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Sample records for oasis valley areas

  1. Delineation of the Pahute Mesa–Oasis Valley groundwater basin, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fenelon, Joseph M.; Halford, Keith J.; Moreo, Michael T.

    2016-01-22

    This report delineates the Pahute Mesa–Oasis Valley (PMOV) groundwater basin, where recharge occurs, moves downgradient, and discharges to Oasis Valley, Nevada. About 5,900 acre-feet of water discharges annually from Oasis Valley, an area of springs and seeps near the town of Beatty in southern Nevada. Radionuclides in groundwater beneath Pahute Mesa, an area of historical underground nuclear testing at the Nevada National Security Site, are believed to be migrating toward Oasis Valley. Delineating the boundary of the PMOV groundwater basin is necessary to adequately assess the potential for transport of radionuclides from Pahute Mesa to Oasis Valley.The PMOV contributing area is defined based on regional water-level contours, geologic controls, and knowledge of adjacent flow systems. The viability of this area as the contributing area to Oasis Valley and the absence of significant interbasin flow between the PMOV groundwater basin and adjacent basins are shown regionally and locally. Regional constraints on the location of the contributing area boundary and on the absence of interbasin groundwater flow are shown by balancing groundwater discharges in the PMOV groundwater basin and adjacent basins against available water from precipitation. Internal consistency for the delineated contributing area is shown by matching measured water levels, groundwater discharges, and transmissivities with simulated results from a single-layer, steady-state, groundwater-flow model. An alternative basin boundary extending farther north than the final boundary was rejected based on a poor chloride mass balance and a large imbalance in the northern area between preferred and simulated recharge.

  2. Ground-water discharge determined from measurements of evapotranspiration, other available hydrologic components, and shallow water-level changes, Oasis Valley, Nye County, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reiner, S.R.; Laczniak, R.J.; DeMeo, G.A.; Smith, J. LaRue; Elliott, P.E.; Nylund, W.E.; Fridrich, C.J.

    2002-01-01

    Oasis Valley is an area of natural ground-water discharge within the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system of southern Nevada and adjacent California. Ground water discharging at Oasis Valley is replenished from inflow derived from an extensive recharge area that includes the northwestern part of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Because nuclear testing has introduced radionuclides into the subsurface of the NTS, the U.S. Department of Energy currently is investigating the potential transport of these radionuclides by ground water flow. To better evaluate any potential risk associated with these test-generated contaminants, a number of studies were undertaken to accurately quantify discharge from areas downgradient in the regional ground-water flow system from the NTS. This report refines the estimate of ground-water discharge from Oasis Valley. Ground-water discharge from Oasis Valley was estimated by quantifying evapotranspiration (ET), estimating subsurface outflow, and compiling ground-water withdrawal data. ET was quantified by identifying areas of ongoing ground-water ET, delineating areas of ET defined on the basis of similarities in vegetation and soil-moisture conditions, and computing ET rates for each of the delineated areas. A classification technique using spectral-reflectance characteristics determined from satellite imagery acquired in 1992 identified eight unique areas of ground-water ET. These areas encompass about 3,426 acres of sparsely to densely vegetated grassland, shrubland, wetland, and open water. Annual ET rates in Oasis Valley were computed with energy-budget methods using micrometeorological data collected at five sites. ET rates range from 0.6 foot per year in a sparse, dry saltgrass environment to 3.1 feet per year in dense meadow vegetation. Mean annual ET from Oasis Valley is estimated to be about 7,800 acre-feet. Mean annual ground-water discharge by ET from Oasis Valley, determined by removing the annual local precipitation

  3. Gravity and magnetic study of the Pahute Mesa and Oasis Valley region, Nye County, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mankinen, Edward A.; Hildenbrand, Thomas G.; Dixon, Gary L.; McKee, Edwin H.; Fridrich, Christopher J.; Laczniak, Randell J.

    1999-01-01

    Regional gravity and aeromagnetic maps reveal the existence of deep basins underlying much of the southwestern Nevada volcanic field, approximately 150 km northwest of Las Vegas. These maps also indicate the presence of prominent features (geophysical lineaments) within and beneath the basin fill. Detailed gravity surveys were conducted in order to characterize the nature of the basin boundaries, delineate additional subsurface features, and evaluate their possible influence on the movement of ground-water. Geophysical modeling of gravity and aeromagnetic data indicates that many of the features may be related to processes of caldera formation. Collapse of the various calderas within the volcanic field resulted in dense basement rocks occurring at greater depths within caldera boundaries. Modeling indicates that collapse occurred along faults that are arcuate and steeply dipping. There are indications that the basement in the western Pahute Mesa - Oasis Valley region consists predominantly of granitic and/or fine-grained siliceous sedimentary rocks that may be less permeable to groundwater flow than the predominantly fractured carbonate rock basement to the east and southeast of the study area. The northeast-trending Thirsty Canyon lineament, expressed on gravity and basin thickness maps, separates dense volcanic rocks on the northwest from less dense intracaldera accumulations in the Silent Canyon and Timber Mountain caldera complexes. The source of the lineament is an approximately 2-km wide ring fracture system with step-like differential displacements, perhaps localized on a pre-existing northeast-trending Basin and Range fault. Due to vertical offsets, the Thirsty Canyon fault zone probably juxtaposes rock types of different permeability and, thus, it may act as a barrier to ground-water flow and deflect flow from Pahute Mesa along its flanks toward Oasis Valley. Within the Thirsty Canyon fault zone, highly fractured rocks may serve also as a conduit

  4. Geohydrology of Monitoring Wells Drilled in Oasis Valley near Beatty, Nye County, Nevada, 1997

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robledo, Armando R.; Ryder, Philip L.; Fenelon, Joseph M.; Paillet, Frederick L.

    1999-01-01

    Twelve monitoring wells were installed in 1997 at seven sites in and near Oasis Valley, Nevada. The wells, ranging in depth from 65 to 642 feet, were installed to measure water levels and to collect water-quality samples. Well-construction data and geologic and geophysical logs are presented in this report. Seven geologic units were identified and described from samples collected during the drilling: (1) Ammonia Tanks Tuff; (2) Tuff of Cutoff Road; (3) tuffs, not formally named but informally referred to in this report as the 'tuff of Oasis Valley'; (4) lavas informally named the 'rhyolitic lavas of Colson Pond'; (5) Tertiary colluvial and alluvial gravelly deposits; (6) Tertiary and Quaternary colluvium; and (7) Quaternary alluvium. Water levels in the wells were measured in October 1997 and February 1998 and ranged from about 18 to 350 feet below land surface. Transmissive zones in one of the boreholes penetrating volcanic rock were identified using flowmeter data. Zones with the highest transmissivity are at depths of about 205 feet in the 'rhyolitic lavas of Colson Pond' and 340 feet within the 'tuff of Oasis Valley.'

  5. Implementation of ground penetrating radar and electrical resistivity tomography for inspecting the Greco-Roman Necropolis at Kilo 6 of the Golden Mummies Valley, Bahariya Oasis, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbas, Abbas M.; Ghazala, Hosni H.; Mesbah, Hany S.; Atya, Magdy A.; Radwan, Ali; Hamed, Diaa E.

    2016-06-01

    Bahariya Oasis is one of the lately inspected spots in Egypt and has a long historical record extending from the old kingdom till the emergence of Islam. Since June 1999, the Valley of the Golden Mummies near Bawiti (at kilometer 6 on the road leads to Farafra Oasis) became significant due to the discoveries of amazing mummies of gelded faces. The archeologists believe that the Valley has more valuable tombs that still unrevealed. Also, the possibility that the Greco-Roman Necropolis extends to areas other than Kilo-6 is sustainable. The ground penetrating radar and electrical resistivity tomography are two geophysical tools that have successful applications in archeological assessment. The two techniques were used in integration plan to assert the archeological potentiality of the studied site and to map the feasible tombs. Sum of 798 GPR profiles and 19 ERT cross sections was carried out over the study area. The results of them were analyzed to envisage these results in archeological terms.

  6. Magnetotelluric study of the Pahute Mesa and Oasis Valley regions, Nye County, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schenkel, Clifford J.; Hildenbrand, Thomas G.; Dixon, Gary L.

    1999-01-01

    Magnetotelluric data delineate distinct layers and lateral variations above the pre-Tertiary basement. On Pahute Mesa, three resistivity layers associated with the volcanic rocks are defined: a moderately resistive surface layer, an underlying conductive layer, and a deep resistive layer. Considerable geologic information can be derived from the conductive layer which extents from near the water table down to a depth of approximately 2 km. The increase in conductivity is probably related to zeolite zonation observed in the volcanic rock on Pahute Mesa, which is relatively impermeable to groundwater flow unless fractured. Inferred faults within this conductive layer are modeled on several profiles crossing the Thirsty Canyon fault zone. This fault zone extends from Pahute Mesa into Oasis Valley basin. Near Colson Pond where the basement is shallow, the Thirsty Canyon fault zone is several (~2.5) kilometers wide. Due to the indicated vertical offsets associated with the Thirsty Canyon fault zone, the fault zone may act as a barrier to transverse (E-W) groundwater flow by juxtaposing rocks of different permeabilities. We propose that the Thirsty Canyon fault zone diverts water southward from Pahute Mesa to Oasis Valley. The electrically conductive nature of this fault zone indicates the presence of abundant alteration minerals or a dense network of open and interconnected fractures filled with electrically conductive groundwater. The formation of alteration minerals require the presence of water suggesting that an extensive interconnected fracture system exists or existed at one time. Thus, the fractures within the fault zone may be either a barrier or a conduit for groundwater flow, depending on the degree of alteration and the volume of open pore space. In Oasis Valley basin, a conductive surface layer, composed of alluvium and possibly altered volcanic rocks, extends to a depth of 300 to 500 m. The underlying volcanic layer, composed mostly of tuffs, fills the

  7. Geologic map of the Oasis Valley basin and vicinity, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Fridrich, C.J.; Minor, S.A.; Ryder, P.L.

    2000-01-13

    This map and accompanying cross sections present an updated synthesis of the geologic framework of the Oasis Valley area, a major groundwater discharge site located about 15 km west of the Nevada Test Site. Most of the data presented in this compilation is new geologic map data, as discussed below. In addition, the cross sections incorporate new geophysical data that have become available in the last three years (Grauch and others, 1997; written comm., 1999; Hildenbrand and others, 1999; Mankinen and others, 1999). Geophysical data are used to estimate the thickness of the Tertiary volcanic and sedimentary rocks on themore » cross sections, and to identify major concealed structures. Large contiguous parts of the map area are covered either by alluvium or by volcanic units deposited after development of the major structures present at the depth of the water table and below. Hence, geophysical data provide critical constraints on our geologic interpretations. A companion paper by Fridrich and others (1999) and the above-cited reports by Hildenbrand and others (1999) and Mankinen and others (1999) provide explanations of the interpretations that are presented graphically on this map. This map covers nine 7.5-minute quadrangles in Nye County, Nevada, centered on the Thirsty Canyon SW quadrangle, and is a compilation of one published quadrangle map (O'Connor and others, 1966) and eight new quadrangle maps, two of which have been previously released (Minor and others, 1997; 1998). The cross sections that accompany this map were drawn to a depth of about 5 km below land surface at the request of hydrologists who are modeling the Death Valley groundwater system.« less

  8. NV PFA - Steptoe Valley

    DOE Data Explorer

    Jim Faulds

    2015-10-29

    All datasets and products specific to the Steptoe Valley model area. Includes a packed ArcMap project (.mpk), individually zipped shapefiles, and a file geodatabase for the northern Steptoe Valley area; a GeoSoft Oasis montaj project containing GM-SYS 2D gravity profiles along the trace of our seismic reflection lines; a 3D model in EarthVision; spreadsheet of links to published maps; and spreadsheets of well data.

  9. Ground-penetrating radar exploration for ancient monuments at the Valley of Mummies -Kilo 6, Bahariya Oasis, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaaban, Fathy A.; Abbas, Abbas M.; Atya, Magdy A.; Hafez, Mahfouz A.

    2009-06-01

    A Valley of Mummies was discovered recently by an Egyptian team at Bahariya Oasis, located about 380 km west of the pyramids. Four tombs were excavated, and inside them were found one hundred and five mummies (105), many of them beautifully gilded. These mummies, many sumptuously decorated with religious scenes, are the very best Roman-Period mummies ever found in Egypt. These remains are around 2000 years old, but they are in remarkable condition. A Ground-Penetrating Radar (GPR) had proved successful in detecting the cavities in resistive soil in which the mummies were found. The GPR survey conducted near the earlier-discovered tombs at Kilo-6 El-Bahariya to Farafra Oasis road is the focus of this paper. The GPR survey was conducted using the SIR-2000 attached to a 200 MHz monostatic antenna. The two areas to be surveyed were selected by the archaeologists in situ. Area one was 40 m × 40 m and Area two was 30 m × 15 m. A grid pattern survey in one direction; with one-meter profile spacing was done to both areas. In addition, a focusing survey was undertaken over the entire Area one. In addition, twenty long GPR profiles were conducted in an attempt to determine the outer, expected limits of the burial area. After the data acquisition, Reflex software was used for data processing and presentation. The final results of the radar survey: in the form of 2D radar records, time slices and 3D block diagrams; were used to guide the archaeologists during the excavation process. The excavation processes have been completed by the archaeologists, and many tombs and mummies were discovered. It is worthy to mention that, the excavations and location of tombs and cavities matched strongly with the GPR results.

  10. The classification and assessment of vulnerability of man-land system of oasis city in arid area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Chao; Lei, Jun; Jin, Fengjun

    2013-12-01

    Oasis city system is the center of the man-land relationship in arid area and it is the most influential spatial and temporal multiple dynamic system. Oasis city system is not only the largest area where artificial disturbances occur at a regional scale but also the most concentrated area of human activity in arid area. In this study, we developed an applicable and convenient method to assess vulnerability of man-land system of oasis cities with vulnerability indicator system, respectively evaluating the sensitivity, adaptability and vulnerability of the eco-environment system, the economic system and the social system. The results showed that the sensitivity and vulnerability of oasis cities in Xinjiang, China have significant differences while their adaptability does little. In order to find the inherent differences in the vulnerability of oasis cities, triangle methodology has been adopted to divide Xinjiang oasis cities into five types. Some adaptive developing policies specific for individual cities are also proposed based on their vulnerability type and constraining factors.

  11. Chemical data and variation diagrams of igneous rocks from the Timber Mountain-Oasis Valley Caldera Complex, southern Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Quinlivan, W.D.; Byers, F.M.

    1977-01-01

    Silica variation diagrams presented here are based on 162 chemical analyses of tuffs, lavas, and intrusives, representative of volcanic centers of the Timber Mountain-Oasis Valley caldera complex and cogenetic rocks of the Silent Canyon ca1dera. Most of the volcanic units sampled are shown on the U.S. Geological Survey geologic map of the Timber Mountain caldera area (I-891) and are described in U.S. Geological Survey Professional Paper 919. Early effusives of the complex, although slightly altered, are probably chemically, and petrographically, more like the calc-alkalic Fraction Tuff (Miocene) of the northern Nellis Air Force Base Bombing and Gunnery Range to the north, whereas effusives of later Miocene age, such as the Paintbrush and Timber Mountain Tuffs, are alkali-calcic.

  12. [Spatial change of the grain-size of aeolian sediments in Qira oasis-desert ecotone, Northwest China].

    PubMed

    Lin, Yong Chong; Xu, Li Shuai

    2017-04-18

    In order to understand the environmental influence of oasis-desert ecotone to oasis ecological system, we comparatively analyzed the grain size characteristics of various aeolian sediments, including the sediments in oasis-desert ecotone, shelterbelt and the inside oasis and in Qira River valley. The results showed that the grain size characteristics (including grain-size distribution curve, grain size parameters, and content of different size classes) of sediments in the oasis-desert ecotone were consistent along the prevailing wind direction with a grain-size range of 0.3-200 μm and modal size of 67 μm. All of the sediments were good sorting and mainly composed of suspension components and saltation components, but not denatured saltation and creeping components (>200 μm). They were typically aeolian deposits being short-range transported. The grain sizes of sediments in oasis-desert ecotone were smaller than that in the material sources of Qira River valley and desert (0.3-800 μm), but very similar to those of the modern aeolian deposits in oasis-desert ecotone, shelterbelt and the inside oasis. The denatured saltation and creep components (>200 μm) were suppressed to transport into oasis-desert ecotone because of the high vegetation cover in oasis-desert ecotone. Therefore, like the shelterbelts, the oasis-desert ecotone could also block the invasion of desert. They safeguarded the oasis ecological environment together.

  13. OASIS for the Old.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franklin, Betty; Smith, Bert Kruger

    This report describes Project OASIS (Older Adults Sharing Important Skills), a project designed to provide paraprofessional mental health services to nursing home residents by providing training for older adult volunteers in areas related to mental health and the elderly, supervision by OASIS staff, and consultation by staff. The background of the…

  14. A cephalometric study of skulls from the Bahriyah oasis

    PubMed Central

    Zaki, Moushira Erfan; Soliman, Muhammad Al-Tohamy; El-Bassyouni, Hala T.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the craniofacial characteristics of crania from the Bahariyah oasis dating from the Greco-Roman period and to compare their cephalometric traits with other ancient Egyptian samples from various time periods and to evaluate sexual dimorphism. Materials and Methods: The sample comprised 149 skulls (90 males and 59 females), belonging to the Greco-Roman (332 B.C. – 395 A.D.). Lateral and postero-anterior cephalograms were taken. Sixteen linear measurements were analyzed and six indices were calculated. Results: Significant differences were found between males and females almost in all measurements. All male measurements were greater than those of the females. The study shows notable differences in the craniofacial parameters of the present sample as compared to other ancient Egyptians from various periods and from various geographical areas. Conclusion: The present study suggests that the studied crania from Bahriyah oasis had a specific craniometric phenotype, which is distinguished from other Egyptian samples from different periods, suggesting some migration could have occurred along the Egyptian Nile Valley over various times. PMID:23741149

  15. Oasis dynamics change and its influence on landscape pattern on Jinta oasis in arid China from 1963a to 2010a: Integration of multi-source satellite images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Yuchu; Gong, Jie; Sun, Peng; Gou, Xiaohua

    2014-12-01

    As one of the vital research highlights of global land use and cover change, oasis change and its interaction with landscape pattern have been regarded as an important content of regional environmental change research in arid areas. Jinta oasis, a typical agricultural oasis characterized by its dramatic exploitation and use of water and land resources in Hexi corridor, northwest arid region in China, was selected as a case to study the spatiotemporal oasis change and its effects on oasis landscape pattern. Based on integration of Keyhole satellite photographs, KATE-200 photographs, Landsat MSS, TM and ETM+ images, we evaluated and analyzed the status, trend and spatial pattern change of Jinta oasis and the characteristics of landscape pattern change by a set of mathematical models and combined this information with landscape metrics and community surveys. During the period of 1963a-2010a, Jinta oasis expanded gradually with an area increase of 219.15 km2, and the conversion between oasis and desert was frequent with a state of “imbalance-balance-extreme imbalance conditions”. Moreover, most of the changes took place in the ecotone between oasis and desert and the interior of oasis due to the reclamation of abandoned land, such as Yangjingziwan and Xiba townships. Furthermore, the area, size and spatial distribution of oasis were influenced by human activities and resulted in fundamental changes of oasis landscape pattern. The fractal characteristics, dispersion degree and fragmentation of Jinta oasis decreased and the oasis landscape tended to be simple and uniform. Oasis change trajectories and its landscape pattern were mainly influenced by water resource utilization, policies (especially land policies), demographic factors, technological advancements, as well as regional economic development. We found that time series analysis of multi-source remote sensing images and the application of an oasis change model provided a useful approach to monitor oasis change

  16. Study on the oasis corridor landscape in the arid regions based on RS and GIS methods--application of Jinta Oasis, China.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ming-guo; Wang, Xue-mei; Cheng, Guo-dong

    2003-03-01

    The study on the oasis corridor landsape is a new hotspot in the ecological environment research in the arid regions. In oasis, main corridor landscape types include river, ditch, shelterbelt and road. This paper introduces the basic ecological effects of the corridor landscape on the transporting mass and energy and obstructing desert landscape expansion and incursion. Using Geographic Information System (GIS), we have researched the corridor distribution and its spatial relationship with other landscape types in the Jinta Oasis. Based on the dynamically monitoring on the landscape pattern change of the Jinta Oasis during the latter 10 years by using Remote Sensing (RS) and GIS, the driving functions of the corridors on this change have been analyzed in detail. The analysis results showed that all kinds of corridors' characteristics can be quantified by the indexes such as length and width, ratio of perimeter and area, density and non-heterogeneity. The total corridor length of Jinta Oasis is 1838.5 km and its density is 2.1 km/km2. The corridor density of the irrigation land, forest and resident area is maximal, which shows that affection degree of the oasis corridors on them is the most. The improvement of the corridors quality is one of the important driving factors on the irrigation land and so on. The organic combination of the RS and GIS technologies and landscape research methods would be an effective means for the corridor landscape research on arid region oasis.

  17. Sedimentology of the fluvial and fluvio-marine facies of the Bahariya Formation (Early Cenomanian), Bahariya Oasis, Western Desert, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalifa, M. A.; Catuneanu, O.

    2008-05-01

    The Lower Cenomanian Bahariya Formation in the Bahariya Oasis, Western Desert, Egypt, was deposited under two coeval environmental conditions. A fully fluvial system occurs in the southern portion of the Bahariya Oasis, including depositional products of meandering and braided streams, and a coeval fluvio-marine setting is dominant to the north. These deposits are organized into four unconformity-bounded depositional sequences, whose architecture is shaped by a complex system of incised valleys. The fluvial portion of the lower two depositional sequences is dominated by low-energy, meandering systems with a tabular geometry, dominated by overbank facies. The fluvial deposits of the upper two sequences represent the product of sedimentation within braided streams, and consist mainly of amalgamated channel-fills. The braided fluvial systems form the fill of incised valleys whose orientation follows a southeast-northwest trending direction, and which truncate the underlying sequences. Four sedimentary facies have been identified within the braided-channel systems, namely thin-laminated sandstones (Sh), cross-bedded sandstones (Sp, St), massive ferruginous sandstones (Sm) and variegated mudstones (Fm). The exposed off-channel overbank facies of the meandering systems include floodplain (Fm) and crevasse splay (Sl) facies. The fluvio-marine depositional systems consist of interbedded floodplain, coastal and shallow-marine deposits. The floodplain facies include fine-grained sandstones (Sf), laminated siltstones (Stf) and mudstones (Mf) that show fining-upward cycles. The coastal to shallow-marine facies consist primarily of mudstones (Mc) and glauconitic sandstones (Gc) organized vertically in coarsening-upward prograding cyclothems topped by thin crusts of ferricrete (Fc). The four depositional sequences are present across the Bahariya Oasis, albeit with varying degrees of preservation related to post-depositional erosion associated with the formation of sequence

  18. Our OASIS

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bircher, Lisa S.; Sansenbaugher, Bonnie

    2017-01-01

    This article describes an elementary science summer day camp at East Palatine High School in East Palestine, Ohio, for students in grades K-4, aided by high school (grades 9-12) student mentors. The school's Outdoor Area for Studies in Science (OASIS) is used for formal and informal studies in science for an elementary science camp week. The camp…

  19. The Martian Oasis Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, P. H.; tomasko, M. G.; McEwen, A.; Rice, J.

    2000-07-01

    The next phase of unmanned Mars missions paves the way for astronauts to land on the surface of Mars. There are lessons to be learned from the unmanned precursor missions to the Moon and the Apollo lunar surface expeditions. These unmanned missions (Ranger, Lunar Orbiter, and Surveyor) provided the following valuable information, useful from both a scientific and engineering perspective, which was required to prepare the way for the manned exploration of the lunar surface: (1) high resolution imagery instrumental to Apollo landing site selection also tremendously advanced the state of Nearside and Farside regional geology; (2) demonstrated precision landing (less than two kilometers from target) and soft landing capability; (3) established that the surface had sufficient bearing strength to support a spacecraft; and (4) examination of the chemical composition and mechanical properties of the surface. The search for extinct or extant life on Mars will follow the water. However, geomorphic studies have shown that Mars has had liquid water on its surface throughout its geologic history. A cornucopia of potential landing sites with water histories (lakes, floodplains, oceans, deltas, hydrothermal regions) presently exist. How will we narrow down site selection and increase the likelihood of finding the signs of life? One way to do this is to identify 'Martian oases.' It is known that the Martian surface is often highly fractured and some areas have karst structures that support underground caves. Much of the water that formed the channels and valley networks is thought to be frozen underground. All that is needed to create the potential for liquid water is a near surface source of heat; recent lava flows and Martian meteorites attest to the potential for volcanic activity. If we can locate even one spot where fracturing, ice, and underground heat are co-located then we have the potential for an oasis. Such a discovery could truly excite the imaginations of both the

  20. Combining remote sensing image with DEM to identify ancient Minqin Oasis, northwest of China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Yaowen

    2008-10-01

    The developing and desertification process of Minqin oasis is representative in the whole arid area of northwest China. Combining Remote Sensing image with Digital Elevation Model (DEM) can produce the three-dimensional image of the research area which can give prominence to the spatial background of historical geography phenomenon's distribution, providing the conditions for extracting and analyzing historical geographical information thoroughly. This research rebuilds the ancient artificial Oasis based on the three-dimensional images produced by the TM digital Remote Sensing image and DEM created using 1:100000 topographic maps. The result indicates that the whole area of the ancient artificial oasis in Minqin Basin over the whole historical period reaches 321km2, in the form of discontinuous sheet, separated on the two banks of ancient Shiyang River and its branches, namely, Xishawo area, west to modern Minqin Basin and Zhongshawo area, in the center of the oasis. Except for a little of the ancient oasis unceasingly used by later people, most of it became desert. The combination of digital Remote Sensing image and DEM can integrate the advantages of both in identifying ancient oasis and improve the interpreting accuracy greatly.

