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Sample records for nyh cells selected

  1. Human small cell lung cancer NYH cells selected for resistance to the bisdioxopiperazine topoisomerase II catalytic inhibitor ICRF-187 demonstrate a functional R162Q mutation in the Walker A consensus ATP binding domain of the alpha isoform.

    PubMed

    Wessel, I; Jensen, L H; Jensen, P B; Falck, J; Rose, A; Roerth, M; Nitiss, J L; Sehested, M

    1999-07-15

    Bisdioxopiperazine drugs such as ICRF-187 are catalytic inhibitors of DNA topoisomerase II, with at least two effects on the enzyme: namely, locking it in a closed-clamp form and inhibiting its ATPase activity. This is in contrast to topoisomerase II poisons as etoposide and amsacrine (m-AMSA), which act by stabilizing enzyme-DNA-drug complexes at a stage in which the DNA gate strand is cleaved and the protein is covalently attached to DNA. Human small cell lung cancer NYH cells selected for resistance to ICRF-187 (NYH/187) showed a 25% increase in topoisomerase IIalpha level and no change in expression of the beta isoform. Sequencing of the entire topoisomerase IIalpha cDNA from NYH/187 cells demonstrated a homozygous G-->A point mutation at nucleotide 485, leading to a R162Q conversion in the Walker A consensus ATP binding site (residues 161-165 in the alpha isoform), this being the first drug-selected mutation described at this site. Western blotting after incubation with ICRF-187 showed no depletion of the alpha isoform in NYH/187 cells in contrast to wild-type (wt) cells, whereas equal depletion of the beta isoform was observed in the two sublines. Alkaline elution assay demonstrated a lack of inhibition of etoposide-induced DNA single-stranded breaks in NYH/187 cells, whereas this inhibition was readily apparent in NYH cells. Site-directed mutagenesis in human topoisomerase IIalpha introduced into a yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain with a temperature-conditional yeast TOP2 mutant demonstrated that R162Q conferred resistance to the bisdioxopiperazines ICRF-187 and -193 but not to etoposide or m-AMSA. Both etoposide and m-AMSA induced more DNA cleavage with purified R162Q enzyme than with the wt. The R162Q enzyme has a 20-25% decreased catalytic capacity compared to the wt and was almost inactive at <0.25 mM ATP compared to the wt. Kinetoplast DNA decatenation by the R162Q enzyme at 1 mM ATP was not resistant to ICRF-187 compared to wt, whereas it was

  2. Trichomonas vaginalis NYH286 phenotypic variation may be coordinated for a repertoire of trichomonad surface immunogens.

    PubMed Central

    Alderete, J F

    1987-01-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis isolate NYH286 was fractionated with immunoglobulin G of sera from patients with trichomoniasis. Subpopulations of trichomonads with phenotypes of either patient serum-immunoglobulin G reactive (PS+) or nonreactive (PS-) were obtained. Flow cytofluorometry of PS+ and PS- subpopulations with a monoclonal antibody called C20A3 which reacts with a high-molecular-weight immunogen of T. vaginalis gave corresponding fluorescent (positive) and nonfluorescent (negative) phenotypes. No relationship was seen between PS+ and PS- phenotypes and binding of soybean agglutinin, wheat germ agglutinin, and concanavalin A, showing that PS- organisms still possessed carbohydrate moieties on their surfaces based on lectin binding. Phenotypic variation among the PS+ and PS- trichomonads was observed during in vitro growth. A positive-to-negative phenotype shift was also recorded for parasites obtained from lesions of mice subcutaneously infected with PS+ trichomonads. The involvement of surface proteins in the differential PS+ and PS- reactions was supported by soluble antigen and whole cell radioimmunoprecipitation assays. Finally, enhanced parasitism and killing of HeLa cells in monolayer cultures were observed for PS- subpopulations as compared with PS+ counterparts. The data support the idea that phenotypic variation for T. vaginalis may be coordinated for a repertoire of trichomonad immunogens and that such membrane dynamics influence expression of virulence determinants for these sexually transmitted disease agents. Images PMID:3497876

  3. Geometries and energy separations of low-lying states of YNH and NYH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Kalyan K.; Balasubramanian, K.

    1990-11-01

    Complete active-space multiconfiguration self-consistent field followed by multireference configuration-interaction calculations are carried out on low-lying electronic states of YNH and NYH. We find the X 2Σ+ linear state of Y-N-H to be 55 kcal/mol more stable than the bent NYH and 59 kcal/mol more stable than the linear N-Y-H. Our calculations confirm the recent assignment of the first observed spectra generated by laser vaporization of Y metal + He/NH3. The theoretical dipole moment of the Y-N-H molecule (3.06 D) is in excellent agreement with an experimental value of 3.06 D obtained by Simard et al. The theoretical Y-N and N-H bond lengths are also in good agreement with the experimental results.

  4. Geometries and energy separations of low-lying states of YNH and NYH

    SciTech Connect

    Das, K.K.; Balasubramanian, K. )

    1990-11-01

    Complete active-space multiconfiguration self--consistent field followed by multireference configuration-interaction calculations are carried out on low-lying electronic states of YNH and NYH. We find the {ital X} {sup 2}{Sigma}{sup +} linear state of Y--N--H to be 55 kcal/mol more stable than the bent NYH and 59 kcal/mol more stable than the linear N--Y--H. Our calculations confirm the recent assignment of the first observed spectra generated by laser vaporization of Y metal + He/NH{sub 3}. The theoretical dipole moment of the Y--N--H molecule (3.06 D) is in excellent agreement with an experimental value of 3.06 D obtained by Simard {ital et} {ital al}. The theoretical Y--N and N--H bond lengths are also in good agreement with the experimental results.

  5. Characterisation of a human small-cell lung cancer cell line resistant to the DNA topoisomerase I-directed drug topotecan.

    PubMed

    Sorensen, M; Sehested, M; Jensen, P B

    1995-08-01

    Camptothecins are DNA topoisomerase I-directed anti-tumour drugs with a novel mechanism of action. Topotecan (TPT), a hydrophilic derivative of camptothecin, is currently undergoing phase II clinical trials in small-cell lung cancer (SCLC). Human SCLC OC-NYH cells were made more than 6-fold resistant to topotecan by stepwise drug exposure and resistance was stable for 70 passages without drug. NYH/TPT cells had half the topoisomerase I level and activity of wild-type cells. However, no difference in camptothecin or topotecan inhibition of topoisomerase I-mediated DNA relaxation was found, indicating that the enzyme itself was unchanged in the resistant cell. In NYH/TPT cells, topoisomerase II alpha and beta levels were increased approximately 2-fold. Accordingly, the topoisomerase II-directed drug etoposide (VP-16) induced an increased number of DNA single-strand breaks in NYH/TPT cells. However, sensitivity to different topoisomerase II-targeting agents in NYH/TPT cells varied from increased to decreased, indicating a role for as yet unidentified factors acting on the pathway to cell death after topoisomerase II-induced DNA damage has occurred. Of 20 anti-cancer agents tested, only hydroxyurea showed marked collateral hypersensitivity in NYH/TPT cells.

  6. Characterisation of a human small-cell lung cancer cell line resistant to the DNA topoisomerase I-directed drug topotecan.

    PubMed Central

    Sorensen, M.; Sehested, M.; Jensen, P. B.

    1995-01-01

    Camptothecins are DNA topoisomerase I-directed anti-tumour drugs with a novel mechanism of action. Topotecan (TPT), a hydrophilic derivative of camptothecin, is currently undergoing phase II clinical trials in small-cell lung cancer (SCLC). Human SCLC OC-NYH cells were made more than 6-fold resistant to topotecan by stepwise drug exposure and resistance was stable for 70 passages without drug. NYH/TPT cells had half the topoisomerase I level and activity of wild-type cells. However, no difference in camptothecin or topotecan inhibition of topoisomerase I-mediated DNA relaxation was found, indicating that the enzyme itself was unchanged in the resistant cell. In NYH/TPT cells, topoisomerase II alpha and beta levels were increased approximately 2-fold. Accordingly, the topoisomerase II-directed drug etoposide (VP-16) induced an increased number of DNA single-strand breaks in NYH/TPT cells. However, sensitivity to different topoisomerase II-targeting agents in NYH/TPT cells varied from increased to decreased, indicating a role for as yet unidentified factors acting on the pathway to cell death after topoisomerase II-induced DNA damage has occurred. Of 20 anti-cancer agents tested, only hydroxyurea showed marked collateral hypersensitivity in NYH/TPT cells. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:7640225

  7. In vitro cross-resistance and collateral sensitivity in seven resistant small-cell lung cancer cell lines: preclinical identification of suitable drug partners to taxotere, taxol, topotecan and gemcitabin.

    PubMed

    Jensen, P B; Holm, B; Sorensen, M; Christensen, I J; Sehested, M

    1997-01-01

    The acquisition of drug-resistant tumour cells is the main problem in the medical treatment of a range of malignant diseases. In recent years, three new classes of anti-cancer agents, each with a novel mechanism of action, have been brought forward to clinical trials. These are the topoisomerase I (topo I) poisons topotecan and irinotecan, which are both camptothecin derivatives, the taxane tubulin stabilizers taxol and taxotere and, finally, the antimetabolite gemcitabin, which is active in solid tumours. The process of optimizing their use in a combination with established agents is very complex, with numerous possible drug and schedule regimens. We describe here how a broad panel of drug-resistant small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) cell lines can be used as a model of tumour heterogeneity to aid in the selection of non-cross-resistant regimens. We have selected low-fold (3-10x) drug-resistant sublines from a classic (NCI-H69) and a variant (OC-NYH) SCLC cell line. The resistant cell lines include two sublines with different phenotypes towards alkylating agents (H69/BCNU and NYH/CIS), two sublines with different phenotypes against topo I poisons (NYH/CAM and NYH/TPT) and three multidrug resistant (MDR) sublines (H69/DAU, NYH/VM, and H69/VP) with combinations of mdr1 and MRP overexpression as well as topoisomerase II (topo II) down-regulation or mutation. Sensitivity to 20 established and new agents was measured in a standardized clonogenic assay. Resistance was highly drug specific. Thus, none of the cell lines was resistant to all drugs. In fact, all resistant cell lines exhibited patterns of collateral sensitivity to various different classes of drugs. The most intriguing pattern was collateral sensitivity to gemcitabin in two cell lines and to ara-C in five drug-resistant cell lines, i.e. in all lines except the lines resistant to topo I poisons. Next, all sensitivity patterns in the nine cell lines were compared by correlation analysis. A high correlation

  8. In vitro cross-resistance and collateral sensitivity in seven resistant small-cell lung cancer cell lines: preclinical identification of suitable drug partners to taxotere, taxol, topotecan and gemcitabin.

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, P. B.; Holm, B.; Sorensen, M.; Christensen, I. J.; Sehested, M.

    1997-01-01

    The acquisition of drug-resistant tumour cells is the main problem in the medical treatment of a range of malignant diseases. In recent years, three new classes of anti-cancer agents, each with a novel mechanism of action, have been brought forward to clinical trials. These are the topoisomerase I (topo I) poisons topotecan and irinotecan, which are both camptothecin derivatives, the taxane tubulin stabilizers taxol and taxotere and, finally, the antimetabolite gemcitabin, which is active in solid tumours. The process of optimizing their use in a combination with established agents is very complex, with numerous possible drug and schedule regimens. We describe here how a broad panel of drug-resistant small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) cell lines can be used as a model of tumour heterogeneity to aid in the selection of non-cross-resistant regimens. We have selected low-fold (3-10x) drug-resistant sublines from a classic (NCI-H69) and a variant (OC-NYH) SCLC cell line. The resistant cell lines include two sublines with different phenotypes towards alkylating agents (H69/BCNU and NYH/CIS), two sublines with different phenotypes against topo I poisons (NYH/CAM and NYH/TPT) and three multidrug resistant (MDR) sublines (H69/DAU, NYH/VM, and H69/VP) with combinations of mdr1 and MRP overexpression as well as topoisomerase II (topo II) down-regulation or mutation. Sensitivity to 20 established and new agents was measured in a standardized clonogenic assay. Resistance was highly drug specific. Thus, none of the cell lines was resistant to all drugs. In fact, all resistant cell lines exhibited patterns of collateral sensitivity to various different classes of drugs. The most intriguing pattern was collateral sensitivity to gemcitabin in two cell lines and to ara-C in five drug-resistant cell lines, i.e. in all lines except the lines resistant to topo I poisons. Next, all sensitivity patterns in the nine cell lines were compared by correlation analysis. A high correlation

  9. Low-level resistance to camptothecin in a human small-cell lung cancer cell line without reduction in DNA topoisomerase I or drug-induced cleavable complex formation.

    PubMed Central

    Sorensen, M.; Sehested, M.; Christensen, I. J.; Larsen, J. K.; Jensen, P. B.

    1998-01-01

    To study the evolution of camptothecin (CPT) resistance, we have established two small-cell lung cancer cell lines with low (3.2-fold, NYH/CAM15) and high (18-fold, NYH/CAM50) resistance to CPT by stepwise drug exposure. NYH/CAM50 cells had reduced topoisomerase I (topo I) content and activity, and consequently CPT-induced DNA single strand breaks (SSBs) were reduced, as measured by alkaline elution. In contrast, NYH/CAM15 cells had identical topo I content and activity as compared with wild-type (wt) cells. CPT-mediated SSBs and the rate of their reversal after drug removal were also equal in wt and NYH/CAM15 cells, as were doubling time, the fraction of cells in S-phase and DNA synthesis rate in response to CPT. As the conversion of DNA SSBs to DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) is thought to represent a critical event leading to cell death, we measured DNA DSBs by neutral elution. In contrast to DNA SSBs, CPT induced fewer DNA DSBs in NYH/CAM15 than in wt cells. DNA flow cytometry showed that, in CPT-treated cells, the G1 phase was emptied as cells accumulated in late S- and G2M phase. A Spearman rank correlation showed that depletion of G1 and accumulation in late S and G2M correlated to CPT sensitivity in these three cell lines. In conclusion, acquired resistance to CPT can occur without a reduction in either topo I enzyme or CPT-induced cleavable complex formation, while a decrease in the level of CPT-induced DNA DSBs may be of major importance in the early stages of CPT resistance. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:9649127

  10. Low-level resistance to camptothecin in a human small-cell lung cancer cell line without reduction in DNA topoisomerase I or drug-induced cleavable complex formation.

    PubMed

    Sorensen, M; Sehested, M; Christensen, I J; Larsen, J K; Jensen, P B

    1998-06-01

    To study the evolution of camptothecin (CPT) resistance, we have established two small-cell lung cancer cell lines with low (3.2-fold, NYH/CAM15) and high (18-fold, NYH/CAM50) resistance to CPT by stepwise drug exposure. NYH/CAM50 cells had reduced topoisomerase I (topo I) content and activity, and consequently CPT-induced DNA single strand breaks (SSBs) were reduced, as measured by alkaline elution. In contrast, NYH/CAM15 cells had identical topo I content and activity as compared with wild-type (wt) cells. CPT-mediated SSBs and the rate of their reversal after drug removal were also equal in wt and NYH/CAM15 cells, as were doubling time, the fraction of cells in S-phase and DNA synthesis rate in response to CPT. As the conversion of DNA SSBs to DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) is thought to represent a critical event leading to cell death, we measured DNA DSBs by neutral elution. In contrast to DNA SSBs, CPT induced fewer DNA DSBs in NYH/CAM15 than in wt cells. DNA flow cytometry showed that, in CPT-treated cells, the G1 phase was emptied as cells accumulated in late S- and G2M phase. A Spearman rank correlation showed that depletion of G1 and accumulation in late S and G2M correlated to CPT sensitivity in these three cell lines. In conclusion, acquired resistance to CPT can occur without a reduction in either topo I enzyme or CPT-induced cleavable complex formation, while a decrease in the level of CPT-induced DNA DSBs may be of major importance in the early stages of CPT resistance.

  11. Sickle Cell: A Selected Resource Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, Washington, DC.

    This annotated, selective bibliography lists the following types of educational and informational material on both sickle cell disease and trait: (1) professional education materials; (2) fact sheets, pamphlets, and brochures; and (3) audiovisual material. A selected list of references is provided for the following topic areas: (1) genetic…

  12. A dominated and resistant subpopulation causes regrowth after response to 1,3-bis(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea treatment of a heterogeneous small cell lung cancer xenograft in nude mice.

    PubMed

    Aabo, K; Roed, H; Vindeløv, L L; Spang-Thomsen, M

    1994-06-15

    In order to address the question of the influence of a primarily chemoresistant tumor cell subpopulation on the progression of a heterogeneous tumor after cytotoxic therapy, in vitro established human small cell lung cancer cell lines of a 1,3-bis(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea (BCNU)-sensitive (592) and a resistant (NYH) tumor were used to produce mixed solid tumors in nude mice. Mixtures of 592/NYH (9:1 and 1:1) were inoculated s.c. After 3-4 weeks of tumor growth, the mice were stratified according to tumor size and randomized to treatment with BCNU 40 mg/kg i.p. (10% of lethal dose) or no treatment. Tumor growth curves were used to calculate the effect of the treatment, and changes in the relative proportions of 592 and NYH in the mixed tumors were monitored by flow cytometric DNA analysis by which the two cell lines were distinguishable due to differences in DNA content. A significant response was demonstrated in the 9:1 mixed tumors in which only 592 cells were detectable at the start of the treatment. The response was short and less pronounced compared with tumors containing only 592. In the regrowing tumors after treatment, only NYH was detected. In untreated 9:1 mixed control tumors, only 592 cells were detectable throughout the entire observation period. It is substantiated that the 592 cells were able to inhibit the growth of the NYH cells completely when grown together in 9:1 mixed tumors. This was not the case in the 1:1 mixed tumors. The 1:1 mixed tumors did not respond to BCNU, although 592 was eradicated. These results indicate that resistant and undetectable (dominated) subpopulations in heterogeneous tumors may be responsible for relapse and that the fractional size and the growth characteristics of the resistant subpopulation may determine the magnitude of the clinical response to cytotoxic treatment.

  13. Selectivity and mixed reactant fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riess, Ilan

    2015-01-01

    Mixed reactant fuel cells (MR-FCs), are aimed at using a uniform mixture of fuel and oxygen applied to both the anode and the cathode. This allows redesign of fuel cells with a significantly simpler construction, having potentially a higher power density, better fuel utilization and be less expensive. The challenge in realizing MR-FCs is finding selective electrodes that can enhance oxygen reduction at the cathode, fuel oxidation at the anode while inhibiting the chemical reaction between the fuel and oxygen in the gas mixture. This task is in particular challenging in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs), as they operate at elevated temperatures, where many reactions are easily activated and selectivity is difficult to achieve. As a result no true MR-FC of the SOFC type were reported while some were found for low temperature fuel cells (FCs). The so-called single-chamber-SOFC are not true MR-FCs as they do not contain two selective electrodes, as required. We shall discuss potential ways to search for and develop selective anodes and cathodes for SOFC type MR-FCs. We first consider material properties which should contribute to that goal. This refers to electronic properties of the bulk, band banding under adsorbed specie, point defects in the bulk and on the surface. We then proceed to show how cell design, in particular electrode structure, can contribute to selectivity. Finally operation conditions are considered and it is shown that they also can contribute to selectivity. The operation condition considered are gas mixture composition, gas mixture residence time in the hot zone, hence gas flow rate, current density and temperature. The topics discussed hold for all FC types but are crucial for the SOFC type because of the difficulty to achieve selectivity at elevated temperatures. It is suggested that a concerted effort taking advantage of all those options should allow development of a true SOFC type MR-FC.

  14. Ovarian follicle selection and granulosa cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Johnson, A L

    2015-04-01

    The reproductive strategy for avian species that produce a sequence (or clutch) of eggs is dependent upon the maintenance of a small cohort of viable, undifferentiated (prehierarchal) follicles. It is from this cohort that a single follicle is selected on an approximate daily basis to initiate rapid growth and final differentiation before ovulation. This review describes a working model in which follicles within this prehierarchal cohort are maintained in an undifferentiated state by inhibitory cell signaling until the time of selection. Ultimately, follicle selection represents a process in which a single undifferentiated follicle per day is predicted to escape such inhibitory mechanisms to begin rapid growth and final maturation before ovulation. Several processes initiated within the granulosa cell layer at selection are dependent upon G protein-coupled receptors signaling via cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), and several critical processes are described herein. Finally, reference is made to several practical outcomes that can result from understanding the process of selection, including applications within the poultry industry. Proximal factors and processes that mediate follicle selection can either extend or decrease the length of the laying sequence, and thus directly influence overall egg production. In particular, any aberration that results in the selection of more than one follicle per day will result in decreased egg production. More generally, in wild birds these processes are modified by prevailing environmental conditions and by social interactions to influence clutch size. The elucidation of cellular processes that regulate follicle selection can assist in the development of assisted reproductive technologies for application in threatened and endangered avian species. © 2014 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  15. Studies on the chemistry and immunochemistry of cell walls of Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    MORSE, S I

    1962-08-01

    The cell walls of an 80/81 strain of Staphylococcus aureus (NYH-6) contain alanine, glycine, glutamic acid, lysine, muramic acid, glucosamine, and ribitol phosphate. 94 per cent of the phosphorus and 41 per cent of the glucosamine are removed by extraction of the cell walls with hot 5 per cent TCA, but significant amounts of the other constituents are not extracted by this procedure. The residue after hot TCA extraction (mucopeptide) is susceptible to lysozyme whereas the intact cell walls are resistant. Staphylococcus aureus cell walls are agglutinated by S. aureus antisera. Agglutination of the cell walls of one S. aureus strain is inhibited by absorption of antisera with cell walls of other S. aureus strains but not by absorption with S. albus cell walls. The ribitol teichoic acid can be isolated from cold TCA extracts of the cell walls. This compound consists almost entirely of ribitol phosphate and glucosamine. The isolated teichoic acid of strain NYH-6 is readily fixed to tanned sheep erythrocytes and these sensitized cells are agglutinated by S. aureus antisera. Cold TCA extracts of cell walls of other strains of S. aureus inhibit hemagglutination whereas extracts of S. albus walls do not. Studies on the inhibition of both hemagglutination and precipitation indicate that the antigenic determinant of S. aureus NYH-6 teichoic acid is beta-N-acetylglucosamine.

  16. STUDIES ON THE CHEMISTRY AND IMMUNOCHEMISTRY OF CELL WALLS OF STAPHYLOCOCCUS AUREUS

    PubMed Central

    Morse, Stephen I.

    1962-01-01

    The cell walls of an 80/81 strain of Staphylococcus aureus (NYH-6) contain alanine, glycine, glutamic acid, lysine, muramic acid, glucosamine, and ribitol phosphate. 94 per cent of the phosphorus and 41 per cent of the glucosamine are removed by extraction of the cell walls with hot 5 per cent TCA, but significant amounts of the other constituents are not extracted by this procedure. The residue after hot TCA extraction (mucopeptide) is susceptible to lysozyme whereas the intact cell walls are resistant. Staphylococcus aureus cell walls are agglutinated by S. aureus antisera. Agglutination of the cell walls of one S. aureus strain is inhibited by absorption of antisera with cell walls of other S. aureus strains but not by absorption with S. albus cell walls. The ribitol teichoic acid can be isolated from cold TCA extracts of the cell walls. This compound consists almost entirely of ribitol phosphate and glucosamine. The isolated teichoic acid of strain NYH-6 is readily fixed to tanned sheep erythrocytes and these sensitized cells are agglutinated by S. aureus antisera. Cold TCA extracts of cell walls of other strains of S. aureus inhibit hemagglutination whereas extracts of S. albus walls do not. Studies on the inhibition of both hemagglutination and precipitation indicate that the antigenic determinant of S. aureus NYH-6 teichoic acid is β-N-acetylglucosamine. PMID:14476345

  17. Clonal dominance between subpopulations of mixed small cell lung cancer xenografts implanted ectopically in nude mice.

    PubMed

    Aabo, K; Vindeløv, L L; Spang-Thomsen, M

    1995-01-01

    Clonal evolution of neoplastic cells during solid tumour growth leads to the emergence of new tumour cell subpopulations with diverging phenotypic characteristics which may alter the behaviour of a malignant disease. Cellular interaction was studied in mixed xenografts in nude mice and during in vitro growth of two sets of small cell lung cancer (SCLC) subpopulations (54A, 54B and NYH, NYH2). The tumour cell lines differed in cellular DNA content enabling flow cytometric DNA analysis (FCM) to be used to monitor changes in the fractional composition of the mixed cell populations. The progeny clone 54B was found to dominate the parent 54A clone when grown as mixed subcutaneous xenografts in nude mice, whereas no dominance was exerted during in vitro growth. The in vivo dominance could not be explained by differences in growth kinetics between the two tumour cell lines, and the interaction was not dependent on 54B being in excess in mixed tumours. The dominance was dependent on close in vivo contact as no remote effect on the growth of 54A was found when the dominating 54B cells were growing in the opposite flank of tumour-bearing mice. Irradiation inactivated 54B cells were unable to exert the dominating effect, indicating that the interaction required viable and proliferating cells. Clonal dominance was not found in mixed NYH-NYH2 tumours indicating that the dominance mechanism(s) may not always be operational between subpopulations in heterogeneous tumours. Recognition of interaction between tumour cell populations may result in a better understanding of the behaviour of heterogeneous human malignancies.

  18. Microgravity-Enhanced Stem Cell Selection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Claudio, Pier Paolo; Valluri, Jagan

    2011-01-01

    Stem cells, both embryonic and adult, promise to revolutionize the practice of medicine in the future. In order to realize this potential, a number of hurdles must be overcome. Most importantly, the signaling mechanisms necessary to control the differentiation of stem cells into tissues of interest remain to be elucidated, and much of the present research on stem cells is focused on this goal. Nevertheless, it will also be essential to achieve large-scale expansion and, in many cases, assemble cells in 3D as transplantable tissues. To this end, microgravity analog bioreactors can play a significant role. Microgravity bioreactors were originally conceived as a tool to study the cellular responses to microgravity. However, the technology can address some of the shortcomings of conventional cell culture systems; namely, the deficiency of mass transport in static culture and high mechanical shear forces in stirred systems. Unexpectedly, the conditions created in the vessel were ideal for 3D cell culture. Recently, investigators have demonstrated the capability of the microgravity bioreactors to expand hematopoietic stem cells compared to static culture, and facilitate the differentiation of umbilical cord stem cells into 3D liver aggregates. Stem cells are capable of differentiating into functional cells. However, there are no reliable methods to induce the stem cells to form specific cells or to gain enough cells for transplantation, which limits their application in clinical therapy. The aim of this study is to select the best experimental setup to reach high proliferation levels by culturing these cells in a microgravity-based bioreactor. In typical cell culture, the cells sediment to the bottom surface of their container and propagate as a one-cell-layer sheet. Prevention of such sedimentation affords the freedom for self-assembly and the propagation of 3D tissue arrays. Suspension of cells is easily achievable using stirred technologies. Unfortunately, in

  19. Engineering novel cell surface chemistry for selective tumor cell targeting

    SciTech Connect

    Bertozzi, C.R. |

    1997-12-31

    A common feature of many different cancers is the high expression level of the two monosaccharides sialic acid and fucose within the context of cell-surface associated glycoconjugates. A correlation has been made between hypersialylation and/or hyperfucosylation and the highly metastatic phenotype. Thus, a targeting strategy based on sialic acid or fucose expression would be a powerful tool for the development of new cancer cell-selective therapies and diagnostic agents. We have discovered that ketone groups can be incorporated metabolically into cell-surface associated sialic acids. The ketone is can be covalently ligated with hydrazide functionalized proteins or small molecules under physiological conditions. Thus, we have discovered a mechanism to selectively target hydrazide conjugates to highly sialylated cells such as cancer cells. Applications of this technology to the generation of novel cancer cell-selective toxins and MRI contrast reagents will be discussed, in addition to progress towards the use of cell surface fucose residues as vehicles for ketone expression.

  20. Selectivity of Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Aricò, Antonino S.; Sebastian, David; Schuster, Michael; Bauer, Bernd; D’Urso, Claudia; Lufrano, Francesco; Baglio, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    Sulfonic acid-functionalized polymer electrolyte membranes alternative to Nafion® were developed. These were hydrocarbon systems, such as blend sulfonated polyetheretherketone (s-PEEK), new generation perfluorosulfonic acid (PFSA) systems, and composite zirconium phosphate–PFSA polymers. The membranes varied in terms of composition, equivalent weight, thickness, and filler and were investigated with regard to their methanol permeation characteristics and proton conductivity for application in direct methanol fuel cells. The behavior of the membrane electrode assemblies (MEA) was investigated in fuel cell with the aim to individuate a correlation between membrane characteristics and their performance in a direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC). The power density of the DMFC at 60 °C increased according to a square root-like function of the membrane selectivity. This was defined as the reciprocal of the product between area specific resistance and crossover. The power density achieved at 60 °C for the most promising s-PEEK-based membrane-electrode assembly (MEA) was higher than the benchmark Nafion® 115-based MEA (77 mW·cm−2 vs. 64 mW·cm−2). This result was due to a lower methanol crossover (47 mA·cm−2 equivalent current density for s-PEEK vs. 120 mA·cm−2 for Nafion® 115 at 60 °C as recorded at OCV with 2 M methanol) and a suitable area specific resistance (0.15 Ohm cm2 for s-PEEK vs. 0.22 Ohm cm2 for Nafion® 115). PMID:26610582

  1. Selectivity of Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Membranes.

    PubMed

    Aricò, Antonino S; Sebastian, David; Schuster, Michael; Bauer, Bernd; D'Urso, Claudia; Lufrano, Francesco; Baglio, Vincenzo

    2015-11-24

    Sulfonic acid-functionalized polymer electrolyte membranes alternative to Nafion(®) were developed. These were hydrocarbon systems, such as blend sulfonated polyetheretherketone (s-PEEK), new generation perfluorosulfonic acid (PFSA) systems, and composite zirconium phosphate-PFSA polymers. The membranes varied in terms of composition, equivalent weight, thickness, and filler and were investigated with regard to their methanol permeation characteristics and proton conductivity for application in direct methanol fuel cells. The behavior of the membrane electrode assemblies (MEA) was investigated in fuel cell with the aim to individuate a correlation between membrane characteristics and their performance in a direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC). The power density of the DMFC at 60 °C increased according to a square root-like function of the membrane selectivity. This was defined as the reciprocal of the product between area specific resistance and crossover. The power density achieved at 60 °C for the most promising s-PEEK-based membrane-electrode assembly (MEA) was higher than the benchmark Nafion(®) 115-based MEA (77 mW·cm(-2) vs. 64 mW·cm(-2)). This result was due to a lower methanol crossover (47 mA·cm(-2) equivalent current density for s-PEEK vs. 120 mA·cm(-2) for Nafion(®) 115 at 60 °C as recorded at OCV with 2 M methanol) and a suitable area specific resistance (0.15 Ohm cm² for s-PEEK vs. 0.22 Ohm cm² for Nafion(®) 115).

  2. Particle compositions with a pre-selected cell internalization mode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decuzzi, Paolo (Inventor); Ferrari, Mauro (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A method of formulating a particle composition having a pre-selected cell internalization mode involves selecting a target cell having surface receptors and obtaining particles that have i) surface moieties, that have an affinity for or are capable of binding to the surface receptors of the cell and ii) a preselected shape, where a surface distribution of the surface moieties on the particles and the shape of the particles are effective for the pre-selected cell internalization mode.

  3. Specific nature of Trichomonas vaginalis parasitism of host cell surfaces.

    PubMed

    Alderete, J F; Garza, G E

    1985-12-01

    The adherence of Trichomonas vaginalis NYH 286 to host cells was evaluated by using monolayer cultures of HeLa and HEp-2 epithelial cells and human fibroblast cell lines. Saturation of sites on HeLa cells was achieved, yielding a maximal T. vaginalis NYH 286-to-cell ratio of two. The ability of radiolabeled NYH 286 to compete with unlabeled trichomonads for attachment and the time, temperature, and pH-dependent nature of host cell parasitism reinforced the idea of specific parasite-cell associations. Other trichomonal isolates (JH31A, RU375, and JHHR) were also found to adhere to cell monolayers, albeit to different degrees, and all isolates produced maximal contact-dependent HeLa cell cytotoxicity. The avirulent trichomonad, Trichomonas tenax, did not adhere to cell monolayers and did not cause host cell damage. Interestingly, parasite cytadherence was greater with HeLa and HEp-2 epithelial cells than with fibroblast cells. In addition, cytotoxicity with fibroblast cells never exceeded 20% of the level of cell killing observed for epithelial cells. Elucidation of properties of the pathogenic human trichomonads that allowed for host cell surface parasitism was also attempted. Treatment of motile T. vaginalis NYH 286 with trypsin diminished cell parasitism. Incubation of trypsinized organisms in growth medium allowed for regeneration of trichomonal adherence, and cycloheximide inhibited the regeneration of attachment. Organisms poisoned with metronidazole or iodoacetate failed to attach to host cells, and adherent trichomonads exposed to metronidazole or iodoacetate were readily released from parasitized cells. Coincubation experiments with polycationic proteins and sugars and pretreatment of parasites or cells with neuraminidase or periodate had no effect on host cell parasitism. Colchicine and cytochalasin B, however, did produce some inhibition of adherence to HeLa cells. The data suggest that metabolizing T. vaginalis adheres to host cells via parasite surface

  4. Specific nature of Trichomonas vaginalis parasitism of host cell surfaces.

    PubMed Central

    Alderete, J F; Garza, G E

    1985-01-01

    The adherence of Trichomonas vaginalis NYH 286 to host cells was evaluated by using monolayer cultures of HeLa and HEp-2 epithelial cells and human fibroblast cell lines. Saturation of sites on HeLa cells was achieved, yielding a maximal T. vaginalis NYH 286-to-cell ratio of two. The ability of radiolabeled NYH 286 to compete with unlabeled trichomonads for attachment and the time, temperature, and pH-dependent nature of host cell parasitism reinforced the idea of specific parasite-cell associations. Other trichomonal isolates (JH31A, RU375, and JHHR) were also found to adhere to cell monolayers, albeit to different degrees, and all isolates produced maximal contact-dependent HeLa cell cytotoxicity. The avirulent trichomonad, Trichomonas tenax, did not adhere to cell monolayers and did not cause host cell damage. Interestingly, parasite cytadherence was greater with HeLa and HEp-2 epithelial cells than with fibroblast cells. In addition, cytotoxicity with fibroblast cells never exceeded 20% of the level of cell killing observed for epithelial cells. Elucidation of properties of the pathogenic human trichomonads that allowed for host cell surface parasitism was also attempted. Treatment of motile T. vaginalis NYH 286 with trypsin diminished cell parasitism. Incubation of trypsinized organisms in growth medium allowed for regeneration of trichomonal adherence, and cycloheximide inhibited the regeneration of attachment. Organisms poisoned with metronidazole or iodoacetate failed to attach to host cells, and adherent trichomonads exposed to metronidazole or iodoacetate were readily released from parasitized cells. Coincubation experiments with polycationic proteins and sugars and pretreatment of parasites or cells with neuraminidase or periodate had no effect on host cell parasitism. Colchicine and cytochalasin B, however, did produce some inhibition of adherence to HeLa cells. The data suggest that metabolizing T. vaginalis adheres to host cells via parasite surface

  5. Central B-Cell Tolerance: Where Selection Begins

    PubMed Central

    Pelanda, Roberta; Torres, Raul M.

    2012-01-01

    The development of an adaptive immune system based on the random generation of antigen receptors requires a stringent selection process that sifts through receptor specificities to remove those reacting with self-antigens. In the B-cell lineage, this selection process is first applied to IgM+ immature B cells. By using increasingly sophisticated mouse models, investigators have identified the central tolerance mechanisms that negatively select autoreactive immature B cells and prevent inclusion of their antigen receptors into the peripheral B-cell pool. Additional studies have uncovered mechanisms that promote the differentiation of nonautoreactive immature B cells and their positive selection into the peripheral B-cell population. These mechanisms of central selection are fundamental to the generation of a naïve B-cell repertoire that is largely devoid of self-reactivity while capable of reacting with any foreign insult. PMID:22378602

  6. CD133+ cell selection is an alternative to CD34+ cell selection for ex vivo expansion of hematopoietic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Kobari, L; Giarratana, M C; Pflumio, F; Izac, B; Coulombel, L; Douay, L

    2001-04-01

    CD133 is a new stem cell antigen that may provide an alternative to CD34 for the selection and expansion of hematopoietic cells for transplantation. This study compared the expansion capacities of CD133(+) and CD34(+) cells isolated from the same cord blood (CB) samples. After 14 days culture in stroma-free, serum-free medium in the presence of stem cell factor (SCF), Flt3-1, megakaryocyte growth and development factor (MGDF), and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), the CD133(+) and CD34(+) fractions displayed comparable expansion of the myeloid compartment (CFC, LTC-IC, and E-LTC-IC). The expansion of CD133(+) CB cells was up to 1262-fold for total cells, 99-fold for CD34(+) cells, 109-fold for CD34(+) CD133(+) cells, 133-fold for CFU-GM, 14.5-fold for LTC-IC, and 7.5-fold for E-LTC-IC. Moreover, the expanded population was able to generate lymphoid B (CD19(+)), NK (CD56(+)), and T (CD4(+) CD8(+)) cells in liquid or fetal thymic organ cultures, while expression of the homing antigen CXCR4 was similar on expanded and nonexpanded CD133(+) or CD34(+) cells. Thus, the CD133(+) subset could be expanded in the same manner as the CD34(+) subset and conserved its multilineage capacity, which would support the relevance of CD133 for clinical hematopoietic selection.

  7. Nylon-3 polymers that enable selective culture of endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Runhui; Chen, Xinyu; Gellman, Samuel H; Masters, Kristyn S

    2013-11-06

    Substrates that selectively encourage the growth of specific cell types are valuable for the engineering of complex tissues. Some cell-selective peptides have been identified from extracellular matrix proteins; these peptides have proven useful for biomaterials-based approaches to tissue repair or regeneration. However, there are very few examples of synthetic materials that display selectivity in supporting cell growth. We describe nylon-3 polymers that support in vitro culture of endothelial cells but do not support the culture of smooth muscle cells or fibroblasts. These materials may be promising for vascular biomaterials applications.

  8. Nylon-3 Polymers that Enable Selective Culture of Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Runhui; Chen, Xinyu; Gellman, Samuel H.; Masters, Kristyn S.

    2014-01-01

    Substrates that selectively encourage the growth of specific cell types are valuable for the engineering of complex tissues. Some cell-selective peptides have been identified from extracellular matrix proteins; these peptides have proven useful for biomaterials-based approaches to tissue repair or regeneration. However, there are very few examples of synthetic materials that display selectivity in supporting cell growth. We describe nylon-3 polymers that support in vitro culture of endothelial cells, but do not support the culture of smooth muscle cells or fibroblasts. These materials may be promising for vascular biomaterials applications. PMID:24156536

  9. Selection of natural autoreactive B cells.

    PubMed

    Hardy, Richard R; Hayakawa, Kyoko

    2015-01-01

    Natural antibodies produced by CD5+ B1 B cells include anti-thymocyte autoantibody (ATA). Transgenic mice bearing the Ig-μ heavy chain of a prototypic ATA, V(H)3609Vκ21c, demonstrated a critical requirement for self-antigen in the accumulation of ATA B cells and production of high levels of serum ATA. Further work with ATA-μκ transgenic mice revealed that, while development of most B cells were blocked at an immature stage in spleen, some mature ATA B cells were present. ATA-μκ transgenic mice with varying levels of Thy-1 autoantigen showed a clear relationship between BCR crosslinking and B cell fate, with low levels generating marginal zone ATA B cells and complete antigen absence allowing maturation to follicular ATA B cells. Finally, different fates of developing ATA B cells encountering high levels self-antigen may be accounted for by variations in the response of newly formed B cells arising from foetal and adult development.

  10. Linker length in podophyllotoxin-acridine conjugates determines potency in vivo and in vitro as well as specificity against MDR cell lines.

    PubMed

    Rothenborg-Jensen, L; Hansen, H F; Wessel, I; Nitiss, J L; Schmidt, G; Jensen, P B; Sehested, M; Jensen, L H

    2001-12-01

    We have synthesized two podophyllotoxin-acridine conjugates-pACR6 and pACR8. In these compounds an 9-acridinyl moiety is beta linked to the C4 carbon of the four ring system in 4'-demethylepipodophyllotoxin (epiDPT) via eighter an N-6-aminohexanylamide linker (pACR6) or via an N-8-aminooctanylamide linker containing two more carbon atoms (pACR8). The acridine-linker moiety occupies the position where different glucoside moieties, dispensable for activity, are normally linked to epiDPT in the well known epipodophyllotoxins VP-16 and VM-26. As with VP-16 and VM-26, pACR6 and pACR8 show evidence of being topoisomerase II poisons as they stimulate topoisomerase II mediated DNA cleavage in vitro and induce DNA damage in vivo. This in vivo DNA damage, as well as pACR6/pACR8 mediated cytotoxicity, is antagonized by the catalytic topoisomerase II inhibitors ICRF-187 and aclarubicin, demonstrating that topoisomerase II is a functional biological target for these drugs. Despite their structural similarities, pACR6 was more potent than pACR8 in stimulating topoisomerase II mediated DNA cleavage in vitro as well as DNA damage in vivo and pACR6 was accordingly more cytotoxic towards various human and murine cell lines than pACR8. Further, marked cross-resistance to pACR6 was seen among a panel of multidrug-resistant (MDR) cell lines over-expressing the MDR1 (multidrug resistance protein 1) ABC drug transporter, while these cell lines remained sensitive towards pACR8. pACR8 was also capable of circumventing drug resistance among at-MDR (altered topoisomerase II MDR) cell lines not over-expressing drug transporters, while pACR6 was not. Two resistant cell lines, OC-NYH/pACR6 and OC-NYH/pACR8, were developed by exposure of small cell lung cancer (SCLC) OC-NYH cells to gradually increasing concentrations of pACR6 and pACR8, respectively. Here, OC-NYH/pACR6 cells were found to over-express MDR1 and, accordingly, displayed active transport of 3H-labeled vincristine, while OC-NYH

  11. Aberrant B cell selection and activation in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Kil, Laurens P; Hendriks, Rudi W

    2013-08-01

    The detrimental role of B lymphocytes in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is evident from the high levels of pathogenic antinuclear autoantibodies (ANAs) found in SLE patients. Affirming this causative role, additional antibody-independent roles of B cells in SLE were appreciated. In recent years, many defects in B cell selection and activation have been identified in murine lupus models and SLE patients that explain the increased emergence and persistence of autoreactive B cells and their lowered activation threshold. Therefore, clinical trials with B cell depletion regimens in SLE patients were initiated but disappointingly the efficacy of B cell depleting agents proved to be limited. Remarkably however, a major breakthrough in SLE therapy was accomplished by blocking B cell survival factors rather then eliminating B cells. This surprising finding indicates that although SLE is a B cell-driven disease, the amplifying crosstalk between B cells and other cells of the immune system likely evokes the observed tolerance breakdown in B cells. Moreover, this implies that intelligent interception of pro-inflammatory loops rather then selectively silencing B cells will be key to the development of new SLE therapies. In this review, we will not only highlight the intrinsic B cell defects that facilitate the persistence of autoreactive B cells and their activation, but in addition we will focus on B cell extrinsic signals derived from T cells and innate immune cells that lower the activation threshold for B cells.

  12. Comparative analysis of selected fuel cell vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    1993-05-07

    Vehicles powered by fuel cells operate more efficiently, more quietly, and more cleanly than internal combustion engines (ICEs). Furthermore, methanol-fueled fuel cell vehicles (FCVs) can utilize major elements of the existing fueling infrastructure of present-day liquid-fueled ICE vehicles (ICEVs). DOE has maintained an active program to stimulate the development and demonstration o fuel cell technologies in conjunction with rechargeable batteries in road vehicles. The purpose of this study is to identify and assess the availability of data on FCVs, and to develop a vehicle subsystem structure that can be used to compare both FCVs and ICEV, from a number of perspectives--environmental impacts, energy utilization, materials usage, and life cycle costs. This report focuses on methanol-fueled FCVs fueled by gasoline, methanol, and diesel fuel that are likely to be demonstratable by the year 2000. The comparative analysis presented covers four vehicles--two passenger vehicles and two urban transit buses. The passenger vehicles include an ICEV using either gasoline or methanol and an FCV using methanol. The FCV uses a Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cell, an on-board methanol reformer, mid-term batteries, and an AC motor. The transit bus ICEV was evaluated for both diesel and methanol fuels. The transit bus FCV runs on methanol and uses a Phosphoric Acid Fuel Cell (PAFC) fuel cell, near-term batteries, a DC motor, and an on-board methanol reformer. 75 refs.

  13. Selectable-Tip Corrosion-Testing Electrochemical Cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lomness, Janice; Hintze, Paul

    2008-01-01

    The figure depicts aspects of an electrochemical cell for pitting- corrosion tests of material specimens. The cell is designed to generate a region of corrosion having a pit diameter determined by the diameter of a selectable tip. The average depth of corrosion is controlled by controlling the total electric charge passing through the cell in a test. The cell is also designed to produce minimal artifacts associated with crevice corrosion. There are three selectable tips, having diameters of 0.1 in. (0.254 cm), 0.3 in. (0.762 cm), and 0.6 in. (1.524 cm), respectively.

  14. T cell depleted haploidentical transplantation: positive selection.

    PubMed

    Aversa, Franco

    2011-06-22

    Interest in mismatched transplantation arises from the fact that a suitable one-haplotype mismatched donor is immediately available for virtually all patients, particularly for those who urgently need an allogenic transplant. Work on one haplotype-mismatched transplants has been proceeding for over 20 years all over the world and novel transplant techniques have been developed. Some centres have focused on the conditioning regimens and post transplant immune suppression; others have concentrated on manipulating the graft which may be a megadose of extensively T celldepleted or unmanipulated progenitor cells. Excellent engraftment rates are associated with a very low incidence of acute and chronic GVHD and regimen-related mortality even in patients who are over 50 years old. Overall, event-free survival and transplant-related mortality compare favourably with reports on transplants from sources of stem cells other than the matched sibling.

  15. Selective Chemosensitization of Rb Mutant Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-07-01

    examined the ability of each E1A mutant to induce p53. Cells expressing full-length E1A dis - played a 20- to 30-fold increase in steady-state p53...retinoblastoma (Rb) protein, and inac- tivation of both is essential for viral transformation (Lane and Crawford 1979; Linzer and Levine 1979; De- Caprio et al...Western blotting. Despite the fact that wild-type MEFs expressing El A dis - played an -10-fold increase in p53 and Mdm2 levels as compared to their Ai?F

  16. Soft fibrin gels promote selection and growth of tumorigenic cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jing; Tan, Youhua; Zhang, Huafeng; Zhang, Yi; Xu, Pingwei; Chen, Junwei; Poh, Yeh-Chuin; Tang, Ke; Wang, Ning; Huang, Bo

    2012-08-01

    The identification of stem-cell-like cancer cells through conventional methods that depend on stem cell markers is often unreliable. We developed a mechanical method for selecting tumorigenic cells by culturing single cancer cells in fibrin matrices of ~100 Pa in stiffness. When cultured within these gels, primary human cancer cells or single cancer cells from mouse or human cancer cell lines grew within a few days into individual round colonies that resembled embryonic stem cell colonies. Subcutaneous or intravenous injection of 10 or 100 fibrin-cultured cells in syngeneic or severe combined immunodeficiency mice led to the formation of solid tumours at the site of injection or at the distant lung organ much more efficiently than control cancer cells selected using conventional surface marker methods or cultured on conventional rigid dishes or on soft gels. Remarkably, as few as ten such cells were able to survive and form tumours in the lungs of wild-type non-syngeneic mice.

  17. Modeling selective elimination of quiescent cancer cells from bone marrow.

    PubMed

    Cavnar, Stephen P; Rickelmann, Andrew D; Meguiar, Kaille F; Xiao, Annie; Dosch, Joseph; Leung, Brendan M; Cai Lesher-Perez, Sasha; Chitta, Shashank; Luker, Kathryn E; Takayama, Shuichi; Luker, Gary D

    2015-08-01

    Patients with many types of malignancy commonly harbor quiescent disseminated tumor cells in bone marrow. These cells frequently resist chemotherapy and may persist for years before proliferating as recurrent metastases. To test for compounds that eliminate quiescent cancer cells, we established a new 384-well 3D spheroid model in which small numbers of cancer cells reversibly arrest in G1/G0 phase of the cell cycle when cultured with bone marrow stromal cells. Using dual-color bioluminescence imaging to selectively quantify viability of cancer and stromal cells in the same spheroid, we identified single compounds and combination treatments that preferentially eliminated quiescent breast cancer cells but not stromal cells. A treatment combination effective against malignant cells in spheroids also eliminated breast cancer cells from bone marrow in a mouse xenograft model. This research establishes a novel screening platform for therapies that selectively target quiescent tumor cells, facilitating identification of new drugs to prevent recurrent cancer. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. MerTK regulates thymic selection of autoreactive T cells.

    PubMed

    Wallet, Mark A; Flores, Rafael R; Wang, Yaming; Yi, Zuoan; Kroger, Charles J; Mathews, Clayton E; Earp, H Shelton; Matsushima, Glenn; Wang, Bo; Tisch, Roland

    2009-03-24

    T cell-mediated autoimmune diseases such as type 1 diabetes (T1D) are believed to be the result in part of inefficient negative selection of self-specific thymocytes. However, the events regulating thymic negative selection are not fully understood. In the current study, we demonstrate that nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice lacking expression of the Mer tyrosine kinase (MerTK) have reduced inflammation of the pancreatic islets and fail to develop diabetes. Furthermore, NOD mice deficient in MerTK expression (Mer(-/-)) exhibit a reduced frequency of beta cell-specific T cells independent of immunoregulatory effectors. The establishment of bone marrow chimeric mice demonstrated that the block in beta cell autoimmunity required hematopoietic-derived cells lacking MerTK expression. Notably, fetal thymic organ cultures and self-peptide administration showed increased thymic negative selection in Mer(-/-) mice. Finally, thymic dendritic cells (DC) prepared from Mer(-/-) mice exhibited an increased capacity to induce thymocyte apoptosis in a peptide-specific manner in vitro. These findings provide evidence for a unique mechanism involving MerTK-mediated regulation of thymocyte negative selection and thymic DC, and suggest a role for MerTK in contributing to beta cell autoimmunity.

  19. Selective single cell isolation for genomics using microraft arrays

    PubMed Central

    Welch, Joshua D.; Williams, Lindsay A.; DiSalvo, Matthew; Brandt, Alicia T.; Marayati, Raoud; Sims, Christopher E.; Allbritton, Nancy L.; Prins, Jan F.; Yeh, Jen Jen; Jones, Corbin D.

    2016-01-01

    Genomic methods are used increasingly to interrogate the individual cells that compose specific tissues. However, current methods for single cell isolation struggle to phenotypically differentiate specific cells in a heterogeneous population and rely primarily on the use of fluorescent markers. Many cellular phenotypes of interest are too complex to be measured by this approach, making it difficult to connect genotype and phenotype at the level of individual cells. Here we demonstrate that microraft arrays, which are arrays containing thousands of individual cell culture sites, can be used to select single cells based on a variety of phenotypes, such as cell surface markers, cell proliferation and drug response. We then show that a common genomic procedure, RNA-seq, can be readily adapted to the single cells isolated from these rafts. We show that data generated using microrafts and our modified RNA-seq protocol compared favorably with the Fluidigm C1. We then used microraft arrays to select pancreatic cancer cells that proliferate in spite of cytotoxic drug treatment. Our single cell RNA-seq data identified several expected and novel gene expression changes associated with early drug resistance. PMID:27530426

  20. Antagonistic effect of aclarubicin on daunorubicin-induced cytotoxicity in human small cell lung cancer cells: relationship to DNA integrity and topoisomerase II.

    PubMed

    Jensen, P B; Jensen, P S; Demant, E J; Friche, E; Sørensen, B S; Sehested, M; Wassermann, K; Vindeløv, L; Westergaard, O; Hansen, H H

    1991-10-01

    The effect of combinations of the anthracyclines aclarubicin and daunorubicin was investigated in a clonogenic assay using the human small cell lung cancer cell line OC-NYH and a multidrug-resistant (MDR) murine subline of Ehrlich ascites tumor (EHR2/DNR+). It was found that the cytotoxicity of daunorubicin in OC-NYH cells was antagonized by simultaneous exposure to nontoxic concentrations of aclarubicin. Coordinately, aclarubicin inhibited the formation of daunorubicin-induced protein-concealed DNA single-strand breaks and DNA-protein cross-links in OC-NYH cells when assayed by the alkaline elution technique. Aclarubicin had no influence on the accumulation of daunorubicin in these cells. In contrast, the accumulation of daunorubicin in EHR2/DNR+ cells was enhanced by more than 300% when the cells were simultaneously incubated with the MDR modulator verapamil, aclarubicin, or the two agents combined. Yet the cytotoxicity of daunorubicin was potentiated significantly only by verapamil. The increased cytotoxicity of daunorubicin in the presence of verapamil was completely antagonized when aclarubicin was used together with the MDR modulator. Finally, the effect of daunorubicin on the DNA cleavage activity of purified topoisomerase II in the presence and absence of aclarubicin was examined. It was found that daunorubicin stimulated DNA cleavage by topoisomerase II at specific DNA sites. The addition of aclarubicin completely inhibited the daunorubicin-induced stimulation of DNA cleavage. Taken together, these data indicate that aclarubicin-mediated inhibition of daunorubicin-induced cytotoxicity is due mainly to a drug interaction with the nuclear enzyme topoisomerase II. This antagonism at the nuclear level explains why aclarubicin is a poor modulator of daunorubicin resistance even though aclarubicin is able to increase the intracellular accumulation of daunorubicin in a MDR cell line.

  1. CD6 modulates thymocyte selection and peripheral T cell homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Consuegra-Fernández, Marta; Girard, Laura; Aranda, Fernando; Martínez, Vanesa-Gabriela; Sarukhan, Adelaida; Malissen, Marie

    2016-01-01

    The CD6 glycoprotein is a lymphocyte surface receptor putatively involved in T cell development and activation. CD6 facilitates adhesion between T cells and antigen-presenting cells through its interaction with CD166/ALCAM (activated leukocyte cell adhesion molecule), and physically associates with the T cell receptor (TCR) at the center of the immunological synapse. However, its precise role during thymocyte development and peripheral T cell immune responses remains to be defined. Here, we analyze the in vivo consequences of CD6 deficiency. CD6−/− thymi showed a reduction in both CD4+ and CD8+ single-positive subsets, and double-positive thymocytes exhibited increased Ca2+ mobilization to TCR cross-linking in vitro. Bone marrow chimera experiments revealed a T cell–autonomous selective disadvantage of CD6−/− T cells during development. The analysis of TCR-transgenic mice (OT-I and Marilyn) confirmed that abnormal T cell selection events occur in the absence of CD6. CD6−/− mice displayed increased frequencies of antigen-experienced peripheral T cells generated under certain levels of TCR signal strength or co-stimulation, such as effector/memory (CD4+TEM and CD8+TCM) and regulatory (T reg) T cells. The suppressive activity of CD6−/− T reg cells was diminished, and CD6−/− mice presented an exacerbated autoimmune response to collagen. Collectively, these data indicate that CD6 modulates the threshold for thymocyte selection and the generation and/or function of several peripheral T cell subpopulations, including T reg cells. PMID:27377588

  2. Cuprous oxide nanoparticles selectively induce apoptosis of tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ye; Zi, Xiao-Yuan; Su, Juan; Zhang, Hong-Xia; Zhang, Xin-Rong; Zhu, Hai-Ying; Li, Jian-Xiu; Yin, Meng; Yang, Feng; Hu, Yi-Ping

    2012-01-01

    In the rapid development of nanoscience and nanotechnology, many researchers have discovered that metal oxide nanoparticles have very useful pharmacological effects. Cuprous oxide nanoparticles (CONPs) can selectively induce apoptosis and suppress the proliferation of tumor cells, showing great potential as a clinical cancer therapy. Treatment with CONPs caused a G1/G0 cell cycle arrest in tumor cells. Furthermore, CONPs enclosed in vesicles entered, or were taken up by mitochondria, which damaged their membranes, thereby inducing apoptosis. CONPs can also produce reactive oxygen species (ROS) and initiate lipid peroxidation of the liposomal membrane, thereby regulating many signaling pathways and influencing the vital movements of cells. Our results demonstrate that CONPs have selective cytotoxicity towards tumor cells, and indicate that CONPs might be a potential nanomedicine for cancer therapy. PMID:22679374

  3. Building Cell Selectivity into CPP-Mediated Strategies.

    PubMed

    Martín, Irene; Teixidó, Meritxell; Giralt, Ernest

    2010-05-14

    There is a pressing need for more effective and selective therapies for cancer and other diseases. Consequently, much effort is being devoted to the development of alternative experimental approaches based on selective systems, which are designed to be specifically directed against target cells. In addition, a large number of highly potent therapeutic molecules are being discovered. However, they do not reach clinical trials because of their low delivery, poor specificity or their incapacity to bypass the plasma membrane. Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) are an open door for cell-impermeable compounds to reach intracellular targets. Putting all these together, research is sailing in the direction of the design of systems with the capacity to transport new drugs into a target cell. Some CPPs show cell type specificity while others require modifications or form part of more sophisticated drug delivery systems. In this review article we summarize several strategies for directed drug delivery involving CPPs that have been reported in the literature.

  4. What makes a cell face selective? The importance of contrast.

    PubMed

    Ohayon, Shay; Freiwald, Winrich A; Tsao, Doris Y

    2012-05-10

    Faces are robustly detected by computer vision algorithms that search for characteristic coarse contrast features. Here, we investigated whether face-selective cells in the primate brain exploit contrast features as well. We recorded from face-selective neurons in macaque inferotemporal cortex, while presenting a face-like collage of regions whose luminances were changed randomly. Modulating contrast combinations between regions induced activity changes ranging from no response to a response greater than that to a real face in 50% of cells. The critical stimulus factor determining response magnitude was contrast polarity, for example, nose region brighter than left eye. Contrast polarity preferences were consistent across cells, suggesting a common computational strategy across the population, and matched features used by computer vision algorithms for face detection. Furthermore, most cells were tuned both for contrast polarity and for the geometry of facial features, suggesting cells encode information useful both for detection and recognition.

  5. ICAMs support B cell interactions with T follicular helper cells and promote clonal selection.

    PubMed

    Zaretsky, Irina; Atrakchi, Ofir; Mazor, Roei D; Stoler-Barak, Liat; Biram, Adi; Feigelson, Sara W; Gitlin, Alexander D; Engelhardt, Britta; Shulman, Ziv

    2017-09-22

    The germinal center (GC) reaction begins with a diverse and expanded group of B cell clones bearing a wide range of antibody affinities. During GC colonization, B cells engage in long-lasting interactions with T follicular helper (Tfh) cells, a process that depends on antigen uptake and antigen presentation to the Tfh cells. How long-lasting T-B interactions and B cell clonal expansion are regulated by antigen presentation remains unclear. Here, we use in vivo B cell competition models and intravital imaging to examine the adhesive mechanisms governing B cell selection for GC colonization. We find that intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) and ICAM-2 on B cells are essential for long-lasting cognate Tfh-B cell interactions and efficient selection of low-affinity B cell clones for proliferative clonal expansion. Thus, B cell ICAMs promote efficient antibody immune response by enhancement of T cell help to cognate B cells. © 2017 Zaretsky et al.

  6. Selective in vivo metabolic cell-labeling-mediated cancer targeting.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hua; Wang, Ruibo; Cai, Kaimin; He, Hua; Liu, Yang; Yen, Jonathan; Wang, Zhiyu; Xu, Ming; Sun, Yiwen; Zhou, Xin; Yin, Qian; Tang, Li; Dobrucki, Iwona T; Dobrucki, Lawrence W; Chaney, Eric J; Boppart, Stephen A; Fan, Timothy M; Lezmi, Stéphane; Chen, Xuesi; Yin, Lichen; Cheng, Jianjun

    2017-02-13

    Distinguishing cancer cells from normal cells through surface receptors is vital for cancer diagnosis and targeted therapy. Metabolic glycoengineering of unnatural sugars provides a powerful tool to manually introduce chemical receptors onto the cell surface; however, cancer-selective labeling still remains a great challenge. Herein we report the design of sugars that can selectively label cancer cells both in vitro and in vivo. Specifically, we inhibit the cell-labeling activity of tetraacetyl-N-azidoacetylmannosamine (Ac4ManAz) by converting its anomeric acetyl group to a caged ether bond that can be selectively cleaved by cancer-overexpressed enzymes and thus enables the overexpression of azido groups on the surface of cancer cells. Histone deacetylase and cathepsin L-responsive acetylated azidomannosamine, one such enzymatically activatable Ac4ManAz analog developed, mediated cancer-selective labeling in vivo, which enhanced tumor accumulation of a dibenzocyclooctyne-doxorubicin conjugate via click chemistry and enabled targeted therapy against LS174T colon cancer, MDA-MB-231 triple-negative breast cancer and 4T1 metastatic breast cancer in mice.

  7. VEGF and Notch in Tip and Stalk Cell Selection

    PubMed Central

    Blanco, Raquel; Gerhardt, Holger

    2013-01-01

    Sprouting angiogenesis is a dynamic process in which endothelial cells collectively migrate, shape new lumenized tubes, make new connections, and remodel the nascent network into a hierarchically branched and functionally perfused vascular bed. Endothelial cells in the nascent sprout adopt two distinct cellular phenotypes—known as tip and stalk cells—with specialized functions and gene expression patterns. VEGF and Notch signaling engage in an intricate cross talk to balance tip and stalk cell formation and to regulate directed tip cell migration and stalk cell proliferation. In this article, we summarize the current knowledge and implications of the tip/stalk cell concepts and the quantitative and dynamic integration of VEGF and Notch signaling in tip and stalk cell selection. PMID:23085847

  8. Metformin selectively affects human glioblastoma tumor-initiating cell viability

    PubMed Central

    Würth, Roberto; Pattarozzi, Alessandra; Gatti, Monica; Bajetto, Adirana; Corsaro, Alessandro; Parodi, Alessia; Sirito, Rodolfo; Massollo, Michela; Marini, Cecilia; Zona, Gianluigi; Fenoglio, Daniela; Sambuceti, Gianmario; Filaci, Gilberto; Daga, Antonio; Barbieri, Federica; Florio, Tullio

    2013-01-01

    Cancer stem cell theory postulates that a small population of tumor-initiating cells is responsible for the development, progression and recurrence of several malignancies, including glioblastoma. In this perspective, tumor-initiating cells represent the most relevant target to obtain effective cancer treatment. Metformin, a first-line drug for type II diabetes, was reported to possess anticancer properties affecting the survival of cancer stem cells in breast cancer models. We report that metformin treatment reduced the proliferation rate of tumor-initiating cell-enriched cultures isolated from four human glioblastomas. Metformin also impairs tumor-initiating cell spherogenesis, indicating a direct effect on self-renewal mechanisms. Interestingly, analyzing by FACS the antiproliferative effects of metformin on CD133-expressing subpopulation, a component of glioblastoma cancer stem cells, a higher reduction of proliferation was observed as compared with CD133-negative cells, suggesting a certain degree of cancer stem cell selectivity in its effects. In fact, glioblastoma cell differentiation strongly reduced sensitivity to metformin treatment. Metformin effects in tumor-initiating cell-enriched cultures were associated with a powerful inhibition of Akt-dependent cell survival pathway, while this pathway was not affected in differentiated cells. The specificity of metformin antiproliferative effects toward glioblastoma tumor-initiating cells was confirmed by the lack of significant inhibition of normal human stem cells (umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells) in vitro proliferation after metformin exposure. Altogether, these data clearly suggest that metformin exerts antiproliferative activity on glioblastoma cells, showing a higher specificity toward tumor-initiating cells, and that the inhibition of Akt pathway may represent a possible intracellular target of this effect. PMID:23255107

  9. Development of a potent and selective cell penetrant Legumain inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Ness, Kerry A; Eddie, Sharon L; Higgins, Catherine A; Templeman, Amy; D'Costa, Zenobia; Gaddale, Kishore K D; Bouzzaoui, Samira; Jordan, Linda; Janssen, Dominic; Harrison, Timothy; Burkamp, Frank; Young, Andrew; Burden, Roberta; Scott, Christopher J; Mullan, Paul B; Williams, Rich

    2015-12-01

    This Letter describes the continued SAR exploration of small molecule Legumain inhibitors with the aim of developing a potent and selective in vitro tool compound. Work continued in this Letter explores the use of alternative P2-P3 linker units and the P3 group SAR which led to the identification of 10t, a potent, selective and cellularly active Legumain inhibitor. We also demonstrate that 10t has activity in both cancer cell viability and colony formation assays.

  10. Selective Cell Growth on Fibronectin-Carbon Nanotube Hybrid Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namgung, Seon; Park, Sung Young; Lee, Byung Yang; Lee, Minbaek; Nam, Jwa-Min; Hong, Seunghun

    2008-03-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNT) have been considered a promising material for biological applications including biosensors, therapeutic application, and nano-structured scaffolds. However, there are still controversies associated with toxicity and biocompatibility of CNTs on live cells. Here, we report general strategy to functionalize CNTs with cell adhesion molecules (fibronectins) for selective and stable adhesion of cells on CNTs. Interestingly, more fibronectins were adsorbed and activated on CNTs rather than on hydrophobic self assembled monolayers (SAMs) or bare substrates (SiO2). We demonstrate the functionality of fibronectins on CNTs with immunofluorescence and molecule-level force measurement study using atomic force microscopy (AFM). These fibronectin-CNT hybrid nanostructures were successfully applied to attract cells selectively onto predefined regions on the substrate. Our strategy was generally available on various cell types including mesenchymal stem cells, KB cells, and NIH3T3 fibroblast cells (Advanced Materials 19, 2530-2534 (2007)). We will also discuss about its impacts on cell biology combined with CNTs.

  11. Efficient selection of Gal-knockout pig cells for somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Reyes, Luz M; Estrada, Jose L; Ivary, Bess; Sidner, Richard A; Paris, Leela L; Tector, A Joseph

    2013-10-01

    The process of selecting transgenic cells has been one of the bottlenecks in the generation of transgenic animals by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). In particular, selection for the Gal double-knockout (Gal-DKO) genotype has been time consuming and inefficient. The objective of this work was to generate a highly efficient system to select Gal-DKO cells to be used in SCNT without affecting the efficiency in production of Gal-null pigs. Fetal liver-derived cells deficient in Gal-expression were initially selected by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) using IB4 conjugated to a fluorescent dye. Cells recovered by FACS were cultured and expanded, followed by a second round of selection using streptavidin magnetic beads and IB4 lectin biotin. Recovery efficiency of target cells was 0.04% for the first selection using FACS and 0.3% for the second round by magnetic beads. Full reprogramming was obtained on selected Gal-DKO cells after FACS and magnetic beads selection, when used for SCNT to produce the Gal-null piglets. Cells obtained from magnetic beads developed 48 colonies; the Gal-null genotype was found in 44 of them (91.7%). Three of these colonies were used to generate piglets by SCNT. From three recipients receiving embryos, two became pregnant and produced 17 piglets, all of them DKO. Sequential selection of Gal-DKO cells by FACS/magnetic beads is a highly efficient system to generate null cells. Selected cells were successfully used to generate healthy double-knockout piglets by SCNT. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Selective Label-free Electrokinetic Cell Tracker (SELECT): a novel liquid platform for cell characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taruvai Kalyana Kumar, Rajeshwari; de Mello Gindri, Izabelle; Kinnamon, David; Kanchustambham, Pradyotha; Rodrigues, Danieli; Prasad, Shalini; BiomaterialsOsseointegration; Novel Engineering Lab Collaboration

    2015-03-01

    Characterization and analysis of rare cells provide critical cues for early diagnosis of diseases. Electrokinetic cell separation has been previously established to have greater efficiency when compared to traditional flow cytometry methods. It has been shown by many researchers that buffer solutions in which cells are suspended in, have enormous effects on producing required dielectrophoretic (DEP) forces to characterize cells. Most commonly used suspension buffers used are deionized water and cell media. However, these solutions exhibit high level of intrinsic noise, which greatly masks the electrokinetic signals from cells under study. Ionic liquids (ILs) show promise towards the creation of conductive fluids with required electrical properties. The goal of this project is to design and test ILs for enhancing DEP forces on cells while creating an environment for preserving their integrity. We analyzed two methylimidazolium based ILs as suspension medium for cell separation. These dicationic ILs possess slight electrical and structural differences with high thermal stability. The two ILs were tested for cytotoxicity using HeLa and bone cells. The effects of electrical neutrality, free charge screening due to ILs towards enhanced electrokinetic signals from cells were studied with improved system resolution and no harmful effects.

  13. Selective transgene expression for detection and elimination of contaminating carcinoma cells in hematopoietic stem cell sources.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, L; Pulsipher, M; Chen, D; Sieff, C; Elias, A; Fine, H A; Kufe, D W

    1996-01-01

    Tumor contamination of bone marrow (BM) and peripheral blood (PB) may affect the outcome of patients receiving high dose chemotherapy with autologous transplantation of hematopoietic stem cell products. In this report, we demonstrate that replication defective adenoviral vectors containing the cytomegalovirus (CMV) or DF3/MUC1 carcinoma-selective promoter can be used to selectively transduce contaminating carcinoma cells. Adenoviral-mediated reporter gene expression in breast cancer cells was five orders of magnitude higher than that found in BM, PB, and CD34+ cells. Our results demonstrate that CD34+ cells have low to undetectable levels of integrins responsible for adenoviral internalization. We show that adenoviral-mediated transduction of a reporter gene can detect one breast cancer cell in 5 x 10(5) BM or PB cells with a vector containing the DF3/MUC1 promoter. We also show that transduction of the HSV-tk gene for selective killing by ganciclovir can be exploited for purging cancer cells from hematopoietic stem cell populations. The selective expression of TK followed by ganciclovir treatment resulted in the elimination of 6-logs of contaminating cancer cells. By contrast, there was little effect on CFU-GM and BFU-E formulation or on long term culture initiating cells. These results indicate that adenoviral vectors with a tumor-selective promoter provide a highly efficient and effective approach for the detection and purging of carcinoma cells in hematopoietic stem cell preparations. PMID:8958216

  14. Cold Atmospheric Plasma for Selectively Ablating Metastatic Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Mian; Holmes, Benjamin; Cheng, Xiaoqian; Zhu, Wei; Keidar, Michael; Zhang, Lijie Grace

    2013-01-01

    Traditional breast cancer treatments such as surgery and radiotherapy contain many inherent limitations with regards to incomplete and nonselective tumor ablation. Cold atomospheric plasma (CAP) is an ionized gas where the ion temperature is close to room temperature. It contains electrons, charged particles, radicals, various excited molecules, UV photons and transient electric fields. These various compositional elements have the potential to either enhance and promote cellular activity, or disrupt and destroy them. In particular, based on this unique composition, CAP could offer a minimally-invasive surgical approach allowing for specific cancer cell or tumor tissue removal without influencing healthy cells. Thus, the objective of this research is to investigate a novel CAP-based therapy for selectively bone metastatic breast cancer treatment. For this purpose, human metastatic breast cancer (BrCa) cells and bone marrow derived human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were separately treated with CAP, and behavioral changes were evaluated after 1, 3, and 5 days of culture. With different treatment times, different BrCa and MSC cell responses were observed. Our results showed that BrCa cells were more sensitive to these CAP treatments than MSCs under plasma dose conditions tested. It demonstrated that CAP can selectively ablate metastatic BrCa cells in vitro without damaging healthy MSCs at the metastatic bone site. In addition, our study showed that CAP treatment can significantly inhibit the migration and invasion of BrCa cells. The results suggest the great potential of CAP for breast cancer therapy. PMID:24040051

  15. Directional summation in non-direction selective retinal ganglion cells.

    PubMed

    Abbas, Syed Y; Hamade, Khaldoun C; Yang, Ellen J; Nawy, Scott; Smith, Robert G; Pettit, Diana L

    2013-01-01

    Retinal ganglion cells receive inputs from multiple bipolar cells which must be integrated before a decision to fire is made. Theoretical studies have provided clues about how this integration is accomplished but have not directly determined the rules regulating summation of closely timed inputs along single or multiple dendrites. Here we have examined dendritic summation of multiple inputs along On ganglion cell dendrites in whole mount rat retina. We activated inputs at targeted locations by uncaging glutamate sequentially to generate apparent motion along On ganglion cell dendrites in whole mount retina. Summation was directional and dependent13 on input sequence. Input moving away from the soma (centrifugal) resulted in supralinear summation, while activation sequences moving toward the soma (centripetal) were linear. Enhanced summation for centrifugal activation was robust as it was also observed in cultured retinal ganglion cells. This directional summation was dependent on hyperpolarization activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels as blockade with ZD7288 eliminated directionality. A computational model confirms that activation of HCN channels can override a preference for centripetal summation expected from cell anatomy. This type of direction selectivity could play a role in coding movement similar to the axial selectivity seen in locust ganglion cells which detect looming stimuli. More generally, these results suggest that non-directional retinal ganglion cells can discriminate between input sequences independent of the retina network.

