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Sample records for nursing diagnosis

  1. Nursing Diagnosis in Graduate Curricula.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shoemaker, Joyce K.

    1989-01-01

    Arguments supporting theoretical analysis, clinical applications, and research of nursing diagnoses in master's degree programs are discussed. Curriculum considerations and an example of an integrated approach to the inclusion of nursing diagnosis in a graduate curriculum are presented. (MSE)

  2. Knowledge-based nursing diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Claudette; Hay, D. Robert

    1991-03-01

    Nursing diagnosis is an integral part of the nursing process and determines the interventions leading to outcomes for which the nurse is accountable. Diagnoses under the time constraints of modern nursing can benefit from a computer assist. A knowledge-based engineering approach was developed to address these problems. A number of problems were addressed during system design to make the system practical extended beyond capture of knowledge. The issues involved in implementing a professional knowledge base in a clinical setting are discussed. System functions, structure, interfaces, health care environment, and terminology and taxonomy are discussed. An integrated system concept from assessment through intervention and evaluation is outlined.

  3. Nursing Diagnosis at the Art Museum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoshiko, Barbara R.

    1985-01-01

    Describes an exercise in which junior year nursing students, who had just completed a course involving the introduction of nursing diagnosis, go to an art museum and look at art from the point of view of nursing diagnosis. The author examines student responses and whether certain goals were accomplished. (CT)

  4. Nationwide survey on the introduction of nursing diagnosis at nursing schools in Japan.

    PubMed

    Oya, Nobuko; Kawaharada, Eiko; Kozawa, Yukie; Takeshita, Mieko

    2009-01-01

    We conducted a nationwide survey to grasp the current status of the introduction of nursing diagnosis at nursing schools. This survey showed that there was a gap in awareness between hospitals [1], which require nursing diagnosis skills, and nursing schools, more than half of which do not teach nursing diagnosis. The survey thus demonstrated the importance of collaborations and information sharing in nursing education.

  5. [Prenatal genetic diagnosis and related nursing care].

    PubMed

    Tzeng, Ya-Ling; Chiu, Tsan-Hung

    2009-12-01

    Prenatal genetic diagnosis plays an important role in eugenics. Early detection of embryo and fetus abnormalities allows preventive precautions to be taken and treatment to begin early in order to reduce the severity and extent of congenital deformities. Advancements in genetic diagnostic techniques infer that nurses are increasingly likely to deal with prenatal genetic diagnosis cases. This essay introduces a few prevalent prenatal genetic diagnosis methods used at different stages of pregnancy; describes in a comprehensive manner the potential physical and psychological responses of the client; and introduces principles of administering prenatal genetic diagnosis to healthcare clients. Ethical issues related to prenatal genetic diagnosis are also discussed.

  6. [Critical thinking skills in the nursing diagnosis process].

    PubMed

    Bittencourt, Greicy Kelly Gouveia Dias; Crossetti, Maria da Graça Oliveira

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the critical thinking skills utilized in the nursing diagnosis process. This was an exploratory descriptive study conducted with seven nursing students on the application of a clinical case to identify critical thinking skills, as well as their justifications in the nursing diagnosis process. Content analysis was performed to evaluate descriptive data. Six participants reported that analysis, scientific and technical knowledge and logical reasoning skills are important in identifying priority nursing diagnoses; clinical experience was cited by five participants, knowledge about the patient and application of standards were mentioned by three participants; Furthermore, discernment and contextual perspective were skills noted by two participants. Based on these results, the use of critical thinking skills related to the steps of the nursing diagnosis process was observed. Therefore, that the application of this process may constitute a strategy that enables the development of critical thinking skills.

  7. Heart Failure: Pathophysiology, Diagnosis, Medical Treatment Guidelines, and Nursing Management.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Chad; Bush, Nathania

    2015-12-01

    Heart failure (HF) is a debilitating chronic disease and is expected to increase in upcoming years due to demographic changes. Nurses in all settings have an essential role in supporting patients in managing this disease. This article describes the pathophysiology of HF, diagnosis, medical management, and nursing interventions. It is crucial for nurses to understand the pathophysiology of HF and the importance that nursing actions have on enhancing medical management to alleviate symptoms and to deter the advancement of the pathophysiologic state. Such an understanding can ultimately reduce morbidity and mortality and optimize quality of life in patients with HF.

  8. Guided visual metaphor: a creative strategy for teaching nursing diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Jeffreys, M R

    1993-01-01

    Guided Visual Metaphor (GVM) is a six-step, learner-centered, creative strategy for teaching nursing diagnosis that combines multidimensional visual and verbal techniques. Learner-participative components include drawing and labeling, reflection, strength and problem identification, nursing diagnosis selection, prioritization, and discussion. The GVM was implemented over a four-week period with 19 associate degree students enrolled in their first nursing course. Positive student evaluations for the GVM, as well as positive learner outcomes, support its continued use. Teacher evaluation of the product (nursing diagnostic statement) was based on three levels of diagnostic skills criteria. Following week four, all students met all Level 1 and Level 2 skills criteria for each nursing diagnosis. Seventy-four percent met at least one Level 3 (highest level) criterion for one or more nursing diagnosis. Fifty-eight percent met at least one Level 3 criterion for two or more nursing diagnoses. Students also required less teacher guidance with each subsequent use of the GVM.

  9. [Nursing diagnosis in adult patients with acute myeloid leukemia].

    PubMed

    de Souza, Luccas Melo; Gorini, Maria Isabel Pinto Coelho

    2006-09-01

    This case study aimed at identifying Nursing Diagnosis (ND) in adult patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia, with the purpose of contributing to the Systematization of Nurse Care. Interviews and observation were used for data collection, in addition to Nursing Process application. During the three months of data collection, other NDs were obtained by searching the files of the 6 patients. The 32 ND found in this study were grouped according to Maslow's hierarchy of needs. Out of these 32 ND, 15 corresponded to changes in Physiological Needs, and 10 to changes in Protection and Safety Needs.

  10. Nursing Process in Post Tonsillectomy Pain Diagnosis: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Soleymanifard, Fateme; Khademolhoseyni, Seyyed Mohamad; Nouri, Jamile Mokhtari

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Tonsillectomy is the most common surgery in the field of ENT. Pain is the most common post tonsillectomy complaint. Considering the importance of nursing cares in relieving post-surgery pain in general and post-tonsillectomy pain in particular, this study is conducted with the aim of presenting nursing process in post tonsillectomy pain diagnosis for decreasing loss of appropriate opportunities in nursing cares and achieving appropriate results in taking care of the patients. Methods: This study is a targeted systematic review focusing on “effective nursing measures in relieving children’s post tonsillectomy pain”. The main stages of searching strategy included searching in electronic sources of Latin databases; Pub Med, Science Direct, and EMBASE and Persian databases; SID, Iran medex, ISC to find published articles from 2009 to 2014. In the end, final synthesis was done on eight articles in English. Findings: Effective nursing measurements for relieving post tonsillectomy pain include: decreasing children’s anxiety through children and their families’ psychological preparation by nurses and other caregivers, using cold compress to reduce neck and jaw pain, presenting distraction techniques, offering fluids and cold foods immediately in the period after surgery, creating a comfortable environment for the children, avoiding too much of talking and adequate sleep. Conclusion: It is recommended to the nursing managers and nurses to perform cares achieved from this systematic review to achieve appropriate results in relieving post tonsillectomy pain. PMID:25560345

  11. Making Nursing Diagnosis Work for You and Your Client: A Step-by-Step Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weber, Gloria

    1991-01-01

    Discusses the many different taxonomies of nursing diagnosis and how it can be brought out of the theory into practical application. Explains five steps of nursing diagnosis: assessment, formulation, expected outcomes, individualized interventions, and evaluation. (JOW)

  12. [Variability in nursing workload within Swiss Diagnosis Related Groups].

    PubMed

    Baumberger, Dieter; Bürgin, Reto; Bartholomeyczik, Sabine

    2014-04-01

    Nursing care inputs represent one of the major cost components in the Swiss Diagnosis Related Group (DRG) structure. High and low nursing workloads in individual cases are supposed to balance out via the DRG group. Research results indicating possible problems in this area cannot be reliably extrapolated to SwissDRG. An analysis of nursing workload figures with DRG indicators was carried out in order to decide whether there is a need to develop SwissDRG classification criteria that are specific to nursing care. The case groups were determined with SwissDRG 0.1, and nursing workload with LEP Nursing 2. Robust statistical methods were used. The evaluation of classification accuracy was carried out with R2 as the measurement of variance reduction and the coefficient of homogeneity (CH). To ensure reliable conclusions, statistical tests with bootstrapping methods were performed. The sample included 213 groups with a total of 73930 cases from ten hospitals. The DRG classification was seen to have limited explanatory power for variability in nursing workload inputs, both for all cases (R2 = 0.16) and for inliers (R2 = 0.32). Nursing workload homogeneity was statistically significant unsatisfactory (CH < 0.67) in 123 groups, including 24 groups in which it was significant defective (CH < 0.60). Therefore, there is a high risk of high and low nursing workloads not balancing out in these groups, and, as a result, of financial resources being wrongly allocated. The development of nursing-care-specific SwissDRG classification criteria for improved homogeneity and variance reduction is therefore indicated.

  13. [Risk of inffective breast-feeding: a nursing diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Viera, Cláudia Silveira

    2004-01-01

    This study is aimed at presenting the 'risk of ineffective breast-feeding' nursing diagnosis regarding mothers of premature infants who are hospitalized in a neonatal Intensive Care Unit. The case study outlined the methodology of the study, and the sample is composed of 35 mothers. Such a diagnosis was detected in 100% of the sample and the risk factors are prematureness; insufficient opportunity to breast-feed due to the newborn's hospitalization; lack of knowledge regarding the maintenance of lactation; maternal fear; inconstancy of breast suction due to separation; and artificial feeding of the newborn. It is believed that the identification of the risks of ineffective breast-feeding during the newborn's hospitalization period makes possible a nursing care focused on the prevention of an 'ineffective breast-feeding' diagnosis.

  14. Nursing diagnosis of grieving: content validity in perinatal loss situations.

    PubMed

    Paloma-Castro, Olga; Romero-Sánchez, José Manuel; Paramio-Cuevas, Juan Carlos; Pastor-Montero, Sonia María; Castro-Yuste, Cristina; Frandsen, Anna J; Albar-Marín, María Jesús; Bas-Sarmiento, Pilar; Moreno-Corral, Luis Javier

    2014-06-01

    To validate the content of the NANDA-I nursing diagnosis of grieving in situations of perinatal loss. Using the Fehring's model, 208 Spanish experts were asked to assess the adequacy of the defining characteristics and other manifestations identified in the literature for cases of perinatal loss. The content validity index was 0.867. Twelve of the 18 defining characteristics were validated, seven as major and five as minor. From the manifestations proposed, "empty inside" was considered as major. The nursing diagnosis of grieving fits in content to the cases of perinatal loss according to experts. The results have provided evidence to support the use of the diagnosis in care plans for said clinical situation. © 2013 NANDA International.

  15. Indicators of a new depression diagnosis in nursing home residents.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Lorraine J; Rantz, Marilyn; Petroski, Gregory F

    2011-01-01

    Depression affects approximately 30% to 40% of nursing home residents but frequently goes unrecognized. Using the Missouri Minimum Data Set, we aimed to determine whether changes in clinical status, other than mood changes, were associated with new depression diagnosis in residents 65 and older without a recorded depression diagnosis. Of 127,587 potential participants, 14,371 met inclusion criteria and were not depressed at baseline (Time 0). At the next quarterly assessment (Time 1), 1,342 (9.3%) had acquired a new diagnosis of depression. Residents with new depression were significantly younger and less cognitively impaired. Nearly 30% had a decline in activities of daily living (ADL) performance. The multivariate model predicting depression showed that increased verbal aggression, urinary incontinence, increased pain, weight loss, change in care needs, cognitive decline, and ADL decline significantly increased the likelihood of new depression diagnosis. The pattern of decline identified here may provide additional clues to the presence of underlying depression.

  16. Introduction to Nursing Diagnosis. Courseware Evaluation for Vocational and Technical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Irving, Jan; And Others

    This courseware evaluation rates the "Introduction to Nursing Diagnosis" program developed by J.B. Lippincott Co. (The program--not included in this document--is a tutorial for second-year nursing students; it presents diagnosis as a mathematical formula). Part A describes the program in terms of subject area (allied health, nursing) and hardware…

  17. From risk for trauma to unintentional injury risk: falls--a concept analysis. Nursing Diagnosis Extension and Classification Research Team.

    PubMed

    Schoenfelder, D P; Crowell, C M

    1999-01-01

    Concept analysis of the nursing diagnosis risk for trauma. To examine the nursing diagnosis risk for trauma and to specify the risk factors for falling. Research and informational articles on falling, and NANDA Nursing Diagnoses: Definitions and Classification, 1999-2000. Replace the current nursing diagnosis risk for trauma with the more specific nursing diagnosis unintentional injury risk: falls. The other risks included in risk for trauma (e.g., burns) also will need to be developed.

  18. Using Nursing Diagnosis to Describe the Clinical Competence of Baccalaureate and Associate Degree Graduating Students: A Comparative Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Helena A.; Strong, Kathleen A.

    1986-01-01

    This study compared perceptions of clinical competence of professional and technical nursing students with the expectations of their nursing faculty by using a nursing diagnosis framework. Results of the study are reported and implications discussed. (CT)

  19. Diagnosis and nursing management of coeliac disease in children.

    PubMed

    Paul, Siba Prosad; McVeigh, Lauren; Gil-Zaragozano, Elena; Basude, Dharamveer

    2016-02-01

    Coeliac disease is an autoimmune condition caused by the ingestion of gluten-containing foods and affects about 1% of children and young people in the UK. Classic symptoms include diarrhoea, bloating, weight loss and abdominal pain. However, extra-intestinal manifestations, such as iron deficiency anaemia, faltering growth, delayed puberty and mouth ulcers, are increasingly being recognised. Some children have an increased risk of developing coeliac disease, such as a strong family history, certain genetic conditions and type 1 diabetes, therefore there is a need for increased awareness and early diagnosis before symptoms occur. If coeliac disease is suspected, a child should have serological screening with anti-tissue transglutaminase titres. Diagnosis is traditionally confirmed by a small bowel biopsy while the child remains on a 'normal' diet that does not exclude gluten. More recently, for a selective group of children, modification of the European Society for Paediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition guidelines has enabled non-biopsy (serological) diagnosis of coeliac disease. Children's nurses have an important role in recognising and diagnosing coeliac disease earlier as well as offering ongoing dietary support. Enabling children to maintain a gluten-free diet is essential for general wellbeing and preventing long-term complications.

  20. Diagnosis, treatment, and nursing care of acute leukemia.

    PubMed

    Viele, Carol S

    2003-05-01

    To review the clinical presentation, current methods of diagnosis and classification, treatment modalities, and novel treatment approaches of acute myelogenous and lymphoblastic leukemia. Professional journals, web sites, and books. The incidence of acute leukemia is increasing. As the population ages, it is anticipated that an even greater number will be diagnosed with this malignancy. The development of monoclonal antibodies, the recognition of the benefit of graft versus leukemia effect, and targeted therapies have improved overall survival rates. Still, age remains a significant prognostic variable. More research is needed to improve both the quality and the quantity of life for these patients. Nurses must understand the rationale and implications of each phase of treatment to educate patients, administer treatments, manage side effects, and provide support throughout the continuum of care.

  1. New method of realization of nursing diagnosis based on 3N in an electronic medical record system.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young ah; An, Mijung; Park, Jungyoen; Jung, Hyensun; Kim, Yongoock; Chang, Byungchul

    2007-01-01

    An electronic medical recording (EMR) system is enlightened as a solution for deciding which nursing diagnosis was selected on the basis of a computerized system; it can help collect and analyze lots of diverse data in an objective way. But there are few reports of successful electronic nursing diagnosis on EMR systems. This study was to develop the objective decision system prior to nursing diagnosis and to adopt it in the Severance EMR system. We adopt a new concept, situational variables, as the key elements of the nursing process, based on the items of nursing intervention. It enables appropriate nursing diagnosis through complex clinical objective data (laboratory results, vital signs, etc.). Through these elements between nursing intervention and nursing diagnosis, we can create reliable evidence-based nursing diagnoses successfully, and make possible fast settlement of nursing intervention in the various clinical fields.

  2. Integrating nursing diagnostic concepts into the medical entities dictionary using the ISO Reference Terminology Model for Nursing Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Jee-In; Cimino, James J; Bakken, Suzanne

    2003-01-01

    The purposes of the study were (1) to evaluate the usefulness of the International Standards Organization (ISO) Reference Terminology Model for Nursing Diagnoses as a terminology model for defining nursing diagnostic concepts in the Medical Entities Dictionary (MED) and (2) to create the additional hierarchical structures required for integration of nursing diagnostic concepts into the MED. The authors dissected nursing diagnostic terms from two source terminologies (Home Health Care Classification and the Omaha System) into the semantic categories of the ISO model. Consistent with the ISO model, they selected Focus and Judgment as required semantic categories for creating intensional definitions of nursing diagnostic concepts in the MED. Because the MED does not include Focus and Judgment hierarchies, the authors developed them to define the nursing diagnostic concepts. The ISO model was sufficient for dissecting the source terminologies into atomic terms. The authors identified 162 unique focus concepts from the 266 nursing diagnosis terms for inclusion in the Focus hierarchy. For the Judgment hierarchy, the authors precoordinated Judgment and Potentiality instead of using Potentiality as a qualifier of Judgment as in the ISO model. Impairment and Alteration were the most frequently occurring judgments. Nursing care represents a large proportion of health care activities; thus, it is vital that terms used by nurses are integrated into concept-oriented terminologies that provide broad coverage for the domain of health care. This study supports the utility of the ISO Reference Terminology Model for Nursing Diagnoses as a facilitator for the integration process.

  3. [A short form of the positions on nursing diagnosis scale: development and psychometric testing].

    PubMed

    Romero-Sánchez, José Manuel; Paloma-Castro, Olga; Paramio-Cuevas, Juan Carlos; Pastor-Montero, Sonia María; O'Ferrall-González, Cristina; Gabaldón-Bravo, Eva Maria; González-Domínguez, Maria Eugenia; Castro-Yuste, Cristina; Frandsen, Anna J; Martínez-Sabater, Antonio

    2013-06-01

    The Positions on Nursing Diagnosis (PND) is a scale that uses the semantic differential technique to measure nurses' attitudes towards the nursing diagnosis concept. The aim of this study was to develop a shortened form of the Spanish version of this scale and evaluate its psychometric properties and efficiency. A double theoretical-empirical approach was used to obtain a short form of the PND, the PND-7-SV, which would be equivalent to the original. Using a cross-sectional survey design, the reliability (internal consistency and test-retest reliability), construct (exploratory factor analysis, known-groups technique and discriminant validity) and criterion-related validity (concurrent validity), sensitivity to change and efficiency of the PND-7-SV were assessed in a sample of 476 Spanish nursing students. The results endorsed the utility of the PND-7-SV to measure attitudes toward nursing diagnosis in an equivalent manner to the complete form of the scale and in a shorter time.

  4. The Nursing Diagnosis of risk for pressure ulcer: content validation.

    PubMed

    Santos, Cássia Teixeira Dos; Almeida, Miriam de Abreu; Lucena, Amália de Fátima

    2016-06-14

    to validate the content of the new nursing diagnosis, termed risk for pressure ulcer. the content validation with a sample made up of 24 nurses who were specialists in skin care from six different hospitals in the South and Southeast of Brazil. Data collection took place electronically, through an instrument constructed using the SurveyMonkey program, containing a title, definition, and 19 risk factors for the nursing diagnosis. The data were analyzed using Fehring's method and descriptive statistics. The project was approved by a Research Ethics Committee. title, definition and seven risk factors were validated as "very important": physical immobilization, pressure, surface friction, shearing forces, skin moisture, alteration in sensation and malnutrition. Among the other risk factors, 11 were validated as "important": dehydration, obesity, anemia, decrease in serum albumin level, prematurity, aging, smoking, edema, impaired circulation, and decrease in oxygenation and in tissue perfusion. The risk factor of hyperthermia was discarded. the content validation of these components of the nursing diagnosis corroborated the importance of the same, being able to facilitate the nurse's clinical reasoning and guiding clinical practice in the preventive care for pressure ulcers. validar o conteúdo do novo diagnóstico de enfermagem, denominado risco de úlcera por pressão. trata-se de uma validação de conteúdo, com amostra composta por 24 enfermeiros especialistas no cuidado à pele, procedentes de seis diferentes hospitais do Sul e Sudeste brasileiro. A coleta de dados ocorreu por meio eletrônico, em instrumento construído pelo programa SurveyMonkey, que continha título, definição e 19 fatores de risco para o diagnóstico de enfermagem. Os dados foram analisados pelo método de Fehring e pela estatística descritiva. O projeto foi aprovado em Comitê de Ética em Pesquisa. título, definição e sete fatores de risco foram validados como "muito importante

  5. Identifying core nursing sensitive outcomes associated with the most frequently used North American Nursing Diagnosis Association-International nursing diagnoses for patients with cerebrovascular disease in Korea.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eunjoo; Park, Hyejin; Whyte, James; Kim, Youngae; Park, Sang Youn

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the core nursing sensitive outcomes according to the most frequently used five North American Nursing Diagnosis Association-International for patients with cerebrovascular disease using the Nursing Outcomes Classification (NOC). A cross-sectional survey design was used. First, nursing problems were identified through 78 charts review, and then linkages between each of nursing problems and nursing sensitive outcomes were established and validated by an expert group for questionnaires. Second, 80 nurses working in the neurosurgical intensive care unit and neurosurgery departments of five Korean hospitals were asked to evaluate how important each outcome is and how often each outcome used to evaluate patient outcomes using 5-point Likert scale. Although there were some differences in the core outcomes identified for each of the nursing problem, consciousness, cognitive orientation, neurologic status and communication were considered the most critical nursing sensitive outcomes for patients suffering cerebrovascular disease. Core nursing sensitive outcomes of patients suffering cerebrovascular disease using NOC were identified to measure the effectiveness of nursing care. © 2013 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  6. Conceptualization of an electronic system for documentation of nursing diagnosis, outcomes, and intervention.

    PubMed

    Peres, Heloisa Helena Ciqueto; de Almeida Lopes Monteiro da Cruz, Diná; Lima, Antônio Fernandes Costa; Gaidzinski, Raquel Rapone; Ortiz, Diley Cardoso Franco; Mendes e Trindade, Michelle; Tsukamoto, Rosangela; Batista de Oliveira, Neurilene

    2010-01-01

    Electronic nursing documentation constitutes technical, scientific, legal, and ethical documents. The objective of this study was to develop an electronic nursing documentation system. The system was developed in four phases (conceptualization, detailing, prototype building, implementation), and the knowledge base was based on domains and classes according to the NANDA-I, NIC, and NOC unified framework. The result is an electronic system (PROCEnf--USP--Nursing Process Electronic Documentation System of the University of São Paulo) which allows documenting nursing process generating reports of nursing process, besides supporting decisions on nursing diagnosis, expected outcomes, and interventions. Integration of different fields of knowledge, as well as the institutional feature of valuing continuous theoretical and practical improvement of nursing process were factors of success of this technological project.

  7. The Nursing Diagnosis Development of Unemployment Disorder: Content Validation With Nursing Experts.

    PubMed

    Bocchino, Anna; Medialdea, María Jesús; Lepiani, Isabel; Mejías, Concepción; Dueñas, María

    2016-06-16

    This study aimed to validate the definition and define the characteristics and related factors of unemployment disorder, a proposed nursing diagnosis. Using Fehring's diagnostic content validity model, Spanish experts were asked to assess the adequacy of the label, defining the characteristics and other related factors. The content validity index was 0.8690. A total of 16 defining characteristics reached major criteria (>0.80). The present study supports the proposed development of a nursing diagnosis for the human response to unemployment. The results suggest that the inclusion of the "unemployment disorder" diagnostic NANDA-I taxonomy would allow nursing professionals to identify the disorder and its causes and manifestations, and therefore provide the information needed for planning more relevant interventions and results. Validación de la definición, características definitorias y factores relacionados de trastorno por desempleo, una propuesta de diagnóstico enfermero. METODOLOGÍA: Usando el modelo de validación de contenido de Fehring, se consensuó mediante expertos españoles la denominación de la etiqueta, las características definitorias y otros factores relacionados. El índice de validez de contenido global fue 0.8690. Un total de 16 características definitorias alcanzaron carácter crítico (>0.80). CONCLUSIÓN: El presente estudio apoya la propuesta de elaborar un diagnóstico de enfermería para la respuesta humana al desempleo. IMPLICACIONES PRÁCTICAS: Los resultados obtenidos sugieren que la inclusión en la taxonomía NANDA-I del diagnóstico "trastorno por desempleo" permitiría a los profesionales de enfermería identificar el problema, sus causas y manifestaciones, y por lo tanto ofrecerían la información necesaria para planificar las intervenciones y resultados más pertinentes. © 2016 NANDA International, Inc.

  8. [Diagnosis "risk of pneumonia" evidence-based evaluation and comparison of nursing interventions].

    PubMed

    Haslinger-Baumann, Elisabeth; Burns, Evelin

    2007-12-01

    In home nursing care, professionally qualified nurses make decisions on their own which must be based on the latest scientific research. The goal of this systematic literature review was to examine if the interventions of the diagnosis "Risk of Pneumonia" as used by a home care service provider in Austria are based on scientific evidence. Based on the research question "Can the interventions of the diagnosis 'risk of pneumonia' be found in the scientific nursing literature?", four evidence-based guidelines from various databases and institutes were identified and evaluated using a standardized checklist. The result of the analysis is that the majority of the Nursing diagnosis interventions can be found in the guidelines. It is also recommended in the guidelines to advise and support clients to stop smoking and inoculate against influenza/pneumonia. Similarly, assessment tools should be used to estimate the severity of pneumonia. The intervention of oral hygiene as a prophylactic intervention against pneumonia should get particular attention.

  9. Integrating Nursing Diagnostic Concepts into the Medical Entities Dictionary Using the ISO Reference Terminology Model for Nursing Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Jee-In; Cimino, James J.; Bakken, Suzanne

    2003-01-01

    Objective: The purposes of the study were (1) to evaluate the usefulness of the International Standards Organization (ISO) Reference Terminology Model for Nursing Diagnoses as a terminology model for defining nursing diagnostic concepts in the Medical Entities Dictionary (MED) and (2) to create the additional hierarchical structures required for integration of nursing diagnostic concepts into the MED. Design and Measurements: The authors dissected nursing diagnostic terms from two source terminologies (Home Health Care Classification and the Omaha System) into the semantic categories of the ISO model. Consistent with the ISO model, they selected Focus and Judgment as required semantic categories for creating intensional definitions of nursing diagnostic concepts in the MED. Because the MED does not include Focus and Judgment hierarchies, the authors developed them to define the nursing diagnostic concepts. Results: The ISO model was sufficient for dissecting the source terminologies into atomic terms. The authors identified 162 unique focus concepts from the 266 nursing diagnosis terms for inclusion in the Focus hierarchy. For the Judgment hierarchy, the authors precoordinated Judgment and Potentiality instead of using Potentiality as a qualifier of Judgment as in the ISO model. Impairment and Alteration were the most frequently occurring judgments. Conclusions: Nursing care represents a large proportion of health care activities; thus, it is vital that terms used by nurses are integrated into concept-oriented terminologies that provide broad coverage for the domain of health care. This study supports the utility of the ISO Reference Terminology Model for Nursing Diagnoses as a facilitator for the integration process. PMID:12668692

  10. Association between risk factors for hypertension and the Nursing Diagnosis overweight in adolescents.

    PubMed

    Nascimento Kluczynik Vieira, Caroline Evelin; Soares Mariz, Larissa; Azevêdo Dantas, Dândara Nayara; Cunha de Menezes, Dayane Jéssyca; Dantas Rêgo, Márcia Camila; Cruz Enders, Bertha

    2016-06-01

    To identify associations between the risk factors for hypertension and the nursing diagnosis of overweight in adolescents. Cross-sectional study conducted in 2013 with 347 teenagers attending schools in Natal, Rio Grande do Norte, Brazil, who answered a form about the socioeconomic profile, physical activity, eating habits and family history of disease and who underwent physical examination. For analytical analysis, two groups were formed: students with the Nursing Diagnosis overweight (n=100) and students without this diagnosis (n=247). the risk factors for hypertension associated with the Nursing Diagnosis were: abdominal obesity (OR=40.0), food intake rich in sugar and fat (OR=40.0), family history of hypertension (OR=6.9), obesity and diabetes (OR=2.0), abnormal systolic and diastolic blood pressure (OR=5.5). the risk factors for hypertension that presented association with the Nursing Diagnosis overweight were abdominal obesity, eating habits, family history of diseases and abnormal blood pressure. These findings may contribute to prevent hypertension in adolescents, in that it directs the gaze of nurses to develop effective measures to address these risk factors.

  11. Design of a nursing clinical decision support system applying nursing diagnosis and nursing evaluation model based data mining.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyungyung; Kim, Insook; Chae, Yougmoon

    2006-01-01

    This study a methodological study; to acquire knowledge on the nursing process by steps of knowledge definition, collection, and representation; then, to design a data warehouse and nursing process clinical decision support system.

  12. Accuracy of nursing diagnosis "readiness for enhanced hope" in patients with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Silva, Renan Alves; Melo, Geórgia Alcântara Alencar; Caetano, Joselany Áfio; Lopes, Marcos Venícios Oliveira; Butcher, Howard Karl; Silva, Viviane Martins da

    2017-07-06

    To analyse the accuracy of the nursing diagnosis readiness for enhanced hope in patients with chronic kidney disease. This is a cross-sectional study with 62 patients in the haemodialysis clinic conducted from August to November 2015. The Hearth Hope Scale was used to create definitions of the defining characteristics of the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association International. We analysed the measures of sensitivity, specificity, predictive value, likelihood ratio, and odds ratio of the defining characteristics of the diagnosis. Of the characteristics, 82.22% presented the diagnosis. The defining characteristics "Expresses the desire to enhance congruency of expectations with desires" and "Expresses the desire to enhance problem solving to meet goals" increased the chance of having the diagnosis by eleven and five, respectively. The characteristics, "Expresses desire to enhance congruency of expectations with desires" and "Expresses desire to enhance problem solving to meet goals" had good accuracy measures.

  13. The role of the community nurse in hepatitis C diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Poll, Ray

    2009-07-01

    Hepatitis C is a common cause of liver disease and many infected individuals remain undiagnosed. Patients may be asymptomatic or have non-specific symptoms, and community nurses can help to identify those at risk and arrange testing. Community nurses can also encourage and support infected individuals to attend specialist hospital clinics for assessment and treatment by giving clear and accurate information about infection and therapy, including common side-effects. Treatment lasts for 6-12 months and patients require regular monitoring with good support. This paper provides an overview of the diagnosis and management of hepatitis C and aims to educate community nurses about this viral infection.

  14. An Interactive Diagnosis Approach for Supporting Clinical Nursing Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wei, Chun-Wang; Lin, Yi-Chun; Lin, Yen-Ting

    2016-01-01

    Clinical resources in nursing schools are always insufficient for satisfying the practice requirements of each student at the same time during a formal course session. Although several studies have applied information and communication technology to develop computer-based learning tools for addressing this problem, most of these developments lack…

  15. An Interactive Diagnosis Approach for Supporting Clinical Nursing Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wei, Chun-Wang; Lin, Yi-Chun; Lin, Yen-Ting

    2016-01-01

    Clinical resources in nursing schools are always insufficient for satisfying the practice requirements of each student at the same time during a formal course session. Although several studies have applied information and communication technology to develop computer-based learning tools for addressing this problem, most of these developments lack…

  16. The Nursing Diagnosis of risk for pressure ulcer: content validation 1

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, Cássia Teixeira; Almeida, Miriam de Abreu; Lucena, Amália de Fátima

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: to validate the content of the new nursing diagnosis, termed risk for pressure ulcer. Method: the content validation with a sample made up of 24 nurses who were specialists in skin care from six different hospitals in the South and Southeast of Brazil. Data collection took place electronically, through an instrument constructed using the SurveyMonkey program, containing a title, definition, and 19 risk factors for the nursing diagnosis. The data were analyzed using Fehring's method and descriptive statistics. The project was approved by a Research Ethics Committee. Results: title, definition and seven risk factors were validated as "very important": physical immobilization, pressure, surface friction, shearing forces, skin moisture, alteration in sensation and malnutrition. Among the other risk factors, 11 were validated as "important": dehydration, obesity, anemia, decrease in serum albumin level, prematurity, aging, smoking, edema, impaired circulation, and decrease in oxygenation and in tissue perfusion. The risk factor of hyperthermia was discarded. Conclusion: the content validation of these components of the nursing diagnosis corroborated the importance of the same, being able to facilitate the nurse's clinical reasoning and guiding clinical practice in the preventive care for pressure ulcers. PMID:27305182

  17. [NURSING DIAGNOSIS PROPOSAL FOR GENDER VIOLENCE SYNDROME IN NANDA-I TAXONOMY].

    PubMed

    Antonio Flores, Juan; Almansa Martínez, María Pilar; Pina Roche, Florentina; Lozano Martínez, Myriam; Lucas Martínez, Ana María; Frapolli Gómez, Griselda

    2015-03-01

    Gender-based violence is a widespread and muted problem in public health that particularly affects millions of women worldwide. The situation being relegated to the private sphere is difficult to know the exact number of women who suffer and causes much of the morbidity and the mortality of women. However, at some point in their lives women visit health services and health professionals, especially nursing, is supposed to be the first to detect cases of abuse. The need to include gender-based violence as a nursing diagnosis is evident because nursing diagnoses names health problems which nurses can approach independently. We have conducted a literature search in order to propose violence as nursing diagnosis to NANDA-I, in order to recognize that this is really a serious health problem and that nursing has an important role in detecting and monitoring of women victims of violence. The aim of this paper is to describe the development phases of as a proposal for inclusion in the NANDA-I taxonomy.

  18. Relating Nursing Care Requirements to Diagnosis Related Groups (DRGs)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-05-09

    posterior fascicular block 426.52 Right bundle branch block and left anterior fascicular block 426.53 Other bilateral bundle branch block Nursing...tachycardia 427.1 Paroxysmal ventricular tachycardia 427.2 Paroxysmal tachycardia, unspecified 427.3 Atrial fibrillation and flutter 427.31 Atrial...fibrillation 427.32 Atrial flutter 427.4 Ventricular fibrillation and flutter 427.41 Ventricular fibrillation 427.42 Ventricular flutter 427.5 Cardiac arrest

  19. The forensic nursing in sexual assaults: the immunochemical diagnosis and prevention of its adverse effects.

    PubMed

    Vitale, Elsa

    2012-04-01

    Sexual assault was a ubiquitous and serious problem in our society. The world's care centers and forensic associations, which were at the forefront of scientific research in sexual assaults, discussed the role of the Forensic Nursing in their early diagnosis and their prevention, but little has been written in literature regarding their appropriate management. This article focuses on the immunochemical laboratory investigation in diagnosis and prevention of its adverse effects in sexual assaults and the role of the Forensic Nursing played in this task. After a careful reading of all the material received from many of the care centers and the associations contacted, a Forensic Nursing Examination Program, with specific immunochemical address, is identified.

  20. Clinical Validation of the "Sedentary Lifestyle" Nursing Diagnosis in Secondary School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Oliveira, Marcos Renato; da Silva, Viviane Martins; Guedes, Nirla Gomes; de Oliveira Lopes, Marcos Venícios

    2016-01-01

    This study clinically validated the nursing diagnosis of "sedentary lifestyle" (SL) among 564 Brazilian adolescents. Measures of diagnostic accuracy were calculated for defining characteristics, and Mantel--Haenszel analysis was used to identify related factors. The measures of diagnostic accuracy showed that the following defining…

  1. Clinical Validation of the "Sedentary Lifestyle" Nursing Diagnosis in Secondary School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Oliveira, Marcos Renato; da Silva, Viviane Martins; Guedes, Nirla Gomes; de Oliveira Lopes, Marcos Venícios

    2016-01-01

    This study clinically validated the nursing diagnosis of "sedentary lifestyle" (SL) among 564 Brazilian adolescents. Measures of diagnostic accuracy were calculated for defining characteristics, and Mantel--Haenszel analysis was used to identify related factors. The measures of diagnostic accuracy showed that the following defining…

  2. Anxiety in children following hospitalization: a proposal for a nursing diagnosis1

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Gabriela Lisieux Lima; da Nóbrega, Maria Miriam Lima

    2015-01-01

    Objective: to describe the process of developing a nursing diagnosis regarding child anxiety following hospitalization, which is to be submitted to the international classification for nursing practice, in accordance with the guidelines set out by the International Council of Nurses and the ISO standard 18104:2014. Method: this methodological study includes a conceptual analysis that bases itself on analyzing the phenomena of anxiety and hospitalization, while identifying the critical attributes of the concept and developing an operational definition. Results: all the criteria for including a new nursing concept were followed and there was no violation of the framework of the International Classification for Nursing Practice with the proposed inclusion, since the concept of anxiety already exists in this classification system and the concept of anxiety from hospitalization would be considered a species or subclass of this concept. Conclusion: this analysis of the concept of hospitalization anxiety in children allowed its meaning to be clarified and, consequently, understanding to be constructed regarding its practical applicability. This achievement contributed in terms of providing incentive to develop new proposals for nursing diagnoses to be included in the International Classification for Nursing Practice. PMID:26487148

  3. Enhancing problem solving and nursing diagnosis in year III Bachelor of Nursing students.

    PubMed

    Lee, Marilyn B; Brysiewicz, Petra

    2009-05-01

    The School of Nursing in which this research was conducted uses a problem based learning approach in clinical nursing courses. Although the skills required for problem solving, and those in nursing care planning, are similar and therefore, support each other in the learning environment, there is limited evidence of the effectiveness of this teaching strategy on problem solving and nursing care planning. The aim of this study was to implement a change in the clinical nursing course in the third year of the Bachelor of Nursing (BN) programme and determine if this change improved students' problem solving and care planning. A nine-step problem solving process to deal with problem scenarios was introduced. We hoped that consistent use of this systematic process would improve students' problem solving and care planning skills in the classroom and the clinical area. In order to determine change in problem solving and care planning skills we compared (a) the previous third year student performance on semester I and II assessments with those of the study participants and (b) results at the end of semester I with end of semester II within the study cohort. Findings from these analyses are presented in this paper.

  4. [Review of nursing diagnosis sedentary lifestyle in individuals with hypertension: conceptual analysis].

    PubMed

    Guedes, Nirla Gomes; Lopes, Marcos Venicios de Oliveira; Cavalcante, Tahissa Frota; Moreira, Rafaella Pessoa; de Araujo, Thelma Leite

    2013-06-01

    This study aims to review the components of the nursing diagnosis Sedentary Lifestyle (SL) proposed by NANDA (North American Nursing Diagnosis Association)-l in individuals with hypertension. The review was developed based on a concept analysis and supported by the Integrative Literature Review method, through which 43 articles were surveyed from five databases (LILACS, CINAHL, PUBMED, SCOPUS and COCHRANE). The following combinations of descriptors and their English and Spanish equivalents were used: Sedentary Lifestyle and Hypertension and Sedentary and Hypertension. Based on the review process, we found that the SL definition has changed, some clinical indicators have been identified and other indicators have been added to the definition. The study promotes a direction for diagnostic efficiency of clinical SL indicators, contributing to the refinement and improvement of this diagnosis and its components.

  5. The most common nursing diagnosis among adults/seniors hospitalised with cancer: integrative review

    PubMed Central

    Jomar, Rafael Tavares; de Souza Bispo, Vitória Régia

    2014-01-01

    The nursing process, with emphasis on the diagnosis phase, is essential to oncology hospital services due to a high frequency of physical and psychological problems that compromise the quality of life of patients undergoing cancer treatment. The goal of this study was to identify, according to NANDA International, the most common nursing diagnosis among adults/seniors with cancer who are hospitalised. This study is an integrative review of the literature completed in 2013 using five electronic databases, resulting in the selection and analysis of nine articles. This review identified the following eight actual diagnoses and two risk diagnoses that are more common among hospitalised adults/seniors with cancer: anxiety, deficient knowledge, constipation, self-care deficit for bathing/hygiene, body image disturbance, acute/chronic pain, fear, disturbed sleep pattern, risk of infection, and risk of deficient fluid volume. The heterogeneity of the studies used in this review may not have allowed the identification of all the common nursing diagnoses in the practice of oncology nursing in hospitals. However, even though the results are not based on the highest possible level of scientific evidence, their correlation to clinical practice can contribute to the enhancement of the nursing process in oncology services provided by hospitals. PMID:25228918

  6. Diagnosis and treatment of patients with bipolar disorder: A review for advanced practice nurses.

    PubMed

    McCormick, Ursula; Murray, Bethany; McNew, Brittany

    2015-09-01

    This review article provides an overview of the frequency, burden of illness, diagnosis, and treatment of bipolar disorder (BD) from the perspective of the advanced practice nurses (APNs). PubMed searches were conducted using the following keywords: "bipolar disorder and primary care," restricted to dates 2000 to present; "bipolar disorder and nurse practitioner"; and "bipolar disorder and clinical nurse specialist." Selected articles were relevant to adult outpatient care in the United States, with a prioritization of articles written by APNs or published in nursing journals. BD has a substantial lifetime prevalence in the population at 4%. Because the manic or depressive symptoms of BD tend to be severe and recurrent over a patient's lifetime, the condition is associated with significant burden to the individual, caregivers, and society. Clinician awareness that BD may be present increases the likelihood of successful recognition and appropriate treatment. A number of pharmacological and nonpharmacological treatments are available for acute and maintenance treatments, with the prospect of achieving reduced symptom burden and increased functioning for many patients. Awareness of the disease burden, diagnostic issues, and management choices in BD has the potential to enhance outcome in substantial proportions of patients. ©2015 The Authors. Journal of the American Association of Nurse Practitioners published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  7. Nursing Diagnosis of "Spiritual Distress" in Women With Breast Cancer: Prevalence and Major Defining Characteristics.

    PubMed

    Caldeira, Sílvia; Timmins, Fiona; de Carvalho, Emília C; Vieira, Margarida

    2016-01-01

    Spirituality and spiritual needs of cancer patients are frequently mentioned in the nursing literature, but the most significant defining characteristics of spiritual distress in the context of clinical reasoning and nursing diagnosis are rarely explored. Understanding of these is important for effective spiritual intervention. The aim of this study was to identify the prevalence and the defining characteristics of the nursing diagnosis "spiritual distress," as classified according to NANDA International, among women with breast cancer. This was a quantitative and cross-sectional study, comprising the third phase of a larger study investigating the clinical validation of spiritual distress in cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy. Fehring's clinical diagnostic validation model was used to identify the prevalence and the major defining characteristics of the diagnosis. A convenience sample was used, and data were collected by structured interview. A total of 70 women participated; most were married (62.9%) and had a mean age of 54 years, and 55.7% reported having at least 1 person depending on them. The average length of time since the cancer diagnosis was 30.9 months. Twenty-seven participants were experiencing spiritual distress (38.6%). Eleven defining characteristics were classified as major. The prevalence of spiritual distress and the major defining characteristics give clinical evidence about the nurse's role in providing spiritual care. The results are useful for the improved use of the NANDA International diagnoses within this domain. The findings highlight the importance of assessing the defining characteristics of the diagnosis as an objective strategy to improve clinical reasoning related to spirituality and to facilitate more effective interventions.

  8. [Opinions of physicians and nurses regarding the prevention, diagnosis and management of delirium].

    PubMed

    Verstraete, L; Joosten, E; Milisen, K

    2008-02-01

    To assess the current opinions of physicians and nurses regarding the prevention, diagnosis and management of delirium, survey administration was conducted to 2256 nurses and 982 physicians within the University Hospitals of Leuven (Belgium). Response rate was 26% with 819 respondents (600 nurses; 219 physicians) completing the questionnaire. 72% of the respondents considered delirium as a minor problem or no problem at all. Yet over half of respondents working on a palliative care unit (87%, n=15), traumatological ward (67%, n=18), cardio-thoracic surgery ward (58%, n=20), intensive care unit (55%, n=120) and geriatric ward (55%, n=42) reported it as a serious problem. Delirium was considered as an underdiagnosed (85%) but preventable (75%) syndrome. Yet patients at risk are rarely (34%) or never (52%) screened for delirium. In case of screening (48%), only 4% used a specific validated assessment tool. 97% of all respondents were convinced that delirium requires an active and immediate intervention of nurse and physician. 82% of the physicians preferred haldol to treat delirium, in case of alcohol withdrawal 69% chose tranxene. Physical restraints were considered important in the management of delirium by a greater proportion of nurses (49%) than physicians (28%). The severity of the problem is underestimated. While opinions regarding the treatment were quite correct, prevention and early detection of delirium deserve more attention.

  9. The connection between nursing diagnosis and the use of healthcare resources.

    PubMed

    Company-Sancho, María Consuelo; Estupiñán-Ramírez, Marcos; Sánchez-Janáriz, Hilda; Tristancho-Ajamil, Rita

    The health service invests up to 75% of its resources on chronic care where the focus should be on caring rather than curing. Nursing staff focuses their work on such care. Care requires being redorded in health histories through the standardized languages. These records enable useful analyses to organisational and healthcare decision-making. Our proposal is to know the association of between nursing diagnosis and a higher total expenditure on health. An observational cross-sectional analytical study was performed based on data from electronic health records in Primary Care (Drago-AP), hospital discharges (CMBD-AH) and prescriptions (REC-SCS) of patients over 50 from 2012-2013 in the Canary Islands. A descriptive, bivariate and multivariate analysis was undertaken to create a predictive model on the use of resources. Sociodemographic (age, sex, type of health-care affiliation, type of prescription charge) and nursing diagnosis (ND) recorded in late 2012. Dependent variables: Resources consumed in 2013. 582,171 patients met the criteria for inclusion. 53.0% of them were women with an average age of 64.3 years (SD 10.8years). 53.2% were pensioners. 49% of the included population had an ND, with an average of 2.1ND per patient. The average costs per patient were 1824.62€ (with a median of 827.5€) 25 and 27 percentiles of 264.1€ and 1824.7€, respectively. The bivariate analysis showed a significant correlation between these expenses and all the demographic variables; the expenses increased when a nursing diagnosis has been made (Spearman's rank=0.37: the more diagnoses, the more expenses). In the multivariate analysis, a first linear regression with the sociodemographic variables as independent variables explains 13.7% of the variability of the logarithm of the full costs (R(2)=0.137). If we add to this model the presence of nursing diagnoses, the explanatory capacity reaches 19.77% (R(2)=0.1977). Compared with a model that only consists of sociodemographic

  10. Diagnosis and treatment of patients with bipolar disorder: A review for advanced practice nurses

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Bethany; McNew, Brittany

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Purpose This review article provides an overview of the frequency, burden of illness, diagnosis, and treatment of bipolar disorder (BD) from the perspective of the advanced practice nurses (APNs). Data sources PubMed searches were conducted using the following keywords: “bipolar disorder and primary care,” restricted to dates 2000 to present; “bipolar disorder and nurse practitioner”; and “bipolar disorder and clinical nurse specialist.” Selected articles were relevant to adult outpatient care in the United States, with a prioritization of articles written by APNs or published in nursing journals. Conclusions BD has a substantial lifetime prevalence in the population at 4%. Because the manic or depressive symptoms of BD tend to be severe and recurrent over a patient's lifetime, the condition is associated with significant burden to the individual, caregivers, and society. Clinician awareness that BD may be present increases the likelihood of successful recognition and appropriate treatment. A number of pharmacological and nonpharmacological treatments are available for acute and maintenance treatments, with the prospect of achieving reduced symptom burden and increased functioning for many patients. Implications for practice Awareness of the disease burden, diagnostic issues, and management choices in BD has the potential to enhance outcome in substantial proportions of patients. PMID:26172568

  11. The challenge of existential issues in acute care: nursing considerations for the patient with a new diagnosis of lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Lehto, Rebecca H

    2012-02-01

    A new diagnosis of lung cancer is a highly threatening experience that raises personally relevant existential issues and brings death-related thoughts and concerns to mind. Those issues can be very disturbing to patients, leading to distress and potentially to a lowered quality of life. The purpose of this article is to present to the practicing oncology nurse the types of existential and death-related concerns that patients with a new diagnosis of lung cancer may have. In addition, the article identifies practical strategies and resources for oncology nurses who can help patients accept and manage the normal but often distressing responses to a life-threatening diagnosis.

  12. Multiple myeloma and treatment-related thromboembolism: oncology nurses' role in prevention, assessment, and diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Wiley, Kathleen E

    2007-12-01

    Immunomodulating agents such as thalidomide and its newly emerged derivative, lenalidomide, are becoming increasingly popular in the treatment of multiple myeloma because of their ability to combat drug resistance. Clinical trials suggest that thalidomide and lenalidomide are effective in all stages of multiple myeloma treatment-new diagnoses, stem cell transplantations, maintenance therapy, and relapsed or refractory disease. The drugs are most efficacious when combined with additional chemotherapeutic agents and/or corticosteroids. However, deep vein thrombosis and other thromboembolic events are associated with the treatment regimens. Oncology nurses must understand the pharmacologic properties of the drugs and the potentially life-threatening complications associated with them. To provide the highest standard of care, oncology nurses must play a vital role in the prevention, diagnosis, and management of thromboembolic events through awareness of the clinical problem, assessment tools, and thromboembolic prophylactic regimens.

  13. [Diagnosis and follow-up of arterial hypertension: is the role of nursing staff relevant?].