  1. Analysis of Human Disturbance and Ecological Security Evolution in Oasis in Arid Area Based on LUCC: A Case Study of Oasis in the Northern Tianshan Mountain Slope Economic Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, W. J.; Chen, M. H.; Zhang, Q.; Liu, S. S.; Yang, J. N.

    2017-07-01

    Oases in arid areas are environmentally and economically vulnerable regions. Study on ecological security of oases in arid areas is of great significance to the stability and the economic development of oases. Based on Land Use/Land Cover data in 1965, 1980, 1995, 2005 and 2015, the study analyze the temporal and spatial changes in human disturbance and ecological security of oases in the Northern Tianshan Mountain Slope Economic Zone (NTMSEZ) in recent 50 years by establishing the ecological security index (ESI) through human disturbance index and landscape vulnerability index. The results showed that: in recent 50 years, the human disturbance of the NTMSEZ has been increased to current moderate human impacts. Urban construction, oasis expansion and farmland reclamation are the main factors of the increment. The human disturbance in Urumchi, Shihezi, Kuitun, Miquan and Changji is higher than that in other oases and that in core areas of oasis is higher than other areas. The ESI of the NTMSEZ increases firstly and then decreases. In most areas, the ESI is “relatively unsafe” and “critical”. However, there are increasingly more vulnerable areas, moving northwestwards and expanding southwards. The ESI gradually presents a “NW-SE” trend of zonal distribution pattern.

  2. Sequence stratigraphy of the Maastrichtian-Paleocene succession at the Dakhla Oasis, Western Desert, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hewaidy, Abdel Galil A.; Farouk, Sherif; Bazeen, Youssef S.

    2017-12-01

    The Maastrichtian-Paleocene succession at the Dakhla Oasis is marked by the presence of a typical Nile Valley Facies represented by the Dakhla and Tarawan formations in Edmonstone and Qur El Malik sections in the central and western parts of the oasis, while a mixed Nile Valley and Garra Al-Arbain facies represented by Dakhla, Kurkur and Tarawan formations in Teneida section in the eastern part of the oasis adjacent to the Abu Tartur Plateau. These sections were examined for their foraminiferal contents, lithologic characters and stratigraphic boundaries. The distribution of foraminifera in the studied sections is variable and inconstant, as the planktonics are concentrated only at certain levels, which may be considered as a time intervals of transgression and maximum flooding surfaces. Eight planktonic biozones are distinguished in this work; of theses two are of Maastrichtain age and six are of Paleocene age. Eight 3rd order depositional sequences are recognized in the studied Maastrichtian-Paleocene succession based on the time stratigraphic boundaries released from the planktonic foraminifera and sea level changes which are released from the paleoecologic interpretations. The distinguished sequences are subdivided into their systems tracts based on the paleobathymetric interpretations of P/B% and benthic biofacies analysis. These sequences are bounded by eight sequence boundaries (SB A - SB H) represented by unconformity surfaces and depositional hiatuses. The correlation of the sequence boundaries of the established depositional sequences with the eustatic sea level curve, suggesting that these depositional sequences were resulted from the interplay of eustatic sea-level changes and local tectonic activities.

  3. Development and performance of a new version of the OASIS coupler, OASIS3-MCT_3.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craig, Anthony; Valcke, Sophie; Coquart, Laure

    2017-09-01

    OASIS is coupling software developed primarily for use in the climate community. It provides the ability to couple different models with low implementation and performance overhead. OASIS3-MCT is the latest version of OASIS. It includes several improvements compared to OASIS3, including elimination of a separate hub coupler process, parallelization of the coupling communication and run-time grid interpolation, and the ability to easily reuse mapping weight files. OASIS3-MCT_3.0 is the latest release and includes the ability to couple between components running sequentially on the same set of tasks as well as to couple within a single component between different grids or decompositions such as physics, dynamics, and I/O. OASIS3-MCT has been tested with different configurations on up to 32 000 processes, with components running on high-resolution grids with up to 1.5 million grid cells, and with over 10 000 2-D coupling fields. Several new features will be available in OASIS3-MCT_4.0, and some of those are also described.

  4. An Evaluation of Operational Airspace Sectorization Integrated System (OASIS) Advisory Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Paul U.; Mogford, Richard H.; Bridges, Wayne; Buckley, Nathan; Evans, Mark; Gujral, Vimmy; Lee, Hwasoo; Peknik, Daniel; Preston, William

    2013-01-01

    In January 2013, a human-in-the-loop evaluation of the Operational Airspace Sectorization Integrated System (OASIS) was conducted in the Airspace Operations Laboratory of the Human Systems Integration Division (Code TH) in conjunction with the Aviation Systems Division (Code AF). The development of OASIS is a major activity of the Dynamic Airspace Configuration (DAC) research focus area within the Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate (ARMD) Airspace Systems Program. OASIS is an advisory tool to assist Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) En Route Area Supervisors in their planning of sector combinedecombine operations as well as opening closing of Data-side (D-side) control positions. These advisory solutions are tailored to the predicted traffic demand over the next few hours. During the experiment, eight retired FAA personnel served as participants for a part-task evaluation of OASIS functionality, covering the user interface as well as the underlying algorithm. Participants gave positive feedback on both the user interface and the algorithm solutions for airspace configuration, including an excellent average rating of 94 on the tool usability scales. They also suggested various enhancements to the OASIS tool, which will be incorporated into the next tool development cycle for the full-scale human-in-the-loop evaluation to be conducted later this year.

  5. Recreational value of an oasis in Oman.

    PubMed

    Zekri, Slim; Mbaga, Msafiri; Fouzai, Ayoub; Al-Shaqsi, Saif

    2011-07-01

    Increasing demand for water to develop non-agricultural activities is causing water to be diverted to high-value uses at the expense of irrigation. However, agriculture provides a flow of amenities in the desert environment which are not either accounted or paid. Oases are spread all over the globe and are threatened for various reasons among which is the high pressure of demand for fresh water. This paper estimates the recreation use value of an oasis. The paper is based on the Misfat Al-Abryeen oasis in Oman, a man-made area of streams and woodland. The travel cost method is used through an on-site questionnaire distributed to 230 visitors. Around 75% of visitors to the oasis also visited other historical or ecological sites during the same day-trip. The econometric model is estimated using negative binomial regression with endogenous stratification. The average consumer surplus, or benefit, from visiting Misfat Al-Abryeen is estimated at US$ 104.74 per individual per trip. The total social benefit from this oasis is estimated at $366,590 per year. These results underscore the importance of the role played by irrigated agriculture in the provision of amenity services for the tourism sector in a desert environment. The sustainability of the irrigation activity depends on the recognition of the recreation role of oases and the transfer of part of these benefits to the farmers who maintain the irrigation system. The implementation of an entrance fee to the oasis might increase farmers' profit by 6-21%.

  6. Recreational Value of an Oasis in Oman

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zekri, Slim; Mbaga, Msafiri; Fouzai, Ayoub; Al-Shaqsi, Saif

    2011-07-01

    Increasing demand for water to develop non-agricultural activities is causing water to be diverted to high-value uses at the expense of irrigation. However, agriculture provides a flow of amenities in the desert environment which are not either accounted or paid. Oases are spread all over the globe and are threatened for various reasons among which is the high pressure of demand for fresh water. This paper estimates the recreation use value of an oasis. The paper is based on the Misfat Al-Abryeen oasis in Oman, a man-made area of streams and woodland. The travel cost method is used through an on-site questionnaire distributed to 230 visitors. Around 75% of visitors to the oasis also visited other historical or ecological sites during the same day-trip. The econometric model is estimated using negative binomial regression with endogenous stratification. The average consumer surplus, or benefit, from visiting Misfat Al-Abryeen is estimated at US 104.74 per individual per trip. The total social benefit from this oasis is estimated at 366,590 per year. These results underscore the importance of the role played by irrigated agriculture in the provision of amenity services for the tourism sector in a desert environment. The sustainability of the irrigation activity depends on the recognition of the recreation role of oases and the transfer of part of these benefits to the farmers who maintain the irrigation system. The implementation of an entrance fee to the oasis might increase farmers' profit by 6-21%.

  7. The OASIS Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, James H., Jr.; Barghouty, Abdulnasser F.; Binns, W. robert; Christl, Mark; Cosse, Charles B.; Guzik, T. Gregory; deNolfo, Georgia A.; Hams,Thomas; Isbert, Joachim; Israel, Martin H.; hide

    2010-01-01

    The Orbiting Astrophysical Observatory in Space (OASIS) is a mission to investigate Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCRs), a major feature of our galaxy. OASIS will use measurements of GCRs to determine the cosmic ray source, where they are accelerated, to investigate local accelerators and to learn what they can tell us about the interstellar medium and the processes that occur in it. OASIS will determine the astrophysical sources of both the material and acceleration of GCRs by measuring the abundances of the rare actinide nuclei and make direct measurements of the spectrum and anisotropy of electrons at energies up to approx.10 TeV, well beyond the range of the Fermi and AMS missions. OASIS has two instruments. The Energetic Trans-Iron Composition Experiment (ENTICE) instrument measures elemental composition. It resolves individual elements with atomic number (Z) from 10 to 130 and has a collecting power of 60m2.str.yrs, >20 times larger than previous instruments, and with improved resolution. The sample of 10(exp 10) GCRs collected by ENTICE will include .100 well-resolved actinides. The High Energy Particle Calorimeter Telescope (HEPCaT) is an ionization calorimeter that will extend the electron spectrum into the TeV region for the first time. It has 7.5 sq m.str.yrs of collecting power. This talk will describe the scientific objectives of the OASIS mission and its discovery potential. The mission and its two instruments which have been designed to accomplish this investigation will also be described.

  8. Perennial Antarctic lake ice: an oasis for life in a polar desert

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Priscu, J. C.; Fritsen, C. H.; Adams, E. E.; Giovannoni, S. J.; Paerl, H. W.; McKay, C. P.; Doran, P. T.; Gordon, D. A.; Lanoil, B. D.; Pinckney, J. L.

    1998-01-01

    The permanent ice covers of Antarctic lakes in the McMurdo Dry Valleys develop liquid water inclusions in response to solar heating of internal aeolian-derived sediments. The ice sediment particles serve as nutrient (inorganic and organic)-enriched microzones for the establishment of a physiologically and ecologically complex microbial consortium capable of contemporaneous photosynthesis, nitrogen fixation, and decomposition. The consortium is capable of physically and chemically establishing and modifying a relatively nutrient- and organic matter-enriched microbial "oasis" embedded in the lake ice cover.

  9. Perennial Antarctic lake ice: an oasis for life in a polar desert.

    PubMed

    Priscu, J C; Fritsen, C H; Adams, E E; Giovannoni, S J; Paerl, H W; McKay, C P; Doran, P T; Gordon, D A; Lanoil, B D; Pinckney, J L

    1998-06-26

    The permanent ice covers of Antarctic lakes in the McMurdo Dry Valleys develop liquid water inclusions in response to solar heating of internal aeolian-derived sediments. The ice sediment particles serve as nutrient (inorganic and organic)-enriched microzones for the establishment of a physiologically and ecologically complex microbial consortium capable of contemporaneous photosynthesis, nitrogen fixation, and decomposition. The consortium is capable of physically and chemically establishing and modifying a relatively nutrient- and organic matter-enriched microbial "oasis" embedded in the lake ice cover.

  10. Conceptual framework and trend analysis of water-level responses to hydrologic stresses, Pahute Mesa–Oasis Valley groundwater basin, Nevada, 1966-2016

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jackson, Tracie R.; Fenelon, Joseph M.

    2018-05-31

    This report identifies water-level trends in wells and provides a conceptual framework that explains the hydrologic stresses and factors causing the trends in the Pahute Mesa–Oasis Valley (PMOV) groundwater basin, southern Nevada. Water levels in 79 wells were analyzed for trends between 1966 and 2016. The magnitude and duration of water-level responses to hydrologic stresses were analyzed graphically, statistically, and with water-level models.The conceptual framework consists of multiple stress-specific conceptual models to explain water-level responses to the following hydrologic stresses: recharge, evapotranspiration, pumping, nuclear testing, and wellbore equilibration. Dominant hydrologic stresses affecting water-level trends in each well were used to categorize trends as nonstatic, transient, or steady state.The conceptual framework of water-level responses to hydrologic stresses and trend analyses provide a comprehensive understanding of the PMOV basin and vicinity. The trend analysis links water-level fluctuations in wells to hydrologic stresses and potential factors causing the trends. Transient and steady-state trend categorizations can be used to determine the appropriate water-level data for groundwater studies.

  11. Photomosaics and logs of trenches on the San Andreas Fault, Thousand Palms Oasis, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fumal, Thomas E.; Frost, William T.; Garvin, Christopher; Hamilton, John C.; Jaasma, Monique; Rymer, Michael J.

    2004-01-01

    We present photomosaics and logs of the walls of trenches excavated for a paleoseismic study at Thousand Palms Oasis (Fig. 1). The site is located on the Mission Creek strand of the San Andreas fault zone, one of two major active strands of the fault in the Indio Hills along the northeast margin of the Coachella Valley (Fig. 2). The Coachella Valley section is the most poorly understood major part of the San Andreas fault with regard to slip rate and timing of past large-magnitude earthquakes, and therefore earthquake hazard. No large earthquakes have occurred for more than three centuries, the longest elapsed time for any part of the southern San Andreas fault. In spite of this, the Working Group on California Earthquake Probabilities (1995) assigned the lowest 30-year conditional probability on the southern San Andreas fault to the Coachella Valley. Models of the behavior of this part of the fault, however, have been based on very limited geologic data. The Thousand Palms Oasis is an attractive location for paleoseismic study primarily because of the well-bedded late Holocene sedimentary deposits with abundant layers of organic matter for radiocarbon dating necessary to constrain the timing of large prehistoric earthquakes. Previous attempts to develop a chronology of paleoearthquakes for the region have been hindered by the scarcity of in-situ 14C-dateable material for age control in this desert environment. Also, the fault in the vicinity of Thousand Palms Oasis consists of a single trace that is well expressed, both geomorphically and as a vegetation lineament (Figs. 2, 3). Results of our investigations are discussed in Fumal et al. (2002) and indicate that four and probably five surface-rupturing earthquakes occurred along this part of the fault during the past 1200 years. The average recurrence time for these earthquakes is 215 ± 25 years, although interevent times may have been as short as a few decades or as long as 400 years. Thus, although the elapsed

  12. Spatial distribution of an ancient agricultural oasis in Juyan, northwestern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Ningke; Li, Xin

    2014-09-01

    Activities related to agricultural cultivation are some of the major human drivers of landscape change on the Earth's surface. Archaeological remains can provide qualitative evidence for studies of past agricultural development and environmental conditions. The ancient Juyan Oasis, which once flourished along the historic Silk Road, was a typical oasis of downstream inland river basins in the arid zone of northwestern China. Historical records and archaeological discoveries have qualitatively shown that the oasis supported extensive agricultural activities in this historical period from the Han Dynasty to the early Ming Dynasty (B.C. 202-A.D. 1375), which can be traced back to 2,000 years ago. In this study, different types of archaeological remains (including archaeological sites, ground surface artifacts, ancient cultivation ruins, and agricultural irrigation canals) that were obtained and identified from previous archaeological reports, field inspections, and remote sensing imagery were used to determine the spatial extent of the agricultural oasis in the historical period of interest. Our approach used multiple data sources in order to increase the accuracy and reliability of the results compared to previous studies. Our results distinctly suggested that much of the oasis was cultivated during the historical periods considered. Additionally, the arable land area in the historical period considered was roughly estimated to be approximately (3.39-4.75) × 104 ha. These findings regarding the spatial distribution of this ancient agricultural oasis and its arable land were reasonably determined to represent the ancient agricultural development that occurred in the Juyan Oasis better than results obtained from single sources of data.

  13. The spatio-temporal variability of groundwater depth in a typical desert-oasis ecotone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Guohua; Zhao, Wenzhi

    2015-06-01

    Eight groundwater observation wells were installed along the river plain, where the landscapes varied from floodplain, to oasis farmland, to desert-oasis ecotone to desert, in a typical desert-oasis ecotone in northwestern China. Ten years of data were used to analyze temporal and spatial changes in the groundwater depth. The results indicated that in the last decade: (1) the groundwater depths in the floodplain (GW1) and the desert (GW8) were basically stable; (2) the groundwater depths in the oasis farmland (GW2, GW3, GW4) increased dramatically: the annual fluctuations were 1.43, 1.01 and 0.79 m respectively, with the groundwater depths increasing by 0.13-0.18 m every year; (3) the groundwater depths in the desert-oasis ecotone (GW5, GW6, GW7) also increased dramatically: the annual fluctuations were 1.10, 1.06 and 1.05 m respectively, and the depths increased by 0.10-0.15 m every year; (4) the influence distance between the river and both the farmland and the desert-oasis ecotone was about 1000-2000 m in the study area. These results show that the natural seasonal fluctuation influence on groundwater depths was not significant, but the human-induced fluctuations such as intensive irrigation caused a significant increase in groundwater depth in both the farmland and the desert-oasis ecotone, seriously affecting sustainable agriculture development and the environment, in the oasis.

  14. Oasis deposits in the southern margin of the Taklimakan Desert and abrupt environmental changes during the last 30 ka

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shu, P.; Li, B.; Wang, H.; Cheng, P.; An, Z.; Zhou, W.; Zhang, D. D.

    2017-12-01

    Taklimakan Desert, the largest arid landform in the Eurasia, is one of the most important dust sources in the world. Growing evidences shows that millennial-scale abrupt climate changes during the last glacial period in the region. However, records on millennial-scale climate and environmental changes remain poorly understood because dating eolian, lacustrine, and fluvial sediments and establishing the reliable environmental proxies from these records are always challenging. Here, we present 32 AMS 14C dates of bulk sediments, grain size, and Rb/Sr ratio parameters from the oasis sequence and dates of bulk loess and charcoal from the upstream source regions to examine the significance of oasis sediments on millennial-scale environmental changes in the Taklimakan Desert. We found that substantial reversal of radiocarbon dates on total organic carbon (TOC) was controlled by source region organic carbon input. Loess hills, alpine meadow north of the study region provided fluvial deposits along drainage system and deflation in the river valleys further provide eolain materials. We argue that early oasis deposits experienced deflation and re-deposition less severe than the younger oasis deposits. After refining radiocarbon age-depth relationships for an age model by Bacon package, proxy records show substantial abrupt fluctuations in climate and environments during the last glacial period, among which three wet intervals, two dry periods are identified. The wetter and warmer conditions during the Holocene facilitated human to occupy the oasis.

  15. 42 CFR 484.20 - Condition of participation: Reporting OASIS information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... layout, edit specifications, and data dictionary, and that includes the required OASIS data set. [64 FR... OASIS data collected in accordance with § 484.55. (a) Standard: Encoding and transmitting OASIS data. An... beneficiary. (b) Standard: Accuracy of encoded OASIS data. The encoded OASIS data must accurately reflect the...

  16. 42 CFR 484.20 - Condition of participation: Reporting OASIS information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... layout, edit specifications, and data dictionary, and that includes the required OASIS data set. [64 FR... OASIS data collected in accordance with § 484.55. (a) Standard: Encoding and transmitting OASIS data. An... beneficiary. (b) Standard: Accuracy of encoded OASIS data. The encoded OASIS data must accurately reflect the...

  17. 42 CFR 484.20 - Condition of participation: Reporting OASIS information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... layout, edit specifications, and data dictionary, and that includes the required OASIS data set. [64 FR... OASIS data collected in accordance with § 484.55. (a) Standard: Encoding and transmitting OASIS data. An... beneficiary. (b) Standard: Accuracy of encoded OASIS data. The encoded OASIS data must accurately reflect the...

  18. 42 CFR 484.20 - Condition of participation: Reporting OASIS information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... layout, edit specifications, and data dictionary, and that includes the required OASIS data set. [64 FR... OASIS data collected in accordance with § 484.55. (a) Standard: Encoding and transmitting OASIS data. An... beneficiary. (b) Standard: Accuracy of encoded OASIS data. The encoded OASIS data must accurately reflect the...

  19. Orbiting Astrophysical Spectrometer in Space (OASIS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, James H.

    2008-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the OASIS mission. The contents include: 1) Introduction to Cosmic Rays; 2) How are they accelerated?; 3) OASIS Objectives; 4) 5) HEPCaT Instrument; and 6) ENTICE Instrument

  20. Windblown sediment transport and loss in a desert–oasis ecotone in the Tarim Basin

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The Tarim Basin is regarded as one of the most highly erodible areas in China. Desert comprises 64% of the land use in the Basin, but the desert–oasis ecotone plays a prominent role in maintaining oasis ecological security and stability. Yet, little is known concerning the magnitude of windblown sed...

  1. OASIS modulates hypoxia pathway activity to regulate bone angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Min; Kanemoto, Soshi; Cui, Xiang; Kaneko, Masayuki; Asada, Rie; Matsuhisa, Koji; Tanimoto, Keiji; Yoshimoto, Yuki; Shukunami, Chisa; Imaizumi, Kazunori

    2015-01-01

    OASIS/CREB3L1, an endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-resident transcription factor, plays important roles in osteoblast differentiation. In this study, we identified new crosstalk between OASIS and the hypoxia signaling pathway, which regulates vascularization during bone development. RT-PCR and real-time PCR analyses revealed significant decreases in the expression levels of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) target genes such as vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGFA) in OASIS-deficient (Oasis−/−) mouse embryonic fibroblasts. In coimmunoprecipitation experiments, the N-terminal fragment of OASIS (OASIS-N; activated form of OASIS) bound to HIF-1α through the bZIP domain. Luciferase assays showed that OASIS-N promoted the transcription activities of a reporter gene via a hypoxia-response element (HRE). Furthermore, the expression levels of an angiogenic factor Vegfa was decreased in Oasis−/− osteoblasts. Immunostaining and metatarsal angiogenesis assay showed retarded vascularization in bone tissue of Oasis−/− mice. These results suggest that OASIS affects the expression of HIF-1α target genes through the protein interaction with HIF-1α, and that OASIS-HIF-1α complexes may play essential roles in angiogenesis during bone development. PMID:26558437

  2. Entomofauna of Ziban Oasis, Biskra, Algeria

    PubMed Central

    Deghiche-Diab, Nassima; Porcelli, Francisco; Belhamra, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    An inventory was carried out at five stations in the oasis of Ziban, an oasis that is characterized by its high-quality dates, in order to study the relationships between the oasis ecosystem and its insect fauna. Specimens were sampled using pitfall traps containing ethylene glycol as a preservative. In total, 115 arthropod species were collected during 5 months of survey. These species belonged to 61 families, 17 orders, and 4 classes (12 orders from Insecta, 3 from Arachnida, 1 from Chilopoda, and 1 from Malocostraca). The most represented insect orders were Coleoptera (44.42%), Hymenoptera (20.86%), and Lepidoptera (7.87%). Represented in the collections were phytophagous, omnivorous, and predator/parasite species. Given the large number of species collected, and the largely unknown relationships existing between the various ecological groups, this study is a first step in the description of the oasis entomofauna. PMID:25855607

  3. Windblown sediment transport and loss in a desert-oasis ecotone in the Tarim Basin.

    PubMed

    Pi, Huawei; Sharratt, Brenton; Lei, Jiaqiang

    2017-08-10

    The Tarim Basin is regarded as one of the most highly erodible areas in China. Desert comprises 64% of the land use in the Basin, but the desert-oasis ecotone plays a prominent role in maintaining oasis ecological security and stability. Yet, little is known concerning the magnitude of windblown sediment transport in a desert-oasis ecotone. Therefore, aeolian sediment transport and loss was assessed from a desert-oasis experimental site located near Alaer City in the northwestern Tarim Basin. Sediment transport and factors governing transport were measured during three high wind events in 2012 and four events in 2013. Sediment transport was measured to a height of 10 m using passive aeolian airborne sediment samplers. The mass flux profile over the eroding surface was well represented by the power-law (R 2  > 0.77). Sediment loss from the site ranged from 118 g m -2 for the 20-24Apr 2012 wind event to 2925 g m -2 for the 31Mar-11Apr 2012 event. Suspension accounted for 67.4 to 84.8% of sediment loss across all high wind events. Our results indicate the severity of wind erosion in a desert-oasis ecotone and thus encourage adoption of management practices that will enhance oasis ecological security.

