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Sample records for nyh cells selected

  1. Trichomonas vaginalis NYH286 phenotypic variation may be coordinated for a repertoire of trichomonad surface immunogens.

    PubMed Central

    Alderete, J F

    1987-01-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis isolate NYH286 was fractionated with immunoglobulin G of sera from patients with trichomoniasis. Subpopulations of trichomonads with phenotypes of either patient serum-immunoglobulin G reactive (PS+) or nonreactive (PS-) were obtained. Flow cytofluorometry of PS+ and PS- subpopulations with a monoclonal antibody called C20A3 which reacts with a high-molecular-weight immunogen of T. vaginalis gave corresponding fluorescent (positive) and nonfluorescent (negative) phenotypes. No relationship was seen between PS+ and PS- phenotypes and binding of soybean agglutinin, wheat germ agglutinin, and concanavalin A, showing that PS- organisms still possessed carbohydrate moieties on their surfaces based on lectin binding. Phenotypic variation among the PS+ and PS- trichomonads was observed during in vitro growth. A positive-to-negative phenotype shift was also recorded for parasites obtained from lesions of mice subcutaneously infected with PS+ trichomonads. The involvement of surface proteins in the differential PS+ and PS- reactions was supported by soluble antigen and whole cell radioimmunoprecipitation assays. Finally, enhanced parasitism and killing of HeLa cells in monolayer cultures were observed for PS- subpopulations as compared with PS+ counterparts. The data support the idea that phenotypic variation for T. vaginalis may be coordinated for a repertoire of trichomonad immunogens and that such membrane dynamics influence expression of virulence determinants for these sexually transmitted disease agents. Images PMID:3497876

  2. Sickle Cell: A Selected Resource Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, Washington, DC.

    This annotated, selective bibliography lists the following types of educational and informational material on both sickle cell disease and trait: (1) professional education materials; (2) fact sheets, pamphlets, and brochures; and (3) audiovisual material. A selected list of references is provided for the following topic areas: (1) genetic…

  3. Microgravity-Enhanced Stem Cell Selection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Claudio, Pier Paolo; Valluri, Jagan

    2011-01-01

    Stem cells, both embryonic and adult, promise to revolutionize the practice of medicine in the future. In order to realize this potential, a number of hurdles must be overcome. Most importantly, the signaling mechanisms necessary to control the differentiation of stem cells into tissues of interest remain to be elucidated, and much of the present research on stem cells is focused on this goal. Nevertheless, it will also be essential to achieve large-scale expansion and, in many cases, assemble cells in 3D as transplantable tissues. To this end, microgravity analog bioreactors can play a significant role. Microgravity bioreactors were originally conceived as a tool to study the cellular responses to microgravity. However, the technology can address some of the shortcomings of conventional cell culture systems; namely, the deficiency of mass transport in static culture and high mechanical shear forces in stirred systems. Unexpectedly, the conditions created in the vessel were ideal for 3D cell culture. Recently, investigators have demonstrated the capability of the microgravity bioreactors to expand hematopoietic stem cells compared to static culture, and facilitate the differentiation of umbilical cord stem cells into 3D liver aggregates. Stem cells are capable of differentiating into functional cells. However, there are no reliable methods to induce the stem cells to form specific cells or to gain enough cells for transplantation, which limits their application in clinical therapy. The aim of this study is to select the best experimental setup to reach high proliferation levels by culturing these cells in a microgravity-based bioreactor. In typical cell culture, the cells sediment to the bottom surface of their container and propagate as a one-cell-layer sheet. Prevention of such sedimentation affords the freedom for self-assembly and the propagation of 3D tissue arrays. Suspension of cells is easily achievable using stirred technologies. Unfortunately, in

  4. Engineering novel cell surface chemistry for selective tumor cell targeting

    SciTech Connect

    Bertozzi, C.R. |

    1997-12-31

    A common feature of many different cancers is the high expression level of the two monosaccharides sialic acid and fucose within the context of cell-surface associated glycoconjugates. A correlation has been made between hypersialylation and/or hyperfucosylation and the highly metastatic phenotype. Thus, a targeting strategy based on sialic acid or fucose expression would be a powerful tool for the development of new cancer cell-selective therapies and diagnostic agents. We have discovered that ketone groups can be incorporated metabolically into cell-surface associated sialic acids. The ketone is can be covalently ligated with hydrazide functionalized proteins or small molecules under physiological conditions. Thus, we have discovered a mechanism to selectively target hydrazide conjugates to highly sialylated cells such as cancer cells. Applications of this technology to the generation of novel cancer cell-selective toxins and MRI contrast reagents will be discussed, in addition to progress towards the use of cell surface fucose residues as vehicles for ketone expression.

  5. Selectivity of Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Membranes.

    PubMed

    Aricò, Antonino S; Sebastian, David; Schuster, Michael; Bauer, Bernd; D'Urso, Claudia; Lufrano, Francesco; Baglio, Vincenzo

    2015-11-24

    Sulfonic acid-functionalized polymer electrolyte membranes alternative to Nafion(®) were developed. These were hydrocarbon systems, such as blend sulfonated polyetheretherketone (s-PEEK), new generation perfluorosulfonic acid (PFSA) systems, and composite zirconium phosphate-PFSA polymers. The membranes varied in terms of composition, equivalent weight, thickness, and filler and were investigated with regard to their methanol permeation characteristics and proton conductivity for application in direct methanol fuel cells. The behavior of the membrane electrode assemblies (MEA) was investigated in fuel cell with the aim to individuate a correlation between membrane characteristics and their performance in a direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC). The power density of the DMFC at 60 °C increased according to a square root-like function of the membrane selectivity. This was defined as the reciprocal of the product between area specific resistance and crossover. The power density achieved at 60 °C for the most promising s-PEEK-based membrane-electrode assembly (MEA) was higher than the benchmark Nafion(®) 115-based MEA (77 mW·cm(-2) vs. 64 mW·cm(-2)). This result was due to a lower methanol crossover (47 mA·cm(-2) equivalent current density for s-PEEK vs. 120 mA·cm(-2) for Nafion(®) 115 at 60 °C as recorded at OCV with 2 M methanol) and a suitable area specific resistance (0.15 Ohm cm² for s-PEEK vs. 0.22 Ohm cm² for Nafion(®) 115).

  6. Selectivity of Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Aricò, Antonino S.; Sebastian, David; Schuster, Michael; Bauer, Bernd; D’Urso, Claudia; Lufrano, Francesco; Baglio, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    Sulfonic acid-functionalized polymer electrolyte membranes alternative to Nafion® were developed. These were hydrocarbon systems, such as blend sulfonated polyetheretherketone (s-PEEK), new generation perfluorosulfonic acid (PFSA) systems, and composite zirconium phosphate–PFSA polymers. The membranes varied in terms of composition, equivalent weight, thickness, and filler and were investigated with regard to their methanol permeation characteristics and proton conductivity for application in direct methanol fuel cells. The behavior of the membrane electrode assemblies (MEA) was investigated in fuel cell with the aim to individuate a correlation between membrane characteristics and their performance in a direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC). The power density of the DMFC at 60 °C increased according to a square root-like function of the membrane selectivity. This was defined as the reciprocal of the product between area specific resistance and crossover. The power density achieved at 60 °C for the most promising s-PEEK-based membrane-electrode assembly (MEA) was higher than the benchmark Nafion® 115-based MEA (77 mW·cm−2 vs. 64 mW·cm−2). This result was due to a lower methanol crossover (47 mA·cm−2 equivalent current density for s-PEEK vs. 120 mA·cm−2 for Nafion® 115 at 60 °C as recorded at OCV with 2 M methanol) and a suitable area specific resistance (0.15 Ohm cm2 for s-PEEK vs. 0.22 Ohm cm2 for Nafion® 115). PMID:26610582

  7. Particle compositions with a pre-selected cell internalization mode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decuzzi, Paolo (Inventor); Ferrari, Mauro (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A method of formulating a particle composition having a pre-selected cell internalization mode involves selecting a target cell having surface receptors and obtaining particles that have i) surface moieties, that have an affinity for or are capable of binding to the surface receptors of the cell and ii) a preselected shape, where a surface distribution of the surface moieties on the particles and the shape of the particles are effective for the pre-selected cell internalization mode.

  8. CD133+ cell selection is an alternative to CD34+ cell selection for ex vivo expansion of hematopoietic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Kobari, L; Giarratana, M C; Pflumio, F; Izac, B; Coulombel, L; Douay, L

    2001-04-01

    CD133 is a new stem cell antigen that may provide an alternative to CD34 for the selection and expansion of hematopoietic cells for transplantation. This study compared the expansion capacities of CD133(+) and CD34(+) cells isolated from the same cord blood (CB) samples. After 14 days culture in stroma-free, serum-free medium in the presence of stem cell factor (SCF), Flt3-1, megakaryocyte growth and development factor (MGDF), and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), the CD133(+) and CD34(+) fractions displayed comparable expansion of the myeloid compartment (CFC, LTC-IC, and E-LTC-IC). The expansion of CD133(+) CB cells was up to 1262-fold for total cells, 99-fold for CD34(+) cells, 109-fold for CD34(+) CD133(+) cells, 133-fold for CFU-GM, 14.5-fold for LTC-IC, and 7.5-fold for E-LTC-IC. Moreover, the expanded population was able to generate lymphoid B (CD19(+)), NK (CD56(+)), and T (CD4(+) CD8(+)) cells in liquid or fetal thymic organ cultures, while expression of the homing antigen CXCR4 was similar on expanded and nonexpanded CD133(+) or CD34(+) cells. Thus, the CD133(+) subset could be expanded in the same manner as the CD34(+) subset and conserved its multilineage capacity, which would support the relevance of CD133 for clinical hematopoietic selection.

  9. Nylon-3 polymers that enable selective culture of endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Runhui; Chen, Xinyu; Gellman, Samuel H; Masters, Kristyn S

    2013-11-06

    Substrates that selectively encourage the growth of specific cell types are valuable for the engineering of complex tissues. Some cell-selective peptides have been identified from extracellular matrix proteins; these peptides have proven useful for biomaterials-based approaches to tissue repair or regeneration. However, there are very few examples of synthetic materials that display selectivity in supporting cell growth. We describe nylon-3 polymers that support in vitro culture of endothelial cells but do not support the culture of smooth muscle cells or fibroblasts. These materials may be promising for vascular biomaterials applications.

  10. Modeling selective elimination of quiescent cancer cells from bone marrow.

    PubMed

    Cavnar, Stephen P; Rickelmann, Andrew D; Meguiar, Kaille F; Xiao, Annie; Dosch, Joseph; Leung, Brendan M; Cai Lesher-Perez, Sasha; Chitta, Shashank; Luker, Kathryn E; Takayama, Shuichi; Luker, Gary D

    2015-08-01

    Patients with many types of malignancy commonly harbor quiescent disseminated tumor cells in bone marrow. These cells frequently resist chemotherapy and may persist for years before proliferating as recurrent metastases. To test for compounds that eliminate quiescent cancer cells, we established a new 384-well 3D spheroid model in which small numbers of cancer cells reversibly arrest in G1/G0 phase of the cell cycle when cultured with bone marrow stromal cells. Using dual-color bioluminescence imaging to selectively quantify viability of cancer and stromal cells in the same spheroid, we identified single compounds and combination treatments that preferentially eliminated quiescent breast cancer cells but not stromal cells. A treatment combination effective against malignant cells in spheroids also eliminated breast cancer cells from bone marrow in a mouse xenograft model. This research establishes a novel screening platform for therapies that selectively target quiescent tumor cells, facilitating identification of new drugs to prevent recurrent cancer.

  11. Selection of natural autoreactive B cells.

    PubMed

    Hardy, Richard R; Hayakawa, Kyoko

    2015-01-01

    Natural antibodies produced by CD5+ B1 B cells include anti-thymocyte autoantibody (ATA). Transgenic mice bearing the Ig-μ heavy chain of a prototypic ATA, V(H)3609Vκ21c, demonstrated a critical requirement for self-antigen in the accumulation of ATA B cells and production of high levels of serum ATA. Further work with ATA-μκ transgenic mice revealed that, while development of most B cells were blocked at an immature stage in spleen, some mature ATA B cells were present. ATA-μκ transgenic mice with varying levels of Thy-1 autoantigen showed a clear relationship between BCR crosslinking and B cell fate, with low levels generating marginal zone ATA B cells and complete antigen absence allowing maturation to follicular ATA B cells. Finally, different fates of developing ATA B cells encountering high levels self-antigen may be accounted for by variations in the response of newly formed B cells arising from foetal and adult development.

  12. Selective Chemosensitization of Rb Mutant Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-07-01

    suppressor. Genes Dev, 1998.12(15): p. 2434-42. 7. Querido , E., J.G. Teodoro, and P.E. Branton, Accumulation ofp53 induced by the adenovirus El A...cells (Debbas and White 1993; Lowe and Ruley 1993; Querido et al. 1997; Samuelson and Lowe 1997), which is reflected by ElA’s remarkable ability to...INK4a tumor suppressor gene encode two unrelated proteins capable of inducing cell cycle arrest. Cell 83: 993-1000. Querido , E., J.G. Teodoro, and P.E

  13. Comparative analysis of selected fuel cell vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    1993-05-07

    Vehicles powered by fuel cells operate more efficiently, more quietly, and more cleanly than internal combustion engines (ICEs). Furthermore, methanol-fueled fuel cell vehicles (FCVs) can utilize major elements of the existing fueling infrastructure of present-day liquid-fueled ICE vehicles (ICEVs). DOE has maintained an active program to stimulate the development and demonstration o fuel cell technologies in conjunction with rechargeable batteries in road vehicles. The purpose of this study is to identify and assess the availability of data on FCVs, and to develop a vehicle subsystem structure that can be used to compare both FCVs and ICEV, from a number of perspectives--environmental impacts, energy utilization, materials usage, and life cycle costs. This report focuses on methanol-fueled FCVs fueled by gasoline, methanol, and diesel fuel that are likely to be demonstratable by the year 2000. The comparative analysis presented covers four vehicles--two passenger vehicles and two urban transit buses. The passenger vehicles include an ICEV using either gasoline or methanol and an FCV using methanol. The FCV uses a Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cell, an on-board methanol reformer, mid-term batteries, and an AC motor. The transit bus ICEV was evaluated for both diesel and methanol fuels. The transit bus FCV runs on methanol and uses a Phosphoric Acid Fuel Cell (PAFC) fuel cell, near-term batteries, a DC motor, and an on-board methanol reformer. 75 refs.

  14. Selective Chemosensitization of Rb Mutant Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-07-01

    Oncogene 9, 359-73 (1994). 5. S. B. McMahon, H. A. Van Buskirk, K. A. Dugan, T. D. Copeland, M. D. Cole, Cell 94, 363-74. 6. E. Querido , J. G... Querido , E., Teodoro, J. G. & Branton, P. E. (1997) /. Virol. 71, 3526-3533. 39. Chiou, S. K. & White, E. (1997) /. Virol. 71, 3515-3525. 40. Mymryk, J...cells (Debbas and White 1993; Lowe and Ruley 1993; Querido et al. 1997; Samuelson and Lowe 1997), which is reflected by ElA’s remarkable ability to

  15. Selectable-Tip Corrosion-Testing Electrochemical Cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lomness, Janice; Hintze, Paul

    2008-01-01

    The figure depicts aspects of an electrochemical cell for pitting- corrosion tests of material specimens. The cell is designed to generate a region of corrosion having a pit diameter determined by the diameter of a selectable tip. The average depth of corrosion is controlled by controlling the total electric charge passing through the cell in a test. The cell is also designed to produce minimal artifacts associated with crevice corrosion. There are three selectable tips, having diameters of 0.1 in. (0.254 cm), 0.3 in. (0.762 cm), and 0.6 in. (1.524 cm), respectively.

  16. T cell depleted haploidentical transplantation: positive selection.

    PubMed

    Aversa, Franco

    2011-06-22

    Interest in mismatched transplantation arises from the fact that a suitable one-haplotype mismatched donor is immediately available for virtually all patients, particularly for those who urgently need an allogenic transplant. Work on one haplotype-mismatched transplants has been proceeding for over 20 years all over the world and novel transplant techniques have been developed. Some centres have focused on the conditioning regimens and post transplant immune suppression; others have concentrated on manipulating the graft which may be a megadose of extensively T celldepleted or unmanipulated progenitor cells. Excellent engraftment rates are associated with a very low incidence of acute and chronic GVHD and regimen-related mortality even in patients who are over 50 years old. Overall, event-free survival and transplant-related mortality compare favourably with reports on transplants from sources of stem cells other than the matched sibling.

  17. Cell-selective metabolic labeling of biomolecules with bioorthogonal functionalities.

    PubMed

    Xie, Ran; Hong, Senlian; Chen, Xing

    2013-10-01

    Metabolic labeling of biomolecules with bioorthogonal functionalities enables visualization, enrichment, and analysis of the biomolecules of interest in their physiological environments. This versatile strategy has found utility in probing various classes of biomolecules in a broad range of biological processes. On the other hand, metabolic labeling is nonselective with respect to cell type, which imposes limitations for studies performed in complex biological systems. Herein, we review the recent methodological developments aiming to endow metabolic labeling strategies with cell-type selectivity. The cell-selective metabolic labeling strategies have emerged from protein and glycan labeling. We envision that these strategies can be readily extended to labeling of other classes of biomolecules.

  18. Soft fibrin gels promote selection and growth of tumorigenic cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jing; Tan, Youhua; Zhang, Huafeng; Zhang, Yi; Xu, Pingwei; Chen, Junwei; Poh, Yeh-Chuin; Tang, Ke; Wang, Ning; Huang, Bo

    2012-08-01

    The identification of stem-cell-like cancer cells through conventional methods that depend on stem cell markers is often unreliable. We developed a mechanical method for selecting tumorigenic cells by culturing single cancer cells in fibrin matrices of ~100 Pa in stiffness. When cultured within these gels, primary human cancer cells or single cancer cells from mouse or human cancer cell lines grew within a few days into individual round colonies that resembled embryonic stem cell colonies. Subcutaneous or intravenous injection of 10 or 100 fibrin-cultured cells in syngeneic or severe combined immunodeficiency mice led to the formation of solid tumours at the site of injection or at the distant lung organ much more efficiently than control cancer cells selected using conventional surface marker methods or cultured on conventional rigid dishes or on soft gels. Remarkably, as few as ten such cells were able to survive and form tumours in the lungs of wild-type non-syngeneic mice.

  19. MerTK regulates thymic selection of autoreactive T cells.

    PubMed

    Wallet, Mark A; Flores, Rafael R; Wang, Yaming; Yi, Zuoan; Kroger, Charles J; Mathews, Clayton E; Earp, H Shelton; Matsushima, Glenn; Wang, Bo; Tisch, Roland

    2009-03-24

    T cell-mediated autoimmune diseases such as type 1 diabetes (T1D) are believed to be the result in part of inefficient negative selection of self-specific thymocytes. However, the events regulating thymic negative selection are not fully understood. In the current study, we demonstrate that nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice lacking expression of the Mer tyrosine kinase (MerTK) have reduced inflammation of the pancreatic islets and fail to develop diabetes. Furthermore, NOD mice deficient in MerTK expression (Mer(-/-)) exhibit a reduced frequency of beta cell-specific T cells independent of immunoregulatory effectors. The establishment of bone marrow chimeric mice demonstrated that the block in beta cell autoimmunity required hematopoietic-derived cells lacking MerTK expression. Notably, fetal thymic organ cultures and self-peptide administration showed increased thymic negative selection in Mer(-/-) mice. Finally, thymic dendritic cells (DC) prepared from Mer(-/-) mice exhibited an increased capacity to induce thymocyte apoptosis in a peptide-specific manner in vitro. These findings provide evidence for a unique mechanism involving MerTK-mediated regulation of thymocyte negative selection and thymic DC, and suggest a role for MerTK in contributing to beta cell autoimmunity.

  20. Selective single cell isolation for genomics using microraft arrays

    PubMed Central

    Welch, Joshua D.; Williams, Lindsay A.; DiSalvo, Matthew; Brandt, Alicia T.; Marayati, Raoud; Sims, Christopher E.; Allbritton, Nancy L.; Prins, Jan F.; Yeh, Jen Jen; Jones, Corbin D.

    2016-01-01

    Genomic methods are used increasingly to interrogate the individual cells that compose specific tissues. However, current methods for single cell isolation struggle to phenotypically differentiate specific cells in a heterogeneous population and rely primarily on the use of fluorescent markers. Many cellular phenotypes of interest are too complex to be measured by this approach, making it difficult to connect genotype and phenotype at the level of individual cells. Here we demonstrate that microraft arrays, which are arrays containing thousands of individual cell culture sites, can be used to select single cells based on a variety of phenotypes, such as cell surface markers, cell proliferation and drug response. We then show that a common genomic procedure, RNA-seq, can be readily adapted to the single cells isolated from these rafts. We show that data generated using microrafts and our modified RNA-seq protocol compared favorably with the Fluidigm C1. We then used microraft arrays to select pancreatic cancer cells that proliferate in spite of cytotoxic drug treatment. Our single cell RNA-seq data identified several expected and novel gene expression changes associated with early drug resistance. PMID:27530426

  1. CD6 modulates thymocyte selection and peripheral T cell homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Consuegra-Fernández, Marta; Girard, Laura; Aranda, Fernando; Martínez, Vanesa-Gabriela; Sarukhan, Adelaida; Malissen, Marie

    2016-01-01

    The CD6 glycoprotein is a lymphocyte surface receptor putatively involved in T cell development and activation. CD6 facilitates adhesion between T cells and antigen-presenting cells through its interaction with CD166/ALCAM (activated leukocyte cell adhesion molecule), and physically associates with the T cell receptor (TCR) at the center of the immunological synapse. However, its precise role during thymocyte development and peripheral T cell immune responses remains to be defined. Here, we analyze the in vivo consequences of CD6 deficiency. CD6−/− thymi showed a reduction in both CD4+ and CD8+ single-positive subsets, and double-positive thymocytes exhibited increased Ca2+ mobilization to TCR cross-linking in vitro. Bone marrow chimera experiments revealed a T cell–autonomous selective disadvantage of CD6−/− T cells during development. The analysis of TCR-transgenic mice (OT-I and Marilyn) confirmed that abnormal T cell selection events occur in the absence of CD6. CD6−/− mice displayed increased frequencies of antigen-experienced peripheral T cells generated under certain levels of TCR signal strength or co-stimulation, such as effector/memory (CD4+TEM and CD8+TCM) and regulatory (T reg) T cells. The suppressive activity of CD6−/− T reg cells was diminished, and CD6−/− mice presented an exacerbated autoimmune response to collagen. Collectively, these data indicate that CD6 modulates the threshold for thymocyte selection and the generation and/or function of several peripheral T cell subpopulations, including T reg cells. PMID:27377588

  2. What makes a cell face selective? The importance of contrast.

    PubMed

    Ohayon, Shay; Freiwald, Winrich A; Tsao, Doris Y

    2012-05-10

    Faces are robustly detected by computer vision algorithms that search for characteristic coarse contrast features. Here, we investigated whether face-selective cells in the primate brain exploit contrast features as well. We recorded from face-selective neurons in macaque inferotemporal cortex, while presenting a face-like collage of regions whose luminances were changed randomly. Modulating contrast combinations between regions induced activity changes ranging from no response to a response greater than that to a real face in 50% of cells. The critical stimulus factor determining response magnitude was contrast polarity, for example, nose region brighter than left eye. Contrast polarity preferences were consistent across cells, suggesting a common computational strategy across the population, and matched features used by computer vision algorithms for face detection. Furthermore, most cells were tuned both for contrast polarity and for the geometry of facial features, suggesting cells encode information useful both for detection and recognition.

  3. Cuprous oxide nanoparticles selectively induce apoptosis of tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ye; Zi, Xiao-Yuan; Su, Juan; Zhang, Hong-Xia; Zhang, Xin-Rong; Zhu, Hai-Ying; Li, Jian-Xiu; Yin, Meng; Yang, Feng; Hu, Yi-Ping

    2012-01-01

    In the rapid development of nanoscience and nanotechnology, many researchers have discovered that metal oxide nanoparticles have very useful pharmacological effects. Cuprous oxide nanoparticles (CONPs) can selectively induce apoptosis and suppress the proliferation of tumor cells, showing great potential as a clinical cancer therapy. Treatment with CONPs caused a G1/G0 cell cycle arrest in tumor cells. Furthermore, CONPs enclosed in vesicles entered, or were taken up by mitochondria, which damaged their membranes, thereby inducing apoptosis. CONPs can also produce reactive oxygen species (ROS) and initiate lipid peroxidation of the liposomal membrane, thereby regulating many signaling pathways and influencing the vital movements of cells. Our results demonstrate that CONPs have selective cytotoxicity towards tumor cells, and indicate that CONPs might be a potential nanomedicine for cancer therapy. PMID:22679374

  4. Selective in vivo metabolic cell-labeling-mediated cancer targeting.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hua; Wang, Ruibo; Cai, Kaimin; He, Hua; Liu, Yang; Yen, Jonathan; Wang, Zhiyu; Xu, Ming; Sun, Yiwen; Zhou, Xin; Yin, Qian; Tang, Li; Dobrucki, Iwona T; Dobrucki, Lawrence W; Chaney, Eric J; Boppart, Stephen A; Fan, Timothy M; Lezmi, Stéphane; Chen, Xuesi; Yin, Lichen; Cheng, Jianjun

    2017-02-13

    Distinguishing cancer cells from normal cells through surface receptors is vital for cancer diagnosis and targeted therapy. Metabolic glycoengineering of unnatural sugars provides a powerful tool to manually introduce chemical receptors onto the cell surface; however, cancer-selective labeling still remains a great challenge. Herein we report the design of sugars that can selectively label cancer cells both in vitro and in vivo. Specifically, we inhibit the cell-labeling activity of tetraacetyl-N-azidoacetylmannosamine (Ac4ManAz) by converting its anomeric acetyl group to a caged ether bond that can be selectively cleaved by cancer-overexpressed enzymes and thus enables the overexpression of azido groups on the surface of cancer cells. Histone deacetylase and cathepsin L-responsive acetylated azidomannosamine, one such enzymatically activatable Ac4ManAz analog developed, mediated cancer-selective labeling in vivo, which enhanced tumor accumulation of a dibenzocyclooctyne-doxorubicin conjugate via click chemistry and enabled targeted therapy against LS174T colon cancer, MDA-MB-231 triple-negative breast cancer and 4T1 metastatic breast cancer in mice.

  5. Development of a potent and selective cell penetrant Legumain inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Ness, Kerry A; Eddie, Sharon L; Higgins, Catherine A; Templeman, Amy; D'Costa, Zenobia; Gaddale, Kishore K D; Bouzzaoui, Samira; Jordan, Linda; Janssen, Dominic; Harrison, Timothy; Burkamp, Frank; Young, Andrew; Burden, Roberta; Scott, Christopher J; Mullan, Paul B; Williams, Rich

    2015-12-01

    This Letter describes the continued SAR exploration of small molecule Legumain inhibitors with the aim of developing a potent and selective in vitro tool compound. Work continued in this Letter explores the use of alternative P2-P3 linker units and the P3 group SAR which led to the identification of 10t, a potent, selective and cellularly active Legumain inhibitor. We also demonstrate that 10t has activity in both cancer cell viability and colony formation assays.

  6. Selective Cell Growth on Fibronectin-Carbon Nanotube Hybrid Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namgung, Seon; Park, Sung Young; Lee, Byung Yang; Lee, Minbaek; Nam, Jwa-Min; Hong, Seunghun

    2008-03-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNT) have been considered a promising material for biological applications including biosensors, therapeutic application, and nano-structured scaffolds. However, there are still controversies associated with toxicity and biocompatibility of CNTs on live cells. Here, we report general strategy to functionalize CNTs with cell adhesion molecules (fibronectins) for selective and stable adhesion of cells on CNTs. Interestingly, more fibronectins were adsorbed and activated on CNTs rather than on hydrophobic self assembled monolayers (SAMs) or bare substrates (SiO2). We demonstrate the functionality of fibronectins on CNTs with immunofluorescence and molecule-level force measurement study using atomic force microscopy (AFM). These fibronectin-CNT hybrid nanostructures were successfully applied to attract cells selectively onto predefined regions on the substrate. Our strategy was generally available on various cell types including mesenchymal stem cells, KB cells, and NIH3T3 fibroblast cells (Advanced Materials 19, 2530-2534 (2007)). We will also discuss about its impacts on cell biology combined with CNTs.

  7. Selective Label-free Electrokinetic Cell Tracker (SELECT): a novel liquid platform for cell characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taruvai Kalyana Kumar, Rajeshwari; de Mello Gindri, Izabelle; Kinnamon, David; Kanchustambham, Pradyotha; Rodrigues, Danieli; Prasad, Shalini; BiomaterialsOsseointegration; Novel Engineering Lab Collaboration

    2015-03-01

    Characterization and analysis of rare cells provide critical cues for early diagnosis of diseases. Electrokinetic cell separation has been previously established to have greater efficiency when compared to traditional flow cytometry methods. It has been shown by many researchers that buffer solutions in which cells are suspended in, have enormous effects on producing required dielectrophoretic (DEP) forces to characterize cells. Most commonly used suspension buffers used are deionized water and cell media. However, these solutions exhibit high level of intrinsic noise, which greatly masks the electrokinetic signals from cells under study. Ionic liquids (ILs) show promise towards the creation of conductive fluids with required electrical properties. The goal of this project is to design and test ILs for enhancing DEP forces on cells while creating an environment for preserving their integrity. We analyzed two methylimidazolium based ILs as suspension medium for cell separation. These dicationic ILs possess slight electrical and structural differences with high thermal stability. The two ILs were tested for cytotoxicity using HeLa and bone cells. The effects of electrical neutrality, free charge screening due to ILs towards enhanced electrokinetic signals from cells were studied with improved system resolution and no harmful effects.

  8. Selective transgene expression for detection and elimination of contaminating carcinoma cells in hematopoietic stem cell sources.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, L; Pulsipher, M; Chen, D; Sieff, C; Elias, A; Fine, H A; Kufe, D W

    1996-01-01

    Tumor contamination of bone marrow (BM) and peripheral blood (PB) may affect the outcome of patients receiving high dose chemotherapy with autologous transplantation of hematopoietic stem cell products. In this report, we demonstrate that replication defective adenoviral vectors containing the cytomegalovirus (CMV) or DF3/MUC1 carcinoma-selective promoter can be used to selectively transduce contaminating carcinoma cells. Adenoviral-mediated reporter gene expression in breast cancer cells was five orders of magnitude higher than that found in BM, PB, and CD34+ cells. Our results demonstrate that CD34+ cells have low to undetectable levels of integrins responsible for adenoviral internalization. We show that adenoviral-mediated transduction of a reporter gene can detect one breast cancer cell in 5 x 10(5) BM or PB cells with a vector containing the DF3/MUC1 promoter. We also show that transduction of the HSV-tk gene for selective killing by ganciclovir can be exploited for purging cancer cells from hematopoietic stem cell populations. The selective expression of TK followed by ganciclovir treatment resulted in the elimination of 6-logs of contaminating cancer cells. By contrast, there was little effect on CFU-GM and BFU-E formulation or on long term culture initiating cells. These results indicate that adenoviral vectors with a tumor-selective promoter provide a highly efficient and effective approach for the detection and purging of carcinoma cells in hematopoietic stem cell preparations. PMID:8958216

  9. Directional Summation in Non-direction Selective Retinal Ganglion Cells

    PubMed Central

    Abbas, Syed Y.; Hamade, Khaldoun C.; Yang, Ellen J.; Nawy, Scott; Smith, Robert G.; Pettit, Diana L.

    2013-01-01

    Retinal ganglion cells receive inputs from multiple bipolar cells which must be integrated before a decision to fire is made. Theoretical studies have provided clues about how this integration is accomplished but have not directly determined the rules regulating summation of closely timed inputs along single or multiple dendrites. Here we have examined dendritic summation of multiple inputs along On ganglion cell dendrites in whole mount rat retina. We activated inputs at targeted locations by uncaging glutamate sequentially to generate apparent motion along On ganglion cell dendrites in whole mount retina. Summation was directional and dependent13 on input sequence. Input moving away from the soma (centrifugal) resulted in supralinear summation, while activation sequences moving toward the soma (centripetal) were linear. Enhanced summation for centrifugal activation was robust as it was also observed in cultured retinal ganglion cells. This directional summation was dependent on hyperpolarization activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels as blockade with ZD7288 eliminated directionality. A computational model confirms that activation of HCN channels can override a preference for centripetal summation expected from cell anatomy. This type of direction selectivity could play a role in coding movement similar to the axial selectivity seen in locust ganglion cells which detect looming stimuli. More generally, these results suggest that non-directional retinal ganglion cells can discriminate between input sequences independent of the retina network. PMID:23516351

  10. Cold Atmospheric Plasma for Selectively Ablating Metastatic Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Mian; Holmes, Benjamin; Cheng, Xiaoqian; Zhu, Wei; Keidar, Michael; Zhang, Lijie Grace

    2013-01-01

    Traditional breast cancer treatments such as surgery and radiotherapy contain many inherent limitations with regards to incomplete and nonselective tumor ablation. Cold atomospheric plasma (CAP) is an ionized gas where the ion temperature is close to room temperature. It contains electrons, charged particles, radicals, various excited molecules, UV photons and transient electric fields. These various compositional elements have the potential to either enhance and promote cellular activity, or disrupt and destroy them. In particular, based on this unique composition, CAP could offer a minimally-invasive surgical approach allowing for specific cancer cell or tumor tissue removal without influencing healthy cells. Thus, the objective of this research is to investigate a novel CAP-based therapy for selectively bone metastatic breast cancer treatment. For this purpose, human metastatic breast cancer (BrCa) cells and bone marrow derived human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were separately treated with CAP, and behavioral changes were evaluated after 1, 3, and 5 days of culture. With different treatment times, different BrCa and MSC cell responses were observed. Our results showed that BrCa cells were more sensitive to these CAP treatments than MSCs under plasma dose conditions tested. It demonstrated that CAP can selectively ablate metastatic BrCa cells in vitro without damaging healthy MSCs at the metastatic bone site. In addition, our study showed that CAP treatment can significantly inhibit the migration and invasion of BrCa cells. The results suggest the great potential of CAP for breast cancer therapy. PMID:24040051

  11. Cell Selection as Driving Force in Lung and Colon Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Schöllnberger, Helmut; Beerenwinkel, Niko; Hoogenveen, Rudolf; Vineis, Paolo

    2011-01-01

    Carcinogenesis is the result of mutations and subsequent clonal expansions of mutated, selectively advantageous cells. To investigate the relative contributions of mutation versus cell selection in tumorigenesis, we compared two mathematical models of carcinogenesis in two different cancer types: lung and colon. One approach is based on a population genetics model, the Wright-Fisher process, whereas the other approach is the two-stage clonal expansion model. We compared the dynamics of tumorigenesis predicted by the two models in terms of the time period until the first malignant cell appears, which will subsequently form a tumor. The mean waiting time to cancer has been calculated approximately for the evolutionary colon cancer model. Here, we derive new analytic approximations to the median waiting time for the two-stage lung cancer model and for a multistage approximation to the Wright-Fisher process. Both equations show that the waiting time to cancer is dominated by the selective advantage per mutation and the net clonal expansion rate, respectively, whereas the mutation rate has less effect. Our comparisons support the idea that the main driving force in lung and colon carcinogenesis is Darwinian cell selection. PMID:20656803

  12. Ligand-Driven T Cell Receptor Selection in Celiac Disease.

    PubMed

    Singh, Nishant K; Baker, Brian M

    2016-10-04

    Recognition of antigens by T cell receptors (TCRs) underlies cellular immunity. By comparing how different TCRs recognize the key antigens associated with celiac disease, Petersen et al. (2016), in this issue of Structure, show how celiac antigen properties select immunologically distinct yet structurally and physically compatible TCRs, ultimately driving autoimmunity.

  13. Selective chemical imaging of static actin in live cells.

    PubMed

    Milroy, Lech-Gustav; Rizzo, Stefano; Calderon, Abram; Ellinger, Bernhard; Erdmann, Silke; Mondry, Justine; Verveer, Peter; Bastiaens, Philippe; Waldmann, Herbert; Dehmelt, Leif; Arndt, Hans-Dieter

    2012-05-23

    We have characterized rationally designed and optimized analogues of the actin-stabilizing natural products jasplakinolide and chondramide C. Efficient actin staining was achieved in fixed permeabilized and non-permeabilized cells using different combinations of dye and linker length, thus highlighting the degree of molecular flexibility of the natural product scaffold. Investigations into synthetically accessible, non-toxic analogues have led to the characterization of a powerful cell-permeable probe to selectively image static, long-lived actin filaments against dynamic F-actin and monomeric G-actin populations in live cells, with negligible disruption of rapid actin dynamics.

  14. Non PN junction solar cells using carrier selective contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowden, Stuart; Ghosh, Kunal; Honsberg, Christiana

    2013-03-01

    A novel device concept utilizing the approach of selectively extracting carriers at the respective contacts is outlined in the work. The dominant silicon solar cell technology is based on a diffused, top-contacted p-n junction on a relatively thick silicon wafer for both commercial and laboratory solar cells. The VOC and hence the efficiency of a diffused p-n junction solar cell is limited by the emitter recombination current and a value of 720 mV is considered to be the upper limit. The value is more than 100 mV smaller than the thermodynamic limit of VOC as applicable for silicon based solar cells. Also, in diffused junction the use of thin wafers (< 50 um) are problematic because of the requirement of high temperature processing steps. But a number of roadmaps have identified solar cells manufactured on thinner silicon wafers to achieve lower cost and higher efficiency. The carrier selective contact device provides a novel alternative to diffused p-n junction solar cells by eliminating the need for complementary doping to form the emitter and hence it allows the solar cells to achieve a VOC of greater than 720 mV. Also, the complete device structure can be fabricated with low temperature thin film deposition or organic coating on silicon substrates and thus epitaxially grown silicon or kerfless silicon, in addition to standard silicon wafers can be utilized.

  15. Metabolic selection of glycosylation defects in human cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yarema, Kevin J.; Goon, Scarlett; Bertozzi, Carolyn R.

    2000-08-01

    Changes in glycosylation are often associated with disease progression, but the genetic and metabolic basis of these events is rarely understood in detail at a molecular level. This report describes a novel metabolism-based approach to the selection of mutants in glycoconjugate biosynthesis that has provided insight into regulatory mechanisms for oligosaccharide expression and metabolic flux. Unnatural intermediates are used to challenge a specific pathway and cell-surface expression of their metabolic products provides a readout of flux in that pathway and a basis for selecting genetic mutants. The approach was applied to the sialic acid metabolic pathway in human cells, yielding novel mutants with phenotypes related to the inborn metabolic defect sialuria and metastatic tumor cells.

  16. Selecting agonists from single cells infected with combinatorial antibody libraries.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongkai; Yea, Kyungmoo; Xie, Jia; Ruiz, Diana; Wilson, Ian A; Lerner, Richard A

    2013-05-23

    We describe a system for direct selection of antibodies that are receptor agonists. Combinatorial antibody libraries in lentiviruses are used to infect eukaryotic cells that contain a fluorescent reporter system coupled to the receptor for which receptor agonist antibodies are sought. In this embodiment of the method, very large numbers of candidate antibodies expressing lentivirus and eukaryotic reporter cells are packaged together in a format where each is capable of replication, thereby forging a direct link between genotype and phenotype. Following infection, cells that fluoresce are sorted and the integrated genes encoding the agonist antibodies recovered. We validated the system by illustrating its ability to generate rapidly potent antibody agonists that are complete thrombopoietin phenocopies. The system should be generalizable to any pathway where its activation can be linked to production of a selectable phenotype.

  17. Rhodacyanine derivative selectively targets cancer cells and overcomes tamoxifen resistance.

    PubMed

    Koren, John; Miyata, Yoshinari; Kiray, Janine; O'Leary, John C; Nguyen, Lana; Guo, Jianping; Blair, Laura J; Li, Xiaokai; Li, Xiokai; Jinwal, Umesh K; Cheng, Jin Q; Gestwicki, Jason E; Dickey, Chad A

    2012-01-01

    MKT-077, a rhodacyanine dye, was shown to produce cancer specific cell death. However, complications prevented the use of this compound beyond clinical trials. Here we describe YM-1, a derivative of MKT-077. We found that YM-1 was more cytotoxic and localized differently than MKT-077. YM-1 demonstrated this cytotoxicity across multiple cancer cell lines. This toxicity was limited to cancer cell lines; immortalized cell models were unaffected. Brief applications of YM-1 were found to be non-toxic. Brief treatment with YM-1 restored tamoxifen sensitivity to a refractory tamoxifen-resistant MCF7 cell model. This effect is potentially due to altered estrogen receptor alpha phosphorylation, an outcome precipitated by selective reductions in Akt levels (Akt/PKB). Thus, modifications to the rhodocyanine scaffold could potentially be made to improve efficacy and pharmacokinetic properties. Moreover, the impact on tamoxifen sensitivity could be a new utility for this compound family.

  18. A selective inhibitor of cell proliferation from normal serum.

    PubMed Central

    Harrington, W N; Godman, G C

    1980-01-01

    A factor in normal serum that selectively and reversibly inhibits proliferation of cells in culture has been enriched 160-fold from calf serum by sequential ammonium sulfate precipitation, gel filtration, and lectin-affinity chromatography. DNA synthesis of normal (but not transformed) rat hepatocytes, human lymphoblast lines, and mitogen-stimulated murine spleen cells is inhibited by greater than 90%, and Vero, murine myeloma, MELC, and a human colon carcinoma cell line to a lesser extent. Growth of other cell lines tested was not affected. Responsive cells are arrested apparently in G1 by this inhibitor, the effect of which is maximal by 24 hr and is spontaneously reversible thereafter unless it is renewed. The active fraction is a protein that migrates with the alpha 2-globulins; it is not a lipoprotein, and it is of high apparent molecular weight. PMID:6928635

  19. Carrier-selective contacts for Si solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldmann, F.; Simon, M.; Bivour, M.; Reichel, C.; Hermle, M.; Glunz, S. W.

    2014-05-01

    Carrier-selective contacts (i.e., minority carrier mirrors) are one of the last remaining obstacles to approaching the theoretical efficiency limit of silicon solar cells. In the 1980s, it was already demonstrated that n-type polysilicon and semi-insulating polycrystalline silicon emitters form carrier-selective emitters which enabled open-circuit voltages (Voc) of up to 720 mV. Albeit promising, to date a polysilicon emitter solar cell having a high fill factor (FF) has not been demonstrated yet. In this work, we report a polysilicon emitter related solar cell achieving both a high Voc = 694 mV and FF = 81%. The passivation mechanism of these so-called tunnel oxide passivated contacts will be outlined and the impact of TCO (transparent conductive oxide) deposition on the injection-dependent lifetime characteristic of the emitter as well as its implications on FF will be discussed. Finally, possible transport paths across the tunnel oxide barrier will be discussed and it will be shown that the passivating oxide layer does not lead to a relevant resistive loss and thus does not limit the solar cell's carrier transport. Contrary to amorphous silicon-based heterojunction solar cells, this structure also shows a good thermal stability and, thus, could be a very appealing option for next generation high-efficiency silicon solar cells.

  20. Hippocampal CA3 pyramidal cells selectively innervate aspiny interneurons.

    PubMed

    Wittner, Lucia; Henze, Darrell A; Záborszky, László; Buzsáki, György

    2006-09-01

    The specific connectivity among principal cells and interneurons determines the flow of activity in neuronal networks. To elucidate the connections between hippocampal principal cells and various classes of interneurons, CA3 pyramidal cells were intracellularly labelled with biocytin in anaesthetized rats and the three-dimensional distribution of their axon collaterals was reconstructed. The sections were double-stained for substance P receptor (SPR)- or metabotropic glutamate receptor 1alpha (mGluR-1alpha)-immunoreactivity to investigate interneuron targets of the CA3 pyramidal cells. SPR-containing interneurons represent a large portion of the GABAergic population, including spiny and aspiny classes. Axon terminals of CA3 pyramidal cells contacted SPR-positive interneuron dendrites in the hilus and in all hippocampal strata in both CA3 and CA1 regions (7.16% of all boutons). The majority of axons formed single contacts (87.5%), but multiple contacts (up to six) on single target neurons were also found. CA3 pyramidal cell axon collaterals innervated several types of morphologically different aspiny SPR-positive interneurons. In contrast, spiny SPR-interneurons or mGluR-1alpha-positive interneurons in the hilus, CA3 and CA1 regions were rarely contacted by the filled pyramidal cells. These findings indicate a strong target selection of CA3 pyramidal cells favouring the activation of aspiny classes of interneurons.

  1. Selective cell adhesion on femtosecond laser-microstructured polydimethylsiloxane.

    PubMed

    Alshehri, A M; Hadjiantoniou, S; Hickey, R J; Al-Rekabi, Z; Harden, J L; Pelling, A E; Bhardwaj, V R

    2016-02-19

    We show that femtosecond laser irradiation of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) enables selective and patterned cell growth by altering the wetting properties of the surface associated with chemical and/or topographical changes. In the low pulse energy regime, the surface becomes less hydrophobic and exhibits a low water contact angle compared to the pristine material. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) also reveals an increased oxygen content in the irradiated regions, to which the C2C12 cells and rabbit anti-mouse protein were found to attach preferentially. In the high pulse energy regime, the laser-modified regions exhibit superhydrophobicity and were found to inhibit cell adhesion, whereas cells were found to attach to the surrounding regions due to the presence of nanoscale debris generated by the ablation process.

  2. Cytotoxicity of selected magnetic fluids on human adenocarcinoma cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilger, Ingrid; Frühauf, Sylvia; Linß, Werner; Hiergeist, Robert; Andrä, Wilfried; Hergt, Rudolf; Kaiser, Werner A.

    2003-04-01

    Based on the knowledge that the magnetite particles seem to be well tolerated by the human body, the cytotoxic potential of coated particles was investigated, which had been selected for potential applications regarding the minimal-invasive elimination of breast tumors by magnetic thermoablation. Human adenocarcinoma cells (BT-20) were exposed (24, 48 and 72 h) to different magnetite particles with diverging total size (8, 10 and 220 nm) and coating (cationic and anionic). One sample contained only non-coated magnetite particles. The magnetite concentration ranged between 0.2 and 20 ng/cell. Cytotoxicity was estimated by measuring the succinate dehydrogenase activity. The morphologic features resulting from the interaction of magnetic fluids with BT-20 cells was determined by transmission electron microscopy. As opposed to the non-coated magnetic particles, cationic particles induced the strongest decrease in cell survival rates depending on time and concentration. Morphologically, the cationic particle samples exerted a strong binding to cellular membranes. Changes in the subcellular structure were found in relation to the coated magnetic particles. In conclusion, our results show that the coated prototype magnetic particles, particularly those with a cationic surfactant, are cytotoxic to BT-20 cells. The cytotoxicity is attributed to electrostatic bindings with cellular membranes, influences of chemical components or non-physiologic pH. Considering the in vivo applications, adverse systemic effects are conceivable and more biocompatible coatings for the selected magnetic particles should be elaborated.

  3. Stem and progenitor cell-mediated tumor selective gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Aboody, K S; Najbauer, J; Danks, M K

    2008-05-01

    The poor prognosis for patients with aggressive or metastatic tumors and the toxic side effects of currently available treatments necessitate the development of more effective tumor-selective therapies. Stem/progenitor cells display inherent tumor-tropic properties that can be exploited for targeted delivery of anticancer genes to invasive and metastatic tumors. Therapeutic genes that have been inserted into stem cells and delivered to tumors with high selectivity include prodrug-activating enzymes (cytosine deaminase, carboxylesterase, thymidine kinase), interleukins (IL-2, IL-4, IL-12, IL-23), interferon-beta, apoptosis-promoting genes (tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand) and metalloproteinases (PEX). We and others have demonstrated that neural and mesenchymal stem cells can deliver therapeutic genes to elicit a significant antitumor response in animal models of intracranial glioma, medulloblastoma, melanoma brain metastasis, disseminated neuroblastoma and breast cancer lung metastasis. Most studies reported reduction in tumor volume (up to 90%) and increased survival of tumor-bearing animals. Complete cures have also been achieved (90% disease-free survival for >1 year of mice bearing disseminated neuroblastoma tumors). As we learn more about the biology of stem cells and the molecular mechanisms that mediate their tumor-tropism and we identify efficacious gene products for specific tumor types, the clinical utility of cell-based delivery strategies becomes increasingly evident.

  4. Thymic Selection of T Cells as Diffusion with Intermittent Traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Košmrlj, Andrej

    2011-04-01

    T cells orchestrate adaptive immune responses by recognizing short peptides derived from pathogens, and by distinguishing them from self-peptides. To ensure the latter, immature T cells (thymocytes) diffuse within the thymus gland, where they encounter an ensemble of self-peptides presented on (immobile) antigen presenting cells. Potentially autoimmune T cells are eliminated if the thymocyte binds sufficiently strongly with any such antigen presenting cell. We model thymic selection of T cells as a random walker diffusing in a field of immobile traps that intermittently turn "on" and "off". The escape probability of potentially autoimmune T cells is equivalent to the survival probability of such a random walker. In this paper we describe the survival probability of a random walker on a d-dimensional cubic lattice with randomly placed immobile intermittent traps, and relate it to the result of a well-studied problem where traps are always "on". Additionally, when switching between the trap states is slow, we find a peculiar caging effect for the survival probability.

  5. Pyridinylquinazolines Selectively Inhibit Human Methionine Aminopeptidase-1 in Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Feiran; Bhat, Shridhar; Gabelli, Sandra B.; Chen, Xiaochun; Miller, Michelle S.; Nacev, Benjamin A.; Cheng, Yim Ling; Meyers, David J.; Tenney, Karen; Shim, Joong Sup; Crews, Phillip; Amzel, L. Mario; Ma, Dawei; Liu, Jun O.

    2013-01-01

    Methionine aminopeptidases (MetAPs) which remove the initiator methionine from nascent peptides are essential in all organisms. While MetAP2 has been demonstrated to be a therapeutic target for inhibiting angiogenesis in mammals, MetAP1 seems to be vital for cell proliferation. Our earlier efforts identified two structural classes of human MetAP1 (HsMetAP1)-selective inhibitors (1–4). But all of them failed to inhibit cellular HsMetAP1. Using Mn(II) or Zn(II) to activate HsMetAP1, we found that 1–4 could only effectively inhibit purified HsMetAP1 in the presence of physiologically unachievable concentrations of Co(II). In an effort to seek Co(II)-independent inhibitors, a novel structural class containing a 2-(pyridin-2-yl)quinazoline core has been discovered. Many compounds in this class potently and selectively inhibited HsMetAP1 without Co(II). Subsequently, we demonstrated that 11j, an auxiliary metal-dependent inhibitor, effectively inhibited HsMetAP1 in primary cells. This is the first report that an HsMetAP1-selective inhibitor is effective against its target in cells. PMID:23634668

  6. Pyridinylquinazolines selectively inhibit human methionine aminopeptidase-1 in cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Feiran; Bhat, Shridhar; Gabelli, Sandra B; Chen, Xiaochun; Miller, Michelle S; Nacev, Benjamin A; Cheng, Yim Ling; Meyers, David J; Tenney, Karen; Shim, Joong Sup; Crews, Phillip; Amzel, L Mario; Ma, Dawei; Liu, Jun O

    2013-05-23

    Methionine aminopeptidases (MetAPs), which remove the initiator methionine from nascent peptides, are essential in all organisms. While MetAP2 has been demonstrated to be a therapeutic target for inhibiting angiogenesis in mammals, MetAP1 seems to be vital for cell proliferation. Our earlier efforts identified two structural classes of human MetAP1 (HsMetAP1)-selective inhibitors (1-4), but all of them failed to inhibit cellular HsMetAP1. Using Mn(II) or Zn(II) to activate HsMetAP1, we found that 1-4 could only effectively inhibit purified HsMetAP1 in the presence of physiologically unachievable concentrations of Co(II). In an effort to seek Co(II)-independent inhibitors, a novel structural class containing a 2-(pyridin-2-yl)quinazoline core has been discovered. Many compounds in this class potently and selectively inhibited HsMetAP1 without Co(II). Subsequently, we demonstrated that 11j, an auxiliary metal-dependent inhibitor, effectively inhibited HsMetAP1 in primary cells. This is the first report that an HsMetAP1-selective inhibitor is effective against its target in cells.

  7. Newcastle disease virus selectively kills human tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Reichard, K W; Lorence, R M; Cascino, C J; Peeples, M E; Walter, R J; Fernando, M B; Reyes, H M; Greager, J A

    1992-05-01

    Newcastle disease virus (NDV), strain 73-T, has previously been shown to be cytolytic to mouse tumor cells. In this study, we have evaluated the ability of NDV to replicate in and kill human tumor cells in culture and in athymic mice. Plaque assays were used to determine the cytolytic activity of NDV on six human tumor cell lines, fibrosarcoma (HT1080), osteosarcoma (KHOS), cervical carcinoma (KB8-5-11), bladder carcinoma (HCV29T), neuroblastoma (IMR32), and Wilm's tumor (G104), and on nine different normal human fibroblast lines. NDV formed plaques on all tumor cells tested as well as on chick embryo cells (CEC), the native host for NDV. Plaques did not form on any of the normal fibroblast lines. To detect NDV replication, virus yield assays were performed which measured virus particles in infected cell culture supernatants. Virus yield increased 10,000-fold within 24 hr in tumor and CEC supernatants. Titers remained near zero in normal fibroblast supernatants. In vivo tumoricidal activity was evaluated in athymic nude Balb-c mice by subcutaneous injection of 9 x 10(6) tumor cells followed by intralesional injection of either live or heat-killed NDV (1.0 x 10(6) plaque forming units [PFU]), or medium. After live NDV treatment, tumor regression occurred in 10 out of 11 mice bearing KB8-5-11 tumors, 8 out of 8 with HT-1080 tumors, and 6 out of 7 with IMR-32 tumors. After treatment with heat-killed NDV no regression occurred (P less than 0.01, Fisher's exact test). Nontumor-bearing mice injected with 1.0 x 10(8) PFU of NDV remained healthy. These results indicate that NDV efficiently and selectively replicates in and kills tumor cells, but not normal cells, and that intralesional NDV causes complete tumor regression in athymic mice with a high therapeutic index.

  8. Characterization of rat hair follicle stem cells selected by vario magnetic activated cell sorting system.

    PubMed

    Huang, Enyi; Lian, Xiaohua; Chen, Wei; Yang, Tian; Yang, Li

    2009-10-30

    Hair follicle stem cells (HfSCs) play crucial roles in hair follicle morphogenesis and hair cycling. These stem cells are self-renewable and have the multi-lineage potential to generate epidermis, sebaceous glands, and hair follicle. The separation and identification of hair follicle stem cells are important for further research in stem cell biology. In this study, we report on the successful enrichment of rat hair follicle stem cells through vario magnetic activated cell sorting (Vario MACS) and the biological characteristics of the stem cells. We chose the HfSCs positive surface markers CD34, alpha 6-integrin and the negative marker CD71 to design four isolation strategies: positive selection with single marker of CD34, positive selection with single marker of alpha 6-integrin, CD71 depletion followed by CD34 positive selection, and CD71 depletion followed by alpha 6-integrin positive selection. The results of flow cytometry analysis showed that all four strategies had ideal effects. Specifically, we conducted a series of researches on HfSCs characterized by their high level of CD34, termed CD34(bri) cells, and low to undetectable expression of CD34, termed CD34(dim) cells. CD34(bri) cells had greater proliferative potential and higher colony-forming ability than CD34(dim) cells. Furthermore, CD34(bri) cells had some typical characteristics as progenitor cells, such as large nucleus, obvious nucleolus, large nuclear:cytoplasmic ratio and few cytoplasmic organelles. Our findings clearly demonstrated that HfSCs with high purity and viability could be successfully enriched with Vario MACS.

  9. Selective cell targeting and lineage tracing of human induced pluripotent stem cells using recombinant avian retroviruses.

    PubMed

    Hildebrand, Laura; Seemann, Petra; Kurtz, Andreas; Hecht, Jochen; Contzen, Jörg; Gossen, Manfred; Stachelscheid, Harald

    2015-12-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSC) differentiate into multiple cell types. Selective cell targeting is often needed for analyzing gene function by overexpressing proteins in a distinct population of hiPSC-derived cell types and for monitoring cell fate in response to stimuli. However, to date, this has not been possible, as commonly used viruses enter the hiPSC via ubiquitously expressed receptors. Here, we report for the first time the application of a heterologous avian receptor, the tumor virus receptor A (TVA), to selectively transduce TVA(+) cells in a mixed cell population. Expression of the TVA surface receptor via genetic engineering renders cells susceptible for infection by avian leucosis virus (ALV). We generated hiPSC lines with this stably integrated, ectopic TVA receptor gene that expressed the receptor while retaining pluripotency. The undifferentiated hiPSC(TVA+) as well as their differentiating progeny could be infected by recombinant ALV (so-called RCAS virus) with high efficiency. Due to incomplete receptor blocking, even sequential infection of differentiating or undifferentiated TVA(+) cells was possible. In conclusion, the TVA/RCAS system provides an efficient and gentle gene transfer system for hiPSC and extends our possibilities for selective cell targeting and lineage tracing studies.

  10. Subcortical orientation biases explain orientation selectivity of visual cortical cells

    PubMed Central

    Vidyasagar, Trichur R; Jayakumar, Jaikishan; Lloyd, Errol; Levichkina, Ekaterina V

    2015-01-01

    The primary visual cortex of carnivores and primates shows an orderly progression of domains of neurons that are selective to a particular orientation of visual stimuli such as bars and gratings. We recorded from single-thalamic afferent fibers that terminate in these domains to address the issue whether the orientation sensitivity of these fibers could form the basis of the remarkable orientation selectivity exhibited by most cortical cells. We first performed optical imaging of intrinsic signals to obtain a map of orientation domains on the dorsal aspect of the anaesthetized cat's area 17. After confirming using electrophysiological recordings the orientation preferences of single neurons within one or two domains in each animal, we pharmacologically silenced the cortex to leave only the afferent terminals active. The inactivation of cortical neurons was achieved by the superfusion of either kainic acid or muscimol. Responses of single geniculate afferents were then recorded by the use of high impedance electrodes. We found that the orientation preferences of the afferents matched closely with those of the cells in the orientation domains that they terminated in (Pearson's r = 0.633, n = 22, P = 0.002). This suggests a possible subcortical origin for cortical orientation selectivity. PMID:25855249

  11. SHAPE SELECTIVE NANOCATALYSTS FOR DIRECT METHANOL FUEL CELL APPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Murph, S.

    2012-09-12

    While gold and platinum have long been recognized for their beauty and value, researchers at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) are working on the nano-level to use these elements for creative solutions to our nation's energy and security needs. Multiinterdisciplinary teams consisting of chemists, materials scientists, physicists, computational scientists, and engineers are exploring unchartered territories with shape-selective nanocatalysts for the development of novel, cost effective and environmentally friendly energy solutions to meet global energy needs. This nanotechnology is vital, particularly as it relates to fuel cells.SRNL researchers have taken process, chemical, and materials discoveries and translated them for technological solution and deployment. The group has developed state-of-the art shape-selective core-shell-alloy-type gold-platinum nanostructures with outstanding catalytic capabilities that address many of the shortcomings of the Direct Methanol Fuel Cell (DMFC). The newly developed nanostructures not only busted the performance of the platinum catalyst, but also reduced the material cost and overall weight of the fuel cell.

  12. Cold atmospheric plasma treatment selectively targets head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    GUERRERO-PRESTON, RAFAEL; OGAWA, TAKENORI; UEMURA, MAMORU; SHUMULINSKY, GARY; VALLE, BLANCA L.; PIRINI, FRANCESCA; RAVI, RAJANI; SIDRANSKY, DAVID; KEIDAR, MICHAEL; TRINK, BARRY

    2014-01-01

    The treatment of locoregional recurrence (LRR) of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) often requires a combination of surgery, radiation therapy and/or chemotherapy. Survival outcomes are poor and the treatment outcomes are morbid. Cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) is an ionized gas produced at room temperature under laboratory conditions. We have previously demonstrated that treatment with a CAP jet device selectively targets cancer cells using in vitro melanoma and in vivo bladder cancer models. In the present study, we wished to examine CAP selectivity in HNSCC in vitro models, and to explore its potential for use as a minimally invasive surgical approach that allows for specific cancer cell or tumor tissue ablation without affecting the surrounding healthy cells and tissues. Four HNSCC cell lines (JHU-022, JHU-028, JHU-029, SCC25) and 2 normal oral cavity epithelial cell lines (OKF6 and NOKsi) were subjected to cold plasma treatment for durations of 10, 30 and 45 sec, and a helium flow of 20 l/min−1 for 10 sec was used as a positive treatment control. We showed that cold plasma selectively diminished HNSCC cell viability in a dose-response manner, as evidenced by MTT assays; the viability of the OKF6 cells was not affected by the cold plasma. The results of colony formation assays also revealed a cell-specific response to cold plasma application. Western blot analysis did not provide evidence that the cleavage of PARP occurred following cold plasma treatment. In conclusion, our results suggest that cold plasma application selectively impairs HNSCC cell lines through non-apoptotic mechanisms, while having a minimal effect on normal oral cavity epithelial cell lines. PMID:25050490

  13. Selection of mammalian cells based on their cell-cycle phase using dielectrophoresis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Unyoung; Shu, Chih-Wen; Dane, Karen Y.; Daugherty, Patrick S.; Wang, Jean Y. J.; Soh, H. T.

    2007-01-01

    An effective, noninvasive means of selecting cells based on their phase within the cell cycle is an important capability for biological research. Current methods of producing synchronous cell populations, however, tend to disrupt the natural physiology of the cell or suffer from low synchronization yields. In this work, we report a microfluidic device that utilizes the dielectrophoresis phenomenon to synchronize cells by exploiting the relationship between the cell's volume and its phase in the cell cycle. The dielectrophoresis activated cell synchronizer (DACSync) device accepts an asynchronous mixture of cells at the inlet, fractionates the cell populations according to the cell-cycle phase (G1/S and G2/M), and elutes them through different outlets. The device is gentle and efficient; it utilizes electric fields that are 1–2 orders of magnitude below those used in electroporation and enriches asynchronous tumor cells in the G1 phase to 96% in one round of sorting, in a continuous flow manner at a throughput of 2 × 105 cells per hour per microchannel. This work illustrates the feasibility of using laminar flow and electrokinetic forces for the efficient, noninvasive separation of living cells. PMID:18093921

  14. Selective Destruction Of Cells Infected With The Human Immunodeficiency Virus

    DOEpatents

    Keener, William K.; Ward, Thomas E.

    2006-03-28

    Compositions and methods for selectively killing a cell containing a viral protease are disclosed. The composition is a varient of a protein synthesis inactivating toxin wherein a viral protease cleavage site is interposed between the A and B chains. The variant of the type II ribosome-inactivating protein is activated by digestion of the viral protease cleavage site by the specific viral protease. The activated ribosome-inactivating protein then kills the cell by inactivating cellular ribosomes. A preferred embodiment of the invention is specific for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and uses ricin as the ribosome-inactivating protein. In another preferred embodiment of the invention, the variant of the ribosome-inactivating protein is modified by attachment of one or more hydrophobic agents. The hydrophobic agent facilitates entry of the variant of the ribosome-inactivating protein into cells and can lead to incorporation of the ribosome-inactivating protein into viral particles. Still another preferred embodiment of the invention includes a targeting moiety attached to the variants of the ribosome-inactivating protein to target the agent to HIV infectable cells.

  15. Selective destruction of cells infected with human immunodeficiency virus

    DOEpatents

    Keener, William K.; Ward, Thomas E.

    2003-09-30

    Compositions and methods for selectively killing a cell containing a viral protease are disclosed. The composition is a variant of a protein synthesis inactivating toxin wherein a viral protease cleavage site is interposed between the A and B chains. The variant of the type II ribosome-inactivating protein is activated by digestion of the viral protease cleavage site by the specific viral protease. The activated ribosome-inactivating protein then kills the cell by inactivating cellular ribosomes. A preferred embodiment of the invention is specific for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and uses ricin as the ribosome-inactivating protein. In another preferred embodiment of the invention, the variant of the ribosome-inactivating protein is modified by attachment of one or more hydrophobic agents. The hydrophobic agent facilitates entry of the variant of the ribosome-inactivating protein into cells and can lead to incorporation of the ribosome-inactivating protein into viral particles. Still another preferred embodiment of the invention includes a targeting moiety attached to the variants of the ribosome-inactivating protein to target the agent to HIV infectable cells.

  16. Selective calcium sensitivity in immature glioma cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Wee, Shimei; Niklasson, Maria; Marinescu, Voichita Dana; Segerman, Anna; Schmidt, Linnéa; Hermansson, Annika; Dirks, Peter; Forsberg-Nilsson, Karin; Westermark, Bengt; Uhrbom, Lene; Linnarsson, Sten; Nelander, Sven; Andäng, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Tumor-initiating cells are a subpopulation in aggressive cancers that exhibit traits shared with stem cells, including the ability to self-renew and differentiate, commonly referred to as stemness. In addition, such cells are resistant to chemo- and radiation therapy posing a therapeutic challenge. To uncover stemness-associated functions in glioma-initiating cells (GICs), transcriptome profiles were compared to neural stem cells (NSCs) and gene ontology analysis identified an enrichment of Ca2+ signaling genes in NSCs and the more stem-like (NSC-proximal) GICs. Functional analysis in a set of different GIC lines regarding sensitivity to disturbed homeostasis using A23187 and Thapsigargin, revealed that NSC-proximal GICs were more sensitive, corroborating the transcriptome data. Furthermore, Ca2+ drug sensitivity was reduced in GICs after differentiation, with most potent effect in the NSC-proximal GIC, supporting a stemness-associated Ca2+ sensitivity. NSCs and the NSC-proximal GIC line expressed a larger number of ion channels permeable to potassium, sodium and Ca2+. Conversely, a higher number of and higher expression levels of Ca2+ binding genes that may buffer Ca2+, were expressed in NSC-distal GICs. In particular, expression of the AMPA glutamate receptor subunit GRIA1, was found to associate with Ca2+ sensitive NSC-proximal GICs, and decreased as GICs differentiated along with reduced Ca2+ drug sensitivity. The correlation between high expression of Ca2+ channels (such as GRIA1) and sensitivity to Ca2+ drugs was confirmed in an additional nine novel GIC lines. Calcium drug sensitivity also correlated with expression of the NSC markers nestin (NES) and FABP7 (BLBP, brain lipid-binding protein) in this extended analysis. In summary, NSC-associated NES+/FABP7+/GRIA1+ GICs were selectively sensitive to disturbances in Ca2+ homeostasis, providing a potential target mechanism for eradication of an immature population of malignant cells.

  17. Wood-fired fuel cells in selected buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIlveen-Wright, D. R.; McMullan, J. T.; Guiney, D. J.

    of selected buildings in rural areas, with regard to the high cost of importing other fuel, and/or lack of grid electricity, could still make these systems attractive options. Any economic analysis of these systems is beset with severe difficulties. Capital costs of the major system components are not known with any great precision. However, a guideline assessment of the payback period for such CHP systems was made. When the best available capital costs for system components were used, most of these systems were found to have unacceptably long payback periods, particularly where the fuel cell lifetimes are short, but the larger systems show the potential for a reasonable economic return.

  18. 21 CFR 866.6020 - Immunomagnetic circulating cancer cell selection and enumeration system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Immunomagnetic circulating cancer cell selection... Associated Antigen immunological Test Systems § 866.6020 Immunomagnetic circulating cancer cell selection and enumeration system. (a) Identification. An immunomagnetic circulating cancer cell selection and...

  19. 21 CFR 866.6020 - Immunomagnetic circulating cancer cell selection and enumeration system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Immunomagnetic circulating cancer cell selection... Associated Antigen immunological Test Systems § 866.6020 Immunomagnetic circulating cancer cell selection and enumeration system. (a) Identification. An immunomagnetic circulating cancer cell selection and...

  20. 21 CFR 866.6020 - Immunomagnetic circulating cancer cell selection and enumeration system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Immunomagnetic circulating cancer cell selection... Associated Antigen immunological Test Systems § 866.6020 Immunomagnetic circulating cancer cell selection and enumeration system. (a) Identification. An immunomagnetic circulating cancer cell selection and...

  1. 21 CFR 866.6020 - Immunomagnetic circulating cancer cell selection and enumeration system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Immunomagnetic circulating cancer cell selection... Associated Antigen immunological Test Systems § 866.6020 Immunomagnetic circulating cancer cell selection and enumeration system. (a) Identification. An immunomagnetic circulating cancer cell selection and...

  2. 21 CFR 866.6020 - Immunomagnetic circulating cancer cell selection and enumeration system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Immunomagnetic circulating cancer cell selection... Associated Antigen immunological Test Systems § 866.6020 Immunomagnetic circulating cancer cell selection and enumeration system. (a) Identification. An immunomagnetic circulating cancer cell selection and...

  3. Nutlin-3a selects for cells harbouring TP53 mutations.

    PubMed

    Kucab, Jill E; Hollstein, Monica; Arlt, Volker M; Phillips, David H

    2017-02-15

    TP53 mutations occur in half of all human tumours. Mutagen-induced or spontaneous TP53 mutagenesis can be studied in vitro using the human TP53 knock-in (Hupki) mouse embryo fibroblast (HUF) immortalisation assay (HIMA). TP53 mutations arise in up to 30% of mutagen-treated, immortalised HUFs; however, mutants are not identified until TP53 sequence analysis following immortalisation (2-5 months) and much effort is expended maintaining TP53-WT cultures. In order to improve the selectivity of the HIMA for HUFs harbouring TP53 mutations, we explored the use of Nutlin-3a, an MDM2 inhibitor that leads to stabilisation and activation of wild-type (WT) p53. First, we treated previously established immortal HUF lines carrying WT or mutated TP53 with Nutlin-3a to examine the effect on cell growth and p53 activation. Nutlin-3a induced the p53 pathway in TP53-WT HUFs and inhibited cell growth, whereas most TP53-mutated HUFs were resistant to Nutlin-3a. We then assessed whether Nutlin-3a treatment could discriminate between TP53-WT and TP53-mutated cells during the HIMA (n = 72 cultures). As immortal clones emerged from senescent cultures, each was treated with 10 µM Nutlin-3a for 5 days and observed for sensitivity or resistance. TP53 was subsequently sequenced from all immortalised clones. We found that all Nutlin-3a-resistant clones harboured TP53 mutations, which were diverse in position and functional impact, while all but one of the Nutlin-3a-sensitive clones were TP53-WT. These data suggest that including a Nutlin-3a counter-screen significantly improves the specificity and efficiency of the HIMA, whereby TP53-mutated clones are selected prior to sequencing and TP53-WT clones can be discarded.

  4. Selection and Separation of Viable Cells Based on a Cell-Lethal Assay

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Wei; Herman, Annadele; Phillips, Colleen; Pai, Jeng-Hao; Sims, Christopher E.; Allbritton, Nancy L.

    2010-01-01

    A method to select and separate viable cells based on the results of a cell-lethal assay was developed. Cells were plated on an array of culture sites with each site composed of closely spaced, releasable micropallets. Clonal colonies spanning multiple micropallets on individual culture sites were established within 72 h of plating. Adjacent sites were widely spaced with 100% of the colonies remaining sequestered on a single culture site during expansion. A laser-based method mechanically released a micropallet underlying a colony to segment the colony into two genetically identical colonies. One portion of the segmented colony was collected with 90% efficiency while viability of both fractions was 100%. The segmented colonies released from the array were fixed and subjected to immunofluorescence staining of intracellular phospho-ERK kinase to identify colonies that were highly resistant or sensitive to phorbol ester-induced activation of ERK. These resistant and sensitive cells were then matched to the corresponding viable colonies on the array. Sensitive and resistant colonies on the array were released and cultured. When these cultured cells were reanalyzed for phorbol ester-induced ERK activity, the cells retained the sensitive or resistant phenotype of the originally screened subcolony. Thus cells were separated and collected based using the result of a cell-lethal assay as selection criteria. These microarrays enabling clonal colony segmentation permitted sampling and manipulation of the colonies at very early times and at small cell numbers to reduce reagent, time and manpower requirements. PMID:21142138

  5. Selection of peptidoglycan-specific aptamers for bacterial cells identification.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Iêda Mendes; de Souza Lacerda, Camila Maria; de Faria, Lígia Santana; Corrêa, Cristiane Rodrigues; de Andrade, Antero Silva Ribeiro

    2014-12-01

    Peptidoglycan is a highly complex and essential macromolecule of bacterial outer cell wall; it is a heteropolymer made up of linear glycan strands cross-linked by peptides. Peptidoglycan has a particular composition which makes it a possible target for specific bacterial recognition. Aptamers are single-stranded DNA or RNA oligonucleotides that bind to target molecules with high affinity and specificity. Aptamers can be labeled with different radioisotopes and possess several properties that make them suitable for molecular imaging. The purpose of this study was to obtain aptamers for use as radiopharmaceutical in bacterial infection diagnosis. Two aptamers (Antibac1 and Antibac2) against peptidoglycan were selected through the Systematic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential Enrichment (SELEX) methodology. The dissociation constant (Kd) for Antibac1 was 0.415 + 0.047 μM and for Antibac2 was 1.261 + 0.280 μM. These aptamers labeled with (32)P showed high affinity for Staphylococcus aureus cells. The binding to S. aureus and Escherichia coli in vitro were significantly higher than for Candida albicans and human fibroblasts, demonstrating their specificity for bacterial cells. These results point Antibac1 and Antibac2 as promising tools for bacterial infections identification.