    PubMed

    Dalfó Baqué, A; Gibert Llorach, E; Vila Coll, M A; Sabartés Saperas, T

    2000-01-01

    To determine the protagonism of the medical and nursing staff in the diagnosis and observation of hypertense patients in a primary care team. Cross-sectional descriptive study. Urban primary care team. Two random samples, with 325 clinical histories, of the hypertense patients under observation in the centre in the years 1995 (N = 1992) and 1996 (N = 1994). The following variables were gathered on which professional had conducted the following: the blood pressure triple take (BPTT), physical examination (weight, height and peripheral pulses), request for further tests, health education on factors of cardiovascular risk (FCR), changes in life-style, anamnesis on side-effects in patients under medical treatment, and the number of attendances. The following details of patients were recorded: age and sex, body mass index, known time of hypertension evolution, blood pressure figures at the start and finish of the periods. 33 people in 1995 (10.2%; 95% CI, 6.8-13.4) and 8 people in 1996 (2.4%; 95% CI, 1-4.8) were diagnosed with hypertension. Average visits per professional in each year was 2.8 and 2.9 for nursing, and 1.5 and 1.8 for the doctor. There was a record of BPTT in 75.6% of cases, analysis request, ECG and full physical examination in 50.5% of cases, tackling CRF in 56.9%, recommendations on changes in life-style in 85.2%, and anamnesis on side-effects in 26.1%. It was basically nursing personnel who conducted BPTT (79.8% in 1996). 1995 saw greater CRF intervention by nursing staff (49.4%; 95% CI, 42.8-56.3) than by medical staff (15.3%; 95% CI, 10.3-19.9). In the second year the figures became 57.5% (95% CI, 50.9-64.2) against 12.3% (95% CI, 7.8-16.7). The interventions on life-style changes and anamnesis on possible side-effects were mainly conducted by nursing staff, at 66.2% (95% CI, 60.2-72.3) against doctors at 25.7% (95% CI, 20.2-31.3). The role of nursing staff is fundamental to the diagnosis and observance of hypertense patients in the primary care

  14. Clinical validation of nursing diagnosis "parental role conflict" in mothers of hospitalized newborns.

    PubMed

    Carmona, Elenice Valentim; Vale, Ianê Nogueira do; Ohara, Conceição Vieira da Silva; Abrão, Ana Cristina Freitas de Vilhena

    2013-10-01

    To clinically validate the nursing diagnosis, parental role conflict, in mothers of hospitalized newborns. Fehring's Clinical Validation Model was used, focusing on mothers, using a sample of 83. Major defining characteristics have been defined as the main indicators of the presence of a diagnosis, whereas minor are secondary indicators. Four minor defining characteristics were identified: (a) "anxiety," (b) "expresses concerns about changes in maternal role," (c) "expresses concerns about family," and (d) "fear." Major defining characteristics did not occur. Mothers who spent less time with their infants were the ones that presented a major number of defining characteristics; therefore, they should have more opportunities for being with their babies. Other studies on subjective phenomena are needed. © 2013 NANDA International.

  15. Clinical diagnosis of completeness of medical abortion by nurses: a reliability study in Mozambique.

    PubMed

    Gebreselassie, Hailemichael; Ustá, Momade; Andersen, Kathryn L; Mitchell, Ellen M H

    2012-07-01

    The provision of medical abortion continues to rely on routine use of ultrasound to confirm expulsion of pregnancy. However, the absence of ultrasound in most of the health facilities in developing countries and the additional training required to enable providers to use ultrasound is often prohibitive. The purpose of this study was to compare clinical history and physical examination with ultrasound in confirming completion of abortion. A total of 718 women consented for medical abortion with misoprostol and were assessed for pregnancy expulsion by nurses and gynecologists. Nurses used history and physical examination while gynecologists used ultrasound to establish their diagnoses. Nurses' clinical diagnoses for complete abortion, incomplete abortion and ongoing pregnancy were 83% (SE 0.01), 15% (SE 0.01) and 2% (SE 0.01), respectively. When gynecologists used ultrasound, the diagnoses for complete abortion, incomplete abortion, an ongoing pregnancy were 80% (SE 0.01), 17% (SE 0.01) and 3% (SE 0.01), respectively. Overall, nurses agreed with gynecologist diagnoses in 84% of cases, with a κ coefficient of 0.49 (SE 0.06) and chance-corrected first-order agreement (AC(1)) of 0.81 (SE 0.02). Agreement was very high for the diagnosis of complete abortion (AC(1) 0.89; SE 0.02), while it was moderate for ongoing pregnancy (AC(1) 0.58; SE 0.22) and incomplete abortion (AC(1) 0.45; SE 0.08). Clinical history and physical examination alone, without the use of ultrasonography, are effective for the determination of successful pregnancy expulsion. However, greater emphasis is required on the clinical identification of ongoing pregnancy during any training of providers. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Breaking bad news: a phenomenological exploration of Irish nurses' experiences of caring for patients when a cancer diagnosis is given in an acute care facility (part 1).

    PubMed

    Tobin, Gerard A

    2012-01-01

    The focus of this article is on the meanings attributed by nurses who worked with patients receiving a cancer diagnosis within acute care settings in Ireland. The aim of this article was to explore the nurses' perceptions of caring for patients who receive bad news in the form of a cancer diagnosis while in an acute care setting. The article focuses on the perceptions of 20 nurses who formed the nurse participant group in a larger phenomenological study exploring giving and receiving a cancer diagnosis. Data were collected using unstructured in-depth interviews. Analysis was conducted using Koch's analytical framework. The nurses' narratives provided 2 emerging themes entitled, "connectedness: journeying as professional within the everyday world" and "connectedness: exclusion of professional within the everyday world." This article focuses on the first emerging theme and highlights the experiences of nurses as they reflect on their interactions with their patients before, during, and after the giving of a cancer diagnosis. This study highlights the importance of professional companionship. It provides insights into the nurse-patient challenges as a result of lack of information. Lack of information and involvement affects the nurse's ability to be authentically present for the recipient and results in a fracture to the nurse-patient relationship. Understanding the experiences of nurses from acute care settings where the cancer diagnosis is often given will inform and enable the nurse working in oncology settings to engage patients in a more meaningful and focused way.

  17. Diagnosis and management of endometriosis: the role of the advanced practice nurse in primary care.

    PubMed

    Mao, Alexandra J; Anastasi, Joyce K

    2010-02-01

    To discuss the etiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis, and management of endometriosis for the advanced practice nurse (APN) in primary care. Selected research, clinical studies, clinical practice guidelines, and review articles. Commonly encountered by the APN in primary care, endometriosis is a chronic, progressive inflammatory disease characterized by endometrial lesions, cysts, fibrosis, or adhesions in the pelvic cavity, causing chronic pelvic pain and infertility in women of reproductive age. Because of its frequently normal physical examination findings, variable clinical presentations, and nonspecific, overlapping symptoms with other conditions, endometriosis can be difficult to diagnose. As there currently are no accurate noninvasive diagnostic tests specific for endometriosis, it is imperative for the APN to become knowledgeable about the etiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis, and current treatment options of this disease. The APN in primary care plays an essential role in health promotion through disease management and infertility prevention by providing support and much needed information to the patient with endometriosis. APNs can also facilitate quality of care and manage treatments effectively to improve quality of life, reduce pain, and prevent further progression of disease. Practice recommendations include timely diagnosis, pain management, infertility counseling, patient education, and support for quality of life issues.

  18. Transcultural Nursing and Nursing Diagnoses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geissler, Elaine M.

    1991-01-01

    Points out the inadequacies of the nursing diagnoses officially sanctioned by the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association for use with culturally diverse patients. Looks at the changes needed to make the defining characteristics more congruent with transcultural nursing. (JOW)

  19. Integrative review of factors related to the nursing diagnosis nausea during antineoplastic chemotherapy 1

    PubMed Central

    Moysés, Aline Maria Bonini; Durant, Lais Corsino; de Almeida, Ana Maria; Gozzo, Thais de Oliveira

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: to identify factors related to the nursing diagnosis nausea among cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy. Method: integrative review conducted in four electronic databases (PUBMED, EMBASE, CINAHL and LILACS) using the key words: neoplasia, antineoplastic agents and nausea. Results: only 30 out of 1,258 papers identified met the inclusion criteria. The most frequent related factors were: being younger than 50 years old, motion sickness, being a woman, emetogenic potential of the chemotherapy, anxiety, conditioned stimulus, and expecting nausea after treatment. Conclusion: this review's findings, coupled with the incidence of nausea among cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy, reveal an important difference between evidence found and that used by NANDA International, Inc. Even though it provides an appropriate definition of related factors, it does not mention chemotherapy, despite the various studies addressing the topic using different designs and presenting various objectives and outcomes. PMID:27737380

  20. Clinical Validation of the "Sedentary Lifestyle" Nursing Diagnosis in Secondary School Students.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Marcos Renato; da Silva, Viviane Martins; Guedes, Nirla Gomes; de Oliveira Lopes, Marcos Venícios

    2016-06-01

    This study clinically validated the nursing diagnosis of "sedentary lifestyle" (SL) among 564 Brazilian adolescents. Measures of diagnostic accuracy were calculated for defining characteristics, and Mantel-Haenszel analysis was used to identify related factors. The measures of diagnostic accuracy showed that the following defining characteristics were statistically significant: "average daily physical activity less than recommended for gender and age," "preference for activity low in physical activity," "nonengagement in leisure time physical activities," and "diminished respiratory capacity." An SL showed statistically significant associations with the following related factors: insufficient motivation for physical activity; insufficient interest in physical activity; insufficient resources for physical activity; insufficient social support for physical activity; attitudes, beliefs, and health habits that hinder physical activity; and insufficient confidence for practicing physical exercises. The study highlighted the four defining characteristics and six related factors for making decisions related to SL among adolescents.

  1. Nursing Diagnosis Risk for falls: prevalence and clinical profile of hospitalized patients.

    PubMed

    Luzia, Melissa de Freitas; Victor, Marco Antonio de Goes; Lucena, Amália de Fátima

    2014-01-01

    to identify the prevalence of the Nursing Diagnosis (ND) Risk for falls in the hospitalizations of adult patients in clinical and surgical units, to characterize the clinical profile and to identify the risk factors of the patients with this ND. a cross-sectional study with 174 patients. The data was collected from the computerized nursing care prescriptions system and on-line hospital records, and analyzed statistically. the prevalence of the ND Risk for falls was 4%. The patients' profile indicated older adults, males (57%), those hospitalized in the clinical units (63.2%), with a median length of hospitalization of 20 (10-24) days, with neurological illnesses (26%), cardio-vascular illnesses (74.1%) and various co-morbidities (3±1.8). The prevalent risk factors were neurological alterations (43.1%), impaired mobility (35.6%) and extremes of age (10.3%). the findings contributed to evidencing the profile of the patients with a risk of falling hospitalized in clinical and surgical wards, which favors the planning of interventions for preventing this adverse event.

  2. Nursing Diagnosis Risk for falls: prevalence and clinical profile of hospitalized patients1

    PubMed Central

    Luzia, Melissa de Freitas; Victor, Marco Antonio de Goes; Lucena, Amália de Fátima

    2014-01-01

    Objectives to identify the prevalence of the Nursing Diagnosis (ND) Risk for falls in the hospitalizations of adult patients in clinical and surgical units, to characterize the clinical profile and to identify the risk factors of the patients with this ND. Method a cross-sectional study with 174 patients. The data was collected from the computerized nursing care prescriptions system and on-line hospital records, and analyzed statistically. Results the prevalence of the ND Risk for falls was 4%. The patients' profile indicated older adults, males (57%), those hospitalized in the clinical units (63.2%), with a median length of hospitalization of 20 (10-24) days, with neurological illnesses (26%), cardio-vascular illnesses (74.1%) and various co-morbidities (3±1.8). The prevalent risk factors were neurological alterations (43.1%), impaired mobility (35.6%) and extremes of age (10.3%). Conclusion the findings contributed to evidencing the profile of the patients with a risk of falling hospitalized in clinical and surgical wards, which favors the planning of interventions for preventing this adverse event. PMID:26107834

  3. Fuzzy cognitive map in differential diagnosis of alterations in urinary elimination: A nursing approach

    PubMed Central

    de Moraes Lopes, Maria Helena Baena; Ortega, Neli Regina Siqueira; Silveira, Paulo Sérgio Panse; Massad, Eduardo; Higa, Rosângela; de Fátima Marin, Heimar

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To develop a decision support system to discriminate the diagnoses of alterations in urinary elimination, according to the nursing terminology of NANDA International (NANDA-I). Methods A fuzzy cognitive map (FCM) was structured considering six possible diagnoses: stress urinary incontinence, reflex urinary incontinence, urge urinary incontinence, functional urinary incontinence, total urinary incontinence and urinary retention; and 39 signals associated with them. The model was implemented in Microsoft Visual C++® Edition 2005 and applied in 195 real cases. Its performance was evaluated through the agreement test, comparing its results with the diagnoses determined by three experts (nurses). The sensitivity and specificity of the model were calculated considering the expert’s opinion as a gold standard. In order to compute the Kappa’s values we considered two situations, since more than one diagnosis was possible: the overestimation of the accordance in which the case was considered as concordant when at least one diagnoses was equal; and the underestimation of the accordance, in which the case was considered as discordant when at least one diagnosis was different. Results The overestimation of the accordance showed an excellent agreement (kappa = 0.92, p < 0.0001); and the underestimation provided a moderate agreement (kappa = 0.42, p < 0.0001). In general the FCM model showed high sensitivity and specificity, of 0.95 and 0.92, respectively, but provided a low specificity value in determining the diagnosis of urge urinary incontinence (0.43) and a low sensitivity value to total urinary incontinence (0.42). Conclusions The decision support system developed presented a good performance compared to other types of expert systems for differential diagnosis of alterations in urinary elimination. Since there are few similar studies in the literature, we are convinced of the importance of investing in this kind of modeling, both from the theoretical and from

  4. Diagnosis, prognosis and awareness of dying in nursing homes: towards the Gold Standard?

    PubMed

    Johnson, Martin; Attree, Moira; Jones, Ian; Al Gamal, Ekhlas; Garbutt, David

    2014-06-01

    In Western society and increasingly elsewhere, death has become medicalised and 'hospitalised' even when people are enduring deteriorating terminal conditions such as dementia and heart failure. In an attempt to rationalise and dignify the place and manner of death, evidence is emerging that the adoption of end-of-life care pathways and models can improve the experience of the end-of-life care across a range of care settings. Each of these demands skills and knowledge in the assessment and prediction of the dying trajectory. In this study, we report complexities facing relatives, residents and nursing home staff in the awareness, diagnosis and prediction of the dying trajectory. Data were collected and analysed within a broadly qualitative methodology. The contexts were two nursing homes in the Greater Manchester area, each at different stages of implementing 'Gold Standards Framework' approaches to planning end-of-life care with residents and their relatives. From 2008 to 2011 and with appropriate consent, data were collected by a mixture of interviews and participant observation with residents, relatives and staff. Appropriate ethics approvals were sought and given. Key emerging themes were diagnosis and awareness of dying in which there is no substitute for experience. Significant resource is needed to engage staff, residents and relatives/carers with the idea of advance care planning. Talking to residents and relatives about their feelings and wishes for care at the end of life remains especially difficult, but education and training in key skills and knowledge can engender confidence. Challenges include diagnosing and predicting dying trajectories. Advance care planning can reduce the distress from and number of inappropriate hospital admissions, but requires determination and consistent application of the approach. This can be very challenging in the face of staff rotation and the unpredictability both of the dying trajectory and the decision-making of some

  5. Teaching differential diagnosis to nurse practitioner students in a distance program.

    PubMed

    Colella, Christine L; Beery, Theresa A

    2014-08-01

    An interactive case study (ICS) is a novel way to enhance the teaching of differential diagnosis to distance learning nurse practitioner students. Distance education renders the use of many teaching strategies commonly used with face-to-face students difficult, if not impossible. To meet this new pedagogical dilemma and to provide excellence in education, the ICS was developed. Kolb's theory of experiential learning supported efforts to follow the utilization of the ICS. This study sought to determine whether learning outcomes for the distance learning students were equivalent to those of on-campus students who engaged in a live-patient encounter. Accuracy of differential diagnosis lists generated by onsite and online students was compared. Equivalency testing assessed clinical, rather than only statistical, significance in data from 291 students. The ICS responses from the distance learning and onsite students differed by 4.9%, which was within the a priori equivalence estimate of 10%. Narrative data supported the findings. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  6. Acute hospital admission for nursing home residents without cognitive impairment with a diagnosis of cancer.

    PubMed

    Drageset, J; Eide, G E; Harrington, C; Ranhoff, A H

    2015-03-01

    Studies of hospitalisation of cognitively intact nursing home (NH) residents with cancer are scarce. Knowledge about associations between socio-demographic, medical and social support variables and hospital admissions aids in preventing unnecessary admissions. This is part of a prospective study from 2004 to 2005 with follow-up to 2010 for admission rates. We studied whether residents with cancer have more admissions and whether socio-demographic and medical variables and social support subdimensions are associated with admission among cognitively intact NH residents with (n = 60) and without (n = 167) cancer aged ≥65 years scoring ≤0.5 on the Clinical Dementia Rating Scale and residing ≥6 months. We measured social support by face-to-face interview. We identified all respondents through NH medical records for hospital admission, linking their identification numbers to the hospital record system to register all admissions. We examined whether socio-demographic and medical variables (medical records) and social support subscales were associated with the time between inclusion and first admission. Residents with cancer had more admissions (25/60) than those without (53/167) (odds ratio 1.7). Social integration was correlated with admission (P = 0.04) regardless of cancer diagnosis. Residents with cancer had more hospital admissions than those without. Higher social integration gave more admissions independent of cancer diagnosis.

  7. Mental health diagnosis by nurses using the Global Mental Health Assessment Tool: a validity and feasibility study

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Vimal K; Lepping, Peter; Krishna, Murali; Durrani, Shazia; Copeland, John RM; Mottram, Patricia; Parhee, Rashmi; Quinn, Bennett; Lane, Steven; Cummins, Anthony

    2008-01-01

    Background The Global Mental Health Assessment Tool — Primary Care Version (GMHAT/PC) has been developed to assist health professionals to make a quick and comprehensive standardised mental health assessment. It has proved to be a reliable and valid tool in a previous study involving GPs. Its use by other health professionals may help in detecting and managing mental disorders in primary care and general health settings. Aim To assess the feasibility of using a computer-assisted diagnostic interview by nurses and to examine the level of agreement between the GMHAT/PC diagnosis and psychiatrists' clinical diagnosis. Design of study Cross-sectional validation study. Setting Primary care, general healthcare (cardiac rehabilitation clinic), and community mental healthcare settings. Method A total of 215 patients between the ages of 16 and 75 years were assessed by nurses and psychiatrists in various settings: primary care centre (n = 54), cardiac rehabilitation centre (n = 98), and community mental health clinic (n = 63). The time taken for the interview, and feedback from patients and interviewers were indicators of feasibility, and the kappa coefficient (κ), sensitivity, and specificity of the GMHAT/PC diagnosis were measures of validity. Results Mean duration of interview was under 15 minutes. The agreement between nurses' GMHAT/PC interview-based diagnosis and psychiatrists' International Classification of Diseases (ICD)–10 criteria-based clinical diagnosis was 80% (κ = 0.76, sensitivity = 0.84, specificity = 0.92). Conclusion The GMHAT/PC can assist nurses to make accurate mental health assessment and diagnosis in various healthcare settings and it is acceptable to patients. PMID:18505618

  8. Influence of nutritional status in the diagnosis of sarcopenia in nursing home residents.

    PubMed

    Lardiés-Sánchez, Beatriz; Sanz-París, Alejandro; Pérez-Nogueras, Javier; Serrano-Oliver, Antonio; Torres-Anoro, María E; Cruz-Jentoft, Alfonso J

    2017-09-01

    Malnutrition and sarcopenia frequently coexist in elderly patients. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of nutritional status in the diagnosis of sarcopenia in nursing home residents. A cross-sectional study was performed with data collected from 339 elderly patients living in five nursing homes. Sarcopenia was defined according to the consensus definition of the European Working Group on Sarcopenia in Older People. Body mass composition was assessed using bioimpedance analysis, handgrip strength using a dynamometer, and physical performance by 5-m gait speed test. The nutritional status of residents was assessed using the Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA). Of 436 patients, 339 (77.8%) were included. The mean age of participants was 84.9 y and 64.3% were women. More than one-third (38.1%) of the population had sarcopenia, with a higher prevalence in women (39.4%). According to the MNA, 32.4% of participants were at risk for malnutrition and 42.5% were malnourished. When analyzed together, the presence of malnutrition plus malnutrition risk, there was no difference between individuals with or without sarcopenia. However, the presence of malnutrition was statistically higher in individuals with sarcopenia compared with those without it. The prevalence of malnutrition was highest in individuals with low handgrip strength (62.8%), and in participants with severe sarcopenia. There were no significant differences in calf circumference between sarcopenic and nonsarcopenic participants. In the multivariate logistic regression analysis, body mass index <22 kg/m(2) and age >80 y remained predictive of sarcopenia status after adjustment. Prevalence of sarcopenia and malnutrition were significant in this population, especially in women. Approximately two-thirds of sarcopenic individuals were malnourished. A low body mass index may be a better predictor of sarcopenia in this population than a small calf circumference (<1 cm). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All

  9. The Difficulty of Selecting the NANDA-I Nursing Diagnosis (2015-2017) of "Death Anxiety" in Japan.

    PubMed

    Shimomai, Kimiyo; Furukawa, Hidetoshi; Kuroda, Yuko; Fukuda, Kazuaki; Masuda, Mitsumi; Koizumi, Junko

    2016-09-21

    The purpose of our study was to clarify any difficulties or problems that exist in Japanese healthcare sites regarding the selection of death anxiety as a nursing diagnosis. This study was a qualitative, inductive research design. The semistructured interviews were conducted on the participants who were nurses and had 3 or more years of clinical experience in Japan. Results showed four categories: "The Japanese have a culture of avoiding death," "It is extremely difficult to match diagnostic indicators and related factors with specific patient cases," "Other diagnoses exist that are effective and enable proactive intervention," and "The definition of death anxiety and the meaning of its diagnostic indicators are unintelligible." It is thought that nursing diagnoses that reflect specific cultural backgrounds require definitions appropriate to each country and appropriate revisions to diagnostic indicators. © 2016 NANDA International, Inc.

  10. Knowledge, attitudes and behaviors of primary health care nurses and midwives in breast cancer early diagnosis applications

    PubMed Central

    Bulut, Aliye; Bulut, Aziz

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this research was to analyze the knowledge, attitudes and behaviors of the nurses and midwives about the early diagnosis of breast cancer. Materials and methods This cross-sectional study was carried out at 9 family medical centers (FMCs) and 1 community health center (CHC) in Bingol; the population of this research consisted of 25 midwives and 38 nurses. The protocol for this study was approved by the regional ethics committee of Bingol University. The study was performed in accordance with the principles of the Declaration of Helsinki. The purpose of this study was explained to the nurses and midwives who participated, and their written and verbal permission was obtained; great care was taken to ensure that they understood participation was voluntary. A questionnaire of 41 questions was used for the data collection. Results When the age distribution of nurses and midwives was examined, it was found that 96.8% of them were aged ≤39 years. A total of 92.0% of midwives and 84.2% of nurses practiced breast self-examination (BSE). A total of 56% of the married women practiced family planning, and the most frequent method was using contraceptive pills. A total of 88.9% of the women had never had hormonal treatment for any reason. The BSE knowledge level of 65% of the women, who performed clinical breast examination, was complete. Among the women who had full knowledge of BSE, 38.5% of them performed examination once every 6 months, 23.0% of them once a year and 38.5% of them once every 3 years. Conclusion This research showed that the deficiencies for nurses and midwives regarding the early diagnosis methods of breast cancer have been identified, and supporting these deficiencies with training is recommended. PMID:28331367

  11. Accuracy of clinical diagnosis of benign eyelid lesions: Is a dedicated nurse-led service safe and effective?

    PubMed

    Mohite, Abhijit A; Johnson, Andria; Rathore, Deepa S; Bhandari, Kamal; Crossman, Richard; Mehta, Purnima; Ahluwalia, Harpreet S

    2016-08-01

    This article compares an independent nurse-led benign lesion service with a doctor-led one, and assesses the impact of clinician seniority on diagnostic accuracy rates. Retrospective review of benign lesions referred to a teaching hospital and managed in either a doctor- or nurse-led lid service. All lesions were diagnosed clinically, excised and then sent for histological diagnosis. Lesions were categorized into subtypes. Pre-excision clinical diagnoses were compared with histological diagnoses. Sensitivity, specificity and missed malignancy rates were calculated for each subtype. Accuracy was compared between different grades of doctors and a specialist nurse. 264 and 332 lesions were managed in a doctor-led and nurse-led service, respectively. Rates of accurate sub-typing were 79.6% and 80.4% in the doctor- and nurse-led services, respectively (p > 0.05). Clinician seniority had no bearing. Missed malignancies or pre-malignancies accounted for 1.1% and 1.5% of lesions in the doctor and nurse-led services, respectively (p > 0.05). Overall, the remaining misdiagnoses were benign lesions of another subtype (13.6%) or non-specific histological findings (5.0%) and 98.6% of lesions were confirmed as benign on histology. Overall sensitivity and specificity values were: benign epithelial proliferations 95.6% and 92.2%, epidermal inclusion cysts 92.2% and 88.0%, xanthelasma 97.5% and 100.0%, cysts of Moll 66.7% and 96.6%, naevi 39.4% and 99.8% and molluscum 20.0% and 99.8%, respectively. A dedicated nurse-led service is as effective in managing a range of clinically benign lid lesions as a doctor-led one, and clinician seniority has little impact on the diagnostic accuracy of these lesions.

  12. [Relation of psychological distress after diagnosis of gastric cancer at a cancer screening center with psychological support from public health nurses and family members].

    PubMed

    Fukui, Sakiko; Ozawa, Harumi

    2003-07-01

    The objectives of this study were to examine the degree of psychological distress during the first 6 months after diagnosis of gastric cancer and investigate the relation to psychological support from public health nurses and family members. One hundred and five patients with stomach, colorectal, or esophagus cancer were mailed a questionnaire. They were asked questions concerning the level of shock on the day of diagnosis, at 1-week after the diagnosis, and at 6 months post diagnosis. In addition, their physical and psychological status was assessed at the 6-month time point. They were also asked about perceived psychological support from public health nurses and family members. The relation between psychological distress and such psychological support was then assessed using multiple regression analyses. The levels of shock on the day of diagnosis and after 1-week were both significantly related to the psychological support from public health nurses. Physical and psychological status at 6 months post diagnosis was significantly related to the level of psychological support from the patient's family members. The study revealed that psychological support from public health nurses improves the level of patient psychological distress during the first 1 week after the cancer diagnosis. Psychological support from family members facilitates the physical and psychological adjustment at 6 months post diagnosis. The results indicate that psychological support is important just after cancer diagnosis and for longer term adjustment, pointing to a major role of health care professionals alleviating problems associated with cancer diagnosis.

  13. [Nursing diagnosis and interventions in a patient with multiple organ failure -- report of a case].

    PubMed

    Gerelli, A M; Soares, M A; Almeida, M A

    1999-07-01

    This study tries to identify Nursing Diagnoses and Interventions. It was done with a patient who was in critical health condition: multiple organs failure, in an Intensive Care Unit of a general hospital in Porto Alegre. The Case Study was the methodology used. Nursing Diagnoses is described mostly using NANDA Taxonomy. They are: Risk for Aspiration, Disuse Syndrome, Diarrhea, Risk for Infection, Impaired Tissue Integrity; and a Collaborative Problem was identified: Hypoglicemia. We have elaborated 34 Nursing Interventions for those diagnoses.

  14. Nursing Diagnosis Risk for Delayed Surgical Recovery (00246): Concept Clarification and Definition of Empirical Referents.

    PubMed

    Rembold, Simone Martins; Santana, Rosimere Ferreira; de Souza, Priscilla Alfradique; Schwartz, Sócrates Miranda de Oliveira Xavier

    2017-05-23

    To clarify the concept of risk for delayed surgical recovery (00246) and to define the empirical referents for identification of predictive factors of delay in recovery. A concept analysis was developed based on the eight steps proposed by Walker and Avant. Defining attributes were determined and antecedents and consequents identified. Cases were proposed cases and empirical referents established. The results provided evidences and instrumentalize empirical referents, which may support an accurate nursing diagnosis. This clarification may contribute to the return to daily activities in a shortest time and promote surgical safety of the patient. Clarificar o conceito de risco de recuperação cirúrgica retardada (00246) e definir as referências empíricas para a identificação dos fatores preditores de atraso na recuperação. MÉTODO: Foi desenvolvida a análise de conceito desse fenômeno, com base nas oito etapas propostas por Walker e Avant. Foram determinados os atributos definidores e identificados seus antecedentes e consequentes. Foram propostos casos e estabelecidas as referências empíricas. CONCLUSÕES: Os resultados proporcionaram evidências e instrumentalização das referências empíricas, o que pode auxiliar na acurácia do diagnóstico de enfermagem. IMPLICAÇÕES PARA A PRÁTICA DE ENFERMAGEM: Esta clarificação poderá contribuir para o retorno do paciente às atividades diárias em um tempo mais curto e promoção da segurança cirúrgica. © 2017 NANDA International, Inc.

  15. No Longer Undertreated? Depression Diagnosis and Antidepressant Therapy in Elderly Long Stay Nursing Home Residents, 1999–2007

    PubMed Central

    Gaboda, Dorothy; Lucas, Judith; Siegel, Michele; Kalay, Ece; Crystal, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To examine the evolution of depression identification and use of antidepressants in elderly long-stay nursing home residents from 1999 through 2007, and the associated sociodemographic and facility characteristics. DESIGN Annual cross-sectional analysis of merged resident assessment data from the Minimum Data Set (MDS) and facility characteristics from the Online Survey Certification and Reporting (OSCAR) data. SETTING Nursing homes in eight states (5,445 facilities). PARTICIPANTS Long-stay nursing home residents aged 65 and over (2,564,687 assessments). MEASUREMENTS Physician-documented depression diagnoses recorded in the MDS were used to identify residents with depression; antidepressant use was measured by MDS information about a resident’s receipt of an antidepressant in the seven days prior to assessment. RESULTS Both diagnosis of depression and antidepressant therapy among those diagnosed increased at a rapid rate. By 2007, 51.8% of residents were diagnosed with depression, among whom 82.8% received an antidepressant. Adjusted odds of treatment were higher for younger residents, whites, and those with moderate impairment of cognitive function. CONCLUSION This study demonstrates striking increases in depression diagnosis and treatment with antidepressant medications; however, disparities persist without clear evidence about underlying mechanisms. More research is needed to assess effectiveness of antidepressant prescribing. PMID:21410441

  16. The attitudes and attributions of student nurses: do they alter according to a person's diagnosis or sexuality and what is the effect of nurse training?

    PubMed

    Stewart, D

    1999-09-01

    The threat of an AIDS (acquired immune deficiency syndrome) epidemic in the early 1980s saw the emergence of strong negative attitudes from both the public and health care professionals alike. Certain 'high risk' groups in society, who were considered as susceptible to the disease, homosexuals and intravenous drug users in particular, became the victims of prejudice and discrimination. More recent research has indicated a possible shift to a more positive orientation, although the findings are far from conclusive. In this current study, the Prejudicial Evaluation and Social Interaction Scale (PESIS) was administered to four separate cohorts of student nurses approximately a year apart in training (n = 192). Each cohort was divided into four groups, each one completing the PESIS after reading a version of a vignette that described either a person with AIDS or leukaemia, and who was either homosexual or heterosexual. The design therefore allowed for within-group and between-group comparisons. Overall the results showed that the student nurses held positive attitudes although they reported a significantly greater prejudice towards AIDS. No significant differences were found for sexual orientation. Additionally significantly greater levels of blame and responsibility were associated with the person with AIDS, but again there was no effect for sexual orientation. The findings suggest that a slightly more negative attitude continues to be associated with a diagnosis of AIDS but no longer with homosexuality. No effect across cohorts was noted either, student nurses being as positive at the beginning of training as at the end. Some of the limitations of PESIS and the difficulties of attitude assessment in general are discussed and future areas of research are identified.

  17. [Follow-up of primary care patients with a NANDA I nursing diagnosis of low self-esteem].

    PubMed

    Díaz-Martín, Alicia; González-Carpio Paredes, Óscar

    2013-01-01

    To describe the evolution and characteristics of the NANDA taxonomy I nursing diagnosis of «situational low self-esteem» (SLS) and its related factors in Primary Care patients from the towns of Fuenlabrada and Leganés in the Autonomous Community of Madrid, in the period 2003-2009. An observational retrospective case series of patients diagnosed by their Primary Care nurse with SLS according to the NANDA I taxonomy. This case series was performed in the towns of Fuenlabrada and Leganes (Madrid). Descriptive analysis of the variables obtained from the database management software for electronic health records in Primary Care (OMI AP). Data observed in percentages. The main variable is 00120 NANDA I diagnosis: SLS. A total of 342 care plans with a SLS diagnosis having completed all the nursing process phases. The NANDA, NOC and NIC classifications were used for the diagnostic formulas, the performance criteria to measure the effectiveness and efficiency of care, and the interventions that were performed to achieve them. The assessment of the nursing process was made according to the Marjory Gordon Functional Health Patterns. The incidence between 2003 and 2009 increased 8-fold. The large majority (80%) were women, with 52.4% between 40 and 64 years. Eighteen percent of the cases were closed, with 88% positively resolved. The most frequent distinctive characteristic was «negative self-verbalization» (26.5%). The main related factors were «disturbed body image» (23.8%). The most established NOC was «to improve the self-esteem» (41.3%) and its evolution was positive in 61%. Just over half (53.2%) of the interventions were «to increase facing up to responsibilities» and «to boost self-esteem». More than half (55%) of the diagnoses were made due to psychological causes, with episodes of a feeling anxiety-nervousness-tension in 33%. Although the approach is still difficul, the resolution of psychosocial problems, particularly those of self-esteem, continue to

  18. Application of 4G wireless network-based system for remote diagnosis and nursing of stomal complications

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiulian; Cao, Yingjuan; Luan, Xiaorong

    2014-01-01

    Background: This study aims to apply 4G wireless network in the remote diagnosis of stoma complications for the first time. Background: Remote diagnosis and nursing care for a variety of illnesses are urgently needed in clinical settings. Objectives: Combining with relevant clinical manifestations, an Android phone-based intelligent diagnosis system was designed to construct a universe, easy access to exploitation and human-computer interaction database and exploitation environment for applications and programs. Methods: “Production rule” and forward reasoning method were utilized to design arborescence structures and logic reasoner associated with stoma complications. Stoma physicians were responsible for delivering evaluation scores on patients’ health status using analytic hierarchy process. The emphasis of this study is to exploit an “Android phone-based system for remote diagnosis of stoma”, which is of certain universe usage. Results: Such system was tested in the Medicine Information Center of Qilu Hospital of Shandong University and initially applied in the city of De Zhou, Shandong province, China. Conclusions: These results collectively demonstrated that the system is easy to carry, of high utility and free from the limitations of wire network environment, etc. It provides clinical evidence for establishing a novel type model for the exchange between patients and physicians. PMID:25550986

  19. Integrative review of factors related to the nursing diagnosis nausea during antineoplastic chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Moysés, Aline Maria Bonini; Durant, Lais Corsino; Almeida, Ana Maria de; Gozzo, Thais de Oliveira

    2016-10-10

    to identify factors related to the nursing diagnosis nausea among cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy. integrative review conducted in four electronic databases (PUBMED, EMBASE, CINAHL and LILACS) using the key words: neoplasia, antineoplastic agents and nausea. only 30 out of 1,258 papers identified met the inclusion criteria. The most frequent related factors were: being younger than 50 years old, motion sickness, being a woman, emetogenic potential of the chemotherapy, anxiety, conditioned stimulus, and expecting nausea after treatment. this review's findings, coupled with the incidence of nausea among cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy, reveal an important difference between evidence found and that used by NANDA International, Inc. Even though it provides an appropriate definition of related factors, it does not mention chemotherapy, despite the various studies addressing the topic using different designs and presenting various objectives and outcomes. identificar os fatores relacionados ao diagnóstico de enfermagem náusea entre pacientes oncológicos durante o tratamento quimioterápico. revisão integrativa de quatro bases eletrônicas de dados (PUBMED, EMBASE, CINAHL e LILACS) com as palavras-chaves neoplasia, agentes antineoplásicos e náusea. dos 1258 artigos identificados, somente 30 atenderam aos critérios de inclusão. Os fatores relacionados mais frequentes foram: idade abaixo de 50 anos, doença do movimento, sexo feminino, potencial emético do quimioterápico, ansiedade, estímulo condicionado e expectativa de náuseas depois do tratamento. diante dos resultados encontrados e da incidência de náusea entre os pacientes oncológicos em tratamento quimioterápico, observa-se diferença importante entre as evidências encontradas e as utilizadas pela NANDA International, Inc. Apesar da definição estar adequada entre os fatores relacionados, não há menção à quimioterapia mesmo com inúmeros estudos, com diferentes delineamentos

  20. Building Care Bridges between Acute and Long-Term Care with Nursing Diagnosis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Carol A.

    The increasing age of the American population and the current emphasis on cost containment in health care make the 1980s an ideal time for building bridges to span the health care needs of elderly persons in acute care and long-term care. While hospitals often discharge patients to nursing homes as an intermediate step between hospitalization and…

  1. A Comparison of Physicians and Nurse Practitioners as Instructors in a Physical Diagnosis Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stillman, Paula L.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    In 1976-77 a physical examination course taught by nurse practitioners (NPs) at the University of Arizona College of Medicine was implemented. In 1977-78 a research project examined whether students' ability to perform varied according to whether they were taught by NPs, residents, or physicians; no significant differences were found. (Author/MLW)

  2. Risk factors for unstable blood glucose level: integrative review of the risk factors related to the nursing diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira, Andressa Magalhães; Tsukamoto, Rosangela; Lopes, Camila Takáo; Silva, Rita de Cassia Gengo e

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: to identify evidence in the literature on the possible risk factors for the risk of unstable blood glucose diagnosis in individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus, and to compare them with the risk factors described by NANDA International. Method: an integrative literature review guided by the question: what are the risk factors for unstable blood glucose level in people with type 2 diabetes mellitus? Primary studies were included whose outcomes were variations in glycemic levels, published in English, Portuguese or Spanish, in PubMed or CINAHL between 2010 and 2015. Results: altered levels of glycated hemoglobin, body mass index>31 kg/m2, previous history of hypoglycemia, cognitive deficit/dementia, autonomic cardiovascular neuropathy, comorbidities and weight loss corresponded to risk factors described in NANDA International. Other risk factors identified were: advanced age, black skin color, longer length of diabetes diagnosis, daytime sleepiness, macroalbuminuria, genetic polymorphisms, insulin therapy, use of oral antidiabetics, and use of metoclopramide, inadequate physical activity and low fasting glycemia. Conclusions: risk factors for the diagnosis, risk for unstable blood glucose level, for persons with type 2 diabetes mellitus were identified, and 42% of them corresponded to those of NANDA International. These findings may contribute to the practice of clinical nurses in preventing the deleterious effects of glycemic variation. PMID:28591300

  3. Revealing a cancer diagnosis to patients: attitudes of patients, families, friends, nurses, and physicians in Lebanon—results of a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Farhat, F.; Othman, A.; el Baba, G.; Kattan, J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Disclosure of a cancer diagnosis to patients is a major problem for physicians in Lebanon. Our survey aimed to identify the attitudes of patients, families and friends, nurses, and physicians regarding disclosure of a cancer diagnosis. Methods Study participants included 343 physicians, nurses, cancer patients, families, and friends from clinics in two major hospitals in Lebanon. All completed a 29-item questionnaire that assessed, by demographic group, the information provided about cancer, opinions about the disclosure of the diagnosis to cancer patients, perceived consequences to patients, and the roles of family, friends, and religion. Results Overall, 7.8% of the patients were convinced that cancer is incurable. Nearly 82% preferred to be informed about their diagnosis. Similarly, 83% of physicians were in favour of disclosing a cancer diagnosis to their patients. However, only 14% of the physicians said that they revealed the truth to the patients themselves, with only 9% doing so immediately after confirmation of the diagnosis. Disclosure of a cancer diagnosis was preferred before the start of the treatment by 59% of the patients and immediately after confirmation of the diagnosis by 72% of the physicians. Overall, 86% of physicians, 51% of nurses, and 69% of patients and their families believed that religion helped with the acceptance of a cancer diagnosis. A role for family in accepting the diagnosis was reported by 74% of the patients, 56% of the nurses, and 88% of the physicians. All participants considered that fear was the most difficult feeling (63%) experienced by cancer patients, followed by pain (29%), pity (8%), and death (1%), with no statistically significant difference between the answers given by the participant groups. Conclusions The social background in Lebanese society is the main obstacle to revealing the truth to cancer patients. Lebanese patients seem to prefer direct communication of the truth, but families take the opposite

  4. Do epilepsy specialist nurses use a similar history-taking process as consultant neurologists in the differential diagnosis of patients presenting with a first seizure?

    PubMed

    Goodwin, Mel

    2011-12-01

    The development of specialist nursing practice has blurred the boundaries between medicine and nursing. This mainly qualitative study compares the structure of epilepsy specialist nurse (ESN) and consultant neurologist (CN) clinical interviews at first seizure presentation and opinion on diagnosis. Twenty patients with a suspected first seizure were randomly allocated for clinical review with an ESN and then a CN, or vice versa. Clinical interviews were unstructured and audio-recorded. The ESN and CN reached an independent diagnosis for each patient. Audiotapes were transcribed verbatim. Emergent themes were identified, catalogued and grouped into major thematic areas. Annotated audio recordings, medical notes and dictated clinic letters were used to validate findings. Statistical analysis of inter-rater agreement of diagnosis was evaluated using Kappa. The clinical interviews of CN and ESN were similar in structure. Differences demonstrated CNs concentrated on the prodrome to events and expressed less diagnostic uncertainty. ESNs concentrated on post-ictal recovery and used more investigations. Complete disagreement on diagnosis occurred in 5 (25%) patients. Kappa score=0.510, demonstrating a moderate level of inter rater agreement on diagnosis between the CN and ESN. 2011 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Cohort study of institutionalized elderly people: fall risk factors from the nursing diagnosis1

    PubMed Central

    dos Reis, Karine Marques Costa; de Jesus, Cristine Alves Costa

    2015-01-01

    Objective: to determine the incidence of falls in elderly residents of long-stay institutions of the Federal District, to identify the aspects involved in the falls, in terms of risk factors, from the application of scales and the Taxonomy II of NANDA-I, and to define the level of accuracy with its sensitivity and specificity for application in the clinical nursing practice. Method: this was a cohort study with the evaluation of 271 elderly people. Cognition, functionality, mobility and other intrinsic factors were evaluated. After six months, the elderly people who fell were identified, with significance analysis then performed to define the risk factors. Results: the results showed an incidence of 41%. Of the 271 patients included, 69 suffered 111 episodes of falls during the monitoring period. Risk factors were the presence of stroke with its sequelae (OR: 1.82, 95% CI 1.01 - 3.28, p=.045), presenting more than five chronic diseases (OR: 2.82, 95% CI 1.43 - 5.56, p=.0028), foot problem (OR: 2.45, 95% CI 1.35 - 4.44, p=.0033) and motion (OR: 2.04, 95% CI 1.15 - 3.61, p=.0145). Conclusion: the taxonomy has high validity regarding the detection of elderly people at risk of falling and should be applied consistently in the clinical nursing practice. PMID:26626005

  6. Scope of a nursing diagnostic list for fulfilling basic human needs in home-visit nursing.

    PubMed

    Esaki, Fusako; Muranaka, Yoko; Tamaki, Miyoko; Akiba, Kimiko; Aoki, Ryouko

    2006-01-01

    Inscriptions on 291 nursing diagnosis items regarding 100 home convalescents were subjected to analysis. The 291-item nursing diagnosis was found to be consistent with a previously reported nursing diagnosis developed by the authors from Henderson's 14 items covering basic nursing practice. Additionally, the analysis indicated a need for nursing diagnosis items for family members, as caregivers for the patients recuperating at home.

  7. Parental role conflict: the nursing diagnosis in mothers of hospitalized newborns.

    PubMed

    Carmona, Elenice Valentim; do Vale, Ianê Nogueira; Ohara, Conceição Vieira da Silva; Abrão, Ana Cristina Freitas de Vilhena

    2013-01-01

    To verify if mothers of newborns hospitalized recognize the defining characteristics of "parental role conflict" as representative of that experience. A cross-sectional and descriptive study, developed in a neonatal unit of a public teaching hospital in the state of São Paulo. The sample consisted of 100 women who assigned scores of 1 to 5 to the defining characteristics of the diagnosis, where 1 meant "not at all characteristic" and 5 meant "completely characteristic of what I am experiencing." Of the total sample, 96 women self-identified with the diagnosis. The most prevalent defining characteristics were: "anxiety," "mother expresses concern(s) in relation to changes in maternal role"; "verbalizes feelings of frustration," "reports concern about family" and "fear". Women who were with their children less often during hospitalization had a higher number of defining characteristics. There was a high prevalence of the defining characteristics of the studied diagnosis, suggesting the relevance of the topic and the need for further studies to be developed in the neonatal unit.

  8. Nursing diagnosis in older adults with chronic kidney disease on hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Debone, Mayara Cristina; Pedruncci, Elisângela da Silva Nunes; Candido, Maristela do Carmo Peterossi; Marques, Sueli; Kusumota, Luciana

    2017-01-01

    To identify the main nursing diagnoses (NSs) in older adult patients under hemodialysis treatment. Exploratory research using case studies in data collection performed by interview and physical examination of older adults, in the first semester of 2016. Were included twenty-eight older adults undergoing chronic hemodialysis treatment who met the selection criteria. The analysis followed two steps (RISNER, 1990): Phase I - Data analysis and synthesis; and Phase II - Establishment of nursing diagnoses using the taxonomy of NANDA-I (2015). The total of NSs was 110, averaging 3.9 per patient. It was listed seven different NSs, and both the Risk of infection and the Volume of excessive liquids appeared on all patients (28; 100%), and risk of electrolyte imbalance, in 26 (96.8%) older adults, being considered as main NSs. Such results can help systematize the care of older people who are undergoing hemodialysis treatment. Identificar os principais diagnósticos de enfermagem (DEs) em pacientes idosos em tratamento hemodialítico. Pesquisa exploratória utilizando estudos de casos na coleta de dados realizada por entrevista e exame físico dos idosos, no primeiro semestre de 2016. Foram incluídos 28 idosos em tratamento crônico por hemodiálise que atenderam aos critérios de seleção. A análise seguiu duas etapas (RISNER, 1990): Fase I - Análise e síntese dos dados; e Fase II - Estabelecimento dos diagnósticos de enfermagem utilizando a taxonomia da NANDA-I (2015). O total de DEs foi de 110, com média de 3,9 por paciente. Foram elencados sete DEs diferentes, sendo que tanto o Risco de infecção quanto o Volume de líquidos excessivo apareceram em todos os pacientes (28; 100%), e Risco de desequilíbrio eletrolítico, em 26 (96,8%) idosos, sendo considerados como principais DEs. Tais resultados podem colaborar na sistematização da assistência do idoso em tratamento hemodialítico.

  9. Nursing Diagnosis Based on Signs and Symptoms of Patients With Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    da Costa, Cíntia; da Costa Linch, Graciele Fernanda; Nogueira de Souza, Emiliane

    2016-10-01

    The aim was to identify the main signs and symptoms of cardiac patients hospitalized in a unit of intensive cardiology care in order to infer the main nursing diagnoses (NDs). We performed a cross-sectional study; the sample consisted of 77 randomly selected records. Those records included only patients hospitalized for cardiovascular causes and with electronic chart available. Signs and symptoms identified at admission were psychic (40.3%), compressive dressing on arterial puncture site (33.8%), chest pain (29.9%), tachycardia (22.1%), and hemodynamic instability (20.8%). According to the data collected, we were able to infer that acute pain, excess of fluid volume, decreased cardiac output, spontaneous ventilation impaired, anxiety and impaired skin integrity are priority for the NDs in the studied population. OBJETIVO: identificar os principais sinais e sintomas de pacientes cardíacos internados em uma unidade de cuidados intensivos de cardiologia, visando inferir os diagnósticos de enfermagem prioritários. MÉTODO: Estudo transversal; a amostra foi composta por 77 registros selecionados aleatoriamente. Incluíram-se apenas pacientes internados por causa cardiovascular e com registro eletrônico disponível. Os sinais e sintomas identificados na admissão foram psíquicos (40,3%), curativo compressivo em sítio de punção arterial (33,8%), dor torácica (29,9%), taquicardia (22,1%) e instabilidade hemodinâmica (20,8%). CONCLUSÕES E IMPLICAÇÕES PARA A PRÁTICA: De acordo com os dados levantados foram inferidos Dor Aguda, Volume de Líquidos Excessivo, Débito Cardíaco Diminuído, Ventilação Espontânea Prejudicada, Ansiedade e Integridade da Pele Prejudicada como diagnósticos de enfermagem prioritários para a população estudada. © 2016 NANDA International, Inc.

  10. Interventions to improve mental health nurses' skills, attitudes, and knowledge related to people with a diagnosis of borderline personality disorder: Systematic review.

    PubMed

    Dickens, Geoffrey L; Hallett, Nutmeg; Lamont, Emma

    2016-04-01

    There is some evidence that mental health nurses have poor attitudes towards people with a diagnosis of borderline personality disorder and that this might impact negatively on the development of helpful therapeutic relationships. We aimed to collate the current evidence about interventions that have been devised to improve the responses of mental health nurses towards this group of people. Systematic review in accordance with the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta Analyses statement. Comprehensive terms were used to search CINAHL, PsycINFO, Medline, Biomedical Reference Collection: Comprehensive, Web of Science, ASSIA, Cochrane Library, EMBASE, ProQuest [including Dissertations/Theses], and Google Scholar for relevant studies. Included studies were those that described an intervention whose aim was to improve attitudes towards, knowledge about or responses to people with a diagnosis of borderline personality disorder. The sample described had to include mental health nurses. Information about study characteristics, intervention content and mode of delivery was extracted. Study quality was assessed, and effect sizes of interventions and potential moderators of those interventions were extracted and converted to Cohen's d to aid comparison. The search strategy yielded a total of eight studies, half of which were judged to be methodologically weak with the remaining four studies judged to be of moderate quality. Only one study employed a control group. The largest effect sizes were found for changes related to cognitive attitudes including knowledge; smaller effect sizes were found in relation to changes in affective outcomes. Self-reported behavioural change in the form of increased use of components of Dialectical Behaviour Therapy following training in this treatment was associated with moderate effect sizes. The largest effect sizes were found among those with poorer baseline attitudes and without previous training about borderline

  11. [Impact of the codification of nursing activities on mean diagnosis of weight related group and its effects on hospital financing].

