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Sample records for nursing diagnoses sexual

  1. Sexual Harassment in Nursing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duldt, Bonnie W.

    1982-01-01

    Sexual harassment in the workplace, specifically in nursing, is discussed. The impact of sexual harassment, characteristics of those commonly involved, the need for changing attitudes of men and women in the workplace, the factor of power in relationships, and ways to avoid legal suits are all examined. (CT)

  2. Sexual harassment in nursing.

    PubMed

    Robbins, I; Bender, M P; Finnis, S J

    1997-01-01

    Sexual harassment is a problem faced by women in the workplace which can lead to adverse psychological consequences as well as impaired work performance. Sexual harassment is about the abuse of power and status rather then merely being about sex per se and has to be viewed in the context of institutionalized male power. Although there is a relative dearth of research, there is increasing evidence that sexual harassment of nurses is common and that it can have adverse effects on nurses physical and psychological health as well as a direct impact on patient care. Nursing, by its very nature of having to care for patients bodily needs, transgresses normal social rules regarding bodily contact. This is exploited by the perpetrator who relies on nurses' caring attitude to be able to harass. A descriptive model of the processes involved in harassment is presented which offers the possibility of being able to intervene at a number of points in the process. Interventions need to be aimed at both individual and organizational levels if there is to be a prospect of reducing a major occupational stressor for nurses.

  3. Critical thinking and accuracy of nurses' diagnoses.

    PubMed

    Lunney, Margaret

    2003-01-01

    Interpretations of patient data are complex and diverse, contributing to a risk of low accuracy nursing diagnoses. This risk is confirmed in research findings that accuracy of nurses' diagnoses varied widely from high to low. Highly accurate diagnoses are essential, however, to guide nursing interventions for the achievement of positive health outcomes. Development of critical thinking abilities is likely to improve accuracy of nurses' diagnoses. New views of critical thinking serve as a basis for critical thinking in nursing. Seven cognitive skills and ten habits of mind are identified as dimensions of critical thinking for use in the diagnostic process. Application of the cognitive skills of critical thinking illustrates the importance of using critical thinking for accuracy of nurses' diagnoses. Ten strategies are proposed for self-development of critical thinking abilities.

  4. Sexual harassment of nurses in the workplace.

    PubMed

    Valente, Sharon M; Bullough, Vern

    2004-01-01

    Nurses who are sexually harassed at work face frustration and emotional and economic consequences. Historically before the 1970s, nurses had little legal recourse and tolerated sexual harassment as a necessary "evil" associated with working. The Civil Rights Act of 1964 created the option for legal remedies for sexual harassment/discrimination cases. Successful court cases established the legal criteria for sexual harassment. This article discusses the history, definition, high profile cases, research, consequences, and prevention of sexual harassment. Although research is scant and little is known of how nurses respond to harassing behavior, prevention requires coordinated activities of employers, individual employees, and the healthcare profession. Sexual harassment at work increases anxiety and undermines the nurse's ability to focus on the delivery of safe and competent care.

  5. Handling Sexuality Concerns in Women with Gynecological Cancer: Egyptian Nurse's Knowledge and Attitudes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mansour, Suzan E.; Mohamed, Hanan E.

    2015-01-01

    Sexuality is an important part of normal human functioning. Gynecological cancer diagnosis and treatment has devastating effect on Sexual issues. Study aim was to investigate Oncology Nurses knowledge and attitudes in Relation to Provision of Sexual Health Care to Women Diagnosed with Gynecological Cancer. The study setting was conducted at…

  6. Sexual harassment of nurses: an occupational hazard?

    PubMed

    Finnis, S J; Robbins, I

    1994-03-01

    A questionnaire was administered to qualified and student nurses to assess the prevalence and consequences of sexual harassment. There was a 56% completion rate. Of these 43 (66%) of the registered nurses and nine (35%) of the student nurses reported having experienced sexual harassment. The incidence of harassment for registered nurses in the year prior to the study was 46%. Patients were most likely to be the harasser for both student and registered nurses but there was an increased likelihood that other staff were involved in the harassment of registered nurses with doctors and male nursing staff being the predominant perpetrators. Dimensions of assertiveness and sex role identity did not predict the likelihood of harassment. Results are discussed in the context of attribution theory and gender power relationships.

  7. Predictive factors for the Nursing Diagnoses in people living with Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome 1

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Richardson Augusto Rosendo; Costa, Romanniny Hévillyn Silva; Nelson, Ana Raquel Cortês; Duarte, Fernando Hiago da Silva; Prado, Nanete Caroline da Costa; Rodrigues, Eduardo Henrique Fagundes

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: to identify the predictive factors for the nursing diagnoses in people living with Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome. Method: a cross-sectional study, undertaken with 113 people living with AIDS. The data were collected using an interview script and physical examination. Logistic regression was used for the data analysis, considering a level of significance of 10%. Results: the predictive factors identified were: for the nursing diagnosis of knowledge deficit-inadequate following of instructions and verbalization of the problem; for the nursing diagnosis of failure to adhere - years of study, behavior indicative of failure to adhere, participation in the treatment and forgetfulness; for the nursing diagnosis of sexual dysfunction - family income, reduced frequency of sexual practice, perceived deficit in sexual desire, perceived limitations imposed by the disease and altered body function. Conclusion: the predictive factors for these nursing diagnoses involved sociodemographic and clinical characteristics, defining characteristics, and related factors, which must be taken into consideration during the assistance provided by the nurse. PMID:27384466

  8. Validity of the decreased sexual desire screener for diagnosing hypoactive sexual desire disorder.

    PubMed

    Clayton, Anita H; Goldfischer, Evan; Goldstein, Irwin; DeRogatis, Leonard; Nappi, Rossella; Lewis-D'Agostino, Diane J; Kimura, Toshio; Hebert, Antoine; Pyke, Robert

    2013-01-01

    The decreased sexual desire screener is a brief diagnostic instrument for generalized acquired hypoactive sexual desire disorder in women. During the screening visit of 2 clinical trials, the authors assessed sensitivity of the decreased sexual desire screener in premenopausal women presenting with decreased sexual desire. The authors compared diagnoses of generalized acquired hypoactive sexual desire disorder made by clinicians who were not trained or specialized in the diagnosis of female sexual dysfunction using the decreased sexual desire screener with diagnoses made by expert clinicians after an extensive diagnostic interview. The sensitivity of the decreased sexual desire screener was 0.946 in a North American trial and 0.960 in a European trial.

  9. [Nursing diagnoses and reports. An appropriate relationship?].

    PubMed

    López Medina, Isabel M; Pancorbo Hidalgo, Pedro L; Sánchez Jurado, Laura I; Sánchez Criado, Vicente

    2003-03-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the use of nursing diagnosis in nursing discharge planning, according to NANDA taxonomy adapted to the model of V. Henderson. We have made a retrospective descriptive study analyzing 260 discharge care plan reports, from a county hospital of Jaén (Spain), during the period 1994-1998. We found 4.2 +/- 2.0 (average +/- standard deviation) nursing problems by discharge plan report. 62.4% of the problems were stated correctly as nursing diagnosis, with an average of 2.6 +/- 1.9 correct nursing diagnosis by report and 37.6% were incorrect nursing diagnosis, 1.6 +/- 1.1 by report as average. Most of the registered nursing problems (95.6%) were actual problems, present in the patients; a 4.3% were potential or high risk problems, and only one possible type nursing diagnosis was identified. After grouping the nursing problems according to the needs of the model of Virginia Henderson, we find that most of diagnosis cited were included in biological needs, and in smaller number to the psychosocial needs.

  10. [Outpatient nursing consultation and nursing diagnoses related to demographic and clinical characteristics].

    PubMed

    Franzen, Elenara; Scain, Suzana Fiore; Záchia, Suzana A; Schmidt, Maria Luiza; Rabin, Eliane G; da Rosa, Ninon Girardon; Menegon, Dóris B; dos Santos, Luciana Batista dos; Heldt, Elizeth

    2012-09-01

    This study was aimed at verifyjing the relationship between demographic and clinicalfeatures and nursing diagnoses established during a nurse consultation in a general hospital. This is a cross-sectional study that assessed 237 nursing consultations of patients in two different programs Women's Health (46 in obstetrical nursing and 24 in mastology nursing) and 167 in diabetes mellitus education. A total of 49 nursing diagnoses were identified. The most frequent in the women's health program were: knowledge deficit, impaired comfort, impaired tissue, integrity and anxiety; in the program of diabetes education were: ineffective therapeutic regimen management, and imbalanced nutrition: more than body requirements. There was a significant association between the most common diagnoses with certain demographic and clinical features. The results confirmed that the identification of the nursing diagnoses during the consultation may provide accuracy in the focus of outpatient care.

  11. Behind closed doors: school nurses and sexual education.

    PubMed

    Brewin, Dorothy; Koren, Ainat; Morgan, Betty; Shipley, Sara; Hardy, Rachel L

    2014-02-01

    School nurses can play a key role in providing sexual education in schools. However, they often face barriers from the school administration and concerned parents. Additionally, school nurses may have limited formal preparation in managing sexual health issues. This study used a descriptive qualitative method to explore the school nurses' experiences with facilitators and barriers to providing sexual education. Eighteen nurses from 12 Massachusetts high schools were interviewed. Results showed that the school nurses do not provide formal sexual education at their schools but frequently conduct informal sessions. School nurses reported that students needed more sexual health information, yet there was no collaboration with the school health teachers. Common barriers included lack of privacy and time, confidentiality issues, and fear of conflict. Nurses working in communities with high teen pregnancy rates reported more barriers. The findings can inform the development of policies and practices for sexual education by school nurses.

  12. Nursing diagnoses in patients with immune-bullous dermatosis 1

    PubMed Central

    Brandão, Euzeli da Silva; dos Santos, Iraci; Lanzillotti, Regina Serrão; Ferreira, Adriano Menis; Gamba, Mônica Antar; Azulay-Abulafia, Luna

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: identify nursing diagnoses in patients with immune-bullous dermatosis. Method: a quantitative and descriptive research, carried out in three institutions located in Rio de Janeiro and Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil, using the Client Assessment Protocol in Dermatology during a nursing consultation. Simple descriptive statistics was used for data analysis. Results: 14 subjects participated in the study, nine with a diagnosis of pemphigus vulgaris, pemphigus two and three of bullous pemphigoid. The age ranged between 27 and 82 years, predominantly females (11). 14 nursing diagnoses were discussed and identified from a clinical rationale in all study participants, representing the most common human responses in this sample. The application of the Assessment Protocol in Dermatology facilitated the comprehensive assessment, in addition to providing the identification of diagnostics according to the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association International. Conclusion: the nursing diagnoses presented confirm the necessity of interdisciplinary work during the care for this clientele. For better description of the phenomena related to the client in question, it is suggested the inclusion of two risk factors related in three diagnoses of this taxonomy. It is worth noting the contribution of the findings for the care, education and research in nursing in dermatology. PMID:27533274

  13. Clinical profile, nursing diagnoses and nursing care for postoperative bariatric surgery patients.

    PubMed

    Steyer, Nathalia Helene; Oliveira, Magáli Costa; Gouvêa, Mara Regina Ferreira; Echer, Isabel Cristina; Lucena, Amália de Fátima

    2016-03-01

    Objective To analyze the clinical profile, nursing diagnoses, and nursing care established for postoperative bariatric surgery patients. Method Cross-sectional study carried out in a hospital in southern Brazil with a sample of 143 patients. Data were collected retrospectively from electronic medical records between 2011 and 2012 and analyzed statistically. Results We found a predominance of adult female patients (84%) with class III obesity (59.4%) and hypertension (72%). Thirty-five nursing diagnoses were reported, among which the most frequent were: Acute Pain (99.3%), Risk for perioperative positioning injury (98.6%), and Impaired tissue integrity (93%). The most frequently prescribed nursing care were: to use protection mechanisms in the surgical patient positioning, to record pain as 5th vital sign, and to take vital signs. There was an association between age and comorbidities. Conclusion The nursing diagnoses supported the nursing care prescription, which enables the qualification of nursing assistance.

  14. [Vision-impaired patients. Nursing diagnoses].

    PubMed

    García-Carpintero Muñoz, M A

    2001-10-01

    The author analyzes the most habitual problems one encounters in patients suffering a visual deficit, using the NANDA diagnostic taxonomy. The author formulates and classifies these problems as well as the specific nursing treatments which should be carried out when dealing with each one of these problems.

  15. Testing the generalizability of the ISO model for nursing diagnoses.

    PubMed

    Harris, Marcelline; Kim, Hyeoneui; Rhudy, Lori; Savova, Guergana; Chute, Christopher

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore whether the ISO reference terminology model for nursing diagnoses could be generalized to the MDS data set that, like nursing terminologies standardizes expressions of the concepts within and relevant to the domain of nursing practice. We first constructed paraphrased expressions of the rubrics from the data set. Next we dissected those expressions into the reference model domains of focus and judgment, recorded any qualifiers required for either domain, and semantic links required to represent associative relations. Our findings demonstrate that the ISO model for nursing diagnoses is generalizable to the MDS data set, however expansions to the model are required if the model is to be used to represent objects rather than terms.

  16. Psychiatric nurses' attitudes toward sexuality, sexual assault/rape, and incest.

    PubMed

    Boutcher, F; Gallop, R

    1996-06-01

    This descriptive, exploratory study examined psychiatric nurses' attitudes towards sexuality, sexual assault/rape, and incest, and explored the relationships between these attitudes and the personal characteristics of the nurse. Contrary to previous research on nurses in nonpsychiatric settings, the nurses in this Canadian study had favorable attitudes towards sexuality and did not subscribe to attitudes of victim blaming in sexual assault/rape and incest. The strongest predictor of attitudes was age of the nurse (p < .02); cultural/ethnic background may also be associated with attitudes (p < .02). The results indicate a need to develop more precise measures of attitude for psychiatric nurses.

  17. Behind Closed Doors: School Nurses and Sexual Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brewin, Dorothy; Koren, Ainat; Morgan, Betty; Shipley, Sara; Hardy, Rachel L.

    2014-01-01

    School nurses can play a key role in providing sexual education in schools. However, they often face barriers from the school administration and concerned parents. Additionally, school nurses may have limited formal preparation in managing sexual health issues. This study used a descriptive qualitative method to explore the school nurses'…

  18. Evaluating Sexual Nursing Care Intervention for Reducing Sexual Dysfunction in Indonesian Cervical Cancer Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Afiyanti, Yati; Rachmawati, Imami Nur; Milanti, Ariesta

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This study aims to describe the factors affecting successful nursing care intervention on sexuality. Methods: A one-group pre- and post-test design was used. Fifty-three cervical cancer survivors and their spouses were administered with nursing care intervention on sexuality in three sessions and evaluated after 6 weeks. Results: Sexual intervention reduced dyspareunia symptoms, improved vaginal lubrication, improved sexual satisfaction, and enhanced sexual arousal, sexual desire, and orgasm among cancer survivors and their spouses. The other influencing factors also simultaneously contributed to the success of nursing care intervention. Conclusions: Nursing care intervention on sexuality could be a part of supportive nursing care and an important aspect in standard nursing care for cancer patients in Indonesia. PMID:27981170

  19. [New nursing diagnoses in imaging: submission to NANDA International].

    PubMed

    Juchem, Beatriz Cavalcanti; Almeida, Míriam de Abreu; Lucena, Amália de Fátima

    2010-01-01

    The present work reports the experiment on the creation and submission to North American Nursing Diagnosis Association International (NANDA-I) of Nursing Diagnosis in the imageology area: "Adverse Reaction to Iodinated Contrast Media" and "Risk of Adverse Reaction to Iodinated Contrast Media". For this experiment the method of integrative revision of literature was utilized associated with the experience in clinical practice. The document for submission was elaborated according to guidance offered by NANDA-I and sent for appreciation to the Diagnosis Development Committee. The risk diagnose was approved and the real diagnose is still in evaluation process by the Diagnosis Development Committee. With this experiment we hope to motivate Brazilian nurses to contribute to the taxonomy of NANDA-I and participate in the building ofnursing knowledge.

  20. Reflection on diagnosing as a nurse in ITU.

    PubMed

    Cutler, L

    2000-01-01

    Brookfield's (1995) four critically reflective lenses are adapted from teaching and applied to nursing within this article. The lenses are used as a framework for exploring the author's feelings associated with diagnosing a life-threatening problem in intensive care in the presence of a disagreeing doctor. The issues surrounding the distinctions between medicine and nursing are explored. Wellington and Austin's (1996) five orientations to reflection provide the framework for the author's 'metacognition'--his thoughts about his thoughts. These are communicated by way of a critical commentary.

  1. Nurses' attitudes to sexuality in caring for cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Cort, E

    The attitudes of hospice nurses towards psychosexual issues in palliative care were surveyed. Sexuality was acknowledged to be both important and relevant in hospice nursing. A high level of awareness of sexual and relationship issues was apparent, reflecting broadly liberal attitudes.

  2. Nurses' attitudes towards the sexuality of colorectal patients.

    PubMed

    Beck, M; Justham, D

    This article reviews the literature on nurses' attitudes towards sexuality and highlights a range of studies carried out on functional outcomes following colorectal surgery. The article provides nurses with an insight into colorectal cancer, the prevalence of sexual dysfunction in men and women following colorectal surgery and the importance of addressing the various aspects of sexuality in a sensitive manner to provide patients with holistic care.

  3. Aboriginal nurses' beliefs, attitudes, and values about sexuality in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Yun-Fang

    2002-11-01

    The potential of risky sexual behaviors and adolescent unplanned pregnancy has become a primary issue in the health care system for aborigines in eastern Taiwan. Using aboriginal nurses to provide information on sexual behaviors may have potential in promoting healthy sexual practices among aborigines. The purposes of this study were to explore Taiwanese aboriginal nurses beliefs. attitudes, and values about sexuality. Several health centers in eastern Taiwan were randomly selected to recruit participants in the year 2000. A self-report questionnaire was administered to 206 female nurses (mean age = 28.4, SD = 7.4) who worked in various clinical units. The results revealed that aboriginal nurses hold moderately positive beliefs, attitudes, and values about sexuality. The conflict between aboriginal nurses' belief and value systems about sexuality was clear. A conflict between aboriginal nurses' value systems and patients behaviors also existed. Strategies to help aboriginal nurses to be more aware of their beliefs, attitudes, and values about sexuality should be an essential issue in the practice and education of nurses.

  4. Diagnostic frameworks and nursing diagnoses: a normative stance.

    PubMed

    Zanotti, Renzo; Chiffi, Daniele

    2015-01-01

    Diagnostic frameworks are essential to many scientific and technological activities and clinical practice. This study examines the main fundamental aspects of such frameworks. The three components required for all diagnoses are identified and examined, i.e. their normative dimension, temporal nature and structure, and teleological perspective. The normative dimension of a diagnosis is based on (1) epistemic values when associated with Hempel's inductive risk concerning the balance between false-positive and false-negative outcomes, leading to probabilistic judgements; and (2) non-epistemic values when related to ideas such as well-being, normality, illness, etc, as idealized norms or ideal points of reference. It should be noted that medical diagnoses match the three necessary components, while some essential diagnostic frameworks - the taxonomies of Gordon and NANDA - in nursing lack some components. The main lack is normative as the most popular frameworks in nursing diagnosis seem to be descriptions of observed reality rather than normative and value-based judgements in which both epistemic and non-epistemic values may coexist.

  5. Relationships between attitudes toward sexuality, sexual behaviors, and contraceptive practices among Chinese medical and nursing undergraduates.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Yingchun; Luo, Taizhen; Zhou, Ying

    2015-09-01

    In this study, we investigated attitudes toward sexuality, the prevalence of sexual behaviors and contraceptive use among Chinese medical and nursing undergraduates, and relationships between attitudes toward sexuality and sexual and contraceptive practices among these participants. This was a descriptive, cross-sectional study carried out by using a Personal Attitude toward Sexuality Scale and Sexual and Contraceptive Questionnaire. The participants were recruited in the researcher's lectures. A total of 158 participants joined this study. Overall, Chinese medical and nursing undergraduates in this study held relatively conservative attitudes toward sexuality. The prevalence of sexually-active students was relatively low, and the percentage of contraceptive use among those sexually-active students was also low. Participants' attitudes toward sexuality had statistically-significant effects on their sexual and contraceptive practices. Nearly half of the sexually-active participants reported never using any contraceptive method during sexual intercourse. This finding has important public health implications, as young people represent the group with the largest rate of new infections of HIV/AIDS in China. A more comprehensive sexual education program that extends to college undergraduates and promotes the social acceptability of using contraception, specifically condoms, is needed.

  6. Implementation of Free Text Format Nursing Diagnoses at a University Hospital's Medical Department. Exploring Nurses' and Nursing Students' Experiences on Use and Usefulness. A Qualitative Study.

    PubMed

    Frigstad, Sigrun Aasen; Nøst, Torunn Hatlen; André, Beate

    2015-01-01

    Background. Nursing documentation has long traditions and represents core element of nursing, but the documentation is often criticized of being incomplete. Nursing diagnoses are an important research topic in nursing in terms of quality of nursing assessment, interventions, and outcome in addition to facilitating communication and continuity. Aim. The aim of this study was to explore the nurses' and nursing students' experiences after implementing free text format nursing diagnoses in a medical department. Method. The study design included educational intervention of free text nursing diagnoses. Data was collected through five focus group interviews with 18 nurses and 6 students as informants. The data was analyzed using qualitative content analysis. Results. The informants describe positive experiences concerning free text format nursing diagnoses' use and usefulness; it promotes reflection and discussion and is described as a useful tool in the diagnostic process, though it was challenging to find the diagnosis' appropriate formulation. Conclusion. Our findings indicate a valid usability of free text format nursing diagnoses as it promotes the diagnostic process. The use seems to enhance critical thinking and may serve as valuable preparation towards an implementation of standardized nursing diagnoses. Use and support of key personnel seem valuable in an implementation process.

  7. Sexuality Among Middle-Aged and Older Adults With Diagnosed and Undiagnosed Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Lindau, Stacy Tessler; Tang, Hui; Gomero, Ada; Vable, Anusha; Huang, Elbert S.; Drum, Melinda L.; Qato, Dima M.; Chin, Marshall H.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To describe sexual activity, behavior, and problems among middle-age and older adults by diabetes status. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS This was a substudy of 1,993 community-residing adults, aged 57–85 years, from a cross-sectional, nationally representative sample (N = 3,005). In-home interviews, observed medications, and A1C were used to stratify by diagnosed diabetes, undiagnosed diabetes, or no diabetes. Logistic regression was used to model associations between diabetes conditions and sexual characteristics, separately by gender. RESULTS The survey response rate was 75.5%. More than 60% of partnered individuals with diagnosed diabetes were sexually active. Women with diagnosed diabetes were less likely than men with diagnosed diabetes (adjusted odds ratio 0.28 [95% CI 0.16–0.49]) and other women (0.63 [0.45–0.87]) to be sexually active. Partnered sexual behaviors did not differ by gender or diabetes status. The prevalence of orgasm problems was similarly elevated among men with diagnosed and undiagnosed diabetes compared with that for other men, but erectile difficulties were elevated only among men with diagnosed diabetes (2.51 [1.53 to 4.14]). Women with undiagnosed diabetes were less likely to have discussed sex with a physician (11%) than women with diagnosed diabetes (19%) and men with undiagnosed (28%) or diagnosed (47%) diabetes. CONCLUSIONS Many middle-age and older adults with diabetes are sexually active and engage in sexual behaviors similarly to individuals without diabetes. Women with diabetes were more likely than men to cease all sexual activity. Older women with diabetes are as likely to have sexual problems but are significantly less likely than men to discuss them. PMID:20802158

  8. Sexuality in the nursing home, part 1: attitudes and barriers to sexual expression.

    PubMed

    Hajjar, Ramzi R; Kamel, Hosam K

    2004-01-01

    Sexuality is a basic human need that begins at birth and continues throughout life. The sexual needs of the elderly are similar to those of the young, but with variations in frequency, intensity, and mode of expression. Regardless of age, every individual has a need for love, intimacy, and companionship. Unfortunately, however, stereotypical thinking, ignorance, and prejudice dominate Western society's view on sexuality in the elderly. In a youth-oriented culture, sexuality is attributed to the young, healthy, and beautiful, and the myth that the elderly are asexual beings predominates. Consequently, the sexual needs of the elderly are frequently overlooked and ignored. Nowhere is this more emphatic than in the nursing home setting. This article explores barriers to sexual expression in the nursing home setting and discusses strategies to overcome them.

  9. Sexuality in the nursing home, part 1: attitudes and barriers to sexual expression.

    PubMed

    Hajjar, Ramzi R; Kamel, Hosam K

    2003-01-01

    Sexuality is a basic human need that begins at birth and continues throughout life. The sexual needs of the elderly are similar to those of the young, but with variations in frequency, intensity, and mode of expression. Regardless of age, every individual has a need for love, intimacy, and companionship. Unfortunately, however, stereotypical thinking, ignorance, and prejudice dominate Western society's view on sexuality in the elderly. In a youth-oriented culture, sexuality is attributed to the young, healthy, and beautiful, and the myth that the elderly are asexual beings predominates. Consequently, the sexual needs of the elderly are frequently overlooked and ignored. Nowhere is this more emphatic than in the nursing home setting. This article explores barriers to sexual expression in the nursing home setting and discusses strategies to overcome them.

  10. Adult Sexual Assault Survivors' Experiences with Sexual Assault Nurse Examiners (SANEs)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fehler-Cabral, Giannina; Campbell, Rebecca; Patterson, Debra

    2011-01-01

    Sexual assault survivors often feel traumatized by the care received in traditional hospital emergency departments. To address these problems, Sexual Assault Nurse Examiner (SANE) programs were created to provide comprehensive medical care, crisis intervention, and forensic services. However, there is limited research on the actual experiences and…

  11. Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity/Expression (Sexual Minority Students): School Nurse Practice. Position Statement. Revised

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradley, Beverly

    2012-01-01

    It is the position of the National Association of School Nurses that all students, regardless of their sexual orientation or the sexual orientation of their parents and family members, are entitled to a safe school environment and equal opportunities for a high level of academic achievement and school participation/involvement. Establishment of…

  12. Sexual abuse of nursing home residents.

    PubMed

    Burgess, A W; Dowdell, E B; Prentky, R A

    2000-06-01

    1. A new subgroup of rape victims resides in nursing homes. 2. Nursing home victims can suffer both compounded and silent rape trauma. 3. Innovative therapies are needed for treating elder rape trauma.

  13. Aspects of Sexuality in Adolescents and Adults Diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorders in Childhood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fernandes, Lucrecia Cabral; Gillberg, Carina I.; Cederlund, Mats; Hagberg, Bibbi; Gillberg, Christopher; Billstedt, Eva

    2016-01-01

    The literature concerning sexuality in autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) is limited regarding inappropriate sexual behaviours and paraphilias and its relation to age, verbal ability, symptom severity, intellectual ability, or adaptive functioning. A cohort of 184 adolescents and young adults (ages 15-39 years) with ASD diagnosed in childhood,…

  14. Revealing sexuality: have nurses' knowledge and attitudes changed?

    PubMed

    Giddings, L S; Wood, P J

    1998-07-01

    All nurses should be adequately prepared for assisting clients with issues relating to sexuality. This article describes a descriptive study undertaken between 1988 and 1991 which used a questionnaire to survey the knowledge and attitudes of New Zealand pre- and post-registration nursing students regarding sexuality. The results of this study have previously been available only in an unpublished report. As interest in this area of research is increasing overseas, and as it is now time to consider resurveying New Zealand nurses, it is useful to have a summary of the findings available to a wider audience. Phase One analysed the responses of a convenience sample of 319 registered nurses undertaking a one-year post-registration programme in four New Zealand schools of nursing in either 1988 or 1989. Phase Two analysed 575 questionnaires completed by a convenience sample of nursing students in their first and/or third years of a three-year programme leading to nursing registration. Analysis of the 35 true/false items showed that students near the completion of their programme were as knowledgeable or more knowledgeable than registered nurses, although there were areas where both groups lacked information. Analysis of the 33 items measuring attitudes on a 5-point Likert scale suggested that the attitudes of both pre- and post-registration students were more liberal than conservative, but with some differences discernible when participants were grouped by demographic variables. Importantly, the study found that 55% of pre-registration students, and 88% of registered nurse participants, felt that nurses were inadequately prepared for helping clients with concerns about sexual matters. The findings are compared with those of studies undertaken overseas this decade.

  15. NASN position statement: Sexual orientation and gender identity/expression (sexual minority students): school nurse practice.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Beverly; Kelts, Susan; Robarge, Deb; Davis, Catherine; Delger, Suzey; Compton, Linda

    2013-03-01

    It is the position of the National Association of School Nurses that all students, regardless of their sexual orientation or the sexual orientation of their parents and family members, are entitled to a safe school environment and equal opportunities for a high level of academic achievement and school participation/involvement. Sexual minority persons are those who identify themselves as gay, lesbian, or bisexual (LGB) or are unsure of their sexual orientation, or those who have had sexual contact with persons of the same sex or both sexes (Kann et al., 2011). Sexual minority is thought to be a more inclusive and neutral term. For the purposes of this statement, the term sexual minority will be used in lieu of LGBTQ (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, or questioning).

  16. Nursing Diagnoses and Caring for Patients with Sickle Cell Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    London, Fran

    1990-01-01

    This continuing education article is designed to teach nurses to describe sickle cell anemia, identify complications, specify signs and symptoms, and describe nursing interventions. It concludes with a multiple-choice test. (SK)

  17. Using Orem's theory to generate nursing diagnoses for electronic documentation.

    PubMed

    Bliss-Holtz, J

    1996-01-01

    If nursing practice is guided by nursing theory, then decision-making processes should be filtered through the theory in such a way that makes the outcomes of the process both unique and useful to nursing. This article presents a discussion of the formulation of a decision-making process based on Orem's self-care deficit nursing theory that produces specific diagnostic statements about the relationship between individuals' therapeutic self-care demand and their self-care agency.

  18. Do knowledge, knowledge sources and reasoning skills affect the accuracy of nursing diagnoses? a randomised study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background This paper reports a study about the effect of knowledge sources, such as handbooks, an assessment format and a predefined record structure for diagnostic documentation, as well as the influence of knowledge, disposition toward critical thinking and reasoning skills, on the accuracy of nursing diagnoses. Knowledge sources can support nurses in deriving diagnoses. A nurse’s disposition toward critical thinking and reasoning skills is also thought to influence the accuracy of his or her nursing diagnoses. Method A randomised factorial design was used in 2008–2009 to determine the effect of knowledge sources. We used the following instruments to assess the influence of ready knowledge, disposition, and reasoning skills on the accuracy of diagnoses: (1) a knowledge inventory, (2) the California Critical Thinking Disposition Inventory, and (3) the Health Science Reasoning Test. Nurses (n = 249) were randomly assigned to one of four factorial groups, and were instructed to derive diagnoses based on an assessment interview with a simulated patient/actor. Results The use of a predefined record structure resulted in a significantly higher accuracy of nursing diagnoses. A regression analysis reveals that almost half of the variance in the accuracy of diagnoses is explained by the use of a predefined record structure, a nurse’s age and the reasoning skills of `deduction’ and `analysis’. Conclusions Improving nurses’ dispositions toward critical thinking and reasoning skills, and the use of a predefined record structure, improves accuracy of nursing diagnoses. PMID:22852577

  19. Vaginal Dryness and Beyond: The Sexual Health Needs of Women Diagnosed With Metastatic Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    McClelland, Sara I; Holland, Kathryn J; Griggs, Jennifer J

    2015-01-01

    While research on the sexual health of women with early stage cancer has grown extensively over the past decade, markedly less information is available to support the sexual health needs of women diagnosed with advanced breast cancer. Semistructured interviews were conducted with 32 women diagnosed with metastatic breast cancer (ages 35 to 77) about questions they had concerning their sexual health and intimate relationships. All participants were recruited from a comprehensive cancer center at a large Midwestern university. Three themes were examined: the role of sexual activity and intimate touch in participants' lives, unmet information needs about sexual health, and communication with medical providers about sexual concerns. Findings indicated that sexual activities with partners were important; however, participants worried about their own physical limitations and reported frequent physical (e.g., bone pains) and vaginal pain associated with intercourse. When women raised concerns about these issues in clinical settings, medical providers often focused exclusively on vaginal lubricants, which did not address the entirety of women's problems or concerns. In addition, women diagnosed with metastatic breast cancer reported needing additional resources about specialized vaginal lubricants, nonpenetrative and nongenitally focused sex, and sexual positions that did not compromise their physical health yet still provided pleasure.

  20. [Consensus on nursing diagnoses, interventions and outcomes for home care of patients with heart failure].

    PubMed

    Azzolin, Karina; de Souza, Emiliane Nogueira; Ruschel, Karen Brasil; Mussi, Cláudia Motta; de Lucena, Amália Fátima; Rabelo, Eneida Rejane

    2012-12-01

    This was a consensus study with six cardiology nurses with the objective of selecting nursing diagnoses, outcomes and interventions described by NANDA International (NANDA-I), Nursing Outcomes Classification (NOC), Nursing Intervention Classification (NIC), for home care of patients with heart failure (HF). Eight nursing diagnoses (NDs) were pre-selected and a consensus was achieved in three stages, during which interventions/activities and outcomes/indicators of each NDs were validated and those considered valid obtained 70% to 100% consensus. From the eight pre-selected NDs, two were excluded due to the lack of consensus on appropriate interventions for the clinical home care scenario. Eleven interventions were selected from a total of 96 pre-selected ones and seven outcomes were validated out of 71. The practice of consensus among expert nurses provides assistance to the qualifications of the care process and deepens the knowledge about the use of tazonomies in nursing clinical practice.

  1. Commercial Sexual Exploitation of Children and the School Nurse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grace, Lisa Goldblatt; Starck, Maureen; Potenza, Jane; Kenney, Patricia A.; Sheetz, Anne H.

    2012-01-01

    As trusted health professionals in the school setting, school nurses are well positioned to identify students who may be victims of commercial sexual exploitation of children (CSEC). However, until recently this issue has been clouded by lack of awareness, stigma, and/or denial. Since nationally the average age of entry for girls into the…

  2. Women's views of their sexual difficulties: agreement and disagreement with clinical diagnoses.

    PubMed

    King, Michael; Holt, Victoria; Nazareth, Irwin

    2007-04-01

    There is controversy about how to conceptualize sexual problems in women. Our purpose in this study was to compare ICD-10 diagnoses of sexual dysfunction in women with whether or not the woman perceived she had a sexual problem, her views on its origins, and its impact on her life. Participants (N = 401, M age, 37.8 years) were consecutive attendees to general practices in London, England. Our main measures were an ICD-10 diagnosis of sexual dysfunction and the woman's own perception of a sexual problem. Based on reported symptoms and behavior, 38% of women had at least one ICD-10 diagnosis of sexual dysfunction. Prevalence fell to 18% in women who also perceived they had a problem and to 6% in women who regarded the problem as moderate or severe. A total of 73 (18%) women were assigned an ICD-10 diagnosis and agreed that they had a problem, 80 (20%) were assigned a diagnosis but reported no problem, 78 (19%) had no diagnosis but reported a sexual problem, and 170 (42%) had no diagnosis and reported no problem. For women with sexual partners, reported sexual satisfaction was lowest in those assigned an ICD-10 diagnosis who also perceived they had a problem and highest in those with no diagnosis and no perceived problem. Relationship and emotional difficulties were the most common perceived causes of sexual difficulties, whether or not an ICD-10 diagnosis was assigned. There were three aspects to sexual difficulties in women. The first concerned symptoms and behavior that clinicians used to make a diagnosis, the second was the woman's own perception that she had a sexual difficulty, and the third was her level of sexual satisfaction. All three appear to be important and may explain why published prevalence rates of sexual dysfunction and associated factors are so conflicting.

  3. Predictors of the Sexual Well-being of Individuals Diagnosed with Herpes and Human Papillomavirus.

    PubMed

    Foster, Lyndsay R; Byers, E Sandra

    2016-02-01

    Research suggests that having a sexually transmitted infection (STI) such as genital herpes and human papillomavirus (HPV) can negatively affect sexual well-being. However, there is little research examining factors associated with poorer sexual well-being among individuals with a STI. This study investigated the extent to which stigma experiences, individual characteristics, and STI characteristics were associated with multiple aspects of sexual well-being among individuals diagnosed with herpes and/or HPV. Participants were an average of 36 years old (SD = 11.58) and included 188 individuals with herpes and/or HPV who completed measures of sexual activity, sexual problems, and sexual cognitive-affective factors. The results showed that experiences of stigmatization were the most important predictors of sexual well-being. Participants who perceived were stigmatized by others as well as those who internalized negative social attitudes to a greater extent reported poorer sexual well-being across all dimensions, over and above individual and STI characteristics. The implications of these findings for sexual health professionals are discussed.

  4. [Opinions of nursing students about various sexual practices].

    PubMed

    Egry, E Y

    1985-04-01

    This study sought to determine the beliefs of nursing students on human sexuality, their information sources, and persons influencing their opinion. A survey conducted December 1983 to January 1985 targeted female graduating students in Nursing and Obstetrics at the University of Sao Paulo (USP) School of Nursing; its findings were then compared to similar studies conducted among the general population. The findings show that the target population and general population opinions differ little, reflecting fear and prejudice about sexual practices. Also, the professional training of Brazil's nurses failed to include a fundamental understanding of human sexuality. The 42 respondents are characterized as follows: age 21 to 36 years; 95.2% single; 88% childless; 59.5% born in the city of Sao Paulo; 88% born in the state of Sao Paulo; 85.7% with long term residence in urban areas and state capitals; and 92.5% attended 4 years of nursing school at USP. Results showed: 47.6% favored premarital sex; 26.2% espoused premarital virginity for men and 19% for women; roughly 60% disapproved of extramarital relations for both sexes. 75% considered masturbation normal for both sexes; about 90% approved of contraceptive practices for men and women; 90.5% favored family planning; 26% were strictly against abortion; nearly 60% found prostitution unacceptable for both sexes; and homosexuality in both sexes was considered taboo by 42.8%, and acceptable by 14%. The vast majority favored sexual education at all levels. Regarding sources of sexual infomation: books, magazines and encyclopedias comprised 25%; male friends, 10%; girlfriends, 9.4%; boyfriends 8%; and, the University of Sao Paulo School of Nursing, a mere 6.5%. The persons who influenced their opinions were: first, boyfriend (23.7%) followed by mother, girlfriends and male friends; second, girlfriend (28.5%) followed by boyfriend and male friend; third, girlfriend, boyfriend, male friend, and teachers (7.1% each); fourth

  5. Aspects of Sexuality in Adolescents and Adults Diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorders in Childhood.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Lucrecia Cabral; Gillberg, Carina I; Cederlund, Mats; Hagberg, Bibbi; Gillberg, Christopher; Billstedt, Eva

    2016-09-01

    The literature concerning sexuality in autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) is limited regarding inappropriate sexual behaviours and paraphilias and its relation to age, verbal ability, symptom severity, intellectual ability, or adaptive functioning. A cohort of 184 adolescents and young adults (ages 15-39 years) with ASD diagnosed in childhood, including both low and high functioning individuals, was examined. The large majority were found to have a sexual interest and showed interest towards the opposite sex. Inappropriate sexual behaviours and paraphilias were reported for about a fourth of the individuals. No relationships were found between inappropriate sexual behaviours and any of the background variables listed above. However, associations were found between paraphilias and ASD symptom severity, intellectual ability, and adaptive functioning.

  6. "Does one size fit all?" Exploring the cultural applicability of NANDA nursing diagnoses to Chinese nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Lai, Wei-Shu; Chao, Co-Shi Chantal; Yang, Wan-Ping; Liu, Hsiao-Ching; Chen, Ching-Huey

    2013-01-01

    East Asia has historically unique concepts of health and well-being and thus is an appropriate setting for exploring the multicultural applicability of the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association's Nursing Diagnoses (NANDA ND) system. This study aimed to explore how NANDA ND affect the growth and quality of professional nursing from the perspective of Taiwanese nurses. Grounded theory was employed in this interview-based investigation of 53 Taiwan-licensed nursing professionals at various hospitals in Taiwan. Data were analyzed using constant comparative analysis until theoretical saturation was reached. The core concept, Struggling with (the NANDA ND notion that) One Size Fits All, emerged after ongoing analysis of the effects of NANDA ND on good nursing, patient welfare, and professional development. The preliminary theoretical framework developed from this study provides evidence that NANDA ND may be incompatible with the cultural beliefs of the traditional Chinese health care setting in Taiwan, which emphasize holistic harmony and balance.

  7. Nursing diagnoses of newborns with sepsis in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Ana Paula de Souza; da Silva, Maria de Lourdes Costa; de Souza, Nilba Lima; Mota, Gabriela Miranda; de França, Débora Feitosa

    2014-01-01

    Objectives to elaborate the Nursing Diagnoses of newborns with sepsis in a neonatal intensive care unit and characterize the profile of the neonates and their mothers. Method a cross-sectional and quantitative study, with a sample of 41 neonates. A physical examination and consultation of the hospital records were undertaken, using an instrument. The elaboration of the Nursing Diagnoses followed a process of diagnostic inference and was based on the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association 2012-2014. Results the mothers were around 25 years old, had a low average number of pre-natal consultations, and various complications during the pregnancy; and the newborns were predominantly premature and with very low birth weights. Five Nursing Diagnoses predominated, and all the neonates presented Risk of Shock and Risk of fluid volume imbalance. Conclusion the Nursing Diagnoses of the neonates with sepsis can guide the formulating of specific assistential plans. The study contributes to the generation of new knowledge and found various relationships between the Nursing Diagnoses and the variables selected in the characterization of the neonates, which deserve to be elucidated in greater detail based on further research on the issue. PMID:26107833

  8. [Creating diagnoses and interventions under the auspices of different nursing classification systems].

    PubMed

    da Mata, Luciana Regina Ferreira; de Souza, Cristiane Chaves; Chianca, Tânia Couto Machado; de Carvalho, Emília Campos

    2012-12-01

    This study analyzes the use of different nursing classification systems to meet the standards established by the norm ISO 18.104:2003, based on a fictitious clinical situation. Nursing diagnoses and interventions were created using NANDA-I, NIC and ICNP® and an analysis was performed of the terminology agreement of these classification systems with the model proposed by the norm ISO 18.104:2003. For the creation of nursing diagnoses, NANDA-I and ICNP® comply with norm ISO 18.104:2003. As for the creation of nursing interventions, ICNP® meets the terminology reference model proposed by ISO 18104:2003. NIC, on the other hand, does not propose a combinatory terminology reference model. The unification of nursing terminology depends on reviewing, standardizing and testing these classifications in order to establish a common and sound language for the profession.

  9. Designing a Curriculum Model to Include Sexuality and a Procedure for its Administration. Human Sexuality-Nursing 50383.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, Elise; And Others

    In order to design and implement a plan to integrate human sexuality into the curriculum for associate degree nursing students at Alvin Community College (Texas), levels of knowledge, attitudes and skills necessary in promoting sexual health were defined. Of the four levels in the Mims and Swenson Sexual Health Model (life experiences, basic,…

  10. [Ineffective sexuality pattern in an adolescent: nursing approach in primary health care].

    PubMed

    Martín-García, Angel; Oter-Quintana, Cristina; Brito-Brito, Pedro Ruymán; Martín-Iglesias, Susana; Alcolea-Cosín, M Teresa

    2013-01-01

    Adolescent is a phase of continual physiological, psychological and social adaptation. It is during this time that young people tend to have their first sexual experiences. Sexual dysfunctions are characterized by important clinical changes in sexual desire and/or by psycho-physiological changes in the sexual response cycle. Premature ejaculation is one of the most frequent sexual dysfunction amongst men, with a higher prevalence in the younger population compared to other populations. The clinical case is presented of a 17 year-old male who experienced difficulties during his sexual relations. It is discussed whether his condition was a sexual dysfunction or ineffective sexual pattern. The care plan which was developed in nursing consultation was described for ineffective sexual pattern; the pending nursing treatment incorporated activities recommended by scientific evidence. Finally, the role of primary health care nursing professionals is pointed out in the detection and approach of sexual problems in adolescents.

  11. [Sexuality according to Michel Foucault: a contribution to nursing].

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, M O

    1999-12-01

    The author develops a reflexion about Foucault conception in relation to the "sexuality dispositive" that has been presented in the book "Microfísica do Poder". She tries to rescue, through this classic literature, a historic and social point of view in the practice of nursing, without missing the actual concepts that deppreciate the affection of the personal relations to overvalue the masculine virility, converting the pleasure a consumer goods and a goal in itself.

  12. Exploring sexual risks in a forensic mental health hospital: perspectives from patients and nurses.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Chris; Happell, Brenda

    2015-01-01

    Patients utilising forensic mental health inpatient services experience a range of sexual risks, including vulnerability to sexual exploitation and exposure to sexually transmissible infections. However, there is a paucity of research exploring the issue of sexual risks from the standpoint of patients and the nurses who work closely with them in inpatient secure settings. This article presents findings from a qualitative exploratory study, which investigated the views of patients and nurses about sexual relationships in forensic mental health settings. Risk was a major theme arising from the data and is the focus of this article. Subthemes from nurse participants included sexual safety, sexual vulnerability, unplanned pregnancies, and male sexuality issues. Subthemes from patients included risks associated with sexual activity, access to information and sexual health care, unplanned pregnancies, vulnerability, and male sexuality issues. Knowledge about these sexual risks by patients and nurses were well articulated, however information and assistance were considered by patients to be less than satisfactory in improving their knowledge or in providing the support they considered important to reduce sexual risks. The issue of risk needs to be addressed, and nurses would be well placed to contribute; however they require education to improve their ability to provide sexual health education to patients along with strategies to ensure patients receive the support and services they require to reduce their exposure to sexual risks.

  13. Expressing sexuality in nursing homes. The experience of older women: A qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Palacios-Ceña, Domingo; Martínez-Piedrola, Rosa María; Pérez-de-Heredia, Marta; Huertas-Hoyas, Elisabet; Carrasco-Garrido, Pilar; Fernández-de-Las-Peñas, Cesar

    In nursing homes, a number of barriers to the expression of sexuality exist, such as the lack of privacy, certain attitudes on behalf of the staff and the family, the lack of a sexual partner, and physical limitations. The aim of this study was to describe the lived experience of sexuality in elderly Spanish women residing in nursing homes. A qualitative phenomenological approach was followed. Data were collected over an 18-month period between 2013 and 2015. Purposeful sampling was conducted with Spanish residents in nursing homes in Madrid. Data were collected using unstructured and semi-structured interviews. The data were analyzed using thematic analysis. Twenty female residents participated. Three main themes emerged from the data: a) expressing sexuality, b) sexuality as a duty and c) respecting vows. Female residents reported key elements influencing how they manage their sexuality in Nursing Homes. These results serve to improve our understanding regarding the expression of sexuality in older female nursing home residents.

  14. [The action control scale for diagnosing performance in nursing students].

    PubMed

    Branco, Elen Martins da Silva Castelo; Peixoto, Mauricio Abreu Pinto; Alvim, Neide Aparecida Titonelli

    2013-12-01

    Quantitative research aimed to verify the relevance of Action Control Theory for the identification of risk for poor performance in the planning of preventive care for pressure ulcers. The action - state orientation deals with individual differences and the ability to regulate emotions, cognitions and attitudes to complete the intentional actions. The instruments used were the Student Assessment Instrument and HAKEMP 90, derived from this theory, in 46 undergraduate nursing students. The analysis showed high sensitivity (0.84) for the diagnosis of risk for poor performance and high specificity (0.90) for detecting the absence of risk in the care planning. The results suggest the HAKEMP 90 as a diagnostic tool for identifying essential elements of nursing education as active learning, regulation of cognitive processes and relevance of basic nursing care in hospital.

  15. Sexual Abuse of Older Residents in Nursing Homes: A Focus Group Interview of Nursing Home Staff

    PubMed Central

    Iversen, Maria Helen; Kilvik, Astrid; Malmedal, Wenche

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to increase knowledge of sexual abuse against older residents in nursing homes. A qualitative approach was used. Through a focus group interview with staff in nursing homes, the aim was to reveal employees' thoughts, experiences, and attitudes. Findings from the focus group interview show that sexual abuse of older residents is a taboo topic among health professionals. Acts of sexual abuse are difficult to imagine; it is hard to believe that it occurs. The fact that staff are not aware that it could happen, or have a hard time believing that it actually happens, can amplify the residents' vulnerable position as potential victims of abuse, and it makes it even more challenging to report or uncover such acts. The study highlights the need for education of all health care workers in Norway as well as more research on sexual abuse against older residents in nursing homes. Furthermore, there is a need for good policies and reporting systems, as an important step towards addressing sexual abuse of the aged in a more appropriate way. Further research must aim to reveal more about this taboo area. PMID:26078879

  16. Prevalence of childhood physical and sexual abuse in veterans with psychiatric diagnoses.

    PubMed

    Koola, Maju Mathew; Qualls, Clifford; Kelly, Deanna L; Skelton, Kelly; Bradley, Bekh; Amar, Richard; Duncan, Erica J

    2013-04-01

    We examined the prevalence of childhood (≤ 18 years) physical and sexual abuse reported among patients admitted to the psychiatric inpatient service and the differential rates of this abuse associated with psychiatric diagnoses. This study consisted of a retrospective chart review of 603 patients admitted to a psychiatric ward during a period of 1 year at Atlanta Veterans Affairs Medical Center who had data on childhood physical and sexual abuse. The prevalence of reported childhood physical or sexual abuse in this inpatient clinical population was 19.4% (117/603). The prevalence of reported physical abuse was 22.6% (19/84) in the women and 12.0% (62/519) in the men (p = 0.008); the prevalence of sexual abuse was 33.3% (28/84) in the women and 7.7% (40/519) in the men (p < 0.0001). More patients with depressive disorders reported sexual abuse than did those without these disorders. More patients with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) reported physical and sexual abuse than did those without these disorders. Stratifying by race, sex, and diagnoses, multivariate analyses showed that the women with PTSD had a greater likelihood to report physical abuse (p = 0.03) and sexual abuse histories (p = 0.008) than did the women without PTSD. The men with substance-induced mood disorder (p = 0.01) were more likely to report physical abuse compared with the men without substance-induced mood disorder. Screening for abuse in patients with depressive disorders and PTSD is warranted to tailor individualized treatments for these patients. More research is needed to better understand the potential implications of childhood abuse on psychiatric diagnoses.

