementing the strategic marketing process.

  6. [Attitudes of nursing staff related to the nursing process].

    PubMed

    Guedes, Erika de Souza; Turrini, Ruth Natália Teresa; de Sousa, Regina Márcia Cardoso; Baltar, Valéria Troncoso; da Cruz, Diná de Almeida Lopes Monteiro

    2012-10-01

    The aims of the study were to describe nurses' positions on nursing process and their perception of power; and to analyse associations between positions on nursing process, power perception and selected variables. One thousand six hundred and five nurses (86.9% female, mean age=44.12 years, SD=9.55) participated in the study. Mean score on the Positions on Nursing Process (PNP) tool was 112.37 (SD=22.28); and on the Power as Knowing Participation in Change Tool - Brazilian Version (PKPCT) was 281.12 (SD=38.72). Baccalaureate nurses had statistically higher scores on PNP and PKPCT than auxiliary nurses. There was positive and moderate correlation between PNP and PKPCT scores. Auxiliary nurses' scores on PNP were associated with sex and post-graduation; auxiliary nurses' scores on PKPCT were associated with sex. For baccalaureate nurses there was association between PKPCT and administrative position. More studies should be developed in order to identify variables potentially associated with the use of nursing process in clinical practice. PMID:23250269

  7. Does Faculty Incivility in Nursing Education Affect Emergency Nursing Practice?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stokes, Pamela

    Incivility in nursing education is a complicated problem which causes disruptions in the learning process and negatively affects future nursing practice. This mixed method research study described incivility as well as incivility's effects through extensive literature review and application of a modified Incivility in Nursing Education (INE) survey. The INE included six demographic items, four quantitative sections, and five open-ended questions. The survey examined emergency nurses' perceptions of incivility and how the experience affected their personal nursing practice. The INE was initially tested in a 2004 pilot study by Dr. Cynthia Clark. For this research study, modifications were made to examine specifically emergency nurse's perceptions of incivility and the effects on their practice. The population was a group of nurses who were members of the emergency nurses association in a Midwestern state. In the quantitative component of the Incivility in Nursing Education (INE) survey, the Likert scale questions indicated that the majority of the participants reported witnessing or experiencing the uncivil behaviors. In the qualitative section of the INE survey, the participants reported that although they have not seen incivility within their own academic career, they had observed faculty incivility with nursing students when the participants were assigned as preceptors as part of their emergency nursing practice.

  8. Foreign nurse importation and the supply of native nurses.

    PubMed

    Cortés, Patricia; Pan, Jessica

    2014-09-01

    The importation of foreign registered nurses has been used as a strategy to ease nursing shortages in the United States. The effectiveness of this policy depends critically on the long-run response of native nurses. We examine the effects of immigration of foreign-born registered nurses on the long-run employment and occupational choice of native nurses. Using a variety of empirical strategies that exploit the geographical distribution of immigrant nurses across US cities, we find evidence of large displacement effects - over a ten-year period, for every foreign nurse that migrates to a city, between 1 and 2 fewer native nurses are employed in the city. We find similar results using data on nursing board exam-takers at the state level - an increase in the flow of foreign nurses significantly reduces the number of natives sitting for licensure exams in more dependent states relative to less dependent states. Using data on self-reported workplace satisfaction among a sample of California nurses, we find suggestive evidence that part of the displacement effects could be driven by a decline in the perceived quality of the workplace environment.

  9. The "old internationals": Canadian nurses in an international nursing community.

    PubMed

    Lapeyre, Jaime; Nelson, Sioban

    2010-12-01

    The vast devastation caused by both the First World War and the influenza pandemic of 1918 led to an increased worldwide demand for public health nurses. In response to this demand, a number of new public health training programs for nurses were started at both national and international levels. At the international level, one of two influential programs in this area included a year-long public health nursing course offered by the League of Red Cross Societies, in conjunction with Bedford College in London, England. In total, 341 nurses from 49 different countries have been documented as participants in this initiative throughout the interwar period, including 20 Canadians. Using archival material from the Canadian Nurses Association and the Royal College of Nursing, as well as articles from the journals Canadian Nurse, American Journal of Nursing and British Journal of Nursing, this paper examines these nurses' commitment to internationalism throughout their careers and explores the effect of this commitment on the development of nursing education and professionalization at the national level.

  10. The nursing education programme in Lithuania: voices of student nurses.

    PubMed

    Kapborg, I

    2000-10-01

    The nursing education programme in Lithuania has passed through many changes. The latest change has been carried out with support from Denmark. Ten female student nurses have been interviewed with the assistance of an interpreter. The purpose of this paper is to describe how student nurses perceived their preregistration training. The most outstanding feature of the nursing education programme in Lithuania was lack of adequate textbooks and students found this disadvantage caused a heavy workload. Students were spending the whole day in school, then studying during the evening. They were constantly tired. Although students were encouraged to be independent and to think actively during lectures, in reality this was difficult because of their workload. Students as a group were satisfied with their education, but they were doubtful about how to manage work as an independent nurse. Nowadays, many nurses in Lithuania view their work professionally and have taken over responsibility for some tasks that were carried out previously by physicians. Nurses trained previously may cause problems for newly graduated nurses because these nurses still work in a traditional manner. It will be impossible to evaluate the usefulness of the new nursing education programme in Lithuania until further investigations show how students qualify and manage their work as nurses.

  11. Images of flight nursing in Australia: A study using institutional ethnography.

    PubMed

    Brideson, Genevieve; Willis, Eileen; Mayner, Lidia; Chamberlain, Diane J

    2016-03-01

    Pictures speak a thousand words. The traditional romantic image of an Australian aeromedical service is a male doctor and male pilot, out to rescue the male stockman from the red dust of the Australian outback. However, the reality is considerably different, particularly in the current context of the Australian healthcare system. This paper examines the images of flight nursing using a critical lens. The images are derived from popular literature sources from the early 1940s through to the present. A textual analysis of the images of flight nursing using the methodology of institutional ethnography reveals a number of themes including the glamorous, the romantic, and the heroic nurse. This study illustrates that the way these nurses are portrayed within popular literature mirrors the Australian cultural ethic of heroic bush pioneer, yet at the same time the work these nurses do is undervalued by various omissions and misrepresentations. The results from this study have the potential to significantly improve recognition of the work performed by flight nurses and to challenge incorrect cultural myths.

  12. The culture of war: a study of women military nurses in Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Scannell-Desch, E

    2000-04-01

    Many books and studies have described the male Vietnam War culture, whereas similar literature about women is almost nonexistent. This study describes the culture of war nursing as experienced by 24 U.S. women military nurses. Data were generated using a core question and in-depth interviews. Phenomenology served as the research method, incorporating data analysis procedures of Colaizzi and Lincoln and Guba. Nine theme categories were identified to describe the culture of war nursing. Core values of the military culture were threaded throughout descriptions, and activities to make their environment more homelike embodied the positive values of their culture.

  13. New Zealand military nurses fight for recognition: World War One-World War Two.

    PubMed

    Clendon, J

    1997-03-01

    This article examines the battle undertaken by New Zealand's military nurses to gain recognition as officers. The fight to win this battle took from just prior to World War One to mid-way through World War Two-twenty seven years. Issues such as male domination of the military and the government, the generally accepted work of women in war and the lack of knowledge concerning nursing's professionalism combined to create a situation whereby practical recognition of the nurses did not take place until visual alterations were made to uniforms in 1941.

  14. The aging nursing workforce: How to retain experienced nurses.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Jeremye D

    2006-01-01

    In the face of an anticipated nursing shortage, healthcare organizations must evaluate their culture, operations, and compensation system to ensure that these elements align with organizational efforts to retain nurses who are approaching retirement age. Management should focus on enhancing elements of job satisfaction and job embeddedness that will motivate nurses to remain both in the workforce and with their employer. Although much of this responsibility falls on the nurse manager, nurse managers are often not provided the necessary support by top management and are neither recognized nor held accountable for nurse turnover. Other retention initiatives can include altering working conditions to reduce both physical and mental stress and addressing issues of employee health and safety. As for compensation, organizations may be well-served by offering senior nursing staff flexible working hours, salary structures that reward experience, and benefit programs that hold value for an aging workforce. PMID:16916117

  15. The aging nursing workforce: How to retain experienced nurses.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Jeremye D

    2006-01-01

    In the face of an anticipated nursing shortage, healthcare organizations must evaluate their culture, operations, and compensation system to ensure that these elements align with organizational efforts to retain nurses who are approaching retirement age. Management should focus on enhancing elements of job satisfaction and job embeddedness that will motivate nurses to remain both in the workforce and with their employer. Although much of this responsibility falls on the nurse manager, nurse managers are often not provided the necessary support by top management and are neither recognized nor held accountable for nurse turnover. Other retention initiatives can include altering working conditions to reduce both physical and mental stress and addressing issues of employee health and safety. As for compensation, organizations may be well-served by offering senior nursing staff flexible working hours, salary structures that reward experience, and benefit programs that hold value for an aging workforce.

  16. Nursing assistant turnover in nursing homes and need satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Caudill, M; Patrick, M

    1989-06-01

    1. Level of Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs is basic physiological needs measured by salary, adequate housing, and food. Attainment of these needs increased the length of stay of nursing assistants in nursing homes. 2. Safety and security (level 2) influenced length of stay of nursing assistants. Those with benefits of retirement, vacation, and holiday pay tended to have less turnover. 3. Praise by the patient and family was most important to nursing assistants. Belonging to a peer group and praise by charge nurse also decreased turnover of nursing assistants (level 3). 4. Level 4, self-esteem measured by input into decisions and being able to criticize, increased length of stay of nursing assistants.

  17. [Nurses' knowledge about Nursing Care Systematization: from theory to practice].

    PubMed

    Silva, Elisama Gomes Correia; de Oliveira, Viviane Carla; Neves, Giselda Bezerra Correia; Guimarães, Tânia Maria Rocha

    2011-12-01

    The objective of this study is to analyze the knowledge that nurses from a large hospital in Recife, Pernambuco, have about Nursing Care Systematization (NCS). This is a descriptive, exploratory, quantitative study. The study population consisted of 107 clinical nurses, with a sample of 73 (68%). Data collection was performed in June 2008, using a semi-structured questionnaire that was filled out by the subjects. We found that 50 (69%) nurses had no knowledge about NCS, especially about nursing diagnoses. We identified the absence of forms in most hospitalization units. The nurses gave several justifications for their not working with NCS, including work overload and the scarcity of forms. We concluded that there is a need for more incentives by the institution and through policies, so as to permit nurses a greater autonomy in their practice.

  18. Nursing: the hospital's competitive edge.

    PubMed

    Shaffer, F A; Preziosi, P

    1988-09-01

    The health care marketplace is becoming increasingly competitive. The hospital has a built-in marketing force with the nursing department, because nurses are in constant, direct contact with the customer. Nursing must identify the case mix profile of the community and focus the hospital product lines to meet community needs. The nursing department should decentralize, change, measure, and innovate the staff mix needed to operationalize these product lines. The development of nursing practice standards for the case mix will help to identify the staff mix needed and create systems to efficiently manage the product lines. Nursing management must become aware of cross-subsidization and downward skill substitution of nursing personnel. Nursing information systems must generate quality reports that invoke cost consciousness on the part of nursing staff. Quality assurance programs must become unit based and complete with frequent audits to correlate length of stay with nursing quality. Correlations must be determined between nursing productivity and case mix to determine the hospital's niche in the marketplace. The transformation of health care into a competitive business industry has created many opportunities for nursing. The health care industry's incentives for efficiency along with the decreasing demand for inpatient hospital services will be the forces driving health care toward a competitive marketplace. The hospital's nursing department should be strategically positioned to become accountable for increasing market share and enhancing quality patient outcomes. The focus has shifted from the theoretical to the tactical, which is a step in the right direction, particularly for nursing. Nursing, if strategically positioned, will not only thrive but will also excel in this chaotic environment by capturing the opportunities and being innovative.

  19. Nursing: the hospital's competitive edge.

    PubMed

    Shaffer, F A; Preziosi, P

    1988-09-01

    The health care marketplace is becoming increasingly competitive. The hospital has a built-in marketing force with the nursing department, because nurses are in constant, direct contact with the customer. Nursing must identify the case mix profile of the community and focus the hospital product lines to meet community needs. The nursing department should decentralize, change, measure, and innovate the staff mix needed to operationalize these product lines. The development of nursing practice standards for the case mix will help to identify the staff mix needed and create systems to efficiently manage the product lines. Nursing management must become aware of cross-subsidization and downward skill substitution of nursing personnel. Nursing information systems must generate quality reports that invoke cost consciousness on the part of nursing staff. Quality assurance programs must become unit based and complete with frequent audits to correlate length of stay with nursing quality. Correlations must be determined between nursing productivity and case mix to determine the hospital's niche in the marketplace. The transformation of health care into a competitive business industry has created many opportunities for nursing. The health care industry's incentives for efficiency along with the decreasing demand for inpatient hospital services will be the forces driving health care toward a competitive marketplace. The hospital's nursing department should be strategically positioned to become accountable for increasing market share and enhancing quality patient outcomes. The focus has shifted from the theoretical to the tactical, which is a step in the right direction, particularly for nursing. Nursing, if strategically positioned, will not only thrive but will also excel in this chaotic environment by capturing the opportunities and being innovative. PMID:3047695

  20. Investigation of risk factors of psychological acceptance and burnout syndrome among nurses in China.

    PubMed

    Yao, Yongcheng; Yao, Wu; Wang, Wei; Li, Hong; Lan, Yajia

    2013-10-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine reliability of Chinese version of Acceptance and Action Questionnaire-II (AAQ-II), the relationship between psychological acceptance (PA), and burnout syndrome and their risk factors among nurses in China. The reliability of AAQ-II in Chinese was evaluated first by testing on 111 doctors and 108 nurses in China. On the number of 845 nurses selected from nine city hospitals by using stratified cluster sampling method, the Maslach Burnout Inventory-General Survey was administered to establish the presence of burnout, and the AAQ-II was used to measure their PA. Results showed that the AAQ-II in Chinese had a good test-retest reliability. PA was statistically significantly negatively correlated to the three dimensionalities of burnout among nurses in China. Male and female nurses had a significant difference in PA. Risk factors for burnout were age (25-44 years), marital status (married), gender (male), hospital department (emergency) and position (primary title) as well as PA. The findings provide insights into the risk factors of burnout in Chinese nurses and may have clinical implications in preventing burnout in Chinese nurses.

