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Sample records for nursing module enm

  1. [Mechanism of action for deep brain stimulation and electrical neuro-network modulation (ENM)].

    PubMed

    Okun, Michael S; Oyama, Genko

    2013-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) has become an important treatment option for carefully screened medication resistant neurological and neuropsychiatric disorders. DBS therapy is not always applied deep to the brain; does not have to be applied exclusively to the brain; and the mechanism for DBS is not simply stimulation of structures. The applications and target locations for DBS devices are rapidly expanding, with many new regions of the brain, spinal cord, peripheral nerves, and muscles now possibly accessed through this technology. We will review the idea of "electrical neuro-network modulation (ENM)"; discuss the importance of the complex neural networks underpinning the effects of DBS; discuss the expansion of brain targets; discuss the use of fiber based targets; and discuss the importance of tailoring DBS therapy to the symptom, rather than the disease.

  2. SWAT-CS(enm): Enhancing SWAT nitrate module for a Canadian Shield catchment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dejian; Chen, Xingwei; Yao, Huaxia

    2016-04-15

    Nonpoint source modeling using hydrological models has been extensively studied at agriculture and urban watersheds; however, this has not been well addressed in forested ones where agricultural sources are comparatively minimal and nitrogen deposition exerts remarkable impacts on the nutrient cycles of a catchment. Thus it is critically important for hydrological models to incorporate the dynamics of nitrogen deposition and its transport processes, for reasonable nitrogen modeling. This is especially so for the Canadian Shield, which is characterized by a cold climate and special physiographic features. A revision of Soil and Water Assessment Tool for Canadian Shield (SWAT-CS) was proposed by Fu et al. (2014) to better characterize the hydrological features. In this study, more revisions were added to better simulate processes of nitrate by: 1) incorporating the dynamics of nitrogen deposition; and 2) allowing the deposition to distribute along with rapid-moving macropore flows. The newly revised model, SWAT-CS(enm) (SWAT-CS with an Enhanced Nitrate Module), and SWAT-CS were calibrated and tested with data of a subbasin of Harp Lake in south-central Ontario for 1990 to 2007. Modeling performance of nitrate flux rate in the stream for SWAT-CS(enm) was nearly acceptable with maximum daily Nash-Sutcliffe efficiencies (ENSs) for calibration and validation periods of 0.66 and 0.43, respectively; whereas the result of SWAT-CS was generally unsatisfied with maximum daily ENSs of 0.16 and 0.07, respectively. An uncertainty analysis using GLUE (generalized likelihood uncertainty estimation) showed a modest performance as about 50% of observations can be incorporated by the 95% prediction range deriving from the behavioral solutions (ENS≥0.5) for both daily and monthly simulations. It is concluded that the enhanced nitrate module improved the model performance of SWAT-CS on nitrate modeling, since the previous SWAT-CS failed to consider the effect of dynamics of nitrogen

  3. ClustENM: ENM-Based Sampling of Essential Conformational Space at Full Atomic Resolution

    PubMed Central

    Kurkcuoglu, Zeynep; Bahar, Ivet; Doruker, Pemra

    2016-01-01

    Accurate sampling of conformational space and, in particular, the transitions between functional substates has been a challenge in molecular dynamic (MD) simulations of large biomolecular systems. We developed an Elastic Network Model (ENM)-based computational method, ClustENM, for sampling large conformational changes of biomolecules with various sizes and oligomerization states. ClustENM is an iterative method that combines ENM with energy minimization and clustering steps. It is an unbiased technique, which requires only an initial structure as input, and no information about the target conformation. To test the performance of ClustENM, we applied it to six biomolecular systems: adenylate kinase (AK), calmodulin, p38 MAP kinase, HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT), triosephosphate isomerase (TIM), and the 70S ribosomal complex. The generated ensembles of conformers determined at atomic resolution show good agreement with experimental data (979 structures resolved by X-ray and/or NMR) and encompass the subspaces covered in independent MD simulations for TIM, p38, and RT. ClustENM emerges as a computationally efficient tool for characterizing the conformational space of large systems at atomic detail, in addition to generating a representative ensemble of conformers that can be advantageously used in simulating substrate/ligand-binding events. PMID:27494296

  4. Assessment of Human Exposure to ENMs.

    PubMed

    Jiménez, Araceli Sánchez; van Tongeren, Martie

    2017-01-01

    Human exposure assessment of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) is hampered, among other factors, by the difficulty to differentiate ENM from other nanomaterials (incidental to processes or naturally occurring) and the lack of a single metric that can be used for health risk assessment. It is important that the exposure assessment is carried out throughout the entire life-cycle as releases can occur at the different stages of the product life-cycle, from the synthesis, manufacture of the nano-enable product (occupational exposure) to the professional and consumer use of nano-enabled product (consumer exposure) and at the end of life.Occupational exposure surveys should follow a tiered approach, increasing in complexity in terms of instruments used and sampling strategy applied with higher tiers in order tailor the exposure assessment to the specific materials used and workplace exposure scenarios and to reduce uncertainty in assessment of exposure. Assessment of consumer exposure and of releases from end-of-life processes currently relies on release testing of nano-enabled products in laboratory settings.

  5. Mechanically enhanced PES electrospun nanofiber membranes (ENMs) for microfiltration: The effects of ENM properties on membrane performance.

    PubMed

    Bae, Jiyeol; Baek, Inchan; Choi, Heechul

    2016-11-15

    The application of electrospun nanofiber membranes (ENMs) as microfilters for the process of water purification requires the substrate to possess suitable strength, permeability, and a smooth surface. Therefore, the fiber homogeneity, inter-fiber adhesion, and surface roughness of the ENMs must be carefully controlled. Concurrently, an understanding of the ENMs' rejection mechanism for contaminants is necessary for the effective application of ENMs. In this study, we demonstrate the fabrication of polyethersulfone (PES) ENMs, which are useful for water purification as water treatment membranes. An optimum fabrication condition that can significantly improve the mechanical property and surface roughness of the PES membrane is also illustrated. This technique induces the solvent remaining on the fiber's surface after the electrospinning process, and the mechanical properties and surface roughness of the membrane are improved by the solvent-induced fusion of the fiber. The fabricated PES ENMs also show higher clean water productivity. Additionally, we show that a particulate contaminant in water is mainly rejected on the ENM surface by using a water filtration test. Based on our conclusions, we suggest the appropriate ENM regeneration method and confirm that the fabricated ENMs show excellent regeneration ability.

  6. The development of nursing research self-study modules.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Marybeth; Aloe, Karen

    2005-01-01

    Research utilization and evidence-based practice are processes that require nurses to have research knowledge and skills. Yet many nurses are fearful of research and avoid reading nursing research studies or using research in their practice. Members of a hospital's Nursing Research Team developed nursing research self-study modules for use by the nursing staff. The goal of this innovative project was to enhance a nurse's ability to critically read nursing research studies and determine their usefulness for practice. As a result, it is hoped that nurses will be more knowledgeable about research and more comfortable participating in the evidence-based practice and research utilization processes. The development, implementation, and evaluation of nursing research self-study modules are described and implications for nursing practice identified.

  7. Tracking translocation of industrially relevant engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) across alveolar epithelial monolayers in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Joel M.; Derk, Raymond; Wang, Liying; Godleski, John; Kobzik, Lester; Brain, Joseph; Demokritou, Philip

    2015-01-01

    Relatively little is known about the fate of industrially relevant engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) in the lungs. Inhalation exposure and subsequent translocation of ENMs across the epithelial lining layer of the lung might contribute to clearance, toxic effects or both. To allow precise quantitation of translocation across lung epithelial cells, we developed a method for tracking industrially-relevant metal oxide ENMs in vitro using neutron activation. The versatility and sensitivity of the proposed In Vitro Epithelial Translocation (INVET) system was demonstrated using a variety of industry relevant ENMs including CeO2 of various primary particle diameter, ZnO, and SiO2-coated-CeO2 and ZnO particles. ENMs were neutron activated, forming gamma emitting isotopes 141Ce and 65Zn respectively. Calu-3 lung epithelial cells cultured to confluency on transwell inserts were exposed to neutron-activated ENM dispersions at sub-lethal doses to investigate the link between ENM properties and translocation potential. The effects of ENM exposure on monolayer integrity was monitored by various methods. ENM translocation across the cellular monolayer was assessed by gamma spectrometry following 2, 4 and 24 hours of exposure. Our results demonstrate that ENMs translocated in small amounts (e.g. <0.01% of the delivered dose at 24 h), predominantly via transcellular pathways without compromising monolayer integrity or disrupting tight junctions. It was also demonstrated that the delivery of particles in suspension to cells in culture is proportional to translocation, emphasizing the importance of accurate dosimetry when comparing ENM-cellular interactions for large panels of materials. The reported INVET system for tracking industrially relevant ENMs while accounting for dosimetry can be a valuable tool for investigating nano-bio interactions in the future. PMID:24479615

  8. Tracking translocation of industrially relevant engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) across alveolar epithelial monolayers in vitro.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Joel M; Derk, Raymond; Wang, Liying; Godleski, John; Kobzik, Lester; Brain, Joseph; Demokritou, Philip

    2014-08-01

    Abstract Relatively little is known about the fate of industrially relevant engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) in the lungs that can be used to convert administered doses to delivered doses. Inhalation exposure and subsequent translocation of ENMs across the epithelial lining layer of the lung might contribute to clearance, toxic effects or both. To allow precise quantitation of translocation across lung epithelial cells, we developed a method for tracking industrially relevant metal oxide ENMs in vitro using neutron activation. The versatility and sensitivity of the proposed in vitro epithelial translocation (INVET) system was demonstrated using a variety of industry relevant ENMs including CeO2 of various primary particle diameter, ZnO, and SiO2-coated CeO2 and ZnO particles. ENMs were neutron activated, forming gamma emitting isotopes (141)Ce and (65)Zn, respectively. Calu-3 lung epithelial cells cultured to confluency on transwell inserts were exposed to neutron-activated ENM dispersions at sub-lethal doses to investigate the link between ENM properties and translocation potential. The effects of ENM exposure on monolayer integrity was monitored by various methods. ENM translocation across the cellular monolayer was assessed by gamma spectrometry following 2, 4 and 24 h of exposure. Our results demonstrate that ENMs translocated in small amounts (e.g. <0.01% of the delivered dose at 24 h), predominantly via transcellular pathways without compromising monolayer integrity or disrupting tight junctions. It was also demonstrated that the delivery of particles in suspension to cells in culture is proportional to translocation, emphasizing the importance of accurate dosimetry when comparing ENM-cellular interactions for large panels of materials. The reported INVET system for tracking industrially relevant ENMs while accounting for dosimetry can be a valuable tool for investigating nano-bio interactions in the future.

  9. Approaches to the safety assessment of engineered nanomaterials (ENM) in food.

    PubMed

    Cockburn, Andrew; Bradford, Roberta; Buck, Neil; Constable, Anne; Edwards, Gareth; Haber, Bernd; Hepburn, Paul; Howlett, John; Kampers, Frans; Klein, Christoph; Radomski, Marek; Stamm, Hermann; Wijnhoven, Susan; Wildemann, Tanja

    2012-06-01

    A systematic, tiered approach to assess the safety of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) in foods is presented. The ENM is first compared to its non-nano form counterpart to determine if ENM-specific assessment is required. Of highest concern from a toxicological perspective are ENMs which have potential for systemic translocation, are insoluble or only partially soluble over time or are particulate and bio-persistent. Where ENM-specific assessment is triggered, Tier 1 screening considers the potential for translocation across biological barriers, cytotoxicity, generation of reactive oxygen species, inflammatory response, genotoxicity and general toxicity. In silico and in vitro studies, together with a sub-acute repeat-dose rodent study, could be considered for this phase. Tier 2 hazard characterisation is based on a sentinel 90-day rodent study with an extended range of endpoints, additional parameters being investigated case-by-case. Physicochemical characterisation should be performed in a range of food and biological matrices. A default assumption of 100% bioavailability of the ENM provides a 'worst case' exposure scenario, which could be refined as additional data become available. The safety testing strategy is considered applicable to variations in ENM size within the nanoscale and to new generations of ENM.

  10. A Systems-Level Approach to Characterizing Effects of ENMs in Terrestrial Organisms and Ecosystems

    EPA Science Inventory

    Engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) represent a new regulatory challenge because of their unique properties and their potential to interact with ecological organisms at various developmental stages, in numerous environmental compartments. Traditional toxicity tests have proven to be...

  11. Comparative lung toxicity of engineered nanomaterials (ENM) utilizing in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo approaches

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: Although engineered nanomaterials (ENM) are currently regulated either in the context of a new chemical, or as a new use of an existing chemical, hazard assessment is still to a large extent reliant on information from historical toxicity studies of the parent compoun...

  12. Getting Down to Business: Nursing Service, Module 14. Teacher Guide. Entrepreneurship Training Components.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolman, Jean

    This is the fourteenth in a set of 36 teacher guides to the Entrepreneurial Training modules and accompanies CE 031 056. The purpose of this module is to give students some idea of what it is like to own and operate a nursing service. Following an overview are general notes on use of the module. Suggested steps for module use contain suggestions…

  13. ENM 590: Case Studies in Engineering Management. Condition Based Maintenance Plus Return on Investment Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-12

    Maintenance Plus Return on Investment Analysis Ken Fischer Date: 01/12/11 Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No. 0704...4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE ENM 590 Case Studies in Engineering Management condition Based Maintenance Plus Return on Investment Analysis 5a. CONTRACT...NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Ken Fischer 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7

  14. Using self-study modules to improve wound care documentation by the staff nurse.

    PubMed

    Koerber, Kathryn L

    2009-01-01

    Many nurses are uncertain of how to appropriately document wound information, and this may result in inconsistent wound care. A method of educating staff nurses on the importance of wound care documentation is needed. Through computerized self-study modules, staff nurses were educated on how to complete documentation accurately and completely, including how to identify the type of wound, stage the wound (for pressure ulcers), measure the wound, and describe exudate, wound base, odor, pain, temperature, tunneling, undermining, and maceration.

  15. Nursing faculty teaching a module in clinical skills to medical students: a Lebanese experience

    PubMed Central

    Abdallah, Bahia; Irani, Jihad; Sailian, Silva Dakessian; Gebran, Vicky George; Rizk, Ursula

    2014-01-01

    Nursing faculty teaching medical students a module in clinical skills is a relatively new trend. Collaboration in education among medical and nursing professions can improve students’ performance in clinical skills and consequently positively impact the quality of care delivery. In 2011, the Faculty of Medicine in collaboration with the Faculty of Health Sciences at the University of Balamand, Beirut, Lebanon, launched a module in clinical skills as part of clinical skills teaching to first-year medical students. The module is prepared and delivered by nursing faculty in a laboratory setting. It consists of informative lectures as well as hands-on clinical practice. The clinical competencies taught are hand-washing, medication administration, intravenous initiation and removal, and nasogastric tube insertion and removal. Around sixty-five medical students attend this module every year. A Likert scale-based questionnaire is used to evaluate their experience. Medical students agree that the module provides adequate opportunities to enhance clinical skills and knowledge and favor cross-professional education between nursing and medical disciplines. Most of the respondents report that this experience prepares them better for clinical rotations while increasing their confidence and decreasing anxiety level. Medical students highly appreciate the nursing faculties’ expertise and perceive them as knowledgeable and resourceful. Nursing faculty participating in medical students’ skills teaching is well perceived, has a positive impact, and shows nurses are proficient teachers to medical students. Cross professional education is an attractive model when it comes to teaching clinical skills in medical school. PMID:25419165

  16. Development of an Intravenous Therapy Module for Second Year Registered Nursing Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balint, Marilyn

    A study aimed at developing an intravenous therapy module for second-year registered nursing students is described in this practicum report. The report's five chapters define the underlying problem and purpose of the study; discuss the history of intravenous therapy and the significance of the module to the host institution; review the relevant…

  17. Getting Down to Business: Nursing Service, Module 14. [Student Guide]. Entrepreneurship Training Components.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolman, Jean

    This module on owning and operating a nursing service is one of 36 in a series on entrepreneurship. The introduction tells the student what topics will be covered and suggests other modules to read in related occupations. Each unit includes student goals, a case study, and a discussion of the unit subject matter. Learning activities are divided…

  18. Assessment of advanced practice palliative care nursing competencies in nurse practitioner students: implications for the integration of ELNEC curricular modules.

    PubMed

    Shea, Joyce; Grossman, Sheila; Wallace, Meredith; Lange, Jean

    2010-04-01

    Advanced practice nurses (APRNs) have key roles in the care of patients who are nearing death and those living with a disabling chronic disease. This article describes a mixed-method formative assessment of 36 graduate nursing students' knowledge about and attitudes toward palliative care preliminary to curricular integration of the End-of-Life Nursing Education Consortium (ELNEC) graduate core modules. Students' knowledge about palliative care was assessed using the 106-item ELNEC examination. In addition, qualitative data were gathered regarding students' definitions of palliative care, the role of the APRN in palliative care, and their definitions of a "good" and "bad" death. Results revealed students' limited knowledge about palliative care. Qualitative findings indicated that most students exclusively linked palliative care with end-of-life care and believed that the treatment they provide should have the goal of prolonging life over maintaining quality of life. Implications for curriculum design, advanced practice role development, and collaboration with community health partners are discussed.

  19. Nurses' perception about a DVD module on 'mental status examination demonstration'.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, Sailaxmi; Lalitha, K; Thennarasu, K; Nagarajaiah; Ramachandra

    2013-01-01

    Computer-based multimedia can improve learning and retention of learnt material A video recorded DVD module on role play of mental status examination was visualised by 226 nursing students and 133 nursing teachers. Their opinion of the DVD on various parameters such as audibility, visibility, clarity, methodical, organisation of content, following the principles of psychiatric interview, symptom elicitation, therapist behaviour, therapist communication skill and ease in understanding revealed that the DVD module was of high quality and could be used as a teaching tool

  20. Incorporating a built environment module into an accelerated second-degree community health nursing course.

    PubMed

    Hays, Judith C; Davis, Jeffrey A; Miranda, Marie Lynn

    2006-01-01

    Environmental quality is a leading indicator of population health. Environmental health content has been integrated into the curriculum of an Accelerated Bachelor of Science in Nursing program for second-degree students through development of an environmental health nursing module for the final-semester community health nursing course. The module was developed through collaboration between two professional schools at Duke University (the School of Nursing and the Nicholas School of the Environment and Earth Sciences). It focused on the role of the built environment in community health and featured a mix of teaching strategies, including five components: (1) classroom lecture with associated readings, (2) two rounds of online small-group student discussions, (3) assessment of the built environment in local neighborhoods by student teams, (4) team presentation of the neighborhood assessments, and (5) individual student papers synthesizing the conclusions from all team presentations. The goal of the module was to provide nursing students with an organizing framework for integrating environmental health into clinical practice and an innovative tool for understanding community-level components of public health.

  1. Responding to Challenging Interactions With Families: A Training Module for Inpatient Oncology Nurses

    PubMed Central

    Zaider, Talia I.; Banerjee, Smita C.; Manna, Ruth; Coyle, Nessa; Pehrson, Cassandra; Hammonds, Stacey; Krueger, Carol A.; Bylund, Carma L.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Sustaining the well-being of the caregiving family is a critical agenda in cancer care. In the multidisciplinary team, nurses often serve as a bridge between the family and oncology team. Evidence suggests that dealing with difficult family dynamics is a common source of stress for oncology nurses, yet nurses typically receive very little guidance on how to achieve an effective partnership with families under these circumstances. We report on the application and preliminary evaluation of a new training module for improving nurses’ skills in responding collaborative to challenging family situations. Method Training was delivered to 282 inpatient oncology nurses at a comprehensive cancer center over 2 years. Posttraining surveys measured perceived changes in confidence working with families, as well as the utility and relevance of this training. A 6-month follow-up survey measured continued use of skills. Results Of the nurses, 75%–90% reported that the skills learned were useful and relevant to their setting. Retrospective pre–post ratings suggested increased confidence in managing stressful encounters with families. Discussion Further investigation is needed to observe how nurses transport these skills into their practice settings and to understand the role of the nurse-as-family champion within the larger multidisciplinary team. PMID:27632541

  2. Windows and mirrors: reflections of a module team teaching the arts in nurse education.

    PubMed

    McKie, Andrew; Adams, Violet; Gass, John P; Macduff, Colin

    2008-05-01

    The five-year experience of a group of nursing lecturers teaching the expressive arts within a Scottish degree programme is outlined and discussed. The place of the arts is contextualised within curriculum developments and module content, sequencing, thematic development, mode of delivery, assessment, student evaluation and pedagogical approaches are all addressed. Relationship to practice is discussed in terms of the art of nursing, reflection, ethics and spirituality. Future developments are discussed in terms of drawing upon the wider resources of the humanities, rather than merely expressivist sources of art. The paper concludes by encouraging the teaching of the arts in nurse education to remain responsive to practice issues and to consideration of students' learning needs.

  3. Responding empathically to patients: Development, implementation, and evaluation of a communication skills training module for oncology nurses

    PubMed Central

    Pehrson, Cassandra; Banerjee, Smita C.; Manna, Ruth; Shen, Megan Johnson; Hammonds, Stacey; Coyle, Nessa; Krueger, Carol A.; Maloney, Erin; Zaider, Talia; Bylund, Carma L.

    2016-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this paper is to report on the development, implementation, and evaluation of a Communication Skills Training (CST) module for inpatient oncology nurses on how to respond empathically to patients. Methods 248 nurses from a USA cancer center participated in a CST module on responding empathically to patients. Nurses completed pre- and post-training Standardized Patient Assessments (SPAs), a survey on their confidence in and intent to utilize skills taught, and a six-month post-training survey of self-reported use of skills. Results Results indicate that nurses were satisfied with the module, reporting that agreement or strong agreement to 5 out of 6 items assessing satisfaction 96.7%–98.0% of the time. Nurses’ self-efficacy in responding empathically significantly increased pre- to post-training. Additionally, nurses showed empathy skill improvement in the post-SPAs. Finally, 88.2% of nurses reported feeling confident in using the skills they learned post-training and reported an increase of 42–63% in the use of specific empathic skills. Conclusions A CST module for nurses in responding empathically to patients showed feasibility, acceptability, and improvement in self-efficacy as well as skill uptake. Practice implications This CST module provides an easily targeted intervention for improving nurse–patient communication and patient-centered care. PMID:26686992

  4. Person-centred communication: design, implementation and evaluation of a communication skills module or undergraduate nursing students - an Irish context.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Bridie; O'Donovan, Moira; Twomey, Angela

    2008-02-01

    Despite wide agreement about the importance of effective communication in nursing there is continuing evidence of the need for nurses to improve their communication skills. Consequently, there is a growing demand for more therapeutic and person-centred communication courses. Studies on communication education reveal considerable variability on the design and operationalisation of these programmes. Additionally, the literature highlights that nurse educators are continually challenged with developing and implementing these programmes. Communication skills are generally taught in years one and two of undergraduate nursing degree programmes. This is a stage when students have minimal contact with patients and clients. We suggest that a communication skills module should be included in all final years of undergraduate nursing programmes. With an array of clinical experiences to draw from, final year nursing students are better placed to apply the skills of effective communication in practice. In this paper, we present the design, implementation and evaluation of an advanced communication skills module undertaken by fourth year undergraduate nursing students completing a Bachelor of Science (BSc) degree - nursing programme at one university in the Republic of Ireland.

  5. Experienced registered nurses' satisfaction with using self-learning modules versus traditional lecture/discussion to achieve competency goals during hospital orientation.

    PubMed

    Carcich, Grace M; Rafti, Karen R

    2007-01-01

    Staff development educators are challenged with various levels of experience and learning styles among newly hired registered nurses in a hospital orientation group. This diversity forces the educator to use various teaching strategies to meet the learning needs of the group. This study investigated the experienced registered nurses' satisfaction with using self-learning modules versus traditional lecture/discussion methods during the nursing orientation process. The results revealed that experienced nurses prefer the more traditional method of learning by lecture/discussion.

  6. Construction and validation of a distance learning module on premedication antisepsis for nursing professionals.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Barbara Juliana da Costa; Mendes, Isabel Amélia Costa; Beatriz Maria, Jorge; Mazzo, Alessandra

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this descriptive study, carried out at a public university, was to design, develop, and validate a distance learning module on intramuscular premedication antisepsis. The content was introduced in the Modular Object-Oriented Dynamic Learning Environment, based on the Systematic Model for Web-Based Training projects. Ten nurses and information technologists at work consented to participate, in compliance with ethical guidelines, and answered a questionnaire to validate the Virtual Learning Environment. The educational aspects of the environment interface were mostly evaluated as "excellent," whereas the assessment of didactic resources indicated interactivity difficulties. It is concluded that distance learning is an important tool for the teaching of premedication antisepsis. To ensure its effectiveness, appropriate methods and interactive devices must be used.

  7. Time spent studying on a pre-registration nursing programme module: an exploratory study and implications for regulation.

    PubMed

    Snelling, Paul C; Lipscomb, Martin; Lockyer, Lesley; Yates, Sue; Young, Pat

    2010-11-01

    European Union (EU) regulations require that university programmes are of specified duration. Additional EU regulations apply specifically to university based nurse education, enacted in the UK by the Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC). However, little is known about how much time student nurses spend on their studies. In this exploratory study, students undertaking a single module in the pre-registration diploma programme at an English university were asked to keep a log of learning activity for the duration of the module. Twenty-six students completed the log. These students achieved higher grades and attended more lectures than the average for the module. The mean study time was 128.4 h against a regulatory assumption that the module should take 200 h. More than half of the 26 students undertook paid work during the module run, though this work was not associated with poorer performance. Problems in regulation for course duration are discussed and it is suggested that undertaking a 4600 h course in 3 years is problematic. More research is required so that patterns of study can be better understood and student centred programmes meeting regulatory requirements developed.

  8. User Violence and Nursing Staff Burnout: The Modulating Role of Job Satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Galián-Muñoz, Inmaculada; Ruiz-Hernández, Jose Antonio; Llor-Esteban, Bartolomé; López-García, Cecilia

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to patient violence in health staff can lead to the onset of burnout in these workers. The main goal of this investigation is to study how exposure to this kind of violence affects onset of burnout and to appraise the role of job satisfaction as a modulating variable. A descriptive, cross-sectional study was carried out using a self-administered anonymous questionnaire with the nursing staff of all the public hospitals of the Region of Murcia (Spain), obtaining a sample of 1,489 health professionals. From the results obtained, we underline the modulating role of extrinsic job satisfaction in the relationship between nonphysical violence and emotional exhaustion, and the protective effect of job satisfaction on the impact of nonphysical violence and the level of cynicism. No effects of job satisfaction in the relationship between physical violence and burnout were observed. We therefore conclude that experiencing nonphysical aggression has a lower impact on the psychological health of workers who are satisfied with their job, and interventions aimed at increasing these workers' extrinsic job satisfaction are highly recommended.

  9. American Nephrology Nurses' Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... Join/Renew Jobs Contact Corporate Shop American Nephrology Nurses Association About ANNA Association About ANNA Strategic Plan ... CExpress Events National Events Chapter / Local Events Nephrology Nurses Week ANNA Education Modules CKD Modules Education Services ...

  10. Design and evaluation of an IPE module at the beginning of professional training in medicine, nursing, and physiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Zirn, Lena; Körner, Mirjam; Luzay, Leonie; Sandeck, Florian; Müller-Fröhlich, Christa; Straub, Christine; Stößel, Ulrich; Silbernagel, Waltraud; Fischer, Julia

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Interprofessional education (IPE) is a central feature of modern education in the health care professions. Despite this, empirically founded and systematically structured IPE courses are absent from many curricula. To answer the WHO’s call for improved interprofessional collaboration in the health care system, a seminar was designed, implemented and evaluated. The target group consisted of students beginning nursing and medical studies (first and second semesters) and physiotherapy students (first year of training). The aim was to develop a basic IPE module focusing not only on the demands placed by academia and politics, but also the interests of the target group. This module was evaluated on the basis of the modified four-level Kirkpatrick approach. Method: Based on focus group interviews analyzed qualitatively using Mayring’s content analysis, it was possible to define five learning objectives and develop four practice-oriented modules. The seminar was then implemented and evaluated using written pre- and post-seminar evaluations and group discussions. Results: Analysis confirmed the success of the IPE concept in that the seminar was positively rated by attendees not only in terms of their immediate reactions, but also attitude, knowledge and skills according to Kirkpatrick. Conclusion: In the future, it is intended to offer the IPE module on a permanent basis and assess the competencies acquired in the seminar using observation. Courses to ensure sustained learning outcomes would also be desirable. PMID:27280135

  11. Validation of a new assessment tool for a pediatric nursing simulation module.

    PubMed

    Shin, Hyunsook; Shim, Kaka; Lee, Yunah; Quinn, Laurie

    2014-11-01

    The Lasater clinical judgment rubric (LCJR) is a standardized scoring method to assess student clinical judgment. The aims of this study were to (a) develop a scenario-specific clinical judgment assessment tool guided by the LCJR and (b) evaluate the new assessment tool's psychometric properties and ability to assess clinical judgment. Content validity was established using an expert panel. Exploratory factor analysis (EFA) and confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) were used to assess the psychometric properties of the instrument. Convergent validity was identified using critical thinking. A three-factor model identified and confirmed with EFA and CFA was used in the new assessment tool to assess 250 undergraduate nursing students from three universities in Seoul, South Korea. The internal consistency using Cronbach's alpha coefficient was 0.825. Results of this study can provide nursing faculty with ways to develop and use new assessment tools in nursing education.

  12. A cooperative inquiry into action learning and praxis development in a community nursing module.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Emrys R; Mabbett, Gaynor M; Surridge, Andrea G; Warring, Joanna; Gwynn, Elizabeth D

    2009-09-01

    As nurse lecturers we investigated practice development and action learning approaches aimed at enabling postregistration bachelor's- and master's-level nursing students (Community Health Studies, Nursing in the Home) to advance practice in the context of policy and professional developments. A patchwork text was used to assess summatively what students achieved (practice change/development) and how this was informed critically, via an extended epistemology. First-person inquiry supplemented by cooperative inquiry postcourse completion (including reflective discussions with 16 students and 16 practice mentors) were used to assist coresearcher constructions of meaning. A relational, tripartite approach to learning and assessment (students', teachers', and practice mentors' collective contributions) depends on continuing reflective attention. Action learning enhances interrelation of experience with dialectic thinking. The patchwork text functions to promote creative writing, evaluative thinking, and praxis development. Role modeling by all, being genuine and not just "talking" genuine, is challenging yet crucial if people are to function as mutual resources for learning.

  13. Bilingual asynchronous online discussion groups: design and delivery of an eLearning distance study module for nurse academics in a developing country.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Peter A; Mai, Van Anh Thi; Gray, Genevieve

    2012-04-01

    The advent of eLearning has seen online discussion forums widely used in both undergraduate and postgraduate nursing education. This paper reports an Australian university experience of design, delivery and redevelopment of a distance education module developed for Vietnamese nurse academics. The teaching experience of Vietnamese nurse academics is mixed and frequently limited. It was decided that the distance module should attempt to utilise the experience of senior Vietnamese nurse academics - asynchronous online discussion groups were used to facilitate this. Online discussion occurred in both Vietnamese and English and was moderated by an Australian academic working alongside a Vietnamese translator. This paper will discuss the design of an online learning environment for foreign correspondents, the resources and translation required to maximise the success of asynchronous online discussion groups, as well as the rationale of delivering complex content in a foreign language. While specifically addressing the first iteration of the first distance module designed, this paper will also address subsequent changes made for the second iteration of the module and comment on their success. While a translator is clearly a key component of success, the elements of simplicity and clarity combined with supportive online moderation must not be overlooked.

  14. Indiana Health Occupations Education: Student Modules for Administration of Medications for Unlicensed Nursing Personnel. Revised Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bilger, Phyllis; And Others

    These learning modules are designed to provide health care workers involved with medications with basic information about the nature and administration of medications. The 30 modules are organized into six units. An overview of preparation and administration of medicines, principles of medication therapy, and medication fundamentals are presented…

  15. Health Instruction Packages: Humanistic Nursing--Nurse/Patient Relations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carpenter, Wanda L.; And Others

    Text, illustrations, and exercises are utilized in this set of four learning modules to instruct nurses and nursing students in humanistic, non-technical aspects of patient care. The first module, "Introduction to Humanistic Nursing Practice Theory" by Wanda L. Carpenter, draws upon the theories of existentialism and phenomenology to…

  16. Adaptation and Evaluation of Online Self-learning Modules to Teach Critical Appraisal and Evidence-Based Practice in Nursing: An International Collaboration.

    PubMed

    Gagnon, Johanne; Gagnon, Marie-Pierre; Buteau, Rose-Anne; Azizah, Ginette Mbourou; Jetté, Sylvie; Lampron, Amélie; Simonyan, David; Asua, José; Reviriego, Eva

    2015-07-01

    Healthcare professionals need to update their knowledge and acquire skills to continually inform their practice based on scientific evidence. This study was designed to evaluate online self-learning modules on critical appraisal skills to promote the use of research in clinical practice among nurses from Quebec (Canada) and the Basque Country (Spain). The teaching material was developed in Quebec and adapted to the Basque Country as part of an international collaboration project. A prospective pre-post study was conducted with 36 nurses from Quebec and 47 from the Basque Country. Assessment comprised the administration of questionnaires before and after the course in order to explore the main intervention outcomes: knowledge acquisition and self-learning readiness. Satisfaction was also measured at the end of the course. Two of the three research hypotheses were confirmed: (1) participants significantly improved their overall knowledge score after the educational intervention; and (2) they were, in general, satisfied with the course, giving it a rating of seven out of 10. Participants also reported a greater readiness for self-directed learning after the course, but this result was not significant in Quebec. The study provides unique knowledge on the cultural adaptation of online self-learning modules for teaching nurses about critical appraisal skills and evidence-based practice.

  17. The effect of learning via module versus lecture teaching methods on the knowledge and practice of oncology nurses about safety standards with cytotoxic drugs in Shiraz University of Medical Sciences

    PubMed Central

    Abbasi, Khadijeh; Hazrati, Maryam; Mohamadi, Nasrin Pourali; Rajaeefard, Abdolreza

    2013-01-01

    Background: Several studies have established that all nurses need continuing education, especially those who are working in oncology wards. In the current programs, there are just two general patterns for teaching: Teacher-centered and student-centered patterns. In this study, the effect of teacher-centered (lecture) and student-centered (module) teaching methods in relation to safety standards with cytotoxic drugs on the knowledge and practice of oncology nurses was compared. Materials and Methods: This research was a quasi-experimental study with two intervention groups (module and lecture) and a control group. In this study, 86 nurses in Shiraz, Fars province in 2011, who participated in the prescription of cytotoxic drugs to patients were selected and randomly divided into three groups. The module group used a self-directed module, the lecture group was taught by an experienced lecturer in the classroom and the control group did not receive any intervention. Data in relation to knowledge and practice of oncology nurses in the three groups were collected before and 8 weeks after the intervention by using a questionnaire and checklist. To analyze the data paired-samples t-test and one way ANOVA analysis were used. Results: Knowledge and practice scores increased significantly from baseline in both intervention groups, but there was no significant difference between the scores of the two groups. No considerable changes were observed in the control group. Conclusions: Both module and lecture methods have similar effects on improving the knowledge and practice of nurses in oncology wards. Therefore, considering the advantages of student-centered educational methods, the work load of nurses and the sensitivity of their jobs, we suggest using module. PMID:24554947

  18. The Mental Vitality @ Work study: design of a randomized controlled trial on the effect of a workers' health surveillance mental module for nurses and allied health professionals

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Employees in health care service are at high risk for developing mental health complaints. The effects of mental health complaints on work can have serious consequences for the quality of care provided by these workers. To help health service workers remain healthy and productive, preventive actions are necessary. A Workers' Health Surveillance (WHS) mental module may be an effective strategy to monitor and promote good (mental) health and work performance. The objective of this paper is to describe the design of a three arm cluster randomized controlled trial on the effectiveness of a WHS mental module for nurses and allied health professionals. Two strategies for this WHS mental module will be compared along with data from a control group. Additionally, the cost effectiveness of the approaches will be evaluated from a societal perspective. Methods The study is designed as a cluster randomized controlled trial consisting of three arms (two intervention groups, 1 control group) with randomization at ward level. The study population consists of 86 departments in one Dutch academic medical center with a total of 1731 nurses and allied health professionals. At baseline, after three months and after six months of follow-up, outcomes will be assessed by online questionnaires. In both intervention arms, participants will complete a screening to detect problems in mental health and work functioning and receive feedback on their screening results. In cases of impairments in mental health or work functioning in the first intervention arm, a consultation with an occupational physician will be offered. The second intervention arm offers a choice of self-help e-mental health interventions, which will be tailored based on each individual's mental health state and work functioning. The primary outcomes will be help-seeking behavior and work functioning. Secondary outcomes will be mental health and wellbeing. Furthermore, cost-effectiveness in both intervention arms

  19. Interprofessional Obstetric Ultrasound Education: Successful Development of Online Learning Modules; Case-Based Seminars; and Skills Labs for Registered and Advanced Practice Nurses, Midwives, Physicians, and Trainees.

    PubMed

    Shaw-Battista, Jenna; Young-Lin, Nichole; Bearman, Sage; Dau, Kim; Vargas, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound is an important aid in the clinical diagnosis and management of normal and complicated pregnancy and childbirth. The technology is widely applied to maternity care in the United States, where comprehensive standard ultrasound examinations are routine. Targeted scans are common and used for an increasing number of clinical indications due to emerging research and a greater availability of equipment with better image resolution at lower cost. These factors contribute to an increased demand for obstetric ultrasound education among students and providers of maternity care, despite a paucity of data to inform education program design and evaluation. To meet this demand, from 2012 to 2015 the University of California, San Francisco nurse-midwifery education program developed and implemented an interprofessional obstetric ultrasound course focused on clinical applications commonly managed by maternity care providers from different professions and disciplines. The course included matriculating students in nursing and medicine, as well as licensed practitioners such as registered and advanced practice nurses, midwives, and physicians and residents in obstetrics and gynecology and family medicine. After completing 10 online modules with a pre- and posttest of knowledge and interprofessional competencies related to teamwork and communication, trainees attended a case-based seminar and hands-on skills practicum with pregnant volunteers. The course aimed to establish a foundation for further supervised clinical training prior to independent practice of obstetric ultrasound. Course development was informed by professional guidelines and clinical and education research literature. This article describes the foundations, with a review of the challenges and solutions encountered in obstetric ultrasound education development and implementation. Our experience will inform educators who wish to facilitate obstetric ultrasound competency development among new and experienced

  20. Northern Ireland and 'The Troubles', outlining an innovative approach to nursing/midwifery student teaching and module evaluation.

    PubMed

    McMullan, Johanna; Clarke, Susan A; O'Hagan, Marie Therese; O'Connor, Tony; Power, John J

    2016-02-01

    This discussion paper outlines an approach to developing and evaluating an educative programme primarily delivered by lay `citizen trainers' in educating student nurses, and student midwives to the impact of and experience of extended and extensive civil unrest within their communities (`the Troubles' ). This is drawn from experience within the Northern Ireland `Troubles' and all of the citizen trainers were directly affected physically/psychologically. The programme was intended to both educate but primarily to help facilitate student nurses and student midwives to better understanding to experience and context and to more effective care delivery to those affected by/damaged by `the Troubles'. Evaluation of the teaching and learning by the students was significantly positive.

  1. Health Instruction Packages: Nursing Care Plans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kowalski, Dorcas S.; And Others

    Text, illustrations, and exercises are provided in this set of learning modules to teach nurses and nursing students various patient care skills. The first module, "How to Write a Nursing Care Plan" by Dorcas S. Kowalski, discusses three tasks in developing patient care plans: identifying and prioritizing a patient's needs, gathering…

  2. Nursing Supplies

    MedlinePlus

    ... Stages Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Nursing Supplies Page Content Article Body Throughout most of ... budget. (Nursing equipment also makes wonderful baby gifts.) Nursing Bras A well-made nursing bra that comfortably ...

  3. Discovery of unique and ENM- specific pathophysiologic pathways: Comparison of the translocation of inhaled iridium nanoparticles from nasal epithelium versus alveolar epithelium towards the brain of rats.

    PubMed

    Kreyling, Wolfgang G

    2016-05-15

    The biokinetics of inhaled nanoparticles (NP) is more complex than that of larger particles since NP may NP deposited on the nasal mucosa of the upper respiratory tract (URT) may translocate to the olfactory bulb of the brain and also via the trigeminus (URT neuronal route); and (b) NP deposited in the lower respiratory tract (LRT) may cross the ABB into blood and enter the brain across the blood-brain-barrier (BBB) or take a neuronal route from enervated tracheo-bronchial epithelia via the vagus nerve. Translocation from both - the URT and the LRT - are quantified during the first 24h after a 1-hour aerosol inhalation of 20nm-sized, (192)Ir radiolabeled iridium NP by healthy adult rats using differential exposures: (I) nose-only exposure of the entire respiratory tract or (II) intratracheal (IT) inhalation of intubated and ventilated rats, thereby bypassing the URT and extrathoracic nasal passages. After nose-only exposure brain accumulation (BrAcc) is significantly nine-fold higher than after IT inhalation since the former results from both pathways (a+b) while the latter exposure comes only from pathway (b). Interestingly, there are significantly more circulating NP in blood 24h after nose-only inhalation than after IT inhalation. Distinguishing translocation from URT versus LRT estimated from the differential inhalation exposures, the former is significantly higher (8-fold) than from the LRT. Although the BrAcc fraction is rather low compared to total NP deposition after this short-term exposure, this study proofs that inhaled insoluble NP can accumulate in the brain from both - URT and LRT which may trigger and/or modulate adverse health effects in the central nervous system (CNS) during chronic exposure.

