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Sample records for nutritional risk index

  1. The Geriatric Nutritional Risk Index Predicts Survival in Elderly Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma Patients with Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kunlun; Liu, Yang; You, Jie; Cui, Han; Zhu, Yiwei; Yuan, Ling

    2016-01-01

    The impact of nutritional status on survival among elderly esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) patients undergoing radiotherapy is unclear. In this study, we aimed at validating the performance of the geriatric nutritional risk index (GNRI) in predicting overall survival time in elderly ESCC patients with radiotherapy. A retrospective cohort study was conducted on 239 ESCC patients aged 60 and over admitted consecutively from January 2008 to November 2014 in the Department of Radiotherapy, Henan Tumor Hospital (Affiliated Tumor Hospital of Zhengzhou University), Zhengzhou, Henan, China. All patients were subjected to nutritional screening using GNRI, and were followed for the occurrence of lymphatic node metastasis, radiation complication and mortality. The Kaplan–Meier method with Log-rank test was used to estimate survival curves. Univariable Cox regression analysis was used to identify variables associated with overall survival time. Among the 239 patients, 184 patients (76.9%) took no nutritional risk, 32 patients (13.4%) took moderate risk of malnutrition, and 23 patients (9.7%) took a high risk of malnutrition. Univariable Cox regression showed that both high nutritional risk group and moderate nutritional risk group were significantly less likely to survive than no nutritional risk patients (hazard ratio (HR) = 1.688, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.019–2.798 for moderate risk group, and HR = 2.699, 95% CI = 1.512–4.819 for high risk group, respectively). The GNRI is an independent prognostic factor for overall survival time in elderly ESCC patients with radiotherapy. A GNRI ≤98 can be suggested as an indicator of surviving less. PMID:27196126

  2. Onodera's Prognostic Nutritional Index as a Risk Factor for Mortality in Peritoneal Dialysis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Seok Hui; Cho, Kyu Hyang; Park, Jong Won; Yoon, Kyung Woo

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical relevance and usefulness of the Onodera's prognostic nutritional index (OPNI) as a prognostic and nutritional indicator in peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients. Patients were divided into 3 groups based on the initial OPNI score: group A (n = 186, < 40), group B (n = 150, 40-45), and group C (n = 186, > 45). Group A was associated with a higher grade according to the Davies risk index than the other groups. Serum creatinine and albumin levels, total lymphocyte count, and fat mass increased with an increase in OPNI. According to the edema index, the correlation coefficient for OPNI was -0.284 and for serum albumin was -0.322. Similarly, according to the C-reactive protein (CRP), the correlation coefficient for OPNI was -0.117 and for serum albumin was -0.169. Multivariate analysis adjusted for age, Davies risk index, CRP, and edema index revealed that the hazard ratios for low OPNI, serum albumin, and CRP were 1.672 (P = 0.003), 1.308 (P = 0.130), and 1.349 (P = 0.083), respectively. Our results demonstrate that the OPNI is a simple method that can be used for predicting the nutritional status and clinical outcome in PD patients. PMID:23166417

  3. The Geriatric Nutritional Risk Index Independently Predicts Mortality in Diabetic Foot Ulcers Patients Undergoing Amputations

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Hailing; Ye, Tingting; Ge, Shengjie; Zhuo, Ruyi

    2017-01-01

    Objective. Patients with diabetic foot ulcers undergoing amputations have poor prognosis. Malnutrition usually occurs in this population and is associated with increased risk of mortality. The geriatric nutritional risk index (GNRI) is a widely used, simple, and well-established tool to assess nutritional risk. The purpose of this study was to assess the association between GNRI and all-cause mortality in diabetic foot ulcers patients undergoing minor or major amputations. Methods. This was a retrospective cohort study including 271 adult patients. Patients were divided into two groups according to a GNRI cutoff value of 92, and characteristics and mortality were compared between the two groups. Cox proportional hazard analysis was performed to explore the association between GNRI and mortality. Result. GNRI (p < 0.001), age (p < 0.001), and eGFR (p = 0.002) were independent predictors of mortality. Among a subgroup of 230 patients with minor amputation, increased age (p < 0.001), coronary artery disease (p = 0.030), and increased GNRI (p < 0.001) were major risk factors. Conclusion. GNRI on admission might be a novel clinical predictor for the incidence of death in patients with diabetic foot ulcers who were undergoing amputations. PMID:28164133

  4. Relationship of nutritional risk, Body Mass Index (BMI), and cognitive functioning in preschoolers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objective: To determine the relationships, if any, between nutritional risk, BMI z-score, and cognitive function in preschoolers. Background: Excessive adipose tissue found in obesity places children at increased health risk. Considerable research has documented that obesity leads to increased ri...

  5. Prognostic Impact of the Geriatric Nutritional Risk Index on Long-Term Outcomes in Patients Who Underwent Percutaneous Coronary Intervention.

    PubMed

    Wada, Hideki; Dohi, Tomotaka; Miyauchi, Katsumi; Doi, Shinichiro; Naito, Ryo; Konishi, Hirokazu; Tsuboi, Shuta; Ogita, Manabu; Kasai, Takatoshi; Hassan, Ahmed; Okazaki, Shinya; Isoda, Kikuo; Suwa, Satoru; Daida, Hiroyuki

    2017-03-16

    Malnutrition has been identified as an important predictor of poor clinical outcomes in patients with heart failure. The aim of this study is to examine the prognostic impact of nutritional status in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) who underwent percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). The impact of nutrition, assessed using the geriatric nutritional risk index (GNRI) calculated by serum albumin and body mass index, was evaluated in 2,853 patients with CAD who underwent their first PCI between 2000 and 2011. Patients were assigned to tertiles based on their GNRI levels. The incidences of all-cause death and cardiac death were assessed. The median GNRI values were 101 (interquartile range 95 to 106). Lower GNRI levels were associated with older age and higher prevalence of acute coronary syndrome and chronic kidney disease. During the median follow-up period of 7.4 years, Kaplan-Meier curves showed ongoing divergence in rates of mortality among tertiles (GNRI <98: 35.1%; 98 to 104: 20.6%; ≥104: 12.1%; log-rank p <0.0001). Stratification analysis by age also showed that the lowest GNRI tertile was associated with mortality in both patients <65 years and those ≥65 years. After adjusting for established cardiovascular risk factors, lower GNRI was an independent predictor of all-cause death (hazard ratio 1.55 per 10 decrease, 95% confidence interval 1.30 to 1.84, p <0.0001) and cardiac death (hazard ratio 1.44, 95% confidence interval 1.08 to 1.90, p = 0.01). In conclusion, nutritional status was associated with long-term clinical outcomes in CAD patients after PCI. Evaluation of GNRI carries important prognostic information and may guide the therapeutic approach to such patients.

  6. Validation of nutritional risk index method against patient-generated subjective global assessment in screening malnutrition in colorectal cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Faramarzi, Elnaz; Mohammad-Zadeh, Mohammad; Nasirimotlagh, Behnam

    2013-01-01

    Objective To validate malnutrition screening tool of nutrition risk index (NRI) against patient-generated subjective global assessment (PG-SGA) as a gold standard tool in colorectal cancer patients before radiotherapy. Methods Nutritional status of 52 volunteer colorectal cancer patients with a mean age of 54.1±16.8 years who referred to radiotherapy center were assessed by PG-SGA (gold standard method) and NRI. Serum albumin levels of patients were determined by colorimetric method. A contingency table was used to determine the sensitivity, specificity, and predictive value of the NRI in screening patients at risk of malnutrition, in comparison with the PG-SGA in patients before radiotherapy. Results The findings of PG-SGA and NRI showed that 52% and 45% of patients in our study were moderately or severely malnourished respectively. The NRI had a sensitivity of 66% and a specificity of 60% against PG-SGA. The positive predictive value was 64% and the negative predicative value was 62%. The agreement between NRI and PG-SGA was statistically insignificant (kappa =0.267; P>0.05). Conclusions The findings of present study showed that the prevalence of malnutrition was high in patients with colorectal cancer. Moreover, NRI method had low sensitivity and specificity in assessing nutritional status of patients with cancer. It seems that the combination of anthropometric, laboratory parameters and a subjective scoring system may be helpful tools in screening of malnutrition in cancer patients. PMID:24255578

  7. The energy intake through regular nontherapeutic meals provision in long-term care: impact on nutritional status and related Geriatric Nutritional Risk Index.

    PubMed

    Sturtzel, Baerbel; Elmadfa, Ibrahim; Ohrenberger, Gerald

    2016-01-01

    To investigate how the energy intake of institutionalized long-term-care patients through the regular nontherapeutic meals provision is associated with the nutritional status and the Geriatric Nutritional Risk Index (GNRI). A 9 month longitudinal, observational study. Long-term-care Hospital. 66 long-term-care patients with multiple medical conditions and solely oral food-intake. 47 (71 %) patients, predominantly women (n = 39/47), with a mean age of 83.04 (±9.58) years completed study time and 19 (29 %) deceased. At week 1 and week 36 of observation time energy intake was measured by means of three-days-weighing-records. Body composition was assessed with bioelectrical impedance analysis. Serum albumin, body weight and body height were taken from the medical report. Albumin content, body weight and height were used to calculate the Geriatric Nutritional Risk Index: GNRI = [1.489 × albumin (g/L)] + [41.7 × (weight/ideal body weight)]. Energy intake was significantly below 24 kcal/kg body weight per day. The GNRI of the deceased patients was significantly (p = 0.002) lower than the GNRI of the completers. During observation time energy-intake p < 0.001, body fat (p = 0.001) and phase angle (PA) of bio impedance measurement (p = 0.018) and likewise the GNRI (p = 0.021) of the completers decreased significantly. At the beginning and at the end of observation time energy intake correlated significantly with PA (p = 0.028/p < 0.001) and GNRI (p = 0.436/p = 0.004). Also GNRI and PA correlated significantly at the beginning (p = 0.001) and at the end (p < 0.001) of observation time. The energy intake through non therapeutic meals provision was too low for sustaining the nutritional status and likewise the GNRI. The malnourishment and the nutrition related clinical risk of the geriatric patients aggrevated during observation time.

  8. Pros and cons of body mass index as a nutritional and risk assessment tool in dialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Carrero, Juan Jesús; Avesani, Carla Maria

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is a problem of serious concern among chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients; it is a risk factor for progression to end-stage renal disease and its incidence and prevalence in dialysis patients exceeds those of the general population. Obesity, typically assessed with the simple metric of body mass index (BMI), is considered a mainstay for nutritional assessment in guidelines on nutrition in CKD. While regular BMI assessment in connection with the dialysis session is a simple and easy-to-use monitoring tool, such ease of access can lead to excess-of-use, as the value of this metric to health care professionals is overestimated. This review examines BMI as a clinical monitoring tool in CKD practice and offers a critical appraisal as to what a high or a low BMI may signify in this patient population. Topics discussed include the utility of BMI as a reflection of body size, body composition and body fat distribution, diagnostic versus prognostic performance, and consideration of temporal trends over single assessments.

  9. Association between Low Dietary Protein Intake and Geriatric Nutrition Risk Index in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease: A Retrospective Single-Center Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Kiuchi, Aki; Ohashi, Yasushi; Tai, Reibin; Aoki, Toshiyuki; Mizuiri, Sonoo; Ogura, Toyoko; Aikawa, Atsushi; Sakai, Ken

    2016-01-01

    Reduced dietary protein intake in malnourished patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) may be associated with adverse clinical outcomes, which may mask any efficacy of a low-protein diet. The study included 126 patients with CKD who attended a dedicated dietary counseling clinic in 2005–2009 and were systematically followed until January 2015. Of these patients, 20 (15.9%) had moderate or severe nutrition-related risk of geriatric nutritional risk index (GNRI) < 92; these patients were more likely to be older, have a greater proteinuria, and have lower body mass index and serum albumin concentration. Dietary protein intake was significantly lower in older patients (r = −0.33, p < 0.001) and those with lower glomerular filtration rate (r = 0.47, p < 0.001). The non-protein to nitrogen calorie ratio was independently associated with GNRI. Reduced GNRI was significantly associated with mortality (hazard ratio (HR) = 4.94; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.61–15.42, p = 0.012) and cardiovascular events (HR = 9.37; 95% CI = 2.49–37.34, p = 0.006), but not with adverse renal outcomes. Restricting protein intake may be harmful to patients with any nutrition-related risk, suggesting that improvement of nutritional status should be a high priority. PMID:27782097

  10. Measuring nutritional risk in hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Rasmussen, Henrik H; Holst, Mette; Kondrup, Jens

    2010-01-01

    About 20%–50% of patients in hospitals are undernourished. The number varies depending on the screening tool amended and clinical setting. A large number of these patients are undernourished when admitted to the hospital, and in most of these patients, undernutrition develops further during hospital stay. The nutrition course of the patient starts by nutritional screening and is linked to the prescription of a nutrition plan and monitoring. The purpose of nutritional screening is to predict the probability of a better or worse outcome due to nutritional factors and whether nutritional treatment is likely to influence this. Most screening tools address four basic questions: recent weight loss, recent food intake, current body mass index, and disease severity. Some screening tools, moreover, include other measurements for predicting the risk of malnutrition. The usefulness of screening methods recommended is based on the aspects of predictive validity, content validity, reliability, and practicability. Various tools are recommended depending on the setting, ie, in the community, in the hospital, and among elderly in institutions. The Nutrition Risk Screening (NRS) 2002 seems to be the best validated screening tool, in terms of predictive validity ie, the clinical outcome improves when patients identified to be at risk are treated. For adult patients in hospital, thus, the NRS 2002 is recommended. PMID:21042553

  11. Validity of nutrition risk index as a malnutrition screening tool compared with subjective global assessment in end-stage renal disease patients on peritoneal dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, N.; Sinha, A.; Gupta, A.; Bhadauria, D.; Manjunath, R.; Kaul, A.; Sharma, R. K.

    2016-01-01

    We undertook this study to compare subjective global assessment (SGA) and nutrition risk index (NRI) as malnutrition screening tools in peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients. Nutrition status of the patients was categorized into low, moderate and high risk of malnutrition based on both NRI and SGA. The sensitivity, specificity and predictive values of NRI were compared with SGA, an already validated tool of nutrition status assessment in PD patients. Two hundred and eighty-three end-stage renal disease patients (age 50.02 ± 13.76 years; 204 males, 150 diabetic) were included. Based on SGA, 71/283 (25.08%) had normal nutrition, 192/283 (67.84%) mild–moderate and 20/283 (7.07%) severe malnutrition. Based on NRI, 38/283 (13.43%) patients had normal nutritional status, 193/283 (68.20%) mild-moderate and 52/283 (18.37%) severe malnutrition. Twenty-three of 283 (8.1%) were correctly classified as normal by NRI (true negative) and 197/283 (69.6%) as malnourished (true positive), 15/283 (5.3%) as false negative, 48/283 (16.96%) were misclassified as malnourished (false positive). NRI has sensitivity of 92.9% and specificity of 32.39%. Positive predictive value and Negative predictive values (NPVs) of NRI are 80.41% and 60.53%, respectively. Accuracy of the test is 78%. The receiver operating characteristic curve of NRI is 0.63. To conclude, NRI carries high sensitivity but low specificity as compared to SGA. It can be used as screening tool but not as a diagnostic tool for assessment of nutritional status in PD patients because of its low specificity and NPV. PMID:26937075

  12. A Sociodemographic Risk Index

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Kristin Anderson; Vandivere, Sharon; Redd, Zakia

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we conceptualize and develop an index of sociodemographic risk that we hypothesize will be an improvement over the standard poverty measure as a measure of risk for children's development. The poverty line is widely used in government statistics and in research but is also widely acknowledged to have multiple shortcomings. Using…

  13. Preconception care: nutritional risks and interventions

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction There is increasingly a double burden of under-nutrition and obesity in women of reproductive age. Preconception underweight or overweight, short stature and micronutrient deficiencies all contribute to excess maternal and fetal complications during pregnancy. Methods A systematic review and meta-analysis of the evidence was conducted to ascertain the possible impact of preconception care for adolescents, women and couples of reproductive age on maternal, newborn and child health (MNCH) outcomes. A comprehensive strategy was used to search electronic reference libraries, and both observational and clinical controlled trials were included. Cross-referencing and a separate search strategy for each preconception risk and intervention ensured wider study capture. Results Maternal pre-pregnancy weight is a significant factor in the preconception period with underweight contributing to a 32% higher risk of preterm birth, and obesity more than doubling the risk for preeclampsia, gestational diabetes. Overweight women are more likely to undergo a Cesarean delivery, and their newborns have higher chances of being born with a neural tube or congenital heart defect. Among nutrition-specific interventions, preconception folic acid supplementation has the strongest evidence of effect, preventing 69% of recurrent neural tube defects. Multiple micronutrient supplementation shows promise to reduce the rates of congenital anomalies and risk of preeclampsia. Although over 40% of women worldwide are anemic in the preconception period, only one study has shown a risk for low birth weight. Conclusion All women, but especially those who become pregnant in adolescence or have closely-spaced pregnancies (inter-pregnancy interval less than six months), require nutritional assessment and appropriate intervention in the preconception period with an emphasis on optimizing maternal body mass index and micronutrient reserves. Increasing coverage of nutrition-specific and nutrition

  14. Evaluation of the Predictive Index for Osteoporosis as a Clinical Tool to Identify the Risk of Osteoporosis in Korean Men by Using the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey Data

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Ji Hyun; Kim, Lee Oh; Kim, Hyeon Ju

    2016-01-01

    Background We previously proposed the Predictive Index for Osteoporosis as a new index to identify men who require bone mineral density measurement. However, the previous study had limitations such as a single-center design and small sample size. Here, we evaluated the usefulness of the Predictive Index for Osteoporosis using the nationally representative data of the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Methods Participants underwent bone mineral density measurements via dual energy X-ray absorptiometry, and the Predictive Index for Osteoporosis and Osteoporosis Self-Assessment Tool for Asians were assessed. Receiver operating characteristic analysis was used to obtain optimal cut-off points for the Predictive Index for Osteoporosis and Osteoporosis Self-Assessment Tool for Asians, and the predictability of osteoporosis for the 2 indices was compared. Results Both indices were useful clinical tools for identifying osteoporosis risk in Korean men. The optimal cut-off value for the Predictive Index for Osteoporosis was 1.07 (sensitivity, 67.6%; specificity, 72.7%; area under the curve, 0.743). When using a cut-off point of 0.5 for the Osteoporosis Self-Assessment Tool for Asians, the sensitivity and specificity were 71.9% and 64.0%, respectively, and the area under the curve was 0.737. Conclusion The Predictive Index for Osteoporosis was as useful as the Osteoporosis Self-Assessment Tool for Asians as a screening index to identify candidates for dual energy X-ray absorptiometry among men aged 50–69 years. PMID:27900073

  15. Proposal of a Nutritional Quality Index (NQI) to Evaluate the Nutritional Supplementation of Sportspeople

    PubMed Central

    Palacin-Arce, Alba; Monteagudo, Celia; Beas-Jimenez, Juan de Dios; Olea-Serrano, Fatima; Mariscal-Arcas, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Background Numerous supplements are used by sportspeople. They are not always appropriate for the individual or the sports activity and may do more harm than good. Vitamin and mineral supplements are unnecessary if the energy intake is sufficient to maintain body weight and derives from a diet with an adequate variety of foods. The study objectives were to evaluate the main nutrients used as supplements in sports and to propose a nutritional quality index (NQI) that enables sportspeople to optimize their use of supplements and detect and remedy possible nutritional deficits. Material and Methods A nutritional study was performed in 485 sportspeople recruited from Centros Andaluces de Medicina del Deporte, (CAMD). All completed socio-demographic, food frequency, and lifestyle questionnaires. The nutritional quality of their diet and need for supplementation were evaluated by scoring their dietary intake with and without supplementation, yielding two NQI scores (scales of 0-21 points) for each participant. Results A superior mean NQI score was obtained when the supplements taken by participants were not included (16. 28 (SD of 3.52)) than when they were included (15.47 (SD: 3.08)), attributable to an excessive intake of some nutrients through supplementation. Conclusions These results indicate that sportspeople with a varied and balanced diet do not need supplements, which appear to offer no performance benefits and may pose a health risk. PMID:25938239

  16. Nutritional Risk among Oklahoma Congregate Meal Participants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quigley, Kimberly K.; Hermann, Janice R.; Warde, William D.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To determine if there were differences by demographic variables in response rates to Nutrition Screening Initiative (NSI) Checklist statements reported by over 50% of Oklahoma Older Americans Act Nutrition Program (OAANP) congregate meal participants categorized at high nutritional risk based on cumulative NSI Checklist scores. Design:…

  17. Nutritional risk and cognitive impairment in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kang Soo; Cheong, Hae-Kwan; Kim, Eun A; Kim, Kyung Ran; Oh, Byoung Hoon; Hong, Chang Hyung

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between nutritional risk and cognitive impairment in the elderly living in the community. Data obtained from 2934 subjects (912 men and 2022 women) aged above 60 years was analyzed from the Gwangju Dementia and Mild Cognitive Impairment Study (GDEMCIS). The study questionnaire comprised demographic characteristics, history of current and past illnesses, drug history, Korean version-Mini Mental State Examination (K-MMSE), and Nutritional Screening Initiative (NSI) checklist. Additionally, we examined the blood pressure, fasting serum glucose level, lipid profile, body mass index, and ApoE genotype. Of the total, 1942 (66.2%) demonstrated good nutritional state (NSI checklist score< or =2) and 992 (33.8%) were at moderate or high nutritional risk (NSI checklist score>2). Multiple logistic regression analysis revealed that moderate or high nutritional risk subjects were associated with an increased risk of cognitive impairment (K-MMSE score< or =17) after adjustment for age, sex, educational level, and Korean version of Short form Geriatric Depression Scale (K-SGDS) score (Odds ratio=OR=1.71, 95%; confidence interval=CI=1.17-2.50). These results suggest that nutritional risk may be associated with cognitive impairment in the elderly.

  18. Parenteral nutrition: indications, risks and nursing care.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Jane

    Parenteral nutrition is a recognised method of feeding patients with specific clinical conditions, most notably those with various forms of intestinal failure who cannot be fed enterally. However, it has several associated risks including sepsis, and metabolic and electrolyte imbalances. The aim of this article is to enhance nurses' understanding of parenteral nutrition and how this differs from oral or enteral nutrition, indications for use and the potential risks involved. Appropriate vascular access is discussed as well as the clinical monitoring that is required to ensure complications of therapy are detected quickly. A greater understanding of the issues associated with parenteral nutrition allows nurses caring for patients receiving parenteral nutrition to ensure safe and effective care.

  19. Index of Free and Inexpensive Food and Nutrition Information Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Kathleen, Comp.; And Others

    This annotated index contains approximately 2,000 free or inexpensive pamphlets or brochures about food and nutrition. The prime criterion for inclusion of materials was that they be easily available and inexpensive; the cut-off cost was set at $3.00. The majority of materials listed were produced in either Canada or the United States. These…

  20. 2013 Nutrition Risk Evidence Review Panel. Evidence Review for: The Risk Factor of Inadequate Nutrition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2014-01-01

    The 2013 Nutrition Risk Standing Review Panel (from here on referred to as the SRP) met for a site visit in Houston, TX on November 20 - 21, 2013. The SRP reviewed the new Evidence Report for the Risk Factor of Inadequate Nutrition (from here on referred to as the 2013 Nutrition Evidence Report), as well as the Research Plan for this Risk. Overall, the SRP thinks the well-qualified research team has compiled an excellent summary of background information in the 2013 Nutrition Evidence Report. The SRP would like to commend the authors in general and particularly note that while the 2013 Nutrition Evidence Report has been written using a single nutrient approach, the research plan takes a much more integrated and physiologically based approach.

  1. Screening of Nutritional Risk and Nutritional Support in General Surgery Patients: A Survey from Shanghai, China

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Zhen-Yi; Yang, Jun; Tong, Da-Nian; Peng, Jia-Yuan; Zhang, Zhong-Wei; Liu, Wei-Jie; Xia, Yang; Qin, Huan-long

    2015-01-01

    To determine the prevalence of nutritional risk in surgical departments and to evaluate the impact of nutritional support on clinical outcomes. The nutritional risk in different surgical diseases and the different way of nutritional support on clinical outcomes in patients at nutritional risk remain unclear. Hospitalized patients from general surgical departments were screened using the Nutritional Risk Screening (NRS) 2002 questionnaire on admission. Data were collected on nutritional risk, complications, and length of stay (LOS). Overall, 5034 patients were recruited; the overall prevalence of nutritional risk on admission were 19.2%. The highest prevalence was found among patients with gastric cancer. At-risk patients had more complications and longer LOS than nonrisk patients. Of the at-risk patients, the complication rate was significantly lower and LOS was significantly shorter in the nutritional-support group than in the no-support group (20.9 versus 30.0%, P < 0.05). Subgroup analysis showed reduced complication rates and LOS only in patients with gastric cancer, colorectal cancer, and hepato-pancreato-biliary (HPB) cancer. Significantly lower complication rates relative to nonsupported patients were found among patients who received enteral nutrition or who received support for 5 to 7 days, or daily support entailing 16 to 25 kcal/kg of nonprotein energy. Different surgical diseases have different levels of nutritional risk. The provision of nutritional support was associated with a lower complication rate and a shorter LOS for gastric, colorectal, and HPB cancer patients at nutritional risk. The improper use of nutritional support may not improve outcomes for at-risk patients. PMID:26011204

  2. Flavonoids at the pharma-nutrition interface: Is a therapeutic index in demand?

    PubMed

    Peluso, Ilaria; Palmery, Maura

    2015-04-01

    The consumption of flavonoid-rich foods could have beneficial effects on health. However, different classes of flavonoids have different effect on disease risk and the relationship between flavonoid intake and risk of disease appeared to be non-linear. Furthermore, contrarily to vitamins, there are no symptoms of deficiency for flavonoids; therefore, our body treats them like other xenobiotics. Therefore, a therapeutic index should be determined. Despite flavonoids are at the pharma-nutrition interface, drugs and foods are subject to different regulatory frameworks and there is no recommended daily allowance (RDA) for flavonoids. Relatively little is known about the efficacy, safety and underlying mechanisms of these bioactive compounds, especially when taken in concert with drugs. Flavonoids could act both as drugs and pro-drugs with pharmacological and toxicological promiscuity. Due to the low bioavailability, the gastrointestinal tract could be the primary target of flavonoids and metabolites. Different effects have been observed after acute and chronic consumption and bioavailability and bioactivity have high inter-individual variability. Furthermore, the difficulties in the design and in the interpretation of human intervention studies make difficult the establishment of a therapeutic index for flavonoids. Probably the concept of 'personalized nutrition' previously proposed could be the better approach. However, despite more studies are needed in order to establish a therapeutic index for each flavonoid subclasses, at the moment RDA of total flavonoids could be between 250-400 mg/d, respecting the seasonality of food sources.

  3. Nutrition and the Risk of Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Lin; Wang, Ying-Li; Sun, Lei

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder that accounts for the major cause of dementia, and the increasing worldwide prevalence of AD is a major public health concern. Increasing epidemiological studies suggest that diet and nutrition might be important modifiable risk factors for AD. Dietary supplementation of antioxidants, B vitamins, polyphenols, and polyunsaturated fatty acids are beneficial to AD, and consumptions of fish, fruits, vegetables, coffee, and light-to-moderate alcohol reduce the risk of AD. However, many of the results from randomized controlled trials are contradictory to that of epidemiological studies. Dietary patterns summarizing an overall diet are gaining momentum in recent years. Adherence to a healthy diet, the Japanese diet, and the Mediterranean diet is associated with a lower risk of AD. This paper will focus on the evidence linking many nutrients, foods, and dietary patterns to AD. PMID:23865055

  4. Differences in nutrition status by body mass index in patients with peripheral artery disease.

    PubMed

    Oka, Roberta K; Alley, Hugh F

    2012-09-01

    Peripheral Arterial Disease (PAD) is most prevalent in the elderly and associated with increased cardio vascular disease (CVD) morbidity and mortality. Treatment focuses on improving functional capacity and reducing CVD risk factors. To date, little is understood about dietary habits and weight in this patient population. Nutritional and weight recommendations are based on heart health, and little is known about the unique needs of elderly PAD patients with multiple comorbidities. This prospective study compared 1) the dietary intake of nonobese PAD patients in comparison with those who were obese and; 2) dietary intake of those patients with the Estimated Average Requirement (EAR) based on age, gender and BMI. Nutritional intake was assessed with the Block 98 Food Frequency Questionnaire. Body mass index (BMI) was calculated in accordance with the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) guidelines.The study population was divided into obese (BMI ≥ 30) and nonobese (NO) groups. Comparisons between groups were performed using the Mann-Whitney U test for continuous variables and the Chi-square test for ordinal variables. All tests were two-tailed and P < 0.05 was considered significant. The Estimated Average Requirement (EAR) cut-point method was used to compare nutritional variables with Dietary Reference Intakes (DRI). The study population included 189 NO (BMI < 30) and 111 obese (BMI > 30) individuals. Obese participants reported greater intake of foods containing cholesterol and trans-fatty acids and more frequent intake of B vitamins in comparison with the NO BMI group. Additionally, the nutrient intake of all participants by age, gender and BMI was lower than the EAR for magnesium, folate, and Vitamin E. These results suggest that the nutritional intake of PAD patients differs based on gender and BMI. Additionally, EAR was lower for specific nutrients than recommended. Further investigation is needed to examine the association between nutritional

  5. HEALTHY EATING INDEX AND OVARIAN CANCER RISK

    PubMed Central

    Chandran, Urmila; Bandera, Elisa V.; Williams-King, Melony G.; Paddock, Lisa E.; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Lorna; Lu, Shou-En; Faulkner, Shameka; Pulick, Katherine; Olson, Sara H.

    2011-01-01

    The evidence for a role of diet on ovarian cancer prevention remains inconclusive. While many studies have evaluated individual foods and food groups, the evaluation of a comprehensive dietary quality index for predicting cancer risk has received little attention. This study investigates the association between the Healthy Eating Index (HEI), which reflects adherence to the current USDA Dietary Guidelines for Americans, and ovarian cancer risk in a population-based case-control study in New Jersey. A total of 205 cases and 390 controls completed the Block 98.2 Food Frequency Questionnaire (FFQ) in addition to reporting on potential risk factors for ovarian cancer. FFQ data were then utilized to calculate the HEI score, and cup, ounce, gram, or caloric equivalents for the 12 different food groups comprising the index. In multivariate models the OR for the highest tertile of the HEI score compared to the lowest (reflecting a better diet compared to a worse diet) was 0.90 (95% CI: 0.55–1.47). There was limited evidence for a statistically significant association between any of the 12 individual food components and ovarian cancer risk. Based on this study’s results, neither individual food groups nor dietary quality showed potential for preventing ovarian cancer. PMID:21286802

  6. Population-specific short-form mini nutritional assessment with body mass index or calf circumference can predict risk of malnutrition in community-living or institutionalized elderly people in taiwan.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Alan C; Chang, Tsui-Lan; Wang, Yi-Chen; Liao, Chiu-Ying

    2010-09-01

    A simple, reliable, noninvasive, and easy-to-use instrument is important for successful monitoring of emerging nutrition problems in elderly people. The objectives of this study were to determine whether adoption of population-specific body mass index (BMI) cutpoints would improve the predictive ability of the short-form Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA) and whether calf circumference could be an acceptable alternative to BMI in the short-form MNA without compromising its predictive ability. Using convenience sampling, the study recruited 301 community-living, 109 care center-living, and 68 nursing home-living elderly people, 65 years or older, as subjects. Subjects were evaluated with the short-form MNA in three versions: (a) the original, (b) Taiwan version 1 (T1), that adopted population-specific BMI cutpoints, and (c) Taiwan version 2 (T2), which substituted calf circumference for BMI, and with the long-form MNA-T2 as a reference. The ability of the short forms to predict the long-form MNA-T2 was evaluated with binary classification and analysis of receiver operating characteristic curves. Results were analyzed with an SPSS for Windows 12.0 software package (version 12.0.1C, 2000, SPSS Inc, Chicago, IL). Results showed that adoption of population-specific anthropometric BMI cutpoints improved the predictive ability of the short-form MNA, whereas replacement of BMI with calf circumference further improved the predictive ability of the scale (kappa values of the binary classification tests were 0.596, 0.742, and 0.843 for community-living; 0.560, 0.683, and 0.839 for care center-living; and 0.346, 0.454, and 0.522 for nursing home-living elderly for the original, T1, and T2 MNA short-form versions, respectively). These results suggest that modification of a measurement tool according to cultural or anthropometric features of the target population is necessary. The study also shows that calf circumference can be an acceptable alternative to BMI in the short

  7. HIV-Risk Index: Development and Validation of a Brief Risk Index for Hispanic Young People.

    PubMed

    Ballester-Arnal, Rafael; Gil-Llario, María Dolores; Castro-Calvo, Jesús; Giménez-García, Cristina

    2016-08-01

    The prevalence of HIV risk behaviors among young people facilitates the spread of HIV, in particular regarding unsafe sex behavior, although this trend is different within this population. For this reason, identifying the riskier young population is required to prevent HIV infection. The main purpose of this study was to develop and validate a risk index to assess the different sexual HIV risk exposure among Hispanic Young people. For this purpose, 9861 Spanish young people were randomly distributed into two groups (derivation and validation group). According to the results, the factor analyses grouped the nine items of the HIV- risk index into two factors (factor 1, direct sexual risk indicators and factor 2, indirect sexual risk indicators) with an equal structure for men and women by a multi-group confirmatory factor analysis. The variance explained was 54.26 %. Moreover, the Cronbach's alpha coefficient revealed high internal reliability (α = .79) and the convergent validity supported its evidence based on different HIV risk indexes. Therefore, the HIV-risk index seem to be a rigorous and valid measure to estimate HIV risk exposure among young people.

  8. Objective Understanding of Front-of-Package Nutrition Labels among Nutritionally At-Risk Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Ducrot, Pauline; Méjean, Caroline; Julia, Chantal; Kesse-Guyot, Emmanuelle; Touvier, Mathilde; Fezeu, Léopold K.; Hercberg, Serge; Péneau, Sandrine

    2015-01-01

    In the ongoing debate about front-of-package (FOP) nutrition labels, little data exist regarding nutritionally at-risk populations, although they are critical targets of prevention programs. This study aimed to compare the impact of FOP labels on the ability to rank products according to their nutritional quality among French adults potentially at risk of poor dietary quality (N = 14,230). Four labels were evaluated: Guideline Daily Amounts (GDA), Multiple Traffic Lights (MTL), 5-Color Nutrition Label (5-CNL), Green Tick (Tick), along with a reference without label. Mixed models were used to assess how individual characteristics and FOP labels were associated with the ability to rank products. Older participants and those with a lower educational level, income, nutritional knowledge, and likelihood of reading nutrition facts were less skilled at ranking food products according to nutritional quality. Compared with individual characteristics, nutrition labels had an increased impact on food product ranking ability. Overall, 5-CNL corresponded to the highest rate of correct responses, followed by MTL, GDA, and Tick (p < 0.0001). The strongest impact of 5-CNL was observed among individuals with no nutritional knowledge (odds ratio (OR): 20.24; 95% confidence interval (CI): 13.19–31.06). Therefore, 5-CNL appeared to be effective at informing consumers, including those who are nutritionally at-risk, about the nutritional quality of food products. PMID:26305255

  9. Waist-to-Height Ratio and Body Mass Index as Indicators of Cardiovascular Risk in Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keefer, Daniel J.; Caputo, Jennifer L.; Tseh, Wayland

    2013-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this investigation was to determine if waist-to-height ratio (WHTR) or body mass index (BMI) is the better indicator of cardiovascular disease risk in children and adolescents of varying ages. Methods: Data from children and adolescents (N?=?2300) who were part of the 2003-2004 National Health and Nutrition Examination…

  10. Seafood: nutritional benefits and risk aspects.

    PubMed

    Oehlenschläger, Jörg

    2012-06-01

    Seafood, such as fish, crustacean and molluscan shellfish, and echinoderms, provides in the edible part (e. g., filet, abdominal muscle) many nutritional components beneficial for the human diet like n-3 polyunsaturated long chain fatty acids (PUFAs), namely eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), essential elements such as selenium and iodine, high potassium and low sodium concentrations, and the vitamins D, A, E, and B(12), as well as taurine (2-aminoethanesulfonic acid) among others. Its protein is highly digestible due to low connective tissue content, and cholesterol content is also low in fish. Lean fish species are extremely low in fat content (<1 %), while fatty species are extremely rich in PUFAs. However, being subject to environmental influences from its habitat, seafood also entails water-borne health risks such as organic pollutants, toxins, parasites, and heavy metals. Nevertheless, the vast majority of experimental and epidemiological studies have proven that the benefits of fish intake exceed the potential risks even for vulnerable consumer groups.

  11. Body Mass Index Genetic Risk Score and Endometrial Cancer Risk

    PubMed Central

    Prescott, Jennifer; Setiawan, Veronica W.; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Schumacher, Fredrick; Yu, Herbert; Delahanty, Ryan; Bernstein, Leslie; Chanock, Stephen J.; Chen, Chu; Cook, Linda S.; Friedenreich, Christine; Garcia-Closas, Monserrat; Haiman, Christopher A.; Le Marchand, Loic; Liang, Xiaolin; Lissowska, Jolanta; Lu, Lingeng; Magliocco, Anthony M.; Olson, Sara H.; Risch, Harvey A.; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Ursin, Giske; Yang, Hannah P.; Kraft, Peter; De Vivo, Immaculata

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified common variants that predispose individuals to a higher body mass index (BMI), an independent risk factor for endometrial cancer. Composite genotype risk scores (GRS) based on the joint effect of published BMI risk loci were used to explore whether endometrial cancer shares a genetic background with obesity. Genotype and risk factor data were available on 3,376 endometrial cancer case and 3,867 control participants of European ancestry from the Epidemiology of Endometrial Cancer Consortium GWAS. A BMI GRS was calculated by summing the number of BMI risk alleles at 97 independent loci. For exploratory analyses, additional GRSs were based on subsets of risk loci within putative etiologic BMI pathways. The BMI GRS was statistically significantly associated with endometrial cancer risk (P = 0.002). For every 10 BMI risk alleles a woman had a 13% increased endometrial cancer risk (95% CI: 4%, 22%). However, after adjusting for BMI, the BMI GRS was no longer associated with risk (per 10 BMI risk alleles OR = 0.99, 95% CI: 0.91, 1.07; P = 0.78). Heterogeneity by BMI did not reach statistical significance (P = 0.06), and no effect modification was noted by age, GWAS Stage, study design or between studies (P≥0.58). In exploratory analyses, the GRS defined by variants at loci containing monogenic obesity syndrome genes was associated with reduced endometrial cancer risk independent of BMI (per BMI risk allele OR = 0.92, 95% CI: 0.88, 0.96; P = 2.1 x 10−5). Possessing a large number of BMI risk alleles does not increase endometrial cancer risk above that conferred by excess body weight among women of European descent. Thus, the GRS based on all current established BMI loci does not provide added value independent of BMI. Future studies are required to validate the unexpected observed relation between monogenic obesity syndrome genetic variants and endometrial cancer risk. PMID:26606540

  12. Novel immunological and nutritional-based prognostic index for gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Kai-Yu; Xu, Jian-Bo; Chen, Shu-Ling; Yuan, Yu-Jie; Wu, Hui; Peng, Jian-Jun; Chen, Chuang-Qi; Guo, Pi; Hao, Yuan-Tao; He, Yu-Long

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To assess the prognostic significance of immunological and nutritional-based indices, including the prognostic nutritional index (PNI), neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio (NLR), and platelet-lymphocyte ratio in gastric cancer. METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed 632 gastric cancer patients who underwent gastrectomy between 1998 and 2008. Areas under the receiver operating characteristic curve were calculated to compare the predictive ability of the indices, together with estimating the sensitivity, specificity and agreement rate. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to identify risk factors for overall survival (OS). Propensity score analysis was performed to adjust variables to control for selection bias. RESULTS: Each index could predict OS in gastric cancer patients in univariate analysis, but only PNI had independent prognostic significance in multivariate analysis before and after adjustment with propensity scoring (hazard ratio, 1.668; 95% confidence interval: 1.368-2.035). In subgroup analysis, a low PNI predicted a significantly shorter OS in patients with stage II-III disease (P = 0.019, P < 0.001), T3-T4 tumors (P < 0.001), or lymph node metastasis (P < 0.001). Canton score, a combination of PNI, NLR, and platelet, was a better indicator for OS than PNI, with the largest area under the curve for 12-, 36-, 60-mo OS and overall OS (P = 0.022, P = 0.030, P < 0.001, and P = 0.024, respectively). The maximum sensitivity, specificity, and agreement rate of Canton score for predicting prognosis were 84.6%, 34.9%, and 70.1%, respectively. CONCLUSION: PNI is an independent prognostic factor for OS in gastric cancer. Canton score can be a novel preoperative prognostic index in gastric cancer. PMID:26019461

  13. Development and implementation of a business continuity management risk index.

    PubMed

    Kadar, Michael

    This paper will present the building blocks for developing and implementing the BCM risk index; whether it is used as a comprehensive metric for risk or preparedness. This paper introduces the concept of a business continuity management (BCM) risk index--a comprehensive metric that measures and reports the status of the primary 'intended outcome' of the BCM programme to top management. In addition to measuring the primary programme output,;the BCM risk index can be used to demonstrate the overall value of the BCM programme to executive management. This is accomplished because the BCM risk index allows quantitative measurement of current risk levels and their comparison with established risk tolerances. The BCM Risk Index can provide executive management with reports on the risk level of individual business units, departments, subsidiaries or the enterprise in a way that drives both risk management and BCM initiatives. The name 'risk index' can be misleading, however. The BCM risk index concept can also be used to measure preparedness levels. In fact, implementation at DTE Energy has resulted in calling it the 'preparedness index', which is used to measure and report preparedness levels rather than risk levels.

  14. Development of the Nutrition and Swallowing Checklist, a Screening Tool for Nutrition Risk and Swallowing Risk in People with Intellectual Disability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Lyn

    2003-01-01

    This article discusses nutrition problems in people with intellectual disabilities, the need for nutrition risk screening, and the development of the Nutrition and Swallowing Checklist in New South Wales. The checklist ensures carer involvement in identifying risks and an interdisciplinary approach to the assessment and management of nutrition and…

  15. Nutritional Risk Needs Assessment of Community-Living Seniors: Prevalence of Nutrition Problems and Priorities for Action.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keller, Heather H.; Hedley, Margaret R.

    2002-01-01

    Surveyed community-dwelling older adults to examine the prevalence of nutritional risk, specific nutrition problems, and educational format preferences. Results revealed that nutrition problems and risk were prevalent among community-dwelling older adults. Common problems included significant weight change in 6 months and low intake of fruits,…

  16. Association between fat mass index and fat-free mass index values and cardiovascular risk in adolescents

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Patrícia Morais; da Silva, Fabiana Almeida; Oliveira, Renata Maria Souza; Mendes, Larissa Loures; Pereira, Michele; Cândido, Ana Paula Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To describe the association between fat mass index and fat-free mass index values and factors associated with cardiovascular risk in adolescents in the city of Juiz de Fora, Minas Gerais. Methods: Cross-sectional study was with 403 adolescents aged 10–14 years, from public and private schools. Anthropometric, clinical, and biochemical measurements were obtained, as well as self-reported time spent performing physical exercises, sedentary activities and sexual maturation stage. Results: Regarding the nutritional status, 66.5% of the adolescents had normal weight, 19.9% were overweight and 10.2% were obese. For both genders, the fat mass index was higher in adolescents who had high serum triglycerides, body mass index and waist circumference. Conclusions: Adolescents who had anthropometric, clinical and biochemical characteristics considered to be at risk for the development of cardiovascular disease had higher values of fat mass index. Different methodologies for the assessment of body composition make health promotion and disease prevention more effective. PMID:26542380

  17. Evidence Report: Risk Factor of Inadequate Nutrition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Scott M.; Zwart, Sara R.; Heer, Martina

    2015-01-01

    The importance of nutrition in exploration has been documented repeatedly throughout history, where, for example, in the period between Columbus' voyage in 1492 and the invention of the steam engine, scurvy resulted in more sailor deaths than all other causes of death combined. Because nutrients are required for the structure and function of every cell and every system in the body, defining the nutrient requirements for spaceflight and ensuring provision and intake of those nutrients are primary issues for crew health and mission success. Unique aspects of nutrition during space travel include the overarching physiological adaptation to weightlessness, psychological adaptation to extreme and remote environments, and the ability of nutrition and nutrients to serve as countermeasures to ameliorate the negative effects of spaceflight on the human body. Key areas of clinical concern for long-duration spaceflight include loss of body mass (general inadequate food intake), bone and muscle loss, cardiovascular and immune system decrements, increased radiation exposure and oxidative stress, vision and ophthalmic changes, behavior and performance, nutrient supply during extravehicular activity, and general depletion of body nutrient stores because of inadequate food supply, inadequate food intake, increased metabolism, and/or irreversible loss of nutrients. These topics are reviewed herein, based on the current gap structure.

  18. Nutritional risk and anthropometric evaluation in pediatric liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Zamberlan, Patrícia; Leone, Cláudio; Tannuri, Uenis; de Carvalho, Werther Brunow; Delgado, Artur Figueiredo

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To analyze the nutritional status of pediatric patients after orthotopic liver transplantation and the relationship with short-term clinical outcome. METHOD: Anthropometric evaluations of 60 children and adolescents after orthotopic liver transplantation, during the first 24 hours in a tertiary pediatric intensive care unit. Nutritional status was determined from the Z score for the following indices: weight/age, height/age or length/age, weight/height or weight/length, body mass index/age, arm circumference/age and triceps skinfold/age. The severity of liver disease was evaluated using one of the two models which was adequated to the patients' age: 1. Pediatric End-stage Liver Disease, 2. Model for End-Stage Liver Disease. RESULTS: We found 50.0% undernutrition by height/age; 27.3% by weight/age; 11.1% by weight/height or weight/length; 10.0% by body mass index/age; 61.6% by arm circumference/age and 51.0% by triceps skinfold/age. There was no correlation between nutritional status and Pediatric End-stage Liver Disease or mortality. We found a negative correlation between arm circumference/age and length of hospitalization. CONCLUSION: Children with chronic liver diseases experience a significant degree of undernutrition, which makes nutritional support an important aspect of therapy. Despite the difficulties in assessment, anthropometric evaluation of the upper limbs is useful to evaluate nutritional status of children before or after liver transplantation. PMID:23295591

  19. [Assessment of the nutritional status of Brazilian adolescents by body mass index].

    PubMed

    Sichieri, R; Allam, V L

    1996-01-01

    The assessment of nutritional status of adolescents is not an easy task because it should take into account sex, age, weight, stature and sexual maturation of the adolescents. In addition, an adequate classification should also be related to subsequent health-related outcomes during adult life. On the other side, screening for overweight and underweight among adolescents is highly desirable since nutritional status during adolescence correlates with adult body habitus. The objective of this study was to propose a classification for screening the nutritional status of Brazilian adolescents based on the body mass index (kg/m(2)) provided by the Pesquisa Nacional sobre Saúde e Nutrição-PNSN, a national survey of the Brazilian population carried out on 1989. We defined as cutoff the 10th and 90th percentile of the body mass index distribution and the 10th percentile for stature.

  20. Body Mass Index, Nutrient Intakes, Health Behaviours and Nutrition Knowledge: A Quantile Regression Application in Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Shih-Neng; Tseng, Jauling

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To assess various marginal effects of nutrient intakes, health behaviours and nutrition knowledge on the entire distribution of body mass index (BMI) across individuals. Design: Quantitative and distributional study. Setting: Taiwan. Methods: This study applies Becker's (1965) model of health production to construct an individual's BMI…

  1. Nutritional risk in allogeneic stem cell transplantation: rationale for a tailored nutritional pathway.

    PubMed

    Aoyama, Takashi; Imataki, Osamu; Mori, Keita; Yoshitsugu, Kanako; Fukaya, Masafumi; Okamura, Ikue; Enami, Terukazu; Tatara, Raine; Ikeda, Takashi

    2017-04-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation carries nutrition-related risks. Therefore, nutritional therapy needs to be initiated before transplantation even takes place. We assessed nutritional risk among patients who underwent allogeneic stem cell transplantation. We assessed nutrient supply (calorie supply and protein supply) by chart review. Assessments were made from the pretreatment phase of transplantation to after the end of parenteral nutrition in 51 patients who underwent allogeneic stem cell transplantation at Shizuoka Cancer Center between 2007 and 2012. We compared nutrition-related adverse events and parameters between two groups: those in whom % loss of body weight was ≥7.5 and those in whom % loss of body weight was <7.5. A correlation was observed between changes in weight and skeletal muscle mass (r = 0.89; P < 0.0001). A weak correlation was observed between % loss of body weight and nutrient supply of calories (r = 0.517; P = 0.0001). There were significant differences between the % loss of body weight ≥7.5 group and the % loss of body weight <7.5 group in the following variables: % loss of body weight, nutrient supply from calories and protein; orally ingested nutrient supply from calories and protein; start day of oral intake; and acute graft-versus-host disease. Orally ingested calories were negatively correlated with nutrition-related adverse events in both groups. Early and customized nutritional intervention may be optimal for all patients who undergo allogeneic stem cell transplantation to ameliorate body weight loss associated with nutrition-related adverse events.

  2. Mother's body mass index as a predictor of infant's nutritional status in the post-emergency phase of a flood.

    PubMed

    Goudet, Sophie; Griffths, Paula; Bogin, Barry A

    2011-10-01

    Maternal nutritional status is a determinant of child health. This paper studies the association between a mother's body mass index (BMI) and her infant's nutritional status over a one year time frame after the 1998 flood crisis in Bangladesh. The paper uses secondary analysis of data collected from 757 households in seven rural areas of Bangladesh affected by the 1998 flood using multiple-stage probability sampling techniques (n = 143). Logistic regression models were employed to investigate the predictive impact of maternal BMI on infant's nutritional status after controlling for a range of child and maternal factors. An underweight mother was a significant factor with regard to the risk of infants suffering stunting (odds ratio (OR) = 4.45, 95 per cent confidence interval (CI) = 1.04-18.94) and being underweight (OR = 3.51, 95 per cent CI = 1.02-12.05) a year later, but not wasting (OR = 2.09, 95 per cent CI = 0.51-8.67). The findings suggest that there is a post-emergency link between maternal and infant nutritional health.

  3. Nutritional Status and Tuberculosis Risk in Adult and Pediatric Household Contacts

    PubMed Central

    Acharya, Xeno; Huang, Chuan-Chin; Becerra, Mercedes C.; Galea, Jerome T.; Chiang, Silvia S.; Contreras, Carmen; Calderon, Roger; Yataco, Rosa; Velásquez, Gustavo E.; Tintaya, Karen; Jimenez, Judith; Lecca, Leonid; Murray, Megan B.

    2016-01-01

    Background Studies show obesity decreases risk of tuberculosis (TB) disease. There is limited evidence on whether high body mass index also protects against TB infection; how very high body mass indices influence TB risk; or whether nutritional status predicts this risk in children. We assessed the impact of body mass index on incident TB infection and disease among adults and children. Methods and Findings We conducted a prospective cohort study among household contacts of pulmonary TB cases in Lima, Peru. We determined body mass index at baseline and followed participants for one year for TB infection and disease. We used Cox proportional regression analyses to estimate hazard ratios for incident TB infection and disease. We enrolled 14,044 household contacts, and among 6853 negative for TB infection and disease at baseline, 1787 (26.1%) became infected. A total of 406 contacts developed secondary TB disease during follow-up. Body mass index did not predict risk of TB infection but overweight household contacts had significantly decreased risk of TB disease (HR 0.48; 95% CI 0.37–0.64; p <0.001) compared to those with normal weight. Among adults, body mass index ≥ 35 kg/m2 continued to predict a lower risk of TB disease (HR 0.30; 95% CI 0.12–0.74; p 0.009). We found no association between high body mass index and TB infection or disease among children under 12 years of age. Conclusions High body mass index protects adults against TB disease even at levels ≥ 35 kg/m2. This protective effect does not extend to TB infection and is not seen in children. PMID:27835678

  4. A nutritionally mediated risk effect of wolves on elk.

    PubMed

    Christianson, David; Creel, Scott

    2010-04-01

    Though it is widely argued that antipredator responses carry nutritional costs, or risk effects, these costs are rarely measured in wild populations. To quantify risk effects in elk, a species that strongly responds to the presence of wolves, we noninvasively monitored diet selection and nutrient balance in wintering elk in the Upper Gallatin, Montana, USA, over three winters while quantifying the local presence of wolves at a fine spatiotemporal scale. Standard nutritional indices based on the botanical and chemical composition of 786 fecal samples, 606 snow urine samples, and 224 forage samples showed that elk were generally malnourished throughout winter. Increased selection for dietary nitrogen within forage types (e.g., grasses) led to approximately 8% higher fecal nitrogen in the presence of wolves. However, urinary allantoin : creatinine and potassium : creatinine ratios decreased in the presence of wolves, suggesting large declines in energy intake, equal to 27% of maintenance requirements. Urinary nitrogen : creatinine ratios confirmed that deficiencies in nitrogen and/or energy were exacerbated in the presence of wolves, leading to increased endogenous protein catabolism. Overall, the nutritional effects of wolf presence may be of sufficient magnitude to reduce survival and reproduction in wintering elk. Nutritionally mediated risk effects may be important for understanding predator-prey dynamics in wild populations, but such effects could be masked as bottom-up forces if antipredator responses are not considered.

  5. Prenatal Nutritional Deficiency and Risk of Adult Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Alan S.; Susser, Ezra S.

    2008-01-01

    Converging evidence suggests that a neurodevelopmental disruption plays a role in the vulnerability to schizophrenia. The authors review evidence supporting in utero exposure to nutritional deficiency as a determinant of schizophrenia. We first describe studies demonstrating that early gestational exposure to the Dutch Hunger Winter of 1944–1945 and to a severe famine in China are each associated with an increased risk of schizophrenia in offspring. The plausibility of several candidate micronutrients as potential risk factors for schizophrenia and the biological mechanisms that may underlie these associations are then reviewed. These nutrients include folate, essential fatty acids, retinoids, vitamin D, and iron. Following this discussion, we describe the methodology and results of an epidemiologic study based on a large birth cohort that has tested the association between prenatal homocysteine, an indicator of serum folate, and schizophrenia risk. The study capitalized on the use of archived prenatal serum specimens that make it possible to obtain direct, prospective biomarkers of prenatal insults, including levels of various nutrients during pregnancy. Finally, we discuss several strategies for subjecting the prenatal nutritional hypothesis of schizophrenia to further testing. These approaches include direct assessment of additional prenatal nutritional biomarkers in relation to schizophrenia in large birth cohorts, studies of epigenetic effects of prenatal starvation, association studies of genes relevant to folate and other micronutrient deficiencies, and animal models. Given the relatively high prevalence of nutritional deficiencies during pregnancy, this work has the potential to offer substantial benefits for the prevention of schizophrenia in the population. PMID:18682377

  6. Nutrition and Gastric Cancer Risk: An Update

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Data from epidemiologic, experimental, and animal studies indicate that diet plays an important role in the etiology of gastric cancer. High intake of fresh fruit and vegetable, lycopene and lycopene-containing food products, and potentially vitamin C and selenium may reduce the risk for gastric can...

  7. The Significance of the Prognostic Nutritional Index in Patients with Completely Resected Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Shunsuke; Usami, Noriyasu; Fukumoto, Koichi; Mizuno, Tetsuya; Kuroda, Hiroaki; Sakakura, Noriaki; Yokoi, Kohei; Sakao, Yukinori

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Immunological parameters and nutritional status influence the outcome of patients with malignant tumors. A prognostic nutritional index, calculated using serum albumin levels and peripheral lymphocyte count, has been used to assess prognosis for various cancers. This study aimed to investigate whether this prognostic nutritional index affects overall survival and the incidence of postoperative complications in patients with completely resected non-small cell lung cancer. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 409 patients with non-small cell lung cancer who underwent complete resection between 2005 and 2007 at the Aichi Cancer Center. Results The 5-year survival rates of patients with high (≥50) and low (<50) prognostic nutritional indices were 84.4% and 70.7%, respectively (p = 0.0011). Univariate analysis showed that gender, histology, pathological stage, smoking history, serum carcinoembryonic antigen levels, and prognostic nutritional index were significant prognostic factors. Multivariate analysis identified pathological stage and the prognostic nutritional index as independent prognostic factors. The frequency of postoperative complications tended to be higher in patients with a low prognostic nutritional index. Conclusions The prognostic nutritional index is an independent prognostic factor for survival of patients with completely resected non-small cell lung cancer. PMID:26356222

  8. Relationship between nutritional risk and exercise capacity in severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in male patients

    PubMed Central

    Shan, Xizheng; Liu, Jinming; Luo, Yanrong; Xu, Xiaowen; Han, Zhiqing; Li, Hailing

    2015-01-01

    Objective The nutritional status of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients is associated with their exercise capacity. In the present study, we have explored the relationship between nutritional risk and exercise capacity in severe male COPD patients. Methods A total of 58 severe COPD male patients were enrolled in this study. The patients were assigned to no nutritional risk group (n=33) and nutritional risk group (n=25) according to the Nutritional Risk Screening (NRS, 2002) criteria. Blood gas analysis, conventional pulmonary function testing, and cardiopulmonary exercise testing were performed on all the patients. Results Results showed that the weight and BMI of the patients in the nutritional risk group were significantly lower than in the no nutritional risk group (P<0.05). The pulmonary diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide of the no nutritional risk group was significantly higher than that of the nutritional risk group (P<0.05). Besides, the peak VO2 (peak oxygen uptake), peak O2 pulse (peak oxygen pulse), and peak load of the nutritional risk group were significantly lower than those of the no nutritional risk group (P<0.05) and there were significantly negative correlations between the NRS score and peak VO2, peak O2 pulse, or peak load (r<0, P<0.05). Conclusion The association between exercise capacity and nutritional risk based on NRS 2002 in severe COPD male patients is supported by these results of this study. PMID:26150712

  9. Syncrude`s fire hazard index priorities risks

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, B.

    1997-05-01

    To quantify fire hazard risks within large production facilities and help establish priorities for additional fire controls, Syncrude Canada Ltd. created a fire hazard index, to identify high-priority risks. The fire hazard index scoring system assigns a number score to each facility or work area. The numerical score represents the composite fire risk associated with the area of concern. The resulting scores are used as a comparative tool to determine which fire risks receive top priority for additional controls and fire inspections/surveys. Unlike other fire hazard indices, the Syncrude index can be used for all facilities regardless of whether they handle flammable material. As a result, the potential fire hazard associated with vehicles, shops, offices, computer rooms, and mechanical equipment can be assessed. 1 ref., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  10. An Anthropometric Risk Index Based on Combining Height, Weight, Waist, and Hip Measurements

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Body mass index (BMI) can be considered an application of a power law model to express body weight independently of height. Based on the same power law principle, we previously introduced a body shape index (ABSI) to be independent of BMI and height. Here, we develop a new hip index (HI) whose normalized value is independent of height, BMI, and ABSI. Similar to BMI, HI demonstrates a U-shaped relationship to mortality in the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES III) population. We further develop a new anthropometric risk index (ARI) by adding log hazard ratios from separate nonlinear regressions of the four indicators, height, BMI, ABSI, and HI, against NHANES III mortality hazard. ARI far outperforms any of the individual indicators as a linear mortality predictor in NHANES III. The superior performance of ARI also holds for predicting mortality hazard in the independent Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) cohort. Thus, HI, along with BMI and ABSI, can capture the risk profile associated with body size and shape. These can be combined in a risk indicator that utilizes complementary information from height, weight, and waist and hip circumference. The combined ARI is promising for further research and clinical applications. PMID:27830087

  11. Risk assessment of genetically modified crops for nutrition and health.

    PubMed

    Magaña-Gómez, Javier A; de la Barca, Ana M Calderón

    2009-01-01

    The risk assessment of genetically modified (GM) crops for human nutrition and health has not been systematic. Evaluations for each GM crop or trait have been conducted using different feeding periods, animal models, and parameters. The most common result is that GM and conventional sources induce similar nutritional performance and growth in animals. However, adverse microscopic and molecular effects of some GM foods in different organs or tissues have been reported. Diversity among the methods and results of the risk assessments reflects the complexity of the subject. While there are currently no standardized methods to evaluate the safety of GM foods, attempts towards harmonization are on the way. More scientific effort is necessary in order to build confidence in the evaluation and acceptance of GM foods.

  12. Preoperative prognostic nutritional index predicts postoperative surgical site infections in gastrointestinal fistula patients undergoing bowel resections

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Qiongyuan; Wang, Gefei; Ren, Jianan; Ren, Huajian; Li, Guanwei; Wu, Xiuwen; Gu, Guosheng; Li, Ranran; Guo, Kun; Deng, Youming; Li, Yuan; Hong, Zhiwu; Wu, Lei; Li, Jieshou

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Recent studies have implied a prognostic value of the prognostic nutritional index (PNI) in postoperative septic complications of elective colorectal surgeries. However, the evaluation of PNI in contaminated surgeries for gastrointestinal (GI) fistula patients is lack of investigation. The purpose of this study was to explore the predictive value of PNI in surgical site infections (SSIs) for GI fistula patients undergoing bowel resections. A retrospective review of 290 GI patients who underwent intestinal resections between November 2012 and October 2015 was performed. Univariate and multivariate analyses were conducted to identify risk factors for SSIs, and receiver operating characteristic cure was used to quantify the effectiveness of PNI. SSIs were diagnosed in 99 (34.1%) patients, with incisional infection identified in 54 patients (18.6%), deep incisional infection in 13 (4.5%), and organ/space infection in 32 (11.0%). receiver operating characteristic curve analysis defined a PNI cut-off level of 45 corresponding to postoperative SSIs (area under the curve [AUC] = 0.72, 76% sensitivity, 55% specificity). Furthermore, a multivariate analysis indicated that the PNI < 45 [odd ratio (OR): 2.24, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.09–4.61, P = 0.029] and leukocytosis (OR: 3.70, 95% CI: 1.02–13.42, P = 0.046) were independently associated with postoperative SSIs. Preoperative PNI is a simple and useful marker to predict SSIs in GI fistula patients after enterectomies. Measurement of PNI is therefore recommended in the routine assessment of patients with GI fistula receiving surgical treatment. PMID:27399098

  13. [Food and nutritional security in a risk area for malaria].

    PubMed

    Guzmán, Valentina; Correa, Adriana María; Carmona-Fonseca, Jaime; Blair, Silvia

    2003-09-01

    To explore some relationships between alimentary and nutritional security (SAN) and nutritional status in an endemic malaria community, applying qualitative and quantitative methods simultaneously. The study was descriptive and prospective. The population were all farming Afro-American families who live in the basin of the river Valle (Bahía Solano. Chocó, Colombia) that derived the base of their feeding of the agriculture. The SAN was measured from the monthly availability of foods and was classified in adequate and inadequate according to the available monthly caloric balance percentage. We determined the risk of acute malnutrition (indicative P/T), chronic (T/E), global (P/E) and risk of thinness (BMI). We sought for malarian cases. The official data of illness were revised. We applied surveys to know the morbidity and knowledge, attitudes and practices in malaria infections, 29% of homes had alimentary insecurity. There was protein deficit and iron of high availability, calcium and vitamin A in 100% of families. In children under 6 years old, we found 31% and 69%, in same order, with low P/T and T/E, while in the 6-10 year old children had 14% and 41%, respectively. In adolescents (11 to 17 years old) the risk of thinness was 15% and in adults 3%. There was not association between alimentary available and family nutritional status. These results suggest subclinics deficiencies of micronutrients.

  14. Developing a risk-based air quality health index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Tze Wai; Tam, Wilson Wai San; Yu, Ignatius Tak Sun; Lau, Alexis Kai Hon; Pang, Sik Wing; Wong, Andromeda H. S.

    2013-09-01

    We developed a risk-based, multi-pollutant air quality health index (AQHI) reporting system in Hong Kong, based on the Canadian approach. We performed time series studies to obtain the relative risks of hospital admissions for respiratory and cardiovascular diseases associated with four air pollutants: sulphur dioxide, nitrogen dioxide, ozone, and particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter less than 10 μm (PM10). We then calculated the sum of excess risks of the hospital admissions associated with these air pollutants. The cut-off points of the summed excess risk, for the issuance of different health warnings, were based on the concentrations of these pollutants recommended as short-term Air Quality Guidelines by the World Health Organization. The excess risks were adjusted downwards for young children and the elderly. Health risk was grouped into five categories and sub-divided into eleven bands, with equal increments in excess risk from band 1 up to band 10 (the 11th band is 'band 10+'). We developed health warning messages for the general public, including at-risk groups: young children, the elderly, and people with pre-existing cardiac or respiratory diseases. The new system addressed two major shortcomings of the current standard-based system; namely, the time lag between a sudden rise in air pollutant concentrations and the issue of a health warning, and the reliance on one dominant pollutant to calculate the index. Hence, the AQHI represents an improvement over Hong Kong's existing air pollution index.

  15. Platelet activation risk index as a prognostic thrombosis indicator

    PubMed Central

    Zlobina, K. E.; Guria, G. Th.

    2016-01-01

    Platelet activation in blood flow under high, overcritical shear rates is initiated by Von Willebrand factor. Despite the large amount of experimental data that have been obtained, the value of the critical shear rate, above which von Willebrand factor starts to activate platelets, is still controversial. Here, we recommend a theoretical approach to elucidate how the critical blood shear rate is dependent on von Willebrand factor size. We derived a diagram of platelet activation according to the shear rate and von Willebrand factor multimer size. We succeeded in deriving an explicit formula for the dependence of the critical shear rate on von Willebrand factor molecule size. The platelet activation risk index was introduced. This index is dependent on the flow conditions, number of monomers in von Willebrand factor, and platelet sensitivity. Probable medical applications of the platelet activation risk index as a universal prognostic index are discussed. PMID:27461235

  16. Healthy lifestyle index and risk of gastric adenocarcinoma in the EPIC cohort study.

    PubMed

    Buckland, G; Travier, N; Huerta, J M; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B As; Siersema, P D; Skeie, G; Weiderpass, E; Engeset, D; Ericson, U; Ohlsson, B; Agudo, A; Romieu, I; Ferrari, P; Freisling, H; Colorado-Yohar, S; Li, K; Kaaks, R; Pala, V; Cross, A J; Riboli, E; Trichopoulou, A; Lagiou, P; Bamia, C; Boutron-Ruault, M C; Fagherazzi, G; Dartois, L; May, A M; Peeters, P H; Panico, S; Johansson, M; Wallner, B; Palli, D; Key, T J; Khaw, K T; Ardanaz, E; Overvad, K; Tjønneland, A; Dorronsoro, M; Sánchez, M J; Quirós, J R; Naccarati, A; Tumino, R; Boeing, H; Gonzalez, C A

    2015-08-01

    Several modifiable lifestyle factors, including smoking, alcohol, certain dietary factors and weight are independently associated with gastric cancer (GC); however, their combined impact on GC risk is unknown. We constructed a healthy lifestyle index to investigate the joint influence of these behaviors on GC risk within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort. The analysis included 461,550 participants (662 first incident GC cases) with a mean follow-up of 11.4 years. A healthy lifestyle index was constructed, assigning 1 point for each healthy behavior related to smoking status, alcohol consumption and diet quality (represented by the Mediterranean diet) for assessing overall GC and also body mass index for cardia GC and 0 points otherwise. Risk of GC was calculated using Cox proportional hazards regression models while adjusting for relevant confounders. The highest versus lowest score in the healthy lifestyle index was associated with a significant lower risk of GC, by 51% overall (HR 0.49 95% CI 0.35, 0.70), by 77% for cardia GC (HR 0.23 95% CI 0.08, 0.68) and by 47% for noncardia GC (HR 0.53 (95% CI 0.32, 0.87), p-trends<0.001. Population attributable risk calculations showed that 18.8% of all GC and 62.4% of cardia GC cases could have been prevented if participants in this population had followed the healthy lifestyle behaviors of this index. Adopting several healthy lifestyle behaviors including not smoking, limiting alcohol consumption, eating a healthy diet and maintaining a normal weight is associated with a large decreased risk of GC.

  17. Socio-Cognitive and Nutritional Factors Associated with Body Mass Index in Children and Adolescents: Possibilities for Childhood Obesity Prevention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Dea, Jennifer A.; Wilson, Rachel

    2006-01-01

    A large national study of schoolchildren aged 6-18 years was conducted to assess nutritional and socio-cognitive factors associated with body mass index (BMI). A questionnaire was used to assess nutritional quality of breakfast, importance of physical activity and food variety score, among 4441 students from randomly selected schools in all states…

  18. Nutritional screening in surgical patients of a teaching hospital from Southern Brazil: the impact of nutritional risk in clinical outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Rosane Scussel; Tavares, Léa Regina da Cunha; Pastore, Carla Alberici

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To assess the prevalence of nutritional risk in surgical patients of a teaching hospital and its associated factors. Methods: A cross-sectional study with secondary data of surgical ward patients of the Hospital Escola da Universidade Federal de Pelotas, from April to October, 2010. Patients were evaluated up to 36 hours after admission using the Malnutrition Screening Tool. Results: The study included 565 patients, with a mean age of 52.8±15.6 years, and the majority (51%) was female. More than 30% of the patients presented with an average or high nutritional risk, and 7% of them were at high risk. Associated with the greater risk were aging, cancer surgery, and mortality. The length of hospital stay showed a linear increase according to nutritional risk. Conclusion: The Malnutrition Screening Tool is a simple and effective tool for nutritional screening that does not require anthropometric measurements. In this study, average or high nutritional risk was prevalent in one third of the sample, and was related to increased mortality, hospital stay, cancer, and aging. Nutritional care outpatients’ protocols could be used prior to elective surgery to reduce the nutritional risk of these patients, improving clinical outcomes and reducing length and costs of hospital stay. PMID:23843052

  19. Use of body mass index of adults in assessing individual and community nutritional status.

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, K. V.; Ferro-Luzzi, A.

    1995-01-01

    Adult malnutrition is much more widespread than is commonly recognized. Described in this article is the use of body mass index (BMI = weight in kg/(height in metres)2) as a measure of adult nutritional status, both of individuals and of communities. Concurrent assessment of the nutritional status of children and adults permits conclusions to be drawn about whether there is generalized undernutrition in a community or whether other factors (e.g., childhood infections or feeding practices) are more important in childhood malnutrition. Included is a tabular presentation that permits rapid assessment of both thinness or underweight (BMI values < 16, 17 and 18.5) and overweight (BMI > 25, 30 and 40). Examples of the use of BMI in both clinical and public health practice are also given. PMID:8846494

  20. Methods to evaluate the nutrition risk in hospitalized patients

    PubMed Central

    Erkan, Tülay

    2014-01-01

    The rate of malnutrition is substantially high both in the population and in chronic patients hospitalized because of different reasons. The rate of patients with no marked malnutrition at the time of hospitalization who develop malnutrition during hospitalization is also substantially high. Therefore, there are currently different screening methods with different targets to prevent malnutrition and its overlook. These methods should be simple and reliable and should not be time-consuming in order to be used in daily practice. Seven nutrition risk screening methods used in children have been established until the present time. However, no consensus has been made on any method as in adults. It should be accepted that interrogation of nutrition is a part of normal examination to increase awareness on this issue and to draw attention to this issue. PMID:26078678

  1. 2013 Nutrition Risk Research Plan Review Final Report. Research Plan Review for: The Risk Factor of Inadequate Nutrition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2014-01-01

    The 2013 Nutrition Risk Standing Review Panel (from here on referred to as the SRP) was impressed by the degree of progress the nutrition discipline has made with the research plan presented since the 2012 Nutrition Risk SRP WebEx/teleconference. The scientists and staff associated with the nutrition discipline have, in addition, continued their impressive publication track record. Specifically the SRP found that the novel and important progress in the ocular health research area (Gap N7.3) represents an important advance in understanding the etiology and potential countermeasures for this condition and thinks that the work will not only be valuable for vision, but may have implications for cardiovascular health, as well. The SRP also considered the bone countermeasure data presented a potentially valuable tool for investigating bone metabolism under the unique conditions of space travel, specifically the innovation of variable use of stable Ca isotopes for bone synthesis and equal contribution for bone to investigate bone metabolism, as well as, the impact of the advanced resistive exercise device (ARED) on body composition during spaceflight. Finally, the SRP considers the planned Integrated Nutrition task to be an important and necessary strategic part of the research plan. The SRP is concerned that the risks observed in previous research on Low Earth Orbit (LEO) may not capture all the risks of longer duration flight beyond LEO. In particular, the SRP believes that there may be a much greater likelihood of an intensified chronic inflammatory response compared to the very minimal evidence seen to date and that modest effects seen in LEO, such as the reduction in appetite, may not predict an absence in longer duration flight out of LEO. The added complications of longer duration flight, greater bio-behavioral stress, radiation exposure, poorer communication, and inability to respond to unforeseen exigencies may create different risks. Thus, preparation for

  2. Nutritional risk factors for tuberculosis among adults in the United States, 1971-1992.

    PubMed

    Cegielski, J Peter; Arab, Lenore; Cornoni-Huntley, Joan

    2012-09-01

    The risk of developing tuberculosis (TB) may be related to nutritional status. To determine the impact of nutritional status on TB incidence, the authors analyzed data from the First National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES I) Epidemiologic Follow-up Study (NHEFS). NHANES I collected information on a probability sample of the US population in 1971-1975. Adults were followed up in 1982-1992. Incident TB cases were ascertained through interviews, medical records, and death certificates. TB incidences were compared across different levels of nutritional status after controlling for potential confounding using proportional hazards regression appropriate to the complex sample design. TB incidence among adults with normal body mass index was 24.7 per 100,000 person-years (95% confidence interval (CI): 13.0, 36.3). In contrast, among persons who were underweight, overweight, and obese, estimated TB incidence rates were 260.2 (95% CI: 98.6, 421.8), 8.9 (95% CI: 2.2, 15.6), and 5.1 (95% CI: 0.0, 10.5) per 100,000 person-years, respectively. Adjusted hazard ratios were 12.43 (95% CI: 5.75, 26.95), 0.28 (95% CI: 0.13, 0.63), and 0.20 (95% CI: 0.07, 0.62), respectively, after controlling for demographic, socioeconomic, and medical characteristics. A low serum albumin level also increased the risk of TB, but low vitamin A, thiamine, riboflavin, and iron status did not. A population's nutritional profile is an important determinant of its TB incidence.