  16. Directional Summation in Non-direction Selective Retinal Ganglion Cells

    PubMed Central

    Abbas, Syed Y.; Hamade, Khaldoun C.; Yang, Ellen J.; Nawy, Scott; Smith, Robert G.; Pettit, Diana L.

    2013-01-01

    Retinal ganglion cells receive inputs from multiple bipolar cells which must be integrated before a decision to fire is made. Theoretical studies have provided clues about how this integration is accomplished but have not directly determined the rules regulating summation of closely timed inputs along single or multiple dendrites. Here we have examined dendritic summation of multiple inputs along On ganglion cell dendrites in whole mount rat retina. We activated inputs at targeted locations by uncaging glutamate sequentially to generate apparent motion along On ganglion cell dendrites in whole mount retina. Summation was directional and dependent13 on input sequence. Input moving away from the soma (centrifugal) resulted in supralinear summation, while activation sequences moving toward the soma (centripetal) were linear. Enhanced summation for centrifugal activation was robust as it was also observed in cultured retinal ganglion cells. This directional summation was dependent on hyperpolarization activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels as blockade with ZD7288 eliminated directionality. A computational model confirms that activation of HCN channels can override a preference for centripetal summation expected from cell anatomy. This type of direction selectivity could play a role in coding movement similar to the axial selectivity seen in locust ganglion cells which detect looming stimuli. More generally, these results suggest that non-directional retinal ganglion cells can discriminate between input sequences independent of the retina network. PMID:23516351

  17. Selective killing of cancer cells by nanoparticle-assisted ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Kosheleva, Olga K; Lai, Tsung-Ching; Chen, Nelson G; Hsiao, Michael; Chen, Chung-Hsuan

    2016-06-14

    Intense ultrasound, such as that used for tumor ablation, does not differentiate between cancerous and normal cells. A method combining ultrasound and biocompatible gold or magnetic nanoparticles (NPs) was developed under in vitro conditions using human breast and lung epithelial cells, which causes ultrasound to preferentially destroy cancerous cells. Co-cultures of BEAS-2B normal lung cells and A549 cancerous lung cells labeled with green and red fluorescent proteins, respectively, were treated with focused ultrasound beams with the addition of gold and magnetic nanoparticles. There were significantly more necrotic A549 cells than BEAS-2 cells when gold nanoparticles were added to the culture medium [(50.6 ± 15.1) vs. (7.4 ± 2.9) %, respectively, P < 0.01]. This selective damage to cancer cells was also observed for MDA-MB231 breast cancer cells relative to MCF-10A normal breast cells after treatment with magnetic nanoparticles. The data obtained for different cell lines indicate that nanoparticle-assisted ultrasound therapy (NAUT) could be an effective new tool for cancer-specific treatment and could potentially be combined with conventional methods of cancer diagnosis and therapy to further increase the overall cancer cure rate.

  18. Best practices for media selection for mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Price, Paul J

    2017-07-19

    Cell culture medium is a complex mixture of nutrients and growth factors that, along with the physical environment, can either help or destroy your experiment or production run. Nutritional requirements differ with different cell types and functions, as do optimal pH and osmolality. As cell growth proceeds, different cells will utilize amino acids and other components at different rates. By controlling for ammonia, free radicals, heavy metal toxicity, pH shifts, fluctuations in osmolality, nutrient depletion, and chemical and biological contaminants, you will optimize the chances of success. The contribution of each component of the medium is essential for the maintenance of the cell type of interest. While some cell types, such as established human cancer cell lines, may be quite able to tolerate a range of media and supplements, many normal cells and stems cells are not. Optimization of each component may be required to successfully maintain the latter cell types. The procedures for selecting and optimizing cell culture media and supplements are presented.

  19. Ligand-Driven T Cell Receptor Selection in Celiac Disease.

    PubMed

    Singh, Nishant K; Baker, Brian M

    2016-10-04

    Recognition of antigens by T cell receptors (TCRs) underlies cellular immunity. By comparing how different TCRs recognize the key antigens associated with celiac disease, Petersen et al. (2016), in this issue of Structure, show how celiac antigen properties select immunologically distinct yet structurally and physically compatible TCRs, ultimately driving autoimmunity.

  20. Cell Selection as Driving Force in Lung and Colon Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Schöllnberger, Helmut; Beerenwinkel, Niko; Hoogenveen, Rudolf; Vineis, Paolo

    2011-01-01

    Carcinogenesis is the result of mutations and subsequent clonal expansions of mutated, selectively advantageous cells. To investigate the relative contributions of mutation versus cell selection in tumorigenesis, we compared two mathematical models of carcinogenesis in two different cancer types: lung and colon. One approach is based on a population genetics model, the Wright-Fisher process, whereas the other approach is the two-stage clonal expansion model. We compared the dynamics of tumorigenesis predicted by the two models in terms of the time period until the first malignant cell appears, which will subsequently form a tumor. The mean waiting time to cancer has been calculated approximately for the evolutionary colon cancer model. Here, we derive new analytic approximations to the median waiting time for the two-stage lung cancer model and for a multistage approximation to the Wright-Fisher process. Both equations show that the waiting time to cancer is dominated by the selective advantage per mutation and the net clonal expansion rate, respectively, whereas the mutation rate has less effect. Our comparisons support the idea that the main driving force in lung and colon carcinogenesis is Darwinian cell selection. PMID:20656803

  1. Collateral sensitivity to gemcitabine (2',2'-difluorodeoxycytidine) and cytosine arabinoside of daunorubicin- and VM-26-resistant variants of human small cell lung cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Bergman, A M; Munch-Petersen, B; Jensen, P B; Sehested, M; Veerman, G; Voorn, D A; Smid, K; Pinedo, H M; Peters, G J

    2001-06-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR), characterized by a cross-resistance to many natural toxin-related compounds, may be caused either by overexpression of a drug efflux pump such as P-glycoprotein, (P-gP), multidrug resistance proteins MRP1-3, or BCRP/MXR or, in the case of DNA topoisomerase II active drugs, by a decrease in the enzymatic activity of the target molecule termed altered topoisomerase MDR (at-MDR). However, human small cell lung carcinoma (SCLC) cell lines showed a collateral sensitivity to 2',2'-difluorodeoxycytidine (gemcitabine, dFdC) and 1-beta-D-arabinofuranosylcytosine (ara-C). H69/DAU, a daunorubicin (DAU)-resistant variant of H69 with a P-gP overexpression, and NYH/VM, a VM-26 (teniposide)-resistant variant of NYH with an at-MDR, were both 2-fold more sensitive to gemcitabine and 7- and 2-fold more sensitive to ara-C, respectively. MDR variants had a 4.3- and 2.0-fold increased activity of deoxycytidine kinase (dCK), respectively. dCK catalyzes the first rate-limiting activation step of both gemcitabine and ara-C. In addition, deoxycytidine deaminase, responsible for inactivation of dFdC and ara-C, was 9.0-fold lower in H69/DAU cells. The level of thymidine kinase 2, a mitochondrial enzyme that can also phosphorylate deoxycytidine and gemcitabine, was not significantly different between the variants. These differences most likely caused an increased accumulation of the active metabolites (dFdCTP, 2.1- and 1.6-fold in NYH/VM and H69/DAU cells, respectively) and of ara-CTP (1.3-fold in NYH/VM cells). Ara-CTP accumulation was not detectable in either H69 variant. The pools of all ribonucleoside and deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates were at least 3- to 4-fold higher in the NYH variants compared to the H69 variants; for dCTP and dGTP this difference was even larger. The higher ribonucleotide pools might explain the >10-fold higher accumulation of dFdCTP in NYH compared to H69 variants. Since dCTP is low, H69 cells might not need a high ara-CTP accumulation

  2. Selective chemical imaging of static actin in live cells.

    PubMed

    Milroy, Lech-Gustav; Rizzo, Stefano; Calderon, Abram; Ellinger, Bernhard; Erdmann, Silke; Mondry, Justine; Verveer, Peter; Bastiaens, Philippe; Waldmann, Herbert; Dehmelt, Leif; Arndt, Hans-Dieter

    2012-05-23

    We have characterized rationally designed and optimized analogues of the actin-stabilizing natural products jasplakinolide and chondramide C. Efficient actin staining was achieved in fixed permeabilized and non-permeabilized cells using different combinations of dye and linker length, thus highlighting the degree of molecular flexibility of the natural product scaffold. Investigations into synthetically accessible, non-toxic analogues have led to the characterization of a powerful cell-permeable probe to selectively image static, long-lived actin filaments against dynamic F-actin and monomeric G-actin populations in live cells, with negligible disruption of rapid actin dynamics.

  3. Direction selectivity and spatiotemporal separability in simple cortical cells.

    PubMed

    García-Pérez, M A

    1999-01-01

    Simple cells in mammalian visual cortex are quasi-linear mechanisms whose behavior departs from true linearity in a very consistent manner. Empirical research on direction selectivity (DS) clearly illustrates these characteristics. A linear DS cell will be DS for all stimuli, whereas a linear non-DS cell will not be DS for any stimuli. However, many simple cells have opposite preferred directions for stimuli of reversed polarity, and some cells are DS for some stimuli (e.g., moving bars) but not for others (e.g., drifting gratings). Also, linear non-DS cells must have separable spatiotemporal receptive fields (RFs), and linear DS cells must have inseparable RFs. Yet many actual DS cells have separable RFs. Here we present a nonlinear model of simple-cell behavior that reproduces all of these empirical behaviors. The model is a variant of the current linear model, amended to include an interleaved nonlinearity (half-wave rectification) that allows it to mimic the (im)balance of push-pull mechanisms. We present simulation results showing that balanced push-pull mechanisms result in linear behavior, while imbalanced push-pull arrangements produce all of the incongruent DS-related behaviors that have been reported for simple cells.

  4. Non PN junction solar cells using carrier selective contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowden, Stuart; Ghosh, Kunal; Honsberg, Christiana

    2013-03-01

    A novel device concept utilizing the approach of selectively extracting carriers at the respective contacts is outlined in the work. The dominant silicon solar cell technology is based on a diffused, top-contacted p-n junction on a relatively thick silicon wafer for both commercial and laboratory solar cells. The VOC and hence the efficiency of a diffused p-n junction solar cell is limited by the emitter recombination current and a value of 720 mV is considered to be the upper limit. The value is more than 100 mV smaller than the thermodynamic limit of VOC as applicable for silicon based solar cells. Also, in diffused junction the use of thin wafers (< 50 um) are problematic because of the requirement of high temperature processing steps. But a number of roadmaps have identified solar cells manufactured on thinner silicon wafers to achieve lower cost and higher efficiency. The carrier selective contact device provides a novel alternative to diffused p-n junction solar cells by eliminating the need for complementary doping to form the emitter and hence it allows the solar cells to achieve a VOC of greater than 720 mV. Also, the complete device structure can be fabricated with low temperature thin film deposition or organic coating on silicon substrates and thus epitaxially grown silicon or kerfless silicon, in addition to standard silicon wafers can be utilized.

  5. Continuously expanding CAR NK-92 cells display selective cytotoxicity against B-cell leukemia and lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Oelsner, Sarah; Friede, Miriam E; Zhang, Congcong; Wagner, Juliane; Badura, Susanne; Bader, Peter; Ullrich, Evelyn; Ottmann, Oliver G; Klingemann, Hans; Tonn, Torsten; Wels, Winfried S

    2017-02-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells can rapidly respond to transformed and stressed cells and represent an important effector cell type for adoptive immunotherapy. In addition to donor-derived primary NK cells, continuously expanding cytotoxic cell lines such as NK-92 are being developed for clinical applications. To enhance their therapeutic utility for the treatment of B-cell malignancies, we engineered NK-92 cells by lentiviral gene transfer to express chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) that target CD19 and contain human CD3ζ (CAR 63.z), composite CD28-CD3ζ or CD137-CD3ζ signaling domains (CARs 63.28.z and 63.137.z). Exposure of CD19-positive targets to CAR NK-92 cells resulted in formation of conjugates between NK and cancer cells, NK-cell degranulation and selective cytotoxicity toward established B-cell leukemia and lymphoma cells. Likewise, the CAR NK cells displayed targeted cell killing of primary pre-B-ALL blasts that were resistant to parental NK-92. Although all three CAR NK-92 cell variants were functionally active, NK-92/63.137.z cells were less effective than NK-92/63.z and NK-92/63.28.z in cell killing and cytokine production, pointing to differential effects of the costimulatory CD28 and CD137 domains. In a Raji B-cell lymphoma model in NOD-SCID IL2R γ(null) mice, treatment with NK-92/63.z cells, but not parental NK-92 cells, inhibited disease progression, indicating that selective cytotoxicity was retained in vivo. Our data demonstrate that it is feasible to generate CAR-engineered NK-92 cells with potent and selective antitumor activity. These cells may become clinically useful as a continuously expandable off-the-shelf cell therapeutic agent. Copyright © 2017 International Society for Cellular Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Metabolic selection of glycosylation defects in human cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yarema, Kevin J.; Goon, Scarlett; Bertozzi, Carolyn R.

    2000-08-01

    Changes in glycosylation are often associated with disease progression, but the genetic and metabolic basis of these events is rarely understood in detail at a molecular level. This report describes a novel metabolism-based approach to the selection of mutants in glycoconjugate biosynthesis that has provided insight into regulatory mechanisms for oligosaccharide expression and metabolic flux. Unnatural intermediates are used to challenge a specific pathway and cell-surface expression of their metabolic products provides a readout of flux in that pathway and a basis for selecting genetic mutants. The approach was applied to the sialic acid metabolic pathway in human cells, yielding novel mutants with phenotypes related to the inborn metabolic defect sialuria and metastatic tumor cells.

  7. Cell-selective metabolic labeling of biomolecules with bioorthogonal functionalities.

    PubMed

    Xie, Ran; Hong, Senlian; Chen, Xing

    2013-10-01

    Metabolic labeling of biomolecules with bioorthogonal functionalities enables visualization, enrichment, and analysis of the biomolecules of interest in their physiological environments. This versatile strategy has found utility in probing various classes of biomolecules in a broad range of biological processes. On the other hand, metabolic labeling is nonselective with respect to cell type, which imposes limitations for studies performed in complex biological systems. Herein, we review the recent methodological developments aiming to endow metabolic labeling strategies with cell-type selectivity. The cell-selective metabolic labeling strategies have emerged from protein and glycan labeling. We envision that these strategies can be readily extended to labeling of other classes of biomolecules. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Selective cell cycle transcription requires membrane synthesis in Caulobacter

    PubMed Central

    Brassinga, Ann Karen C.; Gorbatyuk, Boris; Ouimet, Marie–Claude; Marczynski, Gregory T.

    2000-01-01

    Caulobacter crescentus divides asymmetrically and creates distinct polar membrane surfaces that partition during the cell cycle to distinct cell progeny. Blocking membrane synthesis prevented transcription from selective promoters involved in asymmetric cell division. Transcription from sigma-54-dependent flagellar promoters was blocked completely; however, transcription from the CtrA response regulator-dependent flagellar promoters was activated but reduced. Transcription from the ccrM (DNA methylation) promoter and the che (chemosensory) promoter was also blocked completely. Transcription from a strong promoter at the chromosome replication origin was first stopped then induced by blocked membrane synthesis. We propose a feedback control coupling membrane synthesis to transcription that selectively supports membrane-associated processes such as flagellar assembly, chemosensory biogenesis and chromosome replication. PMID:10675339

  9. Small molecule selectively suppresses MYC transcription in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Bouvard, Claire; Lim, Sang Min; Ludka, John; Yazdani, Nahid; Woods, Ashley K; Chatterjee, Arnab K; Schultz, Peter G; Zhu, Shoutian

    2017-03-28

    Stauprimide is a staurosporine analog that promotes embryonic stem cell (ESC) differentiation by inhibiting nuclear localization of the MYC transcription factor NME2, which in turn results in down-regulation of MYC transcription. Given the critical role the oncogene MYC plays in tumor initiation and maintenance, we explored the potential of stauprimide as an anticancer agent. Here we report that stauprimide suppresses MYC transcription in cancer cell lines derived from distinct tissues. Using renal cancer cells, we confirmed that stauprimide inhibits NME2 nuclear localization. Gene expression analysis also confirmed the selective down-regulation of MYC target genes by stauprimide. Consistent with this activity, administration of stauprimide inhibited tumor growth in rodent xenograft models. Our study provides a unique strategy for selectively targeting MYC transcription by pharmacological means as a potential treatment for MYC-dependent tumors.

  10. Selecting agonists from single cells infected with combinatorial antibody libraries.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongkai; Yea, Kyungmoo; Xie, Jia; Ruiz, Diana; Wilson, Ian A; Lerner, Richard A

    2013-05-23

    We describe a system for direct selection of antibodies that are receptor agonists. Combinatorial antibody libraries in lentiviruses are used to infect eukaryotic cells that contain a fluorescent reporter system coupled to the receptor for which receptor agonist antibodies are sought. In this embodiment of the method, very large numbers of candidate antibodies expressing lentivirus and eukaryotic reporter cells are packaged together in a format where each is capable of replication, thereby forging a direct link between genotype and phenotype. Following infection, cells that fluoresce are sorted and the integrated genes encoding the agonist antibodies recovered. We validated the system by illustrating its ability to generate rapidly potent antibody agonists that are complete thrombopoietin phenocopies. The system should be generalizable to any pathway where its activation can be linked to production of a selectable phenotype.

  11. Optical manipulation of hot nanoparticles can mediate selected cell fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oddershede, Lene B.; Bahadori, Azra; Bendix, Poul M.

    2017-04-01

    Metallic nanoparticles with diameters from 10 nm to 250 nm can be optically trapped and manipulated in 3D using a single tightly focused near infrared laser beam. This will result in a significant heating of the particle and its vicinity, with temperature increases easily reaching hundreds degrees Celsius. If such a hot metallic nanoparticle is brought into the contact zone between two cells or vesicles, this local temperature increase can cause a total fusion of the selected cells or vesicles. Upon fusion, both the membrane and the cargos become completely mixed and we also show that the cells remain viable after fusion. The presented method has potential for single-cell targeted drug delivery and for the creation of hybrid cells.

  12. A selective inhibitor of cell proliferation from normal serum.

    PubMed Central

    Harrington, W N; Godman, G C

    1980-01-01

    A factor in normal serum that selectively and reversibly inhibits proliferation of cells in culture has been enriched 160-fold from calf serum by sequential ammonium sulfate precipitation, gel filtration, and lectin-affinity chromatography. DNA synthesis of normal (but not transformed) rat hepatocytes, human lymphoblast lines, and mitogen-stimulated murine spleen cells is inhibited by greater than 90%, and Vero, murine myeloma, MELC, and a human colon carcinoma cell line to a lesser extent. Growth of other cell lines tested was not affected. Responsive cells are arrested apparently in G1 by this inhibitor, the effect of which is maximal by 24 hr and is spontaneously reversible thereafter unless it is renewed. The active fraction is a protein that migrates with the alpha 2-globulins; it is not a lipoprotein, and it is of high apparent molecular weight. PMID:6928635

  13. Rhodacyanine derivative selectively targets cancer cells and overcomes tamoxifen resistance.

    PubMed

    Koren, John; Miyata, Yoshinari; Kiray, Janine; O'Leary, John C; Nguyen, Lana; Guo, Jianping; Blair, Laura J; Li, Xiaokai; Li, Xiokai; Jinwal, Umesh K; Cheng, Jin Q; Gestwicki, Jason E; Dickey, Chad A

    2012-01-01

    MKT-077, a rhodacyanine dye, was shown to produce cancer specific cell death. However, complications prevented the use of this compound beyond clinical trials. Here we describe YM-1, a derivative of MKT-077. We found that YM-1 was more cytotoxic and localized differently than MKT-077. YM-1 demonstrated this cytotoxicity across multiple cancer cell lines. This toxicity was limited to cancer cell lines; immortalized cell models were unaffected. Brief applications of YM-1 were found to be non-toxic. Brief treatment with YM-1 restored tamoxifen sensitivity to a refractory tamoxifen-resistant MCF7 cell model. This effect is potentially due to altered estrogen receptor alpha phosphorylation, an outcome precipitated by selective reductions in Akt levels (Akt/PKB). Thus, modifications to the rhodocyanine scaffold could potentially be made to improve efficacy and pharmacokinetic properties. Moreover, the impact on tamoxifen sensitivity could be a new utility for this compound family.

  14. Aptamer Cell-Based Selection: Overview and Advances.

    PubMed

    Catuogno, Silvia; Esposito, Carla Lucia

    2017-08-14

    Aptamers are high affinity single-stranded DNA/RNA molecules, produced by a combinatorial procedure named SELEX (Systematic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential enrichment), that are emerging as promising diagnostic and therapeutic tools. Among selection strategies, procedures using living cells as complex targets (referred as "cell-SELEX") have been developed as an effective mean to generate aptamers for heavily modified cell surface proteins, assuring the binding of the target in its native conformation. Here we give an up-to-date overview on cell-SELEX technology, discussing the most recent advances with a particular focus on cancer cell targeting. Examples of the different protocol applications and post-SELEX strategies will be briefly outlined.

  15. Carrier-selective contacts for Si solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldmann, F.; Simon, M.; Bivour, M.; Reichel, C.; Hermle, M.; Glunz, S. W.

    2014-05-01

    Carrier-selective contacts (i.e., minority carrier mirrors) are one of the last remaining obstacles to approaching the theoretical efficiency limit of silicon solar cells. In the 1980s, it was already demonstrated that n-type polysilicon and semi-insulating polycrystalline silicon emitters form carrier-selective emitters which enabled open-circuit voltages (Voc) of up to 720 mV. Albeit promising, to date a polysilicon emitter solar cell having a high fill factor (FF) has not been demonstrated yet. In this work, we report a polysilicon emitter related solar cell achieving both a high Voc = 694 mV and FF = 81%. The passivation mechanism of these so-called tunnel oxide passivated contacts will be outlined and the impact of TCO (transparent conductive oxide) deposition on the injection-dependent lifetime characteristic of the emitter as well as its implications on FF will be discussed. Finally, possible transport paths across the tunnel oxide barrier will be discussed and it will be shown that the passivating oxide layer does not lead to a relevant resistive loss and thus does not limit the solar cell's carrier transport. Contrary to amorphous silicon-based heterojunction solar cells, this structure also shows a good thermal stability and, thus, could be a very appealing option for next generation high-efficiency silicon solar cells.

  16. Hippocampal CA3 pyramidal cells selectively innervate aspiny interneurons.

    PubMed

    Wittner, Lucia; Henze, Darrell A; Záborszky, László; Buzsáki, György

    2006-09-01

    The specific connectivity among principal cells and interneurons determines the flow of activity in neuronal networks. To elucidate the connections between hippocampal principal cells and various classes of interneurons, CA3 pyramidal cells were intracellularly labelled with biocytin in anaesthetized rats and the three-dimensional distribution of their axon collaterals was reconstructed. The sections were double-stained for substance P receptor (SPR)- or metabotropic glutamate receptor 1alpha (mGluR-1alpha)-immunoreactivity to investigate interneuron targets of the CA3 pyramidal cells. SPR-containing interneurons represent a large portion of the GABAergic population, including spiny and aspiny classes. Axon terminals of CA3 pyramidal cells contacted SPR-positive interneuron dendrites in the hilus and in all hippocampal strata in both CA3 and CA1 regions (7.16% of all boutons). The majority of axons formed single contacts (87.5%), but multiple contacts (up to six) on single target neurons were also found. CA3 pyramidal cell axon collaterals innervated several types of morphologically different aspiny SPR-positive interneurons. In contrast, spiny SPR-interneurons or mGluR-1alpha-positive interneurons in the hilus, CA3 and CA1 regions were rarely contacted by the filled pyramidal cells. These findings indicate a strong target selection of CA3 pyramidal cells favouring the activation of aspiny classes of interneurons.

  17. Selective cell adhesion on femtosecond laser-microstructured polydimethylsiloxane.

    PubMed

    Alshehri, A M; Hadjiantoniou, S; Hickey, R J; Al-Rekabi, Z; Harden, J L; Pelling, A E; Bhardwaj, V R

    2016-02-19

    We show that femtosecond laser irradiation of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) enables selective and patterned cell growth by altering the wetting properties of the surface associated with chemical and/or topographical changes. In the low pulse energy regime, the surface becomes less hydrophobic and exhibits a low water contact angle compared to the pristine material. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) also reveals an increased oxygen content in the irradiated regions, to which the C2C12 cells and rabbit anti-mouse protein were found to attach preferentially. In the high pulse energy regime, the laser-modified regions exhibit superhydrophobicity and were found to inhibit cell adhesion, whereas cells were found to attach to the surrounding regions due to the presence of nanoscale debris generated by the ablation process.

  18. Cytotoxicity of selected magnetic fluids on human adenocarcinoma cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilger, Ingrid; Frühauf, Sylvia; Linß, Werner; Hiergeist, Robert; Andrä, Wilfried; Hergt, Rudolf; Kaiser, Werner A.

    2003-04-01

    Based on the knowledge that the magnetite particles seem to be well tolerated by the human body, the cytotoxic potential of coated particles was investigated, which had been selected for potential applications regarding the minimal-invasive elimination of breast tumors by magnetic thermoablation. Human adenocarcinoma cells (BT-20) were exposed (24, 48 and 72 h) to different magnetite particles with diverging total size (8, 10 and 220 nm) and coating (cationic and anionic). One sample contained only non-coated magnetite particles. The magnetite concentration ranged between 0.2 and 20 ng/cell. Cytotoxicity was estimated by measuring the succinate dehydrogenase activity. The morphologic features resulting from the interaction of magnetic fluids with BT-20 cells was determined by transmission electron microscopy. As opposed to the non-coated magnetic particles, cationic particles induced the strongest decrease in cell survival rates depending on time and concentration. Morphologically, the cationic particle samples exerted a strong binding to cellular membranes. Changes in the subcellular structure were found in relation to the coated magnetic particles. In conclusion, our results show that the coated prototype magnetic particles, particularly those with a cationic surfactant, are cytotoxic to BT-20 cells. The cytotoxicity is attributed to electrostatic bindings with cellular membranes, influences of chemical components or non-physiologic pH. Considering the in vivo applications, adverse systemic effects are conceivable and more biocompatible coatings for the selected magnetic particles should be elaborated.

  19. Stem and progenitor cell-mediated tumor selective gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Aboody, K S; Najbauer, J; Danks, M K

    2008-05-01

    The poor prognosis for patients with aggressive or metastatic tumors and the toxic side effects of currently available treatments necessitate the development of more effective tumor-selective therapies. Stem/progenitor cells display inherent tumor-tropic properties that can be exploited for targeted delivery of anticancer genes to invasive and metastatic tumors. Therapeutic genes that have been inserted into stem cells and delivered to tumors with high selectivity include prodrug-activating enzymes (cytosine deaminase, carboxylesterase, thymidine kinase), interleukins (IL-2, IL-4, IL-12, IL-23), interferon-beta, apoptosis-promoting genes (tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand) and metalloproteinases (PEX). We and others have demonstrated that neural and mesenchymal stem cells can deliver therapeutic genes to elicit a significant antitumor response in animal models of intracranial glioma, medulloblastoma, melanoma brain metastasis, disseminated neuroblastoma and breast cancer lung metastasis. Most studies reported reduction in tumor volume (up to 90%) and increased survival of tumor-bearing animals. Complete cures have also been achieved (90% disease-free survival for >1 year of mice bearing disseminated neuroblastoma tumors). As we learn more about the biology of stem cells and the molecular mechanisms that mediate their tumor-tropism and we identify efficacious gene products for specific tumor types, the clinical utility of cell-based delivery strategies becomes increasingly evident.

  20. Arsenic-Specific Stem Cell Selection During Malignant Transformation

    PubMed Central

    Tokar, Erik J.; Qu, Wei; Liu, Jie; Liu, Wei; Webber, Mukta M.; Phang, James M.

    2010-01-01

    Background Arsenic is a carcinogen that targets the urogenital system, including the prostate. Although the mechanisms for arsenic-induced carcinogenesis are undefined, arsenic drives overaccumulation of stem cells and cancer stem cells (CSCs) in vivo and in vitro, indicating that these cells are a key target population. Disruption of stem cell population dynamics may be critical to acquisition of cancer phenotype. We tested the hypothesis that prostate stem cells have a survival selection advantage during arsenic exposure that favors their accumulation and facilitates their malignant transformation. Methods Innate and acquired resistance to acute (24–72 hours of exposure) and chronic (6 weeks of exposure) arsenite-induced cytolethality and apoptosis were assessed in a human prostate stem cell line (WPE-stem) and the mature parental cell line (RWPE-1). Real-time reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction and/or Western blot analysis was used to measure the expression of apoptosis-, stress-, and arsenic-related genes. Arsenic-, cadmium-, and N-methyl-N-nitrosourea–induced isogenic malignant transformants of RWPE-1 cells were compared for acquisition of CSC-like qualities by holoclone and sphere formation assays, growth in soft agar, and expression of CSC biomarkers. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results WPE-stem cells showed innate resistance to arsenic-induced cytolethality (arsenite concentration lethal to 50% of the cells [LC50] = 32.4 μM, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 31.5 to 33.3 μM) and apoptosis compared with parental RWPE-1 cells (LC50 = 10.4 μM, 95% CI = 7.4 to 13.4 μM). Compared with RWPE-1 cells, WPE-stem cells showed noticeably higher expression of antiapoptotic (ie, BCL2, MT), stress-related (ie, NFE2L2, SOD1, PRODH), and arsenic adaptation (ie, ABCC1, GSTP1) factors and noticeably lower expression of proapoptotic factors (ie, BAX, caspases 3, 7, 8, and 9). WPE-stem cells also showed hyper-adaptability to chronic arsenite

  1. Thymic Selection of T Cells as Diffusion with Intermittent Traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Košmrlj, Andrej

    2011-04-01

    T cells orchestrate adaptive immune responses by recognizing short peptides derived from pathogens, and by distinguishing them from self-peptides. To ensure the latter, immature T cells (thymocytes) diffuse within the thymus gland, where they encounter an ensemble of self-peptides presented on (immobile) antigen presenting cells. Potentially autoimmune T cells are eliminated if the thymocyte binds sufficiently strongly with any such antigen presenting cell. We model thymic selection of T cells as a random walker diffusing in a field of immobile traps that intermittently turn "on" and "off". The escape probability of potentially autoimmune T cells is equivalent to the survival probability of such a random walker. In this paper we describe the survival probability of a random walker on a d-dimensional cubic lattice with randomly placed immobile intermittent traps, and relate it to the result of a well-studied problem where traps are always "on". Additionally, when switching between the trap states is slow, we find a peculiar caging effect for the survival probability.

  2. EDKC Selectively Photosensitizes Respiration Of Malignant Cells In Vitro.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ara, G.; Lewandowski, L.; Oseroff, A. R.

    1989-03-01

    We have shown previously that the cationic cyanine dye, EDKC, which photosensitizes malignant cells in vitro and in vivo, blocks respiration in isolated murine liver mitochondria by preferentially inactivating Complex I mediated electron transport. The present work was directed towards examining whether the killing of malignant cells with EDKC and visible radiation was a result of irreparable damage to mitochondria of these cells. We report that EDKC selectively photosensitizes respiration of squamous carcinoma and melanoma cells in vitro. At 0.1 uM, the dye inhibited basal respiration, however, an uncoupler, FCCP, reverted the respiration rate to the control uncoupled rate. Furthermore, the basal respiration of control or EDKC treated cells was totally inhibited by oligomycin, an inhibitor of FoFiATPase, indicating that the respiration was coupled to phosphorylation. After irradiation with 700 + 20 nm light (14 J/cm2) in the presence of 0.1 uM dye, basal respiration was slightly enhanced compared to that of the dye treated cells, however, FCCP-stimulated respiration was drastically lowered. In addition, only 10-20% of the basal respiration was blocked by oligomycin, indicating that a major part of respiration was no longer coupled to phosphorylation. Furthermore, almost no recovery of the mitochondria! respiratory function was detected 6 hr after treatment. Respiration of an untransformed monkey kidney cell line (CV-1) was only minimally affected by ten fold higher dye concentration (1 uM) and 14 J/cm2 radiation.

  3. Pyridinylquinazolines Selectively Inhibit Human Methionine Aminopeptidase-1 in Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Feiran; Bhat, Shridhar; Gabelli, Sandra B.; Chen, Xiaochun; Miller, Michelle S.; Nacev, Benjamin A.; Cheng, Yim Ling; Meyers, David J.; Tenney, Karen; Shim, Joong Sup; Crews, Phillip; Amzel, L. Mario; Ma, Dawei; Liu, Jun O.

    2013-01-01

    Methionine aminopeptidases (MetAPs) which remove the initiator methionine from nascent peptides are essential in all organisms. While MetAP2 has been demonstrated to be a therapeutic target for inhibiting angiogenesis in mammals, MetAP1 seems to be vital for cell proliferation. Our earlier efforts identified two structural classes of human MetAP1 (HsMetAP1)-selective inhibitors (1–4). But all of them failed to inhibit cellular HsMetAP1. Using Mn(II) or Zn(II) to activate HsMetAP1, we found that 1–4 could only effectively inhibit purified HsMetAP1 in the presence of physiologically unachievable concentrations of Co(II). In an effort to seek Co(II)-independent inhibitors, a novel structural class containing a 2-(pyridin-2-yl)quinazoline core has been discovered. Many compounds in this class potently and selectively inhibited HsMetAP1 without Co(II). Subsequently, we demonstrated that 11j, an auxiliary metal-dependent inhibitor, effectively inhibited HsMetAP1 in primary cells. This is the first report that an HsMetAP1-selective inhibitor is effective against its target in cells. PMID:23634668

  4. Pyridinylquinazolines selectively inhibit human methionine aminopeptidase-1 in cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Feiran; Bhat, Shridhar; Gabelli, Sandra B; Chen, Xiaochun; Miller, Michelle S; Nacev, Benjamin A; Cheng, Yim Ling; Meyers, David J; Tenney, Karen; Shim, Joong Sup; Crews, Phillip; Amzel, L Mario; Ma, Dawei; Liu, Jun O

    2013-05-23

    Methionine aminopeptidases (MetAPs), which remove the initiator methionine from nascent peptides, are essential in all organisms. While MetAP2 has been demonstrated to be a therapeutic target for inhibiting angiogenesis in mammals, MetAP1 seems to be vital for cell proliferation. Our earlier efforts identified two structural classes of human MetAP1 (HsMetAP1)-selective inhibitors (1-4), but all of them failed to inhibit cellular HsMetAP1. Using Mn(II) or Zn(II) to activate HsMetAP1, we found that 1-4 could only effectively inhibit purified HsMetAP1 in the presence of physiologically unachievable concentrations of Co(II). In an effort to seek Co(II)-independent inhibitors, a novel structural class containing a 2-(pyridin-2-yl)quinazoline core has been discovered. Many compounds in this class potently and selectively inhibited HsMetAP1 without Co(II). Subsequently, we demonstrated that 11j, an auxiliary metal-dependent inhibitor, effectively inhibited HsMetAP1 in primary cells. This is the first report that an HsMetAP1-selective inhibitor is effective against its target in cells.

  5. B cells participate in thymic negative selection of murine auto-reactive CD4+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Frommer, Friederike; Waisman, Ari

    2010-10-20

    It is well documented that thymic epithelial cells participate in the process of negative selection in the thymus. In recent years it was reported that also dendritic cells enter the thymus and contribute to this process, thus allowing for the depletion of thymocytes that are specific to peripherally expressed self-antigens. Here we report that also B cells may take part in the elimination of auto-reactive thymocytes. Using a unique mouse model we show that B cells induce negative selection of self-reactive thymocytes in a process that leads to the deletion of these cells whereas regulatory T cells are spared. These findings have direct implication in autoimmunity, as expression of a myelin antigen by B cells in the thymus renders the mice resistant to autoimmune inflammation of the CNS.

  6. A three-dimensional flow control concept for single-cell experiments on a microchip. 1. Cell selection, cell retention, cell culture, cell balancing, and cell scanning.

    PubMed

    Peng, Xing Yue; Li, Paul C H

    2004-09-15

    An ideal microchip for single-cell experiments should be able to allow us to culture cells, to select any desired single cell from a group, to retain the cell for convenient cellular signal detection, and to deliver any buffer or reagent directly to the cell at any time during continual detection and observation. Most importantly, any negative impact on the live cell should be minimized. To accomplish all these functions, we developed a three-dimensional liquid flow control concept and employed special liquid flow fields to manipulate and retain a single yeast cell freely in the chip. A zero-speed point was controlled to retain the cell for three-dimensional cell balancing and cell scanning. A dispersive flow delivered reagents at a high speed to very near the cell and provided them to the cell at a low speed. No force stronger than its gravitational force was exerted on the cell, which could be balanced on different positions on an arc-sloping wall, thus minimizing any negative impact on the cell due to strong liquid flows. Specifically, we demonstrate on-chip single-cell culture, cell wall removal, and reagent delivery. Subsequently, single-cell fluorescence detection was performed, and noise filtering and background correction were applied for data processing.

  7. How Selective are Hsp90 Inhibitors for Cancer Cells over Normal Cells?

    PubMed

    Wang, Yao; Koay, Yen Chin; McAlpine, Shelli R

    2017-03-07

    Selectively inhibiting target proteins in cancer cells over normal cells is one of the most critical features of a successful protein inhibitor for clinical applications. By evaluating and comparing the impact of a clinical N-terminal heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) inhibitor, AUY922 (luminespib), on Hsp90 inhibition-associated cellular events in cancer cells versus normal cells, we found that it produces similar phenotype characteristics in both cell types, indicating that AUY922 is not selective for targeting Hsp90 in tumor cells. By comparison, the C-terminal Hsp90 modulator SM258 suppresses cell proliferation, triggers apoptosis, regulates the expression of Hsp90-associated heat shock proteins, and enhances the degradation of Hsp90's client proteins preferentially in cancer cells over normal cells. Our findings support a new paradigm that AUY922 is not tumor selective, whereas SM258 is more selective and likely acts through an Hsp90-dependent mechanism. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Newcastle disease virus selectively kills human tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Reichard, K W; Lorence, R M; Cascino, C J; Peeples, M E; Walter, R J; Fernando, M B; Reyes, H M; Greager, J A

    1992-05-01

    Newcastle disease virus (NDV), strain 73-T, has previously been shown to be cytolytic to mouse tumor cells. In this study, we have evaluated the ability of NDV to replicate in and kill human tumor cells in culture and in athymic mice. Plaque assays were used to determine the cytolytic activity of NDV on six human tumor cell lines, fibrosarcoma (HT1080), osteosarcoma (KHOS), cervical carcinoma (KB8-5-11), bladder carcinoma (HCV29T), neuroblastoma (IMR32), and Wilm's tumor (G104), and on nine different normal human fibroblast lines. NDV formed plaques on all tumor cells tested as well as on chick embryo cells (CEC), the native host for NDV. Plaques did not form on any of the normal fibroblast lines. To detect NDV replication, virus yield assays were performed which measured virus particles in infected cell culture supernatants. Virus yield increased 10,000-fold within 24 hr in tumor and CEC supernatants. Titers remained near zero in normal fibroblast supernatants. In vivo tumoricidal activity was evaluated in athymic nude Balb-c mice by subcutaneous injection of 9 x 10(6) tumor cells followed by intralesional injection of either live or heat-killed NDV (1.0 x 10(6) plaque forming units [PFU]), or medium. After live NDV treatment, tumor regression occurred in 10 out of 11 mice bearing KB8-5-11 tumors, 8 out of 8 with HT-1080 tumors, and 6 out of 7 with IMR-32 tumors. After treatment with heat-killed NDV no regression occurred (P less than 0.01, Fisher's exact test). Nontumor-bearing mice injected with 1.0 x 10(8) PFU of NDV remained healthy. These results indicate that NDV efficiently and selectively replicates in and kills tumor cells, but not normal cells, and that intralesional NDV causes complete tumor regression in athymic mice with a high therapeutic index.

  9. Selective modulation of cell response on engineered fractal silicon substrates

    PubMed Central

    Gentile, Francesco; Medda, Rebecca; Cheng, Ling; Battista, Edmondo; Scopelliti, Pasquale E.; Milani, Paolo; Cavalcanti-Adam, Elisabetta A.; Decuzzi, Paolo

    2013-01-01

    A plethora of work has been dedicated to the analysis of cell behavior on substrates with ordered topographical features. However, the natural cell microenvironment is characterized by biomechanical cues organized over multiple scales. Here, randomly rough, self-affinefractal surfaces are generated out of silicon,where roughness Ra and fractal dimension Df are independently controlled. The proliferation rates, the formation of adhesion structures, and the morphology of 3T3 murine fibroblasts are monitored over six different substrates. The proliferation rate is maximized on surfaces with moderate roughness (Ra ~ 40 nm) and large fractal dimension (Df ~ 2.4); whereas adhesion structures are wider and more stable on substrates with higher roughness (Ra ~ 50 nm) and lower fractal dimension (Df ~ 2.2). Higher proliferation occurson substrates exhibiting densely packed and sharp peaks, whereas more regular ridges favor adhesion. These results suggest that randomly roughtopographies can selectively modulate cell behavior. PMID:23492898

  10. Selective uptake of lucifer yellow by retinal cells.

    PubMed

    Sarthy, P V; Johnson, S M; Detwiler, P B

    1982-04-20

    When turtle retinae were incubated with the fluorescent dye, lucifer yellow, in the absence of Ca2+, the dye was selectively accumulated by cell bodies located in the inner nuclear layer (INL). The morphological features of the labeled cells suggested that they were bipolar cells. Other fluorescent dyes, Procion yellow and Primulin, were also taken up by somata in the INL, in the absence of external Ca2+, although the identity of the labeled cells was uncertain. As with turtle retina, lucifer yellow was accumulated predominantly by cell bodies in the INL of goldfish, frog, and rat retinae. Lucifer yellow uptake appeared to be independent of synaptic activity since dark-adaptation or aspartate treatment of retinae did not alter the dye uptake. Further, retinae from dystrophic (RCS) rats showed uptake similar to that seen in normal rat retinae. After uptake, most of the dye was found intracellularly as patches or vacuoles in the somata of the labeled cells. Dye uptake was not inhibited by removal of Na+ from the incubation medium. Further, prior treatment with metabolic inhibitors, cyanide and iodoacetate, or cytochalasin B, did not block the dye uptake.

  11. Characterization of rat hair follicle stem cells selected by vario magnetic activated cell sorting system.

    PubMed

    Huang, Enyi; Lian, Xiaohua; Chen, Wei; Yang, Tian; Yang, Li

    2009-10-30

    Hair follicle stem cells (HfSCs) play crucial roles in hair follicle morphogenesis and hair cycling. These stem cells are self-renewable and have the multi-lineage potential to generate epidermis, sebaceous glands, and hair follicle. The separation and identification of hair follicle stem cells are important for further research in stem cell biology. In this study, we report on the successful enrichment of rat hair follicle stem cells through vario magnetic activated cell sorting (Vario MACS) and the biological characteristics of the stem cells. We chose the HfSCs positive surface markers CD34, alpha 6-integrin and the negative marker CD71 to design four isolation strategies: positive selection with single marker of CD34, positive selection with single marker of alpha 6-integrin, CD71 depletion followed by CD34 positive selection, and CD71 depletion followed by alpha 6-integrin positive selection. The results of flow cytometry analysis showed that all four strategies had ideal effects. Specifically, we conducted a series of researches on HfSCs characterized by their high level of CD34, termed CD34(bri) cells, and low to undetectable expression of CD34, termed CD34(dim) cells. CD34(bri) cells had greater proliferative potential and higher colony-forming ability than CD34(dim) cells. Furthermore, CD34(bri) cells had some typical characteristics as progenitor cells, such as large nucleus, obvious nucleolus, large nuclear:cytoplasmic ratio and few cytoplasmic organelles. Our findings clearly demonstrated that HfSCs with high purity and viability could be successfully enriched with Vario MACS.

  12. Selective cell targeting and lineage tracing of human induced pluripotent stem cells using recombinant avian retroviruses.

    PubMed

    Hildebrand, Laura; Seemann, Petra; Kurtz, Andreas; Hecht, Jochen; Contzen, Jörg; Gossen, Manfred; Stachelscheid, Harald

    2015-12-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSC) differentiate into multiple cell types. Selective cell targeting is often needed for analyzing gene function by overexpressing proteins in a distinct population of hiPSC-derived cell types and for monitoring cell fate in response to stimuli. However, to date, this has not been possible, as commonly used viruses enter the hiPSC via ubiquitously expressed receptors. Here, we report for the first time the application of a heterologous avian receptor, the tumor virus receptor A (TVA), to selectively transduce TVA(+) cells in a mixed cell population. Expression of the TVA surface receptor via genetic engineering renders cells susceptible for infection by avian leucosis virus (ALV). We generated hiPSC lines with this stably integrated, ectopic TVA receptor gene that expressed the receptor while retaining pluripotency. The undifferentiated hiPSC(TVA+) as well as their differentiating progeny could be infected by recombinant ALV (so-called RCAS virus) with high efficiency. Due to incomplete receptor blocking, even sequential infection of differentiating or undifferentiated TVA(+) cells was possible. In conclusion, the TVA/RCAS system provides an efficient and gentle gene transfer system for hiPSC and extends our possibilities for selective cell targeting and lineage tracing studies.

  13. Subcortical orientation biases explain orientation selectivity of visual cortical cells

    PubMed Central

    Vidyasagar, Trichur R; Jayakumar, Jaikishan; Lloyd, Errol; Levichkina, Ekaterina V

    2015-01-01

    The primary visual cortex of carnivores and primates shows an orderly progression of domains of neurons that are selective to a particular orientation of visual stimuli such as bars and gratings. We recorded from single-thalamic afferent fibers that terminate in these domains to address the issue whether the orientation sensitivity of these fibers could form the basis of the remarkable orientation selectivity exhibited by most cortical cells. We first performed optical imaging of intrinsic signals to obtain a map of orientation domains on the dorsal aspect of the anaesthetized cat's area 17. After confirming using electrophysiological recordings the orientation preferences of single neurons within one or two domains in each animal, we pharmacologically silenced the cortex to leave only the afferent terminals active. The inactivation of cortical neurons was achieved by the superfusion of either kainic acid or muscimol. Responses of single geniculate afferents were then recorded by the use of high impedance electrodes. We found that the orientation preferences of the afferents matched closely with those of the cells in the orientation domains that they terminated in (Pearson's r = 0.633, n = 22, P = 0.002). This suggests a possible subcortical origin for cortical orientation selectivity. PMID:25855249

  14. Human small cell lung cancer NYH cells resistant to the bisdioxopiperazine ICRF-187 exhibit a functional dominant Tyr165Ser mutation in the Walker A ATP binding site of topoisomerase II alpha.

    PubMed

    Wessel, Irene; Jensen, Lars H; Renodon-Corniere, Axelle; Sorensen, Tina K; Nitiss, John L; Jensen, Peter B; Sehested, Maxwell

    2002-06-05

    Bisdioxopiperazine anti-cancer agents are catalytic inhibitors of topoisomerase II which by unknown means lock the enzyme in a closed clamp form and inhibit its ATPase activity. In order to demarcate a putative pharmacophore, we here describe a novel Tyr165Ser mutation in the enzyme's Walker A ATP binding site leading to specific bisdioxopiperazine resistance when transformed into a temperature-conditional yeast system. The Tyr165Ser mutation differed from a previously described Arg162Gln by being heterozygous and by purified Tyr165Ser enzyme being drug-resistant in a kinetoplast DNA decatenation enzymatic assay. This suggested dominant nature of Tyr165Ser was supported by co-transformation studies in yeast of plasmids carrying wild type and mutant genes. These results enable a model of the bisdioxopiperazine pharmacophore using the proposed asymmetric ATP hydrolysis of the enzyme.

  15. SHAPE SELECTIVE NANOCATALYSTS FOR DIRECT METHANOL FUEL CELL APPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Murph, S.

    2012-09-12

    While gold and platinum have long been recognized for their beauty and value, researchers at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) are working on the nano-level to use these elements for creative solutions to our nation's energy and security needs. Multiinterdisciplinary teams consisting of chemists, materials scientists, physicists, computational scientists, and engineers are exploring unchartered territories with shape-selective nanocatalysts for the development of novel, cost effective and environmentally friendly energy solutions to meet global energy needs. This nanotechnology is vital, particularly as it relates to fuel cells.SRNL researchers have taken process, chemical, and materials discoveries and translated them for technological solution and deployment. The group has developed state-of-the art shape-selective core-shell-alloy-type gold-platinum nanostructures with outstanding catalytic capabilities that address many of the shortcomings of the Direct Methanol Fuel Cell (DMFC). The newly developed nanostructures not only busted the performance of the platinum catalyst, but also reduced the material cost and overall weight of the fuel cell.

  16. Nigericin selectively targets cancer stem cells in nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Deng, Cheng-Cheng; Liang, Yi; Wu, Man-Si; Feng, Fu-Tuo; Hu, Wen-Rong; Chen, Li-Zhen; Feng, Qi-Sheng; Bei, Jin-Xin; Zeng, Yi-Xin

    2013-09-01

    Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is prevalent in southern China, northern Africa, and Alaska. The prognosis for NPC patients at early stage is good, while it is poor for patients at late stages. Cancer stem cells (CSCs) have been proposed to be associated with tumor initiation, relapse and metastasis, and the poor prognosis of NPC likely results from residual CSCs after therapy. Study on the therapy targeting CSCs in NPC remains poor, though it received intensive attentions in other cancers. Here, we used NPC cell lines with high and low proportion of CSCs as models to explore the effect of nigericin, an antibiotic, on CSCs. We found that nigericin could selectively target CSCs and sensitize CSCs in NPC to the widely used clinical drug cisplatin both in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, downregulation of the polycomb group protein Bmi-1 may contribute to the inhibitory effect of nigericin on CSCs. Furthermore, by using the in vitro NPC cell models, we found that nigericin could significantly decrease the migration and invasion abilities, which are known to be associated with CSCs. Taken together, our results suggest that nigericin can selectively target CSCs in NPC, which could be a candidate CSCs targeting drug for clinical evaluation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. A Synthetic Hybrid Molecule for the Selective Removal of Human Pluripotent Stem Cells from Cell Mixtures.

    PubMed

    Mao, Di; Ando, Shin; Sato, Shin-Ichi; Qin, Ying; Hirata, Nao; Katsuda, Yousuke; Kawase, Eihachiro; Kuo, Ting-Fang; Minami, Itsunari; Shiba, Yuji; Ueda, Kazumitsu; Nakatsuji, Norio; Uesugi, Motonari

    2017-02-06

    A major hurdle in stem cell therapy is the tumorigenic risk of residual undifferentiated stem cells. This report describes the design and evaluation of synthetic hybrid molecules that efficiently reduce the number of human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) in cell mixtures. The design takes advantage of Kyoto probe 1 (KP-1), a fluorescent chemical probe for hiPSCs, and clinically used anticancer drugs. Among the KP-1-drug conjugates we synthesized, we found an exceptionally selective, chemically tractable molecule that induced the death of hiPSCs. Mechanistic analysis suggested that the high selectivity originates from the synergistic combination of transporter-mediated efflux and the cytotoxicity mode of action. The present study offers a chemical and mechanistic rationale for designing selective, safe, and simple reagents for the preparation of non-tumorigenic clinical samples. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. The synthetic purine reversine selectively induces cell death of cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Piccoli, Marco; Palazzolo, Giacomo; Conforti, Erika; Lamorte, Giuseppe; Papini, Nadia; Creo, Pasquale; Fania, Chiara; Scaringi, Raffaella; Bergante, Sonia; Tringali, Cristina; Roncoroni, Leda; Mazzoleni, Stefania; Doneda, Luisa; Galli, Rossella; Venerando, Bruno; Tettamanti, Guido; Gelfi, Cecilia; Anastasia, Luigi

    2012-10-01

    The synthetic purine reversine has been shown to possess a dual activity as it promotes the de-differentiation of adult cells, including fibroblasts, into stem-cell-like progenitors, but it also induces cell growth arrest and ultimately cell death of cancer cells, suggesting its possible application as an anti-cancer agent. Aim of this study was to investigate the mechanism underneath reversine selectivity in inducing cell death of cancer cells by a comparative analysis of its effects on several tumor cells and normal dermal fibroblasts. We found that reversine is lethal for all cancer cells studied as it induces cell endoreplication, a process that malignant cells cannot effectively oppose due to aberrations in cell cycle checkpoints. On the other hand, normal cells, like dermal fibroblasts, can control reversine activity by blocking the cell cycle, entering a reversible quiescent state. However, they can be induced to become sensitive to the molecule when key cell cycle proteins, e.g., p53, are silenced. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Cold atmospheric plasma treatment selectively targets head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Guerrero-Preston, Rafael; Ogawa, Takenori; Uemura, Mamoru; Shumulinsky, Gary; Valle, Blanca L; Pirini, Francesca; Ravi, Rajani; Sidransky, David; Keidar, Michael; Trink, Barry

    2014-10-01

    The treatment of locoregional recurrence (LRR) of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) often requires a combination of surgery, radiation therapy and/or chemotherapy. Survival outcomes are poor and the treatment outcomes are morbid. Cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) is an ionized gas produced at room temperature under laboratory conditions. We have previously demonstrated that treatment with a CAP jet device selectively targets cancer cells using in vitro melanoma and in vivo bladder cancer models. In the present study, we wished to examine CAP selectivity in HNSCC in vitro models, and to explore its potential for use as a minimally invasive surgical approach that allows for specific cancer cell or tumor tissue ablation without affecting the surrounding healthy cells and tissues. Four HNSCC cell lines (JHU-022, JHU-028, JHU-029, SCC25) and 2 normal oral cavity epithelial cell lines (OKF6 and NOKsi) were subjected to cold plasma treatment for durations of 10, 30 and 45 sec, and a helium flow of 20 l/min-1 for 10 sec was used as a positive treatment control. We showed that cold plasma selectively diminished HNSCC cell viability in a dose-response manner, as evidenced by MTT assays; the viability of the OKF6 cells was not affected by the cold plasma. The results of colony formation assays also revealed a cell-specific response to cold plasma application. Western blot analysis did not provide evidence that the cleavage of PARP occurred following cold plasma treatment. In conclusion, our results suggest that cold plasma application selectively impairs HNSCC cell lines through non-apoptotic mechanisms, while having a minimal effect on normal oral cavity epithelial cell lines.

  20. Cold atmospheric plasma treatment selectively targets head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    GUERRERO-PRESTON, RAFAEL; OGAWA, TAKENORI; UEMURA, MAMORU; SHUMULINSKY, GARY; VALLE, BLANCA L.; PIRINI, FRANCESCA; RAVI, RAJANI; SIDRANSKY, DAVID; KEIDAR, MICHAEL; TRINK, BARRY

    2014-01-01

    The treatment of locoregional recurrence (LRR) of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) often requires a combination of surgery, radiation therapy and/or chemotherapy. Survival outcomes are poor and the treatment outcomes are morbid. Cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) is an ionized gas produced at room temperature under laboratory conditions. We have previously demonstrated that treatment with a CAP jet device selectively targets cancer cells using in vitro melanoma and in vivo bladder cancer models. In the present study, we wished to examine CAP selectivity in HNSCC in vitro models, and to explore its potential for use as a minimally invasive surgical approach that allows for specific cancer cell or tumor tissue ablation without affecting the surrounding healthy cells and tissues. Four HNSCC cell lines (JHU-022, JHU-028, JHU-029, SCC25) and 2 normal oral cavity epithelial cell lines (OKF6 and NOKsi) were subjected to cold plasma treatment for durations of 10, 30 and 45 sec, and a helium flow of 20 l/min−1 for 10 sec was used as a positive treatment control. We showed that cold plasma selectively diminished HNSCC cell viability in a dose-response manner, as evidenced by MTT assays; the viability of the OKF6 cells was not affected by the cold plasma. The results of colony formation assays also revealed a cell-specific response to cold plasma application. Western blot analysis did not provide evidence that the cleavage of PARP occurred following cold plasma treatment. In conclusion, our results suggest that cold plasma application selectively impairs HNSCC cell lines through non-apoptotic mechanisms, while having a minimal effect on normal oral cavity epithelial cell lines. PMID:25050490

  1. Induction and selection of Sox17-expressing endoderm cells generated from murine embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Insa S; Sulzbacher, Sabine; Nolden, Tobias; Fuchs, Joerg; Czarnota, Judith; Meisterfeld, Ronny; Himmelbauer, Heinz; Wobus, Anna M

    2012-01-01

    Embryonic stem (ES) cells offer a valuable source for generating insulin-producing cells. However, current differentiation protocols often result in heterogeneous cell populations of various developmental stages. Here we show the activin A-induced differentiation of mouse ES cells carrying a homologous dsRed-IRES-puromycin knock-in within the Sox17 locus into the endoderm lineage. Sox17-expressing cells were selected by fluorescence-assisted cell sorting (FACS) and characterized at the transcript and protein level. Treatment of ES cells with high concentrations of activin A for 10 days resulted in up to 19% Sox17-positive cells selected by FACS. Isolated Sox17-positive cells were characterized by defini- tive endoderm-specific Sox17/Cxcr4/Foxa2 transcripts, but lacked pluripotency-associated Oct4 mRNA and protein. The Sox17-expressing cells showed downregulation of extraembryonic endoderm (Sox7, Afp, Sdf1)-, mesoderm (Foxf1, Meox1)- and ectoderm (Pax6, NeuroD6)-specific transcripts. The presence of Hnf4α, Hes1 and Pdx1 mRNA demonstrated the expression of primitive gut/foregut cell-specific markers. Ngn3, Nkx6.1 and Nkx2.2 transcripts in Sox17-positive cells were determined as properties of pancreatic endocrine progenitors. Immunocytochemistry of activin A-induced Sox17-positive embryoid bodies revealed coexpression of Cxcr4 and Foxa2. Moreover, the histochemical demonstration of E-cadherin-, Cxcr4-, Sox9-, Hnf1β- and Ngn3-positive epithelial-like structures underlined the potential of Sox17-positive cells to further differentiate into the pancreatic lineage. By reducing the heterogeneity of the ES cell progeny, Sox17-expressing cells are a suitable model to evaluate the effects of growth and differentiation factors and of culture conditions to delineate the differentiation process for the generation of pancreatic cells in vitro. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. Selection of mammalian cells based on their cell-cycle phase using dielectrophoresis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Unyoung; Shu, Chih-Wen; Dane, Karen Y.; Daugherty, Patrick S.; Wang, Jean Y. J.; Soh, H. T.

    2007-01-01

    An effective, noninvasive means of selecting cells based on their phase within the cell cycle is an important capability for biological research. Current methods of producing synchronous cell populations, however, tend to disrupt the natural physiology of the cell or suffer from low synchronization yields. In this work, we report a microfluidic device that utilizes the dielectrophoresis phenomenon to synchronize cells by exploiting the relationship between the cell's volume and its phase in the cell cycle. The dielectrophoresis activated cell synchronizer (DACSync) device accepts an asynchronous mixture of cells at the inlet, fractionates the cell populations according to the cell-cycle phase (G1/S and G2/M), and elutes them through different outlets. The device is gentle and efficient; it utilizes electric fields that are 1–2 orders of magnitude below those used in electroporation and enriches asynchronous tumor cells in the G1 phase to 96% in one round of sorting, in a continuous flow manner at a throughput of 2 × 105 cells per hour per microchannel. This work illustrates the feasibility of using laminar flow and electrokinetic forces for the efficient, noninvasive separation of living cells. PMID:18093921

  3. Selective Destruction Of Cells Infected With The Human Immunodeficiency Virus

    DOEpatents

    Keener, William K.; Ward, Thomas E.

    2006-03-28

    Compositions and methods for selectively killing a cell containing a viral protease are disclosed. The composition is a varient of a protein synthesis inactivating toxin wherein a viral protease cleavage site is interposed between the A and B chains. The variant of the type II ribosome-inactivating protein is activated by digestion of the viral protease cleavage site by the specific viral protease. The activated ribosome-inactivating protein then kills the cell by inactivating cellular ribosomes. A preferred embodiment of the invention is specific for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and uses ricin as the ribosome-inactivating protein. In another preferred embodiment of the invention, the variant of the ribosome-inactivating protein is modified by attachment of one or more hydrophobic agents. The hydrophobic agent facilitates entry of the variant of the ribosome-inactivating protein into cells and can lead to incorporation of the ribosome-inactivating protein into viral particles. Still another preferred embodiment of the invention includes a targeting moiety attached to the variants of the ribosome-inactivating protein to target the agent to HIV infectable cells.

  4. Selective destruction of cells infected with human immunodeficiency virus

    DOEpatents

    Keener, William K.; Ward, Thomas E.

    2003-09-30

    Compositions and methods for selectively killing a cell containing a viral protease are disclosed. The composition is a variant of a protein synthesis inactivating toxin wherein a viral protease cleavage site is interposed between the A and B chains. The variant of the type II ribosome-inactivating protein is activated by digestion of the viral protease cleavage site by the specific viral protease. The activated ribosome-inactivating protein then kills the cell by inactivating cellular ribosomes. A preferred embodiment of the invention is specific for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and uses ricin as the ribosome-inactivating protein. In another preferred embodiment of the invention, the variant of the ribosome-inactivating protein is modified by attachment of one or more hydrophobic agents. The hydrophobic agent facilitates entry of the variant of the ribosome-inactivating protein into cells and can lead to incorporation of the ribosome-inactivating protein into viral particles. Still another preferred embodiment of the invention includes a targeting moiety attached to the variants of the ribosome-inactivating protein to target the agent to HIV infectable cells.

  5. Selective calcium sensitivity in immature glioma cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Wee, Shimei; Niklasson, Maria; Marinescu, Voichita Dana; Segerman, Anna; Schmidt, Linnéa; Hermansson, Annika; Dirks, Peter; Forsberg-Nilsson, Karin; Westermark, Bengt; Uhrbom, Lene; Linnarsson, Sten; Nelander, Sven; Andäng, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Tumor-initiating cells are a subpopulation in aggressive cancers that exhibit traits shared with stem cells, including the ability to self-renew and differentiate, commonly referred to as stemness. In addition, such cells are resistant to chemo- and radiation therapy posing a therapeutic challenge. To uncover stemness-associated functions in glioma-initiating cells (GICs), transcriptome profiles were compared to neural stem cells (NSCs) and gene ontology analysis identified an enrichment of Ca2+ signaling genes in NSCs and the more stem-like (NSC-proximal) GICs. Functional analysis in a set of different GIC lines regarding sensitivity to disturbed homeostasis using A23187 and Thapsigargin, revealed that NSC-proximal GICs were more sensitive, corroborating the transcriptome data. Furthermore, Ca2+ drug sensitivity was reduced in GICs after differentiation, with most potent effect in the NSC-proximal GIC, supporting a stemness-associated Ca2+ sensitivity. NSCs and the NSC-proximal GIC line expressed a larger number of ion channels permeable to potassium, sodium and Ca2+. Conversely, a higher number of and higher expression levels of Ca2+ binding genes that may buffer Ca2+, were expressed in NSC-distal GICs. In particular, expression of the AMPA glutamate receptor subunit GRIA1, was found to associate with Ca2+ sensitive NSC-proximal GICs, and decreased as GICs differentiated along with reduced Ca2+ drug sensitivity. The correlation between high expression of Ca2+ channels (such as GRIA1) and sensitivity to Ca2+ drugs was confirmed in an additional nine novel GIC lines. Calcium drug sensitivity also correlated with expression of the NSC markers nestin (NES) and FABP7 (BLBP, brain lipid-binding protein) in this extended analysis. In summary, NSC-associated NES+/FABP7+/GRIA1+ GICs were selectively sensitive to disturbances in Ca2+ homeostasis, providing a potential target mechanism for eradication of an immature population of malignant cells.

  6. Wood-fired fuel cells in selected buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIlveen-Wright, D. R.; McMullan, J. T.; Guiney, D. J.

    of selected buildings in rural areas, with regard to the high cost of importing other fuel, and/or lack of grid electricity, could still make these systems attractive options. Any economic analysis of these systems is beset with severe difficulties. Capital costs of the major system components are not known with any great precision. However, a guideline assessment of the payback period for such CHP systems was made. When the best available capital costs for system components were used, most of these systems were found to have unacceptably long payback periods, particularly where the fuel cell lifetimes are short, but the larger systems show the potential for a reasonable economic return.

  7. Nutlin-3a selects for cells harbouring TP53 mutations.

    PubMed

    Kucab, Jill E; Hollstein, Monica; Arlt, Volker M; Phillips, David H

    2017-02-15

    TP53 mutations occur in half of all human tumours. Mutagen-induced or spontaneous TP53 mutagenesis can be studied in vitro using the human TP53 knock-in (Hupki) mouse embryo fibroblast (HUF) immortalisation assay (HIMA). TP53 mutations arise in up to 30% of mutagen-treated, immortalised HUFs; however, mutants are not identified until TP53 sequence analysis following immortalisation (2-5 months) and much effort is expended maintaining TP53-WT cultures. In order to improve the selectivity of the HIMA for HUFs harbouring TP53 mutations, we explored the use of Nutlin-3a, an MDM2 inhibitor that leads to stabilisation and activation of wild-type (WT) p53. First, we treated previously established immortal HUF lines carrying WT or mutated TP53 with Nutlin-3a to examine the effect on cell growth and p53 activation. Nutlin-3a induced the p53 pathway in TP53-WT HUFs and inhibited cell growth, whereas most TP53-mutated HUFs were resistant to Nutlin-3a. We then assessed whether Nutlin-3a treatment could discriminate between TP53-WT and TP53-mutated cells during the HIMA (n = 72 cultures). As immortal clones emerged from senescent cultures, each was treated with 10 µM Nutlin-3a for 5 days and observed for sensitivity or resistance. TP53 was subsequently sequenced from all immortalised clones. We found that all Nutlin-3a-resistant clones harboured TP53 mutations, which were diverse in position and functional impact, while all but one of the Nutlin-3a-sensitive clones were TP53-WT. These data suggest that including a Nutlin-3a counter-screen significantly improves the specificity and efficiency of the HIMA, whereby TP53-mutated clones are selected prior to sequencing and TP53-WT clones can be discarded.

  8. Autophagy negatively regulates cancer cell proliferation via selectively targeting VPRBP.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bo-Shi; Liu, Yi-Zhen; Yang, Yang; Zhang, Yu; Hao, Jia-Jie; Yang, Hai; Wang, Xiao-Min; Zhang, Zi-Qiang; Zhan, Qi-Min; Wang, Ming-Rong

    2013-02-01

    There have been multiple lines of evidence suggesting that autophagy selectively targets signalling proteins and regulates cancer cell signalling in addition to bulk clearance of long-lived proteins and organelles. Protein degradation through autophagy requires receptor protein LC3B to sequester the substrates into the autophagosome. In the present study, we screened LC3B (light-chain 3B)-binding partners and identified autophagic substrates in cancer cells. With lung cancer NCI-H1975 and oesophageal cancer KYSE30 cell lines as models, we found that VPRBP (viral protein R-binding protein) was a novel LC3B-binding protein through GST (glutathione transferase)-LC3B pull-down combined with LC-MS/MS (liquid chromatography-tandem MS) methods. Co-immunoprecipitation assay showed that VPRBP-LC3/p62 were in the same protein complex as the two cell lines. Induction of autophagy led to a down-regulation of VPRPB, which could be rescued by the inhibition of autophagy degradation by BFA1 (bafilomycin A1) and by the disruption of autophagy through ATG5-knockdown. We also found that induction of autophagy promotes VPRBP-LC3/p62 interaction. Immunohistochemical examination of human NSCLC (non-small cell lung cancer) tissues showed that VPRBP was positively correlated with p62 and negatively correlated with LC3B. Moreover, p62 and VPRBP were associated with poor prognosis in lung ADC (adenocarcinoma) (p62, P=0.019; VPRBP, P=0.005). Patients with low expression of both p62 and VPRBP showed the best prognosis.

  9. 21 CFR 866.6020 - Immunomagnetic circulating cancer cell selection and enumeration system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Immunomagnetic circulating cancer cell selection... Associated Antigen immunological Test Systems § 866.6020 Immunomagnetic circulating cancer cell selection and enumeration system. (a) Identification. An immunomagnetic circulating cancer cell selection and enumeration...

  10. 21 CFR 866.6020 - Immunomagnetic circulating cancer cell selection and enumeration system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Immunomagnetic circulating cancer cell selection... Associated Antigen immunological Test Systems § 866.6020 Immunomagnetic circulating cancer cell selection and enumeration system. (a) Identification. An immunomagnetic circulating cancer cell selection and enumeration...

  11. 21 CFR 866.6020 - Immunomagnetic circulating cancer cell selection and enumeration system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Immunomagnetic circulating cancer cell selection... Associated Antigen immunological Test Systems § 866.6020 Immunomagnetic circulating cancer cell selection and enumeration system. (a) Identification. An immunomagnetic circulating cancer cell selection and enumeration...

  12. 21 CFR 866.6020 - Immunomagnetic circulating cancer cell selection and enumeration system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Immunomagnetic circulating cancer cell selection... Associated Antigen immunological Test Systems § 866.6020 Immunomagnetic circulating cancer cell selection and enumeration system. (a) Identification. An immunomagnetic circulating cancer cell selection and enumeration...

  13. 21 CFR 866.6020 - Immunomagnetic circulating cancer cell selection and enumeration system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Immunomagnetic circulating cancer cell selection... Associated Antigen immunological Test Systems § 866.6020 Immunomagnetic circulating cancer cell selection and enumeration system. (a) Identification. An immunomagnetic circulating cancer cell selection and enumeration...

  14. Selection and Separation of Viable Cells Based on a Cell-Lethal Assay

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Wei; Herman, Annadele; Phillips, Colleen; Pai, Jeng-Hao; Sims, Christopher E.; Allbritton, Nancy L.

    2010-01-01

    A method to select and separate viable cells based on the results of a cell-lethal assay was developed. Cells were plated on an array of culture sites with each site composed of closely spaced, releasable micropallets. Clonal colonies spanning multiple micropallets on individual culture sites were established within 72 h of plating. Adjacent sites were widely spaced with 100% of the colonies remaining sequestered on a single culture site during expansion. A laser-based method mechanically released a micropallet underlying a colony to segment the colony into two genetically identical colonies. One portion of the segmented colony was collected with 90% efficiency while viability of both fractions was 100%. The segmented colonies released from the array were fixed and subjected to immunofluorescence staining of intracellular phospho-ERK kinase to identify colonies that were highly resistant or sensitive to phorbol ester-induced activation of ERK. These resistant and sensitive cells were then matched to the corresponding viable colonies on the array. Sensitive and resistant colonies on the array were released and cultured. When these cultured cells were reanalyzed for phorbol ester-induced ERK activity, the cells retained the sensitive or resistant phenotype of the originally screened subcolony. Thus cells were separated and collected based using the result of a cell-lethal assay as selection criteria. These microarrays enabling clonal colony segmentation permitted sampling and manipulation of the colonies at very early times and at small cell numbers to reduce reagent, time and manpower requirements. PMID:21142138

  15. Selection of High-Producing Clones Using FACS for CHO Cell Line Development.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, Clair; Kelly, Paul S

    2017-01-01

    Cell line development aims to generate and select clones with desirable characteristics. One of the most important parameters for biopharmaceutical cell selection is cell-specific productivity (Qp) or the quantity of product produced per cell per day. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) is a powerful, high-throughput technique that facilitates multiparametric characterization and isolation of individual cell clones from heterogeneous populations. Here, we describe a FACS-based method for section of high-producing CHO cell clones.

