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  1. The image of nursing, as perceived by Iranian male nurses.

    PubMed

    Valizadeh, Leila; Zamanzadeh, Vahid; Fooladi, Marjaneh M; Azadi, Arman; Negarandeh, Reza; Monadi, Morteza

    2014-09-01

    The stereotypical public image of nursing is a major concern for male nurses around the world. In this study, we explored how Iranian male nurses perceived the public view of nurses, and their perceptions of themselves. A qualitative descriptive design and content analysis were used to obtain data from 18 purposely-selected male hospital nurses with a baccalaureate nursing degree in Tabriz, Iran. Semistructured interviews were conducted and analyzed. Two main themes emerged: (i) the outsider's view of nursing, which referred to the participants' perceptions of their public image; and (ii) the insider's view, which related to the male nurses' perceptions of themselves. Results included personal transition into a positive professional self-image through the educational process, and continued public perception of nursing as a female profession ill-suited for a man. Strategies to improve the insider's and outsider's views of nursing are listed to help recruit and retain more Iranian male nurses.

  2. Nursing instructors' and male nursing students' perceptions of undergraduate, classroom nursing education.

    PubMed

    Dyck, Jeff M; Oliffe, John; Phinney, Alison; Garrett, Bernie

    2009-08-01

    Attrition rates of male nursing students exceed those of females yet the experiences of male students in nursing school are poorly understood. This interpretive ethnographic study explored the experiences of male nursing students and female nursing instructors in the context of classroom education. Data collection consisted of participant observation of classroom teaching sessions followed by interviews with six male nursing students who were participants in the classes and six female nursing instructors who taught the classes. Themes resulting from data analysis addressed men's roles in the nursing classroom and the culture of nursing education. The theme of "nursing like a real man" was characterized by men's reliance on roles and behaviours associated with traditional masculinities including leadership, assertiveness and risk-taking. The theme of "masculinities in a feminine place" captured the gendered culture of nursing education which manifested in stereotypes and a sexualized identity, where men saw themselves as accommodated but not integrated. "Diversity between masculine and feminine" communicated the incongruity between men's educational preferences and the techniques that predominate in nursing education. These findings suggest that nursing instructors need to consider gender in their teaching practice, avoid parody or stereotypes of masculinities, and reject assumptions that male students are homogeneous.

  3. Academic challenges and positive aspects: perceptions of male nursing students.

    PubMed

    Abushaikha, L; Mahadeen, A; AbdelKader, R; Nabolsi, M

    2014-06-01

    Nursing shortage remains a global issue that emphasizes the need for both male and female nurses. Understanding the educational experiences of male nursing students may help in recruiting and retaining male nurses in the nursing profession. The aim of this study was to explore the challenges and positive aspects that undergraduate male nursing students encounter during the course of their study. A qualitative research design using inductive content analysis approach was used to explore perceptions of 20 undergraduate male nursing students in a baccalaureate nursing programme at a major public university in Jordan. Content analysis revealed two major themes: challenges (academic difficulties, biased policies, no social life, negative views of nursing and negative self-view) and positive aspects (personal benefits of studying nursing, every home need a nurse and nursing is a science). The findings added new insights and knowledge regarding the educational experiences of undergraduate male nursing students in a developing country, which is an understudied population. Understanding the challenges and positive aspects of nursing education from the perspectives of undergraduate male nursing students may help nursing educators better understand their students' educational experiences and help clarify their roles and responsibilities in dealing with these issues. Nursing as a career should continue to be a viable choice for both male and female students to address global nursing shortages. This can be ensured by decreasing challenges and supporting positive aspects that nursing students face during their nursing education. Higher education policy makers can use the findings of this study to appreciate the challenges that university students face. They can also reconsider existing policies that may hinder the acceptance of male student into nursing programmes and contribute to educational challenges. © 2014 International Council of Nurses.

  4. Teaching Problems and Strategies with Male Nursing Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tumminia, Patricia A.

    1981-01-01

    Male student nurses encounter unique conflicts in the nursing education process that can interfere with their learning abilities and ultimately their success. This article examines these conflicts and offers a variety of teaching strategies to combat them. (Author/CT)

  5. Survival strategies of male nurses in rural areas of Japan.

    PubMed

    Asakura, Kyoko; Watanabe, Ikue

    2011-12-01

    This study seeks to describe the survival strategies of male nurses in Japanese rural areas. Interviews were conducted with 12 male nurses who described their occupational experiences. The modified grounded theory approach was used for the data collection and analysis. The survival strategies of these male nurses can be categorized into four types: (i) giving priority to the achievement of financial security; (ii) agreeing to a dependent relationship with doctors; (iii) maintaining one's male identity through supporting the female nurses; and (iv) making an appeal to the significance of men in the female-dominated nursing profession. The survival strategies that were used by the male nurses were subtle, allowing them to influence indirectly both the female nurses and the doctors. These findings contribute to our understanding of the experiences of male nurses, a gendered minority in a female-dominated workplace, and encourage gender equality in the nursing profession. © 2011 The Authors. Japan Journal of Nursing Science © 2011 Japan Academy of Nursing Science.

  6. Caring for female patients: The experiences of male nurses.

    PubMed

    Keogh, Brian; Gleeson, Madeline

    This article presents the results of two small qualitative studies, which examined the experiences of six male registered psychiatric nurses (RPN) and five male registered general nurses (RGN) when caring for patients of the opposite sex. Semi-structured interviews were used to collect the data. The focus of the interviews was an attempt to describe the male nurses' experiences of caring for women with a particular emphasis on interventions that involved physical touch. Themes were generated from both studies and the common themes are presented here. Male nurses in this study were often apprehensive about using physical touch and they used coping strategies in response to their fears of being accused of using touch inappropriately. Several factors also influenced the male nurses when using physical touch as an intervention. These findings suggest that learning about caring for female patients needs to be included in the undergraduate curriculum and that further research on the experience of men as nurses is required.

  7. Women Nurses and Male Physicians: Their Educational Relationships.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bullough, Vern; Bullough, Bonnie

    The implications for nursing education of the fact that nursing started as a woman's occupation in a field dominated by the male physician are considered. Although in 1873 nursing represented a real educational opportunity for large numbers of women, none of the prestigious women's colleges were interested in educating women for careers. In the…

  8. There is nothing wrong with being a nurse: The experiences of male nursing students in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Yang, Cheng-I; Yu, Hsing-Yi; Chin, Yen-Fan; Lee, Li-Hung

    2017-02-05

    Male nurses are reported to experience role strain. Fear of gender stereotyping can be stressful and frustrating for male nursing students, which could make them feel isolated and excluded. The aim of this qualitative study was to investigate how male nursing students in Taiwan perceive the barriers to their experience as nursing students and how they manage these barriers in their study environment and social life. A qualitative research approach was used in this study. Data were collected during 2014 from 24 male nursing students from three nursing educational institutes in Taiwan who participated in order to share their experiences by using a semistructured interview. All the interviews were recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed by thematic analysis. The main theme that described the experiences of the male nursing students in Taiwan was: "There is nothing wrong with being a male nurse." Contrary to other studies, role strain for the participants was minimal. The students experienced some barriers because of being a male nursing student, both at school and in their social life. Most of these students tended to manage the barriers by developing positive thinking and coping strategies. Nursing educators are encouraged to use the findings from this study to provide appropriate support for male nursing students. © 2017 Japan Academy of Nursing Science.

  9. Male Nurses in Israel: Barriers, Motivation, and How They Are Perceived by Nursing Students.

    PubMed

    Ashkenazi, Liat; Livshiz-Riven, Ilana; Romem, Pnina; Grinstein-Cohen, Orli

    The current worldwide nursing shortage remains a challenge for the nursing profession. Encouraging men to become nurses and, thereby, increasing the number of practitioners are crucial factors in facing this challenge. The historiography of nursing presents nursing as "women's work," based on the assumption that it is inherently appropriate for women only. Although men were employed as nurses even before nursing was recognized as a profession, male nurses were always a minority in the field. Over the years, the proportion of male nurses has increased, but they still comprise only 5 to 10% of the nursing workforce in the western world. This study examined men's motives for a career choice of nursing, how male nurses are perceived, and the barriers that they face. The study was conducted among 336 nursing students studying in a co-educational program in various academic tracks at a public, nonsectarian university in the south of Israel. Participants completed the following questionnaires in one study session: sociodemographic questionnaire; Attitudes Towards Men in Nursing Scale; motives for career choice questionnaire; and the questionnaire of the perceptions of the professional status of nursing. Study findings revealed that men tended to choose nursing because of financial constraints significantly more frequently than women (P=.001). Among the participants, there was no significant between-sex difference in the perception nursing as women's work (P=.002) or in perception of male nurses as homosexuals. Results of the study showed that the status of the nursing profession is considered low, and the low status deters men from choosing nursing as a career. The motivation for men's career choice must be understood, and men must be empowered to improve their work conditions and financial remuneration in order to recruit men to the field and to improve the perception of the profession and its public status.

  10. Male nurses' experiences of providing intimate care for women clients.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Madoka; Chapman, Rose; Wynaden, Dianne

    2006-09-01

    This paper reports a study of male nurses' experiences of providing intimate care for women clients. The number of men entering the nursing profession has increased worldwide. As a consequence of the move to a more gender-balanced profession, debate has ensued over how intimate care should be performed when this requires male nurses to be physically close to women clients. As there was little previous work on this topic, we wished to provide nurses, clients and other healthcare professionals with a better understanding of male nurses' experiences of working with women clients and within a healthcare system where they often feel excluded. Semi-structured, open-ended interviews were conducted with male nurses working in various clinical settings in Western Australia. Latent content analysis was used to analyse the interviews, which were carried out between June and July 2004. Three themes were identified: the definition of intimate care, the emotional experience associated with providing intimate care and strategies used to assist in the delivery of intimate care for women clients. Providing intimate care for women clients was a challenging experience for male nurses. Participants described how it required them to invade these clients' personal space. Consequently, they often experienced various negative feelings and used several strategies to assist them during care delivery. Nurse educators should assist male nurses to be better prepared to interact with women clients in various settings. Furthermore, workplace environments need to provide additional support and guidance for male nurses to enable them to develop effective coping strategies to manage challenging situations.

  11. 'Being a Chameleon': labour processes of male nurses performing bodywork.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Murray J

    2009-12-01

    This paper is a report of a study examining the labour processes of male nurses in the conduct of bodywork, and is part of a broader study of social practices that configure masculinity through the lives of male nurses. Bodywork is defined as the direct work on others' bodies, and involves interactions of bodies and the control of emotions. As the body is an arena in which social practice occurs then bodywork is a form of social engagement. Bodywork is inextricably intertwined with gender where bodywork is socially structured and culturally accepted as women's work. Life history method was used in this study. Twenty-one life stories from male registered nurses were gathered in 2003-2004 using semi-structured interviews. Each life story underwent structural analysis, using a four-dimension structural model of gender relations. The ability of male nurses to do bodywork and provide care is dependent on the way they 'do' gender, that is, they have to be perceived to be performing the masculine identity that best represents the individual patient's ideology of what it is to be a man, which is set in a particular location and time. In addition, they have to counter the representations of the male nurse, whether it is homosexual, paedophile or heterosexual deviant. Respondents develop labour processes and workplace strategies to overcome the effects of gender stereotypes that may hinder their nursing work. Nursing procedures, policies and texts should reflect the complexity and multiplicity in the conduct of bodywork in nursing and refrain from representing essentialist ways (reinforcing nursing as feminine) of doing nursing.

  12. Relationships among social support, professional empowerment, and nursing career development of male nurses: a cross-sectional analysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Sheng-Hwang; Fu, Chou-Mei; Li, Ren-Hau; Lou, Jiunn-Horng; Yu, Hsing-Yi

    2012-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore the relationships among social support, professional empowerment, and nursing career development and to identify the significant factors that affect nursing career development among male nurses. A cross-sectional survey design was used with 314 male nurses in Taiwan. Social support and professional empowerment were significantly and positively correlated with nursing career development among male nurses. Social support, professional empowerment, salary, type of institution, type of clinical level, and nursing discipline were identified as factors that significantly influenced nursing career development. Together, they accounted for 55.9% of the total variation. Professional empowerment was the most critical predictor of nursing career development and accounted for 47.7% of the variation. Nursing managers should follow male nurses' empowerment with interest and specifically address professional empowerment to promote male nurses' career development.

  13. Celluloid devils: a research study of male nurses in feature films.

    PubMed

    Stanley, David

    2012-11-01

    To report a study of how male nurses are portrayed in feature films. It was hypothesized that male nurses are frequently portrayed negatively or stereotypically in the film media, potentially having a negative impact on male nurse recruitment and the public's perception of male nurses. An interpretive, qualitative methodology guided by insights into hegemonic masculinity and structured around a set of collective case studies (films) was used to examine the portrayal of male nurses in feature films made in the Western world from 1900 to 2007. Over 36,000 feature film synopses were reviewed (via CINAHL, ProQuest and relevant movie-specific literature) for the keyword 'nurse' and 'nursing' with an additional search for films from 1900 to 2010 for the word 'male nurse'. Identified films were labelled as 'cases' and analysed collectively to determine key attributes related to men in nursing and explore them for the emergence of concepts and themes related to the image of male nurses in films. A total of 13 relevant cases (feature films) were identified with 12 being made in the USA. Most films portrayed male nurses negatively and in ways opposed to hegemonic masculinity, as effeminate, homosexual, homicidal, corrupt or incompetent. Few film images of male nurses show them in traditional masculine roles or as clinically competent or self-confident professionals.   Feature films predominantly portray male nurses negatively. Given the popularity of feature films, there may be negative effects on recruitment and on the public's perception of male nurses. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  14. Image of Nursing Profession as Perceived by Egyptian and Jordanian Undergraduate Male Nursing Students: A Comparative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ibrahim, Azza Fathi; Akel, Dalal Talat; Alzghoul, Husam Wasil Mohammed

    2015-01-01

    The hiring and maintaining of male nurses in the nursing field is a very apparent issue nowadays. Hence, there is an urgent need to promote a professional nursing image and enhance its standing in the community, especially for men. Although they have an important position in nursing, men are still proportionately in the minority. This study aimed…

  15. Do higher dispositions for empathy predispose males toward careers in nursing? A descriptive correlational design.

    PubMed

    Penprase, Barbara; Oakley, Barbara; Ternes, Reuben; Driscoll, Dana

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to understand male nursing students' empathy traits compared with other university students using the systematizing quotient and empathizing quotient questionnaires. Female students have higher empathizing traits than male students. However, when male nursing students were compared with the general population of other male students, they revealed higher empathy traits 3.0 (p < .01) than other males. Empathy plays a significant role in attracting men to a nursing career. Male nurses are not only caring individuals but also have high problem-solving skills in complex environments, demonstrating their strong systemizing characteristics to organize, plan, and implement care. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Difficulties Encountered by Final-Year Male Nursing Students in Their Internship Programmes.

    PubMed

    Al-Momani, Mohammed Mahmoud

    2017-08-01

    The cultural norms of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia do not encourage men to choose nursing as a career. Understanding male nursing students' experiences of their clinical exposure to the nursing profession throughout their internship might increase their retention. This study explored the experiences of final-year male nursing students as they transitioned to the role of registered nurse. A qualitative descriptive research design with an inductive content-analysis approach was used. The experiences of 22 final-year male nursing students from three public hospitals in a major city of Saudi Arabia were explored. The data were collected using focus-group interviews and documentary analysis in March 2015 and May 2015. Content analysis revealed three major themes: the societal and cultural image of male nurses, male students' engagement in nursing practice, and restructuring the internship programmes' policies to suit male students' needs. The findings reveal issues that mainly stem from negative social views of nursing as a male profession. Considering the students' social and cultural needs during their internship programme will facilitate their transition into the role of registered nurse and their retention in the nursing profession.

  17. Difficulties Encountered by Final-Year Male Nursing Students in Their Internship Programmes

    PubMed Central

    Al-Momani, Mohammed Mahmoud

    2017-01-01

    Background The cultural norms of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia do not encourage men to choose nursing as a career. Understanding male nursing students’ experiences of their clinical exposure to the nursing profession throughout their internship might increase their retention. This study explored the experiences of final-year male nursing students as they transitioned to the role of registered nurse. Methods A qualitative descriptive research design with an inductive content-analysis approach was used. The experiences of 22 final-year male nursing students from three public hospitals in a major city of Saudi Arabia were explored. The data were collected using focus-group interviews and documentary analysis in March 2015 and May 2015. Results Content analysis revealed three major themes: the societal and cultural image of male nurses, male students’ engagement in nursing practice, and restructuring the internship programmes’ policies to suit male students’ needs. Conclusion The findings reveal issues that mainly stem from negative social views of nursing as a male profession. Considering the students’ social and cultural needs during their internship programme will facilitate their transition into the role of registered nurse and their retention in the nursing profession. PMID:28951687

  18. The male of the species: a profile of men in nursing.

    PubMed

    Stanley, David; Beament, Tania; Falconer, Darren; Haigh, Margaret; Saunders, Rosemary; Stanley, Karen; Wall, Peter; Nielson, Sharon

    2016-05-01

    To establish a profile of men in nursing in Western Australia and explore the perception of men in nursing from the perspective of male and female nurses. A project team, including some of the current authors, produced a YouTube video and DVD about men in nursing which led to further enquiry on this topic. The study employed a non-experimental, comparative, descriptive research design focused on a quantitative methodology, using an online survey in early 2014. A convenience sample incorporated registered and enrolled nurses and midwives in Western Australia. The range of data included demographic information and the respondents' perceptions of men in nursing were collected. Findings indicated that the main reasons for choosing a career in nursing or midwifery were similar for both genders. Common mis-perceptions of men in nursing included: most male nurses are gay; men are not suited to nursing and men are less caring and compassionate than women. Suggestions to promote nursing to men included: nurses are highly skilled professionals; there is the potential to make a difference for patients; nursing offers stable employment, professional diversity and opportunities for team work. There is a diminished awareness of opportunities for men in nursing and negative stereotypes related to men in nursing persist. The study produced recommendations which included: using the right message to target the recruitment for men and promoting a more realistic understanding of the profile and perception of men in nursing. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Self-image of male nursing students in Hong Kong: multi-qualitative approaches.

    PubMed

    Chan, Zenobia C Y; Lo, Kelvin K L; Tse, Kris C Y; Wong, William W

    2014-01-01

    The image of male nurses is closely related to the development of a female-driven nursing occupation. As a minority group in the nursing industry, male nursing students may have a negative self-image in their learning and clinical practicum. This may affect their psychological health and mental status. This study explored the positive and negative self-image of male nursing students. Eighteen participants were recruited from a local nurse-training institute. The participants were undergraduate bachelor's and master's students of nursing. The experience and opinions of the participants were collected by multiple methods. The participants' drawings and audio diaries representing their self-image as nurses were collected in advance of a discussion of ideas raised in the focus group interview. The findings were categorized into three themes: (a) self-roles, functions, and identities; (b) awareness of gender differences; and (c) the future of professional development. The findings of this study provide information on the nurse role, identity, gender differences, and professional development of male nursing students, which will drive the direction of the development of a positive image for male nurses in the future.

  20. Gender-based barriers for male students in nursing education programs: prevalence and perceived importance.

    PubMed

    O'Lynn, Chad Ellis

    2004-05-01

    To meet the recent call to increase the number of nurses by recruiting men, nursing education programs will need to reduce gender-based barriers. No study found has adequately quantified the prevalence and perceived importance of barriers to men in nursing education programs. These barriers create an academic environment that is unfriendly to men. As such, I defined a new construct, "male friendliness," as a function of the presence and importance of these barriers. The aims of this study were to describe the prevalence and perceived importance of barriers and to develop a tool to measure male friendliness in nursing programs. A pilot tool addressing 33 barriers, which were obtained from the literature, my experience, and a panel of nurse educators, was mailed to 200 male nurses. The findings revealed that seven barriers were importantly different in prevalence between different subsamples of male nurses, and no barrier was rated unimportant by more than 20% of respondents. The similarities in findings between groups of male nurses, diverse in geography, school attendance, and graduation dates, suggest that the barriers men face in nursing school are pervasive, consistent, and have changed little over time. From the findings, the Inventory of Male Friendliness in Nursing Programs (IMFNP) was developed.

  1. Clinical learning experiences of male nursing students in a Bachelor of Nursing programme: Strategies to overcome challenges.

    PubMed

    Buthelezi, Sibusiso F; Fakude, Lorrain P; Martin, Penny D; Daniels, Felicity M

    2015-09-30

    Male nursing students are faced with more challenges in the clinical setting than their female counterparts. The ways in which male nurses are viewed and received by nursing staff and patients have an impact on how they perceive themselves and their role in the profession. These perceptions of self have a significant impact on their self-esteem. This study was conducted to explore the clinical learning experiences of male nursing students at a university during their placement in clinical settings in the Western Cape Province, and how these experiences impacted on their self-esteem. To describe the learning experiences of male nursing students during placement in clinical settings, and how these impact on their self-esteem. A qualitative, exploratory study was conducted. Purposive sampling was used to select participants. Three focus group (FG) discussions, consisting of six participants per group, were used to collect data. Data analysis was conducted by means of Coliazzi's (1978) seven steps method of qualitative analysis. The following three major themes were identified: experiences that related to the constraints in the learning environment, the impact on the self-esteem, and the social support of students working in a female-dominated profession. Male nurses should be supported in nursing training, as the rate at which males enter the profession is increasing.

  2. Conscious Engagement in Undergraduate Male Nursing Students: Facilitating Voice through an Action Research Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maykut, Colleen A.; Lee, Andrew; Argueta, Nelson Garcia; Grant, Sean; Miller, Cole

    2016-01-01

    Although women have made significant progress into traditionally male-dominated professions, such as medicine and engineering, the same cannot be said of men in the nursing profession. Utilizing a critical social theory perspective, an action research project was designed to encourage participants, current male nursing students and alumni of…

  3. Conscious Engagement in Undergraduate Male Nursing Students: Facilitating Voice through an Action Research Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maykut, Colleen A.; Lee, Andrew; Argueta, Nelson Garcia; Grant, Sean; Miller, Cole

    2016-01-01

    Although women have made significant progress into traditionally male-dominated professions, such as medicine and engineering, the same cannot be said of men in the nursing profession. Utilizing a critical social theory perspective, an action research project was designed to encourage participants, current male nursing students and alumni of…

  4. [A preliminary study of the work values of male nurses in Taiwan and related factors].

    PubMed

    Hsu, Yu-Ying; Tang, Woung-Ru; Chang, Yue-Cune; Maa, Suh-Hwa

    2013-04-01

    Male nurses account for 1.08% of Taiwan's total professional nursing workforce. While work values are known to impact the practice of female nurses, the work values of male nurses have never been fully evaluated. The aim of this study was to explore the work values of male nurses in Taiwan and related factors. We applied a cross-sectional design that targeted all male nurses nationwide and used a structured questionnaire distributed by mail to collect data. Data were collected from 1,087 Taiwan-based male nurses with 745 valid responses. Mean score for overall work value was 2.78 (on a maximum scale of 4). Socio-demographic differences contributed to work value variance among respondents. Major factors of influence on work value included education, work unit, work position, work rank, salary, hospital classification, and reason for choosing a nursing career. This study found personal characteristics, occupational roles, job performance, and reason for choosing a career in nursing to all correlate strongly with work value.

  5. Blessed art thou among women: male nursing students and gender inequalities in Chile.

    PubMed

    Ayala, Ricardo A; Holmqvist, Moira T; Messing, Helga B; Browne, Rodrigo F

    2014-12-01

    The evolution of nursing education into an academic curriculum and the growing interest of men in nursing have been significant landmarks in the development of a 'female' occupation. Chilean nursing is considered as the leading example of nursing education in Latin America, demanding a five-year training on a full-time university programme. The consequences of education, however, are assumed as more egalitarian opportunities, disregarding the latent replication of structures that perpetuate inequalities. To comprehend the socialisation of male nursing students and its relation with their masculine identity and the construction of inequalities in nursing education. We draw upon interviews undertaken with beginner and advanced nursing students from a Chilean university. Approval was obtained from the relevant Ethics Committee. The data were organised to allow the development of concepts by using the Grounded Theory approach. The analysis uncovers paradoxical results of nursing education and its ineffectiveness in preventing gender-based inequalities. The interest in empowering nursing politically may lead to favour an increasing number of men entering nursing in ways that facilitate male students' progress. Furthermore, there exist discourses of compassion that feed consideration for male students, engendering in the process the prospect of professional success and the gravitation into strategic positions in the employment market. These are mechanisms that reproduce earlier gender-based inequalities in nursing. In the light of the social reproduction theory, the academisation of Chilean nursing seems to be built upon historical gender asymmetries. Although the interest of men in embracing a career in nursing may have a meaningful resonance with the transformation of contemporary society, this process needs a judicious examination in order to protect academic integrity and, ultimately, prevent the reproduction of those inequalities in question. This analysis offers a

  6. Masculinity and nursing care: A narrative analysis of male students' stories about care.

    PubMed

    Jordal, Kristin; Heggen, Kristin

    2015-11-01

    Nursing education programmes and the nursing curriculum have been criticised for presenting an outdated and feminised description of care, which has had the effect of marginalising men, as well as hindering a more modern outlook for the profession. This article uses interview-based data from a qualitative study on Norwegian students' experiences in the first year of training. Using a narrative analysis method, the paper explores how male nursing students use stories to describe care and shows how their storytelling illustrates a way for men to negotiate their role in a feminised profession. The paper aims to deepen our understanding of the ways in which male students can challenge this historically female profession to broaden itself by including male-based caregiving as part of nursing care. In addition, the paper highlights the potential of stories and storytelling as a teaching and learning strategy in nursing education.

  7. Nurse practice issues regarding sperm banking in adolescent male cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Reebals, Jeri F; Brown, Richard; Buckner, Ellen B

    2006-01-01

    The impressive increase in the survival rate of childhood cancer patients has produced increased interest in quality of life issues. This research addresses nurse practice issues in determining whether the newly diagnosed adolescent male patient is offered the option of sperm banking before undergoing chemotherapy treatment. Questionnaires were distributed to nurses and nurse practitioners on 3 inpatient and outpatient units who care for adolescent male cancer patients at the time of diagnosis, during chemotherapy, and during follow-up care. Findings indicate that 96.3% of respondents agreed that all male patients undergoing cancer treatment with infertility as a potential side effect should be offered sperm banking. Respondents viewed oncologists and nurse practitioners as appropriate professionals to discuss the option. Lack of knowledge regarding sperm banking could be limiting nurses' willingness to introduce the topic, and education regarding cryopreservation may improve their knowledge and practice.

  8. Warming the nursing education climate for traditional-age learners who are male.

    PubMed

    Bell-Scriber, Marietta J

    2008-01-01

    For nurse educators to facilitate student learning and the achievement of desired cognitive, affective, and psychomotor outcomes, they need to be competent in recognizing the influence of gender, experience, and other factors on teaching and learning. A study was conducted in one academic institution to describe how traditional-age male learners' perceptions of the nursing education climate compare to perceptions of female learners. Interviews were conducted with a sample of four male and four female learners. Additional data from interviews with nurse educators, classroom observations, and a review of textbooks provided breadth and depth to their perceptions. Findings support a nursing education climate that is cooler to traditional-age male learners and warmer to traditional-age female learners. The main cooling factor for men was caused by nurse educators' characteristics and unsupportive behaviors. Additional factors inside and outside the education environment contributed to a cooler climate for the male learners. Based on these findings, strategies for nurse educators to warm the education climate for traditional-age male learners are presented.

  9. Comparison of masculine and feminine traits in a national sample of male and female nursing students.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Kenny; Glenn, L Lee; Vertein, Daren

    2011-11-01

    The stereotype that male nurses are less masculine has existed for generations and spans all age groups. Several studies have investigated masculinity and femininity in nurses using the Bem Sex-Role Inventory, but the results are conflicting and inconclusive. Therefore, a nationwide survey was conducted across the United States that examined the sex-role identity of individuals who chose nursing as a career path. Twenty-eight males and 81 females from 37 states completed the survey. The males and females in the study both had higher mean scores on masculinity and femininity scales when compared with previous studies. The greatest percentage of participants were classified as androgynous, as opposed to masculine, feminine, or undifferentiated, with half of the males and nearly half of the females falling into this category.

  10. A Study of the Impostor Phenomenon among Male Nurse Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pierce, Stephanie S.

    2011-01-01

    The Clance Impostor Phenomenon Scale and the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale continue to be used to measure impostor characteristics and levels of self-esteem in aggregate populations in corporate and academic environments. Previous studies have focused on females or female dominate populations. A correlational study of nursing educators that are male…

  11. A Study of the Impostor Phenomenon among Male Nurse Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pierce, Stephanie S.

    2011-01-01

    The Clance Impostor Phenomenon Scale and the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale continue to be used to measure impostor characteristics and levels of self-esteem in aggregate populations in corporate and academic environments. Previous studies have focused on females or female dominate populations. A correlational study of nursing educators that are male…

  12. [Perceiving gender or profession: the practical experience of male nursing students in the obstetrics and gynecology ward].

    PubMed

    Lee, Ya-Fen; Yang, Yu-O; Tu, Chia-Ling

    2013-06-01

    The impact of general gender stereotypes on nursing is severe and influential, especially with regard to male nursing students working in obstetrics and gynecology wards. This study examined the experience of male nursing students in obstetrics and gynecology wards. We used a phenomenological qualitative research approach and a sample of 10 male nursing students currently studying at a nursing college in central Taiwan. All participants had obstetrics and gynecology ward experience. Individual interviews were transcribed into the procedural record. Colaizzi content analysis analyzed and categorized research data. Based on participants practical experiences in the obstetrics and gynecology ward, the main stages of participants professional development through their internship experience included: (1) Unbalanced self-role recognition; (2) being defined by the gender framework (gender stereotypes); (3) the difference between male doctor and male nurse; (4) learning appropriate communication techniques; (5) mutual and empathetic understanding of the female psychology during childbirth; (6) gaining sources for positive feedback; (7) releasing the shackles of gender and gaining full insight into and comprehension of nursing functions; and (8) given the opportunity to learn. Through ongoing examination and learning, participant internships in the obstetrics and gynecology wards were significant and essential learning experiences that validated their necessity. Nursing schools and internship institutions alike must realize the importance of gender-equality education to the nursing profession. Medical institutions are encouraged to offer equal learning opportunities to male and female nursing students and provide targeted assistance to males to help them master clinical nursing care practices in the obstetrics and gynecology department.

  13. Exploring masculinity and marginalization of male undergraduate nursing students' experience of belonging during clinical experiences.

    PubMed

    Sedgwick, Monique G; Kellett, Peter

    2015-03-01

    Aggressive recruitment strategies used in Canadian undergraduate nursing programs have enjoyed only moderate success, given that male students represent a small percentage of the student population. To determine whether there were gender differences in their sense of belonging, undergraduate nursing students (n = 462) in southern Alberta were surveyed using the Belongingness Scale-Clinical Placement Experience questionnaire. No significant gender differences were found on two of the subscales. However, male students demonstrated significantly lower scores on the efficacy subscale (p = 0.02). This finding suggests that some men experience feelings of marginalization and discrimination. Nurse educators and students are encouraged to explore their worldviews related to gendered performances and teaching practices that create bias. Practice environments are encouraged to deinstitutionalize policies and procedures that accentuate femininities of care. Finally, men entering into the nursing profession are encouraged to reflect on how their gender performance may facilitate or detract from their feelings of belonging. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  14. Comparative Cost of Early Infant Male Circumcision by Nurse-Midwives and Doctors in Zimbabwe

    PubMed Central

    Mangenah, Collin; Mavhu, Webster; Hatzold, Karin; Biddle, Andrea K; Ncube, Getrude; Mugurungi, Owen; Ticklay, Ismail; Cowan, Frances M; Thirumurthy, Harsha

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: The 14 countries that are scaling up voluntary male medical circumcision (VMMC) for HIV prevention are also considering early infant male circumcision (EIMC) to ensure longer-term reductions in HIV incidence. The cost of implementing EIMC is an important factor in scale-up decisions. We conducted a comparative cost analysis of EIMC performed by nurse-midwives and doctors using the AccuCirc device in Zimbabwe. Methods: Between August 2013 and July 2014, nurse-midwives performed EIMC on 500 male infants using AccuCirc in a field trial. We analyzed the overall unit cost and identified key cost drivers of EIMC performed by nurse-midwives and compared these with costing data previously collected during a randomized noninferiority comparison trial of 2 devices (AccuCirc and the Mogen clamp) in which doctors performed EIMC. We assessed direct costs (consumable and nonconsumable supplies, device, personnel, associated staff training, and waste management costs) and indirect costs (capital and support personnel costs). We performed one-way sensitivity analyses to assess cost changes when we varied key component costs. Results: The unit costs of EIMC performed by nurse-midwives and doctors in vertical programs were US$38.87 and US$49.77, respectively. Key cost drivers of EIMC were consumable supplies, personnel costs, and the device price. In this cost analysis, major cost drivers that explained the differences between EIMC performed by nurse-midwives and doctors were personnel and training costs, both of which were lower for nurse-midwives. Conclusions: EIMC unit costs were lower when performed by nurse-midwives compared with doctors. To minimize costs, countries planning to scale up EIMC should consider using nurse-midwives, who are in greater supply than doctors and are the main providers at the primary health care level, where most infants are born. PMID:27413085

  15. Institutional Factors Contributing to Hispanic Male Nursing Degree Attainment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rios, Deidre M.

    2013-01-01

    President Obama's 2009 graduation initiative has emphasized the shift in the national academic focus from access to higher education to graduation, making degree attainment one of the most important factors of measurement and accountability for institutions of higher education. Students of color, in particular, Hispanic males, have not fared well…

  16. Institutional Factors Contributing to Hispanic Male Nursing Degree Attainment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rios, Deidre M.

    2013-01-01

    President Obama's 2009 graduation initiative has emphasized the shift in the national academic focus from access to higher education to graduation, making degree attainment one of the most important factors of measurement and accountability for institutions of higher education. Students of color, in particular, Hispanic males, have not fared well…

  17. Breaking the Boundaries: Decision Factors That Lead Male Students to Enroll in Associate Degree Nursing Programs in Illinois Community Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Resurreccion, Leandro Alcovendaz

    2013-01-01

    Male nurses are but a small percentage of the total nurse population in the United States, and most certainly have potential to increase in numbers if the profession appeared more attractive as a career option for men. The purpose of this research was to discover the decision factors used by males that led them to enroll in Associate Degree…

  18. Breaking the Boundaries: Decision Factors That Lead Male Students to Enroll in Associate Degree Nursing Programs in Illinois Community Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Resurreccion, Leandro Alcovendaz

    2013-01-01

    Male nurses are but a small percentage of the total nurse population in the United States, and most certainly have potential to increase in numbers if the profession appeared more attractive as a career option for men. The purpose of this research was to discover the decision factors used by males that led them to enroll in Associate Degree…

  19. Increasing gender and ethnic diversity in the health care workforce: The case of Arab male nurses in Israel.

    PubMed

    Popper-Giveon, Ariela; Keshet, Yael; Liberman, Ido

    2015-01-01

    Despite recent attempts at increasing health care workforce diversity, a measure that was found to reduce health disparities, men remain a minority in the traditionally female occupation of nursing. One exception to this observation is the Arab ethnic minority in Israel that includes numerous male nurses. Determining the percentage of Arab male nurses in the Israeli health care system and understanding how they perceive and negotiate their masculinity. We used both quantitative and qualitative methodologies. Quantitative statistics were obtained from the 2011 to 2013 Labor Force Survey conducted by the Israel Central Bureau of Statistics and qualitative data derived from 13 semi-structured, in-depth interviews with Arab nurses working in Israeli public hospitals, conducted during 2014. Nursing constitutes a prominent employment path for Arab men in Israel and is more prominent as an employment path for Arab men than that for Jewish men. A total of 38.6% of all Arab nurses were men and only 7.5% of Jews and others. Quantitative data thus reveal that men do not constitute a minority among Arab nurses. Similarly, qualitative findings show that Arab male nurses do not manifest marginal masculinity but rather demonstrate many elements of hegemonic masculinity. Arab male nurses distinguish themselves and differentiate their roles from those of female nurses, expressing their motives for choosing the nursing profession in terms of hegemonic gender roles for men in Arab society in Israel. Although nursing is a traditionally female occupation, it offers an opportunity for Arab men to demonstrate their masculinity. Arab male nurses choose nursing as a means rather than an end, however, meaning that many of them might not remain in the profession. This observation is significant because of the importance of retaining men from ethnic minorities in nursing, especially in multicultural societies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Promoting Career Opportunities in Nursing to the Minority and Male Population of Galveston.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garcia, Viola Ruth

    In 1991, a project was undertaken to increase the number of minority and male students entering and completing the Associate Degree Nursing (ADN) program at Galveston College (GC) in Texas. The goal of the project was achieved in three interrelated phases. The initial phase focused on establishing an outreach program within the community. The…

  1. Role Strain in Male Diploma Nursing Students: A Descriptive Quantitative Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Charles R.

    2001-01-01

    Responses from 184 of 476 male nursing students in Ontario community colleges showed that the two groups with the least role strain had high masculinity scores and those with the most role strain had low masculinity scores on the Bem Sex-Role Inventory. Role strain declined between the first and second years and increased by the third year of…

  2. [Nursing care in males with spinal cord injury and sexual dysfunction].

    PubMed

    Cobo-Cuenca, Ana Isabel; Martín-Espinosa, Noelia M; Píriz Campos, Rosa M

    2013-01-01

    The impact of spinal cord injury and its sequels requires important efforts of adaptation. In several studies, people with spinal cord injury claim to have covered most of their needs at physical, emotional and social level, but they are not yet fully satisfied with their sexual life. Sexual function is usually impaired in men with spinal cord injuries, and is sometimes related to problems of erection, ejaculation and/or orgasm. This issue is not a priority in the first phase, but it appears over the subsequent periods when patients often ask for a solution to this problem. A case-study is presented of a 25 year old male with chronic complete spinal cord injury (ASIA A), L4-L5 level, who reported sexual dysfunction and attended an annual review in the National Hospital for Paraplegics. After performing a nursing assessment using the functional health patterns of Gordon, the team proposed a nursing care plan according to the taxonomy of NANDA (North American Nursing Association), NOC (Nursing Outcome Classification) and NIC (Nursing Intervention Classification). Nurses are the healthcare professionals who have more direct and continuous contact with these patients. Specific programs need to be designed to provide them with the sexual education, which should contain adequate emotional and sexual information. We believe that an appropriate and systematic assessment of patient's sexuality, as well as the application of the (NANDA, NOC, NIC) nurse methodology, may be very helpful in improving the outcomes of these specific interventions.

  3. Stability and change in work values among male and female nurses and engineers.

    PubMed

    Hagström, Tom; Kjellberg, Anders

    2007-04-01

    Gender related changes of work values were analyzed in a longitudinal questionnaire study of 173 male and 48 female engineers and 353 female and 31 male nurses at three measurement occasions covering about four and half years from the end of their vocational education. At all occasions, Social relations were rated as more important by women than by men and Altruism was given higher ratings by the nurses than by the engineers. Within both occupations women's mean Altruism ratings were higher than men's mean ratings, and in all groups except male engineers the mean ratings dropped between the three occasions. Women's ratings of Benefits and career and Influence were strengthened in both occupations, thereby eliminating an initial gender difference. The stability of work values is discussed in terms of challenges and norms in working life.

  4. Gender Inequality and Role-Strained among Male Nursing Students in Selected Nursing Institution, Lagos, Nigeria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Folami, Florence F.

    2017-01-01

    Gender discrimination remains problem in the world as a whole and unfortunately, nursing profession is not immune to this problem. Gender discrimination is rejection or restriction made on the basis of socially constructed gender roles which prevents a person from relishing full human rights. Role strain has been defined as when an individual is…

  5. Sex differences in gender characteristics of Australian nurses and male engineers: a comparative cross-sectional survey.

    PubMed

    J Fisher, Murray

    2011-08-01

    There continue to be assumptions within the nursing literature that nursing is synonymous with a feminine sex role identity. A comparative cross-sectional survey consisting of the Bem Sex Role Inventory and the Australian sex role scale was used to determine sex difference in gender characteristics of Australian nurses and with male engineers. A statistically significant difference in femininity was found between all the samples (F((2,908)) = 20.24, p < 0.00001; F((2,908)) = 60.13, p < 0.00001). A statistical difference in masculinity was found between female nurses and the two male samples on the two masculine scales (F((2,908)) = 12.48, p < 0.000001; F((2,908)) = 6.94, p = 0.001). Path analysis found strong significant direct relationships between the samples and expressive orientation (t = 27.67) and self display (t = 12.42). Whilst differences in expressive characteristics were found between male and female nurses, a similar difference was found between male nurses and male engineers, supporting the notion that male nurses perceive themselves as having feminine characteristics essentially required for nursing.

  6. The influence of personality traits and social support on male nursing student life stress: a cross-sectional research design.

    PubMed

    Lou, Jiunn-Horng; Chen, Sheng-Hwang; Yu, Hsing-Yi; Li, Ren-Hau; Yang, Cheng-I; Eng, Cheng-Joo

    2010-06-01

    Understanding how male nursing students alleviate life stress during their academic career is conducive to their development as successful nursing professionals. This study was designed to understand the personality traits, social support, and life stresses of male nursing students. The respective influences of personality traits and social support on life stress were also explored. The study used a cross-sectional research design. A college in central Taiwan was targeted as the site for data collection. A total of 158 questionnaires were dispatched, with 145 valid copies returned (valid response rate = 91.7%). Structured questionnaires were designed to collect data on participant demographics, personality traits, social support, and life stress. Statistical methods such as descriptive statistics, one-way analysis of variance, and multiple regression analysis were applied to data analysis. Major findings of this study revealed that (a) in general, the personality traits, social support, and life stress of male nursing students scored in the medium to high range. Participants reported encountering more stress from learning and life goals than from interpersonal stress. (b) Male nursing student demographic variables (e.g., parent [father and mother considered separately] education level) and the personality traits of conscientiousness and family support, respectively, were found to impact significantly on participant life stress perceptions. And (c) the only significant predictors of life stress were support from family and education level of participant fathers and mothers, accounting for about 23.7% of variability. It is suggested that nursing students in each year of their academic career should be exposed to courses geared to reduce the life stress perceptions (especially in the areas of learning and career development) of male nursing students. Increased family support is an effective way to decrease male nursing student life stress. This study could be a

  7. Male ICU nurses' experiences of taking care of dying patients and their families: a gender analysis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tammy W; Oliffe, John L; Bungay, Vicky; Johnson, Joy L

    2015-01-01

    Male intensive care unit (ICU) nurses bring energy and expertise along with an array of beliefs and practices to their workplace. This article investigates the experiences of male ICU nurses in the context of caring for dying patients and their families. Applying a gender analysis, distilled are insights to how masculinities inform and influence the participants' practices and coping strategies. The findings reveal participants draw on masculine ideals of being a protector and rational in their decisive actions toward meeting the comfort needs of dying patients and their families. Somewhat paradoxically, most participants also transgressed masculine norms by outwardly expressing their feelings and talking about emotions related to these experiences. Participants also reported renewed appreciation of their life and their families and many men chronicled recreational activities and social connectedness as strategies for coping with workplace induced stresses. The findings drawn from this study can guide both formal and informal support services for men who are ICU nurses, which in turn might aid retention of this subgroup of workers. © The Author(s) 2014.

  8. Fall risk assessment in very old males and females living in nursing homes.

    PubMed

    Sieri, Tommaso; Beretta, Giovanna

    2004-06-17

    Several studies identified muscle weakness, history of falls, gait deficit and balance deficit as the most common risk factors for falls. To determine risk factors of fall in older males and females living in nursing homes and to compare characteristics of fallers and non fallers. This is a cross-sectional study with a convenience sample of 40 nursing home elderly (13 males and 27 females), mean age 86.35, of which 17 (6 males and 11 females) fell at least once in the previous year and 23 (7 males and 16 females) had not fallen. Each participant filled a self-assessment questionnaire (general health questions and selected questions from the SF-36). An objective evaluation was performed with measurements of blood pressure and heartrate (supine and standing), lower extremity strength and power (dominate side only) by Biodex isokinetic dynamometry, dynamic postural stability by Biodex balance system (5 s trials at level 8) and gait assessment (6 min walk test at comfortable speed) by gait treadmill Biodex. The fallen males decreased significantly knee flexion peak torque (p=0.08), ankle plantarflexion peak torque and average power (p=0.05), compared with the not fallen group. The fallen females decreased significantly knee extension peak torque and average power (p<0.05), walking speed (p<0.005) and cadence (p<0.01), compared with the not fallen group. This study shows that the fallen males had greater deficits of ankle plantar-flexion strength and power, while fallen females had greater deficits of knee extension strength and power and less walking speed.

  9. The influence of perceived prejudice on willingness to be a nurse via the mediating effect of satisfaction with major: A cross-sectional study among chinese male nursing students.

    PubMed

    Feng, Danjun; Zhao, Wenjing; Shen, Shiyu; Chen, Jieru; Li, Lu

    2016-07-01

    The gender-based stereotype of nursing as a female profession has been a large obstacle to men entering the nursing profession. However, there is little quantitative research on the influence of prejudice induced by this stereotype on male nursing students' willingness to be nurses. To examine the effect of perceived prejudice on willingness to be a nurse via the mediating effect of satisfaction with major among Chinese male nursing students. A cross-sectional survey was used. Four hundred and sixty male nursing students who were enrolled either in bachelor's programs in universities or advanced diploma programs in colleges in Jinan, China, were surveyed using questionnaires measuring perceived prejudice, satisfaction with major, and willingness to be a nurse. Structural equation modeling with bias-corrected bootstrapping was employed to determine the influence of perceived prejudice on willingness to be a nurse with major satisfaction as a mediator. Male students who were in an advanced diploma nursing program and those for whom nursing was the first-choice major reported significantly less perceived prejudice, greater satisfaction with major, and greater willingness to be nurses than did those in a bachelor's nursing program and those for whom nursing was not the first-choice major, respectively. Moreover, although perceived prejudice had no significant direct effect on willingness to be a nurse (β=0.07, p>0.05), it did have a strong indirect effect (full mediation) via satisfaction with major (β=-0.59, p<0.001). Perceived prejudice strongly influenced male nursing students' willingness to be nurses via the full mediating effect of satisfaction with major. Because this obsolete stereotype of nursing as a female occupation gives birth to prejudice against male nursing students, effective measures should be taken to change this stereotype to recruit more men as nursing staff. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Males in Dietetics, What Can Be Learned from the Nursing Profession? A Narrative Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Gheller, Brandon; Lordly, Daphne

    2015-12-01

    In Canada 95% of dietitians are female despite serving a sex-diverse population. Literature examining why there are so few male dietitians is limited. However, nursing, like dietetics, is female dominated but has a large body of literature examining sex diversity within the profession. Therefore, a narrative literature review was conducted to find articles that examined the following questions: (i) What are the barriers and motivating factors for prospective male nursing students? and (ii) What are the perceived sex-based challenges that male nursing students encounter during their education? A total of 38 articles were included in the final review and the results are presented under the following headings: barriers, motivators, and educational experiences both in the classroom and during clinical rotations. The review outlines the current state of knowledge regarding sex as it relates to nursing and how this information compares with the current dietetics literature. Conclusions and recommendations are drawn about what changes could be made in dietetic education immediately and how further research could provide insight towards reducing the barriers and facilitating easier access to dietetics education for males.

  11. [Sense of coherence (SOC), occupational stress reactions, and the relationship of SOC with occupational stress reactions among male nurses working in a hospital].

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Eri; Yamada, Kazuko; Morioka, Ikuharu

    2014-01-01

    There is limited information about the sense of coherence (SOC), stress reactions and the relationship between SOC and stress reactions in male nurses. The aim of this survey was to clarify SOC, stress reactions, and the relationship of SOC with stress reactions in male nurses working in a hospital. Fifty-one male and 51 female nurses took part in a questionnaire survey. Each female subject was matched with a male of the same age (within 1 year), qualifications (nurse only or both nurse and public health nurse), and work place (internal medicine ward, surgery ward or others). The question items were basic attributes, SOC, Brief Job Stress Questionnaire and Brief Scales for Coping Profile (BSCP). To examine the relationship between the SOC and stress reactions, a multiple regression analysis was performed with psychological or somatic symptoms, as the dependent variable. The median age of male nurses was 27 (interquartile range: 24-30) years. The median length of their working career was 4 (2-7) years. There were no gender differences in the total scores of SOC. Among the stressors, the conditions of mental demand were better in male nurses, but the conditions of stress by workplace environment were worse than in female nurses. Depressive mood, one of the stress reactions, was worse in male nurses. Support from supervisors and coworkers that had an effect on stress reactions were weaker in male nurses than in female nurses. In the subscales of BSCP, "emotional expression to others" and "avoidance and suppression" were more often used by male nurses, but "seeking help for a solution to problems" was less frequently used by them than by female nurses. There were significant relationships between the total score of SOC and psychological and somatic symptoms in both sexes, even when adjusted for 9 stressor factors, 4 factors that had an effect on stress reactions, and 6 subscales of the BSCP and age. The sense of manageability, one of the subscales of SOC, showed

  12. Relation between hand grip strength, respiratory muscle strength and spirometric measures in male nursing home residents.