  1. Evaluation of the psychoeducation given to the elderly at nursing homes for a healthy lifestyle and developing life satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Tambağ, Hatice; Öz, Fatma

    2013-12-01

    The research was carried out as a pre-test, post-test patterned intervention with one group in order to evaluate the psychoeducation given to older people at nursing homes for a healthy lifestyle and developing life satisfaction. The research was done with 21 female and 21 male older people staying at the state-owned Seyran Bağlari Nursing Home/Elderly Caring Rehabilitation Center and the Ümitköy Nursing Home. In the psychoeducation program, each session was conducted for a duration of 60-90 min in the nursing homes' education classrooms. After the psychoeducation program, the life satisfaction index, the health promotion lifestyle profile total, and the subscale (nutrition, health responsibility, self realization, stress management, interpersonal support, and exercise) mean scores, significantly increased statistically. It is suggested that the nursing homes' health workers, and especially nurses who work full-time, should promote such psychoeducation. PMID:23400690

  2. Comparing Perceptions of the Nursing Profession among Associate and Baccalaureate Nursing Students and Registered Nurses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lovan, Sherry R.

    2009-01-01

    The inconsistencies between the perception of the profession of nursing and the reality of practice can lead to problems in student attrition or result in disillusionment with a career in nursing after a new graduate enters practice. With the nursing shortage reaching critical levels, it is important to examine possible discrepancies that exist…

  3. 'Difference' and nursing research.

    PubMed

    Horsfall, J

    1997-03-01

    In recent decades groups of non-mainstream people have named their/our strengths and used the concept of 'difference' to support this position. The pitfalls of radical individualism and of group essentialism which are likely to ensue from this focus on difference are problematic in nursing research. This paper argues that class, ethnicity and gender structure societies in which research takes place; and that common understandings of difference may unwittingly perpetuate and obscure power inequalities. Nursing researchers need to be conscious of these inequalities and ensure that research is oriented towards constructive change for the benefit of health service consumers.

  4. Nursing students' attitudes toward science in the nursing curricula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maroo, Jill Deanne

    The nursing profession combines the art of caregiving with scientific concepts. Nursing students need to learn science in order to start in a nursing program. However, previous research showed that students left the nursing program, stating it included too much science (Andrew et al., 2008). Research has shown a correlation between students' attitudes and their performance in a subject (Osborne, Simon, & Collins, 2003). However, little research exists on the overall attitude of nursing students toward science. At the time of my study there existed no large scale quantitative study on my topic. The purpose of my study was to identify potential obstacles nursing students face, specifically, attitude and motivation toward learning science. According to research the nation will soon face a nursing shortage and students cite the science content as a reason for not completing the nursing program. My study explored nursing students' attitudes toward science and reasons these students are motivated to learn science. I ran a nationwide mixed methods approach with 1,402 participants for the quantitative portion and 4 participants for the qualitative portion. I validated a questionnaire in order to explore nursing students' attitudes toward science, discovered five different attitude scales in that questionnaire and determined what demographic factors provided a statistically significant prediction of a student's score. In addition, I discovered no statistical difference in attitude exists between students who have the option of taking nursing specific courses and those who do not have that option. I discovered in the qualitative interviews that students feel science is necessary in nursing but do not feel nurses are scientists. My study gives a baseline of the current attitude of nursing students toward science and why these students feel the need to learn the science.

  5. Writing approaches of nursing students.

    PubMed

    Lavelle, Ellen; Ball, Susan C; Maliszewski, Genevieve

    2013-01-01

    Over the past 20years, research has focused on the writing processes of college students, however, despite recent support for writing as a tool of reflection in nursing education, little is known about how it is that nursing students go about writing papers and assignments as part of their professional education. In order to determine the writing processes of nursing students, the Inventory of Processes in College Composition, a self-response questionnaire, was administered to 169 nursing students. Results support the independence of the writing approaches that nursing students use and similarity to the writing approaches of a general college student population.

  6. Perioperative Nurse Leaders and Professionalism.

    PubMed

    Whiteside, Dawn

    2016-08-01

    Professionalism in nursing leadership encompasses key elements that include a common body of knowledge, autonomous practice, self-regulation through education and licensure, a set code of ethics, and a commitment to altruism. Perioperative nurse leaders also must embrace collaboration, vision, accountability, and patient and staff member advocacy based on established ethics, values, and standards of care. Nurse leaders who are committed to professional development through pursuit of higher degrees, application of evidence-based practice, collaboration with colleagues, and certification show a strong commitment to their profession and serve as role models for staff members. This article discusses professionalism in nursing and offers information specific to perioperative nurse leaders. PMID:27472973

  7. Reflections on strategic nurse leadership.

    PubMed

    White, Jean

    2012-10-01

    This paper sets out some personal reflections by the Chief Nursing Officer for Wales on the challenges facing nurses and midwives as they undertake strategic leadership roles in NHS organisations. The paper looks at the national approach taken in Wales where behavioural competencies for executive nurse directors have been implemented. It considers the implications of the breadth of responsibilities executive nurse directors have and the importance of developing and supporting middle grade nurse managers and clinical directors. It concludes by looking at who is responsible for care within an organisation.

  8. The task of nursing ethics.

    PubMed Central

    Melia, K M

    1994-01-01

    This paper raises the questions: 'What do we expect from nursing ethics?' and 'Is the literature of nursing ethics any different from that of medical ethics?' It is suggested that rather than develop nursing ethics as a separate field writers in nursing ethics should take a lead in making the patient the central focus of health care ethics. The case is made for empirical work in health care ethics and it is suggested that a good way of setting about this is to ask practising nurses about the real ethical problems they encounter. PMID:8035446

  9. Increased dopamine level enhances male-male courtship in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tong; Dartevelle, Laurence; Yuan, Chunyan; Wei, Hongping; Wang, Ying; Ferveur, Jean-François; Guo, Aike

    2008-05-21

    Sexual behavior between males is observed in many species, but the biological factors involved are poorly known. In mammals, manipulation of dopamine has revealed the role of this neuromodulator on male sexual behavior. We used genetic and pharmacological approaches to manipulate the dopamine level in dopaminergic cells in Drosophila and investigated the consequence of this manipulation on male-male courtship behavior. Males with increased dopamine level showed enhanced propensity to court other males but did not change their courtship toward virgin females, general olfactory response, general gustatory response, or locomotor activity. Our results indicate that the high intensity of male-male interaction shown by these manipulated males was related to their altered sensory perception of other males.

  10. Increased dopamine level enhances male-male courtship in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tong; Dartevelle, Laurence; Yuan, Chunyan; Wei, Hongping; Wang, Ying; Ferveur, Jean-François; Guo, Aike

    2008-05-21

    Sexual behavior between males is observed in many species, but the biological factors involved are poorly known. In mammals, manipulation of dopamine has revealed the role of this neuromodulator on male sexual behavior. We used genetic and pharmacological approaches to manipulate the dopamine level in dopaminergic cells in Drosophila and investigated the consequence of this manipulation on male-male courtship behavior. Males with increased dopamine level showed enhanced propensity to court other males but did not change their courtship toward virgin females, general olfactory response, general gustatory response, or locomotor activity. Our results indicate that the high intensity of male-male interaction shown by these manipulated males was related to their altered sensory perception of other males. PMID:18495888

  11. Male infertility: biomolecular aspects.

    PubMed

    Pizzol, Damiano; Bertoldo, Alessandro; Foresta, Carlo

    2014-12-01

    Male infertility is a problem that faces increasing interest, and the continuous development of assisted reproduction techniques solicits attempts to identify a precise diagnosis, in particular for idiopathic infertile couples and those undergoing assisted reproductive technique cycles. To date, diagnosis of male infertility is commonly based on standard semen analysis, but in many cases, this is not enough to detect any sperm abnormality. A better understanding of biomolecular issues and mechanism of damaged spermatogenesis and the refinement of the molecular techniques for sperm evaluation and selection are important advances that can lead to the optimization of diagnostic and therapeutic management of male and couple infertility. Faced with a growing number of new proposed techniques and diagnostic tests, it is fundamental to know which tests are already routinely used in the clinical practice and those that are likely to be used in the near future. This review focuses on the main molecular diagnostic techniques for male infertility and on newly developed methods that will probably be part of routine sperm analysis in the near future.

  12. Lycopene and male infertility.

    PubMed

    Durairajanayagam, Damayanthi; Agarwal, Ashok; Ong, Chloe; Prashast, Pallavi

    2014-01-01

    Excessive amounts of reactive oxygen species (ROS) cause a state of oxidative stress, which result in sperm membrane lipid peroxidation, DNA damage and apoptosis, leading to decreased sperm viability and motility. Elevated levels of ROS are a major cause of idiopathic male factor infertility, which is an increasingly common problem today. Lycopene, the most potent singlet oxygen quencher of all carotenoids, is a possible treatment option for male infertility because of its antioxidant properties. By reacting with and neutralizing free radicals, lycopene could reduce the incidence of oxidative stress and thus, lessen the damage that would otherwise be inflicted on spermatozoa. It is postulated that lycopene may have other beneficial effects via nonoxidative mechanisms in the testis, such as gap junction communication, modulation of gene expression, regulation of the cell cycle and immunoenhancement. Various lycopene supplementation studies conducted on both humans and animals have shown promising results in alleviating male infertility-lipid peroxidation and DNA damage were decreased, while sperm count and viability, and general immunity were increased. Improvement of these parameters indicates a reduction in oxidative stress, and thus the spermatozoa is less vulnerable to oxidative damage, which increases the chances of a normal sperm fertilizing the egg. Human trials have reported improvement in sperm parameters and pregnancy rates with supplementation of 4-8 mg of lycopene daily for 3-12 months. However, further detailed and extensive research is still required to determine the dosage and the usefulness of lycopene as a treatment for male infertility.

  13. Black Males Left Behind

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mincy, Ronald B., Ed.

    2006-01-01

    Despite the overall economic gains in the 1990s, many young black men continue to have the poorest life chances of anyone in our society. Joblessness and low earnings among these less-educated young adults are contributing to reductions in marriage, increases in nonmarital childbearing, and a host of other social problems. In "Black Males Left…

  14. Understanding African American Males

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Edward Earl

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the socialization skills, self-esteem, and academic readiness of African American males in a school environment. Discussions with students and the School Perceptions Questionnaire provided data for this investigation. The intended targets for this investigation were African American students; however, there…

  15. Male mating biology

    PubMed Central

    Howell, Paul I; Knols, Bart GJ

    2009-01-01

    Before sterile mass-reared mosquitoes are released in an attempt to control local populations, many facets of male mating biology need to be elucidated. Large knowledge gaps exist in how both sexes meet in space and time, the correlation of male size and mating success and in which arenas matings are successful. Previous failures in mosquito sterile insect technique (SIT) projects have been linked to poor knowledge of local mating behaviours or the selection of deleterious phenotypes during colonisation and long-term mass rearing. Careful selection of mating characteristics must be combined with intensive field trials to ensure phenotypic characters are not antagonistic to longevity, dispersal, or mating behaviours in released males. Success has been achieved, even when colonised vectors were less competitive, due in part to extensive field trials to ensure mating compatibility and effective dispersal. The study of male mating biology in other dipterans has improved the success of operational SIT programmes. Contributing factors include inter-sexual selection, pheromone based attraction, the ability to detect alterations in local mating behaviours, and the effects of long-term colonisation on mating competitiveness. Although great strides have been made in other SIT programmes, this knowledge may not be germane to anophelines, and this has led to a recent increase in research in this area. PMID:19917078

  16. Empowering Young Black Males

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kafele, Baruti K.

    2012-01-01

    Of all the challenges we face in education today, the author can think of none greater than the challenge of motivating, educating, and empowering black male learners. The fact that this group of students is in crisis is evident on multiple levels, starting with graduation rates. According to the Schott Foundation (2008), the U.S. high school…

  17. Educating African American Males

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Edward E.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Schools across America spend money, invest in programs, and sponsor workshops, offer teacher incentives, raise accountability standards, and even evoke the name of Obama in efforts to raise the academic achievement of African American males. Incarceration and college retention rates point to a dismal plight for many African American…

  18. 42 CFR 405.520 - Payment for a physician assistant's, nurse practitioner's, and clinical nurse specialists...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... practitioner's, and clinical nurse specialists' services and services furnished incident to their professional... for Determining Reasonable Charges § 405.520 Payment for a physician assistant's, nurse practitioner's... services. (a) General rule. A physician assistant's, nurse practitioner's, and clinical nurse...

  19. 42 CFR 405.2415 - Services and supplies incident to nurse practitioner, physician assistant, certified nurse...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... practitioner, physician assistant, certified nurse midwife, clinical psychologist, or clinical social worker... nurse practitioner, physician assistant, certified nurse midwife, clinical psychologist, or clinical social worker services. (a) Services and supplies incident to a nurse practitioner, physician...

  20. 42 CFR 405.520 - Payment for a physician assistant's, nurse practitioner's, and clinical nurse specialists...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... practitioner's, and clinical nurse specialists' services and services furnished incident to their professional... for Determining Reasonable Charges § 405.520 Payment for a physician assistant's, nurse practitioner's... services. (a) General rule. A physician assistant's, nurse practitioner's, and clinical nurse...

  1. 42 CFR 405.520 - Payment for a physician assistant's, nurse practitioner's, and clinical nurse specialists...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... practitioner's, and clinical nurse specialists' services and services furnished incident to their professional... for Determining Reasonable Charges § 405.520 Payment for a physician assistant's, nurse practitioner's... services. (a) General rule. A physician assistant's, nurse practitioner's, and clinical nurse...

  2. 42 CFR 405.520 - Payment for a physician assistant's, nurse practitioner's, and clinical nurse specialists...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... practitioner's, and clinical nurse specialists' services and services furnished incident to their professional... for Determining Reasonable Charges § 405.520 Payment for a physician assistant's, nurse practitioner's... services. (a) General rule. A physician assistant's, nurse practitioner's, and clinical nurse...

  3. 42 CFR 405.520 - Payment for a physician assistant's, nurse practitioner's, and clinical nurse specialists...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... practitioner's, and clinical nurse specialists' services and services furnished incident to their professional... for Determining Reasonable Charges § 405.520 Payment for a physician assistant's, nurse practitioner's... services. (a) General rule. A physician assistant's, nurse practitioner's, and clinical nurse...