  4. Nurses’ Perceptions of Usefulness of Nursing Information System: Module of Electronic Medical Record for Patient Care in Two University Hospitals of Iran

    PubMed Central

    Kahouei, Mehdi; Baba Mohammadi, Hassan; Askari Majdabadi, Hesamedin; Solhi, Mahnaz; Parsania, Zeinab; Said Roghani, Panoe; Firozeh, Mehri

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: For almost fifteen years, the application of computer in hospitals increasingly has become popular. Nurses’ beliefs and attitudes towards computer is one of the most important indicators of the application of nursing information system. The purpose of this study was to investigate the perceptions of nurses on the usefulness of nursing information system for patient care. Methods: Here, a descriptive study was carried out. Sample was consisted of 316 nurses working in teaching hospitals in an urban area of Iran. This study was conducted during 2011 to 2012. A reliable and valid questionnaire was developed as a data collection tool. The collected data was analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics. Results: It was not believed that nursing information system was useful for patient care. However, it was mentioned that nursing information system is useful in some aspects of patient care such as expediting care, making early diagnosis and formulating diet plan. A significant association was found between the demographic background of sample and their perceptions of the usefulness of nursing information system (P<0.05). Conclusion: Totally, it can be concluded that nursing information system has a potential for improving patient care in hospital settings. Therefore, policy makers should consider implementing nursing information system in teaching hospitals. PMID:24757398

  5. The “ABCs of AD”: A pilot test of an online educational module to increase use of the autonomic dysreflexia clinical practice guidelines among paramedic and nurse trainees

    PubMed Central

    Tomasone, Jennifer R.; Martin Ginis, Kathleen A.; Pulkkinen, Wayland; Krassioukov, Andrei

    2014-01-01

    Context/Objective Despite availability of clinical practice guidelines (CPGs), gaps in autonomic dysreflexia (AD) knowledge and practice persist. A free, online educational module, the “ABCs of AD”, was developed to improve knowledge of the AD-CPGs among emergency healthcare personnel. We examine short-term changes in paramedic and nurse trainees’ knowledge of, and social cognitions towards using, the AD-CPGs following module completion. Design Pre–post. Methods Thirty-four paramedic and nurse trainees from two training programs in Canada completed measures immediately before and after viewing the online “ABCs of AD” module. Outcome measures AD knowledge test; Theory of Planned Behavior social cognition questionnaire; module feedback survey. Results Paired samples t-tests revealed significant increases in participants’ AD knowledge test scores (M ± SDpre = 9.00 ± 2.46, M ± SDpost = 12.03 ± 4.07, P < 0.001; d = 0.84). Prior to viewing the module, participants reported positive social cognitions for using the AD-CPGs (all Ms ≥ 4.84 out of 7). From pre- to post-module, no significant changes were seen in participants’ social cognitions for using the AD-CPGs. Participants’ average module viewing time was 36.73 ± 24.17 minutes (range 8–90 minutes). There was a decline in viewing from the first to the last module sections, with only half of participants viewing all six sections. Conclusion Knowledge alone is insufficient for clinical behavior change; as such, social cognitive determinants of behavior should be explicitly targeted in future iterations of the module to increase the likelihood of increased use of the AD-CPGs. To engage viewers across all module sections, the “ABCs of AD” module should include supplementary learning strategies, such as interactive quizzes and peer-to-peer interaction. PMID:25055849

  6. Health Instruction Packages: Nursing--Patient Observation and Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Freda; And Others

    Text, illustrations, and exercises are utilized in this set of three learning modules to instruct nurses and nursing students in patient observation and assessment skills. The first module, "The ABC's of Observation" by Freda Cooper, provides psychiatric nurses and technicians with guidelines for determining the mental status of incoming…

  7. Nursing, Nursing Education, and Anxiety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biggers, Thompson; And Others

    In response to the current crisis in the field of nursing, a study examined nursing students' perceived work-related stress and differences among associate degree, diploma, and baccalaureate nursing programs in their preparation of nursing students. The 171 subjects, representing the three different nursing programs, completed a questionnaire…

  8. Nursing Homes

    MedlinePlus

    ... our e-newsletter! Aging & Health A to Z Nursing Homes Basic Facts & Information Nursing homes have changed ... physical health and/or mental disabilities. Is a Nursing Home Right for You? Almost half of all ...

  9. Nursing: What's a Nurse Practitioner?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Your 1- to 2-Year-Old What's a Nurse Practitioner? KidsHealth > For Parents > What's a Nurse Practitioner? ... United States. continue Should My Kids See a Nurse Practitioner? Pediatric NPs can deliver much of the ...

  10. American Nurses Association Nursing World

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ethics Ethics Topics and Articles About The Center Code of Ethics Health & Safety Healthy Nurse, Healthy Nation™ ... VIEWED 2017 Year of the Healthy Nurse About Code of Ethics Join What is Nursing? Career Center ...

  11. What are the criteria that mentors use to make judgements on the clinical performance of student mental health nurses? An exploratory study of the formal written communication at the end of clinical nursing practice modules.

    PubMed

    Brown, N

    2000-10-01

    Issues concerning the assessment of student nurse performance in clinical practice have pre-occupied nurse educationalists for some time and continue to pose problems. The debate in the nursing literature tends to revolve around two seemingly mutually exclusive positions related to competence vs. learning outcomes. These are views that seem to be held by academics with little reference to clinical nurses who have responsibility for the assessment of student performance in clinical practice. This paper adds to the wider debate on clinical assessment by reporting on a small research study that explored the written comments that 150 mentors made in relation to the performance of student mental health nurses following periods of clinical practice. An extensive literature review is provided in order to place the debate in context, followed by a brief outline of the research study, its findings, discussion and conclusion. This analysis of findings demonstrates that student learning is of major concern to mentors, and that the assessment of student performance in clinical practice is not restricted by pre-determined behavioural learning outcomes. Personal characteristics of students exert a great influence on judgements about clinical performance. This paper does not offer solutions to the search for the perfect clinical assessment, but it does call for an increased dialogue between educationalists and mentors to discuss the implications of this research for the development of an appropriate clinical assessment tool.

  12. Preparing nurses for the inevitable: the New Madrid earthquake.

    PubMed

    VanArsdale, S K; Hammons, J O

    1994-01-01

    Although this article discusses earthquake preparedness for the New Madrid seismic zone, registered nurses in any location will be on the front line as patient caregivers and managers in the event of a damaging earthquake. Two self-instructional modules were developed to educate registered nurses about earthquake preparedness. Statistical analyses of pretest and posttest scores from nurses who completed the modules and from nurses who participated in a control group reveal that the modules are effective educational tools. This information will make them more effective as nurses during and after an earthquake and emphasizes the need for their involvement in disaster mitigation and planning.

  13. Effectiveness of a computer based medication calculation education and testing programme for nurses.

    PubMed

    Sherriff, Karen; Burston, Sarah; Wallis, Marianne

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of an on-line, medication calculation education and testing programme. The outcome measures were medication calculation proficiency and self efficacy. This quasi-experimental study involved the administration of questionnaires before and after nurses completed annual medication calculation testing. The study was conducted in two hospitals in south-east Queensland, Australia, which provide a variety of clinical services including obstetrics, paediatrics, ambulatory, mental health, acute and critical care and community services. Participants were registered nurses (RNs) and enrolled nurses with a medication endorsement (EN(Med)) working as clinicians (n=107). Data pertaining to success rate, number of test attempts, self-efficacy, medication calculation error rates and nurses' satisfaction with the programme were collected. Medication calculation scores at first test attempt showed improvement following one year of access to the programme. Two of the self-efficacy subscales improved over time and nurses reported satisfaction with the online programme. Results of this study may facilitate the continuation and expansion of medication calculation and administration education to improve nursing knowledge, inform practise and directly improve patient safety.

  14. Nursing Home Checklist

    MedlinePlus

    Nursing home checklist Name of nursing home: ____________________________________________________ Address: ________________________________________________________________ Phone number: __________________________________________________________ Date of visit: _____________________________________________________________ Basic information Yes No Notes Is the nursing home Medicare certified? Is the nursing ...

  15. Kamikaze nurses.

    PubMed

    1988-01-02

    In Japan nurses have found a somewhat drastic way of ensuring high standards of professional practice it would seem. For, according to a report in the current edition of the International Nursing Review, Fumiko Ohmori, retiring President of the Japanese Nursing Association, is famed for a number of visable achievements.

  16. Nursing: What's a Nurse Practitioner?

    MedlinePlus

    ... is a big part of the pediatric NP's role. Pediatric and family practice NPs can treat acute ( ... Nurse Practitioners (NAPNAP) and through local hospitals or nursing schools. Also, many doctors share office space with ...

  17. Nutrition for Nurses: Nursing 245.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palermo, Karen R.

    A description is presented of "Nutrition for Nurses," a prerequisite course for students anticipating entrance into the junior level of a state university registered nursing program. Introductory material highlights the course focus (i.e., the basics of good nutrition; nutrition through the life cycle; nursing process in nutritional care; and…

  18. Analysis of Nursing Curriculum and Course Competencies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trani, G. M.

    The objectives of this study were to relate the competencies of the Nursing Program at Delaware County Community College to national morbidity statistics and to recommend curriculum changes based on this analysis. Existing terminal objectives of the program and each nursing module were compared with college-wide terminal objectives, overlap was…

  19. The use of mobile computational technology in the nursing process: a new challenge for Brazilian nurses.

    PubMed

    Sperandio, Dircelene Jussara; Evora, Yolanda Dora Martinez

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the use a hand-mobile device with integrated wireless network interface to help nurses document the nursing process. The system is structured in five modules allowing the nurses to access and document data related to vital signals, hydroelectrolytic balance, assessment and nursing prescription at the point-of-care with transmission of data in real time. The results demonstrated that the mobile computer technology provided mobility for nurses and facilitated communication and documentation of care. In addition, real time documentation proved to be more efficient than a manual documentation system.

  20. Nursing students assess nursing education.

    PubMed

    Norman, Linda; Buerhaus, Peter I; Donelan, Karen; McCloskey, Barbara; Dittus, Robert

    2005-01-01

    This study assessed the characteristics of nursing students currently enrolled in nursing education programs, how students finance their nursing education, their plans for clinical practice and graduate education, and the rewards and difficulties of being a nursing student. Data are from a survey administered to a national sample of 496 nursing students. The students relied on financial aid and personal savings and earnings to finance their education. Parents, institutional scholarships, and government loans are also important sources, but less than 15% of the students took out bank loans. Nearly one quarter of the students, particularly younger and minority students, plan to enroll in graduate school immediately after graduation and most want to become advanced nursing practitioners. Most of the nursing students (88%) are satisfied with their nursing education and nearly all (95%) provided written answers to two open-ended questions. Comments collapsed into three major categories reflecting the rewards (helping others, status, and job security) and three categories reflecting the difficulties (problems with balancing demands, quality of nursing education, and the admissions process) of being a nursing student. Implications for public policymaking center on expanding the capacity of nursing education programs, whereas schools themselves should focus on addressing the financial needs of students, helping them strike a balance among their school, work, and personal/family responsibilities and modifying certain aspects of the curriculum.

  1. Nursing Reference Center: a point-of-care resource.

    PubMed

    Vardell, Emily; Paulaitis, Gediminas Geddy

    2012-01-01

    Nursing Reference Center is a point-of-care resource designed for the practicing nurse, as well as nursing administrators, nursing faculty, and librarians. Users can search across multiple resources, including topical Quick Lessons, evidence-based care sheets, patient education materials, practice guidelines, and more. Additional features include continuing education modules, e-books, and a new iPhone application. A sample search and comparison with similar databases were conducted.

  2. Emerging subspecialties in neurology: deep brain stimulation and electrical neuro-network modulation.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Anhar; Okun, Michael S

    2013-01-29

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is a surgical therapy that involves the delivery of an electrical current to one or more brain targets. This technology has been rapidly expanding to address movement, neuropsychiatric, and other disorders. The evolution of DBS has created a niche for neurologists, both in the operating room and in the clinic. Since DBS is not always deep, not always brain, and not always simply stimulation, a more accurate term for this field may be electrical neuro-network modulation (ENM). Fellowships will likely in future years evolve their scope to include other technologies, and other nervous system regions beyond typical DBS therapy.

  3. Arts-based inquiry in nursing education.

    PubMed

    Casey, Briege

    2009-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the methods, processes, and experiences of using arts-based inquiry within the context of an undergraduate nursing curriculum. Exploration of these phenomena was achieved through an ethnographic study that involved participatory research among twenty second year students as they engaged in a Nursing Humanities option module. The capacity of arts-based approaches in the nursing curriculum to foster inquiry and critical thinking; essential attributes in contemporary nursing, is explored through re-presentation and analysis of student artwork/art-making processes, contextual discussions and researcher field notes. The challenges encountered in using arts-informed pedagogical approaches within current nursing curricula are made visible and possibilities for integrating aesthetic inquiry into nurse education programmes are discussed.

  4. Health Instruction Packages: Specific Nursing Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bates, Clarice; And Others

    Text, illustrations, and exercises are utilized in a set of five learning modules designed to instruct nursing students in a variety of clinical skills. The first module, "Down the Tube: Insertion of a Nasogastric Tube" by Clarice Bates, describes materials and procedures used to insert a nasogastric tube through the nose and esophagus…

  5. Whither the "Nurse" in Nurse Practitioner?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weston, Jerry L.

    1975-01-01

    The author sees a need for the nursing profession to evaluate the extended role of the nurse to determine differences in the patient care provided by nurse practitioners and physician's assistants. From the data, appropriate nursing education and nursing practice planning can follow. (EA)

  6. Certified nurse-midwife

    MedlinePlus

    ... United States. The first program used public health registered nurses who had been educated in England. These nurses ... Applicants for nurse-midwife programs usually must be registered nurses and have at least 1 to 2 years ...

  7. Primary Nurse - Role Evolution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mundinger, Mary O'Neil

    1973-01-01

    Primary nursing means that each patient has an individual nurse who is responsible for assessing his nursing needs and planning and evaluating his nursing care. The article describes the advantages and problems connected with this approach to patient care. (AG)

  8. Nursing Positions

    MedlinePlus

    ... and actually needs to feed. Getting Comfortable With Breastfeeding Nursing can be one of the most challenging ... a mother. As you become more used to breastfeeding your baby, you can try different positions or ...

  9. Applying nursing theory to perioperative nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Gillette, V A

    1996-08-01

    The perioperative nursing role has evolved from that of task-oriented specialists to patient-centered professionals. The concept of caring is significant to perioperative nurses and is manifested by the many caring behaviors perioperative nurses demonstrate toward surgical patients. This article describes how the element of caring is an essential function of perioperative nursing and relates the perioperative nursing role to the work of three nursing theorists (le, Florence Nightingale; Virginia Henderson, RN, AM; Carol L. Montgomery, RN, PhD).

  10. Evaluating an Educational Module on Home Inotrope Therapy.

    PubMed

    Lockman-Samkowiak, Jodie; Brenner, Phyllis S; Dunn, Deborah S; Qureshi, Elena

    2015-01-01

    Educating home health nurses presents significant challenges for nurse educators because of the vast geographical areas served and the types of patient cared for. The integration of technology into the home health care arena offers new and innovative opportunities to address the ongoing educational needs of nurses as required by accrediting bodies. This exploratory study evaluated a Web-based educational module on home inotrope therapy in regard to nurses' perceived knowledge and confidence.

  11. Nursing Leadership.

    PubMed

    Crisp, Carol

    2016-01-01

    Nurse transformational leaders can serve in academic settings and at local, national, international professional nursing organizations and community-based groups. As a transformational leader, nurses can lead in any workplace. According to a study by Stanley (2012), clinical leaders are not sought for their capacity to outline a vision, but for their values and beliefs on display that are easily recognized in their actions. This encompasses the moral component of transformational leadership. It is the APRNs duty to continue to strive towards a better vision for the well-being of all nurses, patients, and colleagues. Autonomous APRNs are happier, healthier, and better prepared to provide the best patient care to their patients. We should not be happy to sit back and let others fight this fight. APRNs need to be on the frontline, leading the way. This is only an insight that I have gained after many frustrating years of cheering our profession and then being made to feel inferior at the same time. Only nurses, who have that nurturing spirit, would hold back if they felt it might hurt others. Don't back off or hold back! It might hurt those that follow!

  12. Teaching home care electronic documentation skills to undergraduate nursing students.

    PubMed

    Nokes, Kathleen M; Aponte, Judith; Nickitas, Donna M; Mahon, Pamela Y; Rodgers, Betsy; Reyes, Nancy; Chaya, Joan; Dornbaum, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Although there is general consensus that nursing students need knowledge and significant skill to document clinical findings electronically, nursing faculty face many barriers in ensuring that undergraduate students can practice on electronic health record systems (EHRS). External funding supported the development of an educational innovation through a partnership between a home care agency staff and nursing faculty. Modules were developed to teach EHRS skills using a case study of a homebound person requiring wound care and the Medicare-required OASIS documentation system. This article describes the development and implementation of the module for an upper-level baccalaureate nursing program located in New York City. Nursing faculty are being challenged to develop creative and economical solutions to expose nursing students to EHRSs in nonclinical settings.

  13. Does occupational health nursing exist in India?

    PubMed Central

    Tiwari, Rajnarayan R.; Sharma, Anjali; Zodpey, Sanjay P.; Khandare, Shobha M.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Occupational health services are important to develop healthy and productive work forces, which should be delivered through occupational health team. Occupational health nurse (OHN) is an important member of this team and is required to apply nursing principles in conserving the health of workers in occupational settings. Purpose: This article attempts to map the occupational health nursing courses in India and design competencies and curriculum for such a course. Materials and Methods: Information through the Internet, printed journals, and perspectives of the key stakeholders were the principal sources of data. Discussion: In India, there is a need to initiate a course on occupational health nursing to provide occupational health services for the organized and unorganized sector workforce. A certificate course for occupational health nursing for 3–4 months duration offered through contact session mode can be an opportune beginning. However, to cater employed nurses an online course can be another effective alternative. The theoretical part should essentially include modules on occupational diseases, industrial hygiene, and occupational health legislation, whereas the modules on practical aspects can include visits to industries. Taking into account the existing norms of Indian Factories Act for hazardous units of organized sector an estimated 1,34,640 OHNs are required. Conclusion: There is a need–supply gap in the number of occupational health nursing manpower in India, which can be attributed to the absence of any course to train such manpower. PMID:25598615

  14. Is the School Nurse a Nurse? Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cowell, Julia Muennich

    1998-01-01

    To cut costs, many districts are replacing certified school nurses with uncertified nurses or undereducated health aides. Never has the role of school nurse been more important. Besides attending to sick children and handling emergencies, today's school nurses are active in health education, physical fitness programs, and disease prevention.…

  15. Cultivating a Culture of Medication Safety in Prelicensure Nursing Students.

    PubMed

    Bush, Peggy A; Hueckel, Rémi M; Robinson, Dana; Seelinger, Terry A; Molloy, Margory A

    2015-01-01

    Safety education in nursing has traditionally focused at the level of individual nurse-patient interactions. Students and novice clinicians lack clinical experience to create context and understand the complexity of the health care system and safety science. Using the Quality and Safety Education for Nurses quality and safety competency as a framework, the objective of this education project was to design comprehensive, engaging, learner-centered, online modules that increase knowledge, skills, and attitudes about medication safety.

  16. Team Development Curriculum. Family Nurse Practitioner/Physician Assistant Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dostal, Lori

    A curriculum consisting of four modules is presented to help nurse practitioners, physician assistants, and physicians develop team practices and improve and increase the utilization of nurse practitioners and physician assistants in primary care settings. The curriculum was prepared in 1981-1982 by the California Area Health Education Center…

  17. Survival Strategies for the Learning-Disabled Nursing Student.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tumminia, Patricia A.; Weinfield, Ann Marie

    1986-01-01

    Nursing education can accommodate learning disabled nursing students if programs are flexible and teaching methods are adjusted to include choice of learning modality, the self-paced learning mastery approach, simulation of patient problem-solving modules, use of the computer to aid record keeping, and testing accommodations. (Author/DB)

  18. Camp Nursing: Student Internships.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harwood, Catherine Hoe; Van Hofwegen, Lynn

    2002-01-01

    Camps can meet or supplement their health care delivery needs by using student nurses. Three models for student nurse internships, basic information about nursing education, and tips for negotiating student nurse internships are described. Sidebars present resources for camp health centers, nursing student competence characteristics, types of…

  19. New Brunswick: development of a Web-based orientation program and enhancing senior nurses' mentoring skills.

    PubMed

    Auffrey, Marise; Cormier-Daigle, Monique; Gagnon-Ouellette, Anne

    2012-03-01

    This project to help new nurse recruits integrate into the hospital work environment had two components: the development of a new web-based orientation tool in French for new recruits and mentor training for more experienced nurses. The aim of the first component was to redesign delivery of the nursing orientation program by assessing individual needs of new recruits and developing "just in time" information sessions with online access and e-learning modules. The second component aimed to develop a voluntary mentorship training program for senior nurses that offered training on the role and responsibility of mentors. A total of 30 orientation modules were created as resources that could be adapted to the needs of each nursing unit and accessed online. Sixty nurse recruits used the programs. A mentor training program was developed, and 28 nurses were trained as mentors. The mentorship literature and guides, produced in French, will be a valuable resource for francophone nurses across Canada.

  20. International Transplant Nurses Society

    MedlinePlus

    ... and professional practice in nursing." Demonstration of professional development support and clinical advancement programs are hallmarks of a professional nursing practice environment and critical components of Nursing Magnet status. The ...

  1. [Assessing nursing workload].

    PubMed

    Princiaux, Danielle

    2012-01-01

    Healthcare managers must monitor the nursing workload and back up their arguments when requesting resources. A study was carried out based on a tool which measures whether nursing staff provision meets the nursing care workload.

  2. [Nursing care systems and complex thought in nursing education: document analysis].

    PubMed

    da Silva, Josilaine Porfírio; Garanhani, Mara Lucia; Guariente, Maria Helena Dantas de Menezes

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse the inclusion of the subject Nursing Care Systems (NCS) in nursing education. This study was based on qualitative desk research and it was conducted in a nursing programme in southern Brazil that offers an integrated curriculum with NCS as a cross-cutting theme. Data were collected from September to December 2012, by examining 15 planning and development workbooks on the cross-disciplinary modules of the programme. Analysis was divided into four stages: exploratory, selective, analytic and interpretive reading. The adopted theoretical framework was Complex Thought of Edgar Morin, according to the principles of relevant knowledge. Results were arranged into two categories: NCS as a crosscutting theme in nursing education: the context, the global and the multidimensional; and strategies for teaching, learning and assessment of NCS: the complex. The study contributes to the debate on the importance of teaching NCS as a crosscutting theme in nursing education.

  3. The Colorado Collaborative for Nursing Research: nurses shaping nursing's future.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Karen H; Weiss, Jason; Welton, John; Reeder, Blaine; Ozkaynak, Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    Nurses in the present health care environment have been reduced too often to being providers of safe, competent care rather than quality care. In response, the Institute of Medicine has recommended that nurses become more involved in making changes to the health care system and use data more effectively. If nursing intends to follow these recommendations, the profession needs (a) fresh perspectives to assist in making health care system changes, (b) partnerships between nurse scientists and nurse clinicians to generate and implement data, and (c) capture of the proper value of nursing as distinct from other elements of health care delivery. The Colorado Collaborative for Nursing Research is an effort to meet the recommendations of the Institute of Medicine. The Colorado Collaborative for Nursing Research has a three-arm structure: a research forum where nurse academicians and nurse clinicians can launch collaborative projects; a research support services arm from which nurse collaborators can obtain help with modeling, statistics, writing, and funding; and a data extraction/data sharing mechanism to inform the decision making of nurse leaders.

  4. COMFORT: evaluating a new communication curriculum with nurse leaders.

    PubMed

    Goldsmith, Joy; Wittenberg-Lyles, Elaine

    2013-01-01

    Nursing faculty face increasing instructional demands to keep pace with mounting knowledge and competency requirements for student nurses. In the context of nursing practice, tasks and time pressures detract from the high skill and aptitude expectation of communication. The communication, orientation and opportunity, mindful presence, family, openings, relating, and team (COMFORT) curriculum, an acronym that represents 7 basic nursing communication principles, has been introduced into the communication module of the End-of-Life Nursing Education Consortium, which currently provides the only standardized undergraduate and graduate nurse training in hospice and palliative care. This study examines the potential efficacy of the COMFORT curriculum for everyday communication challenges experienced by members of the Georgia Organization of Nurse Leaders. Participants were prompted to describe communication barriers and then apply an aspect of the COMFORT curriculum to this barrier. Responses revealed primary communication barriers with co-workers and patient/families. Nurses predominantly identified directly correlating components in the COMFORT framework (C-communication, F-family) as solutions to the topics described as barriers. Based on confirmation of extant literature addressing generalist nurse communication challenges, there is support for the inclusion of COMFORT across the nursing curriculum to efficiently and effectively teach communication strategies to nurses.

  5. Cancer nursing in Ontario: defining nursing roles.

    PubMed

    Fitch, Margaret I; Mings, Deborah

    2003-01-01

    The delivery of cancer care in Ontario is facing unprecedented challenges. Shortages in nursing, as in all professional disciplines, are having an impact on the delivery of cancer care. Oncology nurses have a major role to play in the delivery of optimum cancer care. Oncology nursing, when adequately defined and supported, can benefit the cancer delivery system, patients, and families. A primary nursing model is seen as being key to the delivery of optimum cancer care. Primary nursing as a philosophy facilitates continuity of care, coordination of a patient's care plan, and a meaningful ongoing relationship with the patient and his/her family. Primary nursing, when delivered in the collaboration of a nurse-physician team, allows for medical resources to be used appropriately. Defined roles enable nurses to manage patients within their scope of practice in collaboration with physicians. Enacting other nursing roles, such as nurse practitioners and advanced practice nurses, can also enable the health care system to manage a broader number of patients with more complex needs. This article presents a position paper originally written as the basis for an advocacy and education initiative in Ontario. It is shared in anticipation that the work may be useful to oncology nurses in other jurisdictions in their efforts to advance oncology nursing and improvement of patient care.

  6. What nurses want: the nurse incentives project.

    PubMed

    Wieck, K Lynn; Dols, Jean; Northam, Sally

    2009-01-01

    Today's nurse executives are struggling with leadership challenges of managing the multigenerational workforce, financial imperatives to deliver better care for lower costs, and competition to provide the optimal work environment to retain nurses. The purpose of the Nurse Incentives Project was to determine satisfaction with current employment incentives and potential managerial actions which might decrease or delay turnover by registered nurses. This study spawned recommendations regarding the role of incentives in designing an environment where benefits and perks will be seen as incentives to stay and thrive in the current nursing workplace. The results show that nurses know what they want. Attention to generational priorities and flexible benefits programs may help to create the cohesive work environment that nurses seek. Investment into creating delivery arenas where satisfied nurses are caring for satisfied patients is a worthwhile goal.

  7. Medical humanities in nursing: thought provoking?

    PubMed

    Robb, A J; Murray, R

    1992-10-01

    Medical humanities is an innovative way of learning. Discussing literary texts of nursing practice has been used to help students analyse attitudes, values and ethics; it has also been used to help practitioners review and reflect on their own experience and philosophy of nursing. In nursing education, it has been used to explore difficult issues in a safe environment. The value of this approach in nursing education and practice is that it can encourage reflection, promote self-awareness and stimulate debate on difficult issues: for example, death and dying, power and institutionalization (of patients and staff) and pain. This paper gives a detailed worked example of how a literary text can be used in this way, the aim being to provide a resource which readers can then use with a group of students or colleagues. Finally, the authors explore the question of where medical humanities might have a place in the curriculum: as a lecture/tutorial in a course (e.g. Ethics), as a module in the curriculum, as a method of teaching nursing subjects (e.g. communication skills), as a discussion group (outside the curriculum), as a study guide, using literary texts alongside nursing text books. Any of these strategies can be a powerful vehicle for preserving the 'human factor' in both nursing education and continuing professional development.

  8. Parish nursing: an innovative community nursing service.

    PubMed

    Laming, Eleanor; Stewart, Angela

    2016-07-13

    This article explains the concept of parish nursing and provides a historical perspective of this service. It describes the development of a parish nursing service in Heartsease, Norwich, which complements community nursing practice by focusing on the importance of providing spiritual care alongside physical, psychological and social care. Case studies are provided to illustrate the benefits of a parish nursing service to individuals and the community.

  9. Nursing Jobs in Nursing Homes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Torpey, Elka Maria

    2011-01-01

    The need for practical nurses who focus on caring for older people is growing. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the number of people ages 65 and older is expected to increase from 40 million to 72 million between 2010 and 2030. And the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) projects that this increasing population will result in job growth for…

  10. Using poster presentations in nursing education.

    PubMed

    Utecht, Cheryl; Tremayne, Penny

    This article outlines how student nurses evaluated the introduction of a poster presentation within a module. It highlights how such a strategy can: make learning more enjoyable; disseminate information to peers and practice staff; and be used as a teaching aid for patients.

  11. Integrating problem-based learning in a nursing informatics curriculum.

    PubMed

    Demiris, George; Zierler, Brenda

    2010-02-01

    In recent years employers in health care organizations have been recognizing the need for nurses to enter the workforce with a set of informatics competencies. Numerous nursing informatics programs have been established worldwide. The challenge becomes to explore innovative tools that will equip nurses with the appropriate skills to utilize information technology to improve health care quality and patient safety and redesign health care services. This paper presents the introduction of problem-based learning (PBL) modules into an existing nursing informatics curriculum, the Clinical Informatics and Patient Centered Technologies Master program at the School of Nursing, University of Washington. Additionally, we discuss recommendations and challenges associated with the integration of PBL in nursing informatics graduate education including the need for facilitators, flexible technology platforms, promotion and documentation of group work, faculty training and supervision by a program committee.

  12. Nursing's Image on Campus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woolley, Alma S.

    1981-01-01

    In studying the nurse's image at a liberal arts college, it was found that faculty and administrators view nurses as long-suffering drones. On the whole, the image of nursing was positive, with those who had the most contact with the nursing program having a more enlightened image. (CT)

  13. Nurses' Attitudes towards Alcoholics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Speer, Rita D.

    Nurses' attitudes toward the alcoholic can have a profound impact on the person suffering from alcoholism. These attitudes can affect the alcoholic's care and even whether the alcoholic chooses to recover. This study investigated attitudes of approximately 68 nurses employed in hospitals, 49 nurses in treatment facilities, 58 nursing students, and…

  14. Measuring Nursing Care Value.

    PubMed

    Welton, John M; Harper, Ellen M

    2016-01-01

    The value of nursing care as well as the contribution of individual nurses to clinical outcomes has been difficult to measure and evaluate. Existing health care financial models hide the contribution of nurses; therefore, the link between the cost and quality o nursing care is unknown. New data and methods are needed to articulate the added value of nurses to patient care. The final results and recommendations of an expert workgroup tasked with defining and measuring nursing care value, including a data model to allow extraction of key information from electronic health records to measure nursing care value, are described. A set of new analytic metrics are proposed.

  15. [Introduction to nursing aesthetics].

    PubMed

    Chen, Chen-Jung; Tsai, Chuan-Hsiu; Chen, Yi-Chang

    2011-04-01

    Empirical, aesthetic, ethical, and personal knowing are the four fundamental patterns of knowledge inquiry. Of these, the aesthetic knowing pattern is least discussed in nursing literature. This article discusses the definition of nursing aesthetics; its utilization in practice; and correlations between aesthetics and clinical practice. One of the advantages inherent to nursing is its ability to deliver skillful care directly to patients. Skillful performance is essential to reduce discrepancies between goals and patterns. Aesthetic nursing addresses more than the form of nursing. It further addresses the crucial elements of nursing knowledge. The science of nursing is influential in its ability to attain harmony among abundant empiric content, power of beneficence, and pleasure of aesthetic experience. In clinical practice, nurses can employ aesthetic nursing through various channels to create meaning and promote the professional image of nurses. Concepts listed in this article may be utilized in clinical supervision, practice and education.

  16. Advanced urology nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Crowe, Helen

    2014-03-01

    Urology nursing has developed as a specialty over the past few decades in response to several factors, workload demands being a prime reason. Nurses are taking on additional roles and activities including procedures such as cystoscopy and prostate biopsy, and running nurse-led clinics for a variety of urological conditions. Audits of advanced urological nursing practice have shown this care to be of a high standard and investigative procedures performed by these nurses match the diagnostic quality of existing services. Professional urological nursing organizations support the professional needs of these nurses, but the provision of education and training for advanced practice activities remains an unaddressed need. A range of confusing advanced urology nursing titles exists, and uncertainty regarding the roles and scope of practice for these nurses remains a concern. Acceptance and support from medical colleagues is required for the success of advanced urological nursing practice, but opinions on these roles remain divided.

  17. Nursing Home Registered Nurses' and Licensed Practical Nurses' Knowledge of Causes of Falls.

    PubMed

    Gray-Miceli, Deanna; de Cordova, Pamela B; Crane, Giles L; Quigley, Patricia; Ratcliffe, Sarah J

    2016-01-01

    Reducing falls in nursing homes requires a knowledgeable nursing workforce. To test knowledge, 8 validated vignettes representing multifactorial fall causes were administered to 47 nurses from 3 nursing homes. Although licensed practical nurses scored higher than registered nurses in individual categories of falls, when we computed the average score of all 8 categories between groups of registered nurses and licensed practical nurses, registered nurses scored higher (F = 4.106; P < .05) in identifying 8 causal reasons for older adults to fall.

  18. Nursing in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Baumann, Steven L

    2006-10-01

    The current discussion on the nursing shortage needs to focus as much on nursing job satisfaction and retention as on nursing recruitment and education. Selected aspects of the motivational psychology of Abraham Maslow, Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi, and Frederick Hertzberg are here discussed in light of the challenges-opportunities of nursing in Turkey and elsewhere. Also discussed is an innovative program to support the application of nursing theory and professional development in Toronto, Canada.

  19. District nurses prescribing as nurse independent prescribers.

    PubMed

    Downer, Frances; Shepherd, Chew Kim

    2010-07-01

    Nurse prescribing has been established in the UK since 1994, however, limited focus has been placed on the experiences of district nurses adopting this additional role. This phenomenological study explores the experiences of district nurses prescribing as nurse independent prescribers across the West of Scotland. A qualitative Heideggarian approach examined the every-day experiences of independent prescribing among district nurses. A purposive sample was used and data collected using audio taped one-to-one informal interviews. The data was analysed thematically using Colaizzi's seven procedural steps. Overall these nurses reported that nurse prescribing was a predominantly positive experience. Participants identified improvements in patient care, job satisfaction, level of autonomy and role development. However, some of the participants indicated that issues such as support, record keeping, confidence and ongoing education are all major influences on prescribing practices.

  20. Acts of caring: nurses caring for nurses.

    PubMed

    Longo, Joy

    2011-01-01

    Caring behaviors displayed toward nurses by nurse managers and nurse peers play a significant role in establishing relationships that promote a healthy work environment. A qualitative study was done to identify behaviors perceived to be caring toward nurses. The theoretical background used for the study was Nursing as Caring by Boykin and Schoenhofer. Data were collected from focus groups consisting of registered nurses currently employed in the practice setting. Content analysis was used for the analysis. The overarching category that was identified was tending to a caring environment. The following emergent categories were also found: caring through helping and supporting, caring through appreciating, and acknowledging unappreciated caring. The findings suggest that nurses demonstrate caring behaviors toward their colleagues by coming to know them on both a professional and a personal level. These behaviors form the foundation for an environment that supports a consistent demonstration of caring.

  1. Health Instruction Packages: Nursing--Specific Diseases and Disorders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curran, Fern A.; And Others

    Text, illustrations, and exercises are utilized in this set of learning modules to instruct nurses and other health care professionals in the symptoms and treatment of common medical disorders. The first module, by Fern A. Curran, discusses the causes of decubitus ulcers (i.e., bedsores), the physical damage they can do, and methods of preventing…

  2. Decreasing Stress among Nurse Managers: A Long-Term Solution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Judkins, Sharon K.; Ingram, Melba

    2002-01-01

    Hospital nursing managers (n=31) in a rural Texas hospital completed a self-paced module on stress and hardiness (beliefs related to control, commitment, and challenge). Pre/posttest scores showed the module had a significant effect on understanding of stress and coping and increased their hardiness levels. (Contains 25 references.) (SK)

  3. Home Care Nursing via Computer Networks: Justification and Design Specifications

    PubMed Central

    Brennan, Patricia Flatley

    1988-01-01

    High-tech home care includes the use of information technologies, such as computer networks, to provide direct care to patients in the home. This paper presents the justification and design of a project using a free, public access computer network to deliver home care nursing. The intervention attempts to reduce isolation and improve problem solving among home care patients and their informal caregivers. Three modules comprise the intervention: a decision module, a communications module, and an information data base. This paper describes the experimental evaluation of the project, and discusses issues in the delivery of nursing care via computers.

  4. Hospice and Palliative Nurses Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... Press Release Patients & Families About Serious Illness Certified Nurses are Everywhere Advocacy Palliative Nursing Summit Recent Activity ... Principles State Ambassadors Advocacy Resources Healthcare Resources Certified Nurses Day Certified Nurses are Everywhere Certification is Transformational ...

  5. Promoting critical perspectives in mental health nursing education.

    PubMed

    McKie, A; Naysmith, S

    2014-03-01

    This paper explores themes relevant to mental health nursing using the example of one educational module of a nursing degree. The authors argue that the educational preparation of mental health nursing students in higher education must address certain contested philosophical, conceptual, social and ethical dimensions of contemporary mental health care practice. These themes are discussed within the context of a third-year mental health nursing module within a Scottish nursing degree programme. By interlinking epistemology and ontology, the notion of student as 'critical practitioner', involving the encouragement of 'critical thinking', is developed. This is shown via engagement with parallel perspectives of the sciences and the humanities in mental health. Narratives of student nurse engagement with selected literary texts demonstrate the extent to which issues of knowledge, self-awareness and personal development are central to a student's professional journey as they progress through an academic course. The paper concludes by suggesting that these 'critical perspectives' have important wider implications for curriculum design in nursing education. Insights from critical theory can equip nurse educators to challenge consumerist tendencies within contemporary higher education by encouraging them to remain knowledgeable, critical and ethically sensitive towards the needs of their students.

  6. Nursing and Nursing Education: Public Policies and Private Actions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Institute of Medicine (NAS), Washington, DC.

    Results are presented of a study of nursing and nursing education that focused on the need for continued federal support of nursing education, ways to attract nurses to medically underserved areas, and approaches to encourage nurses to stay in the profession. Findings are presented on whether the aggregate supply of generalist nurses will be…

  7. Nursing Home Work Practices and Nursing Assistants' Job Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bishop, Christine E.; Squillace, Marie R.; Meagher, Jennifer; Anderson, Wayne L.; Wiener, Joshua M.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To estimate the impact of nursing home work practices, specifically compensation and working conditions, on job satisfaction of nursing assistants employed in nursing homes. Design and Methods: Data are from the 2004 National Nursing Assistant Survey, responses by the nursing assistants' employers to the 2004 National Nursing Home Survey,…

  8. Using Nursing Languages in School Nursing Practice. Second Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denehy, Janice

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this updated manual is to define and describe standardized nursing languages, highlight how nursing languages are a part of the nursing process, and illustrate through case examples how nursing languages are used in school nursing practice. This manual also summarizes the history and development of three nursing classifications, the…

  9. Addressing the nursing shortage.

    PubMed

    Wilder, Karen S; Halcomb, Kathy; Grubbs, Vicki

    2002-01-01

    Support is essential for students and new nurses to develop confidence in their practice (Oermann & Moffitt-Wolf, 1997). Caring, empowerment and team building are essential in helping affirm the choice of nursing as a profession. Students and new nurses will stay in nursing if they are supported (Meissner, 1986). The nursing community needs to nurture, encourage and inspire its members to learn and to grow; nurses need to treat each other with respect and patience. As Moccia (1990) so aptly stated. "The goal of nursing is to enable others so they might enable still others; to nurse, to teach and to learn with each other in caring ways." "What is modeled for nurses today will shape future practice" (Christensen, 1999).