  4. False color image of Safsaf Oasis in southern Egypt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This is a false color image of the uninhabited Safsaf Oasis in southern Egypt near the Egypt/Sudan border. It was produced from data obtained from the L-band and C-band radars that are part of the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar onboard the Shuttle Endeavour on April 9, 1994. The image is centered at 22 degrees North latitude, 29 degrees East longitude. It shows detailed structures of bedrock, and the dark blue sinuous lines are braided channels that occupy part of an old broad river valley. Virtually everything visible on this radar composite image cannot be seen either when standing on the ground or when viewing photographs or satellite images such as Landsat. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory alternative photo number is P-43920.

  5. From Workbook to Web: Building an Information Literacy OASIS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosen, Jeff; Castro, Gina M.

    2002-01-01

    Describes a Web-based information literacy tutorial, OASIS (Online Advancement of Student Information Skills), developed at San Francisco State University. Discussion includes: core competencies identified; design structure and content; planning and marketing; problems and partnerships in the pilot year of OASIS; restructuring the OASIS tutorial;…

  6. Geological heritage diversity in the Faiyum Oasis (Egypt): A comprehensive assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sallam, Emad S.; Fathy, Esraa E.; Ruban, Dmitry A.; Ponedelnik, Alena A.; Yashalova, Natalia N.

    2018-04-01

    The Faiyum Oasis in the Western Desert of Egypt is famous for its palaeontological localities (Cenozoic whales, primates, etc.) of global importance, but its geological heritage has been not studied in the modern theoretical frame. The new investigation based on the field studies and the literature review permits comprehensive assessment of the geological heritage diversity in this oasis. For this purposes, unique geological features are inventoried with establishment of their geological essence, rank, relative abundance, and intrinsic diversity. As a result, the existence of ten geological heritage types in the Faiyum Oasis is found. These include palaeontological, palaeogeographical, geomorphological, stratigraphical, sedimentary (merged with mineralogical), hydrological coupled with geochemical, igneous, and economical types. From them, the palaeontological and palaeogeographical types are ranked globally, and the geomorphological and hydrological types are ranked nationally. The other types are either of regional (provincial) or local importance. Some hills and cliffs can serve as viewpoint sites for observation of the local geological landscape. The relative abundance and the intrinsic diversity of the unique geological features vary between low and high. Generally, the concentration of this geological heritage in the Faiyum Oasis permits recognition of the geodiversity hotspot that requires conservation and use for tourism purposes. The protected areas located in the oasis and the existing tourism programs do not offer geoconservation and geotourism activities for the entire hotspot. The possible solution of this problem would be creation of a large geopark similar in its design to the Jeju Island Geopark in South Korea. There are important premises for geotourism development in the Faiyum Oasis and its combination with the archaeological and industrial tourism. Nature conservation failures in this geopark should be avoided; some recommendations are given on

  7. Reconnaissance of the chemical quality of water in western Utah, Part I: Sink Valley area, drainage basins of Skull, Rush, and Government Creek Valleys, and the Dugway Valley-Old River Bed area

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waddell, K.M.

    1967-01-01

    This report presents data collected during the first part of an investigation that was started in 1963 by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Utah Geological and Mineralogical Survey. The investigation has the purpose of providing information about the chemical quality of water in western Utah that will help interested parties to evaluate the suitability of the water for various uses in a broad area of Utah where little information of this type previously has been available. The area studied includes the Sink Valley area, the drainage basins of Skull, Rush, and Government Creek Valleys, and the Dugway Valley-Old River Bed area (fig. 1). Osamu Hattori and G. L. Hewitt started the investigation, and the author completed it and prepared the report.

  8. OASIS: Prototyping Graphical Interfaces to Networked Information.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buckland, Michael K.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Describes the latest modifications being made to OASIS, a front-end enhancement to the University of California's MELVYL online union catalog. Highlights include the X Windows interface; multiple database searching to act as an information network; Lisp implementation for flexible data representation; and OASIS commands and features to help…

  9. Oasis: online analysis of small RNA deep sequencing data.

    PubMed

    Capece, Vincenzo; Garcia Vizcaino, Julio C; Vidal, Ramon; Rahman, Raza-Ur; Pena Centeno, Tonatiuh; Shomroni, Orr; Suberviola, Irantzu; Fischer, Andre; Bonn, Stefan

    2015-07-01

    Oasis is a web application that allows for the fast and flexible online analysis of small-RNA-seq (sRNA-seq) data. It was designed for the end user in the lab, providing an easy-to-use web frontend including video tutorials, demo data and best practice step-by-step guidelines on how to analyze sRNA-seq data. Oasis' exclusive selling points are a differential expression module that allows for the multivariate analysis of samples, a classification module for robust biomarker detection and an advanced programming interface that supports the batch submission of jobs. Both modules include the analysis of novel miRNAs, miRNA targets and functional analyses including GO and pathway enrichment. Oasis generates downloadable interactive web reports for easy visualization, exploration and analysis of data on a local system. Finally, Oasis' modular workflow enables for the rapid (re-) analysis of data. Oasis is implemented in Python, R, Java, PHP, C++ and JavaScript. It is freely available at http://oasis.dzne.de. stefan.bonn@dzne.de Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press.

  10. Coastal, valley, and oasis interaction: impact on the evolution of ancient populations in the South Central Andes.

    PubMed

    Varela, Héctor H; Cocilovo, Jose A; Fuchs, María L; O'Brien, Tyler G

    2014-12-01

    The existing biocultural links are analyzed among ancient inhabitants of the Cochabamba valleys (Bolivia) from the Formative and Tiwanaku periods, coastal and inland Azapa region (Chile) from the Late Archaic to the Late periods, and the Atacama Desert oases (Chile) from the Formative period to the time of European contact. Craniometric information obtained from a sample of 565 individuals from different sites of the studied regions was evaluated using methods derived from quantitative genetics and multivariate statistical analysis techniques. It is shown that during the Formative and Tiwanaku periods inhabitants of the Cochabamba valleys maintained contact with the population of northern Chile. This contact was more fluid with the people from the interior valley of Azapa than it was with the settlers of San Pedro Atacama (SPA). An important biological affinity in the Late Period between the inhabitants of the Azapa valley and the late SPA groups is also examined. The Late-Inca Catarpe SPA sample shows a broad genetic variability shared with the majority of the groups studied. The results reaffirm the differences between the coastal and interior Azapa valley groups and strengthen the hypothesis of two pathways to populating the south central Andean area. The divergence observed among subpopulations can be explained by the spatiotemporal dispersion between them, genetic drift dispersion compensated by the action of gene flow, and cultural norms that regulate within group mating. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. The oasis effect and summer temperature rise in arid regions - case study in Tarim Basin

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Xingming; Li, Weihong; Deng, Haijun

    2016-01-01

    This study revealed the influence of the oasis effect on summer temperatures based on MODIS Land Surface Temperature (LST) and meteorological data. The results showed that the oasis effect occurs primarily in the summer. For a single oasis, the maximum oasis cold island intensity based on LST (OCILST) was 3.82 °C and the minimum value was 2.32 °C. In terms of the annual change in OCILST, the mean value of all oases ranged from 2.47 °C to 3.56 °C from 2001 to 2013. Net radiation (Rn) can be used as a key predictor of OCILST and OCItemperature (OCI based on air temperature). On this basis, we reconstructed a long time series (1961–2014) of OCItemperature and Tbase(air temperature without the disturbance of oasis effect). Our results indicated that the reason for the increase in the observed temperatures was the significant decrease in the OCItemperature over the past 50 years. In arid regions, the data recorded in weather stations not only underestimated the mean temperature of the entire study area but also overestimated the increasing trend of the temperature. These discrepancies are due to the limitations in the spatial distribution of weather stations and the disturbance caused by the oasis effect. PMID:27739500

  12. Policies, Land Use, and Water Resource Management in an Arid Oasis Ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Xian; Liao, Jie; Hsing, Youtian; Huang, Cuihua; Liu, Famin

    2015-05-01

    This paper addresses two questions concerning the relationship between state policies and environmental transformation in China in the past four decades. The first one deals with the promotion of agricultural productivity since the 1980s; the second, the water conservation measures as a response to the water crisis that peaked in the early 2000s. We had chosen Minqin County in northwestern China, one of the most fragile arid oasis systems in the world, as the study area. We found that the irrigated farmland in up and midstream areas had greatly expanded between the 1980s and the 2000s under the government policy of promoting commodity grain production. As a result, the runoff flowing into Minqin Oasis had reduced 80 % from the 1950s to early 2000s. Irrigated farmland in Minqin Oasis expanded 15.76 % from 1995 to 2000. In the 2000s, because of the changing policy discourse that has shifted from productivity to conservation, a new set of environmentally framed policies has restructured agricultural production in Minqin by 2005. These new policies included establishing a watershed-level water management system, promoting drought resistant crops, introducing water-saving irrigation measures, and forced reduction of irrigated farming acreage. These policies have produced positive results in terms of greater coverage of vegetation, rising ground water table, and reduction of evaporation. Nevertheless, new policies have also brought new challenges to both farmers and policy makers to keep the balance between poverty reduction and environmental sustainability in Minqin Oasis in the historically poor region in China's Northwest.

  13. [Landscape pattern and productivity characteristics of the oasis landscape ecosystem in Linze, Gansu, China].

    PubMed

    Liu, Xuelu; Ren, Jizhou; Zhang, Zihe

    2002-08-01

    Oasis landscape ecosystem is composed of 10 landscape elements, i.e., residence land, cultivated land, grassland, forestland, water area, water system, road, rocky desert, sandy desert, and gravel desert. Among the elements, cultivated land formed by human being production covers the most of the area, is most connected, and hence, is the matrix of the oasis landscape ecosystem. Residence land, grassland, forestland, water area, rocky desert, sandy desert, and gravel desert are patches. Residence land and forestland generate from human being production, while rocky desert, gravel desert and sandy desert are the remnant with the human being disturbance. Water region and grassland are the environmental resources remnant after natural disturbance. Water system and road are corridors. Cultivated land dominated in plant production should be utilized with more productive layers through developing animal production other than expanding used-area to maintain the landscape heterogeneity and diversity of the oasis landscape ecosystem. For remnant and environmental resource patches, it should be profitable in preserving and stabilizing landscape heterogeneity and diversity, exploiting the functions of water and soil conservation, tourism, windbreak and sand fixation. For landscape elements remnant only, it should be fruitful in avoiding degeneration of the landscape pattern to explore their preceding plant production with moderate plant production.

  14. Oasis 2: improved online analysis of small RNA-seq data.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Raza-Ur; Gautam, Abhivyakti; Bethune, Jörn; Sattar, Abdul; Fiosins, Maksims; Magruder, Daniel Sumner; Capece, Vincenzo; Shomroni, Orr; Bonn, Stefan

    2018-02-14

    Small RNA molecules play important roles in many biological processes and their dysregulation or dysfunction can cause disease. The current method of choice for genome-wide sRNA expression profiling is deep sequencing. Here we present Oasis 2, which is a new main release of the Oasis web application for the detection, differential expression, and classification of small RNAs in deep sequencing data. Compared to its predecessor Oasis, Oasis 2 features a novel and speed-optimized sRNA detection module that supports the identification of small RNAs in any organism with higher accuracy. Next to the improved detection of small RNAs in a target organism, the software now also recognizes potential cross-species miRNAs and viral and bacterial sRNAs in infected samples. In addition, novel miRNAs can now be queried and visualized interactively, providing essential information for over 700 high-quality miRNA predictions across 14 organisms. Robust biomarker signatures can now be obtained using the novel enhanced classification module. Oasis 2 enables biologists and medical researchers to rapidly analyze and query small RNA deep sequencing data with improved precision, recall, and speed, in an interactive and user-friendly environment. Oasis 2 is implemented in Java, J2EE, mysql, Python, R, PHP and JavaScript. It is freely available at https://oasis.dzne.de.

  15. Lunar oasis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duke, Michael B.; Niehoff, John

    1989-01-01

    The 'lunar oasis' emphasizes development toward self-sufficiency in order to reduce dependence on the earth for resupply, and to enable expansion utilizing indigeneous resources. The oasis phase includes: (1) habitation and work facilities for 10 people, (2) capability for extraction of volatile consumables (H2O, O2, N2, etc.) from indigenous resources for resupply of losses and filling of reservoirs, and (3) a highly closed life support system, including food production. In the consolidation phase, the base grows from 10 to 30 crewmembers. Lunar resources are used for expanding the lunar foothold, including construction of habitats, extraction of metals for the fabrication of products for maintenance and repair, and expansion of the power system. The strategy does not produce propellants for space transportation. A 10-year scenario is laid out, which contains all elements needed to allow the base to enter a self-expanding utilization phase. Three lunar missions yer year, two cargo missions and one crew flight, are required. At the end of a decade, the base is producing more than it requires for its continued support, although it is unlikely to be completely self-sufficient.

  16. Theory of stability, and regulation and control of ecological system in oasis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Xiaoling; Chao, Jiping

    2003-06-01

    Starting with analysis on the evolving course of oasis and the characteristics and evolution of transitional zone between oasis and desert, in consideration of ecological elements including plant stomata resistance, area covered by vegetation, and physical elements including albedo of vegetation and bare soil, atmosphere temperature, and humidity, under the condition of the balance among net radiation flux, latent heat flux, and sensible heat flux, the following are calculated: temperatures of vegetation and bare soil in different conditions, as well as the evapotranspiration rate of ecosystem. Analysis on evapotranspiration rate indicates that it depends on both the climate of environment and the physiological and ecological conditions of plants. On certain conditions, the evapotranspiration rate of transitional zone between oasis and desert (i.e. area covered by vegetation less than 20%), in some parameter domains, appears in bifurcation or multiequilibrium state. Meanwhile, in such area, ecosystem is extremely unstable. Any minor change to the balance will cause either increase or reduction of area covered by vegetation in ecosystem, on the basis of discussion on the emergency of these phenomena. This paper is attempting to propose an effective way of destruction and rebuilt ecosystem in transitional zone. The way is to control the evaporation of plant through selecting anti-drought country plant with big stomata resistance, and modify the roughness of the underlying surface in ecosystem by establishing rational interspace structure of plant community, so as to put the degenerative ecosystem into the natural succession track. This primary theory is being verified through observation and analysis on historical data.

  17. Principal facts for gravity stations in the Elko, Steptoe Valley, Coyote Spring Valley, and Sheep Range areas, eastern and southern Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Berger, D.L.; Schaefer, D.H.; Frick, E.A.

    1990-01-01

    Principal facts for 537 gravity stations in the carbonate-rock province of eastern and southern Nevada are tabulated and presented. The gravity data were collected in support of groundwater studies in several valleys. The study areas include the Elko area, northern Steptoe Valley, Coyote Spring Valley, and the western Sheep Range area. The data for each site include values for latitude, longitude, altitude, observed gravity, free- air anomaly, terrain correction, and Bouguer anomaly (calculated at a bedrock density of 2.67 g/cu cm. (USGS)

  18. Environmental engineering interventions to control the expansion of salty lakes and marshes in siwa oasis.

    PubMed

    El-Naggar, Hesham M

    2010-01-01

    The main activity in Siwa Oasis society is the agriculture, it depends on the groundwater. The agricultural drainage water and the unused saline water of naturally flowing springs are poured into four main salty lakes. This leads to an increase in the surface area of the saltwater lakes, marshes and rise in water table levels. to investigate some environmental engineering interventions to control the expansion of saltwater surface area in Siwa Oasis. Field visits, observation sheets and questionnaire survey with farmers were carried out to find out the main environmental problems in the Oasis. Environmental survey was carried out to collect different rocks and stones samples as natural construction materials from the desert that surrounds Siwa Oasis. Physical analyses, chemical composition and principal mechanical parameters were conducted on the collected samples. After the analysis, the safa rocks were the best natural construction materials in the Siwa Oasis. So, it could be used to build a construction wall around the salty lakes and marshes. Walls could convert the lakes into basins. The water will be evaporated at high rate during summer season by solar energy. After evaporation, the remaining salty rock named "karshef" can be easily collected from the lakes to be used as a low cost construction material for traditional building houses in Siwa Oasis. Therefore, the water level of lakes will be reduced to dryness and land could be reused as agricultural land. Among different rocks, safa rocks proved to be the best natural construction materials to construct a defense wall around the lakes and marshes. They will save about 80% of the concrete cost. The formed karshef rocks from the lakes will be used in the construction of the traditional building houses which will save about 90% of the concrete buildings. This intervention will save energy as it exchanges fuel consuming man-made material such as cement with naturally made material. This can reduce the green

  19. OASIS General Introduction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanford Univ., CA.

    Recognizing the need to balance generality and economy in system costs, the Project INFO team at Stanford University developing OASIS has sought to provide generalized and powerful computer support within the normal range of operating and analytical requirements associated with university administration. The specific design objectives of the OASIS…

  20. Oceanic Area System Improvement Study (OASIS). Volume IV. Caribbean Region Air Traffic Services System Description.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-09-01

    OASIS) U Final Report This report i.s one of a set of companion documents which includes the following volumes: Volume I Executive Summary and...Northern Coastal Region of 4 the Directorate of Engineering and Systems (Direccion de Ingenieria y Sistemas ), which is responsible for maintenance of the

  1. Valley fill in the Roswell-Artesia area, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lyford, Forest P.

    1973-01-01

    Drill samples from 225 water and oil wells in an area 70 miles long and 20 miles wide in the Roswell-Artesia area, southeastern New Mexico were examined. A thickness map and a saturated thickness map of the valley-fill sediments were constructed. Maximum depth of valley fill is about 300 feet in large closed depressions near Roswell, Hagerman, and Artesia. The depressions were formed by the solution of carbonates and evaporites that underlie the fill. Maximum saturated thickness is about 250 feet in depressions near Hagerman and Artesia and about 300 feet in a depression near Roswell.

  2. Sequence stratigraphy of the Lower Cenomanian Bahariya Formation, Bahariya Oasis, Western Desert, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catuneanu, O.; Khalifa, M. A.; Wanas, H. A.

    2006-08-01

    The Lower Cenomanian Bahariya Formation corresponds to a second-order depositional sequence that formed within a continental shelf setting under relatively low-rate conditions of positive accommodation (< 200 m during 3-6 My). This overall trend of base-level rise was interrupted by three episodes of base-level fall that resulted in the formation of third-order sequence boundaries. These boundaries are represented by subaerial unconformities (replaced or not by younger transgressive wave ravinement surfaces), and subdivide the Bahariya Formation into four third-order depositional sequences. The construction of the sequence stratigraphic framework of the Bahariya Formation is based on the lateral and vertical changes between shelf, subtidal, coastal and fluvial facies, as well as on the nature of contacts that separate them. The internal (third-order) sequence boundaries are associated with incised valleys, which explain (1) significant lateral changes in the thickness of incised valley fill deposits, (2) the absence of third-order highstand and even transgressive systems tracts in particular areas, and (3) the abrupt facies shifts that may occur laterally over relatively short distances. Within each sequence, the concepts of lowstand, transgressive and highstand systems tracts are used to explain the observed lateral and vertical facies variability. This case study demonstrates the usefulness of sequence stratigraphic analysis in understanding the architecture and stacking patterns of the preserved rock record, and helps to identify 13 stages in the history of base-level changes that marked the evolution of the Bahariya Oasis region during the Early Cenomanian.

  3. Demonstration of obstacle avoidance system (OASYS) symbology in full mission simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharkey, Thomas J.

    1994-06-01

    The U. S. Army Aeroflightdynamics Directorate's (AFDD) Crew Station Research and Development Branch (CSRDB) conducted a multiphase effort to develop symbology displaying information from the Obstacle Avoidance System (OASYS) on the Aviator's Night Vision System (ANVIS) Head Up Display (HUD). The first phase of this program used static symbology displayed on a workstation to identify the types of information required from OASYS by the pilot. The second phase used a low-fidelity, pilot-in-the-loop simulation to evaluate fourteen different symbology-drive law combinations. Based on the results of phases 1 and 2 three candidate symbologies were selected, along with the baseline symbology developed by the OASYS contractor, for evaluation in full mission simulation. In addition, a full-daylight, full field-of-view condition and Night Vision Goggle (NVG) condition, both without OASYS symbology, were used as control conditions. The environmental conditions (e.g., ambient illumination, visual range) and task requirements (e.g., altitude and airspeed) used in the simulation were selected to severely tax the symbology. Reliable differences in performance between symbology conditions were found. Two of the symbologies developed during the earlier phases of this program resulted in reduced frequencies of ground strikes compared to OASYS baseline and NVG only conditions. The frequency of close approaches to wires was lower with the symbology developed in this program than with the baseline symbology. All OASYS symbologies improved performance relative to the NVG control condition. It is recommended that the OASYS symbology and drive laws developed during this program be used during OASYS flight tests.

  4. Long-term outcomes of the Stop Traumatic OASI Morbidity Project (STOMP).

    PubMed

    Basu, Maya; Smith, Dot

    2018-06-09

    To evaluate long-term sustainability of the Stop Traumatic OASI Morbidity Project (STOMP) in reducing the incidence of obstetric anal sphincter injury (OASI). A prospective observational study of women undergoing vaginal delivery at a UK district general hospital between September 1, 2014, and February 28, 2017. The principles of STOMP involve encouraging upright positioning, verbal coaching to avoid expulsive pushing and to slow down delivery, and tactile support to the vertex to judge speed and slow down delivery. After a training period, STOMP was implemented for all vaginal deliveries. Clinical and demographic data on women affected by OASI were collected across a 30-month period. The primary outcome measure was the incidence of OASI. There were 8782 vaginal deliveries during the 30-month period after implementation of STOMP. There was a significant decrease in the mean incidence of OASI relative to the 9 months before implementation (P<0.001). There was a significant decrease in the incidence of OASI for both spontaneous vaginal and instrumental deliveries (both P<0.05). There was no change in the frequency of episiotomy. Implementation of STOMP led to a significant decrease in OASI, confirming the sustainability of this approach to improve outcomes. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  5. OASIS: A Data Fusion System Optimized for Access to Distributed Archives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berriman, G. B.; Kong, M.; Good, J. C.

    2002-05-01

    The On-Line Archive Science Information Services (OASIS) is accessible as a java applet through the NASA/IPAC Infrared Science Archive home page. It uses Geographical Information System (GIS) technology to provide data fusion and interaction services for astronomers. These services include the ability to process and display arbitrarily large image files, and user-controlled contouring, overlay regeneration and multi-table/image interactions. OASIS has been optimized for access to distributed archives and data sets. Its second release (June 2002) provides a mechanism that enables access to OASIS from "third-party" services and data providers. That is, any data provider who creates a query form to an archive containing a collection of data (images, catalogs, spectra) can direct the result files from the query into OASIS. Similarly, data providers who serve links to datasets or remote services on a web page can access all of these data with one instance of OASIS. In this was any data or service provider is given access to the full suite of capabilites of OASIS. We illustrate the "third-party" access feature with two examples: queries to the high-energy image datasets accessible from GSFC SkyView, and links to data that are returned from a target-based query to the NASA Extragalactic Database (NED). The second release of OASIS also includes a file-transfer manager that reports the status of multiple data downloads from remote sources to the client machine. It is a prototype for a request management system that will ultimately control and manage compute-intensive jobs submitted through OASIS to computing grids, such as request for large scale image mosaics and bulk statistical analysis.