  6. Donor selection in T cell-replete haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: knowns, unknowns, and controversies.

    PubMed

    Ciurea, Stefan O; Champlin, Richard E

    2013-02-01

    Multiple donors are generally available for haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Here we discuss the factors that should be considered when selecting donors for this type of transplantation according to the currently available evidence. Donor-specific anti-HLA antibodies (DSAs) increase the risk of graft failure and should be avoided whenever possible. Strategies to manage recipients with DSAs are discussed. One should choose a full haplotype mismatch rather than a better-matched donor and maximize the dose of infused hematopoietic cells. Donor age and sex are other important factors. Other factors, including predicted natural killer cell alloreactivity and consideration of noninherited maternal alleles, are more controversial. Larger studies are needed to further clarify the role of these factors for donor selection in haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

  7. A Novel Selectable Islet 1 Positive Progenitor Cell Reprogrammed to Expandable and Functional Smooth Muscle Cells.

    PubMed

    Turner, Elizabeth C; Huang, Chien-Ling; Sawhney, Neha; Govindarajan, Kalaimathi; Clover, Anthony J P; Martin, Kenneth; Browne, Tara C; Whelan, Derek; Kumar, Arun H S; Mackrill, John J; Wang, Shaohua; Schmeckpeper, Jeffrey; Stocca, Alessia; Pierce, William G; Leblond, Anne-Laure; Cai, Liquan; O'Sullivan, Donnchadh M; Buneker, Chirlei K; Choi, Janet; MacSharry, John; Ikeda, Yasuhiro; Russell, Stephen J; Caplice, Noel M

    2016-05-01

    Disorders affecting smooth muscle structure/function may require technologies that can generate large scale, differentiated and contractile smooth muscle cells (SMC) suitable for cell therapy. To date no clonal precursor population that provides large numbers of differentiated SMC in culture has been identified in a rodent. Identification of such cells may also enhance insight into progenitor cell fate decisions and the relationship between smooth muscle precursors and disease states that implicate differentiated SMC.  In this study, we used classic clonal expansion techniques to identify novel self-renewing Islet 1 (Isl-1) positive primitive progenitor cells (PPC) within rat bone marrow that exhibited canonical stem cell markers and preferential differentiation towards a smooth muscle-like fate. We subsequently used molecular tagging to select Isl-1 positive clonal populations from expanded and de novo marrow cell populations. We refer to these previously undescribed cells as the PPC given its stem cell marker profile, and robust self-renewal capacity. PPC could be directly converted into induced smooth muscle cells (iSMC) using single transcription factor (Kruppel-like factor 4) knockdown or transactivator (myocardin) overexpression in contrast to three control cells (HEK 293, endothelial cells and mesenchymal stem cells) where such induction was not possible. iSMC exhibited immuno- and cytoskeletal-phenotype, calcium signaling profile and contractile responses similar to bona fide SMC. Passaged iSMC could be expanded to a scale sufficient for large scale tissue replacement.  PPC and reprogramed iSMC so derived may offer future opportunities to investigate molecular, structure/function and cell-based replacement therapy approaches to diverse cardiovascular, respiratory, gastrointestinal, and genitourinary diseases that have as their basis smooth muscle cell functional aberrancy or numerical loss. Stem Cells 2016;34:1354-1368.

  8. Neisseria lactamica selectively induces mitogenic proliferation of the naive B cell pool via cell surface Ig.

    PubMed

    Vaughan, Andrew T; Brackenbury, Louise S; Massari, Paola; Davenport, Victoria; Gorringe, Andrew; Heyderman, Robert S; Williams, Neil A

    2010-09-15

    Neisseria lactamica is a commensal bacteria that colonizes the human upper respiratory tract mucosa during early childhood. In contrast to the closely related opportunistic pathogen Neisseria meningitidis, there is an absence of adaptive cell-mediated immunity to N. lactamica during the peak age of carriage. Instead, outer membrane vesicles derived from N. lactamica mediate a B cell-dependent proliferative response in mucosal mononuclear cells that is associated with the production of polyclonal IgM. We demonstrate in this study that this is a mitogenic human B cell response that occurs independently of T cell help and any other accessory cell population. The ability to drive B cell proliferation is a highly conserved property and is present in N. lactamica strains derived from diverse clonal complexes. CFSE staining of purified human tonsillar B cells demonstrated that naive IgD(+) and CD27(-) B cells are selectively induced to proliferate by outer membrane vesicles, including the innate CD5(+) subset. Neither purified lipooligosaccharide nor PorB from N. lactamica is likely to be responsible for this activity. Prior treatment of B cells with pronase to remove cell-surface Ig or treatment with BCR-specific Abs abrogated the proliferative response to N. lactamica outer membrane vesicles, suggesting that this mitogenic response is dependent upon the BCR.

  9. Targeted erythropoietin selectively stimulates red blood cell expansion in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Burrill, Devin R.; Vernet, Andyna; Collins, James J.; Silver, Pamela A.; Way, Jeffrey C.

    2016-01-01

    The design of cell-targeted protein therapeutics can be informed by natural protein–protein interactions that use cooperative physical contacts to achieve cell type specificity. Here we applied this approach in vivo to the anemia drug erythropoietin (EPO), to direct its activity to EPO receptors (EPO-Rs) on red blood cell (RBC) precursors and prevent interaction with EPO-Rs on nonerythroid cells, such as platelets. Our engineered EPO molecule was mutated to weaken its affinity for EPO-R, but its avidity for RBC precursors was rescued via tethering to an antibody fragment that specifically binds the human RBC marker glycophorin A (huGYPA). We systematically tested the impact of these engineering steps on in vivo markers of efficacy, side effects, and pharmacokinetics. huGYPA transgenic mice dosed with targeted EPO exhibited elevated RBC levels, with only minimal platelet effects. This in vivo selectivity depended on the weakening EPO mutation, fusion to the RBC-specific antibody, and expression of huGYPA. The terminal plasma half-life of targeted EPO was ∼28.3 h in transgenic mice vs. ∼15.5 h in nontransgenic mice, indicating that huGYPA on mature RBCs acted as a significant drug sink but did not inhibit efficacy. In a therapeutic context, our targeting approach may allow higher restorative doses of EPO without platelet-mediated side effects, and also may improve drug pharmacokinetics. These results demonstrate how rational drug design can improve in vivo specificity, with potential application to diverse protein therapeutics. PMID:27114509

  10. B cell activating factor (BAFF) selects IL-10(-)B cells over IL-10(+)B cells during inflammatory responses.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ning; Zhang, Yu; Liu, Qilin; Wang, Zhiding; Liu, Xiaoling; Zhu, Gaizhi; Yu, Dandan; Han, Gencheng; Chen, Guojiang; Hou, Chunmei; Wang, Tianxiao; Ma, Yuanfang; Shen, Beifen; Li, Yan; Xiao, He; Wang, Renxi

    2017-05-01

    B cell activating factor (BAFF) regulates B cell maturation, survival, function, and plays a critical pathogenic role in autoimmune diseases. It remains unclear how BAFF affects IL-10(-)B cells versus regulatory B cells (Bregs) in inflammatory responses. In this study, we found that IL-10-expressing Bregs decreased in lupus-prone MRL/lpr mice and experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE) mice. On blockade of the effects of BAFF with TACI-IgG, IL-10(+) Bregs were upregulated in MRL/lpr and EAE mice. In addition, BAFF expanded IL-10(+)B cells over IL-10(-)B cells under noninflammatory conditions in vitro, whereas it expanded IL-10(-)B cells over IL-10(+)B cells during inflammatory responses, such as stimulation with autoantigen and LPS. Finally, the selection of IL-10(-)B cells over IL-10(+)B cells by BAFF was dependent on BAFF receptors (BAFFR, TACI, and BCMA) that were upregulated by inflammatory responses. This study suggests that BAFF selects IL-10(-)B cells over IL-10(+) regulatory B cells via BAFF receptors in inflammatory responses.

  11. Selection of malonate-resistant stromal cell-derived osteoprogenitor cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Klein, B Y; Gal, I; Segal, D

    1993-02-01

    Bone marrow stromal cells give rise to osteoprogenitor cell (OPC) colonies, with characteristic mineralized bone nodules in vitro. During differentiation, OPCs in the culture are surrounded by heterogeneous populations of various cell lineages and by different OPC differentiation stages. In the present study, attempts were made to increase the homogeneity of OPCs in culture. The reliance on energy metabolism restricted to glycolysis, which is specific to the premineralizing skeletal cells, was tested as a selectable marker for cells in this stage. Day 12 alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and day 20-21 calcium precipitates were used as early and late OPC differentiation markers. Malonate, a competitive inhibitor of succinate dehydrogenase, was added to the OPC stimulation medium, to interfere with the Krebs cycle-dependent energy metabolism operating in most of the stromal cells. OPCs that entered the stage of energy metabolism restricted to glycolysis were expected to become malonate resistant. Malonate showed dose and time dependence, 10 mM malonate added on day 3, decreased day 12 ALP activity/well to the lowest level. Variations in time and length of exposure to malonate used during the first 12 days of differentiation showed an inverse correlation between specific ALP activity and cell yield. Malonate-treated variations of specific ALP and of cell yield indices were up to 30- to 40-fold larger than variations within day 21 calcium precipitates. Thus, calcifying cells were almost unchanged relatively to noncalcifying cells. These results indicate that malonate-resistant cells are mostly selected, rather than induced, to differentiate by malonate. The results also show that stromal derived OPCs undergo a similar biochemical stage as in chondrocytes.

  12. Selection of Antibodies Interfering with Cell Surface Receptor Signaling Using Embryonic Stem Cell Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Melidoni, Anna N; Dyson, Michael R; McCafferty, John

    2016-01-01

    Antibodies able to bind and modify the function of cell surface signaling components in vivo are increasingly being used as therapeutic drugs. The identification of such "functional" antibodies from within large antibody pools is, therefore, the subject of intense research. Here we describe a novel cell-based expression and reporting system for the identification of functional antibodies from antigen-binding populations preselected with phage display. The system involves inducible expression of the antibody gene population from the Rosa-26 locus of embryonic stem (ES) cells, followed by secretion of the antibodies during ES cell differentiation. Target antigens are cell-surface signaling components (receptors or ligands) with a known effect on the direction of cell differentiation (FGFR1 mediating ES cell exit from self renewal in this particular protocol). Therefore, inhibition or activation of these components by functional antibodies in a few elite clones causes a shift in the differentiation outcomes of these clones, leading to their phenotypic selection. Functional antibody genes are then recovered from positive clones and used to produce the purified antibodies, which can be tested for their ability to affect cell fates exogenously. Identified functional antibody genes can be further introduced in different stem cell types. Inducible expression of functional antibodies has a temporally controlled protein-knockdown capability, which can be used to study the unknown role of the signaling pathway in different developmental contexts. Moreover, it provides a means for control of stem cell differentiation with potential in vivo applications.

  13. Single-cell Migration Chip for Chemotaxis-based Microfluidic Selection of Heterogeneous Cell Populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yu-Chih; Allen, Steven G.; Ingram, Patrick N.; Buckanovich, Ronald; Merajver, Sofia D.; Yoon, Euisik

    2015-05-01

    Tumor cell migration toward and intravasation into capillaries is an early and key event in cancer metastasis, yet not all cancer cells are imbued with the same capability to do so. This heterogeneity within a tumor is a fundamental property of cancer. Tools to help us understand what molecular characteristics allow a certain subpopulation of cells to spread from the primary tumor are thus critical for overcoming metastasis. Conventional in vitro migration platforms treat populations in aggregate, which leads to a masking of intrinsic differences among cells. Some migration assays reported recently have single-cell resolution, but these platforms do not provide for selective retrieval of the distinct migrating and non-migrating cell populations for further analysis. Thus, to study the intrinsic differences in cells responsible for chemotactic heterogeneity, we developed a single-cell migration platform so that individual cells’ migration behavior can be studied and the heterogeneous population sorted based upon chemotactic phenotype. Furthermore, after migration, the highly chemotactic and non-chemotactic cells were retrieved and proved viable for later molecular analysis of their differences. Moreover, we modified the migration channel to resemble lymphatic capillaries to better understand how certain cancer cells are able to move through geometrically confining spaces.

  14. Drug treatment of cancer cell lines: a way to select for cancer stem cells?

    PubMed

    Chiodi, Ilaria; Belgiovine, Cristina; Donà, Francesca; Scovassi, A Ivana; Mondello, Chiara

    2011-03-04

    Tumors are generally composed of different cell types. In recent years, it has been shown that in many types of cancers a subset of cells show peculiar characteristics, such as the ability to induce tumors when engrafted into host animals, self-renew and being immortal, and give rise to a differentiated progeny. These cells have been defined as cancer stem cells (CSCs) or tumor initiating cells. CSCs can be isolated both from tumor specimens and established cancer cell lines on the basis of their ability to exclude fluorescent dyes, express specific cell surface markers or grow in particular culture conditions. A key feature of CSCs is their resistance to chemotherapeutic agents, which could contribute to the remaining of residual cancer cells after therapeutic treatments. It has been shown that CSC-like cells can be isolated after drug treatment of cancer cell lines; in this review, we will describe the strategies so far applied to identify and isolate CSCs. Furthermore, we will discuss the possible use of these selected populations to investigate CSC biology and develop new anticancer drugs.

  15. Drug Treatment of Cancer Cell Lines: A Way to Select for Cancer Stem Cells?

    PubMed Central

    Chiodi, Ilaria; Belgiovine, Cristina; Donà, Francesca; Scovassi, A. Ivana; Mondello, Chiara

    2011-01-01

    Tumors are generally composed of different cell types. In recent years, it has been shown that in many types of cancers a subset of cells show peculiar characteristics, such as the ability to induce tumors when engrafted into host animals, self-renew and being immortal, and give rise to a differentiated progeny. These cells have been defined as cancer stem cells (CSCs) or tumor initiating cells. CSCs can be isolated both from tumor specimens and established cancer cell lines on the basis of their ability to exclude fluorescent dyes, express specific cell surface markers or grow in particular culture conditions. A key feature of CSCs is their resistance to chemotherapeutic agents, which could contribute to the remaining of residual cancer cells after therapeutic treatments. It has been shown that CSC-like cells can be isolated after drug treatment of cancer cell lines; in this review, we will describe the strategies so far applied to identify and isolate CSCs. Furthermore, we will discuss the possible use of these selected populations to investigate CSC biology and develop new anticancer drugs. PMID:24212655

  16. β-escin selectively targets the glioblastoma-initiating cell population and reduces cell viability

    PubMed Central

    Harford-Wright, Elizabeth; Bidère, Nicolas; Gavard, Julie

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is a highly aggressive tumour of the central nervous system and is associated with an extremely poor prognosis. Within GBM exists a subpopulation of cells, glioblastoma-initiating cells (GIC), which possess the characteristics of progenitor cells, have the ability to initiate tumour growth and resist to current treatment strategies. We aimed at identifying novel specific inhibitors of GIC expansion through use of a large-scale chemical screen of approved small molecules. Here, we report the identification of the natural compound β-escin as a selective inhibitor of GIC viability. Indeed, β-escin was significantly cytotoxic in nine patient-derived GIC, whilst exhibiting no substantial effect on the other human cancer or control cell lines tested. In addition, β-escin was more effective at reducing GIC growth than current clinically used cytotoxic agents. We further show that β-escin triggers caspase-dependent cell death combined with a loss of stemness properties. However, blocking apoptosis could not rescue the β-escin-induced reduction in sphere formation or stemness marker activity, indicating that β-escin directly modifies the stem identity of GIC, independent of the induction of cell death. Thus, this study has repositioned β-escin as a promising potential candidate to selectively target the aggressive population of initiating cells within GBM. PMID:27589691

  17. Hole selective MoOx contact for silicon solar cells.

    PubMed

    Battaglia, Corsin; Yin, Xingtian; Zheng, Maxwell; Sharp, Ian D; Chen, Teresa; McDonnell, Stephen; Azcatl, Angelica; Carraro, Carlo; Ma, Biwu; Maboudian, Roya; Wallace, Robert M; Javey, Ali

    2014-02-12

    Using an ultrathin (∼ 15 nm in thickness) molybdenum oxide (MoOx, x < 3) layer as a transparent hole selective contact to n-type silicon, we demonstrate a room-temperature processed oxide/silicon solar cell with a power conversion efficiency of 14.3%. While MoOx is commonly considered to be a semiconductor with a band gap of 3.3 eV, from X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy we show that MoOx may be considered to behave as a high workfunction metal with a low density of states at the Fermi level originating from the tail of an oxygen vacancy derived defect band located inside the band gap. Specifically, in the absence of carbon contamination, we measure a work function potential of ∼ 6.6 eV, which is significantly higher than that of all elemental metals. Our results on the archetypical semiconductor silicon demonstrate the use of nm-thick transition metal oxides as a simple and versatile pathway for dopant-free contacts to inorganic semiconductors. This work has important implications toward enabling a novel class of junctionless devices with applications for solar cells, light-emitting diodes, photodetectors, and transistors.

  18. Discovery of a novel proteasome inhibitor selective for cancer cells over non-transformed cells.

    PubMed

    Kazi, Aslamuzzaman; Lawrence, Harshani; Guida, Wayne C; McLaughlin, Mark L; Springett, Gregory M; Berndt, Norbert; Yip, Richard M L; Sebti, Saïd M

    2009-06-15

    Numerous proteins controlling cell cycle progression, apoptosis and angiogenesis are degraded by the ubiquitin/proteasome system, which has become the subject for intense investigations for cancer therapeutics. Therefore, we used in silico and experimental approaches to screen compounds from the NCI chemical libraries for inhibitors against the chymotrypsin-like (CT-L) activity of the proteasome and discovered PI-083. Molecular docking indicates that PI-083 interacts with the Thr21, Gly47 and Ala49 residues of the beta5 subunit and Asp114 of the beta6 subunit of the proteasome. PI-083 inhibits CT-L activity and cell proliferation and induces apoptosis selectively in cancer cells (ovarian T80-Hras, pancreatic C7-Kras and breast MCF-7) as compared to their normal/immortalized counterparts (T80, C7 and MCF-10A, respectively). In contrast, Bortezomib, the only proteasome inhibitor approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), did not exhibit this selectivity for cancer over non-transformed cells. In addition, in all cancer cells tested, including Multiple Myeloma (MM), breast, pancreatic, ovarian, lung, prostate cancer cell lines as well as fresh MM cells from patients, PI-083 required less time than Bortezomib to induce its antitumor effects. Furthermore, in nude mouse xenografts in vivo, PI-083, but not Bortezomib, suppressed the growth of human breast and lung tumors. Finally, following in vivo treatment of mice, PI-083 inhibited tumor, but not hepatic liver CT-L activity, whereas Bortezomib inhibited both tumor and liver CT-L activities. These results suggest that PI-083 is more selective for cancer cells and may have broader antitumor activity and therefore warrants further advanced preclinical studies.

  19. Nutlin‐3a selects for cells harbouring TP 53 mutations

    PubMed Central

    Hollstein, Monica; Arlt, Volker M.; Phillips, David H.

    2016-01-01

    TP53 mutations occur in half of all human tumours. Mutagen‐induced or spontaneous TP53 mutagenesis can be studied in vitro using the human TP53 knock‐in (Hupki) mouse embryo fibroblast (HUF) immortalisation assay (HIMA). TP53 mutations arise in up to 30% of mutagen‐treated, immortalised HUFs; however, mutants are not identified until TP53 sequence analysis following immortalisation (2–5 months) and much effort is expended maintaining TP53‐WT cultures. In order to improve the selectivity of the HIMA for HUFs harbouring TP53 mutations, we explored the use of Nutlin‐3a, an MDM2 inhibitor that leads to stabilisation and activation of wild‐type (WT) p53. First, we treated previously established immortal HUF lines carrying WT or mutated TP53 with Nutlin‐3a to examine the effect on cell growth and p53 activation. Nutlin‐3a induced the p53 pathway in TP53‐WT HUFs and inhibited cell growth, whereas most TP53‐mutated HUFs were resistant to Nutlin‐3a. We then assessed whether Nutlin‐3a treatment could discriminate between TP53‐WT and TP53‐mutated cells during the HIMA (n = 72 cultures). As immortal clones emerged from senescent cultures, each was treated with 10 µM Nutlin‐3a for 5 days and observed for sensitivity or resistance. TP53 was subsequently sequenced from all immortalised clones. We found that all Nutlin‐3a‐resistant clones harboured TP53 mutations, which were diverse in position and functional impact, while all but one of the Nutlin‐3a‐sensitive clones were TP53‐WT. These data suggest that including a Nutlin‐3a counter‐screen significantly improves the specificity and efficiency of the HIMA, whereby TP53‐mutated clones are selected prior to sequencing and TP53‐WT clones can be discarded. PMID:27813088

  20. Transitional B cells are the target of negative selection in the B cell compartment

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    B lymphocytes recognize antigen through membrane-bound antigen- receptors, membrane IgM and IgD (mIgM and mIgD). Binding to foreign antigens initiates a cascade of biochemical events that lead to activation and differentiation. In contrast, binding to self-antigens leads to death or to inactivation. It is commonly believed that the B cells acquire the ability to discriminate between self and nonself in the early phases of development. We report here that immature B cells, which have just emerged from the mIgMneg, B220pos pool, are not deleted upon binding of self-antigen. In vivo, developing B cells become sensitive to tolerance induction in a relatively late window of differentiation, when they are in transition from the immature (HSAbright, B220dull) to the mature (HSAdull, B220bright) stage. In the transitional B cells, early markers of differentiation such as Pgp1 (CD44) and ThB reach the highest level of expression, while the expression of CD23 and mIgD, late markers of differentiation, and expression of class II MHC, progressively increases. Most of the transitional B cells, but only few of the mature and of the immature B cells, express the fas antigen, while mature B cells, but not immature and transitional B cells, express bcl-2 protein. mIgM is present in low amounts in immature B cells, reaches the highest level of expression in transitional B cells and is down-regulated in mature resting B cells, where it is coexpressed with mIgD. The high expression of mIgM, the presence of the fas antigen and the absence of bcl-2 protein is compatible with the high sensitivity of transitional B cells to negative selection. In vitro, immature B cells die rapidly by apoptosis after cross-linking of mIgM. This result, combined with the resistance of immature B cells to elimination in vivo, suggests that early in development the stroma cell microenvironment modulates signals transduced through mIgM. The functional and phenotypic division of IgMpos bone marrow B cells in

  1. FAS-Based Cell Depletion Facilitates the Selective Isolation of Mouse Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Warlich, Eva; Schambach, Axel; Lock, Dominik; Wedekind, Dirk; Glage, Silke; Eckardt, Dominik; Bosio, Andreas; Knöbel, Sebastian

    2014-01-01

    Cellular reprogramming of somatic cells into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) opens up new avenues for basic research and regenerative medicine. However, the low efficiency of the procedure remains a major limitation. To identify iPSC, many studies to date relied on the activation of pluripotency-associated transcription factors. Such strategies are either retrospective or depend on genetically modified reporter cells. We aimed at identifying naturally occurring surface proteins in a systematic approach, focusing on antibody-targeted markers to enable live-cell identification and selective isolation. We tested 170 antibodies for differential expression between mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEF) and mouse pluripotent stem cells (PSC). Differentially expressed markers were evaluated for their ability to identify and isolate iPSC in reprogramming cultures. Epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EPCAM) and stage-specific embryonic antigen 1 (SSEA1) were upregulated early during reprogramming and enabled enrichment of OCT4 expressing cells by magnetic cell sorting. Downregulation of somatic marker FAS was equally suitable to enrich OCT4 expressing cells, which has not been described so far. Furthermore, FAS downregulation correlated with viral transgene silencing. Finally, using the marker SSEA-1 we exemplified that magnetic separation enables the establishment of bona fide iPSC and propose strategies to enrich iPSC from a variety of human source tissues. PMID:25029550

  2. Targeting of phage particles towards endothelial cells by antibodies selected through a multi-parameter selection strategy

    PubMed Central

    Mandrup, Ole A.; Lykkemark, Simon; Kristensen, Peter

    2017-01-01

    One of the hallmarks of cancer is sustained angiogenesis. Here, normal endothelial cells are activated, and their formation of new blood vessels leads to continued tumour growth. An improved patient condition is often observed when angiogenesis is prevented or normalized through targeting of these genomically stable endothelial cells. However, intracellular targets constitute a challenge in therapy, as the agents modulating these targets have to be delivered and internalized specifically to the endothelial cells. Selection of antibodies binding specifically to certain cell types is well established. It is nonetheless a challenge to ensure that the binding of antibodies to the target cell will mediate internalization. Previously selection of such antibodies has been performed targeting cancer cell lines; most often using either monovalent display or polyvalent display. In this article, we describe selections that isolate internalizing antibodies by sequential combining monovalent and polyvalent display using two types of helper phages, one which increases display valence and one which reduces background. One of the selected antibodies was found to mediate internalization into human endothelial cells, although our results confirms that the single stranded nature of the DNA packaged into phage particles may limit applications aimed at targeting nucleic acids in mammalian cells. PMID:28186116

  3. Thermo-Responsive Collagen/Cell Penetrating Hybrid Peptide as Nanocarrier in Targeting-Free Cell Selection and Uptake

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Myungeun; Hu, Chloe; Urfano, Selina F.; Arostegui, Merlyn; Slowinska, Katarzyna

    2016-01-01

    The effective delivery of therapeutics and imaging agents to a selected group of cells has been at the forefront of biomedical research. Unfortunately, the identification of the unique cell surface targets for cell selection remains a major challenge, particularly if cells within the selected group are not identical. Here we demonstrate a novel approach to cell section relying on a thermo-responsive peptide-based nanocarrier. The hybrid peptide containing cell-penetrating peptide (CPP) and collagen (COLL) domains is designed to undergo coil-to-helix transition (folding) below physiological temperature. Since only helical form undergoes effective internalization by the cells, this approach allows effective temperature-discriminate cellular uptake. The cells selected for uptake are locally cooled down thus enabling the carrier to fold and subsequently internalize. Our approach demonstrates a generic method as selected cells could differ from the adjacent cells or could belong to the same cell population. The method is fast (< 15 min) and selective; over 99.6% of cells in vitro internalized the peptide carrier at low temperatures (15°C), while less than 0.2% internalized at 37°C. In vivo results confirm the high selectivity of the method. The potential clinical applications in mixed cell differentiation carcinoma, most frequently encountered in breast and ovarian cancer, are envisioned. PMID:27603918

  4. Selective human endothelial cell activation by chemokines as a guide to cell homing.

    PubMed

    Crola Da Silva, Claire; Lamerant-Fayel, Nathalie; Paprocka, Maria; Mitterrand, Michèle; Gosset, David; Dus, Danuta; Kieda, Claudine

    2009-03-01

    An original model of organo-specific, immortalized and stabilized endothelial cell lines was used to delineate the part played by some chemokines (CCL21, CX3CL1, CCL5 and CXCL12) and their receptors in endothelium organo-specificity. Chemokine receptor expression and chemokine presentation were investigated on organo-specific human endothelial cell lines. Although the chemokines showed distinct binding patterns for the various endothelial cell lines, these were not correlated with the expression of the corresponding receptors (CX3CR1, CXCR4, CCR5 and CCR7). Experiments with CCL21 on peripheral lymph node endothelial cells demonstrated that the chemokine did not co-localize with its receptor but was associated with extracellular matrix components. The specific activity of chemokines was clearly shown to be related to the endothelial cell origin. Indeed, CX3CL1 and CCL21 promoted lymphocyte recruitment by endothelial cells from the appendix and peripheral lymph nodes, respectively, while CX3CL1 pro-angiogenic activity was restricted to endothelial cells from the appendix and skin. The high specificity of the chemokine/endothelium interaction allowed the design of a direct in vitro endothelial cell targeting assay. This unique cellular model demonstrated a fundamental role for chemokines in conferring on the endothelium its organo-specificity and its potential for tissue targeting through the selective binding, presentation and activation properties of chemokines.

  5. A theory of germinal center B cell selection, division, and exit.

    PubMed

    Meyer-Hermann, Michael; Mohr, Elodie; Pelletier, Nadége; Zhang, Yang; Victora, Gabriel D; Toellner, Kai-Michael

    2012-07-26

    High-affinity antibodies are generated in germinal centers in a process involving mutation and selection of B cells. Information processing in germinal center reactions has been investigated in a number of recent experiments. These have revealed cell migration patterns, asymmetric cell divisions, and cell-cell interaction characteristics, used here to develop a theory of germinal center B cell selection, division, and exit (the LEDA model). According to this model, B cells selected by T follicular helper cells on the basis of successful antigen processing always return to the dark zone for asymmetric division, and acquired antigen is inherited by one daughter cell only. Antigen-retaining B cells differentiate to plasma cells and leave the germinal center through the dark zone. This theory has implications for the functioning of germinal centers because compared to previous models, high-affinity antibodies appear one day earlier and the amount of derived plasma cells is considerably larger.

  6. Selection of brain metastasis-initiating breast cancer cells determined by growth on hard agar.

    PubMed

    Guo, Lixia; Fan, Dominic; Zhang, Fahao; Price, Janet E; Lee, Ju-Seog; Marchetti, Dario; Fidler, Isaiah J; Langley, Robert R

    2011-05-01

    An approach that facilitates rapid isolation and characterization of tumor cells with enhanced metastatic potential is highly desirable. Here, we demonstrate that plating GI-101A human breast cancer cells on hard (0.9%) agar selects for the subpopulation of metastasis-initiating cells. The agar-selected cells, designated GI-AGR, were homogeneous for CD44(+) and CD133(+) and five times more invasive than the parental GI-101A cells. Moreover, mice injected with GI-AGR cells had significantly more experimental brain metastases and shorter overall survival than did mice injected with GI-101A cells. Comparative gene expression analysis revealed that GI-AGR cells were markedly distinct from the parental cells but shared an overlapping pattern of gene expression with the GI-101A subline GI-BRN, which was generated by repeated in vivo recycling of GI-101A cells in an experimental brain metastasis model. Data mining on 216 genes shared between GI-AGR and GI-BRN breast cancer cells suggested that the molecular phenotype of these cells is consistent with that of cancer stem cells and the aggressive basal subtype of breast cancer. Collectively, these results demonstrate that analysis of cell growth in a hard agar assay is a powerful tool for selecting metastasis-initiating cells in a heterogeneous population of breast cancer cells, and that such selected cells have properties similar to those of tumor cells that are selected based on their potential to form metastases in mice.

  7. Technical approaches to induce selective cell death of pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Ho-Chang; Cho, Seung-Ju; Lee, Mi-Ok; Cha, Hyuk-Jin

    2017-02-28

    Despite the recent promising results of clinical trials using human pluripotent stem cell (hPSC)-based cell therapies for age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the risk of teratoma formation resulting from residual undifferentiated hPSCs remains a serious and critical hurdle for broader clinical implementation. To mitigate the tumorigenic risk of hPSC-based cell therapy, a variety of approaches have been examined to ablate the undifferentiated hPSCs based on the unique molecular properties of hPSCs. In the present review, we offer a brief overview of recent attempts at selective elimination of undifferentiated hPSCs to decrease the risk of teratoma formation in hPSC-based cell therapy.

  8. Coupling Binding to Catalysis – Using Yeast Cell Surface Display to Select Enzymatic Activities

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Keya; Bhuripanyo, Karan; Wang, Yiyang; Yin, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Summary We find yeast cell surface display can be used to engineer enzymes by selecting the enzyme library for high affinity binding to reaction intermediates. Here we cover key steps of enzyme engineering on the yeast cell surface including library design, construction, and selection based on magnetic and fluorescence activated cell sorting. PMID:26060080

  9. Coupling Binding to Catalysis: Using Yeast Cell Surface Display to Select Enzymatic Activities.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Keya; Bhuripanyo, Karan; Wang, Yiyang; Yin, Jun

    2015-01-01

    We find yeast cell surface display can be used to engineer enzymes by selecting the enzyme library for high affinity binding to reaction intermediates. Here we cover key steps of enzyme engineering on the yeast cell surface including library design, construction, and selection based on magnetic and fluorescence-activated cell sorting.

  10. Thymic Selection of T-Cell Receptors as an Extreme Value Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Košmrlj, Andrej; Chakraborty, Arup K.; Kardar, Mehran; Shakhnovich, Eugene I.

    2009-08-01

    T lymphocytes (T cells) orchestrate adaptive immune responses upon activation. T-cell activation requires sufficiently strong binding of T-cell receptors on their surface to short peptides (p) derived from foreign proteins, which are bound to major histocompatibility gene products (displayed on antigen-presenting cells). A diverse and self-tolerant T-cell repertoire is selected in the thymus. We map thymic selection processes to an extreme value problem and provide an analytic expression for the amino acid compositions of selected T-cell receptors (which enable its recognition functions).

  11. Genomic instability, driver genes and cell selection: Projections from cancer to stem cells.

    PubMed

    Ben-David, Uri

    2015-04-01

    Cancer cells and stem cells share many traits, including a tendency towards genomic instability. Human cancers exhibit tumor-specific genomic aberrations, which often affect their malignancy and drug response. During their culture propagation, human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) also acquire characteristic genomic aberrations, which may have significant impact on their molecular and cellular phenotypes. These aberrations vary in size from single nucleotide alterations to copy number alterations to whole chromosome gains. A prominent challenge in both cancer and stem cell research is to identify "driver aberrations" that confer a selection advantage, and "driver genes" that underlie the recurrence of these aberrations. Following principles that are already well-established in cancer research, candidate driver genes have also been suggested in hPSCs. Experimental validation of the functional role of such candidates can uncover whether these are bona fide driver genes. The identification of driver genes may bring us closer to a mechanistic understanding of the genomic instability of stem cells. Guided by terminologies and methodologies commonly applied in cancer research, such understanding may have important ramifications for both stem cell and cancer biology. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Stress as a fundamental theme in cell plasticity.

  12. Toward Cell Selective Surfaces: Cell Adhesion and Proliferation on Breath Figures with Antifouling Surface Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Campos, Enrique; Elzein, Tamara; Bejjani, Alice; García-Granda, Maria Jesús; Santos-Coquillat, Ana; Ramos, Viviana; Muñoz-Bonilla, Alexandra; Rodríguez-Hernández, Juan

    2016-03-01

    We report the preparation of microporous functional polymer surfaces that have been proven to be selective surfaces toward eukaryotic cells while maintaining antifouling properties against bacteria. The fabrication of functional porous films has been carried out by the breath figures approach that allowed us to create porous interfaces with either poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate (PEGMA) or 2,3,4,5,6-pentafluorostyrene (5FS). For this purpose, blends of block copolymers in a polystyrene homopolymer matrix have been employed. In contrast to the case of single functional polymer, using blends enables us to vary the chemical distribution of the functional groups inside and outside the formed pores. In particular, fluorinated groups were positioned at the edges while the hydrophilic PEGMA groups were selectively located inside the pores, as demonstrated by TOF-SIMS. More interestingly, studies of cell adhesion, growth, and proliferation on these surfaces confirmed that PEGMA functionalized interfaces are excellent candidates to selectively allow cell growth and proliferation while maintaining antifouling properties.

  13. Effect of silicon oxidation on long-term cell selectivity of cell-patterned Au/SiO2 platforms.

    PubMed

    Veiseh, Mandana; Zhang, Miqin

    2006-02-01

    Cellular patterning on silicon platforms is the basis for development of integrated cell-based biosensing devices, for which long-term cell selectivity and biostability remain a major challenge. We report the development of a silicon-based platform in a metal-insulator format capable of producing uniform and biostable cell patterns with long-term cell selectivity. Substrates patterned with arrays of gold electrodes were surface-engineered such that the electrodes were activated with fibronectin to mediate cell attachment and the silicon oxide background was passivated with PEG to resist protein adsorption and cell adhesion. Three types of oxide surfaces, i.e., native oxide, dry thermally grown oxide, and wet thermally grown oxide, were produced to illustrate the effect of oxide state of the surface on long-term cell selectivity. Results indicated that the cell selectivity over time differed dramatically among three patterned platforms and the best cell selectivity was found on the dry oxide surface for up to 10 days. Surface analysis results suggested that this enhancement in cell selectivity may be related to the presence of additional, more active oxide states on the dry oxide surface supporting the stability of PEG films and effectively suppressing the cell adhesion. This research offers a new strategy for development of stable and uniform cell-patterned surfaces, which is versatile for immobilization of silane-based chemicals for preparation of biostable interfaces.

  14. Systemic Delivery of Fusogenic Membrane Glycoprotein-expressing Neural Stem Cells to Selectively Kill Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Detu; Lam, Dang Hoang; Purwanti, Yovita Ida; Goh, Sal Lee; Wu, Chunxiao; Zeng, Jieming; Fan, Weimin; Wang, Shu

    2013-01-01

    Intravenously injected neural stem cells (NSCs) can infiltrate both primary and metastatic tumor sites; thus, they are attractive tumor-targeting vehicles for delivering anticancer agents. However, because the systemic distribution of the injected NSCs involves normal organs and might induce off-target actions leading to unintended side effects, clinical applications of this approach is impeded. Given that the vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein (VSV-G) can promote the formation of multinucleated syncytia to kill cells in a pH-dependent manner, we engineered a pH sensor of VSV-G and generated a novel VSV-G mutant that efficiently promotes syncytium formation at the tumor extracellular pH (pHe) but not at pH 7.4. Using transduced NSCs derived from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), the VSV-G mutant was delivered into mice with metastatic breast cancers in the lung through tail vein injection. Compared with the conventional stem cell-based gene therapy that uses the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSVtk) suicide gene, this treatment did not display toxicity to normal non-targeted organs while retaining therapeutic effects in tumor-bearing organs. Our findings demonstrate the effectiveness of a new approach for achieving tumor-selective killing effects following systemic stem cell administration. Its potential in stem cell-based gene therapy for metastatic cancer is worthy of further exploration. PMID:23752308

  15. Mechanosensory calcium-selective cation channels in epidermal cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ding, J. P.; Pickard, B. G.

    1993-01-01

    This paper explores the properties and likely functions of an epidermal Ca(2+)-selective cation channel complex activated by tension. As many as eight or nine linked or linkable equivalent conductance units or co-channels can open together. Open time for co-channel quadruplets and quintuplets tends to be relatively long with millimolar Mg2+ (but not millimolar Ca2+) at the cytosolic face of excised plasma membrane. Sensitivity to tension is regulated by transmembrane voltage and temperature. Under some circumstances channel activity is sychronized in rhythmic pulses. Certain lanthanides and a cytoskeleton-disturbing herbicide that inhibit gravitropic reception act on the channel system at low concentrations. Specifically, ethyl-N-phenylcarbamate promotes tension-dependent activity at micromolar levels. With moderate suction, Gd3+ provided at about 0.5 micromole at the extracellular face of the membrane promotes for several seconds but may then become inhibitory. Provision at 1-2 micromoles promotes and subsequently inhibits more vigorously (often abruptly and totally), and at high levels inhibits immediately. La3+, a poor gravitropic inhibitor, acts similarly but much more gradually and only at much higher concentrations. These properties, particularly these susceptibilities to modulation, indicate that in vivo the mechanosensitive channel must be mechanosensory and mechanoregulatory. It could serve to transduce the shear forces generated in the integrated wall-membrane-cytoskeleton system during turgor changes and cell expansion as well as transducing the stresses induced by gravity, touch and flexure. In so far as such transduction is modulated by voltage and temperature, the channels would also be sensors for these modalities as long as the wall-membrane-cytoskeleton system experiences mechanical stress.

  16. Isolation of cancer stem cells from three human glioblastoma cell lines: characterization of two selected clones.

    PubMed

    Iacopino, Fortunata; Angelucci, Cristiana; Piacentini, Roberto; Biamonte, Filippo; Mangiola, Annunziato; Maira, Giulio; Grassi, Claudio; Sica, Gigliola

    2014-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSC) were isolated via a non-adherent neurosphere assay from three glioma cell lines: LI, U87, and U373. Using a clonal assay, two clones (D2 and F11) were selected from spheres derived from LI cells and were characterized for the: expression of stem cell markers (CD133, Nestin, Musashi-1 and Sox2); proliferation; differentiation capability (determined by the expression of GalC, βIII-Tubulin and GFAP); Ca(2+) signaling and tumorigenicity in nude mice. Both D2 and F11 clones expressed higher levels of all stem cell markers with respect to the parental cell line. Clones grew more slowly than LI cells with a two-fold increase in duplication time. Markers of differentiation (βIII-Tubulin and GFAP) were expressed at high levels in both LI cells and in neurospheres. The expression of Nestin, Sox2, and βIII-Tubulin was down-regulated in D2 and F11 when cultured in serum-containing medium, whereas Musashi-1 was increased. In this condition, duplication time of D2 and F11 increased without reaching that of LI cells. D2, F11 and parental cells did not express voltage-dependent Ca(2+)-channels but they exhibited increased intracellular Ca(2+) levels in response to ATP. These Ca(2+) signals were larger in LI cells and in spheres cultured in serum-containing medium, while they were smaller in serum-free medium. The ATP treatment did not affect cell proliferation. Both D2 and F11 induced the appearance of tumors when ortotopically injected in athymic nude mice at a density 50-fold lower than that of LI cells. All these data indicate that both clones have characteristics of CSC and share the same stemness properties. The findings regarding the expression of differentiation markers and Ca(2+)-channels show that both clones are unable to reach the terminal differentiation. Both D2 and F11 might represent a good model to improve the knowledge on CSC in glioblastoma and to identify new therapeutic approaches.

  17. Depolarization Controls TRAIL-Sensitization and Tumor-Selective Killing of Cancer Cells: Crosstalk with ROS

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki-Karasaki, Yoshihiro; Suzuki-Karasaki, Miki; Uchida, Mayumi; Ochiai, Toyoko

    2014-01-01

    Conventional genotoxic anti-cancer drugs target the proliferative advantage of tumor cells over normal cells. This kind of approach lacks the selectivity of treatment to cancer cells, because most of the targeted pathways are essential for the survival of normal cells. As a result, traditional cancer treatments are often limited by undesirable damage to normal cells (side-effects). Ideal anti-cancer drugs are expected to be highly effective against malignant tumor cells with minimal cytotoxicity toward normal cells. Such selective killing can be achieved by targeting pathways essential for the survival of cancer cells, but not normal cells. As cancer cells are characterized by their resistance to apoptosis, selective apoptosis induction is a promising approach for selective killing of cancer cells. Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) is a promising tumor-selective anti-cancer drug. However, the congenital and acquired resistance of some cancer cell types, including malignant melanoma cells, currently impedes effective TRAIL therapy, and an innovative approach that can override TRAIL resistance is urgently required. Apoptosis is characterized by cell shrinkage caused by disruption of the maintenance of the normal physiological concentrations of K+ and Na+ and intracellular ion homeostasis. The disrupted ion homeostasis leads to depolarization and apoptosis. Recent evidence suggests that depolarization is an early and prerequisite event during TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Moreover, diverse natural products and synthetic chemicals capable of depolarizing the cell membrane exhibit tumor-selective killing and TRAIL-sensitizing effects. Here, we discuss the role of depolarization in selective killing of cancer cells in connection with the emerging concept that oxidative stress is a critical mediator of mitochondrial and endoplasmic reticulum dysfunctions and serves as a tumor-selective target in cancer treatment. PMID:24910845

  18. Human prostatic cancer cells, PC3, elaborate mitogenic activity which selectively stimulates human bone cells

    SciTech Connect

    Perkel, V.S.; Mohan, S.; Herring, S.J.; Baylink, D.J.; Linkhart, T.A. )

    1990-11-01

    Prostatic cancer typically produces osteoblastic metastases which are not attended by marrow fibrosis. In the present study we sought to test the hypothesis that prostatic cancer cells produce factor(s) which act selectively on human osteoblasts. Such a paracrine mechanism would explain the observed increase in osteoblasts, unaccompanied by an increase in marrow fibroblasts. To test this hypothesis we investigated the mitogenic activity released by the human prostatic tumor cell line, PC3. PC3 cells have been reported previously to produce mitogenic activity for cells that was relatively specific for rat osteoblasts compared to rat fibroblasts. However, the effects of this activity on human cells has not been examined previously. PC3-conditioned medium (CM) (5-50 micrograms CM protein/ml) stimulated human osteoblast proliferation by 200-950% yet did not stimulate human fibroblast proliferation ((3H)thymidine incorporation). PC3 CM also increased cell numbers in human osteoblast but not fibroblast cell cultures. To determine whether the osteoblast-specific mitogenic activity could be attributed to known bone growth factors, specific assays for these growth factors were performed. PC3 CM contained 10 pg insulin-like growth factor (IGF) I, less than 2 pg IGF II, 54 pg basic fibroblast growth factor, and 16 pg transforming growth factor beta/microgram CM protein. None of these growth factors alone or in combination could account for the observed osteoblast-specific PC3 cell-derived mitogenic activity. Furthermore, when 5 micrograms/ml PC3 CM was tested in combination with maximally effective concentrations of either basic fibroblast growth factor, IGF I, IGF II, or transforming growth factor beta, it produced an additive effect suggesting that PC3 CM stimulates osteoblast proliferation by a mechanism independent of these bone mitogens.

  19. Distinctive selection mechanisms govern the T cell receptor repertoire of peripheral CD4-CD8- alpha/beta T cells

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    The T cell receptor (TCR) repertoire of CD4+ and CD8+ alpha/beta T cells is heavily influenced by positive and negative selection events that occur during T cell development in the thymus. The coreceptors CD4 and CD8 appear to be essential for this selection to occur. To gain insight into whether T cells that express TCR alpha/beta but lack either coreceptor (CD4- CD8- TCR alpha/beta or alpha/beta double- negative [DN] cells) are also subject to positive and negative selection, and whether selection can occur in the absence of coreceptors, we have performed an extensive immunogenetic analysis of the TCR V beta repertoire of alpha/beta DN cells in lymph nodes of normal mice. Our results show that alpha/beta DN cells appear to be unaffected by clonal deletion of V beta 5 and V beta 11 in I-E- expressing mice, and do not undergo deletion of V beta 6- and V beta 8.1-expressing T cells in Mls-1a-positive mice. They are also unaffected by positive selection of V beta 17a+ T cells in the context of I-Aq. The results suggest that most selection events require the participation of CD4 and CD8, while alpha/beta DN cells are unselected. This argues that most alpha/beta DN cells probably have never expressed CD4 or CD8. However, a unique form of repertoire selection occurs: enrichment of V beta 17a+ alpha/beta DN cells in I-E+ mice. This could be an instance of coreceptor-independent selection. PMID:1512537

  20. New Strategies for Designing Inexpensive but Selective Bioadsorbants for Environmental Pollutants: Selection of specific Ligands and Their Cell Surface Expression

    SciTech Connect

    Brent L. Iverson; George Georgiou; Mohammad M. Ataai; Richard R. Koepsel

    2001-02-22

    The Broad, long term objective of the research plan is to develop exquisitely selective polypeptide metal chelators for the remediation of aqueous systems. A variety of polypeptide chelators will be developed and optimized ranging from antibodies to small peptides. Then, through unique molecular engineering approaches developed in our laboratories, the polypeptide chelators will be anchored directly on the surface of the cells that produce them. Thus, instead of using isolated biomolecules we will employ inexpensive genetically engineered whole cell adsorbents. Following a simple, easily scaleable treatment, the engineered cells can be used to manufacture an inexpensive, particulate adsorbent for metal removal.

  1. Losartan sensitizes selectively prostate cancer cell to ionizing radiation.

    PubMed

    Yazdannejat, H; Hosseinimehr, S J; Ghasemi, A; Pourfallah, T A; Rafiei, A

    2016-01-11

    Losartan is an angiotensin II receptor (AT-II-R) blocker that is widely used by human for blood pressure regulation. Also, it has antitumor property. In this study, we investigated the radiosensitizing effect of losartan on cellular toxicity induced by ionizing radiation on prostate cancer and non-malignant fibroblast cells. Human prostate cancer (DU-145) and human non-malignant fibroblast cells (HFFF2) were treated with losartan at different concentrations (0.5, 1, 10, 50 and 100 µM) and then these cells were exposed to ionizing radiation. The cell proliferation was determined using MTT assay. Our results showed that losartan exhibited antitumor effect on prostate cancer cells; it was reduced cell survival to 66% at concentration 1 µM. Losartan showed an additive killing effect in combination with ionizing radiation on prostate cancer cell. The cell proliferation was reduced to 54% in the prostate cancer cells treated with losartan at concentration 1 µM in combination with ionizing radiation. Losartan did not exhibit any toxicity on HFFF2 cell. This result shows a promising effect of losartan on enhancement of therapeutic effect of ionizing radiation in patients during therapy.

  2. SELECTION WITH THE MAGNET AND CULTIVATION OF RETICULO-ENDOTHELIAL CELLS (KUPFFER CELLS)

    PubMed Central

    Rous, Peyton; Beard, J. W.

    1934-01-01

    Methods and apparatus are described where with living Kupffer cells can be procured from the liver of the rabbit and the dog for study and cultivation in vitro. Almost none of these cells can be dislodged from the normal liver by forcible perfusion; but after they have taken up finely particulate matter (India ink, iron oxide), they come away in great numbers. When they have phagocyted ferromagnetic iron oxide they can be selected with a magnet from amongst the blood elements present in suspension with them; and they are obtainable in quantity by this means. They do poorly when plated in a thin plasma clot, failing to multiply or to assume their characteristic shape; but they flourish when allowed to attach themselves to strands of lens paper bathed in serum that is frequently changed. Bacterial infection of serum cultures of Kupffer cells from normal rabbits and dogs occurs only as the result of secondary contamination of the materials, whereas it regularly develops in cultures from animals with fever induced by the injection of nucleic acid or of killed B. prodigiosus. Kupffer cells obtained under such conditions are abnormally active, and some can be washed out of the liver of sick animals in the absence of any preliminary phagocytosis of particulate matter. The facts have a bearing both on the conditions conducing to blood invasion and on the response of the Kupffer cells in the emergency. The characters of the isolated Kupffer cells and the results of tests of their presumptive functions will be described in later papers. PMID:19870267

  3. Selective cytotoxicity of benzyl isothiocyanate in the proliferating fibroblastoid cells.

    PubMed

    Miyoshi, Noriyuki; Uchida, Koji; Osawa, Toshihiko; Nakamura, Yoshimasa

    2007-02-01

    In the present study, experiments using presynchronization culture cells demonstrated that benzyl ITC (BITC), previously isolated from a tropical papaya fruit extract, induced the cytotoxic effect preferentially in the proliferating human colon CCD-18Co cells to the quiescent ones. Quiescent CCD-18Co cells were virtually unaffected by BITC and marginal cytotoxicity was observed at 15 microM. We observed that BITC dramatically induced the p53 phosphorylation and stabilization only in the quiescent (G(0)/G(1) phase-arrested) cells, but not significantly in the proliferating human colon CCD-18Co cells when compared with quiescent ones. We also observed ataxia telangiectasia-mutated (ATM) phosphorylation in the quiescent cells. The BITC-induced p53 phosphorylation was counteracted by caffeine treatment, implying the involvement of an ATM/ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3-related kinase signaling pathway. Moreover, downregulation of p53 by a siRNA resulted in the enhancement of susceptibility to undergo apoptosis by BITC. We also showed here that depletion of p53 abrogated G(0)/G(1) arrest accompanied by the declined expression of p21(waf1/cip1) and p27(kip1) in CCD-18Co cells. In conclusion, we identified p53 as a potential negative regulator of the apoptosis induction by BITC in the normal colon CCD-18Co cells through the inhibition of cell-cycle progression at the G(0)/G(1) phase.

  4. [The role of IRA B cells in selected inflammatory processes].

    PubMed

    Zasada, Magdalena; Rutkowska-Zapała, Magdalena; Lenart, Marzena; Kwinta, Przemko

    2016-03-16

    The first report about the discovery of new, previously unknown immune cells named IRA B cells (innate response activator B cells) appeared in 2012. So far, their presence has been verified in both mice and humans. However, IRA B cells belong to the family of B lymphocytes and have a number of characteristics unique to this group of cells. IRA B cells are formed from activated B1a lymphocytes after their contact with a pathogen. B1a lymphocytes mainly reside within body cavities. Activated by the pathogen, they move on into secondary lymphoid organs (spleen, lymph nodes) where they differentiate into IRA B cells. IRA B cells are a rich source of granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF). GM-CSF can stimulate IRA B cells in an autocrine manner for the secretion of intracellular stocks of immunoglobulin M (IgM), which can facilitate pathogens' phagocytosis by neutrophils. GM-CSF also stimulates neutrophils into active phagocytosis. Rapid eradication of the pathogen can prevent the development of an excessive inflammatory response, which can be dangerous for the organism. Until now the involvement of IRA B lymphocytes in the pathogenesis of sepsis and pneumonia has been proven, as well as their role in the progression of atherosclerotic lesions in mice. There is research in progress on the possibility of increasing the number of IRA B cells, for example by intravenous supply of modified immunoglobulins. It is necessary to characterize human IRA B cells and to determine their role in the functioning of the immune system.

  5. Bacterial IMPDH gene used for the selection of mammalian cell transfectants.

    SciTech Connect

    Baccam, M.; Huberman, E.; Energy Systems

    2003-06-01

    Stable cell transfection is used for the expression of exogenous genes or cDNAs in eukaryotic cells. Selection of these transfectants requires a dominant selectable marker. A variety of such markers has been identified and is currently in use. However, many of these are not suitable for all cell types or require unique conditions. Here we describe a simple and versatile dominant selectable marker that involves bacterial IMP dehydrogenase (IMPDH), an enzyme essential for the replication of mammalian and bacterial cells. Although IMPDH is evolutionarily conserved, the bacterial enzyme is orders of magnitude more resistant to the toxic effect of the drug mycophenolic acid, which is an IMPDH inhibitor. We have demonstrated that transfection of human, monkey or Chinese hamster cell lines with an expression vector containing bacterial IMPDH and mycophenolic acid treatment resulted in the selection of colonies with a strikingly increased resistance to mycophenolic acid toxicity. Analysis of cells derived from these colonies indicated that the acquisition of this resistance was associated with bacterial IMPDH protein expression. As a proof of principle, we showed that mammalian cell transfection with a hicistronic IMPDH/GFP expression vector and mycophenolic acid treatment can he used to successfully select transfectants that express the fluorescent protein. These results indicate that bacterial IMPDH is a practical dominant selectable marker that can be used for the selection of transfectants that express exogenous genes or cDNAs in mammalian cells.

  6. RESEARCH ON CELL WALL CYTOCHEMISTRY OF SELECTED FUNGI.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    that the resistant material in their cell walls is chitin. All efforts to identify cellulose produced negative results. Solutions of chitinase ...fungi examined, especially Heterocephalum aurantiacum Plastid-like structures in the protoplasts are the cell organs which produce chitin. Chitin

  7. Unconventional myosin traffic in cells reveals a selective actin cytoskeleton

    PubMed Central

    Brawley, Crista M.; Rock, Ronald S.

    2009-01-01

    Eukaryotic cells have a self-organizing cytoskeleton where motors transport cargoes along cytoskeletal tracks. To understand the sorting process, we developed a system to observe single-molecule motility in a cellular context. We followed myosin classes V, VI, and X on triton-extracted actin cytoskeletons from Drosophila S2, mammalian COS-7, and mammalian U2OS cells. We find that these cells vary considerably in their global traffic patterns. The S2 and U2OS cells have regions of actin that either enhance or inhibit specific myosin classes. U2OS cells allow for 1 motor class, myosin VI, to move along stress fiber bundles, while motility of myosin V and X are suppressed. Myosin X motors are recruited to filopodia and the lamellar edge in S2 cells, whereas myosin VI motility is excluded from the same regions. Furthermore, we also see different velocities of myosin V motors in central regions of S2 cells, suggesting regional control of motor motility by the actin cytoskeleton. We also find unexpected features of the actin cytoskeletal network, including a population of reversed filaments with the barbed-end toward the cell center. This myosin motor regulation demonstrates that native actin cytoskeletons are more than just a collection of filaments. PMID:19478066

  8. Murine thymic selection quantified using a unique method to capture deleted T cells.

    PubMed

    Stritesky, Gretta L; Xing, Yan; Erickson, Jami R; Kalekar, Lokesh A; Wang, Xiaodan; Mueller, Daniel L; Jameson, Stephen C; Hogquist, Kristin A

    2013-03-19

    Thymic positive and negative selection events generate a T-cell repertoire that is MHC restricted and self-tolerant. The number of T cells undergoing positive and negative selection in normal mice has never been firmly established. We generated mice that lack the proapoptotic molecule Bim (bcl2l11) together with a Nur77(GFP) transgene, which allowed the identification and enumeration of T cells that would normally undergo clonal deletion. Using this method, we report the striking observation that six times more cells undergo negative selection than complete positive selection. Seventy-five percent of the negatively selected cells are deleted at the double positive stage in the thymic cortex, compared with 25% at the single positive stage in the medulla. The fact that more thymocytes are highly reactive to MHC than are weakly reactive is inconsistent with a random model of recognition and suggests that T-cell recognition is MHC biased. Furthermore, Bim(-/-) mice had an increased number of GFP(hi) cells in the peripheral lymphoid tissue and a corresponding increase in antigen experienced or anergic cell phenotype. Our data also show that the CD4+ T cells that are clonally deleted experienced only slightly stronger T-cell receptor signaling than those that developed into regulatory T cells.

  9. Effect of selected flavones on cancer and endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Pilátová, Martina; Stupáková, Viktória; Varinská, Lenka; Sarisský, Marek; Mirossay, Ladislav; Mirossay, Andrej; Gál, Peter; Kraus, Vladimír; Dianisková, Katarína; Mojzis, Ján

    2010-06-01

    In our study we used quercetin (3,3 ,4 ,5,7-pentahydroxyflavone) as the reference standard to compare antiproliferative and antiangiogenic effects of chrysin (5,7-dihydroxyflavone) and 3-hydroxyflavone. Our data indicates that chrysin and 3-hydroxyflavone showed significantly higher cytotoxic effect than reference standard quercetin. These tested agents significantly decreased cell survival with the efficacy of 65-85% at the concentration 100 micromol/l for HUVEC, lung carcinoma and leukemic cells being the most sensitive. Cell cycle analysis indicates that quercetin and 3-hydroxyflavone might affect the cell cycle of Jurkat cells by a similar or the same mechanism of action which lead to G2/M arrest as well as to an increase in sub-G0/G1 fraction. Treatment of Jurkat cells with chrysin resulted only increase in the fraction of cells with sub-G0/G1 DNA content, which is considered to be a marker of apoptotic cell death. Apoptosis was confirmed by DNA fragmentation and by staining with annexin V. All three tested flavones inhibited endothelial cell migration after 24 h of incubation at a concentration 100 micromol/l. At a lower concentration (10 micromol/l) only quercetin significantly inhibited migration of endothelial cells. Furthermore, in our experiments decreased secretion of matrix metalloproteinases (MMP-2 and MMP-9) was observed after a 72 h treatment with quercetin. No decrease in secretion of MMP-2 and MMP-9 was seen after chrysin and 3-hydroxyflavone treatment. On the other hand, our results showed that none of three flavonoids blocked microcapillary tube formation. Further studies are necessary to investigate the mechanism of action and to find out the relationship between the structure, character and position of substituents of natural substances and their biological activities.

  10. Functional polyesters enable selective siRNA delivery to lung cancer over matched normal cells

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Yunfeng; Liu, Li; Xiong, Hu; Miller, Jason B.; Zhou, Kejin; Kos, Petra; Huffman, Kenneth E.; Elkassih, Sussana; Norman, John W.; Carstens, Ryan; Kim, James; Minna, John D.; Siegwart, Daniel J.

    2016-01-01

    Conventional chemotherapeutics nonselectively kill all rapidly dividing cells, which produces numerous side effects. To address this challenge, we report the discovery of functional polyesters that are capable of delivering siRNA drugs selectively to lung cancer cells and not to normal lung cells. Selective polyplex nanoparticles (NPs) were identified by high-throughput library screening on a unique pair of matched cancer/normal cell lines obtained from a single patient. Selective NPs promoted rapid endocytosis into HCC4017 cancer cells, but were arrested at the membrane of HBEC30-KT normal cells during the initial transfection period. When injected into tumor xenografts in mice, cancer-selective NPs were retained in tumors for over 1 wk, whereas nonselective NPs were cleared within hours. This translated to improved siRNA-mediated cancer cell apoptosis and significant suppression of tumor growth. Selective NPs were also able to mediate gene silencing in xenograft and orthotopic tumors via i.v. injection or aerosol inhalation, respectively. Importantly, this work highlights that different cells respond differentially to the same drug carrier, an important factor that should be considered in the design and evaluation of all NP carriers. Because no targeting ligands are required, these functional polyester NPs provide an exciting alternative approach for selective drug delivery to tumor cells that may improve efficacy and reduce adverse side effects of cancer therapies. PMID:27621434

  11. Cell-selective encapsulation in hydrogel sheaths via biospecific identification and biochemical cross-linking.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Shinji; Liu, Yang; Sengoku, Mikako; Taya, Masahito

    2015-01-01

    Selective encapsulation of a particular cell population from heterogeneous cell populations has potential applications such as studies in cell-to-cell communication, regenerative medicine, and cell therapies. However, there are no versatile methods for realizing this. Here we report a method based on biospecific identification of the target cells through antigen-antibody reaction and subsequent enzymatic hydrogel sheath formation on the cell surfaces by horseradish peroxidase (HRP). Human hepatoma cell line HepG2 cells were selectively encapsulated in alginate-based hydrogel sheath from the mixture with mouse embryo fibroblast-like cell line 10T1/2 fibroblasts using anti-human CD326 antibody conjugated with HRP. The viability of the encapsulated cells was 93%. The cells released at 6 days of the encapsulation by degrading the sheath using alginate lyase grew almost the same as those free from encapsulation. The versatility of the method was confirmed using another antibody, cells, and hydrogel sheath material: Only human vein endothelial cells were encapsulated in gelatin-based hydrogel sheath from the mixture with 10T1/2 fibroblasts using anti-human CD31 antibody conjugated with HRP. The cell-selective encapsulation was also achieved by a system using a primary antibody with a secondary antibody conjugated with HRP.

  12. A cortical region consisting entirely of face-selective cells.

    PubMed

    Tsao, Doris Y; Freiwald, Winrich A; Tootell, Roger B H; Livingstone, Margaret S

    2006-02-03

    Face perception is a skill crucial to primates. In both humans and macaque monkeys, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) reveals a system of cortical regions that show increased blood flow when the subject views images of faces, compared with images of objects. However, the stimulus selectivity of single neurons within these fMRI-identified regions has not been studied. We used fMRI to identify and target the largest face-selective region in two macaques for single-unit recording. Almost all (97%) of the visually responsive neurons in this region were strongly face selective, indicating that a dedicated cortical area exists to support face processing in the macaque.

  13. Thymic Selection of T-Cell Receptors as an Extreme Value Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosmrlj, Andrej; Chakraborty, Arup K.; Kardar, Mehran; Shakhnovich, Eugene I.

    2010-03-01

    T lymphocytes (T cells) orchestrate adaptive immune responses that clear pathogens from infected hosts. T cells recognize short peptides (p) derived from foreign proteins, which are bound to major histocompatibility complex (MHC) gene products (displayed on antigen- presenting cells). Recognition occurs when T cell receptor (TCR) proteins expressed on T cells bind sufficiently strongly to antigen- derived pMHC complexes on the surface of antigen-presenting cells. A diverse repertoire of self-tolerant TCR sequences is shaped during development of T cells in the thymus by processes called positive and negative selection. We map thymic selection processes to an extreme value problem and provide analytic expression for the amino acid composition of selected TCR sequences (which enable its recognition functions).

  14. Selective histone deacetylase 6 inhibitors bearing substituted urea linkers inhibit melanoma cell growth

    PubMed Central

    Bergman, Joel A.; Woan, Karrune; Perez-Villarroel, Patricio; Villagra, Alejandro; Sotomayor, Eduardo M.; Kozikowski, Alan P.

    2012-01-01

    The incidence of malignant melanoma has dramatically increased in recent years thus requiring the need for improved therapeutic strategies. In our efforts to design selective histone deactylase inhibitors (HDACI), we discovered that the aryl urea 1 is a modestly potent yet non-selective inhibitor. Structure activity relationship studies revealed that adding substituents to the nitrogen atom of the urea so as to generate compounds bearing a branched linker group results in increased potency and selectivity for HDAC6. Compound 5g shows low nanomolar inhibitory potency against HDAC6 and a selectivity of ~600-fold relative to the inhibition of HDAC1. These HDACIs were evaluated for their ability to inhibit the growth of B16 melanoma cells with the most potent and selective HDAC6I being found to decrease tumor cell growth. To the best of our knowledge, this work constitutes the first report of HDAC6 selective inhibitors that possess antiproliferative effects against melanoma cells. PMID:23009203

  15. High-selectivity cytology via lab-on-a-disc western blotting of individual cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, John J; Sinkala, Elly; Herr, Amy E

    2017-02-28

    Cytology of sparingly available cell samples from both clinical and experimental settings would benefit from high-selectivity protein tools. To minimize cell handling losses in sparse samples, we design a multi-stage assay using a lab-on-a-disc that integrates cell handling and subsequent single-cell western blotting (scWestern). As the two-layer microfluidic device rotates, the induced centrifugal force directs dissociated cells to dams, which in turn localize the cells over microwells. Cells then sediment into the microwells, where the cells are lysed and subjected to scWestern. Taking into account cell losses from loading, centrifugation, and lysis-buffer exchange, our lab-on-a-disc device handles cell samples with as few as 200 cells with 75% cell settling efficiencies. Over 70% of microwells contain single cells after the centrifugation. In addition to cell settling efficiency, cell-size filtration from a mixed population of two cell lines is also realized by tuning the cell time-of-flight during centrifugation (58.4% settling efficiency with 6.4% impurity). Following the upstream cell handling, scWestern analysis detects four proteins (GFP, β-TUB, GAPDH, and STAT3) in a glioblastoma cell line. By integrating the lab-on-a-disc cell preparation and scWestern analysis, our platform measures proteins from sparse cell samples at single-cell resolution.

  16. Ionene polymers for selectively inhibiting the vitro growth of malignant cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rembaum, Alan (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    Ionene polymers of the structure ##STR1## WHERE X AND Y ARE INTEGERS FROM 3 TO 16, Z.sup.- is an anion such as a halogen and n is an integer from 50 to 150 are found to bind negatively charged mammalian cells such as malignant cells and can be utilized to selectively inhibit the growth of malignant cells in vitro.

  17. Live cell cytoplasm staining and selective labeling of intracellular proteins by non-toxic cell-permeant thiophene fluorophores.

    PubMed

    Di Maria, F; Palamà, I E; Baroncini, M; Barbieri, A; Bongini, A; Bizzarri, R; Gigli, G; Barbarella, G

    2014-03-14

    A structurally correlated series of cell-permeant thiophene fluorophores, characterized by intense green or red fluorescence inside live mouse embryonic fibroblasts, was developed. The fluorophores displayed rapid internalization, excellent retention inside the cells, and high optical stability in the cytosolic environment and did not alter cell viability and reproducibility. Depending on the molecular structure, they experienced distinct fate inside the cells: from bright and lasting staining of the cytoplasm to selective tagging of a small set of globular proteins.

  18. Preliminary evidence of different selection pressures on cancer cells as compared to normal tissues

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Cancer is characterized by both a high mutation rate as well as high rates of cell division and cell death. We postulate that these conditions will result in the eventual mutational inactivation of genes not essential to the survival of the cancer cell, while mutations in essential genes will be eliminated by natural selection leaving molecular signatures of selection in genes required for survival and reproduction. By looking for signatures of natural selection in the genomes of cancer cells, it should therefore be possible to determine which genes have been essential for the development of a particular cancer. Methods We provide a proof of principle test of this idea by applying a test of neutrality (Nei-Gojobori Z-test of selection) to 139 cancer-related nucleotide sequences obtained from GenBank representing 46 cancer-derived genes. Results Among cancer associated sequences, 10 genes showed molecular evidence of selection. Of these 10 genes, four showed molecular evidence of selection in non-cancer transcripts. Among non-cancer associated sequences, eight genes showed molecular evidence of selection, with four of these also showing selection in the cancer associated sequences. Conclusions These results provide preliminary evidence that the same genes may experience different selection pressures within normal and cancer tissues. Application of this technique could identify genes under unique selection pressure in cancer tissues and thereby indicate possible targets for therapeutic intervention. PMID:23146329

  19. Selective elimination of leukemia stem cells: hitting a moving target.

    PubMed

    Crews, Leslie A; Jamieson, Catriona H M

    2013-09-10

    Despite the widespread use of chemotherapeutic cytotoxic agents that eradicate proliferating cell populations, patients suffering from a wide variety of malignancies continue to relapse as a consequence of resistance to standard therapies. In hematologic malignancies, leukemia stem cells (LSCs) represent a malignant reservoir of disease that is believed to drive relapse and resistance to chemotherapy and tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKIs). Major research efforts in recent years have been aimed at identifying and characterizing the LSC population in leukemias, such as chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), which represents an important paradigm for understanding the molecular evolution of cancer. However, the precise molecular mechanisms that promote LSC-mediated therapeutic recalcitrance have remained elusive. It has become clear that the LSC population evolves during disease progression, thus presenting a serious challenge for development of effective therapeutic strategies. Multiple reports have demonstrated that LSC initiation and propagation occurs as a result of aberrant activation of pro-survival and self-renewal pathways regulated by stem-cell related signaling molecules including β-catenin and Sonic Hedgehog (Shh). Enhanced survival in LSC protective microenvironments, such as the bone marrow niche, as well as acquired dormancy of cells in these niches, also contributes to LSC persistence. Key components of these cell-intrinsic and cell-extrinsic pathways provide novel potential targets for therapies aimed at eradicating this dynamic and therapeutically recalcitrant LSC population. Furthermore, combination strategies that exploit LSC have the potential to dramatically improve the quality and quantity of life for patients that are resistant to current therapies.

  20. Engineering of Targeted Nanoparticles for Cancer Therapy Using Internalizing Aptamers Isolated by Cell-Uptake Selection

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Zeyu; Levy-Nissenbaum, Etgar; Alexis, Frank; Lupták, Andrej; Teply, Benjamin A.; Chan, Juliana M.; Shi, Jinjun; Digga, Elise; Cheng, Judy; Langer, Robert; Farokhzad, Omid C.

    2012-01-01

    One of the major challenges in the development of targeted nanoparticles (NPs) for cancer therapy is to discover targeting ligands that allow for differential binding and uptake by the target cancer cells. Using prostate cancer (PCa) as a model disease, we developed a cell-uptake selection strategy to isolate PCa-specific internalizing 2'-Omethyl RNA aptamers (Apts) for NP incorporation. Twelve cycles of selection and counter-selection were done to obtain a panel of internalizing Apts, which can distinguish PCa cells from non-prostate and normal prostate cells. After Apt characterization, size minimization, and conjugation of the Apts with fluorescently-labeled polymeric NPs, the NP-Apt bioconjugates exhibit PCa specificity and enhancement in cellular uptake when compared to non-targeted NPs lacking the internalizing Apts. Furthermore, when docetaxel, a chemotherapeutic agent used for the treatment of PCa, was encapsulated within the NP-Apt, a significant improvement in cytotoxicity was achieved in targeted PCa cells. Rather than isolating high-affinity Apts as reported in previous selection processes, our selection strategy was designed to enrich cancer-cell specific internalizing Apts. A similar cell-uptake selection strategy may be used to develop specific internalizing ligands for a myriad of other diseases and can potentially facilitate delivering various molecules, including drugs and siRNAs, into cells. PMID:22214176

  1. In Vitro Selection of Cancer Cell-Specific Molecular Recognition Elements from Amino Acid Libraries

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Ryan M.; Sooter, Letha J.