  4. Ethical concerns in nurse migration.

    PubMed

    McElmurry, Beverly J; Solheim, Karen; Kishi, Rieko; Coffia, Marcia A; Woith, Wendy; Janepanish, Poolsuk

    2006-01-01

    International nurse migration is natural and to be expected. Recently, however, those who have fostered nurse migration believe that it will solve nursing shortages in developed countries and offer nurse migrants better working conditions and an improved quality of life. Whether natural or manipulated, migration flow patterns largely occur from developing to developed countries. In this article, nurse migration is examined using primary health care (PHC) as an ethical framework. The unmanaged flow of nurse migrants from developing to developed countries is inconsistent with "health for all" principles. Removing key health personnel from countries experiencing resource shortages is contrary to PHC equity. Often, nurse migrants are placed in vulnerable, inequitable work roles, and employing nurse migrants fails to address basic causes of nurse shortages in developed countries, such as dissatisfaction with work conditions and decreased funding for academic settings. Nurse migration policies and procedures can be developed to satisfy PHC ethics criteria if they (1) leave developing countries enhanced rather than depleted, (2) contribute to country health outcomes consistent with essential care for all people, (3) are based on community participation, (4) address common nursing labor issues, and (5) involve equitable and clear financial arrangements. PMID:16873045

  5. [The nurse and patient's nudity].

    PubMed

    dos Santos, Regina Maria; Viana, Ivea Rayane M N; da Silva, Josefa Rita; Trezza, Maria Cristina Soares Figueiredo; Leite, Joséte Luzia

    2010-01-01

    This is a qualitative study about the relationship among nurses of a university hospital and their patients when they need to undress those patients to take care. The purpose was to analyze speech of seven nurses in this situation. The information was taken by transcribing the semi-structured interviews which were analyzed according Michel Foucault's thought. The results demonstrated that the relationship among nurses and patients at the time when nudity is needed to perform nursing care is full of power, to which the nurses don't feel always prepared. Also the nurses don't think that, acting as they act, they exert power over the patients. It is suggested to Nursing schools to perform seminars about the care with the naked body. PMID:21308217

  6. Operating theatre nurses: emotional labour and the hostess role.

    PubMed

    Timmons, Stephen; Tanner, Judith

    2005-04-01

    Emotional labour has been established as a significant factor in nursing work, although no studies have been done looking at emotional labour specifically in an operating theatre nursing context. Theatre staff (17 nurses and three Operating Department Practitioners (technicians) were observed in practice over a period of nine months by one of the authors. Each of the staff was subsequently interviewed. The transcriptions of the observation fieldwork notes and the semistructured interviews were analysed for themes and content. The (predominantly female) nurses perceived that one of their responsibilities was 'looking after the surgeons'. We have described this as the 'hostess' role. This role consisted of two major areas of activity: 'keeping the surgeons happy' and 'not upsetting the surgeons'. Examples are given of how this was accomplished through talk and actions. The (predominantly male) operating department practitioners did not see this as part of their work. This 'hostess' role is a kind of emotional labour, but performed with coworkers rather than patients. Like other forms of emotional labour, it is strongly gendered. The emotional labour performed by the theatre nurses was necessary to maintain what has been called elsewhere the 'sentimental order'. PMID:15752323

  7. [Who is afraid of a well prepared nurse? Nursing education: leadership by nurses is urgently needed].

    PubMed

    Sansoni, J; Luccone, M T

    1998-01-01

    We discuss some problems related to the nursing education and the lack of unitary nursing leadership. The cultural development of the profession is slow and not enough supported. The profession must learn to invest in Nursing education for a real empowerment. We underline some aspects that we think to be important for the future: the revision of the basic nursing curriculum, the teaching position at University, the utility of a post basic nursing degree. In conclusion, some urgent aims for the near future in order to advance the profession, are reported.

  8. Statement on nursing: a personal perspective.

    PubMed

    McCutcheon, Tonna

    2004-01-01

    Contemporary nursing is based on a conglomerate of theoretical nursing models. These models each incorporate four central concepts: person, health, environment, and nursing. By defining these concepts, nurses develop an individual framework from which they base their nursing practice. As an aspiring nurse practitioner in the gastroenterology field, I have retrospectively assessed my personal definitions of person, health, environment, and nursing. From these definitions, I am able to incorporate specific theoretical frameworks into my personal belief system, thus formulating a basis for my nursing practice. This foundation is comprised of the influence of nursing theorists Jean Watson, Sister Callista Roy, Kolcaba, Florence Nightingale, and Ida J. Orlando; the Perioperative Patient-Focused Model; Watson's Theory of Human Caring; theories regarding transpersonal human caring and healing; and feminist theories. Therefore, this article describes self-examination of nursing care by defining central nursing concepts, acknowledging the influence of nursing theorists and theories, and developing a personal framework from which I base my nursing practice.

  9. The Value of Trust to Nursing.

    PubMed

    Rutherford, Marcella M

    2014-01-01

    Trust, one of nursing's intangible assets, impacts nurses' ability to form meaningful relationships with patients and this connection positively impacts health outcomes. Linking trust to the fabric of nursing and investing in its measurement will become essential to nursing's valuation and the resulting investment in nursing. Trust, as nursing's core value, should be fostered by nurse educators as they prepare the next generation of nurses. Nurse administrators should connect the trust a patient has for his or her nurse and patient cooperation and honest transparent communication between providers and the patient. Banking trust as a valuable nursing asset will substantiate nursing's marketing and support its worth. Nursing's trustworthiness is an intangible asset that warrants protection, as trust once lost is hard to recapture.

  10. The Value of Trust to Nursing.

    PubMed

    Rutherford, Marcella M

    2014-01-01

    Trust, one of nursing's intangible assets, impacts nurses' ability to form meaningful relationships with patients and this connection positively impacts health outcomes. Linking trust to the fabric of nursing and investing in its measurement will become essential to nursing's valuation and the resulting investment in nursing. Trust, as nursing's core value, should be fostered by nurse educators as they prepare the next generation of nurses. Nurse administrators should connect the trust a patient has for his or her nurse and patient cooperation and honest transparent communication between providers and the patient. Banking trust as a valuable nursing asset will substantiate nursing's marketing and support its worth. Nursing's trustworthiness is an intangible asset that warrants protection, as trust once lost is hard to recapture. PMID:26267958

  11. Nursing science: more promise than threat.

    PubMed

    Jennings, B M

    1986-09-01

    This paper considers the issue of nursing science. Nursing, as an art, has long been accepted as integral to nursing. Nursing, as a science, however, is a more recent concept. Nursing science is viewed as a threat to the profession by its opponents, while the proponents of nursing science see it as a promise for advancement of the discipline. This paper examines the issue of nursing science by looking at its history and development, the definition of science, and five factors critical to the nursing science issue. The author concludes that nursing science is, in varying respects, both a threat and a promise. It is clear that the preponderance of evidence favours the promise nursing science holds for the profession of nursing. It is not a matter of choosing either art or science, but rather skillfully blending both for the betterment of nursing. Both art and science are necessary in nursing--neither, however, is sufficient.

  12. Social epistemology, gender and nursing theory.

    PubMed

    Cash, K

    1997-04-01

    A major claim for nursing theory is that it contributes to the generation of a body of nursing knowledge that will be important in the definition of nursing's boundaries. It is argued here that the epistemic authority of nursing knowledge is determined by factors such as the gender structure of nursing. This means the knowledge products of nursing will be given low epistemic status by both nurses and non-nurses. The implications of this argument, in terms of professionalisation and the project to develop nursing theory, are examined.

  13. Understanding Race and Racism in Nursing: Insights from Aboriginal Nurses

    PubMed Central

    Vukic, Adele; Jesty, Charlotte; Mathews, Sr. Veronica; Etowa, Josephine

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. Indigenous Peoples are underrepresented in the health professions. This paper examines indigenous identity and the quality and nature of nursing work-life. The knowledge generated should enhance strategies to increase representation of indigenous peoples in nursing to reduce health inequities. Design. Community-based participatory research employing Grounded Theory as the method was the design for this study. Theoretical sampling and constant comparison guided the data collection and analysis, and a number of validation strategies including member checks were employed to ensure rigor of the research process. Sample. Twenty-two Aboriginal nurses in Atlantic Canada. Findings. Six major themes emerged from the study: Cultural Context of Work-life, Becoming a Nurse, Navigating Nursing, Race Racism and Nursing, Socio-Political Context of Aboriginal Nursing, and Way Forward. Race and racism in nursing and related subthemes are the focus of this paper. Implications. The experiences of Aboriginal nurses as described in this paper illuminate the need to understand the interplay of race and racism in the health care system. Our paper concludes with Aboriginal nurses' suggestions for systemic change at various levels. PMID:22778991

  14. Understanding race and racism in nursing: insights from aboriginal nurses.

    PubMed

    Vukic, Adele; Jesty, Charlotte; Mathews, Sr Veronica; Etowa, Josephine

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. Indigenous Peoples are underrepresented in the health professions. This paper examines indigenous identity and the quality and nature of nursing work-life. The knowledge generated should enhance strategies to increase representation of indigenous peoples in nursing to reduce health inequities. Design. Community-based participatory research employing Grounded Theory as the method was the design for this study. Theoretical sampling and constant comparison guided the data collection and analysis, and a number of validation strategies including member checks were employed to ensure rigor of the research process. Sample. Twenty-two Aboriginal nurses in Atlantic Canada. Findings. Six major themes emerged from the study: Cultural Context of Work-life, Becoming a Nurse, Navigating Nursing, Race Racism and Nursing, Socio-Political Context of Aboriginal Nursing, and Way Forward. Race and racism in nursing and related subthemes are the focus of this paper. Implications. The experiences of Aboriginal nurses as described in this paper illuminate the need to understand the interplay of race and racism in the health care system. Our paper concludes with Aboriginal nurses' suggestions for systemic change at various levels.

  15. Innovation in transformative nursing leadership: nursing informatics competencies and roles.

    PubMed

    Remus, Sally; Kennedy, Margaret Ann

    2012-12-01

    In a recent brief to the Canadian Nurses Association's National Expert Commission on the Health of Our Nation, the Academy of Canadian Executive Nurses (ACEN) discussed leadership needs in the Canadian healthcare system, and promoted the pivotal role of nursing executives in transforming Canada's healthcare system into an integrated patient-centric system. Included among several recommendations was the need to develop innovative leadership competencies that enable nurse leaders to lead and advance transformative health system change. This paper focuses on an emerging "avant-garde executive leadership competency" recommended for today's health leaders to guide health system transformation. Specifically, this competency is articulated as "state of the art communication and technology savvy," and it implies linkages between nursing informatics competencies and transformational leadership roles for nurse executive. The authors of this paper propose that distinct nursing informatics competencies are required to augment traditional executive skills to support transformational outcomes of safe, integrated, high-quality care delivery through knowledge-driven care. International trends involving nursing informatics competencies and the evolution of new corporate informatics roles, such as chief nursing informatics officers (CNIOs), are demonstrating value and advanced transformational leadership as nursing executive roles that are informed by clinical data.

  16. [Constipation in the hospital. Ethical reflection on its care by the nursing staff].

    PubMed

    Berger, Valérie; Durand, Luc; Grocq, Martine

    2010-12-01

    The intestinal elimination of the hospitalized patients is a function insufficiently taken into account by the nursing staff from a preventive point of view. Nevertheless, numerous patients present transit disorders which are mostly translated into a diagnosis of constipation requiring therapeutic prescriptions and sometimes even aggressive and expensive medical examinations. The objective of this work is to lead an ethical reflection on the care of intestinal elimination by the nursing staff. Through a questionnaire, we wish to answer 3 questions: how come the nursing staff have difficulties taking care of the intestinal elimination of the hospitalized patients? What are the determiners which influence the care of the intestinal elimination by the nursing staff? Does training prepare the nursing staff to take care of the intestinal elimination of the hospitalized patients? The questionnaire was distributed to doctors, male and female nurses, nursing auxiliaries and students in care of the sick working in medicine, surgery and intensive care of the same hospital. This survey allowed to question 130 persons among whom 36 doctors, 37 male and female nurses, 30 nursing auxiliaries and 27 students. We were able to confirm that the care of the intestinal elimination is insufficiently taken into account in a preventive way, because 56 % of the people interviewed explain that the problem of intestinal elimination is not approached before the complaint of the patient Several determiners make that the nursing staff are not in a preventive approach. This care does not meet much interest, is experienced as devaluing, taboo and the relation nursing staff-patient is hindered because everyone has difficulties to speak about it. Institutional difficulties are also discussed, such as the lack of coordination of the nursing staff and the lack of time. Another point of this survey shows that work experience is not an element which facilitates this care because the more the nursing

  17. Attitudes of Professional and Community Groups toward Male and Female Suicide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeRose, Nancy; Page, Stewart

    In order to explore attitudes toward female and male suicidal behaviors, psychologists (N=38), social workers (N=45), registered nurses (N=44), and lay persons (N=41) were asked to complete the Suicide Opinion Questionnaire (Domino et al., 1982). Half of the questionnaires for each group referred to a female target person and half referred to a…

  18. School Nurse Matters.

    PubMed

    Hopkins, Craig

    2015-06-10

    Devised by the Bexley and Greenwich school nursing team in London, this app is aimed at secondary school pupils. Easy to download and simple to navigate, with appealing colours and graphics, themes can be changed via the settings button. PMID:26058641

  19. Multicultural Nursing Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sommer, Sheryl

    2001-01-01

    Multicultural nursing education should go beyond teaching respect for values and beliefs to integrate multiculturalism throughout the educational environment. Raising awareness, developing critical thinking, supporting diverse ways of learning, and using conflict creatively are some strategies that can be applied. (SK)

  20. Academic Inbreeding in Nursing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Michael H.

    1977-01-01

    Academic inbreeding, the employment for faculty positions of persons who receive their graduate training at the same academic institution, is considered detrimental to an institution's academic environment. Results of a study conducted at 54 universities revealed that almost half the faculty (48 percent) in collegiate nursing programs are drawn…

  1. Find a Nurse Practitioner

    MedlinePlus

    Find a Nurse Practitioner AANP Home MyAANP Contact Us Find an NP near me or near Search Reset I accept AANP's Terms of Use Overall Focus All Primary ... practice site(s) to NP Finder, and enjoy many more member benefits.

  2. Nursing the Follicles.

    PubMed

    Chao, Jesse T; Niwa, Maho

    2016-04-01

    In a recent issue of Science, Lei and Spradling (2016) uncover how germ cells differentiate into oocytes in mouse embryos. Mouse germ cells form cysts, in which sister cells nurse the developing oocyte by donating their organelles and cytoplasmic materials. PMID:27046826

  3. nursing.standard.com.

    PubMed

    2016-07-27

    1 Nurses and other healthcare professionals must treat signs of sepsis with the same urgency as symptoms of a possible heart attack, the National Institute of Health and Care Excellence said in new guidance. Read more rcni.com/sepsis-guidance. PMID:27461293

  4. Nursing Concepts. Teacher Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This curriculum guide contains the materials required to teach a course to prepare students for employment as practical nurses. The following topics are covered in seven instructional units: successful learning skills, positive self-concept, techniques for a balanced lifestyle, communication skills, legal and ethical issues, organizational and…

  5. Building Trust Relationships in Nursing. Midwest Alliance in Nursing Program Meeting (Des Moines, Iowa, April 1983).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minckley, Barbara B., Ed.; Walters, Mary Dale, Ed.