  17. The Sexual Assault Nurse Examiner's Interactions Within the Sexual Assault Response Team: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Adams, Phyllis; Hulton, Linda

    2016-01-01

    Many emergency department nurses care for the sexually assaulted victim, when sexual assault nurse examiner (SANE) programs are not available. Therefore, it is important for emergency department nurses to understand the roles of both the SANE and the sexual assault response team (SART). The purpose of this systematic review was to identify the current research on the integration of the SANE among the SART and evaluate the gaps in research of the SANE's role, attitude, behavior, and satisfaction within the collaborative SART. Studies published between 2004 and 2014 using key words were evaluated. A 3-stage search strategy revealed 582 articles. The articles were assessed and categorized according to Level of Evidence definitions. Twelve qualitative and mixed-methods studies were identified. Studies ranged from SART protocols or responses to situational factors to SANE relationships with other SART members. The review reflected the need for more research within the collaborative atmosphere of this multidisciplinary and interagency team that defines the SART, and the individual member's perceptions. Further studies are needed on the SANE's impact on patient outcome and the emergency department nurses role when a SANE or SART program is not available.

  18. Experiences of Sexual Harassment among Elementary School Students in Taiwan: Implications for School Nurses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Yu-Ting; Hayter, Mark; Lin, Mei-Ling

    2010-01-01

    Sexual harassment is a significant issue in the lives of students. Understanding how young adolescents feel about sexual harassment and their coping strategies is a central element to guide school nursing interventions promoting sexual health. This study explored the sexual harassment experiences of young adolescents in Taiwan. A qualitative…

  19. The emancipatory potential of nursing practice in relation to sexuality: a systematic literature review of nursing research 2009-2014.

    PubMed

    Macleod, Catriona; Nhamo-Murire, Mercy

    2016-09-01

    Nurses play a key role in the provision of services in relation to sexuality in both primary and sexual and reproductive health-care. Given the intersection of sexualities with a range of social injustices, this study reviews research on nursing practice concerning sexuality from an emancipatory/social justice perspective. A systematic review of English articles published in nursing journals appearing on the Web of Science database from 2009 to 2014 was conducted. Thirty-eight articles met the inclusion criteria. Analysis consisted of a descriptive phase (types and location of studies, aspects of sexualities focused on, target health users and aspects of nursing practice focused on) and a critical/emancipatory phase. In terms of practice, our analysis revealed that: barriers exist to the integration of issues relating to sexuality in nursing practice; the social location of nurses and their personal feelings regarding sexuality influence their practice; content that addresses gendered norms and media that assist in communication underpin some emancipatory practices. Few studies locate analyses of nursing practice within gendered, cultural and social norms; consider advocacy as part of the practice of nurses; or analyse the promotion of health user participation in health services and structures. The implications for emancipatory practice are drawn out.

  20. Sexuality of people living with a mental illness: a collaborative challenge for mental health nurses.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Chris; Browne, Graeme

    2009-06-01

    This article is a review of the literature examining the sexuality of mental health consumers and the role of mental health nurses. A search identified 72 English articles on the topic. The evidence clearly indicates that sexuality is a critical aspect of who we are as individuals, and of how we view ourselves, but discussion of this topic is neglected by mental health nurses. Discussion focuses upon the wide acceptance of sexuality as a legitimate area for nurses to address in their care, and addresses mental health nurses' lack of knowledge about sexuality, conservative attitudes, and anxiety when discussing sexual issues. Consumer sexuality is poorly assessed in mental health, and is infrequently explored by mental health nurses. The result is that issues of sexuality for the consumer continue to affect many areas of their lives, including their relationships and ongoing commitment to treatment. The nurse-consumer relationship provides an opportunity to take sexual history into consideration, promote safe sexual practices, discuss sexual problems, and educate clients about sexual issues. This literature review identifies the need for further discussion of this topic and for research to point the way ahead for this important but neglected area of mental health nursing.

  1. [Nursing diagnoses of patients in immediate postoperative period of laparoscopic cholecystectomy].

    PubMed

    Dalri, Cristina Camargo; Rossi, Lídia Aparecida; Dalri, Maria Célia Barcellos

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify and analyze the nursing diagnoses for patients in the immediate postoperative period of laparoscopic cholecystectomy. We elaborated and validated an instrument for data collection and registration. Fifteen 15 adult patients were evaluated in the immediate postoperative period of laparoscopic cholecystectomy, four men and 11 women, with average age of 45 years. Identified nursing diagnoses were: Impaired Skin Integrity (100%), Risk for Infection (100%), Sensory/Perceptual Alterations (100%), Risk for aspiration (100%), Risk for Ineffective Breathing Pattern (80%), Hypothermia (60%), Risk for Altered Body Temperature (40%), Altered nutrition: more than body requirements (33,3%) and Acute pain (26,7%). All patients were admitted in ambulatory regimen and were discharged from Post anesthesia Care Unit, still presenting the nursing diagnoses of Impaired Skin Integrity and Risk for infection.

  2. A Review and Critique of Advances in Nursing Science Articles That Focus on Sexual Health and Sexual Rights: A Call to Leadership and Policy Development.

    PubMed

    Rew, Lynn; Thurman, Whitney; McDonald, Kari

    Sexual health and sexual rights are integral to nursing science but ignored in nursing publications. We searched Advances in Nursing Science for prevalence of these topics. Fifteen articles (1.3%) met our criteria. No nursing theories were used as frameworks, and few concrete suggestions were made for further theory development. Discussion of sociopolitical influences on sexual health and/or sexual rights was limited, mostly unrelated to health care. Information to influence nursing practice, theory development, further research, or policy across the life span, for both males and females, and for variant-gender individuals, was limited. We urge authors to contribute further to this field of discourse in nursing.

  3. [The development of forensic nursing from the perspective of domestic violence and sexual assault preventive policies].

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Hsiu-Fen; Wang, Hsiu-Hung; Chang, Shu-Chen

    2013-12-01

    Forensic nursing is a new nursing specialty that provides forensic nursing service to domestic violence victims and offenders. Development of the role of forensic nurses has become urgent and necessary. The high rates of domestic violence and sexual assault in Taiwan suggest that forensic nurses have an important role to play in domestic healthcare. This article highlights the significance of forensic nursing in Taiwan in the future in terms of its origin, definitions, models, roles and functions, training and education, and previous studies. Through cooperation among academia, government, industry, and law enforcement agencies, it is expected that forensic nursing will be a positive and important area of expansion for professional nursing.

  4. [Nursing role in patient management diagnosed chronic fatigue syndrome].

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Carballo; Royes, Badía; Lalinde, Sevillano; Vidal, Llinas; Martín, Alegre

    2010-12-01

    Chronic fatigue syndrome is a serious, complex and debilitating fatigue characterized by intense physical and mental, that does not subside significantly after rest and worsens with activity The appearance of the disease requires the patient to reduce the activity diminished their quality of life. While there is no cure, the complexity of the disease requires an interdisciplinary approach where the mission of nursing is to identify the least healthy responses of each individual in relation to their health status and interfering with them by means of specific support, integrated support and follow a care plan tailored to the individual needs of each individual. Fatigue, pain, sleep pattern disturbance, anxiety and lack of knowledge are the most prevalent health problems in patients treated at the Chronic Fatigue Unit, University Hospital Vail d'Hebron. Thus, in these problems and by developing a customized care plan process we use for health education as a tool for influencing the control of symptoms through interventions to improve the learning support, emotional support and Accompanying with the aim of helping the patient and their relatives are an adaptive response to their new health status and thus improve the quality of life.

  5. Experiences of sexual harassment among elementary school students in Taiwan: implications for school nurses.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yu-Ting; Hayter, Mark; Lin, Mei-Ling

    2010-04-01

    Sexual harassment is a significant issue in the lives of students. Understanding how young adolescents feel about sexual harassment and their coping strategies is a central element to guide school nursing interventions promoting sexual health. This study explored the sexual harassment experiences of young adolescents in Taiwan. A qualitative research design was employed using focus groups to collect data from 47 elementary students, 10 and 12 years of age. Three themes emerged from the data analysis: "experiences of physical harassment," "experiences of verbal harassment," and "coping with harassment." The potential for school nurses to influence students' behavior, improve sexual health instruction, and create a healthy school environment is significant. School nurses should participate in sexual health education classes actively to advance the sexual health behaviors of school children.

  6. Using an Educational Electronic Documentation System to Help Nursing Students Accurately Identify Nursing Diagnoses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pobocik, Tamara J.

    2013-01-01

    The use of technology and electronic medical records in healthcare has exponentially increased. This quantitative research project used a pretest/posttest design, and reviewed how an educational electronic documentation system helped nursing students to identify the accurate related to statement of the nursing diagnosis for the patient in the case…

  7. Representations of nurses regarding sexuality of women treated for breast cancer in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Elisabeth Meloni; Ford, Nicholas John; Santos, Manoel Antonio Dos; Junqueira, Lílian Cláudia Ulian; Giami, Alain

    2013-10-01

    The development of new treatments has improved survival and quality of life among cancer patients. Nurses are expected to answer questions and to provide orientation regarding patients' sexuality since it is an important aspect of life. The main objective of this paper is to understand the representations of sexuality among nurses working with women who survive breast cancer after diagnosis and during treatment assuming that their representations may affect communication with the patient. This is a qualitative study using an in-depth guideline which involved interviews with 28 nurses living and working in the southeast of Brazil. The narratives were submitted to a content analysis and categories of representations were identified and are discussed here. Several representations of sexuality were found in the nurses' discourses. Some of the nurses' representations may be expected to hinder their ability to provide helpful orientation regarding the sexual lives of these patients.

  8. Nurse practitioner knowledge of child sexual abuse in children with cognitive disabilities.

    PubMed

    Koetting, Cathy; Fitzpatrick, Joyce J; Lewin, Linda; Kilanowski, Jill

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the knowledge level of nurse practitioners regarding symptoms of child sexual abuse in children with cognitive disabilities. A total sample of 43 nurse practitioners from two professional nurse practitioner organizations was surveyed to assess child sexual abuse symptoms identification in intellectually disabled children using a revised edition of the Child Sexual Abuse Knowledge Survey. Data collected showed nurse practitioners have deficits in identifying various parts of prepubescent female genitalia. The majority of nurse practitioners did not check genitalia in regular physical exams, did not feel competent to perform this type of evaluation, and were not aware of their professional organizations' position regarding checking for child sexual abuse. When assessing a child with an intellectual disability, nurse practitioners must accurately assess physical symptoms and behaviors that could have resulted from sexual abuse. Examining children for sexual abuse is a required duty of the nurse practitioner as evidenced by the position statements of the various professional organizations and nurse practitioners must be aware of their required scope of practice.

  9. Relationships between diagnoses of sexually transmitted infections and urinary tract infections among male service members diagnosed with urethritis, active component, U.S. Armed Forces, 2000-2013.

    PubMed

    2014-07-01

    A previous MSMR report found that 42.8% of all incident (first-time) urinary tract infections (UTIs) in males, but only 0.4% of such UTIs in females, were diagnosed as "urethritis, unspecified" (ICD-9: 597.80). This study explored the possibility that many of the diagnoses of urethritis in males represented sexually transmitted infections (STIs), even though ICD-9: 597.80 is explicitly reserved for cases of urethritis that are deemed to not be sexually transmitted. Examined were relationships between diagnoses of urethritis, diagnoses of STIs, and recurrent diagnoses of UTIs. Male service members who received a diagnosis of "urethritis, unspecified" (ICD-9: 597.80) had an increased risk of a subsequent UTI diagnosis, especially of "urethritis, unspecified," compared to all male service members. Most service members who were diagnosed with "urethritis, unspecified" had no documented diagnoses of an STI in their Military Health System health records; however, recurrent UTIs were more common among service members who did have documented STIs. The most commonly diagnosed STIs in this study were "other non-gonococcal urethritis" (which includes that caused by Chlamydia trachomatis) and gonorrhea.

  10. Sexuality in early childhood: pediatric nurses' attitudes, knowledge, and clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Popovich, D M

    2000-01-01

    This exploratory study assessed pediatric nurses' attitudes, knowledge, and patient care practices related to the sexuality of hospitalized preschool and early school-age children. Sexuality was defined as the sum of the physical, emotional, and psychologic attributes that are expressed in gender identity and behavior. For this study, a questionnaire containing 24 attitude, 20 knowledge, and 29 nursing practice Likert-scale items was used to survey 45 pediatric nurses in a southeastern tertiary care teaching hospital. Results indicated that, in general, the nurses surveyed had positive attitudes, sound knowledge, and appropriate practice with regard to the sexuality-related needs of their patients. However, there appeared to be some attitudinal biases and knowledge gaps that could adversely affect nursing practice. These findings were used to alter the content in pediatric nursing education at the study institution.

  11. Software development to support decision making in the selection of nursing diagnoses and interventions for children and adolescents1

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Kenya de Lima; Évora, Yolanda Dora Martinez; Cintra, Camila Santana Justo

    2015-01-01

    Objective: to report the development of a software to support decision-making for the selection of nursing diagnoses and interventions for children and adolescents, based on the nomenclature of nursing diagnoses, outcomes and interventions of a university hospital in Paraiba. Method: a methodological applied study based on software engineering, as proposed by Pressman, developed in three cycles, namely: flow chart construction, development of the navigation interface, and construction of functional expressions and programming development. Result: the software consists of administrative and nursing process screens. The assessment is automatically selected according to age group, the nursing diagnoses are suggested by the system after information is inserted, and can be indicated by the nurse. The interventions for the chosen diagnosis are selected by structuring the care plan. Conclusion: the development of this tool used to document the nursing actions will contribute to decision-making and quality of care. PMID:26487144

  12. [Signs and symptoms in patients with decompensated heart failure: inference of priority nursing diagnoses].

    PubMed

    Aliti, Graziella Badin; Linhares, Joelza Celesilvia Chisté; Linch, Graciele Fernanda da Costa; Ruschel, Karen Brasil; Rabelo, Eneida Rejane

    2011-09-01

    The aim of this study is to identify the signs and symptoms of patients admitted for decompensated heart failure (HF) in order to infer the priority nursing diagnoses (ND). This is a cross-sectional study undertaken in a university hospital. The data were collected by nurses trained to deal with HF and registered in a file containing identification items, and demographic and clinical variables. We included 303 patients. Most patients were in emergency departments (95.7%) with functional class III (65.7%). The signs and symptoms identified at the time of admission were dyspnea (91.4%), paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnea (87.5%), fatigue (67.3%), edema (63.7%), orthopnea (55.4 %) and jugular vein distention (28.7%). From the signs and symptoms raised, that became the set of relevant clues and consistent as an indicator for ND, we conclude that Decreased Cardiac Output and Fluid Volume Excess diagnoses were the priorities for this population.

  13. [Nursing care in males with spinal cord injury and sexual dysfunction].

    PubMed

    Cobo-Cuenca, Ana Isabel; Martín-Espinosa, Noelia M; Píriz Campos, Rosa M

    2013-01-01

    The impact of spinal cord injury and its sequels requires important efforts of adaptation. In several studies, people with spinal cord injury claim to have covered most of their needs at physical, emotional and social level, but they are not yet fully satisfied with their sexual life. Sexual function is usually impaired in men with spinal cord injuries, and is sometimes related to problems of erection, ejaculation and/or orgasm. This issue is not a priority in the first phase, but it appears over the subsequent periods when patients often ask for a solution to this problem. A case-study is presented of a 25 year old male with chronic complete spinal cord injury (ASIA A), L4-L5 level, who reported sexual dysfunction and attended an annual review in the National Hospital for Paraplegics. After performing a nursing assessment using the functional health patterns of Gordon, the team proposed a nursing care plan according to the taxonomy of NANDA (North American Nursing Association), NOC (Nursing Outcome Classification) and NIC (Nursing Intervention Classification). Nurses are the healthcare professionals who have more direct and continuous contact with these patients. Specific programs need to be designed to provide them with the sexual education, which should contain adequate emotional and sexual information. We believe that an appropriate and systematic assessment of patient's sexuality, as well as the application of the (NANDA, NOC, NIC) nurse methodology, may be very helpful in improving the outcomes of these specific interventions.

  14. Articulating a policy resolution for sexual diversity research: nurses as moral agents.

    PubMed

    MacDonnell, Judith A

    2007-12-01

    This case study of community nurses in the Canadian province of Ontario explores the relevance of power relations to nursing ethical inquiry. Public health nurses critically reflected on their role in challenging social inequities as they generated evidence to inform practice. In the process, they developed a policy resolution articulating values and principles for ethical nursing research with diversely situated sexual minorities. The author uses a qualitative case study design and applies a feminist bioethics framework using critical literature to analyze this document and the practice context. The findings suggest that dynamics of power, including gender, influence nurses' ability to advocate for sexual minorities through research, prompting the development of a public statement on knowledge production. There are implications for undertaking nursing ethical inquiries that explore how dominant and counter-discourses and multiple dimensions of power shape nurses' moral agency in challenging the status quo.

  15. Diagnose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schauer, Wolfgang

    Die Zunahme der Elektronik im Kraftfahrzeug, die Nutzung von Software zur Steuerung des Fahrzeugs und die erhöhte Komplexität moderner Einspritzsysteme stellen hohe Anforderungen an das Diagnosekonzept, die Überwachung im Fahrbetrieb (On-Board-Diagnose) und die Werkstattdiagnose (Bild 1). Basis der Werkstattdiagnose ist die geführte Fehlersuche, die verschiedene Möglichkeiten von Onboard- und Offboard-Prüfmethoden und Prüfgeräten verknüpft. Im Zuge der Verschärfung der Abgasgesetzgebung und der Forderung nach laufender Überwachung hat auch der Gesetzgeber die On-Board-Diagnose als Hilfsmittel zur Abgasüberwachung erkannt und eine herstellerunabhängige Standardisierung geschaffen. Dieses zusätzlich installierte System wird OBD-System (On Board Diagnostic System) genannt.

  16. Sexual arousal and lubrication problems in women with clinically diagnosed hypoactive sexual desire disorder: preliminary findings from the hypoactive sexual desire disorder registry for women.

    PubMed

    Maserejian, Nancy N; Shifren, Jan; Parish, Sharon J; Segraves, R Taylor; Huang, Liyuan; Rosen, Raymond C

    2012-01-01

    Sexual desire and arousal difficulties are often correlated in women. However, no studies have examined characteristics of women with clinically diagnosed hypoactive sexual desire disorder (HSDD) that increase the likelihood of co-occurring arousal difficulties. The authors examined combined HSDD and arousal/ lubrication problems using baseline cross-sectional data from the HSDD Registry for Women. Their analyses were restricted to women who could be classified with certainty as having arousal or lubrication difficulties by the Female Sexual Function Index (requiring sexually activity in the past 4 weeks). Results showed that among 426 premenopausal women with HSDD, 50.2% had arousal problems, 42.5% lubrication problems, 39.0% combination, and 46.2% neither. Among 174 postmenopausal women, prevalence percentages were 58.0% arousal, 56.9% lubrication, 49.4% combined, and 34.5% neither. The strongest predictor of combined arousal/lubrication problems was self-reported severity of HSDD. Among premenopausal women, race/ethnicity, depression, and lower relationship happiness were also associated with combined arousal/lubrication problems. Among postmenopausal women, surgical menopause and use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors were positively associated with arousal problems. Arousal and lubrication problems were present in approximately half of this subsample of HSDD Registry participants, with distinctions in prevalence and predictors by menopausal status and type of arousal difficulty (arousal vs. lubrication).

  17. HIV Screening Rates among Medicaid Enrollees Diagnosed with Other Sexually Transmitted Infections

    PubMed Central

    Adekeye, Oluwatoyosi A.; Abara, Winston E.; Xu, Junjun; Lee, Joel M.; Rust, George; Satcher, David

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Approximately 20 million new sexually transmitted infections (STIs) are diagnosed yearly in the United States costing the healthcare system an estimated $16 billion in direct medical expenses. The presence of other STIs increases the risk of HIV transmission. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has long recommended routine HIV screening for individuals with a diagnosed STI. Unfortunately, HIV screening prevalence among STI diagnosed patients are still sub-optimal in many healthcare settings. Objective To determine the proportion of STI-diagnosed persons in the Medicaid population who are screened for HIV, examine correlates of HIV screening, and to suggest critical intervention points to increase HIV screening in this population. Methods A retrospective database analysis was conducted to examine the prevalence and correlates of HIV screening among participants. Participant eligibility was restricted to Medicaid enrollees in 29 states with a primary STI diagnosis (chlamydia, gonorrhea, and syphilis) or pelvic inflammatory disease claim in 2009. HIV-positive persons were excluded from the study. Frequencies and descriptive statistics were conducted to characterize the sample in general and by STI diagnosis. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression were performed to estimate unadjusted odds ratios and adjusted odds ratio respectively and the 95% confidence intervals. Multivariate logistic regression models that included the independent variables (race, STI diagnosis, and healthcare setting) and covariates (gender, residential status, age, and state) were analyzed to examine independent associations with HIV screening. Results About 43% of all STI-diagnosed study participants were screened for HIV. STI-diagnosed persons that were between 20–24 years, female, residing in a large metropolitan area and with a syphilis diagnosis were more likely to be screened for HIV. Participants who received their STI diagnosis in the emergency

  18. Knowledge of School Nurses in the U.K. regarding Sexual Health Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westwood, Jo; Mullan, Barbara

    2006-01-01

    In the U.K., a current government health strategy indicates that school nurses should be key contributors to sexual health education because they have access to the school-age population. However, there appears to be little research that investigates whether school nurses are the most appropriate health care professionals or indeed have sufficient…

  19. Developing and Establishing School-Based Sexual Health Services: Issues for School Nursing Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayter, Mark; Owen, Jenny; Cooke, Jo

    2012-01-01

    School-based sexual health clinics are emerging as one of the key ways to promote sexual health among young people, and school nurses play an important role in developing and delivering these services. This study used a qualitative design to explore the experiences of health professionals and policy makers involved in setting up such services in…

  20. Teachers' and Pupils' Perceptions of the School Nurse in Relation to Sexual Health Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westwood, Jo; Mullan, Barbara

    2009-01-01

    The current government in the United Kingdom has made a commitment to reducing the high rates of teenage conceptions and sexually transmitted infections by implementing various sexual health strategies. It emphasises an increased public health role for school nurses by identifying that they have access to the school-age population and the…

  1. A study of sexuality education performance and associated factors among elementary school nurses in Taipei.

    PubMed

    Jou, Ming-Huey; Chen, Ping-Ling; Lee, Sheuan; Yin, Teresa J C

    2003-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the performance and associated factors of sexuality education by elementary school nurses in Taipei. A structured questionnaire was utilized to collect data from a convenience sample of 145 elementary school nurses. The Kuder-Richarson reliability for sex knowledge scale was.73, and Cronbach's agr; for sex attitude scale was.93. The findings of the study were as followed: (1) Sex knowledge was high among study samples. The average scores for sex knowledge regarding " masturbation ", " sexual harassment and sexual abuse " were among the highest; those regarding " secondary sexual characteristics ", " ovulation ", " menstruation health care ", and " sexually transmitted diseases " were among the lowest. (2) Sex attitude was positive. Eighty percent of the study subjects agreed that school nurses were responsible for the promotion of sexual health in schools. More than 90% of the study subjects were willing to participate actively in sexuality education program in school, providing health consultation and guidance. (3) Twenty percent of the study subjects were not involved in sex education because they were not invited or due to busy working schedule.(4) Marital status, highest level of education, job title, job seniority, continuing education or training experience were the factors associated with the implementation of sexuality education among school nurses.

  2. Nurses on the Front Lines: Improving Adolescent Sexual and Reproductive Health Across Health Care Settings.

    PubMed

    Santa Maria, Diane; Guilamo-Ramos, Vincent; Jemmott, Loretta Sweet; Derouin, Anne; Villarruel, Antonia

    2017-01-01

    : Nurses care for adolescents in a variety of settings, including communities, schools, and public health and acute care clinics, which affords them many opportunities to improve adolescents' sexual and reproductive health and reduce the rates of unplanned pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections. To ensure that adolescents have access to sexual and reproductive health care (which includes both preventive counseling and treatment) in all nursing practice sites, nurses need to gain the knowledge and hone the skills required to deliver evidence-based counseling and services to adolescents and parents. Collectively, nurses can use their unique combination of knowledge and skills to make a positive impact on adolescent sexual and reproductive outcomes. Nurses have the capacity and opportunity to disseminate information about sexual and reproductive health to adolescents and their parents in communities, schools, public health clinics, and acute care settings. This article discusses the Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine's goals and recommendations, which address adolescent sexual and reproductive health as both a health care and a human rights issue.

  3. Determinants of the accuracy of nursing diagnoses: influence of ready knowledge, knowledge sources, disposition toward critical thinking, and reasoning skills.

    PubMed

    Paans, Wolter; Sermeus, Walter; Nieweg, Roos; van der Schans, Cees

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine how knowledge sources, ready knowledge, and disposition toward critical thinking and reasoning skills influence the accuracy of student nurses' diagnoses. A randomized controlled trial was conducted to determine the influence of knowledge sources. We used the following questionnaires: (a) knowledge inventory, (b) California Critical Thinking Disposition Inventory, and (c) Health Science Reasoning Test (HSRT). The use of knowledge sources had very little influence on the accuracy of nursing diagnoses. Accuracy was significantly related to the analysis domain of the HSRT. Students were unable to operationalize knowledge sources to derive accurate diagnoses and did not effectively use reasoning skills.

  4. Forensic nursing - Global scenario and Indian perspective.

    PubMed

    Dash, Shreemanta Kumar; Patel, Shailendra; Chavali, Krishnadutt

    2016-08-01

    Sexual violence is a significant cause of physical and psychological harm and suffering for women and children. Although sexual violence mostly affects women and girls, boys are also subject to child sexual abuse. Nurse is the person who attends the victim first. In order to meet the rigid and ever-changing demands of providing care to the victim and complying with our confusing system of laws, the nursing should has been forced to expand into a Forensic nursing, specialty of its own. Nursing roles in the criminal justice service known by many names worldwide-Custody nursing, Prison/Correctional nursing, Immigration centre nursing, Sexual Assault Nurse Examiner (SANE) or Sexual Assault Forensic Examiner (SAFE), SARTs (Sexual assault response team), SARCs (Sexual assault referral centre) and FNDIs (Forensic nurse death investigator). In India the premier institutes like AIIMS New Delhi and The PGI Chandigarh, do not have forensic content in their nursing curriculum manuals. The WHO and IAFN have urged inclusion of forensic content in both undergraduate and postgraduate nursing programs. Forensic Nurse Specialist can provide direct services to individual clients, consultation services to nursing, medical and law-related agencies, as well as providing expert court testimony in areas dealing with trauma and/or questioned death investigative processes, adequacy of services delivered, and specialized diagnoses of specific medical conditions. Research Findings on the Effectiveness of Sexual Assault Nurse Examiner (SANE) Programs suggests various improvements in each and every step in care of victim of sexual assault.

  5. The role of the Sexual Assault Nurse Examiner in England: nurse experiences and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Cowley, Rhiannon; Walsh, Elizabeth; Horrocks, Judith

    2014-01-01

    Sexual Assault Nurse Examiners (SANEs) were introduced in the United Kingdom in 2001, but there is a lack of knowledge about their role and the services they provide. The aim of this study was to explore the role of SANEs currently working in England. Qualitative semistructured interviews explored the training experiences, roles, and working practices of five SANEs in a variety of settings. The findings identified three categories: training and qualifications, SANE care, and working within multidisciplinary teams (MDT). SANEs have complex roles that involve patient care as well as collection of forensic evidence. There was variation in service provision and training of SANEs interviewed and differences in how they felt their role was regarded by members of the MDT. The findings suggest that SANE services need further evaluation to determine a model of practice that can be consistently implemented to provide both optimal patient care and reliable forensic evidence.

  6. Policy aspects and nursing care of families with parents who are sexual minorities.

    PubMed

    Weber, Scott

    2009-08-01

    Families in which parents are lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender are more diverse than they are similar. This article reviews current literature to identify fundamental issues facing families that include sexual minority parents and their children. The unique nursing needs of families with gay, lesbian, transgender, or bisexual parents are critically examined for direct relevance to family nursing practice. Nurses and other health care professionals can incorporate current knowledge of unique child developmental, parenting, and legal issues into their work with these families. Nursing assessment and policies that consider the unique needs of these families will be addressed.

  7. [Nursing diagnoses and outcomes related to the circulatory-system terms (ICNP®) represented in an ontology].

    PubMed

    Cubas, Marcia Regina; Brondani, Arianny Macedo; Malucelli, Andreia

    2013-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to develop titles of Nursing Diagnoses and Outcomes (ND/NO) through the relationship between the terms of the Focus axis, limited to the Circulatory System Process, and the terms of other ICNP® axes and to integrate these terms into an ontology. Titles were developed linking 17 terms of the focus axis, which were evaluated by expert nurses in five Brazilian cities. Titles whose use concordance was above 0.80 were included in the ontology. In total, 89 titles for ND/NO were supported in the literature, and 19 were not supported; 37 were assessed as eligible for use in healthcare practice and were included in the ontology. The construction of ND/NO titles based on the ICNP® and using a formal representation of knowledge is a task that requires deepening concepts used for nursing and adequate classification revisions. The elaborated titles will facilitate the composition of diagnostics that are more consistent with practice.

  8. The 5-As framework for including sexual concerns in mental health nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Chris; Happell, Brenda; Welch, Anthony

    2013-01-01

    Available evidence informs us that sexual health concerns of consumers are commonly avoided within mental health services. This paper describes the findings of a qualitative exploratory research project. This research was conducted in three stages, all involving in-depth interviews with 14 nurses working in a mental health setting. Stage 1 involved an exploration of participants' views about including sexual concerns in their practice and included an educational intervention designed to encourage sexual inclusivity in practice. Stage 2 involved follow up interviews 4-6 weeks later to discuss the effectiveness of the intervention and whether practice change had resulted. Stage 3 was conducted two years later with the aim of determining the extent to which practice changes had been sustained. The themes emerging throughout the research emphasised five main stages in the nurses' experience: avoidance; awareness; applying; approval; and acknowledgement. Avoidance of the topic was commonly noted in the early stages of the research. The education program led to awareness raising of sexual concerns and approval towards the importance of this area to which lead to applying it to practice. This ultimately resulted in acknowledgement of the need for sexual concerns to become part of mental health nursing practice. These five stages are represented in the Five A's for including sexual concerns in mental health nursing practice, the framework developed by the first author.

  9. The forensic nursing in sexual assaults: the immunochemical diagnosis and prevention of its adverse effects.

    PubMed

    Vitale, Elsa

    2012-04-01

    Sexual assault was a ubiquitous and serious problem in our society. The world's care centers and forensic associations, which were at the forefront of scientific research in sexual assaults, discussed the role of the Forensic Nursing in their early diagnosis and their prevention, but little has been written in literature regarding their appropriate management. This article focuses on the immunochemical laboratory investigation in diagnosis and prevention of its adverse effects in sexual assaults and the role of the Forensic Nursing played in this task. After a careful reading of all the material received from many of the care centers and the associations contacted, a Forensic Nursing Examination Program, with specific immunochemical address, is identified.

  10. Consumer sexual relationships in a forensic mental health hospital: perceptions of nurses and consumers.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Chris; Happell, Brenda

    2015-04-01

    The management of consumer-related risk is paramount in a secure forensic mental health facility. However, the consequent risk aversion presents a major barrier to consumers forming sexual relationships in a manner that is open and accepted. Investigation of the views of nurses working in forensic mental health settings on this topic is limited, and even more so for consumers of services. This qualitative exploratory study was undertaken to elicit the views of consumers and nurses about forming sexual relationships within this long-term and secure setting. Individual in-depth interviews were conducted with 12 nurses and 10 consumers. The benefits of, and barriers to, sexual relationships was identified as a major theme, and these findings are the focus of this paper. Nurse responses included the subthemes 'supportive factors' and 'potential dangers', reflecting their qualified support. Consumer responses included the subthemes 'therapeutic', 'feeling normal', 'restrictions and barriers', and 'lack of support and secrecy'. The importance of sexual relationships was clearly articulated, as was the difficulties in forming and maintaining them within the forensic setting. More open discussion about this commonly-avoided issue and the education of nurses and other health professionals is required.

  11. Video gaming and sexual violence: rethinking forensic nursing in a digital age.

    PubMed

    Mercer, Dave; Parkinson, Denis

    2014-01-01

    This article reports findings from a qualitative study into how forensic nurses, and male personality disordered sexual offenders, talked about "pornography" in one U.K. high-security hospital. Research rationale was rooted in current professional and political debates, adopting a discourse analytic design to situate the project in a clinical context. Semistructured interviews, as co-constructed accounts, explored talk about sexual media, offending, treatment, and risk. Data were analyzed using a version of discourse analysis popular in healthcare research, identifying discursive repertoires, or collective language use, characteristic of the institutional culture. Findings revealed that masculine discourse marginalized female nurses and contradicted therapeutic goals, where men's talk about pornography, sex, and sexual crime represented discriminatory and gendered language. Nursing definitions of pornography were constructed in the context of the client group and an organizational need to manage risk. In a highly controlled environment, with a long-stay population, priority in respondent talk was given to mainstream commercial sexual media and everyday items/images perceived to have embedded sexual meaning. However, little mention was made of contemporary modes of producing/distributing pornography, where sex and sexual violence are enacted in virtual realities of cyberspace. Failure to engage with information technology, and globally mediated sex, is discussed as a growing concern for forensic health workers.

  12. Effect of music as nursing intervention for people diagnosed with fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Onieva-Zafra, María Dolores; Castro-Sánchez, Adelaida María; Matarán-Peñarrocha, Guillermo A; Moreno-Lorenzo, Carmen

    2013-06-01

    Primary fibromyalgia, a poorly understood chronic pain syndrome, is a disorder of uncertain etiology. The ultimate goal of fibromyalgia treatment is to develop a multimodal therapy. In recent years, the use of music as an intervention for the pain management and other symptoms has increased. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of music on pain and depression for people diagnosed with fibromyalgia using Rogers' theory of the unitary human being as the theoretical framework. An experimental 4-week longitudinal trial design was undertaken. Sixty patients diagnosed with fibromyalgia were randomly assigned to either a music intervention group or a control group. Music interventions consisted of listening to music once a day for 4 consecutive weeks using two types of CDs. Pain was measured with the McGill Pain Questionnaire Long Form and depression with the Beck inventory; a 100-mm visual analog scale was used to measure pain and depression. The treatment group reported a significant reduction in pain and depression at week 4 compared with the control group. Members of the control group reported no differences in pain. The findings of this pilot study suggest the importance of music therapy as a nursing intervention and justify further investigation into music as a self-management intervention to reduce pain and depression.

  13. Sexual Assault Nurse Examiners' Perceptions of Their Relationship with Doctors, Rape Victim Advocates, Police, and Prosecutors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maier, Shana L.

    2012-01-01

    In response to the negative and inefficient treatment of rape victims by emergency room personnel, the first Sexual Assault Nurse Examiner (SANE) programs began in the late 1970s. While SANEs, doctors, rape victim advocates, police officers and prosecutors work together to ensure the most comprehensive and sensitive care of rape victims, they all…

  14. Sexual Assault Nurse Examiners' Perceptions of the Revictimization of Rape Victims

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maier, Shana L.

    2012-01-01

    While Sexual Assault Nurse Examiner programs have improved the treatment of rape victims by offering more compassionate and thorough treatment, SANEs believe victims continue to face revictimization by the medical, criminal justice and legal systems. The purpose of this research is to explore SANEs' perceptions of the revictimization of rape…

  15. Using a Social Marketing Approach to Advertise Sexual Assault Nurse Examination (SANE) Services to College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Konradi, Amanda; DeBruin, Patty L.

    2003-01-01

    The authors report on an advertising campaign to communicate the availability and desirability of using Sexual Assault Nurse Examination (SANE) services. They used social marketing precepts to develop posters to educate college students about using SANE as a health service and as an arm of prosecution. After 2 advertising campaigns, they conducted…

  16. The politics of heterosexuality--a missing discourse in cancer nursing literature on sexuality: a discussion paper.

    PubMed

    Hyde, Abbey

    2007-02-01

    In this article, a critique of cancer nursing literature on the issue of sexuality is presented, with particular reference to literature on cancers common to women. The paper begins with an account of two competing perspectives on sexuality. The first is a version of sexuality rooted in sexology, underpinned by biomedical science that makes a claim to having identified 'normal' sexuality. The second is a version of sexuality developed within feminist scholarship that tends to reject biological determinism as a basis for understanding sexuality, instead favouring constructionist perspectives, with the socio-political context of sexual relations problematised. The focus of the article then shifts to cancer nursing literature on sexuality that deals primarily with cancers common to women, to appraise the extent to which either of the above perspectives on sexuality is invoked. Within this body of nursing knowledge, I argue that there has largely been an uncritical endorsement of biomedical constructions of sexuality, rooted in orthodox sexology, with a dominant focus on sexual functioning and on sexual rehabilitation for women with cancer. Moreover, in this knowledge base, phallocentric heterosexuality over and above other forms of sexual expression is privileged, and the socio-political context of unequal gender power relations is largely excluded. References to the social sphere as a dimension of nursing care are focused almost exclusively on maintaining normality, and reflect the emphasis on functional restoration. The largely individualistic, uncritical and biocentric emphasis in this literature may serve inadvertently to reinforce and maintain existing gender inequalities in heterosexual relationships. Finally, I consider the difficulties for oncology nurses in dealing with contradictory truth claims or conventional wisdoms about sexuality from the disparate disciplines of which holism is comprised.

  17. Difficulties in Diagnosing Sexual Abuse in Children with Condyloma Acuminata in Turkey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bulbul, Selda; Demirceken, Fulya; Cakir, Baris; Cakir, Elif Pinar; Unlu, Erdal; Soyer, Tutku

    2010-01-01

    Human papillomavirus is responsible for anogenital warts and could be regarded as an indicator of possible sexual abuse in children. A genital wart was detected during an investigation of anti-hepatitis C virus positivity in a four-year-old male patient. No pathological findings of another sexually transmitted disease were found except complete…

  18. Nurse-led sexually transmitted disease clinics: staff perceptions concerning the quality of the service.

    PubMed

    Mindel, A; Fennema, J S A; Christie, E; van Leent, E

    2009-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate staff perception of a nurse-led sexually transmitted infection (STI) clinical service. The staff at the Amsterdam STI clinic were interviewed using a standardized questionnaire. A series of eight questions was designed to determine the perceived advantages or disadvantages of nurse-led clinics, based on personal experience, using a Likert scale. After completion of the structured interview, the staff were offered the opportunity of providing comments. All 36 members of staff completed the survey. Twenty-seven (75%) agreed or strongly agreed that nurse-led clinics provided more time with patients. Sixty-four percent agreed or strongly agreed that such a service provided greater confidentiality and 94% agreed or strongly agreed that 'nurse-led clinics provided a high level of job satisfaction for nurses.' In contrast, only 64% agreed or strongly agreed that nurse-led clinics provided a high level of job satisfaction for doctors. When staff comments were evaluated, four common themes emerged. First, that this was an efficient way of providing services; second, that the clinic was a pleasant environment, there was excellent teamwork and greater job satisfaction; third, that a good deal of rivalry existed between doctors and nurses and finally, that there was a need for and importance of protocols, rules and staff training and development. In conclusion, there was a high level of staff satisfaction with the service. Nurse-led STI clinics may be a useful adjunct to existing STI facilities.

  19. Communicating With School Nurses About Sexual Orientation and Sexual Health: Perspectives of Teen Young Men Who Have Sex With Men.

    PubMed

    Rasberry, Catherine N; Morris, Elana; Lesesne, Catherine A; Kroupa, Elizabeth; Topete, Pablo; Carver, Lisa H; Robin, Leah

    2015-10-01

    Black and Latino young men who have sex with men (YMSM) are at disproportionate risk for sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), including HIV. This study informs school-centered strategies for connecting YMSM to health services by describing their willingness, perceived safety, and experiences in talking to school staff about sexual health. Cross-sectional data were collected from Black and Latino YMSM aged 13-19 through web-based questionnaires (N = 415) and interviews (N = 32). School nurses were the staff members youth most often reported willingness to talk to about HIV testing (37.8%), STD testing (37.1%), or condoms (37.3%), but least often reported as safe to talk to about attraction to other guys (11.4%). Interviews revealed youth reluctance to talk with school staff including nurses when uncertain of staff members' perceptions of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and questioning (LGBTQ) people or perceiving staff to lack knowledge of LGBTQ issues, communities, or resources. Nurses may need additional training to effectively reach Black and Latino YMSM.

  20. Communicating with School Nurses about Sexual Orientation and Sexual Health: Perspectives of Teen Young Men who have Sex with Men

    PubMed Central

    Rasberry, Catherine N.; Morris, Elana; Lesesne, Catherine A.; Kroupa, Elizabeth; Topete, Pablo; Carver, Lisa H.; Robin, Leah

    2015-01-01

    Black and Latino young men who have sex with men (YMSM) are at disproportionate risk for sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), including HIV. This study informs school-centered strategies for connecting YMSM to health services by describing their willingness, perceived safety, and experiences in talking to school staff about sexual health. Cross-sectional data were collected from black and Latino YMSM ages 13–19 through Web-based questionnaires (n=415) and interviews (n=32). School nurses were the staff members youth most often reported willingness to talk to about HIV testing (37.8%), STD testing (37.1%), or condoms (37.3%), but least often reported as safe to talk to about attraction to other guys (11.4%). Interviews revealed youth reluctance to talk with school staff including nurses when uncertain of staff members’ perceptions of LGBTQ people or perceiving staff to lack knowledge of LGBTQ issues, communities, or resources. Nurses may need additional training to effectively reach black and Latino YMSM. PMID:25519713

  1. Obtaining Self-Samples to Diagnose Curable Sexually Transmitted Infections: A Systematic Review of Patients’ Experiences

    PubMed Central

    Paudyal, Priyamvada; Llewellyn, Carrie; Lau, Jason; Mahmud, Mohammad; Smith, Helen

    2015-01-01

    Background Routine screening is key to sexually transmitted infection (STI) prevention and control. Previous studies suggest that clinic-based screening programmes capture only a small proportion of people with STIs. Self-sampling using non- or minimally invasive techniques may be beneficial for those reluctant to actively engage with conventional sampling methods. We systematically reviewed studies of patients’ experiences of obtaining self-samples to diagnose curable STIs. Methods We conducted an electronic search of MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, PsychINFO, BNI, and Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews to identify relevant articles published in English between January 1980 and March 2014. Studies were included if participants self-sampled for the diagnosis of a curable STI and had specifically sought participants’ opinions of their experience, acceptability, preferences, or willingness to self-sample. Results The initial search yielded 558 references. Of these, 45 studies met the inclusion criteria. Thirty-six studies assessed patients’ acceptability and experiences of self-sampling. Pooled results from these studies shows that self-sampling is a highly acceptable method with 85% of patients reporting the method to be well received and acceptable. Twenty-eight studies reported on ease of self-sampling; the majority of patients (88%) in these studies found self-sampling an “easy” procedure. Self-sampling was favoured compared to clinician sampling, and home sampling was preferred to clinic-based sampling. Females and older participants were more accepting of self-sampling. Only a small minority of participants (13%) reported pain during self-sampling. Participants were willing to undergo self-sampling and recommend others. Privacy and safety were the most common concerns. Conclusion Self-sampling for diagnostic testing is well accepted with the majority having a positive experience and willingness to use again. Standardization of self-sampling procedures

  2. Diagnosing and litigating hebephilia in sexually violent predator civil commitment proceedings.

    PubMed

    Fabian, John Matthew

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, state and federal legislative initiatives have heavily emphasized punitive laws to combat sexual crime. These statutes include indefinite civil commitment, which is the ultimate infringement on sexual offenders' civil liberties. Many of these committed offenders have repeatedly offended against prepubescent children (pedophiles), and many have committed nonconsensual sexual offenses against adults (rapists). A substantial number of sex offenders have offended against postpubescent adolescents and teenagers outside the age range of pedophilia (commonly referred to by some clinicians and researchers as hebephilia). The use of the term hebephilia has recently received heightened scrutiny in sexually violent predator civil commitment proceedings. Specifically, experts debate whether hebephilia is recognized within the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, Text Revision (DSM-IV-TR) and whether it is a generally accepted diagnosis within the field of sexual offender assessment. Scholars and practitioners question how hebephilia pertains to sexual deviance and one's risk of reoffending and whether it ultimately meets the legal mental abnormality threshold of civil commitment through DSM diagnostic criteria. This article addresses these questions and provides recent federal case law that attends to hebephilia in sexually violent predator proceedings.

  3. Nurse leaders' experiences of implementing regulatory changes in sexual health nursing practice in British Columbia, Canada.

    PubMed

    Bungay, Vicky; Stevenson, Janine

    2013-05-01

    Most research about regulatory policy change concerning expanded nursing activities has emphasized advanced practice roles and acute care settings. This study is a contribution to the small pool of research concerned with regulatory policy implementation for nurses undertaking expanded nursing practice activities in a public health context. Using the regulatory changes in certified nursing practice in one Canadian province as our starting point, we investigated the experiences of nurse leaders in implementing this change. Using a qualitative interpretive descriptive approach informed by tenets of complexity theory, we examined the experiences of 16 nurse leaders as situated within the larger public health care system in which nurses practice. Two interrelated themes, (a) preparing for certification and (b) the certification process, were identified to illustrate how competing and contrasting demands between health care and regulatory organizations created substantial barriers to policy change. Implications for health service delivery and future research are discussed.

  4. Is there a role for paediatric Sexual Assault Nurse Examiners in the management of child sexual assault in Australia?

    PubMed

    Nathanson, Dania; Woolfenden, Susan; Zwi, Karen

    2016-09-01

    In Australia, paediatricians and Child Protection Specialists provide the medical and forensic examinations of child victims of sexual assault. There are workforce challenges in the recruitment and retention of doctors to undertake child sexual assault (CSA) work particularly in remote and rural areas. Pediatric Sexual Assault Nurse Examiner (PSANE) programs have existed in the USA and the UK for many years. Using Rapid Evidence Assessment (REA) methodology, a systematic search of the literature was performed to ascertain what is known about SANE programs, to evaluate the evidence for their effectiveness across a number of domains (accessibility, health and legal outcomes and cost effectiveness) and to inform policy on models of care and elements of best practice which may be appropriate for local implementation in Australia. This review showed that despite the limited evidence available and significant gaps in the evidence, SANEs provide a high standard of medical care and are not detrimental to the legal process. By providing recommendations regarding the potential value, effectiveness and feasibility of establishing a PSANE program in Australia, this article may be of interest to other high income countries facing similar workforce challenges in meeting the needs of children with alleged sexual assault.

  5. Factors that influence the provision of sexual health care by Dutch cancer nurses.

    PubMed

    Gamel, C; Hengeveld, M W; Davis, B; Van der Tweel, I

    1995-06-01

    A descriptive-correlational design was used with a sample of Dutch cancer nurses (n = 104) to describe provision of sexual health care (SHC) and to explore influential factors. This report is limited to the second goal. The Theory of Reasoned Action provided the conceptual framework for investigation of five previously identified factors and one unexplored factor. Knowledge, comfort, attitude (towards sexuality) and subjective norm were significantly related with provision of SHC. Multiple regression analysis demonstrated that knowledge and comfort were significant explanatory variables, accounting for 37% of the variance.

  6. Depression and HIV Serostatus Disclosure to Sexual Partners Among Newly HIV-Diagnosed Men Who Have Sex with Men

    PubMed Central

    Abler, Laurie; Watt, Melissa H.; Hansen, Nathan B.; Wilson, Patrick A.; Kochman, Arlene

    2015-01-01

    Abstract HIV disclosure to sexual partners facilitates joint decision-making and risk reduction strategies for safer sex behaviors, but disclosure may be impacted by depression symptoms. Disclosure is also associated with disclosure self-efficacy, which in turn may also be influenced by depressive symptoms. This study examined the relationship between depression and HIV disclosure to partners following diagnosis among men who have sex with men (MSM), mediated by disclosure self-efficacy. Newly HIV-diagnosed MSM (n = 92) who reported sexual activity after diagnosis completed an assessment soon after diagnosis which measured depressive symptoms, and another assessment within 3 months of diagnosis that measured disclosure self-efficacy and disclosure. Over one-third of the sample reported elevated depressive symptoms soon after diagnosis and equal proportions (one-third each) disclosed to none, some, or all partners in the 3 months after diagnosis. Depressive symptoms were negatively associated with disclosure self-efficacy and disclosure to partners, while disclosure self-efficacy was positively associated with disclosure. Disclosure self-efficacy partially mediated the relationship between depression and disclosure, accounting for 33% of the total effect. These findings highlight the importance of addressing depression that follows diagnosis to enhance subsequent disclosure to sexual partners. PMID:26430721

  7. Pitfalls in diagnosing psychogenic nonepileptic seizures in a sexually abused child.

    PubMed

    Nagamitsu, Shinichiro; Yamashita, Yushiro; Ohya, Takashi; Shibuya, Ikuhiko; Komatsu, Hiroko; Matsuoka, Michiko; Ohzono, Shuichi; Matsuishi, Toyojiro

    2011-08-01

    A six-year-old girl living in a residential care facility because of previous sexual abuse at home showed intractable seizures with epileptic discharges on interictal EEG. The features of the attacks were sudden impaired consciousness, only in daytime while eating, studying, and walking, with no motor acts and continuing for several minutes to one hour. She could not recall the attacks, and anticonvulsants showed no effects. She gradually became irritated and antisocial, exhibiting impulsive and hyperactive behavior. Interictal EEG repeatedly showed diffuse irregular spikes and wave complexes. The attacks continued sporadically for more than two years and ceased after disclosure of repeated sexual abuse by a boy at the residential care facility. In this case, delayed diagnosis of psychogenic nonepileptic seizures was associated with diagnostic difficulty of dissociative symptoms in a child, the presence of epileptiform EEG in an abused child, and undetected sexual abuse in a residential care facility, the potential for which pediatric neurologists should be aware. These pitfalls are discussed in the context of previous related literature.

  8. How does an online patient-nurse communication service meet the information needs of men with recently diagnosed testicular cancer?

    PubMed

    Wibe, Torunn; Hellesø, Ragnhild; Varsi, Cecilie; Ruland, Cornelia; Ekstedt, Mirjam

    2012-01-01

    Online communication has become a potential means of communication between patients and health care providers, but so far few studies are published about online communication as part of nursing care. The aim of this study was to explore how an online patient-nurse communication (OPNC) service meets the information needs of men with newly diagnosed testicular cancer. We applied a qualitative approach by examining the content of online messages sent by patients to nurses in a specialist cancer unit. In addition, individual interviews were conducted with patients who had used the OPNC service. Four themes became distinct through a synthesis of the material from the interviews and the messages: "a means for managing illness-related concerns at home," "a means for ensuring information flow," "a means for strategic information seeking," and "not yet available when needed most." Individualized information provided by nurses with access to their medical record was shown to be important to these patients. The findings of this study indicate that not only may access to an OPNC service help patients fulfill their otherwise unmet information needs, but also it may prevent delays and discontinuity in care due to informational gaps and lead to improved patient safety.