  3. Clinical Significance of the Prognostic Nutritional Index for Predicting Short- and Long-Term Surgical Outcomes After Gastrectomy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jee Youn; Kim, Hyoung-Il; Kim, You-Na; Hong, Jung Hwa; Alshomimi, Saeed; An, Ji Yeong; Cheong, Jae-Ho; Hyung, Woo Jin; Noh, Sung Hoon; Kim, Choong-Bai

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To evaluate the predictive and prognostic significance of the prognostic nutritional index (PNI) in a large cohort of gastric cancer patients who underwent gastrectomy. Assessing a patient's immune and nutritional status, PNI has been reported as a predictive marker for surgical outcomes in various types of cancer. We retrospectively reviewed data from a prospectively maintained database of 7781 gastric cancer patients who underwent gastrectomy from January 2001 to December 2010 at a single center. From this data, we analyzed clinicopathologic characteristics, PNI, and short- and long-term surgical outcomes for each patient. We used the PNI value for the 10th percentile (46.70) of the study cohort as a cut-off for dividing patients into low and high PNI groups. Regarding short-term outcomes, multivariate analysis showed a low PNI (odds ratio [OR] = 1.505, 95% CI = 1.212–1.869, P <0.001), old age, male sex, high body mass index, medical comorbidity, total gastrectomy, and combined resection to be independent predictors of postoperative complications. Among these, only low PNI (OR = 4.279, 95% CI = 1.760–10.404, P = 0.001) and medical comorbidity were independent predictors of postoperative mortality. For long-term outcomes, low PNI was a poor prognostic factor for overall survival, but not recurrence (overall survival: hazard ratio [HR] = 1.383, 95% CI = 1.221–1.568, P < 0.001; recurrence-free survival: HR = 1.142, 95% CI = 0.985–1.325, P = 0.078). PNI can be used to predict patients at increased risk of postoperative morbidity and mortality. Although PNI was an independent prognostic factor for overall survival, the index was not associated with cancer recurrence. PMID:27149460

  4. Increasing Risk Awareness: The Coastal Community Resilience Index

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Jody A.; Sempier, Tracie; Swann, LaDon

    2012-01-01

    As the number of people moving to the Gulf Coast increases, so does the risk of exposure to floods, hurricanes, and other storm-related events. In an effort to assist communities in preparing for future storm events, the Coastal Community Resilience Index was created. The end result is for communities to take actions to address the weaknesses they…

  5. Solemnity: A Clinical Risk Index for Iron Deficient Infants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Honig, Alice Sterling; Oski, Frank A.

    1984-01-01

    Studies four groups of infants with iron deficiency but without anemia in an attempt to discover behavioral signs that can be used to index high-risk probability for iron deficiency. Solemnity in well-attached infants is suggested as a clinical sign to indicate the need for biochemical screening for iron deficiency. (AS)

  6. Novel Threat-risk Index Using Probabilistic Risk Assessment and Human Reliability Analysis - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    George A. Beitel

    2004-02-01

    In support of a national need to improve the current state-of-the-art in alerting decision makers to the risk of terrorist attack, a quantitative approach employing scientific and engineering concepts to develop a threat-risk index was undertaken at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). As a result of this effort, a set of models has been successfully integrated into a single comprehensive model known as Quantitative Threat-Risk Index Model (QTRIM), with the capability of computing a quantitative threat-risk index on a system level, as well as for the major components of the system. Such a threat-risk index could provide a quantitative variant or basis for either prioritizing security upgrades or updating the current qualitative national color-coded terrorist threat alert.

  7. The Prognostic Nutritional Index Predicts Survival and Identifies Aggressiveness of Gastric Cancer.

    PubMed

    Eo, Wan Kyu; Chang, Hye Jung; Suh, Jungho; Ahn, Jin; Shin, Jeong; Hur, Joon-Young; Kim, Gou Young; Lee, Sookyung; Park, Sora; Lee, Sanghun

    2015-01-01

    Nutritional status has been associated with long-term outcomes in cancer patients. The prognostic nutritional index (PNI) is calculated by serum albumin concentration and absolute lymphocyte count, and it may be a surrogate biomarker for nutritional status and possibly predicts overall survival (OS) of gastric cancer. We evaluated the value of the PNI as a predictor for disease-free survival (DFS) in addition to OS in a cohort of 314 gastric cancer patients who underwent curative surgical resection. There were 77 patients in PNI-low group (PNI ≤ 47.3) and 237 patients in PNI-high group (PNI > 47.3). With a median follow-up of 36.5 mo, 5-yr DFS rates in PNI-low group and PNI-high group were 63.5% and 83.6% and 5-yr OS rates in PNI-low group and PNI-high group were 63.5% and 88.4%, respectively (DFS, P < 0.0001; OS, P < 0.0001). In the multivariate analysis, the only predictors for DFS were PNI, tumor-node-metastasis (TNM) stage, and perineural invasion, whereas the only predictors for OS were PNI, age, TNM stage, and perineural invasion. In addition, the PNI was independent of various inflammatory markers. In conclusion, the PNI is an independent prognostic factor for both DFS and OS, and provides additional prognostic information beyond pathologic parameters.

  8. Elevated Plasma Vitamin B12 Concentrations Are Independent Predictors of In-Hospital Mortality in Adult Patients at Nutritional Risk.

    PubMed

    Cappello, Silvia; Cereda, Emanuele; Rondanelli, Mariangela; Klersy, Catherine; Cameletti, Barbara; Albertini, Riccardo; Magno, Daniela; Caraccia, Marilisa; Turri, Annalisa; Caccialanza, Riccardo

    2016-12-23

    Background: Elevated plasma vitamin B12 concentrations were identified as predictors of mortality in patients with oncologic, hepatic and renal diseases, and in elderly and critically ill medical patients. The association between vitamin B12 concentrations and in-hospital mortality in adult patients at nutritional risk has not been assessed. Methods: In this five-year prospective study, we investigated whether high vitamin B12 concentrations (>1000 pg/mL) are associated with in-hospital mortality in 1373 not-bed-ridden adult patients at nutritional risk (Nutrition Risk Index <97.5), admitted to medical and surgical departments. Results: Three hundred and ninety-six (28.8%) patients presented vitamin B12 > 1000 pg/mL. Two hundred and four patients died in the hospital (14.9%). The adjusted odds ratio of in-hospital mortality in patients with high vitamin B12 was 2.20 (95% CI, 1.56-3.08; p < 0.001); it was independent of age, gender, body mass index, six-month previous unintentional weight loss, admission ward, presence of malignancy, renal function, C-reactive protein and prealbumin. Patients with high vitamin B12 also had a longer length of stay (LOS) than those with normal concentrations (median 25 days, (IQR 15-41) versus 23 days (IQR 14-36); p = 0.014), and elevated vitamin B12 was an independent predictor of LOS (p = 0.027). Conclusions: An independent association between elevated vitamin B12 concentrations, mortality and LOS was found in our sample of hospitalized adult patients at nutritional risk. Although the underlying mechanisms are still unknown and any cause-effect relation cannot be inferred, clinicians should be aware of the potential negative impact of high vitamin B12 concentrations in hospitalized patients at nutritional risk and avoid inappropriate vitamin supplementation.

  9. Elevated Plasma Vitamin B12 Concentrations Are Independent Predictors of In-Hospital Mortality in Adult Patients at Nutritional Risk

    PubMed Central

    Cappello, Silvia; Cereda, Emanuele; Rondanelli, Mariangela; Klersy, Catherine; Cameletti, Barbara; Albertini, Riccardo; Magno, Daniela; Caraccia, Marilisa; Turri, Annalisa; Caccialanza, Riccardo

    2016-01-01

    Background: Elevated plasma vitamin B12 concentrations were identified as predictors of mortality in patients with oncologic, hepatic and renal diseases, and in elderly and critically ill medical patients. The association between vitamin B12 concentrations and in-hospital mortality in adult patients at nutritional risk has not been assessed. Methods: In this five-year prospective study, we investigated whether high vitamin B12 concentrations (>1000 pg/mL) are associated with in-hospital mortality in 1373 not-bed-ridden adult patients at nutritional risk (Nutrition Risk Index <97.5), admitted to medical and surgical departments. Results: Three hundred and ninety-six (28.8%) patients presented vitamin B12 > 1000 pg/mL. Two hundred and four patients died in the hospital (14.9%). The adjusted odds ratio of in-hospital mortality in patients with high vitamin B12 was 2.20 (95% CI, 1.56–3.08; p < 0.001); it was independent of age, gender, body mass index, six-month previous unintentional weight loss, admission ward, presence of malignancy, renal function, C-reactive protein and prealbumin. Patients with high vitamin B12 also had a longer length of stay (LOS) than those with normal concentrations (median 25 days, (IQR 15–41) versus 23 days (IQR 14–36); p = 0.014), and elevated vitamin B12 was an independent predictor of LOS (p = 0.027). Conclusions: An independent association between elevated vitamin B12 concentrations, mortality and LOS was found in our sample of hospitalized adult patients at nutritional risk. Although the underlying mechanisms are still unknown and any cause-effect relation cannot be inferred, clinicians should be aware of the potential negative impact of high vitamin B12 concentrations in hospitalized patients at nutritional risk and avoid inappropriate vitamin supplementation. PMID:28025528

  10. Mini-Nutritional-Assessment (MNA) without body mass index (BMI) predicts functional disability in elderly Taiwanese.

    PubMed

    Lee, Li-Chin; Tsai, Alan Chung-hong

    2012-01-01

    Nutritional status and functional ability are mutually dependent especially in the elderly. This study examined the functional status-predictive ability of the MNA in a cross-sectional study. We analyzed the dataset of the "Survey of Health and Living Status of the Elderly in Taiwan" (SHLSET). Subjects were 2948≥65 year-old persons who were rated with the long-form (LF) and short-form (SF) MNA with or without BMI for the risk of malnutrition, and with the Activities of Daily Living (ADL) and the Instrument Activities of Daily Living (IADL) for functional status. The ADL and IADL scores were calculated according to rated nutritional status. Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curves were generated for ADL and IADL status predicted by the MNA. Logistic regression was performed to evaluate the association of rated MNA scores with ADL or IADL status. Results showed that both SF and LF of MNA-T1 and T2 were able to predict ADL and IADL disabilities. Those who were rated malnourished or at risk of malnutrition had drastically higher risk of ADL or IADL dependency compared to those who were rated normal. The SF versions performed well in rating nutritional status and predicting ADL and IADL status. Overall, MNA-T2-SF performed at least equally well as MNA-T1-SF in rating functional decline. These results suggest the MNA is able to predict functional decline of the elderly. MNA-T2, especially the SF, a version without BMI should be particularly useful in clinical, long-term care and community settings.

  11. The Social Environment of Schools and Adolescent Nutrition: Associations between the School Nutrition Climate and Adolescents' Eating Behaviors and Body Mass Index

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cvjetan, Branko; Utter, Jennifer; Robinson, Elizabeth; Denny, Simon

    2014-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to determine the association between the school nutrition climate and students' eating behaviors and body mass index (BMI). Methods: Data were collected as part of Youth'07, a nationally representative health survey of high school students in New Zealand. Overall, 9107 randomly selected students from 96…

  12. Low-, medium- and high-glycaemic index carbohydrates and risk of type 2 diabetes in men.

    PubMed

    Similä, Minna E; Valsta, Liisa M; Kontto, Jukka P; Albanes, Demetrius; Virtamo, Jarmo

    2011-04-01

    Findings on dietary glycaemic index (GI) and glycaemic load (GL) as risk factors for type 2 diabetes have been controversial. We examined the associations of dietary GI and GL and the associations of substitution of lower-GI carbohydrates for higher-GI carbohydrates with diabetes risk in a cohort of Finnish men. The cohort consisted of 25 943 male smokers aged 50-69 years. Diet was assessed, at baseline, using a validated diet history questionnaire. During a 12-year follow-up, 1098 incident diabetes cases were identified from a national register. Cox proportional hazard modelling was used to estimate the risk of diabetes, and multivariate nutrient density models were used to examine the effects of substitution of different carbohydrates. Dietary GI and GL were not associated with diabetes risk; multivariate relative risk (RR) for highest v. lowest quintile for GI was 0·87 (95 % CI 0·71, 1·07) and for GL 0·88 (95 % CI 0·65, 1·17). Substitution of medium-GI carbohydrates for high-GI carbohydrates was inversely associated with diabetes risk (multivariate RR for highest v. lowest quintile 0·75, 95 % CI 0·59, 0·96), but substitution of low-GI carbohydrates for medium- or high-GI carbohydrates was not associated with the risk. In conclusion, dietary GI and GL were not associated with diabetes risk, and substitutions of lower-GI carbohydrates for higher-GI carbohydrates were not consistently associated with a lower diabetes risk. The associations of dietary GI and GL with diabetes risk should be interpreted by considering nutritional correlates, as foods may have different properties that affect risk.

  13. Carbohydrate intake, glycemic index and prostate cancer risk

    PubMed Central

    Vidal, Adriana C.; Williams, Christina D.; Allott, Emma H.; Howard, Lauren E.; Grant, Delores J.; McPhail, Megan; Sourbeer, Katharine N.; Pao-Hwa, Lin; Boffetta, Paolo; Hoyo, Cathrine; Freedland, Stephen J.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Reported associations between dietary carbohydrate and prostate cancer (PC) risk are poorly characterized by race. METHODS We analyzed the association between carbohydrate intake, glycemic index (GI), and PC risk in a study of white (N=262) and black (N=168) veterans at the Durham VA Hospital. Cases were 156 men with biopsy-confirmed PC and controls (N=274) had a PSA test but were not recommended for biopsy. Diet was assessed before biopsy with a self-administered food frequency questionnaire. Logistic regression models were used to estimate PC risk. RESULTS In multivariable analyses, higher carbohydrate intake, measured as percent of energy from carbohydrates, was associated with reduced PC risk (3rd vs. 1st tertile, OR=0.41, 95%CI 0.21–0.81, p=0.010), though this only reached significance in white men (p-trend=0.029). GI was unrelated to PC risk among all men, but suggestively linked with reduced PC risk in white men (p-trend=0.066) and increased PC risk in black men (p-trend=0.172), however the associations were not significant. Fiber intake was not associated with PC risk (all p-trends >0.55). Higher carbohydrate intake was associated with reduced risk of high-grade (p-trend=0.016), but not low-grade PC (p-trend=0.593). CONCLUSIONS Higher carbohydrate intake may be associated with reduced risk of overall and high-grade PC. Future larger studies are needed to confirm these findings. PMID:25417840

  14. A Computerized Risk Index Screening Program for At-Risk Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stowitschek, Joseph J.; And Others

    This paper describes a data-based screening tool for identifying at-risk students. It is intended to complement referral and other qualitative means of identification. The Computerized Risk Index Screening Program (CRISP) is an application of a commonly available data management program that: (1) provides a school-based screening system; (2) can…

  15. Dietary intake, physical activity, body mass index, and childhood asthma in the Third National Health And Nutrition Survey (NHANES III).

    PubMed

    Romieu, Isabelle; Mannino, David M; Redd, Stephen C; McGeehin, Michael A

    2004-07-01

    Childhood asthma may be affected by dietary changes and increased body mass related to a sedentary lifestyle, although the mechanisms are poorly understood. To test this hypothesis, we used data from the National Health and Nutrition Survey (NHANES III) from 1988-1994, including 7,904 children. We analyzed cross-sectional information on body mass index (BMI = weight/height2), physical activity (hr/day viewing television), dietary intake (24-hr recall), and vitamin C intake (60 mg/day). The probability of self-reported asthma or wheezing relating to risk factors was calculated by logistic regression. After controlling for dietary intake, physical activity, and sociodemographic variables, asthma risk was three times higher for children aged 6-16 years in the highest percentiles of BMI (>95th percentile) when compared to children in percentiles 25-49 (OR = 3.44; 95% CI, 1.49-7.96). No increase was observed in children aged 2-5 years. Low vitamin C intake was marginally related to self-reported current wheezing in children aged 6-16 years. Our results show that increased BMI may influence asthma prevalence in children, but further investigation is needed.

  16. Prognostic nutritional index as a prognostic biomarker for survival in digestive system carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yang; Xu, Peng; Kang, Huafeng; Lin, Shuai; Wang, Meng; Yang, Pengtao; Dai, Cong; Liu, Xinghan; Liu, Kang; Zheng, Yi; Dai, Zhijun

    2016-01-01

    The prognostic nutritional index (PNI) has been reported to correlate with the prognosis in patients with various malignancies. We performed a meta-analysis to determine the predictive potential of PNI in digestive system cancers. Twenty-three studies with a total of 7,384 patients suffering from digestive system carcinomas were involved in this meta-analysis. A lower PNI was significantly associated with the shorter overall survival (OS) [Hazard Ratio (HR) 1.83, 95% Confidence Interval (CI) 1.62–2.07], the poorer disease-free survival (DFS) (HR 1.85, 95% CI 1.19–2.89), and the higher rate of post-operative complications (HR 2.31, 95% CI 1.63–3.28). In conclusion, PNI was allowed to function as an efficient indicator for the prognosis of patients with digestive system carcinomas. PMID:27888808

  17. Parent, but not teacher, weight bias correlates with nutritional risk in preschool children

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Maladaptive eating behaviors have been reported among youth who report experiencing weight bias, so it is important to study whether nutritional risk and zBMI of young children correlate with weight biases held by caregivers. A previous analysis of these data showed that nutritional risk...

  18. The Significance of the Prognostic Nutritional Index for All Stages of Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Hoon; Chung, Moon Jae; Kim, Bun; Lee, Hee Seung; Lee, Hyun Jik; Heo, Ja Yoon; Kim, Yeong Jin; Park, Jeong Youp; Bang, Seungmin; Park, Seung Woo; Song, Si Young; Chung, Jae Bock

    2017-04-01

    Nutritional status affects the prognosis of various tumors. The prognostic nutritional index (PNI) is the known predictor of postoperative outcome in resectable pancreatic cancer patients. This study aimed to validate the prognostic value of PNI in all stages of pancreatic cancer. We retrospectively reviewed 499 patients with pancreatic cancer who were diagnosed at Severance Hospital between January 2006 and December 2011. The PNI value was calculated as 10 × serum albumin (g/dL) + 0.005 × total lymphocyte count (/mm(3)) at initial diagnosis. The median patient age was 62 yr, and 289 were men. The study group comprised resectable disease (n = 121), locally advanced disease (n = 118), and metastatic disease (n = 260). Univariate and multivariate analysis revealed that PNI ≤ 49.5 at initial diagnosis, together with performance status, platelet count, and clinical stage, was significantly associated with overall survival (hazard ratio, 1.562; all P < 0.05). Patients with PNI ≤ 49.5 (n = 208) had shorter median overall survival compared to patients with high PNI (9.8 vs. 14.2 mo; log rank, P < 0.001). In clinical stage subgroup analysis, initial PNI ≤49.5 independently predicted shorter overall survival, especially in resectable and metastatic disease (P = 0.041, P = 0.002, respectively).

  19. Prevalence and risk factors associated with nutrition-related noncommunicable diseases in the Eastern Mediterranean region

    PubMed Central

    Musaiger, Abdulrahman O; Al-Hazzaa, Hazzaa M

    2012-01-01

    This paper reviews the current situation concerning nutrition-related noncommunicable diseases (N-NCDs) and the risk factors associated with these diseases in the Eastern Mediterranean region (EMR). A systematic literature review of studies and reports published between January 1, 1990 and September 15, 2011 was conducted using the PubMed and Google Scholar databases. Cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, metabolic syndrome, obesity, cancer, and osteoporosis have become the main causes of morbidity and mortality, especially with progressive aging of the population. The estimated mortality rate due to cardiovascular disease and diabetes ranged from 179.8 to 765.2 per 100,000 population, with the highest rates in poor countries. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome was very high, ranging from 19% to 45%. The prevalence of overweight and obesity (body mass index ≥25 kg/m2) has reached an alarming level in most countries of the region, ranging from 25% to 82%, with a higher prevalence among women. The estimated mortality rate for cancer ranged from 61.9 to 151 per 100,000 population. Osteoporosis has become a critical problem, particularly among women. Several risk factors may be contributing to the high prevalence of N-NCDs in EMR, including nutrition transition, low intake of fruit and vegetables, demographic transition, urbanization, physical inactivity, hypertension, tobacco smoking, stunting of growth of preschool children, and lack of nutrition and health awareness. Intervention programs to prevent and control N-NCDs are urgently needed, with special focus on promotion of healthy eating and physical activity. PMID:22399864

  20. Multiple nutritional factors and the risk of Hashimoto's Thyroiditis.

    PubMed

    Hu, Shiqian; Rayman, Margaret P

    2017-03-14

    Background Hashimoto's Thyroiditis (HT) is considered to be the most common autoimmune disease. It is currently accepted that genetic susceptibility, environmental factors and immune disorders contribute to its development. Regarding nutritional factors, evidence implicates high iodine intake, deficiencies of selenium and iron with a potential relevance of vitamin D status. To elucidate the role of nutritional factors in the risk, pathogenesis and treatment of Hashimoto's Thyroiditis (HT), PubMed and the Cochrane Library were searched for publications on iodine, iron, selenium and vitamin D and risk/treatment of HT. Summary Iodine: Chronic exposure to excess iodine intake induces autoimmune thyroiditis, partly because highly-iodinated thyroglobulin is more immunogenic. Recent introduction of universal salt iodization can have a similar, though transient, effect. Iron: Iron deficiency impairs thyroid metabolism. Thyroid peroxidase (TPO), the enzyme responsible for the production of thyroid hormones is a heme (iron-containing) enzyme; it becomes active at the apical surface of thyrocytes only after binding heme. HT patients are frequently iron-deficient as autoimmune gastritis, which impairs iron absorption, is a common co-morbidity. Treatment of anemic women with impaired thyroid function with iron improved thyroid-hormone concentrations while thyroxine and iron together were more effective in improving iron status. Selenium: Selenoproteins are essential to thyroid action. In particular, the glutathione peroxidases protect the thyroid by removing excessive hydrogen peroxide produced there for thyroglobulin iodination. Genetic data implicate the anti-inflammatory selenoprotein S in HT risk. There is evidence from observational studies and randomized controlled trials that selenium/selenoproteins can reduce TPO-antibody titer, hypothyroidism and post-partum thyroiditis. Vitamin D: Lower vitamin D status has been found in HT patients than in controls and inverse

  1. Rural Middle School Nutrition and Physical Activity Environments and the Change in Body Mass Index during Adolescence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Demment, Margaret; Wells, Nancy; Olson, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Background: For rural adolescents, schools are among the few places where environmental interventions can promote health outside of the home. The goal of this study was to assess the nutrition and physical activity (N&PA) environments of schools attended by a birth cohort and examine the association with change in body mass index (BMI) from…

  2. Dietary glycemic index and glycemic load and their relationship to cardiovascular risk factors in Chinese children.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xinyu; Zhu, Yanna; Cai, Li; Ma, Lu; Jing, Jin; Guo, Li; Jin, Yu; Ma, Yinghua; Chen, Yajun

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the cross-sectional associations between dietary glycemic index (GI) and glycemic load (GL) and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors in Chinese children. A total of 234 Chinese schoolchildren aged 8-11 years in Guangdong participated in the study. Dietary intake was assessed via a 3-day dietary record. Seven established cardiovascular indicators were analyzed in this study: fasting plasma glucose (FPG), fasting triglycerides (TG), total cholesterol (TC), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), systolic blood pressure, and diastolic blood pressure. Higher dietary GI was significantly associated with higher TG levels (P = 0.037) and lower HDL-C levels (P = 0.005) after adjusting for age, sex, nutritional intake, physical activity, and body mass index z score. LDL-C was found to differ across tertiles of dietary GL. The middle tertile tended to show the highest level of LDL-C. TC, FPG, and blood pressure were independent of both dietary GI and GL. Our findings suggest that higher dietary GI is differentially associated with some CVD risk factors, including lower HDL-C and higher TG, in school-aged children from south China.

  3. Prognostic nutritional index is an independent prognostic factor for gastric cancer patients with peritoneal dissemination

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Runcong; Yuan, Shuqiang; Chen, Shi; Chen, Xiaojiang; Chen, Yongming; Zhu, Baoyan; Qiu, Haibo; Zhou, Zhiwei; Peng, Junsheng; Chen, Yingbo

    2016-01-01

    Objective The predictive and prognostic role of prognostic nutritional index (PNI) in gastric cancer patients with peritoneal dissemination remains unclear. This study aims to explore the role of the PNI in predicting outcomes of gastric cancer patients with peritoneal dissemination. Methods A total of 660 patients diagnosed with gastric adenocarcinoma with peritoneal metastasis between January 2000 and April 2014 at Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center and the Sixth Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-sen University were retrospectively analyzed. The clinicopathologic characteristics and clinical outcomes of patients with peritoneal dissemination were analyzed. Results Compared with PNI-high group, PNI-low group was correlated with advanced age (P=0.036), worse performance status (P<0.001), higher frequency of ascites (P<0.001) and higher frequency of multisite distant metastasis (P<0.001). Kaplan-Meier survival curves showed that PNI-high group had a significantly longer median overall survival than PNI-low group (13.13 vs. 9.03 months, P<0.001). Multivariate survival analysis revealed that Borrmann type IV (P=0.014), presence of ascites (P=0.017) and lower PNI (P=0.041) were independent poor prognostic factors, and palliative surgery (P<0.001) and first-line chemotherapy (P<0.001) were good prognostic factors. For patients receiving palliative surgery, the postoperative morbidity rates in the PNI-low group and PNI-high group were 9.1% and 9.9%, respectively (P=0.797). The postoperative mortality rate was not significantly different between PNI-low and PNI-high groups (2.3% vs. 0.9%, P=0.362). Conclusions PNI is a useful and practical tool for evaluating the nutritional status of gastric cancer patients with peritoneal dissemination, and is an independent prognostic factor for these patients. PMID:28174485

  4. Body mass index, lifetime smoking intensity and lung cancer risk.

    PubMed

    El-Zein, Mariam; Parent, Marie-Elise; Nicolau, Belinda; Koushik, Anita; Siemiatycki, Jack; Rousseau, Marie-Claude

    2013-10-01

    There is as yet no generally accepted explanation for the common finding that low body mass index (BMI) is associated with an increased risk of lung cancer. We investigated this association in a Canadian population-based case-control study (1996-2002) with a particular view to assessing the hypothesis that the observed association was due to residual confounding by smoking. Analyses were based on 1,076 cases and 1,439 controls who provided their height at enrollment and their weight at two points in time, at age 20 and 2 years before enrollment. BMI, in kg/m(2) , was classified into underweight (<18.5), normal (18.5-24.9), overweight (25.0-29.9), and obese (≥30). Smoking history was synthesized into a comprehensive smoking index (CSI) that integrated duration, intensity and time since quitting. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for BMI-lung cancer associations were estimated, adjusting for CSI as well as several sociodemographic, lifestyle and occupational factors. The normal BMI category was used as the reference. Among those who were underweight at age 20, there was a lower risk of lung cancer (OR = 0.69, 95% CI: 0.50-0.95). Conversely, lung cancer risk was increased among those who were underweight 2 years before enrollment (OR = 2.30, 95% CI: 1.30-4.10). The results were almost identical when stratifying analyses based on smoking history into never/lighter and heavier smokers. The inverse association between recent BMI and lung cancer is unlikely to be largely attributable to residual confounding by smoking. Reverse causality or a true relationship between BMI and lung cancer remain plausible.

  5. Nutrition

    MedlinePlus

    ... into your diet. These include brightly colored and dark fruits and vegetables. Balance the food you eat ... can also order your free copy of Nutrition Matters and visit our Ask about Nutrition forum. << Back ...

  6. Biomechanical rupture risk assessment of abdominal aortic aneurysms based on a novel probabilistic rupture risk index.

    PubMed

    Polzer, Stanislav; Gasser, T Christian

    2015-12-06

    A rupture risk assessment is critical to the clinical treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) patients. The biomechanical AAA rupture risk assessment quantitatively integrates many known AAA rupture risk factors but the variability of risk predictions due to model input uncertainties remains a challenging limitation. This study derives a probabilistic rupture risk index (PRRI). Specifically, the uncertainties in AAA wall thickness and wall strength were considered, and wall stress was predicted with a state-of-the-art deterministic biomechanical model. The discriminative power of PRRI was tested in a diameter-matched cohort of ruptured (n = 7) and intact (n = 7) AAAs and compared to alternative risk assessment methods. Computed PRRI at 1.5 mean arterial pressure was significantly (p = 0.041) higher in ruptured AAAs (20.21(s.d. 14.15%)) than in intact AAAs (3.71(s.d. 5.77)%). PRRI showed a high sensitivity and specificity (discriminative power of 0.837) to discriminate between ruptured and intact AAA cases. The underlying statistical representation of stochastic data of wall thickness, wall strength and peak wall stress had only negligible effects on PRRI computations. Uncertainties in AAA wall stress predictions, the wide range of reported wall strength and the stochastic nature of failure motivate a probabilistic rupture risk assessment. Advanced AAA biomechanical modelling paired with a probabilistic rupture index definition as known from engineering risk assessment seems to be superior to a purely deterministic approach.

  7. Biomechanical rupture risk assessment of abdominal aortic aneurysms based on a novel probabilistic rupture risk index

    PubMed Central

    Polzer, Stanislav; Gasser, T. Christian

    2015-01-01

    A rupture risk assessment is critical to the clinical treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) patients. The biomechanical AAA rupture risk assessment quantitatively integrates many known AAA rupture risk factors but the variability of risk predictions due to model input uncertainties remains a challenging limitation. This study derives a probabilistic rupture risk index (PRRI). Specifically, the uncertainties in AAA wall thickness and wall strength were considered, and wall stress was predicted with a state-of-the-art deterministic biomechanical model. The discriminative power of PRRI was tested in a diameter-matched cohort of ruptured (n = 7) and intact (n = 7) AAAs and compared to alternative risk assessment methods. Computed PRRI at 1.5 mean arterial pressure was significantly (p = 0.041) higher in ruptured AAAs (20.21(s.d. 14.15%)) than in intact AAAs (3.71(s.d. 5.77)%). PRRI showed a high sensitivity and specificity (discriminative power of 0.837) to discriminate between ruptured and intact AAA cases. The underlying statistical representation of stochastic data of wall thickness, wall strength and peak wall stress had only negligible effects on PRRI computations. Uncertainties in AAA wall stress predictions, the wide range of reported wall strength and the stochastic nature of failure motivate a probabilistic rupture risk assessment. Advanced AAA biomechanical modelling paired with a probabilistic rupture index definition as known from engineering risk assessment seems to be superior to a purely deterministic approach. PMID:26631334

  8. Children-at-Risk for Poor Nutrition: Expanding the Approach of Future Professionals in Educational Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shor, Ron

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: To examine how the subject of nutrition is being addressed in the work with children at risk of poor nutrition in educational institutions and what the barriers are which may hinder inclusion of this subject. Methods: A structured questionnaire was constructed for the purpose of this study and was implemented with 111 students in…

  9. Nutrition label use is associated with lower longer-term diabetes risk in US adults.

    PubMed

    Kollannoor-Samuel, Grace; Shebl, Fatma M; Hawley, Nicola L; Pérez-Escamilla, Rafael

    2017-03-29

    Background: Regular nutrition label use may have important long-term health implications. To our knowledge, the role of nutrition label use in protecting against the development of chronic diseases was unexplored prospectively before this study.Objective: We tested the association between nutrition label use and risk of a future diabetes diagnosis in a multiethnic US cohort.Design: Data from the ongoing National Longitudinal Survey of Youth-1979 (NLSY79) were analyzed. From 2002 (baseline) to 5 follow-up time points (2004-2012), 7150 diabetes-free, multiethnic young adults were prospectively followed for a diagnosis of incident diabetes. Nutrition label use, diabetes diagnosis, time to diabetes diagnosis, and all covariates were self-reported.Results: Between January 2002 and September 2013, 430 participants (6.0%) were diagnosed with diabetes. A weighted, multivariable, extended Cox regression was conducted, which suggested that in nutrition label users, the HR of diabetes diagnosis risk decreased significantly with time (P-nutrition label use × time interaction < 0.05) compared with risk in nutrition label nonusers.Conclusions: There is an association between nutrition label use and diabetes risk in the longer term. However, additional longitudinal research with a robust dietary intake assessment is needed to test this hypothesis.

  10. Nutritional status and dietary intake among pregnant women in relation to pre-pregnancy body mass index in Japan.

    PubMed

    Uno, Kaoru; Takemi, Yukari; Hayashi, Fumi; Hosokawa, Momo

    2016-01-01

    Objective The present study examined nutritional status and dietary intake of pregnant women in Japan in relation to pre-pregnancy body mass index (BMI).Methods Participants included 141 Japanese women with singleton pregnancies, from the outpatient department of the S hospital, Gunma prefecture, Japan. Two-day food records, dietary assessment questionnaires, and clinical records were obtained at 20 weeks gestation. Nine patients were excluded from the study due to morning sickness. The remaining 132 participants were divided into 3 groups according to pre-pregnancy BMI: underweight, normal weight, and overweight. Nutritional status and dietary intake were analyzed in relation to BMI using the chi-square test, Fisher's exact test, Kruskal-Wallis test, one-way analysis of variance, and analysis of covariance with adjustment for age, employment status, and total energy intake.Results Women who were underweight before pregnancy were more frequently working full-time than normal weight and overweight women. Underweight women were also more frequently anemic (P=0.038, underweight 39.3%, normal weight 24.7%, overweight 0%) and had lower mean hemoglobin (Hb) (P=0.021, underweight 11.3 g/dL, normal weight 11.6 g/dL, overweight 12.1 g/dL) and hematocrit (Hct) levels (P=0.025, underweight 33.7%, normal weight 34.3%, overweight 36.0%). Their dietary intake of protein, iron, magnesium, and folic acid was lower than that of normal weight and overweight women. Their meals tended to include fewer meat, fish, egg, and soybean dishes (underweight, mean of 4.7 servings per day; normal weight, 6.1 servings; overweight, 6.1 servings).Conclusion Pregnant women who were underweight before pregnancy had increased risk of anemia as well as reduced Hb and Hct levels. They had lower dietary intake of protein, iron and folic acid compared to women in the other BMI categories. Anemia and these nutrient deficiencies are known risk factors for low birth weight. Our findings suggest

  11. Evaluation of Prognostic Nutritional Index in Patients Undergoing Radical Surgery with Nonsmall Cell Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Chen; Qu, Xiao; Shen, Hongchang; Zheng, Chunlong; Zhu, Linhai; Meng, Long; Du, Jiajun

    2015-01-01

    The prognostic nutritional index (PNI) has been reported to be a prognostic indicator in some malignant tumors. However, its prognostic value in nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC) has not been fully investigated. A retrospective review of 1416 patients with NSCLC who underwent radical surgery between January 2006 and December 2011 was conducted. To obtain optimal cutoff levels of PNI, running log-rank statistics was applied. Survival was calculated by the Kaplan-Meier method. The prognostic significance of PNI, together with various clinicopathological factors, was evaluated by multivariate analysis. The optimal cutoff point for PNI was 52. The 1-, 3-, and 5-yr survival rates in patients with PNI of less than 52 were 80.0%, 61.3%, and 50.4%, respectively, and were significantly more unfavorable than those in patients with PNI 52 or higher (84.7%, 71.5%, and 60.3%, respectively, P < 0.001). Multivariate analysis suggested that gender (P = 0.026), age (P < 0.001), PNI (P = 0.005), differentiation (P = 0.024), pathology T category (P = 0.003), and pathology N category (P < 0.001) were revealed to be independent prognostic factors. Our results indicate that PNI is an independent predictor of survival for patients undergoing radical surgery with NSCLC.

  12. Anthropometric measures and epithelial ovarian cancer risk in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition.

    PubMed

    Lahmann, Petra H; Cust, Anne E; Friedenreich, Christine M; Schulz, Mandy; Lukanova, Annekatrin; Kaaks, Rudolf; Lundin, Eva; Tjønneland, Anne; Halkjaer, Jytte; Severinsen, Marianne Tang; Overvad, Kim; Fournier, Agnès; Chabbert-Buffet, Nathalie; Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise; Dossus, Laure; Pischon, Tobias; Boeing, Heiner; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Lagiou, Pagona; Naska, Androniki; Palli, Domenico; Grioni, Sara; Mattiello, Amalia; Tumino, Rosario; Sacerdote, Carlotta; Redondo, María-Luisa; Jakszyn, Paula; Sánchez, María-José; Tormo, María-José; Ardanaz, Eva; Arriola, Larraitz; Manjer, Jonas; Jirström, Karin; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas; May, Anne M; Peeters, Petra H M; Onland-Moret, N Charlotte; Bingham, Sheila; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Allen, Naomi E; Spencer, Elizabeth; Rinaldi, Sabina; Slimani, Nadia; Chajes, Véronique; Michaud, Dominique; Norat, Teresa; Riboli, Elio

    2010-05-15

    We examined the associations of measured anthropometric factors, including general and central adiposity and height, with ovarian cancer risk. We also investigated these associations by menopausal status and for specific histological subtypes. Among 226,798 women in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort, there were 611 incident cases of primary, malignant, epithelial ovarian cancer diagnosed during a mean 8.9 years of follow-up. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs), adjusted for potential confounders. Compared to women with body mass index (BMI) < 25 kg/m2, obesity (BMI > or = 30 kg/m2) was associated with excess ovarian cancer risk for all women combined (HR = 1.33, 95% CI = 1.05-1.68; p(trend) = 0.02) and postmenopausal women (HR = 1.59, 95% CI = 1.20-2.10; p(trend) = 0.001), but the association was weaker for premenopausal women (HR = 1.16, 95% CI = 0.65-2.06; p(trend) = 0.65). Neither height or weight gain, nor BMI-adjusted measures of fat distribution assessed by waist circumference, waist-hip ratio (WHR) or hip circumference were associated with overall risk. WHR was related to increased risk of mucinous tumors (BMI-adjusted HR per 0.05 unit increment = 1.17, 95% CI = 1.00-1.38). For all women combined, no other significant associations with risk were observed for specific histological subtypes. This large, prospective study provides evidence that obesity is an important modifiable risk factor for epithelial ovarian cancer, particularly among postmenopausal women.

  13. Food parenting practices and their association with child nutrition risk status: comparing mothers and fathers.

    PubMed

    Watterworth, Jessica Charlotte; Mackay, Joy Miranda; Buchholz, Andrea C; Darlington, Gerarda; Randall Simpson, Janis A; Ma, David W L; Haines, Jess

    2017-02-14

    In Canada, little is known about how food parenting practices are associated with young children's dietary intakes and no studies have examined food parenting practices of Canadian fathers. This study aimed to examine associations between food parenting practices and preschool-age children's nutrition risk. We conducted a cross-sectional analysis of 31 two-parent families; 31 mothers, 31 fathers and 40 preschool-age children. Parents completed an adapted version of the Comprehensive Feeding Practices Questionnaire. We calculated children's nutrition risk using their NutriSTEP® score. To account for sibling association, we used generalized estimating equations, adjusting for child age, sex, household income, and parental BMI. Both mothers' and fathers' involvement of children in meal preparation were associated with lower child nutrition risk (mother β=-3.45, p=0.02; father β=-1.74, p=0.01), as were their healthy home environment scores (mother β=-8.36, p<0.001; father β=-2.69, p=0.04). Mothers' encouragement of balance and variety was associated with lower nutrition risk (β=-8.88, p=0.01), whereas mothers' use of food as a reward was associated with higher nutrition risk (β=4.67, p<0.001). Fathers' modeling of healthy behaviours was associated with lower nutrition risk (β=-2.21, p=0.01), whereas fathers' restriction for health (β=2.21, p=0.03) and pressure-to-eat scores (β=3.26, p=<0.001) were associated with higher nutrition risk. No associations were found between child nutrition status and parental emotion regulation, control, monitoring, nor restriction for weight. In conclusion, both mothers' and fathers' food parenting practices are associated with their children's nutrition status. Fathers should be included in food parenting practices interventions.

  14. Variation in nutritional risk among Mexican American and non-Mexican American homebound elders who receive home-delivered meals.

    PubMed

    Sharkey, Joseph R

    2004-01-01

    Good nutritional health is essential to prevent functional decline and improve quality of life. Little is known of disparities in the extent of risk for poor nutritional health among homebound Mexican American (MA) elders who receive Older American Act Nutrition Program (OAANP) home-delivered meals. In order to assist OAANP service providers in understanding racial/ethnic differences in nutritional risk, this study examined routinely collected data on 908 homebound MA and non-MA in the Texas Lower Rio Grande Valley. Homebound MA were more likely to report poverty, risk factors for and indicators of poor nutritional health. Independent of poverty and covariates,MA were more likely to report very high nutritional risk. This underscores the importance of understanding racial/ethnic disparities in the extent of risk for poor nutritional health for the development, implementation, and evaluation of effective strategies to alleviate nutritional health disparities.

  15. Dietary fiber and the glycemic index: a background paper for the Nordic Nutrition Recommendations 2012

    PubMed Central

    Øverby, Nina Cecilie; Sonestedt, Emily; Laaksonen, David E.; Birgisdottir, Bryndis Eva

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study is to review recent data on dietary fiber (DF) and the glycemic index (GI), with special focus on studies from the Nordic countries regarding cardiometabolic risk factors, type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, cancer, and total mortality. In this study, recent guidelines and scientific background papers or updates on older reports on DF and GI published between 2000 and 2011 from the US, EU, WHO, and the World Cancer Research Fund were reviewed, as well as prospective cohort and intervention studies carried out in the Nordic countries. All of the reports support the role for fiber-rich foods and DF as an important part of a healthy diet. All of the five identified Nordic papers found protective associations between high intake of DF and health outcomes; lower risk of cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, colorectal and breast cancer. None of the reports and few of the Nordic papers found clear evidence for the GI in prevention of risk factors or diseases in healthy populations, although association was found in sub-groups, e.g. overweight and obese individuals and suggestive for prevention of type 2 diabetes. It was concluded that DF is associated with decreased risk of different chronic diseases and metabolic conditions. There is not enough evidence that choosing foods with low GI will decrease the risk of chronic diseases in the population overall. However, there is suggestive evidence that ranking food based on their GI might be of use for overweight and obese individuals. Issues regarding methodology, validity and practicality of the GI remain to be clarified. PMID:23538683

  16. Assessment of nutritional quality, glycaemic index, antidiabetic and sensory properties of plantain (Musa paradisiaca)-based functional dough meals.

    PubMed

    Famakin, Opeyemi; Fatoyinbo, Akindele; Ijarotimi, Oluwole Steve; Badejo, Adebanjo Ayobamidele; Fagbemi, Tayo Nathaniel

    2016-11-01

    Nutrition transition to high energy-dense foods has been implicated as the major causes of diet related diseases. Plantain-based dough meals supplemented with soybean cake and cassava fibre were developed by combining them in different proportions using response surface methodology. The flour blends were analyzed for the nutritional composition while the glycaemic index, antidiabetic potentials and protein digestibility of the dough meals were determined in wistar rats. The nutritional and essential amino acid contents of the flour blends were comparable to that of cerolina (a commercially available food product commonly recommended for diabetic patients). The rats fed with the formulated dough meals had lower glycaemic index and glycaemic load, and the blood glucose was significantly reduced compared to cerolina and metformin (a synthetic antidiabetic drug). All the plantain-based dough meals were comparable to cerolina and metformin in terms of nutritional quality and blood glycaemic control activities, respectively. Hence, the formulated plantain-based dough meals have potential to be used for the prevention and management of diabetes mellitus.

  17. Short-term nutritional counseling reduces body mass index, waist circumference, triceps skinfold and triglycerides in women with metabolic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background It is recognized that the growing epidemic of metabolic syndrome is related to dietary and lifestyle changes. Objective The purpose of this study was to evaluate short-term application of nutritional counseling in women with metabolic syndrome. Methods This follow-up study was conducted from September to November 2008 with thirty three women ≥35 years old screened clinically for nutritional counseling. Dietary intake was reported, and biochemical and body composition measures were taken at baseline and after three months of follow-up. Results Of the 33 women evaluated, 29 patients completed the study. The prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus, hypertension, dyslipidemia, and obesity was high at 38%, 72.4%, 55.2%, and 75.8%, respectively. At the end of three-months of follow-up, a significant decline in body mass index, waist circumference, triceps skinfold, and triglycerides was observed, as was an increase in calcium and vitamin D intake. The multiple regression analysis showed that changes in body mass index, triceps skinfold, waist circumference and triglyceride levels after nutritional intervention were positively associated with changes in anthropometric (loss of body weight) and biochemical (decrease of TG/HDL-c ratio) parameters. Moreover, waist circumference changes were negatively associated with changes in calcium and vitamin D intake. Conclusion Short-term nutritional counseling improved some factors of metabolic syndrome. Moreover, the increases in calcium and vitamin D consumption can be associated with the improvement in markers of metabolic syndrome. PMID:20181143

  18. Risk of aspiration in patients on enteral nutrition: frequency, relevance, relation to pneumonia, risk factors, and strategies for risk reduction.

    PubMed

    Mizock, Barry A

    2007-08-01

    Upper digestive feeding intolerance, as evidenced by high gastric residual volume and vomiting, is the most common complication among hospitalized patients receiving enteral nutrition. These patients are at high risk of developing aspiration pneumonia, which in turn is associated with prolonged hospital stay and increased mortality. Most episodes of aspiration are small in volume and do not lead to pneumonia. The likelihood of pneumonia increases with multiple aspirations. Pneumonia is also more common in critically ill patients who have bacterial colonization of the oropharynx. Gastric residual volume is commonly used as a means to assess aspiration risk during tube feeding. However, recent studies have demonstrated that this measurement has limited sensitivity. The approach to minimizing the frequency of aspiration during tube feeding involves assessment of the patient's degree of risk and initiation of appropriate measures directed at risk reduction.

  19. Effects of Playing a Serious Computer Game on Body Mass Index and Nutrition Knowledge in Women

    PubMed Central

    Hallinan, Sean; Seif El-Nasr, Magy; Subramanian, Shree; Castaneda-Sceppa, Carmen

    2016-01-01

    Background Obesity and weight gain is a critical public health concern. Serious digital games are gaining popularity in the context of health interventions. They use persuasive and fun design features to engage users in health-related behaviors in a non-game context. As a young field, research about effectiveness and acceptability of such games for weight loss is sparse. Objective The goal of this study was to evaluate real-world play patterns of SpaPlay and its impact on body mass index (BMI) and nutritional knowledge. SpaPlay is a computer game designed to help women adopt healthier dietary and exercise behaviors, developed based on Self-Determination theory and the Player Experience of Need Satisfaction (PENS) model. Progress in the game is tied to real-life activities (e.g., eating a healthy snack, taking a flight of stairs). Methods We recruited 47 women to partake in a within-subject 90-day longitudinal study, with assessments taken at baseline, 1-, 2-, and 3- months. Women were on average, 29.8 years old (±7.3), highly educated (80.9% had BA or higher), 39% non-White, baseline BMI 26.98 (±5.6), who reported at least contemplating making changes in their diet and exercise routine based on the Stages of Change Model. We computed 9 indices from game utilization data to evaluate game play. We used general linear models to examine inter-individual differences between levels of play, and multilevel models to assess temporal changes in BMI and nutritional knowledge. Results Patterns of game play were mixed. Participants who reported being in the preparation or action stages of behavior change exhibited more days of play and more play regularity compared to those who were in the contemplation stage. Additionally, women who reported playing video games 1-2 hours per session demonstrated more sparse game play. Brief activities, such as one-time actions related to physical activity or healthy food, were preferred over activities that require a longer commitment (e

  20. Preoperative albumin-to-globulin ratio and prognostic nutrition index predict prognosis for glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Wen-Zhe; Li, Feng; Xu, Zhen-Kuan; Chen, Xuan; Sun, Bin; Cao, Jing-Wei; Liu, Yu-Guang

    2017-01-01

    Objective Impaired immunonutritional status has disadvantageous effects on outcomes for cancer patients. Preoperative albumin-to-globulin ratio (AGR) and the prognostic nutrition index (PNI) have been used as prognostic factors in various cancers. We aimed to evaluate the clinical significance of the AGR and PNI in glioblastoma. Materials and methods This retrospective analysis involved 166 patients. Demographic, clinical, and laboratory data were collected. AGR and the PNI were calculated as AGR = albumin/(total serum protein − albumin) and PNI = albumin (g/L) + 5 × total lymphocyte count (109/L). Overall survival (OS) was estimated by Kaplan–Meier analysis. Receiver-operating characteristic analysis was used to assess the predictive ability of AGR and the PNI. Cox proportional-hazard models estimating hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were used for univariable and multivariable survival analyses. Results The cutoff values of AGR and PNI were 1.75 and 48. OS was enhanced, with high AGR (>1.75) and the PNI (>48) (P<0.001 for both). Areas under the receiver-operating characteristic curve for AGR and the PNI were 0.68 and 0.631 for 1-year survival and 0.651 and 0.656 for 2-year survival (P<0.05 for all), respectively. On multivariable analyses, both AGR and the PNI were independent predictors of OS (AGR, HR 0.785, 95% CI 0.357–0.979 [P=0.04]; PNI, HR 0.757, 95% CI 0.378–0.985 [P=0.039]). On subgroup analysis, AGR and the PNI were significant prognostic factors for OS in patients with adjuvant therapy (AGR P<0.001; PNI P=0.001). Conclusion Preoperative AGR and the PNI may be easy-to-perform and inexpensive indices for predicting OS with glioblastoma. AGR and the PNI could also help in developing good adjuvant-therapy schedules. PMID:28223828

  1. Body mass index, height and risk of lymphoid neoplasms in a large United States cohort.

    PubMed

    Patel, Alpa V; Diver, W Ryan; Teras, Lauren R; Birmann, Brenda M; Gapstur, Susan M

    2013-06-01

    Results from epidemiologic studies examining associations between body size and risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) are inconsistent, and etiology may vary by histologic subtype of disease. Using Cox proportional hazards regression, multivariable relative risks (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were computed for associations of body mass index (BMI) and height with NHL in the prospective American Cancer Society Cancer Prevention Study-II Nutrition Cohort. From 1992 to 2007, 2074 incident cases of NHL were identified among 152 423 men and women. Obese individuals (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m(2)) had 23% higher incidence of NHL (95% CI 1.08-1.40) compared to those with normal weight (BMI 18.5-< 25 kg/m(2)). Height was positively associated with NHL (RR = 1.25, 95% CI 1.10-1.43, sex-specific quintile 5 vs. 1). BMI associations were strongest for diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Height was most strongly associated with chronic lymphocytic leukemia/small lymphocytic lymphoma and to a lesser extent with multiple myeloma. These findings provide further evidence that body size may play a role in the etiology of NHL, which is of public health importance given the rapid rise in obesity worldwide.

  2. Nutrition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lane, Helen W.

    1990-01-01

    This is a collection of viewgraphs on the Johnson Space Center's work on nutrition for long duration space missions. Nutritional requirements are affected by isolation, workloads, and cold as well as the psychological needs, metabolism, and fluid balance of an individual.

  3. Prognostic nutritional index before adjuvant chemotherapy predicts chemotherapy compliance and survival among patients with non-small-cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Katsuhiko; Okita, Riki; Saisho, Shinsuke; Yukawa, Takuro; Maeda, Ai; Nojima, Yuji; Nakata, Masao

    2015-01-01

    Background Adjuvant chemotherapy after the complete resection of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is now the standard of care. To improve survival, it is important to identify risk factors for the continuation of adjuvant chemotherapy. In this study, we analyzed chemotherapy compliance and magnitude of the prognostic impact of the prognostic nutritional index (PNI) before adjuvant chemotherapy. Methods We conducted a retrospective review of data from 106 patients who had received adjuvant chemotherapy. The adjuvant chemotherapy consisted of an oral tegafur agent (OT) or platinum-based chemotherapy (PB). The correlations between the PNI values and recurrence-free survival (RFS) were then evaluated. Results In the PB group, the percentage of patients who completed the four planned cycles of chemotherapy was not correlated with the PNI. In the OT group, however, a significant difference was observed in the percentage of patients who completed the planned chemotherapy according to the PNI before adjuvant chemotherapy. The RFS of patients with a PNI <50 before adjuvant chemotherapy was significantly poorer than that of the patients with a PNI ≥50. A multivariate analysis showed that nodal metastasis and PNI before chemotherapy were independent predictors of the RFS. However, PNI before surgery was not a predictor of the RFS. In the subgroup analysis, PNI before chemotherapy was independent predictor of the RFS in the OT group (P=0.019), but not in the PB group (P=0.095). Conclusion The PNI before adjuvant chemotherapy influenced the treatment compliance with the planned chemotherapy in the OT group, but not the PB group. In addition, a low PNI before adjuvant chemotherapy was associated with a poor RFS in a multivariate analysis, especially in the OT group. PMID:26504397

  4. [Effect of early nutritional intervention in the a outcome of patients at risk clinical nutrition].

    PubMed

    Montoya Montoya, Susana; Múnera García, Nora Elena

    2014-02-01

    Introducción: La desnutrición hospitalaria es un proceso multicausal y de alta prevalencia. La intervención nutricional en una etapa temprana mejora el pronóstico de los pacientes afectados. Objetivo: Comparar el efecto de una intervención nutricional temprana con el de una atención de rutina, sobre el resultado clínico, en pacientes con riesgo nutricional, detectados con la herramienta de cribado Nutritional Risk Screening NRS 2002, que ingresan a una institución de salud de alta complejidad. Materiales y métodos: Estudio cuasi experimental. Se evaluó en las primeras 48 horas de admisión a 891 pacientes, de los cuales 247 estaban en riesgo nutricional, 116 constituyeron el grupo con atención de rutina y 54 el grupo intervenido. Se evaluaron las complicaciones, días de estancia hospitalaria, pérdida de peso, cambio de índice de masa corporal y adecuación proteico-calórica. Resultados: Los pacientes intervenidos presentaron mayor consumo calórico (1617 ± 444,5 vs 1366 ± 467,1 kilocalorías, p = 0,002) y proteico (1,2 ± 0,2 vs 0,9 ± 0,3 g, p = 0,000), una ganancia de peso promedio de 0,7% vs una pérdida de 2.3% (p = 0,000), una proporción de complicaciones moderadas del 8,2% vs 25,2% (p = 0,012) y una reducción del tiempo de estancia hospitalaria de 2,2 días (p = 0,138), en comparación con el grupo con atención de rutina. Conclusión: La intervención nutricional temprana en los pacientes en riesgo nutricional, disminuyó la proporción de complicaciones moderadas, mejoró la adecuación de energía, proteína y la evolución nutricional en términos de ganancia de peso y cambio de IMC. Los días de estancia no mostraron diferencias significativas.

  5. The impact of nutritional status, nutritional risk, and nutritional treatment on clinical outcome of 2248 hospitalized cancer patients: a multi-center, prospective cohort study in Chinese teaching hospitals.

    PubMed

    Pan, Hongming; Cai, Sanjun; Ji, Jiafu; Jiang, Zhiwei; Liang, Houjie; Lin, Feng; Liu, Xiyong

    2013-01-01

    To better understand the impact of undernutrition, nutritional risk, and nutritional treatment on the clinical outcomes of hospitalized cancer patients in China, the authors conducted a multicenter, cross-sectional study with 2248 cancer patients from 20 hospitals from January to June 2010. The authors defined 19.7% and 26.8% patients as undernourished at baseline and reassessment, respectively. Patients with gastrointestinal malignancies had a higher rate of undernutrition than other patients. The nutritional risk rate was 24.6% and 40.2% at baseline and reassessment, respectively. For patients with nutritional risk, the relative risk (RR) of adverse events (AEs) significantly increased with and without nutritional treatment. In comparison with the nonnutritional treatment subgroup, patients who received enteral nutrition (EN) or total parenteral nutrition (TPN) significantly reduced the RR of AE development. The RR of AEs for EN and TPN were 0.08 (95% CI: 0.01-0.62) and 0.56 (95% CI: 0.33-0.96), respectively. Separated nutrient infusion increased the risk of AEs. The authors concluded that undernutrition and nutritional risk are general problems that impact the outcomes of hospitalized cancer patients in China. Higher NRS2002 scores are related to AE risk but not weight loss. In nutritional treatment, EN and TPN can significantly reduce the risk of AEs.

  6. Diabetes mellitus and risk of prostate cancer in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition.

    PubMed

    Tsilidis, Konstantinos K; Allen, Naomi E; Appleby, Paul N; Rohrmann, Sabine; Nöthlings, Ute; Arriola, Larraitz; Gunter, Marc J; Chajes, Veronique; Rinaldi, Sabina; Romieu, Isabelle; Murphy, Neil; Riboli, Elio; Tzoulaki, Ioanna; Kaaks, Rudolf; Lukanova, Annekatrin; Boeing, Heiner; Pischon, Tobias; Dahm, Christina C; Overvad, Kim; Quirós, J Ramón; Fonseca-Nunes, Ana; Molina-Montes, Esther; Gavrila Chervase, Diana; Ardanaz, Eva; Khaw, Kay T; Wareham, Nick J; Roswall, Nina; Tjønneland, Anne; Lagiou, Pagona; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Palli, Domenico; Pala, Valeria; Tumino, Rosario; Vineis, Paolo; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas; Malm, Johan; Orho-Melander, Marju; Johansson, Mattias; Stattin, Pär; Travis, Ruth C; Key, Timothy J

    2015-01-15

    The current epidemiologic evidence suggests that men with type 2 diabetes mellitus may be at lower risk of developing prostate cancer, but little is known about its association with stage and grade of the disease. The association between self-reported diabetes mellitus at recruitment and risk of prostate cancer was examined in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). Among 139,131 eligible men, 4,531 were diagnosed with prostate cancer over an average follow-up of 12 years. Multivariable hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated using Cox proportional hazards models stratified by EPIC-participating center and age at recruitment, and adjusted for education, smoking status, body mass index, waist circumference, and physical activity. In a subset of men without prostate cancer, the cross-sectional association between circulating concentrations of androgens and insulin-like growth factor proteins with diabetes status was also investigated using linear regression models. Compared to men with no diabetes, men with diabetes had a 26% lower risk of prostate cancer (HR, 0.74; 95% CI, 0.63-0.86). There was no evidence that the association differed by stage (p-heterogeneity, 0.19) or grade (p-heterogeneity, 0.48) of the disease, although the numbers were small in some disease subgroups. In a subset of 626 men with hormone measurements, circulating concentrations of androstenedione, total testosterone and insulin-like growth factor binding protein-three were lower in men with diabetes compared to men without diabetes. This large European study has confirmed an inverse association between self-reported diabetes mellitus and subsequent risk of prostate cancer.

  7. [Influence of nutrition on selected metabolic cardiovascular risk factors among female residents of Krakow].

    PubMed

    Piórecka, Beata; Jagielski, Paweł; Zwirska, Jaśmina; Piskorz, Anna; Brzostek, Tomasz; Schlegel-Zawadzka, Małgorzata

    2007-01-01

    The study involved influence of nutritional factors on select anthropometrical and lipid indices (total cholesterol, LDL, HDL) in female residents of Krakow who were voluntarily participating in the investigation. Only women free of diagnosed cardiovascular diseases were included. The study group consisting of 100 women aged 30-65 years, was divided into two groups: pre-menopause (PM, n=47) and after menopause (AM, n=53). The anthropometrical measurements, % of fat tissue - Tanita scale and Body Mass Index (BMI) was calculated. The energy value and the consumption of basic nutrients intake were calculated using 24-hour recalls from the day before the examination. The AM group presented higher anthropometrical and metabolic risk profile: overweight and obesity (BMI-PM = 25.51 +/- 4.16 kg/m2; AM = 28.28 +/- 4.89 kg/m2) and central adiposity type (WC-PM = 81.04 +/- 10.00 cm; AM = 86.46 +/- 11.73 cm); lipids (Total cholesterol-PM = 5.14 +/- 0.87 mmol/l, AM = 5.67 +/- 1.10 mmol/l; LDL-chol-PM = 2.98 +/- 0.90 mmol/l, AM = 3.40 +/- 0.93 mmol/l; HDL-chol-PM = 1.65 +/- 0.39 mmol/l; AM = 1.63 + 0.46 mmol/l). The irregular participation of fatty acids, proteins from plant sources and dietary fibers in daily diet were found (%Energy PM: SFA = 11.66 +/- 4.34, MUFA = 10.91 +/- 4.04, PUFA = 4.76 +/- 2.75, Keys index = 41.89 +/- 14.91; %EnergyAM: SFA = 11.48 +/- 3.86, MUFA = 11.02 +/- 4.12, PUFA = 4.89 +/- 2.92, Keys index = 40.87 +/- 14.4). Women in the AM group represented healthier nutritional behaviors. Results presented indicate that in further study concerning evaluation of nutrients consumption among women the fact of natural menopause should be considered.

  8. TOTAL LYMPHOCYTE COUNT AND SERUM ALBUMIN AS PREDICTORS OF NUTRITIONAL RISK IN SURGICAL PATIENTS

    PubMed Central

    ROCHA, Naruna Pereira; FORTES, Renata Costa

    2015-01-01

    Background: Early detection of changes in nutritional status is important for a better approach to the surgical patient. There are several nutritional measures in clinical practice, but there is not a complete method for determining the nutritional status, so, health professionals should only choose the best method to use. Aim: To evaluate the total lymphocyte count and albumin as predictors of identification of nutritional risk in surgical patients. Methods: Prospective longitudinal study was conducted with 69 patients undergoing surgery of the gastrointestinal tract. The assessment of nutritional status was evaluated by objective methods (anthropometry and biochemical tests) and subjective methods (subjective global assessment). Results: All parameters used in the nutritional assessment detected a high prevalence of malnutrition, with the exception of BMI which detected only 7.2% (n=5). The albumin (p=0.01), the total lymphocytes count (p=0.02), the percentage of adequacy of skinfolds (p<0.002) and the subjective global assessment (p<0.001) proved to be useful as predictors of risk of postoperative complications, since the smaller the values of albumin and lymphocyte count and higher the score the subjective global assessment were higher risks of surgical complications. Conclusions: A high prevalence of malnutrition was found, except for BMI. The use of albumin and total lymphocyte count were good predictor for the risk of postoperative complications and when used with other methods of assessing the nutritional status, such as the subjective global assessment and the percentage of adequacy of skinfolds, can be useful for identification of nutritional risk and postoperative complications. PMID:26537145

  9. Association between the Family Nutrition and Physical Activity screening tool and cardiovascular disease risk factors in 10-year old children

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yee, Kimbo Edward

    Purpose. To examine the association of the Family Nutrition and Physical Activity (FNPA) screening tool, a behaviorally based screening tool designed to assess the obesogenic family environment and behaviors, with cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors in 10-year old children. Methods. One hundred nineteen children were assessed for body mass index (BMI), percent body fat (%BF), waist circumference (WC), total cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol, and resting blood pressure. A continuous CVD risk score was created using total cholesterol to HDL-cholesterol ratio (TC:HDL), mean arterial pressure (MAP), and WC. The FNPA survey was completed by parents. The associations between the FNPA score and individual CVD risk factors and the continuous CVD risk score were examined using correlation analyses. Results. Approximately 35% of the sample were overweight (19%) or obese (16%). The mean FNPA score was 24.6 +/- 2.5 (range 18 to 29). Significant correlations were found between the FNPA score and WC (r = -.35, p<.01), BMI percentile (r = -.38, p<.01), %BF (r = -.43, p<.01), and the continuous CVD risk score (r = -.22, p = .02). No significant association was found between the FNPA score and TC:HDL (r=0.10, p=0.88) or MAP (r=-0.12, p=0.20). Conclusion. Children from a high-risk, obesogenic family environment as indicated with a lower FNPA score have a higher CVD risk factor profile than children from a low-risk family environment.

  10. Nutrition in the adolescent.

    PubMed

    Wahl, R

    1999-02-01

    This article reviews the nutritional requirements of puberty and the clinical assessment of nutritional status, and discusses the nutritional risks imposed by vegetarian diets, pregnancy, and athletic involvement. Energy (calories) and protein are essential in pubertal development. Adolescent females require approximately 2200 calories/day, whereas male adolescents require 2500-3000 calories/day. Additional intake requirements include fat, calcium, iron, zinc, vitamins, and fiber. The clinical assessment of nutritional status begins with obtaining a good diet history of the patient and this could be offered by the body mass index. Nutritional deficiencies and poor eating habits established during adolescence can have long-term consequences, including delayed sexual maturation, loss of final adult height, osteoporosis, hyperlipidemia, and obesity. As for vegetarian adolescents, nutritional risks include lack of iodine, vitamin B12, vitamin D, and some essential fatty acids. In addition, substances in some grains reduce gut absorption, thus increasing mineral deficiencies. Pregnancy may also be a risk factor for poor nutrition during adolescence. A pregnant adolescent has different nutritional needs because she is still growing. Among adolescent athletes many are turning to nutritional supplements in an attempt to improve athletic performance. A balanced, varied diet provides adequate calories and nutrition to meet the needs of most adolescents. They also have greater water needs than do adult athletes. Details on adolescent health concerns are further discussed in this article.

  11. Childhood body mass index growth trajectories and endometrial cancer risk

    PubMed Central

    Aarestrup, Julie; Gamborg, Michael; Tilling, Kate; Ulrich, Lian G.; Sørensen, Thorkild I.A.

    2016-01-01

    Previously, we found that excess weight already in childhood has positive associations with endometrial cancer; however, associations with changes in body mass index (BMI) during childhood are not well understood. Therefore, we examined whether growth in childhood BMI is associated with endometrial cancer and its sub‐types. A cohort of 155,505 girls from the Copenhagen School Health Records Register with measured weights and heights at the ages of 6–14 years and born 1930–1989 formed the analytical population. BMI was transformed to age‐specific z scores. Using linear spline multilevel models, each girl's BMI growth trajectory was estimated as the deviance from the average trajectory for three different growth periods (6.25–7.99, 8.0–10.99, 11.0–14.0 years). Via a link to health registers, 1,020 endometrial cancer cases were identified, and Cox regressions were performed. A greater gain in BMI during childhood was positively associated with endometrial cancer but no differences between the different growth periods were detected in models adjusted for baseline BMI. The hazard ratios for the associations with overall growth during childhood per 0.1 z score increase were 1.15 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.07–1.24) for all endometrial cancers, 1.12 (95% CI: 1.04–1.21) for estrogen‐dependent cancers, 1.16 (95% CI: 1.06–1.26) for endometrioid adenocarcinomas and 1.46 (95% CI: 1.16–1.84) for non‐estrogen‐dependent cancers. Growth in BMI in early life is positively linked to later endometrial cancer risk. We did not identify any sensitive childhood growth period, which suggests that excess gain in BMI during the entire childhood period should be avoided. PMID:27718528

  12. Nutrition-Related Cancer Prevention Cognitions and Behavioral Intentions: Testing the Risk Perception Attitude Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, Helen W.; Beckjord, Ellen Burke; Finney Rutten, Lila J.; Hesse, Bradford W.

    2008-01-01

    This study tested whether the risk perception attitude framework predicted nutrition-related cancer prevention cognitions and behavioral intentions. Data from the 2003 Health Information National Trends Survey were analyzed to assess respondents' reported likelihood of developing cancer (risk) and perceptions of whether they could lower their…

  13. Prenatal nutrition, epigenetics and schizophrenia risk: can we test causal effects?

    PubMed

    Kirkbride, James B; Susser, Ezra; Kundakovic, Marija; Kresovich, Jacob K; Davey Smith, George; Relton, Caroline L

    2012-06-01

    We posit that maternal prenatal nutrition can influence offspring schizophrenia risk via epigenetic effects. In this article, we consider evidence that prenatal nutrition is linked to epigenetic outcomes in offspring and schizophrenia in offspring, and that schizophrenia is associated with epigenetic changes. We focus upon one-carbon metabolism as a mediator of the pathway between perturbed prenatal nutrition and the subsequent risk of schizophrenia. Although post-mortem human studies demonstrate DNA methylation changes in brains of people with schizophrenia, such studies cannot establish causality. We suggest a testable hypothesis that utilizes a novel two-step Mendelian randomization approach, to test the component parts of the proposed causal pathway leading from prenatal nutritional exposure to schizophrenia. Applied here to a specific example, such an approach is applicable for wider use to strengthen causal inference of the mediating role of epigenetic factors linking exposures to health outcomes in population-based studies.

  14. Prenatal nutrition, epigenetics and schizophrenia risk: can we test causal effects?

    PubMed Central

    Kirkbride, James B; Susser, Ezra; Kundakovic, Marija; Kresovich, Jacob K; Smith, George Davey; Relton, Caroline L

    2014-01-01

    We posit that maternal prenatal nutrition can influence offspring schizophrenia risk via epigenetic effects. In this article, we consider evidence that prenatal nutrition is linked to epigenetic outcomes in offspring and schizophrenia in offspring, and that schizophrenia is associated with epigenetic changes. We focus upon one-carbon metabolism as a mediator of the pathway between perturbed prenatal nutrition and the subsequent risk of schizophrenia. Although post-mortem human studies demonstrate DNA methylation changes in brains of people with schizophrenia, such studies cannot establish causality. We suggest a testable hypothesis that utilizes a novel two-step Mendelian randomization approach, to test the component parts of the proposed causal pathway leading from prenatal nutritional exposure to schizophrenia. Applied here to a specific example, such an approach is applicable for wider use to strengthen causal inference of the mediating role of epigenetic factors linking exposures to health outcomes in population-based studies. PMID:22690666

  15. A theory-based newsletter nutrition education program reduces nutritional risk and improves dietary intake for congregate meal participants.

    PubMed

    Francis, Sarah L; MacNab, Lindsay; Shelley, Mack

    2014-01-01

    At-risk older adults need community-based nutrition programs that improve nutritional status and practices. This 6-month study assessed the impact of the traditional Chef Charles (CC) program (Control) compared to a theory-based CC program (Treatment) on nutritional risk (NR), dietary intakes, self-efficacy (SE), food security (FS), and program satisfaction for congregate meal participants. Participants were mostly educated, single, "food secure" White females. NR change for the treatment group was significantly higher (P = 0.042) than the control group. No differences were noted for SE or FS change and program satisfaction between groups. The overall distribution classification levels of FS changed significantly (P < .001) from pre to post. Over half (n = 46, 76.7%) reported making dietary changes and the majority (n = 52, 86.7%) rated CC as good to excellent. Results suggest the theory-based CC program (treatment) is more effective in reducing NR and dietary practices than the traditional CC program (control).

  16. The Index of Harm: A Measure for Comparing Occupational Risk Across Industries

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-03-01

    estimate of BEIR II (absolute Risk-Plateau Model) (Ref. 12). Under two of the five assumptions tested, the mining industry is found to have the...highest index of harm; under a third assumption, it comes very close to registering the highest index. The true index of harm for the mining industry -and

  17. A High Dietary Glycemic Index Increases Total Mortality in a Mediterranean Population at High Cardiovascular Risk

    PubMed Central

    Castro-Quezada, Itandehui; Sánchez-Villegas, Almudena; Estruch, Ramón; Salas-Salvadó, Jordi; Corella, Dolores; Schröder, Helmut; Álvarez-Pérez, Jacqueline; Ruiz-López, María Dolores; Artacho, Reyes; Ros, Emilio; Bulló, Mónica; Covas, María-Isabel; Ruiz-Gutiérrez, Valentina; Ruiz-Canela, Miguel; Buil-Cosiales, Pilar; Gómez-Gracia, Enrique; Lapetra, José; Pintó, Xavier; Arós, Fernando; Fiol, Miquel; Lamuela-Raventós, Rosa María; Martínez-González, Miguel Ángel; Serra-Majem, Lluís

    2014-01-01

    Objective Different types of carbohydrates have diverse glycemic response, thus glycemic index (GI) and glycemic load (GL) are used to assess this variation. The impact of dietary GI and GL in all-cause mortality is unknown. The objective of this study was to estimate the association between dietary GI and GL and risk of all-cause mortality in the PREDIMED study. Material and Methods The PREDIMED study is a randomized nutritional intervention trial for primary cardiovascular prevention based on community-dwelling men and women at high risk of cardiovascular disease. Dietary information was collected at baseline and yearly using a validated 137-item food frequency questionnaire (FFQ). We assigned GI values of each item by a 5-step methodology, using the International Tables of GI and GL Values. Deaths were ascertained through contact with families and general practitioners, review of medical records and consultation of the National Death Index. Cox regression models were used to estimate multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios (HR) and their 95% CI for mortality, according to quartiles of energy-adjusted dietary GI/GL. To assess repeated measures of exposure, we updated GI and GL intakes from the yearly FFQs and used Cox models with time-dependent exposures. Results We followed 3,583 non-diabetic subjects (4.7 years of follow-up, 123 deaths). As compared to participants in the lowest quartile of baseline dietary GI, those in the highest quartile showed an increased risk of all-cause mortality [HR = 2.15 (95% CI: 1.15–4.04); P for trend  = 0.012]. In the repeated-measures analyses using as exposure the yearly updated information on GI, we observed a similar association. Dietary GL was associated with all-cause mortality only when subjects were younger than 75 years. Conclusions High dietary GI was positively associated with all-cause mortality in elderly population at high cardiovascular risk. PMID:25250626

  18. Clinical Significance of the Prognostic Nutritional Index for Predicting Short- and Long-Term Surgical Outcomes After Gastrectomy: A Retrospective Analysis of 7781 Gastric Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jee Youn; Kim, Hyoung-Il; Kim, You-Na; Hong, Jung Hwa; Alshomimi, Saeed; An, Ji Yeong; Cheong, Jae-Ho; Hyung, Woo Jin; Noh, Sung Hoon; Kim, Choong-Bai

    2016-05-01

    To evaluate the predictive and prognostic significance of the prognostic nutritional index (PNI) in a large cohort of gastric cancer patients who underwent gastrectomy.Assessing a patient's immune and nutritional status, PNI has been reported as a predictive marker for surgical outcomes in various types of cancer.We retrospectively reviewed data from a prospectively maintained database of 7781 gastric cancer patients who underwent gastrectomy from January 2001 to December 2010 at a single center. From this data, we analyzed clinicopathologic characteristics, PNI, and short- and long-term surgical outcomes for each patient. We used the PNI value for the 10th percentile (46.70) of the study cohort as a cut-off for dividing patients into low and high PNI groups.Regarding short-term outcomes, multivariate analysis showed a low PNI (odds ratio [OR] = 1.505, 95% CI = 1.212-1.869, P <0.001), old age, male sex, high body mass index, medical comorbidity, total gastrectomy, and combined resection to be independent predictors of postoperative complications. Among these, only low PNI (OR = 4.279, 95% CI = 1.760-10.404, P = 0.001) and medical comorbidity were independent predictors of postoperative mortality. For long-term outcomes, low PNI was a poor prognostic factor for overall survival, but not recurrence (overall survival: hazard ratio [HR] = 1.383, 95% CI = 1.221-1.568, P < 0.001; recurrence-free survival: HR = 1.142, 95% CI = 0.985-1.325, P = 0.078).PNI can be used to predict patients at increased risk of postoperative morbidity and mortality. Although PNI was an independent prognostic factor for overall survival, the index was not associated with cancer recurrence.