  6. Analysis of land cover change and its driving forces in a desert oasis landscape of southern Xinjiang, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amuti, T.; Luo, G.

    2014-07-01

    The combined effects of drought, warming and the changes in land cover have caused severe land degradation for several decades in the extremely arid desert oases of Southern Xinjiang, Northwest China. This study examined land cover changes during 1990-2008 to characterize and quantify the transformations in the typical oasis of Hotan. Land cover classifications of these images were performed based on the supervised classification scheme integrated with conventional vegetation and soil indexes. Change-detection techniques in remote sensing (RS) and a geographic information system (GIS) were applied to quantify temporal and spatial dynamics of land cover changes. The overall accuracies, Kappa coefficients, and average annual increase rate or decrease rate of land cover classes were calculated to assess classification results and changing rate of land cover. The analysis revealed that major trends of the land cover changes were the notable growth of the oasis and the reduction of the desert-oasis ecotone, which led to accelerated soil salinization and plant deterioration within the oasis. These changes were mainly attributed to the intensified human activities. The results indicated that the newly created agricultural land along the margins of the Hotan oasis could result in more potential areas of land degradation. If no effective measures are taken against the deterioration of the oasis environment, soil erosion caused by land cover change may proceed. The trend of desert moving further inward and the shrinking of the ecotone may lead to potential risks to the eco-environment of the Hotan oasis over the next decades.

  7. Application of the unified mask data format based on OASIS for VSB EB writers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Toshio; Hirumi, Junji; Suga, Osamu

    2005-11-01

    Mask data preparation (MDP) for modern mask manufacturing becomes a complex process because many kinds of EB data formats are used in mask makers and EB data files continue to become bigger by the application of RET. Therefore we developed a unified mask pattern data format named "OASIS.VSB1" and a job deck format named "MALY2" for Variable-Shaped-Beam (VSB) EB writers. OASIS.VSB is the mask pattern data format based on OASISTM 3 (Open Artwork System Interchange Standard) released as a successive format to GDSII by SEMI. We defined restrictions on OASIS for VSB EB writers to input OASIS.VSB data directly to VSB EB writers just like the native EB data. OASIS.VSB specification and MALY specification have been disclosed to the public and will become a SEMI standard in the near future. We started to promote the spread activities of OASIS.VSB and MALY. For practical use of OASIS.VSB and MALY, we are discussing the infrastructure system of MDP processing using OASIS.VSB and MALY with mask makers, VSB EB makers, and device makers. We are also discussing the tools for the infrastructure system with EDA vendors. The infrastructure system will enable TAT, the man-hour, and the cost in MDP to be reduced. In this paper, we propose the plan of the infrastructure system of MDP processing using OASIS.VSB and MALY as an application of OASIS.VSB and MALY.

  8. Groundwater mixing and mineralization processes in a mountain-oasis-desert basin, northwest China: hydrogeochemistry and environmental tracer indicators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Bin; Jin, Menggui; Liang, Xing; Li, Jing

    2018-02-01

    Hydrogeochemistry and environmental tracers (2H, 18O, 87Sr/86Sr) in precipitation, river and reservoir water, and groundwater have been used to determine groundwater recharge sources, and to identify mixing characteristics and mineralization processes in the Manas River Basin (MRB), which is a typical mountain-oasis-desert ecosystem in arid northwest China. The oasis component is artificial (irrigation). Groundwater with enriched stable isotope content originates from local precipitation and surface-water leakage in the piedmont alluvial-oasis plain. Groundwater with more depleted isotopes in the north oasis plain and desert is recharged by lateral flow from the adjacent mountains, for which recharge is associated with high altitude and/or paleo-water infiltrating during a period of much colder climate. Little evaporation and isotope exchange between groundwater and rock and soil minerals occurred in the mountain, piedmont and oasis plain. Groundwater δ2H and δ18O values show more homogeneous values along the groundwater flow direction and with well depths, indicating inter-aquifer mixing processes. A regional contrast of groundwater allows the 87Sr/86Sr ratios and δ18O values to be useful in a combination with Cl, Na, Mg, Ca and Sr concentrations to distinguish the groundwater mixing characteristics. Two main processes are identified: groundwater lateral-flow mixing and river leakage in the piedmont alluvial-oasis plain, and vertical mixing in the north oasis plain and the desert. The 87Sr/86Sr ratios and selected ion ratios reveal that carbonate dissolution and mixing with silicate from the southern mountain area are primarily controlling the strontium isotope hydrogeochemistry.

  9. The Outcome and Assessment Information Set (OASIS): A Review of Validity and Reliability

    PubMed Central

    O’CONNOR, MELISSA; DAVITT, JOAN K.

    2015-01-01

    The Outcome and Assessment Information Set (OASIS) is the patient-specific, standardized assessment used in Medicare home health care to plan care, determine reimbursement, and measure quality. Since its inception in 1999, there has been debate over the reliability and validity of the OASIS as a research tool and outcome measure. A systematic literature review of English-language articles identified 12 studies published in the last 10 years examining the validity and reliability of the OASIS. Empirical findings indicate the validity and reliability of the OASIS range from low to moderate but vary depending on the item studied. Limitations in the existing research include: nonrepresentative samples; inconsistencies in methods used, items tested, measurement, and statistical procedures; and the changes to the OASIS itself over time. The inconsistencies suggest that these results are tentative at best; additional research is needed to confirm the value of the OASIS for measuring patient outcomes, research, and quality improvement. PMID:23216513

  10. OASIS is Automated Statistical Inference for Segmentation, with applications to multiple sclerosis lesion segmentation in MRI.

    PubMed

    Sweeney, Elizabeth M; Shinohara, Russell T; Shiee, Navid; Mateen, Farrah J; Chudgar, Avni A; Cuzzocreo, Jennifer L; Calabresi, Peter A; Pham, Dzung L; Reich, Daniel S; Crainiceanu, Ciprian M

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can be used to detect lesions in the brains of multiple sclerosis (MS) patients and is essential for diagnosing the disease and monitoring its progression. In practice, lesion load is often quantified by either manual or semi-automated segmentation of MRI, which is time-consuming, costly, and associated with large inter- and intra-observer variability. We propose OASIS is Automated Statistical Inference for Segmentation (OASIS), an automated statistical method for segmenting MS lesions in MRI studies. We use logistic regression models incorporating multiple MRI modalities to estimate voxel-level probabilities of lesion presence. Intensity-normalized T1-weighted, T2-weighted, fluid-attenuated inversion recovery and proton density volumes from 131 MRI studies (98 MS subjects, 33 healthy subjects) with manual lesion segmentations were used to train and validate our model. Within this set, OASIS detected lesions with a partial area under the receiver operating characteristic curve for clinically relevant false positive rates of 1% and below of 0.59% (95% CI; [0.50%, 0.67%]) at the voxel level. An experienced MS neuroradiologist compared these segmentations to those produced by LesionTOADS, an image segmentation software that provides segmentation of both lesions and normal brain structures. For lesions, OASIS out-performed LesionTOADS in 74% (95% CI: [65%, 82%]) of cases for the 98 MS subjects. To further validate the method, we applied OASIS to 169 MRI studies acquired at a separate center. The neuroradiologist again compared the OASIS segmentations to those from LesionTOADS. For lesions, OASIS ranked higher than LesionTOADS in 77% (95% CI: [71%, 83%]) of cases. For a randomly selected subset of 50 of these studies, one additional radiologist and one neurologist also scored the images. Within this set, the neuroradiologist ranked OASIS higher than LesionTOADS in 76% (95% CI: [64%, 88%]) of cases, the neurologist 66% (95% CI: [52%, 78

  11. Validation of SWEEP for creep, saltation, and suspension in a desert-oasis ecotone

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Wind erosion in the desert-oasis ecotone can accelerate desertification and thus impacts oasis ecological security. Little is known about the susceptibility of the desert-oasis ecotone to wind erosion in the Tarim Basin even though the ecotone is a major source of windblown dust in China. The object...

  12. Phase 1 Environmental Baseline Survey for the Leasing of Nevada Test and Training Range, EC-South Range, Well Site ER-EC-11, for the Underground Test Area Pahute Mesa Phase 2 Drilling and Testing Program Nye County, Nevada

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-05-01

    rates are low, ranging from 0.014 to 2.2 liters per second (0.22 to 35 gallons per minute) (IT, 1997; Thordarson and Robinson, 1971). Most water...Area Ash Meadows Discharge Area Oasis Valley Discharge Area 29 fractured volcanic rocks (Winograd and Thordarson , 1975; Laczniak et al., 1996...Vicinity The current understanding of regional groundwater flow at the subject property and adjacent NTS is derived from work by Winograd and Thordarson

  13. Profile Changes in the Soil Microbial Community When Desert Becomes Oasis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chen-hua; Tang, Li-song; Jia, Zhong-jun; Li, Yan

    2015-01-01

    The conversion of virgin desert into oasis farmland creates two contrasting types of land-cover. During oasis formation with irrigation and fertilizer application, however, the changes in the soil microbial population, which play critical roles in the ecosystem, remain poorly understood. We applied high-throughput pyrosequencing to investigate bacterial and archaeal communities throughout the profile (0–3 m) in an experimental field, where irrigation and fertilization began in 1990 and cropped with winter wheat since then. To assess the effects of cultivation, the following treatments were compared with the virgin desert: CK (no fertilizer), PK, NK, NP, NPK, NPKR, and NPKM (R: straw residue; M: manure fertilizer). Irrigation had a greater impact on the overall microbial community than fertilizer application. The greatest impact occurred in topsoil (0–0.2 m), e.g., Cyanobacteria (25% total abundance) were most abundant in desert soil, while Actinobacteria (26%) were most abundant in oasis soil. The proportions of extremophilic and photosynthetic groups (e.g., Deinococcus-Thermus and Cyanobacteria) decreased, while the proportions of R-strategy (e.g., Gammaproteobacteria including Xanthomonadales), nitrifying (e.g., Nitrospirae), and anaerobic bacteria (e.g., Anaerolineae) increased throughout the oasis profile. Archaea occurred only in oasis soil. The impact of fertilizer application was mainly reflected in the non-dominant communities or finer taxonomic divisions. Oasis formation led to a dramatic shift in microbial community and enhanced soil enzyme activities. The rapidly increased soil moisture and decreased salt caused by irrigation were responsible for this shift. Furthermore, difference in fertilization and crop growth altered the organic carbon contents in the soil, which resulted in differences of microbial communities within oasis. PMID:26426279

  14. The Climate and its Impacts on deterioration and weathering rate of EI-Nadura Temple in El- Kharga Oasis, Western Desert of Egypt.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismael, Hossam

    2015-04-01

    Undoubtedly, El-Kharga Oasis monumental sites are considered an important part of our world's cultural heritage in the South Western Desert of Egypt. These sites are scattered on the floor of the oasis representing ancient civilizations. The Roman stone monuments in Kharga represent cultural heritage of an outstanding universal value. Such those monuments have suffered weathering deterioration. There are various elements which affect the weathering process of stone monuments: climate conditions, shapes of cultural heritages, exposed time periods, terrains, and vegetation around them, etc. Among these, climate conditions are the most significant factor affecting the deterioration of Archeological sites in Egypt. El- Kharga Oasis belongs administratively to the New Valley Governorate. It is located in the southern part of the western desert of Egypt, lies between latitudes 22°30'14" and 26°00'00" N, and between 30°27'00" and 30°47'00" E. The area of El Kharga Oasis covers about 7500 square kilometers. Pilot studies were carried out on the EI-Nadura Temple, composed of sandstones originating from the great sand sea. The major objective of this study is to monitor and measure the weathering features and the weathering rate affecting the building stones forming El-Nadora Roman building rocks in cubic cm. To achieve these aims, the present study used analysis of climatic data such as annual and seasonal solar radiation, Monthly average number of hours of sunshine, maximum and minimum air temperatures, wind speed, which have obtained from actual field measurements and data Meteorological Authority of El-Kharga station for the period 1977 to 2010 (33 years), and from the period 1941-2050 (110 years) as a long term of temperature data. Several samples were collected and examined by polarizing microscopy (PLM), X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy equipped with an energy dispersive X-ray analysis system (SEM-EDX). The results were in

  15. View of the Salinas River Valley area south of Monterey Bay, California

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1973-08-15

    SL3-88-004 (July-September 1973) --- A vertical view of the Salinas River Valley area south of Monterey Bay, California area is seen in this Skylab 3 Earth Resources Experiments Package S190-B (five-inch Earth terrain camera) photograph taken from the Skylab space station in Earth orbit. The valley is an irrigated agricultural area, and is indicated by the dark-green and light-gray rectangular patterns in the centre of the picture. The city of Salinas is barely visible under the cloud cover at the top (north) end of the valley. The dark mass on the left (west) side of the valley is the Santa Lucia mountain range. The Big Sur area is on the left and partly covered by clouds. The Diablo Range forms the dark mass in the lower right (southeast) corner of the photograph. The town of Hollister is the gray area in the dark-green rectangular farm tracts which occupy the floor of the San Benito Valley in the upper right (northeast) corner of the photograph. The Salinas River flows northwestward toward Monterey Bay. The towns of Soledad, Greenfield and King City appear as gray areas along U.S. 101 in the Salinas Valley. The geology of the area is complex, and has been racked by several earthquakes resulting from movement along the San Andreas and subsidiary faults. Here, the surface expression of the San Andreas Fault can be traced from a point just west of Hollister at the contrast of dark brown and tan to a point about one inch left of the lower right (southeast) corner of the picture. Subsidiary faults are indicated by the curving trend of the rocks along the right side. The photograph will provide detailed information on land use patterns (Dr. R. Colwell, University of California, Berkeley) and fault tectonics (Dr. P. Merifield, Earth Science Res., Inc. and Dr. M. Abdel-Gawad, Rockwell International). Federal agencies participating with NASA on the EREP project are the Departments of Agriculture, Commerce, Interior, the Environmental Protection Agency and the Corps of

  16. The Bitterroot Valley of western Montana: Area economic profile

    Treesearch

    Larry Swanson

    2001-01-01

    This profile provides a description and assessment of the area economy of the Bitterroot Valley of southwestern Montana. Changing conditions and trends in the area economy over the course of the last twenty to twenty- five years are examined, including trends in population and employment growth and associated income changes and economic restructuring. Changing...

  17. Histopathological assessment of OASIS Ultra on critical-sized wound healing: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Daniel Dante; Nazarian, Rosalynn M; Demetri, Leah; Mesar, Tomaz; Dijkink, Suzan; Larentzakis, Andreas; Velmahos, George; Sadik, Karim Walid

    2017-06-01

    Dermatopathologists assess wounds secondary to trauma, infection, or oncologic resection that can be challenging to reconstruct. OASIS Ultra, an extracellular matrix, has been described for use in chronic and burn wounds. The aim of this pilot study is to assess wound healing in post-traumatic and infective wounds treated with OASIS using histological markers of repair. Adults with traumatic, infective or iatrogenic wound defects with size precluding primary closure were eligible. Half the wound was randomly assigned to receive OASIS plus standard therapy; the other half received standard of care (SOC) therapy. During dressing changes, standardized-scale photographs were taken and biopsies obtained. Histologic sections were reviewed for degree of acute inflammation and extent of tissue repair. Neutrophils, edema, hemorrhage, necrosis, fibroblasts, collagen density and neovascularization were semi-quantitatively assessed. Forty-four skin biopsies from 7 patients with 10 acute wounds met eligibility criteria. Histologically, OASIS samples demonstrated improved acute inflammation scores compared to SOC. No patients experienced OASIS-related complications. OASIS-treated wound halves trended toward more wound contraction and improved tissue repair. Our scoring system aids histopathological wound assessment. Treatment of critical-sized, post-traumatic, acute wounds with OASIS resulted in decreased inflammation, and potentially more advanced wound healing, compared to SOC. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Instructional Television Transmission System for the Genesee Valley Area.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown Associates, Rochester, NY.

    In the entire Genessee Valley area of New York, only two channels are available to educators. Therefore, a study was made of the feasibility of constructing a multi-channel system for the transmission of television and data signals to schools in the area. Field strength measurements were taken of the local educational broadcast signal WXXI-TV to…

  19. Soil Susceptibility to Macropore Flow Across a Desert-Oasis Ecotone of the Hexi Corridor, Northwest China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yongyong; Zhao, Wenzhi; He, Jianhua; Fu, Li

    2018-02-01

    Macropore flow not only provides a fast pathway for water and solute transport and increases the risks of water and nutrient loss but also enhances soil aeration and groundwater recharge. However, macropore flow characteristics in irrigated oasis soils subject to continuous crop cultivation are poorly understood. This study was to investigate the effect of continuous cultivation on soil properties and macropore flow and to quantify the changes in macropore flow characteristics in an old oasis field (>50 years of cultivation, OOF), young oasis field (20 years, YOF), and adjacent uncultivated sandy area (0 year, USL) in Northwest China. Triplicate soil samples were collected from each site to investigate soil properties. Dye tracer experiments with also three replicates were conducted at each site. The degree of macropore flow (i.e., parameters of macropore flow) was highest at the OOF, intermediate at the YOF, and minimal at the USL. The macropore flow fraction (i.e., fraction of total infiltration flows through macropore flow pathways) at the OOF was 3.4 times greater than at the USL. The heterogeneous infiltration pattern at the OOF was dominated by macropore flow, while funnel flow was predominant at the USL. Long-term irrigation with silt-laden river water has increased silt + clay contents of the oasis soils. Irrigation and high-input crop cultivation also increased organic matter. These changes in soil properties contributed to the interaggregate voids formation. The conversion of native desert soils to irrigated croplands increases the degree of macropore flow, which might enhance groundwater recharge in the desert-oasis ecotone.

  20. Is It Working? Lysimeter Monitoring in the Southern Willamette Valley Groundwater Management Area

    EPA Science Inventory

    Groundwater nitrate contamination affects thousands of households in the southern Willamette Valley and many more across the Pacific Northwest. The southern Willamette Valley Groundwater Management Area (SWV GWMA) was established in 2004 due to nitrate levels in the groundwater ...

  1. Evaluation of methods for delineating areas that contribute water to wells completed in valley-fill aquifers in Pennsylvania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Risser, Dennis W.; Madden, Thomas M.

    1994-01-01

    Valley-fill aquifers in Pennsylvania are the source of drinking water for many wells in the glaciated parts of the State and along major river valleys. These aquifers area subject to contamination because of their shallow water-table depth and highly transmissive sediments. The possibility for contamination of water-supply wells in valley-fill aquifers can be minimized by excluding activities that could contaminate areas that contribute water to supply wells. An area that contributes water to a well is identified in this report as either an area of diversion, time-of-travel area, or contributing area. The area of diversion is a projection to land surface of the valley-fill aquifer volume through which water is diverted to a well and the time-of travel area is that fraction of the area of diversion through which water moves to the well in a specified time. The contributing area, the largest of three areas, includes the area of diversion but also incorporates bedrock uplands and other area that contribute water. Methods for delineating areas of diversion and contributing areas in valley-fill aquifers, described and compared in order of increasing complexity, include fixed radius, uniform flow, analytical, semianalytical, and numerical modeling. Delineated areas are considered approximations because the hydraulic properties and boundary conditions of the real ground-water system are simplified even in the most complex numerical methods. Successful application of any of these methods depends on the investigator's understanding of the hydrologic system in and near the well field, and the limitations of the method. The hydrologic system includes not only the valley-fill aquifer but also the regional surface-water and ground-water flow systems within which the valley is situated. As shown by numerical flow simulations of a well field in the valley-fill aquifer along Marsh Creek Valley near Asaph, Pa., water from upland bedrock sources can provide nearly all the water

  2. Expansion of agricultural oasis in the Heihe River Basin of China: Patterns, reasons and policy implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Wei; Zhang, Ying

    The Heihe River Basin (HRB) is the second largest inland river basin in the arid region of northwestern China. An agricultural oasis is a typical landscape in arid regions providing precious fertile soil, living space and ecological services. The agricultural oasis change has been one of the key issues in sustainable development in recent decades. In this paper, we examined the changes in the agricultural oasis in HRB and analyzed the socio-economic and climatic driving forces behind them. It was found that the agricultural oasis in HRB expanded by 25.11% and 14.82% during the periods of 1986-2000 and 2000-2011, respectively. Most of the newly added agricultural oases in HRB were converted from grassland (40.94%) and unused land (40.22%). The expansion in the agricultural oasis mainly occurred in the middle reaches of HRB, particularly in the counties of Shandan, Minle, Jinta and Jiuquan city. Changes in the rural labor force, annual temperature and precipitation have significant positive effects on agricultural oasis changes, while the ratio of irrigated agricultural oases has significant negative effects on agricultural oasis changes. The agricultural oasis expansion in HRB is the combined effect of human activity and climate change.

  3. Hydrogeology of the western part of the Salt River Valley area, Maricopa County, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brown, James G.; Pool, D.R.

    1989-01-01

    The Salt River Valley is a major population and agricultural center of more than 3,000 mi2 in central Arizona (fig. 1). The western part of the Salt River Valley area (area of this report) covers about 1,500 mi2. The Phoenix metropolitan area with a population of more than 1.6 million in 1985 (Valley National Bank, 1987) is located within the valley. The watersheds of the Salt, Verde, and Agua Fria Rivers provide the valley with a reliable but limited surface-water supply that must be augmented with ground water even in years of plentiful rainfall. Large-scale ground-water withdrawals began in the Salt River Valley in the early part of the 20th century; between 1915 and 1983, the total estimated ground-water pumpage was 81 million acre-ft (U.S. Geological Survey, 1984). Because of the low average annual rainfall and high potential evapotranspiration, the principal sources of ground-water recharge are urban runoff, excess irrigation, canal seepage and surface-water flows during years of higher-than-normal rainfall. Withdrawals greatly exceed recharge and, in some area, ground-water levels have declines as much as 350 ft (Laney and other, 1978; Ross, 1978). In the study area, ground-water declines of more than 300 ft have occurred in Deer Valley and from Luke Air Force Base north to Beardsley. As a result, a large depression of the water table has developed west of Luke Air Force Base (fig. 2). Ground-water use has decreased in recent years because precipitation and surface-water supplies have been greater than normal. Increased precipitation also caused large quantities of runoff to be released into the normally dry Salt and Gila River channels. From February 1978 to June 1980, streamflow losses of at least 90,000 acre-ft occurred between Jointhead Dam near the east boundary of the study area and Gillespie Dam several miles southwest of the west edge of the study area (Mann and Rhone, 1983). Consequently, ground-water declines in a large part of the basin have

  4. Land-use legacies from dry farming in the Park Valley area of Box Elder County

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Last fall in this newsletter, we reported on the initiation of a study on the land-use legacies of dry farming in the Park Valley area. Land-use legacies are the long lasting impacts of historic land uses; such as, cultivation for dry farming. The Park Valley area and Box Elder County experienced ...

  5. Geology and ground water in Russian River Valley areas and in Round, Laytonville, and Little Lake Valleys, Sonoma and Mendocino Counties, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cardwell, G.T.

    1965-01-01

    This report describes the occurrence, availability, and quality of ground water in seven valley areas along the course of the Russian River in Sonoma and Mendocino Counties, Calif., and in three valleys in the upper drainage reach of the Eel River in Mendocino County. Except for the westward-trending lower Russian River valley, the remaining valley areas along the Russian River (Healdsburg, Alexander, Cloverdale, Sanel, Ukiah, and Potter Valleys) lie in northwest-trending structurally controlled depressions formed in marine rocks of Jurassic and Cretaceous age. The principal aquifer in all the valleys is the alluvium of Recent age, which includes highly permeable channel deposits of gravel and sand. Water for domestic, irrigation, industrial, and other uses is developed by (1) direct diversion from the Russian River and its tributaries, (2) withdrawal of ground water and river water from shallow wells near the river, and (3) withdrawals of ground water from wells in alluvial deposits at varying distances from the river. Surface water in the Russian River and most tributaries is of good chemical quality. The water is a calcium magnesium bicarbonate type and contains 75,200 parts per million of dissolved solids. Ground water is also of good chemical quality throughout most of the drainage basin, but the concentration of dissolved solids (100-300 parts per million) is somewhat higher than that in the surface water. Round, Laytonville, and Little Lake Valleys are in central and northern Mendocino County in the drainage basin of the northwestward flowing Eel River. In Round Valley the alluvium of Recent age yields water of good chemical quality in large quantities. Yields are lower and the chemical quality poorer in Laytonville Valley. Ground water in Little Lake Valley is relatively undeveloped. Selected descriptions of wells, drillers' logs, chemical analyses, and hydrographs showing water-level fluctuations are included in the report. Accompanying maps show the

  6. Hydrology reconnaissance of the Sink Valley area, Tooele and Box Elder Counties, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Price, Don; Bolke, E.L.