  9. Barriers for the inclusion of sexuality in nursing care for women with gynecological and breast cancer: perspective of professionals 1

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Simone Mara de Araújo; Gozzo, Thais de Oliveira; Panobianco, Marislei Sanches; dos Santos, Manoel Antônio; de Almeida, Ana Maria

    2015-01-01

    AIM: qualitative study, which aimed to identify the barriers that influence nursing care practices related to the sexuality of women with gynecological and breast cancer. METHODS: the study was conducted with 16 professionals of the nursing area (nurses, nursing technicians and nursing assistants) from two sectors of a university hospital situated in the state of São Paulo, Brazil. The data was collected using semi-structured, in-depth individual interviews. All the interviews were recorded and the participants' responses were identified and categorized using Content Analysis. RESULTS: three major themes were identified. These are as follows: 1) barriers related to the biomedical model; 2) barriers related to institutional dynamics and 3) barriers related to the social interpretations of sexuality. CONCLUSIONS: the results of this study showed that the systematized inclusion of this issue in nursing care routines requires changes in the health paradigm and in the work dynamic, as well as reflection on the personal values and social interpretations related to the topic. A major challenge is to divest sexuality of the taboos and prejudices which accompany it, as well as to contribute to the nursing team being more aware of the difficulties faced by women with gynaecological and breast cancer. PMID:25806635

  10. [Nursing diagnoses and interventions for patients with congestive heart failure using the ICNP ®].

    PubMed

    de Araújo, Angela Amorim; da Nóbrega, Maria Miriam Lima; Garcia, Telma Ribeiro

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this descriptive exploratory study was to construct nursing diagnosis and intervention statements for patients with Congestive Heart Failure. To accomplish this aim, 53 terms were identified in the focus axis of the International Classification for Nursing Practice (ICNP®), which guided the construction of these statements using the guidelines of the International Council of Nurses and ISO 18. 104. A total of 92 nursing diagnosis statements were constructed, which resulted in 66 statements after standardization. The standardized statements were separated according to the following pathophysiological models: 13 related to tachycardia, 20 related to dyspnea, 19 related to edema, and 14 related to congestion. A total of 234 interventions were constructed for these statements using the terms from the 7-Axis Model of the ICNP®, the literature in the area and the clinical experience of the authors. The nursing diagnosis and intervention statements designed are expected to facilitate the evaluation of CHF patients and assist in the construction of a terminological subset for the ICNP®.

  11. Nurses and subordination: a historical study of mental nurses’ perceptions on administering aversion therapy for ‘sexual deviations’

    PubMed Central

    Dickinson, Tommy; Cook, Matt; Playle, John; Hallett, Christine

    2014-01-01

    Nurses and subordination: a historical study of mental nurses’ perceptions on administering aversion therapy for ‘sexual deviations’ This study aimed to examine the meanings that nurses attached to the ‘treatments’ administered to cure ‘sexual deviation’ (SD) in the UK, 1935–1974. In the UK, homosexuality was considered a classifiable mental illness that could be ‘cured’ until 1992. Nurses were involved in administering painful and distressing treatments. The study is based on oral history interviews with fifteen nurses who had administered treatments to cure individuals of their SD. The interviews were transcribed for historical interpretation. Some nurses believed that their role was to passively follow any orders they had been given. Other nurses limited their culpability concerning administering these treatments by adopting dehumanising and objectifying language and by focussing on administrative tasks, rather than the human beings in need of their care. Meanwhile, some nurses genuinely believed that they were acting beneficently by administering these distinctly unpleasant treatments. It is envisaged that this study might act to reiterate the need for nurses to ensure their interventions have a sound evidence base and that they constantly reflect on the moral and value base of their practice and the influence that science and societal norms can have on changing views of what is considered ‘acceptable practice’. PMID:23876127

  12. Knowledge, Perceptions, and Practice of Nurses toward HIV+/AIDS Patients Diagnosed with Tuberculosis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Messmer, Patricia R.; Jones, Sande; Moore, Jackie; Taggart, Bonnie; Parchment, Yvonne; Holloman, Faye; Quintero, Lisa Mitchell

    1998-01-01

    Nurses (n=35) participating in an experimental education program on HIV-associated tuberculosis were compared with 15 controls. The experimental group had greater knowledge of tuberculosis and more adherence to universal precaution protocols. However, there was no tangible increase in their AIDS knowledge, attitudes, or concerns. (SK)

  13. Potential impact and acceptability of Internet partner notification for men who have sex with men and transgender women recently diagnosed as having sexually transmitted disease in Lima, Peru.

    PubMed

    Clark, Jesse L; Segura, Eddy R; Perez-Brumer, Amaya G; Reisner, Sari L; Peinado, Jesus; Salvatierra, Hector J; Sanchez, Jorge; Lama, Javier R

    2014-01-01

    We assessed the potential impact of Internet partner notification among men who have sex with men and transgender women in Peru recently diagnosed as having sexually transmitted disease. Use of Internet partner notification was anticipated for 55.9% of recent partners, including 43.0% of partners not currently expected to be notified, a 20.6% increase in anticipated notification outcomes.

  14. Using a social marketing approach to advertise Sexual Assault Nurse Examination (SANE) services to college students.

    PubMed

    Konradi, Amanda; DeBruin, Patty L

    2003-01-01

    The authors report on an advertising campaign to communicate the availability and desirability of using Sexual Assault Nurse Examination (SANE) services. They used social marketing precepts to develop posters to educate college students about using SANE as a health service and as an arm of prosecution. After 2 advertising campaigns, they conducted an anonymous survey of 1,051 college students. The findings indicated that posters placed in residence halls and public bathrooms reached students, produced a statistically significant increase in students' understanding of SANE services, and were significantly associated with their hypothetical encouragement of others to use SANE. Gender mediated some results. Posters placed in private viewing spaces were found to be a viable way to communicate information about SANE. Funding to combat violence against women on campus should be aimed at increasing students' access to SANE and should include the costs of advertising the program.

  15. Parenting, family life, and well-being among sexual minorities: nursing policy and practice implications.

    PubMed

    Weber, Scott

    2008-06-01

    Parenting and family life are fundamental social constructs in human society and in law and public policy. Family structures and support systems provide important economic and psychological advantages for parents as well as for their children. Stigma toward lesbian and gay parents often marginalize individuals in these families and restrict family members' full expression of social citizenship, humanity, and personhood. Stigma directly contributes to increased risk for substance abuse, anxiety, and depressive illness among both parents and children. This article reviews the relevant policy literature to deconstruct the impacts of stigma on the psychological health and well-being of sexual minority parents so that psychiatric/mental health nurses and other health care providers can identify and counter these effects in their practices and advocate for policy improvements.

  16. "It's One of the Hardest Jobs in the World": The Experience and Understanding of Qualified Nurses Who Work with Individuals Diagnosed with Both Learning Disability and Personality Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Amy; Kiemle, Gundi

    2015-01-01

    Background: This study examines the experiences of qualified nurses working with individuals diagnosed with both intellectual disability and personality disorder (PD) in a medium-secure forensic intellectual disability setting. Potential training needs are highlighted, as well as other ways in which services could better support staff to work…

  17. An initial exploration of community mental health nurses' attitudes to and experience of sexuality-related issues in their work with people experiencing mental health problems.

    PubMed

    Cort, E M; Attenborough, J; Watson, J P

    2001-12-01

    Human sexuality is a complex dynamic concept that escapes simple definition. Within nursing there seems to be a preference for broad holistic definitions that emphasize sexuality as an aspect of the unique human character. Whilst the nursing literature mostly portrays sexuality as wholesome and good, it also notes that sexuality can be a vehicle for the expression of power, hostility or hatred. In this study, the authors did not prescribe or limit the definition of 'sexuality'. Rather the term 'sexuality' was used in a broad sense in order to embrace the range of variables within the concept and allow respondents to consider the issues according to their own perspective. Despite broad acceptance of sexuality as a legitimate focus of health care, clinicians remain ambivalent about actively broaching sexual issues and there is a potential for clients' needs to go unmet. A number of intertwining variables can influence sexuality-related nursing practice. Nurses' attitudes are regarded as major barriers that prevent open discussion on the topic. This study aims to explore a sample of community mental health nurses' views on the topic of sexuality in relation to their work with clients. The authors adapted a sexual ideology scale previously used for the purposes of teaching students and promoting discussion. The questionnaire was distributed to nurse delegates at an annual CPNA conference. Two of the authors were available throughout the conference to discuss the study. Delegates were asked to recruit CMHN colleagues following the conference in order to increase the sample. The data are described and analysed using SPSS for Windows. Respondent characteristics have been cross-tabulated with item responses and analysed using chi-square and other statistical tests of association. The respondents (n = 122) confirmed sexuality as a relevant clinical issue and there was an overwhelming affirmation of people with mental health problems as sexual beings. Sixty-three per cent (n

  18. Bullying and sexual harassment in the school setting.

    PubMed

    Cavendish, R; Salomone, C

    2001-02-01

    This article defines bullying and sexual harassment, identifies associated characteristics of the aggressor and the victim, and describes implications for school nurses. The background of federal laws with a focus on the most current 1999 Supreme Court decision, holding a school district liable for damages under federal law (Title IX), is addressed with a case study. Health promotion issues and prevention concepts are outlined in a 10-Point Action Plan to facilitate the prevention and management of bullying and sexual harassment in schools. A survey tool to assess bullying and teaching plans for parents of victims and aggressors are provided. Suggested linkages among approved nursing languages, North American Nursing Diagnosis Association (NANDA) nursing diagnoses (NANDA, 1998), Nursing Interventions Classification interventions (Iowa Intervention Project, 2000), and Nursing Outcomes Classification outcomes (Iowa Outcomes Project, 2000) are included for use in developing nursing care plans for both aggressors and victims of harassment.

  19. Communicating with School Nurses about Sexual Orientation and Sexual Health: Perspectives of Teen Young Men Who Have Sex With Men

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rasberry, Catherine N.; Morris, Elana; Lesesne, Catherine A.; Kroupa, Elizabeth; Topete, Pablo; Carver, Lisa H.; Robin, Leah

    2015-01-01

    Black and Latino young men who have sex with men (YMSM) are at disproportionate risk for sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), including HIV. This study informs school-centered strategies for connecting YMSM to health services by describing their willingness, perceived safety, and experiences in talking to school staff about sexual health.…

  20. Now We Know: Assessing Sexual Assault Criminal Justice Case Processing in an Urban Community Using the Sexual Assault Nurse Practitioner Evaluation Toolkit.

    PubMed

    Valentine, Julie L; Shaw, Jessica; Lark, Alyssa; Campbell, Rebecca

    2016-01-01

    Campbell and colleagues developed an evaluation Toolkit for use by sexual assault nurse examiners (SANEs) to assess criminal case outcomes in adult sexual assault cases seen by SANE programs (Campbell, Townsend, Shaw, Karim, & Markowitz, 2014; Campbell, Bybee, et al., 2014). The Toolkit provides step-by-step directions and an easy-to-use statistical program. This study describes implementation of the Toolkit in Salt Lake County, the first site outside the pilot sites to utilize the program. The Toolkit revealed that, in Salt Lake County from 2003 to 2011, only 6% of adult sexual assault cases were successfully prosecuted. These findings prompted multiple community discussions, media attention, and a call to action to improve the investigation and prosecution of adult sexual assault cases. The primary purpose of this case report is to encourage other SANE teams and communities to use the Toolkit by sharing the successful experience of Salt Lake County in implementing the Toolkit.Video Abstract available for additional insights from Dr. Valentine (see Supplemental Digital Content 1, http://links.lww.com/JFN/A19).

  1. Life history interviews with 11 boys diagnosed with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder who had sexually offended: a sad storyline.

    PubMed

    Tidefors, Inga; Strand, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    Little is known of the possible relationship between a diagnosis of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and sexually offensive behavior in adolescents. Our aim was to understand how adolescents with ADHD who had sexually offended described their childhood experiences and spoke about their diagnostic symptoms. The boys' early lives and relations were unpredictable, and emotional, physical, and sexual limits had been crossed. However, many boys saw themselves or their diagnosis, rather than their parents, school, or "society," as the underlying cause of their behavior. They used different strategies, for example repressing memories or regarding traumatic experiences as normal, to manage their lives. Most boys had difficulty with emotions and expressed sadness or frustration through anger. They spoke of being inattentive and restless in school and impulsive before and during their sexual offenses. The psychiatric assessment was described as a "messy" experience that strengthened their belief that something was wrong with them. Some had incorporated neuropsychiatric language into otherwise limited vocabularies and tended to use their diagnostic symptoms to excuse their offenses. The focus in the assessment on the boys themselves and their behaviors may darken their understandings of themselves, their experiences of abuse, and the offenses they have committed. Further research is needed into the possible consequences of a diagnosis of ADHD on adolescents' self-image and sense of self-control.

  2. Can Internet-Based Sexual Health Services Increase Diagnoses of Sexually Transmitted Infections (STI)? Protocol for a Randomized Evaluation of an Internet-Based STI Testing and Results Service

    PubMed Central

    Free, Caroline; Morris, Tim P; Kenward, Michael G; Syred, Jonathan; Baraitser, Paula

    2016-01-01

    Background Ensuring rapid access to high quality sexual health services is a key public health objective, both in the United Kingdom and internationally. Internet-based testing services for sexually transmitted infections (STIs) are considered to be a promising way to achieve this goal. This study will evaluate a nascent online STI testing and results service in South East London, delivered alongside standard face-to-face STI testing services. Objective The aim of this study is to establish whether an online testing and results services can (1) increase diagnoses of STIs and (2) increase uptake of STI testing, when delivered alongside standard face-to-face STI testing services. Methods This is a single-blind randomized controlled trial. We will recruit 3000 participants who meet the following eligibility criteria: 16-30 years of age, resident in the London boroughs of Lambeth and Southwark, having at least one sexual partner in the last 12 months, having access to the Internet and willing to take an STI test. People unable to provide informed consent and unable to read and understand English (the websites will be in English) will be excluded. Baseline data will be collected at enrolment. This includes participant contact details, demographic data (date of birth, gender, ethnicity, and sexual orientation), and sexual health behaviors (last STI test, service used at last STI test and number of sexual partners in the last 12 months). Once enrolled, participants will be randomly allocated either (1) to an online STI testing and results service (Sexual Health 24) offering postal self-administered STI kits for chlamydia, gonorrhoea, syphilis, and HIV; results via text message (short message service, SMS), except positive results for HIV, which will be delivered by phone; and direct referrals to local clinics for treatment or (2) to a conventional sexual health information website with signposting to local clinic-based sexual health services. Participants will be free to

  3. The attitudes and attributions of student nurses: do they alter according to a person's diagnosis or sexuality and what is the effect of nurse training?

    PubMed

    Stewart, D

    1999-09-01

    The threat of an AIDS (acquired immune deficiency syndrome) epidemic in the early 1980s saw the emergence of strong negative attitudes from both the public and health care professionals alike. Certain 'high risk' groups in society, who were considered as susceptible to the disease, homosexuals and intravenous drug users in particular, became the victims of prejudice and discrimination. More recent research has indicated a possible shift to a more positive orientation, although the findings are far from conclusive. In this current study, the Prejudicial Evaluation and Social Interaction Scale (PESIS) was administered to four separate cohorts of student nurses approximately a year apart in training (n = 192). Each cohort was divided into four groups, each one completing the PESIS after reading a version of a vignette that described either a person with AIDS or leukaemia, and who was either homosexual or heterosexual. The design therefore allowed for within-group and between-group comparisons. Overall the results showed that the student nurses held positive attitudes although they reported a significantly greater prejudice towards AIDS. No significant differences were found for sexual orientation. Additionally significantly greater levels of blame and responsibility were associated with the person with AIDS, but again there was no effect for sexual orientation. The findings suggest that a slightly more negative attitude continues to be associated with a diagnosis of AIDS but no longer with homosexuality. No effect across cohorts was noted either, student nurses being as positive at the beginning of training as at the end. Some of the limitations of PESIS and the difficulties of attitude assessment in general are discussed and future areas of research are identified.

  4. Sexual assault services delivered by SANEs.

    PubMed

    Stermac, Lana; Dunlap, Hester; Bainbridge, Deidre

    2005-01-01

    Sexual Assult Nurse Examiner (SANE) programs have become the standard of care for sexual assault victims in many urgent care settings. This study examines SANE clinical nursing practices at one Canadian sexual assault urgent care centre.

  5. Effectiveness of Health Education Teachers and School Nurses Teaching Sexually Transmitted Infections/Human Immunodeficiency Virus Prevention Knowledge and Skills in High School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borawski, Elaine A.; Tufts, Kimberly Adams; Trapl, Erika S.; Hayman, Laura L.; Yoder, Laura D.; Lovegreen, Loren D.

    2015-01-01

    Background: We examined the differential impact of a well-established human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/sexually transmitted infections (STIs) curriculum, Be Proud! Be Responsible!, when taught by school nurses and health education classroom teachers within a high school curricula. Methods: Group-randomized intervention study of 1357 ninth and…

  6. Web GIS in practice II: interactive SVG maps of diagnoses of sexually transmitted diseases by Primary Care Trust in London, 1997 – 2003

    PubMed Central

    Boulos, Maged N Kamel; Russell, Chris; Smith, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Background The rates of Sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) in England have been rising steadily since the mid 1990s, making them a major public health concern. In 2003, 672,718 people were diagnosed with an STD in England, and around one third of those cases were diagnosed in London. Results Using GeoReveal v1.1 for Windows, we produced Web-based interactive choropleth maps of diagnoses of STDs by Primary Care Trust (PCT) in London for the years from 1997 to 2003 . These maps are in Scalable Vector Graphics (SVG) format and require a freely available Adobe SVG browser plug-in to be displayed. They are based on data obtained from the House of Commons Hansard Written Answers for 15 October 2004. They show steadily rising rates of STDs in London over the covered seven-year period. Also, one can clearly see on the maps that PCTs located in central London had the highest numbers of STD diagnoses throughout the mapped seven years. A companion bar chart allows users to instantly compare the STD figure of a given PCT for a given year against the average figure for all 25 mapped PCTs for the same year, and also compare those figures across all seven years. The maps offer users a rich set of useful features and functions, including the ability to change the classification method in use, the number of ranges in the map, and the colour theme, among others. Conclusions Wizard-driven tools like GeoReveal have made it very easy to transform complex raw data into valuable decision support information products (interactive Web maps) in very little time and without requiring much expertise. The resultant interactive maps have the potential of further supporting health planners and decision makers in their planning and management tasks by allowing them to graphically interrogate data, instantly spot trends, and make quick and effective visual comparisons of geographically differentiated phenomena between different geographical areas and over time. SVG makes an ideal format for such

  7. Predicting sexual assault kit submission among adolescent rape cases treated in forensic nurse examiner programs.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Jessica; Campbell, Rebecca

    2013-12-01

    Following a sexual assault, victims are usually advised to have a medical forensic exam and sexual assault forensic exam kit (SAK). Once completed, the SAK is to be transported by law enforcement to the crime lab for analysis. However, many kits are never transported to the crime lab, thereby preventing forensic evidence obtained in the kit to be used during the prosecutorial process. The current study examined rates of SAK submission for 393 adolescent sexual assault cases in two Midwestern communities and explored what factors predicted law enforcement officers' submission of SAKs to the crime lab for analysis. Findings reveal that more than 40% of the adolescent cases did not have their SAK submitted, and several factors, including the age and race of the victim, the number of perpetrators in the assault, and the number of assaultive acts, predicted SAK submission. Implications for SAK community protocols are discussed.

  8. Introduction of a sexual health practice nurse is associated with increased STI testing of men who have sex with men in primary care

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The study objective was to investigate the effect of the introduction of a sexual health practice nurse on HIV and STI testing in a general practice that specialized in gay men’s health. Methods This observational study compared the proportion of gay and other men who have sex with men (MSM) tested for HIV, syphilis, chlamydia (urethral and anal) and gonorrhoea (anal), or all of the above (defined as a complete set of tests at a single visit), two years before and one year after the nurse was introduced (Clinic A). Clinic B, a general practice which also specialized in gay men’s health, but with no sexual health nurse, was used as a control. Results In Clinic A, amongst HIV negative MSM the proportion of men who had a complete set of HIV and STI tests increased from 41% to 47% (p < 0.01) after the nurse was introduced. Amongst HIV positive MSM attending clinic A there was an increase in the proportion of men who had a complete set of tests after the nurse was introduced from 27% to 43% (p < 0.001). In Clinic B there was no significant increase in testing in the proportion of either HIV negative or HIV positive men who had a complete set of tests over the same time periods. Conclusions The introduction of the sexual health practice nurse resulted in significant increases in episodes of complete STI testing among MSM. The effect was most pronounced among HIV positive MSM. PMID:23815371

  9. School-based youth health nurses and adolescent decision-making concerning reproductive and sexual health advice: How can the law guide healthcare practitioners in this context?

    PubMed

    Smith, Malcolm K; Stepanov, Nikola

    2014-01-01

    Abstract School-Based Youth Health Nurses (SBYHNs) work in Queensland high schools, providing sexual and reproductive health care/advice (amongst other things) to adolescents. SBYHNs are often responsible for referring high school students to other health care practitioners or external health services/community agencies. One of the difficulties faced in this context is how to assess the issue of capacity in terms of the adolescent's ability to provide consent to his or her own health care without parental involvement. This is important because it enables SBYHNs to maintain confidentiality with adolescents, which encourages adolescents to obtain sexual health advice. In this paper we outline the key legal principles relevant to nurses working in this field. We provide some practical examples of issues faced by SBYHNs and consider how the issue of Gillick competency is relevant to these examples. We demonstrate that the law seeks to prioritise the concept of confidentiality and aims to avoid exposing adolescents to harm that may result from unsafe sexual practices. Importantly, the issues discussed in this paper are relevant to nurses working within this field in all Australian jurisdictions.

  10. School-Based Youth Health Nurses and Adolescent Decision-Making Concerning Reproductive and Sexual Health Advice: How Can the Law Guide Healthcare Practitioners in this Context?

    PubMed

    Smith, Malcolm K; Stepanov, Nikola

    2014-03-11

    Abstract School-Based Youth Health Nurses (SBYHNs) work in Queensland high schools, providing sexual and reproductive health care/advice (amongst other things) to adolescents. SBYHNs are often responsible for referring high school students to other health care practitioners or external health services/community agencies. One of the difficulties faced in this context is how to assess the issue of capacity in terms of the adolescent's ability to provide consent to his or her own health care without parental involvement. This is important because it enables SBYHNs to maintain confidentiality with adolescents, which encourages adolescents to obtain sexual health advice. In this paper we outline the key legal principles relevant to nurses working in this field. We provide some practical examples of issues faced by SBYHNs and consider how the issue of Gillick competency is relevant to these examples. We demonstrate that the law seeks to prioritise the concept of confidentiality and aims to avoid exposing adolescents to harm that may result from unsafe sexual practices. Importantly, the issues discussed in this paper are relevant to nurses working within this field in all Australian jurisdictions.

  11. Extreme sexual behavior in dementia as a specific manifestation of disinhibition.

    PubMed

    Bartelet, Marjukka; Waterink, Wim; van Hooren, Susan

    2014-01-01

    In nursing homes, extreme sexual behavior is one of the most challenging behaviors in dementia. Despite this, however, there is no conformity in the literature regarding how to label and define this type of behavior. Examples of labels used include inappropriate sexual behavior, improper sexual behavior, sexually disinhibited behavior, or hyper sexuality. According to recent theoretical perspectives, extreme sexual behavior may be regarded as a part of disinhibited behavior or could be considered as an independent neuropsychiatric symptom. In this multicenter study, it was investigated whether there is a relationship between extreme sexual behavior and the typical neuropsychiatric symptoms seen in dementia. In 179 residents diagnosed with dementia, extreme sexual behavior was measured using an observation scale. Twelve neuropsychiatric symptoms were measured by the Neuropsychiatric Inventory. Multivariate analysis of covariance with gender showed that residents with observed extreme sexual behavior (n = 43) only showed a higher score on neuropsychiatric symptom 'disinhibition', as compared to residents with non-observed sexual behavior (n = 136). In addition, the effect size was large. These findings indicate that among residents with dementia, extreme sexual behaviors should not be considered as an independent neuropsychiatric symptom. Instead, disinhibition may be an important underlying mechanism for extreme sexual behavior and thus validates the label 'sexually disinhibited behavior'.

  12. An epidemiological study of sexual disorders in south Indian rural population

    PubMed Central

    Sathyanarayana Rao, T. S.; Darshan, M. S.; Tandon, Abhinav

    2015-01-01

    Background: Sexuality is an important aspect of the personality of an individual and influences psychological, physical and social well-being of both men and women. It is a paradox, that in the country where ‘kamasutra’ (by Vatsyayana) took birth, there is a lack of research publications and sexuality related literature; hence the current study was conducted, to estimate the prevalence and association of sexual disorders with various socio-demographic variables, in the selected rural population. Materials and Methods: Subjects who were sexually active and fulfilled the study criteria were administered Arizona Sexual Experience Scale as screening tool for the presence of sexual problems. Those who were found to be having sexual problems were interviewed further using appropriate questionnaires. Results: 21.15% of the male subjects were diagnosed to have one (or more) sexual disorder. Prevalence of erectile dysfunction was found to be 15.77%, male hypoactive sexual desire disorder (HSDD) 2.56%; premature ejaculation was found to be prevalent in 8.76% of the male subjects. Around 14% of the female subjects were diagnosed to have female sexual disorders. Prevalence of female arousal dysfunction was found to be 6.65%, female HSDD 8.87%, female anorgasmia 5.67%, female dyspareunia 2.34% and female sexual aversion disorder was found to be prevalent in 0.37% of the female subjects. Conclusion: This study concluded that one in five males and one in seven females were suffering from one (or more) sexual disorder. Improving the training of undergraduate medical and nursing students in sexuality related issues, increasing trained individuals in sexual medicine by starting new courses, providing sex education to the general population using media and merging sexual health care with primary care, are likely to play a significant role in addressing the increasing sexual health morbidity. PMID:26124520

  13. Department of Defense Sexually Transmitted Infections: Estimation of Burden among Active Duty Service Members using Clinical Diagnoses, Laboratory Results, and Medical Event Reports

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-03-01

    Gender Characteristics by Data Source of Patients Diagnosed with at Least One Chlamydia Infection in CY2006...10 Table 8. Service and Gender Characteristics by Data Source of Patients Diagnosed with at Least One...Gonorrhea Infection in CY2006 ...................................................................................11 Table 9. Service and Gender

  14. Iowa Gambling Task performance and emotional distress interact to predict risky sexual behavior in individuals with dual substance and HIV diagnoses.

    PubMed

    Wardle, Margaret C; Gonzalez, Raul; Bechara, Antoine; Martin-Thormeyer, Eileen M

    2010-12-01

    HIV+ substance-dependent individuals (SDIs) show emotional distress and executive impairment, but in isolation these poorly predict sexual risk. We hypothesized that an executive measure sensitive to emotional aspects of judgment (Iowa Gambling Task; IGT) would identify HIV+ SDIs whose sexual risks were influenced by emotional distress. We assessed emotional distress and performance on several executive tasks in 190 HIV+ SDIs. IGT performance interacted significantly with emotional distress, such that only in better performers were distress and risk related. Our results are interpreted using the somatic marker hypothesis and indicate that the IGT identifies HIV+ SDIs for whom psychological distress influences HIV risk.

  15. Getting Diagnosed

    MedlinePlus

    ... also for those with related disorders. How is Marfan syndrome diagnosed? getting_diagnosed.jpg A Marfan diagnosis ... spinal column). Is there a genetic test for Marfan syndrome? Genetic testing can provide helpful information in ...

  16. [Sexuality and infertility].

    PubMed

    Salama, S; Boitrelle, F; Gauquelin, A; Jaoul, M; Albert, M; Bailly, M; Wainer, R; Veluire, M

    2012-12-01

    Following the recent medical innovations, it is now possible to disassociate sexuality and reproduction. With contraception, people can have free sexuality without the fear of an unexpected pregnancy. Frequently, Assisted Reproductive Technologies (ART), with in vitro fertilization, can obtain a pregnancy without intercourse. There are three major problems concerning infertility and sexuality. Firstly, infertility because of a sexual disorder; secondly, sexual disorder induced by infertility diagnosis; thirdly, sexual disorder induced by ART. Praticians should be aware of possible existence of sexual problems to allow the couple to express them. Once diagnosed, these troubles can be treated by the pratician himself or the couple has to be referred to a psychologist or a sexologist.

  17. Transcultural Self-Efficacy of Nursing Education Leaders and Faculty Related to Non-Binary Sexual Identities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoyer, Grace

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore transcultural self-efficacy in nursing education administrators/faculty and to gain understanding of confidence related to lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender (LGBT) issues. The 83-item Transcultural Self-Efficacy Tool (TSET) with an additional 11 LGBT questions was administered to 535 nursing education…

  18. Sexual counselling for individuals with cardiovascular disease and their partners: a consensus document from the American Heart Association and the ESC Council on Cardiovascular Nursing and Allied Professions (CCNAP).

    PubMed

    Steinke, Elaine E; Jaarsma, Tiny; Barnason, Susan A; Byrne, Molly; Doherty, Sally; Dougherty, Cynthia M; Fridlund, Bengt; Kautz, Donald D; Mårtensson, Jan; Mosack, Victoria; Moser, Debra K

    2013-11-01

    After a cardiovascular event, patients and their families often cope with numerous changes in their lives, including dealing with consequences of the disease or its treatment on their daily lives and functioning. Coping poorly with both physical and psychological challenges may lead to impaired quality of life. Sexuality is one aspect of quality of life that is important for many patients and partners that may be adversely affected by a cardiac event. The World Health Organization defines sexual health as '… a state of physical, emotional, mental and social well-being in relation to sexuality; it is not merely the absence of disease, dysfunction or infirmity. Sexual health requires a positive and respectful approach to sexuality and sexual relationships, as well as the possibility of having pleasurable and safe sexual experiences ….'(1(p4)) The safety and timing of return to sexual activity after a cardiac event have been well addressed in an American Heart Association scientific statement, and decreased sexual activity among cardiac patients is frequently reported.(2) Rates of erectile dysfunction (ED) among men with cardiovascular disease (CVD) are twice as high as those in the general population, with similar rates of sexual dysfunction in females with CVD.(3) ED and vaginal dryness may also be presenting signs of heart disease and may appear 1-3 years before the onset of angina pectoris. Estimates reflect that only a small percentage of those with sexual dysfunction seek medical care;(4) therefore, routine assessment of sexual problems and sexual counselling may be of benefit as part of effective management by physicians, nurses, and other healthcare providers.

  19. Diagnosing ALS

    MedlinePlus

    ... that a person diagnosed with ALS seek a second opinion from an ALS "expert" - someone who diagnoses and treats many ALS patients and has training in this medical specialty. The ALS Association maintains a list of recognized experts in the field of ALS. See ALS Association Certified Centers of ...

  20. Newly Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Suggestions Examine Your Skin Newly Diagnosed? Understanding Your Pathology Biopsy: The First Step Sentinel Node Biopsy Melanoma ... start this journey: Get a copy of your pathology report. We can help you understand the report ...

  1. Newly Diagnosed

    MedlinePlus

    ... of transmitting HIV to others. Do I Have AIDS? Being HIV-positive does NOT necessarily mean you ... Children Newly Diagnosed: Older Adults Related Topics on AIDS.gov Stages of HIV Infection Immune System 101 ...

  2. The application of Reiki in nurses diagnosed with Burnout Syndrome has beneficial effects on concentration of salivary IgA and blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Rodríguez, Lourdes; Arroyo-Morales, Manuel; Cantarero-Villanueva, Irene; Férnandez-Lao, Carolina; Polley, Marie; Fernández-de-las-Peñas, César

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the immediate effects of the secretory immunoglobulin A (sIgA), α-amylase activity and blood pressure levels after the application of a Reiki session in nurses with Burnout Syndrome. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover design was conducted to compare the immediate effects of Reiki versus control intervention (Hand-off sham intervention) in nurses with Burnout Syndrome. Sample was composed of eighteen nurses (aged 34-56 years) with burnout syndrome. Participants were randomly assigned to receive either a Reiki treatment or a placebo (sham Reiki) treatment, according to the established order in two different days. The ANOVA showed a significant interaction time x intervention for diastolic blood pressure (F=4.92, P=0.04) and sIgA concentration (F=4.71, P=0.04). A Reiki session can produce an immediate and statistically significant improvement in sIgA concentration and diastolic blood pressure in nurses with Burnout Syndrome.

  3. Sexual Behavior Pattern and Related Factors in Women with Breast Cancer in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Rashidi, Sanaz; Dashti, Forouzandeh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Despite the most of treatment team efforts focused on the maintaining patient’s life, attention to sexual issues don’t be considered. This stud is designed to determine the sexual behavior pattern and related factors in women with breast cancer. Methods: This descriptive- correlation study was performed on 90 women that diagnosed with breast Cancer that was admitted to Sayed-Al-Shohada hospital of Isfahan in 2010. Sampling method was available (non- random sampling) and Sexual Behavior Pattern determined with 3 domains: sexual identity, sexual role and sexual function. Data collection tools, was a questionnaire that made by the researcher and was used after determining the validity and reliability. For data analysis, was used of Descriptive- analytic statistics, frequency and ANOVA and Pearson correlation analytical tests in the SPSS statistical software (version 16). Results: Cases had 60% of Desirable sexual identity, 50% of Desirable sexual role, 40% Desirable sexual function and were be able to play 47.61% Desirable sexual behavior. Participants that their husbands had Elementary education had more desirable sexual behavior (p<0.031). Cases that were homemaker had more desirable Sexual behavior than of were working and retired (p<0.023). Non-surgical treatment with chemotherapy, radiotherapy and hormone therapy had a negative impact on sexual behavior (p<0.014). Conclusion: Study of sexual behavior pattern that is one of the important aspects of health, Provide valuable information to nurses and medical team and will be enhance the quality of provided services. Adopt appropriate strategies and interventions to promote sexual health, breast cancer is recommended. PMID:26925917

  4. Diagnosing Flu

    MedlinePlus

    ... your symptoms and their clinical judgment. Will my health care provider test me for flu if I have flu-like ... flu symptoms do not require testing because the test results usually do not change how you are treated. Your health care provider may diagnose you with flu based on ...

  5. Sexual assault in the workplace.

    PubMed

    Garrett, Linda H

    2011-01-01

    Women are sexually assaulted at an alarming rate, and the workplace is a frequent arena for assault. However, in recent decades, attention has been given to improving responses to sexual assault. Sexual assault is a frequent cause of injury and death for women in the United States. One in five American women admit they have experienced a completed rape during their lifetime. These estimates are conservative because sexual assault and sexual violence are both underreported and underprosecuted. Fear of job loss and discrimination are frequent reasons women do not report sexual assault in the workplace. Women are entering the workplace in greater numbers due in part to more single parent families and the depressed economy. Also, women are entering work environments that have traditionally been the domain of male workers: corporate headquarters, semi trucks, health care providers' offices, rural farms, and rural factories. Employers must have a plan to protect female employees and effectively address any incidents of sexual assault or violence. Occupational health nurses and nurse practitioners can assist both employees and employers to prevent sexual assault and resolve the aftermath of sexual assault. However, to accomplish this goal, occupational health nurses and nurse practitioners must be trained in sexual assault and violence response as well as preventive interventions.

  6. Child sexual abuse: consequences and implications.

    PubMed

    Hornor, Gail

    2010-01-01

    Sexual abuse is a problem of epidemic proportions in the United States. Given the sheer numbers of sexually abused children, it is vital for pediatric nurse practitioners to understand both short-term and long-term consequences of sexual abuse. Understanding consequences of sexual abuse can assist the pediatric nurse practitioner in anticipating the physical and mental health needs of patients and also may assist in the identification of sexual abuse victims. Sexual abuse typically does not occur in isolation. Implications for practice will be discussed.

  7. Developing an electronic nursing record system for clinical care and nursing effectiveness research in a korean home healthcare setting.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eun Joo; Lee, Mikyoung; Moorhead, Sue

    2009-01-01

    Increased accountability requirements for the cost and quality of healthcare force nurses to clearly define and verify nursing's contributions to patient outcomes. This demand necessitates documentation of nursing care in a precise manner. An electronic nursing record system is considered a key element that enhances nurses' ability not only to record nursing care provided to patients but also to measure, report, and monitor quality and effectiveness. Home care is a growing field as nurses attempt to meet the demand for long-term care. The development of an electronic record system for home care nursing was the immediate focus of this study. We identified the nursing content required for home care nursing using standardized nursing languages and designed linkages among medical diagnoses, nursing diagnoses, nursing interventions, and nursing-sensitive outcomes within the system. Equipping an electronic nursing record system with nursing standards is particularly critical for enhancing nursing practice and for creating refined data to verify nursing effectiveness.

  8. When sexual harassment hits home.

    PubMed

    Fiesta, J

    1999-05-01

    Sexual harassment cases illustrate the problems facing employees, including nurses' abusive experiences with both physicians and patients. Learn how to give employees the support they need and lower your liability.

  9. An analysis of and intervention in the sexual transmission of disease.

    PubMed Central

    Montesinos, L; Frisch, L E; Greene, B F; Hamilton, M

    1990-01-01

    Sexually transmitted diseases are a serious threat to the public health. Indeed, when an individual seeks medical treatment for a sexually transmitted disease, health authorities frequently attempt to identify, procure, and treat that individual's sexual contact(s). We conducted a comparative analysis of three alternative approaches to tracing the sexual partners of individuals diagnosed as having a sexually transmitted disease. The first approach involved counseling individuals (n = 27) infected with either gonorrhea or nongonococcal urethritis and exhorting them to procure their sexual partners for treatment. In addition to counseling, the second and third approaches involved distributing "occasion cards" for patients to use when informing sexual contacts of the need for treatment. Moreover, in the second approach, the counselor (a nurse or physician) informed infected patients (n = 19) that they and their partners could waive the $3 clinic fee contingent upon the partners seeking treatment within 1 week. In the third approach, the counselor asked infected persons (n = 19) to accept a follow-up telephone contact if their sexual partners failed to seek treatment within 1 week. The third approach was most effective. Ninety percent of the partners identified through this approach sought treatment, versus only about 60% of the partners in the other two conditions. The third approach was also the least expensive, costing about $2.95 to procure each partner for treatment. PMID:2249964

  10. Angels and swingers, matrons and sinners: nursing stereotypes.

    PubMed

    Ferns, Terry; Chojnacka, Irena

    Media sexual stereotyping of the nursing profession is a well-recognized phenomenon; however the sexual stereotyping of the image of the nurse by the sex/pornography industry is a much less publicized or discussed phenomenon within the nursing profession. This paper aims to examine the presentation of the sexual stereotyping of nurses by newspapers and the sex/pornography industry. Both national and local newspapers in the UK frequently use derogatory terminology to depict the sexual stereotyping of nurses. Images and sexual stereotyping of nursing by the sex industry is also noted. The media was found to emphasize both positive and negative nursing stereotypes and in comparison with other occupations and professions sexual stereotyping was prevalent. The utilization of nursing imagery is also significantly visible across a wide range of pornographic and sex industry material.

  11. Sexual Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... Statistics Resources on infectious diseases, reproductive health and sexual violence prevention. Sexually Transmitted Diseases Up-to-date Sexually ... Health Answers to women's and men's reproductive concerns Sexual Violence Prevention Sexual violence affects all people, particularly women ...

  12. "I have lost sexual interest …"-challenges of balancing personal and professional lives among nurses caring for people living with HIV and AIDS in Limpopo, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Sofolahan, Yewande; Airhihenbuwa, Collins; Makofane, Daisy; Mashaba, Ephraim

    2010-01-01

    As part of a capacity-building research project, this study examined the extent to which caring for people living with HIV and AIDS (PLWHA) affects both professional and personal relationships of nurse caregivers. The data were collected using focus group interviews with 17 female nurses at two Limpopo hospitals. The PEN-3 cultural model was used as a theoretical framework for exploring how nurses balance job demands with family responsibilities. The results generated three themes: the multiple identities nurses experience within their family and professional lives; nurse attitudes related to patient gender; and stigma experienced by nurses who care for PLWHA. Caring for PLWHA influences nurses' personal and professional lives by interfering with their perceptions and emotions as they relate to spousal, parental, and gendered relationships. The findings offer insight into factors requiring consideration when designing interventions to help nurses cope with the stress associated with caring for PLWHA while simultaneously managing family responsibilities.

  13. Exploring attitudes towards older people's sexuality.

    PubMed

    Price, B

    2009-07-01

    Sexuality is an important part of life, for older people as well as for others. Sexual attitudes, beliefs and lifestyles may be as diverse among older people as they are among younger age groups. But for nurses to plan care with patients in ways that take issues of sexuality into account, they need to feel more comfortable talking about sexuality with older people. This article uses case studies to help readers explore their own attitudes and those of colleagues towards sexuality in later years, and prompts discussions on what this might signify for future nursing care so that staff are better equipped to assist patients with this subject.

  14. Sexual Difficulties

    MedlinePlus

    ... and conditions Caregiving Wellness Staying active Mental health Sexual health Sexual difficulties Protecting yourself Safety and abuse Falls ... updates. Enter email address Submit Home > Healthy Aging > Sexual health Healthy Aging Sexual difficulties Learn more about men's ...

  15. Teenage pregnancy and sexual health.

    PubMed

    Hadley, Alison; Evans, David T

    The under-18 conception rate in England is at a 40-year low but a further reduction is needed to reach levels in comparable western European countries. Sexually transmitted infections are common among young people, with chlamydia the most prevalent STI in the UK. To challenge this, a multi-agency approach is needed, with high-quality sex and relationships education, easy access to contraception and sexual health services and an open culture around relationships and sexual health. Nurses play a crucial role in supporting young people within both contraception and sexual health services and as trusted practitioners in a range of settings.

  16. How Are Arrhythmias Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Are Arrhythmias Diagnosed? Arrhythmias can be hard to diagnose, especially the types ... symptoms every once in a while. Doctors diagnose arrhythmias based on medical and family histories, a physical ...

  17. [Family oriented nursing care].

    PubMed

    Lima-Rodríguez, Joaquin Salvador; Lima-Serrano, Marta; Sáez-Bueno, Africa

    2009-01-01

    Nursing has experienced an important methodological development, in which it gives priority to the individual, although at a socioeconomic level a marked interest is seen in the health care of the family unit and the NANDA (North American Nursing Diagnosis Association), NIC (Nursing Interventions Classification) and NOC (Nursing Outcomes Classification) nursing guidelines, using diagnoses, criteria of results and interventions orientated towards this aim. We consider to the family as an opened system consisted of human elements, with a common history, which they form a functional unit been ruled by own procedure. In this paper we look at those aspects that must be taken into account in nursing assessment of families from a systemic perspective, including some tools for data collection and analysis of information. In addition, we identify specific areas of intervention. We believe that the family must be studied from a nursing care point of view with its own characteristics as opposed to those possessed individually by each of its members. We also believe that, when assessment is centred on the Henderson unaided activities study or the Gordon functional health patterns, they are not useful in assessing the family unit. This work offers an assessment method centred on the family unit, which helps to identify the nursing diagnoses applicable to it. Our proposal, which has been successfully used by nursing students over the last few years, hopes to contribute to quality clinical practice with a tool orientated towards the family.

  18. Caring for sexual assault survivors. The value of choice.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, Helen

    2003-10-01

    Over the past 10 years, Helen Griffiths has been interviewing registered nurses throughout British Columbia and writing articles for Nursing BC on how these registered nurses meet RNABC's Standards for Registered Nursing Practice in their practice. For this issue, we asked Helen to write about her own practice as a registered nurse with the B.C. Women's Hospital and Health Centre Sexual Assault Service.

  19. Health Promotion through the Use of Nurse-Client Contracts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Dover, Leslie J.

    Much of the practice of community health nurses is focused on health promotion. Nurse-client contracting has been used with clients experiencing hypertension, diabetes, or arthritis. A study was conducted to determine whether nurse-client contracting would be useful as a method for providing nursing care to assist sexually active young women to…

  20. Cardiac disease and sexuality: implications for research and practice.

    PubMed

    Hardin, Sonya R

    2007-12-01

    Many symptoms of cardiovascular disease can impact the patient's level of sexual desire. Nurses are in a position to assess sexuality of the cardiovascular patient and to provide a high degree of counseling on the subject; yet, nurses frequently complain that they lack the proper knowledge to provide this education and counseling. This article attempts to provide the necessary information regarding the physiologic effects of sexual intercourse on the heart, the role of sexuality in various types of cardiovascular disease, and the evidence-based nursing interventions needed to provide holistic care to patients with cardiovascular disease.

  1. Sexual Assault

    MedlinePlus

    Sexual assault is any sexual activity to which you haven't freely given your consent. This includes completed ... trust, a friend, an acquaintance, or a stranger. Sexual assault can affect your health in many ways. It ...

  2. Sexual Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... Reproductive System Gynecomastia Help! Is This My Body? Male Reproductive System When Will I Start Developing? Why Are My ... Erection When Waking Up? Is My Penis Normal? Male Reproductive System Sexual Attraction and Orientation Sexual Harassment and Sexual ...

  3. Sexual Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... Irregular. What's Going On? Pap Smears Pelvic Exams Polycystic Ovary Syndrome Sexual Attraction and Orientation Sexual Harassment and Sexual ... My Monthly Cycle Go Back to Normal With PCOS Treatment? For Guys Can I Stop Myself From ...

  4. Sexual Problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... for a healthy life Mental health for men Sexual health for men Male infertility Prostate health Sexual problems ... updates. Enter email address Submit Home > Men's Health > Sexual health for men Men's Health This information in Spanish ( ...

  5. Sexual Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... healthy and enjoyable sex life at any age. Sex and aging Can older adults remain sexually active? ... from sexually transmitted infections. Talking to kids about sex Kids and sexuality — those words strike fear into ...

  6. Sexual Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... health include Fear of unplanned pregnancy Concerns about infertility Sexually transmitted diseases Chronic diseases such as cancer or heart disease Medicines that affect sexual desire or performance

  7. Managing female sexual dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Buster, John E

    2013-10-01

    Female sexual dysfunctions (FSDs) range from short-term aggravations to major emotional disturbances adversely affecting family and workplace. This review highlights diagnosis and management of the four most widely diagnosed FSDs. It initially focuses on hypoactive sexual desire disorder (HSDD) as a driving force at the heart of all other FSDs; nothing happens without sexual desire. Successful resolution of HSDD frequently facilitates resolution of other disorders. Central to understanding HSDD is the impact of aging female sexual endocrinology and its effect on both prevalence and expression patterns of FSD. Advances in this field have enabled introduction of some the most effective treatments yet described for HSDD. Sexual arousal disorder, though commonly affected by the same factors as HSDD, is heavily associated with psychotropic drugs and mood elevators. Orgasmic disorder is frequently the downstream result of other sexual dysfunctions, particularly HSDD, or the result of a major psychosexual trauma. Successful management of the underlying disorder often resolves orgasmic disorder. Sexual pain disorder is frequently the result of a gynecologic disorder, such as endometriosis, that can be substantially managed through successful treatment of that disorder. This article ends with the article's most important note: how to initiate the conversation.

  8. Education for sexuality.

    PubMed

    Sapire, K E

    1988-03-01

    Sex education provides a means to reduce the growing incidence of sexual abuse and of sexually transmitted diseases. Knowledge, which differs from permission, may protect. Sex education needs to provide factual information about anatomy and physiology and sexual development and responses. Further, it must guide young people towards healthy attitudes that develop concern and respect for others. This should enable them to make sound decisions about sexual behavior based on both knowledge and understanding of their own sexual identity and interpersonal relationships. The recent research shows that teenagers exposed to sex education are no more likely to engage in sexual intercourse than are other adolescents, and those who become sexually active are more likely to use a contraceptive method at 1st intercourse and are slightly less likely to experience premarital pregnancies. The nonuse of contraceptives is related to ignorance, lack of awareness of the consequences of sexual activity, and inaccessibility of suitable services. Consequently, young people need help to learn about the risks of pregnancy, how to avoid unwanted pregnancy, and where to go for counseling and services before they become sexually active. The provision of contraceptives must be made to meet the needs of adolescents. Formal sex education should be given in schools only with parental knowledge and cooperation. Youth leaders can influence young people positively by teaching about health and hygiene and promoting responsible attitudes toward sex and religion. Doctors and nurses have a unique opportunity to provide counseling throughout their patients' lives. The Department of Health (Capetown, South Africa) has appointed 445 nurses who oversee the youth program. They give sex education at schools, teaching colleges, youth camps, and at clinics. They also provide individual and group counseling for never pregnant, pregnant, and parent adolescents and their parents and partners at 8 youth health

  9. [Sexual dysfunctions in selected endocrinopathies].

    PubMed

    Skrzypulec, Violetta; Nowosielski, Krzysztof; Drosdzol, Agnieszka; Kowalaczyk, Robert

    2005-01-01

    According to the socio-sexological reports approximately 40-45% of women and up to 30% of males may suffer from different sexual dysfunctions. The prevalence of those disorders is gradually increasing with age. Multiply numbers of endocrinopathies may influence the human sexual life. In diabetic patients all phases of the sexual responses cycle, especially orgasm, might be affected. Women diagnosed with PCOS have decreased adaptation to the sexual life, low self-esteem and perception of self sexual attractiveness. The intimacy of infertile couples has not been well described and the characteristic of particular dysfunction in sex life has not been established yet. Interdisciplinary approach, understood as treatment of the endocrinopathy accompanied with psychological and sexological counseling, seems to be the fundamental issue in the therapy of sexual dysfunctions in patients with endocrinological disorders.

  10. Flibanserin and Female Sexual Desire.

    PubMed

    Fantasia, Heidi Collins

    2016-01-01

    Female hypoactive sexual desire disorder (HSDD) is one type of sexual problem that can affect women. It is characterized by low or absent sexual desire that cannot be attributed to another cause and results in difficulty in interpersonal relationships. HSDD is not well understood, and women may not report symptoms of difficulties to their health care providers. In August 2015, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved flibanserin, a nonhormonal oral medication for the treatment of HSDD in premenopausal women. Flibanserin is the only currently available pharmacologic treatment for HSDD. This article will provide an overview of flibanserin, including potential adverse reactions, special considerations for use, and implications for nursing practice.

  11. High-risk sexual offenders: an examination of sexual fantasy, sexual paraphilia, psychopathy, and offence characteristics.