  19. Low Prognostic Nutritional Index (PNI) Predicts Unfavorable Distant Metastasis-Free Survival in Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma: A Propensity Score-Matched Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Shaodong; Chen, Haiyang; Liang, Shaobo; Peng, Peijian; Chen, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Background Poor nutritional status is associated with progression and advanced disease in patients with cancer. The prognostic nutritional index (PNI) may represent a simple method of assessing host immunonutritional status. This study was designed to investigate the prognostic value of the PNI for distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS) in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Methods A training cohort of 1,168 patients with non-metastatic NPC from two institutions was retrospectively analyzed. The optimal PNI cutoff value for DMFS was identified using the online tool “Cutoff Finder”. DMFS was analyzed using stratified and adjusted analysis. Propensity score-matched analysis was performed to balance baseline characteristics between the high and low PNI groups. Subsequently, the prognostic value of the PNI for DMFS was validated in an external validation cohort of 756 patients with NPC. The area under the receiver operating characteristics curve (AUC) was calculated to compare the discriminatory ability of different prognostic scores. Results The optimal PNI cutoff value was determined to be 51. Low PNI was significantly associated with poorer DMFS than high PNI in univariate analysis (P<0.001) as well as multivariate analysis (P<0.001) before propensity score matching. In subgroup analyses, PNI could also stratify different risks of distant metastases. Propensity score-matched analyses confirmed the prognostic value of PNI, excluding other interpretations and selection bias. In the external validation cohort, patients with high PNI also had significantly lower risk of distant metastases than those with low PNI (Hazards Ratios, 0.487; P<0.001). The PNI consistently showed a higher AUC value at 1-year (0.780), 3-year (0.793) and 5-year (0.812) in comparison with other prognostic scores. Conclusion PNI, an inexpensive and easily assessable inflammatory index, could aid clinicians in developing individualized treatment and follow-up strategies for patients

  20. [Modified texture diet and useful in patients with nutritional risk].

    PubMed

    de Luis, Daniel A; Aller, Rocío; Izaola, Olatz

    2014-01-20

    In the nutritional management of patients with dysphagia and/or elderly must make a multidisciplinary approach and a main tool is changing the texture of food. Patients with dysphagia, who need a texture modified diet, generally do not have a calorie and nutrient requirements different from those exhibited by people of the same age and sex, unless a condition or disease coexist. In these patients, Texture of foods should be individualized according to the patient and the time course of their disease. The use of texture modified diets without specifying produces a clear decrease in caloric and protein intakes and nutritional disorders. These patients may have other characteristics associated diseases, which would require special modification, as in the case of diabetes mellitus, hypertension, osteoporosis and constipation. Sometimes it is necessary to use artificial products to achieve different desired textures and precooked dishes, too.

  1. Long-term nutrition education reduces several risk factors for type 2 diabetes mellitus in Brazilians with impaired glucose tolerance.

    PubMed

    Pimentel, Gustavo D; Portero-McLellan, Kátia C; Oliveira, Erick P; Spada, Ana P M; Oshiiwa, Marie; Zemdegs, Juliane C S; Barbalho, Sandra M

    2010-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of a nutrition education program (NEP) on anthropometric, dietetic, and metabolic parameters in high-risk subjects for type 2 diabetes mellitus. Fifty-one participants, both sexes, were randomly assigned to either the control (58.8%) or the intervention (NEP) group. The intervention group received frequent individual and group nutritional counseling from a team of nutritionists. Participants were assessed at baseline (M0) and after 12 months (M1) for anthropometric, dietetic, and metabolic parameters. The hypothesis was that high-risk subjects for type 2 diabetes mellitus participating in NEP would show an improvement in these parameters. At M1, the intervention group showed a significant decline in body weight (-3.4%), body mass index (-5.7%), cholesterol intake (-49.5%), fasting glycemia (-14.0%), fasting insulin (-9.0%), postprandial glycemia (-21.0%), postprandial insulin (-71.0%), total serum cholesterol (-23.0%), and glycated hemoglobin (-24.0%). A decrease in energy intake (5%, P = .06) and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (25%, P = .07) was observed in the interventional group, although it did not reach statistical significance. In contrast, the control group presented a significantly higher energy intake (19%, P = .04) and a nonsignificant increase in consumption of all macronutrients. The long-term NEP was found to improve anthropometric, dietary, and metabolic parameters in high-risk subjects for type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  2. Analysis of risk factors for pharyngocutaneous fistula after total laryngectomy with particular focus on nutritional status.

    PubMed

    Mattioli, F; Bettini, M; Molteni, G; Piccinini, A; Valoriani, F; Gabriele, S; Presutti, L

    2015-10-01

    Pharyngocutaneous fistula (PCF) is the most common complication following total laryngectomy and the most difficult to manage. It often causes increased morbidity, delays starting adjuvant therapy, prolongs hospitalisation, increases treatment costs and reduces the quality of life (QoL). The objective of this study is to analyse the predisposing factors and the most important nutritional parameters related to the development of PCF in patients undergoing total laryngectomy and to suggest medical alternatives that might improve results. We performed a retrospective study of 69 patients who underwent either primary or salvage total laryngectomy in our department between January 2008 and January 2012. Risk factors for fistula formation were analysed including tumour characteristics (histology, grading, AJCC stage), treatment (primary or salvage surgery, extent of resection, flap reconstruction, preoperative radiotherapy), comorbidity and nutritional status (preoperative haemoglobin, albumin and prealbumin levels and their changes during hospitalisation). Twenty-four patients developed a PCF (overall incidence 34.8%). Fistula formation was significantly higher in patients with diabetes, preoperative malnutrition (identified from low preoperative albumin and prealbumin levels). After specific nutritional evaluation and support, no patient developed a PCF. Risk factors for PCF formation are extensively treated in the literature but identification of high-risk patients is still controversial. Our study demonstrates that nutritional status of the patient, assessed by preoperative albumin, is also an important risk factor for PCF formation in addition to classical factors. Maintenance of a normal perioperative nutritional status can be helpful to avoid this complication.

  3. Anthropometry of Arm: Nutritional Risk Indicator in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Salvioni, Cristina Cleide Dos Santos; Stanich, Patricia; Oliveira, Acary Souza Bulle; Orsini, Marco

    2015-12-29

    The aim of the paper is to examine the correlation between clinical data, nutritional, respiratory and functional parameters in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). This is a descriptive study of 111 ALS patients [91 spinal onset (GS) and 20 bulbar onset (GB)] carried on using nutritional and respiratory parameters and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis functional rating scale (ALSFRS). ALSFRS was analyzed in the main domains (D1, D2 and D3). Forced vital capacity and anthropometric measurements, there was significant association for GS and GB, and in GS there was positive correlation with midarm circumference (MAC) (r=0.30; P=0.020), midarm muscle circumference (r=0.29; P=0.026), arm muscle area (r=0.28; P=0.033) and protein-caloric malnutrition score (r=0.27; P=0.039), while for GB only with body weight (r=0.64; P=0.024). On correlation of nutritional parameters and ALSFRS for GS patients we observed that MAC and %MAC presented positive association with both issues of D1 and D2. For GB, the total score in addition to correlate positively with anthropometric parameters related to lean body mass also presented negative association with a parameter associated with body fat. In summary, it is suggested that the application of anthropometry of arm could be useful in routine monitoring of ALS patients.

  4. Anthropometry of Arm: Nutritional Risk Indicator in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Stanich, Patricia; Oliveira, Acary Souza Bulle; Orsini, Marco

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the paper is to examine the correlation between clinical data, nutritional, respiratory and functional parameters in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). This is a descriptive study of 111 ALS patients [91 spinal onset (GS) and 20 bulbar onset (GB)] carried on using nutritional and respiratory parameters and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis functional rating scale (ALSFRS). ALSFRS was analyzed in the main domains (D1, D2 and D3). Forced vital capacity and anthropometric measurements, there was significant association for GS and GB, and in GS there was positive correlation with midarm circumference (MAC) (r=0.30; P=0.020), midarm muscle circumference (r=0.29; P=0.026), arm muscle area (r=0.28; P=0.033) and protein-caloric malnutrition score (r=0.27; P=0.039), while for GB only with body weight (r=0.64; P=0.024). On correlation of nutritional parameters and ALSFRS for GS patients we observed that MAC and %MAC presented positive association with both issues of D1 and D2. For GB, the total score in addition to correlate positively with anthropometric parameters related to lean body mass also presented negative association with a parameter associated with body fat. In summary, it is suggested that the application of anthropometry of arm could be useful in routine monitoring of ALS patients. PMID:26788263

  5. Rationale and Development of a Security Assurance Index with Application toward the Development of a World Risk Index

    SciTech Connect

    M. M. Plum; G. A. Beitel, PhD

    2006-06-01

    Assurance categories were previously developed to support the Department of Homeland Security’s efforts in the mitigation of Cyber Control System events. Defined according to the risk of life and economic loss, the minimum range is designated by policy, whereas the maximum limit seems to be constrained only by limits and interdependencies of the event. Use of this life / assets scale has proven to be helpful in managing risk due to the scale's ease of use, communication, and understanding. Suggestions have been made that this scale could be applied to all events of terror, disaster, and calamity of an international scale, with equally good results. This paper presents the history of some existing scales of disaster and assurance, the rationale behind the development of the original Security Assurance Index, and our proposed scale of disaster and calamity as a World Risk Index.

  6. [Nutritional therapy in the obese patient with insulin resistance and cardiovascular risk].

    PubMed

    Nubiola, A; Remolins, I; Nubiola, M

    2016-01-01

    Currently, each of the different scientific societies advocate one kind or another nutritional recommendations for patients with vascular risk. This variety of diets on the one hand enrich the nutritional therapeutic possibilities, but on the other can lead to some confusion, both for the patient and for the professional that advises. Furthermore, most studies assessing vascular risk mention a "diet" without defining or specifying to which kind of diet they refer, thereby introducing an important bias in the results of those studies. In fact, some of them bear a degree of contradiction. This review aims to shed some light on such a controversial topic.

  7. A Land-Use Perspective for Birdstrike Risk Assessment: The Attraction Risk Index

    PubMed Central

    Coccon, Francesca; Zucchetta, Matteo; Bossi, Giulia; Borrotti, Matteo; Torricelli, Patrizia; Franzoi, Piero

    2015-01-01

    Collisions between aircraft and birds, birdstrikes, pose a serious threat to aviation safety. The occurrence of these events is influenced by land-uses in the surroundings of airports. Airports located in the same region might have different trends for birdstrike risk, due to differences in the surrounding habitats. Here we developed a quantitative tool that assesses the risk of birdstrike based on the habitats within a 13-km buffer from the airport. For this purpose, we developed Generalized Linear Models (GLMs) with binomial distribution to estimate the contribution of habitats to wildlife use of the study area, depending on season. These GLMs predictions were combined to the flight altitude of birds within the 13-km buffer, the airport traffic pattern and the severity indices associated with impacts. Our approach was developed at Venice Marco Polo International airport (VCE), located in northeast Italy and then tested at Treviso Antonio Canova International airport (TSF), which is 20 km inland. Results from the two airports revealed that both the surrounding habitats and the season had a significant influence to the pattern of risk. With regard to VCE, agricultural fields, wetlands and urban areas contributed most to the presence of birds in the study area. Furthermore, the key role of distance of land-uses from the airport on the probability of presence of birds was highlighted. The reliability of developed risk index was demonstrated since at VCE it was significantly correlated with bird strike rate. This study emphasizes the importance of the territory near airports and the wildlife use of its habitats, as factors in need of consideration for birdstrike risk assessment procedures. Information on the contribution of habitats in attracting birds, depending on season, can be used by airport managers and local authorities to plan specific interventions in the study area in order to lower the risk. PMID:26114958

  8. Weight-for-age as an index of risk of death in children.

    PubMed

    Kielmann, A A; McCord, C

    1978-06-10

    Between April, 1968, and May, 1973, the Department of International Health of Johns Hopkins University studied the effects of the interaction of nutrition and infection in fourteen villages of Punjab, North India. Serial anthropometric measurements (used as index of nutritional status) and vital statistics of almost 3000 children aged 1-36 months showed that, on average, child mortality doubled with each 10% decline below 80% of the Harvard weight median. The relation between season and mortality showed that mortality-rates were highest just before and during the main (wheat) harvest, reflecting the effects of food scarcity, relative child neglect, and climate on child deaths among those already underweight.

  9. Body mass index and risk of Parkinson's disease: a prospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Logroscino, Giancarlo; Sesso, Howard D; Paffenbarger, Ralph S; Lee, I-Min

    2007-11-15

    High body mass index has been associated with increased risk of several chronic diseases, including cardiovascular disease, and, recently, Alzheimer's disease. There are few data on the association of body mass index with Parkinson's disease, and results have been inconsistent. The authors conducted a prospective study among 10,812 men in the Harvard Alumni Health Study, followed from 1988 to 1998 (mean age at baseline: 67.7 years), to test the hypothesis that body mass index is associated with Parkinson's disease risk. Among 106 incident cases of Parkinson's disease, body mass index at baseline was not associated with Parkinson's disease risk (for body mass index <22.5, 22.5-<24.9, and > or =25.0 kg/m2: multivariate relative risks = 1.51 (95% confidence interval: 0.95, 2.40), 1.00 (referent), and 0.86 (95% confidence interval: 0.53, 1.41)). The authors had information on body mass index during late adolescence, when men entered college; this was unrelated to Parkinson's disease risk as well. Subjects who lost at least 0.5 units of body mass index per decade between college entry and 1988 had a significantly increased Parkinson's disease risk, compared with men having stable body mass index (multivariate relative risk = 2.60, 95% confidence interval: 1.10, 6.10). The authors conclude that body mass index is unrelated to Parkinson's disease risk and speculate that the observation of increased risk with body mass index loss since late adolescence may reflect weight loss due to Parkinson's disease that preceded clinical diagnosis.

  10. Evaluation of Malnutrition Risk after Liver Transplantation Using the Nutritional Screening Tools.

    PubMed

    Lim, Hee-Sook; Kim, Hyung-Chul; Park, Yoon-Hyung; Kim, Soon-Kyung

    2015-10-01

    Malnutrition is a common problem in patients with end-stage liver disease requiring liver transplantation. The aim of this study was to evaluate nutritional status by using nutritional screening tools [Nutritional Risk Screening (NRS) 2002, Malnutrition Universal Screening Tool (MUST) and Subjective Global Assessment (SGA)] in patients before and after liver transplantation. We analyzed medical record, blood test, nutrient intake and malnutrition rate just before transplantation and at discharge, and at 3, 6, 12 months after transplantation respectively. Initially 33 patients enrolled as study subjects and finally 28 patients completed the study. Nutrients intake such as energy, fiber, calcium, potassium, vitamin C, and folate were insufficient at 12 months after transplantation. The rates of malnutrition before transplantation were very high, reported at 81.8% for the NRS 2002, 87.9% for the MUST, and 84.8% for the SGA. By 12 months after operation, malnutrition rates reported at NRS, MUST and SGA had decreased to 6.1%, 10.7%, and 10.7%, respectively. Sensitivity was 87.1% for the NRS 2002, 82.0% for the MUST, and 92.0% for the SGA. Of these screening tools the SGA was the highest sensitive tool that predict the risk of mortality in malnutrition patients who received transplantation. Further studies on nutritional status of patients and proper tools for nutrition intervention are needed to provide adequate nutritional care for patients.

  11. Evaluation of Malnutrition Risk after Liver Transplantation Using the Nutritional Screening Tools

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Hee-Sook; Kim, Hyung-Chul; Park, Yoon-Hyung

    2015-01-01

    Malnutrition is a common problem in patients with end-stage liver disease requiring liver transplantation. The aim of this study was to evaluate nutritional status by using nutritional screening tools [Nutritional Risk Screening (NRS) 2002, Malnutrition Universal Screening Tool (MUST) and Subjective Global Assessment (SGA)] in patients before and after liver transplantation. We analyzed medical record, blood test, nutrient intake and malnutrition rate just before transplantation and at discharge, and at 3, 6, 12 months after transplantation respectively. Initially 33 patients enrolled as study subjects and finally 28 patients completed the study. Nutrients intake such as energy, fiber, calcium, potassium, vitamin C, and folate were insufficient at 12 months after transplantation. The rates of malnutrition before transplantation were very high, reported at 81.8% for the NRS 2002, 87.9% for the MUST, and 84.8% for the SGA. By 12 months after operation, malnutrition rates reported at NRS, MUST and SGA had decreased to 6.1%, 10.7%, and 10.7%, respectively. Sensitivity was 87.1% for the NRS 2002, 82.0% for the MUST, and 92.0% for the SGA. Of these screening tools the SGA was the highest sensitive tool that predict the risk of mortality in malnutrition patients who received transplantation. Further studies on nutritional status of patients and proper tools for nutrition intervention are needed to provide adequate nutritional care for patients. PMID:26566519

  12. Development of a brief parent-report risk index for children following parental divorce.

    PubMed

    Tein, Jenn-Yun; Sandler, Irwin N; Braver, Sanford L; Wolchik, Sharlene A

    2013-12-01

    This article reports on the development of a brief 15-item parent-report risk index (Child Risk Index for Divorced or Separated Families; CRI-DS) to predict problem outcomes of children who have experienced parental divorce. A series of analyses using 3 data sets were conducted that identified and cross-validated a parsimonious set of items representing parent report of child behavior problems and family level risk and protective factors, each of which contributed to the predictive accuracy of the index. The index predicted child behavior outcomes and substance abuse problems up to 6 years later. The index has acceptable levels of sensitivity and specificity as a screening measure to predict problem outcomes up to 1 year later. The use of the index to identify the need for preventive services is discussed, along with limitations of the study.

  13. Nutrition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saur, Susan

    An elementary level nutrition unit provides teachers with student background information, suggested activities, and student worksheets. Part 1 focuses on the relationship of food to growth, health, and energy. In part 2, students learn about the four main food groups. Part 3 deals with nutrients and provides information about carbohydrates, fats,…

  14. Idiosyncratic risk in the Dow Jones Eurostoxx50 Index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daly, Kevin; Vo, Vinh

    2008-07-01

    Recent evidence by Campbell et al. [J.Y. Campbell, M. Lettau B.G. Malkiel, Y. Xu, Have individual stocks become more volatile? An empirical exploration of idiosyncratic risk, The Journal of Finance (February) (2001)] shows an increase in firm-level volatility and a decline of the correlation among stock returns in the US. In relation to the Euro-Area stock markets, we find that both aggregate firm-level volatility and average stock market correlation have trended upwards. We estimate a linear model of the market risk-return relationship nested in an EGARCH(1, 1)-M model for conditional second moments. We then show that traditional estimates of the conditional risk-return relationship, that use ex-post excess-returns as the conditioning information set, lead to joint tests of the theoretical model (usually the ICAPM) and of the Efficient Market Hypothesis in its strong form. To overcome this problem we propose alternative measures of expected market risk based on implied volatility extracted from traded option prices and we discuss the conditions under which implied volatility depends solely on expected risk. We then regress market excess-returns on lagged market implied variance computed from implied market volatility to estimate the relationship between expected market excess-returns and expected market risk.We investigate whether, as predicted by the ICAPM, the expected market risk is the main factor in explaining the market risk premium and the latter is independent of aggregate idiosyncratic risk.

  15. State of the art in benefit-risk analysis: food and nutrition.

    PubMed

    Tijhuis, M J; de Jong, N; Pohjola, M V; Gunnlaugsdóttir, H; Hendriksen, M; Hoekstra, J; Holm, F; Kalogeras, N; Leino, O; van Leeuwen, F X R; Luteijn, J M; Magnússon, S H; Odekerken, G; Rompelberg, C; Tuomisto, J T; Ueland, Ø; White, B C; Verhagen, H

    2012-01-01

    Benefit-risk assessment in food and nutrition is relatively new. It weighs the beneficial and adverse effects that a food (component) may have, in order to facilitate more informed management decisions regarding public health issues. It is rooted in the recognition that good food and nutrition can improve health and that some risk may be acceptable if benefit is expected to outweigh it. This paper presents an overview of current concepts and practices in benefit-risk analysis for food and nutrition. It aims to facilitate scientists and policy makers in performing, interpreting and evaluating benefit-risk assessments. Historically, the assessments of risks and benefits have been separate processes. Risk assessment is mainly addressed by toxicology, as demanded by regulation. It traditionally assumes that a maximum safe dose can be determined from experimental studies (usually in animals) and that applying appropriate uncertainty factors then defines the 'safe' intake for human populations. There is a minor role for other research traditions in risk assessment, such as epidemiology, which quantifies associations between determinants and health effects in humans. These effects can be both adverse and beneficial. Benefit assessment is newly developing in regulatory terms, but has been the subject of research for a long time within nutrition and epidemiology. The exact scope is yet to be defined. Reductions in risk can be termed benefits, but also states rising above 'the average health' are explored as benefits. In nutrition, current interest is in 'optimal' intake; from a population perspective, but also from a more individualised perspective. In current approaches to combine benefit and risk assessment, benefit assessment mirrors the traditional risk assessment paradigm of hazard identification, hazard characterization, exposure assessment and risk characterization. Benefit-risk comparison can be qualitative and quantitative. In a quantitative comparison, benefits

  16. Prospective association between cancer risk and an individual dietary index based on the British Food Standards Agency Nutrient Profiling System.

    PubMed

    Donnenfeld, Mathilde; Julia, Chantal; Kesse-Guyot, Emmanuelle; Méjean, Caroline; Ducrot, Pauline; Péneau, Sandrine; Deschasaux, Mélanie; Latino-Martel, Paule; Fezeu, Léopold; Hercberg, Serge; Touvier, Mathilde

    2015-11-28

    The Food Standards Agency Nutrient Profiling System (FSA-NPS) constitutes the basis for the Five-Colour Nutrition Label suggested in France to be put on the front-of-pack of food products. At the individual level, a dietary index (FSA-NPS DI) has been derived and validated and corresponds to a weighted mean of all FSA-NPS scores of foods usually consumed by the individual, reflecting the nutritional quality of his/her diet. Our aim was to investigate the association between the FSA-NPS DI and cancer risk in a large cohort. This prospective study included 6435 participants to the SUpplémentation en VItamines et Minéraux AntioXydants cohort (1994-2007) who completed at least six 24 h dietary records during the first 2 years of follow-up. FSA-NPS DI was computed for each subject (higher values representing lower nutritional quality of the diet). After a median follow-up of 12·6 years, 453 incident cancers were diagnosed. Associations were characterised by multivariate Cox proportional hazards models. The FSA-NPS DI was directly associated with overall cancer risk (hazard ratio (HR)for a 1-point increment=1·08 (95 % CI 1·01, 1·15), P trend=0·02; HRQ5 v. Q1=1·34 (95 % CI 1·00, 1·81), P trend=0·03). This association tended to be more specifically observed in subjects with moderate energy intake (≤median, HRfor a 1-point increment=1·10 (95 % CI 1·01-1·20), P trend=0·03). No association was observed in subjects with higher energy intake (P trend=0·3). Results were not statistically significant for breast and prostate cancer risks. For the first time, this study investigated the prospective association between the FSA-NPS individual score and cancer risk. The results suggest that unhealthy food choices may be associated with a 34 % increase in overall cancer risk, supporting the public health relevance of developing front-of-pack nutrition labels based on this score.

  17. Nutrition and risk of dementia: overview and methodological issues.

    PubMed

    Morris, Martha Clare

    2016-03-01

    After two decades of research on nutrition and dementia there is strong evidence for preventive effects of vitamin E, B vitamins, and n-3 fatty acids and deleterious effects of saturated fat on dementia. Among specific foods with evidence of neuroprotection are green leafy vegetables, other vegetables, berries, and seafood. A number of studies have examined dietary patterns, particularly the Mediterranean diet and DASH (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension), neither of which is tailored to the specific foods and nutrients that have been identified as neuroprotective. A new diet called MIND (Mediterranean-DASH Intervention for Neurodegenerative Delay) incorporates many elements of the Mediterranean diet and DASH but with modifications that reflect current evidence for brain neuroprotection. The evidence in support of the relation of various nutrients and the Mediterranean diet to dementia has been inconsistent. The inconsistencies may be explained by inattention to nutrient/food intake levels in the interpretation of study findings and trial design, including a shifting metric among studies for scoring adherence to the Mediterranean diet. Future studies should pay particular attention to levels of intake in the design and analyses of nutritional studies.

  18. Nutrition and risk of dementia: overview and methodological issues

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Martha Clare

    2016-01-01

    After little more than two decades of research on nutrition and dementia, there is strong evidence for preventive effects of vitamin E, B vitamins, and n-3 fatty acids, and deleterious effects of saturated fat, on dementia. Among specific foods with evidence of neuroprotection are green leafy vegetables and other vegetables, berries, and seafood. A number of studies have examined dietary patterns, particularly the Mediterranean and DASH (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension) diets; neither of these diets is tailored to the specific foods and nutrients that have been identified as neuroprotective. A new diet, called MIND (Mediterranean–DASH Intervention for Neurodegenerative Delay), incorporates many elements of the Mediterranean and DASH diets but with modifications that reflect the best evidence for brain neuroprotection. The evidence in support of the relation of various nutrients and the Mediterranean diet to dementia has been inconsistent. The seeming inconsistencies may be explained by inattention to nutrient/food intake levels in the interpretation of study findings and trial design. This includes a shifting metric among studies for scoring adherence to the Mediterranean diet. Future studies should pay particular attention to levels of intake in the design and analyses of nutritional studies. PMID:27116239

  19. Family medicine obstetrics: pregnancy and nutrition.

    PubMed

    Harnisch, Jean M; Harnisch, Patricia H; Harnisch, David R

    2012-03-01

    This article discusses pregnancy and nutrition in 3 main timeframes, the prepregnancy nutritional health evaluation, nutrition during pregnancy, and nutrition during the puerperium, and also includes comments on nutrition and lactation. This article begins with a brief review of the risks of obesity (increased body mass index [BMI]) and anorexia (decreased BMI), with special attention to these undesired conditions during pregnancy, followed by a section on nutrients other than calories. Information on body weight, minerals, and vitamins during pregnancy is reviewed. This article ends with information on nutrition in the postpartum period.

  20. Relationships among body mass index, activities of daily living and zinc nutritional status in disabled elderly patients in nursing facilities.

    PubMed

    Kosaka, Kazue; Yamashita, Sachiko; Ando, Chinatsu; Endo, Yoriaki; Taniguchi, Keiko; Kikunaga, Shigeshi

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between the zinc nutritional status and the factors associated with serum zinc concentration in the elderly patients in two nursing facilities: body mass index (BMI), the level of care, the grade of bedriddenness, and the grade of cognitive function. The estimations of the hematological constituents, physical index, and dietary survey were made based on the examination carried out of the 26 disabled elderly patients (male 6, female 20, mean age 90±6 y). The results obtained from this study can be summarized as follows: 1) The low activities of daily living (ADL) group showed a low level of serum zinc concentration, although the uptake rate of zinc by subjects was shown to be high when compared to the Dietary Reference Intakes 2010. 2) The high ADL group showed a high level of serum zinc concentration. 3) The results of multiple regression analysis among the serum zinc concentration, the determined serum ingredients, and the physical characteristics showed the significant correlation of serum zinc concentration against the BMI, the level of care, height, Alb and iron values. 4) The BMI, the level of care, the grade of bedriddenness, and the grade of cognitive function of the subjects changed according to the zinc nutritional status. These results suggested that the actual requirements of zinc of the subjects were different according to the BMI, the level of care, the grade of bedriddenness, and the grade of cognitive function.

  1. Sensitivity analysis of the Ohio phosphorus risk index

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Phosphorus (P) Index is a widely used tool for assessing the vulnerability of agricultural fields to P loss; yet, few of the P Indices developed in the U.S. have been evaluated for their accuracy. Sensitivity analysis is one approach that can be used prior to calibration and field-scale testing ...

  2. A Late Life Risk Index for Severe Cognitive Impairment in Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Downer, Brian; Veeranki, Sreenivas P.; Wong, Rebeca

    2016-01-01

    Background Several dementia risk indices have been developed for older adults in high-income countries. However, no index has been developed for populations in low- or middle-income countries. Objective To create a risk index for predicting severe cognitive impairment among adults aged ≥60 in Mexico and to compare the accuracy of this index to the Dementia Screening Indicator (DSI). Methods This study included 3,002 participants from the Mexican Health and Aging Study (MHAS) interviewed in 2001 and 2012. The MHAS risk index included sociodemographic, health, and functional characteristics collected in 2001. A point value based on the beta coefficients from a multivariable logistic regression model was assigned to each risk factor and the total score was calculated. Results The MHAS risk index (AUC = 0.74 95% CI = 0.70–0.77) and DSI (AUC = 0.72 95% CI = 0.69–0.77) had similar accuracy for discriminating between participants who developed severe cognitive impairment from those who did not. A score of ≥16 on the MHAS risk index had a sensitivity of 0.69 (95% CI = 0.64–0.70) and specificity of 0.67 (95% CI = 0.66–0.69). A score of ≥23 on the DSI had a sensitivity of 0.56 (95% CI = 0.50–0.63) and specificity of 0.78 (95% CI = 0.76–0.79). Discussion The MHAS risk index and DSI have moderate accuracy for predicting severe cognitive impairment among older adults in Mexico. This provides evidence that existing dementia risk indices may be applicable in low- and middle-income countries such as Mexico. Future research should seek to identify additional risk factors that can improve the accuracy of the MHAS risk index. PMID:27060940

  3. Measuring Appetite with the Simplified Nutritional Appetite Questionnaire Identifies Hospitalised Older People at Risk of Worse Health Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    PILGRIM, A.L.; BAYLIS, D.; JAMESON, K.A.; COOPER, C.; SAYER, A.A.; ROBINSON, S.M.; ROBERTS, H.C.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Poor appetite is commonly reported by older people but is rarely measured. The Simplified Nutritional Appetite Questionnaire (SNAQ) was validated to predict weight loss in community dwelling older adults but has been little used in hospitals. We evaluated it in older women on admission to hospital and examined associations with healthcare outcomes. Design Longitudinal observational with follow-up at six months. Setting Female acute Medicine for Older People wards at a University hospital in England. Participants 179 female inpatients. Measurements Age, weight, Body Mass Index (BMI), grip strength, SNAQ, Barthel Index Score, Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE), Geriatric Depression Scale: Short Form (GDS-SF), Malnutrition Universal Screening Tool (MUST), category of domicile and receipt of care were measured soon after admission and repeated at six month follow-up. The length of hospital stay (LOS), hospital acquired infection, readmissions and deaths by follow-up were recorded. Results 179 female participants mean age 87 (SD 4.7) years were recruited. 42% of participants had a low SNAQ score (<14, indicating poor appetite). A low SNAQ score was associated with an increased risk of hospital acquired infection (OR 3.53; 95% CI: 1.48, 8.41; p=0.004) and with risk of death (HR 2.29; 95% CI: 1.12, 4.68; p = 0.023) by follow-up. Conclusion Poor appetite was common among the older hospitalised women studied, and was associated with higher risk of poor healthcare outcomes. PMID:26728926

  4. Heated apple juice supplemented with onion has greatly improved nutritional quality and browning index.

    PubMed

    Lee, Bonggi; Seo, Jeong Dae; Rhee, Jin-Kyu; Kim, Choon Young

    2016-06-15

    Although fruit juices are very popular, enzymatic browning occurs easily. Browning of fruit juice deteriorates nutrition value and product quality due to oxidation of polyphenol compounds. Therefore, development of natural food additives that reduce browning will be beneficial for improving quality of fruit juices. Onion has been reported to be a potent natural anti-browning agent. Here, we compared unheated and heated apple juices pre-supplemented with onion with respect to browning and nutritional quality. The unheated apple juice supplemented with onion showed reduced browning as well as increased total soluble solid, total phenol concentration, radical scavenging activities, and ferric reducing and copper chelating activities without any change in flavonoid concentration. On the other hand, heated juice supplemented with onion not only showed improved values for these parameters but also markedly increased flavonoid concentration. Thus, we conclude that application of heating and onion addition together may greatly improve quality of apple juice.

  5. Nutritional Status and Risk Factors for Chronic Disease in Urban-Dwelling Adults with Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braunschweig, Carol L.; Gomez, Sandra; Sheean, Patricia; Tomey, Kristin M.; Rimmer, James; Heller, Tamar

    2004-01-01

    Nutritional status and biochemical risk factors for chronic disease were assessed in 48 community-dwelling adults with Down syndrome in the Chicago area. Dietary intake was measured using a food frequency questionnaire completed by the participant's primary caregiver; anthropometric measures included height and weight and waist circumference.…

  6. Nutritional status and diarrheal illness as independent risk factors for alveolar pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Coles, Christian L; Fraser, Drora; Givon-Lavi, Noga; Greenberg, David; Gorodischer, Raphael; Bar-Ziv, Jacob; Dagan, Ron

    2005-11-15

    Community-acquired alveolar pneumonia (CAAP) is typically associated with bacterial infections and is especially prevalent in vulnerable populations worldwide. The authors studied nutritional status and diarrheal history as risk factors for CAAP in Bedouin children <5 years of age living in Israel. In this prospective case-control study (2001-2002), 334 children with radiographically confirmed CAAP were compared with 529 controls without pneumonia with regard to nutritional status and diarrhea history. Controls were frequency matched to cases on age and enrollment month. Logistic regression models were used to evaluate associations of CAAP with nutritional status and recent diarrhea experience. Anemia (adjusted odds ratio (AOR) = 3.32, 95% confidence interval (CI): 2.24, 4.94; p < 0.001), low birth weight (AOR = 2.16, 95% CI: 1.32, 3.54; p = 0.002), stunting (AOR = 2.22, 95% CI: 1.31, 3.78; p = 0.004), serum retinol concentration (AOR = 1.03 per microg/dl, 95% CI: 1.02, 1.05; p < 0.001), and having > or =1 diarrhea episodes within 31 days prior to enrollment (AOR = 2.30, 95% CI: 1.26, 4.19; p = 0.007) were identified as risk factors for CAAP. Results suggest that improving antenatal care and the nutritional status of infants may reduce the risk of CAAP in Bedouin children. Furthermore, they suggest that vaccines developed to prevent diarrhea may also lower the risk of CAAP.

  7. Macronutrient intake and risk of urothelial cell carcinoma in the European prospective investigation into cancer and nutrition.

    PubMed

    Allen, Naomi E; Appleby, Paul N; Key, Timothy J; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B; Ros, Martine M; Kiemeney, Lambertus A L M; Tjønneland, Anne; Roswall, Nina; Overvad, Kim; Weikert, Steffen; Boeing, Heiner; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Teucher, Birgit; Panico, Salvatore; Sacerdote, Carlotta; Tumino, Rosario; Palli, Domenico; Sieri, Sabina; Peeters, Petra; Quirós, Jose Ramón; Jakszyn, Paula; Molina-Montes, Esther; Chirlaque, María-Dolores; Ardanaz, Eva; Dorronsoro, Miren; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Wareham, Nick; Ljungberg, Börje; Hallmans, Göran; Ehrnström, Roy; Ericson, Ulrika; Gram, Inger Torhild; Parr, Christine L; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Karapetyan, Tina; Dilis, Vardis; Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Fagherrazzi, Guy; Romieu, Isabelle; Gunter, Marc J; Riboli, Elio

    2013-02-01

    Previous studies have suggested that dietary factors may be important in the development of bladder cancer. We examined macronutrient intake in relation to risk of urothelial cell carcinoma among 469,339 men and women in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition. Associations were examined using Cox regression, stratified by sex, age at recruitment and centre and further adjusted for smoking status and duration, body mass index and total energy intake. After an average of 11.3 years of follow-up, 1,416 new cases of urothelial cell carcinoma were identified. After allowing for measurement error, a 3% increase in the consumption of energy intake from animal protein was associated with a 15% higher risk (95% confidence interval [CI]: 3-30%; p(trend) = 0.01) and a 2% increase in energy from plant protein intake was associated with a 23% lower risk (95% CI: 36-7%, p(trend) = 0.006). Dietary intake of fat, carbohydrate, fibre or calcium was not associated with risk. These findings suggest that animal and/or plant protein may affect the risk of urothelial cell carcinoma, and examination of these associations in other studies is needed.

  8. Oral contraceptives, reproductive history and risk of colorectal cancer in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition

    PubMed Central

    Tsilidis, K K; Allen, N E; Key, T J; Bakken, K; Lund, E; Berrino, F; Fournier, A; Olsen, A; Tjønneland, A; Overvad, K; Boutron-Ruault, M-C; Clavel-Chapelon, F; Byrnes, G; Chajes, V; Rinaldi, S; Chang-Claude, J; Kaaks, R; Bergmann, M; Boeing, H; Koumantaki, Y; Stasinopoulou, G; Trichopoulou, A; Palli, D; Tagliabue, G; Panico, S; Tumino, R; Vineis, P; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B; van Duijnhoven, F J B; van Gils, C H; Peeters, P H M; Rodríguez, L; González, C A; Sánchez, M-J; Chirlaque, M-D; Barricarte, A; Dorronsoro, M; Borgquist, S; Manjer, J; van Guelpen, B; Hallmans, G; Rodwell, S A; Khaw, K-T; Norat, T; Romaguera, D; Riboli, E

    2010-01-01

    Background: Oral contraceptive use and reproductive factors may initiate long-term changes to the hormonal milieu and thereby, possibly influence colorectal cancer risk. Methods: We examined the association of hormonal and reproductive factors with risk of colorectal cancer among 337 802 women in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition, of whom 1878 developed colorectal cancer. Results: After stratification for center and age, and adjustment for body mass index, smoking, diabetes mellitus, physical activity and alcohol consumption, ever use of oral contraceptives was marginally inversely associated with colorectal cancer risk (hazard ratio (HR), 0.92; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.83–1.02), although this association was stronger among post-menopausal women (HR, 0.84; 95% CI: 0.74–0.95). Duration of oral contraceptive use and reproductive factors, including age at menarche, age at menopause, type of menopause, ever having an abortion, parity, age at first full-term pregnancy and breastfeeding, were not associated with colorectal cancer risk. Conclusion: Our findings provide limited support for a potential inverse association between oral contraceptives and colorectal cancer risk. PMID:21045829

  9. Let Food Be Thy Medicine: Diet, Nutrition, and Biomarkers' Risk of Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Mosconi, Lisa; McHugh, Pauline F

    2015-06-01

    Epidemiological evidence linking diet-one of the most important modifiable lifestyle factors-and risk of Alzheimer's disease (AD)-the most common cause of dementia-is rapidly increasing. However, the biological mechanisms underlying the relationship between dietary nutrients, brain aging, and risk of AD are largely unexplored. Recent studies using brain imaging and biological markers of AD have begun to clarify how diet and nutrition modulate risk of AD in cognitively normal individuals, especially those at increased genetic risk. Such knowledge is critical prior to implementing dietary recommendations for prevention and treatment of disease.

  10. Let Food Be Thy Medicine: Diet, Nutrition, and Biomarkers’ Risk of Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mosconi, Lisa; McHugh, Pauline F.

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiological evidence linking diet—one of the most important modifiable lifestyle factors—and risk of Alzheimer’s disease (AD)—the most common cause of dementia—is rapidly increasing. However, the biological mechanisms underlying the relationship between dietary nutrients, brain aging, and risk of AD are largely unexplored. Recent studies using brain imaging and biological markers of AD have begun to clarify how diet and nutrition modulate risk of AD in cognitively normal individuals, especially those at increased genetic risk. Such knowledge is critical prior to implementing dietary recommendations for prevention and treatment of disease. PMID:26167396

  11. Nutritional status and well being. Is there a relationship between body mass index and the well-being of older people?

    PubMed

    Balcombe, N R; Ferry, P G; Saweirs, W M

    2001-01-01

    Poor nutritional status may impair well being indirectly as a consequence of increased morbidity and decline in functional status. The aim of this study was to examine the independent effect of body mass index on the well being of older people. Thirty one hospital-based patients over 65 years of age were studied. Well being was assessed using the Philadelphia Geriatric Center Morale Scale (PGCMS)--anglicised version. Body mass index and well being were assessed on admission to hospital and at three months. At follow-up, a significant correlation was observed between body mass index and PGCMS values. Further analysis showed that this relationship was linear, with poor nutritional status being associated with low levels of well being and good nutritional status being associated with the highest levels of well being. High or low body mass index was able to predict the PGCMS score with a poor sensitivity of 44% and specificity of 96%. When the contribution of potential confounding variables was analysed, body mass was found to have no significant independent effect on well being. Instead, the presence of depression was the most powerful predictor of levels of well being. In conclusion, this study has demonstrated that nutritional status, as indicated by body mass index, has no detectable independent effect on well being. However, measurement of nutritional status may still have a role in the assessment of well being, in that, while the finding of a low body mass index cannot be taken as indicative of low levels of well being, the finding of a high body mass index is likely to indicate adequate well being. Further studies, however, are required in this area that would involve larger numbers of subjects and alternative measures of nutritional status and well being.

  12. Low Prognostic Nutritional Index Correlates with Worse Survival in Patients with Advanced NSCLC following EGFR-TKIs

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Tao; Hu, Zhi-Huang; Hong, Shao-Dong; Zhou, Ting; Huang, Yan; Zhao, Hong-Yun; Zhang, Li

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study was designed to demonstrate the prognostic value of prognostic nutritional index (PNI), a reflection systemic immunonutritional status, on the long-term survival of patients taking epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). Methods In this retrospective study, eligible advanced NSCLC patients with sensitive EGFR mutations (exon 19 deletion or L858R in exon 21) were included to investigate the correlation between the PNI and overall survival (OS). The PNI was calculated as 10 x serum albumin value (g/dl) + 0.005 x peripheral lymphocyte count (per mm3). The prognostic significance of PNI and other clinicopathologic factors was identified by univariate and multivariate analysis. Results Finally, 144 patients met the inclusion criteria. The optimal cut-off value of PNI for survival stratification was 48.78. Compared with high PNI group (n = 81), low PNI (n = 63) was significantly associated with elevated C-reactive protein (CRP) level and non-response to TKIs. Overall survival was superior in the high PNI group (HR, 0.44, p = 0.004), especially for patient with L858R (HR, 0.37, p = 0.009) rather than 19 deletion (HR, 0.69, p = 0.401). The independent prognostic value of PNI was validated by multivariate analysis. Conclusion This pilot investigation demonstrated that low prognostic nutritional index correlates with worse survival for patients with advanced NSCLC and taking EGFR-TKIs. The assessment of a convenient index, known as PNI, worth attention in routine clinical practice for patients following EGFR-TKIs treatment. PMID:26784943

  13. Oral contraceptive use and reproductive factors and risk of ovarian cancer in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition

    PubMed Central

    Tsilidis, K K; Allen, N E; Key, T J; Dossus, L; Lukanova, A; Bakken, K; Lund, E; Fournier, A; Overvad, K; Hansen, L; Tjønneland, A; Fedirko, V; Rinaldi, S; Romieu, I; Clavel-Chapelon, F; Engel, P; Kaaks, R; Schütze, M; Steffen, A; Bamia, C; Trichopoulou, A; Zylis, D; Masala, G; Pala, V; Galasso, R; Tumino, R; Sacerdote, C; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B; van Duijnhoven, F J B; Braem, M G M; Onland-Moret, N C; Gram, I T; Rodríguez, L; Travier, N; Sánchez, M-J; Huerta, J M; Ardanaz, E; Larrañaga, N; Jirström, K; Manjer, J; Idahl, A; Ohlson, N; Khaw, K-T; Wareham, N; Mouw, T; Norat, T; Riboli, E

    2011-01-01

    Background: It is well established that parity and use of oral contraceptives reduce the risk of ovarian cancer, but the associations with other reproductive variables are less clear. Methods: We examined the associations of oral contraceptive use and reproductive factors with ovarian cancer risk in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition. Among 327 396 eligible women, 878 developed ovarian cancer over an average of 9 years. Hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using Cox proportional hazard models stratified by centre and age, and adjusted for smoking status, body mass index, unilateral ovariectomy, simple hysterectomy, menopausal hormone therapy, and mutually adjusted for age at menarche, age at menopause, number of full-term pregnancies and duration of oral contraceptive use. Results: Women who used oral contraceptives for 10 or more years had a significant 45% (HR, 0.55; 95% CI, 0.41–0.75) lower risk compared with users of 1 year or less (P-trend, <0.01). Compared with nulliparous women, parous women had a 29% (HR, 0.71; 95% CI, 0.59–0.87) lower risk, with an 8% reduction in risk for each additional pregnancy. A high age at menopause was associated with a higher risk of ovarian cancer (>52 vs ⩽45 years: HR, 1.46; 95% CI, 1.06–1.99; P-trend, 0.02). Age at menarche, age at first full-term pregnancy, incomplete pregnancies and breastfeeding were not associated with risk. Conclusion: This study shows a strong protective association of oral contraceptives and parity with ovarian cancer risk, a higher risk with a late age at menopause, and no association with other reproductive factors. PMID:21915124

  14. Nutrition and Other Protective Behaviors Motivated by Environmental Health Risk Awareness

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Elizabeth W.; Feng, Limin; Dixon, Jane K.; Dixon, John P.; Hofe, Carolyn R.; Gaetke, Lisa M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Research findings have suggested that exposure to environmental pollutants contributes to increased health risks, which may be modulated by certain nutrition and other protective health behaviors. Nutrition professionals play an important role in effectively disseminating this information and in devising specific community-based nutrition education programs for audiences located in areas with environmental health issues. Objective To assess awareness of environmental health problems and motivation to adopt protective health behaviors for use in planning nutrition education programs for communities exposed to environmental pollutants. Method Data were collected from a modified, validated Environmental Health Engagement Profile (EHEP) survey instrument administered to adults (n=774) participating in community events in Kentucky based on location relative to hazardous waste sites. Results The modified EHEP survey instrument showed good internal consistency reliability, and demographic characteristics were evaluated. Correlation analyses revealed significant positive correlations in all groups, separately and combined, between awareness of environmental pollution in an individual’s surroundings and the extent of concern that pollutants cause adverse health effects (P < 0.01) and between concern that pollutants cause adverse health effects and taking personal actions to protect against such environmental insults (P < 0.01). The groups having the highest level of awareness posed by pollution are those residing near federally designated hazardous waste sites. Conclusion These results suggest that determining and expanding an audience’s knowledge and perceptions of environmental health risks will enhance effective nutrition education program planning. PMID:28090221

  15. Preoperative Nutritional Therapy Reduces the Risk of Anastomotic Leakage in Patients with Crohn's Disease Requiring Resections

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Zhen; Guo, Dong; Gong, Jianfeng; Zhu, Weiming; Zuo, Lugen; Sun, Jing; Li, Ning; Li, Jieshou

    2016-01-01

    Background. The rate of anastomotic leakage is high in surgeries for Crohn's disease, and therefore a temporary diverting stoma is often needed. We conducted this study to investigate whether preoperative nutritional therapy could reduce the risk of anastomotic leakage while decreasing the frequency of temporary stoma formation. Methods. This was a retrospective study. Patients requiring bowel resections due to Crohn's disease were reviewed. The rate of anastomotic leakage and temporary diverting stoma was compared between patients who received preoperative nutritional therapy and those on a normal diet before surgery. Possible predictive factors for anastomotic leakage were also analyzed. Results. One hundred and fourteen patients undergoing 123 surgeries were included. Patients in nutritional therapy (NT) group had a significantly lower level of C-reactive protein on the day before surgery. Patients in NT group suffered less anastomotic leakage (2.3% versus 17.9%, P = 0.023) and less temporary diverting stoma (22.8% versus 40.9%, P = 0.036). Serum albumin of the day before surgery ≤35 g/L and preoperative nutritional therapy were identified as factors which independently affected the rate of anastomotic leakage. Conclusion. Preoperative nutritional therapy reduced the risk of anastomotic leakage and the frequency of temporary diverting stoma formation in patients with Crohn's disease requiring resections. PMID:26858749

  16. Evaluation of dysphagia risk, nutritional status and caloric intake in elderly patients with Alzheimer's

    PubMed Central

    Goes, Vanessa Fernanda; Mello-Carpes, Pâmela Billig; de Oliveira, Lilian Oliveira; Hack, Jaqueline; Magro, Marcela; Bonini, Juliana Sartori

    2014-01-01

    Objective to evaluate the risk of dysphagia and its relationship with the stage of Alzheimer's Disease, as well as the relationship between the risk of dysphagia and nutritional status and caloric intake in elderly people with Alzheimer's disease. Methods the sample consisted of 30 subjects of both genders with probable Alzheimer's disease. The stage of the disease, nutritional status, energy intake, and risk of dysphagia were assessed. Results it was found that increased risk of dysphagia is associated with the advance in the stages of Alzheimer's disease and that even patients in the early stages of disease have a slight risk of developing dysphagia. No association was found between nutritional status and the risk of dysphagia. High levels of inadequate intake of micronutrients were also verified in the patients. Conclusion an association between dysphagia and the development of Alzheimer's disease was found. The results indicate the need to monitor the presence of dysphagia and the micronutrient intake in patients with Alzheimer's disease. PMID:26107841

  17. Screening for Peripheral Artery Disease and Cardiovascular Disease Risk Assessment with Ankle Brachial Index in Adults

    MedlinePlus

    Understanding Task Force Recommendations Screening for Peripheral Artery Disease and Cardiovascular Disease Risk Assessment with Ankle Brachial Index in Adults The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (Task Force) has issued a ...

  18. Association between nutritional risk and routine clinical laboratory measurements and adverse outcomes: a prospective study in hospitalized patients of wuhan tongji hospital

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Z Y; Gao, C; Ye, T; Zuo, X Z; Wang, G H; Xu, X S; Yao, Y

    2015-01-01

    Background/Objectives: Nutritional risk screening (NRS-2002) and routine clinical laboratory measurements (RCLMs) had been shown to have a predictive value in adverse outcomes in some studies, respectively. This study analyzed the association between NRS-2002 and RCLMs and estimated their prospective value in predicting adverse outcomes. Subjects/Methods: A total of 916 hospitalized patients were screened on admission with NRS-2002 and Subjective Global Assessment; RCLMs, which include blood test, kidney and liver function and electrolytes, were recorded. Diagnosis, nutritional support, surgery, radiotherapy, chemotherapy, complications, mortality and hospital stay during hospitalization were collected. The X2-test, odds ratios with 95% confidence intervals, kappa (k) statistic and regression analyses were conducted. Results: An overall 48.1% of the 916 patients were at nutritional risk on admission. Comparing ‘at risk' with ‘no risk', a significantly higher incidence of abnormality was found not only in nutritional markers but also in other parameters of RCLMs (OR ranged from 1.5 to 3.5). Regression analyses showed that ‘at risk' determined at admission was not a significant predictor of adverse outcomes after adjusting for other confounding factors, although it was a strong predictor in univariate analysis, whereas hypoalbuminemia, low total lymphocyte count, abnormality of hepatic and renal function were predictors after adjusting for confounders. Conclusions: The findings suggest that NRS-2002 might be a global index of ‘sickness' rather than be only a nutritional screening tool. It being rated once at admission is insufficient and should be repeated for using it as a predictor, whereas RCLMs routinely measured at admission may be able to be used to predict adverse outcomes. PMID:25369828

  19. The correlation between the comprehensive nutrition index and quality of life of patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma treated by intensity-modulated radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Ma, Liqin; Wu, Tingting; Pan, Jianji; Kong, Xiangquan; Guo, Qiaojuan; Yang, Ling; Zhang, Yu; Lin, Shaojun; Chen, Chuanben; Huang, Chaobin

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the changing tendency of nutrition with 54 nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients during intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), and to investigate the correlation between comprehensive nutritional status and quality of life (QoL), which was assessed by the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Core Quality-of-Life Questionnaire. The nutritional index, including body mass index, ideal body weight percentage, usual body weight percentage, albumin, hemoglobin, and total lymphocyte count (TLC), was evaluated at 2 time points: within 48 h after admission (T1) and at the end of treatment with IMRT (T2). A statistically significant downgrade of every index was observed during IMRT. A comprehensive nutritional model was established by principal components analysis at T2. QoL scores of functional (P = 0.002) and the global QoL scales (P = 0.001) existed a positive correlation with comprehensive nutritional status. QoL scores of symptom scales (P = 0.002) and 6 single items (P = 0.005) had a negative correlation with it. The scores of global QoL scales in comprehensive nutrition of normal (20.4%), moderate (55.6%), and severe malnutrition (24.1%) were 69.70 ± 17.98, 48.33 ± 19.25, and 37.18 ± 24.67, respectively. Patients with different nutritional status had different QoL (B = 10.405, SE = 2.828, t = 3.680, P = 0.001). Multiaspect nutritional supports should be enhanced to improve patients' comprehensive nutritional status during treatment.

  20. Gallbladder cancer and nutritional risk factors in Chile

    PubMed

    Navarro Rosenblatt, Deborah; Durán Agüero, Samuel

    2016-02-16

    Gallbladder cancer is the most malign neoplasm of the biliary tract. Chile presents the third highest prevalence of gallbladder cancer in the Americas, being Chilean women from the city of Valdivia the ones with the highest prevalence. The main risk factors associated with gallbladder cancer are: sex, cholelithiasis, obesity, ethnicity, chronic inflammation, history of infection diseases such as Helicobacter pyloriand Salmonellaand family history of gallbladder cancer. In Chile gallbladder cancer mortality is close to prevalence level. This is related to the silent symptomatology of this cancer, as well as the lack of specific symptoms. The high prevalence of obesity and infectious diseases present in Chile are two of the main risk factors of gallbladder cancer and Chile has prevalence of obesity close to 30%. The aim of this literary review is to inform and summarize the main risk factors of gallbladder cancer that are prevalent in Chile, in order to be able to focus preventive and management interventions of this risk factor for the reduction in prevalence and mortality of gallbladder cancer in Chile.

  1. Relationship Between the Comprehensive Nutritional Index and the EORTC QLQ-H&N35 in Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Patients Treated with Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy.

    PubMed

    He, Yan; Chen, Liping; Chen, Linmin; Hu, Wen; Wang, Cong; Tang, Linquan; Mai, Haiqiang; Li, Jianmei; Wu, Liping; Fan, Yuying

    2017-04-01

    This study aimed to explore the relationship between the comprehensive nutritional index (CNI) and quality of life in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients receiving intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). The nutritional index, which includes total lymphocyte count, hemoglobin and albumin levels, body mass index, and usual body weight percentage, was evaluated pre-treatment and post-treatment in patients who underwent IMRT. The quality of life of NPC patients was measured by the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire Head and Neck Cancer Module (EORTC QLQ-H&N35) at four time points: pre-treatment, post-treatment, and 3 and 6 mo after IMRT. A comprehensive nutritional model was used to assess the correlation with QLQ-H&N35. The nutritional index decreased significantly post-treatment. The CNI was associated with immunotherapy; the International Union Against Cancer (UICC) stage; concurrent chemotherapy; speech problems, trouble with social contact, feeling ill and having dental problems at pre-treatment; sexuality at 3 mos post-treatment; and sensory problems and xerostomia at 6 mo post-treatment (P < 0.05). The nutritional status and QLQ-H&N35 scores in NPC patients decreased during IMRT. Our study provides an alternative measure of the CNI to improve the QLQ-H&N35 evaluation system for patients with NPC.

  2. Development of a composite trauma exposure risk index.

    PubMed

    Liu, Honghu; Prause, Nicole; Wyatt, Gail E; Williams, John K; Chin, Dorothy; Davis, Teri; Loeb, Tamra; Marchand, Erica; Zhang, Muyu; Myers, Hector F

    2015-09-01

    The high burden of exposure to chronic life adversities and trauma is quite prevalent, but assessment of this risk burden is uncommon in primary care settings. This calls for a brief, multiple dimensional mental health risk screening tool in primary care settings. We aimed to develop such a screening tool named the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) Life Adversities Screener (LADS). Using pooled data across 4 studies from the UCLA Center for Culture, Trauma, and Mental Health Disparities, 5 domains of mental health risk including perceived discrimination, sexual abuse histories, family adversity, intimate partner violence, and trauma histories, were identified. Regression models for depression (Centers for Epidemiology Studies Depression Scale) and posttraumatic stress disorder (Posttraumatic Diagnostic Scale), controlling for demographic factors, were fitted to develop a weighted continuous scale score for the UCLA LADS. Confirmatory factor analysis supported the 5-domain structure, while item response theory endorsed the inclusion of each item. Receiver operating characteristic analysis indicated that the score was predictive for classifying subjects as reaching clinical threshold criteria for either depression (Beck Depression Inventory-II ≥ 14 or Patient Health Questionnaire-9 ≥ 10) or anxiety (Patient Health Questionnaire-13 ≥10). An optimal cut of 0.33 is suggested based on maximizing sensitivity and specificity of the LADS score, identifying patients at high risk for mental health problems. Given its predictive utility and ease of administration, the UCLA LADS could be useful as a screener to identify racial minority individuals in primary care settings who have a high trauma burden, needing more extensive evaluation.

  3. Development of a Composite Trauma Exposure Risk Index

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Honghu; Prause, Nicole; Wyatt, Gail E.; Williams, John K.; Chin, Dorothy; Davis, Teri; Loeb, Tamra; Marchand, Erica; Zhang, Muyu; Myers, Hector F.

    2015-01-01

    The high burden of exposure to chronic life adversities and trauma is quite prevalent, but assessment of this risk burden is uncommon in primary care settings. This calls for a brief, multiple dimensional mental health risk screening tool in primary care settings. We aimed to develop such a screening tool named the UCLA Life Adversities Screener (LADS). Using pooled data across four studies from the UCLA Center for Culture, Trauma and Mental Health Disparities, five domains of mental health risk including perceived discrimination, sexual abuse histories, family adversity, interpersonal violence, and trauma histories, were identified. Regression models for depression (Centers for Epidemiology Studies-Depression scale (CES-D)) and PTSD (Posttraumatic Diagnostic Scale (PDS)), controlling for demographic factors, were fitted to to develop a weighted continuous scale score for the UCLA LADS. Confirmatory factor analysis supported the five-domain structure, while Item Response Theory (IRT) endorsed the inclusion of each item. Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) analysis indicated that the score was predictive for classifying subjects as reaching clinical threshold criteria for either depression (Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) ≥14 or Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9) ≥ 10) or anxiety (Patient Health Questionnaire-13 (PHQ-13) ≥10). An optimal cut of 0.33 is suggested based on maximizing sensitivity and specificity of the LADS score, identifying patients at high risk for mental health problems. Given its predictive utility and ease of administration, the UCLA LADS could be useful as a screener to identify racial minority individuals in primary care settings who have a high trauma burden, needing more extensive evaluation. PMID:25984638

  4. Bioelectrical impedance vectorial analysis and nutritional status of older women according to body mass index

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Longitudinal studies, both epidemiological and clinical, have shown that elderly with high body mass index (BMI) are able to better face stressing factors, and have better survival rate as consequence. The aim of the present study was to evaluate if higher BMI values were associated with improved nu...

  5. Nutritional Risk in Major Abdominal Surgery: Protocol of a Prospective Observational Trial to Evaluate the Prognostic Value of Different Nutritional Scores in Pancreatic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Probst, Pascal; Haller, Sebastian; Dörr-Harim, Colette; Bruckner, Thomas; Ulrich, Alexis; Hackert, Thilo; Diener, Markus K

    2015-01-01

    Background The influence of patients’ preoperative nutritional status on their clinical outcome has already been proven. Therefore, patients with malnutrition are in need of additional therapeutic efforts. However, for pancreatic surgery, evidence suggesting the adequacy of existing nutritional assessment scores to estimate malnutrition associated with postoperative outcome is limited. Objective The aim of the observational trial “Nutritional Risk in Major Abdominal Surgery (NURIMAS) Pancreas” is to prospectively assess and analyze different nutritional assessment scores for their prognostic value on postoperative complications in patients undergoing pancreatic surgery. Methods All patients scheduled to receive elective pancreatic surgery at the University Hospital of Heidelberg will be screened for eligibility. Preoperatively, 12 nutritional assessment scores will be collected and patients will be assigned either at risk or not at risk for malnutrition. The postoperative course will be followed prospectively and complications according to the Clavien-Dindo classification will be recorded. The prognostic value for complications will be evaluated for every score in a univariable and multivariable analysis corrected for known risk factors in pancreatic surgery. Results Final data analysis is expected to be available during Spring 2016. Conclusions The NURIMAS Pancreas trial is a monocentric, prospective, observational trial aiming to find the most predictive clinical nutritional assessment score for postoperative complications. Using the results of this protocol as a knowledge base, it is possible to conduct nutritional risk-guided intervention trials to prevent postoperative complications in the pancreatic surgical population. Trial Registration germanctr.de: DRKS00006340; https://drks-neu.uniklinik-freiburg.de/drks_web/navigate.do?navigationId=trial.HTML&TRIAL_ID=DRKS00006340 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/6bzXWSRYZ) PMID:26573991

  6. Dietary patterns based on carbohydrate nutrition are associated with the risk for diabetes and dyslipidemia.

    PubMed

    Song, Su Jin; Lee, Jung Eun; Paik, Hee-Young; Park, Min Sun; Song, Yoon Ju

    2012-08-01

    Several studies have been conducted on dietary patterns based on carbohydrate nutrition in Asian populations. We examined the cross-sectional associations in dietary patterns based on carbohydrate nutrition, including the glycemic index (GI) with dyslipidemia and diabetes among the Korean adult population. We analyzed 9,725 subjects (3,795 men and 5,930 women, ≥ 20 years) from the Fourth Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Dietary information was collected using single 24-hour recall. Reduced rank regression was used to derive dietary patterns from 22 food groups as predictor variables and four dietary factors related to the quantity and quality of carbohydrates as response variables. Two dietary patterns were identified: 1) the balanced pattern was characterized by high intake of various kinds of foods including white rice, and 2) the rice-oriented pattern was characterized by a high intake of white rice but low intake of vegetables, fruits, meat, and dairy products. Both patterns had considerable amounts of total carbohydrate, but GI values differed. The rice-oriented pattern was positively associated with hypertriglyceridemia in men and low high density lipoprotein-cholesterol in both men and women. The balanced pattern had no overall significant association with the prevalence of dyslipidemia or diabetes, however, men with energy intake above the median showed a reduced prevalence of diabetes across quintiles of balanced pattern scores. The results show that dietary patterns based on carbohydrate nutrition are associated with prevalence of dyslipidemia and diabetes in the Korean adult population.

  7. Healthy Lifestyle and Risk of Cancer in the European Prospective Investigation Into Cancer and Nutrition Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    McKenzie, Fiona; Biessy, Carine; Ferrari, Pietro; Freisling, Heinz; Rinaldi, Sabina; Chajès, Veronique; Dahm, Christina C.; Overvad, Kim; Dossus, Laure; Lagiou, Pagona; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. Bas; May, Anne; Peeters, Petra H.; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Sanchez, Maria-Jose; Navarro, Carmen; Ardanaz, Eva; Ericson, Ulrika; Wirfält, Elisabet; Travis, Ruth C.; Romieu, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    Abstract It has been estimated that at least a third of the most common cancers are related to lifestyle and as such are preventable. Key modifiable lifestyle factors have been individually associated with cancer risk; however, less is known about the combined effects of these factors. This study generated a healthy lifestyle index score (HLIS) to investigate the joint effect of modifiable factors on the risk of overall cancers, alcohol-related cancers, tobacco-related cancers, obesity-related cancers, and reproductive-related cancers. The study included 391,608 men and women from the multinational European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort. The HLIS was constructed from 5 factors assessed at baseline (diet, physical activity, smoking, alcohol consumption, and anthropometry) by assigning scores of 0 to 4 to categories of each factor, for which higher values indicate healthier behaviors. Hazard ratios (HR) were estimated by Cox proportional regression and population attributable fractions (PAFs) estimated from the adjusted models. There was a 5% lower risk (adjusted HR 0.952, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.946, 0.958) of all cancers per point score of the index for men and 4% (adjusted HR 0.961, 95% CI: 0.956, 0.966) for women. The fourth versus the second category of the HLIS was associated with a 28% and 24% lower risk for men and women respectively across all cancers, 41% and 33% for alcohol-related, 49% and 46% for tobacco-related, 41% and 26% for obesity-related, and 21% for female reproductive cancers. Findings suggest simple behavior modifications could have a sizeable impact on cancer prevention, especially for men. PMID:27100409

  8. Healthy Lifestyle and Risk of Cancer in the European Prospective Investigation Into Cancer and Nutrition Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    McKenzie, Fiona; Biessy, Carine; Ferrari, Pietro; Freisling, Heinz; Rinaldi, Sabina; Chajès, Veronique; Dahm, Christina C; Overvad, Kim; Dossus, Laure; Lagiou, Pagona; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas; May, Anne; Peeters, Petra H; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Sanchez, Maria-Jose; Navarro, Carmen; Ardanaz, Eva; Ericson, Ulrika; Wirfält, Elisabet; Travis, Ruth C; Romieu, Isabelle

    2016-04-01

    It has been estimated that at least a third of the most common cancers are related to lifestyle and as such are preventable. Key modifiable lifestyle factors have been individually associated with cancer risk; however, less is known about the combined effects of these factors. This study generated a healthy lifestyle index score (HLIS) to investigate the joint effect of modifiable factors on the risk of overall cancers, alcohol-related cancers, tobacco-related cancers, obesity-related cancers, and reproductive-related cancers. The study included 391,608 men and women from the multinational European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort. The HLIS was constructed from 5 factors assessed at baseline (diet, physical activity, smoking, alcohol consumption, and anthropometry) by assigning scores of 0 to 4 to categories of each factor, for which higher values indicate healthier behaviors. Hazard ratios (HR) were estimated by Cox proportional regression and population attributable fractions (PAFs) estimated from the adjusted models. There was a 5% lower risk (adjusted HR 0.952, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.946, 0.958) of all cancers per point score of the index for men and 4% (adjusted HR 0.961, 95% CI: 0.956, 0.966) for women. The fourth versus the second category of the HLIS was associated with a 28% and 24% lower risk for men and women respectively across all cancers, 41% and 33% for alcohol-related, 49% and 46% for tobacco-related, 41% and 26% for obesity-related, and 21% for female reproductive cancers. Findings suggest simple behavior modifications could have a sizeable impact on cancer prevention, especially for men.

  9. Nutrition Risk in Home-Bound Older Adults: Using Dietician-Trained and Supervised Nutrition Volunteers for Screening and Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laforest, Sophie; Goldin, Benita; Nour, Kareen; Roy, Marie-Andree; Payette, Helene

    2007-01-01

    Nutrition screening and early intervention in home-bound older adults are key to preventing unfavourable health outcomes and functional decline. This pilot study's objectives were (a) to test the reliability of the Elderly Nutrition Screening Tool (ENS [C]) when administered by dietician-trained and supervised nutrition volunteers, and (b) to…

  10. Association of body mass index and aerobic physical fitness with cardiovascular risk factors in children☆

    PubMed Central

    Gonçalves, Reginaldo; Szmuchrowski, Leszek Antony; Damasceno, Vinícius Oliveira; de Medeiros, Marcelo Lemos; Couto, Bruno Pena; Lamounier, Joel Alves

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To identify the association between both, body mass index and aerobic fitness, with cardiovascular disease risk factors in children. Methods: Cross-sectional study, carried out in Itaúna-MG, in 2010, with 290 school children ranging from 6 to 10 years-old of both sexes, randomly selected. Children from schools located in the countryside and those with medical restrctions for physical activity were not included. Blood sample was collected after a 12-hour fasting period. Blood pressure, stature and weight were evaluated in accordance with international standards. The following were considered as cardiovascular risk factors: high blood pressure, high total cholesterol, LDL, triglycerides and insulin levels, and low HDL. The statistical analysis included the Spearman's coefficient and the logistic regression, with cardiovascular risk factors as dependent variables. Results: Significant correlations were found, in both sexes, among body mass index and aerobic fitness with most of the cardiovascular risk factors. Children of both sexes with body mass index in the fourth quartile demonstrated increased chances of having high blood insulin and clustering cardiovascular risk factors. Moreover, girls with aerobic fitness in the first quartile also demonstrated increased chances of having high blood insulin and clustering cardiovascular risk factors. Conclusion: The significant associations and the increased chances of having cardiovascular risk factors in children with less aerobic fitness and higher levels of body mass index justify the use of these variables for health monitoring in Pediatrics. PMID:25479851

  11. Risk assessment to underpin food regulatory decisions: an example of public health nutritional epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Baines, Janis; Cunningham, Judy; Leemhuis, Christel; Hambridge, Tracy; Mackerras, Dorothy

    2011-01-01

    The approach used by food regulation agencies to examine the literature and forecast the impact of possible food regulations has many similar features to the approach used in nutritional epidemiological research. We outline the Risk Analysis Framework described by FAO/WHO, in which there is formal progression from identification of the nutrient or food chemical of interest, through to describing its effect on health and then assessing whether there is a risk to the population based on dietary exposure estimates. We then discuss some important considerations for the dietary modeling component of the Framework, including several methodological issues that also exist in research nutritional epidemiology. Finally, we give several case studies that illustrate how the different methodological components are used together to inform decisions about how to manage the regulatory problem.

  12. Model risk for European-style stock index options.

    PubMed

    Gençay, Ramazan; Gibson, Rajna

    2007-01-01

    In empirical modeling, there have been two strands for pricing in the options literature, namely the parametric and nonparametric models. Often, the support for the nonparametric methods is based on a benchmark such as the Black-Scholes (BS) model with constant volatility. In this paper, we study the stochastic volatility (SV) and stochastic volatility random jump (SVJ) models as parametric benchmarks against feedforward neural network (FNN) models, a class of neural network models. Our choice for FNN models is due to their well-studied universal approximation properties of an unknown function and its partial derivatives. Since the partial derivatives of an option pricing formula are risk pricing tools, an accurate estimation of the unknown option pricing function is essential for pricing and hedging. Our findings indicate that FNN models offer themselves as robust option pricing tools, over their sophisticated parametric counterparts in predictive settings. There are two routes to explain the superiority of FNN models over the parametric models in forecast settings. These are nonnormality of return distributions and adaptive learning.

  13. MATERNAL NUTRITIONAL STATUS AS A CONTRIBUTING FACTOR FOR THE RISK OF FETAL ALCOHOL SPECTRUM DISORDERS

    PubMed Central

    May, Philip A.; Hamrick, Kari J.; Corbin, Karen D.; Hasken, Julie M.; Marais, Anna-Susan; Blankenship, Jason; Hoyme, H. Eugene; Gossage, J. Phillip

    2016-01-01

    Objective Compare nutritional status of 57 South African mothers of children with fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD) with 148 mothers of controls. Methods Dietary data were analyzed for macronutrients, micronutrients, and fats via Estimated Average Requirements (EAR) and Adequate Intakes (AI) for pregnant women. Results Virtually all mothers were likely deficient on most micronutrients by either EAR (<50%) or AI values. Mothers of FASD children consumed more of 13 of 25 micronutrients. For percentage below EAR, only vitamin D was significantly higher for FASD mothers. Despite no difference in total food intake, control mothers had a higher mean body mass index (BMI) than FASD mothers. Maternal BMI is more significant for positive child outcomes than any individual nutrient. Conclusions Most mothers have inadequate dietary intake. Minor advantages in nutrient intake are overpowered by teratogenic effects of alcohol. Further study is needed of the interaction of alcohol, maternal nutrition, and metabolism. PMID:26656914

  14. A frailty index to predict the mortality risk in a population of senior mexican adults

    PubMed Central

    García-González, José Juan; García-Peña, Carmen; Franco-Marina, Francisco; Gutiérrez-Robledo, Luis Miguel

    2009-01-01

    Background Frailty in the elderly can be regarded as nonspecific vulnerability to adverse health outcomes, caused by multiple factors. The aim was to analyze the relationships between the frailty index, age and mortality in a two year follow up study of Mexican elderly. Methods A frailty index was developed using 34 variables. To obtain the index, the mean of the total score for each individual was obtained. Survival analyses techniques were used to examine the risk ratios for the different levels of the frailty index. Kaplan-Meier estimates were obtained, adjusted for age and gender. Cox proportional hazards models were also built to obtain hazard ratio estimates. Results A total of 4082 participants was analyzed. Participants had an average age of 73 years and 52.5% were women. On average, participants were followed-up for 710 days (standard deviation = 111 days) and 279 of them died. Mortality increased with the frailty index level, especially in those with levels between .21 to .65, reaching approximately 17% and 21%, respectively. Cox proportional hazards models showed that participants with frailty index levels associated to increased mortality (.21 and higher) represent 24.0% of those aged 65-69 years and 47.6% of those 85 and older. Conclusion The frailty index shows the properties found in the other studies, it allows stratifying older Mexican into several groups different by the degree of the risk of mortality, and therefore the frailty index can be used in assessing health of elderly. PMID:19887005

  15. Nutritional Status among Rural Community Elderly in the Risk Area of Liver Fluke, Surin Province, Thailand.

    PubMed

    Kaewpitoon, Soraya J; Namwichaisirikul, Niwatchai; Loyd, Ryan A; Churproong, Seekaow; Ueng-Arporn, Naporn; Matrakool, Likit; Tongtawee, Taweesak; Rujirakul, Ratana; Nimkhuntod, Porntip; Wakhuwathapong, Parichart; Kaewpitoon, Natthawut

    2015-01-01

    Thailand is becoming an aging society, this presenting as a serious problem situation especially regarding health. Chronic diseases found frequently in the elderly may be related to dietary intake and life style. Surin province has been reported as a risk area for liver fluke with a high incidence of cholangiocarcinma especially in the elderly. Therefore, this study aimed to determine the nutritional status and associated factors among elderly in Surin province, northeast of Thailand. A community-based cross-sectional study was conducted among 405 people aged 60 years and above, between September 2012 and July 2014. The participants were selected through a randomized systematic sampling method and completed a pre-designed questionnaire with general information, food recorded, weight, height, waist circumference, and behavior regarding to food consume related to liver fluke infection. The data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and Spearman's rank correlation coefficients. The majority of participants was female (63.5%), age between 60-70 years old (75.6%), with elementary school education (96.6%), living with their (78.9%), and having underlying diseases (38.3%). Carbohydrate (95.3%) was need to improve the consumption. The participants demonstrated under-nutrition (24.4%), over-nutrition (16.4%), and obesity (15.4%). Elderly had a waist circumference as the higher than normal level (34.0%). Gender, female, age 71-80 years old, elementary school and underlying diseases were significantly associated with poor nutritional status. The majority of them had a high knowledge (43.0%), moderate attitude (44.4%), and moderate practice (46.2%) regarding food consumption related to liver fluke infection. In conclusion, these findings data indicated that elderly age group often have an under- or over-nutritional status. Carbohydrate consumption needs to be improved. Some elderly show behavior regarding food consumption that is related to liver fluke infection hat needs

  16. ENSO-Based Index Insurance: Approach and Peru Flood Risk Management Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalil, A. F.; Kwon, H.; Lall, U.; Miranda, M. J.; Skees, J. R.