  16. Selection of peptidoglycan-specific aptamers for bacterial cells identification.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Iêda Mendes; de Souza Lacerda, Camila Maria; de Faria, Lígia Santana; Corrêa, Cristiane Rodrigues; de Andrade, Antero Silva Ribeiro

    2014-12-01

    Peptidoglycan is a highly complex and essential macromolecule of bacterial outer cell wall; it is a heteropolymer made up of linear glycan strands cross-linked by peptides. Peptidoglycan has a particular composition which makes it a possible target for specific bacterial recognition. Aptamers are single-stranded DNA or RNA oligonucleotides that bind to target molecules with high affinity and specificity. Aptamers can be labeled with different radioisotopes and possess several properties that make them suitable for molecular imaging. The purpose of this study was to obtain aptamers for use as radiopharmaceutical in bacterial infection diagnosis. Two aptamers (Antibac1 and Antibac2) against peptidoglycan were selected through the Systematic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential Enrichment (SELEX) methodology. The dissociation constant (Kd) for Antibac1 was 0.415 + 0.047 μM and for Antibac2 was 1.261 + 0.280 μM. These aptamers labeled with (32)P showed high affinity for Staphylococcus aureus cells. The binding to S. aureus and Escherichia coli in vitro were significantly higher than for Candida albicans and human fibroblasts, demonstrating their specificity for bacterial cells. These results point Antibac1 and Antibac2 as promising tools for bacterial infections identification.

  17. Donor selection in T cell-replete haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: knowns, unknowns, and controversies.

    PubMed

    Ciurea, Stefan O; Champlin, Richard E

    2013-02-01

    Multiple donors are generally available for haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Here we discuss the factors that should be considered when selecting donors for this type of transplantation according to the currently available evidence. Donor-specific anti-HLA antibodies (DSAs) increase the risk of graft failure and should be avoided whenever possible. Strategies to manage recipients with DSAs are discussed. One should choose a full haplotype mismatch rather than a better-matched donor and maximize the dose of infused hematopoietic cells. Donor age and sex are other important factors. Other factors, including predicted natural killer cell alloreactivity and consideration of noninherited maternal alleles, are more controversial. Larger studies are needed to further clarify the role of these factors for donor selection in haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

  18. A Novel Selectable Islet 1 Positive Progenitor Cell Reprogrammed to Expandable and Functional Smooth Muscle Cells.

    PubMed

    Turner, Elizabeth C; Huang, Chien-Ling; Sawhney, Neha; Govindarajan, Kalaimathi; Clover, Anthony J P; Martin, Kenneth; Browne, Tara C; Whelan, Derek; Kumar, Arun H S; Mackrill, John J; Wang, Shaohua; Schmeckpeper, Jeffrey; Stocca, Alessia; Pierce, William G; Leblond, Anne-Laure; Cai, Liquan; O'Sullivan, Donnchadh M; Buneker, Chirlei K; Choi, Janet; MacSharry, John; Ikeda, Yasuhiro; Russell, Stephen J; Caplice, Noel M

    2016-05-01

    Disorders affecting smooth muscle structure/function may require technologies that can generate large scale, differentiated and contractile smooth muscle cells (SMC) suitable for cell therapy. To date no clonal precursor population that provides large numbers of differentiated SMC in culture has been identified in a rodent. Identification of such cells may also enhance insight into progenitor cell fate decisions and the relationship between smooth muscle precursors and disease states that implicate differentiated SMC.  In this study, we used classic clonal expansion techniques to identify novel self-renewing Islet 1 (Isl-1) positive primitive progenitor cells (PPC) within rat bone marrow that exhibited canonical stem cell markers and preferential differentiation towards a smooth muscle-like fate. We subsequently used molecular tagging to select Isl-1 positive clonal populations from expanded and de novo marrow cell populations. We refer to these previously undescribed cells as the PPC given its stem cell marker profile, and robust self-renewal capacity. PPC could be directly converted into induced smooth muscle cells (iSMC) using single transcription factor (Kruppel-like factor 4) knockdown or transactivator (myocardin) overexpression in contrast to three control cells (HEK 293, endothelial cells and mesenchymal stem cells) where such induction was not possible. iSMC exhibited immuno- and cytoskeletal-phenotype, calcium signaling profile and contractile responses similar to bona fide SMC. Passaged iSMC could be expanded to a scale sufficient for large scale tissue replacement.  PPC and reprogramed iSMC so derived may offer future opportunities to investigate molecular, structure/function and cell-based replacement therapy approaches to diverse cardiovascular, respiratory, gastrointestinal, and genitourinary diseases that have as their basis smooth muscle cell functional aberrancy or numerical loss. Stem Cells 2016;34:1354-1368.

  19. Targeted erythropoietin selectively stimulates red blood cell expansion in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Burrill, Devin R.; Vernet, Andyna; Collins, James J.; Silver, Pamela A.; Way, Jeffrey C.

    2016-01-01

    The design of cell-targeted protein therapeutics can be informed by natural protein–protein interactions that use cooperative physical contacts to achieve cell type specificity. Here we applied this approach in vivo to the anemia drug erythropoietin (EPO), to direct its activity to EPO receptors (EPO-Rs) on red blood cell (RBC) precursors and prevent interaction with EPO-Rs on nonerythroid cells, such as platelets. Our engineered EPO molecule was mutated to weaken its affinity for EPO-R, but its avidity for RBC precursors was rescued via tethering to an antibody fragment that specifically binds the human RBC marker glycophorin A (huGYPA). We systematically tested the impact of these engineering steps on in vivo markers of efficacy, side effects, and pharmacokinetics. huGYPA transgenic mice dosed with targeted EPO exhibited elevated RBC levels, with only minimal platelet effects. This in vivo selectivity depended on the weakening EPO mutation, fusion to the RBC-specific antibody, and expression of huGYPA. The terminal plasma half-life of targeted EPO was ∼28.3 h in transgenic mice vs. ∼15.5 h in nontransgenic mice, indicating that huGYPA on mature RBCs acted as a significant drug sink but did not inhibit efficacy. In a therapeutic context, our targeting approach may allow higher restorative doses of EPO without platelet-mediated side effects, and also may improve drug pharmacokinetics. These results demonstrate how rational drug design can improve in vivo specificity, with potential application to diverse protein therapeutics. PMID:27114509

  20. Targeted erythropoietin selectively stimulates red blood cell expansion in vivo.

    PubMed

    Burrill, Devin R; Vernet, Andyna; Collins, James J; Silver, Pamela A; Way, Jeffrey C

    2016-05-10

    The design of cell-targeted protein therapeutics can be informed by natural protein-protein interactions that use cooperative physical contacts to achieve cell type specificity. Here we applied this approach in vivo to the anemia drug erythropoietin (EPO), to direct its activity to EPO receptors (EPO-Rs) on red blood cell (RBC) precursors and prevent interaction with EPO-Rs on nonerythroid cells, such as platelets. Our engineered EPO molecule was mutated to weaken its affinity for EPO-R, but its avidity for RBC precursors was rescued via tethering to an antibody fragment that specifically binds the human RBC marker glycophorin A (huGYPA). We systematically tested the impact of these engineering steps on in vivo markers of efficacy, side effects, and pharmacokinetics. huGYPA transgenic mice dosed with targeted EPO exhibited elevated RBC levels, with only minimal platelet effects. This in vivo selectivity depended on the weakening EPO mutation, fusion to the RBC-specific antibody, and expression of huGYPA. The terminal plasma half-life of targeted EPO was ∼28.3 h in transgenic mice vs. ∼15.5 h in nontransgenic mice, indicating that huGYPA on mature RBCs acted as a significant drug sink but did not inhibit efficacy. In a therapeutic context, our targeting approach may allow higher restorative doses of EPO without platelet-mediated side effects, and also may improve drug pharmacokinetics. These results demonstrate how rational drug design can improve in vivo specificity, with potential application to diverse protein therapeutics.

  1. Neisseria lactamica selectively induces mitogenic proliferation of the naive B cell pool via cell surface Ig.

    PubMed

    Vaughan, Andrew T; Brackenbury, Louise S; Massari, Paola; Davenport, Victoria; Gorringe, Andrew; Heyderman, Robert S; Williams, Neil A

    2010-09-15

    Neisseria lactamica is a commensal bacteria that colonizes the human upper respiratory tract mucosa during early childhood. In contrast to the closely related opportunistic pathogen Neisseria meningitidis, there is an absence of adaptive cell-mediated immunity to N. lactamica during the peak age of carriage. Instead, outer membrane vesicles derived from N. lactamica mediate a B cell-dependent proliferative response in mucosal mononuclear cells that is associated with the production of polyclonal IgM. We demonstrate in this study that this is a mitogenic human B cell response that occurs independently of T cell help and any other accessory cell population. The ability to drive B cell proliferation is a highly conserved property and is present in N. lactamica strains derived from diverse clonal complexes. CFSE staining of purified human tonsillar B cells demonstrated that naive IgD(+) and CD27(-) B cells are selectively induced to proliferate by outer membrane vesicles, including the innate CD5(+) subset. Neither purified lipooligosaccharide nor PorB from N. lactamica is likely to be responsible for this activity. Prior treatment of B cells with pronase to remove cell-surface Ig or treatment with BCR-specific Abs abrogated the proliferative response to N. lactamica outer membrane vesicles, suggesting that this mitogenic response is dependent upon the BCR.

  2. An Electrochemical Cell for Selective Lithium Capture from Seawater.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joo-Seong; Lee, Yong-Hee; Choi, Seungyeon; Shin, Jaeho; Dinh, Hung-Cuong; Choi, Jang Wook

    2015-08-18

    Lithium (Li) is a core element of Li-ion batteries (LIBs). Recent developments in mobile electronics such as smartphones and tablet PCs as well as advent of large-scale LIB applications including electrical vehicles and grid-level energy storage systems have led to an increase in demand for LIBs, giving rise to a concern on the availability and market price of Li resources. However, the current Lime-Soda process that is responsible for greater than 80% of worldwide Li resource supply is applicable only in certain regions on earth where the Li concentrations are sufficiently high (salt lakes or salt pans). Moreover, not only is the process time-consuming (12-18 months), but post-treatments are also required for the purification of Li. Here, we have devised a location-independent electrochemical system for Li capture, which can operate within a short time period (a few hours to days). By engaging olivine LiFePO4 active electrode that improves interfacial properties via polydopamine coating, the electrochemical cell achieves 4330 times amplification in Li/Na ion selectivity (Li/Na molar ratio of initial solution = 0.01 and Li/Na molar ratio of final electrode = 43.3). In addition, the electrochemical system engages an I(-)/I3(-) redox couple in the other electrode for balancing of the redox states on both electrode sides and sustainable operations of the entire cell. Based on the electrochemical results, key material and interfacial properties that affect the selectivity in Li capture are identified.

  3. B cell activating factor (BAFF) selects IL-10(-)B cells over IL-10(+)B cells during inflammatory responses.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ning; Zhang, Yu; Liu, Qilin; Wang, Zhiding; Liu, Xiaoling; Zhu, Gaizhi; Yu, Dandan; Han, Gencheng; Chen, Guojiang; Hou, Chunmei; Wang, Tianxiao; Ma, Yuanfang; Shen, Beifen; Li, Yan; Xiao, He; Wang, Renxi

    2017-05-01

    B cell activating factor (BAFF) regulates B cell maturation, survival, function, and plays a critical pathogenic role in autoimmune diseases. It remains unclear how BAFF affects IL-10(-)B cells versus regulatory B cells (Bregs) in inflammatory responses. In this study, we found that IL-10-expressing Bregs decreased in lupus-prone MRL/lpr mice and experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE) mice. On blockade of the effects of BAFF with TACI-IgG, IL-10(+) Bregs were upregulated in MRL/lpr and EAE mice. In addition, BAFF expanded IL-10(+)B cells over IL-10(-)B cells under noninflammatory conditions in vitro, whereas it expanded IL-10(-)B cells over IL-10(+)B cells during inflammatory responses, such as stimulation with autoantigen and LPS. Finally, the selection of IL-10(-)B cells over IL-10(+)B cells by BAFF was dependent on BAFF receptors (BAFFR, TACI, and BCMA) that were upregulated by inflammatory responses. This study suggests that BAFF selects IL-10(-)B cells over IL-10(+) regulatory B cells via BAFF receptors in inflammatory responses.

  4. Selective inhibitory effects of zinc on cell proliferation in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma through Orai1.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sangyong; Cui, Chaochu; Luo, Yanhong; Kim, Sun-Hee; Ko, Jae-Kyun; Huo, Xiaofang; Ma, Jianjie; Fu, Li-Wu; Souza, Rhonda F; Korichneva, Irina; Pan, Zui

    2017-09-19

    Zinc, an essential micronutrient, has a cancer preventive role. Zinc deficiency has been shown to contribute to the progression of esophageal cancer. Orai1, a store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE) channel, was previously reported to be highly expressed in tumor tissues removed from patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) with poor prognosis, and elevation of its expression contributes to both hyperactive intracellular Ca(2+) oscillations and fast cell proliferation in human ESCC cells. However, the molecular basis of cancer preventive functions of zinc and its association with Orai1-mediated cell proliferation remains unknown. The present study shows that zinc supplementation significantly inhibits proliferation of ESCC cell lines and that the effect of zinc is reversible with N,N,N',N'-Tetrakis (2-pyridylmethyl) ethylenediamine, a specific Zn(2+) chelator, whereas nontumorigenic esophageal epithelial cells are significantly less sensitive to zinc treatment. Fluorescence live cell imaging revealed that extracellular Zn(2+) exerted rapid inhibitory effects on Orai1-mediated SOCE and on intracellular Ca(2+) oscillations in the ESCC cells. Knockdown of Orai1 or expression of Orai1 mutants with compromised zinc binding significantly diminished sensitivity of the cancer cells to zinc treatment in both SOCE and cell proliferation analyses. These data suggest that zinc may inhibit cell proliferation of esophageal cancer cells through Orai1-mediated intracellular Ca(2+) oscillations and reveal a possible molecular basis for zinc-induced cancer prevention and Orai1-SOCE signaling pathway in cancer cells.-Choi, S., Cui, C., Luo, Y., Kim, S.-H., Ko, J.-K., Huo, X., Ma, J., Fu, L.-W., Souza, R. F., Korichneva, I., Pan, Z. Selective inhibitory effects of zinc on cell proliferation in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma through Orai1. © FASEB.

  5. Selection of malonate-resistant stromal cell-derived osteoprogenitor cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Klein, B Y; Gal, I; Segal, D

    1993-02-01

    Bone marrow stromal cells give rise to osteoprogenitor cell (OPC) colonies, with characteristic mineralized bone nodules in vitro. During differentiation, OPCs in the culture are surrounded by heterogeneous populations of various cell lineages and by different OPC differentiation stages. In the present study, attempts were made to increase the homogeneity of OPCs in culture. The reliance on energy metabolism restricted to glycolysis, which is specific to the premineralizing skeletal cells, was tested as a selectable marker for cells in this stage. Day 12 alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and day 20-21 calcium precipitates were used as early and late OPC differentiation markers. Malonate, a competitive inhibitor of succinate dehydrogenase, was added to the OPC stimulation medium, to interfere with the Krebs cycle-dependent energy metabolism operating in most of the stromal cells. OPCs that entered the stage of energy metabolism restricted to glycolysis were expected to become malonate resistant. Malonate showed dose and time dependence, 10 mM malonate added on day 3, decreased day 12 ALP activity/well to the lowest level. Variations in time and length of exposure to malonate used during the first 12 days of differentiation showed an inverse correlation between specific ALP activity and cell yield. Malonate-treated variations of specific ALP and of cell yield indices were up to 30- to 40-fold larger than variations within day 21 calcium precipitates. Thus, calcifying cells were almost unchanged relatively to noncalcifying cells. These results indicate that malonate-resistant cells are mostly selected, rather than induced, to differentiate by malonate. The results also show that stromal derived OPCs undergo a similar biochemical stage as in chondrocytes.

  6. Drug treatment of cancer cell lines: a way to select for cancer stem cells?

    PubMed

    Chiodi, Ilaria; Belgiovine, Cristina; Donà, Francesca; Scovassi, A Ivana; Mondello, Chiara

    2011-03-04

    Tumors are generally composed of different cell types. In recent years, it has been shown that in many types of cancers a subset of cells show peculiar characteristics, such as the ability to induce tumors when engrafted into host animals, self-renew and being immortal, and give rise to a differentiated progeny. These cells have been defined as cancer stem cells (CSCs) or tumor initiating cells. CSCs can be isolated both from tumor specimens and established cancer cell lines on the basis of their ability to exclude fluorescent dyes, express specific cell surface markers or grow in particular culture conditions. A key feature of CSCs is their resistance to chemotherapeutic agents, which could contribute to the remaining of residual cancer cells after therapeutic treatments. It has been shown that CSC-like cells can be isolated after drug treatment of cancer cell lines; in this review, we will describe the strategies so far applied to identify and isolate CSCs. Furthermore, we will discuss the possible use of these selected populations to investigate CSC biology and develop new anticancer drugs.

  7. Drug Treatment of Cancer Cell Lines: A Way to Select for Cancer Stem Cells?

    PubMed Central

    Chiodi, Ilaria; Belgiovine, Cristina; Donà, Francesca; Scovassi, A. Ivana; Mondello, Chiara

    2011-01-01

    Tumors are generally composed of different cell types. In recent years, it has been shown that in many types of cancers a subset of cells show peculiar characteristics, such as the ability to induce tumors when engrafted into host animals, self-renew and being immortal, and give rise to a differentiated progeny. These cells have been defined as cancer stem cells (CSCs) or tumor initiating cells. CSCs can be isolated both from tumor specimens and established cancer cell lines on the basis of their ability to exclude fluorescent dyes, express specific cell surface markers or grow in particular culture conditions. A key feature of CSCs is their resistance to chemotherapeutic agents, which could contribute to the remaining of residual cancer cells after therapeutic treatments. It has been shown that CSC-like cells can be isolated after drug treatment of cancer cell lines; in this review, we will describe the strategies so far applied to identify and isolate CSCs. Furthermore, we will discuss the possible use of these selected populations to investigate CSC biology and develop new anticancer drugs. PMID:24212655

  8. Selection of Antibodies Interfering with Cell Surface Receptor Signaling Using Embryonic Stem Cell Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Melidoni, Anna N; Dyson, Michael R; McCafferty, John

    2016-01-01

    Antibodies able to bind and modify the function of cell surface signaling components in vivo are increasingly being used as therapeutic drugs. The identification of such "functional" antibodies from within large antibody pools is, therefore, the subject of intense research. Here we describe a novel cell-based expression and reporting system for the identification of functional antibodies from antigen-binding populations preselected with phage display. The system involves inducible expression of the antibody gene population from the Rosa-26 locus of embryonic stem (ES) cells, followed by secretion of the antibodies during ES cell differentiation. Target antigens are cell-surface signaling components (receptors or ligands) with a known effect on the direction of cell differentiation (FGFR1 mediating ES cell exit from self renewal in this particular protocol). Therefore, inhibition or activation of these components by functional antibodies in a few elite clones causes a shift in the differentiation outcomes of these clones, leading to their phenotypic selection. Functional antibody genes are then recovered from positive clones and used to produce the purified antibodies, which can be tested for their ability to affect cell fates exogenously. Identified functional antibody genes can be further introduced in different stem cell types. Inducible expression of functional antibodies has a temporally controlled protein-knockdown capability, which can be used to study the unknown role of the signaling pathway in different developmental contexts. Moreover, it provides a means for control of stem cell differentiation with potential in vivo applications.

  9. Single-cell Migration Chip for Chemotaxis-based Microfluidic Selection of Heterogeneous Cell Populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yu-Chih; Allen, Steven G.; Ingram, Patrick N.; Buckanovich, Ronald; Merajver, Sofia D.; Yoon, Euisik

    2015-05-01

    Tumor cell migration toward and intravasation into capillaries is an early and key event in cancer metastasis, yet not all cancer cells are imbued with the same capability to do so. This heterogeneity within a tumor is a fundamental property of cancer. Tools to help us understand what molecular characteristics allow a certain subpopulation of cells to spread from the primary tumor are thus critical for overcoming metastasis. Conventional in vitro migration platforms treat populations in aggregate, which leads to a masking of intrinsic differences among cells. Some migration assays reported recently have single-cell resolution, but these platforms do not provide for selective retrieval of the distinct migrating and non-migrating cell populations for further analysis. Thus, to study the intrinsic differences in cells responsible for chemotactic heterogeneity, we developed a single-cell migration platform so that individual cells’ migration behavior can be studied and the heterogeneous population sorted based upon chemotactic phenotype. Furthermore, after migration, the highly chemotactic and non-chemotactic cells were retrieved and proved viable for later molecular analysis of their differences. Moreover, we modified the migration channel to resemble lymphatic capillaries to better understand how certain cancer cells are able to move through geometrically confining spaces.

  10. β-escin selectively targets the glioblastoma-initiating cell population and reduces cell viability

    PubMed Central

    Harford-Wright, Elizabeth; Bidère, Nicolas; Gavard, Julie

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is a highly aggressive tumour of the central nervous system and is associated with an extremely poor prognosis. Within GBM exists a subpopulation of cells, glioblastoma-initiating cells (GIC), which possess the characteristics of progenitor cells, have the ability to initiate tumour growth and resist to current treatment strategies. We aimed at identifying novel specific inhibitors of GIC expansion through use of a large-scale chemical screen of approved small molecules. Here, we report the identification of the natural compound β-escin as a selective inhibitor of GIC viability. Indeed, β-escin was significantly cytotoxic in nine patient-derived GIC, whilst exhibiting no substantial effect on the other human cancer or control cell lines tested. In addition, β-escin was more effective at reducing GIC growth than current clinically used cytotoxic agents. We further show that β-escin triggers caspase-dependent cell death combined with a loss of stemness properties. However, blocking apoptosis could not rescue the β-escin-induced reduction in sphere formation or stemness marker activity, indicating that β-escin directly modifies the stem identity of GIC, independent of the induction of cell death. Thus, this study has repositioned β-escin as a promising potential candidate to selectively target the aggressive population of initiating cells within GBM. PMID:27589691

  11. β-escin selectively targets the glioblastoma-initiating cell population and reduces cell viability.

    PubMed

    Harford-Wright, Elizabeth; Bidère, Nicolas; Gavard, Julie

    2016-10-11

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is a highly aggressive tumour of the central nervous system and is associated with an extremely poor prognosis. Within GBM exists a subpopulation of cells, glioblastoma-initiating cells (GIC), which possess the characteristics of progenitor cells, have the ability to initiate tumour growth and resist to current treatment strategies. We aimed at identifying novel specific inhibitors of GIC expansion through use of a large-scale chemical screen of approved small molecules. Here, we report the identification of the natural compound β-escin as a selective inhibitor of GIC viability. Indeed, β-escin was significantly cytotoxic in nine patient-derived GIC, whilst exhibiting no substantial effect on the other human cancer or control cell lines tested. In addition, β-escin was more effective at reducing GIC growth than current clinically used cytotoxic agents. We further show that β-escin triggers caspase-dependent cell death combined with a loss of stemness properties. However, blocking apoptosis could not rescue the β-escin-induced reduction in sphere formation or stemness marker activity, indicating that β-escin directly modifies the stem identity of GIC, independent of the induction of cell death. Thus, this study has repositioned β-escin as a promising potential candidate to selectively target the aggressive population of initiating cells within GBM.

  12. Hole selective MoOx contact for silicon solar cells.

    PubMed

    Battaglia, Corsin; Yin, Xingtian; Zheng, Maxwell; Sharp, Ian D; Chen, Teresa; McDonnell, Stephen; Azcatl, Angelica; Carraro, Carlo; Ma, Biwu; Maboudian, Roya; Wallace, Robert M; Javey, Ali

    2014-02-12

    Using an ultrathin (∼ 15 nm in thickness) molybdenum oxide (MoOx, x < 3) layer as a transparent hole selective contact to n-type silicon, we demonstrate a room-temperature processed oxide/silicon solar cell with a power conversion efficiency of 14.3%. While MoOx is commonly considered to be a semiconductor with a band gap of 3.3 eV, from X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy we show that MoOx may be considered to behave as a high workfunction metal with a low density of states at the Fermi level originating from the tail of an oxygen vacancy derived defect band located inside the band gap. Specifically, in the absence of carbon contamination, we measure a work function potential of ∼ 6.6 eV, which is significantly higher than that of all elemental metals. Our results on the archetypical semiconductor silicon demonstrate the use of nm-thick transition metal oxides as a simple and versatile pathway for dopant-free contacts to inorganic semiconductors. This work has important implications toward enabling a novel class of junctionless devices with applications for solar cells, light-emitting diodes, photodetectors, and transistors.

  13. Repair of Ischemic Injury by Pluripotent Stem Cell Based Cell Therapy without Teratoma through Selective Photosensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Seung-Ju; Kim, So-Yeon; Jeong, Ho-Chang; Cheong, Hyeonsik; Kim, Doseok; Park, Soon-Jung; Choi, Jong-Jin; Kim, Hyongbum; Chung, Hyung-Min; Moon, Sung-Hwan; Cha, Hyuk-Jin

    2015-01-01

    Summary Stem-toxic small molecules have been developed to induce selective cell death of pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) to lower the risk of teratoma formation. However, despite their high efficacies, chemical-based approaches may carry unexpected toxicities on specific differentiated cell types. Herein, we took advantage of KillerRed (KR) as a suicide gene, to selectively induce phototoxicity using visible light via the production of reactive oxygen species. PSCs in an undifferentiated state that exclusively expressed KR (KR-PSCs) were eliminated by a single exposure to visible light. This highly selective cell death in KR-PSCs was exploited to successfully inhibit teratoma formation. In particular, endothelial cells from KR-mPSCs remained fully functional in vitro and sufficient to repair ischemic injury in vivo regardless of light exposure, suggesting that a genetic approach in which KR is expressed in a tightly controlled manner would be a viable strategy to inhibit teratoma formation for future safe PSC-based therapies. PMID:26584542

  14. Discovery of a novel proteasome inhibitor selective for cancer cells over non-transformed cells.

    PubMed

    Kazi, Aslamuzzaman; Lawrence, Harshani; Guida, Wayne C; McLaughlin, Mark L; Springett, Gregory M; Berndt, Norbert; Yip, Richard M L; Sebti, Saïd M

    2009-06-15

    Numerous proteins controlling cell cycle progression, apoptosis and angiogenesis are degraded by the ubiquitin/proteasome system, which has become the subject for intense investigations for cancer therapeutics. Therefore, we used in silico and experimental approaches to screen compounds from the NCI chemical libraries for inhibitors against the chymotrypsin-like (CT-L) activity of the proteasome and discovered PI-083. Molecular docking indicates that PI-083 interacts with the Thr21, Gly47 and Ala49 residues of the beta5 subunit and Asp114 of the beta6 subunit of the proteasome. PI-083 inhibits CT-L activity and cell proliferation and induces apoptosis selectively in cancer cells (ovarian T80-Hras, pancreatic C7-Kras and breast MCF-7) as compared to their normal/immortalized counterparts (T80, C7 and MCF-10A, respectively). In contrast, Bortezomib, the only proteasome inhibitor approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), did not exhibit this selectivity for cancer over non-transformed cells. In addition, in all cancer cells tested, including Multiple Myeloma (MM), breast, pancreatic, ovarian, lung, prostate cancer cell lines as well as fresh MM cells from patients, PI-083 required less time than Bortezomib to induce its antitumor effects. Furthermore, in nude mouse xenografts in vivo, PI-083, but not Bortezomib, suppressed the growth of human breast and lung tumors. Finally, following in vivo treatment of mice, PI-083 inhibited tumor, but not hepatic liver CT-L activity, whereas Bortezomib inhibited both tumor and liver CT-L activities. These results suggest that PI-083 is more selective for cancer cells and may have broader antitumor activity and therefore warrants further advanced preclinical studies.

  15. Nutlin‐3a selects for cells harbouring TP 53 mutations

    PubMed Central

    Hollstein, Monica; Arlt, Volker M.; Phillips, David H.

    2016-01-01

    TP53 mutations occur in half of all human tumours. Mutagen‐induced or spontaneous TP53 mutagenesis can be studied in vitro using the human TP53 knock‐in (Hupki) mouse embryo fibroblast (HUF) immortalisation assay (HIMA). TP53 mutations arise in up to 30% of mutagen‐treated, immortalised HUFs; however, mutants are not identified until TP53 sequence analysis following immortalisation (2–5 months) and much effort is expended maintaining TP53‐WT cultures. In order to improve the selectivity of the HIMA for HUFs harbouring TP53 mutations, we explored the use of Nutlin‐3a, an MDM2 inhibitor that leads to stabilisation and activation of wild‐type (WT) p53. First, we treated previously established immortal HUF lines carrying WT or mutated TP53 with Nutlin‐3a to examine the effect on cell growth and p53 activation. Nutlin‐3a induced the p53 pathway in TP53‐WT HUFs and inhibited cell growth, whereas most TP53‐mutated HUFs were resistant to Nutlin‐3a. We then assessed whether Nutlin‐3a treatment could discriminate between TP53‐WT and TP53‐mutated cells during the HIMA (n = 72 cultures). As immortal clones emerged from senescent cultures, each was treated with 10 µM Nutlin‐3a for 5 days and observed for sensitivity or resistance. TP53 was subsequently sequenced from all immortalised clones. We found that all Nutlin‐3a‐resistant clones harboured TP53 mutations, which were diverse in position and functional impact, while all but one of the Nutlin‐3a‐sensitive clones were TP53‐WT. These data suggest that including a Nutlin‐3a counter‐screen significantly improves the specificity and efficiency of the HIMA, whereby TP53‐mutated clones are selected prior to sequencing and TP53‐WT clones can be discarded. PMID:27813088

  16. Transitional B cells are the target of negative selection in the B cell compartment

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    B lymphocytes recognize antigen through membrane-bound antigen- receptors, membrane IgM and IgD (mIgM and mIgD). Binding to foreign antigens initiates a cascade of biochemical events that lead to activation and differentiation. In contrast, binding to self-antigens leads to death or to inactivation. It is commonly believed that the B cells acquire the ability to discriminate between self and nonself in the early phases of development. We report here that immature B cells, which have just emerged from the mIgMneg, B220pos pool, are not deleted upon binding of self-antigen. In vivo, developing B cells become sensitive to tolerance induction in a relatively late window of differentiation, when they are in transition from the immature (HSAbright, B220dull) to the mature (HSAdull, B220bright) stage. In the transitional B cells, early markers of differentiation such as Pgp1 (CD44) and ThB reach the highest level of expression, while the expression of CD23 and mIgD, late markers of differentiation, and expression of class II MHC, progressively increases. Most of the transitional B cells, but only few of the mature and of the immature B cells, express the fas antigen, while mature B cells, but not immature and transitional B cells, express bcl-2 protein. mIgM is present in low amounts in immature B cells, reaches the highest level of expression in transitional B cells and is down-regulated in mature resting B cells, where it is coexpressed with mIgD. The high expression of mIgM, the presence of the fas antigen and the absence of bcl-2 protein is compatible with the high sensitivity of transitional B cells to negative selection. In vitro, immature B cells die rapidly by apoptosis after cross-linking of mIgM. This result, combined with the resistance of immature B cells to elimination in vivo, suggests that early in development the stroma cell microenvironment modulates signals transduced through mIgM. The functional and phenotypic division of IgMpos bone marrow B cells in

  17. FAS-Based Cell Depletion Facilitates the Selective Isolation of Mouse Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Warlich, Eva; Schambach, Axel; Lock, Dominik; Wedekind, Dirk; Glage, Silke; Eckardt, Dominik; Bosio, Andreas; Knöbel, Sebastian

    2014-01-01

    Cellular reprogramming of somatic cells into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) opens up new avenues for basic research and regenerative medicine. However, the low efficiency of the procedure remains a major limitation. To identify iPSC, many studies to date relied on the activation of pluripotency-associated transcription factors. Such strategies are either retrospective or depend on genetically modified reporter cells. We aimed at identifying naturally occurring surface proteins in a systematic approach, focusing on antibody-targeted markers to enable live-cell identification and selective isolation. We tested 170 antibodies for differential expression between mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEF) and mouse pluripotent stem cells (PSC). Differentially expressed markers were evaluated for their ability to identify and isolate iPSC in reprogramming cultures. Epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EPCAM) and stage-specific embryonic antigen 1 (SSEA1) were upregulated early during reprogramming and enabled enrichment of OCT4 expressing cells by magnetic cell sorting. Downregulation of somatic marker FAS was equally suitable to enrich OCT4 expressing cells, which has not been described so far. Furthermore, FAS downregulation correlated with viral transgene silencing. Finally, using the marker SSEA-1 we exemplified that magnetic separation enables the establishment of bona fide iPSC and propose strategies to enrich iPSC from a variety of human source tissues. PMID:25029550

  18. Targeting of phage particles towards endothelial cells by antibodies selected through a multi-parameter selection strategy

    PubMed Central

    Mandrup, Ole A.; Lykkemark, Simon; Kristensen, Peter

    2017-01-01

    One of the hallmarks of cancer is sustained angiogenesis. Here, normal endothelial cells are activated, and their formation of new blood vessels leads to continued tumour growth. An improved patient condition is often observed when angiogenesis is prevented or normalized through targeting of these genomically stable endothelial cells. However, intracellular targets constitute a challenge in therapy, as the agents modulating these targets have to be delivered and internalized specifically to the endothelial cells. Selection of antibodies binding specifically to certain cell types is well established. It is nonetheless a challenge to ensure that the binding of antibodies to the target cell will mediate internalization. Previously selection of such antibodies has been performed targeting cancer cell lines; most often using either monovalent display or polyvalent display. In this article, we describe selections that isolate internalizing antibodies by sequential combining monovalent and polyvalent display using two types of helper phages, one which increases display valence and one which reduces background. One of the selected antibodies was found to mediate internalization into human endothelial cells, although our results confirms that the single stranded nature of the DNA packaged into phage particles may limit applications aimed at targeting nucleic acids in mammalian cells. PMID:28186116

  19. Prediction of NK Cell Licensing Level in Selection of Hematopoietic Stem Cell Donor, Initial Results.

    PubMed

    Rogatko-Koroś, Marta; Mika-Witkowska, Renata; Bogunia-Kubik, Katarzyna; Wysoczańska, Barbara; Jaskuła, Emilia; Kościńska, Katarzyna; Nestorowicz, Klaudia; Dziopa, Joanna; Szlendak, Urszula; Gwozdowicz, Sławomir; Graczyk-Pol, Elżbieta; Lange, Andrzej; Nowak, Jacek

    2016-12-01

    Natural killer (NK) cell licensing status depends on clonal expression of inhibitory killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (iKIR) and short term HLA environment. Licensed NK cells are more efficient in tumor killing than unlicensed NK cells. Cognate KIR-HLA pairs in hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) donor and recipient are decisive for the possible change in the NK cell licensing status after HSCT. We assessed clinical outcomes in 297 patients with lymphoproliferative or myeloproliferative malignancies, or myelodysplastic syndrome in a model with upward licensing, downward resetting, and unchanged licensing genetics status after T cell replate HSCT from unrelated donors. We found extremely low (0%) relapse/progression incidence (RI), and better (59%) event-free survival (EFS) in recipients with upward licensing status and highly increased RI (37.5%), and reduced EFS (8%) among patients with the downward resetting status of repopulated donor NK cells after HSCT, as compared with unchanged NK cell licensing (RI 23%, EFS 47%). These trends were confirmed in adjusted multivariable models (for RI p = 6.66E-09, OR = 1.47, 95% CI 1.29-1.66 and for EFS p = 3.79E-13, OR = 1.67, 95% CI 1.50-1.84). Differences in the incidence of acute graft versus host disease (GvHD 62, 69, and 47%) and chronic GvHD (24, 44, and 15%, respectively) in three groups were insignificant. It would be rationale the preferential selection of the donors with upward licensing over downward resetting inhibitory KIR:HLA constellation and inclusion of the KIR genotyping in the donor selection algorithm for malignant patients. Further studies using enlarged cohorts of patients with more homogenous diagnosis are essential to reliably verify these preliminary data.

  20. Thermo-Responsive Collagen/Cell Penetrating Hybrid Peptide as Nanocarrier in Targeting-Free Cell Selection and Uptake

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Myungeun; Hu, Chloe; Urfano, Selina F.; Arostegui, Merlyn; Slowinska, Katarzyna

    2016-01-01

    The effective delivery of therapeutics and imaging agents to a selected group of cells has been at the forefront of biomedical research. Unfortunately, the identification of the unique cell surface targets for cell selection remains a major challenge, particularly if cells within the selected group are not identical. Here we demonstrate a novel approach to cell section relying on a thermo-responsive peptide-based nanocarrier. The hybrid peptide containing cell-penetrating peptide (CPP) and collagen (COLL) domains is designed to undergo coil-to-helix transition (folding) below physiological temperature. Since only helical form undergoes effective internalization by the cells, this approach allows effective temperature-discriminate cellular uptake. The cells selected for uptake are locally cooled down thus enabling the carrier to fold and subsequently internalize. Our approach demonstrates a generic method as selected cells could differ from the adjacent cells or could belong to the same cell population. The method is fast (< 15 min) and selective; over 99.6% of cells in vitro internalized the peptide carrier at low temperatures (15°C), while less than 0.2% internalized at 37°C. In vivo results confirm the high selectivity of the method. The potential clinical applications in mixed cell differentiation carcinoma, most frequently encountered in breast and ovarian cancer, are envisioned. PMID:27603918

  1. Treatment Selection for Patients With Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Atkins, Michael B.; Choueiri, Toni K.; Cho, Daniel; Regan, Meredith; Signoretti, Sabina

    2009-01-01

    The availability of approved agents with distinct mechanisms of action has encouraged investigations to identify optimal treatment strategies for specific patients and specific tumor features. Study of tumors from patients treated with interleukin 2 (IL-2) has suggested that response was unlikely in patients with tumors with papillary features or low carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX) expression. A model combining histologic features and CAIX expression separated patients into 2 groups of roughly equal size, with 96% of the responding patients being in the favorable prognostic group. Additional studies have begun to identify molecular features that might predict response IL-2 therapy. In contrast, clinical trial data suggest that temsirolimus was relatively more active than interferon in patients with tumors containing non-clear cell features. Furthermore, pathologic examination showed no correlation of response with CAIX expression but an apparent association with high expression of either phospho-AKT or phospho-S6, proteins either upstream or downstream of mTOR. Preliminary investigations of tumor specimens from patients receiving VEGF-targeted therapy suggested that high hypoxia inducible factor expression might predict for response. In addition, response appeared more likely in tumors with mutated or methylated VHL genes; however, substantial antitumor activity was still seen in patients with VHL wild-type tumors, particularly in patients treated with either sunitinib or axitinib, rather than bevacizumab or sorafenib. Although these data provide some guidance in treatment selection, considerably more research is needed to identify and validate selection models for particular treatment approaches and enable rational and optimal utilization of the available treatment options. PMID:19402069

  2. Lithocholic bile acid selectively kills neuroblastoma cells, while sparing normal neuronal cells

    PubMed Central

    Goldberg, Alexander A.; Beach, Adam; Davies, Gerald F.; Harkness, Troy A. A.; LeBlanc, Andréa; Titorenko, Vladimir I.

    2011-01-01

    Aging is one of the major risk factors of cancer. The onset of cancer can be postponed by pharmacological and dietary anti-aging interventions. We recently found in yeast cellular models of aging that lithocholic acid (LCA) extends longevity. Here we show that, at concentrations that are not cytotoxic to primary cultures of human neurons, LCA kills the neuroblastoma (NB) cell lines BE(2)-m17, SK-n-SH, SK-n-MCIXC and Lan-1. In BE(2)-m17, SK-n-SH and SK-n-MCIXC cells, the LCA anti-tumor effect is due to apoptotic cell death. In contrast, the LCA-triggered death of Lan-1 cells is not caused by apoptosis. While low concentrations of LCA sensitize BE(2)-m17 and SK-n-MCIXC cells to hydrogen peroxide-induced apoptotic cell death controlled by mitochondria, these LCA concentrations make primary cultures of human neurons resistant to such a form of cell death. LCA kills BE(2)-m17 and SK-n-MCIXC cell lines by triggering not only the intrinsic (mitochondrial) apoptotic cell death pathway driven by mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization and initiator caspase-9 activation, but also the extrinsic (death receptor) pathway of apoptosis involving activation of the initiator caspase-8. Based on these data, we propose a mechanism underlying a potent and selective anti-tumor effect of LCA in cultured human NB cells. Moreover, our finding that LCA kills cultured human breast cancer and rat glioma cells implies that it has a broad anti-tumor effect on cancer cells derived from different tissues and organisms. PMID:21992775

  3. Selective human endothelial cell activation by chemokines as a guide to cell homing.

    PubMed

    Crola Da Silva, Claire; Lamerant-Fayel, Nathalie; Paprocka, Maria; Mitterrand, Michèle; Gosset, David; Dus, Danuta; Kieda, Claudine

    2009-03-01

    An original model of organo-specific, immortalized and stabilized endothelial cell lines was used to delineate the part played by some chemokines (CCL21, CX3CL1, CCL5 and CXCL12) and their receptors in endothelium organo-specificity. Chemokine receptor expression and chemokine presentation were investigated on organo-specific human endothelial cell lines. Although the chemokines showed distinct binding patterns for the various endothelial cell lines, these were not correlated with the expression of the corresponding receptors (CX3CR1, CXCR4, CCR5 and CCR7). Experiments with CCL21 on peripheral lymph node endothelial cells demonstrated that the chemokine did not co-localize with its receptor but was associated with extracellular matrix components. The specific activity of chemokines was clearly shown to be related to the endothelial cell origin. Indeed, CX3CL1 and CCL21 promoted lymphocyte recruitment by endothelial cells from the appendix and peripheral lymph nodes, respectively, while CX3CL1 pro-angiogenic activity was restricted to endothelial cells from the appendix and skin. The high specificity of the chemokine/endothelium interaction allowed the design of a direct in vitro endothelial cell targeting assay. This unique cellular model demonstrated a fundamental role for chemokines in conferring on the endothelium its organo-specificity and its potential for tissue targeting through the selective binding, presentation and activation properties of chemokines.

  4. Determinants of Initiation Codon Selection during Translation in Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Matsuda, Daiki; Mauro, Vincent P.

    2010-01-01

    Factors affecting translation of mRNA contribute to the complexity of eukaryotic proteomes. In some cases, translation of a particular mRNA can generate multiple proteins. However, the factors that determine whether ribosomes initiate translation from the first AUG codon in the transcript, from a downstream codon, or from multiple sites are not completely understood. Various mRNA properties, including AUG codon-accessibility and 5′ leader length have been proposed as potential determinants that affect where ribosomes initiate translation. To explore this issue, we performed studies using synthetic mRNAs with two in-frame AUG codons−both in excellent context. Open reading frames initiating at AUG1 and AUG2 encode large and small isoforms of a reporter protein, respectively. Translation of such an mRNA in COS-7 cells was shown to be 5′ cap-dependent and to occur efficiently from both AUG codons. AUG codon-accessibility was modified by using two different elements: an antisense locked nucleic acid oligonucleotide and an exon-junction complex. When either element was used to mask AUG1, the ratio of the proteins synthesized changed, favoring the smaller (AUG2-initiated) protein. In addition, we observed that increased leader length by itself changed the ratio of the proteins and favored initiation at AUG1. These observations demonstrate that initiation codon selection is affected by various factors, including AUG codon-accessibility and 5′ leader length, and is not necessarily determined by the order of AUG codons (5′→3′). The modulation of AUG codon accessibility may provide a powerful means of translation regulation in eukaryotic cells. PMID:21124832

  5. Technical approaches to induce selective cell death of pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Ho-Chang; Cho, Seung-Ju; Lee, Mi-Ok; Cha, Hyuk-Jin

    2017-02-28

    Despite the recent promising results of clinical trials using human pluripotent stem cell (hPSC)-based cell therapies for age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the risk of teratoma formation resulting from residual undifferentiated hPSCs remains a serious and critical hurdle for broader clinical implementation. To mitigate the tumorigenic risk of hPSC-based cell therapy, a variety of approaches have been examined to ablate the undifferentiated hPSCs based on the unique molecular properties of hPSCs. In the present review, we offer a brief overview of recent attempts at selective elimination of undifferentiated hPSCs to decrease the risk of teratoma formation in hPSC-based cell therapy.

  6. A theory of germinal center B cell selection, division, and exit.

    PubMed

    Meyer-Hermann, Michael; Mohr, Elodie; Pelletier, Nadége; Zhang, Yang; Victora, Gabriel D; Toellner, Kai-Michael

    2012-07-26

    High-affinity antibodies are generated in germinal centers in a process involving mutation and selection of B cells. Information processing in germinal center reactions has been investigated in a number of recent experiments. These have revealed cell migration patterns, asymmetric cell divisions, and cell-cell interaction characteristics, used here to develop a theory of germinal center B cell selection, division, and exit (the LEDA model). According to this model, B cells selected by T follicular helper cells on the basis of successful antigen processing always return to the dark zone for asymmetric division, and acquired antigen is inherited by one daughter cell only. Antigen-retaining B cells differentiate to plasma cells and leave the germinal center through the dark zone. This theory has implications for the functioning of germinal centers because compared to previous models, high-affinity antibodies appear one day earlier and the amount of derived plasma cells is considerably larger.

  7. Selection of Brain Metastasis-Initiating Breast Cancer Cells Determined by Growth on Hard Agar

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Lixia; Fan, Dominic; Zhang, Fahao; Price, Janet E.; Lee, Ju-Seog; Marchetti, Dario; Fidler, Isaiah J.; Langley, Robert R.

    2011-01-01

    An approach that facilitates rapid isolation and characterization of tumor cells with enhanced metastatic potential is highly desirable. Here, we demonstrate that plating GI-101A human breast cancer cells on hard (0.9%) agar selects for the subpopulation of metastasis-initiating cells. The agar-selected cells, designated GI-AGR, were homogeneous for CD44+ and CD133+ and five times more invasive than the parental GI-101A cells. Moreover, mice injected with GI-AGR cells had significantly more experimental brain metastases and shorter overall survival than did mice injected with GI-101A cells. Comparative gene expression analysis revealed that GI-AGR cells were markedly distinct from the parental cells but shared an overlapping pattern of gene expression with the GI-101A subline GI-BRN, which was generated by repeated in vivo recycling of GI-101A cells in an experimental brain metastasis model. Data mining on 216 genes shared between GI-AGR and GI-BRN breast cancer cells suggested that the molecular phenotype of these cells is consistent with that of cancer stem cells and the aggressive basal subtype of breast cancer. Collectively, these results demonstrate that analysis of cell growth in a hard agar assay is a powerful tool for selecting metastasis-initiating cells in a heterogeneous population of breast cancer cells, and that such selected cells have properties similar to those of tumor cells that are selected based on their potential to form metastases in mice. PMID:21514446

  8. Selection of brain metastasis-initiating breast cancer cells determined by growth on hard agar.

    PubMed

    Guo, Lixia; Fan, Dominic; Zhang, Fahao; Price, Janet E; Lee, Ju-Seog; Marchetti, Dario; Fidler, Isaiah J; Langley, Robert R

    2011-05-01

    An approach that facilitates rapid isolation and characterization of tumor cells with enhanced metastatic potential is highly desirable. Here, we demonstrate that plating GI-101A human breast cancer cells on hard (0.9%) agar selects for the subpopulation of metastasis-initiating cells. The agar-selected cells, designated GI-AGR, were homogeneous for CD44(+) and CD133(+) and five times more invasive than the parental GI-101A cells. Moreover, mice injected with GI-AGR cells had significantly more experimental brain metastases and shorter overall survival than did mice injected with GI-101A cells. Comparative gene expression analysis revealed that GI-AGR cells were markedly distinct from the parental cells but shared an overlapping pattern of gene expression with the GI-101A subline GI-BRN, which was generated by repeated in vivo recycling of GI-101A cells in an experimental brain metastasis model. Data mining on 216 genes shared between GI-AGR and GI-BRN breast cancer cells suggested that the molecular phenotype of these cells is consistent with that of cancer stem cells and the aggressive basal subtype of breast cancer. Collectively, these results demonstrate that analysis of cell growth in a hard agar assay is a powerful tool for selecting metastasis-initiating cells in a heterogeneous population of breast cancer cells, and that such selected cells have properties similar to those of tumor cells that are selected based on their potential to form metastases in mice.

  9. Coupling Binding to Catalysis – Using Yeast Cell Surface Display to Select Enzymatic Activities

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Keya; Bhuripanyo, Karan; Wang, Yiyang; Yin, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Summary We find yeast cell surface display can be used to engineer enzymes by selecting the enzyme library for high affinity binding to reaction intermediates. Here we cover key steps of enzyme engineering on the yeast cell surface including library design, construction, and selection based on magnetic and fluorescence activated cell sorting. PMID:26060080

  10. Coupling Binding to Catalysis: Using Yeast Cell Surface Display to Select Enzymatic Activities.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Keya; Bhuripanyo, Karan; Wang, Yiyang; Yin, Jun

    2015-01-01

    We find yeast cell surface display can be used to engineer enzymes by selecting the enzyme library for high affinity binding to reaction intermediates. Here we cover key steps of enzyme engineering on the yeast cell surface including library design, construction, and selection based on magnetic and fluorescence-activated cell sorting.

  11. Thymic Selection of T-Cell Receptors as an Extreme Value Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Košmrlj, Andrej; Chakraborty, Arup K.; Kardar, Mehran; Shakhnovich, Eugene I.

    2009-08-01

    T lymphocytes (T cells) orchestrate adaptive immune responses upon activation. T-cell activation requires sufficiently strong binding of T-cell receptors on their surface to short peptides (p) derived from foreign proteins, which are bound to major histocompatibility gene products (displayed on antigen-presenting cells). A diverse and self-tolerant T-cell repertoire is selected in the thymus. We map thymic selection processes to an extreme value problem and provide an analytic expression for the amino acid compositions of selected T-cell receptors (which enable its recognition functions).

  12. Specialized proteasome subunits play an essential role in thymic selection of CD8+ T cells

    PubMed Central

    Kincaid, Eleanor Z.; Murata, Shigeo; Tanaka, Keiji; Rock, Kenneth L.

    2016-01-01

    The cells that stimulate positive selection express different specialized proteasome β-subunits than all other cells, including those involved in negative selection. Mice that lack all four specialized proteasome β-subunits, and therefore express only constitutive proteasomes in all cells, had a profound defect in the generation of CD8+ T cells. While a defect in positive selection would reflect an inability to generate the appropriate positively selecting peptides, a block at negative selection would point to the potential need to switch peptides between positive and negative selection to avoid the two processes often cancelling each other out. We found that the block in T cell development occurred around the checkpoints of positive and, surprisingly, also negative selection. PMID:27294792

  13. Genomic instability, driver genes and cell selection: Projections from cancer to stem cells.

    PubMed

    Ben-David, Uri

    2015-04-01

    Cancer cells and stem cells share many traits, including a tendency towards genomic instability. Human cancers exhibit tumor-specific genomic aberrations, which often affect their malignancy and drug response. During their culture propagation, human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) also acquire characteristic genomic aberrations, which may have significant impact on their molecular and cellular phenotypes. These aberrations vary in size from single nucleotide alterations to copy number alterations to whole chromosome gains. A prominent challenge in both cancer and stem cell research is to identify "driver aberrations" that confer a selection advantage, and "driver genes" that underlie the recurrence of these aberrations. Following principles that are already well-established in cancer research, candidate driver genes have also been suggested in hPSCs. Experimental validation of the functional role of such candidates can uncover whether these are bona fide driver genes. The identification of driver genes may bring us closer to a mechanistic understanding of the genomic instability of stem cells. Guided by terminologies and methodologies commonly applied in cancer research, such understanding may have important ramifications for both stem cell and cancer biology. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Stress as a fundamental theme in cell plasticity.

  14. Toward Cell Selective Surfaces: Cell Adhesion and Proliferation on Breath Figures with Antifouling Surface Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Campos, Enrique; Elzein, Tamara; Bejjani, Alice; García-Granda, Maria Jesús; Santos-Coquillat, Ana; Ramos, Viviana; Muñoz-Bonilla, Alexandra; Rodríguez-Hernández, Juan

    2016-03-01

    We report the preparation of microporous functional polymer surfaces that have been proven to be selective surfaces toward eukaryotic cells while maintaining antifouling properties against bacteria. The fabrication of functional porous films has been carried out by the breath figures approach that allowed us to create porous interfaces with either poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate (PEGMA) or 2,3,4,5,6-pentafluorostyrene (5FS). For this purpose, blends of block copolymers in a polystyrene homopolymer matrix have been employed. In contrast to the case of single functional polymer, using blends enables us to vary the chemical distribution of the functional groups inside and outside the formed pores. In particular, fluorinated groups were positioned at the edges while the hydrophilic PEGMA groups were selectively located inside the pores, as demonstrated by TOF-SIMS. More interestingly, studies of cell adhesion, growth, and proliferation on these surfaces confirmed that PEGMA functionalized interfaces are excellent candidates to selectively allow cell growth and proliferation while maintaining antifouling properties.

  15. Antioxidant defense in quiescent cells determines selectivity of electron transport chain inhibition-induced cell death.

    PubMed

    Blecha, Jan; Novais, Silvia Magalhaes; Rohlenova, Katerina; Novotna, Eliska; Lettlova, Sandra; Schmitt, Sabine; Zischka, Hans; Neuzil, Jiri; Rohlena, Jakub

    2017-07-31

    Mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC) targeting shows a great promise in cancer therapy. It is particularly effective in tumors with high ETC activity where ETC-derived reactive oxygen species (ROS) are efficiently induced. Why modern ETC-targeted compounds are tolerated on the organismal level remains unclear. As most somatic cells are in non-proliferative state, the features associated with the ETC in quiescence could account for some of the specificity observed. Here we report that quiescent cells, despite increased utilization of the ETC and enhanced supercomplex assembly, are less susceptible to cell death induced by ETC disruption when glucose is not limiting. Mechanistically, this is mediated by the increased detoxification of ETC-derived ROS by mitochondrial antioxidant defense, principally by the superoxide dismutase 2 - thioredoxin axis. In contrast, under conditions of glucose limitation, cell death is induced preferentially in quiescent cells and is correlated with intracellular ATP depletion but not with ROS. This is related to the inability of quiescent cells to compensate for the lost mitochondrial ATP production by the upregulation of glucose uptake. Hence, elevated ROS, not the loss of mitochondrially-generated ATP, are responsible for cell death induction by ETC disruption in ample nutrients condition, e.g. in well perfused healthy tissues, where antioxidant defense imparts specificity. However, in conditions of limited glucose, e.g. in poorly perfused tumors, ETC disruption causes rapid depletion of cellular ATP, optimizing impact towards tumor-associated dormant cells. In summary, we propose that antioxidant defense in quiescent cells is aided by local glucose limitations to ensure selectivity of ETC inhibition-induced cell death. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Effect of silicon oxidation on long-term cell selectivity of cell-patterned Au/SiO2 platforms.

    PubMed

    Veiseh, Mandana; Zhang, Miqin

    2006-02-01

    Cellular patterning on silicon platforms is the basis for development of integrated cell-based biosensing devices, for which long-term cell selectivity and biostability remain a major challenge. We report the development of a silicon-based platform in a metal-insulator format capable of producing uniform and biostable cell patterns with long-term cell selectivity. Substrates patterned with arrays of gold electrodes were surface-engineered such that the electrodes were activated with fibronectin to mediate cell attachment and the silicon oxide background was passivated with PEG to resist protein adsorption and cell adhesion. Three types of oxide surfaces, i.e., native oxide, dry thermally grown oxide, and wet thermally grown oxide, were produced to illustrate the effect of oxide state of the surface on long-term cell selectivity. Results indicated that the cell selectivity over time differed dramatically among three patterned platforms and the best cell selectivity was found on the dry oxide surface for up to 10 days. Surface analysis results suggested that this enhancement in cell selectivity may be related to the presence of additional, more active oxide states on the dry oxide surface supporting the stability of PEG films and effectively suppressing the cell adhesion. This research offers a new strategy for development of stable and uniform cell-patterned surfaces, which is versatile for immobilization of silane-based chemicals for preparation of biostable interfaces.

  17. Rapid Identification of Cell-Specific, Internalizing RNA Aptamers with Bioinformatics Analyses of a Cell-Based Aptamer Selection

    PubMed Central

    Thiel, William H.; Bair, Thomas; Peek, Andrew S.; Liu, Xiuying; Dassie, Justin; Stockdale, Katie R.; Behlke, Mark A.; Miller, Francis J.; Giangrande, Paloma H.

    2012-01-01

    Background The broad applicability of RNA aptamers as cell-specific delivery tools for therapeutic reagents depends on the ability to identify aptamer sequences that selectively access the cytoplasm of distinct cell types. Towards this end, we have developed a novel approach that combines a cell-based selection method (cell-internalization SELEX) with high-throughput sequencing (HTS) and bioinformatics analyses to rapidly identify cell-specific, internalization-competent RNA aptamers. Methodology/Principal Findings We demonstrate the utility of this approach by enriching for RNA aptamers capable of selective internalization into vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Several rounds of positive (VSMCs) and negative (endothelial cells; ECs) selection were performed to enrich for aptamer sequences that preferentially internalize into VSMCs. To identify candidate RNA aptamer sequences, HTS data from each round of selection were analyzed using bioinformatics methods: (1) metrics of selection enrichment; and (2) pairwise comparisons of sequence and structural similarity, termed edit and tree distance, respectively. Correlation analyses of experimentally validated aptamers or rounds revealed that the best cell-specific, internalizing aptamers are enriched as a result of the negative selection step performed against ECs. Conclusions and Significance We describe a novel approach that combines cell-internalization SELEX with HTS and bioinformatics analysis to identify cell-specific, cell-internalizing RNA aptamers. Our data highlight the importance of performing a pre-clear step against a non-target cell in order to select for cell-specific aptamers. We expect the extended use of this approach to enable the identification of aptamers to a multitude of different cell types, thereby facilitating the broad development of targeted cell therapies. PMID:22962591

  18. Mechanosensory calcium-selective cation channels in epidermal cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ding, J. P.; Pickard, B. G.

    1993-01-01

    This paper explores the properties and likely functions of an epidermal Ca(2+)-selective cation channel complex activated by tension. As many as eight or nine linked or linkable equivalent conductance units or co-channels can open together. Open time for co-channel quadruplets and quintuplets tends to be relatively long with millimolar Mg2+ (but not millimolar Ca2+) at the cytosolic face of excised plasma membrane. Sensitivity to tension is regulated by transmembrane voltage and temperature. Under some circumstances channel activity is sychronized in rhythmic pulses. Certain lanthanides and a cytoskeleton-disturbing herbicide that inhibit gravitropic reception act on the channel system at low concentrations. Specifically, ethyl-N-phenylcarbamate promotes tension-dependent activity at micromolar levels. With moderate suction, Gd3+ provided at about 0.5 micromole at the extracellular face of the membrane promotes for several seconds but may then become inhibitory. Provision at 1-2 micromoles promotes and subsequently inhibits more vigorously (often abruptly and totally), and at high levels inhibits immediately. La3+, a poor gravitropic inhibitor, acts similarly but much more gradually and only at much higher concentrations. These properties, particularly these susceptibilities to modulation, indicate that in vivo the mechanosensitive channel must be mechanosensory and mechanoregulatory. It could serve to transduce the shear forces generated in the integrated wall-membrane-cytoskeleton system during turgor changes and cell expansion as well as transducing the stresses induced by gravity, touch and flexure. In so far as such transduction is modulated by voltage and temperature, the channels would also be sensors for these modalities as long as the wall-membrane-cytoskeleton system experiences mechanical stress.

  19. Mechanosensory calcium-selective cation channels in epidermal cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ding, J. P.; Pickard, B. G.

    1993-01-01

    This paper explores the properties and likely functions of an epidermal Ca(2+)-selective cation channel complex activated by tension. As many as eight or nine linked or linkable equivalent conductance units or co-channels can open together. Open time for co-channel quadruplets and quintuplets tends to be relatively long with millimolar Mg2+ (but not millimolar Ca2+) at the cytosolic face of excised plasma membrane. Sensitivity to tension is regulated by transmembrane voltage and temperature. Under some circumstances channel activity is sychronized in rhythmic pulses. Certain lanthanides and a cytoskeleton-disturbing herbicide that inhibit gravitropic reception act on the channel system at low concentrations. Specifically, ethyl-N-phenylcarbamate promotes tension-dependent activity at micromolar levels. With moderate suction, Gd3+ provided at about 0.5 micromole at the extracellular face of the membrane promotes for several seconds but may then become inhibitory. Provision at 1-2 micromoles promotes and subsequently inhibits more vigorously (often abruptly and totally), and at high levels inhibits immediately. La3+, a poor gravitropic inhibitor, acts similarly but much more gradually and only at much higher concentrations. These properties, particularly these susceptibilities to modulation, indicate that in vivo the mechanosensitive channel must be mechanosensory and mechanoregulatory. It could serve to transduce the shear forces generated in the integrated wall-membrane-cytoskeleton system during turgor changes and cell expansion as well as transducing the stresses induced by gravity, touch and flexure. In so far as such transduction is modulated by voltage and temperature, the channels would also be sensors for these modalities as long as the wall-membrane-cytoskeleton system experiences mechanical stress.

  20. Isolation of cancer stem cells from three human glioblastoma cell lines: characterization of two selected clones.

    PubMed

    Iacopino, Fortunata; Angelucci, Cristiana; Piacentini, Roberto; Biamonte, Filippo; Mangiola, Annunziato; Maira, Giulio; Grassi, Claudio; Sica, Gigliola

    2014-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSC) were isolated via a non-adherent neurosphere assay from three glioma cell lines: LI, U87, and U373. Using a clonal assay, two clones (D2 and F11) were selected from spheres derived from LI cells and were characterized for the: expression of stem cell markers (CD133, Nestin, Musashi-1 and Sox2); proliferation; differentiation capability (determined by the expression of GalC, βIII-Tubulin and GFAP); Ca(2+) signaling and tumorigenicity in nude mice. Both D2 and F11 clones expressed higher levels of all stem cell markers with respect to the parental cell line. Clones grew more slowly than LI cells with a two-fold increase in duplication time. Markers of differentiation (βIII-Tubulin and GFAP) were expressed at high levels in both LI cells and in neurospheres. The expression of Nestin, Sox2, and βIII-Tubulin was down-regulated in D2 and F11 when cultured in serum-containing medium, whereas Musashi-1 was increased. In this condition, duplication time of D2 and F11 increased without reaching that of LI cells. D2, F11 and parental cells did not express voltage-dependent Ca(2+)-channels but they exhibited increased intracellular Ca(2+) levels in response to ATP. These Ca(2+) signals were larger in LI cells and in spheres cultured in serum-containing medium, while they were smaller in serum-free medium. The ATP treatment did not affect cell proliferation. Both D2 and F11 induced the appearance of tumors when ortotopically injected in athymic nude mice at a density 50-fold lower than that of LI cells. All these data indicate that both clones have characteristics of CSC and share the same stemness properties. The findings regarding the expression of differentiation markers and Ca(2+)-channels show that both clones are unable to reach the terminal differentiation. Both D2 and F11 might represent a good model to improve the knowledge on CSC in glioblastoma and to identify new therapeutic approaches.

  1. Depolarization Controls TRAIL-Sensitization and Tumor-Selective Killing of Cancer Cells: Crosstalk with ROS

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki-Karasaki, Yoshihiro; Suzuki-Karasaki, Miki; Uchida, Mayumi; Ochiai, Toyoko

    2014-01-01

    Conventional genotoxic anti-cancer drugs target the proliferative advantage of tumor cells over normal cells. This kind of approach lacks the selectivity of treatment to cancer cells, because most of the targeted pathways are essential for the survival of normal cells. As a result, traditional cancer treatments are often limited by undesirable damage to normal cells (side-effects). Ideal anti-cancer drugs are expected to be highly effective against malignant tumor cells with minimal cytotoxicity toward normal cells. Such selective killing can be achieved by targeting pathways essential for the survival of cancer cells, but not normal cells. As cancer cells are characterized by their resistance to apoptosis, selective apoptosis induction is a promising approach for selective killing of cancer cells. Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) is a promising tumor-selective anti-cancer drug. However, the congenital and acquired resistance of some cancer cell types, including malignant melanoma cells, currently impedes effective TRAIL therapy, and an innovative approach that can override TRAIL resistance is urgently required. Apoptosis is characterized by cell shrinkage caused by disruption of the maintenance of the normal physiological concentrations of K+ and Na+ and intracellular ion homeostasis. The disrupted ion homeostasis leads to depolarization and apoptosis. Recent evidence suggests that depolarization is an early and prerequisite event during TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Moreover, diverse natural products and synthetic chemicals capable of depolarizing the cell membrane exhibit tumor-selective killing and TRAIL-sensitizing effects. Here, we discuss the role of depolarization in selective killing of cancer cells in connection with the emerging concept that oxidative stress is a critical mediator of mitochondrial and endoplasmic reticulum dysfunctions and serves as a tumor-selective target in cancer treatment. PMID:24910845

  2. Human prostatic cancer cells, PC3, elaborate mitogenic activity which selectively stimulates human bone cells

    SciTech Connect

    Perkel, V.S.; Mohan, S.; Herring, S.J.; Baylink, D.J.; Linkhart, T.A. )

    1990-11-01

    Prostatic cancer typically produces osteoblastic metastases which are not attended by marrow fibrosis. In the present study we sought to test the hypothesis that prostatic cancer cells produce factor(s) which act selectively on human osteoblasts. Such a paracrine mechanism would explain the observed increase in osteoblasts, unaccompanied by an increase in marrow fibroblasts. To test this hypothesis we investigated the mitogenic activity released by the human prostatic tumor cell line, PC3. PC3 cells have been reported previously to produce mitogenic activity for cells that was relatively specific for rat osteoblasts compared to rat fibroblasts. However, the effects of this activity on human cells has not been examined previously. PC3-conditioned medium (CM) (5-50 micrograms CM protein/ml) stimulated human osteoblast proliferation by 200-950% yet did not stimulate human fibroblast proliferation ((3H)thymidine incorporation). PC3 CM also increased cell numbers in human osteoblast but not fibroblast cell cultures. To determine whether the osteoblast-specific mitogenic activity could be attributed to known bone growth factors, specific assays for these growth factors were performed. PC3 CM contained 10 pg insulin-like growth factor (IGF) I, less than 2 pg IGF II, 54 pg basic fibroblast growth factor, and 16 pg transforming growth factor beta/microgram CM protein. None of these growth factors alone or in combination could account for the observed osteoblast-specific PC3 cell-derived mitogenic activity. Furthermore, when 5 micrograms/ml PC3 CM was tested in combination with maximally effective concentrations of either basic fibroblast growth factor, IGF I, IGF II, or transforming growth factor beta, it produced an additive effect suggesting that PC3 CM stimulates osteoblast proliferation by a mechanism independent of these bone mitogens.

  3. Group 3 innate lymphoid cells mediate intestinal selection of commensal bacteria-specific CD4+ T cells

    PubMed Central

    Hepworth, Matthew R.; Fung, Thomas C.; Masur, Samuel H.; Kelsen, Judith R.; McConnell, Fiona M.; Dubrot, Juan; Withers, David R.; Hugues, Stephanie; Farrar, Michael A.; Reith, Walter; Eberl, Gerard; Baldassano, Robert N.; Laufer, Terri M.; Elson, Charles O.; Sonnenberg, Gregory F.

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory CD4+ T cell responses to self or commensal bacteria underlie the pathogenesis of autoimmunity and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), respectively. While selection of self-specific T cells in the thymus limits responses to tissue antigens, the mechanisms that control selection of commensal bacteria-specific T cells remain poorly understood. Here we demonstrate that group 3 innate lymphoid cell (ILC3)-intrinsic expression of major histocompatibility complex class II (MHCII) is regulated similarly to thymic epithelial cells, and that MHCII+ ILC3s directly induce cell death of activated commensal bacteria-specific T cells. Further, MHCII on human colonic ILC3s was reduced in pediatric IBD patients. Collectively, these results define a selection pathway for commensal bacteria-specific CD4+ T cells in the intestine, and suggest that this process is dysregulated in human IBD. PMID:25908663

  4. Depletion of T regulatory cells through selection of CD127-positive cells results in a population enriched in memory T cells: implications for anti-tumor cell therapy

    PubMed Central

    Touil, Soumia; Rosenzwajg, Michelle; Landau, Dan Avi; Le Corvoisier, Philippe; Frédéric, Charlotte; Klatzmann, David; Maury, Sébastien; Cohen, José L.

    2012-01-01

    Background Donor lymphocyte infusions can induce remissions in patients with relapse after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Nevertheless, some grafted patients never display any signs of alloreactivity, either following allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation or after donor lymphocyte infusions. Consequently, they do not develop graft-versus-host disease and frequently do not respond to donor lymphocyte infusions. In a recently published clinical trial, we observed that elimination of CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ natural regulatory T cells from the donor lymphocyte product could improve alloreactivity and the associated anti-tumor effect in a small proportion of patients with relapsed hematologic malignancies. Here, we aimed to improve the effect of donor lymphocyte infusion by modifying the procedure for depletion of T regulatory cells. Design and Methods We directly compared depletion of regulatory T cells from human peripheral blood mononuclear cells achieved by selection of CD127-positive cells or by selection of CD25-negative cells. We tested the manipulated products (i) in vitro in mixed lymphocyte reactions and against pathogen-derived recall antigens and (ii) in vivo in experimental graft-versus-host disease. Results In vitro, we found that depletion of regulatory T cells through CD127 positive selection improved both alloreactive and pathogen-specific immune responses. In vivo, we observed accelerated donor T-cell division and enhanced graft-versus-host disease due to efficient regulatory T-cell depletion accompanied by enrichment in memory T cells. Conclusions Our results show that the strategy of CD127 positive selection is an efficient way of eliminating regulatory T cells from donor lymphocyte infusions and improves alloreactivity. This supports the investigation of CD127 positive selection in place of elimination of CD25-positive cells for clinical applications. PMID:22581007

  5. B-cell selection and the development of autoantibodies

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The clearest evidence that B cells play an important role in human autoimmunity is that immunotherapies that deplete B cells are very effective treatments for many autoimmune diseases. All people, healthy or ill, have autoreactive B cells, but not at the same frequency. A number of genes influence the level of these autoreactive B cells and whether they are eliminated or not during development at a central checkpoint in the bone marrow (BM) or at a later checkpoint in peripheral lymphoid tissues. These genes include those encoding proteins that regulate signaling through the B-cell receptor complex such as Btk and PTPN22, proteins that regulate innate signaling via Toll-like receptors (TLRs) such as MyD88 and interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinase 4, as well as the gene encoding the activation-induced deaminase (AID) essential for B cells to undergo class switch recombination and somatic hypermutation. Recent studies have revealed that TLR signaling elements and AID function not only in peripheral B cells to help mediate effective antibody responses to foreign antigens, but also in the BM to help remove autoreactive B-lineage cells at a very early point in B-cell development. Newly arising B cells that leave the BM and enter the blood and splenic red pulp can express both AID and TLR signaling elements like TLR7, and thus are fully equipped to respond rapidly to antigens (including autoantigens), to isotype class switch, and to undergo somatic hypermutation. These red pulp B cells may thus be an important source of autoantibody-producing cells arising particularly in extrafollicular sites, and indeed may be as significant a source of autoantibody-producing cells as B cells arising from germinal centers. PMID:23281837

  6. Siglec-8 as mast cell selective target: developing paradigms amidst inconvenient truths.

    PubMed

    Molderings, Gerhard J

    2017-09-14

    Due to the limited efficacy of current drugs in treating systemic mast cell activation disease, there is an urgent need for more effective drugs selectively acting at mast cells. In the past, a large number of compounds have been claimed to be effective and mast cell selective on the basis of cell culture experiments and studies on blood leukocytes which could not be verified in organ and animal studies. Nevertheless, over time in review papers about potential mast cell targets mast cell selectivity of these targets has been no longer challenged. A recent example for such developing paradigms amidst inconvenient truths is the hype on the purported selective expression of the putative adhesion molecule sialic acid binding Ig-like lectin 8 (Siglec-8) in mast cells and eosinophils, although current data from different publically available databases/sources clearly demonstrate a widespread expression of Siglec-8 in the cells of most tissues. Two suggestions are presented: (1) In the specific case of Siglec-8, the limited mast cell selectivity should be kept in mind in the development and surveillance of Siglec-8-based mast cell- and eosinophil-targeted therapeutic strategies because of potential severe adverse effects in the Siglec-8-positive tissues. (2) In general, readers should always challenge reports about the selective expression of potential targets for drugs in a few cell types of the organism, even if they are published in highly renown journals.