    2015-01-01

    Differential cell systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX) is an in vitro selection method for obtaining molecular recognition elements (MREs) that specifically bind to individual cell types with high affinity. MREs are selected from initial large libraries of different nucleic or amino acids. This review outlines the construction of peptide and antibody fragment libraries as well as their different host types. Common methods of selection are also reviewed. Additionally, examples of cancer cell MREs are discussed, as well as their potential applications. PMID:26436100

  2. High affinity nanobodies against human epidermal growth factor receptor selected on cells by E. coli display

    PubMed Central

    Salema, Valencio; Mañas, Carmen; Cerdán, Lidia; Piñero-Lambea, Carlos; Marín, Elvira; Roovers, Rob C.; Van Bergen en Henegouwen, Paul M.P.; Fernández, Luis Ángel

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Most therapeutic antibodies (Abs) target cell surface proteins on tumor and immune cells. Cloning of Ab gene libraries in E. coli and their display on bacteriophages is commonly used to select novel therapeutic Abs binding target antigens, either purified or expressed on cells. However, the sticky nature of bacteriophages renders phage display selections on cells challenging. We previously reported an E. coli display system for expression of VHHs (i.e., nanobodies, Nbs) on the surface of bacteria and selection of high-affinity clones by magnetic cell sorting (MACS). Here, we demonstrate that E. coli display is also an attractive method for isolation of Nbs against cell surface antigens, such as the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), upon direct selection and screening of Ab libraries on live cells. We employ a whole cell-based strategy using a VHH library obtained by immunization with human tumor cells over-expressing EGFR (i.e., A431), and selection of bacterial clones bound to murine fibroblast NIH-3T3 cells transfected with human EGFR, after depletion of non-specific clones on untransfected cells. This strategy resulted in the isolation of high-affinity Nbs binding distinct epitopes of EGFR, including Nbs competing with the ligand, EGF, as characterized by flow cytometry of bacteria displaying the Nbs and binding assays with purified Nbs using surface plasmon resonance. Hence, our study demonstrates that E. coli display of VHH libraries and selection on cells enables efficient isolation and characterization of high-affinity Nbs against cell surface antigens. PMID:27472381

  3. High affinity nanobodies against human epidermal growth factor receptor selected on cells by E. coli display.

    PubMed

    Salema, Valencio; Mañas, Carmen; Cerdán, Lidia; Piñero-Lambea, Carlos; Marín, Elvira; Roovers, Rob C; Van Bergen En Henegouwen, Paul M P; Fernández, Luis Ángel

    2016-10-01

    Most therapeutic antibodies (Abs) target cell surface proteins on tumor and immune cells. Cloning of Ab gene libraries in E. coli and their display on bacteriophages is commonly used to select novel therapeutic Abs binding target antigens, either purified or expressed on cells. However, the sticky nature of bacteriophages renders phage display selections on cells challenging. We previously reported an E. coli display system for expression of VHHs (i.e., nanobodies, Nbs) on the surface of bacteria and selection of high-affinity clones by magnetic cell sorting (MACS). Here, we demonstrate that E. coli display is also an attractive method for isolation of Nbs against cell surface antigens, such as the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), upon direct selection and screening of Ab libraries on live cells. We employ a whole cell-based strategy using a VHH library obtained by immunization with human tumor cells over-expressing EGFR (i.e., A431), and selection of bacterial clones bound to murine fibroblast NIH-3T3 cells transfected with human EGFR, after depletion of non-specific clones on untransfected cells. This strategy resulted in the isolation of high-affinity Nbs binding distinct epitopes of EGFR, including Nbs competing with the ligand, EGF, as characterized by flow cytometry of bacteria displaying the Nbs and binding assays with purified Nbs using surface plasmon resonance. Hence, our study demonstrates that E. coli display of VHH libraries and selection on cells enables efficient isolation and characterization of high-affinity Nbs against cell surface antigens.

  4. Bioconversion of piceid to resveratrol by selected probiotic cell extracts.

    PubMed

    Basholli-Salihu, Mimoza; Schuster, Roswitha; Mulla, Dafina; Praznik, Werner; Viernstein, Helmut; Mueller, Monika

    2016-12-01

    Resveratrol exerts several pharmacological activities, including anti-cancer, anti-inflammatory, cardioprotective, or antioxidant effects. However, due to its occurrence in plants more in glycosidic form as piceid, the bioavailability and bioactivity are limited. The enzymatic potential of probiotics for the transformation of piceid to resveratrol was elucidated. Cell extract from Bifidobacteria (B.) infantis, B. bifidum, Lactobacillus (L.) casei, L. plantarum, and L. acidophilus was evaluated for their effect in this bioconversion using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) as analytical tool. Cell extract of B. infantis showed the highest effect on the deglycosylation of piceid to resveratrol, already after 30 min. Cell extracts of all other tested strains showed a significant biotransformation with no further metabolization of resveratrol. The conversion of piceid to resveratrol is of importance to increase bioavailability and bioactivity as shown for anti-inflammation in this study. Cell extracts from probiotics, especially from B. infantis, may be added to piceid containing products, for achieving higher biological effects caused by the bioactivity of resveratrol or by health promoting of the probiotics. These findings open a new perspective of novel combination of cell extracts from probiotics and piceid, in health-promoting pharmaceutical and food products.

  5. Selecting MODFLOW cell sizes for accurate flow fields.

    PubMed

    Haitjema, H; Kelson, V; de Lange, W

    2001-01-01

    Contaminant transport models often use a velocity field derived from a MODFLOW flow field. Consequently, the accuracy of MODFLOW in representing a ground water flow field determines in part the accuracy of the transport predictions, particularly when advective transport is dominant. We compared MODFLOW ground water flow rates and MODPATH particle traces (advective transport) for a variety of conceptual models and different grid spacings to exact or approximate analytic solutions. All of our numerical experiments concerned flow in a single confined or semiconfined aquifer. While MODFLOW appeared robust in terms of both local and global water balance, we found that ground water flow rates, particle traces, and associated ground water travel times are accurate only when sufficiently small cells are used. For instance, a minimum of four or five cells are required to accurately model total ground water inflow in tributaries or other narrow surface water bodies that end inside the model domain. Also, about 50 cells are needed to represent zones of differing transmissivities or an incorrect flow field and (locally) inaccurate ground water travel times may result. Finally, to adequately represent leakage through aquitards or through the bottom of surface water bodies it was found that the maximum allowable cell dimensions should not exceed a characteristic leakage length lambda, which is defined as the square root of the aquifer transmissivity times the resistance of the aquitard or stream bottom. In some cases a cell size of one-tenth of lambda is necessary to obtain accurate results.

  6. Ferrocifen derivatives that induce senescence in cancer cells: selected examples.

    PubMed

    Bruyère, Céline; Mathieu, Véronique; Vessières, Anne; Pigeon, Pascal; Top, Siden; Jaouen, Gérard; Kiss, Robert

    2014-12-01

    Platinum coordination complexes represent an important class of anti-tumor agents. Due to recognized drawbacks, research into other types of metallodrugs has been diversified with the aim of finding new chemical entities with alternative mechanisms of action to overcome classical chemoresistance. P5 and DP1, two closely related ferrocenyl complexes bearing a similar ferrocenyl-ene-phenyl motif and displaying marked differences in their conformations and oxidation state versatility, were assayed in cancer cell models characterized by various sensitivities to pro-apoptotic stimuli. P5 and DP1 exert growth inhibitory effects between 0.5 and 10 μM against glioma and melanoma cells including pluripotent stem-like cells. These effects are due, at least partly, to senescence induction with typical SA-β-galactosidase staining and senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP) as measured by the secretion of IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8 and TNF-α. Regulation of these cytokines' secretion may be related to AP-1 and other transcription factors unrelated to senescence. An in vivo graft of B16F10 cells after in vitro pre-incubation with DP1 or P5 led to increased survival in mice. In conclusion, P5 and DP1 ferrocenyl complexes induce senescence in various cancer cell models associated with distinct sensitivity to pro-apoptotic stimuli.

  7. Selectivity of biopolymer membranes using HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Lü, Dongyuan; Gao, Yuxin; Luo, Chunhua; Lü, Shouqian; Wang, Qian; Xu, Xianghong; Sun, Shujin; Wang, Chengzhi; Long, Mian

    2015-03-01

    Bioartificial liver (BAL) system has emerged as an alternative treatment to bridge acute liver failure to either liver transplantation or liver regeneration. One of the main reasons that the efficacy of the current BAL systems was not convincing in clinical trials is attributed to the lack of friendly interface between the membrane and the hepatocytes in liver bioreactor, the core unit of BAL system. Here, we systematically compared the biological responses of hepatosarcoma HepG2 cells seeded on eight, commercially available biocompatible membranes made of acetyl cellulose-nitrocellulose mixed cellulose (CA-NC), acetyl cellulose (CA), nylon (JN), polypropylene (PP), nitrocellulose (NC), polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF), polycarbonate (PC) and polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE). Physicochemical analysis and mechanical tests indicated that CA, JN and PP membranes yield high adhesivity and reasonable compressive and/or tensile features with friendly surface topography for cell seeding. Cells prefer to adhere on CA, JN, PP or PTFE membranes with high proliferation rate in spheriod-like shape. Actin, albumin and cytokeratin 18 expressions are favorable for cells on CA or PP membrane, whereas protein filtration is consistent among all the eight membranes. These results further the understandings of cell growth, morphology and spreading, as well as protein filtration on distinct membranes in designing a liver bioreactor.

  8. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in sickle cell disease: patient selection and special considerations

    PubMed Central

    Bhatia, Monica; Sheth, Sujit

    2015-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation remains the only curative treatment currently in use for patients with sickle cell disease (SCD). The first successful hematopoietic stem cell transplantation was performed in 1984. To date, approximately 1,200 transplants have been reported. Given the high prevalence of this disorder in Africa, and its emergence in the developed world through immigration, this number is relatively small. There are many reasons for this; primary among them are the availability of a donor, the risks associated with this complex procedure, and the cost and availability of resources in the developing world. Of these, it is fair to say that the risks associated with the procedure have steadily decreased to the point where, if currently performed in a center with experience using a matched sibling donor, overall survival is close to 100% and event-free survival is over 90%. While there is little controversy around offering hematopoietic stem cell transplantation to symptomatic SCD patients with a matched sibling donor, there is much debate surrounding the use of this modality in “less severe” patients. An overview of the current state of our understanding of the pathology and treatment of SCD is important to show that our current strategy is not having the desired impact on survival of homozygous SCD patients, and should be changed to significantly impact the small proportion of these patients who have matched siblings and could be cured, especially those without overt clinical manifestations. Both patient families and providers must be made to understand the progressive nature of SCD, and should be encouraged to screen full siblings of patients with homozygous SCD for their potential to be donors. Matched siblings should be referred to an experienced transplant center for evaluation and counseling. In this review, we will discuss the rationale for these opinions and make recommendations for patient selection. PMID:26203293

  9. Selection of optimal sensors for predicting performance of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Lei; Jackson, Lisa

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, sensor selection algorithms are investigated based on a sensitivity analysis, and the capability of optimal sensors in predicting PEM fuel cell performance is also studied using test data. The fuel cell model is developed for generating the sensitivity matrix relating sensor measurements and fuel cell health parameters. From the sensitivity matrix, two sensor selection approaches, including the largest gap method, and exhaustive brute force searching technique, are applied to find the optimal sensors providing reliable predictions. Based on the results, a sensor selection approach considering both sensor sensitivity and noise resistance is proposed to find the optimal sensor set with minimum size. Furthermore, the performance of the optimal sensor set is studied to predict fuel cell performance using test data from a PEM fuel cell system. Results demonstrate that with optimal sensors, the performance of PEM fuel cell can be predicted with good quality.

  10. CARbodies: Human Antibodies Against Cell Surface Tumor Antigens Selected From Repertoires Displayed on T Cell Chimeric Antigen Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Alonso-Camino, Vanesa; Sánchez-Martín, David; Compte, Marta; Nuñez-Prado, Natalia; Diaz, Rosa M; Vile, Richard; Alvarez-Vallina, Luis

    2013-01-01

    A human single-chain variable fragment (scFv) antibody library was expressed on the surface of human T cells after transduction with lentiviral vectors (LVs). The repertoire was fused to a first-generation T cell receptor ζ (TCRζ)-based chimeric antigen receptor (CAR). We used this library to isolate antibodies termed CARbodies that recognize antigens expressed on the tumor cell surface in a proof-of-principle system. After three rounds of activation-selection there was a clear repertoire restriction, with the emergence dominant clones. The CARbodies were purified from bacterial cultures as soluble and active proteins. Furthermore, to validate its potential application for adoptive cell therapy, human T cells were transduced with a LV encoding a second-generation costimulatory CAR (CARv2) bearing the selected CARbodies. Transduced human primary T cells expressed significant levels of the CARbodies-based CARv2 fusion protein on the cell surface, and importantly could be specifically activated, after stimulation with tumor cells. This approach is a promising tool for the generation of antibodies fully adapted to the display format (CAR) and the selection context (cell synapse), which could extend the scope of current adoptive cell therapy strategies with CAR-redirected T cells. PMID:23695536

  11. Copper conducting electrode with nickel as a seed layer for selective emitter crystalline silicon solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ur Rehman, Atteq; Shin, Eun Gu; Lee, Soo Hong

    2014-09-01

    In this research, we investigated selective emitter formation with a single-step photolithography process having a metallization scheme composed of nickel/copper metal stacks. The nickel seed layers were deposited by applying the electroless deposition process while copper was formed by light induced electro-plating arrangements as the main conducting electrode. The electroless deposition of nickel, along with a sintering process, was employed to create a diffusion barrier between copper and silicon. The nickel metal stack below the copper-conducting electrode also helped in lowering the sheet resistance and improving the contact adhesion. The nickel used as a seed layer was successfully demonstrated in the fabrication of a homogeneous 60 Ω/□ emitter and selective emitter cells. Lower series resistances of 0.165 Ω and 0.253 Ω were achieved for the selective emitter and the homogeneous emitter cells, respectively. The best cell efficiency of 18.37% for the selective emitter solar cell was achieved, with average cell efficiencies of 18.17% and 17.3% for the selective emitter and the homogeneous emitter cells, respectively. An approximate efficiency increase of about 0.8% was recorded for the selective emitter solar cells.

  12. Solid tumor therapy by selectively targeting stromal endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shihui; Liu, Jie; Ma, Qian; Cao, Liu; Fattah, Rasem J.; Yu, Zuxi; Bugge, Thomas H.; Finkel, Toren; Leppla, Stephen H.

    2016-01-01

    Engineered tumor-targeted anthrax lethal toxin proteins have been shown to strongly suppress growth of solid tumors in mice. These toxins work through the native toxin receptors tumor endothelium marker-8 and capillary morphogenesis protein-2 (CMG2), which, in other contexts, have been described as markers of tumor endothelium. We found that neither receptor is required for tumor growth. We further demonstrate that tumor cells, which are resistant to the toxin when grown in vitro, become highly sensitive when implanted in mice. Using a range of tissue-specific loss-of-function and gain-of-function genetic models, we determined that this in vivo toxin sensitivity requires CMG2 expression on host-derived tumor endothelial cells. Notably, engineered toxins were shown to suppress the proliferation of isolated tumor endothelial cells. Finally, we demonstrate that administering an immunosuppressive regimen allows animals to receive multiple toxin dosages and thereby produces a strong and durable antitumor effect. The ability to give repeated doses of toxins, coupled with the specific targeting of tumor endothelial cells, suggests that our strategy should be efficacious for a wide range of solid tumors. PMID:27357689

  13. Leveraging patterned ion implantation to develop high efficiency selective emitter solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniels, Kevin; Dubé, Christopher E.; Tsefrekas, Basil; Bhosle, Vikram; Mullin, James; Skinner, Wesley; Sullivan, Paul

    2012-11-01

    This paper reports the benefits of using patterned ion implantation to create higher efficiency selective emitter solar cells. This doping approach uses in-situ masking to enable selective doping of the contact and field regions of the emitter in a single step. The cell efficiency benefits of implantation versus current POCl3 diffusion processes are also explained, highlighting the improved junction quality, the ability to perform single side doping and the elimination of a junction isolation step which reduces cell efficiency. The implanted selective emitter solar cell process described reduces cell cost per watt through a combination of higher cell efficiency, improved cell binning and fewer process steps. Alignment between the doped regions of the solar cell and the subsequent downstream metallization process is key to enabling this process for adoption in PV manufacturing. The benefits for process integration of the implanted process will be described including the ability to optically align to the selectively implanted contact regions without additional alignment fiducial marks on the front of the cell. Experimental data yielding cell efficiencies of >19% are shown.

  14. Multifunctionalized iron oxide nanoparticles for selective drug delivery to CD44-positive cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aires, Antonio; Ocampo, Sandra M.; Simões, Bruno M.; Josefa Rodríguez, María; Cadenas, Jael F.; Couleaud, Pierre; Spence, Katherine; Latorre, Alfonso; Miranda, Rodolfo; Somoza, Álvaro; Clarke, Robert B.; Carrascosa, José L.; Cortajarena, Aitziber L.

    2016-02-01

    Nanomedicine nowadays offers novel solutions in cancer therapy and diagnosis by introducing multimodal treatments and imaging tools in one single formulation. Nanoparticles acting as nanocarriers change the solubility, biodistribution and efficiency of therapeutic molecules, reducing their side effects. In order to successfully apply these novel therapeutic approaches, efforts are focused on the biological functionalization of the nanoparticles to improve the selectivity towards cancer cells. In this work, we present the synthesis and characterization of novel multifunctionalized iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) with antiCD44 antibody and gemcitabine derivatives, and their application for the selective treatment of CD44-positive cancer cells. The lymphocyte homing receptor CD44 is overexpressed in a large variety of cancer cells, but also in cancer stem cells (CSCs) and circulating tumor cells (CTCs). Therefore, targeting CD44-overexpressing cells is a challenging and promising anticancer strategy. Firstly, we demonstrate the targeting of antiCD44 functionalized MNPs to different CD44-positive cancer cell lines using a CD44-negative non-tumorigenic cell line as a control, and verify the specificity by ultrastructural characterization and downregulation of CD44 expression. Finally, we show the selective drug delivery potential of the MNPs by the killing of CD44-positive cancer cells using a CD44-negative non-tumorigenic cell line as a control. In conclusion, the proposed multifunctionalized MNPs represent an excellent biocompatible nanoplatform for selective CD44-positive cancer therapy in vitro.

  15. Selective binding of human cumulus cell-secreted glycoproteins to human spermatozoa during capacitation in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Tesarik, J.; Kopecny, V.; Dvorak, M.

    1984-06-01

    The results of this study demonstrate that glycoproteins manufactured by human cumulus cells can be detected bound to human spermatozoa incubated in capacitational medium containing the labeled cumulus-cell secretions. Cumulus-cell-secreted glycoproteins were labeled with a mixture of /sup 3/H-methionine and /sup 3/H-tryptophan or with 3H-fucose, and the binding of the labeled compounds to spermatozoa was evaluated by autoradiography. The binding was highly selective, involving only approximately 1% of the samples of spermatozoa used. The results suggest that the binding of cumulus-cell-secreted glycoproteins to spermatozoa may represent a final and highly selective step in human sperm capacitation.

  16. Thermal modulation of selective transmittance spectra by combination of cholesteric liquid crystal cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogiwara, Akifumi; Kakiuchida, Hiroshi

    2016-09-01

    The effects of the combination of cholesteric liquid crystal (CLC) cells on selective wavelength are investigated by the spectroscopic analysis under thermal modulation. The several kinds of CLC cells are formed by using the chiral dopants with different magnitudes and signs of helical twisting power (HTP). The combination of CLC cells with different temperature dependence shows that the infrared light range longer than 700nm is widely reflected and the visible light is little modulated when the temperature increase from 25 °C to 45 °C. The results demonstrate that the thermal modulation of selective transmittance spectra is controllable by the combination of CLC cells with different temperature dependence.

  17. Selective histone deacetylase 6 inhibitors bearing substituted urea linkers inhibit melanoma cell growth.

    PubMed

    Bergman, Joel A; Woan, Karrune; Perez-Villarroel, Patricio; Villagra, Alejandro; Sotomayor, Eduardo M; Kozikowski, Alan P

    2012-11-26

    The incidence of malignant melanoma has dramatically increased in recent years thus requiring the need for improved therapeutic strategies. In our efforts to design selective histone deactylase inhibitors (HDACI), we discovered that the aryl urea 1 is a modestly potent yet nonselective inhibitor. Structure-activity relationship studies revealed that adding substituents to the nitrogen atom of the urea so as to generate compounds bearing a branched linker group results in increased potency and selectivity for HDAC6. Compound 5 g shows low nanomolar inhibitory potency against HDAC6 and a selectivity of ∼600-fold relative to the inhibition of HDAC1. These HDACIs were evaluated for their ability to inhibit the growth of B16 melanoma cells with the most potent and selective HDAC6I being found to decrease tumor cell growth. To the best of our knowledge, this work constitutes the first report of HDAC6-selective inhibitors that possess antiproliferative effects against melanoma cells.

  18. Selective photothermal therapy for mixed cancer cells using aptamer-conjugated nanorods.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yu-Fen; Sefah, Kwame; Bamrungsap, Suwussa; Chang, Huan-Tsung; Tan, Weihong

    2008-10-21

    Safe and effective photothermal therapy depends on efficient delivery of heat for killing cells and molecular specificity for targeting cells. To address these requirements, we have designed an aptamer-based nanostructure which combines the high absorption efficiency of Au-Ag nanorods with the target specificity of molecular aptamers, a combination resulting in the development of an efficient and selective therapeutic agent for targeted cancer cell photothermal destruction. Most nanomaterials, such as gold nanoshells or nanorods (NRs), require a relatively high power of laser irradiation (1 x 10 (5)-1 x 10 (10) W/m (2)). In contrast, the high absorption characteristic of our Au-Ag NRs requires only 8.5 x 10 (4) W/m (2) laser exposure to induce 93 (+/-11)% cell death of NR-aptamer-labeled cells. Aptamers, the second component of the nanostructure, are generated from a cell-SELEX (systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment) process and can be easily selected for specific recognition of individual tumor cell types without prior knowledge of the biomarkers for the cell. When tested with both cell suspensions and artificial solid tumor samples, these aptamer conjugates were shown to have excellent hyperthermia efficiency and selectivity. Under a specific laser intensity and duration of laser exposure, about 50 (+/-1)% of target (CEM) cells were severely damaged, while more than 87 (+/-1)% of control (NB-4) cells remained intact in a suspension cell mixture. These results indicate that the Au-Ag nanorod combination offers selective and efficient photothermal killing of targeted tumor cells, thus satisfying the two key challenges noted above. Consequently, for future in vivo application, it is fully anticipated that the tumor tissue will be selectively destroyed at laser energies which will not harm the surrounding normal tissue.

  19. [Selective localization of neptunium-237 in nuclei of mammalian cells].

    PubMed

    Galle, P; Boulahdour, H; Metivier, H

    1992-01-01

    After injection in the rat of soluble neptunium salt, the distribution of this element was studied at the subcellular level by electron microscopy and electron probe microanalysis. Abnormal structures have been observed by electron microscopy in the nuclei of hepatocytes, and the same structures have also been observed in the nuclei of the proximal tubules cells of the kidney. These structures are formed of clusters of very small and dense particles, several nanometers in diameter. The clusters are localized in the central part of the nuclei and they are separate from nucleoli and heterochromatin. Electron probe X-ray analysis of this cluster have shown that they contain neptunium associated with phosphorus. In the cell containing neptunium inclusions, other non specific lesions are also observed (nuclear pycnosis, mitochondrial depletion).

  20. Selection of antibodies to cell surface determinants on mouse thymic epithelial cells using a phage display library.

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, D B; George, A J; Ritter, M A

    1997-01-01

    The network of thymic epithelium contributes significantly to the thymic stromal cell environment, which plays a vital role in the generation and maturation of thymocytes. Monoclonal antibodies (mAb) have revealed considerable heterogeneity within this epithelial component of the mouse thymic microenvironment, but many of these antibodies recognize epitopes that are located inside the cell and so cannot be used in functional studies. As an alternative approach to isolate antibodies specific to thymic epithelium, we used a phage display library expressing single chain Fv antibodies. For selection, a thymic cell suspension was incubated with the phage display library, and major histocompatibility complex class II positive cells, the majority of which are epithelial, were then specifically selected. Phage bound to these cells were eluted and the selection procedure was repeated for a further five rounds. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that these phage antibodies show differential staining of thymic epithelial subsets. Flow cytometric analysis of a thymic epithelial cell line using a panel of these antibodies demonstrated that they recognize epitopes on the cell surface. Furthermore, some of these antibodies also labelled human thymic epithelium, suggesting that the epitopes recognized by these antibodies are conserved between human and rodent thymus. Our approach therefore provides a rapid method to select antibodies specific for thymic epithelial cell surface determinants in their native configuration. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:9301539

  1. Advances in clinical NK cell studies: Donor selection, manufacturing and quality control

    PubMed Central

    Koehl, U.; Kalberer, C.; Spanholtz, J.; Lee, D. A.; Miller, J. S.; Cooley, S.; Lowdell, M.; Uharek, L.; Klingemann, H.; Curti, A.; Leung, W.; Alici, E.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Natural killer (NK) cells are increasingly used in clinical studies in order to treat patients with various malignancies. The following review summarizes platform lectures and 2013–2015 consortium meetings on manufacturing and clinical use of NK cells in Europe and United States. A broad overview of recent pre-clinical and clinical results in NK cell therapies is provided based on unstimulated, cytokine-activated, as well as genetically engineered NK cells using chimeric antigen receptors (CAR). Differences in donor selection, manufacturing and quality control of NK cells for cancer immunotherapies are described and basic recommendations are outlined for harmonization in future NK cell studies. PMID:27141397

  2. The double life of a B-1 cell: self-reactivity selects for protective effector functions.

    PubMed

    Baumgarth, Nicole

    2011-01-01

    During their development, B and T cells with self-reactive antigen receptors are generally deleted from the repertoire to avoid autoimmune diseases. Paradoxically, innate-like B-1 cells in mice are positively selected for self-reactivity and form a pool of long-lived, self-renewing B cells that produce most of the circulating natural IgM antibodies. This Review provides an overview of the developmental processes that shape the B-1 cell pool in mice, outlines the functions of B-1 cells in both the steady state and during host defence, and discusses possible functional B-1 cell homologues that exist in humans.

  3. Targeting the Human Complement Membrane Attack Complex to Selectively Kill Prostate Cancer Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-01

    1 AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-11-1-0309 TITLE: Targeting the Human Complement Membrane Attack Complex to Selectively Kill Prostate...Attack Complex to Selectively Kill Prostate Cancer Cells 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-11-1-0309 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Samuel R...leading to the lytic death of PSA- producing prostate cancer cells as well as a significant bystander effect and killing of non-PSA producing cancer

  4. Survival of the fittest: in vivo selection and stem cell gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Neff, Tobias; Beard, Brian C; Kiem, Hans-Peter

    2006-03-01

    Stem cell gene therapy has long been limited by low gene transfer efficiency to hematopoietic stem cells. Recent years have witnessed clinical success in select diseases such as X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) and ADA deficiency. Arguably, the single most important factor responsible for the increased efficacy of these recent protocols is the fact that the genetic correction provided a selective in vivo survival advantage. Since, for most diseases, there will be no selective advantage of gene-corrected cells, there has been a significant effort to arm vectors with a survival advantage. Two-gene vectors can be used to introduce the therapeutic gene and a selectable marker gene. Efficient in vivo selection strategies have been demonstrated in clinically relevant large-animal models. Mutant forms of the DNA repair-enzyme methylguanine methyltransferase in particular have allowed for efficient in vivo selection and have achieved sustained marking with virtually 100% gene-modified cells in large animals, and with clinically acceptable toxicity. Translation of these strategies to the clinical setting is imminent. Here, we review how in vivo selection strategies can be used to make stem cell gene therapy applicable to the treatment of a wider scope of genetic diseases and patients.

  5. Tumorigenic Polyploid Cells Contain Elevated ROS and are Selectively Targeted by Antioxidant Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Roh, Meejeon; van der Meer, Riet; Abdulkadir, Sarki A.

    2011-01-01

    Polyploidy has been linked to tumorigenicity mainly due to the chromosomal aberrations. Elevated reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, on the other hand, has also been associated with oncogenic transformation in most cancer cells. However, a possible link between ploidy and ROS is largely unexplored. Here we have exemined the role of ROS in the tumorigenicity of polyploid cells. We show that polyploid prostate and mammary epithelial cells contain higher levels of ROS due to their higher mitochondrial contents. ROS levels and mitochondrial mass are also higher in dihydrocytochalasin B (DCB)-induced polyploid cells, suggesting that higher levels of ROS observed in polyploid cell can occur due to cytokinesis failure. Interestingly, polyploid cells were more sensitive to the inhibitory effect of the antioxidant, N-Acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC), than control diploid cells. Treatment of polyploid/diploid cells with NAC led to the selective elimination of polyploid cells over time and abrogated the tumorigenicity of polyploid cells. This effect was partially mediated via the Akt signaling pathway. We next explored a possible role for ROS in promoting chromosomal instability by analyzing the effects of ROS on the mitotic stage of the cell cycle. Enhancing ROS levels by treating cells with hydrogen peroxide delayed not only entry into and but also exit from mitosis. Furthermore, increasing ROS levels significantly increased taxol resistance. Our results indicated that increased ROS in polyploid cells can contribute to tumorigenicity and highlight the therapeutic potential of antioxidants by selectively targeting the tumorigenic polyploid cells and by reversing taxol resistance. PMID:21503880

  6. Directional Excitatory Input to Direction-Selective Ganglion Cells in the Rabbit Retina.

    PubMed

    Percival, Kumiko A; Venkataramani, Sowmya; Smith, Robert G; Rowland Taylor, W

    2017-03-14

    Directional responses in retinal ganglion cells are generated in large part by direction-selective release of GABA from starburst amacrine cells onto direction-selective ganglion cells (DSGCs). The excitatory inputs to DSGCs are also widely reported to be direction-selective, however, recent evidence suggests that glutamate release from bipolar cells is not directional, and directional excitation seen in patch-clamp analyses may be an artifact resulting from incomplete voltage control. Here we test this voltage-clamp-artifact hypothesis in recordings from 62 On-Off DSGCs in the rabbit retina. The strength of the directional excitatory signal varies considerably across the sample of cells, but is not correlated with the strength of directional inhibition, as required for a voltage-clamp artifact. These results implicate additional mechanisms in generating directional excitatory inputs to DSGCs. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  7. Signalling thresholds and negative B-cell selection in acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhengshan; Shojaee, Seyedmehdi; Buchner, Maike; Geng, Huimin; Lee, Jae Woong; Klemm, Lars; Titz, Björn; Graeber, Thomas G; Park, Eugene; Tan, Ying Xim; Satterthwaite, Anne; Paietta, Elisabeth; Hunger, Stephen P; Willman, Cheryl L; Melnick, Ari; Loh, Mignon L; Jung, Jae U; Coligan, John E; Bolland, Silvia; Mak, Tak W; Limnander, Andre; Jumaa, Hassan; Reth, Michael; Weiss, Arthur; Lowell, Clifford A; Müschen, Markus

    2015-05-21

    B cells are selected for an intermediate level of B-cell antigen receptor (BCR) signalling strength: attenuation below minimum (for example, non-functional BCR) or hyperactivation above maximum (for example, self-reactive BCR) thresholds of signalling strength causes negative selection. In ∼25% of cases, acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) cells carry the oncogenic BCR-ABL1 tyrosine kinase (Philadelphia chromosome positive), which mimics constitutively active pre-BCR signalling. Current therapeutic approaches are largely focused on the development of more potent tyrosine kinase inhibitors to suppress oncogenic signalling below a minimum threshold for survival. We tested the hypothesis that targeted hyperactivation--above a maximum threshold--will engage a deletional checkpoint for removal of self-reactive B cells and selectively kill ALL cells. Here we find, by testing various components of proximal pre-BCR signalling in mouse BCR-ABL1 cells, that an incremental increase of Syk tyrosine kinase activity was required and sufficient to induce cell death. Hyperactive Syk was functionally equivalent to acute activation of a self-reactive BCR on ALL cells. Despite oncogenic transformation, this basic mechanism of negative selection was still functional in ALL cells. Unlike normal pre-B cells, patient-derived ALL cells express the inhibitory receptors PECAM1, CD300A and LAIR1 at high levels. Genetic studies revealed that Pecam1, Cd300a and Lair1 are critical to calibrate oncogenic signalling strength through recruitment of the inhibitory phosphatases Ptpn6 (ref. 7) and Inpp5d (ref. 8). Using a novel small-molecule inhibitor of INPP5D (also known as SHIP1), we demonstrated that pharmacological hyperactivation of SYK and engagement of negative B-cell selection represents a promising new strategy to overcome drug resistance in human ALL.

  8. A Photoactivatable GFP for Selective Photolabeling of Proteins and Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patterson, George H.; Lippincott-Schwartz, Jennifer

    2002-09-01

    We report a photoactivatable variant of the Aequorea victoria green fluorescent protein (GFP) that, after intense irradiation with 413-nanometer light, increases fluorescence 100 times when excited by 488-nanometer light and remains stable for days under aerobic conditions. These characteristics offer a new tool for exploring intracellular protein dynamics by tracking photoactivated molecules that are the only visible GFPs in the cell. Here, we use the photoactivatable GFP both as a free protein to measure protein diffusion across the nuclear envelope and as a chimera with a lysosomal membrane protein to demonstrate rapid interlysosomal membrane exchange.

  9. A photoactivatable GFP for selective photolabeling of proteins and cells.

    PubMed

    Patterson, George H; Lippincott-Schwartz, Jennifer

    2002-09-13

    We report a photoactivatable variant of the Aequorea victoria green fluorescent protein (GFP) that, after intense irradiation with 413-nanometer light, increases fluorescence 100 times when excited by 488-nanometer light and remains stable for days under aerobic conditions. These characteristics offer a new tool for exploring intracellular protein dynamics by tracking photoactivated molecules that are the only visible GFPs in the cell. Here, we use the photoactivatable GFP both as a free protein to measure protein diffusion across the nuclear envelope and as a chimera with a lysosomal membrane protein to demonstrate rapid interlysosomal membrane exchange.

  10. Selective beta-cell differentiation of dissociated embryonic pancreatic precursor cells cultured in synthetic polyethylene glycol hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Mason, Mariah N; Mahoney, Melissa J

    2009-06-01

    Continuing advances in islet cell transplantation have been promising; however, several limitations, including severe shortage of transplantable islets, hinder the widespread use of this therapy. Pancreatic precursor cells are one alternative to cadaveric donor islets. These cells found in the developing pancreatic buds are capable of self-renewal and also have the innate ability to become insulin-producing beta-cells. For this work, bioinert polyethylene glycol (PEG) hydrogels were chosen as the supportive three-dimensional matrix for encapsulation of dissociated pancreatic precursor cells obtained from the dorsal pancreatic bud of day-15 rat embryos. This culture system was selected in order to eliminate cell-extracellular matrix and cell-cell signal heterogeneity present when intact pancreatic buds are embedded in protein-based gels, the typical in vitro culture conditions used to study this cell population. In this study it was found that (1) dissociated precursor cells maintain a robust viability for 7 days in PEG hydrogel culture, (2) encapsulated cells selectively differentiate into insulin-expressing beta-cells, and (3) differentiated beta-cells have releasable insulin stores, but are not achieving a mature, glucose responsive phenotype. These findings suggest that encapsulating dissociated pancreatic precursor cells in an environment designed to minimize the heterogeneous signaling cues present during development or in standard culture conditions generates a population highly enriched in pancreatic beta-cells; however, future efforts must focus on achieving glucose responsiveness in this cell population. Further, these results indicate that differentiation down a beta-cell lineage may be the default pathway in pancreatic development.

  11. Selective proapoptotic activity of polyphenols from red wine on teratocarcinoma cell, a model of cancer stem-like cell.

    PubMed

    Sharif, Tanveer; Auger, Cyril; Bronner, Christian; Alhosin, Mahmoud; Klein, Thibaut; Etienne-Selloum, Nelly; Schini-Kerth, Valérie B; Fuhrmann, Guy

    2011-04-01

    Cancer stem cells are expected to be responsible for tumor initiation and metastasis. These cells are therefore potential targets for innovative anticancer therapies. However, the absence of bona fide cancer stem cell lines is a real problem for the development of such approaches. Since teratocarcinoma cells are totipotent stem cells with a high degree of malignancy, we used them as a model of cancer stem cells in order to evaluate the anticancer chemopreventive activity of red wine polyphenols (RWPs) and to determine the underlying cellular and molecular mechanisms. We therefore investigated the effects of RWPs on the embryonal carcinoma (EC) cell line P19 which was grown in the same culture conditions as the most appropriate normal cell line counterpart, the pluripotent embryonic fibroblast cell line NIH/3T3. The present study indicates that RWPs selectively inhibited the proliferation of P19 EC cells and induced G1 cell cycle arrest in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, RWPs treatment specifically triggered apoptosis of P19 EC cells in association with a dramatic upregulation of the tumor suppressor gene p53 and caspase-3 activation. Our findings suggest that the chemopreventive activity of RWPs on tumor initiation and development is related to a growth inhibition and a p53-dependent induction of apoptosis in teratocarcinoma cells. In addition, this study also shows that the EC cell line is a convenient source for studying the responses of cancer stem cells to new potential anticancer agents.

  12. Selective elimination of neuroblastoma cells by synergistic effect of Akt kinase inhibitor and tetrathiomolybdate.

    PubMed

    Navrátilová, Jarmila; Karasová, Martina; Kohutková Lánová, Martina; Jiráková, Ludmila; Budková, Zuzana; Pacherník, Jiří; Šmarda, Jan; Beneš, Petr

    2017-02-28

    Neuroblastoma is the most common extracranial solid tumour of infancy. Pathological activation of glucose consumption, glycolysis and glycolysis-activating Akt kinase occur frequently in neuroblastoma cells, and these changes correlate with poor prognosis of patients. Therefore, several inhibitors of glucose utilization and the Akt kinase activity are in preclinical trials as potential anti-cancer drugs. However, metabolic plasticity of cancer cells might undermine efficacy of this approach. In this work, we identified oxidative phosphorylation as compensatory mechanism preserving viability of neuroblastoma cells with inhibited glucose uptake/Akt kinase. It was oxidative phosphorylation that maintained intracellular level of ATP and proliferative capacity of these cells. The oxidative phosphorylation inhibitors (rotenone, tetrathiomolybdate) synergized with inhibitor of the Akt kinase/glucose uptake in down-regulation of both viability of neuroblastoma cells and clonogenic potential of cells forming neuroblastoma spheroids. Interestingly, tetrathiomolybdate acted as highly specific inhibitor of oxygen consumption and activator of lactate production in neuroblastoma cells, but not in normal fibroblasts and neuronal cells. Moreover, the reducing effect of tetrathiomolybdate on cell viability and the level of ATP in the cells with inhibited Akt kinase/glucose uptake was also selective for neuroblastoma cells. Therefore, efficient elimination of neuroblastoma cells requires inhibition of both glucose uptake/Akt kinase and oxidative phosphorylation activities. The use of tetrathiomolybdate as a mitochondrial inhibitor contributes to selectivity of this combined treatment, preferentially targeting neuroblastoma cells.

  13. Selective culling of high avidity antigen-specific CD4+ T cells after virulent Salmonella infection.

    PubMed

    Ertelt, James M; Johanns, Tanner M; Mysz, Margaret A; Nanton, Minelva R; Rowe, Jared H; Aguilera, Marijo N; Way, Sing Sing

    2011-12-01

    Typhoid fever is a persistent infection caused by host-adapted Salmonella strains adept at circumventing immune-mediated host defences. Given the importance of T cells in protection, the culling of activated CD4+ T cells after primary infection has been proposed as a potential immune evasion strategy used by this pathogen. We demonstrate that the purging of activated antigen-specific CD4+ T cells after virulent Salmonella infection requires SPI-2 encoded virulence determinants, and is not restricted only to cells with specificity to Salmonella-expressed antigens, but extends to CD4+ T cells primed to expand by co-infection with recombinant Listeria monocytogenes. Unexpectedly, however, the loss of activated CD4+ T cells during Salmonella infection demonstrated using a monoclonal population of adoptively transferred CD4+ T cells was not reproduced among the endogenous repertoire of antigen-specific CD4+ T cells identified with MHC class II tetramer. Analysis of T-cell receptor variable segment usage revealed the selective loss and reciprocal enrichment of defined CD4+ T-cell subsets after Salmonella co-infection that is associated with the purging of antigen-specific cells with the highest intensity of tetramer staining. Hence, virulent Salmonella triggers the selective culling of high avidity activated CD4+ T-cell subsets, which re-shapes the repertoire of antigen-specific T cells that persist later after infection.

  14. Surface display vectors for selective detection and isolation of high level antibody producing cells.

    PubMed

    Lang, Sabine; Drewello, Delia; Wichter, Johannes; Nommay, Audrey; Wilms, Burkhard; Knopf, Hans-Peter; Jostock, Thomas

    2016-11-01

    Cell line generation for production of biopharmaceuticals in mammalian cells usually involves intensive screening of clones to identify the rare high producers. In order to facilitate efficient and selective fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS) based enrichment and cloning of antibody producing CHO cells, we developed a special vector setup by inserting a leaky translation termination signal between the heavy chain of an IgG antibody and an IgG transmembrane domain. Partial read-through during translation of the antibody heavy chain leads to display of a subset of the produced antibody on the surface of the expressing cell. We could show that the level of surface expression correlates well with the productivity. By applying FACS, high producing cells can be selectively enriched and cloned. Two sequential FACS enrichment cycles were performed which led to more than eightfold increased productivities of transfected and selected cell populations without cloning. The combination of selective FACS enrichment and FACS cloning with the new vector setup led to a sevenfold higher average productivity of the resulting clones as compared to a reference vector. Productivity and production stability assessment of clones generated with the new vector showed no negative impact of the co-expression of transmembrane antibody. Clone productivities of 4 g/L in a generic shake flask fed-batch model were achieved. Thus, this new vector setup facilitates fast and selective isolation of high producing production cell lines and allows significant reduction of clone screening efforts during cell line development for production cell lines. Additionally, the high productivity of FACS-enriched but non-clonal cell populations supports rapid, high yield, and cost efficient material production in early project phases. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 2386-2393. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. IL-15 inhibits pre-B cell proliferation by selectively expanding Mac-1{sup +}B220{sup +} NK cells

    SciTech Connect

    Nakajima, Shinsuke; Hida, Shigeaki; Taki, Shinsuke

    2008-05-16

    Natural killer (NK) cells are the cells critical for inhibition of repopulation of allogenic bone marrow cells. However, it is not well known if NK cells affect autologous lymphopoiesis. Here, we observed that NK cells could inhibit pre-B cell proliferation in vitro driven by interleukin (IL)-7 in a manner dependent on IL-15. Interestingly, the great majority of expanding NK cells were Mac-1{sup +}B220{sup +}, a recently identified potent interferon (IFN)-{gamma} producer. Indeed, IFN-{gamma} was produced in those cultures, and pre-B cells lacking IFN-{gamma} receptors, but not those lacking type I IFN receptors, were resistant to such an inhibition. Furthermore, even NK cells from mice lacking {beta}2-microglobulin, which were known to be functionally dampened, inhibited pre-B cell proliferation as well. Thus, activated NK cells, which were expanded selectively by IL-15, could potentially regulate B lymphopoiesis through IFN-{gamma} beyond the selection imposed upon self-recognition.

  16. Negative immunomagnetic selection of T cells from peripheral blood of presentation AML specimens.

    PubMed

    Le Dieu, Rifca; Taussig, David; Lister, T Andrew; Gribben, John G

    2009-08-31

    To date, studies on T cells in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) have been limited to flow cytometric analysis of whole peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) specimens or functional work looking at the impact of AML myeloblasts on normal or remission T cells. This lack of information on T cells at the time of presentation with disease is due in part to the difficulty in isolating sufficiently pure T cells from these specimens for further study. Negative immunomagnetic selection has been the method of choice for isolating immune cells for functional studies due to concerns that binding antibodies to the cell surface may induce cellular activation, block ligand-receptor interactions or result in immune clearance. In order specifically to study T cells in presentation AML specimens, we set out to develop a method of isolating highly pure CD4 and CD8 T cells by negative selection from the peripheral blood (PB) of newly diagnosed AML patients. This technique, unlike T cell selection from PB from normal individuals or from patients with chronic lymphocytic leukaemia, was extremely problematic due to properties of the leukaemic myeloblasts. A successful method was eventually optimized requiring the use of a custom antibody cocktail consisting of CD33, CD34, CD123, CD11c and CD36, to deplete myeloblasts.

  17. Selective advantage of trisomic human cells cultured in non-standard conditions

    PubMed Central

    Rutledge, Samuel D.; Douglas, Temple A.; Nicholson, Joshua M.; Vila-Casadesús, Maria; Kantzler, Courtney L.; Wangsa, Darawalee; Barroso-Vilares, Monika; Kale, Shiv D.; Logarinho, Elsa; Cimini, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    An abnormal chromosome number, a condition known as aneuploidy, is a ubiquitous feature of cancer cells. A number of studies have shown that aneuploidy impairs cellular fitness. However, there is also evidence that aneuploidy can arise in response to specific challenges and can confer a selective advantage under certain environmental stresses. Cancer cells are likely exposed to a number of challenging conditions arising within the tumor microenvironment. To investigate whether aneuploidy may confer a selective advantage to cancer cells, we employed a controlled experimental system. We used the diploid, colorectal cancer cell line DLD1 and two DLD1-derived cell lines carrying single-chromosome aneuploidies to assess a number of cancer cell properties. Such properties, which included rates of proliferation and apoptosis, anchorage-independent growth, and invasiveness, were assessed both under standard culture conditions and under conditions of stress (i.e., serum starvation, drug treatment, hypoxia). Similar experiments were performed in diploid vs. aneuploid non-transformed human primary cells. Overall, our data show that aneuploidy can confer selective advantage to human cells cultured under non-standard conditions. These findings indicate that aneuploidy can increase the adaptability of cells, even those, such as cancer cells, that are already characterized by increased proliferative capacity and aggressive tumorigenic phenotypes. PMID:26956415

  18. Lymphocyte Display: A Novel Antibody Selection Platform Based on T Cell Activation

    PubMed Central

    Alonso-Camino, Vanesa; Sánchez-Martín, David; Compte, Marta; Álvarez-Vallina, Laura Sanz, Luis

    2009-01-01

    Since their onset, display technologies have proven useful for the selection of antibodies against a variety of targets; however, most of the antibodies selected with the currently available platforms need to be further modified for their use in humans, and are restricted to accessible antigens. Furthermore, these platforms are not well suited for in vivo selections. We present here a novel cell based antibody display platform, which takes advantage of the functional capabilities of T lymphocytes. The display of antibodies on the surface of T lymphocytes, as a part of a chimeric-immune receptor (CIR) mediating signaling, may ideally link the antigen-antibody interaction to a demonstrable change in T cell phenotype, due to subsequent expression of the early T cell activation marker CD69. In this proof-of-concept, an in vitro selection was carried out using a human T cell line lentiviral-transduced to express a tumor-specific CIR on the surface, against a human tumor cell line expressing the carcinoembryonic antigen. Based on an effective interaction between the CIR and the tumor antigen, we demonstrated that combining CIR-mediated activation with FACS sorting of CD69+ T cells, it is possible to isolate binders to tumor specific cell surface antigen, with an enrichment factor of at least 103-fold after two rounds, resulting in a homogeneous population of T cells expressing tumor-specific CIRs. PMID:19777065

  19. Morphological evaluation of sperm from infertile men selected by magnetic activated cell sorting (MACS).

    PubMed

    Curti, Gianni; Skowronek, Fernanda; Vernochi, Rita; Rodriguez-Buzzi, Ana Laura; Rodriguez-Buzzi, Juan Carlos; Casanova, Gabriela; Sapiro, Rossana

    2014-12-01

    Electron microscopy analysis performed in five infertile human subjects after sperm selection by swim-up followed by magnetic activated cell sorting (MACS) demonstrated a decrease in the number of spermatozoa with characteristics compatible with cell death. However, no significant differences were found when the swim-up/MACS semen fraction was compared with swim-up fraction alone.

  20. Selective effect of cell membrane on synaptic neurotransmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Postila, Pekka A.; Vattulainen, Ilpo; Róg, Tomasz

    2016-01-01

    Atomistic molecular dynamics simulations were performed with 13 non-peptidic neurotransmitters (NTs) in three different membrane environments. The results provide compelling evidence that NTs are divided into membrane-binding and membrane-nonbinding molecules. NTs adhere to the postsynaptic membrane surface whenever the ligand-binding sites of their synaptic receptors are buried in the lipid bilayer. In contrast, NTs that have extracellular ligand-binding sites do not have a similar tendency to adhere to the membrane surface. This finding is a seemingly simple yet important addition to the paradigm of neurotransmission, essentially dividing it into membrane-independent and membrane-dependent mechanisms. Moreover, the simulations also indicate that the lipid composition especially in terms of charged lipids can affect the membrane partitioning of NTs. The revised paradigm, highlighting the importance of cell membrane and specific lipids for neurotransmission, should to be of interest to neuroscientists, drug industry and the general public alike.

  1. Aptamers Selected by Cell-SELEX for Molecular Imaging.

    PubMed

    Jin, Cheng; Zheng, Jing; Li, Chunmei; Qiu, Liping; Zhang, Xiaobing; Tan, Weihong

    2015-12-01

    Conventional diagnostics for cancer rely primarily on anatomical techniques. However, these techniques cannot monitor the changes at the molecular level in normal cells, which possibly signal the onset of cancer at its very earliest stages. For accurate prediction of the carcinogenesis at the molecular level, targeting ligands have been used in combination with imaging probes to monitor this biological process. Among these targeting ligands, aptamers have high binding affinity to various targets ranging from small molecules to whole organisms, and, hence, exceptional recognition ability. Many recent studies have been reported on aptamer-based molecular imaging, clearly indicating its clinical and diagnostic utility. In this review, we will discuss some key results of these studies.

  2. Strategies for selecting recombinant CHO cell lines for cGMP manufacturing: improving the efficiency of cell line generation.

    PubMed

    Porter, Alison J; Racher, Andrew J; Preziosi, Richard; Dickson, Alan J

    2010-01-01

    Transfectants with a wide range of cellular phenotypes are obtained during the process of cell line generation. For the successful manufacture of a therapeutic protein, a means is required to identify a cell line with desirable growth and productivity characteristics from this phenotypically wide-ranging transfectant population. This identification process is on the critical path for first-in-human studies. We have stringently examined a typical selection strategy used to isolate cell lines suitable for cGMP manufacturing. One-hundred and seventy-five transfectants were evaluated as they progressed through the different assessment stages of the selection strategy. High producing cell lines, suitable for cGMP manufacturing, were identified. However, our analyses showed that the frequency of isolation of the highest producing cell lines was low and that ranking positions were not consistent between each assessment stage, suggesting that there is potential to improve upon the strategy. Attempts to increase the frequency of isolation of the 10 highest producing cell lines, by in silico analysis of alternative selection strategies, were unsuccessful. We identified alternative strategies with similar predictive capabilities to the typical selection strategy. One alternate strategy required fewer cell lines to be progressed at the assessment stages but the stochastic nature of the models means that cell line numbers are likely to change between programs. In summary, our studies illuminate the potential for improvement to this and future selection strategies, based around use of assessments that are more informative or that reduce variance, paving the way to improved efficiency of generation of manufacturing cell lines.

  3. Selective inhibitors of aurora kinases inhibit proliferation, reduce cell viability and impair cell cycle progression in papillary thyroid carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Baldini, E; Tuccilli, C; Prinzi, N; Sorrenti, S; Antonelli, A; Fallahi, P; Mian, C; Barollo, S; Catania, A; Morrone, S; Tartaglia, F; Mascagni, D; Coccaro, C; Pepe, M; Filippini, A; D'Armiento, M; Ulisse, S

    2015-01-01

    The three members of the Aurora kinase family, Aurora-A, -B and -C, regulate several aspects of the mitotic process, and their aberrant expression and/or function causes mitotic abnormalities leading either to cell death or aneuploidy. They are found overexpressed in several human malignancies, including the papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC). In the present study, we sought to establish whether Aurora kinase inhibition could be of any therapeutic value in the treatment of aggressive forms of PTC, enduring to radioactive iodide (RAI) ablation. To this end, the effects of selective inhibitors of Aurora-A (MLN8237) and Aurora-B (AZD1152) were analyzed on 3 human PTC cell lines expressing either wild-type (K1 and TPC1) or mutant p53 (BCPAP). The two inhibitors were capable of reducing cell proliferation in a time- and dose-dependent manner, with IC₅₀ comprised between 65.4 and 114.9 nM for MLN8237, and between 26.6 and 484.6 nM for AZD1152. Immunofluorescence experiments confirmed that AZD1152 inhibited Aurora-B phosphorylation of histone H3 on Ser10, however, it did not affect Aurora-A autophosphorylation. MLN8237 inhibited Aurora-A autophosphorylation as expected, but at concentrations required to achieve the maximum antiproliferative effects it also abolished H3 (Ser10) phosphorylation. Time-lapse videomicroscopy evidenced that both inhibitors prevented the completion of cytokinesis, and cytofluorimetric analysis showed accumulation of cells in G2/M phase and/or polyploidy. Apoptosis was induced in all the cells by both inhibitors independently from the p53 status. In conclusion, in the present preclinical study MLN8237 and AZD1152 have emerged as promising drug candidates for RAI-insensitive PTC.

  4. Assembly of MOF Microcapsules with Size-Selective Permeability on Cell Walls.

    PubMed

    Li, Wanbin; Zhang, Yufan; Xu, Zehai; Meng, Qin; Fan, Zheng; Ye, Shuaiju; Zhang, Guoliang

    2016-01-18

    The assembly of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) into microcapsules has attracted great interest because of their unique properties. However, it remains a challenge to obtain MOF microcapsules with size selectivity at the molecular scale. In this report, we used cell walls from natural biomaterials as non-toxic, stable, and inexpensive support materials to assemble MOF/cell wall (CW) microcapsules with size-selective permeability. By making use of the hollow structure, small pores, and high density of heterogeneous nucleation sites of the cell walls, uniform and continuous MOF layers could be easily obtained by inside/outside interfacial crystallization. The prepared MOF/CW microcapsules have excellent stability and enable the steady, slow, and size-selective release of small molecules. Moreover, the size selectivity of the microcapsules can be adjusted by changing the type of deposited MOF.

  5. A breast cancer stem cell-selective, mammospheres-potent osmium(VI) nitrido complex.

    PubMed

    Suntharalingam, Kogularamanan; Lin, Wei; Johnstone, Timothy C; Bruno, Peter M; Zheng, Yao-Rong; Hemann, Michael T; Lippard, Stephen J

    2014-10-15

    The effect of a newly developed osmium(VI) nitrido complex, 1, on breast cancer stem cells (CSCs) is reported. The complex displays selective toxicity for HMLER breast cancer cells enriched with CD44-positive, CSC-like cells over the same cells having reduced CSC character. Remarkably, 1 also reduces the proportion of CSCs within a heterogeneous breast cancer cell population and irreversibly inhibits the formation of free-floating mammospheres to an extent similar to that of salinomycin, a natural product that targets CSCs. Detailed mechanistic studies reveal that in breast cancer cells 1 induces DNA damage and endoplasmic reticulum stress, the latter being responsible for the CSC selectivity. The anti-CSC properties of 1 provide a strong impetus for the development of new metal-based compounds to target CSCs and to treat chemotherapy-resistant and relapsed tumors.

  6. Beyond Helper Phage: Using "Helper Cells" to Select Peptide Affinity Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Shou, Yulin; Schmidt, Emily N.; Paavola, Chad D.; Naranjo, Leslie; Bemdich, Sara; Swanson, Basil I.; Bradbury, Andrew R. M.; Martinez, Jennifer S.

    2016-01-01

    Peptides are important affinity ligands for microscopy, biosensing, and targeted delivery. However, because they can have low affinity for their targets, their selection from large naïve libraries can be challenging. When selecting peptidic ligands from display libraries, it is important to: 1) ensure efficient display; 2) maximize the ability to select high affinity ligands; and 3) minimize the effect of the display context on binding. The “helper cell” packaging system has been described as a tool to produce filamentous phage particles based on phagemid constructs with varying display levels, while remaining free of helper phage contamination. Here we report on the first use of this system for peptide display, including the systematic characterization and optimization of helper cells, their inefficient use in antibody display and their use in creating and selecting from a set of phage display peptide libraries. Our libraries were analyzed with unprecedented precision by standard or deep sequencing, and shown to be superior in quality than commercial gold standards. Using our helper cell libraries, we have obtained ligands recognizing Yersinia pestis surface antigen F1V and L-glutamine-binding periplasmic protein QBP. In the latter case, unlike any of the peptide library selections described so far, we used a combination of phage and yeast display to select intriguing peptide ligands. Based on the success of our selections we believe that peptide libraries obtained with helper cells are not only suitable, but preferable to traditional phage display libraries for selection of peptidic ligands. PMID:27626637

  7. Optoelectronic simulation of GaAs solar cells with angularly selective filters

    SciTech Connect

    Kraus, Tobias Höhn, Oliver; Hauser, Hubert; Bläsi, Benedikt

    2014-02-07

    We discuss the influence of angularly selective filters on thin film gallium arsenide solar cells. For this reason, the detailed balance model was refined to fit our needs with respect to Auger recombination, reflection, transmission, and realistic absorption. For calculating real systems, an approach was made to include optical effects of angularly selective filters into electron-hole dynamic equations implemented in PC1D, a one dimensional solar cell calculation tool. With this approach, we find a relative V{sub oc} increase of 5% for an idealized 100 nm GaAs cell, including Auger recombination.

  8. Optimized selection of anti-tumor recombinant antibodies from phage libraries on intact cells.

    PubMed

    Pavoni, Emiliano; Vaccaro, Paola; Anastasi, Anna Maria; Minenkova, Olga

    2014-02-01

    Generation of human recombinant antibody libraries displayed on the surface of the filamentous phage and selection of specific antibodies against desirable targets allows production of fully human antibodies usable for repeated administration in humans. Various lymphoid tissues from immunized donors, such as lymph nodes or peripheral blood lymphocytes from individuals with tumor or lymphocytes infiltrating tumor masses may serve as a source of specific anti-tumor antibody repertoire for generation of tumor-focused phage display libraries. In the case of lack of tumor-associated antigens in the purified form, high affinity anti-tumor antibodies can be isolated through library panning on whole cells expressing these antigens. However, affinity selection against cell surface specific antigens within highly heterogeneous population of molecules is not a very efficient process that often results in the selection of unspecific antibodies or antibodies against intracellular antigens that are generally useless for targeted immunotherapy. In this work, we developed a new cell-based antibody selection protocol that, by eliminating the contamination of dead cells from the cell suspension, dramatically improves the selection frequency of anti-tumor antibodies recognizing cell surface antigens.

  9. Identification of HDAC6-Selective Inhibitors of Low Cancer Cell Cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Gaisina, Irina N; Tueckmantel, Werner; Ugolkov, Andrey; Shen, Sida; Hoffen, Jessica; Dubrovskyi, Oleksii; Mazar, Andrew; Schoon, Renee A; Billadeau, Daniel; Kozikowski, Alan P

    2016-01-05

    The histone deacetylases (HDACs) occur in 11 different isoforms, and these enzymes regulate the activity of a large number of proteins involved in cancer initiation and progression. The discovery of isoform-selective HDAC inhibitors (HDACIs) is desirable, as it is likely that such compounds would avoid some of the undesirable side effects found with the first-generation inhibitors. A series of HDACIs previously reported by us were found to display some selectivity for HDAC6 and to induce cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis in pancreatic cancer cells. In the present work, we show that structural modification of these isoxazole-based inhibitors leads to high potency and selectivity for HDAC6 over HDAC1-3 and HDAC10, while unexpectedly abolishing their ability to block cell growth. Three inhibitors with lower HDAC6 selectivity inhibit the growth of cell lines BxPC3 and L3.6pl, and they only induce apoptosis in L3.6pl cells. We conclude that HDAC6 inhibition alone is insufficient for disruption of cell growth, and that some degree of class 1 HDAC inhibition is required. Moreover, the highly selective HDAC6Is reported herein that are weakly cytotoxic may find use in cancer immune system reactivation.

  10. Embryonic stem cells can be used to construct hybrid cell lines containing a single, selectable murine chromosome.

    PubMed

    Jakobs, P M; Smith, L; Thayer, M; Grompe, M

    1999-04-01

    Microcell-mediated chromosome transfer is a useful technique for the study of gene function, gene regulation, gene mapping, and functional cloning in mammalian cells. Complete panels of donor cell lines, each containing a different human chromosome, have been developed. These donor cell lines contain a single human chromosome marked with a dominant selectable gene in a rodent cell background. However, a similar panel does not exist for murine chromosomes. To produce mouse monochromosomal donor hybrids, we have utilized embryonic stem (ES) cells with targeted gene disruptions of known chromosomal location as starting material. ES cells with mutations in aprt, fyn, and myc were utilized to generate monochromosomal hybrids with neomycin phosphotransferase-marked murine Chr 8, 10, or 15 respectively in a hamster or rat background. This same methodology can be used to generate a complete panel of marked mouse chromosomes for somatic cell genetic experimentaion.

  11. Optofluidic Cell Selection from Complex Microbial Communities for Single-Genome Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Landry, Zachary C.; Giovanonni, Stephen J.; Quake, Stephen R.; Blainey, Paul C.

    2013-01-01

    Genetic analysis of single cells is emerging as a powerful approach for studies of heterogeneous cell populations. Indeed, the notion of homogeneous cell populations is receding as approaches to resolve genetic and phenotypic variation between single cells are applied throughout the life sciences. A key step in single-cell genomic analysis today is the physical isolation of individual cells from heterogeneous populations, particularly microbial populations, which often exhibit high diversity. Here, we detail the construction and use of instrumentation for optical trapping inside microfluidic devices to select individual cells for analysis by methods including nucleic acid sequencing. This approach has unique advantages for analyses of rare community members, cells with irregular morphologies, small quantity samples, and studies that employ advanced optical microscopy. PMID:24060116

  12. Selection and expansion of natural killer cells for NK cell-based immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Becker, Petra S A; Suck, Garnet; Nowakowska, Paulina; Ullrich, Evelyn; Seifried, Erhard; Bader, Peter; Tonn, Torsten; Seidl, Christian

    2016-04-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells have been used in several clinical trials as adaptive immunotherapy. The low numbers of these cells in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) have resulted in various approaches to preferentially expand primary NK cells from PBMC. While some clinical trials have used the addition of interleukin 2 (IL-2) to co-stimulate the expansion of purified NK cells from allogeneic donors, recent studies have shown promising results in achieving in vitro expansion of NK cells to large numbers for adoptive immunotherapy. NK cell expansion requires multiple cell signals for survival, proliferation and activation. Thus, expansion strategies have been focused either to substitute these factors using autologous feeder cells or to use genetically modified allogeneic feeder cells. Recent developments in the clinical use of genetically modified NK cell lines with chimeric antigen receptors, the development of expansion protocols for the clinical use of NK cell from human embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells are challenging improvements for NK cell-based immunotherapy. Transfer of several of these protocols to clinical-grade production of NK cells necessitates adaptation of good manufacturing practice conditions, and the development of freezing conditions to establish NK cell stocks will require some effort and, however, should enhance the therapeutic options of NK cells in clinical medicine.

  13. Salvianolic acid A shows selective cytotoxicity against multidrug-resistant MCF-7 breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin; Wang, Chunyan; Zhang, Longjiang; Li, Yanjun; Wang, Shouju; Wang, Jiandong; Yuan, Caiyun; Niu, Jia; Wang, Chengsheng; Lu, Guangming

    2015-02-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is a major cause for incurable breast cancer. Salvianolic acid A (SAA), the hydrophilic polyphenolic derivative of Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge (Danshen/Red Sage), was examined for cytotoxicities to MDR MCF-7 human breast cancer cells and their parental counterparts. We have shown that SAA inhibited proliferation, caused cell cycle arrest at the S phase, and induced apoptosis dose dependently to the two kinds of cancer cells. However, the resistant cells were significantly susceptible to the inhibition of SAA compared with the parental cells. SAA increased the level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by 6.2-fold in the resistant cells, whereas the level of SAA-induced ROS changed only by 1.6-fold in their parental counterparts. Thus, the data showed that the selective cytotoxicity resulted from the hypersensitivity of the resistant cells to the strongly elevated ROS by SAA. In addition, SAA-triggered apoptosis was associated with increased caspase-3 activity, disrupted mitochondrial membrane potential, downregulated Bcl-2 expression, and upregulated Bax expression in the resistant cells. Moreover, SAA downregulated the level of P-glycoprotein, which was overexpressed in the resistant cells. This indicated that SAA modulated MDR. Furthermore, SAA showed higher antitumor activity than did doxorubicin in xenografts established from the resistant cells. The present work raised a possibility that SAA might be considered a potential choice to overcome MDR for the selective susceptibility of the resistant breast cancer cells to SAA treatment.

  14. Engineering a growth sensor to select intracellular antibodies in the cytosol of mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Thuy Duong; Takasuka, Hitoshi; Kaku, Yoshihiro; Inoue, Satoshi; Nagamune, Teruyuki; Kawahara, Masahiro

    2017-03-16

    Intracellular antibodies (intrabodies) are expected to function as therapeutics as well as tools for elucidating in vivo function of proteins. In this study, we propose a novel intrabody selection method in the cytosol of mammalian cells by utilizing a growth signal, induced by the interaction of the target antigen and an scFv-c-kit growth sensor. Here, we challenge this method to select specific intrabodies against rabies virus nucleoprotein (RV-N) for the first time. As a result, we successfully select antigen-specific intrabodies from a naïve synthetic library using phage panning followed by our growth sensor-based intracellular selection method, demonstrating the feasibility of the method. Additionally, we succeed in improving the response of the growth sensor by re-engineering the linker region of its construction. Collectively, the described selection method utilizing a growth sensor may become a highly efficient platform for selection of functional intrabodies in the future.

  15. Lysophosphatidic acid induces cell migration through the selective activation of Akt1

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun Kyoung; Yun, Sung Ji; Do, Kee Hun; Kim, Min Sung; Cho, Mong; Suh, Dong-Soo; Kim, Chi Dae; Kim, Jae Ho; Birnbaum, Morris J.

    2008-01-01

    Akt plays pivotal roles in many physiological responses including growth, proliferation, survival, metabolism, and migration. In the current studies, we have evaluated the isoform-specific role of akt in lysophosphatidic acid (LPA)-induced cell migration. Ascites from ovarian cancer patients (AOCP) induced mouse embryo fibroblast (MEF) cell migration in a dose-dependent manner. On the other hand, ascites from liver cirrhosis patients (ALCP) did not induce MEF cell migration. AOCP-induced MEF cell migration was completely blocked by pre-treatment of cells with LPA receptor antagonist, Ki16425. Both LPA- and AOCP-induced MEF cell migration was completely attenuated by PI3K inhibitor, LY294002. Furthermore, cells lacking Akt1 displayed defect in LPA-induced cell migration. Re-expression of Akt1 in DKO (Akt1-/-Akt2-/-) cells restored LPA-induced cell migration, whereas re-expression of Akt2 in DKO cells could not restore the LPA-induced cell migration. Finally, Akt1 was selectively phosphorylated by LPA and AOCP stimulation. These results suggest that LPA is a major factor responsible for AOCP-induced cell migration and signaling specificity of Akt1 may dictate LPA-induced cell migration. PMID:18779657

  16. Designing the nanobiointerface of fluorescent nanodiamonds: highly selective targeting of glioma cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slegerova, Jitka; Hajek, Miroslav; Rehor, Ivan; Sedlak, Frantisek; Stursa, Jan; Hruby, Martin; Cigler, Petr

    2014-12-01

    Core-shell nanoparticles based on fluorescent nanodiamonds coated with a biocompatible N-(2-hydroxypropyl)methacrylamide copolymer shell were developed for background-free near-infrared imaging of cancer cells. The particles showed excellent colloidal stability in buffers and culture media. After conjugation with a cyclic RGD peptide they selectively targeted integrin αvβ3 receptors on glioblastoma cells with high internalization efficacy.Core-shell nanoparticles based on fluorescent nanodiamonds coated with a biocompatible N-(2-hydroxypropyl)methacrylamide copolymer shell were developed for background-free near-infrared imaging of cancer cells. The particles showed excellent colloidal stability in buffers and culture media. After conjugation with a cyclic RGD peptide they selectively targeted integrin αvβ3 receptors on glioblastoma cells with high internalization efficacy. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Materials and methods, colloidal stability studies and cell viability studies. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr02776k

  17. Selective cytotoxicity of indirect nonequilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma against ovarian clear-cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Utsumi, Fumi; Kajiyama, Hiroaki; Nakamura, Kae; Tanaka, Hiromasa; Hori, Masaru; Kikkawa, Fumitaka

    2014-01-01

    Ovarian clear cell carcinoma (CCC) is a histological type of epithelial ovarian cancer that is less responsive to chemotherapy and associated with a poorer prognosis than serous and endometrioid carcinoma. Non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma which produces reactive species has recently led to an explosion of research in plasma medicine. Plasma treatment can be applied to cancer treatment to induce apoptosis and tumor growth arrest. Furthermore, recent studies have shown that a medium exposed to plasma also has an anti-proliferative effect against cancer in the absence of direct exposure to plasma. In this study, we confirmed whether this indirect plasma has an anti-tumor effect against CCC, and investigated whether this efficacy is selective for cancer cells. Non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma induced apoptosis in CCC cells, while human peritoneal mesothelial cells remained viable. Non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma exhibits selective cytotoxicity against CCC cells which are resistant to chemotherapy.

  18. What makes a cell face-selective: the importance of contrast

    PubMed Central

    Ohayon, Shay; Freiwald, Winrich A; Tsao, Doris Y

    2012-01-01

    Summary Faces are robustly detected by computer vision algorithms that search for characteristic coarse contrast features. Here, we investigated whether face-selective cells in the primate brain exploit contrast features as well. We recorded from face-selective neurons in macaque inferotemporal cortex, while presenting a face-like collage of regions whose luminances were changed randomly. Modulating contrast combinations between regions induced activity changes ranging from no response to a response greater than that to a real face in 50% of cells. The critical stimulus factor determining response magnitude was contrast polarity, e.g., nose region brighter than left eye. Contrast polarity preferences were consistent across cells, suggesting a common computational strategy across the population, and matched features used by computer vision algorithms for face detection. Furthermore, most cells were tuned both for contrast polarity and for the geometry of facial features, suggesting cells encode information useful both for detection and recognition. PMID:22578507

  19. Selection for Hyoscyamine and Cinnamoyl Putrescine Overproduction in Cell and Root Cultures of Hyoscyamus muticus.

    PubMed

    Medina-Bolivar, F.; Flores, H. E.

    1995-08-01

    Hairy root cultures of Hyoscyamus muticus have been shown to produce stable levels of tropane alkaloids comparable to those found in whole plants. In contrast, cell cultures of this and other solanaceous species produce only trace amounts of alkaloids but can be used for selection of metabolic variants. We have taken advantage of both systems and the ability to convert between them in vitro in an effort to select for increased production of the tropane alkaloid hyoscyamine. Hairy roots were converted into cell suspensions by addition of 1 mg/L 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid to Murashige-Skoog medium (T. Murashige and F. Skoog [1962] Physiol Plant 15: 473-497) and screened for resistance to the amino acid analog p-fluorophenylalanine (PFP). Cells that could grow in media containing 400 [mu]M PFP were selected and cloned from single cells. The resistant cells accumulated high levels of cinnamoyl putrescines, which share the same biosynthetic precursors as hyoscyamine. Hairy root cultures were regenerated from both PFP-sensitive and PFP-resistant cells by removing 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid from the medium. Resistance to PFP continued to be expressed in regenerated roots. Higher levels of hyoscyamine were found in hairy roots regenerated from PFP-resistant cells than were found in controls. We suggest that the precursors overproduced by the PFP-resistant cells can be diverted into the hyoscyamine pathway upon the regeneration of root cultures.

  20. Selection for Hyoscyamine and Cinnamoyl Putrescine Overproduction in Cell and Root Cultures of Hyoscyamus muticus.

    PubMed Central

    Medina-Bolivar, F.; Flores, H. E.

    1995-01-01

    Hairy root cultures of Hyoscyamus muticus have been shown to produce stable levels of tropane alkaloids comparable to those found in whole plants. In contrast, cell cultures of this and other solanaceous species produce only trace amounts of alkaloids but can be used for selection of metabolic variants. We have taken advantage of both systems and the ability to convert between them in vitro in an effort to select for increased production of the tropane alkaloid hyoscyamine. Hairy roots were converted into cell suspensions by addition of 1 mg/L 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid to Murashige-Skoog medium (T. Murashige and F. Skoog [1962] Physiol Plant 15: 473-497) and screened for resistance to the amino acid analog p-fluorophenylalanine (PFP). Cells that could grow in media containing 400 [mu]M PFP were selected and cloned from single cells. The resistant cells accumulated high levels of cinnamoyl putrescines, which share the same biosynthetic precursors as hyoscyamine. Hairy root cultures were regenerated from both PFP-sensitive and PFP-resistant cells by removing 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid from the medium. Resistance to PFP continued to be expressed in regenerated roots. Higher levels of hyoscyamine were found in hairy roots regenerated from PFP-resistant cells than were found in controls. We suggest that the precursors overproduced by the PFP-resistant cells can be diverted into the hyoscyamine pathway upon the regeneration of root cultures. PMID:12228562

  1. A Role for the Tec Family Tyrosine Kinase Txk in T Cell Activation and Thymocyte Selection

    PubMed Central

    Sommers, Connie L.; Rabin, Ronald L.; Grinberg, Alexander; Tsay, Henry C.; Farber, Joshua; Love, Paul E.

    1999-01-01

    Recent data indicate that several members of the Tec family of protein tyrosine kinases function in antigen receptor signal transduction. Txk, a Tec family protein tyrosine kinase, is expressed in both immature and mature T cells and in mast cells. By overexpressing Txk in T cells throughout development, we found that Txk specifically augments the phospholipase C (PLC)-γ1–mediated calcium signal transduction pathway upon T cell antigen receptor (TCR) engagement. Although Txk is structurally different from inducible T cell kinase (Itk), another Tec family member expressed in T cells, expression of the Txk transgene could partially rescue defects in positive selection and signaling in itk−/− mice. Conversely, in the itk+/+ (wild-type) background, overexpression of Txk inhibited positive selection of TCR transgenic thymocytes, presumably due to induction of cell death. These results identify a role for Txk in TCR signal transduction, T cell development, and selection and suggest that the Tec family kinases Itk and Txk perform analogous functions. PMID:10562318

  2. Selection of highly osteogenic and chondrogenic cells from bone marrow stromal cells in biocompatible polymer-coated plates.