    2006-12-01

    Index insurance has recently been advocated as a useful risk transfer tool for disaster management situations where rapid fiscal relief is desirable, and where estimating insured losses may be difficult, time consuming, or subject to manipulation and falsification. For climate related hazards, a rainfall or temperature index may be proposed. However, rainfall may be highly spatially variable relative to the gauge network, and in many locations data are inadequate to develop an index due to short time-series and the spatial dispersion of stations. In such cases, it may be helpful to consider a climate proxy index as a regional rainfall index. This is particularly useful if a long record is available for the climate index through an independent source and it is well correlated with the regional rainfall hazard. Here, ENSO related climate indices are explored for use as a proxy to extreme rainfall in one of the departments of Peru -- Piura. The ENSO index insurance product may be purchased by banks or microfinance institutions (MFIs) to aid agricultural damage relief in Peru. Crop losses in the region are highly correlated with floods, but are difficult to assess directly. Beyond agriculture, many other sectors suffer as well. Basic infrastructure is destroyed during the most severe events. This disrupts trade for many micro-enterprises. The reliability and quality of the local rainfall data is variable. Averaging the financial risk across the region is desirable. Some issues with the implementation of the proxy ENSO index are identified and discussed. Specifically, we explore (a) the reliability of the index at different levels of probability of exceedance of maximum seasonal rainfall; (b) the potential for clustering of payoffs; (c) the potential that the index could be predicted with some lead time prior to the flood season; and (d) evidence for climate change or non-stationarity in the flood exceedance probability from the long ENSO record. Finally, prospects for

  17. A comparison of the environmental impact of different AOPs: risk indexes.

    PubMed

    Giménez, Jaime; Bayarri, Bernardí; González, Óscar; Malato, Sixto; Peral, José; Esplugas, Santiago

    2014-12-31

    Today, environmental impact associated with pollution treatment is a matter of great concern. A method is proposed for evaluating environmental risk associated with Advanced Oxidation Processes (AOPs) applied to wastewater treatment. The method is based on the type of pollution (wastewater, solids, air or soil) and on materials and energy consumption. An Environmental Risk Index (E), constructed from numerical criteria provided, is presented for environmental comparison of processes and/or operations. The Operation Environmental Risk Index (EOi) for each of the unit operations involved in the process and the Aspects Environmental Risk Index (EAj) for process conditions were also estimated. Relative indexes were calculated to evaluate the risk of each operation (E/NOP) or aspect (E/NAS) involved in the process, and the percentage of the maximum achievable for each operation and aspect was found. A practical application of the method is presented for two AOPs: photo-Fenton and heterogeneous photocatalysis with suspended TiO2 in Solarbox. The results report the environmental risks associated with each process, so that AOPs tested and the operations involved with them can be compared.

  18. ERICA: A multiparametric toxicological risk index for the assessment of environmental healthiness.

    PubMed

    Boriani, Elena; Mariani, Alessandro; Baderna, Diego; Moretti, Cinzia; Lodi, Marco; Benfenati, Emilio

    2010-10-01

    A risk assessment strategy considering the impact of chemicals on the whole ecosystem has been developed in order to create a sound and useful method for quantifying and comparing the global risk posed by the main different hazardous chemicals found in the environment. This index, called Environmental Risk Index for Chemical Assessment (ERICA), merges in a single number the environmental assessment, the human health risk assessment and the uncertainty due to missing or uncertain data. ERICA uses a dedicated scoring system with parameters for the main characteristics of the pollutants. The main advantage is that it preserves a simple approach by condensing in this single value an analysis of the risk for the area under observation. ERICA quantifies and compares the global risk posed by hazardous chemicals found in the environment and can be considered a diagnostic and prognostic method for environmental contaminants in critical and potentially dangerous sites, such as incinerators, landfills and industrial areas or in broader geographical areas. The application of the proposed integrated index provides a preliminary quantitative analysis of possible environmental alert due to the presence of one or some pollutants in the investigated site. This paper presents the method and the equations behind the index and a first case study based on the Italian legislation and a pilot study located on the Italian seacoast.

  19. Informing Early Childhood Policy: An Analysis of the Sensitivity of a School Readiness Risk Index to Changes in Indicator Selection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schumacher, Krista S.

    2015-01-01

    The importance of school readiness to both the future of an individual child and society as a whole has given rise to several state-specific indexes designed to measure county-level risk for starting school unprepared to learn. One such index is the Oklahoma School Readiness Risk Index (OK SRRI), comprised of indicators known to be associated with…

  20. Nutritional Risk is Associated with Chronic Musculoskeletal Pain in Community-dwelling Older Persons: The PAINEL Study.

    PubMed

    Bárbara Pereira Costa, Aline; Andrade Carneiro Machado, Luciana; Marcos Domingues Dias, João; Keller Coelho de Oliveira, Adriana; Ude Viana, Joana; da Silva, Sílvia Lanziotti Azevedo; Gonçalves Pereira Couto, Flávia; Lustosa Torres, Juliana; Mendes, Liliane P; Correa Dias, Rosangela

    2016-01-01

    Malnutrition is a risk factor for noncommunicable diseases related to ageing, and it can also contribute to musculoskeletal health. This study investigated whether nutritional risk is associated with chronic musculoskeletal pain in community-dwelling older persons. Nutritional risk was assessed by the DETERMINE Checklist. Chronic musculoskeletal pain was defined as the presence of pain in the past six months that did not disappear for at least 30 consecutive days. Multivariate logistic regression including confounding variables was used for the analysis. The sample was comprised of 383 participants (age 75.6 ± SD 6.1); the majority were at moderate-to-high nutritional risk (69%) and approximately one third presented chronic musculoskeletal pain (30%). The nutritional risk score was independently associated with chronic musculoskeletal pain: adding one unit in the risk score produces an 11% increment in the odds of presenting pain (OR 1.109, 95% CI 1.022-1.204). Individuals classified into moderate- or high-risk categories also had substantially higher odds (∼90%) of presenting chronic musculoskeletal pain when compared to those in the low-risk category, although our findings were only marginally significant. This is the first study to demonstrate the association between nutritional risk and chronic musculoskeletal pain above and beyond the contributed effects from relevant confounders.

  1. Increasing Prevalence, Changes in Diagnostic Criteria, and Nutritional Risk Factors for Autism Spectrum Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Neggers, Yasmin H.

    2014-01-01

    The frequency of autism spectrum disorders (ASD) diagnoses has been increasing for decades, but researchers cannot agree on whether the trend is a result of increased awareness, improved detection, expanding definition, or an actual increase in incidence or a combination of these factors. Though both genetic and multiple environmental risk factors have been studied extensively, many potentially modifiable risk factors including nutritional and immune function related risk factors such as vitamin D, folic acid, and metabolic syndrome have not received sufficient attention. Several recent studies have put forward hypotheses to explain the mechanism of association between both folic acid and vitamin D and autism. A continuous rise in the prevalence of autism in the USA has coincided with a significant enhancement of maternal folate status with FDA mandated folic acid fortification of certain foods starting in 1998. There is also a growing body of research that suggests that vitamin D status either in utero or early in life may be a risk for autism. In this communication, controversies regarding increase in estimate of prevalence, implications of changes in definition, and possible association between some modifiable nutritional risk factors such as folic acid and vitamin D and ASD will be discussed. PMID:24967269

  2. Ecological risks of trace metals in Guanabara Bay, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil: An index analysis approach.

    PubMed

    de Carvalho Aguiar, Valquiria Maria; de Lima, Michelle Nunes; Abuchacra, Rodrigo Coutinho; Abuchacra, Paula Ferreira Falheiro; Neto, José Antônio Baptista; Borges, Heloísa Vargas; de Oliveira, Vitor Calôr

    2016-11-01

    Total concentrations of Ni, Cr, Cu, Pb and Zn were determined in surface sediments from 30 stations in Guanabara Bay in 1999 and 2008. An approach using various environmental indices was used to assess contamination status of metals. This approach allowed the comparison with different coastal areas. Background Enrichment Index, Contamination index and Ecological Risk index (Pollution Load Index; Sediment Quality Guideline Quotient and Ecological Risk Index) were calculated for the metals. Results revealed a great load of organic matter and significant increases in Cu and Pb levels between 1999 and 2008. The concentrations of Cr and Zn were of great concern, surpassing the values of Probable Effect Level reference values. In spite of the differences of each index, results effectively revealed the striking contamination in Guanabara Bay concerning trace metals, and also suggested potential risk to local biota. The contamination of the northwest area was notably higher than the rest of the bay. In comparison with some other coastal bays around the world, Guanabara Bay stood out as a remarkably contaminated environment.

  3. Human Research Program Human Health Countermeasures Element Nutrition Risk Standing Review Panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bistrian, Bruce

    2009-01-01

    The Nutrition Risk Standing Review Panel (SRP) reviewed and discussed the specific gaps and tasks for the Human Health Countermeasures (HHC) Element related to nutrition identified in the Human Research Program (HRP) Integrated Research Plan. There was general consensus that the described gaps and proposed tasks were critical to future NASA mission success. The SRP acknowledged the high scientific quality of the work currently being undertaken by the Nutritional Biochemistry group under the direction of Dr. Scott Smith. In review of the entire HRP, four new gaps were identified that complement the Element's existing research activities. Given the limitations of ground-based analogs for many of the unique physiological and metabolic alterations in space, future studies are needed to quantify nutritional factors that change during actual space flight. In addition, future tasks should seek to better evaluate the time course of physiological and metabolic alterations during flight to better predict alterations during longer duration missions. Finally, given the recent data suggesting a potential role for increased inflammatory responses during space flight, the role of inflammation needs to be explored in detail, including the development of potential countermeasures and new ground based analogs, if this possibility is confirmed.

  4. The physical and empirical basis for a specific clear-air turbulence risk index

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, J. L.

    1985-01-01

    An improved operational CAT detection and forecasting technique is developed and detailed. This technique is the specific clear air turbulence risk (SCATR) index. This index shows some promising results. The improvements seen using hand analyzed data, as a result of the more realistic representation of the vertical shear of the horizontal wind, are also realized in the data analysis used in the PROFS/CWP application. The SCATR index should improve as database enhancements such as profiler and VAS satellite data, which increase the resolution in space and time, are brought into even more sophisticated objective analysis schemes.

  5. Diet Quality Index as a predictor of short-term mortality in the American Cancer Society Cancer Prevention Study II Nutrition Cohort.

    PubMed

    Seymour, Jennifer D; Calle, Eugenia E; Flagg, Elaine W; Coates, Ralph J; Ford, Earl S; Thun, Michael J

    2003-06-01

    The Diet Quality Index (DQI) was developed to measure overall dietary patterns and to predict chronic disease risk. This study examined associations between DQI and short-term all-cause, all-circulatory-disease, and all-cancer mortality in the American Cancer Society Cancer Prevention Study II Nutrition Cohort, a cohort of US adults aged 50-79 years enrolled in a prospective study. After 4 years of follow-up (1992-1996), there were 869 deaths among 63,109 women and 1,736 deaths among 52,724 men. All study participants reported being disease free at baseline in 1992-1993. In age-adjusted Cox models, a higher DQI, which was indicative of a poorer quality diet, was positively related to all-cause and all-circulatory-disease mortality rates in both women and men and to cancer mortality in men only. However, in fully adjusted Cox models, only circulatory disease mortality was clearly positively related to DQI and only in women (medium-low-quality diet vs. highest-quality diet: rate ratio = 1.86, 95% confidence interval: 1.19, 2.89). Although trend tests indicated significant positive relations between DQI and all-cause mortality, effects were small (rate ratios

  6. [An epidemiological index to assess the nutritional status of children based in a polynomial model of values from Z punctuation for the age in Mexico].

    PubMed

    Avila-Curiel, A; Shamah, T; Barragán, L; Chávez, A; Avila, Maria; Juárez, L

    2004-03-01

    A nutritional status index was built by modeling the mathematical function of the mean Z scores of weight for age, from 60,079 children under five years of age, selected in a probabilistic fashion from the Mexican population. The most precise mathematical model was a fifth degree polynomial. The correlation coefficient was between .937index is the integral of the polynomial function, which represents the nutritional gap between the observed and the reference population. This model is used to analyze the characteristics of the different study populations. The index shows an improvement of -39.6 to -16.8 at the national level, between the years 1988 and 1999. This improvement is greater in urban (-36-4 to -8.4) than in rural areas (-48.8 in 1989, to -37.7 in 1999). The indigenous rural population of the country showed the highest levels of malnutrition (-54.4), as compared to the non-indigenous rural population (-37.1). In Mexico, City, the index was -5.9 in 1995, which represents an average of extreme nutritional values: -17.3 in the lower socioeconomic strata and 18.0 in the higher strata, the latter suggesting the presence of childhood obesity. This index is useful to estimate the epidemiological burden and the characteristics of malnutrition at early ages, as well as to assess the impact of interventions, without being altered by common biases related to the utilization of malnutrition prevalence values.

  7. Development and validation of risk index for cognitive decline using blood-derived markers

    PubMed Central

    Ayonayon, Hilsa; Harris, Tamara; Phillips, Caroline; Rosano, Caterina; Satterfield, Suzanne; Yaffe, Kristine

    2015-01-01

    Objective: We sought to develop and validate a risk index for prospective cognitive decline in older adults based on blood-derived markers. Methods: The index was based on 8 markers that have been previously associated with cognitive aging: APOE genotype, plasma β-amyloid 42/40 ratio, telomere length, cystatin C, glucose, C-reactive protein, interleukin-6, and albumin. The outcome was person-specific cognitive slopes (Modified Mini-Mental State Examination) from 11 years of follow-up. A total of 1,445 older adults comprised the development sample. An index based on dichotomized markers was divided into low-, medium-, and high-risk categories; the risk categories were validated with the remaining sample (n = 739) using linear regression. Amyloid was measured on a subsample (n = 865) and was included only in a secondary index. Results: The risk categories showed significant differences from each other and were predictive of prospective cognitive decline in the validation sample, even after adjustment for age and baseline cognitive score: the low-risk group (24.8%) declined 0.32 points/y (95% confidence interval [CI]: −0.46, −0.19), the medium-risk group (58.7%) declined 0.55 points/y (95% CI: −0.65, 0.45), and the high-risk group (16.6%) declined 0.69 points/y (95% CI: −0.85, −0.54). Using the secondary index, which included β-amyloid 42/40 (validation n = 279), the low-risk group (26.9%) declined 0.20 points/y (95% CI: −0.42, 0.01), the medium-risk group (61.3%) declined 0.55 points/y (95% CI: −0.72, −0.38), and the high-risk group (11.8%) declined 0.83 points/y (95% CI: −1.14, −0.51). Conclusions: A risk index based on 8 blood-based markers was modestly able to predict cognitive decline over an 11-year follow-up. Further validation in other cohorts is necessary. PMID:25609760

  8. Development of an Objective Autism Risk Index Using Remote Eye Tracking

    PubMed Central

    Frazier, Thomas W.; Klingemier, Eric W.; Beukemann, Mary; Speer, Leslie; Markowitz, Leslie; Parikh, Sumit; Wexberg, Steven; Giuliano, Kimberly; Schulte, Elaine; Delahunty, Carol; Ahuja, Veena; Eng, Charis; Manos, Michael J.; Hardan, Antonio Y.; Youngstrom, Eric A.; Strauss, Mark S.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Abnormal eye gaze is a hallmark characteristic of autism spectrum disorder (ASD), and numerous studies have identified abnormal attention patterns in ASD. The primary aim of the present study was to create an objective, eye tracking-based autism risk index. Method In initial and replication studies, children were recruited after referral for comprehensive multidisciplinary evaluation of ASD and subsequently grouped by clinical consensus diagnosis (ASD n=25/15, non-ASD n=20/19 for initial/replication samples). Remote eye tracking was blinded to diagnosis and included multiple stimuli. Dwell times were recorded to each a priori-defined region-of-interest (ROI) and averaged across ROIs to create an autism risk index. Receiver operating characteristic curve analyses examined classification accuracy. Correlations with clinical measures evaluated whether the autism risk index was associated with autism symptom severity independent of language ability. Results In both samples, the autism risk index had high diagnostic accuracy (area under the curve [AUC]=.91 and .85, 95%CIs=.81–.98 and .71–.96), was strongly associated with Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule–Second Edition (ADOS-2) severity scores (r=.58 and .59, p<.001), and not significantly correlated with language ability (r≤|−.28|, p>.095). Conclusion The autism risk index may be a useful quantitative and objective measure of risk for autism in at-risk settings. Future research in larger samples is needed to cross-validate these findings. If a validated scale for clinical use, this measure could inform clinical judgment regarding ASD diagnosis and track symptom improvements. PMID:27015721

  9. Looking beyond borders: integrating best practices in benefit-risk analysis into the field of food and nutrition.

    PubMed

    Tijhuis, M J; Pohjola, M V; Gunnlaugsdóttir, H; Kalogeras, N; Leino, O; Luteijn, J M; Magnússon, S H; Odekerken-Schröder, G; Poto, M; Tuomisto, J T; Ueland, O; White, B C; Holm, F; Verhagen, H

    2012-01-01

    An integrated benefit-risk analysis aims to give guidance in decision situations where benefits do not clearly prevail over risks, and explicit weighing of benefits and risks is thus indicated. The BEPRARIBEAN project aims to advance benefit-risk analysis in the area of food and nutrition by learning from other fields. This paper constitutes the final stage of the project, in which commonalities and differences in benefit-risk analysis are identified between the Food and Nutrition field and other fields, namely Medicines, Food Microbiology, Environmental Health, Economics and Marketing-Finance, and Consumer Perception. From this, ways forward are characterized for benefit-risk analysis in Food and Nutrition. Integrated benefit-risk analysis in Food and Nutrition may advance in the following ways: Increased engagement and communication between assessors, managers, and stakeholders; more pragmatic problem-oriented framing of assessment; accepting some risk; pre- and post-market analysis; explicit communication of the assessment purpose, input and output; more human (dose-response) data and more efficient use of human data; segmenting populations based on physiology; explicit consideration of value judgments in assessment; integration of multiple benefits and risks from multiple domains; explicit recognition of the impact of consumer beliefs, opinions, views, perceptions, and attitudes on behaviour; and segmenting populations based on behaviour; the opportunities proposed here do not provide ultimate solutions; rather, they define a collection of issues to be taken account of in developing methods, tools, practices and policies, as well as refining the regulatory context, for benefit-risk analysis in Food and Nutrition and other fields. Thus, these opportunities will now need to be explored further and incorporated into benefit-risk practice and policy. If accepted, incorporation of these opportunities will also involve a paradigm shift in Food and Nutrition benefit-risk

  10. Flavonoid and lignan intake and pancreatic cancer risk in the European prospective investigation into cancer and nutrition cohort

    PubMed Central

    Molina‐Montes, Esther; Zamora‐Ros, Raul; Bueno‐de‐Mesquita, H.B(as); Wark, Petra A.; Obon‐Santacana, Mireia; Kühn, Tilman; Katzke, Verena; Travis, Ruth C.; Ye, Weimin; Sund, Malin; Naccarati, Alessio; Mattiello, Amalia; Krogh, Vittorio; Martorana, Caterina; Masala, Giovanna; Amiano, Pilar; Huerta, José‐María; Barricarte, Aurelio; Quirós, José‐Ramón; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Angell Åsli, Lene; Skeie, Guri; Ericson, Ulrika; Sonestedt, Emily; Peeters, Petra H.; Romieu, Isabelle; Scalbert, Augustin; Overvad, Kim; Clemens, Matthias; Boeing, Heiner; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Peppa, Eleni; Vidalis, Pavlos; Khaw, Kay‐Tee; Wareham, Nick; Olsen, Anja; Tjønneland, Anne; Boutroun‐Rualt, Marie‐Christine; Clavel‐Chapelon, Françoise; Cross, Amanda J.; Lu, Yunxia; Riboli, Elio; Duell, Eric J.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the potential cancer preventive effects of flavonoids and lignans, their ability to reduce pancreatic cancer risk has not been demonstrated in epidemiological studies. Our aim was to examine the association between dietary intakes of flavonoids and lignans and pancreatic cancer risk in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort. A total of 865 exocrine pancreatic cancer cases occurred after 11.3 years of follow‐up of 477,309 cohort members. Dietary flavonoid and lignan intake was estimated through validated dietary questionnaires and the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) and Phenol Explorer databases. Hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using age, sex and center‐stratified Cox proportional hazards models, adjusted for energy intake, body mass index (BMI), smoking, alcohol and diabetes status. Our results showed that neither overall dietary intake of flavonoids nor of lignans were associated with pancreatic cancer risk (multivariable‐adjusted HR for a doubling of intake = 1.03, 95% CI: 0.95–1.11 and 1.02; 95% CI: 0.89–1.17, respectively). Statistically significant associations were also not observed by flavonoid subclasses. An inverse association between intake of flavanones and pancreatic cancer risk was apparent, without reaching statistical significance, in microscopically confirmed cases (HR for a doubling of intake = 0.96, 95% CI: 0.91–1.00). In conclusion, we did not observe an association between intake of flavonoids, flavonoid subclasses or lignans and pancreatic cancer risk in the EPIC cohort. PMID:27184434

  11. Association of Nut Consumption with Cardiometabolic Risk Factors in the 2008/2009 New Zealand Adult Nutrition Survey

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Rachel C.; Tey, Siew Ling; Gray, Andrew R.; Chisholm, Alexandra; Smith, Claire; Fleming, Elizabeth; Parnell, Winsome

    2015-01-01

    Nut consumption has been associated with improvements in risk factors for chronic disease in populations within North America, Europe and Iran. This relationship has not been investigated in New Zealand (NZ). The associations between nut consumption and cardiometabolic risk factors among New Zealanders were examined. Data from the 24-h diet recalls of 4721 participants from the NZ Adult Nutrition Survey 2008/2009 (2008/2009 NZANS) were used to determine whole and total nut intake. Anthropometric data and blood pressure were collected, as well as blood samples analysed for total cholesterol (total-C) and HDL cholesterol (HDL-C), glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c), C-reactive protein (CRP) and folate. Participants were classified according to their five-year cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. Both whole and total nut consumers had significantly lower weight, body mass index (BMI), waist circumference and central adiposity than non-nut consumers (all p ≤ 0.044). Whole blood, serum and red blood cell folate concentrations were significantly higher among whole nut consumers compared to non-whole nut consumers (all p ≤ 0.014), with only serum folate higher in total nut consumers compared to non-total nut consumers (p = 0.023). There were no significant differences for blood pressure, total-C, HDL-C and HbA1c; however, significant negative associations between total nut consumption and CVD risk category (p < 0.001) and CRP (p = 0.045) were apparent. Nut consumption was associated with more favourable body composition and a number of risk factors, which could collectively reduce chronic disease. PMID:26371037

  12. The effect of a nutritional education program on the nutritional status of elderly patients in a long-term care hospital in Jeollanamdo province: health behavior, dietary behavior, nutrition risk level and nutrient intake.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bok Hee; Kim, Mi-Ju; Lee, Yoonna

    2012-02-01

    This study was conducted to assess improvements in nutritional status following the application of nutrition education to elderly patients in a long-term care hospital. The study was carried out from January to May 2009, during which a preliminary survey, a pretest, the application of nutrition education, and a post-test were applied in stages. The number of subjects at pretest was 81, and the number of participants included in the final analysis was 61 (18 men, 43 women), all of whom participated in both the nutrition education program and the post-test. The survey consisted of general demographic items, health behaviors, dietary behaviors, the Nutrition Screening Initiative checklist, and nutrient intake assessment (24 hour recall method). The nutrition education program lasted for four weeks. It included a basic education program, provided once a week, and mini-education program, which was offered daily during lunch times. The survey was conducted before and after the education program using the same assessment method, although some items were included only at pretest. When analyzing the changes in elderly patients after the nutritional education program, we found that, among subjective dietary behaviors, self-rated perceptions of health (P < 0.001) and of depression (P < 0.001) improved significantly and that dietary behavior scores also improved significantly (P < 0.001), while nutritional risk levels decreased. In terms of nutrient intake, subjects' intake of energy, protein, fat, carbohydrate, calcium, phosphorus, iron, vitamin A, thiamin, riboflavin, niacin, and vitamin C all increased significantly (P < 0.001). These results indicated that nutritional education is effective in improving the nutritional status of elderly patients. We hope that the results of this study can be used as preliminary data for establishing guidelines for nutrition management tailored to elderly patients in long-term care hospitals.

  13. Body Mass Index, Waist Circumference, Body Adiposity Index, and Risk for Type 2 Diabetes in Two Populations in Brazil: General and Amerindian

    PubMed Central

    Alvim, Rafael de Oliveira; Mourao-Junior, Carlos Alberto; de Oliveira, Camila Maciel; Krieger, José E.; Mill, José G.; Pereira, Alexandre C.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The use of the anthropometric indices of adiposity, especially body mass index and waist circumference in the prediction of diabetes mellitus has been widely explored. Recently, a new body composition index, the body adiposity index was proposed. The aim of this study was to compare the effectiveness of body mass index, waist circumference, and body adiposity index in the risk assessment for type 2 diabetes mellitus. Design and methods A total of 1,572 individuals from the general population of Vitoria City, Brazil and 620 Amerindians from the Aracruz Indian Reserve, Brazil were randomly selected. BMI, waist circumference, and BAI were determined according to a standard protocol. Type 2 diabetes mellitus was diagnosed by the presence of fasting glucose ≥126 mg/dL or by the use of antidiabetic drugs. Results The area under the curve was similar for all anthropometric indices tested in the Amerindian population, but with very different sensitivities or specificities. In women from the general population, the area under the curve of waist circumference was significantly higher than that of the body adiposity index. Regarding risk assessment for type 2 diabetes mellitus, the body adiposity index was a better risk predictor than body mass index and waist circumference in the Amerindian population and was the index with highest odds ratio for type 2 diabetes mellitus in men from the general population, while in women from the general population waist circumference was the best risk predictor. Conclusion Body adiposity index was the best risk predictor for type 2 diabetes mellitus in the Amerindian population and men from the general population. Our data suggest that the body adiposity index is a useful tool for the risk assessment of type 2 diabetes mellitus in admixture populations. PMID:24937307

  14. Use of a systematic risk analysis method to improve safety in the production of paediatric parenteral nutrition solutions

    PubMed Central

    Bonnabry, P; Cingria, L; Sadeghipour, F; Ing, H; Fonzo-Christe, C; Pfister, R

    2005-01-01

    Background: Until recently, the preparation of paediatric parenteral nutrition formulations in our institution included re-transcription and manual compounding of the mixture. Although no significant clinical problems have occurred, re-engineering of this high risk activity was undertaken to improve its safety. Several changes have been implemented including new prescription software, direct recording on a server, automatic printing of the labels, and creation of a file used to pilot a BAXA MM 12 automatic compounder. The objectives of this study were to compare the risks associated with the old and new processes, to quantify the improved safety with the new process, and to identify the major residual risks. Methods: A failure modes, effects, and criticality analysis (FMECA) was performed by a multidisciplinary team. A cause-effect diagram was built, the failure modes were defined, and the criticality index (CI) was determined for each of them on the basis of the likelihood of occurrence, the severity of the potential effect, and the detection probability. The CIs for each failure mode were compared for the old and new processes and the risk reduction was quantified. Results: The sum of the CIs of all 18 identified failure modes was 3415 for the old process and 1397 for the new (reduction of 59%). The new process reduced the CIs of the different failure modes by a mean factor of 7. The CI was smaller with the new process for 15 failure modes, unchanged for two, and slightly increased for one. The greatest reduction (by a factor of 36) concerned re-transcription errors, followed by readability problems (by a factor of 30) and chemical cross contamination (by a factor of 10). The most critical steps in the new process were labelling mistakes (CI 315, maximum 810), failure to detect a dosage or product mistake (CI 288), failure to detect a typing error during the prescription (CI 175), and microbial contamination (CI 126). Conclusions: Modification of the process

  15. Nutritional status of children and adolescents based on body mass index: agreement between World Health Organization and International Obesity Task Force

    PubMed Central

    Cavazzotto, Timothy Gustavo; Brasil, Marcos Roberto; Oliveira, Vinicius Machado; da Silva, Schelyne Ribas; Ronque, Enio Ricardo V.; Queiroga, Marcos Roberto; Serassuelo, Helio

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the agreement between two international criteria for classification of children and adolescents nutritional status. Methods: The study included 778 girls and 863 boys aged from six to 13 years old. Body mass and height were measured and used to calculate the body mass index. Nutritional status was classified according to the cut-off points defined by the World Health Organization and the International Obesity Task Force. The agreement was evaluated using Kappa statistic and weighted Kappa. Results: In order to classify the nutritional status, the agreement between the criteria was higher for the boys (Kappa 0.77) compared to girls (Kappa 0.61). The weighted Kappa was also higher for boys (0.85) in comparison to girls (0.77). Kappa index varied according to age. When the nutritional status was classified in only two categories - appropriate (thinness + accentuated thinness + eutrophy) and overweight (overweight + obesity + severe obesity) -, the Kappa index presented higher values than those related to the classification in six categories. Conclusions: A substantial agreement was observed between the criteria, being higher in males and varying according to the age. PMID:24676189

  16. Three-in-one parenteral nutrition in neonates and pediatric patients: risks and benefits.

    PubMed

    Blackmer, Allison Beck; Partipilo, M Luisa

    2015-06-01

    Parenteral nutrition (PN) is a life-sustaining therapy designed to deliver essential nutrients to patients unable to meet nutrition needs via the enteral route. PN may be delivered via a 2-in-1 system (one solution containing amino acids, dextrose, electrolytes, vitamins, minerals, and fluids and one solution containing intravenous fat emulsions [IVFEs]) or via a 3-in-1 system (all nutrients mixed in one container). Although the use of 3-in-1 PN solutions is not necessarily therapeutically advantageous, certain benefits may exist such as the potential to reduce the risk of contamination due to decreased manipulations; ease of administration, particularly in the home care setting; possible cost savings; and reduced IVFE wastage. However, the incorporation of IVFE in 3-in-1 solutions also presents unique risks for the neonatal and pediatric population such as decreased stability, increased lipid globule size, decreased sterility and the potential for increased microbial growth/infectious complications, the need to use a larger filter size, precipitation and compatibility risks, and an increased chance of catheter occlusion. This review outlines the unique issues and challenges to be considered when formulating neonatal and pediatric 3-in-1 PN admixtures. While 3-in-1 PN solutions may be advantageous for certain pediatric populations, specifically those dependent on home PN, the risks do not outweigh the benefits in neonatal patients, and use should be avoided in this population.

  17. A Preoperative Nutritional Index for Predicting Cancer-Specific and Overall Survival in Chinese Patients With Laryngeal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Yan; Chen, Shu-Wei; Chen, Shi-Qi; Ou-Yang, Dian; Liu, Wei-Wei; Song, Ming; Yang, An-Kui; Zhang, Quan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Pinato prognostic nutritional index (PNI) adequately predicts long-term outcomes of various malignancies. However, its value in predicting outcomes in laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma (LSCC) is unknown. All patients newly diagnosed with LSCC presenting to the Department of Head and Neck Oncology at Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center between January 1, 1990 and July 31, 2010 were eligible. The PNI was calculated as serum albumin (g/L) + 5 × total lymphocyte count/L. The Cutoff Finder software program was used to classify the patients into 3 groups for which the PNI score was at least 70% sensitive, at least 70% specific, or equivocal. Cancer-specific survival was estimated using the Kaplan–Meier method, and predictors were assessed with Cox regression analysis. Median time between surgery and PNI administration for the 975 eligible patients was 83 months. Index score groups were significantly associated with age, T stage, TNM stage, and type of surgery. Five-year CSS and OS were 57.3% and 56.6% in patients with PNI scores below 48.65 (low-probability of survival), 72.8% and 71.3% with scores between 48.65 and 56.93 (moderate-probability of survival), and 77.6% and 75.3% with scores above 56.93 (high-probability of survival); 10-year CSS and OS were 44.2% and 42.7%, 61.6% and 55.6%, 68.3% and 63.5%, respectively. The PNI score groups significantly predicted CSS and OS (P < 0.001). The PNI is an inexpensive and readily available score that predicted survival in patients with LSCC after curative laryngectomy. PMID:26986105

  18. An index of risk as a measure of biodiversity conservation achieved through land reform.

    PubMed

    Walker, Susan; Price, Robbie; Stephens, R T Theo

    2008-02-01

    We measured the net progress of land reform in achieving a national policy goal for biodiversity conservation in the context of ongoing clearing of native vegetation and additions of land to a highly nonrepresentative (residual) reserve network, interior South Island, New Zealand. We used systematic conservation-planning approaches to develop a spatially explicit index of risk of biodiversity loss (RBL). The index incorporated information from national data sets that describe New Zealand's remaining indigenous land cover, legal protection, and land environments and modeled risk to biodiversity on the basis of stated assumptions about the effects of past habitat loss and legal protection. The index identified irreplaceable and vulnerable native habitats in lowland environments as the most at risk of biodiversity loss, and risk was correlated with the density of threatened plant records. To measure achievement, we used changes in the index that reflected gains made and opportunity costs incurred by legal protection and privatization. Application of the index to measure the difference made by land reform showed it had caused a net increase in the risk of biodiversity loss because most land vulnerable to habitat modification and rich in threatened plant species was privatized and land at least risk of biodiversity loss was protected. The application revealed that new high-elevation reserves did little to mitigate biodiversity decline, that privatization of low-elevation land further jeopardized the most vulnerable biodiversity in lowland native habitats, and that outcomes of land reform for biodiversity deteriorated over time. Further development of robust achievement measures is needed to encourage more accountable biodiversity conservation decisions.

  19. Innovation in drought risk management: exploring the potential of weather index insurance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iglesias, E.; Baez, K.

    2012-04-01

    Many family farming and indigenous communities depend on grazing livestock activities and are particularly prone to drought risks. Vulnerability to drought limits the ability of these households to exit poverty and in many cases leads to environmental degradation. It is well known that uninsured exposure exacerbates income inequality in farming systems and eventually results in welfare losses for rural families. The advantages of farmers who have access to financial tools have been widely acknowledged. However, high administrative costs of traditional insurance hinder small farmers' access to risk management tools. One of the main problems in insurance design relates to the lack of quality data to estimate the risk premium. In rural areas where there are no historical records of farm production data on adverse events such as drought. New technologies such as remote sensing help to overcome this problem and generate information from these areas that otherwise would be impossible or too expensive to obtain. In this paper, we use a satellite based vegetation index (NDVI) and develop a stochastic model to analyse the potential of index insurance to address the risk of drought in Chilean grazing lands. Our results suggest that contract design is a key issue to improve the correlation of the index with individual farm losses, thus reducing basis risk. In particular, we find that the definition of homogeneous areas and the selection of the triggering index threshold are critical issues and show the incidence of different contract designs on (i) the probability that the farmer experience losses but does not receive compensation (false negative) and (ii) the probability that the index triggers compensation but the farmer does not experience drought losses (false negative). Both aspects are key issues to offer the farmer an adequate protection against droughts and guarantee the affordability of the risk premium.

  20. Risk Factors for Subclavian Vein Thrombosis in Cancer Patients With Total Parenteral Nutrition

    PubMed Central

    Berea-Baltierra, Ricardo; Rivas-Ruiz, Rodolfo; Vela-Martinez, Elpidia; Sevilla-Gonzalez, Maria de la Luz; Talavera-Pina, Juan Osvaldo; Valencia-Jimenez, Elena; Perez-Franco, Irene; Escobedo-Hernandez, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Background There are few reports on total parenteral nutrition (TPN) and its possible prothrombotic effect. The purpose of this study was to identify risk factors for subclavian vein thrombosis (SVT) in patients receiving TPN. Method Cancer patients with indwelling subclavian catheters and TPN were followed in a cohort study. Doppler ultrasound examination was performed 8 and 30 days after catheter placement. Results One hundred twenty-one patients were included, with a mean of 61 (± 11.8) years of age. We detected 36 SVT events at day 8 (29.8%) and 47 (38.8%) at day 30 after central catheter placement. Mean length of subclavian catheterization was 17.2 (± 8.2) days. Fifty-three point three percent of patients receiving ≥ 3,050 mOsm TPN in 24 hours developed SVT (relative risk (RR) = 2.01, 95% CI, 1.14 - 3.57; P = 0.016) at day 8 and 60% (RR = 1.67, 95% CI, 1.30 - 2.71; P = 0.038) at day 30 post-catheter placement. Protein administration of > 97.5 g/day was shown to be a risk factor for early thrombosis with a mean of 16.88 days for the development of SVT (95% CI, 10 - 23.7) versus 27.8 days (95% CI, 25.8 - 29.9) in the group with nutritional protein content < 97.5 g/day (P = 0.000). Conclusion High-osmolarity and high-protein nutrition formulas were shown to be risk factors for SVT in cancer patients receiving TPN. PMID:25110538

  1. Nutrient intakes, nutritional patterns and the risk of liver cirrhosis: an explorative case-control study.

    PubMed

    Corrao, Giovanni; Zambon, Antonella; Bagnardi, Vinccnzo; Aricò, Sarino; Loguercio, Carmelina; D'Amicis, Amleto

    2004-01-01

    Several experimental studies have suggested that specific nutrients might play a role on the risk of liver damage. Nevertheless, few epidemiological studies have evaluated the role of diet on the risk of symptomatic liver cirrhosis, giving contradictory results. To evaluate the role of the intake of nutritional factors and dietary patterns on the risk of symptomatic liver cirrhosis and to examine their combined action with alcohol consumption we used data from the Italian Study on Liver Cirrhosis Determinants project. From 1994 to 1998 all the consecutive cirrhotic inpatients admitted to 19 Italian collaborative hospitals for signs of liver decompensation in whom the diagnosis of liver cirrhosis was made for the first time (259 cases) and one or two gender, age and area of residence matched individuals (416 controls) were recruited. Data on lifetime alcohol intake, usual consumption of 191 food items and on markers of hepatitis B and C viral infection were collected. The analysis of principal components identified a nutritional pattern positively correlated with vegetable and fruit intakes and negatively with animal and no-fruit sugar products. With respect to abstainers, relative risks in consumers of use < or = 25 and > or = 51 g/day of alcohol increased from 0.4 [95% confidence interval 0.0, 5.9] to 9.3 [1.3, 69.0] and from 2.1 [1.1, 4.2] to 18.1 [2.8, 118.3] for the lowest and the highest value of this nutritional pattern, respectively. Diet might therefore modulate the damaging effect of alcohol on the liver.

  2. Cardiovascular disease risk factors and depression in Korean women: results from the fourth Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.

    PubMed

    Park, Jong Eun; Lee, Jung Eun

    2011-12-30

    Depression is the fourth leading factor of disease burden for the global female population, but while increasing evidence has supported a contributing role of depression in cardiovascular disease, little is known about this association within the female population of Korea. We examined the association in a study of 5658 Korean women who participated in the fourth Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. A logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). A total of 279 cases of depression were included. Cardiovascular disease risk factors were associated with higher odds of depression: ORs (95% CIs) were 3.99 (2.25-7.05) for current smokers with <5 pack-years vs. never-smokers, 1.97 (1.18-3.30) for ≥28 vs. <20kg/m(2) of body mass index, 1.42 (1.03-1.95) for 100-125 vs. <100mg/dL of fasting serum glucose levels, and 2.10 (1.46-3.03) for a history of hyperlipidemia. Women with a history of two or three comorbid disorders (diabetes, hypertension, and cardiovascular disease) had a 1.63-fold higher OR for depression than women without any of these diseases. Korean women with depression had a greater prevalence of major risk factors for cardiovascular disease than women without depression.

  3. Prognostic nutritional index predicts short-term outcomes after liver resection for hepatocellular carcinoma within the Milan criteria

    PubMed Central

    Li, Na; Ren, Yifan; Shi, Aihua; Lv, Yi; He, Haiqi

    2016-01-01

    Background The prognostic nutritional index (PNI) is calculated based on the serum albumin concentration and the total lymphocyte count. The aim of this study was to investigate the prognostic ability of the PNI for postoperative complications after liver resection to treat hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) within the Milan criteria. Results Postoperative complications were observed in 166 (44.6%) patients. The optimal cutoff value of the PNI was set at 45.6 for postoperative complications. Patients in the PNI-low (PNI < 45.6) group were more likely to have postoperative complications, more blood loss, a longer surgery time and a longer hospital stay than patients in the PNI-high group (PNI > 45.6). Our regression analysis demonstrated that the preoperative PNI and albumin-bilirubin (ALBI) score were significantly associated with postoperative complications (Pearson correlation coefficient, -0.865, p < 0.001). The multivariate analysis revealed that the PNI was an independent predictor of postoperative complications. Materials and Methods Three-hundred and seventy-two patients who underwent partial hepatectomy for HCC from 2003 to 2014 were identified. The cutoff value of the PNI was determined by a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to identify clinicopathological features associated with postoperative complications. Conclusion The PNI may be a significant prognostic factor for evaluating short-term outcomes of patients with HCC after partial hepatectomy. PMID:27835570

  4. Parent/Student Risk and Protective Factors in Understanding Early Adolescent's Body Mass Index

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitzpatrick, Kevin M.; Willis, Don

    2016-01-01

    This article's aim is to examine correlates of middle school students' body mass index (BMI). Little research simultaneously has considered both child and parent correlates in predicting child's BMI; we examine the interrelationships between middle school students and their parent's risks and protective factors and their impact on the child's BMI.…

  5. The physical and empirical basis for a specific clear-air turbulence risk index

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, J. L.

    1986-01-01

    The fundamental emphasis of this research was to develop a technique which would be a significant improvement over those currently used for flight planning to avoid clear air turbulence (CAT). The technique should, ideally, be both quantitative in determining potential intensity and specific in locating regions of relatively high risk. Furthermore, it should not rely on specialized data but be functional using the currently available rawinsonde observation (raob) system. Encouraging results documented in an earlier investigation were considered compelling enough to warrant a closer look into the possibilities of a Specific Clear Air Turbulence Risk (SCATR) index approach to the clear air turbulence problem. Unlike that research, which considered sustained periods of flight in light to moderate clear air turbulence, this study focuses on several cases of documented severe CAT. Results of these case studies suggest that a SCATR index is not an unrealizable goal and that uses of such an index, event in its current prototype level of development, are also apparent.

  6. Phase angle and handgrip strength are sensitive early markers of energy intake in hypophagic, non-surgical patients at nutritional risk, with contraindications to enteral nutrition.

    PubMed

    Caccialanza, Riccardo; Cereda, Emanuele; Klersy, Catherine; Bonardi, Chiara; Cappello, Silvia; Quarleri, Lara; Turri, Annalisa; Montagna, Elisabetta; Iacona, Isabella; Valentino, Francesco; Pedrazzoli, Paolo

    2015-03-11

    The assessment of nutritional intakes during hospitalization is crucial, as it is known that nutritional status tends to worsen during the hospital stay, and this can lead to the negative consequences of malnutrition. International guidelines recommend the use of parenteral nutrition (PN) in hypophagic, non-surgical patients at nutritional risk, with contraindications to enteral nutrition. However, to date, there are no published data regarding either energy intake or objective measurements associated with it in this patient population. The aim of the present exploratory methodological study was to evaluate whether phase angle (PhA) and handgrip strength normalized for skeletal muscle mass (HG/SMM) are sensitive early markers of energy intake in hypophagic, non-surgical patients at nutritional risk, with contraindications to enteral nutrition. We evaluated 30 eligible patients, who were treated with personalized dietary modifications and supplemental PN for at least one week during hospitalization. In a liner regression model adjusted for age, gender, basal protein intake and the basal value of each variable, a trend toward improvement of PhA and preservation of HG/SMM was observed in patients satisfying the estimated calorie requirements (N = 20), while a significant deterioration of these parameters occurred in those who were not able to reach the target (N = 10). The mean adjusted difference and 95% CI were +1.4° (0.5-2.3) (p = 0.005) for PhA and +0.23 (0.20-0.43) (p = 0.033) for HG/SMM. A significant correlation between PhA and HG/SMM variations was also observed (r = 0.56 (95% CI, 0.23-0.77); p = 0.0023). PhA and HG/SMM were able to distinguish between hypophagic, non-surgical patients at nutritional risk who satisfied their estimated caloric requirements and those who did not after a one-week personalized nutritional support. Clinical studies are warranted, in order to verify these preliminary observations and to validate the role of PhA variations as early

  7. The Perinatal Risk Index: Early Risks Experienced by Domestic Adoptees in the United States.

    PubMed

    Marceau, Kristine; De Araujo-Greecher, Marielena; Miller, Emily S; Massey, Suena H; Mayes, Linda C; Ganiban, Jody M; Reiss, David; Shaw, Daniel S; Leve, Leslie D; Neiderhiser, Jenae M

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to assess comprehensively the prevalence of perinatal risks experienced by a potentially high-risk yet understudied population of children domestically adopted in the United States. Data are from participant report and medical records from mothers (n = 580) who completed a domestic adoption placement with nonrelatives at or near birth (Mean placement age = 7 days). We describe a comprehensive measure of perinatal risks, including divergences from previous assessment tools and the incorporation of multiple reporters, and report the prevalence of various types of perinatal risks. The prevalence of each specific risk factor was generally low, although several risks were more prevalent in this sample than estimates from nationally representative publicly available data. Nearly the entire sample (99%) experienced some type of risk exposure. Birth mothers who placed their children for adoption domestically in the US experience higher levels of perinatal risks than the national average, but not for all specific types of risk. Thus, the developmental trajectories of children adopted domestically may systematically differ from the general population to the extent that these specific perinatal risks impact development.

  8. The Perinatal Risk Index: Early Risks Experienced by Domestic Adoptees in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Marceau, Kristine; De Araujo-Greecher, Marielena; Miller, Emily S.; Massey, Suena H.; Mayes, Linda C.; Ganiban, Jody M.; Reiss, David; Shaw, Daniel S.; Leve, Leslie D.; Neiderhiser, Jenae M.

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to assess comprehensively the prevalence of perinatal risks experienced by a potentially high-risk yet understudied population of children domestically adopted in the United States. Data are from participant report and medical records from mothers (n = 580) who completed a domestic adoption placement with nonrelatives at or near birth (Mean placement age = 7 days). We describe a comprehensive measure of perinatal risks, including divergences from previous assessment tools and the incorporation of multiple reporters, and report the prevalence of various types of perinatal risks. The prevalence of each specific risk factor was generally low, although several risks were more prevalent in this sample than estimates from nationally representative publicly available data. Nearly the entire sample (99%) experienced some type of risk exposure. Birth mothers who placed their children for adoption domestically in the US experience higher levels of perinatal risks than the national average, but not for all specific types of risk. Thus, the developmental trajectories of children adopted domestically may systematically differ from the general population to the extent that these specific perinatal risks impact development. PMID:27010541

  9. Energy and macronutrient intake and risk of differentiated thyroid carcinoma in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition study.

    PubMed

    Zamora-Ros, Raul; Rinaldi, Sabina; Tsilidis, Konstantinos K; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Rostgaard-Hansen, Agnetha Linn; Tjønneland, Anne; Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise; Mesrine, Sylvie; Katzke, Verena A; Kühn, Tilman; Förster, Jana; Boeing, Heiner; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Lagiou, Pagona; Klinaki, Eleni; Masala, Giovanna; Sieri, Sabina; Ricceri, Fulvio; Tumino, Rosario; Mattiello, Amalia; Peeters, Petra H M; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B As; Engeset, Dagrun; Skeie, Guri; Argüelles, Marcial; Agudo, Antonio; Sánchez, María-José; Chirlaque, María-Dolores; Barricarte, Aurelio; Chamosa, Saioa; Almquist, Martin; Tosovic, Ada; Hennings, Joakim; Sandström, Maria; Schmidt, Julie A; Khaw, Kay-Thee; Wareham, Nicholas J; Cross, Amanda J; Slimani, Nadia; Byrnes, Graham; Romieu, Isabelle; Riboli, Elio; Franceschi, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Incidence rates of differentiated thyroid carcinoma (TC) have increased in many countries. Adiposity and dietary risk factors may play a role, but little is known on the influence of energy intake and macronutrient composition. The aim of this study was to investigate the associations between TC and the intake of energy, macronutrients, glycemic index (GI) and glycemic load in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort. The study included 477,274 middle-age participants (70.2% women) from ten European countries. Dietary data were collected using country-specific validated dietary questionnaires. Total carbohydrates, proteins, fats, saturated, monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats (PUFA), starch, sugar, and fiber were computed as g/1,000 kcal. Multivariable Cox regression was used to calculate multivariable adjusted hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) by intake quartile (Q). After a mean follow-up time of 11 years, differentiated TC was diagnosed in 556 participants (90% women). Overall, we found significant associations only with total energy (HRQ4 vs .Q1 , 1.29; 95% CI, 1.00-1.68) and PUFA intakes (HRQ4 vs .Q1 , 0.74; 95% CI, 0.57-0.95). However, the associations with starch and sugar intake and GI were significantly heterogeneous across body mass index (BMI) groups, i.e., positive associations with starch and GI were found in participants with a BMI ≥ 25 and with sugar intake in those with BMI < 25. Moreover, inverse associations with starch and GI were observed in subjects with BMI < 25. In conclusion, our results suggest that high total energy and low PUFA intakes may increase the risk of differentiated TC. Positive associations with starch intake and GI in participants with BMI ≥ 25 suggest that those persons may have a greater insulin response to high starch intake and GI than lean people.

  10. Impact of dining out on nutritional intake and metabolic syndrome risk factors: data from the 2011 Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.

    PubMed

    Oh, Chorong; Kim, Hak-Seon; No, Jae-Kyung

    2015-02-14

    The frequency of dining out has rapidly increased; however, the independent associations between dining out, metabolic syndrome risk factors and nutritional status have not been well characterised. The aim of the present study was to investigate the associations between dining out, nutritional intakes and metabolic syndrome risk factors among Korean adults, using data from the 2011 Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Frequency of dining out was significantly associated with intake of nutrients such as energy, water, protein, fat, carbohydrate, Ca, Na, vitamin A and carotene. Especially, the result revealed that Korean adults had insufficient Ca intake compared with the Korean reference intake (700 mg). As the frequency of dining out increased, so did energy intake. In addition, individuals who dined out seven or more times per week experienced a 64% higher likelihood of blood pressure abnormalities, an 88% higher likelihood of waist circumference abnormalities, and a 32% higher likelihood of low HDL-cholesterol levels than those who dined out less than once per week. BMI was not associated with the frequency of dining out. Our findings suggest that strategies to modify dining-out behaviour could reduce metabolic syndrome risk factors via improved nutrition.

  11. Nutritional status and eating disorders: neglected risks factor for nontuberculous mycobacterial lung disease?

    PubMed

    Portillo, Karina; Morera, Josep

    2012-01-01

    Nontuberculous mycobacterial lung disease (NTMLD) in immunocompetent patients is an increasingly important epidemiologic concern. However, risk factors associated with susceptibility to NTMLD are not completely known. A prevalence of NTMLD appears to be rising, mainly in some populations such as middle-aged or elderly thin women, (a group including those with Lady Windermere syndrome) with neither remarkable history of respiratory disease nor smoking habit. Right middle lobe (RML) and lingula are often involved. Various predisposing factors and genetic defects have been described as possible causes of development of NTMLD, namely: voluntary suppression of cough, RML anatomical factors, menopause and mutations in cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). Malnutrition is also an important and common risk factor associated with other mycobacterial disease like tuberculosis (TB) and its probable association with NTMLD as have been pointed out for some authors. However, a real description of all nutritional aspects and eating habits of patients prior to NTMLD diagnosis is lacking. We hypothesized that malnutrition and eating disorders like anorexia nervosa could be risk factors that may promoting NTMLD. From a clinical viewpoint, if this hypothesis proves to be correct, eating habits and nutritional aspects should be taken into account in the diagnosis process of suspected NTMLD, since they are easily identifiable and treatable conditions.

  12. Incidence and Risk Factors of Parenteral Nutrition-Associated Cholestasis in Omani Neonates

    PubMed Central

    Sharef, Sharef W.; Al-Sinani, Siham; Al-Naamani, Khalid; Al-Zakwani, Ibrahim; Reyes, Zenaida S.; Al-Ryiami, Hilal; Khan, Ashfaq A.; Al-Mamari, Watfa

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Parenteral nutrition-associated cholestasis (PNAC) is one of the most challenging complications of prolonged parenteral nutrition (PN) in neonates. There is a lack of research investigating its incidence in newborn infants in Oman and the Arab region. Therefore, this study aimed to assess the incidence of PNAC and its risk factors in Omani neonates. Methods: This retrospective study took place between January and April 2014. All neonates who received PN for ≥14 days during a four-year period (June 2009 to May 2013) at the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) in Sultan Qaboos University Hospital, Muscat, Oman, were enrolled. Results: A total of 1,857 neonates were admitted to the NICU over the study period and 135 neonates (7.3%) received PN for ≥14 days. Determining the incidence of PNAC was only possible in 97 neonates; of these, 38 (39%) had PNAC. The main risk factors associated with PNAC were duration of PN, duration of enteral starvation, gastrointestinal surgeries, blood transfusions and sepsis. Neonates with PNAC had a slightly higher incidence of necrotising enterocolitis in comparison to those without PNAC. Conclusion: This study found a PNAC incidence of 39% in Omani neonates. There were several significant risk factors for PNAC in Omani neonates; however, after logistic regression analysis, only total PN duration remained statistically significant. Preventive strategies should be implemented in NICUs so as to avoid future chronic liver disease in this population. PMID:26052457

  13. Job level risk assessment using task level strain index scores: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Drinkaus, Phillip; Bloswick, Donald S; Sesek, Richard; Mann, Clay; Bernard, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    This paper explores 2 methods of modifying the Strain Index (SI) to assess the ergonomic risk of multi-task jobs. Twenty-eight automotive jobs (15 cases and 13 controls) were studied. The first method is based on the maximum task SI score, and the second method is modeled on the NIOSH Composite Lifting Index (CLI) algorithm, named cumulative assessment of risk to the distal upper extremity (CARD). Significant odds ratios of 11 (CI 1.7-69) and 24 (CI 2.4-240) were obtained using the modified maximum task and CARD, respectively. This indicates that modification of the SI may be useful in determining the risk of distal upper extremity injury associated with a multi-task job.

  14. Diet and Colorectal Cancer Risk: Evaluation of a Nutrition Education Leaflet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dyer, K. J.; Fearon, K. C. H.; Buckner, K.; Richardson, R. A.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effect of a needs-based, nutrition education leaflet on nutritional knowledge. Design: Comparison of nutritional knowledge levels before and after exposure to a nutrition education leaflet. Setting: A regional colorectal out-patient clinic in Edinburgh. Method: A nutrition education leaflet, based on an earlier…

  15. Nutritional Risk, Micronutrient Status and Clinical Outcomes: A Prospective Observational Study in an Infectious Disease Clinic

    PubMed Central

    Dizdar, Oguzhan Sıtkı; Baspınar, Osman; Kocer, Derya; Dursun, Zehra Bestepe; Avcı, Deniz; Karakükcü, Cigdem; Çelik, İlhami; Gundogan, Kursat

    2016-01-01

    Malnutrition has been associated with increased morbidity and mortality. The objective of this study was to determine the nutritional status and micronutrient levels of hospitalized patients in an infectious disease clinic and investigate their association with adverse clinical outcomes. The nutritional status of the study participants was assessed using the Nutritional Risk Screening 2002 (NRS 2002) and micronutrient levels and routine biochemical parameters were tested within the first 24 h of the patient’s admission. The incidence of zinc, selenium, thiamine, vitamin B6, vitamin B12 deficiency were 66.7% (n = 40), 46.6% (n = 29), 39.7% (n = 27), 35.3% (n = 24), 14.1% (n = 9), respectively. Selenium levels were significantly higher in patients with urinary tract infections, but lower in soft tissue infections. Copper levels were significantly higher in patients with soft tissue infections. In the Cox regression models, lower albumin, higher serum lactate dehydrogenase levels and higher NRS-2002 scores were associated with increased death. Thiamine, selenium, zinc and vitamin B6 deficiencies but not chromium deficiencies are common in infectious disease clinics. New associations were found between micronutrient levels and infection type and their adverse clinical outcomes. Hypoalbuminemia and a high NRS-2002 score had the greatest accuracy in predicting death, systemic inflammatory response syndrome and sepsis on admission. PMID:26938553

  16. Safety nets can help address the risks to nutrition from increasing climate variability.

    PubMed

    Alderman, Harold

    2010-01-01

    Models of climate change predict increased variability of weather as well as changes in agro-ecology. The increased variability will pose special challenges for nutrition. This study reviews evidence on climate shocks and nutrition and estimates the economic consequences in terms of reduced schooling and economic productivity stemming from nutritional insults in childhood. Panel data covering up to 20 y indicate that that short-term climate shocks have long-term impacts on children that persist, often into their adult lives. Other studies document the potential for relief programs to offset these shocks providing that the programs can be implemented with flexible financing, rapid identification of those affected by the shock, and timely scale-up. The last of these presumes that programs are already in place with contingency plans drawn up. Arguably, direct food distribution, including that of ready-to-use therapeutic food, may be part of the overall strategy. Even if such programs are too expensive for sustainable widespread use in the prevention of malnutrition, scalable food distribution programs may be cost effective to address the heightened risk of malnutrition following weather-related shocks.

  17. Development of nutritionally at-risk young children is predicted by malaria, anemia, and stunting in Pemba, Zanzibar

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nutritionally at-risk children suffer delays in physical growth and motor and language development. Infectious diseases such as malaria pose an additional risk. We examined the cross-sectional relationships among malaria infection, hemoglobin (Hb) concentration, length-for-age Z-scores (LAZ), motor ...

  18. Integration of Nutrition-Related Components by Early Childhood Education Professionals into Their Individual Work with Children at Risk

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shor, Ron; Friedman, Adina

    2009-01-01

    Poor nutrition is a major risk factor affecting proper development of children. However, there is limited knowledge about the way in which this subject is being integrated into professionals' work in early childhood education programs dealing with situations of children-at-risk. A study on this subject was conducted with 60 professionals who…

  19. Index-based dietary patterns and colorectal cancer risk: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Steck, Susan E; Guinter, Mark; Zheng, Jiali; Thomson, Cynthia A

    2015-11-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer in both men and women in the United States. Various a priori dietary patterns that take into account diet complexity have been associated with CRC risk. This systematic review augments the evidence for an association between CRC risk and the Mediterranean Diet Score (MDS) and the Healthy Eating Index (HEI), and provides new evidence for a novel Dietary Inflammatory Index (DII). Human studies published in English after 31 December 2008 were reviewed. Five case-control studies and 7 prospective cohort studies conducted in the United States and Europe were identified. Five of the studies examined the MDS, 4 examined the HEI, and 4 examined the DII. Comparing highest to lowest score groups, higher MDSs were associated with an 8-54% lower CRC risk, and higher HEI scores were associated with a 20-56% lower CRC risk. More proinflammatory diet scores were associated with a 12-65% higher CRC risk compared with more anti-inflammatory diets in studies that used the DII. The results reported by sex suggested similar associations for men and women. This review builds upon the evidence supporting the association between higher overall diet quality and lower risk of CRC. Increasing scores of MDS and HEI and anti-inflammatory DII scores are characterized by high intake of plant-based foods and low intake of animal products. Future studies in more diverse populations and with consistent scoring calculations are recommended.

  20. Index-Based Dietary Patterns and Colorectal Cancer Risk: A Systematic Review123

    PubMed Central

    Steck, Susan E; Guinter, Mark; Zheng, Jiali; Thomson, Cynthia A

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer in both men and women in the United States. Various a priori dietary patterns that take into account diet complexity have been associated with CRC risk. This systematic review augments the evidence for an association between CRC risk and the Mediterranean Diet Score (MDS) and the Healthy Eating Index (HEI), and provides new evidence for a novel Dietary Inflammatory Index (DII). Human studies published in English after 31 December 2008 were reviewed. Five case-control studies and 7 prospective cohort studies conducted in the United States and Europe were identified. Five of the studies examined the MDS, 4 examined the HEI, and 4 examined the DII. Comparing highest to lowest score groups, higher MDSs were associated with an 8–54% lower CRC risk, and higher HEI scores were associated with a 20–56% lower CRC risk. More proinflammatory diet scores were associated with a 12–65% higher CRC risk compared with more anti-inflammatory diets in studies that used the DII. The results reported by sex suggested similar associations for men and women. This review builds upon the evidence supporting the association between higher overall diet quality and lower risk of CRC. Increasing scores of MDS and HEI and anti-inflammatory DII scores are characterized by high intake of plant-based foods and low intake of animal products. Future studies in more diverse populations and with consistent scoring calculations are recommended. PMID:26567200

  1. Weather-Related Flood and Landslide Damage: A Risk Index for Italian Regions

    PubMed Central

    Messeri, Alessandro; Morabito, Marco; Messeri, Gianni; Brandani, Giada; Petralli, Martina; Natali, Francesca; Grifoni, Daniele; Crisci, Alfonso; Gensini, Gianfranco; Orlandini, Simone

    2015-01-01

    The frequency of natural hazards has been increasing in the last decades in Europe and specifically in Mediterranean regions due to climate change. For example heavy precipitation events can lead to disasters through the interaction with exposed and vulnerable people and natural systems. It is therefore necessary a prevention planning to preserve human health and to reduce economic losses. Prevention should mainly be carried out with more adequate land management, also supported by the development of an appropriate risk prediction tool based on weather forecasts. The main aim of this study is to investigate the relationship between weather types (WTs) and the frequency of floods and landslides that have caused damage to properties, personal injuries, or deaths in the Italian regions over recent decades. In particular, a specific risk index (WT-FLARI) for each WT was developed at national and regional scale. This study has identified a specific risk index associated with each weather type, calibrated for each Italian region and applicable to both annual and seasonal levels. The risk index represents the seasonal and annual vulnerability of each Italian region and indicates that additional preventive actions are necessary for some regions. The results of this study represent a good starting point towards the development of a tool to support policy-makers, local authorities and health agencies in planning actions, mainly in the medium to long term, aimed at the weather damage reduction that represents an important issue of the World Meteorological Organization mission. PMID:26714309

  2. Weather-Related Flood and Landslide Damage: A Risk Index for Italian Regions.

    PubMed

    Messeri, Alessandro; Morabito, Marco; Messeri, Gianni; Brandani, Giada; Petralli, Martina; Natali, Francesca; Grifoni, Daniele; Crisci, Alfonso; Gensini, Gianfranco; Orlandini, Simone

    2015-01-01

    The frequency of natural hazards has been increasing in the last decades in Europe and specifically in Mediterranean regions due to climate change. For example heavy precipitation events can lead to disasters through the interaction with exposed and vulnerable people and natural systems. It is therefore necessary a prevention planning to preserve human health and to reduce economic losses. Prevention should mainly be carried out with more adequate land management, also supported by the development of an appropriate risk prediction tool based on weather forecasts. The main aim of this study is to investigate the relationship between weather types (WTs) and the frequency of floods and landslides that have caused damage to properties, personal injuries, or deaths in the Italian regions over recent decades. In particular, a specific risk index (WT-FLARI) for each WT was developed at national and regional scale. This study has identified a specific risk index associated with each weather type, calibrated for each Italian region and applicable to both annual and seasonal levels. The risk index represents the seasonal and annual vulnerability of each Italian region and indicates that additional preventive actions are necessary for some regions. The results of this study represent a good starting point towards the development of a tool to support policy-makers, local authorities and health agencies in planning actions, mainly in the medium to long term, aimed at the weather damage reduction that represents an important issue of the World Meteorological Organization mission.

  3. Nutrition in Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Hamdy, Osama; Barakatun-Nisak, Mohd-Yusof

    2016-12-01

    Medical nutrition therapy (MNT) is a key component of diabetes management. The importance of balancing macronutrients, reducing carbohydrate load, lowering glycemic index, and implementing an overall healthy dietary pattern are emerging as better approaches for MNT in diabetes. Recent research points to improved glycemic control, reduction in body weight, and improvement in many cardiovascular risk factors when these approaches are provided by registered dietitians or health care providers. This review article discusses the current evidence about the role of sensible nutrition in diabetes management. Specific eating plans for weight reduction and for patients with type 1 diabetes are also discussed.

  4. The spatial distribution characteristics of a comprehensive drought risk index in southwestern China and underlying causes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Lanying; Zhang, Qiang; Ma, Pengli; Jia, Jianying; Wang, Jinsong

    2016-05-01

    Drought is a serious problem in southwestern China, where drought risk exceeds the national average. Climate change is likely to exacerbate the problem, thereby endangering China's food security. In this paper, we used the analytic hierarchy process and meteorological, geographic, soil, and remote-sensing data to develop a drought risk assessment model based on the drought hazard, environmental vulnerability, sensitivity and exposure of the values at risk, and capacity to prevent or mitigate the problem. Using the model, we assessed the drought risk (defined using a comprehensive drought risk index, R) and its spatial distribution in southwestern China and revealed complex zonality. The eastern part of the study area had an extremely high risk, and risk was generally greater in the north than in the south, and increased from southwest to northeast. The comprehensive risk ( R) was lowest in Yunnan province. It was highest in Sichuan Province and Chongqing Municipality. The contribution of the risk factors to R was highest for the capacity for prevention and mitigation, followed by the drought hazard, sensitivity and exposure, and environmental vulnerability.

  5. Prognostic nutritional index serves as a predictive marker of survival and associates with systemic inflammatory response in metastatic intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chenyue; Wang, Haiyong; Ning, Zhouyu; Xu, Litao; Zhuang, Liping; Wang, Peng; Meng, Zhiqiang

    2016-01-01

    Objective The significance of the prognostic nutritional index (PNI) has been widely reported and confirmed in many types of cancers. However, few studies are available indicating its prognostic power in patients with intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC). Thus, we investigated its relationship with overall survival (OS) to evaluate its role in predicting survival in patients with ICC. Patients and methods Between October 2011 and October 2015, 173 consecutive patients with pathologically confirmed locally advanced or metastatic ICC were enrolled. First, the correlations between PNI and clinical factors were analyzed among these patients. Next, univariate and multivariate analyses were conducted to evaluate the association between PNI and OS among these patients with ICC. In addition, the relationships between PNI and three typical systemic inflammatory response (SIR) markers – the neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio (NLR), the platelet/lymphocyte ratio (PLR), and the lymphocyte/monocyte ratio (LMR) – were also assessed. Results A lower PNI was linked with a shorter OS in patients with ICC, as reflected obviously in the Kaplan–Meier analyses. The patients with ICC were divided into the locally advanced group and the metastatic group. Further analyses revealed that PNI is not associated with OS in the locally advanced group. However, in the subgroup of patients with metastatic ICC, a lower PNI significantly correlated with a worsened OS. The OS for patients with a low PNI is 5 months, whereas the OS is 10.17 months for patients with a high PNI. Multivariate analyses revealed that PNI is independently correlated with OS. We finally proved that PNI is negatively proportional to NLR and PLR and positively proportional to LMR. Conclusion Our results demonstrate that decreased PNI signifies a poor OS and is associated with SIR in patients with metastatic ICC. Therefore, it may serve as a valuable predictive marker in patients with metastatic ICC. PMID:27799789

  6. [Clinical application value of prognostic nutritional index for predicting survival in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer].

    PubMed

    Xu, W J; Kang, Y M; Zhou, L; Chen, F F; Song, Y H; Zhang, C Q

    2017-02-23

    Objective: To explore the clinical application value of prognostic nutritional index(PNI) for predicting overall survival(OS) in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods: 123 patients with histologically confirmed non-small cell lung cancer were enrolled in this study, and their clinical and laboratory data were reviewed. The PNI was calculated as 10×serum albumin value+ 5×total lymphocyte countin peripheral blood.Univariate and multivariate analyses were used to identify the potential prognostic factors for advanced NSCLC. Results: PNI of the 123 NSCLC patients was 46.24±6.56. PNI was significantly associated with age, weight loss and pleural effusion (P<0.05). However, it showed no relationship with sex, smoking, hemoptysis, chest pain, dyspnea, histological type, clinical stage, and administration of chemotherapy (P>0.05). The median OS of the 123 patients was 19.5 months. The median OS in the higher PNI group (PNI≥46.24) and lower PNI group(PNI<46.24) were 25.2 months and 16.4 months, respectively.The 1-year survival rates were 80.6% and 63.9%, and 2-year survival rates were 54.8% and 19.6%, respectively (P<0.01). Univariate analysis showed that PNI, age, dyspnea, and weight loss were related to the OS of the advanced NSCLC patients (P<0.05). Multivariate analysis identified PNI as an independent prognostic factor for OS of advanced NSCLC (P<0.001). Conclusion: PNI can be easily calculated, and may be used as a relatively new prognostic indicator for advanced NSCLC in clinical practice.

  7. [Bromatological characterization of mulberry cultivars, Morus spp., and determination of nutritional indexes of Bombyx mori L. (Lepidoptera: Bombycidae)].

    PubMed

    Meneguim, Ana M; Lustri, Cristina; Oliveira, Dássia D de; Yada, Inês F U; Pasini, Amarildo

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this work was to assess, through consumption and utilization of natural food measurements, whether mulberry cultivars, Morus spp., could be recommended to rear the silkworm, Bombyx mori L., in a commercial scale. The mulberry cultivars Miura (standard), Korin and Tailandesa and the hybrids FM 3/3, FM 86, SK 1 and SK 4 were tested. Seventy five fifth-instar commercial hybrid larvae were individualized in gerbox® unities and maintained in a rearing room (25 ± 3ºC and 80 ± 10% RH).The mulberry leaves of each of the five cultivars used to feed the silkworm larvae were submitted to bromatological analysis. The dry weight of larvae at the beginning and at the end of the fifth instar, the food consumed and the feces eliminated were recorded to determine the following indexes: relative consumption rate (RCR), relative metabolic rate (RMR), relative growth rate (RGR), approximate digestibility (AD), efficiency of conversion of ingested food (ECI), efficiency of conversion of digested food (ECD), metabolic cost (MC). The bromatological composition analysis of mulberry leaf cultivars revealed that the hybrid SK 4 presented superior nutritional quality compared to the standard cultivar Miura, due to its higher content in crude protein and ethereal extract, and lower detergent fiber content. The hybrid SK 4 was the most adequate food to the silkworm larvae because it was ingested in small amounts, thus providing good digestibility to the larvae, low metabolic cost, good growth rate and one of the highest efficiencies in the conversion of the ingested food and ingested and digested in biomass.

  8. Associations between food insecurity, supplemental nutrition assistance program (SNAP) benefits, and body mass index among adult females.

    PubMed

    Jilcott, Stephanie B; Wall-Bassett, Elizabeth D; Burke, Sloane C; Moore, Justin B

    2011-11-01

    Obesity disproportionately affects low-income and minority individuals and has been linked with food insecurity, particularly among women. More research is needed to examine potential mechanisms linking obesity and food insecurity. Therefore, this study's purpose was to examine cross-sectional associations between food insecurity, Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) benefits per household member, perceived stress, and body mass index (BMI) among female SNAP participants in eastern North Carolina (n=202). Women were recruited from the Pitt County Department of Social Services between October 2009 and April 2010. Household food insecurity was measured using the validated US Department of Agriculture 18-item food security survey module. Perceived stress was measured using the 14-item Cohen's Perceived Stress Scale. SNAP benefits and number of children in the household were self-reported and used to calculate benefits per household member. BMI was calculated from measured height and weight (as kg/m(2)). Multivariate linear regression was used to examine associations between BMI, SNAP benefits, stress, and food insecurity while adjusting for age and physical activity. In adjusted linear regression analyses, perceived stress was positively related to food insecurity (P<0.0001), even when SNAP benefits were included in the model. BMI was positively associated with food insecurity (P=0.04). Mean BMI was significantly greater among women receiving <$150 in SNAP benefits per household member vs those receiving ≥$150 in benefits per household member (35.8 vs 33.1; P=0.04). Results suggest that provision of adequate SNAP benefits per household member might partially ameliorate the negative effects of food insecurity on BMI.

  9. Pretreatment prognostic nutritional index is a significant predictor of prognosis in patients with cervical cancer treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Haraga, Junko; Nakamura, Keiichiro; Omichi, Chiaki; Nishida, Takeshi; Haruma, Tomoko; Kusumoto, Tomoyuki; Seki, Noriko; Masuyama, Hisashi; Katayama, Norihisa; Kanazawa, Susumu; Hiramatsu, Yuji

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated whether pretreatment neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR), platelet-to-lymphocyte ratio (PLR) and prognostic nutritional index (PNI) are prognostic factors in patients with cervical cancer who undergo concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) and radiotherapy (RT). A total of 131 patients who underwent CCRT and RT for cervical cancer were retrospectively investigated and the correlations of NLR, PLR and PNI with clinical parameters and prognosis were assessed in CCRT and RT. The CCRT and RT groups had a median progression-free survival (PFS) of 41.82 and 24.72 months, respectively, and an overall survival of 49.70 and 29.56 months, respectively. At a cut-off value of NLR≥2.85, the PFS and OS in patients with higher NLR undergoing RT were significantly shorter compared with those in patients with lower NLR (P=0.029 and P=0.017, respectively). At a cut-off value for PNI of ≤48.55 in patients undergoing CCRT and ≤45.80 in patients undergoing RT, the PFS and OS in patients with lower PNI were significantly shorter compared with those in patients with higher PNI (PFS and OS with CCRT, P<0.001 and P<0.001, respectively; PFS and OS with RT, P=0.002 and P=0.008, respectively). Multivariate analyses also identified low PNI as an independent prognostic factor for PFS and OS in patients receiving CCRT. Therefore, low PNI was shown to predict poor prognosis in patients with cervical cancer. PMID:27900086

  10. Managing the financial risk of low water levels in Great Lakes with index-based contracts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, E.; Characklis, G. W.; Brown, C. M.; Moody, P.