    PubMed

    Bahat, Gulistan; Tufan, Asli; Ozkaya, Hilal; Tufan, Fatih; Akpinar, Timur Selçuk; Akin, Sibel; Bahat, Zumrut; Kaya, Zuleyha; Kiyan, Esen; Erten, Nilgün; Karan, Mehmet Akif

    2014-09-01

    Adverse-outcomes related to sarcopenia are mostly mentioned as physical disability. As the other skeletal muscles, respiratory muscles may also be affected by sarcopenia. Respiratory muscle strength is known to affect pulmonary functions. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the relations between extremity muscle strength, respiratory muscle strengths and spirometric measures in a group of male nursing home residents. Among a total of 104 male residents, residents with obstructive measures were excluded and final study population was composed of 62 residents. Mean age was 70.5 ± 6.7 years, body mass index: 27.7 ± 5.3 kg/m2 and dominant hand grip strength: 29.7 ± 6.5 kg. Hand grip strength was positively correlated with maximal inspiratory pressure (MIP) and maximal expiratory pressure (MEP) (r = 0.35, p < 0.01 and r = 0.26, p < 0.05, respectively). In regression analysis, the only factor related to MIP was hand grip strength; among spirometric measures only parameter significantly related to grip strength was peak cough flow (PCF). The association of PCF with grip strength disappeared when MIP alone or "MIP and MEP" were included in the regression analysis. In the latter case, PCF was significantly associated only with MIP. We found peripheric muscle strength be associated with MIP and PCF but not with MEP or any other spirometric parameters. The relation between peripheral muscle strength and PCF was mediated by MIP. Our findings suggest that sarcopenia may affect inspiratory muscle strength earlier or more than the expiratory muscle strength. Sarcopenia may cause decrease in PCF in the elderly, which may stand for some common adverse respiratory complications.

  13. Implementing two nurse practitioner models of service at an Australian male prison: A quality assurance study.

    PubMed

    Wong, Ides; Wright, Eryn; Santomauro, Damian; How, Raquel; Leary, Christopher; Harris, Meredith

    2017-06-21

    To examine the quality and safety of nurse practitioner services of two newly implemented nurse practitioner models of care at a correctional facility. Nurse practitioners could help to meet the physical and mental health needs of Australia's growing prison population; however, the nurse practitioner role has not previously been evaluated in this context. A quality assurance study conducted in an Australian prison where a primary health nurse practitioner and a mental health nurse practitioner were incorporated into an existing primary healthcare service. The study was guided by Donabedian's structure, processes and outcomes framework. Routinely collected information included surveys of staff attitudes to the implementation of the nurse practitioner models (n = 21 staff), consultation records describing clinical processes and time use (n = 289 consultations), and a patient satisfaction survey (n = 29 patients). Data were analysed descriptively and compared to external benchmarks where available. Over the two-month period, the nurse practitioners provided 289 consultations to 208 prisoners. The presenting problems treated indicated that most referrals were appropriate. A significant proportion of consultations involved medication review and management. Both nurse practitioners spent more than half of their time on individual patient-related care. Overall, multidisciplinary team staff agreed that the nurse practitioner services were necessary, safe, met patient need and reduced treatment delays. Findings suggest that the implementation of nurse practitioners into Australian correctional facilities is acceptable and feasible and has the potential to improve prisoners' access to health services. Structural factors (e.g., room availability and limited access to prisoners) may have reduced the efficiency of the nurse practitioners' clinical processes and service implementation. Results suggest that nurse practitioner models can be successfully integrated into a

  14. Evidence of allomaternal nursing across one-male units in the Yunnan snub-nosed monkey (Rhinopithecus Bieti).

    PubMed

    Ren, Baoping; Li, Dayong; Garber, Paul A; Li, Ming

    2012-01-01

    Allomaternal nursing, common in several species of social mammals, also has been reported in nonhuman primates. However, the function of this behavior in enhancing infant survivorship remains poorly understood. The study was conducted on a free-ranging group of the Yunnan snub-nosed monkey (Rhinopithecus bieti) in the Baimaxueshan Natural Reserve. Direct observation and ad libitum sampling were used to record allocare behavior during a 20 month field study. R. bieti exhibits a multilevel social organization in which a large single troop, consisting of over 100 individuals, is divided into many one-male units (OMUs: 6∼41). These OMUs coordinate their daily activities, and feed, forage, travel, and rest together. Here we report on one case of infant temporary adoption in which an adult female from one OMU engaged in allomaternal nursing and cared for an infant from a different OMU of the same troop. This event began when the mother and her five-month-old infant were found to became separated accidentally. The victim infant was observed staying in another OMU. Over the next several days we observed a lactating female in the new OMU to care for and nurse both her infant and the immigrant infant, who also was tolerated by and cared for by the harem male. Our findings suggest that lactating primate females are primed to care for young infants and, that the misdirected parental care hypothesis may offer the strongest explanation for allomaternal nursing in R. bieti.

  15. A study to ascertain gynaecological patients' perceived levels of embarrassment with physical and psychological care given by female and male nurses.

    PubMed

    Lodge, N; Mallett, J; Blake, P; Fryatt, I

    1997-05-01

    The Sex Discrimination Act lifted the barriers which prevented men from training and practising as midwives. However, cultural attitudes perceive nursing to be a female profession, and whilst care from a male doctor is considered to be acceptable, care from a male nurse is said to be embarrassing. The purpose of the study was to identify if there was any relationship between the intimacy of a nursing interaction and the patient's level of embarrassment. Data collection was by questionnaires with rating scales. Demographic data was obtained from nursing and medical notes. Statistical analysis was performed by non-parametric methods using Mini-tab. Ninety-one questionnaires were returned from a convenience sample of patients on a gynaecological oncology ward. Analysis of the data indicates that in a population of patients who have no prior experience of hospital admission, or of being cared for by a male nurse, there is a preference for care by a female nurse. However, this preference is not demonstrated in patients who have undergone previous hospital admission within the last five years or who have been cared for by a male nurse. These findings would indicate a cultural preference for care by a female nurse in patients with gynaecological cancer that is changed by experience during hospital admission.

  16. [Italian male nurses called to arms in World War II: the letters of the years of imprisonment].

    PubMed

    Gaetano, Rosa Maria; Milos, Roberto; Rossi, Ivana Maria; Rancati, Stefania

    2016-01-01

    During the Second World War the male staff of assistance in the Italia hospitals was called to arms.This work concerns the letters sent by the male nurses who were captured by the Germans and put in prison. The aim is to know whether their profession had somehow affected their living condition in jail and had favoured their release or not. 88 personal files of nurses on duty in Ospedale Maggiore and sent to the front during the period between 1940 and 1945 have been studied. The documents are kept in the historical archive of the Ospedale Maggiore of Milan and the research covered the period from December to January 2013. The sources have been analyzed according to Chabod's method of historical research (2012). 4 prisoners have been found among the 88 files of soldiers and handwritten letter has been selected for each one. These letters the attempt of the prisoners to reassure their loved ones emerges. Moreover, in the files of the prisoners' formal request for their release sent by hospital board were found. As a result one of the prisoners was released. This paper suggests that the fact of being a nurse in a hospital influenced the conditions during tha period of captivity. Much is still to be found to shed light on a dramatic period of our country and to restore the memory of the contribution given by the profession.

  17. Conceptions of gender--a study of female and male head nurses' statements.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Kerstin; Larsson, Ullabeth Sätterlund

    2005-03-01

    Gender can be seen as a construction in which history, culture and social relation are central. Thus, the construction remains strong can be explained by the fact that the existing conceptions about gender are continually passed on. It is not known how conceptions about gender in the context of Swedish health care are expressed by head nurses or what significance the conceptions have for their leadership. To study head nurses' statements about their conceptions of gender and what significance these conceptions have in carrying out their work. Thematic interviews were held with 36 head nurses, and the contents of the transcribed interviews were analysed. The results showed conceptions about men's direct and women's roundabout ways of communicating. Statements were also made concerning how men are oriented towards technical matters and women towards relationships, and how men are expected to show what they can do to a greater extent than women. These conceptions have an effect on head nurses in their work, as they are expected to live up to them. As we wished to obtain variation in the respondents' statements about gender, we conducted an interview study. Hence, the transferability of the findings is a question of conceptualization, and the conceptions we recorded cannot be seen as representative for all head nurses. The results imply, however, that greater awareness about conceptions of gender may promote greater equality in women's and men's careers and allow greater freedom to head nurses to do what they themselves feel they should do instead of what they are expected to do.

  18. Prevalence of sarcopenia and its association with functional and nutritional status among male residents in a nursing home in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Bahat, Gulistan; Saka, Bulent; Tufan, Fatih; Akin, Sibel; Sivrikaya, Süleyman; Yucel, Nurullah; Erten, Nilgun; Karan, Mehmet A

    2010-09-01

    The prevalence of sarcopenia differs between different populations, ages, gender and between settings such as the community and nursing homes. Studies on the association of sarcopenia with functional status revealed conflicting results whereas its association with nutritional status is well documented. We aimed at investigating the prevalence of sarcopenia and its association with functional and nutritional status among male residents in a nursing home in Turkey. Fat free mass (FFM) was detected by bioelectric impedance analysis. Functional status was evaluated with Katz activities of daily living (ADL) and Lawton Instrumental activities of daily living (IADL). Nutritional assessment was performed by Mini Nutritional Assessment Test (MNA(R)). One hundred fifty-seven male residents composed the study cohort. Mean age was 73.1 +/- 6.7 years. The prevalence of sarcopenia was 85.4%. No significant correlation was found between sarcopenia and ADL or IADL. There was a weak but significant correlation between IADL score and FFM (r = 0.18; p = 0.02). Sarcopenic residents had lower MNA score than non-sarcopenic residents (18.1 +/- 3.2 vs. 21.8 +/- 0.8, p = 0.02). FFM was significantly lower in the residents with malnutrition compared to well-nourished residents (26.8 +/- 1 kg/body surface area vs. 28.1 +/- 1.8 kg/body surface area, p < 0.05). In conclusion, the prevalence of sarcopenia was very high among male nursing home residents in Turkey. Sarcopenia was associated with low nutritional status but not with functional status.

  19. [A range of mobbing among female and male nurses employed in the Szczecin hospitals].

    PubMed

    Kunecka, Danuta; Kamińska, Magdalena; Karakiewicz, Beata

    2008-01-01

    Workplace mobbing, a particular type of conflict, has recently been recognized as one of the factors of occupational hazard, resulting from the social environment. Health service workers belong to occupational groups, which are particularly exposed to mobbing. Moreover, changes in the structure of medical labor market make that nurses often work under strong pressure and thus the phenomenon of mobbing becomes even more intensified. The aim of this study was to analyze the incidence of mobbing in the nursing stuff employed in the Szczecin hospitals. The method of diagnostic poll was based on a questionnaire, developed and distributed among 1578 respondents employed in hospitals in Szczecin. Of this number, 1261 correctly completed questionnaires were statistically analyzed. The results showed that the phenomenon of mobbing is actually common in the nursing occupational group (18.6%). The majority (40%) of respondents indicated a superior as a mobber (torturer). The high incidence of mobbing observed in the nursing occupational group may evidence that Human Resource Management (HRM) processes are not perfect.

  20. Evaluation of a safer male circumcision training programme for traditional surgeons and nurses in the Eastern Cape, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Peltzer, Karl; Nqeketo, Ayanda; Petros, George; Kanta, Xola

    2008-06-18

    Training designed to improve circumcision knowledge, attitude and practice was delivered over 5 days to 34 traditional surgeons and 49 traditional nurses in the Eastern Cape, South Africa. Training included the following topics: initiation rites; statutory regulation of traditional male circumcision and initiation into Manhood (TCIM); structure and function of the male sex organs; procedure of safe circumcision, infection control; sexually transmitted infections (STIs); HIV/AIDS; infection control measures; aftercare of the initiate including after care of the circumcision wound and initiate as a whole; detection and early management of common complications of circumcision; nutrition and fluid management; code of conduct and ethics; and sexual health education. The evaluation of the training consisted of a prospective assessment of knowledge and attitude immediately prior to and after training. Significant improvement in knowledge and/or attitudes was observed in legal aspects, STI, HIV and environmental aspects, attitudes in terms of improved collaboration with biomedical health care providers, normal and abnormal anatomy and physiology, sexually transmitted infections and including HIV, circumcision practice and aftercare of initiates. We concluded that safer circumcision training can be successfully delivered to traditional surgeons and nurses.

  1. Pubescent male students' attitudes towards menstruation in Taiwan: implications for reproductive health education and school nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yu-Ting; Hayter, Mark; Lin, Mei-Ling

    2012-02-01

    To explore male students' attitudes towards menstruation. Menstruation is a biological event that is often surrounded by secrecy and social stigma that causes anxiety amongst many young girls. A key element of this is the attitudes of young males towards this reproductive health issue. However, the literature around what young males think and feel about menstruation is limited. Qualitative. A sample of 27 male students aged between 10-12 years participated in five focus groups. Data were then subject to a thematic analysis. Five themes emerged from the data analysis that reflected the boys' feelings, experiences and attitudes towards menstruation: 'A silent topic', 'An unimportant issue', 'Errant information about menstruation'. In addition, according to their experience, participants gradually came to see menstruation from the 'menstrual stereotype' viewpoint. In their social life, they made choices that resulted in gradually regulating their behaviour that affected their 'relationships with girls'. Young boys have misguided knowledge about menstruation and this helps to perpetuate the stigma surrounding this element of reproductive health. Boys also express a desire to learn more but are often restricted in this by home and school. School nurses are the best placed professionals to address this issue. Menstrual education with boys should take a greater prominence than it often does in sexual health education in schools. Such inclusion will provide boys with a balanced and accurate knowledge base and therefore help towards reducing the social stigma around menstruation that is often experienced by young girls. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  2. Is it a (fe)male pain? Portuguese nurses' and laypeople's gendered representations of common pains.

    PubMed

    Bernardes, S F; Silva, S A; Carvalho, H; Costa, M; Pereira, S

    2014-04-01

    Although many studies have explored gender role expectations of pain behaviours in different cultures, only a few authors have tried to explore whether certain pains are more associated with the typical man or woman. Hence, this study aimed at exploring, among Portuguese laypeople and nurses, patterns of common pains more strongly associated with the typical man or woman, and their relationship with health-care training and personal pain experiences. A total of 68 nurses (76% women) and 55 laypeople (62% women) were asked to identify, through free association, the most frequent common pains that people in general associate with the typical man and woman, respectively, and also to report their personal past pain experiences. A content analysis was used to categorize and quantify participants' responses. A multiple correspondence analysis was performed to identify gendered patterns of common pains, followed by a cluster analysis to classify participants according to their endorsed patterns. Findings showed that while 'back and musculoskeletal pains' was the only pattern associated with the typical man, more differentiated patterns of pains were associated with the typical woman, namely (1) headaches; (2) abdominal, back and musculoskeletal pains; and (3) pains due to hormonal cycles, labour/puerperium and from the urinary/reproductive system. These representations were shared by laypeople and nurses and were only significantly associated with personal experiences of pains from the urinary/reproductive system. This study identified different gendered patterns of common pains, which may have important implications for (wo)men's pain experiences and how these are interpreted by others. © 2013 European Pain Federation - EFIC®

  3. Prevalence of vitamin D deficiency and association with functional status in newly admitted male veteran nursing home residents.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Gotaro; Tamai, Anna; Masaki, Kamal; Gatchell, Gregory; Epure, James; China, Craig; Ross, G Webster; Petrovitch, Helen; Tanabe, Marianne

    2013-11-01

    To provide the first report on prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in newly admitted nursing home (NH) residents and associations with functional disabilities and chronic diseases. Retrospective chart review. Nursing home (NH). Male veterans newly admitted to a NH for rehabilitation, skilled-nursing care, intermediate care, or respite care between January 2011 and June 2012. Total serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) levels were measured on admission. Vitamin D supplement users and those without 25(OH)D measurement within 7 days of admission were excluded, leaving an analytical sample of 104 residents. Vitamin D deficiency was defined as 25(OH)D less than 20 ng/mL. Data were collected on age, ethnicity, season, body mass index (BMI), functional disability in activities of daily living (ADLs) (mobility, bathing, dressing, toileting, continence, and feeding), and prevalent chronic diseases. Prevalence of vitamin D deficiency was 49.0%. In multivariate logistic regression models adjusted for age, ethnicity, and BMI, vitamin D deficiency was significantly associated with number of ADL disabilities (odds ratio (OR) = 1.4 for each 1-point increase in ADL disability score, P = .03) and prevalent diabetes mellitus (OR = 3.0, P = .03). In regression models using each ADL disability as a separate variable, only disability in feeding (OR = 4.7, P = .05) and diabetes mellitus (OR = 2.9, P = .04) remained significant. Almost half the individuals entering the NH and not taking vitamin D supplements had vitamin D deficiency. Greater number of ADL disabilities, disability in feeding, and prevalent diabetes mellitus were independently associated with vitamin D deficiency. © 2013, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2013, The American Geriatrics Society.

  4. Promoting Success of Ethnic Minority and Male Students in an Accelerated, Entry-Level Master of Nursing Program: The SUSTAIN Program.

    PubMed

    Cowan, Patricia A; Weeks, Y'Esha; Wicks, Mona Newsome

    2015-09-01

    Diverse health care workers are essential to meet the needs of a diverse U.S. Ethnic minorities and men are frequently underrepresented in the nursing profession and within schools of nursing. Although many nursing schools have implemented programs to improve retention and academic success of these students, the lack of success is, in part, a reflection of program ineffectiveness. A nursing college developed the multifaceted SUSTAIN (Scholarships for Underrepresented Students in an Accelerated Initial Nursing) program to promote ethnic minority and male students' success in an accelerated entry-level master of nursing program. Students engaged in mentoring, academic support, and service-learning activities. Participants (N = 51) achieved 100% retention and graduation rates and a 92% first-time NCLEX-RN(®) examination pass rate. Program students participated in professional organizations and held leadership roles within the college. Implementation of a program focused on student retention and success is recommended for diverse students enrolled in accelerated entry-level master of nursing programs. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  5. Maternal Transfer of Bisphenol A During Nursing Causes Sperm Impairment in Male Offspring.

    PubMed

    Kalb, Ana Cristina; Kalb, Ana Luiza; Cardoso, Tainã Figueiredo; Fernandes, Cristina Gevehr; Corcini, Carine Dahl; Varela Junior, Antonio Sergio; Martínez, Pablo Elías

    2016-05-01

    The health effects of environmental chemicals on animals and humans are of growing concern. Human epidemiological and animal study data indicate that reproductive disorders and diseases begin early during prenatal and postnatal development. An increase of human male reproductive disturbance in the past several decades was associated to chemicals called endocrine disruptors (ED). Bisphenol A (BPA) is a ubiquitous organic environmental contaminant with ED activity. This study verified the effect of BPA exposure via breast milk during the lactation (early postnatal) period in male mice. Dams were exposed to oral BPA (300, 900, and 3000 µg/kg/BW/day) during the breastfeeding period (21 days). BPA at all concentrations significantly impaired sperm parameters in adult mice (8 months old), but mitochondrial functionality was more affected at BPA 3000. The acrosome membrane parameter was affected by BPA concentrations from 900 to 3000, and DNA integrity showed pronounced impairment at BPA 900 and 3000. BPA 3000 treatment also induced testicular degeneration and complete aplasia in some seminiferous tubules. Testicular oxidative damage was observed, and the total antioxidant capacity was impaired in BPA 900 and 3000 treatment groups. Taken together, the present study demonstrated long-term adverse effects of BPA in male mice, including reduced sperm quality, antioxidant capacity, and changes in testicular tissue. Our results clearly demonstrate the danger of BPA transferred via lactation on sperm quality registered even after a long time-elapsed from exposure to this harmful chemical.

  6. Knowledge, attitudes and perceptions of pharmacy and nursing students towards male circumcision and HIV in a KwaZulu-Natal University, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Dawood, Farzana; Driver, Christine; Narainsamy, Magdalene; Ndlovu, Sikhanyiso; Ndlovu, Victor

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Male circumcision is currently being promoted in South Africa as a Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) prevention method. Effective implementation requires that healthcare providers should believe in the procedure's efficacy and should possess a positive attitude. A study was undertaken amongst pharmacy and nursing students with different objectives. Objectives To ascertain students’ knowledge, attitudes and perceptions regarding male circumcision and (HIV) prevention. Method A descriptive cross-sectional study using anonymous questionnaires was undertaken amongst 4th year pharmacy and nursing students studying at a university in KwaZulu-Natal, after obtaining their consent. Data were captured and analysed using SPSS version 15. Results A response rate of 83.18% and a mean knowledge score of 66.43% with relatively positive attitudes (62.7) were obtained; 85.4% of the respondents felt that promoting male circumcision is appropriate, with all Muslim students (n < 11) supporting the promotion of male circumcision. Even though all Muslim students supported male circumcision, only 3 students were willing to perform the procedure if adequately trained (p < 0.03). The majority of the female students were unwilling to perform the procedure (p < 0.005). A third of the respondents indicated that male circumcision would both undermine existing protective behaviours and strategies as well as increase riskier sexual behaviour. Over 54% of the respondents believed that the South African Health System would be able to cope with the massive male circumcision drive. The majority of the respondents favoured the procedure to be done at birth. Pain was cited as the most important reason for not wanting to be circumcised. Conclusion Pharmacy and nursing students have a moderate knowledge of male circumcision and HIV prevention with relatively positive attitudes. The majority felt that promoting male circumcision is appropriate and should be encouraged.

  7. Gender-Based Barriers Experienced by Male Students in an Online RN-to-BSN Nursing Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirk, John R.

    2012-01-01

    This quantitative survey-based research study examined the experiences of 49 men through a comparative analysis of their traditional classroom-based Diploma or Associate Degree in Nursing program and their subsequent experiences in the University of Phoenix online Registered Nurse to Bachelor of Science in Nursing (RN-to-BSN) degree completion…

  8. Gender-Based Barriers Experienced by Male Students in an Online RN-to-BSN Nursing Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirk, John R.

    2012-01-01

    This quantitative survey-based research study examined the experiences of 49 men through a comparative analysis of their traditional classroom-based Diploma or Associate Degree in Nursing program and their subsequent experiences in the University of Phoenix online Registered Nurse to Bachelor of Science in Nursing (RN-to-BSN) degree completion…

  9. Effects of night shift working on some immunological, prostate specific antigen, cortisol level and malondialdehyde in male nurses at Hawler city

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muhammad, Dilshad Hussein; Qadir, Fikry Ali

    2017-09-01

    The present study was carried out to show the effects of nightshift working on some immunological, serum cortisol level, and malondialdehyde (MDA) on male nurses in Hawler city hospitals. After performing the exclusion and inclusion criteria, ninety-six male nurses were participated in this study. According to working shifts, the participants were divided into two groups. First group includes sixty seven night-shift male nurses working for 3-12 years with 8-10 nights/month. The second group consisted of twenty-nine day-shift male nurses working for 3-12 years. The age range of both groups was (≥20-40≤). The second group was used as a control group for statistical comparison. The results showed that night-shift working in male nurses was associated with significant increases in tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) (77.15 ± 3.328 vs.101.1 ± 6.968, p=0.024), interleukin-2 (IL-2) (1147 ± 59.54vs1626 ± 34.71, p=0.001), and interferon-γ (IFN-γ) (272.3 ± 16.00 vs. 319.6 ± 12.48, p=0.029) when compared with day-shift group. Two-fold significant increase of high-sensitive C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) (3154 ± 403.3 vs. 6739 ± 334.0, p=0.001) was found in nightshift group as compared with day-shift group. Prostate specific antigen (PSA) estimation showed no significant increase in night-shift group in comparison with day-shift group (1.755 ± 0.202 vs. 1.987 ± 0.159, p=0.424). The results also showed that night-shift working was associated with significant elevations in serum cortisol levels when compared with dayshift nurses (7.844 ± 0.529 vs. 11.18 ± 0.406, p=0.001). Similar significant increasing was also observed for serum malondialdehyde (MDA) (1.124 ± 0.075 vs. 1.681 ± 0.079, p=0.001) in night-shift group when compared with day-shift group.

  10. Barriers Identified by Swedish School Nurses in Giving Information about Testicular Cancer and Testicular Self-Examination to Adolescent Males

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rudberg, Lennart; Nilsson, Sten; Wikblad, Karin; Carlsson, Marianne

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate to what extent school nurses in Sweden inform adolescent men about testicular cancer (TC) and testicular self-examination (TSE). A questionnaire was completed by 129 school nurses from 29 randomly selected municipalities. All respondents were women, with a mean age of 42 years. The results showed that…

  11. Barriers Identified by Swedish School Nurses in Giving Information about Testicular Cancer and Testicular Self-Examination to Adolescent Males

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rudberg, Lennart; Nilsson, Sten; Wikblad, Karin; Carlsson, Marianne

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate to what extent school nurses in Sweden inform adolescent men about testicular cancer (TC) and testicular self-examination (TSE). A questionnaire was completed by 129 school nurses from 29 randomly selected municipalities. All respondents were women, with a mean age of 42 years. The results showed that…

  12. Safety, Acceptability, and Feasibility of Early Infant Male Circumcision Conducted by Nurse-Midwives Using the AccuCirc Device: Results of a Field Study in Zimbabwe

    PubMed Central

    Mavhu, Webster; Larke, Natasha; Hatzold, Karin; Ncube, Getrude; Weiss, Helen A; Mangenah, Collin; Chonzi, Prosper; Mugurungi, Owen; Mufuka, Juliet; Samkange, Christopher A; Gwinji, Gerald; Cowan, Frances M; Ticklay, Ismail

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: For prevention of HIV, early infant male circumcision (EIMC) needs to be scaled up in countries with high HIV prevalence. Routine EIMC will maintain the HIV prevention gains anticipated from current adult male circumcision initiatives. We present here the results of a field study of EIMC conducted in Zimbabwe. Methods: The study was observational and based on the World Health Organization (WHO) framework for clinical evaluation of male circumcision devices. We recruited parents of newborn male infants between August 2013 and July 2014 from 2 clinics. Nurse-midwives used the AccuCirc device to circumcise eligible infants. We followed participants for 14 days after EIMC. Outcome measures were EIMC safety, acceptability, and feasibility. Results: We enrolled 500 male infants in the field study (uptake 11%). The infants were circumcised between 6 and 60 days postpartum. The procedure took a median of 17 minutes (interquartile range of 5 to 18 minutes). Mothers’ knowledge of male circumcision was extensive. Of the 498 mothers who completed the study questionnaire, 91% knew that male circumcision decreases the risk of HIV acquisition, and 83% correctly stated that this prevention is partial. Asked about their community’s perception of EIMC, 40% felt that EIMC will likely be viewed positively in their community; 13% said negatively; and 47% said the perception could be both ways. We observed 7 moderate or severe adverse events (1.4%; 95% confidence interval, 0.4% to 2.4%). All resolved without lasting effects. Nearly all mothers (99%) reported great satisfaction with the outcome, would recommend EIMC to other parents, and would circumcise their next sons. Conclusion: This first field study in sub-Saharan Africa of the AccuCirc device for EIMC demonstrated that EIMC conducted by nurse-midwives with this device is safe, feasible, and acceptable to parents. PMID:27413083

  13. The Prediction of Physical Activity Intention and Behavior in Elderly Male Residents of a Nursing Home: A Comparison of Two Behavioral Theories

    PubMed Central

    Ghahremani, Leila; Niknami, Shamsaddin; Nazari, Mahin

    2012-01-01

    Background: Regular physical activity is ranked as a leading health indicator. Despite the extensive benefits of physical activity, elder people are much less active than desired. Using Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) and the self-efficacy construct, this study examined the prediction of physical activity intention and behavior in a sample of elderly male resident of a nursing home. Methods: In a cross-sectional study of the residents of Kahrizak Nursing Home in Tehran, Iran, elderly men who were 60 years or older, capable of independent living, mobility, and verbal communication were asked to complete measures of the TPB, self-efficacy and physical activity behavior. Results: A hierarchical step-wise multiple regression analysis indicated that affective/instrumental attitude, subjective norm, and perceived behavioral control (PBC) explained 32.8% of the variance in physical activity intention, and self-efficacy provided an additional 2.7%. In a reverse step regression, the TPB variables explained an additional 12.2% of physical activity intention. In a multiple regression analysis on physical activity behavior, affective/instrumental attitude, subjective norm, perceived behavioral control (PBC) and intention explained 15.7% of the variance in physical activity behavior while self-efficacy contributed an additional 5.6%. In the reverse step regression, TPB predictors contributed an additional 3.0% in explaining the variance in physical activity behavior. Conclusion: The results indicate that in addition to the TPB, self-efficacy may also play an important role in the prediction of behavior, and should be included in the design of physical activity programs for elderly men of nursing home residents. PMID:23115427

  14. The prediction of physical activity intention and behavior in elderly male residents of a nursing home: a comparison of two behavioral theories.

    PubMed

    Ghahremani, Leila; Niknami, Shamsaddin; Nazari, Mahin

    2012-03-01

    Regular physical activity is ranked as a leading health indicator. Despite the extensive benefits of physical activity, elder people are much less active than desired. Using Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) and the self-efficacy construct, this study examined the prediction of physical activity intention and behavior in a sample of elderly male resident of a nursing home. In a cross-sectional study of the residents of Kahrizak Nursing Home in Tehran, Iran, elderly men who were 60 years or older, capable of independent living, mobility, and verbal communication were asked to complete measures of the TPB, self-efficacy and physical activity behavior. A hierarchical step-wise multiple regression analysis indicated that affective/instrumental attitude, subjective norm, and perceived behavioral control (PBC) explained 32.8% of the variance in physical activity intention, and self-efficacy provided an additional 2.7%. In a reverse step regression, the TPB variables explained an additional 12.2% of physical activity intention. In a multiple regression analysis on physical activity behavior, affective/instrumental attitude, subjective norm, perceived behavioral control (PBC) and intention explained 15.7% of the variance in physical activity behavior while self-efficacy contributed an additional 5.6%. In the reverse step regression, TPB predictors contributed an additional 3.0% in explaining the variance in physical activity behavior. The results indicate that in addition to the TPB, self-efficacy may also play an important role in the prediction of behavior, and should be included in the design of physical activity programs for elderly men of nursing home residents.

  15. Development of a nursing care problems coping scale for male caregivers for people with dementia living at home.

    PubMed

    Nishio, Midori; Ono, Mitsu

    2015-01-01

    The number of male caregivers has increased, but male caregivers face several problems that reduce their quality of life and psychological condition. This study focused on the coping problems of men who care for people with dementia at home. It aimed to develop a coping scale for male caregivers so that they can continue caring for people with dementia at home and improve their own quality of life. The study also aimed to verify the reliability and validity of the scale. The subjects were 759 men who care for people with dementia at home. The Care Problems Coping Scale consists of 21 questions based on elements of questions extracted from a pilot study. Additionally, subjects completed three self-administered questionnaires: the Japanese version of the Zarit Caregiver Burden Scale, the Depressive Symptoms and the Self-esteem Emotional Scale, and Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale. There were 274 valid responses (36.1% response rate). Regarding the answer distribution, each average value of the 21 items ranged from 1.56 to 2.68. The median answer distribution of the 21 items was 39 (SD = 6.6). Five items had a ceiling effect, and two items had a floor effect. The scale stability was about 50%, and Cronbach's α was 0.49. There were significant correlations between the Care Problems Coping Scale and total scores of the Japanese version of the Zarit Caregiver Burden Scale, the Depressive Symptoms and Self-esteem Emotional Scale, and the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale. The answers provided on the Care Problems Coping Scale questionnaire indicated that male caregivers experience care problems. In terms of validity, there were significant correlations between the external questionnaires and 19 of the 21 items in this scale. This scale can therefore be used to measure problems with coping for male caregivers who care for people with dementia at home.

  16. Coping and Its Relation to Retention among Male Minority Nursing Students in an Associate Degree Nursing Program in a South Texas Community College: An Explanatory Sequential Mixed Methods Inquiry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diggs, Gwendolyn Smith

    2013-01-01

    In Texas, there is an increase in the enrollment of men of various ethnicities in nursing schools, especially Associate Degree Nursing (ADN) programs. As these men strive to complete the nursing education, they face many concerns that center on barriers that are encountered in what is still a predominately Caucasian and female environment. In…

  17. Coping and Its Relation to Retention among Male Minority Nursing Students in an Associate Degree Nursing Program in a South Texas Community College: An Explanatory Sequential Mixed Methods Inquiry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diggs, Gwendolyn Smith

    2013-01-01

    In Texas, there is an increase in the enrollment of men of various ethnicities in nursing schools, especially Associate Degree Nursing (ADN) programs. As these men strive to complete the nursing education, they face many concerns that center on barriers that are encountered in what is still a predominately Caucasian and female environment. In…

  18. Male catheterization.

    PubMed

    Hadfield-Law, L

    2001-10-01

    The insertion of catheters into male emergency patients is fairly common practice and is associated with a worryingly high rate of infection. Everyday pressures within the department, along with the added stress of resuscitation can result in inappropriately trained or skilled staff undertaking this procedure. The issue of gender and whether female nurses should catheterize male patients may also affect this vulnerable group of patients. Acquiring the psychomotor skills of inserting a urethral catheter is only one part of preparation for practice. Emergency nurses must know when and when not to resort to catheterization. Choosing the type and size of catheter requires careful judgment. What will you do if insertion proves difficult? Prevention of infection is of paramount importance and there are an increasing number of evidence-based sources of information, which are crucial to formulating procedures and informing every day practice. In the pressured surroundings of A&E departments, it is easy to ignore the vulnerability of men requiring catheterization, both from a physical and psychological point of view. Making the effort to explain the procedure, listen to questions and concerns and record relevant details in the notes, will take only a few extra moments. There is no doubt that urinary catheterization is not without complications. It is associated with significant morbidity and occasionally, mortality.

  19. Nursing Homes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Most nursing homes have nursing aides and skilled nurses on hand 24 hours a day. Some nursing ... speech and occupational therapy. There might be a nurses' station on each floor. Other nursing homes try ...

  20. Male circumcision.

    PubMed

    2012-09-01

    Male circumcision consists of the surgical removal of some, or all, of the foreskin (or prepuce) from the penis. It is one of the most common procedures in the world. In the United States, the procedure is commonly performed during the newborn period. In 2007, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) convened a multidisciplinary workgroup of AAP members and other stakeholders to evaluate the evidence regarding male circumcision and update the AAP's 1999 recommendations in this area. The Task Force included AAP representatives from specialty areas as well as members of the AAP Board of Directors and liaisons representing the American Academy of Family Physicians, the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The Task Force members identified selected topics relevant to male circumcision and conducted a critical review of peer-reviewed literature by using the American Heart Association's template for evidence evaluation. Evaluation of current evidence indicates that the health benefits of newborn male circumcision outweigh the risks; furthermore, the benefits of newborn male circumcision justify access to this procedure for families who choose it. Specific benefits from male circumcision were identified for the prevention of urinary tract infections, acquisition of HIV, transmission of some sexually transmitted infections, and penile cancer. Male circumcision does not appear to adversely affect penile sexual function/sensitivity or sexual satisfaction. It is imperative that those providing circumcision are adequately trained and that both sterile techniques and effective pain management are used. Significant acute complications are rare. In general, untrained providers who perform circumcisions have more complications than well-trained providers who perform the procedure, regardless of whether the former are physicians, nurses, or traditional religious providers. Parents are entitled to factually correct

  1. [Homophobia among nursing students].

    PubMed

    Campo-Arias, Adalberto; Herazo, Edwin; Cogollo, Zuleima

    2010-09-01

    Homophobia is defined as a general negative attitude towards homosexual persons, with implications on public health. This fact has been less investigated among nursing students. The objective of this review was to learn about the prevalence of homophobia and its associated variables among nursing students. A systematic review was performed on original articles published in EBSCO, Imbiomed, LILACS, MEDLINE, Ovid, and ProQuest, including articles published between 1998 and 2008 in English, Portuguese and Spanish. Keywords used were homophobia, homosexuality, and nursing students. Descriptive analysis was performed. Eight studies were analyzed. The incidence of homophobia in nursing students is between 7% and 16%. Homophobia is more common among males and religious conservatism people. Homophobia is quite frequent in nursing students. This negative attitude toward homosexuality may affect services and care giving by nursing professions and could have negative implications in nursing practice.

  2. Nurses who do not nurse: factors that predict non-nursing work in the U.S. registered nursing labor market.

    PubMed

    Black, Lisa; Spetz, Joanne; Harrington, Charlene

    2010-01-01

    Registered nurses (RNs) who work outside of nursing have seldom been examined. This aim of this study was to compare the 122,178 (4%) of RNs who are employed outside of nursing to those who work in nursing jobs in terms of sociodemographic, market, and political variables to determine if these groups are substantively different from one another. Using a logit regression model, wages were a significant predictor of working outside of nursing for unmarried nurses but not for married nurses. Married and unmarried male nurses were more likely to work outside of nursing. Baccalaureate education, children under age 6, higher family income, and years since graduation increased the odds of working outside of nursing for married nurses. Ultimately, identifying characteristics on which these groups differ may inform future policy directions that could target nurses who may leave nursing at a time when retention efforts might be effective to alter their trajectory away from the profession.

  3. Homemade male incontinence pouch.

    PubMed

    Lafrades, A R

    1999-09-01

    It is estimated that more than 13 million Americans experience incontinence or loss of bladder control. As a registered nurse specializing in urology, the author created a male drip collector, made from a female sanitary napkin (ALWAYS with Wings). This homemade male incontinence pouch is cost effective, comfortable to use, easy to make, can absorb 20 cc to 70 cc of urine, and is available in any store.

  4. Gender discrimination and nursing: α literature review.

    PubMed

    Kouta, Christiana; Kaite, Charis P

    2011-01-01

    This article aims to examine gender stereotypes in relation to men in nursing, discuss gender discrimination cases in nursing, and explore methods used for promoting equal educational opportunities during nursing studies. The literature review was based on related databases, such as CINAHL, Science Direct, MEDLINE, and EBSCO. Legal case studies are included in order to provide a more practical example of those barriers existing for men pursuing nursing, as well as statistical data concerning gender discrimination and male attrition to nursing schools in relation to those barriers. These strengthen the validity of the manuscript. Literature review showed that gender discrimination is still prevalent within nursing profession. Nursing faculty should prepare male nursing students to interact effectively with female clients as well. Role modeling the therapeutic relationship with clients is one strategy that may help male students. In general, the faculty should provide equal learning opportunities to nursing students. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Nursing: Registered Nurses

    MedlinePlus

    ... in hospitals, physicians’ offices, home healthcare services, and nursing care facilities. Others work in correctional facilities or ... of three education paths: a bachelor’s degree in nursing, an associate’s degree in nursing, or a diploma ...

  6. Gender-Based Wage Differentials in a Predominantly Female Profession: Observations from Nursing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Cheryl, Bland; Gates, Michael

    2004-01-01

    Despite numerous studies examining nursing wages, very little attention has focused on nursing wage differentials. We build on previous research by modeling nursing wages and examining male-female wage differences within the context of the current nursing shortage. Our results show that male nurses do earn a wage premium, largely explained by…

  7. Nursing Supplies

    MedlinePlus

    ... Stages Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Nursing Supplies Page Content Article Body Throughout most of ... budget. (Nursing equipment also makes wonderful baby gifts.) Nursing Bras A well-made nursing bra that comfortably ...

  8. Engineers have more sons, nurses have more daughters: an evolutionary psychological extension of Baron-Cohen's extreme male brain theory of autism.

    PubMed

    Kanazawa, Satoshi; Vandermassen, Griet

    2005-04-21

    In his extreme male brain theory of autism, Baron-Cohen postulates that having a typically male brain was adaptive for ancestral men and having a typically female brain was adaptive for ancestral women. He also suggests that brain types are substantially heritable. These postulates, combined with the insight from the Trivers-Willard hypothesis regarding parental ability to vary offspring sex ratio, lead to the prediction that people who have strong male brains should have more sons than daughters, and people who have strong female brains should have more daughters than sons. The analysis of the 1994 US General Social Survey data provides support for this prediction. Our results suggest potentially fruitful extensions of both Baron-Cohen's theory and the Trivers-Willard hypothesis.

  9. Nursing and the "F" word.

    PubMed

    Kane, D; Thomas, B

    2000-01-01

    This article uses a set of strategies designed by Abigail Stewart to guide the generation of knowledge about women and gender to revisit the relationship between nursing and feminism. It is important that nurses be aware of the valuable feminist contributions made by their predecessors in order to uncover the hidden links that exist between nursing and feminism. As long as the relationship between nursing and feminism remains invisible, the gender, problems in nursing that are systemic to a woman's occupation in a male-dominated society will continue.

  10. American Nurses Association Nursing World

    MedlinePlus

    ... ANA » My ANA » Shop » ANA Nursing Knowledge Center Nursing Insider News 09/28/17 ANA Enterprise CEO ... Wake of Police Abuse of Registered Nurse More Nursing Insider News Upcoming Events 10/17/2017 - 10/ ...

  11. Nursing: What's a Nurse Practitioner?

    MedlinePlus

    ... nurses, or APNs) have a master's degree in nursing (MS or MSN) and board certification in their ... Nurse Practitioners (NAPNAP) and through local hospitals or nursing schools. Also, many doctors share office space with ...

  12. Advocating for nurses and nursing.

    PubMed

    Tomajan, Karen

    2012-01-31

    Every nurse has the opportunity to make a positive impact on the profession through day-to-day advocacy for nurses and the nursing profession. In this article the author defines advocacy; describes advocacy skills every nurse can employ to advocate for a safe and healthy work environment; and explains how nurses can advocate for nursing as part of their daily activity whether they are point-of-care nurses, nurse managers, or nurse educators. The advocacy practices discussed are applicable whether advocating on one's own behalf, for colleagues at the unit level, or for issues at the organizational or system level.

  13. Nursing, Nursing Education, and Anxiety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biggers, Thompson; And Others

    In response to the current crisis in the field of nursing, a study examined nursing students' perceived work-related stress and differences among associate degree, diploma, and baccalaureate nursing programs in their preparation of nursing students. The 171 subjects, representing the three different nursing programs, completed a questionnaire…

  14. Stressors affecting nursing students in Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Watson, R; Rehman, S; Ali, P A

    2017-08-08

    To determine factors contributing to stress experienced by preregistration nursing students in Pakistan, using the Stressors in Nursing Students scale. The aim was to explore the psychometric properties of this instrument and to investigate the effect of a range of demographic variables on the perception of stressors in nursing students. Nursing is a stressful profession, and nursing students may experience more stress due to competing demands and challenges of nursing education, assessment, placements and worries about employment prospects. In this cross-sectional survey, data from 726 nursing students from 11 schools of nursing in Karachi, Pakistan, were collected using a questionnaire. Data were analysed using descriptive as well inferential statistics. An exploratory factor analysis was also conducted. There was no apparent factor structure to the Stressors in Nursing Students scale, unlike in previous studies. The total score on the Stressors in Nursing Students scale was related to gender with males scoring higher. The score generally increased over 4 years of the programme, and students in private schools of nursing scored higher than those in public schools of nursing. Nursing students in Pakistan do not appear to differentiate between different stressors, and this may be due to cultural differences in the students and to the structure of the programme and the articulation between the academic and clinical aspects. Likewise, cultural reasons may account for differences between stress experienced by male and female students. The fact that scores on the Stressors in Nursing Students scale increased over 4 years of the programme and males scored higher than females should alert nursing schools and policymakers related to nursing education and workforce to pay attention to prevent attrition from nursing programmes. © 2017 International Council of Nurses.

  15. Nursing Positions

    MedlinePlus

    ... Habits for TV, Video Games, and the Internet Nursing Positions KidsHealth > For Parents > Nursing Positions Print A ... and actually needs to feed. Getting Comfortable With Breastfeeding Nursing can be one of the most challenging ...

  16. Nursing a fine line: patient privacy and sex discrimination.

    PubMed

    Hawke, C

    1998-10-01

    Recent court decisions provide the only parameters for applying Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 to male nurse hiring and assignment. As the male nursing student population climbs toward 10%, nurses and health care providers struggle to define their employment rights.

  17. Undergraduate nursing students' compatibility with the nursing profession

    PubMed Central

    Adib-Hajbaghery, Mohsen; Dianati, Mansur

    2005-01-01

    Background The high rate of attrition among nursing students has caused some nursing leaders to think about the necessity of considering students' personality during the process of admission into nursing schools. Due to the lack of studies on Iranian nursing students' personality traits, this study was designed to assess freshmen nursing students' personality characteristics and their compatibility with the demands of the nursing profession. Methods A descriptive study was conducted at Tehran and kashan medical universities and one of the branches of Azad University. Convenience sampling was used and 52 freshmen nursing students were assessed using Holland's Vocational Interests Inventory. Results From the total participants 63.5% were females and 36.5% were males. Based on the Holland's Vocational Interests Inventory 44% did not have appropriate personality characteristics for the nursing profession. 77% of the nursing students participating in the study reported that they lacked information about nursing. Conclusion It seems that personality tests can help to select the best students for nursing schools from those who show good academic capabilities. This would decrease the rate of attrition and could improve the quality of care. PMID:16011800

  18. Transcultural Nursing and Nursing Diagnoses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geissler, Elaine M.

    1991-01-01

    Points out the inadequacies of the nursing diagnoses officially sanctioned by the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association for use with culturally diverse patients. Looks at the changes needed to make the defining characteristics more congruent with transcultural nursing. (JOW)

  19. Male Depression: Understanding the Issues

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2015;15:1135. Gagnon M, et al. Male depression and suicide: What NPs should know. The Nurse Practitioner. 2015;40:50. Rice SM, et al. Men's perceived barriers to help seeking for depression: Longitudinal findings relative to symptom onset and duration. ...

  20. Counseling Males.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scher, Murray, Ed.

    1981-01-01

    Contains 16 articles about counseling males including: (1) gender role conflict; (2) sex-role development; (3) counseling adolescent, adult, and gay males; (4) teenage fathers; (5) female therapists and male clients; (6) career development; (7) hypermasculinity; (8) counseling physically abusive men, uncoupling men; (9) group therapy, men's…

  1. Nurses Behave Differentially to Neonates in Terms of Their True Gender Compared to Their Ascribed Gender.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hollenbeck, Albert R.; And Others

    Response patterns of 24 female nurses to 2-day-old neonates who had been arbitrarily labeled male or female were studied. A total of 17 reliable behaviors of nurses were scored from videotapes of nurse-infant interaction. Nurses responded differentially to neonates based on true gender rather than ascribed gender. Nurses held boys more by their…

  2. What motivates men to choose nursing as a profession? A systematic review of qualitative studies.

    PubMed

    Yi, Myungkeun; Keogh, Brian

    2016-02-01

    This systematic review was conducted to provide a deeper understanding of male nurses' motivations for choosing nursing as a profession. A systematic literature review of qualitative data was conducted. CINAHL, Pubmed, PsychINFO, Pubmesh, and Embase were searched from January 1970 to December 2013. Qualitative studies which described male nurses' motivations for choosing nursing were selected. Relevant data were extracted from the included papers and were coded and then synthesised under four main themes. Four main themes were identified which described male nurses' motivations for choosing nursing; 'Early exposure to nursing and other health care professionals', 'Choosing nursing as a profession by chance', 'Choosing nursing because of extrinsic motivating factors', and 'Choosing nursing because of intrinsic motivating factors'. To help encourage more men to enter and remain in nursing, recruitment and retention strategies need to focus on addressing the gender stereotypes associated with the nursing profession.

  3. Nurse manager who did not take any action over 'bad' nurse.

    PubMed

    Castledine, George

    2003-02-13

    Brenda was the nurse in charge of a continuing care ward for elderly people. Most of the residents, all of whom were male, had a dementing illness. The ward itself was a 24-bedded facility consisting of several four-bedded bays and single units, together with a large lounge/dining area. The ward was staffed by Beryl, a junior sister, four E-grade staff nurses three D-grade staff nurses, and several nursing assistants.

  4. Views on nurse prescribing: a survey of community mental health nurses in the Republic of Ireland.

    PubMed

    Wells, J; Bergin, M; Gooney, M; Jones, A

    2009-02-01

    A nurse prescribing scheme has recently been implemented within the Republic of Ireland. This paper reports on the views of community mental health nurses on nurse prescribing just prior to the implementation of the scheme. Data were gathered through a 13-item questionnaire administered to 103 members of the Association of Community Mental Health Nurses in Ireland. Results indicated a distinct difference of view between male and female community mental health nurses, with female nurses having greater reservations towards the desirability of nurse prescribing in relation to educational preparation and impact on professional relationships. Overall, only 17% of respondents favoured being supervised in their prescribing practice by their consultant psychiatrist. The paper concludes that there is ambivalence towards prescribing in this important group of nurses which may need to be taken into account if nurse prescribing is to be successfully implemented within the Irish mental health service context.

