Science.gov

Sample records for o-rings

  1. O-Ring-Testing Fixture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, James E.; Mccluney, D. Scott

    1991-01-01

    Fixture tests O-rings for sealing ability under dynamic conditions after extended periods of compression. Hydraulic cylinder moves plug in housing. Taper of 15 degrees on plug and cavity of housing ensures that gap created between O-ring under test and wall of cavity. Secondary O-rings above and below test ring maintain pressure applied to test ring. Evaluates effects of variety of parameters, including temperature, pressure, rate of pressurization, rate and magnitude of radial gap movement, and pretest compression time.

  2. Conical O-ring seal

    DOEpatents

    Chalfant, Jr., Gordon G.

    1984-01-01

    A shipping container for radioactive or other hazardous materials which has a conical-shaped closure containing grooves in the conical surface thereof and an O-ring seal incorporated in each of such grooves. The closure and seal provide a much stronger, tighter and compact containment than with a conventional flanged joint.

  3. Conical O-ring seal

    DOEpatents

    Chalfant, G.G. Jr.

    A shipping container for radioactive or other hazardous materials has a conical-shaped closure containing grooves in the conical surface thereof and an O-ring seal incorporated in each of such grooves. The closure and seal provide a much stronger, tighter and compact containment than with a conventional flanged joint.

  4. Nitrile O-ring Cracking: A Case of Vacuum Flange O-ring Failures

    SciTech Connect

    Dees, Craig

    2016-07-01

    A review of recent nitrile O-ring failures in ISO-KF vacuum flange connections in glovebox applications is presented. An investigation of a single “isolated” o-ring failure leads to the discovery of cracked nitrile o-rings in a glovebox atmospheric control unit. The initial cause of the o-ring failure is attributed to ozone degradation. However, additional investigation reveals nitrile o-ring cracking on multiple gloveboxes and general purpose piping, roughly 85% of the nitrile o-rings removed for inspection show evidence of visible cracking after being in service for 18 months or less. The results of material testing and ambient air testing is presented, elevatedmore » ozone levels are not found. The contributing factors of o-ring failure, including nitrile air sensitivity, inadequate storage practices, and poor installation techniques, are discussed. A discussion of nitrile o-ring material properties, the benefits and limitations, and alternate materials are discussed. Considerations for o-ring material selection, purchasing, storage, and installation are presented in the context of lessons learned from the nitrile o-ring cracking investigation. This paper can be presented in 20 minutes and does not require special accommodations or special audio visual devices.« less

  5. Fluorosilicone and silicone o-ring aging study.

    SciTech Connect

    Bernstein, Robert; Gillen, Kenneth T.

    2007-10-01

    Fluorosilicone o-ring aging studies were performed. These studies examined the compressive force loss of fluorosilicone o-rings at accelerated (elevated) temperatures and were then used to make predictions about force loss at room temperature. The results were non-Arrhenius with evidence for a lowering in Arrhenius activation energies as the aging temperature was reduced. The compression set of these fluorosilicone o-rings was found to have a reasonably linear correlation with the force loss. The aging predictions based on using the observed curvature of the Arrhenius aging plots were validated by field aged o-rings that yielded degradation values reasonably close to the predictions.more » Compression set studies of silicone o-rings from a previous study resulted in good correlation to the force loss predictions for the fluorosilicone o-rings from this study. This resulted in a preliminary conclusion that an approximately linear correlation exists between compression set and force decay values for typical fluorosilicone and silicone materials, and that the two materials age at similar rates at low temperatures. Interestingly, because of the observed curvature of the Arrhenius plots available from longer-term, lower temperature accelerated exposures, both materials had faster force decay curves (and correspondingly faster buildup of compression set) at room temperature than anticipated from typical high-temperature exposures. A brief study on heavily filled conducting silicone o-rings resulted in data that deviated from the linear relationship, implying that a degree of caution must be exercised about any general statement relating force decay and compression set.« less

  6. Note: O-ring stack system for electron gun alignment.

    PubMed

    Park, In-Yong; Cho, Boklae; Han, Cheolsu; Shin, Seungmin; Lee, Dongjun; Ahn, Sang Jung

    2015-01-01

    We present a reliable method for aligning an electron gun which consists of an electron source and lenses by controlling a stack of rubber O-rings in a vacuum condition. The beam direction angle is precisely tilted along two axes by adjusting the height difference of a stack of O-rings. In addition, the source position is shifted in each of three orthogonal directions. We show that the tilting angle and linear shift along the x and y axes as obtained from ten stacked O-rings are ±2.55° and ±2 mm, respectively. This study can easily be adapted to charged particle gun alignment and adjustments of the flange position in a vacuum, ensuring that its results can be useful with regard to electrical insulation between flanges with slight modifications.

  7. Note: O-ring stack system for electron gun alignment

    SciTech Connect

    Park, In-Yong; Cho, Boklae; Han, Cheolsu

    We present a reliable method for aligning an electron gun which consists of an electron source and lenses by controlling a stack of rubber O-rings in a vacuum condition. The beam direction angle is precisely tilted along two axes by adjusting the height difference of a stack of O-rings. In addition, the source position is shifted in each of three orthogonal directions. We show that the tilting angle and linear shift along the x and y axes as obtained from ten stacked O-rings are ±2.55° and ±2 mm, respectively. This study can easily be adapted to charged particle gun alignmentmore » and adjustments of the flange position in a vacuum, ensuring that its results can be useful with regard to electrical insulation between flanges with slight modifications.« less

  8. Composite correlation filter for O-ring detection in stationary colored noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassebrook, Laurence G.

    2009-04-01

    O-rings are regularly replaced in aircraft and if they are not replaced or if they are installed improperly, they can result in catastrophic failure of the aircraft. It is critical that the o-rings be packaged correctly to avoid mistakes made by technicians during routine maintenance. For this reason, fines may be imposed on the o-ring manufacturer if the o-rings are packaged incorrectly. That is, a single o-ring must be packaged and labeled properly. No o-rings or more than one o-ring per package is not acceptable. We present an industrial inspection system based on real-time composite correlation filtering that has successfully solved this problem in spite of opaque paper o-ring packages. We present the system design including the composite filter design.

  9. Development and Evaluation of Phosphonitrilic Fluoroelastomer O-Rings.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-04-01

    and having the following formula: c 0CH2(CF2$CF2H n 1 The polymer contained svfflclent cure sites to attain good curability with mnvent~onai...cable with phosphonitrilic fluoroelastomer compounds. A good quality coating of approximately 0,031" thickness was obtained by passing the cable through...extreme low temperature flexibility, outstanding fluid resistance, good heat resis- tance and good dynnmic properties. O-ring seals are one such

  10. Tritium, deuterium, and helium permeation through EPDM O-rings

    SciTech Connect

    Swansiger, W.A.

    1992-03-01

    This paper discusses tritium permeabilities determined at room temperature, 1.0 MPa (150 psia) tritium for three 23.4 cm diameter EPDM (ethylene-propylene-diene monomer) O-rings using a full-scale mock-up of the Al-SX shipping container seal geometry. The AL-SX container is being developed by Sandia National Laboratories for shipping tritium reservoirs. To determine the tritium permeation rate as a function of temperature, a 50.8 mm diameter EPDM O-ring was tested from room temperature to 150{degrees}C at a pressure of 1.0 MPa. Additional permeation measurements were made under the following test conditions: deuterium and helium-4 at room temperature and a pressure of 1.0 MPamore » using the full-scale AL-SX fixture, tritium from 0.1 MPa to 1.0 MPa at 142{degrees}C using the 50.8 mm fixture, and deuterium form room temperature to 150{degrees}C at a pressure of 1.0 MPa using the three full-scale O-rings showed the average room temperature, 1.0 MPa steady state tritium permeation rate to be about 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}2} Pa-liter/sec (7.6 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} torr-liter/sec or 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} std cc/sec), well within the allowable limit of 7.1 {times} 10{sup {minus}2} Pa-liter/sec for tritium release form the AL-SX container.« less

  11. Viscoelastic properties of elastomeric materials for O-ring applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bower, Mark V.

    1989-01-01

    Redesign of the Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Booster necessitated re-evaluation of the material used in the field joint O-ring seals. This research project was established to determine the viscoelastic characteristics of five candidate materials. The five materials are: two fluorocarbon compounds, two nitrile compounds, and a silicon compound. The materials were tested in a uniaxial compression test to determine the characteristic relaxation functions. These tests were performed at five different temperatures. A master material curve was developed for each material from the experimental data. The results of this study are compared to tensile relaxation tests. Application of these results to the design analysis is discussed in detail.

  12. O-Ring sealing arrangements for ultra-high vacuum systems

    DOEpatents

    Kim, Chang-Kyo; Flaherty, Robert

    1981-01-01

    An all metal reusable O-ring sealing arrangement for sealing two concentric tubes in an ultra-high vacuum system. An O-ring of a heat recoverable alloy such as Nitinol is concentrically positioned between protruding sealing rings of the concentric tubes. The O-ring is installed between the tubes while in a stressed martensitic state and is made to undergo a thermally induced transformation to an austenitic state. During the transformation the O-ring expands outwardly and contracts inwardly toward a previously sized austenitic configuration, thereby sealing against the protruding sealing rings of the concentric tubes.

  13. Inflatable O-ring seal would ease closing of hatch cover plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neary, K. J.

    1966-01-01

    Inflatable O-ring seal provides positive sealing means that does not require the manual exertion of a large compressive force during opening or closing of a rotary-type hatch cover plate. The O-ring is deflated during opening and closing and inflated after closure by a gas pressure source.

  14. Butyl rubber O-ring seals: Revision of test procedures for stockpile materials

    SciTech Connect

    Domeier, L.A.; Wagter, K.R.

    1996-12-01

    Extensive testing showed little correlation between test slab and O-ring performance. New procedures, comparable to those used with the traditional test slabs, were defined for hardness, compression set, and tensile property testing on sacrificial O-ring specimens. Changes in target performance values were made as needed and were, in one case, tightened to reflect the O-ring performance data. An additional study was carried out on O-ring and slab performance vs cure cycle and showed little sensitivity of material performance to large changes in curing time. Aging and spectra of certain materials indicated that two sets of test slabs from current vendormore » were accidently made from EPDM rather than butyl rubber. Random testing found no O-rings made from EPDM. As a result, and additional spectroscope test will be added to the product acceptance procedures to verify the type of rubber compound used.« less

  15. The Influence of Hoop Diameter on Aerodynamic Performance of O-Ring Paper Plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail, N. I.; Sharudin, Hazim; Talib, R. J.; Hassan, A. A.; Yusoff, H.

    2018-05-01

    The O-ring paper plane can be categorized as one of the Micro Air Vehicle (MAV) based on their characteristics and size. However, the aerodynamics performance of the O-ring paper plane was not fully discovered by previous researchers due to its aerodynamics complexity and various hoop diameters. Thus, the objective of this research is to study the influence of hoop diameters towards the aerodynamics performance of O-ring paper plane. In this works, three types of O-ring paper plane known as Design 1, 2 and 3 with different hoop diameter were initially developed by using the ANSYS-Design Modeler. All the design was analyzed based on aerodynamic simulations works executed on ANSYS-CFX solver. The results suggested that Design 3 (with larger hoop size) produced better CL, CLmax and AoAstall magnitude compared to other design. In fact, O-ring paper plane with larger hoop size configurations showed potential in providing at least 5.2% and 5.9% better performance in stability (ΔCM/ΔCL) and aerodynamic efficiency (CL/CDmax), respectively. Despite the advantages found in lift performances, however, O-ring paper plane with larger hoop size configurations slightly suffered from larger drag increment (CDincrement) compared to smaller hoop size configurations. Based on these results, it can be presumed that O-Ring paper plane with larger hoop sizes contributed into better lift, stability and aerodynamic efficiency performances but slightly suffered from larger drag penalty.

  16. FY2017 status report: Model 9975 O-ring fixture long-term leak performance

    SciTech Connect

    Daugherty, W. L.

    A series of experiments to monitor the aging performance of Viton® GLT and GLT-S O-rings used in the Model 9975 shipping package has been ongoing since 2004 at the Savannah River National Laboratory. One approach has been to periodically evaluate the leak performance of O-rings being aged in mock-up 9975 Primary Containment Vessels (PCVs) at elevated temperature. Other methods such as compression-stress relaxation (CSR) tests and field surveillance are also on-going to evaluate O-ring behavior. Seventy tests using PCV mock-ups with GLT O-rings were assembled and heated to temperatures ranging from 200 to 450 ºF. They were leak-tested initially andmore » have been tested periodically to determine if they continue to meet the leak-tightness criterion defined in ANSI standard N14.5-97. Due to material substitution, a smaller test matrix with fourteen additional tests was initiated in 2008 with GLT-S O-rings heated to temperatures ranging from 200 to 400 ºF. Leak test failures have been experienced in all of the GLT O-ring fixtures aging at 350 ºF and higher temperatures, and in 8 fixtures aging at 300 ºF. The 300 °F GLT O-ring fixtures failed after 2.8 to 5.7 years at temperature. The remaining GLT O-ring fixtures aging at 300 ºF were retired from testing following more than 5 years at temperature without failure. No failures have yet been observed in GLT O-ring fixtures aging at 200 ºF for 9 to 10.5 years, or in GLT O-ring fixtures aging at 270 ºF for 5.7 years. These aging temperatures bound O-ring temperatures anticipated during normal storage in K-Area Complex (KAC). Leak test failures have been experienced in all of the GLT-S O-ring fixtures aging at 300 ºF and above. No failures have yet been observed in GLT-S O-ring fixtures aging at 200 and 250 ºF for 6.9 to 7.5 years. Data from the O-ring fixtures are generally consistent with results from compression stress relaxation testing, and provide confidence in the predictive models based on those

  17. SEVENTH INTERIM STATUS REPORT: MODEL 9975 PCV O-RING FIXTURE LONG-TERM LEAK PERFORMANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Daugherty, W.

    2012-08-30

    A series of experiments to monitor the aging performance of Viton® GLT O-rings used in the Model 9975 package has been ongoing since 2004 at the Savannah River National Laboratory. Seventy tests using mock-ups of 9975 Primary Containment Vessels (PCVs) were assembled and heated to temperatures ranging from 200 to 450 ºF. They were leak-tested initially and have been tested periodically to determine if they meet the criterion of leak-tightness defined in ANSI standard N14.5-97. Fourteen additional tests were initiated in 2008 with GLT-S O-rings heated to temperatures ranging from 200 to 400 ºF. High temperature aging continues for 23more » GLT O-ring fixtures at 200 – 270 ºF. Room temperature leak test failures have been experienced in all of the GLT O-ring fixtures aging at 350 ºF and higher temperatures, and in 8 fixtures aging at 300 ºF. The remaining GLT O-ring fixtures aging at 300 ºF have been retired from testing following more than 5 years at temperature without failure. No failures have yet been observed in GLT O-ring fixtures aging at 200 ºF for 54-72 months, which is still bounding to O-ring temperatures during storage in K-Area Complex (KAC). Based on expectations that the fixtures aging at 200 ºF will remain leak-tight for a significant period yet to come, 2 additional fixtures began aging in 2011 at an intermediate temperature of 270 ºF, with hopes that they may reach a failure condition before the 200 ºF fixtures. High temperature aging continues for 6 GLT-S O-ring fixtures at 200 – 300 ºF. Room temperature leak test failures have been experienced in all 8 of the GLT-S O-ring fixtures aging at 350 and 400 ºF. No failures have yet been observed in GLT-S O-ring fixtures aging at 200 - 300 ºF for 30 - 36 months. For O-ring fixtures that have failed the room temperature leak test and been disassembled, the O-rings displayed a compression set ranging from 51 – 96%. This is greater than seen to date for any packages inspected during

  18. NINTH INTERIM STATUS REPORT: MODEL 9975 PCV O-RING FIXTURE LONG-TERM LEAK PERFORMANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Daugherty, W.

    2014-08-06

    A series of experiments to monitor the aging performance of Viton® GLT O-rings used in the Model 9975 package has been ongoing since 2004 at the Savannah River National Laboratory. One approach has been to periodically evaluate the leak performance of O-rings being aged in mock-up 9975 Primary Containment Vessels (PCVs) at elevated temperatures. Other methods such as compression-stress relaxation (CSR) tests and field surveillance are also on-going to evaluate O-ring behavior. Seventy tests using PCV mock-ups were assembled and heated to temperatures ranging from 200 to 450 ºF. They were leak-tested initially and have been tested periodically to determinemore » if they continue to meet the leak-tightness criterion defined in ANSI standard N14.5-97. Due to material substitution, fourteen additional tests were initiated in 2008 with GLT-S O-rings heated to temperatures ranging from 200 to 400 ºF. High temperature aging continues for 23 GLT O-ring fixtures at 200 – 270 ºF. Room temperature leak test failures have been experienced in all of the GLT O-ring fixtures aging at 350 ºF and higher temperatures, and in 8 fixtures aging at 300 ºF. The earliest 300 °F GLT O-ring fixture failure was observed at 34 months. The remaining GLT O-ring fixtures aging at 300 ºF have been retired from testing following more than 5 years at temperature without failure. No failures have yet been observed in GLT O-ring fixtures aging at 200 ºF for 72 - 96 months, which bounds O-ring temperatures anticipated during storage in K-Area Complex (KAC). Based on expectations that the 200 ºF fixtures will remain leak-tight for a significant period yet to come, 2 additional fixtures began aging in 2011 at 270 ºF, with hopes that they may reach a failure condition before the 200 ºF fixtures, thus providing additional time to failure data. High temperature aging continues for 6 GLT-S O-ring fixtures at 200 – 300 ºF. Room temperature leak test failures have been experienced in all 8

  19. EIGHTH INTERIM STATUS REPORT: MODEL 9975 PCV O-RING FIXTURE LONG-TERM LEAK PERFORMANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Daugherty, W. L.

    2013-09-03

    A series of experiments to monitor the aging performance of Viton® GLT O-rings used in the Model 9975 package has been ongoing since 2004 at the Savannah River National Laboratory. Seventy tests using mock-ups of 9975 Primary Containment Vessels (PCVs) were assembled and heated to temperatures ranging from 200 to 450 ºF. They were leak-tested initially and have been tested periodically to determine if they meet the criterion of leak-tightness defined in ANSI standard N14.5-97. Fourteen additional tests were initiated in 2008 with GLT-S O-rings heated to temperatures ranging from 200 to 400 ºF. High temperature aging continues for 23more » GLT O-ring fixtures at 200 – 270 ºF. Room temperature leak test failures have been experienced in all of the GLT O-ring fixtures aging at 350 ºF and higher temperatures, and in 8 fixtures aging at 300 ºF. The remaining GLT O-ring fixtures aging at 300 ºF have been retired from testing following more than 5 years at temperature without failure. No failures have yet been observed in GLT O-ring fixtures aging at 200 ºF for 61 - 85 months, which is still bounding to O-ring temperatures during storage in KArea Complex (KAC). Based on expectations that the fixtures aging at 200 ºF will remain leaktight for a significant period yet to come, 2 additional fixtures began aging in 2011 at an intermediate temperature of 270 ºF, with hopes that they may reach a failure condition before the 200 ºF fixtures. High temperature aging continues for 6 GLT-S O-ring fixtures at 200 – 300 ºF. Room temperature leak test failures have been experienced in all 8 of the GLT-S O-ring fixtures aging at 350 and 400 ºF. No failures have yet been observed in GLT-S O-ring fixtures aging at 200 - 300 ºF for 41 - 45 months. Aging and periodic leak testing will continue for the remaining PCV fixtures.« less

  20. SIXTH INTERIM STATUS REPORT: MODEL 9975 PCV O-RING FIXTURE LONG-TERM LEAK PERFORMANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Daugherty, W.

    2011-08-31

    A series of experiments to monitor the aging performance of Viton{reg_sign} GLT O-rings used in the Model 9975 package has been ongoing for seven years at the Savannah River National Laboratory. Seventy tests using mock-ups of 9975 Primary Containment Vessels (PCVs) were assembled and heated to temperatures ranging from 200 to 450 F. They were leak-tested initially and have been tested periodically to determine if they meet the criterion of leak-tightness defined in ANSI standard N14.5-97. Fourteen additional tests were initiated in 2008 with GLT-S O-rings heated to temperatures ranging from 200 to 400 F. High temperature aging continues formore » 33 GLT O-ring fixtures at 200-300 F. Room temperature leak test failures have been experienced in all of the GLT O-ring fixtures aging at 350 F and higher temperatures, and in 7 fixtures aging at 300 F. No failures have yet been observed in GLT O-ring fixtures aging at 200 F for 41-60 months, which is still bounding to O-ring temperatures during storage in K-Area Complex (KAC). Based on expectations that the fixtures aging at 200 F will remain leak-tight for a significant period yet to come, 2 additional fixtures began aging within the past year at an intermediate temperature of 270 F, with hopes that they may leak before the 200 F fixtures. High temperature aging continues for 6 GLT-S O-ring fixtures at 200-300 F. Room temperature leak test failures have been experienced in all 8 of the GLT-S O-ring fixtures aging at 350 and 400 F. No failures have yet been observed in GLT-S O-ring fixtures aging at 200-300 F for up to 26 months. For O-ring fixtures that have failed the room temperature leak test and been disassembled, the Orings displayed a compression set ranging from 51-96%. This is greater than seen to date for packages inspected during KAC field surveillance (24% average). For GLT O-rings, separate service life estimates have been made based on the O-ring fixture leak test data and based on compression stress

  1. Crosslinking of SAVY-4000 O-rings as a Function of Aging Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Van Buskirk, Caleb Griffith

    SAVY-4000 containers were developed as a part of DOE M 441.1-1 to protect workers who handle stored nuclear material from exposure due to loss of containment.1 The SAVY-4000 is comprised of three parts: a lid, a container, and a cross-linked fluoropolymer O-ring. Degradation of the O-ring during use could limit the lifetime of the SAVY-4000. In order to quantify the chemical changes of the Oring over time, the molecular weight between crosslinks was determined as a function of aging conditions using a swelling technique. Because the O-ring is a cross-linked polymer, it will absorb solvent into its matrix without dissolving.more » The relative amount of solvent uptake can be related to the degree of crosslinking using an equation developed by Paul Flory and John Rehner Jr3. This method was used to analyze O-ring samples aged under thermal and ionizing-radiation conditions. It was found that at the harsher thermal gaining conditions in absence of ionizing-radiation the average molecular weight between crosslinks decreased, indicating a rise in crosslinks, which may be attributable to advanced aging with no ionizing radiation present. Inversely, in the presence of ionizing radiation it was found that material has a higher level of cross-linking with age. This information could be used to help predict the lifetime of the O-rings in SAVY-4000 containers under service conditions.« less

  2. Grease-Resistant O Rings for Joints in Solid Rocket Motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harvey, Albert R.; Feldman, Harold

    2003-01-01

    There is a continuing effort to develop improved O rings for sealing joints in solid-fuel rocket motors. Following an approach based on the lessons learned in the explosion of the space shuttle Challenger, investigators have been seeking O-ring materials that exhibit adequate resilience for effective sealing over a broad temperature range: What are desired are O rings that expand far and fast enough to maintain seals, even when metal sealing surfaces at a joint move slightly away from each other shortly after ignition and the motor was exposed to cold weather before ignition. Other qualities desired of the improved O rings include adequate resistance to ablation by hot rocket gases and resistance to swelling when exposed to hydrocarbon-based greases used to protect some motor components against corrosion. Five rubber formulations two based on a fluorosilicone polymer and three based on copolymers of epichlorohydrin with ethylene oxide were tested as candidate O-ring materials. Of these, one of the epichlorohydrin/ethylene oxide formulations was found to offer the closest to the desired combination of properties and was selected for further evaluation.

  3. REVIEW OF AGING DATA ON EPDM O-RINGS IN THE H1616 SHIPPING PACKAGE

    SciTech Connect

    Skidmore, E.

    Currently, all H1616 shipping package containers undergo annual re-verification testing, including containment vessel leak testing to verify leak-tightness (<1 x 10{sup -7} ref cc/sec air) as per ANSI N14.5. The purpose of this literature review is to supplement aging studies currently being performed by SRNL on the EPDM O-rings to provide the technical basis for extending annual re-verification testing for the H1616 shipping package and to predict the life of the seals at bounding service conditions. The available data suggest that the EPDM O-rings can retain significant mechanical properties and sealing force at or below bounding service temperatures (169 Fmore » or 76 C) beyond the 1 year maintenance period. Interpretation of available data suggests that a service life of at least 2 years and potentially 4-6 years may be possible at bounding temperatures. Seal lifetimes at lower, more realistic temperatures will likely be longer. Being a hydrocarbon elastomer, EPDM O-rings may exhibit an inhibition period due to the presence of antioxidants. Once antioxidants are consumed, mechanical properties and seal performance could decline at a faster rate. Testing is being performed to validate the assumptions outlined in this report and to assess the long-term performance of O-ring seals under actual service conditions.« less

  4. Aging of Weapon Seals – An Update on Butyl O-ring Issues

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, Mark H.

    2011-07-13

    During testing under the Enhanced Surveillance Campaign in 2001, preliminary data detected a previously unknown and potentially serious concern with recently procured butyl o-rings on several programs. All butyl o-rings molded from a proprietary formulation throughout the period circa 1999 through 2001 had less than a full cure. Engineering judgment was that under curing is detrimental and could possibly lead to sub-optimum performance or, in the worst case, premature seal failure. An aging study was undertaken to ensure that suspect o-rings installed in the stockpile will retain sufficient sealing force for a minimum ten-year service life. A new prediction modelmore » developed for this study indicates suspect o-rings do not need to be replaced before the ten-year service life. Long-term testing results are reported on a yearly basis to validate the prediction model. This report documents the aging results for the period September 2002 to January 2011.« less

  5. Eleventh interim status report: Model 9975 O-Ring fixture long-term leak performance

    SciTech Connect

    Daugherty, W.

    2016-08-01

    A series of experiments to monitor the aging performance of Viton® GLT O-rings used in the Model 9975 package has been ongoing since 2004 at the Savannah River National Laboratory. One approach has been to periodically evaluate the leak performance of O-rings being aged in mock-up 9975 Primary Containment Vessels (PCVs) at elevated temperature. Other methods such as compression-stress relaxation (CSR) tests and field surveillance are also on-going to evaluate O-ring behavior. Seventy tests using PCV mock-ups were assembled and heated to temperatures ranging from 200 to 450 ºF. They were leak-tested initially and have been tested periodically to determinemore » if they continue to meet the leak-tightness criterion defined in ANSI standard N14.5-97. Due to material substitution, fourteen additional tests were initiated in 2008 with GLT-S O-rings heated to temperatures ranging from 200 to 400 ºF.« less

  6. Tenth interim status report: Model 9975 O-ring fixture long-term leak performance

    SciTech Connect

    Daugherty, W. L.

    2015-08-26

    A series of experiments to monitor the aging performance of Viton ® GLT O-rings used in the Model 9975 package has been ongoing since 2004 at the Savannah River National Laboratory. One approach has been to periodically evaluate the leak performance of O-rings being aged in mock-up 9975 Primary Containment Vessels (PCVs) at elevated temperatures. Other methods such as compression-stress relaxation (CSR) tests and field surveillance are also on-going to evaluate O-ring behavior. Seventy tests using PCV mock-ups were assembled and heated to temperatures ranging from 200 to 450 °F. They were leak-tested initially and have been tested periodically tomore » determine if they continue to meet the leak-tightness criterion defined in ANSI standard N14.5-97. Due to material substitution, fourteen additional tests were initiated in 2008 with GLT-S O-rings heated to temperatures ranging from 200 to 400 °F.« less

  7. Aging Behavior of the EPDM O-Rings in the H1616 Shipping Package

    SciTech Connect

    Daugherty, W.; Stefek, T.; Skidmore, E.

    The H1616 shipping package is used within the DOE complex for shipping tritium reservoirs. The annual recertification frequency can create logistical difficulties with other constraints on the timing of shipments; thus, a longer re-certification period is desirable. The ethylene propylene diene monomer (EPDM) O-rings used in the H1616 shipping package are being aged and tested at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to provide a technical basis for extending the annual maintenance of the H1616 shipping package. H1616 EPDM O-rings are being aged at elevated temperature, and tested for degradation in mechanical properties, compression stress relaxation (CSR) behavior, and leakmore » performance. Mechanical properties of aged O-rings show significant degradation can occur, but an inert atmosphere (argon backfill) greatly reduces the rate of degradation. The CSR behavior of O-rings was evaluated in air at 79 to 177 °C. These collective data were used to develop a predictive model for extrapolation of CSR behavior to relevant service temperatures (<67 °C). O-rings were also aged in H1616 Containment Vessels (CV) in an inert atmosphere at 71 to 149 °C. The vessels are helium leak tested periodically to determine if they continue to remain leak-tight. The vessel tests provide a solid demonstration that the H1616 O-rings will remain leak-tight at temperatures up to 113 °C for up to approximately 2.3 years. Significantly longer periods of leak-tight service are expected at the lower temperatures actually experienced in service. The predictive model developed from the CSR data conservatively indicates a service life of ~5 years at 67 °C. Although the relationship between CSR behavior and leak-tight performance has not been established for this design, the CSR predictions for this O-ring are conservative relative to leak-tight performance. Based on the collective data developed to date, SRNL has recommended that the maintenance interval for the H1616 package

  8. The future of the application of the Bi-Digital O-Ring Test in Sports Psychology.

    PubMed

    Ozerkan, Kemal Nuri

    2005-01-01

    The Bi-Digital O-Ring Test, originally developed by Dr. Omura, utilizes changes in the degree of strength of voluntary movements of muscles of the fingers under a definite muscle tonus, making Bi-Digital O-Rings, as an indicator of pathology in the body. Research in Sports Psychology can use the classical measurement methods and Bi-Digital O-Ring Test method comparatively and thus produce new findings regarding the reliability and certainty of the Bi-Digital O-Ring Test test. It seems probable that by using the non-invasive Bi-Digital O-Ring Test test, it is possible to measure enzymes, hormones and neuro-transmitters instantaneously and assess a sports person's actual psychological and physiological performance, and thereby help them reach their peak performance levels during both exercise and competitions.

  9. Conformity of modified O-ring test and maximal pinch strength for cross tape application direction.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung-Hoon; Choi, Hyun-Su

    2018-06-01

    Although cross tape has recently been used by clinicians for various musculoskeletal conditions, scientific studies on the direction of cross tape application are lacking. The present study aimed to investigate whether the direction of cross tape application affected the outcomes of the modified O-ring test and maximal pinch strength using a pinch gauge and the conformity between these 2 tests when cross tape was applied to the forearm muscles of individuals with no upper extremity pain and no restriction of joint range of motion.This study used a single-blinding crossover design. The subjects comprised 39 adults (16 men and 23 women). Cross tape was applied to the dominant hand so that the 4 rows were at an angle of 45° to the right or left of the direction of the flexor digitorum superficialis muscle fibers, and then the subjects underwent a modified O-ring test and a test of maximal pinch strength using a pinch gauge. Both tests were performed in both directions, and the order of the directions and tests was randomized. SPSS 18.0 was used for statistical analysis. Cohen's kappa coefficient was used to analyze the conformity of the results from the 2 tests. The statistical significance level was P < .05. A positive response in the modified O-ring test and maximal pinch strength were both affected by cross tape direction. The modified O-ring test and maximal pinch strength using pinch gauge results were in agreement (P < .00), and the kappa coefficient was significant at 1.00. The direction of cross tape application that produced a positive response in the modified O-ring test also produced greater maximal pinch strength. Thus, we propose that when applying cross tape to muscles, the direction of the 4 lines of the cross tape should be 45° relative to the direction of the muscle fibers, toward the side that produces a positive response in the modified O-ring test or produces the greatest maximal pinch strength using a pinch gauge.

  10. Effect of temperature and O-ring gland finish on sealing ability of Viton V747-75

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lach, Cynthia L.

    1993-01-01

    As a part of the redesign project of the Space Shuttle solid rocket motor (SRM) following the Challenger accident, the field joint was redesigned to minimize the relative joint motion caused by internal motor pressurization during ignition. The O-ring seals and glands for the field joint were designed both to accommodate structural deflections and to promote pressure-assisted sealing. Tests were conducted in various face seal fixtures to evaluate the ability of Viton V747-75 O-rings to seal for a range of temperatures and surface finishes of the redesigned O-ring gland. The effect of surface finish on the sealing performance and wear characteristics of the O-rings was evaluated during simulated launch conditions that included low-frequency vibrations, gap openings, and rapid pressurizations. The effect of contamination on the sealing performance was also investigated. The O-rings sealed throughout the 75 deg F leak check test and for the seal tests from 50 deg F to 120 deg F for the range of surface finishes investigated. Although abrasions were found in the O-rings from pressurization against the rougher finishes, these abrasions were not detrimental to sealing. Below 50 deg F, Viton V747-75 O-rings were insufficiently resilient to track the test gap opening.

  11. Leak Rate Performance of Silicone Elastomer O-Rings Contaminated with JSC-1A Lunar Regolith Simulant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oravec, Heather Ann; Daniels, Christopher C.

    2014-01-01

    Contamination of spacecraft components with planetary and foreign object debris is a growing concern. Face seals separating the spacecraft cabin from the debris filled environment are particularly susceptible; if the seal becomes contaminated there is potential for decreased performance, mission failure, or catastrophe. In this study, silicone elastomer O-rings were contaminated with JSC- 1A lunar regolith and their leak rate performance was evaluated. The leak rate values of contaminated O-rings at four levels of seal compression were compared to those of as-received, uncontaminated, O-rings. The results showed a drastic increase in leak rate after contamination. JSC-1A contaminated O-rings lead to immeasurably high leak rate values for all levels of compression except complete closure. Additionally, a mechanical method of simulant removal was examined. In general, this method returned the leak rate to as-received values.

  12. Evaluation of soft rubber goods. [for use as O-rings, and seals on space shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merz, P. L.

    1974-01-01

    The performance of rubber goods suitable for use as O-rings, seals, gaskets, bladders and diaphragms under conditions simulating those of the space shuttle were studied. High reliability throughout the 100 flight missions planned for the space shuttle was considered of overriding importance. Accordingly, in addition to a rank ordering of the selected candidate materials based on prolonged fluid compatibility and sealability behavior, basic rheological parameters (such as cyclic hysteresis, stress relaxation, indicated modulus, etc.) were determined to develop methods capable of predicting the cumulative effect of these multiple reuse cycles.

  13. Performance of Metal and Polymeric O-Ring Seals during Beyond-Design-Basis Thermal Conditions.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jiann C; Hnetkovsky, Edward; Rinehart, Doris; Fernandez, Marco; Gonzalez, Felix; Borowsky, Joseph

    2017-04-01

    This paper summarizes the small scale thermal exposure test results of the performance of metallic and polymeric O-ring seals typically used in radioactive material transportation packages. Five different O-ring materials were evaluated: Inconel/silver, ethylene-propylene diene monomer (EPDM), polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), silicone, butyl, and Viton. The overall objective of this study is to provide test data and insights to the performance of these Oring seals when exposed to beyond-design-basis temperature conditions due to a severe fire. Tests were conducted using a small-scale stainless steel pressure vessel pressurized with helium to 2 bar or 5 bar at room temperature. The vessel was then heated in an electric furnace to temperatures up to 900 °C for a pre-determined period (typically 8 h to 9 h). The pressure drop technique was used to determine if leakage occurred during thermal exposure. Out of a total of 46 tests performed, leakage (loss of vessel pressure) was detected in 13 tests.

  14. Performance of Metal and Polymeric O-Ring Seals during Beyond-Design-Basis Thermal Conditions*

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jiann C.; Hnetkovsky, Edward; Rinehart, Doris; Fernandez, Marco; Gonzalez, Felix; Borowsky, Joseph

    2017-01-01

    This paper summarizes the small scale thermal exposure test results of the performance of metallic and polymeric O-ring seals typically used in radioactive material transportation packages. Five different O-ring materials were evaluated: Inconel/silver, ethylene-propylene diene monomer (EPDM), polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), silicone, butyl, and Viton. The overall objective of this study is to provide test data and insights to the performance of these Oring seals when exposed to beyond-design-basis temperature conditions due to a severe fire. Tests were conducted using a small-scale stainless steel pressure vessel pressurized with helium to 2 bar or 5 bar at room temperature. The vessel was then heated in an electric furnace to temperatures up to 900 °C for a pre-determined period (typically 8 h to 9 h). The pressure drop technique was used to determine if leakage occurred during thermal exposure. Out of a total of 46 tests performed, leakage (loss of vessel pressure) was detected in 13 tests. PMID:28503009

  15. Effect of temperature and gap opening rate on the resiliency of candidate solid rocket booster O-ring materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lach, Cynthia L.

    1992-01-01

    In the redesign of the Space Shuttle solid rocket motor following the Challenger accident, the field and nozzle-to-case joints were designed to minimize gap opening caused by internal motor pressurization during ignition. The O-ring seals and glands for these joints were designed both to accommodate structural deflections and to promote pressure assisted sealing. The resiliency behavior of several candidate O-ring materials was evaluated for the effects of temperature and gap opening rates. The performance of three of the elastomeric materials was tested under the specific redesign gap opening requirement. Dynamic flexure conditions unique to launch produce low frequency vibrations in the gap opening. The effect of these vibrations on the ability of the O-ring to maintain contact with the sealing surface was addressed. The resiliency of the O-ring materials was found to be extremely sensitive to variations in temperature and gap opening rate. The top three elastomeric materials tracked the simulated solid rocket booster (SRB) field joint deflection at 75 and 120 F. The external tank/SRB attach strut load vibrations had a negligible effect on the ability of the O-ring to track the simulated SRB field joint deflection.

  16. Aging Study Of EPDM O-Ring Material For The H1616 Shipping Package - Three Year Status

    SciTech Connect

    Stefek, T.; Daugherty, W.; Skidmore, E.

    This is a 3-year status report for tasks carried out per Task Technical Plan SRNL-STI-2011-00506. A series of tasks/experiments were performed at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to monitor the aging performance of ethylene propylene diene monomer (EPDM) O-rings used in the H1616 shipping package. The test data provide a technical basis to extend the annual maintenance of the H1616 shipping package to three years and to predict the life of the EPDM O-rings at the bounding service conditions.

  17. Investigation on thermal oxidative aging of nitrile rubber (NBR) O-rings under compression stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, X. R.; Zhang, W. F.; Lou, W. T.; Huang, Y. X.; Dai, W.

    2017-11-01

    The degradation behaviors of nitrile rubber O-rings exposure to air under compression were investigated at three elevated temperatures. The physical and mechanical properties of the aging samples before and after exposure at selected time were studied by measuring weight loss, tensile strength and elongation at break. The Attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy and fracture morphology were used to reveal the microstructural changes of the aging samples. The results indicate that the weight decreased with exposure time and temperature. Based on the results of the crosslinking density, the crosslinking predominates during the most of aging process. The significant changes in tensile strength and elongation at break also indicate the severe degradation in air. The fracture morphology results show that the fracture surface after 64 days of exposure to air turns rough and present defects. The ATR-FTIR results demonstrate that the hydroxyl groups were formed for the samples aged in air.

  18. Time-Variant Reliability Analysis for Rubber O-Ring Seal Considering Both Material Degradation and Random Load

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Baopeng; Yan, Meichen; Zhang, Weifang; Zhou, Kun

    2017-01-01

    Due to the increase in working hours, the reliability of rubber O-ring seals used in hydraulic systems of transfer machines will change. While traditional methods can only analyze one of the material properties or seal properties, the failure of the O-ring is caused by these two factors together. In this paper, two factors are mainly analyzed: the degradation of material properties and load randomization by processing technology. Firstly, the two factors are defined in terms of material failure and seal failure, before the experimental methods of rubber materials are studied. Following this, the time-variant material properties through experiments and load distribution by monitoring the processing can be obtained. Thirdly, compressive stress and contact stress have been calculated, which was combined with the reliability model to acquire the time-variant reliability for the O-ring. Finally, the life prediction and effect of oil pressure were discussed, then compared with the actual situation. The results show a lifetime of 12 months for the O-ring calculated in this paper, and compared with the replacement records from the maintenance workshop, the result is credible. PMID:29053597

  19. STATUS REPORT FOR AGING STUDIES OF EPDM O-RING MATERIAL FOR THE H1616 SHIPPING PACKAGE

    SciTech Connect

    Stefek, T.; Daugherty, W.; Skidmore, E.

    This is an interim status report for tasks carried out per Task Technical Plan SRNL-STI-2011-00506. A series of tasks/experiments are being performed at the Savannah River National Laboratory to monitor the aging performance of ethylene propylene diene monomer (EPDM) Orings used in the H1616 shipping package. The data will support the technical basis to extend the annual maintenance of the EPDM O-rings in the H1616 shipping package and to predict the life of the seals at bounding service conditions. Current expectations are that the O-rings will maintain a seal at bounding normal temperatures in service (152 F) for at leastmore » 12 months. The baseline aging data review suggests that the EPDM O-rings are likely to retain significant mechanical properties and sealing force at bounding service temperatures to provide a service life of at least 2 years. At lower, more realistic temperatures, longer service life is likely. Parallel compression stress relaxation and vessel leak test efforts are in progress to further validate this assessment and quantify a more realistic service life prediction. The H1616 shipping package O-rings were evaluated for baseline property data as part of this test program. This was done to provide a basis for comparison of changes in material properties and performance parameters as a function of aging. This initial characterization was limited to physical and mechanical properties, namely hardness, thickness and tensile strength. These properties appear to be consistent with O-ring specifications. Three H1616-1 Containment Vessels were placed in test conditions and are aging at temperatures ranging from 160 to 300 F. The vessels were Helium leak-tested initially and have been tested at periodic intervals after cooling to room temperature to determine if they meet the criterion of leaktightness defined in ANSI standard N14.5-97 (< 1E-07 std cc air/sec at room temperature). To date, no leak test failures have occurred. The cumulative time

  20. Use of an implant o-ring attachment for the tooth supported mandibular overdenture: a clinical report.

    PubMed

    Guttal, Satyabodh S; Tavargeri, Anand K; Nadiger, Ramesh K; Thakur, Srinath L

    2011-07-01

    Retention of a mandibular denture can be achieved by an implant-retained or natural tooth-retained bar and stud attachment in the anterior segment of the mandible. The same design principles holds true for both implant-retained and tooth-retained methods of anchoring the bar and stud attachment. A simple and cost effective treatment for more complex implant overdenture is the concept of conventional tooth-retained overdentures. When few firm teeth still remain in a compromised dentition, preservation of these teeth for overdentures can improve retention and stability. The authors present a clinical report of a patient treated with a mandibular tooth-borne overdenture with bar and O-ring attachment. A splinted bar supported the prosthesis and an O-ring retained the denture.

  1. Use of an Implant O-Ring Attachment for the Tooth Supported Mandibular Overdenture: A Clinical Report

    PubMed Central

    Guttal, Satyabodh S.; Tavargeri, Anand K.; Nadiger, Ramesh K.; Thakur, Srinath L.

    2011-01-01

    Retention of a mandibular denture can be achieved by an implant-retained or natural tooth-retained bar and stud attachment in the anterior segment of the mandible. The same design principles holds true for both implant-retained and tooth-retained methods of anchoring the bar and stud attachment. A simple and cost effective treatment for more complex implant overdenture is the concept of conventional tooth-retained overdentures. When few firm teeth still remain in a compromised dentition, preservation of these teeth for overdentures can improve retention and stability. The authors present a clinical report of a patient treated with a mandibular tooth-borne overdenture with bar and O-ring attachment. A splinted bar supported the prosthesis and an O-ring retained the denture. PMID:21769276

  2. View of the O-ring in the top of the aft segment of the right SRB

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    This is a close-out photograph of the O-ring in the top of the aft segment of the right solid rocket booster (SRB) flown on Space Shuttle mission 51-L. The photograph was released following a hearing on the accident (10163); Close-out photograph of the top of the aft segment of the right SRB flown on Space Shuttle mission 51-L (10164).

  3. New mini dental implant attachments versus O-ring attachment after cyclic aging: Analysis of retention strength and gap space.

    PubMed

    Fatalla, Abdalbseet A; Song, Ke; Cao, Ying-Guang

    2017-06-01

    Overdenture as a treatment modality for both partially and fully edentulous patients is costeffective and less expensive. The purpose of the present study was to examine the newly fabricated attachments by comparing them with conventional O-ring attachment in vitro in terms of retention force and cyclic aging resistance. A total of 150 samples were prepared and divided into five groups according to the materials used (O-ring attachment, Deflex M10 XR, Deflex Classic SR, Deflex Acrilato FD, and flexible acrylic resin). The retention force of different attachments was measured by a mini dental implant after three subsequent aging (0, 63, and 126) cycles in the circumstances similar to the oral environment. The gap space between the head of the implant and the inner surface of the attachments was detected. Two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) analysis with multiple comparisons test was applied for statistical analysis. The results showed that Deflex M10 XR had the highest retention force and the lowest gap space after cyclic aging; in addition, by comparing the relative force reduction, the lowest values were obtained in the O-ring attachment and the highest values in the flexible acrylic resin attachment. The retention force measured after cyclic aging for the Deflex M10 XR attachment was greatly improved when compared with the O-ring attachment and other types of attachment materials; in addition, the Deflex M10 XR attachment exhibited the minimum gap space between the inner surface and the mini dental implant head. In conclusion, Deflex M10 XR has the ability to withstand weathering conditions and retains its durable and retentive properties after aging when compared with other attachments.

  4. Nitrile/Buna N Material Failure Assessment for an O-Ring used on the Gaseous Hydrogen Flow Control Valve (FCV) of the Space Shuttle Main Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wingard, Doug

    2006-01-01

    After the rollout of Space Shuttle Discovery in April 2005 in preparation for return-to-flight, there was a failure of the Orbiter (OV-103) helium signature leak test in the gaseous hydrogen (GH2) system. Leakage was attributed to the Flow Control Valve (FCV) in Main Engine 3. The FCV determined to be the source of the leak for OV-103 is designated as LV-58. The nitrile/Buna N rubber O-ring seal was removed from LV-58, and failure analysis indicated radial cracks providing leak paths in one quadrant. Cracks were eventually found in 6 of 9 FCV O-rings among the three Shuttle Orbiters, though none were as severe as those for LV-58, OV-103. Testing by EM10 at MSFC on all 9 FCV O- rings included: laser dimensional, Shore A hardness and properties from a dynamic mechanical analyzer (DMA) and an Instron tensile machine. The following test data was obtained on the cracked quadrant of the LV-58, OV-103 O-ring: (1) the estimated compression set was only 9.5%, compared to none for the rest of the O-ring; (2) Shore A hardness for the O.D. was higher by almost 4 durometer points than for the rest of the O-ring; and (3) DMA data showed that the storage/elastic modulus E was almost 25% lower than for the rest of the O-ring. Of the 8 FCV O-rings tested on an Instron, 4 yielded tensile strengths that were below the MIL spec requirement of 1350 psi-a likely influence of rubber cracking. Comparisons were made between values of modulus determined by DNA (elastic) and Instron (Young s). Each nitrile/Buna N O-ring used in the FCV conforms to the MIL-P-25732C specification. A number of such O-rings taken from shelf storage at MSFC and Kennedy Space Center (KSC) were used to generate a reference curve of DMA glass transition temperature (Tg) vs. shelf storage time ranging from 8 to 26 years. A similar reference curve of TGA onset temperature (of rubber weight loss) vs. shelf storage time was also generated. The DMA and TGA data for the used FCV O-rings were compared to the reference

  5. Evidence that Arrhenius high-temperature aging behavior for an EPDM o-ring does not extrapolate to lower temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Gillen, K.T.; Wise, J.; Celina, M.

    1997-09-01

    Because of the need to significantly extend the lifetimes of weapons, and because of potential implications of environmental O-ring failure on degradation of critical internal weapon components, the authors have been working on improved methods of predicting and verifying O-ring lifetimes. In this report, they highlight the successful testing of a new predictive method for deriving more confident lifetime extrapolations. This method involves ultrasensitive oxygen consumption measurements. The material studied is an EPDM formulation use for the environmental O-ring the W88. Conventional oven aging (155 C to 111 C) was done on compression molded sheet material; periodically, samples were removedmore » from the ovens and subjected to various measurements, including ultimate tensile elongation, density and modulus profiles. Compression stress relaxation (CSR) measurements were made at 125 C and 111 C on disc shaped samples (12.7 mm diameter by 6 mm thick) using a Shawbury Wallace Compression Stress Relaxometer MK 2. Oxygen consumption measurements were made versus time, at temperatures ranging from 160 C to 52 C, using chromatographic quantification of the change in oxygen content caused by reaction with the EPDM material in sealed containers.« less

  6. Experimental characterization of elastomeric O-rings as reusable seals for mass spectrometric measurements: Application to in situ K-Ar dating on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Yuichiro; Kameda, Shingo; Okuno, Mamoru; Horiuchi, Misa; Shibasaki, Kazuo; Wagatsuma, Ryo; Aida, Yusuke; Miura, Yayoi N.; Yoshioka, Kazuo; Okazaki, Ryuji; Sugita, Seiji

    2017-10-01

    Mass spectrometry has been widely used in lander missions to characterize the volatiles in rocks and soils on planetary surfaces. A good vacuum seal is very important for introducing such solid samples to a vacuum chamber and ejecting them. However, multiple measurements require many metal gaskets, leading to extra weight and complexity for the instruments. In this study, we investigate the capability of three kinds of elastomeric O-rings (Viton, Nexus-SLT, and Nexus-FV) as vacuum seals for mass spectrometric measurements, particularly for in situ K-Ar dating on Mars. First, thermal cycle tests revealed that low-temperature-resistant O-rings can maintain pressure <10-5 Pa at -60 °C under 1 bar ambient pressure, whereas Viton O-rings leaked at -25 °C. Then, the amount of 40Ar due to outgassing from the O-rings and permeation under the ambient pressure of 650 Pa or 3 Pa was measured and compared with the amounts of 40Ar that a flight-equivalent laser would liberate from potential target Martian rocks. The measured amounts were <1% of that a target rock with 5000 ppm K2O and an age of 4.2 Ga would yield. These results suggest that a Viton O-ring can maintain the Ar blank low under the Mars atmospheric pressure when temperatures are higher than -25 °C. A double O-ring seal using the low-temperature-resistant elastomers would be an alternative approach at lower temperatures. The elastomeric O-rings would be useful for constructing a small and light-weighted mass spectrometric instrument for in situ K-Ar dating on Mars.

  7. Evaluation of the Performance of O-rings Made with Different Elastomeric Polymers in Simulated Geothermal Environments at 300°C

    SciTech Connect

    Sugama, Toshifumi; Pyatina, Tatiana; Redline, Erica Marie

    2014-12-01

    This paper aims to evaluate the survival of O-rings made with six different elastomeric polymers, EPDM, type I- and II-FKM, FEPM, FFKM, and FSR, in five different simulated geothermal environments at 300°C. It further defines the relative strengths and weaknesses of the materials in each environment. The environments tested were: 1) non-aerated steam-cooling cycles, 2) aerated steam-cooling cycles, 3) water-based drilling fluid, 4) CO2-rich geo-brine fluid, and, 5) heat-cool water quenching cycles. Following exposure, the extent of oxidation, oxidationinduced degradation, thermal behaviors, micro-defects, permeation depths of ionic species present in environments throughout the O-ring, silicate-related scale-deposition, and changes in mechanicalmore » properties were assessed.« less

  8. A summary of laboratory testing performed to characterize and select an elastomeric O-ring material to be used in the redesigned solid rocket motors of the space transportation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, J. E.

    1993-01-01

    An elastomeric O-ring material is used in the joints of the redesigned solid motors (RSRM's) of the National Space Transportation System (NSTS). The selection of the O-ring material used in the RSRM's was a very thorough process that included efforts by NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center and the Langley Research Center, and the Thiokol Corporation. One of the efforts performed at MSFC was an extensive in-house laboratory test regime to screen potential O-ring materials and ultimately to characterize the elastomeric material that was chosen to be used in the RSRM's. The laboratory tests performed at MSFC are summarized.

  9. Radiation resistance of elastomeric O-rings in mixed neutron and gamma fields: Testing methodology and experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zenoni, A.; Bignotti, F.; Donzella, A.; Donzella, G.; Ferrari, M.; Pandini, S.; Andrighetto, A.; Ballan, M.; Corradetti, S.; Manzolaro, M.; Monetti, A.; Rossignoli, M.; Scarpa, D.; Alloni, D.; Prata, M.; Salvini, A.; Zelaschi, F.

    2017-11-01

    Materials and components employed in the presence of intense neutron and gamma fields are expected to absorb high dose levels that may induce deep modifications of their physical and mechanical properties, possibly causing loss of their function. A protocol for irradiating elastomeric materials in reactor mixed neutron and gamma fields and for testing the evolution of their main mechanical and physical properties with absorbed dose has been developed. Four elastomeric compounds used for vacuum O-rings, one fluoroelastomer polymer (FPM) based and three ethylene propylene diene monomer rubber (EPDM) based, presently available on the market have been selected for the test. One EPDM is rated as radiation resistant in gamma fields, while the other elastomers are general purpose products. Particular care has been devoted to dosimetry calculations, since absorbed dose in neutron fields, unlike pure gamma fields, is strongly dependent on the material composition and, in particular, on the hydrogen content. The products have been tested up to about 2 MGy absorbed dose. The FPM based elastomer, in spite of its lower dose absorption in fast neutron fields, features the largest variations of properties, with a dramatic increase in stiffness and brittleness. Out of the three EPDM based compounds, one shows large and rapid changes in the main mechanical properties, whereas the other two feature more stable behaviors. The performance of the EPDM rated as radiation resistant in pure gamma fields does not appear significantly better than that of the standard product. The predictive capability of the accelerated irradiation tests performed as well as the applicable concepts of threshold of radiation damage is discussed in view of the use of the examined products in the selective production of exotic species facility, now under construction at the Legnaro National Laboratories of the Italian Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare. It results that a careful account of dose rate effects

  10. Radiation resistance of elastomeric O-rings in mixed neutron and gamma fields: Testing methodology and experimental results.

    PubMed

    Zenoni, A; Bignotti, F; Donzella, A; Donzella, G; Ferrari, M; Pandini, S; Andrighetto, A; Ballan, M; Corradetti, S; Manzolaro, M; Monetti, A; Rossignoli, M; Scarpa, D; Alloni, D; Prata, M; Salvini, A; Zelaschi, F

    2017-11-01

    Materials and components employed in the presence of intense neutron and gamma fields are expected to absorb high dose levels that may induce deep modifications of their physical and mechanical properties, possibly causing loss of their function. A protocol for irradiating elastomeric materials in reactor mixed neutron and gamma fields and for testing the evolution of their main mechanical and physical properties with absorbed dose has been developed. Four elastomeric compounds used for vacuum O-rings, one fluoroelastomer polymer (FPM) based and three ethylene propylene diene monomer rubber (EPDM) based, presently available on the market have been selected for the test. One EPDM is rated as radiation resistant in gamma fields, while the other elastomers are general purpose products. Particular care has been devoted to dosimetry calculations, since absorbed dose in neutron fields, unlike pure gamma fields, is strongly dependent on the material composition and, in particular, on the hydrogen content. The products have been tested up to about 2 MGy absorbed dose. The FPM based elastomer, in spite of its lower dose absorption in fast neutron fields, features the largest variations of properties, with a dramatic increase in stiffness and brittleness. Out of the three EPDM based compounds, one shows large and rapid changes in the main mechanical properties, whereas the other two feature more stable behaviors. The performance of the EPDM rated as radiation resistant in pure gamma fields does not appear significantly better than that of the standard product. The predictive capability of the accelerated irradiation tests performed as well as the applicable concepts of threshold of radiation damage is discussed in view of the use of the examined products in the selective production of exotic species facility, now under construction at the Legnaro National Laboratories of the Italian Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare. It results that a careful account of dose rate effects

  11. Evaluation of selected elastomer O-ring pump seals for service at the Wilsonville, Alabama, Advanced Coal Liquefaction Research and Development Facility. [Ethylenepropylenediene monomer compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Skena, C.C.; Keiser, J.R.

    1986-08-01

    Previous laboratory tests of elastomer O-rings in coal liquefaction solvents conducted at L'Garde, Inc., indicated that certain ethylenepropylenediene monomer (EPDM) compounds provided the best performance when a backup ring was used to limit swelling. Before service testing in a pump at the Wilsonville, Alabama, Advanced Coal Liquefaction Research and Development Facility, tests of six selected elastomers in the appropriate Wilsonville-produced solvent were conducted at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The ORNL tests measured the elastomers' changes in cross section, weight, density, and relative flexibility. Although two perfluoroelastomers showed less degradation of most properties during these tests, it was decided tomore » proceed with service testing of two EPDM elastomers because of their much lower cost. 5 refs., 14 figs., 7 tabs.« less

  12. Volumetric modulated arc therapy of head-and-neck cancer on a fast-rotating O-ring linac: Plan quality and delivery time comparison with a C-arm linac.

    PubMed

    Michiels, Steven; Poels, Kenneth; Crijns, Wouter; Delombaerde, Laurence; De Roover, Robin; Vanstraelen, Bianca; Haustermans, Karin; Nuyts, Sandra; Depuydt, Tom

    2018-05-05

    Linac improvements in gantry speed, leaf speed and dose rate may increase the time-efficiency of volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) delivery. The plan quality achievable with faster VMAT however remains to be investigated. In this study, a fast-rotating O-ring linac with fast-moving leaves is compared with a C-arm linac in terms of plan quality and delivery time for VMAT of head-and-neck cancer (HNC). For 30 patients with HNC, treatment planning was performed using dual-arc (HA2) and triple-arc (HA3) VMAT on a Halcyon fast-rotating O-ring linac and using dual-arc VMAT on a TrueBeam C-arm linac (TB2). Target coverage metrics and complication probabilities were compared. Plan delivery was verified using 3%/3 mm gamma-index analysis of helical diode array measurements. Volumetric image acquisition and plan delivery times were compared. All studied VMAT-techniques fulfilled the target coverage objectives. D 2% to the boost volume was higher for HA2 (median 103.7%, 1st-3rd quartile [103.5%;104.0%]) and HA3 (103.2% [103.0%;103.7%)] than for TB2 (102.6% [102.3%;103.0%)], resulting in an increased boost target dose heterogeneity for HA2 and HA3. Complication probabilities were comparable between HA2 and TB2, while HA3 showed a xerostomia probability reduction (0.8% [0.2%;1.8%]) and dysphagia probability reduction (1.0% [0.2%;1.8%]) compared with TB2. Gamma-index agreement scores were never below 93.0% for HA2, HA3 and TB2. Volumetric imaging and plan delivery time was shorter for HA2 (1 m 24 s ± 1 s) and HA3 (1 m 54 s ± 1 s) than for TB2 (2 m 47 s ± 1 s). For VMAT of HNC, the fast-rotating O-ring linac at least maintains the plan quality of two arcs on a C-arm linac while reducing the image acquisition and plan delivery time. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Accurate localization of organ representation areas on the feet & hands using the bi-digital O-ring test resonance phenomenon: its clinical implication in diagnosis & treatment--Part I.