    PubMed

    Sebastián Viana, Tomás; Del Pozo Herranz, Purificación; Navalón Cebrián, Rafael; Lema Lorenzo, Isabel; Nogueiras Quintas, Carmen Gloria

    2009-01-01

    To assess the impact of codification of nursing activities and procedures on a hospital's weighting and finance. Codification was performed in two inpatient settings using discharge data. Nurses' procedures and patient conditions falling within nurses' responsibilities were codified. New mean weights for diagnosisrelated groups (DRGs) and hospital complexity units (HCU) were calculated, as were their effects on finance. In January and February, 2006, the mean weighting in the medical admission unit increased by 0.0655, representing 7.2727 more HCU and a rise in the monthly budget of 13,092.25euro. On January of 2006, the mean weighting in the surgical admission unit increased by 0.0747 representing 10.8315 HCU and an increase in the monthly budget of 19,498.76euro. Codification of nursing activities has improved the case mix and has had a positive effect on the hospital's finance.

  12. Risk factors for unstable blood glucose level: integrative review of the risk factors related to the nursing diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Andressa Magalhães; Tsukamoto, Rosangela; Lopes, Camila Takáo; Silva, Rita de Cassia Gengo E

    2017-06-05

    to identify evidence in the literature on the possible risk factors for the risk of unstable blood glucose diagnosis in individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus, and to compare them with the risk factors described by NANDA International. an integrative literature review guided by the question: what are the risk factors for unstable blood glucose level in people with type 2 diabetes mellitus? Primary studies were included whose outcomes were variations in glycemic levels, published in English, Portuguese or Spanish, in PubMed or CINAHL between 2010 and 2015. altered levels of glycated hemoglobin, body mass index>31 kg/m2, previous history of hypoglycemia, cognitive deficit/dementia, autonomic cardiovascular neuropathy, comorbidities and weight loss corresponded to risk factors described in NANDA International. Other risk factors identified were: advanced age, black skin color, longer length of diabetes diagnosis, daytime sleepiness, macroalbuminuria, genetic polymorphisms, insulin therapy, use of oral antidiabetics, and use of metoclopramide, inadequate physical activity and low fasting glycemia. risk factors for the diagnosis, risk for unstable blood glucose level, for persons with type 2 diabetes mellitus were identified, and 42% of them corresponded to those of NANDA International. These findings may contribute to the practice of clinical nurses in preventing the deleterious effects of glycemic variation. identificar evidências na literatura acerca de possíveis fatores de risco do diagnóstico risco de glicemia instável para pessoas com diabetes mellitus tipo 2 e compará-los com os fatores de risco descritos pela NANDA International . revisão integrativa norteada pela pergunta: quais são os fatores de risco de glicemia instável em pessoas com diabetes mellitus tipo 2? Incluíram-se estudos primários cujos desfechos eram variações nos níveis glicêmicos, publicados em inglês, português ou espanhol no PubMed ou CINAHL entre 2010 e 2015. observou

  13. Diagnosis and treatment of (disease-related) in-hospital malnutrition: the performance of medical and nursing staff.

    PubMed

    Bavelaar, J W; Otter, C D; van Bodegraven, A A; Thijs, A; van Bokhorst-de van der Schueren, M A E

    2008-06-01

    Malnutrition continues to be an important problem in health care which is still under recognized and underrated in developed countries. This study aims to describe current practice in diagnosing and treating malnutrition by medical doctors, medical students and nurses prior, during and after hospitalisation. Prospective analysis of current practice in assessing nutritional status and prescribing treatment by medical and nursing staff in a cohort of hospitalised patients from the general medical wards of the VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam. Comparison of objective identification of malnutrition by an independent observer with subjective identification by the medical and nursing staff. Quantification of diagnosing, treating and communicating malnutrition before, during and following hospital stay by medical doctors, medical students and nurses by evaluating the written information in medical and nursing charts, and referral and discharge letters. Three hundred and ninety-five women and men, aged 19-96 years, were included from June to September 2005. The prevalence of malnutrition was 31.9%. Nutritional information was not mentioned in written referrals. Medical doctors performed nutritional assessment in 15.3%, medical students in 52.8%, and nurses in 29.9% of their patients. Medical doctors were the most capable of differentiating between malnourished and well-nourished patients as a basis for undertaking nutritional assessment, although this was still inadequate. Little nutritional intervention was applied during hospital stay. Information on nutritional status was lacking in most discharge letters. Nutritional follow-up was appointed in 1.2%. Nutritional assessment and intervention were not sufficiently applied by any professional at any stage of the pre-, actual and post-hospitalisation period.

  14. Diagnosis and Medication Overload? A Nurse Review of the Psychiatric Histories of Older Youth in Treatment Foster Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Narendorf, Sarah Carter; Bertram, Julie; McMillen, J. Curtis

    2011-01-01

    Prior research has raised concern about the appropriateness of psychotropic medication use and the validity of psychiatric diagnosing for youth in child welfare but has lacked in-depth case information. This study reports results from a psychiatric nurse review conducted with eight youth entering a foster care intervention using case records and…

  15. Diagnosis and Medication Overload? A Nurse Review of the Psychiatric Histories of Older Youth in Treatment Foster Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Narendorf, Sarah Carter; Bertram, Julie; McMillen, J. Curtis

    2011-01-01

    Prior research has raised concern about the appropriateness of psychotropic medication use and the validity of psychiatric diagnosing for youth in child welfare but has lacked in-depth case information. This study reports results from a psychiatric nurse review conducted with eight youth entering a foster care intervention using case records and…

  16. Emotional reaction to diagnosis of infertility in Kuwait and successful clients' perception of nurses' role during treatment

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The unfulfilled desire of millions of infertile couples worldwide to have their own biological children results in emotional distress. This study evaluated the emotional reactions of couples attending a combined infertility clinic in Kuwait and successful clients' perception of nurses. Methods Quantitative and qualitative methods were used. The first phase was by structured interview using two standardized psychological scales: the 25-item Hopkins Symptom Checklist and Modified Fertility Adjustment Scale. Data were collected from 268 couples attending the combined infertility clinic, between October 2002 and September 2007. The second phase was a semi-structured interview of 10 clients who got pregnant following treatment. The interview explored their feelings and perception of the nurses' role. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and analyzed. Results The average duration of infertility was 4 years; 65.7% of the women and 76.1% of men suffered from primary infertility. Emotional reactions experienced were: anxiety in women (12.7%) and men (6%), depression in women (5.2%) and men (14.9%) and reduced libido in women (6.7%) and men (29.9%). Also in men, 14.9% experienced premature ejaculation, 5.2% weak ejaculation and 7.9% had impotence although 4.9% were transient. In the semi-structured interviews, the emotions expressed were similar and in addition to anger, feelings of devastation, powerlessness, sense of failure and frustration. In the survey, 12.7% of the men were found to show more anxiety than women (6%). Although all the 10 women interviewed confirmed they were anxious; only 4 of their partners were reported to be sad or anxious. Successful clients' perception of nurses' roles included nurses carrying out basic nursing procedures, communicating, educating about investigative and treatment procedures, providing emotional support by listening, encouraging, reassuring and being empathetic. Conclusions This study illuminates the emotional reactions

  17. Discharge of Non-Acute Coronary Syndrome Chest Pain Patients From Emergency Care to an Advanced Nurse Practitioner-Led Chest Pain Clinic: A Cross-Sectional Study of Referral Source and Final Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Ingram, Shirley J; McKee, Gabrielle; Quirke, Mary B; Kelly, Niamh; Moloney, Ashling

    Chest pain is a common presentation to emergency departments (EDs). Pathways for patients with non-acute coronary syndrome (ACS) chest pain are not optimal. An advanced cardiology nurse-led chest pain service was commenced to address this. The aim of the study was to assess the outcomes of non-ACS patients discharged from ED to an advanced cardiology nurse-led chest pain clinic and compare by referral type (nurse or ED physician). The service consisted of advanced cardiology nurse or ED physician consultation in the ED and discharge to advanced nurse-led chest pain clinic review less than 72 hours after discharge. Referrals were by the advanced nurses during consult hours and out-of-hours were by the ED physicians. Data were extracted from case notes. This was a 1-site cross-sectional study of patients attending the chest pain clinic over 2 years. Confirmed coronary disease was diagnosed in 24% of patients. Of the 1041 patients, 45% were referred by the advanced nurses, who referred significantly more patients who were older (56.5 years/52.3 years), had positive exercise stress test results (21%/12%), and were diagnosed with stable coronary artery disease (19%/11%) and less patients with musculoskeletal diagnosis (5%/13%) and other noncardiac pain (36%/45%). The study fills a gap in the literature on the follow up of non-ACS patients who present to ED and used advanced cardiology nursing expertise in the ED and chest pain clinic. The advanced nurse referred more patients who were diagnosed with coronary disease, reflecting the expertise, experience, and efficiency of the advanced cardiology nurse-led service.

  18. Nursing Homes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Most nursing homes have nursing aides and skilled nurses on hand 24 hours a day. Some nursing ... speech and occupational therapy. There might be a nurses' station on each floor. Other nursing homes try ...

  19. Nurse practitioner malpractice data: Informing nursing education.

    PubMed

    Sweeney, Casey Fryer; LeMahieu, Anna; Fryer, George E

    Nurse practitioners (NPs) are often identified in medical malpractice claims. However, the use of malpractice data to inform the development of nursing curriculum is limited. The purpose of this study is to examine medical errors committed by NPs. Using National Practitioner Data Bank public use data, years 1990 to 2014, NP malpractice claims were classified by event type, patient outcome, setting, and number of practitioners involved. The greatest proportion of malpractice claims involving nurse practitioners were diagnosis related (41.46%) and treatment related (30.79%). Severe patient outcomes most often occurred in the outpatient setting. Nurse practitioners were independently responsible for the event in the majority of the analyzed claims. Moving forward, nurse practitioner malpractice data should be continuously analyzed and used to inform the development of nurse practitioner education standards and graduate program curriculum to address areas of clinical weakness and improve quality of care and patient safety. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Perceptions and Attitudes Toward NANDA-I Nursing Diagnoses: A Cross-Sectional Study of Jordanian Nursing Students.

    PubMed

    Abed El-Rahman, Mona; Al Kalaldeh, Mahmoud T; Malak, Malakeh Z

    2017-01-01

    To assess the perceptions and attitudes of undergraduate nursing students toward NANDA-I nursing diagnosis. A descriptive cross-sectional design was used. A convenient sample was recruited from nursing students at Zarqa University/Jordan. Perceptions toward NANDA-I Nursing Diagnosis scale and Positions on Nursing Diagnosis scale were used. A total of 101 nursing students were included. A correct perception toward NANDA-I nursing diagnosis was evident. Attitudes toward NANDA appeared positive. However, insufficient distinction between nursing diagnosis and medical diagnosis and feeling less comfort while using NANDA-I were reported. Nursing students showed correct perceptions and positive attitudes toward the application of NANDA-I. Proper implementation of NANDA-I is a prerequisite to the better understanding of nursing language. © 2015 NANDA International, Inc.

  1. One Method for Comparing Different Nursing Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sohn, Kum Sook

    1991-01-01

    Discusses a simple method for comparing nursing models, using a four-step framework: assessment, diagnosis plan, implementation, and evaluation. Uses four nursing models as illustrations--Henderson, Orem, Neuman, and Roy. (JOW)

  2. Nurses' Own Recordkeeping: The Nursing Minimum Data Set Revisited.

    PubMed

    Halloran, Edward J; Halloran, Diane C

    2015-11-01

    There is no consistent, standardized, concise method for nurses to record information about their patients and clients that is conducive to store, retrieve, and use in patient and client care; to improve professional self-development; and to use in collaboration with patients and clients, their families, other nurses, doctors, hospitals, and health systems. Nurses gauge the health status of their patients and clients every day and are now in a position both to record their impressions for their own use and to share them with colleagues who care for the same patients and clients. What is now needed is a way to record these clinical impressions within an authoritative format that is related to the depth and breadth of the clinical literature related to nursing and the needs of the patients and clients nurses serve. The International Council of Nurses' Nurse-Patient Summary is proposed here to fill the gulf between narrative nurses' notes, proprietary and widely varying electronic health record systems, and information from nurses about their patiens and clients human needs. The International Council of Nurses' Nurse-Patient Summary could replace nursing diagnosis items in the Nursing Minimum Data Set and serve as a substitute for the World Health Organization's International Classification of Function, Disability and Health, a seldom used instrument derived from the International Council of Nurses' Basic Principles of Nursing Care.

  3. Mental health nurses' attitudes, behaviour, experience and knowledge regarding adults with a diagnosis of borderline personality disorder: systematic, integrative literature review.

    PubMed

    Dickens, Geoffrey L; Lamont, Emma; Gray, Sarah

    2016-07-01

    To establish whether mental health nurses responses to people with borderline personality disorder are problematic and, if so, to inform solutions to support change. There is some evidence that people diagnosed with borderline personality disorder are unpopular among mental health nurses who respond to them in ways which could be counter-therapeutic. Interventions to improve nurses' attitudes have had limited success. Systematic, integrative literature review. Computerised databases were searched from inception to April 2015 for papers describing primary research focused on mental health nurses' attitudes, behaviour, experience, and knowledge regarding adults diagnosed with borderline personality disorder. Analysis of qualitative studies employed metasynthesis; analysis of quantitative studies was informed by the theory of planned behaviour. Forty studies were included. Only one used direct observation of clinical practice. Nurses' knowledge and experiences vary widely. They find the group very challenging to work with, report having many training needs, and, objectively, their attitudes are poorer than other professionals' and poorer than towards other diagnostic groups. Nurses say they need a coherent therapeutic framework to guide their practice, and their experience of caregiving seems improved where this exists. Mental health nurses' responses to people with borderline personality disorder are sometimes counter-therapeutic. As interventions to change them have had limited success there is a need for fresh thinking. Observational research to better understand the link between attitudes and clinical practice is required. Evidence-based education about borderline personality disorder is necessary, but developing nurses to lead in the design, implementation and teaching of coherent therapeutic frameworks may have greater benefits. There should be greater focus on development and implementation of a team-wide approach, with nurses as equal partners, when working

  4. [Analysis of the nursing practice in a medical ICU based on an electronic nursing record].

    PubMed

    Song, Kyung Ja

    2007-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the entity of critical care nursing practices through analyzing nursing statements described by electronic nursing records in a MICU. 176,459 nursing statements of 188 patients during a 6 month-stay were analyzed statement by statement according to the nursing process(nursing phenomena, nursing diagnosis, & nursing activity) and 21 nursing components of Saba's Clinical Care Classification. Among 176,459 single statements, the statements of nursing activity ranked first in number. The contents of the statements were analyzed and categorized by main themes. Among 489 categorized themes, the number of themes of nursing phenomena statements was the highest. When analyzed by Saba's clinical Care Classification, the nursing statements mainly included a physiological component. Among 21 components, the respiratory component ranked in the first position in nursing phenomena, nursing diagnosis and nursing activity. The extra statements not included in the 21 components were 9,294(15.1%) in nursing phenomena and 21,949(22.7%) in nursing activity. Most are statements related to tests and the doctor. The entity of MICU nursing practice expressed by electronic nursing records was mainly focused on physiological components and more precisely on respiratory components.

  5. Nursing: Registered Nurses

    MedlinePlus

    ... in hospitals, physicians’ offices, home healthcare services, and nursing care facilities. Others work in correctional facilities or ... of three education paths: a bachelor’s degree in nursing, an associate’s degree in nursing, or a diploma ...

  6. Nursing Supplies

    MedlinePlus

    ... Stages Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Nursing Supplies Page Content Article Body Throughout most of ... budget. (Nursing equipment also makes wonderful baby gifts.) Nursing Bras A well-made nursing bra that comfortably ...

  7. Diagnostic-specific outcomes and nursing effectiveness research.

    PubMed

    Moorhead, Sue; Johnson, Marion

    2004-01-01

    To review the use of diagnosis-specific outcomes in health care and nursing. Published literature, information databases. The need to identify nursing diagnosis-specific outcomes is necessary in order to expand nursing's knowledge base and identify the cost-effectiveness of nursing interventions. Outcomes work needs to be done across settings where care is provided. Outcomes information is necessary to identify the cost and impact of nursing interventions.

  8. American Nurses Association Nursing World

    MedlinePlus

    ... ANA » My ANA » Shop » ANA Nursing Knowledge Center Nursing Insider News 09/28/17 ANA Enterprise CEO ... Wake of Police Abuse of Registered Nurse More Nursing Insider News Upcoming Events 10/17/2017 - 10/ ...

  9. Nursing: What's a Nurse Practitioner?

    MedlinePlus

    ... nurses, or APNs) have a master's degree in nursing (MS or MSN) and board certification in their ... Nurse Practitioners (NAPNAP) and through local hospitals or nursing schools. Also, many doctors share office space with ...

  10. [Family oriented nursing care].

    PubMed

    Lima-Rodríguez, Joaquin Salvador; Lima-Serrano, Marta; Sáez-Bueno, Africa

    2009-01-01

    Nursing has experienced an important methodological development, in which it gives priority to the individual, although at a socioeconomic level a marked interest is seen in the health care of the family unit and the NANDA (North American Nursing Diagnosis Association), NIC (Nursing Interventions Classification) and NOC (Nursing Outcomes Classification) nursing guidelines, using diagnoses, criteria of results and interventions orientated towards this aim. We consider to the family as an opened system consisted of human elements, with a common history, which they form a functional unit been ruled by own procedure. In this paper we look at those aspects that must be taken into account in nursing assessment of families from a systemic perspective, including some tools for data collection and analysis of information. In addition, we identify specific areas of intervention. We believe that the family must be studied from a nursing care point of view with its own characteristics as opposed to those possessed individually by each of its members. We also believe that, when assessment is centred on the Henderson unaided activities study or the Gordon functional health patterns, they are not useful in assessing the family unit. This work offers an assessment method centred on the family unit, which helps to identify the nursing diagnoses applicable to it. Our proposal, which has been successfully used by nursing students over the last few years, hopes to contribute to quality clinical practice with a tool orientated towards the family.

  11. Advocating for nurses and nursing.

    PubMed

    Tomajan, Karen

    2012-01-31

    Every nurse has the opportunity to make a positive impact on the profession through day-to-day advocacy for nurses and the nursing profession. In this article the author defines advocacy; describes advocacy skills every nurse can employ to advocate for a safe and healthy work environment; and explains how nurses can advocate for nursing as part of their daily activity whether they are point-of-care nurses, nurse managers, or nurse educators. The advocacy practices discussed are applicable whether advocating on one's own behalf, for colleagues at the unit level, or for issues at the organizational or system level.

  12. Nursing, Nursing Education, and Anxiety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biggers, Thompson; And Others

    In response to the current crisis in the field of nursing, a study examined nursing students' perceived work-related stress and differences among associate degree, diploma, and baccalaureate nursing programs in their preparation of nursing students. The 171 subjects, representing the three different nursing programs, completed a questionnaire…

  13. Nursing Positions

    MedlinePlus

    ... Habits for TV, Video Games, and the Internet Nursing Positions KidsHealth > For Parents > Nursing Positions Print A ... and actually needs to feed. Getting Comfortable With Breastfeeding Nursing can be one of the most challenging ...

  14. [Nursing diagnoses and reports. An appropriate relationship?].

    PubMed

    López Medina, Isabel M; Pancorbo Hidalgo, Pedro L; Sánchez Jurado, Laura I; Sánchez Criado, Vicente

    2003-03-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the use of nursing diagnosis in nursing discharge planning, according to NANDA taxonomy adapted to the model of V. Henderson. We have made a retrospective descriptive study analyzing 260 discharge care plan reports, from a county hospital of Jaén (Spain), during the period 1994-1998. We found 4.2 +/- 2.0 (average +/- standard deviation) nursing problems by discharge plan report. 62.4% of the problems were stated correctly as nursing diagnosis, with an average of 2.6 +/- 1.9 correct nursing diagnosis by report and 37.6% were incorrect nursing diagnosis, 1.6 +/- 1.1 by report as average. Most of the registered nursing problems (95.6%) were actual problems, present in the patients; a 4.3% were potential or high risk problems, and only one possible type nursing diagnosis was identified. After grouping the nursing problems according to the needs of the model of Virginia Henderson, we find that most of diagnosis cited were included in biological needs, and in smaller number to the psychosocial needs.

  15. Nursing phenomena in inpatient psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Frauenfelder, F; Müller-Staub, M; Needham, I; Van Achterberg, T

    2011-04-01

    Little is known about the question if the nursing diagnosis classification of North American Nursing Association-International (NANDA-I) describes the adult inpatient psychiatric nursing care. The present study aimed to identify nursing phenomena mentioned in journal articles about the psychiatric inpatient nursing care and to compare these phenomena with the labels and the definitions of the nursing diagnoses to elucidate how well this classification covers these phenomena. A search of journal articles took place in the databases MedLine, PsychInfo, Cochrane and CINAHL. A qualitative content analysis approach was used to identify nursing phenomena in the articles. Various phenomena were found in the articles. The study demonstrated that NANDA-I describes essential phenomena for the adult inpatient psychiatry on the level of labels and definitions. However, some apparently important nursing phenomena are not covered by the labels or definitions of NANDA-I. Other phenomena are assigned as defining characteristics or as related factors to construct nursing diagnoses. The further development of the classification NANDA-I will strengthen the application in the daily work of psychiatric nurses and enhance the quality of nursing care in the inpatient setting. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing.

  16. Restructuring registered nurse curricula.

    PubMed

    Hegge, M

    1995-01-01

    National initiatives in higher education, health reform, and the nursing curriculum revolution are applied to five curricular patterns for registered nurse (RN) upward mobility baccalaureate education. American Association of Higher Education principles for quality baccalaureate education are applied to the curricular models. The patterns described are: community model, health promotion model, nursing diagnosis model, case management model, and caring model. Three educational strategies for prompting paradigm shifts in RNs who return to school are discussed: collaborative learning, portfolios, and self-assessments. These learning strategies are designed to move the adult student through Perry's phases of cognitive development from duality to relativism. The combination of fresh new curriculum patterns and collaborative learning strategies can empower nurses to discover new paradigms with which to transform the profession.

  17. Nursing care and treatment of patients with bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Turner, B

    Bladder cancer is the second most common urological cancer after prostate cancer in the UK. This article aims to update nurses knowledge about the disease, focusing on diagnosis, treatment and nursing care.

  18. The Opinions of Nursing Students Regarding the Nursing Process and Their Levels of Proficiency in Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Taskın Yilmaz, Feride; Sabanciogullari, Selma; Aldemir, Kadriye

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Nursing process, as a scientific method of nursing practice, is an important tool for putting nursing knowledge into practice which increases the quality of nursing care. The study was aimed to determine the opinions of nursing students regarding the nursing process and their levels of proficiency. Methods: A total of 44 nursing students participated in this descriptive study. Data were collected by a three-part questionnaire including the opinion of students on nursing process, Gordon’s functional health patterns model and the NANDA diagnoses. Data were analyzed by SPSS software. Results: Most of the students (65.9%) believed that the nursing process was necessary. half of the students explained the diagnosis, 58.3% explained the planning, 41.3% explained the implementation, and 43.6% explained the evaluation sufficiently. Conclusion: It is suggested for instructors to use different teaching methods in order to develop critical thinking while teaching the nursing process. PMID:26744726

  19. Nursing Reclaims its Role.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diers, Donna

    1982-01-01

    An attempt is made to explain the nurses' role: what the nurse is, what the nurse does, how the nurse is viewed by society, why nurses suffer burnout, nursing costs, and health care system reform. (CT)

  20. Helpline nursing.

    PubMed

    Pearce, Lynne

    2016-12-14

    Viewed by some as a backwater, only attracting those in the twilight of their career, the nurse's role on specialist health helplines is often misunderstood and undervalued. A new framework, written by senior staff at charities that employ information nurses, is set to challenge these unwarranted perceptions. 'It dignifies what we're doing,' says Cancer Research UK head information nurse Martin Ledwick, who manages a team of eight. 'And it gives nurses an idea of what we expect from them.'

  1. Kamikaze nurses.

    PubMed

    1988-01-02

    In Japan nurses have found a somewhat drastic way of ensuring high standards of professional practice it would seem. For, according to a report in the current edition of the International Nursing Review, Fumiko Ohmori, retiring President of the Japanese Nursing Association, is famed for a number of visable achievements.

  2. Nursing Home Checklist

    MedlinePlus

    Nursing home checklist Name of nursing home: ____________________________________________________ Address: ________________________________________________________________ Phone number: __________________________________________________________ Date of visit: _____________________________________________________________ Basic information Yes No Notes Is the nursing home Medicare certified? Is the nursing ...

  3. Nursing: What's a Nurse Practitioner?

    MedlinePlus

    ... is a big part of the pediatric NP's role. Pediatric and family practice NPs can treat acute ( ... Nurse Practitioners (NAPNAP) and through local hospitals or nursing schools. Also, many doctors share office space with ...

  4. Nutrition for Nurses: Nursing 245.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palermo, Karen R.

    A description is presented of "Nutrition for Nurses," a prerequisite course for students anticipating entrance into the junior level of a state university registered nursing program. Introductory material highlights the course focus (i.e., the basics of good nutrition; nutrition through the life cycle; nursing process in nutritional care; and…

  5. Nutrition for Nurses: Nursing 245.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palermo, Karen R.

    A description is presented of "Nutrition for Nurses," a prerequisite course for students anticipating entrance into the junior level of a state university registered nursing program. Introductory material highlights the course focus (i.e., the basics of good nutrition; nutrition through the life cycle; nursing process in nutritional care; and…

  6. Identifying nursing interventions associated with the accuracy used nursing diagnoses for patients with liver cirrhosis 1

    PubMed Central

    Gimenes, Fernanda Raphael Escobar; Motta, Ana Paula Gobbo; da Silva, Patrícia Costa dos Santos; Gobbo, Ana Flora Fogaça; Atila, Elisabeth; de Carvalho, Emilia Campos

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: to identify the nursing interventions associated with the most accurate and frequently used NANDA International, Inc. (NANDA-I) nursing diagnoses for patients with liver cirrhosis. Method: this is a descriptive, quantitative, cross-sectional study. Results: a total of 12 nursing diagnoses were evaluated, seven of which showed high accuracy (IVC ≥ 0.8); 70 interventions were identified and 23 (32.86%) were common to more than one diagnosis. Conclusion: in general, nurses often perform nursing interventions suggested in the NIC for the seven highly accurate nursing diagnoses identified in this study to care patients with liver cirrhosis. Accurate and valid nursing diagnoses guide the selection of appropriate interventions that nurses can perform to enhance patient safety and thus improve patient health outcomes.

  7. Surgical Oncology Nursing: Looking Back, Looking Forward.

    PubMed

    Crane, Patrick C; Selanders, Louise

    2017-02-01

    To provide a historical perspective in the development of oncology nursing and surgical oncology as critical components of today's health care system. Review of the literature and Web sites of key organizations. The evolution of surgical oncology nursing has traversed a historical journey from that of a niche subspecialty of nursing that had very little scientific underpinning, to a highly sophisticated discipline within a very short time. Nursing continues to contribute its expertise to the encyclopedic knowledge base of surgical oncology and cancer care, which have helped improve the lives of countless patients and families who have had to face the difficulties of this diagnosis. An understanding of the historical context for which a nursing specialty such as surgical oncology nursing evolves is critical to gaining an appreciation for the contributions of nursing. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. [The diagnostic nurse consultation in head and neck oncology].

    PubMed

    Cambreleng, Christine; Goujon, Géraldine

    2015-09-01

    The diagnosis announcement nurse consultation is carried out with the patient and/or their family. It is a time of exchange, listening and sharing of information. The diagnosis announcement nurse is available to answer questions from the patient and their family about the disease, the treatments and the follow-up care.

  9. Nursing students assess nursing education.

    PubMed

    Norman, Linda; Buerhaus, Peter I; Donelan, Karen; McCloskey, Barbara; Dittus, Robert

    2005-01-01

    This study assessed the characteristics of nursing students currently enrolled in nursing education programs, how students finance their nursing education, their plans for clinical practice and graduate education, and the rewards and difficulties of being a nursing student. Data are from a survey administered to a national sample of 496 nursing students. The students relied on financial aid and personal savings and earnings to finance their education. Parents, institutional scholarships, and government loans are also important sources, but less than 15% of the students took out bank loans. Nearly one quarter of the students, particularly younger and minority students, plan to enroll in graduate school immediately after graduation and most want to become advanced nursing practitioners. Most of the nursing students (88%) are satisfied with their nursing education and nearly all (95%) provided written answers to two open-ended questions. Comments collapsed into three major categories reflecting the rewards (helping others, status, and job security) and three categories reflecting the difficulties (problems with balancing demands, quality of nursing education, and the admissions process) of being a nursing student. Implications for public policymaking center on expanding the capacity of nursing education programs, whereas schools themselves should focus on addressing the financial needs of students, helping them strike a balance among their school, work, and personal/family responsibilities and modifying certain aspects of the curriculum.

  10. Nursing: Licensed Practical and Licensed Vocational Nurses

    MedlinePlus

    ... LPNs) and licensed vocational nurses (LVNs) provide basic nursing care. They work under the direction of registered ... licensed vocational nurses work in many settings, including nursing homes and extended care facilities, hospitals, physicians’ offices, ...

  11. Causation and Validation of Nursing Diagnoses: A Middle Range Theory.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira Lopes, Marcos Venícios; da Silva, Viviane Martins; Herdman, T Heather

    2017-01-01

    To describe a predictive middle range theory (MRT) that provides a process for validation and incorporation of nursing diagnoses in clinical practice. Literature review. The MRT includes definitions, a pictorial scheme, propositions, causal relationships, and translation to nursing practice. The MRT can be a useful alternative for education, research, and translation of this knowledge into practice. This MRT can assist clinicians in understanding clinical reasoning, based on temporal logic and spectral interaction among elements of nursing classifications. In turn, this understanding will improve the use and accuracy of nursing diagnosis, which is a critical component of the nursing process that forms a basis for nursing practice standards worldwide. © 2015 NANDA International, Inc.

  12. Elevated BMI and antibodies to citrullinated proteins interact to increase rheumatoid arthritis risk and shorten time to diagnosis: A nested case-control study of women in the Nurses' Health Studies.

    PubMed

    Tedeschi, Sara K; Cui, Jing; Arkema, Elizabeth V; Robinson, William H; Sokolove, Jeremy; Lingampalli, Nithya; Sparks, Jeffrey A; Karlson, Elizabeth W; Costenbader, Karen H

    2017-06-01

    Overweight/obesity and anti-citrullinated protein antibodies (ACPA) increase rheumatoid arthritis (RA) risk. We investigated the relationship between body mass index (BMI) and ACPA, tested for an interaction between BMI and ACPA for RA risk, and examined effects of BMI and ACPA on time to RA diagnosis. Within the Nurses' Health Studies, blood samples were collected before diagnosis from medical record-confirmed incident RA cases and matched controls. Multiplex assays measured 7 ACPA subtypes (biglycan, clusterin, enolase, fibrinogen, histone 2A, histone 2B, and vimentin). Logistic regression analyses tested the association of BMI and ACPA and for a multiplicative interaction between BMI groups (≥25 vs. <25kg/m(2)) and ACPA positivity (≥2 vs. <2 subtypes), adjusting for age, smoking, alcohol use, and HLA-shared epitope. In case-only analyses, log-rank tests compared time from blood draw to RA onset by cross-classified BMI/ACPA status. Among 255 pre-RA cases and 778 matched controls, 15.7% vs. 2.1% (p<0.001) had ≥2 ACPA and 49.4% vs. 40.2% (p<0.01) were overweight/obese. Continuous BMI was not associated with presence of ≥2 ACPA [OR per kg/m(2) unit BMI: 1.03 (95% CI: 0.97-1.09)]. However, there was a multiplicative interaction between elevated BMI and the presence of ≥2 ACPA for RA risk (p = 0.027). Women with BMI≥25kg/m(2) and ≥2 ACPA had OR 22.7 (95% CI: 6.64-77.72) for RA. Median time to RA differed by BMI/ACPA group (overall log-rank p<0.001) and was shortest among women with ≥2 ACPA and BMI≥25kg/m(2) [45.0 months, IQR: 17.5-72.5] and longest in women with <2 ACPA and BMI<25kg/m(2) [125.0 months, IQR: 72.0-161.0] (pairwise log-rank p = 0.002). Elevated BMI and presence of ACPA interacted to increase RA risk. Time to RA onset was shortest among overweight/obese women with ≥2 ACPA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Using an Educational Electronic Documentation System to Help Nursing Students Accurately Identify Nursing Diagnoses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pobocik, Tamara J.

    2013-01-01

    The use of technology and electronic medical records in healthcare has exponentially increased. This quantitative research project used a pretest/posttest design, and reviewed how an educational electronic documentation system helped nursing students to identify the accurate related to statement of the nursing diagnosis for the patient in the case…

  14. Using an Educational Electronic Documentation System to Help Nursing Students Accurately Identify Nursing Diagnoses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pobocik, Tamara J.

    2013-01-01

    The use of technology and electronic medical records in healthcare has exponentially increased. This quantitative research project used a pretest/posttest design, and reviewed how an educational electronic documentation system helped nursing students to identify the accurate related to statement of the nursing diagnosis for the patient in the case…

  15. The attitudes of GPs towards the nurse-practitioner role.

    PubMed

    Carr, J; Bethea, J; Hancock, B

    2001-09-01

    In recent years, nursing and health-care policy have promoted the advanced role of the nurse -- that of nurse practitioner. But such a role has not been integrated widely into the primary health-care team. This study investigates the knowledge and attitudes of GPs who do not employ nurse practitioners to find out what prevents them doing so. Ten GPs who did not already employ a nurse practitioner took part in semi-structured interviews. Our findings show that GPs, although confused about the role, were generally supportive of advanced nursing practice. Skills identified with the role were prescribing, disease diagnosis and minor-illness management. GPs thought that protocols and guidelines should govern practice, which differs fundamentally from the Royal College of Nursing definition. None of the GPs had encountered the role in primary care, and the lack of professional regulation and role definition for practice nurses and nurse practitioners who work in primary care may have affected GPs' perceptions.

  16. Nursing informatics: state of the science.

    PubMed

    Henry, S B

    1995-12-01

    The phenomena of interest in nursing informatics are nursing data, nursing information and nursing knowledge. The current state of knowledge related to these phenomena suggests four implications for the development of systems to support nursing. First, research has provided evidence that knowledge and experience is related to the quality of nursing assessment, diagnosis or clinical inference, and planning of nursing care, and also that knowledge is task-specific. Information technology can provide access to a variety of information resources, such as knowledge bases and decision support systems, to increase the level of knowledge of the nurse decision-maker. Second, structured patient assessment forms with linkages to knowledge bases of diagnoses have the potential to improve the quality of the patient assessment and the accuracy of the diagnosis or clinical inference. Third, studies on planning care have demonstrated the complexity of the task when a number of options are potentially appropriate. Model-based decision support applications such as decision analysis and multi-attribute utility theory can assist the clinicians and patients to analyse and compare the treatment alternatives in a systematic manner. Fourth, there is modest support for demonstrating the relationship between the process and outcomes of clinical decision making. Large databases built upon nursing data are needed to further examine this relationship.

  17. [The nurse and management of glioblastoma].

    PubMed

    Pichaut, Marion

    2017-02-01

    Lead nurses in neuro-oncology support patients with glioblastoma and their family from the time of diagnosis. They work closely with all health professionals practising in hospitals and in the home. They coordinate patients' care pathways, from the diagnosis consultation to their death. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Inflammatory Bowel Disease: School Nurse Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kitto, Lisa

    2010-01-01

    Initial symptoms and diagnosis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) usually occur between 10 and 20 years of age, although younger cases are reported. The complicated nature of IBD diagnosis and treatment can interfere with physical and emotional development that normally occurs in school-age children and adolescents. The school nurse should be…

  19. Nurse crop

    Treesearch

    Wayne D. Shepperd; John R. Jones

    1985-01-01

    In forestry, a nurse crop generally is a crop of trees or shrubs that fosters the development of another tree species, usually by protecting the second species, during its youth, from frost, insolation, or wind (Ford-Robertson 1971). Aspen may be a nurse crop for shade-tolerant tree species that do not become established in full sunlight (e.g., Engelmann spruce)....

  20. Is the ISO Reference Terminology Model for Nursing Actions Enough to Describe Nursing Actions?

    PubMed

    Lee, Joo Yun; Park, Hyeoun-Ae

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to test the applicability of the International Standards Organization (ISO) Reference terminology model (RTM) for nursing action to describe Detailed Clinical Models (DCMs) for nursing action. All verb and target terms were mapped to 'Action' and 'Target' category of RTM for nursing actions. Among 72 attributes qualifying the verb terms, 50 attributes were mapped to Means, Route, Timing, or Site categories of the nursing action model. Among 142 attributes qualifying the target terms, 20 attributes were mapped to Means, Timing, or Site categories of the nursing action model and 6 attributes were mapped to Degree or Judgment categories of the nursing diagnosis model. The findings suggest the need for an integrated RTM for nursing.

  1. The Ontario nursing workload demonstration projects: rethinking how we measure, cost and plan the work of nurses.

    PubMed

    Ferguson-Paré, Mary; Bandurchin, Annabelle

    2010-05-01

    In 2008 the Nursing Secretariat of Ontario's Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care formed a Nursing Workload Steering Committee to oversee the implementation of three demonstration projects with the objectives: to assess the feasibility of Health Outcomes for Better Information and Care (HOBIC) data as a measure of nursing workload, determine the indicators that best support nurse leaders to measure nursing work and make informed staffing decisions, and develop a model that predicts acute care nursing costs. Three HOBIC scales--activities of daily living (ADLs), continence and fatigue--explained a small amount of the variance in nurse judgment of the amount of nursing time patients require in the first 24 hours of care. Nurses in the study appreciated providing their professional judgment to help estimate the nursing work requirements of patients. The priority and secondary indicators most important for decision-making included medical severity of patients, environmental complexity, nurse experience, patient turnover, nurse-to-patient ratio, cognitive status, infection control, nurse vacancy, predictability of patient types, nursing interventions, patient volumes, co-morbidities, patient self-care abilities, physical and psychosocial functioning, unit type and medical diagnosis. A fairly robust model was developed using existing data sources to estimate nursing input into a patient's costs. The model explained between 69% and 80% of the variation in nursing costs for each patient. In order to effectively measure, plan and cost nursing, we need to determine what nursing is. In the future, recognition of nurses as knowledge workers will require us to consider the many patient and environmental factors that affect the ability of nurses to apply their professional judgment to care for patients.

  2. Demystifying Nursing Theory: A Christian Nursing Perspective.

    PubMed

    Schaffer, Marjorie A; Sandau, Kristin; Missal, Bernita

    How does nursing theory apply to nursing practice? Nursing theory can explain the why and how of nursing practice, guide nursing interventions, and provide a framework for measuring outcomes. This article briefly explains nursing theory, provides examples for applying theory to nursing practice, and proposes questions for examining the consistency of nursing theories with Christian perspectives. A helpful table illustrating grand, middle-range, and situation-specific theories and their application to nursing practice and research, along with references, is provided online as supplemental digital content. Three caring theories are analyzed from biblical beliefs.

  3. Whither the "Nurse" in Nurse Practitioner?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weston, Jerry L.

    1975-01-01

    The author sees a need for the nursing profession to evaluate the extended role of the nurse to determine differences in the patient care provided by nurse practitioners and physician's assistants. From the data, appropriate nursing education and nursing practice planning can follow. (EA)

  4. Nurses' and Physicians' Perceptions of Nursing Authority.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katzman, Elaine Menter

    1989-01-01

    The findings in the Authority in Nursing Roles Inventory support the premise that in spite of expanded nursing roles emphasizing nursing authority, there are disagreements between nurses' and physicians' perceptions of the authority of nurses as well as areas of dissatisfaction within each professional group. (Author/MLW)

  5. Program for nurse-clinicians.

    PubMed

    1974-08-01

    A 3-month training course to prepare registered nurses from outside the U.S. to become family planning nurse-clinicians in their own countries will begin in the fall of 1974 under the direction of Planned Parenthood of New York City's Margaret Sanger Center International Training Program. The course will offer lectures in reproductive anatomy, physiology, and endocrinology, contraceptive methods, human sexuality, diagnosis and treatment of common gynecological problems, and infertility, as well as clinical practice in pelvic and breast examinations, diagnostic techniques, management of contraceptives, and use consultation and referral sources. The course will be conducted in Spanish. Further information may be obtained from the Administrative Director.

  6. Carrier Diagnosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Risk? Signs & Symptoms Diagnosis Treatment Options Immune Tolerance Induction Current issues in inhibitors Resources Prophylaxis Types of ... Risk? Signs & Symptoms Diagnosis Treatment Options Immune Tolerance Induction Current issues in inhibitors Resources Prophylaxis Types of ...

  7. Nursing Positions

    MedlinePlus

    ... and actually needs to feed. Getting Comfortable With Breastfeeding Nursing can be one of the most challenging ... a mother. As you become more used to breastfeeding your baby, you can try different positions or ...

  8. Nursing Homes

    MedlinePlus

    ... estimated 50-70% of residents. More than three fourths of nursing-home residents have problems making daily ... to communicate the needs of the resident. Updated: July 2017 Posted: March 2012 © 2017 Health in Aging. ...

  9. Implementation of Free Text Format Nursing Diagnoses at a University Hospital's Medical Department. Exploring Nurses' and Nursing Students' Experiences on Use and Usefulness. A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Frigstad, Sigrun Aasen; Nøst, Torunn Hatlen; André, Beate

    2015-01-01

    Background. Nursing documentation has long traditions and represents core element of nursing, but the documentation is often criticized of being incomplete. Nursing diagnoses are an important research topic in nursing in terms of quality of nursing assessment, interventions, and outcome in addition to facilitating communication and continuity. Aim. The aim of this study was to explore the nurses' and nursing students' experiences after implementing free text format nursing diagnoses in a medical department. Method. The study design included educational intervention of free text nursing diagnoses. Data was collected through five focus group interviews with 18 nurses and 6 students as informants. The data was analyzed using qualitative content analysis. Results. The informants describe positive experiences concerning free text format nursing diagnoses' use and usefulness; it promotes reflection and discussion and is described as a useful tool in the diagnostic process, though it was challenging to find the diagnosis' appropriate formulation. Conclusion. Our findings indicate a valid usability of free text format nursing diagnoses as it promotes the diagnostic process. The use seems to enhance critical thinking and may serve as valuable preparation towards an implementation of standardized nursing diagnoses. Use and support of key personnel seem valuable in an implementation process. PMID:26075091

  10. Implementation of Free Text Format Nursing Diagnoses at a University Hospital's Medical Department. Exploring Nurses' and Nursing Students' Experiences on Use and Usefulness. A Qualitative Study.

    PubMed

    Frigstad, Sigrun Aasen; Nøst, Torunn Hatlen; André, Beate

    2015-01-01

    Background. Nursing documentation has long traditions and represents core element of nursing, but the documentation is often criticized of being incomplete. Nursing diagnoses are an important research topic in nursing in terms of quality of nursing assessment, interventions, and outcome in addition to facilitating communication and continuity. Aim. The aim of this study was to explore the nurses' and nursing students' experiences after implementing free text format nursing diagnoses in a medical department. Method. The study design included educational intervention of free text nursing diagnoses. Data was collected through five focus group interviews with 18 nurses and 6 students as informants. The data was analyzed using qualitative content analysis. Results. The informants describe positive experiences concerning free text format nursing diagnoses' use and usefulness; it promotes reflection and discussion and is described as a useful tool in the diagnostic process, though it was challenging to find the diagnosis' appropriate formulation. Conclusion. Our findings indicate a valid usability of free text format nursing diagnoses as it promotes the diagnostic process. The use seems to enhance critical thinking and may serve as valuable preparation towards an implementation of standardized nursing diagnoses. Use and support of key personnel seem valuable in an implementation process.

  11. [Neurologically critical patient. Nurses' care].

    PubMed

    López Díaz, Cristina

    2009-12-01

    Handling a neurologically critical patient requires some necessary knowledge and aptitudes in order to avoid risks and complications which could worsen a patient's prognosis. To that end, in this article the author deals with two important points nursing personnel need to bear in mind: the distinct methods and catheters which can be used to monitor intracranial pressure, obtaining an important parameter for evaluation purposes and therapeutic follow-up on these patients, placing special emphasis on ventricular drainage and nursing care, and the operations nurses take when dealing with patients who present a risk of intracranial hypertension, setting up a protocol based on seven necessities in the Virginia Henderson model: breathing, elimination, temperature, hygiene and skin, feeding and hydration, mobility and safety. In each of these necessities, the author studies the problems these patients present, identifying them with a series of diagnoses according to NANDA (North American Nursing Diagnosis Association), and defining the care or nursing activities for each of them, which will prove essential to prevent cerebral ischemia after suffering a primary cerebral injury due to a "TCE"(Cranial Encephalic Trauma) hemorrhage, etc. Nurses' role in caring for neurologically critical patients proves to be of vital importance since these professionals must be capable of evaluating, preventing, controlling and identifying those risk situations which neurologically critical patients could present, avoiding possible complications, aiding their recuperation, and providing quality health care.

  12. Primary Nurse - Role Evolution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mundinger, Mary O'Neil

    1973-01-01

    Primary nursing means that each patient has an individual nurse who is responsible for assessing his nursing needs and planning and evaluating his nursing care. The article describes the advantages and problems connected with this approach to patient care. (AG)

  13. Understanding nursing units with data and theory.

    PubMed

    Diers, Donna; Hendrickson, Karrie; Rimar, Joan; Donovan, Donna

    2013-01-01

    Nursing units are social systems whose function depends on many variables. Available nursing data, combined with a theory of organizational diagnosis, can be used to understand nursing unit performance. One troubled unit served as a case study in organizational diagnosis and treatment using modern methods of data mining and performance improvement. Systems theory did not prescribe how to fix an underbounded system. The theory did suggest, however, that addressing the characteristics of overbounded and underbounded systems can provide some order and structure and identify helpful resources. In this instance, the data analysis served to help define the unit's problems in conjunction with information gained from talking with the nurses and touring the unit, but it was the theory that gave hints for direction for change.

  14. Applying nursing theory to perioperative nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Gillette, V A

    1996-08-01

    The perioperative nursing role has evolved from that of task-oriented specialists to patient-centered professionals. The concept of caring is significant to perioperative nurses and is manifested by the many caring behaviors perioperative nurses demonstrate toward surgical patients. This article describes how the element of caring is an essential function of perioperative nursing and relates the perioperative nursing role to the work of three nursing theorists (le, Florence Nightingale; Virginia Henderson, RN, AM; Carol L. Montgomery, RN, PhD).

  15. [Breastfeeding: nurses' practice under the perspective of the International Classification of Collective Health Nursing Practices].

    PubMed

    Chaves, Maria Marta Nolasco; de Senna Ávila Farias, Fabiana Costa; Apostólico, Maíra Rosa; Cubas, Marcia Regina; Egry, Emiko Yoshikawa

    2011-03-01

    This descriptive and exploratory study aimed to describe nursing diagnoses and interventions under the International Nursing Practice Classification in Collective Health--CIPESC®--in Women's Health Care, sub-theme Pre-Natal and Puerperium, correlating them to nurses' competences at Curitiba's Mother Program. Data used were diagnoses and interventions during nursing consultation from April to July/ 2005. Basic Statistics was used for data treatment. Proper Breastfeeding was the most frequent diagnosis and most interventions are related to strengthening the user to face the health-disease process (68.9%). In spite of nurses' practice during puerperium, such a competence is not part of the Program Protocol. In conclusion, minor adjustments are necessary in the analyzed diagnoses and the Protocol should be reviewed to entail nurses' competences that are developed in their practice in health services according to CIPESC' s registers.

  16. Describing patient problems & nursing treatment patterns using nursing minimum data sets (NMDS & NMMDS) & UHDDS repositories.

    PubMed Central

    Delaney, C.; Reed, D.; Clarke, M.

    2000-01-01

    Dramatic changes in health care have intensified practitioners' efforts to access and use information to determine more efficacious approaches to patient outcomes. The overall goal of the study is to measure the influence of nursing informatics clinical reasoning decision support interventions on patient outcomes. This paper describes Phases I of the study: the methodology for establishing and testing the usefulness of large data repositories comprised of three minimum data sets, including the Nursing Minimum Data Set (NMDS), the Nursing Management Minimum Data Set (NMMDS), and the Uniform Hospital Discharge Data Set (UHDDS), and the American Nurses Association Quality Indicators to support effectiveness research. The use of generic data modeling to construct a clinical nursing repository of more than 477,000 electronic records is discussed. Patient problem and treatment profiles, patterns, and variations based on standardized analyzing classifications are described for inpatient adult samples, and nursing and medical diagnosis groups. PMID:11079868

  17. Nursing home-acquired pneumonia.

    PubMed

    El Solh, Ali A

    2009-02-01

    Nursing home-acquired pneumonia (NHAP) was first described in 1978. Since then there has been much written regarding NHAP and its management despite the lack of well-designed studies in this patient population. The most characteristic features of patients with NHAP are the atypical presentation, which may lead to delay in diagnosis and therapy. The microbial etiology of pneumonia encompasses a wide spectrum that spans microbes recovered from patients with community-acquired pneumonia to organisms considered specific only to nosocomial settings. Decision to transfer a nursing home patient to an acute care facility depends on a host of factors, which include the level of staffing available at the nursing home, patients' advance directives, and complexity of treatment. The presence of risk factors for multidrug-resistant pathogens dictates approach to therapy. Prevention remains the cornerstone of reducing the incidence of disease. Despite the advance in medical services, mortality from NHAP remains high.

  18. Nursing Leadership.

    PubMed

    Crisp, Carol

    2016-01-01

    Nurse transformational leaders can serve in academic settings and at local, national, international professional nursing organizations and community-based groups. As a transformational leader, nurses can lead in any workplace. According to a study by Stanley (2012), clinical leaders are not sought for their capacity to outline a vision, but for their values and beliefs on display that are easily recognized in their actions. This encompasses the moral component of transformational leadership. It is the APRNs duty to continue to strive towards a better vision for the well-being of all nurses, patients, and colleagues. Autonomous APRNs are happier, healthier, and better prepared to provide the best patient care to their patients. We should not be happy to sit back and let others fight this fight. APRNs need to be on the frontline, leading the way. This is only an insight that I have gained after many frustrating years of cheering our profession and then being made to feel inferior at the same time. Only nurses, who have that nurturing spirit, would hold back if they felt it might hurt others. Don't back off or hold back! It might hurt those that follow!