    2014-12-01

    Low water levels in the Great Lakes have recently had significant financial impacts on the region's commercial shipping, responsible for transporting millions of dollars' worth of bulk goods each year. Low lake levels can significantly affect shipping firms, as cargo capacity is a function of draft, or the distance between water level and the ship's bottom. Draft increases with weight, and lower lake levels force ships to reduce cargo to prevent running aground in shallow harbors, directly impacting the finances of shipping companies. Risk transfer instruments may provide adaptable, yet unexplored, alternatives for managing these financial risks, at significantly less expense than more traditional solutions (e.g., dredging). Index-based financial instruments can be particularly attractive as contract payouts are directly linked to well-defined transparent metrics (e.g., lake levels), eliminating the need for subjective adjustors, as well as concerns over moral hazard. In developing such instruments, a major challenge is identifying an index that is well correlated with financial losses, and thus a contract that reliably pays out when losses are experienced (low basis risk). In this work, a relationship between lake levels and shipping revenues is developed, and actuarial analyses of the frequency and magnitude of revenue losses is completed using this relationship and synthetic water level data. This analysis is used to develop several types of index-based contracts. A standardized suite of binary contracts is developed, with each indexed to lake levels and priced according to predefined thresholds. These are combined to form portfolios with different objectives (e.g. options, collars), with optimal portfolio structure and length of coverage determined by limiting basis risk and contract cost, using simulations over the historic dataset. Results suggest that portfolios of these binary contracts can substantially reduce the risk of financial losses during periods of

  11. Comparison of Nursing Records and the Catholic Medical Center Nutritional Risk Screening as a Nutrition Screening Tool for Intensive Care Unit Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hye Jin; Hong, Jeong Im

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, we aimed to compare the results from nutritional risk screening based on nursing records with those using the Catholic Medical Center Nutritional Risk Screening (CMCNRS) tool. A cross-sectional study was performed involving 91 patients aged ≥ 18 years from an intensive care unit. We collected general characteristics of the patients and nutrition screening was conducted for each patient by using computerized hospital program for the nursing records as well as the CMCNRS conducted by clinical dietitians. The subjects were aged 64.0 ± 17.5 years, and 52 (57.1%) patients had a NPO (nothing by mouth) status. Neurological disease was the most common diagnosis (25.3%). Compared with the CMCNRS results from the clinical dietitians, the results for the nursing records had a sensitivity of 40.5% (95% CI 32.0-40.5) and a specificity of 100.0% (95% CI 92.8-100.0). The agreement was fair between the CMCNRS results obtained by clinical dietitians and the nursing records (k = 0.423). Analysis of the errors from the screening using the nursing records revealed significant differences for all subjective indicators (p < 0.001), compared with the CMCNRS by the clinical dietitians. Thus, after assessing the methods used for nutrition screening and the differences in the search results regarding malnourished status, we noted that the nursing records had a lower sensitivity than the screening by the CMCNRS. PMID:25713793

  12. Endothelial function in a cardiovascular risk population with borderline ankle–brachial index

    PubMed Central

    Syvänen, Kari; Korhonen, Päivi; Partanen, Auli; Aarnio, Pertti

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: The diagnosis of peripheral arterial disease (PAD) can be made by measuring the ankle–brachial index (ABI). Traditionally ABI values > 1.00–1.40 have been considered normal and ABI ≤ 0.90 defines PAD. Recent studies, however, have shown that individuals with ABI values between 0.90–1.00 are also at risk of cardiovascular events. We studied this cardiovascular risk population subgroup in order to determine their endothelial function using peripheral arterial tonometry (PAT). Methods: We selected 66 individuals with cardiovascular risk and borderline ABI. They all had hypertension, newly diagnosed glucose disorder, metabolic syndrome, obesity, or a ten year risk of cardiovascular disease death of 5% or more according to the Systematic Coronary Risk Evaluation System (SCORE). Subjects with previously diagnosed diabetes or cardiovascular disease were excluded. Endothelial function was assessed by measuring the reactive hyperemia index (RHI) from fingertips using an Endo-PAT device. Results: The mean ABI was 0.95 and mean RHI 2.11. Endothelial dysfunction, defined as RHI < 1.67, was detected in 15/66 (23%) of the subjects. There were no statistically significant differences in RHI values between subjects with different cardiovascular risk factors. The only exception was that subjects with impaired fasting glucose (IFG) had slightly lower RHI values (mean RHI 1.91) than subjects without IFG (mean RHI 2.24) (P = 0.02). Conclusions: In a cardiovascular risk population with borderline ABI nearly every fourth subject had endothelial dysfunction, indicating an elevated risk of cardiovascular events. This might point out a subgroup of individuals in need of more aggressive treatment for their risk factors. PMID:21415923

  13. Transgenerational epigenetic inheritance of diabetes risk as a consequence of early nutritional imbalances.

    PubMed

    Jimenez-Chillaron, Josep C; Ramon-Krauel, Marta; Ribo, Silvia; Diaz, Ruben

    2016-02-01

    In today's world, there is an unprecedented rise in the prevalence of chronic metabolic diseases, including obesity, insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes (T2D). The pathogenesis of T2D includes both genetic and environmental factors, such as excessive energy intake and physical inactivity. It has recently been suggested that environmental factors experienced during early stages of development, including the intrauterine and neonatal periods, might play a major role in predisposing individuals to T2D. Furthermore, several studies have shown that such early environmental conditions might even contribute to disease risk in further generations. In this review, we summarise recent data describing how parental nutrition during development increases the risk of diabetes in the offspring. We also discuss the potential mechanisms underlying transgenerational inheritance of metabolic disease, with particular emphasis on epigenetic mechanisms.

  14. Association between ratio indexes of body composition phenotypes and metabolic risk in Italian adults.

    PubMed

    Powell, M; Lara, J; Mocciaro, G; Prado, C M; Battezzati, A; Leone, A; Tagliabue, A; de Amicis, R; Vignati, L; Bertoli, S; Siervo, M

    2016-12-01

    The ratio between fat mass (FM) and fat-free mass (FFM) has been used to discriminate individual differences in body composition and improve prediction of metabolic risk. Here, we evaluated whether the use of a visceral adipose tissue-to-fat-free mass index (VAT:FFMI) ratio was a better predictor of metabolic risk than a fat mass index to fat-free mass index (FMI:FFMI) ratio. This is a cross-sectional study including 3441 adult participants (age range 18-81; men/women: 977/2464). FM and FFM were measured by bioelectrical impedance analysis and VAT by ultrasonography. A continuous metabolic risk Z score and harmonised international criteria were used to define cumulative metabolic risk and metabolic syndrome (MetS), respectively. Multivariate logistic and linear regression models were used to test associations between body composition indexes and metabolic risk. In unadjusted models, VAT:FFMI was a better predictor of MetS (OR 8.03, 95%CI 6.69-9.65) compared to FMI:FFMI (OR 2.91, 95%CI 2.45-3.46). However, the strength of association of VAT:FFMI and FMI:FFMI became comparable when models were adjusted for age, gender, clinical and sociodemographic factors (OR 4.06, 95%CI 3.31-4.97; OR 4.25, 95%CI 3.42-5.27, respectively). A similar pattern was observed for the association of the two indexes with the metabolic risk Z score (VAT:FFMI: unadjusted b = 0.69 ± 0.03, adjusted b = 0.36 ± 0.03; FMI:FFMI: unadjusted b = 0.28 ± 0.028, adjusted b = 0.38 ± 0.02). Our results suggest that there is no real advantage in using either VAT:FFMI or FMI:FFMI ratios as a predictor of metabolic risk in adults. However, these results warrant confirmation in longitudinal studies.

  15. [Nutritional status, lifestyle and cardiovascular risk in lacto-ovo vegetarians and omnivore].

    PubMed

    Fernandes Dourado, Keila; Campos, Florisbela de Arruda Câmara e Siqueira; Rojas, Hernando Flores; Simiões, Shirley Kelly dos Santos; de Siqueira, Leonardo Pereira

    2010-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess socioeconomic characteristics, dietary intake, nutritional status and cardiovascular risk (using anthropometric indicators of central obesity) in lacto-ovo vegetarians and non-vegetarians. Two non-vegetarians were selected for each vegetarian (paired for gender and age) in order to increase the power of the statistical tests. The sample was made up of 87 individuals (58.6% males; 29 vegetarians and 58 non-vegetarians) with a mean age of 40 +/- 13 years. Among the socioeconomic characteristics, only the number of residents per household differed between groups, with a greater percentage of homes with five or more residents in the vegetarian group. Concerning lifestyle, the groups differed with regard to smoking habits (p < 0.001), with a higher proportion of smokers among the non-vegetarians. There were no significant differences between groups in any of the anthropometric variables studied. Concerning dietary intake, no difference between groups was found with regard to total calorie intake, but the consumption of proteins, total lipids, saturated fat and cholesterol was higher among the non-vegetarians, whereas carbohydrate and fiber intake was higher among the vegetarians. The results of the present study suggest that, although a lacto-ovo vegetarian diet is considered healthier due to the lower consumption of total fat, saturated fatty acids and cholesterol, there are no significant differences in nutritional status or anthropometric indicators of cardiovascular risk when lifestyle and total calorie intake are similar.

  16. [Relationship between groundwater quality index of nutrition element and organic matter in riparian zone and water quality in river].

    PubMed

    Hua-Shan, Xu; Tong-Qian, Zhao; Hong-Q, Meng; Zong-Xue, Xu; Chao-Hon, Ma

    2011-04-01

    Riparian zone hydrology is dominated by shallow groundwater with complex interactions between groundwater and surface water. There are obvious relations of discharge and recharge between groundwater and surface water. Flood is an important hydrological incident that affects groundwater quality in riparian zone. By observing variations of physical and chemical groundwater indicators in riparian zone at the Kouma section of the Yellow River Wetland, especially those took place in the period of regulation for water and sediment at the Xiaolangdi Reservoir, relationship between the groundwater quality in riparian zone and the flood water quality in the river is studied. Results show that there will be great risk of nitrogen, phosphorus, nitrate nitrogen and organic matter permeating into the groundwater if floodplain changes into farmland. As the special control unit of nitrogen pollution between rivers and artificial wetlands, dry fanning areas near the river play a very important role in nitrogen migration between river and groundwater. Farm manure as base fertilizer may he an important source of phosphorus leak and loss at the artificial wetlands. Phosphorus leaks into the groundwater and is transferred along the hydraulic gradient, especially during the period of regulation for water and sediment at the Xiaolangdi Reservoir. The land use types and farming systems of the riparian floodplain have a major impact on the nitrate nitrogen contents of the groundwater. Nitrogen can infiltrate and accumulate quickly at anaerobic conditions in the fish pond area, and the annual nitrogen achieves a relatively balanced state in lotus area. In those areas, the soil is flooded and at anaerobic condition in spring and summer, nitrogen infiltrates and denitrification significantly, but soil is not flooded and at aerobic condition in the autumn and winter, and during these time, a significant nitrogen nitrification process occurs. In the area between 50 m and 200 m from the river

  17. Development of prolonged standing strain index to quantify risk levels of standing jobs.

    PubMed

    Halim, Isa; Omar, Abdul Rahman

    2012-01-01

    Many occupations in industry such as metal stamping workers, electronics parts assembly operators, automotive industry welders, and lathe operators require working in a standing posture for a long time. Prolonged standing can contribute to discomfort and muscle fatigue particularly in the back and legs. This study developed the prolonged standing strain index (PSSI) to quantify the risk levels caused by standing jobs, and proposed recommendations to minimize the risk levels. Risk factors associated with standing jobs, such as working posture, muscles activity, standing duration, holding time, whole-body vibration, and indoor air quality, were the basis for developing the PSSI. All risk factors were assigned multipliers, and the PSSI was the product of those multipliers. Recommendations for improvement are based on the PSSI; however, extensive studies are required to validate their effectiveness. multipliers, and the PSSI was the product of those multipliers. Recommendations for improvement are based on the PSSI; however, extensive studies are required to validate their effectiveness.

  18. Prevalence and measures of nutritional compromise among nursing home patients: weight loss, low body mass index, malnutrition, and feeding dependency, a systematic review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Bell, Christina L; Tamura, Bruce K; Masaki, Kamal H; Amella, Elaine J

    2013-02-01

    Weight loss and poor nutrition have been important considerations in measuring quality of nursing home care since 1987. Our purpose was to examine, synthesize, and provide a systematic review of the current literature on the prevalence and definitions of nutritional problems in nursing home residents. In the fall of 2011, we performed MEDLINE searches of English-language articles published after January 1, 1990. Articles were systematically selected for inclusion if they presented prevalence data for general nursing home populations on at least one of the following: weight loss, low body mass index, Mini-Nutritional Assessment or other measure of malnutrition, poor oral intake, or dependency for feeding. Data on each study, including study author, year, setting, population, type of study (study design), measures, and results, were systematically extracted onto standard matrix tables by consensus by a team of two fellowship-trained medical school faculty geriatrician clinician-researchers with significant experience in long term care. The MEDLINE search yielded 672 studies plus 229 studies identified through related citations and reference lists. Of the 77 studies included, 11 articles provided prevalence data from the baseline data of an intervention study, and 66 articles provided prevalence data in the context of an observational study of nutrition. There is a wide range of prevalence of low body mass index, poor appetite, malnutrition, and eating disability reported among nursing home residents. Studies demonstrate a lack of standardized definitions and great variability among countries. Of all the measures, the Minimum Data Set (MDS) weight loss definition of ≥5% in 1 month or ≥10% in 6 months had the narrowest range of prevalence rate: 6% to 15%. Weight loss, as measured by the MDS, may be the most easily replicated indicator of nutritional problems in nursing home residents for medical directors to follow for quality-improvement purposes. Additional

  19. Leukocytes as risk markers for cardiovascular disease in adolescents: association with birth characteristics, nutritional status and biochemical tests

    PubMed Central

    do Prado, Pedro Paulo; de Faria, Franciane Rocha; de Faria, Eliane Rodrigues; Franceschini, Sylvia do Carmo Castro; Priore, Silvia Eloiza

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To evaluate the correlation between the number of leukocytes and cardiovascular risks associated with birth characteristics, nutritional status and biochemical tests. Methods: Cross-sectional study developed with 475 adolescents, born between 1992 and 2001, in the municipality of Viçosa (MG). Maternal medical records were analyzed in the hospital units, and the following was recorded: birth weight and length, head circumference, chest circumference, Apgar score, gestational age. In adolescents, body mass index, skinfold thickness, body composition, blood count, biochemical tests and clinical variables were also assessed. The statistical analyses was carried out using Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) version 20.0 and Data Analysis and Statistical Software (STATA) with Kruskal–Wallis, Mann–Whitney, chi-square or Fisher's exact tests and Linear Regression. Significance level was set at α<0.05. The study was approved by the Research Ethics Committee of UFV for studies with human subjects. Results: Weight and birth length, head and chest circumference were higher among boys. In adolescents, the number of leukocytes was higher in individuals with excess weight and body fat and high adiposity index, waist-to-height ratio and waist circumference. Only altered triglycerides showed differences between leukocyte medians. Regardless of the anthropometric variable of the final regression model, the stage of adolescence, number of platelets, eosinophils, monocytes and lymphocytes were associated with the increase in leukocytes. Conclusions: The birth variables were not associated with changes in leukocyte numbers, whereas the anthropometric variables were good indicators for a higher leukocyte count, regardless of the stage of adolescence and gender. PMID:26572104

  20. Study on the application of the Kent index method on the risk assessment of disastrous accidents in subway engineering.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hao; Wang, Mingyang; Yang, Baohuai; Rong, Xiaoli

    2013-01-01

    With the development of subway engineering, according to uncertain factors and serious accidents involved in the construction of subways, implementing risk assessment is necessary and may bring a number of benefits for construction safety. The Kent index method extensively used in pipeline construction is improved to make risk assessment much more practical for the risk assessment of disastrous accidents in subway engineering. In the improved method, the indexes are divided into four categories, namely, basic, design, construction, and consequence indexes. In this study, a risk assessment model containing four kinds of indexes is provided. Three kinds of risk occurrence modes are listed. The probability index model which considers the relativity of the indexes is established according to the risk occurrence modes. The model provides the risk assessment process through the fault tree method and has been applied in the risk assessment of Nanjing subway's river-crossing tunnel construction. Based on the assessment results, the builders were informed of what risks should be noticed and what they should do to avoid the risks. The need for further research is discussed. Overall, this method may provide a tool for the builders, and improve the safety of the construction.

  1. Study on the Application of the Kent Index Method on the Risk Assessment of Disastrous Accidents in Subway Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Hao; Wang, Mingyang; Yang, Baohuai; Rong, Xiaoli

    2013-01-01

    With the development of subway engineering, according to uncertain factors and serious accidents involved in the construction of subways, implementing risk assessment is necessary and may bring a number of benefits for construction safety. The Kent index method extensively used in pipeline construction is improved to make risk assessment much more practical for the risk assessment of disastrous accidents in subway engineering. In the improved method, the indexes are divided into four categories, namely, basic, design, construction, and consequence indexes. In this study, a risk assessment model containing four kinds of indexes is provided. Three kinds of risk occurrence modes are listed. The probability index model which considers the relativity of the indexes is established according to the risk occurrence modes. The model provides the risk assessment process through the fault tree method and has been applied in the risk assessment of Nanjing subway's river-crossing tunnel construction. Based on the assessment results, the builders were informed of what risks should be noticed and what they should do to avoid the risks. The need for further research is discussed. Overall, this method may provide a tool for the builders, and improve the safety of the construction. PMID:23710136

  2. Physical activity and lung cancer risk in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition Cohort.

    PubMed

    Steindorf, Karen; Friedenreich, Christine; Linseisen, Jakob; Rohrmann, Sabine; Rundle, Andrew; Veglia, Fabrizio; Vineis, Paolo; Johnsen, Nina Fønns; Tjønneland, Anne; Overvad, Kim; Raaschou-Nielsen, Ole; Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Schulz, Mandy; Boeing, Heiner; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Kalapothaki, Victoria; Koliva, Maria; Krogh, Vittorio; Palli, Domenico; Tumino, Rosario; Panico, Salvatore; Monninkhof, Evelyn; Peeters, Petra H; Boshuizen, Hendriek C; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas; Chirlaque, Maria-Dolores; Agudo, Antonio; Larrañaga, Nerea; Quirós, José R; Martínez, Carmen; Barricarte, Aurelio; Janzon, Lars; Berglund, Göran; Bingham, Sheila; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Key, Timothy J; Norat, Teresa; Jenab, Mazda; Cust, Anne; Riboli, Elio

    2006-11-15

    Research conducted predominantly in male populations on physical activity and lung cancer has yielded inconsistent results. We examined this relationship among 416,277 men and women from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). Detailed information on recent recreational, household and occupational physical activity, smoking habits and diet was assessed at baseline between 1992 and 2000. Relative risks (RR) were estimated using Cox regression. During 6.3 years of follow-up we identified 607 men and 476 women with incident lung cancer. We did not observe an inverse association between recent occupational, recreational or household physical activity and lung cancer risk in either males or females. However, we found some reduction in lung cancer risk associated with sports in males (adjusted RR = 0.71; 95% confidence interval 0.50-0.98; highest tertile vs. inactive group), cycling (RR = 0.73; 0.54-0.99) in females and non-occupational vigorous physical activity. For occupational physical activity, lung cancer risk was increased for unemployed men (adjusted RR = 1.57; 1.20-2.05) and men with standing occupations (RR = 1.35; 1.02-1.79) compared with sitting professions. There was no evidence of heterogeneity of physical activity associations across countries, or across any of the considered cofactors. For some histologic subtypes suggestive sex-specific reductions, limited by subgroup sizes, were observed, especially with vigorous physical activity. In total, our study shows no consistent protective associations of physical activity with lung cancer risk. It can be assumed that the elevated risks found for occupational physical activity are not produced mechanistically by physical activity itself but rather reflect exposure to occupation-related lung cancer risk factors.

  3. A genetic risk tool for obesity predisposition assessment and personalized nutrition implementation based on macronutrient intake.

    PubMed

    Goni, Leticia; Cuervo, Marta; Milagro, Fermín I; Martínez, J Alfredo

    2015-01-01

    There is little evidence about genetic risk score (GRS)-diet interactions in order to provide personalized nutrition based on the genotype. The aim of the study was to assess the value of a GRS on obesity prediction and to further evaluate the interactions between the GRS and dietary intake on obesity. A total of 711 seekers of a Nutrigenetic Service were examined for anthropometric and body composition measurements and also for dietary habits and physical activity. Oral epithelial cells were collected for the identification of 16 SNPs (related with obesity or lipid metabolism) using DNA zip-coded beads. Genotypes were coded as 0, 1 or 2 according to the number of risk alleles, and the GRS was calculated by adding risk alleles with such a criterion. After being adjusted for gender, age, physical activity and energy intake, the GRS demonstrated that individuals carrying >7 risk alleles had in average 0.93 kg/m(2) of BMI, 1.69 % of body fat mass, 1.94 cm of waist circumference and 0.01 waist-to-height ratio more than the individuals with ≤7 risk alleles. Significant interactions for GRS and the consumption of energy, total protein, animal protein, vegetable protein, total fat, saturated fatty acids, polyunsaturated fatty acids, total carbohydrates, complex carbohydrates and fiber intake on adiposity traits were found after adjusted for confounders variables. The GRS confirmed that the high genetic risk group showed greater values of adiposity than the low risk group and demonstrated that macronutrient intake modifies the GRS association with adiposity traits.

  4. Scanning laser edema index: a reliable tool to correlate with diabetic retinopathy and systemic risk factors?

    PubMed

    Peyman, Mohammadreza; Tajunisah, Iqbal; Loo, Angela; Chuah, Khai Choon; Subrayan, Visvaraja

    2012-01-01

    To correlate Heidelberg Retina Tomograph (HRT) derived macular edema (DME) index with severity of diabetic retinopathy and systemic factors. A total of 300 diabetic patients were recruited for the study for each of them a value for the macular edema index was obtained using the HRT II. Patients' age, gender, duration and type of diabetes mellitus, latest HbA1c result and presence or absence of co-morbid factors (hypertension, ischemic heart disease, nephropathy) were recorded together with the stage of diabetic retinopathy. These were correlated with DME. Out of 300 patients, HRT defined macula edema was seen in 68 patients (22.6%). There is a wider and higher range (95% percentile) of macula edema index in the severe non proliferative diabetic retinopathy (NPDR) group. Independent samples t test showed significant difference between the severe NPDR group and no DR group (p<0.001), mild NPDR group (p<0.05) and moderate NPDR group (p<0.05). A higher macula edema index was also found to have a low degree of correlation with more advanced stages of retinopathy (r=0.310; p<0.001). Also nephropathy showed a strong and significant correlation with DME. Hypertension had moderately significant correlation with DME. This study found no correlation between ischemic heart disease and DME. HRT derived scanning laser edema index is a reliable objective tool to evaluate diabetic retinopathy and systemic risk factors.

  5. The Veterans Aging Cohort Study (VACS) Index is associated with concurrent risk for neurocognitive impairment

    PubMed Central

    MARQUINE, María J.; UMLAUF, Anya; ROONEY, Alexandra; FAZELI, Pariya L.; GOUAUX, Ben; WOODS, Steven Paul; LETENDRE, Scott L.; ELLIS, Ronald J.; GRANT, Igor; MOORE, David J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The Veterans Aging Cohort Study (VACS) Index is predictive of mortality, and combines age, traditional HIV biomarkers (HIV-1 plasma RNA and current CD4 count) and non-HIV biomarkers (indicators of renal and liver function, anemia, and Hepatitis C co-infection). We examined the association between the VACS Index and HIV-associated neurocognitive impairment (NCI). Design and Methods Participants included 601 HIV-infected adults enrolled in cohort studies at the UCSD HIV Neurobehavioral Research Program (Ages: 18-76 years; 88% male; 63% White; Median current CD4=364; 63% on antiretroviral therapy; AIDS=64%). Biomarkers used in calculating the VACS Index were measured in prospectively collected blood samples using conventional laboratory methods. NCI was defined using global and seven domain deficit scores. Results Higher VACS Index scores were associated with concurrent risk for global NCI (p<.001; OR=1.21, CI=1.12-1.32), even when adjusting for psychiatric comorbidities. This relation was statistically significant for most cognitive domains in adjusted models. Furthermore, the VACS Index predicted concurrent NCI beyond nadir CD4 and estimated duration of infection. Older age, lower hemoglobin and lower CD4 counts were the VACS components most strongly linked to NCI. Conclusions The findings extend prior research on the potential usefulness of the VACS Index in predicting HIV-associated outcomes to include NCI. Although the effect size was relatively small, our findings suggest that demographic information, HIV-disease factors, and common comorbidities might each play important roles in the clinical manifestation of cognitive impairment among HIV-infected individuals. Additional research is needed to determine if a more sensitive and specific index can be developed. PMID:24442225

  6. Identifying critically ill patients who benefit the most from nutrition therapy: the development and initial validation of a novel risk assessment tool

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction To develop a scoring method for quantifying nutrition risk in the intensive care unit (ICU). Methods A prospective, observational study of patients expected to stay > 24 hours. We collected data for key variables considered for inclusion in the score which included: age, baseline APACHE II, baseline SOFA score, number of comorbidities, days from hospital admission to ICU admission, Body Mass Index (BMI) < 20, estimated % oral intake in the week prior, weight loss in the last 3 months and serum interleukin-6 (IL-6), procalcitonin (PCT), and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels. Approximate quintiles of each variable were assigned points based on the strength of their association with 28 day mortality. Results A total of 597 patients were enrolled in this study. Based on the statistical significance in the multivariable model, the final score used all candidate variables except BMI, CRP, PCT, estimated percentage oral intake and weight loss. As the score increased, so did mortality rate and duration of mechanical ventilation. Logistic regression demonstrated that nutritional adequacy modifies the association between the score and 28 day mortality (p = 0.01). Conclusions This scoring algorithm may be helpful in identifying critically ill patients most likely to benefit from aggressive nutrition therapy. PMID:22085763

  7. Evaluation of index-overlay methods for groundwater vulnerability and risk assessment in Kathmandu Valley, Nepal.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, Sangam; Kafle, Ranjana; Pandey, Vishnu Prasad

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed at evaluating three index-overlay methods of vulnerability assessment (i.e., DRASTIC, GOD, and SI) for estimating risk to pollution of shallow groundwater aquifer in the Kathmandu Valley, Nepal. The Groundwater Risk Assessment Model (GRAM) model was used to compute the risk to groundwater pollution. Results showed that DRASTIC and SI methods are comparable for vulnerability assessment as both methods delineate around 80% of the groundwater basin area under high vulnerable zone. From the perspective of risk to pollution results, DRASTIC and GOD methods are comparable. Nevertheless, all the three methods estimate that at least 60% of the groundwater basin is under moderate risk to NO3-N pollution, which goes up to 75% if DRASTIC or GOD-based vulnerabilities are considered as exposure pathways. Finally, based on strength and significance of correlation between the estimated risk and observed NO3-N concentrations, it was found that SI method is a better-suited one to assess the vulnerability and risk to groundwater pollution in the study area. Findings from this study are useful to design strategies and actions aimed to prevent nitrate pollution in groundwater of Kathmandu Valley in Nepal.

  8. Sports Nutrition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Houtkooper, Linda; And Others

    This kit provides coaches, physical education teachers, and health professionals with current nutrition information and guidelines for applying that information in classes and athletic training programs. The kit contains four components. A "Key Terms" section provides an index to nutrition-fitness terminology and concepts. The instructional…

  9. Dietary carbohydrate intake, glycemic index, and glycemic load and endometrial cancer risk: a prospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Helen G; Kitahara, Cari M; Murray, Liam J; Dodd, Kevin W; Black, Amanda; Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z; Cantwell, Marie M

    2014-01-01

    Endometrial cancer risk has been directly associated with glycemic load. However, few studies have investigated this link, and the etiological role of specific dietary carbohydrate components remains unclear. Our aim was to investigate associations of carbohydrate intake, glycemic index, and glycemic load with endometrial cancer risk in the US Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial. Recruitment took place in 1993-2001. Over a median of 9.0 years of follow-up through 2009, 386 women developed endometrial cancer among 36,115 considered in the analysis. Dietary intakes were assessed using a 124-item diet history questionnaire. Cox proportional hazards models were applied to calculate hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals. Significant inverse associations were detected between endometrial cancer risk and total available carbohydrate intake (hazard ratio (HR) = 0.66, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.49, 0.90), total sugars intake (HR = 0.71, 95% CI: 0.52, 0.96), and glycemic load (HR = 0.63, 95% CI: 0.46, 0.84) when women in the highest quartile of intake were compared with those in the lowest. These inverse associations were strongest among overweight and obese women. No associations with endometrial cancer risk were observed for glycemic index or dietary fiber. Our findings contrast with previous evidence and suggest that high carbohydrate intakes and glycemic loads are protective against endometrial cancer development. Further clarification of these associations is warranted.

  10. Early and Long-term Undernutrition in Female Rats Exacerbates the Metabolic Risk Associated with Nutritional Rehabilitation*

    PubMed Central

    Lizárraga-Mollinedo, Esther; Fernández-Millán, Elisa; García-San Frutos, Miriam; de Toro-Martín, Juan; Fernández-Agulló, Teresa; Ros, Manuel; Álvarez, Carmen; Escrivá, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Human studies have suggested that early undernutrition increases the risk of obesity, thereby explaining the increase in overweight among individuals from developing countries who have been undernourished as children. However, this conclusion is controversial, given that other studies do not concur. This study sought to determine whether rehabilitation after undernutrition increases the risk of obesity and metabolic disorders. We employed a published experimental food-restriction model. Wistar female rats subjected to severe food restriction since fetal stage and controls were transferred to a moderately high-fat diet (cafeteria) provided at 70 days of life to 6.5 months. Another group of undernourished rats were rehabilitated with chow. The energy intake of undernourished animals transferred to cafeteria formula exceeded that of the controls under this regime and was probably driven by hypothalamic disorders in insulin and leptin signal transduction. The cafeteria diet resulted in greater relative increases in both fat and lean body mass in the undernourished rats when compared with controls, enabling the former group to completely catch up in length and body mass index. White adipose tissues of undernourished rats transferred to the high-lipid regime developed a browning which, probably, contributed to avoid the obesigenic effect observed in controls. Nevertheless, the restricted group rehabilitated with cafeteria formula had greater accretion of visceral than subcutaneous fat, showed increased signs of macrophage infiltration and inflammation in visceral pad, dyslipidemia, and ectopic fat accumulation. The data indicate that early long-term undernutrition is associated with increased susceptibility to the harmful effects of nutritional rehabilitation, without causing obesity. PMID:26105051

  11. Coffee, tea and melanoma risk: findings from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition.

    PubMed

    Caini, Saverio; Masala, Giovanna; Saieva, Calogero; Kvaskoff, Marina; Savoye, Isabelle; Sacerdote, Carlotta; Hemmingsson, Oskar; Hammer Bech, Bodil; Overvad, Kim; Tjønneland, Anne; Petersen, Kristina E N; Mancini, Francesca Romana; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Cervenka, Iris; Kaaks, Rudolf; Kühn, Tilman; Boeing, Heiner; Floegel, Anna; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Valanou, Elisavet; Kritikou, Maria; Tagliabue, Giovanna; Panico, Salvatore; Tumino, Rosario; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B As; Peeters, Petra H; Veierød, Marit B; Ghiasvand, Reza; Lukic, Marko; Quirós, José Ramón; Chirlaque, Maria-Dolores; Ardanaz, Eva; Salamanca Fernández, Elena; Larrañaga, Nerea; Zamora-Ros, Raul; Maria Nilsson, Lena; Ljuslinder, Ingrid; Jirström, Karin; Sonestedt, Emily; Key, Timothy J; Wareham, Nick; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Gunter, Marc; Huybrechts, Inge; Murphy, Neil; Tsilidis, Konstantinos K; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Palli, Domenico

    2017-05-15

    In vitro and animal studies suggest that bioactive constituents of coffee and tea may have anticarcinogenic effects against cutaneous melanoma; however, epidemiological evidence is limited to date. We examined the relationships between coffee (total, caffeinated or decaffeinated) and tea consumption and risk of melanoma in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). EPIC is a multicentre prospective study that enrolled over 500,000 participants aged 25-70 years from ten European countries in 1992-2000. Information on coffee and tea drinking was collected at baseline using validated country-specific dietary questionnaires. We used adjusted Cox proportional hazards regression models to calculate hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) for the associations between coffee and tea consumption and melanoma risk. Overall, 2,712 melanoma cases were identified during a median follow-up of 14.9 years among 476,160 study participants. Consumption of caffeinated coffee was inversely associated with melanoma risk among men (HR for highest quartile of consumption vs. non-consumers 0.31, 95% CI 0.14-0.69) but not among women (HR 0.96, 95% CI 0.62-1.47). There were no statistically significant associations between consumption of decaffeinated coffee or tea and the risk of melanoma among both men and women. The consumption of caffeinated coffee was inversely associated with melanoma risk among men in this large cohort study. Further investigations are warranted to confirm our findings and clarify the possible role of caffeine and other coffee compounds in reducing the risk of melanoma.

  12. Mendelian randomization study of body mass index and colorectal cancer risk

    PubMed Central

    Thrift, Aaron P.; Gong, Jian; Peters, Ulrike; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Rudolph, Anja; Slattery, Martha L.; Chan, Andrew T.; Locke, Adam E.; Kahali, Bratati; Justice, Anne E.; Pers, Tune H.; Gallinger, Steven; Hayes, Richard B; Baron, John A.; Caan, Bette J.; Ogino, Shuji; Berndt, Sonja I.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Casey, Graham; Haile, Robert W.; Du, Mengmeng; Harrison, Tabitha A.; Thornquist, Mark; Duggan, David J.; Le Marchand, Loïc; Lindor, Noralane M.; Seminara, Daniela; Song, Mingyang; Wu, Kana; Thibodeau, Stephen N.; Cotterchio, Michelle; Win, Aung Ko; Jenkins, Mark A.; Hopper, John L.; Ulrich, Cornelia M.; Potter, John D.; Newcomb, Polly A.; Hoffmeister, Michael; Brenner, Hermann; White, Emily; Hsu, Li; Campbell, Peter T.

    2015-01-01

    Background High body mass index (BMI) is consistently linked to increased risk of colorectal cancer (CRC) for men, whereas the association is less clear for women. As risk estimates from observational studies may be biased and/or confounded, we conducted a Mendelian randomization study to estimate the causal association between BMI and CRC. Methods We used data from 10,226 CRC cases and 10,286 controls of European ancestry. The Mendelian randomization analysis used a weighted genetic risk score, derived from 77 genome-wide association study identified variants associated with higher BMI, as an instrumental variable (IV). We compared the IV odds ratio (IV-OR) with the OR obtained using a conventional covariate-adjusted analysis. Results Individuals carrying greater numbers of BMI-increasing alleles had higher CRC risk (per weighted allele OR, 1.31; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.10–1.57). Our IV estimation results support the hypothesis that genetically influenced BMI is directly associated with risk for CRC (IV-OR per 5 kg/m2, 1.50; 95% CI, 1.13–2.01). In the sex-specific IV analyses higher BMI was associated with higher risk of CRC among women (IV-OR per 5 kg/m2, 1.82; 95% CI, 1.26–2.61). For men, genetically influenced BMI was not associated with CRC (IV-OR per 5 kg/m2, 1.18; 95% CI, 0.73–1.92). Conclusions High BMI was associated with increased CRC risk for women. Whether abdominal obesity, rather than overall obesity, is a more important risk factor for men requires further investigation. Impact Overall, conventional epidemiologic and Mendelian randomization studies suggest a strong association between obesity and the risk of CRC. PMID:25976416

  13. Body mass index, abdominal fatness and the risk of gallbladder disease.

    PubMed

    Aune, Dagfinn; Norat, Teresa; Vatten, Lars J

    2015-09-01

    Epidemiological studies have indicated a positive association between adiposity and gallbladder disease risk, however, the shape of the dose-response relationship and differences between overall and abdominal adiposity remains to be clarified. We conducted a systematic review and dose-response meta-analysis of cohort studies of body mass index (BMI), waist circumference and waist-to-hip ratio and risk of gallbladder disease. PubMed and Embase databases were searched up to January 9th 2015. Summary relative risks were calculated using a random effects model. Seventeen prospective studies of BMI and gallbladder disease risk with 55,670 cases among 1,921,103 participants were included. The summary relative risk (RR) for a 5 unit increment in BMI was 1.63 (95 % CI 1.49-1.78, I(2) = 98 %). There was evidence of a nonlinear association overall and among women, p(nonlinearity) < 0.0001, but not among men, p(nonlinearity) = 0.99, with a slight flattening of the curve at very high BMI levels (BMI 40-45), however, the risk of gallbladder disease increased almost twofold even within the "normal" BMI range. The summary RR for a 10 cm increase in waist circumference was 1.46 (95 % CI 1.24-1.72, I(2) = 98 %, n = 5) and for a 0.1 unit increment in waist-to-hip ratio was 1.44 (95 % CI 1.26-1.64, I(2) = 92 %, n = 4). Associations were attenuated, but still significant, when BMI and abdominal adiposity measures were mutually adjusted. Our results confirm a positive association between both general and abdominal fatness and the risk of gallbladder disease. There is an almost twofold increase in the risk even within the "normal" BMI range, suggesting that even moderate increases in BMI may increase risk.

  14. Air quality trends and potential health effects - Development of an aggregate risk index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sicard, Pierre; Lesne, Olivia; Alexandre, Nicolas; Mangin, Antoine; Collomp, Rémy

    2011-02-01

    The "Provence Alpes Côte d'Azur" (PACA) region, in the South East of France, is one of Europe's regions most influenced by the atmospheric pollution. During the last 15 years, the industrial emissions decrease caused an evolution of the atmospheric pollution nature. Nowadays, atmospheric pollution is more and more influenced by the road traffic, the dominating pollution source in urban zones for the PACA region. Combined with this intense road traffic, the strong hot season of the Mediterranean climate contributes to the region bad air quality; it is known to be one of the worse in Europe. The recognized air pollution effects over public health include increased risk of hospital admissions and mortality by respiratory or cardiovascular diseases. The combination of these serious pollution related health hazards with senior and children vulnerabilities leads to serious sanitary concerns. Over the 1990-2005 period, we obtained, using the non-parametric Mann-Kendall test from annual mortality dataset (CépiDC), decreasing trends for Asthma (-5.00% year -1), Cardiovascular (-0.73% year -1), Ischemic (-0.69% year -1) and cerebrovascular diseases (-3.10% year -1). However, for "Other heart diseases" (+0.10% year -1) and "Respiratory" (+0.10% year -1) an increase was observed. The development of an adequate tool to understand impacts of pollution levels is of utmost importance. Different pollutants have different health endpoints, information may be lost through the use of a single index consequently, in this study we present the modified formula of air quality index, based on Cairncross's concept the Aggregate Risk Index (ARI). ARI is based on the relative risk of the well-established increased daily mortality, or morbidity, enabling an assessment of additive effects of short-term exposure to the main air pollutants: PM 2.5, PM 10, SO 2, O 3 and NO 2 in order to account for the reality of the multiple exposures impacts of chemical agents. The ARI, developed per pathology

  15. A theoretically based Behavioral Nutrition Intervention for Community Elders at high risk: the B-NICE randomized controlled clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Locher, Julie L; Bales, Connie W; Ellis, Amy C; Lawrence, Jeannine C; Newton, Laura; Ritchie, Christine S; Roth, David L; Buys, David L; Vickers, Kristin S

    2011-01-01

    We conducted a study designed to evaluate the efficacy and feasibility of a multilevel self-management intervention to improve nutritional intake in a group of older adults receiving Medicare home health services who were at especially high risk for experiencing undernutrition. The Behavioral Nutrition Intervention for Community Elders (B-NICE) trial used a prospective randomized controlled design to determine whether individually tailored counseling focused on social and behavioral aspects of eating resulted in increased caloric intake and improved nutrition-related health outcomes in a high-risk population of older adults. The study was guided by the theoretical approaches of the Ecological Model and Social Cognitive Theory. The development and implementation of the B-NICE protocol, including the theoretical framework, methodology, specific elements of the behavioral intervention, and assurances of the treatment fidelity, as well as the health policy implications of the trial results, are presented in this article.

  16. Nutritional risk screening 2002 and ASA score predict mortality after elective liver resection for malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Nelio

    2017-01-01

    Introduction The aim of the study was to evaluate whether Nutritional risk screening 2002 (NRS 2002) at hospital admission may predict postoperative mortality and complications within 90 days after elective liver resection for malignancy. Material and methods A retrospective cohort study of a prospective database was performed. Two-hundred and three patients with elective liver resection for malignancy between 9 November 2007 and 27 May 2014 were included. Clinical data, NRS 2002, surgical procedures and histology were recorded. The primary endpoint was 90-day mortality. Complications were registered within 90 days postoperatively according to the Clavien-Dindo classification. Results The 90-day mortality was 5.9% and the overall complication rate was 59.1%. Multivariate analysis identified NRS 2002 score ≥ 4 (odds ratio (OR) = 9.24; p = 0.005) and American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) score ≥ 3 (OR = 6.20; p = 0.009) as predictors of 90-day mortality. The 90-day mortality was 27.6% (8/29) for patients with both risk factors (NRS 2002 score ≥ 4 and ASA score ≥ 3) vs. 2.3% (4/174) for patients without or with only one risk factor (p < 0.001). Conclusions In the present study NRS 2002 score ≥ 4 and ASA score ≥ 3 were predictors of 90-day mortality after elective liver resection for malignancy. PMID:28261289

  17. Analysis concerning nutritional behaviors in the context of the risk of orthorexia

    PubMed Central

    Olejniczak, Dominik; Bugajec, Dorota; Panczyk, Mariusz; Brytek-Matera, Anna; Religioni, Urszula; Czerw, Aleksandra; Grąbczewska, Aleksandra; Juszczyk, Grzegorz; Jabłkowska-Górecka, Karolina; Staniszewska, Anna

    2017-01-01

    Orthorexia is recognized as an eating disorder, an obsessive–compulsive spectrum disorder, or a somatoform disorder. The aim of our research was to analyze nutritional behaviors for the assessment of the risk of orthorexia. The authors developed a questionnaire in which 981 respondents participated and used it as a research method. Both men and women ate mostly 4–5 meals per day (46.30% women versus 34.74% men); however, more men than women ate 1–2 meals daily (18.95% men versus 7.9% women). Both place of birth and field of study did not differ in terms of the number of meals. Moreover, it was observed that the number of meals per day was correlated with the declared time spent on planning a diet. People who ate over 3 meals per day more often indicates that they spent >3 h per day on planning their diet in comparison with people who ate only 1–2 meals. Only 17.6% of the respondents declared that they most often ate meals in a company of someone, whereas 45.3% indicated that there was no rule. The remaining 37.1% of the respondents most often consumed their meals alone. Almost twice as many men as women never paid attention to the qualitative composition of nutrition. Women followed a slimming diet more often than men (20.3% versus 5.8%) and this indicated >4 attempts of losing weight. Around one-third of all the respondents suffered or suffer from eating disorders. Owing to insufficient information on orthorexia, it is essential to conduct further research to determine the characteristics of high-risk groups. Taking the growing interest in a healthy lifestyle into account, there is a need to address the problem of orthorexia in the public space. PMID:28260900

  18. Metabolic syndrome's risk factors and its association with nutritional status in schoolchildren.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Fabiana Costa; Pereira, Flavia Erika Felix; Pereira, Avany Fernandes; Ribeiro, Beatriz Gonçalves

    2017-06-01

    The metabolic risk factors (RF) to the diagnosis of metabolic syndrome (MetS) have been evidenced at early ages, including children. The aim of the present study was to identify the prevalence of RF to the diagnosis of MetS and its association with nutritional status of schoolchildren from 6 to 10 years old. A cross-sectional study was carried out in 505 students of municipal schools in Macae, Brazil, conducted from 2013 to 2014. The RF evaluated were: blood pressure (mm Hg), triglycerides (mmol/L), HDL-cholesterol (mmol/L) fasting glucose (mmol/L) and waist circumference (cm). At least one RF was present in 61% (n = 308) of the sample. By nutritional status, there was higher prevalence of RF in overweight/obese schoolchildren compared to those with normal weight, except in the concentration of HDL-c. The prevalence of one, two and three RF (MetS) were 34.7% (n = 175), 21.0% (n = 106) and 5.3% (n = 27), respectively. Two RF were more present in overweight (28.2% 95%CI 19.0; 39.0) and obese (41.5% 95%CI 31.4; 52.1) compared to normal weight children (13.5% 95%CI 9.9; 17.8). Three or more RF were more frequent among obese (25.5% 95%CI 17.0; 35.5) in relation to overweight (2.4% 95%CI 0.2; 8.2) and normal weight children (0.3% 95%CI 0; 1.7). The data indicate high prevalence of RF and its relationship with the magnitude of body weight excess. Therefore, the identification and early treatment of these RF might minimize the risk of MetS and related diseases.

  19. [Nutritional assessment and perioperative nutritional support in gastric cancer patients].

    PubMed

    Seo, Kyung Won; Yoon, Ki Young

    2013-04-01

    Weight loss and malnutrition are common in cancer patients. Although weight loss is predominantly due to loss of fat mass, the morbidity risk is given by the decrease in muscle mass. The assessment of nutritional status is essential for a diagnosis of nutritional compromise and required for the multidisciplinary approach. Subjective global assessment (SGA) is made by the patients nutritional symptoms and weight loss. The objective assessment, a significant weight loss (>10%) for 6 months is considered an indicator of nutritional deficiency. The mean body index, body fat mass and body protein mass are decreased as cancer stage increases. The biochemical data of albumin, cholesterol, triglyceride, Zn, transferrin, total lymphocyte count are decreased in advanced cancer stage. Daily energy intake, cabohyderate and Vit B1 intake is decreased according to cancer stage. The patients are divided into three groups according to SGA. The three groups showed a significant difference in body weight, 1 month weight loss%, 6 month weight loss%, body mass index, mid arm circumference, albumin, energy intake, as well as carbohyderate intake protein and energy malnutrition. Nutritional assessment is of great importance because undernutrition has been shown to be associated with increase in stomach cancer associated morbidity and mortality. The authors concluded that nutritional assessment should be done in cancer patients preoperatively, and with adequate nutritional support, the morbidity and mortality would be decreased.

  20. Body mass index and risk for mental stress induced ischemia in coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Soufer, Robert; Fernandez, Antonio B; Meadows, Judith; Collins, Dorothea; Burg, Matthew M

    2016-05-19

    Acute emotionally reactive mental stress (MS) can provoke prognostically relevant deficits in cardiac function and myocardial perfusion, and chronic inflammation increases risk for this ischemic phenomenon. We have described parasympathetic withdrawal and generation of inflammatory factors in MS. Adiposity is also associated with elevated markers of chronic inflammation. High body mass index (BMI) is frequently used as a surrogate for assessment of excess adiposity, and associated with traditional CAD risk factors, and CAD mortality. BMI is also associated with autonomic dysregulation, adipose tissue derived proinflammatory cytokines, which are also attendant to emotion provoked myocardial ischemia. Thus, we sought to determine if body mass index (BMI) contributes to risk of developing myocardial ischemia provoked by mental stress. We performed a prospective interventional study in a cohort of 161 patients with stable CAD. They completed an assessment of myocardial blood flow with single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) simultaneously during 2 conditions: laboratory mental stress and at rest. Multivariate logistic regression determined the independent contribution of BMI to the occurrence of mental-stress induced ischemia. Mean age was 65.6±9.0 years; 87.0% had a history of hypertension, and 28.6% had diabetes. Mean BMI was 30.4±4.7. Prevalence of mental stress ischemia was 39.8%. BMI was an independent predictor of mental stress ischemia, OR=1.10, 95% CI [1.01-1.18] for one-point increase in BMI and OR=1.53, 95% CI [1.06-2.21] for a 4.7 point increase in BMI (one standard deviation beyond the cohort BMI mean), p=0.025 for all. These data suggest that BMI may serve as an independent risk marker for mental stress ischemia. The factors attendant with greater BMI, which include autonomic dysregulation and inflammation, may represent pathways by which high BMI contribute to this risk and serve as a conceptual construct to replicate these findings in larger

  1. Body mass index and risk of pneumonia: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Phung, D T; Wang, Z; Rutherford, S; Huang, C; Chu, C

    2013-10-01

    The aims of our meta-analysis were to examine the pattern and gender's influence on body mass index (BMI) - pneumonia relationship. Published studies were searched from PubMed, Web of Science, Cochrane Library databases using keywords of pneumonia, BMI and epidemiologic studies. Random-effects analysis was applied to estimate pooled effect sizes from individual studies. The Cochrane Q-test and index of heterogeneity (I(2) ) were used to evaluate heterogeneity, and Egger's test was used to evaluate publication bias. Random-effects meta-regression was applied to examine the pattern and gender's influence on BMI-pneumonia relationship. A total of 1,531 studies were initially identified, and 25 studies finally were included. The pooled relative risk (RR) and meta-regression model revealed a J-shaped relationship between BMI and risk of community-acquired pneumonia (underweight, RR 1.8, 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.4-2.2, P < 0.01; overweight, 0.89, 95%CI, 0.8-1.03, P, 0.1; obesity, 1.03, 95% CI, 0.8-1.3, p. 8) and U-shaped relationship between BMI and risk of influenza-related pneumonia (underweight, RR 1.9, 95% CI, 1.2-3, P < 0.01; overweight, 0.89, 95% CI, 0.79-0.99, P, 0.03; obesity, 1.3, 95% CI, 1.05-1.63, p. 2; morbidity obesity, 4.6, 95% CI, 2.2-9.8, P < 0.01); whereas, no difference in risk of nosocomial pneumonia was found across the BMI groups. Gender difference did not make significant contribution in modifying BMI-pneumonia risk relationship.

  2. Dietary carbohydrate intake, glycemic load, glycemic index and ovarian cancer risk in African-American women

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Bo; Moorman, Patricia G.; Alberg, Anthony J.; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill S.; Bondy, Melissa; Cote, Michelle L.; Funkhouser, Ellen; Peters, Edward S.; Schwartz, Ann G.; Terry, Paul; Schildkraut, Joellen M.; Bandera, Elisa V.

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiologic evidence regarding the association between carbohydrate intake, glycemic load and glycemic index and risk of ovarian cancer has been mixed. Little is known about their impact on ovarian cancer risk in African-American women. Associations between carbohydrate quantity and quality and ovarian cancer risk were investigated among 406 cases and 609 controls using data from the African American Cancer Epidemiology Study (AACES). AACES is an ongoing population-based case-control study of ovarian cancer in African Americans in the US. Cases were identified through rapid case ascertainment and age- and site-matched controls were identified by random-digit-dialing. Dietary information over the year preceding diagnosis or the reference date was obtained using a food frequency questionnaire. Multivariable logistic regression models were used to estimate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) adjusted for covariates. The ORs comparing the highest quartile of total carbohydrate intake and total sugars intake versus the lowest quartile were 1.57 (95% CI 1.08, 2.28; p-trend=0.03) and 1.61 (95% CI 1.12, 2.30; p-trend<0.01) respectively. A suggestion of an inverse association was found for fiber intake. Higher glycemic load was positively associated with the risk of ovarian cancer (OR 1.18 for each 10 units/1,000 kcal; 95% CI 1.04, 1.33). No associations were observed for starch or glycemic index. Our findings suggest that high intake of total sugars and glycemic load are associated with greater risk of ovarian cancer in African-American women. PMID:26669283

  3. Diabetes, Triglyceride Levels, and Other Risk Factors for Glaucoma in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2005–2008

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Fang; Boland, Michael V.; Gupta, Priya; Gadkaree, Shekhar K.; Vitale, Susan; Guallar, Eliseo; Zhao, Di; Friedman, David S.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To determine risk factors for glaucoma in a population-based study in the United States. Methods Participants age 40 and older from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey underwent questionnaires, physical examination, laboratory tests, and vision tests including fundus imaging. Glaucoma was determined based on expert grading of fundus photographs. Regression modeling of glaucoma risk factors was performed. Results Participants with glaucoma (172) were older (mean age 68.1 [95% confidence interval (CI) 65.6–70.7] vs. 56.4 years [95% CI 55.6–57.2, P < 0.001]), likely to have less than high school education (25.1% vs. 18.1%, P = 0.05), to have diabetes (23.1% vs. 10.8%, P < 0.001), to have central obesity (72.5% vs. 60.7%, P = 0.01), to have systolic hypertension (30.3% vs. 20.1%, P = 0.01), to have diastolic hypotension (30.3% vs. 13.9%, P < 0.001), and to be nonsmokers (91.0% vs. 79.3%, P = 0.002). Sex, poverty, access to health care, fasting glucose, insulin dependence, body mass index, cholesterol levels, diastolic hypertension, systolic hypotension, obstructive sleep apnea, and marijuana were not associated with glaucoma. Multivariable modeling showed associations between glaucoma and older age (odds ratio [OR] 1.09 per year, 95% CI 1.04–1.14), black race (OR 4.40, 95% CI 1.71–11.30), and poverty (OR 3.39, 95% CI 1.73–6.66). Diabetes was no longer associated with glaucoma after adjustment for triglyceride levels. Sex, education, insurance status, body mass index, blood pressure, obstructive sleep apnea, and smoking were not associated with glaucoma. Conclusions People who are older, of black race, and with lower income levels have a higher prevalence of glaucoma. A novel association between diabetes, triglyceride levels, and glaucoma is also identified. PMID:27111561

  4. Serum Vitamin D and Risk of Prostate Cancer in a Case-Control Analysis Nested Within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC)

    PubMed Central

    Travis, Ruth C.; Allen, Naomi E.; Appleby, Paul N.; Roddam, Andrew W.; Tjønneland, Anne; Olsen, Anja; Linseisen, Jakob; Kaaks, Rudolf; Boeing, Heiner; Kröger, Janine; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Dilis, Vardis; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Vineis, Paolo; Palli, Domenico; Tumino, Rosario; Sieri, Sabina; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. Bas; van Duijnhoven, Fränzel J. B.; Chirlaque, María-Dolores; Barricarte, Aurelio; Larrañaga, Nerea; González, Carlos A.; Argüelles, Marcial V.; Sánchez, Maria-José; Stattin, Pär; Hallmans, Göran; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Bingham, Sheila; Rinaldi, Sabina; Slimani, Nadia; Jenab, Mazda; Riboli, Elio; Key, Timothy J.

    2009-01-01

    Results from the majority of studies show little association between circulating concentrations of vitamin D and prostate cancer risk, a finding that has not been demonstrated in a wider European population, however. The authors examined whether vitamin D concentrations were associated with prostate cancer risk in a case-control study nested within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (1994–2000). Serum concentrations of 25-hydroxyvitamin D were measured in 652 prostate cancer cases matched to 752 controls from 7 European countries after a median follow-up time of 4.1 years. Conditional logistic regression models were used to calculate odds ratios for prostate cancer risk in relation to serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D after standardizing for month of blood collection and adjusting for covariates. No significant association was found between 25-hydroxyvitamin D and risk of prostate cancer (highest vs. lowest quintile: odds ratio = 1.28, 95% confidence interval: 0.88, 1.88; P for trend = 0.188). Subgroup analyses showed no significant heterogeneity by cancer stage or grade, age at diagnosis, body mass index, time from blood collection to diagnosis, or calcium intake. In summary, the results of this large nested case-control study provide no evidence in support of a protective effect of circulating concentrations of vitamin D on the risk of prostate cancer. PMID:19359375

  5. Prediagnostic circulating concentrations of plasma insulin-like growth factor-I and risk of lymphoma in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition.

    PubMed

    Perez-Cornago, Aurora; Appleby, Paul N; Tipper, Sarah; Key, Timothy J; Allen, Naomi E; Nieters, Alexandra; Vermeulen, Roel; Roulland, Sandrine; Casabonne, Delphine; Kaaks, Rudolf; Fortner, Renee T; Boeing, Heiner; Trichopoulou, Antonia; La Vecchia, Carlo; Klinaki, Eleni; Hansen, Louise; Tjønneland, Anne; Bonnet, Fabrice; Fagherazzi, Guy; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Pala, Valeria; Masala, Giovanna; Sacerdote, Carlotta; Peeters, Petra H; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B As; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Dorronsoro, Miren; Quirós, J Ramón; Barricarte, Aurelio; Gavrila, Diana; Agudo, Antonio; Borgquist, Signe; Rosendahl, Ann H; Melin, Beatrice; Wareham, Nick; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Gunter, Marc; Riboli, Elio; Vineis, Paolo; Travis, Ruth C

    2017-03-01

    Insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I has cancer promoting activities. However, the hypothesis that circulating IGF-I concentration is related to risk of lymphoma overall or its subtypes has not been examined prospectively. IGF-I concentration was measured in pre-diagnostic plasma samples from a nested case-control study of 1,072 cases of lymphoid malignancies and 1,072 individually matched controls from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition. Odds ratios (ORs) and confidence intervals (CIs) for lymphoma were calculated using conditional logistic regression. IGF-I concentration was not associated with overall lymphoma risk (multivariable-adjusted OR for highest versus lowest third = 0.77 [95% CI = 0.57-1.03], ptrend  = 0.06). There was no statistical evidence of heterogeneity in this association with IGF-I by sex, age at blood collection, time between blood collection and diagnosis, age at diagnosis, or body mass index (pheterogeneity for all  ≥ 0.05). There were no associations between IGF-I concentration and risk for specific BCL subtypes, T-cell lymphoma or Hodgkin lymphoma, although number of cases were small. In this European population, IGF-I concentration was not associated with risk of overall lymphoma. This study provides the first prospective evidence on circulating IGF-I concentrations and risk of lymphoma. Further prospective data are required to examine associations of IGF-I concentrations with lymphoma subtypes.

  6. Predicting dyslexia at age 11 from a risk index questionnaire at age 5.

    PubMed

    Helland, Turid; Plante, Elena; Hugdahl, Kenneth

    2011-08-01

    This study focused on predicting dyslexia in children ahead of formal literacy training. Because dyslexia is a constitutional impairment, risk factors should be seen in preschool. It was hypothesized that data gathered at age 5 using questions targeting the dyslexia endophenotype should be reliable and valid predictors of dyslexia at age 11. A questionnaire was given to caretakers of 120 5-year-old children, and a risk index score was calculated based on questions regarding health, laterality, motor skills, language, special needs education and heredity. An at-risk group (n = 25) and matched controls (n = 24) were followed until age 11, when a similar questionnaire and literacy tests were administered to the children who participated in the follow-up study (22 at risk and 20 control). Half of the at-risk children and two of the control children at age 5 were identified as having dyslexia at age 11 (8 girls and 5 boys). It is concluded that it is possible to identify children at the age of 5 who will have dyslexia at the age of 11 through a questionnaire approach.

  7. Body mass index and smoking-related lung cancer risk in the Singapore Chinese Health Study

    PubMed Central

    Koh, W-P; Yuan, J-M; Wang, R; Lee, H-P; Yu, M C

    2009-01-01

    Background: Smokers with low body mass index (BMI) may be more susceptible to lung cancer. Methods: We prospectively examined the association between baseline BMI and lung cancer risk in the Singapore Chinese Health Study, a cohort of 63 257 Chinese enrolled between 1993 and 1998. Results: After adjustment for smoking intensity and duration, BMI was inversely associated with risk of lung cancer among current smokers (P for trend=0.0004). Current smokers at different dosage of smoking with low BMI had significantly higher risk for lung cancer than those with high BMI. Hazard ratios (95% confidence intervals) of lung cancer for heavy smokers with BMI of ⩾28, 24–<28, 20–<24, and <20 kg m−2 were 6.37 (2.10–19.30), 9.01 (5.04–16.10), 8.53 (6.35–11.5), and 11.12 (6.60–18.70), respectively, as compared with nonsmokers. BMI had no modifying effects on lung cancer risk among nonsmokers and former smokers. Conclusion: Smokers with lower BMI may experience an enhanced risk of lung cancer. The findings have significant public-health implication given the increase in smoking prevalence in developing countries, where people still have relatively low BMI. PMID:20010947

  8. A risk index for multicriterial selection of a logging system with low environmental impact

    SciTech Connect

    Horodnic, Sergiu Andrei

    2015-02-15

    Setting up the working stages in forest operations is conditioned by environmental protection and forest health requirements. This paper exposes a method for improving the decision-making process by choosing the most environmentally effective logging systems according to terrain configuration and stand characteristics. Such a methodology for selecting machines or logging systems accounting for environment, safety as well as economics, becomes mandatory in the context of sustainable management of forest with multiple functions. Based on analytic hierarchy process analysis the following classification of the environmental performance for four considered alternatives was obtained: skyline system (42.43%), forwarder system (20.22%), skidder system (19.92%) and horse logging system (17.43%). Further, an environmental risk matrix for the most important 28 risk factors specific to any work equipment used in forest operations was produced. In the end, a multicriterial analysis generated a risk index RI ranging between 1.0 and 3.5, which could help choosing the optimal combination of logging system and logging equipment with low environmental impact. In order to demonstrate the usefulness of the proposed approach, a simple application in specific conditions of a harvesting site is presented. - Highlights: • We propose a decision-making algorithm to select eco-friendly logging systems. • Analytic hierarchy process was applied for ranking 4 types of logging systems. • An environmental risk matrix with 28 risk factors in forest operations was made up.

  9. Association between prostatic resistive index and cardiovascular risk factors in patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Baykam, Mehmet Murat; Aktas, Binhan Kagan; Bulut, Suleyman; Ozden, Cuneyt; Deren, Tagmac; Tagci, Suleyman; Gokkaya, Cevdet Serkan; Memis, Ali

    2015-04-01

    We evaluated the relationship between prostatic resistive index (RI) and cardiovascular system (CVS) risk factors in patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia. The study included 120 patients who were attending our outpatient clinic with lower urinary tract symptoms related to benign prostatic hyperplasia. The clinical, laboratory, anthropometric data, and CVS risk factors (hypertension, diabetes mellitus, metabolic syndrome, history of CVS events, and smoking) of the patients were evaluated regarding the association between prostate RI level by regression analyses. The prostatic RI levels of the patients were measured using power Doppler imaging. In univariate regression analysis, there were statistically significant relationships between prostatic RI levels and the patients' age, International Prostate Symptom Score, hip circumference, fasting blood glucose, prostate specific antigen, triglycerides, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, total prostate volume, uroflowmetric maximal flow rate, and all investigated CVS risk factors (p < 0.05). The prostatic RI levels were found to be associated with fasting blood glucose and total prostate volume, and also with CVS risk factors including only metabolic syndrome and cigarette smoking in the multivariate regression analysis. Our results showed that prostatic RI level is significantly related to metabolic syndrome and smoking among the investigated CVS risk factors.

  10. Utilization of kidneys with similar kidney donor risk index values from standard versus expanded criteria donors.

    PubMed

    Woodside, K J; Merion, R M; Leichtman, A B; de los Santos, R; Arrington, C J; Rao, P S; Sung, R S

    2012-08-01

    With the shortage of standard criteria donor (SCD) kidneys, efficient expanded criteria donor (ECD) kidney utilization has become more vital. We investigated the effects of the ECD label on kidney recovery, utilization and outcomes. Using data from the Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients from November 2002 to May 2010, we determined recovery and transplant rates, and modeled discard risk, for kidneys within a range of kidney donor risk index (KDRI) 1.4-2.1 that included both SCD and ECD kidneys. To further compare similar quality kidneys, these kidneys were again divided into three KDRI intervals. Overall, ECD kidneys had higher recovery rates, but lower transplant rates. However, within each KDRI interval, SCD and ECD kidneys were transplanted at similar rates. Overall, there was increased risk for discard for biopsied kidneys. SCD kidneys in the lower two KDRI intervals had the highest risk of discard if biopsied. Pumped kidneys had a lower risk of discard, which was modulated by KDRI for SCD kidneys but not ECD kidneys. Although overall ECD graft survival was worse than SCD, there were no differences within individual KDRI intervals. Thus, ECD designation adversely affects neither utilization nor outcomes beyond that predicted by KDRI.

  11. The Aftershock Risk Index - quantification of aftershock impacts during ongoing strong-seismic sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, Andreas; Daniell, James; Khazai, Bijan; Wenzel, Friedemann

    2016-04-01

    The occurrence and impact of strong earthquakes often triggers the long-lasting impact of a seismic sequence. Strong earthquakes are generally followed by many aftershocks or even strong subsequently triggered ruptures. The Nepal 2015 earthquake sequence is one of the most recent examples where aftershocks significantly contributed to human and economic losses. In addition, rumours about upcoming mega-earthquakes, false predictions and on-going cycles of aftershocks induced a psychological burden on the society, which caused panic, additional casualties and prevented people from returning to normal life. This study shows the current phase of development of an operationalised aftershock intensity index, which will contribute to the mitigation of aftershock hazard. Hereby, various methods of earthquake forecasting and seismic risk assessments are utilised and an integration of the inherent aftershock intensity is performed. A spatio-temporal analysis of past earthquake clustering provides first-hand data about the nature of aftershock occurrence. Epidemic methods can additionally provide time-dependent variation indices of the cascading effects of aftershock generation. The aftershock hazard is often combined with the potential for significant losses through the vulnerability of structural systems and population. A historical database of aftershock socioeconomic effects from CATDAT has been used in order to calibrate the index based on observed impacts of historical events and their aftershocks. In addition, analytical analysis of cyclic behaviour and fragility functions of various building typologies are explored. The integration of many different probabilistic computation methods will provide a combined index parameter which can then be transformed into an easy-to-read spatio-temporal intensity index. The index provides daily updated information about the probability of the inherent seismic risk of aftershocks by providing a scalable scheme fordifferent aftershock

  12. [Nutritional therapy of gout].

    PubMed

    Nickolai, Beate; Kiss, Caroline

    2016-01-01

    Nutrition and nutritional behaviours have been found to play a major role in the development of gout. Studies show that body mass index (BMI), as well as excessive intake of alcoholic beverages, meat, soft drinks and fruit juices increase the risk of developing gout. Similarly, dairy products and coffee have been seen to decrease the risk of hyperuricemia and gout, as they increase the excretion of uric acid. Flares of gout are often caused by large meals and high alcohol consumption. Each additional intake of meat portion per day increases the risk of gout by 21 %. Taking total alcohol consumption into account, the risk of gout increases after one to two standard drinks. In contrast to previous assumptions purine-rich plant foods like legumes and vegetables do not increase the risk of gout. The current dietary guidelines take into account nutritional factors, which not only consider purine intake, but also their endogenous production and their influence on renal excretion. A balanced diet based on the Swiss healthy eating guideline pyramid as well as the Mediterranean diet is appropriate for this patient population. The treatment of gout is multi-faceted, since this patient population presents other comorbidities such as obesity, diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia and hypertension. Collectively, these risk factors are diet dependent and require a treatment strategy that is centered on modifying one's nutrition and nutritional behaviours. The aim of such therapy is to educate the patient as well as treat the accompanying comorbidities with the goal of decreasing serum uric acid values. Motivated patients require consultation and follow-up care in order to be able to actively decrease the serum uric acid.

  13. Association Between Lateral Posterior Tibial Slope, Body Mass Index, and ACL Injury Risk

    PubMed Central

    Bojicic, Katherine M.; Beaulieu, Mélanie L.; Imaizumi Krieger, Daniel Y.; Ashton-Miller, James A.; Wojtys, Edward M.

    2017-01-01

    Background: While body mass index (BMI), a modifiable parameter, and knee morphology, a nonmodifiable parameter, have been identified as risk factors for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture, the interaction between them remains unknown. An understanding of this interaction is important because greater compressive axial force (perhaps due to greater BMI) applied to a knee that is already at an increased risk because of its geometry, such as a steep lateral posterior tibial slope, could further increase the probability of ACL injury. Purpose: To quantify the relationship between BMI and select knee morphological parameters as potential risk factors for ACL injury. Study Design: Case-control study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: Sagittal knee magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) files from 76 ACL-injured and 42 uninjured subjects were gathered from the University of Michigan Health System’s archive. The posterior tibial slope (PTS), middle cartilage slope (MCS), posterior meniscus height (PMH), and posterior meniscus bone angle (MBA) in the lateral compartment were measured using MRI. BMI was calculated from demographic data. The association between the knee structural factors, BMI, and ACL injury risk was explored using univariate and multivariate logistic regression. Results: PTS (P = .043) and MCS (P = .037) significantly predicted ACL injury risk. As PTS and MCS increased by 1°, odds of sustaining an ACL injury increased by 12% and 13%, respectively. The multivariate logistic regression analysis, which included PTS, BMI centered around the mean (cBMI), and their interaction, showed that this interaction predicted the odds of ACL rupture (P = .050; odds ratio, 1.03). For every 1-unit increase in BMI from the average that is combined with a 1° increase in PTS, the odds of an ACL tear increased by 15%. Conclusion: An increase in BMI was associated with increased risk of ACL tear in the presence of increased lateral posterior tibial slope. Larger values of PTS or

  14. Nutritional Risk Screening 2002 as a Predictor of Postoperative Outcomes in Patients Undergoing Abdominal Surgery: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Prospective Cohort Studies

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Zhen; Kong, Xin-Juan; Jing, Xue; Deng, Run-Jun; Tian, Zi-Bin

    2015-01-01

    Background The nutritional risk screening (NRS 2002) has been applied increasingly in patients who underwent abdominal surgery for nutritional risk assessment. However, the usefulness of the NRS 2002 for predicting is controversial. This meta-analysis was to examine whether a preoperative evaluation of nutritional risk by NRS 2002 provided prediction of postoperative outcomes in patients undergoing abdominal surgery. Methods A systematic literature search for published papers was conducted using the following online databases: MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane library, EBSCO, CRD databases, Cinahl, PsycInfo and BIOSIS previews. The pooled odds ratio (OR) or weight mean difference (WMD) was calculated using a random-effect model or a fix-effect model. Results Eleven studies with a total of 3527 patients included in this study. Postoperative overall complications were more frequent in nutritional risk patients versus patients without nutritional risk (the pooled OR 3.13 [2.51, 3.90] p<0.00001). The pooled OR of mortality for the nutritional risk group and non-nutritional risk group was 3.61 [1.38, 9.47] (p = 0.009). Furthermore, the postoperative hospital stay was significant longer in the preoperative nutritional risk group than in the nutritional normal group (WMD 5.58 [4.21, 6.95] p<0.00001). Conclusions The present study has demonstrated that patients at preoperative nutritional risk have increased complication rates, high mortality and prolonged hospital stay after surgery. However, NRS 2002 needs to be validated in larger samples of patients undergoing abdominal surgery by better reference method. PMID:26172830

  15. Determination of the health of Lunyangwa wetland using Wetland Classification and Risk Assessment Index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wanda, Elijah M. M.; Mamba, Bhekie B.; Msagati, Titus A. M.; Msilimba, Golden

    2016-04-01

    Wetlands are major sources of various ecological goods and services including storage and distribution of water in space and time which help in ensuring the availability of surface and groundwater throughout the year. However, there still remains a poor understanding of the range of values of water quality parameters that occur in wetlands either in its impacted state or under natural conditions. It was thus imperative to determine the health of Lunyangwa wetland in Mzuzu City in Malawi in order to classify and determine its state. This study used the Escom's Wetland Classification and Risk Assessment Index Field Guide to determine the overall characteristics of Lunyangwa wetland and to calculate its combined Wetland Index Score. Data on site information, field measurements (i.e. EC, pH, temperature and DO) and physical characteristics of Lunyangwa wetland were collected from March, 2013 to February, 2014. Results indicate that Lunyangwa wetland is a largely open water zone which is dominated by free-floating plants on the water surface, beneath surface and emergent in substrate. Furthermore, the wetland can be classified as of a C ecological category (score = 60-80%), which has been moderately modified with moderate risks of the losses and changes occurring in the natural habitat and biota in the wetland. It was observed that the moderate modification and risk were largely because of industrial, agricultural, urban/social catchment stressors on the wetland. This study recommends an integrated and sustainable management approach coupled with continuous monitoring and evaluation of the health of the wetland for all stakeholders in Mzuzu City. This would help to maintain the health of Lunyangwa wetland which is currently at risk of being further modified due to the identified catchment stressors.

  16. Association between food and nutrition insecurity with cardiometabolic risk factors in childhood and adolescence: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, Naruna Pereira; Milagres, Luana Cupertino; de Novaes, Juliana Farias; Franceschini, Sylvia do Carmo Castro

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To address the association between food and nutrition insecurity and cardiometabolic risk factors in childhood and adolescence. Data source: Articles were selected from the Medline, Lilacs and SciELO databases with no publication date limit, involving children and adolescents, using the descriptors: food and nutrition security, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, metabolic syndrome, stress and dyslipidemia. The terms were used in Portuguese, English and Spanish. The search was carried out systematically and independently by two reviewers. Data synthesis: Exposure to food insecurity during childhood and adolescence ranged from 3.3% to 82% in the selected publications. Exposure to food insecurity was associated with stress, anxiety, greater chance of hospitalization, nutritional deficiencies, excess weight and inadequate diets with reduced intake of fruits and vegetables and increased consumption of refined carbohydrates and fats. Conclusions: Food and nutrition insecurity was associated with the presence of cardiometabolic risk factors in the assessed publications. Childhood and adolescence constitute a period of life that is vulnerable to food insecurity consequences, making it extremely important to ensure the regular and permanent access to food. Because this is a complex association, some difficulties are found, such as the synergy between risk factors, the assessment of heterogeneous groups and extrapolation of data to other populations, in addition to the influence of environmental factors. PMID:26564327

  17. Body mass index and risk of non-melanoma skin cancer: cumulative evidence from prospective studies

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Daijun; Wu, Jun; Luo, Gaoxing

    2016-01-01

    Prospective epidemiologic studies that investigated the association between body mass index (BMI) and non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) yielded inconsistent findings. A dose-response meta-analysis was conducted to quantitatively summarize the evidence. PubMed and Embase databases were searched for relevant studies. Study-specific relative risk (RR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) for an increase in BMI of 5 kg/m2 was computed with the generalized least squares trend estimation, and these risk estimates were combined with the random-effects model. Nine publications were included in the final analyses, consisting of 18 independent cohorts with 22 risk estimates (971,795 participants and 50,561 NMSC cases). Results of the dose-response analyses showed a nonlinear inverse relationship between BMI and NMSC (RR = 0.88, 95% CI: 0.85–0.91, I2 = 71.2%, P-nonlinearity <0.001), which persisted when limiting to the studies with adjustment for important potential confounders including sun exposure and sensitivity factors. The risk estimates were very similar for squamous cell carcinoma and basal cell carcinoma. Sex appeared a source of heterogeneity (P-difference = 0.06), with a weaker, but still significant inverse association in men than in women. This dose-response meta-analysis suggests a nonlinear inverse association between BMI and NMSC. PMID:27898109

  18. Use of Chesapeake Bay Restoration Goals Index in ecological risk assessments

    SciTech Connect

    Biksey, T.

    1995-12-31

    Restoration goals for Chesapeake Bay benthic infaunal communities have been developed by the USEPA Chesapeake Bay Program Office and the Maryland Department of Natural Resources. The Restoration Goals Index (RGI) includes measures that describe characteristics of benthic assemblages expected in habitats having little evidence of environmental stress or disturbance. The RGI includes parameters for biodiversity, life history strategy, subsurface activity, abundance, biomass, and feeding guild. Eight habitat classes were defined by salinity and sediment type to account for natural habitat variability. Ecological risk assessments use measurement endpoints as quantitative expressions of an observed or measured effect of an environmental stressor to evaluate assessment endpoints -- the ecological value to be protected. Many of the same expressions used as measurement endpoints or effect indicators are included in the RGI. The use of the RGI in ecological risk assessments conducted at the Naval Weapons Station Yorktown helped reduced the uncertainty in the risk characterization phase. The RGIs provided a reference condition for refining the natural temporal and spatial variability inherent in benthic infaunal communities. The significance of the risk to aquatic receptors was placed in perspective to the regional conditions in the York River and lower Chesapeake Bay ecosystems.