    PubMed

    Omura, Y

    1994-01-01

    Accuracy of the widely used organ representation areas, currently used in different schools of foot and hand reflexology was evaluated using Bi-Digital O-Ring test resonance phenomenon. Our previous study indicated that mapping organ representation areas of the tongue using Bi-Digital O-Ring Test resonance phenomenon between 2 identical substances often provided more reliable clinical information for both diagnosis and treatment than the 2 widely used, but crude, traditional schools of Chinese tongue diagnosis. This same method was applied for the mapping of the organ representation areas on the feet and hands. We succeeded in mapping the following areas on human feet: 1) Middle (3rd) toe on the sole side represents the following starting from the tip: A) Head, B) Face with eye, ear, nose, and mouth (1st Digit) C) Neck and organs within the neck (narrow band of space between 1st crease after the 1st digit and crease at the junction of the beginning of the sole); 2) 2nd and 4th toe represent upper extremities, the beginning tip being fingers and hands. The crease at the base of these toes represents the shoulder. The 2nd toe represents right upper extremity, and the 4th toe represents left upper extremity; 3) 1st and 5th toes in both the right and left feet represent lower extremities with the tip being the toes and soles of feet. The crease at the base of these toes represents the inguinal area. The 1st toe of each foot represents right lower extremity, and 5th toe represents left lower extremity. The sole of the foot is divided into the following 3 distinctive sections. 1) Upper (1st) section represents organs in the chest cavity including 2 thymus glands, trachea, 2 lungs, with the heart between them, and with the esophagus appearing as a narrow band outside of the lung near and below the 1st and 2nd toe depending upon the individual. Chest section occupies the first 1/3 to 1/5 (on a relatively long foot) of the entire sole. The boundary between the chest and G

  14. Bi-directional transmission of molecular information by photon or electron beams passing in the close vicinity of specific molecules, and its clinical and basic research applications: 1) Diagnosis of humans or animal patients without any direct contact; 2) Light microscopic and electron microscopic localization of neuro-transmitters, heavy metals, Oncogen C-fos (AB2), etc. of intracellular fine structures of normal and abnormal single cells using light or electro-microscopic indirect Bi-Digital O-Ring Test.

    PubMed

    Omura, Y; Losco, M; Omura, A K; Takeshige, C; Hisamitsu, T; Nakajima, H; Soejima, K; Yamamoto, S; Ishikawa, H; Kagoshima, T

    1992-01-01

    In 1985, Omura, Y. discovered that, when specific molecules were placed anywhere in the close vicinity of the path of a light beam (laser), their molecular information, as well as information on electrical & magnetic fields, is transmitted bi-directionally along the path of this light beam. Namely, this information is transmitted in the direction the light beam is projected and towards the direction from which the light beam is coming. This finding was applied to the following clinical and basic research: 1) In the past, using indirect Bi-Digital O-Ring Test, human or animal patients were diagnosed through an intermediate third person holding a good electrical conducting probe, the tip of which was touching the part of the patient to be examined. However, in order to diagnose the patient in isolation from a distance, or a dangerous or unmanagable unanesthesized animal, such as a lion or tiger, the author succeeded in making a diagnosis by replacing the metal conducting probe with a soft laser beam which is held by the one hand of the third person whose index finger is placed in close vicinity of the laser beam generated by a battery-powered penlight-type solid state laser generator. Thus, diagnosis within visible distance, without direct patient contact, became a reality. 2) Using a projection light microscope, by giving indirect Bi-Digital O-Ring Test while contacting with a fine electro-conductive probe on the magnified fine structure of normal and abnormal cells, various normal and abnormal intracellular substances were localized through a third person holding a pure reference control substance with the same hand that is holding the probe as an intermediary for the indirect Bi-Digital O-Ring Test. Instead of the photon beam in a light microscope, the author found that, using an electron beam passing through the close vicinity of specific molecules of specimens in an electron microscope, the molecular information is transmitted to the magnified fluorescent screen

  15. O-Ring Installation for Underwater Components and Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-04-15

    cure is effected and the heat source removed. AGING -- To undergo changes in physical properties with age or lapse of time. AIR CHECKS -- Surface...the use of heat and pressure, resulting in greatly increased strength and elasticity of rubber -like materials. VULCANIZING AGENT -- A material that...Cross Section Dia -- Diameter EP, EPM, EPDM -- Ethylene-Propylene Rubber F or ’F -- Degrees Fahrenheit FED -- Federal Specification FPM -- Fluorocarbon

  16. Anti-diffusion metal coated O-rings

    DOEpatents

    Biallas, George Herman; Boyce, James Reid

    2016-03-22

    A method for inhibiting diffusion of gases and/or transmission of photons through elastomeric seals and a diffusion inhibiting elastomeric seal wherein at least a portion of the surface of a diffusion inhibiting elastomeric seal is coated with a compatibly-deformable, malleable metal coating.

  17. Interrelationships between the heart and central nervous system: localization of neuro-transmitters and imaging of their associated nuclei, including the raphe nuclei & the locus coeruleus, as well as the imaging of the heart and its representation areas in slices of the human central nervous system using the "Bi-Digital O-Ring Test" imaging method.

    PubMed

    Omura, Y

    1987-01-01

    Using microscopic slides of specific tissues from the human body or pure substances including neuro-transmitters such as serotonin, dopamine, norepinephrine, etc., as reference control substances in the Bi-Digital O-Ring Test Molecular Identification Method, the author was able to localize and image normal and abnormal internal organs, and to localize and trace the distribution of neurotransmitters in the different parts of the central nervous system. Using microscopic slides of different parts of the heart, we were able to image the outline of the heart as well as the SA node, AV node, tricuspid valve, mitral valve, aortic valve, pulmonary valve, coronary arteries, and aorta and its branches, including the vertebral arteries, without using any bulky or expensive imaging instruments. Using serotonin as a reference control substance on the different parts of the central nervous system, it was possible to demonstrate the 6 well-known raphe nuclei and the locus coeruleus (which contains serotonin & norepinephrine), as well as the distribution of serotonin in the cerebrum and the cerebellum, all of which closely resembled previously published well-known neuroanatomical structures and distributions of neurotransmitters. As an extension of this work, possible representations of different internal organs on the central nervous system were examined using microscopic slides of different internal organs as reference control substances. The results indicated that the entire heart is represented primarily in the medulla oblongata, and that the SA node and the upper half of the left atrium are represented in the caudal end of the pons; the right side of the heart (i.e. R-atrium, AV node, tricuspid valve, R-ventricle) is represented on the right side of the medulla oblongata, and the left side of the heart (i.e. lower half of the L-atrium, mitral valve, L-ventricle) is represented on the left side of the medulla oblongata, and the upper half of the left atrium is represented in

  18. Design analysis of a self-acting spiral-groove ring seal for counter-rotating shafts. [o ring seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dirusso, E.

    1983-01-01

    A self-acting spiral groove inter-shaft ring seal of nominal 16.33 cm (6.43 in.) diameter for sealing fan bleed air between counter rotating shafts in advanced turbofan engines was analyzed. The analysis focused on the lift force characteristics of the spiral grooves. A NASA Lewis developed computer program for predicting the performance of gas lubricated face seals was used to optimize the spiral groove geometry to produce maximum lift force. Load capacity curves (lift force as function of film thickness) were generated for four advanced turbofan engine operating conditions at relative seal speeds ranging from 17,850 to 29,800 rpm, sealed air pressures from 6 to 42 N/sq cm (9 to 60 psi) absolute and temperatures from 95 to 327 C (203 to 620 F). The relative seal sliding speed range was 152 to 255 m/sec (500 to 836 ft/sec). The analysis showed that the spiral grooves are capable of producing sufficient lift force such that the ring seal will operate in a noncontacting mode over the operating range of typical advanced turbofan engines.

  19. Caution on the use of Viton® or FETFE® O-rings in carbon dioxide sample containers for δ180 analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Revesz, Kinga M.; Coplen, Tyler B.

    1991-01-01

    Caution needs to be exercised in selecting sample containers for CO2 isotope-ratio samples of < 200 μmol. If stopcocks are used in construction of containers for such samples, the use of all-glass stopcocks with Apiezon N® hydrocarbon-based grease will eliminate the fractionation of oxygen isotopes.

  20. Pressman (rubber goods; rubber tire & tube) 559.885; Pressman, O-Rings (rubber goods) 559.885--Technical Report on Development of the USTES Aptitude Test Battery.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manpower Administration (DOL), Washington, DC. U.S. Training and Employment Service.

    The United States Training and Employment Service General Aptitude Test Battery (GATB), first published in 1947, has been included in a continuing program of research to validate the tests against success in many different occupations. The GATB consists of 12 tests which measure nine aptitudes: General Learning Ability; Verbal Aptitude; Numerical…

  1. Trimethyl phosphite as a trap for alkoxy radicals formed from the ring opening of oxiranylcarbinyl radicals. Conversion to alkenes. Mechanistic applications to the study of C-C versus C-O ring cleavage.

    PubMed

    Ding, Bangwei; Bentrude, Wesley G

    2003-03-19

    Trimethyl phosphite, (MeO)(3)P, is introduced as an efficient and selective trap in oxiranylcarbinyl radical (2) systems, formed from haloepoxides 8-13 under thermal AIBN/n-Bu(3)SnH conditions at about 80 degrees C. Initially, the transformations of 8-13, in the absence of phosphite, to allyl alcohol 7 and/or vinyl ether 5 were measured quantitatively (Table 1). Structural variations in the intermediate oxiranylcarbinyl (2), allyloxy (3), and vinyloxycarbinyl (4) radicals involve influences of the thermodynamics and kinetics of the C-O (2 --> 3, k(1)) and C-C (2 --> 4, k(2)) radical scission processes and readily account for the changes in the amounts of product vinyl ether (5) and allyl alcohol (7) formed. Added (MeO)(3)P is inert to vinyloxycarbinyl radical 4 and selectively and rapidly traps allyloxy radical 3, diverting it to trimethyl phosphate and allyl radical 6. Allyl radicals (6) dimerize or are trapped by n-Bu(3)SnH to give alkenes, formed from haloepoxides 8, 9, and 13 in 69-95% yields. Intermediate vinyloxycarbinyl radicals (4), in the presence or absence of (MeO)(3)P, are trapped by n-Bu(3)SnH to give vinyl ethers (5). The concentrations of (MeO)(3)P and n-Bu(3)SnH were varied independently, and the amounts of phosphate, vinyl ether (5), and/or alkene from haloepoxides 10, 11, and 13 were carefully monitored. The results reflect readily understood influences of changes in the structures of radicals 2-4, particularly as they influence the C-O (k(1)) and C-C (k(2)) cleavages of intermediate oxiranylcarbinyl radical 2 and their reverse (k(-1), k(-2)). Diversion by (MeO)(3)P of allyloxy radicals (3) from haloepoxides 11 and 12 fulfills a prior prediction that under conditions closer to kinetic control, products of C-O scission, not just those of C-C scission, may result. Thus, for oxiranylcarbinyl radicals from haloepoxides 11, 12, and 13, C-O scission (k(1), 2 --> 3) competes readily with C-C cleavage (k(2), 2 --> 4), even though C-C scission is favored thermodynamically.

  2. Heat-shrink plastic tubing seals joints in glass tubing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Del Duca, B.; Downey, A.

    1968-01-01

    Small units of standard glass apparatus held together by short lengths of transparent heat-shrinkable polyolefin tubing. The tubing is shrunk over glass O-ring type connectors having O-rings but no lubricant.

  3. 75 FR 15679 - Foreign-Trade Zone 272-Lehigh Valley, Pennsylvania Application for Subzone Grundfos Pumps...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-30

    ... from abroad (representing 65% of the value of the finished pumps) include: Pump parts, electric motors, plastic closures and o- rings, rubber o-rings and gaskets, labels, pipe fittings, fasteners, motor...

  4. 76 FR 66685 - Foreign-Trade Zone 37-Orange County, NY, Application for Subzone, ITT Water Technology, Inc...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-27

    ... (representing 39% of the value of the finished pumps) include: electric motors, pump parts, mechanical seals, plastic o-rings, rubber o-rings, shafts, flanges, motor and shaft couplings, and fasteners (duty rates...

  5. 46 CFR 162.161-3 - Materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL ENGINEERING EQUIPMENT Fixed Clean Agent Fire Extinguishing Systems § 162.161-3... § 162.161-2) and be made of metal, except for bushings, o-rings, and gaskets. Aluminum or aluminum..., or if galvanically incompatible, be separated by a bushing, o-ring, gasket, or similar device. (c...

  6. 46 CFR 162.161-3 - Materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL ENGINEERING EQUIPMENT Fixed Clean Agent Fire Extinguishing Systems § 162.161-3... § 162.161-2) and be made of metal, except for bushings, o-rings, and gaskets. Aluminum or aluminum..., or if galvanically incompatible, be separated by a bushing, o-ring, gasket, or similar device. (c...

  7. 46 CFR 162.161-3 - Materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL ENGINEERING EQUIPMENT Fixed Clean Agent Fire Extinguishing Systems § 162.161-3... § 162.161-2) and be made of metal, except for bushings, o-rings, and gaskets. Aluminum or aluminum..., or if galvanically incompatible, be separated by a bushing, o-ring, gasket, or similar device. (c...

  8. Sealing a Loosely Fitting Valve Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goff, L.; Tellier, G.

    1986-01-01

    Double-ring seal avoids expense of remachining or redesigning valve parts. Mating fittings on valve sealed by pair of rings - one O-ring and backup ring. Backup ring fills relatively large gap between parts. Prevents softer O-ring from being pushed into and through gap.

  9. Static Gas-Charging Plug

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Indoe, William

    2012-01-01

    A gas-charging plug can be easily analyzed for random vibration. The design features two steeped O-rings in a radial configuration at two different diameters, with a 0.050-in. (.1.3-mm) diameter through-hole between the two O-rings. In the charging state, the top O-ring is engaged and sealing. The bottom O-ring outer diameter is not squeezed, and allows air to flow by it into the tank. The inner diameter is stretched to plug the gland diameter, and is restrained by the O-ring groove. The charging port bushing provides mechanical stop to restrain the plug during gas charge removal. It also prevents the plug from becoming a projectile when removing gas charge from the accumulator. The plug can easily be verified after installation to ensure leakage requirements are met.

  10. Leak detection aid

    DOEpatents

    Steeper, Timothy J.

    1989-01-01

    A leak detection apparatus and method for detecting leaks across an O-ring sealing a flanged surface to a mating surface is an improvement in a flanged surface comprising a shallow groove following O-ring in communication with an entrance and exit port intersecting the shallow groove for injecting and withdrawing, respectively, a leak detection fluid, such as helium. A small quantity of helium injected into the entrance port will flow to the shallow groove, past the O-ring and to the exit port.

  11. Leak detection aid

    DOEpatents

    Steeper, T.J.

    1989-12-26

    A leak detection apparatus and method for detecting leaks across an O-ring sealing a flanged surface to a mating surface is an improvement in a flanged surface comprising a shallow groove following O-ring in communication with an entrance and exit port intersecting the shallow groove for injecting and withdrawing, respectively, a leak detection fluid, such as helium. A small quantity of helium injected into the entrance port will flow to the shallow groove, past the O-ring and to the exit port. 2 figs.

  12. 78 FR 28190 - Foreign-Trade Zone (FTZ) 134-Chattanooga, Tennessee; Notification of Proposed Production Activity...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-14

    ... domestic sales, Komatsu would be able to choose the duty rates during customs entry procedures that apply... abroad include: cleaning agents; glues; adhesives; adhesive plates; O-rings; rubber bolts/rods; hoses...

  13. 78 FR 45911 - Foreign-Trade Zone (FTZ) 38-Spartanburg County, South Carolina, Notification of Proposed...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-30

    ... chargers; magnets; magnetic chucks; lead-acid, power pack, NiMH and lithium ion batteries; SA battery packs...-bags; battery caps; blister packs; shrink-heat tubing; plastic handles and knobs; O- rings; seals...

  14. Thermal Barrier/Seal for Extreme Temperature Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M.; Dunlap, Patrick H., Jr.; Phelps, Jack; Bauer, Paul; Bond, Bruce; McCool, Alex (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Large solid rocket motors, as found on the Space Shuttle, are fabricated in segments for manufacturing considerations, bolted together, and sealed using conventional Viton O-ring seals. Similarly the nine large solid rocket motor nozzles are assembled from several different segments, bolted together, and sealed at six joint locations using conventional O-ring seals. The 5500 F combustion gases are generally kept a safe distance away from the seals by thick layers of phenolic or rubber insulation. Joint-fill compounds, including RTV (room temperature vulcanized compound) and polysulfide filler, are used to fill the joints in the insulation to prevent a direct flow-path to the O-rings. Normally these two stages of protection are enough to prevent a direct flow-path of the 900-psi hot gases from reaching the temperature-sensitive O-ring seals. However, in the current design 1 out of 15 Space Shuttle solid rocket motors experience hot gas effects on the Joint 6 wiper (sacrificial) O-rings. Also worrisome is the fact that joints have experienced heat effects on materials between the RTV and the O-rings, and in two cases O-rings have experienced heat effects. These conditions lead to extensive reviews of the post-flight conditions as part of the effort to monitor flight safety. We have developed a braided carbon fiber thermal barrier to replace the joint fill compounds in the Space Shuttle solid rocket motor nozzles to reduce the incoming 5500 F combustion gas temperature and permit only cool (approximately 100 F) gas to reach the temperature-sensitive O-ring seals. Implementation of this thermal barrier provides more robust, consistent operation with shorter turn around times between Shuttle launches.

  15. Development of Thermal Barriers For Solid Rocket Motor Nozzle Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M.; Dunlap, Patrick H., Jr.

    2000-01-01

    Joints in the Space Shuttle solid rocket motors are sealed by O-rings to contain combustion gases inside the rocket that reach pressures of up to 900 psi and temperatures of up to 5500 F. To provide protection for the O-rings, the motors are insulated with either phenolic or rubber insulation. Gaps in the joints leading up to the O-rings are filled with polysulfide joint-fill compounds as an additional level of protection. The current RSRM nozzle-to-case joint design incorporating primary, secondary, and wiper O-rings experiences gas paths through the joint-fill compound to the innermost wiper O-ring in about one out of every seven motors. Although this does not pose a safety hazard to the motor, it is an undesirable condition that NASA and rocket manufacturer Thiokol want to eliminate. Each nozzle-to-case joint gas path results in extensive reviews and evaluation before flights can be resumed. Thiokol and NASA Marshall are currently working to improve the nozzle-to-case joint design by implementing a more reliable J-leg design that has been used successfully in the field and igniter joint. They are also planning to incorporate the NASA Glenn braided carbon fiber thermal barrier into the joint. The thermal barrier would act as an additional level of protection for the O-rings and allow the elimination of the joint-fill compound from the joint.

  16. Collar nut and thrust ring

    DOEpatents

    Lowery, Guy B.

    1991-01-01

    A collar nut comprises a hollow cylinder having fine interior threads at one end for threadably engaging a pump mechanical seal assembly and an inwardly depending flange at the other end. The flange has an enlarged portion with a groove for receiving an O-ring for sealing against the intrusion of pumpage from the exterior. The enlarged portion engages a thrust ring about the pump shaft for crushing a hard O-ring, such as a graphite O-ring. The hard O-ring seals the interior of the mechanical seal assembly and pump housing against the loss of lubricants or leakage of pumpage. The fine threads of the hollow cylinder provide the mechanical advantage for crushing the hard O-ring evenly and easily with a hand tool from the side of the collar nut rather than by tightening a plurality of bolts from the end and streamlines the exterior surface of the mechanical seal. The collar nut avoids the spatial requirements of bolt heads at the end of a seal and associated bolt head turbulence.

  17. Caps Seal Boltholes On Vacuum-System Flanges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roman, Robert F.

    1993-01-01

    Sealing caps devised for boltholes on vacuum-system flanges. Used in place of leak-prone gaskets, and provide solid metal-to-metal interfaces. Each sealing cap contains square-cut circular groove in which O-ring placed. Mounted on studs protruding into access ports, providing positive seal around each bolthole. Each cap mates directly with surface of flange, in solid metal-to-metal fit, with O-ring completely captured in groove. Assembly immune to misalignment, leakage caused by vibration, and creeping distortion caused by weight of port. O-ring material chosen for resistance to high temperature; with appropriate choice of material, temperature raised to as much as 315 degrees C.

  18. Stress and Sealing Performance Analysis of Containment Vessel

    SciTech Connect

    WU, TSU-TE

    2005-05-24

    This paper presents a numerical technique for analyzing the containment vessel subjected to the combined loading of closure-bolt torque and internal pressure. The detailed stress distributions in the O-rings generated by both the torque load and the internal pressure can be evaluated by using this method. Consequently, the sealing performance of the O-rings can be determined. The material of the O-rings can be represented by any available constitutive equation for hyperelastic material. In the numerical calculation of this paper, the form of the Mooney-Rivlin strain energy potential is used. The technique treats both the preloading process of bolt tightening andmore » the application of internal pressure as slow dynamic loads. Consequently, the problem can be evaluated using explicit numerical integration scheme.« less

  19. Tool Measures Depths of Defects on a Case Tang Joint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ream, M. Bryan; Montgomery, Ronald B.; Mecham, Brent A.; Keirstead, Bums W.

    2005-01-01

    A special-purpose tool has been developed for measuring the depths of defects on an O-ring seal surface. The surface lies in a specially shaped ringlike fitting, called a capture feature tang, located on an end of a cylindrical segment of a case that contains a solid-fuel booster rocket motor for launching a space shuttle. The capture feature tang is a part of a tang-and-clevis, O-ring joint between the case segment and a similar, adjacent cylindrical case segment. When the segments are joined, the tang makes an interference fit with the clevis and squeezes the O-ring at the side of the gap.

  20. Stress analysis in oral obturator prostheses, part II: photoelastic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pesqueira, Aldiéris Alves; Goiato, Marcelo Coelho; da Silva, Emily Vivianne Freitas; Haddad, Marcela Filié; Moreno, Amália; Zahoui, Abbas; dos Santos, Daniela Micheline

    2014-06-01

    In part I of the study, two attachment systems [O-ring; bar-clip (BC)] were used, and the system with three individualized O-rings provided the lowest stress on the implants and the support tissues. Therefore, the aim of this study was to assess the stress distribution, through the photoelastic method, on implant-retained palatal obturator prostheses associated with different attachment systems: BOC-splinted implants with a bar connected to two centrally placed O-rings, and BOD-splinted implants with a BC connected to two distally placed O-rings (cantilever). One photoelastic model of the maxilla with oral-sinus-nasal communication with three parallel implants was fabricated. Afterward, two implant-retained palatal obturator prostheses with the two attachment systems described above were constructed. Each assembly was positioned in a circular polariscope and a 100-N axial load was applied in three different regions with implants by using a universal testing machine. The results were obtained through photograph record analysis of stress. The BOD system exhibited the highest stress concentration, followed by the BOC system. The O-ring, centrally placed on the bar, allows higher mobility of the prostheses and homogeneously distributes the stress to the region of the alveolar ridge and implants. It can be concluded that the use of implants with O-rings, isolated or connected with a bar, to rehabilitate maxillectomized patients allows higher prosthesis mobility and homogeneously distributes the stress to the alveolar ridge region, which may result in greater chewing stress distribution to implants and bone tissue. The clinical implication of the augmented bone support loss after maxillectomy is the increase of stress in the attachment systems and, consequently, a higher tendency for displacement of the prosthesis.

  1. Integration of Flex Nozzle System and Electro Hydraulic Actuators to Solid Rocket Motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayani, Kishore Nath; Bajaj, Dinesh Kumar

    2017-10-01

    A rocket motor assembly comprised of solid rocket motor and flex nozzle system. Integration of flex nozzle system and hydraulic actuators to the solid rocket motors are done after transportation to the required place where integration occurred. The flex nozzle system is integrated to the rocket motor in horizontal condition and the electro hydraulic actuators are assembled to the flex nozzle systems. The electro hydraulic actuators are connected to the hydraulic power pack to operate the actuators. The nozzle-motor critical interface are insulation diametrical compression, inhibition resin-28, insulation facial compression, shaft seal `O' ring compression and face seal `O' ring compression.

  2. Magnetic Check Valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Brian G.; Bozeman, Richard J., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    Poppet in proposed check valve restored to closed condition by magnetic attraction instead of spring force. Oscillations suppressed, with consequent reduction of wear. Stationary magnetic disk mounted just upstream of poppet, also containing magnet. Valve body nonmagnetic. Forward pressure or flow would push poppet away from stationary magnetic disk so fluid flows easily around poppet. Stop in valve body prevents poppet from being swept away. When flow stopped or started to reverse, magnetic attraction draws poppet back to disk. Poppet then engages floating O-ring, thereby closing valve and preventing reverse flow. Floating O-ring facilitates sealing at low loads.

  3. Liquid-Oxygen-Compatible Cement for Gaskets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elmore, N. L.; Neale, B. C.

    1984-01-01

    Fluorelastomer and metal bonded reliably by new procedure. To cure fluoroelastomer cement, metal plate/gasket assembly placed in vacuum bag evacuated to minimum vacuum of 27 inches (69 cm) of mercury. Vacuum maintained throughout heating process and until assembly returns to ambient room temperature. Used to seal gaskets and O-rings or used to splice layers of elastomer to form non-standard sized O-rings. Another possible use is to apply protective, liquid-oxygen-compatible coating to metal parts.

  4. Fast valve

    DOEpatents

    Van Dyke, W.J.

    1992-04-07

    A fast valve is disclosed that can close on the order of 7 milliseconds. It is closed by the force of a compressed air spring with the moving parts of the valve designed to be of very light weight and the valve gate being of wedge shaped with O-ring sealed faces to provide sealing contact without metal to metal contact. The combination of the O-ring seal and an air cushion create a soft final movement of the valve closure to prevent the fast air acting valve from having a harsh closing. 4 figs.

  5. Fast valve

    DOEpatents

    Van Dyke, William J.

    1992-01-01

    A fast valve is disclosed that can close on the order of 7 milliseconds. It is closed by the force of a compressed air spring with the moving parts of the valve designed to be of very light weight and the valve gate being of wedge shaped with O-ring sealed faces to provide sealing contact without metal to metal contact. The combination of the O-ring seal and an air cushion create a soft final movement of the valve closure to prevent the fast air acting valve from having a harsh closing.

  6. Design of the KOSMOS oil-coupled spectrograph camera lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, Thomas P.; Derwent, Mark; Martini, Paul; Poczulp, Gary

    2014-07-01

    We present the design details of oil-coupled lens groups used in the KOSMOS spectrograph camera. The oil-coupled groups use silicone rubber O-rings in a unique way to accurately center lens elements with high radial and axial stiffness while also allowing easy assembly. The O-rings robustly seal the oil within the lens gaps to prevent oil migration. The design of an expansion diaphragm to compensate for differential expansion due to temperature changes is described. The issues of lens assembly, lens gap shimming, oil filling and draining, bubble mitigation, material compatibility, mechanical inspection, and optical testing are discussed.

  7. Performance testing of elastomeric seal materials under low and high temperature conditions: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    BRONOWSKI,DAVID R.

    The US Department of Energy Offices of Defense Programs and Civilian Radioactive Waste Management jointly sponsored a program to evaluate elastomeric O-ring seal materials for radioactive material shipping containers. The report presents the results of low- and high-temperature tests conducted on 27 common elastomeric compounds.

  8. Micro Chemical Oxygen-Iodine Laser (COIL)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-10-01

    required to form a good o-ring seal. Steam generator design A pumping system based on steam ejectors was designed during the course of the previous HEL-JTO...options for the steam generator design . The first is to catalyze the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide through the use of a standard solid

  9. Engineering and Technical Efforts to Design and Construct a 10 MW gyrotron Laboratory

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-01-18

    coupling coefficients are proptional to the square of the effective electric field at the beam. The effective electric field, Es, is given in...develop- ed to alleviate shorts in the body current beam diagnostic and baking constraints that previous o-ring designs have experienced. The prototype

  10. Thermal Barriers Developed for Solid Rocket Motor Nozzle Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M.; Dunlap, Patrick H., Jr.

    2000-01-01

    Space shuttle solid rocket motor case assembly joints are sealed with conventional O-ring seals that are shielded from 5500 F combustion gases by thick layers of insulation and by special joint-fill compounds that fill assembly splitlines in the insulation. On a number of occasions, NASA has observed hot gas penetration through defects in the joint-fill compound of several of the rocket nozzle assembly joints. In the current nozzle-to-case joint, NASA has observed penetration of hot combustion gases through the joint-fill compound to the inboard wiper O-ring in one out of seven motors. Although this condition does not threaten motor safety, evidence of hot gas penetration to the wiper O-ring results in extensive reviews before resuming flight. The solid rocket motor manufacturer (Thiokol) approached the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field about the possibility of applying Glenn's braided fiber preform seal as a thermal barrier to protect the O-ring seals. Glenn and Thiokol are working to improve the nozzle-to-case joint design by implementing a more reliable J-leg design and by using a braided carbon fiber thermal barrier that would resist any hot gases that the J-leg does not block.

  11. Degradation of different elastomeric polymers in simulated geothermal environments at 300°C

    DOE PAGES

    Sugama, Toshifumi; Pyatina, Tatiana; Redline, Erica Marie; ...

    2015-07-17

    This study evaluates the degradation of six different elastomeric polymers used for O-rings: EPDM, FEPM, type I- and II-FKM, FFKM, and FSR, in five different simulated geothermal environments at 300 °C: 1) non-aerated steam/cooling cycles, 2) aerated steam/cooling cycles, 3) water-based drilling fluid, 4) CO 2-rich geo-brine fluid, and, 5) heat–cool water quenching cycles. The factors assessed included the extent of oxidation, changes in thermal behavior, micro-defects, permeation of ionic species from the test environments into the O-rings, silicate-related scale-deposition, and changes in the O-rings' elastic modulus. The reliability of the O-rings to maintain their integrity depended on the elastomericmore » polymer composition and the exposure environment. FSR disintegrated while EPDM was oxidized only to some degree in all the environments, FKM withstood heat-water quenching but underwent chemical degradation, FEPM survived in all the environments with the exception of heat-water quenching where it underwent severe oxidation-induced degradation, and FFKM displayed outstanding compatibility with all the tested environments. This study discusses the degradation mechanisms of the polymers under the aforementioned conditions.« less

  12. Large diameter metal ring seal prevents gas leakage at 5000 psi

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Middelkoop, J. H.

    1966-01-01

    Large metal ring seal prevents gas leakage in hydrogen, helium, or nitrogen storage bottles at pressures up to 5,000 psi. The grooved ring seal which contains elastomer O-rings is installed between the mating faces of the access cover and the storage bottle.

  13. Degradation of different elastomeric polymers in simulated geothermal environments at 300°C

    SciTech Connect

    Sugama, Toshifumi; Pyatina, Tatiana; Redline, Erica Marie

    This study evaluates the degradation of six different elastomeric polymers used for O-rings: EPDM, FEPM, type I- and II-FKM, FFKM, and FSR, in five different simulated geothermal environments at 300 °C: 1) non-aerated steam/cooling cycles, 2) aerated steam/cooling cycles, 3) water-based drilling fluid, 4) CO 2-rich geo-brine fluid, and, 5) heat–cool water quenching cycles. The factors assessed included the extent of oxidation, changes in thermal behavior, micro-defects, permeation of ionic species from the test environments into the O-rings, silicate-related scale-deposition, and changes in the O-rings' elastic modulus. The reliability of the O-rings to maintain their integrity depended on the elastomericmore » polymer composition and the exposure environment. FSR disintegrated while EPDM was oxidized only to some degree in all the environments, FKM withstood heat-water quenching but underwent chemical degradation, FEPM survived in all the environments with the exception of heat-water quenching where it underwent severe oxidation-induced degradation, and FFKM displayed outstanding compatibility with all the tested environments. This study discusses the degradation mechanisms of the polymers under the aforementioned conditions.« less

  14. Four-step reaction for polytriazine elastomers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosser, R. W.; Korus, R. A.

    1980-01-01

    Four step imidoylamidine reaction sequence is used to make crosslinked polyperfluoralkyltriazines with superior elastomeric properties, greater molecular weight, and crosslinking control. Polymers can find useful application in fuel tank sealants, o-ring, wire enamels, pneumatic ducts, and many other applications.

  15. Rubber-coated bellows improves vibration damping in vacuum lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hegland, D. E.; Smith, R. J.

    1966-01-01

    Compact-vibration damping systems, consisting of rubber-coated metal bellows with a sliding O-ring connector, are used in vacuum lines. The device presents a metallic surface to the vacuum system and combines flexibility with the necessary stiffness. It protects against physical damage, reduces fatigue failure, and provides easy mating of nonparallel lines.

  16. Photoelastic analysis to compare implant-retained and conventional obturator dentures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goiato, Marcelo Coelho; Prado Ribeiro, Paula do; Pellizzer, Eduardo Piza; Pesqueira, Aldiéris Alves; Haddad, Marcela Filiè; dos Santos, Daniela Micheline; Moreno, Amália

    2012-06-01

    The use of photoelastic analysis contributes to the rehabilitation of patients with oral-sinus-nasal sequelae, which in turn affect important functions such as chewing, swallowing, and speech. The prosthetic rehabilitation with implant-retained dentures is a suitable treatment option. The purpose of this study was to verify, by using a photoelastic analysis, the stress distribution in implant-retained palatal obturator dentures (relined or not) associated with different attachment systems (O-ring, bar-clip, and bar-clip associated with distally placed O-rings). Two photoelastic models were obtained from an experimental maxillary cast presenting an oral-nasal communication. One model had two 13-mm length implants placed on the left region. A total of eight colorless maxillary obturators were fabricated and subsequently four of them were relined with soft silicone soft, and three had attachment systems associated. The assembly (model/attachment system/prosthesis) was positioned in a circular polariscope and a 100-N load was applied at 10 mm/s. The results showed that the denture relining influenced the distribution and amount of stress on the models. The O-ring group displayed the lowest stress levels, followed by bar-clip system associated with distally placed O-rings and bar-clip groups.

  17. Feed-through connector couples RF power into vacuum chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grandy, G. L.

    1967-01-01

    Feed-through device connects RF power to an RF coil in a vacuum chamber. The coil and leads are water cooled and vacuum tight seals are provided at the junctions. The device incorporates silver soldered copper tubes, polytetrafluoroethylene electrical insulators, and O-ring vacuum seals.

  18. International Symposium on Air Breathing Engines (5th)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-05-29

    Marquardt Co., USA 22 Flowfield Studies of Dump Combustors Raghunath S. Boray, Wright Patterson AFB, USA and Cherng Chang, Breham Laboratory, USA 23 A Ramjet...Bending Loads R. Padmanabhan, K. Ramachandra, V. Maruthi and B.J. Raghunath , Gas Turbine Research Establishment, Bangalore, India 56 Influence of O-Rings

  19. 77 FR 39209 - Foreign-Trade Zone 74-Baltimore, MD, Notification of Proposed Production Activity, J.D. Neuhaus...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-02

    ... from abroad include: air and hydraulic powered hoist and trolley subassemblies and parts, cranes/ winches and related parts, hoist chain, lubricating oils, plastic air hoses, rubber gaskets and o-rings, fasteners, springs, air filters, air pressure regulators, valves and related parts, and bearings and bearing...

  20. 3. VIEW LOOKING NORTH FROM LEFT TO RIGHT BAYS 5 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. VIEW LOOKING NORTH FROM LEFT TO RIGHT BAYS 5 & 6 OF O-RING FACILITY, POWER PLANT. TEST STAND SUPPORT BUILDING, (REMAINING WALLS) DYNAMIC TEST TOWERS IN BACKGROUND (BOTH VERSIONS). - Marshall Space Flight Center, East Test Area, Power Plant Test Stand, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  1. 78 FR 79391 - Foreign-Trade Zone (FTZ) 22-Chicago, Illinois, Notification of Proposed Production Activity...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-30

    ...; cable clamps; locks; belts; O-rings; sealing gaskets; support packages; filter bags; disposable bags; assembly bags; dust bags; maintenance packs; paper bags; dirt tube kits; paper adaptor bags; filters...; wire racks; bake pans; pizza pans; coffee water filters; water filters; base assemblies; dust cup...

  2. Finite element analysis to compare complete denture and implant-retained overdentures with different attachment systems.

    PubMed

    Barão, Valentim Adelino Ricardo; Assunção, Wirley Gonçalves; Tabata, Lucas Fernando; Delben, Juliana Aparecida; Gomes, Erica Alves; de Sousa, Edson Antonio Capello; Rocha, Eduardo Passos

    2009-07-01

    This finite element analysis compared stress distribution on complete dentures and implant-retained overdentures with different attachment systems. Four models of edentulous mandible were constructed: group A (control), complete denture; group B, overdenture retained by 2 splinted implants with bar-clip system; group C, overdenture retained by 2 unsplinted implants with o'ring system; and group D, overdenture retained by 2 splinted implants with bar-clip and 2 distally placed o'ring system. Evaluation was performed on Ansys software, with 100-N vertical load applied on central incisive teeth. The lowest maximum general stress value (in megapascal) was observed in group A (64.305) followed by groups C (119.006), D (258.650), and B (349.873). The same trend occurred in supporting tissues with the highest stress value for cortical bone. Unsplinted implants associated with the o'ring attachment system showed the lowest maximum stress values among all overdenture groups. Furthermore, o'ring system also improved stress distribution when associated with bar-clip system.

  3. Executive Order 12898 and Social, Economic, and Sociopolitical Factors Influencing Toxic Release Inventory Facility Location in EPA Region 6: A Multi-Scale Spatial Assessment of Environmental Justice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Andrea Lisa

    2013-01-01

    Toxic Release Inventory facilities are among the many environmental hazards shown to create environmental inequities in the United States. This project examined four factors associated with Toxic Release Inventory, specifically, manufacturing facility location at multiple spatial scales using spatial analysis techniques (i.e., O-ring statistic and…

  4. 1. VIEW EAST/SOUTHEAST FROM LEFT TO RIGHT REMAINS OF POWER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. VIEW EAST/SOUTHEAST FROM LEFT TO RIGHT REMAINS OF POWER PLANT TEST STAND INCLUDING SUPPORT BUILDING (BACKGROUND), FLAME TRENCH (FOREGROUND) RECENT ADDITION (O-RING FACILITY) OVER OTHER FLAME TRENCH. - Marshall Space Flight Center, East Test Area, Power Plant Test Stand, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  5. Filter for high-pressure gases has easy take- down, assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mac Glashan, W. F.

    1964-01-01

    A small metal filter body, for use in tubing supplying sterilization gases, has an inlet end that can be unscrewed. Inside, the high pressure filter is supported on both sides and sealed by an O ring. Design facilitates assembly and disassembly of parts.

  6. Viscoelastic analysis of seals for extended service life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bower, Mark V.

    1993-01-01

    The space station is being developed for a service life of up to thirty years. As a consequence, the design requirements for the seals to be used are unprecedented. Full scale testing to assure the selected seals can satisfy the design requirements are not feasible. As an alternative, a sub-scale test program (2) has been developed by MSFC to calibrate the analysis tools to be used to certify the proposed design. This research has been conducted in support of the MSFC Integrated Seal Test Program. The ultimate objective of this research is to correlate analysis and test results to qualify the analytical tools which in turn, are to be used to qualify the flight hardware. Seals are simple devices, in wide spread use. The most common type of seal is the O-ring. O-ring seals are typically rings of rubber with a circular cross section. The rings are placed between the surfaces to be sealed, usually in a groove of some design. The particular design may differ based on a number of different factors. This research is focused on O-rings that are staticly compressed by perpendicular clamping forces, commonly referred to as face seals. In this type of seal the O-ring is clamped between the sealing surfaces by loads perpendicular to the circular cross section.

  7. Holder for rotating glass body

    DOEpatents

    Kolleck, Floyd W.

    1978-04-04

    A device is provided for holding and centering a rotating glass body such as a rod or tube. The device includes a tubular tip holder which may be held in a lathe chuck. The device can utilize a variety of centering tips each adapted for a particular configuration, such as a glass O-ring joint or semi-ball joint.

  8. Hydrazine-Compatible Elastomer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markles, O., F.; Dye, T. G.

    1982-01-01

    Hydrazine hardly reacts with ethylene propylene diene monomer, even at high temperatures. According to report to tests, EPDM is most hydrazine-compatible material among elastomers. Has strong potential as valve-seat and O-ring seal with hydrazine, especially at high temperatures.

  9. Lifetime Extension Report: Progress on the SAVY-4000 Lifetime Extension Program

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, Cynthia F.; Smith, Paul Herrick; Weis, Eric M.

    The 3-year accelerated aging study of the SAVY-4000 O-ring shows very little evidence of significant degradation to samples subjected to aggressive elevated temperature and radiation conditions. Whole container thermal aging studies followed by helium leakage testing and compression set measurements were used to establish an estimate for a failure criterion for O-ring compression set of ≥65 %. The whole container aging studies further show that the air flow and efficiency functions of the filter do not degrade significantly after thermal aging. However, the degradation of the water-resistant function leads to water penetration failure after four months at 210°C, but doesmore » not cause failure after 10 months at 120°C (130°C is the maximum operating temperature for the PTFE membrane). The thermal aging data for O-ring compression set do not meet the assumptions of standard time-temperature superposition analysis for accelerated aging studies. Instead, the data suggest that multiple degradation mechanisms are operative, with a reversible mechanism operative at low aging temperatures and an irreversible mechanism dominating at high aging temperatures. To distinguish between these mechanisms, we have measured compression set after allowing the sample to physically relax, thereby minimizing the effect of the reversible mechanism. The resulting data were analyzed using two distinct mathematical methods to obtain a lifetime estimate based on chemical degradation alone. Both methods support a lifetime estimate of greater than 150 years at 80°C. Although the role of the reversible mechanism is not fully understood, it is clear that the contribution to the total compression set is small in comparison to that due to the chemical degradation mechanism. To better understand the chemical degradation mechanism, thermally aged O-ring samples have been characterized by Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR), Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR), Gel Permeation Chromatography

  10. Space shuttle Production Verification Motor 1 (PV-1) static fire

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    All inspection and instrumentation data indicate that the PV-1 static test firing conducted 18 Aug. 1988 was successful. With the exception of the intentionally flawed joints and static test modifications, PV-1 was flight configuration. Fail-safe flaws guaranteeing pressure to test the sealing capability of primary O-rings were included in the aft field joint, case-to-nozzle joint, and nozzle internal Joint 5. The test was conducted at ambient conditions, with the exception of the field joints and case/nozzle joints which were maintained at a minimum of 75 F. Ballistics performance values were within specification requirements. The PV-1 motor exhibited chamber pressure oscillations similar to previously tested Space Shuttle redesigned solid rocket motors, particularly QM-7. The first longitudinal mode oscillations experienced by PV-1 were the strongest ever measured in a Space Shuttle motor. Investigation into this observation is being conducted. Joint insulation performed as designed with no evidence of gas flow within unflawed forward field joints. The intentionally flawed center and aft case field joint insulation performance was excellent. There was no evidence of hot gas past the center field joint capture feature O-ring, the case-to-nozzle joint primary O-ring, or the aft field joint primary O-ring. O-ring seals and barriers with assured pressure at the flaws showed erosion and heat effect, but all sealed against passage of hot gases with the exception of the aft field joint capture feature O-ring. There was no evidence of erosion, heat effect, or blowby on any O-ring seals or barriers at the unflawed joints. Nozzle performance was nominal with typical erosion. Post-test examination revealed that the forward nose ring was of the old high performance motor design configuration with the 150-deg ply angle. All nozzle components remained intact for post-test evaluation. The thrust vector control system operated correctly. The water deluge system, CO2 quench, and

  11. Stability of the prosthetic screws of three types of craniofacial prostheses retention systems

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This study aimed to evaluate the stability of prosthetic screws from three types of craniofacial prostheses retention systems (bar-clip, ball/O-ring, and magnet) when submitted to mechanical cycling. Materials and Methods Twelve models of acrylic resin were used with implants placed 20 mm from each other and separated into three groups: (1) bar-clip (Sistema INP, São Paulo, Brazil), (2) ball/O-ring (Sistema INP), and (3) magnet (Metalmag, São Paulo, Brazil), with four samples in each group. Each sample underwent a mechanical cycling removal and insertion test (f=0.5 Hz) to determine the torque and the detorque values of the retention screws. A servo-hydraulic MTS machine (810-Flextest 40; MTS Systems, Eden Prairie, MN, USA) was used to perform the cycling with 2.5 mm and a displacement of 10 mm/s. The screws of the retention systems received an initial torque of 30 Ncm and the torque values required for loosening the screw values were obtained in three cycles (1,080, 2,160, and 3,240). The screws were retorqued to 30 Ncm before each new cycle. Results The sample was composed of 24 screws grouped as follows: bar-clip (n=8), ball/O-ring (n=8), and magnet (n=8). There were significant differences between the groups, with greater detorque values observed in the ball/O-ring group when compared to the bar-clip and magnet groups for the first cycle. However, the detorque value was greater in the bar-clip group for the second cycle. Conclusion The results of this study indicate that all prosthetic screws will loosen slightly after an initial tightening torque, also the bar-clip retention system demonstrated greater loosening of the screws when compared with ball/O-ring and magnet retention systems. PMID:28053905

  12. SciTech Connect

    Mcwilliams, A. J.; Daugherty, W. L.; Skidmore, T. E.

    The 9975 Type B shipping package is used within the DOE complex for shipping special nuclear materials. This package is re-certified annually in accordance with Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP) requirements. The package is also used at the Savannah River Site as part of the long-term storage configuration of special nuclear materials. As such, the packages do not undergo annual recertification during storage, with uncertainty as to how long some of the package components will meet their functional requirements in the storage environment. The packages are currently approved for up to 15 years storage, and work continues to providemore » a technical basis to extend that period. This report describes efforts by the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to extend the service life estimate of Viton® GLT and GLT-S fluoroelastomer O-rings used in the 9975 shipping package. O-rings of both GLT and GLT-S compositions are undergoing accelerated aging at elevated temperature, and are periodically tested for compression stress relaxation (CSR) behavior. The CSR behavior of O-rings was evaluated at temperatures from 175 to 400 °F. These collective data were used to develop predictive models for extrapolation of CSR behavior to relevant service temperatures (< 156 °F). The predictive model developed from the CSR data conservatively indicates a service life of approximately 37 years for Viton GLT O-rings at the maximum effective service temperature of 156 °F. The estimated service life for Viton GLT-S O-rings is significantly longer.« less

  13. SciTech Connect

    Daugherty, W.; Mcwilliams, A.; Skidmore, E.

    The 9975 Type B shipping package is used within the DOE complex for shipping special nuclear materials. This package is re-certified annually in accordance with Safety Analysis Report requirements. The package is also used at the Savannah River Site as part of the long-term storage configuration of special nuclear materials. As such, the packages do not undergo annual recertification during storage, with uncertainty as to how long some of the package components will meet their functional requirements in the storage environment. The packages are currently approved for up to 15 years storage, and work continues to provide a technical basismore » to extend that period. This paper describes efforts by the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to extend the service life estimate of Viton® GLT and GLT-S fluoroelastomer O-rings used in the 9975 shipping package. O-rings of both compositions are undergoing accelerated aging at elevated temperature, and are periodically tested for compression stress relaxation (CSR) behavior and leak performance. The CSR behavior of O-rings was evaluated at temperatures from 79 °C to 177 °C. These collective data were used to develop predictive models for extrapolation of CSR behavior to relevant service temperatures (< 75 °C). O-rings were also aged in Primary Containment Vessel (PCV) fixtures at temperatures ranging from 79 °C to 232 °C. The fixtures are helium leak tested periodically to determine if they remain leak-tight. The PCV fixture tests demonstrate that the 9975 O-rings will remain leak-tight at temperatures up to 149 °C for 3 years or more, and no leak failures have been observed with up to 8 years aging at 93 °C. Significantly longer periods of leak-tight service are expected at the lower temperatures actually experienced in the storage environment. The predictive model developed from the CSR data conservatively indicates a service life of more than 20 years at the bounding temperature of 75 °C. Although the

  14. Contamination analysis unit

    DOEpatents

    Gregg, H.R.; Meltzer, M.P.

    1996-05-28

    The portable Contamination Analysis Unit (CAU) measures trace quantities of surface contamination in real time. The detector head of the portable contamination analysis unit has an opening with an O-ring seal, one or more vacuum valves and a small mass spectrometer. With the valve closed, the mass spectrometer is evacuated with one or more pumps. The O-ring seal is placed against a surface to be tested and the vacuum valve is opened. Data is collected from the mass spectrometer and a portable computer provides contamination analysis. The CAU can be used to decontaminate and decommission hazardous and radioactive surfaces by measuring residual hazardous surface contamination, such as tritium and trace organics. It provides surface contamination data for research and development applications as well as real-time process control feedback for industrial cleaning operations and can be used to determine the readiness of a surface to accept bonding or coatings. 1 fig.

  15. Contamination analysis unit

    DOEpatents

    Gregg, Hugh R.; Meltzer, Michael P.

    1996-01-01

    The portable Contamination Analysis Unit (CAU) measures trace quantifies of surface contamination in real time. The detector head of the portable contamination analysis unit has an opening with an O-ring seal, one or more vacuum valves and a small mass spectrometer. With the valve closed, the mass spectrometer is evacuated with one or more pumps. The O-ring seal is placed against a surface to be tested and the vacuum valve is opened. Data is collected from the mass spectrometer and a portable computer provides contamination analysis. The CAU can be used to decontaminate and decommission hazardous and radioactive surface by measuring residual hazardous surface contamination, such as tritium and trace organics It provides surface contamination data for research and development applications as well as real-time process control feedback for industrial cleaning operations and can be used to determine the readiness of a surface to accept bonding or coatings.

  16. Method and apparatus for making an optical element having a dielectric film

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Augason, Gordon C. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A film-application device (FAD) comprising a pair of exterior, tapered, O-ring bearing plate members and a central plate member for simplifying the process of thermally bonding a thin dielectric film to a substrate comprising an optical element are discussed. In use, the film is sandwiched between the O rings and stretched across the optical element by squeezing the exterior plates together before bonding to the element. The film may be used for protecting the optical element or to reduce surface reflection of radiation. The FAD may also be used without the center plate to stretch a dielectric film prior to its attachment to or insertion in a holder to make pellicles or beam-splitters.

  17. Propagation of short stress pulses in discrete strongly nonlinear tunable metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yichao; Nesterenko, Vitali F

    2014-08-28

    The propagation of short pulses with wavelength comparable to the size of a unit cell has been studied in a one-dimensional discrete metamaterial composed of steel discs alternating with toroidal nitrile O-rings under different levels of precompression using experiments, numerical simulations and theoretical analysis. This strongly nonlinear metamaterial is more tunable than granular chains composed of linear elastic spherical particles and has better potential for attenuation of dynamic loads. A double power-law relationship for compressed O-rings was found to describe adequately their quasi-static and dynamic behaviour with significantly different elastic moduli. It is demonstrated that the double power-law metamaterial investigated allows a dramatic increase in sound speed and acoustic impedance of three to four times using a moderate force. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  18. Damped flexible seal

    DOEpatents

    DuBois, Neil J.; Amaral, Antonio M.

    1992-10-27

    A damped flexible seal assembly for a torpedo isolates the tailcone thereof rom vibrational energy present in the drive shaft assembly. A pair of outside flanges, each of which include an inwardly facing groove and an O-ring constrained therein, provide a watertight seal against the outer non-rotating surface of the drive shaft assembly. An inside flange includes an outwardly-facing groove and an O-ring constrained therein, and provides a watertight seal against the inner surface of the tail cone. Two cast-in-place elastomeric seals provide a watertight seal between the flanges and further provide a damping barrier between the outside flanges and the inside flanges for damping vibrational energy present in the drive shaft assembly before the energy can reach the tailcone through the seal assembly.

  19. Extreme pressure fluid sample transfer pump

    DOEpatents

    Halverson, Justin E.; Bowman, Wilfred W.

    1990-01-01

    A transfer pump for samples of fluids at very low or very high pressures comprising a cylinder having a piston sealed with an O-ring, the piston defining forward and back chambers, an inlet and exit port and valve arrangement for the fluid to enter and leave the forward chamber, and a port and valve arrangement in the back chamber for adjusting the pressure across the piston so that the pressure differential across the piston is essentially zero and approximately equal to the pressure of the fluid so that the O-ring seals against leakage of the fluid and the piston can be easily moved, regardless of the pressure of the fluid. The piston may be actuated by a means external to the cylinder with a piston rod extending through a hole in the cylinder sealed with a bellows attached to the piston head and the interior of the back chamber.

  20. IR and SiO Maser Observations of Miras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cotton, W. D.; Mennesson, B.; Diamond, P. J.; Perrin, G.; Coudé du Foresto, V.; Chagnon, G.; van Langevelde, H. J.; Ridgway, S.; Waters, R.; Vlemmings, W.; Morel, S.; Traub, W.; Carleton, N.; Lacasse, M.

    2005-12-01

    Preliminary results of a coordinated program of near IR and SiO maser interferometric observations of Mira variables are reported. The 2.2 and 3.6 micron results are from the FLUOR/TISIS beam combiners on the IOTA interferometer and the SiO maser observations from the VLBA. The ratio of the SiO ring diameter to the apparent diameter at 2.2 microns for stars in our sample cluster around 2, whereas the 3.6 micron diameters range from slightly larger than the 2.2 micron diameter to approximately the SiO ring diameter. This may be due to differences in the opacity of the molecular envelope at 3.6 microns.

  1. Chromatography resin support

    DOEpatents

    Dobos, James G.

    2002-01-01

    An apparatus and method of using an improved chromatography resin support is disclosed. The chromatography support platform is provided by a stainless steel hollow cylinder adapted for being inserted into a chromatography column. An exterior wall of the stainless steel cylinder defines a groove for carrying therein an "O"-ring. The upper surface of the stainless steel column is covered by a fine stainless steel mesh welded to the edges of the stainless steel cylinder. When placed upon a receiving ledge defined within a chromatography column, the "O"-ring provides a fluid tight seal with the inner edge wall of the chromatography cylinder. The stainless steel mesh supports the chromatography matrix and provides a back flushable support which is economical and simple to construct.

  2. Design and analysis of seals for extended service life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bower, Mark V.

    1992-01-01

    Space Station Freedom is being developed for a service life of up to thirty years. As a consequence, the design requirements for the seals to be used are unprecedented. Full scale testing to assure the selected seals can satisfy the design requirements are not feasible. As an alternative, a sub-scale test program has been developed by MSFC to calibrate the analysis tools to be used to certify the proposed design. This research has been conducted in support of the MSFC Integrated Seal Test Program. The ultimate objective of this research is to correlate analysis and test results to qualify the analytical tools, which in turn, are to be used to qualify the flight hardware. This research is totally focused on O-rings that are compressed by perpendicular clamping forces. In this type of seal the O-ring is clamped between the sealing surfaces by loads perpendicular to the circular cross section.

  3. In-Vacuum Dissociator for Atomic-Hydrogen Masers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vessot, R. F.

    1987-01-01

    Thermal control and vacuum sealing achieved while contamination avoided. Simple, relatively inexpensive molecular-hydrogen dissociator for atomic-hydrogen masers used on Earth or in vacuum of space. No air cooling required, and absence of elastomeric O-ring seals prevents contamination. In-vacuum dissociator for atomic hydrogen masers, hydrogen gas in glass dissociator dissociated by radio-frequency signal transmitted from surrounding 3-turn coil. Heat in glass conducted away by contacting metal surfaces.

  4. ACES. Accelerated Corrosion Expert Simulator

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-02-01

    Composites Coating Systems Organic Inorganic Ceramic Materials 22 Inputs and Dimensions Xi Thickness Hardness Strength Ductility Abrasion Resistance...GPU 25 T-Handle Latch 10-Year ACT Material/ Coating Configuration Die Cast Zinc T-Handle Carbon Steel Pin CS Shank CS T-Washer Carbon Steel Dish E- coat ...CARC Zinc Plating Cadmium Plated BoltE- coat /CARC CS Panel CS Panel O-Ring E- coat /CARC Original (10-year ACT) Design Green Flag Color Qualitative

  5. Synthesis of perfluoroalkylether triazine elastomers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosser, R. W.; Korus, R. A.

    1980-01-01

    A method of perfluoroalkylether triazine elastomer synthesis is described. To form an elastomer, the resultant polymer is heated in a closed oven at slightly reduced pressures for 1-day periods at 100, 130 and 150 C. A high-molecular-weight perfluoroalkylether triazine elastomer is produced that exhibits thermal and oxidative stability. This material is potentially useful in applications such as high-temperature seals, 'O' rings, and wire enamels.

  6. Fuel and Fuel System Materials Compatibility Test Program for A JP-8+100 Fuel Additive. Volume 1: Thermal Stability Additive Package BetzDearborn Spec Aid(Registered) 8Q462

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-10-01

    SAE Rings, Sealing, Butadiene-Acrylonitrile ( NBR ), Rubber Fuel and Low Temperature Resistant 60 - 70 MIL-R-83248C Rubber , Fluorocarbon...KAPTON/TEFLON (COMPOSITE) WIRE I.I.10 34 VI. REFERENCE DOCUMENTS Non-Metallics MIL-HDBK-149B Military Standardization Hand Book Rubber ...ASTM D-1414 Standard Test Methods for Rubber O-Rings ASTM D-412 Type II Standard Test Methods for Vulcanized Rubber and Thermoplastic

  7. Best Practices for Fuel System Contamination Detection and Remediation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-14

    Valve Fyre Ring GR DBB Style Plug Valve Gasket SS graphite Spiral DBB Style Plug Valve O- rings & slip seals VI DBB Style Plug Valve Packing gland...Pumps Impeller Key SS Vertical Turbine Pumps Impeller Retaining Ring SS Vertical Turbine Pumps Impellers (Electroless Nickel Plating) DI Vertical... Turbine Pumps Line Shaft SS Vertical Turbine Pumps Lineshaft Bearing CA Vertical Turbine Pumps Mating Ring Si-C Vertical Turbine Pumps Mechanical

  8. Best Practices for Fuel System Contamination Detection and Remediation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-01-15

    Valve Fyre Ring GR DBB Style Plug Valve Gasket SS graphite Spiral DBB Style Plug Valve O- rings & slip seals VI DBB Style Plug Valve Packing gland...Pumps Impeller Key SS Vertical Turbine Pumps Impeller Retaining Ring SS Vertical Turbine Pumps Impellers (Electroless Nickel Plating) DI Vertical... Turbine Pumps Line Shaft SS Vertical Turbine Pumps Lineshaft Bearing CA Vertical Turbine Pumps Mating Ring Si-C Vertical Turbine Pumps Mechanical

  9. Experimental Studies of Premixed Flame Structure and Propagation Characteristics in Compressible Flow

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-14

    turbulence has not been addressed experimentally. These issues are important for next generation high-pressure gas turbine , and especially, for scramjet...subsonic wind tunnel capable of Mach numbers in excess of Mach 0.7, with the ability to generate varying turbulence levels and accommodate fuel injection...square O- ring stock seal mounted in the corners to aid in locating the individual seals and window panes, as well as RTV silicone gasket seal galleries

  10. Utility Distribution Systems in Sweden, Finland, Norway and England

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-11-01

    the duct adds to the water protection and sumps, with access for pumping, are provided -at low points. Glass wool or mineral wool insulation is placed...mm thick, is glass, mineral wool or polyurethane foam. The outer pipe is steel, polyurethane or asbestos cement coupled with O-ring seals. Asbestos...decided that asbestos cement should be replaced by less dangerous materials. Some use is made of steel, plastic or copper tubes with mineral wool or

  11. Methods Development for the Isolation and Culture of Primary Corneal Endothelial Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-02-01

    are collectively referred to as mustard gas keratopathy (MGK). Prevailing evidence suggests that late onset MGK may result from a deficit in corneal...and PBK is similar to that seen in mustard gas keratopathy (MGK).3,6,7 MGK can occur years after ocular sulfur mustard (SM) exposure. Treatment...component into the stage component such that the O-ring creates a liquid -tight seal. The final assembled device is shown in panel D. A primary

  12. Partial-Vacuum-Gasketed Electrochemical Corrosion Cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonifas, Andrew P.; Calle, Luz M.; Hintze, Paul E.