  10. Value of intensified nursing

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Wilhelm; Konta, Brigitte; Prusa, Nina; Raymann, Cornelia

    2006-01-01

    The concept "intensified nursing" is mentioned in differentiation to concepts of "nursing care" or "nursing" which intensifies resources or patient contact. Especially psychic and social needs of patients are very appreciated in nursing. A similar type of nursing is known under the concept "advanced nursing practice" (ANP) which means, that a specialised, academically trained nurse offers an extended nursing care in which a focus on the published knowledge of evidence based research is made. From the thin literature to this topic a selection of predetermined topics was analysed where at least two articles with a sufficient high methodical quality were available. The selected topic groups were: „Infant and paediatric nursing", "gerontology" and "oncology". Generally the five publications concerning infant and paediatric nursing could conclusive show a benefit of intensified nursing. Further research is still needed to prove intensified nursing care. Two publications could be found to the gerontological intensified nursing; both used an extended nursing model and an enlarged use of resources. Both studies demonstrated a measurable success in the applied parameters. Two studies also could be analysed in the oncological field in which successes were also provable by the applied parameters. The success was given especially in a higher patient satisfaction, one study showed an improved scheduling (time planning) of nurses. There was not one article concerning economic questions of intensified nursing care. It has to be taken into account that the financial resources have to be used effectively also in nursing nowadays. It has to be assumed that the costs are driven by increased use of resources. Savings can be achieved, however, in the form of avoided therapies and days in hospital by intensified nursing. The intensified nursing can be considered as similar cost-effective as conventional models of nursing. Ethically it is necessary to consider that the possibilities of

  11. IL-2 and IL-10 gene polymorphisms are associated with respiratory tract infection and may modulate the effect of vitamin E on lower respiratory tract infections in elderly nursing home residents

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vitamin E supplementation has been suggested as a potential strategy to prevent respiratory infections (RI) in the elderly. Previously, we showed that vitamin E reduced RI in some but not all nursing home residents. The efficacy of vitamin E supplementation may depend on individual factors including...

  12. Role socialization: designing a web-based program to orient new school nurses.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Tia B

    2009-04-01

    Traditional orientation programs for school nurses may not meet the needs of nurses new to the specialty. In this era where technology is a major aspect of our daily lives, the Internet offers new school nurses an avenue where information can be accessed at anytime and from anyplace. This article explores a Web-based orientation program that has been developed for new school nurses in Virginia. Modules in the program outline the history of school nursing, advice from an experienced school nurse, school enrollment requirements, scope of school nursing practice, standards of professional performance, and legal issues in school nursing and are available through a single Web portal. Information presented could be customized to provide specific content unique to practice in any state or area.

  13. Nurse attendee purchasing patterns.

    PubMed

    Weiss, M D; Savik, K; Kjervik, D K

    1993-01-01

    Retention of nursing professionals is crucial in responding to the increasing demand for and complexity of nursing care. Augmenting the decision-making role of nurses is one important retention-related strategy. Purchasing patterns reflect one aspect of nurses' decision-making role. National meetings provide nurses with an opportunity to investigate educational and employment options, as well as to preview technological advances in patient care products and supplies. Yet, the purchasing patterns of nurses related to the marketing of patient care supplies, or educational material at national meetings have rarely been acknowledged or researched. This study investigated the purchasing patterns of nurse attendees as revealed at a national meeting and how attendance influenced purchasing input following the meeting. The study addressed differences in purchasing patterns between specific groups of nurse attendees, as well as the relationship between meeting attendance motivators and purchasing patterns. A descriptive methodology utilizing participant observation at four national nursing meetings and mail survey in four phases was used to determine if there were: (1) identifiable purchasing patterns for nurses attending specific nursing-organization sponsored national meetings, (2) differences in purchasing patterns between nurse attendees from these meetings, (3) differences in self-reported post-meeting purchase input, and (4) relationships between meeting attendance motivators and purchasing patterns. The findings demonstrate that nurse attendee purchasing patterns can be identified and do vary among nursing groups. Nurse attendees at specialty meetings were more likely to act as specifiers, have a more dominant role in purchasing and were more likely to influence product purchases than were nurse attendees from generalist meetings. Self-reports of post-meeting purchasing input demonstrated that nurse attendees utilized information gained at national meetings in

  14. Cross border nursing.

    PubMed

    Cutshall, P

    1993-01-01

    In 1989, the Canadian Nurses Association asked a professional nurse from British Columbia to help nurses in Nepal develop their association an work on nursing legislation. Nepal had about 3000 nurses, including assistant nurse-midwives, 500 of whom were members of the Trained Nurses Association of Nepal (TNAN). It wanted to expand nursing's contribution to health care in Nepal. The nurses wanted to increase the visibility of the association, to become a self-sustaining organization, to establish a licensing law, and to improve the availability of continuing education. The Canadian nurse helped the Nepalese nurses with a workshop on association management covering record keeping and meeting plans. She helped a newly formed committee with licensing law and with decision factors in pursuing self-regulation for nursing. She discussed a work plan and a lobby strategy. She helped another committee develop objectives for the next year. A follow-up visit the next year revealed that the office was operating well and the association was keeping good records. TNAN sponsored workshops on professionalism and leadership. This visit yielded further progress on a licensing law and on identifying ways to become self-sufficient. The nurses discussed the Norwegian Nurses Association's (NNA) interest in providing funds to buy a building for TNAN use and to derive income from rent. NNA eventually donated the funds. By the 1992 visit, the nurses had revised and registered their constitution and bylaws. They had sponsored workshops on HIV/AIDS and mental health. The name was now the Nursing Association of Nepal (NAN). The newly created executive council had met frequently. NAN had expanded from 6 to 11 local branches. It had created 5 committees: fund raising, research, international coordination, nurses welfare, and publications. A workshop in western Nepal centered on quality nursing care. NAN had a role in the government's progress in primary health care and mental health services.

  15. The impact of Chinese cultural values on Taiwan nursing leadership styles: comparing the self-assessments of staff nurses and head nurses.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yuanmay

    2008-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of Chinese culture on nursing leadership behavior in Taiwan nurses. A descriptive study compared staff nurses' assessment of Chinese value in the leadership behavior of their head nurses. Data analysis was made on a convenience sample in Taiwan of 214 head nurses and 2,127 staff nurses who had worked with their head nurse for at least one year. Six medical centers and regional hospitals in northern (Taipei), central (Taichung) and southern (Kaohsiung) Taiwan were recruited for this study. Instruments included the demographic questionnaire, Chinese Value Survey, and Kang's Chinese Leadership Behaviors Module Scale. Results indicated that head nurses scored significantly higher than staff nurses in terms of all cultural values and leadership behaviors. Both staff nurses and head nurses scored the highest mean scores in personal integrity (Yi) and human connectedness (Ren) and the lowest in moral discipline (Li). Staff nurse perceptions of leadership behavior indicated the role of parent to be higher than either the role of director or mentor. Head nurses perceptions of leadership behavior emphasized the role of the director more than either parent or mentor. There were no significant differences between the staff nurses and head nurses in terms of expectative leadership behavior, which gave the role of director higher mean scores than those of either the parent or mentor. Positive and significant associations (r = .266 to r = .334) were found between cultural values and perceptions of leadership behavior. Cultural values predicted 10.6% of leadership behavior variance. The three demographic characteristics of location in northern Taiwan (beta = .09), intention to leave (beta = -.14), and general unit (beta = .10) and the two cultural values of human connectedness (Ren) (beta = .16) and personal integrity (Yi) (beta = .16) together reported a cumulative R2 of 14.6% to explain variance in leadership behavior

  16. Nursing informatics competences still challenging nurse educators.

    PubMed

    Rajalahti, Elina; Saranto, Kaija

    2012-01-01

    In recent years nursing documentation has been one of the most important development areas of nursing informatics (NI) in Finland. The purpose of this study is to describe the development of the nurse educators' competences in nursing documentation during a project called eNNI. The eNNI project (2008-2010) was a cooperative project by nurse educators and working life experts. The goal of the project was to implement the national documentation model and thereby improve operational processes at workplaces. The study includes pre- and post-test questioning of NI applications with a web-based questionnaire (n=136). The data were analyzed with distribution, cross-tabulations and average tests and descriptive statistic multivariate method. According to the results, the ICT skills of the nurse educators were good at the end of the project, and they had good information literacy competence. On the other hand, their advanced NI skills left room for improvement.

  17. The nurse match instrument: Exploring professional nursing identity and professional nursing values for future nurse recruitment.

    PubMed

    Mazhindu, Deborah M; Griffiths, Lauren; Pook, Carol; Erskine, Allen; Ellis, Roger; Smith, Fleur

    2016-05-01

    From April 1st 2015 it will be mandatory for Higher Education Institutions (HEI) in the United Kingdom (UK) providing pre-qualifying health care higher education to use a Values Based Recruitment (VBR) tool, to ensure only the candidates with the "right" personal identity and values commensurate with the Professional Identity of Nursing (PIN) are accepted for nurse education. "Nurse Match" instrument was developed to enhance the recruitment and selection of candidates for pre-qualifying nursing. Action Research into PIN commenced with voluntary, purposive, convenience samples of qualified nurses (n = 30), Service Users (N = 10), postgraduate diploma nurses in mental health (N = 25), third year mental health branch students (N = 20) and adult and child student nurses in years 2 and 3 (N = 20) in Focus Groups. Data collection and analysis occurred concomitantly between July 2013 and October 2014, aided by NVivo 10 software and revealed Key Quality Indicators (KQIs) of the social construction of PIN. Construct development included a literature review spanning the last fifteen years, which identified four main themes; 1. Nursing's ethics and values. 2. Nursing's professional identity and caring. 3. Nursing's emotional intelligence. 4. Nursing's professionalism. Nurse Match offers an evidence-based enhancement to VBR, for future nurse recruitment locally, nationally and internationally.

  18. Call to Action for Nurses/Nursing

    PubMed Central

    Premji, Shahirose S.; Hatfield, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    The 13 million nurses worldwide constitute most of the global healthcare workforce and are uniquely positioned to engage with others to address disparities in healthcare to achieve the goal of better health for all. A new vision for nurses involves active participation and collaboration with international colleagues across research practice and policy domains. Nursing can embrace new concepts and a new approach—“One World, One Health”—to animate nursing engagement in global health, as it is uniquely positioned to participate in novel ways to improve healthcare for the well-being of the global community. This opinion paper takes a historical and reflective approach to inform and inspire nurses to engage in global health practice, research, and policy to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals. It can be argued that a colonial perspective currently informs scholarship pertaining to nursing global health engagement. The notion of unidirectional relationships where those with resources support training of those less fortunate has dominated the framing of nursing involvement in low- and middle-income countries. This paper suggests moving beyond this conceptualization to a more collaborative and equitable approach that positions nurses as cocreators and brokers of knowledge. We propose two concepts, reverse innovation and two-way learning, to guide global partnerships where nurses are active participants. PMID:27144160

  19. Adapting the Nursing Curriculum To Enhance Nurse/Patient Relationship by Meeting the Needs of the Multi-Ethnic, Multicultural South Florida Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belock, Shirley; And Others

    Florida International University's project is designed to sensitize nurses to the intercultural, interracial problems experienced when working with the local, multiethnic community. It consists of an educational module augmenting the technical curriculum and intended to: (1) enhance nurses' knowledge and understanding of cultural and racial…

  20. A Mixed-Method Evaluation of a Workforce Development Intervention for Nursing Assistants in Nursing Homes: The Case of WIN A STEP UP

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, Jennifer Craft; Konrad, Thomas R.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate WIN A STEP UP, a workforce development program for nursing assistants (NAs) in nursing homes (NHs) involving continuing education by onsite trainers, compensation for education modules, supervisory skills training of frontline supervisors, and short-term retention contracts for bonuses and/or wage…

  1. Modulation techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schilling, D. L.

    1982-01-01

    Bandwidth efficient digital modulation techniques, proposed for use on and/or applied to satellite channels, are reviewed. In a survey of recent works on digital modulation techniques, the performance of several schemes operating in various environments are compared. Topics covered include: (1) quadrature phase shift keying; (2) offset - QPSK and MSK; (3) combined modulation and coding; and (4) spectrally efficient modulation techniques.

  2. National Nursing Home Survey

    Cancer.gov

    The National Nursing Home Survey provides includes characteristics such as size of nursing home facilities, ownership, Medicare/Medicaid certification, occupancy rate, number of days of care provided, and expenses.

  3. Emergency Nurses Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ribbon Commands Skip to main content ENA - Emergency Nurses Association - Safe Practice, Safe Care Sign In Join ... Wiley, MSN, RN, CEN, Takes Office as Emergency Nurses Association President 01-04-17 ENA Applauds VA’s ...

  4. Exploring improvisation in nursing.

    PubMed

    Hanley, Mary Anne; Fenton, Mary V

    2007-06-01

    Improvisation has long been considered a function of music, dance, and the theatre arts. An exploration of the definitions and characteristics of this concept in relation to the art and practice of nursing provide an opportunity to illuminate related qualities within the field of nursing. Nursing has always demonstrated improvisation because it is often required to meet the needs of patients in a rapidly changing environment. However, little has been done to identify improvisation in the practice of nursing or to teach improvisation as a nursing knowledge-based skill. This article strives to explore the concept of improvisation in nursing, to describe the characteristics of improvisation as applied to nursing, and to utilize case studies to illustrate various manifestations of improvisation in nursing practice.

  5. Nursing's Preferred Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aydelotte, Myrtle K.

    1987-01-01

    The author discusses future trends for society and relates them to future roles and characteristics of nursing. She presents strategies that nursing professionals should use to be prepared for the stated trends. (CH)

  6. Needed: Nursing Administration Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blair, Eunice M.

    1976-01-01

    A master's program that synthesizes clinical nursing knowledge with management theory and skills is one way to prepare nursing service administrators capable of exerting an influence on today's complex health care system. (Editor)

  7. [Nursing motivation leadership].

    PubMed

    Chen, Ia-Ling; Hung, Chich-Hsiu

    2007-02-01

    The concept of "patients treated as guests" is emphasized in today's medical service and patient-center nursing care. However, with rapid changes in health insurance and hospital accreditation systems as well as increasing consumer awareness, the nurse manager must both efficiently relieve the working pressure of nurses and motivate them. However, it would be an extreme challenge for nurse managers to build a team in which each member works in a self-fulfilling work environment and achieves a high quality of care. This article presents several theories and techniques that relate to motivation strategies. These strategies can serve as a guide and a reference for nurse managers to inspire teamwork and raise morale. It can be expected that increasing nurse satisfaction, performance, and care quality will decrease turnover and desertion rates. Hopefully, this article will assist nurse managers to become better leaders and to achieve success in providing efficient services and good of nursing care quality.

  8. Research Issues: Nursing & Professionalization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenfeld, Peri

    Nursing has always been viewed as a "women's profession" as evidenced by the fact that 97 percent of the 1.9 million registered nurses in the United States are female. The values of helping others, altruism, compassion, and sacrifice are associated with women and with nursing. However, because many young people today do not view these values as…

  9. Nursing students and Haiku.

    PubMed

    Anthony, M L

    1998-01-01

    The emphasis in nursing education is frequently on facts, details, and linear issues. Students need more encouragement to use the creative abilities which exist in each of them. The use of haiku, a simple unrhymed Japanese verse, is one method which stimulates nursing students to use their creativity. A haiku exercise worked well in encouraging a group of nursing students to express their feelings.

  10. Nursing Research: Position Statement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Copp, Laurel; And Others

    The role of the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) in encouraging research through the programs and activities of the member schools is discussed. It is suggested that the dean or administrative head of a college of nursing is in a position to influence nursing research activities. The principal role of the academic dean in…

  11. Nursing in Crisis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fulcher, Roxanne

    2007-01-01

    Both the nation's health-care and nursing education systems are in crisis. While the care provided by registered nurses (RNs) is essential to patients' recovery from acute illness and to the effective management of their chronic conditions, the United States is experiencing a nursing shortage that is anticipated to increase as baby boomers age and…

  12. Nursing in Virginia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Virginia State Council of Higher Education, Richmond.

    Prefacing its comments with an explanatory note concerning the reason for its organization, purpose, and procedure, the Committee utilizes half its report statistically documenting various factors in nursing practice and nursing education in Virginia. The statistics are based on a study, "Nursing and Health Care in Virginia", by Thomas…

  13. Meals in nursing homes.

    PubMed

    Kofod, Jens; Birkemose, Anna

    2004-06-01

    Undernutrition is present among 33% of nursing home residents in Denmark. Hence, it is relevant to examine the meal situation at nursing homes to single out factors that may increase or reduce the residents' food intake. In the ongoing Danish nursing home debate it is claimed that a new type of nursing home improves the residents' meal situation with a positive effect on nutrition. The aim of this work is to test the general hypothesis that (i) residents appreciate the meal situation in these nursing homes and (ii) nutritional status of the residents is improved in this type of nursing home. This study was carried out in four Danish nursing homes at various locations in Denmark. The methods used are qualitative interviews and observations at four nursing homes in combination with measurement of body mass index (BMI) at two of the four nursing homes. Undernutrition is defined as a BMI below 20. The study could not confirm the general hypothesis, as a consistent improvement in the meal situation was not found in the nursing homes studied. But an indication of improved nutritional status was found in two of the nursing homes where the degree of undernutrition was lower than generally found in Denmark. Furthermore, the study indicated that the staff and the residents conceived the nursing homes differently.

  14. Nursing Role Transition Preceptorship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Batory, Susan M.

    2014-01-01

    The preceptorship clinical experience in a practical nursing (PN) program at a Midwestern community college is considered crucial to the PN students' transition from novice nurse to professional nurse. However, no research has been available to determine whether the preceptorship clinical accomplishes its purpose. A case study was conducted to…

  15. Identifying Nursing's Future Leaders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gunning, Carolyn S.; Hawken, Patty L.

    1990-01-01

    A study determined that encouraging and supporting students in professional activities while they were still in school would lead those students to participate in professional nursing organizations after they graduated. Organized nursing needs to identify the factors that influence nurses to join organizations and concentrate on these factors to…

  16. Nursing home staff--nursing student partnership.

    PubMed

    Karam, S E; Nies, D M

    1995-10-01

    A partnership between a nursing home and a school of nursing provides both staff and students with creative opportunities for solving clinical problems. Through collaborative efforts of senior baccalaureate students and the staff administration of a long-term care facility in eastern Virginia, a successful bowel management program was developed and implemented.

  17. Nursing 436A: Pediatric Oncology for Nurses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackman, Cynthia L.

    A description is provided of "Pediatric Oncology for Nurses," the first in a series of three courses offered to fourth-year nursing students in pediatric oncology. The first section provides a course overview, discusses time assignments, and describes the target student population. Next, a glossary of terms, and lists of course goals, long-range…

  18. [Training for nurse coordinators in nursing homes].

    PubMed

    Martin, Jean-René

    2016-01-01

    For the last three years, the Poitou-Charentes regional health agency has organised and funded training for nurse coordinators in nursing homes. The training programme, created in partnership with the Poitiers healthcare manager training institute, enables professionals with multiple responsibilities and missions, who deserve greater recognition, to acquire the necessary skills.

  19. Patient Education for Nurses: Nursing 200A.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirsch, Maureen

    A description is provided of "Patient Education for Nurses," a required course for second-year nursing students which focuses on the assessment of the learning needs of adults, and the planning and and implemention of formal patient education. First, general information on the significance of the course and its place in the School of Nursing…

  20. Standardization of Korean nursing terminology.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyeoun-Ae; Kim, Ji-Hyun; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Lee, Hyang-Yeon; Kim, Jeong-Wha; Kim, Won-Ock; Kim, Ok-Soo; Lee, Young-Whee; Park, Ho-Ran; Choi-Kwon, Smi; Kim, In-Sook; Park, Young-Joo; Park, Young-Im

    2006-01-01

    Korean nursing terminology was standardized to improve sharing and exchange of nursing data and information. English nursing terms were collected from existing nursing terminology, journal articles, nursing records, text books, and nursing/medical dictionaries, translated into Korean and were tested for their validity. More than 9000 terms were standardized and published on a website for further feedback from the users. This study will contribute to communication within the nursing community and with other health care professionals.

  1. [The NAS system: Nursing Activities Score in mobile technology].

    PubMed

    Catalan, Vanessa Menezes; Silveira, Denise Tolfo; Neutzling, Agnes Ludwig; Martinato, Luísa Helena Machado; Borges, Gilberto Cabral de Mello

    2011-12-01

    The objective of this study was to present the computerized structure that enables the use of the Nursing Activities Score (NAS) in mobile technology. It is a project for the development of technology production based on software engineering, founded on the theory of systems development life cycle. The NAS system was built in two modules: the search module, which is accessed using a personal computer (PC), and Data Collection module, which is accessed through a mobile device (Smartphone). The NAS system was constructed to allow other forms, in addition to the NAS tool, to be included in the future. Thus, it is understood that the development of the NAS will bring nurses closer to mobile technology and facilitate their accessibility to the data of the instrument relating to patients, thus assisting in decision-making and in staffing to provide nursing care.

  2. The opinions of Polish nurses and patients on nursing protests.

    PubMed

    Binkowska-Bury, Monika; Marc, Malgorzata; Nagorska, Malgorzata; Januszewicz, Pawel; Ryzko, Jozef

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this study is to explore nurses' and patients' opinions about nurses in Poland going on strike. The study was carried out in Poland between January and June 2009, using 150 nurses and 150 hospitalized patients. The study was conducted using two questionnaire surveys. The main reasons why nursing strikes are organized, in the opinions of nurses, are: higher wages, the improvement of working conditions and the improvement of the image of the nursing profession. The main reasons why nursing strikes are organized, in the opinions of patients, are: higher wages, not abiding standards of employment by government and the improvement of the image of the nursing profession. The main reasons for a lack of active participation in strikes are holidays and occupational and economic matters. Patients and nurses support nursing strikes. Both nurses (53.3%) and patients (42%) said that organizing nursing strikes is right and might improve the occupational situation of nurses.

  3. Wildfire Disasters and Nursing.

    PubMed

    Hanes, Patricia Frohock

    2016-12-01

    Multiple factors contribute to wildfires in California and other regions: drought, winds, climate change, and spreading urbanization. Little has been done to study the multiple roles of nurses related to wildfire disasters. Major nursing organizations support disaster education for nurses. It is essential for nurses to recognize their roles in each phase of the disaster cycle: mitigation, preparedness, response, and recovery. Skills learned in the US federal all-hazards approach to disasters can then be adapted to more specific disasters, such as wildfires, and issues affecting health care. Nursing has an important role in each phase of the disaster cycle.

  4. Community Health Nursing Curriculum. Components in Baccalaureate Nursing Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Catell, Grace Manion

    Community health nursing curriculum components in a sample of baccalaureate nursing programs were investigated. Questionnaires were sent to a sample of 12 National League of Nursing (NLN) accredited, generic, baccalaureate nursing programs representative of the four NLN regions in the United States. Community health nursing content in theory…

  5. Development of a Nursing Data Set for School Nursing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fahrenkrug, Mary Ann

    2003-01-01

    School nurses need to clearly identify how they promote the health and educational achievement of children. School nurses contribute to student health by providing health assessment and nursing interventions, advocating for healthy living, and contributing to prevention of illness and disease management. A Nursing Data Set for School Nursing can…

  6. Economics of nursing.

    PubMed

    Aiken, Linda H

    2008-05-01

    Pay-for-performance initiatives have renewed interest in payment reform as a vehicle for improving nurse staffing and working conditions in hospitals because of research linking investments in nursing and better patient outcomes. This article addresses the economics of nursing from a broad perspective that considers how both national policies such as hospital prospective payment and managerial decisions within institutions impact the outcomes of nurses and patients. Cost offsets are considered from the perspective of savings in patient-care resources that accrue from investments in nursing. Cost offsets are also considered from the perspective of the interactions among different strategies for investing in nursing, including the impact of staffing levels on patient outcomes with varying educational levels of nurses and varying quality of practice environments.

  7. Development of aerospace nursing.

    PubMed

    Barron, N J

    1975-04-01

    In the initial development, the primary purpose of the USAF aerospace nursing program was to prepare the nurse to function as an integral member of the aerospace medical team in support of bioastronautics, occupational health and aerospace medical research programs. The absence of an expanded manned space program has required the aerospace nurse to redirect her energies toward the immediate needs of the aerospace medicine program. Many of the aerospace nurse's more specific functions are dependent upon the mission objectives of the command and military base to which she is assigned. Aerospace nursing reflects a concern for the total health needs of the Air Force community and the application of a holistic approach. It includes all aspects of health and all environmental hazards which alter health. The development of aerospace nursing paves the way for this expanded view of nursing practice.

  8. [Homophobia among nursing students].

    PubMed

    Campo-Arias, Adalberto; Herazo, Edwin; Cogollo, Zuleima

    2010-09-01

    Homophobia is defined as a general negative attitude towards homosexual persons, with implications on public health. This fact has been less investigated among nursing students. The objective of this review was to learn about the prevalence of homophobia and its associated variables among nursing students. A systematic review was performed on original articles published in EBSCO, Imbiomed, LILACS, MEDLINE, Ovid, and ProQuest, including articles published between 1998 and 2008 in English, Portuguese and Spanish. Keywords used were homophobia, homosexuality, and nursing students. Descriptive analysis was performed. Eight studies were analyzed. The incidence of homophobia in nursing students is between 7% and 16%. Homophobia is more common among males and religious conservatism people. Homophobia is quite frequent in nursing students. This negative attitude toward homosexuality may affect services and care giving by nursing professions and could have negative implications in nursing practice.

  9. Evaluation of a Behavior Management Training Program for Nursing Home Caregivers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marsiske, Michael; And Others

    This study examined the effectiveness of a new skills training program designed to increase nurse aides' knowledge of behavior management. The training program, designed as five 90-minute group learning modules, was implemented in two Western Pennsylvania nursing homes over a 5-month period. Topics covered within the training program included…

  10. [Training future nurses in providing care for patients who committed criminal acts].

    PubMed

    Corvest, Karina; Royer, Gilles Ripaille-Le; Dugardin, Thierry

    2011-01-01

    Providing care for patients who have carried out criminal acts is a source of questioning for caregivers, who must position themselves in this specific care relationship. For three years, the nursing training institute (IFSI) in Orthez has offered students an optional module in criminology. Through discussions and critical reflection, its aim is to enable future nurses to be better prepared.

  11. Effects of Self-Study on Achievement in a Medical-Surgical Nursing Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blatchley, Mary Elizabeth; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Independent study is at least as effective as traditional teaching methods, according to this report of a three-year project to evaluate self-study modules, called "minicourses," in a new nursing curriculum. (MF)

  12. Academic Incivility in Nursing Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marlow, Sherri

    2013-01-01

    A well-documented and growing problem impacting the nursing shortage in the United States is the increasing shortage of qualified nursing faculty. Many factors contribute to the nursing faculty shortage such as retirement, dissatisfaction with the nursing faculty role and low salary compensation (American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN),…

  13. Nurse Reinvestment Act. Public Law.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC.

    This document contains the text of the Nurse Reinvestment Act, which amends the Public Health Service Act to address the increasing shortage of registered nurses by instituting a series of policies to improve nurse recruitment and nurse retention. Title I details two initiatives to boost recruitment of nurses. The first initiative includes the…

  14. Competency of Graduate Nurses as Perceived by Nurse Preceptors and Nurse Managers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wise, Vanessa

    2013-01-01

    As newly graduated associate degree nurses (ADN) and baccalaureate degree nurses (BSN) enter into the workforce, they must be equipped to care for a complex patient population; therefore, the purpose of this study was to address the practice expectations and clinical competency of new nurses as perceived by nurse preceptors and nurse managers.…

  15. Perceptions of "Nursing" and "Nursing Care" in the United States by Dutch Nursing Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haloburdo, Esther P.; Thompson, Mary Ann

    2001-01-01

    In the opinions of 11 Dutch nursing students on a study tour of the United States, the U.S. emphasizes technical aspects of nursing and medical over nursing care, lacks team nursing and collegiality, and has a litigious environment. These negative images have implications for the use of U.S. nursing as a benchmark for global education and…

  16. The future of nursing: understanding who nurses are.

    PubMed

    Wyatt, David A

    2013-09-01

    The Institute of Medicine report The Future of Nursing: Leading Change, Advancing Health highlights the need for more information about the nursing workforce. Without attention to the problem, OR nursing is likely to continue to experience the nursing shortage more acutely than other practice areas. By changing how they acquire and use nursing data, and by advocating for improved exchange of data between federal and state governments and nursing schools, facilities can be better prepared for future workforce challenges.

  17. [Response of Taiwan nursing education to today's nursing shortage].

    PubMed

    Chou, Shieu-Ming

    2012-10-01

    The shortage of nursing manpower has recently attracted significant attention from Taiwan society. Government efforts to improve the nursing practice environment have challenged the quality of current domestic nursing education. This article provides an overview of Taiwan nursing education in terms of its development under current nursing shortage conditions and in light of Taiwan's low birthrate, ageing society. A few suggestions for nursing education are listed at the end of the article.

  18. Module Configuration

    DOEpatents

    Oweis, Salah; D'Ussel, Louis; Chagnon, Guy; Zuhowski, Michael; Sack, Tim; Laucournet, Gaullume; Jackson, Edward J.

    2002-06-04

    A stand alone battery module including: (a) a mechanical configuration; (b) a thermal management configuration; (c) an electrical connection configuration; and (d) an electronics configuration. Such a module is fully interchangeable in a battery pack assembly, mechanically, from the thermal management point of view, and electrically. With the same hardware, the module can accommodate different cell sizes and, therefore, can easily have different capacities. The module structure is designed to accommodate the electronics monitoring, protection, and printed wiring assembly boards (PWAs), as well as to allow airflow through the module. A plurality of modules may easily be connected together to form a battery pack. The parts of the module are designed to facilitate their manufacture and assembly.

  19. Nursing: Licensed Practical and Licensed Vocational Nurses

    MedlinePlus

    ... Outlook Occupational Outlook Handbook Handbook of Methods Research Papers Copyright Information Contact & Help Economic Releases Latest Releases » ... and licensed vocational nurses may advance to supervisory positions. Some LPNs and LVNs advance to other healthcare ...

  20. From staff nurse to nurse consultant.

    PubMed

    Fowler, John

    John Fowler Independent education consultant, continues his series for clinical nurses hoping to share their experiences with a wider audience, with advice on developing a potential article for a professional journal.

  1. Ethics and Transcultural Nursing Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eliason, Michele J.

    1993-01-01

    Argues that nursing practice and theory cannot be ethical unless cultural factors are taken into consideration and that ethical/transcultural nursing is central to the philosophy and practice of nursing. (Author)

  2. Ensuring Quality Nursing Home Care

    MedlinePlus

    Ensuring Quality Nursing Home Care Before you choose a nursing home Expert information from Healthcare Professionals Who Specialize in the Care ... Nearly 1.6 million older Americans live in nursing homes in the United States. The move to ...

  3. Military nursing competencies.

    PubMed

    Ross, Mary Candice

    2010-06-01

    Competencies for military nurses are much broader in scope than their civilian counterparts. Not only must they be proficient at basic nursing skills, but they must also quickly master such military skills as protecting themselves and others during attack or threat of attack, caring for major trauma victims under austere conditions, and preparing such patients for transport through the military system of evacuation. This requires consistent and specialized training. This article describes the competencies necessary for practice by military nurses.

  4. Spirituality in nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Melanie; Wattis, John

    2015-05-27

    Spirituality is an important aspect of holistic care that is frequently overlooked. This is because of difficulties in conceptualising spirituality and confusion about how it should be integrated into nursing care. This article explores what is meant by spirituality and spiritually competent practice. It examines attitudes to spirituality, describes factors that might affect the integration of spirituality into nursing care and offers practical guidance to equip nurses to incorporate spirituality into their practice.

  5. Best nursing practice.

    PubMed

    2016-09-01

    As part of this year's centenary celebrations, the RCN is showcasing the best nursing practice, focusing on that which often goes unobserved. Nurses, healthcare assistants and nursing students are asked to share ideas and innovations for improving practice and patient care. These will contribute to the development of a library of good practice and the RCN will invest in a small number of the successful projects. The closing date is 31 December.

  6. Nursing is the room rate.

    PubMed

    Rutherford, Marcella M

    2012-01-01

    Shrinking dollars increase the need for health care stakeholders to clearly understand nursing's worth. For nursing to assure an adequate investment in nurses, it needs to articulate its value drivers. Nursing revenue offers a data source that reflects stakeholder choices and patient needs. The daily nursing billing supports hospital payment and provides cost data, important for hospital financial decision making. This revenue is a tangible asset reflecting nursing value and can be used to justify an investment in the profession. Nursing leadership can use this daily nursing charge data to monitor and measure the impact of efficiencies related to patient care.

  7. The shortage of nurses and nursing faculty: what critical care nurses can do.

    PubMed

    Siela, Debra; Twibell, K Renee; Keller, Vicki

    2008-01-01

    Nurses are needed more than ever to support the healthcare needs of every American. Nurses make up the greatest single component of hospital staff. In 2004, of the almost 3 million nurses in the United States, 83% were employed in nursing, and 58% of those were employed full-time. However, a severe shortage of nurses exists nationwide, putting the safe, effective healthcare of Americans in jeopardy. The concurrent shortage of nursing faculty has significant impact on the potential for admitting and graduating sufficient numbers of nursing students to address the shortage of prepared nurses. A close examination of the demographics of the 3 million nurses provides a context for an in-depth discussion of strategies that critical care nurses can employ to help alleviate the nursing and nurse faculty shortages.

  8. The image of nursing, as perceived by Iranian male nurses.

    PubMed

    Valizadeh, Leila; Zamanzadeh, Vahid; Fooladi, Marjaneh M; Azadi, Arman; Negarandeh, Reza; Monadi, Morteza

    2014-09-01

    The stereotypical public image of nursing is a major concern for male nurses around the world. In this study, we explored how Iranian male nurses perceived the public view of nurses, and their perceptions of themselves. A qualitative descriptive design and content analysis were used to obtain data from 18 purposely-selected male hospital nurses with a baccalaureate nursing degree in Tabriz, Iran. Semistructured interviews were conducted and analyzed. Two main themes emerged: (i) the outsider's view of nursing, which referred to the participants' perceptions of their public image; and (ii) the insider's view, which related to the male nurses' perceptions of themselves. Results included personal transition into a positive professional self-image through the educational process, and continued public perception of nursing as a female profession ill-suited for a man. Strategies to improve the insider's and outsider's views of nursing are listed to help recruit and retain more Iranian male nurses.

  9. Modelling district nurse expertise.

    PubMed

    Burke, Michelle

    2014-12-01

    As changes in society and health provision mean that one in four people over the age of 75 will require nursing care at home, pre-registration adult nurse education increasingly prepares student nurses for a future career within the community. District nurses undertake complex, multidimensional health and social assessments and care in a non-clinical setting and work in partnership with patients and their significant others to promote practical and psychological coping mechanisms and self-care. The district nurse's first assessment visit is key to developing a therapeutic partnership and it is often during this visit that expertise in district nursing practice emerges. The holistic, contextual and dynamic aspects of nursing in the home setting can make district nursing expertise difficult to illustrate and demonstrate within the classroom setting. This article explores the ways in which an understanding of expertise development theory can enable the tacit expertise that occurs within the first assessment visit to be made visible to student nurses, using simulation and expert narrative as a pedagogical strategy.

  10. Communication in Nursing Practice

    PubMed Central

    Kourkouta, Lambrini; Papathanasiou, Ioanna V.

    2014-01-01

    Good communication between nurses and patients is essential for the successful outcome of individualized nursing care of each patient. To achieve this, however, nurses must understand and help their patients, demonstrating courtesy, kindness and sincerity. Also they should devote time to the patient to communicate with the necessary confidentiality, and must not forget that this communication includes persons who surround the sick person, which is why the language of communication should be understood by all those involved in it. Good communication also is not only based on the physical abilities of nurses, but also on education and experience. PMID:24757408

  11. Nursing at the forefront.

    PubMed

    Hunt, L P

    2000-06-01

    The Government sees nurses at the forefront of the drive for improvement in healthcare delivery. In this article, Lord Hunt, the Government spokesperson on nursing, spells out the role that nurses are expected to play in this process. Clinical governance has undoubtedly already been mentioned if not enacted in your Trust, and maybe some of you have applied for the discretionary points now on offer. Whatever the outcome of these and other strategies, the future is going to be different for perioperative nurses, whether we like it or not. Your views, as ever, are welcome....

  12. [Family oriented nursing care].

    PubMed

    Lima-Rodríguez, Joaquin Salvador; Lima-Serrano, Marta; Sáez-Bueno, Africa

    2009-01-01

    Nursing has experienced an important methodological development, in which it gives priority to the individual, although at a socioeconomic level a marked interest is seen in the health care of the family unit and the NANDA (North American Nursing Diagnosis Association), NIC (Nursing Interventions Classification) and NOC (Nursing Outcomes Classification) nursing guidelines, using diagnoses, criteria of results and interventions orientated towards this aim. We consider to the family as an opened system consisted of human elements, with a common history, which they form a functional unit been ruled by own procedure. In this paper we look at those aspects that must be taken into account in nursing assessment of families from a systemic perspective, including some tools for data collection and analysis of information. In addition, we identify specific areas of intervention. We believe that the family must be studied from a nursing care point of view with its own characteristics as opposed to those possessed individually by each of its members. We also believe that, when assessment is centred on the Henderson unaided activities study or the Gordon functional health patterns, they are not useful in assessing the family unit. This work offers an assessment method centred on the family unit, which helps to identify the nursing diagnoses applicable to it. Our proposal, which has been successfully used by nursing students over the last few years, hopes to contribute to quality clinical practice with a tool orientated towards the family.

  13. [Nurses in print].

    PubMed

    1990-01-01

    The paper presents an analysis of the articles on nursing personnel published from September 1989 till June 1990 in the two most widespread newspapers: II Corriere della Sera and La Republica. The nursing profession has been a very important object of nation as well as local chronicles, specifically during the nationwide "nursing emergency." It is striking however to see that nurses themselves are absent as subjects from the debate on the crisis of the profession. It is further underlined that journalists are very rough in their analyses of the cause of professional malaise and in the formulation and discussion of hypotheses for solution.

  14. Module Evaluation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-02-01

    various testing methodologies for the evaluation and characterization of Transmit /Receive (T/R) modules for phased array radars. Discussed are techniques...for characterizing T/R modules in transmit and receive modes under ideal and emulated operation environments. Further, techniques for life testing...characteristics of T/R modules developed during the early and mid 1980’s. Data provided shows the performance in terms of gain and phase for both transmit

  15. Assessing new graduate nurse performance.

    PubMed

    Berkow, Steven; Virkstis, Katherine; Stewart, Jennifer; Conway, Lindsay

    2008-11-01

    New graduate nurses now comprise more than 10% of a typical hospital's nursing staff, with this number certain to grow given the increasing numbers of entrants into the nurse workforce. Concomitantly, only 10% of hospital and health system nurse executives believe their new graduate nurses are fully prepared to provide safe and effective care. As part of a multipronged research initiative on bridging the preparation-practice gap, the Nursing Executive Center administered a national survey to a cross section of frontline nurse leaders on new graduate nurse proficiency across 36 nursing competencies deemed essential to safe and effective nursing practice. Based on survey data analysis, the authors discuss the most pressing and promising opportunities for improving the practice readiness of new graduate nurses.

  16. [Computers in nursing: development of free software application with care and management].

    PubMed

    dos Santos, Sérgio Ribeiro

    2010-06-01

    This study aimed at developing an information system in nursing with the implementation of nursing care and management of the service. The SisEnf--Information System in Nursing--is a free software module that comprises the care of nursing: history, clinical examination and care plan; the management module consists of: service shifts, personnel management, hospital indicators and other elements. The system was implemented at the Medical Clinic of the Lauro Wanderley University Hospital, at Universidade Federal da Paraiba. In view of the need to bring user and developer closer, in addition to the constant change of functional requirements during the interactive process, the method of unified process was used. The SisEnf was developed on a WEB platform and using free software. Hence, the work developed aimed at assisting in the working process of nursing, which will now have the opportunity to incorporate information technology in their work routine.

  17. Understanding the art of feminist pedagogy: facilitating interpersonal skills learning for nurses.

    PubMed

    Lamont, Emma

    2014-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore feminist pedagogy integrated with facilitation skills. A pedagogy project was undertaken with students participating in the BSc (Hons) Nursing programme, whereby a module, "Interpersonal Skills for Nurses" was developed for 72 year 1 students. A feminist pedagogy involves employing the powers of diversity to create an environment where all students' voices are heard. It values the power of sharing to create a community of learners in which teachers and students share their talents, skills and abilities to enhance the learning of all (Chinn, 2001). An end of semester evaluation provided feedback which indicated this was a valuable module to teach year 1 student nurses. It highlighted that student nurses found the topic both interesting and relevant and felt it was taught in a way that promoted their personal development and identity as a nurse.

  18. What's funny about nursing?

    PubMed

    Pierlot, D; Warelow, P J

    1999-12-01

    The authors examine the topic of humour and argue that humour is needed as one of many skills within the nurse patient relationship. We advance the view that humour has been well researched as an agent of therapeutic value and as a communication tool which helps to relieve stress, but, to date is not used to its fullest potential and tends therefore to be underestimated in both general and psychiatric nursing areas. Humour has benefits for both the nurse and the patient having psychological benefits and a vast array of physiological advantages and is regarded by those who use it as a social lubricant acting as a positive in nurse patient relationships. We also argue that it is essential that nurses know when to use humour as timing and appropriateness is imperative in order for it to be most effective. Humour can be used in all areas of clinical nursing practice and may prove useful in being a reliable predictor over the course of a patient's illness. The use of humour can help improve the nurse-patient relationship by initially breaking the ice between nurse and patient. This alternative mode of delivery can then be foundational to other areas of the nurse patient relationship such as self-disclosure, the enhancement of learning and relieving stress. Furthermore, it helps to facilitate and promote mutual health and well being for both the patient and the nurse. The usage of humour in psychiatric nurse settings is discussed and the benefits to both the patients and their staff are outlined as being of immense therapeutic value. The literature perhaps tends to skirt around these benefits somewhat, as psychiatry and laughter in partnership are not really considered important discursive topics.