  19. Nursing process approach improves receivables management.

    PubMed

    Dias, K; Stockamp, D

    1992-09-01

    The "nursing process" is a systematic decision-making approach to problem solving based on open-system theory. This theory assumes that there is an on-going interchange between all system components. Components cannot be viewed in isolation, because decisions regarding one component will affect other components. Receivables management is similar to the nursing process, in that it involves constant diagnosis, assessment, and intervention in the work in process during all phases of the receivables cycle. In experiments that applied the nursing process concept to the management of accounts receivable in several hospitals, gross days in accounts receivable were reduced and cash flow was increased.

  20. [Museum diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Lozano-Alcázar, Jaim

    2013-01-01

    In Mexico among physicians it is common to use the term "bus diagnosis" to mean one that can be done only by looking someone, thanks to knowledge, experience and a bit of imagination. Ophthalmologists are able to do specialty diagnosis in some pictures of famous painters, thus "museum diagnosis." An aesthetic and historical research conducted for years provided the material. We present herein some examples of portraits made by Sharaku, Georg Groz, Il Bronzino, De la Tour, Vermeer, Rembrandt, Reynolds, Remedios Varo, Toulouse-Lautrec, Picasso, Ingres and others. The "museum diagnosis" enhances interest and aesthetic pleasure. Art could be useful as a tool for teaching clinical ophthalmology.

  1. Supporting Nursing Students with Learning Disabilities: A Metacognitive Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ijiri, Lisa; Kudzma, Elizabeth C.

    2000-01-01

    Addresses diagnosis, intervention, and accommodation from a metacognitive perspective for students with learning disabilities. Identifies curriculum issues for nursing education and gives examples of modifications in classroom and clinical settings. (SK)

  2. Stress overload: a new diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Lunney, Margaret

    2006-01-01

    To describe the phenomenon of stress overload as a nursing diagnosis. A qualitative study using case study method was conducted with nine adults experiencing stress overload to fully describe the experience and identify possible defining characteristics. Current literature sources on stress and its related factors were examined to support stress overload as a nursing diagnosis for inclusion in the NANDA International classification. Stress overload, defined as excessive amounts and types of demands that require action, is a human response that is experienced as a problem and contributes to the development of other problems. The proposed defining characteristics are perceives situational stress as excessive, expresses a feeling of tension or pressure, expresses difficulty in functioning as usual, expresses problems with decision-making, demonstrates increased feelings of anger and impatience, and reports negative effects from stress such as physical symptoms or psychological distress. Nursing interventions such as active listening and decision-making support are needed to help people reduce stress levels. Studies are needed to further validate the defining characteristics and related factors of this new diagnosis.

  3. The Nursing Home as a Site for Teaching Medical Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiener, Myra; Shamaskin, Ann

    1990-01-01

    Responses to questionnaires were compared between 106 students in nursing homes with those of 171 students in hospitals to evaluate interview and physical examination instruction for medical students. The nursing home was assessed as an appropriate alternative site for teaching the medical interview and physical diagnosis. (GLR)

  4. Nurses' Attitudes toward Gay and Hemophiliac Patients with AIDS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strasser, Judith A.; Damrosch, Shirley

    A sample of nurses (N=183) enrolled in a School of Nursing's master degree program was randomly assigned to read one of six vignettes about a patient who differed only in terms of diagnosis and lifestyle. Possible diagnoses were Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS), AIDS acquired by a hemophiliac through blood therapy, and leukemia; possible…

  5. The Experience of Intense Pain: Nursing Management and Interventions.

    PubMed

    Kiser-Larson, Norma

    Personal stories of illness give depth to otherwise clinical descriptions of diagnoses. This article offers an autobiographical narrative of complications after total knee replacement surgery. Diagnosis and nursing management of acute compartment syndrome, nociceptive and neuropathic origins of pain, pharmacologic and nursing interventions for pain, the use of prayer in illness, and compassionate caring from a Christian perspective are discussed.

  6. Nurses' Attitudes toward Gay and Hemophiliac Patients with AIDS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strasser, Judith A.; Damrosch, Shirley

    A sample of nurses (N=183) enrolled in a School of Nursing's master degree program was randomly assigned to read one of six vignettes about a patient who differed only in terms of diagnosis and lifestyle. Possible diagnoses were Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS), AIDS acquired by a hemophiliac through blood therapy, and leukemia; possible…

  7. Is the School Nurse a Nurse? Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cowell, Julia Muennich

    1998-01-01

    To cut costs, many districts are replacing certified school nurses with uncertified nurses or undereducated health aides. Never has the role of school nurse been more important. Besides attending to sick children and handling emergencies, today's school nurses are active in health education, physical fitness programs, and disease prevention.…

  8. Guide for Instructors of Practical Nursing in South Carolina, Phase 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clemson Univ., SC. Vocational Education Media Center.

    The South Carolina Department of Education has printed an instruction manual for teacher use in schools of nursing. The guide covers the areas of medical surgical nursing, diagnosis of disease, dealing with the surgical patient, care of the aged, rehabilitation and chronic illness, nursing the cancer patient, gynecological disorders, respiratory…

  9. Guide for Instructors of Practical Nursing in South Carolina, Phase 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clemson Univ., SC. Vocational Education Media Center.

    The South Carolina Department of Education has printed an instruction manual for teacher use in schools of nursing. The guide covers the areas of medical surgical nursing, diagnosis of disease, dealing with the surgical patient, care of the aged, rehabilitation and chronic illness, nursing the cancer patient, gynecological disorders, respiratory…

  10. The role of the nurse practitioner in congenital heart surgery.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Patricia

    2007-01-01

    Pediatric nurse practitioners are often members of the interdisciplinary team caring for children with congenital heart disease. The collaborative practice model, in which a physician-led team of physicians, nurse practitioners, and other clinicians work together to provide comprehensive, quality patient care, has had positive benefits for patients and their families, physicians, and nurses. The acute care pediatric nurse practitioner combines advanced training in assessment, diagnosis, and management of common pediatric health problems with advanced nursing expertise in patient education, counseling, and health promotion to meet the specialized needs of children with complex acute and chronic illnesses. This article focuses on the development and current practice of pediatric nurse practitioners in acute care settings and concludes with a discussion of the role of nurse practitioners on the postoperative cardiac surgery service at Children's Hospital, Boston.

  11. Evidence for the Existing American Nurses Association-Recognized Standardized Nursing Terminologies: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Tastan, Sevinc; Linch, Graciele C. F.; Keenan, Gail M.; Stifter, Janet; McKinney, Dawn; Fahey, Linda; Dunn Lopez, Karen; Yao, Yingwei; Wilkie, Diana J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine the state of the science for the five standardized nursing terminology sets in terms of level of evidence and study focus. Design Systematic Review. Data sources Keyword search of PubMed, CINAHL, and EMBASE databases from 1960s to March 19, 2012 revealed 1,257 publications. Review Methods From abstract review we removed duplicate articles, those not in English or with no identifiable standardized nursing terminology, and those with a low-level of evidence. From full text review of the remaining 312 articles, eight trained raters used a coding system to record standardized nursing terminology names, publication year, country, and study focus. Inter-rater reliability confirmed the level of evidence. We analyzed coded results. Results On average there were 4 studies per year between 1985 and 1995. The yearly number increased to 14 for the decade between 1996–2005, 21 between 2006–2010, and 25 in 2011. Investigators conducted the research in 27 countries. By evidence level for the 312 studies 72.4% were descriptive, 18.9% were observational, and 8.7% were intervention studies. Of the 312 reports, 72.1% focused on North American Nursing Diagnosis-International, Nursing Interventions Classification, Nursing Outcome Classification, or some combination of those three standardized nursing terminologies; 9.6% on Omaha System; 7.1% on International Classification for Nursing Practice; 1.6% on Clinical Care Classification/Home Health Care Classification; 1.6% on Perioperative Nursing Data Set; and 8.0% on two or more standardized nursing terminology sets. There were studies in all 10 foci categories including those focused on concept analysis/classification infrastructure (n = 43), the identification of the standardized nursing terminology concepts applicable to a health setting from registered nurses’ documentation (n = 54), mapping one terminology to another (n = 58), implementation of standardized nursing terminologies into electronic health

  12. Determining true nursing costs improves financial planning.

    PubMed

    Payson, A A

    1987-05-01

    The traditional method of apportioning nursing care costs ona per diem basis does not consider nursing intensity or patients' special needs and often includes nonnursing duties. Many hospitals now favor a fee-for-service concept and are determining direct patient care costs to identify the true nursing cost. A patient classification system correlated with the diagnosis-related group (DRG) classification improves nursing cost analyses. For each patient, nurse managers need systems to determine quantified nursing tasks and patient acuity levels for each day. This information can be used to adjust staffing and to establish variable billing procedures. Then they can institute variable billing methods that are based on direct care costs as well as indirect costs of administration, education, and supplies. Variable billing identifies revenue cost centers, allows systematic monitoring of nursing services, and improves budget planning. The entire nursing staff must become involved in the financial system so the hospital can obtain an accurate data base for rate setting and third-party reimbursement.

  13. [Analysis of RN-BSN students' clinical nursing competency].

    PubMed

    Son, Jung Tae; Park, Myonghwa; Kim, Hye Ryoung; Lee, Woo-Sook; Oh, Kasil

    2007-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate RN-BSN students' clinical nursing competency in order to establish baseline data for developing nursing competency based clinical education for RN-BSN students. A survey of 1,453 RN-BSN students from 21 nursing schools was conducted using a self administered questionnaire. The mean score of the clinical nursing competency was 2.93. The scores for competency were shown as 2.91 for nursing management, 2.94 for developing professionalism & legal implementation, 2.95 for critical thinking, 2.96 for teaching & leadership, and data collection, basic nursing care, and communication were above 3.00. The items perceived as insufficient competency were physical examination and observation & monitoring in data collection, cardiopulmonary resuscitation, psycho-social care, spiritual care, hospice in basic nursing care, application of knowledge and theory, formulating nursing diagnosis, nursing care planning in critical thinking, education material development, leadership, delegation in teaching and leadership, analysis of organization, planning, infection control, role & job description, evaluation of nursing activities in nursing management, quality improvement, and research in developing professionalism and legal implementation. This study will contribute to developing a nursing competency based on clinical education for RN-BSN students who have various education needs and clinical backgrounds.

  14. Nursing shortages and international nurse migration.

    PubMed

    Ross, S J; Polsky, D; Sochalski, J

    2005-12-01

    The United Kingdom and the United States are among several developed countries currently experiencing nursing shortages. While the USA has not yet implemented policies to encourage nurse immigration, nursing shortages will likely result in the growth of foreign nurse immigration to the USA. Understanding the factors that drive the migration of nurses is critical as the USA exerts more pull on the foreign nurse workforce. To predict the international migration of nurses to the UK using widely available data on country characteristics. The Nursing and Midwifery Council serves as the source of data on foreign nurse registrations in the UK between 1998 and 2002. We develop and test a regression model that predicts the number of foreign nurse registrants in the UK based on source country characteristics. We collect country-level data from sources such as the World Bank and the World Health Organization. The shortage of nurses in the UK has been accompanied by massive and disproportionate growth in the number of foreign nurses from poor countries. Low-income, English-speaking countries that engage in high levels of bilateral trade experience greater losses of nurses to the UK. Poor countries seeking economic growth through international trade expose themselves to the emigration of skilled labour. This tendency is currently exacerbated by nursing shortages in developed countries. Countries at risk for nurse emigration should adjust health sector planning to account for expected losses in personnel. Moreover, policy makers in host countries should address the impact of recruitment on source country health service delivery.

  15. Genetics-genomics competencies and nursing regulation.

    PubMed

    Kirk, Maggie; Calzone, Kathleen; Arimori, Naoko; Tonkin, Emma

    2011-06-01

    The aim of this article is to explore the interaction between the integration of genetics-genomics competencies into nursing curricula and regulatory standards. By taking a global perspective of activity in this field, we aim to develop a framework that can inform strategic planning in relation to international genetics-genomics and nursing education. We focus our exploration around a small-scale international survey on the progress, achievements, and critical success factors of 10 countries in relation to the integration of genetics-genomics into nursing education, with exemplars from three of those countries. Analysis of the data generated 10 themes, each with several subthemes that play a critical role in the development of genetics-genomics in nursing education and practice. The themes were organized into three overarching themes: nursing in genetics, genetics in nursing, and recognition and support. Genetics-genomics competence is not fully integrated into nursing education at an appropriate level in any country, nor was it reflected robustly in current standards for registration and licensure. Strong leadership from the specialist genetics community plays a critical role in defining genetics-genomics competence but the engagement of nursing professionals at senior levels in both government and regulatory institutions is essential if nurses are to be active participants in the innovations offered by genomic healthcare. Safe and effective nursing practice must incorporate the needs of those with, at risk for, or susceptible to genetic-genomic conditions, as well as those who might benefit from the application of genomic technologies in the diagnosis and management of common conditions such as cancer and heart disease. The scope of such practice can be articulated though competence statements. Professional regulation defines the standard of competence that practicing nurses should demonstrate at initial registration and licensure. No claim to original US

  16. Camp Nursing: Student Internships.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harwood, Catherine Hoe; Van Hofwegen, Lynn

    2002-01-01

    Camps can meet or supplement their health care delivery needs by using student nurses. Three models for student nurse internships, basic information about nursing education, and tips for negotiating student nurse internships are described. Sidebars present resources for camp health centers, nursing student competence characteristics, types of…

  17. Leaders from Nursing's History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fondiller, Shirley H.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Looks at the lives and accomplishments of four leaders in professional nursing: (1) Loretta Ford, who championed the cause of nurse practitioners; (2) Mable Staupers, a pioneer in community health and nursing; (3) Janet Geister, a leader in private nursing; and (4) Isabel Stewart, who led the movement to standardize nursing education. (JOW)

  18. Camp Nursing: Student Internships.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harwood, Catherine Hoe; Van Hofwegen, Lynn

    2002-01-01

    Camps can meet or supplement their health care delivery needs by using student nurses. Three models for student nurse internships, basic information about nursing education, and tips for negotiating student nurse internships are described. Sidebars present resources for camp health centers, nursing student competence characteristics, types of…

  19. Training nurses and nursing students about prevention, diagnoses, and treatment of fetal alcohol spectrum disorders.

    PubMed

    Zoorob, Roger J; Durkin, Kristy M; Gonzalez, Sandra J; Adams, Susie

    2014-08-01

    Alcohol consumption during pregnancy can result in birth defects known as fetal alcohol spectrum disorders. This study examined whether 1-h training sessions on alcohol screening, brief intervention, diagnoses, and treatment of fetal alcohol spectrum disorders could increase practical knowledge and confidence in nurses and student nurses. Data were collected from 420 nurses (n = 95) and student nurses (n = 325) in the southeastern United States, from 2009 to 2011. Pre- and post-test data were analyzed using chi-square tests and t-tests. The post-training response rate was 84%. Nurses were more likely to know what constitutes binge drinking, facial abnormalities associated with fetal alcohol syndrome, and criteria for diagnosis. Nurses were also more confident in educating about effects of prenatal alcohol use, identifying fetal alcohol spectrum disorders and utilizing resources. Training materials may need to be improved and/or longer training programs developed for student nurses, and nursing school programs should place more emphasis on educating and preparing student nurses regarding this topic area. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Diagnoses for child and adolescent psychiatric nursing. Combining NANDA and the DSM-III-R.

    PubMed

    Coler, M S

    1989-01-01

    The classification system of the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association and a revised axial system, such as appears in the DSM-III, offer a solution to combining nursing and psychiatry in the practice of child and adolescent psychiatric nursing. A historical perspective of the major diagnostic systems in nursing and psychiatry help focus on alternatives toward developing a meaningful method of diagnostic-based intervention.

  1. Dual Diagnosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... diagnosis has both a mental disorder and an alcohol or drug problem. These conditions occur together frequently. In particular, alcohol and drug problems tend to occur with Depression Anxiety disorders ...

  2. Child Psychiatric Nursing Option.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koehler, Mary Frances

    1981-01-01

    Describes a course at the Indiana University School of Nursing which allows senior students in a baccalaureate nursing program to concentrate on emotionally disturbed children in an advanced nursing course. Discusses course philosophy, clinical experiences, and program results. (CT)

  3. International Transplant Nurses Society

    MedlinePlus

    ... the Transplant Nursing Symposium. Register for the Transplant Nursing Symposium Registration is now open for the Transplant ... to non-members. Purchase your copy today! Transplant Nursing Scope & Standards of Practice, 2nd Edition Click the ...

  4. Emergency Nurses Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... Nurses Week Celebration Led by the Emergency Nurses Association, #ENWeek, Oct. 8-14, recognizes the work of ... care for emergency department patients, the Emergency Nurses Association is opposed to the passage of the recently- ...

  5. [Assessing nursing workload].

    PubMed

    Princiaux, Danielle

    2012-01-01

    Healthcare managers must monitor the nursing workload and back up their arguments when requesting resources. A study was carried out based on a tool which measures whether nursing staff provision meets the nursing care workload.

  6. The Colorado Collaborative for Nursing Research: nurses shaping nursing's future.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Karen H; Weiss, Jason; Welton, John; Reeder, Blaine; Ozkaynak, Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    Nurses in the present health care environment have been reduced too often to being providers of safe, competent care rather than quality care. In response, the Institute of Medicine has recommended that nurses become more involved in making changes to the health care system and use data more effectively. If nursing intends to follow these recommendations, the profession needs (a) fresh perspectives to assist in making health care system changes, (b) partnerships between nurse scientists and nurse clinicians to generate and implement data, and (c) capture of the proper value of nursing as distinct from other elements of health care delivery. The Colorado Collaborative for Nursing Research is an effort to meet the recommendations of the Institute of Medicine. The Colorado Collaborative for Nursing Research has a three-arm structure: a research forum where nurse academicians and nurse clinicians can launch collaborative projects; a research support services arm from which nurse collaborators can obtain help with modeling, statistics, writing, and funding; and a data extraction/data sharing mechanism to inform the decision making of nurse leaders.

  7. Cardiovascular genomics: implications for acute and critical care nurses.

    PubMed

    Quinn Griffin, Mary T; Klein, Deborah; Winkelman, Chris

    2013-01-01

    As genomic health care becomes commonplace, nurses will be asked to provide genomic care in all health care settings including acute care and critical care. Three common cardiac conditions are reviewed, Marfan syndrome, bicuspid aortic valve, and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, to provide acute care and critical care nurses with an overview of these pathologies through the lens of genomics and relevant case studies. This information will help critical care nursing leaders become familiar with genetics related to common cardiac conditions and prepare acute care and critical care nurses for a new phase in patient diagnostics, with greater emphasis on early diagnosis and recognition of conditions before sudden cardiac death.

  8. Diagnosis of stable ischemic heart disease: summary of a clinical practice guideline from the American College of Physicians/American College of Cardiology Foundation/American Heart Association/American Association for Thoracic Surgery/Preventive Cardiovascular Nurses Association/Society of Thoracic Surgeons.

    PubMed

    Qaseem, Amir; Fihn, Stephan D; Williams, Sankey; Dallas, Paul; Owens, Douglas K; Shekelle, Paul

    2012-11-20

    The American College of Physicians (ACP) developed this guideline in collaboration with the American College of Cardiology Foundation (ACCF), American Heart Association (AHA), American Association for Thoracic Surgery, Preventive Cardiovascular Nurses Association, and Society of Thoracic Surgeons to help clinicians diagnose known or suspected stable ischemic heart disease. Literature on this topic published before November 2011 was identified by using MEDLINE, Embase, Cochrane CENTRAL, PsychINFO, AMED, and SCOPUS. Searches were limited to human studies published in English. This guideline grades the evidence and recommendations according to a translation of the ACCF/AHA grading system into ACP's clinical practice guidelines grading system. This guideline includes 28 recommendations that address the following issues: the initial diagnosis of the patient who might have stable ischemic heart disease, cardiac stress testing to assess the risk for death or myocardial infarction in patients diagnosed with stable ischemic heart disease, and coronary angiography for risk assessment.

  9. Nursing 433: Uncomplicated Grief and Bereavement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kane, James J.

    A description is provided of "Uncomplicated Grief and Bereavement," a course designed to provide the graduate nursing student with the assessment, diagnosis, planning, intervention, and evaluation skills required to facilitate a normal bereavement outcome among persons experiencing the loss of a significant other. The course description first…

  10. [Glioblastoma and nursing care in neurosurgery].

    PubMed

    Lefort, Mathilde

    2017-02-01

    Nurses in neurosurgical departments play a critical role as they are involved in the first stages of the care pathway of patients with glioblastoma. Indeed, surgery enables a definitive histopathological diagnosis to be established and the size of the tumour to be significantly reduced, thereby improving the prognosis.

  11. Nursing Assessment Tool for People With Liver Cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Reis, Renata Karina; da Silva, Patrícia Costa dos Santos; Silva, Ana Elisa Bauer de Camargo; Atila, Elisabeth

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the process of developing a nursing assessment tool for hospitalized adult patients with liver cirrhosis. A descriptive study was carried out in three stages. First, we conducted a literature review to develop a data collection tool on the basis of the Conceptual Model of Wanda Horta. Second, the data collection tool was assessed through an expert panel. Third, we conducted the pilot testing in hospitalized patients. Most of the comments offered by the panel members were accepted to improve the tool. The final version was in the form of a questionnaire with open-closed questions. The panel members concluded that the tool was useful for accurate nursing diagnosis. Horta's Conceptual Model assisted with the development of this data collection tool to help nurses identify accurate nursing diagnosis in hospitalized patients with liver cirrhosis. We hope that the tool can be used by all nurses in clinical practice. PMID:26425862

  12. Cancer nursing in Ontario: defining nursing roles.

    PubMed

    Fitch, Margaret I; Mings, Deborah

    2003-01-01

    The delivery of cancer care in Ontario is facing unprecedented challenges. Shortages in nursing, as in all professional disciplines, are having an impact on the delivery of cancer care. Oncology nurses have a major role to play in the delivery of optimum cancer care. Oncology nursing, when adequately defined and supported, can benefit the cancer delivery system, patients, and families. A primary nursing model is seen as being key to the delivery of optimum cancer care. Primary nursing as a philosophy facilitates continuity of care, coordination of a patient's care plan, and a meaningful ongoing relationship with the patient and his/her family. Primary nursing, when delivered in the collaboration of a nurse-physician team, allows for medical resources to be used appropriately. Defined roles enable nurses to manage patients within their scope of practice in collaboration with physicians. Enacting other nursing roles, such as nurse practitioners and advanced practice nurses, can also enable the health care system to manage a broader number of patients with more complex needs. This article presents a position paper originally written as the basis for an advocacy and education initiative in Ontario. It is shared in anticipation that the work may be useful to oncology nurses in other jurisdictions in their efforts to advance oncology nursing and improvement of patient care.

  13. Emergency preparedness: school nurses leading the way.

    PubMed

    Flaherty, Elizabeth A

    2013-07-01

    Nurses are trained to think in terms of the nursing process, which encompasses the five steps of assessment, diagnosis, outcomes/planning, implementation, and evaluation. Cities and towns have developed emergency plans based on the "all-hazards" approach. School district plans are also formulated based on the all-hazards approach of hazard mitigation, preparedness, response, and recovery, which mirrors the nursing process. Individual school efforts focus on thesefourprinciples to facilitate development of a comprehensive plan for each school. Utilizing the principles of education, collaboration, resource utilization, leadership, and advocacy throughout the evolution of an updated and functional plan allows for an inclusive and adaptable plan. Like the nursing process, these steps are not separate and distinct, but a continuous process.

  14. Nursing Jobs in Nursing Homes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Torpey, Elka Maria

    2011-01-01

    The need for practical nurses who focus on caring for older people is growing. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the number of people ages 65 and older is expected to increase from 40 million to 72 million between 2010 and 2030. And the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) projects that this increasing population will result in job growth for…

  15. Fault diagnosis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbott, Kathy

    1990-01-01

    The objective of the research in this area of fault management is to develop and implement a decision aiding concept for diagnosing faults, especially faults which are difficult for pilots to identify, and to develop methods for presenting the diagnosis information to the flight crew in a timely and comprehensible manner. The requirements for the diagnosis concept were identified by interviewing pilots, analyzing actual incident and accident cases, and examining psychology literature on how humans perform diagnosis. The diagnosis decision aiding concept developed based on those requirements takes abnormal sensor readings as input, as identified by a fault monitor. Based on these abnormal sensor readings, the diagnosis concept identifies the cause or source of the fault and all components affected by the fault. This concept was implemented for diagnosis of aircraft propulsion and hydraulic subsystems in a computer program called Draphys (Diagnostic Reasoning About Physical Systems). Draphys is unique in two important ways. First, it uses models of both functional and physical relationships in the subsystems. Using both models enables the diagnostic reasoning to identify the fault propagation as the faulted system continues to operate, and to diagnose physical damage. Draphys also reasons about behavior of the faulted system over time, to eliminate possibilities as more information becomes available, and to update the system status as more components are affected by the fault. The crew interface research is examining display issues associated with presenting diagnosis information to the flight crew. One study examined issues for presenting system status information. One lesson learned from that study was that pilots found fault situations to be more complex if they involved multiple subsystems. Another was pilots could identify the faulted systems more quickly if the system status was presented in pictorial or text format. Another study is currently under way to

  16. What nurses want: the nurse incentives project.

    PubMed

    Wieck, K Lynn; Dols, Jean; Northam, Sally

    2009-01-01

    Today's nurse executives are struggling with leadership challenges of managing the multigenerational workforce, financial imperatives to deliver better care for lower costs, and competition to provide the optimal work environment to retain nurses. The purpose of the Nurse Incentives Project was to determine satisfaction with current employment incentives and potential managerial actions which might decrease or delay turnover by registered nurses. This study spawned recommendations regarding the role of incentives in designing an environment where benefits and perks will be seen as incentives to stay and thrive in the current nursing workplace. The results show that nurses know what they want. Attention to generational priorities and flexible benefits programs may help to create the cohesive work environment that nurses seek. Investment into creating delivery arenas where satisfied nurses are caring for satisfied patients is a worthwhile goal.

  17. The Nurse as a Moral Missionary.

    PubMed

    2016-07-01

    : Editor's note: From its first issue in 1900 through to the present day, AJN has unparalleled archives detailing nurses' work and lives over the last century. These articles not only chronicle nursing's growth as a profession within the context of the events of the day, but they also reveal prevailing societal attitudes about women, health care, and human rights. Today's nursing school curricula rarely include nursing's history, but it's a history worth knowing. To this end, From the AJN Archives will be a frequent column, containing articles selected to fit today's topics and times.This month's article, from the December 1912 issue, shares a nurse's struggles with the limitations of her role (and with the "morals" of the household) while caring for a seriously ill toddler. Her nursing assessment points to a diagnosis that is ultimately proven accurate, but her concerns are brushed off by the attending physician, delaying the child's treatment. As the story unfolds, it becomes clear that this nurse is grappling with "moral distress" of a kind still encountered in health care today. In this issue, Cynda Hylton Rushton and colleagues offer a new perspective on these dilemmas in "Moral Distress: A Catalyst in Building Moral Resilience."

  18. Nursing, knowledge and practice.

    PubMed

    Allen, D

    1997-07-01

    Recent commentators have suggested that academic knowledge is irrelevant to nursing practice and may actually undermine nursing's traditional caring ethos. Furthermore, by making nursing more academic, it is claimed that 'natural' but non-academic carers are prevented from pursuing a career in nursing. Debates about the relationship between nursing, knowledge and practice have a long history and have to be understood in terms of wider political and economic issues relating to nursing, its status within society and the changing role of nurses within the health services division of labour. One crucial issue is nursing's status as women's work. Critics of developments in nurse education draw an ideological equation between nursing work and the traditional female role. From this perspective the qualities that make a good nurse cannot be taught, rather they are founded on 'natural' feminine skills. Irrespective of whether caring is 'natural' or not, it is questionable as to whether, for today's nurses, being caring is sufficient. The shape of nursing jurisdiction is a long way removed from its origins in the Victorian middle-class household. In addition to their traditional caring role, contemporary nurses may also have complex clinical, management and research responsibilities, as well as being crucial coordinators of service provision. It is suggested that these and future developments in health services make the need for an educated nursing workforce even more pressing. In order to adequately prepare nurses for practice, however, it is vital that nurse education reflects the reality of service provision.

  19. Parish nursing: an innovative community nursing service.

    PubMed

    Laming, Eleanor; Stewart, Angela

    2016-07-13

    This article explains the concept of parish nursing and provides a historical perspective of this service. It describes the development of a parish nursing service in Heartsease, Norwich, which complements community nursing practice by focusing on the importance of providing spiritual care alongside physical, psychological and social care. Case studies are provided to illustrate the benefits of a parish nursing service to individuals and the community.

  20. Iranian nursing students’ experiences of nursing

    PubMed Central

    Motlagh, Farzaneh Gholami; Karimi, Mahboubeh; Hasanpour, Marzieh

    2012-01-01

    Background: The negative attitudes and behaviors of Iranian nursing students impede learning and threaten their progression and retention in nursing programs. The need to understand students’ perception and experiences of nursing provide knowledge about effectiveness of nursing education program as well as their professional identity. The purpose of this study was to discover experiences of nursing students. Materials and Methods: In a descriptive, exploratory and qualitative study, twelve senior nursing students of Isfahan University of Medical Sciences (School of Nursing and Midwifery) were participated. Data was collected via unstructured in-depth interview, and thematic analysis method was used for analyzing the data. Findings: The findings from this study revealed that the nursing students in Iran experienced altered experiences during their education program as positive and negative. Two major themes were constructed from the thematic analysis of the transcripts: professional dimensions and professional conflicts. Conclusions: Regarding the findings, positive experiences of students have leaded them to acceptance and satisfaction of nursing and negative experiences to rejection and hating of nursing and lack of adaptation with their professional roles. Therefore, it is recommended that revision and improvement in nursing education program is essential to facilitate positive experiences and remove negative experiences of nursing student’s educational environment. PMID:23833591

  1. Virtually Nursing: Emerging Technologies in Nursing Education.

    PubMed

    Foronda, Cynthia L; Alfes, Celeste M; Dev, Parvati; Kleinheksel, A J; Nelson, Douglas A; OʼDonnell, John M; Samosky, Joseph T

    Augmented reality and virtual simulation technologies in nursing education are burgeoning. Preliminary evidence suggests that these innovative pedagogical approaches are effective. The aim of this article is to present 6 newly emerged products and systems that may improve nursing education. Technologies may present opportunities to improve teaching efforts, better engage students, and transform nursing education.

  2. Professional Transition: Nurse to Nurse-Midwife

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulligan, Joan E.

    1976-01-01

    The article focuses on one nurse's experience in the nurse-midwife program at a large New York medical center. Terming the learning process a painful transition from academe to reality, the author discusses skills learned, conflicts with physicians' belief systems, rewards and frustrations, and the need for nurse-midwife identity. (Author/MS)

  3. Understanding HIV-related stigma among Indonesian nurses.

    PubMed

    Waluyo, Agung; Culbert, Gabriel J; Levy, Judith; Norr, Kathleen F

    2015-01-01

    Evidence indicates widespread stigmatization of persons living with HIV (PLWH) in Indonesia. Such attitudes among health care workers could impede the country's policies for effective diagnosis and medical treatment of PLWH. Nonetheless, research to guide interventions to reduce stigma in health care settings is lacking. Also, the contributions of workplace, religion, and HIV knowledge to nurses' HIV-related stigma are poorly understood. Our cross-sectional study aimed to describe factors associated with nurses' stigmatizing attitudes toward PLWH. Four hundred nurses recruited from four hospitals in Jakarta, Indonesia, were surveyed using the Nurse AIDS Attitude Scale to measure stigma. Stigmatizing attitudes were significantly predicted by education, HIV training, perceived workplace stigma, religiosity, Islamic religious identification, and affiliation with the Islamic hospital. HIV knowledge was not a significant predictor of stigmatizing attitudes. Organization changes fostering workplace diversity are likely to substantially reduce stigmatizing attitudes in nurses. Copyright © 2015 Association of Nurses in AIDS Care. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. [Development of a set of nursing-sensitive indicators for Swiss practice].

    PubMed

    Kleinknecht-Dolf, Michael; Baumberger, Dieter; Jucker, Thomas; Kliem, Uwe; Zimmermann, Natalie; Spirig, Rebecca

    2016-02-01

    The SwissDRG prospective payment system is known to inadequately account for nursing intensity due to the DRG group criteria insufficiently describing the variability of nursing intensity within individual diagnosis-related groups. In order to allow for appropriate reimbursement and resource allocation, nursing intensity must be able to be explicitly quantified and accounted for. The aim of this project was to develop a set of nursing-sensitive indicators intended to reduce the variation within individual diagnosis-related groups, supplementary to existing SwissDRG group criteria. The approach comprised a variety of methods. A systematic literature review, input from an advisory board and an expert panel, as well as three focus group interviews with nurses and nurse managers formed the basis for the synthesis of data and information gathered from these sources. A set of 14 nursing-sensitive indicators was developed. The indicators are intended to improve the homogeneity of nursing intensity within SwissDRG diagnosis-related groups. Before these nursing indicators can be adopted as group criteria, they must be formulated to conform with SwissDRG and tested empirically. This set of indicators can be seen at as a first step towards nursing intensity being adequately represented in SwissDRG diagnosis-related groups. The next challenge to be met is operationalising the indicators in codable form.

  5. Cardiovascular nursing in Israel.

    PubMed

    Blaer, Yosef; Rosenberg, Orit; Reisin, Leonardo

    2003-01-01

    Cardiovascular (CV) nursing as an entity in Israel dates back to 1952, when the nurses in Tel-Hashomer hospital took care of postoperative heart surgery patients. The first intensive cardiac care units (ICCUs) were established in 1971. In 1982, the first ICCU course was established in Tel-Hashomer hospital nursing school. Today, most of the nursing staff in Israels ICCUs are graduates of ICCU courses. The nurses professional society, the Society for Nursing of Israel, was established in 1947. In 1989 the Society for Advancement of Cardiac Nursing in Israel (SACN) was established. The main goals of the society were: the exchange of CV nursing knowledge, CV nursing research, CV nursing education in nursing schools, education of nurses in other departments in the care of the cardiac patient, and CV nursing education in the community. The CV nurse takes a large role in the total care of the cardiac patient, which includes rehabilitation within the hospital and in the ambulatory setting and coordination of nursing in national and international multicenter clinical trials. In collaboration with the Ministry of Health Nursing Division, Israeli CV nurses participate in national and international projects to: develop and upgrade nursing education; train new CV nurses; develop, review, and revise nursing protocols and guidelines; and establish new, more advanced ICCUs in underdeveloped areas within Israel and around the world. Our vision for the future development of CV nursing in Israel includes coordination and management roles in the hospital setting, and the establishment and management of home-care programs. Copyright 2003 CHF, Inc.

  6. Nurses' Attitudes towards Alcoholics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Speer, Rita D.

    Nurses' attitudes toward the alcoholic can have a profound impact on the person suffering from alcoholism. These attitudes can affect the alcoholic's care and even whether the alcoholic chooses to recover. This study investigated attitudes of approximately 68 nurses employed in hospitals, 49 nurses in treatment facilities, 58 nursing students, and…

  7. Nursing's Image on Campus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woolley, Alma S.

    1981-01-01

    In studying the nurse's image at a liberal arts college, it was found that faculty and administrators view nurses as long-suffering drones. On the whole, the image of nursing was positive, with those who had the most contact with the nursing program having a more enlightened image. (CT)

  8. Nursing's Scientific Quest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Jean

    1981-01-01

    Examines nursing's changing research practices. Discusses changes in the philosophy of science, dichotomies within nursing, and nursing's changing research tradition. Concludes that a new research tradition can provide nursing with the scientific and social freedom and openness to solve both conceptual and empirical problems. (CT)

  9. Intention in Nursing Practice.

    PubMed

    Sofhauser, Cynthia

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this column is to explore the meaning of intention in nursing practice and distinguish it from the concept of intentionality. The notion that nurses engage in a purposeful act of setting intention prior to delivery of nursing care is introduced, and nursing implications for setting intention in practice is offered. © The Author(s) 2015.

  10. Nursing Education and Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindeman, Carol A.

    1989-01-01

    Three issues directly influence the relationship between nurses and physicians: the nature of nursing practice, the education of registered nurses, and the American Medical Association proposal for registered care technicians. Nursing education programs should focus their programs and objectives so as to prepare their graduates for different…

  11. Paths to nursing leadership.

    PubMed

    Bondas, Terese

    2006-07-01

    The aim was to explore why nurses enter nursing leadership and apply for a management position in health care. The study is part of a research programme in nursing leadership and evidence-based care. Nursing has not invested enough in the development of nursing leadership for the development of patient care. There is scarce research on nurses' motives and reasons for committing themselves to a career in nursing leadership. A strategic sample of 68 Finnish nurse leaders completed a semistructured questionnaire. Analytic induction was applied in an attempt to generate a theory. A theory, Paths to Nursing Leadership, is proposed for further research. Four different paths were found according to variations between the nurse leaders' education, primary commitment and situational factors. They are called the Path of Ideals, the Path of Chance, the Career Path and the Temporary Path. Situational factors and role models of good but also bad nursing leadership besides motivational and educational factors have played a significant role when Finnish nurses have entered nursing leadership. The educational requirements for nurse leaders and recruitment to nursing management positions need serious attention in order to develop a competent nursing leadership.

  12. Nursing's Image on Campus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woolley, Alma S.

    1981-01-01

    In studying the nurse's image at a liberal arts college, it was found that faculty and administrators view nurses as long-suffering drones. On the whole, the image of nursing was positive, with those who had the most contact with the nursing program having a more enlightened image. (CT)

  13. Polymyositis: Diagnosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... themselves being invaded by cells of the immune system. Looking for more information, support or ways to get involved? Contact Us Get Our Emails About Polymyositis (PM) Signs and Symptoms Diagnosis Causes/Inheritance Medical Management Research Find your MDA Care Center Current Clinical ...

  14. [New nursing diagnoses in imaging: submission to NANDA International].

    PubMed

    Juchem, Beatriz Cavalcanti; Almeida, Míriam de Abreu; Lucena, Amália de Fátima

    2010-01-01

    The present work reports the experiment on the creation and submission to North American Nursing Diagnosis Association International (NANDA-I) of Nursing Diagnosis in the imageology area: "Adverse Reaction to Iodinated Contrast Media" and "Risk of Adverse Reaction to Iodinated Contrast Media". For this experiment the method of integrative revision of literature was utilized associated with the experience in clinical practice. The document for submission was elaborated according to guidance offered by NANDA-I and sent for appreciation to the Diagnosis Development Committee. The risk diagnose was approved and the real diagnose is still in evaluation process by the Diagnosis Development Committee. With this experiment we hope to motivate Brazilian nurses to contribute to the taxonomy of NANDA-I and participate in the building ofnursing knowledge.

  15. "Does one size fit all?" Exploring the cultural applicability of NANDA nursing diagnoses to Chinese nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Lai, Wei-Shu; Chao, Co-Shi Chantal; Yang, Wan-Ping; Liu, Hsiao-Ching; Chen, Ching-Huey

    2013-01-01

    East Asia has historically unique concepts of health and well-being and thus is an appropriate setting for exploring the multicultural applicability of the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association's Nursing Diagnoses (NANDA ND) system. This study aimed to explore how NANDA ND affect the growth and quality of professional nursing from the perspective of Taiwanese nurses. Grounded theory was employed in this interview-based investigation of 53 Taiwan-licensed nursing professionals at various hospitals in Taiwan. Data were analyzed using constant comparative analysis until theoretical saturation was reached. The core concept, Struggling with (the NANDA ND notion that) One Size Fits All, emerged after ongoing analysis of the effects of NANDA ND on good nursing, patient welfare, and professional development. The preliminary theoretical framework developed from this study provides evidence that NANDA ND may be incompatible with the cultural beliefs of the traditional Chinese health care setting in Taiwan, which emphasize holistic harmony and balance.

  16. Measuring Nursing Care Value.

    PubMed

    Welton, John M; Harper, Ellen M

    2016-01-01

    The value of nursing care as well as the contribution of individual nurses to clinical outcomes has been difficult to measure and evaluate. Existing health care financial models hide the contribution of nurses; therefore, the link between the cost and quality o nursing care is unknown. New data and methods are needed to articulate the added value of nurses to patient care. The final results and recommendations of an expert workgroup tasked with defining and measuring nursing care value, including a data model to allow extraction of key information from electronic health records to measure nursing care value, are described. A set of new analytic metrics are proposed.

  17. [Introduction to nursing aesthetics].

    PubMed

    Chen, Chen-Jung; Tsai, Chuan-Hsiu; Chen, Yi-Chang

    2011-04-01

    Empirical, aesthetic, ethical, and personal knowing are the four fundamental patterns of knowledge inquiry. Of these, the aesthetic knowing pattern is least discussed in nursing literature. This article discusses the definition of nursing aesthetics; its utilization in practice; and correlations between aesthetics and clinical practice. One of the advantages inherent to nursing is its ability to deliver skillful care directly to patients. Skillful performance is essential to reduce discrepancies between goals and patterns. Aesthetic nursing addresses more than the form of nursing. It further addresses the crucial elements of nursing knowledge. The science of nursing is influential in its ability to attain harmony among abundant empiric content, power of beneficence, and pleasure of aesthetic experience. In clinical practice, nurses can employ aesthetic nursing through various channels to create meaning and promote the professional image of nurses. Concepts listed in this article may be utilized in clinical supervision, practice and education.

  18. Advanced urology nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Crowe, Helen

    2014-03-01

    Urology nursing has developed as a specialty over the past few decades in response to several factors, workload demands being a prime reason. Nurses are taking on additional roles and activities including procedures such as cystoscopy and prostate biopsy, and running nurse-led clinics for a variety of urological conditions. Audits of advanced urological nursing practice have shown this care to be of a high standard and investigative procedures performed by these nurses match the diagnostic quality of existing services. Professional urological nursing organizations support the professional needs of these nurses, but the provision of education and training for advanced practice activities remains an unaddressed need. A range of confusing advanced urology nursing titles exists, and uncertainty regarding the roles and scope of practice for these nurses remains a concern. Acceptance and support from medical colleagues is required for the success of advanced urological nursing practice, but opinions on these roles remain divided.

  19. District nurses prescribing as nurse independent prescribers.

    PubMed

    Downer, Frances; Shepherd, Chew Kim

    2010-07-01

    Nurse prescribing has been established in the UK since 1994, however, limited focus has been placed on the experiences of district nurses adopting this additional role. This phenomenological study explores the experiences of district nurses prescribing as nurse independent prescribers across the West of Scotland. A qualitative Heideggarian approach examined the every-day experiences of independent prescribing among district nurses. A purposive sample was used and data collected using audio taped one-to-one informal interviews. The data was analysed thematically using Colaizzi's seven procedural steps. Overall these nurses reported that nurse prescribing was a predominantly positive experience. Participants identified improvements in patient care, job satisfaction, level of autonomy and role development. However, some of the participants indicated that issues such as support, record keeping, confidence and ongoing education are all major influences on prescribing practices.

  20. Acts of caring: nurses caring for nurses.

    PubMed

    Longo, Joy

    2011-01-01

    Caring behaviors displayed toward nurses by nurse managers and nurse peers play a significant role in establishing relationships that promote a healthy work environment. A qualitative study was done to identify behaviors perceived to be caring toward nurses. The theoretical background used for the study was Nursing as Caring by Boykin and Schoenhofer. Data were collected from focus groups consisting of registered nurses currently employed in the practice setting. Content analysis was used for the analysis. The overarching category that was identified was tending to a caring environment. The following emergent categories were also found: caring through helping and supporting, caring through appreciating, and acknowledging unappreciated caring. The findings suggest that nurses demonstrate caring behaviors toward their colleagues by coming to know them on both a professional and a personal level. These behaviors form the foundation for an environment that supports a consistent demonstration of caring.

  1. Nursing in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Baumann, Steven L

    2006-10-01

    The current discussion on the nursing shortage needs to focus as much on nursing job satisfaction and retention as on nursing recruitment and education. Selected aspects of the motivational psychology of Abraham Maslow, Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi, and Frederick Hertzberg are here discussed in light of the challenges-opportunities of nursing in Turkey and elsewhere. Also discussed is an innovative program to support the application of nursing theory and professional development in Toronto, Canada.

  2. [Classification of nursing interventions].

    PubMed

    Guimarães, H C; Barros, A L

    2001-06-01

    During the last years, Nursing is seeking to classify its diagnoses, interventions/actions and outcomes. Here is presented one of the classifications of nursing interventions that was proposed by nurses of the University of Iowa in 1987, the Nursing Interventions Classifications (NIC) as well as the reasons os its creation, in order to contribute to the dissemination of one of the most advanced proposals for classifying nursing interventions.

  3. Nursing Home Registered Nurses' and Licensed Practical Nurses' Knowledge of Causes of Falls.

    PubMed

    Gray-Miceli, Deanna; de Cordova, Pamela B; Crane, Giles L; Quigley, Patricia; Ratcliffe, Sarah J

    2016-01-01

    Reducing falls in nursing homes requires a knowledgeable nursing workforce. To test knowledge, 8 validated vignettes representing multifactorial fall causes were administered to 47 nurses from 3 nursing homes. Although licensed practical nurses scored higher than registered nurses in individual categories of falls, when we computed the average score of all 8 categories between groups of registered nurses and licensed practical nurses, registered nurses scored higher (F = 4.106; P < .05) in identifying 8 causal reasons for older adults to fall.

  4. Melanoma Diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horsch, Alexander

    The chapter deals with the diagnosis of the malignant melanoma of the skin. This aggressive type of cancer with steadily growing incidence in white populations can hundred percent be cured if it is detected in an early stage. Imaging techniques, in particular dermoscopy, have contributed significantly to improvement of diagnostic accuracy in clinical settings, achieving sensitivities for melanoma experts of beyond 95% at specificities of 90% and more. Automatic computer analysis of dermoscopy images has, in preliminary studies, achieved classification rates comparable to those of experts. However, the diagnosis of melanoma requires a lot of training and experience, and at the time being, average numbers of lesions excised per histology-proven melanoma are around 30, a number which clearly is too high. Further improvements in computer dermoscopy systems and their competent use in clinical settings certainly have the potential to support efforts of improving this situation. In the chapter, medical basics, current state of melanoma diagnosis, image analysis methods, commercial dermoscopy systems, evaluation of systems, and methods and future directions are presented.

  5. Addressing the nursing shortage.

    PubMed

    Wilder, Karen S; Halcomb, Kathy; Grubbs, Vicki

    2002-01-01

    Support is essential for students and new nurses to develop confidence in their practice (Oermann & Moffitt-Wolf, 1997). Caring, empowerment and team building are essential in helping affirm the choice of nursing as a profession. Students and new nurses will stay in nursing if they are supported (Meissner, 1986). The nursing community needs to nurture, encourage and inspire its members to learn and to grow; nurses need to treat each other with respect and patience. As Moccia (1990) so aptly stated. "The goal of nursing is to enable others so they might enable still others; to nurse, to teach and to learn with each other in caring ways." "What is modeled for nurses today will shape future practice" (Christensen, 1999).

  6. Value of intensified nursing

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Wilhelm; Konta, Brigitte; Prusa, Nina; Raymann, Cornelia

    2006-01-01

    The concept "intensified nursing" is mentioned in differentiation to concepts of "nursing care" or "nursing" which intensifies resources or patient contact. Especially psychic and social needs of patients are very appreciated in nursing. A similar type of nursing is known under the concept "advanced nursing practice" (ANP) which means, that a specialised, academically trained nurse offers an extended nursing care in which a focus on the published knowledge of evidence based research is made. From the thin literature to this topic a selection of predetermined topics was analysed where at least two articles with a sufficient high methodical quality were available. The selected topic groups were: „Infant and paediatric nursing", "gerontology" and "oncology". Generally the five publications concerning infant and paediatric nursing could conclusive show a benefit of intensified nursing. Further research is still needed to prove intensified nursing care. Two publications could be found to the gerontological intensified nursing; both used an extended nursing model and an enlarged use of resources. Both studies demonstrated a measurable success in the applied parameters. Two studies also could be analysed in the oncological field in which successes were also provable by the applied parameters. The success was given especially in a higher patient satisfaction, one study showed an improved scheduling (time planning) of nurses. There was not one article concerning economic questions of intensified nursing care. It has to be taken into account that the financial resources have to be used effectively also in nursing nowadays. It has to be assumed that the costs are driven by increased use of resources. Savings can be achieved, however, in the form of avoided therapies and days in hospital by intensified nursing. The intensified nursing can be considered as similar cost-effective as conventional models of nursing. Ethically it is necessary to consider that the possibilities of

  7. National Institute of Nursing Research

    MedlinePlus

    ... Content Page Level Navigation NINR - National Institute of Nursing Research NINR Dr. Heitkemper to Present NINR Director's ... patient outcomes. Read More > Nursing Research WHAT IS NURSING RESEARCH? Nursing research develops knowledge to: Build the ...

  8. [Project of introduction of nursing records at the pediatric intensive care unit].

    PubMed

    Canello, B L; Muntsch, S

    1998-01-01

    The project, performed at the Infantile General Hospital ITU, in Curitiba, Paraná, enabled to experience nursing practices in caring for seriously ill in hospital children and, also in concrete day by day situations. At beginning we have notice the absence of nursing care records of any kind, through many situations, that sometimes, put children's treatment in risk for nursing information records precariously and for the Tailorized way of nursing care. From nursing records process diagnosis, was discussed the project build, we have elaborated a record form and two manuals (Nursing records and Pharmacology Notions) for professionals training and follow-up. The project introduction has provided a better interaction between patient and nursing assistance and has encouraged, through the systematized way of information records, a interdisciplinary work, besides organization of nursing assistance, resulting in a better assistance quality and credibility.

  9. Nursing Home Work Practices and Nursing Assistants' Job Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bishop, Christine E.; Squillace, Marie R.; Meagher, Jennifer; Anderson, Wayne L.; Wiener, Joshua M.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To estimate the impact of nursing home work practices, specifically compensation and working conditions, on job satisfaction of nursing assistants employed in nursing homes. Design and Methods: Data are from the 2004 National Nursing Assistant Survey, responses by the nursing assistants' employers to the 2004 National Nursing Home Survey,…

  10. Nursing Home Work Practices and Nursing Assistants' Job Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bishop, Christine E.; Squillace, Marie R.; Meagher, Jennifer; Anderson, Wayne L.; Wiener, Joshua M.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To estimate the impact of nursing home work practices, specifically compensation and working conditions, on job satisfaction of nursing assistants employed in nursing homes. Design and Methods: Data are from the 2004 National Nursing Assistant Survey, responses by the nursing assistants' employers to the 2004 National Nursing Home Survey,…

  11. Using Nursing Languages in School Nursing Practice. Second Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denehy, Janice

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this updated manual is to define and describe standardized nursing languages, highlight how nursing languages are a part of the nursing process, and illustrate through case examples how nursing languages are used in school nursing practice. This manual also summarizes the history and development of three nursing classifications, the…

  12. Nursing and Nursing Education: Public Policies and Private Actions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Institute of Medicine (NAS), Washington, DC.