    2006-01-01

    An electrochemical cell for making corrosion measurements has been designed to prevent or reduce crevice corrosion, which is a common source of error in prior such cells. The present cell (see figure) includes an electrolyte reservoir with O-ring-edged opening at the bottom. In preparation for a test, the reservoir, while empty, is pressed down against a horizontal specimen surface to form an O-ring seal. A purge of air or other suitable gas is begun in the reservoir, and the pressure in the reservoir is regulated to maintain a partial vacuum. While maintaining the purge and partial vacuum, and without opening the interior of the reservoir to the atmosphere, the electrolyte is pumped into the reservoir. The reservoir is then slowly lifted a short distance off the specimen. The level of the partial vacuum is chosen such that the differential pressure is just sufficient to keep the electrolyte from flowing out of the reservoir through the small O-ring/specimen gap. Electrochemical measurements are then made. Because there is no gasket (and, hence, no crevice between the specimen and the gasket), crevice corrosion is unlikely to occur.

  13. Development of a new seal for use on large openings of pressurized spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weddendorf, B.

    1994-01-01

    The goal of this project was to design, build, and test an example of the seal invented by the author for use on Space Station Freedom and patented in 1991. The seal features a metallic spring core and replaceable elastomeric sealing elements. The metallic spring is designed to retain the sealing force of the elastomeric element against both sides of face seal gland for any specified amount of waviness or separation of the glands. A seal able to tolerate at least 1.3 mm (0.05 in) of flange distortion or separation and a test fixture of this seal which allowed direct comparison testing of O-rings were built. These designs were tested to compare leakage at different amounts of flange deflection. Results of the testing show the development seal exceeded its requirement to seal 1.3 mm of flange separation by 1 mm. This compared with the O-ring leakage, increasing dramatically at 0.5 mm of separation. The development seal also leaked at a lower rate than the O-ring seals in all tests.

  14. Structural behavior of the space shuttle SRM Tang-Clevis joint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greene, W. H.; Knight, N. F., Jr.; Stockwell, A. E.

    1986-01-01

    The space shuttle Challenger accident investigation focused on the failure of a tang-clevis joint on the right solid rocket motor. The existence of relative motion between the inner arm of the clevis and the O-ring sealing surface on the tang has been identified as a potential contributor to this failure. This motion can cause the O-rings to become unseated and therefore lose their sealing capability. Finite element structural analyses have been performed to predict both deflections and stresses in the joint under the primary, pressure loading condition. These analyses have demonstrated the difficulty of accurately predicting the structural behavior of the tang-clevis joint. Stresses in the vicinity of the connecting pins, obtained from elastic analyses, considerably exceed the material yield allowables indicating that inelastic analyses are probably necessary. Two modifications have been proposed to control the relative motion between the inner clevis arm and the tang at the O-ring sealing surface. One modification, referred to as the capture feature, uses additional material on the inside of the tang to restrict motion of the inner clevis arm. The other modification uses external stiffening rings above and below the joint to control the local bending in the shell near the joint. Both of these modifications are shown to be effective in controlling the relative motion in the joint.

  15. Structural behavior of the space shuttle SRM tang-clevis joint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greene, William H.; Knight, Norman F., Jr.; Stockwell, Alan E.

    1988-01-01

    The space shuttle Challenger accident investigation focused on the failure of a tang-clevis joint on the right solid rocket motor. The existence of relative motion between the inner arm of the clevis and the O-ring sealing surface on the tang has been identified as a potential contributor to this failure. This motion can cause the O-rings to become unseated and therefore lose their sealing capability. Finite element structural analyses have been performed to predict both deflections and stresses in the joint under the primary, pressure loading condition. These analyses have demonstrated the difficulty of accurately predicting the structural behavior of the tang-clevis joint. Stresses in the vicinity of the connecting pins, obtained from elastic analyses, considerably exceed the material yield allowables indicating that inelastic analyses are probably necessary. Two modifications have been proposed to control the relative motion between the inner clevis arm and the tang at the O-ring sealing surface. One modification, referred to as the capture feature, uses additional material on the inside of the tang to restrict motion of the inner clevis arm. The other modification uses external stiffening rings above and below the joint to control the local bending in the shell near the joint. Both of these modifications are shown to be effective in controlling the relative motion in the joint.

  16. The relative effects of habitat loss and fragmentation on population genetic variation in the red-cockaded woodpecker (Picoides borealis).

    PubMed

    Bruggeman, Douglas J; Wiegand, Thorsten; Fernández, Néstor

    2010-09-01

    The relative influence of habitat loss, fragmentation and matrix heterogeneity on the viability of populations is a critical area of conservation research that remains unresolved. Using simulation modelling, we provide an analysis of the influence both patch size and patch isolation have on abundance, effective population size (N(e)) and F(ST). An individual-based, spatially explicit population model based on 15 years of field work on the red-cockaded woodpecker (Picoides borealis) was applied to different landscape configurations. The variation in landscape patterns was summarized using spatial statistics based on O-ring statistics. By regressing demographic and genetics attributes that emerged across the landscape treatments against proportion of total habitat and O-ring statistics, we show that O-ring statistics provide an explicit link between population processes, habitat area, and critical thresholds of fragmentation that affect those processes. Spatial distances among land cover classes that affect biological processes translated into critical scales at which the measures of landscape structure correlated best with genetic indices. Therefore our study infers pattern from process, which contrasts with past studies of landscape genetics. We found that population genetic structure was more strongly affected by fragmentation than population size, which suggests that examining only population size may limit recognition of fragmentation effects that erode genetic variation. If effective population size is used to set recovery goals for endangered species, then habitat fragmentation effects may be sufficiently strong to prevent evaluation of recovery based on the ratio of census:effective population size alone.

  17. Embedded Strain Gauges for Condition Monitoring of Silicone Gaskets

    PubMed Central

    Schotzko, Timo; Lang, Walter

    2014-01-01

    A miniaturized strain gauge with a thickness of 5 µm is molded into a silicone O-ring. This is a first step toward embedding sensors in gaskets for structural health monitoring. The signal of the integrated sensor exhibits a linear correlation with the contact pressure of the O-ring. This affords the opportunity to monitor the gasket condition during installation. Thus, damages caused by faulty assembly can be detected instantly, and early failures, with their associated consequences, can be prevented. Through the embedded strain gauge, the contact pressure applied to the gasket can be directly measured. Excessive pressure and incorrect positioning of the gasket can cause structural damage to the material of the gasket, which can lead to an early outage. A platinum strain gauge is fabricated on a thin polyimide layer and is contacted through gold connections. The measured resistance pressure response exhibits hysteresis for the first few strain cycles, followed by a linear behavior. The short-term impact of the embedded sensor on the stability of the gasket is investigated. Pull-tests with O-rings and test specimens have indicated that the integration of the miniaturized sensors has no negative impact on the stability in the short term. PMID:25014099

  18. Evaluation of stress patterns produced by implant-retained overdentures and implant-retained fixed partial denture.

    PubMed

    Mazaro, José Vitor Quinelli; Filho, Humberto Gennari; Vedovatto, Eduardo; Pellizzer, Eduardo Piza; Rezende, Maria Cristina Rosifini Alves; Zavanelli, Adriana Cristina

    2011-11-01

    The purposes of this study were to photoelastically measure the biomechanical behavior of 4 implants retaining different cantilevered bar mandibular overdenture designs and to compare a fixed partial denture (FPD). A photoelastic model of a human edentulous mandible was fabricated, which contained 4 screw-type implants (3.75 × 10 mm) embedded in the parasymphyseal area. An FPD and 3 overdenture designs with the following attachments were evaluated: 3 plastic Hader clips, 1 Hader clip with 2 posterior resilient cap attachments, and 3 ball/O-ring attachments. Vertical occlusal forces of 100 N were applied between the central incisor and unilaterally to the right and left second premolars and second molars. Stresses that developed in the supporting structure were monitored photoelastically and recorded photographically. The results showed that the anterior loading, the overdenture with 3 plastic Hader clips, displayed the largest stress concentration at the medium implant. With premolar loading, the FPD and overdenture with 3 plastic Hader clips displayed the highest stresses to the ipsilateral terminal implant. With molar loading, the overdenture with 3 ball/O-ring attachments displayed the most uniform stress distribution in the posterior edentulous ridge, with less overloading in the terminal implant. It was concluded that vertical forces applied to the bar-clip overdenture and FPD created immediate stress patterns of greater magnitude and concentration on the ipsilateral implants, whereas the ball/O-ring attachments transferred minimal stress to the implants. The increased cantilever in the FPD caused the highest stresses to the terminal implant.

  19. Implementation of a Non-Metallic Barrier in an Electric Motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    M?Sadoques, George; Carra, Michael; Beringer, Woody

    2012-01-01

    Electric motors that run in pure oxygen must be sealed, or "canned," for safety reasons to prevent the oxygen from entering into the electrical portion of the motor. The current canning process involves designing a metallic barrier around the rotor to provide the separation. This metallic barrier reduces the motor efficiency as speed is increased. In higher-speed electric motors, efficiency is greatly improved if a very thin, nonmetallic barrier can be utilized. The barrier thickness needs to be approximately 0.025-in. (.0.6-mm) thick and can be made of a brittle material such as glass. The motors, however, designed for space applications are typically subject to high-vibration environments. A fragile, non-metallic barrier can be utilized in a motor assembly if held in place by a set of standard rubber O-ring seals. The O-rings provide the necessary sealing to keep oxygen away from the electrical portion of the motor and also isolate the fragile barrier from the harsh motor vibration environment. The compliance of the rubber O-rings gently constrains the fragile barrier and isolates it from the harsh external motor environment. The use of a non-metallic barrier greatly improves motor performance, especially at higher speeds, while isolating the electronics from the working fluid with an inert liner.

  20. Engineering and Design of the Steady Inductive Helicity Injected Torus (HIT--SI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sieck, P. E.; Jarboe, T. R.; Nelson, B. A.; Rogers, J. A.; Shumlak, U.

    1999-11-01

    Steady Inductive Helicity Injection (SIHI) is an inductive helicity injection method that injects helicity at a nearly constant rate, without open field lines, and without removing any helicity or magnetic energy from the plasma.(T.R. Jarboe, Fusion Technology, 36) (1), p. 85, 1999 SIHI directly produces a rotating magnetic field structure, and in the frame of the rotating field the current profile is nearly time independent. The Steady Inductive Helicity Injected Torus (HIT--SI) is a spheromak designed to implement SIHI so that the current profile in the rotating frame is optimized. The geometry of HIT--SI will be presented, including the manufacturing techniques and metallurgical processes planned for construction of the close-fitting flux conserver. The flux conserver is made of aged chromium copper with 80% the conductivity of pure copper. The detailed electrical insulation requirements in the helicity injector design lead to a complex o-ring seal and a plasma-sprayed alumina insulation coating. This has prompted the construction of an o-ring prototype test fixture having the main features of the o-ring design and the alumina coating. The design and evaluation of this fixture will also be presented with vacuum and voltage test results.

  1. Rocket Motor Joint Construction Including Thermal Barrier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M. (Inventor); Dunlap, Patrick H., Jr. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A thermal barrier for extremely high temperature applications consists of a carbon fiber core and one or more layers of braided carbon fibers surrounding the core. The thermal barrier is preferably a large diameter ring, having a relatively small cross-section. The thermal barrier is particularly suited for use as part of a joint structure in solid rocket motor casings to protect low temperature elements such as the primary and secondary elastomeric O-ring seals therein from high temperature gases of the rocket motor. The thermal barrier exhibits adequate porosity to allow pressure to reach the radially outward disposed O-ring seals allowing them to seat and perform the primary sealing function. The thermal barrier is disposed in a cavity or groove in the casing joint, between the hot propulsion gases interior of the rocket motor and primary and secondary O-ring seals. The characteristics of the thermal barrier may be enhanced in different applications by the inclusion of certain compounds in the casing joint, by the inclusion of RTV sealant or similar materials at the site of the thermal barrier, and/or by the incorporation of a metal core or plurality of metal braids within the carbon braid in the thermal barrier structure.

  2. Retention and wear behaviors of two implant overdenture stud-type attachments at different implant angulations.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jae-Won; Bae, Ji-Hyeon; Jeong, Chang-Mo; Huh, Jung-Bo

    2017-05-01

    Implant angulation should be considered when selecting an attachment. Some in vitro studies have investigated the relationship between implant angulation and changes in the retention force of the stud attachment, but few studies have evaluated the effect of cyclic loading and repeated cycles of insertion and removal on the stud attachment. The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effects of implant angulation on the retentive characteristics of overdentures with 2 different stud attachments, an experimental system and O-rings in red and orange, after cyclic loading and repeated insertion and removal cycles. The canine region of a mandibular experimental model was fitted with 2 implant fixtures with 2 different stud attachment systems at implant angulations of 0, 15, or 30 degrees. A mastication simulator was used to simulate cyclic loading, and a universal testing machine was used to evaluate retentive force changes after repeated insertion and removal cycles. To simulate the numbers of mastication and insertion and removal cycles per annum, 400000 cyclic loadings and 1080 insertion and removal cycles were performed. Wear patterns and attachment surface deformations were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy. Data were analyzed using the Kruskal-Wallis test, Mann-Whitney U test with Bonferroni correction (α=.05/3=.017), and the paired-sample Student t test (α=.05). When retentive forces before and after testing were compared, O-ring showed significant retention loss at all implant angulations (P<.001). In contrast, the experimental system showed little retention loss in the 0- and 15-degree models (P>.05), whereas the 30-degree model showed a significant increase in retentive force (P=.001). At all implant angulations, retention loss increased significantly for the orange O-ring, followed by the red O-ring, and the experimental system (P<.001). Scanning electron microscopy analysis showed more intense wear in the matrix than the patrix

  3. Feasibility Assessment of Thermal Barrier Seals for Extreme Transient Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M.; Dunlap, Patrick H., Jr.

    1998-01-01

    The assembly joints of modem solid rocket motor cases are generally sealed using conventional O-ring type seals. The 5500+ F combustion gases produced by rocket motors are kept a safe distance away from the seals by thick layers of phenolic insulation. Special compounds are used to fill insulation gaps leading up to the seals to prevent a direct flowpath to them. Design criteria require that the seals should not experience torching or charring during operation, or their sealing ability would be compromised. On limited occasions, NASA has observed charring of the primary O-rings of the Space Shuttle solid rocket nozzle assembly joints due to parasitic leakage paths opening up in the gap-fill compounds during rocket operation. NASA is investigating different approaches for preventing torching or charring of the primary O-rings. One approach is to implement a braided rope seal upstream of the primary O-ring to serve as a thermal barrier that prevents the hot gases from impinging on the O-ring seals. This paper presents flow, resiliency, and thermal resistance for several types of NASA rope seals braided out of carbon fibers. Burn tests were performed to determine the time to burn through each of the seals when exposed to the flame of an oxyacetylene torch (5500 F), representative of the 5500 F solid rocket motor combustion temperatures. Rope seals braided out of carbon fibers endured the flame for over six minutes, three times longer than solid rocket motor burn time. Room and high temperature flow tests are presented for the carbon seals for different amounts of linear compression. Room temperature compression tests were performed to assess seal resiliency and unit preloads as a function of compression. The thermal barrier seal was tested in a subscale "char" motor test in which the seal sealed an intentional defect in the gap insulation. Temperature measurements indicated that the seal blocked 2500 F combustion gases on the upstream side with very little temperature

  4. Validation of Test Methods for Air Leak Rate Verification of Spaceflight Hardware

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oravec, Heather Ann; Daniels, Christopher C.; Mather, Janice L.

    2017-01-01

    As deep space exploration continues to be the goal of NASAs human spaceflight program, verification of the performance of spaceflight hardware becomes increasingly critical. Suitable test methods for verifying the leak rate of sealing systems are identified in program qualification testing requirements. One acceptable method for verifying the air leak rate of gas pressure seals is the tracer gas leak detector method. In this method, a tracer gas (commonly helium) leaks past the test seal and is transported to the leak detector where the leak rate is quantified. To predict the air leak rate, a conversion factor of helium-to-air is applied depending on the magnitude of the helium flow rate. The conversion factor is based on either the molecular mass ratio or the ratio of the dynamic viscosities. The current work was aimed at validating this approach for permeation-level leak rates using a series of tests with a silicone elastomer O-ring. An established pressure decay method with constant differential pressure was used to evaluate both the air and helium leak rates of the O-ring under similar temperature and pressure conditions. The results from the pressure decay tests showed, for the elastomer O-ring, that neither the molecular flow nor the viscous flow helium-to-air conversion factors were applicable. Leak rate tests were also performed using nitrogen and argon as the test gas. Molecular mass and viscosity based helium-to-test gas conversion factors were applied, but did not correctly predict the measured leak rates of either gas. To further this study, the effect of pressure boundary conditions was investigated. Often, pressure decay leak rate tests are performed at a differential pressure of 101.3 kPa with atmospheric pressure on the downstream side of the test seal. In space applications, the differential pressure is similar, but with vacuum as the downstream pressure. The same O-ring was tested at four unique differential pressures ranging from 34.5 to 137.9 k

  5. Burn rates of TiH2/KClO4/Viton and output testing of NASA SKD26100098-301 pressure cartridges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holy, John A.

    1993-01-01

    The burn rates of the pyrotechnic TiH2/KClO4/Viton with a mass ratio of 30/65/5 have been measured as a function of pressure in nitrogen up to 312 MPa(45 Kpsi). The burn rates were fit to R = a pn, with a = 2.055 cm/sec/MPan and n = 0.472 between 0.15 MPa (22 psi) and 21.6 MPa (3.13 Kpsi) and a = 4.38 cm/sec/MPan and n = 0.266 between 70 MPa (10.15 Kpsi) and 312 MPa (45.25 Kpsi). The decrease in slope at the higher pressures is attributed to a diffusion limited reaction. No acoustically driven flame instabilities or large conductive-to-convective burn transitions were observed. Solid reaction products were analyzed by x-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). X-ray diffraction detected only TiO2 and KC1. SEM showed that the particle size of the reaction products increased as the nitrogen pressure increased. There were no anomalous characteristics of the burn of this pyrotechnic that could be interpreted as a cause of the o-ring blow-by problem in the forward shear bolt assembly. Three NASA SKD26100098-301 pressure cartridges were fired into a fixed volume vessel that was sealed with an O-ring. A maximum pressure of 181.7 MPa(26,350 psi) was reached in around 100 ,mu sec for two shots fired into a volume of 16.3 cm3(0.996 in3). A maximum pressure of 33,460 psi was reached for one shot fired into a volume of 9.55 cm3(0.583 in3). The O-ring burned through on one shot in the larger volume and leaked on the other two thereby simulating the effects of an O-ring leak. The results imply that the piston in the shear bolt assembly would receive a large impulse even if there was a leak in an O-ring seal.

  6. Providing a Turn for the Better

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Engineers are tasked with designing new systems every day to meet changing or unexpected technical requirements. After the tragic explosion of the Space Shuttle Challenger on January 28, 1986, NASA engineers embarked on a complete overhaul of many of their long-standing quality systems and procedures. When the official cause of the accident was determined to be an O-ring failure in the right Solid Rocket Booster, NASA's Shuttle Program initiated a thorough redesign of the rocket boosters' clevis ends, which are the O-ring's mating surfaces. One of the unique systems that NASA engineers developed as a result of this effort included a heating assembly that is coupled to the outside of the rocket boosters. When the assembly is affixed to the external surface of the boosters, the very nature of its design allows for the warming of the O-rings prior to launch. After the engineers completed the assembly's design, however, they found that it was nearly impossible to tighten the spanner nuts required for attaching the system, given the minimum amount of clearance they had in the limited and confined space. Under these circumstances, the standard wrenches typically used for tightening these types of nuts did not work, and there were no other existing devices to solve the problem. NASA engineers embraced the challenge, developing a torque wrench tool adapter that allowed for a full rotation of spanner nuts in confined spaces. The tool, which is similar to an open-ended crowfoot wrench and a fixed-face spanner wrench, contains two dowel pins that center and lock the wrench onto the nut.

  7. RSRM Nozzle-to-Case Joint J-leg Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albrechtsen, Kevin U.; Eddy, Norman F.; Ewing, Mark E.; McGuire, John R.

    2003-01-01

    Since the beginning of the Space Shuttle Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) program, nozzle-to-case joint polysulfide adhesive gas paths have occurred on several flight motors. These gas paths have allowed hot motor gases to reach the wiper O-ring. Even though these motors continue to fly safely with this condition, a desire was to reduce such occurrences. The RSRM currently uses a J-leg joint configuration on case field joints and igniter inner and outer joints. The J-leg joint configuration has been successfully demonstrated on numerous RSRM flight and static test motors, eliminating hot gas intrusion to the critical O-ring seals on these joints. Using the proven technology demonstrated on the case field joints and igniter joints, a nozzle-to-case joint J-leg design was developed for implementation on RSRM flight motors. This configuration provides an interference fit with nozzle fixed housing phenolics at assembly, with a series of pressurization gaps incorporated outboard of the joint mating surface to aid in joint pressurization and to eliminate any circumferential flow in this region. The joint insulation is bonded to the nozzle phenolics using the same pressure sensitive adhesive used in the case field joints and igniter joints. An enhancement to the nozzle-to-case joint J-leg configuration is the implementation of a carbon rope thermal barrier. The thermal barrier is located downstream of the joint bondline and is positioned within the joint in a manner where any hot gas intrusion into the joint passes through the thermal barrier, reducing gas temperatures to a level that would not affect O-rings downstream of the thermal barrier. This paper discusses the processes used in reaching a final nozzle-to-case joint J-leg design, provides structural and thermal results in support of the design, and identifies fabrication techniques and demonstrations used in arriving at the final configuration.

  8. A three-dimensional finite element analysis for overdenture attachments supported by teeth and/or mini dental implants.

    PubMed

    Fatalla, Abdalbseet A; Song, Ke; Du, Tianfeng; Cao, Yingguang

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this study was to establish the optimum design and attachment combination to support an overdenture with minimal stress and flexing produced in the alveolar bone surrounding any natural teeth and/or mini dental implants. Twelve models were included in the study: the six main models (A, B, C, D, E, and F) were categorized according to the support designs of the overdenture prosthesis, and each model was further subdivided according to the attachment combinations into model 1: with Dalbo elliptic and/or O-ring attachments only and model 2: with flexible acrylic attachments. Vertical loads (35 N) and 17.5 N lateral loads under static conditions were applied to the models to simulate the occlusal forces following the concept of lingualized occlusion. All conditions were created using a finite element software program. Maximum von Mises stress at the level of the attachments and at the bone support foundation interfaces were compared in all 12 models. The flexing of the mandible and the attachments were also compared qualitatively. Stress on these models was analyzed after the given loading condition. The results showed that the model with three freestanding mini dental implants and flexible acrylic attachments showed the lowest von Mises stress and flexing, while the models with four freestanding mini dental implants and O-ring attachments showed the highest von Mises stress. Three freestanding mini dental implants with flexible acrylic attachment systems supporting an overdenture were better choices than four mini dental implants with O-ring attachment systems, which showed the maximum flexing and stress values in this qualitative comparison. © 2012 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  9. Spatial Distribution of Oak Mistletoe as It Relates to Habits of Oak Woodland Frugivores

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Ethan A.; Sullivan, Patrick J.; Dickinson, Janis L.

    2014-01-01

    This study addresses the underlying spatial distribution of oak mistletoe, Phoradendron villosum, a hemi-parasitic plant that provides a continuous supply of berries for frugivorous birds overwintering the oak savanna habitat of California's outer coast range. As the winter community of birds consuming oak mistletoe varies from group-living territorial species to birds that roam in flocks, we asked if mistletoe volume was spatially autocorrelated at the scale of persistent territories or whether the patterns predicted by long-term territory use by western bluebirds are overcome by seed dispersal by more mobile bird species. The abundance of mistletoe was mapped on trees within a 700 ha study site in Carmel Valley, California. Spatial autocorrelation of mistletoe volume was analyzed using the variogram method and spatial distribution of oak mistletoe trees was analyzed using Ripley's K and O-ring statistics. On a separate set of 45 trees, mistletoe volume was highly correlated with the volume of female, fruit-bearing plants, indicating that overall mistletoe volume is a good predictor of fruit availability. Variogram analysis showed that mistletoe volume was spatially autocorrelated up to approximately 250 m, a distance consistent with persistent territoriality of western bluebirds and philopatry of sons, which often breed next door to their parents and are more likely to remain home when their parents have abundant mistletoe. Using Ripley's K and O-ring analyses, we showed that mistletoe trees were aggregated for distances up to 558 m, but for distances between 558 to 724 m the O-ring analysis deviated from Ripley's K in showing repulsion rather than aggregation. While trees with mistletoe were aggregated at larger distances, mistletoe was spatially correlated at a smaller distance, consistent with what is expected based on persistent group territoriality of western bluebirds in winter and the extreme philopatry of their sons. PMID:25389971

  10. A Digital Temperature Control and Measurement System.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-07-04

    tubing. Vacuum connections, indicated by closed circles, are made with elastomer o-rings. 9.10 The outer vacuum can A is made entirely of aluminum , which...provides good thermal conductivity with minimal weight. Around the outer can is wrapped a 3/8" o.d. aluminum 3 tubing at one turn per inch. The first...through the aluminum tubing. The second stage, radiation shield B. is made entirely of coDper. A heater wire of #32 manganin wire with a total

  11. Dust Tolerant Connectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, Robert P. (Inventor); Lewis, Mark E. (Inventor); Bastin, Gary L. (Inventor); Branch, Matthew C. (Inventor); Carlson, Jeffrey W. (Inventor); Dokos, Adam G. (Inventor); Murtland, Kevin A. (Inventor); Nugent, Matthew W. (Inventor); Tamasy, Gabor J. (Inventor); Townsend, III, Ivan I. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Methods and systems may provide for debris exclusion and removal apparatuses for connectors which have inverting end caps with a multi-axis lever configuration, inverting end caps with enlarged handle and/or side rail configurations, rotating end cap configurations, poppet valve configurations, O-ring configurations, filament barrier configurations, retractable cover configurations, clamshell end cap configurations, or any combination thereof. Apparatuses may also provide for an intelligent electrical connector system capable of detecting damage to or faults within a plurality of conductors and then rerouting the energy through a non-damaged spare conductor.

  12. Advanced Solid Rocket Motor case design status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, G. L.; Cash, S. F.; Beck, J. P.

    1993-01-01

    The Advanced Solid Rocket Motor (ASRM) case design aimed at achieving a safer and more reliable solid rocket motor for the Space Shuttle system is considered. The ASRM case has a 150.0 inch diameter, three equal length segment, and 9Ni-4CO-0.3C steel alloy. The major design features include bolted casebolted case joints which close during pressurization, plasma arc welded factory joints, integral stiffener for splash down and recovery, and integral External Tank attachment rings. Each mechanical joint has redundant and verifiable o-ring seals.

  13. EG and G and NASA face seal codes comparison

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Basu, Prit

    1994-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation presents the following results for the example comparison: EG&G code with face deformations suppressed and SPIRALG agree well with each other as well as with the experimental data; 0 rpm stiffness data calculated by EG&G code are about 70-100 percent lower than that by SPIRALG; there is no appreciable difference between 0 rpm and 16,000 rpm stiffness and damping coefficients calculated by SPIRALG; and the film damping above 500 psig calculated by SPIRALG is much higher than the O-Ring secondary seal damping (e.g. 50 lbf.s/in).

  14. An instrument to aid tubal sterilization by laparoscopy.

    PubMed

    Siegler, A M

    1972-05-01

    A single-handled instrument, developed by Siegler for his two-incision technique, has broad biopsy capability. The shaft and handle are insulated to protect the operator from shock; the jaws rotate independently from the handle position; an O-ring seal in the cannula eliminates the need for external sealing devices for carbon dioxide maintenance; and either the cutting or coagulation power may be applied. The biopsy instrument can coagulate and biopsy both tubes without removing the forceps after treating one side since the jaws are large enough to accommodate both segments. The instrument is manufactured by the American Cystoscope Makers, Inc., Pelham Manor, New York.

  15. Crystal structure of 1,2,3,5-di-O-methyl­ene-α-d-xylo­furan­ose

    PubMed Central

    Tiritiris, Ioannis; Tussetschläger, Stefan; Kantlehner, Willi

    2015-01-01

    The title compound, C7H10O5, was synthesized by reaction of d-xylose with paraformaldehyde. In the crystal, the central part of the mol­ecule consists of a five-membered C4O ring with an envelope conformation, with the methine C atom adjacent to the O atom being the flap. The protected O atoms of both cyclic acetal groups are oriented so that the four chiral C atoms of the furan­ose part show an R configuration. C—H⋯O hydrogen bonds are present between adjacent mol­ecules, generating a three-dimensional network. PMID:26594582

  16. Ultra high vacuum pumping system and high sensitivity helium leak detector

    DOEpatents

    Myneni, Ganapati Rao

    1997-01-01

    An improved helium leak detection method and apparatus are disclosed which increase the leak detection sensitivity to 10.sup.-13 atm cc s.sup.-1. The leak detection sensitivity is improved over conventional leak detectors by completely eliminating the use of o-rings, equipping the system with oil-free pumping systems, and by introducing measured flows of nitrogen at the entrances of both the turbo pump and backing pump to keep the system free of helium background. The addition of dry nitrogen flows to the system reduces backstreaming of atmospheric helium through the pumping system as a result of the limited compression ratios of the pumps for helium.

  17. Ultra high vacuum pumping system and high sensitivity helium leak detector

    DOEpatents

    Myneni, G.R.

    1997-12-30

    An improved helium leak detection method and apparatus are disclosed which increase the leak detection sensitivity to 10{sup {minus}13} atm cc/s. The leak detection sensitivity is improved over conventional leak detectors by completely eliminating the use of o-rings, equipping the system with oil-free pumping systems, and by introducing measured flows of nitrogen at the entrances of both the turbo pump and backing pump to keep the system free of helium background. The addition of dry nitrogen flows to the system reduces back streaming of atmospheric helium through the pumping system as a result of the limited compression ratios of the pumps for helium. 2 figs.

  18. Fail-Safe Pressure Plug

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Svejkovsky, Paul A.

    1993-01-01

    Protective plug resists slowly built-up pressure or automatically releases itself if pressure rises suddenly. Seals out moisture at pressures ranging from 50 micrometers of mercury to 200 pounds per square inch. Designed to seal throat of 38 Reaction Control Thrusters on Space Shuttle protecting internal components from corrosion. Plug conforms to contour of nozzle throat, where O-ring forms pressure seal. After plug inserted, cover attached by use of cover-fitting assembly. Modified versions useful in protecting engines, pumps, reaction vessels, and other industrial equipment during shipment and maintenance.

  19. Low Cost Motor Demonstration Program. Volume 1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-02-01

    and held in place by engaging a head end stud (with O-ring) in the igniter cavity in the forward end of the mandrel. The fins on the mandrel used...object. Even if the chunk had been burning when it first appeared, it was extinguished by the time it hit the con- crete and asphalt pavement just...outside the test cell. Impact marks on the chunk were not smoothed by subsequent burning and pieces of loose asphalt were ernbeded in the chunk

  20. Zeolite Degradation: An Investigation of CO2 Capacity Loss of 13x Sorbent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Roger; Richardson, Tra-My Justine; Belancik, Grace; Jan, Darrell; Hogan, John; Knox, James C.

    2017-01-01

    System testing of the Carbon Dioxide Removal and Compression System (CRCS) has revealed that sufficient CO2 removal capability was not achieved with the designed system. Subsystem component analysis of the zeolite bed revealed that the sorbent material suffered significant degradation and CO2 loading capacity loss. In an effort to find the root cause of this degradation, various factors were investigated to try to reproduce the observed performance loss. These factors included contamination by vacuum pump oil, o-ring vacuum grease, loading/unloading procedures, and operations. This paper details the experiments that were performed and their results.

  1. Fireproof Hydraulic Brake System.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-10-01

    MLBT elastomer personnel recommended the use of Firestone’s Phosphonitrilic Fluoroelastomer (PNF) for elastomeric O-rings in the CTFE fluid system. C.E...resealed with modified "PNF" (phosphonitrilic fluoroelastomer) elastomer Ŕ" rings. The hoses are PTFE lined for compatibility with the CTFE...Plus 65-42808-6 Nylon Braid )* AN837-8 Elbow (on Truck) 61-11536-1 Tube Assy (Strut/Truck Hose to Truck Tee)* 290 -7. 61-11530-1 Tube Assy (Truck Tee

  2. Note: An improved solenoid driver valve for miniature shock tubes.

    PubMed

    Lynch, P T

    2016-05-01

    A solenoid driver valve has been built to improve the operating performance of diaphragmless shock tubes, which are used for high pressure, high temperature chemical kinetics, and fluid mechanics studies. For shock tube driver application, the most important characteristics are those of sealing, strength, and quality of the generated shock waves and repeatability of opening characteristics and therefore subsequent post-shock conditions. The main features of the new driver valve are a face o-ring sealing design of the valve, the large internal volume, and through inserts near the solenoid core: adjustable opening characteristics of the valve.

  3. Test chamber for alpha spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Larsen, Robert P.

    1977-01-01

    Alpha emitters for low-level radiochemical analysis by measurement of alpha spectra are positioned precisely with respect to the location of a surface-barrier detector by means of a chamber having a removable threaded planchet holder. A pedestal on the planchet holder holds a specimen in fixed engagement close to the detector. Insertion of the planchet holder establishes an O-ring seal that permits the chamber to be pumped to a desired vacuum. The detector is protected against accidental contact and resulting damage.

  4. Study of Damped Set-Back Pins for S and A Mechanisms.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-11-01

    arm device for artillery munitions. This damped set-back pin assembly is one of two safety features on a S and A device used in the M739 PD/XM587 ET...The damped set-back pin study program was for the design, testing, fabrication, and delivery and damped set-back pin assemblies for use in a safe and...fuzes for a rotating projectile. A pin, porous disc, return spring, floating O-ring, and sleeve comprise the selected damped set-back pin assembly

  5. Means for positively seating a piezoceramic element in a piezoelectric valve during inlet gas injection

    DOEpatents

    Wright, Kenneth E.

    1994-01-01

    A piezoelectric valve in a gas delivery system includes a piezoceramic element bonded to a valve seal and disposed over a valve seat, and retained in position by an O-ring and a retainer; an insulating ball normally biased by a preload spring against the piezoceramic element; an inlet gas port positioned such that upon admission of inlet gas into the valve, the piezoceramic element is positively seated. The inlet gas port is located only on the side of the piezoceramic element opposite the seal.

  6. Apparatus for testing skin samples or the like

    DOEpatents

    Holland, J.M.

    1982-08-31

    An apparatus for testing the permeability of living skin samples has a flat base with a plurality of sample-holding cavities formed in its upper surface, the samples being placed in counterbores in the cavities with the epidermis uppermost. O-rings of Teflon washers are respectively placed on the samples and a flat cover is connected to the base to press the rings against the upper surfaces of the samples. Media to maintain tissue viability and recovery of metabolites is introduced into the lower portion of the sample-holding cavities through passages in the base. Test materials are introduced through holes in the cover plate after assembly of the chamber.

  7. Optical-Fiber Leak Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Workman, Gary L.; Kosten, Susan E.

    1994-01-01

    Proposed optical-fiber sensor detects small changes in pressure in elastomeric O-ring or similar pressure seal, which may indicate deterioration of seal and interpreted as indications of incipient failure. According to concept, length of optical fiber embedded in seal. Light-emitting diode illuminates one end of fiber; photodetector measures intensity of light emerging from other end. Pressure-induced changes in seal bend fiber slightly, altering microbending-induced loss of light from fiber and alter intensity of light at photodetector. Change in intensity approximately proportional to change in pressure.

  8. Modular microfluidic systems using reversibly attached PDMS fluid control modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skafte-Pedersen, Peder; Sip, Christopher G.; Folch, Albert; Dufva, Martin

    2013-05-01

    The use of soft lithography-based poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) valve systems is the dominating approach for high-density microscale fluidic control. Integrated systems enable complex flow control and large-scale integration, but lack modularity. In contrast, modular systems are attractive alternatives to integration because they can be tailored for different applications piecewise and without redesigning every element of the system. We present a method for reversibly coupling hard materials to soft lithography defined systems through self-aligning O-ring features thereby enabling easy interfacing of complex-valve-based systems with simpler detachable units. Using this scheme, we demonstrate the seamless interfacing of a PDMS-based fluid control module with hard polymer chips. In our system, 32 self-aligning O-ring features protruding from the PDMS fluid control module form chip-to-control module interconnections which are sealed by tightening four screws. The interconnection method is robust and supports complex fluidic operations in the reversibly attached passive chip. In addition, we developed a double-sided molding method for fabricating PDMS devices with integrated through-holes. The versatile system facilitates a wide range of applications due to the modular approach, where application specific passive chips can be readily attached to the flow control module.

  9. A parametric shell analysis of the shuttle 51-L SRB AFT field joint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Randall C.; Bowman, Lynn M.; Hughes, Robert M., IV; Jackson, Brian J.

    1990-01-01

    Following the Shuttle 51-L accident, an investigation was conducted to determine the cause of the failure. Investigators at the Langley Research Center focused attention on the structural behavior of the field joints with O-ring seals in the steel solid rocket booster (SRB) cases. The shell-of-revolution computer program BOSOR4 was used to model the aft field joint of the solid rocket booster case. The shell model consisted of the SRB wall and joint geometry present during the Shuttle 51-L flight. A parametric study of the joint was performed on the geometry, including joint clearances, contact between the joint components, and on the loads, induced and applied. In addition combinations of geometry and loads were evaluated. The analytical results from the parametric study showed that contact between the joint components was a primary contributor to allowing hot gases to blow by the O-rings. Based upon understanding the original joint behavior, various proposed joint modifications are shown and analyzed in order to provide additional insight and information. Finally, experimental results from a hydro-static pressurization of a test rocket booster case to study joint motion are presented and verified analytically.

  10. Diamond-anvil high-pressure cell with improved x-ray collimation system

    DOEpatents

    Schiferl, D.; Olinger, B.W.; Livingston, R.W.

    1984-03-30

    An adjustable x-ray collimation system for a diamond-anvil high-pressure cell of the type including a cooperable piston and cylinder and a pair of opposing diamonds located between the head of the piston and the head of the cylinder. The x-ray collimation system includes a tubular insert which contains an x-ray collimator. The insert is engageable in the bore of the piston. The collimator is mounted within the insert by means of an elastomeric o-ring at the end closest the opposed diamonds, and by means of a set of adjustable set screws at the opposite end. By adjustment of the set screws the collimator can be pivoted about the o-ring and brought into alignment with the opposed diamonds and the sample contained therein. In the preferred embodiment there is further provided a set of plugs which are insertable in the bore of the collimator. The plugs have bores of different diameters. By successively inserting plugs of progressively smaller bore diameters and adjusting the alignment of the collimator with each plug, the collimator can be quickly brought into accurate alignment with the diamonds. The collimation system allows alignment of the collimator either before or after the cell has been loaded and pressurized.

  11. Development of a Rubber-Based Product Using a Mixture Experiment: A Challenging Case Study

    SciTech Connect

    Kaya, Yahya; Piepel, Gregory F.; Caniyilmaz, Erdal

    2013-07-01

    Many products used in daily life are made by blending two or more components. The properties of such products typically depend on the relative proportions of the components. Experimental design, modeling, and data analysis methods for mixture experiments provide for efficiently determining the component proportions that will yield a product with desired properties. This article presents a case study of the work performed to develop a new rubber formulation for an o-ring (a circular gasket) with requirements specified on 10 product properties. Each step of the study is discussed, including: 1) identifying the objective of the study and requirements formore » properties of the o-ring, 2) selecting the components to vary and specifying the component constraints, 3) constructing a mixture experiment design, 4) measuring the responses and assessing the data, 5) developing property-composition models, 6) selecting the new product formulation, and 7) confirming the selected formulation in manufacturing. The case study includes some challenging and new aspects, which are discussed in the article.« less

  12. Instability of the Antarctic Ross Sea Embayment as climate warms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, Terence; Zhao, Zihong; Hintz, Raymond; Fastook, James

    2017-06-01

    Collapse of the Antarctic Ice Sheet since the Last Glacial Maximum 18,000 years ago is most pronounced in the Ross Sea Embayment, which is partly ice-free during Antarctic summers, thereby breaching the O-ring of ice shelves and sea ice surrounding Antarctica that stabilizes the ice sheet. The O-ring may have vanished during Early Holocene (5000 to 3000 B.C.), Roman (1 to 400 A.D.), and Medieval (900 to 1300 A.D.) warm periods and reappeared during the Little Ice Age (1300 to 1900 A.D.). We postulate further collapse in the embayment during the post-1900 warming may be forestalled because East Antarctic outlet glaciers "nail" the Ross Ice Shelf to the Transantarctic Mountains so it can resist the push from West Antarctic ice streams. Our hypothesis is examined for Byrd Glacier and a static ice shelf using three modeling experiments having plastic, viscous, and viscoplastic solutions as more data and improved modeling became available. Observed crevasse patterns were not reproduced. A new research study is needed to model a dynamic Ross Ice Shelf with all its feeder ice streams, outlet glaciers, and ice calving dynamics in three dimensions over time to fully test our hypothesis. The required model must allow accelerated calving if further warming melts sea ice and discerps the ice shelf. Calving must then successively pull the outlet glacier "nails" so collapse of the marine West Antarctic Ice Sheet proceeds to completion.

  13. Evacuated optical structure comprising optical bench mounted to sidewall of vacuum chamber in a manner which inhibits deflection and rotation of the optical bench

    DOEpatents

    Bowers, Joel M.

    1994-01-01

    An improved evacuated optical structure is disclosed comprising an optical bench mounted in a vacuum vessel in a manner which inhibits transmission of movement of the vacuum vessel to the optical bench, yet provides a compact and economical structure. The vacuum vessel is mounted, through a sidewall thereof, to a support wall at four symmetrically positioned and spaced apart areas, each of which comprises a symmetrically positioned group of mounting structures passing through the sidewall of the vacuum vessel. The optical bench is pivotally secured to the vacuum vessel by four symmetrically spaced apart bolts and spherical bearings, each of which is centrally positioned within one of the four symmetrically positioned groups of vacuum vessel mounting structures. Cover plates and o-ring seals are further provided to seal the vacuum vessel mounting structures from the interior of the vacuum vessel, and venting bores are provided to vent trapped gases in the bores used to secure the cover plates and o-rings to the vacuum vessel. Provision for detecting leaks in the mounting structures from the rear surface of the vacuum vessel sidewall facing the support wall are also provided. Deflection to the optical bench within the vacuum vessel is further minimized by tuning the structure for a resonant frequency of at least 100 Hertz.

  14. Assessment of potential asbestos exposures from jet engine overhaul work.

    PubMed

    Mlynarek, S P; Van Orden, D R

    2012-06-01

    Asbestos fibers have been used in a wide variety of products and numerous studies have shown that exposures from the use or manipulation of these products can vary widely. Jet engines contained various components (gaskets, clamps, o-rings and insulation) that contained asbestos that potentially could release airborne fibers during routine maintenance or during an engine overhaul. To evaluate the potential exposures to aircraft mechanics, a Pratt & Whitney JT3D jet engine was obtained and overhauled by experienced mechanics using tools and work practices similar to those used since the time this engine was manufactured. This study has demonstrated that the disturbance of asbestos-containing gaskets, o-rings, and other types of asbestos-containing components, while performing overhaul work to a jet engine produces very few airborne fibers, and that virtually none of these aerosolized fibers is asbestos. The overhaul work was observed to be dirty and oily. The exposures to the mechanics and bystanders were several orders of magnitude below OSHA exposure regulations, both current and historic. The data presented underscore the lack of risk to the health of persons conducting this work and to other persons in proximity to it from airborne asbestos. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Stress analysis in oral obturator prostheses: imaging photoelastic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pesqueira, Aldiéris Alves; Goiato, Marcelo Coelho; dos Santos, Daniela Micheline; Haddad, Marcela Filié; Andreotti, Agda Marobo; Moreno, Amália

    2013-06-01

    Maxillary defects resulting from cancer, trauma, and congenital malformation affect the chewing efficiency and retention of dentures in these patients. The use of implant-retained palatal obturator dentures has improved the self-esteem and quality of life of several subjects. We evaluate the stress distribution of implant-retained palatal obturator dentures with different attachment systems by using the photoelastic analysis images. Two photoelastic models of the maxilla with oral-sinus-nasal communication were fabricated. One model received three implants on the left side of the alveolar ridge (incisive, canine, and first molar regions) and the other did not receive implants. Afterwards, a conventional palatal obturator denture (control) and two implant-retained palatal obturator dentures with different attachment systems (O-ring; bar-clip) were constructed. Models were placed in a circular polariscope and a 100-N axial load was applied in three different regions (incisive, canine, and first molar regions) by using a universal testing machine. The results were photographed and analyzed qualitatively using a software (Adobe Photoshop). The bar-clip system exhibited the highest stress concentration followed by the O-ring system and conventional denture (control). Images generated by the photoelastic method help in the oral rehabilitator planning.

  16. High cleanliness globe valve with sine mechanism drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Hu

    2018-06-01

    This paper gives a new type of quick-opening globe valve for life support pneumatic control system of the safety cabin at underground coal mine. The valve adopts the sine mechanism to transmit the rotating of the handle in the range of 90° to the reciprocating motion of the spool. The mechanism implements the quick-opening function of the valve through controlling the contact and separation between the O-ring and the end face of the valve. Since there is no relative sliding between the sealing interfaces, the valve solute uncontrollable disadvantage wear particles which produced by package ball valve, to ensure high cleanliness in flow path. Traditional transmission mechanism has a reinforcement effect and reduce handle open torque. By the finite element method, the relationship between the contact force and the compression of O-ring is analyzed to provide the boundary condition for the calculation of the rotational torque. Meanwhile the velocity field and pressure field along the flow path are simulated. The caliber size of the valve and the flow resistance coefficient are obtained. There is higher cleanliness, more reliable sealing, smaller handle open torque advantage compared with existing packing ball valve. The above work presents a new technical approach for the design of pneumatic control valve of the safety cabin.

  17. Diamond-anvil high-pressure cell with improved X-ray collimation system

    DOEpatents

    Schiferl, David; Olinger, Barton W.; Livingston, Robert W.

    1986-01-01

    An adjustable X-ray collimation system for a diamond-anvil high-pressure cell of the type including a cooperable piston and cylinder and a pair of opposing diamonds located between the head of the piston and the head of the cylinder. The X-ray collimation system includes a tubular insert which contains an X-ray collimator. The insert is engageable in the bore of the piston. The collimator is mounted within the insert by means of an elastomeric O-ring at the end closest the opposed diamonds, and by means of a set of adjustable set screws at the opposite end. By adjustment of the set screws the collimator can be pivoted about the O-ring and brought into alignment with the opposed diamonds and the sample contained therein. In the preferred embodiment there is further provided a set of plugs which are insertable in the bore of the collimator. The plugs have bores of different diameters. By successively inserting plugs of progressively smaller bore diameters and adjusting the alignment of the collimator with each plug, the collimator can be quickly brought into accurate alignment with the diamonds. The collimation system allows alignment of the collimator either before or after the cell has been loaded and pressurized.

  18. Analysis of the plugging of the systems autonomy demonstration project brassboard filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clay, John C.

    1989-01-01

    A fine gray powder was clogging the brassboard filters. The powder appeared to be residue from a galvanic corrosive attack by ammonia of the aluminum and stainless steel components in the system. The corrosion was caused by water and chlorine that had entered into the system and combined with the ammonia. This combination made an electrolyte and a corrosive agent of the ammonia that attacked the metals in the system. The corroded material traveled through the system with the ammonia and clogged the filters. Key conclusions are: the debris collecting in the filters is a by-product of galvanic corrosion; the debris is principally corroded aluminum and stainless from the system; and galvanic corrosion occurred from water and chlorine that entered the system during normal and/or extreme operating and servicing conditions. Key recommendations are: use only one metal in the ammonia system-titanium, aluminum, or stainless steel; make the system as air-tight as possible (replace fittings with welded joints); and replace electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) O-rings with neoprene O-rings, and do not use freon to clean system components.

  19. Flight set 360H005 (STS-28) seals, volume 4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curry, Jeffrey T.

    1990-01-01

    The performance is assessed of the 360H005, Fifth flight, Redesigned Solid Rocket Motors (RSMR) in respect to joint sealing issues as seen from post flight inspection of the seals and sealing surfaces. The factory joint disassembly inspections have resumed for 360H005. The new factory joint grease application is in effect and now can be assessed during the disassembly process. The RSRM is illustrated consisting of capture feature field joints as is the J-joint insulation configuration. The nozzle-to-case joint design is also illustrated, which includes 100, 7/8 inch radial bolts in conjunction with a wiper O-ring and modified insulation design. The ignition system seals and a cross section of the igniter are illustrated. The configuration of all the internal nozzle joints are also shown. The postflight inspection of both motors showed the seal components to be in excellent condition except for the indentation found on the inner primary seal of the right hand inner igniter gasket, aft face. Detailed inspection results, and inspections performed by the O-ring Inspection Team are presented.

  20. Evacuated optical structure comprising optical bench mounted to sidewall of vacuum chamber in a manner which inhibits deflection and rotation of the optical bench

    DOEpatents

    Bowers, J.M.

    1994-04-19

    An improved evacuated optical structure is disclosed comprising an optical bench mounted in a vacuum vessel in a manner which inhibits transmission of movement of the vacuum vessel to the optical bench, yet provides a compact and economical structure. The vacuum vessel is mounted, through a sidewall thereof, to a support wall at four symmetrically positioned and spaced apart areas, each of which comprises a symmetrically positioned group of mounting structures passing through the sidewall of the vacuum vessel. The optical bench is pivotally secured to the vacuum vessel by four symmetrically spaced apart bolts and spherical bearings, each of which is centrally positioned within one of the four symmetrically positioned groups of vacuum vessel mounting structures. Cover plates and o-ring seals are further provided to seal the vacuum vessel mounting structures from the interior of the vacuum vessel, and venting bores are provided to vent trapped gases in the bores used to secure the cover plates and o-rings to the vacuum vessel. Provision for detecting leaks in the mounting structures from the rear surface of the vacuum vessel sidewall facing the support wall are also provided. Deflection to the optical bench within the vacuum vessel is further minimized by tuning the structure for a resonant frequency of at least 100 Hertz. 10 figures.

  1. Evaluation of a Conductive Elastomer Seal for Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniels, C. C.; Mather, J. L.; Oravec, H. A.; Dunlap, P. H., Jr.

    2016-01-01

    An electrically conductive elastomer was evaluated as a material candidate for a spacecraft seal. The elastomer used electrically conductive constituents as a means to reduce the resistance between mating interfaces of a sealed joint to meet spacecraft electrical bonding requirements. The compound's outgassing levels were compared against published NASA requirements. The compound was formed into a hollow O-ring seal and its compression set was measured. The O-ring seal was placed into an interface and the electrical resistance and leak rate were quantified. The amount of force required to fully compress the test article in the sealing interface and the force needed to separate the joint were also measured. The outgassing and resistance measurements were below the maximum allowable levels. The room temperature compression set and leak rates were fairly high when compared against other typical spacecraft seal materials, but were not excessive. The compression and adhesion forces were desirably low. Overall, the performance of the elastomer compound was sufficient to be considered for future spacecraft seal applications.

  2. Space shuttle development Motor No. 9 (DM-9), volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garecht, Diane M.

    1990-01-01

    The results obtained during the December 23, 1987 static firing of the DM-9 test article are presented. The DM-9 full-scale static test article employed redesigned solid rocket motor (RSRM) field joint capture feature hardware with J-seal insulation configuration, and nozzle-to-case joint radial bolt design with bonded insulation configuration. The nozzle incorporated RSRM components, including a thicker cowl with involuted outer boot ring. The nozzle employed redundant and verifiable seals in all five joints, and room temperature vulcanization backfill in three joints. With very few exceptions, the DM-9 test article was flight configuration. The test was conducted under extreme weather conditions: temperature of 25 F and wind at 15 to 20 mph. Ballistics performance values were within specification requirements. The RSRM field joint (J-seal) insulation configuration functioned as predicted with no indication of hot gases reaching the capture feature O-rings. There was a blowhole in the polysulfide adhesive in the nozzle-to-case joint, but no evidence of hot gases past the wiper O-ring. Nozzle design changes appeared to perform nominally, with the exception of the outer boot ring, which suffered partial structural breakup late in the test. Field joint heaters maintained the controlling resistance temperature device temperature within the specified requirements during heater operation. The thrust vector control system operated properly. The redesigned water deluge system, temperature conditioning equipment, and other test support equipment performed as planned.

  3. Challenges of Cold Conditioning and Static Testing the Second Ares Demonstration Motor (DM-2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quinn, Shyla; Davis, Larry C.

    2011-01-01

    On August 31, 2010, a five-segment demonstration motor (DM) for the Ares program was successfully tested. A series of demonstration motors (DMs) will be tested in different conditioned environments to confirm they meet their design specifications. The second demonstration motor (DM-2) was the first cold motor. The motor needed to be subjected to sub-freezing temperatures for two months so that its internal propellant mean bulk temperature (PMBT) was approximately 40 F. Several challenges had to be overcome to make this a successful test. One challenge was to condition four field joints to get the O-rings approximately 32 F. This would be done by applying conditioning shrouds to externally cool each field joint after the test bay was pulled off. The purpose of this conditioning was to validate the new O-ring design and allow joint heaters to be eliminated. Another challenge was maintaining temperature requirements for components in the nozzle vectoring system. A separate heating system was used to warm these components during cold conditioning. There were 53 test objectives that required 764 channels of data to be recorded; 460 were specific to DM-2. This instrumentation had to be installed prior to conditioning, which meant the baseline process and timeline had to be modified to meet this time critical schedule.

  4. 9975 Shipping package component long-term degradation rates

    SciTech Connect

    Daugherty, W. L.

    Special nuclear materials are being stored in the K-Area Complex using 3013 containers that are held within Model 9975 shipping packages. The service life for these packages in storage was recently increased from 15 to 20 years, since some of these packages have been stored for nearly 15 years. A strategy is also being developed whereby such storage might be extended beyond 20 years. This strategy is based on recent calculations that support acceptable 9975 package performance for 20 years with internal heat loads up to 19 watts, and identifies a lower heat load limit for which the package componentsmore » should degrade at half the bounding rate or less, thus doubling the effective storage life for these lower wattage packages. The components of the 9975 package that are sensitive to aging under storage conditions are the fiberboard overpack and the O-ring seals, although some degradation of the lead shield and outer drum are also possible. This report summarizes degradation rates applicable to lower heat load storage conditions. In particular, the O-ring seals should provide leak-tight performance for more than 40 years in packages for which their maximum temperature is ≤135 °F. Similarly, the fiberboard should remain acceptable in performance of its required safety functions for up to 40 years in packages with a maximum fiberboard temperature ≤125 °F.« less

  5. Reusable Solid Rocket Motor Nozzle Joint-4 Thermal Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clayton, J. Louie

    2001-01-01

    This study provides for development and test verification of a thermal model used for prediction of joint heating environments, structural temperatures and seal erosions in the Space Shuttle Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) Nozzle Joint-4. The heating environments are a result of rapid pressurization of the joint free volume assuming a leak path has occurred in the filler material used for assembly gap close out. Combustion gases flow along the leak path from nozzle environment to joint O-ring gland resulting in local heating to the metal housing and erosion of seal materials. Analysis of this condition was based on usage of the NASA Joint Pressurization Routine (JPR) for environment determination and the Systems Improved Numerical Differencing Analyzer (SINDA) for structural temperature prediction. Model generated temperatures, pressures and seal erosions are compared to hot fire test data for several different leak path situations. Investigated in the hot fire test program were nozzle joint-4 O-ring erosion sensitivities to leak path width in both open and confined joint geometries. Model predictions were in generally good agreement with the test data for the confined leak path cases. Worst case flight predictions are provided using the test-calibrated model. Analysis issues are discussed based on model calibration procedures.

  6. Advances in large, transportable, highly spin-polarized, solid HD targets operable in the frozen-spin mode in a 1-4K temperature environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Aaron Paul

    The development of large, portable highly spin-polarized solid HD targets has been in progress at Syracuse University for the past 5 years. These targets are scheduled for deployment at Brookhaven National Laboratory, bearing the acronym SPHICE (Spin-Polarized Hydrogen Ice), for studies of the electro-magnetic spin structure of the nucleus via scattering of polarized gammas from the HD polarized protons and deuterons. The target work has just reached the milestone demonstration of the complete system, including polarization of triple targets containing 4 moles of solid HD, aging of these targets so that they retain their polarization for months under storage at a temperature of 1.3K and in an 8 Tesla field, and for at least a week at operational conditions of 1.3K and 0.7 Tesla in an in-beam cryostat. Cold-transfers of the polarized targets to a storage cryostat have been successfully carried out, and the storage cryostat has been trucked from Syracuse to BNL with one polarized target, sufficient to test the in-beam operations there. The complete system is presented here, with emphasis on innovations for engagement and disengagement of multiple targets, a solution to the challenge of attaining sufficiently strong RF fields in the large volume probe coils at acceptable power dissipation in the cables, and the polarization production and monitoring in the highly inhomogeneous magnetic fields owing to the multiple targets and the large dimensions of the targets. In this first multiple target production and extraction-to-storage cycle, air-ice accumulation in the dilution refrigerator due to repetitive use of cold sliding o-ring seals resulted in a rupture of one of the inserted targets, and a consequent partial thermal short from a solid HD ice bridge. The o-ring fault was cured with double evacuatable o-ring seals, and the air-ice was successfully cleaned out. However, the refrigerator operating base temperature was substantially higher than that normally obtained

  7. Studies on nitrile rubber degradation in zinc bromide completion fluid and its prevention by surface fluorination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vega-Cantu, Yadira Itzel

    Poly(acrylonitrile-co-butadiene) or nitrile-butadiene rubber (NBR) is frequently used as an O-ring material in the oil extraction industry due to its excellent chemical properties and resistance to oil. However, degradation of NBR gaskets is known to occur during the well completion and oil extraction process where packers are exposed to completion fluids such as ZnBr2 brine. Under these conditions NBR exhibits accelerated chemical degradation resulting in embrittlement and cracking. Samples of NBR, poly(acrylonitrile) (PAN) and poly(butadiene) (PB) have been exposed to ZnBr2 based completion fluid, and analyzed by ATR and diffuse reflectance IR. Analysis shows the ZnBr2 based completion fluid promotes hydrolysis of the nitrile group to form amides and carboxylic groups. Analysis also shows that carbon-carbon double bonds in NBR are unaffected after short exposure to zinc bromide based completion fluid, but are quickly hydrolyzed in acidic bromide mixtures. Although fluoropolymers have excellent chemical resistance, their strength is less than nitrile rubber and replacing the usual gasket materials with fluoroelastomers is expensive. However, a fluoropolymer surface on a nitrile elastomer can provide the needed chemical resistance while retaining their strength. In this study, we have shown that this can be achieved by direct fluorination, a rather easy and inexpensive process. Samples of NBR O-rings have been fluorinated by exposure to F2 and F2/HF mixtures at various temperatures. Fluorination with F 2 produces the desired fluoropolymer layer; however, fluorination by F2/HF mixtures gave a smoother fluorinated layer at lower temperatures and shorter times. Fluorinated samples were exposed to ZnBr2 drilling fluid and solvents. Elemental analysis shows that the fluorinated layer eliminates ZnBr2 diffusion into the NBR polymeric matrix. It was also found that surface fluorination significantly retards the loss of mechanical properties such as elasticity, tensile

  8. Atlas V Launch Incorporated NASA Glenn Thermal Barrier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunlap, Patrick H., Jr.; Steinetz, Bruce M.