    Focusing on issues concerning trust relationships within the nursing field, the papers in these proceedings consider relationships between nursing service and nursing education, staff or faculty and nursing administration, rural and urban nursing agencies, and among intercultural nursing groups. The proceedings contain: (1) "Trust: An Idealistic…

  6. Nurses' Perceptions on the Shortage of Nurses and Enrollment Decline in Nursing Programs and Means to Increase Student Nurse Enrollment in Arizona.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, A. Louise

    A case study investigated three specific concerns related to the shortage of nurses and the decline in enrollment in nursing programs: (1) identification of reasons for the nursing shortage and enrollment decline; (2) identification of weaknesses in nursing that have contributed to the shortage of nurses and enrollment decline; and (3)…

  7. School Nursing Practice: Roles and Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Proctor, Susan Tonskemper; And Others

    This document is an application of the American Nurses' Association's (ANA's) "Standards of Clinical Nursing Practice" (1991) to the specialty of school nursing. It identifies specialty standards of practice for the school nurse subsumed under the standards of clinical practice which apply to all nurses. Chapter One focuses on the ANA standards…

  8. Public Health Interventions for School Nursing Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaffer, Marjorie A.; Anderson, Linda J. W.; Rising, Shannon

    2016-01-01

    School nurses (SNs) use public health nursing knowledge and skills to provide nursing services to school populations. The Public Health Intervention Wheel is a practice framework that can be used to explain and guide public health nursing interventions. SNs who were also members of the National Association of School Nurses completed an electronic…

  9. Strengthening Preceptors' Competency in Thai Clinical Nursing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mingpun, Renu; Srisa-ard, Boonchom; Jumpamool, Apinya

    2015-01-01

    The problem of lack of nurses can be solved by employing student nurses. Obviously, nurse instructors and preceptors have to work extremely hard to train student nurses to meet the standard of nursing. The preceptorship model is yet to be explored as to what it means to have an effective program or the requisite skills to be an effective…

  10. Perceptions of Novice Clinical Adjunct Nursing Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Himmelberg, Layna

    2011-01-01

    The anticipated nursing shortage in the United States is well documented and continues to be a topic of discussion. A nationwide solution has been for nursing programs to increase their enrollment of nursing students. This could be difficult for many nursing schools; as many have a shortage of qualified nursing faculty with which to instruct…

  11. School Nurse Intention to Pursue Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broussard, Lisa; White, Debra

    2014-01-01

    In 2011, the Institute of Medicine recommended that 80% of the nurses possess a minimum of a bachelor of science in nursing by 2020 and double the number of doctorally prepared nurses. This has prompted a significant number of registered nurses to advance their educational level. School nurses in Louisiana are not required to have a…

  12. Nursing: Supply and Demand through 2020

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carnevale, Anthony P.; Smith, Nicole; Gulish, Artem

    2015-01-01

    This report analyzes the growing need for qualified nurses. The study projects that the economy will create 1.6 million job openings for nurses through 2020. Yet, there will not be enough nurses to fill those openings. this report projects that the nursing workforce will be facing a shortfall of roughly 200,000 nursing professionals by 2020. One…

  13. Strategies for Maintaining Associate Degree Nursing Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tilton, Theodore

    As part of the national campaign of the American Nurses Association (ANA) to create two levels of nursing, one for bachelor of science nurses (BSN's) and one for associate degree nurses (ADN's), Illinois has been targeted for a legislative push to change the laws governing nurse licensure, which, if successful, would signal the beginning of the…

  14. NURSING FOR THE KINGDOM OF GOD.

    PubMed

    Eckerd, Nancy A

    2015-01-01

    The importance of nursing as Christ would is vital for Christian nurses. At one Christian school of nursing, students are taught the concept of Kingdom Nursing: focused, dynamic, patient-centered care, inspired by the qualities of Christ and influenced by the presence of the Holy Spirit in the life of the nurse.

  15. 20 CFR 404.1029 - Student nurses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Student nurses. 404.1029 Section 404.1029... Student nurses. If you are a student nurse, your work for a hospital or nurses training school is excluded from employment if you are enrolled and regularly attending classes in a nurses training school...

  16. Bibliography of Nursing Monographs, 1970-1978.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ewens, Wilma A., Comp.; And Others

    This list consists of titles published since 1970 on nursing, grouping them into five broad categories: (1) nursing practice, including clinical nursing, communication, community health, emergency care, family health, obstetrics, and universal self care; (2) nursing as a profession; (3) educational aspects of nursing; (4) basic health science…

  17. 38 CFR 51.130 - Nursing services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Nursing services. 51.130... FOR NURSING HOME CARE OF VETERANS IN STATE HOMES Standards § 51.130 Nursing services. The facility management must provide an organized nursing service with a sufficient number of qualified nursing...

  18. 38 CFR 51.130 - Nursing services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Nursing services. 51.130... FOR NURSING HOME CARE OF VETERANS IN STATE HOMES Standards § 51.130 Nursing services. The facility management must provide an organized nursing service with a sufficient number of qualified nursing...

  19. 38 CFR 51.130 - Nursing services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Nursing services. 51.130... FOR NURSING HOME CARE OF VETERANS IN STATE HOMES Standards § 51.130 Nursing services. The facility management must provide an organized nursing service with a sufficient number of qualified nursing...

  20. 38 CFR 51.130 - Nursing services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Nursing services. 51.130... FOR NURSING HOME CARE OF VETERANS IN STATE HOMES Standards § 51.130 Nursing services. The facility management must provide an organized nursing service with a sufficient number of qualified nursing...

  1. 38 CFR 51.130 - Nursing services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Nursing services. 51.130... FOR NURSING HOME CARE OF VETERANS IN STATE HOMES Standards § 51.130 Nursing services. The facility management must provide an organized nursing service with a sufficient number of qualified nursing...

  2. Standardized Nursing Languages. Position Statement. Revised

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duff, Carolyn; Endsley, Patricia; Chau, Elizabeth; Morgitan, Judith

    2012-01-01

    It is the position of the National Association of School Nurses (NASN) that standardized nursing languages (SNL) are essential communication tools for registered professional school nurses (hereinafter, school nurses) to assist in planning, delivery, and evaluation of quality nursing care. SNL help identify, clarify and document the nature and…

  3. Introducing ADN students to nursing research.

    PubMed

    Thorpe, R; Smutko, P W

    1998-01-01

    Every nurse, regardless of educational preparation, should be involved in and benefit from nursing research. The research process needs to become an integral part of nursing practice. In this article, the authors emphasize the importance of nursing research in the associate degree nursing curriculum, emphasizing strategies that enable the ADN graduate to appreciate research reports and use the knowledge in the clinical practice setting.

  4. 20 CFR 404.1029 - Student nurses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Student nurses. 404.1029 Section 404.1029... Student nurses. If you are a student nurse, your work for a hospital or nurses training school is excluded from employment if you are enrolled and regularly attending classes in a nurses training school...

  5. A post-modern nursing model.

    PubMed

    Archibald, G

    For some time, nursing has been based on the structure of the nursing process and nursing models. However, in an age where the old order of science and medicine can no longer answer all of society's questions, can a nursing model, with its roots firmly based in the modernist structure of the nursing process, be post-modern?

  6. Hiring and incorporating doctor of nursing practice-prepared nurse faculty into academic nursing programs.

    PubMed

    Agger, Charlotte A; Oermann, Marilyn H; Lynn, Mary R

    2014-08-01

    Semistructured interviews were conducted with 15 deans and directors of nursing programs across the United States to gain an understanding of how Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP)-prepared nurses seeking academic positions are hired and used in schools of nursing. Interviews sought to gain information regarding (a) differences and similarities in the roles and responsibilities of DNP- and Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)-prepared faculty, (b) educational advancement and mentoring of DNP-prepared nurse faculty, (c) recruitment of doctorally prepared nurse faculty, and (d) shortages of nursing faculty. DNP- and PhD-prepared nurse faculty are hired for varying roles in baccalaureate and higher degree schools of nursing, some similar to other faculty with master's degrees and others similar to those with PhDs; in associate degree in nursing programs, they are largely hired for the same type of work as nurse faculty with master's degrees. Regardless of program or degree type, the main role of DNP-prepared faculty is teaching.

  7. Nursing and the nursing workplace in Queensland, 2001-2010: what the nurses think.

    PubMed

    Eley, Robert; Francis, Karen; Hegney, Desley

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of the study was to inform policy for reform in nursing. A survey mailed to members of the Queensland Nurses' Union four times between 2001 and 2010 elicited views on their employment and working conditions, professional development and career opportunities. Results across years and sectors of nursing consistently showed dissatisfaction in many aspects of employment, particularly by nurses working in aged care. However, views on staffing numbers, skill mix, workload, work stress, pay and staff morale all showed significant improvements over the decade. For example in 2001, 48.8% of nurses believed that their pay was poor, whereas in 2010, this had reduced to 35.2%. Furthermore, there was a significant rise throughout the decade in the opinion of the value of nursing as a good career. In light of the need to address nurse workforce shortages, the trends are encouraging; however, more improvements are required in order to support recruitment and retention. PMID:25157941

  8. Remote nursing certified practice: viewing nursing and nurse practitioner practice through a social justice lens.

    PubMed

    Tarlier, Denise S; Browne, Annette J

    2011-06-01

    Remote Nursing Certified Practice (RNCP) was introduced in 2010 to regulate nursing practice in remote, largely First Nations communities in British Columbia, Canada. These are communities that often experience profound health and health-care inequities. Typically nurses are the main health-care providers. Using a critical social justice lens, the authors explore the clinical and ethical implications of RNCP in terms of access to equitable, high-quality primary health care.They examine the fit between the level and scope of health services provided by registered nurses working under RNCP and the health needs of remote First Nations communities. In doing so, they draw comparisons between nurse practitioners (NPs) and outpost nurses working in NP roles who historically were employed to provide health care in these communities.The authors conclude by calling for nursing regulations that support equitable, high-quality primary care for all British Columbians.

  9. Influence of Continuous Nursing on the Psychological State and Coping Style of Patients Undergoing Pacemaker Implantation

    PubMed Central

    LIU, Xin; HE, Xu; LI, Ling; HUANG, Lili; LIU, Zhaojun

    2015-01-01

    Background: Patients undergoing pacemaker implantation often experience anxiety and fear. As such, studies have focused on the mechanisms that relieve the negative emotions caused by the intervention. Continuous nursing is a safe and effective nursing mode. In this study, continuous nursing intervention was provided for elderly patients undergoing pacemaker implantation and an empirical investigation was performed to determine the effects of their negative emotion and disease-coping ability. Methods: Overall, 114 (68 males and 46 females) elderly patients who were undergoing pacemaker implantation from Harbin City (China), were enrolled in the study. The patients were divided into two groups, namely, the control group and the intervention group, based on different nursing methods. Routine nursing was applied to the control group; continuous nursing support was provided for the intervention group from January 2014 to January 2015. The nursing results of the two groups were compared. These results were also evaluated using self-rating depression scale, self-rating anxiety scale, and trait coping style questionnaire. Result: The effects of depression and anxiety intervention were significant in the intervention group (P<0.05). Compared with the control group, the intervention group did not significantly differ. The coping style of the intervention group elicited significant effects. Compared with the control group, the intervention group was significantly different (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Continuous nursing can relieve the negative emotion and improve the negative coping style of patients undergoing pacemaker implantation. PMID:26576373

  10. Nurses' willingness and readiness to report for duty in a disaster.

    PubMed

    Fung, Olivia Wai Man; Loke, Alice Yuen

    2013-01-01

    Inadequate healthcare workforce during a disaster affects the survival and health outcome of victims. During disaster strikes, nurses may face a dilemma regarding whether or not to report for duty, facing professional duty and their personal and/or family safety that may be at stake. This is a cross-sectional descriptive study. This study seeks for a better understanding of the factors affecting nurses' willingness and readiness to report for duty in a disaster. A total of 269 currently practicing registered nurses completed the questionnaire. Results showed that only 68.7 percent and 53.2 percent of nurses were willing to report to work during a disaster. Male nurses were more likely to report to work than females during disaster (p = 0.007) and infection outbreak (p = 0.002) situations. Nurses with young children were less likely to report to work during an infectious disease outbreak (34.5 percent vs 55.4 percent, p = 0.033). It is concluded that about one-third of nurses indicated that they would not report to work when a disaster strikes. This raises a warning signal for healthcare managers that they need to plan ahead to maintain an adequate workforce when disasters strike. Managers are urged to do more to understand the factors leading to nurses' unwillingness to report to work and to undertake realistic staffing planning to cope with the extra demand.

  11. Newborn male circumcision.

    PubMed

    Sorokan, S Todd; Finlay, Jane C; Jefferies, Ann L

    2015-01-01

    The circumcision of newborn males in Canada has become a less frequent practice over the past few decades. This change has been significantly influenced by past recommendations from the Canadian Paediatric Society and the American Academy of Pediatrics, who both affirmed that the procedure was not medically indicated. Recent evidence suggesting the potential benefit of circumcision in preventing urinary tract infection and some sexually transmitted infections, including HIV, has prompted the Canadian Paediatric Society to review the current medical literature in this regard. While there may be a benefit for some boys in high-risk populations and circumstances where the procedure could be considered for disease reduction or treatment, the Canadian Paediatric Society does not recommend the routine circumcision of every newborn male.