  19. Nunavut: building nursing capacity.

    PubMed

    Malott, Misty

    2012-03-01

    Recruitment and retention issues associated with the growing nursing shortage in Canada are magnified in Nunavut, where the scope of nursing practice is much broader than in urban settings. The Qikiqtani General Hospital (QGH), a 35-bed hospital in Nunavut's capital, Iqaluit, was the home base for this multi-pronged pilot project that spanned 16 months to March 2011. The goals of the project included creating opportunities for front-line nurses to develop new clinical skills and knowledge and expand their competencies; offering enhanced critical care training relevant to the needs of nurses; and providing a smooth transition to entry to practice in a hospital setting for new graduate nurses. An in-house mentorship program was developed, and contracts were made with three outside parties: the Critical Care Education Network (CRI), the Ottawa Hospital and the Perinatal Partnership Program of Eastern and Southeastern Ontario. A number of professional development opportunities were provided – for example, 26 nurses participated in the CRI's critical care training, and six nurses were trained as CRI trainers.Overall, nurses were satisfied with the accessibility, delivery and applicability of the RTA education opportunities, and all nurses agreed that these opportunities increased their professional skills. A plan for the sustainability of the critical care portion of the Nunavut RTA project is currently in place, and the QGH is in the process of hiring a nurse educator for the hospital. This hiring will be a key piece to sustain the project initiatives. If the mentorship program is to continue, it will be essential to hire someone dedicated to the orientation of new graduates and new nurses.

  20. Course development for web-based nursing education programs.

    PubMed

    Schnetter, Vicki A; Lacy, Darlene; Jones, Melinda Mitchell; Bakrim, Khadija; Allen, Patricia E; O'Neal, Cynthia

    2014-11-01

    Developing and launching online programs requires nurse educators to reframe content and rethink traditional teaching methodologies. Creating a framework for course design and standardization of templates can result in online learning that is student centered while allowing the institution to scale up enrollment with quality education at the core. This article explores the considerations needed for effective, interactive online course delivery in nursing education. Working in conjunction with other university technology stakeholders, nurse educators can select the learning management system with the features that will work best for the program, develop the course structure and organization through adherence to template rules for both syllabi and course modules, and develop appropriate learning activities to assure student exposure to content identified in the course objectives. With these structure pieces in place process becomes the second focus for nurse educators in online programs. Process activities for active engagement are discussed.

  1. Are international nursing students disadvantaged by UK patients?

    PubMed

    De, Diana

    International students bring billions of pounds annually to the UK through higher education. Although nursing students may not contribute as significantly in monetary terms as traditional graduate and postgraduate learners, they do, however, bring with them other benefits in terms of wealth of experience, diversity and cultural capital, often looking after client groups sometimes marginalized by mainstream society. The reality is that many nursing homes and care homes simply would not function without internationally recruited nurses contributing to our health service and the wellbeing of society. The author of this article is a module manager for a Nursing and Midwifery Council regulated Overseas Nurses Programme, which runs up to four times per year at a large Faculty of Health, Sports and Science in South Wales. Anecdotal evidence from class disclosures by international nursing students provided the rationale for this independent enquiry. Listening to verbal accounts suggested that internationally-recruited nurses were experiencing episodes of 'unfair treatment' by patients under their care when undertaking the clinical practice component of the programme.

  2. Registered Nurse Education and the Registered Nurse Job Market.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunt, Howard Allan

    This effort compares the graduates of the three types of Registered Nurse (RN) education programs (three-year Diploma in Nursing, two-year Associate Degree in Nursing (ADN), and four-year Bachelor of Science Degree in Nursing). The basic objective is to determine whether they are perfect substitutes, especially whether ADN graduates can adequately…

  3. Current Nursing Research Grants Supported by the Division of Nursing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Institutes of Health (DHEW), Bethesda, MD. Div. of Nursing.

    The United States Public Health Service Nursing Research Project Grants established in 1955, support studies dealing with all aspects of nursing practice, organization and delivery of nursing services to the patient, nursing as an occupation, and ways of communicating research findings. Intended as a means of sharing information about ongoing…

  4. How do nursing students perceive substance abusing nurses?

    PubMed

    Boulton, Martha A; Nosek, Laura J

    2014-02-01

    Substance abuse among nurses was recognized by nurse leaders and professional nursing organizations as a growing threat to patient safety and to the health of the abusing nurse more than 30years ago. Although numerous studies on nurse impairment were published in the 1980s and 1990s, there was minimal focus on student nurses' perceptions about impaired nurses and less research has been published more recently, despite a growing rate of substance abuse. A quasi-experimental study to explore the perceptions of student nurses toward nurses who are chemically dependent was conducted using a two-group, pretest-posttest design. The Perception of Nurse Impairment Inventory (PNII) was completed by student nurses at the beginning of their junior course work, prior to formal education about substance abuse. The PNII was repeated after the students received substance abuse education. The PNII was also completed by a control group of sophomore student nurses who did not receive the formal substance abuse education. A repeated measures analysis of variance was used to measure the differences between the two groups of students. Students who received the education chose more compassionate responses on the PNII and were more likely to respond that an impaired nurse's supervisor is responsible for supporting and guiding the impaired nurse to access professional care. Discrepancies in study findings about the efficacy of education for effecting positive attitudes of student nurses toward impaired nurses may be related to the length and type of the education.

  5. Hospice Education Program for Nurses. Health Manpower References.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    HCS, Inc., Potomac, MD.

    This publication contains a curriculum to prepare nurses for delivery of hospice care for the terminally ill. It provides training manuals for both participant and facilitator in a preservice or inservice Hospice Education Program. Each manual (participant and facilitator) includes nine modules: (1) Hospice Care Concept; (2) Communication Skills;…

  6. AACC Nursing Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Association of Community Colleges, Washington, DC.

    This document, presented in the form of PowerPoint print outs, indicates a total of 420 (nearly 60%) associate degree nursing (ADN) programs responded to a survey conducted by the American Association of Community Colleges' (AACC) Nursing and Allied Health Initiative (NAHI) for 2003. The sample is representative based on urbanicity and region.…

  7. The School Nurse Practitioner

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Igoe, Judith Bellaire

    1975-01-01

    Denver's four-month intensive course in primary health care for experienced nurses serving in disadvantaged areas, followed by inservice training with regular consultation available from a local physician, has produced school nurse practitioners who extend the traditional role to include comprehensive evaluations, management of minor illnesses,…

  8. Brokerage in multicultural nursing.

    PubMed

    Chalanda, M

    1995-01-01

    Nurses in contact with clients from different cultures often encounter beliefs at appear inconsistent with conventional Western medicine, resulting in the need for the nurse to act as a broker--i.e. translating and processing messages, instructions and belief systems from one group to a another.

  9. School Nurse Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borja, Mary C.; Amidon, Christine; Spellings, Diane; Franzetti, Susan; Nasuta, Mary

    2009-01-01

    This article features school nurses from across the country who are championing for school-located influenza immunization within their communities. These nurses are: (1) Mary C. Borja; (2) Christine Amidon; (3) Diane Spellings; (4) Susan Franzetti; and (5) Mary Nasuta. (Contains 6 figures.)

  10. Hospital Nurse Aide. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iowa Univ., Iowa City. Coll. of Education.

    This report presents results of a project to revise the current 120-hour advanced nurse aide course to include all recommended minimum competencies. A three-page description of project objectives, activities, and outcomes is followed by a list of the competencies for the 75-hour nurse aide course for long-term care and for the 120-hour advanced…

  11. Comparison of Nursing Roles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macdonough, Georgia P.

    2001-01-01

    This 1972 paper presents 12 comparisons of the nurse's role in the school versus in the hospital. For example, in the hospital, patients know they are ill and want to get well, while in school patients may not recognize that they need help. In the hospital, the nurse's workload is determined for her, while in school, it is self-determined. (SM)

  12. Registered Nurse (Associate Degree).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center on Education and Training for Employment.

    This document, which is designed for use in developing a tech prep competency profile for the occupation of registered nurse (with an associate degree), lists technical competencies and competency builders for 19 units pertinent to the health technologies cluster in general and 5 units specific to the occupation of registered nurse. The following…

  13. Nurse Practitioner Pharmacology Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waigandt, Alex; Chang, Jane

    A study compared the pharmacology training of nurse practitioner programs with medical and dental programs. Seventy-three schools in 14 states (40 nurse practitioner programs, 19 schools of medicine, and 14 schools of dentistry) were surveyed by mailed questionnaire about the number of hours devoted to the study of pharmacology. The major findings…

  14. Reference Sources for Nursing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nursing Outlook, 1978

    1978-01-01

    The tenth revision of a list of reference works for nurses, revised by a committee of the Interagency Council on Library Resources for Nursing, listed by type of publication as abstract journals, audiovisuals, bibliographies, books, dictionaries, directories, pharmacologies, indexes, guides, and so on. (MF)

  15. Continuing Education in Nursing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curtis, Frieda Smith; And Others

    This book is planned to provide guidance for nurses in planning, conducting, and evaluating programs of continuing education; content is built on the collective experiences and thinking of a regional group of nurse educators engaged in developing a coordinated program for a large geographical area. After discussion of changing patterns of health…

  16. School Nursing Certification Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Selekman, Janice; Wolfe, Linda C.

    2010-01-01

    The 2010 update to the resource you have been waiting for to help you prepare to take the National School Nurse Certification Exam. Dr. Janice Selekman DNSc, RN, NCSN, a recognized expert in pediatric nursing, and NASN Past President Linda C. Wolfe MEd, BSN, RN, NCSN, FNASN are the authors. This text was created in response to many years of…

  17. School Nursing in Illinois.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Endicott, Bettye; And Others

    This handbook for pupil personnel workers traces the historical development of school nursing and its establishment in Illinois. The role and function of school nurses are described, including planning and implementing optimum school health standards, protecting student health, and promoting well-being through the use of an interdisciplinary…

  18. Clinical Nursing Records Study (Executive Summary)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-08-01

    assessments received praise for those records completed during testing, issues surrounding identification and prioritizing nursing care problems and...of inpatient treatment and the patient’s responses. Nursing documentation reflects nursing practice patterns based on planned nursing care , which, in...Nursing History/Nursing Assessment/ Nursing Care Plans); the necessity of transcribing all orders appearing on physician order sheets to allow for

  19. Nurses working outside of nursing: societal trend or workplace crisis?

    PubMed

    Black, Lisa; Spetz, Joanne; Harrington, Charlene

    2008-08-01

    The phenomenon of career inactivity in professional nursing has been historically portrayed in the literature as a major cause of disequilibrium in the registered nurse labor market. However, there remains a general lack of understanding of the diverse forces that shape the inactive nurse pool and the likelihood that this population will return to nursing. The purpose of this study was to examine the population of registered nurses who are active in the labor market but work in nonnursing employment. Specifically, this study sought to determine the relative importance of nonworkplace- and workplace-related reasons for working outside of nursing. The results demonstrate that dissatisfaction with the nursing workplace is the key reason cited by actively licensed nurses for working outside of nursing employment. These findings suggest that policy and employer remedies are needed to improve the nursing workplace.

  20. Nurses across borders: foregrounding international migration in nursing history.

    PubMed

    Choy, Catherine Ceniza

    2010-01-01

    Although the international migration of nurses has played a formative role in increasing the racial and ethnic diversity of the health care labor force, nursing historians have paid very little attention to the theme of international migration and the experiences of foreign-trained nurses, A focus on international migration complements two new approaches in nursing history: the agenda to internationalize its frameworks, and the call to move away from "great women, great events" and toward the experiences of "ordinary" nurses. This article undertakes a close reading of the life and work of Filipino American nurse Ines Cayaban to reconceptualize nursing biography in an international framework that is attentive to issues of migration, race, gender, and colonialism. It was a Hannah keynote lecture delivered by the author on June 5, 2008, as part of the CAHN/ACHN (Canadian Association for the History of Nursing/Association Canadienne pour l'Histoire du Nursing) International Nursing History Conference.

  1. [Nurse anesthetist in France].

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Ju; Yann, Douchy; De Almeida, Sylvie; Deckert, Christine; Gauss, Tobias; Bonneville, Claire Tae; Merckx, Paul; Mantz, Jean

    2006-12-01

    We present the system of nurse anesthetist (Infirmier Anesthésiste Diplômé d'Etat: IADE) in France to the community of Japanese anesthesiologists. This French system with 70 years' history is older than the Japan Society of Anesthesiologists itself. There are 7000 nurse anesthetists in France now and the number of nurse anesthetists increases by 450-500 each year. Training to become a nurse anesthetist requires at least two years' experience as a general nurse and the general nurse must pass an examination after two years' special training in an anesthetistic nurse school to acquire the national certification. The nurse anesthetist's profession is regulated by French law. They work in a team with certified anesthesiologists. They can perform many kinds of anesthetic tasks including tracheal intubation and insertion of arterial catheter under the responsibility and supervision of certified anesthesiologists. The nurse anesthetists are not allowed to perform spinal, epidural, conduction and local anesthesia, although they can maintain these anesthesia and control these methods, e.g., by injecting local anesthetic agents through epidural catheter, following a specified prescription. The nurse anesthetists are not allowed to insert central venous and pulmonary artery catheters, although they can manage them. They are allowed to administer inhalation anesthetic agents, and inject venous anesthetic agents, muscle relaxants, their antagonists, and opioids by their own initiatives, but the decision for the use of catecholamine and emergency drugs is reserved to certified anesthesiologists. The nurse anesthetists perform other tasks preparing and checking anesthetic agents and equipment such as anesthetic machine, monitor, and defibrillator everyday, and sometimes use autologous blood recovery systems. The relationship between the certified anesthesiologist and the nurse anesthetist is marked by mutual respect, confidence and cooperation at each step of the anesthetic

  2. Characteristics of intuitive nurses.

    PubMed

    Miller, V G

    1995-06-01

    A description is provided of the process used to verify characteristics of intuitive nurses that had been reported in the literature. These characteristics supplied the framework for construction of the Miller Intuitiveness Instrument (MII) reported earlier (Miller, 1993). Evidence for validity of the MII was provided in the Miller (1993) study by examining factor analyses and correlations with the intuitive component of the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI). The following characteristics were subsequently verified: Intuitive nurses are willing to act on their intuitions, are skilled clinicians, and incorporate a spiritual component in their practices. In addition, intuitive nurses express an interest in the abstract nature of things and are risk takers. Intuitive nurses prefer intuition to sensing (as reflected by the MBTI) as a way to take in information. They are extroverted and express confidence in their intuitions. Likewise, nurses who delay making decisions until all the information is in are more intuitive than those who make decisions abruptly.

  3. [Gender mainstreaming and nursing].

    PubMed

    Wang, Hsiu-Hung

    2011-12-01

    Gender mainstreaming is one of the most important strategies in promoting global gender equality. The Taiwan government launched policies on gender mainstreaming and gender impact assessment in 2007 in response to strong public and academic advocacy work. With rising awareness of gender issues, nursing professionals in Taiwan should keep pace with global trends and become actively involved in advancing gender-mainstreaming policies. This article shows that nursing professionals should prepare themselves by cultivating gender competence, understanding gender-related regulations, recognizing the importance of gender impact assessment implementation, integrating gender issues into nursing education, conducting gender-related research and participating in decision-making processes that promote gender mainstreaming. Nursing professionals should enhance their knowledge and understanding of gender mainstreaming-related issues and get involved in the gender-related decision-making process in order to enhance gender awareness and women's health and further the professional development of nurses.

  4. Workplace bullying in nurses.

    PubMed

    Quine, L

    2001-01-01

    The article reports a study of workplace bullying in community nurses in an NHS trust. The aims were to determine the prevalence of bullying, to examine the association between bullying and occupational health outcomes, and to investigate whether support at work could moderate the effects of bullying. Forty-four percent of nurses reported experiencing one or more types of bullying in the previous 12 months, compared to 35 percent of other staff. Fifty percent of nurses had witnessed the bullying of others. Nurses who had been bullied reported significantly lower levels of job satisfaction and significantly higher levels of anxiety, depression and propensity to leave. They were also more critical of aspects of the organizational climate of the trust. Support at work was able to protect nurses from some of the damaging effects of bullying.

  5. Gerontological Nursing Charlotte Eliopoulos Gerontological Nursing Lippincott Williams& Wilkins $58.95(&35) 652pp 9780781753449 0781753449 [Formula: see text].

    PubMed

    2009-11-24

    The Broad content of this text will appeal to foundation nursing and those at higher levels of practice. There is a lot of valuable information that is rarely covered in UK texts; for example, the chapter on 'safe medication use' offers a succinct module of pharmacology for the uninitiated and a useful revision for the more advanced.

  6. Leveraging data to transform nursing care: insights from nurse leaders.

    PubMed

    Jeffs, Lianne; Nincic, Vera; White, Peggy; Hayes, Laureen; Lo, Joyce

    2015-01-01

    A study was undertaken to gain insight into how nurse leaders are influencing the use of performance data to improve nursing care in hospitals. Two themes emerged: getting relevant, reliable, and timely data into the hands of nurses, and the leaders' ability to "connect the dots" in working with different stakeholders. Study findings may inform nurse leaders in their efforts to leverage data to transform nursing care.

  7. Fund-raising tips for nurse leaders and nurse executives.

    PubMed

    Fitzpatrick, Joyce J

    2014-01-01

    Fund-raising may be new to most nurse leaders and executives. This article focuses on dispelling the myths and mystery that surrounds nursing philanthropy. Key myths are addressed with supporting information to dispel them. Several practical tips are presented to enhance nurse leaders' involvement in philanthropy. Two recent gifts to hospital nursing departments are described as exemplars of relationship building and of nurses investing in their own future and that of the profession.

  8. Nurse-Faculty Census, 1968.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National League for Nursing, New York, NY. Research and Development.

    This is the 1968 biennial census of nurse-faculty members teaching in nursing programs and in cooperating institutions providing clinical experiences for students in nursing. It is intended as an overview of current conditions and a basis for future estimates and planning. As of January 1968, 20,077 full-time and 3,554 part-time nurse-faculty…

  9. Who Will Teach the Nurses?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaRocco, Susan A.

    2006-01-01

    In 1999, most deans of nursing schools that belonged to the American Association of Colleges of Nursing reported that they did not have a faculty shortage. By 2005, however, 75 percent of U.S. nursing schools cited faculty shortages as the major reason for denying admission to qualified students. The average age of nurse educators holding PhDs is…

  10. Transforming Articulation Barriers in Nursing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waters, Verle

    Barriers to educational mobility for nurses have existed since the mid-1960s. In 1963, the National League for Nursing (NLN) adopted a position that ruled out articulation of any kind between associate degree in nursing (ADN) and bachelors in science in nursing (BSN) programs. In the mid-1970s, a countermovement took shape, supporting open…

  11. Role of the School Nurse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maryland State Dept. of Health and Mental Hygiene, Baltimore.

    These guidelines on Maryland school nursing are based on recommendations of a Maryland committee composed of representatives from state and local health and education agencies, schools of nursing, the Board of Nursing, Maryland State School Health Council, directors of nursing, and a physician. The standards established by the American Nurses…

  12. Reflective writing and nursing education.

    PubMed

    Craft, Melissa

    2005-02-01

    Reflective writing is a valued tool for teaching nursing students and for documentation, support, and generation of nursing knowledge among experienced nurses. Expressive or reflective writing is becoming widely accepted in both professional and lay publications as a mechanism for coping with critical incidents. This article explores reflective writing as a tool for nursing education.

  13. Nursing and nursing education in Haiti.

    PubMed

    Garfield, Richard M; Berryman, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Haiti has long had the largest proportion of people living in poverty and the highest mortality level of any country in the Americas. On January 12, 2010, the most powerful earthquake to hit Haiti in 200 years struck. Before the earthquake, half of all Haitians lacked any access to modern medical care services. Health care professionals in Haiti number around one-fourth of the world average and about one-tenth the ratio present in North America. The establishment of new primary care services in a country where half of the people had no access to modern health care prior to the earthquake requires advanced practice roles for nurses and midwives. With a high burden of infectious, parasitic, and nutritional conditions, Haiti especially needs mid-level community health workers and nurses who can train and supervise them for public health programs. As in many other developing countries, organized nursing lacks many of the management and planning skills needed to move its agenda forward. The public schools prepare 3-year diploma graduates. These programs have upgraded the curriculum little in decades and have mainly trained for hospital service. Primary care, public health program management, and patient education had often not been stressed. Specializations in midwifery and HIV care exist, while only informal programs of specialization exist in administration, surgery, and pediatrics. An advanced practice role, nonetheless, is not yet well established. Nursing has much to contribute to the recovery of Haiti and the revitalization if its health system. Professional nurses are needed in clinics and hospitals throughout the country to care for patients, including thousands in need of rehabilitation and mental health services. Haitian nursing colleagues in North America have key roles in strengthening their profession. Ways of supporting our Haitian colleagues are detailed.

  14. Doctorate in nursing practice: a survey of massachusetts nurses.

    PubMed

    DeMarco, Rosanna F; Pulcini, Joyce; Haggerty, Lois A; Tang, Trinh

    2009-01-01

    Recently, the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) resolved that a new practice degree, the doctorate in nursing practice (DNP), is to become the terminal practice degree and minimum education standard for advanced practice nurses by the year 2015(American Association of Colleges of Nursing. (2004). AACN position statement on the practice doctorate in nursing. Retrieved July 1, 2007, from http://www.aacn.nche.edu.html). The DNP will have a clinical-intensive focus. Advanced practice nurses potentially impacted by this resolution will include nurse practitioners, nurse anesthetists, nurse midwives, and clinical nurse specialists. A task force at the William F. Connell School of Nursing at Boston College conducted an electronic survey in 2006 in an attempt to understand nurses' thoughts about doctoral preparation and the interest of nurses in Massachusetts in pursuing doctoral study. A self-selected group of 376 nurses participated in the study. Nurses identified both positive and negative perceptions related to the degree's viability and practicality, with a majority (55%) preferring the DNP as an educational option.

  15. Nursing student attitudes toward statistics.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Lizy; Aktan, Nadine M

    2014-04-01

    Nursing is guided by evidence-based practice. To understand and apply research to practice, nurses must be knowledgeable in statistics; therefore, it is crucial to promote a positive attitude toward statistics among nursing students. The purpose of this quantitative cross-sectional study was to assess differences in attitudes toward statistics among undergraduate nursing, graduate nursing, and undergraduate non-nursing students. The Survey of Attitudes Toward Statistics Scale-36 (SATS-36) was used to measure student attitudes, with higher scores denoting more positive attitudes. The convenience sample was composed of 175 students from a public university in the northeastern United States. Statistically significant relationships were found among some of the key demographic variables. Graduate nursing students had a significantly lower score on the SATS-36, compared with baccalaureate nursing and non-nursing students. Therefore, an innovative nursing curriculum that incorporates knowledge of student attitudes and key demographic variables may result in favorable outcomes.

  16. Critical care nursing.

    PubMed

    Dracup, K

    1987-01-01

    The research pertaining to the delivery of nursing care in the ICU was reviewed to describe: the impact of the unit structure and organization, including policies and procedures, on patients, nurses, and families; the process of critical care nursing; the outcomes of critical care nursing; some of the ethical issues germane to the care of the critically ill patient. Although these areas of inquiry are quite diverse, a number of similarities can be identified. The most obvious of the similarities was that, with few exceptions, the studies pertaining to delivery of nursing care were performed by researchers from a variety of disciplines other than nursing, including medicine, psychology, public health, and economics. In many instances, such as the studies of patients' stress experiences in ICUs, these efforts enhanced our knowledge of the phenomena and complemented or replicated the efforts of nurse researchers. Unfortunately, in some areas nurse researchers were quite absent, with the result that the studies lacked a nursing perspective. For example, the large body of knowledge related to the effects of critical care on patient outcome reflected medicine's orientation toward cure. While it is important to measure the effect of nursing care in the ICU on patient survival, the effect of nursing efforts on short- and long-term quality of life, functional status, and health maintenance is also critical and remains unknown. Nurse researchers need to build on the data base already acquired about critical care. Even more important, they need to fashion programs of research focused on the concepts central to the discipline of nursing. A second similarity relates to the increasing quality of the reported research over the past decade. In general, early descriptive studies were conducted in a single critical care unit with a small and often biased sample. These gave way to more carefully designed, multicenter studies, although lack of randomization procedures continued to be

  17. Child maltreatment: every nurse's business.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Julie; Bradbury-Jones, Caroline

    2015-03-18

    Every nurse has a responsibility for protecting children, even nurses who do not work directly with children. However, nurses may be reluctant to deal with child maltreatment issues because they do not want to get things wrong or make a situation worse. The aim of this article is to assist nurses in their child protection role. It describes the different types of child maltreatment, the risk factors and potential consequences. The nurse's role in recognising and responding to suspected child maltreatment is discussed.

  18. Nursing and the next millennium.

    PubMed

    Huch, M H

    1995-01-01

    On March 19, 1993, in Toronto, Canada, at Discovery International, Inc.'s, Biennnial Nurse Theorist Conference, five theorists participated in a panel discussion on: caring as an essence of nursing; the value of continuing to develop nursing theory; what constitutes nursing research; the role of advanced practice nurses. The theorists were Imogene M. King, Madeleine M. Leininger, Rosemarie Rizzo Parse, Hildegard E. Peplau, and Martha E. Rogers. Marlaine C. Smith was the moderator and presented the questions to the panel.

  19. Nursing Practice Environment and Registered Nurses' Job Satisfaction in Nursing Homes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choi, JiSun; Flynn, Linda; Aiken, Linda H.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Recruiting and retaining registered nurses (RNs) in nursing homes is problematic, and little research is available to guide efforts to make nursing homes a more attractive practice environment for RNs. The purpose of this study was to examine relationships between aspects of the nursing practice environment and job satisfaction among RNs…

  20. The integration of an online module on student learning.

    PubMed

    Yehle, Karen S; Chang, Karen

    2012-11-01

    Heart failure is a prevalent and costly condition. Patients with better self-management are less likely to be rehospitalized. An online interactive heart failure module was developed and integrated into a medical-surgical nursing course to assist students in learning how to care for patients with heart failure. The purpose of this study was to examine whether the integration of an online heart failure module improved baccalaureate nursing students' heart failure self-management knowledge. A pretest/posttest design was used to examine the effects of student knowledge of heart failure self-management following implementation of an online module. Among 235 students, significant improvement of heart failure self-management knowledge was observed (P < .05). The mean posttest scores ranged from 13.82 to 15.93. Students had problems mastering knowledge of weight monitoring, use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, symptoms to report to physicians, and potassium-based salt substitutes. These findings were similar to four studies examining nurses' knowledge of heart failure. Students and nurses have difficulty mastering similar heart failure education concepts. An additional strategy, such as simulated or case scenarios, needs to be developed to help nurses and nursing students master all key concepts of heart failure self-management.

  1. Health Occupations Curriculum. Skills for Nursing Assistant. Volume 3, Unit 8.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arizona State Dept. of Education, Phoenix.

    Part of a health occupations program, this instructional unit contains 13 learning modules for use in training nursing assistants. Covered in the modules are (1) making beds, bathing patients, and measuring intake and output; (2) body mechanics, moving and lifting patients, range of motion exercises, and caring for patients in casts or traction;…

  2. Student Material for Competency-Based Education Curriculum for Licensed Practical Nurse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Associated Educational Consultants, Inc., Pittsburgh, PA.

    This curriculum for licensed practical nurse contains 18 units. Each unit is divided into modules comprised of task or job-related competencies. A student competency sheet (SCS) provided for each task is organized into this format: unit number and name, module letter and name of the group of related tasks, and number and name of task; performance…

  3. My Name is Nurse.

    PubMed

    2016-05-01

    : Editor's note: From its first issue in 1900 through to the present day, AJN has unparalleled archives detailing nurses' work and lives over more than a century. These articles not only chronicle nursing's growth as a profession within the context of the events of the day, but they also reveal prevailing societal attitudes about women, health care, and human rights. Today's nursing school curricula rarely include nursing's history, but it's a history worth knowing. To this end, From the AJN Archives offers articles selected to fit today's topics and times.This month's article, from the May 1993 issue, is a tongue-in-cheek editorial by former editor-in-chief Mary B. Mallison. In it, she introduces us to the "PerceptoPhone"-an imaginary device that allows the wearer to access the thoughts of nurses. PerceptoPhones are used to educate hospital trustees on nurses' essential but often invisible abilities: to identify early warning signs of complications; teach and encourage; and carefully assess, soothe, and heal-abilities that are "hard to quantify with usual accounting methods." More than 20 years later, we still look for better ways to teach the public about nursing.

  4. Wanted-nurses. Ethical issues and the nursing shortage.

    PubMed

    Erlen, Judith A

    2004-01-01

    The persistent nursing shortage is challenging the values and beliefs of the nursing profession and causing nurses to ask how they can fulfill their ethical responsibilities to patients when there are an insufficient number and a maldistribution of nurses. Nurses are expressing job dissatisfaction, experiencing moral distress, and wondering about their inability to provide quality patient care. In this article, the author addresses the commitment to care for patients and the ethical dilemma with which nurses are grappling: caring for self versus caring for others. Recommendations for possible action include reenvisioning the profession of nursing, empowering nurses, providing support, and restructuring the work environment. Taken together, these actions have the potential to reduce the moral distress that nurses are experiencing and to enable them to honor their commitment to patient care.

  5. Swedish forensic nursing care: nurses' professional contributions and educational needs.

    PubMed

    Rask, Mikael; Aberg, Jonas

    2002-10-01

    Nurses (registered nurses, RN, and licensed mental nurses, LMN) working in five Swedish forensic psychiatric units filled in a questionnaire designed for general psychiatric nursing, but modified for forensic use. In this report, data regarding how nursing care could contribute to improved care and the organizational changes needed and what knowledge the nurses need, in order to be able to meet the demands in the future, were analysed by means of content analysis. The salient findings were: (i) an interpersonal patient-nurse relationship based on trust, empathy, respect and responsibility for the patients' personal resources and knowledge seems to be the essence of nursing care and a way to improve care; and (ii) the nurses' educational needs emanate from different treatment modalities, how to perform different treatments, how to establish developing relationships and in-service training adapted to the ward-specific problems.

  6. Presentation skills for nurses.

    PubMed

    Foulkes, Mark

    2015-02-20

    This article emphasises the importance of effective presentation skills. Such skills allow nurses to share knowledge and expertise and to communicate clearly in a range of workplace scenarios. Nurses are increasingly being asked to present in formal and informal situations, such as conferences, poster presentations, job interviews, case reports and ward-based teaching. This article explores the principles underpinning the development of these skills, discusses the situations in which they could be applied and demonstrates how nurses might improve and develop as presenters.

  7. Crisis intervention for nurses.

    PubMed

    Chase, Emily

    2013-06-01

    Cancer diagnoses and treatments can be crisis-causing events that overwhelm the usual coping abilities of patients and their families. Oncology nurses constantly are observing and attending to patients' diverse needs, ranging from biomedical to emotional, social, and psychological. Nurses have the chance to be first responders in times of patient crises, as they are in the position to recognize the crisis, respond effectively, and transform the crisis into a pivotal learning experience. This article discusses a way to think about patient and family crises that empowers nurses to respond in a manner appropriate to the cultural context and respectful of the individual space of the patient.

  8. Emotional intelligence and nursing performance among nursing students.

    PubMed

    Beauvais, Audrey M; Brady, Noreen; O'Shea, Eileen R; Griffin, Mary T Quinn

    2011-05-01

    Some scholars have proposed that the educational preparation of nurses can be improved by incorporating emotional intelligence lessons into the nursing curricula. However, the relationship between emotional intelligence and nursing performance in nursing students is unknown. The purpose of the study was to examine this relationship among nursing students. A descriptive correlational design with non-probability sampling methods of 87 nursing students in a university setting was conducted. The variables of focus were emotional intelligence and nursing performance. Emotional intelligence was measured with the Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test (MSCEIT). Nursing performance was measured using the Six Dimension Scale of Nursing Performance (6-D Scale). The sample was predominately Caucasian (91%), female (93%), mean age 24 years. The mean score for emotional intelligence was 0.53, SD ± 0.06 indicating moderate emotional intelligence. The mean score for nursing performance was 3.14, SD ± 0.40 indicating moderate nursing performance. Emotional intelligence was related to nursing performance. Four of the six nursing performance subscale scores were significantly correlated with the total emotional intelligence scores. Implications for nursing education and clinical practice are discussed.

  9. Modulated Entry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, Frederick C.

    1960-01-01

    The technique of modulation, or variable coefficients, is discussed and the analytical formulation is reviewed. Representative numerical results of the use of modulation are shown for the lifting and nonlifting cases. These results include the effects of modulation on peak acceleration, entry corridor, and heat absorption. Results are given for entry at satellite speed and escape speed. The indications are that coefficient modulation on a vehicle with good lifting capability offers the possibility of sizable loading reductions or, alternatively, wider corridors; thus, steep entries become practical from the loading standpoint. The amount of steepness depends on the acceptable heating penalty. The price of sizable fractions of the possible gains does not appear to be excessive.

  10. The link between nursing discourses and nurses' silence: implications for a knowledge-based discourse for nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Canam, Connie J

    2008-01-01

    Much emphasis has been placed on the importance of nurses' articulating what they do to counteract the invisibility of nursing practice. Yet there has been minimal focus on why nurses are silent. This article explores the link between technical and caring discourses and nurses' silence and suggests an alternative discourse that conceptualizes nursing as a knowledge-driven enterprise that shifts the focus from what nurses do to what nurses know by promoting nurses' practice knowledge as a language for articulating their practice.

  11. The impact and perception of nursing certification in pediatric nursing.

    PubMed

    Straka, Kristen L; Ambrose, Heather L; Burkett, Marnie; Capan, Michelle; Flook, Donna; Evangelista, Tonya; Houck, Patty; Lukanski, Amy; Schenkel, Kathleen; Thornton, Michelle

    2014-01-01

    Nursing certification is an assessment and formal recognition of specialized knowledge, and is awarded through achievement of standards identified by a nursing specialty (Niebuhr & Biel, 2007). This recognition is a method of not only assessing competency, but knowledge and skills, and has been linked to an increase in patient satisfaction and nurse retention (Kleinpell, 2009). For these reasons, a heightened focus has been on identifying the value of nursing certification and outcomes related to patient care. This study explored nurse perception of certification and measured response to a high fidelity simulated scenario by certified and non-certified pediatric nurses to a deteriorating patient through simulation and self-assessment.

  12. Administrators: Nursing Home Administrator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahl, Anne

    1976-01-01

    Responsibilities, skills needed, training needed, earnings, employment outlook, and sources of additional information are outlined for the administrator who holds the top management job in a nursing home. (JT)

  13. The future of nursing.

    PubMed

    Moores, Y

    1999-01-01

    The White paper, "The New NHS, Modern-Dependable" has marked a turning point for the National Health Service and Nursing, replacing the internal market with integrated care, and sets out a vision of health service that meets the full range of patients' needs in all care settings. Assuring quality is an underpinning theme of the White paper, with nursing having a vital role in driving this agenda forward. Quality encompasses the environment of care, the professionalism, skill and compassion of staff, the effectiveness of treatments and respect and dignity of patients. This is an exciting time for nursing with many challenges, as the recognition and value for nursing grows. The profession has the ability to rise to these challenges and make a real difference to people's health and well being.

  14. Nursing and spirituality.

    PubMed

    Hussey, Trevor

    2009-04-01

    Those matters that are judged to be spiritual are seen as especially valuable and important. For this reason it is claimed that nurses need to be able to offer spiritual care when appropriate and, to aid them in this, nurse theorists have discussed the nature of spirituality. In a recent debate John Paley has argued that nurses should adopt a naturalistic stance which would enable them to employ the insights of modern science. Barbara Pesut has criticized this thesis, especially as it is applied to palliative care. This paper re-examines this debate with particular attention to the meaning of 'spirituality' and the justification for accepting spiritual and religious theories. It is argued that when we take into consideration the great diversity among religious and spiritual ideas, the lack of rational means of deciding between them when they conflict, and the practicalities of nursing, we find that a spiritual viewpoint is less useful than a naturalistic one, when offering palliative care.

  15. [Nursing care wall planning].

    PubMed

    Moreau, Véronique

    2013-01-01

    Nursing care wall planners are not a tool for assessing workload, but a means of providing coherence and individualised monitoring of care. Its application is focused not only on team organisation, but also on the patient's needs.

  16. Dysthanasia: nursing professionals' perception.

    PubMed

    de Menezes, Milene Barcellos; Selli, Lucilda; de Souza Alves, Joseane

    2009-01-01

    Dysthanasia means slow and painful death without quality of life. This study aimed to know whether nurses identify dysthanasia as part of the final process of the lives of terminal patients hospitalized at an adult ICU. This is an exploratory-qualitative study. Data were collected through semi-structured interviews with ten nurses with at least one year of experience in an ICU, and interpreted through content analysis. Results indicate that nurses understand and identify dysthanasia, do not agree with it and recognize elements of orthonasia as the adequate procedure for terminal patients. We conclude that nurses interpret dysthanasia as extending life with pain and suffering, while terminal patients are submitted to futile treatments that do not benefit them. They also identify dysthanasia using elements of orthonasia to explain it.

  17. The drama of nursing.

    PubMed

    Holmes, C A

    1992-08-01

    This exploratory paper considers a few possibilities for conceiving nursing as a form of aesthetic praxis. More specifically, drawing on the works of Erving Goffman on dramaturgy, and Elizabeth Burns on theatre, it makes some suggestions concerning nursing as a form of dramatic performance, and briefly attempts to relate this to concepts of praxis drawn from the writings of Hannah Arendt and critical social theorists. In contrast to Goffman's dramaturgy, which stresses the artifice of social relations and suggests a cynical view of human interactions, a critical theory of dramatic praxis introduces a normative dimension in which performance may become self-realizing and emancipatory as it aspires to the status of aesthetic praxis. Conceived in such terms, nursing practice becomes a powerful form of self-expression which has the potential to become liberating for the nurse and the patient.

  18. Restructuring registered nurse curricula.

    PubMed

    Hegge, M

    1995-01-01

    National initiatives in higher education, health reform, and the nursing curriculum revolution are applied to five curricular patterns for registered nurse (RN) upward mobility baccalaureate education. American Association of Higher Education principles for quality baccalaureate education are applied to the curricular models. The patterns described are: community model, health promotion model, nursing diagnosis model, case management model, and caring model. Three educational strategies for prompting paradigm shifts in RNs who return to school are discussed: collaborative learning, portfolios, and self-assessments. These learning strategies are designed to move the adult student through Perry's phases of cognitive development from duality to relativism. The combination of fresh new curriculum patterns and collaborative learning strategies can empower nurses to discover new paradigms with which to transform the profession.

  19. [Associationism and nursing].

    PubMed

    Martínez Riera, José Ramón

    2009-01-01

    Author personal reflection on the importance of association in the nurse profession as one of the most important tools of development; also that notices the necessity to use mass media like bridge of connection with the society.

  20. Social responsibility of nursing: a global perspective.

    PubMed

    Tyer-Viola, Lynda; Nicholas, Patrice K; Corless, Inge B; Barry, Donna M; Hoyt, Pamela; Fitzpatrick, Joyce J; Davis, Sheila M

    2009-05-01

    This study addresses social responsibility in the discipline of nursing and implications for global health. The concept of social responsibility is explicated and its relevance for nursing is examined, grounded in the American Nurses Association Code of Ethics and the International Council of Nurses Code of Ethics. Social justice, human rights, nurse migration, and approaches to nursing education are discussed within the framework of nursing's social responsibility. Strategies for addressing nursing workforce issues and education within a framework of social responsibility are explored.

  1. [Nursing care in prison].

    PubMed

    Aujard, Ségolène; de Brisoult, Béatrice; Broussard, Daniel; Petitclerc-Roche, Solenne; Lefort, Hugues

    2016-03-01

    In France, nurses practising in the prison environment work in a health care unit, for somatic care, or in a regional medical-psychological unit for large facilities and psychological care. These units belong to the regional hospitals. Located at the heart of the prison, they cater for prisoner-patients. On the frontline, the nurse has specific autonomy and responsibility in this unique context.

  2. Communication and nursing: a study-abroad student's reflections.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Anna Karina Martins; Tuohy, Dympna

    Globalisation in the academic context provides the opportunity for sharing knowledge and innovations between institutions in different countries, through the creation of study abroad and academic mobility programmes. For nursing students, studying abroad facilitates the development of cultural sensitivity so that they may care appropriately for an increasingly multicultural patient population in their own countries. This article describes a Brazilian 'study abroad' student nurse's experience of studying a 'communication and therapeutic relationships' module in an Irish university. Johns' model of structured reflection was used to frame, describe and reflect on the experience. This reflection informs 'study abroad' students and their universities about the student experience through a personal account of one such student.

  3. Handbook of clinical nursing practice

    SciTech Connect

    Asheervath, J.; Blevins, D.R.

    1986-01-01

    Written in outline format, this reference will help nurses further their understanding of advanced nursing procedures. Information is provided on the physiological, psychological, environmental, and safety considerations of nursing activities associated with diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. Special consideration is given to the areas of pediatric nursing, nursing assessment, and selected radiologic and nuclear medicine procedures for each system. Contents: Clinical Introduction. Clinical Nursing Practice: Focus on Basics. Focus on Cardiovascular Function. Focus on Respiratory Function. Focus on Gastrointestinal Function. Focus on Renal and Genito-Urological Function. Focus on Neuro-Skeletal and Muscular Function. Appendices.