    PubMed

    Liu, G; Iwata, K; Ogasawara, T; Watanabe, J; Fukazawa, K; Ishihara, K; Asawa, Y; Fujihara, Y; Chung, U-L; Moro, T; Takatori, Y; Takato, T; Nakamura, K; Kawaguchi, H; Hoshi, K

    2010-03-15

    To enrich the subpopulation that preserves self-renewal and multipotentiality from conventionally prepared bone marrow stromal cells (MSCs), we attempted to use 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC) polymer-coated plates that selected the MSCs with strong adhesion ability and evaluated the proliferation ability or osteogenic/chondrogenic potential of the MPC polymer-selected MSCs. The number of MSCs that were attached to the MPC polymer-coated plates decreased with an increase in the density of MPC unit (0-10%), whereas no significant difference in the proliferation ability was seen among these cells. The surface epitopes of CD29, CD44, CD105, and CD166, and not CD34 or CD45, were detectable in the cells of all MPC polymer-coated plates, implying that they belong to the MSC category. In the osteogenic and chondrogenic induction, the MSCs selected by the 2-5% MPC unit composition showed higher expression levels of osteoblastic and chondrocytic markers (COL1A1/ALP, or COL2A1/COL10A1/Sox9) at passage 2, compared with those of 0-1% or even 10% MPC unit composition, while the enhanced effects continued by passage 5. The selection based on the adequate cell adhesiveness by the MPC polymer-coated plates could improve the osteogenic and chondrogenic potential of MSCs, which would provide cell sources that can be used to treat the more severe and various bone/cartilage diseases.

  3. Tocotrienol-rich fraction of palm oil induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis selectively in human prostate cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, Janmejai K.; Gupta, Sanjay . E-mail: sanjay.gupta@case.edu

    2006-07-28

    One of the requisite of cancer chemopreventive agent is elimination of damaged or malignant cells through cell cycle inhibition or induction of apoptosis without affecting normal cells. In this study, employing normal human prostate epithelial cells (PrEC), virally transformed normal human prostate epithelial cells (PZ-HPV-7), and human prostate cancer cells (LNCaP, DU145, and PC-3), we evaluated the growth-inhibitory and apoptotic effects of tocotrienol-rich fraction (TRF) extracted from palm oil. TRF treatment to PrEC and PZ-HPV-7 resulted in almost identical growth-inhibitory responses of low magnitude. In sharp contrast, TRF treatment resulted in significant decreases in cell viability and colony formation in all three prostate cancer cell lines. The IC{sub 5} values after 24 h TRF treatment in LNCaP, PC-3, and DU145 cells were in the order 16.5, 17.5, and 22.0 {mu}g/ml. TRF treatment resulted in significant apoptosis in all the cell lines as evident from (i) DNA fragmentation (ii) fluorescence microscopy, and (iii) cell death detection ELISA, whereas the PrEC and PZ-HPV-7 cells did not undergo apoptosis, but showed modestly decreased cell viability only at a high dose of 80 {mu}g/ml. In cell cycle analysis, TRF (10-40 {mu}g/ml) resulted in a dose-dependent G0/G1 phase arrest and sub G1 accumulation in all three cancer cell lines but not in PZ-HPV-7 cells. These results suggest that the palm oil derivative TRF is capable of selectively inhibiting cellular proliferation and accelerating apoptotic events in prostate cancer cells. TRF offers significant promise as a chemopreventive and/or therapeutic agent against prostate cancer.

  4. Engineering Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotube Therapeutic Bionanofluids to Selectively Target Papillary Thyroid Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Paliouras, Miltiadis; Mitmaker, Elliot J.; Trifiro, Mark A.

    2016-01-01

    Background The incidence of papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) has risen steadily over the past few decades as well as the recurrence rates. It has been proposed that targeted ablative physical therapy could be a therapeutic modality in thyroid cancer. Targeted bio-affinity functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (BioNanofluid) act locally, to efficiently convert external light energy to heat thereby specifically killing cancer cells. This may represent a promising new cancer therapeutic modality, advancing beyond conventional laser ablation and other nanoparticle approaches. Methods Thyroid Stimulating Hormone Receptor (TSHR) was selected as a target for PTC cells, due to its wide expression. Either TSHR antibodies or Thyrogen or purified TSH (Thyrotropin) were chemically conjugated to our functionalized Bionanofluid. A diode laser system (532 nm) was used to illuminate a PTC cell line for set exposure times. Cell death was assessed using Trypan Blue staining. Results TSHR-targeted BioNanofluids were capable of selectively ablating BCPAP, a TSHR-positive PTC cell line, while not TSHR-null NSC-34 cells. We determined that a 2:1 BCPAP cell:α-TSHR-BioNanofluid conjugate ratio and a 30 second laser exposure killed approximately 60% of the BCPAP cells, while 65% and >70% of cells were ablated using Thyrotropin- and Thyrogen-BioNanofluid conjugates, respectively. Furthermore, minimal non-targeted killing was observed using selective controls. Conclusion A BioNanofluid platform offering a potential therapeutic path for papillary thyroid cancer has been investigated, with our in vitro results suggesting the development of a potent and rapid method of selective cancer cell killing. Therefore, BioNanofluid treatment emphasizes the need for new technology to treat patients with local recurrence and metastatic disease who are currently undergoing either re-operative neck explorations, repeated administration of radioactive iodine and as a last resort external beam

  5. Selective advantage for multicellular replicative strategies: A two-cell example

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tannenbaum, Emmanuel

    2006-01-01

    This paper develops a quasispecies model where cells can adopt a two-cell survival strategy. Within this strategy, pairs of cells join together, at which point one of the cells sacrifices its own replicative ability for the sake of the other cell. We develop a simplified model for the evolutionary dynamics of this process, allowing us to solve for the steady state using standard approaches from quasispecies theory. We find that our model exhibits two distinct regimes of behavior: At low concentrations of limiting resource, the two-cell strategy outcompetes the single-cell survival strategy, while at high concentrations of limiting resource, the single-cell survival strategy dominates. The single-cell survival strategy becomes disadvantageous at low concentrations of limiting resource because the energetic costs of maintaining reproductive and metabolic pathways approach, and may even exceed, the rate of energy production, leaving little excess energy for the purposes of replicating a new cell. However, if the rate of energy production exceeds the energetic costs of maintaining metabolic pathways, then the excess energy, if shared among several cells, can pay for the reproductive costs of a single cell, leaving energy to replicate a new cell. Associated with the two solution regimes of our model is a localization to delocalization transition over the portion of the genome coding for the multicell strategy, analogous to the error catastrophe in standard quasispecies models. The existence of such a transition indicates that multicellularity can emerge because natural selection does not act on specific cells, but rather on replicative strategies. Within this framework, individual cells become the means by which replicative strategies are propagated. Such a framework is therefore consistent with the concept that natural selection does not act on individuals, but rather on populations.

  6. PB-100: a potent and selective inhibitor of human BCNU resistant glioblastoma cell multiplication.

    PubMed

    Beljanski, M; Crochet, S; Beljanski, M S

    1993-01-01

    Major drawbacks to present-day cancer chemotherapy are its intrinsic lack of selectivity for tumour cells, resulting in severe damage to normal rapidly dividing cells, and the widespread emergence of drug resistance. Here experimental evidence is presented demonstrating that PB-100, a beta-carboline alkaloid, selectively inhibits in vitro multiplication of human BCNU-resistant glioblastoma cells (U251), but has no effect on normal astrocyte (CRL 1656) multiplication. PB-100 activity is dose-dependent. In the presence of ferritin or CaCl2, which are highly mitogenic for glioblastoma cells, higher doses of the alkaloid are required to inhibit multiplication completely. PB-100 is one of several compounds which were selected for their specific action on cancer DNA and cells, together with lack of activity on normal DNA and cells. Both the selectivity of PB-100 and its ability to overcome drug resistance stem from its effect on cancer DNA secondary structure. This activity is described and discussed, and therapeutic applications are mentioned.

  7. Selective photothermal efficiency of citrate capped gold nanoparticles for destruction of cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Raji, V.; Kumar, Jatish; Rejiya, C.S.; Vibin, M.; Shenoi, Vinesh N.; Abraham, Annie

    2011-08-15

    Gold nanoparticles are recently having much attention because of their increased applications in biomedical fields. In this paper, we demonstrated the photothermal efficacy of citrate capped gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) for the destruction of A431 cancer cells. Citrate capped AuNPs were synthesized successfully and characterized by UV-visible-NIR spectrophotometry and High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HR-TEM). Further, AuNPs were conjugated with epidermal growth factor receptor antibody (anti-EGFR) and applied for the selective photothermal therapy (PTT) of human epithelial cancer cells, A431. PTT experiments were conducted in four groups, Group I-control cells, Group II-cells treated with laser light alone, Group III-cells treated with unconjugated AuNP and further laser irradiation and Group IV-anti-EGFR conjugated AuNP treated cells irradiated by laser light. After laser irradiation, cell morphology changes that were examined using phase contrast microscopy along with the relevant biochemical parameters like lactate dehydrogenase activity, reactive oxygen species generation and caspase-3 activity were studied for all the groups to determine whether cell death occurs due to necrosis or apoptosis. From these results we concluded that, these immunotargeted nanoparticles could selectively induce cell death via ROS mediated apoptosis when cells were exposed to a low power laser light.

  8. A Small Molecule Inhibitor Selectively Induces Apoptosis in Cells Transformed by High Risk Human Papilloma Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Min S.; Qi, Huilin; Chaniewski, Susan; Zheng, Xiaofan; Farr, Glen A.; Esposito, Kim; Harden, David; Lei, Ming; Schweizer, Liang; Friborg, Jacques; Agler, Michele; McPhee, Fiona; Gentles, Robert; Beno, Brett R.; Chupak, Lou; Mason, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    A phenotypic high-throughput cell culture screen was performed to identify compounds that prevented proliferation of the human Papilloma virus type 16 (HPV-16) transformed cell line Ca Ski. A series of quinoxaline compounds exemplified by Compound 1 was identified. Testing against a panel of cell lines demonstrated that Compound 1 selectively inhibited replication of all HPV-16, HPV-18, and HPV-31 transformed cell lines tested with 50% Inhibitory Concentration (IC50) values of 2 to 8 μM relative to IC50 values of 28 to 73 μM in HPV-negative cell lines. Treatment with Compound 1 resulted in a cascade of multiple apoptotic events, including selective activation of effector caspases 3 and 7, fragmentation of cellular DNA, and PARP (poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase) cleavage in HPV-positive cells relative to HPV-negative cells. Unregulated proliferation of HPV transformed cells is dependent on the viral oncogenes, E6 and E7. Treatment with Compound 1 resulted in a decrease in HPV E7 protein in Ca Ski cells. However, the timing of this reduction relative to other effects of compound treatment suggests that this was a consequence, rather than a cause, of the apoptotic cascade. Likewise, compound treatment resulted in no obvious effects on the E6- and E7- mediated down regulation of p53 and Rb, or their downstream effectors, p21 or PCNA. Further investigation of apoptotic signals induced by Compound 1 revealed cleavage of Caspase-8 in HPV-positive cells as early as 2 hours post-treatment, suggesting the compound initiates apoptosis through the extrinsic, death receptor-mediated, pathway of cell death. These studies provide proof of concept that cells transformed by oncogenic Papillomaviruses can be selectively induced to undergo apoptosis by compound treatment. PMID:27280728

  9. Lectin of Abelmoschus esculentus (okra) promotes selective antitumor effects in human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Monte, Leonardo G; Santi-Gadelha, Tatiane; Reis, Larissa B; Braganhol, Elizandra; Prietsch, Rafael F; Dellagostin, Odir A; E Lacerda, Rodrigo Rodrigues; Gadelha, Carlos A A; Conceição, Fabricio R; Pinto, Luciano S

    2014-03-01

    The anti-tumor effects of a newly-discovered lectin, isolated from okra, Abelmoschus esculentus (AEL), were investigated in human breast cancer (MCF7) and skin fibroblast (CCD-1059 sk) cells. AEL induced significant cell growth inhibition (63 %) in MCF7 cells. The expression of pro-apoptotic caspase-3, caspase-9, and p21 genes was increased in MCF7 cells treated with AEL, compared to those treated with controls. In addition, AEL treatment increased the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio in MCF7 cells. Flow cytometry also indicated that cell death (72 %) predominantly occurred through apoptosis. Thus, AEL in its native form promotes selective antitumor effects in human breast cancer cells and may represent a potential therapeutic to combat human breast cancer.

  10. Phage display selection of scFv to murine endothelial cell membranes.

    PubMed

    Kennel, Stephen J; Lankford, Trish; Foote, Linda; Wall, Melissa; Davern, Sandra

    2004-08-01

    The diversity of endothelial cells is becoming more apparent and more important in defining vessel systems that supply blood to normal organs and to tumors. Reagents that identify expression of cell surface determinants on these cells are crucial for differentiating among different vessel types. As a first step in this process we have selected a panel of 25 scFvs from a phage display library that bind to the endothelial cell line LEII. The scFvs are of high affinity and bind to some tumor cells as well as to the target endothelial cell. The scFvs can be divided into 8 epitope groups by use of competition binding studies. DNA sequencing of the members of these groups generally support the classification. This work shows that phage display is a rapid and efficient method for identification of reagents for cell surface molecules.

  11. Selective expansion of T cells expressing V beta 2 in toxic shock syndrome

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    Infection with Staphylococcus aureus and the production of toxic shock syndrome toxin-1 (TSST-1) have been implicated in the pathogenesis of toxic shock syndrome. Previous in vitro studies have demonstrated that TSST-1 is a powerful but selective stimulator of human T cells, and that the majority of activated cells express the TCR V beta 2 gene segment. We therefore studied patients with toxic shock syndrome using a modification of the PCR to determine if expansion of V beta 2+ T cells is a marker of the in vivo disease process. Five of eight patients studied demonstrated markedly elevated levels of circulating V beta 2+ T cells, whereas none showed significantly elevated levels of T cells expressing other V beta gene segments. The results suggest that toxin-mediated T cell activation, which involves a large fraction of the human T cell repertoire, may be critical in the pathogenesis of this disease. PMID:2117641

  12. Selective Conditions Are Required for the Induction of Invariant NKT Cell Hyporesponsiveness by Antigenic Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Wingender, Gerhard; Birkholz, Alysia M; Sag, Duygu; Farber, Elisa; Chitale, Sampada; Howell, Amy R; Kronenberg, Mitchell

    2015-10-15

    Activation of invariant (i)NKT cells with the model Ag α-galactosylceramide induces rapid production of multiple cytokines, impacting a wide variety of different immune reactions. In contrast, following secondary activation with α-galactosylceramide, the behavior of iNKT cells is altered for months, with the production of most cytokines being strongly reduced. The requirements for the induction of this hyporesponsive state, however, remain poorly defined. In this study, we show that Th1-biasing iNKT cell Ags could induce iNKT cell hyporesponsiveness, as long as a minimum antigenic affinity was reached. In contrast, the Th2-biasing Ag OCH did not induce a hyporesponsive state, nor did cytokine-driven iNKT cell activation by LPS or infections. Furthermore, although dendritic cells and B cells have been reported to be essential for iNKT cell stimulation, neither dendritic cells nor B cells were required to induce iNKT cell hyporesponsiveness. Therefore, our data indicate that whereas some bone marrow-derived cells could induce iNKT cell hyporesponsiveness, selective conditions, dependent on the structure and potency of the Ag, were required to induce hyporesponsiveness.

  13. Analysis of selective reflection spectrum in cholesteric liquid crystal cells for solar-ray controller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogiwara, Akifumi; Kakiuchida, Hiroshi

    2015-09-01

    The cholesteric liquid crystal (CLC) cells are fabricated by varying the concentration of various chiral dopants and liquid crystal (LC) diacrylate monomers. The wavelength and bandwidth of selective reflection spectrum in CLC cells are measured by a spectroscopic technique. The variation of the selective reflection spectrum in CLC cells is investigated by doping the different kinds of liquid crystal (LC) diacrylate monomers which stabilize a helical twisting structure by photopolymerization. The effects of the selective reflection spectrum on the visible and infrared lights in spectral solar irradiance are explained by the performance for a solar-ray controller based on the spectral solar irradiance for air mass 1.5 and the standard luminous efficiency function for photopic vision.

  14. A novel steroidal saponin glycoside from Fagonia indica induces cell-selective apoptosis or necrosis in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Waheed, Abdul; Barker, James; Barton, Stephen J; Owen, Caroline P; Ahmed, Sabbir; Carew, Mark A

    2012-09-29

    Fagonia indica is a small spiny shrub of great ethnopharmacological importance in folk medicine. The aqueous decoction of aerial parts is a popular remedy against various skin lesions, including cancer. We used a biological activity-guided fractionation approach to isolate the most potent fraction of the crude extract on three cancer cell lines: MCF-7 oestrogen-dependent breast cancer, MDA-MB-468 oestrogen-independent breast cancer, and Caco-2 colon cancer cells. A series of chromatographic and spectroscopic procedures were utilised on the EtOAc fraction, which resulted in the isolation of a new steroidal saponin glycoside. The cytotoxic activity of the saponin glycoside was determined in cancer cells using the MTT and neutral red uptake assays. After 24h treatment, the observed IC(50) values of the saponin glycoside were 12.5 μM on MDA-MB-468 and Caco-2 cells, but 100 μM on MCF-7 cells. Several lines of evidence: PARP cleavage, caspase-3 cleavage, DNA ladder assays, and reversal of growth inhibition with the pan-caspase inhibitor Z-VAD-fmk, suggested stimulation of apoptosis in MDA-MB-468 and Caco-2 cells, but not in MCF-7 cells, which do not express caspase-3. The haemolytic activity of the saponin glycoside was confirmed in sheep red blood cells, with cell lysis observed at >100 μM, suggesting that, at this concentration, the saponin glycoside caused necrosis through cell lysis in MCF-7 cells. Using the DNA ladder assay, the saponin glycoside (12.5 μM) was not toxic to HUVEC (human umbilical vein endothelial cells) or U937 cells, indicating some selectivity between malignant and normal cells. We conclude that the steroidal saponin glycoside isolated from F. indica is able to induce apoptosis or necrosis in cancer cells depending on the cell type.

  15. Cell line selection combined with jasmonic acid elicitation enhance camptothecin production in cell suspension cultures of Ophiorrhiza mungos L.

    PubMed

    Deepthi, S; Satheeshkumar, K

    2017-01-01

    Ophiorrhiza mungos is a herbaceous medicinal plant which contains a quinoline alkaloid, camptothecin (CPT), an anticancer compound. A high-yielding cell line, O. mungos cell line-3 (OMC3) was selected from cell suspension cultures of O. mungos using cell aggregate cloning method and established cell suspension culture. OMC3 cell suspension produced significantly high biomass (9.25 ± 1.3 g/flask fresh weight (FW)) and CPT yield (0.095 ± 0.002 mg g(-1) dry weight (DW)) compared with the original cell suspension. Inoculum size of OMC3 cell suspension culture was optimised as 14 g L(-1). Media optimisation has shown that 5 % (w/v) sucrose and an increased ammonium/nitrate concentration of 40/20 mM favoured CPT production, whereas 3 % (w/v) sucrose, an ammonium/nitrate concentration of 20/40 mM and 1.25 mM of phosphate favoured biomass accumulation. Jasmonic acid, chitin and salicylic acid was used to elicit CPT production in the original cell suspension culture and achieved significantly high CPT production with jasmonic acid (JA) elicitation. Further, OMC3 cell suspension culture was elicited with JA (50 μM) and obtained 1.12 ± 0.08 mg g(-1) DW CPT and 9.52 ± 1.4 g/flask FW (190.4 g L(-1) FW). The combination of cell line selection and elicitation has produced 18.66-fold increases in CPT production together with significantly high biomass yield. The study is helpful in the scale-up studies of O. mungos cell suspension culture in suitable bioreactor systems for the production of CPT.

  16. Unusual target selectivity of perisomatic inhibitory cells in the hilar region of the rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Acsády, L; Katona, I; Martínez-Guijarro, F J; Buzsáki, G; Freund, T F

    2000-09-15

    Perisomatic inhibitory innervation of all neuron types profoundly affects their firing characteristics and vulnerability. In this study we examined the postsynaptic targets of perisomatic inhibitory cells in the hilar region of the dentate gyrus where the proportion of potential target cells (excitatory mossy cells and inhibitory interneurons) is approximately equal. Both cholecystokinin (CCK)- and parvalbumin-immunoreactive basket cells formed multiple contacts on the somata and proximal dendrites of mossy cells. Unexpectedly, however, perisomatic inhibitory terminals arriving from these cell types largely ignored hilar GABAergic cell populations. Eighty-ninety percent of various GABAergic neurons including other CCK-containing basket cells received no input from CCK-positive terminals. Parvalbumin-containing cells sometimes innervated each other but avoided 75% of other GABAergic cells. Overall, a single mossy cell received 40 times more CCK-immunoreactive terminals and 15 times more parvalbumin-positive terminals onto its soma than the cell body of an average hilar GABAergic cell. In contrast to the pronounced target selectivity in the hilar region, CCK- and parvalbumin-positive neurons innervated each other via collaterals in stratum granulosum and moleculare. Our observations indicate that the inhibitory control in the hilar region is qualitatively different from other cortical areas at both the network level and the level of single neurons. The paucity of perisomatic innervation of hilar interneurons should have profound consequences on their action potential generation and on their ensemble behavior. These findings may help explain the unique physiological patterns observed in the hilus and the selective vulnerability of the hilar cell population in various pathophysiological conditions.

  17. Cidofovir selectivity is based on the different response of normal and cancer cells to DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cidofovir (CDV) proved efficacious in treatment of human papillomaviruses (HPVs) hyperplasias. Antiproliferative effects of CDV have been associated with apoptosis induction, S-phase accumulation, and increased levels of tumor suppressor proteins. However, the molecular mechanisms for the selectivity and antitumor activity of CDV against HPV-transformed cells remain unexplained. Methods We evaluated CDV drug metabolism and incorporation into cellular DNA, in addition to whole genome gene expression profiling by means of microarrays in two HPV+ cervical carcinoma cells, HPV- immortalized keratinocytes, and normal keratinocytes. Results Determination of the metabolism and drug incorporation of CDV into genomic DNA demonstrated a higher rate of drug incorporation in HPV+ tumor cells and immortalized keratinocytes compared to normal keratinocytes. Gene expression profiling clearly showed distinct and specific drug effects in the cell types investigated. Although an effect on inflammatory response was seen in all cell types, different pathways were identified in normal keratinocytes compared to immortalized keratinocytes and HPV+ tumor cells. Notably, Rho GTPase pathways, LXR/RXR pathways, and acute phase response signaling were exclusively activated in immortalized cells. CDV exposed normal keratinocytes displayed activated cell cycle regulation upon DNA damage signaling to allow DNA repair via homologous recombination, resulting in genomic stability and survival. Although CDV induced cell cycle arrest in HPV- immortalized cells, DNA repair was not activated in these cells. In contrast, HPV+ cells lacked cell cycle regulation, leading to genomic instability and eventually apoptosis. Conclusions Taken together, our data provide novel insights into the mechanism of action of CDV and its selectivity for HPV-transformed cells. The proposed mechanism suggests that this selectivity is based on the inability of HPV+ cells to respond to DNA damage, rather than on a

  18. Low-dose IL-2 selectively activates subsets of CD4+ Tregs and NK cells

    PubMed Central

    Hirakawa, Masahiro; Matos, Tiago; Liu, Hongye; Koreth, John; Kim, Haesook T.; Paul, Nicole E.; Murase, Kazuyuki; Whangbo, Jennifer; Alho, Ana C.; Nikiforow, Sarah; Cutler, Corey; Ho, Vincent T.; Armand, Philippe; Alyea, Edwin P.; Antin, Joseph H.; Blazar, Bruce R.; Lacerda, Joao F.; Soiffer, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    CD4+ regulatory T cells (CD4Tregs) play a critical role in the maintenance of immune tolerance and prevention of chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. IL-2 supports the proliferation and survival of CD4Tregs and previous studies have demonstrated that IL-2 induces selective expansion of CD4Tregs and improves clinical manifestations of chronic GVHD. However, mechanisms for selective activation of CD4Tregs and the effects of low-dose IL-2 on other immune cells are not well understood. Using mass cytometry, we demonstrate that low concentrations of IL-2 selectively induce STAT5 phosphorylation in Helios+ CD4Tregs and CD56brightCD16– NK cells in vitro. Preferential activation and expansion of Helios+ CD4Tregs and CD56brightCD16– NK cells was also demonstrated in patients with chronic GVHD receiving low-dose IL-2. With prolonged IL-2 treatment for 48 weeks, phenotypic changes were also observed in Helios– CD4Tregs. The effects of low-dose IL-2 therapy on conventional CD4+ T cells and CD8+ T cells were limited to increased expression of PD-1 on effector memory T cells. These studies reveal the selective effects of low-dose IL-2 therapy on Helios+ CD4Tregs and CD56bright NK cells that constitutively express high-affinity IL-2 receptors as well as the indirect effects of prolonged exposure to low concentrations of IL-2 in vivo. PMID:27812545

  19. Inferring fitness landscapes and selection on phenotypic states from single-cell genealogical data

    PubMed Central

    Kussell, Edo

    2017-01-01

    Recent advances in single-cell time-lapse microscopy have revealed non-genetic heterogeneity and temporal fluctuations of cellular phenotypes. While different phenotypic traits such as abundance of growth-related proteins in single cells may have differential effects on the reproductive success of cells, rigorous experimental quantification of this process has remained elusive due to the complexity of single cell physiology within the context of a proliferating population. We introduce and apply a practical empirical method to quantify the fitness landscapes of arbitrary phenotypic traits, using genealogical data in the form of population lineage trees which can include phenotypic data of various kinds. Our inference methodology for fitness landscapes determines how reproductivity is correlated to cellular phenotypes, and provides a natural generalization of bulk growth rate measures for single-cell histories. Using this technique, we quantify the strength of selection acting on different cellular phenotypic traits within populations, which allows us to determine whether a change in population growth is caused by individual cells’ response, selection within a population, or by a mixture of these two processes. By applying these methods to single-cell time-lapse data of growing bacterial populations that express a resistance-conferring protein under antibiotic stress, we show how the distributions, fitness landscapes, and selection strength of single-cell phenotypes are affected by the drug. Our work provides a unified and practical framework for quantitative measurements of fitness landscapes and selection strength for any statistical quantities definable on lineages, and thus elucidates the adaptive significance of phenotypic states in time series data. The method is applicable in diverse fields, from single cell biology to stem cell differentiation and viral evolution. PMID:28267748

  20. Selection of DNA Aptamers against Glioblastoma Cells with High Affinity and Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Dezhi; Wang, Jiangjie; Zhang, Weiyun; Song, Yanling; Li, Xilan; Zou, Yuan; Zhu, Mingtao; Zhu, Zhi; Chen, Fuyong; Yang, Chaoyong James

    2012-01-01

    Background Glioblastoma is the most common and most lethal form of brain tumor in human. Unfortunately, there is still no effective therapy to this fatal disease and the median survival is generally less than one year from the time of diagnosis. Discovery of ligands that can bind specifically to this type of tumor cells will be of great significance to develop early molecular imaging, targeted delivery and guided surgery methods to battle this type of brain tumor. Methodology/Principal Findings We discovered two target-specific aptamers named GBM128 and GBM131 against cultured human glioblastoma cell line U118-MG after 30 rounds selection by a method called cell-based Systematic Evolution of Ligands by EXponential enrichment (cell-SELEX). These two aptamers have high affinity and specificity against target glioblastoma cells. They neither recognize normal astraglial cells, nor do they recognize other normal and cancer cell lines tested. Clinical tissues were also tested and the results showed that these two aptamers can bind to different clinical glioma tissues but not normal brain tissues. More importantly, binding affinity and selectivity of these two aptamers were retained in complicated biological environment. Conclusion/Significance The selected aptamers could be used to identify specific glioblastoma biomarkers. Methods of molecular imaging, targeted drug delivery, ligand guided surgery can be further developed based on these ligands for early detection, targeted therapy, and guided surgery of glioblastoma leading to effective treatment of glioblastoma. PMID:23056171

  1. T cell selection and differential activation on structurally related HLA-DR4 ligands.

    PubMed

    Gebe, J A; Novak, E J; Kwok, W W; Farr, A G; Nepom, G T; Buckner, J H

    2001-09-15

    Plasticity of TCR interactions during CD4(+) T cell activation by an MHC-peptide complex accommodates variation in the peptide or MHC contact sites in which recognition of an altered ligand by the T cell can modify the T cell response. To explore the contribution of this form of TCR cross-recognition in the context of T cell selection on disease-associated HLA molecules, we have analyzed the relationship between TCR recognition of the DRB1*0401- and DRB1*0404-encoded HLA class II molecules associated with rheumatoid arthritis. Thymic reaggregation cultures demonstrated that CD4(+) T cells selected on either DRB1*0401 or DRB1*0404 could be subsequently activated by the other MHC molecule. Using HLA tetramer technology we identify hemagglutinin residue 307-319-specific T cells restricted by DRB1*0401, but activated by hemagglutinin residues 307-319, in the context of DRB1*0404. One such clone exhibits an altered cytokine profile upon activation with the alternative MHC ligand. This altered phenotype persists when both class II molecules are present. These findings directly demonstrate that T cells selected on an MHC class II molecule carry the potential for activation on altered self ligands when encountering Ags presented on a related class II molecule. In individuals heterozygous for these alleles the possibility of TCR cross-recognition could lead to an aberrant immune response.

  2. Sulindac sulfide selectively increases sensitivity of ABCC1 expressing tumor cells to doxorubicin and glutathione depletion.

    PubMed

    Whitt, Jason D; Keeton, Adam B; Gary, Bernard D; Sklar, Larry A; Sodani, Kamlesh; Chen, Zhe-Sheng; Piazza, Gary A

    2016-03-01

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters ABCC1 (MRP1), ABCB1 (P-gp), and ABCG2 (BCRP) contribute to chemotherapy failure. The primary goals of this study were to characterize the efficacy and mechanism of the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), sulindac sulfide, to reverse ABCC1 mediated resistance to chemotherapeutic drugs and to determine if sulindac sulfide can influence sensitivity to chemotherapeutic drugs independently of drug efflux. Cytotoxicity assays were performed to measure resistance of ABC-expressing cell lines to doxorubicin and other chemotherapeutic drugs. NSAIDs were tested for the ability to restore sensitivity to resistance selected tumor cell lines, as well as a large panel of standard tumor cell lines. Other experiments characterized the mechanism by which sulindac sulfide inhibits ABCC1 substrate and co-substrate (GSH) transport in isolated membrane vesicles and intact cells. Selective reversal of multi-drug resistance (MDR), decreased efflux of doxorubicin, and fluorescent substrates were demonstrated by sulindac sulfide and a related NSAID, indomethacin, in resistance selected and engineered cell lines expressing ABCC1, but not ABCB1 or ABCG2. Sulindac sulfide also inhibited transport of leukotriene C4 into membrane vesicles. Sulindac sulfide enhanced the sensitivity to doxorubicin in 24 of 47 tumor cell lines, including all melanoma lines tested (7-7). Sulindac sulfide also decreased intracellular GSH in ABCC1 expressing cells, while the glutathione synthesis inhibitor, BSO, selectively increased sensitivity to sulindac sulfide induced cytotoxicity. Sulindac sulfide potently and selectively reverses ABCC1-mediated MDR at clinically achievable concentrations. ABCC1 expressing tumors may be highly sensitive to the direct cytotoxicity of sulindac sulfide, and in combination with chemotherapeutic drugs that induce oxidative stress.

  3. Sulindac sulfide selectively increases sensitivity of ABCC1 expressing tumor cells to doxorubicin and glutathione depletion

    PubMed Central

    Whitt, Jason D.; Keeton, Adam B.; Gary, Bernard D.; Sklar, Larry A.; Sodani, Kamlesh; Chen, Zhe-Sheng; Piazza, Gary A.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transpo rters ABCC1 (MRP1), ABCB1 (P-gp), and ABCG2 (BCRP) contribute to chemotherapy failure. The primary goals of this study were to characterize the efficacy and mechanism of the non­steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), sulindac sulfide, to reverse ABCC1 mediated resistance to chemother­apeutic drugs and to determine if sulindac sulfide can influence sensitivity to chemotherapeutic drugs independently of drug efflux. Cytotoxicity assays were performed to measure resistance of ABC-expressing cell lines to doxoru­bicin and other chemotherapeutic drugs. NSAIDs were tested for the ability to restore sensitivity to resistance selected tumor cell lines, as well as a large panel of standard tumor cell lines. Other experiments characterized the mechanism by which sulindac sulfide inhibits ABCC1 substrate and co-substrate (GSH) transport in isolated membrane vesicles and intact cells. Selective reversal of multi-drug resistance (MDR), decreased efflux of doxor­ubicin, and fluorescent substrates were demonstrated by sulindac sulfide and a related NSAID, indomethacin, in resistance selected and engineered cell lines expressing ABCC1, but not ABCB1 or ABCG2. Sulindac sulfide also inhibited transport of leukotriene C4 into membrane vesicles. Sulindac sulfide enhanced the sensitivity to doxoru­bicin in 24 of 47 tumor cell lines, including all melanoma lines tested (7-7). Sulindac sulfide also decreased intra­cellular GSH in ABCC1 expressing cells, while the glutathione synthesis inhibitor, BSO, selectively increased sensitivity to sulindac sulfide induced cytotoxicity. Sulindac sulfide potently and selectively reverses ABCC1-mediated MDR at clinically achievable concentrations. ABCC1 expressing tumors may be highly sensitive to the direct cytotoxicity of sulindac sulfide, and in combination with chemotherapeutic drugs that induce oxidative stress. PMID:28276667

  4. Granulosa cells and retinoic acid co-treatment enrich potential germ cells from manually selected Oct4-EGFP expressing human embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hsin-Fu; Jan, Pey-Shynan; Kuo, Hung-Chih; Wu, Fang-Chun; Lan, Chen-Wei; Huang, Mei-Chi; Chien, Chung-Liang; Ho, Hong-Nerng

    2014-09-01

    Differentiation of human embryonic stem (HES) cells to germ cells may become clinically useful in overcoming diseases related to germ-cell development. Niches were used to differentiate HES cell lines, NTU1 and H9 Oct4-enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP), including laminin, granulosa cell co-culture or conditioned medium, ovarian stromal cell co-culture or conditioned medium, retinoic acid, stem cell factor (SCF) and BMP4-BMP7-BMP8b treatment. Flow cytometry showed that granulosa cell co-culture (P < 0.001) or conditioned medium (P = 0.007) treatment for 14 days significantly increased the percentages of differentiated H9 Oct4-EGFP cells expressing early germ cell marker stage-specific embryonic antigen 1(SSEA1); sorted SSEA1[+] cells did not express higher levels of germ cell gene VASA and GDF9. Manually collected H9 Oct4-EGFP[+] cells expressed significantly higher levels of VASA (P = 0.005) and GDF9 (P = 0.001). H9 Oct4-EGFP[+] cells developed to ovarian follicle-like structures after culture for 28 days but with low efficiency. Unlike SCF and BMP4, retinoic acid co-treatment enhanced VASA, GDF9 and SCP3 expression. A protocol is recommended to enrich differentiated HES cells with germ-cell potential by culture with granulosa cells, conditioned medium or retinoic acid, manual selection of Oct4-EGFP[+] cells, and analysis of VASA, GDF9 expression, or both.

  5. Selective control of human glioma cell proliferation by specific cell interaction.

    PubMed

    MacDonald, C M; Freshney, R I; Hart, E; Graham, D I

    1985-01-01

    Cells cultured from anaplastic astrocytoma (Kernohan and Sayre, grades III and IV) will proliferate on confluent monolayers of normal glia, while cells cultured from normal brain will not. The growth of a cell line containing a high proportion of well-differentiated glioma cells (G-CCM) was partially inhibited, though not as much as normal glia, while the growth of a cell line made up of less differentiated cells (G-UVW) was enhanced by the normal glia. Although non-glial confluent monolayers also inhibited the growth of normal glia, this was less specific, as one normal glial line (N-DUT) grew on fibroblasts and intestinal epithelium, although it was unable to do so on normal glia. It is suggested that this may be a useful method for examining reduced density limitation of growth, discriminating between normal and malignant glia, and for separating glioma cells from contaminating normal cells.

  6. Triethylenetetramine Synergizes with Pharmacologic Ascorbic Acid in Hydrogen Peroxide Mediated Selective Toxicity to Breast Cancer Cell

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lianlian; Luo, Xiaofang; Li, Cong; Huang, Yubing; Xu, Ping; Lloyd-Davies, Laetitia H.; Delplancke, Thibaut; Peng, Chuan; Qi, Hongbo; Baker, Philip

    2017-01-01

    Breast cancer is characterized by overexpression of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and downregulation of catalase and more resistance to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) than normal cells. Thus, relatively high H2O2 promotes breast cancer cell growth and proliferation. However, excessive intracellular H2O2 leads to death of breast cancer cells. In cancer cells, high level ascorbic acid (Asc) is able to be autoxidized and thus provides an electron to oxygen to generate H2O2. In the present study, we demonstrated that triethylenetetramine (TETA) enhances Asc autoxidation and thus elevates H2O2 production in MCF-7 cells. Furthermore, Asc/TETA combination significantly impaired cancer cell viability, while having much milder effects on normal cells, indicating Asc/TETA could be a promising therapy for breast cancer. Moreover, SOD1 and N-acetyl-L-cysteine failed to improve MCF-7 cells viability in the presence of Asc/TETA, while catalase significantly inhibited the cytotoxicity of Asc/TETA to breast cancer cells, strongly suggesting that the selective cytotoxicity of Asc/TETA to cancer cells is H2O2-dependent. In addition, Asc/TETA induces RAS/ERK downregulation in breast cancer cells. Animal studies confirmed that Asc/TETA effectively suppressed tumor growth in vivo. In conclusion, TETA synergizes pharmacologic Asc autoxidation and H2O2 overproduction in breast cancer cells, which suppresses RAS/ERK pathway and results in apoptosis. PMID:28280522

  7. Selective and potent furin inhibitors protect cells from anthrax without significant toxicity.

    PubMed

    Remacle, Albert G; Gawlik, Katarzyna; Golubkov, Vladislav S; Cadwell, Gregory W; Liddington, Robert C; Cieplak, Piotr; Millis, Sherri Z; Desjardins, Roxane; Routhier, Sophie; Yuan, Xue Wen; Neugebauer, Witold A; Day, Robert; Strongin, Alex Y

    2010-06-01

    Furin and related proprotein convertases cleave the multibasic motifs R-X-R/K/X-R in the precursor proteins and, as a result, transform the latent proproteins into biologically active proteins and peptides. Furin is present both in the intracellular secretory pathway and at the cell surface. Intracellular furin processes its multiple normal cellular targets in the Golgi and secretory vesicle compartments while cell-surface furin appears to be essential only for the processing of certain pathogenic proteins and, importantly, anthrax. To design potent, safe and selective inhibitors of furin, we evaluated the potency and selectivity of the derivatized peptidic inhibitors modeled from the extended furin cleavage sequence of avian influenza A H5N1. We determined that the N- and C-terminal modifications of the original RARRRKKRT inhibitory scaffold produced selective and potent, nanomolar range, inhibitors of furin. These inhibitors did not interfere with the normal cellular function of furin because of the likely functional redundancy existing between furin and other proprotein convertases. These furin inhibitors, however, were highly potent in blocking the furin-dependent cell-surface processing of anthrax protective antigen-83 both in vitro and cell-based assays and in vivo. We conclude that the inhibitors we have designed have a promising potential as selective anthrax inhibitors, without affecting major cell functions.

  8. Pertussis Toxin Is a Robust and Selective Inhibitor of High Grade Glioma Cell Migration and Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lei; Natali, Letizia; Karimi-Mostowfi, Nicki; Brifault, Coralie; Gonias, Steven L.

    2016-01-01

    In high grade glioma (HGG), extensive tumor cell infiltration of normal brain typically precludes identifying effective margins for surgical resection or irradiation. Pertussis toxin (PT) is a multimeric complex that inactivates diverse Gi/o G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs). Despite the broad continuum of regulatory events controlled by GPCRs, PT may be applicable as a therapeutic. We have shown that the urokinase receptor (uPAR) is a major driver of HGG cell migration. uPAR-initiated cell-signaling requires a Gi/o GPCR, N-formyl Peptide Receptor 2 (FPR2), as an essential co-receptor and is thus, PT-sensitive. Herein, we show that PT robustly inhibits migration of three separate HGG-like cell lines that express a mutated form of the EGF Receptor (EGFR), EGFRvIII, which is constitutively active. PT also almost completely blocked the ability of HGG cells to invade Matrigel. In the equivalent concentration range (0.01–1.0 μg/mL), PT had no effect on cell survival and only affected proliferation of one cell line. Neutralization of EGFRvIII expression in HGG cells, which is known to activate uPAR-initiated cell-signaling, promoted HGG cell migration. The increase in HGG cell migration, induced by EGFRvIII neutralization, was entirely blocked by silencing FPR2 gene expression or by treating the cells with PT. When U87MG HGG cells were cultured as suspended neurospheres in serum-free, growth factor-supplemented medium, uPAR expression was increased. HGG cells isolated from neurospheres migrated through Transwell membranes without loss of cell contacts; this process was inhibited by PT by >90%. PT also inhibited expression of vimentin by HGG cells; vimentin is associated with epithelial-mesenchymal transition and worsened prognosis. We conclude that PT may function as a selective inhibitor of HGG cell migration and invasion. PMID:27977780

  9. Crossreactive αβ T cell receptors are the predominant targets of thymocyte negative selection

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Benjamin D.; Bunker, Jeffrey J.; Erickson, Steven A.; Oh-Hora, Masatsugu; Bendelac, Albert

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY The precise impact of thymic positive and negative selection on the T cell receptor (TCR) repertoire remains controversial. Here, we used unbiased, high-throughput cloning and retroviral expression of individual preselection TCRs to provide a direct assessment of these processes at the clonal level in vivo. We found that 15% of random TCRs induced signaling and directed positive (7.5%) or negative (7.5%) selection, depending on strength of signal, whereas the remaining 85% failed to induce signaling or selection. Most negatively selected TCRs exhibited promiscuous crossreactivity toward multiple other major histocompatibility complex (MHC) haplotypes. In contrast, TCRs that were positively selected or non-selected were minimally crossreactive. Negative selection of crossreactive TCRs led to clonal deletion but also recycling into intestinal CD4−CD8β− intraepithelial lymphocytes (iIELs). Thus, broadly crossreactive TCRs arise at low frequency in the pre-selection repertoire but constitute the primary drivers of thymic negative selection and iIEL lineage differentiation. PMID:26522985

  10. Low Selection Pressure Aids the Evolution of Cooperative Ribozyme Mutations in Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Amini, Zhaleh N.; Müller, Ulrich F.

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the evolution of functional RNA molecules is important for our molecular understanding of biology. Here we tested experimentally how two evolutionary parameters, selection pressure and recombination, influenced the evolution of an evolving RNA population. This was done using four parallel evolution experiments that employed low or gradually increasing selection pressure, and recombination events either at the end or dispersed throughout the evolution. As model system, a trans-splicing group I intron ribozyme was evolved in Escherichia coli cells over 12 rounds of selection and amplification, including mutagenesis and recombination. The low selection pressure resulted in higher efficiency of the evolved ribozyme populations, whereas differences in recombination did not have a strong effect. Five mutations were responsible for the highest efficiency. The first mutation swept quickly through all four evolving populations, whereas the remaining four mutations accumulated later and more efficiently under low selection pressure. To determine why low selection pressure aided this evolution, all evolutionary intermediates between the wild type and the 5-mutation variant were constructed, and their activities at three different selection pressures were determined. The resulting fitness profiles showed a high cooperativity among the four late mutations, which can explain why high selection pressure led to inefficient evolution. These results show experimentally how low selection pressure can benefit the evolution of cooperative mutations in functional RNAs. PMID:24089519

  11. Long-term artificial selection reveals a role of TCTP in autophagy in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ke; Huang, Chunhua; Yuan, Jia; Cheng, Hanhua; Zhou, Rongjia

    2014-08-01

    Understanding genomic variation and detecting selection signatures in a genome under selection have been great challenges for a century. Activation, development/exhaustion of primordial follicles in mammalian ovary determines reproductive success, menopause/end of female reproductive life. However, molecular mechanisms underlying oogenesis, particularly under artificial selection, are largely unknown. We report that a proteome-wide scan for selection signatures in the genome over 9,000 years of artificial pressure on the ovary revealed a general picture of selection signatures in the genome, especially genomic variations through artificial selection were detected in promoter and intron regions. Crossbreeding between domestic and wild species results in more than half of the protein spots exhibiting heterosis. Translationally controlled tumor protein (TCTP) is upregulated by artificial selection and positively regulates autophagy through the AMP-activated protein kinase pathway. Notably, TCTP interacts with ATG16 complex. In addition to cytoplasmic autophagy, nucleophagy occurs in the nuclei of granulosa and cumulus cells in ovaries, indicating an importance of the nuclear material for degradation by nucleophagy. Our findings provide insight into cellular and molecular mechanisms relevant for improvement of ovary functions, and identify selection signatures in the genome for ovary function over long-term artificial selection pressure.

  12. Quercetin derivatives as potent inducers of selective cytotoxicity in glioma cells.

    PubMed

    Dell'Albani, Paola; Di Marco, Barbara; Grasso, Sonia; Rocco, Concetta; Foti, Mario C

    2017-04-01

    Quercetin (Q) is a flavonoid widely distributed in the plant kingdom and well-known for its ability to exert antioxidant, prooxidant and anticarcinogenic activities in several tumor cells. Furthermore, quercetin plays an important role both in the regulation of key elements in cellular signal transduction pathways related to apoptotic cell death, and in cell cycle progression. Several studies have reported of toxic effects of Q against glioma cell lines. In this study, the effects of Q and of some Q-derivatives (acyl esters and bromo-derivatives) on U373-MG and 9L glioma cell lines survival are analyzed. The 24-hour treatment of glioma cells with several concentrations of Q (25, 50 and 100μM) did not cause any cytotoxic effects, while the administration of Q-derivatives, such as acylated and brominated quercetin, caused a sharp increase in cell death. Among all tested derivatives, 3-O-decanoylquercetin 10 manifested the strongest cytotoxic effect at a concentration as low as 25μM both in U373-MG (ca. 40% viability after 24h) and in 9L cells (ca. 20% viability after 24h). The cytotoxic effects of the Q-derivatives 3 and 10-13 were proven to be satisfactorily selective for glioma cells. When Q-derivatives were in fact administered to mouse primary astroglial or human fibroblast cell cultures, a higher cell survival rate (~90-70% and 55-45%, respectively) was observed relative to that detected in glioma cells. These results prove that selective esterification and bromination of Q increase to a great extent the toxicity of this polyphenol against glioma cells, thereby providing a possible new tool for cyto-specific glioma therapy.

  13. Selection of Intracellularly Functional RNA Mimics of Green Fluorescent Protein Using Fluorescence-Activated Cell Sorting.

    PubMed

    Zou, Jiawei; Huang, Xin; Wu, Lei; Chen, Gangyi; Dong, Juan; Cui, Xin; Tang, Zhuo

    2015-12-01

    Fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) was exploited to isolate Escherichia coli cells that were highly fluorescent due to the expression of RNA aptamers that induce fluorescence of 3,5-difluoro-4-hydroxybenzylidene imidazolinone. Two different aptamers, named ZT-26 and ZT-324, were identified by this method and compared to the fluorescence-signaling properties of Spinach, a previously reported RNA aptamer. Aptamer ZT-26 exhibits significantly enhanced fluorescence over Spinach only in vitro. However, aptamer ZT-324 is 36% brighter than Spinach when expressed in E. coli. The FACS-based selection strategy presented here is attractive for deriving fluorescent RNA aptamers that function in cells as it directly selects for cells with a high level of fluorescence due to the expression of the RNA aptamer.

  14. Targeting heat shock proteins on cancer cells: selection, characterization, and cell-penetrating properties of a peptidic GRP78 ligand.

    PubMed

    Kim, Youngsoo; Lillo, Antonietta M; Steiniger, Sebastian C J; Liu, Ying; Ballatore, Carlo; Anichini, Andrea; Mortarini, Roberta; Kaufmann, Gunnar F; Zhou, Bin; Felding-Habermann, Brunhilde; Janda, Kim D

    2006-08-08

    Peptidic ligands can be used for specific cell targeting and the delivery of payloads into the target cell. Here we describe the screening of a pool of cyclic peptide phage display libraries using whole-cell panning against human melanoma cell line Me6652/4. This strategy resulted in the selection of the cyclic 13-mer Pep42, CTVALPGGYVRVC, which showed preferential internalization into melanoma cell line Me6652/4 versus the reference cell line Me6652/56. This translocation is a receptor-mediated process that does not require electrostatic interactions nor does it involve transfer to the lysosomal compartment. The cellular receptor for Pep42 was identified as the surface membrane form of glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78), a member of the heat shock protein family and a marker on malignant cancer cells. The cellular uptake and intracellular trafficking of Pep42-Quantum Dot conjugates was monitored by confocal laser microscopy, and colocalization within the endoplasmic reticulum was observed. The uptake of Pep42 could be blocked by a monoclonal antibody against the identified receptor. Furthermore, Pep42 was shown to target specifically GRP78-expressing cancer cells. The in vitro cytotoxicity of a Pep42-Taxol conjugate was evaluated by flow cytometry wherein the conjugate was shown to induce apoptosis and was more effective in promoting programmed cell death in Me6652/4 cells. In summary, the data presented suggest that cyclic peptide Pep42 might be a powerful tool in the construction of drug conjugates designed to selectively kill malignant cancer cells.

  15. Selective purging of human multiple myeloma cells from autologous stem cell transplant grafts using oncolytic myxoma virus

    PubMed Central

    Bartee, Eric; Chan, Winnie S.; Moreb, Jan S.; Cogle, Christopher R.; McFadden, Grant

    2012-01-01

    Autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) and novel therapies have improved overall survival of patients with multiple myeloma; however, most patients relapse and eventually succumb to their disease. Evidence indicates that residual cancer cells contaminate autologous grafts and may contribute to early relapses after ASCT. Here, we demonstrate that ex vivo treatment with an oncolytic poxvirus called myxoma virus results in specific elimination of human myeloma cells by inducing rapid cellular apoptosis while fully sparing normal hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs). The specificity of this elimination is based on strong binding of the virus to myeloma cells coupled with an inability of the virus to bind or infect CD34+ HSPCs. These two features allow myxoma to readily identify and distinguish even low levels of myeloma cells in complex mixtures. This ex vivo MYXV treatment also effectively inhibits systemic in vivo engraftment of human myeloma cells into immunodeficient mice and results in efficient elimination of primary CD138+ myeloma cells contaminating patient hematopoietic cell products. We conclude that ex vivo myxoma treatment represents a safe and effective method to selectively eliminate myeloma cells from hematopoietic autografts prior to reinfusion. PMID:22516053

  16. A 3D model of tumour angiogenic microenvironment to monitor hypoxia effects on cell interactions and cancer stem cell selection.

    PubMed

    Klimkiewicz, Krzysztof; Weglarczyk, Kazimierz; Collet, Guillaume; Paprocka, Maria; Guichard, Alan; Sarna, Michal; Jozkowicz, Alicja; Dulak, Jozef; Sarna, Tadeusz; Grillon, Catherine; Kieda, Claudine

    2017-03-10

    Tumour microenvironment determines the fate of treatments. Reconstitution of tumour conditions is mandatory for alternative in vitro methods devoted to cancer development and the selection of therapeutic strategies. This work describes a 3D model of melanoma growth in its environment. Introducing means to mimic tumour angiogenesis, which turns on tumour progression, the model shows that melanoma tumour spheroids allow reconstitution of solid tumours with stromal cells. Angiogenesis evidenced the differential recruitment of endothelial cells (EC) from early progenitors (EEPCs) to mature ECs. Hypoxia was the key parameter that selected and stabilized melanoma cancer stem like cells (CSCs) phenotype based on aldehyde dehydrogenase expression as the best criterion. The 3D-tumour-model demonstrated the distinct reactivity of ECs toward tumour cells in terms of cellular cross-talk and humoral response. Intra-spheroid cell-to-cell membrane dye exchanges, mediated by intercellular interactions, uncovered the melanoma-to-EEPC cooperation. The resulting changes in tumour milieu were evidenced by the chemokinic composition and hypoxia-related variations in microRNA expression assessed in each cellular component of the spheroids. This method brings new tools to decipher the molecular mechanism of tumour-mediated cell recruitment and for in vitro assessment of therapeutic approaches.

  17. Manipulating Antigenic Ligand Strength to Selectively Target Myelin-Reactive CD4+ T Cells in EAE

    PubMed Central

    Sabatino, Joseph J.; Rosenthal, Kristen M.

    2010-01-01

    The development of antigen-specific therapies for the selective tolerization of autoreactive T cells remains the Holy Grail for the treatment of T-cell-mediated autoimmune diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS) and its animal model experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). This quest remains elusive, however, as the numerous antigen-specific strategies targeting myelin-specific T cells over the years have failed to result in clinical success. In this review, we revisit the antigen-based therapies used in the treatment of myelin-specific CD4+ T cells in the context of the functional avidity and the strength of signal of the encephalitogenic CD4+ T cell repertoire. In light of differences in activation thresholds, we propose that autoreactive T cells are not all equal, and therefore tolerance induction strategies must incorporate ligand strength in order to be successful in treating EAE and ultimately the human disease MS. PMID:19904613

  18. Aneuploidy impairs hematopoietic stem cell fitness and is selected against in regenerating tissues in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Pfau, Sarah J.; Silberman, Rebecca E.; Knouse, Kristin A.; Amon, Angelika

    2016-01-01

    Aneuploidy, an imbalanced karyotype, is a widely observed feature of cancer cells that has long been hypothesized to promote tumorigenesis. Here we evaluate the fitness of cells with constitutional trisomy or chromosomal instability (CIN) in vivo using hematopoietic reconstitution experiments. We did not observe cancer but instead found that aneuploid hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) exhibit decreased fitness. This reduced fitness is due at least in part to the decreased proliferative potential of aneuploid hematopoietic cells. Analyses of mice with CIN caused by a hypomorphic mutation in the gene Bub1b further support the finding that aneuploidy impairs cell proliferation in vivo. Whereas nonregenerating adult tissues are highly aneuploid in these mice, HSCs and other regenerative adult tissues are largely euploid. These findings indicate that, in vivo, mechanisms exist to select against aneuploid cells. PMID:27313317

  19. Selective recycle of viable animal cells by coupling of airlift reactor and cell settler.

    PubMed

    Hülscher, M; Scheibler, U; Onken, U

    1992-02-20

    A new system for the perfusion culture of animal cells in suspension is described. It consists of an airlift loop reactor and a settling tank for cell retention. Insufficient nutrient and oxygen supply of the cells in the settling tank was prevented by cooling the cell suspension before entering the settler. As a result, the catabolic activity of the cells in the settler was reversibly reduced. Furthermore, the density gradient induced by cooling caused a liquid motion through the settler. Thus, it was not necessary to pump medium containing shear, sensitive cells. With this simple system, it was possible to prduce 2 to 5 g of antibodies in a 5.4-L reactor in continuous runs of 400 to 600 h. The productivity was increased by a factor of 17 and the cell density was 4 times higher in comparison with the corresponding batch system. The cell retention system was found to have the property of separating viable and nonviable cells. With the increasing perfusion rate, dead cells and debris were preferably washed out. For perfusion rates up to 1.3 d(-1), the retention efficiency of the settler was nearly 100% for viable cells; hence, this system may show advantages at the industrial scale.

  20. Kaempferol nanoparticles achieve strong and selective inhibition of ovarian cancer cell viability.

    PubMed

    Luo, Haitao; Jiang, Bingbing; Li, Bingyun; Li, Zhaoliang; Jiang, Bing-Hua; Chen, Yi Charlie

    2012-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer death for women throughout the Western world. Kaempferol, a natural flavonoid, has shown promise in the chemoprevention of ovarian cancer. A common concern about using dietary supplements for chemoprevention is their bioavailability. Nanoparticles have shown promise in increasing the bioavailability of some chemicals. Here we developed five different types of nanoparticles incorporating kaempferol and tested their efficacy in the inhibition of viability of cancerous and normal ovarian cells. We found that positively charged nanoparticle formulations did not lead to a significant reduction in cancer cell viability, whereas nonionic polymeric nanoparticles resulted in enhanced reduction of cancer cell viability. Among the nonionic polymeric nanoparticles, poly(ethylene oxide)-poly(propylene oxide)-poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO-PPO-PEO) nanoparticles incorporating kaempferol led to significant reduction in cell viability of both cancerous and normal cells. Poly(DL-lactic acid-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles incorporating kaempferol resulted in enhanced reduction of cancer cell viability together with no significant reduction in cell viability of normal cells compared with kaempferol alone. Therefore, both PEO-PPO-PEO and PLGA nanoparticle formulations were effective in reducing cancer cell viability, while PLGA nanoparticles incorporating kaempferol had selective toxicity against cancer cells and normal cells. A PLGA nanoparticle formulation could be advantageous in the prevention and treatment of ovarian cancers. On the other hand, PEO-PPO-PEO nanoparticles incorporating kaempferol were more effective inhibitors of cancer cells, but they also significantly reduced the viability of normal cells. PEO-PPO-PEO nanoparticles incorporating kaempferol may be suitable as a cancer-targeting strategy, which could limit the effects of the nanoparticles on normal cells while retaining their potency against cancer cells. We

  1. Silicon cells made by self-aligned selective-emitter plasma-etchback process

    DOEpatents

    Ruby, Douglas S.; Schubert, William K.; Gee, James M.; Zaidi, Saleem H.

    2000-01-01

    Photovoltaic cells and methods for making them are disclosed wherein the metallized grids of the cells are used to mask portions of cell emitter regions to allow selective etching of phosphorus-doped emitter regions. The preferred etchant is SF.sub.6 or a combination of SF.sub.6 and O.sub.2. This self-aligned selective etching allows for enhanced blue response (versus cells with uniform heavy doping of the emitter) while preserving heavier doping in the region beneath the gridlines needed for low contact resistance. Embodiments are disclosed for making cells with or without textured surfaces. Optional steps include plasma hydrogenation and PECVD nitride deposition, each of which are suited to customized applications for requirements of given cells to be manufactured. The techniques disclosed could replace expensive and difficult alignment methodologies used to obtain selectively etched emitters, and they may be easily integrated with existing plasma processing methods and techniques of the invention may be accomplished in a single plasma-processing chamber.

  2. Polarity governed selective amplification of through plane proton shuttling in proton exchange membrane fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Gautam, Manu; Chattanahalli Devendrachari, Mruthyunjayachari; Thimmappa, Ravikumar; Raja Kottaichamy, Alagar; Pottachola Shafi, Shahid; Gaikwad, Pramod; Makri Nimbegondi Kotresh, Harish; Ottakam Thotiyl, Musthafa

    2017-03-15

    Graphene oxide (GO) anisotropically conducts protons with directional dominance of in plane ionic transport (σ IP) over the through plane (σ TP). In a typical H2-O2 fuel cell, since the proton conduction occurs through the plane during its generation at the fuel electrode, it is indeed inevitable to selectively accelerate GO's σ TP for advancement towards a potential fuel cell membrane. We successfully achieved ∼7 times selective amplification of GO's σ TP by tuning the polarity of the dopant molecule in its nanoporous matrix. The coexistence of strongly non-polar and polar domains in the dopant demonstrated a synergistic effect towards σ TP with the former decreasing the number of water molecules coordinated to protons by ∼3 times, diminishing the effects of electroosmotic drag exerted on ionic movements, and the latter selectively accelerating σ TP across the catalytic layers by bridging the individual GO planes via extensive host guest H-bonding interactions. When they are decoupled, the dopant with mainly non-polar or polar features only marginally enhances the σ TP, revealing that polarity factors contribute to fuel cell relevant transport properties of GO membranes only when they coexist. Fuel cell polarization and kinetic analyses revealed that these multitask dopants increased the fuel cell performance metrics of the power and current densities by ∼3 times compared to the pure GO membranes, suggesting that the functional group factors of the dopants are of utmost importance in GO-based proton exchange membrane fuel cells.

  3. Modulation of Igβ is essential for the B cell selection in germinal center

    PubMed Central

    Todo, Kagefumi; Koga, Orie; Nishikawa, Miwako; Hikida, Masaki

    2015-01-01

    The positive and negative selection of antigen-reactive B cells take place in the germinal center (GC) during an immune responses. However, the precise molecular mechanisms underlying these selection machineries, including the involvement of antigen receptor signaling molecules, remain to be elucidated. We found that expression levels of Igα and Igβ, which are the essential components of B cell antigen-receptor complex, were differentially regulated in GC B cells and that the expression of Igβ was more prominently down-regulated in a portion of GC B cells. The suppression of Igβ down-regulation reduced the number of GL7+GC B cells and the affinity maturation in T-dependent responses was markedly impaired. In addition, the disease phenotypes in autoimmune-prone mice were ameliorated by blocking of Igβ down-regulation. These results suggest that Igβ down-regulation is involved in the normal positive selection in GC and the accumulation of autoreactive B cells in autoimmune-prone mice. PMID:25980548

  4. Chromosome segregation impacts on cell growth and division site selection in Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Donovan, Catriona; Schauss, Astrid; Krämer, Reinhard; Bramkamp, Marc

    2013-01-01

    Spatial and temporal regulation of bacterial cell division is imperative for the production of viable offspring. In many rod-shaped bacteria, regulatory systems such as the Min system and nucleoid occlusion ensure the high fidelity of midcell divisome positioning. However, regulation of division site selection in bacteria lacking recognizable Min and nucleoid occlusion remains less well understood. Here, we describe one such rod-shaped organism, Corynebacterium glutamicum, which does not always place the division septum precisely at midcell. Here we now show at single cell level that cell growth and division site selection are spatially and temporally regulated by chromosome segregation. Mutants defective in chromosome segregation have more variable cell growth and aberrant placement of the division site. In these mutants, division septa constrict over and often guillotine the nucleoid, leading to nonviable, DNA-free cells. Our results suggest that chromosome segregation or some nucleoid associated factor influences growth and division site selection in C. glutamicum. Understanding growth and regulation of C. glutamicum cells will also be of importance to develop strains for industrial production of biomolecules, such as amino acids.

  5. Chromosome Segregation Impacts on Cell Growth and Division Site Selection in Corynebacterium glutamicum

    PubMed Central

    Donovan, Catriona; Schauss, Astrid; Krämer, Reinhard; Bramkamp, Marc

    2013-01-01

    Spatial and temporal regulation of bacterial cell division is imperative for the production of viable offspring. In many rod-shaped bacteria, regulatory systems such as the Min system and nucleoid occlusion ensure the high fidelity of midcell divisome positioning. However, regulation of division site selection in bacteria lacking recognizable Min and nucleoid occlusion remains less well understood. Here, we describe one such rod-shaped organism, Corynebacterium glutamicum, which does not always place the division septum precisely at midcell. Here we now show at single cell level that cell growth and division site selection are spatially and temporally regulated by chromosome segregation. Mutants defective in chromosome segregation have more variable cell growth and aberrant placement of the division site. In these mutants, division septa constrict over and often guillotine the nucleoid, leading to nonviable, DNA-free cells. Our results suggest that chromosome segregation or some nucleoid associated factor influences growth and division site selection in C. glutamicum. Understanding growth and regulation of C. glutamicum cells will also be of importance to develop strains for industrial production of biomolecules, such as amino acids. PMID:23405112

  6. Modulation of Igβ is essential for the B cell selection in germinal center.

    PubMed

    Todo, Kagefumi; Koga, Orie; Nishikawa, Miwako; Hikida, Masaki

    2015-05-18

    The positive and negative selection of antigen-reactive B cells take place in the germinal center (GC) during an immune responses. However, the precise molecular mechanisms underlying these selection machineries, including the involvement of antigen receptor signaling molecules, remain to be elucidated. We found that expression levels of Igα and Igβ, which are the essential components of B cell antigen-receptor complex, were differentially regulated in GC B cells and that the expression of Igβ was more prominently down-regulated in a portion of GC B cells. The suppression of Igβ down-regulation reduced the number of GL7(+)GC B cells and the affinity maturation in T-dependent responses was markedly impaired. In addition, the disease phenotypes in autoimmune-prone mice were ameliorated by blocking of Igβ down-regulation. These results suggest that Igβ down-regulation is involved in the normal positive selection in GC and the accumulation of autoreactive B cells in autoimmune-prone mice.

  7. Manool, a Salvia officinalis diterpene, induces selective cytotoxicity in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Pollyanna Francielli; Munari, Carla Carolina; Nicolella, Heloiza Diniz; Veneziani, Rodrigo Cassio Sola; Tavares, Denise Crispim

    2016-10-01

    Manool, a diterpene isolated from Salvia officinalis, was evaluated by the XTT colorimetric assay for cytotoxicity and selectivity against different cancer cell lines: B16F10 (murine melanoma), MCF-7 (human breast adenocarcinoma), HeLa (human cervical adenocarcinoma), HepG2 (human hepatocellular carcinoma), and MO59J, U343 and U251 (human glioblastoma). A normal cell line (V79, Chinese hamster lung fibroblasts) was used to compare the selectivity of the test substance. Manool exhibited higher cytotoxic activity against HeLa (IC50 = 6.7 ± 1.1 µg/mL) and U343 (IC50 = 6.7 ± 1.2 µg/mL) cells. In addition, in the used experimental protocols, the treatment with manool was significantly more cytotoxic for different tumor cell lines than for the normal cell line V79 (IC50 = 49.3 ± 3.3 µg/mL), and showed high selectivity. These results suggest that manool may be used to treat cancer without affecting normal cells.

  8. Selective Expansion of Skeletal Muscle Stem Cells From Bulk Muscle Cells in Soft Three-Dimensional Fibrin Gel.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Pei; Zhou, Yalu; Wu, Furen; Hong, Yuanfan; Wang, Xin; Shekhawat, Gajendra; Mosenson, Jeffrey; Wu, Wen-Shu

    2017-02-28

    Muscle stem cells (MuSCs) exhibit robust myogenic potential in vivo, thus providing a promising curative treatment for muscle disorders. Ex vivo expansion of adult MuSCs is highly desired to achieve a therapeutic cell dose because of their scarcity in limited muscle biopsies. Sorting of pure MuSCs is generally required for all the current culture systems. Here we developed a soft three-dimensional (3D) salmon fibrin gel culture system that can selectively expand mouse MuSCs from bulk skeletal muscle preparations without cell sorting and faithfully maintain their regenerative capacity in culture. Our study established a novel platform for convenient ex vivo expansion of MuSCs, thus greatly advancing stem cell-based therapies for various muscle disorders. © Stem Cells Translational Medicine 2017.

  9. Aging-associated inflammation promotes selection for adaptive oncogenic events in B cell progenitors

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Curtis J.; Casás-Selves, Matias; Kim, Jihye; Zaberezhnyy, Vadym; Aghili, Leila; Daniel, Ashley E.; Jimenez, Linda; Azam, Tania; McNamee, Eoin N.; Clambey, Eric T.; Klawitter, Jelena; Serkova, Natalie J.; Tan, Aik Choon; Dinarello, Charles A.; DeGregori, James

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of cancer is higher in the elderly; however, many of the underlying mechanisms for this association remain unexplored. Here, we have shown that B cell progenitors in old mice exhibit marked signaling, gene expression, and metabolic defects. Moreover, B cell progenitors that developed from hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) transferred from young mice into aged animals exhibited similar fitness defects. We further demonstrated that ectopic expression of the oncogenes BCR-ABL, NRASV12, or Myc restored B cell progenitor fitness, leading to selection for oncogenically initiated cells and leukemogenesis specifically in the context of an aged hematopoietic system. Aging was associated with increased inflammation in the BM microenvironment, and induction of inflammation in young mice phenocopied aging-associated B lymphopoiesis. Conversely, a reduction of inflammation in aged mice via transgenic expression of α-1-antitrypsin or IL-37 preserved the function of B cell progenitors and prevented NRASV12-mediated oncogenesis. We conclude that chronic inflammatory microenvironments in old age lead to reductions in the fitness of B cell progenitor populations. This reduced progenitor pool fitness engenders selection for cells harboring oncogenic mutations, in part due to their ability to correct aging-associated functional defects. Thus, modulation of inflammation — a common feature of aging — has the potential to limit aging-associated oncogenesis. PMID:26551682

  10. A Selective and Purification-Free Strategy for Labeling Adherent Cells with Inorganic Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yu; Lim, Jing; Yeo, David Chen Loong; Liao, Shanshan; Lans, Malin; Wang, Yaqi; Teoh, Swee-Hin; Goh, Bee Tin; Xu, Chenjie

    2016-03-01

    Cellular labeling with inorganic nanoparticles such as magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles, quantum dots, and fluorescent silica nanoparticles is an important method for the noninvasive visualization of cells using various imaging modalities. Currently, this is mainly achieved through the incubation of cultured cells with the nanoparticles that eventually reach the intracellular compartment through specific or nonspecific internalization. This classic method is advantageous in terms of simplicity and convenience, but it suffers from issues such as difficulties in fully removing free nanoparticles (suspended in solution) and the lack of selectivity on cell types. This article reports an innovative strategy for the specific labeling of adherent cells without the concern of freely suspended nanoparticles. This method relies on a nanocomposite film that is prepared by homogeneously dispersing nanoparticles within a biodegradable polymeric film. When adherent cells are seeded on the film, they adhere, spread, and filtrate into the film through the micropores formed during the film fabrication. The pre-embedded nanoparticles are thus internalized by the cells during this infiltration process. As an example, fluorescent silica nanoparticles were homogeneously distributed within a polycaprolactone film by utilizing cryomilling and heat pressing. Upon incubation within physiological buffer, no silica nanoparticles were released from the nanocomposite film even after 20 d of incubation. However, when adherent cells (e.g., human mesenchymal stem cells) were grown on the film, they became fluorescent after 3 d, which suggests internalization of silica nanoparticles by cells. In comparison, the suspension cells (e.g., monocytes) in the medium remained nonfluorescent no matter whether there was the presence of adherent cells or not. This strategy eventually allowed the selective and concomitant labeling of mesenchymal stem cells during their harvest from bone marrow aspiration.

  11. Cold atmospheric plasma jet-generated RONS and their selective effects on normal and carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sun Ja; Chung, T H

    2016-02-03

    Cold atmospheric helium plasma jets were fabricated and utilized for plasma-cell interactions. The effect of operating parameters and jet design on the generation of specific reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) within cells and cellular response were investigated. It was found that plasma treatment induced the overproduction of RONS in various cancer cell lines selectively. The plasma under a relatively low applied voltage induced the detachment of cells, a reduction in cell viability, and apoptosis, while the plasma under higher applied voltage led to cellular necrosis in our case. To determine whether plasma-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation occurs through interfering with mitochondria-related cellular response, we examined the plasma effects on ROS generation in both parental A549 cells and A549 ρ(0) cells. It was observed that cancer cells were more susceptible to plasma-induced RONS (especially nitric oxide (NO) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2(-)) radicals) than normal cells, and consequently, plasma induced apoptotic cell responses mainly in cancer cells.

  12. Molecular mechanisms of apoptosis and cell selectivity of zinc dithiocarbamates functionalized with hydroxyethyl substituents.

    PubMed

    Tan, Yee Seng; Ooi, Kah Kooi; Ang, Kok Pian; Akim, Abdah Md; Cheah, Yoke-Kqueen; Halim, Siti Nadiah Abdul; Seng, Hoi-Ling; Tiekink, Edward R T

    2015-09-01

    In the solid state each of three binuclear zinc dithiocarbamates bearing hydroxyethyl groups, {Zn[S2CN(R)CH2CH2OH]2}2 for R = iPr (1), CH2CH2OH (2), and Me (3), and an all alkyl species, [Zn(S2CNEt2)2]2 (4), features a centrosymmetric {ZnSCS}2 core with a step topology; both 1 and 3 were isolated as monohydrates. All compounds were broadly cytotoxic, specifically against human cancer cell lines compared with normal cells, with greater potency than cisplatin. Notably, some selectivity were indicated with 2 being the most potent against human ovarian carcinoma cells (cisA2780), and 4 being more cytotoxic toward multidrug resistant human breast carcinoma cells (MCF-7R), human colon adenocarcinoma cells (HT-29), and human lung adenocarcinoma epithelial cells (A549). Based on human apoptosis PCR-array analysis, caspase activities, DNA fragmentation, cell apoptotic assays, intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) measurements and human topoisomerase I inhibition, induction of apoptosis in HT-29 cells is demonstrated via both extrinsic and intrinsic pathways. Compounds 2-4 activate the p53 gene while 1 activates both p53 and p73. Cell cycle arrest at the S and G2/M phases correlates with inhibition of HT-29 cell growth. Cell invasion is also inhibited by 1-4 which is correlated with down-regulation of NF-κB.

  13. Selective local lysis and sampling of live cells for nucleic acid analysis using a microfluidic probe

    PubMed Central

    Kashyap, Aditya; Autebert, Julien; Delamarche, Emmanuel; Kaigala, Govind V.