    PubMed

    Woodworth, Michael; Freimuth, Tabatha; Hutton, Erin L; Carpenter, Tara; Agar, Ava D; Logan, Matt

    2013-01-01

    High-risk sexual offenders are a complex and heterogeneous group of offenders about whom researchers, clinicians, and law enforcement agencies still know relatively little. In response to the paucity of information that is specifically applicable to high-risk offenders, the present study investigated the potential influence of sexual fantasy, sexual paraphilia, and psychopathy on the offending behaviour of 139 of the highest risk sexual offenders in one province of Canada. The sample included 41 child molesters, 42 rapists, 18 rapist/molesters, 30 mixed offenders, and 6 "other" sexual offenders. Two offenders could not be categorized by type due to insufficient file information. Data analyses revealed significant differences between offender types for a number of criminal history variables including past sexual and nonsexual convictions, number of victims, weapon use, and age of offending onset. Further, there were significant differences between offender types for sexual fantasy themes, paraphilia diagnoses, and levels of psychopathy. For example, results revealed that offenders' sexual fantasies were significantly more likely to correspond with the specific type of index sexual offence that they had committed. Further, offenders scoring high in psychopathy were significantly more likely to have a sadistic paraphilia than offenders with either low or moderate psychopathy scores. Results from the current study provide a refined and informed understanding of sexual offending behaviour with important implications for future research, assessment, and treatment, as well as law enforcement practices when working with high-risk sexual offenders.

  12. Improving Sexual Risk Communication with Adolescents Using Event History Calendars

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martyn, Kristy K.; Darling-Fisher, Cynthia; Pardee, Michelle; Ronis, David L.; Felicetti, Irene L.; Saftner, Melissa A.

    2012-01-01

    This study was conducted to explore the effects of an event history calendar (EHC) approach on adolescent sexual risk communication and sexual activity. Adolescent school-linked health clinic patients (n = 30) who reported sexual activity self-administered the EHC that was used by nurse practitioners (NPs; n = 2) during a clinic visit. Immediately…

  13. Sexual Harassment and Sexual Bulllying (For Teens)

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Sexual Harassment and Sexual Bullying KidsHealth > For Teens > Sexual Harassment and Sexual Bullying ... being sexually harassed or bullied. What Are Sexual Bullying and Harassment? Just like other kinds of bullying, ...

  14. How Is Sarcoidosis Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Sarcoidosis Diagnosed? Your doctor will diagnose sarcoidosis based on ... Content: NEXT >> Featured Video Living With and Managing Sarcoidosis 05/18/2011 This video—presented by the ...

  15. How Is Atherosclerosis Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Atherosclerosis Diagnosed? Your doctor will diagnose atherosclerosis based on ... Rate This Content: NEXT >> Featured Video What is atherosclerosis? 05/22/2014 Describes how the build-up ...

  16. Crisis intervention for nurses.

    PubMed

    Chase, Emily

    2013-06-01

    Cancer diagnoses and treatments can be crisis-causing events that overwhelm the usual coping abilities of patients and their families. Oncology nurses constantly are observing and attending to patients' diverse needs, ranging from biomedical to emotional, social, and psychological. Nurses have the chance to be first responders in times of patient crises, as they are in the position to recognize the crisis, respond effectively, and transform the crisis into a pivotal learning experience. This article discusses a way to think about patient and family crises that empowers nurses to respond in a manner appropriate to the cultural context and respectful of the individual space of the patient.

  17. The pattern of exposure to static magnetic field of nurses involved in activities related to contrast administration into patients diagnosed in 1.5 T MRI scanners.

    PubMed

    Karpowicz, Jolanta; Gryz, Krzysztof

    2013-06-01

    Static magnetic fields (SMFs) and time-varying electromagnetic fields exposure is necessary to obtain the diagnostic information regarding the structure of patient's tissues, by the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanners. A diagnostic procedure may also include the administration of pharmaceuticals called contrast, which are to be applied to a patient during the examination. The nurses involved in administering contrast into a patient during the pause in examination are approaching permanently active magnets of MRI scanners and are exposed to SMF. There were performed measurements of spatial distribution of SMF in the vicinity of MRI magnets and parameters of personal exposure of nurses (i.e. individual exposimetric profiles of variability in time of SMF affecting the nurse who is performing tasks in the vicinity of magnet, characterized by statistical parameters of recorded magnetic flux density affecting the nurse). The SMF exposure in the vicinity of various MRI magnets depends on both magnetic flux density of the main field B 0 (applicable to a patient) and the construction of the scanner, but the most important factor determining the workers' exposure is the work practice. In the course of a patient's routine examination in scanners of B₀ = 1.5 T, the nurses are present over ∼0.4-2.9 min in SMF exceeding 0.03% of B₀ (i.e. 0.5 mT), but only sometimes they are present in SMF exceeding 5% of B 0 (i.e. 75 mT). When patients need more attention because of their health status/condition, the nurses' exposure may be significantly longer--it may even exceed 10 min and 30% of B 0 (i.e. 500 mT). We have found that the level of exposure of nurses to SMF may vary from < 5% of the main field (a median value: 0.5-1.5%; inter-quartile range: 0.04-8.8%; max value: 1.3-12% of B₀) when a patient is moved from the magnets bore before contrast administration, up to the main field level (B₀) when a patient stays in the magnets bore and nurse is crawling into the

  18. Nursing instructors' and male nursing students' perceptions of undergraduate, classroom nursing education.

    PubMed

    Dyck, Jeff M; Oliffe, John; Phinney, Alison; Garrett, Bernie

    2009-08-01

    Attrition rates of male nursing students exceed those of females yet the experiences of male students in nursing school are poorly understood. This interpretive ethnographic study explored the experiences of male nursing students and female nursing instructors in the context of classroom education. Data collection consisted of participant observation of classroom teaching sessions followed by interviews with six male nursing students who were participants in the classes and six female nursing instructors who taught the classes. Themes resulting from data analysis addressed men's roles in the nursing classroom and the culture of nursing education. The theme of "nursing like a real man" was characterized by men's reliance on roles and behaviours associated with traditional masculinities including leadership, assertiveness and risk-taking. The theme of "masculinities in a feminine place" captured the gendered culture of nursing education which manifested in stereotypes and a sexualized identity, where men saw themselves as accommodated but not integrated. "Diversity between masculine and feminine" communicated the incongruity between men's educational preferences and the techniques that predominate in nursing education. These findings suggest that nursing instructors need to consider gender in their teaching practice, avoid parody or stereotypes of masculinities, and reject assumptions that male students are homogeneous.

  19. Nursing Supplies

    MedlinePlus

    ... Stages Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Nursing Supplies Page Content Article Body Throughout most of ... budget. (Nursing equipment also makes wonderful baby gifts.) Nursing Bras A well-made nursing bra that comfortably ...

  20. Healthy Sexuality

    MedlinePlus

    ... a sexual experience is safe, healthy, and enjoyable. Sexual health is a vital part of a person’s total well-being. Of course, sex is essential for reproduction, but it can also build intimacy in relationships ...

  1. Nursing documentation with NANDA and NIC in a comprehensive HIS/EPR system.

    PubMed

    Flø, Kåre

    2006-01-01

    DIPS nursing documentation system facilitates that nurses can write several types of notes into the EPR. Within these notes the nurses can register NANDA diagnoses and NIC interventions with nursing activities. To choose NANDA and NIC the nurse can use a search engine, or she can choose a relevant Care plan guideline and pick the suggested diagnoses and interventions from there. Diagnoses and interventions with nursing activities registered are presented in a Care plan. When a nurse writes a note for a patient she will always be presented the Care plan and she can easy evaluate and update the Care plan.

  2. Queer diagnoses revisited: The past and future of homosexuality and gender diagnoses in DSM and ICD.

    PubMed

    Drescher, Jack

    2015-01-01

    The American Psychiatric Association (APA) recently completed a several year process of revising the fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5). During that time, there were objections raised to retaining DSM's gender identity disorder diagnoses and calls to remove them, just as homosexuality had been removed from DSM-II in 1973. At the conclusion of the DSM-5 revision process, the gender diagnoses were retained, albeit in altered form and bearing the new name of 'gender dysphoria'. The author of this paper was a member of the DSM-5 Workgroup on Sexual and Gender Identity Disorders and presently serves on the WHO Working Group on Sexual Disorders and Sexual Health. Both groups faced similar tasks: reconciling patients' needs for access to care with the stigma of being given a psychiatric diagnosis. The differing nature of the two diagnostic manuals led to two different outcomes. As background, this paper updates the history of homosexuality and the gender diagnoses in the DSM and in the International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems (ICD) as well as what is expected to happen to the homosexuality and gender diagnoses following the current ICD-11 revision process.

  3. Sexual desire, not hypersexuality, is related to neurophysiological responses elicited by sexual images

    PubMed Central

    Steele, Vaughn R.; Staley, Cameron; Fong, Timothy; Prause, Nicole

    2013-01-01

    Background Modulation of sexual desires is, in some cases, necessary to avoid inappropriate or illegal sexual behavior (downregulation of sexual desire) or to engage with a romantic partner (upregulation of sexual desire). Some have suggested that those who have difficulty downregulating their sexual desires be diagnosed as having a sexual ‘addiction’. This diagnosis is thought to be associated with sexual urges that feel out of control, high-frequency sexual behavior, consequences due to those behaviors, and poor ability to reduce those behaviors. However, such symptoms also may be better understood as a non-pathological variation of high sexual desire. Hypersexuals are thought to be relatively sexual reward sensitized, but also to have high exposure to visual sexual stimuli. Thus, the direction of neural responsivity to sexual stimuli expected was unclear. If these individuals exhibit habituation, their P300 amplitude to sexual stimuli should be diminished; if they merely have high sexual desire, their P300 amplitude to sexual stimuli should be increased. Neural responsivity to sexual stimuli in a sample of hypersexuals could differentiate these two competing explanations of symptoms. Methods Fifty-two (13 female) individuals who self-identified as having problems regulating their viewing of visual sexual stimuli viewed emotional (pleasant sexual, pleasant-non-sexual, neutral, and unpleasant) photographs while electroencephalography was collected. Results Larger P300 amplitude differences to pleasant sexual stimuli, relative to neutral stimuli, was negatively related to measures of sexual desire, but not related to measures of hypersexuality. Conclusion Implications for understanding hypersexuality as high desire, rather than disordered, are discussed. PMID:24693355

  4. Sexual desire, distress, and associated factors in premenopausal women: preliminary findings from the hypoactive sexual desire disorder registry for women.

    PubMed

    Connor, Megan K; Maserejian, Nancy N; De Rogatis, Leonard; Meston, Cindy M; Gerstenberger, Eric P; Rosen, Raymond C

    2011-01-01

    This article presents data from a validation sample of 390 premenopausal women clinically diagnosed with hypoactive sexual desire disorder (HSDD) enrolled in the HSDD Registry for Women. Participants completed validated measures of sexual distress (e.g., Female Sexual Distress Scale Revised, Question 13) and sexual function including desire (e.g., Female Sexual Function Index). Results showed that lower levels of desire in these women were associated with diminished sexual satisfaction, increased sexually related distress, and fatigue or stress in the women's lives. In addition, the level of distress related to sexual desire decreased with age. The authors conclude that even among women with clinically diagnosed HSDD, the level of sexually related distress varies with situational factors, such as stress and fatigue.

  5. Knowledge-based nursing diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Claudette; Hay, D. Robert

    1991-03-01

    Nursing diagnosis is an integral part of the nursing process and determines the interventions leading to outcomes for which the nurse is accountable. Diagnoses under the time constraints of modern nursing can benefit from a computer assist. A knowledge-based engineering approach was developed to address these problems. A number of problems were addressed during system design to make the system practical extended beyond capture of knowledge. The issues involved in implementing a professional knowledge base in a clinical setting are discussed. System functions, structure, interfaces, health care environment, and terminology and taxonomy are discussed. An integrated system concept from assessment through intervention and evaluation is outlined.

  6. How Is Raynaud's Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... diagnose primary Raynaud's (Raynaud's disease) or secondary Raynaud's (Raynaud's phenomenon) based on your medical history, a physical exam, and test results. Specialists Involved Primary care doctors and internists often diagnose and treat Raynaud's. If you have the disorder, you also may ...

  7. Sexual Orientation, Gender Identity and Perceived Source of Infection Among Men Who Have Sex with Men (MSM) and Transgender Women (TW) Recently Diagnosed with HIV and/or STI in Lima, Peru.

    PubMed

    Blair, Cheríe S; Segura, Eddy R; Perez-Brumer, Amaya G; Sanchez, Jorge; Lama, Javier R; Clark, Jesse L

    2016-10-01

    Risk perception and health behaviors result from individual-level factors influenced by specific partnership contexts. We explored individual- and partner-level factors associated with partner-specific perceptions of HIV/STI risk among 372 HIV/STI-positive MSM and transgender women (TW) in Lima, Peru. Generalized estimating equations explored participants' perception of their three most recent partner(s) as a likely source of their HIV/STI diagnosis. Homosexual/gay (PR = 2.07; 95 % CI 1.19-3.61) or transgender (PR = 2.84; 95 % CI 1.48-5.44) partners were more likely to be considered a source of infection than heterosexual partners. Compared to heterosexual respondents, gay and TW respondents were less likely to associate their partner with HIV/STI infection, suggesting a cultural link between gay or TW identity and perceived HIV/STI risk. Our findings demonstrate a need for health promotion messages tailored to high-risk MSM partnerships addressing how perceived HIV/STI risk aligns or conflicts with actual transmission risks in sexual partnerships and networks.

  8. Sexual Safety and Sexual Security among Young Black Women Who Have Sex with Women and Men

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, Kamila Anise; Fannin, Ehriel F.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To examine sexuality narratives of Black women who have sex with women and men and explore factors that influence their sexual safety and sexual security. Design Secondary qualitative content analysis. Setting We recruited young self-identified Black women from beauty salons and community-based organizations. Participants Our sample included a subset of five sexually active, Black women age 19 to 25 who reported engaging in sexual relationships with women and men. Participants were selected from a larger parent study that included sexuality narratives from 25 women. Methods We analyzed interview transcripts in which participants described sexual relationships. We used constant comparative techniques and conventional content analysis methodology. Results We uncovered three themes illustrating influences on sexual safety and sexual security: institutional expectations, emotional connectedness, and sexual behaviors. Conclusions From this analysis, we derive valuable insights into decision-making processes within sexual relationships from the perspectives of young Black women who have sex with women and men. Clinicians and investigators can use these findings to inform programs designed to improve the sexual health of this often invisible group of women. Nurses are uniquely positioned to support young women as they navigate societal institutions and emotional experiences that inform future sexual decisions and behaviors. PMID:24942676

  9. Female sexuality.

    PubMed

    Rao, T S Sathyanarana; Nagaraj, Anil Kumar M

    2015-07-01

    Sex is a motive force bringing a man and a woman into intimate contact. Sexuality is a central aspect of being human throughout life and encompasses sex, gender identities and roles, sexual orientation, eroticism, pleasure, intimacy, and reproduction. Sexuality is experienced and expressed in thoughts, fantasies, desires, beliefs, attitudes, values, behaviors, practices, roles and relationships. Though generally, women are sexually active during adolescence, they reach their peak orgasmic frequency in their 30 s, and have a constant level of sexual capacity up to the age of 55 with little evidence that aging affects it in later life. Desire, arousal, and orgasm are the three principle stages of the sexual response cycle. Each stage is associated with unique physiological changes. Females are commonly affected by various disorders in relation to this sexual response cycle. The prevalence is generally as high as 35-40%. There are a wide range of etiological factors like age, relationship with a partner, psychiatric and medical disorders, psychotropic and other medication. Counseling to overcome stigma and enhance awareness on sexuality is an essential step in management. There are several effective psychological and pharmacological therapeutic approaches to treat female sexual disorders. This article is a review of female sexuality.

  10. Female sexuality

    PubMed Central

    Rao, T.S. Sathyanarana; Nagaraj, Anil Kumar M.

    2015-01-01

    Sex is a motive force bringing a man and a woman into intimate contact. Sexuality is a central aspect of being human throughout life and encompasses sex, gender identities and roles, sexual orientation, eroticism, pleasure, intimacy, and reproduction. Sexuality is experienced and expressed in thoughts, fantasies, desires, beliefs, attitudes, values, behaviors, practices, roles and relationships. Though generally, women are sexually active during adolescence, they reach their peak orgasmic frequency in their 30 s, and have a constant level of sexual capacity up to the age of 55 with little evidence that aging affects it in later life. Desire, arousal, and orgasm are the three principle stages of the sexual response cycle. Each stage is associated with unique physiological changes. Females are commonly affected by various disorders in relation to this sexual response cycle. The prevalence is generally as high as 35–40%. There are a wide range of etiological factors like age, relationship with a partner, psychiatric and medical disorders, psychotropic and other medication. Counseling to overcome stigma and enhance awareness on sexuality is an essential step in management. There are several effective psychological and pharmacological therapeutic approaches to treat female sexual disorders. This article is a review of female sexuality. PMID:26330647

  11. Usefulness: forensic photo documentation after sexual assault.

    PubMed

    Ernst, E J; Speck, P M; Fitzpatrick, J J

    2011-01-01

    The forensic medical legal evaluation following sexual assault establishes evidence for law enforcement's investigation and criminal prosecution by the legal system. The sexual assault nurse examiner performs the forensic evaluation and uses digital photography to document physical injuries after sexual assault. Photographs have varying degrees of usefulness, but for a photograph to be useful, it must exhibit technical elements for the viewer. There was no tool available to evaluate the usefulness of digital photographs taken during forensic evaluation of genital injuries after sexual assault. The Photo Documentation Image Quality Scoring System (PDIQSS) tool was developed to rate photographic technical elements for usefulness. Using this tool, three experts on two separate occasions evaluated a series of digital photographs taken following sexual assault. The PDIQSS tool predicted usefulness in digital photography of female genital injuries following sexual assault when measured in all dimensions.

  12. Neurological rehabilitation: sexuality and reproductive health.

    PubMed

    Aisen, Mindy Lipson

    2013-01-01

    Sexuality is the embodiment of sexual and reproductive activities involving complex interactions among biological, psychological, and social systems. An individual's perception of their sexuality, as well as society's perception, can have an inestimable impact on self-esteem, and hence willingness to openly address these issues Earle S (2001). Disability, facilitated sex and the role of the nurse. J Adv Nurs 3: 433-440. Such barriers to communication represent a real challenge to practicing clinicians. However, advances in treatment options obligate the clinician providing care to those with neurogenic sexual/reproductive dysfunction to learn to communicate effectively about these issues, provide effective therapies, and refer patients to appropriate specialists. This chapter will address counseling, an overview of male and female sexual and reproductive physiological responses in the case of an intact nervous system, and a description of the impact of disorders of the nervous system on sexual function and reproductive health. Treatment options are also reviewed.

  13. How Is Neuroblastoma Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Neuroblastoma Early Detection, Diagnosis, and Staging How Is Neuroblastoma Diagnosed? Neuroblastomas are usually found when a child ... Ask Your Child’s Doctor About Neuroblastoma? More In Neuroblastoma About Neuroblastoma Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention Early ...

  14. How Is Hemophilia Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Hemophilia Diagnosed? If you or your child appears to ... have bleeding problems. However, some people who have hemophilia have no recent family history of the disease. ...

  15. How Is Lymphocytopenia Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... of lymphocytes—T cells, B cells, and natural killer cells. The test can help diagnose the underlying ... cause low levels of B cells or natural killer cells. Tests for Underlying Conditions Many diseases and ...

  16. Ending disruptive behavior: staff nurse recommendations to nurse educators.

    PubMed

    Lux, Kathleen M; Hutcheson, Jane B; Peden, Ann R

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative descriptive study was to identify educational strategies that can prepare new graduates to manage disruptive behavior (DB) in the workplace. DB is any inappropriate behavior, confrontation, or conflict - ranging from verbal abuse to sexual harassment - that harms or intimidates others to the extent that quality of care or patient safety could be compromised. Individual interviews were conducted with nine staff nurses currently in practice in acute care settings in the United States. Staff nurses recommended educational strategies that focused on communication skills for professional practice. These included learning how to communicate with hostile individuals, and giving and receiving constructive criticism. Descriptions that participants provided about their work culture were an unexpected finding that has relevance for nurse educators as they prepare students for transition to practice Nurses described lack of management support and intervention for DB situations, personality clashes with coworkers, and devaluation of nursing work as affecting professional practice.

  17. Sexual Preoccupation Behavior in Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Bronner, Gila; Hassin-Baer, Sharon; Gurevich, Tanya

    2017-01-01

    People with Parkinson's disease (PD) present with problematic sexual behaviors that are often misunderstood or ignored. Sexual problems in PD are part of a non-motor syndrome, and they play a  prominent role in the life of affected individuals and their partners. Based on our considerable clinical experience, we describe four common types of sexual preoccupation behaviors in people with PD: (1) sexual behavior with underlying sexual dysfunction, (2) sexual desire discrepancy with partner after restored desire, (3) hypersexuality and compulsive sexual behavior, and (4) sexual behavior with underlying restless genital syndrome. We also suggest methods of assessing and diagnosing these sexual behaviors, and propose alternative possible treatments for people with PD and their partners/caregivers. Understanding these four behavioral types will assist healthcare professionals in explaining and educating people with PD and their partners, contribute to decreased stress and tension between them, and help them manage these sexual issues.

  18. Media and technology in adolescent sexual education and safety.

    PubMed

    Harris, Allyssa L

    2011-01-01

    Media play an important role in the lives of adolescents, providing them with opportunities for education and socialization. Media content is increasingly permeated with violence and sexual references that can be highly influential as adolescents continue the developmental process. Providing patient education is one of the cornerstones of nursing practice, and nurses are ideally suited to affect adolescent and parental education about the sexual and violent content of media.

  19. Compulsory sexuality.

    PubMed

    Emens, Elizabeth F

    2014-02-01

    Asexuality is an emerging identity category that challenges the common assumption that everyone is defined by some type of sexual attraction. Asexuals--those who report feeling no sexual attraction to others--constitute one percent of the population, according to one prominent study. In recent years, some individuals have begun to identify as asexual and to connect around their experiences interacting with a sexual society. Asexuality has also become a protected classification under the antidiscrimination law of one state and several localities, but legal scholarship has thus far neglected the subject. This Article introduces asexuality to the legal literature as a category of analysis, an object of empirical study, and a phenomenon of medical science. It then offers a close examination of the growing community of self-identified asexuals. Asexual identity has revealing intersections with the more familiar categories of gender, sexual orientation, and disability, and inspires new models for understanding sexuality. Thinking about asexuality also sheds light on our legal system. Ours is arguably a sexual law, predicated on the assumption that sex is important. This Article uses asexuality to develop a framework for identifying the ways that law privileges sexuality. Across various fields, these interactions include legal requirements of sexual activity, special carve-outs to shield sexuality from law, legal protections from others' sexuality, and legal protections for sexual identity. Applying this framework, the Article traces several ways that our sexual law burdens, and occasionally benefits, asexuals. This Article concludes by closely examining asexuality's prospects for broader inclusion into federal, state, and local antidiscrimination laws.

  20. NANDA Diagnoses, NIC Interventions, and NOC Outcomes Used in an Electronic Health Record with Elementary School Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lunney, Margaret

    2006-01-01

    This is a report of a secondary analysis of data from a published quasi-experimental feasibility study of the effects of implementing diagnoses from North American Nursing Diagnosis Association International, interventions from the Nursing Interventions Classification, and outcomes from the Nursing Outcomes Classification (referred to as NNN) on…

  1. Nursing, Nursing Education, and Anxiety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biggers, Thompson; And Others

    In response to the current crisis in the field of nursing, a study examined nursing students' perceived work-related stress and differences among associate degree, diploma, and baccalaureate nursing programs in their preparation of nursing students. The 171 subjects, representing the three different nursing programs, completed a questionnaire…

  2. Self-screening for sexually transmitted infections.

    PubMed

    Potter, Yvonne

    2014-06-17

    There is an increasing trend towards self-collection of samples for sexually transmitted infection screening in lieu of genital examination and clinician-obtained urethral and cervical swabs. This article examines the advantages and disadvantages of this trend, and the effect on nursing practice particularly within integrated sexual health (ISH) services, which provide genito-urinary medicine (GUM) and contraceptive services. This article might also be of interest to nurses working within separate GUM and contraceptive services, especially those that are preparing to become ISH services.

  3. Sexual pain.

    PubMed

    Boardman, Lori A; Stockdale, Colleen K

    2009-12-01

    Sexual pain is an underrecognized and poorly treated constellation of disorders that significantly impact affected women and their partners. Recognized as a form of chronic pain, sexual pain disorders are heterogeneous and include dyspareunia (superficial and deep), vaginismus, vulvodynia, vestibulitis, and noncoital sexual pain disorder. Women too often tolerate pain in the belief that this will meet their partners' needs. This article provides a review of the terminology and definition of the condition, theories on the pathophysiology, diagnostic considerations, and recommendations on the management of female sexual pain.

  4. Internet Sexualities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Döring, Nicola

    The term “internet sexuality” (or OSA, online sexual activities) refers to sexual-related content and activities observable on the internet (cf. Adams, Oye, & Parker, 2003; Cooper, McLoughlin, & Campbell, 2000; Leiblum & Döring, 2002). It designates a variety of sexual phenomena (e.g., pornography, sex education, sexual contacts) related to a wide spectrum of online services and applications (e.g., websites, online chat rooms, peer-to-peer networks). If an even broader range of computer networks - such as the Usenet or bulletin board systems - is included in this extensional definition, one speaks of “online sexuality” or “cybersexuality.”

  5. Sexual assault.

    PubMed

    Dunn, S F; Gilchrist, V J

    1993-06-01

    Estimates are that one in four women will be sexually assaulted at some time during her life. For the victim, it is a life-changing, traumatic event. This paper reviews both the immediate and long-term care of the sexual assault victim. For the victim seen immediately after the assault, physicians must provide empathic, nonjudgmental care that puts the victim back in control of her life. It is essential that the physician provide continued support for the victim and her family through the recovery process. The medical presentations that should prompt the physician to inquire about undisclosed sexual assault and the social and cultural myths that promote sexual assault are reviewed.

  6. Adolescent sexuality.

    PubMed

    Grant, L M; Demetriou, E

    1988-12-01

    The consequences of adolescent sexual behavior are an enormous burden both for the adolescent and society. The problem is not that teens are sexually active but rather that they have little preparation and guidance in developing responsible sexual behavior. Developmentally, adolescents reach physical maturity before they are cognitively able to appreciate the consequences of their behavior. A teenager's primary source of information regarding sexuality is his or her peer group, all of whom are experiencing and reinforcing the same behaviors. The family, the major socializer of other behaviors, is not as powerful a force in shaping responsible sexual behavior because of parental discomfort with sex education and sexual discussions. This is the result of a social milieu in which sex is frequently portrayed but rarely linked with responsible behavior or accurate, nonjudgmental information. The pediatric practitioner is in an ideal position to intervene in these dynamics. In the office, the practitioner can provide accurate sexual information to both parents and adolescents, support parental-child communication on sexual issues, and provide appropriate services or referral. In the community, the practitioner can advocate for school-based sex education as well as act as an information resource. Finally, the practitioner can advocate for the health care needs for adolescents on a national level, supporting legislation that provides adolescents with information and access to services necessary to make responsible sexual decisions.

  7. Nursing Homes

    MedlinePlus

    ... our e-newsletter! Aging & Health A to Z Nursing Homes Basic Facts & Information Nursing homes have changed ... physical health and/or mental disabilities. Is a Nursing Home Right for You? Almost half of all ...

  8. Theorising sexual media and sexual violence in a forensic setting: men's talk about pornography and offending.

    PubMed

    Mercer, Dave; Perkins, Liz

    2014-01-01

    This article reports findings from a discourse analytic study which critically explored the language of mental health nurses, and detained sexual offenders, in relation to pornography in one high-security hospital. It recognised previous empirical investigation, and pro-feminist theorising, into mediated representations and male sexual violence, but situated the research process in a forensic nursing context. Decision-making about access to, or restriction of, commercial sexual literature, as a component of therapeutic intervention and offender management, reveals tensions between service-user rights and treatment goals. The aim was to access nurse and patient talk in a specific culture. Semi-structured interviews with eighteen nursing staff, and nine patients, were used to co-construct accounts of pornography, sexual offending, and treatment. Analysis and data collection were undertaken concurrently. Interviews were audio-taped and transcribed. Data was coded to identify theoretical/conceptual themes and sub-themes representing discursive repertoires. Attention was given to how textual variation positioned respondents in relation to each other and the institution. Findings suggested collective male talk textured the environment, promoted gendered inequality, marginalised female nurses, and undermined rehabilitation. Shared discourse enabled male staff and patients to relate to each other as men, while maintaining distance through constructions of otherness. Discussion focuses on discriminatory discursive-practices, where men's talk about pornography and sexual violence embodied gendered knowledge/experience and contributed to a toxic culture. Consideration is given to ways of resisting institutional impediments and promoting positive therapeutic relations.

  9. Sexuality and intimacy among people living with serious mental illnesses: Factors contributing to sexual activity

    PubMed Central

    Bonfils, Kelsey A.; Firmin, Ruth L.; Salyers, Michelle P.; Wright, Eric R.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Limited research has focused on sexuality for those diagnosed with a severe mental illness. We aimed to extend existing work by exploring relationships between mastery (perception of control of one's life and future), sexual self-esteem (perceptions of one's capacity to engage in healthy sexual behavior), sexual attitudes (permissive ideas about sexuality), and perceived importance of relationships/sexuality and number of sexual partners. Methods A secondary analysis of survey data from adult participants living with a severe mental illness (N=401) in the Indiana Mental Health Services and HIV-Risk Study (Perry & Wright, 2006) was conducted. Analysis of covariance (controlling for marital status) compared those with zero partners, one partner, or multiple partners over the past three months on the dependent variables of mastery, sexual self-esteem, sexual attitudes, and perceived importance. Results Participants with more permissive attitudes, greater perceived importance, and higher mastery were more likely to be sexually active with multiple partners. Self-esteem did not differentiate groups. Conclusions and Implications for Practice Given the key role of sexual satisfaction in quality of life and the high rates of sexual risk behavior in this population, it is important that clinicians systematically assess mastery, perceived importance, and attitudes about sexuality when working with consumers diagnosed with a severe mental illness. Individually tailoring existing interventions based on consumers' levels of mastery, related to self-efficacy for implementing changes in life, could improve long-term outcomes for these programs. Future research should examine other constructs that may account for more variance in sexual activity, such as perceptions of risk, intentions for sexual safety, or romantic relationship functioning. PMID:25664756

  10. Nursing: What's a Nurse Practitioner?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Your 1- to 2-Year-Old What's a Nurse Practitioner? KidsHealth > For Parents > What's a Nurse Practitioner? ... United States. continue Should My Kids See a Nurse Practitioner? Pediatric NPs can deliver much of the ...

  11. American Nurses Association Nursing World

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ethics Ethics Topics and Articles About The Center Code of Ethics Health & Safety Healthy Nurse, Healthy Nation™ ... VIEWED 2017 Year of the Healthy Nurse About Code of Ethics Join What is Nursing? Career Center ...

  12. Sexual Preference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Commission on the Observance of International Women's Year, Washington, DC.

    This document considers sexual preference as it specifically relates to women. Divided into two parts, the document presents a fact sheet about lesbianism and contains a workshop resource guide on sexual preference. The fact sheet, arranged in a question-answer format, focuses on the following concerns: (1) lesbianism as a woman's issue; (2) legal…

  13. How a Stroke Is Diagnosed

    MedlinePlus

    ... News About Neurology Image Library Search The Internet Stroke Center Patients & Families About Stroke Stroke Diagnosis Stroke ... Diagnosis » How a Stroke is Diagnosed How a Stroke is Diagnosed How a Stroke is Diagnosed Lab ...

  14. How Is Cardiogenic Shock Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Cardiogenic Shock Diagnosed? The first step in diagnosing cardiogenic shock ... is cardiogenic shock. Tests and Procedures To Diagnose Shock and Its Underlying Causes Blood Pressure Test Medical ...

  15. How Are Genetic Conditions Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Consultation How are genetic conditions diagnosed? How are genetic conditions diagnosed? A doctor may suspect a diagnosis ... and advocacy resources. For more information about diagnosing genetic conditions: Genetics Home Reference provides information about genetic ...

  16. Considerations for Sexuality Education and Services for LGB Elders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chaya, Julie; Bernert, Donna J.

    2014-01-01

    Sexuality education and health services for elderly individuals who reside in care settings (e.g., assisted living facilities, nursing homes, retirement communities) have received limited attention in the professional literature. However, the lack of sexual health promotion practices in elder care facilities can be detrimental to older…

  17. Sexual prejudice.

    PubMed

    Herek, Gregory M; McLemore, Kevin A

    2013-01-01

    Despite shifts toward greater acceptance in U.S. public opinion and policy, lesbian, gay, and bisexual people remain widely stigmatized. This article reviews empirical research on sexual prejudice, that is, heterosexuals' internalization of cultural stigma, manifested in the form of negative attitudes toward sexual minorities and same-sex desires and behaviors. After briefly reviewing measurement issues, we discuss linkages between sexual prejudice and religion, gender, sexuality, and related variables, and consider how the cultural institutions encompassing these domains create a social context within which individual expressions of prejudice can meet important psychological needs. These include needs for securing social acceptance, affirming values that are central to one's self-concept, and avoiding anxiety and other negative emotions associated with threats to self-esteem. We conclude by discussing factors that may motivate heterosexuals to reduce their own sexual prejudice, including intergroup contact, as well as avenues for future empirical inquiry.

  18. Controversies in Gender Diagnoses.

    PubMed

    Drescher, Jack

    2014-03-01

    This article presents the author's thoughts on gender diagnosis controversies during his tenure at the DSM-5 Workgroup on Sexual and Gender Identity Disorders and the ICD-11 Working Group on the Classification of Sexual Disorders and Sexual Health. The work summarizes some of the published conclusions of the DSM-5 and ICD-11 revision processes regarding three particular controversies: (1) stigma versus access to care; (2) the retention of a child gender diagnosis; and (3) the treatment of prepubescent transgender children. Both the DSM and ICD work groups decided that despite the stigma associated with a diagnosis, retaining an adolescent and adult gender diagnosis is necessary to maintain access to care. As for the child gender diagnosis, given the heterogeneity of this clinical population and that gender dysphoria does not persist in most children, a child diagnosis of Gender Dysphoria (DSM) and Gender Incongruence (ICD) should be retained to facilitate ongoing evaluation and management in childhood while acknowledging the uncertainty of the outcome. The treatment of extremely gender variant prepubescent children remains a controversial subject since some underlying assumptions of the treating clinicians are a matter of opinion rather than of empirical data.

  19. PROCenf evaluation: Are the assessments triggering the correct NANDA-I diagnoses?

    PubMed Central

    Tellez, Michelle; Peres, Heloisa Helena Ciqueto; de Almeida Lopes Monteiro da Cruz, Diná

    PROCEnf-USP is a decision support system that offers staff nurses at the University Hospital in Sao Paulo, Brazil a set of questionnaires to guide patient assessment. Using the answers, the system computes probabilities for nursing diagnoses based on NANDA-I. This study aims to evaluate PROCenf in terms of its reliability (Does it consistently gives the right diagnose?) and its validity in Brazil (Does NANDA-I terminology represent the healthcare experience of a Brazilian population) PMID:24303277

  20. Ophthalmic and Glaucoma Treatment Characteristics Associated with Changes in Health-Related Quality of Life Before and After Newly Diagnosed Primary Open-Angle Glaucoma in Nurses Health Study Participants

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Lucy A.; Okereke, Olivia I.; Kawachi, Ichiro; Cioffi, George A.; Pasquale, Louis R.; Kang, Jae H.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To identify attributes related to glaucoma diagnosis or early glaucoma treatment patterns that are associated with changes in health-related quality of life among those with newly diagnosed primary open-angle glaucoma. Methods Among Nurses’ Health Study participants with incident medical record-confirmed primary open-angle glaucoma diagnosed in 1992–2000, we included 317 women who completed the Short-Form 36 Health Survey pre- and post-diagnosis. The two primary outcomes were 4-year changes (1992–1996 or 1996–2000) in the physical and mental component summary scores. Multiple regression models were used to estimate differences in score changes by early treatment pattern history and characteristics as of diagnosis (i.e., number of eyes affected, history of cataract, macular degeneration, cup-to-disc ratio, intraocular pressure, visual field loss type). Results In multivariable models, no ophthalmologic characteristics were associated with physical component score change. However, compared to treatment with eye drops or pills only, laser trabeculoplasty treatment (concomitant with history of treatment with eye drops or pills in 84%) was associated with a worse mental component score change over four years (-2.5 units; 95% confidence interval: −4.6, −0.3); this association was stronger with a family history of glaucoma (p-interaction=0.04) or with bilateral disease (p-interaction=0.001). Conclusions Among patients with incident glaucoma, no major factors were associated with change in physical well-being. However, compared to medical treatment only, a history of laser trabeculoplasty, which was commonly accompanied with a history of medical treatment and likely represented the need for a second line of treatment, was associated with a worse decline in mental well-being. PMID:26125994

  1. Diagnosing Abiotic Degradation

    EPA Science Inventory

    The abiotic degradation of chlorinated solvents in ground water can be difficult to diagnose. Under current practice, most of the “evidence” is negative; specifically the apparent disappearance of chlorinated solvents with an accumulation of vinyl chloride, ethane, ethylene, or ...

  2. Newly Diagnosed: Older Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... Children Newly Diagnosed: Older Adults Related Topics on AIDS.gov Aging with HIV/AIDS National HIV/AIDS ... an Emerging Challenge Last revised: 07/10/2015 AIDS.gov HIV/AIDS Basics • Federal Resources • Using New ...

  3. Female sexual function, dysfunction, and pregnancy: implications for practice.

    PubMed

    Murtagh, Jessica

    2010-01-01

    Women's sexual function is a complex and dynamic interplay of variables that involve physical, emotional, and psychosocial states. Sexual dysfunction may occur at any level, and diagnosing such issues begins with careful assessment through a sexual health history. However, discussions about female sexual health and function are often deficient in the primary care setting. This article reviews the published research on female sexual function, sexual dysfunction, and sexual function in pregnancy to gain a better understanding of how these aspects of a woman's life impact the health care services she receives. The evaluation of female sexual function is in need of consistent measurement tools and more dialogue during health care visits. Women's health care practitioners have an opportunity to advance patient satisfaction and overall health by evaluating and communicating with female patients about their sexual function.

  4. Harmonising Nursing Terminologies Using a Conceptual Framework.

    PubMed

    Jansen, Kay; Kim, Tae Youn; Coenen, Amy; Saba, Virginia; Hardiker, Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    The International Classification for Nursing Practice (ICNP®) and the Clinical Care Classification (CCC) System are standardised nursing terminologies that identify discrete elements of nursing practice, including nursing diagnoses, interventions, and outcomes. While CCC uses a conceptual framework or model with 21 Care Components to classify these elements, ICNP, built on a formal Web Ontology Language (OWL) description logic foundation, uses a logical hierarchical framework that is useful for computing and maintenance of ICNP. Since the logical framework of ICNP may not always align with the needs of nursing practice, an informal framework may be a more useful organisational tool to represent nursing content. The purpose of this study was to classify ICNP nursing diagnoses using the 21 Care Components of the CCC as a conceptual framework to facilitate usability and inter-operability of nursing diagnoses in electronic health records. Findings resulted in all 521 ICNP diagnoses being assigned to one of the 21 CCC Care Components. Further research is needed to validate the resulting product of this study with practitioners and develop recommendations for improvement of both terminologies.

  5. Task Force Report on Care for Victims of Sexual Assault

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-04-01

    is defined, as any sort of sexual activity in which one person is involved against his or her will, with or without physical force. Of the almost 3...deployed environment, is not currently a consideration in force planning. For example, Sexual Assault Nurse Examiners (SANE) exist in the active and...risks and actively engage in preventive measures xii DoD Care for Victims of Sexual Assault Task Force Report all responders treat victims with

  6. Approach in sexually transmitted diseases.

    PubMed

    Belda Junior, Walter; Shiratsu, Ricardo; Pinto, Valdir

    2009-01-01

    Nowadays, sexually transmitted diseases are one of the most common public health issues. Among its consequences are the possibility of transmission from mother to baby - which may cause miscarriages and congenital disease, male and female infertility, and the increase of HIV infection risk. Therefore, the main goal of these guidelines is to contribute to the improvement of the treatment for sexually transmitted diseases patients by presenting to the medical community how today's science stands on the matter and also what the recommendation for diagnosing and treating a patient are.

  7. Nurses Urged to Prepare for Sex Education.

    PubMed

    2017-01-01

    Editors' note: From its first issue in 1900 through to the present day, AJN has unparalleled archives detailing nurses' work and lives over more than a century. These articles not only chronicle nursing's growth as a profession within the context of the events of the day, but they also reveal prevailing societal attitudes about women, health care, and human rights. Today's nursing school curricula rarely include nursing's history, but it's a history worth knowing. To this end, From the AJN Archives highlights articles selected to fit today's topics and times.This month we reprint a brief "Professional Practice" note from the June 1969 issue about what was described as the first family planning conference for nurse educators. Speakers emphasized the need to make this subject a routine part of nursing school curricula (despite debates over the nurse's role in family planning), "so that nurses can counsel out of wisdom and not from piety or ignorance." Speakers included James Lieberman, MD, who years later coauthored with his daughter a teen sex guide, and Alan Guttmacher, MD, then president of Planned Parenthood, whose Center for Family Planning Program Development within that organization was later renamed the Guttmacher Institute in his honor.Nurses today are deeply involved in sexual and reproductive health care. In this issue, public health specialist Diane Santa Maria and colleagues offer ways to advance sexual and reproductive health care for adolescents by devising more friendly, youth-oriented clinical settings.

  8. Male infertility: an obstacle to sexuality?

    PubMed

    Bechoua, S; Hamamah, S; Scalici, E

    2016-05-01

    Interactions between infertility and sexuality are numerous and complex. Infertile men may suffer from sexual dysfunction (SD) when undergoing an assisted reproductive technology programme. We undertook a review both in French and English of the available data on male SD when being diagnosed with a fertility problem with a specific focus on azoospermic men. The review was performed over a 30-year time period using PubMed/Medline. The sexual concerns and needs of infertile/sterile men for whom potential parenting can be compromised were evaluated. When diagnosed with infertility, men usually go through a crisis that can have a deleterious effect on their sexuality with sometimes a feeling of sexual inadequacy. Infertile men will feel stigmatized because they are perceived as being deficient in a specific component of their masculinity. Hence, subsequent SD may occur that can impact the couple sexuality and the infertility management. However, little is known on how the announcement of azoospermia may affect male on a sexual and psychological point of view. The present review suggests that a global management through a healthcare network (biologist, andrologist, sexologist and psychologist) is required which will allow to consider infertility and its subsequent sexual disorders as a whole and not as dichotomized issues.

  9. Diagnosing Deep Venous Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Doyle, D. Lynn

    1992-01-01

    Patients often present with unexplained lower limb pain and swelling. It is important to exclude deep venous thrombosis in the diagnosis because of the threat of sudden death. Simple clinical diagnosis is unacceptable, and noninvasive tests should be used initially. Serial testing detects proximal extension of isolated calf thrombi. Multiple diagnostic modalities are employed to diagnose a new deep venous thrombosis in patients with postphlebitic syndrome. PMID:21221369

  10. Community-based, nurse-led post-exposure prophylaxis: results and implications.

    PubMed

    O'Byrne, Patrick; MacPherson, Paul; Roy, Marie; Orser, Lauren

    2017-04-01

    HIV medications can be used as post-exposure prophylaxis to efficaciously prevent an HIV-negative person who has come into contact with HIV from becoming HIV-positive. Traditionally, these medications have been available in emergency departments, which have constituted a barrier for the members of many minority groups who are greatly affected by HIV transmission (i.e. gay, bisexual and other men who have sex with men, and persons who use injection drugs). From 5 September 2013 through 4 September 2015, we sought to increase the use of HIV post-exposure prophylaxis by having registered nurses provide these medications, when indicated, in community clinics in Ottawa, Canada. We undertook a chart review of patients who accessed services for HIV post-exposure prophylaxis in this period. Over the two years of data collection, 112 persons requested HIV post-exposure prophylaxis and 64% (n = 72) initiated these medications. Most (93%, or n = 67, of the 72 initiations) were among men, with 88% (n = 59) of these men reporting same sex sexual partners. Among these 58 men, 31% (n = 18) had sexual contact with other men known to be HIV-positive. Among women (n = 8), five initiated post-exposure prophylaxis: three after needle-sharing contact or sexual contact with a male partner who reportedly shared needles, and two after unprotected vaginal sex with a male partner known to be HIV-positive. Overall, no one was diagnosed with HIV at the four-month HIV testing follow-up, although six persons were diagnosed with HIV from the baseline HIV testing, and an additional four were diagnosed with HIV during routine HIV testing one year after completing post-exposure prophylaxis. In total, nine persons in our sample were thus diagnosed with HIV during the study period, which accounted for 9.4% (n = 10 of 106) of all reported HIV diagnoses in Ottawa during this time. We conclude that nurse-initiated HIV post-exposure prophylaxis can be an effective way to provide

  11. Teenage Sexuality

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pediatrician Ages & Stages Prenatal Baby Toddler Preschool Gradeschool Teen Dating & Sex Fitness Nutrition Driving Safety School Substance Abuse Young Adult Healthy Children > Ages & Stages > Teen > Dating & Sex > Teenage Sexuality Ages & Stages Listen Español Text Size ...

  12. Sexual harassment in academia: legal and administrative challenges.

    PubMed

    Dowell, M

    1992-01-01

    Guidelines and institutional policies regarding sexual harassment in academia have a relatively short and controversial background. Deference to Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) guidelines in employment sexual harassment incidents guides much of the thinking in contemporary courts. Title IX of the Educational Amendments and the Civil Rights Restoration Act of 1987 are but two of the legal redresses available to students with harassment grievance complaints. Lack of definition of the term as well as research studies in nursing complicate the issue of sexual harassment. The potential impact of harassment on nursing students both in the classroom and in the practice area is significant. Nursing administrators and educators must be proactive in writing and implementing policies regarding sexual harassment.

  13. [Feminist strategies in nursing science].

    PubMed

    Gendron, C

    1993-05-01

    This article is the first of a two-part series that will be completed in next month's issue. The article illustrates through examples how nursing has the potential for sexual bias. It also demonstrates how the feminist movement can contribute to improving nursing practice. This month, the views of Peggy Chinn are discussed, outlining myths that limit the development or hinder the progress of non-sexist education in nursing. Myths that have become traditional, scientific male-centred methodologies now solidly rooted in the health care community are identified. The author explains that once the myths are identified, they should be extracted and isolated from the context of nursing. This is the way feminist research can be useful. Next month the author will define the feminist approach and how it applies to specific aspects of women's health.

  14. [Possibilities and problems in the development of forensic nursing in Japan: a questionnaire survey of clinical nurses].

    PubMed

    Kodama, Hiromi; Tsuntematsu, Kayoko; Yanai, Keiko

    2012-09-01

    Forensic nursing scientifically obtains and preserves the criminal damage from victims of domestic violence, child abuse, elder abuse, sexual violence and other related forms of violence. This was developed in North America in the 1980s, and has carried out appropriate nursing care while protecting the human rights of victims. Serious crime in Japan has been increasing, and it would seem that forensic nursing opportunities should expand as well. However, in Japan, there hasn't been much discussion about forensic nursing. Theorizing that support for clinical forensic nursing should be recognized and relevant, we carried out a survey of 581 clinical nurses to investigate the development of forensic nursing in Japan. 93 clinical nurses (16.0%) had a low level of familiarity with forensic nursing; however, 324 nurses (56.3%) had encountered patients who had suffered violence. 264 nurses (45.4%) had a feeling of wanting to be involved in forensic nursing, but were not confident with the knowledge and technology, while 144 nurses (24.8%) were concerned about the larger responsibility they would have. 400 nurses (68.8%) hoped to receive specialized knowledge and technical education. It is necessary to establish an education system for forensic nursing in accordance with the educational status-quo while considering the present state of forensic nursing education.

  15. Students Enrolled in an Introductory Gerontology Course: Their Knowledge of and Attitudes toward Sexual Expression in Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ewen, Heidi H.; Brown, Pamela S.

    2012-01-01

    Little is known about younger adults' attitudes towards age-related sexual changes and behaviors. Research using the Aging Sexuality Knowledge and Attitudes Scale (ASKAS) (White, 1982) has been effective in determining knowledge and attitudes among the staff of long-term care facilities, nurses, undergraduate nursing students, health care…

  16. Sexual sadism in sexual offenders and sexually motivated homicide.

    PubMed

    Briken, Peer; Bourget, Dominique; Dufour, Mathieu

    2014-06-01

    This article gives a clinically oriented overview of forensically relevant forms of sexual sadism disorder and its specific relationship to sexual homicide. In sexual homicide perpetrators, peculiar patterns of sexual sadism may be a motivational pathway to kill. Sexual sadism increases the risk for reoffending in sexual offenders. Through psychotherapy and pharmacological interventions, treatment of sadistic sex offenders has to consider special characteristics that may be different from those of nonsadistic sex offenders. Many of these offenders share a combination of sexual sadistic motives and an intact self-regulation, sometimes combined with a high level of sexual preoccupation.

  17. Parental attitudes toward adolescent sexuality: transcultural perspectives.

    PubMed

    DeSantis, L; Thomas, J T

    1987-08-01

    The problem of teenage pregnancy continues to impact private and public resources, affecting all socioeconomic and cultural groups. A key factor for nurse practitioners to consider when planning sex education programs is the differing parental attitudes toward teenage sexuality. These attitudes are especially important to keep in mind when dealing with parents from minority cultural groups, as these groups are often highly influential in determining the nature of adolescent sexual behavior and attitudes toward reproduction. A study of Cuban and Haitian child-rearing practices clearly demonstrates two divergent parental views of adolescent sexuality. Nurse practitioners must recognize these differing views, and individualize their approach, in order to develop culturally sensitive sex education programs for adolescents and their parents. Suggestions are provided for development of such programs for Cuban and Haitian parents and children.

  18. [Sexuality in acute myocardial infarction patients].

    PubMed

    Casado Dones, Ma J; de Andrés Gimeno, B; Moreno González, C; Fernández Balcones, C; Cruz Martín, R Ma; Colmenar García, C

    2002-01-01

    We as nurses in the Coronary Unit we do not see the sexuality of the patients sufficiently addressed neither by us nor by the patients themselves. In this article we are trying to analize the reasons and to emphasize the need to include this subject in our Nursing Problem List. In it we explaine the fears and the wrong ideas that we have identified in our patients. The sexual function is not affected by a myocardial infarction but psychological factors, age, drugs and other associated diseases might be a reason. A quiet enviroment, a fit training plan and looking for personalise proper alternatives may help the patient to start a satisfactory sexual life again.