  5. Nursing Reclaims its Role.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diers, Donna

    1982-01-01

    An attempt is made to explain the nurses' role: what the nurse is, what the nurse does, how the nurse is viewed by society, why nurses suffer burnout, nursing costs, and health care system reform. (CT)

  6. Helpline nursing.

    PubMed

    Pearce, Lynne

    2016-12-14

    Viewed by some as a backwater, only attracting those in the twilight of their career, the nurse's role on specialist health helplines is often misunderstood and undervalued. A new framework, written by senior staff at charities that employ information nurses, is set to challenge these unwarranted perceptions. 'It dignifies what we're doing,' says Cancer Research UK head information nurse Martin Ledwick, who manages a team of eight. 'And it gives nurses an idea of what we expect from them.'

  7. Kamikaze nurses.

    PubMed

    1988-01-02

    In Japan nurses have found a somewhat drastic way of ensuring high standards of professional practice it would seem. For, according to a report in the current edition of the International Nursing Review, Fumiko Ohmori, retiring President of the Japanese Nursing Association, is famed for a number of visable achievements.

  8. Nursing Home Checklist

    MedlinePlus

    Nursing home checklist Name of nursing home: ____________________________________________________ Address: ________________________________________________________________ Phone number: __________________________________________________________ Date of visit: _____________________________________________________________ Basic information Yes No Notes Is the nursing home Medicare certified? Is the nursing ...

  9. Nursing: What's a Nurse Practitioner?

    MedlinePlus

    ... is a big part of the pediatric NP's role. Pediatric and family practice NPs can treat acute ( ... Nurse Practitioners (NAPNAP) and through local hospitals or nursing schools. Also, many doctors share office space with ...

  10. Condoms - male

    MedlinePlus

    Prophylactics; Rubbers; Male condoms; Contraceptive - condom; Contraception - condom; Barrier method - condom ... rubber Polyurethane Condoms are the only method of birth control for men that are not permanent. They can ...

  11. Nutrition for Nurses: Nursing 245.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palermo, Karen R.

    A description is presented of "Nutrition for Nurses," a prerequisite course for students anticipating entrance into the junior level of a state university registered nursing program. Introductory material highlights the course focus (i.e., the basics of good nutrition; nutrition through the life cycle; nursing process in nutritional care; and…

  12. Nutrition for Nurses: Nursing 245.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palermo, Karen R.

    A description is presented of "Nutrition for Nurses," a prerequisite course for students anticipating entrance into the junior level of a state university registered nursing program. Introductory material highlights the course focus (i.e., the basics of good nutrition; nutrition through the life cycle; nursing process in nutritional care; and…

  13. Male sexuality.

    PubMed

    Ginsberg, Terrie B

    2010-05-01

    It should be recognized that sexuality in the aging male is of such import that a complete sexual history must be performed. By taking a complete sexual history, facts can be obtained that will allow for appropriate focus relating to a holistic evaluation and will enable us to dispel antiquated sexual myths pertaining to the aging male. If initiated by the history taker, questions concerning sexuality may be discussed more comfortably by the patient. Erectile dysfunction, male sexual response cycle, testosterone, sexually transmitted diseases, human immunodeficiency virus, long-term illness, along with religion and culture are explored in this article with the aim of improving one's knowledge base, self reflection, and awareness of the importance of male sexuality. A complete understanding and appreciation of the aging male's medical history, surgical history, social history, and emotional history as well as his sexual, cultural, and religious concepts will allow the health care provider to better analyze information, and to recommend and provide appropriate advice and treatment to the aging male patient. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. The California Nurse Mentor Project: every nurse deserves a mentor.

    PubMed

    Mills, Joyce F; Mullins, Anna C

    2008-01-01

    In the rush to fill positions, newly hired and transitioning RNs are increasingly put into demanding roles without adequate clinical or organizational preparation. One approach that has shown promising preliminary success in enhancing nursing job satisfaction and increasing long-term retention is the use of trained nurse mentors who are paired with newly hired or new graduate nurses to provide ongoing support, guidance, and assistance. The California Nurse Mentor Project was a 3-year pilot project whose goal was to create a replicable program designed to improve the quality, sensitivity, and effectiveness of patient care through enhanced retention of nurses, including multicultural, multilingual, and male nurses. The pilot implementation of the California Nurse Mentor project has been extremely successful. Attrition rates are lower for nurses who are enrolled in the program than those who did not. Both mentors and mentees report that the program has impacted several areas, including their job satisfaction and professional confidence. Preceptor training, according to participant feedback, shows lasting effects on their pedagogy even a year after attending the training.

  15. Sexual harassment in nursing.

    PubMed

    Robbins, I; Bender, M P; Finnis, S J

    1997-01-01

    Sexual harassment is a problem faced by women in the workplace which can lead to adverse psychological consequences as well as impaired work performance. Sexual harassment is about the abuse of power and status rather then merely being about sex per se and has to be viewed in the context of institutionalized male power. Although there is a relative dearth of research, there is increasing evidence that sexual harassment of nurses is common and that it can have adverse effects on nurses physical and psychological health as well as a direct impact on patient care. Nursing, by its very nature of having to care for patients bodily needs, transgresses normal social rules regarding bodily contact. This is exploited by the perpetrator who relies on nurses' caring attitude to be able to harass. A descriptive model of the processes involved in harassment is presented which offers the possibility of being able to intervene at a number of points in the process. Interventions need to be aimed at both individual and organizational levels if there is to be a prospect of reducing a major occupational stressor for nurses.

  16. Counseling Chinese Patients about Cigarette Smoking: The Role of Nurses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Han Zao; Zhang, Yu; MacDonell, Karen; Li, Xiao Ping; Chen, Xinguang

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The main purpose of this study is to determine the cigarette smoking rate and smoking cessation counseling frequency in a sample of Chinese nurses. Design/methodology/approach: At the time of data collection, the hospital had 260 nurses, 255 females and five males. The 200 nurses working on the two daytime shifts were given the…

  17. Counseling Chinese Patients about Cigarette Smoking: The Role of Nurses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Han Zao; Zhang, Yu; MacDonell, Karen; Li, Xiao Ping; Chen, Xinguang

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The main purpose of this study is to determine the cigarette smoking rate and smoking cessation counseling frequency in a sample of Chinese nurses. Design/methodology/approach: At the time of data collection, the hospital had 260 nurses, 255 females and five males. The 200 nurses working on the two daytime shifts were given the…

  18. Nursing students assess nursing education.

    PubMed

    Norman, Linda; Buerhaus, Peter I; Donelan, Karen; McCloskey, Barbara; Dittus, Robert

    2005-01-01

    This study assessed the characteristics of nursing students currently enrolled in nursing education programs, how students finance their nursing education, their plans for clinical practice and graduate education, and the rewards and difficulties of being a nursing student. Data are from a survey administered to a national sample of 496 nursing students. The students relied on financial aid and personal savings and earnings to finance their education. Parents, institutional scholarships, and government loans are also important sources, but less than 15% of the students took out bank loans. Nearly one quarter of the students, particularly younger and minority students, plan to enroll in graduate school immediately after graduation and most want to become advanced nursing practitioners. Most of the nursing students (88%) are satisfied with their nursing education and nearly all (95%) provided written answers to two open-ended questions. Comments collapsed into three major categories reflecting the rewards (helping others, status, and job security) and three categories reflecting the difficulties (problems with balancing demands, quality of nursing education, and the admissions process) of being a nursing student. Implications for public policymaking center on expanding the capacity of nursing education programs, whereas schools themselves should focus on addressing the financial needs of students, helping them strike a balance among their school, work, and personal/family responsibilities and modifying certain aspects of the curriculum.

  19. Sexual harassment of nurses: an occupational hazard?

    PubMed

    Finnis, S J; Robbins, I

    1994-03-01

    A questionnaire was administered to qualified and student nurses to assess the prevalence and consequences of sexual harassment. There was a 56% completion rate. Of these 43 (66%) of the registered nurses and nine (35%) of the student nurses reported having experienced sexual harassment. The incidence of harassment for registered nurses in the year prior to the study was 46%. Patients were most likely to be the harasser for both student and registered nurses but there was an increased likelihood that other staff were involved in the harassment of registered nurses with doctors and male nursing staff being the predominant perpetrators. Dimensions of assertiveness and sex role identity did not predict the likelihood of harassment. Results are discussed in the context of attribution theory and gender power relationships.

  20. Male contraception.

    PubMed

    Wang, Christina; Swerdloff, Ronald S

    2002-04-01

    Currently approved male-directed contraceptive methods include condoms and vas occlusion. Vas occlusion is very effective but is intended to be non-reversible. Condoms have a relatively high failure rate, at least partially due to compliance problems and are not accepted by many couples. The only other male-oriented methods in clinical trials utilize the administration of testosterone alone or its combination with another gonadotropin-suppressing agent such as a progestin or a gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonist. Studies published in the 1990s demonstrated that a testosterone-containing hormonal contraceptive method suppressed spermatogenesis to azoospermia in most men and severe oligozoospermia in the remaining. The contraceptive efficacy after treatment with testosterone alone was comparable to that of female hormonal methods. Having proven that reversible male contraception is a reality, present trials are attempting to identify the best androgen delivery system and the most effective androgen plus progestin preparation. It is likely that the first marketed male hormonal contraceptive method will be a long-acting (injectable or implant) combination of an androgen plus a progestin. Research is continuing to identify other target areas for male contraceptive development, including agents with post-testicular and epididymal sites of action.

  1. [Feminism and qualitative nursing research].

    PubMed

    Yi, Myungsun; Yih, Bong-Sook

    2004-06-01

    The purpose of this article was to describe feminism and to propose the integration of a feminist method into qualitative nursing methodology in order to expand the body of nursing knowledge. The world view of feminism including philosophy, epistemology and methodology was outlined, and a feminist grounded theory and feminist ethnography were suggested as a way of strengthening nursing research methodology using literature review. Four different philosophical perspectives of feminism, that is, liberal feminism, radical feminism, Marxist feminism, and social feminism were described. Also epistemological perspectives including feminist empiricism, feminist standpoint, and postmodern feminism, were explained and were related to the methodology and methods of feminism. To enhance the strengths of nursing research within the feminist perspectives, feminist grounded theory and feminist ethnography were exemplified in the paradigm of qualitative nursing research. This paper suggested that incorporation of feminist approaches within nursing is a valuable attempt to expand the body of nursing knowledge and to enhance the quality of nursing care services by rectifying male-oriented knowledge and by empowering women in the care of other people as well as themselves.

  2. Male baldness.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Philip

    2016-04-01

    Male baldness is very common. Its effect on individuals is extremely variable, and in some people it will have a significant adverse effect on their quality of life. The objectives of this article are to help general practitioners (GPs) be aware of potential health problems related to male baldness, to have an approach to assessing hair loss and to be aware of treatment options. Male baldness is, most often, a normal occurrence, but it may have significant effects on a man's health. It may also be a pointer to other potential health issues. The GP is in the ideal position to conduct an initial evaluation, consider other health issues and advise on treatment options.

  3. Nursing: Licensed Practical and Licensed Vocational Nurses

    MedlinePlus

    ... LPNs) and licensed vocational nurses (LVNs) provide basic nursing care. They work under the direction of registered ... licensed vocational nurses work in many settings, including nursing homes and extended care facilities, hospitals, physicians’ offices, ...

  4. [Beginnings of nursing education and nurses' contribution to nursing professional development in Serbia].

    PubMed

    Vlaisavljević, Željko; Čolović, Nataša; Perišić, Mirjana

    2014-01-01

    The oldest records of developmental beginnings of patients' healthcare relate to the first hospital founded by St. Sava at the monastery Studenica in 1199. The profile of the Kosovian girl became the hallmark of nursing profession in Serbia. The first school for midwives was founded in 1899 at the Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics of the General State Hospital in Belgrade. However, there were no other schools for nurses in Serbia until the foundation of the School for Midwives of the Red Cross Society in 1021. Until then the healthcare of patients and the injured was carried out by self-taught volunteer nurses with completed short courses of patients' healthcare. The first course for male and female nurses was organized by the Serbian Red Cross at the beginning of the First Serbian-Turkish War in 1876. During wars with Serbian participation in 19th and 20th centuries with Serbian participation, nurses gave a remarkable contribution being exposed to extreme efforts and often sacrificing their own lives. In war times great merit belongs to the members of the humanitarian society the Circle of Serbian Sisters founded in Belgrade in 1903, which was the resource of a great number of nurses who became the pride of nursing profession. Generations of nurses were educated on their example. In 2004 the annual award "Dušica Spasić" was established which is awarded to the best medical nurse is Serbia. Dušica Spasić was a medical nurse that died at her workplace, when aged 23 years, nursing the sick from variola.

  5. Men Nursing Students: How They Perceive Their Situation...A Student Surveys His Classmates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogness, Hal

    1976-01-01

    Men nurse stereotypes (former corpsmen, homosexuals, or those seeking administrative positions) were challenged by results of an open-ended questionnaire survey of 15 male nursing students. In addition to the role conflicts all nurses experience, men in nursing face: isolation and loneliness, lack of role models, and others' stereotyped ideas.…

  6. Hate crimes against gay males: an overview.

    PubMed

    Willis, Danny G

    2004-03-01

    As the United States has become more multicultural and diverse, there has been an increase in violence motivated by hate. Hate crimes against gay males are the most prevalent of the hate crimes based on sexual orientation. Hate crimes have their roots in normative, individual, and societal attitudes and ideologies that lead to intimidation, bullying, teasing, physical assault, rape, and murder. This paper provides an overview of the issues specific to hate crime assaults against gay males. Mental health nurses may find this knowledge useful in developing further nursing inquiry, education, and clinical practice related to hate crime and violence prevention.

  7. Predictors of a Desire to be Helpful to Professional Nurses Among Japanese Nursing Assistants in Small- to Medium-Sized Hospitals.

    PubMed

    Kudo, Yasushi; Kono, Keiko; Toyoshima, Yasuko; Sugisaki, Hitomi; Matsuhashi, Ayako; Tsutsumi, Akizumi

    2016-06-01

    Registered nurses and licensed practical nurses have been educated as professional nurses. Professional nurses can concentrate on their jobs requiring a high degree of expertise with help they get from nursing assistants.If professional nurses have improper attitudes toward nursing assistants, it is most likely that the nursing assistants will not help them to the best of their ability. We investigated nursing assistants' impressions regarding professional nurses' attitudes, and what effects nursing assistants' impressions have on their "desire to be helpful to professional nurses." The study design was a cross sectional study. Twenty-five small- to medium-sized hospitals with 55 to 458 beds were included in this study. The analyzed subjects were 642 nursing assistants (96 males, 546 females). Factor analyses were conducted to extract the factors of nursing assistants' impressions regarding professional nurses' attitudes. Multiple linear regression analysis was conducted to investigate the predictors of "desire to be helpful to professional nurses." We discovered 5 factors: 1. professional nurses' model behavior, 2. manner dealing with nursing assistants, 3. respect for nursing assistants' passion for their work, 4. respect for nursing assistants' work, and 5. enhancing the ability of nursing assistants to do their work. The "desire to be helpful to professional nurses" was significantly associated with "professional nurses' model behavior," "manner dealing with nursing assistants" and "respect for nursing assistants' passion for their work." Factors 1 to 3 are fundamental principles when people establish appropriate relationships. Professional nurses must consider these fundamentals in their daily work in order to get complete cooperation from nursing assistants.

  8. Many paths lead to nursing: factors influencing students' perceptions of nursing.

    PubMed

    Cowin, L S; Johnson, M

    2011-12-01

    A diverse group of students is being recruited to nursing programmes worldwide, although little research has identified the effect of this diversity. Contemporary knowledge of the qualities of nurses and how they vary with demographic and other factors may assist in the retention of nursing students. The aim of this study is to explore student nurses' perceptions of the qualities of nurses and how these differ with age, country of birth, gender, healthcare experience and mode of entry to the nursing programme. Using a descriptive comparative design, 676 nursing students in their first week of a Bachelor of Nursing programme participated (77% response). Participants completed a survey noting demographic data such as age, gender, healthcare experience, country of birth, nursing programme entry method and attributes of nurses from the valid and reliable Qualities of Nursing Scale (QoN). Overall, the students confirmed their agreement with the 12 items of the QoN and rated good listening skills as the most important quality for a nurse rather than Caring or Helping. Male participants and participants born overseas demonstrated the lowest mean scores on most qualities, suggesting less agreement with the qualities. The recruitment of students to university needs to continue to support disparate entry pathways. Students with more life experience (older students) or health experience may be more likely to complete nursing courses and to be retained within health services. Qualities of nurses may be changing to reflect modern perceptions of nurses with a shift away from the focus on caring. © 2011 The Authors. International Nursing Review © 2011 International Council of Nurses.

  9. Ethics of rationing of nursing care.

    PubMed

    Rooddehghan, Zahra; Yekta, Zohreh Parsa; Nasrabadi, Alireza N

    2016-09-21

    Rationing of various needed services, for example, nursing care, is inevitable due to unlimited needs and limited resources. Rationing of nursing care is considered an ethical issue since it requires judgment about potential conflicts between personal and professional values. The present research sought to explore aspects of rationing nursing care in Iran. This study applied qualitative content analysis, a method to explore people's perceptions of everyday life phenomena and interpret the subjective content of text data. Data collection was performed through in-depth, unstructured, face-to-face interviews with open-ended questions. The study population included Iranian nurses of all nursing positions, from clinical nurses to nurse managers. Purposive sampling was employed to select 15 female and 3 male nurses (11 clinical nurses, 3 supervisors, 1 matron, 1 nurse, and 2 members of the Nursing Council) working in hospitals of three cities in Iran. The study protocol was approved by Tehran University of Medical Sciences (91D1302870). Written informed consent was also obtained from all participants. According to the participants, rationing of nursing care consisted of two categories, that is, causes of rationing and consequences of rationing. The first category comprised three subcategories, namely, patient needs and demands, routinism, and VIP patients. The three subcategories forming the second category were missed nursing care, patient dissatisfaction, and nurses' feeling of guilt. Levels at which healthcare practices are rationed and clarity of the rationing are important structural considerations in the development of an equal, appropriate, and ethical healthcare system. Moreover, the procedure of rationing is critical as it not only influences people's lives but also reflects the values that dominate in the society. Therefore, in order to minimize the negative consequences of rationing of nursing care, further studies on the ethical dimensions of this phenomenon

  10. [Feminist strategies in nursing science].

    PubMed

    Gendron, C

    1993-05-01

    This article is the first of a two-part series that will be completed in next month's issue. The article illustrates through examples how nursing has the potential for sexual bias. It also demonstrates how the feminist movement can contribute to improving nursing practice. This month, the views of Peggy Chinn are discussed, outlining myths that limit the development or hinder the progress of non-sexist education in nursing. Myths that have become traditional, scientific male-centred methodologies now solidly rooted in the health care community are identified. The author explains that once the myths are identified, they should be extracted and isolated from the context of nursing. This is the way feminist research can be useful. Next month the author will define the feminist approach and how it applies to specific aspects of women's health.

  11. [Anthropology, gender, and contemporary nursing].

    PubMed

    Lillo Crespo, Manuel

    2002-12-01

    We live in an age when decisive changes occur. Social changes in the field of Genre and Work Cultures will take on a crucial role regarding the development of Nursing. New technological advances, and a higher degree of specialization in the Nursing field, as well as the increase in the number of nursing professionals coming from the male genere, enter into conflict with traditional social structures and act as intellectual tools which are necessary to acquire a critical understanding of the times in which we live, where an anthropological evaluation of the Genre factor is essential as a beginning principle in order to explain the subordination of nursing professionals as this has existed up until our times.

  12. Male osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Giusti, A; Bianchi, G

    2014-07-28

    As a result of population ageing worldwide, osteoporotic fractures are becoming a serious problem in the western world. Osteoporotic fractures are associated with a significant burden in terms of morbidity, mortality, and economic costs. Although less frequent than in women, male osteoporosis is also a relatively common problem. Since bone loss and fragility fractures in men have been recognized as a serious medical condition, over the last two decades several studies have investigated a number of aspects related to the pathogenesis, diagnosis and assessment, prevention and treatment of male osteoporosis. A better understanding of factors underlying increased bone fragility in men has led to the definition of appropriate screening and diagnostic strategies, and the development of treatments that have shown to improve bone mineral density and, in some cases, reduce fracture risk in men as well as in women. This review will summarize recent findings on male osteoporosis with a particular focus on risk factors and causes of bone loss, and available therapeutic options.

  13. Nurse crop

    Treesearch

    Wayne D. Shepperd; John R. Jones

    1985-01-01

    In forestry, a nurse crop generally is a crop of trees or shrubs that fosters the development of another tree species, usually by protecting the second species, during its youth, from frost, insolation, or wind (Ford-Robertson 1971). Aspen may be a nurse crop for shade-tolerant tree species that do not become established in full sunlight (e.g., Engelmann spruce)....

  14. Canadian-trained nurses in North Carolina.

    PubMed

    Pink, George H; Hall, Linda McGillis; Leatt, Peggy

    2004-01-01

    Little is known about nurses who leave Canada to work in the US. The main purpose of this study is to gain some insight into the emigration component of nursing supply and demand by comparing characteristics of nurses who left Canada to nurses who stayed. Specifically, Canadian-trained RNs who work in the state of North Carolina are compared to RNs who work in Canada. Results show that there are 40% more Canadian-trained RNs in North Carolina than there are in Prince Edward Island. A higher percentage of Canadian-trained RNs in North Carolina are male, under 40 years of age, have baccalaureate training and graduated less than 10 years ago. Canadian-trained nurses in both countries have very low rates of unemployment. The loss of Canadian-trained RNs to the US is a significant problem, and there is an urgent need to obtain a better understanding of why nurses leave the country.

  15. [Male contraception].

    PubMed

    Demery, A

    1987-05-01

    Except for condoms, male contraception is very slightly utilized in France. Several male experimental methods are under study. A synthetic luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) analog has been used successfully in women and offers promise in men of blocking LHRH and thus blocking spermatogenesis. Several nonsteroid substances such an hypertensives and adrenaline would suppress follicle stimulating hormone and luteinizing hormone release, but are too toxic for use. The combination of 40 mcg ethinyl estradiol and 20 mg of methyltestosterone inhibits gonadotropin release and produces azoospermia in men, but at the risk of loss of libido, constant gynecomastia, and testicular atrophy. Several combinations of androgens and progestins have been evaluated. Percutaneous testosterone and medroxyprogesterone acetate appears to be the most effective, with good metabolic tolerance and maintenance of libido and sexual performance. Injections of inhibine, a testicular factor that controls secretion of follicle stimulating hormone by feedback, offer promise of suppressing spermatogenesis without affecting other systems. Numerous substances are known to inhibit spermatogenesis but are to toxic for use or entail an unacceptable loss of libido. Gossypol has been employed as a contraceptive by the Chinese for its action in inhibiting protein synthesis, but it is known to have serious secondary effects. Among male methods currently in use, the condom had a Pearl index of .4-1.6 in the most recent British studies. Coitus interruptus can seriously interfere with sexual pleasure and has a failure rate of 25-30%. Vasectomy is safe, effective, and easy to perform, but is not a reversible method. The combination of 20 mg of medroxyprogesterone acetate in 2 daily doses and 100 mg of testosterone applied in an abdominal spray has given very promising results in 2 small studies in France and merits further development and diffusion.

  16. Demystifying Nursing Theory: A Christian Nursing Perspective.

    PubMed

    Schaffer, Marjorie A; Sandau, Kristin; Missal, Bernita

    How does nursing theory apply to nursing practice? Nursing theory can explain the why and how of nursing practice, guide nursing interventions, and provide a framework for measuring outcomes. This article briefly explains nursing theory, provides examples for applying theory to nursing practice, and proposes questions for examining the consistency of nursing theories with Christian perspectives. A helpful table illustrating grand, middle-range, and situation-specific theories and their application to nursing practice and research, along with references, is provided online as supplemental digital content. Three caring theories are analyzed from biblical beliefs.

  17. Whither the "Nurse" in Nurse Practitioner?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weston, Jerry L.

    1975-01-01

    The author sees a need for the nursing profession to evaluate the extended role of the nurse to determine differences in the patient care provided by nurse practitioners and physician's assistants. From the data, appropriate nursing education and nursing practice planning can follow. (EA)

  18. Nurses' and Physicians' Perceptions of Nursing Authority.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katzman, Elaine Menter

    1989-01-01

    The findings in the Authority in Nursing Roles Inventory support the premise that in spite of expanded nursing roles emphasizing nursing authority, there are disagreements between nurses' and physicians' perceptions of the authority of nurses as well as areas of dissatisfaction within each professional group. (Author/MLW)

  19. Nursing Positions

    MedlinePlus

    ... and actually needs to feed. Getting Comfortable With Breastfeeding Nursing can be one of the most challenging ... a mother. As you become more used to breastfeeding your baby, you can try different positions or ...

  20. Nursing Homes

    MedlinePlus

    ... estimated 50-70% of residents. More than three fourths of nursing-home residents have problems making daily ... to communicate the needs of the resident. Updated: July 2017 Posted: March 2012 © 2017 Health in Aging. ...

  1. Primary Nurse - Role Evolution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mundinger, Mary O'Neil

    1973-01-01

    Primary nursing means that each patient has an individual nurse who is responsible for assessing his nursing needs and planning and evaluating his nursing care. The article describes the advantages and problems connected with this approach to patient care. (AG)

  2. Exploring nurses' confirmed expectations regarding health IT: a phenomenological study.

    PubMed

    Zadvinskis, Inga M; Chipps, Esther; Yen, Po-Yin

    2014-02-01

    Health information technology (IT) benefits both patients and providers with respect to health care quality and perceived usefulness. Although existing research provides a preliminary understanding of nurses' perception of health IT, perceptions do not guide actions. This phenomenological study explored nurses' perceptions regarding electronic health records and bar code medication administration four months post implementation on a medical-surgical unit in an academic medical center. Ten staff nurses (8 females and 2 males) participated. We categorized the results into five themes from personal-level to organizational-level confirmed expectations: (1) nurses' interaction with computer, (2) nursing performance regarding task accomplishment, (3) unit-specific teamwork, (4) interdisciplinary teamwork, and (5) quality of care. We discovered that effective health IT must be congruent with nursing expectations. IT professionals, nursing and organizational leaders may use findings to structure an environment supportive of effective health IT in nursing practice.

  3. Working experiences of Iranian retired nurses: a content analysis study.

    PubMed

    Nobahar, Monir; Ahmadi, Fazlollah; Alhani, Fatemah; Fallahi Khoshknab, Masood

    2013-10-01

    Understanding the experiences of retired nurses can be useful in increasing self-confidence, motivation to work and work enthusiasm among nurses. The purpose of this study was to explore the work experiences of Iranian retired nurses. A qualitative design was conducted using a content analysis approach. Purposive sampling was used to choose the study participants. Semi-structured interviews were held to collect the perspectives of 20 retired nurses (10 female and 10 male). Two main themes emerged in the data analysis: 'work problems and unpleasant experiences in a sense' with subthemes 'exhausting work', 'insufficient salary', 'inappropriate relation' and 'unsuitable social position'; and 'job satisfaction and pleasant experiences in a sense' with subthemes 'divine satisfaction and religious belief', 'satisfaction of patients and their companions' and 'love of nursing profession and relaxation experience'. The findings indicate the challenges that nurses face after retirement. These experiences will help nurse managers to adopt appropriate measures to support nurses after retirement.

  4. Applying nursing theory to perioperative nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Gillette, V A

    1996-08-01

    The perioperative nursing role has evolved from that of task-oriented specialists to patient-centered professionals. The concept of caring is significant to perioperative nurses and is manifested by the many caring behaviors perioperative nurses demonstrate toward surgical patients. This article describes how the element of caring is an essential function of perioperative nursing and relates the perioperative nursing role to the work of three nursing theorists (le, Florence Nightingale; Virginia Henderson, RN, AM; Carol L. Montgomery, RN, PhD).

  5. Nursing students' personal qualities: a descriptive study.

    PubMed

    Pitt, Victoria; Powis, David; Levett-Jones, Tracy; Hunter, Sharyn

    2014-09-01

    Reports of a lack of compassionate care from nurses have resulted in calls to integrate the assessment of personal qualities into nursing student selection, with the intent to recruit individuals whose attributes reflect those desired in the practising nurse. Whilst nursing programmes are able to determine students' academic abilities on enrolment limited attention has been given to other qualities. Although there is an understanding of the qualities desired in the practising nurse, to date there has been limited exploration of nursing students' personal qualities as they enter nursing programmes and whether these change over time. To describe the personal qualities of newly enrolled Bachelor of Nursing students, and to determine if these qualities are age and gender specific and whether they change over time. The Personal Qualities Assessment (PQA; www.pqa.net.au) was completed by 138 nursing students on enrolment and repeated after three years. Twenty four percent of students had PQA scores at the extreme ends (±2 SD) of the continuum of one or more sub-scale distributions. Significant positive correlations were found between age and the PQA measured traits: self-control, resilience, narcissism, empathy and moral orientation. Females were significantly more conscientious, community orientated and involved; males had significantly higher narcissism and aloofness scores and lower empathy. For those students (n=28) who completed the follow-up PQA, their personal qualities scores did not change. Most of the study sample possessed mid-range personal quality trait scores, but approximately a quarter of the nursing students recorded extreme scores. Older students were found to have a higher measure of self-control, resilience, empathy and narcissism and more communitarian in attitude. Significant differences were found between males' and females' scores. That personal qualities were unchanged after three years suggests the importance of incorporating the assessment of

  6. Nursing Leadership.

    PubMed

    Crisp, Carol

    2016-01-01

    Nurse transformational leaders can serve in academic settings and at local, national, international professional nursing organizations and community-based groups. As a transformational leader, nurses can lead in any workplace. According to a study by Stanley (2012), clinical leaders are not sought for their capacity to outline a vision, but for their values and beliefs on display that are easily recognized in their actions. This encompasses the moral component of transformational leadership. It is the APRNs duty to continue to strive towards a better vision for the well-being of all nurses, patients, and colleagues. Autonomous APRNs are happier, healthier, and better prepared to provide the best patient care to their patients. We should not be happy to sit back and let others fight this fight. APRNs need to be on the frontline, leading the way. This is only an insight that I have gained after many frustrating years of cheering our profession and then being made to feel inferior at the same time. Only nurses, who have that nurturing spirit, would hold back if they felt it might hurt others. Don't back off or hold back! It might hurt those that follow!

  7. Nurse executives: new roles, new opportunities.

    PubMed

    Kleinman, C S

    1999-01-01

    As women have been nursing since the earliest days of recorded civilization, so nurses have been associated with health care since the earliest days of recorded medical history. Gender and function have been inextricably woven in ways that created a struggle for success within a male-dominated industry. Nurses, as women, have been undervalued as, until recently, their role in health care has been similarly undervalued. Changing realities in the health care environment have created an opportunity for women's unique skills and talents to be revalued in a way that offers new opportunities for nurses. Teamwork, global thinking, multitasking, creativity, and flexibility are characteristics that have assumed new importance in the marketplace. Nursing leaders possess these attributes, along with a strong clinical foundation that is integrated with knowledge of sound business principles. This combination now positions nurse executives to reach the highest levels of heath care administration. Critical to this achievement is the professional credibility obtained through education at the master's degree level in health care and nursing administration programs that provide the essential tools for professional success. New opportunities for nurse executives afford educators in health care and nursing administration similar opportunities to develop and market programs to this large group of health care professionals who are seeking graduate education in increasing numbers.

  8. [Male contraception].

    PubMed

    Demoulin, A

    1984-04-01

    Among the reasons why male hormonal contraception has lagged behind female methods are the necessity of preserving virility, the fact that spermatogenesis is a continuous process, the need to control secondary effects and toxicity, and the requirement that modes of administration be acceptable to both partners. Among currently available reversible mehtods, withdrawal is undoubtedly the most ancient. It is still widespread but cannot be recommended because of its limited effectiveness. The condom is used by about 10% of couples worldwide as a principal or temporary method, but its inter-ference with sensation has limited its acceptance. Condoms are nevertheless highly effective when used with a spermicide. Various androgens are currently under investigation. High doses of testosterone can induce azoospermia without affecting libido but their side effects may be serious. The use of combinations of steroids permits doses to be reduced and offers promise for the future. The combination of oral medroxyprogesterone acetate and percutaneous testosterone is one of the better approaches; the combination is effective and nontoxic but has the disadvantage of percutaneous administration. Gossypol, a pigment extracted from the cotton plant, has been used as a contraceptive in China with a reported efficacy of 99.89%, recovery of fertility within 3 months, and no effect on future fertility. However, its toxicity appears to be significant in the animal and its reversibility is uncertain. A search is on for analogs which would preserve the contraceptive effects while eliminating toxic effects. Several gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) analogs under investigation for their interference with spermatogenesis have given promising results. Several chemicals tested for contraceptive effects have had unacceptably high toxicity. Chinese investigators have reported good results with various physical methods of interfering with sperm production, but their reversibility and innocuity

  9. A comparison of patient and nurse expectations regarding nursing care in the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Blank, Fidela S J; Tobin, Judith; Jaouen, Marcia; Smithline, Ellen; Tierney, Heather; Visintainer, Paul

    2014-07-01

    Patient satisfaction, an important measurable outcome, allows nurses to assess what can be improved in nursing practice. The purpose of this study is to compare expectations of patients and nurses using 3 nursing care attributes: 1) friendliness, courtesy, and respectfulness; 2) comfort measures; and 3) degree of information sharing. This is an Institutional Review Board-exempt survey of paired patients' and nurses' perceptions of nursing care in a 50-bed emergency department of a level 1 trauma center. The survey consists of questions that addressed 3 performance attributes of nursing care. The respondent circled their responses in a Likert scale of 5 choices from 1: "way below expectation" to 5: "way above expectation." An open-ended comment section followed each question; the last survey item asked for recommendations on how to make nursing care extraordinary. Nineteen males and 30 female patients, ages 18-89 participated. Of the nurse participants, 20% had <5 years ED experience, 22% had 5-10 years, and 52% had >10 years. The patients rated the care they received consistently higher than nurses. The difference in the average patient ratings vs. the average nurse's rating was significant. (P = < 0.002, paired T test and Sign test). Patient ratings were also consistently higher when patients either knew their nurse's name or were able to identify them by sight. The higher average rating was significant in all 3 attributes (P = 0.02, Wilcoxon Rank-sum test). The unexpected highly positive patient rating did not identify specific areas for practice improvement; it did provide positive feedback for excellent care, reinforcing good nursing practice. Copyright © 2014 Emergency Nurses Association. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Male Reproductive System

    MedlinePlus

    ... Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Male Reproductive System KidsHealth > For Parents > Male Reproductive System A A ... your son's reproductive health. continue About the Male Reproductive System Most species have two sexes: male and female. ...

  11. Is the School Nurse a Nurse? Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cowell, Julia Muennich

    1998-01-01

    To cut costs, many districts are replacing certified school nurses with uncertified nurses or undereducated health aides. Never has the role of school nurse been more important. Besides attending to sick children and handling emergencies, today's school nurses are active in health education, physical fitness programs, and disease prevention.…

  12. Nursing shortages and international nurse migration.

    PubMed

    Ross, S J; Polsky, D; Sochalski, J

    2005-12-01

    The United Kingdom and the United States are among several developed countries currently experiencing nursing shortages. While the USA has not yet implemented policies to encourage nurse immigration, nursing shortages will likely result in the growth of foreign nurse immigration to the USA. Understanding the factors that drive the migration of nurses is critical as the USA exerts more pull on the foreign nurse workforce. To predict the international migration of nurses to the UK using widely available data on country characteristics. The Nursing and Midwifery Council serves as the source of data on foreign nurse registrations in the UK between 1998 and 2002. We develop and test a regression model that predicts the number of foreign nurse registrants in the UK based on source country characteristics. We collect country-level data from sources such as the World Bank and the World Health Organization. The shortage of nurses in the UK has been accompanied by massive and disproportionate growth in the number of foreign nurses from poor countries. Low-income, English-speaking countries that engage in high levels of bilateral trade experience greater losses of nurses to the UK. Poor countries seeking economic growth through international trade expose themselves to the emigration of skilled labour. This tendency is currently exacerbated by nursing shortages in developed countries. Countries at risk for nurse emigration should adjust health sector planning to account for expected losses in personnel. Moreover, policy makers in host countries should address the impact of recruitment on source country health service delivery.

  13. Nurse-physician collaboration and associations with perceived autonomy in Cypriot critical care nurses.

    PubMed

    Georgiou, Evanthia; Papathanassoglou, Elizabeth DE; Pavlakis, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    Increased nurse-physician collaboration is a factor in improved patient outcomes. Limited autonomy of nurses has been proposed as a barrier to collaboration. This study aims to explore nurse-physician collaboration and potential associations with nurses' autonomy and pertinent nurses' characteristics in adult intensive care units (ICUs) in Cyprus. Descriptive correlational study with sampling of the entire adult ICU nurses' population in Cyprus (five ICUs in four public hospitals, n = 163, response rate 88·58%). Nurse-physician collaboration was assessed by the Collaboration and Satisfaction About Care Decisions Scale (CSACD), and autonomy by the Varjus et al. scale. The average CSACD score was 36·36 ± 13·30 (range: 7-70), implying low levels of collaboration and satisfaction with care decisions. Male participants reported significantly lower CSACD scores (t = 2·056, p = 0·04). CSACD correlated positively with years of ICU nursing experience (r = 0·332, p < 0·0001) and professional satisfaction (r = 0·455, p < 0·0001). The mean autonomy score was 76·15 ± 16·84 (range: 18-108). Higher degree of perceived collaboration (CSACD scores) associated with higher autonomy scores (r = 0·508, p <0·0001). Our findings imply low levels of nurse-physician collaboration and satisfaction with care decisions and moderate levels of autonomy in ICU nurses in Cyprus. The results provide insight into the association between nurse-physician collaboration and nurses' autonomy and the correlating factors. © 2015 British Association of Critical Care Nurses.

  14. Reframing the Field of Gender and Nursing Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solbraekke, Kari Nyheim; Solvoll, Betty-Ann; Heggen, Kristin M.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this article is to explore how male students learn to practice nursing and the role of technology in their training process. The study is inspired by Bruno Latour's understanding of social interaction as an interplay between humans and technology. The students' use of the washcloth and the stethoscope, two significant nursing tools, is…

  15. Reframing the Field of Gender and Nursing Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solbraekke, Kari Nyheim; Solvoll, Betty-Ann; Heggen, Kristin M.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this article is to explore how male students learn to practice nursing and the role of technology in their training process. The study is inspired by Bruno Latour's understanding of social interaction as an interplay between humans and technology. The students' use of the washcloth and the stethoscope, two significant nursing tools, is…

  16. Camp Nursing: Student Internships.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harwood, Catherine Hoe; Van Hofwegen, Lynn

    2002-01-01

    Camps can meet or supplement their health care delivery needs by using student nurses. Three models for student nurse internships, basic information about nursing education, and tips for negotiating student nurse internships are described. Sidebars present resources for camp health centers, nursing student competence characteristics, types of…

  17. Leaders from Nursing's History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fondiller, Shirley H.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Looks at the lives and accomplishments of four leaders in professional nursing: (1) Loretta Ford, who championed the cause of nurse practitioners; (2) Mable Staupers, a pioneer in community health and nursing; (3) Janet Geister, a leader in private nursing; and (4) Isabel Stewart, who led the movement to standardize nursing education. (JOW)

  18. Camp Nursing: Student Internships.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harwood, Catherine Hoe; Van Hofwegen, Lynn

    2002-01-01

    Camps can meet or supplement their health care delivery needs by using student nurses. Three models for student nurse internships, basic information about nursing education, and tips for negotiating student nurse internships are described. Sidebars present resources for camp health centers, nursing student competence characteristics, types of…

  19. Male to male transmission of supernumerary nipples.

    PubMed

    Tsukahara, M; Uchida, M; Uchino, S; Fujisawa, R; Kamei, T; Itoh, T

    1997-03-17

    We report on a father and his son with supernumerary nipples. No male-to-male transmission has previously been described with this trait. This observation confirms that this trait is inherited in an autosomal dominant fashion.

  20. Father surrogate: historical perceptions and perspectives of men in nursing and their relationship with fathers in the NICU.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Steven W

    2008-01-01

    Femininity is often associated with the nursing profession, but is not one of its defining characteristics. Men have been providing care to the sick and injured for many centuries, and they continue to do so for many reasons. Male nurses display a wide range of caring practices, which may not always be interpreted as such by their female counterparts. This article presents the male perspective and approach to caring, including the unique relationship that male nurses can have with fathers in the NICU.

  1. Public health nursing: an autonomous career for World War II nurse veterans.

    PubMed

    Barnum, Nancy C

    2011-01-01

    The 1944 G.I. Bill increased accessibility of higher education to male veterans. Less is known about how its availability affected opportunities for female veterans. The purpose of this study was to examine nurse veterans' use of the G. I. Bill at one large public university. Primary sources included archival documents of one large public university as well as articles published in professional nursing and medical journals of the 1940s and 1950s. Secondary sources addressing nursing and nursing education history, and the history of the G. I. Bill provided further context. Historical research methodology was conducted. Findings demonstrate that nurse veterans desired more independence in practice following the war. Archival documents of one large public university show that nurse veterans used G. I. Bill funds to seek degrees in public health nursing. The specialty of public health provided increased independence and autonomy of practice not experienced in hospital based care. G.I. Bill educational funds provided these nurse veterans the means to attain degrees in public health nursing, providing them the opportunity for more autonomous practice.

  2. Child Psychiatric Nursing Option.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koehler, Mary Frances

    1981-01-01

    Describes a course at the Indiana University School of Nursing which allows senior students in a baccalaureate nursing program to concentrate on emotionally disturbed children in an advanced nursing course. Discusses course philosophy, clinical experiences, and program results. (CT)

  3. International Transplant Nurses Society

    MedlinePlus

    ... the Transplant Nursing Symposium. Register for the Transplant Nursing Symposium Registration is now open for the Transplant ... to non-members. Purchase your copy today! Transplant Nursing Scope & Standards of Practice, 2nd Edition Click the ...

  4. Emergency Nurses Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... Nurses Week Celebration Led by the Emergency Nurses Association, #ENWeek, Oct. 8-14, recognizes the work of ... care for emergency department patients, the Emergency Nurses Association is opposed to the passage of the recently- ...

  5. [Assessing nursing workload].

    PubMed

    Princiaux, Danielle

    2012-01-01

    Healthcare managers must monitor the nursing workload and back up their arguments when requesting resources. A study was carried out based on a tool which measures whether nursing staff provision meets the nursing care workload.

  6. The Colorado Collaborative for Nursing Research: nurses shaping nursing's future.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Karen H; Weiss, Jason; Welton, John; Reeder, Blaine; Ozkaynak, Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    Nurses in the present health care environment have been reduced too often to being providers of safe, competent care rather than quality care. In response, the Institute of Medicine has recommended that nurses become more involved in making changes to the health care system and use data more effectively. If nursing intends to follow these recommendations, the profession needs (a) fresh perspectives to assist in making health care system changes, (b) partnerships between nurse scientists and nurse clinicians to generate and implement data, and (c) capture of the proper value of nursing as distinct from other elements of health care delivery. The Colorado Collaborative for Nursing Research is an effort to meet the recommendations of the Institute of Medicine. The Colorado Collaborative for Nursing Research has a three-arm structure: a research forum where nurse academicians and nurse clinicians can launch collaborative projects; a research support services arm from which nurse collaborators can obtain help with modeling, statistics, writing, and funding; and a data extraction/data sharing mechanism to inform the decision making of nurse leaders.

  7. Gender difference in academic performance of nursing students in a Malaysian university college.

    PubMed

    Wan Chik, W Z; Salamonson, Y; Everett, B; Ramjan, L M; Attwood, N; Weaver, R; Saad, Z; Davidson, P M

    2012-09-01

    To examine differences in academic performance between male and female nursing students, and to identify whether professional identity and language usage were explanatory factors of academic performance. Although the numbers of men entering the nursing profession are increasing, societal stereotypes and the lack of male role models in nursing may have a negative impact on motivation, and hence, academic performance. A total of 147 students who were enrolled in an undergraduate nursing programme in Peninsula Malaysia were surveyed in January 2011. In addition to demographic and academic data, three instruments were administered to measure language acculturation and professional identity. The mean age of participants was 20.0 (SD: 1.5) years with 81% being female. Almost all students spoke the Malay language at home. Although there were no differences between male and female nursing students in relation to professional identity (P=0.496), male nursing students reported a lower mean English language usage score (9.9 vs. 10.9, P=0.011) and a higher mean Malay language usage score (20.4 vs. 18.8, P=0.017). Males were also found to have lower academic performance than female students, as measured by grade point average (GPA) (2.7 vs. 3.2, P<0.001). Regression analysis revealed gender was the only significant predictor of academic performance (β=-0.44, P<0.001). Males represent less than 10% of the nursing workforce in developed countries, with some developing countries experiencing even lower participation rates. Promoting academic support of male nursing students may assist in increasing the number of male registered nurses in the nursing workforce. © 2012 The Authors. International Nursing Review © 2012 International Council of Nurses.

  8. Is Nurses' Professional Competence Related to Their Personality and Emotional Intelligence? A Cross-Sectional Study.

    PubMed

    Heydari, Abbas; Kareshki, Hossein; Armat, Mohammad Reza

    2016-01-01

    Nurses' professional competence is a crucial factor in clinical practice. Systematic evaluation of nurses' competence and its related factors are essential for enhancing the quality of nursing care. This study aimed to assess the nurses' competence level and its possible relationship with their personality and emotional intelligence. Using a cross-sectional survey design, three instruments including Nurse Competence Scale, short form of Schutte Self Report Emotional Intelligence Test, and the short 10-item version of Big Five Factor Inventory, were administered simultaneously to a randomized stratified sample of 220 nurses working in hospitals affiliated to Mashhad University of Medical Sciences. Data analysis was performed using SPSS 11.5. Majority of nurses rated themselves as "good" and "very good", with the highest scores in "managing situations" and "work role" dimensions of nurse competence. A relatively similar pattern of scores was seen in competence dimensions, personality and emotional intelligence, among male and female nurses. Emotional intelligence and personality scores showed a significant relationship with nurses' competence, explaining almost 20% of variations in nurse competence scores. Iranian nurses evaluated their overall professional competence at similar level of the nurses in other countries. Knowledge about the nurses' competence level and its related factors, including personality and emotional intelligence, may help nurse managers in enhancing nurses' professional competence through appropriate task assignments and conducting in-service educational programs, thus improving the health status of patients.

  9. Cancer nursing in Ontario: defining nursing roles.

    PubMed

    Fitch, Margaret I; Mings, Deborah

    2003-01-01

    The delivery of cancer care in Ontario is facing unprecedented challenges. Shortages in nursing, as in all professional disciplines, are having an impact on the delivery of cancer care. Oncology nurses have a major role to play in the delivery of optimum cancer care. Oncology nursing, when adequately defined and supported, can benefit the cancer delivery system, patients, and families. A primary nursing model is seen as being key to the delivery of optimum cancer care. Primary nursing as a philosophy facilitates continuity of care, coordination of a patient's care plan, and a meaningful ongoing relationship with the patient and his/her family. Primary nursing, when delivered in the collaboration of a nurse-physician team, allows for medical resources to be used appropriately. Defined roles enable nurses to manage patients within their scope of practice in collaboration with physicians. Enacting other nursing roles, such as nurse practitioners and advanced practice nurses, can also enable the health care system to manage a broader number of patients with more complex needs. This article presents a position paper originally written as the basis for an advocacy and education initiative in Ontario. It is shared in anticipation that the work may be useful to oncology nurses in other jurisdictions in their efforts to advance oncology nursing and improvement of patient care.

  10. From Nurse to Nurse Anesthetist: The Influence of Age and Gender on Professional Socialization and Career Commitment of Advanced Practice Nurses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waugaman, Wynne R.; Lohrer, Donna J.

    2000-01-01

    A survey of 1,106 student nurse anesthetists (40% male) showed that increasing age was negatively correlated with socioeconomic rewards. Male gender was positively correlated with administrative/supervisory roles, female gender with holistic patient care. Men achieved socialization more readily in occupational orientation. (SK)

  11. From Nurse to Nurse Anesthetist: The Influence of Age and Gender on Professional Socialization and Career Commitment of Advanced Practice Nurses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waugaman, Wynne R.; Lohrer, Donna J.