    2016-01-01

    Heterogeneity is inherent to biology, thus it is imperative to realize methods capable of obtaining spatially-resolved genomic and transcriptomic profiles of heterogeneous biological samples. Here, we present a new method for local lysis of live adherent cells for nucleic acid analyses. This method addresses bottlenecks in current approaches, such as dilution of analytes, one-sample-one-test, and incompatibility to adherent cells. We make use of a scanning probe technology - a microfluidic probe - and implement hierarchical hydrodynamic flow confinement (hHFC) to localize multiple biochemicals on a biological substrate in a non-contact, non-destructive manner. hHFC enables rapid recovery of nucleic acids by coupling cell lysis and lysate collection. We locally lysed ~300 cells with chemical systems adapted for DNA or RNA and obtained lysates of ~70 cells/μL for DNA analysis and ~15 cells/μL for mRNA analysis. The lysates were introduced into PCR-based workflows for genomic and transcriptomic analysis. This strategy further enabled selective local lysis of subpopulations in a co-culture of MCF7 and MDA-MB-231 cells, validated by characteristic E-cadherin gene expression in individually extracted cell types. The developed strategy can be applied to study cell-cell, cell-matrix interactions locally, with implications in understanding growth, progression and drug response of a tumor. PMID:27411740

  14. Selective retention of herpes simplex virus-specific T cells in latently infected human trigeminal ganglia

    PubMed Central

    Verjans, Georges M. G. M.; Hintzen, Rogier Q.; van Dun, Jessica M.; Poot, Angelique; Milikan, Johannes C.; Laman, Jon D.; Langerak, Anton W.; Kinchington, Paul R.; Osterhaus, Albert D. M. E.

    2007-01-01

    Primary infection with herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) and varicella zoster virus (VZV) results in lifelong latent infections of neurons in sensory ganglia such as the trigeminal ganglia (TG). It has been postulated that T cells retained in TG inhibit reactivation of latent virus. The acquisition of TG specimens of individuals within hours after death offered the unique opportunity to characterize the phenotype and specificity of TG-resident T cells in humans. High numbers of activated CD8+ T cells expressing a late effector memory phenotype were found to reside in latently infected TG. The T cell infiltrate was oligoclonal, and T cells selectively clustered around HSV-1 but not VZV latently infected neurons. Neuronal damage was not observed despite granzyme B expression by the neuron-interacting CD8+ T cells. The TG-resident T cells, mainly CD8+ T cells, were directed against HSV-1 and not to VZV, despite neuronal expression of VZV proteins. The results implicate that herpesvirus latency in human TG is associated with a local, persistent T cell response, comprising activated late effector memory CD8+ T cells that appear to control HSV-1 latency by noncytolytic pathways. In contrast, T cells do not seem to be directly involved in controlling VZV latency in human TG. PMID:17360672

  15. Polarized Growth Controls Cell Shape and Bipolar Bud Site Selection in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Sheu, Yi-Jun; Barral, Yves; Snyder, Michael

    2000-01-01

    We examined the relationship between polarized growth and division site selection, two fundamental processes important for proper development of eukaryotes. Diploid Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells exhibit an ellipsoidal shape and a specific division pattern (a bipolar budding pattern). We found that the polarity genes SPA2, PEA2, BUD6, and BNI1 participate in a crucial step of bud morphogenesis, apical growth. Deleting these genes results in round cells and diminishes bud elongation in mutants that exhibit pronounced apical growth. Examination of distribution of the polarized secretion marker Sec4 demonstrates that spa2Δ, pea2Δ, bud6Δ, and bni1Δ mutants fail to concentrate Sec4 at the bud tip during apical growth and at the division site during repolarization just prior to cytokinesis. Moreover, cell surface expansion is not confined to the distal tip of the bud in these mutants. In addition, we found that the p21-activated kinase homologue Ste20 is also important for both apical growth and bipolar bud site selection. We further examined how the duration of polarized growth affects bipolar bud site selection by using mutations in cell cycle regulators that control the timing of growth phases. The grr1Δ mutation enhances apical growth by stabilizing G1 cyclins and increases the distal-pole budding in diploids. Prolonging polarized growth phases by disrupting the G2/M cyclin gene CLB2 enhances the accuracy of bud site selection in wild-type, spa2Δ, and ste20Δ cells, whereas shortening the polarized growth phases by deleting SWE1 decreases the fidelity of bipolar budding. This study reports the identification of components required for apical growth and demonstrates the critical role of polarized growth in bipolar bud site selection. We propose that apical growth and repolarization at the site of cytokinesis are crucial for establishing spatial cues used by diploid yeast cells to position division planes. PMID:10866679

  16. Selective killing of cancer cells by β-lapachone: Direct checkpoint activation as a strategy against cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Youzhi; Sun, Xiangao; LaMont, J. Thomas; Pardee, Arthur B.; Li, Chiang J.

    2003-01-01

    Most chemotherapeutic drugs kill cancer cells by indirectly activating checkpoint-mediated apoptosis after creating nonselective damage to DNA or microtubules, which accounts for their toxicity toward normal cells. We seek to target cancer cells by directly activating checkpoint regulators without creating such damage. Here, we show that β-lapachone selectively induces apoptosis in cancer cells without causing the death of nontransformed cells in culture. This unusual selectivity against cancer cells is preceded by activation of S-phase checkpoint and selective induction of E2F1, a regulator of checkpoint-mediated apoptosis. This study suggests direct checkpoint activation as a strategy against cancer. PMID:12598645

  17. A two-step Notch-dependant mechanism controls the selection of the polar cell pair in Drosophila oogenesis.

    PubMed

    Vachias, Caroline; Couderc, Jean-Louis; Grammont, Muriel

    2010-08-01

    Organisers control the patterning and growth of many tissues and organs. Correctly regulating the size of these organisers is crucial for proper differentiation to occur. Organiser activity in the epithelium of the Drosophila ovarian follicle resides in a pair of cells called polar cells. It is known that these two cells are selected from a cluster of equivalent cells. However, the mechanisms responsible for this selection are still unclear. Here, we present evidence that the selection of the two cells is not random but, by contrast, depends on an atypical two-step Notch-dependent mechanism. We show that this sequential process begins when one cell becomes refractory to Notch activation and is selected as the initial polar cell. This cell then produces a Delta signal that induces a high level of Notch activation in one other cell within the cluster. This Notch activity prevents elimination by apoptosis, allowing its selection as the second polar cell. Therefore, the mechanism used to select precisely two cells from among an equivalence group involves an inductive Delta signal that originates from one cell, itself unable to respond to Notch activation, and results in one other cell being selected to adopt the same fate. Given its properties, this two-step Notch-dependent mechanism represents a novel aspect of Notch action.

  18. Salinomycin inhibits the tumor growth of glioma stem cells by selectively suppressing glioma-initiating cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tunan; Yi, Liang; Li, Fei; Hu, Rong; Hu, Shengli; Yin, Yi; Lan, Chuan; Li, Zhao; Fu, Chuhua; Cao, Liu; Chen, Zhi; Xian, Jishu; Feng, Hua

    2015-04-01

    Glioma‑initiating cells are a small population of cells that have the ability to undergo self‑renewal and initiate tumorigenesis. In the present study, the potential role of salinomycin, a polyether antibiotic, on the suppression of glioma cell growth was investigated. GL261 glioma cells were maintained in a stem‑cell‑like status [GL261 neurospheres (GL261‑NS)] or induced for differentiation [GL261 adherent cells (GL261‑AC)]. It was demonstrated that salinomycin significantly reduced the cell viability of GL261‑NS and GL261‑AC cells in a dose‑dependent manner, with a more substantial inhibition of GL261‑NS proliferation (P<0.05). The inhibitory effect of salinomycin on cell growth was more effective than that of 1‑(4‑amino‑2‑methyl‑5‑pyrimid l)‑methyl‑3‑(2‑chloroethyl)‑3‑nitrosourea hydrochloride and vincristine (P<0.05). Salinomycin depleted GL261‑NS from tumorspheres and induced cell apoptosis. In addition, salinomycin prolonged the median survival time of glioma‑bearing mice (P<0.05). Therefore, the present study indicated that salinomycin may preferentially inhibit glioma‑initiated cell growth by inducing apoptosis, suggesting that salinomycin may provide a valuable therapeutic strategy for the treatment of malignant glioma.

  19. Pancratistatin selectively targets cancer cell mitochondria and reduces growth of human colon tumor xenografts.

    PubMed

    Griffin, Carly; Karnik, Aditya; McNulty, James; Pandey, Siyaram

    2011-01-01

    The naturally occurring Amaryllidaceae alkaloid pancratistatin exhibits potent apoptotic activity against a large panel of cancer cells lines and has an insignificant effect on noncancerous cell lines, although with an elusive cellular target. Many current chemotherapeutics induce apoptosis via genotoxic mechanisms and thus have low selectivity. The observed selectivity of pancratistatin for cancer cells promoted us to consider the hypothesis that this alkaloid targets cancer cell mitochondria rather than DNA or its replicative machinery. In this study, we report that pancratistatin decreased mitochondrial membrane potential and induced apoptotic nuclear morphology in p53-mutant (HT-29) and wild-type p53 (HCT116) colorectal carcinoma cell lines, but not in noncancerous colon fibroblast (CCD-18Co) cells. Interestingly, pancratistatin was found to be ineffective against mtDNA-depleted (ρ(0)) cancer cells. Moreover, pancratistatin induced cell death in a manner independent of Bax and caspase activation, and did not alter β-tubulin polymerization rate nor cause double-stranded DNA breaks. For the first time we report the efficacy of pancratistatin in vivo against human colorectal adenocarcinoma xenografts. Intratumor administration of pancratistatin (3 mg/kg) caused significant reduction in the growth of subcutaneous HT-29 tumors in Nu/Nu mice (n = 6), with no apparent toxicity to the liver or kidneys as indicated by histopathologic analysis and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling. Altogether, this work suggests that pancratistatin may be a novel mitochondria-targeting compound that selectively induces apoptosis in cancer cells and significantly reduces tumor growth.

  20. Apoptotic effect of the selective PPARβ/δ agonist GW501516 in invasive bladder cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Péchery, Adeline; Fauconnet, Sylvie; Bittard, Hugues; Lascombe, Isabelle

    2016-11-01

    GW501516 is a selective and high-affinity synthetic agonist of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor β/δ (PPARβ/δ). This molecule promoted the inhibition of proliferation and apoptosis in few cancer cell lines, but its anticancer action has never been investigated in bladder tumor cells. Thus, this study was undertaken to determine whether GW501516 had antiproliferative and/or apoptotic effects on RT4 and T24 urothelial cancer cells and to explore the molecular mechanisms involved. Our results indicated that, in RT4 cells (derived from a low-grade papillary tumor), GW501516 did not induce cell death. On the other hand, in T24 cells (derived from an undifferentiated high-grade carcinoma), this PPARβ/δ agonist induced cytotoxic effects including cell morphological changes, a decrease of cell viability, a G2/M cell cycle arrest, and the cell death as evidenced by the increase of the sub-G1 cell population. Furthermore, GW501516 triggered T24 cell apoptosis in a caspase-dependent manner including both extrinsic and intrinsic apoptotic pathways through Bid cleavage. In addition, the drug led to an increase of the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, a mitochondrial dysfunction associated with the dissipation of ΔΨm, and the release of cytochrome c from the mitochondria to the cytosol. GW501516 induced also ROS generation which was not responsible for T24 cell death since NAC did not rescue cells upon PPARβ/δ agonist exposure. For the first time, our data highlight the capacity of GW501516 to induce apoptosis in invasive bladder cancer cells. This molecule could be relevant as a therapeutic drug for high-grade urothelial cancers.

  1. Automated Cell Selection Using Support Vector Machine for Application to Spectral Nanocytology

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Qin; Derbas, Justin; Eid, Aya; Subramanian, Hariharan; Backman, Vadim

    2016-01-01

    Partial wave spectroscopy (PWS) enables quantification of the statistical properties of cell structures at the nanoscale, which has been used to identify patients harboring premalignant tumors by interrogating easily accessible sites distant from location of the lesion. Due to its high sensitivity, cells that are well preserved need to be selected from the smear images for further analysis. To date, such cell selection has been done manually. This is time-consuming, is labor-intensive, is vulnerable to bias, and has considerable inter- and intraoperator variability. In this study, we developed a classification scheme to identify and remove the corrupted cells or debris that are of no diagnostic value from raw smear images. The slide of smear sample is digitized by acquiring and stitching low-magnification transmission. Objects are then extracted from these images through segmentation algorithms. A training-set is created by manually classifying objects as suitable or unsuitable. A feature-set is created by quantifying a large number of features for each object. The training-set and feature-set are used to train a selection algorithm using Support Vector Machine (SVM) classifiers. We show that the selection algorithm achieves an error rate of 93% with a sensitivity of 95%. PMID:26904682

  2. CD44v6-Peptide Functionalized Nanoparticles Selectively Bind to Metastatic Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Linxian; Schmitt, Mark; Matzke-Ogi, Alexandra; Wadhwani, Parvesh; Orian-Rousseau, Veronique; Levkin, Pavel A

    2017-01-01

    CD44v6 peptide functionalized nanoparticles are fabricated in a facile and controllable way to selectively bind to CD44v6 positive tumor cells with highly efficient anticancer and antimetastatic properties. The reported modular synthesis and facile preparation makes this system highly potent for developing novel multifunctional nanocarriers for therapeutic and/or diagnostic anticancer applications.

  3. A novel bifunctional mitochondria-targeted anticancer agent with high selectivity for cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    He, Huan; Li, Dong-Wei; Yang, Li-Yun; Fu, Li; Zhu, Xun-Jin; Wong, Wai-Kwok; Jiang, Feng-Lei; Liu, Yi

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria have recently emerged as novel targets for cancer therapy due to its important roles in fundamental cellular function. Discovery of new chemotherapeutic agents that allow for simultaneous treatment and visualization of cancer is urgent. Herein, we demonstrate a novel bifunctional mitochondria-targeted anticancer agent (FPB), exhibiting both imaging capability and anticancer activity. It can selectively accumulate in mitochondria and induce cell apoptosis. Notably, it results in much higher toxicity toward cancer cells owing to much higher uptake by cancer cells. These features make it highly attractive in cancer imaging and treatment. PMID:26337336

  4. Quantum efficiency enhancement in selectively transparent silicon thin film solar cells by distributed Bragg reflectors.

    PubMed

    Kuo, M Y; Hsing, J Y; Chiu, T T; Li, C N; Kuo, W T; Lay, T S; Shih, M H

    2012-11-05

    This work demonstrated a-Si:H thin-film solar cells with backside TiO(2)/ SiO(2) distributed Bragg reflectors (DBRs) for applications involving building-integrated photovoltaics (BIPVs). Selectively transparent solar cells are formed by adjusting the positions of the DBR stop bands to allow the transmission of certain parts of light through the solar cells. Measurement and simulation results indicate that the transmission of blue light (430 ~500 nm) with the combination of three DBR mirrors has the highest increase in conversion efficiency.

  5. Quantum efficiency enhancement in selectively transparent silicon thin film solar cells by distributed Bragg reflectors.

    PubMed

    Kuo, M Y; Hsing, J Y; Chiu, T T; Li, C N; Kuo, W T; Lay, T S; Shih, M H

    2012-11-05

    This work demonstrated a-Si:H thin-film solar cells with backside TiO(2) / SiO(2) distributed Bragg reflectors (DBRs) for applications involving building-integrated photovoltaics (BIPVs). Selectively transparent solar cells are formed by adjusting the positions of the DBR stop bands to allow the transmission of certain parts of light through the solar cells. Measurement and simulation results indicate that the transmission of blue light (430 ~500 nm) with the combination of three DBR mirrors has the highest increase in conversion efficiency.

  6. Non-selective voltage-activated cation channel in the human red blood cell membrane.

    PubMed

    Kaestner, L; Bollensdorff, C; Bernhardt, I

    1999-02-04

    Using the patch-clamp technique, a non-selective voltage-activated Na+ and K+ channel in the human red blood cell membrane was found. The channel operates only at positive membrane potentials from about +30 mV (inside positive) onwards. For sodium and potassium ions, similar conductances of about 21 pS were determined. Together with the recently described K+(Na+)/H+ exchanger, this channel is responsible for the increase of residual K+ and Na+ fluxes across the human red blood cell membrane when the cells are suspended in low ionic strength medium.

  7. Inactivation of an integrated antibiotic resistance gene in mammalian cells to re-enable antibiotic selection.

    PubMed

    Ni, Peiling; Zhang, Qian; Chen, Haixia; Chen, Lingyi

    2014-01-01

    Removing an antibiotic resistance gene allows the same antibiotic to be re-used in the next round of genetic manipulation. Here we applied the CRISPR/Cas system to disrupt the puromycin resistance gene in an engineered mouse embryonic stem cell line and then re-used puromycin selection in the resulting cells to establish stable reporter cell lines. With the CRISPR/Cas system, pre-engineered sequences, such as loxP or FRT, are not required. Thus, this technique can be used to disrupt antibiotic resistance genes that cannot be removed by the Cre-loxP and Flp-FRT systems.

  8. Identification of a cell-surface antigen selectively expressed on the natural killer cell

    PubMed Central

    1977-01-01

    We have studied the cell-surface phenotype of natural killer (NK) cells of NZB and B6 mice which react to an MuLV+ lymphoid tumor. (a) NK cells do not express Thy1, Ly2, or Ig surface markers. (b) NK cells express an antigen recognized by C3H anti-CE antiserum ('anti-Ly1.2 antiserum'). Inasmuch as NK activity of spleen cells from B6 and B6/Ly1.1 congenic strains were both equally sensitive to C3H anti-CE antiserum, the NK antigen is distinct from Ly1.2. This point was confirmed by the observation that alphaNK activity was removed by absorption of C3H anti-CE antiserum with spleen cells from either B6 or B6/Ly1.1 congenic strains. Absorption of C3H alphaCE serum with BALB/c thymocytes and spleen cells (which are Ly1.2+NK-) removed anti-Ly1.2 activity and left anti-NK activity intact. This absorption step could be circumvented by inserting the BALB/c genotype into the recipient immunized to CE cells (i.e., (C3H X BALB/c)F1 alphaCE spleen cells). This antiserum, provisionally termed 'anti-NK', defines a new subclass of lymphocytes which may play a central role in the immunosurveillance against tumors. PMID:187714

  9. Alkali-treated titanium selectively regulating biological behaviors of bacteria, cancer cells and mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Jinhua; Wang, Guifang; Wang, Donghui; Wu, Qianju; Jiang, Xinquan; Liu, Xuanyong

    2014-12-15

    Many attentions have been paid to the beneficial effect of alkali-treated titanium to bioactivity and osteogenic activity, but few to the other biological effect. In this work, hierarchical micro/nanopore films were prepared on titanium surface by acid etching and alkali treatment and their biological effects on bacteria, cancer cells and mesenchymal stem cells were investigated. Gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus, Gram-negative Escherichia coli, and human cholangiocarcinoma cell line RBE were used to investigate whether alkali-treated titanium can influence behaviors of bacteria and cancer cells. Responses of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs) to alkali-treated titanium were also subsequently investigated. The alkali-treated titanium can potently reduce bacterial adhesion, inhibit RBE and BMMSCs proliferation, while can better promote BMMSCs osteogenesis and angiogenesis than acid-etched titanium. The bacteriostatic ability of the alkali-treated titanium is proposed to result from the joint effect of micro/nanotopography and local pH increase at bacterium/material interface due to the hydrolysis of alkali (earth) metal titanate salts. The inhibitory action of cell proliferation is thought to be the effect of local pH increase at cell/material interface which causes the alkalosis of cells. This alkalosis model reported in this work will help to understand the biologic behaviors of various cells on alkali-treated titanium surface and design the intended biomedical applications.

  10. Reversible Fluorescent Probe for Selective Detection and Cell Imaging of Oxidative Stress Indicator Bisulfite.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yajiao; Guan, Lingmei; Yu, Huan; Yan, Yehan; Du, Libo; Liu, Yang; Sun, Mingtai; Huang, Dejian; Wang, Suhua

    2016-04-19

    In this paper, we report a benzothiazole-functionalized cyanine fluorescence probe and demonstrate that it is selectively reactive to bisulfite, an intermediate indicator for oxidative stress. The selective reaction can be monitored by distinct ratiometric fluorescence variation favorable for cell imaging and visualization. The original probe can be regenerated in high yield through the elimination of bisulfite from the product by peroxides such as hydrogen peroxide, accompanied by fluorescence turning on at 590 nm, showing a potential application for the detection of peroxides. We successfully applied this probe for fluorescence imaging of bisulfite in cancer cells (MCF-7) treated with bisulfite and hydrogen peroxide as well as a selective detection limit of 0.34 μM bisulfite in aqueous solution.

  11. Ebf2 is a selective marker of brown and beige adipogenic precursor cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenshan; Kissig, Megan; Rajakumari, Sona; Huang, Li; Lim, Hee-Woong; Won, Kyoung-Jae; Seale, Patrick

    2014-10-07

    Brown adipocytes and muscle and dorsal dermis descend from precursor cells in the dermomyotome, but the factors that regulate commitment to the brown adipose lineage are unknown. Here, we prospectively isolated and determined the molecular profile of embryonic brown preadipose cells. Brown adipogenic precursor activity in embryos was confined to platelet-derived growth factor α(+), myogenic factor 5(Cre)-lineage-marked cells. RNA-sequence analysis identified early B-cell factor 2 (Ebf2) as one of the most selectively expressed genes in this cell fraction. Importantly, Ebf2-expressing cells purified from Ebf2(GFP) embryos or brown fat tissue did not express myoblast or dermal cell markers and uniformly differentiated into brown adipocytes. Interestingly, Ebf2-expressing cells from white fat tissue in adult animals differentiated into brown-like (or beige) adipocytes. Loss of Ebf2 in brown preadipose cells reduced the expression levels of brown preadipose-signature genes, whereas ectopic Ebf2 expression in myoblasts activated brown preadipose-specific genes. Altogether, these results indicate that Ebf2 specifically marks and regulates the molecular profile of brown preadipose cells.

  12. Green tea extract selectively targets nanomechanics of live metastatic cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, Sarah E.; Jin, Yu-Sheng; Lu, Qing-Yi; Rao, JianYu; Gimzewski, James K.

    2011-05-01

    Green tea extract (GTE) is known to be a potential anticancer agent (Yang et al 2009 Nat. Rev. Cancer 9 429-39) with various biological activities (Lu et al 2005 Clin. Cancer Res. 11 1675-83 Yang et al 1998 Carcinogenesis 19 611-6) yet the precise mechanism of action is still unclear. The biomechanical response of GTE treated cells taken directly from patient's body samples was measured using atomic force microscopy (AFM) (Binnig et al 1986 Phys. Rev. Lett. 56 930). We found significant increase in stiffness of GTE treated metastatic tumor cells, with a resulting value similar to untreated normal mesothelial cells, whereas mesothelial cell stiffness after GTE treatment is unchanged. Immunofluorescence analysis showed an increase in cytoskeletal-F-actin in GTE treated tumor cells, suggesting GTE treated tumor cells display mechanical, structural and morphological features similar to normal cells, which appears to be mediated by annexin-I expression, as determined by siRNA analysis of an in vitro cell line model. Our data indicates that GTE selectively targets human metastatic cancer cells but not normal mesothelial cells, a finding that is significantly advantageous compared to conventional chemotherapy agents.

  13. Selective Capture and Quick Detection of Targeting Cells with SERS-Coding Microsphere Suspension Chip.

    PubMed

    Li, Dian; Zhang, Yuting; Li, Ruimin; Guo, Jia; Wang, Changchun; Tang, Chuanbing

    2015-05-13

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) captured from blood fluid represent recurrent cancers and metastatic lesions to monitor the situation of cancers. We develop surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS)-coding microsphere suspension chip as a new strategy for fast and efficient capture, recovery, and detection of targeting cancer cells. Using HeLa cells as model CTCs, we first utilize folate as a recognition molecule to be immobilized in magnetic composite microspheres for capturing HeLa cells and attaining high capturing efficacy (up to 95%). After capturing cells, the composite microsphere, which utilizes a disulfide bond as crosslinker in the polymer shell and as a spacer for linking folate, can recycle 90% cells within 20 min eluted by glutathion solution. Taking advantage of the SERS with fingerprint features, we characterize captured/recovered cells with the unique signal of report-molecule 4-aminothiophenol through introducing the SERS-coding microsphere suspension chip to CTCs. Finally, the exploratory experiment of sieving cells shows that the magnetic composite microspheres can selectively capture the HeLa cells from samples of mixed cells, indicating that these magnetic composite microspheres have potential in real blood samples for capturing CTCs.

  14. Rapid Selection and Proliferation of Cancer Stem Cells in a NASA Developed Microgravity Bioreactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, S. E.; Di Benedetto, A.; Valluri, J. V.; Claudio, P. P.

    2008-06-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are considered a subset of the bulk tumor responsible for initiating and maintaining the disease. Saos-2 is a human sarcoma cell line that is used as a model for osteoblastic cells, which contains 10% of CD133(+) cells. CD133 is a transmembrane pentameric glycoprotein. It is a cell surface marker expressed by hematopoietic stem cells but not mature blood cells. It has also been found to be a marker for other stem and progenitor cells including neural and embryonic stem cells, and it is expressed in cancers, including some leukemias and brain tumors. We isolated CD133(+) CSCs from the Saos-2 cell line by using a MACsorting system which consists of magnetic beads conjugated to an antibody against CD133 (Miltenyi, Auburn, CA). Saos-2 positivity to CD133 was assessed by Facs analysis using the BD FacsAria (Franklin Lakes, NJ). The Hydrodynamic Focusing Bioreactor (HFB) (Celdyne, Houston, TX) which was developed by NASA at the Johnson Space Center selected and proliferated CD133(+).

  15. Mechanistic insights into selective killing of OXPHOS-dependent cancer cells by arctigenin.

    PubMed

    Brecht, Karin; Riebel, Virginie; Couttet, Philippe; Paech, Franziska; Wolf, Armin; Chibout, Salah-Dine; Pognan, Francois; Krähenbühl, Stephan; Uteng, Marianne

    2017-04-01

    Arctigenin has previously been identified as a potential anti-tumor treatment for advanced pancreatic cancer. However, the mechanism of how arctigenin kills cancer cells is not fully understood. In the present work we studied the mechanism of toxicity by arctigenin in the human pancreatic cell line, Panc-1, with special emphasis on the mitochondria. A comparison of Panc-1 cells cultured in glucose versus galactose medium was applied, allowing assessments of effects in glycolytic versus oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS)-dependent Panc-1 cells. For control purposes, the mitochondrial toxic response to treatment with arctigenin was compared to the anti-cancer drug, sorafenib, which is a tyrosine kinase inhibitor known for mitochondrial toxic off-target effects (Will et al., 2008). In both Panc-1 OXPHOS-dependent and glycolytic cells, arctigenin dissipated the mitochondrial membrane potential, which was demonstrated to be due to inhibition of the mitochondrial complexes II and IV. However, arctigenin selectively killed only the OXPHOS-dependent Panc-1 cells. This selective killing of OXPHOS-dependent Panc-1 cells was accompanied by generation of ER stress, mitochondrial membrane permeabilization and caspase activation leading to apoptosis and aponecrosis.

  16. Selective manipulation of the human T-cell receptor repertoire expressed by thymocytes in organ culture.

    PubMed Central

    Merkenschlager, M; Fisher, A G

    1992-01-01

    A recently described organ culture system for human thymocytes is shown to support the generation of a diverse T-cell receptor repertoire in vitro: thymocytes of the alpha beta lineage, including representatives of the V beta families 5.2/5.3, 6.7, and 8, accounted for the majority of T-cell receptor-positive cells throughout a 3-week culture period. Thymocytes bearing gamma delta receptors were also identified, particularly among the CD4 CD8 double-negative subset. The T-cell receptor repertoire expressed in organ culture responded to experimental manipulation with staphylococcal enterotoxins. Staphylococcal enterotoxin D (a powerful activator of human peripheral T cells expressing V beta 5.2/5.3 receptors) caused a marked reduction of V beta 5.2/5.3 expression, as determined with the V beta-specific antibody 42/1C1. Evidence is presented that this loss of V beta 5.2/5.3 expression resulted from the selective deletion of activated thymocytes by apoptosis, in concert with T-cell receptor modulation. These effects of staphylococcal enterotoxin D were specific (since staphylococcal enterotoxin E did not influence V beta 5.2/5.3 expression) and V beta-selective (since expression of V beta 6.7 remained unaffected by staphylococcal enterotoxin D). On the basis of these observations, we suggest that thymic organ culture provides a powerful approach to study the generation of the human T-cell repertoire. Images PMID:1584760

  17. Highly sensitive and selective detection of cancer cell with a label-free electrochemical cytosensor.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiyang; Qin, Yinan; Li, Dan; Wang, Tianshu; Liu, Yaqing; Wang, Jin; Wang, Erkang

    2013-03-15

    Electrochemical methods have attracted considerable attention for developing cytosensing system since they can decrease the cost and time requirement for cell detection with simple instrumentation. Herein, a label-free electrochemical cytosensor with surface-confined ferrocene as signal indicator was developed for highly sensitive and selective detection of cancer cell. With layer-by-layer (LBL) self-assembly technique, positively charged poly(ethylene imine) functionalized with ferrocene (Fc-PEI) and negatively charged single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) were alternately assembled on 3-mercaptopropionic acid (MPA) modified gold substrate. Folic acid (FA) was covalently bonded onto SWNTs surface to specifically recognize cancer cells according to the high affinity of FA for folate receptor (FR) on cellular surface. The developed cytosensor presented high sensitivity and selectivity for the detection of human cervical carcinoma (HeLa) cell. By using fast-response differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) method, a wide detection range from 10 to 10(6) cells/mL with a detection limit as low as 10 cells/mL was reached even in the presence of a large amount of non-cancerous cells.

  18. Glycosylated carriers for cell-selective and nuclear delivery of nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Wijagkanalan, Wassana; Kawakami, Shigeru; Hashida, Mitsuru

    2011-06-01

    Targeted gene delivery via selective cellular receptors has been realized as a crucial strategy for successful gene therapy by maximizing therapeutic efficiency in target cells and minimizing systemic toxicity. The membrane carbohydrate-binding proteins (membrane lectins) with different carbohydrate specificities are differentially expressed on the cellular and intracellular membranes of a number of cells. Their multiplicity, high affinity, and effective endocytosis after receptor binding as well as the biocompatibility of carbohydrate ligands endow them as potential ligands for glycosylated carriers in cell-selective delivery of nucleic acids. To achieve the in vivo application, glycosylated carriers/nucleic acid complexes have to fulfill certain conditions, including having a suitable size, minimal nonspecific interactions, low immunogenicity, and high uptake in target cells. Accordingly, the effective nuclear delivery of nucleic acids is the paramount important step for efficient gene transfer. This review summarizes the recent progress regarding application of glycosylated carriers for cell-selective and nuclear delivery of nucleic acids and their critical factors for efficient gene transfer. In addition, the development of new materials, such as carbon nanotubes, carbon nanospheres, and gold nanoparticles, as innovative carriers will be discussed with regards to glycosylation-mediated delivery of nucleic acids.

  19. A cationic amphiphilic peptide ABP-CM4 exhibits selective cytotoxicity against leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu Qing; Min, Cui; Sang, Ming; Han, Yang Yang; Ma, Xiao; Xue, Xiao Qing; Zhang, Shuang Quan

    2010-08-01

    Some cationic antibacterial peptides exhibit a broad spectrum of cytotoxic activity against cancer cells, which could provide a new class of anticancer drugs. In the present study, the anticancer activity of ABP-CM4, an antibacterial peptide from Bombyx mori, against leukemic cell lines THP-1, K562 and U937 was evaluated, and the cytotoxicity compared with the effects on non-cancerous mammalian cells, including peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), HEK-293 and erythrocytes. ABP-CM4 reduced the number of viable cells of the leukemic cell lines after exposure for 24h. The reduction was concentration dependent, and the IC50 values ranged from 14 to 18 microM. Conversely, ABP-CM4, even at 120 microM, exhibited no cytotoxicity toward HEK-293 or PBMCs, indicating that there was no significant effect on these two types of non-cancer cells. ABP-CM4 at a concentration of 200 microM had no hemolytic activity on mammalian erythrocytes. Together, these results suggested a selective cytotoxicity in leukemia cells. Flow cytometry demonstrated that the binding activity of ABP-CM4 to leukemia cells was much higher than that to HEK-293 or PBMCs, and there was almost no binding to erythrocytes. FITC-labeled ABP-CM4 molecules were examined under a confocal microscope and found to be concentrated at the surface of leukemia cells and changes of the cell membrane were determined by a cell permeability assay, which led us to the conclusion that ABP-CM4 could act at the cell membrane for its anticancer activity on leukemia cells. Collectively, our results indicated that ABP-CM4 has the potential for development as a novel antileukemic agent.

  20. Lenalidomide causes selective degradation of IKZF1 and IKZF3 in multiple myeloma cells.

    PubMed

    Krönke, Jan; Udeshi, Namrata D; Narla, Anupama; Grauman, Peter; Hurst, Slater N; McConkey, Marie; Svinkina, Tanya; Heckl, Dirk; Comer, Eamon; Li, Xiaoyu; Ciarlo, Christie; Hartman, Emily; Munshi, Nikhil; Schenone, Monica; Schreiber, Stuart L; Carr, Steven A; Ebert, Benjamin L

    2014-01-17

    Lenalidomide is a drug with clinical efficacy in multiple myeloma and other B cell neoplasms, but its mechanism of action is unknown. Using quantitative proteomics, we found that lenalidomide causes selective ubiquitination and degradation of two lymphoid transcription factors, IKZF1 and IKZF3, by the CRBN-CRL4 ubiquitin ligase. IKZF1 and IKZF3 are essential transcription factors in multiple myeloma. A single amino acid substitution of IKZF3 conferred resistance to lenalidomide-induced degradation and rescued lenalidomide-induced inhibition of cell growth. Similarly, we found that lenalidomide-induced interleukin-2 production in T cells is due to depletion of IKZF1 and IKZF3. These findings reveal a previously unknown mechanism of action for a therapeutic agent: alteration of the activity of an E3 ubiquitin ligase, leading to selective degradation of specific targets.

  1. Cerebellar cortical degeneration with selective granule cell loss in Bavarian mountain dogs.

    PubMed

    Flegel, T; Matiasek, K; Henke, D; Grevel, V

    2007-08-01

    Three Bavarian mountain dogs aged between 18 and 20 months, not related to each other, were presented with chronic signs of cerebellar dysfunction. On sagittal T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging brain images, the tentative diagnosis of cerebellar hypoplasia was established based on an enlarged cerebrospinal fluid space around the cerebellum and an increased cerebrospinal fluid signal between the folia. Post-mortem examination was performed in one dog and did show an overall reduction of cerebellar size. On histopathologic examination, a selective loss of cerebellar granule cells with sparing of Purkinje cells was evident. Therefore, the Bavarian mountain dog is a breed where cerebellar cortical degeneration caused by the rather exceptional selective granule cell loss can be seen as cause of chronic, slowly progressive cerebellar dysfunction starting at an age of several months.

  2. Selective dissolution of halide perovskites as a step towards recycling solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Byeong Jo; Kim, Dong Hoe; Kwon, Seung Lee; Park, So Yeon; Li, Zhen; Zhu, Kai; Jung, Hyun Suk

    2016-05-01

    Most research on perovskite solar cells has focused on improving power-conversion efficiency and stability. However, if one could refurbish perovskite solar cells, their stability might not be a critical issue. From the perspective of cost effectiveness, if failed, perovskite solar cells could be collected and recycled; reuse of their gold electrodes and transparent conducting glasses could reduce the price per watt of perovskite photovoltaic modules. Herein, we present a simple and effective method for removing the perovskite layer and reusing the mesoporous TiO2-coated transparent conducting glass substrate via selective dissolution. We find that the perovskite layer can be easily decomposed in polar aprotic solvents because of the reaction between polar aprotic solvents and Pb2+ cations. After 10 cycles of recycling, a mesoporous TiO2-coated transparent conducting glass substrate-based perovskite solar cell still shows a constant power-conversion efficiency, thereby demonstrating the possibility of recycling perovskite solar cells.

  3. The Yin and Yang of chromatin dynamics in adult stem cell fate selection

    PubMed Central

    Adam, Rene C.; Fuchs, Elaine

    2015-01-01

    Adult organisms rely on tissue stem cells for maintenance and repair. During homeostasis, the concerted action of local niche signals and epigenetic regulators establish stable gene expression patterns to ensure that stem cells are not lost over time. However, stem cells also provide host tissues with a remarkable plasticity to respond to perturbations. How adult stem cells choose and acquire new fates is unknown, but the genome-wide mapping of epigenetic landscapes suggests a critical role for chromatin remodeling in these processes. Here, we explore the emerging role of chromatin modifiers and pioneer transcription factors in adult stem cell fate decisions and plasticity, which ensure that selective lineage choices are only made when environmentally cued. PMID:26689127

  4. Remote Actuation of Magnetic Nanoparticles For Cancer Cell Selective Treatment Through Cytoskeletal Disruption.

    PubMed

    Master, Alyssa M; Williams, Philise N; Pothayee, Nikorn; Pothayee, Nipon; Zhang, Rui; Vishwasrao, Hemant M; Golovin, Yuri I; Riffle, Judy S; Sokolsky, Marina; Kabanov, Alexander V

    2016-09-20

    Motion of micron and sub-micron size magnetic particles in alternating magnetic fields can activate mechanosensitive cellular functions or physically destruct cancer cells. However, such effects are usually observed with relatively large magnetic particles (>250 nm) that would be difficult if at all possible to deliver to remote sites in the body to treat disease. Here we show a completely new mechanism of selective toxicity of superparamagnetic nanoparticles (SMNP) of 7 to 8 nm in diameter to cancer cells. These particles are coated by block copolymers, which facilitates their entry into the cells and clustering in the lysosomes, where they are then magneto-mechanically actuated by remotely applied alternating current (AC) magnetic fields of very low frequency (50 Hz). Such fields and treatments are safe for surrounding tissues but produce cytoskeletal disruption and subsequent death of cancer cells while leaving healthy cells intact.

  5. Remote Actuation of Magnetic Nanoparticles For Cancer Cell Selective Treatment Through Cytoskeletal Disruption

    PubMed Central

    Master, Alyssa M.; Williams, Philise N.; Pothayee, Nikorn; Pothayee, Nipon; Zhang, Rui; Vishwasrao, Hemant M.; Golovin, Yuri I.; Riffle, Judy S.; Sokolsky, Marina; Kabanov, Alexander V.

    2016-01-01

    Motion of micron and sub-micron size magnetic particles in alternating magnetic fields can activate mechanosensitive cellular functions or physically destruct cancer cells. However, such effects are usually observed with relatively large magnetic particles (>250 nm) that would be difficult if at all possible to deliver to remote sites in the body to treat disease. Here we show a completely new mechanism of selective toxicity of superparamagnetic nanoparticles (SMNP) of 7 to 8 nm in diameter to cancer cells. These particles are coated by block copolymers, which facilitates their entry into the cells and clustering in the lysosomes, where they are then magneto-mechanically actuated by remotely applied alternating current (AC) magnetic fields of very low frequency (50 Hz). Such fields and treatments are safe for surrounding tissues but produce cytoskeletal disruption and subsequent death of cancer cells while leaving healthy cells intact. PMID:27644858

  6. Selective dissolution of halide perovskites as a step towards recycling solar cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Byeong Jo; Kim, Dong Hoe; Kwon, Seung Lee; Park, So Yeon; Li, Zhen; Zhu, Kai; Jung, Hyun Suk

    2016-05-23

    Most research on perovskite solar cells has focused on improving power-conversion efficiency and stability. However, if one could refurbish perovskite solar cells, their stability might not be a critical issue. From the perspective of cost effectiveness, if failed, perovskite solar cells could be collected and recycled; reuse of their gold electrodes and transparent conducting glasses could reduce the price per watt of perovskite photovoltaic modules. Herein, we present a simple and effective method for removing the perovskite layer and reusing the mesoporous TiO2-coated transparent conducting glass substrate via selective dissolution. We find that the perovskite layer can be easily decomposed in polar aprotic solvents because of the reaction between polar aprotic solvents and Pb(2+) cations. After 10 cycles of recycling, a mesoporous TiO2-coated transparent conducting glass substrate-based perovskite solar cell still shows a constant power-conversion efficiency, thereby demonstrating the possibility of recycling perovskite solar cells.

  7. Selective dissolution of halide perovskites as a step towards recycling solar cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Byeong Jo; Kim, Dong Hoe; Kwon, Seung Lee; Park, So Yeon; Li, Zhen; Zhu, Kai; Jung, Hyun Suk

    2016-01-01

    Most research on perovskite solar cells has focused on improving power-conversion efficiency and stability. However, if one could refurbish perovskite solar cells, their stability might not be a critical issue. From the perspective of cost effectiveness, if failed, perovskite solar cells could be collected and recycled; reuse of their gold electrodes and transparent conducting glasses could reduce the price per watt of perovskite photovoltaic modules. Herein, we present a simple and effective method for removing the perovskite layer and reusing the mesoporous TiO2-coated transparent conducting glass substrate via selective dissolution. We find that the perovskite layer can be easily decomposed in polar aprotic solvents because of the reaction between polar aprotic solvents and Pb2+ cations. After 10 cycles of recycling, a mesoporous TiO2-coated transparent conducting glass substrate-based perovskite solar cell still shows a constant power-conversion efficiency, thereby demonstrating the possibility of recycling perovskite solar cells. PMID:27211006

  8. Macrophage infection via selective capture of HIV-1-infected CD4+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Baxter, Amy E; Russell, Rebecca A; Duncan, Christopher J A; Moore, Michael D; Willberg, Christian B; Pablos, Jose L; Finzi, Andrés; Kaufmann, Daniel E; Ochsenbauer, Christina; Kappes, John C; Groot, Fedde; Sattentau, Quentin J

    2014-12-10

    Macrophages contribute to HIV-1 pathogenesis by forming a viral reservoir and mediating neurological disorders. Cell-free HIV-1 infection of macrophages is inefficient, in part due to low plasma membrane expression of viral entry receptors. We find that macrophages selectively capture and engulf HIV-1-infected CD4+ T cells leading to efficient macrophage infection. Infected T cells, both healthy and dead or dying, were taken up through viral envelope glycoprotein-receptor-independent interactions, implying a mechanism distinct from conventional virological synapse formation. Macrophages infected by this cell-to-cell route were highly permissive for both CCR5-using macrophage-tropic and otherwise weakly macrophage-tropic transmitted/founder viruses but restrictive for nonmacrophage-tropic CXCR4-using virus. These results have implications for establishment of the macrophage reservoir and HIV-1 dissemination in vivo.

  9. High-throughput magnetic flow sorting of human cells selected on the basis of magnetophoretic mobility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reece, Lisa M.; Sanders, Lehanna; Kennedy, David; Guernsey, Byron; Todd, Paul; Leary, James F.

    2010-02-01

    flow parameters so that desired cell populations could be selected on the basis of a mobility "window". The MCTV and the QMS are able to work together to provide good sort boundaries for cell populations that are mathematically defined as opposed to the traditional magnetic sort systems that solely rely on whether a cell is simply "magnetized" or not. One long-term application of this new high speed cell sorting system is to sterilely isolate large numbers of human stem cells directly from a donor's blood for subsequent manipulation in tissue culture for regenerative medicine within that same patient. This will eliminate the need for immune suppressive drugs in an autologous transplantation procedure.

  10. Prolonged cultivation of hippocampal neural precursor cells shifts their differentiation potential and selects for aneuploid cells.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, The Duy; Widera, Darius; Greiner, Johannes; Müller, Janine; Martin, Ina; Slotta, Carsten; Hauser, Stefan; Kaltschmidt, Christian; Kaltschmidt, Barbara

    2013-12-01

    Neural precursor cells (NPCs) are lineage-restricted neural stem cells with limited self-renewal, giving rise to a broad range of neural cell types such as neurons, astrocytes, and oligodendrocytes. Despite this developmental potential, the differentiation capacity of NPCs has been controversially discussed concerning the trespassing lineage boundaries, for instance resulting in hematopoietic competence. Assessing their in vitro plasticity, we isolated nestin+/Sox2+, NPCs from the adult murine hippocampus. In vitro-expanded adult NPCs were able to form neurospheres, self-renew, and differentiate into neuronal, astrocytic, and oligodendrocytic cells. Although NPCs cultivated in early passage efficiently gave rise to neuronal cells in a directed differentiation assay, extensively cultivated NPCs revealed reduced potential for ectodermal differentiation. We further observed successful differentiation of long-term cultured NPCs into osteogenic and adipogenic cell types, suggesting that NPCs underwent a fate switch during culture. NPCs cultivated for more than 12 passages were aneuploid (abnormal chromosome numbers such as 70 chromosomes). Furthermore, they showed growth factor-independent proliferation, a hallmark of tumorigenic transformation. In conclusion, our findings substantiate the lineage restriction of NPCs from adult mammalian hippocampus. Prolonged cultivation results, however, in enhanced differentiation potential, which may be attributed to transformation events leading to aneuploid cells.

  11. Aldehyde dehydrogenase activity selects for lung adenocarcinoma stem cells dependent on notch signaling.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, James P; Spinola, Monica; Dodge, Michael; Raso, Maria G; Behrens, Carmen; Gao, Boning; Schuster, Katja; Shao, Chunli; Larsen, Jill E; Sullivan, Laura A; Honorio, Sofia; Xie, Yang; Scaglioni, Pier P; DiMaio, J Michael; Gazdar, Adi F; Shay, Jerry W; Wistuba, Ignacio I; Minna, John D

    2010-12-01

    Aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) is a candidate marker for lung cancer cells with stem cell-like properties. Immunohistochemical staining of a large panel of primary non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) samples for ALDH1A1, ALDH3A1, and CD133 revealed a significant correlation between ALDH1A1 (but not ALDH3A1 or CD133) expression and poor prognosis in patients including those with stage I and N0 disease. Flow cytometric analysis of a panel of lung cancer cell lines and patient tumors revealed that most NSCLCs contain a subpopulation of cells with elevated ALDH activity, and that this activity is associated with ALDH1A1 expression. Isolated ALDH(+) lung cancer cells were observed to be highly tumorigenic and clonogenic as well as capable of self-renewal compared with their ALDH(-) counterparts. Expression analysis of sorted cells revealed elevated Notch pathway transcript expression in ALDH(+) cells. Suppression of the Notch pathway by treatment with either a γ-secretase inhibitor or stable expression of shRNA against NOTCH3 resulted in a significant decrease in ALDH(+) lung cancer cells, commensurate with a reduction in tumor cell proliferation and clonogenicity. Taken together, these findings indicate that ALDH selects for a subpopulation of self-renewing NSCLC stem-like cells with increased tumorigenic potential, that NSCLCs harboring tumor cells with ALDH1A1 expression have inferior prognosis, and that ALDH1A1 and CD133 identify different tumor subpopulations. Therapeutic targeting of the Notch pathway reduces this ALDH(+) component, implicating Notch signaling in lung cancer stem cell maintenance.

  12. Fast and selective cell isolation from blood sample by microfiber fabric system with vacuum aspiration

    PubMed Central

    Ueki, Takayuki; Yoshihara, Akifumi; Teramura, Yuji; Takai, Madoka

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Since circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are tumor cells which are found in the blood of cancer patients, CTCs are potential tumor markers, so a rapid isolation of CTCs is desirable for clinical applications. In this paper, a three-dimensional polystyrene (PS) microfiber fabric with vacuum aspiration system was developed for capturing CTCs within a short time. Various microfiber fabrics with different diameters were prepared by the electrospinning method and optimized for contact frequency with cells. Vacuum aspiration utilizing these microfiber fabrics could filter all cells within seconds without mechanical damage. The microfiber fabric with immobilized anti-EpCAM antibodies was able to specifically capture MCF-7 cells that express EpCAM on their surfaces. The specificity of the system was confirmed by monitoring the ability to isolate MCF-7 cells from a mixture containing CCRF-CEM cells that do not express EpCAM. Furthermore, the selective capture ability of the microfiber was retained even when the microfiber was exposed to the whole blood of pigs spiked with MCF-7 cells. The specific cell capture ratio of the vacuum aspiration system utilizing microfiber fabric could be improved by increasing the thickness of the microfiber fabric through electrospinning time. PMID:27933120

  13. Sulforhodamine 101 selectively labels human astrocytoma cells in an animal model of glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Georges, Joseph F; Martirosyan, Nikolay L; Eschbacher, Jennifer; Nichols, Joshua; Tissot, Maya; Preul, Mark C; Feuerstein, Burt; Anderson, Trent; Spetzler, Robert F; Nakaji, Peter

    2014-05-01

    Sulforhodamine 101 (SR101) is a useful tool for immediate staining of astrocytes. We hypothesized that if the selectivity of SR101was maintained in astrocytoma cells, it could prove useful for glioma research. Cultured astrocytoma cells and acute slices from orthotopic human glioma (n=9) and lymphoma (n=6) xenografts were incubated with SR101 and imaged with confocal microscopy. A subset of slices (n=18) were counter-immunostained with glial fibrillary acidic protein and CD20 for stereological assessment of SR101 co-localization. SR101 differentiated astrocytic tumor cells from lymphoma cells. In acute slices, SR101 labeled 86.50% (±1.86; p<0.0001) of astrocytoma cells and 2.19% (±0.47; p<0.0001) of lymphoma cells. SR101-labeled astrocytoma cells had a distinct morphology when compared with in vivo astrocytes. Immediate imaging of human astrocytoma cells in vitro and in ex vivo rodent xenograft tissue labeled with SR101 can identify astrocytic tumor cells and help visualize the tumor margin. These features are useful in studying astrocytoma in the laboratory and may have clinical applications.

  14. Clonogenic assay allows for selection of a primitive mammary epithelial cell population in bovine.

    PubMed

    Martignani, Eugenio; Cravero, Diego; Miretti, Silvia; Accornero, Paolo; Baratta, Mario

    2015-11-01

    Adult mammary stem cells have been identified in several species including the bovine. They are responsible for the development of the gland and for cyclic remodeling during estrous cycles and pregnancy. Epithelial cell subpopulations exist within the mammary gland. We and others showed previously that the Colony Forming Cell (CFC) assay can be used to detect lineage-restricted mammary progenitors. We carried out CFCs with bovine mammary cells and manually separated colonies with specific morphologies associated with either a luminal or a myoepithelial phenotype. Expression of specific markers was assessed by immunocytochemistry or by flow cytometry to confirm that the manual separation resulted in isolation of phenotipically different cells. When transplanted in recipient immunodeficient mice, we found that only myoepithelial-like colonies gave rise to outgrowths that resembled bovine mammary alveoli, thus proving that adult stem cells were maintained during culture and segregated with myoepithelial cells. After recovery of the cells from the transplanted mice and subsequent progenitor content analysis, we found a tendency to detect a higher progenitor frequency when myoepithelial-like colonies were transplanted. We here demonstrate that bovine adult mammary stem cells can be sustained in short-term culture and that they can be enriched by manually selecting for basal-like morphology.

  15. Sequential Salinomycin Treatment Results in Resistance Formation through Clonal Selection of Epithelial-Like Tumor Cells.

    PubMed

    Kopp, Florian; Hermawan, Adam; Oak, Prajakta Shirish; Ulaganathan, Vijay Kumar; Herrmann, Annika; Elnikhely, Nefertiti; Thakur, Chitra; Xiao, Zhiguang; Knyazev, Pjotr; Ataseven, Beyhan; Savai, Rajkumar; Wagner, Ernst; Roidl, Andreas

    2014-12-01

    Acquiring therapy resistance is one of the major obstacles in the treatment of patients with cancer. The discovery of the cancer stem cell (CSC)-specific drug salinomycin raised hope for improved treatment options by targeting therapy-refractory CSCs and mesenchymal cancer cells. However, the occurrence of an acquired salinomycin resistance in tumor cells remains elusive. To study the formation of salinomycin resistance, mesenchymal breast cancer cells were sequentially treated with salinomycin in an in vitro cell culture assay, and the resulting differences in gene expression and salinomycin susceptibility were analyzed. We demonstrated that long-term salinomycin treatment of mesenchymal cancer cells resulted in salinomycin-resistant cells with elevated levels of epithelial markers, such as E-cadherin and miR-200c, a decreased migratory capability, and a higher susceptibility to the classic chemotherapeutic drug doxorubicin. The formation of salinomycin resistance through the acquisition of epithelial traits was further validated by inducing mesenchymal-epithelial transition through an overexpression of miR-200c. The transition from a mesenchymal to a more epithelial-like phenotype of salinomycin-treated tumor cells was moreover confirmed in vivo, using syngeneic and, for the first time, transgenic mouse tumor models. These results suggest that the acquisition of salinomycin resistance through the clonal selection of epithelial-like cancer cells could become exploited for improved cancer therapies by antagonizing the tumor-progressive effects of epithelial-mesenchymal transition.

  16. Antibodies to Interleukin-2 elicit selective T cell subset potentiation through distinct conformational mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Spangler, Jamie B.; Tomala, Jakub; Luca, Vincent C.; Jude, Kevin M.; Dong, Shen; Ring, Aaron M.; Votavova, Petra; Pepper, Marion; Kovar, Marek; Garcia, K. Christopher

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Interleukin-2 (IL-2) is a pleiotropic cytokine that regulates immune cell homeostasis, and has been used to treat a range of disorders such as cancer and autoimmune disease. IL-2 signals via interleukin-2 receptor-β (IL-2Rβ):IL-2Rγ heterodimers on cells expressing high (regulatory T cells, Treg) or low (effector cells) amounts of IL-2Rα (CD25). When complexed with IL-2, certain anti-cytokine antibodies preferentially stimulate expansion of Treg (JES6-1) or effector (S4B6) cells, offering a strategy for targeted disease therapy. We found that JES6-1 sterically blocked the IL-2:IL-2Rβ and IL-2:IL-2Rγ interactions, but also allosterically lowered the IL-2:IL-2Rα affinity through a ‘triggered exchange’ mechanism favoring IL-2Rαhi Treg cells, creating a positive feedback loop for IL-2Rαhi cell activation. Conversely, S4B6 sterically blocked the IL-2:IL-2Rα interaction, while also conformationally stabilizing the IL-2:IL-2Rβ interaction, thus stimulating all IL-2 responsive immune cells, particularly IL-2Rβhi effector cells. Our insights provide a molecular blueprint for engineering selectively potentiating therapeutic antibodies. PMID:25992858

  17. Collecting duct-derived cells display mesenchymal stem cell properties and retain selective in vitro and in vivo epithelial capacity.

    PubMed

    Li, Joan; Ariunbold, Usukhbayar; Suhaimi, Norseha; Sunn, Nana; Guo, Jinjin; McMahon, Jill A; McMahon, Andrew P; Little, Melissa

    2015-01-01

    We previously described a mesenchymal stem cell (MSC)-like population within the adult mouse kidney that displays long-term colony-forming efficiency, clonogenicity, immunosuppression, and panmesodermal potential. Although phenotypically similar to bone marrow (BM)-MSCs, kidney MSC-like cells display a distinct expression profile. FACS sorting from Hoxb7/enhanced green fluorescent protein (GFP) mice identified the collecting duct as a source of kidney MSC-like cells, with these cells undergoing an epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition to form clonogenic, long-term, self-renewing MSC-like cells. Notably, after extensive passage, kidney MSC-like cells selectively integrated into the aquaporin 2-positive medullary collecting duct when microinjected into the kidneys of neonatal mice. No epithelial integration was observed after injection of BM-MSCs. Indeed, kidney MSC-like cells retained a capacity to form epithelial structures in vitro and in vivo, and conditioned media from these cells supported epithelial repair in vitro. To investigate the origin of kidney MSC-like cells, we further examined Hoxb7(+) fractions within the kidney across postnatal development, identifying a neonatal interstitial GFP(lo) (Hoxb7(lo)) population displaying an expression profile intermediate between epithelium and interstitium. Temporal analyses with Wnt4(GCE/+):R26(tdTomato/+) mice revealed evidence for the intercalation of a Wnt4-expressing interstitial population into the neonatal collecting duct, suggesting that such intercalation may represent a normal developmental mechanism giving rise to a distinct collecting duct subpopulation. These results extend previous observations of papillary stem cell activity and collecting duct plasticity and imply a role for such cells in collecting duct formation and, possibly, repair.

  18. Diarylacylhydrazones: Clostridium-Selective Antibacterials with Activity Against Stationary-Phase Cells

    PubMed Central

    Casadei, Gabriele; Bremner, John B.; Lewis, Kim; Kelso, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Current antibiotics for treating Clostridium difficile infections (CDI), i.e. metronidazole, vancomycin and more recently fidaxomicin, are mostly effective but treatment failure and disease relapse remain as significant clinical problems. The shortcomings of these agents are attributed to their low selectivity for C. difficile over normal gut microflora and their ineffectiveness against C. difficile spores. This paper reports that certain diarylacylhydrazones identified during a high-throughput screening/counter-screening campaign show selective activity against two Clostridium species (C. difficile and C. perfringens) over common gut commensals. Representative examples are shown to possess activity similar to vancomycin against clinical C. difficile strains and to kill stationary-phase C. difficile cells, which are responsible for spore production. Structure-activity relationships with additional synthesised analogues suggested a protonophoric mechanism may play a role in the observed activity/selectivity and this was supported by the well-known protonophore carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenyl hydrazone (CCCP) showing selective anti-Clostridium effects and activity similar to diarylacylhydrazones against stationary-phase C. difficile cells. Two diarylacylhydrazones were shown to be non-toxic towards human FaDu and Hep G2 cells indicating that further studies with the class are warranted towards new drugs for CDI. PMID:24360560

  19. Solution-processed carrier selective layers for high efficiency organic/nanostructured-silicon hybrid solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kou, Ying-Shu; Yang, Song-Ting; Thiyagu, Subramani; Liu, Chien-Ting; Wu, Jia-Wei; Lin, Ching-Fuh

    2016-02-01

    The reduction of interface minority carrier recombination is regarded as a key performance indicator in improving the power conversion efficiency (PCE) of organic-inorganic hybrid solar cells. In this study, we chose two kinds of carrier-selective layers to be applied in a hybrid solar cell device. A hole selective transporting layer of N,N'-bis(3-methylphenyl)-N,N'-diphenylbenzidine (TPD) was added to the interface between Si nanohole structures and PEDOT:PSS, and the electron selective layer cesium carbonate (Cs2CO3) was added to the interface between the backside Si wafer and the rear Ti/Ag electrode. The main process used a clean and low-cost solution process, and the annealed temperature was under 140 °C. In addition, after we inserted these two carrier selective layers, the minority carrier lifetime was prolonged from 29.98 μs to 140.81 μs, indicating its significance in reducing the recombination rate. Eventually, we demonstrated that the PCE of Si/organic heterojunction solar cells can be improved to 13.23%.

  20. Human CD4 T cell epitopes selective for Vaccinia versus Variola virus.

    PubMed

    Probst, Alicia; Besse, Aurore; Favry, Emmanuel; Imbert, Gilles; Tanchou, Valérie; Castelli, Florence Anne; Maillere, Bernard

    2013-04-01

    Due to the high degree of sequence identity between Orthopoxvirus species, the specific B and T cell responses raised against these viruses are largely cross-reactive and poorly selective. We therefore searched for CD4 T cell epitopes present in the conserved parts of the Vaccinia genome (VACV) but absent from Variola viruses (VARV), with a view to identifying immunogenic sequences selective for VACV. We identified three long peptide fragments from the B7R, B10R and E7R proteins by in silico comparisons of the poxvirus genomes, and evaluated the recognition of these fragments by VACV-specific T cell lines derived from healthy donors. For the 12 CD4 T cell epitopes identified, we assessed their binding to common HLA-DR allotypes and their capacity to induce peptide-specific CD4 T-cell lines. Four peptides from B7R and B10R displayed a broad binding specificity for HLA-DR molecules and induced multiple T cell lines from healthy donors. Besides their absence from VARV, the two B10R peptide sequences were mutated in the Cowpox virus and completely absent from the Monkeypox genome. This work contributes to the development of differential diagnosis of poxvirus infections.

  1. Aptamers Selected to Postoperative Lung Adenocarcinoma Detect Circulating Tumor Cells in Human Blood

    PubMed Central

    Zamay, Galina S; Kolovskaya, Olga S; Zamay, Tatiana N; Glazyrin, Yury E; Krat, Alexey V; Zubkova, Olga; Spivak, Ekaterina; Wehbe, Mohammed; Gargaun, Ana; Muharemagic, Darija; Komarova, Mariia; Grigorieva, Valentina; Savchenko, Andrey; Modestov, Andrey A; Berezovski, Maxim V; Zamay, Anna S

    2015-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are rare cells and valuable clinical markers of prognosis of metastasis formation and prediction of patient survival. Most CTC analyses are based on the antibody-based detection of a few epithelial markers; therefore miss an important portion of mesenchymal cancer cells circulating in blood. In this work, we selected and identified DNA aptamers as specific affinity probes that bind to lung adenocarcinoma cells derived from postoperative tissues. The unique feature of our selection strategy is that aptamers are produced for lung cancer cell biomarkers in their native state and conformation without previous knowledge of the biomarkers. The aptamers did not bind to normal lung cells and lymphocytes, and had very low affinity to A549 lung adenocarcinoma culture. We applied these aptamers to detect CTCs, apoptotic bodies, and microemboli in clinical samples of peripheral blood of lung cancer and metastatic lung cancer patients. We identified aptamer-associated protein biomarkers for lung cancer such as vimentin, annexin A2, annexin A5, histone 2B, neutrophil defensin, and clusterin. Tumor-specific aptamers can be produced for individual patients and synthesized many times during anticancer therapy, thereby opening up the possibility of personalized diagnostics. PMID:26061649

  2. LuIII parvovirus selectively and efficiently targets, replicates in, and kills human glioma cells.

    PubMed

    Paglino, Justin C; Ozduman, Koray; van den Pol, Anthony N

    2012-07-01

    Because productive infection by parvoviruses requires cell division and is enhanced by oncogenic transformation, some parvoviruses may have potential utility in killing cancer cells. To identify the parvovirus(es) with the optimal oncolytic effect against human glioblastomas, we screened 12 parvoviruses at a high multiplicity of infection (MOI). MVMi, MVMc, MVM-G17, tumor virus X (TVX), canine parvovirus (CPV), porcine parvovirus (PPV), rat parvovirus 1A (RPV1A), and H-3 were relatively ineffective. The four viruses with the greatest oncolytic activity, LuIII, H-1, MVMp, and MVM-G52, were tested for the ability, at a low MOI, to progressively infect the culture over time, causing cell death at a rate higher than that of cell proliferation. LuIII alone was effective in all five human glioblastomas tested. H-1 progressively infected only two of five; MVMp and MVM-G52 were ineffective in all five. To investigate the underlying mechanism of LuIII's phenotype, we used recombinant parvoviruses with the LuIII capsid replacing the MVMp capsid or with molecular alteration of the P4 promoter. The LuIII capsid enhanced efficient replication and oncolysis in MO59J gliomas cells; other gliomas tested required the entire LuIII genome to exhibit enhanced infection. LuIII selectively infected glioma cells over normal glial cells in vitro. In mouse models, human glioblastoma xenografts were selectively infected by LuIII when administered intratumorally; LuIII reduced tumor growth by 75%. LuIII also had the capacity to selectively infect subcutaneous or intracranial gliomas after intravenous inoculation. Intravenous or intracranial LuIII caused no adverse effects. Intracranial LuIII caused no infection of mature mouse neurons or glia in vivo but showed a modest infection of developing neurons.

  3. Poorly selective cation channels in the apical membrane of A6 cells.

    PubMed

    Van Driessche, W; De Smet, P; de Smedt, H

    1994-03-01

    This paper describes a Ca(2+)-blockable, poorly selective cation pathway in the apical membrane of A6 epithelia. This pathway has properties that resemble the cation-selective channels in the toad urinary bladder and frog skin. Transepithelial short circuit currents (Isc) and power density spectra (PDS) of the fluctuations in current were recorded. The basolateral surface of the tissues was exposed to Cl- or SO4(2-) solutions with Na+ as the major cation. Ca(2+)-blockable inward oriented currents and Lorentzian noise were recorded with isotonic (215 mosmol/kg) mucosal Cl- and hypotonic (144 mos-mol/kg serosal SO4(2-) solution with Na+, K+, Rb+ or Cs+ as the major mucosal cation. Experiments with mucosal K+ demonstrated that the cation-selective channel was markedly activated by serosal hypotonicity. Effects of an increased electrical driving force were excluded on the basis of the results obtained with microelectrode experiments and transepithelial voltage clamping. Cell volume expansion induced by isotonic replacements of serosal sucrose by glycerol or urea also activated the cation-selective pathway. Furthermore, the presence of Cl- in the mucosal solution was a prerequisite for a sustained response to hypotonicity or replacements of the organic compounds. Moreover, we found that the cation-selective channels are mainly expressed in the cells during the early period of epithelial growth.

  4. Novel blockers of hyperpolarization-activated current with isoform selectivity in recombinant cells and native tissue.

    PubMed

    Del Lungo, Martina; Melchiorre, Michele; Guandalini, Luca; Sartiani, Laura; Mugelli, Alessandro; Koncz, Istvan; Szel, Tamas; Varro, Andras; Romanelli, Maria Novella; Cerbai, Elisabetta

    2012-05-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Selective hyperpolarization activated, cyclic nucleotide-gated channel (HCN) blockers represent an important therapeutic goal due to the wide distribution and multiple functions of these proteins, representing the molecular correlate of f- and h-current (I(f) or I(h) ). Recently, new compounds able to block differentially the homomeric HCN isoforms expressed in HEK293 have been synthesized. In the present work, the electrophysiological and pharmacological properties of these new HCN blockers were characterized and their activities evaluated on native channels. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH HEK293 cells expressing mHCN1, mHCN2 and hHCN4 isoforms were used to verify channel blockade. Selected compounds were tested on native guinea pig sinoatrial node cells and neurons from mouse dorsal root ganglion (DRG) by patch-clamp recordings and on dog Purkinje fibres by intracellular recordings. KEY RESULTS In HEK293 cells, EC18 was found to be significantly selective for HCN4 and MEL57A for HCN1 at physiological membrane potential. When tested on guinea pig sinoatrial node cells, EC18 (10 µM) maintained its activity, reducing I(f) by 67% at -120 mV, while MEL57A (3 µM) reduced I(f) by 18%. In contrast, in mouse DRG neurons, only MEL57A (30 and 100 µM) significantly reduced I(h) by 60% at -80 mV. In dog cardiac Purkinje fibres, EC18, but not MEL57A, reduced the amplitude and slowed the slope of the spontaneous diastolic depolarization. CONCLUSIONS Our results have identified novel and highly selective HCN isoform blockers, EC18 and MEL57A; the selectivity found in recombinant system was maintained in various tissues expressing different HCN isoforms.

  5. Two-stage microfluidic chip for selective isolation of circulating tumor cells (CTCs).

    PubMed

    Hyun, Kyung-A; Lee, Tae Yoon; Lee, Su Hyun; Jung, Hyo-Il

    2015-05-15

    Over the past few decades, circulating tumor cells (CTCs) have been studied as a means of overcoming cancer. However, the rarity and heterogeneity of CTCs have been the most significant hurdles in CTC research. Many techniques for CTC isolation have been developed and can be classified into positive enrichment (i.e., specifically isolating target cells using cell size, surface protein expression, and so on) and negative enrichment (i.e., specifically eluting non-target cells). Positive enrichment methods lead to high purity, but could be biased by their selection criteria, while the negative enrichment methods have relatively low purity, but can isolate heterogeneous CTCs. To compensate for the known disadvantages of the positive and negative enrichments, in this study we introduced a two-stage microfluidic chip. The first stage involves a microfluidic magnetic activated cell sorting (μ-MACS) chip to elute white blood cells (WBCs). The second stage involves a geometrically activated surface interaction (GASI) chip for the selective isolation of CTCs. We observed up to 763-fold enrichment in cancer cells spiked into 5 mL of blood sample using the μ-MACS chip at 400 μL/min flow rate. Cancer cells were successfully separated with separation efficiencies ranging from 10.19% to 22.91% based on their EpCAM or HER2 surface protein expression using the GASI chip at a 100 μL/min flow rate. Our two-stage microfluidic chips not only isolated CTCs from blood cells, but also classified heterogeneous CTCs based on their characteristics. Therefore, our chips can contribute to research on CTC heterogeneity of CTCs, and, by extension, personalized cancer treatment.

  6. O-naphthoquinone isolated from Capraria biflora L. induces selective cytotoxicity in tumor cell lines.

    PubMed

    de S Wisintainer, G G N; Scola, G; Moura, S; Lemos, T L G; Pessoa, C; de Moraes, M O; Souza, L G S; Roesch-Ely, M; Henriques, J A P

    2015-12-21

    Biflorin is an o-naphthoquinone isolated from the roots of the plant Capraria biflora L. (Scrophulariaceae). In this study, the cytotoxic effects of biflorin were verified, and late apoptosis was detected in various cancer cell lines by in situ analysis. The cytotoxicity was further evaluated exclusively for 48 h of treatment in different tumor and non-tumor cell lines (Hep-2, HeLa, HT-29, A-375, and A-549, and HEK-293, respectively). The results indicated that biflorin induced selective cytotoxicity in tumor cells. HeLa cells were more susceptible to biflorin, followed by HT-29, A-549, A-375, and Hep-2 at all concentrations (range 5-50 μg/mL), and the highest half-maximal inhibitory concentration IC50 (56.01 ± 1.17 μg/mL) was observed in HEK-293 cells. Late apoptotic/necrotic events, observed by in situ immunostaining with Annexin V, varied with each cell line; an increase in late apoptotic events was observed corresponding to the increase in biflorin dosage. Hep-2 cells showed a greater percentage of late apoptotic events among the tumor cell lines when treated with higher concentrations of biflorin (69.63 ± 2.28%). The non-tumor HEK-293 line showed greater resistance to late apoptotic events, as well as a lower level of cytotoxicity (77.69 ± 6.68%) than the tested tumor lines. The data presented indicate that biflorin showed an important, possibly selective, cytotoxicity against tumor cell lines, thereby revealing a promising novel substance with potential anticancer activity for tumor therapy.

  7. Targeting tumor cells via EGF receptors: selective toxicity of an HBEGF-toxin fusion protein.

    PubMed

    Chandler, L A; Sosnowski, B A; McDonald, J R; Price, J E; Aukerman, S L; Baird, A; Pierce, G F; Houston, L L

    1998-09-25

    Over-expression of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a hallmark of numerous solid tumors, thus providing a means of selectively targeting therapeutic agents. Heparin-binding epidermal growth factor (HBEGF) binds to EGFRs with high affinity and to heparan sulfate proteoglycans, resulting in increased mitogenic potential compared to other EGF family members. We have investigated the feasibility of using HBEGF to selectively deliver a cytotoxic protein into EGFR-expressing tumor cells. Recombinant fusion proteins consisting of mature human HBEGF fused to the plant ribosome-inactivating protein saporin (SAP) were expressed in Escherichia coli. Purified HBEGF-SAP chimeras inhibited protein synthesis in a cell-free assay and competed with EGF for binding to receptors on intact cells. A construct with a 22-amino-acid flexible linker (L22) between the HBEGF and SAP moieties exhibited an affinity for the EGFR that was comparable to that of HBEGF. The sensitivity to HBEGF-L22-SAP was determined for a variety of human tumor cell lines, including the 60 cell lines comprising the National Cancer Institute Anticancer Drug Screen. HBEGF-L22-SAP was cytotoxic in vitro to a variety of EGFR-bearing cell lines and inhibited growth of EGFR-over-expressing human breast carcinoma cells in vivo. In contrast, the fusion protein had no effect on small-cell lung carcinoma cells, which are EGFR-deficient. Our results demonstrate that fusion proteins composed of HBEGF and SAP exhibit targeting specificity and cytotoxicity that may be of therapeutic value in treating a variety of EGFR-bearing malignancies.

  8. The antimicrobial polymer PHMB enters cells and selectively condenses bacterial chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    Chindera, Kantaraja; Mahato, Manohar; Kumar Sharma, Ashwani; Horsley, Harry; Kloc-Muniak, Klaudia; Kamaruzzaman, Nor Fadhilah; Kumar, Satish; McFarlane, Alexander; Stach, Jem; Bentin, Thomas; Good, Liam

    2016-01-01

    To combat infection and antimicrobial resistance, it is helpful to elucidate drug mechanism(s) of action. Here we examined how the widely used antimicrobial polyhexamethylene biguanide (PHMB) kills bacteria selectively over host cells. Contrary to the accepted model of microbial membrane disruption by PHMB, we observed cell entry into a range of bacterial species, and treated bacteria displayed cell division arrest and chromosome condensation, suggesting DNA binding as an alternative antimicrobial mechanism. A DNA-level mechanism was confirmed by observations that PHMB formed nanoparticles when mixed with isolated bacterial chromosomal DNA and its effects on growth were suppressed by pairwise combination with the DNA binding ligand Hoechst 33258. PHMB also entered mammalian cells, but was trapped within endosomes and excluded from nuclei. Therefore, PHMB displays differential access to bacterial and mammalian cellular DNA and selectively binds and condenses bacterial chromosomes. Because acquired resistance to PHMB has not been reported, selective chromosome condensation provides an unanticipated paradigm for antimicrobial action that may not succumb to resistance. PMID:26996206

  9. The antimicrobial polymer PHMB enters cells and selectively condenses bacterial chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Chindera, Kantaraja; Mahato, Manohar; Sharma, Ashwani Kumar; Horsley, Harry; Kloc-Muniak, Klaudia; Kamaruzzaman, Nor Fadhilah; Kumar, Satish; McFarlane, Alexander; Stach, Jem; Bentin, Thomas; Good, Liam

    2016-03-21

    To combat infection and antimicrobial resistance, it is helpful to elucidate drug mechanism(s) of action. Here we examined how the widely used antimicrobial polyhexamethylene biguanide (PHMB) kills bacteria selectively over host cells. Contrary to the accepted model of microbial membrane disruption by PHMB, we observed cell entry into a range of bacterial species, and treated bacteria displayed cell division arrest and chromosome condensation, suggesting DNA binding as an alternative antimicrobial mechanism. A DNA-level mechanism was confirmed by observations that PHMB formed nanoparticles when mixed with isolated bacterial chromosomal DNA and its effects on growth were suppressed by pairwise combination with the DNA binding ligand Hoechst 33258. PHMB also entered mammalian cells, but was trapped within endosomes and excluded from nuclei. Therefore, PHMB displays differential access to bacterial and mammalian cellular DNA and selectively binds and condenses bacterial chromosomes. Because acquired resistance to PHMB has not been reported, selective chromosome condensation provides an unanticipated paradigm for antimicrobial action that may not succumb to resistance.