  19. Social environment and problem behavior: perceived school safety, gender, and sexual debut.

    PubMed

    March, Alice L; Serdar Atav, A

    2010-04-01

    In 2007, 48% of U.S. students of grades 9 to 12 had experienced sexual debut, 7% before the age of 13 years. Preventing early intercourse, sexually transmitted diseases, adolescent pregnancy, and the loss of educational opportunity are important concerns for nurses and educators. A secondary data analysis of the Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS) 2003 provided data identifying the relationships among age at sexual debut, gender, location of residence, and perceived school safety (PSS) as framed by the theory of problem behavior. Mean age at sexual debut was 14.4 years. Males were younger at sexual debut than females. Students reporting positive PSS were older at sexual debut. Age at sexual debut was significantly associated with PSS, gender, and location of residence. School nurses are positioned to identify evidence-based programs, facilitate the development of collaborative interventions to improve PSS, and change trajectories of sexual activity leading to poor health outcomes in adolescents and health risk behaviors in adults.

  20. [Nursing diagnosis and interventions in a patient with multiple organ failure -- report of a case].

    PubMed

    Gerelli, A M; Soares, M A; Almeida, M A

    1999-07-01

    This study tries to identify Nursing Diagnoses and Interventions. It was done with a patient who was in critical health condition: multiple organs failure, in an Intensive Care Unit of a general hospital in Porto Alegre. The Case Study was the methodology used. Nursing Diagnoses is described mostly using NANDA Taxonomy. They are: Risk for Aspiration, Disuse Syndrome, Diarrhea, Risk for Infection, Impaired Tissue Integrity; and a Collaborative Problem was identified: Hypoglicemia. We have elaborated 34 Nursing Interventions for those diagnoses.

  1. Current trends in feminist nursing research.

    PubMed

    Im, Eun-Ok

    2010-01-01

    Despite an increasing number of feminist studies in nursing, few reviews on current trends in feminist nursing research have been published. This article aims to explore the current trends in feminist nursing research and provide recommendations for future feminist studies in nursing. In multiple database searches, 207 articles were retrieved. These were reviewed based on 5 criteria: (1) epistemological background, (2) research questions, (3) research participants, (4) research methods, and (5) implications for changes. The review indicated that feminist nurse researchers with diverse epistemological backgrounds adopted new research methods to ask new questions; expanded their focus to include differences in ethnicity, class, sexual preference, and disability; and incorporated these diversities among women in a global context in their research. Based on these findings, recommendations for future feminist research in nursing are outlined.

  2. Child Sexual Abuse

    MedlinePlus

    ... Enter ZIP code here Enter ZIP code here Child Sexual Abuse Public This section is for Veterans, General Public, Family, & Friends Child Sexual Abuse What is child sexual abuse? Child sexual abuse ...

  3. Healthy Aging -- Sexual Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... Healthy Aging This information in Spanish ( en español ) Sexual health More information on sexual health Many older women ... Protecting yourself Return to top More information on Sexual health Read more from womenshealth.gov Sexually Transmitted Infections ...

  4. Religion in sexual health: a staff perspective.

    PubMed

    Hobern, Kylie

    2014-04-01

    This paper reports data on the complexities of delivering religious/spiritual care in sexual health from a staff perspective. A learning needs analysis, in survey format, was conducted with the nursing staff of a leading London, sexual health clinic. Recruitment took place in May 2011 over a period of 2 weeks. The sample consisted of 25 members of staff which included service support workers and registered nurses. The 25 question survey was conducted and reviewed using Survey Monkey™. The survey was divided into three sections, being population demographics, clinical experience and understanding and education. This article will explore the second section of being clinical experience and understanding. This section used six open-ended questions to investigate participant's experience of common clinical episodes where religion was an influential part of the patient experience and decision-making. A range of contemporary sexual health and religious issues were extrapolated from the survey findings ranging from homosexuality to termination of pregnancy. Four main areas of complexity identified from participants responses were sexual dysfunction, treatment issues, sexual health knowledge and high-risk behaviour. Findings from the study highlight the diversity of influence of religion has on the sexual health of patients.

  5. Nursing home resident symptomatology triggering transfer: avoiding unnecessary hospitalizations.

    PubMed

    Ashcraft, Alyce S; Champion, Jane Dimmitt

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe nursing home resident symptomatology and medical diagnoses associated with nursing home to hospital transfers. A retrospective chart review of documented transfers was conducted at a 120-bed, nonprofit urban Continuing Care Retirement Center nursing home facility located in the southwestern United States. The transferred residents (n = 101) had seventy different medical diagnoses prior to hospital transfer with hypertension, coronary artery disease, and congestive heart failure most frequently reported. Most frequently reported symptomatology included fatigue, lethargy or weakness, shortness of breath, and change in level of consciousness. Multiple symptomatology was indicative of a wide variety of medical diagnoses. The diagnoses and symptomatology recorded in this paper identify the importance of strategic planning concerning assessment and communication of common nursing home resident symptomatology and the importance of basic nursing and diagnostic procedures for prevention of potentially avoidable hospitalizations.

  6. [Nursing care in patients undergoing radiological surgery. A case report].

    PubMed

    Armero-Barranco, David; Ruiz-Mateos, María; Alcaraz-Baños, Miguel; Bernal-Páez, Fernando Luis

    2007-01-01

    We report the case of a 73-year-old man with medical diagnoses of long-standing diabetes mellitus, chronic ischemia of the lower limbs and intermittent claudication, for which the patient had been treated with minimally invasive radiological surgery. On arrival at the radiology unit, the patient had nursing diagnoses of anxiety and fear. Intraoperatively, the client had nursing diagnoses of pain, urine retention and infection risk. At discharge, a collaboration problem was detected and hemorrhagic risk. The patient received individualized nursing care. Interventions were planned following the nursing intervention classification (NIC) and the expected results for these interventions followed the Nursing Outcomes Classification (NOC) taxonomy. The application of an appropriate nursing care plan contributes to making the patient's hospital stay easier, more comfortable and less traumatic.

  7. Nursing Home Checklist

    MedlinePlus

    Nursing home checklist Name of nursing home: ____________________________________________________ Address: ________________________________________________________________ Phone number: __________________________________________________________ Date of visit: _____________________________________________________________ Basic information Yes No Notes Is the nursing home Medicare certified? Is the nursing ...

  8. Factors Related to Homophobia Among Nursing Students.

    PubMed

    Rowniak, Stefan R

    2015-01-01

    A convenience sample of 90 nursing students participated in an online survey measuring homophobia or sexual prejudice. Significantly higher scores were seen among those who endorsed the belief that being gay was a matter of personal choice, did not have a friend or family member who was gay or lesbian, and endorsed religiosity. A significantly higher level of sexual prejudice was seen among those who identified as non-Catholic Christians when compared to other religions. Asian/Pacific Islanders showed significantly higher scores on the scales compared to non-Hispanic Caucasian students. Nursing education should focus on those aspects of homophobia amenable to change.

  9. A Qualitative Study of Egyptian School Nurses' Attitudes and Experiences toward Sex and Relationship Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farrag, Shewikar; Hayter, Mark

    2014-01-01

    School nurses play a vital role in the promotion of sexual health. However, there is very limited evidence of how school nurses experience this topic in an Islamic cultural setting. Using an exploratory qualitative design, 13 in-depth interviews were conducted with Egyptian school nurses. Data were subject to thematic analysis. Four themes emerged…

  10. How Is Kawasaki Disease Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Kawasaki Disease Diagnosed? Kawasaki disease is diagnosed based on your child's signs and ... are the first to suspect a child has Kawasaki disease. Pediatricians are doctors who specialize in treating children. ...

  11. How Is Pulmonary Hypertension Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Hypertension Diagnosed? Your doctor will diagnose pulmonary hypertension (PH) based on your medical and family histories, a ... exam, and the results from tests and procedures. PH can develop slowly. In fact, you may have ...

  12. Diagnosing Dementia--Positive Signs

    MedlinePlus

    ... Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Diagnosing Dementia—Positive Signs Past Issues / Fall 2007 Table of ... easy, affordable blood test that could accurately diagnose Alzheimer's disease (AD)—even before symptoms began to show? Researchers ...

  13. Adolescent sexual activity.

    PubMed

    Braverman, P K; Strasburger, V C

    1993-11-01

    Adolescents are becoming sexually active at younger ages. One half of the adolescents in the United States are sexually active. This article reviews adolescent sexual activity, including rates of sexual activity, sexual practices, gay and lesbian youth, and factors affecting the initiation of sexual activity. In addition, adolescent pregnancy, with possible outcomes and effects on teen parents and their offspring, is discussed.

  14. Kamikaze nurses.

    PubMed

    1988-01-02

    In Japan nurses have found a somewhat drastic way of ensuring high standards of professional practice it would seem. For, according to a report in the current edition of the International Nursing Review, Fumiko Ohmori, retiring President of the Japanese Nursing Association, is famed for a number of visable achievements.

  15. Diagnosing Musculoskeletal Tumours

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Simon R.; Spooner, David; Sneath, Rodney S.

    2001-01-01

    In 1993 we became aware of a worrying increase in apparent errors in the histopathological diagnosis of musculoskeletal tumours in our Unit. As a result all cases seen over the past 8 years were reviewed by an independent panel. Of the 1996 cases reviewed there was an error in 87. In 54 cases (2.7%) this had led to some significant change in the active management of the patient. The main areas where errors arose were in those very cases where clinical and radiological features were not helpful in confirming or refuting the diagnosis. The incidence of errors rose with the passage of time, possibly related to a deterioration in the pathologist’s health. The error rate in diagnosing bone tumours in previously published series ranges from 9 to 40%. To ensure as accurate a rate of diagnosis as possible multidisciplinary working and regular audit are essential. PMID:18521309

  16. Diagnosable structured logic array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitaker, Sterling (Inventor); Miles, Lowell (Inventor); Gambles, Jody (Inventor); Maki, Gary K. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A diagnosable structured logic array and associated process is provided. A base cell structure is provided comprising a logic unit comprising a plurality of input nodes, a plurality of selection nodes, and an output node, a plurality of switches coupled to the selection nodes, where the switches comprises a plurality of input lines, a selection line and an output line, a memory cell coupled to the output node, and a test address bus and a program control bus coupled to the plurality of input lines and the selection line of the plurality of switches. A state on each of the plurality of input nodes is verifiably loaded and read from the memory cell. A trusted memory block is provided. The associated process is provided for testing and verifying a plurality of truth table inputs of the logic unit.

  17. Nursing: What's a Nurse Practitioner?

    MedlinePlus

    ... is a big part of the pediatric NP's role. Pediatric and family practice NPs can treat acute ( ... Nurse Practitioners (NAPNAP) and through local hospitals or nursing schools. Also, many doctors share office space with ...

  18. ICNP Catalogues for supporting nursing content in electronic health records.

    PubMed

    Coenen, Amy; Kim, Tae Youn; Bartz, Claudia C; Jansen, Kay; Hardiker, Nicholas

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe sets of nursing concepts including, for example, nursing diagnoses and interventions, which are knowledge-based and clinically relevant to support nursing practice. Health information systems using the International Classification for Nursing Practice (ICNP®) provide a platform for standardized nursing documentation for patients' health care, clinical decision support, and repositories for re-use of clinical data for quality evaluation, research, management decisions and policy development. Clinically relevant sets of ICNP concepts can facilitate implementation of health information systems for nursing. Descriptive analysis was used to examine the types of, and relationships among, existing nursing content sets. Findings included the need for various types of content sets, as represented in ICNP catalogues, for nursing documentation. Five types of ICNP Catalogues included Care Plans, Order Sets, Clinical Templates, Nursing Minimum Data Sets, and Terminology Subsets.

  19. Doing Foucault: inquiring into nursing knowledge with Foucauldian discourse analysis.

    PubMed

    Springer, Rusla Anne; Clinton, Michael E

    2015-04-01

    Foucauldian discourse analysis (FDA) is a methodology that is well suited to inquiring into nursing knowledge and its organization. It is a critical analytic approach derived from Foucault's histories of science, madness, medicine, incarceration and sexuality, all of which serve to exteriorize or make visible the 'positive unconscious of knowledge' penetrating bodies and minds. Foucauldian discourse analysis (FDA) holds the potential to reveal who we are today as nurses and as a profession of nursing by facilitating our ability to identify and trace the effects of the discourses that determine the conditions of possibility for nursing practice that are continuously shaping and (re)shaping the knowledge of nursing and the profession of nursing as we know it. In making visible the chain of knowledge that orders the spaces nurses occupy, no less than their subjectivities, FDA is a powerful methodology for inquiring into nursing knowledge based on its provocation of deep critical reflection on the normalizing power of discourse.

  20. Brief Report: Sexual Sensation Seeking and Its Relationship to Risky Sexual Behaviour among African-American Adolescent Females

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spitalnick, Joshua S.; DiClemente, Ralph J.; Wingood, Gina M.; Crosby, Richard A.; Milhausen, Robin R.; Sales, Jessica M.; McCarty, Frances; Rose, Eve; Younge, Sinead N.

    2007-01-01

    The relationship between sexual sensation seeking and sexual risk taking has been investigated among adult populations. There are limited data, however, regarding this relationship for adolescents. Since African-American adolescent females continue to be disproportionately diagnosed with STDs, including HIV, we examined this association among a…

  1. [Sexuality and exclusion].

    PubMed

    Fontana, E; Béran, M D

    1995-06-01

    In Lausanne, Switzerland, a family planning counselor and a public health physician conducted an action research in an immigrant Portuguese community, which aimed to establish conditions that would allow women to prevent unwanted pregnancies and sexually transmitted diseases, including AIDS, in order to permit community members to better confront these issues. In this community, the subject of abortion is a taboo. Portuguese women with different backgrounds (e.g., nurse, comedian, and student of modern French), who had received training in family planning counseling from different institutions (e.g., the university hospital center in Vaud canton and the public health service), shared their knowledge in the Portuguese communities in Vaud canton. Implementation of a Portuguese language telephone hot-line and reception place assured continuity of their work in the heart of the community. Thus, the Portuguese women could call on these counselors when they confronted problems of sexuality, contraception, abortion, or risky sexual behavior. Most abortions in Lausanne occurred at the obstetric/gynecologic service of the university hospital center where the family planning counselors had felt powerless due to the recurrence of situations. In this action research, the counselors could evaluate the desire of their patients to take charge. They could then encourage the patients to contact their community through the permanent telephone hot-line or reception place. The sense of powerlessness of the professional counselors decreased when they took a more coherent educative and preventive action. In extrapolating, these situations could take place in medical offices where health problems are revealed. The physician would be able to use the hot-line to avoid repeat consultations with the same patient telling him/her the same story. The action research also included formation of groups where perimenopausal women could receive information on perimenopause, ask questions, and

  2. The role of the school nurse in providing sex education.

    PubMed

    Cohen, P

    School and family planning nurses are well placed to promote high quality sex education to children and young people. Parents and teachers are often seen as authority figures whereas the nurse is an independent health professional. Government guidelines encourage liaison with teachers and this article--the second in a series on sexual health--gives examples of such a collaboration, as well as interviews with nurses who use innovative methods to put their message across.

  3. Applying artificial intelligence technology to support decision-making in nursing: A case study in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Liao, Pei-Hung; Hsu, Pei-Ti; Chu, William; Chu, Woei-Chyn

    2015-06-01

    This study applied artificial intelligence to help nurses address problems and receive instructions through information technology. Nurses make diagnoses according to professional knowledge, clinical experience, and even instinct. Without comprehensive knowledge and thinking, diagnostic accuracy can be compromised and decisions may be delayed. We used a back-propagation neural network and other tools for data mining and statistical analysis. We further compared the prediction accuracy of the previous methods with an adaptive-network-based fuzzy inference system and the back-propagation neural network, identifying differences in the questions and in nurse satisfaction levels before and after using the nursing information system. This study investigated the use of artificial intelligence to generate nursing diagnoses. The percentage of agreement between diagnoses suggested by the information system and those made by nurses was as much as 87 percent. When patients are hospitalized, we can calculate the probability of various nursing diagnoses based on certain characteristics.

  4. Sexually transmitted infections in preadolescent children.

    PubMed

    Lewin, Linda C

    2007-01-01

    Pediatric nurse practitioners may be called on to conduct an assessment for sexual abuse of a young child. Depending on the type of sexual contact, a decision may have to be made to obtain cultures for sexually transmitted infections (STIs). Recognizing the symptoms of STIs in preadolescent children, along with having knowledge of the modes of transmission, diagnostics, and treatment, are part of the clinical decision. The impact of STI in preadolescent children has physical and emotional consequences for the child and family, along with legal consequences for an accused perpetrator. Knowledge about types of sexual contact that necessitate STI cultures, incubation periods, and symptomatology is essential. Accurate techniques and appropriate selection of culture materials are necessary. Proper positioning of the child for obtaining cultures can decrease the potential for discomfort during the examination. Gonorrhea, Chlamydia trachomatis, herpes simplex virus, human papillomavirus virus, syphilis, Trichomonas vaginalis, hepatitis B, and HIV are reviewed.

  5. Nutrition for Nurses: Nursing 245.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palermo, Karen R.

    A description is presented of "Nutrition for Nurses," a prerequisite course for students anticipating entrance into the junior level of a state university registered nursing program. Introductory material highlights the course focus (i.e., the basics of good nutrition; nutrition through the life cycle; nursing process in nutritional care; and…

  6. Sexual Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... grow older. By Mayo Clinic Staff As you age, sex isn't the same as it was in ... work for you and your partner. At any age, emotional issues can affect your sexuality. Many older couples report greater satisfaction with their sex life because they have fewer distractions, more time ...

  7. Sexual Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... lack of interest loss of orgasm worry or anxiety that interferes with sex reduced frequency of sex physical obstacles arising from a disease or health condition. The Most Common Types of Sexual Problems in Older Adults For women, age-related changes due to menopause include: lack ...

  8. Reclaiming 'Big Nurse': a feminist critique of Ken Kesey's portrayal of Nurse Ratched in One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest.

    PubMed

    Darbyshire, P

    1995-12-01

    Nurse Ratched or 'Big Nurse' in Ken Kesey's counter-culture novel One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest is one of popular culture's most arresting and memorable images of the nurse. She is, however, deemed to be remarkable primarily for her malice and authoritarianism. This paper argues that such a purely realist reading fails to fully appreciate the significance of the character of Nurse Ratched. A feminist critique of the novel contends that the importance of 'Big Nurse' is less related to how realistic/unrealistic or good/bad she is as a nurse. Nurse Ratched is important because she exemplifies all that traditional masculinity abhors in women, and particularly in strong women in positions of power and influence. This paper explores the stereotype of 'Big Nurse' and argues that Kesey's vision of her ultimate 'conquest' is not a progressive allegory of 'individual freedom', but a reactionary misogyny which would deny women any function other than that of sexual trophy.

  9. Attitudes of primary care team to diagnosing dementia.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Hywel

    2010-04-01

    Healthcare professionals in primary care are gatekeepers to specialist services and are important in terms of ensuring access to community support and appropriate referral for the sizable number of older people with mental health problems. This literature review explores the role of primary care professionals, particularly GPs and practice nurses, in diagnosing and managing patients with dementia. It recommends that education and training are required to raise awareness of the importance of accurate diagnosis and management in primary care.

  10. Prevalence of violence towards nursing staff in Slovenian nursing homes

    PubMed Central

    Eržen, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction The purpose of this research was to identify the prevalence of violence towards nursing staff in Slovenian nursing homes. Methods For the purpose of this study, a non-experimental sampling method was employed, using a structured questionnaire as a data collection instrument (n=527). The contents of the questionnaire proved valid and reliable, with a high enough degree of internal consistency (Cronbach Alpha minimum 0.82). Results The nursing staffs working in nursing homes for senior citizens are at high risk of violence. In the last year, the employees were most often faced with verbal violence (71.7%), physical violence (63.8%) and sexual violence (35.5%). 35.5% of employees suffered injuries at their working place. During aggressive outbursts of nursing home residents, employees particularly experience vulnerability, fear and insecurity. Conclusion There is a need for a comprehensive approach to tackle workplace violence. Some psychiatric health care facilities have already introduced certain measures in this field, and reduction of workplace violence proves that it is possible to reduce aggressive outbursts of patients. After conducting further quantitative research, which would expose detailed characteristics and the background of such violence, it would be sensible to develop similar measures in the field of health care in nursing homes. PMID:27703541

  11. Application of the sexual health model in the long-term treatment of hypoactive sexual desire and female orgasmic disorder.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Beatrice Bean E; Munns, Rosemary A; Weber-Main, Anne M; Lowe, Margaret A; Raymond, Nancy C

    2011-04-01

    Using the Sexual Health Model as a framework, this case study illustrates the treatment of female orgasmic and low desire disorder in a long-term case with numerous complexities and other co-morbid mental health diagnoses. Derived from a sexological approach to education, the Sexual Health Model defines 10 key components posited to be essential aspects of healthy human sexuality: talking about sex, culture and sexual identity, sexual anatomy and functioning, sexual health care and safer sex, challenges to sexual health, body image, masturbation and fantasy, positive sexuality, intimacy and relationships, and spirituality. The client was selected because of the commonality of her initial presenting concerns and the etiological and treatment complexity of the case, which necessitated the use of all the sexual health treatment modalities provided at our center-individual, couple, and group therapy, sexual medicine, and psychiatric care. Her case is distinct in that her sexual dysfunctions and negative cognitions, while common, occurred in the context of serious relational, family sexual abuse, depression, and life-threatening medical problems, which necessitated long-term treatment. This case illustrates the multifactoral etiology of complex sexual dysfunctions requiring treatment that deals with varied psychosocial and biological factors.

  12. Diagnosing mucopolysaccharidosis IVA.

    PubMed

    Wood, Timothy C; Harvey, Katie; Beck, Michael; Burin, Maira Graeff; Chien, Yin-Hsiu; Church, Heather J; D'Almeida, Vânia; van Diggelen, Otto P; Fietz, Michael; Giugliani, Roberto; Harmatz, Paul; Hawley, Sara M; Hwu, Wuh-Liang; Ketteridge, David; Lukacs, Zoltan; Miller, Nicole; Pasquali, Marzia; Schenone, Andrea; Thompson, Jerry N; Tylee, Karen; Yu, Chunli; Hendriksz, Christian J

    2013-03-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis IVA (MPS IVA; Morquio A syndrome) is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disorder resulting from a deficiency of N-acetylgalactosamine-6-sulfate sulfatase (GALNS) activity. Diagnosis can be challenging and requires agreement of clinical, radiographic, and laboratory findings. A group of biochemical genetics laboratory directors and clinicians involved in the diagnosis of MPS IVA, convened by BioMarin Pharmaceutical Inc., met to develop recommendations for diagnosis. The following conclusions were reached. Due to the wide variation and subtleties of radiographic findings, imaging of multiple body regions is recommended. Urinary glycosaminoglycan analysis is particularly problematic for MPS IVA and it is strongly recommended to proceed to enzyme activity testing even if urine appears normal when there is clinical suspicion of MPS IVA. Enzyme activity testing of GALNS is essential in diagnosing MPS IVA. Additional analyses to confirm sample integrity and rule out MPS IVB, multiple sulfatase deficiency, and mucolipidoses types II/III are critical as part of enzyme activity testing. Leukocytes or cultured dermal fibroblasts are strongly recommended for enzyme activity testing to confirm screening results. Molecular testing may also be used to confirm the diagnosis in many patients. However, two known or probable causative mutations may not be identified in all cases of MPS IVA. A diagnostic testing algorithm is presented which attempts to streamline this complex testing process.

  13. Diagnosing oceanic nutrient deficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, C. Mark

    2016-11-01

    The supply of a range of nutrient elements to surface waters is an important driver of oceanic production and the subsequent linked cycling of the nutrients and carbon. Relative deficiencies of different nutrients with respect to biological requirements, within both surface and internal water masses, can be both a key indicator and driver of the potential for these nutrients to become limiting for the production of new organic material in the upper ocean. The availability of high-quality, full-depth and global-scale datasets on the concentrations of a wide range of both macro- and micro-nutrients produced through the international GEOTRACES programme provides the potential for estimation of multi-element deficiencies at unprecedented scales. Resultant coherent large-scale patterns in diagnosed deficiency can be linked to the interacting physical-chemical-biological processes which drive upper ocean nutrient biogeochemistry. Calculations of ranked deficiencies across multiple elements further highlight important remaining uncertainties in the stoichiometric plasticity of nutrient ratios within oceanic microbial systems and caveats with regards to linkages to upper ocean nutrient limitation. This article is part of the themed issue 'Biological and climatic impacts of ocean trace element chemistry'.

  14. Diagnosing pulmonary embolism

    PubMed Central

    Riedel, M

    2004-01-01

    Objective testing for pulmonary embolism is necessary, because clinical assessment alone is unreliable and the consequences of misdiagnosis are serious. No single test has ideal properties (100% sensitivity and specificity, no risk, low cost). Pulmonary angiography is regarded as the final arbiter but is ill suited for diagnosing a disease present in only a third of patients in whom it is suspected. Some tests are good for confirmation and some for exclusion of embolism; others are able to do both but are often non-diagnostic. For optimal efficiency, choice of the initial test should be guided by clinical assessment of the likelihood of embolism and by patient characteristics that may influence test accuracy. Standardised clinical estimates can be used to give a pre-test probability to assess, after appropriate objective testing, the post-test probability of embolism. Multidetector computed tomography can replace both scintigraphy and angiography for the exclusion and diagnosis of this disease and should now be considered the central imaging investigation in suspected pulmonary embolism. PMID:15192162

  15. CE: Human Papillomavirus-Related Oral Cancers: The Nurse's Role in Mitigating Stigma and Dispelling Myths.

    PubMed

    Katz, Anne

    2017-01-01

    : The prevalence of human papillomavirus (HPV)-related oral cancers has been rising, the cancers occurring in adults at a younger age than HPV-negative oral cancers typically do and in men more often than women. Patients who are diagnosed often don't understand the disease's etiology. Because HPV is sexually transmitted, diagnosis with an HPV-related oral cancer may prompt feelings of shame, embarrassment, and guilt. There are currently three vaccines for HPV. It's essential for nurses to educate patients on HPV transmission and HPV-related oral cancer, thus helping to mitigate the stigma and dispel myths, and to promote vaccination in at-risk populations, including children and young adults.

  16. Nursing students assess nursing education.

    PubMed

    Norman, Linda; Buerhaus, Peter I; Donelan, Karen; McCloskey, Barbara; Dittus, Robert

    2005-01-01

    This study assessed the characteristics of nursing students currently enrolled in nursing education programs, how students finance their nursing education, their plans for clinical practice and graduate education, and the rewards and difficulties of being a nursing student. Data are from a survey administered to a national sample of 496 nursing students. The students relied on financial aid and personal savings and earnings to finance their education. Parents, institutional scholarships, and government loans are also important sources, but less than 15% of the students took out bank loans. Nearly one quarter of the students, particularly younger and minority students, plan to enroll in graduate school immediately after graduation and most want to become advanced nursing practitioners. Most of the nursing students (88%) are satisfied with their nursing education and nearly all (95%) provided written answers to two open-ended questions. Comments collapsed into three major categories reflecting the rewards (helping others, status, and job security) and three categories reflecting the difficulties (problems with balancing demands, quality of nursing education, and the admissions process) of being a nursing student. Implications for public policymaking center on expanding the capacity of nursing education programs, whereas schools themselves should focus on addressing the financial needs of students, helping them strike a balance among their school, work, and personal/family responsibilities and modifying certain aspects of the curriculum.

  17. Mental Illness Sexual Stigma: Implications for Health and Recovery

    PubMed Central

    Wainberg, Milton L.; Cournos, Francine; Wall, Melanie M.; Pala, Andrea Norcini; Mann, Claudio Gruber; Pinto, Diana; Pinho, Veronica; McKinnon, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Objective Among people in psychiatric care worldwide, the majority is sexually active, and sharply elevated rates of HIV infection compared to the general population have been shown. Recovery-oriented treatment does not routinely address sexuality. We examined the relationship between gender, severe mental illness diagnosis, and stigma experiences related to sexuality among people in psychiatric outpatient care. Method 641 sexually active adults attending eight public outpatient psychiatric clinics in Rio de Janeiro were interviewed for psychiatric diagnosis and stigma experiences. Stigma mechanisms well established in the literature but not previously examined in relation to sexuality were measured with the Mental Illness Sex Stigma Questionnaire, a 27-item interview about stigma in sexual situations and activities. Results Experiences of stigma were reported by a majority of participants for 48% of questionnaire items. Most people reported supportive attitudes toward their sexuality from providers and family members. Those with severe mental illness diagnoses showed greater stigma on Individual Discrimination and Structural Stigma mechanisms than those with non-severe mental illness diagnoses, while there was no difference on the Social Psychological Processes (internalized stigma) mechanism. Regardless of diagnosis or gender, a majority of participants devalued themselves as sexual partners. Conclusions and Implications for Practice Adults in psychiatric outpatient care frequently reported stigma experiences related to aspects of their sexual lives. From the perspectives of both HIV prevention and recovery from mental illness, examining the consequences of stigma in the sexual lives of people in psychiatric care and improving their measurement would have wide applicability. PMID:27030909

  18. Evaluation and Management of Female Victims of Sexual Assault.

    PubMed

    Vrees, Roxanne A

    2017-01-01

    Sexual assault is characterized by any sexual contact or behavior that occurs without explicit consent. Classifications vary based on the status of the perpetrator's relationship to the victim (eg, stranger, acquaintance) and characteristics of the victim herself (eg, child, elder adult, mentally disabled adult). Regardless of the classification, sexual assault is a significant individual as well as public health issue affecting women of all ages. While the majority of sexual assault cases are not initially reported to law enforcement, the best available data suggest the lifetime prevalence of sexual assault in the United States is approximately 20% among adult women. With such a significant proportion of women affected by sexual assault, women's health care providers in both ambulatory and emergency care settings play key roles in the evaluation, management, and advocacy of these victims. Establishing standard protocols based on state laws and on victim-centered practices to avoid revictimization of the patient is critical. The primary goals of care include the assessment and treatment of physical injuries, psychological assessment and support, pregnancy assessment and prevention, and therapy for prevention of sexually transmitted infections. In addition, evidentiary collection is a critical component of the sexual assault evaluation and subsequent legal proceedings. This report focuses specifically on the immediate evaluation and management of adult female victims of sexual assault. Best practices include the utility of the Sexual Assault Nurse Examiner and Sexual Assault Forensic Examiner programs, as well as standardized treatment protocols.

  19. Values and sexual behaviour in central and eastern europe.

    PubMed

    Goodwin, Robin; Realo, Anu; Kwiatkowska, Anna; Kozlova, Alexandra; Luu, Lan Anh Nguyen; Nizharadze, George

    2002-01-01

    Despite the profusion of social cognitive models for the prediction of sexual behaviour, we have only limited knowledge as to the role of individual values in predicting risky sexual activity. This study assessed the relationship between a recently developed value structure and sexual behaviour in the context of rising HIV infection in central and eastern Europe. Five hundred and three respondents (business people, doctors and nurses) from Estonia, Georgia, Hungary, Poland and Russia completed Schwartz's Portrait Values Questionnaire and reported their condom use, partnership history and record of sexual disease. Results indicated that values had a moderate but consistent relationship with sexual behaviour, with riskier sexual activity reported by those high on Openness to Change, Hedonism and Self-Enhancement. These findings are discussed in the context of the need for culturally sensitive interventions in order to tackle the growing HIV epidemic in this region.

  20. Brief report: sexual sensation seeking and its relationship to risky sexual behaviour among African-American adolescent females.

    PubMed

    Spitalnick, Joshua S; DiClemente, Ralph J; Wingood, Gina M; Crosby, Richard A; Milhausen, Robin R; Sales, Jessica M; McCarty, Frances; Rose, Eve; Younge, Sinead N

    2007-02-01

    The relationship between sexual sensation seeking and sexual risk taking has been investigated among adult populations. There are limited data, however, regarding this relationship for adolescents. Since African-American adolescent females continue to be disproportionately diagnosed with STDs, including HIV, we examined this association among a clinic-based sample of African-American adolescent females (N=715) enrolled in an STD/HIV prevention intervention. Participants (ages 15-21) endorsing higher levels of sexual sensation seeking reported higher levels of sexual risk-taking behaviours (e.g. frequency of vaginal intercourse, number of sexual partners, and poorer condom use). Results remained significant after controlling for known covariates associated with sexual risk-taking behaviours. Results are consistent with the adult literature and highlight the need for future investigations examining sexual sensation seeking among adolescents. These results, though preliminary, could be used to better inform prevention interventions and clinicians/health educators who provide direct services to adolescents.

  1. Puberty and adolescent sexuality.

    PubMed

    Fortenberry, J Dennis

    2013-07-01

    This article is part of a Special Issue "Puberty and Adolescence". Sexuality emerges as a major developmental element of puberty and the adolescent years that follow. However, connecting the sexuality that emerges with puberty and elements of adult sexuality is difficult because much adolescent sexuality research addresses the transition to partnered sexual behaviors (primarily coitus) and consequences such as unplanned pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections. This review proposes a framework of an expanded understanding of puberty and adolescent sexuality from the perspective of four hallmarks of adult sexuality: sexual desire; sexual arousal; sexual behaviors; and, sexual function. This approach thus addresses important gaps in understanding of the ontogeny of sex and the continuum of sexuality development from adolescence through the adult lifespan.

  2. Diagnosable systems for intermittent faults

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mallela, S.; Masson, G. M.

    1978-01-01

    The fault diagnosis capabilities of systems composed of interconnected units capable of testing each other are studied for the case of systems with intermittent faults. A central role is played by the concept of t(i)-fault diagnosability. A system is said to be t(i)-fault diagnosable when it is such that if no more than t(i) units are intermittently faulty then a fault-free unit will never be diagnosed as faulty and the diagnosis at any time is at worst incomplete. Necessary and sufficient conditions for t(i)-fault diagnosability are proved, and bounds for t(i) are established. The conditions are in general more restrictive than those for permanent-fault diagnosability. For intermittent faults there is only one testing strategy (repetitive testing), and consequently only one type of intermittent-fault diagnosable system.

  3. Sexual abuse in childhood and the mentally disordered female offender.

    PubMed

    Silberman, Matthew

    2010-10-01

    This study examines the role that a history of child sexual abuse played in the diagnosis and treatment of mental disorders in a sample of 321 female offenders incarcerated in a maximum-security prison for women. The results show that a history of child sexual abuse increases the likelihood that an inmate would receive mental health treatment. Psychotropic medication is frequently prescribed in response to adjustment problems associated with childhood sexual abuse. White women who exhibit adjustment problems associated with a history of child sexual abuse are especially likely to be diagnosed as mentally disordered at admission and to be sent to the mental health unit for treatment. In the absence of a diagnosed mental disorder at admission, women who receive psychotropic medication to help them adjust to prison life are likely to be diagnosed with a mental disorder later on.

  4. Sexuality and Young Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Honig, Alice Sterling

    2000-01-01

    Describes normal aspects of sexuality during the early years, including masturbation and children's fanciful sexual ideas. Presents inappropriately mature sexual knowledge as a danger sign of abuse. Discusses whether and what teachers/caregivers should tell children about sexuality, and notes the importance of teaching staff about sexual identity…

  5. Geriatric nursing in acute settings.

    PubMed

    Fulmer, T; Ashley, J; Reilly, C

    1986-01-01

    In conclusion, it is important to reiterate the interdependent nature of the functional health patterns as they relate to the geriatric patient in the acute care setting. Further, the combination of the primary nursing model with the functional health pattern approach that leads to subsequent nursing diagnoses provides a comprehensive care approach, which is so important for the elderly patient. As elders live longer, become frailer, and are subject to increasingly frequent hospitalizations, it will become more and more important to provide care in a manner that decreases fragmentation, increases individualization, and makes provisions for comprehensive and wholistic continuing care.

  6. Antidepressant treatment of depression in rural nursing home residents.

    PubMed

    Kerber, Cindy Sullivan; Dyck, Mary J; Culp, Kennith R; Buckwalter, Kathleen

    2008-09-01

    Under-diagnosis and under-treatment of depression are major problems in nursing home residents. The purpose of this study was to determine antidepressant use among nursing home residents who were diagnosed with depression using three different methods: (1) the Geriatric Depression Scale, (2) Minimum Data Set, and (3) primary care provider assessments. As one would expect, the odds of being treated with an antidepressant were about eight times higher for those diagnosed as depressed by the primary care provider compared to the Geriatric Depression Scale or the Minimum Data Set. Men were less likely to be diagnosed and treated with antidepressants by their primary care provider than women. Depression detected by nurses through the Minimum Data Set was treated at a lower rate with antidepressants, which generates issues related to interprofessional communication, nursing staff communication, and the need for geropsychiatric role models in nursing homes.

  7. An ICU nurse with a history of tremors.

    PubMed

    Lurati, Ann

    2015-01-01

    A 52-year-old female working as a registered nurse in the ICU developed tremors with fine motor activities in stressful situations. She was evaluated by a neurologist and was diagnosed with physiological tremors. Implications for practice are explored.

  8. School nursing in America--1902-1994: a return to public health nursing.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, J W; Hayes, E R; Corliss, C P

    1994-12-01

    In October 1902, Lina Lavanche Rogers began her work in the New York City schools as the first school nurse in the United States. The purpose of this research was to examine the evolution of school nursing as it exemplifies development of a public health nursing specialty. Historiographic methodology was used. Primary sources included materials written by pioneers in school nursing. Secondary sources included journals, books, newspapers, biographical materials, and unpublished materials from the archives of health care and educational institutions and agencies. Public health nurses in 1902 had a model for practice that was considerably more independent and interdependent than that characterizing the practice of hospital nurses. From its origins in public health nursing, the role of the school nurse shrunk in many school systems to that of dispenser of bandages and aspirins, only to return once more to an advanced practice model. HIV, tuberculosis, sexually transmitted diseases, addiction, and violence have returned and/or replaced the contagious diseases of 1902 and the early years of school nursing. New immigrants, poverty, homelessness, and lack of primary care offer challenges to school nurses to meet the needs of schoolchildren and their families in the 1900s.

  9. The 2012 American College of Nurse-Midwives core competencies for basic midwifery practice: history and revision.

    PubMed

    Phillippi, Julia C; Avery, Melissa D

    2014-01-01

    The American College of Nurse-Midwives (ACNM) Core Competencies for Basic Midwifery Practice, approved in 2012, (hereafter referred to as Core Competencies) outline the knowledge, skills, and abilities that can be expected of new certified nurse-midwives (CNMs) and certified midwives (CMs). The Core Competencies are standards for midwifery education, and the document is an important guide for midwifery practice and policy. As a part of the 2012 revision, the Basic Competency Section of the ACNM Division of Education reviewed a variety of national and international documents to ensure that the basic education of CNMs/CMs is consistent with the practice of midwives in the United States and internationally. Few substantive changes were made to the document, but several areas were adjusted and clarified. New graduates continue to be prepared by midwifery education programs to provide safe, evidence-based midwifery care to women across the lifespan, well newborns up to 28 days, and sexual partners of women diagnosed with sexually transmitted infections.

  10. XYY chromosome abnormality in sexual homicide perpetrators.

    PubMed

    Briken, Peer; Habermann, Niels; Berner, Wolfgang; Hill, Andreas

    2006-03-05

    In a retrospective investigation of the court reports about sexual homicide perpetrators chromosome analysis had been carried out in 13 of 166 (7.8%) men. Three men (1.8%) with XYY chromosome abnormality were found. This rate is much higher than that found in unselected samples of prisoners (0.7-0.9%) or in the general population (0.01%). The three men had shown prepubescent abnormalities, school problems, and had suffered from physical abuse. The chromosome analysis in all cases had been carried out in connection with the forensic psychiatric court report due to the sexual homicide. However, two men had earlier psychiatric referrals. All were diagnosed as sexual sadistic, showed a psychopathic syndrome or psychopathy according to the Psychopathy Checklist-Revised [Hare RD, 1991, The Hare Psychopathy Checklist-Revised, Toronto, Ontario, Canada: Multi-Health Systems]. Two were multiple murderers. Especially forensic psychiatrists should be vigilant of the possibility of XYY chromosome abnormalities in sexual offenders.

  11. Sexual Dysfunction in Women

    MedlinePlus

    ... pressure), excessive alcohol use or vaginal infections can cause sexual problems. Depression, relationship problems or abuse (current or past abuse) can also cause sexual dysfunction.You may have less sexual desire ...

  12. How Is Aplastic Anemia Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Aplastic Anemia Diagnosed? Your doctor will diagnose aplastic anemia based on your medical and family histories, a ... your primary care doctor thinks you have aplastic anemia, he or she may refer you to a ...

  13. Collaboration between family physicians and nurse clinicians

    PubMed Central

    Maheux, Brigitte; Côté, Luc; Sobanjo, Omobola; Authier, Louise; Lajeunesse, Julie; Leclerc, Mylène; Lefort, Louise

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective To determine whether graduating family physicians are exposed to collaboration between family physicians and nurse clinicians during their training, as well as their opinions about shared care between doctors and nurse clinicians in the delivery of patient care. Design Anonymous online survey. Setting Two French-Canadian university family medicine residency programs. Participants The 2010 and 2011 graduating family physicians (N = 343) from the University of Montreal and Laval University in Quebec. Main outcome measures The extent to which nurse clinicians in graduating family physicians’ training milieu were involved in preventive and curative patient care activities, and graduates’ opinions about nurse clinicians sharing care with physicians. Results Of 343 graduates, 186 (54.2%) participated in the survey. Although as residents in family medicine their exposure to shared care with nurse clinicians was somewhat limited, respondents indicated that they were generally quite open to the idea of sharing care with nurse clinicians. More than 70% of respondents agreed or strongly agreed that nurse clinicians could adjust, according to protocols of clinical guidelines, the treatment of patients with diabetes, hypertension, and asthma, as well as regulate medication for pain control in terminally ill patients. By contrast, respondents were less favourable to nurse clinicians adjusting the treatment of patients with depression. More than 80% of respondents agreed or strongly agreed that nurse clinicians could initiate treatment via a medical directive for routine hormonal contraception, acne, uncomplicated cystitis, and sexually transmitted infections. Respondents’ opinions on nurse clinicians initiating treatment for pharyngitis and otitis were more divided. Conclusion Graduating family physicians are quite open to collaborating with nurse clinicians. Although they have observed some collaboration between physicians and nurses, there are areas of

  14. Neuroblastoma in Children: Just Diagnosed Information

    MedlinePlus

    ... Other Press Room Employment Feedback Contact Select Page Neuroblastoma in Children – Just Diagnosed Home > Cancer Resources > Types ... Diagnosed Just Diagnosed In Treatment After Treatment Diagnosing Neuroblastoma Depending on the location of the tumor and ...

  15. [Neurologically critical patient. Nurses' care].

    PubMed

    López Díaz, Cristina

    2009-12-01

    Handling a neurologically critical patient requires some necessary knowledge and aptitudes in order to avoid risks and complications which could worsen a patient's prognosis. To that end, in this article the author deals with two important points nursing personnel need to bear in mind: the distinct methods and catheters which can be used to monitor intracranial pressure, obtaining an important parameter for evaluation purposes and therapeutic follow-up on these patients, placing special emphasis on ventricular drainage and nursing care, and the operations nurses take when dealing with patients who present a risk of intracranial hypertension, setting up a protocol based on seven necessities in the Virginia Henderson model: breathing, elimination, temperature, hygiene and skin, feeding and hydration, mobility and safety. In each of these necessities, the author studies the problems these patients present, identifying them with a series of diagnoses according to NANDA (North American Nursing Diagnosis Association), and defining the care or nursing activities for each of them, which will prove essential to prevent cerebral ischemia after suffering a primary cerebral injury due to a "TCE"(Cranial Encephalic Trauma) hemorrhage, etc. Nurses' role in caring for neurologically critical patients proves to be of vital importance since these professionals must be capable of evaluating, preventing, controlling and identifying those risk situations which neurologically critical patients could present, avoiding possible complications, aiding their recuperation, and providing quality health care.

  16. Sexual assault.

    PubMed

    DeVore, Heather K; Sachs, Carolyn J

    2011-08-01

    Sexual assault is a problem that permeates all socioeconomic classes and impacts hundreds of thousands in the United States and millions worldwide. Most victims do not report the assault; those that do often present to an emergency department. Care must encompass the patients' physical and emotional needs. Providers must be cognizant regarding handling of evidence and possible legal ramifications. This article discusses the emergency medicine approach to history taking, physical examination, evidence collection, chain of custody, psychological and medical treatment, and appropriate follow-up. Special circumstances discussed include intimate partner violence, male examinations, pediatric examinations, suspect examinations, and drug-facilitated assaults.

  17. Nurses' Attitudes toward Gay and Hemophiliac Patients with AIDS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strasser, Judith A.; Damrosch, Shirley

    A sample of nurses (N=183) enrolled in a School of Nursing's master degree program was randomly assigned to read one of six vignettes about a patient who differed only in terms of diagnosis and lifestyle. Possible diagnoses were Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS), AIDS acquired by a hemophiliac through blood therapy, and leukemia; possible…

  18. The Experience of Intense Pain: Nursing Management and Interventions.

    PubMed

    Kiser-Larson, Norma

    Personal stories of illness give depth to otherwise clinical descriptions of diagnoses. This article offers an autobiographical narrative of complications after total knee replacement surgery. Diagnosis and nursing management of acute compartment syndrome, nociceptive and neuropathic origins of pain, pharmacologic and nursing interventions for pain, the use of prayer in illness, and compassionate caring from a Christian perspective are discussed.

  19. Education about Sexuality in the Elderly by Healthcare Professionals: A Survey from the Southern Hemisphere

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helmes, Edward; Chapman, Joanne

    2012-01-01

    Education about sexuality is one method of reducing common negative stereotypes about this aspect of the life of older people. Knowledge and attitudes toward sexuality are therefore particularly important in those who educate healthcare professionals. We surveyed schools of medicine, nursing, occupational therapy, physiotherapy, psychology, and…

  20. Development of Standardized Clinical Training Cases for Diagnosis of Sexual Abuse using a Secure Telehealth Application

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frasier, Lori D.; Thraen, Ioana; Kaplan, Rich; Goede, Patricia

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: The training of physicians, nurse examiners, social workers and other health professional on the evidentiary findings of sexual abuse in children is challenging. Our objective was to develop peer reviewed training cases for medical examiners of child sexual abuse, using a secure web based telehealth application (TeleCAM). Methods:…

  1. Social Environment and Problem Behavior: Perceived School Safety, Gender, and Sexual Debut

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    March, Alice L.; Atav, A. Serdar

    2010-01-01

    In 2007, 48% of U.S. students of grades 9 to 12 had experienced sexual debut, 7% before the age of 13 years. Preventing early intercourse, sexually transmitted diseases, adolescent pregnancy, and the loss of educational opportunity are important concerns for nurses and educators. A secondary data analysis of the Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS)…

  2. Sexual excitement.

    PubMed

    Stoller, R J

    1976-08-01

    Sexual excitement depends on a scenario the person to be aroused has been writing since childhood. The story is an adventure, an autobiography disguised as fiction, in which the hero/heroine hides crucial intrapsychic conflicts, mysteries, screen memories of actual traumatic events and the resolution of these elements into a happy ending, best celebrated by orgasm. The function of the fantasy is to take these painful experiences and convert them to pleasure-triumph. In order to sharpen excitement-the vibration between the fear of original traumas repeating and the hope of a pleasurable conclusion this time-one introduces into the story elements of risk (approximations of the trauma) meant to prevent boredom and safety factors (sub-limnal signals to the storyteller that the risk are not truly dangerous). Sexual fantasy can be studied by means of a person's daydreams (including those chosen in magazines, books, plays, television, movies, and outright pornography), masturbatory behavior, object choice, foreplay, techniques of intercourse, or postcoital behavior.

  3. Nursing informatics: state of the science.

    PubMed

    Henry, S B

    1995-12-01

    The phenomena of interest in nursing informatics are nursing data, nursing information and nursing knowledge. The current state of knowledge related to these phenomena suggests four implications for the development of systems to support nursing. First, research has provided evidence that knowledge and experience is related to the quality of nursing assessment, diagnosis or clinical inference, and planning of nursing care, and also that knowledge is task-specific. Information technology can provide access to a variety of information resources, such as knowledge bases and decision support systems, to increase the level of knowledge of the nurse decision-maker. Second, structured patient assessment forms with linkages to knowledge bases of diagnoses have the potential to improve the quality of the patient assessment and the accuracy of the diagnosis or clinical inference. Third, studies on planning care have demonstrated the complexity of the task when a number of options are potentially appropriate. Model-based decision support applications such as decision analysis and multi-attribute utility theory can assist the clinicians and patients to analyse and compare the treatment alternatives in a systematic manner. Fourth, there is modest support for demonstrating the relationship between the process and outcomes of clinical decision making. Large databases built upon nursing data are needed to further examine this relationship.

  4. Multidimensional sexual perfectionism.

    PubMed

    Stoeber, Joachim; Harvey, Laura N; Almeida, Isabel; Lyons, Emma

    2013-11-01

    Perfectionism is a multidimensional personality characteristic that can affect all areas of life. This article presents the first systematic investigation of multidimensional perfectionism in the domain of sexuality exploring the unique relationships that different forms of sexual perfectionism show with positive and negative aspects of sexuality. A sample of 272 university students (52 male, 220 female) completed measures of four forms of sexual perfectionism: self-oriented, partner-oriented, partner-prescribed, and socially prescribed. In addition, they completed measures of sexual esteem, sexual self-efficacy, sexual optimism, sex life satisfaction (capturing positive aspects of sexuality) and sexual problem self-blame, sexual anxiety, sexual depression, and negative sexual perfectionism cognitions during sex (capturing negative aspects). Results showed unique patterns of relationships for the four forms of sexual perfectionism, suggesting that partner-prescribed and socially prescribed sexual perfectionism are maladaptive forms of sexual perfectionism associated with negative aspects of sexuality whereas self-oriented and partner-oriented sexual perfectionism emerged as ambivalent forms associated with positive and negative aspects.

  5. Sexually transmitted diseases in men.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Kenneth D; Dudgeon, Wesley D; Becker, Joel; Bopp, Christopher M

    2004-06-01

    Sexually transmitted diseases are the most common infectious diseases in the United States. Physicians, nurses, and other health care providers are uncomfortable discussing sexual issues with their clients. Therefore many health care needs are not addressed, and many opportunities for education aimed at preventing STDs are missed. In the periodic health history, the health care provider must elicit information about sexual practices (vaginal,oral, or anal intercourse), sexual orientation (heterosexual, homosexual, or bisexual), sexual risk behaviors (ie, unprotected intercourse with multiple partners), contraceptive use (particularly condoms), and prior STDs. Based on this information, the health care practitioner moves to more specific questions regarding sexual health. The health care practitioner asks about sores on the penis, dripping or discharge from the penis, staining of the underwear, testicular pain, and scrotal swelling. For the client who engages in oral sex, the health care practitioner asks about sore throat. For the client who engages in anal intercourse ask about diarrhea, rectal bleeding, anal itching, and pain. Probe the desire phase, the arousal phase (erection), and the ejaculation phase. Ask about the desire for fatherhood and concerns about fatherhood. An important part of health care is prevention. Culturally specific and sensitive information should be available for patients. Patient education should not consist of simply handing a brochure to a man. Using the brochure as a guide for including all the necessary information and ascertaining the man's understanding may be a very effective method of patient education. For men who are at increased risk for STDs or who present with symptoms of STDs, offering diagnostic testing is necessary. Men who have multiple sexual partners especially need diagnostic testing and prevention counseling. The CDC recommends annual HIV and hepatitis C testing for men who have sex with men and other men who have

  6. [Sexually transmitted diseases--an update].