    2000-01-01

    A survey of 1,106 student nurse anesthetists (40% male) showed that increasing age was negatively correlated with socioeconomic rewards. Male gender was positively correlated with administrative/supervisory roles, female gender with holistic patient care. Men achieved socialization more readily in occupational orientation. (SK)

  12. Nursing Jobs in Nursing Homes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Torpey, Elka Maria

    2011-01-01

    The need for practical nurses who focus on caring for older people is growing. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the number of people ages 65 and older is expected to increase from 40 million to 72 million between 2010 and 2030. And the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) projects that this increasing population will result in job growth for…

  13. What nurses want: the nurse incentives project.

    PubMed

    Wieck, K Lynn; Dols, Jean; Northam, Sally

    2009-01-01

    Today's nurse executives are struggling with leadership challenges of managing the multigenerational workforce, financial imperatives to deliver better care for lower costs, and competition to provide the optimal work environment to retain nurses. The purpose of the Nurse Incentives Project was to determine satisfaction with current employment incentives and potential managerial actions which might decrease or delay turnover by registered nurses. This study spawned recommendations regarding the role of incentives in designing an environment where benefits and perks will be seen as incentives to stay and thrive in the current nursing workplace. The results show that nurses know what they want. Attention to generational priorities and flexible benefits programs may help to create the cohesive work environment that nurses seek. Investment into creating delivery arenas where satisfied nurses are caring for satisfied patients is a worthwhile goal.

  14. Hospital nurse administrators in Japan: a feminist dimensional analysis.

    PubMed

    Brandi, C L; Naito, A

    2006-03-01

    Nursing administration research is scarce in Japan during a time when health care is rapidly reforming and baccalaureate and graduate nursing programmes are rapidly developing. Additionally, nursing administration content relies heavily on Western and non-nursing theories, some of which have been criticized for male bias. The purpose of this article is to present key findings from a qualitative study that explored the perspectives or viewpoints of 16 Japanese senior female nurse administrators in hospitals in order to learn what was happening in their working situations and how they were managing. This feminist study used dimensional analysis strategies for data collection and analysis. Semi-structured, tape-recorded interviews were conducted by both researchers in Japanese, transcribed into Japanese, and translated into English. The resulting explanatory matrix portrayed a story of 16 nurse administrators, most of whom were able successfully to enact a management role in a context of role ambiguity that was congruent with their relational values and beliefs. Important conditions influencing value-based role enactment included organization mission and purpose, organization structure, nurse-doctor relationships, participant-supervisor relationships, and personal attributes. Many participants were able to overcome barriers in these categories using strategies of tempered radicalism and consequently made positive organizational changes. Advanced formal education, better organizational support, and a raised consciousness among nurses that views nurses and midwives as equal partners with other professionals will enable Japanese nurse administrators to help advance patient-centred care and nursing development and empowerment.

  15. Nursing, knowledge and practice.

    PubMed

    Allen, D

    1997-07-01

    Recent commentators have suggested that academic knowledge is irrelevant to nursing practice and may actually undermine nursing's traditional caring ethos. Furthermore, by making nursing more academic, it is claimed that 'natural' but non-academic carers are prevented from pursuing a career in nursing. Debates about the relationship between nursing, knowledge and practice have a long history and have to be understood in terms of wider political and economic issues relating to nursing, its status within society and the changing role of nurses within the health services division of labour. One crucial issue is nursing's status as women's work. Critics of developments in nurse education draw an ideological equation between nursing work and the traditional female role. From this perspective the qualities that make a good nurse cannot be taught, rather they are founded on 'natural' feminine skills. Irrespective of whether caring is 'natural' or not, it is questionable as to whether, for today's nurses, being caring is sufficient. The shape of nursing jurisdiction is a long way removed from its origins in the Victorian middle-class household. In addition to their traditional caring role, contemporary nurses may also have complex clinical, management and research responsibilities, as well as being crucial coordinators of service provision. It is suggested that these and future developments in health services make the need for an educated nursing workforce even more pressing. In order to adequately prepare nurses for practice, however, it is vital that nurse education reflects the reality of service provision.

  16. Parish nursing: an innovative community nursing service.

    PubMed

    Laming, Eleanor; Stewart, Angela

    2016-07-13

    This article explains the concept of parish nursing and provides a historical perspective of this service. It describes the development of a parish nursing service in Heartsease, Norwich, which complements community nursing practice by focusing on the importance of providing spiritual care alongside physical, psychological and social care. Case studies are provided to illustrate the benefits of a parish nursing service to individuals and the community.

  17. Spirituality, religiosity, and personal beliefs of Australian undergraduate nursing students.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Violeta; Fischer, Imke; Leigh, Maria Cynthia; Larkin, David; Webster, Sue

    2014-10-01

    To explore Australian nursing students' perceptions of spirituality, religiosity, and personal belief. Spiritual and religious literature support the benefits to patients' physical and mental health. Nurses have an ethical obligation to understand and incorporate patient's spiritual beliefs and values into the care plan. A cross-sectional survey was conducted using the 32-item WHO-QOL-SRPB questionnaire. The sample consisted of 483 undergraduate nursing students in Sydney, Australia. There were 21% male and 79% female students; age ranged from 18 to 56 years, with a mean age of 26.53 (SD = 7.32). There were no significant difference between male and female nursing students, but there were difference in SRPB scores between first-, second-, and third-year students and between religious affiliations. Spirituality is multidimensional and multilevel and is interconnected with religiosity and personal belief. Nurses need to understand their own spirituality before they can incorporate spirituality in their patient care. © The Author(s) 2014.

  18. [The Spanish influence in Colombian nursing].

    PubMed

    Velandia, A L

    1993-06-01

    Four statements inferenced from: religious traditions, gender or woman status, military heritage and ethnic inheritance, and their influence in nursing, are presented in this article. The ethnic inheritance analyses the issue based upon the cultural influences of the native-indigenous groups and the spanish and mediterranean attributes in nursing development. The religious tradition began with Pedro Claver's J.C. presence between 1610 and 1617. His presence is followed by the "Hermanos Hospitalarios de San Juan de Dios" in 1768, and further with the presence of the sisters of Charity in 1873. Lastly, the article compares the Barcelona's Santa Cruz hospital organization, where at that time, seems to appear a new type of nursing arrangement; with present functions and charges, currently utilized in colombian hospitals (administrator of patient rooms, "servidor", women in charge of female patients and sick children, "ecónoma", chief in charge, and senior male nurse).

  19. Iranian nursing students’ experiences of nursing

    PubMed Central

    Motlagh, Farzaneh Gholami; Karimi, Mahboubeh; Hasanpour, Marzieh

    2012-01-01

    Background: The negative attitudes and behaviors of Iranian nursing students impede learning and threaten their progression and retention in nursing programs. The need to understand students’ perception and experiences of nursing provide knowledge about effectiveness of nursing education program as well as their professional identity. The purpose of this study was to discover experiences of nursing students. Materials and Methods: In a descriptive, exploratory and qualitative study, twelve senior nursing students of Isfahan University of Medical Sciences (School of Nursing and Midwifery) were participated. Data was collected via unstructured in-depth interview, and thematic analysis method was used for analyzing the data. Findings: The findings from this study revealed that the nursing students in Iran experienced altered experiences during their education program as positive and negative. Two major themes were constructed from the thematic analysis of the transcripts: professional dimensions and professional conflicts. Conclusions: Regarding the findings, positive experiences of students have leaded them to acceptance and satisfaction of nursing and negative experiences to rejection and hating of nursing and lack of adaptation with their professional roles. Therefore, it is recommended that revision and improvement in nursing education program is essential to facilitate positive experiences and remove negative experiences of nursing student’s educational environment. PMID:23833591

  20. Virtually Nursing: Emerging Technologies in Nursing Education.

    PubMed

    Foronda, Cynthia L; Alfes, Celeste M; Dev, Parvati; Kleinheksel, A J; Nelson, Douglas A; OʼDonnell, John M; Samosky, Joseph T

    Augmented reality and virtual simulation technologies in nursing education are burgeoning. Preliminary evidence suggests that these innovative pedagogical approaches are effective. The aim of this article is to present 6 newly emerged products and systems that may improve nursing education. Technologies may present opportunities to improve teaching efforts, better engage students, and transform nursing education.

  1. Professional Transition: Nurse to Nurse-Midwife

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulligan, Joan E.

    1976-01-01

    The article focuses on one nurse's experience in the nurse-midwife program at a large New York medical center. Terming the learning process a painful transition from academe to reality, the author discusses skills learned, conflicts with physicians' belief systems, rewards and frustrations, and the need for nurse-midwife identity. (Author/MS)

  2. Cardiovascular nursing in Israel.

    PubMed

    Blaer, Yosef; Rosenberg, Orit; Reisin, Leonardo

    2003-01-01

    Cardiovascular (CV) nursing as an entity in Israel dates back to 1952, when the nurses in Tel-Hashomer hospital took care of postoperative heart surgery patients. The first intensive cardiac care units (ICCUs) were established in 1971. In 1982, the first ICCU course was established in Tel-Hashomer hospital nursing school. Today, most of the nursing staff in Israels ICCUs are graduates of ICCU courses. The nurses professional society, the Society for Nursing of Israel, was established in 1947. In 1989 the Society for Advancement of Cardiac Nursing in Israel (SACN) was established. The main goals of the society were: the exchange of CV nursing knowledge, CV nursing research, CV nursing education in nursing schools, education of nurses in other departments in the care of the cardiac patient, and CV nursing education in the community. The CV nurse takes a large role in the total care of the cardiac patient, which includes rehabilitation within the hospital and in the ambulatory setting and coordination of nursing in national and international multicenter clinical trials. In collaboration with the Ministry of Health Nursing Division, Israeli CV nurses participate in national and international projects to: develop and upgrade nursing education; train new CV nurses; develop, review, and revise nursing protocols and guidelines; and establish new, more advanced ICCUs in underdeveloped areas within Israel and around the world. Our vision for the future development of CV nursing in Israel includes coordination and management roles in the hospital setting, and the establishment and management of home-care programs. Copyright 2003 CHF, Inc.

  3. Nurses' Attitudes towards Alcoholics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Speer, Rita D.

    Nurses' attitudes toward the alcoholic can have a profound impact on the person suffering from alcoholism. These attitudes can affect the alcoholic's care and even whether the alcoholic chooses to recover. This study investigated attitudes of approximately 68 nurses employed in hospitals, 49 nurses in treatment facilities, 58 nursing students, and…

  4. Nursing's Image on Campus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woolley, Alma S.

    1981-01-01

    In studying the nurse's image at a liberal arts college, it was found that faculty and administrators view nurses as long-suffering drones. On the whole, the image of nursing was positive, with those who had the most contact with the nursing program having a more enlightened image. (CT)

  5. Nursing's Scientific Quest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Jean

    1981-01-01

    Examines nursing's changing research practices. Discusses changes in the philosophy of science, dichotomies within nursing, and nursing's changing research tradition. Concludes that a new research tradition can provide nursing with the scientific and social freedom and openness to solve both conceptual and empirical problems. (CT)

  6. Intention in Nursing Practice.

    PubMed

    Sofhauser, Cynthia

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this column is to explore the meaning of intention in nursing practice and distinguish it from the concept of intentionality. The notion that nurses engage in a purposeful act of setting intention prior to delivery of nursing care is introduced, and nursing implications for setting intention in practice is offered. © The Author(s) 2015.

  7. Nursing Education and Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindeman, Carol A.

    1989-01-01

    Three issues directly influence the relationship between nurses and physicians: the nature of nursing practice, the education of registered nurses, and the American Medical Association proposal for registered care technicians. Nursing education programs should focus their programs and objectives so as to prepare their graduates for different…

  8. Paths to nursing leadership.

    PubMed

    Bondas, Terese

    2006-07-01

    The aim was to explore why nurses enter nursing leadership and apply for a management position in health care. The study is part of a research programme in nursing leadership and evidence-based care. Nursing has not invested enough in the development of nursing leadership for the development of patient care. There is scarce research on nurses' motives and reasons for committing themselves to a career in nursing leadership. A strategic sample of 68 Finnish nurse leaders completed a semistructured questionnaire. Analytic induction was applied in an attempt to generate a theory. A theory, Paths to Nursing Leadership, is proposed for further research. Four different paths were found according to variations between the nurse leaders' education, primary commitment and situational factors. They are called the Path of Ideals, the Path of Chance, the Career Path and the Temporary Path. Situational factors and role models of good but also bad nursing leadership besides motivational and educational factors have played a significant role when Finnish nurses have entered nursing leadership. The educational requirements for nurse leaders and recruitment to nursing management positions need serious attention in order to develop a competent nursing leadership.

  9. Nursing's Image on Campus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woolley, Alma S.

    1981-01-01

    In studying the nurse's image at a liberal arts college, it was found that faculty and administrators view nurses as long-suffering drones. On the whole, the image of nursing was positive, with those who had the most contact with the nursing program having a more enlightened image. (CT)

  10. Graduating Black Males

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Edward Earl

    2010-01-01

    Background: The graduation numbers for Black males are dismal, chilling, and undeniably pathetic. The nation graduates only 47% of Black males who enter the 9th grade. The infusion of federal dollars and philanthropic support will not stop the trajectory of Black males who drop out of school. Black males face an upheaval educational battle;…

  11. Gender bias favors female nursing students in the written examination evaluation: Crossover study.

    PubMed

    Kiekkas, Panagiotis; Igoumenidis, Michael; Stefanopoulos, Nikolaos; Bakalis, Nick; Kefaliakos, Antonios; Aretha, Diamanto

    2016-10-01

    Gender discrimination against male nursing students has been reported and attributed to the female-dominated tradition of nursing profession. To investigate gender bias in the written examination evaluation of undergraduate nursing students. One-group crossover study with two phases. Four male and four female examiners provided 400 previously graded examination scripts (50 each) of nursing students. Participating examiners were asked to re-grade scripts after any information about student identity was covered to allow blind marking. Script degrees after non-blind and blind marking were compared within male and within female students, as well as between male and female students. Significantly more female students' degrees shifted downwards and less of them shifted upwards compared with male students' degrees after blind marking, while mean degree of female students was significantly lower. Among male examiners, significantly more female students' degrees shifted downwards and less of them shifted upwards compared with male students' degrees after blind marking, while mean degree of male students was significantly higher. Among female examiners, mean degree of both male and female students was significantly lower after blind marking. No central tendency bias was detected. Gender bias in favor of females was detected in the written examination evaluation of nursing students. This unequal treatment may prevent retention of males in nursing studies and profession. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. How nurse gender influences patient priority assignments in US emergency departments.

    PubMed

    Vigil, Jacob Miguel; Coulombe, Patrick; Alcock, Joe; Stith, Sarah See; Kruger, Eric; Cichowski, Sara

    2017-03-01

    The goals of this study were to compare whether emergency department (ED) patients' pain intensity (PI) is measured differently by male and female nurses and to determine whether PI, heart rate (HR), and respiratory rate (RR) were used to prioritize patient urgency differently by male and female nurses. The associations between patients' PI|HR|RR and the Emergency Severity Index (ESI) scores they were assigned by attending nurses were analyzed using a national database of electronic medical records of US Veterans Affairs ED patients from 2008 to 2012. A total of 129,991 patients presenting for emergency care (Mage = 59.5, 92% males) and their triage nurses (n = 774, Mage = 47.5, 18% males) were analyzed, resulting in a total of 359,642 patient-provider interactions. Patients' PI did not differ by the nurse's gender; however a cross-classified mixed-effects model showed that nurse gender influenced how PI and RR measurements informed the ESI levels that male patients received. Higher PI levels were associated with more urgent (higher priority) ESI levels by female nurses, yet less urgent ESI levels by male nurses. In contrast, male patients with high RR received more urgent ESI levels by male nurses, whereas the nurse gender did not influence ESI assignments for female patients. These findings show that ED patients receive disparate treatment based on inherent characteristics of their triage nurses, and more standardized (eg, automated) protocols that can account for implicit social factors on health care practice for reliably assessing and prioritizing ED patients may be currently warranted.

  13. Measuring Nursing Care Value.

    PubMed

    Welton, John M; Harper, Ellen M

    2016-01-01

    The value of nursing care as well as the contribution of individual nurses to clinical outcomes has been difficult to measure and evaluate. Existing health care financial models hide the contribution of nurses; therefore, the link between the cost and quality o nursing care is unknown. New data and methods are needed to articulate the added value of nurses to patient care. The final results and recommendations of an expert workgroup tasked with defining and measuring nursing care value, including a data model to allow extraction of key information from electronic health records to measure nursing care value, are described. A set of new analytic metrics are proposed.

  14. Transnational spaces of care: migrant nurses in Norway.

    PubMed

    Isaksen, Lise Widding

    2012-01-01

    This article argues that international nurse recruitment from Latvia to Norway is not a win–win situation. The gains and losses of nurse migration are unevenly distributed between sender and receiver countries. On the basis of empirical research and interviews with Latvian nurses and families they left behind, this article argues that nurse migration transforms families and communities and that national health services now become global workplaces. Some decades ago feminist research pointed to the fact that the welfare state was based on a male breadwinner family and women’s unpaid production of care work at home. Today this production of unpaid care is “outsourced” from richer to poorer countries and is related to an emergence of transnational spaces of care. International nurse recruitment and global nurse care chains in Norway increasingly provide the labor that prevents the new adult worker model and gender equality politics from being disrupted in times where families are overloaded with elder care loads.

  15. Joining the nursing profession in Qatar: motives and perceptions.

    PubMed

    Okasha, M S; Ziady, H H

    2001-11-01

    We aimed to identify why female students in Qatar decide to become nurses and how the students perceived the community attitude towards nursing. A self-administered anonymous questionnaire was distributed to all (57) female students of the four academic classes of the Nursing Unit, University of Qatar for the academic year 1999-2000. The two commonest reasons for joining the nursing profession were an interest in medical services and the humanitarian nature of nursing. There were 33 (57.89%) students who considered there was a negative community attitude towards nursing mainly due to the presence of male patients and colleagues and the working hours. A mass media campaign and govemmental support were two strategies suggested to change this.

  16. [Tendency of the studies on moral harassment and nurses].

    PubMed

    Fontes, Kátia Biagio; Pelloso, Sandra Marisa; Carvalho, Maria Dalva de Barros

    2011-12-01

    This is an Integrative Literature Review that aims to analyze productions on moral harassment in nursing published in journals in Brazil and abroad. Articles from 1999 to 2009 were researched in online databases, comprising a sample of 18 publications. After careful reading seven thematic categories were built: evaluation of the moral harassment; behaviors of moral harassment on the part of male nurses; consequences of the moral harassment; coping strategies adopted by nurses; moral harassment in nursing as race and gender discrimination; moral harassment among nursing professionals; institutions as propagators of moral harassment. Results confirm the presence of moral harassment in nursing. However, they indicate that these professionals have been accepting and reproducing this kind of violence as part of the organizational culture, thus showing a need to educate this population and the health institutions themselves about moral harassment and its damages.

  17. [Introduction to nursing aesthetics].

    PubMed

    Chen, Chen-Jung; Tsai, Chuan-Hsiu; Chen, Yi-Chang

    2011-04-01

    Empirical, aesthetic, ethical, and personal knowing are the four fundamental patterns of knowledge inquiry. Of these, the aesthetic knowing pattern is least discussed in nursing literature. This article discusses the definition of nursing aesthetics; its utilization in practice; and correlations between aesthetics and clinical practice. One of the advantages inherent to nursing is its ability to deliver skillful care directly to patients. Skillful performance is essential to reduce discrepancies between goals and patterns. Aesthetic nursing addresses more than the form of nursing. It further addresses the crucial elements of nursing knowledge. The science of nursing is influential in its ability to attain harmony among abundant empiric content, power of beneficence, and pleasure of aesthetic experience. In clinical practice, nurses can employ aesthetic nursing through various channels to create meaning and promote the professional image of nurses. Concepts listed in this article may be utilized in clinical supervision, practice and education.

  18. Advanced urology nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Crowe, Helen

    2014-03-01

    Urology nursing has developed as a specialty over the past few decades in response to several factors, workload demands being a prime reason. Nurses are taking on additional roles and activities including procedures such as cystoscopy and prostate biopsy, and running nurse-led clinics for a variety of urological conditions. Audits of advanced urological nursing practice have shown this care to be of a high standard and investigative procedures performed by these nurses match the diagnostic quality of existing services. Professional urological nursing organizations support the professional needs of these nurses, but the provision of education and training for advanced practice activities remains an unaddressed need. A range of confusing advanced urology nursing titles exists, and uncertainty regarding the roles and scope of practice for these nurses remains a concern. Acceptance and support from medical colleagues is required for the success of advanced urological nursing practice, but opinions on these roles remain divided.

  19. District nurses prescribing as nurse independent prescribers.

    PubMed

    Downer, Frances; Shepherd, Chew Kim

    2010-07-01

    Nurse prescribing has been established in the UK since 1994, however, limited focus has been placed on the experiences of district nurses adopting this additional role. This phenomenological study explores the experiences of district nurses prescribing as nurse independent prescribers across the West of Scotland. A qualitative Heideggarian approach examined the every-day experiences of independent prescribing among district nurses. A purposive sample was used and data collected using audio taped one-to-one informal interviews. The data was analysed thematically using Colaizzi's seven procedural steps. Overall these nurses reported that nurse prescribing was a predominantly positive experience. Participants identified improvements in patient care, job satisfaction, level of autonomy and role development. However, some of the participants indicated that issues such as support, record keeping, confidence and ongoing education are all major influences on prescribing practices.

  20. Acts of caring: nurses caring for nurses.

    PubMed

    Longo, Joy

    2011-01-01

    Caring behaviors displayed toward nurses by nurse managers and nurse peers play a significant role in establishing relationships that promote a healthy work environment. A qualitative study was done to identify behaviors perceived to be caring toward nurses. The theoretical background used for the study was Nursing as Caring by Boykin and Schoenhofer. Data were collected from focus groups consisting of registered nurses currently employed in the practice setting. Content analysis was used for the analysis. The overarching category that was identified was tending to a caring environment. The following emergent categories were also found: caring through helping and supporting, caring through appreciating, and acknowledging unappreciated caring. The findings suggest that nurses demonstrate caring behaviors toward their colleagues by coming to know them on both a professional and a personal level. These behaviors form the foundation for an environment that supports a consistent demonstration of caring.

  1. Nursing in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Baumann, Steven L

    2006-10-01

    The current discussion on the nursing shortage needs to focus as much on nursing job satisfaction and retention as on nursing recruitment and education. Selected aspects of the motivational psychology of Abraham Maslow, Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi, and Frederick Hertzberg are here discussed in light of the challenges-opportunities of nursing in Turkey and elsewhere. Also discussed is an innovative program to support the application of nursing theory and professional development in Toronto, Canada.

  2. [Classification of nursing interventions].

    PubMed

    Guimarães, H C; Barros, A L

    2001-06-01

    During the last years, Nursing is seeking to classify its diagnoses, interventions/actions and outcomes. Here is presented one of the classifications of nursing interventions that was proposed by nurses of the University of Iowa in 1987, the Nursing Interventions Classifications (NIC) as well as the reasons os its creation, in order to contribute to the dissemination of one of the most advanced proposals for classifying nursing interventions.

  3. Nursing Home Registered Nurses' and Licensed Practical Nurses' Knowledge of Causes of Falls.

    PubMed

    Gray-Miceli, Deanna; de Cordova, Pamela B; Crane, Giles L; Quigley, Patricia; Ratcliffe, Sarah J

    2016-01-01

    Reducing falls in nursing homes requires a knowledgeable nursing workforce. To test knowledge, 8 validated vignettes representing multifactorial fall causes were administered to 47 nurses from 3 nursing homes. Although licensed practical nurses scored higher than registered nurses in individual categories of falls, when we computed the average score of all 8 categories between groups of registered nurses and licensed practical nurses, registered nurses scored higher (F = 4.106; P < .05) in identifying 8 causal reasons for older adults to fall.

  4. Korean nursing students' intention to migrate abroad.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eunjoo; Moon, Mikyung

    2013-12-01

    Migration of Korean nurses has continued with changing patterns and reasons. However, detailed studies of migration among Korean nursing students are limited. This study examined the intention, reasons, and preferences of migration among Korean nursing students. This study also identified priorities and barriers to the decision of nursing students to migrate and work abroad. A descriptive study using a questionnaire was used for this study. A total of 717 nursing students from four BSN programs and three diploma programs at nursing schools in D city and K province of South Korea were included in the analysis. According to the results, 69.8% of respondents intended to migrate abroad, if possible, or absolutely in the future. The score for females who answered "yes, if possible" regarding the intention to migrate was significantly higher, compared to males. More than 64% of respondents eventually want to return to Korea after migration. The two most common reasons for migration were economic reason (salary) (29.7%) and "professional development (28.2%)". Half of all respondents preferred the US as the destination country of migration (50.5%). "Working condition" was the most prevalent reason for the decision regarding the destination and the place to work. More than 71% of respondents selected "the lack of language proficiency" as a barrier to migration. Economic reason was not as strong as in the past to explain migration of Korean nursing students. Most Korean nursing students want to return back with professional development and higher degree. Even permanent migration and return migration of nurses are an inevitable part of globalization, positive and negative aspects of migration between donor as well as destination countries should be investigated. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The nurse executive: challenges for the 21st century.

    PubMed

    Fedoruk, M; Pincombe, J

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to examine the challenges facing the nurse executive in the 21st century by questioning the traditional attributions of leadership to the nurse executive role. Historically, the leadership role in nursing has been assumed by the nurse executive. The predominantly female character of nursing, however, has ensured that demonstrations of leadership amongst nurses have been infrequent and compatible with prevailing male-defined ideologies. Examples of this include career restructuring and educational reforms in Australia. This paper found that the apparent lack of leadership in nursing was able to be traced back to early management theories which categorized leadership as a function of management. If nurses are to assume leadership positions in the health care system of the 21st century, nurse leaders will have to let go of traditional managerial practices and behaviours. In the emerging health care system of the new century, nurse executive practices will focus on achieving change rather than predictability in organizational outcomes.

  6. Parental decision making in male circumcision.

    PubMed

    Sardi, Lauren; Livingston, Kathy

    2015-01-01

    To study which healthcare professionals (HCPs) firstasked parents about their decision regarding circumcision; whether parents felt they were given enough information by their HCP; and what reasons parents cited for their decision. Bilingual questionnaires were administered to parents and expecting parents of boys (N = 60). Close-ended survey responses were analyzed through factor analysis to ascertain what types of beliefs parents used in their decision making, whether they felt they had enough information, and who first asked them about their decision. Nurses were most likely to be the first HCPs to ask parents about circumcision. Parental personal and cultural beliefs played an equal or more important role in influencing decision making than medical information received. However, some parents noted that there was a lack of access to accurate information regarding risks and benefits of male circumcision. Nurses continue to play a critical role in acquisition of knowledge surrounding male circumcision and serve as important liaisons between parents and the proxy consent process. Nurses, as well as other HCPs, should discuss circumcision early in pregnancy so parents have ample time to ask questions, gather information, and make an appropriate decision.

  7. Addressing the nursing shortage.

    PubMed

    Wilder, Karen S; Halcomb, Kathy; Grubbs, Vicki

    2002-01-01

    Support is essential for students and new nurses to develop confidence in their practice (Oermann & Moffitt-Wolf, 1997). Caring, empowerment and team building are essential in helping affirm the choice of nursing as a profession. Students and new nurses will stay in nursing if they are supported (Meissner, 1986). The nursing community needs to nurture, encourage and inspire its members to learn and to grow; nurses need to treat each other with respect and patience. As Moccia (1990) so aptly stated. "The goal of nursing is to enable others so they might enable still others; to nurse, to teach and to learn with each other in caring ways." "What is modeled for nurses today will shape future practice" (Christensen, 1999).

  8. Value of intensified nursing

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Wilhelm; Konta, Brigitte; Prusa, Nina; Raymann, Cornelia

    2006-01-01

    The concept "intensified nursing" is mentioned in differentiation to concepts of "nursing care" or "nursing" which intensifies resources or patient contact. Especially psychic and social needs of patients are very appreciated in nursing. A similar type of nursing is known under the concept "advanced nursing practice" (ANP) which means, that a specialised, academically trained nurse offers an extended nursing care in which a focus on the published knowledge of evidence based research is made. From the thin literature to this topic a selection of predetermined topics was analysed where at least two articles with a sufficient high methodical quality were available. The selected topic groups were: „Infant and paediatric nursing", "gerontology" and "oncology". Generally the five publications concerning infant and paediatric nursing could conclusive show a benefit of intensified nursing. Further research is still needed to prove intensified nursing care. Two publications could be found to the gerontological intensified nursing; both used an extended nursing model and an enlarged use of resources. Both studies demonstrated a measurable success in the applied parameters. Two studies also could be analysed in the oncological field in which successes were also provable by the applied parameters. The success was given especially in a higher patient satisfaction, one study showed an improved scheduling (time planning) of nurses. There was not one article concerning economic questions of intensified nursing care. It has to be taken into account that the financial resources have to be used effectively also in nursing nowadays. It has to be assumed that the costs are driven by increased use of resources. Savings can be achieved, however, in the form of avoided therapies and days in hospital by intensified nursing. The intensified nursing can be considered as similar cost-effective as conventional models of nursing. Ethically it is necessary to consider that the possibilities of

  9. National Institute of Nursing Research

    MedlinePlus

    ... Content Page Level Navigation NINR - National Institute of Nursing Research NINR Dr. Heitkemper to Present NINR Director's ... patient outcomes. Read More > Nursing Research WHAT IS NURSING RESEARCH? Nursing research develops knowledge to: Build the ...

  10. Nursing Home Work Practices and Nursing Assistants' Job Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bishop, Christine E.; Squillace, Marie R.; Meagher, Jennifer; Anderson, Wayne L.; Wiener, Joshua M.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To estimate the impact of nursing home work practices, specifically compensation and working conditions, on job satisfaction of nursing assistants employed in nursing homes. Design and Methods: Data are from the 2004 National Nursing Assistant Survey, responses by the nursing assistants' employers to the 2004 National Nursing Home Survey,…

  11. Nursing Home Work Practices and Nursing Assistants' Job Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bishop, Christine E.; Squillace, Marie R.; Meagher, Jennifer; Anderson, Wayne L.; Wiener, Joshua M.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To estimate the impact of nursing home work practices, specifically compensation and working conditions, on job satisfaction of nursing assistants employed in nursing homes. Design and Methods: Data are from the 2004 National Nursing Assistant Survey, responses by the nursing assistants' employers to the 2004 National Nursing Home Survey,…

  12. Using Nursing Languages in School Nursing Practice. Second Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denehy, Janice

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this updated manual is to define and describe standardized nursing languages, highlight how nursing languages are a part of the nursing process, and illustrate through case examples how nursing languages are used in school nursing practice. This manual also summarizes the history and development of three nursing classifications, the…

  13. Nursing and Nursing Education: Public Policies and Private Actions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Institute of Medicine (NAS), Washington, DC.

    Results are presented of a study of nursing and nursing education that focused on the need for continued federal support of nursing education, ways to attract nurses to medically underserved areas, and approaches to encourage nurses to stay in the profession. Findings are presented on whether the aggregate supply of generalist nurses will be…

  14. Using Nursing Languages in School Nursing Practice. Second Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denehy, Janice

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this updated manual is to define and describe standardized nursing languages, highlight how nursing languages are a part of the nursing process, and illustrate through case examples how nursing languages are used in school nursing practice. This manual also summarizes the history and development of three nursing classifications, the…

  15. Nurse attendee purchasing patterns.

    PubMed

    Weiss, M D; Savik, K; Kjervik, D K

    1993-01-01

    Retention of nursing professionals is crucial in responding to the increasing demand for and complexity of nursing care. Augmenting the decision-making role of nurses is one important retention-related strategy. Purchasing patterns reflect one aspect of nurses' decision-making role. National meetings provide nurses with an opportunity to investigate educational and employment options, as well as to preview technological advances in patient care products and supplies. Yet, the purchasing patterns of nurses related to the marketing of patient care supplies, or educational material at national meetings have rarely been acknowledged or researched. This study investigated the purchasing patterns of nurse attendees as revealed at a national meeting and how attendance influenced purchasing input following the meeting. The study addressed differences in purchasing patterns between specific groups of nurse attendees, as well as the relationship between meeting attendance motivators and purchasing patterns. A descriptive methodology utilizing participant observation at four national nursing meetings and mail survey in four phases was used to determine if there were: (1) identifiable purchasing patterns for nurses attending specific nursing-organization sponsored national meetings, (2) differences in purchasing patterns between nurse attendees from these meetings, (3) differences in self-reported post-meeting purchase input, and (4) relationships between meeting attendance motivators and purchasing patterns. The findings demonstrate that nurse attendee purchasing patterns can be identified and do vary among nursing groups. Nurse attendees at specialty meetings were more likely to act as specifiers, have a more dominant role in purchasing and were more likely to influence product purchases than were nurse attendees from generalist meetings. Self-reports of post-meeting purchasing input demonstrated that nurse attendees utilized information gained at national meetings in

  16. Cross border nursing.

    PubMed

    Cutshall, P

    1993-01-01

    In 1989, the Canadian Nurses Association asked a professional nurse from British Columbia to help nurses in Nepal develop their association an work on nursing legislation. Nepal had about 3000 nurses, including assistant nurse-midwives, 500 of whom were members of the Trained Nurses Association of Nepal (TNAN). It wanted to expand nursing's contribution to health care in Nepal. The nurses wanted to increase the visibility of the association, to become a self-sustaining organization, to establish a licensing law, and to improve the availability of continuing education. The Canadian nurse helped the Nepalese nurses with a workshop on association management covering record keeping and meeting plans. She helped a newly formed committee with licensing law and with decision factors in pursuing self-regulation for nursing. She discussed a work plan and a lobby strategy. She helped another committee develop objectives for the next year. A follow-up visit the next year revealed that the office was operating well and the association was keeping good records. TNAN sponsored workshops on professionalism and leadership. This visit yielded further progress on a licensing law and on identifying ways to become self-sufficient. The nurses discussed the Norwegian Nurses Association's (NNA) interest in providing funds to buy a building for TNAN use and to derive income from rent. NNA eventually donated the funds. By the 1992 visit, the nurses had revised and registered their constitution and bylaws. They had sponsored workshops on HIV/AIDS and mental health. The name was now the Nursing Association of Nepal (NAN). The newly created executive council had met frequently. NAN had expanded from 6 to 11 local branches. It had created 5 committees: fund raising, research, international coordination, nurses welfare, and publications. A workshop in western Nepal centered on quality nursing care. NAN had a role in the government's progress in primary health care and mental health services.

  17. Male pattern baldness (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Male pattern baldness is a sex-linked characteristic that is passed from mother to child. A man can more accurately predict his chances of developing male pattern baldness by observing his mother's father than by looking ...

  18. Nurse practitioner malpractice data: Informing nursing education.

    PubMed

    Sweeney, Casey Fryer; LeMahieu, Anna; Fryer, George E

    Nurse practitioners (NPs) are often identified in medical malpractice claims. However, the use of malpractice data to inform the development of nursing curriculum is limited. The purpose of this study is to examine medical errors committed by NPs. Using National Practitioner Data Bank public use data, years 1990 to 2014, NP malpractice claims were classified by event type, patient outcome, setting, and number of practitioners involved. The greatest proportion of malpractice claims involving nurse practitioners were diagnosis related (41.46%) and treatment related (30.79%). Severe patient outcomes most often occurred in the outpatient setting. Nurse practitioners were independently responsible for the event in the majority of the analyzed claims. Moving forward, nurse practitioner malpractice data should be continuously analyzed and used to inform the development of nurse practitioner education standards and graduate program curriculum to address areas of clinical weakness and improve quality of care and patient safety. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Nursing informatics competences still challenging nurse educators.

    PubMed

    Rajalahti, Elina; Saranto, Kaija

    2012-01-01

    In recent years nursing documentation has been one of the most important development areas of nursing informatics (NI) in Finland. The purpose of this study is to describe the development of the nurse educators' competences in nursing documentation during a project called eNNI. The eNNI project (2008-2010) was a cooperative project by nurse educators and working life experts. The goal of the project was to implement the national documentation model and thereby improve operational processes at workplaces. The study includes pre- and post-test questioning of NI applications with a web-based questionnaire (n=136). The data were analyzed with distribution, cross-tabulations and average tests and descriptive statistic multivariate method. According to the results, the ICT skills of the nurse educators were good at the end of the project, and they had good information literacy competence. On the other hand, their advanced NI skills left room for improvement.

  20. Opportunities to promote health to vulnerable male teenagers.

    PubMed

    Wildbore, Amanda

    Forty years ago an increase in 'juvenile delinquency' led to a large prison-building programme for young offenders. Today, the emphasis is on community sentencing and a reduction in prison places. The secondment of nurses into youth offending teams makes it possible to offer primary health services to a group of mainly male, vulnerable people.

  1. Embedding Nursing Informatics Education into an Australian Undergraduate Nursing Degree.

    PubMed

    Cummings, Elizabeth; Shin, Eun Hee; Mather, Carey; Hovenga, Evelyn

    2016-01-01

    Alongside the rapid rise in the adoption of electronic health records and the use of technology to support nursing processes, there is a requirement for nursing students, new graduate nurses, and nursing educators to embrace nursing informatics. Whilst nursing informatics has been taught at post graduate levels for many years, the integration of it into undergraduate studies for entry level nurses has been slow. This is made more complex by the lack of explicit nursing informatics competencies in many countries. Australia has now mandated the inclusion of nursing informatics into all undergraduate nursing curricula but there continues to be an absence of a relevant set of agreed nursing competencies. There is a resulting lack of consistency in nursing curricula content nationally. This paper describes the process used by one Australian university to integrate nursing informatics throughout the undergraduate nursing degree curriculum to ensure entry level nurses have a basic level of skills in the use of informatics.

  2. Male adolescent bullying and the school shooter.

    PubMed

    Reuter-Rice, Karin

    2008-12-01

    An extensive review of the literature reveals that adolescent male victims of peer bullying suffer somatic and emotional consequences from being victimized. Limited research on school shooters found that a significant number of them were adolescents who were targets of bullies and claimed their shootings were in response to their victimization. To date, there is no profile of the school shooter, although research has suggested various dynamics that contribute to an environment that can predispose a community to a school shooting. No published nursing research has examined the relationship between bullying and the school shooter or that of adolescents who experience peer bullying. Despite findings from other disciplines, such as law enforcement, education, sociology, and psychology, school nurses need to be part of the team to recognize the bullied teen and intervene before there are serious life-threatening consequences.

  3. Moral distress in Iranian pediatric nurses.

    PubMed

    Ghasemi, Elham; Negarandeh, Reza; Janani, Leila

    2017-01-01

    Moral distress is a very common experience in the nursing profession, and it is one of the main reasons for job dissatisfaction, burnout, and quitting among nurses. For instance, morally difficult situations in taking care of child patients who are severely ill may lead to moral distress for nurses. However, most of the studies about moral distress have been conducted on nurses of special wards and adult medical centers with much focus on developed countries. Subsequently, little has been researched on this topic among nurses in other nations such as Iran, and most certainly, there has been hardly any such research involving Iranian pediatric nurses. Aim/objectives: This study was conducted to evaluate moral distress among nurses in selected pediatric hospitals in Tehran, Iran. This cross-sectional study was conducted on eligible nurses who were selected through proportional stratified sampling and who completed demographic characteristics and the pediatric version of Moral Distress Scale-Revised questionnaires. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, t test, one-way analysis of variance, and Pearson correlation coefficient. Participants and research context: In total, 195 pediatric nurses working at three selected children's specialized university hospitals in Tehran participated in this study. Ethical considerations: This study was evaluated and approved by the institutional review board of Tehran University of Medical Sciences. The mean and standard deviation of total score of moral distress was 106.41 ± 61.64 within a range of 10-257. Also, the difference between the mean score of moral distress of the group who had not quitted their position and those who have quit in the past was statistically significant (p = 0.043). The situation that was associated with the highest moral distress was "observing medical students performing painful procedures on patients just to gain some skill." Total score of moral distress was significantly higher among male

  4. Nursing Education for College Graduates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slavinsky, Ann T.; Diers, Donna

    1982-01-01

    Describes the masters programs for nonnurse college graduates at Yale School of Nursing which offers both basic and advanced nursing preparation in a single three-year curriculum sequence. The program prepares nurses who can function in advanced-practice specialty roles as nurse-midwives, nurse practitioners, or clinical nurse specialists. (CT)

  5. Call to Action for Nurses/Nursing

    PubMed Central

    Premji, Shahirose S.; Hatfield, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    The 13 million nurses worldwide constitute most of the global healthcare workforce and are uniquely positioned to engage with others to address disparities in healthcare to achieve the goal of better health for all. A new vision for nurses involves active participation and collaboration with international colleagues across research practice and policy domains. Nursing can embrace new concepts and a new approach—“One World, One Health”—to animate nursing engagement in global health, as it is uniquely positioned to participate in novel ways to improve healthcare for the well-being of the global community. This opinion paper takes a historical and reflective approach to inform and inspire nurses to engage in global health practice, research, and policy to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals. It can be argued that a colonial perspective currently informs scholarship pertaining to nursing global health engagement. The notion of unidirectional relationships where those with resources support training of those less fortunate has dominated the framing of nursing involvement in low- and middle-income countries. This paper suggests moving beyond this conceptualization to a more collaborative and equitable approach that positions nurses as cocreators and brokers of knowledge. We propose two concepts, reverse innovation and two-way learning, to guide global partnerships where nurses are active participants. PMID:27144160

  6. The nurse match instrument: Exploring professional nursing identity and professional nursing values for future nurse recruitment.

    PubMed

    Mazhindu, Deborah M; Griffiths, Lauren; Pook, Carol; Erskine, Allen; Ellis, Roger; Smith, Fleur

    2016-05-01

    From April 1st 2015 it will be mandatory for Higher Education Institutions (HEI) in the United Kingdom (UK) providing pre-qualifying health care higher education to use a Values Based Recruitment (VBR) tool, to ensure only the candidates with the "right" personal identity and values commensurate with the Professional Identity of Nursing (PIN) are accepted for nurse education. "Nurse Match" instrument was developed to enhance the recruitment and selection of candidates for pre-qualifying nursing. Action Research into PIN commenced with voluntary, purposive, convenience samples of qualified nurses (n = 30), Service Users (N = 10), postgraduate diploma nurses in mental health (N = 25), third year mental health branch students (N = 20) and adult and child student nurses in years 2 and 3 (N = 20) in Focus Groups. Data collection and analysis occurred concomitantly between July 2013 and October 2014, aided by NVivo 10 software and revealed Key Quality Indicators (KQIs) of the social construction of PIN. Construct development included a literature review spanning the last fifteen years, which identified four main themes; 1. Nursing's ethics and values. 2. Nursing's professional identity and caring. 3. Nursing's emotional intelligence. 4. Nursing's professionalism. Nurse Match offers an evidence-based enhancement to VBR, for future nurse recruitment locally, nationally and internationally. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Nurse leaders' responsibilities in supporting nurses experiencing difficult situations in clinical nursing.

    PubMed

    Honkavuo, Leena; Lindström, Unni Å

    2014-01-01

    To make nurse leaders aware of different kinds of difficult situations in clinical nursing that may cause suffering to nurses and to discuss how nurse leaders can approach and alleviate this suffering. Difficult situations are a part of clinical nursing. Nurses are repeatedly exposed to situations that may cause them suffering and reduce their ability to serve the patients. Data collection was based on a sample of semi-structured face-to-face deep interviews with eight nurses who were encouraged to narrate their lived experiences of difficult situations in clinical nursing. Nurses want to discuss issues connected to nursing and caring science that emerge in clinical nursing with their nurse leaders. Painful memories and thoughts are often related to patients struggling between life and death, the despair of families and friends, and their hovering between hope and hopelessness. The results do not support the notion that nurses would request other kinds of support or debriefing. The mission of nursing is to serve, console and alleviate human suffering. Nurse leaders carry a responsibility to create such evidence-based caring cultures that support the mission of nursing. Nurse leaders' understanding, sympathetic attitude, ethical value basis, personality and ability to discuss are important aspects for nurses. Through the support from nurse leaders, it seems possible to alleviate the nurse's suffering in clinical nursing. Implications for Nursing Management Nurse leaders' support creates a foundation for the nurses' professional development. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Alternatives to Nursing Homes

    MedlinePlus

    ... this website may not be available. Alternatives to nursing homes Before you make any decisions about long ... live and what help you may need. A nursing home may not be your only choice. Discharge ...

  9. Oncology Nursing Society

    MedlinePlus

    ... Account Login Cart Search the ONS website Continuing Nursing Education Courses and Activities Access Devices: The Virtual ... Vomiting Chemotherapy for Non-Oncology Conditions Clinical Trials Nursing 101 Cognitive Impairment Fundamentals of Blood and Marrow ...

  10. [Nursing motivation leadership].

    PubMed

    Chen, Ia-Ling; Hung, Chich-Hsiu

    2007-02-01

    The concept of "patients treated as guests" is emphasized in today's medical service and patient-center nursing care. However, with rapid changes in health insurance and hospital accreditation systems as well as increasing consumer awareness, the nurse manager must both efficiently relieve the working pressure of nurses and motivate them. However, it would be an extreme challenge for nurse managers to build a team in which each member works in a self-fulfilling work environment and achieves a high quality of care. This article presents several theories and techniques that relate to motivation strategies. These strategies can serve as a guide and a reference for nurse managers to inspire teamwork and raise morale. It can be expected that increasing nurse satisfaction, performance, and care quality will decrease turnover and desertion rates. Hopefully, this article will assist nurse managers to become better leaders and to achieve success in providing efficient services and good of nursing care quality.

  11. Emergency Nurses Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... an authority, advocate, lobbyist, and voice for emergency nursing. ENA has 40,000+ members and continues to ... advocate for patient safety and excellence in emergency nursing practice. Find out about our many membership opportunities. ...

  12. Nurse-Performed Endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Duffield, Christine; Chapman, Susan; Rowbotham, Samantha; Blay, Nicole

    2017-01-01

    Increasing demands for health care globally often lead to discussions about expanding the involvement of nurses in a range of nontraditional roles. Several countries have introduced nurse endoscopists as a means of easing the burden of demand for a range of endoscopic procedures. A shortage of medical staff in Australia combined with increasing demand for endoscopy led to the implementation of nurse endoscopists as a pilot program in the state of Queensland, where a nurse practitioner model was implemented, and Victoria, where an advanced practice model was used. This article will discuss the implementation of and responses from the nursing, medical, and policy community to nurse-performed endoscopy in this country. Regarding health policy, access to cancer screening may be improved by providing nurses with advanced training to safely perform endoscopy procedures. Moreover, issues of nurse credentialing and payment need to be considered appropriate to each country's health system model.

  13. Implementing Nursing Professional Development.

    PubMed

    Bruce, Sandra L

    2016-01-01

    Sandra Bruce is the Nurse Education Program Manager, Air Force Personnel Center, Joint Base San Antonio-Randolph in Texas, and is responsible for the Air Force Continuing Nursing Education program and facilitation of selection boards for graduate education and fellowship programs. She served as editor for the third and fourth editions of the Association for Nursing Professional Development (ANPD) Core Curriculums for Nursing Professional Development. Sandy previously served as the Education Consultant to the Air Force Surgeon General for Nursing Education programs for over 3,000 Air Force Nurse Corps members. She received her BSN from Mercy College of Detroit in 1976 and entered the Air Force in 1982. The Air Force sponsored her Master's Degree in Nursing as a Clinical Nurse Specialist.

  14. American Nephrology Nurses' Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... Join/Renew Jobs Contact Corporate Shop American Nephrology Nurses Association About ANNA Association About ANNA Strategic Plan ... CExpress Events National Events Chapter / Local Events Nephrology Nurses Week ANNA Education Modules CKD Modules Education Services ...

  15. Needed: Nursing Administration Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blair, Eunice M.

    1976-01-01

    A master's program that synthesizes clinical nursing knowledge with management theory and skills is one way to prepare nursing service administrators capable of exerting an influence on today's complex health care system. (Editor)

  16. Nursing's Preferred Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aydelotte, Myrtle K.

    1987-01-01

    The author discusses future trends for society and relates them to future roles and characteristics of nursing. She presents strategies that nursing professionals should use to be prepared for the stated trends. (CH)

  17. Exploring improvisation in nursing.

    PubMed

    Hanley, Mary Anne; Fenton, Mary V

    2007-06-01

    Improvisation has long been considered a function of music, dance, and the theatre arts. An exploration of the definitions and characteristics of this concept in relation to the art and practice of nursing provide an opportunity to illuminate related qualities within the field of nursing. Nursing has always demonstrated improvisation because it is often required to meet the needs of patients in a rapidly changing environment. However, little has been done to identify improvisation in the practice of nursing or to teach improvisation as a nursing knowledge-based skill. This article strives to explore the concept of improvisation in nursing, to describe the characteristics of improvisation as applied to nursing, and to utilize case studies to illustrate various manifestations of improvisation in nursing practice.

  18. National Nursing Home Survey

    Cancer.gov

    The National Nursing Home Survey provides includes characteristics such as size of nursing home facilities, ownership, Medicare/Medicaid certification, occupancy rate, number of days of care provided, and expenses.