  19. Obesity Indexes and Total Mortality among Elderly Subjects at High Cardiovascular Risk: The PREDIMED Study

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-González, Miguel A.; García-Arellano, Ana; Toledo, Estefanía; Bes-Rastrollo, Maira; Bulló, Mónica; Corella, Dolores; Fito, Montserrat; Ros, Emilio; Lamuela-Raventós, Rosa Maria; Rekondo, Javier; Gómez-Gracia, Enrique; Fiol, Miquel; Santos-Lozano, Jose Manuel; Serra-Majem, Lluis; Martínez, J. Alfredo; Eguaras, Sonia; Sáez-Tormo, Guillermo; Pintó, Xavier; Estruch, Ramon

    2014-01-01

    Background Different indexes of regional adiposity have been proposed for identifying persons at higher risk of death. Studies specifically assessing these indexes in large cohorts are scarce. It would also be interesting to know whether a dietary intervention may counterbalance the adverse effects of adiposity on mortality. Methods We assessed the association of four different anthropometric indexes (waist-to-height ratio (WHtR), waist circumference (WC), body mass index (BMI) and height) with all-cause mortality in 7447 participants at high cardiovascular risk from the PREDIMED trial. Forty three percent of them were men (55 to 80 years) and 57% were women (60 to 80 years). All of them were initially free of cardiovascular disease. The recruitment took place in 11 recruiting centers between 2003 and 2009. Results After adjusting for age, sex, smoking, diabetes, hypertension, intervention group, family history of coronary heart disease, and leisure-time physical activity, WC and WHtR were found to be directly associated with a higher mortality after 4.8 years median follow-up. The multivariable-adjusted HRs for mortality of WHtR (cut-off points: 0.60, 0.65, 0.70) were 1.02 (0.78–1.34), 1.30 (0.97–1.75) and 1.55 (1.06–2.26). When we used WC (cut-off points: 100, 105 and 110 cm), the multivariable adjusted Hazard Ratios (HRs) for mortality were 1.18 (0.88–1.59), 1.02 (0.74–1.41) and 1.57 (1.19–2.08). In all analyses, BMI exhibited weaker associations with mortality than WC or WHtR. The direct association between WHtR and overall mortality was consistent within each of the three intervention arms of the trial. Conclusions Our study adds further support to a stronger association of abdominal obesity than BMI with total mortality among elderly subjects at high risk of cardiovascular disease. We did not find evidence to support that the PREDIMED intervention was able to counterbalance the harmful effects of increased adiposity on total mortality. Trial

  20. Increased Dietary Inflammatory Index (DII) Is Associated With Increased Risk of Prostate Cancer in Jamaican Men

    PubMed Central

    Shivappa, Nitin; Jackson, Maria D.; Bennett, Franklyn; Hébert, James R.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Prostate cancer is the most common non-skin malignancy; and it accounts for the most cancer deaths among Jamaican males. Diet has been implicated in the etiology of prostate cancer, including through its effects on inflammation. Method We examined the association between a newly developed dietary inflammatory index (DII) and prostate cancer in a case-control study of 40-80 year-old Jamaican males. A total of 229 incident cases and 250 controls attended the same urology out-patient clinics at 2 major hospitals and private practitioners in the Kingston, Jamaica Metropolitan area between March 2005 and July 2007. The DII was computed based on dietary intake assessed using a previously validated food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) that was expanded to assess diet and cancer in this Jamaican population. Multivariable logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios, with DII as continuous and expressed as quartiles. Logistic regression analysis adjusted for age, total energy intake, education, body mass index (BMI), smoking status, physical activity and family history of prostate cancer. Results Men in the highest quartile of the DII were at higher risk of prostate cancer [odds ratio (OR) = 2.39; 95% confidence interval (CI) =1.14–5.04 (Ptrend = 0.08)] compared to men in the lowest DII quartile. Conclusion These data suggest a pro-inflammatory diet, as indicated by increasing DII score, may be a risk factor for prostate cancer in Jamaican men. PMID:26226289

  1. Integrated Risk Index of Chemical Aquatic Pollution (IRICAP): case studies in Iberian rivers.

    PubMed

    Fàbrega, Francesc; Marquès, Montse; Ginebreda, Antoni; Kuzmanovic, Maja; Barceló, Damià; Schuhmacher, Marta; Domingo, José L; Nadal, Martí

    2013-12-15

    The hazard of chemical compounds can be prioritized according to their PBT (persistence, bioaccumulation, toxicity) properties by using Self-Organizing Maps (SOM). The objective of the present study was to develop an Integrated Risk Index of Chemical Aquatic Pollution (IRICAP), useful to evaluate the risk associated to the exposure of chemical mixtures contained in river waters. Four Spanish river basins were considered as case-studies: Llobregat, Ebro, Jucar and Guadalquivir. A SOM-based hazard index (HI) was estimated for 205 organic compounds. IRICAP was calculated as the product of the HI by the concentration of each pollutant, and the results of all substances were aggregated. Finally, Pareto distribution was applied to the ranked lists of compounds in each site to prioritize those chemicals with the most significant incidence on the IRICAP. According to the HI outcomes, perfluoroalkyl substances, as well as specific illicit drugs and UV filters, were among the most hazardous compounds. Xylazine was identified as one of the chemicals with the highest contribution to the total IRICAP value in the different river basins, together with other pharmaceutical products such as loratadine and azaperol. These organic compounds should be proposed as target chemicals in the implementation of monitoring programs by regulatory organizations.

  2. Effect of a child care center-based obesity prevention program on body mass index and nutrition practices among preschool-aged children.

    PubMed

    Natale, Ruby A; Lopez-Mitnik, Gabriela; Uhlhorn, Susan B; Asfour, Lila; Messiah, Sarah E

    2014-09-01

    This study examined the effect of an early childhood obesity prevention program on changes in Body Mass Index (BMI) z-score and nutrition practices. Eight child care centers were randomly assigned to an intervention or attention control arm. Participants were a multiethnic sample of children aged 2 to 5 years old (N = 307). Intervention centers received healthy menu changes and family-based education focused on increased physical activity and fresh produce intake, decreased intake of simple carbohydrate snacks, and decreased screen time. Control centers received an attention control program. Height, weight, and nutrition data were collected at baseline and at 3, 6, and 12 months. Analysis examined height, weight, and BMI z-score change by intervention condition (at baseline and at 3, 6, and 12 months). Pearson correlation analysis examined relationships among BMI z-scores and home activities and nutrition patterns in the intervention group. Child BMI z-score was significantly negatively correlated with the number of home activities completed at 6-month post intervention among intervention participants. Similarly, intervention children consumed less junk food, ate more fresh fruits and vegetables, drank less juice, and drank more 1% milk compared to children at control sites at 6 months post baseline. Ninety-seven percent of those children who were normal weight at baseline were still normal weight 12 months later. Findings support child care centers as a promising setting to implement childhood obesity prevention programs in this age group.

  3. Body mass index and the risk of incident functional disability in elderly Japanese

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shu; Tomata, Yasutake; Sugiyama, Kemmyo; Kaiho, Yu; Honkura, Kenji; Watanabe, Takashi; Tanji, Fumiya; Sugawara, Yumi; Tsuji, Ichiro

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The relationship between the body mass index (BMI) and the incidence of cause-specific disability remains unclear. We conducted a prospective cohort study of 12,376 Japanese individuals aged ≥65 years who were followed up for 5.7 years. Information on BMI and other lifestyle factors was collected via a questionnaire in 2006. Functional disability data were retrieved from the public Long-term Care Insurance database. BMI was divided into 6 groups (<21, 21–<23, 23–<25, 25–<27[reference], 27–<29 and ≥29). Hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals for cause-specific disability were estimated using Cox proportional hazards regression models. A U-shaped relationship between BMI and functional disability was observed, with a nadir at 26. The nadir BMI values with the lowest disability risk were 28 for dementia, 25 for stroke, and 23 for joint disease. A low BMI (<23) was a risk factor for disability due to dementia, the HR values (95% CI) being 2.48 (1.70–3.63) for BMI <21 and 2.25 (1.54–3.27) for BMI 21 to <23; a high BMI (≥29) was a risk factor for disability due to joint disease, the HR value (95% CI) being 2.17 (1.40–3.35). There was no significant relationship between BMI and disability due to stroke. The BMI nadirs for cause-specific disability differed: a low BMI (<23) was a risk factor for disability due to dementia, and a high BMI (≥29) was a risk factor for disability due to joint disease. Because BMI values of 23 to <29 did not pose a significantly higher risk for each cause of disability, this range should be regarded as the optimal one for the elderly population. PMID:27495075

  4. The Relationship between Native American Ancestry, Body Mass Index and Diabetes Risk among Mexican-Americans.

    PubMed

    Hu, Hao; Huff, Chad D; Yamamura, Yuko; Wu, Xifeng; Strom, Sara S

    2015-01-01

    Higher body mass index (BMI) is a well-established risk factor for type 2 diabetes, and rates of obesity and type 2 diabetes are substantially higher among Mexican-Americans relative to non-Hispanic European Americans. Mexican-Americans are genetically diverse, with a highly variable distribution of Native American, European, and African ancestries. Here, we evaluate the role of Native American ancestry on BMI and diabetes risk in a well-defined Mexican-American population. Participants were randomly selected among individuals residing in the Houston area who are enrolled in the Mexican-American Cohort study. Using a custom Illumina GoldenGate Panel, we genotyped DNA from 4,662 cohort participants for 87 Ancestry-Informative Markers. On average, the participants were of 50.2% Native American ancestry, 42.7% European ancestry and 7.1% African ancestry. Using multivariate linear regression, we found BMI and Native American ancestry were inversely correlated; individuals with <20% Native American ancestry were 2.5 times more likely to be severely obese compared to those with >80% Native American ancestry. Furthermore, we demonstrated an interaction between BMI and Native American ancestry in diabetes risk among women; Native American ancestry was a strong risk factor for diabetes only among overweight and obese women (OR = 1.190 for each 10% increase in Native American ancestry). This study offers new insight into the complex relationship between obesity, genetic ancestry, and their respective effects on diabetes risk. Findings from this study may improve the diabetes risk prediction among Mexican-American individuals thereby facilitating targeted prevention strategies.

  5. Fatty Acid Synthase Polymorphisms, Tumor Expression, Body Mass Index, Prostate Cancer Risk, and Survival

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Paul L.; Ma, Jing; Chavarro, Jorge E.; Freedman, Matthew L.; Lis, Rosina; Fedele, Giuseppe; Fiore, Christopher; Qiu, Weiliang; Fiorentino, Michelangelo; Finn, Stephen; Penney, Kathryn L.; Eisenstein, Anna; Schumacher, Fredrick R.; Mucci, Lorelei A.; Stampfer, Meir J.; Giovannucci, Edward; Loda, Massimo

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Fatty acid synthase (FASN) regulates de novo lipogenesis, body weight, and tumor growth. We examined whether common germline single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the FASN gene affect prostate cancer (PCa) risk or PCa-specific mortality and whether these effects vary by body mass index (BMI). Methods In a prospective nested case-control study of 1,331 white patients with PCa and 1,267 age-matched controls, we examined associations of five common SNPs within FASN (and 5 kb upstream/downstream, R2 > 0.8) with PCa incidence and, among patients, PCa-specific death and tested for an interaction with BMI. Survival analyses were repeated for tumor FASN expression (n = 909). Results Four of the five SNPs were associated with lethal PCa. SNP rs1127678 was significantly related to higher BMI and interacted with BMI for both PCa risk (Pinteraction = .004) and PCa mortality (Pinteraction = .056). Among overweight men (BMI ≥ 25 kg/m2), but not leaner men, the homozygous variant allele carried a relative risk of advanced PCa of 2.49 (95% CI, 1.00 to 6.23) compared with lean men with the wild type. Overweight patients carrying the variant allele had a 2.04 (95% CI, 1.31 to 3.17) times higher risk of PCa mortality. Similarly, overweight patients with elevated tumor FASN expression had a 2.73 (95% CI, 1.05 to 7.08) times higher risk of lethal PCa (Pinteraction = .02). Conclusion FASN germline polymorphisms were significantly associated with risk of lethal PCa. Significant interactions of BMI with FASN polymorphisms and FASN tumor expression suggest FASN as a potential link between obesity and poor PCa outcome and raise the possibility that FASN inhibition could reduce PCa-specific mortality, particularly in overweight men. PMID:20679621

  6. The Your Disease Risk Index for colorectal cancer is an inaccurate risk stratification tool for advanced colorectal neoplasia at screening colonoscopy.

    PubMed

    Schroy, Paul C; Coe, Alison M; Mylvaganam, Shamini R; Ahn, Lynne B; Lydotes, Maria A; Robinson, Patricia A; Davis, Julie T; Chen, Clara A; Ashba, Jacqueline; Atkinson, Michael L; Colditz, Graham A; Heeren, Timothy C

    2012-08-01

    Tailoring the use of screening colonoscopy based on the risk of advanced colorectal neoplasia (ACN) could optimize the cost-effectiveness of colorectal cancer (CRC) screening. Our goal was to assess the accuracy of the Your Disease Risk (YDR) CRC risk index for stratifying average risk patients into low- versus intermediate/high-risk categories for ACN. The YDR risk assessment tool was administered to 3,317 asymptomatic average risk patients 50 to 79 years of age just before their screening colonoscopy. Associations between YDR-derived relative risk (RR) scores and ACN prevalence were examined using logistic regression and χ(2) analyses. ACN was defined as a tubular adenoma ≥1 cm, tubulovillous or villous adenoma of any size, and the presence of high-grade dysplasia or cancer. The overall prevalence of ACN was 5.6%. Although YDR-derived RR scores were linearly associated with ACN after adjusting for age and gender (P = 0.033), the index was unable to discriminate "below average" from "above/average" risk patients [OR, 1.01; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.75-1.37]. Considerable overlap in rates of ACN was also observed between the different YDR risk categories in our age- and gender-stratified analyses. The YDR index lacks accuracy for stratifying average risk patients into low- versus intermediate/high-risk categories for ACN.

  7. Healthy lifestyle and risk of breast cancer among postmenopausal women in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition cohort study.

    PubMed

    McKenzie, Fiona; Ferrari, Pietro; Freisling, Heinz; Chajès, Veronique; Rinaldi, Sabina; de Batlle, Jordi; Dahm, Christina C; Overvad, Kim; Baglietto, Laura; Dartois, Laureen; Dossus, Laure; Lagiou, Pagona; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Krogh, Vittorio; Panico, Salvatore; Tumino, Rosario; Rosso, Stefano; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B As; May, Anne; Peeters, Petra H; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Buckland, Genevieve; Sanchez, Maria-Jose; Navarro, Carmen; Ardanaz, Eva; Andersson, Anne; Sund, Malin; Ericson, Ulrika; Wirfält, Elisabet; Key, Tim J; Travis, Ruth C; Gunter, Marc; Riboli, Elio; Vergnaud, Anne-Claire; Romieu, Isabelle

    2015-06-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women and prevention strategies are needed to reduce incidence worldwide. A healthy lifestyle index score (HLIS) was generated to investigate the joint effect of modifiable lifestyle factors on postmenopausal breast cancer risk. The study included 242,918 postmenopausal women from the multinational European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort, with detailed information on diet and lifestyle assessed at baseline. The HLIS was constructed from five factors (diet, physical activity, smoking, alcohol consumption and anthropometry) by assigning scores of 0-4 to categories of each component, for which higher values indicate healthier behaviours. Hazard ratios (HR) were estimated by Cox proportional regression models. During 10.9 years of median follow-up, 7,756 incident breast cancer cases were identified. There was a 3% lower risk of breast cancer per point increase of the HLIS. Breast cancer risk was inversely associated with a high HLIS when fourth versus second (reference) categories were compared [adjusted HR = 0.74; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.66-0.83]. The fourth versus the second category of the HLIS was associated with a lower risk for hormone receptor double positive (adjusted HR = 0.81, 95% CI: 0.67-0.98) and hormone receptor double negative breast cancer (adjusted HR = 0.60, 95% CI: 0.40-0.90). Findings suggest having a high score on an index of combined healthy behaviours reduces the risk of developing breast cancer among postmenopausal women. Programmes which engage women in long term health behaviours should be supported.

  8. Sleep duration and cancer risk: time to use a "sleep-years" index?

    PubMed

    Erren, Thomas C

    2012-09-01

    With a focus on melatonin, a recent paper in the Journal investigated the hypothesis that endometrial cancer might be associated with the duration, and ultimately, amount of sleep. The authors found that "[s]elf-reported sleep duration may not adequately represent melatonin levels." The authors also concluded that there was "weak evidence of an association between sleep duration and endometrial cancer risk." Overall, these are interesting observations because primarily experimental and mechanistic research from many angles supports the study's notion that inappropriate sleep may be a determinant of cancer risk. To find out whether this is so in man, rather than assigning study individuals to fixed or average "baseline sleep categories" i.e., ≤5, 6, 7, 8, ≥9 h of habitual sleep in the present study, the accumulated amount of sleep over decades should be reconstructed in retrospective or constructed in prospective studies. To achieve this end, future epidemiological studies may want to use a sleep-years index [SYI]. This simple exposure parameter promises to be a sensible, feasible, and affordable way to approximate cumulative time spent at sleep in critical time windows over many years which we should expect to be relevant for the development of cancer. The SYI could be tested and used in observational studies which promise to be comparable and can be merged. This commentary provides roots of the index and explains why and how it should be used and how it could be interpreted in rigorous studies of biologically plausible links between sleep, on the one hand, and the development of internal cancers, on the other. This commentary also points out limitations of interpreting the SYI. It is emphasized that, where possible, the SYI should be assessed independently of (a) other sleep facets--such as quality--and of (b) known or suspected cancer risk factors. The respective contribution of (a) and (b) to risk must then be assessed during the analyses. Overall, the

  9. Women's higher health risks in the obesogenic environment: a gender nutrition approach to metabolic dimorphism with predictive, preventive, and personalised medicine

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Women's evolution for nurturing and fat accumulation, which historically yielded health and longevity advantages against scarcity, may now be counteracted by increasing risks in the obesogenic environment, recently shown by narrowing gender health gap. Women's differential metabolism/disease risks, i.e. in fat accumulation/distribution, exemplified during puberty/adolescence, suggest gender dimorphism with obesity outcomes. Women's higher body fat percentage than men, even with equal body mass index, may be a better risk predictor. Differential metabolic responses to weight-reduction diets, with women's lower abdominal fat loss, better response to high-protein vs. high-carbohydrate diets, higher risks with sedentariness vs. exercise benefits, and tendency toward delayed manifestation of central obesity, metabolic syndrome, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and certain cancers until menopause—but accelerated thereafter—suggest a need for differing metabolic and chronological perspectives for prevention/intervention. These perspectives, including women's differential responses to lifestyle changes, strongly support further research with a gender nutrition emphasis within predictive, preventive, and personalized medicine. PMID:23311512

  10. Association between infant- and child-feeding index and nutritional status: results from a cross-sectional study among children attending an urban hospital in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Khatoon, Tahmina; Mollah, Md Abid Hossain; Choudhury, Ahmed Murtaza; Islam, M Munirul; Rahman, Kazi Mizanur

    2011-08-01

    Integration of infant- and child-feeding index (ICFI) addressing the multidimensional child-feeding practices into one age-specific summary index is gaining importance. This cross-sectional study was aimed at understanding the association between the ICFI and the nutritional status of 259 children, aged 6-23 months, who attended the paediatric outpatient department of the Dhaka Medical College Hospital in Bangladesh. The mean length-for-age z-score (LAZ) of children aged 12-23 months was significantly (p < 0.05) higher among those who were at the upper ICFI tercile compared to those who were at the middle or lower ICFI tercile (-2.01 and -3.20 respectively). A significant correlation was found between the ICFI and the LAZ (r = 0.24, p = 0.01 and r = 0.29, p = 0.01) in children aged 6-8-months and 12-23-months. Multivariable analysis, after adjusting for potential confounders, also found a significant association between the ICFI and the LAZ (beta = 0.13, p = 0.03). The predictive capability of the proposed ICFI on nutritional status of children, especially length-for-age, needs to be further evaluated prospectively among healthy children in the community.

  11. Nutritional Status, Body Surface, and Low Lean Body Mass/Body Mass Index Are Related to Dose Reduction and Severe Gastrointestinal Toxicity Induced by Afatinib in Patients With Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    De la Torre-Vallejo, Martha; López-Macías, Diego; Orta, David; Turcott, Jenny; Macedo-Pérez, Eleazar-Omar; Sánchez-Lara, Karla; Ramírez-Tirado, Laura-Alejandra; Baracos, Vickie E.

    2015-01-01

    Background. The main reason for dose reduction of afatinib is gastrointestinal toxicity (GT). In a phase II study, we analyzed anthropometrical, nutritional, and biochemical factors associated with GT induced by afatinib. Materials and Methods. Patients diagnosed with non-small cell lung cancer who progressed to prior chemotherapy received 40 mg of afatinib. Malnutrition was determined by Subjective Global Assessment, and lean body mass (LBM) was determined by computed tomography scan analysis using a pre-established Hounsfield unit threshold. Toxicity was obtained during four cycles by Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events. Results. Eighty-four patients were enrolled. Afatinib was administered as the second, third, and fourth line of treatment in 54.8%, 38.1%, and 7.12% of patients, respectively. Severe diarrhea, mucositis, and overall severe GT were present in 38.9%, 28.8%, and 57.5%, respectively. Of the patients, 50% developed dose-limiting toxicity (DLT). Patients with malnutrition have higher risk for severe GT. Patients with lower LBM and body mass index developed more DLT (71.4% vs. 18.8%). Conclusion. Malnutrition is associated with a higher risk of severe GT induced by afatinib. Determination of nutritional status and body composition are helpful in identifying patients at higher risk of severe GT and could allow initiating treatment with lower doses according to tolerance. Implications for Practice: Body composition analysis, specifically lean body mass quantification, and nutritional status assessment are significant clinical variables to take into account when assessing oncological patients. This study on patients with non-small cell lung cancer treated with afatinib showed the important impact that malnutrition and low lean body mass have on the risk for developing dose-limiting toxicity and severe gastrointestinal toxicity. Still more research needs to be done to explore dose adjustment according to lean body mass, especially in drugs that

  12. Use of Subjective Global Assessment, Patient-Generated Subjective Global Assessment and Nutritional Risk Screening 2002 to evaluate the nutritional status of non-critically ill patients on parenteral nutrition.

    PubMed

    Badia-Tahull, M B; Cobo-Sacristán, S; Leiva-Badosa, E; Miquel-Zurita, M E; Méndez-Cabalerio, N; Jódar-Masanés, R; Llop-Talaverón, J

    2014-02-01

    Objetivo: Evaluar el estado nutricional de pacientes no críticos de cirugía digestiva, en el momento de iniciar la nutrición parenteral, utilizando tres tests de evaluación nutricional. Estudiar la correlación entre los tests y su asociación con los parámetros clínicos y de laboratorio utilizados para el seguimiento de estos pacientes. Métodos: Estudio prospectivo de 4 meses. Se recogen variables antropométricas y clínicas. Los resultados de Subjective Global Assessment, Patient-Generated Subjective Global Assessment y Nutritional Risk Screening 2002 se comparan mediante test kappa. La relación entre las variables clínicas y de laboratorio con Subjective Global Assessment se estudian con regresión multinominal; y con Patient-Generated Subjective Global Assessment y Nutritional Risk Screening mediante regresión lineal múltiple. Edad y sexo se introdujeron como variables de ajuste. Resultados: La desnutrición en 45 pacientes estudiados variaba entre el 51% y el 57%. Subjective Global Assessment correlacionaba bien con Patient-Generated Subjective Global Assessment y el Nutritional Risk Screening (= 0,531 p = 0,000). Nutritional Risk Screening 2002 mostró mejor asociación con variables clínicas y analíticas: peor estado nutricional en este test se asoció con peor comportamiento de albúmina (B = -0,087; CI = -0,169/-0,005]); prealbumina (B = -0,005; CI = [-0,011/ 0,001]), proteína C reactiva (B = 0,006;CI = [0,001/0,011]) y leucocitos (B = 0,134; CI = [0,031/0,237]) al final de la nutrición parenteral. Discusión: La mitad de los pacientes de cirugía digestiva presentan algún grado de desnutrición en el momento de iniciar la nutrición parenteral. El Nutritional Risk Screening 2002 se mostró como el test con mayor relación con las variables utilizadas en el seguimiento clínico de los pacientes con nutrición parenteral.

  13. Climate Risk and Production Shocks: Using Index Insurance to Link Climate Science to Policy for Sustainable Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarney, G. R.; Osgood, D. E.

    2011-12-01

    Smallholder farmers in developing countries are often severely impacted by droughts and other climate related events. However, agricultural insurance programs are largely unavailable in lower-income countries because of limitations in traditional loss-based indemnity insurance. As a result, it is often the case that farmers who are the most vulnerable to climate shocks lack access to the insurance tools that could help to reduce their production risk. Index insurance, a recent financial innovation, has the potential to increase access to insurance for smallholder farmers (Barrett et al. 2007). Index insurance allows farmers to insure their production risk based on a weather index (such as total seasonal rainfall) rather than on crop yields. The use of a weather index addresses many of the perverse incentive problems found in traditional crop insurance, and greatly reduces the costs of insuring smallholder farmers. The trade-off in index insurance, however, is limited accuracy in calibrating payouts to actual losses, a phenomenon commonly known as basis risk. While index insurance has promise as a risk-smoothing instrument, many argue it has greater promise as a mechanism for improving access to credit for smallholder farmers in developing countries (e.g. Barnett, Barrett & Skees 2008). In these areas, farmers are often fully exposed to climate shocks, which greatly affect their willingness to borrow. By smoothing the uncertainty in climate shocks, insurance may allow farmers to take credit for productive risks. There has been much discussion as to the optimal strategy for combining index insurance with credit, specifically if the financial institutions or the individual farmers themselves should hold the insurance policy. Many existing insurance implementations insure the farmer directly. However, since a weather index is a proxy for yield loss based on regional data, there is basis risk due to uninsured idiosyncratic differences between farmers. As a response to

  14. Dairy products and risk of hepatocellular carcinoma: the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition.

    PubMed

    Duarte-Salles, Talita; Fedirko, Veronika; Stepien, Magdalena; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Bamia, Christina; Lagiou, Pagona; Lukanova, Annekatrin; Trepo, Elisabeth; Overvad, Kim; Tjønneland, Anne; Halkjaer, Jytte; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Racine, Antoine; Cadeau, Claire; Kühn, Tilman; Aleksandrova, Krasimira; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Tsiotas, Konstantinos; Boffetta, Paolo; Palli, Domenico; Pala, Valeria; Tumino, Rosario; Sacerdote, Carlotta; Panico, Salvatore; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B as; Dik, Vincent K; Peeters, Petra H; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Torhild Gram, Inger; Hjartåker, Anette; Ramón Quirós, Jose; Fonseca-Nunes, Ana; Molina-Montes, Esther; Dorronsoro, Miren; Navarro Sanchez, Carmen; Barricarte, Aurelio; Lindkvist, Björn; Sonestedt, Emily; Johansson, Ingegerd; Wennberg, Maria; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Wareham, Nick; Travis, Ruth C; Romieu, Isabelle; Riboli, Elio; Jenab, Mazda

    2014-10-01

    Intake of dairy products has been associated with risk of some cancers, but findings are often inconsistent and information on hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) risk is limited, particularly from prospective settings. The aim of our study was to investigate the association between consumption of total and specific dairy products (milk/cheese/yogurt) and their components (calcium/vitamin D/fats/protein), with first incident HCC (N(cases) = 191) in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition cohort, including a nested case-control subset (N(cases) = 122) with the assessment of hepatitis B virus/hepatitis C virus infections status, liver damage and circulating insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I levels. For cohort analyses, multivariable-adjusted Cox proportional hazard models were used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI). For nested case-control analyses, conditional logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratios and 95% CI. A total of 477,206 participants were followed-up for an average of 11 years (person-years follow-up = 5,415,385). In the cohort study, a significant positive HCC risk association was observed for total dairy products (highest vs. lowest tertile, HR = 1.66, 95% CI: 1.13-2.43; p(trend) = 0.012), milk (HR = 1.51, 95% CI: 1.02-2.24; p(trend) = 0.049), and cheese (HR = 1.56, 95% CI: 1.02-2.38; p(trend) = 0.101), but not yogurt (HR = 0.94, 95% CI: 0.65-1.35). Dietary calcium, vitamin D, fat and protein from dairy sources were associated with increased HCC risk, whereas the same nutrients from nondairy sources showed inverse or null associations. In the nested case-control study, similar results were observed among hepatitis-free individuals. Results from this large prospective cohort study suggest that higher consumption of dairy products, particularly milk and cheese, may be associated with increased HCC risk. Validation of these findings in other populations is necessary. Potential biologic

  15. Body Mass Index and risk of colorectal cancer in Chinese Singaporeans: the Singapore Chinese Health Study

    PubMed Central

    Odegaard, Andrew O.; Koh, Woon-Puay; Yu, Mimi C.; Yuan, Jian-Min

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To examine the association between body mass index (BMI) and incident colorectal cancer across the spectrum of BMI, including underweight, because detailed prospective cohort data on this topic in Asians is scarce, as is data on underweight (BMI < 18.5 kg/m2) in any population RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Analysis of the Singapore Chinese Health Study included 51,251 men and women ages 45–74 years enrolled in 1993–1998 and followed up through 2007. Incident cancer cases and deaths among cohort members were identified through record linkage and 980 cases were identified. Cox regression models were used to investigate the association of baseline BMI with risk of incident colorectal cancer during mean 11.5 years of follow-up. RESULTS A significant U-shaped, quadratic association was observed between BMI and colon cancer risk, with increased risk in BMI’s ≥27.5 and < 18.5 kg/m2. The association was more pronounced in never-smokers; and most prominent when further limiting the sample to those free of diabetes and cases with greater than five years of follow up. Localized cases had a more pronounced association in BMI’s ≥27.5, whereas advanced cases had a more pronounced association in BMI’s < 18.5 kg/m2. No association was found in relation to rectal cancer risk. The association was also stronger among subjects aged 65 years and above. CONCLUSIONS BMI displays a U-shaped, quadratic association with colon cancer risk in this Chinese population in Southeast Asia. PMID:21815135

  16. Association between body mass index and risk of total knee replacement, the Singapore Chinese Health Study

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Ying-Ying; Allen, John Carson; Noviani, Maria; Ang, Li-Wei; Wang, Renwei; Yuan, Jian-Min; Koh, Woon-Puay

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Data on the association between body mass index (BMI) and risk of knee osteoarthritis (KOA) are sparse for Asian populations who are leaner than Western populations. We evaluated the association between BMI and risk of total knee replacement (TKR) due to severe KOA among Chinese in Singapore. Methods We used data from the Singapore Chinese Health Study, a population based prospective cohort of 63,257 Chinese men and women, aged 45–74 years at enrollment from 1993 to 1998. Information on height, weight, diet and lifestyle factors were obtained via in-person interviews. TKR cases for severe KOA were identified via linkage with the nationwide hospital discharge database through 2011. Cox regression and weighted least squares regression were used in the analysis. Results The mean BMI among cohort participants was 23.1 kg/m2, and more than two-thirds had BMI below 25 kg/m2. A total of 1,649 had TKR attributable to severe KOA. Risk of TKR increased in a strong dose-dependent manner with increasing BMI throughout the 15–32 kg/m2 range and became less clear at BMI > 32 kg/m2. In the BMI range 16–27 kg/m2, there was a 27% increase in TKR risk for each unit increase in BMI (p for trend < 0.001). Compared to BMI 19–20 kg/m2, the risk estimates of TKR were all statistically significant with increasing unit of BMI ≥ 21 kg/m2. Results were similar for men and women. Conclusion Our results provided evidence for a constant mechanical mechanism underlying BMI and KOA initiation and/or progression. PMID:25450848

  17. Nottingham prognostic index plus (NPI+) predicts risk of distant metastases in primary breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Green, Andrew R; Soria, D; Powe, D G; Nolan, C C; Aleskandarany, M; Szász, M A; Tőkés, A M; Ball, G R; Garibaldi, J M; Rakha, E A; Kulka, J; Ellis, I O

    2016-05-01

    The Nottingham prognostic index plus (NPI+) is based on the assessment of biological class combined with established clinicopathologic prognostic variables providing improved patient outcome stratification for breast cancer superior to the traditional NPI. This study aimed to determine prognostic capability of the NPI+ in predicting risk of development of distant disease. A well-characterised series of 1073 primary early-stage BC cases treated in Nottingham and 251 cases from Budapest were immunohistochemically assessed for cytokeratin (Ck)5/6, Ck18, EGFR, oestrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor, HER2, HER3, HER4, Mucin 1 and p53 expression. NPI+ biological class and prognostic scores were assigned using individual algorithms for each biological class incorporating clinicopathologic parameters and investigated in terms of prediction of distant metastases-free survival (MFS). The NPI+ identified distinct prognostic groups (PG) within each molecular class which were predictive of MFS providing improved patient outcome stratification superior to the traditional NPI. NPI+ PGs, between series, were comparable in predicting patient outcome between series in luminal A, basal p53 altered and HER2+/ER+ (p > 0.01) tumours. The low-risk groups were similarly validated in luminal B, luminal N, basal p53 normal tumours (p > 0.01). Due to small patient numbers the remaining PGs could not be validated. NPI+ was additionally able to predict a higher risk of metastases at certain distant sites. This study may indicate the NPI+ as a useful tool in predicting the risk of metastases. The NPI+ provides accurate risk stratification allowing improved individualised clinical decision making for breast cancer.

  18. Association between body mass index and risk of breast cancer in Tunisian women

    PubMed Central

    Awatef, Msolly; Olfa, Gharbi; Kacem, Mahmoudi; Sami, Limem; Makram, Hochlef; Slim, Ben Ahmed

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: The number of breast cancer in women has increased dramatically in Tunisia. The cause is perceived to stem from adaptation to a westernized life style which increases body mass index (BMI). This study aimed to investigate the association between BMI and breast cancer among Tunisian women. DESIGN AND SETTING: Hospital-based case control study of breast cancer patients seen between November 2006 and April 2009 at the University College Hospital Farhat Hached in Sousse, Tunisia. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Standardized questionnaires concerning BMI and other anthropometric data were completed on 400 breast cancer cases and 400 controls. The controls were frequency-matched to the cases by age. RESULTS: BMI at diagnosis was positively correlated with the risk of breast cancer among postmenopausal women (P<.001 for trend). When compared with women with a low BMI (<19), women with a BMI of 23-27 and 27-31 had a 1.7-fold (95% CI, 1.1-2.9) and 2.1-fold (95% CI, 1.1-3.9) increased risk of breast cancer, respectively, after adjustment for non-anthropometric risk factors. BMI at diagnosis was not related to the risk of breast cancer among premenopausal women. The odds ratios for premenopausal women with a BMI of 23-27 and 27-31 were 1.5 (95% CI, 0.8-2.8) and 1.3 (95% CI, 0.4-4.5), respectively. Furthermore, present BMI was not associated with breast cancer risk in either pre- and postmenopausal women. CONCLUSIONS: Weight control in obese women may be an effective measure of breast cancer prevention in postmenopausal women. PMID:21808117

  19. Dietary carbohydrate intake, glycaemic load, glycaemic index and ovarian cancer risk in African-American women.

    PubMed

    Qin, Bo; Moorman, Patricia G; Alberg, Anthony J; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill S; Bondy, Melissa; Cote, Michele L; Funkhouser, Ellen; Peters, Edward S; Schwartz, Ann G; Terry, Paul; Schildkraut, Joellen M; Bandera, Elisa V

    2016-02-28

    Epidemiological evidence regarding the association between carbohydrate intake, glycaemic load (GL) and glycaemic index (GI) and risk of ovarian cancer has been mixed. Little is known about their impact on ovarian cancer risk in African-American women. Associations between carbohydrate quantity and quality and ovarian cancer risk were investigated among 406 cases and 609 controls using data from the African American Cancer Epidemiology Study (AACES). AACES is an ongoing population-based case-control study of ovarian cancer in African-Americans in the USA. Cases were identified through rapid case ascertainment and age- and site-matched controls were identified by random-digit dialling. Dietary information over the year preceding diagnosis or the reference date was obtained using a FFQ. Multivariable logistic regression models were used to estimate odds ratios and 95% CI adjusted for covariates. The OR comparing the highest quartile of total carbohydrate intake and total sugar intake v. the lowest quartile were 1·57 (95% CI 1·08, 2·28; P trend=0·03) and 1·61 (95% CI 1·12, 2·30; P trend<0·01), respectively. A suggestion of an inverse association was found for fibre intake. Higher GL was positively associated with the risk of ovarian cancer (OR 1·18 for each 10 units/4184 kJ (1000 kcal); 95% CI 1·04, 1·33). No associations were observed for starch or GI. Our findings suggest that high intake of total sugars and GL are associated with greater risk of ovarian cancer in African-American women.

  20. Body mass index in relation to serum prostate-specific antigen levels and prostate cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Bonn, Stephanie E; Sjölander, Arvid; Tillander, Annika; Wiklund, Fredrik; Grönberg, Henrik; Bälter, Katarina

    2016-07-01

    High Body mass index (BMI) has been directly associated with risk of aggressive or fatal prostate cancer. One possible explanation may be an effect of BMI on serum levels of prostate-specific antigen (PSA). To study the association between BMI and serum PSA as well as prostate cancer risk, a large cohort of men without prostate cancer at baseline was followed prospectively for prostate cancer diagnoses until 2015. Serum PSA and BMI were assessed among 15,827 men at baseline in 2010-2012. During follow-up, 735 men were diagnosed with prostate cancer with 282 (38.4%) classified as high-grade cancers. Multivariable linear regression models and natural cubic linear regression splines were fitted for analyses of BMI and log-PSA. For risk analysis, Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to estimate hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) and natural cubic Cox regression splines producing standardized cancer-free probabilities were fitted. Results showed that baseline Serum PSA decreased by 1.6% (95% CI: -2.1 to -1.1) with every one unit increase in BMI. Statistically significant decreases of 3.7, 11.7 and 32.3% were seen for increasing BMI-categories of 25 < 30, 30 < 35 and ≥35 kg/m(2), respectively, compared to the reference (18.5 < 25 kg/m(2)). No statistically significant associations were seen between BMI and prostate cancer risk although results were indicative of a positive association to incidence rates of high-grade disease and an inverse association to incidence of low-grade disease. However, findings regarding risk are limited by the short follow-up time. In conclusion, BMI was inversely associated to PSA-levels. BMI should be taken into consideration when referring men to a prostate biopsy based on serum PSA-levels.

  1. Interleukin-6-related genotypes, body mass index, and risk of multiple myeloma and plasmacytoma.

    PubMed

    Cozen, Wendy; Gebregziabher, Mulugeta; Conti, David V; Van Den Berg, David J; Coetzee, Gerhard A; Wang, Sophia S; Rothman, Nathaniel; Bernstein, Leslie; Hartge, Patricia; Morhbacher, Ann; Coetzee, Simon G; Salam, Muhammad T; Wang, Wei; Zadnick, John; Ingles, Sue A

    2006-11-01

    Interleukin-6 (IL-6) promotes normal plasma cell development and proliferation of myeloma cells in culture. We evaluated IL-6 genotypes and body mass index (BMI) in a case-control study of multiple myeloma and plasmacytoma. DNA samples and questionnaires were obtained from incident cases of multiple myeloma (n = 134) and plasmacytoma (n = 16; plasma cell neoplasms) ascertained from the Los Angeles County population-based cancer registry and from siblings or cousins of cases (family controls, n = 112) and population controls (n = 126). Genotypes evaluated included IL-6 promoter gene single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) at positions -174, -572, and -597; one variable number of tandem repeats (-373 A(n)T(n)); and one SNP in the IL-6 receptor (IL-6ralpha) gene at position -358. The variant allele of the IL-6 promoter SNP -572 was associated with a roughly 2-fold increased risk of plasma cell neoplasms when cases were compared with family [odds ratio (OR), 1.8; 95% confidence interval (95% CI), 0.7-4.7] or population controls (OR, 2.4; 95% CI, 1.2-4.7). The -373 9A/9A genotype was associated with a decreased risk compared with the most common genotype (OR for cases versus family controls, 0.4; 95% CI, 0.1-1.7; OR for cases versus population controls, 0.3; 95% CI, 0.1-0.9). No other SNPs were associated with risk. Obesity (BMI >or= 30 kg/m(2)) increased risk nonsignificantly by 40% and 80% when cases were compared with family controls or population controls, respectively, relative to persons with a BMI of <25 kg/m(2). These results suggest that IL-6 promoter genotypes may be associated with increased risk of plasma cell neoplasms.

  2. Age at First Delivery and Osteoporosis Risk in Korean Postmenopausal Women: The 2008-2011 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES).

    PubMed

    Yun, Bo Hyon; Choi, Yun Rak; Choi, Young Sik; Cho, SiHyun; Lee, Byung Seok; Seo, Seok Kyo

    2015-01-01

    It has been reported in several studies that there may be a significant correlation between reproductive history and the risk of osteoporosis due to the effect of estrogen. Under this hypothesis, however, it is unclear whether the age at first delivery has any major influences on the risk of osteoporosis. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the relationship between the age at first delivery and the risk of osteoporosis in Korean menopausal women. This study was performed using data from the 2008-2011 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey and included 2,530 Korean postmenopausal women. The diagnosis of osteoporosis was made using the World Health Organization T-score criteria (T-score ≤ -2.5, at the femoral neck or lumbar spine). Participants were categorized into 3 groups according to age at first delivery: ≤ 23, 24-29, and ≥ 30 years. Older age, lower body mass index, lower calcium intake, later menarche, and earlier menopause increased the risk of osteoporosis, whereas hormone therapy and oral contraceptive use were associated with a decreased risk of osteoporosis. Postmenopausal women whose first delivery occurred at age 24-29 years were shown to have a significantly increased risk of osteoporosis (odds ratio, 2.124; 95% confidence interval, 1.096-4.113; P = 0.026) compared to those who first gave birth after the age of 30 years. These findings suggest that postmenopausal women whose first delivery occurred in their mid to late 20s, a period during which bone mass slowly accumulates to the peak, are at an increased risk of osteoporosis.

  3. Dietary Inflammatory Index and Risk of Colorectal Cancer: A Case-Control Study in Korea.

    PubMed

    Cho, Young Ae; Lee, Jeonghee; Oh, Jae Hwan; Shin, Aesun; Kim, Jeongseon

    2016-07-30

    The role of diet-associated inflammation in colorectal cancer is of interest. Accordingly, we aimed to examine whether the dietary inflammatory index (DII) was associated with the risk of colorectal cancer in a case-control study conducted in Korea. The DII was based on dietary intake, which was determined by a 106-item semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire completed by 923 colorectal cancer cases and 1846 controls. Logistic regression was used to estimate odd ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Subgroup analyses were conducted by the anatomical site of the cancer, sex, and other risk factors. Higher DII scores were associated with an increased incidence of colorectal cancer (OR (95% CI) = 2.16 (1.71, 2.73) for highest vs. lowest tertile). The magnitude differed by anatomical site and sex. This association was slightly weaker in subjects with proximal colon cancer (1.68 (1.08, 2.61)) and was stronger in women (2.50 (1.64, 3.82)). Additionally, stronger associations were observed in subjects who were older than 50 years (p for interaction = 0.004) and engaged in physical activity (p for interaction < 0.001). Results from this study suggest that diet-associated inflammation may increase the risk of colorectal cancer, and this effect may differ by certain factors, such as anatomical site, age, sex, and lifestyle.

  4. Does maternal body mass index during pregnancy influence risk of schizophrenia in the adult offspring?

    PubMed

    Khandaker, G M; Dibben, C R M; Jones, P B

    2012-06-01

    Maternal obesity in pregnancy has been linked with several adverse outcomes in offspring including schizophrenia. The rising prevalence of obesity may contribute to an increase in the number of schizophrenia cases in the near future; therefore, it warrants further exploration. We reviewed current evidence regarding maternal body mass index (BMI) in pregnancy and risk of schizophrenia in adult offspring. We searched PubMed and Embase databases and included studies that were based on large and representative population-based datasets. A qualitative review was undertaken due to heterogeneity between studies. Four studies with 305 cases of schizophrenia and 24,442 controls were included. Maternal obesity (pre-pregnant BMI over 29 or 30 compared with mothers with low or average BMI) was associated with two- to threefold increased risk of schizophrenia in the adult offspring in two birth cohorts. High maternal BMI at both early and late pregnancy also increased risk of schizophrenia in the offspring. Discrepant findings from one study could be attributable to sample characteristics and other factors. The area needs more research. Future studies should take into account obstetric complications, diabetes, maternal infections and immune responses that might potentially mediate this association.

  5. Does maternal body mass index during pregnancy influence risk of schizophrenia in the adult offspring?

    PubMed Central

    Khandaker, G M; Dibben, C R M; Jones, P B

    2012-01-01

    Summary Maternal obesity in pregnancy has been linked with several adverse outcomes in offspring including schizophrenia. The rising prevalence of obesity may contribute to an increase in the number of schizophrenia cases in the near future; therefore, it warrants further exploration. We reviewed current evidence regarding maternal body mass index (BMI) in pregnancy and risk of schizophrenia in adult offspring. We searched PubMed and Embase databases and included studies that were based on large and representative population-based datasets. A qualitative review was undertaken due to heterogeneity between studies. Four studies with 305 cases of schizophrenia and 24,442 controls were included. Maternal obesity (pre-pregnant BMI over 29 or 30 compared with mothers with low or average BMI) was associated with two- to threefold increased risk of schizophrenia in the adult offspring in two birth cohorts. High maternal BMI at both early and late pregnancy also increased risk of schizophrenia in the offspring. Discrepant findings from one study could be attributable to sample characteristics and other factors. The area needs more research. Future studies should take into account obstetric complications, diabetes, maternal infections and immune responses that might potentially mediate this association. PMID:22188548

  6. Improving Index-Based Drought Insurance in Varying Topography: Evaluating Basis Risk Based on Perceptions of Nicaraguan Hillside Farmers

    PubMed Central

    Kost, André; Läderach, Peter; Fisher, Myles; Cook, Simon; Gómez, Lorena

    2012-01-01

    This paper discusses a methodology to model precipitation indices and premium prices for index-based drought insurance for smallholders. Spatial basis risk, which is borne by the insured, is a problem, especially in variable topography. Also, site-specific drought risk needs to be estimated accurately in order to offer effective insurance cover and ensure financial sustainability of the insurance scheme. We explore farmers' perceptions on drought and spatial climate variability and draw conclusions concerning basis risk with regards to the proposed methodology. There are technically many options to represent natural heterogeneity in index insurance contracts while serving the customer adequately and keeping transaction costs low. PMID:23240020

  7. Improving index-based drought insurance in varying topography: evaluating basis risk based on perceptions of Nicaraguan hillside farmers.

    PubMed

    Kost, André; Läderach, Peter; Fisher, Myles; Cook, Simon; Gómez, Lorena

    2012-01-01

    This paper discusses a methodology to model precipitation indices and premium prices for index-based drought insurance for smallholders. Spatial basis risk, which is borne by the insured, is a problem, especially in variable topography. Also, site-specific drought risk needs to be estimated accurately in order to offer effective insurance cover and ensure financial sustainability of the insurance scheme. We explore farmers' perceptions on drought and spatial climate variability and draw conclusions concerning basis risk with regards to the proposed methodology. There are technically many options to represent natural heterogeneity in index insurance contracts while serving the customer adequately and keeping transaction costs low.

  8. Exploiting Nutritional Value of Staple Foods in the World's Semi-Arid Areas: Risks, Benefits, Challenges and Opportunities of Sorghum.

    PubMed

    Proietti, Ilaria; Frazzoli, Chiara; Mantovani, Alberto

    2015-03-30

    Sorghum (Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench) is a drought-resistant crop and an important food resource in terms of nutritional as well as social-economic values, especially in semi-arid environments. Cultivar selection and processing methods have been observed to impact on composition and functional and nutritional value of sorghum. Amino acid imbalance, cyanogenic glycosides, endogenous anti-nutrients, mycotoxins and toxic elements are among factors impairing its nutritional value. This paper reviews possible approaches (varieties selection, production practices, cooking processes) to improve the benefits-to-risks balance of sorghum meal, to mitigate the risk of deficiencies and/or imbalances and to improve effects on human nutrition. Opportunity for avoiding dietary diversification in high sorghum consumers is also discussed, e.g., tryptophan and niacin deficits potentially related to pellagra, or unavailability of proteins and divalent cations (e.g., Fe, Zn) due to the antinutrient activity of phytic acid and tannins. As potential candidate for production investments, the role of sorghum in preserving biological diversity is also considered.

  9. Risk of injury during alpine and telemark skiing and snowboarding. The equipment-specific distance-correlated injury index.

    PubMed

    Rønning, R; Gerner, T; Engebretsen, L

    2000-01-01

    Estimation of injury risk in alpine sports is difficult. We present a new method of calculating an injury index related to the distance traveled on ski or snowboard. The distance-correlated injury index equals the number of injuries per 100,000 km traveled distance. This injury index can also be correlated to the type of equipment used. The equipment-specific distance-correlated injury index is the same as the distance-correlated injury index, but it is sport-specific. We found the distance-correlated injury index for alpine skiing to be 3.9 (95% Cl = 2.8 to 5.4); for snowboarding, 13.5 (95% Cl = 8.3 to 22.0); and for telemark skiing, 3.0 (95% Cl = 1.0 to 9.4), suggesting a three- to four-times higher incidence of injuries requiring hospital treatment among snowboarders than among alpine and telemark skiers.

  10. [Nutritional and metabolic factors as risk factors for cardiovascular diseases in an adult population in the city of Maracibo, Estado Zulia, Venezuela].

    PubMed

    García-Araujo, M; Semprún-Fereira, M; Sulbarán, T A; Silva, E; Calmón, G; Campos, G

    2001-03-01

    To analyze the nutritional and metabolic risk factors for Cardiovascular Diseases (CVD) present in a group of people in the city of Maracaibo a study was performed with 209 volunteers (145 women and 64 men) between 20 and 89 years of age who underwent: a) Anthropometric Evaluation: Body Mass Index (BMI) and Waist-to-Hip Ratio (WHR) and Physical Examination: Systolic (SBP) and Diastolic Blood Pressure (DBP); b) Dietetic Evaluation (24 hours recall), and c) Biochemical Evaluation: Glycemia (GLYC), Triglycerides (TG), Total Cholesterol (CHOL), HDL-C, LDL-C and VLDL-C, applying enzymatic methods. It was also investigated, their Age, Family History of Metabolic Alterations (FHMA), physical activity, smoking habits and alcohol consumption. More than 50% of the individuals showed a BMI > 25; 64% of women showed a WHR value > 0.8; 34 and 28% of men and women respectively had a high fat ingestion (HFI); 36% of men had hypertriglyceridemia and high levels of VLDL-C; 41% of women and 30% of men showed decreased HDL-C. A high frequency of FHMA was found in 85% of women and 78% of men followed by sedentary life in 64% of men and 79% of women. The age significantly (p < 0.05) affected the values for WHR, SBP, DBP, GLYC, CHOL, TG, HDL-C, LDL-C and VLDL-C. The dietetic evaluation showed a diet that was low in calories, high in protein, normal in fat and low in carbohydrates. It is concluded that the population elected for this study might be considered under a high risk for CVD, since both nutritional and metabolic factors, as well as the other risk factors analyzed, were present in a high percentage of the individuals studied.

  11. Prevalence and risk factors for poor nutritional status among children in the Kilimanjaro region of Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Abubakar, Amina; Uriyo, Jacqueline; Msuya, Sia E; Swai, Mark; Stray-Pedersen, Babill

    2012-10-05

    The current study investigated the prevalence and risk factors for poor nutritional status among children less than 36 months of age in the Kilimanjaro region of Tanzania. Using a cross sectional study design, children and their caregivers were recruited into the study. Anthropometric measures were taken based on established protocol while a standard questionnaire was utilized to collect socio-demographic data. A finger-prick blood sample was collected from all the children and haemoglobin (Hb) concentration analyzed using a HemoCue photometer (HemoCue AB, Angelholm, Sweden). Four hundred and twenty three (423) children (214 females) took part in this study. Participating children were aged between 1–35 months (mean = 13.04, SD = 7.70). We observed high rates of stunting (44.2%) and underweight (19.1%). Nearly 70% (n = 295) of the sample was anaemic (Hb < 11 g/dL). In a multivariate logistic regression model concerns on child growth, maternal education, and child's age were found to independently predict stunting; whereas concerns over child's growth and development, and distance to water source were found to uniquely predict being underweight. Maternal education was the only factor related to the child's anaemia. The current study further emphasizes the need to implement context relevant interventions to combat malnutrition in this region of Tanzania and other similar settings.

  12. Body mass index and risk of liver cirrhosis in middle aged UK women: prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Balkwill, Angela; Reeves, Gillian; Beral, Valerie

    2010-01-01

    Objective To determine the relation between body mass index (BMI) and liver cirrhosis and the contribution that BMI and alcohol consumption make to the incidence of liver cirrhosis in middle aged women in the UK. Design Prospective cohort study (Million Women Study). Setting Women recruited from 1996 to 2001 in NHS breast screening centres and followed by record linkage to routinely collected information on hospital admissions and deaths. Participants 1 230 662 women (mean age 56 years at recruitment) followed for an average of 6.2 years. Main outcome measures Relative risk and absolute risk of first hospital admission with or death from liver cirrhosis adjusted for age, recruitment region, alcohol consumption, smoking, socioeconomic status, and physical activity. Results 1811 women had a first hospital admission with or died from liver cirrhosis during follow-up. Among women with a BMI of 22.5 or above, increasing BMI was associated with an increased incidence of liver cirrhosis: the adjusted relative risk of cirrhosis increased by 28% (relative risk 1.28, 95% confidence interval 1.19 to 1.38; P<0.001) for every 5 unit increase in BMI. Although the relative increase in the risk of liver cirrhosis per 5 unit increase in BMI did not differ significantly according to the amount of alcohol consumed, the absolute risk did. Among women who reported drinking less than 70 g alcohol per week, the absolute risk of liver cirrhosis per 1000 women over five years was 0.8 (0.7 to 0.9) for those with a BMI between 22.5 and 25 and 1.0 (0.9 to 1.2) for those with a BMI of 30 or more. Among women who reported drinking 150 g alcohol or more per week, the corresponding figures were 2.7 (2.1 to 3.4) and 5.0 (3.8 to 6.6). Conclusions Excess body weight increases the incidence of liver cirrhosis. In middle aged women in the UK, an estimated 17% of incident or fatal liver cirrhosis is attributable to excess body weight. This compares with an estimated 42% attributable to alcohol

  13. Prevalence and Risk Factors of Chronic Otitis Media: The Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2010–2012

    PubMed Central

    Park, Mina; Lee, Ji Sung; Lee, Jun Ho; Oh, Seung Ha; Park, Moo Kyun

    2015-01-01

    Background The performance of nationwide studies of chronic otitis media (COM) in adults has been insufficient in Korea. We evaluated the prevalence and risk factors of COM in Korea. Methods This study was conducted using data from the fifth Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (n = 23,621). After excluding the subjects under 20 year old and suffered from cancers, 16,063 patients were evaluated for COM. Participants underwent a medical interview, physical examination, endoscopic examination, and blood and urine test. COM was diagnosed by trained residents in the Department of Otorhinolaryngology using an ear, nose, and throat questionnaire and otoendoscopy findings. Data on the presence and absence of COM were collected. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed to identify its risk factors. Results Of the 16,063 participants aged above 20 year old, the weighted prevalence of COM was 3.8%. In the multivariate analyses, the following factors showed high odds ratios (ORs) for COM: pulmonary tuberculosis (adjusted OR, 1.78; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.06-3.01), chronic rhinosinusitis (adjusted OR, 1.87; 95% CI, 1.17-2.98), mild hearing impairment (adjusted OR, 1.95; 95% CI, 1.34-2.85), moderate hearing impairment (adjusted OR, 4.00; 95% CI, 2.21-7.22), tinnitus (adjusted OR, 1.82; 95% CI, 1.34-2.49), increased hearing thresholds in pure tone audiometry in the right ear (adjusted OR, 1.02; 95% CI, 1.01-1.03), and left ear (adjusted OR, 1.03; 95% CI, 1.02-1.04). The following factors showed low odds ratios for COM: hepatitis B (adjusted OR, 0.28; 95% CI, 0.08-0.94) and rhinitis (adjusted OR, 0.60; 95% CI, 0.42-0.88). In addition, high levels of vitamin D, lead, and cadmium, EQ-5D index; and low red blood cell counts were associated with development of COM (Student’s t-test, P < 0.01). Conclusions Our population-based study showed that COM is not rare in Korea, and its development may be associated with various host and

  14. Predictive Value of Triglyceride Glucose Index for the Risk of Incident Diabetes: A 4-Year Retrospective Longitudinal Study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Da Young; Lee, Eun Seo; Kim, Ji Hyun; Park, Se Eun; Park, Cheol-Young; Oh, Ki-Won; Park, Sung-Woo; Rhee, Eun-Jung; Lee, Won-Young

    The Triglyceride Glucose Index (TyG index) is considered a surrogate marker of insulin resistance. The aim of this study is to investigate whether the TyG index has a predictive role in identifying individuals with a high risk of incident diabetes and to compare it with other indicators of metabolic health. A total 2900 non-diabetic adults who attended five consecutive annual health check-ups at Kangbuk Samsung Hospital was divided into four subgroups using three methods: (1) baseline TyG index; (2) obesity status (body mass index ≥25 kg/m2) and cutoff value of TyG index; (3) obesity status and metabolic health, defined as having fewer than two of the five components of high blood pressure, fasting blood glucose, triglyceride, low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and highest decile of homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance. The development of diabetes was assessed annually using self-questionnaire, fasting glucose, and glycated hemoglobin. We compared the risk of incident diabetes using multivariate Cox analysis. During 11623 person-years there were 101 case of incident diabetes. Subjects with high TyG index had a high risk of diabetes. For TyG index quartiles, hazard ratios (HRs) of quartiles 3 and 4 were 4.06 (p = 0.033) and 5.65 (p = 0.006) respectively. When the subjects were divided by obesity status and cutoff value of TyG index of 8.8, the subgroups with TyG index ≥ 8.8 regardless of obesity had a significantly high risk for diabetes (HR 2.40 [p = 0.024] and 2.25 [p = 0.048]). For obesity status and metabolic health, the two metabolically unhealthy subgroups regardless of obesity had a significantly high risk for diabetes (HRs 2.54 [p = 0.024] and 2.73 [p = 0.021]). In conclusion, the TyG index measured at a single time point may be an indicator of the risk for incident diabetes. The predictive value of the TyG index was comparable to that of metabolic health.

  15. Changes in Body Mass Index and Obesity Risk in Married Couples Over 25 Years

    PubMed Central

    Cobb, Laura K.; McAdams-DeMarco, Mara A.; Gudzune, Kimberly A.; Anderson, Cheryl A. M.; Demerath, Ellen; Woodward, Mark; Selvin, Elizabeth; Coresh, Josef

    2016-01-01

    Married couples might be an appropriate target for obesity prevention interventions. In the present study, we aimed to evaluate whether an individual's risk of obesity is associated with spousal risk of obesity and whether an individual's change in body mass index (BMI; weight in kilograms divided by height in meters squared) is associated with spousal BMI change. We analyzed data from 3,889 spouse pairs in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study cohort who were sampled at ages 45–65 years from 1986 to 1989 and followed for up to 25 years. We estimated hazard ratios for incident obesity by whether spouses remained nonobese, became obese, remained obese, or became nonobese. We estimated the association of participants' BMI changes with concurrent spousal BMI changes using linear mixed models. Analyses were stratified by sex. At baseline, 22.6% of men and 24.7% of women were obese. Nonobese participants whose spouses became obese were more likely to become obese themselves (for men, hazard ratio = 1.78, 95% confidence interval: 1.30, 2.43; for women, hazard ratio = 1.89, 95% confidence interval: 1.39, 2.57). With each 1-unit increase in spousal BMI change, women's BMI change increased by 0.15 (95% confidence interval: 0.13, 0.18) and men's BMI change increased by 0.10 (95% confidence interval: 0.09, 0.12). Having a spouse become obese nearly doubles one's risk of becoming obese. Future research should consider exploring the efficacy of obesity prevention interventions in couples. PMID:26405117

  16. Risk of Mortality According to Body Mass Index and Body Composition Among Postmenopausal Women

    PubMed Central

    Bea, Jennifer W.; Thomson, Cynthia A.; Wertheim, Betsy C.; Nicholas, J. Skye; Ernst, Kacey C.; Hu, Chengcheng; Jackson, Rebecca D.; Cauley, Jane A.; Lewis, Cora E.; Caan, Bette; Roe, Denise J.; Chen, Zhao

    2015-01-01

    Obesity, often defined as a body mass index (BMI; weight (kg)/height (m)2) of 30 or higher, has been associated with mortality, but age-related body composition changes can be masked by stable BMI. A subset of Women's Health Initiative participants (postmenopausal women aged 50–79 years) enrolled between 1993 and 1998 who had received dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry scans for estimation of total body fat (TBF) and lean body mass (LBM) (n = 10,525) were followed for 13.6 (standard deviation, 4.6) years to test associations between BMI, body composition, and incident mortality. Overall, BMI ≥35 was associated with increased mortality (adjusted hazard ratio (HR) = 1.45, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.16, 1.82), while TBF and LBM were not. However, an interaction between age and body composition (P < 0.001) necessitated age stratification. Among women aged 50–59 years, higher %TBF increased risk of death (HR = 2.44, 95% CI: 1.38, 4.34) and higher %LBM decreased risk of death (HR = 0.41, 95% CI: 0.23, 0.74), despite broad-ranging BMIs (16.4–69.1). However, the relationships were reversed among women aged 70–79 years (P < 0.05). BMI did not adequately capture mortality risk in this sample of postmenopausal women. Our data suggest the clinical utility of evaluating body composition by age group to more robustly assess mortality risk among postmenopausal women. PMID:26350478

  17. Reducing Production Basis Risk through Rainfall Intensity Frequency (RIF) Indexes: Global Sensitivity Analysis' Implication on Policy Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muneepeerakul, Chitsomanus; Huffaker, Ray; Munoz-Carpena, Rafael

    2016-04-01

    The weather index insurance promises financial resilience to farmers struck by harsh weather conditions with swift compensation at affordable premium thanks to its minimal adverse selection and moral hazard. Despite these advantages, the very nature of indexing causes the presence of "production basis risk" that the selected weather indexes and their thresholds do not correspond to actual damages. To reduce basis risk without additional data collection cost, we propose the use of rain intensity and frequency as indexes as it could offer better protection at the lower premium by avoiding basis risk-strike trade-off inherent in the total rainfall index. We present empirical evidences and modeling results that even under the similar cumulative rainfall and temperature environment, yield can significantly differ especially for drought sensitive crops. We further show that deriving the trigger level and payoff function from regression between historical yield and total rainfall data may pose significant basis risk owing to their non-unique relationship in the insured range of rainfall. Lastly, we discuss the design of index insurance in terms of contract specifications based on the results from global sensitivity analysis.

  18. A basin scale risk assessment using a lotic ecosystem trophic index

    SciTech Connect

    Matlock, M.; Storm, D.; Henley, W.J.; Burks, S.L.

    1994-12-31

    Nutrient enrichment, specifically nitrogen and phosphorus, are principal contaminants to lotic ecosystems from agricultural nonpoint sources. Increased nutrient loading associated with human activity results in accelerated eutrophication of the lotic ecosystem. The authors have developed an in-situ method for estimating the primary productivity of a lotic ecosystem, determining the limiting nutrient at a given site, estimating the maximum potential productivity of a stream reach, and predicting the lotic ecosystem response to increased levels of specific nutrients. This method employs a quantifiable nutrient enrichment system based on passive diffusion across a semipermeable membrane. Using this system, the authors have monitored the trophic status of seven stream reaches within sensitive watersheds in the Upper Illinois River Basin in Oklahoma to determine the ecological risk posed by agricultural activities. The authors have developed a lotic ecosystem trophic status index based on the ratio of base-line primary productivity to maximum potential productivity. This trophic status index has been coupled with SIMPLE, a GIS-based terrestrial nutrient transport model, to link ecological effects with nonpoint sources of pollution.

  19. Obesity as Assessed by Body Adiposity Index and Multivariable Cardiovascular Disease Risk

    PubMed Central

    Dhaliwal, Satvinder S.; Welborn, Timothy A.; Goh, Louise G. H.; Howat, Peter A.

    2014-01-01

    To assess the role of body adiposity index (BAI) in predicting cardiovascular disease (CVD) and coronary heart disease (CHD) mortality, in comparison with body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC), and the waist circumference to hip circumference ratio (WHR). This study was a prospective 15 year mortality follow-up of 4175 Australian males, free of heart disease, diabetes and stroke. The Framingham Risk Scores (FRS) for CHD and CVD death were calculated at baseline for all subjects. Multivariable logistic regression was used to assess the effects of the measures of obesity on CVD and CHD mortality, before adjustment and after adjustment for FRS. The predictive ability of BAI, though present in the unadjusted analyses, was generally not significant after adjustment for age and FRS for both CVD and CHD mortality. BMI behaved similarly to BAI in that its predictive ability was generally not significant after adjustments. Both WC and WHR were significant predictors of CVD and CHD mortality and remained significant after adjustment for covariates. BAI appeared to be of potential interest as a measure of % body fat and of obesity, but was ineffective in predicting CVD and CHD. PMID:24714547

  20. Symposium on 'The challenge of translating nutrition research into public health nutrition'. Session 5: Nutrition communication. The challenge of effective food risk communication.

    PubMed

    McGloin, Aileen; Delaney, Liam; Hudson, Eibhlin; Wall, Pat

    2009-05-01

    A chronology of food scares combined with a rapid, unchecked, rise in lifestyle-related diseases such as obesity highlights the need for a focus on effective food risk communication. However, food risk communication is highly complex. Many factors will affect its success, including the demeanour and conduct of the source, its transparency, interaction with the public, acknowledgement of risks and timely disclosure. How the message is developed is also important in terms of language, style and pretesting with target audiences, as is the choice of appropriate channels for reaching target audiences. Finally, there are many personal factors that may affect risk perception such as previous experience, knowledge, attitudes and beliefs, personality, psychological factors and socio-demographic factors, many of which remain unexplored. While there is evidence that campaigns that communicate health risk have been associated with behaviour change in relation to major public health and safety issues in the past, it is unknown at this stage whether targeting risk information based on risk-perception segmentation can increase the effectiveness of the messages.

  1. Diminishing Risk for Age-Related Macular Degeneration with Nutrition: A Current View

    PubMed Central

    Schleicher, Molly; Weikel, Karen; Garber, Caren; Taylor, Allen

    2013-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness in the elderly. Clinical hallmarks of AMD are observed in one third of the elderly in industrialized countries. Preventative interventions through dietary modification are attractive strategies, because they are more affordable than clinical therapies, do not require specialists for administration and many studies suggest a benefit of micro- and macro-nutrients with respect to AMD with few, if any, adverse effects. The goal of this review is to provide information from recent literature on the value of various nutrients, particularly omega-3 fatty acids, lower glycemic index diets and, perhaps, some carotenoids, with regard to diminishing risk for onset or progression of AMD. Results from the upcoming Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS) II intervention trial should be particularly informative. PMID:23820727

  2. Glycemic index, glycemic load, dietary carbohydrate, and dietary fiber intake and risk of liver and biliary tract cancers in Western Europeans

    PubMed Central

    Fedirko, V.; Lukanova, A.; Bamia, C.; Trichopolou, A.; Trepo, E.; Nöthlings, U.; Schlesinger, S.; Aleksandrova, K.; Boffetta, P.; Tjønneland, A.; Johnsen, N. F.; Overvad, K.; Fagherazzi, G.; Racine, A.; Boutron-Ruault, M. C.; Grote, V.; Kaaks, R.; Boeing, H.; Naska, A.; Adarakis, G.; Valanou, E.; Palli, D.; Sieri, S.; Tumino, R.; Vineis, P.; Panico, S.; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. B(as).; Siersema, P. D.; Peeters, P. H.; Weiderpass, E.; Skeie, G.; Engeset, D.; Quirós, J. R.; Zamora-Ros, R.; Sánchez, M. J.; Amiano, P.; Huerta, J. M.; Barricarte, A.; Johansen, D.; Lindkvist, B.; Sund, M.; Werner, M.; Crowe, F.; Khaw, K. T.; Ferrari, P.; Romieu, I.; Chuang, S. C.; Riboli, E.; Jenab, M.

    2013-01-01

    Background The type and quantity of dietary carbohydrate as quantified by glycemic index (GI) and glycemic load (GL), and dietary fiber may influence the risk of liver and biliary tract cancers, but convincing evidence is lacking. Patients and methods The association between dietary GI/GL and carbohydrate intake with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC; N = 191), intrahepatic bile duct (IBD; N = 66), and biliary tract (N = 236) cancer risk was investigated in 477 206 participants of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition cohort. Dietary intake was assessed by country-specific, validated dietary questionnaires. Hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals were estimated from proportional hazard models. HBV/HCV status was measured in a nested case–control subset. Results Higher dietary GI, GL, or increased intake of total carbohydrate was not associated with liver or biliary tract cancer risk. For HCC, divergent risk estimates were observed for total sugar = 1.43 (1.17–1.74) per 50 g/day, total starch = 0.70 (0.55–0.90) per 50 g/day, and total dietary fiber = 0.70 (0.52–0.93) per 10 g/day. The findings for dietary fiber were confirmed among HBV/HCV-free participants [0.48 (0.23–1.01)]. Similar associations were observed for IBD [dietary fiber = 0.59 (0.37–0.99) per 10 g/day], but not biliary tract cancer. Conclusions Findings suggest that higher consumption of dietary fiber and lower consumption of total sugars are associated with lower HCC risk. In addition, high dietary fiber intake could be associated with lower IBD cancer risk. PMID:23123507

  3. Influence of glycemic index and glycemic load of the diet on the risk of overweight and adiposity in childhood

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Kellen Cristine; Nobre, Luciana Neri; Vicente, Sofia Emanuelle de Castro Ferreira; Moreira, Lidiane Lopes; Lessa, Angelina do Carmo; Lamounier, Joel Alves

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To investigate the association between the glycemic index and the glycemic load of the diet with the risk of overweight and high adiposity in children with 5 years of age. Methods: Cross-sectional study nested in a cohort of 232 children born and living in Diamantina (MG, Brazil). Parents and/or guardians provided the food intake data, using a semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire, past history and socioeconomic conditions. Anthropometric and fatness data were collected from the children. The dietary glycemic index and the glycemic load were calculated from the food intake. The glycemic index and glycemic load effect on overweight and adiposity in children was assessed by the Poisson regression (p<0.05). Results: The prevalence of overweight by body mass index was 17.3%, and high adiposity was observed in 3.4% and 6.9% by triceps skinfold and subscapular skinfold, respectively. No difference was reported between the mean body mass index, triceps skinfold and subscapular skinfold according to the glycemic index and glycemic load tertiles; however, the overweight group presented a higher carbohydrate intake (p=0.04). No association was found between glycemic index and glycemic load with overweight and adiposity among the children assessed. Conclusions: The glycemic index and glycemic load of the diet were not identified as risk factors for overweight and adiposity in this cross-sectional study. PMID:27215968

  4. Risk Factors and Disease Prevention. Nutrition in Health Promotion Series, Number 19.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roehrig, Karla L.

    Nutrition is well-recognized as a necessary component of educational programs for physicians. This is to be valued in that of all factors affecting health in the United States, none is more important than nutrition. This can be argued from various perspectives, including health promotion, disease prevention, and therapeutic management. In all…

  5. Body Mass Index and Risk of Pancreatic Cancer in a Chinese Population

    PubMed Central

    Untawale, Seema; Odegaard, Andrew O.; Koh, Woon-Puay; Jin, Ai Zhen; Yuan, Jian-Min; Anderson, Kristin E.

    2014-01-01

    Few studies have examined the association between body mass index (BMI: kg/m2) and pancreatic cancer risk in Asian populations. We examined this relationship in 51,251 Chinese men and women aged 45–74 who enrolled between 1993 and 1998 in the population based, prospective Singapore Chinese Health Study. Data were collected through in-person interviews. By December 31, 2011, 194 cohort participants had developed pancreatic cancer. A Cox proportional hazards model was used to estimate hazard ratios (HR) and their 95% confidence intervals (95% CI). We hypothesized the association between BMI and pancreatic cancer risk may vary by smoking status (ever v. never) and there was evidence for this as the interaction between BMI and smoking status was significant (p = 0.018). Among ever smokers, being classified as underweight (BMI <18.5 kg/m2), was associated with a significantly elevated risk of pancreatic cancer relative to smokers with a BMI of 21.5–24.4 kg/m2 (HR = 1.99, 95% CI  =  1.03–3.84). This association was strengthened after exclusion of the first three years of follow-up time. Among never smokers, there was no association between BMI and pancreatic cancer risk. However, after excluding pancreatic cancer cases and person-years in the first three years of follow-up, never smokers with a BMI ≥ 27.5 kg/m2 showed a suggestive increased risk of pancreatic cancer relative to never smokers with a BMI of 21.5–24.4 kg/m2 (HR  =  1.75, 95% CI  =  0.93–3.3). In conclusion, Singaporean Chinese who were underweight with a history of smoking had an increased risk of developing pancreatic cancer, whereas there was no significant association between BMI and pancreatic cancer in never smokers. PMID:24454807

  6. Frequency of nut consumption and mortality risk in the PREDIMED nutrition intervention trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Prospective studies in non-Mediterranean populations have consistently related increasing nut consumption to lower coronary heart disease mortality. A small protective effect on all-cause and cancer mortality has also been suggested. To examine the association between frequency of nut consumption and mortality in individuals at high cardiovascular risk from Spain, a Mediterranean country with a relatively high average nut intake per person. Methods We evaluated 7,216 men and women aged 55 to 80 years randomized to 1 of 3 interventions (Mediterranean diets supplemented with nuts or olive oil and control diet) in the PREDIMED (‘PREvención con DIeta MEDiterránea’) study. Nut consumption was assessed at baseline and mortality was ascertained by medical records and linkage to the National Death Index. Multivariable-adjusted Cox regression and multivariable analyses with generalized estimating equation models were used to assess the association between yearly repeated measurements of nut consumption and mortality. Results During a median follow-up of 4.8 years, 323 total deaths, 81 cardiovascular deaths and 130 cancer deaths occurred. Nut consumption was associated with a significantly reduced risk of all-cause mortality (P for trend <0.05, all). Compared to non-consumers, subjects consuming nuts >3 servings/week (32% of the cohort) had a 39% lower mortality risk (hazard ratio (HR) 0.61; 95% CI 0.45 to 0.83). A similar protective effect against cardiovascular and cancer mortality was observed. Participants allocated to the Mediterranean diet with nuts group who consumed nuts >3 servings/week at baseline had the lowest total mortality risk (HR 0.37; 95% CI 0.22 to 0.66). Conclusions Increased frequency of nut consumption was associated with a significantly reduced risk of mortality in a Mediterranean population at high cardiovascular risk. Please see related commentary: http://www.biomedcentral.com/1741-7015/11/165. Trial registration Clinicaltrials

  7. Utility of Braden Scale Nutrition Subscale Ratings as an Indicator of Dietary Intake and Weight Outcomes among Nursing Home Residents at Risk for Pressure Ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Kennerly, Susan; Boss, Lisa; Yap, Tracey L.; Batchelor-Murphy, Melissa; Horn, Susan D.; Barrett, Ryan; Bergstrom, Nancy

    2015-01-01

    The Braden Scale for Pressure Sore Risk© is a screening tool to determine overall risk of pressure ulcer development and estimate severity of specific risk factors for individual residents. Nurses often use the Braden nutrition subscale to screen nursing home (NH) residents for nutritional risk, and then recommend a more comprehensive nutritional assessment as indicated. Secondary data analysis from the Turn for Ulcer ReductioN (TURN) study’s investigation of U.S. and Canadian NH residents (n = 690) considered at moderate or high pressure ulcer (PrU) risk was used to evaluate the subscale’s utility for identifying nutritional intake risk factors. Associations were examined between Braden Nutritional Risk subscale screening, dietary intake (mean % meal intake and by meal timing, mean number of protein servings, protein sources, % intake of supplements and snacks), weight outcomes, and new PrU incidence. Of moderate and high PrU risk residents, 61.9% and 59.2% ate a mean meal % of <75. Fewer than 18% overall ate <50% of meals or refused meals. No significant differences were observed in weight differences by nutrition subscale risk or in mean number protein servings per meal (1.4 (SD = 0.58) versus 1.3 (SD = 0.53)) for moderate versus high PrU risk residents. The nutrition subscale approximates subsequent estimated dietary intake and can provide insight into meal intake patterns for those at either moderate or high PrU risk. Findings support the Braden Scale’s use as a preliminary screening method to identify focused areas for potential intervention. PMID:27417802

  8. Environmental risk assessment of pharmaceuticals in rivers: relationships between hazard indexes and aquatic macroinvertebrate diversity indexes in the Llobregat River (NE Spain).