  4. Nursing research methodology: transcending Cartesianism.

    PubMed

    Walters, A J

    1996-06-01

    Nurses involved in research are concerned with methodological issues. This paper explores the Cartesian debate that has polarized the discourse on nursing research methodology. It is argued that methodologies exclusively based on objectivism, one pole of the Cartesian debate, or subjectivism, the other, do not provide nurses with adequate research foundations to understand the complexity of the lifeworld of nursing practice. This paper provides nurse researchers with an alternative methodological perspective, Gadamerian hermeneutics, which is in harmony with the clinical world of nursing practice.

  5. Nurse administrators: leading environmental change.

    PubMed

    Tullai-McGuinness, Susan; Ballard, Karen A; Gallagher, Rita Munley; Carpenter, Holly

    2010-01-01

    Evidence is building about the impact of environmental contaminants on patients and health care providers. The nurse administrator has a professional responsibility to provide leadership in assuring that the health care organization does not have a negative impact on health. This article presents critical environmental health concerns and an overview of the nursing profession efforts to improve the environment, which includes development of the American Nurses Association's Principles of Environmental Health for Nursing Practice with Implementation Strategies. An example is provided as to how the nurse administrator can use Appreciative Inquiry to harness the nurses collaborative energy for an environmentally healthy organization.

  6. Firefighting Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    NASA and the U.S. Coast Guard are working jointly to develop a helicopter transportable firefighting module that can shave precious minutes in combating shipboard or harbor fires. The program was undertaken in 1975, after a series of disastrous fires on oil tankers indicated a need for a lightweight, self-contained system that could be moved quickly to the scene of a fire. A prototype module was delivered to the Coast Guard last year and service testing is under way. The compact module weighs little more than a ton but it contains everything needed to fight a fire. The key component is a high output pump, which delivers up to 2,000 gallons of sea water a minute; the pump can be brought up to maximum output in only one minute after turning on the power source, a small Allison gas turbine engine. The module also contains hose, a foam nozzle and a spray nozzle, three sets of protective clothing for firefighters, and fuel for three hours operation. Designed to be assembled without special tools, the module can be set up for operation in less than 20 minutes.

  7. Sickening nurses: fever nursing, nurses' illness, and the anatomy of blame, New Zealand 1903-1923.

    PubMed

    Wood, Pamela J

    2011-01-01

    In the early twentieth century, patients with infectious fevers represented a danger to the health of others including their nurses. This research describes the training New Zealand nurses received in fever nursing during the period 1903-1923, and considers how they applied hospital cross-infection principles in emergency tent fever camps in remote rural areas. It examines the reaction of nurses, hospital boards, and physicians to nurses who succumbed with their patients' fevers. It therefore reveals attitudes to nurses, prevailing ideas about responsibility for nurses' health, and elements in the emerging professional culture of nursing. Although some measures protected them against epidemic fevers, nurses were held responsible for their own health. A complex anatomy of blame is evident against those who sickened; the nature of the blame shifted, depending on the observer, disease, and practice setting. Physicians blamed nurses, especially when they sickened with typhoid fever. The country's chief nurse and other nurses blamed those who jeopardized their health through ill-spent leisure time. Sick nurses could be absolved from blame for the lax discipline evident through their failure to observe cross-infection principles if their practice setting was the fever camp. Willingness to work in difficult circumstances showed they embodied the ideal of sacrifice that, like discipline, was part of the emerging nursing culture.

  8. Creating Quality Online Materials for Specialty Nurse Practitioner Content: Filling a Need for the Graduate Nurse Practitioner.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Rosemary L; Klein, Sara Jo; Rosenzweig, Margaret Q

    2016-01-18

    Nurse practitioners are entering specialized areas of practice immediately after graduation from nurse practitioner (NP) education and certification and are finding employment in specialized areas such as oncology. Rapidly achieving a knowledge base in this highly specialized area of medicine coupled with the stress of the new nurse practitioner role can lead to a very difficult orientation and transition period. There are several methods to provide specialized education to NPs during their orientation period. Unfortunately, limitations such as a lack of motivated mentors, limited opportunities to practice the desired skill set or a lack of structure in regards to curriculum quality, and the learning needs of the new nurse hinder the NP's transition to practice. In response to either inadequate or non-standardized orientation to the specialty role of the oncology NP (ONP), a web-enhanced educational tool, funded through the National Cancer Institute, was developed for use in the USA: Oncology Nurse Practitioner Web Education Resource (ONc-PoWER). The development of ONc-PoWER was based upon essential education for NPs new to cancer care, adult learning theory, Bloom's Taxonomy, and foundations of quality online education. The five interactive web-based modules provide specialized education for the nurse practitioner new to oncology along with an on-site mentor to assist the NP in applying the course content to clinical practice.

  9. Doctoral education for WOC nurses considering advanced practice nursing.

    PubMed

    Pieper, Barbara; Colwell, Janice

    2012-01-01

    Advanced practice nursing education is at a crossroads. Societal changes, increased health care demands, and leadership nursing organizations have identified the need of a doctor of nursing practice (DNP) degree as the advanced practice degree. WOC nurses need to examine DNP programs when considering returning for an advanced practice degree. This article explores nursing education at the doctorate level and areas the WOC nurse should consider when making a decision about attending a program. The WOC nurse needs to understand the similarities and differences of the doctor of philosophy and the DNP, issues about each program and its completion, personal factors, and the application process. Although selecting a doctoral program is a daunting experience, the education will provide opportunities for the WOC nurse to excel as a scholar, thus influencing the profession and the practice.

  10. Rewards in Nursing: The Case of Nurse Preceptors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turnbull, Ellie

    1983-01-01

    Using nursing preceptorship programs as an example, the author illustrates how nursing administrators can develop and implement specific reward mechanisms that increase role satisfaction for preceptors and benefit both the service and the institution. (Author/SK)

  11. Firefighting Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Aviation Power Supply's mobile firefighting module called Firefly II is mounted on a trailer pulled by a pickup truck. Trailer unit has two three- inch water cannons, and the pickup carries a six inch cannon. Completely self contained, module pumps 3,000 gallons of water a minute from hydrants or open bodies of water. Stream can go as far as 400 feet or can be employed in a high-loft mode to reach the tops of tall refinery towers. Compact Firefly II weighs only 2,500 pounds when fully fueled. Key component is a specially designed two stage pump. Power for the pump is generated by a gas turbine engine. Module also includes an electronic/pump controller, multiple hose connections, up to 1,500 feet of hose and fuel for four hours operation. Firefly trailer can be backed onto specially-built large fireboat.

  12. Firefighting Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Aviation Power Supply's mobile firefighting module called Firefly II is mounted on a trailer pulled by a pickup truck. Trailer unit has two three- inch water cannons, and the pickup carries a six inch cannon. Completely self contained, module pumps 3,000 gallons of water a minute from hydrants or open bodies of water. Stream can go as far as 400 feet or can be employed in a high-loft mode to reach the tops of tall refinery towers. Compact Firefly II weighs only 2,500 pounds when fully fueled. Key component is a specially designed two stage pump. Power for the pump is generated by a gas turbine engine. Module also includes an electronic/pump controller, multiple hose connections, up to 1,500 feet of hose and fuel for four hours operation. Firefly trailer can be backed onto specially-built large fireboat.

  13. Nursing in Malawi: nursing theory in the movement to professionalize nursing.

    PubMed

    Bultemeier, Kaye I

    2012-04-01

    Nursing in Malawi has been predominately a technical trade and only recently has begun the transition to a profession with autonomy and advanced degree preparation. Nursing theories provide a framework for the evolution of nursing to an independent profession. Theories provide a means for the articulation of the nursing role to other members of the healthcare team including consumers. Healthcare and human needs are basic and the guidance provided by nursing theories, including Nightingale's, gives language and structure to the education of nurses as the profession moves into advanced practice in a developing country.

  14. Thermionic modules

    DOEpatents

    King, Donald B.; Sadwick, Laurence P.; Wernsman, Bernard R.

    2002-06-18

    Modules of assembled microminiature thermionic converters (MTCs) having high energy-conversion efficiencies and variable operating temperatures manufactured using MEMS manufacturing techniques including chemical vapor deposition. The MTCs incorporate cathode to anode spacing of about 1 micron or less and use cathode and anode materials having work functions ranging from about 1 eV to about 3 eV. The MTCs also exhibit maximum efficiencies of just under 30%, and thousands of the devices and modules can be fabricated at modest costs.

  15. Nursing information systems: applications in nursing curricula.

    PubMed

    Poirrier, G P; Wills, E M; Broussard, P C; Payne, R L

    1996-01-01

    America's healthcare system is being transformed to meet a new set of priorities: cost-effectiveness, quality, and access. To meet these priorities, health practitioners of the 21st century will rely heavily on computer information systems to provide complete, easily accessed patient data. Incorporation of this technology in nursing programs will enhance the quality of the graduates who will then strengthen the availability of a qualified work force to employers.

  16. Nurses' information retrieval skills in psychiatric hospitals - are the requirements for evidence-based practice fulfilled?

    PubMed

    Koivunen, Marita; Välimäki, Maritta; Hätönen, Heli

    2010-01-01

    Nursing professionals have long recognized the importance to practice of research and the value of research evidence. Nurses still do not use research findings in practice. The purpose of this paper was to describe nurses' skills in using literature databases and the Internet in psychiatric hospitals and associations of nurses' gender, age, and job position with their information retrieval skills. The study was carried out in 2004 among nursing staff (N=183) on nine acute psychiatric wards in two psychiatric hospitals in Finland (n=180, response rate 98%). The Finnish version of the European Computer Driving Licence test (ECDL) was used as a data collection instrument. The study showed that there were clear deficits in information retrieval skills among nurses working in psychiatric hospitals. Thus, nurses' competence does not support the realization of evidence-based practice in the hospitals. Therefore, it is important to increase nurses' information retrieval skills by tailoring continuing education modules. It would be also advisable to develop centralized systems for the internal dissemination of research findings for the use of nursing staff.

  17. Nursing Home Staffing Standards: Their Relationship to Nurse Staffing Levels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mueller, Christine; Arling, Greg; Kane, Robert; Bershadsky, Julie; Holland, Diane; Joy, Annika

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: This study reviews staffing standards from the 50 states and the District of Columbia to determine if these standards are related to nursing home staffing levels. Design and Methods: Rules and regulations for states' nursing home staffing standards were obtained for the 50 states and the District of Columbia. Nurse staffing data were…

  18. Clinical Nursing Knowledge Research; Implications for Nursing Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diekelmann, Nancy L.; And Others

    A new way to view the nursing curriculum is presented based on Heideggerian phenomenology and clinical nursing knowledge research. A restructuring of the nursing curriculum based on this approach allows researchers to generate new research questions and has implications for alternative curricular and instructional practices. In addition, this…

  19. Infusing gerontological nursing content into advanced practice nursing education.

    PubMed

    Kohlenberg, Eileen; Kennedy-Malone, Laurie; Crane, Patricia; Letvak, Susan

    2007-01-01

    The inclusion of gerontology content in the nursing curriculum is paramount as our population of older adults grows. As one of 10 recipients of the John A. Hartford Foundation/AACN awards for Enhancing Gerontological and Geriatric Nursing Education for Advanced Practice Nursing Programs, we successfully integrated gerontological/ geriatric content throughout core courses for all concentrations taught at the master's level. The Nurse Practitioner and Clinical Nurse Specialist Competencies for Older Adult Care were used as a guide to integrate gerontological nursing content across the core courses. We present examples of content, strategies, and evaluation methods that demonstrate infusion of gerontology in a nursing theory course, research course, and healthcare law and policy course. Twenty-two of the competencies are addressed in these core courses and provide a foundation for further development in the support and specialty courses for the nurse practitioner, clinical nurse specialist, nursing administrator, nurse educator, and nurse anesthetist. We also present helpful Web-based resources for older adult care.

  20. Comparable Worth: Implications for Nursing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bellocq, Jeanne A.

    1985-01-01

    A historical overview of the doctrine of equal pay for comparable worth is provided, related cases and legislation involving nurses and nonnurses are analyzed, and the implications of comparable worth for the nursing profession are discussed. (MSE)

  1. Nurse! What's Taking So Long?

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_164577.html Nurse! What's Taking So Long? Study at a children's ... in a child's hospital room, anxious parents expect nurses to respond pronto. That rarely happens, however, and ...

  2. American Association of Nurse Anesthetists

    MedlinePlus

    ... us in Seattle on Sept. 8-12 for nurse anesthesia's premier educational, professional, and social event! Register ... on health policy research that will validate the nurse anesthesia profession and advance patient safety. 150 AANA ...

  3. Nursing and health in Russia.

    PubMed

    1998-01-01

    There are over one million nurses in Russia, and they work in a crippled healthcare system facing a dramatic increase in infectious diseases. But nurses are valiantly coping with the country's health crisis and becoming a recognized profession.

  4. Nursing malpractice: cause for consideration.

    PubMed

    Fiesta, J

    1999-02-01

    Because so many factors influence a patient's health, it's difficult to know with certainty that a nurse's error actually caused the negative outcome. In nursing malpractice cases, causation can be a successful defense strategy.

  5. Gilligan: a voice for nursing?

    PubMed Central

    Harbison, J

    1992-01-01

    The current reform of nursing education is resulting in major changes in the curricula of colleges of nursing. For the first time, ethical and moral issues are being seen as an important theme underpinning the entire course. The moral theorist with whose work most nurse teachers are acquainted is Kohlberg. In this paper, it is suggested that his work, and the conventions of morality which he exemplifies, may not be the most appropriate from which to address the moral issues facing the nurse. The author suggests that the work of Carol Gilligan of Harvard university is of great significance, not only for nurses involved in the teaching of ethics, but for all nurses. Gilligan's emphasis on caring and relationships accords with the common experience of the nurse, and echoes the current revival of interest within nursing in examining, and valuing, the phenomenon of caring. PMID:1460649

  6. Applying talent management to nursing.

    PubMed

    Haines, Sue

    To deliver the chief nursing officer for England's vision for compassionate care and embed the 6Cs effectively, the NHS must attract, develop and retain talented nurses with a diverse range of skills. This is particularly important given the predicted shortage of nurses and evidence that NHS providers need to increase skill mix ratios to deliver safe patient care. "Talent management" is increasingly discussed within the health service; we recently asked nurses and student nurses to identify their priorities for talent development. They highlighted the importance of strong ward leadership, effective personal appraisal, clearer career pathways, increased staff engagement and involvement in decision making, as well as a need for greater emphasis on the recognition and reward of nursing achievements. We concluded that these factors are crucial to attracting, retaining and developing talent in nursing. Nurse leaders can learn approaches to developing talent from business and wider healthcare settings.

  7. National Institute of Nursing Research

    MedlinePlus

    ... Life Care in the ICU Because of Nursing Research: Supporting Technologies for Healthy Independent Living Genomic Science For the ... Life Care in the ICU Because of Nursing Research: Supporting Technologies for Healthy Independent Living Genomic Science For the ...

  8. A Curriculum Framework for Nursing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webber, Pamela Bayliss

    2002-01-01

    Presents a framework for nursing curricula based on five conceptual cornerstones: nursing knowledge, skills, values, meanings, and experience. Outlines desired outcomes for each cornerstone for associate, bachelor's and master's degree programs. (Contains 47 references.) (SK)

  9. A State Nurses' Association Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyer, Cheryl M.

    1983-01-01

    Discusses the accreditation and evolution of continuing education programs developed by state nurses' associations and other nursing organizations and the value of the accreditation. Also relates current accreditation system to the future of professional continuing education. (JOW)

  10. American Psychiatric Nurses Association-Transitions in Practice Certificate Program: Bridging the Knowledge Gap in Caring for Psychiatric Patients Within the General Nursing Workforce.

    PubMed

    Adams, Susie M; Black, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to publicize an important new Web-based educational program. Recognizing the growing gap in psychiatric-mental health knowledge and the need to better prepare new graduates and nurses transitioning from other service lines into psychiatric inpatient nursing settings, the American Psychiatric Nurses Association developed a 15-hour, modularized curriculum to provide foundational psychiatric-mental health knowledge. This modularized curriculum, called American Psychiatric Nurses Association Transitions in Practice (ATP) focuses on the knowledge and skills to insure the success of nurses new to psychiatric-mental health nursing settings and to improve the overall care for persons with mental health and substance use disorders. The ATP program is also proving to be useful content for nurses in emergency departments, hospitals, and other health settings to improve their care of patients with psychiatric and mental health needs. A summary of the program modules and a toolkit with suggested measures for nurses, patients, and agency outcomes is described. Feedback from participants completing the ATP program within the first 6 months is overwhelmingly positive and holds promise for widespread application across a variety of health care settings.

  11. Engaging nurses in research utilization.

    PubMed

    Wintersgill, Wendy; Wheeler, Erlinda C

    2012-01-01

    Research skills education is needed for nurses at all levels: novice, intermediate, and advanced. Nurse educators can help novice nurse researchers develop skills such as performing literature searches and critiquing research articles, which are necessary to develop and update clinical practice guidelines and implement evidence-based practice. The purpose of this article is to describe an innovative approach to encourage nurses to perform literature searches and critique research articles as a means to eventually engage in evidence-based practice.

  12. Development management for nursing administration.

    PubMed

    Heyden, R; Luyas, G; Henry, B

    1990-04-01

    What are the needs of a nurse administrator in a developing country? For that matter, what are the requirements for a nurse administrator in areas of lesser developed delivery in this country (e.g., care of the homeless, care of indigent populations)? Heyden, Luyas, and Henry look at the educational needs of these nurse managers and compare the needs to the typical education received in nursing administration programs.

  13. [Guidelines for nursing methodology implantation].

    PubMed

    Alberdi Castell, Rosamaría; Artigas Lelong, Berta; Cuxart Ainaud, Núria; Agüera Ponce, Ana

    2003-09-01

    The authors introduce three guidelines as part of the process to implant the nursing methodology based on the Virginia Henderson Conceptual Model; they propose to help nurses adopt the aforementioned method in their daily practice. These three guidelines shall be published in successive articles: Guidelines to identify attitudes and aptitudes related to the nursing profession; Guidelines to implant the nursing methodology based on the Virginia Henderson Conceptual Model; and Guidelines to plan areas for improvement.

  14. Nursing homes in China.

    PubMed

    Chu, Leung-Wing; Chi, Iris

    2008-05-01

    China will face a dramatic transition from a young to an aged society in the coming 30 to 40 years. In 2000, there were 88,110,000 persons aged 65 years and older, which represented 7% of the population. This percentage is projected to increase to 23% in 2050. Regarding health and long-term care for older adults, the current challenge is to build a comprehensive system of care for older adults. Nursing home care is an inevitable care model for frail older adults in China, which is largely sponsored by the government of China with contributions from some nongovernment organizations and private investors. China is a large country. Within the country, long-term care varies greatly between rural and urban areas, and among the different economic developing areas. In urban and better-developed areas, the range of services exists; however, in rural and less-developed areas, the range of services is limited. The "Star Light Program" and "Beloved Care Engineering" were recent government initiatives to improve aged care. They were launched in 2001 and have dramatically increased the number of both senior centers and nursing homes for older adults. While the quantity of nursing homes is still inadequate with an additional mismatch problem between the supply and demand, the quality of care in most nursing homes is suboptimal. At present, most administrative and frontline workers in nursing homes have received little training in elder care. There is a need for good-quality structured training in long-term care for all types of staff. Moreover, quality standard for care, including standard setting, assessment, and monitoring, is an important issue and needs substantial improvement for nursing homes in China. Currently, 1.5% of older people live in nursing homes and apartments for older people. Because of the peculiar 4-2-1 family structure in China, we expect the prevalence of nursing home placement of older adults will increase in the coming years. The government of China has

  15. Age and 'type' of domain specific entry qualifications as predictors of student nurses' performance in biological, social and behavioural sciences in nursing assessments.

    PubMed

    Ofori, R

    2000-05-01

    The present study explored the effects of age and 'type' of entry qualifications in psychology, sociology and biology on student performance in 'the psychological, sociological and biological perspectives in nursing' module assessments, respectively. Data from 222 students undertaking 'the pre-registration diploma in nursing' programme at a university in the north West of England were analysed. The study found no significant differences in performance among those students with GCSE 'O' level, those with access and those without any type of domain specific qualifications. However, student age significantly predicted performance, with such performances found to be highly consistent across the three modules. The 'non-mature' students (aged < 20 years) were identified in the study as being at risk in terms of academic performance whilst the 'very mature' students (aged > 34 years) were found to predict better overall performance. The findings suggest that, paper qualifications such as GCSE O.level, GNVQ or BTEC in psychology, sociology or biology should not be relied upon as predictors of academic performance in their related nursing modules when selecting potential nurses. On the basis of the findings and their probable explanations, it seems possible that the entry gate to nursing can further be widened by giving more credit to the older applicant who has, for example, achieved NVQ at level 2 or 3. However, such flexibility in nurse selection will have to be matched with equal flexibility in the pre-registration diploma in nursing curriculum which at present fails to recognize 'at risk' groups. The findings and the implications for nurse education and recruitment and discussed with support from a growing number of studies investigating student approaches to studying and learning.

  16. Rural nurses. Part II, Surviving the nurse shortage.

    PubMed

    Fuszard, B; Slocum, L I; Wiggers, D E

    1990-05-01

    Cost containment and the nurse shortage have impacted rural hospitals and their nursing staffs. This impact did not appreciably affect burnout levels among the rural nurses, but did evidence itself in the reports of the directors of nursing and their nurses. Cost containment brought with it layoffs of colleagues in the work setting who were neighbors or relatives. This occurred while the rural areas were already filled with the unemployed and underemployed. Unfamiliar recordkeeping increased two- and three-fold, and the 23-hour admit caused unequal work flow. Downsizing, elimination of some services and reports of rural hospital closings were threatening to the nurses, who were often the sole support of their families. The rural nurse shortage was seen to be different from the national nurse shortage in significant ways. Except for the few study hospitals that were close to population centers, nurses could not be recruited from outside the geographic area. Suggestions from the Secretary's Commission on Nursing are not all appropriate for the rural hospital nurse shortage. Rural hospitals changed in the face of cost containment, and nursing personnel also worked to contain costs. However the nurses have worked within cost and salary constraints for so long that they predict loyalty to their community hospitals can be coming to an end. The nurse shortage is being approached by minor alterations in staffing and mode of care delivery. Federal support is desperately needed by the rural hospitals to permit equitable salaries, and to support financial aid to permanent residents of the rural areas for entrance into or advancement in nursing education.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  17. Sexual harassment in nursing.

    PubMed

    Robbins, I; Bender, M P; Finnis, S J

    1997-01-01

    Sexual harassment is a problem faced by women in the workplace which can lead to adverse psychological consequences as well as impaired work performance. Sexual harassment is about the abuse of power and status rather then merely being about sex per se and has to be viewed in the context of institutionalized male power. Although there is a relative dearth of research, there is increasing evidence that sexual harassment of nurses is common and that it can have adverse effects on nurses physical and psychological health as well as a direct impact on patient care. Nursing, by its very nature of having to care for patients bodily needs, transgresses normal social rules regarding bodily contact. This is exploited by the perpetrator who relies on nurses' caring attitude to be able to harass. A descriptive model of the processes involved in harassment is presented which offers the possibility of being able to intervene at a number of points in the process. Interventions need to be aimed at both individual and organizational levels if there is to be a prospect of reducing a major occupational stressor for nurses.

  18. Husserl, phenomenology and nursing.

    PubMed

    Paley, J

    1997-07-01

    Discussions of phenomenological research in nursing consistently appeal to either Husserl or Heidegger in justifying the technical and conceptual resources they deploy. This paper focuses on Husserl, and examines the relationship between his phenomenology and the accounts of it that are to be found in the nursing literature. Three central ideas are given particular attention: the phenomenological reduction, phenomena, and essence. It is argued that nurse researchers largely misunderstand these concepts and that, as a result, their version of Husserl's philosophy bears little resemblance to the original. A further consequence is that the project of identifying the 'essential structure' of a phenomenon, typically adopted by the nurse researchers who cite Husserl as an authority, comes close to being unintelligible. It is suggested that, while the methods used in 'phenomenological' nursing research may still have some legitimacy, they cannot achieve what they are alleged to achieve, and they should be detached from the framework of Husserlian ideas and terminology which is supposed to justify them.

  19. [Nursing, simply complicated].

    PubMed

    Martínez Riera, José Ramón

    2005-04-01

    From a very young age, we played doctors and nurses. Back then, society was positive that a nursing profession existed. Now, is society's vision adequate? Evidently not. But, Why does this distortion exist? Fundamentally this occurs because the professionals themselves do not have a clear identity regarding their profession. And Why is this? Because the education transmitted has important lacks, the sanitary system dampens innovation and creativity, there are no appropriate leaders, lobbies transform into "wolves", and neither do we have a tradition which facilitates association and cooperation amongst professionals. These are some of the factors which the author develops in this deep, brave analysis about the reality of the nursing profession in order to arrive at the conclusion that we must have clear in our minds what nursing power is, a power which interacts with the community, and that this is important not only as a power in itself but rather as a means to increase the intrinsic value of nursing, none other than providing care.

  20. Source Book--Nursing Personnel.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spencer, William E.

    This book, organized in six chapters and a bibliography, presents historical and current statistics and references on the supply of nursing personnel within the United States. Chapter 1 includes a discussion of national estimates of the active nurse supply and the distribution of these nurses by field of practice and by academic preparation.…

  1. Competency Based Refresher Nurse Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lombardo, Mary C.

    This competency-based course is designed to update the skills and knowledge of inactive nurses desiring to return to active practice. Focus of the course is on organizing and managing patient care using the nursing process; performing nursing procedures, including medication administration; and reintegrating oneself into the professional…

  2. The computer-literate nurse.

    PubMed

    Bryson, D M

    1991-01-01

    This study investigated the perceptions of nursing educators concerning the amount and kinds of computer training that should occur in the nursing degree program. Data were collected in two phases: a semi-structured interview of experts in the application of the computer to nursing and a random sample of nursing educators in 2-year and 4-year nursing degree programs. The panel of experts identified objectives within each of seven domains: programming and algorithms, skills in computer usage, major uses and applications, limitations of computers, personal and social aspects, and relevant values and attitudes. The responses of this panel were used to generate an universe of computer literacy objectives. The sample of nursing educators then identified a subset of objectives within the universe that they felt nursing students should master in order to be computer literate. The survey found that nursing educators desire graduates of nursing degree programs to understand how a computer works and to develop skills in using application programs. They do not expect nursing graduates to acquire programming skills, however, they do expect the graduates to acquire skills in using the computer as a tool in nursing. These skills include using a word processor for writing nursing care plans, using computer-aided instruction as a learning tool, using a hospital computer information system, using a computerized library database, and using software for statistical computations.

  3. Advancing leadership capacity in nursing.

    PubMed

    Scott, Elaine S; Miles, Jane

    2013-01-01

    To address the potential shortage of nurse leaders, the profession must evaluate current strategies in both education and practice. While many new graduates dream of becoming a nurse practitioner or nurse anesthetist, few transition into practice with the goal of becoming a nurse leader. To increase the number of nurses capable of leadership, the profession must address 2 critical issues. First, effort must be made to augment faculty and students' conceptualization of nursing such that leadership is seen as a dimension of practice for all nurses, not just those in formal leadership roles. In so doing, leadership identity development would be seen as a part of becoming an expert nurse. Second, a comprehensive conceptual framework for lifelong leadership development of nurses needs to be designed. This framework should allow for baseline leadership capacity building in all nurses and advanced leadership development for those in formal administrative and advanced practice roles. The knowledge and skill requirements for quality improvement and patient safety have been explored and recommendations made for Quality and Safety Education for Nurses, but parallel work needs to be done to outline educational content, objectives, and effective pedagogy for advancing leadership development in nursing students at all levels.

  4. Being Human: Transdisciplinarity in Nursing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Timmons, Stephen; Edgley, Alison; Meal, Andy; Narayanasamy, Aru

    2016-01-01

    Nursing as an academic discipline typically draws on a wide range of other disciplines. There is debate about whether this is a sound basis for the discipline, or whether nursing needs to develop a distinctive body of knowledge. The concept of transdisciplinarity, though little discussed in nursing, is of considerable value in understanding…

  5. Social bullying in nursing academia.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Earl; Beitz, Janice; Wieland, Diane; Levine, Ciara

    2013-01-01

    Social bullying has gained attention in the contemporary literature and increasing scrutiny in nursing academia. With a paucity of research on the topic in nursing, the authors asked nursing faculty about the phenomenon of being bullied by faculty colleagues or academic administrators. They discuss their study and its outcomes and implications for academic work lives, recruitment, and retention.

  6. Innovating Traditional Nursing Administration Challenges.

    PubMed

    Joseph, M Lindell; Fowler, Debra

    2016-03-01

    The evolving and complex practice environment calls for new mindsets among nurse leaders, academics, and nurse innovators to envision innovative ways to manage and optimize traditional tasks and processes in nursing administration. The purpose of this article is to present 3 case studies that used linear programming and simulation to innovate staffing enterprises, financial management of healthcare systems, and curricula development.

  7. Psychiatric-Mental Health Nursing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reighley, Joan

    A description is provided of a course, "Psychiatric-Mental Health Nursing," designed to teach students at Level 3 of a two-year college nursing program about the role of the nurse in a psychiatric setting and about concepts of mental health and psychiatric disorders, using both classroom and clinical instruction. The first section of the course…

  8. Legal Issues in Nursing Homes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kapp, Marshall B.

    This paper examines the variety of legal rules and processes which have been established to assess and ensure that the quality of care provided in nursing homes satisfies an acceptable level. It begins with a general overview of nursing home law. Areas discussed in this section include: (1) sources of nursing home law; (2) theories of liability;…

  9. Quality Assurance in Nursing Homes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balgopal, Pallassana R.; And Others

    This manual, developed for the nursing home employee, examines the concept of quality assurance in nursing homes, describes the benefits of an effective quality assurance program, and provides guidelines to aid nursing homes in developing an appropriate quality assurance program. After a brief introduction, a working definition of quality…

  10. STATEWIDE PLANNING FOR NURSING EDUCATION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LEONE, LUCILE PETRY

    NEEDS IN NURSING EDUCATION ARE OUTLINED IN 5 IMPERATIVES--(1) AN IMMEDIATE NEED FOR COMPREHENSIVE PLANNING (BECAUSE OF UP TO 50 PERCENT VACANCIES IN NURSING POSITIONS IN SOME HOSPITALS, USE OF SUBPROFESSIONALS EXCEEDING THE SAFETY LEVEL, AND EXTREME SHORTAGE OF NURSES FOR POSITIONS OF HIGHEST RESPONSIBILITY, AND FUTURE OVERTAXING OF THE SUPPLY DUE…

  11. The Evolution of the Society of Trauma Nurses' Leadership Institute.

    PubMed

    Krichten, Amy; Kyle, Amber

    2015-01-01

    The Society of Trauma Nurses (STN) understands the increasing complexity of trauma care and the vital leadership role nurses play. In 2009, the STN took the initiative to form a Leadership Committee tasked with researching the possibility of developing a mechanism to offer trauma leaders opportunities in leadership development. Investigation and collaboration among the committee members, with input from the Board of Directors and the organization's executive director, resulted in the STN Leadership Institute. The Leadership Institute design is to equip trauma nurses with the tools needed to effectively lead from the bedside to the boardroom and beyond through web-based modules. Operationalization of the plan took intense focus and dedicated leadership. Following a pilot study, the initial cohort ran the first quarter of 2015. Because of the positive feedback and identified opportunities for improvement, the program will continue to be offered with further expansion planning underway.

  12. Enhancing cancer nursing education through school of nursing partnerships: the Cancer Nursing Faculty Fellows Program.

    PubMed

    Hermann, Carla P; Conner, April L; Mundt, Mary H

    2008-06-01

    This article describes the Cancer Nursing Faculty Fellows Program, an innovative program designed to provide nurse educators with state-of-the-art cancer knowledge to enhance their ability to teach cancer content. The Faculty Fellows Program was developed at the University of Louisville School of Nursing and was part of a multifaceted educational intervention to improve cancer nursing education. This intervention included comprehensive curriculum reviews, conferences with national consultants, cancer-specific faculty seminars, and funded instructional projects. The Faculty Fellows Program consisted of a mentored experience attending the Oncology Nursing Society Congress and a month-long intensive program to provide faculty with exposure to cancer experts, researchers, and clinical and community resources. By providing a forum for nurse educators to obtain this knowledge and provide the resources they need to change the way they educate nursing students, the program can significantly affect cancer-related nursing education and, ultimately, the care of patients with cancer and survivors.

  13. Emancipatory Nursing Praxis: A Theory of Social Justice in Nursing.

    PubMed

    Walter, Robin R

    2016-10-28

    Emancipatory nursing praxis (ENP) is a middle-range nursing theory of social justice developed from an international, grounded theory study of the critical factors influencing nurses' perceptions of their role in social justice. The ENPs implementing processes (becoming, awakening, engaging, and transforming) and 2 conditional contexts (relational and reflexive) provide an in-depth understanding of the transformative learning process that determines nurse engagement in social justice. Interpretive findings include the voice of Privilege primarily informed ENP theory, the lack of nursing educational and organizational support in social justice role development, and the advocate role should expand to include the role of an ally.

  14. [The nursing shortage and nursing retention strategies in Taiwan].

    PubMed

    Lin, Chiou-Fen; Huang, Chung-I; Kao, Ching-Chiu; Lu, Meei-Shiow

    2013-06-01

    A chronic shortage of working nurses has led hospitals in Taiwan to close wards and reduce bed numbers. Work overload and job stress are major causes of this shortage. The purpose of this study is to propose a solution to improve the nursing workload situation. We reviewed literature articles and conference presentations to synthesize relevant measures, which included reforming the current care model; using innovation to simplify nursing practice; and creating a culture of workplace respect and inter-team cooperation. Based on this, we proposed our nursing retention strategy after reviewing national Department of Health development policies on nursing manpower.

  15. Does Faculty Incivility in Nursing Education Affect Emergency Nursing Practice?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stokes, Pamela

    Incivility in nursing education is a complicated problem which causes disruptions in the learning process and negatively affects future nursing practice. This mixed method research study described incivility as well as incivility's effects through extensive literature review and application of a modified Incivility in Nursing Education (INE) survey. The INE included six demographic items, four quantitative sections, and five open-ended questions. The survey examined emergency nurses' perceptions of incivility and how the experience affected their personal nursing practice. The INE was initially tested in a 2004 pilot study by Dr. Cynthia Clark. For this research study, modifications were made to examine specifically emergency nurse's perceptions of incivility and the effects on their practice. The population was a group of nurses who were members of the emergency nurses association in a Midwestern state. In the quantitative component of the Incivility in Nursing Education (INE) survey, the Likert scale questions indicated that the majority of the participants reported witnessing or experiencing the uncivil behaviors. In the qualitative section of the INE survey, the participants reported that although they have not seen incivility within their own academic career, they had observed faculty incivility with nursing students when the participants were assigned as preceptors as part of their emergency nursing practice.

  16. Foreign nurse importation and the supply of native nurses.

    PubMed

    Cortés, Patricia; Pan, Jessica

    2014-09-01

    The importation of foreign registered nurses has been used as a strategy to ease nursing shortages in the United States. The effectiveness of this policy depends critically on the long-run response of native nurses. We examine the effects of immigration of foreign-born registered nurses on the long-run employment and occupational choice of native nurses. Using a variety of empirical strategies that exploit the geographical distribution of immigrant nurses across US cities, we find evidence of large displacement effects - over a ten-year period, for every foreign nurse that migrates to a city, between 1 and 2 fewer native nurses are employed in the city. We find similar results using data on nursing board exam-takers at the state level - an increase in the flow of foreign nurses significantly reduces the number of natives sitting for licensure exams in more dependent states relative to less dependent states. Using data on self-reported workplace satisfaction among a sample of California nurses, we find suggestive evidence that part of the displacement effects could be driven by a decline in the perceived quality of the workplace environment.

  17. Undergraduate nursing students' compatibility with the nursing profession

    PubMed Central

    Adib-Hajbaghery, Mohsen; Dianati, Mansur

    2005-01-01

    Background The high rate of attrition among nursing students has caused some nursing leaders to think about the necessity of considering students' personality during the process of admission into nursing schools. Due to the lack of studies on Iranian nursing students' personality traits, this study was designed to assess freshmen nursing students' personality characteristics and their compatibility with the demands of the nursing profession. Methods A descriptive study was conducted at Tehran and kashan medical universities and one of the branches of Azad University. Convenience sampling was used and 52 freshmen nursing students were assessed using Holland's Vocational Interests Inventory. Results From the total participants 63.5% were females and 36.5% were males. Based on the Holland's Vocational Interests Inventory 44% did not have appropriate personality characteristics for the nursing profession. 77% of the nursing students participating in the study reported that they lacked information about nursing. Conclusion It seems that personality tests can help to select the best students for nursing schools from those who show good academic capabilities. This would decrease the rate of attrition and could improve the quality of care. PMID:16011800

  18. Developing nurse educators' computer skills towards proficiency in nursing informatics.

    PubMed

    Rajalahti, Elina; Heinonen, Jarmo; Saranto, Kaija

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to assess nurse educators' competence development in nursing informatics (NI) and to compare their competence to the NI competence of other healthcare professionals. Electronic health records (EHR) have been in use for many years. However, the adoption of the nursing care plan finally made it possible for nurses in Finland to develop a model for structured documentation with nursing terminology. A total of n = 124 (n = 85 pre-test and n = 39 post-test) participants from Universities of Applied Sciences (UAS), hospitals, hospitals' information management and health centres were surveyed with a e-questionnaire designed to assess the development of their NI competences during the nursing documentation development project. The questionnaire included 145 structured questions and 6 open questions. Data analysis focused on classification and comparison of NI competences through data description and statistical parameters using figures and tables. The basic NI competences of the nurse educators were good at the end of project and the nurse educators had better information literacy and information management competences than other participants. The information retrieval skills varied greatly, but they improved evenly towards the end. The nurse educators mastered better evidence-based nursing and use of nursing process models in their work.

  19. Exploring clinical nursing experiences: listening to student nurses.

    PubMed

    Pearcey, Patricia; Draper, Peter

    2008-07-01

    Student nurses spend one half of their educational programme in the clinical area. The success of an educationally sound clinical placement is crucial to forming a professional nursing identity that will encompass the seen and 'unseen' aspects of the nurses' role. The aim of this study was to explore the clinical nursing environment through the perceptions of first year student nurses. Semi-structured interviews were used to collect data from 12 student nurses who each had four weeks clinical experience, representing 21 wards and five hospitals. Results suggest that these student nurses were disillusioned with the reality of clinical nursing and that their expectations of nursing were not realised. They perceived that paperwork, completing tasks and meeting targets were dominant features of nursing work at the expense of patient contact and communication. A majority indicated that nursing was not as caring as they expected and vowed to hold on to their personal values of caring about patients and forming communicative, interpersonal relationships with them.

  20. The "old internationals": Canadian nurses in an international nursing community.

    PubMed

    Lapeyre, Jaime; Nelson, Sioban

    2010-12-01

    The vast devastation caused by both the First World War and the influenza pandemic of 1918 led to an increased worldwide demand for public health nurses. In response to this demand, a number of new public health training programs for nurses were started at both national and international levels. At the international level, one of two influential programs in this area included a year-long public health nursing course offered by the League of Red Cross Societies, in conjunction with Bedford College in London, England. In total, 341 nurses from 49 different countries have been documented as participants in this initiative throughout the interwar period, including 20 Canadians. Using archival material from the Canadian Nurses Association and the Royal College of Nursing, as well as articles from the journals Canadian Nurse, American Journal of Nursing and British Journal of Nursing, this paper examines these nurses' commitment to internationalism throughout their careers and explores the effect of this commitment on the development of nursing education and professionalization at the national level.

  1. The nurses are innocent.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, G

    1993-12-01

    In 1980-81, the nursing and medical staff of Toronto's Hospital for Sick Children (HSC) were agonizing over an increased death rate on cardiac wards 4A and 4B and groping for the cause. The key to this diagnostic puzzle appeared to surface when hospital radioimmunoassay tests revealed very high autopsy readings of digoxin on four babies who died during this period, Janice Estrella, Justin Cook, Kevin Pacsai and Allana Miller. Since one nursing team was present during each of these infants' final hours, it was assumed that one or more of the nurses had intentionally poisoned the infants with digoxin. A web of circumstantial evidence entrapped team member Susan Nelles, who was charged with murder.

  2. Marketing in nursing organizations.

    PubMed

    Chambers, S B

    1989-05-01

    The purpose of chapter 3 is to provide a conceptual framework for understanding marketing. Although it is often considered to be, marketing is not really a new activity for nursing organizations. What is perhaps new to most nursing organizations is the conduct of marketing activities as a series of interrelated events that are part of a strategic marketing process. The increasingly volatile nursing environment requires a comprehensive approach to marketing. This chapter presents definitions of marketing, the marketing mix, the characteristics of nonprofit marketing, the relationship of strategic planning and strategic marketing, portfolio analysis, and a detailed description of the strategic marketing process. While this chapter focuses on marketing concepts, essential components, and presentation of the strategic marketing process, chapter 4 presents specific methods and techniques for implementing the strategic marketing process.