  7. Distinctive selection mechanisms govern the T cell receptor repertoire of peripheral CD4-CD8- alpha/beta T cells

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    The T cell receptor (TCR) repertoire of CD4+ and CD8+ alpha/beta T cells is heavily influenced by positive and negative selection events that occur during T cell development in the thymus. The coreceptors CD4 and CD8 appear to be essential for this selection to occur. To gain insight into whether T cells that express TCR alpha/beta but lack either coreceptor (CD4- CD8- TCR alpha/beta or alpha/beta double- negative [DN] cells) are also subject to positive and negative selection, and whether selection can occur in the absence of coreceptors, we have performed an extensive immunogenetic analysis of the TCR V beta repertoire of alpha/beta DN cells in lymph nodes of normal mice. Our results show that alpha/beta DN cells appear to be unaffected by clonal deletion of V beta 5 and V beta 11 in I-E- expressing mice, and do not undergo deletion of V beta 6- and V beta 8.1-expressing T cells in Mls-1a-positive mice. They are also unaffected by positive selection of V beta 17a+ T cells in the context of I-Aq. The results suggest that most selection events require the participation of CD4 and CD8, while alpha/beta DN cells are unselected. This argues that most alpha/beta DN cells probably have never expressed CD4 or CD8. However, a unique form of repertoire selection occurs: enrichment of V beta 17a+ alpha/beta DN cells in I-E+ mice. This could be an instance of coreceptor-independent selection. PMID:1512537

  8. New Strategies for Designing Inexpensive but Selective Bioadsorbants for Environmental Pollutants: Selection of specific Ligands and Their Cell Surface Expression

    SciTech Connect

    Brent L. Iverson; George Georgiou; Mohammad M. Ataai; Richard R. Koepsel

    2001-02-22

    The Broad, long term objective of the research plan is to develop exquisitely selective polypeptide metal chelators for the remediation of aqueous systems. A variety of polypeptide chelators will be developed and optimized ranging from antibodies to small peptides. Then, through unique molecular engineering approaches developed in our laboratories, the polypeptide chelators will be anchored directly on the surface of the cells that produce them. Thus, instead of using isolated biomolecules we will employ inexpensive genetically engineered whole cell adsorbents. Following a simple, easily scaleable treatment, the engineered cells can be used to manufacture an inexpensive, particulate adsorbent for metal removal.

  9. Losartan sensitizes selectively prostate cancer cell to ionizing radiation.

    PubMed

    Yazdannejat, H; Hosseinimehr, S J; Ghasemi, A; Pourfallah, T A; Rafiei, A

    2016-01-11

    Losartan is an angiotensin II receptor (AT-II-R) blocker that is widely used by human for blood pressure regulation. Also, it has antitumor property. In this study, we investigated the radiosensitizing effect of losartan on cellular toxicity induced by ionizing radiation on prostate cancer and non-malignant fibroblast cells. Human prostate cancer (DU-145) and human non-malignant fibroblast cells (HFFF2) were treated with losartan at different concentrations (0.5, 1, 10, 50 and 100 µM) and then these cells were exposed to ionizing radiation. The cell proliferation was determined using MTT assay. Our results showed that losartan exhibited antitumor effect on prostate cancer cells; it was reduced cell survival to 66% at concentration 1 µM. Losartan showed an additive killing effect in combination with ionizing radiation on prostate cancer cell. The cell proliferation was reduced to 54% in the prostate cancer cells treated with losartan at concentration 1 µM in combination with ionizing radiation. Losartan did not exhibit any toxicity on HFFF2 cell. This result shows a promising effect of losartan on enhancement of therapeutic effect of ionizing radiation in patients during therapy.

  10. In vitro and in vivo evaluation of the indoloquinone EO-9 (NSC 382 459) against human small cell carcinoma of the lung.

    PubMed

    Roed, H; Aabo, K; Vindeløv, L; Spang-Thomsen, M; Christensen, I B; Hansen, H H

    1989-08-01

    As the indoloquinone EO-9 has previously shown activity in several tumor model systems it was evaluated against four human small cell lung cancer cell lines by the clonogenic assay. In two cell lines (Nyh and Tol), exponential dose-response curves were achieved with both 1 h and continuous exposure, whereas no cell kill was obtained in the other two cell lines (69 and 592) when tested with 1 h incubation up to 0.25 microgram/ml. When the cells were exposed to drug in vitro, flow cytometric DNA analysis showed perturbations in the cell cycle distribution of the most sensitive cell line (Tol) at a lower EO-9 concentration than in the less sensitive cel line (592). This in vitro predicted difference in EO-9 sensitivity between two of the cell lines (592 and Tol) was confirmed when the cell lines were heterotransplanted to nude mice.

  11. Selective Antitumor Activity of Ibrutinib in EGFR-Mutant Non–Small Cell Lung Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Wen; Wang, Michael; Wang, Li; Lu, Haibo; Wu, Shuhong; Dai, Bingbing; Ou, Zhishuo; Zhang, Liang; Heymach, John V.; Gold, Kathryn A.; Minna, John; Roth, Jack A.; Hofstetter, Wayne L.; Swisher, Stephen G.

    2014-01-01

    Ibrutinib, which irreversibly inhibits Bruton tyrosine kinase, was evaluated for antitumor activity in a panel of non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines and found to selectively inhibit growth of NSCLC cells carrying mutations in the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene, including T790M mutant and erlotinib-resistant H1975 cells. Ibrutinib induced dose-dependent inhibition of phosphor-EGFR at both Y1068 and Y1173 sites, suggesting ibrutinib functions as an EGFR inhibitor. Survival was analyzed by Kaplan–Meier estimation and log-rank test. All statistical tests were two-sided. In vivo study showed that ibrutinib statistically significantly suppressed H1975 tumor growth and prolonged survival of the tumor bearing mice (n = 5 per group). The mean survival times for solvent- and erlotinib-treated mice were both 17.8 days (95% confidence interval [CI] = 14.3 to 21.3 days), while the mean survival time for ibrutinib-treated mice was 29.8 days (95% CI = 26.0 to 33.6 days, P = .008). Our results indicate that ibrutinib could be a candidate drug for treatment of EGFR-mutant NSCLC, including erlotinib-resistant tumors. PMID:25214559

  12. SELECTION WITH THE MAGNET AND CULTIVATION OF RETICULO-ENDOTHELIAL CELLS (KUPFFER CELLS)

    PubMed Central

    Rous, Peyton; Beard, J. W.

    1934-01-01

    Methods and apparatus are described where with living Kupffer cells can be procured from the liver of the rabbit and the dog for study and cultivation in vitro. Almost none of these cells can be dislodged from the normal liver by forcible perfusion; but after they have taken up finely particulate matter (India ink, iron oxide), they come away in great numbers. When they have phagocyted ferromagnetic iron oxide they can be selected with a magnet from amongst the blood elements present in suspension with them; and they are obtainable in quantity by this means. They do poorly when plated in a thin plasma clot, failing to multiply or to assume their characteristic shape; but they flourish when allowed to attach themselves to strands of lens paper bathed in serum that is frequently changed. Bacterial infection of serum cultures of Kupffer cells from normal rabbits and dogs occurs only as the result of secondary contamination of the materials, whereas it regularly develops in cultures from animals with fever induced by the injection of nucleic acid or of killed B. prodigiosus. Kupffer cells obtained under such conditions are abnormally active, and some can be washed out of the liver of sick animals in the absence of any preliminary phagocytosis of particulate matter. The facts have a bearing both on the conditions conducing to blood invasion and on the response of the Kupffer cells in the emergency. The characters of the isolated Kupffer cells and the results of tests of their presumptive functions will be described in later papers. PMID:19870267

  13. [The role of IRA B cells in selected inflammatory processes].

    PubMed

    Zasada, Magdalena; Rutkowska-Zapała, Magdalena; Lenart, Marzena; Kwinta, Przemko

    2016-03-16

    The first report about the discovery of new, previously unknown immune cells named IRA B cells (innate response activator B cells) appeared in 2012. So far, their presence has been verified in both mice and humans. However, IRA B cells belong to the family of B lymphocytes and have a number of characteristics unique to this group of cells. IRA B cells are formed from activated B1a lymphocytes after their contact with a pathogen. B1a lymphocytes mainly reside within body cavities. Activated by the pathogen, they move on into secondary lymphoid organs (spleen, lymph nodes) where they differentiate into IRA B cells. IRA B cells are a rich source of granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF). GM-CSF can stimulate IRA B cells in an autocrine manner for the secretion of intracellular stocks of immunoglobulin M (IgM), which can facilitate pathogens' phagocytosis by neutrophils. GM-CSF also stimulates neutrophils into active phagocytosis. Rapid eradication of the pathogen can prevent the development of an excessive inflammatory response, which can be dangerous for the organism. Until now the involvement of IRA B lymphocytes in the pathogenesis of sepsis and pneumonia has been proven, as well as their role in the progression of atherosclerotic lesions in mice. There is research in progress on the possibility of increasing the number of IRA B cells, for example by intravenous supply of modified immunoglobulins. It is necessary to characterize human IRA B cells and to determine their role in the functioning of the immune system.

  14. Cutting edge: impaired transitional B cell production and selection in the nonobese diabetic mouse.

    PubMed

    Quinn, William J; Noorchashm, Negin; Crowley, Jenni E; Reed, Amy J; Noorchashm, Hooman; Naji, Ali; Cancro, Michael P

    2006-06-15

    Developing B cells undergo selection at multiple checkpoints to eliminate autoreactive clones. We analyzed B cell kinetics in the NOD mouse to establish whether these checkpoints are intact. Our results show that although bone marrow production is normal in NOD mice, transitional (TR) B cell production collapses at 3 wk of age, reflecting a lack of successful immature B cell migration to the periphery. This yields delayed establishment of the follicular pool and a lack of selection at the TR checkpoint, such that virtually all immature B cells that exit the bone marrow mature without further selection. These findings suggest that compromised TR B cell generation in NOD mice yields relaxed TR selection, affording autoreactive specificities access to mature pools.

  15. Unconventional myosin traffic in cells reveals a selective actin cytoskeleton

    PubMed Central

    Brawley, Crista M.; Rock, Ronald S.

    2009-01-01

    Eukaryotic cells have a self-organizing cytoskeleton where motors transport cargoes along cytoskeletal tracks. To understand the sorting process, we developed a system to observe single-molecule motility in a cellular context. We followed myosin classes V, VI, and X on triton-extracted actin cytoskeletons from Drosophila S2, mammalian COS-7, and mammalian U2OS cells. We find that these cells vary considerably in their global traffic patterns. The S2 and U2OS cells have regions of actin that either enhance or inhibit specific myosin classes. U2OS cells allow for 1 motor class, myosin VI, to move along stress fiber bundles, while motility of myosin V and X are suppressed. Myosin X motors are recruited to filopodia and the lamellar edge in S2 cells, whereas myosin VI motility is excluded from the same regions. Furthermore, we also see different velocities of myosin V motors in central regions of S2 cells, suggesting regional control of motor motility by the actin cytoskeleton. We also find unexpected features of the actin cytoskeletal network, including a population of reversed filaments with the barbed-end toward the cell center. This myosin motor regulation demonstrates that native actin cytoskeletons are more than just a collection of filaments. PMID:19478066

  16. RESEARCH ON CELL WALL CYTOCHEMISTRY OF SELECTED FUNGI.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    that the resistant material in their cell walls is chitin. All efforts to identify cellulose produced negative results. Solutions of chitinase ...fungi examined, especially Heterocephalum aurantiacum Plastid-like structures in the protoplasts are the cell organs which produce chitin. Chitin

  17. Bacterial IMPDH gene used for the selection of mammalian cell transfectants.

    SciTech Connect

    Baccam, M.; Huberman, E.; Energy Systems

    2003-06-01

    Stable cell transfection is used for the expression of exogenous genes or cDNAs in eukaryotic cells. Selection of these transfectants requires a dominant selectable marker. A variety of such markers has been identified and is currently in use. However, many of these are not suitable for all cell types or require unique conditions. Here we describe a simple and versatile dominant selectable marker that involves bacterial IMP dehydrogenase (IMPDH), an enzyme essential for the replication of mammalian and bacterial cells. Although IMPDH is evolutionarily conserved, the bacterial enzyme is orders of magnitude more resistant to the toxic effect of the drug mycophenolic acid, which is an IMPDH inhibitor. We have demonstrated that transfection of human, monkey or Chinese hamster cell lines with an expression vector containing bacterial IMPDH and mycophenolic acid treatment resulted in the selection of colonies with a strikingly increased resistance to mycophenolic acid toxicity. Analysis of cells derived from these colonies indicated that the acquisition of this resistance was associated with bacterial IMPDH protein expression. As a proof of principle, we showed that mammalian cell transfection with a hicistronic IMPDH/GFP expression vector and mycophenolic acid treatment can he used to successfully select transfectants that express the fluorescent protein. These results indicate that bacterial IMPDH is a practical dominant selectable marker that can be used for the selection of transfectants that express exogenous genes or cDNAs in mammalian cells.

  18. Effect of selected flavones on cancer and endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Pilátová, Martina; Stupáková, Viktória; Varinská, Lenka; Sarisský, Marek; Mirossay, Ladislav; Mirossay, Andrej; Gál, Peter; Kraus, Vladimír; Dianisková, Katarína; Mojzis, Ján

    2010-06-01

    In our study we used quercetin (3,3 ,4 ,5,7-pentahydroxyflavone) as the reference standard to compare antiproliferative and antiangiogenic effects of chrysin (5,7-dihydroxyflavone) and 3-hydroxyflavone. Our data indicates that chrysin and 3-hydroxyflavone showed significantly higher cytotoxic effect than reference standard quercetin. These tested agents significantly decreased cell survival with the efficacy of 65-85% at the concentration 100 micromol/l for HUVEC, lung carcinoma and leukemic cells being the most sensitive. Cell cycle analysis indicates that quercetin and 3-hydroxyflavone might affect the cell cycle of Jurkat cells by a similar or the same mechanism of action which lead to G2/M arrest as well as to an increase in sub-G0/G1 fraction. Treatment of Jurkat cells with chrysin resulted only increase in the fraction of cells with sub-G0/G1 DNA content, which is considered to be a marker of apoptotic cell death. Apoptosis was confirmed by DNA fragmentation and by staining with annexin V. All three tested flavones inhibited endothelial cell migration after 24 h of incubation at a concentration 100 micromol/l. At a lower concentration (10 micromol/l) only quercetin significantly inhibited migration of endothelial cells. Furthermore, in our experiments decreased secretion of matrix metalloproteinases (MMP-2 and MMP-9) was observed after a 72 h treatment with quercetin. No decrease in secretion of MMP-2 and MMP-9 was seen after chrysin and 3-hydroxyflavone treatment. On the other hand, our results showed that none of three flavonoids blocked microcapillary tube formation. Further studies are necessary to investigate the mechanism of action and to find out the relationship between the structure, character and position of substituents of natural substances and their biological activities.

  19. Murine thymic selection quantified using a unique method to capture deleted T cells.

    PubMed

    Stritesky, Gretta L; Xing, Yan; Erickson, Jami R; Kalekar, Lokesh A; Wang, Xiaodan; Mueller, Daniel L; Jameson, Stephen C; Hogquist, Kristin A

    2013-03-19

    Thymic positive and negative selection events generate a T-cell repertoire that is MHC restricted and self-tolerant. The number of T cells undergoing positive and negative selection in normal mice has never been firmly established. We generated mice that lack the proapoptotic molecule Bim (bcl2l11) together with a Nur77(GFP) transgene, which allowed the identification and enumeration of T cells that would normally undergo clonal deletion. Using this method, we report the striking observation that six times more cells undergo negative selection than complete positive selection. Seventy-five percent of the negatively selected cells are deleted at the double positive stage in the thymic cortex, compared with 25% at the single positive stage in the medulla. The fact that more thymocytes are highly reactive to MHC than are weakly reactive is inconsistent with a random model of recognition and suggests that T-cell recognition is MHC biased. Furthermore, Bim(-/-) mice had an increased number of GFP(hi) cells in the peripheral lymphoid tissue and a corresponding increase in antigen experienced or anergic cell phenotype. Our data also show that the CD4+ T cells that are clonally deleted experienced only slightly stronger T-cell receptor signaling than those that developed into regulatory T cells.

  20. A cortical region consisting entirely of face-selective cells.

    PubMed

    Tsao, Doris Y; Freiwald, Winrich A; Tootell, Roger B H; Livingstone, Margaret S

    2006-02-03

    Face perception is a skill crucial to primates. In both humans and macaque monkeys, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) reveals a system of cortical regions that show increased blood flow when the subject views images of faces, compared with images of objects. However, the stimulus selectivity of single neurons within these fMRI-identified regions has not been studied. We used fMRI to identify and target the largest face-selective region in two macaques for single-unit recording. Almost all (97%) of the visually responsive neurons in this region were strongly face selective, indicating that a dedicated cortical area exists to support face processing in the macaque.

  1. Functional polyesters enable selective siRNA delivery to lung cancer over matched normal cells

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Yunfeng; Liu, Li; Xiong, Hu; Miller, Jason B.; Zhou, Kejin; Kos, Petra; Huffman, Kenneth E.; Elkassih, Sussana; Norman, John W.; Carstens, Ryan; Kim, James; Minna, John D.; Siegwart, Daniel J.

    2016-01-01

    Conventional chemotherapeutics nonselectively kill all rapidly dividing cells, which produces numerous side effects. To address this challenge, we report the discovery of functional polyesters that are capable of delivering siRNA drugs selectively to lung cancer cells and not to normal lung cells. Selective polyplex nanoparticles (NPs) were identified by high-throughput library screening on a unique pair of matched cancer/normal cell lines obtained from a single patient. Selective NPs promoted rapid endocytosis into HCC4017 cancer cells, but were arrested at the membrane of HBEC30-KT normal cells during the initial transfection period. When injected into tumor xenografts in mice, cancer-selective NPs were retained in tumors for over 1 wk, whereas nonselective NPs were cleared within hours. This translated to improved siRNA-mediated cancer cell apoptosis and significant suppression of tumor growth. Selective NPs were also able to mediate gene silencing in xenograft and orthotopic tumors via i.v. injection or aerosol inhalation, respectively. Importantly, this work highlights that different cells respond differentially to the same drug carrier, an important factor that should be considered in the design and evaluation of all NP carriers. Because no targeting ligands are required, these functional polyester NPs provide an exciting alternative approach for selective drug delivery to tumor cells that may improve efficacy and reduce adverse side effects of cancer therapies. PMID:27621434

  2. Functional polyesters enable selective siRNA delivery to lung cancer over matched normal cells.

    PubMed

    Yan, Yunfeng; Liu, Li; Xiong, Hu; Miller, Jason B; Zhou, Kejin; Kos, Petra; Huffman, Kenneth E; Elkassih, Sussana; Norman, John W; Carstens, Ryan; Kim, James; Minna, John D; Siegwart, Daniel J

    2016-09-27

    Conventional chemotherapeutics nonselectively kill all rapidly dividing cells, which produces numerous side effects. To address this challenge, we report the discovery of functional polyesters that are capable of delivering siRNA drugs selectively to lung cancer cells and not to normal lung cells. Selective polyplex nanoparticles (NPs) were identified by high-throughput library screening on a unique pair of matched cancer/normal cell lines obtained from a single patient. Selective NPs promoted rapid endocytosis into HCC4017 cancer cells, but were arrested at the membrane of HBEC30-KT normal cells during the initial transfection period. When injected into tumor xenografts in mice, cancer-selective NPs were retained in tumors for over 1 wk, whereas nonselective NPs were cleared within hours. This translated to improved siRNA-mediated cancer cell apoptosis and significant suppression of tumor growth. Selective NPs were also able to mediate gene silencing in xenograft and orthotopic tumors via i.v. injection or aerosol inhalation, respectively. Importantly, this work highlights that different cells respond differentially to the same drug carrier, an important factor that should be considered in the design and evaluation of all NP carriers. Because no targeting ligands are required, these functional polyester NPs provide an exciting alternative approach for selective drug delivery to tumor cells that may improve efficacy and reduce adverse side effects of cancer therapies.

  3. Thymic Selection of T-Cell Receptors as an Extreme Value Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosmrlj, Andrej; Chakraborty, Arup K.; Kardar, Mehran; Shakhnovich, Eugene I.

    2010-03-01

    T lymphocytes (T cells) orchestrate adaptive immune responses that clear pathogens from infected hosts. T cells recognize short peptides (p) derived from foreign proteins, which are bound to major histocompatibility complex (MHC) gene products (displayed on antigen- presenting cells). Recognition occurs when T cell receptor (TCR) proteins expressed on T cells bind sufficiently strongly to antigen- derived pMHC complexes on the surface of antigen-presenting cells. A diverse repertoire of self-tolerant TCR sequences is shaped during development of T cells in the thymus by processes called positive and negative selection. We map thymic selection processes to an extreme value problem and provide analytic expression for the amino acid composition of selected TCR sequences (which enable its recognition functions).

  4. High-selectivity cytology via lab-on-a-disc western blotting of individual cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, John J; Sinkala, Elly; Herr, Amy E

    2017-02-28

    Cytology of sparingly available cell samples from both clinical and experimental settings would benefit from high-selectivity protein tools. To minimize cell handling losses in sparse samples, we design a multi-stage assay using a lab-on-a-disc that integrates cell handling and subsequent single-cell western blotting (scWestern). As the two-layer microfluidic device rotates, the induced centrifugal force directs dissociated cells to dams, which in turn localize the cells over microwells. Cells then sediment into the microwells, where the cells are lysed and subjected to scWestern. Taking into account cell losses from loading, centrifugation, and lysis-buffer exchange, our lab-on-a-disc device handles cell samples with as few as 200 cells with 75% cell settling efficiencies. Over 70% of microwells contain single cells after the centrifugation. In addition to cell settling efficiency, cell-size filtration from a mixed population of two cell lines is also realized by tuning the cell time-of-flight during centrifugation (58.4% settling efficiency with 6.4% impurity). Following the upstream cell handling, scWestern analysis detects four proteins (GFP, β-TUB, GAPDH, and STAT3) in a glioblastoma cell line. By integrating the lab-on-a-disc cell preparation and scWestern analysis, our platform measures proteins from sparse cell samples at single-cell resolution.

  5. Ionene polymers for selectively inhibiting the vitro growth of malignant cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rembaum, Alan (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    Ionene polymers of the structure ##STR1## WHERE X AND Y ARE INTEGERS FROM 3 TO 16, Z.sup.- is an anion such as a halogen and n is an integer from 50 to 150 are found to bind negatively charged mammalian cells such as malignant cells and can be utilized to selectively inhibit the growth of malignant cells in vitro.

  6. Selective histone deacetylase 6 inhibitors bearing substituted urea linkers inhibit melanoma cell growth

    PubMed Central

    Bergman, Joel A.; Woan, Karrune; Perez-Villarroel, Patricio; Villagra, Alejandro; Sotomayor, Eduardo M.; Kozikowski, Alan P.

    2012-01-01

    The incidence of malignant melanoma has dramatically increased in recent years thus requiring the need for improved therapeutic strategies. In our efforts to design selective histone deactylase inhibitors (HDACI), we discovered that the aryl urea 1 is a modestly potent yet non-selective inhibitor. Structure activity relationship studies revealed that adding substituents to the nitrogen atom of the urea so as to generate compounds bearing a branched linker group results in increased potency and selectivity for HDAC6. Compound 5g shows low nanomolar inhibitory potency against HDAC6 and a selectivity of ~600-fold relative to the inhibition of HDAC1. These HDACIs were evaluated for their ability to inhibit the growth of B16 melanoma cells with the most potent and selective HDAC6I being found to decrease tumor cell growth. To the best of our knowledge, this work constitutes the first report of HDAC6 selective inhibitors that possess antiproliferative effects against melanoma cells. PMID:23009203

  7. Selective elimination of leukemia stem cells: hitting a moving target.

    PubMed

    Crews, Leslie A; Jamieson, Catriona H M

    2013-09-10

    Despite the widespread use of chemotherapeutic cytotoxic agents that eradicate proliferating cell populations, patients suffering from a wide variety of malignancies continue to relapse as a consequence of resistance to standard therapies. In hematologic malignancies, leukemia stem cells (LSCs) represent a malignant reservoir of disease that is believed to drive relapse and resistance to chemotherapy and tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKIs). Major research efforts in recent years have been aimed at identifying and characterizing the LSC population in leukemias, such as chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), which represents an important paradigm for understanding the molecular evolution of cancer. However, the precise molecular mechanisms that promote LSC-mediated therapeutic recalcitrance have remained elusive. It has become clear that the LSC population evolves during disease progression, thus presenting a serious challenge for development of effective therapeutic strategies. Multiple reports have demonstrated that LSC initiation and propagation occurs as a result of aberrant activation of pro-survival and self-renewal pathways regulated by stem-cell related signaling molecules including β-catenin and Sonic Hedgehog (Shh). Enhanced survival in LSC protective microenvironments, such as the bone marrow niche, as well as acquired dormancy of cells in these niches, also contributes to LSC persistence. Key components of these cell-intrinsic and cell-extrinsic pathways provide novel potential targets for therapies aimed at eradicating this dynamic and therapeutically recalcitrant LSC population. Furthermore, combination strategies that exploit LSC have the potential to dramatically improve the quality and quantity of life for patients that are resistant to current therapies.

  8. Live cell cytoplasm staining and selective labeling of intracellular proteins by non-toxic cell-permeant thiophene fluorophores.

    PubMed

    Di Maria, F; Palamà, I E; Baroncini, M; Barbieri, A; Bongini, A; Bizzarri, R; Gigli, G; Barbarella, G

    2014-03-14

    A structurally correlated series of cell-permeant thiophene fluorophores, characterized by intense green or red fluorescence inside live mouse embryonic fibroblasts, was developed. The fluorophores displayed rapid internalization, excellent retention inside the cells, and high optical stability in the cytosolic environment and did not alter cell viability and reproducibility. Depending on the molecular structure, they experienced distinct fate inside the cells: from bright and lasting staining of the cytoplasm to selective tagging of a small set of globular proteins.

  9. Preliminary evidence of different selection pressures on cancer cells as compared to normal tissues

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Cancer is characterized by both a high mutation rate as well as high rates of cell division and cell death. We postulate that these conditions will result in the eventual mutational inactivation of genes not essential to the survival of the cancer cell, while mutations in essential genes will be eliminated by natural selection leaving molecular signatures of selection in genes required for survival and reproduction. By looking for signatures of natural selection in the genomes of cancer cells, it should therefore be possible to determine which genes have been essential for the development of a particular cancer. Methods We provide a proof of principle test of this idea by applying a test of neutrality (Nei-Gojobori Z-test of selection) to 139 cancer-related nucleotide sequences obtained from GenBank representing 46 cancer-derived genes. Results Among cancer associated sequences, 10 genes showed molecular evidence of selection. Of these 10 genes, four showed molecular evidence of selection in non-cancer transcripts. Among non-cancer associated sequences, eight genes showed molecular evidence of selection, with four of these also showing selection in the cancer associated sequences. Conclusions These results provide preliminary evidence that the same genes may experience different selection pressures within normal and cancer tissues. Application of this technique could identify genes under unique selection pressure in cancer tissues and thereby indicate possible targets for therapeutic intervention. PMID:23146329

  10. Agonist-selected T cell development requires strong T-cell receptor signaling and store-operated calcium entry

    PubMed Central

    Oh-hora, Masatsugu; Komatsu, Noriko; Pishyareh, Mojgan; Feske, Stefan; Hori, Shohei; Taniguchi, Masaru; Rao, Anjana; Takayanagi, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    Summary T-cell receptor (TCR) signaling driven by interaction of the TCR with specific complexes of self-peptide and the major histocompatibility complex, determines T cell fate in thymic development. However, the signaling pathway through which TCR signal strength regulates distinct T cell lineages remains unknown. Here we have used mice lacking the endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ sensors STIM1 and STIM2 to show that STIM-induced store-operated Ca2+ entry is not essential for thymic development of conventional TCRαβ+ T cells, but is specifically required for the development of agonist-selected T cells (regulatory T cells, invariant natural killer T cells and TCRαβ+ CD8αα+ intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes). The severe impairment of agonist-selected T cell development is mainly due to a defect in interleukin-2 (IL-2) or IL-15 signaling. Thus, STIM1 and STIM2-mediated store-operated Ca2+ influx, leading to efficient activation of NFAT (nuclear factor of activated T-cells), is critical for the post-selection maturation of agonist-selected T cells. PMID:23499491

  11. Circulating cancer stem cells: the importance to select

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ming-Hsin; Imrali, Ahmet

    2015-01-01

    It has been demonstrated that even localized tumors without clinically apparent metastasis give rise to circulating tumor cells (CTCs). A growing number of technically diverse platforms are being developed for detecting/isolating CTCs in the circulating blood. Despite the technical challenges of isolating rare CTCs from blood, recent studies have already shown the predictive value of CTCs enumeration. Thus, it is becoming increasingly accepted that CTC numbers are linked to patients’ outcome and may also be used to monitor treatment response and disease relapse, respectively. Further CTCs provide a non-invasive source for tumor material, ‘liquid biopsy’, which is particularly important for patients, where no biopsy material can be obtained or where serial biopsies of the tumor, e.g., following treatment, are practically impossible. On the other hand the molecular and biological characterization of CTCs has still remained at a rather experimental stage. Future studies are necessary to define CTC heterogeneity to establish the crucial role of circulating cancer stem cells for driving metastasis, which represent a distinct subpopulation of CTCs that bear metastasis-initiating capabilities based on their stemness properties and invasiveness and thus are critical for the patients’ clinical outcome. As compared to non-tumorigenic/metastatic bulk CTCs, circulating cancer stem cells may not only be capable of evading from the primary tumor, but also escape from immune surveillance, survive in the circulating blood and subsequently form metastases in distant organs. Thus, circulating cancer stem cells represent a subset of exclusively tumorigenic cancer stem cells characterized by their invasive characteristics and are potential therapeutic targets for preventing disease progression. To date, only a few original reports and reviews have been published focusing on circulating cancer stem cells. This review discusses the potential importance of isolating and

  12. Circulating cancer stem cells: the importance to select.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ming-Hsin; Imrali, Ahmet; Heeschen, Christopher

    2015-10-01

    It has been demonstrated that even localized tumors without clinically apparent metastasis give rise to circulating tumor cells (CTCs). A growing number of technically diverse platforms are being developed for detecting/isolating CTCs in the circulating blood. Despite the technical challenges of isolating rare CTCs from blood, recent studies have already shown the predictive value of CTCs enumeration. Thus, it is becoming increasingly accepted that CTC numbers are linked to patients' outcome and may also be used to monitor treatment response and disease relapse, respectively. Further CTCs provide a non-invasive source for tumor material, 'liquid biopsy', which is particularly important for patients, where no biopsy material can be obtained or where serial biopsies of the tumor, e.g., following treatment, are practically impossible. On the other hand the molecular and biological characterization of CTCs has still remained at a rather experimental stage. Future studies are necessary to define CTC heterogeneity to establish the crucial role of circulating cancer stem cells for driving metastasis, which represent a distinct subpopulation of CTCs that bear metastasis-initiating capabilities based on their stemness properties and invasiveness and thus are critical for the patients' clinical outcome. As compared to non-tumorigenic/metastatic bulk CTCs, circulating cancer stem cells may not only be capable of evading from the primary tumor, but also escape from immune surveillance, survive in the circulating blood and subsequently form metastases in distant organs. Thus, circulating cancer stem cells represent a subset of exclusively tumorigenic cancer stem cells characterized by their invasive characteristics and are potential therapeutic targets for preventing disease progression. To date, only a few original reports and reviews have been published focusing on circulating cancer stem cells. This review discusses the potential importance of isolating and characterizing

  13. Engineering of Targeted Nanoparticles for Cancer Therapy Using Internalizing Aptamers Isolated by Cell-Uptake Selection

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Zeyu; Levy-Nissenbaum, Etgar; Alexis, Frank; Lupták, Andrej; Teply, Benjamin A.; Chan, Juliana M.; Shi, Jinjun; Digga, Elise; Cheng, Judy; Langer, Robert; Farokhzad, Omid C.

    2012-01-01

    One of the major challenges in the development of targeted nanoparticles (NPs) for cancer therapy is to discover targeting ligands that allow for differential binding and uptake by the target cancer cells. Using prostate cancer (PCa) as a model disease, we developed a cell-uptake selection strategy to isolate PCa-specific internalizing 2'-Omethyl RNA aptamers (Apts) for NP incorporation. Twelve cycles of selection and counter-selection were done to obtain a panel of internalizing Apts, which can distinguish PCa cells from non-prostate and normal prostate cells. After Apt characterization, size minimization, and conjugation of the Apts with fluorescently-labeled polymeric NPs, the NP-Apt bioconjugates exhibit PCa specificity and enhancement in cellular uptake when compared to non-targeted NPs lacking the internalizing Apts. Furthermore, when docetaxel, a chemotherapeutic agent used for the treatment of PCa, was encapsulated within the NP-Apt, a significant improvement in cytotoxicity was achieved in targeted PCa cells. Rather than isolating high-affinity Apts as reported in previous selection processes, our selection strategy was designed to enrich cancer-cell specific internalizing Apts. A similar cell-uptake selection strategy may be used to develop specific internalizing ligands for a myriad of other diseases and can potentially facilitate delivering various molecules, including drugs and siRNAs, into cells. PMID:22214176

  14. Properties of pattern and component direction-selective cells in area MT of the macaque.

    PubMed

    Wang, Helena X; Movshon, J Anthony

    2016-06-01

    Neurons in area MT/V5 of the macaque visual cortex encode visual motion. Some cells are selective for the motion of oriented features (component direction-selective, CDS); others respond to the true direction of complex patterns (pattern-direction selective, PDS). There is a continuum of selectivity in MT, with CDS cells at one extreme and PDS cells at the other; we compute a pattern index that captures this variation. It is unknown how a neuron's pattern index is related to its other tuning characteristics. We therefore analyzed the responses of 792 MT cells recorded in the course of other experiments from opiate-anesthetized macaque monkeys, as a function of the direction, spatial frequency, drift rate, size, and contrast of sinusoidal gratings and of the direction and speed of random-dot textures. We also compared MT responses to those of 718 V1 cells. As expected, MT cells with higher pattern index tended to have stronger direction selectivity and broader direction tuning to gratings, and they responded better to plaids than to gratings. Strongly PDS cells also tended to have smaller receptive fields and stronger surround suppression. Interestingly, they also responded preferentially to higher drift rates and higher speeds of moving dots. The spatial frequency preferences of PDS cells depended strongly on their preferred temporal frequencies, whereas these preferences were independent in component-selective cells. Pattern direction selectivity is statistically associated with many response properties of MT cells but not strongly associated with any particular property. Pattern-selective signals are thus available in association with most other signals exported by MT. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  15. Selectivity of biopolymer membranes using HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Lü, Dongyuan; Gao, Yuxin; Luo, Chunhua; Lü, Shouqian; Wang, Qian; Xu, Xianghong; Sun, Shujin; Wang, Chengzhi; Long, Mian

    2015-03-01

    Bioartificial liver (BAL) system has emerged as an alternative treatment to bridge acute liver failure to either liver transplantation or liver regeneration. One of the main reasons that the efficacy of the current BAL systems was not convincing in clinical trials is attributed to the lack of friendly interface between the membrane and the hepatocytes in liver bioreactor, the core unit of BAL system. Here, we systematically compared the biological responses of hepatosarcoma HepG2 cells seeded on eight, commercially available biocompatible membranes made of acetyl cellulose-nitrocellulose mixed cellulose (CA-NC), acetyl cellulose (CA), nylon (JN), polypropylene (PP), nitrocellulose (NC), polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF), polycarbonate (PC) and polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE). Physicochemical analysis and mechanical tests indicated that CA, JN and PP membranes yield high adhesivity and reasonable compressive and/or tensile features with friendly surface topography for cell seeding. Cells prefer to adhere on CA, JN, PP or PTFE membranes with high proliferation rate in spheriod-like shape. Actin, albumin and cytokeratin 18 expressions are favorable for cells on CA or PP membrane, whereas protein filtration is consistent among all the eight membranes. These results further the understandings of cell growth, morphology and spreading, as well as protein filtration on distinct membranes in designing a liver bioreactor.

  16. Selecting MODFLOW cell sizes for accurate flow fields.

    PubMed

    Haitjema, H; Kelson, V; de Lange, W

    2001-01-01

    Contaminant transport models often use a velocity field derived from a MODFLOW flow field. Consequently, the accuracy of MODFLOW in representing a ground water flow field determines in part the accuracy of the transport predictions, particularly when advective transport is dominant. We compared MODFLOW ground water flow rates and MODPATH particle traces (advective transport) for a variety of conceptual models and different grid spacings to exact or approximate analytic solutions. All of our numerical experiments concerned flow in a single confined or semiconfined aquifer. While MODFLOW appeared robust in terms of both local and global water balance, we found that ground water flow rates, particle traces, and associated ground water travel times are accurate only when sufficiently small cells are used. For instance, a minimum of four or five cells are required to accurately model total ground water inflow in tributaries or other narrow surface water bodies that end inside the model domain. Also, about 50 cells are needed to represent zones of differing transmissivities or an incorrect flow field and (locally) inaccurate ground water travel times may result. Finally, to adequately represent leakage through aquitards or through the bottom of surface water bodies it was found that the maximum allowable cell dimensions should not exceed a characteristic leakage length lambda, which is defined as the square root of the aquifer transmissivity times the resistance of the aquitard or stream bottom. In some cases a cell size of one-tenth of lambda is necessary to obtain accurate results.

  17. Bioconversion of piceid to resveratrol by selected probiotic cell extracts.

    PubMed

    Basholli-Salihu, Mimoza; Schuster, Roswitha; Mulla, Dafina; Praznik, Werner; Viernstein, Helmut; Mueller, Monika

    2016-12-01

    Resveratrol exerts several pharmacological activities, including anti-cancer, anti-inflammatory, cardioprotective, or antioxidant effects. However, due to its occurrence in plants more in glycosidic form as piceid, the bioavailability and bioactivity are limited. The enzymatic potential of probiotics for the transformation of piceid to resveratrol was elucidated. Cell extract from Bifidobacteria (B.) infantis, B. bifidum, Lactobacillus (L.) casei, L. plantarum, and L. acidophilus was evaluated for their effect in this bioconversion using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) as analytical tool. Cell extract of B. infantis showed the highest effect on the deglycosylation of piceid to resveratrol, already after 30 min. Cell extracts of all other tested strains showed a significant biotransformation with no further metabolization of resveratrol. The conversion of piceid to resveratrol is of importance to increase bioavailability and bioactivity as shown for anti-inflammation in this study. Cell extracts from probiotics, especially from B. infantis, may be added to piceid containing products, for achieving higher biological effects caused by the bioactivity of resveratrol or by health promoting of the probiotics. These findings open a new perspective of novel combination of cell extracts from probiotics and piceid, in health-promoting pharmaceutical and food products.

  18. Ferrocifen derivatives that induce senescence in cancer cells: selected examples.

    PubMed

    Bruyère, Céline; Mathieu, Véronique; Vessières, Anne; Pigeon, Pascal; Top, Siden; Jaouen, Gérard; Kiss, Robert

    2014-12-01

    Platinum coordination complexes represent an important class of anti-tumor agents. Due to recognized drawbacks, research into other types of metallodrugs has been diversified with the aim of finding new chemical entities with alternative mechanisms of action to overcome classical chemoresistance. P5 and DP1, two closely related ferrocenyl complexes bearing a similar ferrocenyl-ene-phenyl motif and displaying marked differences in their conformations and oxidation state versatility, were assayed in cancer cell models characterized by various sensitivities to pro-apoptotic stimuli. P5 and DP1 exert growth inhibitory effects between 0.5 and 10 μM against glioma and melanoma cells including pluripotent stem-like cells. These effects are due, at least partly, to senescence induction with typical SA-β-galactosidase staining and senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP) as measured by the secretion of IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8 and TNF-α. Regulation of these cytokines' secretion may be related to AP-1 and other transcription factors unrelated to senescence. An in vivo graft of B16F10 cells after in vitro pre-incubation with DP1 or P5 led to increased survival in mice. In conclusion, P5 and DP1 ferrocenyl complexes induce senescence in various cancer cell models associated with distinct sensitivity to pro-apoptotic stimuli.

  19. Differential cytotoxicity of 19 anticancer agents in wild type and etoposide resistant small cell lung cancer cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, P. B.; Christensen, I. J.; Sehested, M.; Hansen, H. H.; Vindeløv, L.

    1993-01-01

    A panel of six 'wild type' and three VP-16 resistant small cell lung cancer (SCLC) cell lines is used to evaluate to what extent in vitro sensitivity testing using a clonogenic assay can contribute to combine cytotoxic drugs to regimens with improved efficacy against SCLC. The resistant lines include (a) H69/DAU4, which is classical multidrug resistant (MDR) with a P-glycoprotein efflux pump (b) NYH/VM, which exhibits an altered topoisomerase II (topo II) activity and (c) H69/VP, which is cross-resistant to vincristine, exhibits a reduced drug accumulation as H69/DAU4 but is without P-glycoprotein. 19 anticancer agents were compared in the panel. The MDR lines demonstrated, as expected, cross-resistance to all topo II drugs, but also different patterns of collateral sensitivity to BCNU, cisplatin, ara-C, hydroxyurea, and to the topo I inhibitor camptothecin. The complete panel of nine cell lines clearly demonstrated diverse sensitivity patterns to drugs with different modes of action. Correlation analysis showed high correlation coefficients (CC) among drug analogues (e.g. VP-16/VM-26 0.99, vincristine/vindesine 0.89), and between drugs with similar mechanisms of action (e.g. BCNU/Cisplatin 0.89, VP-16/Doxorubicin 0.92), whereas different drug classes demonstrated low or even negative CC (e.g. BCNU/VP-16 -0.21). When the CC of the 19 drug patterns to VP-16 were plotted against the CC to BCNU, clustering was observed between drugs acting on microtubules, on topo II, alkylating agents, and antimetabolites. In this plot, camptothecin and ara-C patterns were promising by virtue of their lack of cross-resistance to alkylating agents and topo II drugs. Thus, the differential cytotoxicity patterns on this panel of cells can (1) give information about drug mechanism of action, (2) enable the selection and combination of non-cross-resistant drugs, and (3) show where new drugs 'fit in' among established agents. PMID:8094293

  20. Differential cytotoxicity of 19 anticancer agents in wild type and etoposide resistant small cell lung cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Jensen, P B; Christensen, I J; Sehested, M; Hansen, H H; Vindeløv, L

    1993-02-01

    A panel of six 'wild type' and three VP-16 resistant small cell lung cancer (SCLC) cell lines is used to evaluate to what extent in vitro sensitivity testing using a clonogenic assay can contribute to combine cytotoxic drugs to regimens with improved efficacy against SCLC. The resistant lines include (a) H69/DAU4, which is classical multidrug resistant (MDR) with a P-glycoprotein efflux pump (b) NYH/VM, which exhibits an altered topoisomerase II (topo II) activity and (c) H69/VP, which is cross-resistant to vincristine, exhibits a reduced drug accumulation as H69/DAU4 but is without P-glycoprotein. 19 anticancer agents were compared in the panel. The MDR lines demonstrated, as expected, cross-resistance to all topo II drugs, but also different patterns of collateral sensitivity to BCNU, cisplatin, ara-C, hydroxyurea, and to the topo I inhibitor camptothecin. The complete panel of nine cell lines clearly demonstrated diverse sensitivity patterns to drugs with different modes of action. Correlation analysis showed high correlation coefficients (CC) among drug analogues (e.g. VP-16/VM-26 0.99, vincristine/vindesine 0.89), and between drugs with similar mechanisms of action (e.g. BCNU/Cisplatin 0.89, VP-16/Doxorubicin 0.92), whereas different drug classes demonstrated low or even negative CC (e.g. BCNU/VP-16 -0.21). When the CC of the 19 drug patterns to VP-16 were plotted against the CC to BCNU, clustering was observed between drugs acting on microtubules, on topo II, alkylating agents, and antimetabolites. In this plot, camptothecin and ara-C patterns were promising by virtue of their lack of cross-resistance to alkylating agents and topo II drugs. Thus, the differential cytotoxicity patterns on this panel of cells can (1) give information about drug mechanism of action, (2) enable the selection and combination of non-cross-resistant drugs, and (3) show where new drugs 'fit in' among established agents.

  1. High affinity nanobodies against human epidermal growth factor receptor selected on cells by E. coli display.

    PubMed

    Salema, Valencio; Mañas, Carmen; Cerdán, Lidia; Piñero-Lambea, Carlos; Marín, Elvira; Roovers, Rob C; Van Bergen En Henegouwen, Paul M P; Fernández, Luis Ángel

    2016-10-01

    Most therapeutic antibodies (Abs) target cell surface proteins on tumor and immune cells. Cloning of Ab gene libraries in E. coli and their display on bacteriophages is commonly used to select novel therapeutic Abs binding target antigens, either purified or expressed on cells. However, the sticky nature of bacteriophages renders phage display selections on cells challenging. We previously reported an E. coli display system for expression of VHHs (i.e., nanobodies, Nbs) on the surface of bacteria and selection of high-affinity clones by magnetic cell sorting (MACS). Here, we demonstrate that E. coli display is also an attractive method for isolation of Nbs against cell surface antigens, such as the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), upon direct selection and screening of Ab libraries on live cells. We employ a whole cell-based strategy using a VHH library obtained by immunization with human tumor cells over-expressing EGFR (i.e., A431), and selection of bacterial clones bound to murine fibroblast NIH-3T3 cells transfected with human EGFR, after depletion of non-specific clones on untransfected cells. This strategy resulted in the isolation of high-affinity Nbs binding distinct epitopes of EGFR, including Nbs competing with the ligand, EGF, as characterized by flow cytometry of bacteria displaying the Nbs and binding assays with purified Nbs using surface plasmon resonance. Hence, our study demonstrates that E. coli display of VHH libraries and selection on cells enables efficient isolation and characterization of high-affinity Nbs against cell surface antigens.

  2. High affinity nanobodies against human epidermal growth factor receptor selected on cells by E. coli display

    PubMed Central

    Salema, Valencio; Mañas, Carmen; Cerdán, Lidia; Piñero-Lambea, Carlos; Marín, Elvira; Roovers, Rob C.; Van Bergen en Henegouwen, Paul M.P.; Fernández, Luis Ángel

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Most therapeutic antibodies (Abs) target cell surface proteins on tumor and immune cells. Cloning of Ab gene libraries in E. coli and their display on bacteriophages is commonly used to select novel therapeutic Abs binding target antigens, either purified or expressed on cells. However, the sticky nature of bacteriophages renders phage display selections on cells challenging. We previously reported an E. coli display system for expression of VHHs (i.e., nanobodies, Nbs) on the surface of bacteria and selection of high-affinity clones by magnetic cell sorting (MACS). Here, we demonstrate that E. coli display is also an attractive method for isolation of Nbs against cell surface antigens, such as the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), upon direct selection and screening of Ab libraries on live cells. We employ a whole cell-based strategy using a VHH library obtained by immunization with human tumor cells over-expressing EGFR (i.e., A431), and selection of bacterial clones bound to murine fibroblast NIH-3T3 cells transfected with human EGFR, after depletion of non-specific clones on untransfected cells. This strategy resulted in the isolation of high-affinity Nbs binding distinct epitopes of EGFR, including Nbs competing with the ligand, EGF, as characterized by flow cytometry of bacteria displaying the Nbs and binding assays with purified Nbs using surface plasmon resonance. Hence, our study demonstrates that E. coli display of VHH libraries and selection on cells enables efficient isolation and characterization of high-affinity Nbs against cell surface antigens. PMID:27472381

  3. In Vitro Selection of Cancer Cell-Specific Molecular Recognition Elements from Amino Acid Libraries

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Ryan M.; Sooter, Letha J.

    2015-01-01

    Differential cell systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX) is an in vitro selection method for obtaining molecular recognition elements (MREs) that specifically bind to individual cell types with high affinity. MREs are selected from initial large libraries of different nucleic or amino acids. This review outlines the construction of peptide and antibody fragment libraries as well as their different host types. Common methods of selection are also reviewed. Additionally, examples of cancer cell MREs are discussed, as well as their potential applications. PMID:26436100

  4. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in sickle cell disease: patient selection and special considerations

    PubMed Central

    Bhatia, Monica; Sheth, Sujit

    2015-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation remains the only curative treatment currently in use for patients with sickle cell disease (SCD). The first successful hematopoietic stem cell transplantation was performed in 1984. To date, approximately 1,200 transplants have been reported. Given the high prevalence of this disorder in Africa, and its emergence in the developed world through immigration, this number is relatively small. There are many reasons for this; primary among them are the availability of a donor, the risks associated with this complex procedure, and the cost and availability of resources in the developing world. Of these, it is fair to say that the risks associated with the procedure have steadily decreased to the point where, if currently performed in a center with experience using a matched sibling donor, overall survival is close to 100% and event-free survival is over 90%. While there is little controversy around offering hematopoietic stem cell transplantation to symptomatic SCD patients with a matched sibling donor, there is much debate surrounding the use of this modality in “less severe” patients. An overview of the current state of our understanding of the pathology and treatment of SCD is important to show that our current strategy is not having the desired impact on survival of homozygous SCD patients, and should be changed to significantly impact the small proportion of these patients who have matched siblings and could be cured, especially those without overt clinical manifestations. Both patient families and providers must be made to understand the progressive nature of SCD, and should be encouraged to screen full siblings of patients with homozygous SCD for their potential to be donors. Matched siblings should be referred to an experienced transplant center for evaluation and counseling. In this review, we will discuss the rationale for these opinions and make recommendations for patient selection. PMID:26203293

  5. Selective GPR55 antagonism reduces chemoresistance in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Singh, Nagendra S; Bernier, Michel; Wainer, Irving W

    2016-09-01

    G protein-coupled receptor 55 (GPR55) possesses pro-oncogenic activity and its function can be competitively inhibited with (R,R')-4'-methoxy-1-naphthylfenoterol (MNF) through poorly defined signaling pathways. Here, the anti-tumorigenic effect of MNF was investigated in the human pancreatic cancer cell line, PANC-1, by focusing on the expression of known cancer biomarkers and the expression and function of multidrug resistance (MDR) exporters such as P-glycoprotein (Pgp) and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP). Incubation of PANC1 cells with MNF (1μM) for 24h significantly decreased EGF receptor, pyruvate kinase M2 (PKM2), and β-catenin protein levels and was accompanied by significant reduction in nuclear accumulation of HIF-1α and the phospho-active forms of PKM2 and β-catenin. Inhibition of GPR55 with either MNF or the GPR55 antagonist CID 16020046 lowered the amount of MDR proteins in total cellular extracts while diminishing the nuclear expression of Pgp and BCRP. There was significant nuclear accumulation of doxorubicin in PANC-1 cells treated with MNF and the pre-incubation with MNF increased the cytotoxicity of doxorubicin and gemcitabine in these cells. Potentiation of doxorubicin cytotoxicity by MNF was also observed in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells and U87MG glioblastoma cells, which express high levels of GPR55. The data suggest that inhibition of GPR55 activity produces antitumor effects via attenuation of the MEK/ERK and PI3K-AKT pathways leading to a reduction in the expression and function of MDR proteins.

  6. Microfluidic chip system for the selection and enrichment of cell binding aptamers

    PubMed Central

    Stoll, Heidi; Kiessling, Heiko; Stelzle, Martin; Wendel, Hans Peter; Schütte, Julia; Hagmeyer, Britta; Avci-Adali, Meltem

    2015-01-01

    Aptamers are promising cell targeting ligands for several applications such as for the diagnosis, therapy, and drug delivery. Especially, in the field of regenerative medicine, stem cell specific aptamers have an enormous potential. Using the combinatorial chemistry process SELEX (Systematic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential enrichment), aptamers are selected from a huge oligonucleotide library consisting of approximately 1015 different oligonucleotides. Here, we developed a microfluidic chip system that can be used for the selection of cell specific aptamers. The major drawbacks of common cell-SELEX methods are the inefficient elimination of the unspecifically bound oligonucleotides from the cell surface and the unspecific binding/uptake of oligonucleotides by dead cells. To overcome these obstacles, a microfluidic device, which enables the simultaneous performance of dielectrophoresis and electrophoresis in the same device, was designed. Using this system, viable cells can be selectively assembled by dielectrophoresis between the electrodes and then incubated with the oligonucleotides. To reduce the rate of unspecifically bound sequences, electrophoretic fields can be applied in order to draw loosely bound oligonucleotides away from the cells. Furthermore, by increasing the flow rate in the chip during the iterative rounds of SELEX, the selection pressure can be improved and aptamers with higher affinities and specificities can be obtained. This new microfluidic device has a tremendous capability to improve the cell-SELEX procedure and to select highly specific aptamers. PMID:26180568

  7. Selection of optimal sensors for predicting performance of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Lei; Jackson, Lisa

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, sensor selection algorithms are investigated based on a sensitivity analysis, and the capability of optimal sensors in predicting PEM fuel cell performance is also studied using test data. The fuel cell model is developed for generating the sensitivity matrix relating sensor measurements and fuel cell health parameters. From the sensitivity matrix, two sensor selection approaches, including the largest gap method, and exhaustive brute force searching technique, are applied to find the optimal sensors providing reliable predictions. Based on the results, a sensor selection approach considering both sensor sensitivity and noise resistance is proposed to find the optimal sensor set with minimum size. Furthermore, the performance of the optimal sensor set is studied to predict fuel cell performance using test data from a PEM fuel cell system. Results demonstrate that with optimal sensors, the performance of PEM fuel cell can be predicted with good quality.

  8. Structure-activity relationship of 9-methylstreptimidone, a compound that induces apoptosis selectively in adult T-cell leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Takeiri, Masatoshi; Ota, Eisuke; Nishiyama, Shigeru; Kiyota, Hiromasa; Umezawa, Kazuo

    2012-01-01

    We previously reported that 9-methylstreptimidone, a piperidine compound isolated from a culture filtrate of Streptomyces, induces apoptosis selectively in adult T-cell leukemia cells. It was screened for a compound that inhibits LPS-induced NF-kappaB and NO production in mouse macrophages. However, 9-methystreptimidone is poorly obtained from the producing microorganism and difficult to synthesize. Therefore, in the present research, we studied the structure-activity relationship to look for new selective inhibitors. We found that the structure of the unsaturated hydrophobic portion of 9-methylstreptimidone was essential for the inhibition of LPS-induced NO production. Among the 9-methylstreptimidone-related compounds tested, (+/-)-4,alpha-diepi-streptovitacin A inhibited NO production in macrophage-like cells as potently as 9-methylstreptimidone and without cellular toxicity. Moreover, this compound selectively induced apoptosis in adult T-cell leukemia MT-1 cells.

  9. CARbodies: Human Antibodies Against Cell Surface Tumor Antigens Selected From Repertoires Displayed on T Cell Chimeric Antigen Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Alonso-Camino, Vanesa; Sánchez-Martín, David; Compte, Marta; Nuñez-Prado, Natalia; Diaz, Rosa M; Vile, Richard; Alvarez-Vallina, Luis

    2013-01-01

    A human single-chain variable fragment (scFv) antibody library was expressed on the surface of human T cells after transduction with lentiviral vectors (LVs). The repertoire was fused to a first-generation T cell receptor ζ (TCRζ)-based chimeric antigen receptor (CAR). We used this library to isolate antibodies termed CARbodies that recognize antigens expressed on the tumor cell surface in a proof-of-principle system. After three rounds of activation-selection there was a clear repertoire restriction, with the emergence dominant clones. The CARbodies were purified from bacterial cultures as soluble and active proteins. Furthermore, to validate its potential application for adoptive cell therapy, human T cells were transduced with a LV encoding a second-generation costimulatory CAR (CARv2) bearing the selected CARbodies. Transduced human primary T cells expressed significant levels of the CARbodies-based CARv2 fusion protein on the cell surface, and importantly could be specifically activated, after stimulation with tumor cells. This approach is a promising tool for the generation of antibodies fully adapted to the display format (CAR) and the selection context (cell synapse), which could extend the scope of current adoptive cell therapy strategies with CAR-redirected T cells. PMID:23695536

  10. Solid tumor therapy by selectively targeting stromal endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shihui; Liu, Jie; Ma, Qian; Cao, Liu; Fattah, Rasem J.; Yu, Zuxi; Bugge, Thomas H.; Finkel, Toren; Leppla, Stephen H.

    2016-01-01

    Engineered tumor-targeted anthrax lethal toxin proteins have been shown to strongly suppress growth of solid tumors in mice. These toxins work through the native toxin receptors tumor endothelium marker-8 and capillary morphogenesis protein-2 (CMG2), which, in other contexts, have been described as markers of tumor endothelium. We found that neither receptor is required for tumor growth. We further demonstrate that tumor cells, which are resistant to the toxin when grown in vitro, become highly sensitive when implanted in mice. Using a range of tissue-specific loss-of-function and gain-of-function genetic models, we determined that this in vivo toxin sensitivity requires CMG2 expression on host-derived tumor endothelial cells. Notably, engineered toxins were shown to suppress the proliferation of isolated tumor endothelial cells. Finally, we demonstrate that administering an immunosuppressive regimen allows animals to receive multiple toxin dosages and thereby produces a strong and durable antitumor effect. The ability to give repeated doses of toxins, coupled with the specific targeting of tumor endothelial cells, suggests that our strategy should be efficacious for a wide range of solid tumors. PMID:27357689

  11. Solid tumor therapy by selectively targeting stromal endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shihui; Liu, Jie; Ma, Qian; Cao, Liu; Fattah, Rasem J; Yu, Zuxi; Bugge, Thomas H; Finkel, Toren; Leppla, Stephen H

    2016-07-12

    Engineered tumor-targeted anthrax lethal toxin proteins have been shown to strongly suppress growth of solid tumors in mice. These toxins work through the native toxin receptors tumor endothelium marker-8 and capillary morphogenesis protein-2 (CMG2), which, in other contexts, have been described as markers of tumor endothelium. We found that neither receptor is required for tumor growth. We further demonstrate that tumor cells, which are resistant to the toxin when grown in vitro, become highly sensitive when implanted in mice. Using a range of tissue-specific loss-of-function and gain-of-function genetic models, we determined that this in vivo toxin sensitivity requires CMG2 expression on host-derived tumor endothelial cells. Notably, engineered toxins were shown to suppress the proliferation of isolated tumor endothelial cells. Finally, we demonstrate that administering an immunosuppressive regimen allows animals to receive multiple toxin dosages and thereby produces a strong and durable antitumor effect. The ability to give repeated doses of toxins, coupled with the specific targeting of tumor endothelial cells, suggests that our strategy should be efficacious for a wide range of solid tumors.

  12. Isolation of single cells for protein therapeutics using microwell selection and Surface Plasmon Resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Abali, F; Stevens, M; Tibbe, A G J; Terstappen, L W M M; van der Velde, P N; Schasfoort, R B M

    2017-08-15

    Here the feasibility is demonstrated that by combining Surface Plasmon Resonance Imaging (SPRi) and self-sorting microwell technology product secretion of individual cells can be monitored. Additionally isolation of the selected cells can be performed by punching the cells from the microwells using coordinates of the positions of microwells obtained with SPRi. Cells of interest can be retrieved sterile from the microwell array for further cultivation. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. T cell positive selection by a high density, low affinity ligand

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chih-Pin; Crawford, Frances; Marrack, Philippa; Kappler, John

    1998-01-01

    Interaction of the αβ T cell receptor (TCR) with major histocompatibility (MHC) molecules occupied with any of a large collection of peptides derived from self proteins is a critical step in driving T cell “positive” selection in the thymus. Interaction with this same pool of self-peptide/MHC ligands deletes T cells with potential self-reactivity. To examine how T cells survive both of these processes to form a self-tolerant mature repertoire, mice were constructed whose entire class II MHC IEk specific repertoire was positively selected on a single peptide covalently attached to the IEk molecule. In these mice T cells were identified that could respond to a variant of the positively selecting peptide bound to IEk. The affinities of the TCRs from these T cells for the positively selecting ligand were extremely low and at least 10-fold less than those for the activating ligand. These results support the theory that positive selection is driven by TCR affinities lower than those involved in T cell deletion or activation and that, if present at high concentration, even very low affinity ligands can positively select. PMID:9539770

  14. Copper conducting electrode with nickel as a seed layer for selective emitter crystalline silicon solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ur Rehman, Atteq; Shin, Eun Gu; Lee, Soo Hong

    2014-09-01

    In this research, we investigated selective emitter formation with a single-step photolithography process having a metallization scheme composed of nickel/copper metal stacks. The nickel seed layers were deposited by applying the electroless deposition process while copper was formed by light induced electro-plating arrangements as the main conducting electrode. The electroless deposition of nickel, along with a sintering process, was employed to create a diffusion barrier between copper and silicon. The nickel metal stack below the copper-conducting electrode also helped in lowering the sheet resistance and improving the contact adhesion. The nickel used as a seed layer was successfully demonstrated in the fabrication of a homogeneous 60 Ω/□ emitter and selective emitter cells. Lower series resistances of 0.165 Ω and 0.253 Ω were achieved for the selective emitter and the homogeneous emitter cells, respectively. The best cell efficiency of 18.37% for the selective emitter solar cell was achieved, with average cell efficiencies of 18.17% and 17.3% for the selective emitter and the homogeneous emitter cells, respectively. An approximate efficiency increase of about 0.8% was recorded for the selective emitter solar cells.

  15. Cell-Selective Biological Activity of Rhodium Metalloinsertors Correlates with Subcellular Localization

    PubMed Central

    Komor, Alexis C.; Schneider, Curtis J.; Weidmann, Alyson G.; Barton, Jacqueline K.

    2013-01-01

    Deficiencies in the mismatch repair (MMR) pathway are associated with several types of cancers, as well as resistance to commonly used chemotherapeutics. Rhodium metalloinsertors have been found to bind DNA mismatches with high affinity and specificity in vitro, and also exhibit cell-selective cytotoxicity, targeting MMR-deficient cells over MMR-proficient cells. Ten distinct metalloinsertors with varying lipophilicities have been synthesized and their mismatch binding affinities and biological activities determined. Although DNA photocleavage experiments demonstrate that their binding affinities are quite similar, their cell-selective antiproliferative and cytotoxic activities vary significantly. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) experiments have uncovered a relationship between the subcellular distribution of these metalloinsertors and their biological activities. Specifically, we find that all of our metalloinsertors localize in the nucleus at sufficient concentrations for binding to DNA mismatches. However, the metalloinsertors with high rhodium localization in the mitochondria show toxicity that is not selective for MMR-deficient cells, whereas metalloinsertors with less mitochondrial rhodium show activity that is highly selective for MMR-deficient versus proficient cells. This work supports the notion that specific targeting of the metalloinsertors to nuclear DNA gives rise to their cell-selective cytotoxic and antiproliferative activities. The selectivity in cellular targeting depends upon binding to mismatches in genomic DNA. PMID:23137296

  16. Unprecedented Cell-Selection Using Ultra-Quick Freezing Combined with Aquaporin Expression

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Yasuhiro; Miyauchi, Takayuki; Abe, Youichiro; Kojić, Dušan; Tanaka, Manami; Chikazawa, Nana; Nakatake, Yuhki; Ko, Shigeru B. H.; Kobayashi, Daisuke; Hazama, Akihiro; Fujiwara, Shoko; Uchida, Tatsuya; Yasui, Masato

    2014-01-01

    Freezing is usually used for preservation and storage of biological samples; however, this process may have some adverse effects such as cell membrane damage. Aquaporin (AQP), a water channel protein, has been suggested to play some roles for cryopreservation although its molecular mechanism remains unclear. Here we show that membrane damage caused by ultra-quick freezing is rescued by the expression of AQP4. We next examine if the expression of AQP combined with ultra-quick freezing can be used to select cells efficiently under freezing conditions where most cells are died. CHO cells stably expressing AQP4 were exclusively selected from mixed cell cultures. Having identified the increased expression of AQP4 during ES cell differentiation into neuro-ectoderm using bioinformatics, we confirmed the improved survival of differentiated ES cells with AQP4 expression. Finally we show that CHO cells transiently transfected with Endothelin receptor A and Aqp4 were also selected and concentrated by multiple cycles of freezing/thawing, which was confirmed with calcium imaging in response to endothelin. Furthermore, we found that the expression of AQP enables a reduction in the amount of cryoprotectants for freezing, thereby decreasing osmotic stress and cellular toxicity. Taken together, we propose that this simple but efficient and safe method may be applicable to the selection of mammalian cells for applications in regenerative medicine as well as cell-based functional assays or drug screening protocols. PMID:24558371

  17. Multifunctionalized iron oxide nanoparticles for selective drug delivery to CD44-positive cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aires, Antonio; Ocampo, Sandra M.; Simões, Bruno M.; Josefa Rodríguez, María; Cadenas, Jael F.; Couleaud, Pierre; Spence, Katherine; Latorre, Alfonso; Miranda, Rodolfo; Somoza, Álvaro; Clarke, Robert B.; Carrascosa, José L.; Cortajarena, Aitziber L.

    2016-02-01

    Nanomedicine nowadays offers novel solutions in cancer therapy and diagnosis by introducing multimodal treatments and imaging tools in one single formulation. Nanoparticles acting as nanocarriers change the solubility, biodistribution and efficiency of therapeutic molecules, reducing their side effects. In order to successfully apply these novel therapeutic approaches, efforts are focused on the biological functionalization of the nanoparticles to improve the selectivity towards cancer cells. In this work, we present the synthesis and characterization of novel multifunctionalized iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) with antiCD44 antibody and gemcitabine derivatives, and their application for the selective treatment of CD44-positive cancer cells. The lymphocyte homing receptor CD44 is overexpressed in a large variety of cancer cells, but also in cancer stem cells (CSCs) and circulating tumor cells (CTCs). Therefore, targeting CD44-overexpressing cells is a challenging and promising anticancer strategy. Firstly, we demonstrate the targeting of antiCD44 functionalized MNPs to different CD44-positive cancer cell lines using a CD44-negative non-tumorigenic cell line as a control, and verify the specificity by ultrastructural characterization and downregulation of CD44 expression. Finally, we show the selective drug delivery potential of the MNPs by the killing of CD44-positive cancer cells using a CD44-negative non-tumorigenic cell line as a control. In conclusion, the proposed multifunctionalized MNPs represent an excellent biocompatible nanoplatform for selective CD44-positive cancer therapy in vitro.

  18. Leveraging patterned ion implantation to develop high efficiency selective emitter solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniels, Kevin; Dubé, Christopher E.; Tsefrekas, Basil; Bhosle, Vikram; Mullin, James; Skinner, Wesley; Sullivan, Paul

    2012-11-01

    This paper reports the benefits of using patterned ion implantation to create higher efficiency selective emitter solar cells. This doping approach uses in-situ masking to enable selective doping of the contact and field regions of the emitter in a single step. The cell efficiency benefits of implantation versus current POCl3 diffusion processes are also explained, highlighting the improved junction quality, the ability to perform single side doping and the elimination of a junction isolation step which reduces cell efficiency. The implanted selective emitter solar cell process described reduces cell cost per watt through a combination of higher cell efficiency, improved cell binning and fewer process steps. Alignment between the doped regions of the solar cell and the subsequent downstream metallization process is key to enabling this process for adoption in PV manufacturing. The benefits for process integration of the implanted process will be described including the ability to optically align to the selectively implanted contact regions without additional alignment fiducial marks on the front of the cell. Experimental data yielding cell efficiencies of >19% are shown.

  19. Selective differentiation and proliferation of hematopoietic cells induced by recombinant human interleukins.

    PubMed Central

    Saito, H; Hatake, K; Dvorak, A M; Leiferman, K M; Donnenberg, A D; Arai, N; Ishizaka, K; Ishizaka, T

    1988-01-01

    Effects of recombinant human interleukins on hematopoiesis were explored by using suspension cultures of mononuclear cells of human umbilical-cord blood and bone marrow. The results showed that interleukin 5 induced the selective differentiation and proliferation of eosinophils. After 3 weeks in culture with interleukin 5, essentially all nonadherent cells in both bone marrow and cord blood cell cultures became eosinophilic myelocytes. Culture of the same cells with interleukin 4 resulted in the selective growth of OKT3+ lymphocytes. However, OKT3+ cells did not develop if the bone marrow cells were depleted of OKT3+/OKT11+ cells prior to the culture, indicating that interleukin 4 induced the proliferation of a subpopulation of resting T cells present in cord blood and bone marrow cell preparations. In suspension cultures of bone marrow cells and cord blood cells grown in the presence of interleukin 3, basophilic, eosinophilic, and neutrophilic myelocytes and macrophages developed within 2 weeks. By 3 weeks, however, the majority of nonadherent cells became eosinophilic myelocytes. In contrast to mouse bone marrow cell cultures, neither interleukin 3 nor a combination of interleukins 3 and 4 induced the differentiation of mast cells in human bone marrow or cord blood cell cultures. Images PMID:3258425

  20. Selective binding of human cumulus cell-secreted glycoproteins to human spermatozoa during capacitation in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Tesarik, J.; Kopecny, V.; Dvorak, M.

    1984-06-01

    The results of this study demonstrate that glycoproteins manufactured by human cumulus cells can be detected bound to human spermatozoa incubated in capacitational medium containing the labeled cumulus-cell secretions. Cumulus-cell-secreted glycoproteins were labeled with a mixture of /sup 3/H-methionine and /sup 3/H-tryptophan or with 3H-fucose, and the binding of the labeled compounds to spermatozoa was evaluated by autoradiography. The binding was highly selective, involving only approximately 1% of the samples of spermatozoa used. The results suggest that the binding of cumulus-cell-secreted glycoproteins to spermatozoa may represent a final and highly selective step in human sperm capacitation.

  1. Thermal modulation of selective transmittance spectra by combination of cholesteric liquid crystal cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogiwara, Akifumi; Kakiuchida, Hiroshi

    2016-09-01

    The effects of the combination of cholesteric liquid crystal (CLC) cells on selective wavelength are investigated by the spectroscopic analysis under thermal modulation. The several kinds of CLC cells are formed by using the chiral dopants with different magnitudes and signs of helical twisting power (HTP). The combination of CLC cells with different temperature dependence shows that the infrared light range longer than 700nm is widely reflected and the visible light is little modulated when the temperature increase from 25 °C to 45 °C. The results demonstrate that the thermal modulation of selective transmittance spectra is controllable by the combination of CLC cells with different temperature dependence.