    1970-01-01

    This is the sixth in a series of reports by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Utah Department of Natural Resources, Division of Water Rights, which describe the water resources of selected basins in western Utah. Areas covered by previously published reports in this series are shown in figure 1 and are listed on page 29. The purpose of this report is to present available hydrologic data on the Sink Valley (Puddle Valley) area, to provide an evaluation of the potential for water-resource development in the area, and to serve as a basis for planning possible later detailed investigations.

  7. Spectral reflectance properties of major objects in desert oasis: a case study of the Weigan-Kuqa river delta oasis in Xinjiang, China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fei; Tiyip, Tashpolat; Ding, Jianli; Sawut, Mamat; Tashpolat, Nigara; Kung, Hsiangte; Han, Guihong; Gui, Dongwei

    2012-08-01

    Aiming at the remote sensing application has been increasingly relying on ground object spectral characteristics. In order to further research the spectral reflectance characteristics in arid area, this study was performed in the typical delta oasis of Weigan and Kuqa rivers located north of Tarim Basin. Data were collected from geo-targets at multiple sites in various field conditions. The spectra data were collected for different soil types including saline-alkaline soil, silt sandy soil, cotton field, and others; vegetations of Alhagi sparsifolia, Phragmites australis, Tamarix, Halostachys caspica, etc., and water bodies. Next, the data were processed to remove high-frequency noise, and the spectral curves were smoothed with the moving average method. The derivative spectrum was generated after eliminating environmental background noise so that to distinguish the original overlap spectra. After continuum removal of the undesirable absorbance, the spectrum curves were able to highlight features for both optical absorbance and reflectance. The spectrum information of each ground object is essential for fully utilizing the multispectrum data generated by remote sensing, which will need a representative spectral library. In this study using ENVI 4.5 software, a preliminary spectral library of surface features was constructed using the data surveyed in the study area. This library can support remote sensing activities such as feature investigation, vegetation classification, and environmental monitoring in the delta oasis region. Future plan will focus on sharing and standardizing the criteria of professional spectral library and to expand and promote the utilization of the spectral databases.

  8. Cooperative geochemical investigation of geothermal resources in the Imperial Valley and Yuma areas. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Coplen, T.B.

    1973-10-01

    Preliminary studies indicate that the Imperial Valley has a large geothermal potential. In order to delineate additional geothermal systems a chemical and isotopic investigation of samples from water wells, springs, and geothermal wells in the Imperial Valley and Yuma areas was conducted. Na, K, and Ca concentrations of nearly 200 well water, spring water, hot spring, and geothermal fluid samples from the Imperial Valley area were measured by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Fournier and Truesdell's function was determined for each water sample. Suspected geothermal areas are identified. Hydrogen and oxygen isotope abundances were determined in order to determine and to identifymore » the source of the water in the Mesa geothermal system. (JGB)« less

  9. Ground-water areas and well logs, central Sevier Valley, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Young, Richard A.

    1960-01-01

    Between September 1959 and June 1960 the United States Geological Survey and the Utah State Engineer, with financial assistance from Garfield, Millard, Piute, Sanpete, and Sevier Counties and from local water-users’ associations, cooperated in an investigation to determine the structural framework of the central Sevier Valley and to evaluate the valley’s ground-water potential. An important aspect of the study was the drilling of 22 test holes under private contract. These data and other data collected during the course of the larger ground-water investigation of which the test drilling was a part will be evaluated in a report on the geology and ground-water resources of the central Sevier Valley. The present report has been prepared to make available the logs of test holes and to describe in general terms the availability of ground water in the different areas of the valley.

  10. Mapping geodiversity and cultural heritage; a case study: Aït Bou Oulli valley in central High-Atlas, Morocco.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouzekraoui, Hicham; Barakat, Ahmed; El Youssi, Mohammed; El Khalki, Yahia; Hafid, Abdelatif; Mouaddine, Atika

    2016-04-01

    Central High-Atlas mountain in the centre of Morocco, contains an exceptional geodiversity. Some geomorphological and geological objects of it are included and protected recently by the World Heritage list. The valley of Aït Bou Oulli is located in the heart of the Moroccan central High-Atlas, whose height is 4068 m in Ighil M'goun and 3800 m in Rat Mountain. The mountain areas are characterized by higher geodiversity in comparison with other areas. The valley possesses a geological and geomorphological heritage which is very rich, much diversified and exceptional landscapes of high mountains. It is part of geopark M'Goun; the valley attracts a number of tourists every year. However, this number remains restricted because of the lack of the tools of promotion, valuation and mediation of this geoheritage. Moreover, the touristic infrastructure is modest. Regarding this situation, the geotouristic map appears as a tool of promotion of the geotourism and diversification of the regional and national tourist product. This work aims at elaborating new maps of geomorphosites, cultural sites, and geomonuments in high Mountain landscapes of the valley, suggested in geotourism circuits. The first results reveal the low exploitation of the geodiversity of this valley-oasis: the spectacular waterfalls, water sources, canyons, glacial cirques and U-shaped valleys, superficial karstic forms (sinkholes and swallow-holes), high-Atlas peaks and cliffs, spectacular scree slopes, badlands landscapes, fairy chimneys, and the geological history dating back to the Paleozoic and angular unconformity. In addition, the valley has diverse tangible cultural heritage spanning hundreds of years such as the enigmatic rock engravings (dating from 2000 to 3000 years), troglodyte caves and terraced agriculture landscapes, geomonuments (old cooperative storage, Kasbah, traditional water mills) and the architecture of the villages. It has also an intangible cultural heritage such as folklore. This

  11. Geophysical Characterization of Groundwater-Fault Dynamics at San Andreas Oasis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faherty, D.; Polet, J.; Osborn, S. G.

    2017-12-01

    The San Andreas Oasis has historically provided a reliable source of fresh water near the northeast margin of the Salton Sea, although since the recent completion of the Coachella Canal Lining Project and persistent drought in California, surface water at the site has begun to disappear. This may be an effect of the canal lining, however, the controls on groundwater are complicated by the presence of the Hidden Springs Fault (HSF), a northeast dipping normal fault that trends near the San Andreas Oasis. Its surface expression is apparent as a lineation against which all plant growth terminates, suggesting that it may form a partial barrier to subsurface groundwater flow. Numerous environmental studies have detailed the chemical evolution of waters resources at San Andreas Spring, although there remains a knowledge gap on the HSF and its relation to groundwater at the site. To better constrain flow paths and characterize groundwater-fault interactions, we have employed resistivity surveys near the surface trace of the HSF to generate profiles of lateral and depth-dependent variations in resistivity. The survey design is comprised of lines installed in Wenner Arrays, using an IRIS Syscal Kid, with 24 electrodes, at a maximum electrode spacing of 5 meters. In addition, we have gathered constraints on the geometry of the HSF using a combination of ground-based magnetic and gravity profiles, conducted with a GEM walking Proton Precession magnetometer and a Lacoste & Romberg gravimeter. Seventeen gravity measurements were acquired across the surface trace of the fault. Preliminary resistivity results depict a shallow conductor localized at the oasis and discontinuous across the HSF. Magnetic data reveal a large contrast in subsurface magnetic susceptibility that appears coincident with the surface trace and trend of the HSF, while gravity data suggests a shallow, relatively high density anomaly centered near the oasis. These data also hint at a second, previously

  12. Geologic characterization report for the Paradox Basin Study Region, Utah Study Areas. Volume 6: Salt Valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1984-12-01

    Surface landforms in the Salt Valley Area are generally a function of the Salt Valley anticline and are characterized by parallel and subparallel cuestaform ridges and hogbacks and flat valley floors. The most prominent structure in the Area is the Salt Valley anticline. Erosion resulting from the Tertiary uplift of the Colorado Plateau led to salt dissolution and subsequent collapse along the crest of the anticline. Continued erosion removed the collapse material, forming an axial valley along the crest of the anticline. Paleozoic rocks beneath the salt bearing Paradox Formation consist of limestone, dolomite, sandstone, siltstone and shale. The salt beds of the Paradox formation occur in distinct cycles separated by an interbed sequence of anhydrite, carbonate, and clastic rocks. The Paradox Formation is overlain by Pennsylvanian limestone; Permian sandstone; and Mesozoic sandstone, mudstone, conglomerate and shale. No earthquakes have been reported in the area during the period of the historic record and contemporary seismicity appears to be diffusely distributed, of low level and small magnitude. The upper unit includes the Permian strata and upper Honaker trail formation.

  13. OASIS: Organics Analyzer for Sampling Icy Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Getty, S. A.; Dworkin, J. P.; Glavin, D. P.; Martin, M.; Zheng, Y.; Balvin, M.; Southard, A. E.; Ferrance, J.; Malespin, C.

    2012-01-01

    Liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS) is a well established laboratory technique for detecting and analyzing organic molecules. This approach has been especially fruitful in the analysis of nucleobases, amino acids, and establishing chirol ratios [1 -3]. We are developing OASIS, Organics Analyzer for Sampling Icy Surfaces, for future in situ landed missions to astrochemically important icy bodies, such as asteroids, comets, and icy moons. The OASIS design employs a microfabricated, on-chip analytical column to chromatographically separate liquid ana1ytes using known LC stationary phase chemistries. The elution products are then interfaced through electrospray ionization (ESI) and analyzed by a time-of-flight mass spectrometer (TOF-MS). A particular advantage of this design is its suitability for microgravity environments, such as for a primitive small body.

  14. Quantitative assessment of the impact of an inter-basin surface-water transfer project on the groundwater flow and groundwater-dependent eco-environment in an oasis in arid northwestern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xiaobin; Wu, Jichun; Nie, Huijun; Guo, Fei; Wu, Jianfeng; Chen, Kouping; Liao, Penghui; Xu, Hongxia; Zeng, Xiankui

    2018-06-01

    Inter-basin water transfer projects (IBWTPs) can involve basins as water donors and water receivers. In contrast to most studies on IBWTPs, which mainly impact the surface-water eco-environment, this study focuses on the impacts of an IBWTP on groundwater and its eco-environment in a water donor basin in an arid area, where surface water and groundwater are exchanged. Surface water is assumed to recharge groundwater and a groundwater numerical simulation model was constructed using MODFLOW. The model was used to quantitatively evaluate the impact of an IBWTP located in the upstream portion of Nalenggele River (the biggest river in the Qaidam basin, Northwest China). The impact involved decrease in spring flow, drawdown of groundwater, reduction in oasis area, and an increase in species replacement of oasis vegetation in the midstream and downstream of the river. Results show that the emergence sites of springs at the front of the oasis will move 2-5 km downstream, and the outflow of springs will decrease by 42 million m3/a. The maximum drawdown of groundwater level at the front of the oasis will be 3.6 m and the area across which groundwater drawdown exceeds 2.0 m will be about 59.02 km2, accounting for 2.71% of the total area of the oasis. Under such conditions, reeds will gradually be replaced by Tamarix, shrubs, and other alternative plant species. These findings have important implications for the optimization of water resource allocation and protection of the eco-environment in arid regions.

  15. An endangered oasis of aquatic microbial biodiversity in the Chihuahuan desert

    PubMed Central

    Souza, Valeria; Espinosa-Asuar, Laura; Escalante, Ana E.; Eguiarte, Luis E.; Farmer, Jack; Forney, Larry; Lloret, Lourdes; Rodríguez-Martínez, Juan M.; Soberón, Xavier; Dirzo, Rodolfo; Elser, James J.

    2006-01-01

    The Cuatro Cienegas basin in the Chihuahuan desert is a system of springs, streams, and pools. These ecosystems support >70 endemic species and abundant living stromatolites and other microbial communities, representing a desert oasis of high biodiversity. Here, we combine data from molecular microbiology and geology to document the microbial biodiversity of this unique environment. Ten water samples from locations within the Cuatro Cienegas basin and two neighboring valleys as well as three samples of wet sediments were analyzed. The phylogeny of prokaryotic populations in the samples was determined by characterizing cultured organisms and by PCR amplification and sequencing of 16S rRNA genes from total community DNA. The composition of microbial communities was also assessed by determining profiles of terminal restriction site polymorphisms of 16S rRNA genes in total community DNA. There were 250 different phylotypes among the 350 cultivated strains. Ninety-eight partial 16S rRNA gene sequences were obtained and classified. The clones represented 38 unique phylotypes from ten major lineages of Bacteria and one of Archaea. Unexpectedly, 50% of the phylotypes were most closely related to marine taxa, even though these environments have not been in contact with the ocean for tens of millions of years. Furthermore, terminal restriction site polymorphism profiles and geological data suggest that the aquatic ecosystems of Cuatro Cienegas are hydrologically interconnected with adjacent valleys recently targeted for agricultural intensification. The findings underscore the conservation value of desert aquatic ecosystems and the urgent need for study and preservation of freshwater microbial communities. PMID:16618921

  16. 75 FR 9827 - Proposed Expansion of the Santa Maria Valley Viticultural Area (2008R-287P)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-04

    ... 105(e) of the Federal Alcohol Administration Act (FAA Act), 27 U.S.C. 205(e), authorizes the Secretary... Valley as a ``natural funnel-shaped'' valley.) Temperatures remain consistent throughout the gentle west... 1974. (c) Boundary. The Santa Maria Valley viticultural area is located in Santa Barbara and San Luis...

  17. OASIS: PARAMETER ESTIMATION SYSTEM FOR AQUIFER RESTORATION MODELS, USER'S MANUAL VERSION 2.0

    EPA Science Inventory

    OASIS, a decision support system for ground water contaminant modeling, has been developed for the CPA by Rice University, through the National Center for Ground Water Research. As a decision support system, OASIS was designed to provide a set of tools which will help scientists ...

  18. Landslide susceptibility in the Tully Valley area, Finger Lakes region, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jager, Stefan; Wieczorek, Gerald E.

    1994-01-01

    As a consequence of a large landslide in the Tully Valley, Onondaga County, New York, an investigation was undertaken to determine the factors responsible for the landslide in order to develop a model for regional landslide susceptibility. The April 27, 1993 Tully Valley landslide occurred within glacial lake clays overlain by till and colluvium on gentle slopes of 9-12 degrees. The landslide was triggered by extreme climatic events of prolonged heavy rainfall combined with rapid melting of a winter snowpack. A photoinventory and field checking of landslides within a 415 km2 study area, including the Tully Valley, revealed small recently-active landslides and other large dormant prehistoric landslides, probably Pleistocene in age. Similar to the larger Tully Valley landslide, the smaller recently-active landslides occurred in red, glacial lake clays very likely triggered by seasonal rainfall. The large dormant landslides have been stable for long periods as evidenced by slope denudational processes that have modified the landslides. These old and ancient landslides correspond with proglacial lake levels during the Pleistocene, suggesting that either inundation or rapid drainage was responsible for triggering these landslides. A logistic regression analysis was performed within a Geographic Information System (GIS) environment to develop a model of landslide susceptibility for the Tully Valley study area. Presence of glacial clays, slope angle, and glacial lake levels were used as explanatory variables for landslide incidence. The spatial probability of landsliding, categorized as low, moderate and high, is portrayed within 90-m square cells on the susceptibility map.

  19. Geologic Map of the House Rock Valley Area, Coconino County, Northern Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Billingsley, George H.; Priest, Susan S.

    2010-01-01

    This geologic map is a cooperative effort of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), the Bureau of Land Management, the National Park Service, and the U.S. Forest Service to provide a geologic database for resource management officials and visitor information services. This map was produced in response to information needs related to a proposed withdrawal of three segregated land areas near Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona, from new hard rock mining activity. House Rock Valley was designated as the east parcel of the segregated lands near the Grand Canyon. This map was needed to provide connectivity for the geologic framework of the Grand Canyon segregated land areas. This geologic map of the House Rock Valley area encompasses approximately 280 mi2 (85.4 km2) within Coconino County, northern Arizona, and is bounded by longitude 111 degrees 37'30' to 112 degrees 05' W. and latitude 36 degrees 30' to 36 degrees 50' N. The map area is in the eastern part of the Arizona Strip, which lies within the southern Colorado Plateaus geologic province (herein Colorado Plateau). The Arizona Strip is the part of Arizona lying north of the Colorado River. The map is bound on the east by the Colorado River in Marble Canyon within Grand Canyon National Park and Glen Canyon National Recreation Area, on the south and west by the Kaibab National Forest and Grand Canyon National Game Preserve, and on the north by the Vermilion Cliffs Natural Area, the Paria Canyon Vermilion Cliffs Wilderness Area, and the Vermilion Cliffs National Monument. House Rock State Buffalo Ranch also bounds the southern edge of the map area. The Bureau of Land Management Arizona Field Office in St. George, Utah, manages public lands of the Vermilion Cliffs Natural Area, Paria Canyon - Vermilion Cliffs Wilderness and Vermilion Cliffs National Monument. The North Kaibab Ranger District in Fredonia, Arizona, manages U.S. Forest Service land along the west edge of the map area and House Rock State Buffalo Ranch

  20. Preliminary report on geology and ground water of the Pajaro Valley area, Santa Cruz and Monterey counties, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Muir, K.S.

    1972-01-01

    The Pajaro Valley area, California, covering about 120 square miles, extends from the southern part of Santa Cruz County to several miles south of the county line into Monterey County. It borders the Pacific Ocean on the west and the Santa Cruz Mountains on the east. The city of Watsonville is the largest center of population. Deposits that range in age from Pliocene to Holocene make up the ground-water reservoir. These include, from oldest to youngest, the Purisima Formation, Aromas Red Sands of Allen (1946), terrace deposits, alluvium, and dune sand. These deposits underlie an area of about 80 square miles and have a maximum thickness of about 4,000 feet. The alluvium yields most of the water pumped from wells in the area. Pre-Pliocene rocks underlie and form the boundaries of the ground-water reservoir. These rocks contain ground water in fractures and in sandstone beds. However, they are not an important source of ground water. There is close continuity between the geology of the Pajaro Valley area and that of the Soquel-Aptos area, which is contiguous on the north. Ground water in the Pajaro Valley area is derived from three sources: (1) Precipitation within the Pajaro Valley area that reaches the ground-water body by direct infiltration or by seepage from streams, (2) seepage from the Pajaro River as it crosses the Pajaro Valley carrying runoff which originates upstream from the valley, and (3) precipitation in the Soquel-Aptos area that infiltrates and then moves southeastward at depth into the Pajaro Valley area. Ground water in most wells in the Pajaro Valley area occurs under confined (artesian) conditions; the only exception is ground water in the upper, near-surface part of the alluvium and that in the dune sand. It moves south from the north part of the area and southwest away from the San Andreas fault toward and out under Monterey Bay. In the south part of the area, ground-water movement is almost due west. The San Andreas fault probably is the only

  1. Alto Patache fog oasis in the Atacama Desert: Geographical basis for a sustainable development program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calderón, M.; Cereceda, P.; Larrain, H.; Osses, P.; Pérez, L.; Ibáñez, M.

    2010-07-01

    Alto Patache coastal fog oasis is a protected area located south of Iquique, Northern Chile, being presently in charge of the Atacama Desert Center (ADC) research group of the Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, since 1997. On 2007, the Chilean Government bestowed a piece of land stretch covering 1,114 hectares to ADC scientific group for scientific research, ecosystem protection and environmental education. This oasis has been recently studied from different points of view: climate, biogeography, fog collection, geomorphology, soil survey and land use planning, plant distribution, conservation and archaeology. During 2009, a study of the geographical basis to elaborate a general management plan was undertaken to collect information to fulfill our planned out objectives. Through this study, georreferenciated strategic information was compiled to evaluate future actions conducting to a sustainable development within the protected area. This information was translated into thematic maps showing the spatial distribution of variables like: climate, geology, geomorphology, soils, vegetation, fauna, archaeological sites and management zones. The methodology used is the analysis of satellite imagery, using GPS by creating a cartographic Data Base incorporated in GIS. Results show that the area starts at the littoral plain, ranging from 500 m to 2.000 m, being continued in parts by a piedmont intercepted by a very abrupt mega-cliff, or hectares of climbing sand dunes leading to a short high plateau limited by a soft hilly area to the East. Two soil types are characteristic: Entisols (Torriorthent) covering the coastal beach sediments, and Aridisols along the cliff and adjacent hills. Vegetation consists not only of a very rich lichen cover, but also of endangered vascular species associations constituting a very fragile sub-tropical coastal desert community, such as Eulychnia, Cumulopuntia, Eriosyce cacti, and Lycium - Nolana- Ephedra communities. Fog oasis

  2. OASIS - ORBIT ANALYSIS AND SIMULATION SOFTWARE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, S. C.

    1994-01-01

    The Orbit Analysis and Simulation Software, OASIS, is a software system developed for covariance and simulation analyses of problems involving earth satellites, especially the Global Positioning System (GPS). It provides a flexible, versatile and efficient accuracy analysis tool for earth satellite navigation and GPS-based geodetic studies. To make future modifications and enhancements easy, the system is modular, with five major modules: PATH/VARY, REGRES, PMOD, FILTER/SMOOTHER, and OUTPUT PROCESSOR. PATH/VARY generates satellite trajectories. Among the factors taken into consideration are: 1) the gravitational effects of the planets, moon and sun; 2) space vehicle orientation and shapes; 3) solar pressure; 4) solar radiation reflected from the surface of the earth; 5) atmospheric drag; and 6) space vehicle gas leaks. The REGRES module reads the user's input, then determines if a measurement should be made based on geometry and time. PMOD modifies a previously generated REGRES file to facilitate various analysis needs. FILTER/SMOOTHER is especially suited to a multi-satellite precise orbit determination and geodetic-type problems. It can be used for any situation where parameters are simultaneously estimated from measurements and a priori information. Examples of nonspacecraft areas of potential application might be Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) geodesy and radio source catalogue studies. OUTPUT PROCESSOR translates covariance analysis results generated by FILTER/SMOOTHER into user-desired easy-to-read quantities, performs mapping of orbit covariances and simulated solutions, transforms results into different coordinate systems, and computes post-fit residuals. The OASIS program was developed in 1986. It is designed to be implemented on a DEC VAX 11/780 computer using VAX VMS 3.7 or higher. It can also be implemented on a Micro VAX II provided sufficient disk space is available.

  3. Human settlement and its influencing factors during the historicalperiod in an oasis-desert transition zone of Dunhuang, Hexi Corridor,northwest China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, H.; Dong, G.; Zhang, S.

    2017-12-01

    Many ancient cities and settlement sites have been found in Lucaogou, an ancient oasis near Dunhuangcity in northwest China. These settlements indicate that humans inhabited this area during the historicalperiod. However, the chronology and subsistence practices of this area remain unclear. Based on newdata from radiocarbon dating, macrobotanical analysis, and the synthesis of historical documents andhigh-resolution paleoclimatic records, we discuss the inter-relationship between human settlements andplant resource utilization strategies at Lucaogou ancient oasis during historical period. Our resultsindicate that these ancient sites in Lucaogou area were built between the Han dynasty (202 BC-AD 220)and the Ming dynasty (AD 1368-AD 1644). People mainly used foxtail millet, broomcorn millet, barleyand three types of wood (Tamarix, Salix, Populus), probably as fuel for cooking. Human settlement intensityin the area during the historical period was primarily influenced by political situations, whichmight also have been affected by fluctuations in precipitation.

  4. Hydrogeology of Valley-Fill Aquifers and Adjacent Areas in Eastern Chemung County, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heisig, Paul M.

    2015-10-19

    Water-resource potential is greatest within saturated sand and gravel in the Chemung River valley (nearly 1 mile wide), especially where induced infiltration of additional water from the Chemung River is possible. The second most favorable area is the Newtown Creek valley at the confluence of Newtown Creek with North Branch Newtown Creek east of Horseheads, N.Y. Extensive sand and gravel deposits within the Breesport, N.Y., area are largely unsaturated but may have greater saturation along the east side of Jackson Creek immediately north of Breesport. Till deposits confine sand and gravel along Newtown Creek at Erin, N.Y., and along much of the upper reach of North Branch Newtown Creek; this confining unit may limit recharge and potential well yield. The north-south oriented valleys of Baldwin and Wynkoop Creeks end at notched divides that imply input of glacial meltwater and limited sediment from outside of the present watersheds. These two valleys are relatively narrow but contain variably sorted sand and gravel, which, in places, may be capable of supplying modest-size community water systems.