  10. Implications of quantum metabolism and natural selection for the origin of cancer cells and tumor progression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Paul; Demetrius, Lloyd A.; Tuszynski, Jack A.

    2012-03-01

    Empirical studies give increased support for the hypothesis that the sporadic form of cancer is an age-related metabolic disease characterized by: (a) metabolic dysregulation with random abnormalities in mitochondrial DNA, and (b) metabolic alteration - the compensatory upregulation of glycolysis to offset mitochondrial impairments. This paper appeals to the theory of Quantum Metabolism and the principles of natural selection to formulate a conceptual framework for a quantitative analysis of the origin and proliferation of the disease. Quantum Metabolism, an analytical theory of energy transduction in cells inspired by the methodology of the quantum theory of solids, elucidates the molecular basis for differences in metabolic rate between normal cells, utilizing predominantly oxidative phosphorylation, and cancer cells utilizing predominantly glycolysis. The principles of natural selection account for the outcome of competition between the two classes of cells. Quantum Metabolism and the principles of natural selection give an ontogenic and evolutionary rationale for cancer proliferation and furnish a framework for effective therapeutic strategies to impede the spread of the disease.

  11. Implications of quantum metabolism and natural selection for the origin of cancer cells and tumor progression.

    PubMed

    Davies, Paul; Demetrius, Lloyd A; Tuszynski, Jack A

    2012-03-01

    Empirical studies give increased support for the hypothesis that the sporadic form of cancer is an age-related metabolic disease characterized by: (a) metabolic dysregulation with random abnormalities in mitochondrial DNA, and (b) metabolic alteration - the compensatory upregulation of glycolysis to offset mitochondrial impairments. This paper appeals to the theory of Quantum Metabolism and the principles of natural selection to formulate a conceptual framework for a quantitative analysis of the origin and proliferation of the disease. Quantum Metabolism, an analytical theory of energy transduction in cells inspired by the methodology of the quantum theory of solids, elucidates the molecular basis for differences in metabolic rate between normal cells, utilizing predominantly oxidative phosphorylation, and cancer cells utilizing predominantly glycolysis. The principles of natural selection account for the outcome of competition between the two classes of cells. Quantum Metabolism and the principles of natural selection give an ontogenic and evolutionary rationale for cancer proliferation and furnish a framework for effective therapeutic strategies to impede the spread of the disease.

  12. Cardinal Orientation Selectivity Is Represented by Two Distinct Ganglion Cell Types in Mouse Retina

    PubMed Central

    Nath, Amurta

    2016-01-01

    Orientation selectivity (OS) is a prominent and well studied feature of early visual processing in mammals, but recent work has highlighted the possibility that parallel OS circuits might exist in multiple brain locations. Although both classic and modern work has identified an OS mechanism in selective wiring from lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN) to primary visual cortex, OS responses have now been found upstream of cortex in mouse LGN and superior colliculus, suggesting a possible origin in the retina. Indeed, retinal OS responses have been reported for decades in rabbit and more recently in mouse. However, we still know very little about the properties and mechanisms of retinal OS in the mouse, including whether there is a distinct OS ganglion cell type, which orientations are represented, and what are the synaptic mechanisms of retinal OS. We have identified two novel types of OS ganglion cells in the mouse retina that are highly selective for horizontal and vertical cardinal orientations. Reconstructions of the dendritic trees of these OS ganglion cells and measurements of their synaptic conductances offer insights into the mechanism of the OS computation at the earliest stage of the visual system. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Orientation selectivity (OS) is one of the most well studied computations in the brain and has become a prominent model system in various areas of sensory neuroscience. Although the cortical mechanism of OS suggested by Hubel and Wiesel (1962) has been investigated intensely, other OS cells exist upstream of cortex as early as the retina and the mechanisms of OS in subcortical regions are much less well understood. We identified two ON retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) in mouse that compute OS along the horizontal (nasal–temporal) and vertical (dorsoventral) axes of visual space. We show the relationship between dendritic morphology and OS for each RGC type and reveal new synaptic mechanisms of OS computation in the retina. PMID:26985031

  13. HER4 selectively coregulates estrogen stimulated genes associated with breast tumor cell proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Wen; Jones, Frank E.

    2014-01-10

    Highlights: •HER4/4ICD is an obligate coactivator for 37% of estrogen regulated genes. •HER4/4ICD coactivated genes selectively regulate estrogen stimulated proliferation. •Estrogen stimulated tumor cell migration occurs independent of HER4/4ICD. •Disrupting HER4/4ICD and ER coactivated gene expression may suppress breast cancer. -- Abstract: The EGFR-family member HER4 undergoes regulated intramembrane proteolysis (RIP) to generate an intracellular domain (4ICD) that functions as a transcriptional coactivator. Accordingly, 4ICD coactivates the estrogen receptor (ER) and associates with ER at target gene promoters in breast tumor cells. However, the extent of 4ICD coactivation of ER and the functional significance of the 4ICD/ER transcriptional complex is unclear. To identify 4ICD coactivated genes we performed a microarray gene expression analysis of β-estradiol treated cells comparing control MCF-7 breast cancer cells to MCF-7 cells where HER4 expression was stably suppressed using a shRNA. In the MCF-7 cell line, β-estradiol significantly stimulated or repressed by 2-fold or more 726 or 53 genes, respectively. Significantly, HER4/4ICD was an obligate coactivator for 277 or 38% of the β-estradiol stimulated genes. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis of β-estradiol regulated genes identified significant associations with multiple cellular functions regulating cellular growth and proliferation, cell cycle progression, cancer metastasis, decreased hypoplasia, tumor cell migration, apoptotic resistance of tumor cells, and increased transcription. Genes coactivated by 4ICD displayed functional specificity by only significantly contributing to cellular growth and proliferation, cell cycle progression, and decreased hypoplasia. In direct concordance with these in situ results we show that HER4 knockdown in MCF-7 cells results in a loss of estrogen stimulated tumor cell proliferation and cell cycle progression, whereas, estrogen stimulated tumor cell migration was

  14. Specific T-cell tolerance may reflect selective activation of lymphokine synthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Vidard, L; Colarusso, L J; Benacerraf, B

    1995-01-01

    Selective T-cell unresponsiveness, as measured by interleukin 2 (IL-2) synthesis upon challenge with antigen, was induced in SJL mice by ovalbumin (OVA) in incomplete or complete Freund's adjuvant administered i.p. or s.c. Ten days later, the mice were given booster injections of 100 micrograms of OVA/complete Freund's adjuvant. On day 20, lymph node and spleen cells were challenged in vitro with serial dilutions of OVA. There was an antigen-specific dose-dependent down regulation of IL-2 production and T-cell proliferation in lymph node T cells. Concomitantly, 100 micrograms of OVA up regulated IL-4 and, to a lesser extent, interferon gamma (IFN-gamma) production, particularly by spleen T cells. Altogether, these data indicate that the drop of IL-2 production and T-cell proliferation, as well as the up regulation of IL-4 and IFN-gamma production, are complex manifestations of an evolving T-cell response. The maturation of the T-cell response leads to the production of different patterns of lymphokines, which may be significantly affected, as desired, by dosage, timing, and route of immunization, as well as by the choice of adjuvants. PMID:7892258

  15. Discrete TCR Binding Kinetics Control Invariant NKT Cell Selection and Central Priming.

    PubMed

    Cruz Tleugabulova, Mayra; Escalante, Nichole K; Deng, Shenglou; Fieve, Stephanie; Ereño-Orbea, June; Savage, Paul B; Julien, Jean-Philippe; Mallevaey, Thierry

    2016-11-15

    Invariant NKT (iNKT) cells develop and differentiate in the thymus, segregating into iNKT1/2/17 subsets akin to Th1/2/17 classical CD4(+) T cells; however, iNKT TCRs recognize Ags in a fundamentally different way. How the biophysical parameters of iNKT TCRs influence signal strength in vivo and how such signals affect the development and differentiation of these cells are unknown. In this study, we manipulated TCRs in vivo to generate clonotypic iNKT cells using TCR retrogenic chimeras. We report that the biophysical properties of CD1d-lipid-TCR interactions differentially impacted the development and effector differentiation of iNKT cells. Whereas selection efficiency strongly correlated with TCR avidity, TCR signaling, cell-cell conjugate formation, and iNKT effector differentiation correlated with the half-life of CD1d-lipid-TCR interactions. TCR binding properties, however, did not modulate Ag-induced iNKT cytokine production. Our work establishes that discrete TCR interaction kinetics influence iNKT cell development and central priming.

  16. Role of endothelial cell-selective adhesion molecule in hematogeneous metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Cangara, Husni M.; Ishida, Tatsuro; Hara, Tetsuya; Sun, Li; Toh, Ryuji; Rikitake, Yoshiyuki; Kundu, Ramendra K.; Quertermous, Thomas; Hirata, Ken-ichi; Hayashi, Yoshitake

    2016-01-01

    The spread of malignant cells from a localized tumor is thought to be directly related to the number of microvessels in the tumor. The endothelial cell-selective adhesion molecule (ESAM) is a member of the immunoglobulin superfamily that mediates homophilic interactions between endothelial cells. Previous studies have indicated that ESAM regulates angiogenesis in the primary tumor growth and endothelial permeability. In this study, we aimed to further elucidate the role of ESAM in tumor metastasis through angiogenic processes. ESAM expression was higher in hypervascular metastatic tumor tissues than in normal tissues in human lungs. Cell culture studies found that conditioned medium from B16F10 melanoma cells increased ESAM expression in endothelial cells and promoted endothelial migration and tube formation. The B16F10 medium-induced endothelial migration and tube formation were significantly attenuated when ESAM was downregulated by siRNA transfection. Intravenous injection of B16F10 cells into ESAM+/+ and ESAM−/− mice for comparison of metastatic potential resulted in the number of metastatic lung nodules in ESAM−/− mice being 83% lower than of those in ESAM+/+ mice. The microvascular density in the tumor was also lower in ESAM−/− than in ESAM+/+ mice. These findings indicate that ESAM regulates tumor metastasis through endothelial cell migration and tube formation in metastatic nodules. Inhibition of ESAM may therefore inhibit tumor metastasis by inhibiting the angiogenic processes. PMID:20153339

  17. Cyclin D3 is selectively required for proliferative expansion of germinal center B cells.

    PubMed

    Cato, Matthew H; Chintalapati, Suresh K; Yau, Irene W; Omori, Sidne A; Rickert, Robert C

    2011-01-01

    The generation of robust T-cell-dependent humoral immune responses requires the formation and expansion of germinal center structures within the follicular regions of the secondary lymphoid tissues. B-cell proliferation in the germinal center drives ongoing antigen-dependent selection and the generation of high-affinity class-switched plasma and memory B cells. However, the mechanisms regulating B-cell proliferation within this microenvironment are largely unknown. Here, we report that cyclin D3 is uniquely required for germinal center progression. Ccnd3(-/-) mice exhibit a B-cell-intrinsic defect in germinal center maturation and fail to generate an affinity-matured IgG response. We determined that the defect resulted from failed proliferative expansion of GL7(+) IgD(-) PNA(+) B cells. Mechanistically, sustained expression of cyclin D3 was found to be regulated at the level of protein stability and controlled by glycogen synthase kinase 3 in a cyclic AMP-protein kinase A-dependent manner. The specific defect in proliferative expansion of GL7(+) IgD(-) PNA(+) B cells in Ccnd3(-/-) mice defines an underappreciated step in germinal center progression and solidifies a role for cyclin D3 in the immune response, and as a potential therapeutic target for germinal center-derived B-cell malignancies.

  18. Selective turnover and alteration of soluble and cell wall polysaccharides in grasses

    SciTech Connect

    Gibeaut, D.M.; Carpita, N.C. )

    1991-05-01

    Cells of proso millet in liquid culture and leaves of maize seedlings readily incorporated radioactive glucose and arabinose into soluble and cell wall polymers. Radioactivity from arabinose accumulated selectively in polymers containing arabinose or xylose because a salvage pathway and C-4 epimerase yields both nucleotide-pentoses. On the other hand, radioactivity from glucose was found in all sugars and polymers. Pulse-chase experiments with proso millet cells in liquid culture demonstrated turnover of buffer soluble polymers within minutes and accumulation of radioactive polymers in the cell wall. In leaves of maize seedlings, radioactive polymers accumulated quickly and peaked 30 hours after the pulse, then decreased slowly for the remaining time course. During further growth of the seedling, radioactive polymers became more tenaciously bound in the cell wall. Sugars were constantly recycled from turnover of polysaccharides of the cell wall. Arabinose, hydrolyzed from glucuronoarabinoxylans, and glucose, hydrolyzed from mixed-linkage {beta}-D-glucans, constituted most of the sugar participating in turnover. Arabinogalactans were a large portion of the buffer soluble (cytoplasmic) polymers of both proso millet cells and maize seedling, and these polymers also exhibited turnover. Our results indicate that the primary cell wall is not simply a sink for various polysaccharide components, but rather a dynamic compartment exhibiting long-term re-organization by turnover and alteration of specific polymers during development.

  19. Selective capture of endothelial and perivascular cells from brain microvessels using laser capture microdissection.

    PubMed

    Kinnecom, Katie; Pachter, Joel S

    2005-12-01

    Laser capture microdissection (LCM) of the major cell types comprising brain microvessels offers a powerful technology to explore the molecular basis of the blood-brain barrier in health and disease. However, the ability to selectively retrieve endothelial or perivascular cells, without cross-contamination from the other, has proven difficult. Additionally, histochemical methods previously described for use with LCM have not allowed for identification of all the different size branches of the microvascular tree. Here, we describe a double immunostaining method, combining bright-field and fluorescence microscopy, and using an extensive dehydration with xylene, to clearly identify and spatially resolve endothelial from perivascular cells within all size microvascular branches in frozen brain sections. LCM of these sections, coupled with RNA analysis by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction, revealed that captured endothelial cells show endothelial markers but no detectable markers for astrocytes or smooth muscle cells/pericytes. Conversely, captured astrocytes or smooth muscle cells/pericytes demonstrate their respective markers, but not those of endothelial cells. This approach has applicability to microarray analysis, thereby enabling global gene profiling of the different cell types along the entirety of the brain microvascular tree.

  20. Targeting procaspase-3 with WF-208, a novel PAC-1 derivative, causes selective cancer cell apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fangyang; Liu, Yajing; Wang, Lihui; Yang, Jingyu; Zhao, Yanfang; Wang, Nannan; Cao, Qi; Gong, Ping; Wu, Chunfu

    2015-08-01

    Caspase-3 is a critical effector caspase in apoptosis cascade, and is often over-expressed in many cancer tissues. The first synthesized procaspase-3 activator, PAC-1, induces cancer cell apoptosis and exhibits antitumour activity in murine xenograft models. To identify more potent procaspase-3 activators, a series of compounds were designed, synthesized and evaluated for their ability of inducing cancer cell death in culture. Among these compounds, WF-208 stood out by its high cytotoxicity against procaspase-3 overexpressed HL-60 cells. Compared with PAC-1, WF-208 showed higher cytotoxicity in cancer cells and lower toxicity in normal cells. The further investigation described herein showed that WF-208 activated procaspase-3, degraded IAPs (The Inhibitors of apoptosis proteins) and leaded to caspase-3-dependent cell death in tumour cells, which possibly because of the zinc-chelating properties. WF-208 also showed greater antitumour activity than PAC-1 in murine xenograft model. In conclusion, we have discovered WF-208 as a promising procaspase-3 activating compound, with higher activity and higher cell selectivity than PAC-1.

  1. Predicting bacteriophage proteins located in host cell with feature selection technique.

    PubMed

    Ding, Hui; Liang, Zhi-Yong; Guo, Feng-Biao; Huang, Jian; Chen, Wei; Lin, Hao

    2016-04-01

    A bacteriophage is a virus that can infect a bacterium. The fate of an infected bacterium is determined by the bacteriophage proteins located in the host cell. Thus, reliably identifying bacteriophage proteins located in the host cell is extremely important to understand their functions and discover potential anti-bacterial drugs. Thus, in this paper, a computational method was developed to recognize bacteriophage proteins located in host cells based only on their amino acid sequences. The analysis of variance (ANOVA) combined with incremental feature selection (IFS) was proposed to optimize the feature set. Using a jackknife cross-validation, our method can discriminate between bacteriophage proteins located in a host cell and the bacteriophage proteins not located in a host cell with a maximum overall accuracy of 84.2%, and can further classify bacteriophage proteins located in host cell cytoplasm and in host cell membranes with a maximum overall accuracy of 92.4%. To enhance the value of the practical applications of the method, we built a web server called PHPred (〈http://lin.uestc.edu.cn/server/PHPred〉). We believe that the PHPred will become a powerful tool to study bacteriophage proteins located in host cells and to guide related drug discovery.

  2. Thymic involution perturbs negative selection leading to autoreactive T cells that induce chronic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Coder, Brandon D; Wang, Hongjun; Ruan, Linhui; Su, Dong-Ming

    2015-06-15

    Thymic involution and the subsequent amplified release of autoreactive T cells increase the susceptibility toward developing autoimmunity, but whether they induce chronic inflammation with advanced age remains unclear. The presence of chronic low-level proinflammatory factors in elderly individuals (termed inflammaging) is a significant risk factor for morbidity and mortality in virtually every chronic age-related disease. To determine how thymic involution leads to the persistent release and activation of autoreactive T cells capable of inducing inflammaging, we used a Foxn1 conditional knockout mouse model that induces accelerated thymic involution while maintaining a young periphery. We found that thymic involution leads to T cell activation shortly after thymic egress, which is accompanied by a chronic inflammatory phenotype consisting of cellular infiltration into non-lymphoid tissues, increased TNF-α production, and elevated serum IL-6. Autoreactive T cell clones were detected in the periphery of Foxn1 conditional knockout mice. A failure of negative selection, facilitated by decreased expression of Aire rather than impaired regulatory T cell generation, led to autoreactive T cell generation. Furthermore, the young environment can reverse age-related regulatory T cell accumulation in naturally aged mice, but not inflammatory infiltration. Taken together, these findings identify thymic involution and the persistent activation of autoreactive T cells as a contributing source of chronic inflammation (inflammaging).

  3. Cost-effective recovery and purification of polyhydroxyalkanoates by selective dissolution of cell mass.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jian; Chen, Lilian X L

    2006-01-01

    Highly efficient separation and purification of polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) from PHA-containing cell mass is essential to production of the bioplastics from renewable resources in a cost-effective, environmentally friendly way. Based on selective dissolution of non-PHA cell mass (NPCM) by protons in aqueous solution and crystallization kinetics of PHA biopolymers, a simple process is developed and demonstrated to recover PHAs from cell mass to high purity (>97 wt %) with high yield (>95 wt %). The average molecular weight of biopolyesters is controlled, which follows an exponential function of process severity, a combined factor of processing conditions. Compared with conventional chemical treatment such as sequential surfactant and hypochlorite treatment, this new technology substantially reduces the chemical cost for PHA recovery and purification from PHA-containing cell mass.

  4. Kv1 channels selectively prevent dendritic hyperexcitability in rat Purkinje cells

    PubMed Central

    Khavandgar, Simin; Walter, Joy T; Sageser, Kristin; Khodakhah, Kamran

    2005-01-01

    Purkinje cells, the sole output of the cerebellar cortex, encode the timing signals required for motor coordination in their firing rate and activity pattern. Dendrites of Purkinje cells express a high density of P/Q-type voltage-gated calcium channels and fire dendritic calcium spikes. Here we show that dendritic subthreshold Kv1.2 subunit-containing Kv1 potassium channels prevent generation of random spontaneous calcium spikes. With Kv1 channels blocked, dendritic calcium spikes drive bursts of somatic sodium spikes and prevent the cell from faithfully encoding motor timing signals. The selective dendritic function of Kv1 channels in Purkinje cells allows them to effectively suppress dendritic hyperexcitability without hindering the generation of somatic action potentials. Further, we show that Kv1 channels also contribute to dendritic integration of parallel fibre synaptic input. Kv1 channels are often targeted to soma and axon and the data presented support a major dendritic function for these channels. PMID:16210348

  5. A Novel Inhibitor Of Topoisomerase I is Selectively Toxic For A Subset of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Cell Lines | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    SW044248, identified through a screen for chemicals that are selectively toxic for NSCLC cell lines, was found to rapidly inhibit macromolecular synthesis in sensitive, but not in insensitive cells. SW044248 killed approximately 15% of a panel of 74 NSCLC cell lines and was non-toxic to immortalized human bronchial cell lines.

  6. PRMT5-Selective Inhibitors Suppress Inflammatory T Cell Responses and Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Webb, Lindsay M.; Amici, Stephanie A.; Jablonski, Kyle A.; Savardekar, Himanshu; Panfil, Amanda R.; Li, Linsen; Zhou, Wei; Peine, Kevin; Karkhanis, Vrajesh; Bachelder, Eric M.; Ainslie, Kristy M.; Green, Patrick L.; Li, Chenglong; Baiocchi, Robert A.

    2017-01-01

    In the autoimmune disease multiple sclerosis and its animal model, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), expansion of pathogenic, myelin-specific Th1 cell populations drives active disease; selectively targeting this process may be the basis for a new therapeutic approach. Previous studies have hinted at a role for protein arginine methylation in immune responses, including T cell–mediated autoimmunity and EAE. However, a conclusive role for the protein arginine methyltransferase (PRMT) enzymes that catalyze these reactions has been lacking. PRMT5 is the main PRMT responsible for symmetric dimethylation of arginine residues of histones and other proteins. PRMT5 drives embryonic development and cancer, but its role in T cells, if any, has not been investigated. In this article, we show that PRMT5 is an important modulator of CD4+ T cell expansion. PRMT5 was transiently upregulated during maximal proliferation of mouse and human memory Th cells. PRMT5 expression was regulated upstream by the NF-κB pathway, and it promoted IL-2 production and proliferation. Blocking PRMT5 with novel, highly selective small molecule PRMT5 inhibitors severely blunted memory Th expansion, with preferential suppression of Th1 cells over Th2 cells. In vivo, PRMT5 blockade efficiently suppressed recall T cell responses and reduced inflammation in delayed-type hypersensitivity and clinical disease in EAE mouse models. These data implicate PRMT5 in the regulation of adaptive memory Th cell responses and suggest that PRMT5 inhibitors may be a novel therapeutic approach for T cell–mediated inflammatory disease. PMID:28087667

  7. Selective removal of undifferentiated embryonic stem cells from differentiation cultures through HSV1 thymidine kinase and ganciclovir treatment.

    PubMed

    Naujok, Ortwin; Kaldrack, Joanna; Taivankhuu, Terbish; Jörns, Anne; Lenzen, Sigurd

    2010-09-01

    Pluripotent cell lines such as embryonic stem cells are an attractive source for a potential cell replacement therapy. However, transplantation of differentiated cells harbors the risk of teratoma formation, presenting a serious health risk. To overcome this obstacle, a negative selection system was established that permits selective removal of undifferentiated cells during in vitro differentiation. Use of the HSV1 thymidine kinase and eGFP under the control of the Oct4 promoter allowed the destruction of undifferentiated ES cells by ganciclovir treatment; differentiated cells were unharmed. Clonal ES cells remained pluripotent and showed positive staining for a wide range of embryonic markers. Thus, treatment with ganciclovir during in vitro differentiation effectively removed the population of undifferentiated cells and provided a pure population of completely differentiated cells. This approach may pave the way for a safe application of ES cells in regenerative medicine in the future.

  8. [Cloning goat producing human lactoferrin with genetically modified donor cells selected by single or dual markers].

    PubMed

    An, Liyou; Yuan, Yuguo; Yu, Baoli; Yang, Tingjia; Cheng, Yong

    2012-12-01

    We compared the efficiency of cloning goat using human lactoferrin (hLF) with genetically modified donor cells marked by single (Neo(r)) or double (Neo(r)/GFP) markers. Single marker expression vector (pBLC14) or dual markers expression vector (pAPLM) was delivered to goat fetal fibroblasts (GFF), and then the transgenic GFF was used as donor cells to produce transgenic goats. Respectively, 58.8% (20/34) and 86.7% (26/30) resistant cell lines confirmed the transgenic integration by PCR. Moreover, pAPLM cells lines were subcultured with several passages, only 20% (6/30) cell lines was observed fluorescence from each cell during the cell passage. Somatic cell nuclear transfer using the donor cells harbouring pBLC14 or pAPLM construct, resulting in a total of 806 reconstructed embryos, a pregnancy rate at 35 d (53.8%, 39.1%) and 60 d (26.9%, 21.7%), and an offspring birth rate (1.9%, 1.4%) with 5 and 7 newborn cloned goats, respectively. Transgene was confirmed by PCR and southern-blot in all cloned offspring. There were no significant differences at the reconstructed embryo fusion rates, pregnancy rates and the birth rate (P > 0.05) between single and double markers groups. The Neo(r)/GFP double markers could improve the reliability for accurately and efficiently selecting the genetically modified donor cells. No adverse effect was observed on the efficiency of transgenic goat production by SCNT using somatic cells transfected with double (Neo(r)/GFP) markers vector.

  9. Selective stabilization of microtubules oriented toward the direction of cell migration.

    PubMed Central

    Gundersen, G G; Bulinski, J C

    1988-01-01

    A small subset of the microtubule (MT) array in many cultured cells does not exhibit the rapid turnover (t 1/2 approximately equal to 10 min) shown by most cellular MTs. The function of the stable class of MTs is unknown and has been confounded by the apparent lack of organization of stable MTs within cells. Using an antibody against detyrosinated tubulin, a post-translationally modified form of tubulin that accumulates in stable MTs, we localized the stable MTs in mouse 3T3 cells induced to initiate directional migration by experimental wounding of confluent monolayers. Immediately after monolayer wounding, the distribution of stable MTs in cells at the wound edge resembled that in cells in the monolayer interior; most cells either contained randomly distributed stable MTs or lacked them entirely. However, by 20 min after wounding, cells at the wound margin began to generate an asymmetric MT array, with virtually all stable MTs oriented toward the cell edge in contact with the wound. Two hours after monolayer wounding, greater than or equal to 80% of cells at the wound margin had generated this polarized array of stable MTs, and the array was maintained for at least 12 hr. MTs in the polarized array showed enhanced resistance to depolymerization by nocodazole, thus providing an independent test of their stability. Formation of the polar array of stable MTs appeared to precede onset of cell migration and closely paralleled reorientation of the MT-organizing center. These results show that cultured cells can remodel their MT array rapidly in response to an extracellular signal and suggest that selective stabilization of MTs is an early event in the generation of cellular asymmetry. Images PMID:3413068

  10. Effects of selective inhibitors of Aurora kinases on anaplastic thyroid carcinoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Baldini, Enke; Tuccilli, Chiara; Prinzi, Natalie; Sorrenti, Salvatore; Antonelli, Alessandro; Gnessi, Lucio; Morrone, Stefania; Moretti, Costanzo; Bononi, Marco; Arlot-Bonnemains, Yannick; D'Armiento, Massimino; Ulisse, Salvatore

    2014-10-01

    Aurora kinases are serine/threonine kinases that play an essential role in cell division. Their aberrant expression and/or function induce severe mitotic abnormalities, resulting in either cell death or aneuploidy. Overexpression of Aurora kinases is often found in several malignancies, among which is anaplastic thyroid carcinoma (ATC). We have previously demonstrated the in vitro efficacy of Aurora kinase inhibitors in restraining cell growth and survival of different ATC cell lines. In this study, we sought to establish which Aurora might represent the preferential drug target for ATC. To this end, the effects of two selective inhibitors of Aurora-A (MLN8237) and Aurora-B (AZD1152) on four human ATC cell lines (CAL-62, BHT-101, 8305C, and 8505C) were analysed. Both inhibitors reduced cell proliferation in a time- and dose-dependent manner, with IC50 ranges of 44.3-134.2 nM for MLN8237 and of 9.2-461.3 nM for AZD1152. Immunofluorescence experiments and time-lapse videomicroscopy yielded evidence that each inhibitor induced distinct mitotic phenotypes, but both of them prevented the completion of cytokinesis. As a result, poliploidy increased in all AZD1152-treated cells, and in two out of four cell lines treated with MLN8237. Apoptosis was induced in all the cells by MLN8237, and in BHT-101, 8305C, and 8505C by AZD1152, while CAL-62 exposed to AZD1152 died through necrosis after multiple rounds of endoreplication. Both inhibitors were capable of blocking anchorage-independent cell growth. In conclusion, we demonstrated that either Aurora-A or Aurora-B might represent therapeutic targets for the ATC treatment, but inhibition of Aurora-A appears more effective for suppressing ATC cell proliferation and for inducing the apoptotic pathway.

  11. Divergent selection for ester-linked diferulates in maize pith stalk tissues: effects on cell wall composition and degradability

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cross-linking of grass cell wall components through diferulates (DFAs) has a marked impact on cell wall properties. However, results of genetic selection for DFA concentration have not been reported for any grass species. We report here the results of direct selection for ester-linked DFA concentrat...

  12. High-Performance TiO2 -Based Electron-Selective Contacts for Crystalline Silicon Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xinbo; Bi, Qunyu; Ali, Haider; Davis, Kristopher; Schoenfeld, Winston V; Weber, Klaus

    2016-07-01

    Thin TiO2 films are demonstrated to be an excellent electron-selective contact for crystalline silicon solar cells. An efficiency of 21.6% is achieved for crystalline silicon solar cells featuring a full-area TiO2 -based electron-selective contact.

  13. Cell type-selective disease-association of genes under high regulatory load.

    PubMed

    Galhardo, Mafalda; Berninger, Philipp; Nguyen, Thanh-Phuong; Sauter, Thomas; Sinkkonen, Lasse

    2015-10-15

    We previously showed that disease-linked metabolic genes are often under combinatorial regulation. Using the genome-wide ChIP-Seq binding profiles for 93 transcription factors in nine different cell lines, we show that genes under high regulatory load are significantly enriched for disease-association across cell types. We find that transcription factor load correlates with the enhancer load of the genes and thereby allows the identification of genes under high regulatory load by epigenomic mapping of active enhancers. Identification of the high enhancer load genes across 139 samples from 96 different cell and tissue types reveals a consistent enrichment for disease-associated genes in a cell type-selective manner. The underlying genes are not limited to super-enhancer genes and show several types of disease-association evidence beyond genetic variation (such as biomarkers). Interestingly, the high regulatory load genes are involved in more KEGG pathways than expected by chance, exhibit increased betweenness centrality in the interaction network of liver disease genes, and carry longer 3' UTRs with more microRNA (miRNA) binding sites than genes on average, suggesting a role as hubs integrating signals within regulatory networks. In summary, epigenetic mapping of active enhancers presents a promising and unbiased approach for identification of novel disease genes in a cell type-selective manner.

  14. An electrostatic selection mechanism controls sequential kinase signaling downstream of the T cell receptor

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Neel H; Wang, Qi; Yan, Qingrong; Karandur, Deepti; Kadlecek, Theresa A; Fallahee, Ian R; Russ, William P; Ranganathan, Rama; Weiss, Arthur; Kuriyan, John

    2016-01-01

    The sequence of events that initiates T cell signaling is dictated by the specificities and order of activation of the tyrosine kinases that signal downstream of the T cell receptor. Using a platform that combines exhaustive point-mutagenesis of peptide substrates, bacterial surface-display, cell sorting, and deep sequencing, we have defined the specificities of the first two kinases in this pathway, Lck and ZAP-70, for the T cell receptor ζ chain and the scaffold proteins LAT and SLP-76. We find that ZAP-70 selects its substrates by utilizing an electrostatic mechanism that excludes substrates with positively-charged residues and favors LAT and SLP-76 phosphosites that are surrounded by negatively-charged residues. This mechanism prevents ZAP-70 from phosphorylating its own activation loop, thereby enforcing its strict dependence on Lck for activation. The sequence features in ZAP-70, LAT, and SLP-76 that underlie electrostatic selectivity likely contribute to the specific response of T cells to foreign antigens. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.20105.001 PMID:27700984

  15. Cell type-selective disease-association of genes under high regulatory load

    PubMed Central

    Galhardo, Mafalda; Berninger, Philipp; Nguyen, Thanh-Phuong; Sauter, Thomas; Sinkkonen, Lasse

    2015-01-01

    We previously showed that disease-linked metabolic genes are often under combinatorial regulation. Using the genome-wide ChIP-Seq binding profiles for 93 transcription factors in nine different cell lines, we show that genes under high regulatory load are significantly enriched for disease-association across cell types. We find that transcription factor load correlates with the enhancer load of the genes and thereby allows the identification of genes under high regulatory load by epigenomic mapping of active enhancers. Identification of the high enhancer load genes across 139 samples from 96 different cell and tissue types reveals a consistent enrichment for disease-associated genes in a cell type-selective manner. The underlying genes are not limited to super-enhancer genes and show several types of disease-association evidence beyond genetic variation (such as biomarkers). Interestingly, the high regulatory load genes are involved in more KEGG pathways than expected by chance, exhibit increased betweenness centrality in the interaction network of liver disease genes, and carry longer 3′ UTRs with more microRNA (miRNA) binding sites than genes on average, suggesting a role as hubs integrating signals within regulatory networks. In summary, epigenetic mapping of active enhancers presents a promising and unbiased approach for identification of novel disease genes in a cell type-selective manner. PMID:26338775

  16. Selective retention of bone marrow-derived cells to enhance spinal fusion.

    PubMed

    Muschler, George F; Matsukura, Yoichi; Nitto, Hironori; Boehm, Cynthia A; Valdevit, Antonio D; Kambic, Helen E; Davros, William J; Easley, Kirk A; Powell, Kimerly A

    2005-03-01

    Connective tissue progenitors can be concentrated rapidly from fresh bone marrow aspirates using some porous matrices as a surface for cell attachment and selective retention, and for creating a cellular graft that is enriched with respect to the number of progenitor cells. We evaluated the potential value of this method using demineralized cortical bone powder as the matrix. Matrix alone, matrix plus marrow, and matrix enriched with marrow cells were compared in an established canine spinal fusion model. Fusions were compared based on union score, fusion mass, fusion volume, and by mechanical testing. Enriched matrix grafts delivered a mean of 2.3 times more cells and approximately 5.6 times more progenitors than matrix mixed with bone marrow. The union score with enriched matrix was superior to matrix alone and matrix plus marrow. Fusion volume and fusion area also were greater with the enriched matrix. These data suggest that the strategy of selective retention provides a rapid, simple, and effective method for concentration and delivery of marrow-derived cells and connective tissue progenitors that may improve the outcome of bone grafting procedures in various clinical settings.

  17. Melatonin, a novel selective ATF-6 inhibitor, induces human hepatoma cell apoptosis through COX-2 downregulation

    PubMed Central

    Bu, Li-Jia; Yu, Han-Qing; Fan, Lu-Lu; Li, Xiao-Qiu; Wang, Fang; Liu, Jia-Tao; Zhong, Fei; Zhang, Cong-Jun; Wei, Wei; Wang, Hua; Sun, Guo-Ping

    2017-01-01

    AIM To clarify the mechanisms involved in the critical endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress initiating unfolded protein response pathway modified by melatonin. METHODS Hepatoma cells, HepG2, were cultured in vitro. Flow cytometry and TUNEL assay were used to measure HepG2 cell apoptosis. Western blotting and quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction methods were used to determine the protein and messenger RNA levels of ER stress and apoptosis related genes’ expression, respectively. Tissue microarray construction from patients was verified by immunohistochemical analysis. RESULTS In the present study, we first identified that melatonin selectively blocked activating transcription factor 6 (ATF-6) and then inhibited cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression, leading to enhanced liver cancer cell apoptosis under ER stress condition. Dramatically increased CCAAT-enhancer-binding protein homologous protein level, suppressed COX-2 and decreased Bcl-2/Bax ratio by melatonin or ATF-6 siRNA contributed the enhanced HepG2 cell apoptosis under tunicamycin (an ER stress inducer) stimulation. In clinical hepatocellular carcinoma patients, the close relationship between ATF-6 and COX-2 was further confirmed. CONCLUSION These findings indicate that melatonin as a novel selective ATF-6 inhibitor can sensitize human hepatoma cells to ER stress inducing apoptosis. PMID:28246472

  18. Rabies virus infection selectively impairs membrane receptor functions in neuronal model cells.

    PubMed

    Koschel, K; Halbach, M

    1979-03-01

    A persistent infection with rabies virus (HEP-Flury) was established in the CNS-derived hybrid cell line 108CC15 which possesses specific membrane receptors for prostaglandins, catecholamines and acetylcholine. We report a differential virus influence on the specific receptor response to PGE, isoproterenol and acetycholine as indicated by typical changes of the intracellular cyclic AMP levels. As the adenylate cyclase activity was unchanged in infected cells in vitro, a selective virus influence on specific receptors themselves or their coupling to the cAMP synthesizing system must be considered.

  19. Targeting ferritin receptors for the selective delivery of imaging and therapeutic agents to breast cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geninatti Crich, S.; Cadenazzi, M.; Lanzardo, S.; Conti, L.; Ruiu, R.; Alberti, D.; Cavallo, F.; Cutrin, J. C.; Aime, S.

    2015-04-01

    In this work the selective uptake of native horse spleen ferritin and apoferritin loaded with MRI contrast agents has been assessed in human breast cancer cells (MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231). The higher expression of L-ferritin receptors (SCARA5) led to an enhanced uptake in MCF-7 as shown in T2 and T1 weighted MR images, respectively. The high efficiency of ferritin internalization in MCF-7 has been exploited for the simultaneous delivery of curcumin, a natural therapeutic molecule endowed with antineoplastic and anti-inflammatory action, and the MRI contrast agent Gd-HPDO3A. This theranostic system is able to treat selectively breast cancer cells over-expressing ferritin receptors. By entrapping in apoferritin both Gd-HPDO3A and curcumin, it was possible to deliver a therapeutic dose of 167 μg ml-1 (as calculated by MRI) of this natural drug to MCF-7 cells, thus obtaining a significant reduction of cell proliferation.In this work the selective uptake of native horse spleen ferritin and apoferritin loaded with MRI contrast agents has been assessed in human breast cancer cells (MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231). The higher expression of L-ferritin receptors (SCARA5) led to an enhanced uptake in MCF-7 as shown in T2 and T1 weighted MR images, respectively. The high efficiency of ferritin internalization in MCF-7 has been exploited for the simultaneous delivery of curcumin, a natural therapeutic molecule endowed with antineoplastic and anti-inflammatory action, and the MRI contrast agent Gd-HPDO3A. This theranostic system is able to treat selectively breast cancer cells over-expressing ferritin receptors. By entrapping in apoferritin both Gd-HPDO3A and curcumin, it was possible to deliver a therapeutic dose of 167 μg ml-1 (as calculated by MRI) of this natural drug to MCF-7 cells, thus obtaining a significant reduction of cell proliferation. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Competition studies with free apoferritin, Fig. S1; APO-FITC intracellular distribution by

  20. Selective transport of cationized fluorescent topoisomerase into nuclei of live cells for DNA damage studies.

    PubMed

    Minchew, Candace L; Didenko, Vladimir V

    2014-01-01

    The targeted delivery of fluorescently labeled, DNA-modifying proteins into cellular nuclei permits investigation of DNA damage and chromatin function in living cells. Commercially available protein delivery vectors cannot provide selective intranuclear transportation and primarily unload their cargo in the cytoplasm. Here we describe a simple approach for specific intranuclear transportation of vaccinia topoisomerase protein based on its cationization. The delivered protein can be observed and monitored by fluorescence microscopy. The technique is cost-efficient and time-saving. It can be useful in live cell studies.

  1. Silicon solar cells made by a self-aligned, selective-emitter, plasma-etchback process

    DOEpatents

    Ruby, D.S.; Schubert, W.K.; Gee, J.M.

    1999-02-16

    A potentially low-cost process for forming and passivating a selective emitter. The process uses a plasma etch of the heavily doped emitter to improve its performance. The grids of the solar cell are used to mask the plasma etch so that only the emitter in the region between the grids is etched, while the region beneath the grids remains heavily doped for low contact resistance. This process is potentially low-cost because it requires no alignment. After the emitter etch, a silicon nitride layer is deposited by plasma-enhanced, chemical vapor deposition, and the solar cell is annealed in a forming gas. 5 figs.

  2. Silicon solar cells made by a self-aligned, selective-emitter, plasma-etchback process

    DOEpatents

    Ruby, Douglas S.; Schubert, William K.; Gee, James M.

    1999-01-01

    A potentially low-cost process for forming and passivating a selective emitter. The process uses a plasma etch of the heavily doped emitter to improve its performance. The grids of the solar cell are used to mask the plasma etch so that only the emitter in the region between the grids is etched, while the region beneath the grids remains heavily doped for low contact resistance. This process is potentially low-cost because it requires no alignment. After the emitter etch, a silicon nitride layer is deposited by plasma-enhanced, chemical vapor deposition, and the solar cell is annealed in a forming gas.

  3. Disturbance characteristics of half-selected cells in a cross-point resistive switching memory array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhe; Li, Haitong; Chen, Hong-Yu; Chen, Bing; Liu, Rui; Huang, Peng; Zhang, Feifei; Jiang, Zizhen; Ye, Hongfei; Gao, Bin; Liu, Lifeng; Liu, Xiaoyan; Kang, Jinfeng; Wong, H.-S. Philip; Yu, Shimeng

    2016-05-01

    Disturbance characteristics of cross-point resistive random access memory (RRAM) arrays are comprehensively studied in this paper. An analytical model is developed to quantify the number of pulses (#Pulse) the cell can bear before disturbance occurs under various sub-switching voltage stresses based on physical understanding. An evaluation methodology is proposed to assess the disturb behavior of half-selected (HS) cells in cross-point RRAM arrays by combining the analytical model and SPICE simulation. The characteristics of cross-point RRAM arrays such as energy consumption, reliable operating cycles and total error bits are evaluated by the methodology. A possible solution to mitigate disturbance is proposed.

  4. On-Bead Two-Color (OBTC) Cell Screen for Direct Identification of Highly Selective Cell Surface Receptor Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Udugamasooriya, D. Gomika; Kodadek, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Combinatorial library screens can identify a suitable ligand for a biological target of interest out of thousands or even millions of compounds, and can play a key role in the modern drug development process. While conventional high-throughput cell screens based on functional assays require expensive robotics, simple on-bead combinatorial assays for ligand binding to the target protein can be done far more cheaply. This article describes one such assay, developed using combinatorial peptoid libraries for targeting integral membrane receptors or other cell surface-exposed molecules. In addition to the reduced cost, a unique advantage of this assay is the direct identification of the most selective ligands for a cell surface receptor that is expressed in its natural environment. PMID:22582145

  5. Formalin-treated bacteria as selective B cell mitogens: results in primary and acquired immunodeficiencies.

    PubMed Central

    Sirianni, M C; Pucillo, L P; Fiorilli, M; Aiuti, F; Banck, G; Forsgren, A

    1981-01-01

    The mitogenic activity of the formalin-treated bacterial strains Branhamella catarrhalis, Haemophilus influenzae and the Cowan I strain of Staphylococcus aureus was assessed in peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) from patients with primary immunodeficiencies, acute lymphocytic leukaemia (ALL), chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and in umbilical cord blood lymphocytes. The bacteria selectively stimulated B cells, as demonstrated by the finding of a normal de novo DNA synthesis in children with a T cell defect and of an absent response in X-linked agammaglobulinaemia and severe combined immunodeficiency. A decreased mitogenic activity was exerted on PBL from four out of seven adults with common variable hypogammaglobulinemia (CVH). In B-CLL the mitogenic activity was normal while in T-ALL it was decreased. Umbilical cord blood lymphocytes responded better than PBL from adults. The selective stimulative ability of the bacteria for B lymphocytes is expressed when PBL are cultured together with the formalin-treated bacteria for 48 to 72 hr. PMID:6976247

  6. Transparent conductor-embedding nanocones for selective emitters: optical and electrical improvements of Si solar cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joondong; Yun, Ju-Hyung; Kim, Hyunyub; Cho, Yunae; Park, Hyeong-Ho; Kumar, M Melvin David; Yi, Junsin; Anderson, Wayne A; Kim, Dong-Wook

    2015-03-19

    Periodical nanocone-arrays were employed in an emitter region for high efficient Si solar cells. Conventional wet-etching process was performed to form the nanocone-arrays for a large area, which spontaneously provides the graded doping features for a selective emitter. This enables to lower the electrical contact resistance and enhances the carrier collection due to the high electric field distribution through a nanocone. Optically, the convex-shaped nanocones efficiently reduce light-reflection and the incident light is effectively focused into Si via nanocone structure, resulting in an extremely improved the carrier collection performances. This nanocone-arrayed selective emitter simultaneously satisfies optical and electrical improvement. We report the record high efficiency of 16.3% for the periodically nanoscale patterned emitter Si solar cell.

  7. Silicon heterojunction solar cell with passivated hole selective MoOx contact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battaglia, Corsin; de Nicolás, Silvia Martín; De Wolf, Stefaan; Yin, Xingtian; Zheng, Maxwell; Ballif, Christophe; Javey, Ali

    2014-03-01

    We explore substoichiometric molybdenum trioxide (MoOx, x < 3) as a dopant-free, hole-selective contact for silicon solar cells. Using an intrinsic hydrogenated amorphous silicon passivation layer between the oxide and the silicon absorber, we demonstrate a high open-circuit voltage of 711 mV and power conversion efficiency of 18.8%. Due to the wide band gap of MoOx, we observe a substantial gain in photocurrent of 1.9 mA/cm2 in the ultraviolet and visible part of the solar spectrum, when compared to a p-type amorphous silicon emitter of a traditional silicon heterojunction cell. Our results emphasize the strong potential for oxides as carrier selective heterojunction partners to inorganic semiconductors.

  8. Transparent conductor-embedding nanocones for selective emitters: optical and electrical improvements of Si solar cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Joondong; Yun, Ju-Hyung; Kim, Hyunyub; Cho, Yunae; Park, Hyeong-Ho; Kumar, M. Melvin David; Yi, Junsin; Anderson, Wayne A.; Kim, Dong-Wook

    2015-01-01

    Periodical nanocone-arrays were employed in an emitter region for high efficient Si solar cells. Conventional wet-etching process was performed to form the nanocone-arrays for a large area, which spontaneously provides the graded doping features for a selective emitter. This enables to lower the electrical contact resistance and enhances the carrier collection due to the high electric field distribution through a nanocone. Optically, the convex-shaped nanocones efficiently reduce light-reflection and the incident light is effectively focused into Si via nanocone structure, resulting in an extremely improved the carrier collection performances. This nanocone-arrayed selective emitter simultaneously satisfies optical and electrical improvement. We report the record high efficiency of 16.3% for the periodically nanoscale patterned emitter Si solar cell. PMID:25787933

  9. Phthalates Are Metabolised by Primary Thyroid Cell Cultures but Have Limited Influence on Selected Thyroid Cell Functions In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Juliana Frohnert; Brorson, Marianne Møller; Boas, Malene; Frederiksen, Hanne; Nielsen, Claus Henrik; Lindström, Emma Sofie; Hofman-Bang, Jacob; Hartoft-Nielsen, Marie-Louise; Frisch, Thomas; Main, Katharina M.; Bendtzen, Klaus; Rasmussen, Åse Krogh; Feldt-Rasmussen, Ulla

    2016-01-01

    Phthalates are plasticisers added to a wide variety of products, resulting in measurable exposure of humans. They are suspected to disrupt the thyroid axis as epidemiological studies suggest an influence on the peripheral thyroid hormone concentration. The mechanism is still unknown as only few in vitro studies within this area exist. The aim of the present study was to investigate the influence of three phthalate diesters (di-ethyl phthalate, di-n-butyl phthalate (DnBP), di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP)) and two monoesters (mono-n-butyl phthalate and mono-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (MEHP)) on the differentiated function of primary human thyroid cell cultures. Also, the kinetics of phthalate metabolism were investigated. DEHP and its monoester, MEHP, both had an inhibitory influence on 3'-5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate secretion from the cells, and MEHP also on thyroglobulin (Tg) secretion from the cells. Results of the lactate dehydrogenase-measurements indicated that the MEHP-mediated influence was caused by cell death. No influence on gene expression of thyroid specific genes (Tg, thyroid peroxidase, sodium iodine symporter and thyroid stimulating hormone receptor) by any of the investigated diesters could be demonstrated. All phthalate diesters were metabolised to the respective monoester, however with a fall in efficiency for high concentrations of the larger diesters DnBP and DEHP. In conclusion, human thyroid cells were able to metabolise phthalates but this phthalate-exposure did not appear to substantially influence selected functions of these cells. PMID:26985823

  10. Selectivity of Pinus sylvestris extract and essential oil to estrogen-insensitive breast cancer cells Pinus sylvestris against cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Hoai, Nguyen Thi; Duc, Ho Viet; Thao, Do Thi; Orav, Anne; Raal, Ain

    2015-01-01

    Background: So far, the anticancer action of pine tree extracts has mainly been shown for the species distributed widely around the Asian countries. Objective: Therefore, this study was performed to examine the potential cytotoxicity of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) native also to the European region and growing widely in Estonia. Materials and Methods: The cytotoxic activity of methanol extract and essential oil of Scots pine needles was determined by sulforhodamine B assay in different human cancer cell lines. Results: This needle extract was found to suppress the viability of several human cancer cell lines showing some selectivity to estrogen receptor negative breast cancer cells, MDA-MB-231(half maximal inhibitory concentration [IC50] 35 μg/ml) in comparison with estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer cells, MCF-7 (IC50 86 μg/ml). It is the strongest cytotoxic effect at all measured, thus far for the needles and leaves extracts derived from various pine species, and is also the first study comparing the anticancer effects of pine tree extracts on molecularly different human breast cancer cells. The essential oil showed the stronger cytotoxic effect to both negative and positive breast cancer cell lines (both IC50 29 μg/ml) than pine extract (IC50 42 and 80 μg/ml, respectively). Conclusion: The data from this report indicate that Scots pine needles extract and essential oil exhibits some potential as chemopreventive or chemotherapeutic agent for mammary tumors unresponsive to endocrine treatment. PMID:26664017

  11. Energy and chemicals from the selective electrooxidation of renewable diols by organometallic fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Bellini, Marco; Bevilacqua, Manuela; Filippi, Jonathan; Lavacchi, Alessandro; Marchionni, Andrea; Miller, Hamish A; Oberhauser, Werner; Vizza, Francesco; Annen, Samuel P; Grützmacher, H

    2014-09-01

    Organometallic fuel cells catalyze the selective electrooxidation of renewable diols, simultaneously providing high power densities and chemicals of industrial importance. It is shown that the unique organometallic complex [Rh(OTf)(trop2NH)(PPh3)] employed as molecular active site in an anode of an OMFC selectively oxidizes a number of renewable diols, such as ethylene glycol , 1,2-propanediol (1,2-P), 1,3-propanediol (1,3-P), and 1,4-butanediol (1,4-B) to their corresponding mono-carboxylates. The electrochemical performance of this molecular catalyst is discussed, with the aim to achieve cogeneration of electricity and valuable chemicals in a highly selective electrooxidation from diol precursors.

  12. The use of covalently immobilized stem cell factor to selectively affect hematopoietic stem cell activity within a gelatin hydrogel

    PubMed Central

    Mahadik, B.P.; Haba, S. Pedron; Skertich, L.J.; Harley, B.A.C.

    2015-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are a rare stem cell population found primarily in the bone marrow and responsible for the production of the body’s full complement of blood and immune cells. Used clinically to treat a range of hematopoietic disorders, there is a significant need to identify approaches to selectively expand their numbers ex vivo. Here we describe a methacrylamide-functionalized gelatin (GelMA) hydrogel for in vitro culture of primary murine HSCs. Stem cell factor (SCF) is a critical biomolecular component of native HSC niches in vivo and is used in large dosages in cell culture media for HSC expansion in vitro. We report a photochemistry based approach to covalently immobilize SCF within GelMA hydrogels via acrylate-functionalized polyethylene glycol (PEG) tethers. PEG-functionalized SCF retains the native bioactivity of SCF but can be stably incorporated and retained within the GelMA hydrogel over 7 days. Freshly-isolated murine HSCs cultured in GelMA hydrogels containing covalently-immobilized SCF showed reduced proliferation and improved selectivity for maintaining primitive HSCs. Comparatively, soluble SCF within the GelMA hydrogel network induced increased proliferation of differentiating hematopoietic cells. We used a microfluidic templating approach to create GelMA hydrogels containing gradients of immobilized SCF that locally direct HSC response. Together, we report a biomaterial platform to examine the effect of the local presentation of soluble vs. matrix-immobilized biomolecular signals on HSC expansion and lineage specification. This approach may be a critical component of a biomaterial-based artificial bone marrow to provide the correct sequence of niche signals to grow HSCs in the laboratory. PMID:26232879

  13. Biochemical mechanism of Caffeic Acid Phenylethyl Ester (CAPE) selective toxicity towards melanoma cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Kudugunti, Shashi K.; Vad, Nikhil M.; Whiteside, Amanda J.; Naik, Bhakti U.; Yusuf, Mohd. A.; Srivenugopal, Kalkunte S.; Moridani, Majid Y.

    2010-01-01

    In the current work, we investigated the in-vitro biochemical mechanism of caffeic acid phenylethyl ester (CAPE) toxicity and eight hydroxycinnamic/caffeic acid derivatives in-vitro, using tyrosinase enzyme as a molecular target in human SK-MEL-28 melanoma cells. Enzymatic reaction models using tyrosinase/O2 and HRP/H2O2 were used to delineate the role of one- and two-electron oxidation. Ascorbic acid (AA), NADH and GSH depletion were used as markers of quinone formation and oxidative stress in CAPE induced toxicity in melanoma cells. Ethylenediamine, an o-quinone trap, prevented the formation of o-quinone and oxidations of AA and NADH mediated by tyrosinase bioactivation of CAPE. The IC50 of CAPE towards SK-MEL-28 melanoma cells was 15μM. Dicoumarol, a diaphorase inhibitor, and 1-bromoheptane, a GSH depleting agent, increased CAPE’s toxicity towards SK-MEL-28 cells indicating quinone formation played an important role in CAPE induced cell toxicity. Cyclosporin-A and trifluoperazine, inhibitors of the mitochondrial membrane permeability transition pore (PTP), prevented CAPE toxicity towards melanoma cells. We further investigated the role of tyrosinase in CAPE toxicity in the presence of a shRNA plasmid, targeting tyrosinase mRNA. Results from tyrosinase shRNA experiments showed that CAPE led to negligible anti-proliferative effect, apoptotic cell death and ROS formation in shRNA plasmid treated cells. Furthermore, it was also found that CAPE selectively caused escalation in the ROS formation and intracellular GSH (ICG) depletion in melanocytic human SK-MEL-28 cells which express functional tyrosinase. In contrast, CAPE did not lead to ROS formation and ICG depletion in amelanotic C32 melanoma cells, which do not express functional tyrosinase. These findings suggest that tyrosinase plays a major role in CAPE’s selective toxicity towards melanocytic melanoma cell lines. Our findings suggest that the mechanisms of CAPE toxicity in SK-MEL-28 melanoma cells

  14. Immune selection of tumor cells in TCR β-chain transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Silaeva, Yulia Yu; Grinenko, Tatyana S; Vagida, Murad S; Kalinina, Anastasia A; Khromykh, Ludmila M; Kazansky, Dmitry B

    2014-10-01

    The concept of immunological surveillance implies that immunogenic variants of tumor cells arising in the organism can be recognized by the immune system. Tumor progression is provided by somatic evolution of tumor cells under the pressure of the immune system. The loss of MHC Class I molecules on the surface of tumor cells is one of the most known outcomes of immune selection. This study developed a model of immune selection based on the immune response of TCR 1d1 single β-chain transgenic B10.D2(R101) (K(d)I(d)D(b)) mice to allogeneic EL4 (H-2(b)) thymoma cells. In wild-type B10.D2(R101) mice, immunization with EL4 cells induced a vigorous CTL response targeted to the H-2K(b) molecule and results in full rejection of the tumor cells. In contrast, transgenic mice developed a compromised proliferative response in mixed-lymphocyte response assays and were unable to reject transplanted allogeneic EL4 cells. During the immune response to EL4 cells, CD8(+) T-lymphocytes with endogenous β-chains accumulated predominantly in the spleen of transgenic mice and only a small part of the T-lymphocytes expressing transgenic β-chains became CD8(+)CD44(+)CD62L(-) effectors. Then, instead of a full elimination of tumor cells as in wild-type mice, a reproducible prolonged equilibrium phase and subsequent escape was observed in transgenic mice that resulted in death of 90% of the mice in 40-60 days after grafting. Prolonged exposure of tumor cells to the pressure of the immune system in transgenic mice in vivo resulted in a stable loss of H-2K(b) molecules on the EL4 cell surface. Genetic manipulation of the T-lymphocyte repertoire was sufficient to reproduce the classic pattern of interactions between tumor cells and the immune system, usually observed in reliable syngeneic models of anti-tumor immunity. This newly-developed model could be used in further studies of immunoregulatory circuits common for transplantational and anti-tumor immune responses.

  15. Selection-independent generation of gene knockout mouse embryonic stem cells using zinc-finger nucleases.

    PubMed

    Osiak, Anna; Radecke, Frank; Guhl, Eva; Radecke, Sarah; Dannemann, Nadine; Lütge, Fabienne; Glage, Silke; Rudolph, Cornelia; Cantz, Tobias; Schwarz, Klaus; Heilbronn, Regine; Cathomen, Toni

    2011-01-01

    Gene knockout in murine embryonic stem cells (ESCs) has been an invaluable tool to study gene function in vitro or to generate animal models with altered phenotypes. Gene targeting using standard techniques, however, is rather inefficient and typically does not exceed frequencies of 10(-6). In consequence, the usage of complex positive/negative selection strategies to isolate targeted clones has been necessary. Here, we present a rapid single-step approach to generate a gene knockout in mouse ESCs using engineered zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs). Upon transient expression of ZFNs, the target gene is cleaved by the designer nucleases and then repaired by non-homologous end-joining, an error-prone DNA repair process that introduces insertions/deletions at the break site and therefore leads to functional null mutations. To explore and quantify the potential of ZFNs to generate a gene knockout in pluripotent stem cells, we generated a mouse ESC line containing an X-chromosomally integrated EGFP marker gene. Applying optimized conditions, the EGFP locus was disrupted in up to 8% of ESCs after transfection of the ZFN expression vectors, thus obviating the need of selection markers to identify targeted cells, which may impede or complicate downstream applications. Both activity and ZFN-associated cytotoxicity was dependent on vector dose and the architecture of the nuclease domain. Importantly, teratoma formation assays of selected ESC clones confirmed that ZFN-treated ESCs maintained pluripotency. In conclusion, the described ZFN-based approach represents a fast strategy for generating gene knockouts in ESCs in a selection-independent fashion that should be easily transferrable to other pluripotent stem cells.

  16. Selective killing of ATM- or p53-deficient cancer cells through inhibition of ATR.

    PubMed

    Reaper, Philip M; Griffiths, Matthew R; Long, Joanna M; Charrier, Jean-Damien; Maccormick, Somhairle; Charlton, Peter A; Golec, Julian M C; Pollard, John R

    2011-04-13

    Here we report a comprehensive biological characterization of a potent and selective small-molecule inhibitor of the DNA damage response (DDR) kinase ATR. We show a profound synthetic lethal interaction between ATR and the ATM-p53 tumor suppressor pathway in cells treated with DNA-damaging agents and establish ATR inhibition as a way to transform the outcome for patients with cancer treated with ionizing radiation or genotoxic drugs.

  17. DNA-SMART: Biopatterned Polymer Film Microchannels for Selective Immobilization of Proteins and Cells.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Ann-Kathrin; Nikolov, Pavel M; Giselbrecht, Stefan; Niemeyer, Christof M

    2017-02-22

    A novel SMART module, dubbed "DNA-SMART" (DNA substrate modification and replication by thermoforming) is reported, where polymer films are premodified with single-stranded DNA capture strands, microthermoformed into 3D structures, and postmodified with complementary DNA-protein conjugates to realize complex biologically active surfaces within microfluidic devices. As a proof of feasibility, it is demonstrated that microchannels presenting three different proteins on their inner curvilinear surface can be used for selective capture of cells under flow conditions.

  18. Selection-Independent Generation of Gene Knockout Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells Using Zinc-Finger Nucleases

    PubMed Central

    Osiak, Anna; Radecke, Frank; Guhl, Eva; Radecke, Sarah; Dannemann, Nadine; Lütge, Fabienne; Glage, Silke; Rudolph, Cornelia; Cantz, Tobias; Schwarz, Klaus; Heilbronn, Regine; Cathomen, Toni

    2011-01-01

    Gene knockout in murine embryonic stem cells (ESCs) has been an invaluable tool to study gene function in vitro or to generate animal models with altered phenotypes. Gene targeting using standard techniques, however, is rather inefficient and typically does not exceed frequencies of 10−6. In consequence, the usage of complex positive/negative selection strategies to isolate targeted clones has been necessary. Here, we present a rapid single-step approach to generate a gene knockout in mouse ESCs using engineered zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs). Upon transient expression of ZFNs, the target gene is cleaved by the designer nucleases and then repaired by non-homologous end-joining, an error-prone DNA repair process that introduces insertions/deletions at the break site and therefore leads to functional null mutations. To explore and quantify the potential of ZFNs to generate a gene knockout in pluripotent stem cells, we generated a mouse ESC line containing an X-chromosomally integrated EGFP marker gene. Applying optimized conditions, the EGFP locus was disrupted in up to 8% of ESCs after transfection of the ZFN expression vectors, thus obviating the need of selection markers to identify targeted cells, which may impede or complicate downstream applications. Both activity and ZFN-associated cytotoxicity was dependent on vector dose and the architecture of the nuclease domain. Importantly, teratoma formation assays of selected ESC clones confirmed that ZFN-treated ESCs maintained pluripotency. In conclusion, the described ZFN-based approach represents a fast strategy for generating gene knockouts in ESCs in a selection-independent fashion that should be easily transferrable to other pluripotent stem cells. PMID:22194948

  19. Selective induction of apoptosis in glioma tumour cells by a Gynostemma pentaphyllum extract.

    PubMed

    Schild, L; Chen, B H; Makarov, P; Kattengell, K; Heinitz, K; Keilhoff, G

    2010-07-01

    At low concentration H(2)O(2) is an important signal molecule in proliferation of tumour cells. We report about a study investigating the effect of an ethanolic extract from Gynostemma pentaphyllum on proliferation of C6 glioma tumour cells and cellular H(2)O(2) concentration. The proliferation of these cells was maximal at about 1 muM extracellular H(2)O(2). HPLC-finger prints of the extract revealed a set of saponines as essential components. In C6 glioma cells the extract caused increase in super oxide dismutase (SOD) activity, in the amount of SOD protein, and in cellular H(2)O(2) concentration. It inhibited cell proliferation and induced activation of caspase 3 as indication of apoptosis. No effect of the extract was observed on the proliferation of astrocytes of a primary cell culture. From these findings we suggest that the ethanolic extract from Gynostemma pentaphyllum may selectively shift the H(2)O(2) concentration to toxic levels exclusively in tumour cells due to increased SOD activity. It may have a high potency in cancer therapy and cancer prophylaxis.

  20. The sesquiterpene lactone parthenolide induces selective apoptosis of B-chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Steele, A J; Jones, D T; Ganeshaguru, K; Duke, V M; Yogashangary, B C; North, J M; Lowdell, M W; Kottaridis, P D; Mehta, A B; Prentice, A G; Hoffbrand, A V; Wickremasinghe, R G

    2006-06-01

    We have studied the in vitro actions of the sesquiterpene lactone parthenolide (PTL) on cells isolated from patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). Dye reduction viability assays showed that the median LD(50) for PTL was 6.2 muM (n=78). Fifteen of these isolates were relatively resistant to the conventional agent chlorambucil but retained sensitivity to PTL. Brief exposures to PTL (1-3 h) were sufficient to induce caspase activation and commitment to cell death. Chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells were more sensitive towards PTL than were normal T lymphocytes or CD34(+) haematopoietic progenitor cells. The mechanism of cell killing was via PTL-induced generation of reactive oxygen species, resulting in turn in a proapoptotic Bax conformational change, release of mitochondrial cytochrome c and caspase activation. Parthenolide also decreased nuclear levels of the antiapoptotic transcription factor nuclear factor-kappa B and diminished phosphorylation of its negative regulator IkappaB. Killing of CLL cells by PTL was apparently independent of p53 induction. This is the first report showing the relative selectivity of PTL towards CLL cells. The data here warrant further investigation of this class of natural product as potential therapeutic agents for CLL.

  1. Salinomycin inhibits Wnt signaling and selectively induces apoptosis in chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Lu, Desheng; Choi, Michael Y; Yu, Jian; Castro, Januario E; Kipps, Thomas J; Carson, Dennis A

    2011-08-09

    Salinomycin, an antibiotic potassium ionophore, has been reported recently to act as a selective breast cancer stem cell inhibitor, but the biochemical basis for its anticancer effects is not clear. The Wnt/β-catenin signal transduction pathway plays a central role in stem cell development, and its aberrant activation can cause cancer. In this study, we identified salinomycin as a potent inhibitor of the Wnt signaling cascade. In Wnt-transfected HEK293 cells, salinomycin blocked the phosphorylation of the Wnt coreceptor lipoprotein receptor related protein 6 (LRP6) and induced its degradation. Nigericin, another potassium ionophore with activity against cancer stem cells, exerted similar effects. In otherwise unmanipulated chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells with constitutive Wnt activation nanomolar concentrations of salinomycin down-regulated the expression of Wnt target genes such as LEF1, cyclin D1, and fibronectin, depressed LRP6 levels, and limited cell survival. Normal human peripheral blood lymphocytes resisted salinomycin toxicity. These results indicate that ionic changes induced by salinomycin and related drugs inhibit proximal Wnt signaling by interfering with LPR6 phosphorylation, and thus impair the survival of cells that depend on Wnt signaling at the plasma membrane.

  2. Type I interferon is selectively required by dendritic cells for immune rejection of tumors.

    PubMed

    Diamond, Mark S; Kinder, Michelle; Matsushita, Hirokazu; Mashayekhi, Mona; Dunn, Gavin P; Archambault, Jessica M; Lee, Hsiaoju; Arthur, Cora D; White, J Michael; Kalinke, Ulrich; Murphy, Kenneth M; Schreiber, Robert D

    2011-09-26

    Cancer immunoediting is the process whereby the immune system suppresses neoplastic growth and shapes tumor immunogenicity. We previously reported that type I interferon (IFN-α/β) plays a central role in this process and that hematopoietic cells represent critical targets of type I IFN's actions. However, the specific cells affected by IFN-α/β and the functional processes that type I IFN induces remain undefined. Herein, we show that type I IFN is required to initiate the antitumor response and that its actions are temporally distinct from IFN-γ during cancer immunoediting. Using mixed bone marrow chimeric mice, we demonstrate that type I IFN sensitivity selectively within the innate immune compartment is essential for tumor-specific T cell priming and tumor elimination. We further show that mice lacking IFNAR1 (IFN-α/β receptor 1) in dendritic cells (DCs; Itgax-Cre(+)Ifnar1(f/f) mice) cannot reject highly immunogenic tumor cells and that CD8α(+) DCs from these mice display defects in antigen cross-presentation to CD8(+) T cells. In contrast, mice depleted of NK cells or mice that lack IFNAR1 in granulocytes and macrophage populations reject these tumors normally. Thus, DCs and specifically CD8α(+) DCs are functionally relevant targets of endogenous type I IFN during lymphocyte-mediated tumor rejection.

  3. Autocrine signaling based selection of combinatorial antibodies that transdifferentiate human stem cells.

    PubMed

    Xie, Jia; Zhang, Hongkai; Yea, Kyungmoo; Lerner, Richard A

    2013-05-14

    We report here the generation of antibody agonists from intracellular combinatorial libraries that transdifferentiate human stem cells. Antibodies that are agonists for the granulocyte colony stimulating factor receptor were selected from intracellular libraries on the basis of their ability to activate signaling pathways in reporter cells. We used a specialized "near neighbor" approach in which the entire antibody library and its target receptor are cointegrated into the plasma membranes of a population of reporter cells. This format favors unusual interactions between receptors and their protein ligands and ensures that the antibody acts in an autocrine manner on the cells that produce it. Unlike the natural granulocyte-colony stimulating factor that activates cells to differentiate along a predetermined pathway, the isolated agonist antibodies transdifferentiated human myeloid lineage CD34+ bone marrow cells into neural progenitors. This transdifferentiation by agonist antibodies is different from more commonly used methods because initiation is agenetic. Antibodies that act at the plasma membrane may have therapeutic potential as agents that transdifferentiate autologous cells.

  4. Novel Chemokine-Based Immunotoxins for Potent and Selective Targeting of Cytomegalovirus Infected Cells

    PubMed Central

    Spiess, Katja; Jeppesen, Mads G.; Malmgaard-Clausen, Mikkel; Krzywkowski, Karen

    2017-01-01

    Immunotoxins as antiviral therapeutics are largely unexplored but have promising prospective due to their high selectivity potential and their unparalleled efficiency. One recent example targeted the virus-encoded G protein-coupled receptor US28 as a strategy for specific and efficient treatment of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infections. US28 is expressed on virus-infected cells and scavenge chemokines by rapid internalization. The chemokine-based fusion-toxin protein (FTP) consisted of a variant (F49A) of CX3CL1 specifically targeting US28 linked to the catalytic domain of Pseudomonas exotoxin A (PE). Here, we systematically seek to improve F49A-FTP by modifications in its three structural domains; we generated variants with (1) altered chemokine sequence (K14A, F49L, and F49E), (2) shortened and elongated linker region, and (3) modified toxin domain. Only F49L-FTP displayed higher selectivity in its binding to US28 versus CX3CR1, the endogenous receptor for CX3CL1, but this was not matched by a more selective killing of US28-expressing cells. A longer linker and different toxin variants decreased US28 affinity and selective killing. Thereby, F49A-FTP represents the best candidate for HCMV treatment. Many viruses encode internalizing receptors suggesting that not only HCMV but also, for instance, Epstein-Barr virus and Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus may be targeted by FTPs. PMID:28251165

  5. Novel Chemokine-Based Immunotoxins for Potent and Selective Targeting of Cytomegalovirus Infected Cells.

    PubMed

    Spiess, Katja; Jeppesen, Mads G; Malmgaard-Clausen, Mikkel; Krzywkowski, Karen; Kledal, Thomas N; Rosenkilde, Mette M

    2017-01-01

    Immunotoxins as antiviral therapeutics are largely unexplored but have promising prospective due to their high selectivity potential and their unparalleled efficiency. One recent example targeted the virus-encoded G protein-coupled receptor US28 as a strategy for specific and efficient treatment of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infections. US28 is expressed on virus-infected cells and scavenge chemokines by rapid internalization. The chemokine-based fusion-toxin protein (FTP) consisted of a variant (F49A) of CX3CL1 specifically targeting US28 linked to the catalytic domain of Pseudomonas exotoxin A (PE). Here, we systematically seek to improve F49A-FTP by modifications in its three structural domains; we generated variants with (1) altered chemokine sequence (K14A, F49L, and F49E), (2) shortened and elongated linker region, and (3) modified toxin domain. Only F49L-FTP displayed higher selectivity in its binding to US28 versus CX3CR1, the endogenous receptor for CX3CL1, but this was not matched by a more selective killing of US28-expressing cells. A longer linker and different toxin variants decreased US28 affinity and selective killing. Thereby, F49A-FTP represents the best candidate for HCMV treatment. Many viruses encode internalizing receptors suggesting that not only HCMV but also, for instance, Epstein-Barr virus and Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus may be targeted by FTPs.