    PubMed

    Davidovitch, Nadav; Shohat, Tami; Dan, Michael

    2005-04-01

    Sexually transmitted infections represent an worldwide challenge for the public health. According to WHO estimates, approximately 330 million people are infected annually by curable sexually transmitted infections (AIDS excluded). and their incidence has been increasing, particularly in high-risk populations. Like in other developed countries, the occurrence of venereal diseases in Israel has been increasing recently. In addition, a sharp rise has been observed in the resistance rate of gonococci to fluoroquinolones. The purpose of the present review is to update the information on the epidemiology, diagnosis, therapy and prevention of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) in Israel. In response to the reemergence of these diseases in Israel, it was decided in the Ministry of Health to open for the first time ever STD clinics in the two cities with the highest disease burden, namely Tel Aviv and Haifa. These clinics are staffed with a multidisciplinary group of specialists, including gynecologists, dermatologists, epidemiologists, nurses and social workers.

  7. Treatment options for men with sexual dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Lewis, J H

    1992-01-01

    Erectile dysfunction can occur in men of any age, but it is more common in older men. It is one of the most devastating problems a man can face. An estimated 10 to 12 million American men experience impotence. Increased sexual expectations for an aging population have resulted in an increased interest in the treatment of impotence. Treatment options range from a simple adjustment in medication to surgical implantation of a penile prosthesis. The good news is that sexual function can almost always be restored. The bad news is that many men with chronic erectile dysfunction never seek help. A sensitive nurse who has an understanding of sexual health and functioning and the conditions that interfere with them can steer those who need help in the direction of treatment.

  8. [Sexual hallucinations and dreams under anesthesia and sedation : medicolegal aspects].

    PubMed

    Schneemilch, C; Schiltz, K; Meinshausen, E; Hachenberg, T

    2012-03-01

    Dreams and hallucinations under sedation or anesthesia have been well known phenomena since the introduction of anesthesia. Sexual hallucinations may lead to allegations of sexual molestation or assault by medical doctors or professional nursing staff. Hallucinations under the influence of sedative or hypnotic drugs may be very vivid and as misinterpreted as being real and it is therefore often difficult to disprove the resulting false allegations. In this report the terms drug-induced dreams and hallucinations are defined and the probable mechanism described. By a historical review and case reports the medicolegal consequences are demonstrated and procedures recommended to avoid allegations of sexual assault.

  9. How Is Stomach Cancer Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer Early Detection, Diagnosis, and Staging How Is Stomach Cancer Diagnosed? Stomach cancers are usually found when ... Ask Your Doctor About Stomach Cancer? More In Stomach Cancer About Stomach Cancer Causes, Risk Factors, and ...

  10. How Is Childhood Leukemia Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Early Detection, Diagnosis, and Types How Is Childhood Leukemia Diagnosed? Most of the signs and symptoms of ... enlarged spleen or liver. Tests to look for leukemia in children If the doctor thinks your child ...

  11. How Is Pulmonary Embolism Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Doctors can use computed tomography (to-MOG-rah-fee) scans, or CT scans, to look for blood ... Pulmonary Angiography Pulmonary angiography (an-jee-OG-rah-fee) is another test used to diagnose PE. This ...

  12. How Is Atrial Fibrillation Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... event monitor for weeks or until symptoms occur. Stress Test Some heart problems are easier to diagnose ... heart is working hard and beating fast. During stress testing , you exercise to make your heart work ...

  13. How Are Wilms Tumors Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Tumor Early Detection, Diagnosis, and Staging How Are Wilms Tumors Diagnosed? Wilms tumors are usually found when a ... Your Child’s Doctor About Wilms Tumor? More In Wilms Tumor About Wilms Tumor Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention ...

  14. Whither the "Nurse" in Nurse Practitioner?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weston, Jerry L.

    1975-01-01

    The author sees a need for the nursing profession to evaluate the extended role of the nurse to determine differences in the patient care provided by nurse practitioners and physician's assistants. From the data, appropriate nursing education and nursing practice planning can follow. (EA)

  15. Sexual Problems of Counselees.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heritage, Jeannette G.; West, W. Beryl

    Approximately 50% of American marriages have some sexual dysfunction. Because sexuality is an important part of a person's life, counselors should be sensitive to sexual concerns of their clients. Taking an adequate sex history and highlighting problem areas may increase counseling efficiency. When counselors teach courses on human sexuality, they…

  16. Sexuality and Violence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanctuary, Gerald

    The author examines specific manifestations of violence in relation to sexuality: (1) forcible rape rate; (2) war atrocities; (3) sexual violence in prisons; and (4) pornography. Drawing much from Hannah Arendt's book on violence, he views sexual violence as symptomatic of a lack of sexual power, not a sign of its possession. The causes are seen…

  17. Sexuality and the law.

    PubMed

    Portelli, C J

    1998-01-01

    Federal, state, and local laws in the US now govern almost every aspect of sexuality. This includes sexuality at the workplace, sexuality education, adolescent sexuality, access to sexuality information and sexually explicit materials, sexual orientation, and sexually transmitted disease(STD)/HIV transmission. Almost 33% of the US Supreme Court's docket this past term concerned sexuality issues. In contrast to 50 years ago, when sexuality law was confined to the criminal arena, contemporary "sex crimes" primarily relate to nonconsensual and exploitative behaviors. It is time for lawmakers, judges, lawyers, policy analysts, lobbyists, and advocates to realize they cannot legislate or litigate how, when, or why people fall in love. Rather, the role of the law should be to create and preserve models of justice and equality that seek to preserve one's individual rights to privacy and freedom to choose in matters related to one's sexuality. This includes free access to age-appropriate sexuality information, the right to marriage and children regardless of sexual orientation, comprehensive sexuality education that encompasses information about avoiding unwanted pregnancies and HIV/STDs, access to contraception and abortion, protection from sexually abusive or exploitative relationships, and access to sexual health care.

  18. Military Sexual Trauma

    MedlinePlus

    Military Sexual Trauma What is military sexual trauma (MST)? Military sexual trauma, or MST, is the term used by VA to refer to experiences of sexual assault ... that a Veteran experienced during his or her military service. The definition used by the VA comes ...

  19. Addressing Sexual Harassment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Ellie L.; Ashbaker, Betty Y.

    2008-01-01

    This article discusses ways on how to address the problem of sexual harassment in schools. Sexual harassment--simply defined as any unwanted and unwelcome sexual behavior--is a sensitive topic. Merely providing students, parents, and staff members with information about the school's sexual harassment policy is insufficient; schools must take…

  20. The Nursing Minimum Data Set: abstraction tool for standardized, comparable, essential data.

    PubMed Central

    Werley, H H; Devine, E C; Zorn, C R; Ryan, P; Westra, B L

    1991-01-01

    The Nursing Minimum Data Set (NMDS) represents the first attempt to standardize the collection of essential nursing data. These minimum core data, used on a regular basis by the majority of nurses in the delivery of care across settings, can provide an accurate description of nursing diagnoses, nursing care, and nursing resources used. Collected on an ongoing basis, a standardized nursing data base will enable nurses to compare data across populations, settings, geographic areas, and time. Public health nurses will be able to evaluate and compare services. The purpose of this article is to discuss briefly the following aspects of the NMDS: background including definition, purposes, and elements; availability and reliability of the data; benefits; implications of the NMDS with emphasis on nursing research; and health policy decision making. PMID:2003618

  1. A normal ano-genital exam: sexual abuse or not?

    PubMed

    Hornor, Gail

    2010-01-01

    Sexual abuse is a problem of epidemic proportions in the United States. Pediatric nurse practitioners (PNPs) are at the forefront of providing care to children and families. The PNP is in a unique position to educate patients and families regarding sexual abuse and dispel common myths associated with sexual abuse. One such myth is that a normal ano-genital examination is synonymous with the absence of sexual abuse. This article will provide primary care providers, including PNPs, with a framework for understanding why a normal ano-genital examination does not negate the possibility of sexual abuse/assault. Normal ano-genital anatomy, changes that occur with puberty, and physical properties related to the genitalia and anus will be discussed. Photos will provide visualization of both normal variants of the pre-pubertal hymen and genitalia as well as changes that occur with puberty. Implications for practice for PNPs will be discussed.

  2. Adolescent sexual orientation.

    PubMed

    Spigarelli, Michael G

    2007-12-01

    Sexual orientation has been defined as the patterns of sexual thoughts, fantasies, and attractions that an individual has toward other persons of the same or opposite gender. Throughout childhood and approaching adolescence, children try to understand their own sexuality and sexual orientation in the context of the society in which they live. Typically, this attempt to understand first occurs in thoughts of a sexual nature and later through actions, usually before sexual orientation is clearly defined. How these experiences are handled, by the individual and close friends and relatives, helps to define how an individual views and accepts their sexual orientation ultimately as an adult.

  3. Certified nurse-midwife

    MedlinePlus

    ... United States. The first program used public health registered nurses who had been educated in England. These nurses ... Applicants for nurse-midwife programs usually must be registered nurses and have at least 1 to 2 years ...

  4. Primary Nurse - Role Evolution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mundinger, Mary O'Neil

    1973-01-01

    Primary nursing means that each patient has an individual nurse who is responsible for assessing his nursing needs and planning and evaluating his nursing care. The article describes the advantages and problems connected with this approach to patient care. (AG)

  5. Adjustment of inpatient care reimbursement for nursing intensity.

    PubMed

    Welton, John M; Zone-Smith, Laurie; Fischer, Mary H

    2006-11-01

    The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services has begun an ambitious recalibration of the inpatient prospective payment system, the first since its introduction in 1983. Unfortunately, inpatient nursing care has been overlooked in the new payment system and continues to be treated as a fixed cost and billed at a set per-diem "room and board" fee despite the known variability of nursing intensity across different care settings and diagnoses. This article outlines the historical influences regarding costing, billing, and reimbursement of inpatient nursing care and provides contemporary evidence about the variability of nursing intensity and costs at acute care hospitals in the United States. A remedy is proposed to overcome the existing limitations of the Inpatient Prospective Payment System by creating a new nursing cost center and nursing intensity adjustment by DRG for each routine-and intensive-care day of stay to allow independent costing, billing, and reimbursement of inpatient nursing care.

  6. Sexual Function Across Aging.

    PubMed

    Clayton, Anita H; Harsh, Veronica

    2016-03-01

    Women experience multiple changes in social and reproductive statuses across the life span which can affect sexual functioning. Various phases of the sexual response cycle may be impacted and can lead to sexual dysfunction. Screening for sexual problems and consideration of contributing factors such as neurobiology, reproductive life events, medical problems, medication use, and depression can help guide appropriate treatment and thereby improve the sexual functioning and quality of life of affected women. Treatment options include psychotropic medications, hormone therapy, and psychotherapy.

  7. Nursing Positions

    MedlinePlus

    ... and actually needs to feed. Getting Comfortable With Breastfeeding Nursing can be one of the most challenging ... a mother. As you become more used to breastfeeding your baby, you can try different positions or ...

  8. Prevalence of childhood sexual abuse among Malaysian paramedical students.

    PubMed

    Singh, H S; Yiing, W W; Nurani, H N

    1996-06-01

    There has been increasing awareness that sexual abuse of children is a problem in Malaysia. Existing data is based on notification of cases. Population based studies are required to plan services for sexually abused children. This study utilized trainee paramedical staff as a community population to determine the prevalence of childhood sexual abuse. An anonymous, self-administered questionnaire was given to student nurses and trainee medical assistants at the Ipoh School of Nursing and Hospital Bahagia Medical Assistant Training School. Questionnaires were distributed directly to all students in a classroom setting and retrieved after a 30-minute interval. Information collected included questions on personal experiences of sexual abuse. Sexual abuse was defined as rape, sodomy, molestation, or exhibitionism occurring to a child less than 18 years of age. Six hundred and sixteen students participated in the study; 6.8% of the students admitted to having been sexually abused in their childhood, 2.1% of males and 8.3% of females. Of those abused, 69% reported sexual abuse involving physical contact, 9.5% of whom experienced sexual intercourse. The age at first abuse was < 10 years in 38.1% of the cases; 59.5% were repeatedly abused and 33.3% had more than one abuser. Of the abusers, 71.4% were known to the respondent, 14.2% of whom were brothers, 24.5% relatives, and 24.5% a family friend. Further, 28.9% of all students knew of an individual who had been sexually abused as a child. While this population may not be entirely reflective of the community, this study does provide an indication of the prevalence of sexual abuse in Malaysian children. The prevalence figures in this study are lower than those reported in industrialized countries and this may reflect local sociocultural limitations in reporting abuse.

  9. Prevalence of Childhood Sexual Abuse among Malaysian Paramedical Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singh, HSS Amar; And Others

    1996-01-01

    A survey of 616 nursing and paramedical students in Malaysia found that 2.1% of males and 8.3% of females reported having been sexually abused in their childhood. Of these, 69% reported the abuse involved physical contact; 38% reported the abuse began before the age of 10; and 71% reported knowing the abuser. (Author/DB)

  10. School Health Education about Human Sexuality. Position Statement. Revised

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradley, Beverly J.; Mancuso, Patty; Cagginello, Joan B.; Board, Connie; Clark, Sandra; Harvel, Robin; Kelts, Susan

    2012-01-01

    It is the position of the National Association of School Nurses (NASN) that age-appropriate health education about human sexuality should be included as part of a comprehensive school health education program and be accessible to all students in schools. NASN recognizes the role of parents and families as the primary source of education about…

  11. Health Professionals' Perceptions of Sexual Assault Management: A Delphi Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jancey, Jonine; Meuleners, Lynn; Phillips, Maureen

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To explore health professionals' perceptions of sexual assault management practices and identify issues related to these practices across Western Australia (WA). Design: A two-round electronic Delphi study was undertaken with health professionals (medical doctors, registered nurses, social workers and managers). Setting: Healthcare…

  12. Sexuality and Aging: Implications for Long Term Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinkley, Nancy E.

    With increasing emphasis on treating the whole person, on the maintenance of an individual's former life style, and on patients' rights, long-term care personnel need to become aware that many nursing home residents experience needs related to their sexuality. A model two-day workshop is presented wlth a focus on the following topics: (1) a broad…

  13. Bullying and Sexual Harassment in the School Setting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavendish, Roberta; Salomone, Cynthia

    2001-01-01

    Defines bullying and sexual harassment, identifying characteristics of aggressors and victims, describing implications for school nurses, examining relevant federal laws, and reviewing a 10-Point Action Plan. A survey tool to assess bullying and teaching plans for parents of victims and aggressors are provided. Suggested linkages among relevant…

  14. Sexual harassment of psychiatric trainees: experiences and attitudes.

    PubMed

    Morgan, J F; Porter, S

    1999-07-01

    A survey was carried out of psychiatric trainees' work-related experiences of unwanted sexual contact. A structured postal questionnaire was administered to 100 psychiatric trainees from senior house officer to specialist registrar level in a large psychiatric rotation. There was an 85% response rate; 86% (73) of the sample had experienced unwanted sexual contact, with 47% (40) experiencing deliberate touching, leaning over or cornering, and 18% (15) receiving letters, telephone calls or material of a sexual nature. Three-quarters (64) of respondents had experienced unwanted sexual contact from patients and 64% (54) from staff. Experiences and attitudes did not generally differ by gender, grade or training experience. Four out of 48 female respondents described stalking by patients. Of the 39 respondents who had reported harassment by patients, 31 felt supported by colleagues, while of the 13 who had reported harassment by colleagues, eight felt supported. Two-thirds of the respondents considered sexual harassment 'some-times' or 'frequently' a problem for the profession. Diagnoses of confusional states, mania or schizophrenia made subjects less likely to consider unwanted sexual behaviour to be 'sexual harassment' (86%, 80%, and 67%, respectively), but not for other diagnoses. Levels of threatening and intrusive sexual harassment are unacceptably high in this study group. Health trusts should adopt policies of 'zero tolerance' and all incidents should be reported. Psychological impact on victims should be acknowledged even when the behaviour of the perpetrator can be explained by diagnosis.

  15. Relationship Between Ischemic Heart Disease and Sexual Satisfaction

    PubMed Central

    Afra, Leila Ghanbari; Taghadosi, Mohsen; Gilasi, Hamid Reza

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Ischemic heart disease is a life-threatening condition. Considerable doubts exist over the effects of this disease on patients’ sexual activity and satisfaction. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between ischemic heart disease and sexual satisfaction. Methods: In a retrospective cohort study, the convenience sample of 150 patients exposure with ischemic heart disease and 150 people without exposure it was drawn from Shahid Beheshti hospital, Kashan, Iran. Sampling was performed from March to September 2014. We employed the Larson’s Sexual Satisfaction Questionnaire for gathering the data. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and Chi-square, t-test and linear regression analysis. Results: The means of sexual satisfaction in patients exposure with ischemic heart disease and among the subjects without exposure it were 101.47±13.42 and 100.91±16.52, respectively. There was no significant difference between the two groups regarding sexual satisfaction. However, sexual satisfaction was significantly correlated with gender and the use of cardiac medications (P value < 0.05). Conclusion: The level of sexual satisfaction in patients with exposure ischemic heart disease is similar to the people without exposure it. Moreover, the men and the patients who do not receive cardiac medications have higher levels of sexual satisfaction. Nurses who are providing care to patients with ischemic heart disease need to pay closer attention to patient education about sexual issues. PMID:26234982

  16. Cues Resulting in Desire for Sexual Activity in Women

    PubMed Central

    McCall, Katie; Meston, Cindy

    2010-01-01

    Introduction A number of questionnaires have been created to assess levels of sexual desire in women, but to our knowledge, there are currently no validated measures for assessing cues that result in sexual desire. A questionnaire of this nature could be useful for both clinicians and researchers, because it considers the contextual nature of sexual desire and it draws attention to individual differences in factors that can contribute to sexual desire. Aim The aim of the present study was to create a multidimensional assessment tool of cues for sexual desire in women that is validated in women with and without hypoactive sexual desire disorder (HSDD). Methods Factor analyses conducted on both an initial sample (N = 874) and a community sample (N = 138) resulted in the Cues for Sexual Desire Scale (CSDS) which included four factors: (i) Emotional Bonding Cues; (ii) Erotic/ Explicit Cues; (iii) Visual/Proximity Cues; and (iv) Implicit/Romantic Cues. Main Outcome Measures Scale construction of cues associated with sexual desire and differences between women with and without sexual dysfunction. Results The CSDS demonstrated good reliability and validity and was able to detect significant differences between women with and without HSDD. Results from regression analyses indicated that both marital status and level of sexual functioning predicted scores on the CSDS. The CSDS provided predictive validity for the Female Sexual Function Index desire and arousal domain scores, and increased cues were related to a higher reported frequency of sexual activity in women. Conclusions The findings from the present study provide valuable information regarding both internal and external triggers that can result in sexual desire for women. We believe that the CSDS could be beneficial in therapeutic settings to help identify cues that do and do not facilitate sexual desire in women with clinically diagnosed desire difficulties. PMID:16942529

  17. Sexuality and Islam.

    PubMed

    Dialmy, Abdessamad

    2010-06-01

    This paper deals with three major questions: (1) What are the sexual norms defined by the sacred texts (Koran and Sunna)? (2) What are the sexual practices currently observed among Moslems? (3) To which extent are current sexual practices of Moslems dissociated from Islamic sexual norms? Sexual standards in Islam are paradoxical: on the one hand, they allow and actually are an enticement to the exercise of sexuality but, on the other hand, they discriminate between male and female sexuality, between marital and pre- or extramarital sexuality, and between heterosexuality and homosexuality. Men are given more rights with regard to the expression of their sexuality; women are forbidden to have extramarital sex (with their slaves) and both genders to have homosexual relationships. The combination of these paradoxical standards with modernisation leads to the current back and forth swing of sexual practices between repression and openness. Partial modernisation leads to greater sexual tolerance. But restrictive sexual standards have gathered strength and have become idealised as a result of the current radicalisation of Islam. This swing of the pendulum between repression and openness is illustrated by phenomena such as public harassment, premarital sexuality, female pleasure, prostitution, and homosexuality. Currently, Islam is not any more the only reference which provides guidance concerning sexual practices but secularisation of sexual laws is still politically unthinkable today. So the only solution is to achieve reform in the name of Islam, through the reinterpretation of repressive holy texts.

  18. Boundary violations, gender and the nature of nursing work.

    PubMed

    Chiarella, Mary; Adrian, Amanda

    2014-05-01

    Complaints against nurses can be made on several grounds and orders, including removal from the registry of nurses, can be made as a result of these complaints. Boundary violations generally relate to complaints around criminal charges, unsatisfactory professional conduct or professional misconduct or a lack of good character. This article explores the spectrum of boundary violations in the nurse-patient relationship by reviewing disciplinary cases from the New South Wales Nurses and Midwives Tribunal and Professional Standards Committees. The complaints spanned a spectrum of behaviours, from minor infringements such as inappropriate compliments to intimate touching and sexual intercourse. Furthermore, the majority of respondents were men, although men comprise a minority of the nursing profession. This phenomenon is discussed in terms of gender stereotyping and nursing work. In addition, the possibility that improved supervision may have gone some way to preventing the violations is explored.

  19. Violence against psychiatric nurses: sensitive research as science and intervention.

    PubMed

    Lanza, Marilyn Lewis; Zeiss, Robert; Rierdan, Jill

    2006-01-01

    Psychiatric nurses are frequent victims of workplace violence, much of which is perpetrated by patients. In a review of literature on prevalence, perpetrators, and impact of violence on psychiatric nurses, we note that workplace violence is a virtually normative experience for the nurse, rather than a rare occurrence. Verbal violence and sexual harassment, like physical violence, are common experiences; in contrast to physical violence, these are often initiated by co-workers. The emotional impact of violence on psychiatric nurses is studied less often than frequency of exposure; we discuss hypotheses for this paucity of relevant research. Finally, we reflect on the implications of current research, concluding with recommendations for future research on violence against psychiatric nurses. In particular, we elaborate on the role of violence research in the healthcare setting as "sensitive research"--a research process that in itself may have both direct and indirect beneficial effects for the nursing profession.

  20. The use of nursing terminology in electronic documentation.

    PubMed

    Häyrinen, Kristiina; Saranto, Kaija

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to describe the use of nursing terminology in nursing documentation in the neurological care setting. The use of standardized terminology in nursing documentation allows the visualization of nursing practice and makes it quantifiable. Once collected, data can also be reused for administrative purposes. In Finland the Nursing Minimum Data Set (NMDS) is part of the core data set of patient electronic health records. The Nursing Minimum Data Set has been complied using the Finnish Classification of Nursing Interventions (FiCNI) and Finnish Classification of Nursing Diagnoses (FiCND), both based on the Clinical Care Classification. Standardized terminology was introduced in nursing documentation in 2004. The data form part of a wider set of electronic health record data (2003-2006). The data consist of 40 neurological nursing care plans. The data were analysed using statistical methods and content analysis. Nursing terminology had been widely used in nursing documentation. However, there remains a clear need for both training in and further validation of the terminology currently used.

  1. Applying nursing theory to perioperative nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Gillette, V A

    1996-08-01

    The perioperative nursing role has evolved from that of task-oriented specialists to patient-centered professionals. The concept of caring is significant to perioperative nurses and is manifested by the many caring behaviors perioperative nurses demonstrate toward surgical patients. This article describes how the element of caring is an essential function of perioperative nursing and relates the perioperative nursing role to the work of three nursing theorists (le, Florence Nightingale; Virginia Henderson, RN, AM; Carol L. Montgomery, RN, PhD).

  2. "In reality, it is complex and difficult": UK nurses' perspectives on "treatment as prevention" within HIV care.

    PubMed

    Evans, Catrin; Bennett, Juliet; Croston, Michelle; Brito-Ault, Nathaniel; Bruton, Jane

    2015-01-01

    Globally, clinical guidelines for HIV treatment are being altered to reflect new research showing that successful treatment with antiretroviral therapies (ART) can prevent the onward transmission of HIV. As a result, health care services are being challenged to find ways to roll out "treatment as prevention" (TasP) as a public health measure. In theory, TasP requires individuals to start ART as soon as they are diagnosed - for public health reasons - which may be some time before ART for that individual is required for clinical reasons. There is currently little research on the acceptability of TasP from a patient or provider perspective. This paper reports findings from a qualitative study that sought to explore UK nurses' views and experiences of TasP in HIV care. Ten HIV specialist nurses, purposively selected from across the country, were interviewed. Results suggest that, although positive about TasP in principle, nurses hold several reservations about its implementation in practice. Perceived benefits of TasP include reassurance for patients that their loved ones are protected and that immediate care is available. Concerns include the possibility of sexual dis-inhibition or coercion within sexual relationships. In the UK context, decisions around TasP are still being made on a highly individualised patient by patient basis, within a philosophy of holistic care and partnership working. As such, the research participants called for more resources to support information giving, risk assessment and decision-making. The results show that translating a public health treatment approach into individual patient care is complex, potentially time-consuming and may alter traditional provider-patient dynamics. The findings from this study suggest that in-depth research is needed to understand better the patient, community and provider experience as TasP becomes more widely rolled out.

  3. Challenges in diagnosing hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Weissenborn, K

    2015-02-01

    The term "hepatic encephalopathy" (HE) covers the neuropsychiatric syndrome associated with acute, chronic and acute-on-chronic liver disease (CLD). This paper deals with clinical features and diagnosis of HE in patients with liver cirrhosis and portal hypertension or porto-systemic shunts. The possible impact of concomitant disorders and the cirrhosis underlying liver disease upon brain function is described emphasizing the need of a detailed diagnostic work up of every individual case before diagnosing HE. Currently used methods for diagnosing minimal or covert hepatic encephalopathy are compared with regard to their sensitivity and specificity for diagnosing HE against the background of a multitude of concomitant disorders and diseases that could contribute to brain dysfunction.

  4. Thyroid hemangiomas diagnosed on sonography.

    PubMed

    Park, Sung Hee; Kim, Soo Jin; Jung, Hyun Kyung

    2014-04-01

    Primary thyroid hemangiomas are extremely rare, and only a few cases have been previously reported. Primary hemangiomas are developmental anomalies resulting from the inability of the angioblastic mesenchyme to form canals. Thyroid hemangiomas are generally considered difficult to diagnose preoperatively because of their low incidence and nonspecific imaging findings. Here we report 2 cases of thyroid hemangiomas that were diagnosed correctly on preoperative sonography. Our cases showed similar sonographic findings, such as well-circumscribed hypoechoic lesions with internal channel-like linear lines, and bloody content was aspirated during fine-needle aspirations. Our report shows that thyroid hemangiomas can be diagnosed correctly by sonography with or without confirmation of bloody content in the lesions by fine-needle aspiration.

  5. [Use of echocardiography for diagnosing anomalies of sex differentiation].

    PubMed

    Calzi, P; Paesano, P L; Gargantini, L; Braggion, F; Del Maschio, A; Chiumello, G

    1989-01-01

    Real-time ultrasonography of pelvic organs is a useful tool in diagnosing disorders in sexual development. US has proved to be rapid, accurate, non invasive method to visualize normal and pathologic pelvic structures and its role in intersex disorders lies in the capacity of demonstrate the anatomy of the genital and urinary tracts. The sonographic finding of feminine internal genitalia and bilateral enlargement of the adrenal glands in a newborn is suggestive for congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) and allows to prevent the symptoms of a salt-losing syndrome.

  6. Combating heterosexism: implications for nursing.

    PubMed

    Walpin, L

    1997-05-01

    Gays and lesbians are becoming increasingly visible to the healthcare professional as a result of the AIDS epidemic and the growing number of lesbian mothers. Ethical practice requires that nurses have an understanding of diverse cultures but focus has historically been on racial and ethnic minorities; little research exists on those with minority sexual or affectional preferences. Heterosexism, the promotion of a heterosexual orientation as the only viable option, has much the same effect as racism. Individuals experience feelings of shame, self-hatred, and lowered self-esteem. The purpose of this article is (1) to present the current state of knowledge regarding individual identity formation and couple development in the gay and lesbian community and (2) to describe the impact of heterosexism. Implications for nursing practice and research will be explored.

  7. Sexual narcissism and the perpetration of sexual aggression.

    PubMed

    Widman, Laura; McNulty, James K

    2010-08-01

    Despite indirect evidence linking narcissism to sexual aggression, studies directly examining this relationship have yielded inconsistent results. Likely contributing to such inconsistencies, prior research has used global measures of narcissism not sensitive to whether the components of narcissism are activated in sexual versus non-sexual domains. The current research avoided such problems by using a measure of sexual narcissism to predict sexual aggression. In a sample of 299 men and women, Study 1 validated the Sexual Narcissism Scale, a new sexuality research instrument with four subscales-Sexual Exploitation, Sexual Entitlement, Low Sexual Empathy, and Sexual Skill. Then, in a sample of 378 men, Study 2 demonstrated that sexual narcissism was associated with reports of the frequency of sexual aggression, three specific types of sexual aggression (unwanted sexual contact, sexual coercion, and attempted/completed rape), and the likelihood of future sexual aggression. Notably, global narcissism was unrelated to all indices of sexual aggression when sexual narcissism was controlled. That sexual narcissism outperformed global assessments of narcissism to account for variance in sexual aggression suggests that future research may benefit by examining whether sexual narcissism and other sexual-situation-specific measurements of personality can similarly provide a more valid test of the association between personality and other sexual behaviors and outcomes (e.g., contraceptive use, infidelity, sexual satisfaction).

  8. Diagnosing and Treating Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome (HPS)

    MedlinePlus

    ... CDC.gov . Hantavirus Share Compartir Diagnosing and Treating Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome (HPS) Diagnosing HPS Diagnosing HPS in ... of patients that develop HPS from New World Hantaviruses recover completely. No chronic infection has been detected ...

  9. Transcultural perspectives in nursing administration.

    PubMed

    Andrews, M M

    1998-11-01

    Population demographics are reshaping the healthcare work force with respect to race, ethnicity, gender, national origin, sexual orientation, age, handicap, disability, and related factors as national sensitivity to various forms of diversity grows. Given the demographic trends, it is inevitable that nurse administrators will need skill in transcultural administration as they manage diversity and identify the cultural origins of conflict in the multicultural workplace. Culture influences the manner in which administrators, staff and patients perceive, identify, define and solve problems. In this article, the complex and interrelated factors that influence workplace diversity are examined.

  10. Trichobezoar in Vagina: Assessment for Child Sexual Abuse and Diagnostic Result of Forensic Science.

    PubMed

    Bağ, Özlem; Acar, Buğra Han; Öztürk, Şenol; Alşen, Sevay; Ecevit, Çiğdem

    2017-03-01

    Vaginal discharge and bleeding in children require a through and thoughtful evaluation to diagnose the underlying problem including infections, sexual abuse, and vaginal foreign bodies. We report a 6-year-old girl presenting with bloody vaginal discharge, carefully evaluated for sexual abuse, and finally diagnosed as a vaginal foreign body after vaginoscopy. A rolling hair ball was extracted from the vagina and was diagnosed as trichobezoar pathologically without any endo-ecto-mesodermal residual tissue. The hair ball was genetically detected and diagnosed to belong herself by containing no foreign structure. Child sexual abuse was ruled out by forensic interview at CAC and report of forensic science that reported genetic structure belonging to the child. Medicolegal assessment helped in final diagnosis to exclude child sexual abuse.

  11. Indian concepts on sexuality

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Kaustav; Thakurata, Rajarshi Guha

    2013-01-01

    India is a vast country depicting wide social, cultural and sexual variations. Indian concept of sexuality has evolved over time and has been immensely influenced by various rulers and religions. Indian sexuality is manifested in our attire, behavior, recreation, literature, sculptures, scriptures, religion and sports. It has influenced the way we perceive our health, disease and device remedies for the same. In modern era, with rapid globalization the unique Indian sexuality is getting diffused. The time has come to rediscover ourselves in terms of sexuality to attain individual freedom and to reinvest our energy to social issues related to sexuality. PMID:23858263

  12. Multidimensional Sexual Perfectionism and Female Sexual Function: A Longitudinal Investigation.

    PubMed

    Stoeber, Joachim; Harvey, Laura N

    2016-11-01

    Research on multidimensional sexual perfectionism differentiates four forms: self-oriented, partner-oriented, partner-prescribed, and socially prescribed. Self-oriented sexual perfectionism reflects perfectionistic standards people apply to themselves as sexual partners; partner-oriented sexual perfectionism reflects perfectionistic standards people apply to their sexual partner; partner-prescribed sexual perfectionism reflects people's beliefs that their sexual partner imposes perfectionistic standards on them; and socially prescribed sexual perfectionism reflects people's beliefs that society imposes such standards on them. Previous studies found partner-prescribed and socially prescribed sexual perfectionism to be maladaptive forms of sexual perfectionism associated with a negative sexual self-concept and problematic sexual behaviors, but only examined cross-sectional relationships. The present article presents the first longitudinal study examining whether multidimensional sexual perfectionism predicts changes in sexual self-concept and sexual function over time. A total of 366 women aged 17-69 years completed measures of multidimensional sexual perfectionism, sexual esteem, sexual anxiety, sexual problem self-blame, and sexual function (cross-sectional data). Three to six months later, 164 of the women completed the same measures again (longitudinal data). Across analyses, partner-prescribed sexual perfectionism emerged as the most maladaptive form of sexual perfectionism. In the cross-sectional data, partner-prescribed sexual perfectionism showed positive relationships with sexual anxiety, sexual problem self-blame, and intercourse pain, and negative relationships with sexual esteem, desire, arousal, lubrication, and orgasmic function. In the longitudinal data, partner-prescribed sexual perfectionism predicted increases in sexual anxiety and decreases in sexual esteem, arousal, and lubrication over time. The findings suggest that partner-prescribed sexual

  13. Evaluating a Sexual Health Patient Education Resource

    PubMed Central

    Matzo, Marianne; Troup, Sandi; Hijjazi, Kamal; Ferrell, Betty

    2015-01-01

    This article shares the findings of an evaluation of a patient teaching resource for sexual health entitled Everything Nobody Tells You About Cancer Treatment and Your Sex Life: From A to Z, which was accomplished through systematic conceptualization, construction, and evaluation with women diagnosed with breast or gynecologic cancer. This resource, which has evolved from patient-focused research and has been tested in the clinical setting, can be used in patient education and support. Oncology professionals are committed to addressing quality-of-life concerns for patients across the trajectory of illness. Sexuality is a key concern for patients and impacts relationships and overall quality of life. Through careful assessment, patient education, and support, clinicians can ensure that sexuality is respected as an essential part of patient-centered care. PMID:26557411

  14. Female adolescent sexuality. Promoting healthy sexual development.

    PubMed

    Blythe, M J; Rosenthal, S L

    2000-03-01

    Health care providers must recognize the specific challenges and rewards of providing services for adolescents. Quality care begins with the establishment of trust, respect, and confidentiality between the health care provider and the adolescent. Data suggest that the normal age for beginning puberty is decreasing, which has important clinical, educational, and social implications. The health care provider should be aware of the broad range of potential sexual behaviors involving adolescents, as well as the teen's acceptance of such behaviors, often dictated by age, gender, culture, and education. When providing gynecologic care to adolescent girls, the physician should not only provide contraception and screen for sexually transmitted diseases but should contribute to the development of the patient's sexual health. Especially when providing care for the younger teen, the health care provider must focus on involving a member of the family or another significant adult to provide needed support and guidance. Anticipatory guidance for parents should focus on assessing their parenting styles and promoting supervision. Although parents should strive to maintain open communication with their adolescents, they may not accurately estimate the sexual activity of and the sexual risk for their teenage children. Parents need to be encouraged to consider the implications of their own sexual behaviors. The provider should attempt to foster a comfortable environment in which youth may seek help and support for appropriate medical care while reserving the right to disclose their sexual identity when ready. Health care professionals cannot exclude heterosexual behavior on the basis that a young woman self-identifies as homosexual. Her reported sexual behaviors may not indicate her sexual orientation. Self-definition of sexual orientation is a dynamic process including factors such as fantasies, desires, and behaviors. Self-definition of sexual identity is affected by individual

  15. New attitudes to sexuality in the menopause: clinical evaluation and diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Nappi, R E

    2007-10-01

    Sexuality is a critical issue at menopause for many women. Several biological, psychological and socio-relational factors are related to women's sexual health and they may negatively affect the entire sexual response cycle, inducing significant changes in desire, arousal, orgasm and satisfaction. Age- and menopause-related events may impair the integrity of multiple biological systems involved in the normal sexual response of women, including hormonal environment, neuromuscular substrates and vascular supplies. Sex hormones, namely low levels of estradiol, physical and mental well-being and, very importantly, feelings for partner are extremely relevant for women's sexuality in natural menopause. Even a significant lack of androgens, as more frequently occurs in surgical menopause, has a negative impact on women's desire and sexual responsiveness. Sexual history and clinical evaluation may help doctors to accurately diagnose sexual symptoms causing personal and relational distress and to identify the best therapeutic approach.

  16. Not only headache: higher degree of sexual pain symptoms among migraine sufferers.

    PubMed

    Ifergane, Gal; Ben-Zion, Itzhak Z; Plakht, Ygal; Regev, Keren; Wirguin, Itzhak

    2008-04-01

    Chronic illness and chronic pain can have profound negative effects on relationship and sexual satisfaction, yet the influence of migraine on sexuality has not been previously evaluated. To assess sexual functions in subjects with migraine compared to those with no migraine. We evaluated female university students using the Israeli sexual behavior inventory (ISBI). Migraine was diagnosed according to self-reported symptoms according to the IHS criteria. Several dimensions of female sexuality--desire, orgasm, sexual avoidance, interpersonal sexual relationship, health influence, satisfaction and pain were evaluated using a structured questionnaire. Thirty-three (23.9%) of the participants met the IHS criteria for episodic migraine with and without aura. Sexual activity, desire, orgasm and satisfaction from sexual life did not differ significantly between migraine sufferers and non-sufferers. Migraine patients reported lower ISBI scores, higher health influence on sexual life, higher levels of sexual pain and lower sexual satisfaction. Migraine negatively affected the sexual life of sufferers. Sexual pain disorder is more common among migraine sufferers compared to non-migraineurs.

  17. Nursing Assistants for Long-Term Care. Performance-Based Instructional Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Indiana Univ., Bloomington. Vocational Education Services.

    This guide is intended to assist students enrolled in programs to train nursing assistants for employment in an Indiana long-term health care facility. The first part discusses human development (growth, aging, and dying); communication with residents; sexuality; legal, ethical, and professional responsibilities of nursing assistants in long-term…

  18. Nursing Leadership.

    PubMed

    Crisp, Carol

    2016-01-01

    Nurse transformational leaders can serve in academic settings and at local, national, international professional nursing organizations and community-based groups. As a transformational leader, nurses can lead in any workplace. According to a study by Stanley (2012), clinical leaders are not sought for their capacity to outline a vision, but for their values and beliefs on display that are easily recognized in their actions. This encompasses the moral component of transformational leadership. It is the APRNs duty to continue to strive towards a better vision for the well-being of all nurses, patients, and colleagues. Autonomous APRNs are happier, healthier, and better prepared to provide the best patient care to their patients. We should not be happy to sit back and let others fight this fight. APRNs need to be on the frontline, leading the way. This is only an insight that I have gained after many frustrating years of cheering our profession and then being made to feel inferior at the same time. Only nurses, who have that nurturing spirit, would hold back if they felt it might hurt others. Don't back off or hold back! It might hurt those that follow!

  19. How Is Fanconi Anemia Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Fanconi Anemia Diagnosed? People who have Fanconi anemia (FA) are born with the disorder. They may ... questions about: Any personal or family history of anemia Any surgeries you’ve had related to the ...

  20. System diagnosability using triplet assertion

    SciTech Connect

    Lombardi, F.

    1982-01-01

    A new technique for system diagnosability is presented. It is based on a triplet assertion strategy to overcome the asymmetric invalidation and the requirement of a central test controller. The basic characteristics of the triplet assertion are generalized to higher networks. The application of this technique to parallel processing is outlined. 24 references.

  1. Sexual behaviors and sexually transmitted infections among self-identified lesbian and bisexual college women.

    PubMed

    Lindley, Lisa L; Kerby, Molly B; Nicholson, Thomas J; Lu, Ning

    2007-01-01

    Sexually transmitted infections (STIs) are a significant health issue for lesbian and bisexual women. Older age and having a history of sexual intercourse with males are primary risk factors for STIs among this population. However, little research has been conducted to assess sexual risk among lesbian and bisexual college women exclusively. A cross-sectional Internet survey was conducted with 230 self-identified lesbian and bisexual female college students to examine their sexual risk and to determine with which, if any, STIs they had ever been diagnosed. Eight percent of lesbian and bisexual college women reported ever being diagnosed with an STI; the human papillomavirus, bacterial vaginosis, and genital herpes accounted for 84% of STI cases. Number of lifetime sex partners was significantly associated with an STI diagnosis among this population. Older age, engaging in penile-vaginal intercourse with a male (lifetime), and younger age at first same-sex experience were significantly associated with a greater number of lifetime sex partners. Results may be useful to sexual health programs targeting lesbian and bisexual college women and/or their providers.

  2. Bedside coaching to improve nurses' recognition of delirium.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Susan Jean; Melillo, Karen Devereaux; Nannini, Angela; Lakatos, Barbara E

    2013-10-01

    Delirium is a widespread complication of hospitalization and is frequently unrecognized by nurses and other healthcare professionals. Patients with neuroscience diagnoses are at increased risk for delirium as compared with other patients. The aims of this quality improvement project were to (1) increase neuroscience nurses' knowledge of delirium, (2) integrate coaching into evidence-based practice, and (3) evaluate the effectiveness of this combined approach to improve nurses' recognition of delirium on a neuroscience unit. Institutional review board approval was obtained. A retrospective chart review of randomly selected patients admitted before the intervention was completed. The (modified) Nurse's Knowledge of Delirium Tool was electronically administered to nursing staff (n = 47), followed within 2 weeks by a didactic presentation on delirium. Bedside coaching was performed over a period of 4 weeks. The (modified) Nurses Knowledge of Delirium Tool was electronically readministered to nurses 4 weeks later to determine the change in aggregate knowledge. A postintervention chart review was conducted. SPSS software was used to analyze descriptive statistics with regard to chart reviews, documentation, and change in questionnaire scores. Findings reveal that neuroscience nurses recognize the absence of delirium 94.4% of the time and the presence of delirium 100% of the time after a didactic session and coaching. The postintervention chart review showed a statistically significant increase (p = .000) in the documentation of delirium screening results. Expert coaching at the bedside may be a reliable method for teaching nurses to use evidence-based screening tools to detect delirium in patients with neuroscience diagnoses.

  3. Sexual functions in ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Bal, Serpil; Bal, Kaan; Turan, Yasemin; Deniz, Gonca; Gürgan, Alev; Berkit, Işıl Karataş; Sendur, Omer Faruk

    2011-07-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the axial skeleton. In recent years, several authors reported an increased prevalence of sexual dysfunction among AS patients. We aimed to find out, whether the prevalence of erectile dysfunction among AS patients is different from age-matched healthy controls. Thirty-seven male patients with AS who were diagnosed according to the modified New York criteria and 67 normal healthy controls (NHC) were included in this study. Clinical characteristics of patients including age, disease duration and morning stiffness were noted. Disease activity was evaluated by using Bath AS disease activity index (BASDAI), functional statement was evaluated by using Bath AS functional index, and scores of spinal measurements were done by using Bath AS metrology index. Erectile function is evaluated using the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF) scoring system. Health-related quality of life was assessed by short form 36. The mean age of the patients and controls were 42.8 + 10.8 and 43.6 + 5.9 years (P = 0.666). The prevalence of erectile dysfunction in AS patients and NHC were 35.1 and 26.9%, respectively (P = 0.335). There was no statistically significant difference between IIEF domain scores of AS patients and NHC except for the sexual desire domain (P = 0.014). Duration of morning stiffness and BASDAI was negatively correlated with sexual desire and overall satisfaction; however, they have no negative impact on erectile function, orgasmic function and intercourse satisfaction domains of IIEF. In this report, we showed that only the sexual desire domain of IIEF was significantly lower in AS patients. The prevalence of erectile dysfunction among AS patients is similar to NHC, which is a finding contrary to previous reports. AS patients do not suffer from erectile dysfunction, they rather have problems of satisfaction from the intercourse.

  4. [Manifestations of sexually transmitted diseases on oral mucous membranes].

    PubMed

    Ljubojević, Suzana; Skerlev, Mihael; Alajbeg, Ivan

    2013-12-01

    Many believe that oral sex is safe sex and does not pose a risk of getting sexually transmitted diseases. Despite the prevalence of oral sex, the number of diagnosed oral and pharyngeal sexually transmitted infection is lower than that of anal and vaginal sex. Oral contact with the genitals can cause tiny micro traumas through which pathological microorganisms that are present in body fluids can come into contact and be transmitted. This article reviews the literature on the role of oral sex in the transmission of sexually transmitted diseases and the corresponding clinical presentation or oral diseases.

  5. [The electronic use of the NANDA-, NOC- and NIC- classifications and implications for nursing practice].

    PubMed

    Bernhart-Just, Alexandra; Hillewerth, Kathrin; Holzer-Pruss, Christina; Paprotny, Monika; Zimmermann Heinrich, Heidi

    2009-12-01

    The data model developed on behalf of the Nursing Service Commission of the Canton of Zurich (Pflegedienstkommission des Kantons Zürich) is based on the NANDA nursing diagnoses, the Nursing Outcome Classification, and the Nursing Intervention Classification (NNN Classifications). It also includes integrated functions for cost-centered accounting, service recording, and the Swiss Nursing Minimum Data Set. The data model uses the NNN classifications to map a possible form of the nursing process in the electronic patient health record, where the nurse can choose nursing diagnoses, outcomes, and interventions relevant to the patient situation. The nurses' choice is guided both by the different classifications and their linkages, and the use of specific text components pre-defined for each classification and accessible through the respective linkages. This article describes the developed data model and illustrates its clinical application in a specific patient's situation. Preparatory work required for the implementation of NNN classifications in practical nursing such as content filtering and the creation of linkages between the NNN classifications are described. Against the background of documentation of the nursing process based on the DAPEP(1) data model, possible changes and requirements are deduced. The article provides a contribution to the discussion of a change in documentation of the nursing process by implementing nursing classifications in electronic patient records.

  6. Hypoactive Sexual Desire Disorder and current pharmacotherapeutic options in women.

    PubMed

    Palacios, Santiago

    2011-01-01

    Hypoactive Sexual Desire Disorder (HSDD) is the most common female sexual dysfunction. The diagnosis of HSDD requires the existence of personal distress or interpersonal difficulties associated with low sexual desire, that cannot be explained by any other psychiatric affection and that is not exclusively due to a disease or substance. HSDD can have a serious effect on emotional wellbeing and interpersonal relationships, and it occurs in premenopausal and postmenopausal women. The Decreased Sexual Desire Screener is a shortened diagnostic method designed to help doctors who are not specialized in female sexual dysfunction to diagnose acquired HSDD in women. There is evidence that treatment with androgens or with estrogens is effective in HSDD; however, important unanswered questions still exist. Presently, new therapeutic strategies to combat HSDD are being researched, including novel methods of testosterone provision and drugs that act upon the CNS.

  7. Female sexual dysfunction in patients with endometriosis: Indian scenario

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Vineet V.; Nanda, Sakshi; Gandhi, Khushali; Aggarwal, Rohina; Choudhary, Sumesh; Gondhali, Raveendra

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Female sexual dysfunction (FSD) in Indian women is often overlooked due to cultural beliefs and considered as social taboos. Sexuality is an important and integral part of life. There are many causes of sexual dysfunction, but the prevalence of FSD in endometriotic patients is still underdiagnosed. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Study design - Cross-sectional observational study conducted at tertiary care center, from June 2015 to March 2016. Sample size - Fifty-one patients in reproductive age group (18–47 years) who were diagnosed with endometriosis on diagnostic laparoscopy were included. Methods - FSD was assessed with a detailed 19-item female sexual function index questionnaire. All six domains of sexual dysfunction, i.e., desire, arousal, lubrication, orgasm, satisfaction, and pain were studied. Exclusion - Patients with other gynecological, medical or surgical history were excluded. RESULTS: Out of 51 patients with endometriosis, 47.06% of patients had sexual dysfunction. With the increase in staging of endometriosis, sexual dysfunction prevalence is also rising. FSD was 100% in patients with severe endometriosis as compared to 33.33% in minimal endometriosis. CONCLUSION: Every individual deserves good sexual life. The sexual dysfunction associated with endometriosis should also be taken into consideration while managing these patients. PMID:28216913

  8. Preparing the sexual health workforce to deliver integrated services: is education the answer? A qualitative study exploring the impact of sexual health education on developing integrated policy and practice.

    PubMed

    Brook, Judy; Salmon, Debra; Knight, Rachael-Anne

    2017-03-14

    Aim This study aimed to explore the ability of sexual health nurses working in the South West of England, to implement new learning within existing sexual health service delivery models. Drawing on Lipsky's account of street-level bureaucracy to conceptualise policy implementation, the impact of workforce learning on the development of integrated services across this region of the United Kingdom was assessed.

  9. Is the School Nurse a Nurse? Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cowell, Julia Muennich

    1998-01-01

    To cut costs, many districts are replacing certified school nurses with uncertified nurses or undereducated health aides. Never has the role of school nurse been more important. Besides attending to sick children and handling emergencies, today's school nurses are active in health education, physical fitness programs, and disease prevention.…

  10. Child Sexual Abuse

    MedlinePlus

    ... Z) Hepatitis HIV Mental Health Mental Health Home Suicide Prevention Substance Abuse Military Sexual Trauma PTSD Research ( ... include: PTSD and anxiety. Depression and thoughts of suicide. Sexual anxiety and disorders, including having too many ...

  11. Children and Sexuality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corbett, Susan Miller

    1991-01-01

    Presents a newsletter that discusses methods parents can use to handle sexual questions or behavior in young children. An accompanying letter to parents addresses young children's sexual behavior and ways parents can respond to this behavior. (GH)

  12. Child Sexual Abuse

    MedlinePlus

    ... for pornography is also sexual abuse. Most sexual abusers know the child they abuse. They may be ... friends, neighbors or babysitters. About one-third of abusers are related to the child. Most abusers are ...

  13. Men and Sexual Trauma

    MedlinePlus

    ... are some symptoms related to sexual trauma in boys and men? Particularly when the assailant is a ... those who do not. Emotional Disorders Men and boys who have been sexually assaulted are more likely ...