    PubMed

    Ginebreda, Antoni; Muñoz, Isabel; de Alda, Miren López; Brix, Rikke; López-Doval, Julio; Barceló, Damià

    2010-02-01

    Continuous input of pharmaceuticals into rivers, through wastewater treatment systems, may cause adverse effects on the aquatic ecosystems of the receiving waterbodies, due to the intrinsic biological activity of these compounds. To investigate this issue, we have carried out an Environmental Risk Assessment in the lower part of the Llobregat River basin (NE Spain). The survey was carried out along three campaigns in 7 sampling points, located in the main river and in one of its tributaries (Anoia River). In each sample, 29 commonly used pharmaceuticals, belonging to different therapeutical classes (analgesics and non-steroidal anti-inflammatories (NSAIDs), lipid regulators, psychiatric drugs, anti-histamines, anti-ulcer agents, antibiotics and beta-blockers) have been determined. Simultaneously, the macroinvertebrate community status of the same points has been also studied. Hazard quotient indexes have been estimated for the most representative compounds as the ratio between concentrations and EC(50) reported values, for three bioassays commonly used in environmental toxicology, namely, fish, Daphnia and algae. Hazard indexes are obtained for each sample by summing up the hazard quotients of all the compounds present, and taking its average along the three sampling campaigns. In general, hazard quotients tend to increase when going downstream. Only those points located most upstream of the two rivers can be qualified under low risk for the three bioassays. The most sensitive bioassay seems to be algae, followed by Daphnia and fish. Log-transformed hazard indexes show fairly good inverse correlations (r=-0.58 to -0.93, p<0.05) with Shannon diversity indexes of macroinvertebrates, determined from both densities and biomasses. Best correlations are obtained for Daphnia based hazard indexes, as expected from its taxonomical proximity to macroinvertebrates. The abnormal correlation behaviour found in one point located in the Anoia River is explained by the presence of

  9. Husband's preference for a son and women's nutrition: examining the role of actual and desired family composition on women's anaemia and body mass index in India.

    PubMed

    Sabarwal, Shagun; Subramanian, S V; McCormick, Marie C; Silverman, Jay G

    2012-01-01

    This study examines the relationship between the husband's preference for a son, sex composition of children and risk of anaemia and underweight among married Indian women. Information was collected regarding 29,517 couples having at least one child in the nationally representative 2005-06 National Family Health Survey of India. The exposures were husband's preference for a son and sex composition of children: sons only, daughters only and mixed. Outcome included maternal underweight and moderate/severe anaemia. Husband's preference for a son was not found to be associated with his wife's risk of anaemia or underweight. Sex composition of the children was modestly associated with increased odds of anaemia among women from households with daughters only as compared with those with sons only [AOR: 1.19; 95% CI 1.04, 1.35]. The findings from this population-based study of socio-cultural norms around preference for a son and married Indian women's nutritional status do not support the hypothesis that husband's preference for sons influences the nutritional status of their wives. However, having daughters only is associated with maternal anaemia for reasons that remain to be established.

  10. Body mass index, serum total cholesterol, and risk of gastric high-grade dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ya-Kai; Kang, Wei-Ming; Ma, Zhi-Qiang; Liu, Yu-Qin; Zhou, Li; Yu, Jian-Chun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Obesity is related to an increased risk of gastric cardia cancer. However, the influences of excess body weight and serum total cholesterol on the risk of gastric high-grade dysplasia have not been fully characterized. A case–control study was conducted to explore the relationships between body mass index (BMI), serum total cholesterol level, and the risk of gastric high-grade dysplasia in Chinese adults. A total of 893 consecutive patients with gastric high-grade dysplasia (537 men and 356 women) and 902 controls (543 men and 359 women) were enrolled from January 2000 to October 2015. Odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated, and a multivariate analysis was conducted. After adjusting for age, alcohol consumption, smoking status, family history of gastric cancer or esophageal cancer, and serum total cholesterol level, a BMI ranging from 27.5 to 29.9 was significantly related to an increased risk of gastric high-grade dysplasia in both men (adjusted OR = 1.87, 95% CI = 1.24–2.81) and women (adjusted OR = 2.72, 95% CI = 1.44–5.16). The 2 highest BMI categories (27.5–29.9 and ≥30.0) were identified as risk factors for gastric cardia high-grade dysplasia in both men (BMI = 27.5–29.9: adjusted OR = 1.78, 95% CI = 1.02–3.10; BMI ≥ 30.0: adjusted OR = 2.54, 95% CI = 1.27–5.08) and women (BMI = 27.5–29.9: adjusted OR = 2.88, 95% CI = 1.27–6.55; BMI ≥ 30.0: adjusted OR = 2.77, 95% CI = 1.36–5.64), whereas only a BMI ranging from 27.5 to 29.9 was a risk factor for gastric noncardia high-grade dysplasia in both men (adjusted OR = 1.98, 95% CI = 1.25–3.14) and women (adjusted OR = 2.88, 95% CI = 1.43–5.81). In addition, higher serum total cholesterol was associated with an increased risk of gastric noncardia high-grade dysplasia (adjusted OR = 1.83, 95% CI = 1.25–2.69) in women. Increased BMI was associated with an increased risk

  11. An electrophysiological index of changes in risk decision-making strategies

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Dandan; Gu, Ruolei; Wu, Tingting; Broster, Lucas S.; Luo, Yi; Jiang, Yang; Luo, Yue-jia

    2014-01-01

    Human decision-making is significantly modulated by previously experienced outcomes. Using event-related potentials (ERPs), we examined whether ERP components evoked by outcome feedbacks could serve as biomarkers to signal the influence of current outcome evaluation on subsequent decision-making. In this study, eighteen adult volunteers participated in a simple monetary gambling task, in which they were asked to choose between two options that differed in risk. Their decisions were immediately followed by outcome presentation. Temporospatial principle component analysis (PCA) was applied to the outcome-onset locked ERPs in the -200 – 1000 ms time window. The PCA factors that approximated classical ERP components (P2, feedback-related negativity, P3a, & P3b) in terms of time course and scalp distribution were tested for their association with subsequent decision-making strategies. Our results revealed that a fronto-central PCA factor approximating the classical P3a was related to changes of decision-making strategies on subsequent trials. The decision to switch between high- and low-risk options resulted in a larger P3a relative to the decision to retain the same choice. According to the results, we suggest the amplitude of the fronto-central P3a is an electrophysiological index of the influence of current outcome on subsequent risk decision-making. Furthermore, the ERP source analysis indicated that the activations of the frontopolar cortex and sensorimotor cortex were involved in subsequent changes of strategies, which enriches our understanding of the neural mechanisms of adjusting decision-making strategies based on previous experience. PMID:23643796

  12. Body mass index predicts major bleeding risks in patients on warfarin.

    PubMed

    Ogunsua, Adedotun A; Touray, Sunkaru; Lui, Justin K; Ip, Tiffany; Escobar, Jorge V; Gore, Joel

    2015-11-01

    Despite the lack of an optimum dosing strategy in obese patients, warfarin remains the most commonly used anticoagulant. Body mass index (BMI) >30 has been linked to increased time to obtain a therapeutic international normalized ratio on initiation of warfarin as well as higher maintenance dose. Despite higher dosage requirements, few studies have examined the relationship between warfarin and bleeding events in obese individuals. We examined the performance of BMI in predicting the incidence of bleeding at an anticoagulation clinic (ACC) over a 1 year period. Eight hundred and sixty-three patients followed in the ACC over a 1 year period were evaluated for bleeds in relation to BMI [defined as weight (kg)/height (m(2))]. Seventy-one of the 863 patients had a bleeding event (8.2 %); mean age 69.5 years and 44 % females. BMI categories were normal weight (21 %), overweight (38 %), obese class I (21 %), II (9 %), and III (11.3 %), respectively. Prevalence of major and minor bleeding events were 4.4 and 3.8 %, respectively. In univariate analyses, hazard ratio (HR) for major bleeding risks increases with higher obesity categories (HR 1.3, 1.85, and 1.93 for classes I, II, III, respectively). In multivariable adjusted model obesity classes II and III significantly increased the risk of major bleeds (HR 1.84, p < 0.001). Bleeding risk is higher in obese compared to normal weight individuals who are on warfarin. These results suggests that BMI plays a role in bleeding events in patients on warfarin.

  13. An electrophysiological index of changes in risk decision-making strategies.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dandan; Gu, Ruolei; Wu, Tingting; Broster, Lucas S; Luo, Yi; Jiang, Yang; Luo, Yue-jia

    2013-07-01

    Human decision-making is significantly modulated by previously experienced outcomes. Using event-related potentials (ERPs), we examined whether ERP components evoked by outcome feedbacks could serve as biomarkers to signal the influence of current outcome evaluation on subsequent decision-making. In this study, 18 adult volunteers participated in a simple monetary gambling task, in which they were asked to choose between two options that differed in risk. Their decisions were immediately followed by outcome presentation. Temporospatial principle component analysis (PCA) was applied to the outcome-onset locked ERPs in the 200-1000 ms time window. The PCA factors that approximated classical ERP components (P2, feedback-related negativity, P3a, and P3b) in terms of time course and scalp distribution were tested for their association with subsequent decision-making strategies. Our results revealed that a fronto-central PCA factor approximating the classical P3a was related to changes of decision-making strategies on subsequent trials. The decision to switch between high- and low-risk options resulted in a larger P3a relative to the decision to retain the same choice. According to the results, we suggest that the amplitude of the fronto-central P3a is an electrophysiological index of the influence of current outcome on subsequent risk decision-making. Furthermore, the ERP source analysis indicated that the activations of the frontopolar cortex and sensorimotor cortex were involved in subsequent changes of strategies, which enriches our understanding of the neural mechanisms of adjusting decision-making strategies based on previous experience.

  14. Body Mass Index and the Risk of Dementia among Louisiana Low Income Diabetic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Gang; Horswell, Ronald; Wang, Yujie; Li, Wei; Besse, Jay; Xiao, Ke; Chen, Honglei; Keller, Jeffrey N.; Heymsfield, Steven B.; Ryan, Donna H.; Katzmarzyk, Peter T.

    2012-01-01

    Background The association between obesity and dementia risk remains debatable and no studies have assessed this association among diabetic patients. The aim of our study was to investigate the association between body mass index (BMI) and dementia risk among middle and low income diabetic patients. Methodology/Principal Findings The sample included 44,660 diabetic patients (19,618 white and 25,042 African American) 30 to 96 years of age without a history of dementia in the Louisiana State University Hospital-Based Longitudinal Study. During a mean follow-up period of 3.9 years, 388 subjects developed incident dementia. The age- and sex-adjusted hazards ratios (HRs) for incident dementia at different levels of BMI (≤25, 25–26.9, 27–29.9, 30–34.9, and ≥35 kg/m2) were 1.00, 0.53 (95% CI 0.34–0.83), 0.29 (0.18–0.45), 0.37 (0.25–0.56), and 0.31 (0.21–0.48) (Ptrend<0.001) in white diabetic patients, and 1.00, 1.00 (95% CI 0.62–1.63), 0.62 (0.39–0.98), 0.56 (0.36–0.86), and 0.65 (0.43–1.01) (Ptrend = 0.029) in African American diabetic patients. Further adjustment for other confounding factors affected the results only slightly. There was a significant interaction between race and BMI on dementia risk (χ2 = 5.52, 1df, p<0.025), such that the association was stronger in white patients. In stratified analyses, the multivariate-adjusted inverse association between BMI and risk of dementia was present in subjects aged 55–64 years, 65–74 years, and ≥75 years, in men and women, in non-smokers and smokers, and in subjects with different types of health insurance. Conclusions/Significance Higher baseline BMI was associated with a lower risk of dementia among diabetic patients, and this association was stronger among white than among African American diabetic patients. PMID:22957079

  15. Using bispectral index and cerebral oximetry to guide hemodynamic therapy in high-risk surgical patients.

    PubMed

    Bidd, Heena; Tan, Audrey; Green, David

    2013-05-19

    High-risk surgery represents 12.5% of cases but contributes 80% of deaths in the elderly population. Reduction in morbidity and mortality by the use of intervention strategies could result in thousands of lives being saved and savings of up to £400m per annum in the UK. This has resulted in the drive towards goal-directed therapy and intraoperative flow optimization of high-risk surgical patients being advocated by authorities such as the National Institute of Health and Care Excellence and the Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland.Conventional intraoperative monitoring gives little insight into the profound physiological changes occurring as a result of anesthesia and surgery. The build-up of an oxygen debt is associated with a poor outcome and strategies have been developed in the postoperative period to improve outcomes by repayment of this debt. New monitoring technologies such as minimally invasive cardiac output, depth of anesthesia and cerebral oximetry can minimize oxygen debt build-up. This has the potential to reduce complications and lessen the need for postoperative optimization in high-dependency areas.Flow monitoring has thus emerged as essential during intraoperative monitoring in high-risk surgery. However, evidence suggests that current optimization strategies of deliberately increasing flow to meet predefined targets may not reduce mortality.Could the addition of depth of anesthesia and cerebral and tissue oximetry monitoring produce a further improvement in outcomes?Retrospective studies indicate a combination of excessive depth of anesthesia hypotension and low anesthesia requirement results in increased mortality and length of hospital stay.Near infrared technology allows assessment and maintenance of cerebral and tissue oxygenation, a strategy, which has been associated with improved outcomes. The suggestion that the brain is an index organ for tissue oxygenation, especially in the elderly, indicates a role for this

  16. [Community nutrition].

    PubMed

    Aranceta Bartrina, J; Pérez Rodrigo, C; Serra Majem, L I

    2006-01-01

    A growing body of scientific and epidemiological evidence indicates that diet and health are related: diet may be a risk factor or have potential protective effects. As a consequence, the focus of nutrition research has experienced a shift towards qualitative aspects of diet which could influence chronic disease, longevity, quality of life and physical and cognitive performance, leading to the development of Community Nutrition. The main undertakings in a Community Nutrition Unit are related to the identification, assessment and monitoring of nutrition problems at the community level and to planning, design, implementation and evaluation of nutrition intervention programs. Such programs combine a number of suitable strategies in a whole population approach, a high risk approach or an approach targeted at specific population groups, and are implemented in different settings, such as the work place, schools or community organizations. Community nutrition interventions aim to gradually achieve change in eating patterns towards a healthier profile. Community Nutrition programs require the use of a combination of strategies and a working group of people from different backgrounds. Many factors influence the nutritional status of an individual or a population. In order to gain effective work output, sound understanding of these patterns and a practical surveillance system are required.

  17. Effects of Maternal Nutrition, Resource Use and Multi-Predator Risk on Neonatal White-Tailed Deer Survival

    PubMed Central

    Duquette, Jared F.; Belant, Jerrold L.; Svoboda, Nathan J.; Beyer, Dean E.; Lederle, Patrick E.

    2014-01-01

    Growth of ungulate populations is typically most sensitive to survival of neonates, which in turn is influenced by maternal nutritional condition and trade-offs in resource selection and avoidance of predators. We assessed whether resource use, multi-predator risk, maternal nutritional effects, hiding cover, or interactions among these variables best explained variation in daily survival of free-ranging neonatal white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) during their post-partum period (14 May–31 Aug) in Michigan, USA. We used Cox proportional hazards mixed-effects models to assess survival related to covariates of resource use, composite predation risk of 4 mammalian predators, fawn body mass at birth, winter weather, and vegetation growth phenology. Predation, particularly from coyotes (Canis latrans), was the leading cause of mortality; however, an additive model of non-ideal resource use and maternal nutritional effects explained 71% of the variation in survival. This relationship suggested that dams selected areas where fawns had poor resources, while greater predation in these areas led to additive mortalities beyond those related to resource use alone. Also, maternal nutritional effects suggested that severe winters resulted in dams producing smaller fawns, which decreased their likelihood of survival. Fawn resource use appeared to reflect dam avoidance of lowland forests with poor forage and greater use by wolves (C. lupus), their primary predator. While this strategy led to greater fawn mortality, particularly by coyotes, it likely promoted the life-long reproductive success of dams because many reached late-age (>10 years old) and could have produced multiple generations of fawns. Studies often link resource selection and survival of ungulates, but our results suggested that multiple factors can mediate that relationship, including multi-predator risk. We emphasize the importance of identifying interactions among biological and environmental factors

  18. Effects of maternal nutrition, resource use and multi-predator risk on neonatal white-tailed deer survival.

    PubMed

    Duquette, Jared F; Belant, Jerrold L; Svoboda, Nathan J; Beyer, Dean E; Lederle, Patrick E

    2014-01-01

    Growth of ungulate populations is typically most sensitive to survival of neonates, which in turn is influenced by maternal nutritional condition and trade-offs in resource selection and avoidance of predators. We assessed whether resource use, multi-predator risk, maternal nutritional effects, hiding cover, or interactions among these variables best explained variation in daily survival of free-ranging neonatal white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) during their post-partum period (14 May-31 Aug) in Michigan, USA. We used Cox proportional hazards mixed-effects models to assess survival related to covariates of resource use, composite predation risk of 4 mammalian predators, fawn body mass at birth, winter weather, and vegetation growth phenology. Predation, particularly from coyotes (Canis latrans), was the leading cause of mortality; however, an additive model of non-ideal resource use and maternal nutritional effects explained 71% of the variation in survival. This relationship suggested that dams selected areas where fawns had poor resources, while greater predation in these areas led to additive mortalities beyond those related to resource use alone. Also, maternal nutritional effects suggested that severe winters resulted in dams producing smaller fawns, which decreased their likelihood of survival. Fawn resource use appeared to reflect dam avoidance of lowland forests with poor forage and greater use by wolves (C. lupus), their primary predator. While this strategy led to greater fawn mortality, particularly by coyotes, it likely promoted the life-long reproductive success of dams because many reached late-age (>10 years old) and could have produced multiple generations of fawns. Studies often link resource selection and survival of ungulates, but our results suggested that multiple factors can mediate that relationship, including multi-predator risk. We emphasize the importance of identifying interactions among biological and environmental factors when

  19. Be Well: results of a nutrition, exercise, and weight management intervention among at-risk older adults.

    PubMed

    Kogan, Alexis Coulourides; Gonzalez, Jorge; Hart, Bonita; Halloran, Skip; Thomason, Brenda; Levine, Morgan; Enguidanos, Susan

    2013-10-01

    The objective of this article is to test the effectiveness of a multifaceted exercise and nutritional education intervention for chronically ill, community-dwelling older adults. A pre/post cohort design was implemented with measures of physical activity, fitness, depression, and anthropometry collected via 4-month in-person interview and telephone follow-up. The study was conducted at two community-based senior centers in the Los Angeles area and participants (n=62) were older adults aged 60 or older, with multiple chronic conditions, with one or more emergency department visits or hospital admissions in the previous 6 months, and at nutritionally moderate to high risk. The intervention was a fitness program providing nutritional counseling, low-impact exercise, and weight management. Results revealed significant improvements for hours of weekly exercise (Z = -4.3, p < .001), daily walking distance (Z = -5.7, p < .001), performance on fitness tests, depression (Z = 3.9, p < .001), and body measurements were observed. Findings speak to the healthy benefits of exercise and good nutrition as possible alternatives or adjuncts to pharmacotherapy for weight loss and depression.

  20. High tendency to the substantial concern on body shape and eating disorders risk of the students majoring Nutrition or Sport Sciences

    PubMed Central

    Bilgiç, Pelin; Yabancı, Nurcan

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES Studies have indicated that university students majoring in nutrition and dietetics or sport sciences may have more obsessions associated with eating attitudes and body shape perception compared to other disciplines i.e. social sciences. Therefore, this study aimed to assess and compare the risk of eating disorders and body shape perception. MATERIALS/METHODS Data was collected from 773 undergraduate students at the Departments of Nutrition and Dietetics (NDD) (n = 254), Physical Education and Sports (PESD) (n = 263), and Social Sciences (SOC) (n = 256).A socio-demographic and personal information questionnaire, Eating Attitudes Test (EAT-40), Body Shape Questionnaire (BSQ-34), Perceived Figure Rating Scale (FRS) were applied; and body weights and heights were measured. RESULTS Mean EAT-40 scores showed that, both male and female students of PESD had the highest scores (17.4 ± 11.6) compared with NDD (14.3 ± 8.3) and SOC (13.0 ± 6.2) (P < 0.05). According to EAT-40 classification, high risk in abnormal eating behavior was more in PESD (10.7%) compared to NDD (2.9%) and SOC (0.4%) students (P < 0.05). Students of PESD, who skipped meal, had higher tendency to the risk of eating disorders (P < 0.05). In parallel, body shape perception was found to be marked with higher scores in NDD (72.0 ± 28.7) and PESD (71.5 ± 32.8) compared with SOC (64.2 ± 27.5) students (P < 0.05). Considering BSQ-34 classification, high concern (moderate and marked) for body shape were more in PESD (7.4 %) compared to NDD (5.2%) and SOC (1.9%) students (P < 0.05). The body size judgement via obtained by the FRS scale were generally correlated with BMI. The Body Mass Index levels were in normal range (Mean BMI: 21.9 ± 2.8 kg/m2) and generally consistent with FRS data. CONCLUSIONS Tendency to the abnormal eating behavior and substantial body shape perception were higher in PESD students who have more concern on body shape and were not well-educated about nutrition

  1. Nutritional quality of legumes, and their role in cardiometabolic risk prevention: a review.

    PubMed

    Bouchenak, Malika; Lamri-Senhadji, Myriem

    2013-03-01

    of the nutritional quality of legumes and their potential contribution in cardiometabolic risk prevention.

  2. [Nutrition and life style in the elderly - risk factors and recommendations].

    PubMed

    Antal, Magda; Regöly-Mérei, Andrea

    2011-01-30

    Demographic data appear to demonstrate an increase in the number and ratio of elderly world-wide. Authors give a short survey on physiological alterations occurring at older age, on methods suitable for assessing nutritional status and criticism thereof. Nutritional and life style habits are also discussed. Prevalence of obesity and undernutrition and their sequelae are likewise presented. Diagnosis of undernutrition by using questionnaire can significantly improve the efficiency of family doctors' activity. Authors provide recommendations for improving nutrition and life style in healthy persons with optimal body mass, and for obese and undernourished subjects.

  3. El Niño-Southern Oscillation-based index insurance for floods: Statistical risk analyses and application to Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalil, Abedalrazq F.; Kwon, Hyun-Han; Lall, Upmanu; Miranda, Mario J.; Skees, Jerry

    2007-10-01

    Index insurance has recently been advocated as a useful risk transfer tool for disaster management situations where rapid fiscal relief is desirable and where estimating insured losses may be difficult, time consuming, or subject to manipulation and falsification. For climate-related hazards, a rainfall or temperature index may be proposed. However, rainfall may be highly spatially variable relative to the gauge network, and in many locations, data are inadequate to develop an index because of short time series and the spatial dispersion of stations. In such cases, it may be helpful to consider a climate proxy index as a regional rainfall index. This is particularly useful if a long record is available for the climate index through an independent source and it is well correlated with the regional rainfall hazard. Here El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) related climate indices are explored for use as a proxy to extreme rainfall in one of the districts of Peru, Piura. The ENSO index insurance product may be purchased by banks or microfinance institutions to aid agricultural damage relief in Peru. Crop losses in the region are highly correlated with floods but are difficult to assess directly. Beyond agriculture, many other sectors suffer as well. Basic infrastructure is destroyed during the most severe events. This disrupts trade for many microenterprises. The reliability and quality of the local rainfall data are variable. Averaging the financial risk across the region is desirable. Some issues with the implementation of the proxy ENSO index are identified and discussed. Specifically, we explore (1) the reliability of the index at different levels of probability of exceedance of maximum seasonal rainfall, (2) the effect of sampling uncertainties and the strength of the proxy's association to local outcome, (3) the potential for clustering of payoffs, (4) the potential that the index could be predicted with some lead time prior to the flood season, and (5) evidence

  4. Redefining high-risk patients with stage II colon cancer by risk index and microRNA-21: results from a population-based cohort

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, T F; Kjær-Frifeldt, S; Christensen, R D; Morgenthaler, S; Blondal, T; Lindebjerg, J; Sørensen, F B; Jakobsen, A

    2014-01-01

    Background: The aim of the present study was to analyse the prognostic value of microRNA-21 (miRNA-21) in patients with stage II colon cancer aiming at a risk index for this group of patients. Methods: A population-based cohort of 554 patients was included. MicroRNA-21 was analysed by qPCR based on tumour tissue. An index was created using the coefficients obtained from a collective multiple Cox regression. The entire procedure was cross-validated (10-fold). The performance of the index was quantified by time-dependent receiver operating characteristics curves. Results: High miRNA-21 expression was associated with an unfavourable recurrence-free cancer-specific survival (RF-CSS), hazard ratio 1.35 (95% confidence interval, 1.03–1.76) (P=0.028). The generated RF-CSS index divided the traditional high-risk patients into subgroups with 5-year RF-CSS rates of 87% and 73%, respectively (P<0.001). The overall survival (OS) index identified three different subgroups (P<0.001). Cross-validated 5-year OS rates were 88%, 68%, and 50%, respectively. Conclusions: This population-based study supports miRNA-21 as an additional prognostic biomarker in patients with stage II colon cancer. Furthermore, the introduction of a risk index may guide the use of postoperative adjuvant treatment in a more appropriate way compared with current practice. PMID:25051407

  5. Prediagnostic circulating concentrations of plasma insulin‐like growth factor‐I and risk of lymphoma in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition

    PubMed Central

    Appleby, Paul N.; Tipper, Sarah; Key, Timothy J.; Allen, Naomi E.; Nieters, Alexandra; Vermeulen, Roel; Roulland, Sandrine; Casabonne, Delphine; Kaaks, Rudolf; Fortner, Renee T.; Boeing, Heiner; Trichopoulou, Antonia; La Vecchia, Carlo; Klinaki, Eleni; Hansen, Louise; Tjønneland, Anne; Bonnet, Fabrice; Fagherazzi, Guy; Boutron‐Ruault, Marie‐Christine; Pala, Valeria; Masala, Giovanna; Sacerdote, Carlotta; Peeters, Petra H.; Bueno‐de‐Mesquita, H. B(as); Weiderpass, Elisabete; Dorronsoro, Miren; Quirós, J. Ramón; Barricarte, Aurelio; Gavrila, Diana; Agudo, Antonio; Borgquist, Signe; Rosendahl, Ann H.; Melin, Beatrice; Wareham, Nick; Khaw, Kay‐Tee; Gunter, Marc; Riboli, Elio; Vineis, Paolo; Travis, Ruth C.

    2016-01-01

    Insulin‐like growth factor (IGF)‐I has cancer promoting activities. However, the hypothesis that circulating IGF‐I concentration is related to risk of lymphoma overall or its subtypes has not been examined prospectively. IGF‐I concentration was measured in pre‐diagnostic plasma samples from a nested case–control study of 1,072 cases of lymphoid malignancies and 1,072 individually matched controls from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition. Odds ratios (ORs) and confidence intervals (CIs) for lymphoma were calculated using conditional logistic regression. IGF‐I concentration was not associated with overall lymphoma risk (multivariable‐adjusted OR for highest versus lowest third = 0.77 [95% CI = 0.57–1.03], p trend = 0.06). There was no statistical evidence of heterogeneity in this association with IGF‐I by sex, age at blood collection, time between blood collection and diagnosis, age at diagnosis, or body mass index (p heterogeneity for all ≥ 0.05). There were no associations between IGF‐I concentration and risk for specific BCL subtypes, T‐cell lymphoma or Hodgkin lymphoma, although number of cases were small. In this European population, IGF‐I concentration was not associated with risk of overall lymphoma. This study provides the first prospective evidence on circulating IGF‐I concentrations and risk of lymphoma. Further prospective data are required to examine associations of IGF‐I concentrations with lymphoma subtypes. PMID:27870006

  6. Definition and GIS-based characterization of an integral risk index applied to a chemical/petrochemical area.

    PubMed

    Nadal, Martí; Kumar, Vikas; Schuhmacher, Marta; Domingo, José L

    2006-08-01

    A risk map of the chemical/petrochemical industrial area of Tarragona (Catalonia, Spain) was designed following a two-stage procedure. The first step was the creation of a ranking system (Hazard Index) for a number of different inorganic and organic pollutants: heavy metals, polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and polychlorinated aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) by applying self-organizing maps (SOM) to persistence, bioaccumulation and toxicity properties of the chemicals. PCBs seemed to be the most hazardous compounds, while the light PAHs showed the minimum values. Subsequently, an Integral Risk Index was developed taking into account the Hazard Index and the concentrations of all pollutants in soil samples collected in the assessed area of Tarragona. Finally, a risk map was elaborated by representing the spatial distribution of the Integral Risk Index with a geographic information system (GIS). The results of the present study seem to indicate that the development of an integral risk map might be useful to help in making-decision processes concerning environmental pollutants.

  7. Alzheimer,s Disease Risk and Progression: The Role of Nutritional Supplements and their Effect on Drug Therapy Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Giulietti, A.; Vignini, A.; Nanetti, L.; Mazzanti, L.; Primio, R. Di; Salvolini, E.

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common neurodegenerative disease in the elderly population. Despite significant advancements in understanding the genetic and molecular basis of AD, the pathology still lacks treatments that can slow down or reverse the progression of cognitive deterioration. Recently, the relationship between nutrient deficiency and dementia onset has been highlighted. AD is in fact a multifactorial pathology, so that a multi-target approach using combinations of micronutrients and drugs could have beneficial effects on cognitive function in neurodegenerative brain disorders leading to synaptic degeneration. Primarily, this review examines the most recent literature regarding the effects of nutrition on the risk/progression of the disease, focusing attention mostly on antioxidants agents, polyunsaturated fatty acids and metals. Secondly, it aims to figure out if nutritional supplements might have beneficial effects on drug therapy outcome. Even if nutritional supplements showed contrasting evidence of a likely effect of decreasing the risk of AD onset that could be studied more deeply in other clinical trials, no convincing data are present about their usefulness in combination with drug therapies and their effectiveness in slowing down the disease progression. PMID:26415975

  8. Differentiating the associations of waist circumference and body mass index with cardiovascular disease risk in a Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Li, Rui; Shi, Liang; Jia, Jian; Li, Yanyun; Yang, Qundi; Ruan, Ye; Chen, Renjie; Kan, Haidong

    2015-03-01

    It is not known which obesity index best explains variations in cardiovascular disease risk across populations. The objective of this study was to differentiate the associations of waist circumference (WC) and body mass index (BMI) with cardiovascular disease risk in a Chinese population. Cardiovascular risk factors, WC, and BMI were measured in 13 817 adults aged more than 18 years in Shanghai. Higher WC tertiles were associated with higher blood pressure and higher cholesterol, triacylglycerol, and glucose concentrations within each tertile of BMI and vice versa. The odds ratios (ORs) of hypertension, dyslipidemia, and metabolic syndrome increased with successive WC (or BMI) tertiles after adjustment for BMI (or WC) and several covariates. However, BMI tertiles were not associated with the ORs of diabetes after adjustment for WC. WC may be better than BMI as an alternative measure of body fatness or fat distribution for predicting diabetic risks in Chinese adults.

  9. Individualized nutritional recommendations: do we have the measurements needed to assess risk and make dietary recommendations?

    PubMed

    Arab, Lenore

    2004-02-01

    Is the information currently available to adjust nutritional recommendations and develop individualized nutrition? No. There is not even the information needed for setting dietary recommendations with confidence now at the group level. Will it be available soon? The answer to this question depends on the drive and will of the nutritional community, the success in recruiting funding to the area, the education of nutritionists and the spawning of great ideas and approaches. The emerging tools of genomics, proteomics and metabolomics are enabling the in-depth study of relationships between diet, genetics and metabolism. The advent of technologies can be compared with the discovery of the microscope and the new dimensions of scientific visualization enabled by that discovery. Nutritionists stand at the crest of new waves of data that can be generated, and new methods for their digestion will be required. To date, the study of dietary requirements has been based largely on a black box approach. Subjects are supplemented or depleted and clinical outcomes are observed. Few recommendations are based on metabolic outcomes. Metabolomics and nutrigenomics promise tools with which recommendations can be refined to meet individual requirements and the potential of individualized nutrition can be explored. As yet, these tools are not being widely applied in nutritional research and are rarely being applied by nutritionists. The result is often interesting research that is frequently nutritionally flawed, resulting in inappropriate conclusions. Nutritional education is needed to put nutritionists at the forefront of the development of applications for these technologies, creating a generation of nutrigenomicists. A new generation of nutritionists should be working interdisciplinarily with geneticists, molecular biologists and bioinformaticians in the development of research strategies. The present paper reviews the current status of nutrigenomic research, the current

  10. Benefits of migration in relation to nutritional condition and predation risk in a partially migratory moose population.

    PubMed

    White, Kevin S; Barten, Neil L; Crouse, Stacy; Crouse, John

    2014-01-01

    The costs and benefits of alternative migratory strategies are often framed in the context of top-down and bottom-up effects on individual fitness. This occurs because migration is considered a costly behavioral strategy that presumably confers explicit benefits to migrants in the form of either decreased predation risk (predation risk avoidance hypothesis) or increased nutrition (forage maturation hypothesis). To test these hypotheses, we studied a partially migratory moose (Alces alces) population and contrasted explicit measures of predation risk (i.e., offspring survival) and nutrition (i.e., accumulation of endogenous energy reserves) between resident and migratory subpopulations. We relied on data collected from migratory and nonmigratory radio-marked moose (n = 67) that inhabited a novel study system located in coastal Alaska between 2004 and 2010. In this area, 30% of the population resides year-round on a coastal foreland area, while 48% migrate to either a small island archipelago or a subalpine ridge system (the remainder exhibited one of six different low-occurrence strategies). Overall, we determined that accumulation of body fat during the growing season did not differ between migratory or resident modalities. However, calf survival was 2.6-2.9 times higher for individuals that migrated (survival, islands = 0.49 +/- 0.16 [mean +/- SE], n = 35; ridge = 0.52 +/- 0.16, n = 33) than those that did not (survival, resident = 0.19 +/- 0.08, n = 57). Our results support the predation risk avoidance hypotheses, and suggest that migration is a behavioral strategy that principally operates to reduce the risk of calf predation and does not confer explicit nutritional benefits. We did not directly detect trade-offs between predation risk and nutrition for migratory individuals. Yet we identify an indirect life history mechanism that may mildly dampen the apparent fitness benefits of migration. The proximate factors accounting for differences in migration

  11. Identification of Major Risk Sources for Surface Water Pollution by Risk Indexes (RI) in the Multi-Provincial Boundary Region of the Taihu Basin, China

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Hong; Li, Weixin; Qian, Xin

    2015-01-01

    Environmental safety in multi-district boundary regions has been one of the focuses in China and is mentioned many times in the Environmental Protection Act of 2014. Five types were categorized concerning the risk sources for surface water pollution in the multi-provincial boundary region of the Taihu basin: production enterprises, waste disposal sites, chemical storage sites, agricultural non-point sources and waterway transportations. Considering the hazard of risk sources, the purification property of environmental medium and the vulnerability of risk receptors, 52 specific attributes on the risk levels of each type of risk source were screened out. Continuous piecewise linear function model, expert consultation method and fuzzy integral model were used to calculate the integrated risk indexes (RI) to characterize the risk levels of pollution sources. In the studied area, 2716 pollution sources were characterized by RI values. There were 56 high-risk sources screened out as major risk sources, accounting for about 2% of the total. The numbers of sources with high-moderate, moderate, moderate-low and low pollution risk were 376, 1059, 101 and 1124, respectively, accounting for 14%, 38%, 5% and 41% of the total. The procedure proposed could be included in the integrated risk management systems of the multi-district boundary region of the Taihu basin. It could help decision makers to identify major risk sources in the risk prevention and reduction of surface water pollution. PMID:26308032

  12. Identification of Major Risk Sources for Surface Water Pollution by Risk Indexes (RI) in the Multi-Provincial Boundary Region of the Taihu Basin, China.

    PubMed

    Yao, Hong; Li, Weixin; Qian, Xin

    2015-08-21

    Environmental safety in multi-district boundary regions has been one of the focuses in China and is mentioned many times in the Environmental Protection Act of 2014. Five types were categorized concerning the risk sources for surface water pollution in the multi-provincial boundary region of the Taihu basin: production enterprises, waste disposal sites, chemical storage sites, agricultural non-point sources and waterway transportations. Considering the hazard of risk sources, the purification property of environmental medium and the vulnerability of risk receptors, 52 specific attributes on the risk levels of each type of risk source were screened out. Continuous piecewise linear function model, expert consultation method and fuzzy integral model were used to calculate the integrated risk indexes (RI) to characterize the risk levels of pollution sources. In the studied area, 2716 pollution sources were characterized by RI values. There were 56 high-risk sources screened out as major risk sources, accounting for about 2% of the total. The numbers of sources with high-moderate, moderate, moderate-low and low pollution risk were 376, 1059, 101 and 1124, respectively, accounting for 14%, 38%, 5% and 41% of the total. The procedure proposed could be included in the integrated risk management systems of the multi-district boundary region of the Taihu basin. It could help decision makers to identify major risk sources in the risk prevention and reduction of surface water pollution.

  13. The Vascular Quality Initiative Cardiac Risk Index for prediction of myocardial infarction after vascular surgery

    PubMed Central

    Schanzer, Andres; Scali, Salvatore T.; Goodney, Philip P.; Eldrup-Jorgensen, Jens; Cronenwett, Jack L.

    2016-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to develop and to validate the Vascular Quality Initiative (VQI) Cardiac Risk Index (CRI) for prediction of postoperative myocardial infarction (POMI) after vascular surgery. Methods We developed risk models for in-hospital POMI after 88,791 nonemergent operations from the VQI registry, including carotid endarterectomy (CEA; n = 45,340), infrainguinal bypass (INFRA; n = 18,054), suprainguinal bypass (SUPRA; n = 2678), endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR; n = 18,539), and open abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (OAAA repair; n = 4180). Multivariable logistic regression was used to create an all-procedure and four procedure-specific risk calculators based on the derivation cohort from 2012 to 2014 (N = 61,236). Generalizability of the all-procedure model was evaluated by applying it to each procedure subtype. The models were validated using a cohort (N = 27,555) from January 2015 to February 2016. Model discrimination was measured by area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC), and performance was validated by bootstrapping 5000 iterations. The VQI CRI calculator was made available on the Internet and as a free smart phone app available through QxCalculate. Results Overall POMI incidence was 1.6%, with variation by procedure type as follows: CEA, 0.8%; EVAR, 1.0%; INFRA, 2.6%; SUPRA, 3.1%; and OAAA repair, 4.3% (P < .001). Predictors of POMI in the all-procedure model included age, operation type, coronary artery disease, congestive heart failure, diabetes, creatinine concentration >1.8 mg/dL, stress test status, and body mass index (AUC, 0.75; 95% confidence interval =CI], 0.73-0.76). The all-procedure model demonstrated only minimally reduced accuracy when it was applied to each procedure, with the following AUCs: CEA, 0.65 (95% CI, 0.59-0.70); INFRA, 0.69 (95% CI, 0.64-0.73); EVAR, 0.72 (95% CI, 0.65-0.80); SUPRA, 0.62 (95% CI, 0.52-0.72); and OAAA, 0.63 (95% CI, 0.56-0.70). Procedure-specific models had

  14. Development of a Risk Index for Serious Prescription Opioid‐Induced Respiratory Depression or Overdose in Veterans’ Health Administration Patients

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Lin; Wang, Li; Joyce, Andrew; Vick, Catherine; Brigham, Janet; Kariburyo, Furaha; Baser, Onur; Murrelle, Lenn

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective Develop a risk index to estimate the likelihood of life‐threatening respiratory depression or overdose among medical users of prescription opioids. Subjects, Design, and Methods A case‐control analysis of administrative health care data from the Veterans’ Health Administration identified 1,877,841 patients with a pharmacy record for an opioid prescription between October 1, 2010 and September 30, 2012. Overdose or serious opioid‐induced respiratory depression (OSORD) occurred in 817. Ten controls were selected per case (n = 8,170). Items for an OSORD risk index (RIOSORD) were selected through logistic regression modeling, with point values assigned to each predictor. Modeling of risk index scores produced predicted probabilities of OSORD; risk classes were defined by the predicted probability distribution. Results Fifteen variables most highly associated with OSORD were retained as items, including mental health disorders and pharmacotherapy; impaired drug metabolism or excretion; pulmonary disorders; specific opioid characteristics; and recent hospital visits. The average predicted probability of experiencing OSORD ranged from 3% in the lowest risk decile to 94% in the highest, with excellent agreement between predicted and observed incidence across risk classes. The model's C‐statistic was 0.88 and Hosmer–Lemeshow goodness‐of‐fit statistic 10.8 (P > 0.05). Conclusion RIOSORD performed well in identifying medical users of prescription opioids within the Veterans’ Health Administration at elevated risk of overdose or life‐threatening respiratory depression, those most likely to benefit from preventive interventions. This novel, clinically practical, risk index is intended to provide clinical decision support for safer pain management. It should be assessed, and refined as necessary, in a more generalizable population, and prospectively evaluated. PMID:26077738

  15. Feasibility of body roundness index for identifying a clustering of cardiometabolic abnormalities compared to BMI, waist circumference and other anthropometric indices: the China Health and Nutrition Survey, 2008 to 2009.

    PubMed

    Tian, Simiao; Zhang, Xiuzhi; Xu, Yang; Dong, Huimin

    2016-08-01

    The body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference (WC) are commonly used anthropometric measures for predicting cardiovascular diseases risk factors, but it is uncertain which specific measure might be the most appropriate predictor of a cluster of cardiometabolic abnormalities (CMA) in Chinese adults. A body shape index (ABSI) and body roundness index (BRI) have been recently developed as alternative anthropometric indices that may better reflect health status. The main aims of this study were to investigate the predictive capacity of ABSI and BRI in identifying various CMA compared to BMI, WC, waist-to-hip ratio (WHpR), and waist-to-height ratio (WHtR), and to determine whether there exists a best single predictor of all CMA.We used data from the 2009 wave of the China Health and Nutrition Survey, and the final analysis included 8126 adults aged 18 to 85 years with available fasting blood samples and anthropometric measurements. Receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) analyses were conducted to assess the best anthropometric indices to predict the risk of hypertension, diabetes, dyslipidemia, hyperuricemia, and metabolic syndrome (MetS). Logistic regression models were fit to evaluate the OR of each CMA according to anthropometric indices.In women, the ROC analysis showed that BRI and WHtR had the best predictive capability in identifying all of CMA (area under the curves [AUCs] ranged from 0.658 to 0.721). In men, BRI and WHtR were better predictor of hypertension, diabetes, and at least 1 CMA (AUC: 0.668, 0.708, and 0.698, respectively), whereas BMI and WC were more sensitive predictor of dyslipidemia, hyperuricemia, and MetS. Furthermore, the ABSI showed the lowest AUCs for each CMA. According to the multivariate logistic regression analysis, BRI and WHtR were superior in discriminating hyperuricemia and at least 1 CMA while BMI performed better in predicting hypertension, diabetes, and MetS in women. In men, WC and BRI were the 2 best predictor of all CMA

  16. Indexing Disease Progression at Study Entry with Individuals At-Risk for Huntington Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ying; Long, Jeffrey D.; Mills, James A.; Warner, John H.; Lu, Wenjing; Paulsen, Jane S.

    2011-01-01

    The identification of clinical and biological markers of disease in persons at risk for Huntington Disease (HD) has increased in efforts to better quantify and characterize the epoch of prodrome prior to clinical diagnosis. Such efforts are critical in the design and implementation of clinical trials for HD so that interventions can occur at a time most likely to increase neuronal survival and maximize daily functioning. A prime consideration in the examination of prodromal individuals is their proximity to diagnosis. It is necessary to quantify proximity so that individual differences in key marker variables can be properly interpreted. We take a data-driven approach to develop an index that can be viewed as a proxy for time to HD diagnosis known as the CAG-Age Product Scaled or CAPS. CAPS is an observed utility variable computed for all genetically at-risk individuals based on age at study entry and CAG repeat length. Results of a longitudinal receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis showed that CAPS had a relatively strong ability to predict individuals who became diagnosed, especially in the first 2 years. Bootstrap validation provided evidence that CAPS computed on a new sample from the same population could have similar discriminatory power. Cutoffs for the empirical CAPS distribution can be used to create a classification for mutation-positive individuals (Low-Med-High) that is useful for comparison with the naturally occurring mutation-negative Control group. The classification is an improvement over the one currently in use as it is based on observed data rather than model-based estimated values. PMID:21858921

  17. Prognostic significance of preoperative prognostic nutritional index in colorectal cancer: results from a retrospective cohort study and a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yuchong; Gao, Peng; Chen, Xiaowan; Song, Yongxi; Shi, Jinxin; Zhao, Junhua; Sun, Jingxu; Xu, Yingying; Wang, Zhenning

    2016-09-06

    The preoperative prognostic nutritional index (PNI) may forecast colorectal cancer (CRC) outcomes, but the evidence is not conclusive. Here, we retrospectively analyzed a cohort of patients from the Department of Surgical Oncology at the First Hospital of China Medical University (CMU-SO). We also conducted a meta-analysis of eleven cohort studies. Bayesian Information Criterion (BIC) was used to determine the optimal PNI cut-off values for classifying prognosis in the patients from the CMU-SO. The result from CMU-SO and meta-analysis both confirmed that low PNI was significantly associated with a poor prognosis and advanced TNM stages. Among the patients from the CMU-SO, the optimal cut-off values were "41-45-58" (PNI < 41, 41 ≤ PNI < 45, 45 ≤ PNI < 58, PNI ≥ 58), which divided patients into 4 stages. The BIC value for TNM staging combined with the PNI was smaller than that of TNM staging alone (-325.76 vs. -310.80). In conclusion, low PNI was predictive of a poor prognosis and was associated with clinicopathological features in patients with CRC, and the 41-45-58 four-stage division may be suitable for determining prognosis. PNI may thus provide an additional index for use along with the current TNM staging system to determine more accurate CRC prognoses.

  18. A novel inflammation-based prognostic score for patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma: the c-reactive protein/prognostic nutritional index ratio

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Sheng; Yang, Xun; Feng, Ji-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Background Inflammation plays a critical role in cancer prognosis. In the current study, we proposed a novel inflammation-based prognostic score, named c-reactive protein/prognostic nutritional index ratio (CRP/PNI ratio), for predicting the prognosis for patients with resectable esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). Results The optimal cut-off value was 0.10 for CRP/PNI ratio according to the ROC curve. Patients with CRP/PNI ratio ≤0.10 had a significantly better 5-year CSS compared to CRP/PNI ratio >0.10 (44.5% vs. 15.7%, P<0.001). On multivariate analyses, we revealed that CRP/PNI ratio was a significant predictive factor of CSS (P=0.009). A nomogram could be more accuracy for CSS. The Harrell's c-index for CSS prediction was 0.688. Materials and Methods A total of 308 patients with resectable ESCC were enrolled in this retrospective study. The optimal cuf-off value for CRP/PNI ratio was calculated by a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve. Kaplan-Meier methods were used to analyse the cancer-specific survival (CSS). Univariate and multivariate analyses were evaluated for CSS. A nomogram was also established to predict the prognosis for CSS. Conclusion The CRP/PNI ratio is a novel and useful prognostic score for CSS in patients with resectable ESCC. PMID:27557504

  19. Prognostic significance of preoperative prognostic nutritional index in colorectal cancer: results from a retrospective cohort study and a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiaowan; Song, Yongxi; Shi, Jinxin; Zhao, Junhua; Sun, Jingxu; Xu, Yingying; Wang, Zhenning

    2016-01-01

    The preoperative prognostic nutritional index (PNI) may forecast colorectal cancer (CRC) outcomes, but the evidence is not conclusive. Here, we retrospectively analyzed a cohort of patients from the Department of Surgical Oncology at the First Hospital of China Medical University (CMU-SO). We also conducted a meta-analysis of eleven cohort studies. Bayesian Information Criterion (BIC) was used to determine the optimal PNI cut-off values for classifying prognosis in the patients from the CMU-SO. The result from CMU-SO and meta-analysis both confirmed that low PNI was significantly associated with a poor prognosis and advanced TNM stages. Among the patients from the CMU-SO, the optimal cut-off values were “41-45-58” (PNI < 41, 41 ≤ PNI < 45, 45 ≤ PNI < 58, PNI ≥ 58), which divided patients into 4 stages. The BIC value for TNM staging combined with the PNI was smaller than that of TNM staging alone (−325.76 vs. −310.80). In conclusion, low PNI was predictive of a poor prognosis and was associated with clinicopathological features in patients with CRC, and the 41-45-58 four-stage division may be suitable for determining prognosis. PNI may thus provide an additional index for use along with the current TNM staging system to determine more accurate CRC prognoses. PMID:27344182

  20. Assessment of nutritional status by composite index for anthropometric failure: a study among slum children in Bankura, West Bengal.

    PubMed

    Shit, Subhadeep; Taraphdar, Pranita; Mukhopadhyay, Dipta K; Sinhababu, Apurba; Biswas, Akhil B

    2012-01-01

    A community-based cross-sectional study was conducted to find out the prevalence of composite index of anthropometric failure (CIAF) among 117 slum dwelling under-five children in Bankura town, West Bengal and its relation with some common socio-economic factors. Among study population, the prevalence of underweight was 41.6%, whereas CIAF was 80.3%. CIAF gave a near complete estimation of undernutrition unlike underweight. Children who were unimmunized, with more number of siblings, living in a nuclear family, or with illiterate mothers were more likely to be undernourished.

  1. Copula-based drought risk assessment combined with an integrated index in the Wei River Basin, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Jianxia; Li, Yunyun; Wang, Yimin; Yuan, Meng

    2016-09-01

    It is critical to assess drought risk based on a reliably integrated drought index incorporating comprehensive information of meteorology, hydrology and agriculture drought indices, which is of great value for further understanding the future drought tendency, prevention and mitigation. Thus, the primary objective of this study was to focus on constructing a multivariate integrated drought index (MIDI) by coupling four drought indices (i.e., Precipitation Anomaly Percentage (PAP), Runoff Anomaly Percentage (RAP), Standardized Precipitation Index with 6-month aggregation time step (SPI6) and Modified Palmer Drought Severity Index (MPDSI)) to objectively and comprehensively investigate drought risk. The variable fuzzy set theory and entropy weight method are used during the MIDI construction process. Based on the MIDI, a drought event including drought duration and severity is redefined using run theory. Then copula-based drought risk is fully assessed through the joint probability distribution of drought duration and severity. Results indicate the following: (1) the constructed MIDI is consistent with the Standardized Precipitation Index (SPI) and Runoff Anomaly Percentage (RAP) series, and it is more sensitive and effective to capture historical drought events; (2) the drought characteristics present noticeable spatial variability among five subzones, and the entire basin has 49 droughts with the longest drought duration spanning 8.55 months; and (3) the mainstream, especially the middle and lower reaches, has higher occurrences of severe droughts for approximately every 10 years.

  2. N100 Repetition Suppression Indexes Neuroplastic Defects in Clinical High Risk and Psychotic Youth.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Heydrich, Joseph; Enlow, Michelle Bosquet; D'Angelo, Eugene; Seidman, Larry J; Gumlak, Sarah; Kim, April; Woodberry, Kristen A; Rober, Ashley; Tembulkar, Sahil; O'Donnell, Kyle; Hamoda, Hesham M; Kimball, Kara; Rotenberg, Alexander; Oberman, Lindsay M; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro; Keshavan, Matcheri S; Duffy, Frank H

    2016-01-01

    Highly penetrant mutations leading to schizophrenia are enriched for genes coding for N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor signaling complex (NMDAR-SC), implicating plasticity defects in the disease's pathogenesis. The importance of plasticity in neurodevelopment implies a role for therapies that target these mechanisms in early life to prevent schizophrenia. Testing such therapies requires noninvasive methods that can assess engagement of target mechanisms. The auditory N100 is an obligatory cortical response whose amplitude decreases with tone repetition. This adaptation may index the health of plasticity mechanisms required for normal development. We exposed participants aged 5 to 17 years with psychosis (n = 22), at clinical high risk (CHR) for psychosis (n = 29), and healthy controls (n = 17) to an auditory tone repeated 450 times and measured N100 adaptation (mean amplitude during first 150 tones - mean amplitude during last 150 tones). N100 adaptation was reduced in CHR and psychosis, particularly among participants <13 years old. Initial N100 blunting partially accounted for differences. Decreased change in the N100 amplitude with tone repetition may be a useful marker of defects in neuroplastic mechanisms measurable early in life.

  3. A Frailty Index Based On Deficit Accumulation Quantifies Mortality Risk in Humans and in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Rockwood, K.; Blodgett, J. M.; Theou, O.; Sun, M. H.; Feridooni, H. A.; Mitnitski, A.; Rose, R. A.; Godin, J.; Gregson, E.; Howlett, S. E.

    2017-01-01

    Although many common diseases occur mostly in old age, the impact of ageing itself on disease risk and expression often goes unevaluated. To consider the impact of ageing requires some useful means of measuring variability in health in animals of the same age. In humans, this variability has been quantified by counting age-related health deficits in a frailty index. Here we show the results of extending that approach to mice. Across the life course, many important features of deficit accumulation are present in both species. These include gradual rates of deficit accumulation (slope = 0.029 in humans; 0.036 in mice), a submaximal limit (0.54 in humans; 0.44 in mice), and a strong relationship to mortality (1.05 [1.04–1.05] in humans; 1.15 [1.12–1.18] in mice). Quantifying deficit accumulation in individual mice provides a powerful new tool that can facilitate translation of research on ageing, including in relation to disease. PMID:28220898

  4. Prospective study of dietary inflammatory index and risk of breast cancer in Swedish women

    PubMed Central

    Shivappa, Nitin; Sandin, Sven; Löf, Marie; Hébert, James R; Adami, Hans-Olov; Weiderpass, Elisabete

    2015-01-01

    Background: The role of diet in breast cancer (BrCa) aetiology has been studied widely. Although the results are inconsistent, dietary components have been implicated through their effects on inflammation. We examined the association between a dietary inflammatory index (DII) and BrCa incidence in the Swedish Women's Lifestyle Study. Methods: The DII was computed at baseline from a validated 80-item food frequency questionnaire in a cohort of 49 258 women, among whom 1895 incident BrCa cases were identified through linkage with the National Cancer Registry through 2011. We used multivariable Cox proportional models to estimate hazard ratios (HR). Results: Positive associations were observed between DII and BrCa (HRDII quartile 4 vs 1=1.18; 95% CI: 1.00, 1.39), with somewhat stronger associations in postmenopausal women (HRDII quartile 4 vs 1=1.22; 95% CI: 1.01, 1.46). Conclusions: A proinflammatory diet appears to increase the risk of developing BrCa, especially in postmenopausal women. PMID:26335605

  5. Can the Air Pollution Index be used to communicate the health risks of air pollution?

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Lin, Guo-Zhen; Liu, Hua-Zhang; Guo, Yuming; Ou, Chun-Quan; Chen, Ping-Yan

    2015-10-01

    The validity of using the Air Pollution Index (API) to assess health impacts of air pollution and potential modification by individual characteristics on air pollution effects remain uncertain. We applied distributed lag non-linear models (DLNMs) to assess associations of daily API, specific pollution indices for PM10, SO2, NO2 and the weighted combined API (APIw) with mortality during 2003-2011 in Guangzhou, China. An increase of 10 in API was associated with a 0.88% (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.50, 1.27%) increase of non-accidental mortality at lag 0-2 days. Harvesting effects appeared after 2 days' exposure. The effect estimate of API over lag 0-15 days was statistically significant and similar with those of pollutant-specific indices and APIw. Stronger associations between API and mortality were observed in the elderly, females and residents with low educational attainment. In conclusion, the API can be used to communicate health risks of air pollution.

  6. N100 Repetition Suppression Indexes Neuroplastic Defects in Clinical High Risk and Psychotic Youth

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Heydrich, Joseph; Bosquet Enlow, Michelle; D'Angelo, Eugene; Seidman, Larry J.; Gumlak, Sarah; Kim, April; Woodberry, Kristen A.; Rober, Ashley; Tembulkar, Sahil; O'Donnell, Kyle; Hamoda, Hesham M.; Kimball, Kara; Rotenberg, Alexander; Oberman, Lindsay M.; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro; Keshavan, Matcheri S.; Duffy, Frank H.

    2016-01-01

    Highly penetrant mutations leading to schizophrenia are enriched for genes coding for N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor signaling complex (NMDAR-SC), implicating plasticity defects in the disease's pathogenesis. The importance of plasticity in neurodevelopment implies a role for therapies that target these mechanisms in early life to prevent schizophrenia. Testing such therapies requires noninvasive methods that can assess engagement of target mechanisms. The auditory N100 is an obligatory cortical response whose amplitude decreases with tone repetition. This adaptation may index the health of plasticity mechanisms required for normal development. We exposed participants aged 5 to 17 years with psychosis (n = 22), at clinical high risk (CHR) for psychosis (n = 29), and healthy controls (n = 17) to an auditory tone repeated 450 times and measured N100 adaptation (mean amplitude during first 150 tones − mean amplitude during last 150 tones). N100 adaptation was reduced in CHR and psychosis, particularly among participants <13 years old. Initial N100 blunting partially accounted for differences. Decreased change in the N100 amplitude with tone repetition may be a useful marker of defects in neuroplastic mechanisms measurable early in life. PMID:26881109

  7. High atherogenic index of plasma in subclinical hypothyroidism: Implications in assessment of cardiovascular disease risk

    PubMed Central

    James, Stephen R.; Ray, Lopamudra; Ravichandran, Kandasamy; Nanda, Sunil Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Background: A controversy exists regarding the association between subclinical hypothyroidism (SH) and dyslipidemia. Moreover, studies on lipid ratios and atherogenic index of plasma (AIP) in SH are rare, particularly in the Indian scenario. Aim: This study aimed to investigate abnormalities in conventional lipid profile, lipid ratios, and AIP in SH and attempted to correlate thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) and AIP in SH. Materials and Methods: In this retrospective analysis of patient records of SH subjects and euthyroid subjects, age, free triiodothyronine, free thyroxine, TSH, total cholesterol, triglycerides, high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C), low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol, lipid ratios, and AIP were compared between the two groups. The correlation of TSH and AIP in SH was studied. Spearman's correlation, Mann–Whitney U-test and logistic regression analysis were performed. Results: Triglyceride, triglyceride/HDL-C, and AIP were significantly higher in SH as compared to euthyroid group, but there was no correlation between TSH and AIP in SH. AIP emerged as the significant single factor associated with SH in multiple logistic regressions. Conclusion: The positive association of dyslipidemia and SH indicates a need for regular screening of these patients to enable early diagnosis and treatment of dyslipidemia. Even in patients who have a normal conventional lipid profile, lipid ratios, and AIP have to be calculated for better assessment of atherogenic risk. PMID:27730076

  8. Host Risk Factors, Ultraviolet Index of Residence, and Incident Malignant Melanoma In Situ Among US Women and Men

    PubMed Central

    Walls, Andrew C.; Han, Jiali; Li, Tricia; Qureshi, Abrar A.

    2013-01-01

    The incidences of malignant melanoma in situ (MMIS) and invasive malignant melanoma are rising in the United States, but few studies have examined risk factors for MMIS. We evaluated the risk of MMIS according to the host phenotype and the ultraviolet index of the state of residence. Prospective data were collected via biennial questionnaires from 250,151 women and men aged ≥20 years in the Nurses' Health Study (1980–2008), the Nurses' Health Study 2 (1989–2009), and the Health Professionals Follow-up Study (1986–2008). During 7,144,820 person-years of follow-up, 888 incident MMIS lesions occurred, representing 33% of all incident malignant melanoma. Meta-analysis across the cohorts demonstrated that the presence of multiple nevi on the extremities conferred the highest relative risk for MMIS (relative risk = 3.18, 95% confidence interval: 2.59, 3.90). Family history of melanoma, number of severe sunburns, sunburn susceptibility, hair color, and Fitzpatrick skin types I, II, and III were significantly associated with an increased risk of MMIS. Conversely, the ultraviolet index of the state of residence at birth, at age 15 years, and at age 30 years was not associated with increased risk of MMIS. Continued study of MMIS and associated risk factors will help identify persons who are most at risk and elucidate the role of MMIS within the spectrum of cutaneous melanoma. PMID:23579556

  9. Association between Dietary Inflammatory Index (DII) and risk of prediabetes: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Vahid, Farhad; Shivappa, Nitin; Karamati, Mohsen; Naeini, Alireza Jafari; Hebert, James R; Davoodi, Sayed Hossein

    2017-04-01

    The possible relationship between diet-related inflammation and the risk of prediabetes requires further investigation, especially in non-Western populations. We examined the ability of the dietary inflammatory index (DII) to predict the risk of prediabetes in a case-control study conducted at specialized centers in Esfahan, Iran. A total of 214 incident cases of prediabetes were selected with the nonrandom sampling procedure, and the 200 controls randomly selected from the same clinics were frequency-matched on age (±5 years) and sex. DII scores were computed based on dietary intake assessed using a validated and reproducible 168-item food-frequency questionnaire. Linear and logistic regression models were used to estimate multivariable beta estimates and odds ratios (ORs). Subjects in tertile 3 versus tertile 1 (T3VS1) of DII had significantly higher fasting plasma glucose (DIIT3VS1: b = 4.49; 95% CI 1.89, 7.09), oral glucose tolerance (DIIT3VS1: b = 8.76; 95% CI 1.78, 15.73), HbA1c (DIIT3VS1: b = 0.30; 95% CI 0.17, 0.42), low-density lipoprotein (DIIT3VS1: b = 16.37; 95% CI 11.04, 21.69), triglyceride (DIIT3VS1: b = 21.01; 95% CI 8.61, 33.42) and body fat (DIIT3VS1: b = 2.41; 95% CI 0.56, 4.26) and lower high-density lipoprotein (DIIT3VS1: b = -3.39; 95% CI -5.94, -0.84) and lean body mass (DIIT3VS1: b = -3.11; 95% CI -4.83, -1.39). After multivariate adjustment, subjects in the most pro-inflammatory DII group had 19 times higher odds of developing prediabetes compared with subjects in tertile 1 (DIIT3VS1: OR = 18.88; 95% CI 7.02, 50.82). Similar results were observed when DII was used as a continuous variable, (DIIcontinuous: OR = 3.62; 95% CI 2.50, 5.22). Subjects who consumed a more pro-inflammatory diet were at increased risk of prediabetes compared with those who consumed a more anti-inflammatory diet.

  10. Childhood body mass index and height and risk of histologic subtypes of endometrial cancer

    PubMed Central

    Aarestrup, J; Gamborg, M; Ulrich, L G; Sørensen, T I A; Baker, J L

    2016-01-01

    Background: Endometrial cancer risk factors include adult obesity and taller stature, but the influence of size earlier in life is incompletely understood. We examined whether childhood body mass index (BMI; kg m−2) and height were associated with histologic subtypes of endometrial cancer. Methods: From the Copenhagen School Health Records Register, 155 505 girls born 1930–1989 with measured weights and heights from 7 to 13 years were linked to health registers. BMI and height were transformed to age-specific z-scores. Hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals were estimated by Cox regressions. Results: A total of 1020 endometrial cancers were recorded. BMI was non-linearly associated with all endometrial cancers, oestrogen-dependent cancers and the subtype of endometrioid adenocarcinomas; associations were statistically significant and positive above a z-score=0 and non-significant below zero. Compared with a 7-year-old girl with a BMI z-score=0, an equally tall girl who was 3.6 kg heavier (BMI z-score=1.5) had a hazard ratio=1.53 (95% confidence interval: 1.29–1.82) for endometrioid adenocarcinoma. BMI was not associated with non-oestrogen-dependent cancers, except at the oldest childhood ages. Height at all ages was statistically significant and positively associated with all endometrial cancers, except non-oestrogen-dependent cancers. At 7 years, per ~5.2 cm (1 z-score), the risk of endometrioid adenocarcinoma was 1.18 (95% confidence interval: 1.09–1.28). Among non-users of unopposed oestrogens, associations between BMI and endometrioid adenocarcinoma strengthened, but no effects on height associations were observed. Conclusions: Endometrial carcinogenesis is linked to early-life body size, suggesting that childhood BMI and height may be useful indicators for the risk of later development of endometrial cancer and might aid in the early prevention of obesity-related endometrial cancers. PMID:27121254

  11. Change of flood risk under climate change based on Discharge Probability Index in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nitta, T.; Yoshimura, K.; Kanae, S.; Oki, T.

    2010-12-01

    Water-related disasters under the climate change have recently gained considerable interest, and there have been many studies referring to flood risk at the global scale (e.g. Milly et al., 2002; Hirabayashi et al., 2008). In order to build adaptive capacity, however, regional impact evaluation is needed. We thus focus on the flood risk over Japan in the present study. The output from the Regional Climate Model 20 (RCM20), which was developed by the Meteorological Research Institute, was used. The data was first compared with observed data based on Automated Meteorological Data Acquisition System and ground weather observations, and the model biases were corrected using the ratio and difference of the 20-year mean values. The bias-corrected RCM20 atmospheric data were then forced to run a land surface model and a river routing model (Yoshimura et al., 2007; Ngo-Duc, T. et al. 2007) to simulate river discharge during 1981-2000, 2031-2050, and 2081-2100. Simulated river discharge was converted to Discharge Probability Index (DPI), which was proposed by Yoshimura et al based on a statistical approach. The bias and uncertainty of the models are already taken into account in the concept of DPI, so that DPI serves as a good indicator of flood risk. We estimated the statistical parameters for DPI using the river discharge for 1981-2000 with an assumption that the parameters stay the same in the different climate periods. We then evaluated the occurrence of flood events corresponding to DPI categories in each 20 years and averaged them in 9 regions. The results indicate that low DPI flood events (return period of 2 years) will become more frequent in 2031-2050 and high DPI flood events (return period of 200 years) will become more frequent in 2081-2100 compared with the period of 1981-2000, though average precipitation will become larger during 2031-2050 than during 2081-2100 in most regions. It reflects the increased extreme precipitation during 2081-2100.

  12. [Community Nutrition].

    PubMed

    Aranceta, Javier

    2004-06-01

    In the last 20 years, Public Health Nutrition focused mainly on the qualitative aspects which may influence the onset of chronic diseases, quality of life, physical and mental performance and life expectancy. This applied knowledge organised as part of preventive and health promotion programs led to the development of Community Nutrition. The aim of Community Nutrition actions is to adequate lifestyles related to food consumption patterns in order to improve the quality of life and contribute to health promotion of the population in the community where programs and services are delivered. Key functions to develop in a Community Nutrition Unit consist in the identification and assessment of nutrition problems in the community as well as the design, implementation and evaluation of intervention programs by means of appropriate strategies. These should aim at different populations groups and settings, such as work places, schools, high risk groups or the general public. Nowadays, Community Nutrition work efforts should focus on three main aspects: nutrition education in schools and in the community; food safety and food security and the development and reinforcement of food preparation skills across all age groups. Social catering services, either in schools, the work place or at the community level, need to ensure adequate nutritional supply, provide foods contributing to healthy eating practices as well as to enhance culinary traditions and social learning. Food safety and food security have become a top priority in Public Health. The concepts referes to the availability of food safe and adequate as well as in sufficient amount in order to satisfy nutrition requirements of all individuals in the community. Social changes along new scientific developments will introduce new demands in Community Nutrition work and individual dietary counselling will become a key strategy. In order to face new challenges, community nutrition pactitioners require a high quality

  13. [Nutritional risk factors in patients with head and neck cancer in oncology care center Michoacan state].

    PubMed

    García Rojas Vázquez, L E; Trujano-Ramos, L A; Pérez-Rivera, E

    2013-01-01

    En Michoacán, México, el cáncer de cabeza y cuello (CCC), es el tercer tipo de cáncer más frecuente y representa el 12% de las defunciones. El incremento de la desnutrición en un paciente con CCC se ha relacionado con el aumento en la mortalidad. Material y métodos: Se estudiaron de forma prospectiva 30 pacientes de ambos sexos, mayores de 18 años de edad con cáncer de cabeza y cuello del Centro de Atención Oncológica del Estado de Michoacán. En el periodo de evaluación comprendido de agosto de 2010 a agosto de 2011. Se utilizaron los formatos de VGS-Oncológico (Valoración Global Subjetiva), NRS 2002 (Nutritional risk screen) y GUSS (Gugging Swallowing Screen), por medio de los cuales se determinó el riesgo nutricional, y se estableció la capacidad deglutoria de la población estudiada. Resultados: El 53,3% de la población presento desnutrición moderada según la VGS Oncológica, El 33% registro pérdida de peso. La NRS 2002 muestro que el 43,3% se encuentra en riesgo de desnutrición. El grado de disfagia se muestra con mayor frecuencia en aquellos pacientes de mayor edad, el tipo cáncer que comprometía la vía oral y el estadio de la enfermedad. Conclusiones: Las escalas de riesgo nutricional se relacionan de manera directamente proporcional con la localización del tumor y el estadio, además, existen otros factores distintos a los oncológicos que participan en el deterioro nutricional del paciente. Por lo cual es de vital importancia contar con un nutriólogo como parte del equipo multidisciplinario, para detectar el riesgo nutricional y poder manejarlo de manera oportuna.

  14. Calculation of the ecological risk index in the José Antonio Alzate Dam, State of Mexico, Mexico.

    PubMed

    López-Galván, Edgar; Barceló-Quintal, Icela; Solís-Correa, Hugo E; Bussy, Anne Laure; Avila-Pérez, Pedro; Delgadillo, Sergio Martínez

    2010-06-01

    Due to the problem of contamination in the Jose Antonio Alzate dam, located in the State of Mexico, Mexico, the partition coefficient, the contamination degree, and the ecological risk index of nine metals were calculated in order to establish the water quality in different areas of the Alzate dam. The sampling sites were selected according to the river flow into the dam, via three sampling programs, the physical-chemical parameters were measured in situ, and the samples were collected to measure metals in the dissolved phase and also as suspended particulate matter. Thomann's model was used to calculate the partition coefficient. Håkanson's methodology was used to determine the degree of contamination and the ecological risk index. Finally, the water quality criteria for the dissolved metals were calculated. The results for suspended particulate matter suggest a moderate risk of metal contamination in the dam. Copper and lead in dissolved form exceeded the values of water quality criteria.

  15. Methodological challenges in the application of the glycemic index in epidemiological studies using data from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition.

    PubMed

    van Bakel, Marit M E; Slimani, Nadia; Feskens, Edith J M; Du, Huaidong; Beulens, Joline W J; van der Schouw, Yvonne T; Brighenti, Furio; Halkjaer, Jytte; Cust, Anne E; Ferrari, Pietro; Brand-Miller, Jennie; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas; Peeters, Petra; Ardanaz, Eva; Dorronsoro, Miren; Crowe, Francesca L; Bingham, Sheila; Rohrmann, Sabine; Boeing, Heiner; Johansson, Ingegerd; Manjer, Jonas; Tjonneland, Anne; Overvad, Kim; Lund, Eiliv; Skeie, Guri; Mattiello, Amalia; Salvini, Simonetta; Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise; Kaaks, Rudolf

    2009-03-01

    Associations between the glycemic index (GI) or glycemic load (GL) and diseases are heterogeneous in epidemiological studies. Differences in assigning GI values to food items may contribute to this inconsistency. Our objective was to address methodological issues related to the use of current GI and GL values in epidemiological studies. We performed ecological comparison and correlation studies by calculating dietary GI and GL from country-specific dietary questionnaires (DQ) from 422,837 participants from 9 countries participating in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition study and single standardized 24-h dietary recalls (24-HDR) obtained from a representative sample (n = 33,404) using mainly Foster Powell's international table as a reference source. Further, 2 inter-rater and 1 inter-method comparison were conducted, comparing DQ GI values assigned by independent groups with values linked by us. The ecological correlation between DQ and 24-HDR was good for GL (overall r = 0.76; P < 0.005) and moderate for GI (r = 0.57; P < 0.05). Mean GI/GL differences between DQ and 24-HDR were significant for most centers. GL but not GI from DQ was highly correlated with total carbohydrate (r = 0.98 and 0.15, respectively; P < 0.0001) and this was higher for starch (r = 0.72; P < 0.0001) than for sugars (r = 0.36; P < 0.0001). The inter-rater and inter-method variations were considerable for GI (weighted kappa coefficients of 0.49 and 0.65 for inter-rater and 0.25 for inter-method variation, respectively) but only mild for GL (weighted kappa coefficients > 0.80). A more consistent methodology to attribute GI values to foods and validated DQ is needed to derive meaningful GI/GL estimates for nutritional epidemiology.

  16. Reproducibility and relative validity of dietary glycaemic index and glycaemic load assessed by the food-frequency questionnaire used in the Dutch cohorts of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition.