    Results are presented of a study of nursing and nursing education that focused on the need for continued federal support of nursing education, ways to attract nurses to medically underserved areas, and approaches to encourage nurses to stay in the profession. Findings are presented on whether the aggregate supply of generalist nurses will be…

  13. Using Nursing Languages in School Nursing Practice. Second Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denehy, Janice

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this updated manual is to define and describe standardized nursing languages, highlight how nursing languages are a part of the nursing process, and illustrate through case examples how nursing languages are used in school nursing practice. This manual also summarizes the history and development of three nursing classifications, the…

  14. Nurse attendee purchasing patterns.

    PubMed

    Weiss, M D; Savik, K; Kjervik, D K

    1993-01-01

    Retention of nursing professionals is crucial in responding to the increasing demand for and complexity of nursing care. Augmenting the decision-making role of nurses is one important retention-related strategy. Purchasing patterns reflect one aspect of nurses' decision-making role. National meetings provide nurses with an opportunity to investigate educational and employment options, as well as to preview technological advances in patient care products and supplies. Yet, the purchasing patterns of nurses related to the marketing of patient care supplies, or educational material at national meetings have rarely been acknowledged or researched. This study investigated the purchasing patterns of nurse attendees as revealed at a national meeting and how attendance influenced purchasing input following the meeting. The study addressed differences in purchasing patterns between specific groups of nurse attendees, as well as the relationship between meeting attendance motivators and purchasing patterns. A descriptive methodology utilizing participant observation at four national nursing meetings and mail survey in four phases was used to determine if there were: (1) identifiable purchasing patterns for nurses attending specific nursing-organization sponsored national meetings, (2) differences in purchasing patterns between nurse attendees from these meetings, (3) differences in self-reported post-meeting purchase input, and (4) relationships between meeting attendance motivators and purchasing patterns. The findings demonstrate that nurse attendee purchasing patterns can be identified and do vary among nursing groups. Nurse attendees at specialty meetings were more likely to act as specifiers, have a more dominant role in purchasing and were more likely to influence product purchases than were nurse attendees from generalist meetings. Self-reports of post-meeting purchasing input demonstrated that nurse attendees utilized information gained at national meetings in

  15. Cross border nursing.

    PubMed

    Cutshall, P

    1993-01-01

    In 1989, the Canadian Nurses Association asked a professional nurse from British Columbia to help nurses in Nepal develop their association an work on nursing legislation. Nepal had about 3000 nurses, including assistant nurse-midwives, 500 of whom were members of the Trained Nurses Association of Nepal (TNAN). It wanted to expand nursing's contribution to health care in Nepal. The nurses wanted to increase the visibility of the association, to become a self-sustaining organization, to establish a licensing law, and to improve the availability of continuing education. The Canadian nurse helped the Nepalese nurses with a workshop on association management covering record keeping and meeting plans. She helped a newly formed committee with licensing law and with decision factors in pursuing self-regulation for nursing. She discussed a work plan and a lobby strategy. She helped another committee develop objectives for the next year. A follow-up visit the next year revealed that the office was operating well and the association was keeping good records. TNAN sponsored workshops on professionalism and leadership. This visit yielded further progress on a licensing law and on identifying ways to become self-sufficient. The nurses discussed the Norwegian Nurses Association's (NNA) interest in providing funds to buy a building for TNAN use and to derive income from rent. NNA eventually donated the funds. By the 1992 visit, the nurses had revised and registered their constitution and bylaws. They had sponsored workshops on HIV/AIDS and mental health. The name was now the Nursing Association of Nepal (NAN). The newly created executive council had met frequently. NAN had expanded from 6 to 11 local branches. It had created 5 committees: fund raising, research, international coordination, nurses welfare, and publications. A workshop in western Nepal centered on quality nursing care. NAN had a role in the government's progress in primary health care and mental health services.

  16. Infectious Diseases in the Nursing Home Setting: Challenges and Opportunities for Clinical Investigation

    PubMed Central

    Juthani-Mehta, Manisha; Quagliarello, Vincent J.

    2011-01-01

    The global population is aging. With the high prevalence of dementia and functional decline in older Americans, many aging adults with disabilities reside in nursing homes in their final stage of life. Immunosenescence, multiple comorbid disease, and grouped quarter living all coalesce in nursing home residents to increase the risk for infectious disease. The unique issues involved with diagnosis, prognosis, and management of infectious diseases in nursing home residents make research based in the nursing home setting both necessary and exciting for the physician investigator. This review discusses the opportunities and challenges involved with research of the evolving public health problem of infections among nursing home residents. PMID:20822459

  17. ISO reference terminology models for nursing: applicability for natural language processing of nursing narratives.

    PubMed

    Bakken, Suzanne; Hyun, Sookyung; Friedman, Carol; Johnson, Stephen B

    2005-08-01

    Natural language processing (NLP) systems have demonstrated utility in parsing narrative texts for purposes such as surveillance and decision support. However, there has been little work related to NLP of nursing narratives. The purpose of this study was to compare the semantic categories of a NLP system (Medical Language Extraction and Encoding [MedLEE] system) with the semantic domains, categories, and attributes of the International Standards Organization (ISO) reference terminology models for nursing diagnoses and nursing actions. All but two MedLEE diagnosis and procedure-related semantic categories mapped to ISO models. In some instances, we found exact correspondence between the semantic structures of MedLEE and the ISO models. In other situations (e.g. aspects of Site or Location), the ISO model was not as granular as MedLEE. For clinical procedure and non-invasive examination, two ISO nursing action model components (Action and Target) mapped to a single MedLEE semantic category. The ISO models are applicable to NLP of nursing narratives. However, the ISO models require additional specification of selected semantic categories for the abstract semantic domains in order to achieve the objective of using NLP to parse and encode data from nursing narratives. Our analysis also suggests areas for extension of MedLEE particularly in regard to represent nursing actions.

  18. Nursing informatics competences still challenging nurse educators.

    PubMed

    Rajalahti, Elina; Saranto, Kaija

    2012-01-01

    In recent years nursing documentation has been one of the most important development areas of nursing informatics (NI) in Finland. The purpose of this study is to describe the development of the nurse educators' competences in nursing documentation during a project called eNNI. The eNNI project (2008-2010) was a cooperative project by nurse educators and working life experts. The goal of the project was to implement the national documentation model and thereby improve operational processes at workplaces. The study includes pre- and post-test questioning of NI applications with a web-based questionnaire (n=136). The data were analyzed with distribution, cross-tabulations and average tests and descriptive statistic multivariate method. According to the results, the ICT skills of the nurse educators were good at the end of the project, and they had good information literacy competence. On the other hand, their advanced NI skills left room for improvement.

  19. Embedding Nursing Informatics Education into an Australian Undergraduate Nursing Degree.

    PubMed

    Cummings, Elizabeth; Shin, Eun Hee; Mather, Carey; Hovenga, Evelyn

    2016-01-01

    Alongside the rapid rise in the adoption of electronic health records and the use of technology to support nursing processes, there is a requirement for nursing students, new graduate nurses, and nursing educators to embrace nursing informatics. Whilst nursing informatics has been taught at post graduate levels for many years, the integration of it into undergraduate studies for entry level nurses has been slow. This is made more complex by the lack of explicit nursing informatics competencies in many countries. Australia has now mandated the inclusion of nursing informatics into all undergraduate nursing curricula but there continues to be an absence of a relevant set of agreed nursing competencies. There is a resulting lack of consistency in nursing curricula content nationally. This paper describes the process used by one Australian university to integrate nursing informatics throughout the undergraduate nursing degree curriculum to ensure entry level nurses have a basic level of skills in the use of informatics.

  20. Nursing Education for College Graduates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slavinsky, Ann T.; Diers, Donna

    1982-01-01

    Describes the masters programs for nonnurse college graduates at Yale School of Nursing which offers both basic and advanced nursing preparation in a single three-year curriculum sequence. The program prepares nurses who can function in advanced-practice specialty roles as nurse-midwives, nurse practitioners, or clinical nurse specialists. (CT)

  1. Call to Action for Nurses/Nursing

    PubMed Central

    Premji, Shahirose S.; Hatfield, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    The 13 million nurses worldwide constitute most of the global healthcare workforce and are uniquely positioned to engage with others to address disparities in healthcare to achieve the goal of better health for all. A new vision for nurses involves active participation and collaboration with international colleagues across research practice and policy domains. Nursing can embrace new concepts and a new approach—“One World, One Health”—to animate nursing engagement in global health, as it is uniquely positioned to participate in novel ways to improve healthcare for the well-being of the global community. This opinion paper takes a historical and reflective approach to inform and inspire nurses to engage in global health practice, research, and policy to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals. It can be argued that a colonial perspective currently informs scholarship pertaining to nursing global health engagement. The notion of unidirectional relationships where those with resources support training of those less fortunate has dominated the framing of nursing involvement in low- and middle-income countries. This paper suggests moving beyond this conceptualization to a more collaborative and equitable approach that positions nurses as cocreators and brokers of knowledge. We propose two concepts, reverse innovation and two-way learning, to guide global partnerships where nurses are active participants. PMID:27144160

  2. The nurse match instrument: Exploring professional nursing identity and professional nursing values for future nurse recruitment.

    PubMed

    Mazhindu, Deborah M; Griffiths, Lauren; Pook, Carol; Erskine, Allen; Ellis, Roger; Smith, Fleur

    2016-05-01

    From April 1st 2015 it will be mandatory for Higher Education Institutions (HEI) in the United Kingdom (UK) providing pre-qualifying health care higher education to use a Values Based Recruitment (VBR) tool, to ensure only the candidates with the "right" personal identity and values commensurate with the Professional Identity of Nursing (PIN) are accepted for nurse education. "Nurse Match" instrument was developed to enhance the recruitment and selection of candidates for pre-qualifying nursing. Action Research into PIN commenced with voluntary, purposive, convenience samples of qualified nurses (n = 30), Service Users (N = 10), postgraduate diploma nurses in mental health (N = 25), third year mental health branch students (N = 20) and adult and child student nurses in years 2 and 3 (N = 20) in Focus Groups. Data collection and analysis occurred concomitantly between July 2013 and October 2014, aided by NVivo 10 software and revealed Key Quality Indicators (KQIs) of the social construction of PIN. Construct development included a literature review spanning the last fifteen years, which identified four main themes; 1. Nursing's ethics and values. 2. Nursing's professional identity and caring. 3. Nursing's emotional intelligence. 4. Nursing's professionalism. Nurse Match offers an evidence-based enhancement to VBR, for future nurse recruitment locally, nationally and internationally. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Suicidal patients as experienced by psychiatric nurses in inpatient care.

    PubMed

    Carlén, Pontus; Bengtsson, Anita

    2007-08-01

    Psychiatric nurses have a major influence on the lives of patients with suicidal behaviour in inpatient care. Despite this, there is a lack of knowledge about how nurses experience patients with suicidal behaviour in a deeper sense. The aim of this study was to investigate how psychiatric nurses experience patients with suicidal behaviour within an inpatient psychiatric context. Semi-structured interviews were carried out with 11 psychiatric nurses, each of whom had more than 5 years of experience caring for patients with suicidal behaviour. Data were analysed using qualitative latent content analysis. Two main themes emerged from the data analysis. These are 'labelled' and 'suffering'. In the nurses' natural attitude, they saw patients as being labelled with different conditions and/or behaviours based on objective signs. These were categorized into different groups or identities such as psychiatric diagnosis, mask wearer, screened-off, or the social, relapsing or determined patient. On reflection, however, the nurses described the patients' suffering in terms related to feelings of hopelessness, meaninglessness, and being out of control. The nurses' experiences of the patients as suffering were based on their subjective reflective experience of the patients. The study gives support to the conclusion that two main logic systems are represented in the care of patients with suicidal behaviour: technical practical and nursing perspectives. In order to ensure that these two logic systems combine, it is necessary for the psychiatric care organization to intervene to support the nurses in reflecting on their everyday work.

  4. Nurse practitioner-led surgical spine consultation clinic.

    PubMed

    Sarro, Angela; Rampersaud, Yoga Raja; Lewis, Stephen

    2010-12-01

    This study is a report of a study of patient satisfaction with non-surgical nurse practitioner management of pre-selected spinal referrals. Nurse practitioners are linked to particular patient populations or specific physicians in a medical setting. In a universal healthcare delivery system, patients are often faced with long and anxiety-provoking waiting times, particularly for sub-specialized consultations such as spinal surgery. A nurse practitioner-led spine consultation ambulatory clinic was implemented at a Canadian neuroscience centre. A prospective patient satisfaction and clinical accuracy study was performed in 2008. All patients assessed by the nurse practitioner completed a post-consultation validated patient satisfaction questionnaire. All patients were reviewed with the surgeon for confirmation of diagnosis and management. A total of 177 pre-selected patients (disc-herniations, spinal stenosis, degenerative disc disease) were assessed by the nurse practitioner. Mean time from referral to nurse practitioner clinic assessment was 12 weeks (range: 9·8-21 weeks) compared with 10-52 weeks if seen in a conventional clinic. Nurse practitioner clinical diagnosis and management plan were in agreement with those of the surgeon (100% and 95% respectively). Patient satisfaction was 97% with the consultation and 94% and with examination thoroughness. Preference for a longer waiting period for direct consultation with the surgeon was 26%. Nurse practitioners can play an effective and efficient role in providing care to patients requiring specific disease management in a specialty setting. The nurse practitioner-run clinic offers accurate and earlier assessment, thus facilitating a timelier diagnosis and management plan. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  5. Nurse leaders' responsibilities in supporting nurses experiencing difficult situations in clinical nursing.

    PubMed

    Honkavuo, Leena; Lindström, Unni Å

    2014-01-01

    To make nurse leaders aware of different kinds of difficult situations in clinical nursing that may cause suffering to nurses and to discuss how nurse leaders can approach and alleviate this suffering. Difficult situations are a part of clinical nursing. Nurses are repeatedly exposed to situations that may cause them suffering and reduce their ability to serve the patients. Data collection was based on a sample of semi-structured face-to-face deep interviews with eight nurses who were encouraged to narrate their lived experiences of difficult situations in clinical nursing. Nurses want to discuss issues connected to nursing and caring science that emerge in clinical nursing with their nurse leaders. Painful memories and thoughts are often related to patients struggling between life and death, the despair of families and friends, and their hovering between hope and hopelessness. The results do not support the notion that nurses would request other kinds of support or debriefing. The mission of nursing is to serve, console and alleviate human suffering. Nurse leaders carry a responsibility to create such evidence-based caring cultures that support the mission of nursing. Nurse leaders' understanding, sympathetic attitude, ethical value basis, personality and ability to discuss are important aspects for nurses. Through the support from nurse leaders, it seems possible to alleviate the nurse's suffering in clinical nursing. Implications for Nursing Management Nurse leaders' support creates a foundation for the nurses' professional development. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Alternatives to Nursing Homes

    MedlinePlus

    ... this website may not be available. Alternatives to nursing homes Before you make any decisions about long ... live and what help you may need. A nursing home may not be your only choice. Discharge ...

  7. Oncology Nursing Society

    MedlinePlus

    ... Account Login Cart Search the ONS website Continuing Nursing Education Courses and Activities Access Devices: The Virtual ... Vomiting Chemotherapy for Non-Oncology Conditions Clinical Trials Nursing 101 Cognitive Impairment Fundamentals of Blood and Marrow ...

  8. [Nursing motivation leadership].

    PubMed

    Chen, Ia-Ling; Hung, Chich-Hsiu

    2007-02-01

    The concept of "patients treated as guests" is emphasized in today's medical service and patient-center nursing care. However, with rapid changes in health insurance and hospital accreditation systems as well as increasing consumer awareness, the nurse manager must both efficiently relieve the working pressure of nurses and motivate them. However, it would be an extreme challenge for nurse managers to build a team in which each member works in a self-fulfilling work environment and achieves a high quality of care. This article presents several theories and techniques that relate to motivation strategies. These strategies can serve as a guide and a reference for nurse managers to inspire teamwork and raise morale. It can be expected that increasing nurse satisfaction, performance, and care quality will decrease turnover and desertion rates. Hopefully, this article will assist nurse managers to become better leaders and to achieve success in providing efficient services and good of nursing care quality.

  9. Emergency Nurses Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... an authority, advocate, lobbyist, and voice for emergency nursing. ENA has 40,000+ members and continues to ... advocate for patient safety and excellence in emergency nursing practice. Find out about our many membership opportunities. ...

  10. Nurse-Performed Endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Duffield, Christine; Chapman, Susan; Rowbotham, Samantha; Blay, Nicole

    2017-01-01

    Increasing demands for health care globally often lead to discussions about expanding the involvement of nurses in a range of nontraditional roles. Several countries have introduced nurse endoscopists as a means of easing the burden of demand for a range of endoscopic procedures. A shortage of medical staff in Australia combined with increasing demand for endoscopy led to the implementation of nurse endoscopists as a pilot program in the state of Queensland, where a nurse practitioner model was implemented, and Victoria, where an advanced practice model was used. This article will discuss the implementation of and responses from the nursing, medical, and policy community to nurse-performed endoscopy in this country. Regarding health policy, access to cancer screening may be improved by providing nurses with advanced training to safely perform endoscopy procedures. Moreover, issues of nurse credentialing and payment need to be considered appropriate to each country's health system model.

  11. Implementing Nursing Professional Development.

    PubMed

    Bruce, Sandra L

    2016-01-01

    Sandra Bruce is the Nurse Education Program Manager, Air Force Personnel Center, Joint Base San Antonio-Randolph in Texas, and is responsible for the Air Force Continuing Nursing Education program and facilitation of selection boards for graduate education and fellowship programs. She served as editor for the third and fourth editions of the Association for Nursing Professional Development (ANPD) Core Curriculums for Nursing Professional Development. Sandy previously served as the Education Consultant to the Air Force Surgeon General for Nursing Education programs for over 3,000 Air Force Nurse Corps members. She received her BSN from Mercy College of Detroit in 1976 and entered the Air Force in 1982. The Air Force sponsored her Master's Degree in Nursing as a Clinical Nurse Specialist.

  12. American Nephrology Nurses' Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... Join/Renew Jobs Contact Corporate Shop American Nephrology Nurses Association About ANNA Association About ANNA Strategic Plan ... CExpress Events National Events Chapter / Local Events Nephrology Nurses Week ANNA Education Modules CKD Modules Education Services ...

  13. Needed: Nursing Administration Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blair, Eunice M.

    1976-01-01

    A master's program that synthesizes clinical nursing knowledge with management theory and skills is one way to prepare nursing service administrators capable of exerting an influence on today's complex health care system. (Editor)

  14. Nursing's Preferred Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aydelotte, Myrtle K.

    1987-01-01

    The author discusses future trends for society and relates them to future roles and characteristics of nursing. She presents strategies that nursing professionals should use to be prepared for the stated trends. (CH)

  15. Exploring improvisation in nursing.

    PubMed

    Hanley, Mary Anne; Fenton, Mary V

    2007-06-01

    Improvisation has long been considered a function of music, dance, and the theatre arts. An exploration of the definitions and characteristics of this concept in relation to the art and practice of nursing provide an opportunity to illuminate related qualities within the field of nursing. Nursing has always demonstrated improvisation because it is often required to meet the needs of patients in a rapidly changing environment. However, little has been done to identify improvisation in the practice of nursing or to teach improvisation as a nursing knowledge-based skill. This article strives to explore the concept of improvisation in nursing, to describe the characteristics of improvisation as applied to nursing, and to utilize case studies to illustrate various manifestations of improvisation in nursing practice.

  16. National Nursing Home Survey

    Cancer.gov

    The National Nursing Home Survey provides includes characteristics such as size of nursing home facilities, ownership, Medicare/Medicaid certification, occupancy rate, number of days of care provided, and expenses.

  17. Ebstein Anomaly: An Overview for Nursing.

    PubMed

    Johnstad, Christine M; Hecker-Fernandes, Jill Renee; Fernandes, Regis

    2015-01-01

    Ebstein anomaly is a rare congenital heart defect. Many nurses have probably never encountered this anomaly, with very few able to accurately depict the pathological anatomy of the condition. As technology further develops, providers are better equipped to recognize and manage Ebstein anomaly. There are important considerations for nurses when caring for an individual with Ebstein anomaly. The aim of this article is to give an overview of the condition exploring the pathophysiology, how patients typically present, and how to effectively care for a patient with Ebstein anomaly regarding medical and surgical courses of treatment. It is important for nurses to have a resource to reference on Ebstein anomaly, and the majority of current literature is solely based for medical providers. Furthermore, Ebstein patients may be seen on a variety of units in the hospital beyond cardiology (i.e., pregnant patient with a diagnosis of Ebstein anomaly).

  18. [Interventional Patient Hygiene Model. A critical reflection on basic nursing care in intensive care units].

    PubMed

    Bambi, Stefano; Lucchini, Alberto; Solaro, Massimo; Lumini, Enrico; Rasero, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Interventional Patient Hygiene Model. A critical reflection on basic nursing care in intensive care units. Over the past 15 years, the model of medical and nursing care changed from being exclusively oriented to the diagnosis and treatment of acute illness, to the achievement of outcomes by preventing iatrogenic complications (Hospital Acquired Conditions). Nursing Sensitive Outcomes show as nursing is directly involved in the development and prevention of these complications. Many of these complications, including falls from the bed, use of restraints, urinary catheter associated urinary infections and intravascular catheter related sepsis, are related to basic nursing care. Ten years ago in critical care, a school of thought called get back to the basics, was started for the prevention of errors and risks associated with nursing. Most of these nursing practices involve hygiene and mobilization. On the basis of these reflections, Kathleen Vollman developed a model of nursing care in critical care area, defined Interventional Patient Hygiene (IPH). The IPH model provides a proactive plan of nursing interventions to strengthen the patients' through the Evidence-Based Nursing Care. The components of the model include interventions of oral hygiene, mobilization, dressing changes, urinary catheter care, management of incontinence and bed bath, hand hygiene and skin antisepsis. The implementation of IPH model follows the steps of Deming cycle, and requires a deep reflection on the priorities of nursing care in ICU, as well as the effective teaching of the importance of the basic nursing to new generations of nurses.

  19. [Standardisation of nursing care amongst patients in prison].

    PubMed

    Martínez-Delgado, M M

    2014-01-01

    To develop the Standardized Nursing Care Process format amongst patients in a prison. Observational, descriptive study, conducted on a sample of thirty patients in Soria Prison between March and June 2011. We collected information via a review of medical records and conducted an interview of nursing assessments using functional patterns. Subsequent nursing diagnoses and interrelated problems were obtained using NANDA taxonomy. The subsequent use of NIC and NOC taxonomy marked the activities and performance criteria for each diagnosis, in the same way as for interrelated problems. The nursing diagnoses found in the patient sample analyzed, and the frequency thereof, reveal peculiarities in terms of the health care needs of the prison population, which makes it possible to standardize nursing care plans for the population under study.

  20. Antidepressant treatment of depression in rural nursing home residents.

    PubMed

    Kerber, Cindy Sullivan; Dyck, Mary J; Culp, Kennith R; Buckwalter, Kathleen

    2008-09-01

    Under-diagnosis and under-treatment of depression are major problems in nursing home residents. The purpose of this study was to determine antidepressant use among nursing home residents who were diagnosed with depression using three different methods: (1) the Geriatric Depression Scale, (2) Minimum Data Set, and (3) primary care provider assessments. As one would expect, the odds of being treated with an antidepressant were about eight times higher for those diagnosed as depressed by the primary care provider compared to the Geriatric Depression Scale or the Minimum Data Set. Men were less likely to be diagnosed and treated with antidepressants by their primary care provider than women. Depression detected by nurses through the Minimum Data Set was treated at a lower rate with antidepressants, which generates issues related to interprofessional communication, nursing staff communication, and the need for geropsychiatric role models in nursing homes.

  1. Gaps in nurse staffng and nursing home resident needs.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ning Jackie; Unruh, Lynn; Wan, Thomas T H

    2013-01-01

    Trends in nurse staffing levels in nursing homes from 1997 to 2011 varied across the category of nurse and the type of nursing home. The gaps found in this study are important to consider because nurses may become overworked and this may negatively affect the quality of services and jeopardize resident safety. Nursing home administrators should consider improving staffing strategically. Staffing should be based not only on the number of resident days, but also allocated according to particular resident needs. As the demand for nursing home care grows, bridging the gap between nurse staffing and resident nursing care needs will be especially important in light of the evidence linking nurse staffing to the quality of nursing home care. Until more efficient nursing care delivery exits, there may be no other way to safeguard quality except to increase nurse staffing in nursing homes.

  2. Nursing Role Transition Preceptorship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Batory, Susan M.

    2014-01-01

    The preceptorship clinical experience in a practical nursing (PN) program at a Midwestern community college is considered crucial to the PN students' transition from novice nurse to professional nurse. However, no research has been available to determine whether the preceptorship clinical accomplishes its purpose. A case study was conducted to…

  3. Meals in nursing homes.

    PubMed

    Kofod, Jens; Birkemose, Anna

    2004-06-01

    Undernutrition is present among 33% of nursing home residents in Denmark. Hence, it is relevant to examine the meal situation at nursing homes to single out factors that may increase or reduce the residents' food intake. In the ongoing Danish nursing home debate it is claimed that a new type of nursing home improves the residents' meal situation with a positive effect on nutrition. The aim of this work is to test the general hypothesis that (i) residents appreciate the meal situation in these nursing homes and (ii) nutritional status of the residents is improved in this type of nursing home. This study was carried out in four Danish nursing homes at various locations in Denmark. The methods used are qualitative interviews and observations at four nursing homes in combination with measurement of body mass index (BMI) at two of the four nursing homes. Undernutrition is defined as a BMI below 20. The study could not confirm the general hypothesis, as a consistent improvement in the meal situation was not found in the nursing homes studied. But an indication of improved nutritional status was found in two of the nursing homes where the degree of undernutrition was lower than generally found in Denmark. Furthermore, the study indicated that the staff and the residents conceived the nursing homes differently.

  4. Nursing in Crisis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fulcher, Roxanne

    2007-01-01

    Both the nation's health-care and nursing education systems are in crisis. While the care provided by registered nurses (RNs) is essential to patients' recovery from acute illness and to the effective management of their chronic conditions, the United States is experiencing a nursing shortage that is anticipated to increase as baby boomers age and…

  5. Nursing Research: Position Statement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Copp, Laurel; And Others

    The role of the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) in encouraging research through the programs and activities of the member schools is discussed. It is suggested that the dean or administrative head of a college of nursing is in a position to influence nursing research activities. The principal role of the academic dean in…

  6. Nursing in Virginia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Virginia State Council of Higher Education, Richmond.

    Prefacing its comments with an explanatory note concerning the reason for its organization, purpose, and procedure, the Committee utilizes half its report statistically documenting various factors in nursing practice and nursing education in Virginia. The statistics are based on a study, "Nursing and Health Care in Virginia", by Thomas…

  7. Nurses' Attitudes toward Suicide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alston, Maude H.; Robinson, Beverly H.

    1992-01-01

    Examined whether nurses' attitudes toward suicide are based on clinical specialty, age, and degree completed. Findings from 184 nurses revealed no significant differences between clinical specialty groups. Age and degree were significant only on Right to Die scale. Older nurses and those with advanced degrees were more likely to agree with…

  8. Research Issues: Nursing & Professionalization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenfeld, Peri

    Nursing has always been viewed as a "women's profession" as evidenced by the fact that 97 percent of the 1.9 million registered nurses in the United States are female. The values of helping others, altruism, compassion, and sacrifice are associated with women and with nursing. However, because many young people today do not view these values as…

  9. Nursing Research: Position Statement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Copp, Laurel; And Others

    The role of the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) in encouraging research through the programs and activities of the member schools is discussed. It is suggested that the dean or administrative head of a college of nursing is in a position to influence nursing research activities. The principal role of the academic dean in…

  10. Time to market nursing.

    PubMed

    Henry, Heather

    2016-06-29

    For too long nursing has been seen as a cost rather than a way of providing efficient and cost-effective care. My hope is that the nursing framework, Leading Change, Adding Value, will help nurses re-establish their place in the system.

  11. Nursing students and Haiku.

    PubMed

    Anthony, M L

    1998-01-01

    The emphasis in nursing education is frequently on facts, details, and linear issues. Students need more encouragement to use the creative abilities which exist in each of them. The use of haiku, a simple unrhymed Japanese verse, is one method which stimulates nursing students to use their creativity. A haiku exercise worked well in encouraging a group of nursing students to express their feelings.

  12. Technology and Nursing Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neighbors, Marianne; Eldred, Evelyn E.

    1993-01-01

    A study to isolate some of the complex skills that nurses are expected to perform in current practice identified 54 skills and surveyed 167 staff nurses and 53 nurse executives to classify the expected level of performance for a new graduate. Results indicated that educators bear responsibility for learning about technology and incorporating it…

  13. Nursing Role Transition Preceptorship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Batory, Susan M.

    2014-01-01

    The preceptorship clinical experience in a practical nursing (PN) program at a Midwestern community college is considered crucial to the PN students' transition from novice nurse to professional nurse. However, no research has been available to determine whether the preceptorship clinical accomplishes its purpose. A case study was conducted to…

  14. Research Issues: Nursing & Professionalization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenfeld, Peri

    Nursing has always been viewed as a "women's profession" as evidenced by the fact that 97 percent of the 1.9 million registered nurses in the United States are female. The values of helping others, altruism, compassion, and sacrifice are associated with women and with nursing. However, because many young people today do not view these values as…

  15. Identifying Nursing's Future Leaders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gunning, Carolyn S.; Hawken, Patty L.

    1990-01-01

    A study determined that encouraging and supporting students in professional activities while they were still in school would lead those students to participate in professional nursing organizations after they graduated. Organized nursing needs to identify the factors that influence nurses to join organizations and concentrate on these factors to…

  16. The nursing student with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.

    PubMed

    Bradshaw, Martha J; Salzer, Judith Schurr

    2003-01-01

    Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in college-age students presents a complex challenge of coping with academic coursework, refining life skills, and addressing self-limitations. Behaviors that characterize ADHD are particularly problematic for nursing students, especially when the student has difficulty with behaviors that exemplify executive functioning. The authors discuss symptoms and treatments associated with the diagnosis of ADHD and evaluation and interventions for college students, based on guidelines from the Americans With Disabilities Act. Nursing faculty can facilitate academic success by recognizing the problem in nursing students and implementing strategies useful for self-management of ADHD.

  17. Participation in the International Classification for Nursing Practice (ICNP) programme.

    PubMed

    Bartz, Claudia; Coenen, Amy; Hong, Woi-Hyun

    2006-01-01

    The International Council of Nurses (ICN) is a federation of 129 national nurses associations. The International Classification for Nursing Practice (ICNP) is a programme of the ICN. The purpose of this paper is to describe the development and maintenance processes of the ICNP Programme that are used to increase participation. These include processes by which the ICNP was and continues to be developed, tested, distributed and implemented worldwide, with emphasis on the current version, ICNP Version 1.0. The ICNP is a unified nursing language that facilitates cross-mapping among local terms and existing terminologies. ICNP conforms to current terminology standards and criteria, for example, ISO standards and HL7. The ICNP Alpha and Beta Versions documented the progress of concept validation and classification of nursing phenomena and interventions. The ICNP Beta 2 Version was a combinatorial terminology organized in two multi-axial structures representing nursing phenomena and nursing actions. The ICNP Version 1.0, launched in 2005, changed the relatively straight-forward multi-axial structure into a compositional terminology through the application of description logics using Web Ontology Language (OWL) within Protégé, an ontology development environment. ICNP Version 1.0 is also represented in a multiaxial model (7-Axis) for nurses to compose nursing diagnosis, intervention and outcome statements. Language translations and clinical information systems applications are required to make the ICNP Version 1.0 available to nurses at the point of healthcare delivery. ICNP data collected in healthcare environments provide standardized terminology for nursing that allows comparison of nursing practice across health care settings, specialties and countries; facilitate data-based clinical and management decision making; and contribute to the development of guidelines and standards for best practices and optimal outcomes for patients, families and communities.

  18. Professionalism in Nursing Behaviors of Nurse Practitioners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Donna; Miller, Barbara K.

    2001-01-01

    A survey of 502 nurse practitioners found that more than half had written research proposals or participated in research projects recently; nearly 50% wrote their own job descriptions; 93% belonged to the American Academy of Nurse Practitioners; and maintaining certification was the motivation for some professional behaviors. (Contains 29…

  19. [Training for nurse coordinators in nursing homes].

    PubMed

    Martin, Jean-René

    2016-01-01

    For the last three years, the Poitou-Charentes regional health agency has organised and funded training for nurse coordinators in nursing homes. The training programme, created in partnership with the Poitiers healthcare manager training institute, enables professionals with multiple responsibilities and missions, who deserve greater recognition, to acquire the necessary skills.

  20. Nursing 436A: Pediatric Oncology for Nurses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackman, Cynthia L.

    A description is provided of "Pediatric Oncology for Nurses," the first in a series of three courses offered to fourth-year nursing students in pediatric oncology. The first section provides a course overview, discusses time assignments, and describes the target student population. Next, a glossary of terms, and lists of course goals, long-range…

  1. Nursing home staff--nursing student partnership.

    PubMed

    Karam, S E; Nies, D M

    1995-10-01

    A partnership between a nursing home and a school of nursing provides both staff and students with creative opportunities for solving clinical problems. Through collaborative efforts of senior baccalaureate students and the staff administration of a long-term care facility in eastern Virginia, a successful bowel management program was developed and implemented.

  2. Advanced practice nursing role: nurse practitioner.

    PubMed

    Pastorino, C

    1998-01-01

    Nurse Practitioners are advanced practice nurses (APNs) who provide primary and acute care to individuals in many settings. The NP diagnoses and treats medical and surgical conditions that require acute, short-term management and chronic, long-term treatment. States vary in regulating processes regarding collaborative agreements, prescriptive authority, medical staff privileges, and insurance/third party reimbursement.

  3. Nursing 436A: Pediatric Oncology for Nurses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackman, Cynthia L.

    A description is provided of "Pediatric Oncology for Nurses," the first in a series of three courses offered to fourth-year nursing students in pediatric oncology. The first section provides a course overview, discusses time assignments, and describes the target student population. Next, a glossary of terms, and lists of course goals, long-range…

  4. Patient Education for Nurses: Nursing 200A.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirsch, Maureen

    A description is provided of "Patient Education for Nurses," a required course for second-year nursing students which focuses on the assessment of the learning needs of adults, and the planning and and implemention of formal patient education. First, general information on the significance of the course and its place in the School of Nursing…

  5. Nursing management of urinary tract infections.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Sara

    2015-09-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are common in older people and can lead to serious complications. Infections can worsen underlying medical conditions, adversely affect recovery and be alarming to patients, their families and caregivers. UTIs have a complex pathophysiology but the most common cause is the ascent of bacteria from the periurethral area, which explains their prevalence in older women. As a result of antibiotic resistance, an accurate diagnosis is imperative and should be based on clinical history, presence of typical signs and symptoms and test results. Nurses can assist patients through the diagnostic process, treatment and prevention of UTIs, promoting their wellbeing and empowerment. This article explores the pathophysiology of UTIs and diagnosis, prevention and nursing management in a variety of care settings.

  6. Sociology and nursing: role performance in a psychiatric setting.

    PubMed

    Handsley, Stephen; Stocks, Susan

    2009-02-01

    The role of sociology in nursing continues to cast new light on many aspects of health and illness. Over the last 20 years, nursing practice has seen sociological theory become a valuable clinical tool, both in the diagnosis and prognosis of a wide range of illnesses and long-term conditions. Nevertheless, of these, the sociological examination of mental health problems and its impact upon nursing practitioners has received little coverage, simply because, as a discipline, mental health nursing has historically been wedded to a biomedical model, one which continues to embrace psychiatry/psychology as the driving force in the diagnosis and treatment of psychopathology. Adopting a sociological approach, this paper brings to light previously unexplored insights into the way nurses interact with patients experiencing mental health problems. Drawing on social interactionist methodology, this paper considers depression and other mental health problems in relation to current psychiatric nursing practice. Specifically, the paper focuses on aspects of role performance and interpersonal care in a psychiatric setting, and the impact the individual role may have on the wider aspects of institutional and official practices. The paper concludes by making a number of recommendations/observations for nursing practice.

  7. Identification, diagnosis and treatment of wound infection.

    PubMed

    The early identification of the subtle signs of increased bioburden in a wound enables timely and appropriate treatment and therefore improved patient outcomes. The rising costs of antimicrobial dressings and the growth in antibiotic-resistant organisms increase the need for correct diagnosis. Indiscriminate use of antibiotics is a significant contributory factor in bacterial resistance. This article describes a new tool devised by a professional working group of tissue viability nurse specialists which is designed to help healthcare professionals to identify and manage bacterial burden in wounds. It is hoped that this will assist prompt diagnosis and help to reduce patient morbidity with appropriate and timely interventions.

  8. Raynaud's disease: pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment.

    PubMed

    Hodges, H

    1995-04-01

    Raynaud's disease is a common vasospastic disorder affecting the digits of both hands. Women are most commonly affected. This disorder occurs in two forms: Raynaud's disease and Raynaud's phenomenon. Raynaud's phenomenon is associated with a secondary etiology, most commonly scleroderma. Symptoms may precede the onset of connective tissue disease by a number of years. The pathophysiology, differential diagnosis, recommendations for referral, and treatment of Raynaud's disease are presented. A protocol for use by the nurse practitioner in the primary care setting is provided.

  9. Nurse administrators' intentions and considerations in recruiting inactive nurses.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hsing-Yi; Tang, Fu-In; Chen, I-Ju; Yin, Teresa J C; Chen, Chu-Chieh; Yu, Shu

    2016-07-01

    To understand nurse administrators' intentions and considerations in recruiting inactive nurses and to examine predictors of intent to recruit. Few studies have provided insight into employer intentions and considerations in recruiting inactive nurses. A census survey collected data from 392 nurse administrators via a mailing method. Overall, 89.0% of nurse administrators were willing to recruit inactive nurses. Stepwise regression analysis revealed that the only predictor of nurse administrators' intention to recruit was nurse turnover rate at the hospital. Nurse administrators perceived the most important recruiting considerations were inactive nurses' cooperation with alternating shifts, health status and nursing licence. The most frequent reasons for not recruiting were an inactive nurse's lack of understanding of the medical environment and poor nursing competence. Most hospital nurse administrators were willing to recruit inactive nurses. Inactive nurses who wish to return to work should be qualified, willing to work both day and night shifts, and in good health. Nurse administrators can reduce the nursing shortage by recruiting inactive nurses. Re-entry preparation programmes should be implemented that will provide inactive nurses with knowledge of the current medical environment and the skills required to improve their nursing competence. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Assessment, Diagnosis, and Treatment of Binge Eating Disorder.

    PubMed

    Ambrogne, Janet A

    2017-08-01

    Binge eating disorder (BED) is the most prevalent eating disorder in the United States, believed to affect an estimated 2.8 million adults. In the fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, BED was recognized as a separate diagnosis. The purpose of the current article is to provide an overview of BED including assessment, diagnosis, and current pharmacological and nonpharmacological treatment options. Implications for nursing are also addressed. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, 55(8), 32-38.]. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  11. Use of the Internet by Patients: Not a Threat to Nursing, but an Opportunity?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Timmons, Stephen

    2001-01-01

    Patients' use of Internet health information raises concerns about reliability, access to information meant for clinicians, and self-diagnosis and treatment. Nurses should become informed and undertake patient education about consumer health informatics. (Contains 25 references.) (SK)

  12. Use of the Internet by Patients: Not a Threat to Nursing, but an Opportunity?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Timmons, Stephen

    2001-01-01

    Patients' use of Internet health information raises concerns about reliability, access to information meant for clinicians, and self-diagnosis and treatment. Nurses should become informed and undertake patient education about consumer health informatics. (Contains 25 references.) (SK)

  13. Effects of increasing nurse staffing on missed nursing care.

    PubMed

    Cho, S-H; Kim, Y-S; Yeon, K N; You, S-J; Lee, I D

    2015-06-01

    Inadequate nurse staffing has been reported to lead nurses to omit required nursing care. In South Korea, to reduce informal caregiving by patient families and sitters and to improve the quality of nursing care, a public hospital operated by the Seoul Metropolitan Government has implemented a policy of increasing nurse staffing from 17 patients per registered nurse to 7 patients per registered nurse in 4 out of 13 general nursing units since January 2013. The study aims to compare missed nursing care (omission of required care) in high-staffing (7 patients per nurse) units vs. low-staffing (17 patients per nurse) units to examine the effects of nurse staffing on missed care. A nurse survey conducted in July 2013 targeted all staff nurses in all four high-staffing and all nine low-staffing units; 115 nurses in the high-staffing units (response rate = 94.3%) and 117 nurses in the low-staffing units (response rate = 88.6%) participated. Missed nursing care was measured using the MISSCARE survey that included 24 nursing care elements. Nurses were asked how frequently they had missed each element on a 4-point scale from 'rarely' to 'always'. Overall, nurses working in high-staffing units had a significantly lower mean score of missed care than those in low-staffing units. Seven out of 24 nursing care elements were missed significantly less often in high-staffing (vs. low-staffing) units: turning, mouth care, bathing/skin care, patient assessments in each shift, assistance with toileting, feeding and setting up meals. The findings suggest that increasing nurse staffing is associated with a decrease in missed care. Less omission of required nursing care is expected to improve nursing surveillance and patient outcomes, such as patient falls, pressure ulcers and pneumonia. Adequate nurse staffing should be ensured to reduce unmet nursing needs and improve patient outcomes. © 2015 International Council of Nurses.

  14. Standardization of Korean nursing terminology.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyeoun-Ae; Kim, Ji-Hyun; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Lee, Hyang-Yeon; Kim, Jeong-Wha; Kim, Won-Ock; Kim, Ok-Soo; Lee, Young-Whee; Park, Ho-Ran; Choi-Kwon, Smi; Kim, In-Sook; Park, Young-Joo; Park, Young-Im

    2006-01-01

    Korean nursing terminology was standardized to improve sharing and exchange of nursing data and information. English nursing terms were collected from existing nursing terminology, journal articles, nursing records, text books, and nursing/medical dictionaries, translated into Korean and were tested for their validity. More than 9000 terms were standardized and published on a website for further feedback from the users. This study will contribute to communication within the nursing community and with other health care professionals.

  15. Leadership styles in nursing.

    PubMed

    Cope, Vicki; Murray, Melanie

    2017-06-21

    Nurses are often asked to think about leadership, particularly in times of rapid change in healthcare, and where questions have been raised about whether leaders and managers have adequate insight into the requirements of care. This article discusses several leadership styles relevant to contemporary healthcare and nursing practice. Nurses who are aware of leadership styles may find this knowledge useful in maintaining a cohesive working environment. Leadership knowledge and skills can be improved through training, where, rather than having to undertake formal leadership roles without adequate preparation, nurses are able to learn, nurture, model and develop effective leadership behaviours, ultimately improving nursing staff retention and enhancing the delivery of safe and effective care.

  16. Suicide in nurses.

    PubMed

    Hawton, K; Vislisel, L

    1999-01-01

    The worldwide English language literature on suicide in nurses is reviewed in this article. There is evidence from several countries that female nurses are at increased risk of suicide. Very little information is available about the specific causes. Increased risk in nurses has been statistically associated with smoking and negatively related to extent of caffeine consumption. Unlike some other high-risk occupational groups, it is unclear to what extent access to means for suicide contributes to nurses' risk. The methodological issues and specific needs of research concerning suicide in nurses are discussed.

  17. The art of nursing.

    PubMed

    Edwards, S D

    1998-09-01

    This article discusses the question of whether, as is often claimed, nursing is properly described as an art. Following critical remarks on the claims of Carper, Chinn and Watson, and Johnson, the account of art provided by RG Collingwood is described, with particular reference to his influential distinction between art and craft. The question of whether nursing is best described as an art or a craft is then discussed. The conclusion is advanced that nursing cannot properly be described as an art, given acceptance of Collingwood's influential definition of art. Moreover, it is shown that, due to difficulties inherent in specifying the 'ends' of nursing, nursing is only problematically described as a craft.

  18. Wildfire Disasters and Nursing.

    PubMed

    Hanes, Patricia Frohock

    2016-12-01

    Multiple factors contribute to wildfires in California and other regions: drought, winds, climate change, and spreading urbanization. Little has been done to study the multiple roles of nurses related to wildfire disasters. Major nursing organizations support disaster education for nurses. It is essential for nurses to recognize their roles in each phase of the disaster cycle: mitigation, preparedness, response, and recovery. Skills learned in the US federal all-hazards approach to disasters can then be adapted to more specific disasters, such as wildfires, and issues affecting health care. Nursing has an important role in each phase of the disaster cycle.

  19. Formal Schooling and Deculturation: Nursing Practice and the Erosion of Native Communication Styles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, James

    1992-01-01

    Discusses the deculturation that occurs when Native American nursing students are required to adopt communication styles that are contrary to the Native American culture. Nursing students are taught to use direct eye contact, observation, and inquisition to aid in diagnosis. These techniques are considered disrespectful to Native Americans. (KS)

  20. The Nurse's Role in Helping to Assess Learning Disabilities in the School Setting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heinlein, Dolores

    1980-01-01

    The author reviews the role of the school nurse in the diagnosis of learning disabilities. Eight behavioral characteristics of learning disability, such as hyperactivity, are listed and the causes of the disability are discussed. Aspects of the nurse's role in health assessment are outlined, including the aspects of a health history and…

  1. Simulation: The Effects of Simulation on High Stakes Testing in Undergradute Nursing Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walters, Linda

    2014-01-01

    Many nursing programs use standardized testing packages in order to evaluate students' content mastery as well as predict probability of passing the National Council Licensure for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN). Instead of a diagnosis for weak content areas, programs implement testing policies in the belief that such policies ensure student success…

  2. Simulation: The Effects of Simulation on High Stakes Testing in Undergradute Nursing Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walters, Linda

    2014-01-01

    Many nursing programs use standardized testing packages in order to evaluate students' content mastery as well as predict probability of passing the National Council Licensure for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN). Instead of a diagnosis for weak content areas, programs implement testing policies in the belief that such policies ensure student success…

  3. The opinions of Polish nurses and patients on nursing protests.

    PubMed

    Binkowska-Bury, Monika; Marc, Malgorzata; Nagorska, Malgorzata; Januszewicz, Pawel; Ryzko, Jozef

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this study is to explore nurses' and patients' opinions about nurses in Poland going on strike. The study was carried out in Poland between January and June 2009, using 150 nurses and 150 hospitalized patients. The study was conducted using two questionnaire surveys. The main reasons why nursing strikes are organized, in the opinions of nurses, are: higher wages, the improvement of working conditions and the improvement of the image of the nursing profession. The main reasons why nursing strikes are organized, in the opinions of patients, are: higher wages, not abiding standards of employment by government and the improvement of the image of the nursing profession. The main reasons for a lack of active participation in strikes are holidays and occupational and economic matters. Patients and nurses support nursing strikes. Both nurses (53.3%) and patients (42%) said that organizing nursing strikes is right and might improve the occupational situation of nurses.

  4. Nurses' understanding influences comprehension of patients admitted in the observation unit.

    PubMed

    Desme, Aline; Mendes, Nathalie; Perruche, Franck; Veillard, Elsa; Elie, Caroline; Moulinet, Françoise; Sanson, Fabienne; Georget, Jean-Michel; Tissier, Anne; Pourriat, Jean-Louis; Claessens, Yann-Erick

    2013-01-01

    Comprehension is poor in patients admitted in the emergency observation unit. Teamwork communication gaps could contribute to patients' misunderstanding of their health condition. To determine in patients admitted in the emergency observation unit whether comprehension of diagnosis, prognosis, and management depended on nurses' comprehension, the authors conducted a prospective observational study in a busy adult emergency department of a tertiary teaching hospital in Paris over 2 months. Consecutive patients admitted in the emergency observation unit were included. Patients' and nurses' comprehension of diagnosis, prognosis, and management was compared with the statements of the emergency department attending physicians for these items. The authors observed whether patients' misunderstanding was associated with nurses' misunderstanding. A total of 544 patients were evaluated. For each patient, nurses' and patients' comprehension was available. Patients understood severity in 40%, organ involved in 69%, medical wording in 57%, reason for admission in 48%, and discharge instruction in 67%. In comparison with patients, nurses better understood each item except for discharge instruction. The authors observed that patients' comprehension was better when nurses understood diagnosis (p <.0001), reasons for admission (p =.032) and discharge instructions (p =.002). Nurses' understanding of severity did not modify patients' comprehension. These results support the conclusions that communication gaps in teamwork alter patients' comprehension and that nurses' and patients' misunderstandings are associated. Therefore, improving communication by nurses and physicians to patients may improve patients' understanding.

  5. Economics of Nursing

    PubMed Central

    Aiken, Linda H.

    2008-01-01

    Pay-for-performance initiatives have renewed interest in payment reform as a vehicle for improving nurse staffing and working conditions in hospitals because of research linking investments in nursing and better patient outcomes. This article addresses the economics of nursing from a broad perspective that considers how both national policies such as hospital prospective payment and managerial decisions within institutions impact the outcomes of nurses and patients. Cost offsets are considered from the perspective of savings in patient-care resources that accrue from investments in nursing. Cost off-sets are also considered from the perspective of the interactions among different strategies for investing in nursing, including the impact of staffing levels on patient outcomes with varying educational levels of nurses and varying quality of practice environments. PMID:18480318

  6. Economics of nursing.

    PubMed

    Aiken, Linda H

    2008-05-01

    Pay-for-performance initiatives have renewed interest in payment reform as a vehicle for improving nurse staffing and working conditions in hospitals because of research linking investments in nursing and better patient outcomes. This article addresses the economics of nursing from a broad perspective that considers how both national policies such as hospital prospective payment and managerial decisions within institutions impact the outcomes of nurses and patients. Cost offsets are considered from the perspective of savings in patient-care resources that accrue from investments in nursing. Cost offsets are also considered from the perspective of the interactions among different strategies for investing in nursing, including the impact of staffing levels on patient outcomes with varying educational levels of nurses and varying quality of practice environments.