  2. Selective histone deacetylase 6 inhibitors bearing substituted urea linkers inhibit melanoma cell growth.

    PubMed

    Bergman, Joel A; Woan, Karrune; Perez-Villarroel, Patricio; Villagra, Alejandro; Sotomayor, Eduardo M; Kozikowski, Alan P

    2012-11-26

    The incidence of malignant melanoma has dramatically increased in recent years thus requiring the need for improved therapeutic strategies. In our efforts to design selective histone deactylase inhibitors (HDACI), we discovered that the aryl urea 1 is a modestly potent yet nonselective inhibitor. Structure-activity relationship studies revealed that adding substituents to the nitrogen atom of the urea so as to generate compounds bearing a branched linker group results in increased potency and selectivity for HDAC6. Compound 5 g shows low nanomolar inhibitory potency against HDAC6 and a selectivity of ∼600-fold relative to the inhibition of HDAC1. These HDACIs were evaluated for their ability to inhibit the growth of B16 melanoma cells with the most potent and selective HDAC6I being found to decrease tumor cell growth. To the best of our knowledge, this work constitutes the first report of HDAC6-selective inhibitors that possess antiproliferative effects against melanoma cells.

  3. [Selective localization of neptunium-237 in nuclei of mammalian cells].

    PubMed

    Galle, P; Boulahdour, H; Metivier, H

    1992-01-01

    After injection in the rat of soluble neptunium salt, the distribution of this element was studied at the subcellular level by electron microscopy and electron probe microanalysis. Abnormal structures have been observed by electron microscopy in the nuclei of hepatocytes, and the same structures have also been observed in the nuclei of the proximal tubules cells of the kidney. These structures are formed of clusters of very small and dense particles, several nanometers in diameter. The clusters are localized in the central part of the nuclei and they are separate from nucleoli and heterochromatin. Electron probe X-ray analysis of this cluster have shown that they contain neptunium associated with phosphorus. In the cell containing neptunium inclusions, other non specific lesions are also observed (nuclear pycnosis, mitochondrial depletion).

  4. Requirement for Cell Dispersion Prior to Selection of Induced Azaguanine-Resistant Colonies of Chinese Hamster Cells

    PubMed Central

    Myhr, B. C.; DiPaolo, J. A.

    1975-01-01

    With V79 Chinese hamster cell cultures treated with a mutagen, the maximum frequency of colonies resistant to 8-azaguanine (AZG) was attained when the cells were dispersed after a suitable expression time before adding the selection medium. V79–4 cells were exposed to 500 µM MMS, 7 µM AFAA, or 10 µM MNNG and allowed to multiply before being reseeded at 4 x 104 cells/60 mm dish and selected with 10 µg/ml AZG. Maximum frequencies of 4 x 10-5, 4 x 10-4, and 2.4 x 10-3 were obtained about 100, 130, and 200 hrs after exposure to MMS, AFAA, and MNNG, respectively. The maximum frequencies following MMS or MNNG treatments were about 10-fold greater than those obtained when induction and selection of AZG-resistant colonies were performed in the same culture dish. The reseeding of treated cells eliminated the possibility of metabolic cooperation within mosaic colonies of wild-type and mutant cells and achieved expression of the induced changes before intercolony crossfeeding reduced the frequency of resistant colonies.—AZG-resistant colonies were selected in medium containing dialyzed fetal bovine serum, and the selection medium was replaced at least twice. Both serum dialysis and selection medium replacement were necessary for consistent achievement of background frequencies of resistant colonies near 10-6. Reconstruction experiments with AZG-resistant V79 lines showed that the efficiency of recovery of resistant cells in the selection medium was constant over a range of 0–20 colonies observed/dish. A mixed population of V79 and AZG-resistant cells was also correctly analyzed by the procedure used in mutagenesis studies. PMID:1093934

  5. Selective photothermal therapy for mixed cancer cells using aptamer-conjugated nanorods.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yu-Fen; Sefah, Kwame; Bamrungsap, Suwussa; Chang, Huan-Tsung; Tan, Weihong

    2008-10-21

    Safe and effective photothermal therapy depends on efficient delivery of heat for killing cells and molecular specificity for targeting cells. To address these requirements, we have designed an aptamer-based nanostructure which combines the high absorption efficiency of Au-Ag nanorods with the target specificity of molecular aptamers, a combination resulting in the development of an efficient and selective therapeutic agent for targeted cancer cell photothermal destruction. Most nanomaterials, such as gold nanoshells or nanorods (NRs), require a relatively high power of laser irradiation (1 x 10 (5)-1 x 10 (10) W/m (2)). In contrast, the high absorption characteristic of our Au-Ag NRs requires only 8.5 x 10 (4) W/m (2) laser exposure to induce 93 (+/-11)% cell death of NR-aptamer-labeled cells. Aptamers, the second component of the nanostructure, are generated from a cell-SELEX (systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment) process and can be easily selected for specific recognition of individual tumor cell types without prior knowledge of the biomarkers for the cell. When tested with both cell suspensions and artificial solid tumor samples, these aptamer conjugates were shown to have excellent hyperthermia efficiency and selectivity. Under a specific laser intensity and duration of laser exposure, about 50 (+/-1)% of target (CEM) cells were severely damaged, while more than 87 (+/-1)% of control (NB-4) cells remained intact in a suspension cell mixture. These results indicate that the Au-Ag nanorod combination offers selective and efficient photothermal killing of targeted tumor cells, thus satisfying the two key challenges noted above. Consequently, for future in vivo application, it is fully anticipated that the tumor tissue will be selectively destroyed at laser energies which will not harm the surrounding normal tissue.

  6. New method for selection of hydrogen peroxide adapted bifidobacteria cells using continuous culture and immobilized cell technology.

    PubMed

    Mozzetti, Valeria; Grattepanche, Franck; Moine, Déborah; Berger, Bernard; Rezzonico, Enea; Meile, Leo; Arigoni, Fabrizio; Lacroix, Christophe

    2010-07-27

    Oxidative stress can severely compromise viability of bifidobacteria. Exposure of Bifidobacterium cells to oxygen causes accumulation of reactive oxygen species, mainly hydrogen peroxide, leading to cell death. In this study, we tested the suitability of continuous culture under increasing selective pressure combined with immobilized cell technology for the selection of hydrogen peroxide adapted Bifidobacterium cells. Cells of B. longum NCC2705 were immobilized in gellan-xanthan gum gel beads and used to continuously ferment MRS medium containing increasing concentration of H2O2 from 0 to 130 ppm. At the beginning of the culture, high cell density of 10(13) CFU per litre of reactor was tested. The continuous culture gradually adapted to increasing H2O2 concentrations. However, after increasing the H2O2 concentration to 130 ppm the OD of the culture decreased to 0. Full wash out was prevented by the immobilization of the cells in gel matrix. Hence after stopping the stress, it was possible to re-grow the cells that survived the highest lethal dose of H2O2 and to select two adapted colonies (HPR1 and HPR2) after plating of the culture effluent. In contrast to HPR1, HPR2 showed stable characteristics over at least 70 generations and exhibited also higher tolerance to O2 than non adapted wild type cells. Preliminary characterization of HPR2 was carried out by global genome expression profile analysis. Two genes coding for a protein with unknown function and possessing trans-membrane domains and an ABC-type transporter protein were overexpressed in HPR2 cells compared to wild type cells. Our study showed that continuous culture with cell immobilization is a valid approach for selecting cells adapted to hydrogen peroxide. Elucidation of H2O2 adaptation mechanisms in HPR2 could be helpful to develop oxygen resistant bifidobacteria.

  7. Selection of antibodies to cell surface determinants on mouse thymic epithelial cells using a phage display library.

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, D B; George, A J; Ritter, M A

    1997-01-01

    The network of thymic epithelium contributes significantly to the thymic stromal cell environment, which plays a vital role in the generation and maturation of thymocytes. Monoclonal antibodies (mAb) have revealed considerable heterogeneity within this epithelial component of the mouse thymic microenvironment, but many of these antibodies recognize epitopes that are located inside the cell and so cannot be used in functional studies. As an alternative approach to isolate antibodies specific to thymic epithelium, we used a phage display library expressing single chain Fv antibodies. For selection, a thymic cell suspension was incubated with the phage display library, and major histocompatibility complex class II positive cells, the majority of which are epithelial, were then specifically selected. Phage bound to these cells were eluted and the selection procedure was repeated for a further five rounds. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that these phage antibodies show differential staining of thymic epithelial subsets. Flow cytometric analysis of a thymic epithelial cell line using a panel of these antibodies demonstrated that they recognize epitopes on the cell surface. Furthermore, some of these antibodies also labelled human thymic epithelium, suggesting that the epitopes recognized by these antibodies are conserved between human and rodent thymus. Our approach therefore provides a rapid method to select antibodies specific for thymic epithelial cell surface determinants in their native configuration. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:9301539

  8. Advances in clinical NK cell studies: Donor selection, manufacturing and quality control.

    PubMed

    Koehl, U; Kalberer, C; Spanholtz, J; Lee, D A; Miller, J S; Cooley, S; Lowdell, M; Uharek, L; Klingemann, H; Curti, A; Leung, W; Alici, E

    2016-04-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are increasingly used in clinical studies in order to treat patients with various malignancies. The following review summarizes platform lectures and 2013-2015 consortium meetings on manufacturing and clinical use of NK cells in Europe and United States. A broad overview of recent pre-clinical and clinical results in NK cell therapies is provided based on unstimulated, cytokine-activated, as well as genetically engineered NK cells using chimeric antigen receptors (CAR). Differences in donor selection, manufacturing and quality control of NK cells for cancer immunotherapies are described and basic recommendations are outlined for harmonization in future NK cell studies.

  9. Advances in clinical NK cell studies: Donor selection, manufacturing and quality control

    PubMed Central

    Koehl, U.; Kalberer, C.; Spanholtz, J.; Lee, D. A.; Miller, J. S.; Cooley, S.; Lowdell, M.; Uharek, L.; Klingemann, H.; Curti, A.; Leung, W.; Alici, E.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Natural killer (NK) cells are increasingly used in clinical studies in order to treat patients with various malignancies. The following review summarizes platform lectures and 2013–2015 consortium meetings on manufacturing and clinical use of NK cells in Europe and United States. A broad overview of recent pre-clinical and clinical results in NK cell therapies is provided based on unstimulated, cytokine-activated, as well as genetically engineered NK cells using chimeric antigen receptors (CAR). Differences in donor selection, manufacturing and quality control of NK cells for cancer immunotherapies are described and basic recommendations are outlined for harmonization in future NK cell studies. PMID:27141397

  10. The double life of a B-1 cell: self-reactivity selects for protective effector functions.

    PubMed

    Baumgarth, Nicole

    2011-01-01

    During their development, B and T cells with self-reactive antigen receptors are generally deleted from the repertoire to avoid autoimmune diseases. Paradoxically, innate-like B-1 cells in mice are positively selected for self-reactivity and form a pool of long-lived, self-renewing B cells that produce most of the circulating natural IgM antibodies. This Review provides an overview of the developmental processes that shape the B-1 cell pool in mice, outlines the functions of B-1 cells in both the steady state and during host defence, and discusses possible functional B-1 cell homologues that exist in humans.

  11. Targeting the Human Complement Membrane Attack Complex to Selectively Kill Prostate Cancer Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-01

    1 AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-11-1-0309 TITLE: Targeting the Human Complement Membrane Attack Complex to Selectively Kill Prostate...Attack Complex to Selectively Kill Prostate Cancer Cells 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-11-1-0309 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Samuel R...leading to the lytic death of PSA- producing prostate cancer cells as well as a significant bystander effect and killing of non-PSA producing cancer

  12. Exploring the Relationship between the Inhibition Selectivity and the Apoptosis of Roscovitine-Treated Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Cui, Chunying; Wang, Yaonan; Wang, Yuji; Zhao, Ming; Peng, Shiqi

    2013-01-01

    THE ANTITUMOR ACTIVITY OF ROSCOVITINE WAS TESTED IN FOUR CERVICAL CARCINOMA CELLS: C33A, HCE-1, HeLa, and SiHa. The effects of roscovitine on ATP Lite assay, cell cycle, and apoptosis were assessed. The Sub-G1 DNA content occurred great increasing, and this indicates that apoptosis was induced quickly in HeLa cells, but slowly in the other cells. The morphological observation results showed that roscovitine induced apoptosis and cell death in the cervical carcinoma cells. Results revealed that roscovitine exhibited selective cytotoxicity towards 4 cervical carcinoma cells, and the cells showed different morphologic and apoptotic changes at the same concentration. It was estimated that cervical carcinoma cells responded differently to roscovitine because of differences in apoptotic and genetic background in different cervical carcinoma cells. This study suggested that roscovitine had the potential to be a chemotherapeutic agent against cervical carcinoma.

  13. Tumorigenic Polyploid Cells Contain Elevated ROS and are Selectively Targeted by Antioxidant Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Roh, Meejeon; van der Meer, Riet; Abdulkadir, Sarki A.

    2011-01-01

    Polyploidy has been linked to tumorigenicity mainly due to the chromosomal aberrations. Elevated reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, on the other hand, has also been associated with oncogenic transformation in most cancer cells. However, a possible link between ploidy and ROS is largely unexplored. Here we have exemined the role of ROS in the tumorigenicity of polyploid cells. We show that polyploid prostate and mammary epithelial cells contain higher levels of ROS due to their higher mitochondrial contents. ROS levels and mitochondrial mass are also higher in dihydrocytochalasin B (DCB)-induced polyploid cells, suggesting that higher levels of ROS observed in polyploid cell can occur due to cytokinesis failure. Interestingly, polyploid cells were more sensitive to the inhibitory effect of the antioxidant, N-Acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC), than control diploid cells. Treatment of polyploid/diploid cells with NAC led to the selective elimination of polyploid cells over time and abrogated the tumorigenicity of polyploid cells. This effect was partially mediated via the Akt signaling pathway. We next explored a possible role for ROS in promoting chromosomal instability by analyzing the effects of ROS on the mitotic stage of the cell cycle. Enhancing ROS levels by treating cells with hydrogen peroxide delayed not only entry into and but also exit from mitosis. Furthermore, increasing ROS levels significantly increased taxol resistance. Our results indicated that increased ROS in polyploid cells can contribute to tumorigenicity and highlight the therapeutic potential of antioxidants by selectively targeting the tumorigenic polyploid cells and by reversing taxol resistance. PMID:21503880

  14. Survival of the fittest: in vivo selection and stem cell gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Neff, Tobias; Beard, Brian C; Kiem, Hans-Peter

    2006-03-01

    Stem cell gene therapy has long been limited by low gene transfer efficiency to hematopoietic stem cells. Recent years have witnessed clinical success in select diseases such as X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) and ADA deficiency. Arguably, the single most important factor responsible for the increased efficacy of these recent protocols is the fact that the genetic correction provided a selective in vivo survival advantage. Since, for most diseases, there will be no selective advantage of gene-corrected cells, there has been a significant effort to arm vectors with a survival advantage. Two-gene vectors can be used to introduce the therapeutic gene and a selectable marker gene. Efficient in vivo selection strategies have been demonstrated in clinically relevant large-animal models. Mutant forms of the DNA repair-enzyme methylguanine methyltransferase in particular have allowed for efficient in vivo selection and have achieved sustained marking with virtually 100% gene-modified cells in large animals, and with clinically acceptable toxicity. Translation of these strategies to the clinical setting is imminent. Here, we review how in vivo selection strategies can be used to make stem cell gene therapy applicable to the treatment of a wider scope of genetic diseases and patients.

  15. Selective endocytic trafficking in live cells with fluorescent naphthoxazoles and their boron complexes.

    PubMed

    Dias, Gleiston G; Rodrigues, Bernardo L; Resende, Jarbas M; Calado, Hállen D R; de Simone, Carlos A; Silva, Valter H C; Neto, Brenno A D; Goulart, Marilia O F; Ferreira, Fabricia R; Meira, Assuero S; Pessoa, Claudia; Correa, José R; da Silva Júnior, Eufrânio N

    2015-06-04

    Fluorescent naphthoxazoles and their boron derivatives have been synthesized and applied as superior and selective probes for endocytic pathway tracking in live cancer cells. The best fluorophores were compared with the commercially available acridine orange (co-staining experiments), showing far better selectivity.

  16. Quantitative analysis of the T cell repertoire selected by a single peptide-major histocompatibility complex.

    PubMed

    Gapin, L; Fukui, Y; Kanellopoulos, J; Sano, T; Casrouge, A; Malier, V; Beaudoing, E; Gautheret, D; Claverie, J M; Sasazuki, T; Kourilsky, P

    1998-06-01

    The positive selection of CD4+ T cells requires the expression of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules in the thymus, but the role of self-peptides complexed to class II molecules is still a matter of debate. Recently, it was observed that transgenic mice expressing a single peptide-MHC class II complex positively select significant numbers of diverse CD4+ T cells in the thymus. However, the number of selected T cell specificities has not been evaluated so far. Here, we have sequenced 700 junctional complementarity determining regions 3 (CDR3) from T cell receptors (TCRs) carrying Vbeta11-Jbeta1.1 or Vbeta12-Jbeta1.1 rearrangements. We found that a single peptide-MHC class II complex positively selects at least 10(5) different Vbeta rearrangements. Our data yield a first evaluation of the size of the T cell repertoire. In addition, they provide evidence that the single Ealpha52-68-I-Ab complex skews the amino acid frequency in the TCR CDR3 loop of positively selected T cells. A detailed analysis of CDR3 sequences indicates that a fraction of the beta chain repertoire bears the imprint of the selecting self-peptide.

  17. Quantitative Analysis of the T Cell Repertoire Selected by a Single Peptide–Major Histocompatibility Complex

    PubMed Central

    Gapin, Laurent; Fukui, Yoshinori; Kanellopoulos, Jean; Sano, Tetsuro; Casrouge, Armanda; Malier, Vanessa; Beaudoing, Emmanuel; Gautheret, Daniel; Claverie, Jean-Michel; Sasazuki, Takehiko; Kourilsky, Philippe

    1998-01-01

    The positive selection of CD4+ T cells requires the expression of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules in the thymus, but the role of self-peptides complexed to class II molecules is still a matter of debate. Recently, it was observed that transgenic mice expressing a single peptide–MHC class II complex positively select significant numbers of diverse CD4+ T cells in the thymus. However, the number of selected T cell specificities has not been evaluated so far. Here, we have sequenced 700 junctional complementarity determining regions 3 (CDR3) from T cell receptors (TCRs) carrying Vβ11-Jβ1.1 or Vβ12-Jβ1.1 rearrangements. We found that a single peptide–MHC class II complex positively selects at least 105 different Vβ rearrangements. Our data yield a first evaluation of the size of the T cell repertoire. In addition, they provide evidence that the single Eα52-68–I-Ab complex skews the amino acid frequency in the TCR CDR3 loop of positively selected T cells. A detailed analysis of CDR3 sequences indicates that a fraction of the β chain repertoire bears the imprint of the selecting self-peptide. PMID:9607927

  18. Use of biochemical lesions for selection of human cells with hybrid cytoplasms.

    PubMed Central

    Wright, W E; Hayflick, L

    1975-01-01

    Techniques for preparing large populations of anucleate cytoplasms from cultured eukaryotic cells have only recently been described. The principal value of anucleate cytoplasms derives from studies that can be done after they are fused to whole cells. Since present methods for the isolation of heterokaryons are unsuitable for the selection of hybrids between whole cells and anucleate cytoplasms (heteroplasmons), a selective system has been developed which is based on the capacity of anucleate cytoplasms containing active enzymes to rescue whole cells poisoned with iodoacetate. Ethidium bromide, a partially effective agent, was used in conjunction with iodoacetate to demonstrate the feasibility of selecting heterokaryons by producing complementary biochemical lesions in the parental cell strains. The potential for artifact in these systems is not, however, entirely precluded. Images PMID:1057172

  19. Antibody modified porous silicon microparticles for the selective capture of cells.

    PubMed

    Guan, Bin; Magenau, Astrid; Ciampi, Simone; Gaus, Katharina; Reece, Peter J; Gooding, J Justin

    2014-07-16

    Herein, the ability of porous silicon (PSi) particles for selectively binding to specific cells is investigated. PSi microparticles with a high reflectance band in the reflectivity profile are fabricated, and subsequently passivated and modified with antibodies via the Cu(I)-catalyzed alkyne-azide cycloaddition reaction and succimidyl activation. To demonstrate the ability of the antibody-modified PSi particles to selectively bind to one cell type over others, HeLa cells were transfected with surface epitopes fused to fluorescent proteins. The antibody-functionalized PSi particles showed good selectivity for the corresponding surface protein on HeLa cells, with no significant cross-reactivity. The results are important for the application of PSi particles in cell sensing and drug delivery.

  20. Directional Excitatory Input to Direction-Selective Ganglion Cells in the Rabbit Retina.

    PubMed

    Percival, Kumiko A; Venkataramani, Sowmya; Smith, Robert G; Rowland Taylor, W

    2017-03-14

    Directional responses in retinal ganglion cells are generated in large part by direction-selective release of GABA from starburst amacrine cells onto direction-selective ganglion cells (DSGCs). The excitatory inputs to DSGCs are also widely reported to be direction-selective, however, recent evidence suggests that glutamate release from bipolar cells is not directional, and directional excitation seen in patch-clamp analyses may be an artifact resulting from incomplete voltage control. Here we test this voltage-clamp-artifact hypothesis in recordings from 62 On-Off DSGCs in the rabbit retina. The strength of the directional excitatory signal varies considerably across the sample of cells, but is not correlated with the strength of directional inhibition, as required for a voltage-clamp artifact. These results implicate additional mechanisms in generating directional excitatory inputs to DSGCs. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  1. Trichomonas vaginalis surface proteinase activity is necessary for parasite adherence to epithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Arroyo, R; Alderete, J F

    1989-01-01

    The role of cysteine proteinases in adherence of Trichomonas vaginalis NYH 286 to HeLa and human vaginal epithelial cells was evaluated. Only pretreatment of trichomonads, but not epithelial cells, with N-alpha-p-tosyl-L-lysine chloromethyl ketone (TLCK), an inhibitor of trichomonad cysteine proteinases, greatly diminished the ability of T. vaginalis to recognize and bind to epithelial cells. Leupeptin and L-1-tosylamide-2-phenylethyl chloromethyl ketone, other cysteine proteinase inhibitors, also decreased T. vaginalis cytadherence. Parasites incubated with TLCK and washed extensively still did not adhere to cells at levels equal to those seen for control trichomonads treated with phosphate-buffered saline or culture medium alone. Exposure of TLCK-treated organisms with other cysteine proteinases restored cytadherence levels, indicating that proteinase action on the parasite surface is prerequisite for host cell attachment. Concentrations of TLCK which inhibited cytadherence did not alter the metabolism of T. vaginalis, as determined by metabolic labeling of trichomonad proteins; the protein patterns of T. vaginalis in the presence and absence of TLCK were identical. Kinetics of TLCK-mediated inhibition of cytadherence of other T. vaginalis isolates with different levels of epithelial-cell parasitism were similar to the concentration-dependent inhibition seen for isolate NYH 286. Incubation of TLCK-treated, washed organisms in growth medium resulted in regeneration of adherence. Finally, treatment of T. vaginalis organisms with proteinase inhibitors for abrogation of cytadherence effectively rendered the trichomonads unable to kill host cells, which is consistent with the contact-dependent nature of host cytotoxicity. These data show for the first time the involvement of T. vaginalis cysteine proteinases in parasite attachment to human epithelial cells. These results have implications for future pharmacologic intervention at a key step in infection. PMID:2789190

  2. Trichomonas vaginalis surface proteinase activity is necessary for parasite adherence to epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Arroyo, R; Alderete, J F

    1989-10-01

    The role of cysteine proteinases in adherence of Trichomonas vaginalis NYH 286 to HeLa and human vaginal epithelial cells was evaluated. Only pretreatment of trichomonads, but not epithelial cells, with N-alpha-p-tosyl-L-lysine chloromethyl ketone (TLCK), an inhibitor of trichomonad cysteine proteinases, greatly diminished the ability of T. vaginalis to recognize and bind to epithelial cells. Leupeptin and L-1-tosylamide-2-phenylethyl chloromethyl ketone, other cysteine proteinase inhibitors, also decreased T. vaginalis cytadherence. Parasites incubated with TLCK and washed extensively still did not adhere to cells at levels equal to those seen for control trichomonads treated with phosphate-buffered saline or culture medium alone. Exposure of TLCK-treated organisms with other cysteine proteinases restored cytadherence levels, indicating that proteinase action on the parasite surface is prerequisite for host cell attachment. Concentrations of TLCK which inhibited cytadherence did not alter the metabolism of T. vaginalis, as determined by metabolic labeling of trichomonad proteins; the protein patterns of T. vaginalis in the presence and absence of TLCK were identical. Kinetics of TLCK-mediated inhibition of cytadherence of other T. vaginalis isolates with different levels of epithelial-cell parasitism were similar to the concentration-dependent inhibition seen for isolate NYH 286. Incubation of TLCK-treated, washed organisms in growth medium resulted in regeneration of adherence. Finally, treatment of T. vaginalis organisms with proteinase inhibitors for abrogation of cytadherence effectively rendered the trichomonads unable to kill host cells, which is consistent with the contact-dependent nature of host cytotoxicity. These data show for the first time the involvement of T. vaginalis cysteine proteinases in parasite attachment to human epithelial cells. These results have implications for future pharmacologic intervention at a key step in infection.

  3. A Photoactivatable GFP for Selective Photolabeling of Proteins and Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patterson, George H.; Lippincott-Schwartz, Jennifer

    2002-09-01

    We report a photoactivatable variant of the Aequorea victoria green fluorescent protein (GFP) that, after intense irradiation with 413-nanometer light, increases fluorescence 100 times when excited by 488-nanometer light and remains stable for days under aerobic conditions. These characteristics offer a new tool for exploring intracellular protein dynamics by tracking photoactivated molecules that are the only visible GFPs in the cell. Here, we use the photoactivatable GFP both as a free protein to measure protein diffusion across the nuclear envelope and as a chimera with a lysosomal membrane protein to demonstrate rapid interlysosomal membrane exchange.

  4. A photoactivatable GFP for selective photolabeling of proteins and cells.

    PubMed

    Patterson, George H; Lippincott-Schwartz, Jennifer

    2002-09-13

    We report a photoactivatable variant of the Aequorea victoria green fluorescent protein (GFP) that, after intense irradiation with 413-nanometer light, increases fluorescence 100 times when excited by 488-nanometer light and remains stable for days under aerobic conditions. These characteristics offer a new tool for exploring intracellular protein dynamics by tracking photoactivated molecules that are the only visible GFPs in the cell. Here, we use the photoactivatable GFP both as a free protein to measure protein diffusion across the nuclear envelope and as a chimera with a lysosomal membrane protein to demonstrate rapid interlysosomal membrane exchange.

  5. Signalling thresholds and negative B-cell selection in acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhengshan; Shojaee, Seyedmehdi; Buchner, Maike; Geng, Huimin; Lee, Jae Woong; Klemm, Lars; Titz, Björn; Graeber, Thomas G; Park, Eugene; Tan, Ying Xim; Satterthwaite, Anne; Paietta, Elisabeth; Hunger, Stephen P; Willman, Cheryl L; Melnick, Ari; Loh, Mignon L; Jung, Jae U; Coligan, John E; Bolland, Silvia; Mak, Tak W; Limnander, Andre; Jumaa, Hassan; Reth, Michael; Weiss, Arthur; Lowell, Clifford A; Müschen, Markus

    2015-05-21

    B cells are selected for an intermediate level of B-cell antigen receptor (BCR) signalling strength: attenuation below minimum (for example, non-functional BCR) or hyperactivation above maximum (for example, self-reactive BCR) thresholds of signalling strength causes negative selection. In ∼25% of cases, acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) cells carry the oncogenic BCR-ABL1 tyrosine kinase (Philadelphia chromosome positive), which mimics constitutively active pre-BCR signalling. Current therapeutic approaches are largely focused on the development of more potent tyrosine kinase inhibitors to suppress oncogenic signalling below a minimum threshold for survival. We tested the hypothesis that targeted hyperactivation--above a maximum threshold--will engage a deletional checkpoint for removal of self-reactive B cells and selectively kill ALL cells. Here we find, by testing various components of proximal pre-BCR signalling in mouse BCR-ABL1 cells, that an incremental increase of Syk tyrosine kinase activity was required and sufficient to induce cell death. Hyperactive Syk was functionally equivalent to acute activation of a self-reactive BCR on ALL cells. Despite oncogenic transformation, this basic mechanism of negative selection was still functional in ALL cells. Unlike normal pre-B cells, patient-derived ALL cells express the inhibitory receptors PECAM1, CD300A and LAIR1 at high levels. Genetic studies revealed that Pecam1, Cd300a and Lair1 are critical to calibrate oncogenic signalling strength through recruitment of the inhibitory phosphatases Ptpn6 (ref. 7) and Inpp5d (ref. 8). Using a novel small-molecule inhibitor of INPP5D (also known as SHIP1), we demonstrated that pharmacological hyperactivation of SYK and engagement of negative B-cell selection represents a promising new strategy to overcome drug resistance in human ALL.

  6. Purging peripheral blood progenitor cell grafts from lymphoma cells: quantitative comparison of immunomagnetic CD34+ selection systems.

    PubMed

    Paulus, U; Dreger, P; Viehmann, K; von Neuhoff, N; Schmitz, N

    1997-01-01

    Autologous peripheral blood progenitor cell (PBPC) transplantation is increasingly being used for treatment of indolent lymphomas. Since involvement of bone marrow and peripheral blood is frequent and methods to reduce the lymphoma cell load of PBPC grafts are thus highly desirable, we have studied purging of PBPC comparing two immunomagnetic CD34+ selection systems (VarioMACS, Miltenyi Biotech; Bergisch Gladbach, Germany, and Isolex50 System, Baxter; Irvine, CA). Samples of freshly collected mobilized PBPCs were contaminated with BALM-3 or KARPAS422 lymphoma cells that had been labeled with the fluorescent DNA stain Hoechst 33342. The mixture was subjected to separation with the two devices and the resulting "CD34+" fractions were screened for lymphoma cells by limiting dilution using fluorescence microscopy and by polymerase chain reaction amplification of t(14;18) or CDRIII-rearrangements. Both devices yielded comparable purities (MACS 97% [87%-99%]; Isolex 97% [84%-99%]) and recoveries of CD34+ cells (MACS 56% [30%-81%]; Isolex 45% [24%-63%]). The overall depletion of lymphoma cells was 3.9 log (2.6-5.9), however, residual contaminating cells were seen in every single experiment. The purging efficacy was dependent on the type of contaminating lymphoma cell (BALM-3: 4.4 log [3.7-4.8]; KARPAS422: 3.2 log [2.6-4.2]; p = 0.018), whereas the type of selection system used or the percentage of CD34+ cells in the starting material had no influence. We conclude that excellent purification of CD34+ cells leading to a vigorous depletion of lymphoma cells can be achieved with both CD34+ selection systems investigated. However, the efficacy of purging may greatly differ between individual lymphomas, and complete eradication of contaminating cells from PBPC grafts may rarely be achieved with CD34+ selection alone.

  7. Schwann Cell Glycogen Selectively Supports Myelinated Axon Function

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Angus M; Evans, Richard D; Black, Joel; Ransom, Bruce R

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Interruption of energy supply to peripheral axons is a cause of axon loss. We determined if glycogen was present in mammalian peripheral nerve, and if it supported axon conduction during aglycemia. Methods We used biochemical assay and electron microscopy to determine the presence of glycogen, and electrophysiology to monitor axon function. Results Glycogen was present in sciatic nerve, its concentration varying directly with ambient [glucose]. Electron microscopy detected glycogen granules primarily in myelinating Schwann cell cytoplasm and these diminished after exposure to aglycemia. During aglycemia, conduction failure in large myelinated axons (A fibers) mirrored the time-course of glycogen loss. Latency to CAP failure was directly related to nerve glycogen content at aglycemia onset. Glycogen did not benefit the function of slow-conducting, small diameter unmyelinated axons (C fibers) during aglycemia. Blocking glycogen breakdown pharmacologically accelerated CAP failure during aglycemia in A fibers, but not in C fibers. Lactate was as effective as glucose in supporting sciatic nerve function, and was continuously released into the extracellular space in the presence of glucose and fell rapidly during aglycemia. Interpretation Our findings indicated that glycogen is present in peripheral nerve, primarily in myelinating Schwann cells, and exclusively supports large diameter, myelinated axon conduction during aglycemia. Available evidence suggests that peripheral nerve glycogen breaks down during aglycemia and is passed, probably as lactate, to myelinated axons to support function. Unmyelinated axons are not protected by glycogen and are more vulnerable to dysfunction during periods of hypoglycemia. PMID:23034913

  8. Metabolic impairment elicits brain cell type-selective changes in oxidative stress and cell death in culture.

    PubMed

    Park, L C; Calingasan, N Y; Uchida, K; Zhang, H; Gibson, G E

    2000-01-01

    Abnormalities in oxidative metabolism and inflammation accompany many neurodegenerative diseases. Thiamine deficiency (TD) is an animal model in which chronic oxidative stress and inflammation lead to selective neuronal death, whereas other cell types show an inflammatory response. Therefore, the current studies determined the response of different brain cell types to TD and/or inflammation in vitro and tested whether their responses reflect inherent properties of the cells. The cells that have been implicated in TD-induced neurotoxicity, including neurons, microglia, astrocytes, and brain endothelial cells, as well as neuroblastoma and BV-2 microglial cell lines, were cultured in either thiamine-depleted media or in normal culture media with amprolium, a thiamine transport inhibitor. The activity levels of a key mitochondrial enzyme, alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex (KGDHC), were uniquely distributed among different cell types: The highest activity was in the endothelial cells, and the lowest was in primary microglia and neurons. The unique distribution of the activity did not account for the selective response to TD. TD slightly inhibited general cellular dehydrogenases in all cell types, whereas it significantly reduced the activity of KGDHC exclusively in primary neurons and neuroblastoma cells. Among the cell types tested, only in neurons did TD induce apoptosis and cause the accumulation of 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal, a lipid peroxidation product. On the other hand, chronic lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammation significantly inhibited cellular dehydrogenase and KGDHC activities in microglia and astrocytes but not in neurons or endothelial cells. The results demonstrate that the selective cell changes during TD in vivo reflect inherent properties of the different brain cell types.

  9. Selective beta-cell differentiation of dissociated embryonic pancreatic precursor cells cultured in synthetic polyethylene glycol hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Mason, Mariah N; Mahoney, Melissa J

    2009-06-01

    Continuing advances in islet cell transplantation have been promising; however, several limitations, including severe shortage of transplantable islets, hinder the widespread use of this therapy. Pancreatic precursor cells are one alternative to cadaveric donor islets. These cells found in the developing pancreatic buds are capable of self-renewal and also have the innate ability to become insulin-producing beta-cells. For this work, bioinert polyethylene glycol (PEG) hydrogels were chosen as the supportive three-dimensional matrix for encapsulation of dissociated pancreatic precursor cells obtained from the dorsal pancreatic bud of day-15 rat embryos. This culture system was selected in order to eliminate cell-extracellular matrix and cell-cell signal heterogeneity present when intact pancreatic buds are embedded in protein-based gels, the typical in vitro culture conditions used to study this cell population. In this study it was found that (1) dissociated precursor cells maintain a robust viability for 7 days in PEG hydrogel culture, (2) encapsulated cells selectively differentiate into insulin-expressing beta-cells, and (3) differentiated beta-cells have releasable insulin stores, but are not achieving a mature, glucose responsive phenotype. These findings suggest that encapsulating dissociated pancreatic precursor cells in an environment designed to minimize the heterogeneous signaling cues present during development or in standard culture conditions generates a population highly enriched in pancreatic beta-cells; however, future efforts must focus on achieving glucose responsiveness in this cell population. Further, these results indicate that differentiation down a beta-cell lineage may be the default pathway in pancreatic development.

  10. Selective proapoptotic activity of polyphenols from red wine on teratocarcinoma cell, a model of cancer stem-like cell.

    PubMed

    Sharif, Tanveer; Auger, Cyril; Bronner, Christian; Alhosin, Mahmoud; Klein, Thibaut; Etienne-Selloum, Nelly; Schini-Kerth, Valérie B; Fuhrmann, Guy

    2011-04-01

    Cancer stem cells are expected to be responsible for tumor initiation and metastasis. These cells are therefore potential targets for innovative anticancer therapies. However, the absence of bona fide cancer stem cell lines is a real problem for the development of such approaches. Since teratocarcinoma cells are totipotent stem cells with a high degree of malignancy, we used them as a model of cancer stem cells in order to evaluate the anticancer chemopreventive activity of red wine polyphenols (RWPs) and to determine the underlying cellular and molecular mechanisms. We therefore investigated the effects of RWPs on the embryonal carcinoma (EC) cell line P19 which was grown in the same culture conditions as the most appropriate normal cell line counterpart, the pluripotent embryonic fibroblast cell line NIH/3T3. The present study indicates that RWPs selectively inhibited the proliferation of P19 EC cells and induced G1 cell cycle arrest in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, RWPs treatment specifically triggered apoptosis of P19 EC cells in association with a dramatic upregulation of the tumor suppressor gene p53 and caspase-3 activation. Our findings suggest that the chemopreventive activity of RWPs on tumor initiation and development is related to a growth inhibition and a p53-dependent induction of apoptosis in teratocarcinoma cells. In addition, this study also shows that the EC cell line is a convenient source for studying the responses of cancer stem cells to new potential anticancer agents.

  11. Selective culling of high avidity antigen-specific CD4+ T cells after virulent Salmonella infection.

    PubMed

    Ertelt, James M; Johanns, Tanner M; Mysz, Margaret A; Nanton, Minelva R; Rowe, Jared H; Aguilera, Marijo N; Way, Sing Sing

    2011-12-01

    Typhoid fever is a persistent infection caused by host-adapted Salmonella strains adept at circumventing immune-mediated host defences. Given the importance of T cells in protection, the culling of activated CD4+ T cells after primary infection has been proposed as a potential immune evasion strategy used by this pathogen. We demonstrate that the purging of activated antigen-specific CD4+ T cells after virulent Salmonella infection requires SPI-2 encoded virulence determinants, and is not restricted only to cells with specificity to Salmonella-expressed antigens, but extends to CD4+ T cells primed to expand by co-infection with recombinant Listeria monocytogenes. Unexpectedly, however, the loss of activated CD4+ T cells during Salmonella infection demonstrated using a monoclonal population of adoptively transferred CD4+ T cells was not reproduced among the endogenous repertoire of antigen-specific CD4+ T cells identified with MHC class II tetramer. Analysis of T-cell receptor variable segment usage revealed the selective loss and reciprocal enrichment of defined CD4+ T-cell subsets after Salmonella co-infection that is associated with the purging of antigen-specific cells with the highest intensity of tetramer staining. Hence, virulent Salmonella triggers the selective culling of high avidity activated CD4+ T-cell subsets, which re-shapes the repertoire of antigen-specific T cells that persist later after infection.

  12. Selective effect of cell membrane on synaptic neurotransmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Postila, Pekka A.; Vattulainen, Ilpo; Róg, Tomasz

    2016-01-01

    Atomistic molecular dynamics simulations were performed with 13 non-peptidic neurotransmitters (NTs) in three different membrane environments. The results provide compelling evidence that NTs are divided into membrane-binding and membrane-nonbinding molecules. NTs adhere to the postsynaptic membrane surface whenever the ligand-binding sites of their synaptic receptors are buried in the lipid bilayer. In contrast, NTs that have extracellular ligand-binding sites do not have a similar tendency to adhere to the membrane surface. This finding is a seemingly simple yet important addition to the paradigm of neurotransmission, essentially dividing it into membrane-independent and membrane-dependent mechanisms. Moreover, the simulations also indicate that the lipid composition especially in terms of charged lipids can affect the membrane partitioning of NTs. The revised paradigm, highlighting the importance of cell membrane and specific lipids for neurotransmission, should to be of interest to neuroscientists, drug industry and the general public alike.

  13. Aptamers Selected by Cell-SELEX for Molecular Imaging.

    PubMed

    Jin, Cheng; Zheng, Jing; Li, Chunmei; Qiu, Liping; Zhang, Xiaobing; Tan, Weihong

    2015-12-01

    Conventional diagnostics for cancer rely primarily on anatomical techniques. However, these techniques cannot monitor the changes at the molecular level in normal cells, which possibly signal the onset of cancer at its very earliest stages. For accurate prediction of the carcinogenesis at the molecular level, targeting ligands have been used in combination with imaging probes to monitor this biological process. Among these targeting ligands, aptamers have high binding affinity to various targets ranging from small molecules to whole organisms, and, hence, exceptional recognition ability. Many recent studies have been reported on aptamer-based molecular imaging, clearly indicating its clinical and diagnostic utility. In this review, we will discuss some key results of these studies.

  14. Surface display vectors for selective detection and isolation of high level antibody producing cells.

    PubMed

    Lang, Sabine; Drewello, Delia; Wichter, Johannes; Nommay, Audrey; Wilms, Burkhard; Knopf, Hans-Peter; Jostock, Thomas

    2016-11-01

    Cell line generation for production of biopharmaceuticals in mammalian cells usually involves intensive screening of clones to identify the rare high producers. In order to facilitate efficient and selective fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS) based enrichment and cloning of antibody producing CHO cells, we developed a special vector setup by inserting a leaky translation termination signal between the heavy chain of an IgG antibody and an IgG transmembrane domain. Partial read-through during translation of the antibody heavy chain leads to display of a subset of the produced antibody on the surface of the expressing cell. We could show that the level of surface expression correlates well with the productivity. By applying FACS, high producing cells can be selectively enriched and cloned. Two sequential FACS enrichment cycles were performed which led to more than eightfold increased productivities of transfected and selected cell populations without cloning. The combination of selective FACS enrichment and FACS cloning with the new vector setup led to a sevenfold higher average productivity of the resulting clones as compared to a reference vector. Productivity and production stability assessment of clones generated with the new vector showed no negative impact of the co-expression of transmembrane antibody. Clone productivities of 4 g/L in a generic shake flask fed-batch model were achieved. Thus, this new vector setup facilitates fast and selective isolation of high producing production cell lines and allows significant reduction of clone screening efforts during cell line development for production cell lines. Additionally, the high productivity of FACS-enriched but non-clonal cell populations supports rapid, high yield, and cost efficient material production in early project phases. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 2386-2393. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. IL-15 inhibits pre-B cell proliferation by selectively expanding Mac-1{sup +}B220{sup +} NK cells

    SciTech Connect

    Nakajima, Shinsuke; Hida, Shigeaki; Taki, Shinsuke

    2008-05-16

    Natural killer (NK) cells are the cells critical for inhibition of repopulation of allogenic bone marrow cells. However, it is not well known if NK cells affect autologous lymphopoiesis. Here, we observed that NK cells could inhibit pre-B cell proliferation in vitro driven by interleukin (IL)-7 in a manner dependent on IL-15. Interestingly, the great majority of expanding NK cells were Mac-1{sup +}B220{sup +}, a recently identified potent interferon (IFN)-{gamma} producer. Indeed, IFN-{gamma} was produced in those cultures, and pre-B cells lacking IFN-{gamma} receptors, but not those lacking type I IFN receptors, were resistant to such an inhibition. Furthermore, even NK cells from mice lacking {beta}2-microglobulin, which were known to be functionally dampened, inhibited pre-B cell proliferation as well. Thus, activated NK cells, which were expanded selectively by IL-15, could potentially regulate B lymphopoiesis through IFN-{gamma} beyond the selection imposed upon self-recognition.

  16. Negative immunomagnetic selection of T cells from peripheral blood of presentation AML specimens.

    PubMed

    Le Dieu, Rifca; Taussig, David; Lister, T Andrew; Gribben, John G

    2009-08-31

    To date, studies on T cells in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) have been limited to flow cytometric analysis of whole peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) specimens or functional work looking at the impact of AML myeloblasts on normal or remission T cells. This lack of information on T cells at the time of presentation with disease is due in part to the difficulty in isolating sufficiently pure T cells from these specimens for further study. Negative immunomagnetic selection has been the method of choice for isolating immune cells for functional studies due to concerns that binding antibodies to the cell surface may induce cellular activation, block ligand-receptor interactions or result in immune clearance. In order specifically to study T cells in presentation AML specimens, we set out to develop a method of isolating highly pure CD4 and CD8 T cells by negative selection from the peripheral blood (PB) of newly diagnosed AML patients. This technique, unlike T cell selection from PB from normal individuals or from patients with chronic lymphocytic leukaemia, was extremely problematic due to properties of the leukaemic myeloblasts. A successful method was eventually optimized requiring the use of a custom antibody cocktail consisting of CD33, CD34, CD123, CD11c and CD36, to deplete myeloblasts.

  17. Selective advantage of trisomic human cells cultured in non-standard conditions

    PubMed Central

    Rutledge, Samuel D.; Douglas, Temple A.; Nicholson, Joshua M.; Vila-Casadesús, Maria; Kantzler, Courtney L.; Wangsa, Darawalee; Barroso-Vilares, Monika; Kale, Shiv D.; Logarinho, Elsa; Cimini, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    An abnormal chromosome number, a condition known as aneuploidy, is a ubiquitous feature of cancer cells. A number of studies have shown that aneuploidy impairs cellular fitness. However, there is also evidence that aneuploidy can arise in response to specific challenges and can confer a selective advantage under certain environmental stresses. Cancer cells are likely exposed to a number of challenging conditions arising within the tumor microenvironment. To investigate whether aneuploidy may confer a selective advantage to cancer cells, we employed a controlled experimental system. We used the diploid, colorectal cancer cell line DLD1 and two DLD1-derived cell lines carrying single-chromosome aneuploidies to assess a number of cancer cell properties. Such properties, which included rates of proliferation and apoptosis, anchorage-independent growth, and invasiveness, were assessed both under standard culture conditions and under conditions of stress (i.e., serum starvation, drug treatment, hypoxia). Similar experiments were performed in diploid vs. aneuploid non-transformed human primary cells. Overall, our data show that aneuploidy can confer selective advantage to human cells cultured under non-standard conditions. These findings indicate that aneuploidy can increase the adaptability of cells, even those, such as cancer cells, that are already characterized by increased proliferative capacity and aggressive tumorigenic phenotypes. PMID:26956415

  18. Lymphocyte Display: A Novel Antibody Selection Platform Based on T Cell Activation

    PubMed Central

    Alonso-Camino, Vanesa; Sánchez-Martín, David; Compte, Marta; Álvarez-Vallina, Laura Sanz, Luis

    2009-01-01

    Since their onset, display technologies have proven useful for the selection of antibodies against a variety of targets; however, most of the antibodies selected with the currently available platforms need to be further modified for their use in humans, and are restricted to accessible antigens. Furthermore, these platforms are not well suited for in vivo selections. We present here a novel cell based antibody display platform, which takes advantage of the functional capabilities of T lymphocytes. The display of antibodies on the surface of T lymphocytes, as a part of a chimeric-immune receptor (CIR) mediating signaling, may ideally link the antigen-antibody interaction to a demonstrable change in T cell phenotype, due to subsequent expression of the early T cell activation marker CD69. In this proof-of-concept, an in vitro selection was carried out using a human T cell line lentiviral-transduced to express a tumor-specific CIR on the surface, against a human tumor cell line expressing the carcinoembryonic antigen. Based on an effective interaction between the CIR and the tumor antigen, we demonstrated that combining CIR-mediated activation with FACS sorting of CD69+ T cells, it is possible to isolate binders to tumor specific cell surface antigen, with an enrichment factor of at least 103-fold after two rounds, resulting in a homogeneous population of T cells expressing tumor-specific CIRs. PMID:19777065

  19. Strategies for selecting recombinant CHO cell lines for cGMP manufacturing: improving the efficiency of cell line generation.

    PubMed

    Porter, Alison J; Racher, Andrew J; Preziosi, Richard; Dickson, Alan J

    2010-01-01

    Transfectants with a wide range of cellular phenotypes are obtained during the process of cell line generation. For the successful manufacture of a therapeutic protein, a means is required to identify a cell line with desirable growth and productivity characteristics from this phenotypically wide-ranging transfectant population. This identification process is on the critical path for first-in-human studies. We have stringently examined a typical selection strategy used to isolate cell lines suitable for cGMP manufacturing. One-hundred and seventy-five transfectants were evaluated as they progressed through the different assessment stages of the selection strategy. High producing cell lines, suitable for cGMP manufacturing, were identified. However, our analyses showed that the frequency of isolation of the highest producing cell lines was low and that ranking positions were not consistent between each assessment stage, suggesting that there is potential to improve upon the strategy. Attempts to increase the frequency of isolation of the 10 highest producing cell lines, by in silico analysis of alternative selection strategies, were unsuccessful. We identified alternative strategies with similar predictive capabilities to the typical selection strategy. One alternate strategy required fewer cell lines to be progressed at the assessment stages but the stochastic nature of the models means that cell line numbers are likely to change between programs. In summary, our studies illuminate the potential for improvement to this and future selection strategies, based around use of assessments that are more informative or that reduce variance, paving the way to improved efficiency of generation of manufacturing cell lines.

  20. Selective inhibitors of aurora kinases inhibit proliferation, reduce cell viability and impair cell cycle progression in papillary thyroid carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Baldini, E; Tuccilli, C; Prinzi, N; Sorrenti, S; Antonelli, A; Fallahi, P; Mian, C; Barollo, S; Catania, A; Morrone, S; Tartaglia, F; Mascagni, D; Coccaro, C; Pepe, M; Filippini, A; D'Armiento, M; Ulisse, S

    2015-01-01

    The three members of the Aurora kinase family, Aurora-A, -B and -C, regulate several aspects of the mitotic process, and their aberrant expression and/or function causes mitotic abnormalities leading either to cell death or aneuploidy. They are found overexpressed in several human malignancies, including the papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC). In the present study, we sought to establish whether Aurora kinase inhibition could be of any therapeutic value in the treatment of aggressive forms of PTC, enduring to radioactive iodide (RAI) ablation. To this end, the effects of selective inhibitors of Aurora-A (MLN8237) and Aurora-B (AZD1152) were analyzed on 3 human PTC cell lines expressing either wild-type (K1 and TPC1) or mutant p53 (BCPAP). The two inhibitors were capable of reducing cell proliferation in a time- and dose-dependent manner, with IC₅₀ comprised between 65.4 and 114.9 nM for MLN8237, and between 26.6 and 484.6 nM for AZD1152. Immunofluorescence experiments confirmed that AZD1152 inhibited Aurora-B phosphorylation of histone H3 on Ser10, however, it did not affect Aurora-A autophosphorylation. MLN8237 inhibited Aurora-A autophosphorylation as expected, but at concentrations required to achieve the maximum antiproliferative effects it also abolished H3 (Ser10) phosphorylation. Time-lapse videomicroscopy evidenced that both inhibitors prevented the completion of cytokinesis, and cytofluorimetric analysis showed accumulation of cells in G2/M phase and/or polyploidy. Apoptosis was induced in all the cells by both inhibitors independently from the p53 status. In conclusion, in the present preclinical study MLN8237 and AZD1152 have emerged as promising drug candidates for RAI-insensitive PTC.

  1. A breast cancer stem cell-selective, mammospheres-potent osmium(VI) nitrido complex.

    PubMed

    Suntharalingam, Kogularamanan; Lin, Wei; Johnstone, Timothy C; Bruno, Peter M; Zheng, Yao-Rong; Hemann, Michael T; Lippard, Stephen J

    2014-10-15

    The effect of a newly developed osmium(VI) nitrido complex, 1, on breast cancer stem cells (CSCs) is reported. The complex displays selective toxicity for HMLER breast cancer cells enriched with CD44-positive, CSC-like cells over the same cells having reduced CSC character. Remarkably, 1 also reduces the proportion of CSCs within a heterogeneous breast cancer cell population and irreversibly inhibits the formation of free-floating mammospheres to an extent similar to that of salinomycin, a natural product that targets CSCs. Detailed mechanistic studies reveal that in breast cancer cells 1 induces DNA damage and endoplasmic reticulum stress, the latter being responsible for the CSC selectivity. The anti-CSC properties of 1 provide a strong impetus for the development of new metal-based compounds to target CSCs and to treat chemotherapy-resistant and relapsed tumors.

  2. Assembly of MOF Microcapsules with Size-Selective Permeability on Cell Walls.

    PubMed

    Li, Wanbin; Zhang, Yufan; Xu, Zehai; Meng, Qin; Fan, Zheng; Ye, Shuaiju; Zhang, Guoliang

    2016-01-18

    The assembly of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) into microcapsules has attracted great interest because of their unique properties. However, it remains a challenge to obtain MOF microcapsules with size selectivity at the molecular scale. In this report, we used cell walls from natural biomaterials as non-toxic, stable, and inexpensive support materials to assemble MOF/cell wall (CW) microcapsules with size-selective permeability. By making use of the hollow structure, small pores, and high density of heterogeneous nucleation sites of the cell walls, uniform and continuous MOF layers could be easily obtained by inside/outside interfacial crystallization. The prepared MOF/CW microcapsules have excellent stability and enable the steady, slow, and size-selective release of small molecules. Moreover, the size selectivity of the microcapsules can be adjusted by changing the type of deposited MOF. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Themis controls thymocyte selection through regulation of T cell receptor-mediated signaling

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Guo; Vallée, Sébastien; Rybakin, Vasily; McGuire, Marielena V.; Ampudia, Jeanette; Brockmeyer, Claudia; Salek, Mogjiborahman; Fallen, Paul R.; Hoerter, John A.H.; Munshi, Anil; Huang, Yina H.; Hu, Jianfang; Fox, Howard S.; Sauer, Karsten; Acuto, Oreste; Gascoigne, Nicholas R.J.

    2009-01-01

    Themis (Thymocyte expressed molecule involved in selection), a member of a family of proteins with unknown functions, is highly conserved among vertebrates. Here we found that Themis is expressed in high amounts in thymocytes between the pre-T cell receptor (TCR) and positive selection checkpoints, and in low amounts in mature T cells. Themis-deficient thymocytes exhibit defective positive selection, which results in reduced numbers of mature thymocytes. Negative selection is also impaired in Themis-deficient mice. A higher percentage of Themis-deficient T cells exhibit CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ regulatory and CD62LloCD44hi memory phenotypes than in wild-type mice. Supporting a role for Themis in TCR signaling, this protein is phosphorylated quickly after TCR stimulation, and is needed for optimal TCR-driven Ca2+ mobilization and Erk activation. PMID:19597499

  4. Select plant tannins induce IL-2Ralpha up-regulation and augment cell division in gammadelta T cells.

    PubMed

    Holderness, Jeff; Jackiw, Larissa; Kimmel, Emily; Kerns, Hannah; Radke, Miranda; Hedges, Jodi F; Petrie, Charles; McCurley, Patrick; Glee, Pati M; Palecanda, Aiyappa; Jutila, Mark A

    2007-11-15

    Gammadelta T cells are innate immune cells that participate in host responses against many pathogens and cancers. Recently, phosphoantigen-based drugs, capable of expanding gammadelta T cells in vivo, entered clinical trials with the goal of enhancing innate immune system functions. Potential shortcomings of these drugs include the induction of nonresponsiveness upon repeated use and the expansion of only the Vdelta2 subset of human gammadelta T cells. Vdelta1 T cells, the major tissue subset, are unaffected by phosphoantigen agonists. Using FACS-based assays, we screened primary bovine cells for novel gammadelta T cell agonists with activities not encompassed by the current treatments in an effort to realize the full therapeutic potential of gammadelta T cells. We identified gammadelta T cell agonists derived from the condensed tannin fractions of Uncaria tomentosa (Cat's Claw) and Malus domestica (apple). Based on superior potency, the apple extract was selected for detailed analyses on human cells. The apple extract was a potent agonist for both human Vdelta1 and Vdelta2 T cells and NK cells. Additionally, the extract greatly enhanced phosphoantigen-induced gammadelta T cell expansion. Our analyses suggest that a tannin-based drug may complement the phosphoantigen-based drugs, thereby enhancing the therapeutic potential of gammadelta T cells.

  5. CD4 T Cell Help Is Limiting and Selective during the Primary B Cell Response to Influenza Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Alam, Shabnam; Knowlden, Zackery A. G.; Sangster, Mark Y.

    2014-01-01

    Influenza virus vaccination strategies are focused upon the elicitation of protective antibody responses through administration of viral protein through either inactivated virions or live attenuated virus. Often overlooked in this strategy is the CD4 T cell response: how it develops into memory, and how it may support future primary B cell responses to heterologous infection. Through the utilization of a peptide-priming regimen, this study describes a strategy for developing CD4 T cell memory with the capacity to robustly expand in the lung-draining lymph node after live influenza virus infection. Not only were frequencies of antigen-specific CD4 T cells enhanced, but these cells also supported an accelerated primary B cell response to influenza virus-derived protein, evidenced by high anti-nucleoprotein (NP) serum antibody titers early, while there is still active viral replication ongoing in the lung. NP-specific antibody-secreting cells and heightened frequencies of germinal center B cells and follicular T helper cells were also readily detectable in the draining lymph node. Surprisingly, a boosted memory CD4 T cell response was not sufficient to provide intermolecular help for antibody responses. Our study demonstrates that CD4 T cell help is selective and limiting to the primary antibody response to influenza virus infection and that preemptive priming of CD4 T cell help can promote effective and rapid conversion of naive B cells to mature antibody-secreting cells. PMID:24155379

  6. Efficient Subculture Process for Adherent Cells by Selective Collection Using Cultivation Substrate Vibration.

    PubMed

    Kurashina, Yuta; Takemura, Kenjiro; Friend, James; Miyata, Shogo; Komotori, Jun

    2017-03-01

    Cell detachment and reseeding are typical operations in cell culturing, often using trypsin exposure and pipetting, even though this process is known to damage the cells. Reducing the number of detachment and reseeding steps might consequently improve the overall quality of the culture, but to date this has not been an option. This study proposes the use of resonant vibration in the cell cultivation substrate to selectively release adherent calf chondrocyte cells: Some were released from the substrate and collected while others were left upon the substrate to grow to confluence as a subculture-without requiring reseeding. An out-of-plane vibration mode with a single nodal circle was used in the custom culture substrate. At a maximum vibration amplitude of 0.6 µm, 84.9% of the cells adhering to the substrate were released after 3 min exposure, leaving a sufficient number of cells for passage and long-term cell culture, with the greatest cell concentration along the nodal circle where the vibration was relatively quiescent. The 72-h proliferation of the unreleased cells was 20% greater in number than cells handled using the traditional method of trypsin-EDTA (0.050%) release, pipette collection, and reseeding. Due to the vibration, it was possible to reduce the trypsin-EDTA used for selective release to only 0.025%, and in doing so the cell number after 72 h of proliferation was 42% greater in number than the traditional technique.

  7. Optoelectronic simulation of GaAs solar cells with angularly selective filters

    SciTech Connect

    Kraus, Tobias Höhn, Oliver; Hauser, Hubert; Bläsi, Benedikt

    2014-02-07

    We discuss the influence of angularly selective filters on thin film gallium arsenide solar cells. For this reason, the detailed balance model was refined to fit our needs with respect to Auger recombination, reflection, transmission, and realistic absorption. For calculating real systems, an approach was made to include optical effects of angularly selective filters into electron-hole dynamic equations implemented in PC1D, a one dimensional solar cell calculation tool. With this approach, we find a relative V{sub oc} increase of 5% for an idealized 100 nm GaAs cell, including Auger recombination.

  8. Beyond Helper Phage: Using "Helper Cells" to Select Peptide Affinity Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Shou, Yulin; Schmidt, Emily N.; Paavola, Chad D.; Naranjo, Leslie; Bemdich, Sara; Swanson, Basil I.; Bradbury, Andrew R. M.; Martinez, Jennifer S.

    2016-01-01

    Peptides are important affinity ligands for microscopy, biosensing, and targeted delivery. However, because they can have low affinity for their targets, their selection from large naïve libraries can be challenging. When selecting peptidic ligands from display libraries, it is important to: 1) ensure efficient display; 2) maximize the ability to select high affinity ligands; and 3) minimize the effect of the display context on binding. The “helper cell” packaging system has been described as a tool to produce filamentous phage particles based on phagemid constructs with varying display levels, while remaining free of helper phage contamination. Here we report on the first use of this system for peptide display, including the systematic characterization and optimization of helper cells, their inefficient use in antibody display and their use in creating and selecting from a set of phage display peptide libraries. Our libraries were analyzed with unprecedented precision by standard or deep sequencing, and shown to be superior in quality than commercial gold standards. Using our helper cell libraries, we have obtained ligands recognizing Yersinia pestis surface antigen F1V and L-glutamine-binding periplasmic protein QBP. In the latter case, unlike any of the peptide library selections described so far, we used a combination of phage and yeast display to select intriguing peptide ligands. Based on the success of our selections we believe that peptide libraries obtained with helper cells are not only suitable, but preferable to traditional phage display libraries for selection of peptidic ligands. PMID:27626637

  9. Recognition-then-Reaction Enables Site-Selective Bioconjugation to Proteins on Live-Cell Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Cui, Cheng; Zhang, Hui; Wang, Ruowen; Cansiz, Sena; Pan, Xiaoshu; Wan, Shuo; Hou, Weijia; Li, Long; Chen, Meiwan; Liu, Yuan; Chen, Xigao; Liu, Qiaoling; Tan, Weihong

    2017-09-18

    Site-selective protein modification is a key step in facilitating protein functionalization and manipulation. To accomplish this, genetically engineered proteins were previously required, but the procedure was laborious, complex, and technically challenging. Herein we report the development of aptamer-based recognition-then-reaction to guide site-selective protein/DNA conjugation in a single step with outstanding selectivity and efficiency. As models, several proteins, including human thrombin, PDGF-BB, Avidin, and His-tagged recombinant protein, were studied, and the results showed excellent selectivity under mild reaction conditions. Taking advantage of aptamers as recognition elements with extraordinary selectivity and affinity, this simple preparation method can tag a protein in a complex milieu. Thus, with the aptamer obtained from cell-SELEX, real-time modification of live-cell membrane proteins can be achieved in one step without any pre-treatment. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Selective, rapid and optically switchable regulation of protein function in live mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Yu-Hsuan; Essig, Sebastian; James, John R; Lang, Kathrin; Chin, Jason W

    2015-07-01

    The rapid and selective regulation of a target protein within living cells that contain closely related family members is an outstanding challenge. Here we introduce genetically directed bioorthogonal ligand tethering (BOLT) and demonstrate selective inhibition (iBOLT) of protein function. In iBOLT, inhibitor-conjugate/target protein pairs are created where the target protein contains a genetically encoded unnatural amino acid with bioorthogonal reactivity and the inhibitor conjugate contains a complementary bioorthogonal group. iBOLT enables the first rapid and specific inhibition of MEK isozymes, and introducing photoisomerizable linkers in the inhibitor conjugate enables reversible, optical regulation of protein activity (photo-BOLT) in live mammalian cells. We demonstrate that a pan kinase inhibitor conjugate allows selective and rapid inhibition of the lymphocyte specific kinase, indicating the modularity and scalability of BOLT. We anticipate that BOLT will enable the rapid and selective regulation of diverse proteins for which no selective small-molecule ligands exist.

  11. Identification of HDAC6-Selective Inhibitors of Low Cancer Cell Cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Gaisina, Irina N; Tueckmantel, Werner; Ugolkov, Andrey; Shen, Sida; Hoffen, Jessica; Dubrovskyi, Oleksii; Mazar, Andrew; Schoon, Renee A; Billadeau, Daniel; Kozikowski, Alan P

    2016-01-05

    The histone deacetylases (HDACs) occur in 11 different isoforms, and these enzymes regulate the activity of a large number of proteins involved in cancer initiation and progression. The discovery of isoform-selective HDAC inhibitors (HDACIs) is desirable, as it is likely that such compounds would avoid some of the undesirable side effects found with the first-generation inhibitors. A series of HDACIs previously reported by us were found to display some selectivity for HDAC6 and to induce cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis in pancreatic cancer cells. In the present work, we show that structural modification of these isoxazole-based inhibitors leads to high potency and selectivity for HDAC6 over HDAC1-3 and HDAC10, while unexpectedly abolishing their ability to block cell growth. Three inhibitors with lower HDAC6 selectivity inhibit the growth of cell lines BxPC3 and L3.6pl, and they only induce apoptosis in L3.6pl cells. We conclude that HDAC6 inhibition alone is insufficient for disruption of cell growth, and that some degree of class 1 HDAC inhibition is required. Moreover, the highly selective HDAC6Is reported herein that are weakly cytotoxic may find use in cancer immune system reactivation.

  12. Optimized selection of anti-tumor recombinant antibodies from phage libraries on intact cells.

    PubMed

    Pavoni, Emiliano; Vaccaro, Paola; Anastasi, Anna Maria; Minenkova, Olga

    2014-02-01

    Generation of human recombinant antibody libraries displayed on the surface of the filamentous phage and selection of specific antibodies against desirable targets allows production of fully human antibodies usable for repeated administration in humans. Various lymphoid tissues from immunized donors, such as lymph nodes or peripheral blood lymphocytes from individuals with tumor or lymphocytes infiltrating tumor masses may serve as a source of specific anti-tumor antibody repertoire for generation of tumor-focused phage display libraries. In the case of lack of tumor-associated antigens in the purified form, high affinity anti-tumor antibodies can be isolated through library panning on whole cells expressing these antigens. However, affinity selection against cell surface specific antigens within highly heterogeneous population of molecules is not a very efficient process that often results in the selection of unspecific antibodies or antibodies against intracellular antigens that are generally useless for targeted immunotherapy. In this work, we developed a new cell-based antibody selection protocol that, by eliminating the contamination of dead cells from the cell suspension, dramatically improves the selection frequency of anti-tumor antibodies recognizing cell surface antigens.

  13. 4-Pyridylanilinothiazoles that selectively target von Hippel-Lindau deficient Renal Cell Carcinoma cells by inducing autophagic cell death

    PubMed Central

    Hay, Michael P.; Turcotte, Sandra; Flanagan, Jack U.; Bonnet, Muriel; Chan, Denise A.; Sutphin, Patrick D.; Nguyen, Phuong; Giaccia, Amato J.; Denny, William A.

    2009-01-01

    Renal cell carcinomas (RCC) are refractory to standard therapy with advanced RCC having a poor prognosis; consequently treatment of advanced RCC represents an unmet clinical need. The von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) tumor suppressor gene is mutated or inactivated in a majority of RCCs. We recently identified a 4-pyridyl-2- anilinothiazole (PAT) with selective cytotoxicity against VHL-deficient renal cells mediated by induction of autophagy and increased acidification of autolysosomes. We report exploration of structure-activity relationships (SAR) around this PAT lead. Analogues with substituents on each of the three rings, and various linkers between rings, were synthesized and tested in vitro using paired RCC4 cell lines. A contour map describing the relative spatial contributions of different chemical features to potency illustrate a region, adjacent to the pyridyl ring, with potential for further development. Examples probing this domain validated this approach and may provide the opportunity to develop this novel chemotype as a targeted approach to the treatment of RCC. PMID:19994864

  14. Selective retinal ganglion cell loss in familial dysautonomia.

    PubMed

    Mendoza-Santiesteban, Carlos E; Hedges Iii, Thomas R; Norcliffe-Kaufmann, Lucy; Axelrod, Felicia; Kaufmann, Horacio

    2014-04-01

    To define the retinal phenotype of subjects with familial dysautonomia (FD). A cross-sectional study was carried out in 90 subjects divided in three groups of 30 each (FD subjects, asymptomatic carriers and controls). The study was developed at the Dysautonomia Center, New York University Medical Center. All subjects underwent spectral domain optical coherence tomography (OCT) and full neuro-ophthalmic examinations. In a subset of affected subjects, visual evoked potentials and microperimetry were also obtained. We compared the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness from OCT between the three groups. OCT showed loss of the RNFL in all FD subjects predominantly in the maculopapillary region (63 % temporally, p < 0.0001; and 21 % nasally, p < 0.005). RNFL loss was greatest in older FD subjects and was associated with decreased visual acuity and color vision, central visual field defects, temporal optic nerve pallor, and delayed visual evoked potentials. Asymptomatic carriers of the FD gene mutation all had thinner RNFL (12 % globally, p < 0.005). OCT and clinical neuro-ophthalmological findings suggest that maculopapillary ganglion cells are primarily affected in FD subjects, leading to a specific optic nerve damage that closely resembles mitochondrial optic neuropathies. This raises the possibility that reduced IKAP levels may affect mitochondrial proteins and their function in the nervous system, particularly in the retina.

  15. Sam68 Offers Selectively Aimed Modulation of Transcription in Cancer Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Fu, Kai; Wan, Fengyi

    2017-07-20

    In this issue of Cell Chemical Biology,Benoit et al. (2017) report the selective targeting of cancer stem cells (CSCs) by the ICG-001/CWP family of molecules. Their findings reveal that Sam68 is a transcriptional modulator uniquely required for the dysregulated Wnt/β-catenin signaling in CSCs over healthy stem cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Evodiamine selectively targets cancer stem-like cells through the p53-p21-Rb pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Seula; Woo, Jong Kyu; Jung, Yuchae; Jeong, Dawoon; Kang, Minsook; Yoo, Young-Ji; Lee, Hani; Oh, Seung Hyun; Ryu, Jae-Ha; Kim, Woo-Young

    2016-01-22

    In spite of the recent improvements, the resistance to chemotherapy/radiotherapy followed by relapse is the main hurdle for the successful treatment of breast cancer, a leading cause of death in women. A small population of breast cancer cells that have stem-like characteristics (cancer stem-like cells; CSLC) may contribute to this resistance and relapse. Here, we report on a component of a traditional Chinese medicine, evodiamine, which selectively targets CSLC of breast cancer cell lines MCF7 and MDAMB 231 at a concentration that does show a little or no cytotoxic effect on bulk cancer cells. While evodiamine caused the accumulation of bulk cancer cells at the G2/M phase, it did not hold CSLC in a specific cell cycle phase but instead, selectively killed CSLC. This was not due to the culture of CSLC in suspension or without FBS. A proteomic analysis and western blotting revealed that evodiamine changed the expression of cell cycle regulating molecules more efficiently in CSLC cells than in bulk cancer cells. Surprisingly, evodiamine selectively activated p53 and p21 and decreased inactive Rb, the master molecules in G1/S checkpoint. These data collectively suggest a novel mechanism involving CSLC-specific targeting by evodiamine and its possible use to the therapy of breast cancer. - Highlights: • Evodiamine selectively kills breast cancer stem like cells at G1 phase. • Evodiamine utilizes different mechanism of cell cycle modulation in CSLC and in bulk cancer cells. • Evodiamine activate the p53, p21 and Rb pathway.

  17. High-speed photodamage cell selection using a frequency-doubled argon ion laser.

    PubMed

    Keij, J F; Groenewegen, A C; Dubelaar, G B; Visser, J W

    1995-03-01

    A flow cytometer was developed for the high-speed "sorting" of desired cells by selectively irradiating (zapping) the undesired cells from a population. After previous efforts to photoinactivate cells with photosensitizers had failed, it was decided to exploit the photosensitivity of the cell's DNA at 257 nm. It was shown that a 257 nm laser output power of 20-100 mW was sufficient to induce a 4.5 log cell kill after the cells were processed through a focused 257 nm laser beam. Experiments proved that the photodamage flow cytometer (ZAPPER) could selectively photoinactivate cells at rates over 22,000 events/s, and selection purities ranged from 81% to 100%. The yields of the desired cells depended on the selection mode. In the Enrichment mode, the zap laser was not aimed at the jet, and only undesired cells were exposed to a brief ultraviolet (UV) pulse after modulation of the UV laser beam. The yields of desired cells ranged from 95% to 105%. In the Purge mode, the zap laser beam was aimed onto the jet, and only desired cells were allowed to pass after deflection of the UV laser beam; the yields of desired cells ranged from 12% to 52%. The cause of the reduced yields in the PURGE mode was traced to the fact that the Electro-Optic Modulator was used to modulate the zap laser proved too slow for the intended application. The lifetime of the frequency-doubling crystal used for the generation of the 257 nm beam was found to be limited to several days.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  18. Frequency-selective exocytosis by ribbon synapses of hair cells in the bullfrog's amphibian papilla

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Suchit H.; Salvi, Joshua D.; Maoiléidigh, Dáibhid Ó; Hudspeth, A. J.