  19. Nurses opinion on the attributes of polypharmacy in patient safety.

    PubMed

    Jenny, John Lisha; Jenny, Cheriathu; Jayadevan, Sreedharan; Jayakumary, Muttappallymyalil; Mohamed, Arifulla; Arun, Shirwaikar; Mohamed Mohamed, Fathi

    2012-01-01

    Nurses play a functional role in preventing drug related problems. They need to be aware of the dangers of polypharmacy while reviewing patient medications. We studied the nurses' opinion on the diverse effects of polypharmacy in the hospital setting. Nurses working in a tertiary care teaching hospital participated in this cross-sectional study, conducted over 3 months, by responding to a self-administered questionnaire. Chi-square test was used to analyze association between socio-demographic characteristics and items in the study. A value of P<0.05 was considered statistically significant. Increased drug interactions scored the highest (98.1%), followed by increased adverse drug effects (81.9%), and increase in financial burden (69.5%) among the negative effects of polypharmacy. 61% of the respondents felt that polypharmacy increased therapeutic effect in polypathology. No difference was observed in the opinion between male and female nurses or among varying nursing experience. Nurses with 5-10 years of experience opined increase in non-compliance to prescribed medication regimen and increase in financial burden also as negative attributes. Nurses pointed out both positive and negative implications of polypharmacy. Training programs such as continuing nursing education and workshops can be planned to translate this knowledge into practice in their routine nursing practice.

  20. Gaps in nurse staffng and nursing home resident needs.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ning Jackie; Unruh, Lynn; Wan, Thomas T H

    2013-01-01

    Trends in nurse staffing levels in nursing homes from 1997 to 2011 varied across the category of nurse and the type of nursing home. The gaps found in this study are important to consider because nurses may become overworked and this may negatively affect the quality of services and jeopardize resident safety. Nursing home administrators should consider improving staffing strategically. Staffing should be based not only on the number of resident days, but also allocated according to particular resident needs. As the demand for nursing home care grows, bridging the gap between nurse staffing and resident nursing care needs will be especially important in light of the evidence linking nurse staffing to the quality of nursing home care. Until more efficient nursing care delivery exits, there may be no other way to safeguard quality except to increase nurse staffing in nursing homes.

  1. Individual Potentials Related to Evidence-Based Nursing among Nurses in Teaching Hospitals Affiliated to Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Seyyedrasooli, Alehe; Zamanzadeh, Vahid; Valizadeh, Leila; Tadaion, Farideh

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Knowledge, attitude, and skills of nurses regarding evidence-based medicine are some of the important individual potentials in the implementation of these cares. There is no evidence indicating Iranian nurses to have these individual potentials. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determination the perceptions of nurses about individual potentials in evidence-based nursing and its related factors. Methods: In this descriptive correlational study, all nurses (n = 600) working in teaching hospitals affiliated to Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran were included. Valid and reliable translated questionnaires were used to collect data. Descriptive and inferential statistics were employed in SPSS to analyze the data. Results: Based on our findings, moderate levels of knowledge, attitude, and skills were possessed by 274 (45.7%), 394 (65.7%), and 411 (68.5%) nurses, respectively. In addition, male nurses (p = 0.002) and those with a master's degree (p = 0.001) were more knowledgeable. Likewise, more positive attitudes were demonstrated by females (p = 0.004) and nurses with a master's degree (p = 0.04). A statistically significant difference was found between skills and employment status of nurses (p = 0.002). Conclusion: The moderate level of attitude among nurses can provide a good potential in promoting evidence-based nursing in teaching hospitals affiliated to Tabriz University of Medical Sciences. Therefore, more attention should be paid to enhance the awareness and skills of nurses toward evidence-based care. PMID:25276682

  2. Nursing Role Transition Preceptorship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Batory, Susan M.

    2014-01-01

    The preceptorship clinical experience in a practical nursing (PN) program at a Midwestern community college is considered crucial to the PN students' transition from novice nurse to professional nurse. However, no research has been available to determine whether the preceptorship clinical accomplishes its purpose. A case study was conducted to…

  3. Meals in nursing homes.

    PubMed

    Kofod, Jens; Birkemose, Anna

    2004-06-01

    Undernutrition is present among 33% of nursing home residents in Denmark. Hence, it is relevant to examine the meal situation at nursing homes to single out factors that may increase or reduce the residents' food intake. In the ongoing Danish nursing home debate it is claimed that a new type of nursing home improves the residents' meal situation with a positive effect on nutrition. The aim of this work is to test the general hypothesis that (i) residents appreciate the meal situation in these nursing homes and (ii) nutritional status of the residents is improved in this type of nursing home. This study was carried out in four Danish nursing homes at various locations in Denmark. The methods used are qualitative interviews and observations at four nursing homes in combination with measurement of body mass index (BMI) at two of the four nursing homes. Undernutrition is defined as a BMI below 20. The study could not confirm the general hypothesis, as a consistent improvement in the meal situation was not found in the nursing homes studied. But an indication of improved nutritional status was found in two of the nursing homes where the degree of undernutrition was lower than generally found in Denmark. Furthermore, the study indicated that the staff and the residents conceived the nursing homes differently.

  4. Nursing in Crisis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fulcher, Roxanne

    2007-01-01

    Both the nation's health-care and nursing education systems are in crisis. While the care provided by registered nurses (RNs) is essential to patients' recovery from acute illness and to the effective management of their chronic conditions, the United States is experiencing a nursing shortage that is anticipated to increase as baby boomers age and…

  5. Nursing Research: Position Statement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Copp, Laurel; And Others

    The role of the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) in encouraging research through the programs and activities of the member schools is discussed. It is suggested that the dean or administrative head of a college of nursing is in a position to influence nursing research activities. The principal role of the academic dean in…

  6. Nursing in Virginia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Virginia State Council of Higher Education, Richmond.

    Prefacing its comments with an explanatory note concerning the reason for its organization, purpose, and procedure, the Committee utilizes half its report statistically documenting various factors in nursing practice and nursing education in Virginia. The statistics are based on a study, "Nursing and Health Care in Virginia", by Thomas…

  7. Nurses' Attitudes toward Suicide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alston, Maude H.; Robinson, Beverly H.

    1992-01-01

    Examined whether nurses' attitudes toward suicide are based on clinical specialty, age, and degree completed. Findings from 184 nurses revealed no significant differences between clinical specialty groups. Age and degree were significant only on Right to Die scale. Older nurses and those with advanced degrees were more likely to agree with…

  8. Research Issues: Nursing & Professionalization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenfeld, Peri

    Nursing has always been viewed as a "women's profession" as evidenced by the fact that 97 percent of the 1.9 million registered nurses in the United States are female. The values of helping others, altruism, compassion, and sacrifice are associated with women and with nursing. However, because many young people today do not view these values as…

  9. Nursing Research: Position Statement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Copp, Laurel; And Others

    The role of the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) in encouraging research through the programs and activities of the member schools is discussed. It is suggested that the dean or administrative head of a college of nursing is in a position to influence nursing research activities. The principal role of the academic dean in…

  10. Time to market nursing.

    PubMed

    Henry, Heather

    2016-06-29

    For too long nursing has been seen as a cost rather than a way of providing efficient and cost-effective care. My hope is that the nursing framework, Leading Change, Adding Value, will help nurses re-establish their place in the system.

  11. Nursing students and Haiku.

    PubMed

    Anthony, M L

    1998-01-01

    The emphasis in nursing education is frequently on facts, details, and linear issues. Students need more encouragement to use the creative abilities which exist in each of them. The use of haiku, a simple unrhymed Japanese verse, is one method which stimulates nursing students to use their creativity. A haiku exercise worked well in encouraging a group of nursing students to express their feelings.

  12. Technology and Nursing Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neighbors, Marianne; Eldred, Evelyn E.

    1993-01-01

    A study to isolate some of the complex skills that nurses are expected to perform in current practice identified 54 skills and surveyed 167 staff nurses and 53 nurse executives to classify the expected level of performance for a new graduate. Results indicated that educators bear responsibility for learning about technology and incorporating it…

  13. Nursing Role Transition Preceptorship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Batory, Susan M.

    2014-01-01

    The preceptorship clinical experience in a practical nursing (PN) program at a Midwestern community college is considered crucial to the PN students' transition from novice nurse to professional nurse. However, no research has been available to determine whether the preceptorship clinical accomplishes its purpose. A case study was conducted to…

  14. Research Issues: Nursing & Professionalization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenfeld, Peri

    Nursing has always been viewed as a "women's profession" as evidenced by the fact that 97 percent of the 1.9 million registered nurses in the United States are female. The values of helping others, altruism, compassion, and sacrifice are associated with women and with nursing. However, because many young people today do not view these values as…

  15. Identifying Nursing's Future Leaders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gunning, Carolyn S.; Hawken, Patty L.

    1990-01-01

    A study determined that encouraging and supporting students in professional activities while they were still in school would lead those students to participate in professional nursing organizations after they graduated. Organized nursing needs to identify the factors that influence nurses to join organizations and concentrate on these factors to…

  16. Professionalism in Nursing Behaviors of Nurse Practitioners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Donna; Miller, Barbara K.

    2001-01-01

    A survey of 502 nurse practitioners found that more than half had written research proposals or participated in research projects recently; nearly 50% wrote their own job descriptions; 93% belonged to the American Academy of Nurse Practitioners; and maintaining certification was the motivation for some professional behaviors. (Contains 29…

  17. [Training for nurse coordinators in nursing homes].

    PubMed

    Martin, Jean-René

    2016-01-01

    For the last three years, the Poitou-Charentes regional health agency has organised and funded training for nurse coordinators in nursing homes. The training programme, created in partnership with the Poitiers healthcare manager training institute, enables professionals with multiple responsibilities and missions, who deserve greater recognition, to acquire the necessary skills.

  18. Nursing 436A: Pediatric Oncology for Nurses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackman, Cynthia L.

    A description is provided of "Pediatric Oncology for Nurses," the first in a series of three courses offered to fourth-year nursing students in pediatric oncology. The first section provides a course overview, discusses time assignments, and describes the target student population. Next, a glossary of terms, and lists of course goals, long-range…

  19. Nursing home staff--nursing student partnership.

    PubMed

    Karam, S E; Nies, D M

    1995-10-01

    A partnership between a nursing home and a school of nursing provides both staff and students with creative opportunities for solving clinical problems. Through collaborative efforts of senior baccalaureate students and the staff administration of a long-term care facility in eastern Virginia, a successful bowel management program was developed and implemented.

  20. Advanced practice nursing role: nurse practitioner.

    PubMed

    Pastorino, C

    1998-01-01

    Nurse Practitioners are advanced practice nurses (APNs) who provide primary and acute care to individuals in many settings. The NP diagnoses and treats medical and surgical conditions that require acute, short-term management and chronic, long-term treatment. States vary in regulating processes regarding collaborative agreements, prescriptive authority, medical staff privileges, and insurance/third party reimbursement.

  1. Nursing 436A: Pediatric Oncology for Nurses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackman, Cynthia L.

    A description is provided of "Pediatric Oncology for Nurses," the first in a series of three courses offered to fourth-year nursing students in pediatric oncology. The first section provides a course overview, discusses time assignments, and describes the target student population. Next, a glossary of terms, and lists of course goals, long-range…

  2. Patient Education for Nurses: Nursing 200A.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirsch, Maureen

    A description is provided of "Patient Education for Nurses," a required course for second-year nursing students which focuses on the assessment of the learning needs of adults, and the planning and and implemention of formal patient education. First, general information on the significance of the course and its place in the School of Nursing…

  3. Iranian nursing students' perspectives of educational equity.

    PubMed

    Ghiyasvandian, Shahrzad; Nikbakht-Nasrabadi, Alireza; Mohammadpour, Ali; Abbasi, Mahmoud; Javadi, Mostafa

    2014-01-01

    Around the world there is a growing consensus that students' rights must be protected, regardless of race, creed, color, sex, religion, and socioeconomic status. One of these rights is the educational equity. However, little is known about these phenomena in nursing education. The aim of this study was to explore the educational equity from the perspective of nursing students. A qualitative study was conducted. Thus, we purposefully recruited for in-depth interviews 13 nursing students (8 female and 5 male). All interviews were transcribed verbatim and analyzed by thematic analysis approach to identify categories and themes. Four main themes emerged from the data: Fair Educational Opportunity, fair evaluation, attempts to combat discrimination, and employing qualified teachers.  It is argued that educational equity should be developed in higher education. Principles of equity and students' rights may form the most basic rationale for all formal and informal efforts to extend the right of equal access to education.

  4. Is there gender bias in nursing research?

    PubMed

    Polit, Denise F; Beck, Cheryl Tatano

    2008-10-01

    Using data from a consecutive sample of 259 studies published in four leading nursing research journals in 2005-2006, we examined whether nurse researchers favor females as study participants. On average, 75.3% of study participants were female, and 38% of studies had all-female samples. The bias favoring female participants was statistically significant and persistent. The bias was observed regardless of funding source, methodological features, and other participant and researcher characteristics, with one exception: studies that had male investigators had more sex-balanced samples. When designing studies, nurse researchers need to pay close attention to who will benefit from their research and to whether they are leaving out a specific group about which there is a gap in knowledge.

  5. Gender, politics, and regionalism: factors in the evolution of registered psychiatric nursing in Manitoba, 1920-1960.

    PubMed

    Hicks, Beverly

    2011-01-01

    In Canada, psychiatric nursing care is provided by two kinds of nurses. East of Manitoba, it is provided by registered nurses who may or may not have specialized psychiatric nursing education. In the four western provinces, a distinct professional group, registered psychiatric nurses, also provide care. Saskatchewan was the first province to achieve distinct legislation, in 1948, followed by British Columbia in 1951, Alberta in 1955, and Manitoba in 1960. Several factors coalesced to sway Manitoba to adopt the distinct profession model. First, there was little interest by the general nursing body in mental hospital nursing. Second, the other three western provinces had formed a Canadian Council of Psychiatric Nursing that encouraged mental hospital attendants and nurses in Manitoba. Third, a group of male attendants took on leadership roles supported by the mental hospital superintendents. Finally, Manitoba was culturally and geographically more aligned with western than eastern Canada.

  6. A magnificent chaos: feminist (nursing) comments on Western philosophy.

    PubMed

    Emden, C

    1995-03-01

    This paper primarily concerns feminists' problems with Western philosophy and the implications of these for nursing. My interest arises from some reading of philosophy and a profound disenchantment with its male bias. As Susan Moller Okin says, readers should not be misled by the use of supposedly generic terms like 'mankind' and allegedly inclusive pronouns, into thinking philosophers intended to refer to the whole human race. Moira Gatens takes the view that feminists cannot ignore the frameworks and assumptions of traditional philosophy and identifies three major ways in which the relationship between feminist theory and philosophical discourse can be characterized. In contrasting Gatens' thesis with a nursing case in point about ways of viewing disciplines, some ideas emerge for nurses to find positive ways forward in the philosophical enterprise. The topic extends to feminists' reactions to postmodern thinking and subsequent questions raised by these for nurses and nursing.

  7. Nurse administrators' intentions and considerations in recruiting inactive nurses.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hsing-Yi; Tang, Fu-In; Chen, I-Ju; Yin, Teresa J C; Chen, Chu-Chieh; Yu, Shu

    2016-07-01

    To understand nurse administrators' intentions and considerations in recruiting inactive nurses and to examine predictors of intent to recruit. Few studies have provided insight into employer intentions and considerations in recruiting inactive nurses. A census survey collected data from 392 nurse administrators via a mailing method. Overall, 89.0% of nurse administrators were willing to recruit inactive nurses. Stepwise regression analysis revealed that the only predictor of nurse administrators' intention to recruit was nurse turnover rate at the hospital. Nurse administrators perceived the most important recruiting considerations were inactive nurses' cooperation with alternating shifts, health status and nursing licence. The most frequent reasons for not recruiting were an inactive nurse's lack of understanding of the medical environment and poor nursing competence. Most hospital nurse administrators were willing to recruit inactive nurses. Inactive nurses who wish to return to work should be qualified, willing to work both day and night shifts, and in good health. Nurse administrators can reduce the nursing shortage by recruiting inactive nurses. Re-entry preparation programmes should be implemented that will provide inactive nurses with knowledge of the current medical environment and the skills required to improve their nursing competence. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Nurse Practitioners and Men's Primary Health Care.

    PubMed

    Rosu, Marina B; Oliffe, John L; Kelly, Mary T

    2017-09-01

    Though life expectancy sex differences are decreasing in many Western countries, men experience higher mortality rates at all ages. Men are often reluctant to seek medical care because health help-seeking is strongly linked to femininity, male weakness, and vulnerability. Many men are also more likely to access emergency care services in response to injury and/or severe pain instead of engaging primary health care (PHC) services. Nurse practitioners are well positioned to increase men's engagement with PHC to waylay the pressure on emergency services and advance the well-being of men. This article demonstrates how nurse practitioners can work with men in PHC settings to optimize men's self-health and illness prevention and management. Four recommendations are discussed: (1) leveling the hierarchies, (2) talking it through, (3) seeing diversity within patterns, and (4) augmenting face-to-face PHC services. In terms of leveling the hierarchies nurse practitioners can engage men in effectual health decision making. Within the interactions detailed in the talking it through section are strategies for connecting with male patients and mapping their progress. In terms of seeing diversity with in patterns and drawing on the plurality of masculinities, nurse practitioners are encouraged to adapt a variety of age sensitive assessment tools to better intervene and guide men's self-health efforts. Examples of community and web based men's health resources are shared in the augmenting face-to-face PHC services section to guide the work of nurse practitioners. Overall, the information and recommendations shared in this article can proactively direct the efforts of nurse practitioners working with men.

  9. Effects of increasing nurse staffing on missed nursing care.

    PubMed

    Cho, S-H; Kim, Y-S; Yeon, K N; You, S-J; Lee, I D

    2015-06-01

    Inadequate nurse staffing has been reported to lead nurses to omit required nursing care. In South Korea, to reduce informal caregiving by patient families and sitters and to improve the quality of nursing care, a public hospital operated by the Seoul Metropolitan Government has implemented a policy of increasing nurse staffing from 17 patients per registered nurse to 7 patients per registered nurse in 4 out of 13 general nursing units since January 2013. The study aims to compare missed nursing care (omission of required care) in high-staffing (7 patients per nurse) units vs. low-staffing (17 patients per nurse) units to examine the effects of nurse staffing on missed care. A nurse survey conducted in July 2013 targeted all staff nurses in all four high-staffing and all nine low-staffing units; 115 nurses in the high-staffing units (response rate = 94.3%) and 117 nurses in the low-staffing units (response rate = 88.6%) participated. Missed nursing care was measured using the MISSCARE survey that included 24 nursing care elements. Nurses were asked how frequently they had missed each element on a 4-point scale from 'rarely' to 'always'. Overall, nurses working in high-staffing units had a significantly lower mean score of missed care than those in low-staffing units. Seven out of 24 nursing care elements were missed significantly less often in high-staffing (vs. low-staffing) units: turning, mouth care, bathing/skin care, patient assessments in each shift, assistance with toileting, feeding and setting up meals. The findings suggest that increasing nurse staffing is associated with a decrease in missed care. Less omission of required nursing care is expected to improve nursing surveillance and patient outcomes, such as patient falls, pressure ulcers and pneumonia. Adequate nurse staffing should be ensured to reduce unmet nursing needs and improve patient outcomes. © 2015 International Council of Nurses.

  10. Standardization of Korean nursing terminology.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyeoun-Ae; Kim, Ji-Hyun; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Lee, Hyang-Yeon; Kim, Jeong-Wha; Kim, Won-Ock; Kim, Ok-Soo; Lee, Young-Whee; Park, Ho-Ran; Choi-Kwon, Smi; Kim, In-Sook; Park, Young-Joo; Park, Young-Im

    2006-01-01

    Korean nursing terminology was standardized to improve sharing and exchange of nursing data and information. English nursing terms were collected from existing nursing terminology, journal articles, nursing records, text books, and nursing/medical dictionaries, translated into Korean and were tested for their validity. More than 9000 terms were standardized and published on a website for further feedback from the users. This study will contribute to communication within the nursing community and with other health care professionals.

  11. Leadership styles in nursing.

    PubMed

    Cope, Vicki; Murray, Melanie

    2017-06-21

    Nurses are often asked to think about leadership, particularly in times of rapid change in healthcare, and where questions have been raised about whether leaders and managers have adequate insight into the requirements of care. This article discusses several leadership styles relevant to contemporary healthcare and nursing practice. Nurses who are aware of leadership styles may find this knowledge useful in maintaining a cohesive working environment. Leadership knowledge and skills can be improved through training, where, rather than having to undertake formal leadership roles without adequate preparation, nurses are able to learn, nurture, model and develop effective leadership behaviours, ultimately improving nursing staff retention and enhancing the delivery of safe and effective care.

  12. Suicide in nurses.

    PubMed

    Hawton, K; Vislisel, L

    1999-01-01

    The worldwide English language literature on suicide in nurses is reviewed in this article. There is evidence from several countries that female nurses are at increased risk of suicide. Very little information is available about the specific causes. Increased risk in nurses has been statistically associated with smoking and negatively related to extent of caffeine consumption. Unlike some other high-risk occupational groups, it is unclear to what extent access to means for suicide contributes to nurses' risk. The methodological issues and specific needs of research concerning suicide in nurses are discussed.

  13. The art of nursing.

    PubMed

    Edwards, S D

    1998-09-01

    This article discusses the question of whether, as is often claimed, nursing is properly described as an art. Following critical remarks on the claims of Carper, Chinn and Watson, and Johnson, the account of art provided by RG Collingwood is described, with particular reference to his influential distinction between art and craft. The question of whether nursing is best described as an art or a craft is then discussed. The conclusion is advanced that nursing cannot properly be described as an art, given acceptance of Collingwood's influential definition of art. Moreover, it is shown that, due to difficulties inherent in specifying the 'ends' of nursing, nursing is only problematically described as a craft.

  14. Wildfire Disasters and Nursing.

    PubMed

    Hanes, Patricia Frohock

    2016-12-01

    Multiple factors contribute to wildfires in California and other regions: drought, winds, climate change, and spreading urbanization. Little has been done to study the multiple roles of nurses related to wildfire disasters. Major nursing organizations support disaster education for nurses. It is essential for nurses to recognize their roles in each phase of the disaster cycle: mitigation, preparedness, response, and recovery. Skills learned in the US federal all-hazards approach to disasters can then be adapted to more specific disasters, such as wildfires, and issues affecting health care. Nursing has an important role in each phase of the disaster cycle.

  15. The opinions of Polish nurses and patients on nursing protests.

    PubMed

    Binkowska-Bury, Monika; Marc, Malgorzata; Nagorska, Malgorzata; Januszewicz, Pawel; Ryzko, Jozef

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this study is to explore nurses' and patients' opinions about nurses in Poland going on strike. The study was carried out in Poland between January and June 2009, using 150 nurses and 150 hospitalized patients. The study was conducted using two questionnaire surveys. The main reasons why nursing strikes are organized, in the opinions of nurses, are: higher wages, the improvement of working conditions and the improvement of the image of the nursing profession. The main reasons why nursing strikes are organized, in the opinions of patients, are: higher wages, not abiding standards of employment by government and the improvement of the image of the nursing profession. The main reasons for a lack of active participation in strikes are holidays and occupational and economic matters. Patients and nurses support nursing strikes. Both nurses (53.3%) and patients (42%) said that organizing nursing strikes is right and might improve the occupational situation of nurses.

  16. Economics of Nursing

    PubMed Central

    Aiken, Linda H.

    2008-01-01

    Pay-for-performance initiatives have renewed interest in payment reform as a vehicle for improving nurse staffing and working conditions in hospitals because of research linking investments in nursing and better patient outcomes. This article addresses the economics of nursing from a broad perspective that considers how both national policies such as hospital prospective payment and managerial decisions within institutions impact the outcomes of nurses and patients. Cost offsets are considered from the perspective of savings in patient-care resources that accrue from investments in nursing. Cost off-sets are also considered from the perspective of the interactions among different strategies for investing in nursing, including the impact of staffing levels on patient outcomes with varying educational levels of nurses and varying quality of practice environments. PMID:18480318

  17. Economics of nursing.

    PubMed

    Aiken, Linda H

    2008-05-01

    Pay-for-performance initiatives have renewed interest in payment reform as a vehicle for improving nurse staffing and working conditions in hospitals because of research linking investments in nursing and better patient outcomes. This article addresses the economics of nursing from a broad perspective that considers how both national policies such as hospital prospective payment and managerial decisions within institutions impact the outcomes of nurses and patients. Cost offsets are considered from the perspective of savings in patient-care resources that accrue from investments in nursing. Cost offsets are also considered from the perspective of the interactions among different strategies for investing in nursing, including the impact of staffing levels on patient outcomes with varying educational levels of nurses and varying quality of practice environments.

  18. Workplace bullying in nursing.

    PubMed

    Ovayolu, Ozlem; Ovayolu, Nimet; Karadag, Gulendam

    2014-09-01

    This research was designed to determine whether nurses are bullied by other staff members and the effects of such behaviors on the nurse victims. This study reports on nurses' interpersonal workplace relationships in a culturally unique environment. The study was conducted with 260 nurses working in three public hospitals. Data were collected using a questionnaire. The majority of nurses were female with bachelor's degrees and reported being assigned duties outside their usual responsibilities, held responsible for coworkers' mistakes, and criticized for job performance although they thought they had done their work properly. Most of the nurses who were bullied experienced health and sleep problems,did not want to go to work, and had communication problems with other staff members. Nearly all of the study nurses received psychological support to solve their problems and believed that the best way to prevent bullying was education.

  19. Moral reckoning in nursing.

    PubMed

    Nathaniel, Alvita K

    2006-06-01

    Analysis of qualitative data resulted in an original substantive grounded theory of moral reckoning in nursing, a three-stage process. After a novice period, the nurse experiences a stage of ease in which there is comfort in the workplace and congruence of internal and external values. Unexpectedly, a situational bind occurs in which the nurse's core beliefs come into irreconcilable conflict with external forces. This compels the nurse into the stage of resolution, in which he or she either gives up or makes a stand. The nurse then moves into the stage of reflection in which he or she lives with the consequences and iteratively examines beliefs, values, and actions. The nurse tries to make sense of experiences through remembering, telling the story, and examining conflicts. This study sets the stage for further investigation of moral distress. The theory of moral reckoning challenges nurses to tell their stories, examine conflicts, and participate as partners in moral decision making.

  20. Reworking professional nursing identity.

    PubMed

    MacIntosh, Judith

    2003-10-01

    In spite of professional socialization through nursing education programs, new graduates experience stress as they become working professionals. This grounded theory study explores experienced nurses' perceptions of how they became professional. The central problem for nurses was dissonance between expectations and experiences; they addressed this through an iterative, three-stage process of reworking professional identity. The stages of this process are assuming adequacy, realizing practice, and developing a reputation. Iterations of this process occur as new discrepancies are noticed, enhanced awareness dawns, practice changes, learning is undertaken, or experienced nurses become relative novices in another work area. Nurses move through stages more quickly and at different levels with each iteration. Three contextual factors influence the process: expectation; perception of the status accorded by others to nursing; and supportiveness by acceptance, assistance, and advocacy from others in the workplace. These findings expand knowledge about professional socialization and how nurses themselves understand developing professional identity.

  1. Community Health Nursing Curriculum. Components in Baccalaureate Nursing Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Catell, Grace Manion

    Community health nursing curriculum components in a sample of baccalaureate nursing programs were investigated. Questionnaires were sent to a sample of 12 National League of Nursing (NLN) accredited, generic, baccalaureate nursing programs representative of the four NLN regions in the United States. Community health nursing content in theory…

  2. Development of a Nursing Data Set for School Nursing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fahrenkrug, Mary Ann

    2003-01-01

    School nurses need to clearly identify how they promote the health and educational achievement of children. School nurses contribute to student health by providing health assessment and nursing interventions, advocating for healthy living, and contributing to prevention of illness and disease management. A Nursing Data Set for School Nursing can…

  3. Development of a Nursing Data Set for School Nursing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fahrenkrug, Mary Ann

    2003-01-01

    School nurses need to clearly identify how they promote the health and educational achievement of children. School nurses contribute to student health by providing health assessment and nursing interventions, advocating for healthy living, and contributing to prevention of illness and disease management. A Nursing Data Set for School Nursing can…

  4. Exploring the ways experienced nurses in Poland view their profession: a focus group study.

    PubMed

    Marcinowicz, L; Owlasiuk, A; Perkowska, E

    2016-09-01

    To conduct an in-depth analysis to understand how Polish nurses perceive their profession from the perspective of the jobs they perform and their experiences connected with the work. Although there are general educational standards in the nursing profession, nurses worldwide perform their jobs under different systems and cultural conditions. Exploring and describing how experienced nurses view their profession can contribute to recommendations on how to promote the image of the profession and can assist in recruiting new nurses. A descriptive, explorative qualitative study was conducted. Focus groups (n = 6) were organized involving nurses (n = 60) who had between 8 and 33 years of work experience. Data analysis revealed four main themes and ten sub-themes: (i) the role of the nurse (idealistic view of a nurse's work before starting the job, realistic perception of the profession while doing the job); (ii) respect for a nurse (nurses' attitudes towards one another, doctors' attitudes towards nurses, patients' and their families' attitudes towards nurses); (iii) gender issues (stereotypes, favouritism towards male nurses); (iv) prestige of the profession (prestige of the nursing profession in society, remuneration, nurses' choice of a future profession for their children). The study demonstrates that there is a huge discrepancy between the commonly held image of the nursing profession and the reality of the nurse's job. The idealistic view that it is a "clean" job in which the nurse only gives injections is not reflected in the actual duties. The findings revealed factors which influence the perception of the nursing profession in Poland, that is the system of education, professional experience and the current situation in which nurses perform their roles. Nurses' current perception of the job may have negative consequences both for nurses themselves (e.g. burnout) and for the whole profession (e.g. negative selection). Nurses should aim to fulfil leadership

  5. An overview of male intermittent self-catheterisation.

    PubMed

    Logan, Karen

    Since the early 1970s intermittent self-catheterisation (ISC) has become increasingly popular and is now considered the method of choice for draining retained urine from the bladder and to treat urethral strictures in men. It is the preferred option for this kind of bladder dysfunction management instead of an indwelling urinary catheter. Learning ISC can be a challenging time for men, but with the support of knowledgeable experienced nurses in teaching ISC it can be successfully achieved. This article outlines the anatomy of the male urinary tract, offers practical tips for nurses who teach it, and highlights issues important to men when learning and living with ISC.

  6. Lifestyle and Depression among Hong Kong Nurses

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Teris; Yip, Paul S.F.

    2016-01-01

    Recent longitudinal data suggest a close association between depression and lifestyle. Little work to date has estimated the prevalence of depression in the nursing workforce in China, nor considered what lifestyle factors might be correlated with it—a gap filled by the present study. The study’s web-based cross-sectional survey solicited data from qualified nurses aged between 21 and 65 registered with the Hong Kong Nursing Council. The Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale 21 was used to measure 850 nurses for depression, anxiety and symptoms of stress; a generalized linear regression model examined associations between lifestyle factors and depression. Mean depression symptom scores show a downward linear trend for male and female participants. Gender and age, however, did not emerge as significant predictors of depression. Three lifestyles factors (sleep, entertainment and hobbies) showed a significant association with depression. Nurses should make therapeutic lifestyle changes to improve their work-life balance and safeguard their functioning at work and personal well-being. PMID:26784216

  7. Academic ethical awareness among undergraduate nursing students.

    PubMed

    Cho, Ok-Hee; Hwang, Kyung-Hye

    2017-01-01

    Academic ethical awareness is an important aspect especially for nursing students who will provide ethical nursing care to patients in future or try to tread the path of learning toward professional acknowledgement in nursing scholarship. The purpose of this study was to explore academic ethical awareness and its related characteristics among undergraduate nursing students. This study commenced the survey with cross-sectional, descriptive questions and enrolled convenient samples of 581 undergraduate nursing students from three universities in South Korea. It was investigated with structured questionnaires including general characteristics and academic ethical awareness related. Ethical considerations: This study was reviewed and approved by the Institutional Review Board at National University. Academic ethical awareness was the highest regarding behaviors violating the respect or confidentiality of patients and cheating on exams, while it was the lowest for inappropriate behaviors in class. From the result of general characteristics difference, male students showed higher score than female students in relative; first-year students showed higher score than other year students; the higher score was rated from students who were highly satisfied with their major than the other not satisfied with their major; and students with low academic stress showed higher ethical awareness score than persons with higher stress. Personal behaviors were rated with low ethical awareness in relative, but items related to public rules and actual effects on patients or others were rated with higher score. Nursing satisfaction and academic stress are main factors on ethical awareness. To improve overall ethical awareness level of nursing students, it is required to provide more education about the importance of personal behaviors in class and need to improve the understanding of how it will be connected with future situation and effect.

  8. Black Male Rising

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feintuch, Howard

    2010-01-01

    The author reports on Ohio's bevy of education initiatives that take aim at helping African-American male students succeed. The Todd Anthony Bell National Resource Center for the African American Male at The Ohio State University is one of several initiatives that help African-American men succeed in Ohio. All the programs focus on individual…

  9. Professionalism and the Evolution of Nursing as a Discipline: A Feminist Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wuest, Judith

    1994-01-01

    Liberal and socialist feminist theory is used to demonstrate how the male institution of professionalism has hindered the evolution of the predominantly female discipline of nursing. Knowledge acquired through the experience of caring should be an integral part of the vision of nursing. (SK)

  10. Gender bias and discrimination in nursing education: can we change it?

    PubMed

    Anthony, Ann Strong

    2004-01-01

    Gender bias in nursing education impedes recruitment and retention of males into the profession. Nurse educators who are unaware of men's historical contributions to the profession may unknowingly perpetuate gender bias. The author describes how traditional stereotypes can be challenged and teaching/learning strategies can be customized to gender-driven learning styles.

  11. Psychosocial Factors as Predictors of Mentoring among Nurses in Southwestern Nigeria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salami, Samuel O.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine the psychosocial factors that predict mentoring among nurses. Design/methodology/approach: This study adopted a survey research design. Questionnaires were used to collect data on self-esteem, locus of control, emotional intelligence and demographic factors from 480 nurses (males 230; females = 250)…

  12. The Relationship between Nurse Characteristics and Perceptions of Psychotropic Medications in Residential Facilities for the Retarded.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aman, Michael G.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Nurses (N=227) were surveyed regarding attitudes, perceptions, and knowledge about the uses of psychotropic drugs. In general, greater age, male sex, status, and higher qualifications tended to covary and were associated with perception of greater involvement by senior nurses in drug-related decisions for institutionalized retarded persons.…

  13. Psychosocial Factors as Predictors of Mentoring among Nurses in Southwestern Nigeria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salami, Samuel O.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine the psychosocial factors that predict mentoring among nurses. Design/methodology/approach: This study adopted a survey research design. Questionnaires were used to collect data on self-esteem, locus of control, emotional intelligence and demographic factors from 480 nurses (males 230; females = 250)…

  14. Bullying among nursing staff: relationship with psychological/behavioral responses of nurses and medical errors.

    PubMed

    Wright, Whitney; Khatri, Naresh

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this article is to examine the relationship between three types of bullying (person-related, work-related, and physically intimidating) with two types of outcomes (psychological/behavioral responses of nurses and medical errors). In addition, it investigates if the three types of bullying behaviors vary with age or gender of nurses and if the extent of bullying varies across different facilities in an institution. Nurses play an integral role in achieving safe and effective health care. To ensure nurses are functioning at their optimal level, health care organizations need to reduce negative components that impact nurses' job performance and their mental and physical health. Mitigating bullying from the workplace may be necessary to create and maintain a high-performing, caring, and safe hospital culture. Using an internal e-mail system, an e-mail requesting the participants to complete the questionnaire on Survey Monkey was sent to a sample of 1,078 nurses employed across three facilities at a university hospital system in the Midwest. Two hundred forty-one completed questionnaires were received with a response rate of 23%. Bullying was measured utilizing the Negative Acts Questionnaire-Revised (NAQ-R). Outcomes (psychological/behavioral responses of nurses and medical errors) were measured using Rosenstein and O'Daniel's (2008) modified scales. Person-related bullying showed significant positive relationships with psychological/behavioral responses and medical errors. Work-related bullying showed a significant positive relationship with psychological/behavioral responses, but not with medical errors. Physically intimidating bullying did not show a significant relationship to either outcome. Whereas person-related bullying was found to be negatively associated with age of nurses, physically intimidating bullying was positively associated with age. Male nurses experienced higher work-related bullying than female nurses. Findings from this study suggest

  15. Academic Incivility in Nursing Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marlow, Sherri

    2013-01-01

    A well-documented and growing problem impacting the nursing shortage in the United States is the increasing shortage of qualified nursing faculty. Many factors contribute to the nursing faculty shortage such as retirement, dissatisfaction with the nursing faculty role and low salary compensation (American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN),…

  16. Academic Incivility in Nursing Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marlow, Sherri

    2013-01-01

    A well-documented and growing problem impacting the nursing shortage in the United States is the increasing shortage of qualified nursing faculty. Many factors contribute to the nursing faculty shortage such as retirement, dissatisfaction with the nursing faculty role and low salary compensation (American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN),…

  17. Nurse Reinvestment Act. Public Law.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC.

    This document contains the text of the Nurse Reinvestment Act, which amends the Public Health Service Act to address the increasing shortage of registered nurses by instituting a series of policies to improve nurse recruitment and nurse retention. Title I details two initiatives to boost recruitment of nurses. The first initiative includes the…

  18. Nurse Burnout and Patient Satisfaction

    PubMed Central

    Vahey, Doris C.; Aiken, Linda H.; Sloane, Douglas M.; Clarke, Sean P.; Vargas, Delfino

    2010-01-01

    Background Amid a national nurse shortage, there is growing concern that high levels of nurse burnout could adversely affect patient outcomes. Objectives This study examines the effect of the nurse work environment on nurse burnout, and the effects of the nurse work environment and nurse burnout on patients' satisfaction with their nursing care. Research Design/Subjects We conducted cross-sectional surveys of nurses (N = 820) and patients (N = 621) from 40 units in 20 urban hospitals across the United States. Measures Nurse surveys included measures of nurses' practice environments derived from the revised Nursing Work Index (NWI-R) and nurse outcomes measured by the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI) and intentions to leave. Patients were interviewed about their satisfaction with nursing care using the La Monica-Oberst Patient Satisfaction Scale (LOPSS). Results Patients cared for on units that nurses characterized as having adequate staff, good administrative support for nursing care, and good relations between doctors and nurses were more than twice likely as other patients to report high satisfaction with their care, and their nurses reported significantly lower burnout. The overall level of nurse burnout on hospital units also affected patient satisfaction. Conclusions Improvements in nurses' work environments in hospitals have the potential to simultaneously reduce nurses' high levels of job burnout and risk of turnover and increase patients' satisfaction with their care. PMID:14734943

  19. Nurse burnout and patient satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Vahey, Doris C; Aiken, Linda H; Sloane, Douglas M; Clarke, Sean P; Vargas, Delfino

    2004-02-01

    Amid a national nurse shortage, there is growing concern that high levels of nurse burnout could adversely affect patient outcomes. This study examines the effect of the nurse work environment on nurse burnout, and the effects of the nurse work environment and nurse burnout on patients' satisfaction with their nursing care. RESEARCH DESIGN/SUBJECTS: We conducted cross-sectional surveys of nurses (N=820) and patients (N=621) from 40 units in 20 urban hospitals across the United States. Nurse surveys included measures of nurses' practice environments derived from the revised Nursing Work Index (NWI-R) and nurse outcomes measured by the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI) and intentions to leave. Patients were interviewed about their satisfaction with nursing care using the La Monica-Oberst Patient Satisfaction Scale (LOPSS). Patients cared for on units that nurses characterized as having adequate staff, good administrative support for nursing care, and good relations between doctors and nurses were more than twice likely as other patients to report high satisfaction with their care, and their nurses reported significantly lower burnout. The overall level of nurse burnout on hospital units also affected patient satisfaction. Improvements in nurses' work environments in hospitals have the potential to simultaneously reduce nurses' high levels of job burnout and risk of turnover and increase patients' satisfaction with their care.

  20. Promotion or marketing of the nursing profession by nurses.

    PubMed

    Kagan, I; Biran, E; Telem, L; Steinovitz, N; Alboer, D; Ovadia, K L; Melnikov, S

    2015-09-01

    In recent years, much effort has been invested all over the world in nurse recruitment and retention. Issues arising in this context are low job satisfaction, the poor public image of nursing and the reluctance of nurses to promote or market their profession. This study aimed to examine factors explaining the marketing of the nursing profession by nurses working at a general tertiary medical centre in Israel. One hundred sixty-nine registered nurses and midwives from five clinical care units completed a structured self-administered questionnaire, measuring (a) professional self-image, (b) job satisfaction, (c) nursing promotional and marketing activity questionnaire, and (d) demographic data. The mean scores for the promotion of nursing were low. Nurses working in an intensive cardiac care unit demonstrated higher levels of promotional behaviour than nurses from other nursing wards in our study. Nurse managers reported higher levels of nursing promotion activity compared with first-line staff nurses. There was a strong significant correlation between job satisfaction and marketing behaviour. Multiple regression analysis shows that 15% of the variance of promoting the nursing profession was explained by job satisfaction and job position. Nurses are not inclined to promote or market their profession to the public or to other professions. The policy on the marketing of nursing is inadequate. A three-level (individual, organizational and national) nursing marketing programme is proposed for implementation by nurse leadership and policy makers. Among proposed steps to improve marketing of the nursing profession are promotion of the image of nursing by the individual nurse in the course of her or his daily activities, formulation and implementation of policies and programmes to promote the image of nursing at the organizational level and drawing up of a long-term programme for promoting or marketing the professional status of nursing at the national level. © 2015

  1. Impact of Interprofessional Simulation on Nursing Students' Attitudes Toward Teamwork and Collaboration.

    PubMed

    Krueger, Linda; Ernstmeyer, Kim; Kirking, Ellen

    2017-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of a multipatient, interprofessional simulation session on nursing students' attitudes toward nurse-physician collaboration using the Jefferson Scale of Attitudes Toward Physician-Nurse Collaboration. Final-semester nursing students, along with medical resident and students from other health programs, participated in a simulation exercise that included a period of prebriefing, simulation, and debriefing. Participants completed pre- and postsimulation surveys to assess the impact on collaboration. In total, 268 nursing students completed the survey. Participants had a more positive attitude toward nurse-physician collaboration following the simulation event, compared with prior to it. Significant differences between male and female nursing students were found on mean postsimulation scores and for three of the four subscales of the tool. Interprofessional simulation may be an effective way to enhance collaborative relationships, which ultimately may influence patient safety and quality of care. [J Nurs Educ. 2017;56(6):321-327.]. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  2. Bioterrorism knowledge and educational participation of nurses in Missouri.

    PubMed

    Rebmann, Terri; Mohr, Lisa Buettner

    2010-02-01

    Nurses are integral to bioterrorism preparedness, but nurses' bioterrorism preparedness knowledge has not been evaluated well. Missouri Nurses Association members (1,528) were studied in the summer of 2006 to assess their bioterrorism knowledge and the perceived benefits of education as well as barriers to education. The response rate was 31%. Most respondents (60%, n = 284) received no bioterrorism education. Nurses who were nurse practitioners (t = -2.42, p < .05), were male (t = -2.99, p < .01), or were on a planning committee (t = -1.96, p = .05) had received more education than other nurses. The most commonly cited barrier to education (46.6%, n = 221) was not knowing where to obtain training. One third of respondents (31.2%) reported no interest in receiving bioterrorism education in the future. Nurses' average score on the knowledge test was 73%. The most commonly missed questions pertained to infection control and decontamination procedures. Bioterrorism preparedness training should be offered through continuing education and nursing school curricula. Copyright 2010, SLACK Incorporated.

  3. The potential of telemedicine for home nursing in Queensland.

    PubMed

    Black, S; Andersen, K; Loane, M A; Wootton, R

    2001-01-01

    The potential for telemedicine in home nursing was examined by retrospectively reviewing the case-notes relating to home visits made by nurses in Queensland. The case-notes of 166 clients were randomly selected from 10 domiciliary nursing centres run by the Blue Care nursing organization in south-east Queensland. Two experienced community registered nurses independently undertook a retrospective review of the case-notes. Each reviewer made an independent judgement as to whether any of the home nursing visits in the episode of care could have been conducted by telemedicine. Visits requiring hands-on care were deemed to be unsuitable for telemedicine. A total of 12,630 home visits were reviewed. The median number of visits per client was 27 (range 1-722). The mean age of the clients was 72 years (range 2-93 years). A total of 1521 home visits (12%) were judged suitable for telemedicine. There was no significant difference in suitability between males (13%) and females (12%). Care interventions suitable for telemedicine were more likely to be those of a supportive, educational or review nature. Forty per cent of clients lived up to 5 km from the home nursing centre, 33% lived 5-10 km from the centre and 27% lived over 10 km from the centre. The results of the present study confirm the potential for telemedicine in home nursing in Australia.

  4. For love or money: registered nurses who return to hospital practice.

    PubMed

    Kent, Leslie N

    2015-07-01

    This commentary explores the value that returning nurses bring to the hospital setting. Nurses who have left hospital practice, usually due to family obligations, often return once the children are older. They return because they love nursing or they need to make money. They are at a point in their lives where they want to make a difference and miss the nurse-patient relationship. During recessions, nurses return to hospital practice because recessions tend to affect male dominated occupations. Research and policy literature on the returning and/or older nurse was reviewed with a focus on the benefits and challenges of having returning nurses in hospital practice. Returning nurses serve as role models to younger nurses. They also bring experiential knowledge to patient situations. There is limited research on this group of nurses. Yet they are ready for reentry in short order during nursing shortages. When they return, they add value to the hospital unit. Returning nurses want shorter workdays, alternative roles, and less physically taxing work. This can be achieved by offering flexible scheduling and work hours, creating niche roles and providing a more worker friendly physical environment. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Is Nurses' Professional Competence Related to Their Personality and Emotional Intelligence? A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Heydari, Abbas; Kareshki, Hossein; Armat, Mohammad Reza

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Nurses' professional competence is a crucial factor in clinical practice. Systematic evaluation of nurses’ competence and its related factors are essential for enhancing the quality of nursing care. This study aimed to assess the nurses’ competence level and its possible relationship with their personality and emotional intelligence. Methods: Using a cross-sectional survey design, three instruments including Nurse Competence Scale, short form of Schutte Self Report Emotional Intelligence Test, and the short 10-item version of Big Five Factor Inventory, were administered simultaneously to a randomized stratified sample of 220 nurses working in hospitals affiliated to Mashhad University of Medical Sciences. Data analysis was performed using SPSS 11.5. Results: Majority of nurses rated themselves as "good" and "very good", with the highest scores in "managing situations" and "work role" dimensions of nurse competence. A relatively similar pattern of scores was seen in competence dimensions, personality and emotional intelligence, among male and female nurses. Emotional intelligence and personality scores showed a significant relationship with nurses’ competence, explaining almost 20% of variations in nurse competence scores. Conclusion: Iranian nurses evaluated their overall professional competence at similar level of the nurses in other countries. Knowledge about the nurses’ competence level and its related factors, including personality and emotional intelligence, may help nurse managers in enhancing nurses' professional competence through appropriate task assignments and conducting in-service educational programs, thus improving the health status of patients. PMID:27354976

  6. Differences in moral judgment between nursing students and qualified nurses.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong-Soon; Park, Jin-Hee; Han, Sung-Suk

    2007-05-01

    This longitudinal study examined how nursing students' moral judgment changes after they become qualified nurses working in a hospital environment. The sample used was a group of 80 nursing students attending a university in Suwon, Korea, between 2001 and 2003. By using a Korean version of the Judgment About Nursing Decisions questionnaire, an instrument used in nursing care research, moral judgment scores based on Ketefian's six nursing dilemmas were determined. The results were as follows: (1) the qualified nurses had significantly higher idealistic moral judgment scores than the nursing students; (2) the qualified nurses showed significantly higher realistic moral judgment scores than the nursing students; and (3) when comparing idealistic and realistic moral judgment scores, both the qualified nurses and the nursing students had higher scores for idealistic moral judgment. Further study is recommended to examine changes in moral judgment.

  7. Smoking behaviour of student nurses enrolled in diploma, associate degree and undergraduate nursing programmes.

    PubMed

    Rausch, J C; Zimmerman, G; Hopp, J; Lee, J

    1987-01-01

    Because the literature shows that cigarette smoking is a major causative factor in the occurrence of chronic illness, lung cancer is becoming more common in women than breast cancer, nurses smoke more than any other group of health care providers and studies have not examined differences of smoking among the associate degree, undergraduate and diploma levels of nursing, this study was designed to examine selected health behaviours and their relationship to cigarette use among Alabama senior student nurses, and to determine smoking prevalence by level of educational preparation. A sample of senior associate degree, undergraduate and diploma student nurses in Alabama responded to an 87-item questionnaire which was personally administered by the investigator in a classroom setting. Twenty-two of the 87 items were used to compile the demographics, prevalences and health behaviours reported here. The remaining items were used to develop a sequence of information required to test Ajzen and Fishbein's Theory of Reasoned Action and are beyond the scope of this article. Though there was no significant difference of smoking prevalence among educational levels, there was a trend for increased smoking from undergraduate to diploma level with prevalences of: total sample, 26.2%; diploma, 30%; associate degree, 26%; and undergraduate, 24%. Health behaviours which were significantly different between smoking and non-smoking student nurses were breakfast frequency and coffee consumption. Having a regular exercise routine was not significant. Males smoked significantly more than females. More older nurses (over 40 years) smoked than younger nurses. The findings reported here are useful to the development of health education strategies designed to reduce and prevent cigarette use among student nurses.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  8. From staff nurse to nurse consultant.