  3. Prehospital Nursing in Maryland - Legal Considerations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-01-01

    midwifery . In Massachusetts, the Board of Registration in Nursing is authorized to establish conditions and regulations for nursing practice in the...because as a registered nurse, she could orly practice midwifery after complying with the Prehospital Nursing 41 Board’s rules and regulations regarding...standards for the practice of Certified Nurse Practitioner and Nurse Midwifery (Md. Health Occu. Code Ann. §8-306 & §§8-601-603, 1991). Prehospital nursing

  4. Nursing assistant turnover in nursing homes and need satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Caudill, M; Patrick, M

    1989-06-01

    1. Level of Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs is basic physiological needs measured by salary, adequate housing, and food. Attainment of these needs increased the length of stay of nursing assistants in nursing homes. 2. Safety and security (level 2) influenced length of stay of nursing assistants. Those with benefits of retirement, vacation, and holiday pay tended to have less turnover. 3. Praise by the patient and family was most important to nursing assistants. Belonging to a peer group and praise by charge nurse also decreased turnover of nursing assistants (level 3). 4. Level 4, self-esteem measured by input into decisions and being able to criticize, increased length of stay of nursing assistants.

  5. [Nursing care in the perspective of complexity for nursing professors].

    PubMed

    Piexak, Diéssica Roggia; Backes, Dirce Stein; Santos, Silvana Sidney Costa

    2013-06-01

    The complex nursing care is essential for understanding the human being as unique and multidimensional. This study aimed at knowing what nursing care means to nurse-teachers in the perspective of complexity. It is a qualitative research, carried out with seven nurse-teachers of a nursing school from central Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. Data were collected in November 2011, through focus group,from three meetings, systematized with themes which considered the objective of this study. Discursive text analysis was used for data analysis. Results evinced nursing care as unique construction that goes beyond a technical-prescriptive, punctual and linear care. It is concluded that nursing care cannot be conceived as a reductionist action, but as a unique construction, which involves interactions, reflections and self-knowledge.

  6. School nurse online emergency preparedness training: an analysis of knowledge, skills, and confidence.

    PubMed

    Elgie, Robert; Sapien, Robert; Fullerton, Lynne; Moore, Brian

    2010-10-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a computer-assisted emergency preparedness course for school nurses. Participants from a convenience sample (52) of school nurses from New Mexico were randomly assigned to intervention or control groups in an experimental after-only posttest design. Intervention group participants completed 15 online emergency preparedness training modules followed by posttests, and control group participants completed the posttests without taking the training modules. Tests measured emergency preparedness with written exams, confidence surveys, and skills performance in videotaped scenarios; the videotaped scenarios were scored by Pediatric Emergency Medicine physicians blinded to whether the participants were in the intervention or control group. The intervention group participants scored significantly higher in tests of knowledge and skills than control group participants. Confidence Survey scores did not differ significantly. The online training modules are a valuable resource for improving school nurse emergency preparedness knowledge and skills but may not affect participants' confidence.

  7. Nursing: the hospital's competitive edge.

    PubMed

    Shaffer, F A; Preziosi, P

    1988-09-01

    The health care marketplace is becoming increasingly competitive. The hospital has a built-in marketing force with the nursing department, because nurses are in constant, direct contact with the customer. Nursing must identify the case mix profile of the community and focus the hospital product lines to meet community needs. The nursing department should decentralize, change, measure, and innovate the staff mix needed to operationalize these product lines. The development of nursing practice standards for the case mix will help to identify the staff mix needed and create systems to efficiently manage the product lines. Nursing management must become aware of cross-subsidization and downward skill substitution of nursing personnel. Nursing information systems must generate quality reports that invoke cost consciousness on the part of nursing staff. Quality assurance programs must become unit based and complete with frequent audits to correlate length of stay with nursing quality. Correlations must be determined between nursing productivity and case mix to determine the hospital's niche in the marketplace. The transformation of health care into a competitive business industry has created many opportunities for nursing. The health care industry's incentives for efficiency along with the decreasing demand for inpatient hospital services will be the forces driving health care toward a competitive marketplace. The hospital's nursing department should be strategically positioned to become accountable for increasing market share and enhancing quality patient outcomes. The focus has shifted from the theoretical to the tactical, which is a step in the right direction, particularly for nursing. Nursing, if strategically positioned, will not only thrive but will also excel in this chaotic environment by capturing the opportunities and being innovative.

  8. Nursing instructors' and male nursing students' perceptions of undergraduate, classroom nursing education.

    PubMed

    Dyck, Jeff M; Oliffe, John; Phinney, Alison; Garrett, Bernie

    2009-08-01

    Attrition rates of male nursing students exceed those of females yet the experiences of male students in nursing school are poorly understood. This interpretive ethnographic study explored the experiences of male nursing students and female nursing instructors in the context of classroom education. Data collection consisted of participant observation of classroom teaching sessions followed by interviews with six male nursing students who were participants in the classes and six female nursing instructors who taught the classes. Themes resulting from data analysis addressed men's roles in the nursing classroom and the culture of nursing education. The theme of "nursing like a real man" was characterized by men's reliance on roles and behaviours associated with traditional masculinities including leadership, assertiveness and risk-taking. The theme of "masculinities in a feminine place" captured the gendered culture of nursing education which manifested in stereotypes and a sexualized identity, where men saw themselves as accommodated but not integrated. "Diversity between masculine and feminine" communicated the incongruity between men's educational preferences and the techniques that predominate in nursing education. These findings suggest that nursing instructors need to consider gender in their teaching practice, avoid parody or stereotypes of masculinities, and reject assumptions that male students are homogeneous.

  9. Comparing Perceptions of the Nursing Profession among Associate and Baccalaureate Nursing Students and Registered Nurses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lovan, Sherry R.

    2009-01-01

    The inconsistencies between the perception of the profession of nursing and the reality of practice can lead to problems in student attrition or result in disillusionment with a career in nursing after a new graduate enters practice. With the nursing shortage reaching critical levels, it is important to examine possible discrepancies that exist…

  10. Advanced physical assessment skills: implementation of a module.

    PubMed

    Aldridge-Bent, Sharon

    2011-02-01

    This article aims to explore and examine advanced physical assessment skills and the role of the district nurse. It will particularly highlight district nurses' perceptions of how they may implement skills learnt on a new module introduced into the Community Health Care Nursing degree at a university in London. Physical assessment skills have traditionally been viewed as part of a doctor's role; however, with the advancement of nursing roles, it is argued that it has become a key nursing skill. As Government policy continues to expect health professionals to keep patients in the community who have complex health and social care needs, the role of the district nurse presents as 'best placed' to take on this challenge (Department of Health (DH), 2005a; 2005b). Evaluation of the district nurses' perceptions of their practice is shared here, highlighting some of the challenges that they face. The article will address the complexity of developing a curriculum in response to the DH initiatives and the importance of listening to students on courses.

  11. Nursing students' attitudes toward science in the nursing curricula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maroo, Jill Deanne

    The nursing profession combines the art of caregiving with scientific concepts. Nursing students need to learn science in order to start in a nursing program. However, previous research showed that students left the nursing program, stating it included too much science (Andrew et al., 2008). Research has shown a correlation between students' attitudes and their performance in a subject (Osborne, Simon, & Collins, 2003). However, little research exists on the overall attitude of nursing students toward science. At the time of my study there existed no large scale quantitative study on my topic. The purpose of my study was to identify potential obstacles nursing students face, specifically, attitude and motivation toward learning science. According to research the nation will soon face a nursing shortage and students cite the science content as a reason for not completing the nursing program. My study explored nursing students' attitudes toward science and reasons these students are motivated to learn science. I ran a nationwide mixed methods approach with 1,402 participants for the quantitative portion and 4 participants for the qualitative portion. I validated a questionnaire in order to explore nursing students' attitudes toward science, discovered five different attitude scales in that questionnaire and determined what demographic factors provided a statistically significant prediction of a student's score. In addition, I discovered no statistical difference in attitude exists between students who have the option of taking nursing specific courses and those who do not have that option. I discovered in the qualitative interviews that students feel science is necessary in nursing but do not feel nurses are scientists. My study gives a baseline of the current attitude of nursing students toward science and why these students feel the need to learn the science.

  12. Firefighting Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Firefly II pump module is NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center's commercial offshoot of a NASA/US Coast Guard program involving development of a lightweight, helicopter-transportable firefighting module for a quick response in combating shipboard or harbor fires. Operable on land or water, the Amphib One is equipped with 3 water cannons. When all 3 are operating, unit pumps more than 3,000 gallons a minute. Newly developed model used by U.S. Coast Guard can pump 5,000 gallons per minute. It was designed for applications such as firefighting onboard ship fires, emergency dockside water pumping, dewatering ships in danger of sinking, flood control, and emergency water supply at remote locations.

  13. The task of nursing ethics.

    PubMed Central

    Melia, K M

    1994-01-01

    This paper raises the questions: 'What do we expect from nursing ethics?' and 'Is the literature of nursing ethics any different from that of medical ethics?' It is suggested that rather than develop nursing ethics as a separate field writers in nursing ethics should take a lead in making the patient the central focus of health care ethics. The case is made for empirical work in health care ethics and it is suggested that a good way of setting about this is to ask practising nurses about the real ethical problems they encounter. PMID:8035446

  14. The future roles of nurses.

    PubMed

    Perla, Lisa

    2002-01-01

    Healthcare delivery in the United States is changing because of managed care and capitation. The future of hospital nursing is being reshaped because of the economic pressures of managed care and market-led health reforms. A variety of new healthcare job opportunities for nurses will now present themselves. Nurse leader roles will evolve to complement the new managed healthcare structure. Because of the organizational redesign of managed care, nurses will need to develop additional skills and education for these roles. This article discusses potential new roles nurses will occupy in a managed care environment.

  15. Nursing and the "F" word.

    PubMed

    Kane, D; Thomas, B

    2000-01-01

    This article uses a set of strategies designed by Abigail Stewart to guide the generation of knowledge about women and gender to revisit the relationship between nursing and feminism. It is important that nurses be aware of the valuable feminist contributions made by their predecessors in order to uncover the hidden links that exist between nursing and feminism. As long as the relationship between nursing and feminism remains invisible, the gender, problems in nursing that are systemic to a woman's occupation in a male-dominated society will continue.

  16. Mentoring practices benefiting pediatric nurses.

    PubMed

    Weese, Meghan M; Jakubik, Louise D; Eliades, Aris B; Huth, Jennifer J

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies examining predictors of pediatric nurse protégé mentoring benefits demonstrated that protégé perception of quality was the single best predictor of mentoring benefits. The ability to identify the mentoring practices that predict specific benefits for individual nurses provides a better understanding of how mentoring relationships can be leveraged within health care organizations promoting mutual mentoring benefits. This descriptive correlational, non-experimental study of nurses at a northeast Ohio, Magnet® recognized, free-standing pediatric hospital advances nursing science by demonstrating how mentoring practices benefit pediatric nurse protégés.

  17. Addressing the mental health nurse shortage: undergraduate nursing students working as assistants in nursing in inpatient mental health settings.

    PubMed

    Browne, Graeme; Cashin, Andrew; Graham, Iain; Shaw, Warren

    2013-10-01

    The population of mental health nurses is ageing and in the next few years we can expect many to retire. This paper makes an argument for the employment of undergraduate nursing students as Assistants in Nursing (AINs) in mental health settings as a strategy to encourage them to consider a career in mental health nursing. Skill mix in nursing has been debated since at least the 1980s. It appears that the use of AINs in general nursing is established and will continue. The research suggests that with the right skill mix, nursing outcomes and safety are not compromised. It seems inevitable that assistants in nursing will increasingly be part of the mental health nursing workforce; it is timely for mental health nurses to lead these changes so nursing care and the future mental health nursing workforce stay in control of nursing.

  18. Thermoelectric module

    DOEpatents

    Kortier, William E.; Mueller, John J.; Eggers, Philip E.

    1980-07-08

    A thermoelectric module containing lead telluride as the thermoelectric mrial is encapsulated as tightly as possible in a stainless steel canister to provide minimum void volume in the canister. The lead telluride thermoelectric elements are pressure-contacted to a tungsten hot strap and metallurgically bonded at the cold junction to iron shoes with a barrier layer of tin telluride between the iron shoe and the p-type lead telluride element.

  19. Linear modulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    A study of frequency division multiplexing (FDM) systems was made for the purpose of determining the system performance that can be obtained with available state of the art components. System performance was evaluated on the basis of past experience, system analysis, and component evaluation. The system study was specifically directed to the area of FDM systems using subcarrier channel frequencies from 4 kHz to 200 kHz and channel information bandwidths of dc to 1, 2, 4, 8, and 16 kHz. The evaluation also assumes that the demodulation will be from a tape recorder which produces frequency modulation of + or - 1% on the signal due to the tape recorder wow and flutter. For the modulation system it is assumed that the pilot and carrier channel frequencies are stable to within + or - .005% and that the FM on the channel carriers is negligible. The modulator system was evaluated for the temperature range of -20 degree to +85 degree while the demodulator system was evaluated for operation at room temperature.

  20. Insulin: All You Need To Know but Were Afraid To Ask. A Patient Education Module.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGrath, Zoe F.; Moseley, James L.

    This learning module is intended to assist outpatient professional nurses in teaching patients to measure and administer their own insulin and to deal with diabetic emergencies when out of the hospital. The instructor's information (presented in an appendix) includes an overview of the topics covered in the patient module, general directions for…

  1. Ethical concerns in nurse migration.

    PubMed

    McElmurry, Beverly J; Solheim, Karen; Kishi, Rieko; Coffia, Marcia A; Woith, Wendy; Janepanish, Poolsuk

    2006-01-01

    International nurse migration is natural and to be expected. Recently, however, those who have fostered nurse migration believe that it will solve nursing shortages in developed countries and offer nurse migrants better working conditions and an improved quality of life. Whether natural or manipulated, migration flow patterns largely occur from developing to developed countries. In this article, nurse migration is examined using primary health care (PHC) as an ethical framework. The unmanaged flow of nurse migrants from developing to developed countries is inconsistent with "health for all" principles. Removing key health personnel from countries experiencing resource shortages is contrary to PHC equity. Often, nurse migrants are placed in vulnerable, inequitable work roles, and employing nurse migrants fails to address basic causes of nurse shortages in developed countries, such as dissatisfaction with work conditions and decreased funding for academic settings. Nurse migration policies and procedures can be developed to satisfy PHC ethics criteria if they (1) leave developing countries enhanced rather than depleted, (2) contribute to country health outcomes consistent with essential care for all people, (3) are based on community participation, (4) address common nursing labor issues, and (5) involve equitable and clear financial arrangements.

  2. Nurse therapists in behavioural psychotherapy.

    PubMed Central

    Marks, I M; Hallam, R S; Philpott, R; Connolly, J C

    1975-01-01

    Five registered mental nurses (R.M.N.s) were trained over two years to become behavioural psychotherapists for adult neurotic disorders. They achieved results comparable to those obtained with similar patients and methods by psychologists and psychiatrists. Similar results were maintained when over a third year the therapists were seconded to work in four hospitals and a general practice. Patients were satisfied at being treated by nurses. After initial teething difficulties nurse therapists became valuable members of treatment teams during both training and secondment, becoming accepted by most nurses, psychologists, and psychiatrists with whom they came into contact. The training of further nurse therapists would facilitate treatment of many disabled neurotics who would otherwise go without effective treatment. Training nurse therapists takes less time and money than training psychologists and psychiatrists because less of their education is redundant to the skills involved. The pool of R.M.N.s suitable for training is much larger than that of psychiatrists and psychologists. The nurse therapists can be integrated relatively easily into treatment teams. The present nursing structure imposes restrictions on the advancement of clinical nurse specialists and a clinical tree is badly needed parallel with present administrative and teaching hierarchies. An 18-month course in adult behavioural psychotherapy has been recognized by the Joint Board of Clinical Nursing Studies for England and Wales so that nurse therapists seem destined to be a lasting feature of future treatment teams. PMID:1139262

  3. Nursing perspectives for intensive care.

    PubMed

    Woodrow, P

    1997-06-01

    Within health care, market forces increasingly determine what services have economic value. For nursing to survive this economic onslaught, nurses must clarify their values and roles. While nurses working in intensive care develop useful technical skills and normally work within a constructive multi-disciplinary team framework, they have a potentially unique contribution to care, focusing on the patient as a whole person rather than intervening to solve a problem. The need for both physiological and psychological care creates a need for holistic values, best achieved through humanistic perspectives. Humanistic nursing places patients as people at the centre of nursing care, as illustrated by the limitations of reality orientation compared with the potentials of validation therapy. Intensive care nurses asserting and developing such patient-centred roles offer a valuable way forward for nursing to develop into the 21st century.

  4. An integrative nursing theoretical framework.

    PubMed

    Schmieding, N J

    1990-04-01

    The use of an integrative nursing theoretical framework for both clinical and administrative practice has recently been suggested. The author developed a theoretical framework which incorporates key concepts from the writings of Ida J. Orlando and Virginia Henderson and proposes it to be used as an integrative framework. The rationale for using a framework is discussed along with clinical and administrative examples of how to integrate concepts from the proposed framework. The reasons for using an integrative theoretical framework are that it: serves as a guide for both clinical and administrative decisions; forms the basis of the nursing philosophy; facilitates communication with patients and colleagues; helps identify congruent supporting theories and concepts; provides a basis for educational programmes; helps to differentiate nursing from non-nursing activities; and enhances nurse unity and self-esteem. The premise of the article is that benefits are derived from the use of a nursing theoretical framework because it provides a specific vision of nursing.

  5. Implementation and evaluation of Nursing Interventions Classification and Nursing Outcomes Classification in a patient education plan.

    PubMed

    Hajewski, C; Maupin, J M; Rapp, D A; Sitterding, M; Pappas, J

    1998-06-01

    Nursing Interventions Classification (NIC) and Nursing Outcomes Classification (NOC) are recognized examples of standardized nursing languages used to describe the contribution nursing makes to patient care. Columbus Regional Hospital nursing leadership recognized the need to use standardized nursing interventions and nursing-sensitive patient outcomes to describe the unique contribution nursing makes to patient education. In collaboration with the University of Iowa, NIC/NOC languages were implemented in the development of a patient education plan for a clinical pathway population.

  6. Health Instruction Packages: Test-Taking Strategies for the N. L. N. (National League of Nursing) Achievement Tests.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bateman, Leslie Miller

    As an informational aid for students who are planning to take NLN (National League of Nursing) Achievement Tests, the text and accompanying exercises in this module describe NLN testing procedures and fundamental test-taking skills. After introductory material discussing the importance of mastering test-taking skills, the module describes how to…

  7. The Impact of an Educational Intervention on Self-Directed Learning Readiness and Behaviors in Undergraduate Nursing Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daniels, Elizabeth Barnes

    2011-01-01

    This study compared the SDL readiness and behaviors of two homogeneous groups of junior level undergraduate nursing students (n = 33) as measured by Guglielmino's SDLRS. One group was exposed to an educational module that addressed the purpose and process of SDL and the other was not exposed to the educational module. An experimental,…

  8. The Value of Trust to Nursing.

    PubMed

    Rutherford, Marcella M

    2014-01-01

    Trust, one of nursing's intangible assets, impacts nurses' ability to form meaningful relationships with patients and this connection positively impacts health outcomes. Linking trust to the fabric of nursing and investing in its measurement will become essential to nursing's valuation and the resulting investment in nursing. Trust, as nursing's core value, should be fostered by nurse educators as they prepare the next generation of nurses. Nurse administrators should connect the trust a patient has for his or her nurse and patient cooperation and honest transparent communication between providers and the patient. Banking trust as a valuable nursing asset will substantiate nursing's marketing and support its worth. Nursing's trustworthiness is an intangible asset that warrants protection, as trust once lost is hard to recapture.

  9. Nurses who do not nurse: factors that predict non-nursing work in the U.S. registered nursing labor market.

    PubMed

    Black, Lisa; Spetz, Joanne; Harrington, Charlene

    2010-01-01

    Registered nurses (RNs) who work outside of nursing have seldom been examined. This aim of this study was to compare the 122,178 (4%) of RNs who are employed outside of nursing to those who work in nursing jobs in terms of sociodemographic, market, and political variables to determine if these groups are substantively different from one another. Using a logit regression model, wages were a significant predictor of working outside of nursing for unmarried nurses but not for married nurses. Married and unmarried male nurses were more likely to work outside of nursing. Baccalaureate education, children under age 6, higher family income, and years since graduation increased the odds of working outside of nursing for married nurses. Ultimately, identifying characteristics on which these groups differ may inform future policy directions that could target nurses who may leave nursing at a time when retention efforts might be effective to alter their trajectory away from the profession.

  10. Statement on nursing: a personal perspective.

    PubMed

    McCutcheon, Tonna

    2004-01-01

    Contemporary nursing is based on a conglomerate of theoretical nursing models. These models each incorporate four central concepts: person, health, environment, and nursing. By defining these concepts, nurses develop an individual framework from which they base their nursing practice. As an aspiring nurse practitioner in the gastroenterology field, I have retrospectively assessed my personal definitions of person, health, environment, and nursing. From these definitions, I am able to incorporate specific theoretical frameworks into my personal belief system, thus formulating a basis for my nursing practice. This foundation is comprised of the influence of nursing theorists Jean Watson, Sister Callista Roy, Kolcaba, Florence Nightingale, and Ida J. Orlando; the Perioperative Patient-Focused Model; Watson's Theory of Human Caring; theories regarding transpersonal human caring and healing; and feminist theories. Therefore, this article describes self-examination of nursing care by defining central nursing concepts, acknowledging the influence of nursing theorists and theories, and developing a personal framework from which I base my nursing practice.

  11. Achieving Quality Care at the End of Life: A Focus of the End-of-Life Nursing Education Consortium (ELNEC) Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherman, Deborah Witt; Matzo, Marianne LaPorte; Rogers, Susan; McLaughlin, Maureen; Virani, Rose

    2002-01-01

    Describes one of nine modules in the End-of-Life Nursing Education Consortium Curriculum, a train-the-trainer course to prepare nurses for palliative care. Discuses teaching strategies to achieve high-quality care and includes a list of print and web resources. (SK)

  12. A magnetic strategy for new graduate nurses.

    PubMed

    Halfer, Diana

    2007-01-01

    With the shortfall of nurses, more health care organizations are actively recruiting new graduate nurses. To translate active recruitment to successful retention, however, these newest nurses need support to make the adjustment from the security of a protected academic environment to the demands of a professional nursing career. Nursing turnover occurs when their role transition is unsuccessful. A unique model implemented in 2003 transformed new graduate nurses into confident staff nurses in an acute care setting. The insights gained and the investments required for a "magnetic" strategy to make new graduate nurses successful new staff nurses who stay with the organization are revealed.

  13. Innovation in transformative nursing leadership: nursing informatics competencies and roles.

    PubMed

    Remus, Sally; Kennedy, Margaret Ann

    2012-12-01

    In a recent brief to the Canadian Nurses Association's National Expert Commission on the Health of Our Nation, the Academy of Canadian Executive Nurses (ACEN) discussed leadership needs in the Canadian healthcare system, and promoted the pivotal role of nursing executives in transforming Canada's healthcare system into an integrated patient-centric system. Included among several recommendations was the need to develop innovative leadership competencies that enable nurse leaders to lead and advance transformative health system change. This paper focuses on an emerging "avant-garde executive leadership competency" recommended for today's health leaders to guide health system transformation. Specifically, this competency is articulated as "state of the art communication and technology savvy," and it implies linkages between nursing informatics competencies and transformational leadership roles for nurse executive. The authors of this paper propose that distinct nursing informatics competencies are required to augment traditional executive skills to support transformational outcomes of safe, integrated, high-quality care delivery through knowledge-driven care. International trends involving nursing informatics competencies and the evolution of new corporate informatics roles, such as chief nursing informatics officers (CNIOs), are demonstrating value and advanced transformational leadership as nursing executive roles that are informed by clinical data.

  14. Nursing needs of hospitalized older adults. Consumer and nurse perceptions.

    PubMed

    Chang, Esther; Chenoweth, Lynn; Hancock, Karen

    2003-09-01

    The proportion of older adults is increasing in Australia, and the proportion of older adults requiring medical care is expected to increase in the future. At the same time, budget restrictions are a reality for Australia's health system. Increasing need and decreasing resources suggest the need to focus on the quality aspect of treatment and care for older adults. Little research has been conducted in the area of perceived nursing needs of elderly patients during hospitalization. This is an important area of research because it is increasingly recognized that elderly patients have specialized needs and are the major consumers of health care. Even less research has compared patient and carer perceptions with those of nursing staff. This article is a literature review and an investigation of the quality of care elderly patients receive, and of patient and nurse perceptions of the importance of various nursing activities. Quality of care is reviewed in terms of perceptions of nursing care priorities and elderly patients' satisfaction with the quality of nursing care they receive. Research examining nurses' perceptions related to why they are unable to consistently provide quality nursing care to all elderly patients is also reviewed. By identifying the nursing needs of elderly patients and educating nursing staff about these needs, professional practice can be guided and improvements in quality of care, patient satisfaction, and patient outcomes may occur.

  15. Care: what nurses say and what nurses do.

    PubMed

    Warelow, Philip; Edward, Karen-Leigh; Vinek, Jeanette

    2008-01-01

    Caring is neither simply a set of attitudes or theories, nor does it comprise all that nurses do. Nursing care is determined by the way nurses use knowledge and skills to appreciate the uniqueness of the person they are caring for (changing the care noun into a caring verb). The purpose of this article is to present a range of contemporary nurse theorists' ideas on caring and to examine these ideas using the backdrop of nursing as practiced in both Australia and Canada to demonstrate a range of national and international similarities and theoretical beliefs. Caring relationships set up the conditions of trust that enable the one receiving the care to accept the help offered, underpinning the nurse-patient relationship or the therapeutic relationship. Caring is always specific and relational such as that found in the nurse-patient relationship. We believe that caring theory has much to offer nursing practice worldwide. Caring must be considered in the caring context because the nature of the caring relationship is central to most nursing interventions. Nurses need to be able to actually practice caring rather than just theorize about it-using caring theories to inform their practice.

  16. Photovoltaic module and module arrays

    DOEpatents

    Botkin, Jonathan [El Cerrito, CA; Graves, Simon [Berkeley, CA; Lenox, Carl J. S. [Oakland, CA; Culligan, Matthew [Berkeley, CA; Danning, Matt [Oakland, CA

    2012-07-17

    A photovoltaic (PV) module including a PV device and a frame. The PV device has a PV laminate defining a perimeter and a major plane. The frame is assembled to and encases the laminate perimeter, and includes leading, trailing, and side frame members, and an arm that forms a support face opposite the laminate. The support face is adapted for placement against a horizontal installation surface, to support and orient the laminate in a non-parallel or tilted arrangement. Upon final assembly, the laminate and the frame combine to define a unitary structure. The frame can orient the laminate at an angle in the range of 3.degree.-7.degree. from horizontal, and can be entirely formed of a polymeric material. Optionally, the arm incorporates integral feature(s) that facilitate interconnection with corresponding features of a second, identically formed PV module.

  17. Photovoltaic module and module arrays

    DOEpatents

    Botkin, Jonathan; Graves, Simon; Lenox, Carl J. S.; Culligan, Matthew; Danning, Matt

    2013-08-27

    A photovoltaic (PV) module including a PV device and a frame, The PV device has a PV laminate defining a perimeter and a major plane. The frame is assembled to and encases the laminate perimeter, and includes leading, trailing, and side frame members, and an arm that forms a support face opposite the laminate. The support face is adapted for placement against a horizontal installation surface, to support and orient the laminate in a non-parallel or tilted arrangement. Upon final assembly, the laminate and the frame combine to define a unitary structure. The frame can orient the laminate at an angle in the range of 3.degree.-7.degree. from horizontal, and can be entirely formed of a polymeric material. Optionally, the arm incorporates integral feature(s) that facilitate interconnection with corresponding features of a second, identically formed PV module.

  18. Rationalisation of nursing education in Limpopo province : nurse educators' perspectives.

    PubMed

    Makhuvha, T R; Davhana-Maselesele, M; Netshandama, V O

    2007-12-01

    Nursing education institutions are facing a challenge of realigning its functioning according to the changes that are taking place within the country. The intention of the government post apartheid was to correct the imbalances which were brought about by the apartheid government and the following regulations and policies influenced the change in nursing education, that is, Reconstruction and Development Programme (RDP), White Paper on Higher Education (WPHE), and the National Qualification Framework (NQF) (South Africa, 1995:6). In 1996 the government introduced the first democratic constitution of the Republic of South Africa (RSA) according toAct 108 of 1996. In the light of those increasing changes in nursing education, led by political change, the experiences of nurse educators is a critical issue facing nursing campuses. The purpose of this study was two-fold; namely: to explore and describe the experiences of nurse educators with regard to the rationalisation of nursing education and to use information obtained to describe guidelines for the effective rationalisation of a nursing college in the Limpopo Province. A qualitative, exploratory, descriptive and contextual research design was used. Qualitative interviews were conducted with nurse educators who worked in nursing colleges before and after 1994. Measures to ensure trustworthiness were applied and ethical issues were adhered to throughout the research process. Data was analysed following Tesch's method (Creswell 1994:154-155). The research established that nurse educators experienced dissatisfaction in several areas relating to the rationalization of nursing education. Support was also expected from bureaucracy at higher level. This study developed guidelines to policy makers and nurse educators to ensure effective rationalisation process.

  19. Incivility in the hospital environment: the nurse educator-staff nurse relationship.

    PubMed

    Danque, Cynthia T; Serafica, Reimund; Lane, Susan Hayes; Hodge, Mary Alice

    2014-01-01

    Occurrences of incivility in nurse educator-staff nurse relationship studies are limited. A qualitative methodology (n = 6) was used to investigate nurse educators' perceptions of the main stressors for nurses during educational experiences. Identification of uncivil traits as seen by nurse educators and perceived role of nursing leaders in addressing incivility in the workplace were also identified.

  20. Nursing Faculty Members' Perspectives of Faculty-to-Faculty Workplace Incivility among Nursing Faculty Members

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amos, Kimberly S.

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, nursing faculty incivility has been a searing topic of research. Nursing research included studies on incivility among nursing students, incivility between nursing students and nursing faculty, and incivility in the clinical setting. However, literature specifically on nursing faculty incivility was limited. This descriptive,…

  1. Building Trust Relationships in Nursing. Midwest Alliance in Nursing Program Meeting (Des Moines, Iowa, April 1983).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minckley, Barbara B., Ed.; Walters, Mary Dale, Ed.

    Focusing on issues concerning trust relationships within the nursing field, the papers in these proceedings consider relationships between nursing service and nursing education, staff or faculty and nursing administration, rural and urban nursing agencies, and among intercultural nursing groups. The proceedings contain: (1) "Trust: An Idealistic…

  2. The Lived Experience of Nurses Working with Student Nurses in the Clinical Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hathorn, Donna; Machtmes, Krisanna; Tillman, Ken

    2009-01-01

    One response to the nursing shortage is to increase promotion and retention in nursing programs: However, negative attitudes of nurses threaten student progression and retention. A phenomenological study explored the lived experience of nurses who worked with student nurses to discover "what" attitudes nurses had toward student nurses…

  3. Strategies for Maintaining Associate Degree Nursing Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tilton, Theodore

    As part of the national campaign of the American Nurses Association (ANA) to create two levels of nursing, one for bachelor of science nurses (BSN's) and one for associate degree nurses (ADN's), Illinois has been targeted for a legislative push to change the laws governing nurse licensure, which, if successful, would signal the beginning of the…

  4. 38 CFR 52.130 - Nursing services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... comprehensive plans of care, of all participants in the program. (a) There must be at least one registered nurse on duty each day of operation of the adult day health care program. This nurse must be currently... that this nurse be a geriatric nurse practitioner or a clinical nurse specialist. (b) The number...

  5. 38 CFR 51.130 - Nursing services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... service must be under the direction of a full-time registered nurse who is currently licensed by the State... nurses 24 hours per day, 7 days per week. (c) The director of nursing service must designate a registered nurse as a supervising nurse for each tour of duty. (1) Based on the application and results of the...

  6. School Nurse Intention to Pursue Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broussard, Lisa; White, Debra

    2014-01-01

    In 2011, the Institute of Medicine recommended that 80% of the nurses possess a minimum of a bachelor of science in nursing by 2020 and double the number of doctorally prepared nurses. This has prompted a significant number of registered nurses to advance their educational level. School nurses in Louisiana are not required to have a bachelor's…

  7. 20 CFR 404.1029 - Student nurses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Student nurses. 404.1029 Section 404.1029... Student nurses. If you are a student nurse, your work for a hospital or nurses training school is excluded from employment if you are enrolled and regularly attending classes in a nurses training school...

  8. Nurses' Perceptions on the Shortage of Nurses and Enrollment Decline in Nursing Programs and Means to Increase Student Nurse Enrollment in Arizona.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, A. Louise

    A case study investigated three specific concerns related to the shortage of nurses and the decline in enrollment in nursing programs: (1) identification of reasons for the nursing shortage and enrollment decline; (2) identification of weaknesses in nursing that have contributed to the shortage of nurses and enrollment decline; and (3)…

  9. 20 CFR 404.1029 - Student nurses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Student nurses. 404.1029 Section 404.1029... Student nurses. If you are a student nurse, your work for a hospital or nurses training school is excluded from employment if you are enrolled and regularly attending classes in a nurses training school...

  10. 20 CFR 404.1029 - Student nurses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Student nurses. 404.1029 Section 404.1029... Student nurses. If you are a student nurse, your work for a hospital or nurses training school is excluded from employment if you are enrolled and regularly attending classes in a nurses training school...

  11. 20 CFR 404.1029 - Student nurses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Student nurses. 404.1029 Section 404.1029... Student nurses. If you are a student nurse, your work for a hospital or nurses training school is excluded from employment if you are enrolled and regularly attending classes in a nurses training school...

  12. 20 CFR 404.1029 - Student nurses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Student nurses. 404.1029 Section 404.1029... Student nurses. If you are a student nurse, your work for a hospital or nurses training school is excluded from employment if you are enrolled and regularly attending classes in a nurses training school...

  13. 38 CFR 51.130 - Nursing services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Nursing services. 51.130... FOR NURSING HOME CARE OF VETERANS IN STATE HOMES Standards § 51.130 Nursing services. The facility management must provide an organized nursing service with a sufficient number of qualified nursing...

  14. 38 CFR 51.130 - Nursing services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Nursing services. 51.130... FOR NURSING HOME CARE OF VETERANS IN STATE HOMES Standards § 51.130 Nursing services. The facility management must provide an organized nursing service with a sufficient number of qualified nursing...

  15. 38 CFR 51.130 - Nursing services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Nursing services. 51.130... FOR NURSING HOME CARE OF VETERANS IN STATE HOMES Standards § 51.130 Nursing services. The facility management must provide an organized nursing service with a sufficient number of qualified nursing...

  16. Standardized Nursing Languages. Position Statement. Revised

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duff, Carolyn; Endsley, Patricia; Chau, Elizabeth; Morgitan, Judith

    2012-01-01

    It is the position of the National Association of School Nurses (NASN) that standardized nursing languages (SNL) are essential communication tools for registered professional school nurses (hereinafter, school nurses) to assist in planning, delivery, and evaluation of quality nursing care. SNL help identify, clarify and document the nature and…

  17. 38 CFR 51.130 - Nursing services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Nursing services. 51.130... FOR NURSING HOME CARE OF VETERANS IN STATE HOMES Standards § 51.130 Nursing services. The facility management must provide an organized nursing service with a sufficient number of qualified nursing...

  18. Disabled nurses discover new career paths.

    PubMed

    Bemis, Patricia Ann

    2009-06-01

    When confronted with a disability, the steps learned from the nursing process help nurses maintain employability. The nursing process teaches nurses to gather information, evaluate the information, develop a plan, implement the plan, evaluate the outcome, modify the plan, implement again, etc. By following the process to modify their career paths and/or implement adaptive devices, nurses maintain their employability.

  19. Introducing ADN students to nursing research.

    PubMed

    Thorpe, R; Smutko, P W

    1998-01-01

    Every nurse, regardless of educational preparation, should be involved in and benefit from nursing research. The research process needs to become an integral part of nursing practice. In this article, the authors emphasize the importance of nursing research in the associate degree nursing curriculum, emphasizing strategies that enable the ADN graduate to appreciate research reports and use the knowledge in the clinical practice setting.

  20. Nursing: Supply and Demand through 2020

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carnevale, Anthony P.; Smith, Nicole; Gulish, Artem

    2015-01-01

    This report analyzes the growing need for qualified nurses. The study projects that the economy will create 1.6 million job openings for nurses through 2020. Yet, there will not be enough nurses to fill those openings. this report projects that the nursing workforce will be facing a shortfall of roughly 200,000 nursing professionals by 2020. One…

  1. Determinants of Smoking Behavior among Nurses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rausch, Judith Cartledge; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Reviews literature on determinants of smoking behavior among nurses, examining history and current trends of cigarette use among nurses. Cites national and international studies showing nurses to smoke more than any other health professionals. Discusses stress as primary theory of smoking causation among nurses. Considers role of nursing education…

  2. Public Health Interventions for School Nursing Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaffer, Marjorie A.; Anderson, Linda J. W.; Rising, Shannon

    2016-01-01

    School nurses (SNs) use public health nursing knowledge and skills to provide nursing services to school populations. The Public Health Intervention Wheel is a practice framework that can be used to explain and guide public health nursing interventions. SNs who were also members of the National Association of School Nurses completed an electronic…

  3. Bibliography of Nursing Monographs, 1970-1978.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ewens, Wilma A., Comp.; And Others

    This list consists of titles published since 1970 on nursing, grouping them into five broad categories: (1) nursing practice, including clinical nursing, communication, community health, emergency care, family health, obstetrics, and universal self care; (2) nursing as a profession; (3) educational aspects of nursing; (4) basic health science…

  4. Perceptions of Novice Clinical Adjunct Nursing Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Himmelberg, Layna

    2011-01-01

    The anticipated nursing shortage in the United States is well documented and continues to be a topic of discussion. A nationwide solution has been for nursing programs to increase their enrollment of nursing students. This could be difficult for many nursing schools; as many have a shortage of qualified nursing faculty with which to instruct…

  5. An Assessment of North American Nursing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Commission on Graduates of Foreign Nursing Schools, Philadelphia, PA.

    This document, prepared under the auspices of the Trilateral Initiative for North American Nursing, a professional organization of nursing, examines and compares nursing standards in Canada, Mexico, and the United States. The report focuses on first-level, general nurses and advanced or specialty practice nurses, and is organized in four parts:…

  6. Strengthening Preceptors' Competency in Thai Clinical Nursing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mingpun, Renu; Srisa-ard, Boonchom; Jumpamool, Apinya

    2015-01-01

    The problem of lack of nurses can be solved by employing student nurses. Obviously, nurse instructors and preceptors have to work extremely hard to train student nurses to meet the standard of nursing. The preceptorship model is yet to be explored as to what it means to have an effective program or the requisite skills to be an effective…

  7. Sexual Harassment in Nursing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duldt, Bonnie W.

    1982-01-01

    Sexual harassment in the workplace, specifically in nursing, is discussed. The impact of sexual harassment, characteristics of those commonly involved, the need for changing attitudes of men and women in the workplace, the factor of power in relationships, and ways to avoid legal suits are all examined. (CT)

  8. Consultancy pay for nurses.

    PubMed

    1998-01-01

    Nurses working for NHS Direct could be paid at medical consultant level based on equal pay for equal work initiatives, according to Rob Crouch, Deputy Director and Research Fellow (A&E), Centre for the Advancement of Clinical Practice, University of Surrey.

  9. Nursing Telehealth Applications Initiative

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    doses with you. The list should include your prescription meds, vitamins, over the counter meds and herbal supplements . Also include your medication...undergraduate nursing students [Abstract]. Telemedicine and e-Health, 15, supplement 1, 63. 92 INVITED: 2010 Videoconferencing for Clinical Learning and

  10. A Nursing School Cooperative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fraser, Carolyn; Polacsek, Barbara K.

    1975-01-01

    Faculty in five suburban Chicago nursing programs successfully joined together to share inservice programs and curtail duplication of resources and costs, through newsletters, computerized inventories of instructional materials and media owned by each, and inservice training luncheons. Coordinating the scheduling of students' clinical time at…

  11. Nurse Assistant Instructor Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connecticut State Dept. of Education, Hartford. Div. of Vocational, Technical, and Adult Education.

    This document is designed to assist the teacher in a nurse assistant certification program. The program is intended to prepare students for entry-level employment in a long-term care facility or with a licensed home health care agency. The 135-hour course teaches basic skills in patient care that will qualify the student to assist the licensed…

  12. [The transport nurse].

    PubMed

    Le Gal, Ludovic

    2015-01-01

    Caring, reassuring, supporting and repatriating people in medical distress from anywhere in the world: such is the day-to-day work of the repatriation nurses at Mondial Assistance. Ludovic Le Gal has been doing this job for the last eleven years with a passion which has remained undiminished.