    2004-01-01

    In the Spring of 2002, Aerojet experienced a major failure during a qualification test of the solid rocket motor that they were developing for the Atlas V Enhanced Expendable Launch Vehicle. In that test, hot combustion gas reached the O-rings in the nozzle-to-case joint and caused a structural failure that resulted in loss of the nozzle and aft dome sections of the motor. To improve the design of this joint, Aerojet decided to incorporate three braided carbon-fiber thermal barriers developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center. The thermal barriers were used to block the searing-hot 5500 F pressurized gases from reaching the temperature-sensitive O-rings that seal the joint. Glenn originally developed the thermal barriers for the nozzle joints of the space shuttle solid rocket motors, and Aerojet decided to use them on the basis of the results of several successful ground tests of the thermal barriers in the shuttle rockets. Aerojet undertook an aggressive schedule to redesign the rocket nozzle-to-case joint with the thermal barriers and to qualify it in time for a launch planned for the middle of 2003. They performed two successful qualification tests (Oct. and Dec. 2002) in which the Glenn thermal barriers effectively protected the O-rings. These qualification tests saved hundreds of thousands of dollars in development costs and put the Lockheed-Martin/Aerojet team back on schedule. On July 17, 2003, the first flight of an Atlas V boosted with solid rocket motors successfully launched a commercial satellite into orbit from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. Aero-jet's two 67-ft solid rocket boosters performed flawlessly, with each providing thrust in excess of 250,000 lbf. Both motors incorporated three Glenn-developed thermal barriers in their nozzle-to-case joints. The Cablevision satellite launched on this mission will be used to provide direct-to-home satellite television programming for the U.S. market starting in late 2003. The Atlas V is a product of the

  9. Biomechanical behavior of 2-implant-and single-implant-retained mandibular overdentures with conventional or mini implants.

    PubMed

    Pisani, Marina Xavier; Presotto, Anna Gabriella Camacho; Mesquita, Marcelo Ferraz; Barão, Valentim Adelino Ricardo; Kemmoku, Daniel Takanori; Del Bel Cury, Altair Antoninha

    2018-04-24

    The use of single or mini dental implants to retain mandibular overdentures is still questionable. The purpose of this finite element analysis (FEA) study was to investigate the biomechanical behavior of 2- and single-implant-retained mandibular overdentures with conventional or mini implants. Four 3-dimensional (3D) finite element models were constructed with the following designs of mandibular overdentures: 2 (group 2-C) and single (group 1-C) conventional external hexagon implants with ball or O-ring attachment and 2 (group 2-M) and single (group 1-M) 1-piece mini implants. A 150-N axial load was applied bilaterally and simultaneously on the first molar. Overdenture displacement, von Mises equivalent stress (implants and/or prosthetic components), and maximum principal stresses (peri-implant bone) were recorded numerically and then color-coded and compared among the groups. The overdenture displacement (in mm) was higher for the 1-M (0.16) and 2-M (0.17) groups when compared with 1-C (0.09) and 2-C (0.08). Irrespective of the type of implant, the single-implant groups presented higher values of stress (in MPa) on the implants than did the 2-implant groups (1-C=52.53; 1-M=2.95; 2-C=34.66; 2-M=2.37), ball attachment (1-C=201.33; 2-C=159.06), housing or O-ring (1-C=125.01; 1-M=1.96; 2-C=88.84; 2-M=1.27), and peri-implant cortical bone (1-C=19.37; 1-M=1.47; 2-C=15.70; 2-M=1.06). The mini implant overdentures presented lower stress values on the implants, housing or O-ring, and peri-implant bone than did the conventional implant overdentures, regardless of the number of implants. The 2-implant-retained overdentures exhibited lower stresses than the single- implant-retained overdentures, irrespective of the type of implant. The mini implants demonstrated higher overdenture displacement and lower stresses than did conventional implant overdentures for single- and 2-implant-retained overdentures. Copyright © 2018 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic

  10. Computer-aided analysis of star shot films for high-accuracy radiation therapy treatment units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Depuydt, Tom; Penne, Rudi; Verellen, Dirk; Hrbacek, Jan; Lang, Stephanie; Leysen, Katrien; Vandevondel, Iwein; Poels, Kenneth; Reynders, Truus; Gevaert, Thierry; Duchateau, Michael; Tournel, Koen; Boussaer, Marlies; Cosentino, Dorian; Garibaldi, Cristina; Solberg, Timothy; De Ridder, Mark

    2012-05-01

    As mechanical stability of radiation therapy treatment devices has gone beyond sub-millimeter levels, there is a rising demand for simple yet highly accurate measurement techniques to support the routine quality control of these devices. A combination of using high-resolution radiosensitive film and computer-aided analysis could provide an answer. One generally known technique is the acquisition of star shot films to determine the mechanical stability of rotations of gantries and the therapeutic beam. With computer-aided analysis, mechanical performance can be quantified as a radiation isocenter radius size. In this work, computer-aided analysis of star shot film is further refined by applying an analytical solution for the smallest intersecting circle problem, in contrast to the gradient optimization approaches used until today. An algorithm is presented and subjected to a performance test using two different types of radiosensitive film, the Kodak EDR2 radiographic film and the ISP EBT2 radiochromic film. Artificial star shots with a priori known radiation isocenter size are used to determine the systematic errors introduced by the digitization of the film and the computer analysis. The estimated uncertainty on the isocenter size measurement with the presented technique was 0.04 mm (2σ) and 0.06 mm (2σ) for radiographic and radiochromic films, respectively. As an application of the technique, a study was conducted to compare the mechanical stability of O-ring gantry systems with C-arm-based gantries. In total ten systems of five different institutions were included in this study and star shots were acquired for gantry, collimator, ring, couch rotations and gantry wobble. It was not possible to draw general conclusions about differences in mechanical performance between O-ring and C-arm gantry systems, mainly due to differences in the beam-MLC alignment procedure accuracy. Nevertheless, the best performing O-ring system in this study, a BrainLab/MHI Vero system

  11. Innovative real-time and non-destructive method of beam profile measurement under large beam current irradiation for BNCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takada, M.; Kamada, S.; Suda, M.; Fujii, R.; Nakamura, M.; Hoshi, M.; Sato, H.; Endo, S.; Hamano, T.; Arai, S.; Higashimata, A.

    2012-10-01

    We developed a real-time and non-destructive method of beam profile measurement on a target under large beam current irradiation, and without any complex radiation detectors or electrical circuits. We measured the beam profiles on a target by observing the target temperature using an infrared-radiation thermometer camera. The target temperatures were increased and decreased quickly by starting and stopping the beam irradiation within 1 s in response speed. Our method could trace beam movements rapidly. The beam size and position were calibrated by measuring O-ring heat on the target. Our method has the potential to measure beam profiles at beam current over 1 mA for proton and deuteron with the energy around 3 MeV and allows accelerator operators to adjust the beam location during beam irradiation experiments without decreasing the beam current.

  12. Design and Development of Lightweight Composite Tanks for the Mars Ascent Propulsion Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estrada, Hector

    1999-01-01

    The investigation presented here focuses on the design and development of lightweight composite tanks for the Mars ascent propulsion technology. The proposed tanks are fabricated using the filament winding technique. The tanks will be used in the experimental permeability characterization of composite pressure vessels pressurized using cryogenic and kerosene fluids. We considered the geometry and composite material tailorability in the preliminary design formulation to obtain an isotensoid tank. The design formulation is based on membrane shell analysis. The tanks also include circular openings at the apex of the end caps for the installation of polar bosses. The development of a polar boss system was also investigated, and led to an innovative polar boss system that applies a uniform pressure on the o-ring gaskets. The permeability of these tanks was also considered and recommendations for improvement are presented.

  13. Water permeation through organic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doughty, D. H.; West, I. A.

    1981-09-01

    Atmospheric moisture is routinely excluded from weapon systems by the use of elastomer seals at assembly joints and electrical feedthroughs while internal moisture is minimized by relying on desiccants and on pre-dried components assembled in special low humidity assembly rooms. Published values of the water permeation coefficient for ethylene-propylene rubber and other o-ring materials are subject to some variability and the effects of aging on water permability are unknown. We have thus devised a new and extremely sensitive method for measuring moisture permeation coefficients in organic materials. This method uses dilute tritiated water as a tracer and it is approximately two orders of magnitude more sensitive than other methods. We are therefore able to make measurements on materials under STS temperature and humidity conditions. Rate data showing the approach to equilibrium and water permeability values for a variety of elastomers are presented. The test apparatus is also described.

  14. Portable Hyperbaric Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, William C. (Inventor); Locke, James P. (Inventor); DeLaFuente, Horacio (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A portable, collapsible hyperbaric chamber was developed. A toroidal inflatable skeleton provides initial structural support for the chamber, allowing the attendant and/or patient to enter the chamber. Oval hatches mate against bulkhead rings, and the hyperbaric chamber is pressurized. The hatches seal against an o-ring, and the internal pressure of the chamber provides the required pressure against the hatch to maintain an airtight seal. In the preferred embodiment, the hyperbaric chamber has an airlock to allow the attendant to enter and exit the patient chamber during treatment. Visual communication is provided through portholes in the patient and/or airlock chamber. Life monitoring and support systems are in communication with the interior of the hyperbaric chamber and/or airlock chamber through conduits and/or sealed feed-through connectors into the hyperbaric chamber.

  15. Propulsion simulation test technique for V/STOL configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, R. O.; Smith, S. C.; Bustie, J. B.

    1983-01-01

    Ames Research Center is developing the technology for turbine-powered jet engine simulators so that airframe/propulsion system interactions on V/STOL fighter aircraft and other highly integrated configurations can be studied. This paper describes the status of the compact multimission aircraft propulsion simulator (CMAPS) technology. Three CMAPS units have accumulated a total of 340 hr during approximately 1-1/2 yr of static and wind-tunnel testing. A wind-tunnel test of a twin-engine CMAPS-equipped close-coupled canard-wing V/STOL model configuration with nonaxisymmetric nozzles was recently completed. During this test approximately 140 total hours were logged on two CMAPS units, indicating that the rotating machinery is reliable and that the CMAPS and associated control system provide a usable test tool. However, additional development is required to correct a drive manifold O-ring problem that limits the engine-pressure-ratio (EPR) to approximately 3.5.

  16. High-pressure cryogenic seals for pressure vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buggele, A. E.

    1977-01-01

    This investigation of the problems associated with reliably containing gaseous helium pressurized to 1530 bars (22 500 psi) between 4.2 K and 150 K led to the following conclusions: (1) common seal designs used in existing elevated-temperature pressure vessels are unsuitable for high-pressure cryogenic operation, (2) extrusion seal-ring materials such as Teflon, tin, and lead are not good seal materials for cryogenic high-pressure operation; and (3) several high-pressure cryogenic seal systems suitable for large-pressure vessel applications were developed; two seals required prepressurization, and one seal functioned repeatedly without any prepressurization. These designs used indium seal rings, brass or 304 stainless-steel anvil rings, and two O-rings of silicone rubber or Kel-F.

  17. Underwater manipulator

    DOEpatents

    Schrum, Phillip B.; Cohen, George H.

    1993-01-01

    Self-contained, waterproof, water-submersible, remote-controlled apparatus is provided for manipulating a device, such as an ultrasonic transducer for measuring crack propagation on an underwater specimen undergoing shock testing. The subject manipulator includes metal bellows for transmittal of angular motions without the use of rotating shaft seals or O-rings. Inside the manipulator, a first stepper motor controls angular movement. In the preferred embodiment, the bellows permit the first stepper motor to move an ultrasonic transducer .+-.45 degrees in a first plane and a second bellows permit a second stepper motor to move the transducer .+-.10 degrees in a second plane orthogonal to the first. In addition, an XY motor-driven table provides XY motion.

  18. Axisymmetric shell analysis of the Space Shuttle solid rocket booster field joint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemeth, Michael P.; Anderson, Melvin S.

    1989-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Challenger (STS 51-L) accident led to an intense investigation of the structural behavior of the solid rocket booster (SRB) tang and clevis field joints. The presence of structural deformations between the clevis inner leg and the tang, substantial enough to prevent the O-ring seals from eliminating hot gas flow through the joints, has emerged as a likely cause of the vehicle failure. This paper presents results of axisymmetric shell analyses that parametrically assess the structural behavior of SRB field joints subjected to quasi-steady-state internal pressure loading for both the original joint flown on mission STS 51-L and the redesigned joint recently flown on the Space Shuttle Discovery. Discussion of axisymmetric shell modeling issues and details is presented and a generic method for simulating contact between adjacent shells of revolution is described. Results are presented that identify the performance trends of the joints for a wide range of joint parameters.

  19. Physical processes of quartz amorphization due to friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Y.; Muto, J.; Nagahama, H.; Miura, T.; Arakawa, I.; Shimizu, I.

    2011-12-01

    the track after the slip distance of 43 m. The bands at 490 and 606 cm-1 can be assigned to the symmetric stretching of four-membered Si-O ring (D1 band) and planar three-membered Si-O ring (D2 band) in amorphous silica, respectively. The peak at 515 cm-1 corresponds to the strongest coesite A1 mode arising from four-membered Si-O ring structure. On the other hand, the bands at 464 cm-1 broaden to reveal a shoulder adjacent to the main peak in experiments using quartz pins (F = 1 N, σr = 1 MPa, V = 0.01 ~ 2.6 m/s) after a large displacement (>1000m). These results indicate that quartz change intermediate range structure of SiO2 network during friction, and four or three-membered Si-O rings gradually increase in six-membered quartz. The results of FT-IR analyses on friction tracks showed a broad peak at 3000 -3600 cm-1 which indicates the -OH symmetric stretching band of molecular H2O. It shows that hydration of quartz on friction tracks occur due to friction. The results of Raman spectroscopy and FT-IR imply that Si-O-Si bridging of strained rings preferentially react with water to form hydrated amorphous silica layer on friction surfaces, which is likely to occur weakening.

  20. Structural design of an in-line bolted joint for the space shuttle solid rocket motor case segments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorsey, John T.; Stein, Peter A.; Bush, Harold G.

    1987-01-01

    Results of a structural design study of an in-line bolted joint concept which can be used to assemble Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Motor (SRM) case segments are presented. Numerous parametric studies are performed to characterize the in-line bolted joint behavior as major design variables are altered, with the primary objective always being to keep the inside of the joint (where the O-rings are located) closed during the SRM firing. The resulting design has 180 1-inch studs, an eccentricity of -0.5 inch, a flange thickness of 3/4 inch, a bearing plate thickness of 1/4 inch, and the studs are subjected to a preload which is 70% of ultimate. The mass penalty per case segment joint for the in-line design is 346 lbm more than the weight penalty for the proposed capture tang fix.

  1. Polymer materials and component evaluation in acidic-radiation environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celina, M.; Gillen, K. T.; Malone, G. M.; Clough, R. L.; Nelson, W. H.

    2001-07-01

    Polymeric materials used for cable/wire insulation, electrical connectors, O-rings, seals, and in critical components such as motors, level switches and resistive thermo-devices were evaluated under accelerated degradation conditions in combined radiation-oxidative elevated-temperature acidic-vapor (nitric/oxalic) environments relevant to conditions in isotope processing facilities. Experiments included the assessment of individual materials such as PEEK, polyimides, polyolefin based cable insulation, EPDM rubbers, various epoxy systems, commercial caulking materials as well as some functional testing of components. We discuss how to conduct laboratory experiments to simulate such complex hostile environments, describe some degradation effects encountered, and evaluate the impact on appropriate material and component selection.

  2. Manifestly covariant classical correlation dynamics I. General theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Shiru; Wang, Yanchao; Chen, Zhongfang

    2018-06-01

    By means of density functional theory (DFT) computations and particle-swarm optimization (PSO) structure searches, we herein predict five low-lying energy structures of two-dimensional (2D) aluminum monoxide (AlO) nanosheets. Their high cohesive energy, absence of imaginary phonon dispersion, and good thermal stability make them feasible targets for experimental realization. These monolayers exhibit diverse structural topologies, for instance, PmA- and Pmm-AlO possess buckled four- and six-membered AlO rings, whereas P62-, PmB-, and P6 m-AlO have pores of varied sizes. Interestingly, the most energetically preferred monolayers, PmA- and Pmm-AlO, feature wide band gaps (2.45 and 5.13 eV, respectively), which are promising for green and blue light-emitting devices (LEDs) and photodetectors.

  3. Highly efficient conversion of terpenoid biomass to jet-fuel range cycloalkanes in a biphasic tandem catalytic process

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Xiaokun; Li, Teng; Tang, Kan

    2017-06-12

    The demand for bio-jet fuels to reduce carbon emissions is increasing substantially in the aviation sector, while the scarcity of high-density jet fuel components limits the use of bio-jet fuels in high-performance aircrafts compared with conventional jet fuels. In this paper, we report a novel biphasic tandem catalytic process (biTCP) for synthesizing cycloalkanes from renewable terpenoid biomass, such as 1,8-cineole. Multistep tandem reactions, including C–O ring opening by hydrolysis, dehydration, and hydrogenation, were carried out in the “one-pot” biTCP. 1,8-Cineole was efficiently converted to p-menthane at high yields (>99%) in the biTCP under mild reaction conditions. Finally, the catalytic reactionmore » mechanism is discussed.« less

  4. Molded composite pyrogen igniter for rocket motors. [solid propellant ignition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heier, W. C.; Lucy, M. H. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A lightweight pyrogen igniter assembly including an elongated molded plastic tube adapted to contain a pyrogen charge was designed for insertion into a rocket motor casing for ignition of the rocket motor charge. A molded plastic closure cap provided for the elongated tube includes an ignition charge for igniting the pyrogen charge and an electrically actuated ignition squib for igniting the ignition charge. The ignition charge is contained within a portion of the closure cap, and it is retained therein by a noncorrosive ignition pellet retainer or screen which is adapted to rest on a shoulder of the elongated tube when the closure cap and tube are assembled together. A circumferentially disposed metal ring is provided along the external circumference of the closure cap and is molded or captured within the plastic cap in the molding process to provide, along with O-ring seals, a leakproof rotary joint.

  5. Method of laminating structural members

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heier, W. C. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A laminate is obtained by providing a lightweight core material, such as a honeycombed plastic or metal, within the cavity defined by an annular mold cavity frame. Face sheets, which are to be bonded to the core material, are provided on opposite sides of the frame and extend over the frame, thus sealing the core material in the cavity. An adhesive is provided between the core material and the face sheets and the combined thickness of the core material and adhesive is a close fit within the opposed face sheets. A gas tight seal, such as an O-ring gasket, is provided between the frame and the face sheet members to form a gas tight cavity between the face sheet members and the frame. External heat and pressure are used to bond the face sheets to the core material. Gas pressure is introduced into the sealed cavity to minimize out-gasing of the adhesive.

  6. Structural analysis of a bolted joint concept for the space shuttle's solid rocket motor casing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindell, Michael C.; Stalnaker, Winifred A.

    1987-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Challenger accident is thought to have been caused by the failure of one of the tang-clevis joints joining together the casing segments of the Solid Rocket Motors (SRM). Excessive displacement between the tang and clevis, possibly unseating the O-ring seals, may have initiated the resulting accident. An effort was made at NASA Langley Research Center to design an alternative concept for mating the casing segments. A bolted flange joint concept was designed and analyzed to determine if the concept would effectively maintain a seal while minimizing joint weight and controlling stress levels. It is shown that under the loading conditions analyzed the seal area of the joint remains seated. The only potential stress problem is a stress concentration in the flange at the edge of the bolt hole, which is highly localized. While heavier than the existing joint, this concept does have some advantages making the bolted joint an attractive alternative.

  7. Lightweight structural design of a bolted case joint for the space shuttle solid rocket motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorsey, John T.; Stein, Peter A.; Bush, Harold G.

    1988-01-01

    The structural design of a bolted joint with a static face seal which can be used to join Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Motor (SRM) case segments is given. Results from numerous finite element parametric studies indicate that the bolted joint meets the design requirement of preventing joint opening at the O-ring locations during SRM pressurization. A final design recommended for further development has the following parameters: 180 one-in.-diam. studs, stud centerline offset of 0.5 in radially inward from the shell wall center line, flange thickness of 0.75 in, bearing plate thickness of 0.25 in, studs prestressed to 70 percent of ultimate load, and the intermediate alcove. The design has a mass penalty of 1096 lbm, which is 164 lbm greater than the currently proposed capture tang redesign.

  8. Rotatable seal assembly. [Patent application; rotating targets

    DOEpatents

    Logan, C.M.; Garibaldi, J.L.

    1980-11-12

    An assembly is provided for rotatably supporting a rotor on a stator so that vacuum chambers in the rotor and stator remain in communication while the chambers are sealed from ambient air, which enables the use of a ball bearing or the like to support most of the weight of the rotor. The apparatus includes a seal device mounted on the rotor to rotate therewith, but shiftable in position on the rotor while being sealed to the rotor as by an O-ring. The seal device has a flat face that is biased towards a flat face on the stator, and pressurized air is pumped between the faces to prevent contact between them while spacing them a small distance apart to avoid the inflow of large amounts of air between the faces and into the vacuum chambers.

  9. Rotatable seal assembly

    DOEpatents

    Logan, Clinton M.; Garibaldi, Jack L.

    1982-01-01

    An assembly is provided for rotatably supporting a rotor on a stator so that vacuum chambers in the rotor and stator remain in communication while the chambers are sealed from ambient air, which enables the use of a ball bearing or the like to support most of the weight of the rotor. The apparatus includes a seal device mounted on the rotor to rotate therewith, but shiftable in position on the rotor while being sealed to the rotor as by an O-ring. The seal device has a flat face that is biased towards a flat face on the stator, and pressurized air is pumped between the faces to prevent contact between them while spacing them a small distance apart to avoid the inflow of large amounts of air between the faces and into the vacuum chambers.

  10. Underwater manipulator

    DOEpatents

    Schrum, P.B.; Cohen, G.H.

    1993-04-20

    Self-contained, waterproof, water-submersible, remote-controlled apparatus is described for manipulating a device, such as an ultrasonic transducer for measuring crack propagation on an underwater specimen undergoing shock testing. The subject manipulator includes metal bellows for transmittal of angular motions without the use of rotating shaft seals or O-rings. Inside the manipulator, a first stepper motor controls angular movement. In the preferred embodiment, the bellows permit the first stepper motor to move an ultrasonic transducer [plus minus]45 degrees in a first plane and a second bellows permit a second stepper motor to move the transducer [plus minus]10 degrees in a second plane orthogonal to the first. In addition, an XY motor-driven table provides XY motion.

  11. Polyphosphazenes - New polymers with inorganic backbone atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allcock, H. R.

    1976-01-01

    Unique and useful properties of the class of nonhydrocarbon, nonhalocarbon, nonsilicone polymers known as polyphosphazenes are discussed at length. These polymers, with molecular weights to 4 million (degree of polymerization 15,000), can be fabricated as tubes, fibers, woven fabrics, flexible films, or plates, and many variants are stable to attack by water, bases, aqueous acids, jet fuels, oils, hydraulic fluids, gasoline, or other hydrocarbons. Rubbery polymers with these properties can be fashioned into flexible hose, fuel hose, gaskets, or O-rings. Since they do not provoke clotting reactions in blood, and reveal no carcinogenic effects to date, they are considered for internal prosthetic applications (replacement bone, temporary skin, heart valves), as biodegradable suturing material, as carriers for slow release of drugs, and as carriers for chemotherapeutic agents against cancers.

  12. Analysis of RFQ vacuum system for HINS tests at MDB

    SciTech Connect

    Piekarz, Henryk; /Fermilab

    The arrangement of RFQ vacuum system is briefly described. The projections of the vacuum level using standard out-gassing rates for the RFQ major components are compared with measurements. The permeation of water through the Viton O-rings of the LCW manifold inside the RFQ vacuum vessel is analyzed and compared with RGA data. A model where the out-gassing water from the vanes inner surfaces affects seriously RFQ operation is devised and compared with RFQ performance. The rate of a hydrogen gas spill from the LEBT into the RFQ vacuum space is also projected. Suggestions to correct and improve RFQ operation aremore » presented.« less

  13. Modified Cooling System for Low Temperature Experiments in a 3000 Ton Multi-Anvil Press

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Secco, R.; Yong, W.

    2017-12-01

    A new modified cooling system for a 3000-ton multi-anvil press has been developed to reach temperatures below room temperature at high pressures. The new system is much simpler in design, easier to make and use, and has the same cooling capability as the previous design (Secco and Yong, RSI, 2016). The key component of the new system is a steel ring surrounding the module wedges that contains liquid nitrogen (LN2) which flows freely through an entrance port to flood the interior of the pressure module. Upper and lower O-rings on the ring seal in the liquid while permitting modest compression and an thermally insulating layer of foam is attached to the outside of the ring. The same temperature of 220 K reached with two different cooling systems suggests that thermal equilibrium is reached between the removal of heat by LN2 and the influx of heat through the massive steel components of this press.

  14. Supersonic CO electric-discharge lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hason, R. K.; Mitchner, M.; Stanton, A.

    1975-01-01

    Laser modeling activity is described which involved addition of an option allowing N2 as a second diatomic gas. This option is now operational and a few test cases involving N2/CO mixtures were run. Results from these initial test cases are summarized. In the laboratory, a CW double-discharge test facility was constructed and tested. Features include: water-cooled removable electrodes, O-ring construction to facilitate cleaning and design modifications, increased discharge length, and addition of a post-discharge observation section. Preliminary tests with this facility using N2 yielded higher power loadings than obtained in the first-generation facility. Another test-section modification, recently made and as yet untested, will permit injection of secondary gases into the cathode boundary layer. The objective will be to vary and enhance the UV emission spectrum from the auxiliary discharge, thereby influencing the level of photoionization in the main discharge region.

  15. Containment penetration elastomer seal leak rate tests

    SciTech Connect

    Bridges, T.L.

    1987-07-01

    Tests were performed on three elastomer seal designs commonly used for nuclear plant containment mechanical penetrations. The objective of this research project is to obtain an understanding of the integrity and leakage behavior of these seal designs under severe accident temperature and pressure conditions. The three designs tested and the seal materials used in the tests were: (1) double tongue-and-groove design with silicone rubber seals, (2) double-O-ring design with neoprene and ethylene-propylene (EPDM) seals, and (3) double gumdrop design with neoprene and EPDM seals. The effects of thermal aging and angular rotations of flange mating surfaces were determined. The testmore » results provide information required to characterize the leakage behavior of penetrations under severe accident conditions. 3 refs., 10 figs., 12 tabs.« less

  16. Failure life determination of oilfield elastomer seals in sour gas/dimethyl disulfide environments

    SciTech Connect

    Kennelley, K.J.; Abrams, P.I.; Vicic, J.C.

    1989-01-01

    Previous screening tests of various oilfield elastomers in sour gas/dimethyl disulfide environments indicated that hydrogenated nitrile (HNBR), tetrafluoroethylene-propylene (TFE/P), ethylene-propylene-diene (EPDM), and perfluorinated rubber (FFKM) elastomers may perform satisfactorily in these environments. This paper describes subsequent failure life tests conducted with the subject elastomers in the sour gas/dimethyl disulfide test environment at several elevated temperatures (> 135{degrees}C). The materials were tested in the form of O-rings (size 214), which were used to seal an autoclave containing the test environment at 14 MPa gas pressure. The results were used to extrapolate time to failure at a common reference temperature of 135{degrees}C.more » The performance of EPDM and HNBR in the sour gas/dimethyl disulfide mixture substantially exceeded a projected 20-year service life at 135{degrees}C, while FFKM and TFE/P did not.« less

  17. Fertility control using intrauterine devices: an alternative for population control in wild horses.

    PubMed

    Daels, P F; Hughes, J P

    1995-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a contraceptive method for feral horses. The feral horse population has increased significantly in recent years despite attempts to control numbers. As in most wild animal population control programs, contraceptive methods must be easy to apply, cause minimal disruption to the social structure and be fully reversible. In the present study, we tested the effectiveness of an intrauterine device (IUD) for fertility control in mares. Six mares were fitted with a silastic O-ring-shaped IUD on July 1 of Year 1. The IUD-treated mares were turned out with 12 nontreated mares and a fertile stallion in a large pasture until October 20 (112 d). None of the IUD-treated mares and all the nontreated mares became pregnant. The IUD-treated mares were maintained separately from the stallion during the winter. Following removal of the IUD on April 27 of Year 2, the mares were again introduced to the pasture with the stallion together with 6 nontreated mares. For the 6 mares previously treated with an IUD, the mean interval from introduction to the stallion to conception was 17.5 +/- 5 d or 1.3 cycles per pregnancy, and all mares produced a normal foal at term. Subsequently, 19 recorded mare breeding seasons resulted in 18 foals. Uterine cytology and histopathology indicate that the IUD causes mild chronic endometritis without permanent changes in the endometrium. We conclude that based on our observations, the O-ring-shaped IUD is an effective, safe and practical contraceptive method for mares.

  18. A high throughput passive dosing format for the Fish Embryo Acute Toxicity test.

    PubMed

    Vergauwen, Lucia; Schmidt, Stine N; Stinckens, Evelyn; Maho, Walid; Blust, Ronny; Mayer, Philipp; Covaci, Adrian; Knapen, Dries

    2015-11-01

    High throughput testing according to the Fish Embryo Acute Toxicity (FET) test (OECD Testing Guideline 236) is usually conducted in well plates. In the case of hydrophobic test substances, sorptive and evaporative losses often result in declining and poorly controlled exposure conditions. Therefore, our objective was to improve exposure conditions in FET tests by evaluating a passive dosing format using silicone O-rings in standard 24-well polystyrene plates. We exposed zebrafish embryos to a series of phenanthrene concentrations until 120h post fertilization (hpf), and obtained a linear dilution series. We report effect values for both mortality and sublethal morphological effects based on (1) measured exposure concentrations, (2) (lipid normalized) body residues and (3) chemical activity. The LC50 for 120hpf was 310μg/L, CBR50 (critical body residue) was 2.72mmol/kg fresh wt and La50 (lethal chemical activity) was 0.047. All values were within ranges expected for baseline toxicity. Impaired swim bladder inflation was the most pronounced morphological effect and swimming activity was reduced in all exposure concentrations. Further analysis showed that the effect on swimming activity was not attributed to impaired swim bladder inflation, but rather to baseline toxicity. We conclude that silicone O-rings (1) produce a linear dilution series of phenanthrene in the 120hpf FET test, (2) generate and maintain aqueous concentrations for reliable determination of effect concentrations, and allow for obtaining mechanistic toxicity information, and (3) cause no toxicity, demonstrating its potential as an extension of the FET test when testing hydrophobic chemicals. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Arginase reciprocally regulates nitric oxide synthase activity and contributes to endothelial dysfunction in aging blood vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berkowitz, Dan E.; White, Ron; Li, Dechun; Minhas, Khalid M.; Cernetich, Amy; Kim, Soonyul; Burke, Sean; Shoukas, Artin A.; Nyhan, Daniel; Champion, Hunter C.; hide

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although abnormal L-arginine NO signaling contributes to endothelial dysfunction in the aging cardiovascular system, the biochemical mechanisms remain controversial. L-arginine, the NO synthase (NOS) precursor, is also a substrate for arginase. We tested the hypotheses that arginase reciprocally regulates NOS by modulating L-arginine bioavailability and that arginase is upregulated in aging vasculature, contributing to depressed endothelial function. METHODS AND RESULTS: Inhibition of arginase with (S)-(2-boronoethyl)-L-cysteine, HCl (BEC) produced vasodilation in aortic rings from young (Y) adult rats (maximum effect, 46.4+/-9.4% at 10(-5) mol/L, P<0.01). Similar vasorelaxation was elicited with the additional arginase inhibitors N-hydroxy-nor-L-arginine (nor-NOHA) and difluoromethylornithine (DFMO). This effect required intact endothelium and was prevented by 1H-oxadiazole quinoxalin-1-one (P<0.05 and P<0.001, respectively), a soluble guanylyl cyclase inhibitor. DFMO-elicited vasodilation was greater in old (O) compared with Y rat aortic rings (60+/-6% versus 39+/-6%, P<0.05). In addition, BEC restored depressed L-arginine (10(-4) mol/L)-dependent vasorelaxant responses in O rings to those of Y. Arginase activity and expression were increased in O rings, whereas NOS activity and cyclic GMP levels were decreased. BEC and DFMO suppressed arginase activity and restored NOS activity and cyclic GMP levels in O vessels to those of Y. CONCLUSIONS: These findings demonstrate that arginase modulates NOS activity, likely by regulating intracellular L-arginine availability. Arginase upregulation contributes to endothelial dysfunction of aging and may therefore be a therapeutic target.

  20. Effects of population succession on demographic and genetic processes: predictions and tests in the daylily Hemerocallis thunbergii (Liliaceae).

    PubMed

    Chung, Mi Yoon; Nason, John D; Chung, Myong Gi

    2007-07-01

    Spatial genetic structure within plant populations is influenced by variation in demographic processes through space and time, including a population's successional status. To determine how demographic structure and fine-scale genetic structure (FSGS) change with stages in a population's successional history, we studied Hemerocallis thunbergii (Liliaceae), a nocturnal flowering and hawkmoth-pollinated herbaceous perennial with rapid population turnover dynamics. We examined nine populations assigned to three successive stages of population succession: expansion, maturation, and senescence. We developed stage-specific expectations for within-population demographic and genetic structure, and then for each population quantified the spatial aggregation of individuals and genotypes using spatial autocorrelation methods (nonaccumulative O-ring and kinship statistics, respectively), and at the landscape level measured inbreeding and genetic structure using Wright's F-statistics. Analyses using the O-ring statistic revealed significant aggregation of individuals at short spatial scales in expanding and senescing populations, in particular, which may reflect restricted seed dispersal around maternal individuals combined with relatively low local population densities at these stages. Significant FSGS was found for three of four expanding, no mature, and only one senescing population, a pattern generally consistent with expectations of successional processes. Although allozyme genetic diversity was high within populations (mean %P = 78.9 and H(E) = 0.281), landscape-level differentiation among sites was also high (F(ST) = 0.166) and all populations exhibited a significant deficit of heterozygotes relative to Hardy-Weinberg expectations (range F = 0.201-0.424, mean F(IS) = 0.321). Within populations, F was not correlated with the degree of FSGS, thus suggesting inbreeding due primarily to selfing as opposed to mating among close relatives in spatially structured populations

  1. Life test result of Ricor K529N 1watt linear cryocooler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nachman, Ilan; Veprik, Alexander; Pundak, Nachman

    2007-04-01

    The authors summarize the results of the accelerated life testing of the Ricor type K529N 1 Watt linear split Stirling cooler. The test was conducted in the period 2003-2006, during which the cooler accumulated in excess of 27,500 working hours at an elevated ambient temperature, which is equivalent to 45,000 hours at normal ambient conditions, and performed about 7,500 operational cycles including cooldown and steady-state phases. The cryocooler performances were assessed through the cooldown time and power consumption; no visible degradation in performances was observed. After the cooler failure and the compressor disassembling, an electrical short was discovered in the driving coil. The analysis has shown that the wire insulating varnish was not suitable for such elevated temperatures. It is important to note that the cooler under test was taken from the earliest engineering series; in the later manufacturing line military grade wire with high temperature insulation was used, no customer complaints have been recorded in this instance Special attention was paid to the thorough examination of the technical condition of the critical components of the cooler interior. In particular, dynamic piston-cylinder seal, flying leads, internal O-rings and driving coil were examined in the compressor. As to the cold head, we focused on studying the conditions of the dynamic bushing-plunger seal, O-rings and displacer-regenerator. In addition, a leak test was performed to assess the condition of the metallic crushed seals. From the analysis, the authors draw the conclusion that the cooler design is adequate for long life performance (in excess of 20,000 working hours) applications.

  2. Characteristics of Elastomer Seals Exposed to Space Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniels, Christopher C.; deGroh, Henry, III; Dunlap, Patrick H., Jr.; Finkbeiner, Joshua R.; Steinetz, Bruce M.; Bastrzyk, Marta B.; Oswald, Jay J.; Banks, Bruce A.; Dever, Joyce A.; Miller, Sharon K.; hide

    2008-01-01

    A universal docking and berthing system is being developed by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) to support all future space exploration missions to low-Earth orbit (LEO), to the Moon, and to Mars. The Low Impact Docking System (LIDS) is being designed to operate using a seal-on-seal configuration in numerous space environments, each having unique exposures to temperature, solar radiation, reactive elements, debris, and mission duration. As the LIDS seal is likely to be manufactured from an elastomeric material, performance evaluation of elastomers after exposure to atomic oxygen (AO) and ultraviolet radiation (UV) was conducted, of which the work presented herein was a part. Each of the three candidate silicone elastomer compounds investigated, including Esterline ELA-SA-401, and Parker Hannifin S0383-70 and S0899-50, was characterized as a low outgassing compound, per ASTM E595, having percent total mass loss (TML) less than 1.0 percent and collected volatile condensable materials (CVCM) less than 0.1 percent. Each compound was compatible with the LIDS operating environment of -50 to 50 C. The seal characteristics presented include compression set, elastomer-to-elastomer adhesion, and o-ring leakage rate. The ELA-SA-401 compound had the lowest variation in compression set with temperature. The S0383-70 compound exhibited the lowest compression set after exposure to AO and UV. The adhesion for all of the compounds was significantly reduced after exposure to AO and was further decreased after exposure to AO and UV. The leakage rates of o-ring specimens showed modest increases after exposure to AO. The leakage rates after exposure to AO and UV were increased by factors of up to 600 when compared to specimens in the as-received condition.

  3. Endoscopic variceal ligation-induced ulcer bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Eunae; Jun, Chung Hwan; Cho, Sung Bum; Park, Chang Hwan; Kim, Hyun Soo; Choi, Sung Kyu; Rew, Jong Sun

    2017-01-01

    Abstract This study was aimed to determine the risk factors of endoscopic variceal ligation-(EVL) induced ulcer bleeding. The prevalence of EVL-induced ulcer bleeding is reported to be 3.6%. However, there are only limited reports of this serious complication, and the risk factors and the treatment methods are not well established. A total of 430 patients who had undergone EVL in Chonnam National University Hospital from January 2014 to October 2016 were studied. EVL was performed for prophylaxis or acute hemorrhage. The patients were classified into 2 groups: a bleeding group (n = 33) and a non-bleeding group (n = 397). The patients who had endoscopically confirmed EVL-induced ulcer bleeding were included in the bleeding group. EVL-induced ulcer bleeding occurred in 7.7% (n = 33) of the patients. In a multivariate analysis, model for end-stage liver disease (MELD) score >10 (odds ratio [OR]: 3.42, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.10–10.64), concomitant GV F3 (OR: 14.1, 95% CI: 2.84–71.43), and detachment of o-ring bands on follow-up endoscopy (OR: 8.06, 95% CI: 2.55–25.64) were independent predictive factors of EVL-induced ulcer bleeding. Various endoscopic modalities were attempted for hemostasis (EVL in 8 cases [24.2%], endoscopic variceal obturation [EVO] with cyanoacrylate in 6 cases [18.2%], argon plasma coagulation [APC] in 1 case (3%), Sengstaken–Blakemore (SB) tube in 3 cases [9.1%]), and proton pump inhibitor therapy only in 15 cases (45.5%). MELD score >10, concomitant GV F3, and detachment of o-ring bands on follow-up endoscopy are risk factors for EVL-induced ulcer bleeding. PMID:28614248

  4. Comparison of retention and stability of implant-retained overdentures based upon implant number and distribution.

    PubMed

    Scherer, Michael D; McGlumphy, Edwin A; Seghi, Robert R; Campagni, Wayne V

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate the effects of number and distribution of implants upon in vitro dislodging forces to a simulated implant-supported overdenture and to examine differences between several different attachment systems. An experiment was undertaken utilizing a model simulating a mandibular edentulous ridge with dental implants in positions on the model approximating tooth positions in the natural dentition. A cobalt-chromium-cast testing framework was used to measure the peak load required to disconnect an attachment. Four different types of commercially available attachments were used in various positions on the model in sequence to evaluate the effects of retention and stability of overdentures based on implant number and distribution: (1) ERA, (2) O-Ring, (3) Locator, and (4) Ball. For each group, 10 measurements were made of peak dislodging forces. Means were calculated and differences among the systems, directions, and groups were identified using a repeated measured analysis of variance (α = .05). The interactions between the attachment system, direction of force, and implant number and distribution were statistically significant. Vertical dislodging forces of the simulated overdenture prosthesis increased with additional widely spaced implants. Oblique dislodging forces of the simulated prosthesis increased with additional widely spaced implants except in the two-implant model with all attachments, and in the four-implant groups with Locator attachments. Anteroposterior dislodging forces of a simulated overdenture prosthesis increased with additional widely spaced implants except in the four-implant groups with Ball and Locator attachments. Ball attachments reported the highest levels of retention and stability followed by Locator, O-Ring, and ERA. Within the limitations of this study, retention and stability of an implant overdenture prosthesis are significantly affected by implant number, implant distribution, and abutment

  5. Failure and Life Cycle Evaluation of Watering Valves

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, David M; Graciano, Sandy J; Karlstad, John; Leblanc, Mathias; Clark, Tom; Holmes, Scott; Reuter, Jon D

    2011-01-01

    Automated watering systems provide a reliable source of ad libitum water to animal cages. Our facility uses an automated water delivery system to support approximately 95% of the housed population (approximately 14,000 mouse cages). Drinking valve failure rates from 2002 through 2006 never exceeded the manufacturer standard of 0.1% total failure, based on monthly cage census and the number of floods. In 2007, we noted an increase in both flooding and cases of clinical dehydration in our mouse population. Using manufacturer's specifications for a water flow rate of 25 to 50 mL/min, we initiated a wide-scale screening of all valves used. During a 4-mo period, approximately 17,000 valves were assessed, of which 2200 failed according to scoring criteria (12.9% overall; 7.2% low flow; 1.6% no flow; 4.1% leaky). Factors leading to valve failures included residual metal shavings, silicone flash, introduced debris or bedding, and (most common) distortion of the autoclave-rated internal diaphragm and O-ring. Further evaluation revealed that despite normal autoclave conditions of heat, pressure, and steam, an extreme negative vacuum pull caused the valves’ internal silicone components (diaphragm and O-ring) to become distorted and water-permeable. Normal flow rate often returned after a ‘drying out’ period, but components then reabsorbed water while on the animal rack or during subsequent autoclave cycles to revert to a variable flow condition. On the basis of our findings, we recalibrated autoclaves and initiated a preventative maintenance program to mitigate the risk of future valve failure. PMID:22330720

  6. Valve

    DOEpatents

    Cho, Nakwon

    1980-01-01

    A positive acting valve suitable for operation in a corrosive environment is provided. The valve includes a hollow valve body defining an open-ended bore for receiving two, axially aligned, spaced-apart, cylindrical inserts. One insert, designated the seat insert, terminates inside the valve body in an annular face which lies within plane normal to the axis of the two inserts. An elastomeric O-ring seal is disposed in a groove extending about the annular face. The other insert, designated the wedge insert, terminates inside the valve body in at least two surfaces oppositely inclined with respect to each other and with respect to a plane normal to the axis of the two inserts. An elongated reciprocable gate, movable between the two inserts along a path normal to the axis of the two inserts, has a first flat face portion disposed adjacent and parallel to the annular face of the seat insert. The gate has a second face portion opposite to the first face portion provided with at least two oppositely inclined surfaces for mating with respective inclined surfaces of the wedge insert. An opening is provided through the gate which registers with a flow passage through the two inserts when the valve is open. Interaction of the respective inclined surfaces of the gate and wedge insert act to force the first flat face portion of the gate against the O-ring seal in the seat insert at the limits of gate displacement where it reaches its respective fully open and fully closed positions.

  7. Fluorination of silicone rubber by plasma polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fielding, Jennifer Chase

    Plasma polymerized fluorocarbon (PPFC) films were deposited onto various silicone rubber substrates, including O-rings, to decrease oil uptake. Depositions were performed using a radio frequency (rf)-powered plasma reactor and various fluorocarbon monomers, such as C2F6, C2F 5H, C3F6, and 1H,1H,2H-perfluoro-1-dodecene. PPFC films which were most promising for inhibiting oil uptake were deposited with 1H,1H,2H-perfluoro-1-dodecene, and were composed predominantly of perfluoromethylene (CF2) species. These films displayed low critical surface energies (as low as 2.7 mJ/m2), and high contact angles with oil (84°), which were correlated with the amount of CF2 species present in the film. For the films with the highest degree of CF2 (up to 67%), CF2 chains may have been oriented slightly perpendicular to the substrate and terminated by CF3 species. Adhesion of the PPFC films directly to silicone rubber was found to be poor. However, when a plasma polymerized hydrocarbon interlayer was deposited on the silicone rubber prior to the fluorocarbon films, adhesion was excellent. O-rings coated with multilayer fluorocarbon films showed 2.6% oil uptake after soaking in oil for 100 hrs at 100°C. Due to variability in data, and the low quality of the industrial grade silicone rubber, the oil uptake mechanism was determined to be from oil flowing through flaws in the film due to defects within the substrate, not from generalized diffusion through the film. This mechanism was confirmed using higher quality silicone rubber, which showed little or no oil diffusion. Therefore, this film may perform well as an oil-repelling barrier when deposited on a high quality silicone rubber.

  8. Failure and life cycle evaluation of watering valves.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, David M; Graciano, Sandy J; Karlstad, John; Leblanc, Mathias; Clark, Tom; Holmes, Scott; Reuter, Jon D

    2011-09-01

    Automated watering systems provide a reliable source of ad libitum water to animal cages. Our facility uses an automated water delivery system to support approximately 95% of the housed population (approximately 14,000 mouse cages). Drinking valve failure rates from 2002 through 2006 never exceeded the manufacturer standard of 0.1% total failure, based on monthly cage census and the number of floods. In 2007, we noted an increase in both flooding and cases of clinical dehydration in our mouse population. Using manufacturer's specifications for a water flow rate of 25 to 50 mL/min, we initiated a wide-scale screening of all valves used. During a 4-mo period, approximately 17,000 valves were assessed, of which 2200 failed according to scoring criteria (12.9% overall; 7.2% low flow; 1.6% no flow; 4.1% leaky). Factors leading to valve failures included residual metal shavings, silicone flash, introduced debris or bedding, and (most common) distortion of the autoclave-rated internal diaphragm and O-ring. Further evaluation revealed that despite normal autoclave conditions of heat, pressure, and steam, an extreme negative vacuum pull caused the valves' internal silicone components (diaphragm and O-ring) to become distorted and water-permeable. Normal flow rate often returned after a 'drying out' period, but components then reabsorbed water while on the animal rack or during subsequent autoclave cycles to revert to a variable flow condition. On the basis of our findings, we recalibrated autoclaves and initiated a preventative maintenance program to mitigate the risk of future valve failure.

  9. Development of high pressure-high vacuum-high conductance piston valve for gas-filled radiation detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, D. N.; Ayyappan, R.; Kamble, L. P.; Singh, J. P.; Muralikrishna, L. V.; Alex, M.; Balagi, V.; Mukhopadhyay, P. K.

    2008-05-01

    Gas-filled radiation detectors need gas filling at pressures that range from few cms of mercury to as high as 25kg/cm2 at room temperature. Before gas-filling these detectors require evacuation to a vacuum of the order of ~1 × 10-5 mbar. For these operations of evacuation and gas filling a system consisting of a vacuum pump with a high vacuum gauge, gas cylinder with a pressure gauge and a valve is used. The valve has to meet the three requirements of compatibility with high-pressure and high vacuum and high conductance. A piston valve suitable for the evacuation and gas filling of radiation detectors has been designed and fabricated to meet the above requirements. The stainless steel body (80mm×160mm overall dimensions) valve with a piston arrangement has a 1/2 inch inlet/outlet opening, neoprene/viton O-ring at piston face & diameter for sealing and a knob for opening and closing the valve. The piston movement mechanism is designed to have minimum wear of sealing O-rings. The valve has been hydrostatic pressure tested up to 75bars and has Helium leak rate of less than 9.6×10-9 m bar ltr/sec in vacuum mode and 2×10-7 mbar ltr/sec in pressure mode. As compared to a commercial diaphragm valve, which needed 3 hours to evacuate a 7 litre chamber to 2.5×10-5 mbar, the new valve achieved vacuum 7.4×10-6mbar in the same time under the same conditions.

  10. Thermal-Flow Code for Modeling Gas Dynamics and Heat Transfer in Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Motor Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Qunzhen; Mathias, Edward C.; Heman, Joe R.; Smith, Cory W.

    2000-01-01

    A new, thermal-flow simulation code, called SFLOW. has been developed to model the gas dynamics, heat transfer, as well as O-ring and flow path erosion inside the space shuttle solid rocket motor joints by combining SINDA/Glo, a commercial thermal analyzer. and SHARPO, a general-purpose CFD code developed at Thiokol Propulsion. SHARP was modified so that friction, heat transfer, mass addition, as well as minor losses in one-dimensional flow can be taken into account. The pressure, temperature and velocity of the combustion gas in the leak paths are calculated in SHARP by solving the time-dependent Navier-Stokes equations while the heat conduction in the solid is modeled by SINDA/G. The two codes are coupled by the heat flux at the solid-gas interface. A few test cases are presented and the results from SFLOW agree very well with the exact solutions or experimental data. These cases include Fanno flow where friction is important, Rayleigh flow where heat transfer between gas and solid is important, flow with mass addition due to the erosion of the solid wall, a transient volume venting process, as well as some transient one-dimensional flows with analytical solutions. In addition, SFLOW is applied to model the RSRM nozzle joint 4 subscale hot-flow tests and the predicted pressures, temperatures (both gas and solid), and O-ring erosions agree well with the experimental data. It was also found that the heat transfer between gas and solid has a major effect on the pressures and temperatures of the fill bottles in the RSRM nozzle joint 4 configuration No. 8 test.

  11. SciTech Connect

    Brown, Austin Douglas; Runnels, Joel T.; Moore, Murray E.

    A portable instrument has been developed to assess the functionality of filter sand o-rings on nuclear material storage canisters, without requiring removal of the canister lid. Additionally, a set of fifteen filter standards were procured for verifying aerosol leakage and pressure drop measurements in the Los Alamos Filter Test System. The US Department of Energy uses several thousand canisters for storing nuclear material in different chemical and physical forms. Specialized filters are installed into canister lids to allow gases to escape, and to maintain an internal ambient pressure while containing radioactive contaminants. Diagnosing the condition of container filters and canistermore » integrity is important to ensure worker and public safety and for determining the handling requirements of legacy apparatus. This report describes the In-Place-Filter-Tester, the Instrument Development Plan and the Instrument Operating Method that were developed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory to determine the “as found” condition of unopened storage canisters. The Instrument Operating Method provides instructions for future evaluations of as-found canisters packaged with nuclear material. Customized stainless steel canister interfaces were developed for pressure-port access and to apply a suction clamping force for the interface. These are compatible with selected Hagan-style and SAVY-4000 storage canisters that were purchased from NFT (Nuclear Filter Technology, Golden, CO). Two instruments were developed for this effort: an initial Los Alamos POC (Proof-of-Concept) unit and the final Los Alamos IPFT system. The Los Alamos POC was used to create the Instrument Development Plan: (1) to determine the air flow and pressure characteristics associated with canister filter clogging, and (2) to test simulated configurations that mimicked canister leakage paths. The canister leakage scenarios included quantifying: (A) air leakage due to foreign material (i.e. dust and

  12. SciTech Connect

    Ono, Tomohiro; Miyabe, Yuki, E-mail: miyabe@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Yamada, Masahiro

    Purpose: The Vero4DRT system has the capability for dynamic tumor-tracking (DTT) stereotactic irradiation using a unique gimbaled x-ray head. The purposes of this study were to develop DTT conformal arc irradiation and to estimate its geometric and dosimetric accuracy. Methods: The gimbaled x-ray head, supported on an O-ring gantry, was moved in the pan and tilt directions during O-ring gantry rotation. To evaluate the mechanical accuracy, the gimbaled x-ray head was moved during the gantry rotating according to input command signals without a target tracking, and a machine log analysis was performed. The difference between a command and a measuredmore » position was calculated as mechanical error. To evaluate beam-positioning accuracy, a moving phantom, which had a steel ball fixed at the center, was driven based on a sinusoidal wave (amplitude [A]: 20 mm, time period [T]: 4 s), a patient breathing motion with a regular pattern (A: 16 mm, average T: 4.5 s), and an irregular pattern (A: 7.2–23.0 mm, T: 2.3–10.0 s), and irradiated with DTT during gantry rotation. The beam-positioning error was evaluated as the difference between the centroid position of the irradiated field and the steel ball on images from an electronic portal imaging device. For dosimetric accuracy, dose distributions in static and moving targets were evaluated with DTT conformal arc irradiation. Results: The root mean squares (RMSs) of the mechanical error were up to 0.11 mm for pan motion and up to 0.14 mm for tilt motion. The RMSs of the beam-positioning error were within 0.23 mm for each pattern. The dose distribution in a moving phantom with tracking arc irradiation was in good agreement with that in static conditions. Conclusions: The gimbal positional accuracy was not degraded by gantry motion. As in the case of a fixed port, the Vero4DRT system showed adequate accuracy of DTT conformal arc irradiation.« less

  13. Processes to Open the Container and the Sample Catcher of the Hayabusa Returned Capsule in the Planetary Material Sample Curation Facility of JAXA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fujimura, A.; Abe, M.; Yada, T.; Nakamura, T.; Noguchi, T.; Okazaki, R.; Ishibashi, Y.; Shirai, K.; Okada, T.; Yano, H.; hide

    2011-01-01

    Japanese spacecraft Hayabusa, which returned from near-Earth-asteroid Itokawa, successfully returned its reentry capsule to the Earth, the Woomera Prohibited Area in Australia in Jun 13th, 2010, as detailed in another paper [1]. The capsule introduced into the Planetary Material Sample Curation Facility in the Sagamihara campus of JAXA in the early morning of June 18th. Hereafter, we describe a series of processes for the returned capsule and the container to recover gas and materials in there. A transportation box of the recovered capsule was cleaned up on its outer surface beforehand and introduced into the class 10,000 clean room of the facility. Then, the capsule was extracted from the box and its plastic bag was opened and checked and photographed the outer surface of the capsule. The capsule was composed of the container, a backside ablator, a side ablator, an electronic box and a supporting frame. The container consists of an outer lid, an inner lid, a frame for latches, a container and a sample catcher, which is composed of room A and B and a rotational cylinder. After the first check, the capsule was packed in a plastic bag with N2 again, and transferred to the Chofu campus in JAXA, where the X-ray CT instrument is situated. The first X-ray CT analysis was performed on the whole returned capsule for confirming the conditions of latches and O-ring seal of the container. The analysis showed that the latches of the container should have worked normally, and that the double Orings of the container seemed to be sealed its sample catcher with no problem. After the first X-ray CT, the capsule was sent back to Sagamihara and introduced in the clean room to exclude the electronic box and the side ablator from the container by hand tools. Then the container with the backside ablator was set firmly to special jigs to fix the lid of container tightly to the container and set to a milling machine. The backside ablator was drilled by the machine to expose heads of bolts

  14. Test System to Study the Ignition of Metals by Polymers in Oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shoffstall, Michael S.; Stoltzfus, Joel M.; Fries, Joseph (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    A new test system that uses Laser energy to ignite a polymer promoter has been developed at the NASA White Sands Test Facility. It will facilitate the study of the spread of fire from a burning polymer material to the metal surrounding it. The system can be used to answer questions regarding the effects of configuration on ignition and combustion. The data obtained from this test could also be used to develop mathematical models for analyzing the effects of configuration on ignition and combustion. The system features a 10,000-psi (69-MPa) test chamber with sight glass windows on either end and a 25-watt carbon dioxide Laser for an ignition source. The test system can be used with gaseous oxygen, nitrogen or any mixture of the two gases. To minimize the effect of preheating the metallic, the polymer is ignited with a minimal amount of Laser energy. Igniting the polymer in this fashion also simplifies the thermodynamic analysis of the ignition and propagation reactions. The system is very robust, versatile and straightforward to use. Depending on the test pressure and configuration, the test system operator can perform as many as 20 tests per day. Test results verify that ignition and combustion of the metallic sample is not only dependent on pressure, material type and temperature, but configuration of both the polymer promoter and metallic sample. Both 6061 aluminum and 316 stainless steel 0.25-inch (6.35-mm) diameter rods with a standard 0-ring groove were tested with Buna-N, Silicone, Teflon and Viton 0-rings. The system ignited all four types of 0-rings in oxygen at pressures ranging from ambient to 10,000 psi (69 MPa). However, neither the stainless steel nor the aluminum rods on which the O-rings were mounted ignited in any test conditions. Future testing may be done on the 0.25-inch (6.35-mm) rod and O-ring configuration to evaluate the lack of ignition in these tests. Future configurations may include a plug of polymer in the base of the sample and replicas

  15. Comparison of retention and stability of two implant-retained overdentures based on implant location.

    PubMed

    Scherer, Michael D; McGlumphy, Edwin A; Seghi, Robert R; Campagni, Wayne V

    2014-09-01

    The location of dental implants and the choice of retentive attachments for implant-retained overdentures are selected based on clinician preference, expert opinion, or empirical information. Limited information is available regarding implant position and the effect on the retention and stability of 2-implant mandibular implant overdentures. The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate the effect of implant location on the in vitro retention and stability of a simulated 2-implant-supported overdenture and to examine the differences among different attachment systems. A model that simulates a mandibular edentulous ridge with dental implants in positions that approximate tooth positions, and a cobalt-chromium cast framework attached to a universal testing machine was used to measure the peak load (N) required to disconnect the attachments. Four different types of attachments (Ball/Cap, ERA, Locator, and O-Ring) were used in sequence in various positions on the model to evaluate the effect of implant location on the retention and stability of a simulated 2-implant-retained overdenture. Means were calculated, and differences among the systems, directions, and groups were identified by using a repeated measured ANOVA (α=.05). For differences observed between measurements, the Bonferroni post hoc method at the 5% level of significance was used to determine the location and magnitude of difference. The interactions between the attachment system, direction of force, and implant location were statistically significant (P=.01). The vertical retention and horizontal stability of a simulated overdenture prosthesis increased with the distal implant location up to the second premolar, and the anteroposterior stability increased with distal implant location. The attachment type affected retention and stability differently by location. Ball attachments produced the highest levels of retention and stability, followed by Locator (pink), O-Ring, and ERA (orange). The retention

  16. Patient satisfaction and prosthetic aspects with mini-implants retained mandibular overdentures. A 5-year prospective study.