    2012-01-01

    The activity of auditory afferent fibers depends strongly on the frequency of stimulation. Although the bullfrog's amphibian papilla lacks the flexible basilar membrane that effects tuning in mammals, its afferents display comparable frequency selectivity. Seeking additional mechanisms of tuning in this organ, we monitored the synaptic output of hair cells by measuring changes in their membrane capacitance during sinusoidal electrical stimulation at various frequencies. Using perforated-patch recordings, we found that individual hair cells displayed frequency selectivity in synaptic exocytosis within the frequency range sensed by the amphibian papilla. Moreover, each cell's tuning varied in accordance with its tonotopic position. Using confocal imaging, we observed a tonotopic gradient in the concentration of proteinaceous Ca2+ buffers. A model for synaptic release suggests that this gradient maintains the sharpness of tuning. We conclude that hair cells of the amphibian papilla use synaptic tuning as an additional mechanism for sharpening their frequency selectivity. PMID:23015434

  19. Receptor-selective retinoids inhibit the growth of normal and malignant breast cells by inducing G1 cell cycle blockade.

    PubMed

    Wu, Kendall; DuPré, Elizabeth; Kim, Heetae; Tin-U, Caesar K; Bissonnette, Reid P; Lamph, William W; Brown, Powel H

    2006-03-01

    Despite advances in treatment, breast cancer continues to be the second leading cause of cancer mortality in women. Statistics suggest that while focus on treatment should continue, chemopreventive approaches should also be pursued. Previous studies have demonstrated that naturally occurring retinoids such as 9-cis retinoic acid (9cRA) can prevent breast cancer in animal models. However, these studies have also shown that these compounds are too toxic for general use. Work from our laboratory showed that an RXR-selective retinoid LGD1069 prevented tumor development in animal models of cancer with reduced toxicity as compared to an RAR-selective retinoid TTNPB. In the present study, we investigated the mechanisms by which receptor-selective retinoids inhibit the growth of normal and malignant breast cells. Our results demonstrate that the synthetic retinoids tested are as effective as 9cRA in suppressing the growth of normal human mammary epithelial cells (HMECs) and estrogen receptor-positive (ER-positive) breast cancer cells. Although the receptor-selective retinoids induce minimal amounts of apoptosis in T47D breast cancer cells, the predominant factor that leads to growth arrest is G1 cell cycle blockade. Our data indicate that this blockade results from the downregulation of Cyclin D1 and Cyclin D3, which in turn causes Rb hypophosphorylation. Non-toxic retinoids that are potent inducers of cell cycle arrest may be particularly useful for the prevention of breast cancer.

  20. Selective killing of cancer cells by Ashwagandha leaf extract and its component Withanone involves ROS signaling.

    PubMed

    Widodo, Nashi; Priyandoko, Didik; Shah, Navjot; Wadhwa, Renu; Kaul, Sunil C

    2010-10-21

    Ashwagandha is a popular Ayurvedic herb used in Indian traditional home medicine. It has been assigned a variety of health-promoting effects of which the mechanisms remain unknown. We previously reported the selective killing of cancer cells by leaf extract of Ashwagandha (i-Extract) and its purified component Withanone. In the present study, we investigated its mechanism by loss-of-function screening (abrogation of i-Extract induced cancer cell killing) of the cellular targets and gene pathways. Randomized ribozyme library was introduced into cancer cells prior to the treatment with i-Extract. Ribozymes were recovered from cells that survived the i-Extract treatment. Gene targets of the selected ribozymes (as predicted by database search) were analyzed by bioinformatics and pathway analyses. The targets were validated for their role in i-Extract induced selective killing of cancer cells by biochemical and molecular assays. Fifteen gene-targets were identified and were investigated for their role in specific cancer cell killing activity of i-Extract and its two major components (Withaferin A and Withanone) by undertaking the shRNA-mediated gene silencing approach. Bioinformatics on the selected gene-targets revealed the involvement of p53, apoptosis and insulin/IGF signaling pathways linked to the ROS signaling. We examined the involvement of ROS-signaling components (ROS levels, DNA damage, mitochondrial structure and membrane potential) and demonstrate that the selective killing of cancer cells is mediated by induction of oxidative stress. Ashwagandha leaf extract and Withanone cause selective killing of cancer cells by induction of ROS-signaling and hence are potential reagents that could be recruited for ROS-mediated cancer chemotherapy.

  1. Selective Killing of Cancer Cells by Ashwagandha Leaf Extract and Its Component Withanone Involves ROS Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Widodo, Nashi; Priyandoko, Didik; Shah, Navjot; Wadhwa, Renu; Kaul, Sunil C.

    2010-01-01

    Background and Purpose Ashwagandha is a popular Ayurvedic herb used in Indian traditional home medicine. It has been assigned a variety of health-promoting effects of which the mechanisms remain unknown. We previously reported the selective killing of cancer cells by leaf extract of Ashwagandha (i-Extract) and its purified component Withanone. In the present study, we investigated its mechanism by loss-of-function screening (abrogation of i-Extract induced cancer cell killing) of the cellular targets and gene pathways. Methodology/Principal Findings Randomized ribozyme library was introduced into cancer cells prior to the treatment with i-Extract. Ribozymes were recovered from cells that survived the i-Extract treatment. Gene targets of the selected ribozymes (as predicted by database search) were analyzed by bioinformatics and pathway analyses. The targets were validated for their role in i-Extract induced selective killing of cancer cells by biochemical and molecular assays. Fifteen gene-targets were identified and were investigated for their role in specific cancer cell killing activity of i-Extract and its two major components (Withaferin A and Withanone) by undertaking the shRNA-mediated gene silencing approach. Bioinformatics on the selected gene-targets revealed the involvement of p53, apoptosis and insulin/IGF signaling pathways linked to the ROS signaling. We examined the involvement of ROS-signaling components (ROS levels, DNA damage, mitochondrial structure and membrane potential) and demonstrate that the selective killing of cancer cells is mediated by induction of oxidative stress. Conclusion Ashwagandha leaf extract and Withanone cause selective killing of cancer cells by induction of ROS-signaling and hence are potential reagents that could be recruited for ROS-mediated cancer chemotherapy. PMID:20975835

  2. A cost effective 5΄ selective single cell transcriptome profiling approach with improved UMI design

    PubMed Central

    Arguel, Marie-Jeanne; LeBrigand, Kevin; Paquet, Agnès; Ruiz García, Sandra; Zaragosi, Laure-Emmanuelle; Waldmann, Rainer

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Single cell RNA sequencing approaches are instrumental in studies of cell-to-cell variability. 5΄ selective transcriptome profiling approaches allow simultaneous definition of the transcription start size and have advantages over 3΄ selective approaches which just provide internal sequences close to the 3΄ end. The only currently existing 5΄ selective approach requires costly and labor intensive fragmentation and cell barcoding after cDNA amplification. We developed an optimized 5΄ selective workflow where all the cell indexing is done prior to fragmentation. With our protocol, cell indexing can be performed in the Fluidigm C1 microfluidic device, resulting in a significant reduction of cost and labor. We also designed optimized unique molecular identifiers that show less sequence bias and vulnerability towards sequencing errors resulting in an improved accuracy of molecule counting. We provide comprehensive experimental workflows for Illumina and Ion Proton sequencers that allow single cell sequencing in a cost range comparable to qPCR assays. PMID:27940562

  3. Enhanced progenitor cell recruitment and endothelial repair after selective endothelial injury of the mouse kidney.

    PubMed

    Hohenstein, Bernd; Kuo, Mei-Chuan; Addabbo, Francesco; Yasuda, Kaoru; Ratliff, Brian; Schwarzenberger, Claudia; Eckardt, Kai-Uwe; Hugo, Christian P M; Goligorsky, Michael S

    2010-06-01

    Primary and/or secondary injury of the renal microvascular endothelium is a common finding in various renal diseases. Besides well-known endothelial repair mechanisms, including endothelial cell (EC) proliferation and migration, homing of extrinsic cells such as endothelial progenitor cells (EPC) and hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) has been shown in various organs and may contribute to microvascular repair. However, these mechanisms have so far not been studied after selective microvascular injury in the kidney. The present study investigated the time course of EPC and HSC stimulation and homing following induction of selective EC injury in the mouse kidney along with various angiogenic factors potentially involved in EC repair and progenitor cell stimulation. Erythropoietin was used to stimulate progenitor cells in a therapeutic approach. We found that selective EC injury leads to a marked stimulation of EPCs, HSCs, and various angiogenic factors to orchestrate microvascular repair. Angiogenic factors started to increase as early as 30 min after disease induction. Progenitor cells could be first detected in the circulation and the spleen before they selectively homed to the diseased kidney. Injection of a high dose of erythropoietin 2 h after disease induction markedly attenuated vascular injury through nonhemodynamic mechanisms, possibly involving vascular endothelial growth factor release.

  4. Embryonic stem cells can be used to construct hybrid cell lines containing a single, selectable murine chromosome.

    PubMed

    Jakobs, P M; Smith, L; Thayer, M; Grompe, M

    1999-04-01

    Microcell-mediated chromosome transfer is a useful technique for the study of gene function, gene regulation, gene mapping, and functional cloning in mammalian cells. Complete panels of donor cell lines, each containing a different human chromosome, have been developed. These donor cell lines contain a single human chromosome marked with a dominant selectable gene in a rodent cell background. However, a similar panel does not exist for murine chromosomes. To produce mouse monochromosomal donor hybrids, we have utilized embryonic stem (ES) cells with targeted gene disruptions of known chromosomal location as starting material. ES cells with mutations in aprt, fyn, and myc were utilized to generate monochromosomal hybrids with neomycin phosphotransferase-marked murine Chr 8, 10, or 15 respectively in a hamster or rat background. This same methodology can be used to generate a complete panel of marked mouse chromosomes for somatic cell genetic experimentaion.

  5. Selection and expansion of natural killer cells for NK cell-based immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Becker, Petra S A; Suck, Garnet; Nowakowska, Paulina; Ullrich, Evelyn; Seifried, Erhard; Bader, Peter; Tonn, Torsten; Seidl, Christian

    2016-04-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells have been used in several clinical trials as adaptive immunotherapy. The low numbers of these cells in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) have resulted in various approaches to preferentially expand primary NK cells from PBMC. While some clinical trials have used the addition of interleukin 2 (IL-2) to co-stimulate the expansion of purified NK cells from allogeneic donors, recent studies have shown promising results in achieving in vitro expansion of NK cells to large numbers for adoptive immunotherapy. NK cell expansion requires multiple cell signals for survival, proliferation and activation. Thus, expansion strategies have been focused either to substitute these factors using autologous feeder cells or to use genetically modified allogeneic feeder cells. Recent developments in the clinical use of genetically modified NK cell lines with chimeric antigen receptors, the development of expansion protocols for the clinical use of NK cell from human embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells are challenging improvements for NK cell-based immunotherapy. Transfer of several of these protocols to clinical-grade production of NK cells necessitates adaptation of good manufacturing practice conditions, and the development of freezing conditions to establish NK cell stocks will require some effort and, however, should enhance the therapeutic options of NK cells in clinical medicine.

  6. Optofluidic Cell Selection from Complex Microbial Communities for Single-Genome Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Landry, Zachary C.; Giovanonni, Stephen J.; Quake, Stephen R.; Blainey, Paul C.

    2013-01-01

    Genetic analysis of single cells is emerging as a powerful approach for studies of heterogeneous cell populations. Indeed, the notion of homogeneous cell populations is receding as approaches to resolve genetic and phenotypic variation between single cells are applied throughout the life sciences. A key step in single-cell genomic analysis today is the physical isolation of individual cells from heterogeneous populations, particularly microbial populations, which often exhibit high diversity. Here, we detail the construction and use of instrumentation for optical trapping inside microfluidic devices to select individual cells for analysis by methods including nucleic acid sequencing. This approach has unique advantages for analyses of rare community members, cells with irregular morphologies, small quantity samples, and studies that employ advanced optical microscopy. PMID:24060116

  7. Salvianolic acid A shows selective cytotoxicity against multidrug-resistant MCF-7 breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin; Wang, Chunyan; Zhang, Longjiang; Li, Yanjun; Wang, Shouju; Wang, Jiandong; Yuan, Caiyun; Niu, Jia; Wang, Chengsheng; Lu, Guangming

    2015-02-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is a major cause for incurable breast cancer. Salvianolic acid A (SAA), the hydrophilic polyphenolic derivative of Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge (Danshen/Red Sage), was examined for cytotoxicities to MDR MCF-7 human breast cancer cells and their parental counterparts. We have shown that SAA inhibited proliferation, caused cell cycle arrest at the S phase, and induced apoptosis dose dependently to the two kinds of cancer cells. However, the resistant cells were significantly susceptible to the inhibition of SAA compared with the parental cells. SAA increased the level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by 6.2-fold in the resistant cells, whereas the level of SAA-induced ROS changed only by 1.6-fold in their parental counterparts. Thus, the data showed that the selective cytotoxicity resulted from the hypersensitivity of the resistant cells to the strongly elevated ROS by SAA. In addition, SAA-triggered apoptosis was associated with increased caspase-3 activity, disrupted mitochondrial membrane potential, downregulated Bcl-2 expression, and upregulated Bax expression in the resistant cells. Moreover, SAA downregulated the level of P-glycoprotein, which was overexpressed in the resistant cells. This indicated that SAA modulated MDR. Furthermore, SAA showed higher antitumor activity than did doxorubicin in xenografts established from the resistant cells. The present work raised a possibility that SAA might be considered a potential choice to overcome MDR for the selective susceptibility of the resistant breast cancer cells to SAA treatment.

  8. Reference gene selection for in vitro cell-free DNA analysis and gene expression profiling.

    PubMed

    Bronkhorst, Abel Jacobus; Aucamp, Janine; Wentzel, Johannes F; Pretorius, Piet J

    2016-05-01

    (i) To optimize cell-free DNA (cfDNA) and mRNA quantification using eight housekeeping genes (HKGs), (ii) to determine if there is a difference in the occurrence of HKGs in the cfDNA and mRNA of normal cells and cancer cells, and (iii) to investigate whether there is some selectivity involved in the release of cfDNA. cfDNA was isolated directly from the growth medium of 3 cultured cancer cell lines and one non-malignant, primary cell line. At the same time interval, mRNA was isolated from these cells and cDNA was synthesized. CfDNA and cDNA were then amplified with real-time PCR utilizing eight different HKGs. For all cell lines tested, Beta-actin (ACTB) is the most appropriate HKG to use as a control for cfDNA and mRNA quantification. There was no clear difference in the occurrence of HKGs between cancer cells and healthy cells. Lastly, there is a consistent and distinct difference between the mRNA expression and cfDNA of all cell lines. This study reveals a new candidate HKG for a robust control in cfDNA analysis and gene expression profiling, and should be considered for optimal analysis. Furthermore, results indicate that cfDNA is selectively released from cells into culture medium. Copyright © 2016 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Endocytic pathways involved in PLGA nanoparticle uptake by grapevine cells and role of cell wall and membrane in size selection.

    PubMed

    Palocci, Cleofe; Valletta, Alessio; Chronopoulou, Laura; Donati, Livia; Bramosanti, Marco; Brasili, Elisa; Baldan, Barbara; Pasqua, Gabriella

    2017-09-14

    PLGA NPs' cell uptake involves different endocytic pathways. Clathrin-independent endocytosis is the main internalization route. The cell wall plays a more prominent role than the plasma membrane in NPs' size selection. In the last years, many studies on absorption and cell uptake of nanoparticles by plants have been conducted, but the understanding of the internalization mechanisms is still largely unknown. In this study, polydispersed and monodispersed poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid nanoparticles (PLGA NPs) were synthesized, and a strategy combining the use of transmission electron microscopy (TEM), confocal analysis, fluorescently labeled PLGA NPs, a probe for endocytic vesicles (FM4-64), and endocytosis inhibitors (i.e., wortmannin, ikarugamycin, and salicylic acid) was employed to shed light on PLGA NP cell uptake in grapevine cultured cells and to assess the role of the cell wall and plasma membrane in size selection of PLGA NPs. The ability of PLGA NPs to cross the cell wall and membrane was confirmed by TEM and fluorescence microscopy. A strong adhesion of PLGA NPs to the outer side of the cell wall was observed, presumably due to electrostatic interactions. Confocal microscopy and treatment with endocytosis inhibitors suggested the involvement of both clathrin-dependent and clathrin-independent endocytosis in cell uptake of PLGA NPs and the latter appeared to be the main internalization pathway. Experiments on grapevine protoplasts revealed that the cell wall plays a more prominent role than the plasma membrane in size selection of PLGA NPs. While the cell wall prevents the uptake of PLGA NPs with diameters over 50 nm, the plasma membrane can be crossed by PLGA NPs with a diameter of 500-600 nm.

  10. Engineering a growth sensor to select intracellular antibodies in the cytosol of mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Thuy Duong; Takasuka, Hitoshi; Kaku, Yoshihiro; Inoue, Satoshi; Nagamune, Teruyuki; Kawahara, Masahiro

    2017-03-16

    Intracellular antibodies (intrabodies) are expected to function as therapeutics as well as tools for elucidating in vivo function of proteins. In this study, we propose a novel intrabody selection method in the cytosol of mammalian cells by utilizing a growth signal, induced by the interaction of the target antigen and an scFv-c-kit growth sensor. Here, we challenge this method to select specific intrabodies against rabies virus nucleoprotein (RV-N) for the first time. As a result, we successfully select antigen-specific intrabodies from a naïve synthetic library using phage panning followed by our growth sensor-based intracellular selection method, demonstrating the feasibility of the method. Additionally, we succeed in improving the response of the growth sensor by re-engineering the linker region of its construction. Collectively, the described selection method utilizing a growth sensor may become a highly efficient platform for selection of functional intrabodies in the future.

  11. The endoplasmic reticulum is partitioned asymmetrically during mitosis before cell fate selection in proneuronal cells in the early Drosophila embryo

    PubMed Central

    Eritano, Anthony S.; Altamirano, Arturo; Beyeler, Sarah; Gaytan, Norma; Velasquez, Mark; Riggs, Blake

    2017-01-01

    Asymmetric cell division is the primary mechanism to generate cellular diversity, and it relies on the correct partitioning of cell fate determinants. However, the mechanism by which these determinants are delivered and positioned is poorly understood, and the upstream signal to initiate asymmetric cell division is unknown. Here we report that the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is asymmetrically partitioned during mitosis in epithelial cells just before delamination and selection of a proneural cell fate in the early Drosophila embryo. At the start of gastrulation, the ER divides asymmetrically into a population of asynchronously dividing cells at the anterior end of the embryo. We found that this asymmetric division of the ER depends on the highly conserved ER membrane protein Jagunal (Jagn). RNA inhibition of jagn just before the start of gastrulation disrupts this asymmetric division of the ER. In addition, jagn-deficient embryos display defects in apical-basal spindle orientation in delaminated embryonic neuroblasts. Our results describe a model in which an organelle is partitioned asymmetrically in an otherwise symmetrically dividing cell population just upstream of cell fate determination and updates previous models of spindle-based selection of cell fate during mitosis. PMID:28381427

  12. Lysophosphatidic acid induces cell migration through the selective activation of Akt1

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun Kyoung; Yun, Sung Ji; Do, Kee Hun; Kim, Min Sung; Cho, Mong; Suh, Dong-Soo; Kim, Chi Dae; Kim, Jae Ho; Birnbaum, Morris J.

    2008-01-01

    Akt plays pivotal roles in many physiological responses including growth, proliferation, survival, metabolism, and migration. In the current studies, we have evaluated the isoform-specific role of akt in lysophosphatidic acid (LPA)-induced cell migration. Ascites from ovarian cancer patients (AOCP) induced mouse embryo fibroblast (MEF) cell migration in a dose-dependent manner. On the other hand, ascites from liver cirrhosis patients (ALCP) did not induce MEF cell migration. AOCP-induced MEF cell migration was completely blocked by pre-treatment of cells with LPA receptor antagonist, Ki16425. Both LPA- and AOCP-induced MEF cell migration was completely attenuated by PI3K inhibitor, LY294002. Furthermore, cells lacking Akt1 displayed defect in LPA-induced cell migration. Re-expression of Akt1 in DKO (Akt1-/-Akt2-/-) cells restored LPA-induced cell migration, whereas re-expression of Akt2 in DKO cells could not restore the LPA-induced cell migration. Finally, Akt1 was selectively phosphorylated by LPA and AOCP stimulation. These results suggest that LPA is a major factor responsible for AOCP-induced cell migration and signaling specificity of Akt1 may dictate LPA-induced cell migration. PMID:18779657

  13. Selective cytotoxicity of indirect nonequilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma against ovarian clear-cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Utsumi, Fumi; Kajiyama, Hiroaki; Nakamura, Kae; Tanaka, Hiromasa; Hori, Masaru; Kikkawa, Fumitaka

    2014-01-01

    Ovarian clear cell carcinoma (CCC) is a histological type of epithelial ovarian cancer that is less responsive to chemotherapy and associated with a poorer prognosis than serous and endometrioid carcinoma. Non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma which produces reactive species has recently led to an explosion of research in plasma medicine. Plasma treatment can be applied to cancer treatment to induce apoptosis and tumor growth arrest. Furthermore, recent studies have shown that a medium exposed to plasma also has an anti-proliferative effect against cancer in the absence of direct exposure to plasma. In this study, we confirmed whether this indirect plasma has an anti-tumor effect against CCC, and investigated whether this efficacy is selective for cancer cells. Non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma induced apoptosis in CCC cells, while human peritoneal mesothelial cells remained viable. Non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma exhibits selective cytotoxicity against CCC cells which are resistant to chemotherapy.

  14. Designing the nanobiointerface of fluorescent nanodiamonds: highly selective targeting of glioma cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slegerova, Jitka; Hajek, Miroslav; Rehor, Ivan; Sedlak, Frantisek; Stursa, Jan; Hruby, Martin; Cigler, Petr

    2014-12-01

    Core-shell nanoparticles based on fluorescent nanodiamonds coated with a biocompatible N-(2-hydroxypropyl)methacrylamide copolymer shell were developed for background-free near-infrared imaging of cancer cells. The particles showed excellent colloidal stability in buffers and culture media. After conjugation with a cyclic RGD peptide they selectively targeted integrin αvβ3 receptors on glioblastoma cells with high internalization efficacy.Core-shell nanoparticles based on fluorescent nanodiamonds coated with a biocompatible N-(2-hydroxypropyl)methacrylamide copolymer shell were developed for background-free near-infrared imaging of cancer cells. The particles showed excellent colloidal stability in buffers and culture media. After conjugation with a cyclic RGD peptide they selectively targeted integrin αvβ3 receptors on glioblastoma cells with high internalization efficacy. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Materials and methods, colloidal stability studies and cell viability studies. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr02776k

  15. What makes a cell face-selective: the importance of contrast

    PubMed Central

    Ohayon, Shay; Freiwald, Winrich A; Tsao, Doris Y

    2012-01-01

    Summary Faces are robustly detected by computer vision algorithms that search for characteristic coarse contrast features. Here, we investigated whether face-selective cells in the primate brain exploit contrast features as well. We recorded from face-selective neurons in macaque inferotemporal cortex, while presenting a face-like collage of regions whose luminances were changed randomly. Modulating contrast combinations between regions induced activity changes ranging from no response to a response greater than that to a real face in 50% of cells. The critical stimulus factor determining response magnitude was contrast polarity, e.g., nose region brighter than left eye. Contrast polarity preferences were consistent across cells, suggesting a common computational strategy across the population, and matched features used by computer vision algorithms for face detection. Furthermore, most cells were tuned both for contrast polarity and for the geometry of facial features, suggesting cells encode information useful both for detection and recognition. PMID:22578507

  16. Fluorouracil selectively enriches stem-like cells in the lung adenocarcinoma cell line SPC.

    PubMed

    Shi, Mu-mu; Xiong, Yan-lei; Jia, Xin-shan; Li, Xin; Zhang, Li; Li, Xiao-lei; Wang, En-Hua

    2013-06-01

    Most adult stem cells are in the G0 or quiescent phase of the cell cycle and account for only a small percentage of the cells in the tissue. Thus, isolation of stem cells from tissues for further study represents a major challenge. This study sought to enrich cancer stem cells and explore cancer stem-like cell clones using 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) in the lung adenocarcinoma cell line, SPC. Proliferation inhibition was analyzed using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assays, according to which half maximal inhibitory concentration values were calculated. Expression levels of stem cell markers after treatment with 5-FU were examined using immunofluorescence and Western blotting. Additionally, side population (SP) cells were sorted using FACS. Properties of SP cells were evaluated by using Transwell, colony-forming assays, and tumor formation experiments. 5-FU greatly inhibits proliferation, especially of cells in S phase. SP cells possess greater invasive potential, higher clone-forming potential, and greater tumor-forming ability than non-SP cells. Treatment with 5-FU enriches the SP cells with stem cell properties in human lung adenocarcinoma cell lines.

  17. Selective graft-versus-leukemia depends on magnitude and diversity of the alloreactive T cell response

    PubMed Central

    van Luxemburg-Heijs, Simone A.P.; de Wreede, Liesbeth C.; Eefting, Matthijs; von dem Borne, Peter A.; van Balen, Peter; Mulder, Arend; Claas, Fransiscus H.J.; Navarrete, Marcelo A.; Honders, Wilhelmina M.; Rutten, Caroline E.; Veelken, Hendrik; Jedema, Inge; Halkes, Constantijn J.M.; Griffioen, Marieke; Falkenburg, J.H. Frederik

    2017-01-01

    Patients with leukemia who receive a T cell–depleted allogeneic stem cell graft followed by postponed donor lymphocyte infusion (DLI) can experience graft-versus-leukemia (GVL) reactivity, with a lower risk of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). Here, we have investigated the magnitude, diversity, and specificity of alloreactive CD8 T cells in patients who developed GVL reactivity after DLI in the absence or presence of GVHD. We observed a lower magnitude and diversity of CD8 T cells for minor histocompatibility antigens (MiHAs) in patients with selective GVL reactivity without GVHD. Furthermore, we demonstrated that MiHA-specific T cell clones from patients with selective GVL reactivity showed lower reactivity against nonhematopoietic cells, even when pretreated with inflammatory cytokines. Expression analysis of MiHA-encoding genes showed that similar types of antigens were recognized in both patient groups, but in patients who developed GVHD, T cell reactivity was skewed to target broadly expressed MiHAs. As an inflammatory environment can render nonhematopoietic cells susceptible to T cell recognition, prevention of such circumstances favors induction of selective GVL reactivity without development of GVHD. PMID:28067665

  18. Selection for Hyoscyamine and Cinnamoyl Putrescine Overproduction in Cell and Root Cultures of Hyoscyamus muticus.

    PubMed

    Medina-Bolivar, F.; Flores, H. E.

    1995-08-01

    Hairy root cultures of Hyoscyamus muticus have been shown to produce stable levels of tropane alkaloids comparable to those found in whole plants. In contrast, cell cultures of this and other solanaceous species produce only trace amounts of alkaloids but can be used for selection of metabolic variants. We have taken advantage of both systems and the ability to convert between them in vitro in an effort to select for increased production of the tropane alkaloid hyoscyamine. Hairy roots were converted into cell suspensions by addition of 1 mg/L 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid to Murashige-Skoog medium (T. Murashige and F. Skoog [1962] Physiol Plant 15: 473-497) and screened for resistance to the amino acid analog p-fluorophenylalanine (PFP). Cells that could grow in media containing 400 [mu]M PFP were selected and cloned from single cells. The resistant cells accumulated high levels of cinnamoyl putrescines, which share the same biosynthetic precursors as hyoscyamine. Hairy root cultures were regenerated from both PFP-sensitive and PFP-resistant cells by removing 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid from the medium. Resistance to PFP continued to be expressed in regenerated roots. Higher levels of hyoscyamine were found in hairy roots regenerated from PFP-resistant cells than were found in controls. We suggest that the precursors overproduced by the PFP-resistant cells can be diverted into the hyoscyamine pathway upon the regeneration of root cultures.

  19. Selection for Hyoscyamine and Cinnamoyl Putrescine Overproduction in Cell and Root Cultures of Hyoscyamus muticus.

    PubMed Central

    Medina-Bolivar, F.; Flores, H. E.

    1995-01-01

    Hairy root cultures of Hyoscyamus muticus have been shown to produce stable levels of tropane alkaloids comparable to those found in whole plants. In contrast, cell cultures of this and other solanaceous species produce only trace amounts of alkaloids but can be used for selection of metabolic variants. We have taken advantage of both systems and the ability to convert between them in vitro in an effort to select for increased production of the tropane alkaloid hyoscyamine. Hairy roots were converted into cell suspensions by addition of 1 mg/L 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid to Murashige-Skoog medium (T. Murashige and F. Skoog [1962] Physiol Plant 15: 473-497) and screened for resistance to the amino acid analog p-fluorophenylalanine (PFP). Cells that could grow in media containing 400 [mu]M PFP were selected and cloned from single cells. The resistant cells accumulated high levels of cinnamoyl putrescines, which share the same biosynthetic precursors as hyoscyamine. Hairy root cultures were regenerated from both PFP-sensitive and PFP-resistant cells by removing 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid from the medium. Resistance to PFP continued to be expressed in regenerated roots. Higher levels of hyoscyamine were found in hairy roots regenerated from PFP-resistant cells than were found in controls. We suggest that the precursors overproduced by the PFP-resistant cells can be diverted into the hyoscyamine pathway upon the regeneration of root cultures. PMID:12228562

  20. A Role for the Tec Family Tyrosine Kinase Txk in T Cell Activation and Thymocyte Selection

    PubMed Central

    Sommers, Connie L.; Rabin, Ronald L.; Grinberg, Alexander; Tsay, Henry C.; Farber, Joshua; Love, Paul E.

    1999-01-01

    Recent data indicate that several members of the Tec family of protein tyrosine kinases function in antigen receptor signal transduction. Txk, a Tec family protein tyrosine kinase, is expressed in both immature and mature T cells and in mast cells. By overexpressing Txk in T cells throughout development, we found that Txk specifically augments the phospholipase C (PLC)-γ1–mediated calcium signal transduction pathway upon T cell antigen receptor (TCR) engagement. Although Txk is structurally different from inducible T cell kinase (Itk), another Tec family member expressed in T cells, expression of the Txk transgene could partially rescue defects in positive selection and signaling in itk−/− mice. Conversely, in the itk+/+ (wild-type) background, overexpression of Txk inhibited positive selection of TCR transgenic thymocytes, presumably due to induction of cell death. These results identify a role for Txk in TCR signal transduction, T cell development, and selection and suggest that the Tec family kinases Itk and Txk perform analogous functions. PMID:10562318

  1. Solid-state NMR on bacterial cells: selective cell wall signal enhancement and resolution improvement using dynamic nuclear polarization.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Hiroki; Ayala, Isabel; Bardet, Michel; De Paëpe, Gaël; Simorre, Jean-Pierre; Hediger, Sabine

    2013-04-03

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) enhanced solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) has recently emerged as a powerful technique for the study of material surfaces. In this study, we demonstrate its potential to investigate cell surface in intact cells. Using Bacillus subtilis bacterial cells as an example, it is shown that the polarizing agent 1-(TEMPO-4-oxy)-3-(TEMPO-4-amino)propan-2-ol (TOTAPOL) has a strong binding affinity to cell wall polymers (peptidoglycan). This particular interaction is thoroughly investigated with a systematic study on extracted cell wall materials, disrupted cells, and entire cells, which proved that TOTAPOL is mainly accumulating in the cell wall. This property is used on one hand to selectively enhance or suppress cell wall signals by controlling radical concentrations and on the other hand to improve spectral resolution by means of a difference spectrum. Comparing DNP-enhanced and conventional solid-state NMR, an absolute sensitivity ratio of 24 was obtained on the entire cell sample. This important increase in sensitivity together with the possibility of enhancing specifically cell wall signals and improving resolution really opens new avenues for the use of DNP-enhanced solid-state NMR as an on-cell investigation tool.

  2. Selection of highly osteogenic and chondrogenic cells from bone marrow stromal cells in biocompatible polymer-coated plates.

    PubMed

    Liu, G; Iwata, K; Ogasawara, T; Watanabe, J; Fukazawa, K; Ishihara, K; Asawa, Y; Fujihara, Y; Chung, U-L; Moro, T; Takatori, Y; Takato, T; Nakamura, K; Kawaguchi, H; Hoshi, K

    2010-03-15

    To enrich the subpopulation that preserves self-renewal and multipotentiality from conventionally prepared bone marrow stromal cells (MSCs), we attempted to use 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC) polymer-coated plates that selected the MSCs with strong adhesion ability and evaluated the proliferation ability or osteogenic/chondrogenic potential of the MPC polymer-selected MSCs. The number of MSCs that were attached to the MPC polymer-coated plates decreased with an increase in the density of MPC unit (0-10%), whereas no significant difference in the proliferation ability was seen among these cells. The surface epitopes of CD29, CD44, CD105, and CD166, and not CD34 or CD45, were detectable in the cells of all MPC polymer-coated plates, implying that they belong to the MSC category. In the osteogenic and chondrogenic induction, the MSCs selected by the 2-5% MPC unit composition showed higher expression levels of osteoblastic and chondrocytic markers (COL1A1/ALP, or COL2A1/COL10A1/Sox9) at passage 2, compared with those of 0-1% or even 10% MPC unit composition, while the enhanced effects continued by passage 5. The selection based on the adequate cell adhesiveness by the MPC polymer-coated plates could improve the osteogenic and chondrogenic potential of MSCs, which would provide cell sources that can be used to treat the more severe and various bone/cartilage diseases.

  3. Tocotrienol-rich fraction of palm oil induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis selectively in human prostate cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, Janmejai K.; Gupta, Sanjay . E-mail: sanjay.gupta@case.edu

    2006-07-28

    One of the requisite of cancer chemopreventive agent is elimination of damaged or malignant cells through cell cycle inhibition or induction of apoptosis without affecting normal cells. In this study, employing normal human prostate epithelial cells (PrEC), virally transformed normal human prostate epithelial cells (PZ-HPV-7), and human prostate cancer cells (LNCaP, DU145, and PC-3), we evaluated the growth-inhibitory and apoptotic effects of tocotrienol-rich fraction (TRF) extracted from palm oil. TRF treatment to PrEC and PZ-HPV-7 resulted in almost identical growth-inhibitory responses of low magnitude. In sharp contrast, TRF treatment resulted in significant decreases in cell viability and colony formation in all three prostate cancer cell lines. The IC{sub 5} values after 24 h TRF treatment in LNCaP, PC-3, and DU145 cells were in the order 16.5, 17.5, and 22.0 {mu}g/ml. TRF treatment resulted in significant apoptosis in all the cell lines as evident from (i) DNA fragmentation (ii) fluorescence microscopy, and (iii) cell death detection ELISA, whereas the PrEC and PZ-HPV-7 cells did not undergo apoptosis, but showed modestly decreased cell viability only at a high dose of 80 {mu}g/ml. In cell cycle analysis, TRF (10-40 {mu}g/ml) resulted in a dose-dependent G0/G1 phase arrest and sub G1 accumulation in all three cancer cell lines but not in PZ-HPV-7 cells. These results suggest that the palm oil derivative TRF is capable of selectively inhibiting cellular proliferation and accelerating apoptotic events in prostate cancer cells. TRF offers significant promise as a chemopreventive and/or therapeutic agent against prostate cancer.

  4. Engineering Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotube Therapeutic Bionanofluids to Selectively Target Papillary Thyroid Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Paliouras, Miltiadis; Mitmaker, Elliot J.; Trifiro, Mark A.

    2016-01-01

    Background The incidence of papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) has risen steadily over the past few decades as well as the recurrence rates. It has been proposed that targeted ablative physical therapy could be a therapeutic modality in thyroid cancer. Targeted bio-affinity functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (BioNanofluid) act locally, to efficiently convert external light energy to heat thereby specifically killing cancer cells. This may represent a promising new cancer therapeutic modality, advancing beyond conventional laser ablation and other nanoparticle approaches. Methods Thyroid Stimulating Hormone Receptor (TSHR) was selected as a target for PTC cells, due to its wide expression. Either TSHR antibodies or Thyrogen or purified TSH (Thyrotropin) were chemically conjugated to our functionalized Bionanofluid. A diode laser system (532 nm) was used to illuminate a PTC cell line for set exposure times. Cell death was assessed using Trypan Blue staining. Results TSHR-targeted BioNanofluids were capable of selectively ablating BCPAP, a TSHR-positive PTC cell line, while not TSHR-null NSC-34 cells. We determined that a 2:1 BCPAP cell:α-TSHR-BioNanofluid conjugate ratio and a 30 second laser exposure killed approximately 60% of the BCPAP cells, while 65% and >70% of cells were ablated using Thyrotropin- and Thyrogen-BioNanofluid conjugates, respectively. Furthermore, minimal non-targeted killing was observed using selective controls. Conclusion A BioNanofluid platform offering a potential therapeutic path for papillary thyroid cancer has been investigated, with our in vitro results suggesting the development of a potent and rapid method of selective cancer cell killing. Therefore, BioNanofluid treatment emphasizes the need for new technology to treat patients with local recurrence and metastatic disease who are currently undergoing either re-operative neck explorations, repeated administration of radioactive iodine and as a last resort external beam

  5. Selective advantage for multicellular replicative strategies: A two-cell example

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tannenbaum, Emmanuel

    2006-01-01

    This paper develops a quasispecies model where cells can adopt a two-cell survival strategy. Within this strategy, pairs of cells join together, at which point one of the cells sacrifices its own replicative ability for the sake of the other cell. We develop a simplified model for the evolutionary dynamics of this process, allowing us to solve for the steady state using standard approaches from quasispecies theory. We find that our model exhibits two distinct regimes of behavior: At low concentrations of limiting resource, the two-cell strategy outcompetes the single-cell survival strategy, while at high concentrations of limiting resource, the single-cell survival strategy dominates. The single-cell survival strategy becomes disadvantageous at low concentrations of limiting resource because the energetic costs of maintaining reproductive and metabolic pathways approach, and may even exceed, the rate of energy production, leaving little excess energy for the purposes of replicating a new cell. However, if the rate of energy production exceeds the energetic costs of maintaining metabolic pathways, then the excess energy, if shared among several cells, can pay for the reproductive costs of a single cell, leaving energy to replicate a new cell. Associated with the two solution regimes of our model is a localization to delocalization transition over the portion of the genome coding for the multicell strategy, analogous to the error catastrophe in standard quasispecies models. The existence of such a transition indicates that multicellularity can emerge because natural selection does not act on specific cells, but rather on replicative strategies. Within this framework, individual cells become the means by which replicative strategies are propagated. Such a framework is therefore consistent with the concept that natural selection does not act on individuals, but rather on populations.

  6. PB-100: a potent and selective inhibitor of human BCNU resistant glioblastoma cell multiplication.

    PubMed

    Beljanski, M; Crochet, S; Beljanski, M S

    1993-01-01

    Major drawbacks to present-day cancer chemotherapy are its intrinsic lack of selectivity for tumour cells, resulting in severe damage to normal rapidly dividing cells, and the widespread emergence of drug resistance. Here experimental evidence is presented demonstrating that PB-100, a beta-carboline alkaloid, selectively inhibits in vitro multiplication of human BCNU-resistant glioblastoma cells (U251), but has no effect on normal astrocyte (CRL 1656) multiplication. PB-100 activity is dose-dependent. In the presence of ferritin or CaCl2, which are highly mitogenic for glioblastoma cells, higher doses of the alkaloid are required to inhibit multiplication completely. PB-100 is one of several compounds which were selected for their specific action on cancer DNA and cells, together with lack of activity on normal DNA and cells. Both the selectivity of PB-100 and its ability to overcome drug resistance stem from its effect on cancer DNA secondary structure. This activity is described and discussed, and therapeutic applications are mentioned.

  7. Copper chelation selectively kills colon cancer cells through redox cycling and generation of reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Fatfat, Maamoun; Merhi, Raghida Abou; Rahal, Omar; Stoyanovsky, Detcho A; Zaki, Angela; Haidar, Hazar; Kagan, Valerian E; Gali-Muhtasib, Hala; Machaca, Khaled

    2014-07-21

    Metals including iron, copper and zinc are essential for physiological processes yet can be toxic at high concentrations. However the role of these metals in the progression of cancer is not well defined. Here we study the anti-tumor activity of the metal chelator, TPEN, and define its mechanism of action. Multiple approaches were employed, including cell viability, cell cycle analysis, multiple measurements of apoptosis, and mitochondrial function. In addition we measured cellular metal contents and employed EPR to record redox cycling of TPEN-metal complexes. Mouse xenografts were also performed to test the efficacy of TPEN in vivo. We show that metal chelation using TPEN (5μM) selectively induces cell death in HCT116 colon cancer cells without affecting the viability of non-cancerous colon or intestinal cells. Cell death was associated with increased levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and was inhibited by antioxidants and by prior chelation of copper. Interestingly, HCT116 cells accumulate copper to 7-folds higher levels than normal colon cells, and the TPEN-copper complex engages in redox cycling to generate hydroxyl radicals. Consistently, TPEN exhibits robust anti-tumor activity in vivo in colon cancer mouse xenografts. Our data show that TPEN induces cell death by chelating copper to produce TPEN-copper complexes that engage in redox cycling to selectively eliminate colon cancer cells.

  8. Epicatechin Stimulates Mitochondrial Activity and Selectively Sensitizes Cancer Cells to Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Elbaz, Hosam A.; Lee, Icksoo; Antwih, Deborah A.; Liu, Jenney; Hüttemann, Maik; Zielske, Steven P.

    2014-01-01

    Radiotherapy is the treatment of choice for solid tumors including pancreatic cancer, but the effectiveness of treatment is limited by radiation resistance. Resistance to chemotherapy or radiotherapy is associated with reduced mitochondrial respiration and drugs that stimulate mitochondrial respiration may decrease radiation resistance. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the potential of (-)-epicatechin to stimulate mitochondrial respiration in cancer cells and to selectively sensitize cancer cells to radiation. We investigated the natural compound (-)-epicatechin for effects on mitochondrial respiration and radiation resistance of pancreatic and glioblastoma cancer cells using a Clark type oxygen electrode, clonogenic survival assays, and Western blot analyses. (-)-Epicatechin stimulated mitochondrial respiration and oxygen consumption in Panc-1 cells. Human normal fibroblasts were not affected. (-)-Epicatechin sensitized Panc-1, U87, and MIA PaCa-2 cells with an average radiation enhancement factor (REF) of 1.7, 1.5, and 1.2, respectively. (-)-Epicatechin did not sensitize normal fibroblast cells to ionizing radiation with a REF of 0.9, suggesting cancer cell selectivity. (-)-Epicatechin enhanced Chk2 phosphorylation and p21 induction when combined with radiation in cancer, but not normal, cells. Taken together, (-)-epicatechin radiosensitized cancer cells, but not normal cells, and may be a promising candidate for pancreatic cancer treatment when combined with radiation. PMID:24516636

  9. Selective photothermal efficiency of citrate capped gold nanoparticles for destruction of cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Raji, V.; Kumar, Jatish; Rejiya, C.S.; Vibin, M.; Shenoi, Vinesh N.; Abraham, Annie

    2011-08-15

    Gold nanoparticles are recently having much attention because of their increased applications in biomedical fields. In this paper, we demonstrated the photothermal efficacy of citrate capped gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) for the destruction of A431 cancer cells. Citrate capped AuNPs were synthesized successfully and characterized by UV-visible-NIR spectrophotometry and High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HR-TEM). Further, AuNPs were conjugated with epidermal growth factor receptor antibody (anti-EGFR) and applied for the selective photothermal therapy (PTT) of human epithelial cancer cells, A431. PTT experiments were conducted in four groups, Group I-control cells, Group II-cells treated with laser light alone, Group III-cells treated with unconjugated AuNP and further laser irradiation and Group IV-anti-EGFR conjugated AuNP treated cells irradiated by laser light. After laser irradiation, cell morphology changes that were examined using phase contrast microscopy along with the relevant biochemical parameters like lactate dehydrogenase activity, reactive oxygen species generation and caspase-3 activity were studied for all the groups to determine whether cell death occurs due to necrosis or apoptosis. From these results we concluded that, these immunotargeted nanoparticles could selectively induce cell death via ROS mediated apoptosis when cells were exposed to a low power laser light.

  10. Melanoma chemotherapy leads to the selection of ABCB5-expressing cells.

    PubMed

    Chartrain, Marine; Riond, Joëlle; Stennevin, Aline; Vandenberghe, Isabelle; Gomes, Bruno; Lamant, Laurence; Meyer, Nicolas; Gairin, Jean Edouard; Guilbaud, Nicolas; Annereau, Jean Philippe

    2012-01-01

    Metastatic melanoma is the most aggressive skin cancer. Recently, phenotypically distinct subpopulations of tumor cells were identified. Among them, ABCB5-expressing cells were proposed to display an enhanced tumorigenicity with stem cell-like properties. In addition, ABCB5(+) cells are thought to participate to chemoresistance through a potential efflux function of ABCB5. Nevertheless, the fate of these cells upon drugs that are used in melanoma chemotherapy remains to be clarified. Here we explored the effect of anti-melanoma treatments on the ABCB5-expressing cells. Using a melanoma xenograft model (WM266-4), we observed in vivo that ABCB5-expressing cells are enriched after a temozolomide treatment that induces a significant tumor regression. These results were further confirmed in a preliminary study conducted on clinical samples from patients that received dacarbazine. In vitro, we showed that ABCB5-expressing cells selectively survive when exposed to dacarbazine, the reference treatment of metastatic melanoma, but also to vemurafenib, a new inhibitor of the mutated kinase V600E BRAF and other various chemotherapeutic drugs. Our results show that anti-melanoma chemotherapy might participate to the chemoresistance acquisition by selecting tumor cell subpopulations expressing ABCB5. This is of particular importance in understanding the relapses observed after anti-melanoma treatments and reinforces the interest of ABCB5 and ABCB5-expressing cells as potential therapeutic targets in melanoma.

  11. Melanoma Chemotherapy Leads to the Selection of ABCB5-Expressing Cells

    PubMed Central

    Stennevin, Aline; Vandenberghe, Isabelle; Gomes, Bruno; Lamant, Laurence; Meyer, Nicolas; Gairin, Jean Edouard; Guilbaud, Nicolas; Annereau, Jean Philippe

    2012-01-01

    Metastatic melanoma is the most aggressive skin cancer. Recently, phenotypically distinct subpopulations of tumor cells were identified. Among them, ABCB5-expressing cells were proposed to display an enhanced tumorigenicity with stem cell-like properties. In addition, ABCB5+ cells are thought to participate to chemoresistance through a potential efflux function of ABCB5. Nevertheless, the fate of these cells upon drugs that are used in melanoma chemotherapy remains to be clarified. Here we explored the effect of anti-melanoma treatments on the ABCB5-expressing cells. Using a melanoma xenograft model (WM266-4), we observed in vivo that ABCB5-expressing cells are enriched after a temozolomide treatment that induces a significant tumor regression. These results were further confirmed in a preliminary study conducted on clinical samples from patients that received dacarbazine. In vitro, we showed that ABCB5-expressing cells selectively survive when exposed to dacarbazine, the reference treatment of metastatic melanoma, but also to vemurafenib, a new inhibitor of the mutated kinase V600E BRAF and other various chemotherapeutic drugs. Our results show that anti-melanoma chemotherapy might participate to the chemoresistance acquisition by selecting tumor cell subpopulations expressing ABCB5. This is of particular importance in understanding the relapses observed after anti-melanoma treatments and reinforces the interest of ABCB5 and ABCB5-expressing cells as potential therapeutic targets in melanoma. PMID:22675422

  12. A Small Molecule Inhibitor Selectively Induces Apoptosis in Cells Transformed by High Risk Human Papilloma Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Min S.; Qi, Huilin; Chaniewski, Susan; Zheng, Xiaofan; Farr, Glen A.; Esposito, Kim; Harden, David; Lei, Ming; Schweizer, Liang; Friborg, Jacques; Agler, Michele; McPhee, Fiona; Gentles, Robert; Beno, Brett R.; Chupak, Lou; Mason, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    A phenotypic high-throughput cell culture screen was performed to identify compounds that prevented proliferation of the human Papilloma virus type 16 (HPV-16) transformed cell line Ca Ski. A series of quinoxaline compounds exemplified by Compound 1 was identified. Testing against a panel of cell lines demonstrated that Compound 1 selectively inhibited replication of all HPV-16, HPV-18, and HPV-31 transformed cell lines tested with 50% Inhibitory Concentration (IC50) values of 2 to 8 μM relative to IC50 values of 28 to 73 μM in HPV-negative cell lines. Treatment with Compound 1 resulted in a cascade of multiple apoptotic events, including selective activation of effector caspases 3 and 7, fragmentation of cellular DNA, and PARP (poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase) cleavage in HPV-positive cells relative to HPV-negative cells. Unregulated proliferation of HPV transformed cells is dependent on the viral oncogenes, E6 and E7. Treatment with Compound 1 resulted in a decrease in HPV E7 protein in Ca Ski cells. However, the timing of this reduction relative to other effects of compound treatment suggests that this was a consequence, rather than a cause, of the apoptotic cascade. Likewise, compound treatment resulted in no obvious effects on the E6- and E7- mediated down regulation of p53 and Rb, or their downstream effectors, p21 or PCNA. Further investigation of apoptotic signals induced by Compound 1 revealed cleavage of Caspase-8 in HPV-positive cells as early as 2 hours post-treatment, suggesting the compound initiates apoptosis through the extrinsic, death receptor-mediated, pathway of cell death. These studies provide proof of concept that cells transformed by oncogenic Papillomaviruses can be selectively induced to undergo apoptosis by compound treatment. PMID:27280728

  13. Lck availability during thymic selection determines the recognition specificity of the T cell repertoire

    PubMed Central

    Van Laethem, François; Tikhonova, Anastasia N.; Pobezinsky, Leonid A.; Tai, Xuguang; Kimura, Motoko Y.; Le Saout, Cecile; Guinter, Terry I.; Adams, Anthony; Sharrow, Susan O.; Bernhardt, Günter; Feigenbaum, Lionel; Singer, Alfred

    2013-01-01

    Summary Thymic selection requires signaling by the protein tyrosine kinase Lck to generate T cells expressing αβ T cell antigen receptors (TCR). For reasons not understood, the thymus selects only αβTCR that are restricted by major histocompatibility complex (MHC) encoded determinants. Here, we report that Lck proteins that were coreceptor-associated promoted thymic selection of conventionally MHC-restricted TCR, but Lck proteins that were coreceptor-free promoted thymic selection of MHC-independent TCR. Transgenic TCR with MHC-independent specificity for CD155 utilized coreceptor-free Lck to signal thymic selection in the absence of MHC, unlike any transgenic TCR previously described. Thus, the thymus can select either MHC-restricted or MHC-independent αβTCR depending on whether Lck is coreceptor-associated or coreceptor-free. We conclude that the intracellular state of Lck determines the specificity of thymic selection, and that Lck association with coreceptor proteins during thymic selection is the mechanism by which MHC restriction is imposed on a randomly generated αβTCR repertoire. PMID:24034254

  14. Lectin of Abelmoschus esculentus (okra) promotes selective antitumor effects in human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Monte, Leonardo G; Santi-Gadelha, Tatiane; Reis, Larissa B; Braganhol, Elizandra; Prietsch, Rafael F; Dellagostin, Odir A; E Lacerda, Rodrigo Rodrigues; Gadelha, Carlos A A; Conceição, Fabricio R; Pinto, Luciano S

    2014-03-01

    The anti-tumor effects of a newly-discovered lectin, isolated from okra, Abelmoschus esculentus (AEL), were investigated in human breast cancer (MCF7) and skin fibroblast (CCD-1059 sk) cells. AEL induced significant cell growth inhibition (63 %) in MCF7 cells. The expression of pro-apoptotic caspase-3, caspase-9, and p21 genes was increased in MCF7 cells treated with AEL, compared to those treated with controls. In addition, AEL treatment increased the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio in MCF7 cells. Flow cytometry also indicated that cell death (72 %) predominantly occurred through apoptosis. Thus, AEL in its native form promotes selective antitumor effects in human breast cancer cells and may represent a potential therapeutic to combat human breast cancer.

  15. Phage display selection of scFv to murine endothelial cell membranes.

    PubMed

    Kennel, Stephen J; Lankford, Trish; Foote, Linda; Wall, Melissa; Davern, Sandra

    2004-08-01

    The diversity of endothelial cells is becoming more apparent and more important in defining vessel systems that supply blood to normal organs and to tumors. Reagents that identify expression of cell surface determinants on these cells are crucial for differentiating among different vessel types. As a first step in this process we have selected a panel of 25 scFvs from a phage display library that bind to the endothelial cell line LEII. The scFvs are of high affinity and bind to some tumor cells as well as to the target endothelial cell. The scFvs can be divided into 8 epitope groups by use of competition binding studies. DNA sequencing of the members of these groups generally support the classification. This work shows that phage display is a rapid and efficient method for identification of reagents for cell surface molecules.

  16. Selective expansion of T cells expressing V beta 2 in toxic shock syndrome

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    Infection with Staphylococcus aureus and the production of toxic shock syndrome toxin-1 (TSST-1) have been implicated in the pathogenesis of toxic shock syndrome. Previous in vitro studies have demonstrated that TSST-1 is a powerful but selective stimulator of human T cells, and that the majority of activated cells express the TCR V beta 2 gene segment. We therefore studied patients with toxic shock syndrome using a modification of the PCR to determine if expansion of V beta 2+ T cells is a marker of the in vivo disease process. Five of eight patients studied demonstrated markedly elevated levels of circulating V beta 2+ T cells, whereas none showed significantly elevated levels of T cells expressing other V beta gene segments. The results suggest that toxin-mediated T cell activation, which involves a large fraction of the human T cell repertoire, may be critical in the pathogenesis of this disease. PMID:2117641

  17. Selective Conditions Are Required for the Induction of Invariant NKT Cell Hyporesponsiveness by Antigenic Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Wingender, Gerhard; Birkholz, Alysia M; Sag, Duygu; Farber, Elisa; Chitale, Sampada; Howell, Amy R; Kronenberg, Mitchell

    2015-10-15

    Activation of invariant (i)NKT cells with the model Ag α-galactosylceramide induces rapid production of multiple cytokines, impacting a wide variety of different immune reactions. In contrast, following secondary activation with α-galactosylceramide, the behavior of iNKT cells is altered for months, with the production of most cytokines being strongly reduced. The requirements for the induction of this hyporesponsive state, however, remain poorly defined. In this study, we show that Th1-biasing iNKT cell Ags could induce iNKT cell hyporesponsiveness, as long as a minimum antigenic affinity was reached. In contrast, the Th2-biasing Ag OCH did not induce a hyporesponsive state, nor did cytokine-driven iNKT cell activation by LPS or infections. Furthermore, although dendritic cells and B cells have been reported to be essential for iNKT cell stimulation, neither dendritic cells nor B cells were required to induce iNKT cell hyporesponsiveness. Therefore, our data indicate that whereas some bone marrow-derived cells could induce iNKT cell hyporesponsiveness, selective conditions, dependent on the structure and potency of the Ag, were required to induce hyporesponsiveness.

  18. A novel steroidal saponin glycoside from Fagonia indica induces cell-selective apoptosis or necrosis in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Waheed, Abdul; Barker, James; Barton, Stephen J; Owen, Caroline P; Ahmed, Sabbir; Carew, Mark A

    2012-09-29

    Fagonia indica is a small spiny shrub of great ethnopharmacological importance in folk medicine. The aqueous decoction of aerial parts is a popular remedy against various skin lesions, including cancer. We used a biological activity-guided fractionation approach to isolate the most potent fraction of the crude extract on three cancer cell lines: MCF-7 oestrogen-dependent breast cancer, MDA-MB-468 oestrogen-independent breast cancer, and Caco-2 colon cancer cells. A series of chromatographic and spectroscopic procedures were utilised on the EtOAc fraction, which resulted in the isolation of a new steroidal saponin glycoside. The cytotoxic activity of the saponin glycoside was determined in cancer cells using the MTT and neutral red uptake assays. After 24h treatment, the observed IC(50) values of the saponin glycoside were 12.5 μM on MDA-MB-468 and Caco-2 cells, but 100 μM on MCF-7 cells. Several lines of evidence: PARP cleavage, caspase-3 cleavage, DNA ladder assays, and reversal of growth inhibition with the pan-caspase inhibitor Z-VAD-fmk, suggested stimulation of apoptosis in MDA-MB-468 and Caco-2 cells, but not in MCF-7 cells, which do not express caspase-3. The haemolytic activity of the saponin glycoside was confirmed in sheep red blood cells, with cell lysis observed at >100 μM, suggesting that, at this concentration, the saponin glycoside caused necrosis through cell lysis in MCF-7 cells. Using the DNA ladder assay, the saponin glycoside (12.5 μM) was not toxic to HUVEC (human umbilical vein endothelial cells) or U937 cells, indicating some selectivity between malignant and normal cells. We conclude that the steroidal saponin glycoside isolated from F. indica is able to induce apoptosis or necrosis in cancer cells depending on the cell type.

  19. Analysis of selective reflection spectrum in cholesteric liquid crystal cells for solar-ray controller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogiwara, Akifumi; Kakiuchida, Hiroshi

    2015-09-01

    The cholesteric liquid crystal (CLC) cells are fabricated by varying the concentration of various chiral dopants and liquid crystal (LC) diacrylate monomers. The wavelength and bandwidth of selective reflection spectrum in CLC cells are measured by a spectroscopic technique. The variation of the selective reflection spectrum in CLC cells is investigated by doping the different kinds of liquid crystal (LC) diacrylate monomers which stabilize a helical twisting structure by photopolymerization. The effects of the selective reflection spectrum on the visible and infrared lights in spectral solar irradiance are explained by the performance for a solar-ray controller based on the spectral solar irradiance for air mass 1.5 and the standard luminous efficiency function for photopic vision.

  20. An excitatory amacrine cell detects object motion and provides feature-selective input to ganglion cells in the mouse retina

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tahnbee; Soto, Florentina; Kerschensteiner, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Retinal circuits detect salient features of the visual world and report them to the brain through spike trains of retinal ganglion cells. The most abundant ganglion cell type in mice, the so-called W3 ganglion cell, selectively responds to movements of small objects. Where and how object motion sensitivity arises in the retina is incompletely understood. In this study, we use 2-photon-guided patch-clamp recordings to characterize responses of vesicular glutamate transporter 3 (VGluT3)-expressing amacrine cells (ACs) to a broad set of visual stimuli. We find that these ACs are object motion sensitive and analyze the synaptic mechanisms underlying this computation. Anatomical circuit reconstructions suggest that VGluT3-expressing ACs form glutamatergic synapses with W3 ganglion cells, and targeted recordings show that the tuning of W3 ganglion cells' excitatory input matches that of VGluT3-expressing ACs' responses. Synaptic excitation of W3 ganglion cells is diminished, and responses to object motion are suppressed in mice lacking VGluT3. Object motion, thus, is first detected by VGluT3-expressing ACs, which provide feature-selective excitatory input to W3 ganglion cells. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.08025.001 PMID:25988808

  1. Cell line selection combined with jasmonic acid elicitation enhance camptothecin production in cell suspension cultures of Ophiorrhiza mungos L.

    PubMed

    Deepthi, S; Satheeshkumar, K

    2017-01-01

    Ophiorrhiza mungos is a herbaceous medicinal plant which contains a quinoline alkaloid, camptothecin (CPT), an anticancer compound. A high-yielding cell line, O. mungos cell line-3 (OMC3) was selected from cell suspension cultures of O. mungos using cell aggregate cloning method and established cell suspension culture. OMC3 cell suspension produced significantly high biomass (9.25 ± 1.3 g/flask fresh weight (FW)) and CPT yield (0.095 ± 0.002 mg g(-1) dry weight (DW)) compared with the original cell suspension. Inoculum size of OMC3 cell suspension culture was optimised as 14 g L(-1). Media optimisation has shown that 5 % (w/v) sucrose and an increased ammonium/nitrate concentration of 40/20 mM favoured CPT production, whereas 3 % (w/v) sucrose, an ammonium/nitrate concentration of 20/40 mM and 1.25 mM of phosphate favoured biomass accumulation. Jasmonic acid, chitin and salicylic acid was used to elicit CPT production in the original cell suspension culture and achieved significantly high CPT production with jasmonic acid (JA) elicitation. Further, OMC3 cell suspension culture was elicited with JA (50 μM) and obtained 1.12 ± 0.08 mg g(-1) DW CPT and 9.52 ± 1.4 g/flask FW (190.4 g L(-1) FW). The combination of cell line selection and elicitation has produced 18.66-fold increases in CPT production together with significantly high biomass yield. The study is helpful in the scale-up studies of O. mungos cell suspension culture in suitable bioreactor systems for the production of CPT.

  2. Unusual target selectivity of perisomatic inhibitory cells in the hilar region of the rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Acsády, L; Katona, I; Martínez-Guijarro, F J; Buzsáki, G; Freund, T F

    2000-09-15

    Perisomatic inhibitory innervation of all neuron types profoundly affects their firing characteristics and vulnerability. In this study we examined the postsynaptic targets of perisomatic inhibitory cells in the hilar region of the dentate gyrus where the proportion of potential target cells (excitatory mossy cells and inhibitory interneurons) is approximately equal. Both cholecystokinin (CCK)- and parvalbumin-immunoreactive basket cells formed multiple contacts on the somata and proximal dendrites of mossy cells. Unexpectedly, however, perisomatic inhibitory terminals arriving from these cell types largely ignored hilar GABAergic cell populations. Eighty-ninety percent of various GABAergic neurons including other CCK-containing basket cells received no input from CCK-positive terminals. Parvalbumin-containing cells sometimes innervated each other but avoided 75% of other GABAergic cells. Overall, a single mossy cell received 40 times more CCK-immunoreactive terminals and 15 times more parvalbumin-positive terminals onto its soma than the cell body of an average hilar GABAergic cell. In contrast to the pronounced target selectivity in the hilar region, CCK- and parvalbumin-positive neurons innervated each other via collaterals in stratum granulosum and moleculare. Our observations indicate that the inhibitory control in the hilar region is qualitatively different from other cortical areas at both the network level and the level of single neurons. The paucity of perisomatic innervation of hilar interneurons should have profound consequences on their action potential generation and on their ensemble behavior. These findings may help explain the unique physiological patterns observed in the hilus and the selective vulnerability of the hilar cell population in various pathophysiological conditions.

  3. Pyrvinium selectively induces apoptosis of lymphoma cells through impairing mitochondrial functions and JAK2/STAT5.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Meifang; Zhang, Liming; Zhou, Yizheng; Rajoria, Pasupati; Wang, Changfu

    2016-01-15

    Targeting mitochondrial respiration has emerged as an attractive therapeutic strategy in blood cancer due to their unique metabolic dependencies. In this study, we show that pyrvinium, a FDA-approved anthelmintic drug, selectively targets lymphoma T-cells though inhibition of mitochondrial functions and JAK2/STAT5. Pyrvinium induces apoptosis of malignant T-cell line Jurkat and primary T-cells from lymphoma patients while sparing T-cells from healthy donors. Increased level of active caspase-3 and decreased levels of Bcl-2 and Mcl-1 were also observed in Jurkat and lymphoma T-cells but not normal T-cells treated with pyrvinium. In addition, pyrvinium impairs mitochondrial functions by inhibit mitochondrial respiration, suppressing mitochondrial respiratory complex I activity, increasing ROS and decreasing ATP levels. However, the effects of pyrvinium were abolished in mitochondrial respiration-deficient Jurkat ρ(0) cells, confirming that pyrvinium acts on lymphoma T-cells via targeting mitochondrial respiration. We further show that lymphoma T-cells derived from patients depend more on mitochondrial respiration than normal T-cells, and this explains the selective toxicity of pyrvinium in lymphoma versus normal T-cells. Finally, we demonstrate that pyrvinium also suppresses JAK2/STAT5 signaling pathway in Jurkat cells. Our study suggests that pyrvinium is a useful addition to T-cell lymphoma treatment, and emphasizes the potential therapeutic value of the differences in the mitochondrial characteristics between malignant and normal T-cells in blood cancer. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Selective cytotoxicity of goniothalamin against hepatoblastoma HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Al-Qubaisi, Mothanna; Rozita, Rosli; Yeap, Swee-Keong; Omar, Abdul-Rahman; Ali, Abdul-Manaf; Alitheen, Noorjahan B

    2011-04-06

    Liver cancer has become one of the major types of cancer with high mortality and liver cancer is not responsive to the current cytotoxic agents used in chemotherapy. The purpose of this study was to examine the in vitro cytotoxicity of goniothalamin on human hepatoblastoma HepG2 cells and normal liver Chang cells. The cytotoxicity of goniothalamin against HepG2 and liver Chang cell was tested using MTT cell viability assay, LDH leakage assay, cell cycle flow cytometry PI analysis, BrdU proliferation ELISA assay and trypan blue dye exclusion assay. Goniothalamin selectively inhibited HepG2 cells [IC₅₀ = 4.6 (±0.23) µM in the MTT assay; IC₅₀ = 5.20 (±0.01) µM for LDH assay at 72 hours], with less sensitivity in Chang cells [IC₅₀ = 35.0 (±0.09) µM for MTT assay; IC₅₀ = 32.5 (±0.04) µM for LDH assay at 72 hours]. In the trypan blue dye exclusion assay, the Viability Indexes were 52 ± 1.73% for HepG2 cells and 62 ± 4.36% for Chang cells at IC₅₀ after 72 hours. Cytotoxicity of goniothalamin was related to inhibition of DNA synthesis, as revealed by the reduction of BrdU incorporation. At 72 hours, the lowest concentration of goniothalamin (2.3 µL) retained 97.6% of normal liver Chang cells proliferation while it reduced HepG2 cell proliferation to 19.8% as compared to control. Besides, goniothalamin caused accumulation of hypodiploid apoptosis and different degree of G2/M arrested as shown in cell cycle analysis by flow cytometry. Goniothalamin selectively killed liver cancer cell through suppression of proliferation and induction of apoptosis. These results suggest that goniothalamin shows potential cytotoxicity against hepatoblastoma HepG2 cells.

  5. Cidofovir selectivity is based on the different response of normal and cancer cells to DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cidofovir (CDV) proved efficacious in treatment of human papillomaviruses (HPVs) hyperplasias. Antiproliferative effects of CDV have been associated with apoptosis induction, S-phase accumulation, and increased levels of tumor suppressor proteins. However, the molecular mechanisms for the selectivity and antitumor activity of CDV against HPV-transformed cells remain unexplained. Methods We evaluated CDV drug metabolism and incorporation into cellular DNA, in addition to whole genome gene expression profiling by means of microarrays in two HPV+ cervical carcinoma cells, HPV- immortalized keratinocytes, and normal keratinocytes. Results Determination of the metabolism and drug incorporation of CDV into genomic DNA demonstrated a higher rate of drug incorporation in HPV+ tumor cells and immortalized keratinocytes compared to normal keratinocytes. Gene expression profiling clearly showed distinct and specific drug effects in the cell types investigated. Although an effect on inflammatory response was seen in all cell types, different pathways were identified in normal keratinocytes compared to immortalized keratinocytes and HPV+ tumor cells. Notably, Rho GTPase pathways, LXR/RXR pathways, and acute phase response signaling were exclusively activated in immortalized cells. CDV exposed normal keratinocytes displayed activated cell cycle regulation upon DNA damage signaling to allow DNA repair via homologous recombination, resulting in genomic stability and survival. Although CDV induced cell cycle arrest in HPV- immortalized cells, DNA repair was not activated in these cells. In contrast, HPV+ cells lacked cell cycle regulation, leading to genomic instability and eventually apoptosis. Conclusions Taken together, our data provide novel insights into the mechanism of action of CDV and its selectivity for HPV-transformed cells. The proposed mechanism suggests that this selectivity is based on the inability of HPV+ cells to respond to DNA damage, rather than on a

  6. Inferring fitness landscapes and selection on phenotypic states from single-cell genealogical data

    PubMed Central

    Kussell, Edo

    2017-01-01

    Recent advances in single-cell time-lapse microscopy have revealed non-genetic heterogeneity and temporal fluctuations of cellular phenotypes. While different phenotypic traits such as abundance of growth-related proteins in single cells may have differential effects on the reproductive success of cells, rigorous experimental quantification of this process has remained elusive due to the complexity of single cell physiology within the context of a proliferating population. We introduce and apply a practical empirical method to quantify the fitness landscapes of arbitrary phenotypic traits, using genealogical data in the form of population lineage trees which can include phenotypic data of various kinds. Our inference methodology for fitness landscapes determines how reproductivity is correlated to cellular phenotypes, and provides a natural generalization of bulk growth rate measures for single-cell histories. Using this technique, we quantify the strength of selection acting on different cellular phenotypic traits within populations, which allows us to determine whether a change in population growth is caused by individual cells’ response, selection within a population, or by a mixture of these two processes. By applying these methods to single-cell time-lapse data of growing bacterial populations that express a resistance-conferring protein under antibiotic stress, we show how the distributions, fitness landscapes, and selection strength of single-cell phenotypes are affected by the drug. Our work provides a unified and practical framework for quantitative measurements of fitness landscapes and selection strength for any statistical quantities definable on lineages, and thus elucidates the adaptive significance of phenotypic states in time series data. The method is applicable in diverse fields, from single cell biology to stem cell differentiation and viral evolution. PMID:28267748

  7. Conditional Cytotoxic Anti-HIV Gene Therapy for Selectable Cell Modification

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Himanshu; Joshi, Anjali

    2016-01-01

    Gene therapy remains one of the potential strategies to achieve a cure for HIV infection. One of the major limitations of anti-HIV gene therapy concerns recovering an adequate number of modified cells to generate an HIV-proof immune system. Our study addresses this issue by developing a methodology that can mark conditional vector-transformed cells for selection and subsequently target HIV-infected cells for elimination by treatment with ganciclovir (GCV). We used the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (TK) mutant SR39, which is highly potent at killing cells at low GCV concentrations. This gene was cloned into a conditional HIV vector, pNL-GFPRRESA, which expresses the gene of interest as well as green fluorescent protein (GFP) in the presence of HIV Tat protein. We show here that TK-SR39 was more potent that wild-type TK (TK-WT) at eliminating infected cells at lower concentrations of GCV. As the vector expresses GFP in the presence of Tat, transient expression of Tat either by Tat RNA transfection or transduction by a nonintegrating lentiviral (NIL) vector marked the cells with GFP for selection. In cells selected by this strategy, TK-SR39 was more potent at limiting virus replication than TK-WT. Finally, in Jurkat cells modified and selected by this approach, infection with CXCR4-tropic Lai virus could be suppressed by treatment with GCV. GCV treatment limited the number of HIV-infected cells, virus production, as well as virus-induced cytopathic effects in this model. We provide proof of principle that TK-SR39 in a conditional HIV vector can provide a safe and effective anti-HIV strategy. PMID:26800572

  8. Low-dose IL-2 selectively activates subsets of CD4+ Tregs and NK cells

    PubMed Central

    Hirakawa, Masahiro; Matos, Tiago; Liu, Hongye; Koreth, John; Kim, Haesook T.; Paul, Nicole E.; Murase, Kazuyuki; Whangbo, Jennifer; Alho, Ana C.; Nikiforow, Sarah; Cutler, Corey; Ho, Vincent T.; Armand, Philippe; Alyea, Edwin P.; Antin, Joseph H.; Blazar, Bruce R.; Lacerda, Joao F.; Soiffer, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    CD4+ regulatory T cells (CD4Tregs) play a critical role in the maintenance of immune tolerance and prevention of chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. IL-2 supports the proliferation and survival of CD4Tregs and previous studies have demonstrated that IL-2 induces selective expansion of CD4Tregs and improves clinical manifestations of chronic GVHD. However, mechanisms for selective activation of CD4Tregs and the effects of low-dose IL-2 on other immune cells are not well understood. Using mass cytometry, we demonstrate that low concentrations of IL-2 selectively induce STAT5 phosphorylation in Helios+ CD4Tregs and CD56brightCD16– NK cells in vitro. Preferential activation and expansion of Helios+ CD4Tregs and CD56brightCD16– NK cells was also demonstrated in patients with chronic GVHD receiving low-dose IL-2. With prolonged IL-2 treatment for 48 weeks, phenotypic changes were also observed in Helios– CD4Tregs. The effects of low-dose IL-2 therapy on conventional CD4+ T cells and CD8+ T cells were limited to increased expression of PD-1 on effector memory T cells. These studies reveal the selective effects of low-dose IL-2 therapy on Helios+ CD4Tregs and CD56bright NK cells that constitutively express high-affinity IL-2 receptors as well as the indirect effects of prolonged exposure to low concentrations of IL-2 in vivo. PMID:27812545

  9. Conditional Cytotoxic Anti-HIV Gene Therapy for Selectable Cell Modification.

    PubMed

    Garg, Himanshu; Joshi, Anjali

    2016-05-01

    Gene therapy remains one of the potential strategies to achieve a cure for HIV infection. One of the major limitations of anti-HIV gene therapy concerns recovering an adequate number of modified cells to generate an HIV-proof immune system. Our study addresses this issue by developing a methodology that can mark conditional vector-transformed cells for selection and subsequently target HIV-infected cells for elimination by treatment with ganciclovir (GCV). We used the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (TK) mutant SR39, which is highly potent at killing cells at low GCV concentrations. This gene was cloned into a conditional HIV vector, pNL-GFPRRESA, which expresses the gene of interest as well as green fluorescent protein (GFP) in the presence of HIV Tat protein. We show here that TK-SR39 was more potent that wild-type TK (TK-WT) at eliminating infected cells at lower concentrations of GCV. As the vector expresses GFP in the presence of Tat, transient expression of Tat either by Tat RNA transfection or transduction by a nonintegrating lentiviral (NIL) vector marked the cells with GFP for selection. In cells selected by this strategy, TK-SR39 was more potent at limiting virus replication than TK-WT. Finally, in Jurkat cells modified and selected by this approach, infection with CXCR4-tropic Lai virus could be suppressed by treatment with GCV. GCV treatment limited the number of HIV-infected cells, virus production, as well as virus-induced cytopathic effects in this model. We provide proof of principle that TK-SR39 in a conditional HIV vector can provide a safe and effective anti-HIV strategy.