  6. An integrated microfluidic platform for negative selection and enrichment of cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Wen-Yi; Tsai, Sung-Chi; Hsieh, Kuangwen; Lee, Gwo-Bin

    2015-08-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs), tumor cells that disseminate from primary tumors to the bloodstream, have recently emerged as promising indicators for cancer diagnosis and prognosis. However, the technical difficulties in isolating and detecting rare CTCs have limited the widespread applicability of this method to date. In this work, a new integrated microfluidic system integrating micromixers and micropumps capable of performing ‘negative selection and enrichment’ of CTCs was developed. By using anti-human CD45 antibodies-coated magnetic beads, leukocytes were effectively removed by applying an external magnetic force, leaving behind an enriched target cell population. The on-chip CTC recovery rate was experimentally found to be 70   ±   5% after a single round of negative selection and enrichment. Meanwhile, CD45 depletion efficiency was 83.99   ±   1.00% and could be improved to 99.84   ±   0.04% after three consecutive rounds of depletion. Notably, on-chip negative selection and enrichment was 58% faster and the repeated depletion could be processed automatically. These promising results suggested the developed microfluidic chip is potentiated for a standardized CTC isolation platform. Preliminary results of the current paper were presented at Micro TAS 2014, San Antonio, Texas, USA, October 26-30, 2014.

  7. Fast estimation of motion from selected populations of retinal ganglion cells.

    PubMed

    Cerquera, Alexander; Freund, Jan

    2011-02-01

    We explore how the reconstruction efficiency of fast spike population codes varies with population size, population composition and code complexity. Our study is based on experiments with moving light patterns which are projected onto the isolated retina of a turtle Pseudemys scripta elegans. The stimulus features to reconstruct are sequences of velocities kept constant throughout segments of 500 ms. The reconstruction is based on the spikes of a retinal ganglion cell (RGC) population recorded extracellularly via a multielectrode array. Subsequent spike sorting yields the parallel spike trains of 107 RGCs as input to the reconstruction method, here a discriminant analysis trained and tested in jack-knife fashion. Motivated by behavioral response times, we concentrate on fast reconstruction, i.e., within 150 ms following a trigger event defined via significant changes of the population spike rate. Therefore, valid codes involve only few (≤3) spikes per cell. Using only the latency t(1) of each cell (with reference to the trigger event) corresponds to the most parsimonious population code considered. We evaluate the gain in reconstruction efficiency when supplementing t(1) by spike times t(2) and t(3). Furthermore, we investigate whether sub-populations of smaller size benefit significantly from a selection process or whether random compilations are equally efficient. As selection criteria we try different concepts (directionality, reliability, and discriminability). Finally, we discuss the implications of a selection process and its inter-relation with code complexity for optimized reconstruction.

  8. Selection of preconfigured cell assemblies for representation of novel spatial experiences

    PubMed Central

    Dragoi, George; Tonegawa, Susumu

    2014-01-01

    Internal representations about the external world can be driven by the external stimuli or can be internally generated in their absence. It has been a matter of debate whether novel stimuli from the external world are instructive over the brain network to create de novo representations or, alternatively, are selecting from existing pre-representations hosted in preconfigured brain networks. The hippocampus is a brain area necessary for normal internally generated spatial–temporal representations and its dysfunctions have resulted in anterograde amnesia, impaired imagining of new experiences, and hallucinations. The compressed temporal sequence of place cell activity in the rodent hippocampus serves as an animal model of internal representation of the external space. Based on our recent results on the phenomenon of novel place cell sequence preplay, we submit that the place cell sequence of a novel spatial experience is determined, in part, by a selection of a set of cellular firing sequences from a repertoire of existing temporal firing sequences in the hippocampal network. Conceptually, this indicates that novel stimuli from the external world select from their pre-representations rather than create de novo our internal representations of the world. PMID:24366134

  9. Toward genetic transformation of mitochondria in mammalian cells using a recoded drug-resistant selection marker.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Young Geol; Koob, Michael Duane

    2011-04-20

    Due to technical difficulties, the genetic transformation of mitochondria in mammalian cells is still a challenge. In this report, we described our attempts to transform mammalian mitochondria with an engineered mitochondrial genome based on selection using a drug resistance gene. Because the standard drug-resistant neomycin phosphotransferase confers resistance to high concentrations of G418 when targeted to the mitochondria, we generated a recoded neomycin resistance gene that uses the mammalian mitochondrial genetic code to direct the synthesis of this protein in the mitochondria, but not in the nucleus (mitochondrial version). We also generated a universal version of the recoded neomycin resistance gene that allows synthesis of the drug-resistant proteins both in the mitochondria and nucleus. When we transfected these recoded neomycin resistance genes that were incorporated into the mouse mitochondrial genome clones into mouse tissue culture cells by electroporation, no DNA constructs were delivered into the mitochondria. We found that the universal version of the recoded neomycin resistance gene was expressed in the nucleus and thus conferred drug resistance to G418 selection, while the synthetic mitochondrial version of the gene produced no background drug-resistant cells from nuclear transformation. These recoded synthetic drug-resistant genes could be a useful tool for selecting mitochondrial genetic transformants as a precise technology for mitochondrial transformation is developed.

  10. Temperature-induced labelling of Fluo-3 AM selectively yields brighter nucleus in adherent cells

    SciTech Connect

    Meng, Guixian; Pan, Leiting; Li, Cunbo; Hu, Fen; Shi, Xuechen; Lee, Imshik; Drevenšek-Olenik, Irena; Zhang, Xinzheng; Xu, Jingjun

    2014-01-17

    Highlights: •We detailedly examine temperature effects of Fluo-3 AM labelling in adherent cells. •4 °C Loading and 20 °C de-esterification of Fluo-3 AM yields brighter nuclei. •Brighter nuclei labelling by Fluo-3 AM also depends on cell adhesion quality. •A qualitative model of the brighter nucleus is proposed. -- Abstract: Fluo-3 is widely used to study cell calcium. Two traditional approaches: (1) direct injection and (2) Fluo-3 acetoxymethyl ester (AM) loading, often bring conflicting results in cytoplasmic calcium ([Ca{sup 2+}]{sub c}) and nuclear calcium ([Ca{sup 2+}]{sub n}) imaging. AM loading usually yields a darker nucleus than in cytoplasm, while direct injection always induces a brighter nucleus which is more responsive to [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub n} detection. In this work, we detailedly investigated the effects of loading and de-esterification temperatures on the fluorescence intensity of Fluo-3 in response to [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub n} and [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub c} in adherent cells, including osteoblast, HeLa and BV2 cells. Interestingly, it showed that fluorescence intensity of nucleus in osteoblast cells was about two times larger than that of cytoplasm when cells were loaded with Fluo-3 AM at 4 °C and allowed a subsequent step for de-esterification at 20 °C. Brighter nuclei were also acquired in HeLa and BV2 cells using the same experimental condition. Furthermore, loading time and adhesion quality of cells had effect on fluorescence intensity. Taken together, cold loading and room temperature de-esterification treatment of Fluo-3 AM selectively yielded brighter nucleus in adherent cells.

  11. Separability of stimulus parameter encoding by on-off directionally selective rabbit retinal ganglion cells

    PubMed Central

    Nowak, Przemyslaw; Dobbins, Allan C.; Gawne, Timothy J.; Grzywacz, Norberto M.

    2011-01-01

    The ganglion cell output of the retina constitutes a bottleneck in sensory processing in that ganglion cells must encode multiple stimulus parameters in their responses. Here we investigate encoding strategies of On-Off directionally selective retinal ganglion cells (On-Off DS RGCs) in rabbits, a class of cells dedicated to representing motion. The exquisite axial discrimination of these cells to preferred vs. null direction motion is well documented: it is invariant with respect to speed, contrast, spatial configuration, spatial frequency, and motion extent. However, these cells have broad direction tuning curves and their responses also vary as a function of other parameters such as speed and contrast. In this study, we examined whether the variation in responses across multiple stimulus parameters is systematic, that is the same for all cells, and separable, such that the response to a stimulus is a product of the effects of each stimulus parameter alone. We extracellularly recorded single On-Off DS RGCs in a superfused eyecup preparation while stimulating them with moving bars. We found that spike count responses of these cells scaled as independent functions of direction, speed, and luminance. Moreover, the speed and luminance functions were common across the whole sample of cells. Based on these findings, we developed a model that accurately predicted responses of On-Off DS RGCs as products of separable functions of direction, speed, and luminance (r = 0.98; P < 0.0001). Such a multiplicatively separable encoding strategy may simplify the decoding of these cells' outputs by the higher visual centers. PMID:21325684

  12. Selective prostacyclin receptor agonism augments glucocorticoid-induced gene expression in human bronchial epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Sylvia M; Shen, Pamela; Rider, Christopher F; Traves, Suzanne L; Proud, David; Newton, Robert; Giembycz, Mark A

    2009-11-15

    Prostacyclin receptor (IP-receptor) agonists display anti-inflammatory and antiviral activity in cell-based assays and in preclinical models of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. In this study, we have extended these observations by demonstrating that IP-receptor activation also can enhance the ability of glucocorticoids to induce genes with anti-inflammatory activity. BEAS-2B bronchial epithelial cells stably transfected with a glucocorticoid response element (GRE) luciferase reporter were activated in a concentration-dependent manner by the glucocorticoid dexamethasone. An IP-receptor agonist, taprostene, increased cAMP in these cells and augmented luciferase expression at all concentrations of dexamethasone examined. Analysis of the concentration-response relationship that described this effect showed that taprostene increased the magnitude of transcription without affecting the potency of dexamethasone and was, thus, steroid-sparing in this simple system. RO3244794, an IP-receptor antagonist, and oligonucleotides that selectively silenced the IP-receptor gene, PTGIR, abolished these effects of taprostene. Infection of BEAS-2B GRE reporter cells with an adenovirus vector encoding a highly selective inhibitor of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) also prevented taprostene from enhancing GRE-dependent transcription. In BEAS-2B cells and primary cultures of human airway epithelial cells, taprostene and dexamethasone interacted either additively or cooperatively in the expression of three glucocorticoid-inducible genes (GILZ, MKP-1, and p57(kip2)) that have anti-inflammatory potential. Collectively, these data show that IP-receptor agonists can augment the ability of glucocorticoids to induce anti-inflammatory genes in human airway epithelial cells by activating a cAMP/PKA-dependent mechanism. This observation may have clinical relevance in the treatment of airway inflammatory diseases that are either refractory or respond suboptimally to

  13. Netrin-1 expression confers a selective advantage for tumor cell survival in metastatic breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fitamant, Julien; Guenebeaud, Céline; Coissieux, Marie-May; Guix, Catherine; Treilleux, Isabelle; Scoazec, Jean-Yves; Bachelot, Thomas; Bernet, Agnès; Mehlen, Patrick

    2008-01-01

    Netrin-1, an axon navigation cue was proposed to play a crucial role during colorectal tumorigenesis by regulating apoptosis. The netrin-1 receptors DCC and UNC5H were shown to belong to the family of dependence receptors that share the ability to induce apoptosis in the absence of their ligands. Such a trait confers on these receptors a tumor suppressor activity. Expression of one of these dependence receptors at the surface of a tumor cell is indeed speculated to render this cell dependent on ligand availability for its survival, hence inhibiting uncontrolled cell proliferation or metastasis. Consequently, it is a selective advantage for a tumor cell to lose this dependence receptor activity, as previously described with losses of DCC and UNC5H expression in human cancers. However, the model predicts that a similar advantage may be obtained by gaining autocrine expression of the ligand. We describe here that, unlike human nonmetastatic breast tumors, a large fraction of metastatic breast cancers overexpress netrin-1. Moreover, we show that netrin-1-expressing mammary metastatic tumor cell lines undergo apoptosis when netrin-1 expression is experimentally decreased or when decoy soluble receptor ectodomains are added. Such treatments prevent metastasis formation both in a syngenic mouse model of lung colonization of a mammary cancer cell line and in a model of spontaneous lung metastasis of xenografted human breast tumor. Thus, netrin-1 expression observed in a large fraction of human metastatic breast tumors confers a selective advantage for tumor cell survival and potentially represents a promising target for alternative anticancer therapeutic strategies. PMID:18353983

  14. A CB2-Selective Cannabinoid Suppresses T-Cell Activities and Increases Tregs and IL-10.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Rebecca H; Meissler, Joseph J; Fan, Xiaoxuan; Yu, Daohai; Adler, Martin W; Eisenstein, Toby K

    2015-06-01

    We have previously shown that agonists selective for the cannabinoid receptor 2 (CB2), including O-1966, inhibit the Mixed Lymphocyte Reaction (MLR), an in vitro correlate of organ graft rejection, predominantly through effects on T-cells. Current studies explored the mechanism of this immunosuppression by O-1966 using mouse spleen cells. Treatment with O-1966 dose-relatedly decreased levels of the active nuclear forms of the transcription factors NF-κB and NFAT in wild-type T-cells, but not T-cells from CB2 knockout (CB2R k/o) mice. Additionally, a gene expression profile of purified T-cells from MLR cultures generated using a PCR T-cell activation array showed that O-1966 decreased mRNA expression of CD40 ligand and CyclinD3, and increased mRNA expression of Src-like-adaptor 2 (SLA2), Suppressor of Cytokine Signaling 5 (SOCS5), and IL-10. The increase in IL-10 was confirmed by measuring IL-10 protein levels in MLR culture supernatants. Further, an increase in the percentage of regulatory T-cells (Tregs) was observed in MLR cultures. Pretreatment with anti-IL-10 resulted in a partial reversal of the inhibition of proliferation and blocked the increase of Tregs. Additionally, O-1966 treatment caused a dose-related decrease in the expression of CD4 in MLR cultures from wild-type, but not CB2R k/o, mice. These data support the potential of CB2-selective agonists as useful therapeutic agents to prolong graft survival in transplant patients, and strengthens their potential as a new class of immunosuppressive agents with broader applicability.

  15. Laser selective microablation of sensitized intracellular components within auditory receptor cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, David M.; Evans, Burt N.; Santos-Sacchi, Joseph

    1995-05-01

    A laser system can be coupled to a light microscope for laser microbeam ablation and trapping of single cells in vitro. We have extended this technology by sensitization of target structures with vital dyes to provide selective ablation of specific subcellular components. Isolated auditory receptor cells (outer hair cells, OHCs) are known to elongate and contract in response to electrical, chemical and mechanical stimulation. Various intracellular structures are candidate components mediating motility of OHCs, but the exact mechanism(s) is currently unknown. In ongoing studies of OHC motility, we have used the microbeam for selective ablation of lateral wall components and of an axial cytoskeletal core that extends from the nucleus to the cell apex. Both the area beneath the subsurface cistemae of the lateral wall and the core are rich in mitochondria. OHCs isolated from guinea pig cochlea are suspended in L- 15 medium containing 2.0 (mu) M Rhodamine 123, a porphyrin with an affinity for mitochondria. A spark-pumped nitrogen laser pumping a dye cell (Coumarin 500) was aligned on the optical axis of a Nikon Optiphot-2 to produce a 3 ns, 0.5 - 10 micrometers spot (diameter above ablation threshold w/50X water immersion, N.A. 0.8), and energy at the target approximately equals 10 (mu) J/pulse. At short incubation times in Rh123 irradiation caused local blebbing or bulging of cytoplastic membrane and thus loss of the OHC's cylindrical shape. At longer Rh123 incubation times when the central axis of the cell was targeted we observed cytoplasmic clearing, immediate cell elongation (approximately equals 5%) and clumping of core material at nuclear and apical attachments. Experiments are underway to examine the significance of these preliminary observations.

  16. Selective rapid eye movement sleep deprivation affects cell size and number in kitten locus coeruleus.

    PubMed

    Shaffery, James P; Allard, Joanne S; Manaye, Kebreten F; Roffwarg, Howard P

    2012-01-01

    Cells in the locus coeruleus (LC) constitute the sole source of norepinephrine (NE) in the brain and change their discharge rates according to vigilance state. In addition to its well established role in vigilance, NE affects synaptic plasticity in the postnatal critical period (CP) of development. One form of CP synaptic plasticity affected by NE results from monocular occlusion, which leads to physiological and cytoarchitectural alterations in central visual areas. Selective suppression of rapid eye movement sleep (REMS) in the CP kitten enhances the central effects of monocular occlusion. The mechanisms responsible for heightened cortical plasticity following REMS deprivation (REMSD) remain undetermined. One possible mediator of an increase in plasticity is continuous NE outflow, which presumably persists during extended periods of REMSD. Tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) is the rate-limiting enzyme in the synthesis of NE and serves as a marker for NE-producing cells. We selectively suppressed REMS in kittens for 1 week during the CP. The number and size of LC cells expressing immunoreactivity to tyrosine hydroxylase (TH-ir) was assessed in age-matched REMS-deprived (RD)-, treatment-control (TXC)-, and home cage-reared (HCC) animals. Sleep amounts and slow wave activity (SWA) were also examined relative to baseline. Time spent in REMS during the study was lower in RD compared to TXC animals, and RD kittens increased SWA delta power in the latter half of the REMSD period. The estimated total number of TH-ir cells in LC was significantly lower in the RD than in the TXC kittens and numerically lower than in the HCC animals. The size of LC cells expressing TH-ir was greatest in the HCC group. HCC cells were significantly larger than TH-ir cells in the RD kittens. These data are consistent with presumed reduction in NE in forebrain areas, including visual cortex, caused by 1 week of REMSD.

  17. Selection of RNA Replicons Capable of Persistent Noncytopathic Replication in Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Frolov, Ilya; Agapov, Eugene; Hoffman, Thomas A.; Prágai, Béla M.; Lippa, Mara; Schlesinger, Sondra; Rice, Charles M.

    1999-01-01

    The natural life cycle of alphaviruses, a group of plus-strand RNA viruses, involves transmission to vertebrate hosts via mosquitoes. Chronic infections are established in mosquitoes (and usually in mosquito cell cultures), but infection of susceptible vertebrate cells typically results in rapid shutoff of host mRNA translation and cell death. Using engineered Sindbis virus RNA replicons expressing puromycin acetyltransferase as a dominant selectable marker, we identified mutations allowing persistent, noncytopathic replication in BHK-21 cells. Two of these adaptive mutations involved single-amino-acid substitutions in the C-terminal portion of nsP2, the viral helicase-protease. At one of these loci, nsP2 position 726, numerous substitution mutations were created and characterized in the context of RNA replicons and infectious virus. Our results suggest a direct correlation between the level of viral RNA replication and cytopathogenicity. This work also provides a series of alphavirus replicons for noncytopathic gene expression studies (E. V. Agapov, I. Frolov, B. D. Lindenbach, B. M. Prágai, S. Schlesinger, and C. M. Rice, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 95:12989–12994, 1998) and a general strategy for selecting RNA viral mutants adapted to different cellular environments. PMID:10196280

  18. Adenovirus-mediated double suicide gene selectively kills gastric cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xian-Run; Li, Jian-Sheng; Niu, Ying; Miao, Li

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of the adenovirus-mediated double suicide gene (CD/TK) for selective killing of gastric cancer cells. Gastric cancer cells SCG7901 and normal gastric epithelial cell lines were infected by adenoviruses Ad-survivin/GFP and Ad-survivin/CD/TK. GFP expression and CD-TK were detected by fluorescence microscopy and reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), respectively. After treatment of the infected cells with the pro-drugs ganciclovir (GCV) and/or 5-FC, the cell growth status was evaluated by methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium assay. Cell cycle changes were detected using flow cytometry. In nude mice bearing human gastric cancer, the recombinant adenovirus vector was injected directly into the tumor followed by an intraperitoneal injection of GCV and/or 5-FC. The subsequent tumor growth was then observed. The GFP gene driven by survivin could be expressed within the gastric cancer line SCG7901, but not in normal gastric epithelial cells. RT-PCR demonstrated the presence of the CD/TK gene product in the infected SCG7901 cells, but not in the infected normal gastric epithelial cells. The infected gastric cancer SCG7901, but not the gastric cells, was highly sensitive to the pro-drugs. The CD/TK fusion gene system showed significantly greater efficiency than either of the single suicide genes in killing the target cells (P<0.01). Treatment of the infected cells with the pro-drugs resulted in increased cell percentage in G0-Gl phase and decreased percentage in S phase. In nude mice bearing SCG7901 cells, treatment with the double suicide gene system significantly inhibited tumor growth, showing much stronger effects than either of the single suicide genes (P<0.01). The adenovirus-mediated CD/TK double suicide gene driven by survivin promoter combined with GCV an 5-FC treatment could be an effective therapy against experimental gastric cancer with much greater efficacy than the single suicide gene CD/TK combined

  19. Epstein-Barr virus latently infected cells are selectively deleted in simulated-microgravity cultures.

    PubMed

    Long, J P; Hughes, J H

    2001-04-01

    Rotating-wall vessels (RWVs) allow for the cultivation of cells in simulated microgravity. Previously, we showed that the cultivation of lymphoblastoid cells in simulated microgravity results in the suppression of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) reactivation. To determine if the suppression generated by simulated microgravity could be reversed by changing to static culture conditions, cells were cultured in an RRWV for 5 d, and then switched to static conditions. Following the switch to static conditions, viral reactivation remained suppressed (significantly lower) relative to static control cultures over a 4-d period. Additionally, experiments were conducted to determine if chemical treatment could induce viral reactivation in cells from simulated-microgravity cultures. Cells were cultured in static flask cultures and in simulated microgravity in RWVs for 4-7 d. The cells were then transferred to 50-cm3 tubes, and treated with 3 mM n-butyrate for 48 h, or 18 ng/ml of phorbol ester, viz., 12-0-tetradecanoylphorbol-13 acetate (TPA) for either 2 or 48 h, under static conditions. Although EBV was inducible, the cells from simulated-microgravity cultures treated with n-butyrate displayed significantly lower levels of viral-antigen expression compared with the treated cells from static cultures. Also, incubation with TPA for 2-3 h, but not for 48 h, reactivated EBV in cells from RWV cultures. In contrast, EBV was inducible in cells from static cultures treated for either 2-3 or 48 h with TPA. TPA reactivation of EBV following a 2-3-h period of treatment indicates that the protein kinase C signal-transduction pathway is not impaired in lymphoblastoid cells cultured in simulated microgravity. However, the exposure of B-lymphoblastoid cells from simulated-microgravity cultures to TPA for more than 3-4 h triggered a lytic event (apoptosis or necrosis), which prevented replication of the virus. Thus, EBV-infected cells in simulated microgravity were negatively selected in the

  20. G2/M Cell Cycle Arrest and Tumor Selective Apoptosis of Acute Leukemia Cells by a Promising Benzophenone Thiosemicarbazone Compound

    PubMed Central

    Cabrera, Maia; Gomez, Natalia; Remes Lenicov, Federico; Echeverría, Emiliana; Shayo, Carina; Moglioni, Albertina; Fernández, Natalia; Davio, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Anti-mitotic therapies have been considered a hallmark in strategies against abnormally proliferating cells. Focusing on the extensively studied family of thiosemicarbazone (TSC) compounds, we have previously identified 4,4’-dimethoxybenzophenone thiosemicarbazone (T44Bf) as a promising pharmacological compound in a panel of human leukemia cell lines (HL60, U937, KG1a and Jurkat). Present findings indicate that T44Bf-mediated antiproliferative effects are associated with a reversible chronic mitotic arrest caused by defects in chromosome alignment, followed by induced programmed cell death. Furthermore, T44Bf selectively induces apoptosis in leukemia cell lines when compared to normal peripheral blood mononuclear cells. The underlying mechanism of action involves the activation of the mitochondria signaling pathway, with loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and sustained phosphorylation of anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-xL as well as increased Bcl-2 (enhanced phosphorylated fraction) and pro-apoptotic protein Bad levels. In addition, ERK signaling pathway activation was found to be a requisite for T44Bf apoptotic activity. Our findings further describe a novel activity for a benzophenone thiosemicarbazone and propose T44Bf as a promising anti-mitotic prototype to develop chemotherapeutic agents to treat acute leukemia malignancies. PMID:26360247

  1. Glucocorticoid-resistant Th17 cells are selectively attenuated by cyclosporine A.

    PubMed

    Schewitz-Bowers, Lauren P; Lait, Philippa J P; Copland, David A; Chen, Ping; Wu, Wenting; Dhanda, Ashwin D; Vistica, Barbara P; Williams, Emily L; Liu, Baoying; Jawad, Shayma; Li, Zhiyu; Tucker, William; Hirani, Sima; Wakabayashi, Yoshiyuki; Zhu, Jun; Sen, Nida; Conway-Campbell, Becky L; Gery, Igal; Dick, Andrew D; Wei, Lai; Nussenblatt, Robert B; Lee, Richard W J

    2015-03-31

    Glucocorticoids remain the cornerstone of treatment for inflammatory conditions, but their utility is limited by a plethora of side effects. One of the key goals of immunotherapy across medical disciplines is to minimize patients' glucocorticoid use. Increasing evidence suggests that variations in the adaptive immune response play a critical role in defining the dose of glucocorticoids required to control an individual's disease, and Th17 cells are strong candidate drivers for nonresponsiveness [also called steroid resistance (SR)]. Here we use gene-expression profiling to further characterize the SR phenotype in T cells and show that Th17 cells generated from both SR and steroid-sensitive individuals exhibit restricted genome-wide responses to glucocorticoids in vitro, and that this is independent of glucocorticoid receptor translocation or isoform expression. In addition, we demonstrate, both in transgenic murine T cells in vitro and in an in vivo murine model of autoimmunity, that Th17 cells are reciprocally sensitive to suppression with the calcineurin inhibitor, cyclosporine A. This result was replicated in human Th17 cells in vitro, which were found to have a conversely large genome-wide shift in response to cyclosporine A. These observations suggest that the clinical efficacy of cyclosporine A in the treatment of SR diseases may be because of its selective attenuation of Th17 cells, and also that novel therapeutics, which target either Th17 cells themselves or the effector memory T-helper cell population from which they are derived, would be strong candidates for drug development in the context of SR inflammation.

  2. Undecylprodigiosin selectively induces apoptosis in human breast carcinoma cells independent of p53

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, T.-F.; Ma, C.-J.; Lu, C.-H.; Tsai, Yo-Ting; Wei, Y.-H.; Chang, J.-S.; Lai, J.-K.; Cheuh, Pin-Ju; Yeh, C.-T.; Tang, P.-C.; Jingua, T.C.; Ko, J.-L.; Liu, F.-S.; Yen, H.E.

    2007-12-15

    Undecylprodigiosin (UP) is a bacterial bioactive metabolite produced by Streptomyces and Serratia. In this study, we explored the anticancer effect of UP. Human breast carcinoma cell lines BT-20, MCF-7, MDA-MB-231 and T47D and one nonmalignant human breast epithelial cell line, MCF-10A, were tested in this study. We found that UP exerted a potent cytotoxicity against all breast carcinoma cell lines in a dose- and time-dependent manner. In contrast, UP showed limited toxicity to MCF-10A cells, indicating UP's cytotoxic effect is selective for malignant cells. UP's cytotoxic effect was due to apoptosis, as confirmed by positive TUNEL signals, annexin V-binding, caspase 9 activation and PARP cleavage. Notably, UP-induced apoptosis was blocked by the pan-caspase inhibitor z-VAD.fmk, further indicating the involvement of caspase activity. Moreover, UP caused a marked decrease of the levels of antiapoptotic BCL-X{sub L}, Survivin and XIAP while enhancing the levels of proapoptotic BIK, BIM, MCL-1S and NOXA, consequently favoring induction of apoptosis. Additionally, we found that cells with functional p53 (MCF-7, T47D) or mutant p53 (BT-20, MDA-MB-231) were both susceptible to UP's cytotoxicity. Importantly, UP was able to induce apoptosis in MCF-7 cells with p53 knockdown by RNA interference, confirming the dispensability of p53 in UP-induced apoptosis. Overall, our results establish that UP induces p53-independent apoptosis in breast carcinoma cells with no marked toxicity to nonmalignant cells, raising the possibility of its use as a new chemotherapeutic drug for breast cancer irrespective of p53 status.

  3. MSCA-1/TNAP selection of human jaw periosteal cells improves their mineralization capacity.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Dorothea; Schäfer, Fabian; Olbrich, Marcus; Friedrich, Björn; Bühring, Hans-Jörg; Hoffmann, Jürgen; Reinert, Siegmar

    2010-01-01

    Human jaw periosteum-derived cells (JPCs) represent an alternative cell source to bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells for tissue engineering applications in the oral and maxillofacial surgery. In this study we investigated how far the presence or expression of human mesenchymal stem cell antigen-1/tissue non-specific alkaline phosphatase (MSCA-1/TNAP) and LNGFR (CD271) can be utilized to select and enrich the osteogenic progenitor cell fraction from the entire JPC population. Depending on their mineralization capacity, we classified the human isolated JPCs into mineralizing (mJPCs) and non-mineralizing JPCs (nmJPCs). Flow cytometric analyses revealed that undifferentiated mJPCs expressed MSCA-1/TNAP at significant higher levels than nmJPCs at day 5 and 10 of osteogenesis. Western blot analyses showed increased MSCA-1/TNAP expression levels in mJPCs during osteogenesis, whereas in nmJPCs MSCA-1/TNAP expression remained undetectable. Using the MSCA-1 and LNGFR specific antibodies, we separated the positive and negative fractions from the entire mJPC population. In order to analyse the mineralization capacity of the MSCA-1(+) and LNGFR(+) cell subsets, we quantified the calcium deposition in both subpopulations in comparison to the respective negative subpopulations. The MSCA-1(+)/TNAP(+) cell fraction showed a significant higher osteogenic capacity compared to the MSCA-1-/TNAP- cell fraction whereas the LNGFR(+/-) cell fractions did not differ in their osteogenic potential. Our findings suggest that MSCA-1 may represent a promising osteogenic marker for mJPC.

  4. Peripheral blood T- and B-cell immunophenotypic abnormalities in selected women with unexplained recurrent miscarriage.

    PubMed

    Carbone, Javier; Sarmiento, Elizabeth; Gallego, Antonio; Lanio, Nallibe; Navarro, Joaquin; García, Sandra; Fernandez-Cruz, Eduardo

    2016-02-01

    We aimed to investigate if women with recurrent miscarriage disclosed abnormalities in the maturation and activation status of peripheral blood lymphocyte subsets. In a case control study, 24 women with recurrent miscarriage, 37 women with children but no history of miscarriage and 39 women without previous pregnancies were evaluated. Lymphocyte subsets were evaluated using three-colour flow-cytometry. Selected women with recurrent miscarriage had significantly higher absolute counts of central memory CD4+ T-cells, CD8+DR+ T-cells and memory non-switched B-cells than the control groups. Recurrent miscarriage may be associated with abnormalities of the maturation and activation status of peripheral blood T and B lymphocytes.

  5. Selective elimination of malignant stem cells using photosensitizers followed by light treatment.

    PubMed

    Levy, J G; Dowding, C; Mitchell, D; Sorrenti, R; Yip, S; Jamieson, C

    1995-07-01

    The pros and cons of purging of either bone marrow or peripheral blood stem cell preparations for autologous transplantation for cancer has been debated strongly over the past decade. Recent data implicating the role of minimal residual disease in autografted marrow in cancer relapse have renewed interest in this question. There is a considerable body of literature supporting the possibility that photosensitizer molecules in combination with light might provide a therapeutic window permitting selective elimination of malignant stem cells while sparing those of normal lineage. Molecules of this class are known to be taken up more actively by most malignant cells, and intracellular concentrations are critical in their cytotoxic effect when they are activated by light at an appropriate wavelength. The present paper reviews the observations made over the past decade on a variety of photosensitizers and their effects on hemopoietic progenitors.

  6. Nanostructured Electron-Selective Interlayer for Efficient Inverted Organic Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Song, Jiyun; Lim, Jaehoon; Lee, Donggu; Thambidurai, M; Kim, Jun Young; Park, Myeongjin; Song, Hyung-Jun; Lee, Seonghoon; Char, Kookheon; Lee, Changhee

    2015-08-26

    We report a unique nanostructured electron-selective interlayer comprising of In-doped ZnO (ZnO:In) and vertically aligned CdSe tetrapods (TPs) for inverted polymer:fullerene bulkheterojunction (BHJ) solar cells. With dimension-controlled CdSe TPs, the direct inorganic electron transport pathway is provided, resulting in the improvement of the short circuit current and fill factor of devices. We demonstrate that the enhancement is attributed to the roles of CdSe TPs that reduce the recombination losses between the active layer and buffer layer, improve the hole-blocking as well as electron-transporting properties, and simultaneously improve charge collection characteristics. As a result, the power conversion efficiency of PTB7:PC70BM based solar cell with nanostructured CdSe TPs increases to 7.55%. We expect this approach can be extended to a general platform for improving charge extraction in organic solar cells.

  7. Characteristics of candidate sites selected for onsite fuel cell power plant testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Racine, W. C.; Ferraro, V. D.; Woods, R. R.

    A portion of the Onsite Fuel Cell Program involves field testing forty-nine, 40-kW onsite fuel cell power plants. This paper describes the energy characteristics of 82 different sites that have been selected as potential field test locations. The 82 sites include multi-family residential, commercial and light industrial buildings that represent 26 market segments throughout the United States and Japan. Each one of the 82 sites has been instrumented with a standard data acquisition system to obtain hourly thermal and electrical energy consumption data. This energy data will help determine each site's compatibility with a 40-kW fuel cell power plant, and will provide an extensive data base which may be useful in other energy studies.

  8. A role for chromosomal instability in the development of and selection for radioresistant cell variants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Limoli, C. L.; Corcoran, J. J.; Jordan, R.; Morgan, W. F.; Schwartz, J. L.

    2001-01-01

    Chromosome instability is a common occurrence in tumour cells. We examined the hypothesis that the elevated rate of mutation formation in unstable cells can lead to the development of clones of cells that are resistant to the cancer therapy. To test this hypothesis, we compared chromosome instability to radiation sensitivity in 30 independently isolated clones of GM10115 human-hamster hybrid cells. There was a broader distribution of radiosensitivity and a higher mean SF(2)in chromosomally unstable clones. Cytogenetic and DNA double-strand break rejoining assays suggest that sensitivity was a function of DNA repair efficiency. In the unstable population, the more radioresistant clones also had significantly lower plating efficiencies. These observations suggest that chromosome instability in GM10115 cells can lead to the development of cell variants that are more resistant to radiation. In addition, these results suggest that the process of chromosome breakage and recombination that accompanies chromosome instability might provide some selective pressure for more radioresistant variants. Copyright 2001 Cancer Research Campaign.

  9. Efficient Colorful Perovskite Solar Cells Using a Top Polymer Electrode Simultaneously as Spectrally Selective Antireflection Coating.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Youyu; Luo, Bangwu; Jiang, Fangyuan; Jiang, Fuben; Fuentes-Hernandez, Canek; Liu, Tiefeng; Mao, Lin; Xiong, Sixing; Li, Zaifang; Wang, Tao; Kippelen, Bernard; Zhou, Yinhua

    2016-12-14

    Organometal halide perovskites have shown excellent optoelectronic properties and have been used to demonstrate a variety of semiconductor devices. Colorful solar cells are desirable for photovoltaic integration in buildings and other aesthetically appealing applications. However, the realization of colorful perovskite solar cells is challenging because of their broad and large absorption coefficient that commonly leads to cells with dark-brown colors. Herein, for the first time, we report a simple and efficient strategy to achieve colorful perovskite solar cells by using the transparent conducting polymer (poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate), PEDOT:PSS) as a top electrode and simultaneously as an spectrally selective antireflection coating. Vivid colors across the visible spectrum are attained by engineering optical interference effects among the transparent PEDOT:PSS polymer electrode, the hole-transporting layer and the perovskite layer. The colored perovskite solar cells display power conversion efficiency values from 12.8 to 15.1% (from red to blue) when illuminated from the FTO glass side and from 11.6 to 13.8% (from red to blue) when illuminated from the PEDOT:PSS side. The new approach provides an advanced solution for fabricating colorful perovskite solar cells with easy processing and high efficiency.

  10. Spatially-Selective Membrane Permeabilization Induced by Cell-Solution Electrode Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, Shota; Hokari, Yutaro; Kanzaki, Makoto; Kaneko, Toshiro

    2015-09-01

    Gene transfection, which is the process of deliberately introducing nucleic acids into cells, is expected to play an important role in medical treatment because the process is necessary for gene therapy and creation of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. However, the conventional transfection methods have some problems, so we focus attention on promising transfection methods by atmospheric pressure plasma (APP). We have previously reported that the cell membrane permeability, which is closely related with gene transfection, is improved using a cell-solution electrode for generating He-APP. He-APP is irradiated to the solution containing the adherent cells and delivery materials such as fluorescent dyes (YOYO-1) and plasmid DNA (GFP). In case of YOYO-1 delivery, more than 80% of cells can be transferred only in the plasma-irradiated area and the spatially-selective membrane permeabilization is realized by the plasma irradiation. In addition, it is confirmed that plasmid DNA is transfected and the GFP genes are expressed using same APP irradiation system with no obvious cellular damage.

  11. Loss of DNA mismatch repair imparts a selective advantage in planarian adult stem cells.

    PubMed

    Hollenbach, Jessica P; Resch, Alissa M; Palakodeti, Dasaradhi; Graveley, Brenton R; Heinen, Christopher D

    2011-01-01

    Lynch syndrome (LS) leads to an increased risk of early-onset colorectal and other types of cancer and is caused by germline mutations in DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes. Loss of MMR function results in a mutator phenotype that likely underlies its role in tumorigenesis. However, loss of MMR also results in the elimination of a DNA damage-induced checkpoint/apoptosis activation barrier that may allow damaged cells to grow unchecked. A fundamental question is whether loss of MMR provides pre-cancerous stem cells an immediate selective advantage in addition to establishing a mutator phenotype. To test this hypothesis in an in vivo system, we utilized the planarian Schmidtea mediterranea which contains a significant population of identifiable adult stem cells. We identified a planarian homolog of human MSH2, a MMR gene which is mutated in 38% of LS cases. The planarian Smed-msh2 is expressed in stem cells and some progeny. We depleted Smed-msh2 mRNA levels by RNA-interference and found a striking survival advantage in these animals treated with a cytotoxic DNA alkylating agent compared to control animals. We demonstrated that this tolerance to DNA damage is due to the survival of mitotically active, MMR-deficient stem cells. Our results suggest that loss of MMR provides an in vivo survival advantage to the stem cell population in the presence of DNA damage that may have implications for tumorigenesis.

  12. Selection of a whole-cell biocatalyst for methyl parathion biodegradation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jijian; Liu, Ruihua; Jiang, Hong; Yang, Yao; Qiao, Chuanling

    2012-09-01

    Whole-cell biocatalyst has the potential to become a cost-effective alternative to conventional enzyme methods for solving ecological and energy issues. However, cytosolic-expressing biocatalyst systems are critically disadvantaged due to the low permeability of the cell membrane. To overcome substrate transport barrier, periplasmic secretion and surface display biocatalysts were developed by expressing signal peptides or anchor proteins in Escherichia coli. In this work, six carriers were compared in regard to whole-cell activity of methyl parathion hydrolase (MPH). Our results indicate that the surface display systems yielded one to three times whole-cell activity than the periplasmic secretion systems. Although periplasmic secretion systems showed generally more stable than surface display systems, surface display appeared more suitable for whole-cell biocatalyst. It should note that the applicability of the DsbA/PhoA/AIDA-I leader to MPH expression is shown here for the first time. In addition, the result provided a useful reference for other whole-cell biocatalyst selection.

  13. IgH sequences in common variable immune deficiency reveal altered B cell development and selection**

    PubMed Central

    Roskin, Krishna M.; Simchoni, Noa; Liu, Yi; Lee, Ji-Yeun; Seo, Katie; Hoh, Ramona A.; Pham, Tho; Park, Joon H.; Furman, David; Dekker, Cornelia L.; Davis, Mark M.; James, Judith A.; Nadeau, Kari C.; Cunningham-Rundles, Charlotte; Boyd, Scott D.

    2015-01-01

    Common variable immune deficiency (CVID) is the most common symptomatic primary immune deficiency, affecting ∼1 in 25,000 persons. These patients suffer from impaired antibody responses, autoimmunity, and susceptibility to lymphoid cancers. To explore the cellular basis for these clinical phenotypes, we conducted high-throughput DNA sequencing of immunoglobulin heavy chain gene rearrangements from 93 CVID patients and 105 control subjects and sorted naïve and memory B cells from 13 of the CVID patients and 10 of the control subjects. CVID patients showed abnormal VDJ rearrangement and abnormal formation of complementarity determining region 3 (CDR3). We observed decreased selection against antibodies with long CDR3 regions in memory repertoires and decreased V gene replacement, offering possible mechanisms for increased patient autoreactivity. Our data indicate that patient immunodeficiency might derive both from decreased diversity of the naïve B cell pool and decreased somatic hypermutation in memory repertoires. CVID patients also exhibited abnormal clonal expansion of unmutated B cells relative to controls. Although impaired B cell germinal center activation is commonly viewed as causative in CVID, these data indicate that CVID B cells diverge from controls as early as the pro-B cell stage and suggest possible explanations for the increased incidence of autoimmunity, immunodeficiency, and lymphoma CVID patients. PMID:26311730

  14. Anti-EGFR antibody conjugated organic-inorganic hybrid lipid nanovesicles selectively target tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Leung, Siu Ling; Zha, Zhengbao; Cohn, Celine; Dai, Zhifei; Wu, Xiaoyi

    2014-09-01

    Chemical conjugation of anti-epidermal growth factor receptor monoclonal antibodies (anti-EGFR mAbs) to organic-inorganic hybrid liposomal immunocerasomes via maleimide-thiol coupling chemistry is explored as a mechanism for selectively targeting cancer cells. The cellular uptake and internalization of immunocerasomes are investigated in A431 cells that express an abnormally high level of EGFR, DU145 cells that overexpress EGFR, and HL-60 cells that are used as a negative control. The internalization study reveals a strong correlation between the receptor-mediated endocytosis of immunocerasomes and the membrane expression of EGFR. Further, free anti-EGFR mAbs and immunocerasomes conjugated with anti-EGFR mAbs at nanomolar doses display similar anti-proliferative effects on A431 cells. Additionally, serum proteins greatly reduce the cellular uptake of cerasomes that is mediated by non-specific receptors, but have no adverse effects on the specific EGFR-mediated delivery of immunocerasomes to A431 cells.

  15. A novel caspase 8 selective small molecule potentiates TRAIL-induced cell death.

    PubMed

    Bucur, Octavian; Gaidos, Gabriel; Yatawara, Achani; Pennarun, Bodvael; Rupasinghe, Chamila; Roux, Jérémie; Andrei, Stefan; Guo, Bingqian; Panaitiu, Alexandra; Pellegrini, Maria; Mierke, Dale F; Khosravi-Far, Roya

    2015-05-11

    Recombinant soluble TRAIL and agonistic antibodies against TRAIL receptors (DR4 and DR5) are currently being created for clinical cancer therapy, due to their selective killing of cancer cells and high safety characteristics. However, resistance to TRAIL and other targeted therapies is an important issue facing current cancer research field. An attractive strategy to sensitize resistant malignancies to TRAIL-induced cell death is the design of small molecules that target and promote caspase 8 activation. For the first time, we describe the discovery and characterization of a small molecule that directly binds caspase 8 and enhances its activation when combined with TRAIL, but not alone. The molecule was identified through an in silico chemical screen for compounds with affinity for the caspase 8 homodimer's interface. The compound was experimentally validated to directly bind caspase 8, and to promote caspase 8 activation and cell death in single living cells or population of cells, upon TRAIL stimulation. Our approach is a proof-of-concept strategy leading to the discovery of a novel small molecule that not only stimulates TRAIL-induced apoptosis in cancer cells, but may also provide insights into the structure-function relationship of caspase 8 homodimers as putative targets in cancer.

  16. A novel caspase 8 selective small molecule potentiates TRAIL-induced cell death

    PubMed Central

    Bucur, Octavian; Gaidos, Gabriel; Yatawara, Achani; Pennarun, Bodvael; Rupasinghe, Chamila; Roux, Jérémie; Andrei, Stefan; Guo, Bingqian; Panaitiu, Alexandra; Pellegrini, Maria; Mierke, Dale F.; Khosravi-Far, Roya

    2015-01-01

    Recombinant soluble TRAIL and agonistic antibodies against TRAIL receptors (DR4 and DR5) are currently being created for clinical cancer therapy, due to their selective killing of cancer cells and high safety characteristics. However, resistance to TRAIL and other targeted therapies is an important issue facing current cancer research field. An attractive strategy to sensitize resistant malignancies to TRAIL-induced cell death is the design of small molecules that target and promote caspase 8 activation. For the first time, we describe the discovery and characterization of a small molecule that directly binds caspase 8 and enhances its activation when combined with TRAIL, but not alone. The molecule was identified through an in silico chemical screen for compounds with affinity for the caspase 8 homodimer’s interface. The compound was experimentally validated to directly bind caspase 8, and to promote caspase 8 activation and cell death in single living cells or population of cells, upon TRAIL stimulation. Our approach is a proof-of-concept strategy leading to the discovery of a novel small molecule that not only stimulates TRAIL-induced apoptosis in cancer cells, but may also provide insights into the structure-function relationship of caspase 8 homodimers as putative targets in cancer. PMID:25962125

  17. Enrichment of circulating melanoma cells (CMCs) using negative selection from patients with metastatic melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Powrnima; Jacobs, Barbara; Derakhshan, Adeeb; Moore, Lee R.; Elson, Paul; Triozzi, Pierre L.; Borden, Ernest; Zborowski, Maciej

    2014-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells have emerged as prognostic biomarkers in the treatment of metastatic cancers of epithelial origins viz., breast, colorectal and prostate. These tumors express Epithelial Cell Adhesion Molecule (EpCAM) on their cell surface which is used as an antigen for immunoaffinity capture. However, EpCAM capture technologies are of limited utility for non-epithelial cancers such as melanoma. We report a method to enrich Circulating Melanoma Cells (CMCs) that does not presuppose malignant cell characteristics. CMCs were enriched by centrifugation of blood samples from healthy (N = 10) and patient (N = 11) donors, followed by RBC lysis and immunomagnetic depletion of CD45-positive leukocytes in a specialized magnetic separator. CMCs were identified by immunocytochemistry using Melan-A or S100B as melanoma markers and enumerated using automated microscopy image analyses. Separation was optimized for maximum sensitivity and recovery of CMCs. Our results indicate large number of CMCs in Stage IV melanoma patients. Analysis of survival suggested a trend toward decreased survival with increased number of CMCs. Moreover, melanoma-associated miRs were found to be higher in CMC-enriched fractions in two patients when compared with the unseparated samples, validating this method as applicable for molecular analyses. Negative selection is a promising approach for isolation of CMCs and other EpCAM -negative CTCs, and is amenable to molecular analysis of CMCs. Further studies are required to validate its efficacy at capturing specific circulating cells for genomic analysis, and xenograft studies. PMID:24811334

  18. Enrichment of circulating melanoma cells (CMCs) using negative selection from patients with metastatic melanoma.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Powrnima; Jacobs, Barbara; Derakhshan, Adeeb; Moore, Lee R; Elson, Paul; Triozzi, Pierre L; Borden, Ernest; Zborowski, Maciej

    2014-05-15

    Circulating tumor cells have emerged as prognostic biomarkers in the treatment of metastatic cancers of epithelial origins viz., breast, colorectal and prostate. These tumors express Epithelial Cell Adhesion Molecule (EpCAM) on their cell surface which is used as an antigen for immunoaffinity capture. However, EpCAM capture technologies are of limited utility for non-epithelial cancers such as melanoma. We report a method to enrich Circulating Melanoma Cells (CMCs) that does not presuppose malignant cell characteristics. CMCs were enriched by centrifugation of blood samples from healthy (N = 10) and patient (N = 11) donors, followed by RBC lysis and immunomagnetic depletion of CD45-positive leukocytes in a specialized magnetic separator. CMCs were identified by immunocytochemistry using Melan-A or S100B as melanoma markers and enumerated using automated microscopy image analyses. Separation was optimized for maximum sensitivity and recovery of CMCs. Our results indicate large number of CMCs in Stage IV melanoma patients. Analysis of survival suggested a trend toward decreased survival with increased number of CMCs. Moreover, melanoma-associated miRs were found to be higher in CMC-enriched fractions in two patients when compared with the unseparated samples, validating this method as applicable for molecular analyses. Negative selection is a promising approach for isolation of CMCs and other EpCAM -negative CTCs, and is amenable to molecular analysis of CMCs. Further studies are required to validate its efficacy at capturing specific circulating cells for genomic analysis, and xenograft studies.

  19. Selective killing of K-ras mutant cancer cells by small molecule inducers of oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Alice T.; Winslow, Monte M.; Magendantz, Margaret; Ouyang, Chensi; Dowdle, James; Subramanian, Aravind; Lewis, Timothy A.; Maglathin, Rebecca L.; Tolliday, Nicola; Jacks, Tyler

    2011-01-01

    Activating K-RAS mutations are the most frequent oncogenic mutations in human cancer. Numerous downstream signaling pathways have been shown to be deregulated by oncogenic K-ras. However, to date there are still no effective targeted therapies for this genetically defined subset of patients. Here we report the results of a small molecule, synthetic lethal screen using mouse embryonic fibroblasts derived from a mouse model harboring a conditional oncogenic K-rasG12D allele. Among the >50,000 compounds screened, we identified a class of drugs with selective activity against oncogenic K-ras–expressing cells. The most potent member of this class, lanperisone, acts by inducing nonapoptotic cell death in a cell cycle- and translation-independent manner. The mechanism of cell killing involves the induction of reactive oxygen species that are inefficiently scavenged in K-ras mutant cells, leading to oxidative stress and cell death. In mice, treatment with lanperisone suppresses the growth of K-ras–driven tumors without overt toxicity. Our findings establish the specific antitumor activity of lanperisone and reveal oxidative stress pathways as potential targets in Ras-mediated malignancies. PMID:21555567

  20. Acetazolamide serves as selective delivery vehicle for dipeptide-linked drugs to renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Cazzamalli, Samuele; Dal Corso, Alberto; Neri, Dario

    2016-01-01

    In most cases, cytotoxic drugs do not preferentially accumulate at the tumor site, causing unwanted toxicities and preventing dose escalation to therapeutically active regimens. Here, we show that acetazolamide derivatives, which bind to carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX) on the surface of kidney cancer cells, selectively deliver payloads at the site of disease, sparing normal organs. Biodistribution studies, performed in tumor-bearing mice with acetazolamide derivatives bearing a technetium-99m chelator complex or a red fluorophore as payload, revealed a preferential tumor accumulation of the compound at doses up to 560 nmol/Kg. The percentage of injected dose per gram in the tumor was dose-dependent and revealed optimal tumor:organ ratios at 140 nmol/Kg, with a tumor:blood ratio of 80:1 at 6 h. Acetazolamide, coupled to potent cytotoxic drugs via a dipeptide linker, exhibited a potent antitumor activity in nude mice bearing SKRC-52 renal cell carcinomas, while drug derivatives devoid of the acetazolamide moiety did not exhibit any detectable anticancer activity at the same doses. The observation of tumor regression with a noninternalizing ligand and with different cytotoxic moieties (MMAE and PNU-159682) indicates a general mechanism of action, based on the selective accumulation of the product on tumor cells, followed by the extracellular proteolytic release of the cytotoxic payload at the neoplastic site and the subsequent drug internalization into tumor cells. Acetazolamide-based drug conjugates may represent a promising class of targeted agents for the treatment of metastatic kidney cancer, as the majority of human clear cell renal cell carcinomas are strongly positive for CAIX. PMID:27609641

  1. Process cost and facility considerations in the selection of primary cell culture clarification technology.

    PubMed

    Felo, Michael; Christensen, Brandon; Higgins, John

    2013-01-01

    The bioreactor volume delineating the selection of primary clarification technology is not always easily defined. Development of a commercial scale process for the manufacture of therapeutic proteins requires scale-up from a few liters to thousands of liters. While the separation techniques used for protein purification are largely conserved across scales, the separation techniques for primary cell culture clarification vary with scale. Process models were developed to compare monoclonal antibody production costs using two cell culture clarification technologies. One process model was created for cell culture clarification by disc stack centrifugation with depth filtration. A second process model was created for clarification by multi-stage depth filtration. Analyses were performed to examine the influence of bioreactor volume, product titer, depth filter capacity, and facility utilization on overall operating costs. At bioreactor volumes <1,000 L, clarification using multi-stage depth filtration offers cost savings compared to clarification using centrifugation. For bioreactor volumes >5,000 L, clarification using centrifugation followed by depth filtration offers significant cost savings. For bioreactor volumes of ∼ 2,000 L, clarification costs are similar between depth filtration and centrifugation. At this scale, factors including facility utilization, available capital, ease of process development, implementation timelines, and process performance characterization play an important role in clarification technology selection. In the case study presented, a multi-product facility selected multi-stage depth filtration for cell culture clarification at the 500 and 2,000 L scales of operation. Facility implementation timelines, process development activities, equipment commissioning and validation, scale-up effects, and process robustness are examined.

  2. Regulation of AP-1 and NFAT transcription factors during thymic selection of T cells.

    PubMed Central

    Rincon, M; Flavell, R A

    1996-01-01

    The ability of thymocytes to express cytokine genes changes during the different stages of thymic development. Although CD4- CD8- thymocytes are able to produce a wide spectrum of cytokines in response to a T-cell receptor (TcR)-independent stimulus, as they approach the double-positive (DP) CD4+ CD8+ stage, they lose the ability to produce cytokine. After the DP stage, thymocytes become single-positive CD4+ or CD8+ thymocytes which reacquire the ability to secrete cytokines. In an attempt to understand the molecular basis of this specific regulatin, we use AP-1-luciferase and newly generated NFAT-luciferase transgenic mice to analyze the transcriptional and DNA-binding activities of these two transcription factors that are involved in the regulation of cytokine gene expression. Here, we show that both AP-1 and NFAT transcriptional activities are not inducible in the majority of DP cells but that during the differentiation of DP cells to the mature single-positive stage, thymocytes regain this inducibility. Subpopulation analysis demonstrates that this inducibility is reacquired at the DP stage before the down-modulation of one of the coreceptors. Indeed AP-1 inducibility, just like the ability to express the interleukin-2 gene, is reacquired during the differentiation of DP TcRlow CD69low heat-stable antigen (HSA)high thymocytes to DP TcRhigh CD69high HSAhigh cells, which is considered to be the consequence of the first signal that initiates positive selection. We therefore propose that the inability of DP thymocytes to induce AP-1 and NFAT activities is one of the causes for the lack of cytokine gene expression at this stage and that this inducibility is reacquired at the latest stage of DP differentiation as a consequence of positive selection. This could be a mechanism to prevent the activation of DP thymocytes before selection has taken place. PMID:8622652

  3. The linear interplay of intrinsic and extrinsic noises ensures a high accuracy of cell fate selection in budding yeast

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yongkai; Yi, Ming; Zou, Xiufen

    2014-01-01

    To gain insights into the mechanisms of cell fate decision in a noisy environment, the effects of intrinsic and extrinsic noises on cell fate are explored at the single cell level. Specifically, we theoretically define the impulse of Cln1/2 as an indication of cell fates. The strong dependence between the impulse of Cln1/2 and cell fates is exhibited. Based on the simulation results, we illustrate that increasing intrinsic fluctuations causes the parallel shift of the separation ratio of Whi5P but that increasing extrinsic fluctuations leads to the mixture of different cell fates. Our quantitative study also suggests that the strengths of intrinsic and extrinsic noises around an approximate linear model can ensure a high accuracy of cell fate selection. Furthermore, this study demonstrates that the selection of cell fates is an entropy-decreasing process. In addition, we reveal that cell fates are significantly correlated with the range of entropy decreases. PMID:25042292

  4. Detection of G1 proteins in Chinese hamster cells synchronized by isoleucine deprivation or mitotic selection.

    PubMed

    Ley, K D

    1975-07-01

    Examination of labeling patterns of proteins in Chinese hamster cells(line CHO) revealed the presence of a class of protein(s) that is synthesized during G1 phase of the cell cycle. Cells arrested in G1 by isoleucine (Ile) deprivation were prelabeded with [14-C]Ile, induced to traverse G1 by addition of unlabeled Ile, and labeled with [3-H]Ile at hourly intervals. Cells were fractionated into neclear and cytoplasmic portions, and proteins were separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide get electrophoresis. Gel profiles of proteins in the 45,000-160,000 mol wt range from the cytoplasm of cells in G1 were similar to those from cells arrested in G1 except for the presence of a mojor peak of [1-H]Ile incorporated into a protein(s) of approximately 80,000 mol wt. Peaks of net [3-H]Ile incorporation were not detected in neclear preparations. Cellular fractionation by differential centrifugation showed the peak I protein was located in the soluble supernatant fraction of the cytoplasm. Time-course studies showed that synthesis of this protein began 1-2 h after initiation of G1 traverse; the protein reached maximum levels in 4-6 h and was reduced to undetectable levels by 9 h. A cytoplasmic protein with similar electrophoretic mobility was found in G1 phase of cells synchronized by mitotic selection. This class of proteins is synthesized by cells before entry into S phase and may be involved in initiation of DNA synthesis.

  5. Molecular Profiling of Selected Cell Populations in Tissues by On-chip MALDI MS

    PubMed Central

    Schwamborn, Kristina; Zavalin, Andrey I.; Caprioli, Richard M.; Aerni, Hans Rudolf

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Spatial molecular analysis of tissues using MALDI MS is an emerging tool for pathology that enables discovery of diagnostically useful protein signatures that correlate with disease. An ongoing challenge is mapping disease-related proteomic changes in tissues with morphologically complex architecture where analysis at the single cell level is desired. Here we describe a novel highly sensitive workflow that allows the isolation and processing of selected cell subpopulations for MALDI MS analysis. Optimization of the method for fresh frozen and formalin fixed, paraffin embedded (FFPE) tissue is described, and the workflow is applied for the detection of differentially expressed proteins from cells related to perineural invasion (PNI) in human prostate cancer. METHODS: Tissue sections of 4–20 μm thickness were thaw-mounted onto Director slides for staining and dehydration. Laser capture microdissection (LCM) was carried out using a PALM microbeam instrument modified with a custom holder for mounting of capture chips consisting of Teflon printed slides. The sample was digested on-chip with trypsin in a humidity chamber to reduce evaporation of the digestion buffer. Differentially expressed peptides were detected directly from the chip using a 9.4 T Bruker Apex-Qe MALDI MS. RESULTS: An optimized workflow combining LCM, on-chip processing and analysis of fresh frozen and FFPE tissue allowed the detection of meaningful protein signatures from less than 50 dissected cells. Profiles from fresh frozen and FFPE mouse liver tissue from the same mouse showed similar peptide profiles, demonstrating successful on-chip antigen retrieval of FFPE tissue. We then applied this strategy for mapping of differentially expressed proteins in PNI. Molecular profiles from cells undergoing PNI and nerve distant bulk tumor cells showed many differentially expressed peptides, including peptides with m/z = 1356.624 and 1459.696. The rapid, high throughput analysis of cell type

  6. Preclinical testing of selective Aurora kinase inhibitors on a medullary thyroid carcinoma-derived cell line.

    PubMed

    Tuccilli, Chiara; Baldini, Enke; Prinzi, Natalie; Morrone, Stefania; Sorrenti, Salvatore; Filippini, Angelo; Catania, Antonio; Alessandrini, Stefania; Rendina, Roberta; Coccaro, Carmela; D'Armiento, Massimino; Ulisse, Salvatore

    2016-05-01

    Deregulated expression of the Aurora kinases (Aurora-A, B, and C) is thought to be involved in cell malignant transformation and genomic instability in several cancer types. Over the last decade, a number of small-molecule inhibitors of Aurora kinases have been developed, which have proved to efficiently restrain malignant cell growth and tumorigenicity. Regarding medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC), we previously showed the efficacy of a pan-Aurora kinase inhibitor (MK-0457) in impairing growth and survival of the MTC-derived cell line TT. In the present study, we sought to establish if one of the Aurora kinases might represent a preferential target for MTC therapy. The effects of selective inhibitors of Aurora-A (MLN8237) and Aurora-B (AZD1152) were analyzed on TT cell proliferation, apoptosis, cell cycle, and ploidy. The two inhibitors reduced TT cell proliferation in a time- and dose-dependent manner, with IC50 of 19.0 ± 2.4 nM for MLN8237 and 401.6 ± 44.1 nM for AZD1152. Immunofluorescence experiments confirmed that AZD1152 inhibited phosphorylation of histone H3 (Ser10) by Aurora-B, while it did not affect Aurora-A autophosphorylation. MLN8237 inhibited Aurora-A autophosphorylation as expected, but at concentrations required to achieve the maximum antiproliferative effects it also abolished H3 (Ser10) phosphorylation. Cytofluorimetry experiments showed that both inhibitors induced accumulation of cells in G2/M phase and increased the subG0/G1 fraction and polyploidy. Finally, both inhibitors triggered apoptosis. We demonstrated that inhibition of either Aurora-A or Aurora-B has antiproliferative effects on TT cells, and thus it would be worthwhile to further investigate the therapeutical potential of Aurora kinase inhibitors in MTC treatment.

  7. Aqueous Extracts of Selected Potentilla Species Modulate Biological Activity of Human Normal Colon Cells.

    PubMed

    Paduch, Roman; Wiater, Adrian; Locatelli, Marcello; Pleszczyńska, Malgorzata; Tomczyk, Michal

    2015-01-01

    Potentilla L. (Rosaceae) species have been used in traditional and in folk medicine for many years. This study characterized the activity of extracts from aerial parts of selected Potentilla species: P. argentea, P. anserina, P. grandiflora and P. erecta as well as one species of closely related to the genus Potentilla, Drymocallis rupestris (syn. P. rupestris). The biological activities were analyzed using MTT, NR and DPPH assays on CCD 841 CoTr and CCD-18Co cells. Moreover, cell morphology and cytoskeletal actin F-filaments organization and IL-6 and IL-10 levels by ELISA were analyzed after 24 h of incubation. Potentilla extracts at dose levels between 25 and 250 µg/mL were analyzed. For ELISA, 15 µg/mL and 30 μg/mL were chosen. When mitochondrial succinyl dehydrogenase activity was tested (MTT assay) only extract obtained from P. erecta at lower concentrations (up to 125 µg/mL) suppressed metabolism of myofibroblasts, while epithelial cells mitochondrial enzyme activity increased after incubation with all extracts. In Neutral Red (NR) method cellular membrane disturbance of both cell cultures was found after D. rupestris and P. grandiflora addition. Moreover, strong influence on epithelial cells was also found for P. anserina. All extracts showed similar, concentration-dependent free radical scavenging (DPPH) effect. Potentilla extracts, especially at lower concentration, decreased IL-6 production in myofibroblasts but the level of the cytokine was found to be stable in epithelial cells. IL-10 analysis revealed that P. argentea, D. rupestris, P. erecta extracts decrease cytokine level in myofibroblasts, while only when higher concentration were applied, decreased cytokine level produced by epithelial cells was found. F-actin filaments staining revealed that Potentilla extracts significantly influence on cellular cytoskeleton organization. Potentilla extracts influence on cells of human colon wall lining modulating the main features of them (viability

  8. A Potent, Selective and Cell-Active Allosteric Inhibitor of Protein Arginine Methyltransferase 3 (PRMT3)**

    PubMed Central

    Kaniskan, H. Ümit; Szewczyk, Magdalena M.; Yu, Zhengtian; Eram, Mohammad S.; Yang, Xiaobao; Schmidt, Keith; Luo, Xiao; Dai, Miao; He, Feng; Zang, Irene; Lin, Ying; Kennedy, Steven; Li, Fengling; Dobrovetsky, Elena; Dong, Aiping; Smil, David; Min, Sun-Joon; Landon, Melissa; Lin-Jones, Jennifer; Huang, Xi-Ping; Roth, Bryan L.; Schapira, Matthieu; Atadja, Peter; Barsyte-Lovejoy, Dalia; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H.; Brown, Peter J.; Zhao, Kehao; Jin, Jian; Vedadi, Masoud

    2015-01-01

    PRMT3 catalyzes the asymmetric dimethylation of arginine residues of various proteins. It is essential for maturation of ribosomes, may have a role in lipogenesis, and is implicated in several diseases. A potent, selective, and cell- active PRMT3 inhibitor would be a valuable tool for further investigating PRMT3 biology. Here we report the discovery of the first PRMT3 chemical probe, SGC707, by structure-based optimization of the allosteric PRMT3 inhibitors we reported previously, and thorough characterization of this probe in biochemical, biophysical, and cellular assays. SGC707 is a potent PRMT3 inhibitor (IC50 = 31 ± 2 nm, KD = 53 ± 2 nm) with outstanding selectivity (selective against 31 other methyltransferases and more than 250 non-epigenetic targets). The mechanism of action studies and crystal structure of the PRMT3-SGC707 complex confirm the allosteric inhibition mode. Importantly, SGC707 engages PRMT3 and potently inhibits its methyltransferase activity in cells. It is also bioavailable and suitable for animal studies. This well- characterized chemical probe is an excellent tool to further study the role of PRMT3 in health and disease. PMID:25728001

  9. A linear model fails to predict orientation selectivity of cells in the cat visual cortex.

    PubMed Central

    Volgushev, M; Vidyasagar, T R; Pei, X

    1996-01-01

    1. Postsynaptic potentials (PSPs) evoked by visual stimulation in simple cells in the cat visual cortex were recorded using in vivo whole-cell technique. Responses to small spots of light presented at different positions over the receptive field and responses to elongated bars of different orientations centred on the receptive field were recorded. 2. To test whether a linear model can account for orientation selectivity of cortical neurones, responses to elongated bars were compared with responses predicted by a linear model from the receptive field map obtained from flashing spots. 3. The linear model faithfully predicted the preferred orientation, but not the degree of orientation selectivity or the sharpness of orientation tuning. The ratio of optimal to non-optimal responses was always underestimated by the model. 4. Thus non-linear mechanisms, which can include suppression of non-optimal responses and/or amplification of optimal responses, are involved in the generation of orientation selectivity in the primary visual cortex. PMID:8930828

  10. Evaluation of transition metal oxide as carrier-selective contacts for silicon heterojunction solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, L.; Boccard, Matthieu; Holman, Zachary; Bertoni, M.

    2015-04-06

    "Reducing light absorption in the non-active solar cell layers, while enabling the extraction of the photogenerated minority carriers at quasi-Fermi levels are two key factors to improve current generation and voltage, and therefore efficiency of silicon heterojunction solar devices. To address these two critical aspects, transition metal oxide materials have been proposed as alternative to the n- and p-type amorphous silicon used as electron and hole selective contacts, respectively. Indeed, transition metal oxides such as molybdenum oxide, titanium oxide, nickel oxide or tungsten oxide combine a wide band gap typically over 3 eV with a band structure and theoretical band alignment with silicon that results in high transparency to the solar spectrum and in selectivity for the transport of only one carrier type. Improving carrier extraction or injection using transition metal oxide has been a topic of investigation in the field of organic solar cells and organic LEDs; from these pioneering works a lot of knowledge has been gained on materials properties, ways to control these during synthesis and deposition, and their impact on device performance. Recently, the transfer of some of this knowledge to silicon solar cells and the successful application of some metal oxide to contact heterojunction devices have gained much attention. In this contribution, we investigate the suitability of various transition metal oxide films (molybdenum oxide, titanium oxide, and tungsten oxide) deposited either by thermal evaporation or sputtering as transparent hole or electron selective transport layer for silicon solar cells. In addition to systematically characterize their optical and structural properties, we use photoemission spectroscopy to relate compound stoichiometry to band structure and characterize band alignment to silicon. The direct silicon/metal oxide interface is further analyzed by quasi-steady state photoconductance decay method to assess the quality of surface

  11. A Porous Tissue Engineering Scaffold Selectively Degraded by Cell-Generated Reactive Oxygen Species

    PubMed Central

    Martin, John R.; Gupta, Mukesh K.; Page, Jonathan M.; Yu, Fang; Davidson, Jeffrey M.; Guelcher, Scott A.

    2014-01-01

    Biodegradable tissue engineering scaffolds are commonly fabricated from poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) or similar polyesters that degrade by hydrolysis. PLGA hydrolysis generates acidic breakdown products that trigger an accelerated, autocatalytic degradation mechanism that can create mismatched rates of biomaterial breakdown and tissue formation. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are key mediators of cell function in both health and disease, especially at sites of inflammation and tissue healing, and induction of inflammation and ROS are natural components of the in vivo response to biomaterial implantation. Thus, polymeric biomaterials that are selectively degraded by cell-generated ROS may have potential for creating tissue engineering scaffolds with better matched rates of tissue in-growth and cell-mediated scaffold biodegradation. To explore this approach, a series of poly(thioketal) (PTK) urethane (PTK-UR) biomaterial scaffolds were synthesized that degrade specifically by an ROS-dependent mechanism. PTK-UR scaffolds had significantly higher compressive moduli than analogous poly(ester urethane) (PEUR) scaffolds formed from hydrolytically-degradable ester-based diols (p < 0.05). Unlike PEUR scaffolds, the PTK-UR scaffolds were stable under aqueous conditions out to 25 weeks but were selectively degraded by ROS, indicating that their biodegradation would be exclusively cell-mediated. The in vitro oxidative degradation rates of the PTK-URs followed first-order degradation kinetics, were significantly dependent on PTK composition (p < 0.05), and correlated to ROS concentration. In subcutaneous rat wounds, PTK-UR scaffolds supported cellular infiltration and granulation tissue formation, followed first-order degradation kinetics over 7 weeks, and produced significantly greater stenting of subcutaneous wounds compared to PEUR scaffolds. These combined results indicate that ROS-degradable PTK-UR tissue engineering scaffolds have significant advantages over analogous

  12. Selective alterations of the host cell architecture upon infection with parvovirus minute virus of mice

    SciTech Connect

    Nueesch, Juerg P.F. . E-mail: jpf.nuesch@dkfz-heidelberg.de; Lachmann, Sylvie; Rommelaere, Jean

    2005-01-05

    During a productive infection, the prototype strain of parvovirus minute virus of mice (MVMp) induces dramatic morphological alterations to the fibroblast host cell A9, resulting in cell lysis and progeny virus release. In order to understand the mechanisms underlying these changes, we characterized the fate of various cytoskeletal filaments and investigated the nuclear/cytoplasmic compartmentalization of infected cells. While most pronounced effects could be seen on micro- and intermediate filaments, manifest in dramatic rearrangements and degradation of filamentous (F-)actin and vimentin structures, only little impact could be seen on microtubules or the nuclear envelope during the entire monitored time of infection. To further analyze the disruption of the cytoskeletal structures, we investigated the viral impact on selective regulatory pathways. Thereby, we found a correlation between microtubule stability and MVM-induced phosphorylation of {alpha}/{beta} tubulin. In contrast, disassembly of actin filaments late in infection could be traced back to the disregulation of two F-actin associated proteins gelsolin and Wiscott-Aldrich Syndrome Protein (WASP). Thereby, an increase in the amount of gelsolin, an F-actin severing protein was observed during infection, accounting for the disruption of stress fibers upon infection. Concomitantly, the actin polymerization activity also diminished due to a loss of WASP, the activator protein of the actin polymerization machinery the Arp2/3 complex. No effects could be seen in amount and distribution of other F-actin regulatory factors such as cortactin, cofilin, and profilin. In summary, the selective attack of MVM towards distinct host cell cytoskeletal structures argues for a regulatory feature during infection, rather than a collapse of the host cell as a mere side effect of virus production.

  13. Power and area-optimised Carry-Select Adder architecture for standard cell-based design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanmugam, Muthukumar; Choi, GoangSeog

    2015-08-01

    A Carry-Select Adder (CSA) is one of the most suitable adders for high-speed applications, but the power and area penalties are greater, because it requires a double Ripple-Carry Adder (RCA) structure corresponding to carry inputs 0 and 1. Current low-power and low-area techniques are not suitable for a standard cell-based design which is one of the widely adopted design methodologies. Our work proposes two simple optimised architectures suitable for standard cell-based designs. A simple decision logic that replaces the RCA for Carry input 1 in a conventional CSA is proposed. One of the proposed architectures reduces power and area significantly with a small delay penalty compared to the existing techniques. Another proposed architecture improves the speed of operation and reduces the power and area considerably. The first one is more suitable for high-speed arithmetic in battery-operated applications where there is a trade-off between speed and power, while the other one is suitable for high-performance applications which also require area and power optimisation. The proposed architectures were implemented in TSMC 0.18um CMOS technology, and compared with conventional Square Root Carry-Select Adders and an existing standard cell-based design.

  14. Solving da Vinci stereopsis with depth-edge-selective V2 cells

    PubMed Central

    Assee, Andrew; Qian, Ning

    2007-01-01

    We propose a new model for da Vinci stereopsis based on a coarse-to-fine disparity-energy computation in V1 and disparity-boundary-selective units in V2. Unlike previous work, our model contains only binocular cells, relies on distributed representations of disparity, and has a simple V1-to-V2 feedforward structure. We demonstrate with random dot stereograms that the V2 stage of our model is able to determine the location and the eye-of-origin of monocularly occluded regions and improve disparity map computation. We also examine a few related issues. First, we argue that since monocular regions are binocularly defined, they cannot generally be detected by monocular cells. Second, we show that our coarse-to-fine V1 model for conventional stereopsis explains double matching in Panum’s limiting case. This provides computational support to the notion that the perceived depth of a monocular bar next to a binocular rectangle may not be da Vinci stereopsis per se (Gillam et al., 2003). Third, we demonstrate that some stimuli previously deemed invalid have simple, valid geometric interpretations. Our work suggests that studies of da Vinci stereopsis should focus on stimuli more general than the bar-and-rectangle type and that disparity-boundary-selective V2 cells may provide a simple physiological mechanism for da Vinci stereopsis. PMID:17698163

  15. [Immunological blood transfusion safety and selection of red blood cells issued from hospital blood banks].