    PubMed

    Elsyad, Moustafa Abdou

    2016-07-01

    This study aimed to evaluate patient satisfaction and prosthetic aspects during a 5-year prospective clinical study of mini dental implants (MDIs) retaining mandibular overdentures. This observational prospective clinical study was conducted on a group of completely edentulous patients (n = 28) with retention problems of conventional mandibular dentures. All patients received new maxillary and mandibular conventional dentures. A total of 112 MDIs (four per patient) were inserted using the flapless surgical approach and immediately loaded by the new mandibular dentures (overdentures). Patients indicated satisfaction with their prosthesis using a questionnaire and a visual analogue scale (VAS). Patient satisfaction and prosthetic complications were recorded 6 months (T6 m ), 1 (T1), 3 (T3), and 5 (T5) years after overdenture insertion. The patient satisfaction with eating (hard/soft) food (P < 0.001), talking (P < 0.001), appearance (P = 0.001), comfort (P < 0.001), healing process (P = 0.013), socialization (P < 0.001), stability/retention of mandibular dentures (P = 0.001), ease of oral hygiene (P = 0.008), and ease of handling the dentures (P < 0.001) increased significantly with time. After 5 years, the most common complication was wear/damage of O/rings (n = 235), O/ring replacement (n = 125), maxillary denture relining times (n = 13), worn teeth (n = 10), overdentures relines (n = 10), detachment of the metal housings (n = 9), and fracture of mandibular overdentures (n = 8). Mucositis, soreness, and decubitis ulcer under overdenture occurred most often at T6 m and decreased significantly with time (P = 0.002, 0.005, and 0.024, respectively). Within the limitations of this clinical study, patient satisfaction with mini-implant retained mandibular overdentures increased significantly with time. However, this treatment required a considerable amount of prosthetic maintenance and repair after 5 years of service. © 2015 John

  17. An in vitro investigation into retention strength and fatigue resistance of various designs of tooth/implant supported overdentures.

    PubMed

    Fatalla, Abdalbseet A; Song, Ke; Du, Tianfeng; Cao, Yingguang

    2012-02-01

    Previously, the choice of prosthetic implant-retained overdentures has depended on data from previous studies about the retention-fatigue strength of the attachment system selected. Little or no data have been available on the correlation between the attachment system selected and the overdenture support configuration. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the retention force and fatigue resistance of three attachment systems and four support designs of overdenture prosthesis. Four lower edentulous acrylic models were prepared and eight combinations of attachments groups were investigated in the study. These included: O-Rings with mini-dental implants (MDIs), Dalbo elliptic with Dalbo Rotex and fabricated flexible acrylic attachments with both MDI and Dalbo Rotex. The study was divided into four test groups: groups A and B, controls, and groups C and D, experimental groups. Control group A contained three overdenture supports: two free standing MDIs in the canine region and at the midline, and one simulated tooth root with Dalbo Rotex screwed in. Control group B contained four overdenture support foundations: two free standing MDIs in the right canine region and the first premolar region, and two simulated tooth roots with Dalbo Rotex screwed in at the same MDI position, but on the left side of the model. Experimental group C contained three overdenture support foundations: two free standing MDIs in the canine region and at the midline, and one simulated tooth root with MDI screwed in. Experimental group D contained four overdenture support foundations: two free standing MDIs in the right canine region and the first premolar region, and two simulated tooth roots with MDIs screwed in at the same MDI position, but on the left side of the model. Each group was further divided into two subgroups according to attachment type used. Five samples were prepared for each group. Retention force (N) values were recorded initially (0 cycles) and after 360, 720, 1440

  18. High-pressure cell for neutron reflectometry of supercritical and subcritical fluids at solid interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Carmichael, Justin R; Rother, Gernot; Browning, Jim

    2012-01-01

    A new high-pressure cell design for use in neutron reflectometry (NR) for pressures up to 50 MPa and a temperature range of 300 473 K is described. The cell design guides the neutron beam through the working crystal without passing through additional windows or the bulk fluid, which provides for a high neutron transmission, low scattering background, and low beam distortion. The o-ring seal is suitable for a wide range of subcritical and supercritical fluids and ensures high chemical and pressure stability. Wafers with a diameter of 5.08 cm (2 in.) and 5 mm or 10 mm thickness can bemore » used with the cells, depending on the required pressure and momentum transfer range. The fluid volume in the sample cell is very small at about 0.1 ml, which minimizes scattering background and stored energy. The cell design and pressure setup for measurements with supercritical fluids are described. NR data are shown for silicon/silicon oxide and quartz wafers measured against air and subsequently within the high-pressure cell to demonstrate the neutron characteristics of the high-pressure cell. Neutron reflectivity data for supercritical CO2 in contact with quartz and Si/SiO2 wafers are also shown.« less

  19. Integrated high pressure manifold for thermoplastic microfluidic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aghvami, S. Ali; Fraden, Seth

    2017-11-01

    We introduce an integrated tubing manifold for thermoplastic microfluidic chips that tolerates high pressure. In contrast to easy tubing in PDMS microfluidic devices, tube connection has been challenging for plastic microfluidics. Our integrated manifold connection tolerates 360 psi while conventional PDMS connections fail at 50 psi. Important design considerations are incorporation of a quick-connect, leak-free and high-pressure manifold for the inlets and outlets on the lid and registration marks that allow the precise alignment of the inlets and outlets. In our method, devices are comprised of two molded pieces joined together to create a sealed device. The first piece contains the microfluidic features and the second contains the inlet and outlet manifold, a frame for rigidity and a viewing window. The mold for the lid with integrated manifold is CNC milled from aluminium. A cone shape PDMS component which acts as an O-ring, seals the connection between molded manifold and tubing. The lid piece with integrated inlet and outlets will be a standard piece and can be used for different chips and designs. Sealing the thermoplastic device is accomplished by timed immersion of the lid in a mixture of volatile and non-volatile solvents followed by application of heat and pressure.

  20. Design of high temperature ceramic components against fast fracture and time-dependent failure using cares/life

    SciTech Connect

    Jadaan, O.M.; Powers, L.M.; Nemeth, N.N.

    1995-08-01

    A probabilistic design methodology which predicts the fast fracture and time-dependent failure behavior of thermomechanically loaded ceramic components is discussed using the CARES/LIFE integrated design computer program. Slow crack growth (SCG) is assumed to be the mechanism responsible for delayed failure behavior. Inert strength and dynamic fatigue data obtained from testing coupon specimens (O-ring and C-ring specimens) are initially used to calculate the fast fracture and SCG material parameters as a function of temperature using the parameter estimation techniques available with the CARES/LIFE code. Finite element analysis (FEA) is used to compute the stress distributions for the tube as amore » function of applied pressure. Knowing the stress and temperature distributions and the fast fracture and SCG material parameters, the life time for a given tube can be computed. A stress-failure probability-time to failure (SPT) diagram is subsequently constructed for these tubes. Such a diagram can be used by design engineers to estimate the time to failure at a given failure probability level for a component subjected to a given thermomechanical load.« less

  1. Methodology to predict delayed failure due to slow crack growth in ceramic tubular components using data from simple specimens

    SciTech Connect

    Jadaan, O.M.; Tressler, R.E.

    1993-04-01

    The methodology to predict the lifetime of sintered [alpha]-silicon carbide (SASC) tubes subjected to slow crack growth (SCG) conditions involved the experimental determination of the SCG parameters of that material and the scaling analysis to project the stress rupture data from small specimens to large components. Dynamic fatigue testing, taking into account the effect of threshold stress intensity factor, of O-ring and compressed C-ring specimens was used to obtain the SCG parameters. These SCG parameters were in excellent agreement with those published in the literature and extracted from stress rupture tests of tensile and bend specimens. Two methods were usedmore » to predict the lifetimes of internally heated and pressurized SASC tubes. The first is a fracture mechanics approach that is well known in the literature. The second method used a scaling analysis in which the stress rupture distribution (lifetime) of any specimen configuration can be predicted from stress rupture data of another.« less

  2. Analysis of selected specimens from the STS-46 Energetic Oxygen Interaction with Materials-3 experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golden, Johnny L.; Bourassa, Roger J.; Dursch, Harry W.; Pippin, H. Gary

    1995-01-01

    The Energetic Oxygen Interaction with Materials 3 (EOIM-3) experiment was flown on the STS-46 mission, which was launched on 31 Jul. 1992 and returned 8 Aug. 1992. Boeing specimens were located on both the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) tray and the Ballistic Missile Defense Organization (BMDO) tray integrated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). The EOIM-3 pallet was mounted in the Space Shuttle payload bay near the aft bulkhead. During the mission, the atomic oxygen (AO) exposure levels of specimens in these passive sample trays was about 2.3 x 10(exp 20) atoms/sq cm. The specimens also received an estimated 22 equivalent sun hours of solar exposure. In addition, it appears that the EOIM-3 pallet was exposed to a silicone contamination source and many specimens had a thin layer of silicon based deposit on their surfaces after the flight. The specimens on the MSFC tray included seven solid film lubricants, a selection of butyl rubber (B612) and silicone (S383) o-rings, three indirect scatter surfaces, and Silver/Fluorinated Ethylene Propylene (Ag/FEP) and Chemglaze A276 specimens which had previously flown on trailing edge locations of the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF). The specimens on the JPL tray included composites previously flown on LDEF and two indirect scattering surfaces.

  3. BRIC-100VC Biological Research in Canisters (BRIC)-100VC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richards, Stephanie E.; Levine, Howard G. (Compiler); Romero, Vergel

    2016-01-01

    The Biological Research in Canisters (BRIC) is an anodized-aluminum cylinder used to provide passive stowage for investigations of the effects of space flight on small specimens. The BRIC 100 mm petri dish vacuum containment unit (BRIC-100VC) has supported Dugesia japonica (flatworm) within spring under normal atmospheric conditions for 29 days in space and Hemerocallis lilioasphodelus L. (daylily) somatic embryo development within a 5% CO2 gaseous environment for 4.5 months in space. BRIC-100VC is a completely sealed, anodized-aluminum cylinder (Fig. 1) providing containment and structural support of the experimental specimens. The top and bottom lids of the canister include rapid disconnect valves for filling the canister with selected gases. These specialized valves allow for specific atmospheric containment within the canister, providing a gaseous environment defined by the investigator. Additionally, the top lid has been designed with a toggle latch and O-ring assembly allowing for prompt sealing and removal of the lid. The outside dimensions of the BRIC-100VC canisters are 16.0 cm (height) x 11.4 cm (outside diameter). The lower portion of the canister has been equipped with sufficient storage space for passive temperature and relative humidity data loggers. The BRIC- 100VC canister has been optimized to accommodate standard 100 mm laboratory petri dishes or 50 mL conical tubes. Depending on storage orientation, up to 6 or 9 canisters have been flown within an International Space Station (ISS) stowage locker.

  4. Hydraulic pump with in-ground filtration and monitoring capability

    DOEpatents

    Hopkins, C.D.; Livingston, R.R.; Toole, W.R. Jr.

    1995-01-01

    A hydraulically operated pump is described for in-ground filtering and monitoring of wells or other fluid sources, including a hollow cylindrical pump housing with an inlet and an outlet, filtering devices positioned in the inlet and the outlet, a piston that fits slidably within the pump housing, and an optical cell in fluid communication with the pump housing. A conduit within the piston allows fluid communication between the exterior and one end of the piston. A pair of O-rings form a seal between the inside of the pump housing and the exterior of the piston. A flow valve positioned within the piston inside the conduit allows fluid to flow in a single direction. In operation, fluid enters the pump housing through the inlet, flows through the conduit and towards an end of the pump housing. The piston then makes a downward stroke closing the valve, thus forcing the fluid out from the pump housing into the optical cell, which then takes spectrophotometric measurements of the fluid. A spring helps return the piston back to its starting position, so that a new supply of fluid may enter the pump housing and the downward stroke can begin again. The pump may be used independently of the optical cell, as a sample pump to transport a sample fluid from a source to a container for later analysis.

  5. Electrical characterization of thin nanoscale SiOx layers grown on plasma hydrogenated silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halova, E.; Kojuharova, N.; Alexandrova, S.; Szekeres, A.

    2018-03-01

    We analyzed the electrical characteristics of MOS structures with a SiOx layer grown on Si treated in plasma without heating. The hysteresis effect observed indicates the presence of traps spatially distributed into the oxide near the interface. The shift and the shape of the curves reveal a small oxide charge and low leakage currents, i.e. a high-quality dielectric layer. The generalized C-V curve was generated by applying the two-frequency methods on the C-V and G-V characteristics at frequencies in the range from 1 kHz to 300 kHz and by accounting for the series resistance and the leakage through the oxide layer. The energy spectra of the interface traps were calculated by comparing the experimental and the ideal theoretical C-V curves. The spectra showed the presence of interface traps with localized energy levels in the Si bandgap. These conclusions correlate well with the results on this oxide’s mechanical stress level, composition and Si-O ring structure, as well as on the interfacial region composition, obtained by our previous detailed multi-angle spectral ellipsometric studies. The ellipsometric data and the capacitance in strong accumulation of the C-V curves were used to calculate the thickness and the dielectric constants of the oxide layers.

  6. SciTech Connect

    Wang, Bu; Yu, Yingtian; Bauchy, Mathieu, E-mail: bauchy@ucla.edu

    Although quartz (α-form) is a mineral used in numerous applications wherein radiation exposure is an issue, the nature of the atomistic defects formed during radiation-induced damage has not been fully clarified. Especially, the extent of oxygen vacancy formation is still debated, which is an issue of primary importance as optical techniques based on charged oxygen vacancies have been utilized to assess the level of radiation damage in quartz. In this paper, molecular dynamics simulations are applied to study the effects of ballistic impacts on the atomic network of quartz. We show that the defects that are formed mainly consist ofmore » over-coordinated Si and O, as well as Si–O connectivity defects, e.g., small Si–O rings and edge-sharing Si tetrahedra. Oxygen vacancies, on the contrary, are found in relatively low abundance, suggesting that characterizations based on E′ centers do not adequately capture radiation-induced structural damage in quartz. Finally, we evaluate the dependence on the incident energy, of the amount of each type of the point defects formed, and quantify unambiguously the threshold displacement energies for both O and Si atoms. These results provide a comprehensive basis to assess the nature and extent of radiation damage in quartz.« less

  7. Topological defects in liquid crystals and molecular self-assembly (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbott, Nicholas L.

    2017-02-01

    Topological defects in liquid crystals (LCs) have been widely used to organize colloidal dispersions and template polymerizations, leading to a range of elastomers and gels with complex mechanical and optical properties. However, little is understood about molecular-level assembly processes within defects. This presentation will describe an experimental study that reveals that nanoscopic environments defined by LC topological defects can selectively trigger processes of molecular self-assembly. By using fluorescence microscopy, cryogenic transmission electron microscopy and super-resolution optical microscopy, key signatures of molecular self-assembly of amphiphilic molecules in topological defects are observed - including cooperativity, reversibility, and controlled growth of the molecular assemblies. By using polymerizable amphiphiles, we also demonstrate preservation of molecular assemblies templated by defects, including nanoscopic "o-rings" synthesized from "Saturn-ring" disclinations. Our results reveal that topological defects in LCs are a versatile class of three-dimensional, dynamic and reconfigurable templates that can direct processes of molecular self-assembly in a manner that is strongly analogous to other classes of macromolecular templates (e.g., polymer—surfactant complexes). Opportunities for the design of exquisitely responsive soft materials will be discussed using bacterial endotoxin as an example.

  8. Fluid sampling tool

    DOEpatents

    Garcia, Anthony R.; Johnston, Roger G.; Martinez, Ronald K.

    1999-05-25

    A fluid sampling tool for sampling fluid from a container. The tool has a fluid collecting portion which is drilled into the container wall, thereby affixing it to the wall. The tool may have a fluid extracting section which withdraws fluid collected by the fluid collecting section. The fluid collecting section has a fluted shank with an end configured to drill a hole into a container wall. The shank has a threaded portion for tapping the borehole. The shank is threadably engaged to a cylindrical housing having an inner axial passageway sealed at one end by a septum. A flexible member having a cylindrical portion and a bulbous portion is provided. The housing can be slid into an inner axial passageway in the cylindrical portion and sealed to the flexible member. The bulbous portion has an outer lip defining an opening. The housing is clamped into the chuck of a drill, the lip of the bulbous section is pressed against a container wall until the shank touches the wall, and the user operates the drill. Wall shavings (kerf) are confined in a chamber formed in the bulbous section as it folds when the shank advances inside the container. After sufficient advancement of the shank, an o-ring makes a seal with the container wall.

  9. Fluid sampling tool

    DOEpatents

    Garcia, A.R.; Johnston, R.G.; Martinez, R.K.

    1999-05-25

    A fluid sampling tool is described for sampling fluid from a container. The tool has a fluid collecting portion which is drilled into the container wall, thereby affixing it to the wall. The tool may have a fluid extracting section which withdraws fluid collected by the fluid collecting section. The fluid collecting section has a fluted shank with an end configured to drill a hole into a container wall. The shank has a threaded portion for tapping the borehole. The shank is threadably engaged to a cylindrical housing having an inner axial passageway sealed at one end by a septum. A flexible member having a cylindrical portion and a bulbous portion is provided. The housing can be slid into an inner axial passageway in the cylindrical portion and sealed to the flexible member. The bulbous portion has an outer lip defining an opening. The housing is clamped into the chuck of a drill, the lip of the bulbous section is pressed against a container wall until the shank touches the wall, and the user operates the drill. Wall shavings (kerf) are confined in a chamber formed in the bulbous section as it folds when the shank advances inside the container. After sufficient advancement of the shank, an o-ring makes a seal with the container wall. 6 figs.

  10. Motor actuated vacuum door. [for photography from sounding rockets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanagud, A. V.

    1986-01-01

    Doors that allow scientific instruments to record and retrieve the observed data are often required to be designed and installed as a part of sounding rocket hardware. The motor-actuated vacuum door was designed to maintain a medium vacuum of the order of 0.0001 torr or better while closed, and to provide an opening 15 inches long x 8.5 inches wide while open for cameras to image Halley's comet. When the electric motor receives the instruction to open the door through the payload battery, timer, and relay circuit, the first operation is to unlock the door. After unlatching, the torque transmitted by the motor to the main shaft through the links opens the door. A microswitch actuator, which rides on the linear motion conversion mechanism, is adjusted to trip the limit switch at the end of the travel. The process is repeated in the reverse order to close the door. 'O' rings are designed to maintain the seal. Door mechanisms similar to the one described have flown on Aerobee 17.018 and Black Brant 27.047 payloads.

  11. [Spatial point pattern analysis of main trees and flowering Fargesia qinlingensis in Abies fargesii forests in Mt Taibai of the Qinling Mountains, China].

    PubMed

    Li, Guo Chun; Song, Hua Dong; Li, Qi; Bu, Shu Hai

    2017-11-01

    In Abies fargesii forests of the giant panda's habitats in Mt. Taibai, the spatial distribution patterns and interspecific associations of main tree species and their spatial associations with the understory flowering Fargesia qinlingensis were analyzed at multiple scales by univariate and bivaria-te O-ring function in point pattern analysis. The results showed that in the A. fargesii forest, the number of A. fargesii was largest but its population structure was in decline. The population of Betula platyphylla was relatively young, with a stable population structure, while the population of B. albo-sinensis declined. The three populations showed aggregated distributions at small scales and gradually showed random distributions with increasing spatial scales. Spatial associations among tree species were mainly showed at small scales and gradually became not spatially associated with increasing scale. A. fargesii and B. platyphylla were positively associated with flowering F. qinlingensis at large and medium scales, whereas B. albo-sinensis showed negatively associated with flowering F. qinlingensis at large and medium scales. The interaction between trees and F. qinlingensis in the habitats of giant panda promoted the dynamic succession and development of forests, which changed the environment of giant panda's habitats in Qinling.

  12. Antiallodynic Effects of Bee Venom in an Animal Model of Complex Regional Pain Syndrome Type 1 (CRPS-I).

    PubMed

    Lee, Sung Hyun; Lee, Jae Min; Kim, Yun Hong; Choi, Jung Hyun; Jeon, Seung Hwan; Kim, Dong Kyu; Jeong, Hyeon Do; Lee, You Jung; Park, Hue Jung

    2017-09-15

    Neuropathic pain in a chronic post-ischaemic pain (CPIP) model mimics the symptoms of complex regional pain syndrome type I (CRPS I). The administration of bee venom (BV) has been utilized in Eastern medicine to treat chronic inflammatory diseases accompanying pain. However, the analgesic effect of BV in a CPIP model remains unknown. The application of a tight-fitting O-ring around the left ankle for a period of 3 h generated CPIP in C57/Bl6 male adult mice. BV (1 mg/kg ; 1, 2, and 3 times) was administered into the SC layer of the hind paw, and the antiallodynic effects were investigated using the von Frey test and by measuring the expression of neurokinin type 1 (NK-1) receptors in dorsal root ganglia (DRG). The administration of BV dose-dependently reduced the pain withdrawal threshold to mechanical stimuli compared with the pre-administration value and with that of the control group. After the development of the CPIP model, the expression of NK-1 receptors in DRG increased and then decreased following the administration of BV. SC administration of BV results in the attenuation of allodynia in a mouse model of CPIP. The antiallodynic effect was objectively proven through a reduction in the increased expression of NK-1 receptors in DRG.

  13. Flight set 360T004 (STS-30)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelsen, Lowell V.

    1990-01-01

    The performance of 360T004, Forth Flight, Redesigned Solid Rocket Motors (RSRM) is assessed in respect to joint sealing issues as seen from post-test inspection of the seals and sealing surfaces. The factory joint disassembly inspections for this flight set were omitted. The decision was based on the rational that there is sufficient information in the present data base, and this would give H-7 refurbishment operations faster turn around time for this set of hardware. The factory joint disassembly inspections will resume for 360H005, Fifth Flight, through 360L007, Seventh Flight, due to a new grease application being in effect during the assembly process. The left hand nozzle was forced into the snubbed position upon splash down. This required unique tooling to be manufactured to perform the disassembly of the internal nozzle joints. This was completed on February 5 and 6, 1990 at the H-5 Clearfield, Utah facility. The RSRM consisting of capture feature, field joints with the J-joint insulation configuration is illustrated. The nozzle-to-case joint design, which includes 100, 7/8-inch radial bolts in conjunction with a wiper O-ring and modified insulation design is also illustrated, as is the ignition system seals and a cross section of the igniter. The configuration of all internal nozzle joints is shown.

  14. Microchannel heat sink assembly

    DOEpatents

    Bonde, W.L.; Contolini, R.J.

    1992-03-24

    The present invention provides a microchannel heat sink with a thermal range from cryogenic temperatures to several hundred degrees centigrade. The heat sink can be used with a variety of fluids, such as cryogenic or corrosive fluids, and can be operated at a high pressure. The heat sink comprises a microchannel layer preferably formed of silicon, and a manifold layer preferably formed of glass. The manifold layer comprises an inlet groove and outlet groove which define an inlet manifold and an outlet manifold. The inlet manifold delivers coolant to the inlet section of the microchannels, and the outlet manifold receives coolant from the outlet section of the microchannels. In one embodiment, the manifold layer comprises an inlet hole extending through the manifold layer to the inlet manifold, and an outlet hole extending through the manifold layer to the outlet manifold. Coolant is supplied to the heat sink through a conduit assembly connected to the heat sink. A resilient seal, such as a gasket or an O-ring, is disposed between the conduit and the hole in the heat sink in order to provide a watertight seal. In other embodiments, the conduit assembly may comprise a metal tube which is connected to the heat sink by a soft solder. In still other embodiments, the heat sink may comprise inlet and outlet nipples. The present invention has application in supercomputers, integrated circuits and other electronic devices, and is suitable for cooling materials to superconducting temperatures. 13 figs.

  15. Formation of Exotic Networks of Water Clusters in Helium Droplets Facilitated by the Presence of Neon Atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Douberly, Gary E.; Miller, Roger E.; Xantheas, Sotiris S.

    Water clusters are formed in helium droplets via the sequential capture of monomers. One or two neon atoms are added to each droplet prior to the addition of water. The infrared spectrum of the droplet ensemble reveals several signatures of polar, water tetramer clusters having dipole moments between 2D and 3D. Comparison with ab initio computations supports the assignment of the cluster networks to noncyclic “3+1” clusters, which are ~5.3 kcal/mol less stable than the global minimum nonpolar cyclic tetramer. The (H2O)3Ne + H2O ring insertion barrier is sufficiently large, such that evaporative helium cooling is capable of kinetically quenchingmore » the nonequilibrium tetramer system prior to its rearrangement to the lower energy cyclic species. To this end, the reported process results in the formation of exotic water cluster networks that are either higher in energy than the most stable gas-phase analogs or not even stable in the gas phase.« less

  16. Space Shuttle Orbital Maneuvering Subsystem (OMS) Engine Propellant Leakage Ball-Valve Shaft Seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lueders, Kathy; Buntain, Nick; Fries, Joseph (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    Evidence of propellant leakage across ball-valve shaft seals has been noted during the disassembly of five flight engines and one test engine at the NASA Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, White Sands Test Facility. Based on data collected during the disassembly of these five engines, the consequences of propellant leakage across the ball-valve shaft seals can be divided into four primary areas of concern: Damage to the ball-valve pinion shafts, damage to sleeved bearings inside the ball-valve and actuator assemblies, degradation of the synthetic rubber o-rings used in the actuator assemblies, and corrosion and degradation to the interior of the actuator assemblies. The exact time at which leakage across the ball-valve shaft seals occurs has not been determined, however, the leakage most likely occurs during engine firings when, depending on the specification used, ball-valve cavity pressures range as high as 453 to 550 psia. This potential pressure range for the ball-valve cavities greatly exceeds the acceptance leakage test pressure of 332 psia. Since redesign and replacement of the ball-valve shaft seals is unlikely, the near term solution to prevent damage that occurs from shaft-seal leakage is to implement a routine overhaul and maintenance program for engines in the fleet. Recommended repair, verification, and possible preventative maintenance measures are discussed in the paper.

  17. An audit of a hospital-based Doppler ultrasound quality control protocol using a commercial string Doppler phantom.

    PubMed

    Cournane, S; Fagan, A J; Browne, J E

    2014-05-01

    Results from a four-year audit of a Doppler quality assurance (QA) program using a commercially available Doppler string phantom are presented. The suitability of the phantom was firstly determined and modifications were made to improve the reliability and quality of the measurements. QA of Doppler ultrasound equipment is very important as data obtained from these systems is used in patient management. It was found that if the braided-silk filament of the Doppler phantom was exchanged with an O-ring rubber filament and the velocity range below 50 cm/s was avoided for Doppler quality control (QC) measurements, then the maximum velocity accuracy (MVA) error and intrinsic spectral broadening (ISB) results obtained using this device had a repeatability of 18 ± 3.3% and 19 ± 3.5%, respectively. A consistent overestimation of the MVA of between 12% and 56% was found for each of the tested ultrasound systems. Of more concern was the variation of the overestimation within each respective transducer category: MVA errors of the linear, curvilinear and phased array probes were in the range 12.3-20.8%, 32.3-53.8% and 27-40.7%, respectively. There is a dearth of QA data for Doppler ultrasound; it would be beneficial if a multicentre longitudinal study was carried out using the same Doppler ultrasound test object to evaluate sensitivity to deterioration in performance measurements. Copyright © 2013 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Significant demographic and fine-scale genetic structure in expanding and senescing populations of the terrestrial orchid Cymbidium goeringii (Orchidaceae).

    PubMed

    Chung, Mi Yoon; Nason, John D; Chung, Myong Gi

    2011-12-01

    Fine-scale genetic structure (FSGS) in plants is influenced by variation in spatial and temporal demographic processes. To determine how demographic structure and FSGS change with stages of population succession, we studied replicate expanding and senescing populations of the Asian terrestrial orchid Cymbidium goeringii. We used spatial autocorrelation methods (O-ring and kinship statistics) to quantify spatial demographic structure and FSGS in two expanding and two senescing populations, also measuring genetic diversity and inbreeding in each. All populations exhibited significant aggregation of individuals and FSGS at short spatial scales. In expanding populations, this finding was associated with high recruitment rates, suggesting restricted seed dispersal. In senescing populations, recruitment was minimal, suggesting alternative mechanisms of aggregation, perhaps including spatial associations with mycorrhizal fungi. All populations had significant evidence of genetic bottlenecks, and inbreeding levels were consistently high. Our results indicate that different successional stages can generate similar patterns of spatial demographic and genetic structure, but as a consequence of different processes. These results contrast with the only other study of senescence effects on population genetic structure in an herbaceous perennial, which found little to no FSGS in senescing populations. With the exception of populations subject to mass collection by orchid sellers, significant FSGS is characteristic of the 16 terrestrial orchid species examined to date. From a conservation perspective, this result suggests that inference of orchid population history will benefit from analyses of both FSGS and demographic structure in combination with other ecological field data.

  19. Functional performance of pyrovalves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bement, Laurence J.

    1996-01-01

    Following several flight and ground test failures of spacecraft systems using single-shot, 'normally closed' pyrotechnically actuated valves (pyrovalves), a Government/Industry cooperative program was initiated to assess the functional performance of five qualified designs. The goal of the program was to provide information on functional performance of pyrovalves to allow users the opportunity to improve procurement requirements. Specific objectives included the demonstration of performance test methods, the seating; these gases/particles entered the fluid path of measurement of 'blowby' (the passage of gases from the pyrotechnic energy source around the activating piston into the valve's fluid path), and the quantification of functional margins for each design. Experiments were conducted at NASA's Langley Research Center on several units for each of the five valve designs. The test methods used for this program measured the forces and energies required to actuate the valves, as well as the energies and the pressures (where possible) delivered by the pyrotechnic sources. Functional performance ranged widely among the designs. Blowby cannot be prevented by o-ring seals; metal-to-metal seals were effective. Functional margin was determined by dividing the energy delivered by the pyrotechnic sources in excess to that required to accomplish the function by the energy required for that function. Two of the five designs had inadequate functional margins with the pyrotechnic cartridges evaluated.

  20. Vacuum ultraviolet photoionization of carbohydrates and nucleotides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Joong-Won; Bernstein, Elliot R.

    2014-01-01

    Carbohydrates (2-deoxyribose, ribose, and xylose) and nucleotides (adenosine-, cytidine-, guanosine-, and uridine-5'-monophosphate) are generated in the gas phase, and ionized with vacuum ultraviolet photons (VUV, 118.2 nm). The observed time of flight mass spectra of the carbohydrate fragmentation are similar to those observed [J.-W. Shin, F. Dong, M. Grisham, J. J. Rocca, and E. R. Bernstein, Chem. Phys. Lett. 506, 161 (2011)] for 46.9 nm photon ionization, but with more intensity in higher mass fragment ions. The tendency of carbohydrate ions to fragment extensively following ionization seemingly suggests that nucleic acids might undergo radiation damage as a result of carbohydrate, rather than nucleobase fragmentation. VUV photoionization of nucleotides (monophosphate-carbohydrate-nucleobase), however, shows that the carbohydrate-nucleobase bond is the primary fragmentation site for these species. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations indicate that the removed carbohydrate electrons by the 118.2 nm photons are associated with endocyclic C-C and C-O ring centered orbitals: loss of electron density in the ring bonds of the nascent ion can thus account for the observed fragmentation patterns following carbohydrate ionization. DFT calculations also indicate that electrons removed from nucleotides under these same conditions are associated with orbitals involved with the nucleobase-saccharide linkage electron density. The calculations give a general mechanism and explanation of the experimental results.

  1. Phase transition analysis of V-shaped liquid crystal: Combined temperature-dependent FTIR and density functional theory approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Swapnil; Singh, Harshita; Karthick, T.; Tandon, Poonam; Prasad, Veena

    2018-01-01

    Temperature-dependent Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) combined with density functional theory (DFT) is employed to study the mechanism of phase transitions of V-shaped bent-core liquid crystal. Since it has a large number of flexible bonds, one-dimensional potential energy scan (PES) was performed on the flexible bonds and predicted the most stable conformer I. A detailed analysis of vibrational normal modes of conformer I have been done on the basis of potential energy distribution. The good agreement between the calculated spectrum of conformer I and observed FTIR spectrum at room temperature validates our theoretical structure model. Furthermore, the prominent changes observed in the stretching vibrational bands of CH3/CH2, Cdbnd O, ring CC, ring CO, ring CH in-plane bending, and ring CH out-of-plane bending at Iso → nematic phase transition (at 155 °C) have been illustrated. However, the minor changes in the spectral features observed for the other phase transitions might be due to the shape or bulkiness of molecules. Combined FTIR and PES study beautifully explained the dynamics of the molecules, molecular realignment, H-bonding, and conformational changes at the phase transitions.

  2. Spatial Distribution of Coffee Wilt Disease Under Roguing and Replanting Conditions: A Case Study from Kaweri Estate in Uganda.

    PubMed

    Pinard, F; Makune, S E; Campagne, P; Mwangi, J

    2016-11-01

    Based on time and spatial dynamic considerations, this study evaluates the potential role of short- and long-distance dispersal in the spread of coffee wilt disease (CWD) in a large commercial Robusta coffee estate in Uganda (Kaweri, 1,755 ha) over a 4-year period (2008 to 2012). In monthly surveys, total disease incidence, expansion of infection foci, and the occurrence of isolated infected trees were recorded and submitted to spatial analysis. Incidence was higher and disease progression faster in old coffee plantings compared with young plantings, indicating a lack of efficiency of roguing for reducing disease development in old plantings. At large spatial scale (approximately 1 km), Moran indices (both global and local) revealed the existence of clusters characterized by contrasting disease incidences. This suggested that local environmental conditions were heterogeneous or there were spatial interactions among blocks. At finer spatial scale (approximately 200 m), O-ring statistics revealed positive correlation between distant infection sites across distances as great as 60 m. Although these observations indicate the role of short-distance dispersal in foci expansion, dispersal at greater distances (>20 m) appeared to also contribute to both initiation of new foci and disease progression at coarser spatial scales. Therefore, our results suggested the role of aerial dispersal in CWD progression.

  3. An Overview of Advanced Elastomeric Seal Development and Testing Capabilities at NASA Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunlap, Patrick H., Jr.

    2014-01-01

    NASA is developing advanced space-rated elastomeric seals to support future space exploration missions to low Earth orbit, the Moon, near Earth asteroids, and other destinations. This includes seals for a new docking system and vehicle hatches. These seals must exhibit extremely low leak rates to ensure that astronauts have sufficient breathable air for extended missions. Seal compression loads must be below prescribed limits so as not to overload the mechanisms that compress them, and seal adhesion forces must be low to allow the sealed interface to be separated when required (e.g., during undocking or hatch opening). NASA Glenn Research Center has developed a number of unique test fixtures to measure the leak rates and compression and adhesion loads of candidate seal designs under simulated thermal, vacuum, and engagement conditions. Tests can be performed on fullscale seals with diameters on the order of 50 in., subscale seals that are about 12 in. in diameter, and smaller specimens such as O-rings. Test conditions include temperatures ranging from -238 to 662degF (-150 to 350degC), operational pressure gradients, and seal-on-seal or seal-on-flange mating configurations. Nominal and off-nominal conditions (e.g., incomplete seal compression) can also be simulated. This paper describes the main design features and capabilities of each type of test apparatus and provides an overview of advanced seal development activities at NASA Glenn.

  4. Resonant acoustic measurement of vapor phase transport phenomenon in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuhmann, Richard; Garrett, Steven

    2002-05-01

    Diffusion of gases through porous media is commonly described using Fick's law and is characterized by a gas diffusion coefficient modified by a media-specific tortuosity parameter. A phase-locked-loop resonance frequency tracker [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 108, 2520 (2000)] has been upgraded with an insulated copper resonator and a bellows-sealed piston instrumented with an accelerometer. Average system stability (temperature divided by frequency squared) is about 180 ppm. Glass-bead-filled cores of different lengths are fitted into an o-ring sealed opening at the top of the resonator. The rate at which the tracer gas is replaced by air within the resonator is controlled by the core's diffusion constant. Mean molecular weight of the gas mixture in the resonator is determined in real time from the ratio of the absolute temperature to the square of the fundamental acoustic resonance frequency. Molecular weight of the gas mixture is determined approximately six times per minute. Changes in the gas mixture concentration are exponential in time (within 0.1%) over nearly two decades in concentration. We will report diffusion constants for two different sizes of glass beads, in samples of five different lengths, using two different tracer gases, to establish the validity of this approach. [Work supported by ONR.

  5. Micro-reactors for characterization of nanostructure-based sensors.

    PubMed

    Savu, R; Silveira, J V; Flacker, A; Vaz, A R; Joanni, E; Pinto, A C; Gobbi, A L; Santos, T E A; Rotondaro, A L P; Moshkalev, S A

    2012-05-01

    Fabrication and testing of micro-reactors for the characterization of nanosensors is presented in this work. The reactors have a small volume (100 μl) and are equipped with gas input/output channels. They were machined from a single piece of kovar in order to avoid leaks in the system due to additional welding. The contact pins were electrically insulated from the body of the reactor using a borosilicate sealing glass and the reactor was hermetically sealed using a lid and an elastomeric o-ring. One of the advantages of the reactor lies in its simple assembly and ease of use with any vacuum/gas system, allowing the connection of more than one device. Moreover, the lid can be modified in order to fit a window for in situ optical characterization. In order to prove its versatility, carbon nanotube-based sensors were tested using this micro-reactor. The devices were fabricated by depositing carbon nanotubes over 1 μm thick gold electrodes patterned onto Si/SiO(2) substrates. The sensors were tested using oxygen and nitrogen atmospheres, in the pressure range between 10(-5) and 10(-1) mbar. The small chamber volume allowed the measurement of fast sensor characteristic times, with the sensors showing good sensitivity towards gas and pressure as well as high reproducibility.

  6. Micro-reactors for characterization of nanostructure-based sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savu, R.; Silveira, J. V.; Flacker, A.; Vaz, A. R.; Joanni, E.; Pinto, A. C.; Gobbi, A. L.; Santos, T. E. A.; Rotondaro, A. L. P.; Moshkalev, S. A.

    2012-05-01

    Fabrication and testing of micro-reactors for the characterization of nanosensors is presented in this work. The reactors have a small volume (100 μl) and are equipped with gas input/output channels. They were machined from a single piece of kovar in order to avoid leaks in the system due to additional welding. The contact pins were electrically insulated from the body of the reactor using a borosilicate sealing glass and the reactor was hermetically sealed using a lid and an elastomeric o-ring. One of the advantages of the reactor lies in its simple assembly and ease of use with any vacuum/gas system, allowing the connection of more than one device. Moreover, the lid can be modified in order to fit a window for in situ optical characterization. In order to prove its versatility, carbon nanotube-based sensors were tested using this micro-reactor. The devices were fabricated by depositing carbon nanotubes over 1 μm thick gold electrodes patterned onto Si/SiO2 substrates. The sensors were tested using oxygen and nitrogen atmospheres, in the pressure range between 10-5 and 10-1 mbar. The small chamber volume allowed the measurement of fast sensor characteristic times, with the sensors showing good sensitivity towards gas and pressure as well as high reproducibility.

  7. In-situ TEM on (de)hydrogenation of Pd at 0.5-4.5 bar hydrogen pressure and 20-400°C.

    PubMed

    Yokosawa, Tadahiro; Alan, Tuncay; Pandraud, Gregory; Dam, Bernard; Zandbergen, Henny

    2012-01-01

    We have developed a nanoreactor, sample holder and gas system for in-situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of hydrogen storage materials up to at least 4.5 bar. The MEMS-based nanoreactor has a microheater, two electron-transparent windows and a gas inlet and outlet. The holder contains various O-rings to have leak-tight connections with the nanoreactor. The system was tested with the (de)hydrogenation of Pd at pressures up to 4.5 bar. The Pd film consisted of islands being 15 nm thick and 50-500 nm wide. In electron diffraction mode we observed reproducibly a crystal lattice expansion and shrinkage owing to hydrogenation and dehydrogenation, respectively. In selected-area electron diffraction and bright/dark-field modes the (de)hydrogenation of individual Pd particles was followed. Some Pd islands are consistently hydrogenated faster than others. When thermally cycled, thermal hysteresis of about 10-16°C between hydrogen absorption and desorption was observed for hydrogen pressures of 0.5-4.5 bar. Experiments at 0.8 bar and 3.2 bar showed that the (de)hydrogenation temperature is not affected by the electron beam. This result shows that this is a fast method to investigate hydrogen storage materials with information at the nanometer scale. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Vacuum ultraviolet photoionization of carbohydrates and nucleotides.

    PubMed

    Shin, Joong-Won; Bernstein, Elliot R

    2014-01-28

    Carbohydrates (2-deoxyribose, ribose, and xylose) and nucleotides (adenosine-, cytidine-, guanosine-, and uridine-5(')-monophosphate) are generated in the gas phase, and ionized with vacuum ultraviolet photons (VUV, 118.2 nm). The observed time of flight mass spectra of the carbohydrate fragmentation are similar to those observed [J.-W. Shin, F. Dong, M. Grisham, J. J. Rocca, and E. R. Bernstein, Chem. Phys. Lett. 506, 161 (2011)] for 46.9 nm photon ionization, but with more intensity in higher mass fragment ions. The tendency of carbohydrate ions to fragment extensively following ionization seemingly suggests that nucleic acids might undergo radiation damage as a result of carbohydrate, rather than nucleobase fragmentation. VUV photoionization of nucleotides (monophosphate-carbohydrate-nucleobase), however, shows that the carbohydrate-nucleobase bond is the primary fragmentation site for these species. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations indicate that the removed carbohydrate electrons by the 118.2 nm photons are associated with endocyclic C-C and C-O ring centered orbitals: loss of electron density in the ring bonds of the nascent ion can thus account for the observed fragmentation patterns following carbohydrate ionization. DFT calculations also indicate that electrons removed from nucleotides under these same conditions are associated with orbitals involved with the nucleobase-saccharide linkage electron density. The calculations give a general mechanism and explanation of the experimental results.

  9. [Species composition and point pattern analysis of standing trees in secondary Betula albosinensis forest in Xiaolongshan of west Qinling Mountains].

    PubMed

    Guo, Yao-xin; Kang, Bing; Li, Gang; Wang, De-xiang; Yang, Gai-he; Wang, Da-wei

    2011-10-01

    An investigation was conducted on the species composition and population diameter-class structure of a typical secondary Betula albo-sinensis forest in Xiaolongshan of west Qinling Mountains, and the spatial distribution pattern and interspecific correlations of the main populations were analyzed at multiple scales by the O-ring functions of single variable and double variables. In the test forest, B. albo-sinensis was obviously dominant, but from the analysis of DBH class distribution, the B. albo-sinensis seedlings were short of, and the natural regeneration was very poor. O the contrary, the regeneration of Abies fargesii and Populus davidianas was fine. B. albo-sinensis and Salix matsudana had a random distribution at almost all scales, while A. fargesii and P. davidianas were significantly clumped at small scale. B. albo-sinensis had positive correlations with A. fargesii and P. davidianas at medium scale, whereas S. matsudana had negative correlations with B. albo-sinensis, A. fargesii, and P. davidianas at small scale. No significant correlations were observed between other species. The findings suggested that the spatial distribution patterns of the tree species depended on their biological characteristics at small scale, but on the environmental heterogeneity at larger scales. In a period of future time, B. albo-sinensis would still be dominant, but from a long-term view, it was necessary to take some artificial measures to improve the regeneratio of B. albo-sinensis.

  10. MNASA as a Test for Carbon Fiber Thermal Barrier Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, Paul; McCool, Alex (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A carbon fiber rope thermal barrier is being evaluated as a replacement for the conventional room temperature vulcanizing (RTV) thermal barrier that is currently used to protect o-rings in Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) nozzle joints. Performance requirements include its ability to cool any incoming, hot propellant gases that fill and pressurize the nozzle joints, filter slag and particulates, and to perform adequately in various joint assembly conditions as well as dynamic flight motion. Modified National Aeronautics and Space Administration (MNASA) motors, with their inherent and unique ability to replicate select RSRM internal environment features, were an integral step in the development path leading to full scale RSRM static test demonstration of the carbon fiber rope (CFR) joint concept. These 1/4 scale RSRM motors serve to bridge the gap between the other classes of subscale test motors (extremely small and moderate duration, or small scale and short duration) and the critical asset RSRM static test motors. A series of MNASA tests have been used to demonstrate carbon fiber rope performance and have provided rationale for implementation into a full-scale static motor and flight qualification.

  11. Transient UV pump-IR probe investigation of heterocyclic ring-opening dynamics in the solution phase: the role played by nσ* states in the photoinduced reactions of thiophenone and furanone.

    PubMed

    Murdock, Daniel; Harris, Stephanie J; Luke, Joel; Grubb, Michael P; Orr-Ewing, Andrew J; Ashfold, Michael N R

    2014-10-21

    The heterocyclic ring-opening dynamics of thiophenone and furanone dissolved in CH3CN have been probed by ultrafast transient infrared spectroscopy. Following irradiation at 267 nm (thiophenone) or 225 nm (furanone), prompt (τ < 1 ps) ring-opening is confirmed by the appearance of a characteristic antisymmetric ketene stretching feature around 2150 cm(-1). The ring-opened product molecules are formed highly vibrationally excited, and cool subsequently on a ∼6.7 ps timescale. By monitoring the recovery of the parent (S0) bleach, it is found that ∼60% of the initially photoexcited thiophenone molecules reform the parent molecule, in stark contrast with the case in furanone where there is less than 10% parent bleach recovery. Complementary ab initio calculations of potential energy cuts along the S-C([double bond, length as m-dash]O) and O-C([double bond, length as m-dash]O) ring-opening coordinate reveals insights into the reaction mechanism, and the important role played by dissociative (n/π)σ* states in the UV-induced photochemistry of such heterocyclic systems.

  12. Technical Evaluation Motor 3 (TEM-3)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garecht, Diane

    1989-01-01

    A primary objective of the technical evaluation motor program is to recover the case, igniter and nozzle hardware for use on the redesigned solid rocket motor flight program. Two qualification objectives were addressed and met on TEM-3. The Nylok thread locking device of the 1U100269-03 leak check port plug and the 1U52295-04 safe and arm utilizing Krytox grease on the barrier-booster shaft O-rings were both certified. All inspection and instrumentation data indicate that the TEM-3 static test firing conducted 23 May 1989 was successful. The test was conducted at ambient conditions with the exception of the field joints (set point of 121 F, with a minimum of 87 F at the sensors), igniter joint (set point at 122 F with a minimum of 87 F at sensors) and case-to-nozzle joint (set point at 114 F with a minimum of 87 F at sensors). Ballistics performance values were within specification requirements. Nozzle performance was nominal with typical erosion. The nozzle and the case joint temperatures were maintained at the heaters controlling set points while electrical power was supplied. The water and the CO2 quench systems prevented damage to the metal hardware. All other test equipment performed as planned, contributing to a successful motor firing. All indications are that the test was a success, and all expected hardware will be refurbished for the RSRM program.

  13. 9975 SHIPPING PACKAGE LIFE EXTENSION SURVEILLANCE PROGRAM RESULTS SUMMARY

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, K.; Daugherty, W.; Hackney, B.

    2011-05-27

    Results from the 9975 shipping package Storage and Surveillance Program at the Savannah River Site (SRS) are summarized for justification to extend the life of the 9975 packages currently stored in the K-Area Complex (KAC). This justification is established with the stipulation that surveillance activities will continue throughout the extended time to ensure the continued integrity of the 9975 materials of construction and to further understand the currently identified degradation mechanisms. The 10 year storage life justification was developed prior to storage. A subsequent report was later used to validate the qualification of the 9975 shipping packages for 10 yearsmore » in storage. However the qualification for the storage period was provided by the monitoring requirements of the 9975 Storage and Surveillance Program. This report summarizes efforts to determine a new safe storage limit for the 9975 shipping package based on the surveillance data collected since 2005 when the 9975 Storage and Surveillance Program began. The Program has demonstrated that the 9975 package has a robust design that can perform under a variety of conditions. The primary emphasis of the on-going 9975 Storage and Surveillance Program is an aging study of the 9975 Viton{reg_sign} containment vessel O-rings and the Celotex{reg_sign} fiberboard thermal insulation at bounding conditions of radiation, elevated temperatures and/or elevated humidity.« less

  14. Hydraulic pump with in-ground filtration and monitoring capability

    DOEpatents

    Hopkins, Charles D.; Livingston, Ronald R.; Toole, Jr., William R.

    1996-01-01

    A hydraulically operated pump for in-ground filtering and monitoring of ws or other fluid sources, including a hollow cylindrical pump housing with an inlet and an outlet, filtering devices positioned in the inlet and the outlet, a piston that fits slidably within the pump housing, and an optical cell in fluid communication with the pump housing. A conduit within the piston allows fluid communication between the exterior and one end of the piston. A pair of o-rings form a seal between the inside of the pump housing and the exterior of the piston. A flow valve positioned within the piston inside the conduit allows fluid to flow in a single direction. In operation, fluid enters the pump housing through the inlet, flows through the conduit and towards an end of the pump housing. The piston then makes a downward stroke closing the valve, thus forcing the fluid out from the pump housing into the optical cell, which then takes spectrophotometric measurements of the fluid. A spring helps return the piston back to its starting position, so that a new supply of fluid may enter the pump housing and the downward stroke can begin again. The pump may be used independently of the optical cell, as a sample pump to transport a sample fluid from a source to a container for later analysis.

  15. An Overview of Advanced Elastomeric Seal Development and Testing Capabilities at NASA Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunlap, Patrick H.

    2014-01-01

    NASA is developing advanced space-rated elastomeric seals to support future space exploration missions to low Earth orbit, the Moon, near Earth asteroids, and other destinations. This includes seals for a new docking system and vehicle hatches. These seals must exhibit extremely low leak rates to ensure that astronauts have sufficient breathable air for extended missions. Seal compression loads must be below prescribed limits so as not to overload the mechanisms that compress them, and seal adhesion forces must be low to allow the sealed interface to be separated when required (e.g., during undocking or hatch opening). NASA Glenn Research Center has developed a number of unique test fixtures to measure the leak rates and compression and adhesion loads of candidate seal designs under simulated thermal, vacuum, and engagement conditions. Tests can be performed on full-scale seals with diameters on the order of 50 in., subscale seals that are about 12 in. in diameter, and smaller specimens such as O-rings. Test conditions include temperatures ranging from -238 to 662 F (-150 to 350 C), operational pressure gradients, and seal-on-seal or seal-on-flange mating configurations. Nominal and off-nominal conditions (e.g., incomplete seal compression) can also be simulated. This paper describes the main design features and capabilities of each type of test apparatus and provides an overview of advanced seal development activities at NASA Glenn.

  16. When Doing Wrong Feels So Right: Normalization of Deviance.

    PubMed

    Price, Mary R; Williams, Teresa C

    2018-03-01

    Normalization of deviance is a term first coined by sociologist Diane Vaughan when reviewing the Challenger disaster. Vaughan noted that the root cause of the Challenger disaster was related to the repeated choice of NASA officials to fly the space shuttle despite a dangerous design flaw with the O-rings. Vaughan describes this phenomenon as occurring when people within an organization become so insensitive to deviant practice that it no longer feels wrong. Insensitivity occurs insidiously and sometimes over years because disaster does not happen until other critical factors line up. In clinical practice, failing to do time outs before procedures, shutting off alarms, and breaches of infection control are deviances from evidence-based practice. As in other industries, health care workers do not make these choices intending to set into motion a cascade toward disaster and harm. Deviation occurs because of barriers to using the correct process or drivers such as time, cost, and peer pressure. As in other industries, operators will often adamantly defend their actions as necessary and justified. Although many other high-risk industries have embraced the normalization of deviance concept, it is relatively new to health care. It is urgent that we explore the impact of this concept on patient harm. We can borrow this concept from other industries and also the steps these other high-risk organizations have found to prevent it.

  17. SQUID measurements of remanent magnetisation in refillable 3He spin-filter cells (SFC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutanu, V.; Rupp, A.; Sander-Thömmes, T.

    2007-07-01

    A strong influence of external magnetic fields on the relaxation time constant T1 of glass cells serving as reservoirs for polarised 3He, observed for various alkali metal-coated cells made of different glass types, was initially associated with the presence of a large number of ferromagnetic clusters on the glass surface. Later experiments showed the presence of the so-called “ T1 hysteresis” phenomenon with a similar distinctiveness also in uncoated cells made of pure synthetic quartz glass. It suggests that the origin of such a relaxation is a macroscopic magnetisation in the bulk of the cell. We present the results of a multi-SQUID system investigation on magnetised and non-magnetised quartz glass cells, Cs coated as well as bare wall, to be used as neutron spin filters at HMI Berlin. The presence of a macroscopic remanent magnetic moment in the cells after their exposition to external magnetic fields has been experimentally shown. More than 80% of the remanent magnetic moment of the magnetised cells was found to be concentrated in the region of the glass valves. SQUID measurements reveal the existence of some remanent magnetisation in all valve parts and also in the vacuum grease, but most magnetic are the plastic parts and the O-ring. Different valve and sealing types have been compared in order to find the less magnetisable one.

  18. Investigation of the characteristics of a stacked direct borohydride fuel cell for portable applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Cheolhwan; Kim, Kyu-Jung; Ha, Man Yeong

    To investigate the possibility of the portable application of a direct borohydride fuel cell (DBFC), weight reduction of the stack and high stacking of the cells are investigated for practical running conditions. For weight reduction, carbon graphite is adopted as the bipolar plate material even though it has disadvantages in tight stacking, which results in stacking loss from insufficient material strength. For high stacking, it is essential to have a uniform fuel distribution among cells and channels to maintain equal electric load on each cell. In particular, the design of the anode channel is important because active hydrogen generation causes non-uniformity in the fuel flow-field of the cells and channels. To reduce the disadvantages of stacking force margin and fuel maldistribution, an O-ring type-sealing system with an internal manifold and a parallel anode channel design is adopted, and the characteristics of a single and a five-cell fuel cell stack are analyzed. By adopting carbon graphite, the stack weight can be reduced by 4.2 times with 12% of performance degradation from the insufficient stacking force. When cells are stacked, the performance exceeds the single-cell performance because of the stack temperature increase from the reduction of the radiation area from the narrow stacking of cells.

  19. Simplified flangeless unisex waveguide coupler assembly

    DOEpatents

    Michelangelo, Dimartino; Moeller, Charles P.

    1993-01-01

    A unisex coupler assembly is disclosed capable of providing a leak tight coupling for waveguides with axial alignment of the waveguides and rotational capability. The sealing means of the coupler assembly are not exposed to RF energy, and the coupler assembly does not require the provision of external flanges on the waveguides. In a preferred embodiment, O ring seals are not used and the coupler assembly is, therefore, bakeable at a temperature up to about 150.degree. C. The coupler assembly comprises a split collar which clamps around the waveguides and a second collar which fastens to the split collar. The split collar contains an inner annular groove. Each of the waveguides is provided with an external annular groove which receives a retaining ring. The split collar is clamped around one of the waveguides with the inner annular groove of the split collar engaging the retaining ring carried in the external annular groove in the waveguide. The second collar is then slipped over the second waveguide behind the annular groove and retaining ring therein and the second collar is coaxially secured by fastening means to the split collar to draw the respective waveguides together by coaxial force exerted by the second collar against the retaining ring on the second waveguide. A sealing ring is placed against an external sealing surface at a reduced external diameter end formed on one waveguide to sealingly engage a corresponding sealing surface on the other waveguide as the waveguides are urged toward each other.

  20. Simplified flangeless unisex waveguide coupler assembly

    DOEpatents

    Michelangelo, D.; Moeller, C.P.

    1993-05-04

    A unisex coupler assembly is disclosed capable of providing a leak tight coupling for waveguides with axial alignment of the waveguides and rotational capability. The sealing means of the coupler assembly are not exposed to RF energy, and the coupler assembly does not require the provision of external flanges on the waveguides. In a preferred embodiment, O ring seals are not used and the coupler assembly is, therefore, bakeable at a temperature up to about 150 C. The coupler assembly comprises a split collar which clamps around the waveguides and a second collar which fastens to the split collar. The split collar contains an inner annular groove. Each of the waveguides is provided with an external annular groove which receives a retaining ring. The split collar is clamped around one of the waveguides with the inner annular groove of the split collar engaging the retaining ring carried in the external annular groove in the waveguide. The second collar is then slipped over the second waveguide behind the annular groove and retaining ring therein and the second collar is coaxially secured by fastening means to the split collar to draw the respective waveguides together by coaxial force exerted by the second collar against the retaining ring on the second waveguide. A sealing ring is placed against an external sealing surface at a reduced external diameter end formed on one waveguide to sealingly engage a corresponding sealing surface on the other waveguide as the waveguides are urged toward each other.

  1. Modification of surface properties of cellulosic substrates by quaternized silicone emulsions.

    PubMed

    Purohit, Parag S; Somasundaran, P

    2014-07-15

    The present work describes the effect of quaternization of silicones as well as the relevant treatment parameter pH on the frictional, morphological and relaxation properties of fabric substrates. Due to their unique surface properties, silicone polymers are extensively used to modify surface properties of various materials, although the effects of functionalization of silicones and relevant process conditions on modification of substrates are not well understood. Specifically we show a considerable reduction in fabric friction, roughness and waviness upon treatment with quaternized silicones. The treatment at acidic pH results in better deposition of silicone polymers onto the fabric as confirmed through streaming potential measurements which show charge reversal of the fabric. Interestingly, Raman spectroscopy studies show the band of C-O ring stretching mode at ∼1095 cm(-1) shift towards higher wavenumber indicating lowering of stress in fibers upon appropriate silicone treatment. Thus along with the morphological and frictional properties being altered, silicone treatment can lead to a reduction in fabric strain. It is concluded that the electrostatic interactions play an initial role in modification of the fiber substrate followed by multilayer deposition of polymer. This multi-technique approach to study fiber properties upon treatment by combining macro to molecular level methods has helped in understanding of new functional coating materials. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. State-of-the-art survey of joinability of materials for OTEC heat exchangers

    SciTech Connect

    Beaver, R. J.

    1978-12-01

    Literature and industrial sources were surveyed to assess, on the basis of apparent economics and reliability, the joinability of both shell-and-tube and compact ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) heat exchangers. A no-leak requirement is mandatory to prevent mixing seawater and the ammonia working fluid. The operating temperature range considered is 7 to 28/sup 0/C (45 to 82/sup 0/F). Materials evaluated were aluminum, titanium, copper--nickel, AL-6X austenitic stainless steel, singly and in combination with steel and concrete. Many types of welding and brazing processes, roller expansion, magnaforming, O-ring sealing, and adhesive bonding were considered. The automatic gas tungsten-arc welding process andmore » explosion welding processes are the only two joining processes that now appear to offer the high reliability required of no-leak shell-and-tube heat exchangers. Of these two processes, the gas tungsten-arc welding process appears to be the more economically attractive.« less

  3. Comparison between complete denture and implant-retained overdenture: effect of different mucosa thickness and resiliency on stress distribution.