    PubMed

    Du, Huaidong; van der A, Daphne L; van Bakel, Marit M E; Verberne, Lisa D M; Ocké, Marga; Feskens, Edith J M

    2009-08-01

    Limited information is available on the reproducibility and validity of dietary glycaemic index (GI) and glycaemic load (GL) estimated by habitual diet assessment methods such as FFQ, including the FFQ used in the Dutch cohorts of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition study. To examine the reproducibility and relative validity of GI and GL, we used data from 121 Dutch men and women aged 23-72 years. They completed the FFQ three times at intervals of 6 months and twelve 24-h dietary recalls (24HDR) monthly during 1991-2. GI and GL were calculated using published values. Intra-class correlation coefficients of the three repeated FFQ were 0.78 for GI and 0.74 for GL. Pearson correlation coefficients between the first FFQ and the weighted average of the 24HDR were 0.63 for both GI and GL. Weighted kappa values between the first FFQ and the average of the 24HDR (in quintiles) were 0.40 for GI and 0.41 for GL. Bland-Altman plots showed a proportional bias in GI (beta = 0.46), but not in GL (beta = 0.06). In conclusion, this FFQ can be used in epidemiological studies to investigate the relationship of GI and GL with disease risks, but the proportional bias should be taken into account when using this FFQ to assess the absolute GI values.

  17. Consumption of meat and fish and risk of lung cancer: results from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition.

    PubMed

    Linseisen, Jakob; Rohrmann, Sabine; Bueno-de-Mesquita, Bas; Büchner, Frederike L; Boshuizen, Hendriek C; Agudo, Antonio; Gram, Inger Torhild; Dahm, Christina C; Overvad, Kim; Egeberg, Rikke; Tjønneland, Anne; Boeing, Heiner; Steffen, Annika; Kaaks, Rudolf; Lukanova, Annekatrin; Berrino, Franco; Palli, Domenico; Panico, Salvatore; Tumino, Rosario; Ardanaz, Eva; Dorronsoro, Miren; Huerta, José-Maria; Rodríguez, Laudina; Sánchez, María-José; Rasmuson, Torgny; Hallmans, Göran; Manjer, Jonas; Wirfält, Elisabet; Engeset, Dagrun; Skeie, Guri; Katsoulis, Michael; Oikonomou, Eleni; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Peeters, Petra H M; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Wareham, Nicholas; Allen, Naomi; Key, Tim; Brennan, Paul; Romieu, Isabelle; Slimani, Nadia; Vergnaud, Anne-Claire; Xun, Wei W; Vineis, Paolo; Riboli, Elio

    2011-06-01

    Evidence from case-control studies, but less so from cohort studies, suggests a positive association between meat intake and risk of lung cancer. Therefore, this association was evaluated in the frame of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition, EPIC. Data from 478,021 participants, recruited from 10 European countries, who completed a dietary questionnaire in 1992-2000 were evaluated; 1,822 incident primary lung cancer cases were included in the present evaluation. Relative risk estimates were calculated for categories of meat intake using multi-variably adjusted Cox proportional hazard models. In addition, the continuous intake variables were calibrated by means of 24-h diet recall data to account for part of the measurement error. There were no consistent associations between meat consumption and the risk of lung cancer. Neither red meat (RR = 1.06, 95% CI 0.89-1.27 per 50 g intake/day; calibrated model) nor processed meat (RR = 1.13, 95% CI 0.95-1.34 per 50 g/day; calibrated model) was significantly related to an increased risk of lung cancer. Also, consumption of white meat and fish was not associated with the risk of lung cancer. These findings do not support the hypothesis that a high intake of red and processed meat is a risk factor for lung cancer.

  18. Aromatic adducts and lung cancer risk in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) Spanish cohort.

    PubMed

    Gilberson, Tamra; Peluso, Marco E M; Munia, Armelle; Luján-Barroso, Leila; Sánchez, María-José; Navarro, Carmen; Amiano, Pilar; Barricarte, Aurelio; Quirós, J Ramón; Molina-Montes, Esther; Sánchez-Cantalejo, Emilio; Tormo, María-José; Chirlaque, María-Dolores; Ardanaz, Eva; Dorronsoro, Miren; Confortini, Massimo; Bonet, Catalina; Sala, Núria; González, Carlos A; Agudo, Antonio

    2014-09-01

    In this case-cohort study, we examined the association between bulky DNA adducts and the risk of lung cancer within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) Spanish cohort with an average 7-year follow-up, including 98 cases of primary lung cancer and 296 subjects randomly selected from the cohort. Aromatic adducts were measured using (32)P-postlabeling in leukocyte DNA from blood samples collected at enrollment. The association between DNA adducts and the risk of lung cancer was estimated using a Cox proportional hazards model with a modified partial likelihood. There was an overall significant increased risk for developing lung cancer when DNA adduct concentrations were doubled, with relative risk (RR) adjusting for all relevant confounders of 1.36 with 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.18-157. There was a significant increased risk for developing lung cancer when DNA adduct concentrations were doubled for current smokers and among subjects exposed to PAH at work; there was also a slightly higher increase among males than females. However, no statistically significant differences were observed for the effect of adduct levels across smoking status, sex or occupational exposure to PAH. A meta-analysis combined four prospective studies, including this study, resulting in a significant association among current smokers, with an overall estimate of 34% increase in the risk of lung cancer when doubling the level of aromatic DNA adducts in leukocytes.

  19. Evaluating perspectives for PRRS virus elimination from pig dense areas with a risk factor based herd index.

    PubMed

    Fahrion, A S; Beilage, E grosse; Nathues, H; Dürr, S; Doherr, M G

    2014-06-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is wide-spread in pig populations globally. In many regions of Europe with intensive pig production and high herd densities, the virus is endemic and can cause disease and production losses. This fuels discussion about the feasibility and sustainability of virus elimination from larger geographic regions. The implementation of a program aiming at virus elimination for areas with high pig density is unprecedented and its potential success is unknown. The objective of this work was to approach pig population data with a simple method that could support assessing the feasibility of a sustainable regional PRRSV elimination. Based on known risk factors such as pig herd structure and neighborhood conditions, an index characterizing individual herds' potential for endemic virus circulation and reinfection was designed. This index was subsequently used to compare data of all pig herds in two regions with different pig- and herd-densities in Lower Saxony (North-West Germany) where PRRSV is endemic. Distribution of the indexed herds was displayed using GIS. Clusters of high herd index densities forming potential risk hot spots were identified which could represent key target areas for surveillance and biosecurity measures under a control program aimed at virus elimination. In an additional step, for the study region with the higher pig density (2463 pigs/km(2) farmland), the potential distribution of PRRSV-free and non-free herds during the implementation of a national control program aiming at national virus elimination was modeled. Complex herd and trade network structures suggest that PRRSV elimination in regions with intensive pig farming like that of middle Europe would have to involve legal regulation and be accompanied by important trade and animal movement restrictions. The proposed methodology of risk index mapping could be adapted to areas varying in size, herd structure and density. Interpreted in the

  20. Development of a Convection Risk Index to forecast severe weather, and application to predict maximum wind speeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhuiyan, M. A. E.; Wanik, D. W.; Scerbo, D.; Anagnostou, E. N.

    2015-12-01

    We have developed a tool, the Convection Risk Index (CRI), to represent the severity, timing and location of convection for select geographic areas. The CRI is calculated from the Convection Risk Matrix (CRM), a tabulation of numerous meteorological parameters which are categorized into four broad factors that contribute to convection (surface and lower level moisture, atmospheric instability, vertical wind shear, and lift); each of these factors have historically been utilized by meteorologists to predict the likelihood for development of thunderstorms. The CRM ascribes a specific threshold value to each parameter in such a way that it creates a unique tool used to calculate the risk for seeing the development of thunderstorms. The parameters were combined using a weighted formula and which when calculated, yields the Convection Risk Index 1 to 4 scale, with 4 being the highest risk for seeing strong convection. In addition, we also evaluated the performance of the parameters in the CRM and CRI for predicting the maximum wind speed in areas where we calculated the CRI using nonparametric tree-based model, Bayesian additive trees (BART). The use of the CRI and the predicted wind speeds from BART can be used to better inform emergency preparedness efforts in government and industry.We have developed a tool, the Convection Risk Index (CRI), to represent the severity, timing and location of convection for select geographic areas. The CRI is calculated from the Convection Risk Matrix (CRM), a tabulation of numerous meteorological parameters which are categorized into four broad factors that contribute to convection (surface and lower level moisture, atmospheric instability, vertical wind shear, and lift); each of these factors have historically been utilized by meteorologists to predict the likelihood for development of thunderstorms. The CRM ascribes a specific threshold value to each parameter in such a way that it creates a unique tool used to calculate the risk for

  1. Remote Sensing and GIS Based Risk Index Map For Predicting Forest Fire Danger - Evaluation From Forestry Datasets, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, V. K.; Badarinath, K. V. S.

    Forest fires constitute one of the most serious ecological as well as environmental problems affecting most vegetation zones across the world, including India. In this study, we evaluated forest fire risk for sixteen different forest and vegetation types of India. Data from Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) from NOAA AVHRR data has been integrated with bioclimatic data and fuel value index to quantify the forest fire risk. Biomass data for different forest types in different pools has been used as ancillary data. In using the fuel value index, calorific value of wood content for 60 species has been collected and aggregated, for specific species. Results from NDVI and precipitation correlations were found to be highly significant for tropical dry deciduous and moist deciduous forests. Spatial patterns in NDVI closely followed seasonal trends in precipitation for most of the forests. An integrated GIS framework with biophysical, biomass, thermo chemical and bioclimatic parameters allowed the calculation of risk indices for the different forest types. The methodology followed in the study and the maps produced are found to be useful for evaluating forest fire risk and for predicting forest fire danger in different vegetation zones in India.

  2. A Rapidly Prototyped Vegetation Dryness Index Developed for Wildfire Risk Assessment at Stennis Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, Kenton; Graham, William D.; Prados, Donald; Spruce, Joseph

    2006-01-01

    A remote sensing index was developed to allow improved monitoring of vegetation dryness conditions on a regional basis. This remote sensing index was rapidly prototyped at Stennis Space Center in response to drought conditions in the local area in spring 2006.

  3. The traditional Korean dietary pattern is associated with decreased risk of metabolic syndrome: findings from the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 1998-2009.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyung Won; Cho, Mi Sook

    2014-01-01

    The traditional Korean diet has several healthy components, including abundant vegetables, fermented foods, a variety of foodstuffs, and a balance of animal and vegetable food intake. Although the traditional Korean diet has many healthy components, few studies have been conducted on the health advantages of the Korean dietary pattern. This study is intended to clarify the relationship between Korean dietary patterns and chronic diseases using the Integrated Korean Dietary Pattern Score (I-KDPS). I-KDPS is an index for measuring Korean dietary patterns based on traditional Korean meals and reflects the complex and multifaceted characteristics of Korean food culture. I-KDPS is composed of seven items to measure the level of balance and adequacy of Korean food consumption, with a maximum score of 60. When I-KDPS was applied to the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (1998-2009), a nationwide survey, I-KDPS was closely related to the risk of metabolic syndrome. Even though there were a few differences among the years surveyed, the risk of metabolic syndrome, obesity, hypertension, and hypertriglyceridemia significantly decreased as I-KDPS increased. These results indicate that risk of diseases, including metabolic syndrome, decreases in individuals adhering to traditional Korean dietary patterns in adequate levels and those who eat a balanced diet. The result of this study shows that the traditional Korean table setting, which comprises side dishes, including seasoned vegetables, grilled dishes, and fermented products with cooked rice (bap), soup (guk), and kimchi, contains traits that help prevent metabolic syndrome. I-KDPS coupled with the basic study of the healthfulness of the Korean dietary lifestyle is expected to help establish a foundation for continuous development of health promoting Korean foods and dietary culture.

  4. Influence of an elevated nutrition risk score (NRS) on survival in patients following gastrectomy for gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Bachmann, J; Müller, T; Schröder, A; Riediger, C; Feith, M; Reim, D; Friess, H; Martignoni, M E

    2015-07-01

    In the last years, the impact of weight loss in patients with malignant tumors has come more and more into the focus of clinical research, as the occurrence of weight loss is often associated with a reduced survival. Weight loss can be a hint for metastases in patients suffering from malignant tumors; furthermore, these patients are usually not able to be treated with chemotherapy. The aim of the study was to show the influence of weight loss and an elevated nutrition risk score on survival following tumor resection in patients suffering from gastric cancer. In 99 patients in whom a gastrectomy due to gastric cancer was performed, the nutrition risk score was calculated and its influence on mortality, morbidity and survival was analyzed. Of the included patients, 45 % of the patients gave a history of weight loss; they had significantly more often a NRS ≥ 3. In UICC stage 1a/b, a NRS ≥ 3 was associated with a significantly reduced survival compared to patients with a NRS < 3. In early tumor stages (UICC 1a/b), a NRS ≥ 3 was associated with a significantly reduced survival, while in progressed tumor stage, the influence of a poor NRS was not significant. This seems to show that in progressed stages in patients with gastric cancer, the influence of a reduced NRS is negligible.

  5. Risk assessment of nitrate and petroleum-derived hydrocarbon addition on Contricriba weissflogii biomass, lifetime, and nutritional value.

    PubMed

    Shun-Xing, Li; Feng-Jiao, Liu; Feng-Ying, Zheng; Xu-Guang, Huang; Yue-Gang, Zuo

    2014-03-15

    Coastal diatoms are often exposed to both petroleum-derived hydrocarbon pollution and eutrophication. How these exposures influence on algal biomass, lifetime, and nutritional value are unknown. To examine a more accurate risk assessment of the pollutants on the role of diatoms in coastal ecosystem functions, Conticribra weissflogii was maintained at different concentrations of nitrate (N) and/or water-soluble fractions of No.0 diesel oil (WSF). Algal density, cell growth cycle, protein, chlorophyll a, superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, and malonaldehyde (MDA) were determined for the assessment of algal biomass, lifetime, nutritional value, photosynthesis and respiration, antioxidant capacity, and lipid peroxidation, respectively.When N addition was combined with WSF pollution, the cell growth cycles were shortened by 27-44%; SOD activities were decreased by 1-64%; algal density, the concentrations of chlorophyll a, protein, and MDA were varied between 38 and 310%, 62 and 712%, 4 and 124%, and 19 and 233% of the values observed in N addition experiments, respectively. Coastal ecosystem functions were severely weakened by N and WSF additions, and the influence was increased in the order: Nrisk assessment of petroleum-derived hydrocarbon on coastal ecosystem functions.

  6. Serum Gamma-glutamyl Transferase Concentration Within the Reference Range is Related to the Coronary Heart Disease Risk Prediction in Korean Men: Analysis of the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (V-1, 2010 and V-2, 2011)

    PubMed Central

    Han, Kyung-Sun; Cho, Doo-Yeoun; Kim, Young-Sang; Kim, Kyu-Nam

    2015-01-01

    Background: Limited data exist on the association of serum gamma-glutamyl transferase (GGT) level within the reference range with the increased risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) prediction in men. The study examined the association between serum GGT concentration within the reference range and the CHD risk prediction in Korean men. Methods: The study employed data from Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (V-1, 2010 and V-2, 2011) where a total of 1301 individuals were analyzed. A 10-year CHD risk prediction was computed using the Framingham Risk Score (FRS) modified by the National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP) Adult Treatment Panel III (ATP III). Results: Positive correlations were established between log-transformed GGT concentration and FRS (r = 0.237, P < 0.001). After adjustment of body mass index, the amount of alcohol intake and low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol, the odds ratio (95% confidence interval) for intermediate risk and beyond of 10-year CHD prediction (10-year risk ≥10%) with lowest quartile of participants was 1.21 (0.78–1.87) for second quartiles, 1.39 (0.88–2.21) for third quartiles and 2.03 (1.23–3.34) for highest quartiles. Conclusions: Higher serum GGT within its reference range was significantly correlated with a 10-year CHD risk prediction estimation using NCEP ATP III in Korean men. PMID:26228210

  7. Meat and fish consumption and risk of pancreatic cancer: results from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition.

    PubMed

    Rohrmann, Sabine; Linseisen, Jakob; Nöthlings, Ute; Overvad, Kim; Egeberg, Rikke; Tjønneland, Anne; Boutron-Ruault, Marie Christine; Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise; Cottet, Vanessa; Pala, Valeria; Tumino, Rosario; Palli, Domenico; Panico, Salvatore; Vineis, Paolo; Boeing, Heiner; Pischon, Tobias; Grote, Verena; Teucher, Birigit; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Wareham, Nicholas J; Crowe, Francesca L; Goufa, Ioulia; Orfanos, Philippos; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Jeurnink, Suzanne M; Siersema, Peter D; Peeters, Petra H M; Brustad, Magritt; Engeset, Dagrun; Skeie, Guri; Duell, Eric J; Amiano, Pilar; Barricarte, Aurelio; Molina-Montes, Esther; Rodríguez, Laudina; Tormo, María-José; Sund, Malin; Ye, Weimin; Lindkvist, Björn; Johansen, Dorthe; Ferrari, Pietro; Jenab, Mazda; Slimani, Nadia; Ward, Heather; Riboli, Elio; Norat, Teresa; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas

    2013-02-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth most common cause of cancer death worldwide with large geographical variation, which implies the contribution of diet and lifestyle in its etiology. We examined the association of meat and fish consumption with risk of pancreatic cancer in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). A total of 477,202 EPIC participants from 10 European countries recruited between 1992 and 2000 were included in our analysis. Until 2008, 865 nonendocrine pancreatic cancer cases have been observed. Calibrated relative risks (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were computed using multivariable-adjusted Cox hazard regression models. The consumption of red meat (RR per 50 g increase per day = 1.03, 95% CI = 0.93-1.14) and processed meat (RR per 50 g increase per day = 0.93, 95% CI = 0.71-1.23) were not associated with an increased pancreatic cancer risk. Poultry consumption tended to be associated with an increased pancreatic cancer risk (RR per 50 g increase per day = 1.72, 95% CI = 1.04-2.84); however, there was no association with fish consumption (RR per 50 g increase per day = 1.22, 95% CI = 0.92-1.62). Our results do not support the conclusion of the World Cancer Research Fund that red or processed meat consumption may possibly increase the risk of pancreatic cancer. The positive association of poultry consumption with pancreatic cancer might be a chance finding as it contradicts most previous findings.

  8. Dietary inflammatory index is related to asthma risk, lung function and systemic inflammation in asthma

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Lisa G; Shivappa, Nitin; Berthon, Bronwyn S; Gibson, Peter G; Hebert, James R

    2014-01-01

    Background Asthma prevalence has increased in recent years and evidence suggests that diet may be a contributing factor. Increased use of processed foods has led to a decrease in diet quality, which may be creating a pro-inflammatory environment, thereby leading to the development and/or progression of various chronic inflammatory diseases and conditions. Recently, the Dietary Inflammatory Index (DII) has been developed and validated to assess the inflammatory potential of individual diets. Objective This study aimed to examine the DII in subjects with asthma compared to healthy controls and to relate the DII to asthma risk, lung function and systemic inflammation. Methods Subjects with asthma (n=99) and healthy controls (n=61) were recruited. Blood was collected and spirometry was performed. The DII was calculated from food frequency questionnaires administered to study subjects. Results The mean DII score for the asthmatics was higher than the DII score for healthy controls (−1.40 versus −1.86, p=0.04), indicating their diets were more pro-inflammatory. For every 1 unit increase in DII score the odds of having asthma increased by 70% (OR: 1.70, 95% CI: 1.03, 2.14; p=0.040). FEV1 was significantly associated with DII score (β=−3.44, 95% CI: −6.50,−0.39; p=0.020), indicating that for every 1 unit increase in DII score, FEV1 decreased by 3.44 times. Furthermore, plasma IL-6 concentrations were positively associated with DII score (β=0.13, 95% CI: 0.05, 0.21;p=0.002). Conclusion and clinical relevance As assessed using the DII score, the usual diet consumed by asthmatics in this study was pro-inflammatory relative to the diet consumed by the healthy controls. The DII score was associated with increased systemic inflammation and lower lung function. Hence, consumption of pro-inflammatory foods may contribute to worse asthma status and targeting an improvement in DII in asthmatics, as an indicator of suitable dietary intake, might be a useful strategy for

  9. Risk Stratification of Patients with Peripheral Arterial Disease and Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Using Aortic Augmentation Index

    PubMed Central

    Beckmann, Marianne; Husmann, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Background Central augmentation index (cAIx) is an indicator for vascular stiffness. Obstructive and aneurysmatic vascular disease can affect pulse wave propagation and reflection, causing changes in central aortic pressures. Aim To assess and compare cAIx in patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD) and / or abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). Methods cAIx was assessed by radial applanation tonometry (Sphygmocor) in a total of 184 patients at a tertiary referral centre. Patients were grouped as having PAD only, AAA only, or both AAA and PAD. Differences in cAIx measurements between the three patient groups were tested by non-parametric tests and stepwise multivariate linear regression analysis to investigate associations with obstructive or aneurysmatic patterns of vascular disease. Results In the study sample of 184 patients, 130 had PAD only, 20 had AAA only, and 34 patients had both AAA and PAD. Mean cAIx (%) was 30.5 ± 8.2 across all patients. It was significantly higher in females (35.2 ± 6.1, n = 55) than males (28.4 ± 8.2, n = 129), and significantly higher in patients over 80 years of age (34.4 ± 6.9, n = 22) than in those under 80 years (30.0 ± 8.2, n = 162). Intergroup comparison revealed a significant difference in cAIx between the three patient groups (AAA: 27.3 ± 9.5; PAD: 31.4 ± 7.8; AAA & PAD: 28.8 ± 8.5). cAIx was significantly lower in patients with AAA, higher in patients with both AAA and PAD, and highest in patients with PAD only (beta = 0.21, p = 0.006). Conclusion Non-invasive assessment of arterial stiffness in high-risk patients indicates that cAIx differs according to the pattern of vascular disease. Measurements revealed significantly higher cAIx values for patients with obstructive peripheral arterial disease than for patients with aneurysmatic disease. PMID:26452151

  10. Effects of High vs Low Glycemic Index of Dietary Carbohydrate on Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors and Insulin Sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Sacks, Frank M.; Carey, Vincent J.; Anderson, Cheryl A. M.; Miller, Edgar R.; Copeland, Trisha; Charleston, Jeanne; Harshfield, Benjamin J.; Laranjo, Nancy; McCarron, Phyllis; Swain, Janis; White, Karen; Yee, Karen; Appel, Lawrence J.

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Foods that have similar carbohydrate content can differ in the amount they raise blood glucose. The effects of this property, called the glycemic index, on risk factors for cardiovascular disease and diabetes are not well understood. OBJECTIVE To determine the effect of glycemic index and amount of total dietary carbohydrate on risk factors for cardiovascular disease and diabetes. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Randomized crossover-controlled feeding trial conducted in research units in academic medical centers, in which 163 overweight adults (systolic blood pressure, 120–159 mm Hg) were given 4 complete diets that contained all of their meals, snacks, and calorie-containing beverages, each for 5 weeks, and completed at least 2 study diets. The first participant was enrolled April 1, 2008; the last participant finished December 22, 2010. For any pair of the 4 diets, there were 135 to 150 participants contributing at least 1 primary outcome measure. INTERVENTIONS (1) A high–glycemic index (65% on the glucose scale), high-carbohydrate diet (58% energy); (2) a low–glycemic index (40%), high-carbohydrate diet; (3) a high–glycemic index, low-carbohydrate diet (40% energy); and (4) a low–glycemic index, low-carbohydrate diet. Each diet was based on a healthful DASH-type diet. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES The 5 primary outcomes were insulin sensitivity, determined from the areas under the curves of glucose and insulin levels during an oral glucose tolerance test; levels of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, and triglycerides; and systolic blood pressure. RESULTS At high dietary carbohydrate content, the low– compared with high–glycemic index level decreased insulin sensitivity from 8.9 to 7.1 units (−20%, P = .002); increased LDL cholesterol from 139 to 147 mg/dL (6%, P ≤ .001); and did not affect levels of HDL cholesterol, triglycerides, or blood pressure. At low carbohydrate content, the

  11. [Risk assessment and safety evaluation using system normative indexes integration method for non-point source pollution on watershed scale].

    PubMed

    Liu, Jian-Chang; Yan, Yan; Liu, Feng; Ding, Ding; Zhao, Ming

    2008-03-01

    Decision-makers take non-point source pollution under control as well as possible results from enough information of risk trend of nonpoint source pollution on watershed scale. System normative indexes integration evaluation method about system risk trend was developed when focusing on that the probability values of some elements attributing to some trend of the system were more than one, and that the system evaluation needed a formula from the system structure. On the basis of analysis on aspects and characteristics of the system risk normalization, a new valuation method, the relationship between the normalization values of the system and the factors was established. The Lugu Lake Watershed in Southwest China was selected as study area to assess the risk of non-point source loss to surface water using this method. The results indicate that 1) the wholly risk of non-point source loss to surface water in this watershed is in a high level; 2) the system indexes integration evaluation method is an universal method to evaluate a quality or a trend of any system and shows a great power in comparing several systems; 3) the method is helpful to attain an effective and integrated assessment on a system when it is combined with other methods.

  12. The Mediterranean Diet Score Is More Strongly Associated with Favorable Cardiometabolic Risk Factors over 2 Years than Other Diet Quality Indexes in Puerto Rican Adults.

    PubMed

    Mattei, Josiemer; Sotos-Prieto, Mercedes; Bigornia, Sherman J; Noel, Sabrina E; Tucker, Katherine L

    2017-03-08

    Background: Multiple diet quality scores have been used to evaluate adherence to specific dietary recommendations or to consumption of healthful foods and nutrients. It remains unknown which score can more strongly predict longitudinal changes in cardiometabolic risk factors.Objective: We aimed to determine associations of 5 diet quality scores [AHA diet score (AHA-DS), Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH), Healthy Eating Index (HEI)-2005, Mediterranean diet score (MeDS), and Alternative Healthy Eating Index (AHEI)] with 2-y changes in cardiometabolic risk factors in adults 45-75 y old.Methods: Data from the Boston Puerto Rican Health Study were analyzed (n = 1194). Diet quality scores were calculated from a baseline-validated food-frequency questionnaire. Multivariable-adjusted, repeated-subjects, mixed-effects models, adjusted for baseline measures, estimated associations between each z score and 14 individual cardiometabolic factors measured at 2 y.Results: MeDS was significantly associated with lower 2-y waist circumference (β coefficient ± SE: -0.52 ± 0.26, P = 0.048); body mass index (BMI; -0.23 ± 0.08, P = 0.005); log-insulin (-0.06 ± 0.02, P = 0.005); log-homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR; -0.05 ± 0.02, P = 0.030), and log-C-reactive protein (-0.13 ± 0.03, P = 0.0002). Similar but weaker associations were observed for the AHEI with BMI, insulin, and HOMA-IR. The AHA-DS was inversely associated with BMI (-0.17 ± 0.08, P = 0.033). Neither the HEI-2005 nor DASH was significantly associated with any variable. Traditional Puerto Rican foods consumed by individuals with high MeDSs included vegetables and meats in homemade soups, orange juice, oatmeal, beans and legumes, fish, whole milk, corn oil, and beer.Conclusions: The MeDS comprises food components and scores associated with a favorable cardiometabolic profile over 2 y in Puerto Rican adults. An overall healthy diet may be particularly beneficial for maintaining a

  13. DSSTOX EPA INTEGRATED RISK INFORMATION SYSTEM STRUCTURE-INDEX LOCATOR FILE: SDF FILE AND DOCUMENTATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    IRIS is a database of human health effects that may result from exposure to various substances found in the environment. The website contains a chemical susstance index for over 540 chemical substances.

  14. Early inpatient calculation of laboratory-based 30-day readmission risk scores empowers clinical risk modification during index hospitalization.

    PubMed

    Horne, Benjamin D; Budge, Deborah; Masica, Andrew L; Savitz, Lucy A; Benuzillo, José; Cantu, Gabriela; Bradshaw, Alejandra; McCubrey, Raymond O; Bair, Tami L; Roberts, Colleen A; Rasmusson, Kismet D; Alharethi, Rami; Kfoury, Abdallah G; James, Brent C; Lappé, Donald L

    2017-03-01

    Improving 30-day readmission continues to be problematic for most hospitals. This study reports the creation and validation of sex-specific inpatient (i) heart failure (HF) risk scores using electronic data from the beginning of inpatient care for effective and efficient prediction of 30-day readmission risk.

  15. Twelve key nutritional issues in bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Thibault, Ronan; Huber, Olivier; Azagury, Dan E; Pichard, Claude

    2016-02-01

    In morbidly obese patients, i.e. body mass index ≥35, bariatric surgery is considered the only effective durable weight-loss therapy. Laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGBP), laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG), and biliopancreatic diversion with duodenal switch (BPD-DS) are associated with risks of nutritional deficiencies and malnutrition. Therefore, preoperative nutritional assessment and correction of vitamin and micronutrient deficiencies, as well as long-term postoperative nutritional follow-up, are advised. Dietetic counseling is mandatory during the first year, optional later. Planned and structured physical exercise should be systematically promoted to maintain muscle mass and bone health. In this review, twelve key perioperative nutritional issues are raised with focus on LRYGBP and LSG procedures, the most common current bariatric procedures.

  16. Residential radon exposure and risk of incident hematologic malignancies in the Cancer Prevention Study-II Nutrition Cohort.

    PubMed

    Teras, Lauren R; Diver, W Ryan; Turner, Michelle C; Krewski, Daniel; Sahar, Liora; Ward, Elizabeth; Gapstur, Susan M

    2016-07-01

    Dosimetric models show that radon, an established cause of lung cancer, delivers a non-negligible dose of alpha radiation to the bone marrow, as well as to lymphocytes in the tracheobronchial epithelium, and therefore could be related to risk of hematologic cancers. Studies of radon and hematologic cancer risk, however, have produced inconsistent results. To date there is no published prospective, population-based study of residential radon exposure and hematologic malignancy incidence. We used data from the American Cancer Society Cancer Prevention Study-II Nutrition Cohort established in 1992, to examine the association between county-level residential radon exposure and risk of hematologic cancer. The analytic cohort included 140,652 participants (66,572 men, 74,080 women) among which 3019 incident hematologic cancer cases (1711 men, 1308 women) were identified during 19 years of follow-up. Cox proportional hazard regression was used to calculate multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for radon exposure and hematologic cancer risk. Women living in counties with the highest mean radon concentrations (>148Bq/m(3)) had a statistically significant higher risk of hematologic cancer compared to those living in counties with the lowest (<74Bq/m(3)) radon levels (HR=1.63, 95% CI:1.23-2.18), and there was evidence of a dose-response relationship (HRcontinuous=1.38, 95% CI:1.15-1.65 per 100Bq/m(3); p-trend=0.001). There was no association between county-level radon and hematologic cancer risk among men. The findings of this large, prospective study suggest residential radon may be a risk factor for lymphoid malignancies among women. Further study is needed to confirm these findings.

  17. Ryegrass cv. Lema and guava cv. Paluma biomonitoring suitability for estimating nutritional contamination risks under seasonal climate in Southeastern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Bulbovas, Patricia; Camargo, Carla Z S; Domingos, Marisa

    2015-08-01

    The risks posed by nutrient deposition due to air pollution on ecosystems and their respective services to human beings can be appropriately estimated by bioindicator plants when they are well acclimated to the study region environmental conditions. This assumption encouraged us to comparatively evaluate the accumulation potential of ryegrass cv. Lema and guava cv. Paluma macro and micronutrients. We also indicated the most appropriate species for biomonitoring nutrient contamination risks in tropical areas of Southeastern Brazil, which are characterized by marked dry and wet seasons and complex mixtures of air pollutants from different sources (industries, vehicle traffic and agriculture). The study was conducted in 14 sites with different neighboring land uses, within the Metropolitan Region of Campinas, central-eastern region of São Paulo State. The exposure experiments with ryegrass and guava were consecutively repeated 40 (28 days each) and 12 (84 days each) times, respectively, from Oct/2010 to Sept/2013. Macro and micronutrients were analyzed and background concentrations and enrichment ratios (ER) were estimated to classify the contamination risk within the study region. Significantly higher ER suggested that ryegrass were the most appropriate accumulator species for N, S, Mg, Fe, Mn, Cu and Zn deposition and guava for K, Ca, P and B deposition. Based on these biomonitoring adjustments, we concluded that the nutrient deposition was spatially homogeneous in the study area, but clear seasonality in the contamination risk by nutritional inputs was evidenced. Significantly higher contamination risk by S, Fe, K and B occurred during the dry season and enhanced contamination risk by Mn, Cu and Zn were highlighted during the wet season. Distinctly high contamination risk was estimated for S, Fe and Mn in several exposure experiments.

  18. Gender-related risk factors improve mortality predictive ability of VACS Index among HIV-infected women

    PubMed Central

    COHEN, Mardge H; HOTTON, Anna L; HERSHOW, Ronald C; LEVINE, Alexandra; BACCHETTI, Peter; GOLUB, Elizabeth T.; ANASTOS, Kathryn; YOUNG, Mary; GUSTAFSON, Deborah; WEBER, Kathleen M

    2015-01-01

    Background Adding gender-related modifiable characteristics or behaviors to the Veterans Aging Cohort Study (VACS) Index might improve the accuracy of predicting mortality among HIV-infected women on treatment. We evaluated the VACS Index in women with HIV, determined whether additional variables would improve mortality prediction, and quantified the potential for improved survival associated with reduction in these additional risk factors. Methods The VACS Index (based on age, CD4 count, HIV-1 RNA, hemoglobin, AST, ALT, platelets, creatinine and Hepatitis C status) was validated in HIV-infected women in the Women’s Interagency HIV Study (WIHS) who initiated antiretroviral therapy (ART) between January 1996 and December 2007. Models were constructed adding race, depression, abuse, smoking, substance use, transactional sex, and comorbidities to determine whether predictability improved. Population attributable fractions were calculated. Results The VACS Index accurately predicted 5-year mortality in 1057 WIHS women with 1 year on HAART with c-index 0.83 (95% CI 0.79–0.87). In multivariate analysis, the VACS Index score (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR] for 5-point increment 1.30; 95% CI 1.25–1.35), depressive symptoms (aHR 1.73; 95% CI 1.17–2.56) and history of transactional sex (aHR 1.93; 95% CI 1.33–1.82) were independent statistically significant predictors of mortality. Conclusions Including depression and transactional sex significantly improved the performance of the VACS Index in predicting mortality among HIV-infected women. Providing treatment for depression and addressing economic and psychosocial instability in HIV infected women would improve health and perhaps point to a broader public health approach to reducing HIV mortality. PMID:26284531

  19. Association between the Infant and Child Feeding Index (ICFI) and nutritional status of 6- to 35-month-old children in rural western China

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Pengfei; Mi, Baibing; Wang, Duolao; Zhang, Ruo; Yang, Jiaomei; Liu, Danmeng; Dang, Shaonong; Yan, Hong

    2017-01-01

    Background The objective of this study was to determine the relationship between the quality of feeding practices and children’s nutritional status in rural western China. Methods A sample of 12,146 pairs of 6- to 35-month-old children and their mothers were recruited using stratified multistage cluster random sampling in rural western China. Quantile regression was used to analyze the relationship between the Infant and Child Feeding Index (ICFI) and children’s nutritional status. Results In rural western China, 24.37% of all infants and young children suffer from malnutrition. Of this total, 19.57%, 8.74% and 4.63% of infants and children are classified as stunting, underweight and wasting, respectively. After adjusting for covariates, the quantile regression results suggested that qualified ICFI (ICFI > 13.8) was associated with all length and HAZ quantiles (P<0.05) and had a greater effect on the following: poor length and HAZ, the β-estimates (length) from 0.76 cm (95% CI: 0.53 to 0.99 cm) to 0.34 cm (95% CI: 0.09 to 0.59 cm) and the β-estimates (HAZ) from 0.17 (95% CI: 0.10 to 0.24) to 0.11 (95% CI: 0.04 to 0.19). Qualified ICFI was also associated with most weight quantiles (P<0.05 except the 80th and 90th quantiles) and poor and intermediate WAZ quantiles (P<0.05 including the 10th, 20th 30th and 40th quantiles). Additionally, qualified ICFI had a greater effect on poor weight and WAZ quantiles in which the β-estimates (weight) were from 0.20 kg (95% CI: 0.14 to 0.26 kg) to 0.06 kg (95% CI: 0.00 to 0.12 kg) and the β-estimates (WAZ) were from 0.14 (95% CI: 0.08 to 0.21) to 0.05 (95% CI: 0.01 to 0.10). Conclusions Feeding practices were associated with the physical development of infants and young children, and proper feeding practices had a greater effect on poor physical development in infants and young children. For mothers in rural western China, proper guidelines and messaging on complementary feeding practices are necessary. PMID:28207774

  20. Assessment of nutritional risk in community-dwelling older adults (65 to 75 years) in Kolkata, India.

    PubMed

    Majumder, Mondrita; Saha, Indranil; Chaudhuri, Debnath

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted to profile nutritional risk factors in a population of community-dwelling older adults in Kolkata, India. We applied the short version of the Mini Nutritional Assessment-Short Form (MNA-SF) questionnaire among 500 participants (65 to 75 years)--263 males and 237 females. The prevalence of undernutrition was 8.8% in females and 4.9% in males; a risk of undernutrition was found in 24.5% females and 17.5% males. All those with undernutrition or at-risk were studied further using the full version of the MNA. Data regarding education, occupation, socioeconomic status, and food intake pattern were also collected. Females had a significantly lower (P < 0.01) education level than males; 73.4% males were financially independent, whereas 72.7% females were financially dependent on others. Moderate appetite loss was commonly found (64.9%), and in 24.3% of the participants appetite loss was severe. Digestive and chewing problems were present in 32.4% and 21.6% of study participants, respectively. The rate of psychological stress and/or acute disease 3 months prior to study was 47%, and 62.2% of the study population were taking 3 or more medicines per day. Weight loss of greater than 3 kg and of 1 to 3 kg during past 3 months of the study period was observed in 27% and 32.5% of the population, respectively. Undernourished individuals were also found to consume fewer protein-rich foods. We hypothesize that low education levels and lack of financial independence were the strongest underlying causes of high undernutrition in this population, particularly, among females.

  1. A Descriptive Study of the Risk Factors Associated with Catheter-Related Bloodstream Infections in the Home Parenteral Nutrition Population

    PubMed Central

    Durkin, Michael J.; Dukes, Jonathan L.; Reeds, Dominic N.; Mazuski, John E.; Camins, Bernard C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Home parenteral nutrition (HPN) is increasingly used for nutrition support after patients are discharged from the hospital. Catheter-related bloodstream infections (CR-BSI) are a common and potentially fatal complication of HPN. The risk factors for development of CR-BSI in the outpatient setting are poorly understood. Methods We conducted an observational, retrospective study of 225 patients discharged from Barnes-Jewish Hospital on HPN between January 1, 2007, and December 31, 2009. HPN complications were defined as any cause that led to either premature discontinuation of HPN therapy or catheter replacement. CR-BSI events were identified by provider documentation. We calculated the overall complication rate and the complication rate specifically due to CR-BSI. Backward stepwise Cox regression analyses were used to assess for independent predictors of catheter-related complications. Results In total, 111 of 225 patients (49%) developed complications while receiving HPN (incidence = 5.06 episodes/1000 catheter days). Sixty-eight of 225 patients (30%) required catheter removal for CR-BSI (incidence = 3.10 episodes/1000 catheter days). Independent predictors of line removal specifically due to infection included anticoagulant use, ulcer or open wound, and Medicare or Medicaid insurance. The following risk factors were associated with catheter-associated complications and/or CR-BSI: the presence of ulcers, the use of systemic anticoagulants, public insurance (Medicare or Medicaid), and patient age. Independent predictors of line removal for any complication included age and anticoagulant use. Conclusion Catheter-related complications were extremely common in patients receiving HPN. Healthcare providers caring for individuals who require home TPN should be aware of risk factors for complications. PMID:25596210

  2. Breakfast patterns and their likelihood of increased risk of overweight/obesity and risk factors for metabolic syndrome in adults 19+ years: National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2001-2008

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Little is known about the relationship of specific types of breakfast consumed and the risk of overweight/obesity or risk factors for metabolic syndrome. Cluster analysis using National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2001-2008 data identified 12 breakfast clusters—including no breakfast, in...

  3. Social deprivation index and lymphatic filariasis: a tool for mapping urban areas at risk in northeastern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Bonfim, Cristine; Aguiar-Santos, Ana Maria; Pedroza, Dinilson; Costa, Tadeu Rodrigues; Portugal, José Luiz; Oliveira, Conceição; Medeiros, Zulma

    2009-09-01

    This paper describes the construction and application of a social deprivation index that was created to explore the relationship between lymphatic filariasis and socioenvironmental variables in the municipality of Jaboatão dos Guararapes, Pernambuco, Brazil, thereby contributing towards identifying priority areas for interventions. This indicator was obtained from principal-component factor analysis. Variables available from the national census representing socioenvironmental conditions, household characteristics and urban services were used. Epidemiological data came from a parasitological survey on lymphatic filariasis. 23 673 individuals were examined and 323 were positive (1.4%). Two factors that together explained 80.61% of the total variance were selected. The social deprivation strata were capable of indicating a risk gradient, with 74.9% of the microfilaremia cases situated in the high-risk stratum. Principal-component factor analysis was shown to be sensitive for selecting indicators associated with the risk of lymphatic filariasis transmission and for detecting areas potentially at risk. The capacity of the social deprivation index for picking up social inequalities qualifies it as a new tool for use in planning interventions aimed at controlling lymphatic filariasis in urban spaces.

  4. Plasma and dietary carotenoid, retinol and tocopherol levels and the risk of gastric adenocarcinomas in the European prospective investigation into cancer and nutrition

    PubMed Central

    Jenab, M; Riboli, E; Ferrari, P; Friesen, M; Sabate, J; Norat, T; Slimani, N; Tjønneland, A; Olsen, A; Overvad, K; Boutron-Ruault, M-C; Clavel-Chapelon, F; Boeing, H; Schulz, M; Linseisen, J; Nagel, G; Trichopoulou, A; Naska, A; Oikonomou, E; Berrino, F; Panico, S; Palli, D; Sacerdote, C; Tumino, R; Peeters, P H; Numans, M E; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B; Büchner, F L; Lund, E; Pera, G; Chirlaque, M D; Sánchez, M-J; Arriola, L; Barricarte, A; Quirós, J R; Johansson, I; Johansson, A; Berglund, G; Bingham, S; Khaw, K-T; Allen, N; Key, T; Carneiro, F; Save, V; Giudice, G Del; Plebani, M; Kaaks, R; Gonzalez, C A

    2006-01-01

    Despite declining incidence rates, gastric cancer (GC) is a major cause of death worldwide. Its aetiology may involve dietary antioxidant micronutrients such as carotenoids and tocopherols. The objective of this study was to determine the association of plasma levels of seven common carotenoids, their total plasma concentration, retinol and α- and γ-tocopherol, with the risk of gastric adenocarcinoma in a case–control study nested within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC), a large cohort involving 10 countries. A secondary objective was to determine the association of total sum of carotenoids, retinol and α-tocopherol on GCs by anatomical subsite (cardia/noncardia) and histological subtype (diffuse/intestinal). Analytes were measured by high-performance liquid chromatography in prediagnostic plasma from 244 GC cases and 645 controls matched by age, gender, study centre and date of blood donation. Conditional logistic regression models adjusted by body mass index, total energy intake, smoking and Helicobacter pylori infection status were used to estimate relative cancer risks. After an average 3.2 years of follow-up, a negative association with GC risk was observed in the highest vs the lowest quartiles of plasma β-cryptoxanthin (odds ratio (OR)=0.53, 95% confidence intervals (CI)=0.30–0.94, Ptrend=0.006), zeaxanthin (OR=0.39, 95% CI=0.22–0.69, Ptrend=0.005), retinol (OR=0.55, 95% CI=0.33–0.93, Ptrend=0.005) and lipid-unadjusted α-tocopherol (OR=0.59, 95% CI=0.37–0.94, Ptrend=0.022). For all analytes, no heterogeneity of risk estimates or significant associations were observed by anatomical subsite. In the diffuse histological subtype, an inverse association was observed with the highest vs lowest quartile of lipid-unadjusted α-tocopherol (OR=0.26, 95% CI=0.11–0.65, Ptrend=0.003). These results show that higher plasma concentrations of some carotenoids, retinol and α-tocopherol are associated with reduced risk

  5. General and abdominal obesity and risk of esophageal and gastric adenocarcinoma in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition.

    PubMed

    Steffen, Annika; Huerta, José-Maria; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B As; May, Anne M; Siersema, Peter D; Kaaks, Rudolf; Neamat-Allah, Jasmine; Pala, Valeria; Panico, Salvatore; Saieva, Calogero; Tumino, Rosario; Naccarati, Alessio; Dorronsoro, Miren; Sánchez-Cantalejo, Emilio; Ardanaz, Eva; Quirós, J Ramón; Ohlsson, Bodil; Johansson, Mattias; Wallner, Bengt; Overvad, Kim; Halkjaer, Jytte; Tjønneland, Anne; Fagherazzi, Guy; Racine, Antoine; Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise; Key, Tim J; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Wareham, Nick; Lagiou, Pagona; Bamia, Christina; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Ferrari, Pietro; Freisling, Heinz; Lu, Yunxia; Riboli, Elio; Cross, Amanda J; Gonzalez, Carlos A; Boeing, Heiner

    2015-08-01

    General obesity, as reflected by BMI, is an established risk factor for esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC), a suspected risk factor for gastric cardia adenocarcinoma (GCC) and appears unrelated to gastric non-cardia adenocarcinoma (GNCC). How abdominal obesity, as commonly measured by waist circumference (WC), relates to these cancers remains largely unexplored. Using measured anthropometric data from 391,456 individuals from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study and 11 years of follow-up, we comprehensively assessed the association of anthropometric measures with risk of EAC, GCC and GNCC using multivariable proportional hazards regression. One hundred twenty-four incident EAC, 193 GCC and 224 GNCC were accrued. After mutual adjustment, BMI was unrelated to EAC, while WC showed a strong positive association (highest vs. lowest quintile HR = 1.19; 95% CI, 0.63-2.22 and HR = 3.76; 1.72-8.22, respectively). Hip circumference (HC) was inversely related to EAC after controlling for WC, while WC remained positively associated (HR = 0.35; 0.18-0.68, and HR=4.10; 1.94-8.63, respectively). BMI was not associated with GCC or GNCC. WC was related to higher risks of GCC after adjustment for BMI and more strongly after adjustment for HC (highest vs. lowest quintile HR = 1.91; 1.09-3.37, and HR = 2.23; 1.28-3.90, respectively). Our study demonstrates that abdominal, rather than general, obesity is an indisputable risk factor for EAC and also provides evidence for a protective effect of gluteofemoral (subcutaneous) adipose tissue in EAC. Our study further shows that general obesity is not a risk factor for GCC and GNCC, while the role of abdominal obesity in GCC needs further investigation.

  6. Meat consumption among Black and White men and risk of prostate cancer in the Cancer Prevention Study II Nutrition Cohort.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Carmen; McCullough, Marjorie L; Mondul, Alison M; Jacobs, Eric J; Chao, Ann; Patel, Alpa V; Thun, Michael J; Calle, Eugenia E

    2006-02-01

    Previous epidemiologic studies have suggested that intake of red meat may be associated with increased risk of prostate cancer. Few studies, however, have examined these associations by race. We examined intake of red meat, processed meat, and poultry in relation to incident prostate cancer among Black and White men in the Cancer Prevention Study II Nutrition Cohort. Participants in the study completed a detailed questionnaire on diet, medical history, and lifestyle in 1992 to 1993. After excluding men with a history of cancer and incomplete dietary information, 692 Black and 64,856 White men were included in the cohort. During follow-up through August 31, 2001, we documented 85 and 5,028 cases of incident prostate cancer among Black and White men, respectively. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate rate ratios (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI). No measure of meat consumption was associated with risk of prostate cancer among White men. Among Black men, total red meat intake (processed plus unprocessed red meat) was associated with higher risk of prostate cancer (RR, 2.0; 95% CI, 1.0-4.2 for highest versus lowest quartile; P(trend) = 0.05); this increase in risk was mainly due to risk associated with consumption of cooked processed meats (sausages, bacon, and hot dogs; RR, 2.7; 95% CI, 1.3-5.3 for highest versus lowest quartile; P(trend) = 0.008). This study suggests that high consumption of cooked processed meats may contribute to prostate cancer risk among Black men in the United States.

  7. Tea and coffee consumption and risk of esophageal cancer: the European prospective investigation into cancer and nutrition study.

    PubMed

    Zamora-Ros, Raul; Luján-Barroso, Leila; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas; Dik, Vincent K; Boeing, Heiner; Steffen, Annika; Tjønneland, Anne; Olsen, Anja; Bech, Bodil Hammer; Overvad, Kim; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Racine, Antoine; Fagherazzi, Guy; Kuhn, Tilman; Katzke, Verena; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Lagiou, Pagona; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Tumino, Rosario; Panico, Salvatore; Vineis, Paolo; Grioni, Sara; Palli, Domenico; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Skeie, Guri; Huerta, José María; Sánchez, María-José; Argüelles, Marcial; Amiano, Pilar; Ardanaz, Eva; Nilsson, Lena; Wallner, Bengt; Lindkvist, Björn; Wallström, Peter; Peeters, Petra H M; Key, Timothy J; Khaw, Kay-Thee; Wareham, Nicholas J; Freisling, Heinz; Stepien, Magdalena; Ferrari, Pietro; Gunter, Marc J; Murphy, Neil; Riboli, Elio; González, Carlos A

    2014-09-15

    Epidemiological data regarding tea and coffee consumption and risk of esophageal cancer (EC) is still inconclusive. We examined the association of tea and coffee consumption with EC risk among 442,143 men and women without cancer at baseline from 9 countries of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition. Tea and coffee intakes were recorded using country-specific validated dietary questionnaires. Cox regression models were used to analyze the relationships between tea and coffee intake and EC risk. During a mean follow-up of 11.1 years, 339 participants developed EC, of which 142 were esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) and 174 were esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). In the multivariable models, no significant associations between tea (mostly black tea), and coffee intake and risk of EC, EAC and ESCC were observed. In stratified analyses, among men coffee consumption was inversely related to ESCC (HR for comparison of extreme tertiles 0.42, 95% CI 0.20-0.88; p-trend=0.022), but not among women. In current smokers, a significant and inverse association was observed between ESCC risk and tea (HR 0.46, 95% CI 0.23-0.93; p-trend=0.053) and coffee consumption (HR 0.37, 95% CI 0.19-0.73; p-trend=0.011). However, no statistically significant findings were observed using the continuous variable (per 100 mL/d). These data did not show a significant association between tea and coffee consumption and EC, EAC and ESCC, although a decreased risk of ESCC among men and current smokers is suggested, but need to be confirmed in further prospective studies including more cases.

  8. Use of drinking water treatment residuals as a potential best management practice to reduce phosphorus risk index scores.

    PubMed

    Dayton, E A; Basta, N T

    2005-01-01

    The P risk index system has been developed to identify agricultural fields vulnerable to P loss as a step toward protecting surface water. Because of their high Langmuir phosphorus adsorption maxima (P(max)), use of drinking water treatment residuals (WTRs) should be considered as a best management practice (BMP) to lower P risk index scores. This work discusses three WTR application methods that can be used to reduce P risk scores: (i) enhanced buffer strip, (ii) incorporation into a high soil test phosphorus (STP) soil, and (iii) co-blending with manure or biosolids. The relationship between WTR P(max) and reduction in P extractability and runoff P was investigated. In a simulated rainfall experiment, using a buffer strip enhanced with 20 Mg WTR ha(-1), runoff P was reduced by from 66.8 to 86.2% and reductions were related to the WTR P(max). When 25 g kg(-1) WTR was incorporated into a high STP soil of 315 mg kg(-1) determined using Mehlich-3 extraction, 0.01 M calcium chloride-extractable phosphorus (CaCl(2)-P) reductions ranged from 60.9 to 96.0% and were strongly (P < 0.01) related to WTR P(max). At a 100 g kg(-1) WTR addition, Mehlich 3-extractable P reductions ranged from 41.1 to 86.7% and were strongly (P < 0.01) related to WTR P(max). Co-blending WTR at 250 g kg(-1) to manure or biosolids reduced CaCl(2)-P by >75%. The WTR P(max) normalized across WTR application rates (P(max) x WTR application) was significantly related to reductions in CaCl(2)-P or STP. Using WTR as a P risk index modifying factor will promote effective use of WTR as a BMP to reduce P loss from agricultural land.

  9. Handgrip strength cutoff for cardiometabolic risk index among Colombian children and adolescents: The FUPRECOL Study

    PubMed Central

    Ramírez-Vélez, Robinson; Peña-Ibagon, Jhonatan Camilo; Martínez-Torres, Javier; Tordecilla-Sanders, Alejandra; Correa-Bautista, Jorge Enrique; Lobelo, Felipe; García-Hermoso, Antonio

    2017-01-01

    Evidence shows an association between muscular strength (MS) and health among young people, however low muscular strength cut points for the detection of high metabolic risk in Latin-American populations are scarce. The aim of this study was twofold: to explore potential age- and sex-specific thresholds of MS, for optimal cardiometabolic risk categorization among Colombian children and adolescents; and to investigate whether cardiometabolic risk differed by MS group by applying the receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC) cut point. MS was estimated by using a handle dynamometer on 1,950 children and adolescents from Colombia, using MS relative to weight (handgrip strength/body mass). A metabolic risk score was computed from the following components: waist circumference, triglycerides, HDL-c, glucose, and systolic and diastolic blood pressure. ROC analysis showed a significant discriminatory accuracy of MS in identifying the low/high metabolic risk in children and adolescents and in both genders. In children, the handgrip strength/body mass levels for a low metabolic risk were 0.359 and 0.376 in girls and boys, respectively. In adolescents, these points were 0.440 and 0.447 in girls and boys, respectively. In conclusion, the results suggest an MS level relative to weight for having a low metabolic risk, which could be used to identify youths at risk. PMID:28195167

  10. Handgrip strength cutoff for cardiometabolic risk index among Colombian children and adolescents: The FUPRECOL Study.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Vélez, Robinson; Peña-Ibagon, Jhonatan Camilo; Martínez-Torres, Javier; Tordecilla-Sanders, Alejandra; Correa-Bautista, Jorge Enrique; Lobelo, Felipe; García-Hermoso, Antonio

    2017-02-14

    Evidence shows an association between muscular strength (MS) and health among young people, however low muscular strength cut points for the detection of high metabolic risk in Latin-American populations are scarce. The aim of this study was twofold: to explore potential age- and sex-specific thresholds of MS, for optimal cardiometabolic risk categorization among Colombian children and adolescents; and to investigate whether cardiometabolic risk differed by MS group by applying the receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC) cut point. MS was estimated by using a handle dynamometer on 1,950 children and adolescents from Colombia, using MS relative to weight (handgrip strength/body mass). A metabolic risk score was computed from the following components: waist circumference, triglycerides, HDL-c, glucose, and systolic and diastolic blood pressure. ROC analysis showed a significant discriminatory accuracy of MS in identifying the low/high metabolic risk in children and adolescents and in both genders. In children, the handgrip strength/body mass levels for a low metabolic risk were 0.359 and 0.376 in girls and boys, respectively. In adolescents, these points were 0.440 and 0.447 in girls and boys, respectively. In conclusion, the results suggest an MS level relative to weight for having a low metabolic risk, which could be used to identify youths at risk.

  11. The Influence of Body Mass Index, Age and Sex on Inflammatory Disease Risk in Semi-Captive Chimpanzees

    PubMed Central

    Obanda, Vincent; Omondi, George Paul; Chiyo, Patrick Ilukol

    2014-01-01

    Obesity and ageing are emerging issues in the management of captive primates, including Chimpanzees, Pan troglodytes. Studies on humans show that obesity and old age can independently increase the risk of inflammatory-associated diseases indicated by elevated levels of pro-inflammatory cells and proteins in the blood of older or obese compared to levels in younger or non-obese individuals. In humans, sex can influence the outcomes of these risks. Health management of these problems in chimpanzee populations requires an understanding of similarities and differences of factors influencing inflammatory disease risks in humans and in chimpanzees. We examined the relationship between age, sex and Body Mass Index (BMI) with hematological biomarkers of inflammatory disease risk established for humans which include the neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio (NLR), and neutrophil, white blood cell (WBC), platelet microparticle and platelet counts. We found that higher values of NLR, neutrophil count and platelet microparticle count were associated with higher BMI values and older age indicating increased inflammation risk in these groups; a similar pattern to humans. There was a strong sex by age interaction on inflammation risk, with older males more at risk than older females. In contrast to human studies, total WBC count was not influenced by BMI, but like humans, WBC and platelet counts were lower in older individuals compared to younger individuals. Our findings are similar to those of humans and suggest that further insight on managing chimpanzees can be gained from extensive studies of ageing and obesity in humans. We suggest that managing BMI should be an integral part of health management in captive chimpanzee populations in order to partially reduce the risk of diseases associated with inflammation. These results also highlight parallels in inflammation risk between humans and chimpanzees and have implications for understanding the evolution of inflammation related

  12. Waist circumference is the best index for obesity-related cardiovascular disease risk in individuals with spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Ravensbergen, Henrike Rianne Joanna Cornelie; Lear, Scott Alexander; Claydon, Victoria Elizabeth

    2014-02-01

    Obesity is an important identifier of cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk, but is challenging to determine accurately in individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI). Body mass index (BMI) is used worldwide as a simple indicator of obesity, but is difficult to measure in individuals with SCI. Furthermore, standard BMI cutoffs underestimate obesity in this population. Therefore, we aimed to identify the best marker of obesity in individuals with SCI, considering both practicality, and ability to detect adiposity and CVD risk. Five anthropometric measures were evaluated: BMI; waist circumference (WC); waist-to-height ratio (WHtR); waist-to-hip ratio; and neck circumference. We evaluated relationships between these measures and abdominal and total body-fat percentage, seven cardiovascular metabolic risk factors (fasting insulin, glucose, glucose tolerance, triglycerides, high-density lipoprotein, low-density lipoprotein, and total cholesterol), and the Framingham risk score. BMI, WC, and WHtR were correlated with abdominal fat percentage. WC and WHtR were correlated with five metabolic risk factors as well as the Framingham risk score. WC is a more practical measure for an SCI population. The optimal cutoff for identifying adverse CVD risk in individuals with SCI was identified as WC ≥94 cm, with 100% sensitivity and 79% specificity. We propose that WC is a simple, more sensitive alternative to BMI in this population that is easy to use in multiple settings. The cutoff provides a simple tool to predict adverse CVD risk profiles that can be used to guide risk management, as well as as a practical aid for individuals with SCI to maintain a healthy body composition.

  13. Waist Circumference Is the Best Index for Obesity-Related Cardiovascular Disease Risk in Individuals with Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Ravensbergen, Henrike (Rianne) Joanna Cornelie; Lear, Scott Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Obesity is an important identifier of cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk, but is challenging to determine accurately in individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI). Body mass index (BMI) is used worldwide as a simple indicator of obesity, but is difficult to measure in individuals with SCI. Furthermore, standard BMI cutoffs underestimate obesity in this population. Therefore, we aimed to identify the best marker of obesity in individuals with SCI, considering both practicality, and ability to detect adiposity and CVD risk. Five anthropometric measures were evaluated: BMI; waist circumference (WC); waist-to-height ratio (WHtR); waist-to-hip ratio; and neck circumference. We evaluated relationships between these measures and abdominal and total body-fat percentage, seven cardiovascular metabolic risk factors (fasting insulin, glucose, glucose tolerance, triglycerides, high-density lipoprotein, low-density lipoprotein, and total cholesterol), and the Framingham risk score. BMI, WC, and WHtR were correlated with abdominal fat percentage. WC and WHtR were correlated with five metabolic risk factors as well as the Framingham risk score. WC is a more practical measure for an SCI population. The optimal cutoff for identifying adverse CVD risk in individuals with SCI was identified as WC ≥94 cm, with 100% sensitivity and 79% specificity. We propose that WC is a simple, more sensitive alternative to BMI in this population that is easy to use in multiple settings. The cutoff provides a simple tool to predict adverse CVD risk profiles that can be used to guide risk management, as well as as a practical aid for individuals with SCI to maintain a healthy body composition. PMID:24070685

  14. Pathway analysis of body mass index genome-wide association study highlights risk pathways in cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xin; Gu, Jinxia; Li, Ming; Xi, Jie; Sun, Wenyu; Song, Guangmin; Liu, Guiyou

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a class of diseases that involve the heart or blood vessels. It is reported that body mass index (BMI) is risk factor for CVD. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have recently provided rapid insights into genetics of CVD and its risk factors. However, the specific mechanisms how BMI influences CVD risk are largely unknown. We think that BMI may influences CVD risk by shared genetic pathways. In order to confirm this view, we conducted a pathway analysis of BMI GWAS, which examined approximately 329,091 single nucleotide polymorphisms from 4763 samples. We identified 31 significant KEGG pathways. There is literature evidence supporting the involvement of GnRH signaling, vascular smooth muscle contraction, dilated cardiomyopathy, Gap junction, Wnt signaling, Calcium signaling and Chemokine signaling in CVD. Collectively, our study supports the potential role of the CVD risk pathways in BMI. BMI may influence CVD risk by the shared genetic pathways. We believe that our results may advance our understanding of BMI mechanisms in CVD. PMID:26264282

  15. [Food supplements on the domestic market in Hungary: nutritional assessment of the ingredients, risks and benefits, the role of food supplements in human nutrition].

    PubMed

    Lugasi, Andrea; Horacsek, Márta; Martos, Éva

    2010-11-28

    Food supplements are foods that are concentrated sources of nutrients such as vitamins and minerals and other substances with a physiological or nutritional effect. Since joining to the European Union, the distribution of food supplements in Hungary has not been bound to pre-market authorisation; products can be placed to the market after a formal notification at the National Institute for Food and Nutrition Science. Distribution, ingredients, and all information on the label are determined by numerous regulations but at the same time, the lack of harmonized legislation at Community level may cause a lot of problems. In the second part of the review authors introduce the evaluation process of components from the point of view of nutritional and physiological effects and the possible role of food supplements in human nutrition.

  16. Edge-of-field evaluation of the Ohio phosphorus risk index

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Phosphorus Index (PI) has been the cornerstone for phosphorus (P)-based management and planning over the past twenty years; yet, field-scale evaluation of many state PIs has been limited. In this study, measured P loads in surface runoff and tile discharge from 40 agricultural fields in Ohio wit...

  17. Use of Segregation Indices, Townsend Index, and Air Toxics Data to Assess Lifetime Cancer Risk Disparities in Metropolitan Charleston, South Carolina, USA

    PubMed Central

    Rice, LaShanta J.; Jiang, Chengsheng; Wilson, Sacoby M.; Burwell-Naney, Kristen; Samantapudi, Ashok; Zhang, Hongmei

    2014-01-01

    Background: Studies have demonstrated a relationship between segregation and level of education, occupational opportunities, and risk behaviors, yet a paucity of research has elucidated the association between racial residential segregation, socioeconomic deprivation, and lifetime cancer risk. Objectives: We examined estimated lifetime cancer risk from air toxics by racial composition, segregation, and deprivation in census tracts in Metropolitan Charleston. Methods: Segregation indices were used to measure the distribution of groups of people from different races within neighborhoods. The Townsend Index was used to measure economic deprivation in the study area. Poisson multivariate regressions were applied to assess the association of lifetime cancer risk with segregation indices and Townsend Index along with several sociodemographic measures. Results: Lifetime cancer risk from all pollution sources was 28 persons/million for half of the census tracts in Metropolitan Charleston. Isolation Index and Townsend Index both showed significant correlation with lifetime cancer risk from different sources. This significance still holds after adjusting for other sociodemographic measures in a Poisson regression, and these two indices have stronger effect on lifetime cancer risk compared to the effects of sociodemographic measures. Conclusions: We found that material deprivation, measured by the Townsend Index and segregation measured by the Isolation index, introduced high impact on lifetime cancer risk by air toxics at the census tract level. PMID:24852759

  18. Meat and fish consumption and the risk of renal cell carcinoma in the European prospective investigation into cancer and nutrition.

    PubMed

    Rohrmann, Sabine; Linseisen, Jakob; Overvad, Kim; Lund Würtz, Anne Mette; Roswall, Nina; Tjonneland, Anne; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Racine, Antoine; Bastide, Nadia; Palli, Domenico; Agnoli, Claudia; Panico, Salvatore; Tumino, Rosario; Sacerdote, Carlotta; Weikert, Steffen; Steffen, Annika; Kühn, Tilman; Li, Kuanrong; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Wareham, Nicholas J; Bradbury, Kathryn E; Peppa, Eleni; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas; Peeters, Petra H M; Hjartåker, Anette; Skeie, Guri; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Jakszyn, Paula; Dorronsoro, Miren; Barricarte, Aurelio; Santiuste de Pablos, Carmen; Molina-Montes, Esther; de la Torre, Ramón Alonso; Ericson, Ulrika; Sonestedt, Emily; Johansson, Mattias; Ljungberg, Börje; Freisling, Heinz; Romieu, Isabelle; Cross, Amanda J; Vergnaud, Anne-Claire; Riboli, Elio; Boeing, Heiner

    2015-03-01

    Renal cell cancer (RCC) incidence varies worldwide with a higher incidence in developed countries and lifestyle is likely to contribute to the development of this disease. We examined whether meat and fish consumption were related to the risk of RCC in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). The analysis included 493,179 EPIC participants, recruited between 1992 and 2000. Until December 2008, 691 RCC cases have been identified. Meat and fish consumption was assessed at baseline using country-specific dietary assessment instruments; 24-hour recalls were applied in an 8% subsample for calibration purposes. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to calculate multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). Women with a high consumption of red meat (HR = 1.36, 95% CI 1.14-1.62; calibrated, per 50 g/day) and processed meat (HR = 1.78, 95% CI 1.05-3.03; calibrated, per 50 g/day) had a higher risk of RCC, while no association existed in men. For processed meat, the association with RCC incidence was prominent in premenopausal women and was lacking in postmenopausal women (p interaction = 0.02). Neither poultry nor fish consumption were statistically significantly associated with the risk of RCC. The results show a distinct association of red and processed meat consumption with incident RCC in women but not in men. A biological explanation for these findings remains unclear.

  19. Dietary flavonoid intake and colorectal cancer risk in the European prospective investigation into cancer and nutrition (EPIC) cohort.

    PubMed

    Zamora-Ros, Raul; Barupal, Dinesh K; Rothwell, Joseph A; Jenab, Mazda; Fedirko, Veronika; Romieu, Isabelle; Aleksandrova, Krasimira; Overvad, Kim; Kyrø, Cecilie; Tjønneland, Anne; Affret, Aurélie; His, Mathilde; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Katzke, Verena; Kühn, Tilman; Boeing, Heiner; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Naska, Androniki; Kritikou, Maria; Saieva, Calogero; Agnoli, Claudia; Santucci de Magistris, Maria; Tumino, Rosario; Fasanelli, Francesca; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Skeie, Guri; Merino, Susana; Jakszyn, Paula; Sánchez, Maria-José; Dorronsoro, Miren; Navarro, Carmen; Ardanaz, Eva; Sonestedt, Emily; Ericson, Ulrika; Maria Nilsson, Lena; Bodén, Stina; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B As; Peeters, Petra H; Perez-Cornago, Aurora; Wareham, Nicholas J; Khaw, Kay-Thee; Freisling, Heinz; Cross, Amanda J; Riboli, Elio; Scalbert, Augustin

    2017-04-15

    Flavonoids have been shown to inhibit colon cancer cell proliferation in vitro and protect against colorectal carcinogenesis in animal models. However, epidemiological evidence on the potential role of flavonoid intake in colorectal cancer (CRC) development remains sparse and inconsistent. We evaluated the association between dietary intakes of total flavonoids and their subclasses and risk of development of CRC, within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study. A cohort of 477,312 adult men and women were recruited in 10 European countries. At baseline, dietary intakes of total flavonoids and individual subclasses were estimated using centre-specific validated dietary questionnaires and composition data from the Phenol-Explorer database. During an average of 11 years of follow-up, 4,517 new cases of primary CRC were identified, of which 2,869 were colon (proximal = 1,298 and distal = 1,266) and 1,648 rectal tumours. No association was found between total flavonoid intake and the risk of overall CRC (HR for comparison of extreme quintiles 1.05, 95% CI 0.93-1.18; p-trend = 0.58) or any CRC subtype. No association was also observed with any intake of individual flavonoid subclasses. Similar results were observed for flavonoid intake expressed as glycosides or aglycone equivalents. Intake of total flavonoids and flavonoid subclasses, as estimated from dietary questionnaires, did not show any association with risk of CRC development.

  20. [Risk of chronic non-communicable diseases in the population attended in the nutritional education program in Goiânia in the state of Goiás, Brazil].

    PubMed

    Silva, Maria Sebastiana; e Silva, Nathalia Barbosa; Alves, Ana Gabriella Pereira; Araújo, Samantha Pereira; de Oliveira, Amanda Cristine

    2014-05-01

    The scope of this work was to evaluate the risk factors for chronic non-communicable diseases (CNCDs) in subjects treated in the Nutrition Education Program of the School of Physical Education of the Federal University of Goiás. The number of individuals evaluated was 79, namely 65 adults and 14 adolescents. Socio-economic data, lifestyle and previous diseases were recorded by using anamnesis, the feeding habits (FH) were assessed by a food frequency questionnaire and the anthropometric indexes used were body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference (WC). The prevalence of overweight and obesity in the population was 42.9% (n = 27) and the average WC of adults was 82.67 ± 12.49, and 45.1% had increased or very increased risk of cardiovascular diseases. About 88.6% of the population reported the existence of CNCDs in the family. Most of the people (75%) exercised regularly. Those who smoked also drank alcohol frequently, and those that did not smoke were the ones that exercised more. The intake of fruit and vegetables is practiced by 36.7% and 63.3% of participants at least once a day, respectively. The conclusion reached is that the population studied had a high prevalence of exposure to at least one risk factor for CNCDs.

  1. Alcohol, folate, methionine, and risk of incident breast cancer in the American Cancer Society Cancer Prevention Study II Nutrition Cohort.

    PubMed

    Feigelson, Heather Spencer; Jonas, Carolyn R; Robertson, Andreas S; McCullough, Marjorie L; Thun, Michael J; Calle, Eugenia E

    2003-02-01

    Recent studies suggest that the increased risk of breast cancer associated with alcohol consumption may be reduced by adequate folate intake. We examined this question among 66,561 postmenopausal women in the American Cancer Society Cancer Prevention Study II Nutrition Cohort. A total of 1,303 incident cases had accrued during the first 5 years of follow-up. Cox proportional hazards models and stratified analysis were used to examine the relationship between alcohol, dietary and total folate intake, multivitamin use, dietary methionine, and breast cancer. We observed an increasing risk of breast cancer with increasing alcohol consumption (P for trend = 0.01). In the highest category of consumption (15 or more grams of ethanol/day), the risk of breast cancer was 1.26 (95% confidence interval, 1.04-1.53) compared with nonusers. We observed this association with higher alcohol consumption for in situ, localized, and regional disease. We found no association between risk of breast cancer and dietary folate, total folate, multivitamin use, or methionine intake. Furthermore, we found no evidence of an interaction between levels of dietary folate (P for interaction = 0.10) or total folate (P for interaction = 0.61) and alcohol. Nor did we find evidence of an interaction between alcohol consumption and recent or long-term multivitamin use (P for interaction = 0.27). Our results are consistent with a positive association with alcohol but do not support an association with folate or methionine intake or an interaction between folate and alcohol intake on risk of breast cancer.

  2. Adolescents at Risk for Violence: An Initial Validation of the Life Challenges Questionnaire and Risk Assessment Index

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grinberg, Ilyse; Dawkins, Marva; Dawkins, Marvin P.; Fullilove, Constance

    2005-01-01

    Initial validation was sought for the Life-Challenges Questionnaire-Teen Form, a 120-item youth-risk assessment tool. The questionnaire was administered to 99 students enrolled in an adolescent detention facility and a comparison group of 305 students attending high school. The survey items included correlates of youth violence and categorized…

  3. A First-Year Follow-Up of High-Risk Infants: Formulating a Cummulative Risk Index

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Field, Tiffany; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Discriminant function analyses suggested that the most efficient predictors and accurate discriminators of continuing infant risk were: the Parmelee obstetric and postnatal complications scores and the Brazelton interactive and motoric process scores at birth; the Denver rating, mother-infant interaction, and Carey temperament ratings at 4 months;…

  4. Biodex Fall Risk Assessment in the Elderly With Ataxia: A New Age-Dependent Derived Index in Rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Prometti, Paola; Olivares, Adriana; Gaia, Giuseppina; Bonometti, Giampietro; Comini, Laura; Scalvini, Simonetta

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to evaluate if the Biodex Fall Risk Assessment could provide an age-adjusted index useful for classifying patients at “risk of fall.” This was a cohort study conducted on 61 chronic patients, in stable conditions, having a history of ataxia, difficulty in walking or loss of balance, and aged >64 years. These patients were coming from home to our Institute undergoing a period of in-hospital standard rehabilitation. Assessment of clinical parameters was performed at entry. Functional scales (Functional Independence Measure [FIM] for motor and cognitive function, Barthel G, Tinetti POMA), and the Biodex Fall Risk Index (FRI) were performed at entry and discharge. The Normalized FRI, obtained adjusting FRI to the reported maximum predictive FRI for the relevant age, identified 2 types of patients: those with a greater risk of fall than expected for that age, labeled Case 1 (Normalized FRI>1); and those with an equal or even lesser risk of fall than expected for that age, labeled Case 0 (Normalized FRI≤1). FRI, Normalized FRI as well as independent variables as age, sex, pathology group, FIM, BarthelG, were considered in a multiple regression analysis to predict the functional improvement (i.e., delta Tinetti Total score) after rehabilitation. Normalized FRI is useful in assessing patients at risk of falls both before and after rehabilitation. At admission, the Normalized FRI evidenced high fall risk in 46% of patients (Case 1) which decreased to 12% after rehabilitation, being greater than age-predicted in 7 patients (Case 1–1) despite the functional improvement observed after the rehabilitation treatment. Normalized FRI evidenced Case 1–1 patients as neurological, “very old” (86% in age-group 75–84 years), and with serious events at 18 to 24 months’ follow-up. Normalized FRI, but not FRI, at admission was a predictor of improvement in Tinetti Total scores. The normalized FRI effectively indicated patients at higher

  5. Using a Systematic Conceptual Model for a Process Evaluation of a Middle School Obesity Risk-Reduction Nutrition Curriculum Intervention: "Choice, Control & Change"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Heewon; Contento, Isobel R.; Koch, Pamela

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To use and review a conceptual model of process evaluation and to examine the implementation of a nutrition education curriculum, "Choice, Control & Change", designed to promote dietary and physical activity behaviors that reduce obesity risk. Design: A process evaluation study based on a systematic conceptual model. Setting: Five…