  7. Workplace bullying in nursing.

    PubMed

    Ovayolu, Ozlem; Ovayolu, Nimet; Karadag, Gulendam

    2014-09-01

    This research was designed to determine whether nurses are bullied by other staff members and the effects of such behaviors on the nurse victims. This study reports on nurses' interpersonal workplace relationships in a culturally unique environment. The study was conducted with 260 nurses working in three public hospitals. Data were collected using a questionnaire. The majority of nurses were female with bachelor's degrees and reported being assigned duties outside their usual responsibilities, held responsible for coworkers' mistakes, and criticized for job performance although they thought they had done their work properly. Most of the nurses who were bullied experienced health and sleep problems,did not want to go to work, and had communication problems with other staff members. Nearly all of the study nurses received psychological support to solve their problems and believed that the best way to prevent bullying was education.

  8. Moral reckoning in nursing.

    PubMed

    Nathaniel, Alvita K

    2006-06-01

    Analysis of qualitative data resulted in an original substantive grounded theory of moral reckoning in nursing, a three-stage process. After a novice period, the nurse experiences a stage of ease in which there is comfort in the workplace and congruence of internal and external values. Unexpectedly, a situational bind occurs in which the nurse's core beliefs come into irreconcilable conflict with external forces. This compels the nurse into the stage of resolution, in which he or she either gives up or makes a stand. The nurse then moves into the stage of reflection in which he or she lives with the consequences and iteratively examines beliefs, values, and actions. The nurse tries to make sense of experiences through remembering, telling the story, and examining conflicts. This study sets the stage for further investigation of moral distress. The theory of moral reckoning challenges nurses to tell their stories, examine conflicts, and participate as partners in moral decision making.

  9. Reworking professional nursing identity.

    PubMed

    MacIntosh, Judith

    2003-10-01

    In spite of professional socialization through nursing education programs, new graduates experience stress as they become working professionals. This grounded theory study explores experienced nurses' perceptions of how they became professional. The central problem for nurses was dissonance between expectations and experiences; they addressed this through an iterative, three-stage process of reworking professional identity. The stages of this process are assuming adequacy, realizing practice, and developing a reputation. Iterations of this process occur as new discrepancies are noticed, enhanced awareness dawns, practice changes, learning is undertaken, or experienced nurses become relative novices in another work area. Nurses move through stages more quickly and at different levels with each iteration. Three contextual factors influence the process: expectation; perception of the status accorded by others to nursing; and supportiveness by acceptance, assistance, and advocacy from others in the workplace. These findings expand knowledge about professional socialization and how nurses themselves understand developing professional identity.

  10. [Homophobia among nursing students].

    PubMed

    Campo-Arias, Adalberto; Herazo, Edwin; Cogollo, Zuleima

    2010-09-01

    Homophobia is defined as a general negative attitude towards homosexual persons, with implications on public health. This fact has been less investigated among nursing students. The objective of this review was to learn about the prevalence of homophobia and its associated variables among nursing students. A systematic review was performed on original articles published in EBSCO, Imbiomed, LILACS, MEDLINE, Ovid, and ProQuest, including articles published between 1998 and 2008 in English, Portuguese and Spanish. Keywords used were homophobia, homosexuality, and nursing students. Descriptive analysis was performed. Eight studies were analyzed. The incidence of homophobia in nursing students is between 7% and 16%. Homophobia is more common among males and religious conservatism people. Homophobia is quite frequent in nursing students. This negative attitude toward homosexuality may affect services and care giving by nursing professions and could have negative implications in nursing practice.

  11. Community Health Nursing Curriculum. Components in Baccalaureate Nursing Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Catell, Grace Manion

    Community health nursing curriculum components in a sample of baccalaureate nursing programs were investigated. Questionnaires were sent to a sample of 12 National League of Nursing (NLN) accredited, generic, baccalaureate nursing programs representative of the four NLN regions in the United States. Community health nursing content in theory…

  12. Development of a Nursing Data Set for School Nursing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fahrenkrug, Mary Ann

    2003-01-01

    School nurses need to clearly identify how they promote the health and educational achievement of children. School nurses contribute to student health by providing health assessment and nursing interventions, advocating for healthy living, and contributing to prevention of illness and disease management. A Nursing Data Set for School Nursing can…

  13. Development of a Nursing Data Set for School Nursing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fahrenkrug, Mary Ann

    2003-01-01

    School nurses need to clearly identify how they promote the health and educational achievement of children. School nurses contribute to student health by providing health assessment and nursing interventions, advocating for healthy living, and contributing to prevention of illness and disease management. A Nursing Data Set for School Nursing can…

  14. Development and evaluation of evidence-based nursing (EBN) filters and related databases.

    PubMed

    Lavin, Mary A; Krieger, Mary M; Meyer, Geralyn A; Spasser, Mark A; Cvitan, Tome; Reese, Cordie G; Carlson, Judith H; Perry, Anne G; McNary, Patricia

    2005-01-01

    Difficulties encountered in the retrieval of evidence-based nursing (EBN) literature and recognition of terminology, research focus, and design differences between evidence-based medicine and nursing led to the realization that nursing needs its own filter strategies for evidence-based practice. This article describes the development and evaluation of filters that facilitate evidence-based nursing searches. An inductive, multistep methodology was employed. A sleep search strategy was developed for uniform application to all filters for filter development and evaluation purposes. An EBN matrix was next developed as a framework to illustrate conceptually the placement of nursing-sensitive filters along two axes: horizontally, an adapted nursing process, and vertically, levels of evidence. Nursing diagnosis, patient outcomes, and primary data filters were developed recursively. Through an interface with the PubMed search engine, the EBN matrix filters were inserted into a database that executes filter searches, retrieves citations, and stores and updates retrieved citations sets hourly. For evaluation purposes, the filters were subjected to sensitivity and specificity analyses and retrieval set comparisons. Once the evaluation was complete, hyperlinks providing access to any one or a combination of completed filters to the EBN matrix were created. Subject searches on any topic may be applied to the filters, which interface with PubMed. Sensitivity and specificity for the combined nursing diagnosis and primary data filter were 64% and 99%, respectively; for the patient outcomes filter, the results were 75% and 71%, respectively. Comparisons were made between the EBN matrix filters (nursing diagnosis and primary data) and PubMed's Clinical Queries (diagnosis and sensitivity) filters. Additional comparisons examined publication types and indexing differences. Review articles accounted for the majority of the publication type differences, because "review" was accepted by

  15. Redefining nursing according to patients' and families' needs: an evolving concept. AACN Certification Corporation.

    PubMed

    Caterinicchio, M J

    1995-02-01

    Patients' and families' needs have been displaced from the core of today's health-care system. Nurses are positioned to serve a pivotal role during such a critical time, as health-care systems evolve. The health-care system of the future must be driven by the needs of patients and families. Nurses must make decisions and take actions that are crucial in ensuring that this becomes a reality. Nurses must acknowledge that the historical conceptualization of nursing--delineating clinical practice dimensions according to a patient's diagnosis, a nurse's role, the clinical setting, and the patient's psychosocial and physiologic systems--is of limited value if we are to meet these future challenges. Redefining nursing practice according to patients' needs provides an organizing framework to examine, across all levels of nursing, the dimensions of practice most likely to meet patient needs and contribute to optimal outcomes, as well as enhance the linkages between practice, education, and research.

  16. [Systematized care in cardiac preoperative: theory of human caring in the perspective of nurses and users].

    PubMed

    Amorim, Thais Vasconselos; Arreguy-Sena, Cristina; Alves, Marcelo da Silva; Salimena, Anna Maria de Oliveira

    2014-01-01

    This is a case study research that aimed to know, with the adoption of the Theory of Human Caring, the meanings of therapeutic interpersonal relationship between nurse and user on the preoperative nursing visit after the experience of the surgical process. The convenience sample was composed of three nurses and three users of an institution that has updated records to perform highly complex cardiovascular surgery, comprising nine combinations of therapeutic interactions. It was used instruments, structured according to the theory of Jean Watson and North American Nursing Diagnosis Association, Nursing Intervention Classification and Nursing Outcomes Classification taxonomies. The legal and ethical aspects of research involving human subjects were assured. The results revealed three clusters to grasp the significance of preoperative visits by users and five clusters to capture the perception of nurses when they experience this clinical experience.

  17. Paying hospitals on the basis of nursing intensity: policy and political considerations.

    PubMed

    Ginsburg, Paul B

    2008-05-01

    Some believe that explicit incorporation of nursing intensity into hospital payment systems would lead hospitals to increase the use of nursing resources. But 25 years of Medicare provider payment policies, followed increasingly by Medicaid programs and private insurers, means that any incorporation of measures of nursing intensity into payment systems needs to be consistent with concepts of prospective payment. But the main impact of such a step would be to increase equity among hospitals with different case mixes and blunt incentives to specialize in diagnosis-related groups with relatively low nursing intensity. Issues of the role of nurses in hospitals and the intensity of nursing resources used in care are more likely to be influenced by quality reporting and pay for performance than by incorporating nursing intensity into a prospective payment system.

  18. [Nursing methodology applicated in patients with pressure ulcers. Clinical report].

    PubMed

    Galvez Romero, Carmen

    2014-05-01

    The application of functional patterns lets us to make a systematic and premeditated nursing assessment, with which we obtain a lot of relevant patient data in an organized way, making easier to analize them. In our case, we use Marjory Gordon's functional health patterns and NANDA (North American Nursing Diagnosis Association), NOC (Nursing Outcomes Classification), NIC (Nursing Intervention Classification) taxonomy. The overall objective of this paper is to present the experience of implementation and development of nursing methodology in the care of patients with pressure ulcers. In this article it's reported a case of a 52-year-old female who presented necrosis of phalanxes in upper and lower limbs and suffered amputations of them after being hospitalized in an Intensive Care Unit. She was discharged with pressure ulcers on both heels. GENERAL ASSESSMENT: It was implemented the nursing theory known as "Gordon's functional health patterns" and the affected patterns were identified. The Second Pattern (Nutritional-Metabolic) was considered as reference, since this was the pattern which altered the rest. EVOLUTION OF THE PATIENT: The patient had a favourable evolution, improving all the altered patterns. The infections symptoms disappeared and the pressure ulcers of both heels healed completely. The application of nursing methodology to care patients with pressure ulcers using clinical practice guidelines, standardized procedures and rating scales of assessment improves the evaluation of results and the performance of nurses.

  19. Treatment decisions on antidepressants in nursing homes: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Iden, Kristina Riis; Hjørleifsson, Stefan; Ruths, Sabine

    2011-12-01

    To explore decision-making on treatment with antidepressants among doctors and nurses in nursing homes. A qualitative study based on interviews with three focus groups comprising eight physicians engaged full time, eight physicians engaged part time, and eight registered nurses, respectively. The interview guide comprised questions on initiating, evaluating, and withdrawing treatment with antidepressants. The interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed, and analysed by systematic text condensation. The first theme was the diagnostic process. The informants expressed difficulty in differentiating between depression and sorrow resulting from loss in old age. Further, the doctors reported that they relied on nurses' observations and rarely carried out systematic diagnostic work and follow-up of patients with depression. The second theme was treatment. Antidepressants were usually the only type of treatment provided, and patients were kept on medication even though staff felt uncertain whether this was effective. The third theme was who really determines the treatment. Registered nurses reported that unskilled and auxiliary nursing staff requested drug treatment, and doctors felt some pressure from the nurses to prescribe antidepressants. This study suggests that the quality of diagnosis and treatment for depression in nursing homes needs to be improved in Norway. Doctors should be more available and take responsibility and leadership in medical decisions.

  20. Academic Incivility in Nursing Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marlow, Sherri

    2013-01-01

    A well-documented and growing problem impacting the nursing shortage in the United States is the increasing shortage of qualified nursing faculty. Many factors contribute to the nursing faculty shortage such as retirement, dissatisfaction with the nursing faculty role and low salary compensation (American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN),…

  1. Academic Incivility in Nursing Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marlow, Sherri

    2013-01-01

    A well-documented and growing problem impacting the nursing shortage in the United States is the increasing shortage of qualified nursing faculty. Many factors contribute to the nursing faculty shortage such as retirement, dissatisfaction with the nursing faculty role and low salary compensation (American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN),…

  2. Nurse Reinvestment Act. Public Law.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC.

    This document contains the text of the Nurse Reinvestment Act, which amends the Public Health Service Act to address the increasing shortage of registered nurses by instituting a series of policies to improve nurse recruitment and nurse retention. Title I details two initiatives to boost recruitment of nurses. The first initiative includes the…

  3. Nurse Burnout and Patient Satisfaction

    PubMed Central

    Vahey, Doris C.; Aiken, Linda H.; Sloane, Douglas M.; Clarke, Sean P.; Vargas, Delfino

    2010-01-01

    Background Amid a national nurse shortage, there is growing concern that high levels of nurse burnout could adversely affect patient outcomes. Objectives This study examines the effect of the nurse work environment on nurse burnout, and the effects of the nurse work environment and nurse burnout on patients' satisfaction with their nursing care. Research Design/Subjects We conducted cross-sectional surveys of nurses (N = 820) and patients (N = 621) from 40 units in 20 urban hospitals across the United States. Measures Nurse surveys included measures of nurses' practice environments derived from the revised Nursing Work Index (NWI-R) and nurse outcomes measured by the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI) and intentions to leave. Patients were interviewed about their satisfaction with nursing care using the La Monica-Oberst Patient Satisfaction Scale (LOPSS). Results Patients cared for on units that nurses characterized as having adequate staff, good administrative support for nursing care, and good relations between doctors and nurses were more than twice likely as other patients to report high satisfaction with their care, and their nurses reported significantly lower burnout. The overall level of nurse burnout on hospital units also affected patient satisfaction. Conclusions Improvements in nurses' work environments in hospitals have the potential to simultaneously reduce nurses' high levels of job burnout and risk of turnover and increase patients' satisfaction with their care. PMID:14734943

  4. Nurse burnout and patient satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Vahey, Doris C; Aiken, Linda H; Sloane, Douglas M; Clarke, Sean P; Vargas, Delfino

    2004-02-01

    Amid a national nurse shortage, there is growing concern that high levels of nurse burnout could adversely affect patient outcomes. This study examines the effect of the nurse work environment on nurse burnout, and the effects of the nurse work environment and nurse burnout on patients' satisfaction with their nursing care. RESEARCH DESIGN/SUBJECTS: We conducted cross-sectional surveys of nurses (N=820) and patients (N=621) from 40 units in 20 urban hospitals across the United States. Nurse surveys included measures of nurses' practice environments derived from the revised Nursing Work Index (NWI-R) and nurse outcomes measured by the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI) and intentions to leave. Patients were interviewed about their satisfaction with nursing care using the La Monica-Oberst Patient Satisfaction Scale (LOPSS). Patients cared for on units that nurses characterized as having adequate staff, good administrative support for nursing care, and good relations between doctors and nurses were more than twice likely as other patients to report high satisfaction with their care, and their nurses reported significantly lower burnout. The overall level of nurse burnout on hospital units also affected patient satisfaction. Improvements in nurses' work environments in hospitals have the potential to simultaneously reduce nurses' high levels of job burnout and risk of turnover and increase patients' satisfaction with their care.

  5. Promotion or marketing of the nursing profession by nurses.

    PubMed

    Kagan, I; Biran, E; Telem, L; Steinovitz, N; Alboer, D; Ovadia, K L; Melnikov, S

    2015-09-01

    In recent years, much effort has been invested all over the world in nurse recruitment and retention. Issues arising in this context are low job satisfaction, the poor public image of nursing and the reluctance of nurses to promote or market their profession. This study aimed to examine factors explaining the marketing of the nursing profession by nurses working at a general tertiary medical centre in Israel. One hundred sixty-nine registered nurses and midwives from five clinical care units completed a structured self-administered questionnaire, measuring (a) professional self-image, (b) job satisfaction, (c) nursing promotional and marketing activity questionnaire, and (d) demographic data. The mean scores for the promotion of nursing were low. Nurses working in an intensive cardiac care unit demonstrated higher levels of promotional behaviour than nurses from other nursing wards in our study. Nurse managers reported higher levels of nursing promotion activity compared with first-line staff nurses. There was a strong significant correlation between job satisfaction and marketing behaviour. Multiple regression analysis shows that 15% of the variance of promoting the nursing profession was explained by job satisfaction and job position. Nurses are not inclined to promote or market their profession to the public or to other professions. The policy on the marketing of nursing is inadequate. A three-level (individual, organizational and national) nursing marketing programme is proposed for implementation by nurse leadership and policy makers. Among proposed steps to improve marketing of the nursing profession are promotion of the image of nursing by the individual nurse in the course of her or his daily activities, formulation and implementation of policies and programmes to promote the image of nursing at the organizational level and drawing up of a long-term programme for promoting or marketing the professional status of nursing at the national level. © 2015

  6. Differences in moral judgment between nursing students and qualified nurses.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong-Soon; Park, Jin-Hee; Han, Sung-Suk

    2007-05-01

    This longitudinal study examined how nursing students' moral judgment changes after they become qualified nurses working in a hospital environment. The sample used was a group of 80 nursing students attending a university in Suwon, Korea, between 2001 and 2003. By using a Korean version of the Judgment About Nursing Decisions questionnaire, an instrument used in nursing care research, moral judgment scores based on Ketefian's six nursing dilemmas were determined. The results were as follows: (1) the qualified nurses had significantly higher idealistic moral judgment scores than the nursing students; (2) the qualified nurses showed significantly higher realistic moral judgment scores than the nursing students; and (3) when comparing idealistic and realistic moral judgment scores, both the qualified nurses and the nursing students had higher scores for idealistic moral judgment. Further study is recommended to examine changes in moral judgment.

  7. Psychosocial impact of a cancer diagnosis during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Paige

    2013-10-01

    Although a rare occurrence, cancer is sometimes diagnosed during or shortly after pregnancy. This article reviews two recent studies that specifically examine the psychosocial impact of a cancer diagnosis during pregnancy. Researchers have identified risk factors that may exacerbate women's anxiety, stress or distress during these co-occurring events. Nurses are in a unique position to support women dealing with a cancer diagnosis during pregnancy.

  8. From staff nurse to nurse consultant.

    PubMed

    Fowler, John

    John Fowler Independent education consultant, continues his series for clinical nurses hoping to share their experiences with a wider audience, with advice on developing a potential article for a professional journal.

  9. Perceptions of "Nursing" and "Nursing Care" in the United States by Dutch Nursing Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haloburdo, Esther P.; Thompson, Mary Ann

    2001-01-01

    In the opinions of 11 Dutch nursing students on a study tour of the United States, the U.S. emphasizes technical aspects of nursing and medical over nursing care, lacks team nursing and collegiality, and has a litigious environment. These negative images have implications for the use of U.S. nursing as a benchmark for global education and…

  10. Competency of Graduate Nurses as Perceived by Nurse Preceptors and Nurse Managers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wise, Vanessa

    2013-01-01

    As newly graduated associate degree nurses (ADN) and baccalaureate degree nurses (BSN) enter into the workforce, they must be equipped to care for a complex patient population; therefore, the purpose of this study was to address the practice expectations and clinical competency of new nurses as perceived by nurse preceptors and nurse managers.…

  11. Competency of Graduate Nurses as Perceived by Nurse Preceptors and Nurse Managers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wise, Vanessa

    2013-01-01

    As newly graduated associate degree nurses (ADN) and baccalaureate degree nurses (BSN) enter into the workforce, they must be equipped to care for a complex patient population; therefore, the purpose of this study was to address the practice expectations and clinical competency of new nurses as perceived by nurse preceptors and nurse managers.…

  12. The future of nursing: understanding who nurses are.

    PubMed

    Wyatt, David A

    2013-09-01

    The Institute of Medicine report The Future of Nursing: Leading Change, Advancing Health highlights the need for more information about the nursing workforce. Without attention to the problem, OR nursing is likely to continue to experience the nursing shortage more acutely than other practice areas. By changing how they acquire and use nursing data, and by advocating for improved exchange of data between federal and state governments and nursing schools, facilities can be better prepared for future workforce challenges.

  13. [Response of Taiwan nursing education to today's nursing shortage].

    PubMed

    Chou, Shieu-Ming

    2012-10-01

    The shortage of nursing manpower has recently attracted significant attention from Taiwan society. Government efforts to improve the nursing practice environment have challenged the quality of current domestic nursing education. This article provides an overview of Taiwan nursing education in terms of its development under current nursing shortage conditions and in light of Taiwan's low birthrate, ageing society. A few suggestions for nursing education are listed at the end of the article.

  14. Does nursing assistant certification increase nursing student's confidence level of basic nursing care when entering a nursing program?

    PubMed

    Stombaugh, Angie; Judd, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore nursing student's confidence level with basic nursing care when entering the nursing program after implementation of required nursing assistant certification for program admission. In addition, the relationship between being employed as a nursing assistant and confidence level with basic nursing care when entering the nursing program was explored. A Likert-scale survey assessing confidence levels of basic nursing care was sent to 156 nursing students admitted to a nursing program prior to their first nursing course. Confidence level with nursing skills, nursing assistant employment, and length of nursing assistant employment were assessed. Students were most confident in hand washing (M = 5.87, SD = 0.36), gloving and gowning (M =5.46, SD = 0.75), making an unoccupied bed (M = 5.38, SD = 0.88), and oral temperature (M = 5.30, SD = 0.87). Students were least confident in the fitting for cane (M = 1.74, SD = 1.16) and ambulation with crutches on steps (M =1.81, SD = 1.27). Nursing assistant employment increased student confidence with basic nursing care. Nursing programs cannot assume that students are prepared in basic nursing care based on a nursing assistant certification. © 2014.

  15. Development of the Austrian Nursing Minimum Data Set (NMDS-AT): the third Delphi Round, a quantitative online survey.

    PubMed

    Ranegger, Renate; Hackl, Werner O; Ammenwerth, Elske

    2015-01-01

    A Nursing Minimum Data Set (NMDS) aims at systematically describing nursing care in terms of patient problems, nursing activities, and patient outcomes. In an earlier Delphi study, 56 data elements were proposed to be included in an Austrian Nursing Minimum Data Set (NMDS-AT). To identify the most important data elements of this list, and to identify appropriate coding systems. Online Delphi-based survey with 88 experts. 43 data elements were rated as relevant for an NMDS-AT (strong agreement of more than half of the experts): nine data elements concerning the institution, patient demographics, and medical condition; 18 data elements concerning patient problems by using nursing diagnosis; seven data elements concerning nursing outcomes, and nine data elements concerning nursing interventions. As classification systems, national classification systems were proposed besides ICNP, NNN, and nursing-sensitive indicators. The resulting proposal for an NMDS-AT will now be tested with routine data.

  16. Loss and rebuilding: A qualitative study of late diagnosis of cleft palate.

    PubMed

    Tierney, Stephanie; Blackhurst, Maria; Scahill, Rachael; Callery, Peter

    2015-10-01

    To explore the experiences of parents whose child received a late diagnosis of cleft palate (>24 hr after birth). Parents of 17 children and three nurses specialised in cleft care (specialist nurses) took part in a qualitative, semi-structured interview. Framework analysis was applied to data. Loss and rebuilding was an overarching concept-from the crescendo leading up to the bombshell of diagnosis, followed by the aftermath of dealing with the child's long-term condition. Specialist nurses can help parents to trust healthcare professionals and to feel confident in their ability to nurture by listening, informing, and supporting. © 2015, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Reducing variance in nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Sanford, Kathleen D

    2010-11-01

    Nursing and finance leaders can encourage evidence-based nursing by: Investing in best practice procedure products. Providing continuing education to nursing care teams. Encouraging accountability--and empowerment.

  18. Ethics and Transcultural Nursing Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eliason, Michele J.

    1993-01-01

    Argues that nursing practice and theory cannot be ethical unless cultural factors are taken into consideration and that ethical/transcultural nursing is central to the philosophy and practice of nursing. (Author)

  19. Nursing Aides, Orderlies, and Attendants

    MedlinePlus

    ... Z INDEX | OOH SITE MAP | EN ESPAÑOL Healthcare > Nursing Assistants and Orderlies PRINTER-FRIENDLY EN ESPAÑOL Summary ... of workers and occupations. What They Do -> What Nursing Assistants and Orderlies Do About this section Nursing ...

  20. Preparation for Advanced Nursing Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frik, Seigina M.; Pollock, Susan E.

    1993-01-01

    Lehman College's graduate nursing program uses theory-based courses to prepare advanced nurse practitioners. Students increase scholarly inquiry skills and clinical decision making; use of nursing conceptual models helped them plan and evaluate their practice. (SK)

  1. Ethics and Transcultural Nursing Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eliason, Michele J.

    1993-01-01

    Argues that nursing practice and theory cannot be ethical unless cultural factors are taken into consideration and that ethical/transcultural nursing is central to the philosophy and practice of nursing. (Author)

  2. Nursing diagnoses in patients with immune-bullous dermatosis 1

    PubMed Central

    Brandão, Euzeli da Silva; dos Santos, Iraci; Lanzillotti, Regina Serrão; Ferreira, Adriano Menis; Gamba, Mônica Antar; Azulay-Abulafia, Luna

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: identify nursing diagnoses in patients with immune-bullous dermatosis. Method: a quantitative and descriptive research, carried out in three institutions located in Rio de Janeiro and Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil, using the Client Assessment Protocol in Dermatology during a nursing consultation. Simple descriptive statistics was used for data analysis. Results: 14 subjects participated in the study, nine with a diagnosis of pemphigus vulgaris, pemphigus two and three of bullous pemphigoid. The age ranged between 27 and 82 years, predominantly females (11). 14 nursing diagnoses were discussed and identified from a clinical rationale in all study participants, representing the most common human responses in this sample. The application of the Assessment Protocol in Dermatology facilitated the comprehensive assessment, in addition to providing the identification of diagnostics according to the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association International. Conclusion: the nursing diagnoses presented confirm the necessity of interdisciplinary work during the care for this clientele. For better description of the phenomena related to the client in question, it is suggested the inclusion of two risk factors related in three diagnoses of this taxonomy. It is worth noting the contribution of the findings for the care, education and research in nursing in dermatology. PMID:27533274

  3. [ICNP- International Classification of Nursing Practice: origin, structure and development].

    PubMed

    Marucci, Anna Rita; De Caro, Walter; Petrucci, Cristina; Lancia, Loreto; Sansoni, Julita

    2015-01-01

    ICNP is a standardized nursing terminology included within acknowledged terminologies by WHO, it is a relevant aspect of ICN programs and strategies. This paper aims to describe structure and characteristics of ICNP terminology as well as to highlight how this tool can be useful both in practice and in terms of nursing professional development. This version looks like a pyramid with seven axes describing different areas of nursing and related interventions, enriched by two special axes related to pre-coordinated Diagnosis / Outcomes (DC) and Operations (IC) which facilitate daily use in practice. In order to clarify how this tool can be actually be used in daily nursing practice some examples are provided, clarifying how adopting the current version of ICNP terminology (2015 release) Diagnosis/Outcomes and Interventions can be built. The ICNP Italian Centre is committed to introduce it to Italian nurses as a tool for sharing and disseminating terminology in our Country, having as main final aim to achieve even in Italy, professional visibility objectives promoted in different ways by the International Council of Nurses.

  4. Getting eHealth into basic nursing education: report of the RCN information in nursing project.

    PubMed

    Clark, June; Baker, Bernice; Baker, David

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports the results of a project undertaken in 2008 by the Royal College of Nursing's Information in Nursing Forum. The project, undertaken by the RCN IN Forum in association with the RCN Education Forum and the RCN Association of Nursing Students, was in two parts. The first part consisted of an on-line survey of nursing students to discover their "readiness" for working in an electronic environment. The second part consisted of a workshop for invited stakeholders - organisations responsible for commissioning and providing basic nursing education, regulators, nurse teachers, and nursing students themselves - the objective of which was to consider the results of the survey and other information, in order to develop a consensus on how best to incorporate eHealth issues into basic nursing education. The survey was undertaken during April 2008 via the RCN website. Students were asked how well they felt their nursing education had prepared them for competencies set out in a previously published model curriculum. 1,120 students responded. 565 students who had used electronic patient records during their most recent clinical placement were asked about their experience. Students rated their basic computer skills much higher than their understanding of eHealth. While they felt competent to document assessments and care plans using paper records, few felt competent to do so using electronic records. Few know anything about telehealth (remote diagnosis and delivery of healthcare) or telecare (assistive technology in people's homes). Among those who had used computers in their most recent clinical placement there were clear breaches of the protocols designed to ensure security and confidentiality. Twenty seven invited participants attended the workshop held in October 2008, plus 12 members of the participating Forums and relevant RCN staff. Following presentation and discussion of the findings of the survey, participants worked in three groups to identify and

  5. The nurse practitioner in family planning services: law and practice.

    PubMed

    Roemer, R

    1977-06-01

    Before 1971, when Idaho became the 1st state to authorize expanded scope of functions for registered nurses, nearly all states made it illegal for any nurse to perform diagnosis or prescribe treatment, creating an ambiguity as more and more nurses were equipped by education and technology to perform new tasks. Today 30 states have liberalized the scope of nursing functions, making it possible for nurses and nurse-midwives to assume, among other tasks, family planning functions. A table gives the status of legislation and regulations governing nurse practitioners and nurse-midwives in each state. The area of greatest controversy is the prescription of oral contraceptives. In some states it is allowed under doctor's supervision or in rural areas or in areas where clear need exists for a nurse to dispense such medication. Usually this dispensing is limited to a single course of treatment. Nurse-midwives are rapidly being accepted as extensions of scarce medical facilities. Generally nurse-midwives are authorized to provide prenatal and postpartum care, to handle normal deliveries, and do family planning work including fitting diaphragms and inserting and removing IUDs. An innovation is the family planning nurse practitioner. Several courses for such practitioners have been set up across the U.S. Graduates may, with medical direction, perform bimanual pelvic examinations and breast examinations, take blood pressure, prescribe contraception, fit diaphragms, insert IUDs, examine vaginal secretions microscopically, and refer patients with problems to physicians. In a California program both registered and nonregistered nurses are being trained as women's health specialists who may make routine examinations in both pregnant and nonpregnant women and give family planning advice. Non-RN family planning specialists being trained include licensed vocational nurses, baccalaureate degree holders in nonnursing fields, and qualified persons with less formal education. The 24-week

  6. Military nursing competencies.

    PubMed

    Ross, Mary Candice

    2010-06-01

    Competencies for military nurses are much broader in scope than their civilian counterparts. Not only must they be proficient at basic nursing skills, but they must also quickly master such military skills as protecting themselves and others during attack or threat of attack, caring for major trauma victims under austere conditions, and preparing such patients for transport through the military system of evacuation. This requires consistent and specialized training. This article describes the competencies necessary for practice by military nurses.

  7. Pediatric Endocrinology Nurses Society

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2018! Wednesday, May 16, 2018 ​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​ Journal of Pediatric Nursing The Journal of Pediatric Nursing provides original, peer-reviewed research that is based on the philosophy that pediatric nursing incorporates a family-centered approach. PENS Executive Office • ...

  8. Hospital nurses' work motivation.

    PubMed

    Toode, Kristi; Routasalo, Pirkko; Helminen, Mika; Suominen, Tarja

    2015-06-01

    The knowledge surrounding nurses' work motivation is currently insufficient, and previous studies have rarely taken into account the role of many influential background factors. This study investigates the motivation of Estonian nurses in hospitals, and how individual and organisational background factors influence their motivation to work. The study is quantitative and cross-sectional. An electronically self-reported questionnaire was used for data collection. The sample comprised of 201 Registered Nurses working in various hospital settings in Estonia. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics, two-sample Wilcoxon rank-sum (Mann-Whitney) test, Kruskal-Wallis equality-of-populations rank test and Spearman's correlation. Both extrinsic and intrinsic motivations were noted among hospital nurses. Nurses were moderately externally motivated (M = 3.63, SD = 0.89) and intrinsically strongly motivated (M = 4.98, SD = 1.03). A nurses' age and the duration of service were positively correlated with one particular area of extrinsic work motivation, namely introjected regulation (p < 0.001). Nurses who had professional training over 7 days per year had both a higher extrinsic motivation (p = 0.016) and intrinsic work motivation (p = 0.004). The findings expand current knowledge of nurses' work motivation by describing the amount and orientation of work motivation among hospital nurses and highlighting background factors which should be taken into account in order to sustain and increase their intrinsic work motivation. The instrument used in the study can be an effective tool for nurse managers to determine a nurse's reasons to work and to choose a proper motivational strategy. Further research and testing of the instrument in different countries and in different contexts of nursing is however required. © 2014 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  9. Spirituality in nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Melanie; Wattis, John

    2015-05-27

    Spirituality is an important aspect of holistic care that is frequently overlooked. This is because of difficulties in conceptualising spirituality and confusion about how it should be integrated into nursing care. This article explores what is meant by spirituality and spiritually competent practice. It examines attitudes to spirituality, describes factors that might affect the integration of spirituality into nursing care and offers practical guidance to equip nurses to incorporate spirituality into their practice.

  10. Nurses' knowledge of pain.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Benita

    2007-06-01

    The aim of this study was to establish if postregistration education and clinical experience influence nurses' knowledge of pain. Inadequacies in the pain management process may not be tied to myth and bias originating from general attitudes and beliefs, but reflect inadequate pain knowledge. Design. A pain knowledge survey of 20 true/false statements was used to measure the knowledge base of two groups of nurses. This was incorporated in a self-administered questionnaire that also addressed lifestyle factors of patients in pain, inferences of physical pain, general attitudes and beliefs about pain management. One hundred questionnaires were distributed; 86 nurses returned the questionnaire giving a response rate of 86%. Following selection of the sample, 72 nurses participated in the study: 35 hospice/oncology nurses (specialist) and 37 district nurses (general). Data were analysed using SPSS. The specialist nurses had a more comprehensive knowledge base than the general nurses; however, their knowledge scores did not appear to be related to their experience in terms of years within the nursing profession. Whilst educational programmes contribute to an increase in knowledge, it would appear that the working environment has an influence on the development and use of this knowledge. It is suggested that the clinical environment in which the specialist nurse works can induce feelings of reduced self-efficacy and low personal control. To ease tension, strategies are used that can result in nurses refusing to endorse their knowledge, which can increase patients' pain. Clinical supervision will serve to increase the nurses' self-awareness; however, without power and autonomy to make decisions and affect change, feelings of helplessness, reduced self-efficacy and cognitive dissonance can increase. This may explain why, despite educational efforts to increase knowledge, a concomitant change in practice has not occurred.

  11. Best nursing practice.

    PubMed

    2016-09-01

    As part of this year's centenary celebrations, the RCN is showcasing the best nursing practice, focusing on that which often goes unobserved. Nurses, healthcare assistants and nursing students are asked to share ideas and innovations for improving practice and patient care. These will contribute to the development of a library of good practice and the RCN will invest in a small number of the successful projects. The closing date is 31 December.

  12. Diagnosis and Treatment of Delirium

    PubMed Central

    Henry, W. Desmond; Mann, Alan M.

    1965-01-01

    Delirium is not a clinical entity but a symptom-complex of manifold etiology. Its presence signifies acute cerebral insufficiency and often represents a medical and/or psychiatric emergency. Though some forms of delirium have distinctive features, the fundamental phenomena are common to all, with clouding of consciousness the sine qua non. The condition has two major components: (1) the basic “acute brain syndrome” and (2) associated release phenomena. Clinicians must first make the vital differentiation between delirium and “functional” mental disorder, then proceed with the elucidation of the underlying diagnosis and the concurrent organization of symptomatic and etiologic treatment. Proper treatment combines management of the acute brain syndrome with general and specific procedures for control of the underlying condition. Dealing with the symptom-complex itself involves the principles and practice of sedation, hydration, and nutrition, nursing care and supportive measures. Provided the basic organic condition is treatable, the prognosis today is usually good. PMID:5844423

  13. Nursing at the forefront.

    PubMed

    Hunt, L P

    2000-06-01

    The Government sees nurses at the forefront of the drive for improvement in healthcare delivery. In this article, Lord Hunt, the Government spokesperson on nursing, spells out the role that nurses are expected to play in this process. Clinical governance has undoubtedly already been mentioned if not enacted in your Trust, and maybe some of you have applied for the discretionary points now on offer. Whatever the outcome of these and other strategies, the future is going to be different for perioperative nurses, whether we like it or not. Your views, as ever, are welcome....

  14. Communication in Nursing Practice

    PubMed Central

    Kourkouta, Lambrini; Papathanasiou, Ioanna V.

    2014-01-01

    Good communication between nurses and patients is essential for the successful outcome of individualized nursing care of each patient. To achieve this, however, nurses must understand and help their patients, demonstrating courtesy, kindness and sincerity. Also they should devote time to the patient to communicate with the necessary confidentiality, and must not forget that this communication includes persons who surround the sick person, which is why the language of communication should be understood by all those involved in it. Good communication also is not only based on the physical abilities of nurses, but also on education and experience. PMID:24757408

  15. Modelling district nurse expertise.

    PubMed

    Burke, Michelle

    2014-12-01

    As changes in society and health provision mean that one in four people over the age of 75 will require nursing care at home, pre-registration adult nurse education increasingly prepares student nurses for a future career within the community. District nurses undertake complex, multidimensional health and social assessments and care in a non-clinical setting and work in partnership with patients and their significant others to promote practical and psychological coping mechanisms and self-care. The district nurse's first assessment visit is key to developing a therapeutic partnership and it is often during this visit that expertise in district nursing practice emerges. The holistic, contextual and dynamic aspects of nursing in the home setting can make district nursing expertise difficult to illustrate and demonstrate within the classroom setting. This article explores the ways in which an understanding of expertise development theory can enable the tacit expertise that occurs within the first assessment visit to be made visible to student nurses, using simulation and expert narrative as a pedagogical strategy.

  16. [Nurses in print].

    PubMed

    1990-01-01

    The paper presents an analysis of the articles on nursing personnel published from September 1989 till June 1990 in the two most widespread newspapers: II Corriere della Sera and La Republica. The nursing profession has been a very important object of nation as well as local chronicles, specifically during the nationwide "nursing emergency." It is striking however to see that nurses themselves are absent as subjects from the debate on the crisis of the profession. It is further underlined that journalists are very rough in their analyses of the cause of professional malaise and in the formulation and discussion of hypotheses for solution.

  17. Attitudes toward expanding nurses' authority.

    PubMed

    Kerzman, Hana; Van Dijk, Dina; Eizenberg, Limor; Khaikin, Rut; Phridman, Shoshi; Siman-Tov, Maya; Goldberg, Shoshi

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, an increasing number of care procedures previously under the physician's authority have been placed in the hands of registered nurses. The purpose of this study was to examine the attitudes of nurses towards expanding nurses' authority and the relationships between these attitudes and job satisfaction facets, professional characteristics, and demographics. A cross-sectional study was conducted between 2010 and 2011 in three major medical centers in Israel. Participants included 833 nurses working in 89 departments. Attitudes toward the expansion of nurses' authority were assessed by self-report questionnaire, as well as job satisfaction facets including perception of professional autonomy, nurse-physician working relations, workload and burnout, perceptions of quality of care, and nursing staff satisfaction at work. Nurses reported positive attitudes toward the expansion of nurses' authority and moderate attitudes for interpretation of diagnostic tests in selected situations. The results of multivariate regression analyses demonstrate that the nurses' satisfaction from professional autonomy and work relations were the most influential factors in explaining their attitudes toward the expansion of nurses' authority. In addition, professionally young nurses tend to be more positive regarding changes in nurses' authority. In the Israeli reality of a nurse's shortage, we are witnessing professional transitions toward expansion of the scope of nurses' accountability and decision-making authority. The current research contributes to our understanding of attitudes toward the expansion of nurses' authority among the nursing staffs. The findings indicate the necessity of redefining the scope of nursing practice within the current professional context.

  18. Nursing is the room rate.

    PubMed

    Rutherford, Marcella M

    2012-01-01

    Shrinking dollars increase the need for health care stakeholders to clearly understand nursing's worth. For nursing to assure an adequate investment in nurses, it needs to articulate its value drivers. Nursing revenue offers a data source that reflects stakeholder choices and patient needs. The daily nursing billing supports hospital payment and provides cost data, important for hospital financial decision making. This revenue is a tangible asset reflecting nursing value and can be used to justify an investment in the profession. Nursing leadership can use this daily nursing charge data to monitor and measure the impact of efficiencies related to patient care.

  19. The shortage of nurses and nursing faculty: what critical care nurses can do.

    PubMed

    Siela, Debra; Twibell, K Renee; Keller, Vicki

    2008-01-01

    Nurses are needed more than ever to support the healthcare needs of every American. Nurses make up the greatest single component of hospital staff. In 2004, of the almost 3 million nurses in the United States, 83% were employed in nursing, and 58% of those were employed full-time. However, a severe shortage of nurses exists nationwide, putting the safe, effective healthcare of Americans in jeopardy. The concurrent shortage of nursing faculty has significant impact on the potential for admitting and graduating sufficient numbers of nursing students to address the shortage of prepared nurses. A close examination of the demographics of the 3 million nurses provides a context for an in-depth discussion of strategies that critical care nurses can employ to help alleviate the nursing and nurse faculty shortages.

  20. Nurse manager engagement: what it means to nurse managers and staff nurses.

    PubMed

    Gray, Linda R; Shirey, Maria R

    2013-01-01

    To describe what nurse manager engagement means to nurse managers and staff nurses by incorporating an organizational dashboard to document engagement outcomes. Retaining engaged nurse managers is crucial for individual performance and organizational outcomes. However, nurse manager engagement is currently underreported in the literature. Existing data from the 2010 Employee Opinion Survey at the Baylor University Medical Center in Dallas, Texas, were used to measure staff engagement among 28 nurse managers and 1497 staff nurses. The data showed a 21% gap between manager and staff nurse engagement levels, with managers showing higher engagement levels than staff. No clear depiction of nurse manager engagement emerged. Consequently, an expanded definition of nurse manager engagement was developed alongside a beginning dashboard of engagement outcomes. The findings have implications for overcoming barriers that affect staff nurse engagement, improving outcomes, and creating definitions of nurse manager engagement.

  1. The image of nursing, as perceived by Iranian male nurses.

    PubMed

    Valizadeh, Leila; Zamanzadeh, Vahid; Fooladi, Marjaneh M; Azadi, Arman; Negarandeh, Reza; Monadi, Morteza

    2014-09-01

    The stereotypical public image of nursing is a major concern for male nurses around the world. In this study, we explored how Iranian male nurses perceived the public view of nurses, and their perceptions of themselves. A qualitative descriptive design and content analysis were used to obtain data from 18 purposely-selected male hospital nurses with a baccalaureate nursing degree in Tabriz, Iran. Semistructured interviews were conducted and analyzed. Two main themes emerged: (i) the outsider's view of nursing, which referred to the participants' perceptions of their public image; and (ii) the insider's view, which related to the male nurses' perceptions of themselves. Results included personal transition into a positive professional self-image through the educational process, and continued public perception of nursing as a female profession ill-suited for a man. Strategies to improve the insider's and outsider's views of nursing are listed to help recruit and retain more Iranian male nurses.

  2. Nursing documentation and nursing practice: a discourse analysis.

    PubMed

    Heartfield, M

    1996-07-01

    Nursing documentation exists as a daily reality of nurses' work. It is interpreted by some as the evidence of nursing actions and dismissed by others as a misrepresentation of nursing care. This paper reports on a study of nursing documentation as nursing practice. The work of Foucault and discourse analysis provide a research design for examination of how written descriptions of patient events taken from patient case notes result from hegemonic influences that construct a knowledge and therefore a practice of nursing. Discourses as ways of understanding knowledge as language, social practices and power relations are used to identify how nursing documentation functions as a manifestation and ritual of power relations. A focus on body work and fragmented bodies provided details of nursing's participation in the discursive construction of the object patient and invisible nurse. It is through resistances to documentation that alternative knowledge of nursing exists.

  3. The role of resilience and mindful leadership in oncology nursing.

    PubMed

    Rishel, Cindy J

    2015-03-01

    When oncology nurses think of the word resilient, they often describe the term in the context of the patients and families they care for each day. When patients face a diagnosis of cancer, their lives have suddenly been altered in a frightening manner. Everything changes, and they must find a way to navigate the troubled waters ahead. 
.

  4. Occupational health nurse practitioners' roles in workers' compensation.

    PubMed

    Foster, Donna

    2008-05-01

    The occupational health nurse practitioner is an integral part of coordinating care for the injured or ill worker. Decisions regarding whether an injury or illness is related to work are based on the practitioner's diagnosis and reports of the worker's progress. Understanding workers' compensation laws will enable the practitioner to provide efficient care for the worker.

  5. Nurses' views of patient participation in nursing care.

    PubMed

    Tobiano, Georgia; Bucknall, Tracey; Marshall, Andrea; Guinane, Jessica; Chaboyer, Wendy

    2015-12-01

    To explore nurses' views of patient participation in nursing care on medical wards. Nurses have frequent contact with patients, highlighting their potential role in enabling patient participation. However, some nurses' actions and attitudes act as barriers, failing to achieve core requirements of patient participation. Discovering nurses' views may assist in developing strategies to encourage patient participation in hospitals. Interpretive study. Twenty nurses were recruited from four medical wards, located in two Australian hospitals. In-depth semi-structured interviews were conducted between November 2013-March 2014 and analysed using content analysis. Five categories emerged from the nurses' views. The first category, acknowledging patients as partners, showed nurses respected patients as legitimate participants. In the second category, managing risk, nurses emphasized the need to monitor participation to ensure rules and patient safety were maintained. Enabling participation was the third category, which demonstrated nurses' strategies that enhanced patients' participation. The fourth category was hindering participation; encapsulating nurses' difficulty in engaging patients with certain characteristics. In the final category, realizing participation, nurses believed patients could be involved in physical activities or clinical communication. Nurses have a crucial role in promoting patient participation. Through acknowledging and enabling participation, nurses may facilitate patient participation in a range of nursing activities. The nurse's role in enacting participation is complex, having to accommodate each patient's risks and characteristics, highlighting the need for good assessment skills. Education, policy and research strategies are essential to foster nurses' pivotal role in patient participation. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Obtaining a Foundation for Nursing Care at the Time of Patient Admission: A Grounded Theory Study

    PubMed Central

    Jansson, Inger; Pilhammar, Ewa; Forsberg, Anna

    2009-01-01

    The nursing process can be viewed as a problem-solving model, but we do not know whether use of the whole process including care plans with interventions based on nursing diagnoses improves nurses’ ability to carry out assessments. Therefore, the aim of this study was to illuminate and describe the assessment and decision-making process performed by nurses who formulated individual care plans including nursing diagnosis, goals and interventions or who used standardized care plans when a patient was admitted to their ward for care, and those who did not. Data collection and analysis were carried out by means of Grounded theory. Nurses were observed while assessing patients, after which they were interviewed. The main concern of all nurses was to obtain a foundation for nursing care based on four strategies; building pre-understanding, creating a caring environment, collecting information on symptoms and signs and performing an analysis from different perspectives. It appeared that the most important aspect for nurses who did not employ care plans was the medical reason for the patient’s admission. The nurses who employed care plans discussed their decisions in terms of nursing problems, needs and risks. The results indicate that nurses who formulated care plans were more aware of their professional role. PMID:19746207

  7. Interpreting patients as a means of clinical practice: introducing nursing hermeneutics.

    PubMed

    Charalambous, Andreas

    2010-10-01

    The increased reference to hermeneutics from nursing scientists, researchers and academics has emphasized that interpretation has traditionally been a fundamental part of nursing practice. In nursing research a propensity for acquiring knowledge and understanding by using, multiple modalities has been demonstrated. In recent years, the use of hermeneutic phenomenology, has featured amongst these modalities. Hermeneutic phenomenology is an inquiry arm of, philosophical hermeneutics. To explore the hypotheses that the patient can be considered as "text" and as such to be, interpreted in order to gain information for decision-making in clinical practice. A qualitative approach (hermeneutic phenomenological) to nursing clinical practice. The clinical case of a patient suffering from cancer is described in the paper who was treated, in an Oncology Centre in Cyprus. A hermeneutical model of clinical decision-making in nursing is implemented in practice. The, model was initially used in medical practice; however it finds applications to nursing as well. According, to the model, a patient is perceived as a literary text which may be interpreted on four levels: (1) the, literal facts of the patient's body and the literal story told by the patient, (2) the nursing diagnostic, meaning of the literal data, (3) the praxis (the nursing interventions) emanating from the nursing, diagnosis, and (4) the change effected by the clinical encounter in both the patient's and nurse's lifeworlds. Nursing interventions were successfully informed by the interpretation process. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Nurses' perceptions of usefulness of nursing information system: module of electronic medical record for patient care in two university hospitals of iran.

    PubMed

    Kahouei, Mehdi; Baba Mohammadi, Hassan; Askari Majdabadi, Hesamedin; Solhi, Mahnaz; Parsania, Zeinab; Said Roghani, Panoe; Firozeh, Mehri

    2014-02-01

    For almost fifteen years, the application of computer in hospitals increasingly has become popular. Nurses' beliefs and attitudes towards computer is one of the most important indicators of the application of nursing information system. The purpose of this study was to investigate the perceptions of nurses on the usefulness of nursing information system for patient care. Here, a descriptive study was carried out. Sample was consisted of 316 nurses working in teaching hospitals in an urban area of Iran. This study was conducted during 2011 to 2012. A reliable and valid questionnaire was developed as a data collection tool. The collected data was analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics. It was not believed that nursing information system was useful for patient care. However, it was mentioned that nursing information system is useful in some aspects of patient care such as expediting care, making early diagnosis and formulating diet plan. A significant association was found between the demographic background of sample and their perceptions of the usefulness of nursing information system (P<0.05). Totally, it can be concluded that nursing information system has a potential for improving patient care in hospital settings. Therefore, policy makers should consider implementing nursing information system in teaching hospitals.