  12. Newborn male circumcision

    PubMed Central

    Sorokan, S Todd; Finlay, Jane C; Jefferies, Ann L

    2015-01-01

    The circumcision of newborn males in Canada has become a less frequent practice over the past few decades. This change has been significantly influenced by past recommendations from the Canadian Paediatric Society and the American Academy of Pediatrics, who both affirmed that the procedure was not medically indicated. Recent evidence suggesting the potential benefit of circumcision in preventing urinary tract infection and some sexually transmitted infections, including HIV, has prompted the Canadian Paediatric Society to review the current medical literature in this regard. While there may be a benefit for some boys in high-risk populations and circumstances where the procedure could be considered for disease reduction or treatment, the Canadian Paediatric Society does not recommend the routine circumcision of every newborn male. PMID:26435672

  13. Male genital lichen sclerosus.

    PubMed

    Bunker, Christopher Barry; Shim, Tang Ngee

    2015-01-01

    Male genital lichen sclerosus (MGLSc) is a chronic inflammatory skin disease responsible for male sexual dyspareunia and urological morbidity. An afeared complication is squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the penis. The precise etiopathogenesis of MGLSc remains controversial although genetic, autoimmune and infective (such as human papillomavirus (HPV) hepatitis C (HCV), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and Borrelia) factors have been implicated: Consideration of all the evidence suggests that chronic exposure of susceptible epithelium to urinary occlusion by the foreskin seems the most likely pathomechanism. The mainstay of treatment is topical ultrapotent corticosteroid therapy. Surgery is indicated for cases unresponsive to topical corticosteroid therapy, phimosis, meatal stenosis, urethral stricture, carcinoma in situ (CIS) and squamous cell carcinoma. PMID:25814697

  14. Spermatids as male gametes.

    PubMed

    Ogura, A; Yanagimachi, R

    1995-01-01

    Intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) is becoming increasingly popular in human infertility clinics as an efficient method for the treatment of male infertility. It is proposed that spermatids can be used as substitutes for spermatozoa if men are unable to produce sperm in their testes. At least in the hamster and mouse, the nuclei of round spermatids were capable of participating in syngamy when incorporated into homologous mature oocytes either by microsurgical ICSI or electrofusion. Normal mouse offspring were born after after electrofusion of oocytes with round spermatids. When culture in vitro of spermatogonia and spermatocytes is perfected, then spermatids, transforming spermatids and spermatozoa will all be able to be used as male gametes. PMID:7480833

  15. Male osteoporosis: A review

    PubMed Central

    Herrera, Antonio; Lobo-Escolar, Antonio; Mateo, Jesús; Gil, Jorge; Ibarz, Elena; Gracia, Luis

    2012-01-01

    Osteoporosis in men is a heterogeneous disease that has received little attention. However, one third of worldwide hip fractures occur in the male population. This problem is more prevalent in people over 70 years of age. The etiology can be idiopathic or secondary to hypogonadism, vitamin D deficiency and inadequate calcium intake, hormonal treatments for prostate cancer, use of toxic and every disease or drug use that alters bone metabolism. Risk factors such as a previous history of fragility fracture should be assessed for the diagnosis. However, risk factors in men are very heterogeneous. There are significant differences in the pharmacological treatment of osteoporosis between men and women fundamentally due to the level of evidence in published trials supporting each treatment. New treatments will offer new therapeutic prospects. The goal of this work is a revision of the present status knowledge about male osteoporosis. PMID:23362466

  16. Male endocrine dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Hotaling, James M; Patel, Zamip

    2014-02-01

    Evaluation for endocrine function is a pivotal part of the male infertility workup. Endocrine dysfunction may result from endogenous and exogenous sources. This article describes the traditional roles that the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal endocrine axis plays in spermatogenesis and testicular dysfunction, as well as other insults that may contribute to hypospermatogenesis. Recent research into the role alternative hormonal axes play in spermatogenesis and promising new technologies that may correct inborn or acquired endocrinopathies leading to impaired sperm growth and maturation are discussed.

  17. Advances in Male Contraception

    PubMed Central

    Page, Stephanie T.; Amory, John K.; Bremner, William J.

    2008-01-01

    Despite significant advances in contraceptive options for women over the last 50 yr, world population continues to grow rapidly. Scientists and activists alike point to the devastating environmental impacts that population pressures have caused, including global warming from the developed world and hunger and disease in less developed areas. Moreover, almost half of all pregnancies are still unwanted or unplanned. Clearly, there is a need for expanded, reversible, contraceptive options. Multicultural surveys demonstrate the willingness of men to participate in contraception and their female partners to trust them to do so. Notwithstanding their paucity of options, male methods including vasectomy and condoms account for almost one third of contraceptive use in the United States and other countries. Recent international clinical research efforts have demonstrated high efficacy rates (90–95%) for hormonally based male contraceptives. Current barriers to expanded use include limited delivery methods and perceived regulatory obstacles, which stymie introduction to the marketplace. However, advances in oral and injectable androgen delivery are cause for optimism that these hurdles may be overcome. Nonhormonal methods, such as compounds that target sperm motility, are attractive in their theoretical promise of specificity for the reproductive tract. Gene and protein array technologies continue to identify potential targets for this approach. Such nonhormonal agents will likely reach clinical trials in the near future. Great strides have been made in understanding male reproductive physiology; the combined efforts of scientists, clinicians, industry and governmental funding agencies could make an effective, reversible, male contraceptive an option for family planning over the next decade. PMID:18436704

  18. [Urethrocele in males].

    PubMed

    el Mrini, M; Bennani, S; Aboutaieb, R; Joual, A; Benjelloun, S

    1993-01-01

    Concerning one case of male urethral diverticulum, the characteristics of this rare affection are reviewed. Long standing urethral catheter and urethroplasty are the more frequent etiologies of this affection. The diagnosis is clinical, based on the discovery of tumefaction on the urethral track which pression makes spring up urine through urethral meatus. The urethrogram confirms the diagnosis. Surgical approach consists on the resection of the diverticulum and urethrography in one or two stages, based on diverticular neck size and tissue vascularization. PMID:8163849

  19. Nurse prescribing: radicalism or tokenism?

    PubMed

    McCartney, W; Tyrer, S; Brazier, M; Prayle, D

    1999-02-01

    The creation of The Medical Products (Prescription by Nurses, etc.) Act 1992 has been generally welcomed by the nursing profession. This article seeks to introduce a note of scepticism about the assumed motivations for its introduction through an analysis of various legal, ethical, economic and political dimensions. In reviewing the position of nursing vis-à-vis medicine it is argued that one of the ways that nursing has sought to improve its professional position is to take on work previously done by doctors, and nurse prescribing can be seen in the context of the concurrent de-regulation of medicines, allowing greater access to medicines and therefore greater consumer choice. This de-regulation stems from the liberation ideology of the previous Conservative government. Viewed in this way nurse prescribing, particularly with reference to the limited nature of the nursing formulary, can be seen to be anomalous. In the light of this analysis, the reasons generally put forward (notably in the Crown Report 1989) for the introduction of nurse prescribing could be seen to be peripheral to its real purpose. It is argued that the most convincing reasons for its introduction relate to the medical profession as a social institution. It is proposed that the three primary aims behind the introduction of nurse prescribing are: the saving of money; the transfer of routine medical work to nursing; and a challenge to the professional monolith of medicine.

  20. Nurse attrition as a process.

    PubMed

    Crow, Stephen M; Hartman, Sandra J

    2005-01-01

    Problems with attracting and retaining nurses during a tight labor market are exacerbated by the fundamental issues related to attrition from the field. Many individuals leave the field prior to graduation or between graduation and placement. Significant attrition occurs during the first 5 years in the profession. One out of every 3 hospital nurses under the age of 30 is planning to leave the current job in the next year [Nursing Shortage Fact Sheet (March 2002). American College of Nursing. Available at: www.aacn.nche.edu/media/backgrounders/shortagefacts.htmaacn.nche.edu. Accessed January 3, 2003]. In this situation, it is of concern that we have been unable to identify any research which takes a holistic approach to issues of attrition. Instead, research is fragmentary, anecdotal, and treats problems in isolation. In this article, we take a conceptual approach and attempt to consider what is being said in the literature about the forms which nurse attrition takes at varying stages in the nursing career. Specifically, we begin a step-by-step examination of the process through which the individual first considers nursing as a career, to the application and acceptance processes, through the educational process and the nursing curriculum in general, to graduation and initial placement, and finally, to the fifth year when the nurse is fully engaged as a practicing nurse. At each stage, we discuss potential issues which may lead to attrition and develop hypotheses to guide further research. PMID:16131938

  1. Male Body Contouring.

    PubMed

    Singh, Babu; Keaney, Terrence; Rossi, Anthony M

    2015-09-01

    Men are increasingly turning to dermatologists and plastic surgeons to request procedures that correct or enhance physical features. With the advent of this emerging new patient population, alterations in preexisting aesthetic techniques, gender-specific uses of existing devices and overall approaches need to be revisited and adapted to obtain results that are suitable for the male patient. Recently, body contouring has become one of the most sought out procedures by men. Although the majority of clinical studies involving body contouring esthetics are performed with female patients, gains from such studies can be extrapolated to men. Body contouring can be broadly classified as non-invasive or invasive, depending on the modality used. Non-invasive contouring is most frequently performed with devices that target subcutaneous adipose with focused electrical or thermal energy, including low-level laser, cryolipolysis, ultrasonography, and radiofrequency. Invasive body contouring modalities useful for male body contouring include liposuction, pectoral and abdominal wall etching, jawline fillers, synthetic deoxycholic acid injections, and solid silicone implants. The purpose of this review is to bring attention to the unique aspects, strategies, and modalities used in aesthetic body contouring for the male patient.

  2. Melatonin and male reproduction.

    PubMed

    Li, Chunjin; Zhou, Xu

    2015-06-15

    Melatonin is a neurohormone secreted by the pineal gland whose concentrations in the body are regulated by both the dark-light and seasonal cycles. The reproductive function of seasonal breeding animals is clearly influenced by the circadian variation in melatonin levels. Moreover, a growing body of evidence indicates that melatonin has important effects in the reproduction of some non-seasonal breeding animals. In males, melatonin affects reproductive regulation in three main ways. First, it regulates the secretion of two key neurohormones, GnRH and LH. Second, it regulates testosterone synthesis and testicular maturation. Third, as a potent free radical scavenger that is both lipophilic and hydrophilic, it prevents testicular damage caused by environmental toxins or inflammation. This review summarizes the existing data on the possible biological roles of melatonin in male reproduction. Overall, the literature data indicate that melatonin affects the secretion of both gonadotropins and testosterone while also improving sperm quality. This implies that it has important effects on the regulation of testicular development and male reproduction.

  3. Practices of self-medication with antibiotics among nursing students of Institute of Nursing, Dow University of Health Sciences, Karachi, Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Ali, Akbar Shoukat; Ahmed, Javed; Ali, Akbar Shoukat; Sonekhi, Gomand Beekho; Fayyaz, Nargis; Zainulabdin, Zeeshan; Jindani, Rahim

    2016-02-01

    Self-medication practice among nursing students is of growing concern. Access to drugs and handling them in their future practices make nursing students susceptible to self-prescription and self-medication. This cross-sectional study assesses the prevalence and pattern of self-medication with antibiotics among nursing students of Institute of Nursing, Dow University of Health Sciences, Karachi, Pakistan. A random sample of convenience of 160 nursing students underwent a predesigned questionnaire. More than half of nursing students 79 (52.7%) experienced self-medication with antibiotics. It was more prevalent among males 49 (62%) . Knowledge about the drug 59 (74.7%) and convenience 13 (16.5%) were the key reasons to self-medicate. Fever 37 (46.8%) and sore throat 27 (34.2%) were the common symptoms predisposing to self-medication. Beta-lactam group of antibiotics 35 (44.3%) was most frequent used. Only 26 (32.9%) respondents completed the entire antibiotic course. Efforts must be directed towards educating nursing students about responsible and informed self-medication practices.

  4. Nurses' and Nursing Students' Knowledge and Attitudes regarding Pediatric Pain

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz, Mario I.; Ponce-Monter, Héctor A.; Rangel-Flores, Eduardo; Castro-Gamez, Blanca; Romero-Quezada, Luis C.; O'Brien, Jessica P.; Romo-Hernández, Georgina; Escamilla-Acosta, Marco A.

    2015-01-01

    Nursing staff spend more time with patients with pain than any other health staff member. For this reason, the nurse must possess the basic knowledge to identify the presence of pain in patients, to measure its intensity and make the steps necessary for treatment. Therefore, a prospective, descriptive, analytical, and cross-sectional study was conducted to investigate the knowledge and attitudes regarding pediatric pain in two different populations. The questionnaire, Pediatric Nurses Knowledge and Attitudes Survey Regarding Pain (PKNAS), was applied to 111 hospital pediatric nurses and 300 university nursing students. The final scores for pediatric nurses and nursing students were 40.1 ± 7.9 and 40.3 ± 7.5, respectively. None of the sociodemographic variables predicted the scores obtained by the participants (P > 0.05). There was a high correlation between the PKNAS scores of pediatric nurses and nursing students (r = 0.86, P < 0.001). It was observed that the degree of knowledge about pain and its treatment was very low in both groups. Due to this deficiency, pain in children remains inadequately managed, which leads to suffering in this population. It is necessary to increase the continued training in this subject in both areas. PMID:26543643

  5. [Nursing ethics and the access to nursing care].

    PubMed

    Monteverde, Settimio

    2013-08-01

    The increasing number of ethical issues highlighted in everyday nursing care demonstrates the connectedness between nursing ethics and nursing practice. However, what is the role of ethical theories in this context? This question will be examined in this article by analysing the contribution made by the ethics of care, in particular in understandings of gender roles, asymmetries of power, professional knowledge and experience. The adoption and criticism of an emergent nursing ethics is discussed and stated from different viewpoints. The actuality of the caring approach is affirmed by a new reading of the given situation. This article first describes the traditional perception of nurses as marginalised actors in the health sector. By making reference to the current and growing global scarcity of nursing care, it contends that nursing will no longer be marginalised, but instead at the centre of public health attention and reputation. Nevertheless, marginalisation will persist by increasingly affecting the care receivers, especially those groups that are pushed to the fringes by the consequences of the healthcare market, such as persons of extreme old age, suffering from multiple morbidities, or with poor health literacy. Whereas the "classical" understanding of the ethics of care focuses on the nurse-patient relationship and on individual care and understanding of ethics, the new understanding confirms the classical, but adds an understanding of social ethics: caring for the access to care is seen as a main ethical goal of social justice within a nursing ethic.