    PubMed

    Assunção, Wirley Gonçalves; Barão, Valentim Adelino Ricardo; Tabata, Lucas Fernando; de Sousa, Edson Antonio Capello; Gomes, Erica Alves; Delben, Juliana Aparecida

    2009-12-01

    The effect of different mucosa characteristics on stress distribution of complete dentures and overdentures remains unknown. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of different mucosa thickness and resiliency on the stress distribution of complete dentures and implant-retained overdentures using a two-dimensional finite element analysis. Representative models of the edentulous mandible were constructed on AutoCAD software according to the groups' characteristics. In group CD, a model of the edentulous mandible supporting a complete denture was obtained while in group IO, a model of edentulous mandible supporting an overdenture over two unsplinted implants with an o' ring system was constructed. In each group, mucosa assumed three characteristics of thickness (1, 3 and 5 mm) corresponding to the resiliencies hard, resilient and soft respectively. Evaluation was performed on Ansys software with 100N vertical load applied on central incisor teeth. The principal stress was used as analysis criteria. Group IO showed higher stress values than group CD regardless of mucosal thickness and resiliency. Stress decreased at the supporting tissues in both groups as the thickness and resiliency of mucosa increased. In relation to the supporting tissues, cortical bone showed the highest stress values. It was concluded that the use of an attachment system increases stress values and the thickness and resiliency of mucosa influence more on these values.

  4. Hydraulic pump with in-ground filtration and monitoring capability

    DOEpatents

    Hopkins, C.D.; Livingston, R.R.; Toole, W.R. Jr.

    1996-10-29

    A hydraulically operated pump is described for in-ground filtering and monitoring of waters or other fluid sources, includes a hollow cylindrical pump housing with an inlet and an outlet, filtering devices positioned in the inlet and the outlet, a piston that fits slidably within the pump housing, and an optical cell in fluid communication with the pump housing. A conduit within the piston allows fluid communication between the exterior and one end of the piston. A pair of o-rings form a seal between the inside of the pump housing and the exterior of the piston. A flow valve positioned within the piston inside the conduit allows fluid to flow in a single direction. In operation, fluid enters the pump housing through the inlet, flows through the conduit and towards an end of the pump housing. The piston then makes a downward stroke closing the valve, thus forcing the fluid out from the pump housing into the optical cell, which then takes spectrophotometric measurements of the fluid. A spring helps return the piston back to its starting position, so that a new supply of fluid may enter the pump housing and the downward stroke can begin again. The pump may be used independently of the optical cell, as a sample pump to transport a sample fluid from a source to a container for later analysis. 5 figs.

  5. Surveillance Report on SAVY-4000 and Hagan Nuclear Material Storage Containers for FY 2017

    SciTech Connect

    Reeves, Kirk Patrick; Karns, Tristan; Weis, Eric

    In accordance with the SAVY-4000 Surveillance Plan [1] and DOE M441.1-1 requirements, storage container surveillance continued through fiscal year 2017 at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Surveillance items for the year consisted of 8 SAVY-4000 storage containers, 8 Hagan containers, and 39 SAVY-4000 transfer containers. The SAVY-4000 surveillance items ranged in age from 1 year to 5.6 years and the Hagan containers ranged in age from 6.3 years to 17.6 years. The surveillance containers for this year were selected primarily to better understand the extent of corrosion of the stainless steel components of the containers. Accelerated aging studies indicate that themore » O-ring and filter components of the SAVY-4000 will last at least 40 years under LANL storage conditions. However, the observation of corrosion on the inside of SAVY-4000 and Hagan surveillance containers has shifted the emphasis to understanding both the nature and the extent of corrosion on the stainless steel body. The restriction on handling soluble residues greater than 500 grams continued this year, delaying the surveillance of some items that was scheduled in earlier surveillance plans.« less

  6. Evaluation of inlet sampling integrity on NSF/NCAR airborne platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campos, T. L.; Stith, J. L.; Stephens, B. B.; Romashkin, P.

    2017-12-01

    An inlet test project was conducted during IDEAS-IV-GV (2013), to evaluate the sampling integrity of two inlet designs. Use of a single CO2 sensor provided a high precision detector and a large difference in the mean cabin and external concentrations (500-700 ppmv in the cabin). The original HIAPER Modular InLet (HIMIL) is comprised of a tapered flow straightening flow through `cigar' mounted to a strut. The cigar center sampling line sits 12" from the fuselage skin. An o-ring seals the feedthrough plate coupling sampling lines from the strut into the cigar. However, there is no seal to prevent air inside the strut from seeping out around the cigar body. A pressure-equalizing drain hole in the strut access panel; it was positioned at an approximate distance of 4" from the fuselage to ensure that air from any source that drained out of the strut was confined to a low release point. A second aft-facing inlet design was also evaluated. The sampling center line was moved farther from the fuselage at a height of 16". A similar approach was also applied to sampling locations on the C-130 in 2015. The results of these tests and recommendations for best practices will be presented.

  7. Treatment of Oroantral Communication Using the Lateral Palatal Sliding Flap Technique

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Fernando Salimon; de Toledo, Cassio Torres; Aleixo, Michele Romero; Durigan, Maria Cristina; da Silva, Willian Corrêa; Bueno, Samanta Kelen; Pontes, Ana Emília Farias

    2015-01-01

    Herein, we present a case of oroantral communication that was to be treated with clinical examination, tomography, and prototyping. A patient presented with oroantral communication with purulent exudation for 4 months, since the displacement of the dental implant and O-ring component to the maxillary sinus. Tomographic examination and prototyping revealed a 5 mm bone gap. The patient underwent local washes and antibiotic therapy. After local palpation, a bone defect detected by prototyping was suspected to be greater than that observed. For the surgery, a communication tunnel was made, and the bone defect was found to be 12 mm in diameter. A pedicle flap was raised on the palate, followed by sliding and suturing. No complications were observed during the postoperative period, and the suture was removed after a week. Four months later, communication did not resume, and the patient did not complain of pain, foul smelling, or purulent discharge and was satisfied with the outcome. The findings of this case suggest that the lateral sliding flap can be used as an efficient technique for closing oroantral communications. An accurate clinical examination is a critical tool that can be used instead of tomography and prototyping, which can be misleading. PMID:26113864

  8. Effect of mini-implant-supported mandibular overdentures on electromyographic activity of the masseter muscle during chewing of hard and soft food.

    PubMed

    Ashmawy, Tarek Mohy; El Talawy, Dina Bahgat; Shaheen, Nasser Hussein

    2014-09-01

    To objectively evaluate the effect of mini-implant- supported mandibular overdentures on electromyographic activity (EMG) of the masseter muscle during chewing of hard and soft foods. Twelve completely edentulous patients (4 females and 8 males) with maladaptive experience of wearing mandibular dentures received new maxillary and mandibular dentures. After 3 months of adaptation, four mini dental implants (MDIs) were inserted in the interforaminal region of the mandible, and the new mandibular dentures were connected to the implants immediately with O/ring attachments. The activity of masseter muscle (EMG) and the duration of chewing cycle were measured during chewing hard (carrot) and soft (gum) foods. The measurements were made 3 months after wearing each of the following prostheses: the new conventional dentures; and the MDI-retained mandibular overdentures. The EMG of masseter muscle increased and the DC decreased with MDI-retained mandibular overdentures when compared to conventional dentures. Hard food (carrot) was associated with increased EMG and decreased DC when compared to soft food (gum) for both conventional dentures and MDI-retained mandibular overdentures. Mini-implant-supported mandibular overdentures are associated with increased activity of masseter muscle and decreased duration of chewing cycle for both hard and soft foods when compared to conventional dentures.

  9. Self-Sealing Wet Chemistry Cell for Field Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beegle, Luther W.; Soto, Juancarlos; Lasnik, James; Roark, Shane

    2012-01-01

    In most analytical investigations, there is a need to process complex field samples for the unique detection of analytes, especially when detecting low concentration organic molecules that may identify extraterrestrial life. Wet chemistry based instruments are the techniques of choice for most laboratory- based analysis of organic molecules due to several factors including less fragmentation of fragile biomarkers, and ability to concentrate target species resulting in much lower limits of detection. Development of an automated wet chemistry preparation system that can operate autonomously on Earth and is also designed to operate under Martian ambient conditions will demonstrate the technical feasibility of including wet chemistry on future missions. An Automated Sample Processing System (ASPS) has recently been developed that receives fines, extracts organics through solvent extraction, processes the extract by removing non-organic soluble species, and delivers sample to multiple instruments for analysis (including for non-organic soluble species). The key to this system is a sample cell that can autonomously function under field conditions. As a result, a self-sealing sample cell was developed that can autonomously hermetically seal fines and powder into a container, regardless of orientation of the apparatus. The cap is designed with a beveled edge, which allows the cap to be self-righted as the capping motor engages. Each cap consists of a C-clip lock ring below a crucible O-ring that is placed into a groove cut into the sample cap.

  10. Simplified flangeless unisex waveguide coupler assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Michelangelo, D.; Moeller, C.P.

    1993-05-04

    A unisex coupler assembly is disclosed capable of providing a leak tight coupling for waveguides with axial alignment of the waveguides and rotational capability. The sealing means of the coupler assembly are not exposed to RF energy, and the coupler assembly does not require the provision of external flanges on the waveguides. In a preferred embodiment, O ring seals are not used and the coupler assembly is, therefore, bakeable at a temperature up to about 150 C. The coupler assembly comprises a split collar which clamps around the waveguides and a second collar which fastens to the split collar. Themore » split collar contains an inner annular groove. Each of the waveguides is provided with an external annular groove which receives a retaining ring. The split collar is clamped around one of the waveguides with the inner annular groove of the split collar engaging the retaining ring carried in the external annular groove in the waveguide. The second collar is then slipped over the second waveguide behind the annular groove and retaining ring therein and the second collar is coaxially secured by fastening means to the split collar to draw the respective waveguides together by coaxial force exerted by the second collar against the retaining ring on the second waveguide. A sealing ring is placed against an external sealing surface at a reduced external diameter end formed on one waveguide to sealingly engage a corresponding sealing surface on the other waveguide as the waveguides are urged toward each other.« less

  11. Design and Development of Sequential Rotary Valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    D’Orsi, Nicholas; Castillo, Priscilla

    2017-01-01

    Valves are used to regulate the flow of fluids through systems. This rotary valve's main purpose is to fill, pressurize, empty, and vent three smaller tanks with the supply of one larger tank. Many different designs are being taken into consideration, which are each at different stages of development. The furthest along uses three ball valves on a common shaft to open and close their respective ports as the shaft completes one full rotation or cycle. We were tasked with advancing this design to its first test as a plastic model for flow verification, as well as sizing and ordering the necessary O-rings and fasteners. A motor will also be sized to satisfy the torque requirements, and will then be programmed using a Raspberry Pi to rotate the shaft at the calculated speed and dwelling times needed to fill each tank equally. In addition, we have also been advancing designs that use a camshaft and poppets. These are earlier on in their development, currently being sized to replicate the expected flow patterns of the rotary ball valve. Expected outcomes of this valve include bi-directionality, successful sealing under pressure, and accurate cycling.

  12. Assessment of Various Flow Solvers Used to Predict the Thermal Environment inside Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Motor Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Qun-Zhen; Cash, Steve (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    It is very important to accurately predict the gas pressure, gas and solid temperature, as well as the amount of O-ring erosion inside the space shuttle Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) joints in the event of a leak path. The scenarios considered are typically hot combustion gas rapid pressurization events of small volumes through narrow and restricted flow paths. The ideal method for this prediction is a transient three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation with a computational domain including both combustion gas and surrounding solid regions. However, this has not yet been demonstrated to be economical for this application due to the enormous amount of CPU time and memory resulting from the relatively long fill time as well as the large pressure and temperature rising rate. Consequently, all CFD applications in RSRM joints so far are steady-state simulations with solid regions being excluded from the computational domain by assuming either a constant wall temperature or no heat transfer between the hot combustion gas and cool solid walls.

  13. Transient Pressure Test Article (TPTA) 1.1 and 1.1A, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rebells, Clarence A.

    1988-01-01

    This final test report presents the results obtained during the static hot firing and cold-gas high Q tests of the first Transient Pressure Test Article (TPTA) 1.1. The TPTA consisted of field test joints A and B, which were the original RSRM J-insulation configuration, with a metal capture feature. It also consisted of a flight configuration nozzle-to-case test joint (Joint D) with shorter vent slots. Fluorocarbon O-rings were used in all the test joints. The purpose of the TPTA tests is to evaluate and characterize the RSMR field and nozzle-to-case joints under the influence of ignition and strut loads during liftoff anf high Q. All objectives of the cold-gas high Q (TPTA 1.1A) test were met and all measurements were close to predicted values. During the static hot-firing test (TPTA 1.1), the motor was inadvertently plugged by the quench injector plug, making it a more severe test, although no strut loads were applied. The motor was depressurized after approximately 11 min using an auxiliary system, and no anomalies were noted. In the static hot-firing test, pressure was incident on the insulation and the test joint gaps were within the predicted range. During the static hot-firing test, no strut loads were applied because the loading system malfunctioned. For this test, all measurements were within range of similar tests performed without strut loads.

  14. Water driven turbine/brush pipe cleaner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Werlink, Rudy J. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    Assemblies are disclosed for cleaning the inside walls of pipes and tubes. A first embodiment includes a small turbine with angled blades axially mounted on one end of a standoff support. An O-ring for stabilizing the assembly within the pipe is mounted in a groove within the outer ring. A replaceable circular brush is fixedly mounted on the opposite end of the standoff support and can be used for cleaning tubes and pipes of various diameters, lengths and configurations. The turbine, standoff support, and brush spin in unison relative to a hub bearing that is fixedly attached to a wire upstream of the assembly. The nonrotating wire is for retaining the assembly in tension and enabling return of the assembly to the pipe entrance. The assembly is initially placed in the pipe or tube to be cleaned. A pressurized water or solution source is provided at a required flow-rate to propel the assembly through the pipe or tube. The upstream water pressure propels and spins the turbine, standoff support and brush. The rotating brush combined with the solution cleans the inside of the pipe. The solution flows out of the other end of the pipe with the brush rotation controlled by the flow-rate. A second embodiment is similar to the first embodiment but instead includes a circular shaped brush with ring backing mounted in the groove of the exterior ring of the turbine, and also reduces the size of the standoff support or eliminates the standoff support.

  15. Leak Rate Quantification Method for Gas Pressure Seals with Controlled Pressure Differential

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniels, Christopher C.; Braun, Minel J.; Oravec, Heather A.; Mather, Janice L.; Taylor, Shawn C.

    2015-01-01

    An enhancement to the pressure decay leak rate method with mass point analysis solved deficiencies in the standard method. By adding a control system, a constant gas pressure differential across the test article was maintained. As a result, the desired pressure condition was met at the onset of the test, and the mass leak rate and measurement uncertainty were computed in real-time. The data acquisition and control system were programmed to automatically stop when specified criteria were met. Typically, the test was stopped when a specified level of measurement uncertainty was attained. Using silicone O-ring test articles, the new method was compared with the standard method that permitted the downstream pressure to be non-constant atmospheric pressure. The two methods recorded comparable leak rates, but the new method recorded leak rates with significantly lower measurement uncertainty, statistical variance, and test duration. Utilizing this new method in leak rate quantification, projects will reduce cost and schedule, improve test results, and ease interpretation between data sets.

  16. Selection of High Temperature Organic Materials for Future Stirling Convertors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shin, Euy-Sik Eugene

    2017-01-01

    In the future higher temperature Stirling convertors for improved efficiency and performance, various high temperature organic materials have been demanded as essential components for their unique properties and functions such as bonding, potting, sealing, thread locking, insulation, and lubrication. The higher temperature capabilities would also allow current state-of-the-art (SOA) convertors to be used in additional missions, particularly those that require a Venus flyby for a gravity assist. Stirling convertor radioisotope generators have been developed for potential future space applications including Lunar/Mars surface power or a variety of spacecraft and vehicles, especially with a long mission cycle, sometimes up to 17 years, such as deep space exploration. Thus, performance, durability, and reliability of the organics should be critically evaluated in terms of comprehensive structure-process-service environment relations based on the potential mission specifications. The initial efforts in screening the high temperature candidates focused on the most susceptible organics, such as adhesive, potting compound, o-ring, shrink tubing, and thread locker materials in conjunction with commercially available materials. More systematic and practical test methodologies that were developed and optimized based on the extensive organic evaluations and validations performed for various Stirling convertor types were employed to determine thermal stability, outgassing, and material compatibility of the selected organic candidates against their functional requirements. Processing and fabrication conditions and procedures were also optimized. This paper presents results of the three-step candidate evaluation processes, their application limitations, and the final selection recommendations.

  17. Evaluation of Stress Distribution of Mini Dental Implant-Supported Overdentures in Complete Cleft Palate Models: A Three-Dimensional Finite Element Analysis Study.

    PubMed

    Soğancı, Gökçe; Yazıcıoğlu, Hüseyin

    2016-01-01

    Mini dental implants could be an alternative treatment method for prosthetic treatment of edentulous cleft palate. The aim of this study was to analyze stress distribution around the cortical bone and different plans using a varied number of mini dental implants in edentulous unilateral complete cleft palates. Three edentulous maxillary models were modified to create unilateral complete cleft palates. Mini dental implants (2.4 × 15 mm) were located as two mini implants at the premolar region, four mini implants at the premolar and molar region, and six mini implants at the first premolar, second premolar, and first molar regions in the models, respectively. Mucosa, o-ring/ball attachments, and overdentures were simulated. Vertical and horizontal loads of 100 N were applied on both the right and left molar teeth of the overdenture for each model. Maximum and minimum principal stress values and the distribution at cortical bone around the implants and cleft palates were evaluated by finite element analysis. Stress values under vertical loads were lower than values under horizontal loadings for all models. Stress values were found to be lower in the first model than in the second and third models. The highest stress values were found around implants in the second model. The unilateral feature of a complete cleft pattern affected the stress distribution. Stresses occured mostly around implants when the overdenture was supported by six implants; however, the stress distribution around implants was low with two implants because of tissue support.

  18. Functional Performance of Pyrovalves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bement, Laurence J.

    1996-01-01

    Following several flight and ground test failures of spacecraft systems using single-shot, 'normally closed' pyrotechnically actuated valves (pyrovalves), a government/industry cooperative program was initiated to assess the functional performance of five qualified designs. The goal of the program was to improve performance-based requirements for the procurement of pyrovalves. Specific objectives included the demonstration of performance test methods, the measurement of 'blowby' (the passage of gases from the pyrotechnic energy source around the activating piston into the valve's fluid path), and the quantification of functional margins for each design. Experiments were conducted in-house at NASA on several units each of the five valve designs. The test methods used for this program measured the forces and energies required to actuate the valves, as well as the energies and the pressures (where possible) delivered by the pyrotechnic sources. Functional performance ranged widely among the designs. Blowby cannot be prevented by o-ring seals; metal-to-metal seals were effective. Functional margin was determined by dividing the energy delivered by the pyrotechnic sources in excess to that required to accomplish the function by the energy required for that function. All but two designs had adequate functional margins with the pyrotechnic cartridges evaluated.

  19. Investigation of hydrodynamic characteristics of laminar flow condition around sphere using PIV system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abed, A. H.; Shcheklein, S. E.

    2018-05-01

    This paper aims to determine the hydrodynamic characteristics of flow around the sphere in unsteady state condition. An experimental test-rig was designed and constructed for this purpose with the application of an adjusted laser optics system. It is based on the technology of pulsed particle visualization of micro tracers in the cross section per unit time interval. Visualization with Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV-system) is used to study the properties of the flow such as its structure. The PIV-system is the most accepted technique allowed one to measure the instantaneous velocity distribution in fluid applications. In this experimental study, o-ring is used to simulate turbulence on the sphere surface and creates very high-level fluctuations, which creates the flow undergoing a laminar-to-turbulent transition. This transition leads to a delay of the separation point of flow from the sphere surface causing a significant reduction in the drag coefficient, reaching 45%. New results obtained can be useful in the development of numerical validation as well as in design processes.

  20. Optical inspection system for cylindrical objects

    DOEpatents

    Brenden, Byron B.; Peters, Timothy J.

    1989-01-01

    In the inspection of cylindrical objects, particularly O-rings, the object is translated through a field of view and a linear light trace is projected on its surface. An image of the light trace is projected on a mask, which has a size and shape corresponding to the size and shape which the image would have if the surface of the object were perfect. If there is a defect, light will pass the mask and be sensed by a detector positioned behind the mask. Preferably, two masks and associated detectors are used, one mask being convex to pass light when the light trace falls on a projection from the surface and the other concave, to pass light when the light trace falls on a depression in the surface. The light trace may be either dynamic, formed by a scanned laser beam, or static, formed by such a beam focussed by a cylindrical lens. Means are provided to automatically keep the illuminating receiving systems properly aligned.

  1. Experimental validation of prototype high voltage bushing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Sejal; Tyagi, H.; Sharma, D.; Parmar, D.; M. N., Vishnudev; Joshi, K.; Patel, K.; Yadav, A.; Patel, R.; Bandyopadhyay, M.; Rotti, C.; Chakraborty, A.

    2017-08-01

    Prototype High voltage bushing (PHVB) is a scaled down configuration of DNB High Voltage Bushing (HVB) of ITER. It is designed for operation at 50 kV DC to ensure operational performance and thereby confirming the design configuration of DNB HVB. Two concentric insulators viz. Ceramic and Fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) rings are used as double layered vacuum boundary for 50 kV isolation between grounded and high voltage flanges. Stress shields are designed for smooth electric field distribution. During ceramic to Kovar brazing, spilling cannot be controlled which may lead to high localized electrostatic stress. To understand spilling phenomenon and precise stress calculation, quantitative analysis was performed using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) of brazed sample and similar configuration modeled while performing the Finite Element (FE) analysis. FE analysis of PHVB is performed to find out electrical stresses on different areas of PHVB and are maintained similar to DNB HV Bushing. With this configuration, the experiment is performed considering ITER like vacuum and electrical parameters. Initial HV test is performed by temporary vacuum sealing arrangements using gaskets/O-rings at both ends in order to achieve desired vacuum and keep the system maintainable. During validation test, 50 kV voltage withstand is performed for one hour. Voltage withstand test for 60 kV DC (20% higher rated voltage) have also been performed without any breakdown. Successful operation of PHVB confirms the design of DNB HV Bushing. In this paper, configuration of PHVB with experimental validation data is presented.

  2. Vacuum ultraviolet photoionization of carbohydrates and nucleotides

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Joong-Won, E-mail: jshin@govst.edu; Department of Chemistry, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado 80523-1872; Bernstein, Elliot R., E-mail: erb@lamar.colostate.edu

    Carbohydrates (2-deoxyribose, ribose, and xylose) and nucleotides (adenosine-, cytidine-, guanosine-, and uridine-5{sup ′}-monophosphate) are generated in the gas phase, and ionized with vacuum ultraviolet photons (VUV, 118.2 nm). The observed time of flight mass spectra of the carbohydrate fragmentation are similar to those observed [J.-W. Shin, F. Dong, M. Grisham, J. J. Rocca, and E. R. Bernstein, Chem. Phys. Lett. 506, 161 (2011)] for 46.9 nm photon ionization, but with more intensity in higher mass fragment ions. The tendency of carbohydrate ions to fragment extensively following ionization seemingly suggests that nucleic acids might undergo radiation damage as a result of carbohydrate,more » rather than nucleobase fragmentation. VUV photoionization of nucleotides (monophosphate-carbohydrate-nucleobase), however, shows that the carbohydrate-nucleobase bond is the primary fragmentation site for these species. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations indicate that the removed carbohydrate electrons by the 118.2 nm photons are associated with endocyclic C–C and C–O ring centered orbitals: loss of electron density in the ring bonds of the nascent ion can thus account for the observed fragmentation patterns following carbohydrate ionization. DFT calculations also indicate that electrons removed from nucleotides under these same conditions are associated with orbitals involved with the nucleobase-saccharide linkage electron density. The calculations give a general mechanism and explanation of the experimental results.« less

  3. [Spatial patterns of dominant tree species in sub-alpine Betula-Abies forest in West Sichuan of China].

    PubMed

    Miao, Ning; Liu, Shi-Rong; Shi, Zuo-Min; Yu, Hong; Liu, Xing-Liang

    2009-06-01

    Based on the investigation in a 4 hm2 Betula-Abies forest plot in sub-alpine area in West Sichuan of China, and by using point pattern analysis method in terms of O-ring statistics, the spatial patterns of dominant species Betula albo-sinensis and Abies faxoniana in different age classes in study area were analyzed, and the intra- and inter-species associations between these age classes were studied. B. albo-sinensis had a unimodal distribution of its DBH frequency, indicating a declining population, while A. faxoniana had a reverse J-shaped pattern, showing an increasing population. All the big trees of B. albo-sinensis and A. faxoniana were spatially in random at all scales, while the medium age and small trees were spatially clumped at small scales and tended to be randomly or evenly distributed with increasing spatial scale. The maximum aggregation degree decreased with increasing age class. Spatial association mainly occurred at small scales. A. faxoniana generally showed positive intra-specific association, while B. albo-sinensis generally showed negative intra-specific association. For the two populations, big and small trees had no significant spatial association, but middle age trees had negative spatial association. Negative inter-specific associations of the two populations were commonly found in different age classes. The larger the difference of age class, the stronger the negative inter-specific association.

  4. SciTech Connect

    Ranjan, Devesh

    Diffusion bonded heat exchangers are the leading candidates for the sCO 2 Brayton cycles in next generation nuclear power plants. Commercially available diffusion bonded heat exchangers utilize set of continuous semi-circular zigzag micro channels to increase the heat transfer area and enhance heat transfer through increased turbulence production. Such heat exchangers can lead to excessive pressure drop as well as flow maldistribution in the case of poorly designed flow distribution headers. The goal of the current project is to fabricate and test potential discontinuous fin patterns for diffusion bonded heat exchangers; which can achieve desired thermal performance at lower pressuremore » drops. Prototypic discontinuous offset rectangular and Airfoil fin surface geometries were chemically etched on to 316 stainless steel plate and sealed against an un-etched flat pate using O-ring seal emulating diffusion bonded heat exchangers. Thermal-hydraulic performance of these prototypic discontinuous fin geometries was experimentally evaluated and compared to the existing data for the continuous zigzag channels. The data generated from this project will serve as the database for future testing and validation of numerical models.« less

  5. Engineering a Blood Vessel Network Module for Body-on-a-Chip Applications.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Hyunryul; Oh, Soojung; Lee, Hyun Jae; Lee, Jin Young; Lee, Hae Kwang; Jeon, Noo Li

    2015-06-01

    The blood circulatory system links all organs from one to another to support and maintain each organ's functions consistently. Therefore, blood vessels have been considered as a vital unit. Engineering perfusable functional blood vessels in vitro has been challenging due to difficulties in designing the connection between rigid macroscale tubes and fragile microscale ones. Here, we propose a generalizable method to engineer a "long" perfusable blood vessel network. To form millimeter-scale vessels, fibroblasts were co-cultured with human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) in close proximity. In contrast to previous works, in which all cells were permanently placed within the device, we developed a novel method to culture paracrine factor secreting fibroblasts on an O-ring-shaped guide that can be transferred in and out. This approach affords flexibility in co-culture, where the effects of secreted factors can be decoupled. Using this, blood vessels with length up to 2 mm were successfully produced in a reproducible manner (>90%). Because the vessels form a perfusable network within the channel, simple links to inlets and outlets of the device allowed connections to the outside world. The robust and reproducible formation of in vitro engineered vessels can be used as a module to link various organ components as parts of future body-on-a-chip applications. © 2014 Society for Laboratory Automation and Screening.

  6. RM-10A robotic manipulator system

    SciTech Connect

    White, J.R.; Coughlan, J.B.; Harvey, H.W.

    1988-01-01

    The REMOTE RM-10A is a man-replacement manipulator system that has been developed specifically for use in radioactive and other hazardous environments. It can be teleoperated, with man-in-the-loop, for unstructured tasks or programmed to perform routine tasks automatically much like robots in the automated manufacturing industry. The RM-10A is a servomanipulator utilizing a closed-loop, microprocessor-based control system. The system consists of a slave assembly, master control station, and interconnecting cabling. The slave assembly is the part of the system that enters the hostile environment. It is man-like is size and configuration with two identical arms attached to a torso structure. Eachmore » arm attaches to the torso using two captive screws and two guide pins. The guide pins position and stabilize an arm during removal and reinstallation and also align the two electrical connectors located in the arm support plate and torso. These features allow easy remote replacement of an arm, and commonality of the arms allow interchangeability. The water-resistant slave assembly is equipped with gaskets and O-ring seals in the torso and arm and camera assemblies. In addition, each slave arm's elbow, wrist, and tong are protected by replaceable polyurethane boots. An upper camera assembly, consisting of a color television (TV) camera, 6:1 zoom lens, and a pan/tilt unit, mount to the torso to provide remote viewing capability.« less

  7. Removal of Cr, Mn, and Co from textile wastewater by horizontal rotating tubular bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Zeiner, Michaela; Rezić, Tonci; Santek, Bozidar; Rezić, Iva; Hann, Stephan; Stingeder, Gerhard

    2012-10-02

    Environmental pollution by industrial wastewaters polluted with toxic heavy metals is of great concern. Various guidelines regulate the quality of water released from industrial plants and of surface waters. In wastewater treatment, bioreactors with microbial biofilms are widely used. A horizontal rotating tubular bioreactor (HRTB) is a combination of a thin layer and a biodisc reactor with an interior divided by O-ring shaped partition walls as carriers for microbial biomass. Using a biofilm of heavy metal resistant bacteria in combination with this special design provides various advantages for wastewater treatment proven in a pilot study. In the presented study, the applicability of HRTB for removing metals commonly present in textile wastewaters (chromium, manganese, cobalt) was investigated. Artificial wastewaters with a load of 125 mg/L of each metal underwent the bioreactor treatment. Different process parameters (inflow rate, rotation speed) were applied for optimizing the removal efficiency. Samples were drawn along the bioreactor length for monitoring the metal contents on site by UV-vis spectrometry. The metal uptake of the biomass was determined by ICP-MS after acidic microwave assisted digestion. The maximum removal rates obtained for chromium, manganese, and cobalt were: 100%, 94%, and 69%, respectively.

  8. Temperature environment for 9975 packages stored in KAC

    SciTech Connect

    Daugherty, W. L.

    Plutonium materials are stored in the K Area Complex (KAC) in shipping packages, typically the 9975 shipping package. In order to estimate realistic degradation rates for components within the shipping package (i.e. the fiberboard overpack and O-ring seals), it is necessary to understand actual facility temperatures, which can vary daily and seasonally. Relevant facility temperature data available from several periods throughout its operating history have been reviewed. The annual average temperature within the Crane Maintenance Area has ranged from approximately 70 to 74 °F, although there is significant seasonal variation and lesser variation among different locations within the facility. Themore » long-term average degradation rate for 9975 package components is very close to that expected if the component were to remain continually at the annual average temperature. This result remains valid for a wide range of activation energies (which describes the variation in degradation rate as the temperature changes), if the activation energy remains constant over the seasonal range of component temperatures. It is recommended that component degradation analyses and service life estimates incorporate these results. Specifically, it is proposed that future analyses assume an average facility ambient air temperature of 94 °F. This value is bounding for all packages, and includes margin for several factors such as increased temperatures within the storage arrays, the addition of more packages in the future, and future operational changes.« less

  9. Microchannel heat sink assembly

    DOEpatents

    Bonde, Wayne L.; Contolini, Robert J.

    1992-01-01

    The present invention provides a microchannel heat sink with a thermal range from cryogenic temperatures to several hundred degrees centigrade. The heat sink can be used with a variety of fluids, such as cryogenic or corrosive fluids, and can be operated at a high pressure. The heat sink comprises a microchannel layer preferably formed of silicon, and a manifold layer preferably formed of glass. The manifold layer comprises an inlet groove and outlet groove which define an inlet manifold and an outlet manifold. The inlet manifold delivers coolant to the inlet section of the microchannels, and the outlet manifold receives coolant from the outlet section of the microchannels. In one embodiment, the manifold layer comprises an inlet hole extending through the manifold layer to the inlet manifold, and an outlet hole extending through the manifold layer to the outlet manifold. Coolant is supplied to the heat sink through a conduit assembly connected to the heat sink. A resilient seal, such as a gasket or an O-ring, is disposed between the conduit and the hole in the heat sink in order to provide a watetight seal. In other embodiments, the conduit assembly may comprise a metal tube which is connected to the heat sink by a soft solder. In still other embodiments, the heat sink may comprise inlet and outlet nipples. The present invention has application in supercomputers, integrated circuits and other electronic devices, and is suitable for cooling materials to superconducting temperatures.

  10. DMA Modulus as a Screening Parameter for Compatibility of Polymeric Containment Materials with Various Solutions for use in Space Shuttle Microgravity Protein Crystal Growth (PCG) Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wingard, Charles Doug; Munafo, Paul M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Protein crystals are grown in microgravity experiments inside the Space Shuttle during orbit. Such crystals are basically grown in a five-component system containing a salt, buffer, polymer, organic and water. During these experiments, a number of different polymeric containment materials must be compatible with up to hundreds of different PCG solutions in various concentrations for durations up to 180 days. When such compatibility experiments are performed at NASA/MSFC (Marshall Space Flight Center) simultaneously on containment material samples immersed in various solutions in vials, the samples are rather small out of necessity. DMA4 modulus was often used as the primary screening parameter for such small samples as a pass/fail criterion for incompatibility issues. In particular, the TA Instruments DMA 2980 film tension clamp was used to test rubber O-rings as small in I.D. as 0.091 in. by cutting through the cross-section at one place, then clamping the stretched linear cord stock at each end. The film tension clamp was also used to successfully test short length samples of medical/surgical grade tubing with an O.D. of 0.125 in.

  11. Passively operated spool valve for drain-down freeze protection of thermosyphon water heaters. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    None

    1982-04-30

    The work done to extend the existing drain-down valve technology to provide passive drain-down freeze protection for thermosyphon-based solar water heaters is described. The basic design of the existing valve model is that of a spool valve, employing a cylindrical spool which moves axially in a mating cartridge to open and close o-rings at the two operating extremes (drain and operate) to perform the valving function. Three passive actuators to drive the basic valving mechanism were designed, fabricated, and tested. Two piping configurations used to integrate the spool valve with the thermosyphon system are described, as are the passive actuators.more » The three actuator designs are: photovoltaic driven, refrigerant-based bellows, and heat motor cable-drive designs. Costs are compared for the alternative actuator designs, and operating characteristics were examined for the thermosyphon system, including field tests. The market for the valve for thermosyphon systems is then assessed. (LEW)« less

  12. EFFECTS OF TRITIUM GAS EXPOSURE ON EPDM ELASTOMER

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, E.

    2009-12-11

    Samples of four formulations of ethylene-propylene diene monomer (EPDM) elastomer were exposed to initially pure tritium gas at one atmosphere and ambient temperature for various times up to about 420 days in closed containers. Two formulations were carbon-black-filled commercial formulations, and two were the equivalent formulations without filler synthesized for this work. Tritium effects on the samples were characterized by measuring the sample volume, mass, flexibility, and dynamic mechanical properties and by noting changes in appearance. The glass transition temperature was determined by analysis of the dynamic mechanical properties. The glass transition temperature increased significantly with tritium exposure, and themore » unfilled formulations ceased to behave as elastomers after the longest tritium exposure. The filled formulations were more resistant to tritium exposure. Tritium exposure made all samples significantly stiffer and therefore much less able to form a reliable seal when employed as O-rings. No consistent change of volume or density was observed; there was a systematic lowering of sample mass with tritium exposure. In addition, the significant radiolytic production of gas, mainly protium (H{sub 2}) and HT, by the samples when exposed to tritium was characterized by measuring total pressure in the container at the end of each exposure and by mass spectroscopy of a gas sample at the end of each exposure. The total pressure in the containers more than doubled after {approx}420 days tritium exposure.« less

  13. A proven elastomer compound for extremely hostile geothermal and oil field environments

    SciTech Connect

    Hirasuna, A.R.; Friese, G.J.; Stephens, C.A.

    1983-02-01

    Since 1979 the Y267 EPDM elastomer has been independently tested by other organizations in a variety of field and laboratory applications. The following are some examples. The same Y267 EPDM O-rings worked with no leaks as logging tool seals for multiple trips to 4600M (15k ft.) at 320/sup 0/C (608F) BHST. A packer element performed flawlessly for five months in a 204/sup 0/C (400F) continuous steam injection well and was retrieved at the end of the test in an as-new condition. A high-pressure Y267 EPDM packer test was performed with complete success at 232/sup 0/C (450F) for a 7.5 daymore » test in sour crude with differential pressures to 138 MPa (20 ksi) and the seal condition was only very slightly changed by the test. Comprehensive compatibility testing of 34 compounds from 15 companies in geothermal brine, isobutane, and oil at 191C-266/sup 0/C (375-510F) showed that the Y267 EPDM was best of the 34 in all three fluids. Over 15 laboratory and over 20 field case histories of Y267 EPDM such as the above examples are reported. All strongly establish that Y267 EPDM is at the cutting edge of technology.« less

  14. Waste handling: A study of tributyl phosphate compatibility with nonmetallic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkins, C.F.; Briedenbach, P.J.

    1989-01-01

    The need for numerous seals, plastic tubing, instrument components, and miles of plastic pipe for transferring process waste streams containing tributyl phosphate (TBP) and petroleum solvents led to an investigation of compatibility. TBP is a solvent for many plastics and elastomers and causes softening, crazing, or cracking of most nonmetallics tested. In this regard it may be considered an external plasticizer for some polymers. TBP also is a surfactant in aqueous solution. Dimension changes and property changes associated with softening will preclude the use of some materials as gaskets. Teflon/trademark/ and Kalrez/trademark/ gaskets appear to be compatible with TBP. Mixedmore » results were obtained with EPDM elastomers, but EPDM O-rings are less costly than Kalrez/trademark/ and are being applied in some areas. Exposure of CPVC rigid piping led to crazing and, ultimately, catastrophic stress cracking, thus precluding its use in the waste services described. High-density polyethylene and PVDF plastic piping were unaffected by the test exposures and are useable for process and process waste service. Applications include 25-30 miles of polyethylene pipe and a large number of EPDM gaskets in the filter assembly of an effluent treatment system at the Savannah River Plant. 3 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.« less

  15. Optical radar-based device for measuring automobile belt displacement in real time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brennan, Brian W.; Gentile, John R.

    1999-02-01

    Ford Motor Company had a requirement to measure fan belt vibration on their 4.6 liter Cobra-Mustang engine. While this sensor was to be used in the laboratory, it would also be used for field testing of this engine. The general operation temperature was -40 to 120 degrees C, but there was an engine 'soak-back' requirement of up to 200 degrees C. The vibration requirement was 3g continuous at 10 Hz with 20g shock. Humidity was 0-95 percent. Without active cooling, the temperature environment eliminated engine mounted electronics and with it some more common approaches such as laser triangulation based sensing. A laser radar concept was developed which features remotely located electronics, fiber optic delivery and return of the signal and an engine mounted optic head. The three lens design of the receive optics is a compromise choice designed to maximize power at the receiver over the full travel of the belt. The electronic scheme consists of a time-to-amplitude converter based on a precise time interval derived from the phase difference of logic level pulse trains which in turn are formed by the 'exclusive O Ring' of the transmit and receive pulses. In practice, a 10 MHz pulse train is transmitted to the vibrating belt which coupled with some fast electronics results in about 1 0.1 mm resolution, sufficient for this application.

  16. Pressure Dome for High-Pressure Electrolyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norman, Timothy; Schmitt, Edwin

    2012-01-01

    A high-strength, low-weight pressure vessel dome was designed specifically to house a high-pressure [2,000 psi (approx. = 13.8 MPa)] electrolyzer. In operation, the dome is filled with an inert gas pressurized to roughly 100 psi (approx. = 690 kPa) above the high, balanced pressure product oxygen and hydrogen gas streams. The inert gas acts to reduce the clamping load on electrolyzer stack tie bolts since the dome pressure acting axially inward helps offset the outward axial forces from the stack gas pressure. Likewise, radial and circumferential stresses on electrolyzer frames are minimized. Because the dome is operated at a higher pressure than the electrolyzer product gas, any external electrolyzer leak prevents oxygen or hydrogen from leaking into the dome. Instead the affected stack gas stream pressure rises detectably, thereby enabling a system shutdown. All electrical and fluid connections to the stack are made inside the pressure dome and require special plumbing and electrical dome interfaces for this to be accomplished. Further benefits of the dome are that it can act as a containment shield in the unlikely event of a catastrophic failure. Studies indicate that, for a given active area (and hence, cell ID), frame outside diameter must become ever larger to support stresses at higher operating pressures. This can lead to a large footprint and increased costs associated with thicker and/or larger diameter end-plates, tie-rods, and the frames themselves. One solution is to employ rings that fit snugly around the frame. This complicates stack assembly and is sometimes difficult to achieve in practice, as its success is strongly dependent on frame and ring tolerances, gas pressure, and operating temperature. A pressure dome permits an otherwise low-pressure stack to operate at higher pressures without growing the electrolyzer hardware. The pressure dome consists of two machined segments. An O-ring is placed in an O-ring groove in the flange of the bottom

  17. High temperature diaphragm valve-based comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Freye, Chris E; Mu, Lan; Synovec, Robert E

    2015-12-11

    A high-temperature diaphragm valve-based comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GC×GC) instrument is demonstrated which readily allows separations up to 325°C. Previously, diaphragm valve-based GC×GC was limited to 175°C if the valve was mounted in the oven, or limited to 265°C if the valve was faced mounted on the outside of the oven. A new diaphragm valve has been commercially developed, in which the temperature sensitive O-rings that previously limited the separation temperatures have been replaced with Kalrez O-rings, a perfluoroelastomer, allowing for significantly higher temperatures permitting a greater range of volatile and semi-volatile compounds to be readily separated. In the current investigation, a separation temperature up to 325°C is demonstrated with the valve mounted directly in the oven. Since the temperature limit for most commonly used GC columns is at or below 325°C, the scope of diaphragm valve-based GC×GC is now dramatically broadened to encompass a majority of all column stationary phase chemistries. A 44-component mixture of alkanes, alcohols, and polyaromatic hydrocarbons is used to study this new configuration whose boiling points range from 98°C (n-heptane) to 450°C (n-triacontane). For the test mixture using a modulation period PM of 1.0s, peak shapes on second dimension separations, (2)D, are symmetric with average widths at base of 79.4ms, producing a (2)D peak capacity of (2)nc∼12. Based on the average peak width of 2.4s for the first dimension separation with a run time of 32.5min, the (1)D peak capacity is (1)nc∼800. Thus, the ideal two-dimensional peak capacity [Formula: see text] is 9600. Little variation in within-analyte (2)D peak width was observed with an average %RSD of less than 3.0%. Furthermore, retention time on (2)D was very reproducible with an average %RSD less than 0.5%. Measured peak areas (sum of all (2)D peaks for given analyte) had an average %RSD of 4.4%. The transfer fraction from (1)D

  18. BSM Delta Qualification 2, volume 3, book 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This report, presented in three volumes, provides the results of a two-motor Delta Qualification 2 program conducted in 1993 to certify the following enhancements for incorporation into booster separation motor (BSM0 flight hardware: vulcanized-in-place nozzle aft closure insulation; new iso-static ATJ bulk graphite throat insert material, adhesive EA9394 for bonding the nozzle throat, igniter grain rod/centering insert/igniter case; deletion of the igniter adapter insulator ring; deletion of the igniter adapter/igniter case interface RTV; and deletion of loctite from igniter retainer plate threads. The enhancements above directly resulted from (1) the BSM total quality management (TQM) team initiatives to enhance the BSM producibility, and (2) the necessity to qualify new throat insert and adhesive systems to replace existing materials that will not be available. Testing was completed at both the component and motor levels. Component testing was accomplished to screen candidate materials (e.g., throat materials, adhesive systems) and to optimize processes (e.g., aft closure insulator vulcanization approach) prior to their incorporation into the test motors. Motor testing--consisting of two motors, randomly selected by USBI's on-site quality personnel from production lot AAY, which were modified to accept the enhancements -- was completed to provide the final qualification of the enhancements for incorporation into flight hardware. Volume 3, Book 2 provides various supporting documentation to the previous volumes with regards to the testing of the two Delta qualification units: data acceptance records, thermal conditioning analysis, igniter adapter thermal flake analysis, laboratory adhesive (EA-9394) qualification report, throat insert thermal/structural analysis, Delta Qualification Nonconformance Reports (NCR's), O-ring seating tests, and interim test report for vulcanization process qualification.

  19. NASA Tech Briefs, February 2003

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    opics covered include: Integrated Electrode Arrays for Neuro-Prosthetic Implants; Eroding Potentiometers; Common/Dependent-Pressure-Vessel Nickel-Hydrogen Batteries; 120-GHz HEMT Oscillator With Surface-Wave-Assisted Antenna; 80-GHz MMIC HEMT Voltage-Controlled Oscillator; High-Energy-Density Capacitors; Microscale Thermal-Transpiration Gas Pump; Instrument for Measuring Temperature of Water; Improved Measurement of Coherence in Presence of Instrument Noise; Compact Instruments Measure Helium-Leak Rates; Irreversible Entropy Production in Two-Phase Mixing Layers; Subsonic and Supersonic Effects in Bose-Einstein Condensate; Nanolaminate Mirrors With "Piston" Figure-Control Actuators; Mixed Conducting Electrodes for Better AMTEC Cells; Process for Encapsulating Protein Crystals; Lightweight, Self-Deployable Wheels; Grease-Resistant O Rings for Joints in Solid Rocket Motors; LabVIEW Serial Driver Software for an Electronic Load; Software Computes Tape-Casting Parameters; Software for Tracking Costs of Mars Projects; Software for Replicating Data Between X.500 and LDAP Directories; The Technical Work Plan Tracking Tool; Improved Multiple-DOF SAW Piezoelectric Motors; Propulsion Flight-Test Fixture; Mechanical Amplifier for a Piezoelectric Transducer; Swell Sleeves for Testing Explosive Devices; Linear Back-Drive Differentials; Miniature Inchworm Actuators Fabricated by Use of LIGA; Using ERF Devices to Control Deployments of Space Structures; High-Temperature Switched-Reluctance Electric Motor; System for Centering a Turbofan in a Nacelle During Tests; Fabricating Composite-Material Structures Containing SMA Ribbons; Optimal Feedback Control of Thermal Networks; Artifacts for Calibration of Submicron Width Measurements; Navigating a Mobile Robot Across Terrain Using Fuzzy Logic; Designing Facilities for Collaborative Operations; and Quantitating Iron in Serum Ferritin by Use of ICP-MS.

  20. Facilitatory effect of AC-iontophoresis of lidocaine hydrochloride on the permeability of human enamel and dentine in extracted teeth.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Hideharu; Suda, Hideaki

    2013-04-01

    The objectives of the present study were to quantitatively evaluate chemical permeability through human enamel/dentine using conductometry and to clarify if alternating current (AC) iontophoresis facilitates such permeability. Electrical impedance of different concentrations of lidocaine hydrochloride was measured using a bipolar platinum impedance probe. A quadratic curve closely fitted to the response functions between conductance and lidocaine hydrochloride. For analysis of the passage of lidocaine hydrochloride through human enamel/dentine, eight premolars that were extracted for orthodontic treatment were sectioned at the cemento-enamel junction. The tooth crowns were held between two chambers with a double O-ring. The enamel-side chamber was filled with lidocaine hydrochloride, and the pulp-side chamber was filled with extrapure water. Two platinum plate electrodes were set at the end of each chamber to pass alternating current. A simulated interstitial pulp pressure was applied to the pulp-side chamber. The change in the concentration of lidocaine hydrochloride in the pulp-side chamber was measured every 2min using a platinum recording probe positioned at the centre of the pulp-side chamber. Passive entry without iontophoresis was used as a control. The level of lidocaine hydrochloride that passed through enamel/dentine against the dentinal fluid flow increased with time. Electrical conductance (G, mho) correlated closely to the concentration (x, mmol/L) of lidocaine hydrochloride (G=2.16x(2)+0.0289x+0.000376, r(2)=0.999). Lidocaine hydrochloride can pass through enamel/dentine. Conductometry showed that the level of lidocaine hydrochloride that passed through enamel/dentine was increased by AC iontophoresis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Investigation of differences between field and laboratory pH measurements of national atmospheric deposition program/national trends network precipitation samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Latysh, N.; Gordon, J.

    2004-01-01

    A study was undertaken to investigate differences between laboratory and field pH measurements for precipitation samples collected from 135 weekly precipitation-monitoring sites in the National Trends Network from 12/30/1986 to 12/28/1999. Differences in pH between field and laboratory measurements occurred for 96% of samples collected during this time period. Differences between the two measurements were evaluated for precipitation samples collected before and after January 1994, when modifications to sample-handling protocol and elimination of the contaminating bucket o-ring used in sample shipment occurred. Median hydrogen-ion and pH differences between field and laboratory measurements declined from 3.9 ??eq L-1 or 0.10 pH units before the 1994 protocol change to 1.4 ??eq L-1 or 0.04 pH units after the 1994 protocol change. Hydrogen-ion differences between field and laboratory measurements had a high correlation with the sample pH determined in the field. The largest pH differences between the two measurements occurred for high-pH samples (>5.6), typical of precipitation collected in Western United States; however low- pH samples (<5.0) displayed the highest variability in hydrogen-ion differences between field and laboratory analyses. Properly screened field pH measurements are a useful alternative to laboratory pH values for trend analysis, particularly before 1994 when laboratory pH values were influenced by sample-collection equipment.

  2. On-Die Sensors for Transient Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suchak, Mihir Vimal

    Failures caused by transient electromagnetic events like Electrostatic Discharge (ESD) are a major concern for embedded systems. The component often failing is an integrated circuit (IC). Determining which IC is affected in a multi-device system is a challenging task. Debugging errors often requires sophisticated lab setups which require intentionally disturbing and probing various parts of the system which might not be easily accessible. Opening the system and adding probes may change its response to the transient event, which further compounds the problem. On-die transient event sensors were developed that require relatively little area on die, making them inexpensive, they consume negligible static current, and do not interfere with normal operation of the IC. These circuits can be used to determine the pin involved and the level of the event in the event of a transient event affecting the IC, thus allowing the user to debug system-level transient events without modifying the system. The circuit and detection scheme design has been completed and verified in simulations with Cadence Virtuoso environment. Simulations accounted for the impact of the ESD protection circuits, parasitics from the I/O pin, package and I/O ring, and included a model of an ESD gun to test the circuit's response to an ESD pulse as specified in IEC 61000-4-2. Multiple detection schemes are proposed. The final detection scheme consists of an event detector and a level sensor. The event detector latches on the presence of an event at a pad, to determine on which pin an event occurred. The level sensor generates current proportional to the level of the event. This current is converted to a voltage and digitized at the A/D converter to be read by the microprocessor. Detection scheme shows good performance in simulations when checked against process variations and different kind of events.

  3. Who's on base? Revealing the catalytic mechanism of inverting family 6 glycoside hydrolases

    SciTech Connect

    Mayes, Heather B.; Knott, Brandon C.; Crowley, Michael F.

    In several important classes of inverting carbohydrate-active enzymes, the identity of the catalytic base remains elusive, including in family 6 Glycoside Hydrolase (GH6) enzymes, which are key components of cellulase cocktails for cellulose depolymerization. Despite many structural and kinetic studies with both wild-type and mutant enzymes, especially on the Trichoderma reesei (Hypocrea jecorina) GH6 cellulase ( TrCel6A), the catalytic base in the single displacement inverting mechanism has not been definitively identified in the GH6 family. Here, we employ transition path sampling to gain insight into the catalytic mechanism, which provides unbiased atomic-level understanding of key order parameters involved in cleavingmore » the strong glycosidic bond. Our hybrid quantum mechanics and molecular mechanics (QM/MM) simulations reveal a network of hydrogen bonding that aligns two active site water molecules that play key roles in hydrolysis: one water molecule drives the reaction by nucleophilic attack on the substrate and a second shuttles a proton to the putative base (D175) via a short water wire. We also investigated the case where the putative base is mutated to an alanine, an enzyme that is experimentally still partially active. The simulations predict that proton hopping along a water wire via a Grotthuss mechanism provides a mechanism of catalytic rescue. Further simulations reveal that substrate processive motion is 'driven' by strong electrostatic interactions with the protein at the product sites and that the -1 sugar adopts a 2S O ring configuration as it reaches its binding site. Lastly, this work thus elucidates previously elusive steps in the processive catalytic mechanism of this important class of enzymes.« less

  4. A combined arc-melting and tilt-casting furnace for the manufacture of high-purity bulk metallic glass materials.

    PubMed

    Soinila, E; Pihlajamäki, T; Bossuyt, S; Hänninen, H

    2011-07-01

    An arc-melting furnace which includes a tilt-casting facility was designed and built, for the purpose of producing bulk metallic glass specimens. Tilt-casting was chosen because reportedly, in combination with high-purity processing, it produces the best fatigue endurance in Zr-based bulk metallic glasses. Incorporating the alloying and casting facilities in a single piece of equipment reduces the amount of laboratory space and capital investment needed. Eliminating the sample transfer step from the production process also saves time and reduces sample contamination. This is important because the glass forming ability in many alloy systems, such as Zr-based glass-forming alloys, deteriorates rapidly with increasing oxygen content of the specimen. The challenge was to create a versatile instrument, in which high purity conditions can be maintained throughout the process, even when melting alloys with high affinity for oxygen. Therefore, the design provides a high-vacuum chamber to be filled with a low-oxygen inert atmosphere, and takes special care to keep the system hermetically sealed throughout the process. In particular, movements of the arc-melting electrode and sample manipulator arm are accommodated by deformable metal bellows, rather than sliding O-ring seals, and the whole furnace is tilted for tilt-casting. This performance of the furnace is demonstrated by alloying and casting Zr(55)Cu(30)Al(10)Ni(5) directly into rods up to ø 10 mm which are verified to be amorphous by x-ray diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry, and to exhibit locally ductile fracture at liquid nitrogen temperature.

  5. Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae): evaluation of natural long-lasting materials containing pyriproxyfen to improve control strategies.

    PubMed

    Seccacini, Emilia; Juan, Laura; Zerba, Eduardo; Licastro, Susana

    2014-09-01

    Natural materials such as beeswax or a paraffin/stearin mixture containing pyriproxyfen and used as a slow release formulation may convert any breeding place into a larvicidal ovitrap for Aedes aegypti (L.) control. Effectiveness and residual activity of beeswax and paraffin/stearin 1:1 discs containing from 10(-5) to 10(-1) % pyriproxyfen and sticked at the bottom of plastic jars were evaluated for adult emergence inhibition (EI) on late 3rd or early 4th instar A. aegypti larvae. At the initial time t = 0, the EI was 100% for vessels containing beeswax or paraffin/stearin 1:1 discs containing up to 10(-4)% pyriproxyfen. For the lowest pyriproxyfen concentration of 10(-5)%, paraffin/stearin mixture gave a higher EI% value than beeswax (100 and 50%, respectively). Jars were kept at room temperature, and water was totally replaced every 15 days. Bioassays for residual activity repeated monthly showed that at 30 days and for pyriproxyfen 10(-5) % and both matrices, the EI values were low and comparable to control values. For pyriproxyfen 10(-4) %, EI remained above 95% for at least 90 days and around 75% up to 180 days. The EI values are always higher for paraffin/stearin mixture than for beeswax. For all other higher concentrations, 100% EI was obtained at least during 300 days. In a semi-field trial, paraffin/stearin/sand O-rings (2:1:2), containing pyriproxyfen 1%, were sunken in 200-l water-storage tanks and held outdoors in a shadow place. After 72 h, a 250-ml aliquot was taken (t = 0) obtaining 100 % EI. Water level was completed to 200 l every 15 days and bioassays repeated monthly as before. Residual activity remains with 100% EI at least for 6 months.

  6. Fluid circulation determined in the isolated bovine lens.

    PubMed

    Candia, Oscar A; Mathias, Richard; Gerometta, Rosana

    2012-10-11

    In 1997, a theoretical model was developed that predicted the existence of an internal, Na(+)-driven fluid circulation from the poles to the equator of the lens. In the present work, we demonstrate with a novel system that fluid movement can be measured across the polar and equatorial surface areas of isolated cow lenses. We have also determined the effects of ouabain and reduced bath [Na(+)]. Lenses were isolated in a chamber with three compartments separated by two thin O-rings. Each compartment, anterior (A), equatorial (E), and posterior (P), was connected to a vertical capillary graduated in 0.25 μL. Capillary levels were read every 15 minutes. The protocols consisted of 2 hours in either open circuit or short circuit. The effects of ouabain and low-Na(+) solutions were determined under open circuit. In 21 experiments, the E capillary increased at a mean rate of 0.060 μL/min while the A and P levels decreased at rates of 0.044 and 0.037 μL/min, respectively, closely accounting for the increase in E. The first-hour flows under short circuit were approximately 40% larger than those in open-circuit conditions. The first-hour flows were always larger than those during the second hour. Preincubation of lenses with either ouabain or low-[Na(+)] solutions resulted in reduced rates of fluid transport. When KCl was used to replace NaCl, a transitory stimulation of fluid transport occurred. These experiments support that a fluid circulation consistent with the 1997 model is physiologically active.

  7. The thin-wall tube drift chamber operating in vacuum (prototype)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexeev, G. D.; Glonti, L. N.; Kekelidze, V. D.; Malyshev, V. L.; Piskun, A. A.; Potrbenikov, Yu. K.; Rodionov, V. K.; Samsonov, V. A.; Tokmenin, V. V.; Shkarovskiy, S. N.

    2013-08-01

    The goal of this work was to design drift tubes and a chamber operating in vacuum, and to develop technologies for tubes independent assembly and mounting in the chamber. These design and technology were tested on the prototype. The main features of the chamber are the following: the drift tubes are made of flexible mylar film (wall thickness 36 μm, diameter 9.80 mm, length 2160 mm) using ultrasonic welding along the generatrix; the welding device and methods were developed at JINR. Drift tubes with end plugs, anode wires and spacers were completely assembled outside the chamber. "Self-centering" spacers and bushes were used for precise setting of the anode wires and tubes. The assembled tubes were sealed with O-rings in their seats in the chamber which simplified the chamber assembling. Moreover the tube assembly and the chamber manufacture can be performed independently and in parallel; this sufficiently reduces the total time of chamber manufacture and assembling, its cost and allows tubes to be tested outside the chamber. The technology of independent tube assembling is suitable for a chamber of any shape but a round chamber is preferable for operation in vacuum. Single channel amplifier-discriminator boards which are more stable against cross talks were used for testing the tubes. Independently assembled tubes were mounted into the chamber prototype and its performance characteristic measured under the vacuum conditions. The results showed that both the structure and the tubes themselves normally operate. They are suitable for making a full-scale drift chamber for vacuum.