  9. Shifting cardiovascular care to nurses results in structured chronic care.

    PubMed

    Nouwens, Elvira; van Lieshout, Jan; van den Hombergh, Pieter; Laurant, Miranda; Wensing, Michel

    2014-07-01

    To explore nurse involvement in cardiovascular risk management (CVRM) in primary care and how this involvement was associated with the degree of structured chronic illness care. A cross-sectional observational study in 7 European countries. Five aspects of nurse involvement in CVRM and 35 specific components of structured chronic illness care were documented in 202 primary care practices in Austria, Belgium, Germany, the Netherlands, Slovenia, Spain, and Switzerland. An overall measure for chronic care management, range 0 to 5, was constructed, derived from elements of the Chronic Care Model (CCM). Random coefficient regression modeling was used to explore associations. A majority of practices involved nurses for organization of CVRM in administrative tasks (82.2 %), risk factor monitoring (78.5%) and patient education (57.1%). Fewer practices involved nurses in defining protocol and the organization for CVRM (45%) or diagnosis and treatment (34.6%). With an increasing number of tasks handled by nurses, overall median adoption of CCM increased from 2.7 (95% CI, 1.5-3.6) to 4.2 (95% CI, 3.8-4.1). When the number of nurse tasks increased by 1, the adoption of CCM increased by 0.13 (P <.05; 95% CI, 0.03-0.22). Some practices with low nurse involvement had high adoption of CCM, while variation of adoption of CCM across practices reduced substantially with an increasing level of nurse involvement. Nurses were involved in the delivery of CVRM in varying degrees. Higher involvement of nurses was associated with higher degree of structured chronic illness care, with less variation.

  10. Nursing practice environment and outcomes for oncology nursing.

    PubMed

    Shang, Jingjing; Friese, Christopher R; Wu, Evan; Aiken, Linda H

    2013-01-01

    It is commonly assumed that oncology nurses experience high job-related burnout and high turnover because their work involves inherent stressors such as caring for patients with serious and often life-threatening illness. The objectives of this study were to examine the differences in outcomes such as job dissatisfaction and burnout between oncology nurses and medical-surgical nurses, and to identify factors that affect oncology nurse outcomes. A secondary analysis of nurse survey data collected in 2006 including 4047 nurses from 282 hospitals in 3 states was performed; t test and χ2 test compared differences between oncology nurses and medical-surgical nurses in nurse outcomes and their assessments of nurse practice environment, as measured by the Practice Environment Scale of the Nursing Work Index. Logistic regression models estimated the effect of nurse practice environment on 4 nurse-reported outcomes: burnout, job dissatisfaction, intention to leave the current position, and perceived quality of care. Oncology nurses reported favorable practice environments and better outcomes than did medical-surgical nurses. All 4 subscales of the Practice Environment Scale of the Nursing Work Index studied were significantly associated with outcomes. Specifically, nurses who reported favorable nursing foundations for quality of care (eg, active in-service or preceptorship programs) were less likely to report burnout and leave their current position. Better practice environments, including nurse foundations for quality care, can help to achieve optimal nurse outcomes. Improving hospital practice environments holds significant potential to improve nurse well-being, retention, and quality of care. Specifically, hospitals should consider preceptor programs and continuing education and increase nurses' participation in hospital decision making.

  11. [Acute care nursing pathology: case report of odynophagia].

    PubMed

    Hernández-Fabà, Eva; Sanfeliu-Julià, Cristina

    2010-01-01

    Since 2008, the Institut Catala de la Salut (ICS) introduced the nurses management plan for acute pathology, in primary care centres. In the implementation of this system of organization, the ICS introduced various diseases protocols with performance algorithms. To raise awareness of the the practice of acute pathology, we present a clinical case. An urgent consultation of a 30 year-old male, with fever, sore throat and cough, which was managed and resolved by a nurse. The aim of this new management plan is that nursing is the first health professional to take care of patient coming to primary care centre without a scheduled visit, to avoid saturating the general clinic or hospital emergencies. This new organisational system involves an increase in the responsibilities of nursing in the diagnosis and treatment of patients.

  12. Translation and integration of CCC nursing diagnoses into ICNP.

    PubMed

    Matney, Susan A; DaDamio, Rebecca; Couderc, Carmela; Dlugos, Mary; Evans, Jonathan; Gianonne, Gay; Haskell, Robert; Hardiker, Nicholas; Coenen, Amy; Saba, Virginia K

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to translate and integrate nursing diagnosis concepts from the Clinical Care Classification (CCC) System Version 2.0 to DiagnosticPhenomenon or nursing diagnostic statements in the International Classification for Nursing Practice (ICNP) Version 1.0. Source concepts for CCC were mapped by the project team, where possible, to pre-coordinated ICNP terms. The manual decomposition of source concepts according to the ICNP 7-Axis Model served to validate the mappings. A total of 62% of the CCC Nursing Diagnoses were a pre-coordinated match to an ICNP concept, 35% were a post-coordinated match and only 3% had no match. During the mapping process, missing CCC concepts were submitted to the ICNP Programme, with a recommendation for inclusion in future releases.

  13. What's funny about nursing?

    PubMed

    Pierlot, D; Warelow, P J

    1999-12-01

    The authors examine the topic of humour and argue that humour is needed as one of many skills within the nurse patient relationship. We advance the view that humour has been well researched as an agent of therapeutic value and as a communication tool which helps to relieve stress, but, to date is not used to its fullest potential and tends therefore to be underestimated in both general and psychiatric nursing areas. Humour has benefits for both the nurse and the patient having psychological benefits and a vast array of physiological advantages and is regarded by those who use it as a social lubricant acting as a positive in nurse patient relationships. We also argue that it is essential that nurses know when to use humour as timing and appropriateness is imperative in order for it to be most effective. Humour can be used in all areas of clinical nursing practice and may prove useful in being a reliable predictor over the course of a patient's illness. The use of humour can help improve the nurse-patient relationship by initially breaking the ice between nurse and patient. This alternative mode of delivery can then be foundational to other areas of the nurse patient relationship such as self-disclosure, the enhancement of learning and relieving stress. Furthermore, it helps to facilitate and promote mutual health and well being for both the patient and the nurse. The usage of humour in psychiatric nurse settings is discussed and the benefits to both the patients and their staff are outlined as being of immense therapeutic value. The literature perhaps tends to skirt around these benefits somewhat, as psychiatry and laughter in partnership are not really considered important discursive topics.

  14. Nunavut: building nursing capacity.

    PubMed

    Malott, Misty

    2012-03-01

    Recruitment and retention issues associated with the growing nursing shortage in Canada are magnified in Nunavut, where the scope of nursing practice is much broader than in urban settings. The Qikiqtani General Hospital (QGH), a 35-bed hospital in Nunavut's capital, Iqaluit, was the home base for this multi-pronged pilot project that spanned 16 months to March 2011. The goals of the project included creating opportunities for front-line nurses to develop new clinical skills and knowledge and expand their competencies; offering enhanced critical care training relevant to the needs of nurses; and providing a smooth transition to entry to practice in a hospital setting for new graduate nurses. An in-house mentorship program was developed, and contracts were made with three outside parties: the Critical Care Education Network (CRI), the Ottawa Hospital and the Perinatal Partnership Program of Eastern and Southeastern Ontario. A number of professional development opportunities were provided – for example, 26 nurses participated in the CRI's critical care training, and six nurses were trained as CRI trainers.Overall, nurses were satisfied with the accessibility, delivery and applicability of the RTA education opportunities, and all nurses agreed that these opportunities increased their professional skills. A plan for the sustainability of the critical care portion of the Nunavut RTA project is currently in place, and the QGH is in the process of hiring a nurse educator for the hospital. This hiring will be a key piece to sustain the project initiatives. If the mentorship program is to continue, it will be essential to hire someone dedicated to the orientation of new graduates and new nurses.

  15. Assessing new graduate nurse performance.

    PubMed

    Berkow, Steven; Virkstis, Katherine; Stewart, Jennifer; Conway, Lindsay

    2008-11-01

    New graduate nurses now comprise more than 10% of a typical hospital's nursing staff, with this number certain to grow given the increasing numbers of entrants into the nurse workforce. Concomitantly, only 10% of hospital and health system nurse executives believe their new graduate nurses are fully prepared to provide safe and effective care. As part of a multipronged research initiative on bridging the preparation-practice gap, the Nursing Executive Center administered a national survey to a cross section of frontline nurse leaders on new graduate nurse proficiency across 36 nursing competencies deemed essential to safe and effective nursing practice. Based on survey data analysis, the authors discuss the most pressing and promising opportunities for improving the practice readiness of new graduate nurses.

  16. [Evaluation of Nurse Demand Management in Primary Care].

    PubMed

    Brugués Brugués, Alba; Peris Grao, Antoni; Pavón Rodríguez, Francisca; Mateo Viladomat, Enric; Gascón Ferret, Jordi; Flores Mateo, Gemma

    2016-03-01

    to evaluate the health outcomes of nurse demand management on unscheduled patients in a Primary Care Centre, following a clinical guide designed by the whole primary care team. Cross-sectional study. A primary care team from Castelldefels. Barcelona, Spain. A random sample of 558 patients requesting a consultation for the same day in a Primary Care setting, attended between May 1st, 2011 and January 31st, 2012. The guide includes 23 health problems that can be dealt by a nurse autonomously, 18 of them possibly requiring an emergency intervention, and shared decision with the physician. Each health problem is divided into three sections: a) a brief definition of the problem; b) an intervention algorithm; and c) nursing diagnoses of North American Nursing Diagnosis Association for each health problem and a description of the possible nursing interventions. We studied 558 patients with a mean age of 42.5 years old (SD 17.7). The most commonly consulted problems were upper respiratory tract symptoms (19.4%), followed by nausea/vomiting (16.5%), and burns/wounds (12.5%). 73.3% of the problems were resolved autonomously by a nurse. 65,8% of the patients attended received health advice. Nurse demand management has shown to be highly effective at handling the conditions attended, while it provides a high percentage of health advice and education during consultations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. Perceptions of nurses caring for pregnant women in vegetative states.

    PubMed

    Fedorka, Patricia D; Heasley, Susan Wallace; Patton, Carol M

    2014-01-01

    To explore the perceptions of labor and delivery nurses caring for women in persistent vegetative states with viable pregnancies. For this qualitative research study, participants included a purposive sample of 13 RNs who provided bedside care to pregnant women in persistent vegetative states. The researchers simultaneously collected and analyzed data from the participants. When the researchers achieved saturation of the data, they presented their results to the participants for corroboration. The nurses reported both knowledge deficits and skill deficits in caring for this patient population. Nurses described emotional responses related to perceived limited support from administration, and reported seeking education from other sources. Although considered experts in labor and delivery care, the obstetrical nurses in this study reported feeling like novices when caring for patients with a diagnosis of persistent vegetative state. The nurses' caregiving concerns were found to originate in their ethical beliefs of beneficence and nonmaleficence. When a patient presents to an obstetrical unit with an uncommon multidisciplinary severe complication such as vegetative state, the nurses perceived the need for support in order to give the best care. This includes education, a multidisciplinary team approach, and continued instruction throughout the patient's stay. Although nurses consider themselves experts within their practice area, they admit shortcomings when unusual complications are apparent.

  18. Representing nursing judgements in the electronic health record.

    PubMed

    Moen, A; Henry, S B; Warren, J J

    1999-10-01

    The naming of nursing phenomena and representing the phenomena in a standardized manner suitable for encoding in computer-based systems is a challenge for the nursing profession at the national and the international level. Considerable progress has been made in the development of classification systems for nursing practice. The focus of this article is on language systems developed to represent nursing judgements in computer-based systems, in particular the electronic health record. A review of two current systems and their proposed revisions (North American Nursing Diagnosis Association, NANDA, Taxonomies I and II, and the International Classification for Nursing Practice, ICNP, Alpha and Beta versions), according to the features suggested by the Computer-based Patient Record Institute (CPRI) for classification systems appropriate for implementation in computer-based systems, suggests that the evolving versions extend the current versions in terms of sufficient granularity (depth and level of detail) and atomic and compositional character. However, it is not clear from the literature available to date whether the characteristics that are most closely related to definition of a formal terminology (i.e. clear and non-redundant representation of concepts, syntax and grammar for logical constructions of compositional terms, synonyms and language independence) will be part of the evolving vocabularies. Formal terminology models and related tools have the potential to complement, extend, and refine existing nursing classification systems.

  19. [Implementation of the nursing process in a patient with hepatic cirrhosis using the standardized terminologies NANDA, NIC and NOC].

    PubMed

    Vargas, Rosimeire da Silva; França, Fabiana Cláudia de Vasconcelos

    2007-01-01

    This case study aimed at describing the implementation the implementation of the Nursing Process to a patient with hepatic cirrhosis, and report the difficulties found on the implementation of the assistance. The conceptual model of Horfa was used, NANDA--Nursing Diagnosis, Nursing Interventions Classification (NIC) and Nursing Outcomes Classification (NOC) were also applied in care composition. The present study was developed in a public hospital of Distrito Federal, in September 2005, at the Emergency Unit. Among the identified nursing diagnosis was included: acute confusion, constipation and knowledge deficit. Among the pointed difficulties, it was detached: the disinterest of the nursing team and of the pacient, knowledge deficit and unpreparedness of the professionals, lack of human and material resources to deliver the care.

  20. Psychometric properties of the Spanish Burnout Inventory among staff nurses.

    PubMed

    Gil-Monte, P R; Manzano-García, G

    2015-12-01

    The burnout syndrome contributes to the deterioration in the quality of personal life as well as lower quality practice in healthcare personnel. Researchers have been concerned about the psychometric limitations of some previous questionnaires designed to evaluate burnout. The Spanish Burnout Inventory was developed to address the problems associated with other instruments, but it has not yet been validated in staff nurses. This study provides evidence that the Spanish Burnout Inventory has adequate psychometric properties to estimate burnout in staff nurses. The Spanish Burnout Inventory offers a theoretical proposal to explain the different components of burnout. The Spanish Burnout Inventory provides researchers and practitioners with an expanded conceptualization of the burnout syndrome, which can facilitate the diagnosis and treatment of nursing professionals. Researchers have been concerned about the psychometric limitations of the some previous questionnaires designed to evaluate burnout. To address these problems associated with previous instruments, the Spanish Burnout Inventory (SBI) was developed. The instrument has not yet been validated in staff nurses. The purpose of this paper was to evaluate the psychometric properties of the SBI. The sample consisted of 720 staff nurses from two Spanish general hospitals. The instrument is composed of 20 items distributed in four dimensions: Enthusiasm towards the job (five items), Psychological exhaustion (four items), Indolence (six items) and Guilt (five items). Data were subjected to confirmatory factor analysis. To assess the factorial validity of the SBI, four alternative models were tested. Results show that the four-factor model of the SBI has adequate psychometric properties for the study of burnout in staff nurses. This model fitted the data better than the alternative models. The study provides evidence of the adequate psychometric properties of a measure to evaluate burnout in nursing professionals. The

  1. The Impaired Nurse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris County Vocational Technical School District, Denville, NJ.

    This mini-course for nurses is intended to establish an atmosphere conducive to the development of personal awareness of the ramifications of alcohol/substance abuse involving the nurse. Contents include the mini-course's goals and objectives, a course outline, copies of 11 handouts and a booklet written to provide information about nurse…

  2. Registered Nurse (Associate Degree).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center on Education and Training for Employment.

    This document, which is designed for use in developing a tech prep competency profile for the occupation of registered nurse (with an associate degree), lists technical competencies and competency builders for 19 units pertinent to the health technologies cluster in general and 5 units specific to the occupation of registered nurse. The following…

  3. Reference Sources for Nursing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nursing Outlook, 1978

    1978-01-01

    The tenth revision of a list of reference works for nurses, revised by a committee of the Interagency Council on Library Resources for Nursing, listed by type of publication as abstract journals, audiovisuals, bibliographies, books, dictionaries, directories, pharmacologies, indexes, guides, and so on. (MF)

  4. Registered Nurse (Associate Degree).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center on Education and Training for Employment.

    This document, which is designed for use in developing a tech prep competency profile for the occupation of registered nurse (with an associate degree), lists technical competencies and competency builders for 19 units pertinent to the health technologies cluster in general and 5 units specific to the occupation of registered nurse. The following…

  5. Nurse Practitioner Pharmacology Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waigandt, Alex; Chang, Jane

    A study compared the pharmacology training of nurse practitioner programs with medical and dental programs. Seventy-three schools in 14 states (40 nurse practitioner programs, 19 schools of medicine, and 14 schools of dentistry) were surveyed by mailed questionnaire about the number of hours devoted to the study of pharmacology. The major findings…

  6. Never stop nursing.

    PubMed

    Court, Dianne

    2016-10-12

    Well done to 83-year-old nurse Monica Bulman (news, 14 September, page 7 ). At 71 and working on an orthopaedic rehabilitation ward at a hospital in Birmingham, I thought I was getting near to being the oldest nurse practising on a ward.

  7. School Nurse Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borja, Mary C.; Amidon, Christine; Spellings, Diane; Franzetti, Susan; Nasuta, Mary

    2009-01-01

    This article features school nurses from across the country who are championing for school-located influenza immunization within their communities. These nurses are: (1) Mary C. Borja; (2) Christine Amidon; (3) Diane Spellings; (4) Susan Franzetti; and (5) Mary Nasuta. (Contains 6 figures.)

  8. Hospital Nurse Aide. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iowa Univ., Iowa City. Coll. of Education.

    This report presents results of a project to revise the current 120-hour advanced nurse aide course to include all recommended minimum competencies. A three-page description of project objectives, activities, and outcomes is followed by a list of the competencies for the 75-hour nurse aide course for long-term care and for the 120-hour advanced…

  9. School Nursing in Illinois.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Endicott, Bettye; And Others

    This handbook for pupil personnel workers traces the historical development of school nursing and its establishment in Illinois. The role and function of school nurses are described, including planning and implementing optimum school health standards, protecting student health, and promoting well-being through the use of an interdisciplinary…

  10. [Gerontology and nursing care].

    PubMed

    Brandenburg, H

    2001-04-01

    This paper focuses on questions of the philosophy of science and the scientific development of gerontology and nursing science. First, some aspects of the scientific development in gerontology and nursing science (autonomy, inter- and multidisciplinarity as well as the theory debates) are summarized. In gerontology, problems of the philosophy of science are often neglected. The main focus is on empirical research and the establishment of an scientific infrastructure. In nursing science are questions of the philosophy of science, especially debates about the discipline, are significant. In Germany nursing research and the establishment of a scientific infrastructure are still in the initial stages. Second, on the basis of a content analysis the relevance and status of "nursing/need of care/frailty" in two leading journals ("Zeitschrift für Gerontologie und Geriatrie" and the "Pflege") is shown. Main result is that in nursing science publications regarding the status of the discipline, studies of the motivation, attitudes and behavior of nurses as well as investigations of the professionalization are dominant. In gerontology, the main emphasis is on studies of the changing health service structure, geriatric assessment and qualification. Finally chances of an interdisciplinary exchange between gerontology and nursing science are discussed.

  11. AACC Nursing Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Association of Community Colleges, Washington, DC.

    This document, presented in the form of PowerPoint print outs, indicates a total of 420 (nearly 60%) associate degree nursing (ADN) programs responded to a survey conducted by the American Association of Community Colleges' (AACC) Nursing and Allied Health Initiative (NAHI) for 2003. The sample is representative based on urbanicity and region.…

  12. School Nursing Certification Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Selekman, Janice; Wolfe, Linda C.

    2010-01-01

    The 2010 update to the resource you have been waiting for to help you prepare to take the National School Nurse Certification Exam. Dr. Janice Selekman DNSc, RN, NCSN, a recognized expert in pediatric nursing, and NASN Past President Linda C. Wolfe MEd, BSN, RN, NCSN, FNASN are the authors. This text was created in response to many years of…

  13. Nurse practitioners & reimbursement.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, E M

    1992-05-01

    Nursing's Agenda for Health Care Reform (1991) embraces primary health care as the focus of a restructured health care system. As part of this reformed system, consumers would access the most cost-effective providers in community-based settings. Removal of financial and regulatory barriers that limit consumer access to providers, such as lack of direct reimbursement by Medicare for nurse practitioners, should be eliminated according to this plan. Senate bills S2103 and S2104 have been recently introduced to the U.S. Senate mandating reimbursement for services provided by nurse practitioners, clinical nurse specialists, nurse midwives, and physician assistants at 97% of physician payment. The aim of this global legislation is to eliminate the current piecemeal mechanisms for nurse practitioner reimbursement and remove financial disincentives. Case examples presented in this article illustrate how obstacles to reimbursement limit access to care for consumers. Quality of care, opportunities for autonomous practice, and control of nursing practice issues have been highlighted as well by the case format. It is intended that these cases would be useful to support changes in patterns of nurse practitioner reimbursement.

  14. American Nursing's First Textbooks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flaumenhaft, Eugene; Flaumenhaft, Carol

    1989-01-01

    Discusses the four textbooks, written in the last quarter of the 19th century, that shaped nursing in the United States. They provided technical information in a systematic fashion, established an autonomous literature that guided nurses in school and beyond, and defined the training school curriculum. (JOW)

  15. Continuing Education in Nursing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curtis, Frieda Smith; And Others

    This book is planned to provide guidance for nurses in planning, conducting, and evaluating programs of continuing education; content is built on the collective experiences and thinking of a regional group of nurse educators engaged in developing a coordinated program for a large geographical area. After discussion of changing patterns of health…

  16. School Nurse Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borja, Mary C.; Amidon, Christine; Spellings, Diane; Franzetti, Susan; Nasuta, Mary

    2009-01-01

    This article features school nurses from across the country who are championing for school-located influenza immunization within their communities. These nurses are: (1) Mary C. Borja; (2) Christine Amidon; (3) Diane Spellings; (4) Susan Franzetti; and (5) Mary Nasuta. (Contains 6 figures.)

  17. Brokerage in multicultural nursing.

    PubMed

    Chalanda, M

    1995-01-01

    Nurses in contact with clients from different cultures often encounter beliefs at appear inconsistent with conventional Western medicine, resulting in the need for the nurse to act as a broker--i.e. translating and processing messages, instructions and belief systems from one group to a another.

  18. Nurse Practitioner Pharmacology Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waigandt, Alex; Chang, Jane

    A study compared the pharmacology training of nurse practitioner programs with medical and dental programs. Seventy-three schools in 14 states (40 nurse practitioner programs, 19 schools of medicine, and 14 schools of dentistry) were surveyed by mailed questionnaire about the number of hours devoted to the study of pharmacology. The major findings…

  19. The School Nurse Practitioner

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Igoe, Judith Bellaire

    1975-01-01

    Denver's four-month intensive course in primary health care for experienced nurses serving in disadvantaged areas, followed by inservice training with regular consultation available from a local physician, has produced school nurse practitioners who extend the traditional role to include comprehensive evaluations, management of minor illnesses,…

  20. School Nursing Certification Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Selekman, Janice; Wolfe, Linda C.

    2010-01-01

    The 2010 update to the resource you have been waiting for to help you prepare to take the National School Nurse Certification Exam. Dr. Janice Selekman DNSc, RN, NCSN, a recognized expert in pediatric nursing, and NASN Past President Linda C. Wolfe MEd, BSN, RN, NCSN, FNASN are the authors. This text was created in response to many years of…

  1. Comparison of Nursing Roles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macdonough, Georgia P.

    2001-01-01

    This 1972 paper presents 12 comparisons of the nurse's role in the school versus in the hospital. For example, in the hospital, patients know they are ill and want to get well, while in school patients may not recognize that they need help. In the hospital, the nurse's workload is determined for her, while in school, it is self-determined. (SM)

  2. Professional values and nursing.

    PubMed

    Sellman, Derek

    2011-05-01

    The values of nursing arise from a concern with human flourishing. If the desire to become a nurse is a reflection of an aspiration to care for others in need then we should anticipate that those who choose to nurse have a tendency towards the values we would normally associate with a caring profession (care, compassion, perhaps altruism, and so on). However, these values require a secure base if they are not to succumb to the corrupting pressures of the increasingly instrumental nature of the values of the institutions in which healthcare in general and nursing in particular takes place. One way of securing a base for withstanding the corrupting influences of the institution is to understand nursing as a practice in the sense in which Alasdair MacIntyre uses that term. In this brief paper I will outline ways in which the managerial imperative of meeting targets is both distorting practice and undermining nursing's values. I conclude that understanding nursing as a MacIntyrean practice provides a refuge from what might otherwise be overwhelming pressures for nurses to adopt instrumental values to the detriment of professional caring values.

  3. Nursing Practice Environment and Outcomes for Oncology Nursing

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Jingjing; Friese, Christopher R.; Wu, Evan; Aiken, Linda H.

    2012-01-01

    Background It is commonly assumed that oncology nurses experience high job-related burnout and high turnover because their work involves inherent stressors such as caring for patients with serious and often life-threatening illness. Objectives The objectives of this study were to examine the differences in outcomes such as job dissatisfaction and burnout between oncology nurses and medical-surgical nurses, and to identify factors that affect oncology nurse outcomes. Methods A secondary analysis of nurse survey data collected in 2006 including 4047 nurses from 282 hospitals in 3 states was performed; t test and χ2 test compared differences between oncology nurses and medical-surgical nurses in nurse outcomes and their assessments of nurse practice environment, as measured by the Practice Environment Scale of the Nursing Work Index. Logistic regression models estimated the effect of nurse practice environment on 4 nurse-reported outcomes: burnout, job dissatisfaction, intention to leave the current position, and perceived quality of care. Results Oncology nurses reported favorable practice environments and better outcomes than did medical-surgical nurses. All 4 subscales of the Practice Environment Scale of the Nursing Work Index studied were significantly associated with outcomes. Specifically, nurses who reported favorable nursing foundations for quality of care (eg, active in-service or preceptorship programs) were less likely to report burnout and leave their current position. Conclusions Better practice environments, including nurse foundations for quality care, can help to achieve optimal nurse outcomes. Implications for Practice Improving hospital practice environments holds significant potential to improve nurse well-being, retention, and quality of care. Specifically, hospitals should consider preceptor programs and continuing education and increase nurses’ participation in hospital decision making. PMID:22751101

  4. Views of Student Nurses on Caring and Technology in Nursing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brodell, Elizabeth Becky

    2009-01-01

    Nurses entering the workforce are faced with many challenges, but today the multiple demands of patient care are complicated by a nurse's need to keep abreast of fast-changing technology. This research is universally relevant to nursing practice in educational settings and practice areas because nursing education needs to develop strategies to…

  5. Registered Nurse Education and the Registered Nurse Job Market.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunt, Howard Allan

    This effort compares the graduates of the three types of Registered Nurse (RN) education programs (three-year Diploma in Nursing, two-year Associate Degree in Nursing (ADN), and four-year Bachelor of Science Degree in Nursing). The basic objective is to determine whether they are perfect substitutes, especially whether ADN graduates can adequately…

  6. Nurse managers' role in older nurses' intention to stay.

    PubMed

    Armstrong-Stassen, Marjorie; Freeman, Michelle; Cameron, Sheila; Rajacic, Dale

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to propose and test a model of the underlying mechanisms linking perceived availability of human resource (HR) practices relevant to older nurses and older nurses' intentions to stay with their hospitals. Quantitative data were collected from randomly selected older registered nurses (N=660) engaged in direct patient care in hospitals in Canada. Structural equation modelling was used to test the hypothesized model. The relationship between perceptions of HR practices (performance evaluation, recognition/respect) and intentions to stay was mediated by the perceived fairness with which nurse managers managed these HR practices and nurse manager satisfaction. When nurse managers were perceived to administer the HR practices fairly (high perceived procedural justice), older nurses were more satisfied with their nurse manager and, in turn, more likely to intend to stay. The cross-sectional research design does not allow determination of causality. It is important that nurse managers receive training to increase their awareness of the needs of older nurses and that nurse managers be educated on how to manage HR practices relevant to older nurses in a fair manner. Equally important is that hospital administrators and HR managers recognize the importance of providing such HR practices and supporting nurse managers in managing these practices. The findings increase the understanding of how HR practices tailored to older nurses are related to the intentions of these nurses to remain with their hospital, and especially the crucial role that first-line nurse managers play in this process.

  7. Current Nursing Research Grants Supported by the Division of Nursing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Institutes of Health (DHEW), Bethesda, MD. Div. of Nursing.

    The United States Public Health Service Nursing Research Project Grants established in 1955, support studies dealing with all aspects of nursing practice, organization and delivery of nursing services to the patient, nursing as an occupation, and ways of communicating research findings. Intended as a means of sharing information about ongoing…

  8. How do nursing students perceive substance abusing nurses?

    PubMed

    Boulton, Martha A; Nosek, Laura J

    2014-02-01

    Substance abuse among nurses was recognized by nurse leaders and professional nursing organizations as a growing threat to patient safety and to the health of the abusing nurse more than 30years ago. Although numerous studies on nurse impairment were published in the 1980s and 1990s, there was minimal focus on student nurses' perceptions about impaired nurses and less research has been published more recently, despite a growing rate of substance abuse. A quasi-experimental study to explore the perceptions of student nurses toward nurses who are chemically dependent was conducted using a two-group, pretest-posttest design. The Perception of Nurse Impairment Inventory (PNII) was completed by student nurses at the beginning of their junior course work, prior to formal education about substance abuse. The PNII was repeated after the students received substance abuse education. The PNII was also completed by a control group of sophomore student nurses who did not receive the formal substance abuse education. A repeated measures analysis of variance was used to measure the differences between the two groups of students. Students who received the education chose more compassionate responses on the PNII and were more likely to respond that an impaired nurse's supervisor is responsible for supporting and guiding the impaired nurse to access professional care. Discrepancies in study findings about the efficacy of education for effecting positive attitudes of student nurses toward impaired nurses may be related to the length and type of the education.

  9. [Nurse anesthetist in France].

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Ju; Yann, Douchy; De Almeida, Sylvie; Deckert, Christine; Gauss, Tobias; Bonneville, Claire Tae; Merckx, Paul; Mantz, Jean

    2006-12-01

    We present the system of nurse anesthetist (Infirmier Anesthésiste Diplômé d'Etat: IADE) in France to the community of Japanese anesthesiologists. This French system with 70 years' history is older than the Japan Society of Anesthesiologists itself. There are 7000 nurse anesthetists in France now and the number of nurse anesthetists increases by 450-500 each year. Training to become a nurse anesthetist requires at least two years' experience as a general nurse and the general nurse must pass an examination after two years' special training in an anesthetistic nurse school to acquire the national certification. The nurse anesthetist's profession is regulated by French law. They work in a team with certified anesthesiologists. They can perform many kinds of anesthetic tasks including tracheal intubation and insertion of arterial catheter under the responsibility and supervision of certified anesthesiologists. The nurse anesthetists are not allowed to perform spinal, epidural, conduction and local anesthesia, although they can maintain these anesthesia and control these methods, e.g., by injecting local anesthetic agents through epidural catheter, following a specified prescription. The nurse anesthetists are not allowed to insert central venous and pulmonary artery catheters, although they can manage them. They are allowed to administer inhalation anesthetic agents, and inject venous anesthetic agents, muscle relaxants, their antagonists, and opioids by their own initiatives, but the decision for the use of catecholamine and emergency drugs is reserved to certified anesthesiologists. The nurse anesthetists perform other tasks preparing and checking anesthetic agents and equipment such as anesthetic machine, monitor, and defibrillator everyday, and sometimes use autologous blood recovery systems. The relationship between the certified anesthesiologist and the nurse anesthetist is marked by mutual respect, confidence and cooperation at each step of the anesthetic

  10. [Gender mainstreaming and nursing].

    PubMed

    Wang, Hsiu-Hung

    2011-12-01

    Gender mainstreaming is one of the most important strategies in promoting global gender equality. The Taiwan government launched policies on gender mainstreaming and gender impact assessment in 2007 in response to strong public and academic advocacy work. With rising awareness of gender issues, nursing professionals in Taiwan should keep pace with global trends and become actively involved in advancing gender-mainstreaming policies. This article shows that nursing professionals should prepare themselves by cultivating gender competence, understanding gender-related regulations, recognizing the importance of gender impact assessment implementation, integrating gender issues into nursing education, conducting gender-related research and participating in decision-making processes that promote gender mainstreaming. Nursing professionals should enhance their knowledge and understanding of gender mainstreaming-related issues and get involved in the gender-related decision-making process in order to enhance gender awareness and women's health and further the professional development of nurses.

  11. Workplace bullying in nurses.

    PubMed

    Quine, L

    2001-01-01

    The article reports a study of workplace bullying in community nurses in an NHS trust. The aims were to determine the prevalence of bullying, to examine the association between bullying and occupational health outcomes, and to investigate whether support at work could moderate the effects of bullying. Forty-four percent of nurses reported experiencing one or more types of bullying in the previous 12 months, compared to 35 percent of other staff. Fifty percent of nurses had witnessed the bullying of others. Nurses who had been bullied reported significantly lower levels of job satisfaction and significantly higher levels of anxiety, depression and propensity to leave. They were also more critical of aspects of the organizational climate of the trust. Support at work was able to protect nurses from some of the damaging effects of bullying.

  12. Characteristics of intuitive nurses.

    PubMed

    Miller, V G

    1995-06-01

    A description is provided of the process used to verify characteristics of intuitive nurses that had been reported in the literature. These characteristics supplied the framework for construction of the Miller Intuitiveness Instrument (MII) reported earlier (Miller, 1993). Evidence for validity of the MII was provided in the Miller (1993) study by examining factor analyses and correlations with the intuitive component of the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI). The following characteristics were subsequently verified: Intuitive nurses are willing to act on their intuitions, are skilled clinicians, and incorporate a spiritual component in their practices. In addition, intuitive nurses express an interest in the abstract nature of things and are risk takers. Intuitive nurses prefer intuition to sensing (as reflected by the MBTI) as a way to take in information. They are extroverted and express confidence in their intuitions. Likewise, nurses who delay making decisions until all the information is in are more intuitive than those who make decisions abruptly.

  13. Nurses' work environment and nursing outcomes: a survey study among Finnish university hospital registered nurses.

    PubMed

    Tervo-Heikkinen, Tarja; Partanen, Pirjo; Aalto, Pirjo; Vehviläinen-Julkunen, Katri

    2008-10-01

    The aim was to assess the interrelationships between nurses' work environment and nursing outcomes. A cross-sectional survey of 664 registered nurses (RN) on 34 acute care inpatient hospital wards was used to measure nurses' perceptions. Patient data (n = 4045) consisting of a total patient satisfaction indicator were collected simultaneously with the nurse data during year 2005. RN's assessments of staffing adequacy, respect and relationships were the most important factors of work environment having an influence on job-related stress, job satisfaction, patient satisfaction and adverse events to patients and nurses. Some 77% of the RN reported adverse nurse events and 96% reported adverse patient events during a 3 month retrospective period. Ensuring sufficient and suitably qualified nurses' availability in delivering nursing care is an important management issue. Nurses are concerned about the quality of care, and the concerns perceived by nurses can influence their clinical work.

  14. Computers and nursing. Possibilities for transforming nursing.

    PubMed

    Ford, J

    1990-01-01

    The use of computers is becoming commonplace in the clinical setting. However, the impact of computer use and its implications for nursing have yet to be understood (Birckhead, 1978). The purpose of this article is to explore how computer technology may transform nursing. The discourse is guided by Burch's (1985) thesis that "the use of technology is non-neutral. It transforms experience, whether for better or worse, and ultimately shapes human thinking and being". If one values nursing as a humanizing activity, then most of the potential transformations can be viewed as negative. When viewed from an instrumental framework, however, the computer may have a positive rather than a negative impact because computer use promotes expediency, efficiency, and precision.

  15. Nursing professionalism: a national survey of professionalism among Japanese nurses.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Michiko; Yonemitsu, Yoshikazu; Kawamoto, Rieko

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to quantify the professionalism of nurses in Japan. The Japanese version of the Behavioural Inventory for Professionalism in Nursing was conducted as a national survey. Computer-generated random selection of nurses in Japan obtained responses from 1501 nurses. A descriptive design examined the levels of and differences in nursing professionalism. Comparisons of the total level of professionalism in educational preparation, current position, years of experience, and current practice setting were analysed by one-way analysis of variance and post hoc Tukey-Kramer multiple comparison test. The results revealed that Japanese nurses had low levels of professionalism, and professionalism was related significantly to higher educational preparation, years of experience as a nurse, and current position as a nursing administrator or faculty. The results can be used as a benchmark for continued assessments of the level of nursing professionalism and for further development of nursing professionalism. © 2013 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  16. Nurses across borders: foregrounding international migration in nursing history.

    PubMed

    Choy, Catherine Ceniza

    2010-01-01

    Although the international migration of nurses has played a formative role in increasing the racial and ethnic diversity of the health care labor force, nursing historians have paid very little attention to the theme of international migration and the experiences of foreign-trained nurses, A focus on international migration complements two new approaches in nursing history: the agenda to internationalize its frameworks, and the call to move away from "great women, great events" and toward the experiences of "ordinary" nurses. This article undertakes a close reading of the life and work of Filipino American nurse Ines Cayaban to reconceptualize nursing biography in an international framework that is attentive to issues of migration, race, gender, and colonialism. It was a Hannah keynote lecture delivered by the author on June 5, 2008, as part of the CAHN/ACHN (Canadian Association for the History of Nursing/Association Canadienne pour l'Histoire du Nursing) International Nursing History Conference.

  17. Evaluation of nursing manpower allocation in a nursing home.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chun-Hsi; Tsai, Wen-Chen; Chang, Wei-Chieh

    2007-03-01

    The subjects of this study encompassed the nursing staffs (nurses and nursing aids) and residents of a public hospital-based nursing home. By intensive sampling, this study explored the differences in actual times that nurses spent caring for residents. We assessed the functional status of nursing home residents of various illness severities as well as measured the actual nursing manpower needed to meet the residents' care needs using Typology of the Aged with Illustration (TAI). Results showed that current nursing manpower levels in nursing homes was adequate, although some units had excessive manpower allocation. As a result, this study suggests the establishment of a resident classification system for use in long-term care (LTC) facilities to assist with manpower allocation and reasonable utilization of resources within the facility. Adequate nurse staffing will enhance the quality and accessibility of care for the residents with severe illnesses in LTC facilities.

  18. Nurses working outside of nursing: societal trend or workplace crisis?

    PubMed

    Black, Lisa; Spetz, Joanne; Harrington, Charlene

    2008-08-01

    The phenomenon of career inactivity in professional nursing has been historically portrayed in the literature as a major cause of disequilibrium in the registered nurse labor market. However, there remains a general lack of understanding of the diverse forces that shape the inactive nurse pool and the likelihood that this population will return to nursing. The purpose of this study was to examine the population of registered nurses who are active in the labor market but work in nonnursing employment. Specifically, this study sought to determine the relative importance of nonworkplace- and workplace-related reasons for working outside of nursing. The results demonstrate that dissatisfaction with the nursing workplace is the key reason cited by actively licensed nurses for working outside of nursing employment. These findings suggest that policy and employer remedies are needed to improve the nursing workplace.

  19. Psychophysiologic assessment of posttraumatic stress disorder in Vietnam nurse veterans who witnessed injury or death.

    PubMed

    Carson, M A; Paulus, L A; Lasko, N B; Metzger, L J; Wolfe, J; Orr, S P; Pitman, R K

    2000-10-01

    This study examined whether witnessing death and injury could produce psychophysiologically responsive posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Participants consisted of medication-free female Vietnam nurse veterans with a diagnosis of current PTSD (n = 17) and who never had PTSD (n = 21), related to their military service. Individualized scripts describing personal traumatic military nursing events, a standard military nursing event, and other life events were tape recorded and played back to the participant while heart rate, skin conductance, and facial electromyograms were recorded. Nurses with PTSD showed significantly larger physiologic responses than non-PTSD nurses only during imagery of military-related nursing events. The groups' self-reported emotional responses did not differ during imagery. Psychophysiologic results support the proposition that witnessing death and serious injury to others is sufficiently stressful to cause PTSD.

  20. Nursing diagnoses in patients with cerebral vascular accident: an integrative review.

    PubMed

    Lima, Ana Carolina Maria Araújo Chagas Costa; Silva, Aurilene Lima da; Guerra, Débora Rodrigues; Barbosa, Islene Victor; Bezerra, Karine de Castro; Oriá, Mônica Oliveira Batista

    2016-01-01

    to verify the nursing diagnoses in patients affected by CVAs. this is an integrative review of the literature. The search was conducted on LILACS, Scielo, Medline, CINAHL, and Scopus databases between February and March 2015, using the following keywords: "Enfermagem", "Acidente Vascular Cerebral", "Diagnóstico de Enfermagem"; and "Nursing", "Stroke", and "Nursing Diagnosis". we found 9 articles published between 2009 and 2015; most of them were Brazilian, cross-sectional, and exploratory, with a level of evidence of 6. The evidence from the publications was classified as: "Evaluation and validation of specific nursing diagnoses for subjects affected by CVAs" and "Application of the nursing process on subjects affected by CVAs". we noticed the publications focused on nursing diagnoses related to motor disorders, such as risk of falls and impaired physical mobility. Domains regarding safety/protection (domain 11) and sleep/resting (domain 4) were present in most evaluated publications.

  1. The Contribution of the Rasch Model to the Clinical Validation of Nursing Diagnoses: Integrative Literature Review.

    PubMed

    de Souza Oliveira-Kumakura, Ana Railka; Caldeira, Sílvia; Prado Simão, Talita; Camargo-Figuera, Fabio Alberto; de Almeida Lopes Monteiro da Cruz, Diná; Campos de Carvalho, Emília

    2016-10-26

    To analyze the knowledge related to the use of the Rasch model in validation of nursing diagnoses. Integrative literature review with search in LILACS, PUBMED, CINAHL, and SCOPUS. Five studies comprised the sample, which analyzed unidimensionality, local independence, item calibration, item reliability, separation of items and people, and differential item functioning for analyzing nursing diagnoses. The Rasch model seems to be a useful method to validate nursing diagnoses and probably also for the validation of nursing outcomes in the Nursing Outcomes Classification. The use of this model is promising, considering the advantages that it can be used in studies with several methodological designs. Methods that are able to provide more robust evidence of nursing diagnosis validity are needed to support highly accurate diagnostic findings in clinical practice. © 2016 NANDA International, Inc.

  2. Nursing diagnoses in adult/elderly patients undergoing outpatient antineoplastic chemotherapy: a review.

    PubMed

    Jomar, Rafael Tavares; Gomes, Rebeca Anselmo Furtado; Leite, Dayana Carvalho; Gomes, Helena Ferraz; Peres, Ellen Marcia; Junior, Eugenio Fuentes Perez

    2017-01-01

    To search in the scientific literature for nursing diagnoses identified in adult/elderly patients undergoing antineoplastic chemotherapy in an outpatient setting. Review of studies published in Portuguese, English, or Spanish which were searched in five electronic databases in March 2016, using the descriptors nursing process, nursing diagnosis, neoplasms, drug therapy and hospital outpatient clinic. In the four studies selected for review, 40 nursing diagnoses were identified, namely unbalanced nutrition, less than body requirements, risk of deficient fluid volume, diarrhoea, fatigue, impaired home maintenance, deficient knowledge, disturbed body image, interrupted family processes, ineffective sexuality pattern, anxiety, powerlessness, fear, readiness for enhanced religiosity, risk of infection, impaired dentition, risk of impaired skin integrity, acute pain, and nausea. The nursing diagnoses identified can support the selection of interventions and the creation of nursing guidelines in outpatient oncology services.

  3. Nursing diagnoses in adult/elderly patients undergoing outpatient antineoplastic chemotherapy: a review

    PubMed Central

    Jomar, Rafael Tavares; Gomes, Rebeca Anselmo Furtado; Leite, Dayana Carvalho; Gomes, Helena Ferraz; Peres, Ellen Marcia; Junior, Eugenio Fuentes Perez

    2017-01-01

    Objective To search in the scientific literature for nursing diagnoses identified in adult/elderly patients undergoing antineoplastic chemotherapy in an outpatient setting. Methods Review of studies published in Portuguese, English, or Spanish which were searched in five electronic databases in March 2016, using the descriptors nursing process, nursing diagnosis, neoplasms, drug therapy and hospital outpatient clinic. Results In the four studies selected for review, 40 nursing diagnoses were identified, namely unbalanced nutrition, less than body requirements, risk of deficient fluid volume, diarrhoea, fatigue, impaired home maintenance, deficient knowledge, disturbed body image, interrupted family processes, ineffective sexuality pattern, anxiety, powerlessness, fear, readiness for enhanced religiosity, risk of infection, impaired dentition, risk of impaired skin integrity, acute pain, and nausea. Conclusions The nursing diagnoses identified can support the selection of interventions and the creation of nursing guidelines in outpatient oncology services. PMID:28596802

  4. [Analysis of knowledge production on the nursing process: exploratory descriptive study].

    PubMed

    Duran, Erika Christiane Marocco; Toledo, Vanessa Pellegrino

    2011-06-01

    This descriptive exploratory study aims to analyze the production of knowledge on the nursing process, based on Master's theses and doctoral dissertations presented in Brazilian graduate programs in Nursing, using the reports of the Nursing Study and Research Center (CEPEn) from 1972 to 2007, and to identify which were published in indexed databases. We found 122 Master's theses, 42 of which were published, and 26 Doctoral dissertations, with 15 publications. From the year 2000 on more publications were found, with a prevalence of qualitative research. The prevalent thematic trend was nursing assistance, with surveys and validation of nursing diagnosis, as well as the other phases of the process, as the most addressed topics. Publications on the theme show gaps, especially in surveying knowledge production. Researches that study this interface may possibly qualify the practice of nursing.

  5. Nursing and nursing education in Haiti.

    PubMed

    Garfield, Richard M; Berryman, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Haiti has long had the largest proportion of people living in poverty and the highest mortality level of any country in the Americas. On January 12, 2010, the most powerful earthquake to hit Haiti in 200 years struck. Before the earthquake, half of all Haitians lacked any access to modern medical care services. Health care professionals in Haiti number around one-fourth of the world average and about one-tenth the ratio present in North America. The establishment of new primary care services in a country where half of the people had no access to modern health care prior to the earthquake requires advanced practice roles for nurses and midwives. With a high burden of infectious, parasitic, and nutritional conditions, Haiti especially needs mid-level community health workers and nurses who can train and supervise them for public health programs. As in many other developing countries, organized nursing lacks many of the management and planning skills needed to move its agenda forward. The public schools prepare 3-year diploma graduates. These programs have upgraded the curriculum little in decades and have mainly trained for hospital service. Primary care, public health program management, and patient education had often not been stressed. Specializations in midwifery and HIV care exist, while only informal programs of specialization exist in administration, surgery, and pediatrics. An advanced practice role, nonetheless, is not yet well established. Nursing has much to contribute to the recovery of Haiti and the revitalization if its health system. Professional nurses are needed in clinics and hospitals throughout the country to care for patients, including thousands in need of rehabilitation and mental health services. Haitian nursing colleagues in North America have key roles in strengthening their profession. Ways of supporting our Haitian colleagues are detailed.

  6. Clinical Nursing Records Study (Executive Summary)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-08-01

    assessments received praise for those records completed during testing, issues surrounding identification and prioritizing nursing care problems and...of inpatient treatment and the patient’s responses. Nursing documentation reflects nursing practice patterns based on planned nursing care , which, in...Nursing History/Nursing Assessment/ Nursing Care Plans); the necessity of transcribing all orders appearing on physician order sheets to allow for

  7. Primary Intraocular Lymphoma: Diagnosis and Differential Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Sen, H. Nida; Bodaghi, Bahram; Le Hoang, Phuc; Nussenblatt, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Diagnosis of PIOL can be challenging. It requires a high degree of clinical suspicion and differential diagnosis includes infectious and non-infectious etiologies particularly the common masquaraders sarcoidosis, tuberculosis, viral retinitis and syphilis. The definitive diagnosis depends on demonstration of malignant lymphoma cells in ocular specimens or CSF. Ocular specimen could include vitreous, aqueous or chorioretinal biopsy. Ocular pathologist should be consulted prior to the diagnostic procedure to help handle and process the specimen appropriately. In addition to cytology, flow cytometry, immunohistochemistry, molecular analysis and cytokines may be used as adjuncts in facilitating the diagnosis. PMID:19585354

  8. Leveraging data to transform nursing care: insights from nurse leaders.

    PubMed

    Jeffs, Lianne; Nincic, Vera; White, Peggy; Hayes, Laureen; Lo, Joyce

    2015-01-01

    A study was undertaken to gain insight into how nurse leaders are influencing the use of performance data to improve nursing care in hospitals. Two themes emerged: getting relevant, reliable, and timely data into the hands of nurses, and the leaders' ability to "connect the dots" in working with different stakeholders. Study findings may inform nurse leaders in their efforts to leverage data to transform nursing care.

  9. Fund-raising tips for nurse leaders and nurse executives.

    PubMed

    Fitzpatrick, Joyce J

    2014-01-01

    Fund-raising may be new to most nurse leaders and executives. This article focuses on dispelling the myths and mystery that surrounds nursing philanthropy. Key myths are addressed with supporting information to dispel them. Several practical tips are presented to enhance nurse leaders' involvement in philanthropy. Two recent gifts to hospital nursing departments are described as exemplars of relationship building and of nurses investing in their own future and that of the profession.

  10. Role of the School Nurse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maryland State Dept. of Health and Mental Hygiene, Baltimore.

    These guidelines on Maryland school nursing are based on recommendations of a Maryland committee composed of representatives from state and local health and education agencies, schools of nursing, the Board of Nursing, Maryland State School Health Council, directors of nursing, and a physician. The standards established by the American Nurses…

  11. Transforming Articulation Barriers in Nursing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waters, Verle

    Barriers to educational mobility for nurses have existed since the mid-1960s. In 1963, the National League for Nursing (NLN) adopted a position that ruled out articulation of any kind between associate degree in nursing (ADN) and bachelors in science in nursing (BSN) programs. In the mid-1970s, a countermovement took shape, supporting open…

  12. Quality Assurance and Nursing Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strauss, Mary Beth

    1978-01-01

    Preparation for quality assurance in nursing care must begin in basic nursing education, continue through the graduate and doctoral levels, and be provided for practicing nurses through continuing education activities, according to the author. She discusses the meaning of quality assurance and its integration into the nursing curriculum. (MF)

  13. Who Will Teach the Nurses?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaRocco, Susan A.

    2006-01-01

    In 1999, most deans of nursing schools that belonged to the American Association of Colleges of Nursing reported that they did not have a faculty shortage. By 2005, however, 75 percent of U.S. nursing schools cited faculty shortages as the major reason for denying admission to qualified students. The average age of nurse educators holding PhDs is…

  14. Nurse Aide Education in Illinois.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shea, Mary Lou

    Nurse aide education is an issue that governmental and health care agencies are addressing. Nurse aides are employed in numerous and varied health care agencies, such as hospitals, nursing homes, physician's offices, and private homes. Although there are no educational requirements for nurse aides in Illinois, there are a number of formal training…

  15. Role of the School Nurse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maryland State Dept. of Health and Mental Hygiene, Baltimore.