  5. 27 CFR 9.57 - Green Valley of Russian River Valley.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Green Valley of Russian River Valley. 9.57 Section 9.57 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL AMERICAN VITICULTURAL AREAS Approved American Viticultural Areas § 9.57 Green Valley of Russian River...

  6. 27 CFR 9.57 - Green Valley of Russian River Valley.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Green Valley of Russian River Valley. 9.57 Section 9.57 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS AMERICAN VITICULTURAL AREAS Approved American Viticultural Areas § 9.57 Green Valley of Russian River...

  7. 27 CFR 9.57 - Green Valley of Russian River Valley.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Green Valley of Russian River Valley. 9.57 Section 9.57 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS AMERICAN VITICULTURAL AREAS Approved American Viticultural Areas § 9.57 Green Valley of Russian River...

  8. 27 CFR 9.57 - Green Valley of Russian River Valley.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Green Valley of Russian River Valley. 9.57 Section 9.57 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS AMERICAN VITICULTURAL AREAS Approved American Viticultural Areas § 9.57 Green Valley of Russian River...

  9. 27 CFR 9.57 - Green Valley of Russian River Valley.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Green Valley of Russian River Valley. 9.57 Section 9.57 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL AMERICAN VITICULTURAL AREAS Approved American Viticultural Areas § 9.57 Green Valley of Russian River...

  10. Depth to water, 1991, in the Rathdrum Prairie, Idaho; Spokane River valley, Washington; Moscow-Lewiston-Grangeville area, Idaho; and selected intermontane valleys, east-central Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Berenbrock, Charles E.; Bassick, M.D.; Rogers, T.L.; Garcia, S.P.

    1995-01-01

    This map report illustrates digitally generated depth-to-water zones for the Rathdrum Prairie in Idaho; part of the Spokane River Valley in eastern Washington; and the intermontane valleys of the upper Big Wood, Big Lost, Pahsimeroi, Little Lost, and Lemhi Rivers and Birch Creek in Idaho. Depth to water is 400 to 500 feet below land surface in the northern part of Rathdrum Prairie, 100 to 200 feet below land surface at the Idaho-Washington State line, and 0 to 250 feet below land surface in the Spokane area. Depth to water in the intermontane valleys in east-central Idaho is least (usually less than 50 feet) near streams and increases toward valley margins where mountain-front alluvial fans have formed. Depths to water shown in the Moscow-Lewiston-Grangeville area in Idaho are limited to point data at individual wells because most of the water levels measured were not representative of levels in the uppermost aquifer but of levels in deeper aquifers.

  11. STS-26 Discovery, OV-103, OASIS equipment is mounted in payload bay (PLB)

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1988-04-18

    S88-37764 (18 April 1988) --- OASIS, instrumentation which will record the environment experienced by Discovery during the STS-26 Space Shuttle mission, is lowered into position for attachment to the orbiter's aft port sill. Instrumentation sensors in the payload bay which are connected to the tape recorder module will document a variety of environmental measurements during various phases of the flight including temperature, pressure, vibration, sounds, acceleration, stress, and strain. OASIS will also record data during the Flight Readiness Firing. NASA is flying OASIS aboard Discovery in support of the Inertial Upper Stage (IUS) program office of the Air Force Space Division. The system was developed by Lockheed under a NASA contract, funded by the Air Force.

  12. Toward Semantic Interoperability in Home Health Care: Formally Representing OASIS Items for Integration into a Concept-oriented Terminology

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jeungok; Jenkins, Melinda L.; Cimino, James J.; White, Thomas M.; Bakken, Suzanne

    2005-01-01

    Objective: The authors aimed to (1) formally represent OASIS-B1 concepts using the Logical Observation Identifiers, Names, and Codes (LOINC) semantic structure; (2) demonstrate integration of OASIS-B1 concepts into a concept-oriented terminology, the Medical Entities Dictionary (MED); (3) examine potential hierarchical structures within LOINC among OASIS-B1 and other nursing terms; and (4) illustrate a Web-based implementation for OASIS-B1 data entry using Dialogix, a software tool with a set of functions that supports complex data entry. Design and Measurements: Two hundred nine OASIS-B1 items were dissected into the six elements of the LOINC semantic structure and then integrated into the MED hierarchy. Each OASIS-B1 term was matched to LOINC-coded nursing terms, Home Health Care Classification, the Omaha System, and the Sign and Symptom Check-List for Persons with HIV, and the extent of the match was judged based on a scale of 0 (no match) to 4 (exact match). OASIS-B1 terms were implemented as a Web-based survey using Dialogix. Results: Of 209 terms, 204 were successfully dissected into the elements of the LOINC semantics structure and integrated into the MED with minor revisions of MED semantics. One hundred fifty-one OASIS-B1 terms were mapped to one or more of the LOINC-coded nursing terms. Conclusion: The LOINC semantic structure offers a standard way to add home health care data to a comprehensive patient record to facilitate data sharing for monitoring outcomes across sites and to further terminology management, decision support, and accurate information retrieval for evidence-based practice. The cross-mapping results support the possibility of a hierarchical structure of the OASIS-B1 concepts within nursing terminologies in the LOINC database. PMID:15802480

  13. Toward semantic interoperability in home health care: formally representing OASIS items for integration into a concept-oriented terminology.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jeungok; Jenkins, Melinda L; Cimino, James J; White, Thomas M; Bakken, Suzanne

    2005-01-01

    The authors aimed to (1) formally represent OASIS-B1 concepts using the Logical Observation Identifiers, Names, and Codes (LOINC) semantic structure; (2) demonstrate integration of OASIS-B1 concepts into a concept-oriented terminology, the Medical Entities Dictionary (MED); (3) examine potential hierarchical structures within LOINC among OASIS-B1 and other nursing terms; and (4) illustrate a Web-based implementation for OASIS-B1 data entry using Dialogix, a software tool with a set of functions that supports complex data entry. Two hundred nine OASIS-B1 items were dissected into the six elements of the LOINC semantic structure and then integrated into the MED hierarchy. Each OASIS-B1 term was matched to LOINC-coded nursing terms, Home Health Care Classification, the Omaha System, and the Sign and Symptom Check-List for Persons with HIV, and the extent of the match was judged based on a scale of 0 (no match) to 4 (exact match). OASIS-B1 terms were implemented as a Web-based survey using Dialogix. Of 209 terms, 204 were successfully dissected into the elements of the LOINC semantics structure and integrated into the MED with minor revisions of MED semantics. One hundred fifty-one OASIS-B1 terms were mapped to one or more of the LOINC-coded nursing terms. The LOINC semantic structure offers a standard way to add home health care data to a comprehensive patient record to facilitate data sharing for monitoring outcomes across sites and to further terminology management, decision support, and accurate information retrieval for evidence-based practice. The cross-mapping results support the possibility of a hierarchical structure of the OASIS-B1 concepts within nursing terminologies in the LOINC database.

  14. M’zab Valley, Algeria

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-12-08

    NASA image acquired Feb. 9, 2011 Less than 5 percent of Algeria’s land surface is suitable for growing crops, and most precipitation falls on the Atlas Mountains along the coast. Inland, dust-laden winds blow over rocky plains and sand seas. However, in north central Algeria—off the tip of Grand Erg Occidental and about 450 kilometers (280 miles) south of Algiers—lies a serpentine stretch of vegetation. It is the M’zab Valley, filled with palm groves and dotted with centuries-old settlements. The Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA’s Terra satellite captured this image of M’zab Valley on February 9, 2011. ASTER combines infrared, red, and green wavelengths of light. Bare rock ranges in color from beige to peach. Buildings and paved surfaces appear gray. Vegetation is red, and brighter shades of red indicate more robust vegetation. This oasis results from water that is otherwise in short supply in the Sahara Desert, thanks to the valley’s approximately 3,000 wells. Chemical analysis of Algerian aquifers, as well studies of topography in Algeria and Tunisia, suggest this region experienced a cooler climate in the late Pleistocene, and potentially heavy monsoon rains earlier in the Holocene. The M’zab region shows evidence of meandering rivers and pinnate drainage patterns. The vegetation lining M’zab Valley highlights this old river valley’s contours. Cool summer temperatures and monsoon rains had long since retreated from the region by eleventh century, but this valley nevertheless supported the establishment of multiple fortified settlements, or ksours. Between 1012 A.D. and 1350 A.D., locals established the ksours of El-Atteuf, Bounoura, Melika, Ghardaïa, and Beni-Isguen. Collectively these cities are now a United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) World Heritage site. NASA Earth Observatory image by Robert Simmon and Jesse Allen, using data from the GSFC

  15. Environment and forest regeneration in the Illinois Valley area of southwestern Oregon.

    Treesearch

    Don Minore; Joseph N. Graham; Edward W. Murray

    1984-01-01

    Multiple regression analyses were used to relate environmental factors to forest regeneration on clearcut and partial cut areas managed by the Bureau of Land Management in the Illinois Valley area southwest of Grants Pass, Oregon. Difficulty of regenerating clearcuttings at elevations between 3,000 and 4,900 feet (914 and 1 494 m) increased with increases in soil...

  16. Hydrogeology of the Susquehanna River valley-fill aquifer system and adjacent areas in eastern Broome and southeastern Chenango Counties, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heisig, Paul M.

    2012-01-01

    The hydrogeology of the valley-fill aquifer system along a 32-mile reach of the Susquehanna River valley and adjacent areas was evaluated in eastern Broome and southeastern Chenango Counties, New York. The surficial geology, inferred ice-marginal positions, and distribution of stratified-drift aquifers were mapped from existing data. Ice-marginal positions, which represent pauses in the retreat of glacial ice from the region, favored the accumulation of coarse-grained deposits whereas more steady or rapid ice retreat between these positions favored deposition of fine-grained lacustrine deposits with limited coarse-grained deposits at depth. Unconfined aquifers with thick saturated coarse-grained deposits are the most favorable settings for water-resource development, and three several-mile-long sections of valley were identified (mostly in Broome County) as potentially favorable: (1) the southernmost valley section, which extends from the New York–Pennsylvania border to about 1 mile north of South Windsor, (2) the valley section that rounds the west side of the umlaufberg (an isolated bedrock hill within a valley) north of Windsor, and (3) the east–west valley section at the Broome County–Chenango County border from Nineveh to East of Bettsburg (including the lower reach of the Cornell Brook valley). Fine-grained lacustrine deposits form extensive confining units between the unconfined areas, and the water-resource potential of confined aquifers is largely untested. Recharge, or replenishment, of these aquifers is dependent not only on infiltration of precipitation directly on unconfined aquifers, but perhaps more so from precipitation that falls in adjacent upland areas. Surface runoff and shallow groundwater from the valley walls flow downslope and recharge valley aquifers. Tributary streams that drain upland areas lose flow as they enter main valleys on permeable alluvial fans. This infiltrating water also recharges valley aquifers. Current (2012) use of

  17. 42 CFR 488.68 - State Agency responsibilities for OASIS collection and data base requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... operating the OASIS system: (a) Establish and maintain an OASIS database. The State agency or other entity designated by CMS must— (1) Use a standard system developed or approved by CMS to collect, store, and analyze..., system back-up, and monitoring the status of the database; and (3) Obtain CMS approval before modifying...

  18. The Skateboard Factory: Curriculum by Design--Oasis Skateboard Factory Q&A with Craig Morrison

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pearson, George

    2012-01-01

    Since its opening three years ago, Oasis Skateboard Factory (OSF), founded by teacher Craig Morrison, has attracted considerable media exposure and received a Ken Spencer Award from the CEA for its innovative program. OSF is one of three programs offered by Oasis Alternative Secondary School, one of 22 alternative secondary schools of the Toronto…

  19. Oasis Connections: Results from an Evaluation Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Czaja, Sara J.; Lee, Chin Chin; Branham, Janice; Remis, Peggy

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of the Study: The objectives of this study were to evaluate a community-based basic computer and Internet training program designed for older adults, provide recommendations for program refinement, and gather preliminary information on program sustainability. Design and Methods: The program was developed by the OASIS Institute, a nonprofit…

  20. Volatiles in the Desert: Subtle Remote-sensing Signatures of the Dakhleh Oasis Catastrophic Event, Western Desert, Egypt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haldemann, A. F. C.; Kleindienst, M. R.; Churcher, C. S.; Smith, J. R.; Schwarcz, H. P.; Osinski, G.

    2005-01-01

    Over the past decade members of the Dakhleh Oasis Project have studied enigmatic signatures in the Pleistocene geologic record of portions of the Dakhleh oasis and palaeo-oasis in Egypt's Western Desert [1,2]. In particular, Si-Ca-Al rich glass melt (Dakhleh Glass, Fig. 1) points to a catastrophic event between c.100,000-200,000 years ago [3] in this well-studied African savannah and freshwater lake Middle Stone Age environment [4,5].

  1. Implementation of the RCOG guidelines for prevention of obstetric anal sphincter injuries (OASIS) at two London Hospitals: A time series analysis.

    PubMed

    Mohiudin, Henna; Ali, Sajjad; Pisal, Pradyna N; Villar, Rose

    2018-05-01

    To audit the impact of implementation of the RCOG guidelines for prevention of Obstetric anal sphincter injuries (OASIS) by introducing antenatal perineal massage, manual perineal protection, and cutting episiotomies at 60° to the midline at the time of crowning. Time series analysis; Setting - Two London teaching hospitals; Royal Free London (RFL) and Barnet; Population or Sample - All nulliparous women undergoing vaginal birth; Methods - Training was provided for above techniques. EPISCISSORS-60 were introduced to perform 60° episiotomies. Data were extracted from maternity databases and dashboards; Main Outcome Measures - OASIS rates before and after implementation. Data from 2566 births were analysed. In operative vaginal deliveries (OVD), OASIS declined from 9.6% to 2% (p = 0.001) at Barnet and from 5.6% to 4.2% (p = 0.4) at RFL. OASIS reduced in nulliparous OVD's given episiotomies from 6.3% in the 'before' period to 0.6% in the 'after' period [p = 0.01] at Barnet. Before introduction of the EPISCISSORS-60, OASIS rate was 6.3% with episiotomies and 30% without episiotomies (p = 0.000). After introduction of the EPISCISSORS-60, OASIS rate was 0.63% with episiotomies v 16% without episiotomies (p = 0.000) at Barnet. At RFL, OASIS rate was 2.6% with episiotomies, and 42% without episiotomy (p = 0.000). In SVD's at Barnet, OASIS declined from 6.6% before to 0% after (p = 0.000) in women given episiotomies while it declined from 5.4% to 3% (p = 0.12) in those not given episiotomies. After introduction of the EPISCISSORS-60, OASIS was 0% in women with episiotomies and 3% in those without episiotomies (p = 0.04). In SVD's at RFL, OASIS was 0% in women given episiotomy v 4.7% without episiotomy (p = 0.03). Deliveries with EPISCISSORS-60 episiotomies had lesser OASIS than those without episiotomies in both nulliparous OVD's and SVD's. OASIS was lower with EPISCISSORS-60 episiotomies than those with eyeballed episiotomies

  2. [Study on ecological risk assessment technology of fluoride pollution from arid oasis soil].

    PubMed

    Xue, Su-Yin; Li, Ping; Wang, Sheng-Li; Nan, Zhong-Ren

    2014-03-01

    According to translocation regulation of fluoride in the typical oasis soil-plant system under field, an ecological risk assessment model of fluoride was established, and this model was used to assess ecological risk to fluoride pollution from suburban oasis soils in Baiyin City, which was specifically expressed with the potential ecological risk of bioavailability (ER(bc)) model to assess ecological risk of fluoride pollution in oasis regions. Results showed that the ecological risk indices of fluoride pollution from this region were 1.37-24.81, the level of risk at most sites was high to very high, the average ecological risk index was 11.28, belonged to very high risk. This indicated that in the suburb soil of Baiyin City needs to be concerned about the remediation of fluoride pollution.

  3. Hydrologic reconnaissance of the Blue Creek Valley area, Box Elder County, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bolke, E.L.; Price, Don

    1972-01-01

    This report is the tenth in a series of reports prepared by the U. S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Utah Department of Natural Resources, Division of Water Rights, that describe the water resources of selected areas in northwestern Utah. The purpose of this report is to present available hydrologic data for the Blue Creek Valley area and to provide a quantitative evaluation of the potential water-resources development of the area.

  4. Oasis: A high-level/high-performance open source Navier-Stokes solver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mortensen, Mikael; Valen-Sendstad, Kristian

    2015-03-01

    Oasis is a high-level/high-performance finite element Navier-Stokes solver written from scratch in Python using building blocks from the FEniCS project (fenicsproject.org). The solver is unstructured and targets large-scale applications in complex geometries on massively parallel clusters. Oasis utilizes MPI and interfaces, through FEniCS, to the linear algebra backend PETSc. Oasis advocates a high-level, programmable user interface through the creation of highly flexible Python modules for new problems. Through the high-level Python interface the user is placed in complete control of every aspect of the solver. A version of the solver, that is using piecewise linear elements for both velocity and pressure, is shown to reproduce very well the classical, spectral, turbulent channel simulations of Moser et al. (1999). The computational speed is strongly dominated by the iterative solvers provided by the linear algebra backend, which is arguably the best performance any similar implicit solver using PETSc may hope for. Higher order accuracy is also demonstrated and new solvers may be easily added within the same framework.

  5. OASIS 2: online application for survival analysis 2 with features for the analysis of maximal lifespan and healthspan in aging research.

    PubMed

    Han, Seong Kyu; Lee, Dongyeop; Lee, Heetak; Kim, Donghyo; Son, Heehwa G; Yang, Jae-Seong; Lee, Seung-Jae V; Kim, Sanguk

    2016-08-30

    Online application for survival analysis (OASIS) has served as a popular and convenient platform for the statistical analysis of various survival data, particularly in the field of aging research. With the recent advances in the fields of aging research that deal with complex survival data, we noticed a need for updates to the current version of OASIS. Here, we report OASIS 2 (http://sbi.postech.ac.kr/oasis2), which provides extended statistical tools for survival data and an enhanced user interface. In particular, OASIS 2 enables the statistical comparison of maximal lifespans, which is potentially useful for determining key factors that limit the lifespan of a population. Furthermore, OASIS 2 provides statistical and graphical tools that compare values in different conditions and times. That feature is useful for comparing age-associated changes in physiological activities, which can be used as indicators of "healthspan." We believe that OASIS 2 will serve as a standard platform for survival analysis with advanced and user-friendly statistical tools for experimental biologists in the field of aging research.

  6. Ground-water conditions in the Grand County area, Utah, with emphasis on the Mill Creek-Spanish Valley area

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blanchard, Paul J.

    1990-01-01

    The Grand County area includes all of Grand County, the Mill Creek and Pack Creek drainages in San Juan County, and the area between the Colorado and Green Rivers in San Juan County. The Grand County area includes about 3,980 square miles, and the Mill Creek-Spanish Valley area includes about 44 square miles. The three principal consolidated-rock aquifers in the Grand County area are the Entrada, Navajo, and Wingate aquifers in the Entrada Sandstone, the Navajo Sandstone, and the Wingate Sandstone, and the principal consolidated-rock aquifer in the Mill Creek-Spanish Valley area is the Glen Canyon aquifer in the Glen Canyon Group, comprised of the Navajo Sandstone, the Kayenta Formation, and the Wingate Sandstone.Recharge to the Entrada, Navajo, and Glen Canyon aquifers typically occurs where the formations containing the aquifers crop out or are overlain by unconsolidated sand deposits. Recharge is enhanced where the sand deposits are saturated at a depth of more than about 6 feet below the land surface, and the effects of evaporation begin to decrease rapidly with depth. Recharge to the Wingate aquifer typically occurs by downward movement of water from the Navajo aquifer through the Kayenta Formation, and primarily occurs where the Navajo Sandstone, Kayenta Formation, and the Wingate Sandstone are fractured.

  7. Validation of SWEEP for creep, saltation, and suspension in a desert-oasis ecotone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pi, H.; Sharratt, B.; Feng, G.; Lei, J.; Li, X.; Zheng, Z.

    2016-03-01

    Wind erosion in the desert-oasis ecotone can accelerate desertification, but little is known about the susceptibility of the ecotone to wind erosion in the Tarim Basin despite being a major source of windblown dust in China. The objective of this study was to test the performance of the Single-event Wind Erosion Evaluation Program (SWEEP) in simulating soil loss as creep, saltation, and suspension in a desert-oasis ecotone. Creep, saltation, and suspension were measured and simulated in a desert-oasis ecotone of the Tarim Basin during discrete periods of high winds in spring 2012 and 2013. The model appeared to adequately simulate total soil loss (ranged from 23 to 2272 g m-2 across sample periods) according to the high index of agreement (d = 0.76). The adequate agreement of the SWEEP in simulating total soil loss was due to the good performance of the model (d = 0.71) in simulating creep plus saltation. The SWEEP model, however, inadequately simulated suspension based upon a low d (⩽0.43). The slope estimates of the regression between simulated and measured suspension and difference of mean suggested that the SWEEP underestimated suspension. The adequate simulation of creep plus saltation thus provides reasonable estimates of total soil loss using SWEEP in a desert-oasis environment.

  8. Oasis in Iraq: Universities Flourish in Kurdistan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krieger, Zvika

    2007-01-01

    The campus of Salahadin University--peaceful, bustling, and collegial-- is a rare sight in Iraq, where sectarian violence has brought the higher education system to the verge of collapse. Home to the country's historically repressed four million to five million ethnic Kurds, it is an oasis of stability and tranquility while much of the rest of…

  9. Is it working? A look at the changing nutrient practices in the Southern Willamette Valley's Groundwater Management Area

    EPA Science Inventory

    Groundwater nitrate contamination affects thousands of households in the southern Willamette Valley and many more across the Pacific Northwest. The southern Willamette Valley Groundwater Management Area (SWV GWMA) was established in 2004 due to nitrate levels in the groundwater ...

  10. 18 CFR 37.8 - Obligations of OASIS users.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY REGULATIONS UNDER THE FEDERAL POWER ACT OPEN ACCESS SAME-TIME INFORMATION SYSTEMS § 37.8... initiating a significant amount of automated queries. The OASIS user must also notify the Responsible Party one month in advance of expected significant increases in the volume of automated queries. [Order 605...

  11. CAVIAR: CLASSIFICATION VIA AGGREGATED REGRESSION AND ITS APPLICATION IN CLASSIFYING OASIS BRAIN DATABASE

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ting; Rangarajan, Anand; Vemuri, Baba C.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a novel classification via aggregated regression algorithm – dubbed CAVIAR – and its application to the OASIS MRI brain image database. The CAVIAR algorithm simultaneously combines a set of weak learners based on the assumption that the weight combination for the final strong hypothesis in CAVIAR depends on both the weak learners and the training data. A regularization scheme using the nearest neighbor method is imposed in the testing stage to avoid overfitting. A closed form solution to the cost function is derived for this algorithm. We use a novel feature – the histogram of the deformation field between the MRI brain scan and the atlas which captures the structural changes in the scan with respect to the atlas brain – and this allows us to automatically discriminate between various classes within OASIS [1] using CAVIAR. We empirically show that CAVIAR significantly increases the performance of the weak classifiers by showcasing the performance of our technique on OASIS. PMID:21151847

  12. CAVIAR: CLASSIFICATION VIA AGGREGATED REGRESSION AND ITS APPLICATION IN CLASSIFYING OASIS BRAIN DATABASE.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ting; Rangarajan, Anand; Vemuri, Baba C

    2010-04-14

    This paper presents a novel classification via aggregated regression algorithm - dubbed CAVIAR - and its application to the OASIS MRI brain image database. The CAVIAR algorithm simultaneously combines a set of weak learners based on the assumption that the weight combination for the final strong hypothesis in CAVIAR depends on both the weak learners and the training data. A regularization scheme using the nearest neighbor method is imposed in the testing stage to avoid overfitting. A closed form solution to the cost function is derived for this algorithm. We use a novel feature - the histogram of the deformation field between the MRI brain scan and the atlas which captures the structural changes in the scan with respect to the atlas brain - and this allows us to automatically discriminate between various classes within OASIS [1] using CAVIAR. We empirically show that CAVIAR significantly increases the performance of the weak classifiers by showcasing the performance of our technique on OASIS.