    PubMed

    Fowler, John

    John Fowler Independent education consultant, continues his series for clinical nurses hoping to share their experiences with a wider audience, with advice on developing a potential article for a professional journal.

  9. Perceptions of "Nursing" and "Nursing Care" in the United States by Dutch Nursing Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haloburdo, Esther P.; Thompson, Mary Ann

    2001-01-01

    In the opinions of 11 Dutch nursing students on a study tour of the United States, the U.S. emphasizes technical aspects of nursing and medical over nursing care, lacks team nursing and collegiality, and has a litigious environment. These negative images have implications for the use of U.S. nursing as a benchmark for global education and…

  10. Competency of Graduate Nurses as Perceived by Nurse Preceptors and Nurse Managers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wise, Vanessa

    2013-01-01

    As newly graduated associate degree nurses (ADN) and baccalaureate degree nurses (BSN) enter into the workforce, they must be equipped to care for a complex patient population; therefore, the purpose of this study was to address the practice expectations and clinical competency of new nurses as perceived by nurse preceptors and nurse managers.…

  11. Competency of Graduate Nurses as Perceived by Nurse Preceptors and Nurse Managers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wise, Vanessa

    2013-01-01

    As newly graduated associate degree nurses (ADN) and baccalaureate degree nurses (BSN) enter into the workforce, they must be equipped to care for a complex patient population; therefore, the purpose of this study was to address the practice expectations and clinical competency of new nurses as perceived by nurse preceptors and nurse managers.…

  12. Survey of critical thinking and clinical decision making in nursing student of Kerman University.

    PubMed

    Noohi, Esmat; Karimi-Noghondar, Maryam; Haghdoost, Aliakbar

    2012-09-01

    The ability to think critically is an essential element in nursing education and more specifically in nurses' clinical decision making (CDM). Critical thinking (CT) and CDM ability as well as their relationship were examined among nursing students of Kerman University. STUDY WAS DESIGNED IN FOUR TOWNS: Kerman, Bam, Jiroft, and Zarand, settled in Kerman province. This research was a cross-sectional descriptive correlation study. 300 nursing students with different level of education were asked to fill two questionnaires including: (1) California Critical Thinking Skills Test (CCTST) and (2) Lauri and Salantera (2002) CDM instrument. Data were analyzed with SPSS12 and descriptive and inferential statistics. Nursing students yielded a low score (mean = 5/40 from 20) of CT and a mild score (mean = 12.8 from 20) of CDM. We found positively correlation between male and CT and CDM score with mean score of the nursing student. Also CDM score in male was more than female but not significant, and Jirofts CDM nursing student was significantly better than other city. Although students that answers evaluation question in CCTST better can gave better CDM score but there isn't relationship between CT and CDM of nursing student. The finding showed that mean score of nursing student CT was low. Reason can be either due to the defects of nursing education program, teaching, and learning strategies.

  13. The future of nursing: understanding who nurses are.

    PubMed

    Wyatt, David A

    2013-09-01

    The Institute of Medicine report The Future of Nursing: Leading Change, Advancing Health highlights the need for more information about the nursing workforce. Without attention to the problem, OR nursing is likely to continue to experience the nursing shortage more acutely than other practice areas. By changing how they acquire and use nursing data, and by advocating for improved exchange of data between federal and state governments and nursing schools, facilities can be better prepared for future workforce challenges.

  14. [Response of Taiwan nursing education to today's nursing shortage].

    PubMed

    Chou, Shieu-Ming

    2012-10-01

    The shortage of nursing manpower has recently attracted significant attention from Taiwan society. Government efforts to improve the nursing practice environment have challenged the quality of current domestic nursing education. This article provides an overview of Taiwan nursing education in terms of its development under current nursing shortage conditions and in light of Taiwan's low birthrate, ageing society. A few suggestions for nursing education are listed at the end of the article.

  15. Predictors of male microchimerism

    PubMed Central

    Kamper-Jørgensen, Mads; Mortensen, Laust Hvas; Andersen, Anne-Marie Nybo; Hjalgrim, Henrik; Gadi, Vijayakrishna K.; Tjønneland, Anne

    2012-01-01

    The association between microchimerism acquired primarily through pregnancy and later disease is of increasing scientific interest. Because this line of research is new and little is known about the nature of microchimerism, studies of microchimerism are potentially vulnerable to error from confounding and reverse causation. To address the issue of confounding, we conducted an analysis of predictors of male microchimerism in 272 female participants of the Danish Diet, Cancer and Health cohort. Buffy coat DNA was tested for Y chromosome presence as a marker of male microchimerism. First, we used logistic regression and thereafter random forest modeling to evaluate the ability of a range of reproductive, lifestyle, hospital or clinic visit history, and other variables to predict whether women tested positive for male microchimerism. We found some indication that current use of contraceptive pills and hormone replacement therapy reduced the odds of testing positive for male microchimerism. However, prediction of male microchimerism presence was poor based on the available variables. Studies of the possible role of male microchimerism in maternal health and disease are therefore unlikely to be heavily confounded by the variables examined in the present investigation. More research focused on acquisition, retention and clearing of male cells in the maternal circulation is needed. PMID:22926759

  16. Does nursing assistant certification increase nursing student's confidence level of basic nursing care when entering a nursing program?

    PubMed

    Stombaugh, Angie; Judd, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore nursing student's confidence level with basic nursing care when entering the nursing program after implementation of required nursing assistant certification for program admission. In addition, the relationship between being employed as a nursing assistant and confidence level with basic nursing care when entering the nursing program was explored. A Likert-scale survey assessing confidence levels of basic nursing care was sent to 156 nursing students admitted to a nursing program prior to their first nursing course. Confidence level with nursing skills, nursing assistant employment, and length of nursing assistant employment were assessed. Students were most confident in hand washing (M = 5.87, SD = 0.36), gloving and gowning (M =5.46, SD = 0.75), making an unoccupied bed (M = 5.38, SD = 0.88), and oral temperature (M = 5.30, SD = 0.87). Students were least confident in the fitting for cane (M = 1.74, SD = 1.16) and ambulation with crutches on steps (M =1.81, SD = 1.27). Nursing assistant employment increased student confidence with basic nursing care. Nursing programs cannot assume that students are prepared in basic nursing care based on a nursing assistant certification. © 2014.

  17. Love and male impotence.

    PubMed

    Mehler, J A

    1992-01-01

    This paper deals with male impotence in relation to love. A detailed clinical presentation attempts to show how the symptom was embedded in faulty processes of separation-individuation, whereby regression in the service of intercourse, passion and love is hindered by the fears and fantasies underlying merging experiences. These problems are examined as they appear interwoven in transference and counter-transference phenomena. The clinical case presentation is followed by a discussion of different forms of male impotence from a more general viewpoint; its relation not only to castration and phallic anxiety, but also to earlier developmental aspects. Finally, some reflections about male and female gender differences in relation to symbiotic experience.

  18. Male accessory gland infection.

    PubMed

    Krause, W

    2008-04-01

    Male accessory gland infection (MAGI) is a consequence of canalicular spreading of agents via urethra, prostate gland, seminal vesicles, deferent duct, epididymis and testis. Haematogenous infections are rare. The main infectious agents are Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Chlamydia trachomatis, and also enterobacteriae at a lesser frequency. Characteristic symptoms of MAGI are leukocytospermia, enhanced concentration of cytokines and reactive oxygen species. As complications, obstruction of the ductus epididymidis and/or another duct section, impairment of spermatogenesis in orchitis, impairment of sperm function, and dysfunctions of the male accessory glands may occur. Reduction of male fertility is a rare consequence. The treatment has to consider specific antibiotics.

  19. Reducing variance in nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Sanford, Kathleen D

    2010-11-01

    Nursing and finance leaders can encourage evidence-based nursing by: Investing in best practice procedure products. Providing continuing education to nursing care teams. Encouraging accountability--and empowerment.

  20. Ethics and Transcultural Nursing Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eliason, Michele J.

    1993-01-01

    Argues that nursing practice and theory cannot be ethical unless cultural factors are taken into consideration and that ethical/transcultural nursing is central to the philosophy and practice of nursing. (Author)

  1. Nursing Aides, Orderlies, and Attendants

    MedlinePlus

    ... Z INDEX | OOH SITE MAP | EN ESPAÑOL Healthcare > Nursing Assistants and Orderlies PRINTER-FRIENDLY EN ESPAÑOL Summary ... of workers and occupations. What They Do -> What Nursing Assistants and Orderlies Do About this section Nursing ...

  2. Preparation for Advanced Nursing Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frik, Seigina M.; Pollock, Susan E.

    1993-01-01

    Lehman College's graduate nursing program uses theory-based courses to prepare advanced nurse practitioners. Students increase scholarly inquiry skills and clinical decision making; use of nursing conceptual models helped them plan and evaluate their practice. (SK)

  3. Ethics and Transcultural Nursing Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eliason, Michele J.

    1993-01-01

    Argues that nursing practice and theory cannot be ethical unless cultural factors are taken into consideration and that ethical/transcultural nursing is central to the philosophy and practice of nursing. (Author)

  4. Military nursing competencies.

    PubMed

    Ross, Mary Candice

    2010-06-01

    Competencies for military nurses are much broader in scope than their civilian counterparts. Not only must they be proficient at basic nursing skills, but they must also quickly master such military skills as protecting themselves and others during attack or threat of attack, caring for major trauma victims under austere conditions, and preparing such patients for transport through the military system of evacuation. This requires consistent and specialized training. This article describes the competencies necessary for practice by military nurses.

  5. Pediatric Endocrinology Nurses Society

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2018! Wednesday, May 16, 2018 ​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​ Journal of Pediatric Nursing The Journal of Pediatric Nursing provides original, peer-reviewed research that is based on the philosophy that pediatric nursing incorporates a family-centered approach. PENS Executive Office • ...

  6. Hospital nurses' work motivation.

    PubMed

    Toode, Kristi; Routasalo, Pirkko; Helminen, Mika; Suominen, Tarja

    2015-06-01

    The knowledge surrounding nurses' work motivation is currently insufficient, and previous studies have rarely taken into account the role of many influential background factors. This study investigates the motivation of Estonian nurses in hospitals, and how individual and organisational background factors influence their motivation to work. The study is quantitative and cross-sectional. An electronically self-reported questionnaire was used for data collection. The sample comprised of 201 Registered Nurses working in various hospital settings in Estonia. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics, two-sample Wilcoxon rank-sum (Mann-Whitney) test, Kruskal-Wallis equality-of-populations rank test and Spearman's correlation. Both extrinsic and intrinsic motivations were noted among hospital nurses. Nurses were moderately externally motivated (M = 3.63, SD = 0.89) and intrinsically strongly motivated (M = 4.98, SD = 1.03). A nurses' age and the duration of service were positively correlated with one particular area of extrinsic work motivation, namely introjected regulation (p < 0.001). Nurses who had professional training over 7 days per year had both a higher extrinsic motivation (p = 0.016) and intrinsic work motivation (p = 0.004). The findings expand current knowledge of nurses' work motivation by describing the amount and orientation of work motivation among hospital nurses and highlighting background factors which should be taken into account in order to sustain and increase their intrinsic work motivation. The instrument used in the study can be an effective tool for nurse managers to determine a nurse's reasons to work and to choose a proper motivational strategy. Further research and testing of the instrument in different countries and in different contexts of nursing is however required. © 2014 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  7. Spirituality in nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Melanie; Wattis, John

    2015-05-27

    Spirituality is an important aspect of holistic care that is frequently overlooked. This is because of difficulties in conceptualising spirituality and confusion about how it should be integrated into nursing care. This article explores what is meant by spirituality and spiritually competent practice. It examines attitudes to spirituality, describes factors that might affect the integration of spirituality into nursing care and offers practical guidance to equip nurses to incorporate spirituality into their practice.

  8. Nurses' knowledge of pain.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Benita

    2007-06-01

    The aim of this study was to establish if postregistration education and clinical experience influence nurses' knowledge of pain. Inadequacies in the pain management process may not be tied to myth and bias originating from general attitudes and beliefs, but reflect inadequate pain knowledge. Design. A pain knowledge survey of 20 true/false statements was used to measure the knowledge base of two groups of nurses. This was incorporated in a self-administered questionnaire that also addressed lifestyle factors of patients in pain, inferences of physical pain, general attitudes and beliefs about pain management. One hundred questionnaires were distributed; 86 nurses returned the questionnaire giving a response rate of 86%. Following selection of the sample, 72 nurses participated in the study: 35 hospice/oncology nurses (specialist) and 37 district nurses (general). Data were analysed using SPSS. The specialist nurses had a more comprehensive knowledge base than the general nurses; however, their knowledge scores did not appear to be related to their experience in terms of years within the nursing profession. Whilst educational programmes contribute to an increase in knowledge, it would appear that the working environment has an influence on the development and use of this knowledge. It is suggested that the clinical environment in which the specialist nurse works can induce feelings of reduced self-efficacy and low personal control. To ease tension, strategies are used that can result in nurses refusing to endorse their knowledge, which can increase patients' pain. Clinical supervision will serve to increase the nurses' self-awareness; however, without power and autonomy to make decisions and affect change, feelings of helplessness, reduced self-efficacy and cognitive dissonance can increase. This may explain why, despite educational efforts to increase knowledge, a concomitant change in practice has not occurred.

  9. Best nursing practice.

    PubMed

    2016-09-01

    As part of this year's centenary celebrations, the RCN is showcasing the best nursing practice, focusing on that which often goes unobserved. Nurses, healthcare assistants and nursing students are asked to share ideas and innovations for improving practice and patient care. These will contribute to the development of a library of good practice and the RCN will invest in a small number of the successful projects. The closing date is 31 December.

  10. Nursing at the forefront.

    PubMed

    Hunt, L P

    2000-06-01

    The Government sees nurses at the forefront of the drive for improvement in healthcare delivery. In this article, Lord Hunt, the Government spokesperson on nursing, spells out the role that nurses are expected to play in this process. Clinical governance has undoubtedly already been mentioned if not enacted in your Trust, and maybe some of you have applied for the discretionary points now on offer. Whatever the outcome of these and other strategies, the future is going to be different for perioperative nurses, whether we like it or not. Your views, as ever, are welcome....

  11. Communication in Nursing Practice

    PubMed Central

    Kourkouta, Lambrini; Papathanasiou, Ioanna V.

    2014-01-01

    Good communication between nurses and patients is essential for the successful outcome of individualized nursing care of each patient. To achieve this, however, nurses must understand and help their patients, demonstrating courtesy, kindness and sincerity. Also they should devote time to the patient to communicate with the necessary confidentiality, and must not forget that this communication includes persons who surround the sick person, which is why the language of communication should be understood by all those involved in it. Good communication also is not only based on the physical abilities of nurses, but also on education and experience. PMID:24757408

  12. Modelling district nurse expertise.

    PubMed

    Burke, Michelle

    2014-12-01

    As changes in society and health provision mean that one in four people over the age of 75 will require nursing care at home, pre-registration adult nurse education increasingly prepares student nurses for a future career within the community. District nurses undertake complex, multidimensional health and social assessments and care in a non-clinical setting and work in partnership with patients and their significant others to promote practical and psychological coping mechanisms and self-care. The district nurse's first assessment visit is key to developing a therapeutic partnership and it is often during this visit that expertise in district nursing practice emerges. The holistic, contextual and dynamic aspects of nursing in the home setting can make district nursing expertise difficult to illustrate and demonstrate within the classroom setting. This article explores the ways in which an understanding of expertise development theory can enable the tacit expertise that occurs within the first assessment visit to be made visible to student nurses, using simulation and expert narrative as a pedagogical strategy.

  13. [Family oriented nursing care].

    PubMed

    Lima-Rodríguez, Joaquin Salvador; Lima-Serrano, Marta; Sáez-Bueno, Africa

    2009-01-01

    Nursing has experienced an important methodological development, in which it gives priority to the individual, although at a socioeconomic level a marked interest is seen in the health care of the family unit and the NANDA (North American Nursing Diagnosis Association), NIC (Nursing Interventions Classification) and NOC (Nursing Outcomes Classification) nursing guidelines, using diagnoses, criteria of results and interventions orientated towards this aim. We consider to the family as an opened system consisted of human elements, with a common history, which they form a functional unit been ruled by own procedure. In this paper we look at those aspects that must be taken into account in nursing assessment of families from a systemic perspective, including some tools for data collection and analysis of information. In addition, we identify specific areas of intervention. We believe that the family must be studied from a nursing care point of view with its own characteristics as opposed to those possessed individually by each of its members. We also believe that, when assessment is centred on the Henderson unaided activities study or the Gordon functional health patterns, they are not useful in assessing the family unit. This work offers an assessment method centred on the family unit, which helps to identify the nursing diagnoses applicable to it. Our proposal, which has been successfully used by nursing students over the last few years, hopes to contribute to quality clinical practice with a tool orientated towards the family.

  14. [Nurses in print].

    PubMed

    1990-01-01

    The paper presents an analysis of the articles on nursing personnel published from September 1989 till June 1990 in the two most widespread newspapers: II Corriere della Sera and La Republica. The nursing profession has been a very important object of nation as well as local chronicles, specifically during the nationwide "nursing emergency." It is striking however to see that nurses themselves are absent as subjects from the debate on the crisis of the profession. It is further underlined that journalists are very rough in their analyses of the cause of professional malaise and in the formulation and discussion of hypotheses for solution.

  15. Oxidative stress & male infertility.

    PubMed

    Makker, Kartikeya; Agarwal, Ashok; Sharma, Rakesh

    2009-04-01

    The male factor is considered a major contributory factor to infertility. Apart from the conventional causes for male infertility such as varicocoele, cryptorchidism, infections, obstructive lesions, cystic fibrosis, trauma, and tumours, a new and important cause has been identified: oxidative stress. Oxidative stress is a result of the imbalance between reactive oxygen species (ROS) and antioxidants in the body. It is a powerful mechanism that can lead to sperm damage, deformity and eventually, male infertility. This review discusses the physiological need for ROS and their role in normal sperm function. It also highlights the mechanism of production and the pathophysiology of ROS in relation to the male reproductive system and enumerate the benefits of incorporating antioxidants in clinical and experimental settings.

  16. Genital sores - male

    MedlinePlus

    ... within a day of its appearance) Syphilis (small, painless open sore or ulcer [called a chancre] on ... genitals or around the anus) Lymphogranuloma venereum (small painless sore on the male genitals) Other types of ...

  17. Males and Eating Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Males and Eating Disorders Past Issues / Spring 2008 Table of Contents For ... this page please turn Javascript on. Photo: PhotoDisc Eating disorders primarily affect girls and women, but boys and ...

  18. Bladder catheterization, male (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... kept empty (decompressed) and urinary flow assured. The balloon holds the catheter in place for a duration of time. Catheterization in males is slightly more difficult and uncomfortable than in females because of the longer urethra.

  19. Aggressive Angiomyxoma in Males.

    PubMed

    Dehuri, Priyadarshini; Gochhait, Debasis; Srinivas, B H; Sistla, Sarath Chandra

    2017-06-01

    Paratesticular aggressive angiomyxoma is a very rare tumour in males. Most of documented cases of aggressive angiomyxomas have been seen in genital, perineal and pelvic regions in women of child bearing age. We report two cases of aggressive angiomyxomas in males who presented with inguinal swellings. A globular mass with greyish white, glistening cut surface was received after excision of the mass. Microscopic examination revealed a paucicellular tumour comprising of spindle shaped cells along with vessels of varying calibre. The accompanying stroma was myxocollagenous. In addition there was evidence of fat infiltration in one of the cases. Immunohistochemical staining showed CD34, desmin, vimetin positivity and negative staining for S100, actin, Estrogen Receptors (ER) and Progesterone Receptors (PR). The microscopic and immunohistochemical features favoured the diagnosis of aggressive angiomyxoma. This report of angiomyxoma in two cases of males assumes great significance in view of the extreme rarity of the tumour in males and its locally infiltrative nature.

  20. Aggressive Angiomyxoma in Males

    PubMed Central

    Dehuri, Priyadarshini; Srinivas, BH; Sistla, Sarath Chandra

    2017-01-01

    Paratesticular aggressive angiomyxoma is a very rare tumour in males. Most of documented cases of aggressive angiomyxomas have been seen in genital, perineal and pelvic regions in women of child bearing age. We report two cases of aggressive angiomyxomas in males who presented with inguinal swellings. A globular mass with greyish white, glistening cut surface was received after excision of the mass. Microscopic examination revealed a paucicellular tumour comprising of spindle shaped cells along with vessels of varying calibre. The accompanying stroma was myxocollagenous. In addition there was evidence of fat infiltration in one of the cases. Immunohistochemical staining showed CD34, desmin, vimetin positivity and negative staining for S100, actin, Estrogen Receptors (ER) and Progesterone Receptors (PR). The microscopic and immunohistochemical features favoured the diagnosis of aggressive angiomyxoma. This report of angiomyxoma in two cases of males assumes great significance in view of the extreme rarity of the tumour in males and its locally infiltrative nature. PMID:28764175

  1. Consistent male-male paternity differences across female genotypes.

    PubMed

    Sherman, Craig D H; Wapstra, Erik; Olsson, Mats

    2009-04-23

    In a recent paper, we demonstrated that male-female genetic relatedness determines male probability of paternity in experimental sperm competition in the Peron's tree frog (Litoria peronii), with a more closely related male outcompeting his rival. Here, we test the hypothesis that a male-male difference in siring success with one female significantly predicts the corresponding difference in siring success with another female. With male sperm concentration held constant, and the proportion of viable sperm controlled statistically, the male-male difference in siring success with one female strongly predicted the corresponding difference in siring success with another female, and alone explained more than 62 per cent of the variance in male-male siring differences. This study demonstrates that male siring success is primarily dictated by among-male differences in innate siring success with less influence of male-female relatedness.

  2. Thyroid and male reproduction

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Anand; Shekhar, Skand; Dhole, Bodhana

    2014-01-01

    Male reproduction is governed by the classical hypothalamo-hypophyseal testicular axis: Hypothalamic gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH), pituitary luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) and the gonadal steroid, principally, testosterone. Thyroid hormones have been shown to exert a modulatory influence on this axis and consequently the sexual and spermatogenic function of man. This review will examine the modulatory influence of thyroid hormones on male reproduction. PMID:24701426

  3. Attitudes toward expanding nurses' authority.

    PubMed

    Kerzman, Hana; Van Dijk, Dina; Eizenberg, Limor; Khaikin, Rut; Phridman, Shoshi; Siman-Tov, Maya; Goldberg, Shoshi

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, an increasing number of care procedures previously under the physician's authority have been placed in the hands of registered nurses. The purpose of this study was to examine the attitudes of nurses towards expanding nurses' authority and the relationships between these attitudes and job satisfaction facets, professional characteristics, and demographics. A cross-sectional study was conducted between 2010 and 2011 in three major medical centers in Israel. Participants included 833 nurses working in 89 departments. Attitudes toward the expansion of nurses' authority were assessed by self-report questionnaire, as well as job satisfaction facets including perception of professional autonomy, nurse-physician working relations, workload and burnout, perceptions of quality of care, and nursing staff satisfaction at work. Nurses reported positive attitudes toward the expansion of nurses' authority and moderate attitudes for interpretation of diagnostic tests in selected situations. The results of multivariate regression analyses demonstrate that the nurses' satisfaction from professional autonomy and work relations were the most influential factors in explaining their attitudes toward the expansion of nurses' authority. In addition, professionally young nurses tend to be more positive regarding changes in nurses' authority. In the Israeli reality of a nurse's shortage, we are witnessing professional transitions toward expansion of the scope of nurses' accountability and decision-making authority. The current research contributes to our understanding of attitudes toward the expansion of nurses' authority among the nursing staffs. The findings indicate the necessity of redefining the scope of nursing practice within the current professional context.

  4. Nursing is the room rate.

    PubMed

    Rutherford, Marcella M

    2012-01-01

    Shrinking dollars increase the need for health care stakeholders to clearly understand nursing's worth. For nursing to assure an adequate investment in nurses, it needs to articulate its value drivers. Nursing revenue offers a data source that reflects stakeholder choices and patient needs. The daily nursing billing supports hospital payment and provides cost data, important for hospital financial decision making. This revenue is a tangible asset reflecting nursing value and can be used to justify an investment in the profession. Nursing leadership can use this daily nursing charge data to monitor and measure the impact of efficiencies related to patient care.

  5. A Review and Critique of Advances in Nursing Science Articles That Focus on Sexual Health and Sexual Rights: A Call to Leadership and Policy Development.

    PubMed

    Rew, Lynn; Thurman, Whitney; McDonald, Kari

    Sexual health and sexual rights are integral to nursing science but ignored in nursing publications. We searched Advances in Nursing Science for prevalence of these topics. Fifteen articles (1.3%) met our criteria. No nursing theories were used as frameworks, and few concrete suggestions were made for further theory development. Discussion of sociopolitical influences on sexual health and/or sexual rights was limited, mostly unrelated to health care. Information to influence nursing practice, theory development, further research, or policy across the life span, for both males and females, and for variant-gender individuals, was limited. We urge authors to contribute further to this field of discourse in nursing.

  6. The shortage of nurses and nursing faculty: what critical care nurses can do.

    PubMed

    Siela, Debra; Twibell, K Renee; Keller, Vicki

    2008-01-01

    Nurses are needed more than ever to support the healthcare needs of every American. Nurses make up the greatest single component of hospital staff. In 2004, of the almost 3 million nurses in the United States, 83% were employed in nursing, and 58% of those were employed full-time. However, a severe shortage of nurses exists nationwide, putting the safe, effective healthcare of Americans in jeopardy. The concurrent shortage of nursing faculty has significant impact on the potential for admitting and graduating sufficient numbers of nursing students to address the shortage of prepared nurses. A close examination of the demographics of the 3 million nurses provides a context for an in-depth discussion of strategies that critical care nurses can employ to help alleviate the nursing and nurse faculty shortages.

  7. Nurse manager engagement: what it means to nurse managers and staff nurses.

    PubMed

    Gray, Linda R; Shirey, Maria R

    2013-01-01

    To describe what nurse manager engagement means to nurse managers and staff nurses by incorporating an organizational dashboard to document engagement outcomes. Retaining engaged nurse managers is crucial for individual performance and organizational outcomes. However, nurse manager engagement is currently underreported in the literature. Existing data from the 2010 Employee Opinion Survey at the Baylor University Medical Center in Dallas, Texas, were used to measure staff engagement among 28 nurse managers and 1497 staff nurses. The data showed a 21% gap between manager and staff nurse engagement levels, with managers showing higher engagement levels than staff. No clear depiction of nurse manager engagement emerged. Consequently, an expanded definition of nurse manager engagement was developed alongside a beginning dashboard of engagement outcomes. The findings have implications for overcoming barriers that affect staff nurse engagement, improving outcomes, and creating definitions of nurse manager engagement.

  8. All the young men gone: losing men in the gentrification of Australian nursing circa 1860-1899.

    PubMed

    Barber, J

    1996-12-01

    Men played an important role in nursing in colonial Australia. However the number of men undertaking nursing duties declined dramatically in the second half of the nineteenth century. Reasons for this are explored in relation to ramifications of the introduction of the Nightingale pattern of nurse training in Australia, which occurred within the Victorian ethos of gentility and decorum. In this context, nursing came to be seen as a calling that was natural and appropriate for women. The controlled, decorous ambience of nursing, its subservient relationship to medicine and the attractiveness to employers of female pay rates are all associated with the decline in male participation over this period.

  9. Nursing documentation and nursing practice: a discourse analysis.

    PubMed

    Heartfield, M

    1996-07-01

    Nursing documentation exists as a daily reality of nurses' work. It is interpreted by some as the evidence of nursing actions and dismissed by others as a misrepresentation of nursing care. This paper reports on a study of nursing documentation as nursing practice. The work of Foucault and discourse analysis provide a research design for examination of how written descriptions of patient events taken from patient case notes result from hegemonic influences that construct a knowledge and therefore a practice of nursing. Discourses as ways of understanding knowledge as language, social practices and power relations are used to identify how nursing documentation functions as a manifestation and ritual of power relations. A focus on body work and fragmented bodies provided details of nursing's participation in the discursive construction of the object patient and invisible nurse. It is through resistances to documentation that alternative knowledge of nursing exists.

  10. Nurses' views of patient participation in nursing care.

    PubMed

    Tobiano, Georgia; Bucknall, Tracey; Marshall, Andrea; Guinane, Jessica; Chaboyer, Wendy

    2015-12-01

    To explore nurses' views of patient participation in nursing care on medical wards. Nurses have frequent contact with patients, highlighting their potential role in enabling patient participation. However, some nurses' actions and attitudes act as barriers, failing to achieve core requirements of patient participation. Discovering nurses' views may assist in developing strategies to encourage patient participation in hospitals. Interpretive study. Twenty nurses were recruited from four medical wards, located in two Australian hospitals. In-depth semi-structured interviews were conducted between November 2013-March 2014 and analysed using content analysis. Five categories emerged from the nurses' views. The first category, acknowledging patients as partners, showed nurses respected patients as legitimate participants. In the second category, managing risk, nurses emphasized the need to monitor participation to ensure rules and patient safety were maintained. Enabling participation was the third category, which demonstrated nurses' strategies that enhanced patients' participation. The fourth category was hindering participation; encapsulating nurses' difficulty in engaging patients with certain characteristics. In the final category, realizing participation, nurses believed patients could be involved in physical activities or clinical communication. Nurses have a crucial role in promoting patient participation. Through acknowledging and enabling participation, nurses may facilitate patient participation in a range of nursing activities. The nurse's role in enacting participation is complex, having to accommodate each patient's risks and characteristics, highlighting the need for good assessment skills. Education, policy and research strategies are essential to foster nurses' pivotal role in patient participation. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Nursing practice environment and outcomes for oncology nursing.

    PubMed

    Shang, Jingjing; Friese, Christopher R; Wu, Evan; Aiken, Linda H

    2013-01-01

    It is commonly assumed that oncology nurses experience high job-related burnout and high turnover because their work involves inherent stressors such as caring for patients with serious and often life-threatening illness. The objectives of this study were to examine the differences in outcomes such as job dissatisfaction and burnout between oncology nurses and medical-surgical nurses, and to identify factors that affect oncology nurse outcomes. A secondary analysis of nurse survey data collected in 2006 including 4047 nurses from 282 hospitals in 3 states was performed; t test and χ2 test compared differences between oncology nurses and medical-surgical nurses in nurse outcomes and their assessments of nurse practice environment, as measured by the Practice Environment Scale of the Nursing Work Index. Logistic regression models estimated the effect of nurse practice environment on 4 nurse-reported outcomes: burnout, job dissatisfaction, intention to leave the current position, and perceived quality of care. Oncology nurses reported favorable practice environments and better outcomes than did medical-surgical nurses. All 4 subscales of the Practice Environment Scale of the Nursing Work Index studied were significantly associated with outcomes. Specifically, nurses who reported favorable nursing foundations for quality of care (eg, active in-service or preceptorship programs) were less likely to report burnout and leave their current position. Better practice environments, including nurse foundations for quality care, can help to achieve optimal nurse outcomes. Improving hospital practice environments holds significant potential to improve nurse well-being, retention, and quality of care. Specifically, hospitals should consider preceptor programs and continuing education and increase nurses' participation in hospital decision making.

  12. What's funny about nursing?

    PubMed

    Pierlot, D; Warelow, P J

    1999-12-01

    The authors examine the topic of humour and argue that humour is needed as one of many skills within the nurse patient relationship. We advance the view that humour has been well researched as an agent of therapeutic value and as a communication tool which helps to relieve stress, but, to date is not used to its fullest potential and tends therefore to be underestimated in both general and psychiatric nursing areas. Humour has benefits for both the nurse and the patient having psychological benefits and a vast array of physiological advantages and is regarded by those who use it as a social lubricant acting as a positive in nurse patient relationships. We also argue that it is essential that nurses know when to use humour as timing and appropriateness is imperative in order for it to be most effective. Humour can be used in all areas of clinical nursing practice and may prove useful in being a reliable predictor over the course of a patient's illness. The use of humour can help improve the nurse-patient relationship by initially breaking the ice between nurse and patient. This alternative mode of delivery can then be foundational to other areas of the nurse patient relationship such as self-disclosure, the enhancement of learning and relieving stress. Furthermore, it helps to facilitate and promote mutual health and well being for both the patient and the nurse. The usage of humour in psychiatric nurse settings is discussed and the benefits to both the patients and their staff are outlined as being of immense therapeutic value. The literature perhaps tends to skirt around these benefits somewhat, as psychiatry and laughter in partnership are not really considered important discursive topics.

  13. Nunavut: building nursing capacity.

    PubMed

    Malott, Misty

    2012-03-01

    Recruitment and retention issues associated with the growing nursing shortage in Canada are magnified in Nunavut, where the scope of nursing practice is much broader than in urban settings. The Qikiqtani General Hospital (QGH), a 35-bed hospital in Nunavut's capital, Iqaluit, was the home base for this multi-pronged pilot project that spanned 16 months to March 2011. The goals of the project included creating opportunities for front-line nurses to develop new clinical skills and knowledge and expand their competencies; offering enhanced critical care training relevant to the needs of nurses; and providing a smooth transition to entry to practice in a hospital setting for new graduate nurses. An in-house mentorship program was developed, and contracts were made with three outside parties: the Critical Care Education Network (CRI), the Ottawa Hospital and the Perinatal Partnership Program of Eastern and Southeastern Ontario. A number of professional development opportunities were provided – for example, 26 nurses participated in the CRI's critical care training, and six nurses were trained as CRI trainers.Overall, nurses were satisfied with the accessibility, delivery and applicability of the RTA education opportunities, and all nurses agreed that these opportunities increased their professional skills. A plan for the sustainability of the critical care portion of the Nunavut RTA project is currently in place, and the QGH is in the process of hiring a nurse educator for the hospital. This hiring will be a key piece to sustain the project initiatives. If the mentorship program is to continue, it will be essential to hire someone dedicated to the orientation of new graduates and new nurses.

  14. Nurse codependency: instrument development and validation.

    PubMed

    Allison, Sarah

    2004-01-01

    This study developed and evaluated the Nurse Codependency Questionnaire (NCQ) and generated initial estimates of the stability and internal consistency of responses for the questionnaire. An initial pool of 95 items, reflective of four domains of codependency, was generated from the codependency literature using a domain-referenced approach. Seven expert judges from the nursing and codependency fields calculated the content validity index (CVI) as > .80. Items were critiqued for relevance, clarity, and predicted direction of each item's correlation with the total codependency score. A convenience sample of 547 male and female nurses from Texas was recruited from a variety of professional settings to test the NCQ. Evidence of reliability and validity was sought through the use of principal factor analysis (PFA) techniques and correlation analysis. The specific domains of "codependent caretaking" and "lack of voice" represented two of the four hypothesized domains that were supported by factor analysis. Data screening and item analysis resulted in a final sample of 24 items. Test-retest reliability was .90 and internal consistency reliability was .80 for the entire scale. Reliability estimates for the "codependent caretaking" and "lack of voice" scales were .65 and .59, respectively for test-retest; and .81 and .64, respectively for internal consistency. Known groups validity was supported by each of the factors' ability to discriminate between binge and nonbinge eaters. The NCQ may be useful for identifying codependency within the nursing profession. Research is needed to determine the external factors that influence the overt expression of nurse codependency. Screening for nurse codependency may contribute to the health of the profession by providing a means for anticipatory guidance and early intervention.

  15. Burnout Syndrome Among Hemodialysis and Peritoneal Dialysis Nurses.

    PubMed

    Karakoc, Ayten; Yilmaz, Murvet; Alcalar, Nilufer; Esen, Bennur; Kayabasi, Hasan; Sit, Dede

    2016-11-01

    Burnout, a syndrome with 3 dimensions of emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and reduction of personal accomplishment, is very common among hemodialysis nurses, while data are scarce regarding the prevalence of burnout syndrome (BS) among peritoneal dialysis (PD) nurses. This study aimed to assess and compare demographic and professional characteristics and burnout levels in hemodialysis and PD nurses, and to investigate factors that increase the level of burnout in dialysis nurses. A total of 171 nurses from 44 dialysis centers in Turkey were included in a cross-sectional survey study. Data were collected using a questionnaire defining the social and demographic characteristics and working conditions of the nurses as well as the Maslach Burnout Inventory for assessment of burnout level. There was no significant difference in the level of burnout between the hemodialysis and PD nurses groups. Emotional exhaustion and depersonalization scores were higher among the shift workers, nurses who had problems in interactions with the other team members, and those who wanted to leave the unit, as well as the nurses who would not attend training programs. In addition, male sex, younger age, limited working experience, more than 50 hours of working per week, and working in dialysis not by choice were associated with higher depersonalization scores. Personal accomplishment score was lower among the younger nurses who had problems in their interactions with the doctors, who would not regularly attend training programs, and who felt being medically inadequate. Improving working conditions and relations among colleagues, and also providing further dialysis education are necessary for minimizing burnout syndrome. Burnout reduction programs should mainly focus on younger professionals.

  16. Assessing new graduate nurse performance.

    PubMed

    Berkow, Steven; Virkstis, Katherine; Stewart, Jennifer; Conway, Lindsay

    2008-11-01

    New graduate nurses now comprise more than 10% of a typical hospital's nursing staff, with this number certain to grow given the increasing numbers of entrants into the nurse workforce. Concomitantly, only 10% of hospital and health system nurse executives believe their new graduate nurses are fully prepared to provide safe and effective care. As part of a multipronged research initiative on bridging the preparation-practice gap, the Nursing Executive Center administered a national survey to a cross section of frontline nurse leaders on new graduate nurse proficiency across 36 nursing competencies deemed essential to safe and effective nursing practice. Based on survey data analysis, the authors discuss the most pressing and promising opportunities for improving the practice readiness of new graduate nurses.

  17. Male-male homosexology: seven short discourses.

    PubMed

    Money, John

    2004-09-01

    Homosexology is that branch of the science of sexology that deals with same sex relationships. It is subdivided into ideation, imagery, and praxis. Praxeology is the science of praxis. There are two doctrines by which homosexuality is defined: elective and developmental. Elective is like joining a political party and is more likely bisexual than exclusively homosexual. Complete developmental homosexuality is a state of being and is characteristically immutable. Both types of homosexuality are determined multivariately and sequentially, not univariately. Male and female mammals are phylogenically programmed to be reciprocal, not identical, in the praxeology of their courtship and mating. In primate, notably human, evolution, the eyes have taken over from the nose as organs of erotic arousal, but the molecular biology of how this happens in individual development, gay, straight or ambivalent, remains to be ascertained. The different personal histories of homosexual development also remain to be ascertained and cataloged.

  18. Nursing pain management--a qualitative interview study of patients with pain, hospitalized for cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Rustøen, Tone; Gaardsrud, Torill; Leegaard, Marit; Wahl, Astrid K

    2009-03-01

    Pain is a significant symptom in cancer patients. Understanding of patients' experiences in relation to pain management is important in evidence-based nursing in the field of pain. The aim of this study was to explore cancer patients' experiences of nursing pain management during hospitalization for cancer treatment. Eighteen cancer patients participated in the study, all with advanced cancer, including skeleton metastases. The female participants all had breast cancer, and the male participants all had prostate cancer. Data were collected by in-depth interviews, and qualitative description was used to entail low-inference interpretation to reach an understanding of the essence of pain and nursing pain management. Patients found it somewhat difficult to express their expectations of nursing pain management and competencies. However, 1) being present and supportive; 2) giving information and sharing knowledge; 3) taking care of medication; and 4) recognizing the pain emerged as themes in nursing pain management. Although patients believed that nurses were caring persons, they perceived differences between nurses in the ways they handled pain management. Furthermore, some patients experienced a lack of information from nurses in relation to pain management. Although cancer patients' experiences showed the importance of nurses in pain management, it seems that nurses should have a clearer role in cancer pain management in relation to counseling and patient education. The results from this study can increase nurses' awareness of their role in pain management as a first step in improving pain management for patients.

  19. Perceptions of nursing students' parents regarding the profession and their college.

    PubMed

    Baykal, U; Altuntas, S

    2011-06-01

    To ensure client satisfaction, it is important for all educational institutions to identify the characteristics of their clients and to consider their expectations and demands through quality studies. The study aims to identify the perceptions of parents of nursing students regarding the nursing profession and the related educational institution. The parents of all students attending the nursing school of a public Turkish university were included in the study. Following permission from the university management, questionnaires developed by the researchers in light of the related literature were sent to 474 parents via mail, and 133 completed questionnaires (28% response rate) were analysed statistically. Mothers of nursing students were mostly ≤45 years of age, primary school graduates and housewives, while fathers were ≥46 years of age, at least secondary school graduates, old-age pensioners or had an independent business. In general, the responding fathers and mothers preferred not to get involved in their children's choice of profession, perceiving nursing as a helpful and sacred profession. Therefore, they also recommended nursing to others and had no problems with the idea of male nurses. Study findings demonstrated that the parents had positive attitudes towards the nursing profession and were satisfied with the nursing college. © 2010 The Authors. International Nursing Review © 2010 International Council of Nurses.

  20. Gender, gender roles and completion of nursing education: a longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    McLaughlin, Katrina; Muldoon, Orla T; Moutray, Marianne

    2010-05-01

    The current worldwide nursing shortage and high attrition of nursing students remain a challenge for the nursing profession. The aim of this paper was to investigate how key psychological attributes and constructions differentiate between completers and non-completers of nursing education. A questionnaire including measures of gender role identity and perceived gender appropriateness of careers was administered to 384 students early in the first year of the course. At the end of the programme attrition rates were obtained. The findings indicate that males were more likely to leave the course than females. Furthermore, those who completed the course tended to view nursing as more appropriate for women, in contrast to the non-completers who had less gender typed views. The female-dominated nature of nursing, prevalent stereotypes and gender bias inherent in nursing education seem to make this an uncomfortable place for males and those with less gendered typed views. Whilst it is acknowledged that attrition is undoubtedly a complex issue with many contributing factors, the nursing profession need to take steps to address this bias to ensure their profession is open equally to both female and male recruits. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Asylum nursing as a career in the United Kingdom, 1890-1910.

    PubMed

    Brimblecombe, Neil

    2006-09-01

    Nursing staff in lunatic asylums provided the day-to-day care and containment of patients and were the direct occupational ancestors of today's mental health nurses. This study explores (1) How was asylum nursing seen by asylum nurses themselves and by others, particularly other healthcare workers? (2) What were the demographic characteristics of those who became asylum nurses and what were their patterns of employment? Information regarding contemporary views of asylum nursing were gathered through searching a range of contemporary journals and other publications. Statistical information regarding patterns of employment was gathered from asylum records and census data. During the period from 1890 to 1910 the image of asylum nursing was poor. Allegations of brutality continued to effect its image, despite claims by asylum nurses and medical superintendents that such generalizations were unfair and that asylum nursing was at least as valuable as any other from of nursing. The middle class leadership of voluntary hospital general nursing was particularly critical. At the Three Counties Asylum in Southern England, the majority of asylum nurses came from unskilled or semi-skilled backgrounds. 43% were recruited locally; 43% of nursing staff left after less than a year, and less than a quarter remained after 3 years. Even those individuals thought to be suitable by prior experience, such as ex-servicemen, often did not stay long. Dismissals were common, especially amongst male staff (22%). The discipline was hard, hours long and the work often unpleasant. For asylum nurses conditions were poor, the work difficult and their public image negative. The reality was that people from working class backgrounds entered asylum nursing at a relatively young age, often travelling some distance to do so, and then many only stayed for short periods. However, some women were able to take advantage of the possibilities offered by asylum work to develop a career for themselves in the

  2. Work motivation for Japanese nursing assistants in small- to medium-sized hospitals.

    PubMed

    Kudo, Yasushi; Kido, Shigeri; Shahzad, Machiko Taruzuka; Yoshimura, Emiko; Shibuya, Akitaka; Aizawa, Yoshiharu

    2011-01-01

    Nursing assistants can work without a professional certification to help registered nurses and licensed practical nurses. Nursing assistants engage in various tasks, e.g., washing laundry, cleaning up, and clerk tasks regarding nursing. Enhancing work motivation among nursing assistants is essential for every hospital, because when nursing assistants do their jobs well, it allows registered nurses and licensed practical nurses to complete their own specialized jobs. We examined the predictors significantly associated with nursing assistants' work motivation. For those predictors, we produced items to examine job satisfaction. Those items are classified into intrinsic and extrinsic facets. The subjects for this study were Japanese nursing assistants working in 26 hospitals with 62-376 beds (4 public and 22 private hospitals). A total of 516 nursing assistants were analyzed, with the average age and standard deviation of 42.7 ± 12.9 years; the age of 456 female subjects was 43.8 ± 12.7 years and that of 60 male subjects was 34.3 ± 11.0 years. Our results show that "work motivation" is significantly associated with "free time to do one's own things," "nursing assistants as important partners on the job," "feeling helpful to patients," "participating in decision making," and "job-skill improvement." Free time to do one's own things is an extrinsic item. Hospital administrators must monitor the workload and their quality of life among nursing assistants. All the other significant items are intrinsic. Nursing assistants are not only motivated by money. They highly value the intrinsic nature and experience of their jobs.

  3. The public sector nursing workforce in Kenya: a county-level analysis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Kenya’s human resources for health shortage is well documented, yet in line with the new constitution, responsibility for health service delivery will be devolved to 47 new county administrations. This work describes the public sector nursing workforce likely to be inherited by the counties, and examines the relationships between nursing workforce density and key indicators. Methods National nursing deployment data linked to nursing supply data were used and analyzed using statistical and geographical analysis software. Data on nurses deployed in national referral hospitals and on nurses deployed in non-public sector facilities were excluded from main analyses. The densities and characteristics of the public sector nurses across the counties were obtained and examined against an index of county remoteness, and the nursing densities were correlated with five key indicators. Results Of the 16,371 nurses in the public non-tertiary sector, 76% are women and 53% are registered nurses, with 35% of the nurses aged 40 to 49 years. The nursing densities across counties range from 1.2 to 0.08 per 1,000 population. There are statistically significant associations of the nursing densities with a measure of health spending per capita (P value = 0.0028) and immunization rates (P value = 0.0018). A higher county remoteness index is associated with explaining lower female to male ratio of public sector nurses across counties (P value <0.0001). Conclusions An overall shortage of nurses (range of 1.2 to 0.08 per 1,000) in the public sector countrywide is complicated by mal-distribution and varying workforce characteristics (for example, age profile) across counties. All stakeholders should support improvements in human resources information systems and help address personnel shortages and mal-distribution if equitable, quality health-care delivery in the counties is to be achieved. PMID:24467776

  4. Male teacher female students: a novice teacher reflects.

    PubMed

    Kenny, Gerard

    2002-10-01

    This paper seeks to explore the gender dynamics of being a novice male teacher working with female nursing students. Using a reflective framework it examines the gender dynamics within the classroom setting. Educational, social, feminist and political theory are discussed to give some insight into teaching and learning strategies that can perpetuate or circumvent unhelpful gender dynamics. Implications for learning and teaching are evaluated, and further topics for investigation are acknowledged.

  5. [Acute care nursing pathology: case report of odynophagia].

    PubMed

    Hernández-Fabà, Eva; Sanfeliu-Julià, Cristina

    2010-01-01

    Since 2008, the Institut Catala de la Salut (ICS) introduced the nurses management plan for acute pathology, in primary care centres. In the implementation of this system of organization, the ICS introduced various diseases protocols with performance algorithms. To raise awareness of the the practice of acute pathology, we present a clinical case. An urgent consultation of a 30 year-old male, with fever, sore throat and cough, which was managed and resolved by a nurse. The aim of this new management plan is that nursing is the first health professional to take care of patient coming to primary care centre without a scheduled visit, to avoid saturating the general clinic or hospital emergencies. This new organisational system involves an increase in the responsibilities of nursing in the diagnosis and treatment of patients.

  6. Nurse reactions to a prototype home telemedicine system.

    PubMed

    Whitten, P; Collins, B

    1998-01-01

    We have studied nurse reactions to a prototype home health telemedicine system. The system used interactive video through the local cable television network. Six nurses were directly involved with telecare video-visits. There were 54 patients. The average age of the patients was 76 years (range 21-101). Thirty-six (67%) patients were female and 18 (33%) were male. The patients had an average of 4.6 different diagnoses (range 1-16). They were also on a very wide range of medications (mean 9.9, range 2-23). Nurses overwhelmingly felt the system was effective for what this particular project was trying to accomplish. They were enthusiastic about the prospects of practising nursing by telemedicine, even though they had reservations about aspects of the particular system being used. Their main complaints were about limitations of the software and limitations of the telecommunication system that linked them to the patients.