  6. Towards understanding the unpresentable in nursing: some nursing philosophical considerations.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Brenda L

    2006-01-01

    While nursing practice embodies certain observable and sometimes habitual actions, much inheres in these actions that is not immediately discernible. Taking on Lyotard's exegesis of the unpresentable, I undertake an analysis of the unpresentable as it occurs in nursing practices. The unpresentable is a place of alterity often excluded from dominant discourses. Yet this very alterity is what practising nurses face day after day. Drawing from two nursing situations, one from a hermeneutic phenomenological study and the other from the literature, I elucidate the unpresentable from a nursing point of view. Evoking Lyotard as well as selected philosophers from the continental philosophical tradition, I also question whether nursing in its present discourse is capable of responding to the unpresentable in nursing situations. Through the philosophical stance of presentation and representation, I delineate the urgent need to bring the otherness of the unpresentable into our nursing discourse. Nurses in practice confront a wide array of human differences and diversities and come to the realization that no framework alone can ever really have primacy over the multiform presentations of human suffering that so strikingly evoke alterity. PMID:16412200

  7. Keeping the nursing shortage from becoming a nursing crisis.

    PubMed

    Erickson, Jeanette Ives; Holm, Lauren J; Chelminiak, Lee

    2004-02-01

    Healthcare organizations are experiencing an unprecedented shortage of qualified nurses. How can we increase our understanding of how the potential labor pool views the nursing profession and identify recruitment themes to encourage young people and adult career switchers to choose a career in nursing? The authors discuss the results of a study that was conducted to gain a better understanding of the dynamics of career selection among these two target groups and identify what types of communication would motivate young people and career switchers to be drawn to the nursing profession. PMID:14770067

  8. California's minimum-nurse-staffing legislation and nurses' wages.

    PubMed

    Mark, Barbara; Harless, David W; Spetz, Joanne

    2009-01-01

    In 2004, California became the first state to implement minimum-nurse-staffing ratios in acute care hospitals. We examined the wages of registered nurses (RNs) before and after the legislation was enacted. Using four data sets-the National Sample Survey of Registered Nurses, the Current Population Survey, the National Compensation Survey, and the Occupational Employment Statistics Survey-we found that from 2000 through 2006, RNs in California metropolitan areas experienced real wage growth as much as twelve percentage points higher than the growth in the wages of nurses employed in metropolitan areas outside of California.

  9. Insights from nurse leaders to optimize retaining late career nurses.

    PubMed

    Jeffs, Lianne; Nincic, Vera; Hayes, Laureen; Jerome, Danielle; Malecki, Victoria

    2014-09-01

    In an effort to stem the loss of Ontario's late career nurses, the Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care introduced the Late Career Nurse Initiative (LCNI) to implement a 0.20 full-time equivalent reduction of physically or psychologically demanding duties of nurses aged 55 or over and repurposing this time to enriching and less demanding activities. Fifty-nine nurse leaders were interviewed to explore their perceptions associated with implementing the LCNI in their respective organizations. Following a qualitative directed content analysis approach, three themes emerged: (1) having a strategic approach, (2) leveraging staff expertise and (3) securing organizational support.

  10. Finnish nurses' attitudes towards nursing research and related factors.

    PubMed

    Kuuppelomäki, Merja; Tuomi, Jouni

    2005-02-01

    This study was concerned with Finnish nurses' attitudes to nursing research and with the associations of different background factors with these attitudes. The data were collected with a purpose-designed, structured questionnaire. The study was carried out in one central hospital, one central university hospital and 10 community health centres in Finland. A total of 400 nurses took part. The response rate was 67%. The data were analysed using SPSS statistical software. Attitudes to nursing research were generally quite positive, although over half of the nurses felt their own relationship to nursing science was quite distant. There were also shortfalls with respect to the information value and utilisation of research results. Only one-third took the view that doing research is an important part of the nurse's job. Age, the frequency of reading the professional literature, participation in training courses, training received in research and development, and the type of workplace were associated with attitudes. The results underline the importance of paying closer attention to the choice of research objects in the field of nursing science. Greater effort should also be invested in supporting and developing the application of research results. It is recommended that more courses on research methodology and other relevant training be made available to practical nurses. PMID:15680617

  11. Nurses' and Nursing Students' Knowledge and Attitudes regarding Pediatric Pain.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, Mario I; Ponce-Monter, Héctor A; Rangel-Flores, Eduardo; Castro-Gamez, Blanca; Romero-Quezada, Luis C; O'Brien, Jessica P; Romo-Hernández, Georgina; Escamilla-Acosta, Marco A

    2015-01-01

    Nursing staff spend more time with patients with pain than any other health staff member. For this reason, the nurse must possess the basic knowledge to identify the presence of pain in patients, to measure its intensity and make the steps necessary for treatment. Therefore, a prospective, descriptive, analytical, and cross-sectional study was conducted to investigate the knowledge and attitudes regarding pediatric pain in two different populations. The questionnaire, Pediatric Nurses Knowledge and Attitudes Survey Regarding Pain (PKNAS), was applied to 111 hospital pediatric nurses and 300 university nursing students. The final scores for pediatric nurses and nursing students were 40.1 ± 7.9 and 40.3 ± 7.5, respectively. None of the sociodemographic variables predicted the scores obtained by the participants (P > 0.05). There was a high correlation between the PKNAS scores of pediatric nurses and nursing students (r = 0.86, P < 0.001). It was observed that the degree of knowledge about pain and its treatment was very low in both groups. Due to this deficiency, pain in children remains inadequately managed, which leads to suffering in this population. It is necessary to increase the continued training in this subject in both areas.

  12. Nurses' and Nursing Students' Knowledge and Attitudes regarding Pediatric Pain.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, Mario I; Ponce-Monter, Héctor A; Rangel-Flores, Eduardo; Castro-Gamez, Blanca; Romero-Quezada, Luis C; O'Brien, Jessica P; Romo-Hernández, Georgina; Escamilla-Acosta, Marco A

    2015-01-01

    Nursing staff spend more time with patients with pain than any other health staff member. For this reason, the nurse must possess the basic knowledge to identify the presence of pain in patients, to measure its intensity and make the steps necessary for treatment. Therefore, a prospective, descriptive, analytical, and cross-sectional study was conducted to investigate the knowledge and attitudes regarding pediatric pain in two different populations. The questionnaire, Pediatric Nurses Knowledge and Attitudes Survey Regarding Pain (PKNAS), was applied to 111 hospital pediatric nurses and 300 university nursing students. The final scores for pediatric nurses and nursing students were 40.1 ± 7.9 and 40.3 ± 7.5, respectively. None of the sociodemographic variables predicted the scores obtained by the participants (P > 0.05). There was a high correlation between the PKNAS scores of pediatric nurses and nursing students (r = 0.86, P < 0.001). It was observed that the degree of knowledge about pain and its treatment was very low in both groups. Due to this deficiency, pain in children remains inadequately managed, which leads to suffering in this population. It is necessary to increase the continued training in this subject in both areas. PMID:26543643

  13. How healthy are our nurses? New and registered nurses compared.

    PubMed

    Malik, Sumaira; Blake, Holly; Batt, Mark

    This study examined the health behaviour of nursing staff, comparing registered and pre-registered nurses in terms of their self-reported health and lifestyle behaviour. In total, 325 pre-registered nurses and 551 registered nurses, based at the same university teaching hospital and located within an acute NHS trust, completed a self-administered health and lifestyle questionnaire survey. With the exception of smoking behaviour, registered nurses generally had a healthier lifestyle compared with pre-registered nurses. However, when examining the overall health profile of the sample, the study reveals that there is room for improvement in the health and lifestyle behaviour exhibited by both registered and pre-registered nurses. Almost half of the sample failed to meet public health recommendations for levels of physical activity, almost two-thirds did not consume five portions of fruit or vegetables daily and almost half ate foods that were high in fat and sugar content on a daily basis. These findings are alarming given the current government emphasis on the health of NHS staff and the important role that nurses play in influencing lifestyle choices among their patients. There is an urgent need to target education and support services to improve the diet and exercise habits of nursing professionals.

  14. Nurse Education Consultancy: A New Role.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenkins, David A.

    1996-01-01

    A nurse education consultant can help a college enhance the educational process and market effectively and ethically. Nurses considering consultancy should examine their personal qualities, skill and knowledge base, and personal values and beliefs about education and nursing. (SK)

  15. Defining professional nursing accountability: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Krautscheid, Lorretta C

    2014-01-01

    Professional nursing accountability is described by both professional nursing organizations and nursing education credentialing agencies as a core aspect that underpins professional nursing practice. Although accountability is foundational to professional practice, a review of the literature revealed no consistent language or definition regarding professional nursing accountability. Instead, the literature itself reveals that professional nursing accountability is challenging to both describe and define. The ambiguity surrounding how to define professional nursing accountability contributes to challenges associated with both teaching and evaluating student nurse accountability within nursing education curricula. This article provides a reliable and comprehensive definition of professional nursing accountability derived from a synthesis of the literature. Recommendations for nursing education practice and recommendations for nursing education research are proposed. PMID:24503314

  16. Training Advanced Practice Palliative Care Nurses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherman, Deborah Witt

    1999-01-01

    Describes the role and responsibilities of advanced-practice nurses in palliative care and nursing's initiative in promoting high-quality care through the educational preparation of these nurses. (JOW)

  17. Comparison between Heads of Nursing and Nursing Administration Students in the Sultanate of Oman regarding Education for Nurse Administrators

    PubMed Central

    White, Gillian

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To explore the future of nursing administration in preparation for a major review of the current curriculum in the one-year diploma in nursing administration at the Oman Specialized Nursing Institute (OSNI). Methods: A two-part study explored 1) requisite roles, skills and competencies of the nurse administrator, 2) a leadership profile with two convenience samples: heads of nursing and nursing administration students. Each part was analysed separately; the two groups were then compared with the latter revealing similarities and differences. Results: Heads of nursing were more likely to describe roles and be task-oriented, emphasising problem solving, whereas students focused on functions and processes. Both groups wanted nursing to be known for its code of professional conduct, and have an empowered nursing association. Leadership profile comparisons indicated heads of nursing were mature and practical whereas students were idealistic, with risk-taking tendencies. There was overall agreement that preparation for the nursing administration specialty should be at master’s level; however, all nurses should undertake a leadership and management course during their progression to senior positions. Conclusion: The vision of those preparing to enter and those already in leadership positions is for empowerment of the nursing profession in Oman. Thus there is a need for highly educated nurse leaders and managers in nursing administration to provide the driving force for change and sustained motivation. The current Nursing Administration Programme (NAP) needs to be upgraded and delivered at the master’s level for nurses specialising in nursing administration. PMID:22912924

  18. Nursing informatics competencies: bibliometric analysis.

    PubMed

    Kokol, Peter; Blažun, Helena; Vošner, Janez; Saranto, Kaija

    2014-01-01

    Information and communication technology is developing rapidly and it is incorporated in many health care processes, but in spite of that fact we can still notice that nursing informatics competencies had received limited attention in basic nursing education curricula in Europe and especially in Eastern European countries. The purpose of the present paper is to present the results of a bibliometric analysis of the nursing informatics competencies scientific literature production. We applied the bibliometrics analysis to the corpus of 332 papers found in SCOPUS, related to nursing informatics competencies. The results showed that there is a positive trend in the number of published papers per year, indicating the increased research interest in nursing informatics competencies. Despite the fact that the first paper was published in Denmark, the most prolific country regarding the research in nursing informatics competencies is United States as are their institutions and authors.

  19. Compassion fatigue: a nurse's primer.

    PubMed

    Lombardo, Barbara; Eyre, Caryl

    2011-01-01

    Most nurses enter the field of nursing with the intent to help others and provide empathetic care for patients with critical physical, mental, emotional, and spiritual needs. Empathic and caring nurses, however, can become victims of the continuing stress of meeting the often overwhelming needs of patients and their families, resulting in compassion fatigue. Compassion fatigue affects not only the nurse in terms of job satisfaction and emotional and physical health, but also the workplace environment by decreasing productivity and increasing turnover. We begin this article with a case study of a reactive nurse who did not seek help for her continuing stress. This is followed by a review of Watson's theoretical perspective related to compassion fatigue. Next we delineate symptoms of, and describe interventions for addressing compassion fatigue. We conclude by presenting a case study of a proactive nurse who avoided developing compassion fatigue and a discussion of future research needed to better prevent and ameliorate compassion fatigue. PMID:21800934

  20. Factor substitution in nursing homes.

    PubMed

    Cawley, John; Grabowski, David C; Hirth, Richard A

    2006-03-01

    This paper studies factor substitution in one important sector: the nursing home industry. Specifically, we measure the extent to which nursing homes substitute materials for labor when labor becomes relatively more expensive. From a policy perspective, factor substitution in this market is important because materials-intensive methods of care are associated with greater risks of morbidity and mortality among nursing home residents. Studying longitudinal data from 1991 to 2000 on nearly every nursing home in the United States, we use the method of instrumental variables (IV) to address measurement error in nursing home wages. The results from the IV models yield evidence of factor substitution: higher nursing home wages are associated with greater use of psychoactive drugs and lower quality.

  1. [The difficult nursing's relationship with knowledge].

    PubMed

    Dallaire, Clémence

    2015-06-01

    This article claim the existence and the necessity of nursing knowledge and support this claim with definitions and rules from other disciplines, it summarizes briefly the evolution of nursing knowledge, mostly from a North American perspective, it examine its degree of presence in nursing scholarly work, to highlight some conclusions and present briefly two explanations related to the use and development of nursing knowledge by the nursing community. In conclusion, the necessity of learning, analyzing, testing and using nursing knowledge is reiterated.

  2. Medical authority and nursing integrity.

    PubMed

    de Raeve, L

    2002-12-01

    This paper explores the respective legitimacy or illegitimacy of medical authority over nursing work. The analysis makes use of Joseph Raz's ideas concerning the nature of authority. Various scenarios are considered which lend themselves to differing interpretations, and the conclusion reached is that acting in accordance with legitimate medical authority enhances rather than compromises the nurse's professional integrity. Difficulties, however, may lie in disentangling legitimate from illegitimate attempts to control nursing work.

  3. Genomics Nursing Faculty Champion Initiative

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, Jean; Calzone, Kathleen A.

    2016-01-01

    Nurse faculty are challenged to keep up with the emerging and fast-paced field of genomics and the mandate to prepare the nursing workforce to be able to translate genomic research advances into routine clinical care. Using Faculty Champions and other options, the initiative stimulated curriculum development and promoted genomics curriculum integration. The authors summarize this yearlong initiative for undergraduate and graduate nursing faculty. PMID:24300251

  4. The Nurse Reinvestment Act revisited.

    PubMed

    Luther, Ann P

    2007-01-01

    The United States is in the midst of a widely recognized critical nursing shortage. In 2002 the "Nurse Reinvestment Act" was passed with overwhelming bipartisan support in an effort to address this serious public health threat. The Act is due for reauthorization of funding in 2007. This paper provides a brief overview of the programs contained within the Act and describes practical ways in which members of the nursing community can take action to insure renewed support for the Act. PMID:17691598

  5. Developments in male contraception.

    PubMed

    Bialy, G; Alexander, N J

    1992-01-01

    Relevant research efforts in male contraception involve: 1) hormonal approaches to block sperm production by inhibiting the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, 2) disruption of sperm production by drugs that act directly on the testes, 3) interruption of sperm transport, and 4) alteration of secretions of the accessory sex glands and their subsequent effect on the spermatozoa. Both agonistic and antagonistic synthetic analogs of the hypothalamic gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) factor cost too much and lack an effective mode of administration. Recent studies indicate that over 90% of Chinese and Indonesian men can develop complete azoospermia following either a testosterone or a progestin and an androgen combination treatment. Vaccines that utilize GnRH and follicle stimulating hormone as the active antigens have been introduced in clinical studies in the US and India. Drugs such as sulfasalazine, pyrimethamine, nitrofurane, and bis(di-chloracytal) diamines reduce male fertility but side effects make them unacceptable. Dinitropyrroles, halopropanedils, chlorosugars, and indazole carboxylic acids have been tried in laboratory animals. Gossypol rendered men infertile in large-scale clinical studies conducted in China but synthesis of safer analogs has not succeeded. Extracts of another plant, tripterigium wilfordii, are used in China as a popular herbal medicine. Vasectomy has improved with no-scalpel vasectomy and by the novel technique of blocking the vas with cured in situ polymeric plugs. Preliminary data suggest that men prefer condoms made from polyurethane as opposed to latex rubber increasingly used to protect against AIDs and sexually transmitted diseases. The antifungal agents, imidazoles, have spermicidal activity and synthetic variants may reduce undesirable side effects. Research on male-oriented methods has intensified during the last 10-15 years, but a new product is not likely to appear in the next 5-10 years.