  13. Assessing the changes in land use and ecosystem services in an oasis agricultural region of Yanqi Basin, Northwest China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuixian; Wu, Bin; Yang, Pengnian

    2014-12-01

    The Yanqi Basin, one of the most productive agricultural areas, has a high population density in Xinjiang, Northwest China. Land use changes, mainly driven by oasis expansion, significantly impact ecosystem services and functions, but these effects are difficult to quantify. The valuation of ecosystem services is important to clarify the ecological and environmental changes caused by agriculturalization of oasis. This study aimed to investigate variations in ecosystem services in response to land use changes during oasis agricultural expansion activities in the Yanqi Basin from 1964 to 2009. The methods used were based on formula of ecosystem service value (ESV) and ESV coefficients. Satellite data were combined with the ESV coefficients to quantify land use changes and ecosystem service changes in the study area. Sensitivity analysis determined the effect of manipulating the coefficients on the estimated values. The results show that the total ESVs in the Yanqi Basin were $1,674, $1,692, $1,471, $1,732, and $1,603 million in 1964, 1973, 1989, 1999, and 2009, respectively. The net deline in ESV was $71 million in the past 46 years, but the ESVs of each types of landscape changed significantly. The aggregated ESVs of water areas and wetlands were approximately 80 % of the total ESV. Water supply and waste treatment were the two largest service functions and contributed approximately 65 % of the total ESV. The estimated ESVs in this study were elastic with respect to the value coefficients. Therefore, the estimations were robust in spite of uncertainties on the value coefficients. These significant changes in land use occur within the entire basin over the study period. These changes cause environmental problems, such as land degradation, vegetation degeneracy, and changes in aquatic environment.

  14. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 9): San Fernando Valley Area 2, operable unit 2, Los Angeles County, CA, June 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-06-01

    This decision document presents the selected remedial action for the Glendale North Operable Unit, San Fernando Valley Area 2 Superfund site. The remedy involves groundwater extraction and treatment for the shallow aquifer system in the Glendale area of the San Fernando Valley.

  15. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 9): San Fernando Valley Area 2, operable unit 3, Los Angeles County, CA, June 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-06-01

    This decision document presents the selected remedial action for the Glendale South Operable Unit, San Fernando Valley Area 2 Superfund site. The remedy involves groundwater extraction and treatment for the shallow aquifer system in the Glendale area of the San Fernando Valley.

  16. 18 CFR 37.8 - Obligations of OASIS users.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Obligations of OASIS users. 37.8 Section 37.8 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY REGULATIONS UNDER THE FEDERAL POWER ACT OPEN ACCESS SAME-TIME INFORMATION SYSTEMS § 37.8...

  17. Hazard connected to tunnel construction in Mt Stena karstic area (Rosandra Valley, Classical Karst)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cucchi, F.; Boschin, W.; Visintin, L.; Zini, L.

    2009-04-01

    Rosandra Valley -a unique geomorphological environment- is located in the western side of the Classical Karst plateau. This deep limestone gorge is crossed by a stream that is fed by a large basin located in Slovenia. Rosandra Valley is the only example of Classical Karst river valley with surface hydrography; the torrent digs a deep gully into the rock, rich in rapids, swirl holes, small waterfalls, enclosed meanders and basins; here, the first seepage phenomena occur, and part of the water feeds the underground aquifer. Rosandra Valley is theatre to complex structural situation; the NE slope culminates in the structure of Mt Stena, a limestone tectonic scale located between two faults and firmly rooted in the karst platform. Tectonics is quite important for the development of deep karst in this area; Mt Stena, in particular, hosts a comprehensive net of articulated and diversely shaped caves, basically organised on several levels, which stretches over a total of 9,000 metres, bearing testimony to ancient geological and hydrogeological origins. The deepest areas of the system reach a suspended aquifer that is probably sustained by an overthrust and placed about 100 meters above Rosandra torrent underground aquifer. During feasibility studies about Trieste-Divača high velocity railway link, interaction between project and karst features was examined; in fact the proximity of proposal project and Mt Stena karst system suggest to improve the knowledge related to karst and hydrogeological aspects of the massif. Compatibly with the project requirements, risk of voids intersection and water contamination were analyzed. In fact the Mt Stena suspended aquifer partially feeds Rosandra torrent which flows in a protected natural area. Karst features were represented in a 3D model in order to better understand the spatial relationship between railway project and karst system.

  18. Timing of large earthquakes since A.D. 800 on the Mission Creek strand of the San Andreas fault zone at Thousand Palms Oasis, near Palm Springs, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fumal, T.E.; Rymer, M.J.; Seitz, G.G.

    2002-01-01

    Paleoseismic investigations across the Mission Creek strand of the San Andreas fault at Thousand Palms Oasis indicate that four and probably five surface-rupturing earthquakes occurred during the past 1200 years. Calendar age estimates for these earthquakes are based on a chronological model that incorporates radio-carbon dates from 18 in situ burn layers and stratigraphic ordering constraints. These five earthquakes occurred in about A.D. 825 (770-890) (mean, 95% range), A.D. 982 (840-1150), A.D. 1231 (1170-1290), A.D. 1502 (1450-1555), and after a date in the range of A.D. 1520-1680. The most recent surface-rupturing earthquake at Thousand Palms is likely the same as the A.D. 1676 ?? 35 event at Indio reported by Sieh and Williams (1990). Each of the past five earthquakes recorded on the San Andreas fault in the Coachella Valley strongly overlaps in time with an event at the Wrightwood paleoseismic site, about 120 km northwest of Thousand Palms Oasis. Correlation of events between these two sites suggests that at least the southernmost 200 km of the San Andreas fault zone may have ruptured in each earthquake. The average repeat time for surface-rupturing earthquakes on the San Andreas fault in the Coachella Valley is 215 ?? 25 years, whereas the elapsed time since the most recent event is 326 ?? 35 years. This suggests the southernmost San Andreas fault zone likely is very near failure. The Thousand Palms Oasis site is underlain by a series of six channels cut and filled since about A.D. 800 that cross the fault at high angles. A channel margin about 900 years old is offset right laterally 2.0 ?? 0.5 m, indicating a slip rate of 4 ?? 2 mm/yr. This slip rate is low relative to geodetic and other geologic slip rate estimates (26 ?? 2 mm/yr and about 23-35 mm/yr, respectively) on the southernmost San Andreas fault zone, possibly because (1) the site is located in a small step-over in the fault trace and so the rate is not be representative of the Mission Creek fault

  19. Fondaparinux and acute coronary syndromes: update on the OASIS 5-6 studies.

    PubMed

    Schiele, François

    2010-04-15

    Anticoagulant therapy is a major component in the management of acute coronary syndromes (ACS). Four anticoagulant agents are currently commercially available for ACS, namely unfractionated heparin (UFH), enoxaparin, bivalirudin and fondaparinux. We describe the advantages of fondaparinux and the reasons that have hampered its uptake into routine management of ACS. Fondaparinux was shown to be efficacious in the prevention of deep vein thrombosis vs low-molecular-weight heparins, while in the setting of venous thrombo-embolic disease, it was shown to be noninferior to enoxaparin and UFH. Two pivotal studies have demonstrated the efficacy of fondaparinux as an anticoagulant in the setting of ACS, namely OASIS-5 in non-ST elevation ACS, and OASIS-6 in ST elevation myocardial infarction (MI). In OASIS-5, fondaparinux was shown to be noninferior to enoxaparin in terms of death, MI or refractory ischemia at 9 days. Furthermore, a 50% reduction in bleeding complications was obtained with fondaparinux vs enoxaparin, leading to a risk reduction for death. In OASIS-6, fondaparinux was shown to be superior to the comparator (UFH or placebo). European and North American guidelines give fondaparinux a Grade 1A and 1B recommendation respectively, but uptake of fondaparinux in routine practice has been slow. We explore reasons for this, such as prevailing doubts about the efficacy of fondaparinux in the setting of angioplasty, the problem of catheter thrombosis, and the lack of antidote in case of bleeding complications. With the exception of primary angioplasty, fondaparinux is as effective as enoxaparin or UFH, but is also associated with a considerable reduction in bleeding complications, and thus, an undeniable net clinical benefit.

  20. Ground-water hydrology of Pahvant Valley and adjacent areas, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    1990-01-01

    The primary ground-water reservoir in Pahvant Valley and adjacent areas is in the unconsolidated basin fill and interbedded basalt. Recharge in 1959 was estimated to be about 70,000 acre-feet per year and was mostly by seepage from streams, canals, and unconsumed irrigation water and by infiltration of precipitation. Discharge in 1959 was estimated to be about 109,000 acre-feet and was mostly from springs, evapotranspiration, and wells.Water-level declines of more than 50 feet occurred in some areas between 1953 and 1980 because of less-than-normal precipitation and extensive pumping for irrigation. Water levels recovered most of these declines between 1983 and 1986 because of reduced withdrawals and record quantities of precipitation.The quality of ground water in the area west of Kanosh has deteriorated since large ground-water withdrawals began in about 1953. The cause of the deterioration probably is movement of poor quality water into the area from the southwest and possibly the west during periods of large ground-water withdrawals and recycling of irrigation water. The quality of water from some wells has improved since 1983, due to increased recharge and decreased withdrawals for irrigation.Water-level declines of m:>re than 80 feet in some parts of Pahvant Valley are projected if ground-water withdrawals continue for 20 years at the 1977 rate of about 96,000 acre-feet. Rises of as much as 58 feet and declines of as much as 47 feet are projected with withdrawals of 48,000 acre-feet per year for 20 years. The elimination of recharge from the Central Utah Canal is projected to cause water-level declines of up to 8 feet near the canal.

  1. Condition and Health of Rufous Bush Robin (Cercotrichas galactotes) Nestlings in a Polluted Oasis Habitat in Southern Tunisia.

    PubMed

    Alaya-Ltifi, Leila; Hayder-Benyahya, Nawel; Selmi, Slaheddine

    2015-06-01

    We investigated whether the proximity to the Gabès-Ghannouche factory complex of phosphate treatment, in south-eastern Tunisia, was associated with notable changes in the condition and health of Rufous bush robin (Cercotrichas galactotes) nestlings hatched in the neighbouring oasis habitat. Results demonstrated that excrements of nestlings hatched in one oasis close to the factory complex contained higher concentrations of lead and zinc than the excrements of nestlings from one oasis situated 20 km away. Furthermore, when effects of age and nestling number in the nest were controlled, nestlings hatched near the factory complex showed reduced tarsus length, rectrix length, haematocrit level and haemoglobin concentration, but higher levels of fluctuating asymmetry compared to those from the more distant oasis. Overall, results suggest that the proximity to the factory complex was associated with increased exposure to metals and deterioration in nestling condition and development.

  2. Sonographic assessment of the anal sphincter after obstetric anal sphincter injury (OASI) using transperineal ultrasound (TPUS).

    PubMed

    Eisenberg, Vered H; Valsky, Dan V; Yagel, Simcha

    2018-03-24

    Obstetric anal sphincter injury (OASI) is the most common cause of anal incontinence and ano-rectal symptoms in women 1 . Reported rates of anal incontinence following primary repair of OASI range between 15-61%, with a mean of 39% 2, 3 . Other possible complications of OASI include perineal pain, dyspareunia, and less commonly, abscess formation, wound breakdown, and rectovaginal fistulae. Symptom onset may occur immediately, several years postpartum, or only late in life when aging of tissues adds to the delivery insult. Having sustained an OASI may impact significantly on women's physical and emotional health. Missed OASI, inadequate repair or lack of follow up are potential sources of litigation 4 . The reported incidence of OASI may be as high as 4-6.6% 4 , averaging 2.9% in the UK 3 . The incidence is higher in primiparae (6.1%) than in multiparae (1.7%) 3 . Recent years are seeing an increased awareness and structured training programs, which appear to have resulted in an increase in the detection rate of OASI 3 . The following risk factors have been identified with varying risk rates reported 3 : Asian ethnicity (OR 2.27, 95% CI 2.14-2.41), nulliparity (relative risk [RR] 6.97, 95% CI 5.40-8.99), birth weight greater than 4 kg (OR 2.27, 95% CI 2.18-2.36), shoulder dystocia (OR 1.90, 95% CI 1.72-2.08), occipito-posterior position (RR 2.44, 95% CI 2.07-2.89), prolonged second stage of labor (up to RR 2.02, 95% CI 1.62-2.51 after four hours duration). Instrumental deliveries and episiotomy use have been extensively studied resulting in the following evidence: Vacuum delivery without episiotomy (OR 1.89, 95% CI 1.74-2.05); vacuum delivery with episiotomy is protective (OR 0.57, 95% CI 0.51-0.63); forceps delivery without episiotomy carries the highest potential risk (OR 6.53, 95% CI 5.57-7.64); and forceps delivery with episiotomy (OR 1.34, 95% CI 1.21-1.49). Other potential risk factors have been suggested with varying evidence such as advanced maternal age at

  3. Soils of wet valleys in the Larsemann Hills and Vestfold Hills oases (Princess Elizabeth Land, East Antarctica)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mergelov, N. S.

    2014-09-01

    The properties and spatial distribution of soils and soil-like bodies in valleys of the coastal Larsemann Hills and Vestfold Hills oases—poorly investigated in terms of the soil areas of East Antarctica—are discussed. In contrast to Dry Valleys—large continental oases of Western Antarctica—the studied territory is characterized by the presence of temporarily waterlogged sites in the valleys. It is argued that the deficit of water rather than the low temperature is the major limiting factor for the development of living organisms and the pedogenesis on loose substrates. The moisture gradients in the surface soil horizons explain the spatial distribution of the different soils and biotic complexes within the studied valleys. Despite the permanent water-logging of the deep suprapermafrost horizons of most of the soils in the valleys, no gley features have been identified in them. The soils of the wet valleys in the Larsemann Hills oasis do not contain carbonates. They have a slightly acid or neutral reaction. The organic carbon and nitrogen contents are mainly controlled by the amount of living and dead biomass rather than by the humic substances proper. The larger part of the biomass is concentrated inside the mineral soil matrix rather than on the soil surface. The stresses caused by surface drying, strong winds, and ultraviolet radiation prevent the development of organisms on the surface of the soil and necessitate the search for shelter within the soil fine earth material (endoedaphic niche) or under the gravelly pavement (hypolithic niche). In the absence of higher plants, humified products of their decomposition, and rainwater that can wash the soil profile and upon the low content of silt and clay particles in the soil material, "classical" soil horizons are not developed. The most distinct (and, often, the only diagnosed) products of pedogenesis in these soils are represented by organomineral films on the surface of mineral particles.

  4. Bedrock geologic map of the Yucca Mountain area, Nye County, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Day, Warren C.; Dickerson, Robert P.; Potter, Christopher J.; Sweetkind, Donald S.; San Juan, Carma A.; Drake, Ronald M.; Fridrich, Christopher J.

    1998-01-01

    Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada, has been identified as a potential site for underground storage of high-level radioactive nuclear waste. Detailed bedrock geologic maps form an integral part of the site characterization program by providing the fundamental framework for research into the geologic hazards and hydrologic behavior of the mountain. This bedrock geologic map provides the geologic framework and structural setting for the area in and adjacent to the site of the potential repository. The study area comprises the northern and central parts of Yucca Mountain, located on the southern flank of the Timber Mountain-Oasis Valley caldera complex, which was the source for many of the volcanic units in the area. The Timber Mountain-Oasis Valley caldera complex is part of the Miocene southwestern Nevada volcanic field, which is within the Walker Lane belt. This tectonic belt is a northwest-striking megastructure lying between the more active Inyo-Mono and Basin-and-Range subsections of the southwestern Great Basin.Excluding Quaternary surficial deposits, the map area is underlain by Miocene volcanic rocks, principally ash-flow tuffs with lesser amounts of lava flows. These volcanic units include the Crater Flat Group, the Calico Hills Formation, the Paintbrush Group, and the Timber Mountain Group, as well as minor basaltic dikes. The tuffs and lava flows are predominantly rhyolite with lesser amounts of latite and range in age from 13.4 to 11.6 Ma. The 10-Ma basaltic dikes intruded along a few fault traces in the north-central part of the study area. Fault types in the area can be classified as block bounding, relay structures, strike slip, and intrablock. The block-bounding faults separate the 1- to 4-km-wide, east-dipping structural blocks and exhibit hundreds of meters of displacement. The relay structures are northwest-striking normal fault zones that kinematically link the block-bounding faults. The strike-slip faults are steep, northwest-striking dextral

  5. Field Surveys, IOC Valleys. Volume III, Part II. Cultural Resources Survey, Pine and Wah Wah Valleys, Utah.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-08-01

    valleys are typical of the Basin and Range Province, characterized by parallel, north-south trending mountain ranges, separated by hydrologically closed... basins . Pine and Wah Wah valleys each have hardpan-playas in their lowest areas. State Highway 21 runs roughly northwest-southeast through both val...have been important for prehis- toric and historic use of the area. Pine Valley: Pine and Wah Wah valleys are closed alluvial basins . The central part

  6. Hydrogeochemical investigation of groundwater in Jericho area in the Jordan Valley, West Bank, Palestine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Da'as, Ammar; Walraevens, Kristine

    2013-06-01

    Water resources in the Middle East, particularly in Palestine, are extremely scarce and costly. The Jordan Valley is a fertile productive region, described as the food basket of Palestine. Groundwater originating from the Quaternary Aquifer System forms the main water resource in the Jordan Valley. However, the quality of this groundwater is threatened mainly by the high chloride concentration. The most representative area of the Jordan Valley is Jericho area, which was chosen to be the study area. The study area (65 km2) is almost a flat area with a gentle decline towards the east. It is the lowest land on earth with ground levels reaching 400 meters below sea level (mbsl) near the Dead Sea shores. The Quaternary Aquifer System in the study area could be divided into an upper alluvial layer with thickness varying from 40 to 150 m and a lower low-permeable Lisan layer, which crops out in the eastern part of the study area with thickness over 200 m. Hydrogeochemical investigation reveals that the water is generally earth alkaline with higher content of earth alkalis and prevailing chloride. According to Stuyfzand (1986) and Piper's (1944) classification systems, water type in the Alluvial Aquifer varies from fresh hard CaMgHCO3 or MgCaHCO3 water in the west and northwest to brackish very-hard MgNaCl or NaMgCl in the middle. In the east, the water becomes brackish-salt extremely-hard MgNaCl or NaCl. Groundwater quality is deteriorating (increase in salinity) spatially towards the east and vertically with increasing depth (when nearing the Lisan Formation). As an indication of groundwater salinity, total dissolved solids show some variability with time over the last 21 years (1983-2004). In short-time scale, there are high seasonal and yearly fluctuations with regard to salinity, specifically in Cl- and SO42- contents. Spring water from the Upper Cenomanian Aquifer (CaHCO3) represents the fresh end member, while Rift Valley Brines (RVB-CaNaCl) and Dead Sea Brines (DSB

  7. An Isotopic view of water and nitrogen transport through the vadose zone in Oregon's southern Willamette Valley's Groundwater Management Area

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background/Question/MethodsGroundwater nitrate contamination affects thousands of households in Oregon's southern Willamette Valley and many more across the Pacific Northwest. The southern Willamette Valley Groundwater Management Area (SWV GWMA) was established in 2004 due to nit...

  8. 27 CFR 9.27 - Lime Kiln Valley.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Lime Kiln Valley. 9.27... OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS AMERICAN VITICULTURAL AREAS Approved American Viticultural Areas § 9.27 Lime Kiln Valley. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Lime Kiln Valley...

  9. Thin-skinned tectonics of the Upper Ojai Valley and Sulphur Mountain area, Ventura basin, California

    SciTech Connect

    Huftile, G.J.

    1991-08-01

    By integrating surface mapping with subsurface well data and drawing cross sections and subsurface maps, the geometry of shallow structures and their geologic history of the Upper Ojai Valley of California can be reconstructed. The geometry of shallow structures, the geologic history, and the location of earthquake foci then offer constraints on the deep structure of this complex area. The Upper Ojai Valley is a tectonic depression between opposing reverse faults. Its northern border is formed by the active, north-dipping San Cayetano fault, which has 6.0 km of stratigraphic separation in the Silverthread area of the Ojai oil field andmore » 2.6 km of stratigraphic separation west of Sisar Creek. The fault dies out farther west in Ojai Valley, where the south-vergent shortening is transferred to a blind thrust. The southern border of the Upper Ojai Valley is formed by the Quaternary Lion fault set, which dips south and merges into the Sisar decollement within the south-dipping, ductile, lower Miocene Rincon formation. By the middle Pleistocene, the Sulphur Mountain anticlinorium and the Big Canyon syncline began forming as a fault-propagation fold; the fault-propagation fold is rooted in the Sisar decollement, a passive backthrust rising from a blind thrust at depth. The formation of the Sulphur Mountain anticlinorium was followed closely by the ramping of the south-dipping Lion fault set to the surface over the nonmarine upper Pleistocene Saugus Formation. To the east, the San Cayetano fault overrides and folds the Lion Fault set near the surface. Area-balancing of the deformation shows shortening of 15.5 km, and suggests a 17 km depth to the brittle-ductile transition.« less

  10. Impact of artificial recharge and drought in Tafilalet Oasis system: First investigation by GIS and groundwater modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouaamlat, I.; Larabi, A.; Faouzi, M.

    2013-12-01

    The geographical location of Tafilalet oasis system (TOS) in the south of the valley of Ziz (Morocco) offers him a particular advantage on the plane of water potential. The surface water which comes from humid regions of the High Atlas and intercepted by a dam then converged through the watercourse of Ziz towards the plain of the TOS, have created the conditions for the formation of a water table relatively rich with regard to the local climatic conditions (arid climate with recurrent drought). Because of this situation, the region has one of the largest palms of North Africa. Thus there is an agricultural activity that is practiced in a 21 irrigation areas whose size rarely exceeds 2,000 hectare. Given the role of the water table in the economic development of the region, a hydrogeological study was conducted to understand the impact of artificial recharge and recurrent droughts on the development of the groundwater reserves of TOS. In this study, a three-dimensional model of groundwater flow was developed for the Tafilalet oasis system aquifer, to assist the decision makers as a "management tool" in order to assess alternative schemes for development and exploitation of groundwater resources based on the variation of artificial recharge and drought, using for the first time the Modflow code. This study takes into account the most possible real hydrogeological conditions and using the geographical information system (GIS) for the organisation and treatment of data and applying a multidisciplinary approach combining geostatistical and hydrogeological modeling. The results from this numerical investigation of the TOS aquifer shows that the commissioning of the dam to control the flows of extreme flood and good management of water releases, has avoided the losses of irrigation water and consequently the non-overexploitation of the groundwater. So that with one or two water releases per year from the dam of flow rate more than 14 million m3/year it is possible to

  11. Glacial landform assemblages in the catchment area of the upper Quitarasca valley (Cordillera Blanca, Perú)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iturrizaga, L.

    2012-04-01

    The research project focuses on the glacial landform sequences in the upper Quitarasca valley (8°51´S/77°36´W) with particular consideration of the Pucahirca glacier. The study area is located at the eastern side of the Cordillera Blanca, about almost 40 km valley upstream of the confluence with the Rio Santa valley. The highest catchment area is the Pucahirca Massif (6020 m a.s.l.). The present glacier tongue terminates at an elevation of 4500 m a.s.l.. The investigations analyzed the extent of the glaciations from the Last Glacial Maximum to modern times in regard to the transition of the moraine types during the course of deglaciation. The distinct moraine stages were correlated with existent glacial chronologies of adjacent valleys. Due to the hazard potential of the Laguna Safuna Alta, which developed in the late 1940s at the terminus of the Pucahirca glacier, detailed studies have been carried out by various research groups in regard to the composition of the historical / Neoglacial moraine composition providing at the same time valuable material for multi-temporal comparison of the recent development of the glacier tongue. The investigations presented here are part of a project on the glacial geomorphology in the Tropical Andes, financed by the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation.

  12. Equilibrium partitioning of organic compounds to OASIS HLB® as a function of compound concentration, pH, temperature and salinity.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Yoonah; Schäffer, Andreas; Smith, Kilian

    2017-05-01

    Oasis hydrophilic lipophilic balance ® (Oasis HLB) is commonly employed in solid phase extraction (SPE) of environmental contaminants and within polar organic chemical integrative passive samplers (POCIS). In this study batch experiments were carried out to evaluate the relative affinity of a range of relevant organic pollutants to Oasis HLB in aqueous systems. The influence of sorbate concentration, temperature, pH, and salinity on the equilibrium sorption was investigated. Equilibrium partition ratios (K D ) of 28 compounds were determined, ranging over three orders of magnitude from 1.16 × 10 3  L/kg (atenolol) to 1.07 × 10 6  L/kg (isoproturon). The Freundlich model was able to describe the equilibrium partitioning to Oasis HLB, and an analysis of the thermodynamic parameters revealed the spontaneous and exothermic nature of the partitioning process. Ionic strength had only a minor effect on the partitioning, whereas pH had a considerable effect but only for ionizable compounds. The results show that apolar interactions between the Oasis HLB and analyte mainly determine the equilibrium partitioning. These research findings can be used to optimize the application of SPE and POCIS for analyses of environmental contaminants even in complex mixtures. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. 27 CFR 9.154 - Chiles Valley.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Chiles Valley. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Chiles Valley... viticultural area are four 1:24,000 Scale U.S.G.S. topography maps. They are titled: (1) St. Helena, CA 1960 photorevised 1980; (2) Rutherford, CA 1951 photorevised 1968; (3) Chiles Valley, CA 1958 photorevised 1980; (4...