  13. Academic Inbreeding in Nursing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Michael H.

    1977-01-01

    Academic inbreeding, the employment for faculty positions of persons who receive their graduate training at the same academic institution, is considered detrimental to an institution's academic environment. Results of a study conducted at 54 universities revealed that almost half the faculty (48 percent) in collegiate nursing programs are drawn…

  14. Enhanced nurse call systems.

    PubMed

    2001-04-01

    This Evaluation focuses on high-end computerized nurse call systems--what we call enhanced systems. These are highly flexible systems that incorporate microprocessor and communications technologies to expand the capabilities of the nurse call function. Enhanced systems, which vary in configuration from one installation to the next, typically consist of a basic system that provides standard nurse call functionality and a combination of additional enhancements that provide the added functionality the facility desires. In this study, we examine the features that distinguish enhanced nurse call systems from nonenhanced systems, focusing on their application and benefit to healthcare facilities. We evaluated seven systems to determine how well they help (1) improve patient care, as well as increase satisfaction with the care provided, and (2) improve caregiver efficiency, as well as increase satisfaction with the work environment. We found that all systems meet these objectives, but not all systems perform equally well for all implementations. Our ratings will help facilities identify those systems that offer the most effective features for their intended use. The study also includes a Technology Management Guide to help readers (1) determine whether they'll benefit from the capabilities offered by enhanced systems and (2) target a system for purchase and equip the system for optimum performance and cost-effective operation.

  15. Reference Sources for Nursing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nursing Outlook, 1976

    1976-01-01

    The ninth revision (including a Canadian supplement) of a list of nursing reference works lists items in the following sections: abstract journals, audiovisuals, bibliographies, dictionaries, directories, drug lists and pharmacologies, educational programs, histories, indexes, legal guides, library administration and organization, research grants,…

  16. RX for School Nursing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smolkin, Rachel

    2003-01-01

    Describes how some districts are coping with nursing shortages and tight budgets by employing several approaches to providing health services to students, including requesting additional services from existing staff, establishing partnerships with local health agencies and hospitals, and obtaining information about school-health programs from…

  17. Nurse prescribing in Poland

    PubMed Central

    Binkowska-Bury, Monika; Więch, Paweł; Bazaliński, Dariusz; Marć, Małgorzata; Bartosiewicz, Anna; Januszewicz, Paweł

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to identify and examine the differences in opinions held by health care professionals and the general public concerning the right to administer and prescribe medication which has been awarded to nurses and midwives in Poland. The study was conducted from December 1, 2014 to July 1, 2015, in randomly selected primary health care clinics, among 2227 individuals, including 849 subjects representing medical personnel of primary health care and 1378 patients receiving primary care services. The study used 2 versions of a questionnaire. The relationships were examined with χ2 test for independence and Kruskal–Wallis test. Health professionals do not believe the new rights awarded to nurses and midwives will reduce the waiting time for medical consultations (P < 0.001). Nurses’ qualifications for the new tasks were most highly rated by patients, whereas the least favorable opinion was expressed by doctors (P < 0.001). To introduce nurse prescribing it is necessary to develop a suitable strategy enabling implementation of the government's initiative and facilitating the process of taking up the new task by nurses. PMID:27537573

  18. Using advanced mobile devices in nursing practice--the views of nurses and nursing students.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Pauline; Petersson, Göran; Saveman, Britt-Inger; Nilsson, Gunilla

    2014-09-01

    Advanced mobile devices allow registered nurses and nursing students to keep up-to-date with expanding health-related knowledge but are rarely used in nursing in Sweden. This study aims at describing registered nurses' and nursing students' views regarding the use of advanced mobile devices in nursing practice. A cross-sectional study was completed in 2012; a total of 398 participants replied to a questionnaire, and descriptive statistics were applied. Results showed that the majority of the participants regarded an advanced mobile device to be useful, giving access to necessary information and also being useful in making notes, planning their work and saving time. Furthermore, the advanced mobile device was regarded to improve patient safety and the quality of care and to increase confidence. In order to continuously improve the safety and quality of health care, advanced mobile devices adjusted for nursing practice should be further developed, implemented and evaluated in research.

  19. Remote nursing certified practice: viewing nursing and nurse practitioner practice through a social justice lens.

    PubMed

    Tarlier, Denise S; Browne, Annette J

    2011-06-01

    Remote Nursing Certified Practice (RNCP) was introduced in 2010 to regulate nursing practice in remote, largely First Nations communities in British Columbia, Canada. These are communities that often experience profound health and health-care inequities. Typically nurses are the main health-care providers. Using a critical social justice lens, the authors explore the clinical and ethical implications of RNCP in terms of access to equitable, high-quality primary health care.They examine the fit between the level and scope of health services provided by registered nurses working under RNCP and the health needs of remote First Nations communities. In doing so, they draw comparisons between nurse practitioners (NPs) and outpost nurses working in NP roles who historically were employed to provide health care in these communities.The authors conclude by calling for nursing regulations that support equitable, high-quality primary care for all British Columbians.

  20. Staff nurses and their solutions to the nursing shortage.

    PubMed

    Lynn, Mary R; Redman, Richard W

    2006-10-01

    Nurses in acute care hospitals report that situations in their work setting and profession are in dire need of repair. Although they waiver on their intention to remain in their institution and nursing, they do not waiver on their selected resolution to nursing's shortage. A total of 787 staff nurses in eight geographically and demographically diverse states responded and were asked to select the "Top 5" actions they thought would improve nursing and decrease the shortage. Creating career ladders was endorsed by most respondents (85%) with increasing pay endorsed by the fewest (33%). When selecting the single most important action, they reversed the order--increased pay was the most endorsed (26%), and creating career ladders and increased educational opportunities were endorsed by less than 1%. Nurses appeared to be concerned about the profession in general; however, when asked the "most important" thing to do, an age-old action was selected--increase pay.

  1. Filipino Nurses' Spirituality and Provision of Spiritual Nursing Care.

    PubMed

    Labrague, Leodoro J; McEnroe-Petitte, Denise M; Achaso, Romeo H; Cachero, Geifsonne S; Mohammad, Mary Rose A

    2016-12-01

    This study was to explore the perceptions of Filipino nurses' spirituality and the provision of spiritual nursing care. A descriptive, cross-sectional, and quantitative study was adopted for this study. The study was conducted in the Philippines utilizing a convenience sample of 245 nurses. Nurses' Spirituality and Delivery of Spiritual Care (NSDSC) was used as the main instrument. The items on NSDSC with higher mean scores related to nurses' perception of spirituality were Item 7, "I believe that God loves me and cares for me," and Item 8, "Prayer is an important part of my life," with mean scores of 4.87 (SD = 1.36) and 4.88 (SD = 1.34), respectively. Items on NSDSC with higher mean scores related to the practice of spiritual care were Item 26, "I usually comfort clients spiritually (e.g., reading books, prayers, music, etc.)," and Item 25, "I refer the client to his/her spiritual counselor (e.g., hospital chaplain) if needed," with mean scores of 3.16 (SD = 1.54) and 2.92 (SD = 1.59). Nurse's spirituality correlated significantly with their understanding of spiritual nursing care (r = .3376, p ≤ .05) and delivery of spiritual nursing care (r = .3980, p ≤ .05). Positive significant correlations were found between understanding of spiritual nursing care and delivery of spiritual nursing care (r = .3289, p ≤ .05). For nurses to better provide spiritual nursing care, they must care for themselves through self-awareness, self-reflection, and developing a sense of satisfaction and contentment.

  2. 42 CFR 409.21 - Nursing care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... professional nurse. (b) Exception. Medicare does not pay for the services of a private duty nurse or attendant. An individual is not considered to be a private duty nurse or attendant if he or she is an...

  3. Nurse Discontent: The Search for Realistic Solutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ginzberg, Eli; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Following a report on the findings of a survey of North Florida nurses, the authors present several approaches for nursing administrators to consider when searching for more productive strategies to improve retention of hospital nurses. (CT)

  4. Training Advanced Practice Palliative Care Nurses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherman, Deborah Witt

    1999-01-01

    Describes the role and responsibilities of advanced-practice nurses in palliative care and nursing's initiative in promoting high-quality care through the educational preparation of these nurses. (JOW)

  5. Educating Nurse Administrators: One Program's Answer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCloskey, Joanne C.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Describes the master's program in nursing at the University of Iowa, which uses experienced nurse administrators as adjunct faculty members. Discusses core course content, the two-course sequence in nursing administration, and problems with the present curriculum. (CT)

  6. The making of a nurse entrepreneur.

    PubMed

    Porter-O'Grady, T

    1998-03-01

    Nursing provides many opportunities for professional and career advancement. The entrepreneurial pathway is especially benefited by a nursing background. Focusing on the opportunities that nursing provides for the entrepreneur opens almost any door in health care.

  7. Defining professional nursing accountability: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Krautscheid, Lorretta C

    2014-01-01

    Professional nursing accountability is described by both professional nursing organizations and nursing education credentialing agencies as a core aspect that underpins professional nursing practice. Although accountability is foundational to professional practice, a review of the literature revealed no consistent language or definition regarding professional nursing accountability. Instead, the literature itself reveals that professional nursing accountability is challenging to both describe and define. The ambiguity surrounding how to define professional nursing accountability contributes to challenges associated with both teaching and evaluating student nurse accountability within nursing education curricula. This article provides a reliable and comprehensive definition of professional nursing accountability derived from a synthesis of the literature. Recommendations for nursing education practice and recommendations for nursing education research are proposed.

  8. Evaluating nursing collections with the ICIRN's Essential Nursing Resources list.

    PubMed

    Raszewski, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    This study examines libraries' nursing collections using the Interagency Council on Information Resources in Nursing's Essential Nursing Resources' (ENR) 26th edition. An inventory of the online collections of 235 libraries was assembled and compared to free, government, or National Library of Medicine resources and licensed resources from the ENR. The top five resources listed on library websites in descending order were MEDLINE, CINAHL, ERIC, PsycINFO, and Google Scholar. The availability of specialized resources varied, based on factors such as the level of nursing degree at each institution or the libraries' National Network of Libraries of Medicine membership statuses.

  9. [Nursing ethics and the access to nursing care].

    PubMed

    Monteverde, Settimio

    2013-08-01

    The increasing number of ethical issues highlighted in everyday nursing care demonstrates the connectedness between nursing ethics and nursing practice. However, what is the role of ethical theories in this context? This question will be examined in this article by analysing the contribution made by the ethics of care, in particular in understandings of gender roles, asymmetries of power, professional knowledge and experience. The adoption and criticism of an emergent nursing ethics is discussed and stated from different viewpoints. The actuality of the caring approach is affirmed by a new reading of the given situation. This article first describes the traditional perception of nurses as marginalised actors in the health sector. By making reference to the current and growing global scarcity of nursing care, it contends that nursing will no longer be marginalised, but instead at the centre of public health attention and reputation. Nevertheless, marginalisation will persist by increasingly affecting the care receivers, especially those groups that are pushed to the fringes by the consequences of the healthcare market, such as persons of extreme old age, suffering from multiple morbidities, or with poor health literacy. Whereas the "classical" understanding of the ethics of care focuses on the nurse-patient relationship and on individual care and understanding of ethics, the new understanding confirms the classical, but adds an understanding of social ethics: caring for the access to care is seen as a main ethical goal of social justice within a nursing ethic.

  10. Differentiating between a consultant nurse and a clinical nurse specialist.

    PubMed

    Maylor, Miles

    With the introduction of nurse consultants, and regulation of the use of the designation 'specialist nurse', experienced practitioners such as clinical nurse specialists have seen their position eroded. Nurse consultants are a new NHS-employment category, and are expected to be at the top rank of the profession both in status and in salary. However, this article argues that nurses at various levels have the same core functions, and that these do not differ for nurse consultants. Distinguishing between practitioners that might have the same job description could be better done by measuring outcomes. More care needs to be taken over the use of words such as 'expert', which is used differently in different contexts, and it is suggested that competencies be developed by which to measure the effects of expertise. Although nurse consultant appointments are often driven by various political directives and they are employed to meet local and national priorities, difficult issues need to be faced. First, if nurse consultant jobs are the top of the clinical career ladder, will clinical nurse specialists (CNSs) need to accept a lower rung on it? Further, perhaps the title CNS should become obsolete or be regulated? Can CNSs claim parity of pay using the 'Agenda for Change' framework?

  11. Towards understanding the unpresentable in nursing: some nursing philosophical considerations.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Brenda L

    2006-01-01

    While nursing practice embodies certain observable and sometimes habitual actions, much inheres in these actions that is not immediately discernible. Taking on Lyotard's exegesis of the unpresentable, I undertake an analysis of the unpresentable as it occurs in nursing practices. The unpresentable is a place of alterity often excluded from dominant discourses. Yet this very alterity is what practising nurses face day after day. Drawing from two nursing situations, one from a hermeneutic phenomenological study and the other from the literature, I elucidate the unpresentable from a nursing point of view. Evoking Lyotard as well as selected philosophers from the continental philosophical tradition, I also question whether nursing in its present discourse is capable of responding to the unpresentable in nursing situations. Through the philosophical stance of presentation and representation, I delineate the urgent need to bring the otherness of the unpresentable into our nursing discourse. Nurses in practice confront a wide array of human differences and diversities and come to the realization that no framework alone can ever really have primacy over the multiform presentations of human suffering that so strikingly evoke alterity.

  12. California's minimum-nurse-staffing legislation and nurses' wages.

    PubMed

    Mark, Barbara; Harless, David W; Spetz, Joanne

    2009-01-01

    In 2004, California became the first state to implement minimum-nurse-staffing ratios in acute care hospitals. We examined the wages of registered nurses (RNs) before and after the legislation was enacted. Using four data sets-the National Sample Survey of Registered Nurses, the Current Population Survey, the National Compensation Survey, and the Occupational Employment Statistics Survey-we found that from 2000 through 2006, RNs in California metropolitan areas experienced real wage growth as much as twelve percentage points higher than the growth in the wages of nurses employed in metropolitan areas outside of California.

  13. The National Stroke Nursing Council: a nursing call for action.

    PubMed

    Hardy-Joel, Rhonda; Green, Teri

    2007-01-01

    Nursing is fundamental to the care of stroke patients. From the acute setting all the way to rehabilitation and community reintegration, nursing is there. Having well-educated and highly skilled nurses to monitor and care for stroke patients is crucial. Equally important is the collaboration of colleagues at a national level to facilitate and disseminate research and best practice guidelines across Canada. The National Stroke Nursing Council aims to fill this role. Stroke nurses from across Canada were invited to a national forum in 2005, hosted by the Canadian Stroke Network. The focus of this forum was to elucidate issues of concern to nurses across the stroke care continuum in relation to a Canadian Stroke Strategy. Subsequent to this forum, a cadre of nurses, after undergoing a rigorous screening process, were selected to form the inaugural National Stroke Nursing Council (NSNC). With ongoing support from the Canadian Stroke Network, the mandate of the NSNC is to promote leadership, communication, advocacy, education and nursing research in the field of stroke.

  14. Nursing practice environment: a strategy for mental health nurse retention?

    PubMed

    Redknap, Robina; Twigg, Di; Rock, Daniel; Towell, Amanda

    2015-06-01

    Historically, mental health services have faced challenges in their ability to attract and retain a competent nursing workforce in the context of an overall nursing shortage. The current economic downturn has provided some respite; however, this is likely to be a temporary reprieve, with significant nursing shortages predicted for the future. Mental health services need to develop strategies to become more competitive if they are to attract and retain skilled nurses and avoid future shortages. Research demonstrates that creating and maintaining a positive nursing practice environment is one such strategy and an important area to consider when addressing nurse retention. This paper examines the impact the nursing practice environment has on nurse retention within the general and mental health settings. Findings indicate, that while there is a wealth of evidence to support the importance of a positive practice environment on nurse retention in the broader health system, there is little evidence specific to mental health. Further research of the mental health practice environment is required.

  15. Nurses' and Nursing Students' Knowledge and Attitudes regarding Pediatric Pain

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz, Mario I.; Ponce-Monter, Héctor A.; Rangel-Flores, Eduardo; Castro-Gamez, Blanca; Romero-Quezada, Luis C.; O'Brien, Jessica P.; Romo-Hernández, Georgina; Escamilla-Acosta, Marco A.

    2015-01-01

    Nursing staff spend more time with patients with pain than any other health staff member. For this reason, the nurse must possess the basic knowledge to identify the presence of pain in patients, to measure its intensity and make the steps necessary for treatment. Therefore, a prospective, descriptive, analytical, and cross-sectional study was conducted to investigate the knowledge and attitudes regarding pediatric pain in two different populations. The questionnaire, Pediatric Nurses Knowledge and Attitudes Survey Regarding Pain (PKNAS), was applied to 111 hospital pediatric nurses and 300 university nursing students. The final scores for pediatric nurses and nursing students were 40.1 ± 7.9 and 40.3 ± 7.5, respectively. None of the sociodemographic variables predicted the scores obtained by the participants (P > 0.05). There was a high correlation between the PKNAS scores of pediatric nurses and nursing students (r = 0.86, P < 0.001). It was observed that the degree of knowledge about pain and its treatment was very low in both groups. Due to this deficiency, pain in children remains inadequately managed, which leads to suffering in this population. It is necessary to increase the continued training in this subject in both areas. PMID:26543643

  16. Nurses' and Nursing Students' Knowledge and Attitudes regarding Pediatric Pain.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, Mario I; Ponce-Monter, Héctor A; Rangel-Flores, Eduardo; Castro-Gamez, Blanca; Romero-Quezada, Luis C; O'Brien, Jessica P; Romo-Hernández, Georgina; Escamilla-Acosta, Marco A

    2015-01-01

    Nursing staff spend more time with patients with pain than any other health staff member. For this reason, the nurse must possess the basic knowledge to identify the presence of pain in patients, to measure its intensity and make the steps necessary for treatment. Therefore, a prospective, descriptive, analytical, and cross-sectional study was conducted to investigate the knowledge and attitudes regarding pediatric pain in two different populations. The questionnaire, Pediatric Nurses Knowledge and Attitudes Survey Regarding Pain (PKNAS), was applied to 111 hospital pediatric nurses and 300 university nursing students. The final scores for pediatric nurses and nursing students were 40.1 ± 7.9 and 40.3 ± 7.5, respectively. None of the sociodemographic variables predicted the scores obtained by the participants (P > 0.05). There was a high correlation between the PKNAS scores of pediatric nurses and nursing students (r = 0.86, P < 0.001). It was observed that the degree of knowledge about pain and its treatment was very low in both groups. Due to this deficiency, pain in children remains inadequately managed, which leads to suffering in this population. It is necessary to increase the continued training in this subject in both areas.

  17. [Reading nursing Literature in English: new inputs for practicing nurses].

    PubMed

    von Klitzing, Waltraut; Stoll, Hansruedi; Trachsel, Edith; Aldorf, Kurt; Bernhard, Annelis; Eze, Germaine; Spirig, Rebecca

    2007-02-01

    A prerequisite to providing evidence-based care is the ability to comprehend the nursing research literature, most of which is published in English. To facilitate this understanding, a course on "reading the research literature for evidence-based practice in English" was developed by an interdisciplinary team for staff nurses at the University Hospital Basel. The pilot course was offered to nurses who specialized in cancer care. It was led by the oncology Advanced Practice Nurse (APN) from the Department of Medicine. Research articles focusing on the management of chronic illness and cancer pain management were assigned and read. The course consisted of ten 90 minute lessons. The evaluation was designed to address the following questions: 1. Did participation in the course improve the oncology related knowledge of the nurses? 2. Did participation in the course improve the nurses' English language skills? 3. At what level of difficulty did the nurse participants perceive the course to be? 4. Were course participants able to use their newly acquired knowledge to teach their nursing colleagues on the ward? The course evaluation demonstrated that the 15 participants significantly improved their oncology knowledge through this process but that their English skills did not improve. The participants were able to present lectures on their wards based on the course literature, which were positively evaluated by their colleagues and the APN course leader. The participants perceived the course as being sophisticated but also effective at demonstrating the use of English-language research literature for one's own nursing practice.

  18. Contracting for nurse education: nurse leader experiences and future visions.

    PubMed

    Moule, P

    1999-02-01

    The integration of nurse education into higher education establishments following Working for Patients, Working Paper 10 (DOH 1989a) has seen changes to the funding and delivery of nurse education. The introduction of contracting for education initiated a business culture which subsumed previous relationships, affecting collaborative partnerships and shared understanding. Discourse between the providers and purchasers of nurse education is vital to achieve proactive curriculum planning, which supports the development of nursing practitioners who are fit for award and fit for purpose. Research employed philosophical hermeneutics to guide the interviewing of seven nurse leaders within one region. Data analysis occurred within a hermeneutic circle and was refined using NUDIST. Two key themes were seen as impacting on the development of an effective educational strategy. Firstly, the development of collaborative working was thought to have been impeded by communication difficulties between the Trusts and higher education provider. Secondly, there was concern that curriculum developments would support the future evolution of nursing, acknowledging the professional issues impacting on nursing roles. The research findings suggest purchasers and providers of nurse education must move towards achieving mutual understanding and collaborate in developing a curriculum which will prepare nurses for practice and for award.

  19. Informatics competencies for nurse practitioners.

    PubMed

    Curran, Christine R

    2003-08-01

    Informatics knowledge and skills are essential if clinicians are to master the large volume of information generated in healthcare today. Thus, it is vital that informatics competencies be defined for nursing and incorporated into both curricula and practice. Staggers, Gassert, and Curran have defined informatics competencies for four general levels of nursing practice. However, informatics competencies by role (eg, those specific for advanced practice nursing) have not been defined and validated. This article presents an initial proposed list of informatics competencies essential for nurse practitioner education and practice. To this list, derived from the work of Staggers et al., 1 has been added informatics competencies related to evidence-based practice. Two nurse informaticists and six nurse practitioners, who are program directors, were involved in the development of the proposed competencies. The next step will be to validate these competencies via research.

  20. Big Data and Perioperative Nursing.

    PubMed

    Westra, Bonnie L; Peterson, Jessica J

    2016-10-01

    Big data are large volumes of digital data that can be collected from disparate sources and are challenging to analyze. These data are often described with the five "Vs": volume, velocity, variety, veracity, and value. Perioperative nurses contribute to big data through documentation in the electronic health record during routine surgical care, and these data have implications for clinical decision making, administrative decisions, quality improvement, and big data science. This article explores methods to improve the quality of perioperative nursing data and provides examples of how these data can be combined with broader nursing data for quality improvement. We also discuss a national action plan for nursing knowledge and big data science and how perioperative nurses can engage in collaborative actions to transform health care. Standardized perioperative nursing data has the potential to affect care far beyond the original patient.

  1. The globalization of nursing knowledge.

    PubMed

    Holt, J; Barrett, C; Clarke, D; Monks, R

    2000-08-01

    External influences placed upon nurses working in universities and in clinical practice require them to attract research funding, carry out research, generate new knowledge and publish in national and international journals. While there does not appear to be an agreed, unified body of nursing knowledge, critical and scholarly debate is essential to generate knowledge, but this is not an activity in which the majority of nurses can effectively participate. Nevertheless, nurses in the Western world are free to communicate their research, theories or ideas, essentially uncensored, to a vast invisible audience, and there is global dissemination through a vast array of literature and educational materials. This paper challenges nurses to examine the implications of globalization and suggests that the continuing debate on the nature of nursing knowledge should be updated to include consideration of both a change in philosophical stance and the far reaching effects of global dissemination of information.

  2. Education of nurses in genetics.

    PubMed Central

    Forsman, I

    1988-01-01

    The need for education of nurses in genetics was articulated more than 25 years ago. This article reviews the knowledge of practicing nurses about genetics as well as the content of genetics in nursing curricula. Implementation of federal legislation that mandated increased availability of genetic services and genetics education provided support for the examination of genetics content in curricula for health professionals, including nurses, and for the development of model programs to expand this content. Recent efforts to begin to develop a pool of nurse faculty who are well prepared in genetics will be described, as well as programs to provide the necessary content through continuing-education efforts. These efforts are expected to substantially improve the capability of nurses to contribute more effectively in the delivery of genetic services. PMID:3177390

  3. Nursing informatics competencies: bibliometric analysis.

    PubMed

    Kokol, Peter; Blažun, Helena; Vošner, Janez; Saranto, Kaija

    2014-01-01

    Information and communication technology is developing rapidly and it is incorporated in many health care processes, but in spite of that fact we can still notice that nursing informatics competencies had received limited attention in basic nursing education curricula in Europe and especially in Eastern European countries. The purpose of the present paper is to present the results of a bibliometric analysis of the nursing informatics competencies scientific literature production. We applied the bibliometrics analysis to the corpus of 332 papers found in SCOPUS, related to nursing informatics competencies. The results showed that there is a positive trend in the number of published papers per year, indicating the increased research interest in nursing informatics competencies. Despite the fact that the first paper was published in Denmark, the most prolific country regarding the research in nursing informatics competencies is United States as are their institutions and authors.

  4. Critical thinking in nurse managers.

    PubMed

    Zori, Susan; Morrison, Barbara

    2009-01-01

    Formal education and support is needed for nurse managers to effectively function in their role in the current health care environment. Many nurse managers assume their positions based on expertise in a clinical role with little expertise in managerial and leadership skills. Operating as a manager and leader requires ongoing development of critical thinking skills and the inclination to use those skills. Critical thinking can have a powerful influence on the decision making and problem solving that nurse managers are faced with on a daily basis. The skills that typify critical thinking include analysis, evaluation, inference, and deductive and inductive reasoning. It is intuitive that nurse managers require both the skills and the dispositions of critical thinking to be successful in this pivotal role at a time of transformation in health care. Incorporating critical thinking into education and support programs for the nurse manager is necessary to position the nurse manager for success.

  5. Radiofrequency Ablation: A Nursing Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Locklin, Julia K.; Wood, Bradford J.

    2008-01-01

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) has emerged as a safe and predictable technology for treating certain patients with cancer who otherwise have few treatment options. Nurses need to be familiar with all phases of the RFA procedure to create an optimal environment for patients. This article offers a brief review of the RFA procedure and nurses' responsibilities in caring for these patients. Before RFA, nurses should focus on patient education and aggressive hydration. During the procedure, nurses can prevent injury by placing grounding pads appropriately, monitoring vital signs, and medicating patients as needed. After RFA, nurses should assess the skin puncture site, provide adequate pain relief, and, again, hydrate patients. Nurses who care appropriately for RFA recipients may help to improve patient outcomes and make an otherwise frightening procedure more comfortable. PMID:15973845

  6. Changing how nurses spend their time.

    PubMed

    Prescott, P A; Phillips, C Y; Ryan, J W; Thompson, K O

    1991-01-01

    The results of work sampling studies are used to examine how nurses spend their time and to relate nurses' time to the shortage of nursing practice in hospitals. Four types of proposals for improving the delivery of nursing care in hospitals are discussed. The likely impact of these proposals on how nurses spend their time and the consequences of increasing the effectiveness of professional nursing practice are explored.

  7. Retention in the Navy Nurse Corps

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-12-01

    earner and brought many inactive nurses back into the labor force. Rapid salary growth for nurses and nursing education subsidies also boosted the...income maximizers. The economic return on investment in nursing education has never been high relative to other occupations. Quality of working life is...end of the percentage scale most likely represents nurses in administrative or nursing education positions, where patient contact is often minimal. The

  8. Medical authority and nursing integrity

    PubMed Central

    de Raeve, L

    2002-01-01

    This paper explores the respective legitimacy or illegitimacy of medical authority over nursing work. The analysis makes use of Joseph Raz's ideas concerning the nature of authority. Various scenarios are considered which lend themselves to differing interpretations, and the conclusion reached is that acting in accordance with legitimate medical authority enhances rather than compromises the nurse's professional integrity. Difficulties, however, may lie in disentangling legitimate from illegitimate attempts to control nursing work. PMID:12468653

  9. Nurses' Perceptions of Quality Care.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Catherine; Powlesland, Jean; Phillips, Cynthia; Raszewski, Rebecca; Johnson, Alexia; Banks-Enorense, Kelly; Agoo, Victor C; Nacorda-Beltran, Rosalind; Halloway, Shannon; Martin, Kathleen; Smith, Lenore D; Walczak, Debra; Warda, Jane; Washington, Barbara J; Welsh, Julie

    Limited research has been conducted on how nurses define or perceive "quality nursing care." We conducted focus groups to identify nurses' perceptions of quality care at a Midwestern academic medical center. Transcripts of the focus group sessions were analyzed using thematic analysis techniques, and 11 themes emerged: Leadership, Staffing, Resources, Timeliness, Effective Communication/Collaboration, Professionalism, Relationship-Based Care, Environment/Culture, Simplicity, Outcomes, and Patient Experience.

  10. Nursing faculty shortage in 2009.

    PubMed

    Sims, Jennifer M

    2009-01-01

    As everyone is well aware, we are in the midst of a nursing shortage-one with no end in sight at the present time. But are you aware that we also have a shortage of nursing faculty? This article will briefly describe the current and predicted shortage of faculty, potential reasons for the shortage, current ways of coping, and the future for nursing faculty.

  11. The Nurse Reinvestment Act revisited.

    PubMed

    Luther, Ann P

    2007-01-01

    The United States is in the midst of a widely recognized critical nursing shortage. In 2002 the "Nurse Reinvestment Act" was passed with overwhelming bipartisan support in an effort to address this serious public health threat. The Act is due for reauthorization of funding in 2007. This paper provides a brief overview of the programs contained within the Act and describes practical ways in which members of the nursing community can take action to insure renewed support for the Act.

  12. Genomics Nursing Faculty Champion Initiative

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, Jean; Calzone, Kathleen A.

    2016-01-01

    Nurse faculty are challenged to keep up with the emerging and fast-paced field of genomics and the mandate to prepare the nursing workforce to be able to translate genomic research advances into routine clinical care. Using Faculty Champions and other options, the initiative stimulated curriculum development and promoted genomics curriculum integration. The authors summarize this yearlong initiative for undergraduate and graduate nursing faculty. PMID:24300251

  13. [Clinical activity in nursing education].

    PubMed

    Brignon, Béatrice

    2009-12-01

    The purpose of this research is to enlight the actual nursing act of the student in order to search for what makes sense in his (her) self nursing becoming and to reinterpret what is said regarding what is done. Up till, researchs were focused on declarative intentions; instead here, we go beyond using an innovative approach based on the clinical activity research method applied to the nursing education field.

  14. The Impact of State Nursing Home Staffing Standards on Nurse Staffing Levels.

    PubMed

    Paek, Seung Chun; Zhang, Ning J; Wan, Thomas T H; Unruh, Lynn Y; Meemon, Natthani

    2016-02-01

    This study investigated the impact of state nursing home staffing standards on nurse staffing levels for the year 2011. Specifically, the study attempted to measure state staffing standards at facility level (i.e., nurse staffing levels that each individual nursing home must retain by its state staffing standards) and analyzed the policy impact. The study findings indicated that state staffing standards for the categories of registered nurse, licensed nurse, or total nurse are positively related to registered nurse, licensed nurse, or total nurse staffing levels, respectively. Nursing homes more actively responded to licensed staffing requirements than total staffing requirements. However, nursing homes did not increase their staffing levels as much as those required by state staffing standards. It is possibly because the quality-oriented inspection allows flexibility in nursing homes' control of nurse staffing levels.

  15. The Air Force Nurse Intern Program.

    PubMed

    Smith, R H

    1991-08-01

    The Air Force Nurse Intern Program is a 5-month-long introduction to Air Force nursing for BSN-prepared graduate nurses. The program is designed to facilitate the transition from civilian nursing student to practicing Air Force Nurse Corps Officer. After attending Military Indoctrination for Medical Service Officers, newly commissioned nurses attend the program at one of 10 Air Force medical centers before going to their permanent duty stations. Preceptors guide and instruct the interns at each of four clinical rotation sites. The author, a former nurse intern, describes some of the many opportunities available to nurse interns.

  16. Enhancing geriatric nursing scholarship: specialization versus generalization.

    PubMed

    Mezey, M; Fulmer, T; Fairchild, S

    2000-07-01

    This article explores the relative merits of encouraging preparation of more nurses with specialization in geriatrics as compared to encouraging geriatric preparation among nurses whose major field of study is outside geriatrics. The article explores two approaches to examining capacity for geriatric nursing scholarship among nurse scholars not involved in geriatrics, and in schools of nursing with strength in research but with little geriatric research. The findings show an ongoing need to strengthen geriatric nursing as an area of specialization. Faculty prepared in geriatric nursing are underrepresented in schools of nursing, and only a small number of doctoral students specialize in geriatric nursing. Academic nursing programs with strength in geriatric nursing need ongoing support to maintain and expand current geriatric programs. Data support that encouraging individual non-geriatric nurse faculty and doctoral candidates to focus their work on areas of concern to geriatric nursing, and strengthening geriatrics in research-intensive schools of nursing that have not heavily invested in geriatric scholarship are viable options for strengthening academic geriatric nursing. Establishing mechanisms to attract nurse scholars working outside the scope of geriatric nursing to address clinical issues of concern to older adults offers promise in rapidly attracting new scholars to geriatric nursing.

  17. Developing Global Nurse Influencers.

    PubMed

    Spies, Lori A

    2016-01-01

    How can universities create engaged citizens and global leaders? Each year, a select group of advanced practice nursing students at Baylor University Louise Herrington School of Nursing travel to Africa for a month-long clinical mission experience. Students work alongside local and missionary healthcare providers in a comprehensive Christian outreach to the community at a high-volume clinic. Creating rich learning experiences in a global setting in significant and sustainable ways is difficult, but intentionally focusing on what we are called to do and who we serve provides ballast for faculty and students. The success of the trip in preparing students to be global influencers is evident by the work graduates elect to do around the world, following graduation.

  18. Moral realism in nursing.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Steven D

    2014-04-01

    For more than 15 years Professor Per Nortvedt has been arguing the case for moral realism in nursing and the health-care context more generally. His arguments focus on the clinical contexts of nursing and medicine and are supplemented by a series of persuasive examples. Following a description of moral realism, and the kinds of considerations that support it, criticisms of it are developed that seem persuasive. It is argued that our moral responses are explained by our beliefs as opposed to moral realities. In particular, two key arguments presented by Nortvedt are challenged: the so-called argument from convergence and the argument from clinical sensitivity. Both of these key planks in the case for moral realism are rejected, and an alternative 'social conditioning' account briefly sketched, which, it is claimed, has the same explanatory power as Nortvedt's thesis but does not rest on an appeal to independently existing moral properties.

  19. Suicide in Guyana: Nurses' Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Anthony, Maureen; Groh, Carla; Gash, Jean

    Guyana, an English-speaking country on the north coast of South America, has the highest suicide rate in the world. Nurses are an integral part of the healthcare team working with patients experiencing psychological distress and are uniquely qualified to add to the discourse on factors contributing to the high suicide rate in Guyana. The purpose of this study was to explore the attitudes and experiences of nurses and nurse assistants in Guyana related to suicide. Nine registered nurses and nurse assistants who worked at a private hospital in Georgetown, Guyana, were recruited to participate in a focus group. The focus group lasted approximately 70 minutes and was recorded. The audio recordings were later transcribed word for word. Four themes emerged from the data: family issues as they relate to the high suicide rate, suicide attempts as a cry for help, lack of support, and coping mechanisms used by nurses when caring for victims of attempted suicide. Nurses are uniquely positioned to intervene with families in crisis, whether it be suicide, suicide attempts, or the underlying factors of family dysfunction, child maltreatment, poverty, or alcoholism. Establishing forensic nursing as a specialty in Guyana would validate this important role through education and certification of nurses.

  20. An agenda for nurse leaders.

    PubMed

    1994-04-20

    The health service's new ' chief executive, Alan Langlands, is now in place. Also in place, perhaps surprisingly, is his broad strategy for the future of nursing management. Mr Langlands officially took up his post as Chief Executive of the NHS Management Executive (ME) on the first of this montli and has given every indication of his enthusiasm to stop nursing drifting into the policy doldrums that have threatened it over recent years. While there have been nursing initiatives aplenty since the beginning of the NHS marketplace changes, many now languish on forgotten shelves through lack of central will, pushed aside by the latest 'urgent' ministerial agenda. Remember the original Strategy for Nursing?

  1. Strategies for retaining midcareer nurses.

    PubMed

    McGillis Hall, Linda; Lalonde, Michelle; Dales, Lorraine; Peterson, Jessica; Cripps, Lauren

    2011-12-01

    One method of reducing predicted shortages because of the aging nursing workforce is to increase retention. Few studies have examined the unique needs of midcareer nurses. A mixed-method approach including surveys and focus groups was used to identify key retention strategies and desires for midcareer nurses. Salary, benefits, positive working relationships, flexible scheduling, and the opportunity for continued education were identified as key retention strategies from this study. Registered nurses in this study reported higher perceptions of their work and work environment than licensed practical nurses did. Differences in work outcomes were evident across sectors, with community nurses reporting higher levels of job satisfaction and perceptions of work quality than nurses in acute and long-term care. Findings suggest that recruitment opportunities may exist with midcareer nurses seeking employment to return to work after time off to have a family. Proactive retention policies that focus on the needs of midcareer nurses would demonstrate a commitment and interest in keeping them in their work positions and in the profession.

  2. Nursing students with latex allergy.

    PubMed

    Katrancha, Elizabeth D; Harshberger, Lorri A

    2012-11-01

    Latex allergy affects millions of people in the general population and a higher percentage of health care workers. Nursing students with a latex sensitivity pose a unique challenge for the nurse educator. Students may enter the program with pre-existing latex allergy or develop the allergy during the educational process. This manuscript explores the implications of latex allergies exhibited by the nursing student. It addresses the responsibilities of the educator in the skills or simulation laboratory and during clinical learning experiences. It also offers suggestions for ensuring the safety of the student while reducing the legal liabilities of the educational program. The article addresses possible policy ramifications for nursing schools.

  3. Empowering Nurses for Professional Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlson-Catalano, Judy

    1992-01-01

    Empowering teaching strategies encourage leadership, critical thinking, problem solving, and collegiality and discourage passivity, isolation, and subordination. Empowerment prepares nurses for professional practice in hospitals. (SK)

  4. Nurses' knowledge of inadvertent hypothermia.

    PubMed

    Hegarty, Josephine; Walsh, Ella; Burton, Aileen; Murphy, Sheila; O'gorman, Fionuala; McPolin, Gráinne

    2009-04-01

    Inadvertent hypothermia can have significant consequences in the perioperative setting. Knowing how to recognize and manage inadvertent hypothermia is an important aspect of perioperative nursing. A quantitative, descriptive study was conducted at an annual perioperative nursing conference to evaluate nurses' knowledge regarding the prevention of inadvertent perioperative hypothermia. Significant variations in responses regarding definitions of hypothermia and normothermia were noted. In addition, nurses identified a plethora of factors that prevent them from maintaining normothermia in their patients. These factors mandate a need for educational interventions and the adoption of practice guidelines in the clinical area.

  5. Knowledge-based nursing diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Claudette; Hay, D. Robert

    1991-03-01

    Nursing diagnosis is an integral part of the nursing process and determines the interventions leading to outcomes for which the nurse is accountable. Diagnoses under the time constraints of modern nursing can benefit from a computer assist. A knowledge-based engineering approach was developed to address these problems. A number of problems were addressed during system design to make the system practical extended beyond capture of knowledge. The issues involved in implementing a professional knowledge base in a clinical setting are discussed. System functions, structure, interfaces, health care environment, and terminology and taxonomy are discussed. An integrated system concept from assessment through intervention and evaluation is outlined.

  6. [Postmodernism and nursing knowledge development].

    PubMed

    Yeh, Lily; Chen, Ching-Huey

    2008-08-01

    Postmodernism is a philosophical and social movement which stresses that ideas are temporary, research data should be considered only in context, reality is transcendent, grand theories are invalid, problems are deconstructed, and findings should have practical value. Manifestations of the postmodern paradigm are reflected in the epistemological shifts of nursing science and knowledge development in the professional community of nurses in Western countries. This article explores the context within which this movement emerged, delineates how it has deconstructed "language" and "subject" to frame a new paradigm and outlines related implications on nursing knowledge development. Both challenges and opportunities face the nursing profession as it evolves into a postmodern paradigm.

  7. [Discourses on the nursing and psychiatric nurse models, published in the Annals of Nursing (1933-1951)].

    PubMed

    Pereira, Michelle de Macedo; Padilha, Maria Itayra; de Oliveira, Alexandre Barbosa; Santos, Tânia Cristina Franco; Filho, Antonio José de Almeida; Peres, Maria Angélica de Almeida

    2014-06-01

    Social-historical study aimed at discussing the nursing and psychiatric nurse models, from the discourses published in the Annals of Nursing.The historical sources were articles published in the Annals of Nursing journal, from 1933 to 1951. An analysis of the discourse was subsidized by the genealogy of power by Michel Foucault.The analysis showed that the discourse on nursing and the psychiatric nurse, in the first half of the 20th century, is set, on one side, by the propositions used by psychiatrists, who sought to reiterate stereotypes and vocations to practice nursing, and, on the other side, by the active participation of nurses seeking to legitimize expertise for psychiatric nursing. It was concluded that the discourses analyzed defined a psychiatric care focused on the nurse and not the rest of the nursing staff, at that time.

  8. [Aromatherapy in nursing homes].

    PubMed

    Barré, Lucile

    2015-01-01

    Pierre Delaroche de Clisson hospital uses essential oils as part of its daily organisation for the treatment of pain and the development of palliative care. The setting up of this project, in nursing homes and long-term care units, is the fruit of a complex mission carried out by a multidisciplinary team, which had to take into account the risks involved and overcome a certain amount of reluctance.

  9. What do nurses know?

    PubMed

    Luntley, Michael

    2011-01-01

    This paper defends an epistemic conservatism - propositional knowing-that suffices for capturing all the fine details of the knowledge of experienced nurses that depends on the complex ways in which they are embedded in shared fields of activity. I argue against the proliferation of different ways of knowing associated with the work of Dreyfus and Benner. I show how propositional knowledge can capture the detail of the phenomenology that motivates the Dreyfus/Benner proliferation.