    PubMed

    Py, J-Y

    2010-12-01

    Allogeneic red blood cells transfusion is always an immunological challenge and the choice of the blood products is crucial for the patient safety. But this choice may be hampered by the quality or the quantity of the available supply. In the end, the lack of transfusion may be more harmful than transfusion. The balance between patients' needs and blood centres supplying is always delicate. The conditions are not the same for all blood groups. Things are easier for the KEL1 phenotype, where the supply must ensure only 92.5% of KEL: -1 red blood cells instead of the 91% expected. More complicated is the situation for group O red blood cells with 47 versus 43%. But the major problem concerns RH: -1 red blood cells, for which the needs reach 20.1 versus 15%. These challenges require a lot of efforts from blood centres staffs to influence blood donors' recruitment and appointments. A justified and carefully selected blood products issuing may be of great help, especially for group O RH: -1 red blood cells. Therefore, hospital blood banks must have ad hoc procedures and a trained staff to put them into practice.

  16. Selective dissolution of halide perovskites as a step towards recycling solar cells

    DOE PAGES

    Kim, Byeong Jo; Kim, Dong Hoe; Kwon, Seung Lee; ...

    2016-05-23

    Most research on perovskite solar cells has focused on improving power-conversion efficiency and stability. However, if one could refurbish perovskite solar cells, their stability might not be a critical issue. From the perspective of cost effectiveness, if failed, perovskite solar cells could be collected and recycled; reuse of their gold electrodes and transparent conducting glasses could reduce the price per watt of perovskite photovoltaic modules. Here, we present a simple and effective method for removing the perovskite layer and reusing the mesoporous TiO2-coated transparent conducting glass substrate via selective dissolution. We find that the perovskite layer can be easily decomposedmore » in polar aprotic solvents because of the reaction between polar aprotic solvents and Pb2+ cations. After 10 cycles of recycling, a mesoporous TiO2-coated transparent conducting glass substrate-based perovskite solar cell still shows a constant power-conversion efficiency, thereby demonstrating the possibility of recycling perovskite solar cells.« less

  17. A Selective Small Molecule DNA2 Inhibitor for Sensitization of Human Cancer Cells to Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wenpeng; Zhou, Mian; Li, Zhengke; Li, Hongzhi; Polaczek, Piotr; Dai, Huifang; Wu, Qiong; Liu, Changwei; Karanja, Kenneth K.; Popuri, Vencat; Shan, Shu-ou; Schlacher, Katharina; Zheng, Li; Campbell, Judith L.; Shen, Binghui

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cells frequently up-regulate DNA replication and repair proteins such as the multifunctional DNA2 nuclease/helicase, counteracting DNA damage due to replication stress and promoting survival. Therefore, we hypothesized that blocking both DNA replication and repair by inhibiting the bifunctional DNA2 could be a potent strategy to sensitize cancer cells to stresses from radiation or chemotherapeutic agents. We show that homozygous deletion of DNA2 sensitizes cells to ionizing radiation and camptothecin (CPT). Using a virtual high throughput screen, we identify 4-hydroxy-8-nitroquinoline-3-carboxylic acid (C5) as an effective and selective inhibitor of DNA2. Mutagenesis and biochemical analysis define the C5 binding pocket at a DNA-binding motif that is shared by the nuclease and helicase activities, consistent with structural studies that suggest that DNA binding to the helicase domain is necessary for nuclease activity. C5 targets the known functions of DNA2 in vivo: C5 inhibits resection at stalled forks as well as reducing recombination. C5 is an even more potent inhibitor of restart of stalled DNA replication forks and over-resection of nascent DNA in cells defective in replication fork protection, including BRCA2 and BOD1L. C5 sensitizes cells to CPT and synergizes with PARP inhibitors. PMID:27211550

  18. Selective targeting of the BRG/PB1 bromodomains impairs embryonic and trophoblast stem cell maintenance

    PubMed Central

    Fedorov, Oleg; Castex, Josefina; Tallant, Cynthia; Owen, Dafydd R.; Martin, Sarah; Aldeghi, Matteo; Monteiro, Octovia; Filippakopoulos, Panagis; Picaud, Sarah; Trzupek, John D.; Gerstenberger, Brian S.; Bountra, Chas; Willmann, Dominica; Wells, Christopher; Philpott, Martin; Rogers, Catherine; Biggin, Philip C.; Brennan, Paul E.; Bunnage, Mark E.; Schüle, Roland; Günther, Thomas; Knapp, Stefan; Müller, Susanne

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian SWI/SNF [also called Brg/Brahma-associated factors (BAFs)] are evolutionarily conserved chromatin-remodeling complexes regulating gene transcription programs during development and stem cell differentiation. BAF complexes contain an ATP (adenosine 5′-triphosphate)–driven remodeling enzyme (either BRG1 or BRM) and multiple protein interaction domains including bromodomains, an evolutionary conserved acetyl lysine–dependent protein interaction motif that recruits transcriptional regulators to acetylated chromatin. We report a potent and cell active protein interaction inhibitor, PFI-3, that selectively binds to essential BAF bromodomains. The high specificity of PFI-3 was achieved on the basis of a novel binding mode of a salicylic acid head group that led to the replacement of water molecules typically maintained in other bromodomain inhibitor complexes. We show that exposure of embryonic stem cells to PFI-3 led to deprivation of stemness and deregulated lineage specification. Furthermore, differentiation of trophoblast stem cells in the presence of PFI-3 was markedly enhanced. The data present a key function of BAF bromodomains in stem cell maintenance and differentiation, introducing a novel versatile chemical probe for studies on acetylation-dependent cellular processes controlled by BAF remodeling complexes. PMID:26702435

  19. Process to Selectively Distinguish Viable from Non-Viable Bacterial Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaDuc, Myron T.; Bernardini, Jame N.; Stam, Christina N.

    2010-01-01

    The combination of ethidium monoazide (EMA) and post-fragmentation, randomly primed DNA amplification technologies will enhance the analytical capability to discern viable from non-viable bacterial cells in spacecraft-related samples. Intercalating agents have been widely used since the inception of molecular biology to stain and visualize nucleic acids. Only recently, intercalating agents such as EMA have been exploited to selectively distinguish viable from dead bacterial cells. Intercalating dyes can only penetrate the membranes of dead cells. Once through the membrane and actually inside the cell, they intercalate DNA and, upon photolysis with visible light, produce stable DNA monoadducts. Once the DNA is crosslinked, it becomes insoluble and unable to be fragmented for post-fragmentation, randomly primed DNA library formation. Viable organisms DNA remains unaffected by the intercalating agents, allowing for amplification via post-fragmentation, randomly primed technologies. This results in the ability to carry out downstream nucleic acid-based analyses on viable microbes to the exclusion of all non-viable cells.

  20. Selective dissolution of halide perovskites as a step towards recycling solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Byeong Jo; Kim, Dong Hoe; Kwon, Seung Lee; Park, So Yeon; Li, Zhen; Zhu, Kai; Jung, Hyun Suk

    2016-05-23

    Most research on perovskite solar cells has focused on improving power-conversion efficiency and stability. However, if one could refurbish perovskite solar cells, their stability might not be a critical issue. From the perspective of cost effectiveness, if failed, perovskite solar cells could be collected and recycled; reuse of their gold electrodes and transparent conducting glasses could reduce the price per watt of perovskite photovoltaic modules. Here, we present a simple and effective method for removing the perovskite layer and reusing the mesoporous TiO2-coated transparent conducting glass substrate via selective dissolution. We find that the perovskite layer can be easily decomposed in polar aprotic solvents because of the reaction between polar aprotic solvents and Pb2+ cations. After 10 cycles of recycling, a mesoporous TiO2-coated transparent conducting glass substrate-based perovskite solar cell still shows a constant power-conversion efficiency, thereby demonstrating the possibility of recycling perovskite solar cells.

  1. Laser-induced thermal explosion mode for selective nano-photothermolysis of cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Letfullin, Renat R.; Zharov, Vladimir P.; Joenathan, Charles; George, Thomas F.

    2007-02-01

    A new mechanism is proposed for selective laser killing of abnormal cells by laser thermal explosion of single nanoparticles - "nano-bombs" - delivered to the cells. Thermal explosion of the nanoparticles is realized when the heat generates within the strongly-absorbing target more rapidly than the heat can diffuse away. On the basis of simple energy balance, it is shown that the lower level of the threshold energy density of a single laser pulse required for thermal explosion of solid gold nanospehere is about 40 mJ/cm2, which is well below the safety standard for medical lasers (100 mJ/cm2) for healthy tissue and cells. The nanoparticle's explosion energy density can be reduced further (up to 11 mJ/cm2) by using gold nanorods due to higher plasmon-resonance absorption efficiency of nanorods. Additionally, the nanorods optical resonance lies in the near-IR region, where biological tissue transmissivity is the highest. Here, the effective therapeutic effect for cancer cell killing can be achieved due to nonlinear phenomena, which accompany the thermal explosion of the nanoparticles: generation of the strong shock wave with supersonic expansion of dense vapor in the cell volume, producing sound waves and optical plasma.

  2. Design of isoform-selective phospholipase D inhibitors that modulate cancer cell invasiveness

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Sarah A; Selvy, Paige E; Buck, Jason R; Cho, Hyekyung P; Criswell, Tracy L; Thomas, Ashley L; Armstrong, Michelle D; Arteaga, Carlos L; Lindsley, Craig W; Brown, H Alex

    2013-01-01

    Phospholipase D (PLD) is an essential enzyme responsible for the production of the lipid second messenger phosphatidic acid. Phosphatidic acid participates in both G protein-coupled receptor and receptor tyrosine kinase signal transduction networks. The lack of potent and isoform-selective inhibitors has limited progress in defining the cellular roles of PLD. We used a diversity-oriented synthetic approach and developed a library of PLD inhibitors with considerable pharmacological characterization. Here we report the rigorous evaluation of that library, which contains highly potent inhibitors, including the first isoform-selective PLD inhibitors. Specific members of this series inhibit isoforms with > 100-fold selectivity both in vitro and in cells. A subset of inhibitors was shown to block invasiveness in metastatic breast cancer models. These findings demonstrate the power of diversity-oriented synthesis combined with biochemical assays and mass spectrometric lipid profiling of cellular responses to develop the first isoform-selective PLD inhibitors—a new class of antimetastatic agents. PMID:19136975

  3. Cell-free selection of domain antibodies by in vitro compartmentalization.

    PubMed

    Sepp, Armin; Griffiths, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Efficient identification of antibodies, or any fragments thereof, displaying desired specificity and affinity is critical for the development of novel immunotherapeutics. Here we describe the adaptation of in vitro compartmentalization for the cell-free selection of Vκ and VH domain antibodies (dAbs™) from large combinatorial libraries. The dAbs™ are in vitro expressed in fusion to the N-terminus of single-chain variant of phage P22 Arc repressor DNA-binding domain that links the compartmentally expressed protein molecules to their encoding PCR fragment-based genes via cognate operator sites present on the DNA. Libraries of up to 10(10) in size can be rapidly assembled and selected for improved affinity in equilibrium and off-rate conditions.

  4. Hydrazine selective dual signaling chemodosimetric probe in physiological conditions and its application in live cells.

    PubMed

    Nandi, Sandip; Sahana, Animesh; Mandal, Sandip; Sengupta, Archya; Chatterjee, Ansuman; Safin, Damir A; Babashkina, Maria G; Tumanov, Nikolay A; Filinchuk, Yaroslav; Das, Debasis

    2015-09-17

    A rhodamine-cyanobenzene conjugate, (E)-4-((2-(3',6'-bis(diethylamino)-3-oxospiro[isoindoline-1,9'-xanthene]-2-yl)ethylimino)methyl)benzonitrile (1), which structure has been elucidated by single crystal X-ray diffraction, was synthesized for selective fluorescent "turn-on" and colorimetric recognition of hydrazine at physiological pH 7.4. It was established that 1 detects hydrazine up to 58 nM. The probe is useful for the detection of intracellular hydrazine in the human breast cancer cells MCF-7 using a fluorescence microscope. Spirolactam ring opening of 1, followed by its hydrolysis, was established as a probable mechanism for the selective sensing of hydrazine.

  5. Divergent selection for ester-linked diferulates in maize pith stalk tissues. Effects on cell wall composition and degradability.

    PubMed

    Barros-Rios, Jaime; Malvar, Rosa A; Jung, Hans-Joachim G; Bunzel, Mirko; Santiago, Rogelio

    2012-11-01

    Cross-linking of grass cell wall components through diferulates (DFAs) has a marked impact on cell wall properties. However, results of genetic selection for DFA concentration have not been reported for any grass species. We report here the results of direct selection for ester-linked DFA concentration in maize stalk pith tissues and the associated changes in cell wall composition and biodegradability. After two cycles of divergent selection, maize populations selected for higher total DFA (DFAT) content (CHs) had 16% higher DFAT concentrations than populations selected for lower DFAT content (CLs). These significant DFA concentration gains suggest that DFA deposition in maize pith parenchyma cell walls is a highly heritable trait that is genetically regulated and can be modified trough conventional breeding. Maize populations selected for higher DFAT had 13% less glucose and 10% lower total cell wall concentration than CLs, suggesting that increased cross-linking of feruloylated arabinoxylans results in repacking of the matrix and possibly in thinner and firmer cell walls. Divergent selection affected esterified DFAT and monomeric ferulate ether cross link concentrations differently, supporting the hypothesis that the biosynthesis of these cell wall components are separately regulated. As expected, a more higher DFA ester cross-coupled arabinoxylan network had an effect on rumen cell wall degradability (CLs showed 12% higher 24-h total polysaccharide degradability than CHs). Interestingly, 8-8-coupled DFAs, previously associated with cell wall strength, were the best predictors of pith cell wall degradability (negative impact). Thus, further research on the involvement of these specific DFA regioisomers in limiting cell wall biodegradability is encouraged.

  6. High frequency of donor chimerism after allogeneic transplantation of CD34+-selected peripheral blood cells.

    PubMed

    Briones, J; Urbano-Ispizua, A; Lawler, M; Rozman, C; Gardiner, N; Marín, P; Salgado, C; Féliz, P; McCann, S; Montserrat, E

    1998-05-01

    Ex vivo T cell depletion of allogeneic grafts is associated with a high (up to 80%) rate of mixed chimerism (MC) posttransplantation. The number of transplanted progenitor cells is an important factor in achieving complete donor chimerism in the T cell depletion setting. Use of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) peripheral blood allografts allows the administration of large numbers of CD34+ cells. We studied the chimeric status of 13 patients who received allogeneic CD34+-selected peripheral blood progenitor cell transplants (allo-PBPCTs/CD34+) from HLA-identical sibling donors. Patients were conditioned with cyclophosphamide (120 mg/kg) and total-body irradiation (13 Gy in four fractions). Apheresis products were T cell-depleted by the immunoadsorption avidin-biotin method. The median number of CD34+ and CD3+ cells infused was 2.8x10(6)/kg (range 1.9-8.6x10(6)/kg) and 0.4x10(6)/kg (range 0.3-1x10(6)/kg), respectively. Molecular analysis of the engraftment was performed using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of highly polymorphic short tandem repeat (PCR-STR) sequences in peripheral blood samples. MC was detected in two (15%) of 13 patients. These two patients relapsed at 8 and 10 months after transplant, respectively. The remaining 11 patients showed complete donor chimerism and were in clinical remission after a maximum follow-up period of 24 months (range 6-24 months). These results were compared with those obtained in 10 patients who were treated with T cell-depleted bone marrow transplantation by means of elutriation and who received the same conditioning treatment and similar amounts of CD3+ cells (median 0.45x10(6)/kg; not significant) but a lower number of CD34+ cells (median 0.8x10(6)/kg; p = 0.001). MC was documented in six of 10 patients (60%), which was significantly higher than in the allo-PBPCT/CD34+ group (p = 0.04). We conclude that a high frequency of complete donor chimerism is achieved in patients receiving allo-PBPCT/CD34

  7. Selective rather than inductive mechanisms favour specific replacement of Purkinje cells by embryonic cerebellar cells transplanted to the cerebellum of adult Purkinje cell degeneration (pcd) mutant mice.

    PubMed

    Carletti, Barbara; Rossi, Ferdinando

    2005-09-01

    Cell replacement after neuronal degeneration in the adult CNS depends on the availability of specific cues to direct specification, differentiation and integration of newly born neurons into mature circuits. Following recent reports indicating that neurogenic signals may be reactivated in the adult injured CNS, here we asked whether such signals are expressed in the cerebellum after Purkinje cell degeneration. Thus, we compared the fate of embryonic cerebellar cells transplanted to the cerebella of adult wild-type and Purkinje cell degeneration (pcd) mutant mice. Donor cells were dissected from beta-actin-enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) transgenic mice and transplanted as a single cell suspension. In both hosts, grafted cells generated all major cerebellar phenotypes, with a precise localization in the recipient cortex or white matter. Nevertheless, the phenotypic distributions showed striking quantitative differences. Most notably, in the pcd cerebellum there was a higher amount of Purkinje cells, while other phenotypes were less frequent. Analysis of cell proliferation by 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrDU) incorporation revealed that in both hosts mitotic activity was strongly reduced shortly after transplantation, and virtually all donor Purkinje cells were actually generated before grafting. Together, these results indicate that some compensatory mechanisms operate in the pcd environment. However, the very low mitotic rate of transplanted cells suggests that the adult cerebellum, either wild-type or mutant, does not provide instructive neurogenic cues to direct the specification of uncommitted progenitors. Rather, specific replacement in mutant hosts is achieved through selective mechanisms that favour the survival and integration of donor Purkinje cells at the expense of other phenotypes.

  8. Diagnostic biomarkers for renal cell carcinoma: selection using novel bioinformatics systems for microarray data analysis

    PubMed Central

    Osunkoya, Adeboye O; Yin-Goen, Qiqin; Phan, John H; Moffitt, Richard A; Stokes, Todd H; Wang, May D; Young, Andrew N

    2009-01-01

    Summary The differential diagnosis of clear cell, papillary and chromophobe renal cell carcinoma is clinically important, because these tumor subtypes are associated with different pathobiology and clinical behavior. For cases in which histopathology is equivocal, immunohistochemistry and quantitative RT-PCR can assist in the differential diagnosis by measuring expression of subtype-specific biomarkers. Several renal tumor biomarkers have been discovered in expression microarray studies. However, due to heterogeneity of gene and protein expression, additional biomarkers are needed for reliable diagnostic classification. We developed novel bioinformatics systems to identify candidate renal tumor biomarkers from the microarray profiles of 45 clear cell, 16 papillary and 10 chromophobe renal cell carcinoma; the microarray data was derived from two independent published studies. The ArrayWiki biocomputing system merged the microarray datasets into a single file, so gene expression could be analyzed from a larger number of tumors. The caCORRECT system removed non-random sources of error from the microarray data, and the omniBioMarker system analyzed data with several gene-ranking algorithms, in order to identify algorithms effective at recognizing previously described renal tumor biomarkers. We predicted these algorithms would also be effective at identifying unknown biomarkers that could be verified by independent methods. We selected six novel candidate biomakers from the omniBioMarker analysis, and verified their differential expression in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues by quantitative RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. The candidate biomarkers were carbonic anhydrase IX, ceruloplasmin, schwannomin-interacting protein 1, E74-like factor 3, cytochrome c oxidase subunit 5a and acetyl-CoA acetyltransferase 1. Quantitative RT-PCR was performed on 17 clear cell, 13 papillary and 7 chromophobe renal cell carcinoma. Carbonic anhydrase IX and ceruloplasmin were

  9. Highly selective and rapid arsenic removal by metabolically engineered Escherichia coli cells expressing Fucus vesiculosus metallothionein.

    PubMed

    Singh, Shailendra; Mulchandani, Ashok; Chen, Wilfred

    2008-05-01

    An arsenic-chelating metallothionein (fMT) from the arsenic-tolerant marine alga Fucus vesiculosus was expressed in Escherichia coli, resulting in 30- and 26-fold-higher As(III) and As(V) binding, respectively. Coexpression of the As(III)-specific transporter GlpF with fMT further improved arsenic accumulation and offered high selectivity toward As. Resting E. coli cells coexpressing fMT and GlpF completely removed trace amounts (35 ppb) of As(III) within 20 min, providing a promising technology for compliance with the As limit of 10 ppb newly recommended by the U.S. EPA.

  10. Quantification of in vitro mesenchymal stem cell invasion into tumor spheroids using selective plane illumination microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rühland, Svenja; Wechselberger, Alexandra; Spitzweg, Christine; Huss, Ralf; Nelson, Peter J.; Harz, Hartmann

    2015-04-01

    Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) homing and integration into tumors are under evaluation for clinical application. This approach requires the identification of conditions for optimal tumor invasion. We describe a tool for the in vitro comparison of parameters influencing invasion. Human MSC added to experimental tumor spheroids variably migrates toward the center of the structure. To determine MSC distribution inside the three-dimensional specimen, spatial analysis was performed using selective plane illumination microscopy. A standardized method to quantify and compare the invasion potential of variably treated MSC into experimental tumor environments allows efficient screening for optimizing conditions.

  11. Selective Vulnerability of Specific Retinal Ganglion Cell Types and Synapses after Transient Ocular Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Rebecca E.; Ullian, Erik M.; Wong, Rachel O.L.

    2016-01-01

    Key issues concerning ganglion cell type-specific loss and synaptic changes in animal models of experimental glaucoma remain highly debated. Importantly, changes in the structure and function of various RGC types that occur early, within 14 d after acute, transient intraocular pressure elevation, have not been previously assessed. Using biolistic transfection of individual RGCs and multielectrode array recordings to measure light responses in mice, we examined the effects of laser-induced ocular hypertension on the structure and function of a subset of RGCs. Among the α-like RGCs studied, αOFF-transient RGCs exhibited higher rates of cell death, with corresponding reductions in dendritic area, dendritic complexity, and synapse density. Functionally, OFF-transient RGCs displayed decreases in spontaneous activity and receptive field size. In contrast, neither αOFF-sustained nor αON-sustained RGCs displayed decreases in light responses, although they did exhibit a decrease in excitatory postsynaptic sites, suggesting that synapse loss may be one of the earliest signs of degeneration. Interestingly, presynaptic ribbon density decreased to a greater degree in the OFF sublamina of the inner plexiform layer, corroborating the hypothesis that RGCs with dendrites stratifying in the OFF sublamina may be damaged early. Indeed, OFF arbors of ON-OFF RGCs lose complexity more rapidly than ON arbors. Our results reveal type-specific differences in RGC responses to injury with a selective vulnerability of αOFF-transient RGCs, and furthermore, an increased susceptibility of synapses in the OFF sublamina. The selective vulnerability of specific RGC types offers new avenues for the design of more sensitive functional tests and targeted neuroprotection. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Conflicting reports regarding the selective vulnerability of specific retinal ganglion cell (RGC) types in glaucoma exist. We examine, for the first time, the effects of transient intraocular pressure

  12. Highly sensitive and selective odorant sensor using living cells expressing insect olfactory receptors

    PubMed Central

    Misawa, Nobuo; Mitsuno, Hidefumi; Kanzaki, Ryohei; Takeuchi, Shoji

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes a highly sensitive and selective chemical sensor using living cells (Xenopus laevis oocytes) within a portable fluidic device. We constructed an odorant sensor whose sensitivity is a few parts per billion in solution and can simultaneously distinguish different types of chemicals that have only a slight difference in double bond isomerism or functional group such as ─OH, ─CHO and ─C(═O)─. We developed a semiautomatic method to install cells to the fluidic device and achieved stable and reproducible odorant sensing. In addition, we found that the sensor worked for multiple-target chemicals and can be integrated with a robotic system without any noise reduction systems. Our developed sensor is compact and easy to replace in the system. We believe that the sensor can potentially be incorporated into a portable system for monitoring environmental and physical conditions. PMID:20798064

  13. Selective Labeling of Proteins on Living Cell Membranes Using Fluorescent Nanodiamond Probes

    PubMed Central

    Sotoma, Shingo; Iimura, Jun; Igarashi, Ryuji; Hirosawa, Koichiro M.; Ohnishi, Hidenori; Mizukami, Shin; Kikuchi, Kazuya; Fujiwara, Takahiro K.; Shirakawa, Masahiro; Tochio, Hidehito

    2016-01-01

    The impeccable photostability of fluorescent nanodiamonds (FNDs) is an ideal property for use in fluorescence imaging of proteins in living cells. However, such an application requires highly specific labeling of the target proteins with FNDs. Furthermore, the surface of unmodified FNDs tends to adsorb biomolecules nonspecifically, which hinders the reliable targeting of proteins with FNDs. Here, we combined hyperbranched polyglycerol modification of FNDs with the β-lactamase-tag system to develop a strategy for selective imaging of the protein of interest in cells. The combination of these techniques enabled site-specific labeling of Interleukin-18 receptor alpha chain, a membrane receptor, with FNDs, which eventually enabled tracking of the diffusion trajectory of FND-labeled proteins on the membrane surface. PMID:28335184

  14. Incorporation of a selective sigma-2 receptor ligand enhances uptake of liposomes by multiple cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yifei; Huang, Yixian; Zhang, Peng; Gao, Xiang; Gibbs, Robert B; Li, Song

    2012-01-01

    Background: The sigma-2 receptor is an attractive target for tumor imaging and targeted therapy because it is overexpressed in multiple types of solid tumors, including prostate cancer, breast cancer, and lung cancer. SV119 is a synthetic small molecule that binds to sigma-2 receptors with high affinity and specificity. This study investigates the utility of SV119 in mediating the selective targeting of liposomal vectors in various types of cancer cells. Methods: SV119 was covalently linked with polyethylene glycol-dioleyl amido aspartic acid conjugate (PEG-DOA) to generate a novel functional lipid, SV119-PEG-DOA. This lipid was utilized for the preparation of targeted liposomes to enhance their uptake by cancer cells. Liposomes with various SV119 densities (0, 1, 3, and 5 mole%) were prepared and their cellular uptake was investigated in several tumor cell lines. In addition, doxorubicin (DOX) was loaded into the targeted and unmodified liposomes, and the cytotoxic effect on the DU-145 cells was evaluated by MTT assay. Results: Liposomes with or without SV119-PEG-DOA both have a mean diameter of approximately 90 nm and a neutral charge. The incorporation of SV119-PEG-DOA significantly increased the cellular uptake of liposomes by the DU-145, PC-3, A549, 201T, and MCF-7 tumor cells, which was shown by fluorescence microscopy and the quantitative measurement of fluorescence intensity. In contrast, the incorporation of SV119 did not increase the uptake of liposomes by the normal BEAS-2B cells. In a time course study, the uptake of SV119 liposomes by DU-145 cells was also significantly higher at each time point compared to the unmodified liposomes. Furthermore, the DOX-loaded SV119 liposomes showed significantly higher cytotoxicity to DU-145 cells compared to the DOX-loaded unmodified liposomes. Conclusion: SV119 liposomes were developed for targeted drug delivery to cancer cells. The targeting efficiency and specificity of SV119 liposomes to cancer cells was

  15. Antigen-affinity controls pre-germinal centser B cell selection by promoting Mcl-1 induction through BAFF receptor signaling

    PubMed Central

    Wensveen, Felix M.; Slinger, Erik; van Attekum, Martijn HA; Brink, Robert; Eldering, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Upon antigen encounter, the responsive B cell pool undergoes stringent selection which eliminates cells with low B cell receptor (BCR) affinity. Already before formation of the germinal center, activated B cells of low-affinity are negatively selected in a process that is molecularly not well understood. In this study, we investigated the mechanism behind pre-GC affinity-mediated B cell selection. We applied affinity mutants of HEL antigen and found that rapidly after activation B cells become highly dependent on the cytokine BAFF. Moreover, expression of BAFF receptor CD268 is regulated in a BCR-affinity dependent fashion. High affinity responses via BAFF correlated with PI3K activation, which controlled expression of the pro-survival protein Mcl-1, and thereby increased survival. In the presence of excess BAFF, or in absence of the Mcl-1 antagonist Noxa, more low-affinity B cells survived the first two days after antigen encounter. This resulted in increased numbers of antigen-specific B cells of low affinity upon immunization and reduced the overall affinity of cells that contributed to the germinal center reaction. Our findings elucidate a crucial molecular pathway of B cell selection in the earliest phases of activation by identifying a novel link between BCR affinity and BAFF-R signaling towards Mcl-1. PMID:27762293

  16. Human mast cells transmigrate through human umbilical vein endothelial monolayers and selectively produce IL-8 in response to stromal cell-derived factor-1 alpha.

    PubMed

    Lin, T J; Issekutz, T B; Marshall, J S

    2000-07-01

    Mature mast cells are generally considered to be less mobile cells residing within tissue sites. However, mast cell numbers are known to increase in the context of inflammation, and mast cells are recognized to be important in regulating local neutrophil infiltration. CXC chemokines may play a critical role in this process. In this study two human mast cell-like lines, HMC-1 and KU812, and human cord blood-derived primary cultured mast cells were employed to examine role of stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1) in regulating mast cell migration and mediator production. It was demonstrated that human mast cells constitutively express mRNA and protein for CXCR4. Stimulation of human mast cells with SDF-1, the only known ligand for CXCR4, induced a significant increase in intracellular calcium levels. In vitro, SDF-1 alpha mediated dose-dependent migration of human cord blood-derived mast cells and HMC-1 cells across HUVEC monolayers. Although SDF-1 alpha did not induce mast cell degranulation, it selectively stimulated production of the neutrophil chemoattractant IL-8 without affecting TNF-alpha, IL-1beta, IL-6, GM-CSF, IFN-gamma, or RANTES production, providing further evidence of the selective modulation of mast cell function by this chemokine. These findings provide a novel, SDF-1-dependent mechanism for mast cell transendothelial migration and functional regulation, which may have important implications for the local regulation of mast cells in disease.

  17. A precisely substituted benzopyran targets androgen refractory prostate cancer cells through selective modulation of estrogen receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Rajeev; Verma, Vikas; Sharma, Vikas; Jain, Ashish; Singh, Vishal; Sarswat, Amit; Maikhuri, Jagdamba P.; Sharma, Vishnu L.; Gupta, Gopal

    2015-03-15

    Dietary consumption of phytoestrogens like genistein has been linked with lower incidence of prostate cancer. The estradiol-like benzopyran core of genistein confers estrogen receptor-β (ER-β) selectivity that imparts weak anti-proliferative activity against prostate cancer cells. DL-2-[4-(2-piperidinoethoxy)phenyl]-3-phenyl-2H-1-benzopyran (BP), a SERM designed with benzopyran core, targeted androgen independent prostate cancer (PC-3) cells 14-times more potently than genistein, ~ 25% more efficiently than tamoxifen and 6.5-times more actively than ICI-182780, without forfeiting significant specificity in comparison to genistein. BP increased apoptosis (annexin-V and TUNEL labeling), arrested cell cycle, and significantly increased caspase-3 activity along with mRNA expressions of estrogen receptor (ER)-β and FasL (qPCR) in PC-3 cells. In classical ERE-luc reporter assay BP behaved as a potent ER-α antagonist and ER-β agonist. Accordingly, it decreased expression of ER-α target PS2 (P < 0.01) and increased expression of ER-β target TNF-α (P < 0.05) genes in PC-3. ER-β deficient PC-3 (siRNA-transfected) was resistant to apoptotic and anti-proliferative actions of SERMs, including stimulation of FasL expression by BP. BP significantly inhibited phosphorylation of Akt and ERK-1/2, JNK and p38 in PC-3 (immunoblotting), and thus adopted a multi-pathway mechanism to exert a more potent anti-proliferative activity against prostate cancer cells than natural and synthetic SERMs. Its precise ER-subtype specific activity presents a unique lead structure for further optimization. - Highlights: • BP with benzopyran core of genistein was identified for ER-β selective action. • BP was 14-times more potent than genistien in targeting prostate cancer cells. • It behaved as a potent ER-β agonist and ER-α antagonist in gene reporter assays. • BP's anti-proliferative action was inhibited significantly in ER-β deficient cells. • BP — a unique lead structure

  18. Gestational lead exposure selectively decreases retinal dopamine amacrine cells and dopamine content in adult mice

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, Donald A.; Hamilton, W. Ryan; Johnson, Jerry E.; Xiao, Weimin; Chaney, Shawntay; Mukherjee, Shradha; Miller, Diane B.; O'Callaghan, James P.

    2011-11-15

    Gestational lead exposure (GLE) produces supernormal scotopic electroretinograms (ERG) in children, monkeys and rats, and a novel retinal phenotype characterized by an increased number of rod photoreceptors and bipolar cells in adult mice and rats. Since the loss of dopaminergic amacrine cells (DA ACs) in GLE monkeys and rats contributes to supernormal ERGs, the retinal DA system was analyzed in mice following GLE. C57BL/6 female mice were exposed to low (27 ppm), moderate (55 ppm) or high (109 ppm) lead throughout gestation and until postnatal day 10 (PN10). Blood [Pb] in control, low-, moderate- and high-dose GLE was {<=} 1, {<=} 10, {approx} 25 and {approx} 40 {mu}g/dL, respectively, on PN10 and by PN30 all were {<=} 1 {mu}g/dL. At PN60, confocal-stereology studies used vertical sections and wholemounts to characterize tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) expression and the number of DA and other ACs. GLE dose-dependently and selectively decreased the number of TH-immunoreactive (IR) DA ACs and their synaptic plexus without affecting GABAergic, glycinergic or cholinergic ACs. Immunoblots and confocal revealed dose-dependent decreases in retinal TH protein expression and content, although monoamine oxidase-A protein and gene expression were unchanged. High-pressure liquid chromatography showed that GLE dose-dependently decreased retinal DA content, its metabolites and DA utilization/release. The mechanism of DA selective vulnerability is unknown. However, a GLE-induced loss/dysfunction of DA ACs during development could increase the number of rods and bipolar cells since DA helps regulate neuronal proliferation, whereas during adulthood it could produce ERG supernormality as well as altered circadian rhythms, dark/light adaptation and spatial contrast sensitivity. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Peak [BPb] in control, low-, moderate- and high-dose newborn mice with gestational lead exposure: {<=} 1, {<=} 10, 25 and 40 {mu}g/dL Black

  19. Selective cytotoxicity of transformed cells but not normal cells by a sialoglycopeptide growth regulator in the presence of tumor necrosis factor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woods, K. M.; Fattaey, H.; Johnson, T. C.; Chapes, S. K.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1994-01-01

    The tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF)-resistant, SV40-transformed, murine fibroblast cell lines, F5b and F5m, became sensitive to TNF-mediated cytolysis after treatment with a biologically active 18 kDa peptide fragment (SGP) derived from a 66-kDa parental cell surface sialoglycoprotein. Neither TNF nor the SGP alone exhibited cytotoxicity to the two SV40-transformed cell lines. However, Balb/c 3T3 cells, incubated with SGP alone or with SGP and TNF, were not killed. Therefore, SGP can selectively sensitize cells for TNF alpha-mediated cytotoxicity. This selective sensitization may be due to the previously documented ability of the SGP to selectively mediate cell cycle arrest.

  20. Biased small-molecule ligands for selective inhibition of HIV-1 cell entry via CCR5.

    PubMed

    Berg, Christian; Spiess, Katja; Lüttichau, Hans R; Rosenkilde, Mette M

    2016-12-01

    Since the discovery of HIV's use of CCR5 as the primary coreceptor in fusion, the focus on developing small-molecule receptor antagonists for inhibition hereof has only resulted in one single drug, Maraviroc. We therefore investigated the possibility of using small-molecule CCR5 agonists as HIV-1 fusion inhibitors. A virus-free cell-based fusion reporter assay, based on mixing "effector cells" (expressing HIV Env and luciferase activator) with "target cells" (expressing CD4, CCR5 wild type or a selection of well-described mutations, and luciferase reporter), was used as fusion readout. Receptor expression was evaluated by ELISA and fluorescence microscopy. On CCR5 WT, Maraviroc and Aplaviroc inhibited fusion with high potencies (EC 50 values of 91 and 501 nM, respectively), whereas removal of key residues for both antagonists (Glu283Ala) or Maraviroc alone (Tyr251Ala) prevented fusion inhibition, establishing this assay as suitable for screening of HIV entry inhibitors. Both ligands inhibited HIV fusion on signaling-deficient CCR5 mutations (Tyr244Ala and Trp248Ala). Moreover, the steric hindrance CCR5 mutation (Gly286Phe) impaired fusion, presumably by a direct hindrance of gp120 interaction. Finally, the efficacy switch mutation (Leu203Phe) - converting small-molecule antagonists/inverse agonists to full agonists biased toward G-protein activation - uncovered that also small-molecule agonists can function as direct HIV-1 cell entry inhibitors. Importantly, no agonist-induced receptor internalization was observed for this mutation. Our studies of the pharmacodynamic requirements for HIV-1 fusion inhibitors highlight the possibility of future development of biased ligands with selective targeting of the HIV-CCR5 interaction without interfering with the normal functionality of CCR5.

  1. The infarcted cardiac microenvironment cannot selectively promote embryonic stem cell differentiation into cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Chen, You-Ren; Li, Yang; Chen, Li; Yang, Xin-Chun; Su, Pi-Xiong; Cai, Jun

    2011-01-01

    Postinfarct congestive heart failure is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in industrialized countries. It is controversial whether embryonic stem cells are feasible sources for in situ cardiac regeneration in infarcted hearts. In order to investigate whether the infarcted cardiac microenvironment could selectively promote embryonic stem cell differentiation into cardiomyocytes, we assessed the cardiac differentiation potential of mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs) injected into normal (n=16) or acutely infarcted rat hearts (n=18). We found that the transplanted 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI)-labeled mESCs were able to survive and form stable intracardiac grafts both in normal and infarcted hearts, along with macrophages found specifically in the engraftment area. Two to four weeks after mESC transplantation, we found that more DAPI-positive mESCs differentiated into cardiomyocytes, marked by cardiac troponin T (cTnT), in normal than those in infarcted hearts (2.67±0.79% vs. 1.06±0.52%, P<.01). However, the discrepancy between the percentage of DAPI-positive cells that express cTnT in normal and that in infarcted hearts was diminished after 4 weeks (1.17±0.98% vs. 1.07±1.02%, P>.05), when the transverse striation began to present in the mESCs-derived cardiomyocytes. In addition, mESCs differentiated into vimentin-positive cardiac fibroblasts in normal and infracted hearts. Our results indicated that transplanted mESCs cannot only survive but differentiate into cardiomyocytes in infarcted rat hearts. However, the infarcted cardiac microenvironment cannot selectively promote mESCs differentiation into cardiomyocytes.

  2. Construction of antibody-like nanoparticles for selective protein sequestration in living cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yibin; Fang, Simin; Zhai, Junqiu; Zhao, Meiping

    2015-04-01

    We demonstrate the successful construction of fluorescently labeled magnetic antibody-like nanoparticles (ANPs) via a facile one-step surface-initiated in situ molecular imprinting approach over silica coated magnetite (Fe3O4@SiO2) core-shell nanocomposites. The as-prepared ANPs had a highly compact structure with an overall size of 83 +/- 5 nm in diameter and showed excellent aqueous dispersion stability. With the predetermined high specificity to the target protein and high biocompatibility, the ANPs enabled rapid, efficient, selective and optically trackable sequestration of target proteins within living cells. This work represents the first example of fully artificially engineered multifunctional ANPs for the intracellular protein-sequestration without disruption of the cells. The established approach may be further extended to generate ANPs for various proteins of interest and provide useful tools for related biological research and biomedical applications.We demonstrate the successful construction of fluorescently labeled magnetic antibody-like nanoparticles (ANPs) via a facile one-step surface-initiated in situ molecular imprinting approach over silica coated magnetite (Fe3O4@SiO2) core-shell nanocomposites. The as-prepared ANPs had a highly compact structure with an overall size of 83 +/- 5 nm in diameter and showed excellent aqueous dispersion stability. With the predetermined high specificity to the target protein and high biocompatibility, the ANPs enabled rapid, efficient, selective and optically trackable sequestration of target proteins within living cells. This work represents the first example of fully artificially engineered multifunctional ANPs for the intracellular protein-sequestration without disruption of the cells. The established approach may be further extended to generate ANPs for various proteins of interest and provide useful tools for related biological research and biomedical applications. Electronic supplementary information (ESI

  3. PI3Kβ inhibitor TGX221 selectively inhibits renal cell carcinoma cells with both VHL and SETD2 mutations and links multiple pathways.

    PubMed

    Feng, Chenchen; Sun, Yang; Ding, Guanxiong; Wu, Zhong; Jiang, Haowen; Wang, Lujia; Ding, Qiang; Wen, Hui

    2015-04-08

    We aimed to exploit novel compounds with high selectivity to clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) with common mutations. Using the GDSC databases, we searched for compounds with high selectivity for ccRCC with VHL and/or SETD2 mutations. Clinical impact and gene interactions were analysed using TCGA database. In vitro and in vivo studies were performed to validate the inhibitory effects of the compound. We identified the selective PI3Kβ inhibitor TGX221 as a selective inhibitor for ccRCC with both VHL and SETD2 mutations. TGX221 also targeted cancer cells with CDKN2A and PTEN mutations. Changes in PTEN and CDKN2A gene sets were associated with worsened prognosis of ccRCC. TGX221 substantially and selectively inhibited the down stream products of VHL, SETD2, and PTEN in ccRCC cells with VHL and SETD2 mutations. TGX221 also exhibited significant selectivity in inhibiting cell motility and tumourigenesis of ccRCC cells with VHL and SETD2 mutations. TGX221 is a novel inhibitor with high selectivity for ccRCC with VHL and SETD2 mutations. It also targeted PTEN and CDKN2A mutations. How those genes were associated with PI3Kβ warranted further investigations.

  4. Incorporation of a self-aligned selective emitter to realize highly efficient (12.8%) Si nanowire solar cells.

    PubMed

    Um, Han-Don; Park, Kwang-Tae; Jung, Jin-Young; Li, Xiaopeng; Zhou, Keya; Jee, Sang-Won; Lee, Jung-Ho

    2014-05-21

    Formation of a selective emitter in crystalline silicon solar cells improves photovoltaic conversion efficiency by decoupling emitter regions for light absorption (moderately doped) and metallization (degenerately doped). However, use of a selective emitter in silicon nanowire (Si NW) solar cells is technologically challenging because of difficulties in forming robust Ohmic contacts that interface directly with the top-ends of nanowires. Here we describe a self-aligned selective emitter successfully integrated into an antireflective Si NW solar cell. By one-step metal-assisted chemical etching, NW arrays formed only at light-absorbing areas between top-metal grids while selectively retaining Ohmic contact regions underneath the metal grids. We observed a remarkable ∼40% enhancement in blue responses of internal quantum efficiency, corresponding to a conversion efficiency of 12.8% in comparison to the 8.05% of a conventional NW solar cell.

  5. Novel selective inhibitors of nuclear export CRM1 antagonists for therapy in mantle cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kejie; Wang, Michael; Tamayo, Archito T; Shacham, Sharon; Kauffman, Michael; Lee, John; Zhang, Liang; Ou, Zhishuo; Li, Changping; Sun, Luhong; Ford, Richard J; Pham, Lan V

    2013-01-01

    Overexpression of the cellular nuclear exportin 1, more commonly called chromosomal region maintenance 1 (CRM1), has been associated with malignant progression and mortality. Therefore, activation of nuclear export can play a significant etiologic role in some forms of human neoplasia and serve as a novel target for the treatment of these cancers. Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) is an aggressive histotype of B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma that remains incurable. The objective of this study was to investigate the functional significance of CRM1 in MCL by evaluating the therapeutic efficacy of CRM1 inhibition in MCL in vitro and in vivo. Our results showed that CRM1 is highly expressed in MCL cells and is involved in regulating growth and survival mechanisms through the critical nuclear factor-κB survival pathway, which is independent of p53 status. Inhibition of CRM1 by two novel selective inhibitors of nuclear export (SINE), KPT-185 and KPT-276, in MCL cells resulted in significant growth inhibition and apoptosis induction. KPT-185 also induced CRM1 accumulation in the nucleus, resulting in CRM1 degradation by the proteasome. Oral administration of KPT-276 significantly suppressed tumor growth in an MCL-bearing severe combined immunodeficient mouse model, without severe toxicity. Our data suggest that SINE CRM1 antagonists are a potential novel therapy for patients with MCL, particular in relapsed/refractory disease.

  6. Selective Accelerated Proliferation of Malignant Breast Cancer Cells on Planar Graphene Oxide Films.

    PubMed

    Kenry; Chaudhuri, Parthiv Kant; Loh, Kian Ping; Lim, Chwee Teck

    2016-03-22

    Graphene nanomaterials have been actively investigated for biomedical and biological applications, including that of cancer. Despite progress made, most of such studies are conducted on dispersed graphene nanosheets in solution. Consequently, the use of planar graphene films, especially in cancer research, has not been fully explored. Here, we investigate the cellular interactions between the graphene material films and breast cancer cell lines, specifically the effects these films have on cellular proliferation, spreading area, and cytotoxicity. We demonstrate that the graphene oxide (GO) film selectively accelerates the proliferation of both metastatic (MDA-MB-231) and nonmetastatic (MCF-7) breast cancer cells, but not that of noncancer breast epithelial cells (MCF-10A). Contrastingly, this accelerated proliferation is not observed with the use of graphene (G) film. Moreover, GO induces negligible cytotoxicity on these cells. We suggest that the observed phenomena originate from the synergistic effect resulted from the high loading capacity and conformational change of cellular attachment proteins on the GO film, and the high amount of oxygenated groups present in the material. We anticipate that our findings can further shed light on the graphene-cancer cellular interactions and provide better understanding for the future design and application of graphene-based nanomaterials in cancer research.

  7. Selectively Structural Determination of Cellulose and Hemicellulose in Plant Cell Wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Shih-Chun; Park, Yong; Cosgrove, Daniel; Maranas, Janna; Janna Maranas Team; Daniel Cosgrove Team

    2013-03-01

    Primary plant cell walls support the plant body, and regulate cell size, and plant growth. It contains several biopolymers that can be categorized into three groups: cellulose, hemicellulose and pectin. To determine the structure of plant cell wall, we use small angle neutron scattering in combination with selective deuteration and contrast matching method. We compare the structure between wild Arabidopsis thaliana and its xyloglucan-deficient mutant. Hemicellulose in both samples forms coil with similar radii of gyration, and weak scattering from the mutant suggests a limited amount of hemicellulose in the xyloglucan-deficient mutant. We observe good amount of hemicellulose coating on cellulose microfibrils only in wild Arabidopsis. The absence of coating in its xyloglucan-deficient mutation suggests the other polysaccharides do not have comparable interaction with cellulose. This highlights the importance of xyloglucan in plant cell wall. At larger scale, the average distance between cellulose fibril is found smaller than reported value, which directly reflects on their smaller matured plant size. U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Center for LignoCellulose Structure and Formation

  8. Oct1 and OCA-B are selectively required for CD4 memory T cell function.

    PubMed

    Shakya, Arvind; Goren, Alon; Shalek, Alex; German, Cody N; Snook, Jeremy; Kuchroo, Vijay K; Yosef, Nir; Chan, Raymond C; Regev, Aviv; Williams, Matthew A; Tantin, Dean

    2015-11-16

    Epigenetic changes are crucial for the generation of immunological memory. Failure to generate or maintain these changes will result in poor memory responses. Similarly, augmenting or stabilizing the correct epigenetic states offers a potential method of enhancing memory. Yet the transcription factors that regulate these processes are poorly defined. We find that the transcription factor Oct1 and its cofactor OCA-B are selectively required for the in vivo generation of CD4(+) memory T cells. More importantly, the memory cells that are formed do not respond properly to antigen reencounter. In vitro, both proteins are required to maintain a poised state at the Il2 target locus in resting but previously stimulated CD4(+) T cells. OCA-B is also required for the robust reexpression of multiple other genes including Ifng. ChIPseq identifies ∼50 differentially expressed direct Oct1 and OCA-B targets. We identify an underlying mechanism involving OCA-B recruitment of the histone lysine demethylase Jmjd1a to targets such as Il2, Ifng, and Zbtb32. The findings pinpoint Oct1 and OCA-B as central mediators of CD4(+) T cell memory.

  9. HGF/scatter factor selectively promotes cell invasion by increasing integrin avidity.

    PubMed

    Trusolino, L; Cavassa, S; Angelini, P; Andó, M; Bertotti, A; Comoglio, P M; Boccaccio, C

    2000-08-01

    Hepatocyte growth factor/scatter factor (HGF/SF) controls a genetic program known as 'invasive growth', which involves as critical steps cell adhesion, migration, and trespassing of basement membranes. We show here that in MDA-MB-231 carcinoma cells, these steps are elicited by HGF/SF but not by epidermal growth factor (EGF). Neither factor substantially alters the production or activity of extracellular matrix proteases. HGF/SF, but not EGF, selectively promotes cell adhesion on laminins 1 and 5, fibronectin, and vitronectin through a PI3-K-dependent mechanism. Increased adhesion is followed by enhanced invasiveness through isolated matrix proteins as well as through reconstituted basement membranes. Inhibition assays using function-blocking antibodies show that this phenomenon is mediated by multiple integrins including beta1, beta3, beta4, and beta5. HGF/SF triggers clustering of all these integrins at actin-rich adhesive sites and lamellipodia but does not quantitatively modify their membrane expression. These data suggest that HGF/SF promotes cell adhesion and invasiveness by increasing the avidity of integrins for their specific ligands.

  10. Selective targeting of IL-2 to NKG2D bearing cells for improved immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Ghasemi, Reza; Lazear, Eric; Wang, Xiaoli; Arefanian, Saeed; Zheleznyak, Alexander; Carreno, Beatriz M.; Higashikubo, Ryuji; Gelman, Andrew E.; Kreisel, Daniel; Fremont, Daved H.; Krupnick, Alexander Sasha

    2016-01-01

    Despite over 20 years of clinical use, IL-2 has not fulfilled expectations as a safe and effective form of tumour immunotherapy. Expression of the high affinity IL-2Rα chain on regulatory T cells mitigates the anti-tumour immune response and its expression on vascular endothelium is responsible for life threatening complications such as diffuse capillary leak and pulmonary oedema. Here we describe the development of a recombinant fusion protein comprised of a cowpox virus encoded NKG2D binding protein (OMCP) and a mutated form of IL-2 with poor affinity for IL-2Rα. This fusion protein (OMCP-mutIL-2) potently and selectively activates IL-2 signalling only on NKG2D-bearing cells, such as natural killer (NK) cells, without broadly activating IL-2Rα-bearing cells. OMCP-mutIL-2 provides superior tumour control in several mouse models of malignancy and is not limited by mouse strain-specific variability of NK function. In addition, OMCP-mutIL-2 lacks the toxicity and vascular complications associated with parental wild-type IL-2. PMID:27650575

  11. Selective targeting of IL-2 to NKG2D bearing cells for improved immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Ghasemi, Reza; Lazear, Eric; Wang, Xiaoli; Arefanian, Saeed; Zheleznyak, Alexander; Carreno, Beatriz M; Higashikubo, Ryuji; Gelman, Andrew E; Kreisel, Daniel; Fremont, Daved H; Krupnick, Alexander Sasha

    2016-09-21

    Despite over 20 years of clinical use, IL-2 has not fulfilled expectations as a safe and effective form of tumour immunotherapy. Expression of the high affinity IL-2Rα chain on regulatory T cells mitigates the anti-tumour immune response and its expression on vascular endothelium is responsible for life threatening complications such as diffuse capillary leak and pulmonary oedema. Here we describe the development of a recombinant fusion protein comprised of a cowpox virus encoded NKG2D binding protein (OMCP) and a mutated form of IL-2 with poor affinity for IL-2Rα. This fusion protein (OMCP-mutIL-2) potently and selectively activates IL-2 signalling only on NKG2D-bearing cells, such as natural killer (NK) cells, without broadly activating IL-2Rα-bearing cells. OMCP-mutIL-2 provides superior tumour control in several mouse models of malignancy and is not limited by mouse strain-specific variability of NK function. In addition, OMCP-mutIL-2 lacks the toxicity and vascular complications associated with parental wild-type IL-2.

  12. Folic acid-conjugated europium complexes as luminescent probes for selective targeting of cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Quici, Silvio; Casoni, Alessandro; Foschi, Francesca; Armelao, Lidia; Bottaro, Gregorio; Seraglia, Roberta; Bolzati, Cristina; Salvarese, Nicola; Carpanese, Debora; Rosato, Antonio

    2015-02-26

    We report the synthesis of three optical probes (Eu(3+)⊂1, Eu(3+)⊂2, and Eu(3+)⊂3) having a luminescent Eu complex (signaling unit) bonded in different positions to folic acid (FA), the folate receptor (FR) targeting unit. The structures of the two regioisomers Eu(3+)⊂1 and Eu(3+)⊂2 were assigned by mass spectrometric experiments. The optical properties and stability of these probes were assessed in phosphate-buffered saline, cell culture medium, rat serum, and cellular lysate, and results indicated that they are chemically and photophysically stable. Cytotoxicity was studied with ovarian cancer cells having high (SKOV-3), intermediate (OVCAR-3), low (IGROV-1), or null (A2780) expression of FRs. The internalized probe, evaluated in SKOV-3, IGROV-1, and A2780 cells, was in the order Eu(3+)⊂2 > Eu(3+)⊂1 > Eu(3+)⊂3. No internalization was observed for A2780 cells. Such results, together with those obtained in competition experiments of FA versus Eu(3+)⊂2 and FA or Eu(3+)⊂2 versus (3)H-FA, indicate that internalization is receptor-mediated and that Eu(3+)⊂2 shows high selectivity and specificity for FR.

  13. DEVELOPMENT AND SELECTION OF IONIC LIQUID ELECTROLYTES FOR HYDROXIDE CONDUCTING POLYBENZIMIDAZOLE MEMBRANES IN ALKALINE FUEL CELLS

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, E.

    2012-05-01

    Alkaline fuel cell (AFC) operation is currently limited to specialty applications such as low temperatures and pure HO due to the corrosive nature of the electrolyte and formation of carbonates. AFCs are the cheapest and potentially most efficient (approaching 70%) fuel cells. The fact that non-Pt catalysts can be used, makes them an ideal low cost alternative for power production. The anode and cathode are separated by and solid electrolyte or alkaline porous media saturated with KOH. However, CO from the atmosphere or fuel feed severely poisons the electrolyte by forming insoluble carbonates. The corrosivity of KOH (electrolyte) limits operating temperatures to no more than 80°C. This chapter examines the development of ionic liquids electrolytes that are less corrosive, have higher operating temperatures, do not chemically bond to CO and enable alternative fuels. Work is detailed on the IL selection and characterization as well as casting methods within the polybenzimidazole based solid membrane. This approach is novel as it targets the root of the problem (the electrolyte) unlike other current work in alkaline fuel cells which focus on making the fuel cell components more durable.

  14. Cooperative tin oxide fullerene electron selective layers for high-performance planar perovskite solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ke, Weijun; Zhao, Dewei; Xiao, Chuanxiao; Wang, Changlei; Cimaroli, Alexander J.; Grice, Corey R.; Yang, Mengjin; Li, Zhen; Jiang, Chun-Sheng; Al-Jassim, Mowafak; Zhu, Kai; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G.; Fang, Guojia; Yan, Yanfa

    2016-01-01

    Both tin oxide (SnO2) and fullerenes have been reported as electron selective layers (ESLs) for producing efficient lead halide perovskite solar cells. Here, we report that SnO2 and fullerenes can work cooperatively to further boost the performance of perovskite solar cells. We find that fullerenes can be redissolved during perovskite deposition, allowing ultra-thin fullerenes to be retained at the interface and some dissolved fullerenes infiltrate into perovskite grain boundaries. The SnO2 layer blocks holes effectively; whereas, the fullerenes promote electron transfer and passivate both the SnO2/perovskite interface and perovskite grain boundaries. With careful device optimization, the best-performing planar perovskite solar cell using a fullerene passivated SnO2 ESL has achieved a steady-state efficiency of 17.75% and a power conversion efficiency of 19.12% with an open circuit voltage of 1.12 V, a short-circuit current density of 22.61 mA cm-2, and a fill factor of 75.8% when measured under reverse voltage scanning. We find that the partial dissolving of fullerenes during perovskite deposition is the key for fabricating high-performance perovskite solar cells based on metal oxide/fullerene ESLs.

  15. Glucose microfluidic fuel cell based on silver bimetallic selective catalysts for on-chip applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuevas-Muñiz, F. M.; Guerra-Balcázar, M.; Esquivel, J. P.; Sabaté, N.; Arriaga, L. G.; Ledesma-García, J.

    2012-10-01

    A glucose microfluidic fuel cell with outstanding performance at zero flow condition is presented. Polarization tests showed that bimetallic materials based in silver (AuAg/C as anode, PtAg/C as cathode) exhibit tolerance to byproducts and crossover effect. This allowed achieving one of the highest power densities reported for glucose fuel cells, up to a value of 630 μW cm-2 using two separated laminar flows of reactants. Furthermore, the tolerance to crossover effect caused by the selectivity of PtAg/C to oxygen reduction reaction in presence of glucose permitted using a single flow containing a mixture of glucose/oxygen, yielding a performance as high as 270 μW cm-2. Microfluidic fuel cell was further evaluated with a simulated body fluid solution that contained salts commonly present in the human blood plasma, reaching a power of 240 μW cm-2 at zero flow. These results envisage the incorporation of this fuel cell as a portable power source in Lab-on-a-Chip devices without the need of external pumps.

  16. Selection and the cell cycle: positive Darwinian selection in a well-known DNA damage response pathway.

    PubMed

    O'Connell, Mary J

    2010-12-01

    Cancer is a common occurrence in multi-cellular organisms and is not strictly limited to the elderly in a population. It is therefore possible that individuals with genotypes that protect against early onset cancers have a selective advantage. In this study the patterns of mutation in the proteins of a well-studied DNA damage response pathway have been examined for evidence of adaptive evolutionary change. Using a maximum likelihood framework and the mammalian species phylogeny, together with codon models of evolution, selective pressure variation across the interacting network of proteins has been detected. The presence of signatures of adaptive evolution in BRCA1 and BRCA2 has already been documented but the effect on the entire network of interacting proteins in this damage response pathway has, until now, been unknown. Positive selection is evident throughout the network with a total of 11 proteins out of 15 examined displaying patterns of substitution characteristic of positive selection. It is also shown here that modern human populations display evidence of an ongoing selective sweep in 9 of these DNA damage repair proteins. The results presented here provide the community with new residues that may be relevant to cancer susceptibility while also highlighting those proteins where human and mouse have undergone lineage-specific functional shift. An understanding of this damage response pathway from an evolutionary perspective will undoubtedly contribute to future cancer treatment approaches.

  17. Identification of cytotoxic drugs that selectively target tumor cells with MYC overexpression.

    PubMed

    Frenzel, Anna; Zirath, Hanna; Vita, Marina; Albihn, Ami; Henriksson, Marie Arsenian

    2011-01-01

    Expression of MYC is deregulated in a wide range of human cancers, and is often associated with aggressive disease and poorly differentiated tumor cells. Identification of compounds with selectivity for cells overexpressing MYC would hence be beneficial for the treatment of these tumors. For this purpose we used cell lines with conditional MYCN or c-MYC expression, to screen a library of 80 conventional cytotoxic compounds for their ability to reduce tumor cell viability and/or growth in a MYC dependent way. We found that 25% of the studied compounds induced apoptosis and/or inhibited proliferation in a MYC-specific manner. The activities of the majority of these were enhanced both by c-MYC or MYCN over-expression. Interestingly, these compounds were acting on distinct cellular targets, including microtubules (paclitaxel, podophyllotoxin, vinblastine) and topoisomerases (10-hydroxycamptothecin, camptothecin, daunorubicin, doxorubicin, etoposide) as well as DNA, RNA and protein synthesis and turnover (anisomycin, aphidicholin, gliotoxin, MG132, methotrexate, mitomycin C). Our data indicate that MYC overexpression sensitizes cells to disruption of specific pathways and that in most cases c-MYC and MYCN overexpression have similar effects on the responses to cytotoxic compounds. Treatment of the cells with topoisomerase I inhibitors led to down-regulation of MYC protein levels, while doxorubicin and the small molecule MYRA-A was found to disrupt MYC-Max interaction. We conclude that the MYC pathway is only targeted by a subset of conventional cytotoxic drugs currently used in the clinic. Elucidating the mechanisms underlying their specificity towards MYC may be of importance for optimizing treatment of tumors with MYC deregulation. Our data also underscores that MYC is an attractive target for novel therapies and that cellular screenings of chemical libraries can be a powerful tool for identifying compounds with a desired biological activity.

  18. Macrophage secretory products selectively stimulate dermatan sulfate proteoglycan production in cultured arterial smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, I. J.; Wagner, W. D.; Owens, R. T.

    1990-01-01

    Arterial dermatan sulfate proteoglycan has been shown to increase with atherosclerosis progression, but factors responsible for this increase are unknown. To test the hypothesis that smooth muscle cell proteoglycan synthesis may be modified by macrophage products, pigeon arterial smooth muscle cells were exposed to the media of either cholesteryl ester-loaded pigeon peritoneal macrophages or a macrophage cell line P388D1. Proteoglycans radiolabeled with [35S]sulfate and [3H]serine were isolated from culture media and smooth muscle cells and purified following precipitation with 1-hexadecylpyridinium chloride and chromatography. Increasing concentrations of macrophage-conditioned media were associated with a dose-response increase in [35S]sulfate incorporation into secreted proteoglycans, but there was no change in cell-associated proteoglycans. Incorporation of [3H]serine into total proteoglycan core proteins was not significantly different (5.2 X 10(5) dpm and 5.5 X 10(5) disintegrations per minute (dpm) in control and conditioned media-treated cultures, respectively), but selective effects were observed on individual proteoglycan types. Twofold increases in dermatan sulfate proteoglycan and limited degradation of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan were apparent based on core proteins separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Immunoinhibition studies indicated that interleukin-1 was involved in the modulation of proteoglycan synthesis by macrophage-conditioned media. These data provide support for the role of macrophages in alteration of the matrix proteoglycans synthesized by smooth muscle cells and provide a mechanism to account for the reported increased dermatan sulfate/chondroitin sulfate ratios in the developing atherosclerotic lesion. Images Figure 6 PMID:2316626

  19. Substrate selectivity of diacylglycerol kinase in PDGF-stimulated 3T3 cells

    SciTech Connect

    MacDonald, M.L.; Mack, K.F.; Glomset, J.A.

    1987-05-01

    The authors investigated the properties of Diacylglycerol (DAG) Kinase in 3T3 cells. PDGF treatment caused an increase in DAG mass, an increase in incorporation of /sup 32/P into phosphatidic acid (PA) and phosphatidylinositol (PI), and an increase in the rate of phosphorylation of membrane DAG in vitro. The mechanism of enhanced phosphorylation of DAG was studied with dicaprylin (diC/sub 10/) as a probe. Cells were prelabeled with /sup 32/P and treated with PDGF or carrier. DiC/sub 10/ was added to the cell medium before harvesting. With PDGF treatment, the radioactivity in endogenous PA increased fourfold, whereas the radioactivity in PA/sub 10/ and PI/sub 10/ was consistently decreased. To verify that the PDGF effect on PA/sub 10/ formation in intact cells was due to reduced phosphorylation of diC/sub 10/ by DAG kinase, cells were treated with PDGF and/or diC/sub 10/, freeze-thawed, and then incubated with Mg(/sup 32/P)ATP. The rate of phosphorylation of cell-associated diC/sub 10/ was decreased 50% by PDGF treatment. This effect could not be explained by decreased intracellular levels of diC/sub 10/, or by saturation of DAG kinase with endogenous DAGs. Therefore, it seemed that endogenous DAGs, derived from PI, might be better substrates for DAG kinase than is diC/sub 10/. In studies of the properties of DAG kinase with pure DAGs in mixed detergent micelles, they found that the enzyme phosphorylated arachidonoyl-DAG more readily than diC/sub 10/. The selectivity of DAG kinase may play a key role in the formation of arachidonoyl species of PI.

  20. Macrophage secretory products selectively stimulate dermatan sulfate proteoglycan production in cultured arterial smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, I.J.; Wagner, W.D.; Owens, R.T. )

    1990-03-01

    Arterial dermatan sulfate proteoglycan has been shown to increase with atherosclerosis progression, but factors responsible for this increase are unknown. To test the hypothesis that smooth muscle cell proteoglycan synthesis may be modified by macrophage products, pigeon arterial smooth muscle cells were exposed to the media of either cholesteryl ester-loaded pigeon peritoneal macrophages or a macrophage cell line P388D1. Proteoglycans radiolabeled with (35S)sulfate and (3H)serine were isolated from culture media and smooth muscle cells and purified following precipitation with 1-hexadecylpyridinium chloride and chromatography. Increasing concentrations of macrophage-conditioned media were associated with a dose-response increase in (35S)sulfate incorporation into secreted proteoglycans, but there was no change in cell-associated proteoglycans. Incorporation of (3H)serine into total proteoglycan core proteins was not significantly different (5.2 X 10(5) dpm and 5.5 X 10(5) disintegrations per minute (dpm) in control and conditioned media-treated cultures, respectively), but selective effects were observed on individual proteoglycan types. Twofold increases in dermatan sulfate proteoglycan and limited degradation of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan were apparent based on core proteins separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Immunoinhibition studies indicated that interleukin-1 was involved in the modulation of proteoglycan synthesis by macrophage-conditioned media. These data provide support for the role of macrophages in alteration of the matrix proteoglycans synthesized by smooth muscle cells and provide a mechanism to account for the reported increased dermatan sulfate/chondroitin sulfate ratios in the developing atherosclerotic lesion.

  1. Innate-like CD4 T cells selected by thymocytes suppress adaptive immune responses against bacterial infections

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Yu; Gray, Brian M.; Sofi, Mohammed H.; Bauler, Laura D.; Eaton, Kathryn A.; O'Riordan, Mary X. D.; Chang, Cheong-Hee

    2012-01-01

    We have reported a new innate-like CD4 T cell population that expresses cell surface makers of effector/memory cells and produce Th1 and Th2 cytokines immediately upon activation. Unlike conventional CD4 T cells that are selected by thymic epithelial cells, these CD4 T cells, named T-CD4 T cells, are selected by MHC class II expressing thymocytes. Previously, we showed that the presence of T-CD4 T cells protected mice from airway inflammation suggesting an immune regulatory role of T-CD4 T cells. To further understand the function of T-CD4 T cells, we investigated immune responses mediated by T-CD4 T cells during bacterial infection because the generation of antigen specific CD4 T cells contributes to clearance of infection and for the development of immune memory. The current study shows a suppressive effect of T-CD4 T cells on both CD8 and CD4 T cell-mediated immune responses during Listeria and Helicobacter infections. In the mouse model of Listeria monocytogenes infection, T-CD4 T cells resulted in decreasedfrequency of Listeria-specific CD8 T cells and the killing activity of them. Furthermore, mice with T-CD4 T cells developed poor immune memory, demonstrated by reduced expansion of antigen-specific T cells and high bacterial burden upon re-infection. Similarly, the presence of T-CD4 T cells suppressed the generation of antigen-specific CD4 T cells in Helicobacter pylori infected mice. Thus, our studies reveal a novel function of T-CD4 T cells in suppressing anti-bacterial immunity. PMID:23264931

  2. Cell Selection Game for Densely-Deployed Sensor and Mobile Devices In 5G Networks Integrating Heterogeneous Cells and the Internet of Things.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lusheng; Wang, Yamei; Ding, Zhizhong; Wang, Xiumin

    2015-09-18

    With the rapid development of wireless networking technologies, the Internet of Things and heterogeneous cellular networks (HCNs) tend to be integrated to form a promising wireless network paradigm for 5G. Hyper-dense sensor and mobile devices will be deployed under the coverage of heterogeneous cells, so that each of them could freely select any available cell covering it and compete for resource with others selecting the same cell, forming a cell selection (CS) game between these devices. Since different types of cells usually share the same portion of the spectrum, devices selecting overlapped cells can experience severe inter-cell interference (ICI). In this article, we study the CS game among a large amount of densely-deployed sensor and mobile devices for their uplink transmissions in a two-tier HCN. ICI is embedded with the traditional congestion game (TCG), forming a congestion game with ICI (CGI) and a congestion game with capacity (CGC). For the three games above, we theoretically find the circular boundaries between the devices selecting the macrocell and those selecting the picocells, indicated by the pure strategy Nash equilibria (PSNE). Meanwhile, through a number of simulations with different picocell radii and different path loss exponents, the collapse of the PSNE impacted by severe ICI (i.e., a large number of picocell devices change their CS preferences to the macrocell) is profoundly revealed, and the collapse points are identified.

  3. Cell Selection Game for Densely-Deployed Sensor and Mobile Devices In 5G Networks Integrating Heterogeneous Cells and the Internet of Things

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lusheng; Wang, Yamei; Ding, Zhizhong; Wang, Xiumin

    2015-01-01

    With the rapid development of wireless networking technologies, the Internet of Things and heterogeneous cellular networks (HCNs) tend to be integrated to form a promising wireless network paradigm for 5G. Hyper-dense sensor and mobile devices will be deployed under the coverage of heterogeneous cells, so that each of them could freely select any available cell covering it and compete for resource with others selecting the same cell, forming a cell selection (CS) game between these devices. Since different types of cells usually share the same portion of the spectrum, devices selecting overlapped cells can experience severe inter-cell interference (ICI). In this article, we study the CS game among a large amount of densely-deployed sensor and mobile devices for their uplink transmissions in a two-tier HCN. ICI is embedded with the traditional congestion game (TCG), forming a congestion game with ICI (CGI) and a congestion game with capacity (CGC). For the three games above, we theoretically find the circular boundaries between the devices selecting the macrocell and those selecting the picocells, indicated by the pure strategy Nash equilibria (PSNE). Meanwhile, through a number of simulations with different picocell radii and different path loss exponents, the collapse of the PSNE impacted by severe ICI (i.e., a large number of picocell devices change their CS preferences to the macrocell) is profoundly revealed, and the collapse points are identified. PMID:26393617

  4. Treating triple negative breast cancer cells with erlotinib plus a select antioxidant overcomes drug resistance by targeting cancer cell heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Bin; Mitrea, Cristina; Wijesinghe, Priyanga; Marchetti, Luca; Girsch, Emily; Farr, Rebecca L.; Boerner, Julie L; Mohammad, Ramzi; Dyson, Greg; Terlecky, Stanley R.; Bollig-Fischer, Aliccia

    2017-01-01

    Among breast cancer patients, those diagnosed with the triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) subtype have the worst prog-nosis. TNBC does not express estrogen receptor-alpha, progesterone receptor, or the HER2 oncogene; therefore, TNBC lacks targets for molecularly-guided therapies. The concept that EGFR oncogene inhibitor drugs could be used as targeted treatment against TNBC has been put forth based on estimates that 30–60% of TNBC express high levels of EGFR. However, results from clinical trials testing EGFR inhibitors, alone or in combination with cytotoxic chemotherapy, did not improve patient outcomes. Results herein offer an explanation as to why EGFR inhibitors failed TNBC patients and support how combining a select antioxidant and an EGFR-specific small molecule kinase inhibitor (SMKI) could be an effective, novel therapeutic strategy. Treatment with CAT-SKL—a re-engineered protein form of the antioxidant enzyme catalase—inhibited cancer stem-like cells (CSCs), and treatment with the EGFR-specific SMKI erlotinib inhibited non-CSCs. Thus, combining the antioxidant CAT-SKL with erlotinib targeted both CSCs and bulk cancer cells in cultures of EGFR-expressing TNBC-derived cells. We also report evidence that the mechanism for CAT-SKL inhibition of CSCs may depend on antioxidant-induced downregulation of a short alternative mRNA splicing variant of the methyl-CpG binding domain 2 gene, isoform MBD2c. PMID:28281569

  5. IL-4 abrogates TH17 cell-mediated inflammation by selective silencing of IL-23 in antigen-presenting cells

    PubMed Central

    Guenova, Emmanuella; Skabytska, Yuliya; Hoetzenecker, Wolfram; Weindl, Günther; Sauer, Karin; Tham, Manuela; Kim, Kyu-Won; Park, Ji-Hyeon; Seo, Ji Hae; Ignatova, Desislava; Cozzio, Antonio; Levesque, Mitchell P.; Volz, Thomas; Köberle, Martin; Kaesler, Susanne; Thomas, Peter; Mailhammer, Reinhard; Ghoreschi, Kamran; Schäkel, Knut; Amarov, Boyko; Eichner, Martin; Schaller, Martin; Clark, Rachael A.; Röcken, Martin; Biedermann, Tilo

    2015-01-01

    Interleukin 4 (IL-4) can suppress delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions (DTHRs), including organ-specific autoimmune diseases in mice and humans. Despite the broadly documented antiinflammatory effect of IL-4, the underlying mode of action remains incompletely understood, as IL-4 also promotes IL-12 production by dendritic cells (DCs) and IFN-γ–producing TH1 cells in vivo. Studying the impact of IL-4 on the polarization of human and mouse DCs, we found that IL-4 exerts opposing effects on the production of either IL-12 or IL-23. While promoting IL-12–producing capacity of DCs, IL-4 completely abrogates IL-23. Bone marrow chimeras proved that IL-4–mediated suppression of DTHRs relies on the signal transducer and activator of transcription 6 (STAT6)-dependent abrogation of IL-23 in antigen-presenting cells. Moreover, IL-4 therapy attenuated DTHRs