  8. Soft x-ray spectroscopy of high pressure liquid.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Ruimin; Xia, Yujian; Feng, Xuefei; Macdougall, James; Pepper, John; Armitage, Kevin; Borsos, Jason; Knauss, Kevin G; Lee, Namhey; Allézy, Arnaud; Gilbert, Benjamin; MacDowell, Alastair A; Liu, Yi-Sheng; Glans, Per-Anders; Sun, Xuhui; Chao, Weilun; Guo, Jinghua

    2018-01-01

    We describe a new experimental technique that allows for soft x-ray spectroscopy studies (∼100-1000 eV) of high pressure liquid (∼100 bars). We achieve this through a liquid cell with a 100 nm-thick Si 3 N 4 membrane window, which is sandwiched by two identical O-rings for vacuum sealing. The thin Si 3 N 4 membrane allows soft x-rays to penetrate, while separating the high-pressure liquid under investigation from the vacuum required for soft x-ray transmission and detection. The burst pressure of the Si 3 N 4 membrane increases with decreasing size and more specifically is inversely proportional to the side length of the square window. It also increases proportionally with the membrane thickness. Pressures > 60 bars could be achieved for 100 nm-thick square Si 3 N 4 windows that are smaller than 65 μm. However, above a certain pressure, the failure of the Si wafer becomes the limiting factor. The failure pressure of the Si wafer is sensitive to the wafer thickness. Moreover, the deformation of the Si 3 N 4 membrane is quantified using vertical scanning interferometry. As an example of the performance of the high-pressure liquid cell optimized for total-fluorescence detected soft x-ray absorption spectroscopy (sXAS), the sXAS spectra at the Ca L edge (∼350 eV) of a CaCl 2 aqueous solution are collected under different pressures up to 41 bars.

  9. Effect of plasma treatments on the steam-sour gas resistance and lubricity of elastomers. [Rubbers used: copoly(ethene-propene); copoly(1,1-difluoroethane-hexafluoropropene); copoly(2-propenenitrile-1,3 butadiene); plasma polymerized tetrafluoroethane

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, C. Jr.; Bieg, K.W.; Cuthrell, R.E.

    1982-03-01

    Elastomers are widely used in drilling and logging applications as static seals such as casing packers and dynamic seals such as o-rings for drill bits. Static seals often fail in service because of thermochemical degradation due to the combined effects of steam and sour gas at elevated temperatures that are characteristic of deep wells. Dynamic seals frequently fail because of abrasive wear that occurs even at the low temperatures that prevail in shallow wells. We have shown that improved steam-sour gas resistance of a fully formulated ethylene-propylene rubber at elevated temperatures can be achieved by coating the rubber with amore » thin film of plasma polymerized tetrafluoroethylene. Thus, no change in the mechanical properties of the coated rubber was observed after exposure to steam and sour gas at 275/sup 0/C for 48 h. In contrast, the shear modulus of the upcoated rubber increased by 96% after the same exposure. While the effectiveness of the fluorocarbon coating decreased at longer exposure times, short-term protection of elastomers could be beneficial in certain logging operations. It was also found that the coefficient of friction of a nitrile rubber (Buna N) was reduced by 20% after treatment with a carbon tetrafluoride plasma. This enhanced lubricity could lead to better wear characteristics in conventional drill bits where the seal is in contact with a moving metal surface. The surfaces of the plasma treated elastomers were characterized by water contact angle, scanning electron microscopy, and electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis.« less

  10. Fluid Circulation Determined in the Isolated Bovine Lens

    PubMed Central

    Candia, Oscar A.; Mathias, Richard; Gerometta, Rosana

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. In 1997, a theoretical model was developed that predicted the existence of an internal, Na+-driven fluid circulation from the poles to the equator of the lens. In the present work, we demonstrate with a novel system that fluid movement can be measured across the polar and equatorial surface areas of isolated cow lenses. We have also determined the effects of ouabain and reduced bath [Na+]. Methods. Lenses were isolated in a chamber with three compartments separated by two thin O-rings. Each compartment, anterior (A), equatorial (E), and posterior (P), was connected to a vertical capillary graduated in 0.25 μL. Capillary levels were read every 15 minutes. The protocols consisted of 2 hours in either open circuit or short circuit. The effects of ouabain and low-Na+ solutions were determined under open circuit. Results. In 21 experiments, the E capillary increased at a mean rate of 0.060 μL/min while the A and P levels decreased at rates of 0.044 and 0.037 μL/min, respectively, closely accounting for the increase in E. The first-hour flows under short circuit were approximately 40% larger than those in open-circuit conditions. The first-hour flows were always larger than those during the second hour. Preincubation of lenses with either ouabain or low-[Na+] solutions resulted in reduced rates of fluid transport. When KCl was used to replace NaCl, a transitory stimulation of fluid transport occurred. Conclusions. These experiments support that a fluid circulation consistent with the 1997 model is physiologically active. PMID:22969071

  11. Potassium-induced effect on structure and chemical activity of Cu xO/Cu(111) (x≤2) surface: A combined scanning tunneling microscopy and density functional theory study

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Ping; An, Wei; Stacchiola, Dario

    2015-10-16

    Potassium (K) plays an essential role in promoting catalytic reaction in many established industrial catalytic processes. Here, we report a combined study using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and density functional theory (DFT) in understanding the effect of depositing K on the atomic and electronic structures as well as chemical activities of Cu xO/Cu(111) (x≤2). The DFT calculations observe a pseudomorphic growth of K on Cu xO/Cu(111) up to 0.19 monolayer (ML) of coverage, where K binds the surface via strong ionic interaction with chemisorbed oxygen and the relatively weak electrostatic interactions with copper ions, lower and upper oxygen on themore » Cu xO rings. The simulated STM pattern based on the DFT results agrees well with the experimental observations. The deposited K displays great impact on the surface electronic structure of Cu xO/Cu(111), which induces significant reduction in work function and leads to a strong electron polarization on the surface. The promotion of K on the surface binding properties is selective. It varies depending on the nature of adsorbates. According to our results, K has little effect on surface acidity, while it enhances the surface basicity significantly. As a consequence, the presence of K does not help for CO adsorption on Cu xO/Cu(111), but being able to accelerate the activation of CO 2. Thus, such promotion strongly depends on the combinations from both geometric and electronic effects. Our results highlight the origin of promoting effect of alkalis in the design of catalysts for the complex reactions.« less

  12. Engineering Design and Testing of a Novel High-Resolution Trace-Metal Clean Sampler for Profiling and Long-term Deployment Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, A. V.; Crusius, J.; Carlson, K.; Chapin, T. P.

    2016-02-01

    Design, assembly, and testing of a novel in-situ sampler for automated high-frequency trace-metal clean sampling at ocean moorings was undertaken with the goal of improving marine data density for iron (and other metals) by up to a factor of ten relative to existing samplers. Target characteristics are: modular, flexible use (profiling, static moorings, AUV-deployed), high capacity (100-200 samples), low power, low cost ($3k per 100-samples), ability to collect filtered + unfiltered samples, and simple assembly. Smaller sample volumes (10mL) are enabled by recent innovations in analysis techniques, while use of off-the-shelf components enables lower cost and faster development time, although attention must be taken to verify trace-metal cleanliness of materials in commercial products. Standard polypropylene syringes (tips with lock fittings) are adapted as sample chambers through fabrication of a dual (viton) o-ring replacement plunger to prevent barrel contamination between acid washing and sample collection. Syringes are mounted along a (pumped) sampling channel machined into a modular custom-designed 7.5in. HDPE ring; successive rings stack, fitted around the central 3 in. PVC pressure housing containing the pump, batteries, and temperature and pressure sensors. Optional filtering (0.45um) is easily added at the inlet to the pumped sampling line. Syringes, pre-filled with acid for sample preservation, are held "closed" using plastic zipties connected to the plunger pull; individual syringes are selected for filling by breaking a 0.003in. wire (e.g., stainless steel, gold-plated tungsten/rhenium) with a pulse of current or by melting the ziptie loop using a nichrome wire. Multiplexed addressing minimizes required microcontroller output pins and wires between the free-flooded collection chamber and the pressure housing. A novel, custom rotating inlet mounting scheme ensures that the pump tubing inlet remains positioned approximately 1m upstream of the sampler.

  13. Mandibular Overdentures Retained by Two Mini-Implants: A Seven-Year Retention and Satisfaction Study.

    PubMed

    Catalán, Alfonso; Martínez, Alejandra; Marchesani, Francisco; González, Urcesino

    2016-07-01

    Patients with atrophic edentulous ridges generally have problems with retention, therapeutic satisfaction, and comfort with their complete dentures. An alternative treatment to assist in improving retention and stability involves the use of mini-implants. The aim of this study was to evaluate the retention of mandibular overdentures connected to two mini-implants and overall patient satisfaction with them. Seven patients with atrophic mandibular ridges (Type 4D Misch classification), aged 62 to 74 years old were rehabilitated with complete dentures. In each patient, two mini-implants measuring 15 or 13 mm in length and 1.8 mm in diameter were placed. After 15 days, overdentures were connected to the mini-implants with O-ring attachments. In each patient, retention of the overdentures was measured, and a survey of therapeutic satisfaction before and after connection to the mini-implants was administered. Prosthesis retention was measured with a digital dynamometer at 1 month, 6 months, and 2, 3, 5, and 7 years after mini-implant placement. Patient satisfaction was assessed with a survey. Data were analyzed with Student's t-test (satisfaction survey) and the Friedman test (retention measurements and satisfaction survey). The initial retention values (0.34 to 0.63 N without mini-implants) varied significantly (p ≤ 0.050). These values were less than the subsequent measurements of 3.92 to 9.64 N, taken after placement of the mini-implants and connecting them to the dentures. Satisfaction was good to very good over the 7-year observation period. Mucosa and peri-implant bone showed no pathological changes. In this limited sample size clinical study the results indicated that after connecting mandibular overdentures to two mini-implants, patient satisfaction significantly increased and retention significantly improved during the 7-year observation period. © 2015 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  14. Who's on base? Revealing the catalytic mechanism of inverting family 6 glycoside hydrolases

    DOE PAGES

    Mayes, Heather B.; Knott, Brandon C.; Crowley, Michael F.; ...

    2016-06-01

    In several important classes of inverting carbohydrate-active enzymes, the identity of the catalytic base remains elusive, including in family 6 Glycoside Hydrolase (GH6) enzymes, which are key components of cellulase cocktails for cellulose depolymerization. Despite many structural and kinetic studies with both wild-type and mutant enzymes, especially on the Trichoderma reesei (Hypocrea jecorina) GH6 cellulase ( TrCel6A), the catalytic base in the single displacement inverting mechanism has not been definitively identified in the GH6 family. Here, we employ transition path sampling to gain insight into the catalytic mechanism, which provides unbiased atomic-level understanding of key order parameters involved in cleavingmore » the strong glycosidic bond. Our hybrid quantum mechanics and molecular mechanics (QM/MM) simulations reveal a network of hydrogen bonding that aligns two active site water molecules that play key roles in hydrolysis: one water molecule drives the reaction by nucleophilic attack on the substrate and a second shuttles a proton to the putative base (D175) via a short water wire. We also investigated the case where the putative base is mutated to an alanine, an enzyme that is experimentally still partially active. The simulations predict that proton hopping along a water wire via a Grotthuss mechanism provides a mechanism of catalytic rescue. Further simulations reveal that substrate processive motion is 'driven' by strong electrostatic interactions with the protein at the product sites and that the -1 sugar adopts a 2S O ring configuration as it reaches its binding site. Lastly, this work thus elucidates previously elusive steps in the processive catalytic mechanism of this important class of enzymes.« less

  15. Soft x-ray spectroscopy of high pressure liquid

    SciTech Connect

    Qiao, Ruimin; Xia, Yujian; Feng, Xuefei

    Here, we describe a new experimental technique that allows for soft x-ray spectroscopy studies (~100-1000 eV) of high pressure liquid (~100 bars). We achieve this through a liquid cell with a 100 nm-thick Si 3N 4 membrane window, which is sandwiched by two identical O-rings for vacuum sealing. The thin Si 3N 4 membrane allows soft x-rays to penetrate, while separating the high-pressure liquid under investigation from the vacuum required for soft x-ray transmission and detection. The burst pressure of the Si 3N 4 membrane increases with decreasing size and more specifically is inversely proportional to the side length ofmore » the square window. It also increases proportionally with the membrane thickness. Pressures > 60 bars could be achieved for 100 nm-thick square Si 3N 4 windows that are smaller than 65 μm. However, above a certain pressure, the failure of the Si wafer becomes the limiting factor. The failure pressure of the Si wafer is sensitive to the wafer thickness. Moreover, the deformation of the Si 3N 4 membrane is quantified using vertical scanning interferometry. As an example of the performance of the high-pressure liquid cell optimized for total-fluorescence detected soft x-ray absorption spectroscopy (sXAS), the sXAS spectra at the Ca L edge (~350 eV) of a CaCl 2 aqueous solution are collected under different pressures up to 41 bars.« less

  16. Elastomeric Seal Performance after Terrestrial Ultraviolet Radiation Exposure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniels, Christopher C.; Oravec, Heather A.; Mather, Janice L.; Taylor, Shawn C.; Dunlap, Patrick H.

    2015-01-01

    Ultraviolet radiation was evaluated to determine its negative effects on the performance of elastomeric gas pressure seals. The leak rates of the silicone elastomer S0383-70 O-ring test articles were used to quantify the degradation of the seals after exposure to vacuum-ultraviolet and/or middle-to-near-ultraviolet wavelength radiation. Three groups of seals were exposed in terrestrial facilities to 115-165 nm wavelength radiation, 230-500 nm wavelength radiation, or both spectrums, for an orbital spaceflight equivalent of 125 hours. The leak rates of the silicone elastomer S0383-70 seals were quantified and compared to samples that received no radiation. Each lot contained six samples and statistical t-tests were used to determine the separate and combined influences of exposure to the two wavelength ranges. A comparison of the mean leak rates of samples exposed to 115-165 nm wavelength radiation to the control specimens showed no difference, suggesting that spectrum was not damaging. The 230-500 nm wavelength appeared to be damaging, as the mean leak rates of the specimens exposed to that range of wavelengths, and those exposed to the combined 115-165 nm and 230-500 nm spectrums, were significantly different from the leak rates of the control specimens. Most importantly, the test articles exposed to both wavelength spectrums exhibited mean leak rates two orders of magnitude larger than any other exposed specimens, which suggested that both wavelength spectrums are important when simulating the orbital environment.

  17. Screening of High Temperature Organic Materials for Future Stirling Convertors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shin, Euy-sik E.; Scheiman, Daniel A.

    2017-01-01

    Along with major advancement of Stirling-based convertors, high temperature organics are needed to develop future higher temperature convertors for much improved efficiencies as well as to improve the margin of reliability for the current SOA (State-of-the-Art) convertors. The higher temperature capabilities would improve robustness of the convertors and also allow them to be used in additional missions, particularly ones that require a Venus flyby for a gravity assist. Various organic materials have been employed as essential components in the convertor for their unique properties and functions such as bonding, potting, sealing, thread locking, insulation, and lubrication. The Stirling convertor radioisotope generators have been developed for potential future space applications including Lunar/Mars surface power or a variety of spacecraft and vehicles, especially with a long mission cycle, sometimes up to 17 years, such as deep space exploration. Thus, performance, durability, and reliability of the organics should be critically evaluated in terms of every possible material structure-process-service environment relations based on the potential mission specifications. The initial efforts in screening the high temperature candidates focused on the most susceptible organics, such as adhesive, potting compound, O-ring, shrink tubing, and thread locker materials in conjunction with commercially available materials. More systematic and practical test methodologies that were developed and optimized based on the extensive organic evaluations and validations performed for various Stirling convertor types were employed to determine thermal stability, outgassing, and material compatibility of the selected organic candidates against their functional requirements. Processing and fabrication conditions and procedures were also optimized. This report presents results of the three-step candidate evaluation processes, their application limitations, and the final selection

  18. Compact, Two-Sided Structural Cold Plate Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaffetti, Mark

    2011-01-01

    In two-sided structural cold plates, typically there is a structural member, such as a honeycomb panel, that provides the structural strength for the cold plates that cool equipment. The cold plates are located on either side of the structural member and thus need to have the cooling fluid supplied to them. One method of accomplishing this is to route the inlet and outlet tubing to both sides of the structural member. Another method might be to supply the inlet to one side and the outlet to the other. With the latter method, an external feature such as a hose, tube, or manifold must be incorporated to pass the fluid from one side of the structural member to the other. Although this is a more compact design than the first option, since it eliminates the need for a dedicated supply and return line to each side of the structural member, it still poses problems, as these external features can be easily damaged and are now new areas for potential fluid leakage. This invention eliminates the need for an external feature and instead incorporates the feature internally to the structural member. This is accomplished by utilizing a threaded insert that not only connects the cold plate to the structural member, but also allows the cooling fluid to flow through it into the structural member, and then to the cold plate on the opposite side. The insert also employs a cap that acts as a cover to seal the open area needed to install the insert. There are multiple options for location of o-ring style seals, as well as the option to use adhesive for redundant sealing. Another option is to weld the cap to the cold plate after its installation, thus making it an integral part of the structural member. This new configuration allows the fluid to pass from one cold plate to the other without any exposed external features.

  19. Metal ring on 4th or 5th finger markedly increases both cardiac troponin I at left ventricle and cancer-related parameters such as oncogen C-fosAb2 & integrin α₅β₁[corrected] by 4-12 times. Thus these metal rings appear to promote both heart problems & cancer.

    PubMed

    Omura, Yoshiaki; Hines, Howard; Jones, Marilyn; O'Young, Brian; Duvvi, Harsha; Lu, Dominic P; Pallos, Andrew; Shimotsuura, Yasuhiro; Ohki, Motomu

    2010-01-01

    We examined patients wearing a metal ring on the left 4th finger with abnormally increased Cardiac Troponin I (which is known to increase in the presence of myocardial injury or left ventricular hypertrophy) of 5-14ng BDORT units (depending on the ring and individual) at left ventricle compared with normal value of 1ng BDORT units or less. Although shape of the ECG does not change significantly regardless of whether metal rings are on or not, when rings are on, the Bi-Digital O-Ring Test evaluation of trace of ECG revealed "Vulnerable Period of Rising Part of T-wave" of ECG waves (which correspond to the left ventricle and AV node) become abnormal with increased Cardiac Troponin I. DHEA in various parts of the body reduced significantly and maximum decrease in DHEA was found when metal ring was on the left 4th and 5th fingers. Telomere reduced with each of the 5 fingers, but the 2nd, 4th, and 5th fingers produced the maximum reduction of telomere. When metal ring was inserted onto the left 1st finger and left 2nd finger, Cardiac Troponin I did not change significantly. Additional abnormality was found when patients with cancer wore metal ring(s); namely both Cardiac Troponin I and cancer parameters, such as Integrin α₅β₁[corrected] and Oncogen C-fos Ab2, increase anywhere between 4-12 times. However, when the ring was cut, creating a 1mm or longer empty space, no increase in cancer markers and Cardiac Troponin I were observed. Similar findings were found with metal bracelets.

  20. Development of Displacement Gages Exposed to Solid Rocket Motor Internal Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bolton, D. E.; Cook, D. J.

    2003-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) has three non-vented segment-to-segment case field joints. These joints use an interference fit J-joint that is bonded at assembly with a Pressure Sensitive Adhesive (PSA) inboard of redundant O-ring seals. Full-scale motor and sub-scale test article experience has shown that the ability to preclude gas leakage past the J-joint is a function of PSA type, joint moisture from pre-assembly humidity exposure, and the magnitude of joint displacement during motor operation. To more accurately determine the axial displacements at the J-joints, two thermally durable displacement gages (one mechanical and one electrical) were designed and developed. The mechanical displacement gage concept was generated first as a non-electrical, self-contained gage to capture the maximum magnitude of the J-joint motion. When it became feasible, the electrical displacement gage concept was generated second as a real-time linear displacement gage. Both of these gages were refined in development testing that included hot internal solid rocket motor environments and simulated vibration environments. As a result of this gage development effort, joint motions have been measured in static fired RSRM J-joints where intentional venting was produced (Flight Support Motor #8, FSM-8) and nominal non-vented behavior occurred (FSM-9 and FSM-10). This data gives new insight into the nominal characteristics of the three case J-joint positions (forward, center and aft) and characteristics of some case J-joints that became vented during motor operation. The data supports previous structural model predictions. These gages will also be useful in evaluating J-joint motion differences in a five-segment Space Shuttle solid rocket motor.

  1. Spatial pattern of Baccharis platypoda shrub as determined by sex and life stages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fonseca, Darliana da Costa; de Oliveira, Marcio Leles Romarco; Pereira, Israel Marinho; Gonzaga, Anne Priscila Dias; de Moura, Cristiane Coelho; Machado, Evandro Luiz Mendonça

    2017-11-01

    Spatial patterns of dioecious species can be determined by their nutritional requirements and intraspecific competition, apart from being a response to environmental heterogeneity. The aim of the study was to evaluate the spatial pattern of populations of a dioecious shrub reporting to sex and reproductive stage patterns of individuals. Sampling was carried out in three areas located in the meridional portion of Serra do Espinhaço, where in individuals of the studied species were mapped. The spatial pattern was determined through O-ring analysis and Ripley's K-function and the distribution of individuals' frequencies was verified through x2 test. Populations in two areas showed an aggregate spatial pattern tending towards random or uniform according to the observed scale. Male and female adults presented an aggregate pattern at smaller scales, while random and uniform patterns were verified above 20 m for individuals of both sexes of the areas A2 and A3. Young individuals presented an aggregate pattern in all areas and spatial independence in relation to adult individuals, especially female plants. The interactions between individuals of both genders presented spatial independence with respect to spatial distribution. Baccharis platypoda showed characteristics in accordance with the spatial distribution of savannic and dioecious species, whereas the population was aggregated tending towards random at greater spatial scales. Young individuals showed an aggregated pattern at different scales compared to adults, without positive association between them. Female and male adult individuals presented similar characteristics, confirming that adult individuals at greater scales are randomly distributed despite their distinct preferences for environments with moisture variation.

  2. Phenytoin (Dilantin) and acupuncture therapy in the treatment of intractable oral and facial pain.

    PubMed

    Lu, Dominic P; Lu, Winston I; Lu, Gabriel P

    2011-01-01

    Phenytoin is an anti-convulsant and anti-arrhythmic medication. Manufactured by various pharmaceutical companies with various brand names, phenytoin (PHT) is also known as Dilantain, Hydantoin or Phenytek in the United States; Dilantain or Remytoine in Canada; Epamin, Hidantoina in Mexico; and Fenidatoin or Fenitron or other names elsewhere in the world. Phenytoin (PHT) is especially useful for patients suffering from intractable oral and facial pain especially those who exhibit anger, stress, depression and irrational emotions commonly seen in the patients with oral and facial pain. When used properly, Phenytoin is also an effective anxiolysis drug in addition to its theraputic effects on pain and can be used alone or, even better, if combined with other compatible sedatives. Phenytoin is particularly valuable when combined with acupuncture for patients with trigeminal neuralgia, glossopharyneal neuralgia, Bell's palsy, and some other facial paralysis and pain. It also has an advantage of keeping the patient relatively lucid after treatment. Either PHT or acupuncture alone can benefit patients but the success of treatment outcome may be limited. We found by combining both acupuncture and PHT with Selective Drug Uptake Enhancement by stimulating middle finger at the first segment of ventral (palmar) and lateral surfaces, as well as prescribing PHT with the dosage predetermined for each patient by Bi-Digital O-Ring Test (BDORT), the treatment outcome was much better resulted with less recurrence and intensity of pain during episodes of attack. Patients with Bell's palsy were most benefited by acupuncture therapy that could completely get rid of the illness.

  3. Updated determination of the molar gas constant R by acoustic measurements in argon at UVa-CEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segovia, J. J.; Lozano-Martín, D.; Martín, M. C.; Chamorro, C. R.; Villamañán, M. A.; Pérez, E.; García Izquierdo, C.; del Campo, D.

    2017-10-01

    A new determination of the molar gas constant was performed from measurements of the speed of sound in argon at the triple point of water and extrapolation to zero pressure. A new resonant cavity was used. This is a triaxial ellipsoid whose walls are gold-coated steel and which is divided into two identical halves that are bolted and sealed with an O-ring. Microwave and electroacoustic traducers are located in the northern and southern parts of the cavity, respectively, so that measurements of microwave and acoustic frequencies are carried out in the same experiment. Measurements were taken at pressures from 600 kPa to 60 kPa and at 273.16 K. The internal equivalent radius of the cavity was accurately determined by microwave measurements and the first four radial symmetric acoustic modes were simultaneously measured and used to calculate the speed of sound. The improvements made using the new cavity have reduced by half the main contributions to the uncertainty due to the radius determination using microwave measurements which amounts to 4.7 parts in 106 and the acoustic measurements, 4.4 parts in 106, where the main contribution (3.7 parts in 106) is the relative excess half-widths associated with the limit of our acoustic model, compared with our previous measurements. As a result of all the improvements with the new cavity and the measurements performed, we determined the molar gas constant R  =  (8.314 449  ±  0.000 056) J · K-1 · mol-1 which corresponds to a relative standard uncertainty of 6.7 parts in 106. The value reported in this paper lies  -1.3 parts in 106 below the recommended value of CODATA 2014, although still within the range consistent with it.

  4. Integrative approach to diagnosis of genital human papillomaviruses (HPV) infection of female.

    PubMed

    Dunjic, Momir; Stanisic, Slavisa; Krstic, Dejan; Stanisic, Miodrag; Ignjatic, Z Jovanovic; Dunjic, Marija

    2014-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a virus from the papillomavirus family that is capable of infecting humans. Some types of HPVs cause warts, while others can lead to cancers of the cervix, vulva, vagina, penis, oropharynx and anus. High-risk human papillomavirus (hr HPV) has been detected in almost all cervical squamous cell carcinomas and adenocarcinomas. All patients examined by colposcopy. Cervical swab is routinely done and patients are screened with both HPV DNA by Real Time Polimerase Chain Reaction (RT PCR) testing and Pap testing. Pictures obtained by colposcopy were examined by indirect Bi-Digital O-Ring Test (BDORT) by using reference control substance (RCS): HPV 16, HPV 18, and Integrin α5 β1. BDORT was developed by Prof. Omura Y. of New York and received U.S. patent in 1993. For detection of HPV DNA we used RT PCR and standard Qiagen method which detect 18 types (16, 18, 31, 33, 35, 39, 45, 51, 52, 56, 58, 59, 68, 6, 11, 42, 43, 44) of HPV from smear. From 63 patients where is BDORT indicated presence of HPV, in 49 patients (77.8%) RT PCR confirmed presence of HPV. From 63 patients in 54 patients (85.7%), we detected, by colposcopic exam, some kind of lesions associated with HPV infection. Results obtained by RT PCR: one type (1/18) of DNA HPV in 25 patients (51.02%), 2 types (2/18) in 15 patients (30.61%) and 3 types (3/18) in 9 patients (18.37%). Although BDORT results usually have higher sensitivity and detection rate is much higher, it can be used together with RT PCR in detection of HPV and cervical lesions associated with HPV infection.

  5. Wormhole Formation in RSRM Nozzle Joint Backfill

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevens, J.

    2000-01-01

    The RSRM nozzle uses a barrier of RTV rubber upstream of the nozzle O-ring seals. Post flight inspection of the RSRM nozzle continues to reveal occurrence of "wormholes" into the RTV backfill. The term "wormholes", sometimes called "gas paths", indicates a gas flow path not caused by pre-existing voids, but by a little-understood internal failure mode of the material during motor operation. Fundamental understanding of the mechanics of the RSRM nozzle joints during motor operation, nonlinear viscoelastic characterization of the RTV backfill material, identification of the conditions that predispose the RTV to form wormholes, and screening of candidate replacement materials is being pursued by a joint effort between Thiokol Propulsion, NASA, and the Army Propulsion & Structures Directorate at Redstone Arsenal. The performance of the RTV backfill in the joint is controlled by the joint environment. Joint movement, which applies a tension and shear load on the material, coupled with the introduction of high pressure gas in combination create an environment that exceeds the capability of the material to withstand the wormhole effect. Little data exists to evaluate why the material fails under the modeled joint conditions, so an effort to characterize and evaluate the material under these conditions was undertaken. Viscoelastic property data from characterization testing will anchor structural analysis models. Data over a range of temperatures, environmental pressures, and strain rates was used to develop a nonlinear viscoelastic model to predict material performance, develop criteria for replacement materials, and quantify material properties influencing wormhole growth. Three joint simulation analogs were developed to analyze and validate joint thermal barrier (backfill) material performance. Two exploratory tests focus on detection of wormhole failure under specific motor operating conditions. A "validation" test system provides data to "validate" computer models and

  6. Measurement and Modeling of Water-Vapor Diffusion in Elastomers with Impact in Humidity and Vacuum Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šetina, Janez; Sefa, Makfir; Erjavec, Bojan; Hudoklin, Domen

    2013-03-01

    The dynamics of water-vapor dissolution in Viton O-rings is measured with a gravimetric method using a precise mass comparator. A sample gasket was degassed in high vacuum for a sufficiently long period to remove more than 99 % of the dissolved water vapor. After that, it was exposed to the ambient atmosphere with a controlled temperature, and relative humidity and water-vapor uptake curves were measured gravimetrically with a precise balance. The dynamics of a water-vapor release into vacuum from another sample that was previously saturated with water vapor at room temperature was determined. The sample was placed in a vacuum outgassing rate measurement apparatus. The time dependence of the evolved water vapor was calculated by integrating the measured outgassing rate. The physical process of water absorption can be described by the diffusion equation. The geometry of the samples required solving the diffusion equation in cylindrical coordinates. This was done numerically using a finite-difference method. As a result of the modeling, room temperature values of the diffusion constant D, the solubility s, and the permeability K = D× s of water vapor in the sample material (Viton A-401C) were obtained. For sample 1, we obtained D = 8.0 × 10 ^{-8} cm2 {\\cdot } s^{-1} and s = 6.5 × 10^{-7} g {\\cdot } cm^-3 Pa^{-1}, while for sample 2, D = 3.0 × 10^{-7} cm2 s^{-1} and s = 3.5 × 10^{-7} g {\\cdot } cm^{-3} {\\cdot } Pa^{-1}.

  7. PRELIMINARY REPORT: EFFECTS OF IRRADIATION AND THERMAL EXPOSURE ON ELASTOMERIC SEALS FOR CASK TRANSPORTATION AND STORAGE

    SciTech Connect

    Verst, C.; Skidmore, E.; Daugherty, W.

    2014-05-30

    A testing and analysis approach to predict the sealing behavior of elastomeric seal materials in dry storage casks and evaluate their ability to maintain a seal under thermal and radiation exposure conditions of extended storage and beyond was developed, and initial tests have been conducted. The initial tests evaluate the aging response of EPDM elastomer O-ring seals. The thermal and radiation exposure conditions of the CASTOR® V/21 casks were selected for testing as this cask design is of interest due to its widespread use, and close proximity of the seals to the fuel compared to other cask designs leading tomore » a relatively high temperature and dose under storage conditions. A novel test fixture was developed to enable compression stress relaxation measurements for the seal material at the thermal and radiation exposure conditions. A loss of compression stress of 90% is suggested as the threshold at which sealing ability of an elastomeric seal would be lost. Previous studies have shown this value to be conservative to actual leakage failure for most aging conditions. These initial results indicate that the seal would be expected to retain sealing ability throughout extended storage at the cask design conditions, though longer exposure times are needed to validate this assumption. The high constant dose rate used in the testing is not prototypic of the decreasingly low dose rate that would occur under extended storage. The primary degradation mechanism of oxidation of polymeric compounds is highly dependent on temperature and time of exposure, and with radiation expected to exacerbate the oxidation.« less

  8. Geothermal packers and packer elastomers

    SciTech Connect

    Hirasuna, A.R.; Stephens, C.A.

    1981-10-01

    Reliability of thermal packers has been an eternal problem at temperatures beyond the 149 to 177/sup 0/C (300 to 350/sup 0/F) level. High temperature packer elastomer compounds were developed for 260/sup 0/C (500/sup 0/F) environments. Compounds based on four polymer systems were developed which exceed the contract requirements. The Y267 EPDM compound, particularly, has generated interest because of its good performance, economic pricing of constituents and good processability. Several successful downhole and laboratory trials of Y267 EPDM have occurred at moderate and extremely high temperatures. Otis Engineering tested a Y267 packer seal at 302/sup 0/C (575/sup 0/F) for five days.more » The Y267 seal in an Otis packer was subsequently run in a Bakersfield continuous steam injection well at about 204/sup 0/C (400/sup 0/F) for 5 months. The same model packers and elements were run in Union Geothermal wells at the Baca, NM where hydraulic stimulation and diagnostics occurred at 160 to 171/sup 0/C (320 to 340/sup 0/F). Los Alamos National Laboratory tested the Y267 EPDM O-rings for a cablehead. Tests were first run in an autoclave with water and Mobil One oil to temperatures in excess of 340/sup 0/C (644/sup 0/F). The Y267 equipped cablehead was subsequently run at Fenton Hill at 317/sup 0/C (603/sup 0/F). A new casing packer concept for 371/sup 0/C (700/sup 0/F) production service is now undergoing full-scale prototype development.« less

  9. Massively Parallel Simulations of Diffusion in Dense Polymeric Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Faulon, Jean-Loup, Wilcox, R.T.

    1997-11-01

    An original computational technique to generate close-to-equilibrium dense polymeric structures is proposed. Diffusion of small gases are studied on the equilibrated structures using massively parallel molecular dynamics simulations running on the Intel Teraflops (9216 Pentium Pro processors) and Intel Paragon(1840 processors). Compared to the current state-of-the-art equilibration methods this new technique appears to be faster by some orders of magnitude.The main advantage of the technique is that one can circumvent the bottlenecks in configuration space that inhibit relaxation in molecular dynamics simulations. The technique is based on the fact that tetravalent atoms (such as carbon and silicon) fit in themore » center of a regular tetrahedron and that regular tetrahedrons can be used to mesh the three-dimensional space. Thus, the problem of polymer equilibration described by continuous equations in molecular dynamics is reduced to a discrete problem where solutions are approximated by simple algorithms. Practical modeling applications include the constructing of butyl rubber and ethylene-propylene-dimer-monomer (EPDM) models for oxygen and water diffusion calculations. Butyl and EPDM are used in O-ring systems and serve as sealing joints in many manufactured objects. Diffusion coefficients of small gases have been measured experimentally on both polymeric systems, and in general the diffusion coefficients in EPDM are an order of magnitude larger than in butyl. In order to better understand the diffusion phenomena, 10, 000 atoms models were generated and equilibrated for butyl and EPDM. The models were submitted to a massively parallel molecular dynamics simulation to monitor the trajectories of the diffusing species.« less

  10. Soft x-ray spectroscopy of high pressure liquid

    DOE PAGES

    Qiao, Ruimin; Xia, Yujian; Feng, Xuefei; ...

    2018-01-01

    Here, we describe a new experimental technique that allows for soft x-ray spectroscopy studies (~100-1000 eV) of high pressure liquid (~100 bars). We achieve this through a liquid cell with a 100 nm-thick Si 3N 4 membrane window, which is sandwiched by two identical O-rings for vacuum sealing. The thin Si 3N 4 membrane allows soft x-rays to penetrate, while separating the high-pressure liquid under investigation from the vacuum required for soft x-ray transmission and detection. The burst pressure of the Si 3N 4 membrane increases with decreasing size and more specifically is inversely proportional to the side length ofmore » the square window. It also increases proportionally with the membrane thickness. Pressures > 60 bars could be achieved for 100 nm-thick square Si 3N 4 windows that are smaller than 65 μm. However, above a certain pressure, the failure of the Si wafer becomes the limiting factor. The failure pressure of the Si wafer is sensitive to the wafer thickness. Moreover, the deformation of the Si 3N 4 membrane is quantified using vertical scanning interferometry. As an example of the performance of the high-pressure liquid cell optimized for total-fluorescence detected soft x-ray absorption spectroscopy (sXAS), the sXAS spectra at the Ca L edge (~350 eV) of a CaCl 2 aqueous solution are collected under different pressures up to 41 bars.« less

  11. The hydration dependence of CaCO3 absorption lines in the Far IR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, Johnny; Emery, Logan P

    2014-06-01

    The far infrared (FIR) absorption lines of CaCO3 have been measured at a range of relative humidities (RH) between 33 and 92% RH using a Bruker 66v/S spectrometer. Hydration measurements on CaCO3 have been made in the mid-infrared (MIR) by [Al-Hosney, H.A. and Grassian, V.H., 2005, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 7, 1266], and astrophysically-motivated temperature-dependent FIR measurements of CaCO3 in vacuum have also been reported [Posch, T., et al., 2007, Ap. J., 668, 993]. The custom sample cell constructed for these hydrated-FIR spectra is required because the 66v/S bench is under vacuum (3 mbar) during typical measurements. Briefly, the sample cell consists of two Thalium Bromoiodide (KRS-5) windows, four O-rings, a plastic ring for separating the windows and providing a volume for the saturated atmosphere. CaCO3 was deposited on KRS-5 windows using doubly-distilled water as an intermediary. The KRS-5 window with sample and assembled sample cell were placed in a desiccator with the appropriated saturated salt solution [Washburn, E.W. (Ed.), International Critical Tables of Numerical Data, Physics Chemistry and Technology, Vol. 1, (McGraw-Hill, New York, 1926), p. 67-68] and allowed to hydrate for 23 hours. For spectroscopy the desiccator was quickly opened and the second KRS-5 window placed in the cell to seal the chamber. A spectrum was then taken of the sample at the appropriate RH. The spectra taken characterize the adsorption of water vapor and CaCO3 that might occur in circumstellar environments [Melnick, G.J., et al. 2001, Nature, 412, 160].The MIR and FIR reflectance spectra of calcite (CaCO3) have been thoroughly studied by [Hellwege, K.H., et al., 1970, Z. Physik, 232, 61]. Five Lorentzian curves were fit to our data in the range from 378-222 cm-1/SUP> and each was able to be assigned to a known mode of CaCO3. The data does not support the conclusion of a hydration effect on these modes of CaCO3, but it does suggest a possible broadening of three modes

  12. Very-Low-Cost, Rugged Vacuum System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kline-Schoder, Robert; Sorensen, Paul; Passow, Christian; Bilski, Steve

    2013-01-01

    (turbo molecular pump) rotor and stator blades. Also, the symmetry of the rotor is such that dynamic balancing of the rotor is greatly simplified. Finally, because of the simplified design, the number of parts in the unit is cut by nearly a factor of three. In fact, there are only five parts, not counting the motor and off-the-shelf screws and O-rings. This reduces the amount of machining and also makes fit-up much simpler while allowing the maintenance of close tolerances.

  13. Preparation, characterization and application of urease nanoparticles for construction of an improved potentiometric urea biosensor.

    PubMed

    Jakhar, Seema; Pundir, C S

    2018-02-15

    The nanoparticles (NPs) aggregates of commercial urease from jack beans (Canavalia ensiformis) were prepared by desolvation and glutaraldehyde crosslinking and functionalized by cysteamine dihydrochloride. These enzyme nanoparticles (ENPs) were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), UV and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The TEM images of urease NPs showed their size in the range, 18-100nm with an average of 51.2nm. The ENPs were more active and stable with a longer shelf life than native enzyme molecules. The ENPs were immobilized onto chitosan (CHIT) activated nitrocellulose (NC) membrane via glutaraldehyde coupling with 32.22% retention of initial activity of free ureaseNPs with a conjugation yield of 1.63mg/cm 2 . This NC membrane was mounted at the lower/sensitive end of the ammonium ion selective electrode (AISE) with O-ring and then electrode was connected to a digital pH meter to construct a potentiometric urea biosensor. The biosensor exhibited optimum response within 10s at pH 5.5and 40°C. The biosensor was employed for measurement of potentiometric determination of urea in sera of apparently healthy and persons suffering from kidney disorders. The biosensor displayed a low detection limit of 1µM/L with a wide working range of 2-80µM/L (0.002-0.08mM) and sensitivity of 23mV/decade. The analytical recovery of added urea in serum was 106.33%. The within and between-batch coefficient of variations (CVs) of present biosensor were 0.18% and 0.32% respectively. There was a good correlation (r = 0.99) between sera urea values obtained by reference method (Enzymic colorimetric kit method) and the present biosensor. The biosensor had negligible interference from Na + ,K + ,NH +4 and Ca 2+ but Mg 2+ ,Cu 2+ and ascorbic acid but had slight interference, which was overcome by specific ion selective electrode. The ENPs bound NC membrane was used maximally 8-9 times per day over a period of 180 days, when stored in 0.01M sodium

  14. Electrochemical sensor with flavin-containing monooxygenase for triethylamine solution.

    PubMed

    Saito, Hirokazu; Shirai, Takeshi; Kudo, Hiroyuki; Mitsubayashi, Kohji

    2008-06-01

    A bioelectronic sensor for triethylamine (TEA) was developed with a flavin-containing monooxygenase type 3 (FMO-3). The TEA biosensor consisted of a Clark-type dissolved-oxygen electrode and an FMO-3 immobilized membrane. The FMO-3 solution was mixed with a poly(vinyl alcohol) containing stilbazolium groups (PVA-SbQ), coated on to the dialysis membrane, and the membrane was irradiated with a fluorescent light to immobilize the enzyme. In order to amplify the biosensor output, a substrate regeneration cycle, obtained by coupling the monooxygenase with L-ascorbic acid (AsA) as reducing reagent system, was applied. The effect of pH on the determination of TEA was studied. The maximum response was achieved at pH >9.0. A drop of the phosphate buffer solution with the AsA was put on the sensing area of the oxygen electrode, and the FMO-3 immobilized membrane was placed on the oxygen electrode and covered with a supporting Nylon mesh net which was secured with a silicone O-ring. A measurement system for TEA solution was constructed using the FMO-3 biosensor, a personal computer, a computer-controlled potentiostat, and an A/D converter. The FMO-3 biosensor was used to measure TEA solution from 0.5 to 4.0 mmol L(-1) with 10.0 mmol L(-1) AsA. The biosensor also had good reproducibility, for example a 6.31% coefficient of variation for five measurements, and the output current was maintained over a few hours. In order to improve the selectivity of the TEA biosensor, three type of biosensor with FMO isomer types 1, 3, and 5 were constructed and used to measure nitrogen and sulfur compounds. The outputs of the isomer biosensors indicated individual patterns for each sample solution. The selectivity of TEA biosensor would be improved, and determination of sulfur and nitrogen compounds would be possible, by using the different output of biosensors prepared from different FMO isomers.

  15. Self-powered switch-controlled nucleic acid extraction system.

    PubMed

    Han, Kyungsup; Yoon, Yong-Jin; Shin, Yong; Park, Mi Kyoung

    2016-01-07

    Over the past few decades, lab-on-a-chip (LOC) technologies have played a great role in revolutionizing the way in vitro medical diagnostics are conducted and transforming bulky and expensive laboratory instruments and labour-intensive tests into easy to use, cost-effective miniaturized systems with faster analysis time, which can be used for near-patient or point-of-care (POC) tests. Fluidic pumps and valves are among the key components for LOC systems; however, they often require on-line electrical power or batteries and make the whole system bulky and complex, therefore limiting its application to POC testing especially in low-resource setting. This is particularly problematic for molecular diagnostics where multi-step sample processing (e.g. lysing, washing, elution) is necessary. In this work, we have developed a self-powered switch-controlled nucleic acid extraction system (SSNES). The main components of SSNES are a powerless vacuum actuator using two disposable syringes and a switchgear made of PMMA blocks and an O-ring. In the vacuum actuator, an opened syringe and a blocked syringe are bound together and act as a working syringe and an actuating syringe, respectively. The negative pressure in the opened syringe is generated by a restoring force of the compressed air inside the blocked syringe and utilized as the vacuum source. The Venus symbol shape of the switchgear provides multiple functions including being a reagent reservoir, a push-button for the vacuum actuator, and an on-off valve. The SSNES consists of three sets of vacuum actuators, switchgears and microfluidic components. The entire system can be easily fabricated and is fully disposable. We have successfully demonstrated DNA extraction from a urine sample using a dimethyl adipimidate (DMA)-based extraction method and the performance of the DNA extraction has been confirmed by genetic (HRAS) analysis of DNA biomarkers from the extracted DNAs using the SSNES. Therefore, the SSNES can be widely

  16. Normal-Mode Analysis of Circular DNA at the Base-Pair Level. 2. Large-Scale Configurational Transformation of a Naturally Curved Molecule.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Atsushi; Tobias, Irwin; Olson, Wilma K

    2005-01-01

    Fine structural and energetic details embedded in the DNA base sequence, such as intrinsic curvature, are important to the packaging and processing of the genetic material. Here we investigate the internal dynamics of a 200 bp closed circular molecule with natural curvature using a newly developed normal-mode treatment of DNA in terms of neighboring base-pair "step" parameters. The intrinsic curvature of the DNA is described by a 10 bp repeating pattern of bending distortions at successive base-pair steps. We vary the degree of intrinsic curvature and the superhelical stress on the molecule and consider the normal-mode fluctuations of both the circle and the stable figure-8 configuration under conditions where the energies of the two states are similar. To extract the properties due solely to curvature, we ignore other important features of the double helix, such as the extensibility of the chain, the anisotropy of local bending, and the coupling of step parameters. We compare the computed normal modes of the curved DNA model with the corresponding dynamical features of a covalently closed duplex of the same chain length constructed from naturally straight DNA and with the theoretically predicted dynamical properties of a naturally circular, inextensible elastic rod, i.e., an O-ring. The cyclic molecules with intrinsic curvature are found to be more deformable under superhelical stress than rings formed from naturally straight DNA. As superhelical stress is accumulated in the DNA, the frequency, i.e., energy, of the dominant bending mode decreases in value, and if the imposed stress is sufficiently large, a global configurational rearrangement of the circle to the figure-8 form takes place. We combine energy minimization with normal-mode calculations of the two states to decipher the configurational pathway between the two states. We also describe and make use of a general analytical treatment of the thermal fluctuations of an elastic rod to characterize the

  17. Geometric Verification of Dynamic Wave Arc Delivery With the Vero System Using Orthogonal X-ray Fluoroscopic Imaging.

    PubMed

    Burghelea, Manuela; Verellen, Dirk; Poels, Kenneth; Gevaert, Thierry; Depuydt, Tom; Tournel, Koen; Hung, Cecilia; Simon, Viorica; Hiraoka, Masahiro; de Ridder, Mark

    2015-07-15

    The purpose of this study was to define an independent verification method based on on-board orthogonal fluoroscopy to determine the geometric accuracy of synchronized gantry-ring (G/R) rotations during dynamic wave arc (DWA) delivery available on the Vero system. A verification method for DWA was developed to calculate O-ring-gantry (G/R) positional information from ball-bearing positions retrieved from fluoroscopic images of a cubic phantom acquired during DWA delivery. Different noncoplanar trajectories were generated in order to investigate the influence of path complexity on delivery accuracy. The G/R positions detected from the fluoroscopy images (DetPositions) were benchmarked against the G/R angulations retrieved from the control points (CP) of the DWA RT plan and the DWA log files recorded by the treatment console during DWA delivery (LogActed). The G/R rotational accuracy was quantified as the mean absolute deviation ± standard deviation. The maximum G/R absolute deviation was calculated as the maximum 3-dimensional distance between the CP and the closest DetPositions. In the CP versus DetPositions comparison, an overall mean G/R deviation of 0.13°/0.16° ± 0.16°/0.16° was obtained, with a maximum G/R deviation of 0.6°/0.2°. For the LogActed versus DetPositions evaluation, the overall mean deviation was 0.08°/0.15° ± 0.10°/0.10° with a maximum G/R of 0.3°/0.4°. The largest decoupled deviations registered for gantry and ring were 0.6° and 0.4° respectively. No directional dependence was observed between clockwise and counterclockwise rotations. Doubling the dose resulted in a double number of detected points around each CP, and an angular deviation reduction in all cases. An independent geometric quality assurance approach was developed for DWA delivery verification and was successfully applied on diverse trajectories. Results showed that the Vero system is capable of following complex G/R trajectories with maximum deviations during DWA

  18. EFFECTS OF GAMMA IRRADIATION ON EPDM ELASTOMERS

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, E.

    Two formulations of EPDM elastomer, one substituting a UV stabilizer for the normal antioxidant in this polymer, and the other the normal formulation, were synthesized and samples of each were exposed to gamma irradiation in initially pure deuterium gas to compare their radiation stability. Stainless steel containers having rupture disks were designed for this task. After 130 MRad dose of cobalt-60 radiation in the SRNL Gamma Irradiation Facility, a significant amount of gas was created by radiolysis; however the composition indicated by mass spectroscopy indicated an unexpected increase in the total amount deuterium in both formulations. The irradiated samples retainedmore » their ductility in a bend test. No change of sample weight, dimensions, or density was observed. No change of the glass transition temperature as measured by dynamic mechanical analysis was observed, and most of the other dynamic mechanical properties remained unchanged. There appeared to be an increase in the storage modulus of the irradiated samples containing the UV stabilizer above the glass transition, which may indicate hardening of the material by radiation damage. Polymeric materials become damaged by exposure over time to ionizing radiation. Despite the limited lifetime, polymers have unique engineering material properties and polymers continue to be used in tritium handling systems. In tritium handling systems, polymers are employed mainly in joining applications such as valve sealing surfaces (eg. Stem tips, valve packing, and O-rings). Because of the continued need to employ polymers in tritium systems, over the past several years, programs at the Savannah River National Laboratory have been studying the effect of tritium on various polymers of interest. In these studies, samples of materials of interest to the SRS Tritium Facilities (ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMW-PE), polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE, Teflon{reg_sign}), Vespel{reg_sign} polyimide, and the elastomer

  19. REQUIREMENTS AND GUIDELINES FOR NSLS EXPERIMENTAL BEAM LINE VACUUM SYSTEMS-REVISION B.

    SciTech Connect

    FOERSTER,C.

    of front ends. O-ring-sealed valves, if used, are not permitted upstream of the monochromator exit aperture. It will be the responsibility of users to demonstrate that their experiment will not degrade the pressure or quality of the storage ring vacuum. As a matter of operating policy, all beam lines will be monitored for prescribed pressure and the contribution of high mass gases to this pressure each time a beam line has been opened to ring vacuum.« less

  20. Anatomical relationship between traditional acupuncture point ST 36 and Omura's ST 36 (True ST 36) with their therapeutic effects: 1) inhibition of cancer cell division by markedly lowering cancer cell telomere while increasing normal cell telomere, 2) improving circulatory disturbances, with reduction of abnormal increase in high triglyceride, L-homocystein, CRP, or cardiac troponin I & T in blood by the stimulation of Omura's ST 36--Part 1.

    PubMed

    Omura, Yoshiaki; Chen, Yemeng; Lu, Dominic P; Shimotsura, Yasuhiro; Ohki, Motomu; Duvvi, Harsha

    2007-01-01

    Using Bi-Digital O-Ring Test Resonance Phenomena between 2 identical substances, Omura, Y. succeeded in making the image of the outline of internal organs without use of standard imaging devices since 1982. When he imaged the outline of the stomach on the abdominal wall, a number of the lines came out from upper and lower parts of stomach wall. When the lines were followed, they were very close to the well-known stomach meridians. Subsequently, he found a method of localizing meridians and their corresponding acupuncture points as well as shapes and diameters accurately. At the anatomical location of ST 36 described in traditional textbooks, Omura, Y. found there is no acupuncture point. However, in the close vicinity, there is an acupuncture point which he named as true ST 36 in the mid 1980s, but it is generally known as Omura's ST 36. When the effects of the acupuncture on these 2 locations were compared, Omura's ST 36 (true ST 36) produced very significant well-known acupuncture beneficial effects including improved circulation and blood chemistry, while in the traditional ST 36, the effects were small. In this article, the anatomical relationship between these two acupuncture points, with a short distance of 0.6 approximately 1.5 cm between the centers of these locations, was described. In early 2000, Omura, Y. found Press Needle Stimulation of Omura's ST 36, using "Press-Release" procedure repeated 200 times, 4 times a day to cancer patients reduced high cancer cell telomere of 600-1500ng and high Oncogen C-fos Ab2 and Integrin alpha5beta1 of 100-700ng BDORT units to close to lyg (= 10(-24) g) BDORT units. In addition there was a significant reduction of Asbestos and Hg from cancer cells, while markedly reduced normal cell telomere of lyg was increased to optimally high amounts of 500-530ng BDORTunits. Thus, cancer cells can no longer divide and cancer activity is inhibited. The authors have successfully applied this method for a variety of cancers as well as

  1. Resonant Acoustic Measurement of Vapor Phase Transport Phenomenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuhmann, R. J.; Garrett, S. L.; Matson, J. V.

    2002-12-01

    A major impediment to accurate non steady-state diffusion measurements is the ability to accurately measure and track a rapidly changing gas concentration without disturbing the system. Non-destructive methods that do not interfere with system dynamics have been developed in the past. These methods, however, have tended to be cumbersome or inaccurate at low concentrations. A new experimental approach has been developed to measure gaseous diffusion in free air and through porous materials. The method combines the traditional non steady-state laboratory methodology with resonant acoustic gas analysis. A phase-locked-loop (PLL) resonance frequency tracker is combined with a thermally insulated copper resonator. A piston sealed with a metal bellows excites the fundamental standing wave resonance of the resonator. The PLL maintains a constant phase difference (typically 90§) between the accelerometer mounted on the piston and a microphone near the piston to track the resonance frequency in real time. A capillary or glass bead filled core is fitted into an o-ring sealed opening at the end of the resonator opposite the bellows. The rate at which the tracer gas is replaced by air within the resonator is controlled by the diffusion coefficient of the gas in free air through the capillary (DA) or by the effective diffusion coefficient of the gas through the core (De). The mean molecular weight of the gas mixture in the resonator is directly determined six times each minute from the ratio of the absolute temperature to the square of the fundamental acoustic resonance frequency. Average system stability (temperature divided by frequency squared) is better than 350 ppm. DA values for a 0.3-inch diameter capillary were in excellent agreement with published values. De values for porous media samples (0.5 mm glass beads) of four different lengths (1 through 4 inches) using three different tracer gases (He, CH4, Kr) will be reported. Comments will be offered regarding tracer gas

  2. Method for measuring changes in the atmospheric O2/N2 ratio by a gas chromatograph equipped with a thermal conductivity detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tohjima, Yasunori

    2000-06-01

    We present a method for measuring changes in the atmospheric O2/N2 ratio based on data from a gas chromatograph (GC) equipped with a thermal conductivity detector (TCD). In this method, O2 and N2 in an air sample are separated on a column filled with molecular sieve 5A with H2 carrier gas. Since the separated O2 includes Ar, which has a retention time similar to that of O2, the (O2+Ar)/N2 ratio is actually measured. The change in the measured (O2+Ar)/N2 ratio can be easily converted to that in the O2/N2 ratio with a very small error based on the fact that the atmospheric Ar/N2 ratio is almost constant. The improvements to achieve the high-precision measurement include stabilization of the pressure at the GC column head and at the outlets of the TCD and the sample loop. Additionally, the precision is improved statistically by repeating alternate analyses of sample and a reference gas. The standard deviation of the replicate cycles of reference and sample analyses is about 18 per meg (corresponding to 3.8 parts per million (ppm) O2 in air). This means that the standard error is about 7 per meg (1.5 ppm O2 in air) for seven cycles of alternate analyses, which takes about 70 min. The response of this method is likely to have a 2% nonlinearity. Ambient air samples are collected under pressure in glass flasks equipped with two stopcocks sealed by Viton O-rings at both ends. Pressure depletion in the flask during the O2/N2 measurement does not cause any detectable change in the O2/N2 ratio, but the O2/N2 ratio in the flask was found to gradually decrease during the storage period. We also present preliminary results from air samples collected at Hateruma Island (latitude 24°03'N, longitude 123°49') from July 1997 through March 1999. The observed O2/N2 ratios clearly show a seasonal variation, increasing in spring and summer and decreasing in autumn and winter.

  3. Simple New Method of Detecting Lies By Identifying Invisible Unique Physiological Reflex Response Appearing Often Less Than 10-15 Seconds on the Specific Parts of Face of Lying Person; Quick Screening of Potential Murderers & Problematic Persons.

    PubMed

    Omura, Yoshiaki; Nihrane, Abdallah; Lu, Dominic; Jones, Marilyn K; Shimotsuura, Yasuhiro; Ohki, Motomu

    2015-01-01

    Frequently, we cannot find any significant visible changes when somebody lies, but we found there are significant invisible changes appearing in specific areas of the face when somebody lies and their location often depends on whether the lie is serious with or without physical violence involvement. These abnormalities were detected non-invasively at areas: 1) lobules and c) a small round area of each upper lateral side of forehead; 2) the skin between the base of the 2 orifices of the nose and the upper end of upper lip and 3) Alae of both sides of nose. These invisible significant changes usually last less than 15 seconds after telling a lie. In these areas, Bi-Digital O-Ring Test (BDORT), which received a U.S. Patent in 1993, became significantly weak with an abnormal value of (-)7 and TXB2, measured non-invasively, was increased from 0.125-0.5ng to 12.5-15ng (within the first 5 seconds) and then went back down to less than 1ng (after 15 seconds). These unique changes can be documented semi-permanently by taking photographs of the face of people who tell a lie, within as short as 10 seconds after saying a lying statement. These abnormal responses appear in one or more of the above-mentioned 3 areas 1), 2) & 3). At least one abnormal pupil with BDORT of (-)8-(-)12 & marked reduction in Acetylcholine and abnormal increase in any of 3 Alzheimer's disease associated factors Apolipoprotein (Apo) E4, β-Amyloid (1-42), Tau protein, viral and bacterial infections were detected in both pupils and forehead of murderers and people who often have problems with others. Analysis of well-known typical examples of recent mass murderers was presented as examples. Using these findings, potential murderers and people who are very likely to develop problems with others can be screened within 5-10 minutes by examining their facial photographs and signatures before school admission or employment.

  4. Model 9975 Life Extension Test Package 3 - Interim Report - January 2017

    SciTech Connect

    Daugherty, W.

    2017-01-31

    Life extension package LE3 (9975-03203) has been instrumented and subjected to an elevated temperature environment for approximately 8 years. During this time, the cane fiberboard has been maintained at a maximum temperature of ~160 - 165 °F, which was established by a combination of internal (19 watts) and external heat sources. Several tests and parameters were used to characterize the package components. Results from these tests generally indicate agreement between this full-scale shipping package and small-scale laboratory tests on fiberboard samples, including the degradation models based on the laboratory tests. These areas of agreement include the rate of change ofmore » fiberboard weight, dimensions and density, and change in fiberboard thermal conductivity. Corrosion of the lead shield occurred at a high rate during the first several weeks of aging, but dropped significantly after most of the moisture in the fiberboard migrated away from the lead shield. Dimensional measurements of the lead shield indicate that no significant creep deformation has occurred. This is consistent with literature data that predict a very small creep deformation for the time at temperature experienced by this package. The SCV O-rings were verified to remain leak-tight after ~5 years aging at an average temperature of ~170 °F. This package provides an example of the extent to which moisture within a typical fiberboard assembly can redistribute in the presence of a temperature gradient such as might be created by a 19 watt internal heat load. The majority of water within the fiberboard migrated to the bottom layers of fiberboard, with approximately 2 kg of water (2 liters) eventually escaping from the package. Two conditions have developed that are not consistent with package certification requirements. The axial gap at the top of the package increased to a maximum value of 1.549 inches, exceeding the 1 inch criterion. In addition, staining and/or corrosion have formed in a

  5. Effects of Low Earth Orbit on Docking Seal Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imka, Emily C.; Asmar, Olivia C.; deGroh, Henry C., III; Banks, Bruce A.