  14. Sexual Health: Testosterone Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    Healthy Lifestyle Sexual health Considering testosterone therapy to help you feel younger and more vigorous as you age? ... 01, 2015 Original article: http://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/sexual-health/in-depth/testosterone-therapy/art-20045728 . ...

  15. High prevalence of sexual dysfunction in a vulvovaginal specialty clinic

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Dina; Gardella, Carolyn; Eschenbach, David; Mitchell, Caroline M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Our study evaluated the presence and predictors of sexual dysfunction in a vulvovaginal specialty clinic population. Materials & Methods Women who presented to a vulvovaginal specialty clinic were eligible to enroll. Participants completed a questionnaire, including Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI) to assess sexual dysfunction and Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ)-9 depression screen, and underwent a standardized physical exam, with vaginal swabs collected for wet mount and culture. Logistic regression assessed the relationship between sexual dysfunction and clinical diagnosis. Results We enrolled 161 women, aged 18–80 years (median = 36), presenting with vulvovaginal complaints. Median symptom duration was 24 months; 131 women (81%) reported chronic symptoms (≥12 months). By PHQ-9, 28 (17%) women met depression criteria. In the month prior to assessment, 86 (53%) women experienced sexual dysfunction. Women were primarily diagnosed with vaginitis (n = 46, 29%), vestibulodynia/vulvitis (n = 70; 43%), lichen planus or lichen sclerosus (n = 24; 15%). Controlling for age, sexual dysfunction did not correlate with chronic symptoms (IRR 0.86, 95% CI 0.50–1.48), depression (IRR 1.24; 95% CI 0.59, 2.58), or presence of any of the three main diagnoses (IRR 1.16, 95% CI 0.47, 2.88). Discussion Sexual dysfunction is present in over half of women presenting to a vulvovaginitis referral clinic, more than twice the rate in the wider population. PMID:25259664

  16. An Overview of Sexual Harassment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stier, William F., Jr.

    2005-01-01

    Sexual harassment, according to the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC), is when any unwelcome sexual advances for sexual favors, and other verbal or physical conduct of a sexual nature takes place. For sexual harassment to take place there must be some type of behavior, language, or material of a sexual nature, which is offensive.…

  17. Sexual Dysfunction in Women

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Pamela

    1989-01-01

    Sexual dysfunction takes place in the context of women's lives and affects their sexuality and self-esteem. Awareness of these influences are vital to the management of the dysfunction and the promotion of positive sexuality. The family physician's contribution to both the prevention and management of sexual concerns includes an awareness of societal influences and facilitation of a woman's sense of her own power and control over her life. PMID:21248971

  18. Maltreatment and Depression in Adolescent Sexual Offenders with an Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walters, Jessica Bleil; Hughes, Tammy L.; Sutton, Lawrence R.; Marshall, Stephanie N.; Crothers, Laura M.; Lehman, Cathryn; Paserba, Dave; Talkington, Vanessa; Taormina, Rochelle; Huang, Ann

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the self-reported presence and severity of abuse, neglect, and depressive symptoms for 43 adolescents adjudicated delinquent due to a sexual offense. Twenty-seven of the adolescent sexual offenders were also diagnosed with an autism spectrum disorder, and 16 did not carry an autism spectrum disorder diagnosis. Both groups…

  19. Psychopathology in a Large Cohort of Sexually Abused Children Followed up to 43 Years

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cutajar, Margaret C.; Mullen, Paul E.; Ogloff, James R. P.; Thomas, Stuart D.; Wells, David L.; Spataro, Josie

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To determine the rate and risk of clinical and personality disorders diagnosed in childhood and adulthood in those known to have been sexually abused during childhood. Methods: Forensic medical records of 2,759 sexually abused children assessed between 1964 and 1995 were linked with a public psychiatric database between 12 and 43 years…

  20. Increase in Sexually Transmitted Infections among Men Who Have Sex with Men, England, 2014

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Holly; Sile, Bersabeh; Duffell, Stephen; Nardone, Anthony; Hughes, Gwenda

    2016-01-01

    Surveillance data from sexual health clinics indicate recent increases in sexually transmitted infections, particularly among men who have sex with men. The largest annual increase in syphilis diagnoses in a decade was reported in 2014. Less condom use may be the primary reason for these increases. PMID:26689861

  1. Sexuality in Adolescent Boys with Autism Spectrum Disorder: Self-Reported Behaviours and Attitudes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dewinter, Jeroen; Vermeiren, Robert; Vanwesenbeeck, Ine; Lobbestael, Jill; Van Nieuwenhuizen, Chijs

    2015-01-01

    Differences in sexual functioning of adolescents with and without autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are understudied. In the current study, self-reported sexual behaviours, interests and attitudes of 50 adolescent boys, aged 15-18, with at least average intelligence and diagnosed with ASD, were compared with a matched general population control group…

  2. Contextual and Intrapersonal Predictors of Adolescent Risky Sexual Behavior and Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shneyderman, Yuliya; Schwartz, Seth J.

    2013-01-01

    The present study was designed to test a model of contextual and intrapersonal predictors of adolescent risky sexual behaviors and of sexually transmitted infection diagnoses. Using Waves I and II from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health, the authors estimated a structural model in which intrapersonal factors such as adolescents'…

  3. Schooling & Sexualities: Teaching for a Positive Sexuality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laskey, Louise, Ed.; Beavis, Catherine, Ed.

    This collection of papers contains a Foreword by Jane Kenway, an Introduction by Louise Laskey and Catherine Beavis, and four sections. Section 1, Schools and the Social Construction of Sexuality, contains 3 chapters: (1) Power and Partnership? Challenging the Sexual Construction of Schooling (D. Denborough); (2) Where Do You Draw the Line?…

  4. Constructing a 'plausible narrative of progress' for nursing: a neopragmatist suggestion.

    PubMed

    Mason, Walter H

    2009-01-01

    Identity, difference, and the associated subject of cultural diversity pose challenges for nursing. As the demographics of the world change, demands are rising for nurses to provide sensitive, individualized care to people living in our ever-changing global community. Issues concerning gender, sexuality, disability, age, language, economic and occupational status, multiculturalism, and ethnicity are made more complex because many of these topics strike a personal chord for individual nurses. In order for nursing to provide appropriate care to the world's people and to meet future challenges, nursing must define itself in new ways. Kikuchi and Simmons have stated that the best way for nursing to approach this task is through the development of a 'sound' philosophy of nursing that will 'accommodate diversity in nursing thought'. They contend that before we can establish a philosophy of nursing, nurses will have to agree upon the nature of reality, human beings, truth, and knowledge. This paper will suggest that neopragmatism, as described by Richard Rorty, is a way to assure diversity of thought in nursing. However, I will argue against the requirement for this philosophy to be 'sound' in the sense that Kikuchi and Simmons use this term. In place of their call for 'truth and unity in nursing thought'. I will attempt to demonstrate how neopragmatic ideas relate to the construction of what Rorty called a unifying 'plausible narrative of progress'. This change will allow nursing to abandon the dead end debate over epistemologies and instead focus on more important issues related to improving nursing practice.

  5. Preventing sexual violence instead of just responding to it: students' perceptions of sexual violence resources on campus.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Carolyn M; Lechner, Kate E; Frerich, Ellen A; Lust, Katherine A; Eisenberg, Marla E

    2012-06-01

    Rates of sexual assault of college students are higher than the national rates. Colleges are uniquely positioned to offer preventive education and support services to a high-risk group. This qualitative study examines students' perceptions of sexual violence resources and services. Seventy-eight female and male students, between 18 and 24 years old, belonging to various demographic groups, participated in one-to-one walking interviews on five diverse Midwest 2- and 4-year postsecondary campuses. Findings suggest that students are concerned with safety--students want more education regarding sexual violence--and they value services that offer protection from incidents of sexual violence on campus. Participants expressed mixed reactions to prevention education that combined sexual violence prevention with alcohol and drug use. Students shared positive views of the security measures on campus. They emphasized the importance of using varied mechanisms for sexual violence-related resource messaging and advised moving away from the pamphlet toward posters and online resources. Recommendations are offered to strengthen existing resources, such as prevention education and postassault interventions including sexual assault nurse examiner services, and to minimize barriers to access of sexual violence resources.

  6. “Preventing sexual violence instead of just responding to it”: Students’ Perceptions of Sexual Violence Resources on Campus

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Carolyn M.; Lechner, Kate E.; Frerich, Ellen A.; Lust, Katherine A.; Eisenberg, Marla E.

    2012-01-01

    Rates of sexual assault of college students are higher than the national rates. Colleges are uniquely positioned to offer preventive education and support services to a high-risk group. This qualitative study examines students’ perceptions of sexual violence resources and services. Seventy-eight female and male students, between 18–24 years old, belonging to various demographic groups participated in one-to-one, walking interviews on five diverse Midwest 2- and 4-year postsecondary campuses. Findings suggest that students are concerned with safety, students want more education regarding sexual violence, and they value services that offer protection from incidents of sexual violence on campus. Participants expressed mixed reactions to prevention education that combined sexual violence prevention with alcohol and drug use. Students shared positive views of the security measures on campus. They emphasized the importance of using varied mechanisms for sexual violence-related resource messaging and advised moving away from the pamphlet towards posters and online resources. Recommendations are offered to strengthen existing resources, such as prevention education and post-assault interventions including Sexual Assault Nurse Examiner (SANE) services, and to minimize barriers to access of sexual violence resources. PMID:22621664

  7. Religiosity, spirituality, sexual attitudes, and sexual behaviors among college students.

    PubMed

    Luquis, Raffy R; Brelsford, Gina M; Rojas-Guyler, Liliana

    2012-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether religiosity, spirituality, and sexual attitudes accounted for differences in sexual behaviors among college students. The sample included 960 college students enrolled at four northeastern colleges. Results indicated differences in sexual attitudes, religiosity, and spirituality by gender. Moreover, sexual attitudes, religiosity, and spirituality were associated with sexual behaviors among college students. Sexual behaviors among males were influenced by their sexual attitudes, religiosity, and spirituality, while for females, their sexual behaviors were mostly influenced by their sexual attitudes. College health professionals can use these findings when discussing sexual practices with students.

  8. Sexual Harassment in Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, D'Ann

    1986-01-01

    In a recent BEST (Bureau of Evaluative Studies and Testing, Indiana University, Bloomington) survey, 10 percent of Indiana University women who responded had experienced some form of sexual harassment. Sexual harassment in education is any attention of a sexual nature from an instructor or professor which makes a student uncomfortable in class or…

  9. Camp Nursing: Student Internships.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harwood, Catherine Hoe; Van Hofwegen, Lynn

    2002-01-01

    Camps can meet or supplement their health care delivery needs by using student nurses. Three models for student nurse internships, basic information about nursing education, and tips for negotiating student nurse internships are described. Sidebars present resources for camp health centers, nursing student competence characteristics, types of…

  10. Ethics, government and sexual health: insights from Foucault.

    PubMed

    Winch, Sarah

    2005-03-01

    The work of Michel Foucault, the French philosopher who was interested in power relationships, has resonated with many nurses who seek a radically analytical view of nursing practice. The purpose of this article is to explore 'ethics' through a Foucauldian lens, in a conceptual and methodological sense. The intention is to provide a useful framework that will help researchers critically to explore aspects of nursing practice that relate to the construction of the self, morality and identity, be that nurse or patient related. The fundamentals of the research method of genealogy and the methods of ethics are reviewed. Using an example taken from the sexual health practice area, advice is given on how to structure data collection, incorporate interview data, avoid discourse determinism and measure resistance.

  11. Genital abnormalities in early childhood in sexual homicide perpetrators.

    PubMed

    Rettenberger, Martin; Hill, Andreas; Dekker, Arne; Berner, Wolfgang; Briken, Peer

    2013-04-01

    INTRODUCTION.: The present study investigates the relevance of genital abnormalities (GA) like cryptorchidism, hypospadias, and phimosis usually diagnosed in early childhood for the development of psychosexual problems and deficits in a sample of N = 163 convicted sexual homicide perpetrators. AIMS.: The first aim was to investigate the prevalence of early childhood GA in a sample of sexual homicide perpetrators. The second was to explore differences in the psychosexual development of participants with GA in early childhood compared with those without GA. It was expected that offenders with GA show specific problems in their psychosexual development compared with offenders without GA. METHODS.: The data for the present study were obtained by reanalyzing an existing database derived from a large-scale research project about sexual homicide. Using a predominantly exploratory design we, therefore, divided the total sample into two subgroups (with vs. without indicators of GA). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES.: Main outcome measures were the number of sexual homicide perpetrators showing GA in early childhood and the differences of subjects with and without GA with regard to their psychosexual development (i.e., according to sexual deviant interests or sexual dysfunctions). RESULTS.: The prevalence of GA is substantially higher in this sample than epidemiological studies indicated in the normal population. This result provided first support for the importance of GA in the population of sexual homicide perpetrators. Further analyses indicate significant differences between both subgroups: Offenders with GA in early childhood showed indicators for more sexual dysfunctions (e.g., erectile dysfunction) in adulthood and a distinct tendency of more masochistic sexual interests. CONCLUSION.: Even if the exploratory design of the present investigation allows no causal conclusions between GA and sexual homicide offenses, the result provided support for the relevance of early

  12. Scripting sexual function: a qualitative investigation.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Kirstin R; Wellings, Kaye; Nazareth, Irwin; King, Michael; Mercer, Catherine H; Johnson, Anne M

    2011-05-01

    The biomedical model assumes universal agreement in what it means to have a functioning sex life. In reality there is significant variation in the criteria that individuals employ in assessing their sex lives. We use a scripting approach to understand the meaning of sexual function from a lay perspective. Based on the accounts of 32 individuals representing a range of sexual function experience, we identified three scripts employed by participants to describe their sexual experiences: the biomedical script emphasised genital function and physical release (orgasm), the relational script focused on relational aspects of encounters and valued emotional intimacy and security; and the erotic script focused on pleasure and valued novelty and excitement. Respondent accounts usually contained elements of more than one script, but often one of these was prominent. At the intra-psychic level each script serves as a schema, comprising priorities, expectations and evaluative criteria. In the context of sex therapy, this scripting approach may help shed light on the sources of sexual difficulties. Our findings also challenge the current domination of the biomedical script in measuring, diagnosing and treating sexual dysfunction, since the construct does not adequately reflect the priorities of those who prioritise alternative scripts.

  13. Psychosocial barriers to sexual intimacy for older people.

    PubMed

    Garrett, Dawne

    A review of the literature relating to the psychosocial barriers to sexual intimacy in older people reveals wide-ranging influences on people aged 75-85 years. These influences include: a lack of positive social policy, a lack of research, partner availability, negative media portrayals, psychological factors, relationship factors, and difficulties in interactions with health professionals. Stereotypical attitudes about sexual intimacy and older people remain a cultural norm. A high value is placed on a gold standard of sexual performance, which can reinforce negative esteem and set unrealistic expectations and measures for older people. This article focuses on the majority of the older population who do not require residential care. It examines major influences emerging from a review of the literature from 1995 to 2013, which informs a working definition for sexual intimacy in people over the age of 75 years. The article concludes with key recommendations for nurses working with older adults.

  14. Sexual addiction or hypersexual disorder: different terms for the same problem? A review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Karila, Laurent; Wéry, Aline; Weinstein, Aviv; Cottencin, Olivier; Petit, Aymeric; Reynaud, Michel; Billieux, Jöel

    2014-01-01

    Sexual addiction, which is also known as hypersexual disorder, has largely been ignored by psychiatrists, even though the condition causes serious psychosocial problems for many people. A lack of empirical evidence on sexual addiction is the result of the disease's complete absence from versions of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders. However, people who were categorized as having a compulsive, impulsive, addictive sexual disorder or a hypersexual disorder reported having obsessive thoughts and behaviors as well as sexual fantasies. Existing prevalence rates of sexual addiction-related disorders range from 3% to 6%. Sexual addiction/ hypersexual disorder is used as an umbrella construct to encompass various types of problematic behaviors, including excessive masturbation, cybersex, pornography use, sexual behavior with consenting adults, telephone sex, strip club visitation, and other behaviors. The adverse consequences of sexual addiction are similar to the consequences of other addictive disorders. Addictive, somatic and psychiatric disorders coexist with sexual addiction. In recent years, research on sexual addiction has proliferated, and screening instruments have increasingly been developed to diagnose or quantify sexual addiction disorders. In our systematic review of the existing measures, 22 questionnaires were identified. As with other behavioral addictions, the appropriate treatment of sexual addiction should combine pharmacological and psychological approaches. Psychiatric and somatic comorbidities that frequently occur with sexual addiction should be integrated into the therapeutic process. Group-based treatments should also be attempted.

  15. Sexual misconduct and enactment.

    PubMed

    Plakun, E M

    1999-01-01

    Sexual misconduct remains a significant problem in the behavioral health professions. Although it is tempting to view sexual misconduct as perpetrated by "bad" clinicians against patients who are "victims," this is an oversimplification of a complex problem. In this article, the author explores the psychoanalytic concept of enactment as a mechanism that can lead well-meaning clinicians to engage in sexual misconduct; defines enactment and differentiates it from near neighbor phenomena; uses case examples to illustrate how enactments may lead to sexual misconduct or may offer opportunities to deepen and enhance psychotherapeutic work; and offers recommendations for prevention of sexual misconduct.

  16. Sexual Misconduct and Enactment

    PubMed Central

    Plakun, Eric M.

    1999-01-01

    Sexual misconduct remains a significant problem in the behavioral health professions. Although it is tempting to view sexual misconduct as perpetrated by “bad” clinicians against patients who are “victims,” this is an oversimplification of a complex problem. In this article, the author explores the psychoanalytic concept of enactment as a mechanism that can lead well-meaning clinicians to engage in sexual misconduct; defines enactment and differentiates it from near neighbor phenomena; uses case examples to illustrate how enactments may lead to sexual misconduct or may offer opportunities to deepen and enhance psychotherapeutic work; and offers recommendations for prevention of sexual misconduct. PMID:10523431

  17. Necrophilia and sexual homicide.

    PubMed

    Stein, Michelle L; Schlesinger, Louis B; Pinizzotto, Anthony J

    2010-03-01

    A closed case-file review of 211 sexual homicides identified 16 cases of necrophilia. The results of this unique descriptive study of necrophilia associated with sexual homicide provide information on crime-scene locations, methods of killing, body disposition, premortem sexual assault, specifics of the necrophilic acts, methods of victim abduction, and motivational dynamics. The findings suggest that the most common explanation for necrophilia-the offender's desire to have an unresisting partner-may not always be applicable in cases where this rare paraphilia is connected to sexual murder. The possibility of using crime-scene behaviors in these cases to investigate serial sexual murders is offered.

  18. Gender Role Discrepancy Stress, High-Risk Sexual Behavior, and Sexually Transmitted Disease.

    PubMed

    Reidy, Dennis E; Brookmeyer, Kathryn A; Gentile, Brittany; Berke, Danielle S; Zeichner, Amos

    2016-02-01

    Nearly 20 million new sexually transmitted infections occur every year in the United States. Traditionally, men have demonstrated much greater risk for contraction of and mortality from STDs perhaps because they tend to engage in a number of risky sexual activities. Research on masculinity suggests that gender roles influence males' sexual health by encouraging risk-taking behavior, discouraging access to health services, and narrowly defining their roles as partners. However, despite the propensity of highly masculine men to engage in high-risk sexual behavior, there is reason to suspect that men at the other end of the continuum may still be driven to engage in similar high-risk behaviors as a consequence of gender socialization. Discrepancy stress is a form of gender role stress that occurs when men fail to live up to the ideal manhood derived from societal prescriptions (i.e., Gender Role Discrepancy). In the present study, we surveyed a national sample of 600 men via Amazon Mechanical Turk to assess perceived gender role discrepancy, experience of discrepancy stress, and the associations with risky sexual behavior and potential contraction of STDs. Results indicated that men who believe they are less masculine than the typical man (i.e., gender role discrepancy) and experience distress stemming from this discrepancy (i.e., discrepancy stress) engage in high-risk sexual behavior and are subsequently diagnosed with more STDs. Findings are discussed in relation to implications for primary prevention strategies.

  19. [Development of sexuality and motivational aspects of sexual behavior in men with obsessive-compulsive disorders].

    PubMed

    2014-09-01

    Sexual behavior and formation of sexuality in men with obsessive-compulsive disorder is one of the pressing issues in contemporary medicine. Obsessive-compulsive disorder is characterized by the development of intrusive thoughts, memories, movements and actions, as well as a variety of pathological fears (phobias). Increase in the number of patients with this pathology in modern clinical practice of neurotic disorders, the young age of the patients and as a result violation of interpersonal, communicational and sexual nature is quite apparent. The study involved 35 men aged 23 to 47 years with clinical signs of OCD. We determined the severity of obsessive-compulsive symptoms using the Yale-Brown scale. We established the presence of a mild degree of disorder in 34,3% of cases; in 48,6% of cases disorder of moderate severity was diagnosed; remaining 17.1% were assessed subclinical condition of OCD at the applicable scale. The system of motivational maintenance of sexual behavior in men with obsessive-compulsive disorders is investigated. Motives of sexual behavior of the investigated men with the pathology are determined. The presented research in men with OCD have established multidimensionality and complexity of motivational ensuring of sexual behavior.

  20. Sexual Behavior and Sexually Transmitted Infections Among Swingers: Results From an Online Survey in Belgium.

    PubMed

    Platteau, Tom; van Lankveld, Jacques; Ooms, Lieselot; Florence, Eric

    2016-11-30

    Swingers are couples practicing consensual extradyadic heterosexual relations. This subculture is defined by venues and online communities. This study aimed to assess swingers' lifestyle, sexual health, and history of testing for sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and to review risk factors for sexual risk behavior and STI transmission. An online survey was distributed through venues, chat websites, and dating websites. Most of 480 swingers starting the survey completed it (n = 392, 81.6%). Women (n = 146) reported more frequent swinging (p = 0.013), same-sex contacts (p < 0.001), and more sex under influence of alcohol (p < 0.001). Men (n = 334) reported more anal sex (p = 0.002) and condomless vaginal sex (p = 0.004). Of respondents tested, 25.7% ever received an STI diagnosis. Using logistical regression, being male, older, single, and party drug use were associated with sexual risk behavior (p = 0.009). Higher frequency of swinging was associated with an STI diagnosis (p = 0.036). Swingers were sexually active, reported factors associated with sexual risk behavior, and were more diagnosed with an STI compared to the general population. Many swingers were tested for STIs. Nonetheless, implementation of tailored testing strategies should be considered given their elevated risk for STI acquisition.

  1. Understanding disgust in nursing: abjection, self, and the other.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Dave; Perron, Amélie; O'Byrne, Patrick

    2006-01-01

    From the seeming chaos of war zones and emergency rooms to the ritualized order of forensic psychiatric settings and sexual health clinics, nurses often experience feelings of disgust and repulsion in their practice. For these intense feelings to occur, an abject object must exist. Cadaverous, sick, disabled bodies, troubled minds, wounds, vomit, feces, and so forth are all part of nursing work and threaten the clean and proper bodies of nurses. The unclean side of nursing is rarely accounted for in academic literature: it is silenced. Using a theoretical approach, the objective of this paper is to demonstrate how fruitful the concept of abjection is in understanding nurses' reactions of disgust and repulsion regarding particular patients or clinical situations.

  2. Religion and adolescent sexuality.

    PubMed

    Stayton, W R

    1985-06-01

    The health professional can be helpful to the adolescent, the adolescent's family, and the community through participating in and initiating local sex education programs. Religious settings provide a great potential for sexuality education within a value framework. A helpful curriculum will include the meaning of sexuality; developing a positive concept of sexuality, and a healthy sexual identity; present the issues of adolescent sexuality, including the various health issues; and an understanding of quality relationships within the family and among peers. If health professions and the community religious institutions can joint together, they can reach the goals of most programs in human sexuality, namely, "learning to appreciate our sexuality as a positive potential for self-expression, fulfillment and intimacy; respect for the personhood and well-being of others; and responsible decision-making."

  3. Sexual health care for women with dyspareunia.

    PubMed

    Sung, Su-Ching; Jeng, Cherng-Jye; Lin, Yen-Chin

    2011-09-01

    Female dyspareunia is a serious impairment with a prevalence of up to 39.5%, imposing a significant burden on women's health, relationship, and quality of life. Because the causes of female dyspareunia are associated with multiple biological, medical, psychological, sociocultural, and interpersonal dimensions, all members of the health team should help fill this gap in the total care of the patient. The nurse is an ideal member of the health team to counsel patients in the sensitive and highly charged area of human sexuality. The purpose of this article was to explore the essential components of female dyspareunia from nursing care perspective to help women suffering from dyspareunia. The article provides a set of tools, including description and clinical presentation, obtaining a history and clinical data for the evaluation of dyspareunia, and a counseling tool of the Permission, Limited Information, Specific Suggestions, and Intensive Therapy model; suggestions are also provided for health care professionals during the treatment process.

  4. Online Reporting of Military Sexual Trauma.

    PubMed

    Burgess, Ann W; Lee, Wendy J; Carretta, Carrie M

    2016-04-01

    Case finding and treatment of military sexual trauma (MST) remains a serious problem in military and veteran populations as well as in the civilian population. This report provides descriptive examples, with statistics, of persons serving in the military or while living/working on a military base when they experienced unwanted sex. Males, more than females, never disclosed MST before online survey, had more physical injuries as a result and reported chronic disturbing thoughts of the experience. Undisclosed and unreported intrafamilial childhood sexual experiences were cited before an MST by some respondents. Interprofessional collaboration is recommended between military nurse practitioners and behavioral health clinicians as well as innovative strategies using telecommunication and online counseling.

  5. Alternate light sources in sexual assault examinations: an evidence-based practice project.

    PubMed

    Eldredge, Kelli; Huggins, Emily; Pugh, Linda C

    2012-03-01

    The ability of sexual assault nurse examiners to correctly identify and collect DNA evidence improves patient outcomes and prosecution rates. The purpose of this paper is to present findings from a collaborative evidence-based practice (EBP) project between forensic nurses and baccalaureate nursing students. The goal of the project was to determine best practice using an alternate light source (ALS) to identify trace DNA evidence in sexual assault forensic examinations. Using the Johns Hopkins Nursing Evidence-based Practice model, the team searched several databases to summarize the limited amount of evidence available regarding this topic. Recommendations from the EBP project include: elimination of the Wood's lamp in sexual assault examinations; use of an ALS that provides appropriate wavelengths to detect DNA; education of forensic nurses about the advantages and limitations of an ALS; and additional research related to use of an ALS. By participating in similar collaborative efforts, practicing forensic nurses have the opportunity to collaborate with local colleges and universities to make complex projects more manageable while fulfilling the International Association of Forensic Nurses vision for ethical practice.

  6. International Transplant Nurses Society

    MedlinePlus

    ... and professional practice in nursing." Demonstration of professional development support and clinical advancement programs are hallmarks of a professional nursing practice environment and critical components of Nursing Magnet status. The ...

  7. [Assessing nursing workload].

    PubMed

    Princiaux, Danielle

    2012-01-01

    Healthcare managers must monitor the nursing workload and back up their arguments when requesting resources. A study was carried out based on a tool which measures whether nursing staff provision meets the nursing care workload.

  8. Sexually transmitted infections among HIV seropositive men and women

    PubMed Central

    Kalichman, S.; Rompa, D.; Cage, M.

    2000-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the prevalence of identified STIs and recognised symptoms of STIs and their association with health status, substance use, and sexual risk behaviour in a sample of HIV seropositive men and women. Methods: 223 men, 112 women, and five transsexual people living with HIV infection completed confidential surveys. Participants were recruited through community based services, community health clinics, and snowball (chain) recruitment techniques in Atlanta, GA, USA in December 1999. Results: We found that (263) 78% of participants had been sexually active in the previous 3 months. For the entire sample, 42 (12%) participants reported an STI in the past 3 months and 40 (11%) experienced symptoms of an STI without indicating a specific diagnosis in that time. Gonorrhoea, chlamydia, syphilis, and newly diagnosed herpes simplex virus (HSV) were identified at similar rates among men, whereas trichomonas, gonorrhoea, and newly diagnosed HSV occurred most often in women. STIs were associated with substance use in men and women, with "crack" cocaine users having the greatest likelihood of an STI relative to non-crack users. STIs were also associated with continued practice of sexual risk behaviours. Conclusions: This sample of people living with HIV-AIDS reported high rates of diagnoses and symptoms of STIs. There were significant associations between STIs, substance use, and continued high risk sexual practices in men and women. These findings support the need for studies that confirm prevalence of STIs using clinical laboratory tests. Key Words: HIV; sexual risk; HIV transmission PMID:11141850

  9. Lesbians' and gay men's narratives about attitudes in nursing.

    PubMed

    Röndahl, Gerd

    2009-03-01

    Many nurses find it difficult to show compassion and sensitivity, and to give gay patients nursing of a quality equal to that given to heterosexual patients. The aim of the present study was to describe the experiences of gay patients and partners concerning attitudes in nursing. The method included qualitative semi-structured interviews with 17 women and 10 men, from different parts of Sweden. Nearly all informants described a sense of insecurity in 'coming out' to nursing staff. Most patients described being met by the nursing staff in a respectful manner, but sometimes they perceived a kind of distancing in the personnel's behaviour. Informants related that nursing staff judged homosexuality as something abnormal. Informants thought that, as partners, they always felt like outsiders, but these were emotions they believed all relatives experienced irrespective of sexual orientation. However, some partners associated negative attitudes of nursing staff with homosexuality. The informants believed that the insecure feelings affected their ability to interact. The majority of informants stated that they found most of the nursing staff kind and caring, but that there were differences and that the goal should be - for all patients and relatives - equality in nursing care.

  10. Cognitive Workload of Computerized Nursing Process in Intensive Care Units.

    PubMed

    Dal Sasso, Grace Marcon; Barra, Daniela Couto Carvalho

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this work was to measure the cognitive workload to complete printed nursing process versus computerized nursing process from International Classification Practice of Nursing in intensive care units. It is a quantitative, before-and-after quasi-experimental design, with a sample of 30 participants. Workload was assessed using National Aeronautics and Space Administration Task-Load Index. Six cognitive categories were measured. The "temporal demand" was the largest contributor to the cognitive workload, and the role of the nursing process in the "performance" category has excelled that of computerized nursing process. It was concluded that computerized nursing process contributes to lower cognitive workload of nurses for being a support system for decision making based on the International Classification Practice of Nursing. The computerized nursing process as a logical structure of the data, information, diagnoses, interventions and results become a reliable option for health improvement of healthcare, because it can enhance nurse safe decision making, with the intent to reduce damage and adverse events to patients in intensive care.

  11. Service Learning and Community Health Nursing: A Natural Fit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Marilyn P.; Swanson, Elizabeth

    2002-01-01

    Community health nursing students performed community assessments and proposed and implemented service learning projects that addressed adolescent smoking in middle schools, home safety for elderly persons, industrial worker health, and sexual abuse of teenaged girls. Students learned to apply epidemiological research methods, mobilize resources,…

  12. Moral Agency and the Sexual Transmission of HIV

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Leary, Ann; Wolitski, Richard J.

    2009-01-01

    Sexual transmission of HIV occurs because an infected person has unprotected sex with a previously uninfected person. The majority of HIV infections are transmitted by individuals who are unaware of their infection, and most persons who are diagnosed with HIV significantly reduce or eliminate risk behaviors once they learn they have HIV. However,…

  13. The Colorado Collaborative for Nursing Research: nurses shaping nursing's future.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Karen H; Weiss, Jason; Welton, John; Reeder, Blaine; Ozkaynak, Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    Nurses in the present health care environment have been reduced too often to being providers of safe, competent care rather than quality care. In response, the Institute of Medicine has recommended that nurses become more involved in making changes to the health care system and use data more effectively. If nursing intends to follow these recommendations, the profession needs (a) fresh perspectives to assist in making health care system changes, (b) partnerships between nurse scientists and nurse clinicians to generate and implement data, and (c) capture of the proper value of nursing as distinct from other elements of health care delivery. The Colorado Collaborative for Nursing Research is an effort to meet the recommendations of the Institute of Medicine. The Colorado Collaborative for Nursing Research has a three-arm structure: a research forum where nurse academicians and nurse clinicians can launch collaborative projects; a research support services arm from which nurse collaborators can obtain help with modeling, statistics, writing, and funding; and a data extraction/data sharing mechanism to inform the decision making of nurse leaders.

  14. Diagnosability issues in multiprocessor systems

    SciTech Connect

    Raghavan, V.

    1989-01-01

    In a seminal paper on fault diagnosis, Preparata, Metze, and Chien introduced a graph-theoretical model. Barsi, Grandoni, and Maestrini relaxed some constraints in this model to create a different model for fault diagnosis. Both these models have become the subject of intense research in the past two decades. A major open problem for these models is the question of sequential t-diagnosability-Given an arbitrary system of units and that there are no more than t faulty units in it, can we always identify at least one faulty unit The author shows that this problem is co-NP complete in both models. Recent research has shown that there are polynomial time algorithms to find the maximum number of faulty units a system can withstand and still identify all of them from a single collection of test results. He presents improved algorithms to solve this problem in both models. Using the letters n,m, and {tau} to denote the number of units, the number of tests, and the maximum number of faulty units respectively, our results can be summarized as follows: in the model of Barsi, Grandoni, and Maestrini, the algorithm has a time complexity of O(n{tau}{sup 2}/log{tau}) improving on the currently known O(n{tau}{sup 2}); in the model of Preparata, Metze, and Chien, the algorithm has a complexity of O(n{tau}{sup 2.5}) improving on the currently known O(mn{sup 1.5}). He also presents related results in the latter model, which suggest the possibility of reducing the complexity even further. Finally, he develops a general scheme for characterizing diagnosable systems. Using this scheme, he solves the open problem of characterizing t/s and sequentially t-diagnosable systems. The characterizations are then used to rederive some known results.

  15. [Characteristic and treatment of sexual dysfunctions in depression (part I)].

    PubMed

    Gałecki, Piotr; Florkowski, Antoni; Depko, Andrzej; Woźniak, Aneta; Talarowska, Monika

    2011-09-01

    Sexual dysfunction in patients diagnosed with depressive disorders affect all phases of sexual response: a decline in libido, erectile dysfunction, ejaculation disorders in men and orgasm and menstruation in women. It is estimated that are present in approximately 70% of patients, affecting 23-50% of men suffering from depression and 33-90% of women. The most common symptoms include disorders of sexual arousal in women (usually in the form of excessive vaginal dryness), erectile dysfunction in men and affects both sexes abnormal orgasm (anorgasmia or delayed). Sexual dysfunction is treated as a potential side effect of antidepressant therapy. These drugs can exacerbate the symptoms of primary sexual dysfunction, and induce it in those patients who were not present before treatment. Symptoms of sexual dysfunction reduces quality of life, self-esteem, mood, and negatively affect the relationship with your partner. Most currently used antidepressants in the world leads to the occurrence of sexual dysfunction. These include monoamine oxidase inhibitors, tricyclic antidepressants, serotonin reuptake inhibitors, serotonin reuptake inhibitors and norepinephrine, and a new generation of antidepressants. SSRIs are considered to be preparations for the largest iatrogenic effect. Sexual dysfunction resulting from treatment with antidepressant among the most serious reasons for discontinuation by the patients.

  16. Sexism, Sexual Harassment and Sexual Assault: Toward Conceptual Clarity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    SEXISM , SEXUAL HARASSMENT AND SEXUAL ASSAULT: TOWARD CONCEPTUAL CLARITY Dr. Richard Harris Department of Social Work and Center for Policy...00-2007 to 00-00-2007 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Sexism , Sexual Harassment and Sexual Assault: Toward Conceptual Clarity 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT...Sexual Harassment .........................................................................................2 Sexism

  17. Improving Sexual Risk Communication With Adolescents Using Event History Calendars

    PubMed Central

    Martyn, Kristy K.; Darling-Fisher, Cynthia; Pardee, Michelle; Ronis, David L.; Felicetti, Irene L.; Saftner, Melissa A.

    2012-01-01

    This study was conducted to explore the effects of an event history calendar (EHC) approach on adolescent sexual risk communication and sexual activity. Adolescent school-linked health clinic patients (n = 30) who reported sexual activity self-administered the EHC that was used by nurse practitioners (NPs; n = 2) during a clinic visit. Immediately pre- and post-visit, and at 1 and 3 months, adolescents reported sexual risk behaviors and perceptions about EHC communication on questionnaires and by interview. NPs reported their perceptions of EHCs by questionnaire after the visit and poststudy interview. The EHC approach facilitated communication and adolescent awareness of their risk behaviors. Scores increased on Amount of Communication, t(29) = 8.174, p < .001; Satisfaction with Communication, t(29) = 3.112, p = .004; Client Involvement in Decision Making, t(29) = 3.901, p = .001, and Client Satisfaction with Interpersonal Style, t(29) = 3.763, p = .001. Adolescents reported decreased sexual intercourse at 1 month, p = .031. School nurses could use the EHC approach to facilitate adolescent communication and tailoring of interventions. PMID:22071717

  18. Improving sexual risk communication with adolescents using event history calendars.

    PubMed

    Martyn, Kristy K; Darling-Fisher, Cynthia; Pardee, Michelle; Ronis, David L; Felicetti, Irene L; Saftner, Melissa A

    2012-04-01

    This study was conducted to explore the effects of an event history calendar (EHC) approach on adolescent sexual risk communication and sexual activity. Adolescent school-linked health clinic patients (n = 30) who reported sexual activity self-administered the EHC that was used by nurse practitioners (NPs; n = 2) during a clinic visit. Immediately pre- and post-visit, and at 1 and 3 months, adolescents reported sexual risk behaviors and perceptions about EHC communication on questionnaires and by interview. NPs reported their perceptions of EHCs by questionnaire after the visit and poststudy interview. The EHC approach facilitated communication and adolescent awareness of their risk behaviors. Scores increased on Amount of Communication, t(29) = 8.174, p < .001; Satisfaction with Communication, t(29) = 3.112, p = .004; Client Involvement in Decision Making, t(29) = 3.901, p = .001, and Client Satisfaction with Interpersonal Style, t(29) = 3.763, p = .001. Adolescents reported decreased sexual intercourse at 1 month, p = .031. School nurses could use the EHC approach to facilitate adolescent communication and tailoring of interventions.

  19. Sexually transmitted diseases in sexually abused children: medical and legal implications

    PubMed Central

    Hammerschlag, M. R.

    1998-01-01

    Sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) may be transmitted during sexual assault. In children, the isolation of a sexually transmitted organism may be the first indication that abuse has occurred. Although the presence of a sexually transmissible agent from a child beyond the neonatal period is suggestive of sexual abuse, exceptions do exist. In this review I discuss the issues of the transmissibility and diagnosis of STDs in the context of child sexual abuse. Rectal or genital infection with Chlamydia trachomatis among young children may be the result of perinatally acquired infection and may persist for as long as 3 years. A major problem with chlamydia testing in the context of suspected sexual abuse in children has been the inappropriate use of non-culture tests. Although the new generation of nucleic acid amplification tests have shown high sensitivity and specificity with genital specimens from adults, data on use of these tests on any site in children are practically non-existent. Bacterial vaginosis (BV) has been identified among children who have been abused and among those who have not been abused. However, many of the methods used to diagnose BV in adults have not been evaluated in children. Recent studies of perinatal infection with human papillomavirus (HPV) have been inconclusive. HPV DNA has been detected at various sites in children who have not been abused. The relation to the development of clinically apparent genital warts is unclear. Although HIV can be acquired through sexual abuse in children, the exact risk to the child and which children should be screened is still controversial. 


 PMID:9849550

  20. Youth Who Sexual Offended

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Li Lian; Zeng, Gerald; Teoh, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    There has been an increased focus on understanding youth sexual offending in recent years, but there has been limited empirical research on the causes, pathways, and treatment of youth who have sexually offended—especially within a non-Western context. The Good Lives and Self-Regulation Models have often been used to understand and rehabilitate adult sexual offenders, but (unfortunately) there is scant research on youth who sexually offended using these models. The present study aims to describe the different primary goods that are associated with youth sexual offending behaviors in an Asian context. In addition, the study sought to explore whether the age of victim (child vs. nonchild) and nature of sexual offense (penetrative vs. nonpenetrative) influenced the youth’s engagement in offense pathways. The results suggest that pleasure, relatedness, and inner peace were the primary human goods that were most sought after by a sample of 168 youth who sexually offended in Singapore. In addition, offender classification (in relation to the age of victim and nature of sexual offense) influenced the pathways to sexual offending. Therefore, these findings have important clinical implications for assessment, management, and intervention planning for youth who sexually offended. PMID:24048701

  1. A survey of nursing documentation, terminologies and standards in European countries

    PubMed Central

    Thoroddsen, Asta; Ehrenberg, Anna; Sermeus, Walter; Saranto, Kaija

    2012-01-01

    A survey was carried out to describe the current state of art in the use of nursing documentation, terminologies, standards and education. Key informants in European countries were targeted by the Association for Common European Nursing Diagnoses, Interventions and Outcomes (ACENDIO). Replies were received from key informants in 20 European countries. Results show that the nursing process was most often used to structure nursing documentation. Many standardized nursing terminologies were used in Europe with NANDA, NIC, NOC and ICF most frequently used. In 70% of the countries minimum requirements were available for electronic health records (EHR), but nursing not addressed specifically. Standards in use for nursing terminologies and information systems were lacking. The results should be a major concern to the nursing community in Europe. As a European platform, ACENDIO can play a role in enhancing standardization activities, and should develop its role accordingly. PMID:24199130

  2. Integration of Evidence into a Detailed Clinical Model-based Electronic Nursing Record System

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hyeoun-Ae; Jeon, Eunjoo; Chung, Eunja

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to test the feasibility of an electronic nursing record system for perinatal care that is based on detailed clinical models and clinical practice guidelines in perinatal care. Methods This study was carried out in five phases: 1) generating nursing statements using detailed clinical models; 2) identifying the relevant evidence; 3) linking nursing statements with the evidence; 4) developing a prototype electronic nursing record system based on detailed clinical models and clinical practice guidelines; and 5) evaluating the prototype system. Results We first generated 799 nursing statements describing nursing assessments, diagnoses, interventions, and outcomes using entities, attributes, and value sets of detailed clinical models for perinatal care which we developed in a previous study. We then extracted 506 recommendations from nine clinical practice guidelines and created sets of nursing statements to be used for nursing documentation by grouping nursing statements according to these recommendations. Finally, we developed and evaluated a prototype electronic nursing record system that can provide nurses with recommendations for nursing practice and sets of nursing statements based on the recommendations for guiding nursing documentation. Conclusions The prototype system was found to be sufficiently complete, relevant, useful, and applicable in terms of content, and easy to use and useful in terms of system user interface. This study has revealed the feasibility of developing such an ENR system. PMID:22844649

  3. Sexual Functioning in Men Living with a Spinal Cord Injury–A Narrative Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Sunilkumar, MM; Boston, Patricia; Rajagopal, MR

    2015-01-01

    Background: Sexual dysfunction is a major concern for Indian men living with a spinal cord injury Objectives: To examine the literature related to sexuality traumatic cord injury and its impact on sexual functioning. Materials and Methods: Databases using Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) 2000–2012, Medline 1989–2012, Applied Social Sciences Index and Abstracts (ASSIA) 1989–2012 and Google Scholar were the search engines used used for literature review. Results: The search yielded a total of 457 articles and only 75 of them were found relevant. The minimum number of articles required to meet the inclusion criteria for this review was 25–30 articles. Out of the 75 articles, 33 were considered relevant or related to the topic of sexual functioning, spinal cord injury, and paraplegia. Six areas were identified: Sexual stigmatization, physiological barriers to sexual satisfaction, clinical aspects of sexual functioning, biomedical approaches to sexual dysfunction, partner satisfaction, and lack of accessibility to sexual education. Conclusion: Spinal cord injury and sexual functioning affects a large segment of the male Indian population, yet most current research focuses on quantitative measurement with the emphasis on ejaculatory dysfunction, orgasm impairment, incontinence, and other physiological dysfunction. Further research is needed to address the subjective accounts of patients themselves with respect to the emotional and social impact of sexual disability. This would help to identify the best possible outcomes for both treatment and rehabilitation. PMID:26600694

  4. Cancer nursing in Ontario: defining nursing roles.

    PubMed

    Fitch, Margaret I; Mings, Deborah

    2003-01-01

    The delivery of cancer care in Ontario is facing unprecedented challenges. Shortages in nursing, as in all professional disciplines, are having an impact on the delivery of cancer care. Oncology nurses have a major role to play in the delivery of optimum cancer care. Oncology nursing, when adequately defined and supported, can benefit the cancer delivery system, patients, and families. A primary nursing model is seen as being key to the delivery of optimum cancer care. Primary nursing as a philosophy facilitates continuity of care, coordination of a patient's care plan, and a meaningful ongoing relationship with the patient and his/her family. Primary nursing, when delivered in the collaboration of a nurse-physician team, allows for medical resources to be used appropriately. Defined roles enable nurses to manage patients within their scope of practice in collaboration with physicians. Enacting other nursing roles, such as nurse practitioners and advanced practice nurses, can also enable the health care system to manage a broader number of patients with more complex needs. This article presents a position paper originally written as the basis for an advocacy and education initiative in Ontario. It is shared in anticipation that the work may be useful to oncology nurses in other jurisdictions in their efforts to advance oncology nursing and improvement of patient care.

  5. Sexual behaviour and self-reported sexually transmitted diseases (STDs): comparison between White and Chinese American young people.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Wen-Hung; St Lawrence, Janet S

    2006-01-01

    This study examined the sexual behaviour and self-reported incidence of STDs of White and Chinese American young people in a nationally representative US sample. 10,419 White and 340 self-identified Chinese American young people in grade 7 through 12 were selected from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health. Prevalence of sex initiation, ever having casual sex partners, number of lifetime sex partners, age of first sexual intercourse, and history of self-reported STD diagnoses were compared between these two groups. Chinese American young people reported significantly lower rates of sexual intercourse than Whites. Among sexually active young people, Chinese Americans were also less likely to report non-regular sexual partners and to report having a lower number of such sexual partners in the past year. There was no difference in self-reported STDs between the two groups. Ever having been romantically involved, older age, not living in a two-parent household, having more relaxed attitudes about sex, and reported substance use were associated with a higher likelihood of sexual intercourse in both groups. Being native-born was not associated with patterns of sexual behaviour among Chinese Americans.

  6. The sexual responses of sexual sadists.

    PubMed

    Seto, Michael C; Lalumière, Martin L; Harris, Grant T; Chivers, Meredith L

    2012-08-01

    On average, rapists show greater relative genital responses to rape stories than do nonrapists in the laboratory. It has been suggested that this robust group difference is explained by the fact that many rapists are sexually sadistic. It is not clear, however, what the critical cues underlying rapists' genital responses are, because rape stories used in previous research include a mix of sadistic cues of violence and victim injury as well as cues of victim resistance and nonconsent. The present study was conducted to identify the critical cues producing self-identified sadists' sexual responses, and thereby to test sexual sadism as an explanation of rapists' arousal pattern. The present study was also conducted to develop a new phallometric test for sexual sadism for research and clinical applications, given evidence of poor diagnostic reliability and validity. Eighteen self-identified male sadists, 22 men with some sadistic interests who did not meet all of our sadist criteria, and 23 nonsadists (all recruited from the community) were compared in their genital and subjective responses to a new set of stories that disentangle violence/injury cues from resistance/nonconsent cues. The three groups differed in both their genital and subjective responses: using indices of relative responding, sadists responded significantly more to cues of violence/injury than nonsadists and men with some sadistic interests. The group difference for cues of nonconsent was not significant. The results suggest that sexual sadism primarily involves arousal to violence/injury in a sexual context rather than resistance/nonconsent.

  7. A qualitative study of Egyptian school nurses' attitudes and experiences toward sex and relationship education.

    PubMed

    Farrag, Shewikar; Hayter, Mark

    2014-02-01

    School nurses play a vital role in the promotion of sexual health. However, there is very limited evidence of how school nurses experience this topic in an Islamic cultural setting. Using an exploratory qualitative design, 13 in-depth interviews were conducted with Egyptian school nurses. Data were subject to thematic analysis. Four themes emerged from this analysis, "personal issues," "cultural and political dimensions," "parental issues," and "skills and confidence." These themes represented how nurses' views on sex education were tempered by personal and social forces--affecting their practice. Fear of being blamed for creating a permissive culture was a feature of nurses' concerns in this culture. The belief that sex education is morally challenging affected nurses and must be addressed to enable effective sex education to take place. School nurses must contribute actively to this debate and receive governmental support.

  8. Pharmacological effects on sexual function.

    PubMed

    Carey, J Chris

    2006-12-01

    Many drugs may have effects on sexual function. Sexual function is complex and psychological and relationship issues are likely to have greater impacts on sexual function in women than drugs. Although it is important to understand the effects of drugs on sexual function, physicians should use caution in "medicalization" of sexual function in women [106].

  9. What nurses want: the nurse incentives project.

    PubMed

    Wieck, K Lynn; Dols, Jean; Northam, Sally

    2009-01-01

    Today's nurse executives are struggling with leadership challenges of managing the multigenerational workforce, financial imperatives to deliver better care for lower costs, and competition to provide the optimal work environment to retain nurses. The purpose of the Nurse Incentives Project was to determine satisfaction with current employment incentives and potential managerial actions which might decrease or delay turnover by registered nurses. This study spawned recommendations regarding the role of incentives in designing an environment where benefits and perks will be seen as incentives to stay and thrive in the current nursing workplace. The results show that nurses know what they want. Attention to generational priorities and flexible benefits programs may help to create the cohesive work environment that nurses seek. Investment into creating delivery arenas where satisfied nurses are caring for satisfied patients is a worthwhile goal.

  10. Postpartum female sexual function.

    PubMed

    Abdool, Zeelha; Thakar, Ranee; Sultan, Abdul H

    2009-08-01

    Although many women experience sexual problems in the postpartum period, research in this subject is under-explored. Embarrassment and preoccupation with the newborn are some of the reasons why many women do not seek help. Furthermore, there is a lack of professional awareness and expertise and recognition that a prerequisite in the definition of sexual dysfunction is that it must cause distress to the individual (not her partner). Sexual dysfunction is classified as disorders of sexual desire, arousal, orgasm and pain. However, in the postpartum period the most common disorder appears to be that of sexual pain as a consequence of perineal trauma. Health care workers need to be made aware of this silent affliction as sexual morbidity can have a detrimental effect on a women's quality of life impacting on her social, physical and emotional well-being.