  7. The Impaired Nurse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris County Vocational Technical School District, Denville, NJ.

    This mini-course for nurses is intended to establish an atmosphere conducive to the development of personal awareness of the ramifications of alcohol/substance abuse involving the nurse. Contents include the mini-course's goals and objectives, a course outline, copies of 11 handouts and a booklet written to provide information about nurse…

  8. Registered Nurse (Associate Degree).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center on Education and Training for Employment.

    This document, which is designed for use in developing a tech prep competency profile for the occupation of registered nurse (with an associate degree), lists technical competencies and competency builders for 19 units pertinent to the health technologies cluster in general and 5 units specific to the occupation of registered nurse. The following…

  9. Reference Sources for Nursing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nursing Outlook, 1978

    1978-01-01

    The tenth revision of a list of reference works for nurses, revised by a committee of the Interagency Council on Library Resources for Nursing, listed by type of publication as abstract journals, audiovisuals, bibliographies, books, dictionaries, directories, pharmacologies, indexes, guides, and so on. (MF)

  10. Registered Nurse (Associate Degree).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center on Education and Training for Employment.

    This document, which is designed for use in developing a tech prep competency profile for the occupation of registered nurse (with an associate degree), lists technical competencies and competency builders for 19 units pertinent to the health technologies cluster in general and 5 units specific to the occupation of registered nurse. The following…

  11. Nurse Practitioner Pharmacology Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waigandt, Alex; Chang, Jane

    A study compared the pharmacology training of nurse practitioner programs with medical and dental programs. Seventy-three schools in 14 states (40 nurse practitioner programs, 19 schools of medicine, and 14 schools of dentistry) were surveyed by mailed questionnaire about the number of hours devoted to the study of pharmacology. The major findings…

  12. Never stop nursing.

    PubMed

    Court, Dianne

    2016-10-12

    Well done to 83-year-old nurse Monica Bulman (news, 14 September, page 7 ). At 71 and working on an orthopaedic rehabilitation ward at a hospital in Birmingham, I thought I was getting near to being the oldest nurse practising on a ward.

  13. School Nurse Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borja, Mary C.; Amidon, Christine; Spellings, Diane; Franzetti, Susan; Nasuta, Mary

    2009-01-01

    This article features school nurses from across the country who are championing for school-located influenza immunization within their communities. These nurses are: (1) Mary C. Borja; (2) Christine Amidon; (3) Diane Spellings; (4) Susan Franzetti; and (5) Mary Nasuta. (Contains 6 figures.)

  14. Hospital Nurse Aide. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iowa Univ., Iowa City. Coll. of Education.

    This report presents results of a project to revise the current 120-hour advanced nurse aide course to include all recommended minimum competencies. A three-page description of project objectives, activities, and outcomes is followed by a list of the competencies for the 75-hour nurse aide course for long-term care and for the 120-hour advanced…

  15. School Nursing in Illinois.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Endicott, Bettye; And Others

    This handbook for pupil personnel workers traces the historical development of school nursing and its establishment in Illinois. The role and function of school nurses are described, including planning and implementing optimum school health standards, protecting student health, and promoting well-being through the use of an interdisciplinary…

  16. [Gerontology and nursing care].

    PubMed

    Brandenburg, H

    2001-04-01

    This paper focuses on questions of the philosophy of science and the scientific development of gerontology and nursing science. First, some aspects of the scientific development in gerontology and nursing science (autonomy, inter- and multidisciplinarity as well as the theory debates) are summarized. In gerontology, problems of the philosophy of science are often neglected. The main focus is on empirical research and the establishment of an scientific infrastructure. In nursing science are questions of the philosophy of science, especially debates about the discipline, are significant. In Germany nursing research and the establishment of a scientific infrastructure are still in the initial stages. Second, on the basis of a content analysis the relevance and status of "nursing/need of care/frailty" in two leading journals ("Zeitschrift für Gerontologie und Geriatrie" and the "Pflege") is shown. Main result is that in nursing science publications regarding the status of the discipline, studies of the motivation, attitudes and behavior of nurses as well as investigations of the professionalization are dominant. In gerontology, the main emphasis is on studies of the changing health service structure, geriatric assessment and qualification. Finally chances of an interdisciplinary exchange between gerontology and nursing science are discussed.

  17. AACC Nursing Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Association of Community Colleges, Washington, DC.

    This document, presented in the form of PowerPoint print outs, indicates a total of 420 (nearly 60%) associate degree nursing (ADN) programs responded to a survey conducted by the American Association of Community Colleges' (AACC) Nursing and Allied Health Initiative (NAHI) for 2003. The sample is representative based on urbanicity and region.…

  18. School Nursing Certification Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Selekman, Janice; Wolfe, Linda C.

    2010-01-01

    The 2010 update to the resource you have been waiting for to help you prepare to take the National School Nurse Certification Exam. Dr. Janice Selekman DNSc, RN, NCSN, a recognized expert in pediatric nursing, and NASN Past President Linda C. Wolfe MEd, BSN, RN, NCSN, FNASN are the authors. This text was created in response to many years of…

  19. Nurse practitioners & reimbursement.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, E M

    1992-05-01

    Nursing's Agenda for Health Care Reform (1991) embraces primary health care as the focus of a restructured health care system. As part of this reformed system, consumers would access the most cost-effective providers in community-based settings. Removal of financial and regulatory barriers that limit consumer access to providers, such as lack of direct reimbursement by Medicare for nurse practitioners, should be eliminated according to this plan. Senate bills S2103 and S2104 have been recently introduced to the U.S. Senate mandating reimbursement for services provided by nurse practitioners, clinical nurse specialists, nurse midwives, and physician assistants at 97% of physician payment. The aim of this global legislation is to eliminate the current piecemeal mechanisms for nurse practitioner reimbursement and remove financial disincentives. Case examples presented in this article illustrate how obstacles to reimbursement limit access to care for consumers. Quality of care, opportunities for autonomous practice, and control of nursing practice issues have been highlighted as well by the case format. It is intended that these cases would be useful to support changes in patterns of nurse practitioner reimbursement.

  20. American Nursing's First Textbooks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flaumenhaft, Eugene; Flaumenhaft, Carol

    1989-01-01

    Discusses the four textbooks, written in the last quarter of the 19th century, that shaped nursing in the United States. They provided technical information in a systematic fashion, established an autonomous literature that guided nurses in school and beyond, and defined the training school curriculum. (JOW)

  1. Continuing Education in Nursing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curtis, Frieda Smith; And Others

    This book is planned to provide guidance for nurses in planning, conducting, and evaluating programs of continuing education; content is built on the collective experiences and thinking of a regional group of nurse educators engaged in developing a coordinated program for a large geographical area. After discussion of changing patterns of health…

  2. School Nurse Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borja, Mary C.; Amidon, Christine; Spellings, Diane; Franzetti, Susan; Nasuta, Mary

    2009-01-01

    This article features school nurses from across the country who are championing for school-located influenza immunization within their communities. These nurses are: (1) Mary C. Borja; (2) Christine Amidon; (3) Diane Spellings; (4) Susan Franzetti; and (5) Mary Nasuta. (Contains 6 figures.)

  3. Brokerage in multicultural nursing.

    PubMed

    Chalanda, M

    1995-01-01

    Nurses in contact with clients from different cultures often encounter beliefs at appear inconsistent with conventional Western medicine, resulting in the need for the nurse to act as a broker--i.e. translating and processing messages, instructions and belief systems from one group to a another.

  4. Nurse Practitioner Pharmacology Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waigandt, Alex; Chang, Jane

    A study compared the pharmacology training of nurse practitioner programs with medical and dental programs. Seventy-three schools in 14 states (40 nurse practitioner programs, 19 schools of medicine, and 14 schools of dentistry) were surveyed by mailed questionnaire about the number of hours devoted to the study of pharmacology. The major findings…

  5. The School Nurse Practitioner

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Igoe, Judith Bellaire

    1975-01-01

    Denver's four-month intensive course in primary health care for experienced nurses serving in disadvantaged areas, followed by inservice training with regular consultation available from a local physician, has produced school nurse practitioners who extend the traditional role to include comprehensive evaluations, management of minor illnesses,…

  6. School Nursing Certification Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Selekman, Janice; Wolfe, Linda C.

    2010-01-01

    The 2010 update to the resource you have been waiting for to help you prepare to take the National School Nurse Certification Exam. Dr. Janice Selekman DNSc, RN, NCSN, a recognized expert in pediatric nursing, and NASN Past President Linda C. Wolfe MEd, BSN, RN, NCSN, FNASN are the authors. This text was created in response to many years of…

  7. Comparison of Nursing Roles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macdonough, Georgia P.

    2001-01-01

    This 1972 paper presents 12 comparisons of the nurse's role in the school versus in the hospital. For example, in the hospital, patients know they are ill and want to get well, while in school patients may not recognize that they need help. In the hospital, the nurse's workload is determined for her, while in school, it is self-determined. (SM)

  8. Professional values and nursing.

    PubMed

    Sellman, Derek

    2011-05-01

    The values of nursing arise from a concern with human flourishing. If the desire to become a nurse is a reflection of an aspiration to care for others in need then we should anticipate that those who choose to nurse have a tendency towards the values we would normally associate with a caring profession (care, compassion, perhaps altruism, and so on). However, these values require a secure base if they are not to succumb to the corrupting pressures of the increasingly instrumental nature of the values of the institutions in which healthcare in general and nursing in particular takes place. One way of securing a base for withstanding the corrupting influences of the institution is to understand nursing as a practice in the sense in which Alasdair MacIntyre uses that term. In this brief paper I will outline ways in which the managerial imperative of meeting targets is both distorting practice and undermining nursing's values. I conclude that understanding nursing as a MacIntyrean practice provides a refuge from what might otherwise be overwhelming pressures for nurses to adopt instrumental values to the detriment of professional caring values.

  9. Nursing Practice Environment and Outcomes for Oncology Nursing

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Jingjing; Friese, Christopher R.; Wu, Evan; Aiken, Linda H.

    2012-01-01

    Background It is commonly assumed that oncology nurses experience high job-related burnout and high turnover because their work involves inherent stressors such as caring for patients with serious and often life-threatening illness. Objectives The objectives of this study were to examine the differences in outcomes such as job dissatisfaction and burnout between oncology nurses and medical-surgical nurses, and to identify factors that affect oncology nurse outcomes. Methods A secondary analysis of nurse survey data collected in 2006 including 4047 nurses from 282 hospitals in 3 states was performed; t test and χ2 test compared differences between oncology nurses and medical-surgical nurses in nurse outcomes and their assessments of nurse practice environment, as measured by the Practice Environment Scale of the Nursing Work Index. Logistic regression models estimated the effect of nurse practice environment on 4 nurse-reported outcomes: burnout, job dissatisfaction, intention to leave the current position, and perceived quality of care. Results Oncology nurses reported favorable practice environments and better outcomes than did medical-surgical nurses. All 4 subscales of the Practice Environment Scale of the Nursing Work Index studied were significantly associated with outcomes. Specifically, nurses who reported favorable nursing foundations for quality of care (eg, active in-service or preceptorship programs) were less likely to report burnout and leave their current position. Conclusions Better practice environments, including nurse foundations for quality care, can help to achieve optimal nurse outcomes. Implications for Practice Improving hospital practice environments holds significant potential to improve nurse well-being, retention, and quality of care. Specifically, hospitals should consider preceptor programs and continuing education and increase nurses’ participation in hospital decision making. PMID:22751101

  10. Hyperprolactinaemia in male diabetics.

    PubMed Central

    Mooradian, A. D.; Morley, J. E.; Billington, C. J.; Slag, M. F.; Elson, M. K.; Shafer, R. B.

    1985-01-01

    We recently investigated two patients with diabetes and elevated serum prolactin levels in whom no cause of hyperprolactinaemia could be found. For this reason we measured fasting serum prolactin levels in 72 diabetic males and compared the results with those of 63 healthy males and 90 nondiabetic males attending an Impotence Clinic. The diabetic group had significantly higher serum prolactin levels (13.1 +/- 0.9 ng/ml) than the two control groups (9.9 +/- 0.6 ng/ml for normal males and 7.7 +/- 0.3 ng/ml for the non-diabetic impotent group). Eighteen percent of the diabetics studied had serum prolactin levels above the normal range for males (greater than 20 ng/ml). There was no correlation between serum prolactin levels and duration of diabetes, glycosylated haemoglobin level or presence of clinically apparent retinopathy. The correlation between serum prolactin level and fasting plasma glucose was weak though statistically significant (r = 0.26, P less than 0.05). PMID:3991396

  11. Techniques of male circumcision.

    PubMed

    Abdulwahab-Ahmed, Abdullahi; Mungadi, Ismaila A

    2013-01-01

    Male circumcision is a controversial subject in surgical practice. There are, however, clear surgical indications of this procedure. The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommends newborn male circumcision for its preventive and public health benefits that has been shown to outweigh the risks of newborn male circumcision. Many surgical techniques have been reported. The present review discusses some of these techniques with their merits and drawbacks. This is an attempt to inform the reader on surgical aspects of male circumcision aiding in making appropriate choice of a technique to offer patients. Pubmed search was done with the keywords: Circumcision, technique, complications, and history. Relevant articles on techniques of circumcision were selected for the review. Various methods of circumcision including several devices are in use for male circumcision. These methods can be grouped into three: Shield and clamp, dorsal slit, and excision. The device methods appear favored in the pediatric circumcision while the risk of complications increases with increasing age of the patient at surgery.

  12. Views of Student Nurses on Caring and Technology in Nursing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brodell, Elizabeth Becky

    2009-01-01

    Nurses entering the workforce are faced with many challenges, but today the multiple demands of patient care are complicated by a nurse's need to keep abreast of fast-changing technology. This research is universally relevant to nursing practice in educational settings and practice areas because nursing education needs to develop strategies to…

  13. Registered Nurse Education and the Registered Nurse Job Market.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunt, Howard Allan

    This effort compares the graduates of the three types of Registered Nurse (RN) education programs (three-year Diploma in Nursing, two-year Associate Degree in Nursing (ADN), and four-year Bachelor of Science Degree in Nursing). The basic objective is to determine whether they are perfect substitutes, especially whether ADN graduates can adequately…

  14. Nurse managers' role in older nurses' intention to stay.

    PubMed

    Armstrong-Stassen, Marjorie; Freeman, Michelle; Cameron, Sheila; Rajacic, Dale

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to propose and test a model of the underlying mechanisms linking perceived availability of human resource (HR) practices relevant to older nurses and older nurses' intentions to stay with their hospitals. Quantitative data were collected from randomly selected older registered nurses (N=660) engaged in direct patient care in hospitals in Canada. Structural equation modelling was used to test the hypothesized model. The relationship between perceptions of HR practices (performance evaluation, recognition/respect) and intentions to stay was mediated by the perceived fairness with which nurse managers managed these HR practices and nurse manager satisfaction. When nurse managers were perceived to administer the HR practices fairly (high perceived procedural justice), older nurses were more satisfied with their nurse manager and, in turn, more likely to intend to stay. The cross-sectional research design does not allow determination of causality. It is important that nurse managers receive training to increase their awareness of the needs of older nurses and that nurse managers be educated on how to manage HR practices relevant to older nurses in a fair manner. Equally important is that hospital administrators and HR managers recognize the importance of providing such HR practices and supporting nurse managers in managing these practices. The findings increase the understanding of how HR practices tailored to older nurses are related to the intentions of these nurses to remain with their hospital, and especially the crucial role that first-line nurse managers play in this process.

  15. Current Nursing Research Grants Supported by the Division of Nursing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Institutes of Health (DHEW), Bethesda, MD. Div. of Nursing.

    The United States Public Health Service Nursing Research Project Grants established in 1955, support studies dealing with all aspects of nursing practice, organization and delivery of nursing services to the patient, nursing as an occupation, and ways of communicating research findings. Intended as a means of sharing information about ongoing…

  16. How do nursing students perceive substance abusing nurses?

    PubMed

    Boulton, Martha A; Nosek, Laura J

    2014-02-01

    Substance abuse among nurses was recognized by nurse leaders and professional nursing organizations as a growing threat to patient safety and to the health of the abusing nurse more than 30years ago. Although numerous studies on nurse impairment were published in the 1980s and 1990s, there was minimal focus on student nurses' perceptions about impaired nurses and less research has been published more recently, despite a growing rate of substance abuse. A quasi-experimental study to explore the perceptions of student nurses toward nurses who are chemically dependent was conducted using a two-group, pretest-posttest design. The Perception of Nurse Impairment Inventory (PNII) was completed by student nurses at the beginning of their junior course work, prior to formal education about substance abuse. The PNII was repeated after the students received substance abuse education. The PNII was also completed by a control group of sophomore student nurses who did not receive the formal substance abuse education. A repeated measures analysis of variance was used to measure the differences between the two groups of students. Students who received the education chose more compassionate responses on the PNII and were more likely to respond that an impaired nurse's supervisor is responsible for supporting and guiding the impaired nurse to access professional care. Discrepancies in study findings about the efficacy of education for effecting positive attitudes of student nurses toward impaired nurses may be related to the length and type of the education.

  17. Smoking prevalence, attitudes, and perceived smoking prevention and control responsibilities and practices among nurses in Amman, Jordan.

    PubMed

    Merrill, Ray M; Madanat, Hala; Kelley, Alan T

    2010-12-01

    This study assesses smoking prevalence, attitudes, and perceived patient counselling responsibilities among practicing nurses in Amman, Jordan. It also identifies whether their smoking status or training in counselling patients about smoking is associated with their smoking-related attitudes and counselling practices. Data were collected through a cross-sectional survey of 266 (n = 266) nurses at four public and private hospitals in Amman. Smoking prevalence was 42% for male nurses and 13% for female nurses. Nurses strongly favoured enforcement of anti-smoking policy, but did not strongly agree that nurses should be involved in counselling patients about smoking. Approximately 41% of nurses indicated that they had received training on counselling patients about smoking. Nurse training with respect to counselling patients about smoking was positively associated with the nurses' belief that their counselling could help patients stop or never start smoking. In addition, nurses with counselling training about smoking felt significantly better prepared to assist patients to quit smoking. Nurses who smoked were significantly less likely to believe their counselling of patients about smoking could be effective. Finally, smoking status was not significantly associated with how well prepared the nurses felt to assist patients to quit smoking. These findings identify a need for more extensive and better-tailored training programmes for nurses on patient counselling about smoking. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  18. [Nurse anesthetist in France].

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Ju; Yann, Douchy; De Almeida, Sylvie; Deckert, Christine; Gauss, Tobias; Bonneville, Claire Tae; Merckx, Paul; Mantz, Jean

    2006-12-01

    We present the system of nurse anesthetist (Infirmier Anesthésiste Diplômé d'Etat: IADE) in France to the community of Japanese anesthesiologists. This French system with 70 years' history is older than the Japan Society of Anesthesiologists itself. There are 7000 nurse anesthetists in France now and the number of nurse anesthetists increases by 450-500 each year. Training to become a nurse anesthetist requires at least two years' experience as a general nurse and the general nurse must pass an examination after two years' special training in an anesthetistic nurse school to acquire the national certification. The nurse anesthetist's profession is regulated by French law. They work in a team with certified anesthesiologists. They can perform many kinds of anesthetic tasks including tracheal intubation and insertion of arterial catheter under the responsibility and supervision of certified anesthesiologists. The nurse anesthetists are not allowed to perform spinal, epidural, conduction and local anesthesia, although they can maintain these anesthesia and control these methods, e.g., by injecting local anesthetic agents through epidural catheter, following a specified prescription. The nurse anesthetists are not allowed to insert central venous and pulmonary artery catheters, although they can manage them. They are allowed to administer inhalation anesthetic agents, and inject venous anesthetic agents, muscle relaxants, their antagonists, and opioids by their own initiatives, but the decision for the use of catecholamine and emergency drugs is reserved to certified anesthesiologists. The nurse anesthetists perform other tasks preparing and checking anesthetic agents and equipment such as anesthetic machine, monitor, and defibrillator everyday, and sometimes use autologous blood recovery systems. The relationship between the certified anesthesiologist and the nurse anesthetist is marked by mutual respect, confidence and cooperation at each step of the anesthetic

  19. The health-related behaviors and attitudes of student nurses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vowell, Maribeth

    Nurses are an important component of primary medical care, and patient education is a common and important role of most nurses. Patient education and positive role modeling by nurses have the potential to influence patients' life style choices and the serious diseases that may be affected by those choices. A greater understanding of the ways nurses think about their own health could help facilitate healthier choices for them and in their patients. The purpose of this inquiry was to examine the experiences, attitudes and beliefs of student nurses related to their personal health, and to investigate those experiences, attitudes and beliefs as they relate to their education, relationships, values and career choice. The purpose was achieved through phenomenological interviews with eleven senior nursing students, nine females and two males, encouraging them to provide in as much detail as possible their attitudes and values about their personal health. The interviews were tape recorded, transcribed verbatim, and phenomenologically analyzed. A thematic structure emerged such that the nursing students experiences were represented by the four interrelated themes of caring for myself/caring for others ; I control my health/my world controls my health; I have energy/I'm tired; and feeling good/looking good. The contextual grounds for the themes that emerged during the analysis were the Body and Time. This structure was presented in terms of its relationship to health education, other research and to current theory.

  20. Virtual power: gendering the nurse-technology relationship.

    PubMed

    Fairman, J; D'Antonio, P

    1999-09-01

    To date, studies of the relationship between technology and its consumers have used the constructs of traditional paradigms of production and consumption as the foundation for analysis. These studies have served to reinforce traditional concepts of gender and hierarchy in the nursing-technology dichotomy. To propose a new and more relevant framework for analysing the technology-nursing relationship, the analysis of gender within the methodology of the social history of technology will be used. Healthcare will be viewed as a technologic network, and within that network multiple knowledge domains reside and interact. These domains, in turn, are socially constructed and historically contingent. This paper operationalizes this argument by examining the domain of the early nurse practitioner movement of the 1960s as part of a gendered technologic system. The findings of this study illuminate the agency of nurses in the shaping of traditionally male knowledge domains and as a crucial factor for understanding the evolution of not only the particularities of the nurse-technology relationship, but also the generalities of the gendered ways of knowing within the healthcare-technology relationship. Perhaps most importantly, different sets of questions can be formulated to analyse the history of the nurse practitioner movement from a technologic perspective that will provide new standpoints for the nursing-technology dichotomy in the millennium.

  1. [Gender mainstreaming and nursing].

    PubMed

    Wang, Hsiu-Hung

    2011-12-01

    Gender mainstreaming is one of the most important strategies in promoting global gender equality. The Taiwan government launched policies on gender mainstreaming and gender impact assessment in 2007 in response to strong public and academic advocacy work. With rising awareness of gender issues, nursing professionals in Taiwan should keep pace with global trends and become actively involved in advancing gender-mainstreaming policies. This article shows that nursing professionals should prepare themselves by cultivating gender competence, understanding gender-related regulations, recognizing the importance of gender impact assessment implementation, integrating gender issues into nursing education, conducting gender-related research and participating in decision-making processes that promote gender mainstreaming. Nursing professionals should enhance their knowledge and understanding of gender mainstreaming-related issues and get involved in the gender-related decision-making process in order to enhance gender awareness and women's health and further the professional development of nurses.

  2. Workplace bullying in nurses.

    PubMed

    Quine, L

    2001-01-01

    The article reports a study of workplace bullying in community nurses in an NHS trust. The aims were to determine the prevalence of bullying, to examine the association between bullying and occupational health outcomes, and to investigate whether support at work could moderate the effects of bullying. Forty-four percent of nurses reported experiencing one or more types of bullying in the previous 12 months, compared to 35 percent of other staff. Fifty percent of nurses had witnessed the bullying of others. Nurses who had been bullied reported significantly lower levels of job satisfaction and significantly higher levels of anxiety, depression and propensity to leave. They were also more critical of aspects of the organizational climate of the trust. Support at work was able to protect nurses from some of the damaging effects of bullying.

  3. Characteristics of intuitive nurses.

    PubMed

    Miller, V G

    1995-06-01

    A description is provided of the process used to verify characteristics of intuitive nurses that had been reported in the literature. These characteristics supplied the framework for construction of the Miller Intuitiveness Instrument (MII) reported earlier (Miller, 1993). Evidence for validity of the MII was provided in the Miller (1993) study by examining factor analyses and correlations with the intuitive component of the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI). The following characteristics were subsequently verified: Intuitive nurses are willing to act on their intuitions, are skilled clinicians, and incorporate a spiritual component in their practices. In addition, intuitive nurses express an interest in the abstract nature of things and are risk takers. Intuitive nurses prefer intuition to sensing (as reflected by the MBTI) as a way to take in information. They are extroverted and express confidence in their intuitions. Likewise, nurses who delay making decisions until all the information is in are more intuitive than those who make decisions abruptly.

  4. Nurses' work environment and nursing outcomes: a survey study among Finnish university hospital registered nurses.

    PubMed

    Tervo-Heikkinen, Tarja; Partanen, Pirjo; Aalto, Pirjo; Vehviläinen-Julkunen, Katri

    2008-10-01

    The aim was to assess the interrelationships between nurses' work environment and nursing outcomes. A cross-sectional survey of 664 registered nurses (RN) on 34 acute care inpatient hospital wards was used to measure nurses' perceptions. Patient data (n = 4045) consisting of a total patient satisfaction indicator were collected simultaneously with the nurse data during year 2005. RN's assessments of staffing adequacy, respect and relationships were the most important factors of work environment having an influence on job-related stress, job satisfaction, patient satisfaction and adverse events to patients and nurses. Some 77% of the RN reported adverse nurse events and 96% reported adverse patient events during a 3 month retrospective period. Ensuring sufficient and suitably qualified nurses' availability in delivering nursing care is an important management issue. Nurses are concerned about the quality of care, and the concerns perceived by nurses can influence their clinical work.

  5. Computers and nursing. Possibilities for transforming nursing.

    PubMed

    Ford, J

    1990-01-01

    The use of computers is becoming commonplace in the clinical setting. However, the impact of computer use and its implications for nursing have yet to be understood (Birckhead, 1978). The purpose of this article is to explore how computer technology may transform nursing. The discourse is guided by Burch's (1985) thesis that "the use of technology is non-neutral. It transforms experience, whether for better or worse, and ultimately shapes human thinking and being". If one values nursing as a humanizing activity, then most of the potential transformations can be viewed as negative. When viewed from an instrumental framework, however, the computer may have a positive rather than a negative impact because computer use promotes expediency, efficiency, and precision.

  6. Attitudes of Female and Male Nurses Toward Men in Nursing: A Replication and Comparison Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-05-01

    has expanded overall career opportunities for women. This shift in career i goals for both sexes has increased the potential for gender-based... sex -specific occupational segregation. i The reduction of gender-specific occupational segregation was seen as a means of obtaining increased...Fotall, Proximity, Equity, Role 4, and Role 5 total sample, mean total scores were used as the dependent variables. Independent variables included sex

  7. Nursing professionalism: a national survey of professionalism among Japanese nurses.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Michiko; Yonemitsu, Yoshikazu; Kawamoto, Rieko

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to quantify the professionalism of nurses in Japan. The Japanese version of the Behavioural Inventory for Professionalism in Nursing was conducted as a national survey. Computer-generated random selection of nurses in Japan obtained responses from 1501 nurses. A descriptive design examined the levels of and differences in nursing professionalism. Comparisons of the total level of professionalism in educational preparation, current position, years of experience, and current practice setting were analysed by one-way analysis of variance and post hoc Tukey-Kramer multiple comparison test. The results revealed that Japanese nurses had low levels of professionalism, and professionalism was related significantly to higher educational preparation, years of experience as a nurse, and current position as a nursing administrator or faculty. The results can be used as a benchmark for continued assessments of the level of nursing professionalism and for further development of nursing professionalism. © 2013 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  8. Nurses across borders: foregrounding international migration in nursing history.

    PubMed

    Choy, Catherine Ceniza

    2010-01-01

    Although the international migration of nurses has played a formative role in increasing the racial and ethnic diversity of the health care labor force, nursing historians have paid very little attention to the theme of international migration and the experiences of foreign-trained nurses, A focus on international migration complements two new approaches in nursing history: the agenda to internationalize its frameworks, and the call to move away from "great women, great events" and toward the experiences of "ordinary" nurses. This article undertakes a close reading of the life and work of Filipino American nurse Ines Cayaban to reconceptualize nursing biography in an international framework that is attentive to issues of migration, race, gender, and colonialism. It was a Hannah keynote lecture delivered by the author on June 5, 2008, as part of the CAHN/ACHN (Canadian Association for the History of Nursing/Association Canadienne pour l'Histoire du Nursing) International Nursing History Conference.

  9. Evaluation of nursing manpower allocation in a nursing home.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chun-Hsi; Tsai, Wen-Chen; Chang, Wei-Chieh

    2007-03-01

    The subjects of this study encompassed the nursing staffs (nurses and nursing aids) and residents of a public hospital-based nursing home. By intensive sampling, this study explored the differences in actual times that nurses spent caring for residents. We assessed the functional status of nursing home residents of various illness severities as well as measured the actual nursing manpower needed to meet the residents' care needs using Typology of the Aged with Illustration (TAI). Results showed that current nursing manpower levels in nursing homes was adequate, although some units had excessive manpower allocation. As a result, this study suggests the establishment of a resident classification system for use in long-term care (LTC) facilities to assist with manpower allocation and reasonable utilization of resources within the facility. Adequate nurse staffing will enhance the quality and accessibility of care for the residents with severe illnesses in LTC facilities.

  10. Nurses working outside of nursing: societal trend or workplace crisis?

    PubMed

    Black, Lisa; Spetz, Joanne; Harrington, Charlene

    2008-08-01

    The phenomenon of career inactivity in professional nursing has been historically portrayed in the literature as a major cause of disequilibrium in the registered nurse labor market. However, there remains a general lack of understanding of the diverse forces that shape the inactive nurse pool and the likelihood that this population will return to nursing. The purpose of this study was to examine the population of registered nurses who are active in the labor market but work in nonnursing employment. Specifically, this study sought to determine the relative importance of nonworkplace- and workplace-related reasons for working outside of nursing. The results demonstrate that dissatisfaction with the nursing workplace is the key reason cited by actively licensed nurses for working outside of nursing employment. These findings suggest that policy and employer remedies are needed to improve the nursing workplace.

  11. Assessment of Male Reproductive Toxicity##

    EPA Science Inventory

    This review covers all aspects of male reproductive toxicology. It begins with an overview of male reproductive biology and then transitions to the considerations of conducting male reproductive toxicology studies. We discuss multigenerational study as proposed in EPAs harmoniz...

  12. Assessment of Male Reproductive Toxicity##

    EPA Science Inventory

    This review covers all aspects of male reproductive toxicology. It begins with an overview of male reproductive biology and then transitions to the considerations of conducting male reproductive toxicology studies. We discuss multigenerational study as proposed in EPAs harmoniz...

  13. Nursing and nursing education in Haiti.

    PubMed

    Garfield, Richard M; Berryman, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Haiti has long had the largest proportion of people living in poverty and the highest mortality level of any country in the Americas. On January 12, 2010, the most powerful earthquake to hit Haiti in 200 years struck. Before the earthquake, half of all Haitians lacked any access to modern medical care services. Health care professionals in Haiti number around one-fourth of the world average and about one-tenth the ratio present in North America. The establishment of new primary care services in a country where half of the people had no access to modern health care prior to the earthquake requires advanced practice roles for nurses and midwives. With a high burden of infectious, parasitic, and nutritional conditions, Haiti especially needs mid-level community health workers and nurses who can train and supervise them for public health programs. As in many other developing countries, organized nursing lacks many of the management and planning skills needed to move its agenda forward. The public schools prepare 3-year diploma graduates. These programs have upgraded the curriculum little in decades and have mainly trained for hospital service. Primary care, public health program management, and patient education had often not been stressed. Specializations in midwifery and HIV care exist, while only informal programs of specialization exist in administration, surgery, and pediatrics. An advanced practice role, nonetheless, is not yet well established. Nursing has much to contribute to the recovery of Haiti and the revitalization if its health system. Professional nurses are needed in clinics and hospitals throughout the country to care for patients, including thousands in need of rehabilitation and mental health services. Haitian nursing colleagues in North America have key roles in strengthening their profession. Ways of supporting our Haitian colleagues are detailed.

  14. Genetics of Male Infertility.

    PubMed

    Neto, Filipe Tenorio Lira; Bach, Phil Vu; Najari, Bobby Baback; Li, Philip Shihua; Goldstein, Marc

    2016-10-01

    While 7 % of the men are infertile, currently, a genetic etiology is identified in less than 25 % of those men, and 30 % of the infertile men lack a definitive diagnosis, falling in the "idiopathic infertility" category. Advances in genetics and epigenetics have led to several proposed mechanisms for male infertility. These advances may result in new diagnostic tools, treatment approaches, and better counseling with regard to treatment options and prognosis. In this review, we focus on clinical aspects of male infertility and the role of genetics in elucidating etiologies and the potential of treatments.

  15. Male homosexuality reconsidered.

    PubMed

    Leavy, S A

    Prevailing psychoanalytic attitudes toward male homosexuality are predisposed to the treatment of it as a psychopathological disorder. This study proposes that the appearance of disorder follows from the distortions imposed on the personality during development. Superego conflicts ensue that are relieved rather than resolved in the analysis, if the analyst shares the patient's conviction that it is sexuality that is disordered. The study's second point is the suggestion that the unifying characteristic of male homosexuals is to be found in the particular form of body narcissism that leads to same-sex choice. Third, it is proposed that analysts reconsider the likelihood that biogenetic elements enter into the homosexual outcome.

  16. Male Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yalaza, Metin; İnan, Aydın; Bozer, Mikdat

    2016-01-01

    Male breast cancer (MBC) is a rare disease, accounting for less than 1% of all breast cancer diagnoses worldwide. Although breast carcinomas share certain characteristics in both genders, there are notable differences. Most studies on men with breast cancer are very small. Thus, most data on male breast cancer are derived from studies on females. However, when a number of these small studies are grouped together, we can learn more from them. This review emphasizes the incidence, etiology, clinical features, diagnosis, treatment, pathology, survival, and prognostic factors related to MBC.

  17. Clinical Nursing Records Study (Executive Summary)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-08-01

    assessments received praise for those records completed during testing, issues surrounding identification and prioritizing nursing care problems and...of inpatient treatment and the patient’s responses. Nursing documentation reflects nursing practice patterns based on planned nursing care , which, in...Nursing History/Nursing Assessment/ Nursing Care Plans); the necessity of transcribing all orders appearing on physician order sheets to allow for

  18. Leveraging data to transform nursing care: insights from nurse leaders.

    PubMed

    Jeffs, Lianne; Nincic, Vera; White, Peggy; Hayes, Laureen; Lo, Joyce

    2015-01-01

    A study was undertaken to gain insight into how nurse leaders are influencing the use of performance data to improve nursing care in hospitals. Two themes emerged: getting relevant, reliable, and timely data into the hands of nurses, and the leaders' ability to "connect the dots" in working with different stakeholders. Study findings may inform nurse leaders in their efforts to leverage data to transform nursing care.

  19. Fund-raising tips for nurse leaders and nurse executives.

    PubMed

    Fitzpatrick, Joyce J

    2014-01-01

    Fund-raising may be new to most nurse leaders and executives. This article focuses on dispelling the myths and mystery that surrounds nursing philanthropy. Key myths are addressed with supporting information to dispel them. Several practical tips are presented to enhance nurse leaders' involvement in philanthropy. Two recent gifts to hospital nursing departments are described as exemplars of relationship building and of nurses investing in their own future and that of the profession.

  20. Role of the School Nurse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maryland State Dept. of Health and Mental Hygiene, Baltimore.

    These guidelines on Maryland school nursing are based on recommendations of a Maryland committee composed of representatives from state and local health and education agencies, schools of nursing, the Board of Nursing, Maryland State School Health Council, directors of nursing, and a physician. The standards established by the American Nurses…

  1. Transforming Articulation Barriers in Nursing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waters, Verle

    Barriers to educational mobility for nurses have existed since the mid-1960s. In 1963, the National League for Nursing (NLN) adopted a position that ruled out articulation of any kind between associate degree in nursing (ADN) and bachelors in science in nursing (BSN) programs. In the mid-1970s, a countermovement took shape, supporting open…

  2. Quality Assurance and Nursing Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strauss, Mary Beth

    1978-01-01

    Preparation for quality assurance in nursing care must begin in basic nursing education, continue through the graduate and doctoral levels, and be provided for practicing nurses through continuing education activities, according to the author. She discusses the meaning of quality assurance and its integration into the nursing curriculum. (MF)

  3. Who Will Teach the Nurses?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaRocco, Susan A.

    2006-01-01

    In 1999, most deans of nursing schools that belonged to the American Association of Colleges of Nursing reported that they did not have a faculty shortage. By 2005, however, 75 percent of U.S. nursing schools cited faculty shortages as the major reason for denying admission to qualified students. The average age of nurse educators holding PhDs is…

  4. Nurse Aide Education in Illinois.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shea, Mary Lou

    Nurse aide education is an issue that governmental and health care agencies are addressing. Nurse aides are employed in numerous and varied health care agencies, such as hospitals, nursing homes, physician's offices, and private homes. Although there are no educational requirements for nurse aides in Illinois, there are a number of formal training…

  5. Role of the School Nurse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maryland State Dept. of Health and Mental Hygiene, Baltimore.

    These guidelines on Maryland school nursing are based on recommendations of a Maryland committee composed of representatives from state and local health and education agencies, schools of nursing, the Board of Nursing, Maryland State School Health Council, directors of nursing, and a physician. The standards established by the American Nurses…

  6. Nurse-Faculty Census, 1968.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National League for Nursing, New York, NY. Research and Development.

    This is the 1968 biennial census of nurse-faculty members teaching in nursing programs and in cooperating institutions providing clinical experiences for students in nursing. It is intended as an overview of current conditions and a basis for future estimates and planning. As of January 1968, 20,077 full-time and 3,554 part-time nurse-faculty…

  7. Reflective writing and nursing education.

    PubMed

    Craft, Melissa

    2005-02-01

    Reflective writing is a valued tool for teaching nursing students and for documentation, support, and generation of nursing knowledge among experienced nurses. Expressive or reflective writing is becoming widely accepted in both professional and lay publications as a mechanism for coping with critical incidents. This article explores reflective writing as a tool for nursing education.

  8. Critical care nursing.

    PubMed

    Dracup, K

    1987-01-01

    The research pertaining to the delivery of nursing care in the ICU was reviewed to describe: the impact of the unit structure and organization, including policies and procedures, on patients, nurses, and families; the process of critical care nursing; the outcomes of critical care nursing; some of the ethical issues germane to the care of the critically ill patient. Although these areas of inquiry are quite diverse, a number of similarities can be identified. The most obvious of the similarities was that, with few exceptions, the studies pertaining to delivery of nursing care were performed by researchers from a variety of disciplines other than nursing, including medicine, psychology, public health, and economics. In many instances, such as the studies of patients' stress experiences in ICUs, these efforts enhanced our knowledge of the phenomena and complemented or replicated the efforts of nurse researchers. Unfortunately, in some areas nurse researchers were quite absent, with the result that the studies lacked a nursing perspective. For example, the large body of knowledge related to the effects of critical care on patient outcome reflected medicine's orientation toward cure. While it is important to measure the effect of nursing care in the ICU on patient survival, the effect of nursing efforts on short- and long-term quality of life, functional status, and health maintenance is also critical and remains unknown. Nurse researchers need to build on the data base already acquired about critical care. Even more important, they need to fashion programs of research focused on the concepts central to the discipline of nursing. A second similarity relates to the increasing quality of the reported research over the past decade. In general, early descriptive studies were conducted in a single critical care unit with a small and often biased sample. These gave way to more carefully designed, multicenter studies, although lack of randomization procedures continued to be

  9. Nurse turnover: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Laureen J; O'Brien-Pallas, Linda; Duffield, Christine; Shamian, Judith; Buchan, James; Hughes, Frances; Spence Laschinger, Heather K; North, Nicola; Stone, Patricia W

    2006-02-01

    Ongoing instability in the nursing workforce is raising questions globally about the issue of nurse turnover. A comprehensive literature review was undertaken to examine the current state of knowledge about the scope of the nurse turnover problem, definitions of turnover, factors considered to be determinants of nurse turnover, turnover costs and the impact of turnover on patient, and nurse and system outcomes. Much of the research to date has focused on turnover determinants, and recent studies have provided cost estimations at the organizational level. Further research is needed to examine the impact of turnover on health system cost, and how nurse turnover influences patient and nurse outcomes.

  10. A programme for nursing ethics.

    PubMed

    Smith, S J; Davis, A J

    1985-01-01

    This article defines nursing ethics and its place within the disciplines of ethics and nursing. The current endeavours of nursing ethics are identified as: revising codes, assisting nurses to reason ethically, and establishing the nurse's role in ethical decision-making regarding ethical issues, particular clients, and society's definition of health and illness. The authors then propose the further development of nursing ethics to examine critically the ethical dimensions of nursing practice with regards to its theories, diagnostic categories, diagnostic procedures, treatment goals and treatment procedures.

  11. An Integrative Review of Engaging Clinical Nurses in Nursing Research.

    PubMed

    Scala, Elizabeth; Price, Carrie; Day, Jennifer

    2016-07-01

    To review the literature for best practices for engaging clinical nurses in nursing research. Review of the research and nonresearch papers published between 2005 and 2015 that answered the evidence-based practice (EBP) question: what are the best practices for engaging clinical nursing staff in nursing research? PubMed, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), Joanna Briggs Institute, and Cochrane were searched using a combination of controlled vocabulary and key words. Nineteen papers that answered the EBP question were selected for review. It can be difficult to involve clinical nurses in research. There are multiple factors to consider when nursing leadership looks to engage clinical nurses in nursing research. Nurse leaders can take many approaches to engage clinical nurses in research. Each organization must perform its own assessment to identify areas of opportunity. Nursing leadership can take these areas of opportunity to structure a multifaceted approach to support clinical staff in the conduct and dissemination of nursing research. The evidence from this review offers EBP recommendations as well as reports on the gaps in the literature related to best practices for engaging clinical nurses in nursing research. © 2016 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  12. Doctorate in nursing practice: a survey of massachusetts nurses.

    PubMed

    DeMarco, Rosanna F; Pulcini, Joyce; Haggerty, Lois A; Tang, Trinh

    2009-01-01

    Recently, the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) resolved that a new practice degree, the doctorate in nursing practice (DNP), is to become the terminal practice degree and minimum education standard for advanced practice nurses by the year 2015(American Association of Colleges of Nursing. (2004). AACN position statement on the practice doctorate in nursing. Retrieved July 1, 2007, from http://www.aacn.nche.edu.html). The DNP will have a clinical-intensive focus. Advanced practice nurses potentially impacted by this resolution will include nurse practitioners, nurse anesthetists, nurse midwives, and clinical nurse specialists. A task force at the William F. Connell School of Nursing at Boston College conducted an electronic survey in 2006 in an attempt to understand nurses' thoughts about doctoral preparation and the interest of nurses in Massachusetts in pursuing doctoral study. A self-selected group of 376 nurses participated in the study. Nurses identified both positive and negative perceptions related to the degree's viability and practicality, with a majority (55%) preferring the DNP as an educational option.

  13. Nurses' Own Recordkeeping: The Nursing Minimum Data Set Revisited.

    PubMed

    Halloran, Edward J; Halloran, Diane C

    2015-11-01

    There is no consistent, standardized, concise method for nurses to record information about their patients and clients that is conducive to store, retrieve, and use in patient and client care; to improve professional self-development; and to use in collaboration with patients and clients, their families, other nurses, doctors, hospitals, and health systems. Nurses gauge the health status of their patients and clients every day and are now in a position both to record their impressions for their own use and to share them with colleagues who care for the same patients and clients. What is now needed is a way to record these clinical impressions within an authoritative format that is related to the depth and breadth of the clinical literature related to nursing and the needs of the patients and clients nurses serve. The International Council of Nurses' Nurse-Patient Summary is proposed here to fill the gulf between narrative nurses' notes, proprietary and widely varying electronic health record systems, and information from nurses about their patiens and clients human needs. The International Council of Nurses' Nurse-Patient Summary could replace nursing diagnosis items in the Nursing Minimum Data Set and serve as a substitute for the World Health Organization's International Classification of Function, Disability and Health, a seldom used instrument derived from the International Council of Nurses' Basic Principles of Nursing Care.

  14. [Masculinity and femininity in self-perceptions and ideals of registered nurses].

    PubMed

    Kada, Olivia; Brunner, Eva

    2010-08-01

    Despite of intensive professionalisation efforts and changed legal frameworks the public image of nursing is still full of gender-stereotypes. This study investigates to what extend public stereotypes of "typically female" and "typically male" are reflected in the self-concept and ideals of nurses. Using a cross-sectional research design 174 female nurses were surveyed regarding their sex-role orientation and ideals (femininity and masculinity) using a standardized questionnaire (BSRI). Contrary to stereotypes the respondents indentified more with masculine traits. Masculine attributes predominated especially in ideas about the ideal nurse. No differences between nurses who work in different areas could be revealed. In all endeavors regarding autonomy and masculinity the significance of the feminine function of "caring" must not be forgotten. Teachers in healthcare and nursing play a central role in sensibilising students for gender issues.

  15. The exposure of the nursing profession in online and print media

    PubMed Central

    Cardoso, Rodrigo José Martins; Graveto, João Manuel Garcia de Nascimento; Queiroz, Ana Maria Correia Albuquerque

    2014-01-01

    Objective to describe the coverage of news concerning the nursing profession in the Portuguese media: informative sites on the Internet and in print media. Method a total of 1,271 health news items were collected in September and October of 2011 (956 online news items and 325 news items originating from the press review of the Portuguese Order of Nurses). Statistical analysis was used to characterize the variables. Results nurses were the sources of information in 6.6% of cases, suggesting limited media exposure. The health news collected is characterized by a production based on limited information sources, that is, male and official sources, on information disseminated by news agencies focused on economic and political issues in the health field. Conclusion the presence of nurses in the news concerning nursing health is reduced. We suggest that nurses develop public communication skills to disseminate the importance of their profession in society and their relationship with the media. PMID:24553715

  16. The exposure of the nursing profession in online and print media.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Rodrigo José Martins; Graveto, João Manuel Garcia de Nascimento; Queiroz, Ana Maria Correia Albuquerque

    2014-01-01

    to describe the coverage of news concerning the nursing profession in the Portuguese media: informative sites on the Internet and in print media. a total of 1,271 health news items were collected in September and October of 2011 (956 online news items and 325 news items originating from the press review of the Portuguese Order of Nurses). Statistical analysis was used to characterize the variables. nurses were the sources of information in 6.6% of cases, suggesting limited media exposure. The health news collected is characterized by a production based on limited information sources, that is, male and official sources, on information disseminated by news agencies focused on economic and political issues in the health field. the presence of nurses in the news concerning nursing health is reduced. We suggest that nurses develop public communication skills to disseminate the importance of their profession in society and their relationship with the media.

  17. Nursing student attitudes toward statistics.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Lizy; Aktan, Nadine M

    2014-04-01

    Nursing is guided by evidence-based practice. To understand and apply research to practice, nurses must be knowledgeable in statistics; therefore, it is crucial to promote a positive attitude toward statistics among nursing students. The purpose of this quantitative cross-sectional study was to assess differences in attitudes toward statistics among undergraduate nursing, graduate nursing, and undergraduate non-nursing students. The Survey of Attitudes Toward Statistics Scale-36 (SATS-36) was used to measure student attitudes, with higher scores denoting more positive attitudes. The convenience sample was composed of 175 students from a public university in the northeastern United States. Statistically significant relationships were found among some of the key demographic variables. Graduate nursing students had a significantly lower score on the SATS-36, compared with baccalaureate nursing and non-nursing students. Therefore, an innovative nursing curriculum that incorporates knowledge of student attitudes and key demographic variables may result in favorable outcomes.