  10. T cell selection and differential activation on structurally related HLA-DR4 ligands.

    PubMed

    Gebe, J A; Novak, E J; Kwok, W W; Farr, A G; Nepom, G T; Buckner, J H

    2001-09-15

    Plasticity of TCR interactions during CD4(+) T cell activation by an MHC-peptide complex accommodates variation in the peptide or MHC contact sites in which recognition of an altered ligand by the T cell can modify the T cell response. To explore the contribution of this form of TCR cross-recognition in the context of T cell selection on disease-associated HLA molecules, we have analyzed the relationship between TCR recognition of the DRB1*0401- and DRB1*0404-encoded HLA class II molecules associated with rheumatoid arthritis. Thymic reaggregation cultures demonstrated that CD4(+) T cells selected on either DRB1*0401 or DRB1*0404 could be subsequently activated by the other MHC molecule. Using HLA tetramer technology we identify hemagglutinin residue 307-319-specific T cells restricted by DRB1*0401, but activated by hemagglutinin residues 307-319, in the context of DRB1*0404. One such clone exhibits an altered cytokine profile upon activation with the alternative MHC ligand. This altered phenotype persists when both class II molecules are present. These findings directly demonstrate that T cells selected on an MHC class II molecule carry the potential for activation on altered self ligands when encountering Ags presented on a related class II molecule. In individuals heterozygous for these alleles the possibility of TCR cross-recognition could lead to an aberrant immune response.

  11. Selection of DNA Aptamers against Glioblastoma Cells with High Affinity and Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Dezhi; Wang, Jiangjie; Zhang, Weiyun; Song, Yanling; Li, Xilan; Zou, Yuan; Zhu, Mingtao; Zhu, Zhi; Chen, Fuyong; Yang, Chaoyong James

    2012-01-01

    Background Glioblastoma is the most common and most lethal form of brain tumor in human. Unfortunately, there is still no effective therapy to this fatal disease and the median survival is generally less than one year from the time of diagnosis. Discovery of ligands that can bind specifically to this type of tumor cells will be of great significance to develop early molecular imaging, targeted delivery and guided surgery methods to battle this type of brain tumor. Methodology/Principal Findings We discovered two target-specific aptamers named GBM128 and GBM131 against cultured human glioblastoma cell line U118-MG after 30 rounds selection by a method called cell-based Systematic Evolution of Ligands by EXponential enrichment (cell-SELEX). These two aptamers have high affinity and specificity against target glioblastoma cells. They neither recognize normal astraglial cells, nor do they recognize other normal and cancer cell lines tested. Clinical tissues were also tested and the results showed that these two aptamers can bind to different clinical glioma tissues but not normal brain tissues. More importantly, binding affinity and selectivity of these two aptamers were retained in complicated biological environment. Conclusion/Significance The selected aptamers could be used to identify specific glioblastoma biomarkers. Methods of molecular imaging, targeted drug delivery, ligand guided surgery can be further developed based on these ligands for early detection, targeted therapy, and guided surgery of glioblastoma leading to effective treatment of glioblastoma. PMID:23056171

  12. Stem Cell Selection In Vivo Using Foamy Vectors Cures Canine Pyruvate Kinase Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Robert A.; Ironside, Christina; Malik, Punam; Kiem, Hans-Peter

    2012-01-01

    Background Hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) gene therapy has cured immunodeficiencies including X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID-X1) and adenine deaminase deficiency (ADA). For these immunodeficiencies corrected cells have a selective advantage in vivo, and low numbers of gene-modified cells are sufficient to provide therapeutic benefit. Strategies to efficiently transduce and/or expand long-term repopulating cells in vivo are needed for treatment of diseases that require higher levels of corrected cells, such as hemoglobinopathies. Here we expanded corrected stem cells in vivo in a canine model of a severe erythroid disease, pyruvate kinase deficiency. Methodology/Principal Findings We used a foamy virus (FV) vector expressing the P140K mutant of methylguanine methyltransferase (MGMTP140K) for in vivo expansion of corrected hematopoietic repopulating cells. FV vectors are attractive gene transfer vectors for hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy since they efficiently transduce repopulating cells and may be safer than more commonly used gammaretroviral vectors. Following transplantation with HSCs transduced ex vivo using a tri-cistronic FV vector that expressed EGFP, R-type pyruvate kinase, and MGMTP140K, we were able to increase marking from approximately 3.5% to 33% in myeloid long-term repopulating cells resulting in a functional cure. Conclusions/Significance Here we describe in one affected dog a functional cure for a severe erythroid disease using stem cell selection in vivo. In addition to providing a potential cure for patients with pyruvate kinase deficiency, in vivo selection using foamy vectors with MGMTP140K has broad potential for several hematopoietic diseases including hemoglobinopathies. PMID:23028826

  13. Stem cell selection in vivo using foamy vectors cures canine pyruvate kinase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Trobridge, Grant D; Beard, Brian C; Wu, Robert A; Ironside, Christina; Malik, Punam; Kiem, Hans-Peter

    2012-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) gene therapy has cured immunodeficiencies including X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID-X1) and adenine deaminase deficiency (ADA). For these immunodeficiencies corrected cells have a selective advantage in vivo, and low numbers of gene-modified cells are sufficient to provide therapeutic benefit. Strategies to efficiently transduce and/or expand long-term repopulating cells in vivo are needed for treatment of diseases that require higher levels of corrected cells, such as hemoglobinopathies. Here we expanded corrected stem cells in vivo in a canine model of a severe erythroid disease, pyruvate kinase deficiency. We used a foamy virus (FV) vector expressing the P140K mutant of methylguanine methyltransferase (MGMTP140K) for in vivo expansion of corrected hematopoietic repopulating cells. FV vectors are attractive gene transfer vectors for hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy since they efficiently transduce repopulating cells and may be safer than more commonly used gammaretroviral vectors. Following transplantation with HSCs transduced ex vivo using a tri-cistronic FV vector that expressed EGFP, R-type pyruvate kinase, and MGMTP140K, we were able to increase marking from approximately 3.5% to 33% in myeloid long-term repopulating cells resulting in a functional cure. Here we describe in one affected dog a functional cure for a severe erythroid disease using stem cell selection in vivo. In addition to providing a potential cure for patients with pyruvate kinase deficiency, in vivo selection using foamy vectors with MGMTP140K has broad potential for several hematopoietic diseases including hemoglobinopathies.

  14. Highly selective biomechanical separation of cancer cells from leukocytes using microfluidic ratchets and hydrodynamic concentrator.

    PubMed

    Lin, Bill K; McFaul, Sarah M; Jin, Chao; Black, Peter C; Ma, Hongshen

    2013-01-01

    The separation of cells based on their biomechanical properties, such as size and deformability, is important in applications such as the identification of circulating tumor cells, where morphological differences can be used to distinguish target cancer cells from contaminant leukocytes. Existing filtration-based separation processes are limited in their selectivity and their ability to extract the separated cells because of clogging in the filter microstructures. We present a cell separation device consisting of a hydrodynamic concentrator and a microfluidic ratchet mechanism operating in tandem. The hydrodynamic concentrator removes the majority of the fluid and a fraction of leukocytes based on size, while the microfluidic ratchet mechanism separates cancer cells from leukocytes based on a combination of size and deformability. The irreversible ratcheting process enables highly selective separation and robust extraction of separated cells. Using cancer cells spiked into leukocyte suspensions, the complete system demonstrated a yield of 97%, while enriching the concentration of target cancer cells 3000 fold relative to the concentration of leukocytes.

  15. Highly selective biomechanical separation of cancer cells from leukocytes using microfluidic ratchets and hydrodynamic concentrator

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Bill K.; McFaul, Sarah M.; Jin, Chao; Black, Peter C.; Ma, Hongshen

    2013-01-01

    The separation of cells based on their biomechanical properties, such as size and deformability, is important in applications such as the identification of circulating tumor cells, where morphological differences can be used to distinguish target cancer cells from contaminant leukocytes. Existing filtration-based separation processes are limited in their selectivity and their ability to extract the separated cells because of clogging in the filter microstructures. We present a cell separation device consisting of a hydrodynamic concentrator and a microfluidic ratchet mechanism operating in tandem. The hydrodynamic concentrator removes the majority of the fluid and a fraction of leukocytes based on size, while the microfluidic ratchet mechanism separates cancer cells from leukocytes based on a combination of size and deformability. The irreversible ratcheting process enables highly selective separation and robust extraction of separated cells. Using cancer cells spiked into leukocyte suspensions, the complete system demonstrated a yield of 97%, while enriching the concentration of target cancer cells 3000 fold relative to the concentration of leukocytes. PMID:24404034

  16. Interleukin-33 drives a proinflammatory endothelial activation that selectively targets nonquiescent cells.

    PubMed

    Pollheimer, Jürgen; Bodin, Johanna; Sundnes, Olav; Edelmann, Reidunn J; Skånland, Sigrid S; Sponheim, Jon; Brox, Mari Johanna; Sundlisaeter, Eirik; Loos, Tamara; Vatn, Morten; Kasprzycka, Monika; Wang, Junbai; Küchler, Axel M; Taskén, Kjetil; Haraldsen, Guttorm; Hol, Johanna

    2013-02-01

    Interleukin (IL)-33 is a nuclear protein that is released from stressed or damaged cells to act as an alarmin. We investigated the effects of IL-33 on endothelial cells, using the prototype IL-1 family member, IL-1β, as a reference. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells were stimulated with IL-33 or IL-1β, showing highly similar phosphorylation of signaling molecules, induction of adhesion molecules, and transcription profiles. However, intradermally injected IL-33 elicited significantly less proinflammatory endothelial activation when compared with IL-1β and led us to observe that quiescent endothelial cells (ppRb(low)p27(high)) were strikingly resistant to IL-33. Accordingly, the IL-33 receptor was preferentially expressed in nonquiescent cells of low-density cultures, corresponding to selective induction of adhesion molecules and chemokines. Multiparameter phosphoflow cytometry confirmed that signaling driven by IL-33 was stronger in nonquiescent cells. Manipulation of nuclear IL-33 expression by siRNA or adenoviral transduction revealed no functional link between nuclear, endogenous IL-33, and exogenous IL-33 responsiveness. In contrast to other inflammatory cytokines, IL-33 selectively targets nonquiescent endothelial cells. By this novel concept, quiescent cells may remain nonresponsive to a proinflammatory stimulus that concomitantly triggers a powerful response in cells that have been released from contact inhibition.

  17. Mechanism of sensitization of MDR cancer cells by Pluronic block copolymers: Selective energy depletion

    PubMed Central

    Batrakova, E V; Li, S; Elmquist, W F; Miller, D W; Alakhov, V Y; Kabanov, A V

    2001-01-01

    This paper, for the first time, demonstrates that exposure of cells to the poly(ethylene oxide)-poly(propylene oxide) block copolymer, Pluronic P85, results in a substantial decrease in ATP levels selectively in MDR cells. Cells expressing high levels of functional P-glycoprotein (MCF-7/ADR, KBv; LLC-MDR1; Caco-2, bovine brain microvessel endothelial cells [BBMECs]) are highly responsive to Pluronic treatment, while cells with low levels of P-glycoprotein expression (MCF-7, KB, LLC-PK1, human umbilical vein endothelial cells [HUVECs] C2C12 myoblasts) are much less responsive to such treatment. Cytotoxicity studies suggest that Pluronic acts as a chemosensitizer and potentiates cytotoxic effects of doxorubicin in MDR cells. The ability of Pluronic to inhibit P-glycoprotein and sensitize MDR cells appears to be a result of ATP depletion. Because many mechanisms of drug resistance are energy dependent, a successful strategy for treating MDR cancer could be based on selective energy depletion in MDR cells. Therefore, the finding of the energy-depleting effects of Pluronic P85, in combination with its sensitization effects is of considerable theoretical and practical significance. © 2001 Cancer Research Campaign http://www.bjcancer.com PMID:11747344

  18. Selective control of human glioma cell proliferation by specific cell interaction.

    PubMed

    MacDonald, C M; Freshney, R I; Hart, E; Graham, D I

    1985-01-01

    Cells cultured from anaplastic astrocytoma (Kernohan and Sayre, grades III and IV) will proliferate on confluent monolayers of normal glia, while cells cultured from normal brain will not. The growth of a cell line containing a high proportion of well-differentiated glioma cells (G-CCM) was partially inhibited, though not as much as normal glia, while the growth of a cell line made up of less differentiated cells (G-UVW) was enhanced by the normal glia. Although non-glial confluent monolayers also inhibited the growth of normal glia, this was less specific, as one normal glial line (N-DUT) grew on fibroblasts and intestinal epithelium, although it was unable to do so on normal glia. It is suggested that this may be a useful method for examining reduced density limitation of growth, discriminating between normal and malignant glia, and for separating glioma cells from contaminating normal cells.

  19. Sulindac sulfide selectively increases sensitivity of ABCC1 expressing tumor cells to doxorubicin and glutathione depletion.

    PubMed

    Whitt, Jason D; Keeton, Adam B; Gary, Bernard D; Sklar, Larry A; Sodani, Kamlesh; Chen, Zhe-Sheng; Piazza, Gary A

    2016-03-01

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters ABCC1 (MRP1), ABCB1 (P-gp), and ABCG2 (BCRP) contribute to chemotherapy failure. The primary goals of this study were to characterize the efficacy and mechanism of the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), sulindac sulfide, to reverse ABCC1 mediated resistance to chemotherapeutic drugs and to determine if sulindac sulfide can influence sensitivity to chemotherapeutic drugs independently of drug efflux. Cytotoxicity assays were performed to measure resistance of ABC-expressing cell lines to doxorubicin and other chemotherapeutic drugs. NSAIDs were tested for the ability to restore sensitivity to resistance selected tumor cell lines, as well as a large panel of standard tumor cell lines. Other experiments characterized the mechanism by which sulindac sulfide inhibits ABCC1 substrate and co-substrate (GSH) transport in isolated membrane vesicles and intact cells. Selective reversal of multi-drug resistance (MDR), decreased efflux of doxorubicin, and fluorescent substrates were demonstrated by sulindac sulfide and a related NSAID, indomethacin, in resistance selected and engineered cell lines expressing ABCC1, but not ABCB1 or ABCG2. Sulindac sulfide also inhibited transport of leukotriene C4 into membrane vesicles. Sulindac sulfide enhanced the sensitivity to doxorubicin in 24 of 47 tumor cell lines, including all melanoma lines tested (7-7). Sulindac sulfide also decreased intracellular GSH in ABCC1 expressing cells, while the glutathione synthesis inhibitor, BSO, selectively increased sensitivity to sulindac sulfide induced cytotoxicity. Sulindac sulfide potently and selectively reverses ABCC1-mediated MDR at clinically achievable concentrations. ABCC1 expressing tumors may be highly sensitive to the direct cytotoxicity of sulindac sulfide, and in combination with chemotherapeutic drugs that induce oxidative stress.

  20. Sulindac sulfide selectively increases sensitivity of ABCC1 expressing tumor cells to doxorubicin and glutathione depletion

    PubMed Central

    Whitt, Jason D.; Keeton, Adam B.; Gary, Bernard D.; Sklar, Larry A.; Sodani, Kamlesh; Chen, Zhe-Sheng; Piazza, Gary A.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transpo rters ABCC1 (MRP1), ABCB1 (P-gp), and ABCG2 (BCRP) contribute to chemotherapy failure. The primary goals of this study were to characterize the efficacy and mechanism of the non­steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), sulindac sulfide, to reverse ABCC1 mediated resistance to chemother­apeutic drugs and to determine if sulindac sulfide can influence sensitivity to chemotherapeutic drugs independently of drug efflux. Cytotoxicity assays were performed to measure resistance of ABC-expressing cell lines to doxoru­bicin and other chemotherapeutic drugs. NSAIDs were tested for the ability to restore sensitivity to resistance selected tumor cell lines, as well as a large panel of standard tumor cell lines. Other experiments characterized the mechanism by which sulindac sulfide inhibits ABCC1 substrate and co-substrate (GSH) transport in isolated membrane vesicles and intact cells. Selective reversal of multi-drug resistance (MDR), decreased efflux of doxor­ubicin, and fluorescent substrates were demonstrated by sulindac sulfide and a related NSAID, indomethacin, in resistance selected and engineered cell lines expressing ABCC1, but not ABCB1 or ABCG2. Sulindac sulfide also inhibited transport of leukotriene C4 into membrane vesicles. Sulindac sulfide enhanced the sensitivity to doxoru­bicin in 24 of 47 tumor cell lines, including all melanoma lines tested (7-7). Sulindac sulfide also decreased intra­cellular GSH in ABCC1 expressing cells, while the glutathione synthesis inhibitor, BSO, selectively increased sensitivity to sulindac sulfide induced cytotoxicity. Sulindac sulfide potently and selectively reverses ABCC1-mediated MDR at clinically achievable concentrations. ABCC1 expressing tumors may be highly sensitive to the direct cytotoxicity of sulindac sulfide, and in combination with chemotherapeutic drugs that induce oxidative stress. PMID:28276667

  1. Triethylenetetramine Synergizes with Pharmacologic Ascorbic Acid in Hydrogen Peroxide Mediated Selective Toxicity to Breast Cancer Cell

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lianlian; Luo, Xiaofang; Li, Cong; Huang, Yubing; Xu, Ping; Lloyd-Davies, Laetitia H.; Delplancke, Thibaut; Peng, Chuan; Qi, Hongbo; Baker, Philip

    2017-01-01

    Breast cancer is characterized by overexpression of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and downregulation of catalase and more resistance to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) than normal cells. Thus, relatively high H2O2 promotes breast cancer cell growth and proliferation. However, excessive intracellular H2O2 leads to death of breast cancer cells. In cancer cells, high level ascorbic acid (Asc) is able to be autoxidized and thus provides an electron to oxygen to generate H2O2. In the present study, we demonstrated that triethylenetetramine (TETA) enhances Asc autoxidation and thus elevates H2O2 production in MCF-7 cells. Furthermore, Asc/TETA combination significantly impaired cancer cell viability, while having much milder effects on normal cells, indicating Asc/TETA could be a promising therapy for breast cancer. Moreover, SOD1 and N-acetyl-L-cysteine failed to improve MCF-7 cells viability in the presence of Asc/TETA, while catalase significantly inhibited the cytotoxicity of Asc/TETA to breast cancer cells, strongly suggesting that the selective cytotoxicity of Asc/TETA to cancer cells is H2O2-dependent. In addition, Asc/TETA induces RAS/ERK downregulation in breast cancer cells. Animal studies confirmed that Asc/TETA effectively suppressed tumor growth in vivo. In conclusion, TETA synergizes pharmacologic Asc autoxidation and H2O2 overproduction in breast cancer cells, which suppresses RAS/ERK pathway and results in apoptosis. PMID:28280522

  2. Triethylenetetramine Synergizes with Pharmacologic Ascorbic Acid in Hydrogen Peroxide Mediated Selective Toxicity to Breast Cancer Cell.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lianlian; Luo, Xiaofang; Li, Cong; Huang, Yubing; Xu, Ping; Lloyd-Davies, Laetitia H; Delplancke, Thibaut; Peng, Chuan; Gao, Rufei; Qi, Hongbo; Tong, Chao; Baker, Philip

    2017-01-01

    Breast cancer is characterized by overexpression of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and downregulation of catalase and more resistance to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) than normal cells. Thus, relatively high H2O2 promotes breast cancer cell growth and proliferation. However, excessive intracellular H2O2 leads to death of breast cancer cells. In cancer cells, high level ascorbic acid (Asc) is able to be autoxidized and thus provides an electron to oxygen to generate H2O2. In the present study, we demonstrated that triethylenetetramine (TETA) enhances Asc autoxidation and thus elevates H2O2 production in MCF-7 cells. Furthermore, Asc/TETA combination significantly impaired cancer cell viability, while having much milder effects on normal cells, indicating Asc/TETA could be a promising therapy for breast cancer. Moreover, SOD1 and N-acetyl-L-cysteine failed to improve MCF-7 cells viability in the presence of Asc/TETA, while catalase significantly inhibited the cytotoxicity of Asc/TETA to breast cancer cells, strongly suggesting that the selective cytotoxicity of Asc/TETA to cancer cells is H2O2-dependent. In addition, Asc/TETA induces RAS/ERK downregulation in breast cancer cells. Animal studies confirmed that Asc/TETA effectively suppressed tumor growth in vivo. In conclusion, TETA synergizes pharmacologic Asc autoxidation and H2O2 overproduction in breast cancer cells, which suppresses RAS/ERK pathway and results in apoptosis.

  3. Positive selection of T-lymphocytes induced by intrathymic injection of a thymic epithelial cell line

    PubMed Central

    Vukmanović, Stanislav; Grandea, Andres G.; Faas, Susan J.; Knowles, Barbara B.; Bevan, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    Tlymphocytes recognize antigens as peptide fragments associated with molecules encoded by the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) and expressed on the surface of antigen-presenting cells1. In the thymus, T cells bearing αβ receptors that react with the MHC molecules expressed by radioresistant stromal elements are positively selected for maturation2–5. In (A × B → A) bone marrow chimaeras, T cells restricted to the MHC-A haplotype are positively selected, whereas MHC-B-reactive thymocytes are not. We investigated whether the introduction of particular thymic stromal elements bearing MHC-B molecules could alter the fate of B-reactive T cells in these (A × B → A) chimaeras. Thymic epithelial cell (TEC) lines expressing H-2b were introduced by intrathymic injection into (H-2b/s → H2S) bone marrow chimaeras and we measured their ability to generate H-2b-restricted cytotoxic T-lymphocytes (CTLs). We report here that one TEC line, 427.1, was able positively to select CTLs specific for influenza and vesicular stomatitis virus antigens in association with class I H–2b molecules. In addition, line 427.1 can process cytoplasmic proteins for presentation to H–2Kb- and H-2Db-restricted CTLs. Thus, a TEC line capable of normal class I MHC antigen processing and presentation in vitro can induce positive selection after intrathymic injection. PMID:1331804

  4. Selective and potent furin inhibitors protect cells from anthrax without significant toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Remacle, Albert G.; Gawlik, Katarzyna; Golubkov, Vladislav S.; Cadwell, Gregory W.; Liddington, Robert C.; Cieplak, Piotr; Millis, Sherri Z.; Desjardins, Roxane; Routhier, Sophie; Yuan, Xue Wen; Neugebauer, Witold A.; Day, Robert; Strongin, Alex Y.

    2010-01-01

    Furin and related proprotein convertases cleave the multibasic motifs R-X-R/K/X-R in the precursor proteins and, as a result, transform the latent proproteins into biologically active proteins and peptides. Furin is present both in the intracellular secretory pathway and at the cell surface. Intracellular furin processes its multiple normal cellular targets in the Golgi and secretory vesicle compartments while cell-surface furin appears to be essential only for the processing of certain pathogenic proteins and, importantly, anthrax. To design potent, safe and selective inhibitors of furin, we evaluated the potency and selectivity of the derivatized peptidic inhibitors modeled from the extended furin cleavage sequence of avian influenza A H5N1. We determined that the N- and C-terminal modifications of the original RARRRKKRT inhibitory scaffold produced selective and potent, nanomolar range, inhibitors of furin. These inhibitors did not interfere with the normal cellular function of furin because of the likely functional redundancy existing between furin and other proprotein convertases. These furin inhibitors, however, were highly potent in blocking the furin-dependent cell-surface processing of anthrax protective antigen-83 both in vitro and cell-based assays and in vivo. We conclude that the inhibitors we have designed have a promising potential as selective anthrax inhibitors, without affecting major cell functions. PMID:20197107

  5. Selective and potent furin inhibitors protect cells from anthrax without significant toxicity.

    PubMed

    Remacle, Albert G; Gawlik, Katarzyna; Golubkov, Vladislav S; Cadwell, Gregory W; Liddington, Robert C; Cieplak, Piotr; Millis, Sherri Z; Desjardins, Roxane; Routhier, Sophie; Yuan, Xue Wen; Neugebauer, Witold A; Day, Robert; Strongin, Alex Y

    2010-06-01

    Furin and related proprotein convertases cleave the multibasic motifs R-X-R/K/X-R in the precursor proteins and, as a result, transform the latent proproteins into biologically active proteins and peptides. Furin is present both in the intracellular secretory pathway and at the cell surface. Intracellular furin processes its multiple normal cellular targets in the Golgi and secretory vesicle compartments while cell-surface furin appears to be essential only for the processing of certain pathogenic proteins and, importantly, anthrax. To design potent, safe and selective inhibitors of furin, we evaluated the potency and selectivity of the derivatized peptidic inhibitors modeled from the extended furin cleavage sequence of avian influenza A H5N1. We determined that the N- and C-terminal modifications of the original RARRRKKRT inhibitory scaffold produced selective and potent, nanomolar range, inhibitors of furin. These inhibitors did not interfere with the normal cellular function of furin because of the likely functional redundancy existing between furin and other proprotein convertases. These furin inhibitors, however, were highly potent in blocking the furin-dependent cell-surface processing of anthrax protective antigen-83 both in vitro and cell-based assays and in vivo. We conclude that the inhibitors we have designed have a promising potential as selective anthrax inhibitors, without affecting major cell functions.

  6. Selection of mutant Chinese hamster ovary cells altered glycoproteins by means of tritiated fucose suicide.

    PubMed Central

    Hirschberg, C B; Baker, R M; Perez, M; Spencer, L A; Watson, D

    1981-01-01

    Mutant Chinese hamster ovary cells altered in glycoproteins have been isolated by selecting for ability to survive exposure to [6-3H]fucose. Mutagenized wild-type cells were permitted to incorporate [3H]fucose to approximately 1 cpm of trichloroacetic acid-insoluble radioactivity per cell and then frozen for several days to accumulate radiation damage. The overall viability of the population was reduced by 5- to 50-fold. Four consecutive selection cycles were carried out. The surviving cells were screened by replica plating-fluorography for clones showing decreased incorporation of fucose into trichloroacetic acid-insoluble macromolecules. Considerable enrichment for cells deficient in fucose uptake or incorporation into proteins (or both) was found in populations surviving the later selection cycles. Two mutant clones isolated after the fourth selection cycle had the same doubling time as the wild type, but contained only 30 to 40% as much fucose bound to proteins as the wild type. Sialic acid contents of the mutants and the wild type were similar. The mutants differed quantitatively and qualitatively from the wild type and from each other with respect to total glycoprotein profiles as visualized by sodium dodecyl sulfate gel electrophoresis. Differences were also found in resistances to cytotoxicity of lectins such as concanavalin A and wheat germ agglutinin. Images PMID:7202113

  7. Pertussis Toxin Is a Robust and Selective Inhibitor of High Grade Glioma Cell Migration and Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lei; Natali, Letizia; Karimi-Mostowfi, Nicki; Brifault, Coralie; Gonias, Steven L.

    2016-01-01

    In high grade glioma (HGG), extensive tumor cell infiltration of normal brain typically precludes identifying effective margins for surgical resection or irradiation. Pertussis toxin (PT) is a multimeric complex that inactivates diverse Gi/o G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs). Despite the broad continuum of regulatory events controlled by GPCRs, PT may be applicable as a therapeutic. We have shown that the urokinase receptor (uPAR) is a major driver of HGG cell migration. uPAR-initiated cell-signaling requires a Gi/o GPCR, N-formyl Peptide Receptor 2 (FPR2), as an essential co-receptor and is thus, PT-sensitive. Herein, we show that PT robustly inhibits migration of three separate HGG-like cell lines that express a mutated form of the EGF Receptor (EGFR), EGFRvIII, which is constitutively active. PT also almost completely blocked the ability of HGG cells to invade Matrigel. In the equivalent concentration range (0.01–1.0 μg/mL), PT had no effect on cell survival and only affected proliferation of one cell line. Neutralization of EGFRvIII expression in HGG cells, which is known to activate uPAR-initiated cell-signaling, promoted HGG cell migration. The increase in HGG cell migration, induced by EGFRvIII neutralization, was entirely blocked by silencing FPR2 gene expression or by treating the cells with PT. When U87MG HGG cells were cultured as suspended neurospheres in serum-free, growth factor-supplemented medium, uPAR expression was increased. HGG cells isolated from neurospheres migrated through Transwell membranes without loss of cell contacts; this process was inhibited by PT by >90%. PT also inhibited expression of vimentin by HGG cells; vimentin is associated with epithelial-mesenchymal transition and worsened prognosis. We conclude that PT may function as a selective inhibitor of HGG cell migration and invasion. PMID:27977780

  8. Quercetin derivatives as potent inducers of selective cytotoxicity in glioma cells.

    PubMed

    Dell'Albani, Paola; Di Marco, Barbara; Grasso, Sonia; Rocco, Concetta; Foti, Mario C

    2017-04-01

    Quercetin (Q) is a flavonoid widely distributed in the plant kingdom and well-known for its ability to exert antioxidant, prooxidant and anticarcinogenic activities in several tumor cells. Furthermore, quercetin plays an important role both in the regulation of key elements in cellular signal transduction pathways related to apoptotic cell death, and in cell cycle progression. Several studies have reported of toxic effects of Q against glioma cell lines. In this study, the effects of Q and of some Q-derivatives (acyl esters and bromo-derivatives) on U373-MG and 9L glioma cell lines survival are analyzed. The 24-hour treatment of glioma cells with several concentrations of Q (25, 50 and 100μM) did not cause any cytotoxic effects, while the administration of Q-derivatives, such as acylated and brominated quercetin, caused a sharp increase in cell death. Among all tested derivatives, 3-O-decanoylquercetin 10 manifested the strongest cytotoxic effect at a concentration as low as 25μM both in U373-MG (ca. 40% viability after 24h) and in 9L cells (ca. 20% viability after 24h). The cytotoxic effects of the Q-derivatives 3 and 10-13 were proven to be satisfactorily selective for glioma cells. When Q-derivatives were in fact administered to mouse primary astroglial or human fibroblast cell cultures, a higher cell survival rate (~90-70% and 55-45%, respectively) was observed relative to that detected in glioma cells. These results prove that selective esterification and bromination of Q increase to a great extent the toxicity of this polyphenol against glioma cells, thereby providing a possible new tool for cyto-specific glioma therapy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Selective elimination of neuroblastoma cells by synergistic effect of Akt kinase inhibitor and tetrathiomolybdate.

    PubMed

    Navrátilová, Jarmila; Karasová, Martina; Kohutková Lánová, Martina; Jiráková, Ludmila; Budková, Zuzana; Pacherník, Jiří; Šmarda, Jan; Beneš, Petr

    2017-09-01

    Neuroblastoma is the most common extracranial solid tumour of infancy. Pathological activation of glucose consumption, glycolysis and glycolysis-activating Akt kinase occur frequently in neuroblastoma cells, and these changes correlate with poor prognosis of patients. Therefore, several inhibitors of glucose utilization and the Akt kinase activity are in preclinical trials as potential anti-cancer drugs. However, metabolic plasticity of cancer cells might undermine efficacy of this approach. In this work, we identified oxidative phosphorylation as compensatory mechanism preserving viability of neuroblastoma cells with inhibited glucose uptake/Akt kinase. It was oxidative phosphorylation that maintained intracellular level of ATP and proliferative capacity of these cells. The oxidative phosphorylation inhibitors (rotenone, tetrathiomolybdate) synergized with inhibitor of the Akt kinase/glucose uptake in down-regulation of both viability of neuroblastoma cells and clonogenic potential of cells forming neuroblastoma spheroids. Interestingly, tetrathiomolybdate acted as highly specific inhibitor of oxygen consumption and activator of lactate production in neuroblastoma cells, but not in normal fibroblasts and neuronal cells. Moreover, the reducing effect of tetrathiomolybdate on cell viability and the level of ATP in the cells with inhibited Akt kinase/glucose uptake was also selective for neuroblastoma cells. Therefore, efficient elimination of neuroblastoma cells requires inhibition of both glucose uptake/Akt kinase and oxidative phosphorylation activities. The use of tetrathiomolybdate as a mitochondrial inhibitor contributes to selectivity of this combined treatment, preferentially targeting neuroblastoma cells. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine.

  10. Low Selection Pressure Aids the Evolution of Cooperative Ribozyme Mutations in Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Amini, Zhaleh N.; Müller, Ulrich F.

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the evolution of functional RNA molecules is important for our molecular understanding of biology. Here we tested experimentally how two evolutionary parameters, selection pressure and recombination, influenced the evolution of an evolving RNA population. This was done using four parallel evolution experiments that employed low or gradually increasing selection pressure, and recombination events either at the end or dispersed throughout the evolution. As model system, a trans-splicing group I intron ribozyme was evolved in Escherichia coli cells over 12 rounds of selection and amplification, including mutagenesis and recombination. The low selection pressure resulted in higher efficiency of the evolved ribozyme populations, whereas differences in recombination did not have a strong effect. Five mutations were responsible for the highest efficiency. The first mutation swept quickly through all four evolving populations, whereas the remaining four mutations accumulated later and more efficiently under low selection pressure. To determine why low selection pressure aided this evolution, all evolutionary intermediates between the wild type and the 5-mutation variant were constructed, and their activities at three different selection pressures were determined. The resulting fitness profiles showed a high cooperativity among the four late mutations, which can explain why high selection pressure led to inefficient evolution. These results show experimentally how low selection pressure can benefit the evolution of cooperative mutations in functional RNAs. PMID:24089519

  11. Crossreactive αβ T cell receptors are the predominant targets of thymocyte negative selection

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Benjamin D.; Bunker, Jeffrey J.; Erickson, Steven A.; Oh-Hora, Masatsugu; Bendelac, Albert

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY The precise impact of thymic positive and negative selection on the T cell receptor (TCR) repertoire remains controversial. Here, we used unbiased, high-throughput cloning and retroviral expression of individual preselection TCRs to provide a direct assessment of these processes at the clonal level in vivo. We found that 15% of random TCRs induced signaling and directed positive (7.5%) or negative (7.5%) selection, depending on strength of signal, whereas the remaining 85% failed to induce signaling or selection. Most negatively selected TCRs exhibited promiscuous crossreactivity toward multiple other major histocompatibility complex (MHC) haplotypes. In contrast, TCRs that were positively selected or non-selected were minimally crossreactive. Negative selection of crossreactive TCRs led to clonal deletion but also recycling into intestinal CD4−CD8β− intraepithelial lymphocytes (iIELs). Thus, broadly crossreactive TCRs arise at low frequency in the pre-selection repertoire but constitute the primary drivers of thymic negative selection and iIEL lineage differentiation. PMID:26522985

  12. Long-term artificial selection reveals a role of TCTP in autophagy in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ke; Huang, Chunhua; Yuan, Jia; Cheng, Hanhua; Zhou, Rongjia

    2014-08-01

    Understanding genomic variation and detecting selection signatures in a genome under selection have been great challenges for a century. Activation, development/exhaustion of primordial follicles in mammalian ovary determines reproductive success, menopause/end of female reproductive life. However, molecular mechanisms underlying oogenesis, particularly under artificial selection, are largely unknown. We report that a proteome-wide scan for selection signatures in the genome over 9,000 years of artificial pressure on the ovary revealed a general picture of selection signatures in the genome, especially genomic variations through artificial selection were detected in promoter and intron regions. Crossbreeding between domestic and wild species results in more than half of the protein spots exhibiting heterosis. Translationally controlled tumor protein (TCTP) is upregulated by artificial selection and positively regulates autophagy through the AMP-activated protein kinase pathway. Notably, TCTP interacts with ATG16 complex. In addition to cytoplasmic autophagy, nucleophagy occurs in the nuclei of granulosa and cumulus cells in ovaries, indicating an importance of the nuclear material for degradation by nucleophagy. Our findings provide insight into cellular and molecular mechanisms relevant for improvement of ovary functions, and identify selection signatures in the genome for ovary function over long-term artificial selection pressure.

  13. Monitoring ion activities in and around cells using ion-selective liquid-membrane microelectrodes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seong-Ki; Boron, Walter F; Parker, Mark D

    2013-01-15

    Determining the effective concentration (i.e., activity) of ions in and around living cells is important to our understanding of the contribution of those ions to cellular function. Moreover, monitoring changes in ion activities in and around cells is informative about the actions of the transporters and/or channels operating in the cell membrane. The activity of an ion can be measured using a glass microelectrode that includes in its tip a liquid-membrane doped with an ion-selective ionophore. Because these electrodes can be fabricated with tip diameters that are less than 1 μm, they can be used to impale single cells in order to monitor the activities of intracellular ions. This review summarizes the history, theory, and practice of ion-selective microelectrode use and brings together a number of classic and recent examples of their usefulness in the realm of physiological study.

  14. Monitoring Ion Activities In and Around Cells Using Ion-Selective Liquid-Membrane Microelectrodes

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seong-Ki; Boron, Walter F.; Parker, Mark D.

    2013-01-01

    Determining the effective concentration (i.e., activity) of ions in and around living cells is important to our understanding of the contribution of those ions to cellular function. Moreover, monitoring changes in ion activities in and around cells is informative about the actions of the transporters and/or channels operating in the cell membrane. The activity of an ion can be measured using a glass microelectrode that includes in its tip a liquid-membrane doped with an ion-selective ionophore. Because these electrodes can be fabricated with tip diameters that are less than 1 μm, they can be used to impale single cells in order to monitor the activities of intracellular ions. This review summarizes the history, theory, and practice of ion-selective microelectrode use and brings together a number of classic and recent examples of their usefulness in the realm of physiological study. PMID:23322102

  15. Selection of Intracellularly Functional RNA Mimics of Green Fluorescent Protein Using Fluorescence-Activated Cell Sorting.

    PubMed

    Zou, Jiawei; Huang, Xin; Wu, Lei; Chen, Gangyi; Dong, Juan; Cui, Xin; Tang, Zhuo

    2015-12-01

    Fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) was exploited to isolate Escherichia coli cells that were highly fluorescent due to the expression of RNA aptamers that induce fluorescence of 3,5-difluoro-4-hydroxybenzylidene imidazolinone. Two different aptamers, named ZT-26 and ZT-324, were identified by this method and compared to the fluorescence-signaling properties of Spinach, a previously reported RNA aptamer. Aptamer ZT-26 exhibits significantly enhanced fluorescence over Spinach only in vitro. However, aptamer ZT-324 is 36% brighter than Spinach when expressed in E. coli. The FACS-based selection strategy presented here is attractive for deriving fluorescent RNA aptamers that function in cells as it directly selects for cells with a high level of fluorescence due to the expression of the RNA aptamer.

  16. Targeting heat shock proteins on cancer cells: selection, characterization, and cell-penetrating properties of a peptidic GRP78 ligand.

    PubMed

    Kim, Youngsoo; Lillo, Antonietta M; Steiniger, Sebastian C J; Liu, Ying; Ballatore, Carlo; Anichini, Andrea; Mortarini, Roberta; Kaufmann, Gunnar F; Zhou, Bin; Felding-Habermann, Brunhilde; Janda, Kim D

    2006-08-08

    Peptidic ligands can be used for specific cell targeting and the delivery of payloads into the target cell. Here we describe the screening of a pool of cyclic peptide phage display libraries using whole-cell panning against human melanoma cell line Me6652/4. This strategy resulted in the selection of the cyclic 13-mer Pep42, CTVALPGGYVRVC, which showed preferential internalization into melanoma cell line Me6652/4 versus the reference cell line Me6652/56. This translocation is a receptor-mediated process that does not require electrostatic interactions nor does it involve transfer to the lysosomal compartment. The cellular receptor for Pep42 was identified as the surface membrane form of glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78), a member of the heat shock protein family and a marker on malignant cancer cells. The cellular uptake and intracellular trafficking of Pep42-Quantum Dot conjugates was monitored by confocal laser microscopy, and colocalization within the endoplasmic reticulum was observed. The uptake of Pep42 could be blocked by a monoclonal antibody against the identified receptor. Furthermore, Pep42 was shown to target specifically GRP78-expressing cancer cells. The in vitro cytotoxicity of a Pep42-Taxol conjugate was evaluated by flow cytometry wherein the conjugate was shown to induce apoptosis and was more effective in promoting programmed cell death in Me6652/4 cells. In summary, the data presented suggest that cyclic peptide Pep42 might be a powerful tool in the construction of drug conjugates designed to selectively kill malignant cancer cells.

  17. Selective purging of human multiple myeloma cells from autologous stem cell transplant grafts using oncolytic myxoma virus

    PubMed Central

    Bartee, Eric; Chan, Winnie S.; Moreb, Jan S.; Cogle, Christopher R.; McFadden, Grant

    2012-01-01

    Autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) and novel therapies have improved overall survival of patients with multiple myeloma; however, most patients relapse and eventually succumb to their disease. Evidence indicates that residual cancer cells contaminate autologous grafts and may contribute to early relapses after ASCT. Here, we demonstrate that ex vivo treatment with an oncolytic poxvirus called myxoma virus results in specific elimination of human myeloma cells by inducing rapid cellular apoptosis while fully sparing normal hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs). The specificity of this elimination is based on strong binding of the virus to myeloma cells coupled with an inability of the virus to bind or infect CD34+ HSPCs. These two features allow myxoma to readily identify and distinguish even low levels of myeloma cells in complex mixtures. This ex vivo MYXV treatment also effectively inhibits systemic in vivo engraftment of human myeloma cells into immunodeficient mice and results in efficient elimination of primary CD138+ myeloma cells contaminating patient hematopoietic cell products. We conclude that ex vivo myxoma treatment represents a safe and effective method to selectively eliminate myeloma cells from hematopoietic autografts prior to reinfusion. PMID:22516053

  18. Patterning pallet arrays for cell selection based on high-resolution measurements of fluorescent biosensors.

    PubMed

    Shadpour, Hamed; Zawistowski, Jon S; Herman, Annadele; Hahn, Klaus; Allbritton, Nancy L

    2011-06-24

    Pallet arrays enable cells to be separated while they remain adherent to a surface and provide a much greater range of cell selection criteria relative to that of current technologies. However there remains a need to further broaden cell selection criteria to include dynamic intracellular signaling events. To demonstrate the feasibility of measuring cellular protein behavior on the arrays using high resolution microscopy, the surfaces of individual pallets were modified to minimize the impact of scattered light at the pallet edges. The surfaces of the three-dimensional pallets on an array were patterned with a coating such as fibronectin using a customized stamping tool. Micropatterns of varying shape and size were printed in designated regions on the pallets in single or multiple steps to demonstrate the reliability and precision of patterning molecules on the pallet surface. Use of a fibronectin matrix stamped at the center of each pallet permitted the localization of H1299 and mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF) cells to the pallet centers and away from the edges. Compared to pallet arrays with fibronectin coating the entire top surface, arrays with a central fibronectin pattern increased the percentage of cells localized to the pallet center by 3-4-fold. Localization of cells to the pallet center also enabled the physical separation of cells from optical artifacts created by the rough pallet side walls. To demonstrate the measurement of dynamic intracellular signaling on the arrays, fluorescence measurements of high spatial resolution were performed using a RhoA GTPase biosensor. This biosensor utilized fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between cyan fluorescent protein (CFP) and yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) to measure localized RhoA activity in cellular ruffles at the cell periphery. These results demonstrated the ability to perform spatially resolved measurements of fluorescence-based sensors on the pallet arrays. Thus, the patterned pallet arrays

  19. Patterning pallet arrays for cell selection based on high-resolution measurements of fluorescent biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Shadpour, Hamed; Zawistowski, Jon S.; Herman, Annadele; Hahn, Klaus; Allbritton, Nancy L.

    2011-01-01

    Pallet arrays enable cells to be separated while they remain adherent to a surface and provide a much greater range of cell selection criteria relative to that of current technologies. However there remains a need to further broaden cell selection criteria to include dynamic intracellular signaling events. To demonstrate the feasibility of measuring cellular protein behavior on the arrays using high resolution microscopy, the surfaces of individual pallets were modified to minimize the impact of scattered light at the pallet edges. The surfaces of the three-dimensional pallets on an array were patterned with a coating such as fibronectin using a customized stamping tool. Micropatterns of varying shape and size were printed in designated regions on the pallets in single or multiple steps to demonstrate the reliability and precision of patterning molecules on the pallet surface. Use of a fibronectin matrix stamped at the center of each pallet permitted the localization of H1299 and mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF) cells to the pallet centers and away from the edges. Compared to pallet arrays with fibronection coating the entire top surface, arrays with a central fibronectin pattern increased the percentage of cells localized to the pallet center by 3-4 fold. Localization of cells to the pallet center also enabled the physical separation of cells from optical artifacts created by the rough pallet side walls. To demonstrate the measurement of dynamic intracellular signaling on the arrays, fluorescence measurements of high spatial resolution were performed using a RhoA GTPase biosensor. This biosensor utilized fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between cyan fluorescent protein (CFP) and yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) to measure localized RhoA activity in cellular ruffles at the cell periphery. These results demonstrated the ability to perform spatially resolved measurements of fluorescence-based sensors on the pallet arrays. Thus, the patterned pallet

  20. Butyrate-rich Colonic Microenvironment Is a Relevant Selection Factor for Metabolically Adapted Tumor Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Serpa, Jacinta; Caiado, Francisco; Carvalho, Tânia; Torre, Cheila; Gonçalves, Luís G.; Casalou, Cristina; Lamosa, Pedro; Rodrigues, Margarida; Zhu, Zhenping; Lam, Eric W. F.; Dias, Sérgio

    2010-01-01

    The short chain fatty acid (SCFA) buyrate is a product of colonic fermentation of dietary fibers. It is the main source of energy for normal colonocytes, but cannot be metabolized by most tumor cells. Butyrate also functions as a histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor to control cell proliferation and apoptosis. In consequence, butyrate and its derived drugs are used in cancer therapy. Here we show that aggressive tumor cells that retain the capacity of metabolizing butyrate are positively selected in their microenvironment. In the mouse xenograft model, butyrate-preselected human colon cancer cells gave rise to subcutaneous tumors that grew faster and were more angiogenic than those derived from untreated cells. Similarly, butyrate-preselected cells demonstrated a significant increase in rates of homing to the lung after intravenous injection. Our data showed that butyrate regulates the expression of VEGF and its receptor KDR at the transcriptional level potentially through FoxM1, resulting in the generation of a functional VEGF:KDR autocrine growth loop. Cells selected by chronic exposure to butyrate express higher levels of MMP2, MMP9, α2 and α3 integrins, and lower levels of E-cadherin, a marker for epithelial to mesenchymal transition. The orthotopic model of colon cancer showed that cells preselected by butyrate are able to colonize the animals locally and at distant organs, whereas control cells can only generate a local tumor in the cecum. Together our data shows that a butyrate-rich microenvironment may select for tumor cells that are able to metabolize butyrate, which are also phenotypically more aggressive. PMID:20926374

  1. A 3D model of tumour angiogenic microenvironment to monitor hypoxia effects on cell interactions and cancer stem cell selection.

    PubMed

    Klimkiewicz, Krzysztof; Weglarczyk, Kazimierz; Collet, Guillaume; Paprocka, Maria; Guichard, Alan; Sarna, Michal; Jozkowicz, Alicja; Dulak, Jozef; Sarna, Tadeusz; Grillon, Catherine; Kieda, Claudine

    2017-06-28

    Tumour microenvironment determines the fate of treatments. Reconstitution of tumour conditions is mandatory for alternative in vitro methods devoted to cancer development and the selection of therapeutic strategies. This work describes a 3D model of melanoma growth in its environment. Introducing means to mimic tumour angiogenesis, which turns on tumour progression, the model shows that melanoma tumour spheroids allow reconstitution of solid tumours with stromal cells. Angiogenesis evidenced the differential recruitment of endothelial cells (EC) from early progenitors (EEPCs) to mature ECs. Hypoxia was the key parameter that selected and stabilized melanoma cancer stem like cells (CSCs) phenotype based on aldehyde dehydrogenase expression as the best criterion. The 3D-tumour-model demonstrated the distinct reactivity of ECs toward tumour cells in terms of cellular cross-talk and humoral response. Intra-spheroid cell-to-cell membrane dye exchanges, mediated by intercellular interactions, uncovered the melanoma-to-EEPC cooperation. The resulting changes in tumour milieu were evidenced by the chemokinic composition and hypoxia-related variations in microRNA expression assessed in each cellular component of the spheroids. This method brings new tools to decipher the molecular mechanism of tumour-mediated cell recruitment and for in vitro assessment of therapeutic approaches. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Can Selective MHC Downregulation Explain the Specificity and Genetic Diversity of NK Cell Receptors?

    PubMed Central

    Carrillo-Bustamante, Paola; Kesmir, Can; de Boer, Rob J.

    2015-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells express inhibiting receptors (iNKRs), which specifically bind MHC-I molecules on the surface of healthy cells. When the expression of MHC-I on the cell surface decreases, which might occur during certain viral infections and cancer, iNKRs lose inhibiting signals and the infected cells become target for NK cell activation (missing-self detection). Although the detection of MHC-I deficient cells can be achieved by conserved receptor-ligand interactions, several iNKRs are encoded by gene families with a remarkable genetic diversity, containing many haplotypes varying in gene content and allelic polymorphism. So far, the biological function of this expansion within the NKR cluster has remained poorly understood. Here, we investigate whether the evolution of diverse iNKRs genes can be driven by a specific viral immunoevasive mechanism: selective MHC downregulation. Several viruses, including EBV, CMV, and HIV, decrease the expression of MHC-I to escape from T cell responses. This downregulation does not always affect all MHC loci in the same way, as viruses target particular MHC molecules. To study the selection pressure of selective MHC downregulation on iNKRs, we have developed an agent-based model simulating an evolutionary scenario of hosts infected with herpes-like viruses, which are able to selectively downregulate the expression of MHC-I molecules on the cell surface. We show that iNKRs evolve specificity and, depending on the similarity of MHC alleles within each locus and the differences between the loci, they can specialize to a particular MHC-I locus. The easier it is to classify an MHC allele to its locus, the lower the required diversity of the NKRs. Thus, the diversification of the iNKR cluster depends on the locus specific MHC structure. PMID:26136746

  3. Selective recycle of viable animal cells by coupling of airlift reactor and cell settler.

    PubMed

    Hülscher, M; Scheibler, U; Onken, U

    1992-02-20

    A new system for the perfusion culture of animal cells in suspension is described. It consists of an airlift loop reactor and a settling tank for cell retention. Insufficient nutrient and oxygen supply of the cells in the settling tank was prevented by cooling the cell suspension before entering the settler. As a result, the catabolic activity of the cells in the settler was reversibly reduced. Furthermore, the density gradient induced by cooling caused a liquid motion through the settler. Thus, it was not necessary to pump medium containing shear, sensitive cells. With this simple system, it was possible to prduce 2 to 5 g of antibodies in a 5.4-L reactor in continuous runs of 400 to 600 h. The productivity was increased by a factor of 17 and the cell density was 4 times higher in comparison with the corresponding batch system. The cell retention system was found to have the property of separating viable and nonviable cells. With the increasing perfusion rate, dead cells and debris were preferably washed out. For perfusion rates up to 1.3 d(-1), the retention efficiency of the settler was nearly 100% for viable cells; hence, this system may show advantages at the industrial scale.

  4. Repurposing a Prokaryotic Toxin-Antitoxin System for the Selective Killing of Oncogenically Stressed Human Cells.

    PubMed

    Preston, Mark A; Pimentel, Belén; Bermejo-Rodríguez, Camino; Dionne, Isabelle; Turnbull, Alice; de la Cueva-Méndez, Guillermo

    2016-07-15

    Prokaryotes express intracellular toxins that pass unnoticed to carrying cells until coexpressed antitoxin partners are degraded in response to stress. Although not evolved to function in eukaryotes, one of these toxins, Kid, induces apoptosis in mammalian cells, an effect that is neutralized by its cognate antitoxin, Kis. Here we engineered this toxin-antitoxin pair to create a synthetic system that becomes active in human cells suffering a specific oncogenic stress. Inspired by the way Kid becomes active in bacterial cells, we produced a Kis variant that is selectively degraded in human cells expressing oncoprotein E6. The resulting toxin-antitoxin system functions autonomously in human cells, distinguishing those that suffer the oncogenic insult, which are killed by Kid, from those that do not, which remain protected by Kis. Our results provide a framework for developing personalized anticancer strategies avoiding off-target effects, a challenge that has been hardly tractable by other means thus far.

  5. Manipulating Antigenic Ligand Strength to Selectively Target Myelin-Reactive CD4+ T Cells in EAE

    PubMed Central

    Sabatino, Joseph J.; Rosenthal, Kristen M.

    2010-01-01

    The development of antigen-specific therapies for the selective tolerization of autoreactive T cells remains the Holy Grail for the treatment of T-cell-mediated autoimmune diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS) and its animal model experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). This quest remains elusive, however, as the numerous antigen-specific strategies targeting myelin-specific T cells over the years have failed to result in clinical success. In this review, we revisit the antigen-based therapies used in the treatment of myelin-specific CD4+ T cells in the context of the functional avidity and the strength of signal of the encephalitogenic CD4+ T cell repertoire. In light of differences in activation thresholds, we propose that autoreactive T cells are not all equal, and therefore tolerance induction strategies must incorporate ligand strength in order to be successful in treating EAE and ultimately the human disease MS. PMID:19904613

  6. Selective Differentiation of Neural Progenitor Cells by High-Epitope Density Nanofibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Gabriel A.; Czeisler, Catherine; Niece, Krista L.; Beniash, Elia; Harrington, Daniel A.; Kessler, John A.; Stupp, Samuel I.

    2004-02-01

    Neural progenitor cells were encapsulated in vitro within a three-dimensional network of nanofibers formed by self-assembly of peptide amphiphile molecules. The self-assembly is triggered by mixing cell suspensions in media with dilute aqueous solutions of the molecules, and cells survive the growth of the nanofibers around them. These nanofibers were designed to present to cells the neurite-promoting laminin epitope IKVAV at nearly van der Waals density. Relative to laminin or soluble peptide, the artificial nanofiber scaffold induced very rapid differentiation of cells into neurons, while discouraging the development of astrocytes. This rapid selective differentiation is linked to the amplification of bioactive epitope presentation to cells by the nanofibers.

  7. Aneuploidy impairs hematopoietic stem cell fitness and is selected against in regenerating tissues in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Pfau, Sarah J.; Silberman, Rebecca E.; Knouse, Kristin A.; Amon, Angelika

    2016-01-01

    Aneuploidy, an imbalanced karyotype, is a widely observed feature of cancer cells that has long been hypothesized to promote tumorigenesis. Here we evaluate the fitness of cells with constitutional trisomy or chromosomal instability (CIN) in vivo using hematopoietic reconstitution experiments. We did not observe cancer but instead found that aneuploid hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) exhibit decreased fitness. This reduced fitness is due at least in part to the decreased proliferative potential of aneuploid hematopoietic cells. Analyses of mice with CIN caused by a hypomorphic mutation in the gene Bub1b further support the finding that aneuploidy impairs cell proliferation in vivo. Whereas nonregenerating adult tissues are highly aneuploid in these mice, HSCs and other regenerative adult tissues are largely euploid. These findings indicate that, in vivo, mechanisms exist to select against aneuploid cells. PMID:27313317

  8. Selective inhibition of human leukemia cell growth and induction of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis by pseudolaric acid B.

    PubMed

    Ma, Guoyi; Chong, Li; Li, Xing-Cong; Khan, Ikhlas A; Walker, Larry A; Khan, Shabana I

    2010-09-01

    The leukemias account for the largest number of cases of childhood cancer and remain the primary cause of cancer-related mortality among children in the United States. There is a need for novel antileukemia agents due to toxicity and resistant to existing chemotherapeutic agents. In this study, the effects of pseudolaric acid B (PAB) on three human leukemia cell lines, acute promyelocytic leukemia HL-60 cells, acute lymphoblastic leukemia CCRF-CEM cells, and human chronic myeloid leukemia blast-phase K562 cells were investigated in vitro, compared to normal human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). Cell viability was determined using CellTiter-Glo luminescent reagent. Colony formation was assessed by Microtitration cloning assay. Cell cycle analysis was carried out by flow cytometry. Tubulin polymerization was measured by recording the increase in absorbance. Inhibition of topoisomerase I (topo I) and topoisomerase II (topo II) enzyme activities was measured by DNA relaxation assay using topo I and II drug screening kit. Apoptosis was observed by DAPI staining assay and Caspase3/7 activities was measured using Caspase-Glo((R)) 3/7 assay kit. Pseudolaric acid B selectively inhibited the growth of human leukemia HL-60, CCRF-CEM and K562 cells, but not normal PBMC. PAB suppressed colony formation in HL-60 cells. Cell cycle analysis showed that PAB blocked the cell cycle at G(2)/M phase in HL-60 cells, suggesting that it suppresses mitosis. DNA topo I and topo II were not inhibited, but tubulin polymerization was inhibited. PAB-induced apoptosis and activated caspase-3/7 activity. This study indicates that PAB has a potential for use against leukemia and its effects might be mediated by inhibiting tubulin polymerization, preventing cell division and activating caspase-3, which leads to apoptosis.

  9. 76 FR 51038 - Draft Guidance for Industry: Cell Selection Devices for Point of Care Production of Minimally...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-17

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Draft Guidance for Industry: Cell Selection Devices for Point of Care Production of Minimally Manipulated Autologous Peripheral Blood Stem Cells; Withdrawal of... Guidance for Industry: Cell Selection Devices for Point of Care Production of Minimally...

  10. Kaempferol nanoparticles achieve strong and selective inhibition of ovarian cancer cell viability.

    PubMed

    Luo, Haitao; Jiang, Bingbing; Li, Bingyun; Li, Zhaoliang; Jiang, Bing-Hua; Chen, Yi Charlie

    2012-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer death for women throughout the Western world. Kaempferol, a natural flavonoid, has shown promise in the chemoprevention of ovarian cancer. A common concern about using dietary supplements for chemoprevention is their bioavailability. Nanoparticles have shown promise in increasing the bioavailability of some chemicals. Here we developed five different types of nanoparticles incorporating kaempferol and tested their efficacy in the inhibition of viability of cancerous and normal ovarian cells. We found that positively charged nanoparticle formulations did not lead to a significant reduction in cancer cell viability, whereas nonionic polymeric nanoparticles resulted in enhanced reduction of cancer cell viability. Among the nonionic polymeric nanoparticles, poly(ethylene oxide)-poly(propylene oxide)-poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO-PPO-PEO) nanoparticles incorporating kaempferol led to significant reduction in cell viability of both cancerous and normal cells. Poly(DL-lactic acid-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles incorporating kaempferol resulted in enhanced reduction of cancer cell viability together with no significant reduction in cell viability of normal cells compared with kaempferol alone. Therefore, both PEO-PPO-PEO and PLGA nanoparticle formulations were effective in reducing cancer cell viability, while PLGA nanoparticles incorporating kaempferol had selective toxicity against cancer cells and normal cells. A PLGA nanoparticle formulation could be advantageous in the prevention and treatment of ovarian cancers. On the other hand, PEO-PPO-PEO nanoparticles incorporating kaempferol were more effective inhibitors of cancer cells, but they also significantly reduced the viability of normal cells. PEO-PPO-PEO nanoparticles incorporating kaempferol may be suitable as a cancer-targeting strategy, which could limit the effects of the nanoparticles on normal cells while retaining their potency against cancer cells. We

  11. Selective Expansion of Skeletal Muscle Stem Cells From Bulk Muscle Cells in Soft Three-Dimensional Fibrin Gel.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Pei; Zhou, Yalu; Wu, Furen; Hong, Yuanfan; Wang, Xin; Shekhawat, Gajendra; Mosenson, Jeffrey; Wu, Wen-Shu

    2017-02-28

    Muscle stem cells (MuSCs) exhibit robust myogenic potential in vivo, thus providing a promising curative treatment for muscle disorders. Ex vivo expansion of adult MuSCs is highly desired to achieve a therapeutic cell dose because of their scarcity in limited muscle biopsies. Sorting of pure MuSCs is generally required for all the current culture systems. Here we developed a soft three-dimensional (3D) salmon fibrin gel culture system that can selectively expand mouse MuSCs from bulk skeletal muscle preparations without cell sorting and faithfully maintain their regenerative capacity in culture. Our study established a novel platform for convenient ex vivo expansion of MuSCs, thus greatly advancing stem cell-based therapies for various muscle disorders. © Stem Cells Translational Medicine 2017.

  12. Chromosome segregation impacts on cell growth and division site selection in Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Donovan, Catriona; Schauss, Astrid; Krämer, Reinhard; Bramkamp, Marc

    2013-01-01

    Spatial and temporal regulation of bacterial cell division is imperative for the production of viable offspring. In many rod-shaped bacteria, regulatory systems such as the Min system and nucleoid occlusion ensure the high fidelity of midcell divisome positioning. However, regulation of division site selection in bacteria lacking recognizable Min and nucleoid occlusion remains less well understood. Here, we describe one such rod-shaped organism, Corynebacterium glutamicum, which does not always place the division septum precisely at midcell. Here we now show at single cell level that cell growth and division site selection are spatially and temporally regulated by chromosome segregation. Mutants defective in chromosome segregation have more variable cell growth and aberrant placement of the division site. In these mutants, division septa constrict over and often guillotine the nucleoid, leading to nonviable, DNA-free cells. Our results suggest that chromosome segregation or some nucleoid associated factor influences growth and division site selection in C. glutamicum. Understanding growth and regulation of C. glutamicum cells will also be of importance to develop strains for industrial production of biomolecules, such as amino acids.

  13. Chromosome Segregation Impacts on Cell Growth and Division Site Selection in Corynebacterium glutamicum

    PubMed Central

    Donovan, Catriona; Schauss, Astrid; Krämer, Reinhard; Bramkamp, Marc

    2013-01-01

    Spatial and temporal regulation of bacterial cell division is imperative for the production of viable offspring. In many rod-shaped bacteria, regulatory systems such as the Min system and nucleoid occlusion ensure the high fidelity of midcell divisome positioning. However, regulation of division site selection in bacteria lacking recognizable Min and nucleoid occlusion remains less well understood. Here, we describe one such rod-shaped organism, Corynebacterium glutamicum, which does not always place the division septum precisely at midcell. Here we now show at single cell level that cell growth and division site selection are spatially and temporally regulated by chromosome segregation. Mutants defective in chromosome segregation have more variable cell growth and aberrant placement of the division site. In these mutants, division septa constrict over and often guillotine the nucleoid, leading to nonviable, DNA-free cells. Our results suggest that chromosome segregation or some nucleoid associated factor influences growth and division site selection in C. glutamicum. Understanding growth and regulation of C. glutamicum cells will also be of importance to develop strains for industrial production of biomolecules, such as amino acids. PMID:23405112

  14. Modulation of Igβ is essential for the B cell selection in germinal center

    PubMed Central

    Todo, Kagefumi; Koga, Orie; Nishikawa, Miwako; Hikida, Masaki

    2015-01-01

    The positive and negative selection of antigen-reactive B cells take place in the germinal center (GC) during an immune responses. However, the precise molecular mechanisms underlying these selection machineries, including the involvement of antigen receptor signaling molecules, remain to be elucidated. We found that expression levels of Igα and Igβ, which are the essential components of B cell antigen-receptor complex, were differentially regulated in GC B cells and that the expression of Igβ was more prominently down-regulated in a portion of GC B cells. The suppression of Igβ down-regulation reduced the number of GL7+GC B cells and the affinity maturation in T-dependent responses was markedly impaired. In addition, the disease phenotypes in autoimmune-prone mice were ameliorated by blocking of Igβ down-regulation. These results suggest that Igβ down-regulation is involved in the normal positive selection in GC and the accumulation of autoreactive B cells in autoimmune-prone mice. PMID:25980548

  15. Polarity governed selective amplification of through plane proton shuttling in proton exchange membrane fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Gautam, Manu; Chattanahalli Devendrachari, Mruthyunjayachari; Thimmappa, Ravikumar; Raja Kottaichamy, Alagar; Pottachola Shafi, Shahid; Gaikwad, Pramod; Makri Nimbegondi Kotresh, Harish; Ottakam Thotiyl, Musthafa

    2017-03-15

    Graphene oxide (GO) anisotropically conducts protons with directional dominance of in plane ionic transport (σ IP) over the through plane (σ TP). In a typical H2-O2 fuel cell, since the proton conduction occurs through the plane during its generation at the fuel electrode, it is indeed inevitable to selectively accelerate GO's σ TP for advancement towards a potential fuel cell membrane. We successfully achieved ∼7 times selective amplification of GO's σ TP by tuning the polarity of the dopant molecule in its nanoporous matrix. The coexistence of strongly non-polar and polar domains in the dopant demonstrated a synergistic effect towards σ TP with the former decreasing the number of water molecules coordinated to protons by ∼3 times, diminishing the effects of electroosmotic drag exerted on ionic movements, and the latter selectively accelerating σ TP across the catalytic layers by bridging the individual GO planes via extensive host guest H-bonding interactions. When they are decoupled, the dopant with mainly non-polar or polar features only marginally enhances the σ TP, revealing that polarity factors contribute to fuel cell relevant transport properties of GO membranes only when they coexist. Fuel cell polarization and kinetic analyses revealed that these multitask dopants increased the fuel cell performance metrics of the power and current densities by ∼3 times compared to the pure GO membranes, suggesting that the functional group factors of the dopants are of utmost importance in GO-based proton exchange membrane fuel cells.

  16. Silicon cells made by self-aligned selective-emitter plasma-etchback process

    DOEpatents

    Ruby, Douglas S.; Schubert, William K.; Gee, James M.; Zaidi, Saleem H.

    2000-01-01

    Photovoltaic cells and methods for making them are disclosed wherein the metallized grids of the cells are used to mask portions of cell emitter regions to allow selective etching of phosphorus-doped emitter regions. The preferred etchant is SF.sub.6 or a combination of SF.sub.6 and O.sub.2. This self-aligned selective etching allows for enhanced blue response (versus cells with uniform heavy doping of the emitter) while preserving heavier doping in the region beneath the gridlines needed for low contact resistance. Embodiments are disclosed for making cells with or without textured surfaces. Optional steps include plasma hydrogenation and PECVD nitride deposition, each of which are suited to customized applications for requirements of given cells to be manufactured. The techniques disclosed could replace expensive and difficult alignment methodologies used to obtain selectively etched emitters, and they may be easily integrated with existing plasma processing methods and techniques of the invention may be accomplished in a single plasma-processing chamber.

  17. Manool, a Salvia officinalis diterpene, induces selective cytotoxicity in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Pollyanna Francielli; Munari, Carla Carolina; Nicolella, Heloiza Diniz; Veneziani, Rodrigo Cassio Sola; Tavares, Denise Crispim

    2016-10-01

    Manool, a diterpene isolated from Salvia officinalis, was evaluated by the XTT colorimetric assay for cytotoxicity and selectivity against different cancer cell lines: B16F10 (murine melanoma), MCF-7 (human breast adenocarcinoma), HeLa (human cervical adenocarcinoma), HepG2 (human hepatocellular carcinoma), and MO59J, U343 and U251 (human glioblastoma). A normal cell line (V79, Chinese hamster lung fibroblasts) was used to compare the selectivity of the test substance. Manool exhibited higher cytotoxic activity against HeLa (IC50 = 6.7 ± 1.1 µg/mL) and U343 (IC50 = 6.7 ± 1.2 µg/mL) cells. In addition, in the used experimental protocols, the treatment with manool was significantly more cytotoxic for different tumor cell lines than for the normal cell line V79 (IC50 = 49.3 ± 3.3 µg/mL), and showed high selectivity. These results suggest that manool may be used to treat cancer without affecting normal cells.

  18. Modulation of Igβ is essential for the B cell selection in germinal center.

    PubMed

    Todo, Kagefumi; Koga, Orie; Nishikawa, Miwako; Hikida, Masaki

    2015-05-18

    The positive and negative selection of antigen-reactive B cells take place in the germinal center (GC) during an immune responses. However, the precise molecular mechanisms underlying these selection machineries, including the involvement of antigen receptor signaling molecules, remain to be elucidated. We found that expression levels of Igα and Igβ, which are the essential components of B cell antigen-receptor complex, were differentially regulated in GC B cells and that the expression of Igβ was more prominently down-regulated in a portion of GC B cells. The suppression of Igβ down-regulation reduced the number of GL7(+)GC B cells and the affinity maturation in T-dependent responses was markedly impaired. In addition, the disease phenotypes in autoimmune-prone mice were ameliorated by blocking of Igβ down-regulation. These results suggest that Igβ down-regulation is involved in the normal positive selection in GC and the accumulation of autoreactive B cells in autoimmune-prone mice.