    2014-01-01

    Spacecraft docking seals are typically made of silicone elastomers. When such seals are exposed to low Earth orbit (LEO) conditions, they can suffer damage from ultraviolet (UV) radiation and atomic oxygen (AO, or monoatomic oxygen, the predominant oxygen species in LEO). An experiment flew on the International Space Station (ISS) to measure the effects of LEO on seal materials S0383-70 and ELA-SA-401 and various mating counterface materials which included anodized aluminum. Samples flown in different orientations received different amounts of UV and AO. The hypotheses were that most of the damage would be from UV, and 10 days or more of exposure in LEO would badly damage the seals. Eighteen seals were exposed for 543 days in ram (windward), zenith (away from Earth), or wake (leeward) orientations, and 15 control samples (not flown) provided undamaged baseline leakage. To determine post-flight leak rates, each of the 33 seals were placed in an O-ring groove of a leak test fixture and pressure tested over time. Resistance temperature detectors (RTDs), pressure transducers, and LabVIEW (National Instruments) programs were used to measure and analyze the temperature and pressure and calculate leakage. Average leakage of control samples was 2.6 x 10(exp -7) lbs/day. LEO exposure did not considerably damage ELA-SA-401. The S0383-70 flight samples leaked at least 10 times more than ELA-SA-401 in all cases except one, demonstrating that ELA-SA-401 may be a more suitable sealing material in LEO. AO caused greater damage than UV; samples in ram orientation (receiving an AO fluence of 4.3 x 10(exp 21) atoms/(sq cm) and in wake (2.9x 10(exp 20) atoms/(sq cm)) leaked more than those in zenith orientation (1.58 x 10(exp 20) atoms/(sq cm)), whereas variations in UV exposure did not seem to affect the samples. Exposure to LEO did less damage to the seals than hypothesized, and the data did not support the conjecture that UV causes more damage than AO.

  6. 9975 SHIPPING PACKAGE LIFE EXTENSION SURVEILLANCE PROGRAM RESULTS SUMMARY

    SciTech Connect

    Daugherty, W.; Dunn, K.; Hackney, B.

    2011-01-06

    Results from the 9975 Surveillance Program at the Savannah River Site (SRS) are summarized for justification to extend the life of the 9975 packages currently stored in the K-Area Materials Storage (KAMS) facility from 10 years to 15 years. This justification is established with the stipulation that surveillance activities will continue throughout this extended time to ensure the continued integrity of the 9975 materials of construction and to further understand the currently identified degradation mechanisms. The current 10 year storage life was developed prior to storage. A subsequent report was later used to extend the qualification of the 9975 shippingmore » packages for 2 years for shipping plus 10 years for storage. However the qualification for the storage period was provided by the monitoring requirements of the Storage and Surveillance Program. This report summarizes efforts to determine a new safe storage limit for the 9975 shipping package based on the surveillance data collected since 2005 when the surveillance program began. KAMS is a zero-release facility that depends upon containment by the 9975 to meet design basis storage requirements. Therefore, to confirm the continued integrity of the 9975 packages while stored in KAMS, a 9975 Storage and Surveillance Program was implemented alongside the DOE required Integrated Surveillance Program (ISP) for 3013 plutonium-bearing containers. The 9975 Storage and Surveillance Program performs field surveillance as well as accelerated aging tests to ensure any degradation due to aging, to the extent that could affect packaging performance, is detected in advance of such degradation occurring in the field. The Program has demonstrated that the 9975 package has a robust design that can perform under a variety of conditions. As such the primary emphasis of the on-going 9975 Surveillance Program is an aging study of the 9975 Viton(reg.sign) GLT containment vessel O-rings and the Celotex(reg.sign) fiberboard

  7. Free-Piston Stirling Power Conversion Unit for Fission Power System, Phase II Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, J. Gary; Stanley, John

    2016-01-01

    In Phase II, the manufacture and testing of two 6-kW(sub e)Stirling engines was completed. The engines were delivered in an opposed 12-kW(sub e) arrangement with a common expansion space heater head. As described in the Phase I report, the engines were designed to be sealed both hermetically and with a bolted O-ring seal. The completed Phase II convertor is in the bolted configuration to allow future disassembly. By the end of Phase II, the convertor had passed all of the final testing requirements in preparation for delivery to the NASA Glenn Research Center. The electronic controller also was fabricated and tested during Phase II. The controller sets both piston amplitudes and maintains the phasing between them. It also sets the operating frequency of the machine. Details of the controller are described in the Phase I final report. Fabrication of the direct-current to direct-current (DC-DC) output stage, which would have stepped down the main controller output voltage from 700 to 120 V(sub DC), was omitted from this phase of the project for budgetary reasons. However, the main controller was successfully built, tested with the engines, and delivered. We experienced very few development issues with this high-power controller. The project extended significantly longer than originally planned because of yearly funding delays. The team also experienced several hardware difficulties along the development path. Most of these were related to the different thermal expansions of adjacent parts constructed of different materials. This issue was made worse by the large size of the machine. Thermal expansion problems also caused difficulties in the brazing of the opposed stainless steel sodium-potassium (NaK) heater head. Despite repeated attempts Sunpower was not able to successfully braze the opposed head under this project. Near the end of the project, Glenn fabricated an opposed Inconel NaK head, which was installed prior to delivery for testing at Glenn. Engine

  8. SU-F-T-496: An Investigation of Two Novel Devices for Testing Linac Clearance During CT Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Morrow, A; Massingill, B

    Purpose: This work’s objective is to determine the efficacy of two newly patented devices termed the Mor-O rings, Mark1 and Mark2, developed to predict collisions between the patient and a linac at the time of CT simulation. Methods: Mark1: A ring with an inner radius equal to the distance between the isocenter and the nearest portion of a linac head(diso) was made. This is mounted to a stand that allows vertical repositioning. The ring is placed around the patient on the CT table and aligned with isocenter. The patient is moved through the ring. If the ring touches the patient,more » a collision is predicted. To test this device, predicted collisions were marked on a phantom. The phantom was then repositioned on the linac table where the collisions were verified. Mark2: An arc with the radius diso was created with a re-locatable half-linac head wire-frame. The Mark2 is positioned in the same way as the Mark1 but can additionally mimic couch and gantry angulations. The Mark2 was tested with a volunteer using multiple couch, gantry and isocenter positions. The volunteer was then repositioned on the linac table to verify the angles of collisions. Results: Mark1: One isocenter out of ten showed negative clearance (0.9mm) on the linac table. All other collisions were predicted with 1 to 36mm of additional clearance. Mark2: All collisions were prevented with an additional 1.3 to 14.8 degrees of clearance. Conclusion: The Mark1 prototype is able to predict all collisions when no couch angulation is used. This device takes less than a minute to setup and is simple to use. The Mark2, when testing beam geometries used for noncoplanar SBRT, was able to prevent all collisions with 1.3 to 14.8 degrees additional clearance. Improvements in construction for both devices could increase accuracy and usability. Andrew Morrow owns Morrow Physics, LLC and Brian Massingill owns Spur Physics, LLC. We are both listed on the patent for the devices investigated in this work (patent

  9. What if Things Get Worse? Really Grand Challenges for Modeling and Simulation in a Risky and Complex World or Modeling and Simulation for the "Greater Good"?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fifrey, Priscilla

    2010-01-01

    Today Modeling and Simulation-- ---as an important practice or industry or area of expertise ----- is at a complex crossroad - a sort of cyber-highway--where these complexities meet-technical, economic, environmental, geopolitical and cultural. They may converge or collide. Let's not kid ourselves. It is all too much for anyone person or organization Malcolm Gladwell said it. "We have constructed a world in which the potential for high tech catastrophe is embedded in the fabric of everyday life." We are surrounded by problems that scream at us from our television, Internet and social networks along with billboards and protest signs. We face not just high tech catastrophes but, also, landslides, earthquakes, tornados, floods and hurricanes and large-scale criminality. Evil, war, famine and pestilence have not gone away. It is all too much to think about. My friend, George Peabody, who taught me everything I know about power said that addressing such issues requires that we constantly build our network, information resources and the credibility and visibility of our work. That is how we will build the power of simulation so it can change the world --even maybe, save it. We need all the help we can get and give one another because our human early warning systems appear to be out of kilter. We seem to have trouble imagining how small failings can continue to lead to catastrophic disaster. Think about O-rings and blowout preventers. One is reminded of the old nursery rhyme, "For want of a nail, a shoe was lost! for want of a shoe the horse was lost! for want of a rider the battle was lost and so the kingdom fell." Although the investigation will take more time for real answers, it is worrisome that a rig worker reported to the BBC that-- weeks before the explosion of Deep Ocean Horizon. -he identified a leak in the oil rig's safety equipment -the Control Pod of the blowout preventer which has giant shears designed to cut and seal off the well's main pipe. With both

  10. Simple, Affordable and Sustainable Borehole Observatories for Complex Monitoring Objectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopf, A.; Freudenthal, T.; Ratmeyer, V.; Wefer, G.

    2014-12-01

    Seafloor drill rigs are remotely operated systems that provide a cost effective means to recover sedimentary records of the upper sub-seafloor deposits. Recent increases in their payload included downhole logging tools or autoclave coring systems. We here report on another milestone in using seafloor rigs: The development and installation of shallow borehole observatories. Three different systems have been developed for the MeBo seafloor drill, which is operated by MARUM, Univ. Bremen, Germany. A simple design, the MeBoPLUG, separates the inner borehole from the overlying ocean by using o-ring seals at the conical threads of the drill pipe. The systems are self-contained and include data loggers, batteries, thermistors and a differential pressure sensor. A second design, the so-called MeBoCORK, is more sophisticated and also hosts an acoustic modem for data transfer and, if desired, fluid sampling capability using osmotic pumps. Of these MeBoCORKs, two systems have to be distinguished: The CORK-A (A = autonomous) can be installed by the MeBo alone and monitors pressure and temperature inside and above the borehole (the latter for reference). The CORK-B (B = bottom) has a higher payload and can additionally be equipped with geochemical, biological or other physical components. Owing to its larger size, it is installed by ROV and utilises a hotstab connection in the upper portion of the drill string. Either design relies on a hostab connection from beneath which coiled tubing with a conical drop weight is lowered to couple to the formation. These tubes are fluid-saturated and either serve to transmit pore pressure signals or collect pore water in the osmo-sampler. The third design, the MeBoPUPPI (Pop-Up Pore Pressure Instrument), is similar to the MeBoCORK-A and monitors pore pressure and temperature in a self-contained manner. Instead of transferring data upon command using an acoustic modem, the MeBoPUPPI contains a pop-up telemetry with Iridium link. After a

  11. STS-55 pad abort: Engine 2011 oxidizer preburner augmented spark igniter check valve leak

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    The STS-55 initial launch attempt of Columbia (OV102) was terminated on KSC launch pad A March 22, 1993 at 9:51 AM E.S.T. due to violation of an ME-3 (Engine 2011) Launch Commit Criteria (LCC) limit exceedance. The event description and timeline are summarized. Propellant loading was initiated on 22 March, 1993 at 1:15 AM EST. All SSME chill parameters and launch commit criteria (LCC) were nominal. At engine start plus 1.44 seconds, a Failure Identification (FID) was posted against Engine 2011 for exceeding the 50 psia Oxidizer Preburner (OPB) purge pressure redline. The engine was shut down at 1.50 seconds followed by Engines 2034 and 2030. All shut down sequences were nominal and the mission was safely aborted. The OPB purge pressure redline violation and the abort profile/overlay for all three engines are depicted. SSME Avionics hardware and software performed nominally during the incident. A review of vehicle data table (VDT) data and controller software logic revealed no failure indications other than the single FID 013-414, OPB purge pressure redline exceeded. Software logic was executed according to requirements and there was no anomalous controller software operation. Immediately following the abort, a Rocketdyne/NASA failure investigation team was assembled. The team successfully isolated the failure cause to the oxidizer preburner augmented spark igniter purge check valve not being fully closed due to contamination. The source of the contaminant was traced to a cut segment from a rubber O-ring which was used in a fine clean tool during valve production prior to 1992. The valve was apparently contaminated during its fabrication in 1985. The valve had performed acceptably on four previous flights of the engine, and SSME flight history shows 780 combined check valve flights without failure. The failure of an Engine 3 (SSME No. 2011) check valve to close was sensed by onboard engine instruments even though all other engine operations were normal. This

  12. SciTech Connect

    Chen, K.; Tsai, H.; Decision and Information Sciences

    The technical basis for extending the Model 9977 shipping package periodic maintenance beyond the one-year interval to a maximum of five years is based on the performance of the O-ring seals and the environmental conditions. The DOE Packaging Certification Program (PCP) has tasked Argonne National Laboratory to develop a Radio-Frequency Identification (RFID) temperature monitoring system for use by the facility personnel at DAF/NTS. The RFID temperature monitoring system, depicted in the figure below, consists of the Mk-1 RFId tags, a reader, and a control computer mounted on a mobile platform that can operate as a stand-alone system, or it canmore » be connected to the local IT network. As part of the Conditions of Approval of the CoC, the user must complete the prescribed training to become qualified and be certified for operation of the RFID temperature monitoring system. The training course will be administered by Argonne National Laboratory on behalf of the Headquarters Certifying Official. This is a complete documentation package for the RFID temperature monitoring system of the Model 9977 packagings at NTS. The documentation package will be used for training and certification. The table of contents are: Acceptance Testing Procedure of MK-1 RFID Tags for DOE/EM Nuclear Materials Management Applications; Acceptance Testing Result of MK-1 RFID Tags for DOE/EM Nuclear Materials Management Applications; Performance Test of the Single Bolt Seal Sensor for the Model 9977 Packaging; Calibration of Built-in Thermistors in RFID Tags for Nevada Test Site; Results of Calibration of Built-in Thermistors in RFID Tags; Results of Thermal Calibration of Second Batch of MK-I RFID Tags; Procedure for Installing and Removing MK-1 RFID Tag on Model 9977 Drum; User Guide for RFID Reader and Software for Temperature Monitoring of Model 9977 Drums at NTS; Software Quality Assurance Plan (SQAP) for the ARG-US System; Quality Category for the RFID Temperature Monitoring System

  13. Dynamic and static strength of an implant-supported overdenture model reinforced with metal and nonmetal strengtheners.

    PubMed

    Rached, Rodrigo Nunes; de Souza, Evelise Machado; Dyer, Scott R; Ferracane, Jack Liborio

    2011-11-01

    Fractures of overdentures occur in the denture base through the abutments. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of reinforcements and the space available for their placement on the dynamic and static loading capacity of a simulated implant-supported overdenture model. Rhomboidal (6 × 6 × 25 mm) test specimens (n=8), made with an acrylic resin and containing 2 metal O-ring capsules, were reinforced with braided stainless steel bar (BS), stainless steel mesh (SM), unidirectional E-glass fiber (GF), E-glass mesh (GM), woven polyethylene braids (PE), or polyaramid fibers (PA). Two distinct spaces for reinforcement placement were investigated: a 2.5 mm and a 1 mm space. Control groups consisted of nonreinforced specimens. Specimens were thermocycled (5°C and 55°C, 5,000 cycles) and then subjected to a 100,000 cyclic load regime. Unbroken specimens were then loaded until failure. The number of failures under fatigue (f) and static load (s) were compared with the Chi-Square test, while static load means were compared with the Kruskal-Wallis test (α=.05). The number of failures (f:s) of GF (0:16), PE (0:16), and PA (0:16) differed significantly from the control group (8:8) and SM (4:12) (P=.037 and P=.025, respectively). For the 2.5 mm space group, these same reinforcements also exhibited higher static load means than the control (P=.016, P=.003, and P=.003, respectively); under static load, no significant differences were detected between the reinforced groups and the control for the 1.0 mm space group (P=1.0). E-glass fibers, woven polyethylene braids, and polyaramid fibers withstood the fatigue regime and increased the flexural strength of the implant-supported overdenture model. The spaces available for reinforcement did not affect the dynamic strength or the static loading capacity of the implant-supported overdenture model. Copyright © 2011 The Editorial Council of the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Effect of Altered Gravity Environment on Tobacco Hornworm (Manduca Sexta) Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tischler, Marc E.

    1996-01-01

    sealing the top and bottom lids of the canisters with an 0-ring and with vacuum grease caused the insects to stop developing because of accumulation of carbon dioxide. Even though removing both the O-rings and vacuum grease permitted normal development, there was still some increase in carbon dioxide levels. Consequently, the canisters were vented and the vents covered with gas permeable membrane.

  15. A Rapid Survey of the Compatibility of Selected Seal Materials with Conventional and Semi-Synthetic JP-8

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graham, John L.; Striebich, Richard C.; Minus, Donald K.; Harrison, William E., III

    2007-01-01

    of the fuel absorbed in fuel-wetted materials through the use of GC-MS analysis of swollen samples as well as other supporting data. In this presentation the authors will present a summary of the results of the volume swell and fuel absorbed by selected O-rings and sealants as well as a description of the measurement protocols developed for this program.

  16. Palladium complexes of a phosphorus ylide with two stabilizing groups: synthesis, structure, and DFT study of the bonding modes.

    PubMed

    Falvello, Larry R; Ginés, Juan Carlos; Carbó, Jorge J; Lledós, Agustí; Navarro, Rafael; Soler, Tatiana; Urriolabeitia, Esteban P

    2006-08-21

    The phosphorus ylide ligand [Ph3P=C(CO2Me)C(=NPh)CO2Me] (L1) has been prepared and fully characterized by spectroscopic, crystallographic, and density functional theory (DFT) methods (B3LYP level). The reactivity of L1 toward several cationic Pd(II) and Pt(II) precursors, with two vacant coordination sites, has been studied. The reaction of [M(C/\\X)(THF)2]ClO4 with L1 (1:1 molar ratio) gives [M(C/\\X)(L1)]ClO4 [M = Pd, C/\\X = C6H4CH2NMe2 (1), S-C6H4C(H)MeNMe2 (2), CH2-8-C9H6N (3), C6H4-2-NC5H4 (4), o-CH2C6H4P(o-tol)2 (6), eta3-C3H5 (7); M = Pt, C/\\X = o-CH2C6H4P(o-tol)2 (5); M(C/\\X) = Pd(C6F5)(SC4H8) (8), PdCl2 (9)]. In complexes 1-9, the ligand L1 bonds systematically to the metal center through the iminic N and the carbonyl O of the stabilizing CO2Me group, as is evident from the NMR data and from the X-ray structure of 3. Ligand L1 can also be orthopalladated by reaction with Pd(OAc)2 and LiCl, giving the dinuclear derivative [Pd(mu-Cl)(C6H4-2-PPh2=C(CO2Me)C(CO2Me)=NPh)]2 (10). The X-ray crystal structure of 10 is also reported. In none of the prepared complexes 1-10 was the C(alpha) atom found to be bonded to the metal center. DFT calculations and Bader analysis were performed on ylide L1 and complex 9 and its congeners in order to assess the preference of the six-membered N,O metallacycle over the four-membered C,N and five-membered C,O rings. The presence of two stabilizing groups at the ylidic C causes a reduction of its bonding capabilities. The increasing strength of the Pd-C, Pd-O, and Pd-N bonds along with other subtle effects are responsible for the relative stabilities of the different bonding modes.

  17. Investigating Low Temperature Properties of Rubber Seals - 13020

    SciTech Connect

    Jaunich, M.; Wolff, D.; Stark, W.

    To achieve the required tightness levels of containers for low and intermediate level radioactive wastes rubbers are widely applied as main sealing materials. The save encapsulation of the radioactive container contents has to be guaranteed according to legislation and appropriate guidelines for long storage periods as well as down to temperatures of -40 deg. C during transportation. Therefore the understanding of failure mechanisms that lead to leakage at low temperatures is of high importance. It is known that the material properties of rubbers are strongly influenced by temperature. At low temperatures this is caused by the rubber-glass transition (abbr. glassmore » transition). During continuous cooling the material changes from rubber-like entropy-elastic to stiff energy-elastic behaviour, that allows nearly no strain or retraction. Therefore, rubbers are normally used above their glass transition but the minimum working temperature limit is not defined precisely, what can cause problems during application. The temperature range where full functionality is possible is strongly dependent on the application conditions and the material. For this investigation mainly ethylene propylene diene (EPDM) and fluorocarbon rubbers (FKM) were selected as they are often used for radioactive waste containers. Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) and Dynamic Mechanical Analysis (DMA) are typically used for the determination of the temperature range of the glass transition process. The standardized compression set measurement according to ISO 815 is common for investigation of rubber sealing materials as the test simulates the seal behaviour after release. To reduce the test time of the standard tests a faster technique giving the same information was developed. Additionally, the breakdown temperature of the sealing function of complete O-ring seals is measured in a component test setup to compare it with the results of the other tests. The experimental setup is capable

  18. Facility and Methods Developed for Simulated Space Vacuum Ultraviolet Exposure Testing of Polymer Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dever, Joyce A.; Pietromica, Anthony J.; Stueber, Thomas J.; Sechkar, Edward A.; Messer, Russell K.

    2002-01-01

    moveable cesium iodide VUV phototube, and two thermocouples for temperature measurement. The vacuum chamber and exterior equipment is shown. Each VUV lamp is located at the top of the chamber with its projection-tube pushed through an O-ring compression fitting. The lamp assemblies are located on ports that can be isolated from the rest of the vacuum chamber, permitting maintenance or replacement of the lamps without breaking vacuum in the main chamber where the samples are located. A view of two of the four interior VUV-exposure compartments, including the moveable sample stages and detector holders is also shown. Glenn is using this facility to support testing of Next Generation Space Telescope sunshield materials that is being led by the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center and to develop an understanding of the wavelength, intensity, and temperature dependence of VUV-induced polymer degradation.

  19. Non-invasive evaluation of the effects of opening & closing of eyes, and of exposure to a minute light beam, as well as to electrical or magnetic field on the melatonin, serotonin, & other neuro-transmitters of human pineal gland representation areas & the heart.

    PubMed

    Omura, Y; Losco, B M; Takeshige, C

    1993-01-01

    Using the Bi-Digital O-Ring Test electromagnetic resonance phenomena between 2 identical substances, first the pineal gland representational (rep.) areas were localized on the 5 different locations on the surface of the head using microscope slides of the pineal gland or Melatonin (while the eyes are closed) as a reference control substance. The 3 pineal rep. areas along the mid-line of the head always showed two lobes connected as a "Dumbbell" shape, with one round or oval area at each side of the mid-line. From each side of the head, anterior and superior to the ear, it appeared in a shape resembling the side view of a pineal gland. When both eyes were open, Melatonin, Norepinephrine (NE), and Acetylcholine (ACh) markedly decreased, while Serotonin, Dopamine, and GABA increased significantly in the outer part of the pineal gland rep. areas. When both eyes were closed, Melatonin, NE and ACh increased markedly, with marked decrease in Serotonin, Dopamine and GABA in the outer part of the pineal gland rep. areas. However, in the inner core of the pineal gland rep. area, an opposite response was found. Thus, the pineal gland has 2 main lobes, and functionally each lobe seems to have two concentric areas with an inverse relationship, i.e., a "Functional Cortex" area and a "Functional Core" area. The biochemical changes between the cortex and the core are in an inverse relationship. Melatonin was also found in the S-A node & right side of normal heart when the eyes were closed. When the eyes were open, Melatonin was found in the left side of the heart, as well as the salivary glands, stomach, colon, etc. While both eyes were closed, when a weak light beam was exposed at different parts of the body, such as any part of the upper and lower extremities, Melatonin, NE, and ACh decreased, with an increase in Serotonin, GABA and Dopamine only in the functional cortices of the pineal gland lobes on the same side of the body. Even when both eyes were open, if a very weak

  20. Effects of Laser Etching on the Corrosion Susceptibility of SAVY 4000 and Hagan Containers

    SciTech Connect

    Hyer, Holden Christopher; Duque, Juan; Smith, Paul Herrick

    Since the late 1990’s, the Hagan container was used as the primary container for packaging of plutonium-bearing materials. The Hagan design consisted of a threaded closure, a Viton® ORing, a carbon-carbon filter, and a 304L stainless steel (SS) body. Over the years, Hagans have shown vulnerability in their design [1]. In 2008, The Department of Energy (DOE) issued DOE M 441.1-1, Nuclear Material Packaging Manual, which detailed an approach to obtain highconfidence in containers by including specific design requirements, material contents and an approach to determine life span from said contents, and surveillance techniques [2]. In response to both themore » vulnerability issues with the Hagan and DOE M 441.1-1, the SAVY 4000 container with its twist style closure, Viton® O-Ring, Fiberfrax-Gortex filter, and annealed 316L SS body, was designed as the replacement for Hagan containers, but only for a short term lifespan of 5 years [1]. However, both the Hagan and SAVY 4000 are being pushed to maintain a lifespan of 40 years. Therefore, proper confidence must be placed on each component of each container to last a minimum of 40 years. So far, the biggest concern found during surveillance of these containers is corrosion and the potential for failure by corrosion. One concern is that the containers fail due to stress corrosion cracking (SCC), especially around the weld between the collar and the body as welds leave residual stresses. One advantage the SAVY 4000 has is that the body is annealed, but its weld is still susceptible as it was welded after annealing [3, 4]. Moreover, 316L SS is known to have a higher pitting resistance (pits are a precursor to SCC and can also lead to extensive failure of the material), than 304L SS [4]. During recent surveillance activities, two SAVY 4000’s containing Solution Assay Instrument (SAI) solutions were opened. The SAI SAVY 4000’s contained plutonium (Pu) in 3M HCl solution in plastic volumetric flasks placed inside of

  1. Long-term Satellite NDVI Data Sets: Evaluating Their Ability to Detect Ecosystem Functional Changes in South America

    PubMed Central

    Baldi, Germán; Nosetto, Marcelo D.; Aragón, Roxana; Aversa, Fernando; Paruelo, José M.; Jobbágy, Esteban G.

    2008-01-01

    In the last decades, South American ecosystems underwent important functional modifications due to climate alterations and direct human intervention on land use and land cover. Among remotely sensed data sets, NOAA-AVHRR “Normalized Difference Vegetation Index” (NDVI) represents one of the most powerful tools to evaluate these changes thanks to their extended temporal coverage. In this paper we explored the possibilities and limitations of three commonly used NOAA-AVHRR NDVI series (PAL, GIMMS and FASIR) to detect ecosystem functional changes in the South American continent. We performed pixel-based linear regressions for four NDVI variables (average annual, maximum annual, minimum annual and intra-annual coefficient of variation) for the 1982-1999 period and (1) analyzed the convergences and divergences of significant multi-annual trends identified across all series, (2) explored the degree of aggregation of the trends using the O-ring statistic, and (3) evaluated observed trends using independent information on ecosystem functional changes in five focal regions. Several differences arose in terms of the patterns of change (the sign, localization and total number of pixels with changes). FASIR presented the highest proportion of changing pixels (32.7%) and GIMMS the lowest (16.2%). PAL and FASIR data sets showed the highest agreement, with a convergence of detected trends on 71.2% of the pixels. Even though positive and negative changes showed substantial spatial aggregation, important differences in the scale of aggregation emerged among the series, with GIMMS showing the smaller scale (≤11 pixels). The independent evaluations suggest higher accuracy in the detection of ecosystem changes among PAL and FASIR series than with GIMMS, as they detected trends that match expected shifts. In fact, this last series eliminated most of the long term patterns over the continent. For example, in the “Eastern Paraguay” and “Uruguay River margins” focal regions

  2. Long-term Satellite NDVI Data Sets: Evaluating Their Ability to Detect Ecosystem Functional Changes in South America.

    PubMed

    Baldi, Germán; Nosetto, Marcelo D; Aragón, Roxana; Aversa, Fernando; Paruelo, José M; Jobbágy, Esteban G

    2008-09-03

    In the last decades, South American ecosystems underwent important functional modifications due to climate alterations and direct human intervention on land use and land cover. Among remotely sensed data sets, NOAA-AVHRR "Normalized Difference Vegetation Index" (NDVI) represents one of the most powerful tools to evaluate these changes thanks to their extended temporal coverage. In this paper we explored the possibilities and limitations of three commonly used NOAA-AVHRR NDVI series (PAL, GIMMS and FASIR) to detect ecosystem functional changes in the South American continent. We performed pixel-based linear regressions for four NDVI variables (average annual, maximum annual, minimum annual and intra-annual coefficient of variation) for the 1982-1999 period and (1) analyzed the convergences and divergences of significant multi-annual trends identified across all series, (2) explored the degree of aggregation of the trends using the O-ring statistic, and (3) evaluated observed trends using independent information on ecosystem functional changes in five focal regions. Several differences arose in terms of the patterns of change (the sign, localization and total number of pixels with changes). FASIR presented the highest proportion of changing pixels (32.7%) and GIMMS the lowest (16.2%). PAL and FASIR data sets showed the highest agreement, with a convergence of detected trends on 71.2% of the pixels. Even though positive and negative changes showed substantial spatial aggregation, important differences in the scale of aggregation emerged among the series, with GIMMS showing the smaller scale (≤11 pixels). The independent evaluations suggest higher accuracy in the detection of ecosystem changes among PAL and FASIR series than with GIMMS, as they detected trends that match expected shifts. In fact, this last series eliminated most of the long term patterns over the continent. For example, in the "Eastern Paraguay" and "Uruguay River margins" focal regions, the

  3. Phenoxide and alkoxide complexes of Mg, Al and Zn, and their use for the ring-opening polymerization of ℇ-caprolactone with initiators of different natures.

    PubMed

    Minyaev, Mikhail E; Nifant'ev, Ilya E; Shlyakhtin, Andrey V; Ivchenko, Pavel V; Lyssenko, Konstantin A

    2018-05-01

    A new packing polymorph of bis(2,6-di-tert-butyl-4-methylphenolato-κO)bis(tetrahydrofuran-κO)magnesium, [Mg(C 15 H 23 O) 2 (C 4 H 8 O) 2 ] or Mg(BHT) 2 (THF) 2 , (BHT is the 2,6-di-tert-butyl-4-methylphenoxide anion and THF is tetrahydrofuran), (1), has the same space group (P2 1 ) as the previously reported modification [Nifant'ev et al. (2017d). Dalton Trans. 46, 12132-12146], but contains three crystallographically independent molecules instead of one. The structure of (1) exhibits rotational disorder of the tert-butyl groups and positional disorder of a THF ligand. The complex of bis(2,6-di-tert-butyl-4-methylphenolato-κO)bis(μ 2 -ethyl glycolato-κ 2 O,O':κO)dimethyldialuminium, [Al 2 (CH 3 ) 2 (C 4 H 7 O 3 ) 2 (C 15 H 23 O) 2 ] or [(BHT)AlMe(OCH 2 COOEt)] 2 , (2), is a dimer located on an inversion centre and has an Al 2 O 2 rhomboid core. The 2-ethoxy-2-oxoethanolate ligand (OCH 2 COOEt) displays a μ 2 -κ 2 O,O':κO semi-bridging coordination mode, forming a five-membered heteronuclear Al-O-C-C-O ring. The same ligand exhibits positional disorder of the terminal methyl group. The redetermined structure of the heptanuclear complex octakis(μ 3 -benzyloxo-κO:κO:κO)hexaethylheptazinc, [Zn 7 (C 2 H 5 ) 6 (C 7 H 7 O) 8 ] or [Zn 7 (OCH 2 Ph) 8 Et 6 ], (3), possesses a bicubic Zn 7 O 8 core located at an inversion centre and demonstrates positional disorder of one crystallographically independent phenyl group. Cambridge Structural Database surveys are given for complexes structurally analogous to (2) and (3). Complexes (2) and (3), as well as derivatives of (1), are of interest as catalysts for the ring-opening polymerization of ℇ-caprolactone, and polymerization results are reported.

  4. Reusable Solid Rocket Motor - Accomplishments, Lessons, and a Culture of Success

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Dennis R.; Phelps, Willie J.

    2011-01-01

    The Reusable Solid Rocket Motor represents the largest solid rocket motor ever flown and the only human rated solid motor. Each Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) provides approximately 3-million lb of thrust to lift the integrated Space Shuttle vehicle from the launch pad. The motors burn out approximately 2 minutes later, separate from the vehicle and are recovered and refurbished. The size of the motor and the need for high reliability were challenges. Thrust shaping, via shaping of the propellant grain, was needed to limit structural loads during ascent. The motor design evolved through several block upgrades to increase performance and to increase safety and reliability. A major redesign occurred after STS-51L with the Redesigned Solid Rocket Motor. Significant improvements in the joint sealing systems were added. Design improvements continued throughout the Program via block changes with a number of innovations including development of low temperature o-ring materials and incorporation of a unique carbon fiber rope thermal barrier material. Recovery of the motors and post flight inspection improved understanding of hardware performance, and led to key design improvements. Because of the multidecade program duration material obsolescence was addressed, and requalification of materials and vendors was sometimes needed. Thermal protection systems and ablatives were used to protect the motor cases and nozzle structures. Significant understanding of design and manufacturing features of the ablatives was developed during the program resulting in optimization of design features and processing parameters. The project advanced technology in eliminating ozone-depleting materials in manufacturing processes and the development of an asbestos-free case insulation. Manufacturing processes for the large motor components were unique and safety in the manufacturing environment was a special concern. Transportation and handling approaches were also needed for the large

  5. Clinical implications of the HPV-16 infection & 7 beneficial effects of optimal dose of Vitamin D3 in safe, effective cancer treatment: Non-invasive rapid cancer screening using "Mouth, Hand & Foot Writing Form" of 40 participants during 150- minute workshop on the Bi-Digital 0-ring Test, in the 1st day of European Congress for Integrative Medicine, September 9-11, 2016 in Budapest.

    PubMed

    Omura, Yoshiaki

    During the 1st day of European Congress for Integrative Medicine held September 9-11, 2016, almost the entire 1st day was scheduled for the Bi-Digital O-Ring Test, which was originally developed by this author, & consists of 2 main parts for which a U.S. patent was issued in 1993. One is a non-invasive, detection of various molecules using very strong Electromagnetic Field (EMF) Resonance Phenomenon between 2 identical molecules with identical weight. Using this strong EMF Resonance Phenomenon, most molecules & microorganisms can be detected rapidly and non-invasively without directly contacting patients. We measured the HPV-16 infection of 70 participants non-invasively in the first 30 minutes, then screened cancers for 40 volunteers who completed one page "Mouth, Hand & Foot Writing Form," which took an average of 5∼10 minutes for each person to complete. Screening of 75 common cancers was made in 2-5 minutes for each patient. Analysis of 40 volunteers revealed 32 persons had some malignancies including 5 Anaplastic Astrocytomas of the L-brain, 3 Multiple Myelomas, 7 Hodgkin's Lymphomas, 8 Non-Hodgkin's Lymphomas, 2 rectum cancers (with chief complaints of worsening Irritable Bowel Syndrome). Although everyone had HPV-16 infections between about 6,000ng & 250ng, malignancy could not be found among those who had less than 1,200ng. Our individualized safe, effective and economical treatment of various cancers consists of optimal doses of Vitamin D3 with or without Taurine and/or PQQ depending on the positive synergetic compatibility among these 3 substances as normal parts of human tissue. The most serious 2 cases of rectum cancer with multiple metastasis, we confirmed very significant anti-cancer effects of their optimal doses of vitamin D3, which is increased to 800~1,000 I.U. (due to advanced cancer with multiple metastasis instead of the usual 400 I.U. for average adults). The unique 7 beneficial effects of optimal dose of Vitamin D3 (also Taurine or PQQ

  6. Evaluation of a six-DOF electrodynamic shaker system.

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory, Danny Lynn; Smallwood, David Ora

    2009-03-01

    The paper describes the preliminary evaluation of a 6 degree of freedom electrodynamic shaker system. The 8 by 8 inch (20.3 cm) table is driven by 12 electrodynamic shakers producing motion in all 6 rigid body modes. A small electrodynamic shaker system suitable for small component testing is described. The principal purpose of the system is to demonstrate the technology. The shaker is driven by 12 electrodynamic shakers each with a force capability of about 50 lbs (220 N). The system was developed through an informal cooperative agreement between Sandia National Laboratories, Team Corp. and Spectral Dynamics Corporation. Sandia providedmore » the laboratory space and some development funds. Team provided the mechanical system, and Spectral Dynamics provided the control system. Spectral Dynamics was chosen to provide the control system partly because of their experience in MIMO control and partly because Sandia already had part of the system in house. The shaker system was conceived and manufactured by TEAM Corp. Figure 1 shows the overall system. The vibration table, electrodynamic shakers, hydraulic pumps, and amplifiers are all housed in a single cabinet. Figure 2 is a drawing showing how the electrodynamic shakers are coupled to the table. The shakers are coupled to the table through a hydraulic spherical pad bearing providing 5 degrees of freedom and one stiff degree of freedom. The pad bearing must be preloaded with a static force as they are unable to provide any tension forces. The horizontal bearings are preloaded with steel springs. The drawing shows a spring providing the vertical preload. This was changed in the final design. The vertical preload is provided by multiple strands of an O-ring material as shown in Figure 4. Four shakers provide excitation in each of the three orthogonal axes. The specifications of the shaker are outlined in Table 1. Four shakers provide inputs in each of the three orthogonal directions. By choosing the phase

  7. Investigation Leads to Improved Understanding of Space Shuttle RSRM Internal Insulation Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McWhorter, Bruce B.; Bolton, Doug E.; Hicken, Steve V.; Allred, Larry D.; Cook, Dave J.

    2003-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) uses an internal insulation J-joint design for the mated insulation interface between two assembled RSRM segments. In this assembled (mated) segment configuration, this J-joint design serves as a thermal barrier to prevent hot gases from affecting the case field joint metal surfaces and O-rings. A pressure sensitive adhesive (PSA) provides some adhesion between the two mated insulation surfaces. In 1995, after extensive testing, a new ODC-free PSA (free of ozone depleting chemicals) was selected for flight on RSRM-55 (STS-78). Post-flight inspection revealed that the J-joint, equipped with the new ODC-free PSA, did not perform well. Hot gas seeped inside the J-joint interface. Although not a flight safety threat, the J-joint hot gas intrusion on RSRM-55 was a mystery to the investigators since the PSA had previously worked well on a full-scale static test. A team was assembled to study the J-joint and PSA further. All J-joint design parameters, measured data, and historical performance data were re-reviewed and evaluated by subscale testing and analysis. Although both the ODC-free and old PSA were weakened by humidity, the ODC-free PSA strength was lower to start with. Another RSRM full-scale static test was conducted in 1998 and intentionally duplicated the gas intrusion. This test, along with many concurring tests, showed that if a J-joint was 1) mated with the new ODC-free PSA, 2) exposed to a history of high humidity (Kennedy Space Center levels), and 3) also a joint which experienced significant but normal joint motion (J-joint deformation resulting from motor pressurization dynamics) then that J-joint would open (allow gas intrusion) during motor operation. When all of the data from the analyses, subscale tests, and full-scale tests were considered together, a theory emerged. Most of the joint motion on the RSRM occurs early in motor operation at which point the J-joints are pulled into tension. If the new

  8. Composite-Material Tanks with Chemically Resistant Liners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLay, Thomas K.

    2004-01-01

    should be fluorinated ethylene/propylene (FEP), and one or more FEP O ring(s) should be used in the aluminum end fitting(s). This choice of materials is dictated by experimental observations that pure aluminum and FEP are the only materials suitable for long-term storage of hydrogen peroxide and that other materials tend to catalyze the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide to oxygen and water. Other thermoplastic liner materials that are suitable for some applications include nylon 6 and polyethylene. The processing temperatures for nylon 6 are lower than those for FEP. Nylon 6 is compatible with propane, natural gas, and other petroleum-based fuels. Polyethylene is compatible with petroleum- based products and can be used for short-term storage of hydrogen peroxide.

  9. DEVELOPMENT OF A LAMINATED DISK FOR THE SPIN TEK ROTARY MICROFILTER

    SciTech Connect

    Herman, D.

    2011-06-03

    Funded by the Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management, EM-31, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) partnered with SpinTek Filtration{trademark} to develop a filter disk that would withstand a reverse pressure or flow during operation of the rotary microfilter. The ability to withstand a reverse pressure and flow eliminates a potential accident scenario that could have resulted in damage to the filter membranes. While the original welded filter disks have been shown to withstand and reverse pressure/flow in the static condition, the filter disk design discussed in this report will allow a reverse pressure/flow while the disks are rotating.more » In addition, the laminated disk increases the flexibility during filter startup and cleaning operations. The new filter disk developed by SRNL and SpinTek is manufactured with a more open structure significantly reducing internal flow restrictions in the disk. The prototype was tested at the University of Maryland and demonstrated to withstand the reverse pressure due to the centrifugal action of the rotary filter. The tested water flux of the disk was demonstrated to be 1.34 gpm in a single disk test. By comparison, the water flux of the current disk was 0.49 gpm per disk during a 25 disk test. The disk also demonstrated rejection of solids by filtering a 5 wt % Strontium Carbonate slurry with a filtrate clarity of less the 1.4 Nephelometric Turbidity Units (NTU) throughout the two hour test. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has been working with SpinTek Filtration{trademark} to adapt the rotary microfilter for radioactive service in the Department of Energy (DOE) Complex. One potential weakness is the loose nature of the membrane on the filter disks. The current disk is constructed by welding the membrane at the outer edge of the disk. The seal for the center of the membrane is accomplished by an o-ring in compression for the assembled stack. The remainder of the membrane is free

  10. Backward Planetary Protection Issues and Possible Solutions for Icy Plume Sample Return Missions from Astrobiological Targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yano, Hajime; McKay, Christopher P.; Anbar, Ariel; Tsou, Peter

    ). While this is an ideal specification, it far exceeds the current PPP requirements for Category-V “restricted Earth return”, which typically center on a probability of escape of a biologically active particle (e.g., < 1 in 10 (6) chance of escape of particles > 50 nm diameter). Particles of this size (orders of magnitude larger than a helium atom) are not volatile and generally “sticky” toward surfaces; the mobility of viruses and biomolecules requires aerosolization. Thus, meeting the planetary protection challenge does not require hermetic seal. So far, only a handful of robotic missions accomplished deep space sample returns, i.e., Genesis, Stardust and Hayabusa. This year, Hayabusa-2 will be launched and OSIRIS-REx will follow in a few years. All of these missions are classified as “unrestricted Earth return” by the COSPAR PPP recommendation. Nevertheless, scientific requirements of organic contamination control have been implemented to all WBS regarding sampling mechanism and Earth return capsule of Hayabusa-2. While Genesis, Stardust and OSIRIS-REx capsules “breathe” terrestrial air as they re-enter Earth’s atmosphere, temporal “air-tight” design was already achieved by the Hayabusa-1 sample container using a double O-ring seal, and that for the Hayabusa-2 will retain noble gas and other released gas from returned solid samples using metal seal technology. After return, these gases can be collected through a filtered needle interface without opening the entire container lid. This expertise can be extended to meeting planetary protection requirements from “restricted return” targets. There are still some areas requiring new innovations, especially to assure contingency robustness in every phase of a return mission. These must be achieved by meeting both PPP and scientific requirements during initial design and WBS of the integrated sampling system including the Earth return capsule. It is also important to note that international

  11. Compatibility Study for Plastic, Elastomeric, and Metallic Fueling Infrastructure Materials Exposed to Aggressive Formulations of Ethanol-blended Gasoline

    SciTech Connect

    Kass, Michael D; Pawel, Steven J; Theiss, Timothy J

    In 2008 Oak Ridge National Laboratory began a series of experiments to evaluate the compatibility of fueling infrastructure materials with intermediate levels of ethanol-blended gasoline. Initially, the focus was elastomers, metals, and sealants, and the test fuels were Fuel C, CE10a, CE17a and CE25a. The results of these studies were published in 2010. Follow-on studies were performed with an emphasis on plastic (thermoplastic and thermoset) materials used in underground storage and dispenser systems. These materials were exposed to test fuels of Fuel C and CE25a. Upon completion of this effort, it was felt that additional compatibility data with higher ethanolmore » blends was needed and another round of experimentation was performed on elastomers, metals, and plastics with CE50a and CE85a test fuels. Compatibility of polymers typically relates to the solubility of the solid polymer with a solvent. It can also mean susceptibility to chemical attack, but the polymers and test fuels evaluated in this study are not considered to be chemically reactive with each other. Solubility in polymers is typically assessed by measuring the volume swell of the polymer exposed to the solvent of interest. Elastomers are a class of polymers that are predominantly used as seals, and most o-ring and seal manufacturers provide compatibility tables of their products with various solvents including ethanol, toluene, and isooctane, which are components of aggressive oxygenated gasoline as described by the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) J1681. These tables include a ranking based on the level of volume swell in the elastomer associated with exposure to a particular solvent. Swell is usually accompanied by a decrease in hardness (softening) that also affects performance. For seal applications, shrinkage of the elastomer upon drying is also a critical parameter since a contraction of volume can conceivably enable leakage to occur. Shrinkage is also indicative of the removal of one

  12. Simple, affordable and sustainable borehole observatories for complex monitoring objectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopf, A.; Freudenthal, T.; Ratmeyer, V.; Bergenthal, M.; Lange, M.; Fleischmann, T.; Hammerschmidt, S.; Seiter, C.; Wefer, G.

    2014-12-01

    Seafloor drill rigs are remotely operated systems that provide a cost effective means to recover sedimentary records of the upper sub-seafloor deposits. Recent increases in their payload included downhole logging tools or autoclave coring systems. We here report on another milestone in using seafloor rigs: the development and installation of shallow borehole observatories. Three different systems have been developed for the MARUM-MeBo seafloor drill, which is operated by MARUM, University of Bremen, Germany. A simple design, the MeBoPLUG, separates the inner borehole from the overlying ocean by using o-ring seals at the conical threads of the drill pipe. The systems are self-contained and include data loggers, batteries, thermistors and a differential pressure sensor. A second design, the so-called MeBoCORK, is more sophisticated and also hosts an acoustic modem for data transfer and, if desired, fluid sampling capability using osmotic pumps. Of these MeBoCORKs, two systems have to be distinguished: the CORK-A (A = autonomous) can be installed by the MeBo alone and monitors pressure and temperature inside and above the borehole (the latter for reference). The CORK-B (B = bottom) has a higher payload and can additionally be equipped with geochemical, biological or other physical components. Owing to its larger size, it is installed by ROV and utilises a hotstab connection in the upper portion of the drill string. Either design relies on a hotstab connection from beneath which coiled tubing with a conical drop weight is lowered to couple to the formation. These tubes are fluid-saturated and either serve to transmit pore pressure signals or collect pore water in the osmo-sampler. The third design, the MeBoPUPPI (Pop-Up Pore Pressure Instrument), is similar to the MeBoCORK-A and monitors pore pressure and temperature in a self-contained manner. Instead of transferring data upon command using an acoustic modem, the MeBoPUPPI contains a pop-up telemetry with Iridium link

  13. Simple, affordable, and sustainable borehole observatories for complex monitoring objectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopf, A.; Freudenthal, T.; Ratmeyer, V.; Bergenthal, M.; Lange, M.; Fleischmann, T.; Hammerschmidt, S.; Seiter, C.; Wefer, G.

    2015-05-01

    Seafloor drill rigs are remotely operated systems that provide a cost-effective means to recover sedimentary records of the upper sub-seafloor deposits. Recent increases in their payload included downhole logging tools or autoclave coring systems. Here we report on another milestone in using seafloor rigs: the development and installation of shallow borehole observatories. Three different systems have been developed for the MARUM-MeBo (Meeresboden-Bohrgerat) seafloor drill, which is operated by MARUM, University of Bremen, Germany. A simple design, the MeBoPLUG, separates the inner borehole from the overlying ocean by using o-ring seals at the conical threads of the drill pipe. The systems are self-contained and include data loggers, batteries, thermistors and a differential pressure sensor. A second design, the so-called MeBoCORK (Circulation Obviation Retrofit Kit), is more sophisticated and also hosts an acoustic modem for data transfer and, if desired, fluid sampling capability using osmotic pumps. In these MeBoCORKs, two systems have to be distinguished: the CORK-A (A stands for autonomous) can be installed by the MeBo alone and monitors pressure and temperature inside and above the borehole (the latter for reference); the CORK-B (B stands for bottom) has a higher payload and can additionally be equipped with geochemical, biological or other physical components. Owing to its larger size, it is installed by a remotely operated underwater vehicle (ROV) and utilises a hot-stab connection in the upper portion of the drill string. Either design relies on a hot-stab connection from beneath in which coiled tubing with a conical drop weight is lowered to couple to the formation. These tubes are fluid-saturated and either serve to transmit pore pressure signals or collect porewater in the osmo-sampler. The third design, the MeBoPUPPI (Pop-Up Pore Pressure Instrument), is similar to the MeBoCORK-A and monitors pore pressure and temperature in a self-contained manner

  14. NASA Tech Briefs, November 1995. Volume 19, No. 11

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Loads; 40) Tool Indicates Contact Angles in Bearing Raceways; 41) Gravity Slides With Magnetic Braking; 42) High-Torque, Lightweight, Pneumatically Driven Wrench for Small Spaces; 43) Device for Testing Compatibility of an O-Ring; 44) Magnetic Heat Pump Containing Flow Diverters; 45) Variable-Tilt Helicopter Rotor Mast; 46) "Beach-Ball" Robotic Rovers; 47) Apparatus Would Measure Temperatures of Ball Bearings; 48) Flexible Borescope for Inspecting Ducts; 49) Texturing Copper To Reduce Secondary Emission of Electrons; 50) Automated Laser Cutting in Three Dimensions; 51) Algorithm Helps Monitor Engine Operation; 52) Flexible Revision of Data-Processing Communications; 53) Software for Managing the Use of Land; 54) Thermal Strap Increases Cryocooling Efficiency; 55) Reversible Nut With Engagement Indication; 56) Control Algorithms for Kinematically Redundant Manipulators; 57) Computed Hydrogen-Flow Splits in a Rocket Engine; 58) Pressure and Thermal Modeling of Rocket Launches; 59) Field of View of a Spacecraft Antenna: Analysis and Software; 60) Digital Controller for Laser-Beam-Steering Subsystem; 61) More About Beam-Steering Subsystem for Laser Communication; 62) Digital Controller for Laser-Beam-Steering Subsystem: Part 2; 63) Interface Circuit Board for Space-Shuttle Communications; 64) Automated Planning of Spacecraft Telecommunications; 65) Artifacts of Spectral Analysis of Instrument Readings; 66) Neural-Network Controller for Vibration Suppression; 67) Adaptive Finite-Element Computation in Fracture Mechanics; 68) Attitude Control for the Cassini Spacecraft; 69) Analytical Model for Fluid Dynamics in a Microgravity Environment; 70) Study of Rocket-Engine Joints Bonded by NVCU/NARloy-Z; 71) Improved Silicon Nitride for Advanced Heat Engines; 72) Parameters for Welding Aluminum/Lithium Alloys; 73) Lightweight Composite Intertank Structure; 74) Foil Patches Seal Small Vacuum Leaks; 75) Data Base on Cables and Connectors; 76) Effect of Clock Mode on Radiation

  15. System for Continuous Deaeration of Hydraulic Oil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Christopher W.

    2006-01-01

    vacuum against the vacuum pump. 3) The tank must be strong enough to withstand atmospheric pressure against the vacuum inside and must have sufficient volume to enable exposure of a sufficiently large amount of sprayed oil to the vacuum. 4) The spray nozzles must be sized to atomize the oil and to ensure that the rate of flow of sprayed oil does not exceed the rate at which the venturi action can empty the tank. 5) The vacuum pump must produce a hard vacuum against the venturi tube and continue to work when it ingests some oil and water. 6) Fittings must be made vacuum tight (by use of O-rings) to prevent leakage of air into the system. The system is fully automatic, and can be allowed to remain in operation with very little monitoring. It is capable of reducing the air content of the oil from 11 to less than 1 volume percent in about 4 hours and to keep the water content below 100 parts per million.

  16. Pulse Wave Analysis after Treatment of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms with the Ovation Device.

    PubMed

    Georgakarakos, Efstratios; Argyriou, Christos; Georgiadis, George S; Lazarides, Miltos K

    2017-04-01

    Ovation aortic stent-graft system is a new device for the endovascular treatment of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms achieving fixation via a 35-mm long, rigid anchored suprarenal stent and sealing stent at the infrarenal level by a means of a polymer-filling pair of inflatable O-rings, which cause narrowing of flow lumen and regional stenosis. Thus, concerns have been raised regarding hemodynamic consequences associated with this new design. Our preliminary report showed no significant increase of aortic pulse wave velocity (aPWV) immediately after implantation of the ovation in 3 patients. We studied further the hemodynamic implications of the Ovation implantation in 6 patients for a follow-up of 6 months. A brachial cuff-based automatic oscillometric device (Mobil-O-Graph; IEM, Stolberg, Germany) was used to perform noninvasively pulse wave analysis and stiffness estimation. Measurements were held preoperatively in 6 patients treated for abdominal aortic aneurysm, at the end of the first postoperative week, first and sixth postoperative month. Changes in systolic and diastolic blood pressure (cSyst, cDiast), heart rate, aPWV, augmentation index (AI@75), augmentation pressure (AP), and in the amplitude ratio of the reflected-to-forward pressure waves (reflection magnitude, RM) were recorded and compared. Significant change in any parameter was examined via analysis of variance repeated measures. The cSyst was 132 ± 19.6, 127 ± 17.63, 131.3 ± 19.96, and 129.83 ± 31.72 mm Hg (P = 0.81) and cDiast was 88 ± 10.58, 86.83 ± 11.72, 89.83 ± 16.01, and 98.5 ± 24.56 mm Hg (P = 0.40). The heart rate showed an increasing yet nonsignificant tendency (67 ± 10.60, 75.1 ± 8.63, 74.33 ± 8.89, and 70.66 ± 6.65 beats/min, 0.27). The aPWV remained constant (11.61 ± 1.88, 11.6 ± 1.74, 11.8 ± 2.08, and 11.85 ± 2.30 m/sec, P = 0.79). Similarly, RM (71.16 ± 9.94, 60.66 ± 11.79, 61.5 ± 14.47, and 64.5 ± 3.78), AI@75 (33.83

  17. External quality-assurance results for the National Atmospheric Deposition Program/National Trends Network, 1997-99

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gordon, John D.; Latysh, Natalie E.; Lindholm, Sandy J.

    2003-01-01

    hydrogen ion. During 1997 through 1999, the median paired differences between the bucket and bottle portions ranged from 0.00 milligram per liter for nitrate and ammonium to +0.010 milligram per liter for both chloride and sulfate. The median paired difference between the bucket and bottle portions for hydrogen ion was -1.086 microequivalents per liter, whereas for specific conductance, the median paired difference between the bucket and bottle portions was -0.200 microsiemen per centimeter during 1997 through 1999. Surface-chemistry effects due to variable amounts of precipitation contacting prewashed sample-collection and shipping-container surfaces were studied in the blind-audit program by using three different sample volumes. The sample- collection and shipping containers used for the blind-audit study were obtained from the site operator's supply and could have been used for precipitation samples. Results of a Kruskal-Wallis analysis of variance test of the relation between paired blind-audit sample differences in units of concentration and sample volume were statistically significant for magnesium, chloride, sulfate, and hydrogen ion during 1997 through 1999. Before 1994, at least 5 of the 10 analytes displayed a statistically significant difference between paired blind-audit differences in units of concentration and sample volume, supporting the premise that chemical reactions between the 13-liter bucket shipping container (primarily the butadiene o-ring lid of the shipping container) and the sample, which resulted in an increasing loss of hydrogen ion with increasing volume, have been eliminated by the new l-liter bottle sample- shipping protocol. The field-audit program measures the effects of field exposure, handling, and processing on the chemistry of NADP/NTN precipitation samples. In the field-audit program, the site operator is instructed to process and submit a quality- control sample following a standard 7-day, Tuesday-to-Tuesday sampling period with no

  18. The Visual Display of Quantitative Information; Envisioning Information; Visual Explanations: Images and Quantities, Evidence and Narrative (by Edward R. Tufte)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Harold H.

    1999-02-01

    of material for graphics (as in the names on the Vietnam War Memorial), and the use of layering and repetition to emphasize aspects of the data (as in the Hudson and Manhattan railroad manual for train signal lighting). The examples mentioned are only a few of hundreds from various sciences and engineering endeavors, from cultures all over the world and through centuries of time. The examples that Tufte renders are so seductive that the reader is drawn into consideration of data that would not ordinarily be of interest; how many people would you expect to be interested in the geographic distribution of the birthplaces of 10,086 poets of four Chinese dynasties? In Tufte's hands, the data sing to us. Graphics are not just an opportunity for creative and artistic expression. Tufte argues in Visual Explanations that better designed graphs of the data pertinent to the failure at low temperature of the O-ring seals on the Challenger booster might well have altered the fate of the mission and saved the lives of the astronauts. Tufte is by no means the only one making the claim that there was sufficient evidence to justify postponing the launch, but he shows how compelling the data can be, when best presented. Visual Explanations focuses on the presentation of information that has a temporal component. Examples include the visualization in three dimensions and time of the development of a thunderstorm, the explanation of several magic tricks, the hand-drawn graphical log of cosmonaut Georgi Grechko, and notations for the recording of ballet positions. I would think that the designers of textbooks and instructional multimedia materials would find inspiration in this most recent of Tufte's masterworks.

  19. Development of Long-Lifetime Pulsed Gas Valves for Pulsed Electric Thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burkhardt, Wendel M.; Crapuchettes, John M.; Addona, Brad M.; Polzin, Kurt A.

    2015-01-01

    even 10(exp 9) cycles is well above anything demonstrated, this lower value was selected as the design point for the present work. The valve seal must remain leak-tight throughout operation, and the body must maintain a low internal leakage at relatively high operating temperatures. The full set of design requirements used for this program are summarized in Table 1. In this work, we describe two pulsed gas valves that have been fabricated to have long lifetime and demonstrate the characteristics listed above. The first is a miniaturized, conventional electromagnet-based valve while the second is a piezoelectric-based valve design. The conventional valve, shown in Fig. 1, is opened by use of a solenoid electromagnetic actuator. When current is applied to the solenoid coil, magnetic forces pull the plunger away from the valve seat, allowing fluid to flow through the valve. Removal of electrical current permits the spring and fluid pressure to seat the plunger, halting the flow of fluid. The valve body is fabricated from 304L corrosion resistant steel (CRES) and while the parts that form the magnetic circuit are fabricated from 430 CRES. This material does not have optimum magnetic properties, but its corrosion resistance permits incorporation into a design without requiring an additional plating process. A viton O-ring compound (Parker V0884-75), selected for its mechanical strength at elevated temperatures, was used for the valve seat seal. The design was based solely on the use of analytical sizing calculations, as opposed to a more rigorous finite element analysis. While this valve is small and relatively lightweight, it does not represent a design that is optimized for mass and/or a given volume envelope. The piezoelectric valve is a "puller" valve design. Applying a voltage to the piezo crystal causes it to elongate and pull a pintle off the seat, opening the valve. The valve seal consists of the pintle with an external, spherically-formed tip fabricated from