  6. Sexual Selection on male cuticular hydrocarbons via male-male competition and female choice.

    PubMed

    Lane, S M; Dickinson, A W; Tregenza, T; House, C M

    2016-07-01

    Traditional views of sexual selection assumed that male-male competition and female mate choice work in harmony, selecting upon the same traits in the same direction. However, we now know that this is not always the case and that these two mechanisms often impose conflicting selection on male sexual traits. Cuticular hydrocarbons (CHCs) have been shown to be linked to both social dominance and male attractiveness in several insect species. However, although several studies have estimated the strength and form of sexual selection imposed on male CHCs by female mate choice, none have established whether these chemical traits are also subject to sexual selection via male-male competition. Using a multivariate selection analysis, we estimate and compare sexual selection exerted by male-male competition and female mate choice on male CHC composition in the broad-horned flour beetle Gnatocerus cornutus. We show that male-male competition exerts strong linear selection on both overall CHC abundance and body size in males, while female mate choice exerts a mixture of linear and nonlinear selection, targeting not just the overall amount of CHCs expressed but the relative abundance of specific hydrocarbons as well. We discuss the potential implications of this antagonistic selection with regard to male reproductive success.

  7. Sexual Selection on male cuticular hydrocarbons via male-male competition and female choice.

    PubMed

    Lane, S M; Dickinson, A W; Tregenza, T; House, C M

    2016-07-01

    Traditional views of sexual selection assumed that male-male competition and female mate choice work in harmony, selecting upon the same traits in the same direction. However, we now know that this is not always the case and that these two mechanisms often impose conflicting selection on male sexual traits. Cuticular hydrocarbons (CHCs) have been shown to be linked to both social dominance and male attractiveness in several insect species. However, although several studies have estimated the strength and form of sexual selection imposed on male CHCs by female mate choice, none have established whether these chemical traits are also subject to sexual selection via male-male competition. Using a multivariate selection analysis, we estimate and compare sexual selection exerted by male-male competition and female mate choice on male CHC composition in the broad-horned flour beetle Gnatocerus cornutus. We show that male-male competition exerts strong linear selection on both overall CHC abundance and body size in males, while female mate choice exerts a mixture of linear and nonlinear selection, targeting not just the overall amount of CHCs expressed but the relative abundance of specific hydrocarbons as well. We discuss the potential implications of this antagonistic selection with regard to male reproductive success. PMID:27037514

  8. [Male breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Mattson, Johanna; Vehmanen, Leena

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is rare in men. Diagnosis of the illness may be delayed due to the fact that the doctor and the patient fail to suspect it. Male breast cancer is treated mainly on the same principles as female breast cancer. A man affected with breast cancer should always be directed to genetic testing, as inherited mutations increasing the risk of developing cancer are more common than in female breast cancer. Most breast cancers in men are hormone receptor positive. Among hormone treatments, the antiestrogen tamoxifen exhibits the best efficacy both in early-state and advanced cases. PMID:27188086

  9. [Urethrocele in males].

    PubMed

    el Mrini, M; Bennani, S; Aboutaieb, R; Joual, A; Benjelloun, S

    1993-01-01

    Concerning one case of male urethral diverticulum, the characteristics of this rare affection are reviewed. Carriage for long time of urethral catheter and urethroplasty are the more frequent etiologies of this affection. The diagnosis is clinic, based on the discovery of tumefaction on the urethral track which pression makes spring up urine through urethral meatus. The urethrography confirms the diagnosis. Surgical approach consists on the resection of the diverticulum and urethrorrhaphy in one or two stages, based on diverticular neck size and sheet quality. PMID:8253886

  10. Gynecomastia in Adolescent Males

    PubMed Central

    Lemaine, Valerie; Cayci, Cenk; Simmons, Patricia S.; Petty, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Gynecomastia is defined as an enlargement of the male breast. It is often benign, and can be the source of significant embarrassment and psychological distress. A general medical history and careful physical examination are essential to distinguish normal developmental variants from pathological causes. Treatment is geared toward the specific etiology when identified. In the majority of cases of pubertal gynecomastia, observation and reassurance are the mainstays of therapy as the condition usually resolves naturally. Pharmacological treatment and surgery are recommended only in selected cases. PMID:24872741

  11. Moral realism in nursing.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Steven D

    2014-04-01

    For more than 15 years Professor Per Nortvedt has been arguing the case for moral realism in nursing and the health-care context more generally. His arguments focus on the clinical contexts of nursing and medicine and are supplemented by a series of persuasive examples. Following a description of moral realism, and the kinds of considerations that support it, criticisms of it are developed that seem persuasive. It is argued that our moral responses are explained by our beliefs as opposed to moral realities. In particular, two key arguments presented by Nortvedt are challenged: the so-called argument from convergence and the argument from clinical sensitivity. Both of these key planks in the case for moral realism are rejected, and an alternative 'social conditioning' account briefly sketched, which, it is claimed, has the same explanatory power as Nortvedt's thesis but does not rest on an appeal to independently existing moral properties.

  12. Investigating forensic nursing.

    PubMed

    Barton, S

    1995-01-01

    Forensic nurses are making a positive impact in our society today. They are reaching out to aid victims of violence by not only attending to their injuries and emotional distress, but also by identifying, collecting, and preserving vital evidence that will be needed to assist their patients to seek justice through the legal system. Misinterpretation or failure to properly obtain evidence may result in a miscarriage of justice. Helping victims obtain validation of their injustice is crucial to their healing process and may be of critical importance in the effort to avoid further victimization. Forensic nurses work with victims of child abuse, elder abuse, domestic violence, sexual assault, and persons involved with violence or imminent death. This area includes psychiatric specialists who intervene not only with victims but also with perpetrators of violent and/or sexual acts.

  13. Nursing Research--Taking an Active Interest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cleverly, Dankay

    1998-01-01

    In Britain, nurses' attitudes toward research are changing. Schools of nursing must consider the following research issues: funding, contracts, support, publication, and staff recruitment and retention. (SK)

  14. The pension fund for nurses in Denmark.

    PubMed

    Jensen, P D; Lunding, K

    1994-01-01

    As women and because of their job mobility and low wages, female nurses in many countries are among the employee groups most severely disadvantaged under pension schemes. For many national nurses' associations, an adequate and equitable pension income for nurses after retirement is a major concern. Below a report on the system the Danish Nurses' Organization secured for nurses in Denmark--a system that offers nurses the best possible pension conditions and support when ill and disabled--and on page 177 a summary of efforts by the American Nurses' Association to make a portable pension system for nurses a legal requirement for employers.

  15. Knowledge-based nursing diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Claudette; Hay, D. Robert

    1991-03-01

    Nursing diagnosis is an integral part of the nursing process and determines the interventions leading to outcomes for which the nurse is accountable. Diagnoses under the time constraints of modern nursing can benefit from a computer assist. A knowledge-based engineering approach was developed to address these problems. A number of problems were addressed during system design to make the system practical extended beyond capture of knowledge. The issues involved in implementing a professional knowledge base in a clinical setting are discussed. System functions, structure, interfaces, health care environment, and terminology and taxonomy are discussed. An integrated system concept from assessment through intervention and evaluation is outlined.

  16. Space nursing. A professional challenge.

    PubMed

    Perrin, M M

    1985-09-01

    The challenge is to have man living and working in a permanently based space station. Nursing is on the threshold of expanding the health care role to man's adaptation in outer space. Elements of man's physiologic and psychologic responses are involved in determining the most productive use of man and machines in the space environment. Curricular considerations for a career in space nursing are being explored. The projection of possibilities for practice of space nursing can produce effective contributions toward health care maintenance of the space station personnel. The challenge for nursing is to become a collaborating team participant in the exploration of living and working in space.

  17. Nursing leadership in the boardroom.

    PubMed

    Thorman, Kathleen E

    2004-01-01

    It is critical that nurse leaders, including chief nurse executives and service line directors, be part of the institutional decision-making process about resource allocation, strategic direction, and planning for the future. Nurse leaders can use numerous strategies to influence decisions made in the boardroom that affect the women's service line, including perinatal and women's health. These strategies include building on the importance of women's services to the organization, working in collaboration with senior leaders and key physician leaders, marketing, and reaching out to governing boards with information. Nurse leaders must continue to prepare for the future to thrive in the increasingly complex health care environment.

  18. A review of transcultural nursing.

    PubMed

    Narayanasamy, Aru; White, Ethelrene

    2005-02-01

    In this article, transcultural nursing is reviewed in the light of the literature mainly relevant to the British context. The key features of transcultural nursing are examined in the context of multicultural Britain as follows: definitions, racism, ethnocentrism, culture, diversity, transcultural health care practice and nurse education. Models of transcultural care practice and contemporary developments in cultural care are also explored. There is evidence from emerging literature that innovations are taking place in promoting transcultural care practice and education. However, the article concludes that much practice-based research is still needed to establish transcultural nursing in Britain.

  19. AIDS and homophobia among nurses.

    PubMed

    Scherer, Y K; Wu, Y W; Haughey, B P

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to study nurses' attitudes toward homosexuality and caring for homosexual patients. The results reported in this article are a component of a larger study of nurses' knowledge about and attitudes toward caring for patients with AIDS. The sample comprised 581 Registered Nurses residing in Erie County, New York. Data were gathered by mailed questionnaires. Results of the study indicate that issues concerning the care of patients with AIDS may be complicated by the fact that many of these individuals are homosexuals. The results of this research provide data for developing intervention strategies to help nurses cope with their concerns about caring for homosexual patients with AIDS.

  20. The shifting foundations of nursing.

    PubMed

    Law, Kate; Aranda, Kay

    2010-08-01

    In this paper we argue that the concerns generated by the development of Foundation Degrees and the Assistant and Associate Practitioner roles have rekindled some of the unresolved debates regarding the status and identity of nursing and nurses. Through the application of the sociological theories of professionalisation and nostalgia we have identified the shifting and unresolved nature of nursing. We argue that these theories continue to have resonance in the current climate of change and 'upskilling' of the health care workforce and argue, that the shifts illuminated are perhaps so significant as to demonstrate that we have entered a post-nursing era.

  1. Transitions in nursing leadership roles.

    PubMed

    Jobes, M; Steinbinder, A

    1996-01-01

    Today's turbulent, chaotic health care environment necessitates dramatic changes in the roles of nurse executives. These role changes are rapidly being cast upon individuals who are pressured to react, accept, and adapt quickly. Previously successful leadership styles no longer serve nurse executives as they assume nonoperational roles without line authority and power. No prescriptive strategies will be effective to assist nurse leaders in their new roles. One nurse executive's story of her own journey will be shared to illustrate how she is creating a successful transition.

  2. Teaching rheumatology to nurses.

    PubMed

    Wright, V; Hopkins, R

    1978-08-01

    Seven different types of lecturing technique were assessed in 14 groups of nurses at 2 hospitals. Two lectures in rheumatology were given to each group and a multiple choice questionnaire answered by the nurses immediately after the lecture and 3 months later. A significant amount of knowledge was imparted by the lecturer. About a third of the knowledge, however, was lost within a minute of the end of the lecture, and a half to two-thirds within 3 months. There was no correlation between scores and the row on which the students sat. There was no significant difference between the scores of overseas students and those of British nurses. At immediate recall the techniques differed little. The techniques which scored best were giving the questionnaire before the lectures, giving handouts and using the blackboard. At delayed recall 100% differences in marks were seen between the worst and best techniques in the second lecture. The same techniques which scored best at immediate recall did so on delayed recall. The lowest score occurred where note taking was forbidden. Some questions scored significantly better with note taking. When note taking was forbidden, it made no difference if the student was an habitual notetaker or not. Nor did it make any difference if she was frustrated by the ban. There was no correlation between entry qualifications and the scores obtained. Nurses at a non-teaching hospital did just as well as those at a teaching hospital. It should be emphasised that teaching endeavours to influence 3 aspects-knowledge, skills and attitudes. This series of experiments largely tests the first, but does suggest that a technique which scores highly on information recall may be less helpful in forming constructive attitudes to the patient.

  3. [Aromatherapy in nursing homes].

    PubMed

    Barré, Lucile

    2015-01-01

    Pierre Delaroche de Clisson hospital uses essential oils as part of its daily organisation for the treatment of pain and the development of palliative care. The setting up of this project, in nursing homes and long-term care units, is the fruit of a complex mission carried out by a multidisciplinary team, which had to take into account the risks involved and overcome a certain amount of reluctance. PMID:26154352

  4. Popper and nursing theory.

    PubMed

    Allmark, Peter

    2003-04-01

    Science seems to develop by inducing new knowledge from observation. However, it is hard to find a rational justification for induction. Popper offers one attempt to resolve this problem. Nursing theorists have tended to ignore or reject Popper, often on the false belief that he is a logical positivist (and hence hostile to qualitative research). Logical positivism claims that meaningful sentences containing any empirical content should ultimately be reducible to simple, observation statements. Popper refutes positivism by showing that there are no such simple statements. He is not a positivist. For Popper, the scientist begins with problems and puts forward trial solutions. These are subjected to rigorous testing aimed at falsifying them. A new theoretical position is then reached in which the scientist knows either that the trial solutions are false or that they have not yet been falsified. Science is characterized by the fact that it tests its ideas through attempted falsification. Non-science tests its ideas through attempted refutation. Nursing theory is a mixture of science and non-science. Popper's method requires rigorous testing of theory in both realms. As such, some nursing theory should be discarded. Popper's view faces at least two important criticisms. One is that a scientist can always reject an apparent falsification by instead altering some auxiliary hypothesis (e.g. denying the accuracy of the falsifying observation). Popper can deal with this argument by saying that defence of a theory in this way will eventually break down if the theory is false. The second criticism is that Popper's method does ultimately draw upon induction. This criticism is true, but his method can be usefully adapted. An adapted from of Popper's philosophy of science provides a good basis for nursing theory. PMID:14498963

  5. Sir Paul Nurse.

    PubMed

    Birmingham, K

    2001-11-01

    Prizes in science don't come any bigger than the Nobels, and more often than not this award catapults its recipients from the general research milieu into the realms of scientific stardom. In this, its centenary year, the Nobel committee for Physiology or Medicine decided to honor investigators who have identified vital components of the cell cycle. Nature Medicine talked to one of the winners, Sir Paul Nurse. PMID:11689871

  6. Locating nursing students' chronicles.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Zane Robinson

    2011-01-01

    Analysis of students' stories and reflections has contributed to faculty members' knowledge of the student experience. Examining different sources of nursing students' narratives might lead to further understanding of what they think, feel, and perceive during their educational pursuits. Whereas some texts provide ample insights into student life, others are fragmentary or not recorded, evaluated, or systematically investigated. To achieve a different appreciation of stories and other texts calls for faculty research. What is discovered might change teaching approaches.