  19. Aging-associated inflammation promotes selection for adaptive oncogenic events in B cell progenitors

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Curtis J.; Casás-Selves, Matias; Kim, Jihye; Zaberezhnyy, Vadym; Aghili, Leila; Daniel, Ashley E.; Jimenez, Linda; Azam, Tania; McNamee, Eoin N.; Clambey, Eric T.; Klawitter, Jelena; Serkova, Natalie J.; Tan, Aik Choon; Dinarello, Charles A.; DeGregori, James

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of cancer is higher in the elderly; however, many of the underlying mechanisms for this association remain unexplored. Here, we have shown that B cell progenitors in old mice exhibit marked signaling, gene expression, and metabolic defects. Moreover, B cell progenitors that developed from hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) transferred from young mice into aged animals exhibited similar fitness defects. We further demonstrated that ectopic expression of the oncogenes BCR-ABL, NRASV12, or Myc restored B cell progenitor fitness, leading to selection for oncogenically initiated cells and leukemogenesis specifically in the context of an aged hematopoietic system. Aging was associated with increased inflammation in the BM microenvironment, and induction of inflammation in young mice phenocopied aging-associated B lymphopoiesis. Conversely, a reduction of inflammation in aged mice via transgenic expression of α-1-antitrypsin or IL-37 preserved the function of B cell progenitors and prevented NRASV12-mediated oncogenesis. We conclude that chronic inflammatory microenvironments in old age lead to reductions in the fitness of B cell progenitor populations. This reduced progenitor pool fitness engenders selection for cells harboring oncogenic mutations, in part due to their ability to correct aging-associated functional defects. Thus, modulation of inflammation — a common feature of aging — has the potential to limit aging-associated oncogenesis. PMID:26551682

  20. Selective Ru(II)/lawsone complexes inhibiting tumor cell growth by apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Katia M; Liany, Luna-Dulcey; Corrêa, Rodrigo S; Deflon, Victor M; Cominetti, Marcia R; Batista, Alzir A

    2017-11-01

    New Ru(II) complexes with lawsone (law) characterized as trans-[Ru(law)(PPh3)2(N-N)]PF6, where PPh3 means triphenylphosphine and N-N is 2,2'-bipyridine (1), 4,4'-dimethyl-2,2'-bipyridine (2), 4,4'-dimethoxy-2,2'-bipyridine (3), 1,10-phenanthroline (4) or 4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline (5), induce apoptosis in tumor cells. Cytotoxicity of the complexes against the tumor cell lines DU-145 (prostate cancer cells), MCF-7 (breast cancer cells), A549 (lung cancer cells) and lung non-tumor cell line MRC-5 demonstrated promising IC50 values, lower than those found for the cisplatin, a drug used as a reference. Due to the high cytotoxic activity and selectivity against A549 cells line, complex (5) was selected for detailed assays. The complex (5) inhibits cells migration in concentrations in a nanomolar range, inducing tumor cell death by apoptosis, as confirmed by flow cytometry experiments. Furthermore, the antiproliferative activity of complex (5) on A549 tumor cells is attributed to a cell cycle arrest at the Sub G1 phase, followed by a decrease in the number of cells at the S phase. In addition, the interaction of the complexes (1-5) with CT-DNA was evaluated by circular dichroism, in which no changes in the secondary structure of DNA were observed, suggesting a weak interaction of the complexes with the biomolecule. On the other hand, complexes (1-5) showed a higher interaction with human serum albumin (HSA) by non-covalent van der Waals forces and hydrogen bonding, resulting in static quenching. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. A Selective and Purification-Free Strategy for Labeling Adherent Cells with Inorganic Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yu; Lim, Jing; Yeo, David Chen Loong; Liao, Shanshan; Lans, Malin; Wang, Yaqi; Teoh, Swee-Hin; Goh, Bee Tin; Xu, Chenjie

    2016-03-01

    Cellular labeling with inorganic nanoparticles such as magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles, quantum dots, and fluorescent silica nanoparticles is an important method for the noninvasive visualization of cells using various imaging modalities. Currently, this is mainly achieved through the incubation of cultured cells with the nanoparticles that eventually reach the intracellular compartment through specific or nonspecific internalization. This classic method is advantageous in terms of simplicity and convenience, but it suffers from issues such as difficulties in fully removing free nanoparticles (suspended in solution) and the lack of selectivity on cell types. This article reports an innovative strategy for the specific labeling of adherent cells without the concern of freely suspended nanoparticles. This method relies on a nanocomposite film that is prepared by homogeneously dispersing nanoparticles within a biodegradable polymeric film. When adherent cells are seeded on the film, they adhere, spread, and filtrate into the film through the micropores formed during the film fabrication. The pre-embedded nanoparticles are thus internalized by the cells during this infiltration process. As an example, fluorescent silica nanoparticles were homogeneously distributed within a polycaprolactone film by utilizing cryomilling and heat pressing. Upon incubation within physiological buffer, no silica nanoparticles were released from the nanocomposite film even after 20 d of incubation. However, when adherent cells (e.g., human mesenchymal stem cells) were grown on the film, they became fluorescent after 3 d, which suggests internalization of silica nanoparticles by cells. In comparison, the suspension cells (e.g., monocytes) in the medium remained nonfluorescent no matter whether there was the presence of adherent cells or not. This strategy eventually allowed the selective and concomitant labeling of mesenchymal stem cells during their harvest from bone marrow aspiration.

  2. Selective local lysis and sampling of live cells for nucleic acid analysis using a microfluidic probe

    PubMed Central

    Kashyap, Aditya; Autebert, Julien; Delamarche, Emmanuel; Kaigala, Govind V.

    2016-01-01

    Heterogeneity is inherent to biology, thus it is imperative to realize methods capable of obtaining spatially-resolved genomic and transcriptomic profiles of heterogeneous biological samples. Here, we present a new method for local lysis of live adherent cells for nucleic acid analyses. This method addresses bottlenecks in current approaches, such as dilution of analytes, one-sample-one-test, and incompatibility to adherent cells. We make use of a scanning probe technology - a microfluidic probe - and implement hierarchical hydrodynamic flow confinement (hHFC) to localize multiple biochemicals on a biological substrate in a non-contact, non-destructive manner. hHFC enables rapid recovery of nucleic acids by coupling cell lysis and lysate collection. We locally lysed ~300 cells with chemical systems adapted for DNA or RNA and obtained lysates of ~70 cells/μL for DNA analysis and ~15 cells/μL for mRNA analysis. The lysates were introduced into PCR-based workflows for genomic and transcriptomic analysis. This strategy further enabled selective local lysis of subpopulations in a co-culture of MCF7 and MDA-MB-231 cells, validated by characteristic E-cadherin gene expression in individually extracted cell types. The developed strategy can be applied to study cell-cell, cell-matrix interactions locally, with implications in understanding growth, progression and drug response of a tumor. PMID:27411740

  3. Selective retention of herpes simplex virus-specific T cells in latently infected human trigeminal ganglia

    PubMed Central

    Verjans, Georges M. G. M.; Hintzen, Rogier Q.; van Dun, Jessica M.; Poot, Angelique; Milikan, Johannes C.; Laman, Jon D.; Langerak, Anton W.; Kinchington, Paul R.; Osterhaus, Albert D. M. E.

    2007-01-01

    Primary infection with herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) and varicella zoster virus (VZV) results in lifelong latent infections of neurons in sensory ganglia such as the trigeminal ganglia (TG). It has been postulated that T cells retained in TG inhibit reactivation of latent virus. The acquisition of TG specimens of individuals within hours after death offered the unique opportunity to characterize the phenotype and specificity of TG-resident T cells in humans. High numbers of activated CD8+ T cells expressing a late effector memory phenotype were found to reside in latently infected TG. The T cell infiltrate was oligoclonal, and T cells selectively clustered around HSV-1 but not VZV latently infected neurons. Neuronal damage was not observed despite granzyme B expression by the neuron-interacting CD8+ T cells. The TG-resident T cells, mainly CD8+ T cells, were directed against HSV-1 and not to VZV, despite neuronal expression of VZV proteins. The results implicate that herpesvirus latency in human TG is associated with a local, persistent T cell response, comprising activated late effector memory CD8+ T cells that appear to control HSV-1 latency by noncytolytic pathways. In contrast, T cells do not seem to be directly involved in controlling VZV latency in human TG. PMID:17360672

  4. Cold atmospheric plasma jet-generated RONS and their selective effects on normal and carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sun Ja; Chung, T. H.

    2016-01-01

    Cold atmospheric helium plasma jets were fabricated and utilized for plasma–cell interactions. The effect of operating parameters and jet design on the generation of specific reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) within cells and cellular response were investigated. It was found that plasma treatment induced the overproduction of RONS in various cancer cell lines selectively. The plasma under a relatively low applied voltage induced the detachment of cells, a reduction in cell viability, and apoptosis, while the plasma under higher applied voltage led to cellular necrosis in our case. To determine whether plasma-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation occurs through interfering with mitochondria-related cellular response, we examined the plasma effects on ROS generation in both parental A549 cells and A549 ρ0 cells. It was observed that cancer cells were more susceptible to plasma-induced RONS (especially nitric oxide (NO) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2−) radicals) than normal cells, and consequently, plasma induced apoptotic cell responses mainly in cancer cells. PMID:26838306

  5. Intercellular Redistribution of cAMP Underlies Selective Suppression of Cancer Cell Growth by Connexin26

    PubMed Central

    Polusani, Srikanth R.; Mathis, Sandra A.; Zucker, Shoshanna N.; Nicholson, Bruce J.

    2013-01-01

    Connexins (Cx), which constitute gap junction intercellular channels in vertebrates, have been shown to suppress transformed cell growth and tumorigenesis, but the mechanism(s) still remain largely speculative. Here, we define the molecular basis by which Cx26, but less frequently Cx43 or Cx32, selectively confer growth suppression on cancer cells. Functional intercellular coupling is shown to be required, producing partial blocks of the cell cycle due to prolonged activation of several mitogenic kinases. PKA is both necessary and sufficient for the Cx26 induced growth inhibition in low serum and the absence of anchorage. Activation of PKA was not associated with elevated cAMP levels, but appeared to result from a redistribution of cAMP throughout the cell population, eliminating the cell cycle oscillations in cAMP required for efficient cell cycle progression. Cx43 and Cx32 fail to mediate this redistribution as, unlike Cx26, these channels are closed during the G2/M phase of the cell cycle when cAMP levels peak. Comparisons of tumor cell lines indicate that this is a general pattern, with growth suppression by connexins occurring whenever cAMP oscillates with the cell cycle, and the gap junction remain open throughout the cell cycle. Thus, gap junctional coupling, in the absence of any external signals, provides a general means to limit the mitotic rate of cell populations. PMID:24312655

  6. Molecular mechanisms of apoptosis and cell selectivity of zinc dithiocarbamates functionalized with hydroxyethyl substituents.

    PubMed

    Tan, Yee Seng; Ooi, Kah Kooi; Ang, Kok Pian; Akim, Abdah Md; Cheah, Yoke-Kqueen; Halim, Siti Nadiah Abdul; Seng, Hoi-Ling; Tiekink, Edward R T

    2015-09-01

    In the solid state each of three binuclear zinc dithiocarbamates bearing hydroxyethyl groups, {Zn[S2CN(R)CH2CH2OH]2}2 for R = iPr (1), CH2CH2OH (2), and Me (3), and an all alkyl species, [Zn(S2CNEt2)2]2 (4), features a centrosymmetric {ZnSCS}2 core with a step topology; both 1 and 3 were isolated as monohydrates. All compounds were broadly cytotoxic, specifically against human cancer cell lines compared with normal cells, with greater potency than cisplatin. Notably, some selectivity were indicated with 2 being the most potent against human ovarian carcinoma cells (cisA2780), and 4 being more cytotoxic toward multidrug resistant human breast carcinoma cells (MCF-7R), human colon adenocarcinoma cells (HT-29), and human lung adenocarcinoma epithelial cells (A549). Based on human apoptosis PCR-array analysis, caspase activities, DNA fragmentation, cell apoptotic assays, intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) measurements and human topoisomerase I inhibition, induction of apoptosis in HT-29 cells is demonstrated via both extrinsic and intrinsic pathways. Compounds 2-4 activate the p53 gene while 1 activates both p53 and p73. Cell cycle arrest at the S and G2/M phases correlates with inhibition of HT-29 cell growth. Cell invasion is also inhibited by 1-4 which is correlated with down-regulation of NF-κB.

  7. Cold atmospheric plasma jet-generated RONS and their selective effects on normal and carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sun Ja; Chung, T H

    2016-02-03

    Cold atmospheric helium plasma jets were fabricated and utilized for plasma-cell interactions. The effect of operating parameters and jet design on the generation of specific reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) within cells and cellular response were investigated. It was found that plasma treatment induced the overproduction of RONS in various cancer cell lines selectively. The plasma under a relatively low applied voltage induced the detachment of cells, a reduction in cell viability, and apoptosis, while the plasma under higher applied voltage led to cellular necrosis in our case. To determine whether plasma-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation occurs through interfering with mitochondria-related cellular response, we examined the plasma effects on ROS generation in both parental A549 cells and A549 ρ(0) cells. It was observed that cancer cells were more susceptible to plasma-induced RONS (especially nitric oxide (NO) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2(-)) radicals) than normal cells, and consequently, plasma induced apoptotic cell responses mainly in cancer cells.

  8. Selective Killing Of Malignant Cancer Cells By Suppression Of Geminin Activity

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Wenge; DePamphilis, Melvin L.

    2009-01-01

    Eukaryotic cells normally restrict genome duplication to once per cell division. In metazoa, re-replication of DNA during a single S-phase appears to be prevented solely by suppressing CDT1 activity, a protein required for loading the replicative MCM DNA helicase. However, siRNA suppression of geminin (a specific inhibitor of CDT1) arrested proliferation only of cells derived from malignant cancers by inducing DNA re-replication and DNA damage that spontaneously triggered apoptosis. None of these effects were detected either in cells derived from normal human tissues, or in cells immortalized by a viral oncogene. To induce these effects in non-cancer cells required suppression of both geminin and cyclin A, another cell cycle regulator. Therefore, initiating DNA replication in some cancer cells is limited solely by regulating the level of CDT1 activity with geminin, whereas non-cancer cells contain additional safeguards that prevent DNA re-replication. These results demonstrate that inhibition of geminin activity could be used to selectively kill cancer cells without harming other cells. PMID:19487297

  9. Beyond helper phage: Using "helper cells" to select peptide affinity ligands

    DOE PAGES

    Phipps, Mary Lisa; Lillo, Antoinetta M.; Shou, Yulin; ...

    2016-09-14

    Peptides are important affinity ligands for microscopy, biosensing, and targeted delivery. However, because they can have low affinity for their targets, their selection from large naïve libraries can be challenging. When selecting peptidic ligands from display libraries, it is important to: 1) ensure efficient display; 2) maximize the ability to select high affinity ligands; and 3) minimize the effect of the display context on binding. The “helper cell” packaging system has been described as a tool to produce filamentous phage particles based on phagemid constructs with varying display levels, while remaining free of helper phage contamination. Here we report onmore » the first use of this system for peptide display, including the systematic characterization and optimization of helper cells, their inefficient use in antibody display and their use in creating and selecting from a set of phage display peptide libraries. Our libraries were analyzed with unprecedented precision by standard or deep sequencing, and shown to be superior in quality than commercial gold standards. Using our helper cell libraries, we have obtained ligands recognizing Yersinia pestis surface antigen F1V and L-glutamine-binding periplasmic protein QBP. In the latter case, unlike any of the peptide library selections described so far, we used a combination of phage and yeast display to select intriguing peptide ligands. Here, based on the success of our selections we believe that peptide libraries obtained with helper cells are not only suitable, but preferable to traditional phage display libraries for selection of peptidic ligands.« less

  10. Polarized Growth Controls Cell Shape and Bipolar Bud Site Selection in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Sheu, Yi-Jun; Barral, Yves; Snyder, Michael

    2000-01-01

    We examined the relationship between polarized growth and division site selection, two fundamental processes important for proper development of eukaryotes. Diploid Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells exhibit an ellipsoidal shape and a specific division pattern (a bipolar budding pattern). We found that the polarity genes SPA2, PEA2, BUD6, and BNI1 participate in a crucial step of bud morphogenesis, apical growth. Deleting these genes results in round cells and diminishes bud elongation in mutants that exhibit pronounced apical growth. Examination of distribution of the polarized secretion marker Sec4 demonstrates that spa2Δ, pea2Δ, bud6Δ, and bni1Δ mutants fail to concentrate Sec4 at the bud tip during apical growth and at the division site during repolarization just prior to cytokinesis. Moreover, cell surface expansion is not confined to the distal tip of the bud in these mutants. In addition, we found that the p21-activated kinase homologue Ste20 is also important for both apical growth and bipolar bud site selection. We further examined how the duration of polarized growth affects bipolar bud site selection by using mutations in cell cycle regulators that control the timing of growth phases. The grr1Δ mutation enhances apical growth by stabilizing G1 cyclins and increases the distal-pole budding in diploids. Prolonging polarized growth phases by disrupting the G2/M cyclin gene CLB2 enhances the accuracy of bud site selection in wild-type, spa2Δ, and ste20Δ cells, whereas shortening the polarized growth phases by deleting SWE1 decreases the fidelity of bipolar budding. This study reports the identification of components required for apical growth and demonstrates the critical role of polarized growth in bipolar bud site selection. We propose that apical growth and repolarization at the site of cytokinesis are crucial for establishing spatial cues used by diploid yeast cells to position division planes. PMID:10866679

  11. Salinomycin inhibits the tumor growth of glioma stem cells by selectively suppressing glioma-initiating cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tunan; Yi, Liang; Li, Fei; Hu, Rong; Hu, Shengli; Yin, Yi; Lan, Chuan; Li, Zhao; Fu, Chuhua; Cao, Liu; Chen, Zhi; Xian, Jishu; Feng, Hua

    2015-04-01

    Glioma‑initiating cells are a small population of cells that have the ability to undergo self‑renewal and initiate tumorigenesis. In the present study, the potential role of salinomycin, a polyether antibiotic, on the suppression of glioma cell growth was investigated. GL261 glioma cells were maintained in a stem‑cell‑like status [GL261 neurospheres (GL261‑NS)] or induced for differentiation [GL261 adherent cells (GL261‑AC)]. It was demonstrated that salinomycin significantly reduced the cell viability of GL261‑NS and GL261‑AC cells in a dose‑dependent manner, with a more substantial inhibition of GL261‑NS proliferation (P<0.05). The inhibitory effect of salinomycin on cell growth was more effective than that of 1‑(4‑amino‑2‑methyl‑5‑pyrimid l)‑methyl‑3‑(2‑chloroethyl)‑3‑nitrosourea hydrochloride and vincristine (P<0.05). Salinomycin depleted GL261‑NS from tumorspheres and induced cell apoptosis. In addition, salinomycin prolonged the median survival time of glioma‑bearing mice (P<0.05). Therefore, the present study indicated that salinomycin may preferentially inhibit glioma‑initiated cell growth by inducing apoptosis, suggesting that salinomycin may provide a valuable therapeutic strategy for the treatment of malignant glioma.

  12. Selective killing of cancer cells by β-lapachone: Direct checkpoint activation as a strategy against cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Youzhi; Sun, Xiangao; LaMont, J. Thomas; Pardee, Arthur B.; Li, Chiang J.

    2003-01-01

    Most chemotherapeutic drugs kill cancer cells by indirectly activating checkpoint-mediated apoptosis after creating nonselective damage to DNA or microtubules, which accounts for their toxicity toward normal cells. We seek to target cancer cells by directly activating checkpoint regulators without creating such damage. Here, we show that β-lapachone selectively induces apoptosis in cancer cells without causing the death of nontransformed cells in culture. This unusual selectivity against cancer cells is preceded by activation of S-phase checkpoint and selective induction of E2F1, a regulator of checkpoint-mediated apoptosis. This study suggests direct checkpoint activation as a strategy against cancer. PMID:12598645

  13. A two-step Notch-dependant mechanism controls the selection of the polar cell pair in Drosophila oogenesis.

    PubMed

    Vachias, Caroline; Couderc, Jean-Louis; Grammont, Muriel

    2010-08-01

    Organisers control the patterning and growth of many tissues and organs. Correctly regulating the size of these organisers is crucial for proper differentiation to occur. Organiser activity in the epithelium of the Drosophila ovarian follicle resides in a pair of cells called polar cells. It is known that these two cells are selected from a cluster of equivalent cells. However, the mechanisms responsible for this selection are still unclear. Here, we present evidence that the selection of the two cells is not random but, by contrast, depends on an atypical two-step Notch-dependent mechanism. We show that this sequential process begins when one cell becomes refractory to Notch activation and is selected as the initial polar cell. This cell then produces a Delta signal that induces a high level of Notch activation in one other cell within the cluster. This Notch activity prevents elimination by apoptosis, allowing its selection as the second polar cell. Therefore, the mechanism used to select precisely two cells from among an equivalence group involves an inductive Delta signal that originates from one cell, itself unable to respond to Notch activation, and results in one other cell being selected to adopt the same fate. Given its properties, this two-step Notch-dependent mechanism represents a novel aspect of Notch action.

  14. Pancratistatin selectively targets cancer cell mitochondria and reduces growth of human colon tumor xenografts.

    PubMed

    Griffin, Carly; Karnik, Aditya; McNulty, James; Pandey, Siyaram

    2011-01-01

    The naturally occurring Amaryllidaceae alkaloid pancratistatin exhibits potent apoptotic activity against a large panel of cancer cells lines and has an insignificant effect on noncancerous cell lines, although with an elusive cellular target. Many current chemotherapeutics induce apoptosis via genotoxic mechanisms and thus have low selectivity. The observed selectivity of pancratistatin for cancer cells promoted us to consider the hypothesis that this alkaloid targets cancer cell mitochondria rather than DNA or its replicative machinery. In this study, we report that pancratistatin decreased mitochondrial membrane potential and induced apoptotic nuclear morphology in p53-mutant (HT-29) and wild-type p53 (HCT116) colorectal carcinoma cell lines, but not in noncancerous colon fibroblast (CCD-18Co) cells. Interestingly, pancratistatin was found to be ineffective against mtDNA-depleted (ρ(0)) cancer cells. Moreover, pancratistatin induced cell death in a manner independent of Bax and caspase activation, and did not alter β-tubulin polymerization rate nor cause double-stranded DNA breaks. For the first time we report the efficacy of pancratistatin in vivo against human colorectal adenocarcinoma xenografts. Intratumor administration of pancratistatin (3 mg/kg) caused significant reduction in the growth of subcutaneous HT-29 tumors in Nu/Nu mice (n = 6), with no apparent toxicity to the liver or kidneys as indicated by histopathologic analysis and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling. Altogether, this work suggests that pancratistatin may be a novel mitochondria-targeting compound that selectively induces apoptosis in cancer cells and significantly reduces tumor growth.

  15. Rapid selection and proliferation of CD133+ cells from cancer cell lines: chemotherapeutic implications.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Sarah E; Di Benedetto, Altomare; Greco, Adelaide; Howard, Candace M; Sollars, Vincent E; Primerano, Donald A; Valluri, Jagan V; Claudio, Pier Paolo

    2010-04-08

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are considered a subset of the bulk tumor responsible for initiating and maintaining the disease. Several surface cellular markers have been recently used to identify CSCs. Among those is CD133, which is expressed by hematopoietic progenitor cells as well as embryonic stem cells and various cancers. We have recently isolated and cultured CD133 positive [CD133+] cells from various cancer cell lines using a NASA developed Hydrodynamic Focusing Bioreactor (HFB) (Celdyne, Houston, TX). For comparison, another bioreactor, the rotary cell culture system (RCCS) manufactured by Synthecon (Houston, TX) was used. Both the HFB and the RCCS bioreactors simulate aspects of hypogravity. In our study, the HFB increased CD133+ cell growth from various cell lines compared to the RCCS vessel and to normal gravity control. We observed a +15-fold proliferation of the CD133+ cellular fraction with cancer cells that were cultured for 7-days at optimized conditions. The RCCS vessel instead yielded a (-)4.8-fold decrease in the CD133+cellular fraction respect to the HFB after 7-days of culture. Interestingly, we also found that the hypogravity environment of the HFB greatly sensitized the CD133+ cancer cells, which are normally resistant to chemo treatment, to become susceptible to various chemotherapeutic agents, paving the way to less toxic and more effective chemotherapeutic treatment in patients. To be able to test the efficacy of cytotoxic agents in vitro prior to their use in clinical setting on cancer cells as well as on cancer stem cells may pave the way to more effective chemotherapeutic strategies in patients. This could be an important advancement in the therapeutic options of oncologic patients, allowing for more targeted and personalized chemotherapy regimens as well as for higher response rates.

  16. Rapid Selection and Proliferation of CD133(+) Cells from Cancer Cell Lines: Chemotherapeutic Implications

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Sarah E.; Di Benedetto, Altomare; Greco, Adelaide; Howard, Candace M.; Sollars, Vincent E.; Primerano, Donald A.; Valluri, Jagan V.; Claudio, Pier Paolo

    2010-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are considered a subset of the bulk tumor responsible for initiating and maintaining the disease. Several surface cellular markers have been recently used to identify CSCs. Among those is CD133, which is expressed by hematopoietic progenitor cells as well as embryonic stem cells and various cancers. We have recently isolated and cultured CD133 positive [CD133(+)] cells from various cancer cell lines using a NASA developed Hydrodynamic Focusing Bioreactor (HFB) (Celdyne, Houston, TX). For comparison, another bioreactor, the rotary cell culture system (RCCS) manufactured by Synthecon (Houston, TX) was used. Both the HFB and the RCCS bioreactors simulate aspects of hypogravity. In our study, the HFB increased CD133(+) cell growth from various cell lines compared to the RCCS vessel and to normal gravity control. We observed a (+)15-fold proliferation of the CD133(+) cellular fraction with cancer cells that were cultured for 7-days at optimized conditions. The RCCS vessel instead yielded a (−)4.8-fold decrease in the CD133(+)cellular fraction respect to the HFB after 7-days of culture. Interestingly, we also found that the hypogravity environment of the HFB greatly sensitized the CD133(+) cancer cells, which are normally resistant to chemo treatment, to become susceptible to various chemotherapeutic agents, paving the way to less toxic and more effective chemotherapeutic treatment in patients. To be able to test the efficacy of cytotoxic agents in vitro prior to their use in clinical setting on cancer cells as well as on cancer stem cells may pave the way to more effective chemotherapeutic strategies in patients. This could be an important advancement in the therapeutic options of oncologic patients, allowing for more targeted and personalized chemotherapy regimens as well as for higher response rates. PMID:20386701

  17. Apoptotic effect of the selective PPARβ/δ agonist GW501516 in invasive bladder cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Péchery, Adeline; Fauconnet, Sylvie; Bittard, Hugues; Lascombe, Isabelle

    2016-11-01

    GW501516 is a selective and high-affinity synthetic agonist of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor β/δ (PPARβ/δ). This molecule promoted the inhibition of proliferation and apoptosis in few cancer cell lines, but its anticancer action has never been investigated in bladder tumor cells. Thus, this study was undertaken to determine whether GW501516 had antiproliferative and/or apoptotic effects on RT4 and T24 urothelial cancer cells and to explore the molecular mechanisms involved. Our results indicated that, in RT4 cells (derived from a low-grade papillary tumor), GW501516 did not induce cell death. On the other hand, in T24 cells (derived from an undifferentiated high-grade carcinoma), this PPARβ/δ agonist induced cytotoxic effects including cell morphological changes, a decrease of cell viability, a G2/M cell cycle arrest, and the cell death as evidenced by the increase of the sub-G1 cell population. Furthermore, GW501516 triggered T24 cell apoptosis in a caspase-dependent manner including both extrinsic and intrinsic apoptotic pathways through Bid cleavage. In addition, the drug led to an increase of the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, a mitochondrial dysfunction associated with the dissipation of ΔΨm, and the release of cytochrome c from the mitochondria to the cytosol. GW501516 induced also ROS generation which was not responsible for T24 cell death since NAC did not rescue cells upon PPARβ/δ agonist exposure. For the first time, our data highlight the capacity of GW501516 to induce apoptosis in invasive bladder cancer cells. This molecule could be relevant as a therapeutic drug for high-grade urothelial cancers.

  18. Alkali-treated titanium selectively regulating biological behaviors of bacteria, cancer cells and mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Jinhua; Wang, Guifang; Wang, Donghui; Wu, Qianju; Jiang, Xinquan; Liu, Xuanyong

    2014-12-15

    Many attentions have been paid to the beneficial effect of alkali-treated titanium to bioactivity and osteogenic activity, but few to the other biological effect. In this work, hierarchical micro/nanopore films were prepared on titanium surface by acid etching and alkali treatment and their biological effects on bacteria, cancer cells and mesenchymal stem cells were investigated. Gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus, Gram-negative Escherichia coli, and human cholangiocarcinoma cell line RBE were used to investigate whether alkali-treated titanium can influence behaviors of bacteria and cancer cells. Responses of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs) to alkali-treated titanium were also subsequently investigated. The alkali-treated titanium can potently reduce bacterial adhesion, inhibit RBE and BMMSCs proliferation, while can better promote BMMSCs osteogenesis and angiogenesis than acid-etched titanium. The bacteriostatic ability of the alkali-treated titanium is proposed to result from the joint effect of micro/nanotopography and local pH increase at bacterium/material interface due to the hydrolysis of alkali (earth) metal titanate salts. The inhibitory action of cell proliferation is thought to be the effect of local pH increase at cell/material interface which causes the alkalosis of cells. This alkalosis model reported in this work will help to understand the biologic behaviors of various cells on alkali-treated titanium surface and design the intended biomedical applications.

  19. Selective interactions between epithelial tumour cells and bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Hombauer, H; Minguell, J J

    2000-01-01

    This work is a comparative study on the features displayed by an epithelial metastatic breast cancer cell line (MCF-7) when set in co-culture with human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) or a feeder layer of 3T3 fibroblasts. MSC, a subset of non-haematopoietic cells in the marrow stroma, display a potential for self-renewal, proliferation and differentiation into precursors for bone, cartilage, connective and muscular tissue. Adhesion of MCF-7 cells to monolayers of MSC or 3T3 was high (95 and 85% respectively). Once attached, MCF-7 grow well on both monolayers. Morphology of MCF-7 cells, as analysed by light and epifluorescence microscopy, revealed that MCF-7 cells grow in clusters on 3T3, but disperse on MSC. Concomitant with the lost of their aggregation status, MCF-7 on MSC express low levels of the intercellular adhesion molecules, E-cadherin and epithelial-specific antigen (ESA). These results suggest that MSC represent an appropriate cell target to investigate the cellular and molecular events occurring at the interface of epithelial-marrow stromal interactions. Together, the model here described should permit to further evaluate the significance and prognostic impact of the shift of micrometastatic cells from a cluster-aggregated into a single-cell status. © 2000 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10755403

  20. Identification of a cell-surface antigen selectively expressed on the natural killer cell

    PubMed Central

    1977-01-01

    We have studied the cell-surface phenotype of natural killer (NK) cells of NZB and B6 mice which react to an MuLV+ lymphoid tumor. (a) NK cells do not express Thy1, Ly2, or Ig surface markers. (b) NK cells express an antigen recognized by C3H anti-CE antiserum ('anti-Ly1.2 antiserum'). Inasmuch as NK activity of spleen cells from B6 and B6/Ly1.1 congenic strains were both equally sensitive to C3H anti-CE antiserum, the NK antigen is distinct from Ly1.2. This point was confirmed by the observation that alphaNK activity was removed by absorption of C3H anti-CE antiserum with spleen cells from either B6 or B6/Ly1.1 congenic strains. Absorption of C3H alphaCE serum with BALB/c thymocytes and spleen cells (which are Ly1.2+NK-) removed anti-Ly1.2 activity and left anti-NK activity intact. This absorption step could be circumvented by inserting the BALB/c genotype into the recipient immunized to CE cells (i.e., (C3H X BALB/c)F1 alphaCE spleen cells). This antiserum, provisionally termed 'anti-NK', defines a new subclass of lymphocytes which may play a central role in the immunosurveillance against tumors. PMID:187714

  1. Changes in Quail Blastodermal Cell Status as a Result of Selection.

    PubMed

    Sawicka, Dorota; Samek, Kamila; Chojnacka-Puchta, Luiza; Witkowski, Andrzej; Knaga, Sebastian; Dębowska, Michalina; Bednarczyk, Marek

    2015-01-01

    Genetic selection over many years has significantly improved the growth rate of broilers and increased the number of eggs laid by egg laying chicken breeds. Selection has improved desired parameters, but has caused some negative effects as well. Adverse effects of selection may negatively affect embryonic development. The number of live and apoptotic blastodermal cells (BCs) at the X stage of embryogenesis may be a good indicator of changes in selected individuals. In this paper, a comparison of the number of live and apoptotic BCs was made for three lines of quail: Pharaoh (F33), meat-type line, selected for body weight; egg laying line (S33), selected for egg number; and laying line (S22), additionally selected (for 17 generations) for high yolk cholesterol content. Apoptotic BCs were separated by the magnetic activated cell sorting (MACS) method. The percentage of live and apoptotic BCs was different (P ≤ 0.01) for F33 (35.8% and 64.2%, respectively) and S33 (60.0% and 36.4%). The number of apoptotic BCs for F33 embryos (45,098) was higher (P ≤ 0.01) compared to the number of apoptotic BCs for S33 embryos (26,667). The selection for high yolk cholesterol content caused an increase (P ≤ 0.01) in the total number of BCs from 78,403 (S33) to 140,139 (S22). The percentage of apoptotic BCs was lower (P ≤ 0.01) in the S22 line (17.1%) compared to the S33 line (36.4%). The results showed that it is possible to evaluate the effects of selection in the early stage of embryonic development.

  2. CD44v6-Peptide Functionalized Nanoparticles Selectively Bind to Metastatic Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Linxian; Schmitt, Mark; Matzke-Ogi, Alexandra; Wadhwani, Parvesh; Orian-Rousseau, Veronique; Levkin, Pavel A

    2017-01-01

    CD44v6 peptide functionalized nanoparticles are fabricated in a facile and controllable way to selectively bind to CD44v6 positive tumor cells with highly efficient anticancer and antimetastatic properties. The reported modular synthesis and facile preparation makes this system highly potent for developing novel multifunctional nanocarriers for therapeutic and/or diagnostic anticancer applications.

  3. Developmental profile of select immune cells in mice infected with Trichinella spiralis during the intestinal phase

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Trichinella spiralis can cause immunosuppression during the intestinal phase of early infection. However, changes in the peripheral blood during T. spiralis early infection remain unclear. Here, select immune cells in mice infected with 500 muscle larvae (ML) of T. spiralis during the intestinal pha...

  4. Automated Cell Selection Using Support Vector Machine for Application to Spectral Nanocytology

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Qin; Derbas, Justin; Eid, Aya; Subramanian, Hariharan; Backman, Vadim

    2016-01-01

    Partial wave spectroscopy (PWS) enables quantification of the statistical properties of cell structures at the nanoscale, which has been used to identify patients harboring premalignant tumors by interrogating easily accessible sites distant from location of the lesion. Due to its high sensitivity, cells that are well preserved need to be selected from the smear images for further analysis. To date, such cell selection has been done manually. This is time-consuming, is labor-intensive, is vulnerable to bias, and has considerable inter- and intraoperator variability. In this study, we developed a classification scheme to identify and remove the corrupted cells or debris that are of no diagnostic value from raw smear images. The slide of smear sample is digitized by acquiring and stitching low-magnification transmission. Objects are then extracted from these images through segmentation algorithms. A training-set is created by manually classifying objects as suitable or unsuitable. A feature-set is created by quantifying a large number of features for each object. The training-set and feature-set are used to train a selection algorithm using Support Vector Machine (SVM) classifiers. We show that the selection algorithm achieves an error rate of 93% with a sensitivity of 95%. PMID:26904682

  5. Response to somatic cell count-based selection for mastitis resistance in a divergent selection experiment in sheep.

    PubMed

    Rupp, R; Bergonier, D; Dion, S; Hygonenq, M C; Aurel, M R; Robert-Granié, C; Foucras, G

    2009-03-01

    A divergent selection experiment in sheep was implemented to study the consequences of log-transformed somatic cell score (SCS)-based selection on resistance to natural intramammary infections. Using dams and progeny-tested rams selected for extreme breeding values for SCS, we created 2 groups of ewes with a strong divergence in SCS of approximately 3 genetic standard deviations. A survey of 84 first-lactation ewes of both the High and Low SCS lines indicated favorable responses to SCS-based selection on resistance to both clinical and subclinical mastitis. All clinical cases (n = 5) occurred in the High SCS line. Additionally, the frequency of chronic clinical mastitis, as detected by the presence of parenchymal abscesses, was much greater in the High SCS line (n = 21) than in the Low SCS line (n = 1). According to monthly milk bacteriological examinations of udder halves, the prevalence of infection was significantly greater (odds ratio = 3.1) in the High SCS line than in the Low SCS line, with predicted probabilities of 37 and 16%, respectively. The most frequently isolated bacteria responsible for mastitis were staphylococci: Staphylococcus auricularis (42.6% of positive samples), Staphylococcus simulans, Staphylococcus haemoliticus, Staphylococcus xylosus, Staphylococcus chromogenes, Staphylococcus lentus, Staphylococcus warneri, and Staphylococcus aureus. The incidence of positive bacteriology was greater in the High SCS line (39%) than in the Low SCS line (12%) at lambing, indicating that High SCS line ewes were especially susceptible to postpartum subclinical mastitis. Negativation of bacteriological results from one sampling time point to the next was markedly different between lines after weaning (e.g., 41 and 84% in the High and Low SCS lines, respectively). This result was consistent with differences in the duration of infection, which was much greater in the High SCS line compared with the Low SCS line. Finally, ewes from the High SCS line consistently

  6. Quantum efficiency enhancement in selectively transparent silicon thin film solar cells by distributed Bragg reflectors.

    PubMed

    Kuo, M Y; Hsing, J Y; Chiu, T T; Li, C N; Kuo, W T; Lay, T S; Shih, M H

    2012-11-05

    This work demonstrated a-Si:H thin-film solar cells with backside TiO(2)/ SiO(2) distributed Bragg reflectors (DBRs) for applications involving building-integrated photovoltaics (BIPVs). Selectively transparent solar cells are formed by adjusting the positions of the DBR stop bands to allow the transmission of certain parts of light through the solar cells. Measurement and simulation results indicate that the transmission of blue light (430 ~500 nm) with the combination of three DBR mirrors has the highest increase in conversion efficiency.

  7. Quantum efficiency enhancement in selectively transparent silicon thin film solar cells by distributed Bragg reflectors.

    PubMed

    Kuo, M Y; Hsing, J Y; Chiu, T T; Li, C N; Kuo, W T; Lay, T S; Shih, M H

    2012-11-05

    This work demonstrated a-Si:H thin-film solar cells with backside TiO(2) / SiO(2) distributed Bragg reflectors (DBRs) for applications involving building-integrated photovoltaics (BIPVs). Selectively transparent solar cells are formed by adjusting the positions of the DBR stop bands to allow the transmission of certain parts of light through the solar cells. Measurement and simulation results indicate that the transmission of blue light (430 ~500 nm) with the combination of three DBR mirrors has the highest increase in conversion efficiency.

  8. A novel bifunctional mitochondria-targeted anticancer agent with high selectivity for cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    He, Huan; Li, Dong-Wei; Yang, Li-Yun; Fu, Li; Zhu, Xun-Jin; Wong, Wai-Kwok; Jiang, Feng-Lei; Liu, Yi

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria have recently emerged as novel targets for cancer therapy due to its important roles in fundamental cellular function. Discovery of new chemotherapeutic agents that allow for simultaneous treatment and visualization of cancer is urgent. Herein, we demonstrate a novel bifunctional mitochondria-targeted anticancer agent (FPB), exhibiting both imaging capability and anticancer activity. It can selectively accumulate in mitochondria and induce cell apoptosis. Notably, it results in much higher toxicity toward cancer cells owing to much higher uptake by cancer cells. These features make it highly attractive in cancer imaging and treatment. PMID:26337336

  9. Non-selective voltage-activated cation channel in the human red blood cell membrane.

    PubMed

    Kaestner, L; Bollensdorff, C; Bernhardt, I

    1999-02-04

    Using the patch-clamp technique, a non-selective voltage-activated Na+ and K+ channel in the human red blood cell membrane was found. The channel operates only at positive membrane potentials from about +30 mV (inside positive) onwards. For sodium and potassium ions, similar conductances of about 21 pS were determined. Together with the recently described K+(Na+)/H+ exchanger, this channel is responsible for the increase of residual K+ and Na+ fluxes across the human red blood cell membrane when the cells are suspended in low ionic strength medium.

  10. Inactivation of an integrated antibiotic resistance gene in mammalian cells to re-enable antibiotic selection.

    PubMed

    Ni, Peiling; Zhang, Qian; Chen, Haixia; Chen, Lingyi

    2014-01-01

    Removing an antibiotic resistance gene allows the same antibiotic to be re-used in the next round of genetic manipulation. Here we applied the CRISPR/Cas system to disrupt the puromycin resistance gene in an engineered mouse embryonic stem cell line and then re-used puromycin selection in the resulting cells to establish stable reporter cell lines. With the CRISPR/Cas system, pre-engineered sequences, such as loxP or FRT, are not required. Thus, this technique can be used to disrupt antibiotic resistance genes that cannot be removed by the Cre-loxP and Flp-FRT systems.

  11. Defining new criteria for selection of cell-based intestinal models using publicly available databases

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The criteria for choosing relevant cell lines among a vast panel of available intestinal-derived lines exhibiting a wide range of functional properties are still ill-defined. The objective of this study was, therefore, to establish objective criteria for choosing relevant cell lines to assess their appropriateness as tumor models as well as for drug absorption studies. Results We made use of publicly available expression signatures and cell based functional assays to delineate differences between various intestinal colon carcinoma cell lines and normal intestinal epithelium. We have compared a panel of intestinal cell lines with patient-derived normal and tumor epithelium and classified them according to traits relating to oncogenic pathway activity, epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and stemness, migratory properties, proliferative activity, transporter expression profiles and chemosensitivity. For example, SW480 represent an EMT-high, migratory phenotype and scored highest in terms of signatures associated to worse overall survival and higher risk of recurrence based on patient derived databases. On the other hand, differentiated HT29 and T84 cells showed gene expression patterns closest to tumor bulk derived cells. Regarding drug absorption, we confirmed that differentiated Caco-2 cells are the model of choice for active uptake studies in the small intestine. Regarding chemosensitivity we were unable to confirm a recently proposed association of chemo-resistance with EMT traits. However, a novel signature was identified through mining of NCI60 GI50 values that allowed to rank the panel of intestinal cell lines according to their drug responsiveness to commonly used chemotherapeutics. Conclusions This study presents a straightforward strategy to exploit publicly available gene expression data to guide the choice of cell-based models. While this approach does not overcome the major limitations of such models, introducing a rank order of selected

  12. Reversible Fluorescent Probe for Selective Detection and Cell Imaging of Oxidative Stress Indicator Bisulfite.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yajiao; Guan, Lingmei; Yu, Huan; Yan, Yehan; Du, Libo; Liu, Yang; Sun, Mingtai; Huang, Dejian; Wang, Suhua

    2016-04-19

    In this paper, we report a benzothiazole-functionalized cyanine fluorescence probe and demonstrate that it is selectively reactive to bisulfite, an intermediate indicator for oxidative stress. The selective reaction can be monitored by distinct ratiometric fluorescence variation favorable for cell imaging and visualization. The original probe can be regenerated in high yield through the elimination of bisulfite from the product by peroxides such as hydrogen peroxide, accompanied by fluorescence turning on at 590 nm, showing a potential application for the detection of peroxides. We successfully applied this probe for fluorescence imaging of bisulfite in cancer cells (MCF-7) treated with bisulfite and hydrogen peroxide as well as a selective detection limit of 0.34 μM bisulfite in aqueous solution.

  13. Green tea extract selectively targets nanomechanics of live metastatic cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, Sarah E.; Jin, Yu-Sheng; Lu, Qing-Yi; Rao, JianYu; Gimzewski, James K.

    2011-05-01

    Green tea extract (GTE) is known to be a potential anticancer agent (Yang et al 2009 Nat. Rev. Cancer 9 429-39) with various biological activities (Lu et al 2005 Clin. Cancer Res. 11 1675-83 Yang et al 1998 Carcinogenesis 19 611-6) yet the precise mechanism of action is still unclear. The biomechanical response of GTE treated cells taken directly from patient's body samples was measured using atomic force microscopy (AFM) (Binnig et al 1986 Phys. Rev. Lett. 56 930). We found significant increase in stiffness of GTE treated metastatic tumor cells, with a resulting value similar to untreated normal mesothelial cells, whereas mesothelial cell stiffness after GTE treatment is unchanged. Immunofluorescence analysis showed an increase in cytoskeletal-F-actin in GTE treated tumor cells, suggesting GTE treated tumor cells display mechanical, structural and morphological features similar to normal cells, which appears to be mediated by annexin-I expression, as determined by siRNA analysis of an in vitro cell line model. Our data indicates that GTE selectively targets human metastatic cancer cells but not normal mesothelial cells, a finding that is significantly advantageous compared to conventional chemotherapy agents.

  14. Rapid Selection and Proliferation of Cancer Stem Cells in a NASA Developed Microgravity Bioreactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, S. E.; Di Benedetto, A.; Valluri, J. V.; Claudio, P. P.

    2008-06-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are considered a subset of the bulk tumor responsible for initiating and maintaining the disease. Saos-2 is a human sarcoma cell line that is used as a model for osteoblastic cells, which contains 10% of CD133(+) cells. CD133 is a transmembrane pentameric glycoprotein. It is a cell surface marker expressed by hematopoietic stem cells but not mature blood cells. It has also been found to be a marker for other stem and progenitor cells including neural and embryonic stem cells, and it is expressed in cancers, including some leukemias and brain tumors. We isolated CD133(+) CSCs from the Saos-2 cell line by using a MACsorting system which consists of magnetic beads conjugated to an antibody against CD133 (Miltenyi, Auburn, CA). Saos-2 positivity to CD133 was assessed by Facs analysis using the BD FacsAria (Franklin Lakes, NJ). The Hydrodynamic Focusing Bioreactor (HFB) (Celdyne, Houston, TX) which was developed by NASA at the Johnson Space Center selected and proliferated CD133(+).

  15. Osmotic selection of human mesenchymal stem/progenitor cells from umbilical cord blood.

    PubMed

    Parekkadan, Biju; Sethu, Palaniappan; van Poll, Daan; Yarmush, Martin L; Toner, Mehmet

    2007-10-01

    The isolation of undifferentiated adult stem/progenitor cells remains a challenging task primarily due to the rare quantity of these cells in biological samples and the lack of unique markers. Herein, we report a relatively straightforward method for isolation of human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) based on their unusual resistance to osmotic lysis, which we term "osmotic selection" (OS). MSCs can remarkably withstand significant exposure to hypotonic conditions (> 30 min) with only a reversible impairment in cell proliferation and with no loss of stem cell potential after exposure. Comparison of MSCs to other circulating nonhematopoietic cells revealed a time regime, by which purification of these cells would be attainable without considerable cell loss. OS showed a 50-fold enrichment of fibroblast colony-forming units from umbilical cord blood samples when compared to commonly employed techniques. After upstream processing, isolated cells using OS were immunophenotyped to be CD14-, CD34-, CD45-, CD44+, CD105+, and CD106+, and displayed multipotent differentiation. Preliminary investigations to determine mechanisms responsible for osmolytic resistance revealed MSCs to have an ineffective volume of 59%, with the ability to double cell volume at infinite dilution. Disruption of filamentous actin polymerization by cytochalasin D sensitized MSCs to osmotic lysis, which suggests a cytoskeletal element involved in osmolytic resistance.

  16. Ebf2 is a selective marker of brown and beige adipogenic precursor cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenshan; Kissig, Megan; Rajakumari, Sona; Huang, Li; Lim, Hee-Woong; Won, Kyoung-Jae; Seale, Patrick

    2014-10-07

    Brown adipocytes and muscle and dorsal dermis descend from precursor cells in the dermomyotome, but the factors that regulate commitment to the brown adipose lineage are unknown. Here, we prospectively isolated and determined the molecular profile of embryonic brown preadipose cells. Brown adipogenic precursor activity in embryos was confined to platelet-derived growth factor α(+), myogenic factor 5(Cre)-lineage-marked cells. RNA-sequence analysis identified early B-cell factor 2 (Ebf2) as one of the most selectively expressed genes in this cell fraction. Importantly, Ebf2-expressing cells purified from Ebf2(GFP) embryos or brown fat tissue did not express myoblast or dermal cell markers and uniformly differentiated into brown adipocytes. Interestingly, Ebf2-expressing cells from white fat tissue in adult animals differentiated into brown-like (or beige) adipocytes. Loss of Ebf2 in brown preadipose cells reduced the expression levels of brown preadipose-signature genes, whereas ectopic Ebf2 expression in myoblasts activated brown preadipose-specific genes. Altogether, these results indicate that Ebf2 specifically marks and regulates the molecular profile of brown preadipose cells.

  17. Selective Capture and Quick Detection of Targeting Cells with SERS-Coding Microsphere Suspension Chip.

    PubMed

    Li, Dian; Zhang, Yuting; Li, Ruimin; Guo, Jia; Wang, Changchun; Tang, Chuanbing

    2015-05-13

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) captured from blood fluid represent recurrent cancers and metastatic lesions to monitor the situation of cancers. We develop surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS)-coding microsphere suspension chip as a new strategy for fast and efficient capture, recovery, and detection of targeting cancer cells. Using HeLa cells as model CTCs, we first utilize folate as a recognition molecule to be immobilized in magnetic composite microspheres for capturing HeLa cells and attaining high capturing efficacy (up to 95%). After capturing cells, the composite microsphere, which utilizes a disulfide bond as crosslinker in the polymer shell and as a spacer for linking folate, can recycle 90% cells within 20 min eluted by glutathion solution. Taking advantage of the SERS with fingerprint features, we characterize captured/recovered cells with the unique signal of report-molecule 4-aminothiophenol through introducing the SERS-coding microsphere suspension chip to CTCs. Finally, the exploratory experiment of sieving cells shows that the magnetic composite microspheres can selectively capture the HeLa cells from samples of mixed cells, indicating that these magnetic composite microspheres have potential in real blood samples for capturing CTCs.

  18. Selective inhibition of 12-lipoxygenase protects islets and beta cells from inflammatory cytokine-mediated beta cell dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Taylor-Fishwick, David A; Weaver, Jessica; Glenn, Lindsey; Kuhn, Norine; Rai, Ganesha; Jadhav, Ajit; Simeonov, Anton; Dudda, Angela; Schmoll, Dieter; Holman, Theodore R; Maloney, David J; Nadler, Jerry L

    2015-03-01

    Islet inflammation leads to loss of functional pancreatic beta cell mass. Increasing evidence suggests that activation of 12-lipoxygenase leads to inflammatory beta cell loss. This study evaluates new specific small-molecule inhibitors of 12-lipoxygenase for protecting rodent and human beta cells from inflammatory damage. Mouse beta cell lines and mouse and human islets were treated with inflammatory cytokines IL-1β, TNFα and IFNγ in the absence or presence of novel selective 12-lipoxygenase inhibitors. Glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS), gene expression, cell survival and 12-S-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (12-S-HETE) levels were evaluated using established methods. Pharmacokinetic analysis was performed with the lead inhibitor in CD1 mice. Inflammatory cytokines led to the loss of human beta cell function, elevated cell death, increased inflammatory gene expression and upregulation of 12-lipoxygenase expression and activity (measured by 12-S-HETE generation). Two 12-lipoxygenase inhibitors, Compounds 5 and 9, produced a concentration-dependent reduction of stimulated 12-S-HETE levels. GSIS was preserved in the presence of the 12-lipoxygenase inhibitors. 12-Lipoxygenase inhibition preserved survival of primary mouse and human islets. When administered orally, Compound 5 reduced plasma 12-S-HETE in CD1 mice. Compounds 5 and 9 preserved the function and survival of human donor islets exposed to inflammatory cytokines. Selective inhibition of 12-lipoxygenase activity confers protection to beta cells during exposure to inflammatory cytokines. These concept validation studies identify 12-lipoxygenase as a promising target in the prevention of loss of functional beta cells in diabetes.

  19. Selective inhibition of breast cancer stem cells by gold nanorods mediated plasmonic hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yingying; Wang, Jing; Li, Xiaofan; Liu, Ying; Dai, Luru; Wu, Xiaochun; Chen, Chunying

    2014-05-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) have been identified in a variety of cancers and emerged as a new target for cancer therapy. CSCs are resistant to many current cancer treatments, including chemotherapy and radiation therapy. Therefore, eradication of this cell population is a primary objective in cancer therapy. Here, we report gold nanorods (AuNRs) mediated photothermal treatment can selectively eliminate CSCs in MCF-7 breast cancer cells. It significantly reduced the aldehyde dehydrogenase positive (ALDH(+)) cells subpopulation and the mammosphere formation ability of treated cells. Also, the gene expression of stem cell markers was decreased. Cellular uptake assay revealed that polyelectrolyte conjugated AuNRs could be internalized by CSCs much more and faster than non cancer stem cells (NCSCs), which might be the main reason for the selective elimination of CSCs. We further loaded salinomycin (SA), a CSCs inhibitor with polyelectrolyte conjugated AuNRs to get a synergistic CSCs inhibition. Enhanced inhibition of CSCs was obtained by NIR light triggered drug release and hyperthermia. This CSCs-targeted thermo-chemotherapy platform provides a new combinatorial strategy for efficient inhibition of CSCs, which is promising to improve cancer treatment and may overcome the chemoresistance and recurrence of cancer. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Selective manipulation of the human T-cell receptor repertoire expressed by thymocytes in organ culture.

    PubMed Central

    Merkenschlager, M; Fisher, A G

    1992-01-01

    A recently described organ culture system for human thymocytes is shown to support the generation of a diverse T-cell receptor repertoire in vitro: thymocytes of the alpha beta lineage, including representatives of the V beta families 5.2/5.3, 6.7, and 8, accounted for the majority of T-cell receptor-positive cells throughout a 3-week culture period. Thymocytes bearing gamma delta receptors were also identified, particularly among the CD4 CD8 double-negative subset. The T-cell receptor repertoire expressed in organ culture responded to experimental manipulation with staphylococcal enterotoxins. Staphylococcal enterotoxin D (a powerful activator of human peripheral T cells expressing V beta 5.2/5.3 receptors) caused a marked reduction of V beta 5.2/5.3 expression, as determined with the V beta-specific antibody 42/1C1. Evidence is presented that this loss of V beta 5.2/5.3 expression resulted from the selective deletion of activated thymocytes by apoptosis, in concert with T-cell receptor modulation. These effects of staphylococcal enterotoxin D were specific (since staphylococcal enterotoxin E did not influence V beta 5.2/5.3 expression) and V beta-selective (since expression of V beta 6.7 remained unaffected by staphylococcal enterotoxin D). On the basis of these observations, we suggest that thymic organ culture provides a powerful approach to study the generation of the human T-cell repertoire. Images PMID:1584760

  1. Mechanistic insights into selective killing of OXPHOS-dependent cancer cells by arctigenin.

    PubMed

    Brecht, Karin; Riebel, Virginie; Couttet, Philippe; Paech, Franziska; Wolf, Armin; Chibout, Salah-Dine; Pognan, Francois; Krähenbühl, Stephan; Uteng, Marianne

    2017-04-01

    Arctigenin has previously been identified as a potential anti-tumor treatment for advanced pancreatic cancer. However, the mechanism of how arctigenin kills cancer cells is not fully understood. In the present work we studied the mechanism of toxicity by arctigenin in the human pancreatic cell line, Panc-1, with special emphasis on the mitochondria. A comparison of Panc-1 cells cultured in glucose versus galactose medium was applied, allowing assessments of effects in glycolytic versus oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS)-dependent Panc-1 cells. For control purposes, the mitochondrial toxic response to treatment with arctigenin was compared to the anti-cancer drug, sorafenib, which is a tyrosine kinase inhibitor known for mitochondrial toxic off-target effects (Will et al., 2008). In both Panc-1 OXPHOS-dependent and glycolytic cells, arctigenin dissipated the mitochondrial membrane potential, which was demonstrated to be due to inhibition of the mitochondrial complexes II and IV. However, arctigenin selectively killed only the OXPHOS-dependent Panc-1 cells. This selective killing of OXPHOS-dependent Panc-1 cells was accompanied by generation of ER stress, mitochondrial membrane permeabilization and caspase activation leading to apoptosis and aponecrosis.

  2. Highly sensitive and selective detection of cancer cell with a label-free electrochemical cytosensor.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiyang; Qin, Yinan; Li, Dan; Wang, Tianshu; Liu, Yaqing; Wang, Jin; Wang, Erkang

    2013-03-15

    Electrochemical methods have attracted considerable attention for developing cytosensing system since they can decrease the cost and time requirement for cell detection with simple instrumentation. Herein, a label-free electrochemical cytosensor with surface-confined ferrocene as signal indicator was developed for highly sensitive and selective detection of cancer cell. With layer-by-layer (LBL) self-assembly technique, positively charged poly(ethylene imine) functionalized with ferrocene (Fc-PEI) and negatively charged single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) were alternately assembled on 3-mercaptopropionic acid (MPA) modified gold substrate. Folic acid (FA) was covalently bonded onto SWNTs surface to specifically recognize cancer cells according to the high affinity of FA for folate receptor (FR) on cellular surface. The developed cytosensor presented high sensitivity and selectivity for the detection of human cervical carcinoma (HeLa) cell. By using fast-response differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) method, a wide detection range from 10 to 10(6) cells/mL with a detection limit as low as 10 cells/mL was reached even in the presence of a large amount of non-cancerous cells.

  3. Glycosylated carriers for cell-selective and nuclear delivery of nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Wijagkanalan, Wassana; Kawakami, Shigeru; Hashida, Mitsuru

    2011-06-01

    Targeted gene delivery via selective cellular receptors has been realized as a crucial strategy for successful gene therapy by maximizing therapeutic efficiency in target cells and minimizing systemic toxicity. The membrane carbohydrate-binding proteins (membrane lectins) with different carbohydrate specificities are differentially expressed on the cellular and intracellular membranes of a number of cells. Their multiplicity, high affinity, and effective endocytosis after receptor binding as well as the biocompatibility of carbohydrate ligands endow them as potential ligands for glycosylated carriers in cell-selective delivery of nucleic acids. To achieve the in vivo application, glycosylated carriers/nucleic acid complexes have to fulfill certain conditions, including having a suitable size, minimal nonspecific interactions, low immunogenicity, and high uptake in target cells. Accordingly, the effective nuclear delivery of nucleic acids is the paramount important step for efficient gene transfer. This review summarizes the recent progress regarding application of glycosylated carriers for cell-selective and nuclear delivery of nucleic acids and their critical factors for efficient gene transfer. In addition, the development of new materials, such as carbon nanotubes, carbon nanospheres, and gold nanoparticles, as innovative carriers will be discussed with regards to glycosylation-mediated delivery of nucleic acids.

  4. Selection of Aptamers for Mature White Adipocytes by Cell SELEX Using Flow Cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun Young; Kim, Ji Won; Kim, Won Kon; Han, Baek Soo; Park, Sung Goo; Chung, Bong Hyun; Lee, Sang Chul; Bae, Kwang-Hee

    2014-01-01

    Background Adipose tissue, mainly composed of adipocytes, plays an important role in metabolism by regulating energy homeostasis. Obesity is primarily caused by an abundance of adipose tissue. Therefore, specific targeting of adipose tissue is critical during the treatment of obesity, and plays a major role in overcoming it. However, the knowledge of cell-surface markers specific to adipocytes is limited. Methods and Results We applied the CELL SELEX (Systematic Evolution of Ligands by EXponential enrichment) method using flow cytometry to isolate molecular probes for specific recognition of adipocytes. The aptamer library, a mixture of FITC-tagged single-stranded random DNAs, is used as a source for acquiring molecular probes. With the increasing number of selection cycles, there was a steady increase in the fluorescence intensity toward mature adipocytes. Through 12 rounds of SELEX, enriched aptamers showing specific recognition toward mature 3T3-L1 adipocyte cells were isolated. Among these, two aptamers (MA-33 and 91) were able to selectively bind to mature adipocytes with an equilibrium dissociation constant (Kd) in the nanomolar range. These aptamers did not bind to preadipocytes or other cell lines (such as HeLa, HEK-293, or C2C12 cells). Additionally, it was confirmed that MA-33 and 91 can distinguish between mature primary white and primary brown adipocytes. Conclusions These selected aptamers have the potential to be applied as markers for detecting mature white adipocytes and monitoring adipogenesis, and could emerge as an important tool in the treatment of obesity. PMID:24844710

  5. Intravenous application of CD271-selected mesenchymal stem cells during fracture healing.

    PubMed

    Dreger, Tina; Watson, John T; Akers, Walter; Molligan, Jeremy; Achilefu, Samuel; Schon, Lew C; Zhang, Zijun

    2014-01-01

    Circulating mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) participate in fracture healing and can be used to enhance fracture healing. This study investigated how CD271-selected MSCs travel in circulation and when is the optimal time to apply MSCs intravenously during fracture healing. Based on the expression of CD271, MSCs were isolated from human bone marrow and labeled with cypate, a near-infrared fluorochrome. A unilateral closed fracture was created at the femur in immunodeficient mice. The cypate-labeled MSCs were injected into the tail vein of the mice at days 1 and 3 after fracture and were tracked by near-infrared imaging. The mice were euthanized at 3 weeks after fracture. Immunohistochemistry was performed to detect human MSCs at the fracture sites. Migration of CD271-selected MSCs, under the influence of stem cell-derived factor-1, was assessed in vitro. Intravenously injected at day 1, but not day 3, after fracture, CD271-selected MSCs accumulated at the fracture sites significantly and lasted for at least 7 days. All fractures, with or without MSC injections, healed in 3 weeks. Human cells were localized at the fracture sites in mice by immunohistochemistry. CD271-selected MSCs migrated toward the medium contained stem cell-derived factor-1 in vitro. After intravenous injection, CD271-selected MSCs were recruited to the fracture sites. The stages of fracture healing influenced the homing of culture-expanded MSCs. In mice, an optimal window of intravenous injection of MSCs was around 24 hours after fracture. Intravenous application of MSCs may serve as a practical route to deliver stem cells for the treatment of fracture nonunion and delayed union.

  6. Selective sensitiveness of mesenchymal stem cells to shock waves leads to anticancer effect in human cancer cell co-cultures.

    PubMed

    Foglietta, Federica; Duchi, Serena; Canaparo, Roberto; Varchi, Greta; Lucarelli, Enrico; Dozza, Barbara; Serpe, Loredana

    2017-03-15

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) possess the distinctive feature of homing in on and engrafting into the tumor stroma making their therapeutic applications in cancer treatment very promising. Research into new effectors and external stimuli, which can selectively trigger the release of cytotoxic species from MSC toward the cancer cells, significantly raises their potential. Shock waves (SW) have recently gained recognition for their ability to induce specific biological effects, such as the local generation of cytotoxic reactive oxygen species (ROS) in a non-invasive and tunable manner. We thus investigate whether MSC are able to generate ROS and, in turn, affect cancer cell growth when in co-culture with human glioblastoma (U87) or osteosarcoma (U2OS) cells and exposed to SW. MSC were found to be the cell line that was most sensitive to SW treatment as shown by SW-induced ROS production and cytotoxicity. Notably, U87 and U2OS cancer cell growth was unaffected by SW exposure. However, significant decreases in cancer cell growth, 1.8 fold for U87 and 2.3 fold for U2OS, were observed 24h after the SW treatment of MSC co-cultures with cancer cells. The ROS production induced in MSC by SW exposure was then responsible for lipid peroxidation and cell death in U87 and U2OS cells co-cultured with MSC. This experiment highlights the unique ability of MSC to generate ROS upon SW treatment and induce the cell death of co-cultured cancer cells. SW might therefore be proposed as an innovative tool for MSC-mediated cancer treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Selective Expansion of Memory CD4+ T cells By Mitogenic Human CD28 Generates Inflammatory Cytokines and Regulatory T cells

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Manisha; Basu, Sreemanti; Camell, Christina; Couturier, Jacob; Nudelman, Rodolfo J.; Medina, Miguel A.; Rodgers, John R.; Lewis, Dorothy E.

    2009-01-01

    Co-stimulatory signals are important for development of effector and regulatory T cells. In this case, CD28 signaling is usually considered inert in the absence of signaling through the TCR. By contrast, mitogenic rat CD28 mAbs reportedly expand regulatory T cells without TCR stimulation. We found that a commercially available human CD28 mAb (ANC28) stimulated PBMCs without TCR co-ligation or cross-linking; ANC28 selectively expanded CD4+CD25+FoxP3−(T effector) and CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ (Treg) cells. ANC28 stimulated the CD45RO+ CD4+ (memory) population whereas CD45RA+CD4+ (naïve) cells did not respond. ANC28 also induced inflammatory cytokines. Treg induced by ANC28 retain the Treg phenotype longer than did co-stimulated Treg. Treg induced by ANC28 suppressed CD25− T cells through a contact-dependent mechanism. Purity influenced the response of CD4+CD25+ cells because bead-purified CD4+CD25+ cells (85–90% pure) responded strongly to ANC28, whereas 98% pure FACS-sorted CD4+CD25 bright (T-reg) did not respond. Purified CD4+CD25int cells responded similarly to the bead-purified CD4+CD25+ cells. Thus, pre-activated CD4+ T cells (CD25int) respond to ANC28 rather than Treg (CD25bright). The ability of ANC28 to expand both effectors producing inflammatory cytokines as well as suppressive regulatory T cells might be useful for ex vivo expansion of therapeutic T cells. PMID:18446791

  8. Inflammatory cytokine production in tumor cells upon chemotherapy drug exposure or upon selection for drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Edwardson, Derek W; Boudreau, Justin; Mapletoft, Jonathan; Lanner, Carita; Kovala, A Thomas; Parissenti, Amadeo M

    2017-01-01

    Tumor Necrosis Factor alpha (TNF-α) has been shown to be released by tumor cells in response to docetaxel, and lipopolysaccharides (LPS), the latter through activation of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4). However, it is unclear whether the former involves TLR4 receptor activation through direct binding of the drug to TLR4 at the cell surface. The current study was intended to better understand drug-induced TNF-α production in tumor cells, whether from short-term drug exposure or in cells selected for drug resistance. ELISAs were employed to measure cytokine release from breast and ovarian tumor cells in response to several structurally distinct chemotherapy agents and/or TLR4 agonists or antagonists. Drug uptake and drug sensitivity studies were also performed. We observed that several drugs induced TNF-αrelease from multiple tumor cell lines. Docetaxel-induced cytokine production was distinct from that of LPS in both MyD88-positive (MCF-7) and MyD88-deficient (A2780) cells. The acquisition of docetaxel resistance was accompanied by increased constitutive production of TNF-αand CXCL1, which waned at higher levels of resistance. In docetaxel-resistant MCF-7 and A2780 cell lines, the production of TNF-α could not be significantly augmented by docetaxel without the inhibition of P-gp, a transporter protein that promotes drug efflux from tumor cells. Pretreatment of tumor cells with LPS sensitized MyD88-positive cells (but not MyD88-deficient) to docetaxel cytotoxicity in both drug-naive and drug-resistant cells. Our findings suggest that taxane-induced inflammatory cytokine production from tumor cells depends on the duration of exposure, requires cellular drug-accumulation, and is distinct from the LPS response seen in breast tumor cells. Also, stimulation of the LPS-induced pathway may be an attractive target for treatment of drug-resistant disease.

  9. Novel Approach for Selective Emitter Formation and Front Side Metallization of Crystalline Silicon Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Baomin

    2010-07-26

    In this project we will explore the possibility of forming the front side metallization and selective emitter layer for the crystalline silicon solar cells through using selective laser ablation to create contact openings on the front surface and a screen printer to make connections with conductive paste. Using this novel approach we expect to reduce the specific contact resistance of the silver gridlines by about one order of magnitude compared to the state-of-art industrial crystalline silicon solar cells to below 1 mΩ∙cm2, and use lightly doped n+ emitter layer with sheet resistance of not smaller than 100 Ω. This represents an enabling improvement on crystalline silicon solar cell performance and can increase the absolute efficiency of the solar cell by about 1%. In this scientific report we first present our result on the selective laser ablation of the nitride layer to make contact openings. Then we report our work on the solar cell fabrication by using the laser ablated contact openings with self-doping paste. Through various electrical property characterization and SIMS analysis, the factors limiting the cell performance have been discussed. While through this proof-of-concept project we could not reach the target on cell efficiency improvement, the process to fabricate 125mm full-sized silicon solar cells using laser ablation and self-doping paste has been developed, and a much better understanding of technical challenges has been achieved. Future direction to realize the potential of the new technology has been clearly defined.

  10. Lenalidomide causes selective degradation of IKZF1 and IKZF3 in multiple myeloma cells.

    PubMed

    Krönke, Jan; Udeshi, Namrata D; Narla, Anupama; Grauman, Peter; Hurst, Slater N; McConkey, Marie; Svinkina, Tanya; Heckl, Dirk; Comer, Eamon; Li, Xiaoyu; Ciarlo, Christie; Hartman, Emily; Munshi, Nikhil; Schenone, Monica; Schreiber, Stuart L; Carr, Steven A; Ebert, Benjamin L

    2014-01-17

    Lenalidomide is a drug with clinical efficacy in multiple myeloma and other B cell neoplasms, but its mechanism of action is unknown. Using quantitative proteomics, we found that lenalidomide causes selective ubiquitination and degradation of two lymphoid transcription factors, IKZF1 and IKZF3, by the CRBN-CRL4 ubiquitin ligase. IKZF1 and IKZF3 are essential transcription factors in multiple myeloma. A single amino acid substitution of IKZF3 conferred resistance to lenalidomide-induced degradation and rescued lenalidomide-induced inhibition of cell growth. Similarly, we found that lenalidomide-induced interleukin-2 production in T cells is due to depletion of IKZF1 and IKZF3. These findings reveal a previously unknown mechanism of action for a therapeutic agent: alteration of the activity of an E3 ubiquitin ligase, leading to selective degradation of specific targets.

  11. Cerebellar cortical degeneration with selective granule cell loss in Bavarian mountain dogs.

    PubMed

    Flegel, T; Matiasek, K; Henke, D; Grevel, V

    2007-08-01

    Three Bavarian mountain dogs aged between 18 and 20 months, not related to each other, were presented with chronic signs of cerebellar dysfunction. On sagittal T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging brain images, the tentative diagnosis of cerebellar hypoplasia was established based on an enlarged cerebrospinal fluid space around the cerebellum and an increased cerebrospinal fluid signal between the folia. Post-mortem examination was performed in one dog and did show an overall reduction of cerebellar size. On histopathologic examination, a selective loss of cerebellar granule cells with sparing of Purkinje cells was evident. Therefore, the Bavarian mountain dog is a breed where cerebellar cortical degeneration caused by the rather exceptional selective granule cell loss can be seen as cause of chronic, slowly progressive cerebellar dysfunction starting at an age of several months.

  12. Selective dissolution of halide perovskites as a step towards recycling solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Byeong Jo; Kim, Dong Hoe; Kwon, Seung Lee; Park, So Yeon; Li, Zhen; Zhu, Kai; Jung, Hyun Suk

    2016-05-01

    Most research on perovskite solar cells has focused on improving power-conversion efficiency and stability. However, if one could refurbish perovskite solar cells, their stability might not be a critical issue. From the perspective of cost effectiveness, if failed, perovskite solar cells could be collected and recycled; reuse of their gold electrodes and transparent conducting glasses could reduce the price per watt of perovskite photovoltaic modules. Herein, we present a simple and effective method for removing the perovskite layer and reusing the mesoporous TiO2-coated transparent conducting glass substrate via selective dissolution. We find that the perovskite layer can be easily decomposed in polar aprotic solvents because of the reaction between polar aprotic solvents and Pb2+ cations. After 10 cycles of recycling, a mesoporous TiO2-coated transparent conducting glass substrate-based perovskite solar cell still shows a constant power-conversion efficiency, thereby demonstrating the possibility of recycling perovskite solar cells.

  13. Selective dissolution of halide perovskites as a step towards recycling solar cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Byeong Jo; Kim, Dong Hoe; Kwon, Seung Lee; Park, So Yeon; Li, Zhen; Zhu, Kai; Jung, Hyun Suk

    2016-01-01

    Most research on perovskite solar cells has focused on improving power-conversion efficiency and stability. However, if one could refurbish perovskite solar cells, their stability might not be a critical issue. From the perspective of cost effectiveness, if failed, perovskite solar cells could be collected and recycled; reuse of their gold electrodes and transparent conducting glasses could reduce the price per watt of perovskite photovoltaic modules. Herein, we present a simple and effective method for removing the perovskite layer and reusing the mesoporous TiO2-coated transparent conducting glass substrate via selective dissolution. We find that the perovskite layer can be easily decomposed in polar aprotic solvents because of the reaction between polar aprotic solvents and Pb2+ cations. After