  10. Developing blended online and classroom strategies to deliver an occupational health nursing overview course in a multi-state region in the United States.

    PubMed

    de Castro, A B; Shapleigh, Erin; Bruck, Annie; Salazar, Mary K

    2015-03-01

    This article describes how hybrid online and classroom learning approaches were used to design and offer an occupational health nursing review course throughout a multi-state region of the northwest United States. In response to demand from practicing occupational health nurses for board certification preparation, a series of asynchronous and synchronous continuing education modules was created covering a range of occupational health nursing topics. This review course illustrates how innovative educational delivery models can serve the needs of occupational health nurses challenged by geographic and time constraints.

  11. The Nurse's Medication Day

    PubMed Central

    Jennings, Bonnie Mowinski; Sandelowski, Margarete; Mark, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    The medication administration stage of the medication-use process is especially vulnerable to error because errors are least likely to be caught before reaching the patient. Medication administration, however, remains poorly understood. In this article we describe medication administration as observed in an ethnographic study conducted on one medical and one surgical unit. A central finding was that medication administration entailed a complex mixture of varied and often competing demands that temporally structured the nurses' entire workday. Articulation work was evident in time management strategies nurses used to handle demands from institutional policies, technical devices, patients, the physical environment, and the medications themselves. The average number of doses of medication per patient was more than double the number policy groups have indicated. Medication administration is neither simply the giving of drugs nor does it have clearly defined temporal boundaries. Because of its inseparability from other nurses' work, medication administration inherently entails interruption, thereby calling into question the current emphasis on reducing interruptions as a tactic to decrease medication errors. PMID:21693688

  12. Supported PV module assembly

    DOEpatents

    Mascolo, Gianluigi; Taggart, David F.; Botkin, Jonathan D.; Edgett, Christopher S.

    2013-10-15

    A supported PV assembly may include a PV module comprising a PV panel and PV module supports including module supports having a support surface supporting the module, a module registration member engaging the PV module to properly position the PV module on the module support, and a mounting element. In some embodiments the PV module registration members engage only the external surfaces of the PV modules at the corners. In some embodiments the assembly includes a wind deflector with ballast secured to a least one of the PV module supports and the wind deflector. An array of the assemblies can be secured to one another at their corners to prevent horizontal separation of the adjacent corners while permitting the PV modules to flex relative to one another so to permit the array of PV modules to follow a contour of the support surface.

  13. Nursing in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit, Nursing 205.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Varton, Deborah M.

    A description is provided of a course, "Nursing in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit," offered for senior-level baccalaureate degree nursing students. The first section provides information on the place of the course within the curriculum, the allotment of class time, and target student populations. The next section looks at course content in…

  14. Nursing Effort and Quality of Care for Nursing Home Residents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arling, Greg; Kane, Robert L.; Mueller, Christine; Bershadsky, Julie; Degenholtz, Howard B.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between nursing home staffing level, care received by individual residents, and resident quality-related care processes and functional outcomes. Design and Methods: Nurses recorded resident care time for 5,314 residents on 156 units in 105 facilities in four states (Colorado,…

  15. Nursing as career choice: perceptions of Turkish nursing students.

    PubMed

    Başkale, Hatice; Serçekuş, Pınar

    2015-01-01

    Students' perceptions of nursing influence their choice of nursing as a career and whether they remain in the profession. The aim of this study was to explore the perceptions of entry-level male and female nursing students and the reasons for choosing nursing as a career. A qualitative approach was used by focus group interviews with 31 nursing students, and socio-demographic data were collected by questionnaire. Thematic content analysis was used to analyse the data, and findings were grouped into categories and themes. The first category was 'choosing', which included the themes of 'desire to help', 'satisfactory income, and guaranteed employment', 'influence of family and friends' and 'being in a health-related profession'. The second category was 'others' reactions, which included the single theme 'response'. The third category was 'the image of nursing' which included the themes of 'job description' and 'gender'. The study concluded that although a growing amount of male students are enrolling in nursing programs, stereotypical ideas persist, and nursing is considered a female-dominated profession. There is further need to track student experiences during or after clinical practice and explore whether students' perceptions change over time.

  16. Beyond "Hot Lips" and "Big Nurse": Creative Writing and Nursing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Sandra

    2005-01-01

    This essay describes a special topics creative writing course designed for nursing students, and argues that creative writing strategies work to improve nurses' compositional skills. Also discussed are other potential benefits from creatively writing patients' lives, notably, the blending of arts and sciences, and the ways in which medical schools…

  17. The Nurse as Patient Advocate: Implications for Nurse Education Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banja, John D.

    This essay examines ethical considerations in the nurse patient relationship, in particular the relationship between "professional morality" and the nurse's professional identity in the role of advocate for doctors, patients, and hospitals. A discussion of ethics and professionals explores professional ethics, the need for such ethics,…

  18. Professional nursing values among baccalaureate nursing students in Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Lui, May H L; Lam, Lai Wah; Lee, Iris F K; Chien, Wai Tong; Chau, Janita P C; Ip, Wan Yim

    2008-01-01

    The development of a nursing code of professional conduct is to guide nurses to make appropriate clinical decision, in particular when facing ethical dilemma. It is of paramount importance that nurse educators understand baccalaureate nursing students' perceptions of the importance of the code of professional conduct and the level of difficulties in implementing this code while preparing them for future practicing nurses. The Code of Professional Conduct in Hong Kong has been developed to guide nursing practice for over two decades. Nevertheless, no study has examined Hong Kong baccalaureate nursing students' perception about this professional code. The aim of this paper was to examine the perceptions of 263 baccalaureate nursing students about this professional code using a cross sectional survey design. The results indicated that most items in the professional code were rated as important and "provide safe and competent care" was rated as the most important one. A few areas that the students perceived as difficult to implement were discussed and future research was recommended. The significant differences identified among students from different years of study also highlighted areas for consideration in planning educational program to further equip students with the ability to deal with challenges in professional practice.

  19. Pediatric Nurse Practitioner Program: Theories for Extended Pediatric Nursing Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brady, Margaret A.

    A description is provided of "Theories for Extended Pediatric Nursing Practice," a required course for pediatric and family nurse practitioner students in a California state university program. The course description presents information on the curricular placement of the course, prerequisites, in-class time allotments, and the focus of the course…

  20. Using Computerized Clinical Nursing Data Bases for Nursing Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nail, Lillian M.; Lange, Linda L.

    1996-01-01

    Addresses the recognition of differences between clinical and research data in using computerized clinical nursing databases and the issues of privacy and confidentiality for patients whose records are involved. Describes procedures for assessing the quality and usability of these data for nursing research. (SK)

  1. Nurse learners--do nurse tutors know them?

    PubMed

    Moule, P

    1995-04-01

    Research was undertaken to establish the social profile of Project 2000 (Diploma) learners, and to determine when, and with whose influence, learners make decisions to enter nursing. The image of nursing held by the group was sought and nurse tutors perceptions of the group were obtained, using a questionnaire method. Results analysed using statistical measures and content analysis showed that the majority of learners came from middle socio-economic backgrounds, generally decided to enter nursing whilst at school, and were influenced by nursing role models and the media. The learners perceptions and expectations of nursing were influenced by their experiences and showed some differences when compared with tutor responses. The findings from this small study imply the need for the dissemination of accurate and appropriate recruitment information to school personnel and career advisors. Effective marketing which addresses influences of the media and nursing role models should be employed, and finally nurse tutors need to be conversant with course content and learner expectations to facilitate effective recruitment policies and curriculum development.

  2. Seminar: Legal Perspectives of Nursing Practice. Nursing 89.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willis, Odette P.

    This course outline provides information to be used by students in conjunction with Nursing 89, a seminar on the legal aspects of nursing to be offered starting in Spring 1982 at Diablo University (California). General information is provided first, including a class calendar, a statement defining the purpose of the course, an outline of…

  3. Partnership nursing: recovering lost threads of the nursing story.

    PubMed

    Potter, Teddie M

    2012-01-01

    Nursing has been challenged to claim full partnership with other health care providers. To reach this goal nurse educators must ensure that curriculum and textbooks provide appropriate content on the nature and use of power, how to collaborate, and how to develop partnerships.

  4. The Naïve nurse: revisiting vulnerability for nursing

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Nurses in the Western world have given considerable attention to the concept of vulnerability in recent decades. However, nurses have tended to view vulnerability from an individualistic perspective, and have rarely taken into account structural or collective dimensions of the concept. As the need grows for health workers to engage in the global health agenda, nurses must broaden earlier works on vulnerability, noting that conventional conceptualizations and practical applications on the notion of vulnerability warrant extension to include more collective conceptualizations thereby making a more complete understanding of vulnerability in nursing discourse. Discussion The purpose of this paper is to examine nursing contributions to the concept of vulnerability and consider how a broader perspective that includes socio-political dimensions may assist nurses to reach beyond the immediate milieu of the patient into the dominant social, political, and economic structures that produce and sustain vulnerability. Summary By broadening nurse’s conceptualization of vulnerability, nurses can obtain the consciousness needed to move beyond a peripheral role of nursing that has been dominantly situated within institutional settings to contribute in the larger arena of social, economic, political and global affairs. PMID:22520841

  5. Eliciting nursing knowledge from practice: the dualism of nursing.

    PubMed

    Ramprogus, Vince

    2002-01-01

    Nursing knowledge has traditionally been examined and developed through the main research approaches based on the positivist, interpretive or phenomenological philosophies. These approaches are used either from a single and individual stance or combined to address particular research questions. They all, however, retain a focus that deals primarily or exclusively with what can be measured, observed or expressed as a fundamental unit of analysis to reconstruct, interpret and explain nursing practice. In this paper, Vince Ramprogus challenges the traditional approach to how nursing knowledge is defined and the common understanding of the purpose of nursing research. It is argued that adhering to empirical rigour while investigating or measuring nursing practice interferes with the very act and experience of nursing. Indeed, it becomes an either/or situation. It is also argued that nursing is not an empirical subject, and, therefore, the purpose of researching nursing is not about seeking the truth but about improving practice to achieve better patient care. The arguments are intended to provoke discussion and debate rather than to present a set position.

  6. The California Nurse Mentor Project: every nurse deserves a mentor.

    PubMed

    Mills, Joyce F; Mullins, Anna C

    2008-01-01

    In the rush to fill positions, newly hired and transitioning RNs are increasingly put into demanding roles without adequate clinical or organizational preparation. One approach that has shown promising preliminary success in enhancing nursing job satisfaction and increasing long-term retention is the use of trained nurse mentors who are paired with newly hired or new graduate nurses to provide ongoing support, guidance, and assistance. The California Nurse Mentor Project was a 3-year pilot project whose goal was to create a replicable program designed to improve the quality, sensitivity, and effectiveness of patient care through enhanced retention of nurses, including multicultural, multilingual, and male nurses. The pilot implementation of the California Nurse Mentor project has been extremely successful. Attrition rates are lower for nurses who are enrolled in the program than those who did not. Both mentors and mentees report that the program has impacted several areas, including their job satisfaction and professional confidence. Preceptor training, according to participant feedback, shows lasting effects on their pedagogy even a year after attending the training.

  7. International nurse migration: lessons from the Philippines.

    PubMed

    Brush, Barbara L; Sochalski, Julie

    2007-02-01

    Developed countries facing nursing shortages have increasingly turned to aggressive foreign nurse recruitment, primarily from developing nations, to offset their lagging domestic nurse supplies and meet growing health care demands. Few donor nations are prepared to manage the loss of their nurse workforce to migration. The sole country with an explicit nurse export policy and the world's leading donor of nurse labor - the Philippines - is itself facing serious provider maldistribution and countrywide health disparities. Examining the historical roots of Philippines nurse migration provides lessons from which other nurse exporting countries may learn. The authors discuss factors that have predicated nurse migration and policies that have eased the way. Furthermore, the authors analyze how various stakeholders influence migratory patterns, the implications of migration for nurses and the public in their care, and the challenges that future social policy and political systems face in addressing global health issues engendered by unfettered recruitment of nurses and other health workers.

  8. Bullying in undergraduate clinical nursing education.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Colette M; Kane, Deborah J; Rajacich, Dale L; Lafreniere, Kathryn D

    2012-05-01

    Although a limited number of studies have focused on bullying in nursing education to date, all of those studies demonstrate the existence of bullying in clinical settings, where nursing students undertake a significant amount of their nursing education. The purpose of this study was to examine the state of bullying in clinical nursing education among Canadian undergraduate nursing students (N = 674) in all 4 years of their nursing program. Results suggest that nursing students experience and witness bullying behaviors at various frequencies, most notably by clinical instructors and staff nurses. Third-year and fourth-year students experience more bullying behaviors than first-year and second-year students. Implications for practice include ensuring that clinical instructors are well prepared for their role as educators. Policies must be developed that address the issue of bullying within nursing programs and within health care facilities where nursing students undertake their clinical nursing education.

  9. Who provides nursing services in Cambodian hospitals?

    PubMed Central

    Sakurai-Doi, Yukie; Mochizuki, Noriko; Phuong, Keat; Sung, Chao; Visoth, Pheng; Sriv, Bun; Amara, Sar Rath; Murakami, Hitoshi; Komagata, Tomoko; Fujita, Noriko

    2014-01-01

    In Cambodia, the number of nurses is insufficient and details of nursing services are unknown and undocumented. This research explored who provides nursing service activities in Cambodia. The study was conducted at nine hospitals in Cambodia. Findings indicate that non-invasive medical care such as vital signs taking was designated to nurses. In performing more complex medical interventions, nurses shared the tasks with medical doctors. Conversely, simpler nursing tasks, including maintaining bedside environment/hygiene and supporting patient activities, tasks were shared by nurses with patients' family. This study elucidated an optimal personnel mix and task shared between nurses, doctors and patients' families. There are important implications for nursing legislation related to streamlining the production of nurses to provide an adequate and qualified nursing service in Cambodia. PMID:24661282

  10. Results from the Nurse Manifest 2003 study: nurses' perspectives on nursing.

    PubMed

    Jarrín, Olga F

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to raise awareness, inspire action, and open dialogue about professional values and workplace conditions. Results of the Nurse Manifest 2003 Study are presented through meta-synthesis of group summaries answering the questions: What is it like to practice nursing? and, What changes do nurses desire to support practice? The results illuminate the underlying framework of professional values that splits our profession, nursing units, and educational institutions. An analysis of the similarities and differences within and between groups reflect values which are rooted in the history of our profession and affected by present working conditions.

  11. Licensed Nurse and Nursing Assistant Recognition of Delirium in Nursing Home Residents With Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Steis, Melinda R; Behrens, Liza; Colancecco, Elise M; Mogle, Jacqueline; Mulhall, Paula M; Hill, Nikki L; Fick, Donna M; Kolankowski, Ann M

    2016-01-01

    Many nursing home residents experience delirium. Nursing home personnel, especially nursing assistants, have the opportunity to become familiar with residents’ normal cognitive function and to recognize changes in a resident’s cognitive function over time. The purpose of this study was to determine the accuracy of delirium recognition by licensed nurses and nursing assistants from eight nursing homes over a 12-month period. Participants were asked to complete five case vignette assessments at three different time points (in 6-month intervals) to test their ability to identify different subtypes of delirium and delirium superimposed on dementia (DSD). A total of 760 case vignettes were completed across the different time points. Findings reveal that staff recognition of delirium was poor. The case vignette describing hyperactive DSD was correctly identified by the greatest number participants, and the case vignette describing hypoactive DSD was correctly identified by the least number of participants. Recognition of the case vignette describing hypoactive delirium improved over time. Nursing assistants performed similarly to the licensed nurses, indicating that all licensed nursing home staff require further education to correctly recognize delirium in older adults. PMID:28042285

  12. Measuring nursing informatics competencies of practicing nurses in Korea: Nursing Informatics Competencies Questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Chung, Seon Yoon; Staggers, Nancy

    2014-12-01

    Informatics competencies are a necessity for contemporary nurses. However, few researchers have investigated informatics competencies for practicing nurses. A full set of Informatics competencies, an instrument to measure these competencies, and potential influencing factors have yet to be identified for practicing nurses. The Nursing Informatics Competencies Questionnaire was designed, tested for psychometrics, and used to measure beginning and experienced levels of practice. A pilot study using 54 nurses ensured item comprehension and clarity. Internal consistency and face and content validity were established. A cross-sectional survey was then conducted on 230 nurses in Seoul, Korea, to determine construct validity, describe a complete set of informatics competencies, and explore possible influencing factors on existing informatics competencies. Principal components analysis, descriptive statistics, and multiple regression were used for data analysis. Principal components analysis gives support for the Nursing Informatics Competencies Questionnaire construct validity. Survey results indicate that involvement in a managerial position and self-directed informatics-related education may be more influential for improving informatics competencies, whereas general clinical experience and workplace settings are not. This study provides a foundation for understanding how informatics competencies might be integrated throughout nurses' work lives and how to develop appropriate strategies to support nurses in their informatics practice in clinical settings.

  13. Systematic Preparation for Teaching in a Nursing Doctor of Philosophy Program.

    PubMed

    Fiedler, Ruth; Degenhardt, Marguerite; Engstrom, Janet L

    2015-01-01

    Lack of preparation for the faculty role, particularly for teaching, has long been an area of concern in graduate nursing education. This article describes a systematic approach to preparing students in a doctor of philosophy (PhD) program for their future roles as nurse educators. All PhD students at Rush University are required to take a nursing education course that contains four modules: the teacher, learner, and learning environment; the basics of curriculum and course design; evaluation of the learner, course, program, and institution; and the new faculty member. Students also complete a practicum in the course. Students are interviewed before the course begins and complete a self-assessment of their teaching experiences. Based on their learning needs, students are enrolled in the course for variable credit. The course has received excellent evaluations since its inception. The success of this course demonstrates that an education course can be an essential component of the nursing PhD curriculum.

  14. Nurse Migration: A Canadian Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Little, Lisa

    2007-01-01

    Objective To synthesize information about nurse migration in and out of Canada and analyze its role as a policy lever to address the Canadian nursing shortage. Principal Findings Canada is both a source and a destination country for international nurse migration with an estimated net loss of nurses. The United States is the major beneficiary of Canadian nurse emigration resulting from the reduction of full-time jobs for nurses in Canada due to health system reforms. Canada faces a significant projected shortage of nurses that is too large to be ameliorated by ethical international nurse recruitment and immigration. Conclusions The current and projected shortage of nurses in Canada is a product of health care cost containment policies that failed to take into account long-term consequences for nurse workforce adequacy. An aging nurse workforce, exacerbated by layoffs of younger nurses with less seniority, and increasing demand for nurses contribute to a projection of nurse shortage that is too great to be solved ethically through international nurse recruitment. National policies to increase domestic nurse production and retention are recommended in addition to international collaboration among developed countries to move toward greater national nurse workforce self sufficiency. PMID:17489918

  15. Measuring nursing care and compassion: the McDonaldised nurse?

    PubMed

    Bradshaw, A

    2009-08-01

    In June 2008 the UK government, supported by the Royal College of Nursing, stated that nursing care would be measured for compassion. This paper considers the implications of this statement by critically examining the relationship of compassion to care from a variety of perspectives. It is argued that the current market-driven approaches to healthcare involve redefining care as a pale imitation, even parody, of the traditional approach of the nurse as "my brother's keeper". Attempts to measure such parody can only measure artificial techniques and give rise to a McDonald's-type nursing care rather than heartfelt care. The arguments of this paper, although applied to nursing, also apply to medicine and healthcare generally.

  16. Ending disruptive behavior: staff nurse recommendations to nurse educators.

    PubMed

    Lux, Kathleen M; Hutcheson, Jane B; Peden, Ann R

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative descriptive study was to identify educational strategies that can prepare new graduates to manage disruptive behavior (DB) in the workplace. DB is any inappropriate behavior, confrontation, or conflict - ranging from verbal abuse to sexual harassment - that harms or intimidates others to the extent that quality of care or patient safety could be compromised. Individual interviews were conducted with nine staff nurses currently in practice in acute care settings in the United States. Staff nurses recommended educational strategies that focused on communication skills for professional practice. These included learning how to communicate with hostile individuals, and giving and receiving constructive criticism. Descriptions that participants provided about their work culture were an unexpected finding that has relevance for nurse educators as they prepare students for transition to practice Nurses described lack of management support and intervention for DB situations, personality clashes with coworkers, and devaluation of nursing work as affecting professional practice.

  17. Assessment Competency of Nurses in Biological Incidents

    PubMed Central

    Ebadi, Abbas; Yousefi, Shahla; Khaghanizade, Morteza; Saeid, Yaser

    2015-01-01

    Background: There are two main areas within emergency care which focus on departmental and staff preparedness in biological incidents. Despite the importance, little is known about the nurse’s preparedness in facing these events. Objectives: The aim of this study was to assess the effect of two teaching methods (multimedia instructional module versus lecture presentation) on nurse’s competency in biological incidents. Materials and Methods: In this quasi-experimental study, 90 nurses were randomly divided into three groups (lecture presentation, multimedia- compact disk, and control). Data were collected by thirty-four multiple-choice questions for measuring knowledge, and a visual analogue scale graded 0 - 100 for assessing attitude. Data were analyzed using a paired t-test and one-way ANOVA with SPSS version 17.0. A P value less than 0.05 was considered as statistically significant. Results: The results revealed no statistically significant difference in nurse’s competency mean scores between the lecture and multimedia CDs groups. Conclusions: It is recommended to use multimedia CDs for in-service education of nurses. PMID:26839862

  18. Integrating psychology with interpersonal communication skills in undergraduate nursing education: addressing the challenges.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Bridie; Trace, Anna; O'Donovan, Moira

    2014-05-01

    The inclusion of the social, behavioural and bio-sciences is acknowledged as essential to the development of the art and science of nursing. Nonetheless, the literature highlights on-going debate about the content and delivery of these subject areas in undergraduate nursing education. The bio-sciences and social sciences in particular have received much attention but more recently the inclusion of psychology in nursing curricula is gaining momentum. Studies conducted on nursing students' views of these supporting sciences have also highlighted problems with their understanding, relevance and application to nursing practice. Although broad guidelines are given as to what should be included, no detail is given as to how much detail or at what level these subjects should be taught. Subsequently, approved institutions are responsible for their own course content. This has resulted in inconsistent and varied approaches to integrating the sciences in undergraduate nursing curricula. Following a recent review of the undergraduate nursing curriculum in one university in the Republic of Ireland a decision was made to combine the teaching, learning and assessment of Applied Psychology with Interpersonal Communication skills. This paper will describe the developmental process and evaluation of the integrated module.

  19. The leadership role of nurse educators in mental health nursing.

    PubMed

    Sayers, Jan; Lopez, Violeta; Howard, Patricia B; Escott, Phil; Cleary, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    Leadership behaviors and actions influence others to act, and leadership in clinical practice is an important mediator influencing patient outcomes and staff satisfaction. Indeed, positive clinical leadership has been positioned as a crucial element for transformation of health care services and has led to the development of the Practice Doctorate Movement in the United States. Nurse educators in health care have a vital leadership role as clinical experts, role models, mentors, change agents, and supporters of quality projects. By enacting these leadership attributes, nurse educators ensure a skilled and confident workforce that is focused on optimizing opportunities for students and graduates to integrate theory and practice in the workplace as well as developing more holistic models of care for the consumer. Nurse educators need to be active in supporting staff and students in health care environments and be visible leaders who can drive policy and practice changes and engage in professional forums, research, and scholarship. Although nurse educators have always been a feature of the nursing workplace, there is a paucity of literature on the role of nurse educators as clinical leaders. This discursive article describes the role and attributes of nurse educators with a focus on their role as leaders in mental health nursing. We argue that embracing the leadership role is fundamental to nurse educators and to influencing consumer-focused care in mental health. We also make recommendations for developing the leadership role of nurse educators and provide considerations for further research such as examining the impact of clinical leaders on client, staff, and organizational outcomes.

  20. Our Story about Making a Difference in Nursing Practice through Action Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenkins, Emrys; Jones, Jane; Keen, Delia; Kinsella, Faye; Owen, Tracy; Pritchard, Donna; Rees, Susan

    2005-01-01

    This is a shared narrative, by five nurses and two lecturers who worked collaboratively on two undergraduate action research modules. They illustrate their research and education processes, characterised by critical reflection, use of ground rules, metaphor and imagery. Experiences that challenged and changed each of them are presented, including…

  1. Communicating with Patients Who Have Advanced Dementia: Training Nurse Aide Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beer, Laura E.; Hutchinson, Susan R.; Skala-Cordes, Kristine K.

    2012-01-01

    The increase of dementia in older adults is changing how medical care is delivered. Recognizing symptoms of pain, managing behaviors, and providing quality of life for people who have advanced dementia requires a new skill set for caregivers. Researchers in this study targeted nurse aide students to test an educational module's effect on students'…

  2. Excellence in Teaching End-of-Life Care. A New Multimedia Toolkit for Nurse Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkie, Diana J.; Judge, Kay M.; Wells, Marjorie J.; Berkley, Ila Meredith

    2001-01-01

    Describes a multimedia toolkit for teaching palliative care in nursing, which contains modules on end-of-life topics: comfort, connections, ethics, grief, impact, and well-being. Other contents include myths, definitions, pre- and postassessments, teaching materials, case studies, learning activities, and resources. (SK)

  3. Use of PharmaCALogy Software in a PBL Programme to Teach Nurse Prescribing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coleman, Iain P. L.; Watts, Adam S.

    2007-01-01

    Pharmacology is taught on a dedicated module for nurse prescribers who have a limited physical science background. To facilitate learning a problem-based approach was adopted. However, to enhance students' knowledge of drug action a PharmaCALogy software package from the British Pharmacological Society was used. Students were alternately given a…

  4. Communication Skills for End-of-Life Nursing Care: Teaching Strategies from the ELNEC Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matzo, Marianne LaPorte; Sherman, Deborah Witt; Sheehan, Denice C.; Ferrell, Betty Rolling; Penn, Barbara

    2003-01-01

    Presents a key module in a 3-day train-the-trainer course in end-of-life nursing--competence in communicating with patients and families. Factors affecting communication, coping strategies for families, strategies for classroom and clinical teaching, and resources are described. (SK)

  5. School nurse perspectives of challenges and how they perceive success in their professional nursing roles.

    PubMed

    Smith, Shirley G; Firmin, Michael W

    2009-04-01

    This is a phenomenological study of 25 school nurses employed in a large, urban school district in the midwestern section of the United States. In addition to school nursing, the participants also had professional work experience in other nursing specialties. Thematic analysis of the data focused on the challenges faced by the school nurses, their views of school nursing success, and elements of job satisfaction. Overall, the school nurses reported the positive aspects of school nursing outweigh the negative aspects of their jobs. Developmental changes were reported among the school nurses in this study as they reflected on how they perceived their nursing career over time and during different seasons of their lives.

  6. Review: Pediatric nursing status and its application analysis based on high quality nursing theory.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Junling; Zhang, Ying; Liu, Yufang; Shang, Xin'ai; Shi, Zhen; Ma, Xiang'an

    2015-03-01

    children's health concerns the revitalization and future of countries and nations. Pediatric nursing management is always the research hotspot of the international nursing field, and also the weak step in nursing management of China. China is now in a severe situation, i.e., shortage and loss of pediatric nursing staffs. In addition, a huge gap lies in the subject development between China and developed countries. This paper discussed the problems existing in the development of pediatric nursing as well as the application effect of high quality nursing in pediatric nursing, in order to promote the development of pediatric nursing and provide reference for nursing managers.

  7. Filling the gaps: immersing student nurses in specialty nursing and professional associations.

    PubMed

    Vioral, Anna N

    2011-09-01

    The national nursing shortage demands innovative strategies to attract students to the nursing profession. This article provides a potential solution for recruiting and retaining nurses for specialty areas of nursing as well as professional nursing associations by pairing student nurses with professional nurses who belong to nursing associations. An immersion program such as the one described in this article provides a strategy that addresses the nursing work force shortage and professional association membership. The experiential knowledge gained through this type of program may advance the profession throughout the country.

  8. NLN: Celebrating Associate Degree Nursing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoddick, Nancy A.

    1981-01-01

    Introduces a project celebrating the thirtieth anniversary of associate degree nursing (ADN) education. Reviews the efforts and plans of two national associations to identify and resolve recurring ADN issues and recognize the associate degree nurse's contributions. Describes the forums and publications planned to meet these objectives. Includes…

  9. School Nurses Share a Job.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merwin, Elizabeth G.; Voss, Sondra

    1981-01-01

    Job sharing is a relatively new idea in which two or more people share the hours, the work, and the responsibilities of one job. Advantages and disadvantages to this situation are discussed in relation to the experiences of two nurses who shared a position as district nurse. (JN)

  10. Military Nurses Perceptions of Autonomy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-05-01

    questionnaire scale , regardless of grouping by deployment experience, position held (rank) or work environment. Nurses with deployment experience had...authority were only slightly above midpoint for the questionnaire scale , regardless of grouping by deployment experience, position held (rank) or work...position without close supervision (Blanchfield & Biordi, 1996). Operationally, autonomy was measured by the Nursing Authority and Autonomy Scale . Authority

  11. Career Preferences of Nursing Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gould, Odette N.; MacLennan, Anna; Dupuis-Blanchard, Suzanne

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates novice and experienced student nurses' attitudes about caring for patients across the lifespan. Students were also asked why they would enjoy or not enjoy caring for children and older adults. Both novice (n = 114) and advanced (n = 56) nursing students were relatively positive about caring for patients across the lifespan.…

  12. Nursing Ethics: A Lifelong Commitment.

    PubMed

    Gibbons, Susanne W; Jeschke, E Ann

    2016-01-01

    Over the past 30 years, the health-care context as well as the roles and responsibilities of nurses have drastically changed. Leaders in nursing around the world recognize that the health-care system is stressed and the well-being of the nursing workforce plagued by the pressures and challenges it faces in everyday practice. We do not intend to make a strong normative argument for why nursing ethics education should be done in a certain way, but instead show from where we have come and to where we can go, so that educators are positioned to address some of the current shortcomings in ethics education. Our goal is to provide an illustration of ethics education as an interwoven, ongoing, and essential aspect of nursing education and professional development. By developing professional identity as character, we hope that professional nurses are given the skills to stand in the face of adversity and to act in a way that upholds the core competencies of nursing. Ultimately, health-care organizations will thrive because of the support they provide nurses and other health-care professionals.

  13. Clinical supervision for nurse lecturers.

    PubMed

    Lewis, D

    This article builds on a previous one which discussed the use of de Bono's thinking tool, 'six thinking hats' in the clinical, managerial, educational and research areas of nursing (Lewis 1995). This article explores clinical supervision and describes how the six thinking hats may be used as a reflective tool in the supervision of nurse lecturers who teach counselling skills.

  14. Different Voices in Nurse Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stokes, Gilian

    2007-01-01

    Nurse educators, like many of their health care professional colleagues, frequently face moral dilemmas when they identify a student as presenting an unacceptable risk to public safety. In this situation, the statutory requirement of nurse educators to protect the public, under the Health Practitioners Competence Assurance Act (2003), competes…

  15. Should School Nurses Wear Uniforms?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of School Health, 2001

    2001-01-01

    This 1958 paper questions whether school nurses should wear uniforms (specifically, white uniforms). It concludes that white uniforms are often associated with the treatment of ill people, and since many people have a fear reaction to them, they are not necessary and are even undesirable. Since school nurses are school staff members, they should…

  16. Incivility Across the Nursing Continuum.

    PubMed

    Lynette, Jones; Echevarria, Ilia; Sun, Emily; Ryan, Jane Greene

    2016-01-01

    Incivility affects nurses throughout education and practice; it directly affects patient safety as well as nurses' decisions to remain in academia and clinical practice. This article reviews the current literature on incivility and proposes the application of social learning theory to evidence-based strategies that can be implemented to combat incivility.

  17. Aerospace Nursing: The New Frontier.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polk-Walker, Glenda C.

    1989-01-01

    The physiological and psychological stresses that have an impact on the ability of humans to achieve space habitation and nursing's role in that endeavor are discussed. The nursing knowledge base needed to establish the discipline as a major contributor to space health science is discussed. (Author/MLW)

  18. Predicting Success in Nursing Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herrera, Cheryl; Blair, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    As the U.S. population ages and policy changes emerge, such as the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010, the U.S. will experience a significant shortage of Registered Nurses (RNs). Many colleges and universities are attempting to increase the size of nursing cohorts to respond to this imminent shortage. Notwithstanding a 2.6%…

  19. Computer Technology and Nursing Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southern Council on Collegiate Education for Nursing, Atlanta, GA.

    The influences of computer technology on college nursing education programs and health care delivery systems are discussed in eight papers. The use of computers is considered, with attention to clinical care, nursing education and continuing education, administration, and research. Attention is also directed to basic computer terminology, computer…

  20. Development Management for Nursing Administration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heyden, Richard; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Discusses the educational needs of nurse administrators in developing counties and in areas of lesser development in the United States and compares them to the typical education received in nursing administration programs. Concludes that a focus on development management is needed. (JOW)

  1. Work Behaviors of Nursing Faculty.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Rhea P.

    1989-01-01

    Nursing faculty (N=28) in baccalaureate programs were interviewed about work-related activities, publication rates, and primary interests. This was compared with similar data from faculty in other disciplines. Results indicate that nursing faculty favor teaching activities and are less oriented toward conducting research than their peers. (CH)

  2. Florida's Nurses Speak to Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCulloch, Etta S.

    A questionnaire was sent to 5000 Florida hospitals to obtain information from non-members of the Florida Nurses Association (FNA) and to compare the data with that of FNA members on questions relevant to nursing education. Among findings from the 22-item survey, 84 percent of which were returned, were that 80 percent disagreed that licensing…

  3. Nursing Predictors Study, Phase One.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dean, Janet H.; Fischer, Susanne E.

    In an effort to identify the minimum qualifications necessary for an entering student to succeed in a selective admission Nursing Program at Saint Petersburg Junior College in Florida, a study was conducted of 424 generic nursing students who started the program in January 1988, August 1988, January 1989, and August 1989. A successful student was…

  4. Restorative Nurse Assistant. Instructor Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missouri Univ., Columbia. Instructional Materials Lab.

    This curriculum material covers the basic orientation and necessary skills which would enable the practicing Certified Nurse Assistant to be trained as a Restorative Nurse Assistant. The shift in emphasis from maintenance care to restorative care in the long-term care setting has created a need for trained paraprofessionals who are competent in…

  5. Manual for Special Education Nurses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schnetter, Vicki A., Ed.

    This manual aims (1) to provide a standard, well-referenced resource for Iowa special education nurses and (2) to provide direction and continuity for health services to pupils with special needs. The first chapter provides an overview of the special education nurse's role, including philosophy, definitions of assignments, levels of service, and…

  6. Letters from a Nightingale nurse.

    PubMed

    Denny, E

    1996-01-01

    Mary Cadbury was one of six daughters in a wealthy Birmingham family, all of whom took up professional or unpaid philanthropic work. In 1873 Mary began nurse training at the Nightingale School, St Thomas's Hospital, and regularly sent letters to family and friends, which provide a graphic account of the experience of a nurse in the latter half of the nineteenth century.

  7. Emergency nursing in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Brysiewicz, Petra; Bruce, Judy

    2008-04-01

    The role of the emergency nurse in South Africa is a challenging one due to a variety of reasons. This article describes the healthcare system of South Africa with particular attention to the emergency medical system as well as the reason why most emergency clients present to the emergency departments. The actual experience of working as an emergency nurse in South Africa is highlighted.

  8. Medicaid Spenddown in Nursing Homes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Korbin; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Examined incidence and causes of Medicaid spenddown among disabled elderly persons. Found that approximately 10 percent of nursing home discharges experienced asset spenddown, process of converting from private pay to Medicaid, whereas over 50 percent of nursing home patients remained private pay throughout their stays. Becoming Medicaid patient…

  9. Interaction in Distance Nursing Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boz Yuksekdag, Belgin

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine psychiatry nurses' attitudes toward the interactions in distance nursing education, and also scrunize their attitudes based on demographics and computer/Internet usage. The comparative relational scanning model is the method of this study. The research data were collected through "The Scale of Attitudes of…

  10. Perceived roles of oncology nursing.

    PubMed

    Lemonde, Manon; Payman, Naghmeh

    2015-01-01

    The Canadian Association of Nurses in Oncology (CANO) Standards of Care (2001) provides a framework that delineates oncology nursing roles and responsibilities. The purpose of this study was to explore how oncology nurses perceive their roles and responsibilities compared to the CANO Standards of Care. Six focus groups were conducted and 21 registered nurses (RNs) from a community-based hospital participated in this study. Transcripts were analyzed using qualitative inductive content analysis. Three themes were identified: (1) Oncology nurses perceive a gap between their defined roles and the reality of daily practice, as cancer care becomes more complex and as they provide advanced oncology care to more patients while there is no parallel adaptation to the health care system to support them, such as safe staffing; (2) Oncology nursing, as a specialty, requires sustained professional development and leadership roles; and (3) Oncology nurses are committed to providing continuous care as a reference point in the health care team by fostering interdisciplinary collaboration andfacilitating patient's navigation through the system. Organizational support through commitment to appropriate staffing and matching scope ofpractice to patient needs may lead to maximize the health and well-being of nurses, quality of patient care and organizational performance.

  11. Venture actualization in nursing. An analysis of innovation.

    PubMed

    Neidlinger, S H; Bartleson, B J; Drews, N; Hukari, D

    1992-01-01

    From innovations shared by nurse executives and nurse intrapreneurs in acute care hospitals, The Venture Actualization in Nursing Model emerged. Derived from a nursing perspective, this model captures the steps of the nurse innovation process, linking the nurse executive and nurse intrapreneur role components to the process that leads to venture success.

  12. Role, Function, and Utilization of the Triage Nurse

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-12-01

    Emergency Department Experience . 51 20. Mean and Standard Deviation Scores by Basic Nursing Education of Nurse . . . . .. . . . ......... 52 21...Analysis of Variance by Basic Nursing Education of Nurses 52 22. Mean and Standard Deviation Scores of Pursuance of Higher Degree by Nurses...included age, sex, years experience as registered nurse, years experience in the emergency department, basic nursing education program, and whether or

  13. An Assessment of Nursing Attitudes toward Computers in Health Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carl, David L.; And Others

    The attitudes and perceptions of practicing nurses, student nurses, and nurse educators toward computerization of health care were assessed using questionnaires sent to two general hospitals and five nursing education programs. The sample consisted of 83 first-year nursing students, 84 second-year nursing students, 52 practicing nurses, and 26…

  14. Lunar Module Ascent Stage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    The Lunar Module 'Spider' ascent stage is photographed from the Command/Service Module on the fifth day of the Apollo 9 earth-orbital mission. The Lunar Module's descent stage had already been jettisoned.

  15. Wide deviation phase modulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Couch, R. H.; Hearn, C. P.; Wilson, L. R.

    1974-01-01

    Modulator produces phase-modulated waveform having high modulating linearity. Technique is inherently wideband with respect to carrier frequency and can operate over decade carrier frequency range without adjustments. Circuit performance is both mathematically predictable and highly reproducible.

  16. Study of Nursing Manpower Requirements and Resources in Kentucky, 1981 and 1985. Kentucky Nursing Education Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kentucky State Council on Higher Education, Frankfort.

    The Kentucky Nursing Manpower Requirements and Resources Study (1981 and 1985) is one segment of a nursing project designed to develop a coordinated statewide system of nursing education in Kentucky. The study determined the number and types of nurses needed and compared current and anticipated nursing manpower supply and demand. Calculations of…

  17. Nursing presence: putting the art of nursing back into hospital orientation.

    PubMed

    Kostovich, Carol Toliuszis; Clementi, Pamela S

    2014-01-01

    Nursing presence, the "doing for" and "being with" patients, embodies the holistic work of the registered nurse. However, nursing presence is seldom reflected in hospital orientation curricula. Programs traditionally orient nurses to policies and psychomotor tasks but exclude emphasizing how to "be with" patients. This article describes how one Midwestern academic medical center incorporated both the art and science of nursing into orientation.

  18. Need of Knowledge in Nursing and Demand for Knowledge in Nursing Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johansson, Britt

    An English summary of a study on nursing education which was written in Swedish is presented. Standards of medical and surgical knowledge required of student nurses were evaluated based on all written test items in medical and surgical nursing set during one year at Swedish schools of nursing. The views of teaching staff and student nurses on…

  19. Nursing Educator Retention: The Relationship between Job Embeddedness and Intent to Stay among Nursing Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamlin, Amy S.

    2013-01-01

    The United States is in the midst of an increasingly worsening shortage of registered nurses, due, in part, to the nursing educator shortage. Further, nursing programs nationwide are turning away qualified applicants because of a lack of nursing educators. Unfortunately, the nursing educator shortage is not a problem that will be easily fixed. As…

  20. The nursing research idea fair: fostering research interest and activity among nurses.

    PubMed

    Turjanica, Mary Ann; Turner, Barbra; Rodgers, Karen

    2013-01-01

    Educators need creative means to enhance nurses' understanding of the research process. The Nursing Research Idea Fair provides a multifaceted educational experience to stimulate interest in research, educate nurses about research, and engage nurses in the research process in a fun, nonintimidating way. Nurse-driven research studies have increased fourfold since implementing the fair.