  18. Quantifying male attractiveness.

    PubMed Central

    McNamara, John M; Houston, Alasdair I; Marques Dos Santos, Miguel; Kokko, Hanna; Brooks, Rob

    2003-01-01

    Genetic models of sexual selection are concerned with a dynamic process in which female preference and male trait values coevolve. We present a rigorous method for characterizing evolutionary endpoints of this process in phenotypic terms. In our phenotypic characterization the mate-choice strategy of female population members determines how attractive females should find each male, and a population is evolutionarily stable if population members are actually behaving in this way. This provides a justification of phenotypic explanations of sexual selection and the insights into sexual selection that they provide. Furthermore, the phenotypic approach also has enormous advantages over a genetic approach when computing evolutionarily stable mate-choice strategies, especially when strategies are allowed to be complex time-dependent preference rules. For simplicity and clarity our analysis deals with haploid mate-choice genetics and a male trait that is inherited phenotypically, for example by vertical cultural transmission. The method is, however, easily extendible to other cases. An example illustrates that the sexy son phenomenon can occur when there is phenotypic inheritance of the male trait. PMID:14561306

  19. Male and female mania.

    PubMed

    Kubacki, A

    1986-02-01

    A total of 74 manic or hypomanic episodes were scrutinized in 31 probands (18 women and 13 men), followed over the years by the author on an outpatient basis. These turned out to herald bipolar affective illness in some 70 percent of males and almost 40% of females. Unipolar mania occurred twice as often in men, as it did in women (38.4% vs. 22.2%). Men tended to be younger (only 30% aged 45 or older), than women (almost a half in the menopausal age bracket). One third of all female probands (and over 46% of those under age 45) manifested their manic episodes in connection with childbirth (gestational mania). As a paradoxical, acute grief reaction ("funeral mania"), the syndrome under scrutiny, occurred in about 1/7 of the men, and more than 1/4 of the women. Significant medico-surgical problems were found to accompany or precede female mania twice as often, compared to male cases (61.1% vs. 30.7%); and clinical confusion or other indices of "organicity" were present in 2/3 of the women, and less than a half (46.1%) of the men. Over half the male probands demonstrated either an inverted sexual attraction, or hypogonadism; and four out of 13 males were aged 45 or older. The above findings are tentatively related to gender differential in cerebral hemispheric specialization.

  20. Empowering Young Black Males

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kafele, Baruti K.

    2012-01-01

    Of all the challenges we face in education today, the author can think of none greater than the challenge of motivating, educating, and empowering black male learners. The fact that this group of students is in crisis is evident on multiple levels, starting with graduation rates. According to the Schott Foundation (2008), the U.S. high school…

  1. Male rat sexual behavior.

    PubMed

    Agmo, A

    1997-05-01

    The male rat's sexual behavior constitutes a highly ordered sequence of motor acts involving both striate and smooth muscles. It is spontaneously displayed by most adult made rats in the presence of a sexually receptive female. Although the behavior is important for the survival of the species it is not necessary for survival of the individual. In that way it is different from other spontaneous behaviors such as eating, drinking, avoidance of pain, respiration or thermoregulation. Among other things, this means that it is difficult to talk about sexual deprivation or need. Nevertheless, studies of male sex behavior distinguish sexual motivation (the ease by which behavior is activated, "libido") from the execution of copulatory acts (performance, "potency") (Meisel, R.L. and Sachs, B.D., The physiology of male sexual behavior. In: E. Knobil and J.D. Neill (Eds.), The Physiology of Reproduction, 2nd Edn., Vol. 2, Raven Press, New York, 1994, pp. 3-105 [13]). The hormonal control of male sexual behavior has been extensively studied. It is clear that steroid hormones, androgens and estrogens, act within the central nervous system, modifying neuronal excitability. The exact mechanism by which these hormones activate sex behavior remains largely unknown. However, there exists a considerable amount of knowledge concerning the brain structures important for sexual motivation and for the execution of sex behavior. The modulatory role of some non-steroid hormones is partly known, as well as the consequences of manipulations of several neurotransmitter systems.

  2. Minority Male Afterschool Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dalton, Herbert F., Jr.

    Through a program called the Minority Male Afterschool Program (MMAP), college students at Mississippi Valley State University in Itta Bena (Mississippi) are working one-on-one with high school students. The MMAP is an enrichment program that encourages at-risk African American students aged 12 to 19 to complete high school and pursue…

  3. Male breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Reis, Leonardo Oliveira; Dias, Fernando Gf; Castro, Marcos As; Ferreira, Ubirajara

    2011-06-01

    Male breast cancer (MBC) is a rare disease. However, as global populace ages, there is a trend to MBC increasing. Although aetiology is still unclear, constitutional, environmental, hormonal (abnormalities in estrogen/androgen balance) and genetic (positive family history, Klinefelter syndrome, mutations in BRCA1 and specially BRCA2) risk factors are already known. Clinic manifestation is painless hard and fixed nodule in the subareolar region in 75% of cases, with nipple commitment earlier than in women. Breast cancer has similar prognostic factors in males and females, among which axillary adenopathy (present in 40-55% cases) is the most important one. Although mammography, ultrasonography and scintigraphy can be useful tools in diagnosis; clinical assessment, along with a confirmatory biopsy, remains the main step in the evaluation of men with breast lesions. Infiltrating ductal carcinoma is the most frequent histological type. The established standard of care is modified radical mastectomy followed by tamoxifen for endocrine-responsive positive disease, although other options are being explored. While similarities between breast cancer in males and females exist, it is not appropriate to extrapolate data from female disease to the treatment of male. There is a need for specific multi-institutional trials to better understanding of clinicopathologic features and establishment of optimal therapy for this disease.

  4. Lycopene and male infertility

    PubMed Central

    Durairajanayagam, Damayanthi; Agarwal, Ashok; Ong, Chloe; Prashast, Pallavi

    2014-01-01

    Excessive amounts of reactive oxygen species (ROS) cause a state of oxidative stress, which result in sperm membrane lipid peroxidation, DNA damage and apoptosis, leading to decreased sperm viability and motility. Elevated levels of ROS are a major cause of idiopathic male factor infertility, which is an increasingly common problem today. Lycopene, the most potent singlet oxygen quencher of all carotenoids, is a possible treatment option for male infertility because of its antioxidant properties. By reacting with and neutralizing free radicals, lycopene could reduce the incidence of oxidative stress and thus, lessen the damage that would otherwise be inflicted on spermatozoa. It is postulated that lycopene may have other beneficial effects via nonoxidative mechanisms in the testis, such as gap junction communication, modulation of gene expression, regulation of the cell cycle and immunoenhancement. Various lycopene supplementation studies conducted on both humans and animals have shown promising results in alleviating male infertility—lipid peroxidation and DNA damage were decreased, while sperm count and viability, and general immunity were increased. Improvement of these parameters indicates a reduction in oxidative stress, and thus the spermatozoa is less vulnerable to oxidative damage, which increases the chances of a normal sperm fertilizing the egg. Human trials have reported improvement in sperm parameters and pregnancy rates with supplementation of 4–8 mg of lycopene daily for 3–12 months. However, further detailed and extensive research is still required to determine the dosage and the usefulness of lycopene as a treatment for male infertility. PMID:24675655

  5. Understanding African American Males

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Edward Earl

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the socialization skills, self-esteem, and academic readiness of African American males in a school environment. Discussions with students and the School Perceptions Questionnaire provided data for this investigation. The intended targets for this investigation were African American students; however, there…

  6. Eating Disordered Adolescent Males.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eliot, Alexandra O.; Baker, Christina Wood

    2001-01-01

    Described a sample of eating disordered adolescent males who were seen for treatment at Boston Children's Hospital Outpatient Eating Disorders Clinic. Findings suggest the idea that clinicians, coaches, peers, and family should encourage young men to share concerns about body image and weight at an earlier, less severe juncture, with the assurance…

  7. Eating Disordered Adolescent Males.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eliot, Alexandra O.; Baker, Christina Wood

    2001-01-01

    Described a sample of eating disordered adolescent males who were seen for treatment at Boston Children's Hospital Outpatient Eating Disorders Clinic. Findings suggest the idea that clinicians, coaches, peers, and family should encourage young men to share concerns about body image and weight at an earlier, less severe juncture, with the assurance…

  8. Empowering Young Black Males

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kafele, Baruti K.

    2012-01-01

    Of all the challenges we face in education today, the author can think of none greater than the challenge of motivating, educating, and empowering black male learners. The fact that this group of students is in crisis is evident on multiple levels, starting with graduation rates. According to the Schott Foundation (2008), the U.S. high school…

  9. Educating African American Males

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Edward E.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Schools across America spend money, invest in programs, and sponsor workshops, offer teacher incentives, raise accountability standards, and even evoke the name of Obama in efforts to raise the academic achievement of African American males. Incarceration and college retention rates point to a dismal plight for many African American…

  10. My Daughter Wants to Be a Nurse: Occupational Stereotyping in Health Textbooks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holcomb, Carol Ann

    1981-01-01

    An evaluation of the illustrations in elementary and secondary education textbooks reveals that: (1) Males dominate occupations illustrated in contemporary health textbooks; and (2) females are generally portrayed as assistants (nurses, technicians, dental hygienists) to males in higher-level roles or in occupations with low levels of power,…

  11. My Name is Nurse.

    PubMed

    2016-05-01

    : Editor's note: From its first issue in 1900 through to the present day, AJN has unparalleled archives detailing nurses' work and lives over more than a century. These articles not only chronicle nursing's growth as a profession within the context of the events of the day, but they also reveal prevailing societal attitudes about women, health care, and human rights. Today's nursing school curricula rarely include nursing's history, but it's a history worth knowing. To this end, From the AJN Archives offers articles selected to fit today's topics and times.This month's article, from the May 1993 issue, is a tongue-in-cheek editorial by former editor-in-chief Mary B. Mallison. In it, she introduces us to the "PerceptoPhone"-an imaginary device that allows the wearer to access the thoughts of nurses. PerceptoPhones are used to educate hospital trustees on nurses' essential but often invisible abilities: to identify early warning signs of complications; teach and encourage; and carefully assess, soothe, and heal-abilities that are "hard to quantify with usual accounting methods." More than 20 years later, we still look for better ways to teach the public about nursing.

  12. Child maltreatment: every nurse's business.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Julie; Bradbury-Jones, Caroline

    2015-03-18

    Every nurse has a responsibility for protecting children, even nurses who do not work directly with children. However, nurses may be reluctant to deal with child maltreatment issues because they do not want to get things wrong or make a situation worse. The aim of this article is to assist nurses in their child protection role. It describes the different types of child maltreatment, the risk factors and potential consequences. The nurse's role in recognising and responding to suspected child maltreatment is discussed.

  13. Nursing and the next millennium.

    PubMed

    Huch, M H

    1995-01-01

    On March 19, 1993, in Toronto, Canada, at Discovery International, Inc.'s, Biennnial Nurse Theorist Conference, five theorists participated in a panel discussion on: caring as an essence of nursing; the value of continuing to develop nursing theory; what constitutes nursing research; the role of advanced practice nurses. The theorists were Imogene M. King, Madeleine M. Leininger, Rosemarie Rizzo Parse, Hildegard E. Peplau, and Martha E. Rogers. Marlaine C. Smith was the moderator and presented the questions to the panel.

  14. Common metaphors in nursing ethics.

    PubMed

    Milton, Constance L

    2009-10-01

    Metaphors are literary comparisons that are used to create new meaning and insight for concepts, ideas, and situations found in a discipline. This author describes some common moral metaphors used in the discipline of nursing and specifically in situations of nursing ethics. New insights and questions for common usage are offered for the metaphors from a nursing theoretical perspective. Implications for nursing as a discipline are incorporated and discussion points for the future practice of nursing are illuminated.

  15. Nursing Practice Environment and Registered Nurses' Job Satisfaction in Nursing Homes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choi, JiSun; Flynn, Linda; Aiken, Linda H.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Recruiting and retaining registered nurses (RNs) in nursing homes is problematic, and little research is available to guide efforts to make nursing homes a more attractive practice environment for RNs. The purpose of this study was to examine relationships between aspects of the nursing practice environment and job satisfaction among RNs…

  16. Nursing Practice Environment and Registered Nurses' Job Satisfaction in Nursing Homes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choi, JiSun; Flynn, Linda; Aiken, Linda H.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Recruiting and retaining registered nurses (RNs) in nursing homes is problematic, and little research is available to guide efforts to make nursing homes a more attractive practice environment for RNs. The purpose of this study was to examine relationships between aspects of the nursing practice environment and job satisfaction among RNs…

  17. The divergent opinions of nurses, nurse managers and nurse directors: the case in Lebanon.

    PubMed

    Badr, Lina; Rizk, Ursula; Farha, Randa

    2010-03-01

    The present study provides an overview of the status of the nursing profession in Lebanon and compares and contrasts the opinions of directors, nurse supervisors/managers and nurses regarding the nursing profession and the workplace. There are limited publications concerning the working conditions of nurses in Lebanon, and no studies on the views of directors, supervisors/managers and nurses regarding the priorities of the nursing profession. Such data are necessary to build a sound theoretical basis on which recommendations for improving the nursing profession in Lebanon are made as well as to compare and contrast cross cultural findings. Data were collected from 45 hospitals using a mixed methods design. Qualitative data was obtained from 45 nursing directors whereas quantitative data were collected from 64 nursing supervisors and 624 nurses. Similarities and differences in the opinions of nurses, nurse supervisors/managers and nurse directors regarding critical issues for the nursing profession are discussed and contrasted. Nurses are more likely to be satisfied and committed to their profession when they feel that their opinions are being heard and that their work environment promotes professional advancement.

  18. Nurses in the Boardroom.

    PubMed

    Hill, Karen S

    2010-10-01

    This department highlights nursing leaders who have demonstrated the ability to inspire and lead change. This competency is seen in the ability to create, structure, and implement organizational change through strategic vision, risk taking, and effective communication. Each article showcases a project of a nurse leader who demonstrates change in a variety of environments ranging from acute care hospitals to home care and alternative practice settings. Included are several "lessons learned" applicable to multiple settings that provide insight for other nurses in executive practice.

  19. Presentation skills for nurses.

    PubMed

    Foulkes, Mark

    2015-02-20

    This article emphasises the importance of effective presentation skills. Such skills allow nurses to share knowledge and expertise and to communicate clearly in a range of workplace scenarios. Nurses are increasingly being asked to present in formal and informal situations, such as conferences, poster presentations, job interviews, case reports and ward-based teaching. This article explores the principles underpinning the development of these skills, discusses the situations in which they could be applied and demonstrates how nurses might improve and develop as presenters.

  20. Compassion fatigue in nurses.

    PubMed

    Yoder, Elizabeth A

    2010-11-01

    Compassion fatigue, trigger situations, and coping strategies were investigated in hospital and home care nurses. The Professional Quality of Life Scale measured compassion fatigue, compassion satisfaction, and burnout. Narrative questions elicited trigger situations and coping strategies. Compassion fatigue scores were significantly different between nurses who worked 8- or 12-hour shifts. Fifteen percent of the participants had scores indicating risk of the compassion fatigue. There were significant differences in compassion satisfaction, depending on the unit worked and time as a nurse. The most common category of trigger situations was caring for the patient. Work-related and personal coping strategies were identified. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Nursing in Israel.

    PubMed

    Ehrenfeld, Mally; Itzhaki, Michal; Baumann, Steven L

    2007-10-01

    Nurses in Israel struggle with many of the same problems faced by nurses in other parts of the world, such as increased use of technology, overwhelming amounts of information, and demands for high quality of services to larger numbers of people within tighter budgets. In addition to the aging of the general population, the country has welcomed large numbers of immigrants. The nation's expenditures for healthcare and nursing education have, at times, had to take a back seat to the government's efforts to house new immigrants, to relocate groups, and to defend the nation against politically motivated violence and attacks. All of this is in the context of regional conflicts and international debates.

  2. Superstitions among perioperative nurses.

    PubMed

    Mandell, David L; Claypool, Margie L; Kay, David J

    2005-05-01

    A descriptive study was conducted using a mailed questionnaire to determine the prevalence of work-related superstitions among perioperative nurses. Data analysis included the two-sample t test for continuous data and the two-sided Fisher's exact test for binary data. Study results indicate that although only 23% of respondents view themselves as "generally superstitious," specific work-related superstitions are widespread. Belief in specific superstitions was not statistically related to age or number of years as a perioperative nurse. An analysis of the literature on medical workplace superstitions helps to elucidate possible underlying explanations for the phenomenon of nursing superstitions.

  3. Crisis intervention for nurses.

    PubMed

    Chase, Emily

    2013-06-01

    Cancer diagnoses and treatments can be crisis-causing events that overwhelm the usual coping abilities of patients and their families. Oncology nurses constantly are observing and attending to patients' diverse needs, ranging from biomedical to emotional, social, and psychological. Nurses have the chance to be first responders in times of patient crises, as they are in the position to recognize the crisis, respond effectively, and transform the crisis into a pivotal learning experience. This article discusses a way to think about patient and family crises that empowers nurses to respond in a manner appropriate to the cultural context and respectful of the individual space of the patient.

  4. Self-harm in nurses: prevalence and correlates.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Teris; Yip, Paul S F

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the weighed prevalence of self-harm and its correlates among Hong Kong nurses. Recent epidemiological data suggest that the weighted prevalence of past-year suicidality among Hong Kong nurses was found to be 14·9%. Deliberate self-harm was a significant correlate of suicidality. Nonetheless, there are few population-based studies exploring the prevalence of self-harm and its correlates among medical occupational groups in Asia. The study uses a cross-sectional survey design. Data were collected in Hong Kong over a four-week period from October-November 2013. Statistical methods, including binary and multivariate logistic regression models, were used to examine the weighted prevalence of self-harm and its associated factors in nurses. A total of 850 nurses participated in the study. Seventy-nine participants (9·3%) reported self-harm in the past year. Nurses aged between 25-44 were at especially high risk of self-harm. Female nurses reported self-harm more than male nurses. The most common forms of self-harm were self-cutting, striking oneself and poisoning oneself. Clinical experience, chronic illness, relationship crises with family members, a family history of self-harm, smoking, symptoms of stress and psychiatric disorder were significantly associated with nurses' self-harm. The positive correlation between psychiatric disorder and self-harm was confirmed. There is a need for a raft of self-harm prevention strategies, including a continuous monitoring system in the healthcare setting detecting and managing the risks of self-harm in nurses as part of the ordinary provision for their well-being. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Nurse Managers Speak Out About Disruptive Nurse-to-Nurse Relationships.

    PubMed

    Moore, Linda Weaver; Sublett, Cynthia; Leahy, Cathy

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore nurse managers' (NMs') perceptions regarding disruptive nurse-to-nurse relationships. Nurse managers play a pivotal role in creating and sustaining healthy practice environments. They must understand how to recognize and confront disruptive nurse relationships that can threaten the health of their units. A qualitative study design using researcher-participant interviews of 13 NMs from 5 institutions provided data regarding NMs' views on nurse relationships. Nurse managers reported how they became aware of disruptive nurse relationships, their strategies for dealing with those relationships, and the impact that confronting disruptive relationships had on them personally. Findings can be helpful to NMs who are faced with addressing disruptive nurse-to-nurse relationships as they endeavor to create and sustain healthy work environments.

  6. Comparing nurse managers and nurses' perceptions of nurses' self-leadership during capacity building.

    PubMed

    Jooste, Karien; Cairns, Lindi

    2014-05-01

    This paper compares the perceptions of nurse managers and nurses about self-leadership of professional nurses while taking ownership of capacity building during unit management. The Nursing Strategy for South Africa states that the competency of nurses is dependent upon factors that lead to capacity building. A quantitative design was followed by conducting a survey. The target population included nurse managers and professional nurses working at an academic public hospital in the Gauteng Province of South Africa. The findings indicate shortcomings in relation to advising professional nurses about self-direction while taking ownership of their daily pressures and stresses associated with unit management. Professional nurses should develop their confidence by focusing on their self-leadership strengths when managing a unit. Recommendations are made to promote self-leadership while taking ownership of nurses during capacity building of unit management. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Can nurses trust nurses in recovery reentering the workplace?

    PubMed

    Cook, Lisa M

    2013-03-01

    To examine the ability of working direct care nurses to trust nurses in recovery from substance use (or abuse) disorders (SUDs) reentering the workplace. A researcher-designed quantitative survey was used to gather data. Nurses said that they've worked with a nurse with SUD at some time in their career. Nurses are willing to trust their recovering colleagues and strongly agree that nurses in recovery should be allowed to return to the healthcare profession. Many nurses don't know how to provide help or where to locate support such as assistance programs or alternative-to-discipline programs for their impaired colleagues. This study adds to the body of knowledge in the crucial issue of addiction in nursing. Healthcare institutions struggle with best practices in assisting nurses in recovery. By examining underlying issues such as trust, a better understanding of how to implement educational programs may emerge.

  8. Wanted-nurses. Ethical issues and the nursing shortage.

    PubMed

    Erlen, Judith A

    2004-01-01

    The persistent nursing shortage is challenging the values and beliefs of the nursing profession and causing nurses to ask how they can fulfill their ethical responsibilities to patients when there are an insufficient number and a maldistribution of nurses. Nurses are expressing job dissatisfaction, experiencing moral distress, and wondering about their inability to provide quality patient care. In this article, the author addresses the commitment to care for patients and the ethical dilemma with which nurses are grappling: caring for self versus caring for others. Recommendations for possible action include reenvisioning the profession of nursing, empowering nurses, providing support, and restructuring the work environment. Taken together, these actions have the potential to reduce the moral distress that nurses are experiencing and to enable them to honor their commitment to patient care.

  9. Swedish forensic nursing care: nurses' professional contributions and educational needs.

    PubMed

    Rask, Mikael; Aberg, Jonas

    2002-10-01

    Nurses (registered nurses, RN, and licensed mental nurses, LMN) working in five Swedish forensic psychiatric units filled in a questionnaire designed for general psychiatric nursing, but modified for forensic use. In this report, data regarding how nursing care could contribute to improved care and the organizational changes needed and what knowledge the nurses need, in order to be able to meet the demands in the future, were analysed by means of content analysis. The salient findings were: (i) an interpersonal patient-nurse relationship based on trust, empathy, respect and responsibility for the patients' personal resources and knowledge seems to be the essence of nursing care and a way to improve care; and (ii) the nurses' educational needs emanate from different treatment modalities, how to perform different treatments, how to establish developing relationships and in-service training adapted to the ward-specific problems.

  10. Nursing home work practices and nursing assistants' job satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Bishop, Christine E; Squillace, Marie R; Meagher, Jennifer; Anderson, Wayne L; Wiener, Joshua M

    2009-10-01

    To estimate the impact of nursing home work practices, specifically compensation and working conditions, on job satisfaction of nursing assistants employed in nursing homes. Data are from the 2004 National Nursing Assistant Survey, responses by the nursing assistants' employers to the 2004 National Nursing Home Survey, and county-level data from the Area Resource File. Multinomial logistic regression was used to estimate effects of compensation and working conditions on nursing assistants' overall job satisfaction, controlling for personal characteristics and local labor market characteristics. Wages, benefits, and job demands, measured by the ratio of nursing assistant hours per resident day, were associated with job satisfaction. Consistent with previous studies, job satisfaction was greater when nursing assistants felt respected and valued by their employers and had good relationships with supervisors. Nursing assistants were more satisfied when they had enough time to complete their work, when their work was challenging, when they were not subject to mandatory overtime, and where food was not delivered to residents on trays. This is the first investigation of nursing assistant job satisfaction using a nationally representative sample of nursing assistants matched to information about their employing nursing homes. The findings corroborate results of previous studies in showing that compensation and working conditions that provide respect, good relationships with supervisors, and better staffing levels are important to nursing assistant job satisfaction.

  11. Emotional intelligence and nursing performance among nursing students.

    PubMed

    Beauvais, Audrey M; Brady, Noreen; O'Shea, Eileen R; Griffin, Mary T Quinn

    2011-05-01

    Some scholars have proposed that the educational preparation of nurses can be improved by incorporating emotional intelligence lessons into the nursing curricula. However, the relationship between emotional intelligence and nursing performance in nursing students is unknown. The purpose of the study was to examine this relationship among nursing students. A descriptive correlational design with non-probability sampling methods of 87 nursing students in a university setting was conducted. The variables of focus were emotional intelligence and nursing performance. Emotional intelligence was measured with the Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test (MSCEIT). Nursing performance was measured using the Six Dimension Scale of Nursing Performance (6-D Scale). The sample was predominately Caucasian (91%), female (93%), mean age 24 years. The mean score for emotional intelligence was 0.53, SD ± 0.06 indicating moderate emotional intelligence. The mean score for nursing performance was 3.14, SD ± 0.40 indicating moderate nursing performance. Emotional intelligence was related to nursing performance. Four of the six nursing performance subscale scores were significantly correlated with the total emotional intelligence scores. Implications for nursing education and clinical practice are discussed.

  12. Taking personal responsibility: Nurses' and assistant nurses' experiences of good nursing practice in psychiatric inpatient care.

    PubMed

    Gabrielsson, Sebastian; Sävenstedt, Stefan; Olsson, Malin

    2016-10-01

    Therapeutic nurse-patient relationships are considered essential for good nursing practice in psychiatric inpatient care. Previous research suggests that inpatient care fails to fulfil patients' expectations in this regard, and that nurses might experience the reality of inpatient care as an obstruction. The aim of the present study was to explore nurses' and assistant nurses' experiences of good nursing practice in the specific context of psychiatric inpatient care. Qualitative interviews were conducted with 12 skilled, relationship-oriented nurses and assistant nurses in order to explore their experiences with nursing practice related to psychiatric inpatient care. Interviews were transcribed and analysed using an interpretive descriptive approach. Findings describe good nursing practice as a matter of nurses and assistant nurses taking personal responsibility for their actions and for the individual patient as a person. Difficulties in providing dignified nursing care and taking personal responsibility cause them to experience feelings of distress and frustration. Shared values and nursing leadership supports being moral and treating patients with respect, having enough time supports being present and connecting with patients, and working as a part of a competent team with critical daily discussions and diversity supports being confident and building trust. The findings suggest that taking personal responsibility is integral to good nursing practice. If unable to improve poor circumstances, nurses might be forced to promote their own survival by refuting or redefining their responsibility. Nurses need to prioritize being with patients and gain support in shaping their own nursing practice. Nursing leadership should provide moral direction and defend humanistic values. © 2016 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  13. A comparison of the caring behaviours of nursing students and registered nurses: implications for nursing education.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuh-Shiow; Yu, Wen-Pin; Yang, Bao-Huan; Liu, Chin-Fang

    2016-11-01

    To compare the respective views of nursing students and registered nurses on caring behaviours. Research has indicated that nursing includes not only technical skills and professional knowledge but also the expression of care. In addition to nursing care, nurses demonstrate the acts of supporting, negotiating, reinforcing and transforming. However, little research simultaneously investigates the caring behaviours of nursing students and registered nurses. A cross-sectional study was conducted. A total of 657 subjects participated in this study. The research tool was a self-administered structured questionnaire. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics, one-way analysis of variance, t-test and chi-square test. The results showed that the most important caring behaviour is 'knowing the patient', while the least is 'advocating for the patient', which includes caring behaviours to respect the patient's and family's best interests, and voicing for them, possibly because this behaviour is more difficult for nurses to practice in the Taiwanese culture. Moreover, there was no significant difference in the caring behaviours between nursing students and registered nurses. However, age was found to be a significant difference in the caring behaviours of nursing students and registered nurses. Caring behaviour is essential in clinical practice. Based on the results, this study suggested that role models should be provided to nursing students to develop proper caring behaviours. Nursing faculty can boost nursing students' interests in learning caring behaviours by incorporating diverse teaching strategies to enhance the effectiveness of caring behaviours. Much attention should be focused on education about awareness of caring behaviour for both nursing students and nursing staff. This study addressed that nursing administrators and faculty members should emphasise the importance of the essence of caring. Consequently, nursing curricula and training of nurses need to be

  14. The nursing shortage crisis in Québec's McGill University affiliated teaching hospitals: strategies that can work.

    PubMed

    Ferrante, A

    1993-01-01

    A frequently recurring theme expressed in both the professional health literature and other multimedia sources is the current nursing shortage crisis. This shortage is an ever present reality that is of serious concern and that will continue to escalate unless innovative and creative strategies are implemented. This article will specifically address one hospital's approach to the nursing shortage crisis in Québec's McGill University affiliated teaching hospitals. The pivotal issues of retention, recruitment and attraction of nursing as a profession are examined. Recommendations for dealing with these issues include: 1) restructuring nursing salaries, 2) redefining the types of nursing personnel resources, 3) flexibility in work schedule, 4) recognition, 5) providing an accurate public image of nursing, and 6) recruitment of males and mature persons. This article provides nursing administrators in the hospital, community, and educational settings with potential strategies that they can explore and apply in their own settings.

  15. Nurse-patient communication barriers in Iranian nursing.

    PubMed

    Anoosheh, M; Zarkhah, S; Faghihzadeh, S; Vaismoradi, M

    2009-06-01

    Providing effective communication with patients is an essential aspect of nursing care. Understanding the barriers that inhibit nurse-patient communication can provide an opportunity to eliminate them. To investigate nurse-patient and environment-related communication barriers perceived by patients and nurses in Iranian nursing. A descriptive survey was carried out in three randomly selected educational hospitals in a large urban city in Iran. Data were collected by questionnaire; the study sample consisted of 61 patients and 75 nurses. Participants were asked to rate the importance of each communication barriers item. Finally, data were analysed using descriptive statistics, and to compare the perceived importance of communication barriers between patients and nurses, item means were calculated and the t-test for independent samples was applied. Similarities and differences between the two groups were identified. According to nurses' views, 'heavy nursing workload', 'hard nursing tasks' and 'lack of welfare facilities for nurses' were the main communication barriers. From patients' views, 'unfamiliarity of nurses with dialect', 'having contagious diseases' and 'sex differences between nurses and patients' were determined as the main communication barriers. The shared communication barriers were 'age difference', 'social class difference' and 'having contagious diseases'. It can be concluded that nursing managers and healthcare system planners should focus on eliminating or modifying the barriers stated by the two groups, particularly the shared ones. It is suggested that understanding the cultural aspects of nurse-patient communication barriers in various contexts can help nurses. The study relied on self-report by a limited sample of nurses and patients. The responses should now be tested by a larger sample and then by empirical research into actual practice in order to test whether the nurses' and patients' perceived ideas of communication barriers are

  16. Male osteoporosis: A review

    PubMed Central

    Herrera, Antonio; Lobo-Escolar, Antonio; Mateo, Jesús; Gil, Jorge; Ibarz, Elena; Gracia, Luis

    2012-01-01

    Osteoporosis in men is a heterogeneous disease that has received little attention. However, one third of worldwide hip fractures occur in the male population. This problem is more prevalent in people over 70 years of age. The etiology can be idiopathic or secondary to hypogonadism, vitamin D deficiency and inadequate calcium intake, hormonal treatments for prostate cancer, use of toxic and every disease or drug use that alters bone metabolism. Risk factors such as a previous history of fragility fracture should be assessed for the diagnosis. However, risk factors in men are very heterogeneous. There are significant differences in the pharmacological treatment of osteoporosis between men and women fundamentally due to the level of evidence in published trials supporting each treatment. New treatments will offer new therapeutic prospects. The goal of this work is a revision of the present status knowledge about male osteoporosis. PMID:23362466

  17. Male Zuska's disease.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Shepard P; Kaoutzanis, Christodoulos; Schaub, George A

    2014-04-04

    Subareolar abscess of the male breast is a rare condition, which can be complicated by a fistula from the areolar skin into a lactiferous duct. In 1951, Zuska et al first characterised this entity in women. Literature on mammillary fistulas in men is scarce and therefore standardisation of treatment does not exist. We present two cases of recurrent subareolar abscesses with draining fistulas. Both patients were successfully treated by complete excision of the lactiferous duct fistula, and continue to do well with no evidence of disease recurrence. When male patients present with a draining subareolar abscess, one should have a high index of suspicion for a mammillary fistula. Failure to identify and surgically excise the fistula may lead to recurrence of the abscess and prolonged morbidity. The most effective management of this uncommon entity includes complete excision of the lactiferous duct fistula.

  18. Male Genital Lichen Sclerosus

    PubMed Central

    Bunker, Christopher Barry; Shim, Tang Ngee

    2015-01-01

    Male genital lichen sclerosus (MGLSc) is a chronic inflammatory skin disease responsible for male sexual dyspareunia and urological morbidity. An afeared complication is squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the penis. The precise etiopathogenesis of MGLSc remains controversial although genetic, autoimmune and infective (such as human papillomavirus (HPV) hepatitis C (HCV), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and Borrelia) factors have been implicated: Consideration of all the evidence suggests that chronic exposure of susceptible epithelium to urinary occlusion by the foreskin seems the most likely pathomechanism. The mainstay of treatment is topical ultrapotent corticosteroid therapy. Surgery is indicated for cases unresponsive to topical corticosteroid therapy, phimosis, meatal stenosis, urethral stricture, carcinoma in situ (CIS) and squamous cell carcinoma. PMID:25814697

  19. Newborn male circumcision.

    PubMed

    Sorokan, S Todd; Finlay, Jane C; Jefferies, Ann L

    2015-01-01

    The circumcision of newborn males in Canada has become a less frequent practice over the past few decades. This change has been significantly influenced by past recommendations from the Canadian Paediatric Society and the American Academy of Pediatrics, who both affirmed that the procedure was not medically indicated. Recent evidence suggesting the potential benefit of circumcision in preventing urinary tract infection and some sexually transmitted infections, including HIV, has prompted the Canadian Paediatric Society to review the current medical literature in this regard. While there may be a benefit for some boys in high-risk populations and circumstances where the procedure could be considered for disease reduction or treatment, the Canadian Paediatric Society does not recommend the routine circumcision of every newborn male.

  20. Newborn male circumcision

    PubMed Central

    Sorokan, S Todd; Finlay, Jane C; Jefferies, Ann L

    2015-01-01

    The circumcision of newborn males in Canada has become a less frequent practice over the past few decades. This change has been significantly influenced by past recommendations from the Canadian Paediatric Society and the American Academy of Pediatrics, who both affirmed that the procedure was not medically indicated. Recent evidence suggesting the potential benefit of circumcision in preventing urinary tract infection and some sexually transmitted infections, including HIV, has prompted the Canadian Paediatric Society to review the current medical literature in this regard. While there may be a benefit for some boys in high-risk populations and circumstances where the procedure could be considered for disease reduction or treatment, the Canadian Paediatric Society does not recommend the routine circumcision of every newborn male. PMID:26435672

  1. Quality Evaluation of Nursing Observation Based on a Survey of Nursing Documents Using NursingNAVI.

    PubMed

    Tsuru, Satoko; Omori, Miho; Inoue, Manami; Wako, Fumiko

    2016-01-01

    We have identified three foci of the nursing observation and nursing action respectively. Using these frameworks, we have developed the structured knowledge model for a number of diseases and medical interventions. We developed this structure based NursingNAVI® contents collaborated with some quality centred hospitals. Authors analysed the nursing care documentations of post-gastrectomy patients in light of the standardized nursing care plan in the "NursingNAVI®" developed by ourselves and revealed the "failure to observe" and "failure to document", which leaded to the volatility of the patients' data, conditions and some situation. This phenomenon should have been avoided if nurses had employed a standardized nursing care plan. So, we developed thinking process support system for planning, delivering, recording and evaluating in daily nursing using NursingNAVI® contents. It is important to identify the problem of the volatility of the patients' data, conditions and some situation. We developed a survey tool of nursing documents using NursingNAVI® Content for quality evaluation of nursing observation. We recommended some hospitals to use this survey tool. Fifteen hospitals participated the survey using this tool. It is estimated that the volatilizing situation. A hospital which don't participate this survey, knew the result. So the hospital decided to use NursingNAVI® contents in HIS. It was suggested that the system has availability for nursing OJT and time reduction of planning and recording without volatilizing situation.

  2. The relationship between cancer patients' perception of nursing care and nursing attitudes towards nursing profession.

    PubMed

    Coban, Gulay Ipek; Yurdagul, Gulistan

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the patients' perceptions of nursing care with different types of cancer in Turkey and its relationship with nursing attitudes towards nursing profession. An exploratory approach utilizing cross-sectional design with a structured questionnaire, administered to patients nurses a face-to-face, with specific questions about demographic and health status and two standardized scales: Patient Perception of Hospital Experience with Nursing Care (PPHEN) and Attitude Scale for Nursing Profession (ASNP). This study was conducted at the Research and Application Hospital of Ataturk University in Erzurum, Turkey with a convenience sample of 100 patients who were discharged from medical and radiation oncology clinics and 30 nurses that give care to these patients. It was found that patients' satisfaction had low levels with nursing care and similarly the nurses' attitudes from nursing profession were negative. There was a high correlation between the scales. The nurses' attitudes towards nursing profession are affecting the nursing care of patients' perception with cancer. We suggest that the researchers must be evaluating nurse's attitudes when they determine the patient perceptions of nursing care.

  3. Advances in Male Contraception

    PubMed Central

    Page, Stephanie T.; Amory, John K.; Bremner, William J.

    2008-01-01

    Despite significant advances in contraceptive options for women over the last 50 yr, world population continues to grow rapidly. Scientists and activists alike point to the devastating environmental impacts that population pressures have caused, including global warming from the developed world and hunger and disease in less developed areas. Moreover, almost half of all pregnancies are still unwanted or unplanned. Clearly, there is a need for expanded, reversible, contraceptive options. Multicultural surveys demonstrate the willingness of men to participate in contraception and their female partners to trust them to do so. Notwithstanding their paucity of options, male methods including vasectomy and condoms account for almost one third of contraceptive use in the United States and other countries. Recent international clinical research efforts have demonstrated high efficacy rates (90–95%) for hormonally based male contraceptives. Current barriers to expanded use include limited delivery methods and perceived regulatory obstacles, which stymie introduction to the marketplace. However, advances in oral and injectable androgen delivery are cause for optimism that these hurdles may be overcome. Nonhormonal methods, such as compounds that target sperm motility, are attractive in their theoretical promise of specificity for the reproductive tract. Gene and protein array technologies continue to identify potential targets for this approach. Such nonhormonal agents will likely reach clinical trials in the near future. Great strides have been made in understanding male reproductive physiology; the combined efforts of scientists, clinicians, industry and governmental funding agencies could make an effective, reversible, male contraceptive an option for family planning over the next decade. PMID:18436704

  4. [Urethrocele in males].

    PubMed

    el Mrini, M; Bennani, S; Aboutaieb, R; Joual, A; Benjelloun, S

    1993-01-01

    Concerning one case of male urethral diverticulum, the characteristics of this rare affection are reviewed. Long standing urethral catheter and urethroplasty are the more frequent etiologies of this affection. The diagnosis is clinical, based on the discovery of tumefaction on the urethral track which pression makes spring up urine through urethral meatus. The urethrogram confirms the diagnosis. Surgical approach consists on the resection of the diverticulum and urethrography in one or two stages, based on diverticular neck size and tissue vascularization.

  5. Restructuring registered nurse curricula.

    PubMed

    Hegge, M

    1995-01-01

    National initiatives in higher education, health reform, and the nursing curriculum revolution are applied to five curricular patterns for registered nurse (RN) upward mobility baccalaureate education. American Association of Higher Education principles for quality baccalaureate education are applied to the curricular models. The patterns described are: community model, health promotion model, nursing diagnosis model, case management model, and caring model. Three educational strategies for prompting paradigm shifts in RNs who return to school are discussed: collaborative learning, portfolios, and self-assessments. These learning strategies are designed to move the adult student through Perry's phases of cognitive development from duality to relativism. The combination of fresh new curriculum patterns and collaborative learning strategies can empower nurses to discover new paradigms with which to transform the profession.

  6. The drama of nursing.

    PubMed

    Holmes, C A

    1992-08-01

    This exploratory paper considers a few possibilities for conceiving nursing as a form of aesthetic praxis. More specifically, drawing on the works of Erving Goffman on dramaturgy, and Elizabeth Burns on theatre, it makes some suggestions concerning nursing as a form of dramatic performance, and briefly attempts to relate this to concepts of praxis drawn from the writings of Hannah Arendt and critical social theorists. In contrast to Goffman's dramaturgy, which stresses the artifice of social relations and suggests a cynical view of human interactions, a critical theory of dramatic praxis introduces a normative dimension in which performance may become self-realizing and emancipatory as it aspires to the status of aesthetic praxis. Conceived in such terms, nursing practice becomes a powerful form of self-expression which has the potential to become liberating for the nurse and the patient.

  7. Certified nurse-midwife

    MedlinePlus

    ... who also have a chronic illness. SCOPE OF PRACTICE The nurse-midwife is educated and trained to provide a broad ... MD, Howe C. The DNP and entry into midwifery practice: an analysis. J Midwifery Womens Health . 2007;52( ...

  8. [Products of nursing care].

    PubMed

    Coelho, Maria José

    2009-01-01

    The idea is to think about the knowledge and the learning involved in nursing care, its technologies, the health-disease process and its determinants, as well as the care as a product. From 1980 to 1992, 544.357 hospital beds were occupied and 19,6 million hospitalizations; therefore, 544,357 or 19.6 million of delivered care. This consideration emerged from the Research Group Care/Nursing Care from the Anna Nery Nursing School subsidized by Certeau's concepts of daily care and concepts of care practices, care, and client, for the analysis of the constitutive elements in nursing care. The knowledge and learning construction points to the creation of products such as books/chapters, protocols, new papers, agendas, DVDs, CDs, thesis, and dissertations. The way of caring contribute to the development of a series of products, built on a daily basis.

  9. The future of nursing.

    PubMed

    Moores, Y

    1999-01-01

    The White paper, "The New NHS, Modern-Dependable" has marked a turning point for the National Health Service and Nursing, replacing the internal market with integrated care, and sets out a vision of health service that meets the full range of patients' needs in all care settings. Assuring quality is an underpinning theme of the White paper, with nursing having a vital role in driving this agenda forward. Quality encompasses the environment of care, the professionalism, skill and compassion of staff, the effectiveness of treatments and respect and dignity of patients. This is an exciting time for nursing with many challenges, as the recognition and value for nursing grows. The profession has the ability to rise to these challenges and make a real difference to people's health and well being.

  10. Nursing and spirituality.

    PubMed

    Hussey, Trevor

    2009-04-01

    Those matters that are judged to be spiritual are seen as especially valuable and important. For this reason it is claimed that nurses need to be able to offer spiritual care when appropriate and, to aid them in this, nurse theorists have discussed the nature of spirituality. In a recent debate John Paley has argued that nurses should adopt a naturalistic stance which would enable them to employ the insights of modern science. Barbara Pesut has criticized this thesis, especially as it is applied to palliative care. This paper re-examines this debate with particular attention to the meaning of 'spirituality' and the justification for accepting spiritual and religious theories. It is argued that when we take into consideration the great diversity among religious and spiritual ideas, the lack of rational means of deciding between them when they conflict, and the practicalities of nursing, we find that a spiritual viewpoint is less useful than a naturalistic one, when offering palliative care.

  11. Dysthanasia: nursing professionals' perception.

    PubMed

    de Menezes, Milene Barcellos; Selli, Lucilda; de Souza Alves, Joseane

    2009-01-01

    Dysthanasia means slow and painful death without quality of life. This study aimed to know whether nurses identify dysthanasia as part of the final process of the lives of terminal patients hospitalized at an adult ICU. This is an exploratory-qualitative study. Data were collected through semi-structured interviews with ten nurses with at least one year of experience in an ICU, and interpreted through content analysis. Results indicate that nurses understand and identify dysthanasia, do not agree with it and recognize elements of orthonasia as the adequate procedure for terminal patients. We conclude that nurses interpret dysthanasia as extending life with pain and suffering, while terminal patients are submitted to futile treatments that do not benefit them. They also identify dysthanasia using elements of orthonasia to explain it.

  12. [Nursing care wall planning].

    PubMed

    Moreau, Véronique

    2013-01-01

    Nursing care wall planners are not a tool for assessing workload, but a means of providing coherence and individualised monitoring of care. Its application is focused not only on team organisation, but also on the patient's needs.

  13. Administrators: Nursing Home Administrator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahl, Anne

    1976-01-01

    Responsibilities, skills needed, training needed, earnings, employment outlook, and sources of additional information are outlined for the administrator who holds the top management job in a nursing home. (JT)

  14. [Associationism and nursing].

    PubMed

    Martínez Riera, José Ramón

    2009-01-01

    Author personal reflection on the importance of association in the nurse profession as one of the most important tools of development; also that notices the necessity to use mass media like bridge of connection with the society.

  15. Leadership and ethics in nurse-nurse relationships.

    PubMed

    Milton, Constance L

    2009-04-01

    Qualities of nursing leadership may be reflected in the patterns of relating illuminated through communications between interdependent members of a discipline and interdisciplinary professional healthcare relationships. Authority and responsibility in leading-following reside with the designated leader. However, there is power with person in situation with the ever-present possibility of conflict. The author in this column will begin a discussion of conflict in nurse-nurse relationships and offer questions for straight thinking regarding the ethics of leading-following situations with nurse-nurse relationships from a humanbecoming nursing theoretical perspective.

  16. The impact and perception of nursing certification in pediatric nursing.

    PubMed

    Straka, Kristen L; Ambrose, Heather L; Burkett, Marnie; Capan, Michelle; Flook, Donna; Evangelista, Tonya; Houck, Patty; Lukanski, Amy; Schenkel, Kathleen; Thornton, Michelle

    2014-01-01

    Nursing certification is an assessment and formal recognition of specialized knowledge, and is awarded through achievement of standards identified by a nursing specialty (Niebuhr & Biel, 2007). This recognition is a method of not only assessing competency, but knowledge and skills, and has been linked to an increase in patient satisfaction and nurse retention (Kleinpell, 2009). For these reasons, a heightened focus has been on identifying the value of nursing certification and outcomes related to patient care. This study explored nurse perception of certification and measured response to a high fidelity simulated scenario by certified and non-certified pediatric nurses to a deteriorating patient through simulation and self-assessment. © 2014.

  17. Deep nursing: a thoughtful, co-created nursing process.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, Colin

    2017-03-30

    This article examines some of the challenges in nursing practice experienced by patients and nurses in the UK and Ireland, and considers some of the associated stressors in the system. Nurses must respond to these challenges by crafting their own practice, and the article offers a blueprint for developing personal nursing practice through acceptance, paying detailed attention to patients, taking time with patients and personal reflection. It draws on innovations in learning disability practice to suggest that care should be jointly thought through and co-created by patients and nurses, and that this process of thoughtful engagement constitutes 'deep nursing'.

  18. Melatonin and male reproduction.

    PubMed

    Li, Chunjin; Zhou, Xu

    2015-06-15

    Melatonin is a neurohormone secreted by the pineal gland whose concentrations in the body are regulated by both the dark-light and seasonal cycles. The reproductive function of seasonal breeding animals is clearly influenced by the circadian variation in melatonin levels. Moreover, a growing body of evidence indicates that melatonin has important effects in the reproduction of some non-seasonal breeding animals. In males, melatonin affects reproductive regulation in three main ways. First, it regulates the secretion of two key neurohormones, GnRH and LH. Second, it regulates testosterone synthesis and testicular maturation. Third, as a potent free radical scavenger that is both lipophilic and hydrophilic, it prevents testicular damage caused by environmental toxins or inflammation. This review summarizes the existing data on the possible biological roles of melatonin in male reproduction. Overall, the literature data indicate that melatonin affects the secretion of both gonadotropins and testosterone while also improving sperm quality. This implies that it has important effects on the regulation of testicular development and male reproduction.

  19. Male only Systemic Lupus

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Rachna; Namjou, Bahram; Li, Shibo; D'Souza, Anil; Tsao, Betty P; Bruner, Ben; James, Judith A.; Scofield, R. Hal

    2010-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is more common among women than men with a ratio of about 10 to 1. We undertook this study to describe familial male SLE within a large cohort of familial SLE. SLE families (two or more patients) were obtained from the Lupus Multiplex Registry and Repository. Genomic DNA and blood samples were obtained using standard methods. Autoantibodies were determined by multiple methods. Medical records were abstracted for SLE clinical data. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) was performed with X and Y centromere specific probes, and a probe specific for the toll-like receptor 7 gene on the X chromosome. Among 523 SLE families, we found five families in which all the SLE patients were male. FISH found no yaa gene equivalent in these families. SLE-unaffected primary female relatives from the five families with only-male SLE patients had a statistically increased rate of positive ANA compared to SLE-unaffected female relatives in other families. White men with SLE were 5 times more likely to have an offspring with SLE than were White women with SLE but there was no difference in this likelihood among Black men. These data suggest genetic susceptibility factors that act only in men. PMID:20472921

  20. Adolescent male health

    PubMed Central

    Westwood, Michael; Pinzon, Jorge

    2008-01-01

    Although adolescent males have as many health issues and concerns as adolescent females, they are much less likely to be seen in a clinical setting. This is related to both individual factors and the health care system itself, which is not always encouraging and set up to provide comprehensive male health care. Working with adolescent boys involves gaining the knowledge and skills to address concerns such as puberty and sexuality, substance use, violence, risk-taking behaviours and mental health issues. The ability to engage the young male patient is critical, and the professional must be comfortable in initiating conversation about a wide array of topics with the teen boy, who may be reluctant to discuss his concerns. It is important to take every opportunity with adolescent boys to talk about issues beyond the presenting complain, and let them know about confidential care. The physician can educate teens about the importance of regular checkups, and that they are welcome to contact the physician if they are experiencing any concerns about their health or well-being. Parents of preadolescent and adolescent boys should be educated on the value of regular health maintenance visits for their sons beginning in their early teen years. PMID:19119350