    These guidelines on Maryland school nursing are based on recommendations of a Maryland committee composed of representatives from state and local health and education agencies, schools of nursing, the Board of Nursing, Maryland State School Health Council, directors of nursing, and a physician. The standards established by the American Nurses…

  16. Nurse-Faculty Census, 1968.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National League for Nursing, New York, NY. Research and Development.

    This is the 1968 biennial census of nurse-faculty members teaching in nursing programs and in cooperating institutions providing clinical experiences for students in nursing. It is intended as an overview of current conditions and a basis for future estimates and planning. As of January 1968, 20,077 full-time and 3,554 part-time nurse-faculty…

  17. Reflective writing and nursing education.

    PubMed

    Craft, Melissa

    2005-02-01

    Reflective writing is a valued tool for teaching nursing students and for documentation, support, and generation of nursing knowledge among experienced nurses. Expressive or reflective writing is becoming widely accepted in both professional and lay publications as a mechanism for coping with critical incidents. This article explores reflective writing as a tool for nursing education.

  18. [Nurse's coworking to electronic medical record].

    PubMed

    Maresca, M; Gavaciuto, D; Cappelli, G

    2007-01-01

    Nephrologists need to register and look at a great number of clinical data. The use of electronic medical records may improve efficiency and reduce errors. Aim of our work is to report the experience of Villa Scassi Hospital in Genoa, where a "patient file" has been performed to improve nephrology practice management. The file contains all clinical records, laboratory and radiology data, therapy, dialysis clinics, in addition to reports of out-patients department. This system allowed a better efficiency in diagnosis and treatment of the patient. Moreover experience of nurses in employing electronic medical records is reported. A reduced number of errors was found in therapy administering, because of a only one data source for physicians and nurses.

  19. [Participated observation of nursing child health consultation].

    PubMed

    Loureiro, Fernanda Manuela; da Silva, José António Neto Ferreira; Quitério, Margarida Maria de Sousa Lourenço; Charepe, Zaida Borges

    2012-12-01

    Situation diagnosis using exploratory and descriptive scientific methodology (participant observation with descriptive statistical treatment) in order to identify nursing' practices in the area of health promotion during a nursing child health consultation. The 31 consultations observed (n = 31) showed that the majority of observations occurred in children younger than 2 years being the most discussed topic feed with predominant use of expository methodology. There was also little use of informational support and when used relate to the themes of security and nutrition. Most providers raised questions and there was limited registration of the interaction between provider and child with an expenditure averaging of 23 minutes per consultation. Given the results and reflecting about them stands out as intervention the construction of a health promotion manual with the integration of theory and evidence of good practice in this area.

  20. Critical care nursing.

    PubMed

    Dracup, K

    1987-01-01

    The research pertaining to the delivery of nursing care in the ICU was reviewed to describe: the impact of the unit structure and organization, including policies and procedures, on patients, nurses, and families; the process of critical care nursing; the outcomes of critical care nursing; some of the ethical issues germane to the care of the critically ill patient. Although these areas of inquiry are quite diverse, a number of similarities can be identified. The most obvious of the similarities was that, with few exceptions, the studies pertaining to delivery of nursing care were performed by researchers from a variety of disciplines other than nursing, including medicine, psychology, public health, and economics. In many instances, such as the studies of patients' stress experiences in ICUs, these efforts enhanced our knowledge of the phenomena and complemented or replicated the efforts of nurse researchers. Unfortunately, in some areas nurse researchers were quite absent, with the result that the studies lacked a nursing perspective. For example, the large body of knowledge related to the effects of critical care on patient outcome reflected medicine's orientation toward cure. While it is important to measure the effect of nursing care in the ICU on patient survival, the effect of nursing efforts on short- and long-term quality of life, functional status, and health maintenance is also critical and remains unknown. Nurse researchers need to build on the data base already acquired about critical care. Even more important, they need to fashion programs of research focused on the concepts central to the discipline of nursing. A second similarity relates to the increasing quality of the reported research over the past decade. In general, early descriptive studies were conducted in a single critical care unit with a small and often biased sample. These gave way to more carefully designed, multicenter studies, although lack of randomization procedures continued to be

  1. Nurse turnover: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Laureen J; O'Brien-Pallas, Linda; Duffield, Christine; Shamian, Judith; Buchan, James; Hughes, Frances; Spence Laschinger, Heather K; North, Nicola; Stone, Patricia W

    2006-02-01

    Ongoing instability in the nursing workforce is raising questions globally about the issue of nurse turnover. A comprehensive literature review was undertaken to examine the current state of knowledge about the scope of the nurse turnover problem, definitions of turnover, factors considered to be determinants of nurse turnover, turnover costs and the impact of turnover on patient, and nurse and system outcomes. Much of the research to date has focused on turnover determinants, and recent studies have provided cost estimations at the organizational level. Further research is needed to examine the impact of turnover on health system cost, and how nurse turnover influences patient and nurse outcomes.

  2. A programme for nursing ethics.

    PubMed

    Smith, S J; Davis, A J

    1985-01-01

    This article defines nursing ethics and its place within the disciplines of ethics and nursing. The current endeavours of nursing ethics are identified as: revising codes, assisting nurses to reason ethically, and establishing the nurse's role in ethical decision-making regarding ethical issues, particular clients, and society's definition of health and illness. The authors then propose the further development of nursing ethics to examine critically the ethical dimensions of nursing practice with regards to its theories, diagnostic categories, diagnostic procedures, treatment goals and treatment procedures.

  3. A qualitative study of resilience and posttraumatic stress disorder in United States ICU nurses.

    PubMed

    Mealer, Meredith; Jones, Jacqueline; Moss, Marc

    2012-09-01

    Intensive care unit (ICU) nurses are at increased risk of developing psychological problems including posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). However, there are resilient individuals who thrive and remain employed as ICU nurses for many years. The purpose of this study was to identify mechanisms employed by highly resilient ICU nurses to develop preventative therapies to obviate the development of PTSD in ICU nurses. Qualitative study using semi-structured telephone interviews with randomly selected ICU nurses in the USA. Purposive sampling was used to identify ICU nurses who were highly resilient, based on the Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale and those with a diagnosis of PTSD, based on the posttraumatic diagnostic scale. New interviews were conducted until we reached thematic saturation. Thirteen highly resilient nurses and fourteen nurses with PTSD were interviewed (n = 27). A constructivist epistemological framework was used for data analysis. Differences were identified in four major domains: worldview, social network, cognitive flexibility, and self-care/balance. Highly resilient nurses identified spirituality, a supportive social network, optimism, and having a resilient role model as characteristics used to cope with stress in their work environment. ICU nurses with a diagnosis of PTSD possessed several unhealthy characteristics including a poor social network, lack of identification with a role model, disruptive thoughts, regret, and lost optimism. Highly resilient ICU nurses utilize positive coping skills and psychological characteristics that allow them to continue working in the stressful ICU environment. These characteristics and skills may be used to develop target therapies to prevent PTSD in ICU nurses.

  4. An Integrative Review of Engaging Clinical Nurses in Nursing Research.

    PubMed

    Scala, Elizabeth; Price, Carrie; Day, Jennifer

    2016-07-01

    To review the literature for best practices for engaging clinical nurses in nursing research. Review of the research and nonresearch papers published between 2005 and 2015 that answered the evidence-based practice (EBP) question: what are the best practices for engaging clinical nursing staff in nursing research? PubMed, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), Joanna Briggs Institute, and Cochrane were searched using a combination of controlled vocabulary and key words. Nineteen papers that answered the EBP question were selected for review. It can be difficult to involve clinical nurses in research. There are multiple factors to consider when nursing leadership looks to engage clinical nurses in nursing research. Nurse leaders can take many approaches to engage clinical nurses in research. Each organization must perform its own assessment to identify areas of opportunity. Nursing leadership can take these areas of opportunity to structure a multifaceted approach to support clinical staff in the conduct and dissemination of nursing research. The evidence from this review offers EBP recommendations as well as reports on the gaps in the literature related to best practices for engaging clinical nurses in nursing research. © 2016 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  5. Doctorate in nursing practice: a survey of massachusetts nurses.

    PubMed

    DeMarco, Rosanna F; Pulcini, Joyce; Haggerty, Lois A; Tang, Trinh

    2009-01-01

    Recently, the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) resolved that a new practice degree, the doctorate in nursing practice (DNP), is to become the terminal practice degree and minimum education standard for advanced practice nurses by the year 2015(American Association of Colleges of Nursing. (2004). AACN position statement on the practice doctorate in nursing. Retrieved July 1, 2007, from http://www.aacn.nche.edu.html). The DNP will have a clinical-intensive focus. Advanced practice nurses potentially impacted by this resolution will include nurse practitioners, nurse anesthetists, nurse midwives, and clinical nurse specialists. A task force at the William F. Connell School of Nursing at Boston College conducted an electronic survey in 2006 in an attempt to understand nurses' thoughts about doctoral preparation and the interest of nurses in Massachusetts in pursuing doctoral study. A self-selected group of 376 nurses participated in the study. Nurses identified both positive and negative perceptions related to the degree's viability and practicality, with a majority (55%) preferring the DNP as an educational option.

  6. Nursing student attitudes toward statistics.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Lizy; Aktan, Nadine M

    2014-04-01

    Nursing is guided by evidence-based practice. To understand and apply research to practice, nurses must be knowledgeable in statistics; therefore, it is crucial to promote a positive attitude toward statistics among nursing students. The purpose of this quantitative cross-sectional study was to assess differences in attitudes toward statistics among undergraduate nursing, graduate nursing, and undergraduate non-nursing students. The Survey of Attitudes Toward Statistics Scale-36 (SATS-36) was used to measure student attitudes, with higher scores denoting more positive attitudes. The convenience sample was composed of 175 students from a public university in the northeastern United States. Statistically significant relationships were found among some of the key demographic variables. Graduate nursing students had a significantly lower score on the SATS-36, compared with baccalaureate nursing and non-nursing students. Therefore, an innovative nursing curriculum that incorporates knowledge of student attitudes and key demographic variables may result in favorable outcomes.

  7. My Name is Nurse.

    PubMed

    2016-05-01

    : Editor's note: From its first issue in 1900 through to the present day, AJN has unparalleled archives detailing nurses' work and lives over more than a century. These articles not only chronicle nursing's growth as a profession within the context of the events of the day, but they also reveal prevailing societal attitudes about women, health care, and human rights. Today's nursing school curricula rarely include nursing's history, but it's a history worth knowing. To this end, From the AJN Archives offers articles selected to fit today's topics and times.This month's article, from the May 1993 issue, is a tongue-in-cheek editorial by former editor-in-chief Mary B. Mallison. In it, she introduces us to the "PerceptoPhone"-an imaginary device that allows the wearer to access the thoughts of nurses. PerceptoPhones are used to educate hospital trustees on nurses' essential but often invisible abilities: to identify early warning signs of complications; teach and encourage; and carefully assess, soothe, and heal-abilities that are "hard to quantify with usual accounting methods." More than 20 years later, we still look for better ways to teach the public about nursing.

  8. Does vicarious traumatisation affect oncology nurses? A literature review.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, Helen A H; Hamill, Conal

    2007-09-01

    traumatisation is a process through which the therapist's inner experience is negatively transformed through empathic engagement with client's traumatic material [Pearlman, L.A., Saakvitne, K.W., 1995a. Treating therapists with vicarious traumatization and secondary traumatic stress disorders. In: Figley, C.R. (Ed.), Compassion Fatigue: Coping with Secondary Traumatic Stress Disorder in Those Who Treat the Traumatized. Brunner/Mazel, New York, pp. 150-177]. Trauma not only affects individuals who are primarily present, but also those with whom they discuss their experience. If an individual has been traumatised as a result of a cancer diagnosis and shares this impact with oncology nurses, there could be a risk of vicarious traumatisation in this population. However, although Thompson [2003. Vicarious traumatisation: do we adequately support traumatised staff? The Journal of Cognitive Rehabilitation 24-25] suggests that vicarious traumatisation is a broad term used for workers from any profession, it has not yet been empirically determined if oncology nurses experience vicarious traumatisation. This purpose of this paper is to introduce the concept of vicarious traumatisation and argue that it should be explored in oncology nursing. The review will highlight that empirical research in vicarious traumatisation is largely limited to the mental health professions, with a strong recommendation for the need to empirically determine whether this concept exists in oncology nursing.

  9. Child maltreatment: every nurse's business.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Julie; Bradbury-Jones, Caroline

    2015-03-18

    Every nurse has a responsibility for protecting children, even nurses who do not work directly with children. However, nurses may be reluctant to deal with child maltreatment issues because they do not want to get things wrong or make a situation worse. The aim of this article is to assist nurses in their child protection role. It describes the different types of child maltreatment, the risk factors and potential consequences. The nurse's role in recognising and responding to suspected child maltreatment is discussed.

  10. Nursing and the next millennium.

    PubMed

    Huch, M H

    1995-01-01

    On March 19, 1993, in Toronto, Canada, at Discovery International, Inc.'s, Biennnial Nurse Theorist Conference, five theorists participated in a panel discussion on: caring as an essence of nursing; the value of continuing to develop nursing theory; what constitutes nursing research; the role of advanced practice nurses. The theorists were Imogene M. King, Madeleine M. Leininger, Rosemarie Rizzo Parse, Hildegard E. Peplau, and Martha E. Rogers. Marlaine C. Smith was the moderator and presented the questions to the panel.

  11. Common metaphors in nursing ethics.

    PubMed

    Milton, Constance L

    2009-10-01

    Metaphors are literary comparisons that are used to create new meaning and insight for concepts, ideas, and situations found in a discipline. This author describes some common moral metaphors used in the discipline of nursing and specifically in situations of nursing ethics. New insights and questions for common usage are offered for the metaphors from a nursing theoretical perspective. Implications for nursing as a discipline are incorporated and discussion points for the future practice of nursing are illuminated.

  12. Nursing Practice Environment and Registered Nurses' Job Satisfaction in Nursing Homes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choi, JiSun; Flynn, Linda; Aiken, Linda H.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Recruiting and retaining registered nurses (RNs) in nursing homes is problematic, and little research is available to guide efforts to make nursing homes a more attractive practice environment for RNs. The purpose of this study was to examine relationships between aspects of the nursing practice environment and job satisfaction among RNs…

  13. Nursing Practice Environment and Registered Nurses' Job Satisfaction in Nursing Homes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choi, JiSun; Flynn, Linda; Aiken, Linda H.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Recruiting and retaining registered nurses (RNs) in nursing homes is problematic, and little research is available to guide efforts to make nursing homes a more attractive practice environment for RNs. The purpose of this study was to examine relationships between aspects of the nursing practice environment and job satisfaction among RNs…

  14. The divergent opinions of nurses, nurse managers and nurse directors: the case in Lebanon.

    PubMed

    Badr, Lina; Rizk, Ursula; Farha, Randa

    2010-03-01

    The present study provides an overview of the status of the nursing profession in Lebanon and compares and contrasts the opinions of directors, nurse supervisors/managers and nurses regarding the nursing profession and the workplace. There are limited publications concerning the working conditions of nurses in Lebanon, and no studies on the views of directors, supervisors/managers and nurses regarding the priorities of the nursing profession. Such data are necessary to build a sound theoretical basis on which recommendations for improving the nursing profession in Lebanon are made as well as to compare and contrast cross cultural findings. Data were collected from 45 hospitals using a mixed methods design. Qualitative data was obtained from 45 nursing directors whereas quantitative data were collected from 64 nursing supervisors and 624 nurses. Similarities and differences in the opinions of nurses, nurse supervisors/managers and nurse directors regarding critical issues for the nursing profession are discussed and contrasted. Nurses are more likely to be satisfied and committed to their profession when they feel that their opinions are being heard and that their work environment promotes professional advancement.

  15. The SIPI for measuring complexity in nursing care: evaluation study.

    PubMed

    Galimberti, Stefania; Rebora, Paola; Di Mauro, Stefania; D'Ilio, Ilaria; Viganò, Roberto; Moiset, Chantal; Valsecchi Maria, Grazia

    2012-03-01

    The traditional model for nursing staff management widely used in Italian hospitals assumes that diagnosis determines the amount of nursing required, but this has been widely criticized. In order to quantify and monitor the fluctuation of the complexity in nursing care, a questionnaire, called SIPI (Sistema Informativo della Performance Infermieristica), that is based on the care needs expressed by the patients, has been proposed in the Monza Hospital. A group of trained nurses were asked to indicate their own perception of the level of nursing day-care complexity provided to each patient and then to complete the SIPI. The Monza Hospital coordinated this multi-centre study that involved 25 Hospitals of North Italy. Each hospital contributed with a minimum of three units, at least one for each area of intensity of clinical care, as defined by health regulators. All adult in-patients being in the units from at least 24h were included in the survey. Psychiatric wards, neonatology, intensive and semi-intensive care wards were non considered. A group of nurses trained with the use of SIPI completed the questionnaires based on the nursing file of performed activities. Before filling the questionnaire, the nurses were asked to indicate their perception of the level of complexity of the day-care provided to each patient. In order to calculate the SIPI scores that discriminate different nurse complexity levels, a ROC analysis and the multinomial logistic regression model were used, considering the perceived complexity as the standard of reference. The nursing day-care complexity was measured in 115 wards, for a total of 17,803 completed questionnaires. Nursing complexity was roughly the same in areas of different intensity of clinical care, both according to perception and as measured by SIPI. A cut-off of 49.2 was identified as optimal to distinguish two classes of complexity with a good performance (80% of specificity, 85% of sensitivity). The SIPI was shown to be a

  16. [Diagnosis and differential diagnosis of rinderpest].

    PubMed

    Ilchmann, G

    1976-01-01

    Starting from the clinical symptoms and the pathological-anatomical changes hints are given on the diagnosis of the rinderpest and how to distinguish it from other diseases. The paper discusses the differential diagnosis of the rinderpest with respect to mucosal disease, malignent catarrhal fever, Nairobi sheep disease, salmonellosis, pasteurellosis, and coccidiosis.

  17. The quality of paper-based versus electronic nursing care plan in Australian aged care homes: A documentation audit study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ning; Yu, Ping; Hailey, David

    2015-08-01

    The nursing care plan plays an essential role in supporting care provision in Australian aged care. The implementation of electronic systems in aged care homes was anticipated to improve documentation quality. Standardized nursing terminologies, developed to improve communication and advance the nursing profession, are not required in aged care practice. The language used by nurses in the nursing care plan and the effect of the electronic system on documentation quality in residential aged care need to be investigated. To describe documentation practice for the nursing care plan in Australian residential aged care homes and to compare the quantity and quality of documentation in paper-based and electronic nursing care plans. A nursing documentation audit was conducted in seven residential aged care homes in Australia. One hundred and eleven paper-based and 194 electronic nursing care plans, conveniently selected, were reviewed. The quantity of documentation in a care plan was determined by the number of phrases describing a resident problem and the number of goals and interventions. The quality of documentation was measured using 16 relevant questions in an instrument developed for the study. There was a tendency to omit 'nursing problem' or 'nursing diagnosis' in the nursing process by changing these terms (used in the paper-based care plan) to 'observation' in the electronic version. The electronic nursing care plan documented more signs and symptoms of resident problems and evaluation of care than the paper-based format (48.30 vs. 47.34 out of 60, P<0.01), but had a lower total mean quality score. The electronic care plan contained fewer problem or diagnosis statements, contributing factors and resident outcomes than the paper-based system (P<0.01). Both types of nursing care plan were weak in documenting measurable and concrete resident outcomes. The overall quality of documentation content for the nursing process was no better in the electronic system than in

  18. Nurses in the Boardroom.

    PubMed

    Hill, Karen S

    2010-10-01

    This department highlights nursing leaders who have demonstrated the ability to inspire and lead change. This competency is seen in the ability to create, structure, and implement organizational change through strategic vision, risk taking, and effective communication. Each article showcases a project of a nurse leader who demonstrates change in a variety of environments ranging from acute care hospitals to home care and alternative practice settings. Included are several "lessons learned" applicable to multiple settings that provide insight for other nurses in executive practice.

  19. Presentation skills for nurses.

    PubMed

    Foulkes, Mark

    2015-02-20

    This article emphasises the importance of effective presentation skills. Such skills allow nurses to share knowledge and expertise and to communicate clearly in a range of workplace scenarios. Nurses are increasingly being asked to present in formal and informal situations, such as conferences, poster presentations, job interviews, case reports and ward-based teaching. This article explores the principles underpinning the development of these skills, discusses the situations in which they could be applied and demonstrates how nurses might improve and develop as presenters.

  20. Compassion fatigue in nurses.

    PubMed

    Yoder, Elizabeth A

    2010-11-01

    Compassion fatigue, trigger situations, and coping strategies were investigated in hospital and home care nurses. The Professional Quality of Life Scale measured compassion fatigue, compassion satisfaction, and burnout. Narrative questions elicited trigger situations and coping strategies. Compassion fatigue scores were significantly different between nurses who worked 8- or 12-hour shifts. Fifteen percent of the participants had scores indicating risk of the compassion fatigue. There were significant differences in compassion satisfaction, depending on the unit worked and time as a nurse. The most common category of trigger situations was caring for the patient. Work-related and personal coping strategies were identified. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Nursing in Israel.

    PubMed

    Ehrenfeld, Mally; Itzhaki, Michal; Baumann, Steven L

    2007-10-01

    Nurses in Israel struggle with many of the same problems faced by nurses in other parts of the world, such as increased use of technology, overwhelming amounts of information, and demands for high quality of services to larger numbers of people within tighter budgets. In addition to the aging of the general population, the country has welcomed large numbers of immigrants. The nation's expenditures for healthcare and nursing education have, at times, had to take a back seat to the government's efforts to house new immigrants, to relocate groups, and to defend the nation against politically motivated violence and attacks. All of this is in the context of regional conflicts and international debates.

  2. Superstitions among perioperative nurses.

    PubMed

    Mandell, David L; Claypool, Margie L; Kay, David J

    2005-05-01

    A descriptive study was conducted using a mailed questionnaire to determine the prevalence of work-related superstitions among perioperative nurses. Data analysis included the two-sample t test for continuous data and the two-sided Fisher's exact test for binary data. Study results indicate that although only 23% of respondents view themselves as "generally superstitious," specific work-related superstitions are widespread. Belief in specific superstitions was not statistically related to age or number of years as a perioperative nurse. An analysis of the literature on medical workplace superstitions helps to elucidate possible underlying explanations for the phenomenon of nursing superstitions.

  3. Crisis intervention for nurses.

    PubMed

    Chase, Emily

    2013-06-01

    Cancer diagnoses and treatments can be crisis-causing events that overwhelm the usual coping abilities of patients and their families. Oncology nurses constantly are observing and attending to patients' diverse needs, ranging from biomedical to emotional, social, and psychological. Nurses have the chance to be first responders in times of patient crises, as they are in the position to recognize the crisis, respond effectively, and transform the crisis into a pivotal learning experience. This article discusses a way to think about patient and family crises that empowers nurses to respond in a manner appropriate to the cultural context and respectful of the individual space of the patient.

  4. Nurse Managers Speak Out About Disruptive Nurse-to-Nurse Relationships.

    PubMed

    Moore, Linda Weaver; Sublett, Cynthia; Leahy, Cathy

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore nurse managers' (NMs') perceptions regarding disruptive nurse-to-nurse relationships. Nurse managers play a pivotal role in creating and sustaining healthy practice environments. They must understand how to recognize and confront disruptive nurse relationships that can threaten the health of their units. A qualitative study design using researcher-participant interviews of 13 NMs from 5 institutions provided data regarding NMs' views on nurse relationships. Nurse managers reported how they became aware of disruptive nurse relationships, their strategies for dealing with those relationships, and the impact that confronting disruptive relationships had on them personally. Findings can be helpful to NMs who are faced with addressing disruptive nurse-to-nurse relationships as they endeavor to create and sustain healthy work environments.

  5. Comparing nurse managers and nurses' perceptions of nurses' self-leadership during capacity building.

    PubMed

    Jooste, Karien; Cairns, Lindi

    2014-05-01

    This paper compares the perceptions of nurse managers and nurses about self-leadership of professional nurses while taking ownership of capacity building during unit management. The Nursing Strategy for South Africa states that the competency of nurses is dependent upon factors that lead to capacity building. A quantitative design was followed by conducting a survey. The target population included nurse managers and professional nurses working at an academic public hospital in the Gauteng Province of South Africa. The findings indicate shortcomings in relation to advising professional nurses about self-direction while taking ownership of their daily pressures and stresses associated with unit management. Professional nurses should develop their confidence by focusing on their self-leadership strengths when managing a unit. Recommendations are made to promote self-leadership while taking ownership of nurses during capacity building of unit management. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Diagnosis Related Groups as Indicators of Nurse Staffing Requirements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-07-01

    Conceptual Equation ............................ ............ 6 2. Revised Conceptual Equation .. ................................ 34 LIST OF TABLES...involving intra-hospital variable itaffing have been developed in the last twenty 11 years. These staffing systems are based on the intencity or amount of... equation to represent this concept (See Figure 1). The frequency of each DRG in the -ease mix would be evaluated and adjusted for any anticipated changes

  7. Relating Nursing Care Requirements to Diagnosis Related Groups (DRGs)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-10-31

    block, other and unspecified 426.50 Bundle branch block, unspecified 426.51 Right buadle branch block and left posterior fascicular block 426.52 Right...bundle branch block and left anterior fascicular block 426.53 Other bilateral bundle branch block * Nu ’ti ing Caie Re𔃾uiremeriti 4 *3 426.54...Paroxysmal ventricular tachycardia 427.2 Paroxysmal tachycardia, unspecified 427.3 Atrial fibrillation and flutter 427.31 Atrial fibrillation 427.32 Atrial

  8. Can nurses trust nurses in recovery reentering the workplace?

    PubMed

    Cook, Lisa M

    2013-03-01

    To examine the ability of working direct care nurses to trust nurses in recovery from substance use (or abuse) disorders (SUDs) reentering the workplace. A researcher-designed quantitative survey was used to gather data. Nurses said that they've worked with a nurse with SUD at some time in their career. Nurses are willing to trust their recovering colleagues and strongly agree that nurses in recovery should be allowed to return to the healthcare profession. Many nurses don't know how to provide help or where to locate support such as assistance programs or alternative-to-discipline programs for their impaired colleagues. This study adds to the body of knowledge in the crucial issue of addiction in nursing. Healthcare institutions struggle with best practices in assisting nurses in recovery. By examining underlying issues such as trust, a better understanding of how to implement educational programs may emerge.

  9. Wanted-nurses. Ethical issues and the nursing shortage.

    PubMed

    Erlen, Judith A

    2004-01-01

    The persistent nursing shortage is challenging the values and beliefs of the nursing profession and causing nurses to ask how they can fulfill their ethical responsibilities to patients when there are an insufficient number and a maldistribution of nurses. Nurses are expressing job dissatisfaction, experiencing moral distress, and wondering about their inability to provide quality patient care. In this article, the author addresses the commitment to care for patients and the ethical dilemma with which nurses are grappling: caring for self versus caring for others. Recommendations for possible action include reenvisioning the profession of nursing, empowering nurses, providing support, and restructuring the work environment. Taken together, these actions have the potential to reduce the moral distress that nurses are experiencing and to enable them to honor their commitment to patient care.

  10. Swedish forensic nursing care: nurses' professional contributions and educational needs.

    PubMed

    Rask, Mikael; Aberg, Jonas

    2002-10-01

    Nurses (registered nurses, RN, and licensed mental nurses, LMN) working in five Swedish forensic psychiatric units filled in a questionnaire designed for general psychiatric nursing, but modified for forensic use. In this report, data regarding how nursing care could contribute to improved care and the organizational changes needed and what knowledge the nurses need, in order to be able to meet the demands in the future, were analysed by means of content analysis. The salient findings were: (i) an interpersonal patient-nurse relationship based on trust, empathy, respect and responsibility for the patients' personal resources and knowledge seems to be the essence of nursing care and a way to improve care; and (ii) the nurses' educational needs emanate from different treatment modalities, how to perform different treatments, how to establish developing relationships and in-service training adapted to the ward-specific problems.

  11. Nursing home work practices and nursing assistants' job satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Bishop, Christine E; Squillace, Marie R; Meagher, Jennifer; Anderson, Wayne L; Wiener, Joshua M

    2009-10-01

    To estimate the impact of nursing home work practices, specifically compensation and working conditions, on job satisfaction of nursing assistants employed in nursing homes. Data are from the 2004 National Nursing Assistant Survey, responses by the nursing assistants' employers to the 2004 National Nursing Home Survey, and county-level data from the Area Resource File. Multinomial logistic regression was used to estimate effects of compensation and working conditions on nursing assistants' overall job satisfaction, controlling for personal characteristics and local labor market characteristics. Wages, benefits, and job demands, measured by the ratio of nursing assistant hours per resident day, were associated with job satisfaction. Consistent with previous studies, job satisfaction was greater when nursing assistants felt respected and valued by their employers and had good relationships with supervisors. Nursing assistants were more satisfied when they had enough time to complete their work, when their work was challenging, when they were not subject to mandatory overtime, and where food was not delivered to residents on trays. This is the first investigation of nursing assistant job satisfaction using a nationally representative sample of nursing assistants matched to information about their employing nursing homes. The findings corroborate results of previous studies in showing that compensation and working conditions that provide respect, good relationships with supervisors, and better staffing levels are important to nursing assistant job satisfaction.

  12. Emotional intelligence and nursing performance among nursing students.

    PubMed

    Beauvais, Audrey M; Brady, Noreen; O'Shea, Eileen R; Griffin, Mary T Quinn

    2011-05-01

    Some scholars have proposed that the educational preparation of nurses can be improved by incorporating emotional intelligence lessons into the nursing curricula. However, the relationship between emotional intelligence and nursing performance in nursing students is unknown. The purpose of the study was to examine this relationship among nursing students. A descriptive correlational design with non-probability sampling methods of 87 nursing students in a university setting was conducted. The variables of focus were emotional intelligence and nursing performance. Emotional intelligence was measured with the Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test (MSCEIT). Nursing performance was measured using the Six Dimension Scale of Nursing Performance (6-D Scale). The sample was predominately Caucasian (91%), female (93%), mean age 24 years. The mean score for emotional intelligence was 0.53, SD ± 0.06 indicating moderate emotional intelligence. The mean score for nursing performance was 3.14, SD ± 0.40 indicating moderate nursing performance. Emotional intelligence was related to nursing performance. Four of the six nursing performance subscale scores were significantly correlated with the total emotional intelligence scores. Implications for nursing education and clinical practice are discussed.

  13. Taking personal responsibility: Nurses' and assistant nurses' experiences of good nursing practice in psychiatric inpatient care.

    PubMed

    Gabrielsson, Sebastian; Sävenstedt, Stefan; Olsson, Malin

    2016-10-01

    Therapeutic nurse-patient relationships are considered essential for good nursing practice in psychiatric inpatient care. Previous research suggests that inpatient care fails to fulfil patients' expectations in this regard, and that nurses might experience the reality of inpatient care as an obstruction. The aim of the present study was to explore nurses' and assistant nurses' experiences of good nursing practice in the specific context of psychiatric inpatient care. Qualitative interviews were conducted with 12 skilled, relationship-oriented nurses and assistant nurses in order to explore their experiences with nursing practice related to psychiatric inpatient care. Interviews were transcribed and analysed using an interpretive descriptive approach. Findings describe good nursing practice as a matter of nurses and assistant nurses taking personal responsibility for their actions and for the individual patient as a person. Difficulties in providing dignified nursing care and taking personal responsibility cause them to experience feelings of distress and frustration. Shared values and nursing leadership supports being moral and treating patients with respect, having enough time supports being present and connecting with patients, and working as a part of a competent team with critical daily discussions and diversity supports being confident and building trust. The findings suggest that taking personal responsibility is integral to good nursing practice. If unable to improve poor circumstances, nurses might be forced to promote their own survival by refuting or redefining their responsibility. Nurses need to prioritize being with patients and gain support in shaping their own nursing practice. Nursing leadership should provide moral direction and defend humanistic values. © 2016 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  14. A comparison of the caring behaviours of nursing students and registered nurses: implications for nursing education.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuh-Shiow; Yu, Wen-Pin; Yang, Bao-Huan; Liu, Chin-Fang

    2016-11-01

    To compare the respective views of nursing students and registered nurses on caring behaviours. Research has indicated that nursing includes not only technical skills and professional knowledge but also the expression of care. In addition to nursing care, nurses demonstrate the acts of supporting, negotiating, reinforcing and transforming. However, little research simultaneously investigates the caring behaviours of nursing students and registered nurses. A cross-sectional study was conducted. A total of 657 subjects participated in this study. The research tool was a self-administered structured questionnaire. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics, one-way analysis of variance, t-test and chi-square test. The results showed that the most important caring behaviour is 'knowing the patient', while the least is 'advocating for the patient', which includes caring behaviours to respect the patient's and family's best interests, and voicing for them, possibly because this behaviour is more difficult for nurses to practice in the Taiwanese culture. Moreover, there was no significant difference in the caring behaviours between nursing students and registered nurses. However, age was found to be a significant difference in the caring behaviours of nursing students and registered nurses. Caring behaviour is essential in clinical practice. Based on the results, this study suggested that role models should be provided to nursing students to develop proper caring behaviours. Nursing faculty can boost nursing students' interests in learning caring behaviours by incorporating diverse teaching strategies to enhance the effectiveness of caring behaviours. Much attention should be focused on education about awareness of caring behaviour for both nursing students and nursing staff. This study addressed that nursing administrators and faculty members should emphasise the importance of the essence of caring. Consequently, nursing curricula and training of nurses need to be

  15. Amblyopia: Lazy Eye Diagnosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Plastic Surgery Center Laser Surgery Education Center Redmond Ethics Center Global Ophthalmology Guide Academy Publications EyeNet Ophthalmology Information for: International Ophthalmologists Media Medical Students Patients and Public Technicians and Nurses ...

  16. Nurse-patient communication barriers in Iranian nursing.

    PubMed

    Anoosheh, M; Zarkhah, S; Faghihzadeh, S; Vaismoradi, M

    2009-06-01

    Providing effective communication with patients is an essential aspect of nursing care. Understanding the barriers that inhibit nurse-patient communication can provide an opportunity to eliminate them. To investigate nurse-patient and environment-related communication barriers perceived by patients and nurses in Iranian nursing. A descriptive survey was carried out in three randomly selected educational hospitals in a large urban city in Iran. Data were collected by questionnaire; the study sample consisted of 61 patients and 75 nurses. Participants were asked to rate the importance of each communication barriers item. Finally, data were analysed using descriptive statistics, and to compare the perceived importance of communication barriers between patients and nurses, item means were calculated and the t-test for independent samples was applied. Similarities and differences between the two groups were identified. According to nurses' views, 'heavy nursing workload', 'hard nursing tasks' and 'lack of welfare facilities for nurses' were the main communication barriers. From patients' views, 'unfamiliarity of nurses with dialect', 'having contagious diseases' and 'sex differences between nurses and patients' were determined as the main communication barriers. The shared communication barriers were 'age difference', 'social class difference' and 'having contagious diseases'. It can be concluded that nursing managers and healthcare system planners should focus on eliminating or modifying the barriers stated by the two groups, particularly the shared ones. It is suggested that understanding the cultural aspects of nurse-patient communication barriers in various contexts can help nurses. The study relied on self-report by a limited sample of nurses and patients. The responses should now be tested by a larger sample and then by empirical research into actual practice in order to test whether the nurses' and patients' perceived ideas of communication barriers are

  17. Quality Evaluation of Nursing Observation Based on a Survey of Nursing Documents Using NursingNAVI.

    PubMed

    Tsuru, Satoko; Omori, Miho; Inoue, Manami; Wako, Fumiko

    2016-01-01

    We have identified three foci of the nursing observation and nursing action respectively. Using these frameworks, we have developed the structured knowledge model for a number of diseases and medical interventions. We developed this structure based NursingNAVI® contents collaborated with some quality centred hospitals. Authors analysed the nursing care documentations of post-gastrectomy patients in light of the standardized nursing care plan in the "NursingNAVI®" developed by ourselves and revealed the "failure to observe" and "failure to document", which leaded to the volatility of the patients' data, conditions and some situation. This phenomenon should have been avoided if nurses had employed a standardized nursing care plan. So, we developed thinking process support system for planning, delivering, recording and evaluating in daily nursing using NursingNAVI® contents. It is important to identify the problem of the volatility of the patients' data, conditions and some situation. We developed a survey tool of nursing documents using NursingNAVI® Content for quality evaluation of nursing observation. We recommended some hospitals to use this survey tool. Fifteen hospitals participated the survey using this tool. It is estimated that the volatilizing situation. A hospital which don't participate this survey, knew the result. So the hospital decided to use NursingNAVI® contents in HIS. It was suggested that the system has availability for nursing OJT and time reduction of planning and recording without volatilizing situation.

  18. The relationship between cancer patients' perception of nursing care and nursing attitudes towards nursing profession.

    PubMed

    Coban, Gulay Ipek; Yurdagul, Gulistan

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the patients' perceptions of nursing care with different types of cancer in Turkey and its relationship with nursing attitudes towards nursing profession. An exploratory approach utilizing cross-sectional design with a structured questionnaire, administered to patients nurses a face-to-face, with specific questions about demographic and health status and two standardized scales: Patient Perception of Hospital Experience with Nursing Care (PPHEN) and Attitude Scale for Nursing Profession (ASNP). This study was conducted at the Research and Application Hospital of Ataturk University in Erzurum, Turkey with a convenience sample of 100 patients who were discharged from medical and radiation oncology clinics and 30 nurses that give care to these patients. It was found that patients' satisfaction had low levels with nursing care and similarly the nurses' attitudes from nursing profession were negative. There was a high correlation between the scales. The nurses' attitudes towards nursing profession are affecting the nursing care of patients' perception with cancer. We suggest that the researchers must be evaluating nurse's attitudes when they determine the patient perceptions of nursing care.

  19. The pediatric nephrology nurse as clinical care coordinator.

    PubMed

    Frank, R

    1997-06-01

    The discipline of pediatric nephrology addresses a wide range of conditions of varying severity. The most benign conditions include orthostatic proteinuria, and thin basement nephropathy. The most challenging diagnosis in the field is chronic renal failure, particularly if the patient is an infant. Nurses trained in pediatric nephrology provide care to this entire spectrum of patients within the context of their family. The varied responsibilities and specialized training of the pediatric nephrology nurse as described in this article can serve as a prototype for the independent role of clinical care coordinator.

  20. The drama of nursing.

    PubMed

    Holmes, C A

    1992-08-01

    This exploratory paper considers a few possibilities for conceiving nursing as a form of aesthetic praxis. More specifically, drawing on the works of Erving Goffman on dramaturgy, and Elizabeth Burns on theatre, it makes some suggestions concerning nursing as a form of dramatic performance, and briefly attempts to relate this to concepts of praxis drawn from the writings of Hannah Arendt and critical social theorists. In contrast to Goffman's dramaturgy, which stresses the artifice of social relations and suggests a cynical view of human interactions, a critical theory of dramatic praxis introduces a normative dimension in which performance may become self-realizing and emancipatory as it aspires to the status of aesthetic praxis. Conceived in such terms, nursing practice becomes a powerful form of self-expression which has the potential to become liberating for the nurse and the patient.

  1. Certified nurse-midwife

    MedlinePlus

    ... who also have a chronic illness. SCOPE OF PRACTICE The nurse-midwife is educated and trained to provide a broad ... MD, Howe C. The DNP and entry into midwifery practice: an analysis. J Midwifery Womens Health . 2007;52( ...

  2. [Products of nursing care].

    PubMed

    Coelho, Maria José

    2009-01-01

    The idea is to think about the knowledge and the learning involved in nursing care, its technologies, the health-disease process and its determinants, as well as the care as a product. From 1980 to 1992, 544.357 hospital beds were occupied and 19,6 million hospitalizations; therefore, 544,357 or 19.6 million of delivered care. This consideration emerged from the Research Group Care/Nursing Care from the Anna Nery Nursing School subsidized by Certeau's concepts of daily care and concepts of care practices, care, and client, for the analysis of the constitutive elements in nursing care. The knowledge and learning construction points to the creation of products such as books/chapters, protocols, new papers, agendas, DVDs, CDs, thesis, and dissertations. The way of caring contribute to the development of a series of products, built on a daily basis.

  3. The future of nursing.

    PubMed

    Moores, Y

    1999-01-01

    The White paper, "The New NHS, Modern-Dependable" has marked a turning point for the National Health Service and Nursing, replacing the internal market with integrated care, and sets out a vision of health service that meets the full range of patients' needs in all care settings. Assuring quality is an underpinning theme of the White paper, with nursing having a vital role in driving this agenda forward. Quality encompasses the environment of care, the professionalism, skill and compassion of staff, the effectiveness of treatments and respect and dignity of patients. This is an exciting time for nursing with many challenges, as the recognition and value for nursing grows. The profession has the ability to rise to these challenges and make a real difference to people's health and well being.

  4. Nursing and spirituality.

    PubMed

    Hussey, Trevor

    2009-04-01

    Those matters that are judged to be spiritual are seen as especially valuable and important. For this reason it is claimed that nurses need to be able to offer spiritual care when appropriate and, to aid them in this, nurse theorists have discussed the nature of spirituality. In a recent debate John Paley has argued that nurses should adopt a naturalistic stance which would enable them to employ the insights of modern science. Barbara Pesut has criticized this thesis, especially as it is applied to palliative care. This paper re-examines this debate with particular attention to the meaning of 'spirituality' and the justification for accepting spiritual and religious theories. It is argued that when we take into consideration the great diversity among religious and spiritual ideas, the lack of rational means of deciding between them when they conflict, and the practicalities of nursing, we find that a spiritual viewpoint is less useful than a naturalistic one, when offering palliative care.

  5. Dysthanasia: nursing professionals' perception.

    PubMed

    de Menezes, Milene Barcellos; Selli, Lucilda; de Souza Alves, Joseane

    2009-01-01

    Dysthanasia means slow and painful death without quality of life. This study aimed to know whether nurses identify dysthanasia as part of the final process of the lives of terminal patients hospitalized at an adult ICU. This is an exploratory-qualitative study. Data were collected through semi-structured interviews with ten nurses with at least one year of experience in an ICU, and interpreted through content analysis. Results indicate that nurses understand and identify dysthanasia, do not agree with it and recognize elements of orthonasia as the adequate procedure for terminal patients. We conclude that nurses interpret dysthanasia as extending life with pain and suffering, while terminal patients are submitted to futile treatments that do not benefit them. They also identify dysthanasia using elements of orthonasia to explain it.

  6. [Nursing care wall planning].

    PubMed

    Moreau, Véronique

    2013-01-01

    Nursing care wall planners are not a tool for assessing workload, but a means of providing coherence and individualised monitoring of care. Its application is focused not only on team organisation, but also on the patient's needs.

  7. Administrators: Nursing Home Administrator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahl, Anne

    1976-01-01

    Responsibilities, skills needed, training needed, earnings, employment outlook, and sources of additional information are outlined for the administrator who holds the top management job in a nursing home. (JT)

  8. [Associationism and nursing].

    PubMed

    Martínez Riera, José Ramón

    2009-01-01

    Author personal reflection on the importance of association in the nurse profession as one of the most important tools of development; also that notices the necessity to use mass media like bridge of connection with the society.

  9. Body Lice Diagnosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Treatment FAQs Malathion FAQs Epidemiology & Risk Factors Disease Biology Diagnosis Treatment Prevention & Control Resources for Health Professionals ... Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) Epidemiology & Risk Factors Disease Biology Diagnosis Treatment Prevention & Control Resources for Health Professionals ...

  10. Pubic "Crab" Lice Diagnosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Treatment FAQs Malathion FAQs Epidemiology & Risk Factors Disease Biology Diagnosis Treatment Prevention & Control Resources for Health Professionals ... Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) Epidemiology & Risk Factors Disease Biology Diagnosis Treatment Prevention & Control Resources for Health Professionals ...

  11. [Endoscopic diagnosis of enterobiasis].

    PubMed

    Johansen, N; Petersen, H D

    2000-02-28

    This article describes two cases of worm-infestation with symptomatology, diagnosis and treatment. The cases are discussed in respect to the other cases in the literature emphasizing symptomatology and diagnosis by endoscopy.

  12. Prenatal diagnosis of achondrogenesis.

    PubMed

    Golbus, M S; Hall, B D; Filly, R A; Poskanzer, L B

    1977-09-01

    Severe rhizomelic and mesomelic dwarfism was demonstrated in a 20-week gestation fetus by amniography. A systematic progressive approach to prenatal diagnosis in the absence of a definitive diagnosis and the use of contrast radiography is discussed.

  13. Leadership and ethics in nurse-nurse relationships.

    PubMed

    Milton, Constance L

    2009-04-01

    Qualities of nursing leadership may be reflected in the patterns of relating illuminated through communications between interdependent members of a discipline and interdisciplinary professional healthcare relationships. Authority and responsibility in leading-following reside with the designated leader. However, there is power with person in situation with the ever-present possibility of conflict. The author in this column will begin a discussion of conflict in nurse-nurse relationships and offer questions for straight thinking regarding the ethics of leading-following situations with nurse-nurse relationships from a humanbecoming nursing theoretical perspective.

  14. The impact and perception of nursing certification in pediatric nursing.

    PubMed

    Straka, Kristen L; Ambrose, Heather L; Burkett, Marnie; Capan, Michelle; Flook, Donna; Evangelista, Tonya; Houck, Patty; Lukanski, Amy; Schenkel, Kathleen; Thornton, Michelle

    2014-01-01

    Nursing certification is an assessment and formal recognition of specialized knowledge, and is awarded through achievement of standards identified by a nursing specialty (Niebuhr & Biel, 2007). This recognition is a method of not only assessing competency, but knowledge and skills, and has been linked to an increase in patient satisfaction and nurse retention (Kleinpell, 2009). For these reasons, a heightened focus has been on identifying the value of nursing certification and outcomes related to patient care. This study explored nurse perception of certification and measured response to a high fidelity simulated scenario by certified and non-certified pediatric nurses to a deteriorating patient through simulation and self-assessment. © 2014.

  15. Deep nursing: a thoughtful, co-created nursing process.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, Colin

    2017-03-30

    This article examines some of the challenges in nursing practice experienced by patients and nurses in the UK and Ireland, and considers some of the associated stressors in the system. Nurses must respond to these challenges by crafting their own practice, and the article offers a blueprint for developing personal nursing practice through acceptance, paying detailed attention to patients, taking time with patients and personal reflection. It draws on innovations in learning disability practice to suggest that care should be jointly thought through and co-created by patients and nurses, and that this process of thoughtful engagement constitutes 'deep nursing'.

  16. The link between nursing discourses and nurses' silence: implications for a knowledge-based discourse for nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Canam, Connie J

    2008-01-01

    Much emphasis has been placed on the importance of nurses' articulating what they do to counteract the invisibility of nursing practice. Yet there has been minimal focus on why nurses are silent. This article explores the link between technical and caring discourses and nurses' silence and suggests an alternative discourse that conceptualizes nursing as a knowledge-driven enterprise that shifts the focus from what nurses do to what nurses know by promoting nurses' practice knowledge as a language for articulating their practice.

  17. Why history matters to nursing.

    PubMed

    Holme, Annie

    2015-05-01

    This paper proposes that poor knowledge and understanding of the history of nursing particularly in the UK influences the media and public analysis of nursing practice. Comparing reports of current poor practice with a 'golden age' of nursing in the past undermines public confidence in today's nursing and nurse education and has the potential to lead to simplistic and flawed policy decisions in response. The lack of detailed knowledge of past nursing practice, experience and values suggests the need for more historical research in this field. A greater critical understanding of nursing history could strengthen and enrich nursing identity and further develop critical thinking skills in nursing students. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Missouri nurses' bioterrorism preparedness.

    PubMed

    Rebmann, Terri; Mohr, Lisa Buettner

    2008-09-01

    Nurses are the largest group of healthcare providers and will be at the forefront during a response to a bioterrorism attack in the U.S. However, nurses' bioterrorism risk perceptions and their participation in bioterrorism preparedness activities, such as bioterrorism-related exercises or drills, have not been evaluated. We mailed a survey to all members of the Missouri Nurses Association in July 2006, consisting of 1,528 registered nurses. The instrument measured risk perception, perceived susceptibility, perceived seriousness, bioterrorism education received, participation in exercises/drills, and personal response plan thoroughness. The response rate was 31% (474/1,528). Most respondents believe that a bioterrorism attack will occur in the U.S. (82.3%; n = 390), but few (21.3%; n = 101) believe that one will occur in their community. The majority of nurses reported that they believe that a bioterrorism attack would have serious consequences (96.1%, n = 448), including having a serious impact on U.S. citizens' safety (90.7%, n = 446) and on their own safety (84.3%, n = 379). Most (60%, n = 284) reported that they had not received any bioterrorism-related education nor participated in any drills/exercises (82.7%, n = 392). Of those who had received education, most had participated in 3 or fewer programs and in only 1 drill. Few nurses (3.6%, n = 15) reported having all aspects of a personal bioterrorism response plan; approximately 20% (19.4%, n = 81) did not have any components of a plan. Most of the registered nurses in Missouri who were surveyed are not receiving bioterrorism education, participating in bioterrorism exercises, or developing thorough personal response plans. Nurses need to be aware of and encouraged to participate in the many education and training opportunities on bioterrorism and infectious disease disasters.

  19. [Nursing care in prison].

    PubMed

    Aujard, Ségolène; de Brisoult, Béatrice; Broussard, Daniel; Petitclerc-Roche, Solenne; Lefort, Hugues

    2016-03-01

    In France, nurses practising in the prison environment work in a health care unit, for somatic care, or in a regional medical-psychological unit for large facilities and psychological care. These units belong to the regional hospitals. Located at the heart of the prison, they cater for prisoner-patients. On the frontline, the nurse has specific autonomy and responsibility in this unique context.

  20. [The diagnosis artifice].

    PubMed

    Lifshitz, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    The clinical diagnosis is considered the cornerstone in the decisions making process, since it has various functions, including the executive. However, the diagnosis is not only a goal by itself, but a mean to help patients. It is not enough to identify how the disease which ails the patient is called; the diagnosis must be individualized as much as possible in each case, for the mere mention of the diagnosis can mean a wide variety of problems.