  11. Somnambulistic sexual behaviour (sexsomnia).

    PubMed

    Ebrahim, Irshaad Osman

    2006-05-01

    Somnambulism or sleepwalking is a viable defence on the basis of automatism. The behaviours that occur during sleepwalking can be highly complex and include sexual behaviour of all types. Somnambulistic sexual behaviour (also called sexsomnia, sleep sex) is considered a variant of sleepwalking disorder as the overwhelming majority of people with Sexsomnia have a history of parasomnia and a family history of sleepwalking. Sexual behaviour during a sleep automatism can vary from explicit sexual vocalisations, to violent masturbation, to complex sexual acts including anal, oral and vaginal penetration. A recent case in England is reported where the defendant was acquitted on 3 charges of rape on the basis of automatism due to somnambulistic sexual behaviour.

  12. Sexual Conflict in Hermaphrodites

    PubMed Central

    Schärer, Lukas; Janicke, Tim; Ramm, Steven A.

    2015-01-01

    Hermaphrodites combine the male and female sex functions into a single individual, either sequentially or simultaneously. This simple fact means that they exhibit both similarities and differences in the way in which they experience, and respond to, sexual conflict compared to separate-sexed organisms. Here, we focus on clarifying how sexual conflict concepts can be adapted to apply to all anisogamous sexual systems and review unique (or especially important) aspects of sexual conflict in hermaphroditic animals. These include conflicts over the timing of sex change in sequential hermaphrodites, and in simultaneous hermaphrodites, over both sex roles and the postmating manipulation of the sperm recipient by the sperm donor. Extending and applying sexual conflict thinking to hermaphrodites can identify general evolutionary principles and help explain some of the unique reproductive diversity found among animals exhibiting this widespread but to date understudied sexual system. PMID:25237131

  13. Mediators of Sexual Revictimization Risk in Adult Sexual Assault Victims

    PubMed Central

    Ullman, Sarah E.; Vasquez, Amanda L.

    2015-01-01

    This study examined sexual risk behaviors and sexual refusal assertiveness in relationship to child sexual abuse (CSA), emotion dysregulation, and adult sexual revictimization. Path analyses of 1,094 survivors who had sex in the past year were done to examine sexual risk behavior, and sexual refusal assertiveness mediational pathways by which CSA severity and emotion dysregulation may affect revictimization over one year in adult female sexual assault survivors. Exchanging sex for money and sexual refusal assertiveness were significantly associated with emotion dysregulation, whereas exchanging sex for money, and not sexual refusal assertiveness, was only significantly related to CSA severity. Both exchanging sex for money and sex refusal assertiveness mediated the relationship between emotion dysregulation and adult sexual revictimization. Exchanging sex for money mediated the CSA severity-revictimization relationship. These findings demonstrate the importance of considering both risky and protective sexual behaviors in research and prevention programming that address sexual revictimization in women. PMID:25942287

  14. How Is Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Adults Early Detection, Diagnosis, and Types How Is Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia Diagnosed? Certain signs and symptoms can suggest that ... described below. Tests used to diagnose and classify ALL If your doctor thinks you have leukemia, he ...

  15. How Is Heart Valve Disease Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Heart Valve Disease Diagnosed? Your primary care doctor may detect a heart murmur or other signs of heart valve disease. However, a cardiologist usually will diagnose the condition. ...

  16. How Is Deep Vein Thrombosis Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Vein Thrombosis Diagnosed? Your doctor will diagnose deep vein thrombosis (DVT) based on your medical history, a physical exam, and test results. He or she will identify your risk factors and rule out other causes of your symptoms. ...

  17. How Is a Heart Attack Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is a Heart Attack Diagnosed? Your doctor will diagnose a heart attack ... This Content: NEXT >> Featured Video What is a heart attack? 05/22/2014 Describes how a heart attack ...

  18. How Are Obesity and Overweight Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How are obesity & overweight diagnosed? Skip sharing on social media links ... and Blood Institute. (2012). How are overweight and obesity diagnosed? Retrieved August 8, 2012, from http://www. ...

  19. [False allegations of child sexual abuse and paranoid disorder: a report of 2 cases].

    PubMed

    Karanfil, Ramazan; Akçan, Ramazan; Orhan, F Özlem

    2011-01-01

    Allegations of child sexual abuse have considerable consequences for individuals and society. Herein, we report 2 cases of false allegations of child sexual abuse by mothers diagnosed as paranoid disorder. Case 1, a 31-year-old mother accused her husband of sexually abusing her 3 daughters, aged 2, 4, and 6 years. Case 2 is a 30-year-old mother that went to the public prosecutor with allegations of sexual abuse of her 6-year-old daughter by a nursery teacher and a stranger. Examination of both alleged victims did not reveal objective findings of sexual abuse. Based on psychiatric examinations, both mothers were diagnosed with paranoid disorder. Consequently, the public prosecutor decided not to prosecute. Considering the possibility of false allegations in such cases, psychiatric examination of the complainant should be performed in order to provide accurate information necessary for legal proceedings and to protect the child.

  20. Parish nursing: an innovative community nursing service.

    PubMed

    Laming, Eleanor; Stewart, Angela

    2016-07-13

    This article explains the concept of parish nursing and provides a historical perspective of this service. It describes the development of a parish nursing service in Heartsease, Norwich, which complements community nursing practice by focusing on the importance of providing spiritual care alongside physical, psychological and social care. Case studies are provided to illustrate the benefits of a parish nursing service to individuals and the community.

  1. Sexual health and contraception.

    PubMed

    Straw, Fiona; Porter, Charlotte

    2012-10-01

    Sexual health encompasses 'sexual development and reproductive health, as well as the ability to develop and maintain meaningful interpersonal relationships; appreciate one's own body; interact with both genders in respectful and appropriate ways; express affection, love and intimacy in ways consistent with one's own values'. The 2008 WHO Consensus Statement additionally noted that 'responsible adolescent intimate relationships' should be 'consensual, non-exploitative, honest, pleasurable and protected against unintended pregnancy and STDs if any type of intercourse occurs'. Young people (YP) must, therefore, be able to access sexual health information and services that meet their needs. For most YP, interest in sexual activity begins with puberty, and this is associated with increasingly sexualised behaviour, including exploration of themselves and others. Most YP find this a confusing time, and so it is important that health professionals are able to offer advice regarding the wide range of sexual health issues, including sexuality, choice of partner, contraception, risk and management of sexually transmitted infections (STI) in a confident and approachable manner. YP have never had so much choice or information available to them, and this can be confusing for them. There is good evidence that YP who get information from their parents are likely to initiate sexual activity later than their peers who access information from their friends. However, there is also evidence that some YP would prefer to get sexual health information from health professionals. It is therefore imperative that all health professionals who see YP have an awareness of sexual health issues, and know where to signpost YP should they need more specialist sexual health advice and/or treatment. Where appropriate, one-to-one sexual health advice should be provided to YP on how to prevent and get tested for STIs, and how to prevent unwanted pregnancies. Advice should also be given on all methods

  2. [Depressive symptoms and sexuality].

    PubMed

    Porto, Robert

    2014-10-01

    The mutually reinforcing dyad of depressive symptoms and erectile dysfunction is scientifically established. The cure of depression improves sexual dysfunction (SD) and the treatment of SD induces improvement of depression. Most of anti-depressants induce negative sexual side effects that lead to non-compliance of these treatments. The knowledge of interrelation between depression, anti-depressants and sexuality is of great importance in clinical practice.

  3. Evolution and human sexuality.

    PubMed

    Gray, Peter B

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this review is to put core features of human sexuality in an evolutionary light. Toward that end, I address five topics concerning the evolution of human sexuality. First, I address theoretical foundations, including recent critiques and developments. While much traces back to Darwin and his view of sexual selection, more recent work helps refine the theoretical bases to sex differences and life history allocations to mating effort. Second, I consider central models attempting to specify the phylogenetic details regarding how hominin sexuality might have changed, with most of those models honing in on transitions from a possible chimpanzee-like ancestor to the slightly polygynous and long-term bonded sociosexual partnerships observed among most recently studied hunter-gatherers. Third, I address recent genetic and physiological data contributing to a refined understanding of human sexuality. As examples, the availability of rapidly increasing genomic information aids comparative approaches to discern signals of selection in sexuality-related phenotypes, and neuroendocrine studies of human responses to sexual stimuli provide insight into homologous and derived mechanisms. Fourth, I consider some of the most recent, large, and rigorous studies of human sexuality. These provide insights into sexual behavior across other national samples and on the Internet. Fifth, I discuss the relevance of a life course perspective to understanding the evolution of human sexuality. Most research on the evolution of human sexuality focuses on young adults. Yet humans are sexual beings from gestation to death, albeit in different ways across the life course, and in ways that can be theoretically couched within life history theory.

  4. Preventing Sexually Transmitted Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Kieren, Dianne; Cumming, Ceinwen E.; Cumming, David C.

    1992-01-01

    The discouraging results of early efforts to educate the public about sexually transmitted diseases indicated that the goals of STD preventive action must be longer term and must change attitudes and behaviour as well as educate. They must also avoid an ostrich mentality about the sexual involvement of young people. This article examines more recent approaches to teaching about sexuality in general and STD prevention in particular. PMID:21221351

  5. [Sexuality among infertile couples].

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Díaz, Jorge Alberto

    2007-01-01

    A monographic type, bibliographic and hemerographic study on the sexuality in couples with fertility problems is presented. The study is based on the Rubio Aurioles' model of human sexuality, and the four holones (reproductivity, eroticism, affective bonds, gender) in couples with fertility problems are described. A review of clinical studies on the prevailing sexuality in this kind of couples and some theoretical reflections are also presented.

  6. Nursing Jobs in Nursing Homes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Torpey, Elka Maria

    2011-01-01

    The need for practical nurses who focus on caring for older people is growing. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the number of people ages 65 and older is expected to increase from 40 million to 72 million between 2010 and 2030. And the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) projects that this increasing population will result in job growth for…

  7. Sex and Relationships Education in Schools--Evaluation of a Pilot Programme for the Certification of Community Nurses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chalmers, Helen; Tyrer, Paul; Aggleton, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Objective: In support of the UK Government's teenage pregnancy and sexual health strategies, a certificated programme of professional development for school nurses and other community nurses was developed to provide support for personal, social and health education (PSHE) work, including sex and relationships education (SRE), for young people.…

  8. Assessment of nursing care using indicators generated by software1

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Ana Paula Souza; Chianca, Tânia Couto Machado; Tannure, Meire Chucre

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: to analyze the efficacy of the Nursing Process in an Intensive Care Unit using indicators generated by software. METHOD: cross-sectional study using data collected for four months. RNs and students daily registered patients, took history (at admission), performed physical assessments, and established nursing diagnoses, nursing plans/prescriptions, and assessed care delivered to 17 patients using software. Indicators concerning the incidence and prevalence of nursing diagnoses, rate of effectiveness, risk diagnoses, and rate of effective prevention of complications were computed. RESULTS: the Risk for imbalanced body temperature was the most frequent diagnosis (23.53%), while the least frequent was Risk for constipation (0%). The Risk for Impaired skin integrity was prevalent in 100% of the patients, while Risk for acute confusion was the least prevalent (11.76%). Risk for constipation and Risk for impaired skin integrity obtained a rate of risk diagnostic effectiveness of 100%. The rate of effective prevention of acute confusion and falls was 100%. CONCLUSION: the efficacy of the Nursing Process using indicators was analyzed because these indicators reveal how nurses have identified patients' risks and conditions, and planned care in a systematized manner. PMID:26039293

  9. About Military Sexual Trauma

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

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  10. Sexual orientation disparities in sexually transmitted infections: examining the intersection between sexual identity and sexual behavior.

    PubMed

    Everett, Bethany G

    2013-02-01

    The terms MSM (men who have sex with men) and WSW (women who have sex with women) have been used with increasing frequency in the public health literature to examine sexual orientation disparities in sexual health. These categories, however, do not allow researchers to examine potential differences in sexually transmitted infection (STI) risk by sexual orientation identity. Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Adolescent Health, this study investigated the relationship between self-reported STIs and both sexual orientation identity and sexual behaviors. Additionally, this study examined the mediating role of victimization and STI risk behaviors on the relationship between sexual orientation and self-reported STIs. STI risk was found to be elevated among heterosexual-WSW and bisexual women, whether they reported same-sex partners or not, whereas gay-identified WSW were less likely to report an STI compared to heterosexual women with opposite sex relationships only. Among males, heterosexual-identified MSM did not have a greater likelihood of reporting an STI diagnosis; rather, STI risk was concentrated among gay and bisexual identified men who reported both male and female sexual partners. STI risk behaviors mediated the STI disparities among both males and females, and victimization partially mediated STI disparities among female participants. These results suggest that relying solely on behavior-based categories, such as MSM and WSW, may mischaracterize STI disparities by sexual orientation.

  11. ISO reference terminology models for nursing: applicability for natural language processing of nursing narratives.

    PubMed

    Bakken, Suzanne; Hyun, Sookyung; Friedman, Carol; Johnson, Stephen B

    2005-08-01

    Natural language processing (NLP) systems have demonstrated utility in parsing narrative texts for purposes such as surveillance and decision support. However, there has been little work related to NLP of nursing narratives. The purpose of this study was to compare the semantic categories of a NLP system (Medical Language Extraction and Encoding [MedLEE] system) with the semantic domains, categories, and attributes of the International Standards Organization (ISO) reference terminology models for nursing diagnoses and nursing actions. All but two MedLEE diagnosis and procedure-related semantic categories mapped to ISO models. In some instances, we found exact correspondence between the semantic structures of MedLEE and the ISO models. In other situations (e.g. aspects of Site or Location), the ISO model was not as granular as MedLEE. For clinical procedure and non-invasive examination, two ISO nursing action model components (Action and Target) mapped to a single MedLEE semantic category. The ISO models are applicable to NLP of nursing narratives. However, the ISO models require additional specification of selected semantic categories for the abstract semantic domains in order to achieve the objective of using NLP to parse and encode data from nursing narratives. Our analysis also suggests areas for extension of MedLEE particularly in regard to represent nursing actions.

  12. Methods of diagnosing alagille syndrome

    DOEpatents

    Li, Linheng; Hood, Leroy; Krantz, Ian D.; Spinner, Nancy B.

    2004-03-09

    The present invention provides an isolated polypeptide exhibiting substantially the same amino acid sequence as JAGGED, or an active fragment thereof, provided that the polypeptide does not have the amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO:5 or SEQ ID NO:6. The invention further provides an isolated nucleic acid molecule containing a nucleotide sequence encoding substantially the same amino acid sequence as JAGGED, or an active fragment thereof, provided that the nucleotide sequence does not encode the amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO:5 or SEQ ID NO:6. Also provided herein is a method of inhibiting differentiation of hematopoietic progenitor cells by contacting the progenitor cells with an isolated JAGGED polypeptide, or active fragment thereof. The invention additionally provides a method of diagnosing Alagille Syndrome in an individual. The method consists of detecting an Alagille Syndrome disease-associated mutation linked to a JAGGED locus.

  13. Emergence of Burkholderia cepacia in Honolulu: A Case of Nursing Home-acquired B. cepacia sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Charles NC

    2013-01-01

    Burkholderia cepacia has rarely been reported in Honolulu. Its emergence as a nursing home-acquired pathogen with high mortality rate is concerning. This case report describes a local nursing home patient who was diagnosed with B. cepacia sepsis in 2012. PMID:24069571

  14. RN's experiences of sex-based and sexual harassment--an empirical study.

    PubMed

    Madison, J

    1997-01-01

    A survey of 317 registered nurses enrolled in tertiary post-registration courses found that two thirds of the 197 respondents had encountered sexual harassment in the work place. A quarter of these nurses identified medical officers and 22.1% identified co-workers as their harassers.This paper identifies the harassing behaviours the respondents experienced, their responses to the behaviour and the effects the harassment had on them.

  15. Early sex initiation and subsequent unsafe sexual behaviors and sex-related risks among female undergraduates in Wuhan, China.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiantao; Li, Shiyue; Yan, Hong; Xu, Delong; Xiao, Han; Cao, Yue; Mao, Zongfu

    2015-03-01

    This study aims to explore the association between early sex initiation and subsequent unsafe sexual behaviors and risks among Chinese female undergraduates. Of 4769 participants, 863 (18.1%) reported ever having sexual intercourse. The mean age of sexual debut was 19.3 (±1.7) years. Females initiating sex earlier were more likely to have first sex with men who were not their "boyfriends" and less likely to take contraception, to use a condom at first encounter, to use contraception consistently in past year, and/or to use condom consistently during the course of a sexual intercourse. They were more likely to have multiple lifetime and concurrent sexual partners, to report pregnancy, and be diagnosed with sexually transmitted diseases. Comprehensive early sex education should be advocated for young people, not only teaching knowledge of physical health but also providing practical skills training for making them consciously delay start of sexual activity or protecting themselves during sexual intercourse.

  16. Written information material and availability of sexual health care for men experiencing sexual dysfunction after prostate cancer treatment: An evaluation of Dutch urology and radiotherapy departments.

    PubMed

    Grondhuis Palacios, L A; Krouwel, E M; Duijn, M; den Oudsten, B L; den Ouden, M E M; Putter, H; Pelger, R C M; Elzevier, H W

    2017-03-01

    Objective was to investigate content of written information material and availability of sexual health care for men experiencing sexual dysfunction (SD) after prostate cancer treatment. A cross-sectional survey was conducted among Dutch urology and radiotherapy departments to evaluate information materials and availability of sexual health care. Out of 71 eligible departments, 34 urology and 15 radiotherapy departments participated in the survey (response rate 69.0%). Fifty-nine brochures corresponding to 31 urology and 11 radiotherapy departments were analysed. In 88.1% of collected information material, sexual health was mentioned. Regarding extensiveness, 20.4% of the brochures contained extensive information, 50.8% moderate amount of information and 28.8% contained little or no information. Urology departments provided pre-treatment nurse consultations more often than radiotherapy departments. Sexual counselling was more frequently provided by urology departments. Urology departments were more aware of adequate referral possibilities. Information material provided by Dutch urology and radiotherapy departments does not address treatment-related SD routinely. Sexual health care is not available everywhere for men experiencing SD. Applying a standard regarding content of sexual health in information material is recommended as well as improved awareness of referral possibilities and enhanced provision of pre-treatment nurse consultations for men experiencing SD after prostate cancer treatment.

  17. Attention bias for sexual words in female sexual dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Beard, Courtney; Amir, Nader

    2010-01-01

    Cognitive models suggest that attention processes maintain sexual dysfunction. However, few published studies have examined attention bias, and even fewer have studied female participants with sexual dysfunction. Using the Female Sexual Function Index, the authors classified undergraduates as experiencing sexual dysfunction (n = 28) or not (n = 28). The authors assessed whether participants showed attention bias for sexual words using a modified dot-probe task. As expected, female participants with sexual dysfunction showed an attention bias to sexual words, whereas control participants did not. The authors discuss implications for models of sexual dysfunction and clinical intervention.

  18. Sexual minority women's interactions with breast cancer providers.

    PubMed

    Boehmer, Ulrike; Case, Patricia

    2006-01-01

    Good patient-physician relationships and communication lead to better patient health and more satisfied patients. So far, satisfaction of sexual minority (lesbian, bisexual or women who partner with women) cancer patient-physician interactions is unknown. This study describes sexual minorities' experiences with their treating physicians and which provider attitudes were perceived as positive or negative. We conducted separate individual interviews with 39 sexual minority women diagnosed with breast cancer. All interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed and then analyzed from a Grounded Theory perspective. Participants' narratives indicated that satisfaction is connected with a certain style of patient-physician interactions rather than physician gender. Specific provider traits in the two domains of (1) inter-personal behaviors and (2) medical expertise and decision-making determined patient satisfaction. These findings suggest that physicians of either gender can develop the skills needed to improve quality of breast cancer care for sexual minority women.

  19. Nursing's Image on Campus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woolley, Alma S.

    1981-01-01

    In studying the nurse's image at a liberal arts college, it was found that faculty and administrators view nurses as long-suffering drones. On the whole, the image of nursing was positive, with those who had the most contact with the nursing program having a more enlightened image. (CT)

  20. Nurses' Attitudes towards Alcoholics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Speer, Rita D.

    Nurses' attitudes toward the alcoholic can have a profound impact on the person suffering from alcoholism. These attitudes can affect the alcoholic's care and even whether the alcoholic chooses to recover. This study investigated attitudes of approximately 68 nurses employed in hospitals, 49 nurses in treatment facilities, 58 nursing students, and…

  1. Nursing Advocacy in a Post-Genomic Age

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, Rebekah

    2009-01-01

    Synopsis The Human Genome Project will change how health is defined and how disease is prevented, diagnosed and treated. As the largest group of health care providers in contact with patients nurses need to be competent in the science of genetics. Beyond this nurses need to understand the complexities that arise in genomic health care. Ethical, legal and social issues are integral to the delivery of genomic health care and nurses must have an astute understanding of such complexities. What it means to know, to reason and to act in this post-genomic age is explored. PMID:19850180

  2. Management of sexual dysfunctions in women.

    PubMed

    Ghizzani, A; Razzi, S; Fava, A; Sartini, A; Picucci, K; Petraglia, F

    2003-01-01

    The deeper understanding of female physiology changed the perspective used to evaluate sexual difficulties. Systems like: vascular, neurological, biochemical, and endocrine are investigated as their modifications for aging or medical conditions may alter the sexual responsivity of women. New data imply that pharmacological interventions may become suitable for women. Gonadal steroids influence mood, wellbeing, and genital physiology but evidence of actions is controversial. Hormone imbalance provokes symptoms that may also derive from other conditions. Clinicians must exclude dismetabolism, depression and family crisis before diagnosing gonadal problems. The female androgen insufficiency syndrome was defined in July 2001 as altered mood, memory and wellbeing, and loss of desire. Estrogen maintains wellbeing and healthy genitals, influencing mood and sexuality. Progesterone provokes tension and nervousness, causing premenstrual syndrome. Hormone replacement is indicated in the treatment of endocrine deficiency. In research projects women receiving one preparation containing androgen reported improvement of mood, and arousal. Sildenafil cures approximately 25% of sexually dysfunctional, menopausal patients; being more effective with hormone replacement therapy (HRT) and consistently active against the block of antidepressants on orgasm. Added to psychiatric regimens, sildenafil ameliorates excitement. Sex therapy helps patients change behavior, overcome anger, communicate needs and redefine sex. We strongly believe that such crucial aspects must be addressed in therapy, even when the etiology is organic.

  3. [Behavioral approach to sexual dysfunctions].

    PubMed

    Gellman, C

    1983-01-01

    The basic principles of those behaviourist approaches are: - Treatment of the couple, no matter which partner is apparently "responsible" for the sexual problem, and mutual involvement of both partners. - Sexual information and education regarding the cycle of sexual response, anatomy, biology, and sexual techniques. - Changing negative attitudes vis-à-vis sexuality. - Elimination of sexual anxieties. - Improvement of verbal and corporal communication within the couple. - Learning to know oneself and others better--Initiation to psychological attention and observation.

  4. Measuring Nursing Care Value.

    PubMed

    Welton, John M; Harper, Ellen M

    2016-01-01

    The value of nursing care as well as the contribution of individual nurses to clinical outcomes has been difficult to measure and evaluate. Existing health care financial models hide the contribution of nurses; therefore, the link between the cost and quality o nursing care is unknown. New data and methods are needed to articulate the added value of nurses to patient care. The final results and recommendations of an expert workgroup tasked with defining and measuring nursing care value, including a data model to allow extraction of key information from electronic health records to measure nursing care value, are described. A set of new analytic metrics are proposed.

  5. [Critical thinking skills in the nursing diagnosis process].

    PubMed

    Bittencourt, Greicy Kelly Gouveia Dias; Crossetti, Maria da Graça Oliveira

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the critical thinking skills utilized in the nursing diagnosis process. This was an exploratory descriptive study conducted with seven nursing students on the application of a clinical case to identify critical thinking skills, as well as their justifications in the nursing diagnosis process. Content analysis was performed to evaluate descriptive data. Six participants reported that analysis, scientific and technical knowledge and logical reasoning skills are important in identifying priority nursing diagnoses; clinical experience was cited by five participants, knowledge about the patient and application of standards were mentioned by three participants; Furthermore, discernment and contextual perspective were skills noted by two participants. Based on these results, the use of critical thinking skills related to the steps of the nursing diagnosis process was observed. Therefore, that the application of this process may constitute a strategy that enables the development of critical thinking skills.

  6. The Nursing Research Center on HIV/AIDS Health Disparities.

    PubMed

    Holzemer, William L; Méndez, Marta Rivero; Portillo, Carmen; Padilla, Geraldine; Cuca, Yvette; Vargas-Molina, Ricardo L

    2004-01-01

    This report describes the partnership between the schools of nursing at the University of California San Francisco and the University of Puerto Rico to address the need for nursing research on HIV/AIDS health disparities. The partnership led to the creation of the Nursing Research Center on HIV/AIDS Health Disparities with funding from the National Institutes of Health/National Institute of Nursing Research. We provide background information on the disproportionate impact of the HIV/AIDS epidemic on racial and ethnic minorities, describe the major predictors of health disparities in persons at risk for or diagnosed with HIV/AIDS using the Outcomes Model for Health Care Research, and outline the major components of the Nursing Research Center. The center's goal is to improve health outcomes for people living with and affected by HIV/AIDS by enhancing the knowledge base for HIV/AIDS care.

  7. Sport and male sexuality.

    PubMed

    Sgrò, P; Di Luigi, L

    2017-03-22

    The relationships between sport and sexuality in males are of great social and clinical interest, because of sports and motor activities that highly promote social and sexual relationships. Even if few literature exist, two main questions should be taken into account: whether and how physical exercise and sport positively or negatively influence sexual health and behavior and/or whether and how sexual behavior may affect a sub-sequent sport performance. Physical exercise and sport per se can influence, positively or negatively, the hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular axis function and, consequently, the individual's reproductive and/or sexual health. This depends on individual factors such as genetic and epigenetic ones and on different variables involved in the practice of sport activities (type of sport, intensity and duration of training, doping and drug use and abuse, nutrition, supplements, psychological stress, allostatic load, etc.). If well conducted, motor and sport activities could have beneficial effects on sexual health in males. Among different lifestyle changes, influencing sexual health, regular physical activity is fundamental to antagonize the onset of erectile dysfunction (ED). However, competitive sport can lead both reproductive and/or sexual tract damages and dysfunctions, transient (genital pain, hypoesthesia of the genitalia, hypogonadism, DE, altered sexual drive, etc.) or permanent (hypogonadism, DE, etc.), by acting directly (traumas of the external genitalia, saddle-related disorders in cyclists, etc.) or indirectly (exercise-related hypogonadism, drug abuse, doping, stress, etc.). Sexual activities shortly performed before a sport competition could differently influence sport performance. Due to the few existing data, it is advisable to avoid an absolute pre-competition sexual abstinence.

  8. Effects of sexuality on lesbians' experiences of depression.

    PubMed

    Barnard, Amy G

    2005-10-01

    1. Lesbians are members of every racial, ethnic, and socioeconomic group. 2. Very little is known about depression in lesbians, and thus far, study findings are conflicting. However, depression in lesbians seems to be underpinned by relationship issues and levels of social support. 3. Caring for lesbian clients requires nurses to think holistically, understand their clients' sexuality within the context of their life experiences, and demonstrate respect and acceptance.

  9. [Introduction to nursing aesthetics].

    PubMed

    Chen, Chen-Jung; Tsai, Chuan-Hsiu; Chen, Yi-Chang

    2011-04-01

    Empirical, aesthetic, ethical, and personal knowing are the four fundamental patterns of knowledge inquiry. Of these, the aesthetic knowing pattern is least discussed in nursing literature. This article discusses the definition of nursing aesthetics; its utilization in practice; and correlations between aesthetics and clinical practice. One of the advantages inherent to nursing is its ability to deliver skillful care directly to patients. Skillful performance is essential to reduce discrepancies between goals and patterns. Aesthetic nursing addresses more than the form of nursing. It further addresses the crucial elements of nursing knowledge. The science of nursing is influential in its ability to attain harmony among abundant empiric content, power of beneficence, and pleasure of aesthetic experience. In clinical practice, nurses can employ aesthetic nursing through various channels to create meaning and promote the professional image of nurses. Concepts listed in this article may be utilized in clinical supervision, practice and education.

  10. Advanced urology nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Crowe, Helen

    2014-03-01

    Urology nursing has developed as a specialty over the past few decades in response to several factors, workload demands being a prime reason. Nurses are taking on additional roles and activities including procedures such as cystoscopy and prostate biopsy, and running nurse-led clinics for a variety of urological conditions. Audits of advanced urological nursing practice have shown this care to be of a high standard and investigative procedures performed by these nurses match the diagnostic quality of existing services. Professional urological nursing organizations support the professional needs of these nurses, but the provision of education and training for advanced practice activities remains an unaddressed need. A range of confusing advanced urology nursing titles exists, and uncertainty regarding the roles and scope of practice for these nurses remains a concern. Acceptance and support from medical colleagues is required for the success of advanced urological nursing practice, but opinions on these roles remain divided.

  11. Sexual behavior and responsiveness to sexual stimuli following laboratory-induced sexual arousal.

    PubMed

    Both, Stephanie; Spiering, Mark; Everaerd, Walter; Laan, Ellen

    2004-08-01

    Sexual excitement can be seen as an action disposition. In this study sexual arousal was expected to generate sexual action and to increase interest and responsiveness to sexual stimuli. In two experiments, male and female participants were exposed to a neutral or a sexual film. We measured genital and subjective responses to the film, and sexual behavior following the laboratory visit. In Experiment 2, film exposure was followed by a task in which participants rated the sexual arousability of neutral and sexual pictures. Rating time of the sexual pictures served as an index for sexual interest. Responsiveness to the sexual pictures was measured by modulation of spinal tendinous (T) reflexes. Sexual activity, but not sexual desire, was higher for participants in the sexual film condition than for participants in the neutral condition. Sexual interest and responsiveness to still pictures were not higher for participants in the sexual film condition than for those in the neutral film condition. In addition, men who saw the neutral film showed a greater responsiveness to still pictures than men who saw the sexual film. The results support the view of sexual arousal as an emotional state generating action tendencies and actual sexual behavior.

  12. Bisexual Invisibility and the Sexual Health Needs of Adolescent Girls

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Celia B.; Macapagal, Kathryn; Mustanski, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Purpose: The purpose of this study was to analyze bisexual female youth perspectives on their experiences accessing sexual health information and services provided by a doctor, nurse, or counselor. Specifically, we sought to: (1) understand how youth perceptions of providers' attitudes and behaviors affect their seeking and obtaining sexual health information and services; (2) examine how social stigmas within the family context might be associated with barriers to sexual health information and services; and (3) assess school-based sources of sexual health information. Method: We utilized a mixed-method study design. Data from bisexual female youth were collected through an online questionnaire and asynchronous online focus groups addressing lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender health and HIV prevention. Data were analyzed with descriptive statistics and thematic analysis. Results: Barriers to sexual healthcare included judgmental attitudes and assumptions of patient heterosexuality among healthcare providers, and missed opportunities for HIV and sexually transmitted infections (STI) testing. Bisexual stigma within families was associated with restricted youth openness with providers, suggesting fear of disclosure to parent or guardian. School-based sexual health education was limited by a restrictive focus on abstinence and condoms and the exclusion of STI risk information relevant to sex between women. Conclusion: We recommend that practitioners integrate nonjudgmental questions regarding bisexuality into standard contraceptive and sexual health practices involving female youth, including discussion of HIV and STI risk reduction methods. Further support for bisexual health among adolescent girls can come through addressing stigmas of female bisexuality, increasing sensitivity to privacy while engaging parents, and expanding the reach of school-based sexual health education. PMID:27604053

  13. Levels of empathy in undergraduate nursing students.

    PubMed

    McKenna, Lisa; Boyle, Malcolm; Brown, Ted; Williams, Brett; Molloy, Andrew; Lewis, Belinda; Molloy, Liz

    2012-06-01

    Empathy and absence of prejudice and stigma are instrumental in facilitating effective nurse-patient relations. This study assessed empathy levels and regard for specific medical conditions in undergraduate nursing students. A cross-sectional study was undertaken using paper-based versions of the Jefferson Scale of Physician Empathy (JSPE) and Medical Condition Regard Scale (MCRS), along with a brief set of demographic questions. Participants reported good empathy levels on JSPE. Attitudes towards intellectual disability, chronic pain, acute mental illness and terminal illness rated well on MCRS. Attitudes towards substance abuse, however, were lower. There were no significant differences between age groups, gender or year level of study. Overall results of this study were positive. Nursing students demonstrated acceptable empathy levels. Attitudes towards patients who abuse substances highlight an area that needs both further exploration and addressing. Attitudes towards mental health diagnoses were particularly favourable given that these often attract stigma and negative attitudes.

  14. Nursing Home Registered Nurses' and Licensed Practical Nurses' Knowledge of Causes of Falls.

    PubMed

    Gray-Miceli, Deanna; de Cordova, Pamela B; Crane, Giles L; Quigley, Patricia; Ratcliffe, Sarah J

    2016-01-01

    Reducing falls in nursing homes requires a knowledgeable nursing workforce. To test knowledge, 8 validated vignettes representing multifactorial fall causes were administered to 47 nurses from 3 nursing homes. Although licensed practical nurses scored higher than registered nurses in individual categories of falls, when we computed the average score of all 8 categories between groups of registered nurses and licensed practical nurses, registered nurses scored higher (F = 4.106; P < .05) in identifying 8 causal reasons for older adults to fall.

  15. Nursing in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Baumann, Steven L

    2006-10-01

    The current discussion on the nursing shortage needs to focus as much on nursing job satisfaction and retention as on nursing recruitment and education. Selected aspects of the motivational psychology of Abraham Maslow, Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi, and Frederick Hertzberg are here discussed in light of the challenges-opportunities of nursing in Turkey and elsewhere. Also discussed is an innovative program to support the application of nursing theory and professional development in Toronto, Canada.

  16. Diagnosing and treating urinary tract infections in older people.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Kirsty

    2015-05-01

    Even though diagnosing and treating urinary tract infections (UTIs) in older people can be difficult, it is essential to prevent reduction in the patients' wellbeing. Near-patient testing can be useful, but guidelines on this discuss the use of urine dipstick testing and laboratory culture in some detail. In addition, there are significant differences in the management of males and females, those with recurrent infections, and those with catheters. Community nurses are well placed to assess and manage this common condition, implementing correct treatment and resolution, owing to the close relationships they cultivate with service users. This article discusses the diagnosis and management of UTIs in older people, highlighting the differentials and red flags that need to be addressed urgently.

  17. Sexuality after a cancer diagnosis: A population‐based study

    PubMed Central

    Wardle, Jane; Steptoe, Andrew; Fisher, Abigail

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND This study explored differences in sexual activity, function, and concerns between cancer survivors and cancer‐free controls in a population‐based study. METHODS The data were from 2982 men and 3708 women who were 50 years old or older and were participating in the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing. Sexual well‐being was assessed with the Sexual Relationships and Activities Questionnaire, and cancer diagnoses were self‐reported. RESULTS There were no differences between cancer survivors and controls in levels of sexual activity (76.0% vs 78.5% for men and 58.2% vs 55.5% for women) or sexual function. Men and women with cancer diagnoses were more dissatisfied with their sex lives than controls (age‐adjusted percentages: 30.9% vs 19.8% for men [P = .023] and 18.2% vs 11.8% for women [P = .034]), and women with cancer were more concerned about levels of sexual desire (10.2% vs 7.1%; P = .006). Women diagnosed < 5 years ago were more likely to report difficulty with becoming aroused (55.4% vs 31.8%; P = .016) and achieving orgasm (60.6% vs 28.3%; P < .001) and were more concerned about sexual desire (14.8% vs 7.1%; P = .007) and orgasmic experience (17.6% vs 7.1%; P = .042) than controls, but there were no differences in men. CONCLUSIONS Self‐reports of sexual activity and functioning in older people with cancer are broadly comparable to age‐matched, cancer‐free controls. There is a need to identify the causes of sexual dissatisfaction among long‐term cancer survivors despite apparently normal levels of sexual activity and function for their age. The development of interventions addressing low sexual desire and problems with sexual functioning in women is also important and may be particularly relevant for cancer survivors after treatment. Cancer 2016;122:3883–3891. © 2016 American Cancer Society. PMID:27531631

  18. District nurses prescribing as nurse independent prescribers.

    PubMed

    Downer, Frances; Shepherd, Chew Kim

    2010-07-01

    Nurse prescribing has been established in the UK since 1994, however, limited focus has been placed on the experiences of district nurses adopting this additional role. This phenomenological study explores the experiences of district nurses prescribing as nurse independent prescribers across the West of Scotland. A qualitative Heideggarian approach examined the every-day experiences of independent prescribing among district nurses. A purposive sample was used and data collected using audio taped one-to-one informal interviews. The data was analysed thematically using Colaizzi's seven procedural steps. Overall these nurses reported that nurse prescribing was a predominantly positive experience. Participants identified improvements in patient care, job satisfaction, level of autonomy and role development. However, some of the participants indicated that issues such as support, record keeping, confidence and ongoing education are all major influences on prescribing practices.

  19. Acts of caring: nurses caring for nurses.

    PubMed

    Longo, Joy

    2011-01-01

    Caring behaviors displayed toward nurses by nurse managers and nurse peers play a significant role in establishing relationships that promote a healthy work environment. A qualitative study was done to identify behaviors perceived to be caring toward nurses. The theoretical background used for the study was Nursing as Caring by Boykin and Schoenhofer. Data were collected from focus groups consisting of registered nurses currently employed in the practice setting. Content analysis was used for the analysis. The overarching category that was identified was tending to a caring environment. The following emergent categories were also found: caring through helping and supporting, caring through appreciating, and acknowledging unappreciated caring. The findings suggest that nurses demonstrate caring behaviors toward their colleagues by coming to know them on both a professional and a personal level. These behaviors form the foundation for an environment that supports a consistent demonstration of caring.

  20. Diagnoses, labels and stereotypes: Supporting children with intellectual disabilities in the hospital.

    PubMed

    Aston, Megan; Breau, Lynn; MacLeod, Emily

    2014-12-01

    Children with intellectual disabilities (IDs) and their parents continue to experience stigma within health-care systems. Whilst some research studies have examined the stigma associated with children who have IDs, there continues to be a gap in understanding how the experiences of these children, their parents and nurses have been constructed personally, socially and institutionally. Face-to-face semi-structured interviews were conducted with 17 mothers, 12 nurses and 8 children. Feminist post-structuralism and discourse analysis were used to examine the experiences of children, parents and nurses with the intent of understanding the dominant taken-for-granted everyday practices as well as hidden or marginalized practices. Four main themes emerged, which included the theme of Diagnoses, Labels and Stereotypes, which will be discussed in this article. Participants provided rich detail about their experiences in the hospital and how they addressed and often attempted to challenge the stigma associated with children with IDs.

  1. Teaching Sexuality through Media

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cragin, Becca

    2015-01-01

    A central project of feminism has been raising awareness of the role cultural formations of sexuality play in women's inequality (Ritzenhoff and Hermes). Feminists who regularly include discussions of sexuality in their teaching are familiar with the pedagogical challenges of the subject as well as its importance. This article is intended for…

  2. Literacy and Sexual Identity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moje, Elizabeth Birr; MuQaribu, Mudhillun

    2003-01-01

    Calls for more attention to literacy teaching practices and teacher education that acknowledge sexual identity and orientation as key aspects of youth identity development. Discusses experience-based pedagogy and classroom interactions around sexual identities and texts. Notes the need for research and scholarship in the field of literacy and…

  3. Sexual Addiction: Diagnostic Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giugliano, John R.

    2009-01-01

    In recent years clinicians report a great deal of concern about definition, diagnostic assessment, and treatment modalities when dealing with what might be called out-of-control sexual behavior. Many terms have been used to describe the phenomenon of problematic sexual behavior. Many of these concepts overlap, some are no longer popular, and some…

  4. Sexual Behavior of Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagner, Hilmar

    1978-01-01

    Confined to discussion of heterosexual activities, this article examines adolescent sexual behavior in terms of promiscuity; the search for a sexual behavior code; the impact of the media; and the influence of peer groups, religious identification, and the adult double standard. (JC)

  5. Sexuality Sensitive Schooling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCaughtry, Nate; Dillon, Suzanna; Jones, Elizabeth; Smigell, Sara

    2005-01-01

    American schools, especially their physical education and sport programs, provide some of the most hostile social geographies in all of society for gay youth. With the aim of transforming schools toward more democratic and sexuality sensitive institutions, this paper reviews the literature on sexuality and education. In the review, three themes,…

  6. [Female sexual dysfunction].

    PubMed

    Luria, Mijal

    2009-09-01

    Female sexual problems are common, frequently overlooked and have a significant impact on the lives of women. Research in the last decade has brought to the understanding and recognition of a number of standpoints, mainly the broad range of normative function. In 2003, the American Urological Association Foundation convened an international committee of experts in the field of women's sexuality, to reconsider the existing definitions of women's sexual dysfunction. Based on the circular response cycle developed by Basson, the group emphasized motivations that might move a woman from being sexually "neutral" to making a decision to be sexual with her partner, as a normative alternative to the need for spontaneous sexual desire as the trigger for sexual behavior. Etiology may stem from medical as well as psychological factors, thus assessment must include a complete evaluation. Treatment includes psycho-education, improvement of interpersonal communication, cognitive behavioral treatment and elucidation and treatment of medical problems, if necessary. Several pharmacological treatments are under investigation, with modest results and uncertainties about their long term safety. This review presents the female sexual response as it is understood today and the current diagnostic and therapeutic understandings and directions.

  7. Hypoactive Sexual Desire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaplan, Helen S.

    1977-01-01

    Low-libido disorders are highly prevalent, may be extremely distressful to patients and their partners, and influence the course and prognosis of therapy. This paper focuses on this important aspect of human sexuality. Some clinical features of hypoactive sexual desire are described, and some hypotheses about etiology and prognosis are presented.…

  8. Sexual Victimization of Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Small, Kevonne; Zweig, Janine M.

    2007-01-01

    An estimated 7.0% to 8.1% of American youth report being sexually victimized at some point in their life time. This article presents a background to youth sexual victimization, focusing on prevalence data, challenging issues when studying this problem, risk factors, and common characteristics of perpetrators. Additionally, a type of sexual…

  9. Sexually Transmitted Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... 866-284-4107 (TDD: 800-877-8339) American Sexual Health Association Phone Number: 800-227-8922 Planned Parenthood ... 866-284-4107 (TDD: 800-877-8339) American Sexual Health Association Phone Number: 800-227-8922 Planned Parenthood ...

  10. Sexual Reproduction and Breeding

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In the second edition of Plant Propagation Concepts and Laboratory Exercises, we have combined the first edition chapters 36: Sexual Reproduction in Angiosperms and 37: Breeding Horticultural Plants into the present single chapter Sexual Reproduction and Breeding. These topics are so closely relate...

  11. Maternal Sexuality and Breastfeeding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartlett, Alison

    2005-01-01

    In this paper I consider the ways in which lactation has been discussed as a form of maternal sexuality, and the implications this carries for our understanding of breastfeeding practices and sexuality. Drawing on knowledge constructed in the western world during the last half of the twentieth century, the paper identifies a shift between the…

  12. [Female sexual disorders nowadays].

    PubMed

    Rajtman, Marta

    2013-01-01

    This article makes a brief overview of the most frequent female sexual disorders seen in our clinical practice. It highlights the increasing number of women presenting with hypoactive sexual desire and the efforts practitioners put on helping these female patients. The article also shows the pharmacological strategies that are investigated to solve these dysfuntions.

  13. Female Sexuality: An Enigma.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daniluk, Judith

    1991-01-01

    Describes constructions of sexuality that have occurred within social context in which language, culture, and behavior interact to reinforce male power. Against backdrop of these patriarchal examples of female sexual expression and experience, discusses difficulties of female clients. Addresses critical counseling concerns in terms of contextual…

  14. Examining the standardized application of rape kits: an exploratory study of post-sexual assault professional practices.

    PubMed

    Parnis, Deborah; Du Mont, Janice

    2002-12-01

    In this exploratory study we examine the practices surrounding with respect to standardization the administration and processing of the Sexual Assault Evidence Kit (SAEK). Despite the presumed scientific objectivity of this protocol, our survey of sexual assault nurses, physicians, police, and forensic scientists found that discretionary practices pervaded the evidentiary process. We argue that there must be greater awareness of the shaping of medicolegal evidence. Given the diverse characteristics of sexual assaults and of the health care needs of sexually assaulted women, we also suggest that it may be unreasonable to apply a single standard model of a rape kit.

  15. [Drug facilitated sexual assault].

    PubMed

    Alempijević, Djordje; Savić, Slobodan; Stojanović, Jovan; Spasić, Andjelka

    2007-01-01

    In line with the fact that there is little information regarding drug facilitated sexual assault in national medical literature, the authors aimed to prepare a review of the phenomenon based on available international references. Therefore we offered a definition of the concept of sexual assault, and rape in particular. Consent and ability for valid consent for sexual intercourse were defined as well. A review contains discussion about the basic elements of a concept of drug-facilitated sexual assault. There is also available information in regard to pharmacology of common data rape drugs, i.e. flunitrazepam, gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB), and ketamine. We indicate the utmost importance of prompt collecting of biological samples for toxicological screening in patients who are suspected victims of drug facilitated sexual assault.

  16. Sexually transmitted infections in primary care: a need for education.

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, P; Fletcher, J

    2001-01-01

    General practitioners and practice nurses require the clinical skills that will enable them to detect sexually transmitted infections in the context of a shift to having no, or insidious symptoms. They need to be able to confirm the diagnosis and have clear models for management and referral. Primary care and genitourinary medicine need to work more closely together to increase mutual understanding and clarify the issues which surround referral and attendance. Sexual health risk assessment through the investigation of sexual history is a helpful way forward in both differential diagnosis and in targeting sexual health promotion and care. Many aspects of these clinical skills are specific to the primary care context. There is a need for improved undergraduate, postgraduate, and in-service training. Multidisciplinary educational approaches are ideal for the subject of sexual health. Primary care groups offer a potential way forward to help develop quality in primary care and some are developing health improvement programmes that aim to address sexual health issues. PMID:11271875

  17. Contextual influence of Taiwanese adolescents' sexual attitudes and behavioral intent.

    PubMed

    Chen, Angela Chia-Chen; Neilands, Torsten B; Chan, Shu-Min; Lightfoot, Marguerita

    2016-09-01

    This study examined parental, peer, and media influences on Taiwanese adolescents' attitudes toward premarital sex and intent to engage in sexual behavior. Participants included a convenience sample of 186 adolescents aged 13-15 recruited from two middle schools in Taiwan. Parental influence was indicated by perceived parental disapproval toward premarital sex and perceived peer sexual behavior was used to measure peer influence. Media influence was measured by the adolescents' perception of whether the media promotes premarital sex. We conducted structural equation modeling to test a hypothesized model. The findings suggested that the perceived sexual behavior of peers had the strongest effect on Taiwanese adolescents' sexual attitudes and behavioral intent, while parental disapproval and media influence also significantly contributed to adolescents' sexual attitudes and intent to engage in sex. School nurses are in an ideal position to coordinate essential resources and implement evidence-based sexually transmitted infection and HIV/AIDS prevention interventions that address issues associated with the influence of parents, peers, and media.

  18. [Differential diagnoses of West syndrome].

    PubMed

    Fejerman, Natalio

    2013-09-06

    This study describes the clinical and electroencephalographic characteristics of epileptic spasms, and more especially those that occur during the first two years of life (infantile spasms). West syndrome has been clearly defined as the association between infantile spasms with an electroencephalographic pattern of hypsarrhythmia. Although intellectual deficit appears in almost all cases in which infantile spasms are not controlled with medication, this is a developmental aspect of the condition and not a manifestation that must necessarily be present in order to define the syndrome. The analysis of the interictal and ictal electroencephalogram readings, together with the clinical characteristics of the spasms and the neurological examination of patients, provides some orientation as regards the causations. Despite the spectrum that the title of this work focuses on, the study does not cover the treatment of early infants with West syndrome. Emphasis is placed on the differential diagnoses of West syndrome with other epileptic syndromes that manifest in the first two years of life, and more especially with a series of abnormal non-epileptic motor phenomena that occur in early infants. All these last non-epileptic disorders are displayed in a table, but benign myoclonus of early infancy or Fejerman syndrome is given as a paradigmatic example for the differential diagnosis. The primordial aim is to prevent neurologically healthy early infants from receiving antiepileptic drugs and even adrenocorticotropic hormone or corticoids due to a mistaken diagnosis.

  19. [Left pulmonary agenesis diagnosed late].

    PubMed

    Deleanu, Oana; Pătraşcu, Natalia; Nebunoiu, Ana-Maria; Vintilă, V; Ulmeanu, Ruxandra; Mihălţan, F D

    2010-01-01

    We present the case of a 51 years old female-patient, with severe dextroscoliosis, having like unique symptom progressive dyspnea. The blood samples reveals polycythemia, the radiological exam shows the opacification of 2/3 of the left thorax, the absence of the lung structure in the other 1/3, the deviation of the mediastinum, and dextroscoliosis; the computed tomography reveals the absence of the left lung artery and the left airways, compensatory hyperinflation of the right lung and dilatation of the trunk and right pulmonary artery; the bronchoscopy does not visualize the carina or the left main bronchus, typical for pulmonary agenesis. Echocardiography confirmed the absence of left pulmonary artery and shows mild pulmonary hypertension (systolic pressure in the pulmonary artery of 33 mmHg) with dilatation of the right cavities, but good cinetics. We face a case of pulmonary agenesis lately diagnosed, with modest functional cardiologic implications, limited therapeutic options and good survival, justified by the late appearance of the pulmonary hypertension of low severity and without worsening in time.

  20. Outreach sexual infection screening and postal tests in men who have sex with men: are they comparable to clinic screening?

    PubMed

    Wood, Martyn; Ellks, Rachael; Grobicki, Moira

    2015-05-01

    Men who have sex with men (MSM) have higher rates of poor sexual health. The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence has produced guidance on increasing the uptake of HIV testing to reduce undiagnosed infection in MSM. We report the results of a pilot outreach sexually transmitted infection service using nurse-delivered screening and self-sampled postal testing at a sex on premises venue with comparison made against a sexual health clinic service. Thirty men were included in each group. Users of the nurse-delivered and postal services were older (nurse service median age 57.5 years vs. postal kit service 47 years vs. clinic 35.5 years, p ≤ 0.001). Outreach groups were less likely to have undertaken sexually transmitted infection testing previously than the clinic group (53.3% and 60% vs. 93.3%, p ≤ 0.001). Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae testing uptake was comparable across groups (nurse outreach 86.6%, 'do it yourself' postal kit 100% vs. clinic 100%, p = 0.032), but uptake for blood tests was lower in the postal kit group (nurse outreach 83.3%, postal kit 53.3% vs. clinic 100%, p ≤ 0.001). No significant difference in active sexually transmitted infection positivity across the groups was observed. This combination outreach screening approach is effective in targeting MSM who use sex on premises venues.