  7. Sir Paul Nurse.

    PubMed

    Birmingham, K

    2001-11-01

    Prizes in science don't come any bigger than the Nobels, and more often than not this award catapults its recipients from the general research milieu into the realms of scientific stardom. In this, its centenary year, the Nobel committee for Physiology or Medicine decided to honor investigators who have identified vital components of the cell cycle. Nature Medicine talked to one of the winners, Sir Paul Nurse.

  8. Nurse practitioners: a contract for change and excellence in nursing.

    PubMed

    Turner, Clare; Keyzer, Dirk

    2002-10-01

    The role of the Nurse Practitioner has been in existence in a variety of contexts and within a broad range of the scope of their practice throughout the world for a number of years. Many nurses work at this advanced level of clinical practice without the acknowledgement f the very important and responsible role that they play within the healthcare setting. Although the United States and United Kingdom have recognised the role of the advanced Nurse Practitioner for a number of years, there still exists confusion and disagreement as to their scope of practice. There is uncertainty and anxiety as to where the role boundaries between nursing and medical and allied health professionals begin and end. The role of the Nurse Practitioner in Australia has not been without its problems in the developmental stage of its creation. New South Wales finally achieved recognition of the role this year after a decade of negotiation. This has culminated in the acceptance for the development of 40 Nurse Practitioner positions across the State. The first of these was accepted in the Far West Area Health Service in May 2001. The Far West Area Health Service created a five-year plan, which addresses the development of nurses preparing for authorisation, the creation of Nurse Practitioner positions in the remote communities, the creation of clinical guidelines to support advanced practice and the evaluation process for both the positions and the nurses. The objective of this approach is to ensure effective implementation of these advanced nursing positions in the remote communities of New South Wales. The Nurse Practitioner role needs to respond to the individual, the family and the community, utilising advanced clinical skills and remaining responsive to the changes in health care within a primary health care framework, which is essential for combating the complex health care issues in remote areas (NSW Health 2000). PMID:12539922

  9. [Discourses on the nursing and psychiatric nurse models, published in the Annals of Nursing (1933-1951)].

    PubMed

    Pereira, Michelle de Macedo; Padilha, Maria Itayra; de Oliveira, Alexandre Barbosa; Santos, Tânia Cristina Franco; Filho, Antonio José de Almeida; Peres, Maria Angélica de Almeida

    2014-06-01

    Social-historical study aimed at discussing the nursing and psychiatric nurse models, from the discourses published in the Annals of Nursing.The historical sources were articles published in the Annals of Nursing journal, from 1933 to 1951. An analysis of the discourse was subsidized by the genealogy of power by Michel Foucault.The analysis showed that the discourse on nursing and the psychiatric nurse, in the first half of the 20th century, is set, on one side, by the propositions used by psychiatrists, who sought to reiterate stereotypes and vocations to practice nursing, and, on the other side, by the active participation of nurses seeking to legitimize expertise for psychiatric nursing. It was concluded that the discourses analyzed defined a psychiatric care focused on the nurse and not the rest of the nursing staff, at that time. PMID:25158460

  10. The Nurse's Medication Day

    PubMed Central

    Jennings, Bonnie Mowinski; Sandelowski, Margarete; Mark, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    The medication administration stage of the medication-use process is especially vulnerable to error because errors are least likely to be caught before reaching the patient. Medication administration, however, remains poorly understood. In this article we describe medication administration as observed in an ethnographic study conducted on one medical and one surgical unit. A central finding was that medication administration entailed a complex mixture of varied and often competing demands that temporally structured the nurses' entire workday. Articulation work was evident in time management strategies nurses used to handle demands from institutional policies, technical devices, patients, the physical environment, and the medications themselves. The average number of doses of medication per patient was more than double the number policy groups have indicated. Medication administration is neither simply the giving of drugs nor does it have clearly defined temporal boundaries. Because of its inseparability from other nurses' work, medication administration inherently entails interruption, thereby calling into question the current emphasis on reducing interruptions as a tactic to decrease medication errors. PMID:21693688

  11. Nurse-Friendly Hospital Project: enhancing nurse retention and quality of care.

    PubMed

    Meraviglia, Martha; Grobe, Susan J; Tabone, Stephanie; Wainwright, Mary; Shelton, Steve; Yu, Lydia; Jordan, Clair

    2008-01-01

    The present shortage of nurses in the United States is expected to continue. Nurse shortage, the nature of the work environment, and employers' expectations and attitudes, among other factors, influence both nurse retention and quality of patient care. The Nurse-Friendly Hospital Project was designed to improve nurses' work environment in rural and small hospitals in Texas. Findings demonstrate improvements in nurse retention, nurse staffing, and quality of care. PMID:18354333

  12. Male adolescent fertility preservation.

    PubMed

    Moss, Jared L; Choi, Andrew Wonho; Fitzgerald Keeter, Mary Kate; Brannigan, Robert E

    2016-02-01

    Until the 1960s, few adolescents and young adults (AYAs) survived their initial cancer diagnoses. Now, ∼12,400 AYA patients are diagnosed with cancer each year, and almost 80% will now achieve a long-term cure. This dramatic improvement in survival is primarily due to multimodal treatments and combined chemotherapeutic regimens. Unfortunately, the increase in survival is often accompanied by treatment-related toxicities due to chemotherapy, radiation therapy, and surgical procedures. Despite guidelines published by the American Society of Clinical Oncology and numerous other professional organizations, high percentages of male AYA oncology patients are not properly counseled regarding their fertility preservation options before cancer treatment. Although administering fertility preservation care to adolescent males can be challenging in many ways, numerous studies show that this care can be delivered with high degrees of success and high levels of patient and parent satisfaction. The key to this success at many institutions has been the implementation of formalized integrated fertility preservation programs with infrastructure geared toward the delivery of comprehensive expedited care.

  13. Lisping and male homosexuality.

    PubMed

    Van Borsel, John; Van de Putte, Anneleen

    2014-08-01

    The present study examined the popular stereotype that gay men lisp by evaluating to what extent listeners associated dental or frontal articulation/lisping with gayness. Fifteen heterosexual males and 15 heterosexual females listened to 275 samples of read speech and judged the sexual orientation of the speakers. A total of 175 of the samples were of homosexual men, 74 (42.3 %) of which had been identified with lisping in a previous study; 100 were of heterosexual men, 18 (18 %) of which had been identified with lisping previously. Based on the ratings of the listeners of the present study, lisping speakers were significantly more often judged to be homosexual. This was true for the group as a whole as well as for the subgroup of homosexual and heterosexual men separately. Furthermore, there was no significant gender difference with respect to associating lisping with gayness. Male and female judges associated lisping with gayness to a similar degree. Additional analysis showed that overall 56.2 % of the time the judges were correct in their judgment of the speakers' sexual orientation. The results of this study confirmed previous preliminary findings that suggested that frontal or dental articulation/lisping is a feature that listeners associate with gayness. The reason for this association remains to be clarified.

  14. Lisping and male homosexuality.

    PubMed

    Van Borsel, John; Van de Putte, Anneleen

    2014-08-01

    The present study examined the popular stereotype that gay men lisp by evaluating to what extent listeners associated dental or frontal articulation/lisping with gayness. Fifteen heterosexual males and 15 heterosexual females listened to 275 samples of read speech and judged the sexual orientation of the speakers. A total of 175 of the samples were of homosexual men, 74 (42.3 %) of which had been identified with lisping in a previous study; 100 were of heterosexual men, 18 (18 %) of which had been identified with lisping previously. Based on the ratings of the listeners of the present study, lisping speakers were significantly more often judged to be homosexual. This was true for the group as a whole as well as for the subgroup of homosexual and heterosexual men separately. Furthermore, there was no significant gender difference with respect to associating lisping with gayness. Male and female judges associated lisping with gayness to a similar degree. Additional analysis showed that overall 56.2 % of the time the judges were correct in their judgment of the speakers' sexual orientation. The results of this study confirmed previous preliminary findings that suggested that frontal or dental articulation/lisping is a feature that listeners associate with gayness. The reason for this association remains to be clarified. PMID:24578106

  15. Male-male pheromone signalling in a lekking Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Widemo, Fredrik; Johansson, Björn G

    2006-03-22

    Interest in sex pheromones has mainly been focused on mate finding, while relatively little attention has been given to the role of sex pheromones in mate choice and almost none to competition over mates. Here, we study male response to male pheromones in the lekking Drosophila grimshawi, where males deposit long-lasting pheromone streaks that attract males and females to the leks and influence mate assessment. We used two stocks of flies and both stocks adjusted their pheromone depositing behaviour in response to experimental manipulation, strongly indicating male ability to distinguish between competitors from qualitative differences in pheromone streaks alone. This is the first example of an insect distinguishing between individual odour signatures. Pheromone signalling influenced competition over mates, as males adjusted their investment in pheromone deposition in response to foreign pheromone streaks. Both sexes adapt their behaviour according to information from olfactory cues in D. grimshawi, but the relative benefits from male-female, as compared to male-male signalling, remain unknown. It seems likely that the pheromone signalling system originally evolved for attracting females to leks. The transition to a signalling system for conveying information about individuals may well, however, at least in part have been driven by benefits from male-male signalling.

  16. Determinants of hospital-to-nursing home placement delays: a pilot study.

    PubMed Central

    Weissert, W G; Cready, C M

    1988-01-01

    Estimates of hospital-to-nursing home placement delays have always been varied, and given Medicare's new Prospective Payment System (PPS) based on diagnosis-related groups (DRGs), they are likely to have changed again. Theory and previous research suggest that four patient characteristics are the main causes of delays: Medicaid as the patient's nursing home payer source; need for heavy care due to major physical or mental problems; admission to the hospital from a nursing home; and lack of social support. A pilot study of all 1,016 elderly awaiting nursing home placement in two admission cohorts (pre- and post-PPS) from the three largest hospitals in the county surrounding Charlotte, North Carolina--where nursing home beds are in short supply--indicates that other factors are more important. While most placements were delayed, delays were short. Multiple regression results show that Medicaid patients' delays were only about a day longer than those of private-pay patients. Of the many heavy-care conditions studied, only three were associated with delay. Patients without social support and patients admitted from a nursing home, discharged to a hospital-affiliated facility, or placed after PPS had shorter delays. Long delays were found among patients who had applied for Medicaid coverage but had not yet been certified as financially eligible. Nonwhites and males were also delayed. These findings, if replicated in other areas with perceived nursing home bed shortages, appear to have important implications not only for the usefulness of nursing home case-mix reimbursement and subacute levels of nursing home care, but for nursing home bed-need estimates, too, as well as for Medicaid eligibility determination practices and civil rights law enforcement. PMID:3060449

  17. Attitudes towards interprofessional collaboration among primary care physicians and nurses in Singapore.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Ruth Mingli; Sim, Yu Fan; Koh, Gerald Choon-Huat

    2016-07-01

    Interprofessional collaboration (IPC) has been shown to improve patient outcomes, cost efficiency, and health professional satisfaction, and enhance healthy workplaces. We determined the attitudes of primary care physicians and nurses towards IPC and factors facilitating IPC using a cross-sectional study design in Singapore. A self-administered anonymous questionnaire, based on the Jefferson Scale of Attitudes toward Physician-Nurse Collaboration (JSAPNC), was distributed to primary healthcare physicians and nurses working in National Healthcare Group Polyclinics (N = 455). We found that the mean JSAPNC score for physicians was poorer than that for nurses (50.39 [SD = 4.67] vs. 51.61 [SD = 4.19], respectively, mean difference, MD = 1.22, CI = 0.35-2.09, p = .006). Nurses with advanced education had better mean JSAPNC score than nurses with basic education (52.28 [SD = 4.22] vs. 51.12 [SD = 4.11], respectively, MD = 1.16, CI = 0.12-2.20, p = .029). Male participants had poorer mean JSAPNC score compared to females (50.27 [SD = 5.02] vs. 51.38 [SD = 4.22], respectively MD = 1.11, CI = 0.07-2.14, p = .036). With regression analysis, only educational qualification among nurses was independently and positively associated with JSAPNC scores (p = .018). In conclusion, primary care nurses in Singapore had more positive attitudes towards IPC than physicians. Among nurses, those with advanced education had more positive attitudes than those with basic education. Greater emphasis on IPC education in training of physicians and nurses could help improve attitudes further. PMID:27269233

  18. Nursing in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit, Nursing 205.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Varton, Deborah M.

    A description is provided of a course, "Nursing in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit," offered for senior-level baccalaureate degree nursing students. The first section provides information on the place of the course within the curriculum, the allotment of class time, and target student populations. The next section looks at course content in…

  19. Violence and the Nursing Curriculum: Nurse Educators Speak Out.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodtli, M. Anne; Breslin, Eileen T.

    1997-01-01

    Focus groups of 100 nurse educators and survey responses from 107 at a national convention revealed overwhelming agreement that nursing curricula do not adequately address violence and that faculty are not prepared to teach violence assessment and abuse reporting, despite agreement that it is a high-priority issue. (SK)

  20. Beyond "Hot Lips" and "Big Nurse": Creative Writing and Nursing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Sandra

    2005-01-01

    This essay describes a special topics creative writing course designed for nursing students, and argues that creative writing strategies work to improve nurses' compositional skills. Also discussed are other potential benefits from creatively writing patients' lives, notably, the blending of arts and sciences, and the ways in which medical schools…