  14. Principal facts for gravity stations in the Dry Valley area, west-central Nevada and east-central California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sanger, Elizabeth A.; Ponce, David A.

    2003-01-01

    In June, 2002, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) established 143 new gravity stations and 12 new rock samples in the Dry Valley area, 30 miles north of Reno, Nevada, on the California - Nevada border (see fig. 1). This study reports on gravity, magnetic, and physical property data intended for use in modeling the geometry and depth of Dry Valley for groundwater analysis. It is part of a larger study that aims to characterize the hydrologic framework of several basins in Washoe County. Dry Valley is located south of the Fort Sage Mountains and south-east of Long Valley, on USGS 7.5’ quadrangles Constantia and Seven Lakes (fig. 2). The Cretaceous granitic rocks and Tertiary volcanic rocks that bound the sediment filled basin (fig. 3) may be especially important to future modeling because of their impact on groundwater flow. The granitic and volcanic rocks of Dry Valley exhibit densities and magnetic susceptibilities higher than the overlaying sediments, and create a distinguishable pattern of gravity and magnetic anomalies that reflect these properties.

  15. Hydrogeologic and geochemical characterization of groundwater resources in Deep Creek Valley and adjacent areas, Juab and Tooele Counties, Utah, and Elko and White Pine Counties, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gardner, Philip M.; Masbruch, Melissa D.

    2015-09-18

    Water-level altitude contours and groundwater ages indicate the potential for a long flow path from southwest to northeast between northern Spring and Deep Creek Valleys through Tippett Valley. Although information gathered during this study is insufficient to conclude whether or not groundwater travels along this interbasin flow path, dissolved sulfate and chloride data indicate that a small fraction of the lower altitude, northern Deep Creek Valley discharge may be sourced from these areas. Despite the uncertainty due to limited data collection points, a hydraulic connection between northern Spring Valley, Tippett Valley, and Deep Creek Valley appears likely, and potential regional effects resulting from future groundwater withdrawals in northern Spring Valley warrant ongoing monitoring of groundwater levels across this area.

  16. Fecal incontinence, sexual complaints, and anorectal function after third-degree obstetric anal sphincter injury (OASI): 5-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Visscher, A P; Lam, T J; Hart, N; Felt-Bersma, R J F

    2014-05-01

    Our aim was to evaluate alterations in anorectal function after anal sphincteroplasty for third-degree obstetric anal sphincter injury (OASI) in relation to clinical outcome. In this retrospective, descriptive, cross-sectional study conducted between 1998 and 2008, women with persisting fecal incontinence (FI) after 3a OASI and all women with grade 3b or 3c OASI were sent for anorectal function evaluation (AFE) consisting of anal manometry and endosonography 3 months after sphincteroplasty. In 2011, questionnaires regarding FI (Vaizey/Wexner), urinary incontinence (UI) [International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire Short Form (ICIQ-SF)], sexual function [Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI)], and quality of life (QOL) (Rand-36) were sent and women were asked to undergo additional AFE. Sixty-six women underwent AFE. Mean follow-up was 5.0 years. Forty (61%) patients returned questionnaires regarding FI and UI. Prevalence of FI was 63% flatus, 50% liquid stool, and 20% solid stool. Thirty-two of 40 also reported on QOL and SF. Sexual dysfunction was present in the majority of women (cutoff value 26.55) and more pronounced in larger OASI. Sixteen of 40 women underwent additional AFE. Women with combined internal (IAS) and external (EAS) anal sphincter injury (n = 6) had worse FI (P < 0.050) and lower anal pressures (P = 0.040) than women with isolated EAS injury (n = 10). Follow-up after third-degree OASI suggests poor anorectal and sexual function. Women with combined external and internal OASI show more deterioration in anorectal function and experience worse FI. Therefore, special attention should be paid to these women in order to mitigate these symptoms later in life.

  17. Overdiagnosis and rising rate of obstetric anal sphincter injuries (OASIS): time for reappraisal.

    PubMed

    Sioutis, D; Thakar, R; Sultan, A H

    2017-11-01

    To determine the accuracy of clinical diagnosis of obstetric anal sphincter injuries (OASIS) using three-dimensional (3D) endoanal ultrasound (EA-US) and to compare symptoms and anal manometry measurements between women with anal sphincters adequately repaired and those with persistent anal sphincter defects. The EA-US images of women with clinically diagnosed and repaired OASIS, defined as third- or fourth-degree perineal tear, who attended the perineal clinic at Croydon University Hospital over a 10-year period (2003-2013) were reanalyzed by a single expert blind to symptoms and the results of clinical examination. St Mark's Incontinence Scores (SMIS) and anal manometry measurements were obtained and compared between women with an intact anal sphincter and those with an anal sphincter scar and between those with an intact anal sphincter and those with a defect. Anal manometry measurements were compared between women with an external anal sphincter (EAS) defect and those with an internal anal sphincter (IAS) defect. The images of 908 women were reanalyzed. No evidence of OASIS was found in 64 (7.0%) women, an EAS scar alone was detected in 520 (57.3%) and an anal sphincter defect in 324 (35.7%). Of the 324 women with a defect, 112 had an EAS defect, 90 had an IAS defect and 122 had a combined IAS and EAS defect. SMIS results were significantly higher in women with an anal sphincter defect compared with those with no evidence of OASIS (P = 0.018), but there was no significant difference in scores between women with an intact sphincter and those with an EAS scar only. Women with a defect had a significantly lower maximum resting pressure (median (range), 44 (8-106) vs 55 (29-86) mmHg; P < 0.001) and maximum squeeze pressure (median (range), 74 (23-180) vs 103 (44-185) mmHg; P < 0.001) compared with those in the intact group. Similar, but less marked, differences were observed in women with an EAS scar compared with those who had an intact anal sphincter

  18. 78 FR 16792 - Designation of Areas for Air Quality Planning Purposes; State of California; Imperial Valley...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-19

    ... (see, e.g., the PM 10 area designations in 40 CFR 81.305 for Coso Junction planning area, Owens Valley..., this action: Is not ``significant regulatory actions'' subject to review by the Office of Management..., 1999); Is not economically significant regulatory actions based on health or safety risks subject to...

  19. Subsurface Constraints on Late Cenozoic Basin Geometry in Northern Fish Lake Valley and Displacement Transfer Along the Northern Fish Lake Valley Fault Zone, Western Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, N.; Kerstetter, S. R.; Katopody, D. T.; Oldow, J. S.

    2016-12-01

    The NW-striking, right-oblique Fish Lake Valley fault zone (FLVFZ) forms the northern segment of the longest active structure in the western Great Basin; the Death Valley - Furnace Creek - Fish Lake Valley fault system. Since the mid-Miocene, 50 km of right-lateral displacement is documented on the southern FLVFZ and much of that displacement was and is transferred east and north on active WNW left-lateral faults. Prior to the Pliocene, displacement was transferred east and north on a low-angle detachment. Displacement on the northern part of the FLVFZ continues and is transferred to a fanned array of splays striking (west to east) WNW, NNW, ENE and NNE. To determine the displacement budget on these structures, we conducted a gravity survey to determine subsurface basin morphology and its relation to active faults. Over 2450 stations were collected and combined with existing PACES and proprietary data for a total of 3388 stations. The data were terrain corrected and reduced to a 2.67 g/cm3 density to produce a residual complete Bouguer anomaly. The eastern part of northern Fish Lake Valley is underlain by several prominent gravity lows forming several sub-basins with maximum RCBA values ranging from -24 to -28 mGals. The RCBA was inverted for depth using Geosoft Oasis Montaj GM-SYS 3D modeling software. Density values for the inversion were constrained by lithologic and density logs from wells that penetrate the entire Cenozoic section into the Paleozoic basement. Best fitting gravity measurements taken at the wellheads yielded an effective density of 2.4 g/cm3 for the basin fill. Modeled basement depths range between 2.1 to 3 km. The sub-basins form an arc opening to the NW and are bounded by ENE and NNE faults in the south and NS to NNW in the north. At the northern end of the valley, the faults merge with ENE left-lateral strike slip faults of the Mina deflection, which carries displacement to NW dextral strike-slip faults of the central Walker Lane.

  20. 27 CFR 9.132 - Rogue Valley.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Rogue Valley. 9.132... Rogue Valley. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Rouge Valley.” (b) Approved map. The appropriate map for determining the boundaries of the Rogue Valley viticultural...

  1. EPA Region 1 - Valley Depth in Meters

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Raster of the Depth in meters of EPA-delimited Valleys in Region 1.Valleys (areas that are lower than their neighbors) were extracted from a Digital Elevation Model (USGS, 30m) by finding the local average elevation, subtracting the actual elevation from the average, and selecting areas where the actual elevation was below the average. The landscape was sampled at seven scales (circles of 1, 2, 4, 7, 11, 16, and 22 km radius) to take into account the diversity of valley shapes and sizes. Areas selected in at least four scales were designated as valleys.

  2. Isostatic gravity map of the Death Valley ground-water model area, Nevada and California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ponce, D.A.; Blakely, R.J.; Morin, R.L.; Mankinen, E.A.

    2001-01-01

    An isostatic gravity map of the Death Valley groundwater model area was prepared from over 40,0000 gravity stations as part of an interagency effort by the U.S. Geological Survey and the U.S. Department of Energy to help characterize the geology and hydrology of southwest Nevada and parts of California.

  3. 78 FR 16827 - Designation of Areas for Air Quality Planning Purposes; State of California; Imperial Valley...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-19

    ...EPA is proposing to clarify the description of the Imperial Valley planning area, an area designated as nonattainment for the national ambient air quality standard for particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter of a nominal 10 microns or less (PM10). EPA is not proposing to change the boundaries of the PM10 area or the status of the area as a ``serious'' PM10 nonattainment area but is proposing to clarify the description of this partial county area in the Code of Federal Regulations.

  4. Water-quality assessment of the Rio Grande Valley, Colorado, New Mexico, and Texas; shallow ground-water quality of a land-use area in the San Luis Valley, south-central Colorado, 1993

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anderholm, S.K.

    1996-01-01

    This report describes the quality of shallow ground water in an agricultural area in the San Luis Valley, Colorado, and discusses how natural and human factors affect the quality of shallow ground water. Thirty-five wells were installed, and water samples were collected from these wells and analyzed for selected dissolved common constituents, nutrients, trace elements, radionuclides, and synthetic organic compounds. The San Luis Valley is a high intermontane valley that is partially drained by the Rio Grande. The San Luis Valley land-use study area was limited to a part of the valley where the depth to water is generally less than 25 feet. The area where the 35 monitor wells were installed was further limited to the part of the study area where center-pivot overhead sprinklers are used to irrigate crops. Precipitation, runoff from adjacent mountainous areas, and ground-water inflow from the adjacent mountainous areas are the main sources of water to the aquifers in the San Luis Valley. Discharge of water from the shallow, unconfined aquifer in the valley is mainly from evapotranspiration. The dominant land use in the San Luis Valley is agriculture, although nonirrigated land and residential land are interspersed with agricultural land. Alfalfa, native hay, barley, wheat, potatoes, and other vegetables are the main crops. Dissolved-solids concentrations in shallow ground water sampled ranged from 75 to 1,960 milligrams per liter. The largest median concentration of cations was for calcium, and the largest median concentration of anions was for bicarbonate in shallow ground water in the San Luis Valley. Calcium concentrations ranged from 7.5 to 300 milligrams per liter, and bicarbonate concentrations ranged from 28 to 451 milligrams per liter. Nitrite plus nitrate concentrations ranged from less than 0.1 to 58 milligrams per liter as N; water from 11 wells had nitrite plus nitrate concentrations greater than 10 milligrams per liter as N. With the exception of the

  5. Assessment of road traffic noise indices in urban residential areas of Klang Valley, Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halim, Herni; Abdullah, Ramdzani; Nor, Mohd Jailani Mohd; Aziz, Hamidi Abdul; Rahman, Noorhazlinda Abd

    2017-10-01

    Traffic noise has been recognized as a serious threat to the quality of life in most industrialised nations. Klang valley is rapidly emerging as industrialized and urbanized city and has started facing severe noise pollution problems. Urban noise quality assessment is studied in three residential areas; Desa Tun Razak, Kinrara Court and Taman Sentul Utama. Noise pollution indices of L10, L50, L90, Lmax and Lmin as well as equivalent continuous noise level (Leq) were measured for all dwellings. Noise indices results illustrate that Desa Tun Razak recorded the highest values of noise levels among three studied sites. Results also indicate that the highest Leq of 75.7 dB(A) was observed in Desa Tun Razak followed by 74.3 dB(A) in Kinrara Court, and 72.1 dB(A) in Taman Sentul Utama. The noise assessment study clearly reveals the alarming condition of noise pollution in residential areas of Klang Valley as the noise level measured exceeded permissible limit by WHO and Malaysia Guidelines.

  6. Effects of ground-water withdrawals on flow in the Sauk River Valley Aquifer and on streamflow in the Cold Spring area, Minnesota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lindgren, R.J.

    2001-01-01

    The simulated contributing areas for selected watersupply wells in the Cold Spring area generally extend to and possibly beyond the model boundaries to the north and to the southeast. The contributing areas for the Gold'n Plump Poultry Processing Plant supply wells extend: (1) to the Sauk River, (2) to the north to and possibly beyond to the northern model boundary, and (3) to the southeast to and possibly beyond the southeastern model boundary. The primary effects of projected increased ground-water withdrawals of 0.23 cubic feet per second (7.5 percent increase) were to: (1) decrease outflow from the Sauk River Valley aquifer through constant-head boundaries and (2) decrease leakage from the valley unit of the Sauk River Valley aquifer to the streams. No appreciable differences were discernible between the simulated steady-state contributing areas to wells with 1998 pumpage and those with the projected pumpage.

  7. Impact of the Rhône and Durance valleys on sea-breeze circulation in the Marseille area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastin, Sophie; Drobinski, Philippe; Dabas, Alain; Delville, Patricia; Reitebuch, Oliver; Werner, Christian

    2005-03-01

    Sea-breeze dynamics in the Marseille area, in the south of France, is investigated in the framework of the ESCOMPTE experiment conducted during summer 2001 in order to evaluate the role of thermal circulations on pollutant transport and ventilation. Under particular attention in this paper is the sea-breeze channelling by the broad Rhône valley and the narrow Durance valley, both oriented nearly-north-south, i.e., perpendicular to the coastline, and its possible impact on the sea-breeze penetration, intensity and depth, which are key information for air pollution issues. One situation of slight synoptic pressure gradient leading to a northerly flow in the Rhône valley (25 June 2001) and one situation of a weak onshore prevailing synoptic wind (26 June 2001) are compared. The impact of the Rhône and Durance valleys on the sea-breeze dynamics on these two typical days is generalized to the whole ESCOMPTE observing period. The present study shows by combining simple scaling analysis with wind data from meteorological surface stations and Doppler lidars that (i) the Durance valley always affects the sea breeze by accelerating the flow. A consequence is that the Durance valley contributes to weaken the temperature gradient along the valley and thus the sea-breeze circulation. In some cases, the acceleration of the channelled flow in the Durance valley suppresses the sea-breeze flow by temperature gradient inhibition; (ii) the Rhône valley does not generally affect the sea breeze significantly. However, if the sea breeze is combined with an onshore flow, it leads to further penetration inland and intensification of the low-level southerly flow. In this situation, lateral constriction may accelerate the sea breeze. Simple scaling analysis suggests that Saint Paul (44.35°N, about 100 km from the coastline) is the lower limit where sea breeze can be affected by the Rhône valley. These conclusions have implications in air quality topics as channelled sea breeze may

  8. Interpretive geologic cross sections for the Death Valley regional flow system and surrounding areas, Nevada and California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sweetkind, D.S.; Dickerson, R.P.; Blakely, R.J.; Denning, Paul

    2001-01-01

    This report presents a network of 28 geologic cross sections that portray subsurface geologic relations within the Death Valley regional ground-water system, a ground-water basin that encompasses a 3? x 3? area (approximately 70,000 km2) in southern Nevada and eastern California. The cross sections transect that part of the southern Great Basin that includes Death Valley, the Nevada Test Site, and the potential high-level nuclear waste underground repository at Yucca Mountain. The specific geometric relationships portrayed on the cross sections are discussed in the context of four general sub-regions that have stratigraphic similarities and general consistency of structural style: (1) the Nevada Test Site vicinity; (2) the Spring Mountains, Pahrump Valley and Amargosa Desert region; (3) the Death Valley region; and (4) the area east of the Nevada Test Site. The subsurface geologic interpretations portrayed on the cross sections are based on an integration of existing geologic maps, measured stratigraphic sections, published cross sections, well data, and geophysical data and interpretations. The estimated top of pre-Cenozoic rocks in the cross sections is based on inversion of gravity data, but the deeper parts of the sections are based on geologic conceptual models and are more speculative. The region transected by the cross sections includes part of the southern Basin and Range Province, the northwest-trending Walker Lane belt, the Death Valley region, and the northern Mojave Desert. The region is structurally complex, where a locally thick Tertiary volcanic and sedimentary section unconformably overlies previously deformed Proterozoic through Paleozoic rocks. All of these rocks have been deformed by complex Neogene ex-tensional normal and strike-slip faults. These cross sections form a three-dimensional network that portrays the interpreted stratigraphic and structural relations in the region; the sections form part of the geologic framework that will be

  9. 18 CFR 37.6 - Information to be posted on the OASIS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... protocols, information regarding the transmission system necessary to enable prudent business decision... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Information to be posted on the OASIS. 37.6 Section 37.6 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY...

  10. 18 CFR 37.6 - Information to be posted on the OASIS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... protocols, information regarding the transmission system necessary to enable prudent business decision... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Information to be posted on the OASIS. 37.6 Section 37.6 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY...

  11. 27 CFR 9.23 - Napa Valley.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Napa Valley. 9.23 Section 9.23 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS AMERICAN VITICULTURAL AREAS Approved American Viticultural Areas § 9.23 Napa Valley. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area...

  12. 27 CFR 9.23 - Napa Valley.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Napa Valley. 9.23 Section 9.23 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL AMERICAN VITICULTURAL AREAS Approved American Viticultural Areas § 9.23 Napa Valley. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area...

  13. 27 CFR 9.23 - Napa Valley.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Napa Valley. 9.23 Section 9.23 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS AMERICAN VITICULTURAL AREAS Approved American Viticultural Areas § 9.23 Napa Valley. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area...

  14. 27 CFR 9.23 - Napa Valley.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Napa Valley. 9.23 Section 9.23 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL AMERICAN VITICULTURAL AREAS Approved American Viticultural Areas § 9.23 Napa Valley. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area...

  15. 27 CFR 9.23 - Napa Valley.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Napa Valley. 9.23 Section 9.23 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS AMERICAN VITICULTURAL AREAS Approved American Viticultural Areas § 9.23 Napa Valley. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area...

  16. 75 FR 70024 - Notice of Expansion of the Lisbon Valley Known Potash Leasing Area, Utah

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-16

    ... expressions of interest. Any competitive leases issued will be subject to the oil and gas leasing stipulations... of Expansion of the Lisbon Valley Known Potash Leasing Area, Utah AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management... classification standards for the Utah portion of the Paradox Basin geologic province, which includes Lisbon...

  17. Analysis of groundwater flow in arid areas with limited hydrogeological data using the Grey Model: a case study of the Nubian Sandstone, Kharga Oasis, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmod, Wael Elham; Watanabe, Kunio; Zahr-Eldeen, Ashraf A.

    2013-08-01

    Management of groundwater resources can be enhanced by using numerical models to improve development strategies. However, the lack of basic data often limits the implementation of these models. The Kharga Oasis in the western desert of Egypt is an arid area that mainly depends on groundwater from the Nubian Sandstone Aquifer System (NSAS), for which the hydrogeological data needed for groundwater simulation are lacking, thereby introducing a problem for model calibration and validation. The Grey Model (GM) was adopted to analyze groundwater flow. This model combines a finite element method (FEM) with a linear regression model to try to obtain the best-fit piezometric-level trends compared to observations. The GM simulation results clearly show that the future water table in the northeastern part of the study area will face a severe drawdown compared with that in the southwestern part and that the hydraulic head difference between these parts will reach 140 m by 2060. Given the uncertainty and limitation of available data, the GM produced more realistic results compared with those obtained from a FEM alone. The GM could be applied to other cases with similar data limitations.

  18. Quaternary history of the Kiseiba Oasis region, southern Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maxwell, Ted A.; Haynes, C. Vance; Nicoll, Kathleen; Johnston, Andrew K.; Grant, John A.; Kilani, Ali

    2017-12-01

    Kiseiba Oasis and depression are located in southern Egypt between the Selima Sand Sheet to the west and the Nile to the east, an important area that hosted Late Cenozoic drainage, Middle Pleistocene lakes, and numerous Paleolithic and Neolithic cultural sites. A synthesis of orbital data, field surveying and near-surface stratigraphy provides new insights into the Quaternary history of this region. Shuttle Imaging Radar data show a complex of fluvial channels that are due to stringers of surficial fluvial lag, subsurface fluvial deposits, and areas of deep alluvium. Three topographic surfaces are described: 1) the Atmur El-Kibeish, above 230 m elevation, which displays a linear pattern of light radar returns, possibly formed from northeast drainage; 2) the Acheulean Surface, at 200 m elevation, that has dark radar patterns resulting from thick alluvium bounded by pebble sand and calcrete strata, and 3) the Kiseiba Surface, below 190 m, that has a complex series of surface and subsurface fluvial and aeolian sediments. Initial drainage from the Early through Middle Pleistocene was to the northeast, which may have lasted through the Last Interglacial. Later reworking of sediments during the Last Glacial Maximum and the Holocene resulted in topographic inversion, with any subsequent local drainage on the Kiseiba Surface to the southwest, towards the Kiseiba Scarp.

  19. 18 CFR 37.6 - Information to be posted on the OASIS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Information to be posted on the OASIS. 37.6 Section 37.6 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY REGULATIONS UNDER THE FEDERAL POWER ACT OPEN ACCESS SAME-TIME...

  20. 18 CFR 37.6 - Information to be posted on the OASIS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Information to be posted on the OASIS. 37.6 Section 37.6 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY REGULATIONS UNDER THE FEDERAL POWER ACT OPEN ACCESS SAME-TIME...

  1. 18 CFR 37.6 - Information to be posted on the OASIS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Information to be posted on the OASIS. 37.6 Section 37.6 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY REGULATIONS UNDER THE FEDERAL POWER ACT OPEN ACCESS SAME-TIME...

  2. Estimation of the recharge area contributing water to a pumped well in a glacial-drift, river-valley aquifer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morrissey, Daniel J.

    1989-01-01

    The highly permeable, unconfined, glacial-drift aquifers that occupy most New England river valleys constitute the principal source of drinking water for many of the communities that obtain part or all of their public water supply from ground water. Recent events have shown that these aquifers are highly susceptible to contamination that results from a number of sources, such as seepage from wastewater lagoons, leaking petroleum-product storage tanks, and road salting. To protect the quality of water pumped from supply wells in these aquifers, it is necessary to ensure that potentially harmful contaminants do not enter the ground in the area that contributes water to the well. A high degree of protection can be achieved through the application of appropriate land-use controls within the contributing area. However, the contributing areas for most supply wells are not known. This report describes the factors that affect the size and shape of contributing areas to public supply wells and evaluates several methods that may be used to delineate contributing areas of wells in glacial-drift, river-valley aquifers. Analytical, two-dimensional numerical, and three-dimensional numerical models were used to delineate contributing areas. These methods of analysis were compared by applying them to a hypothetical aquifer having the dimensions and geometry of a typical glacial-drift, river-valley aquifer. In the model analyses, factors that control the size and shape of a contributing area were varied over ranges of values common to glacial-drift aquifers in New England. The controlling factors include the rate of well discharge, rate of recharge to the aquifer from precipitation and from adjacent till and bedrock uplands, distance of a pumping well from a stream or other potential source of induced recharge, degree of hydraulic connection of the aquifer with a stream, horizontal hydraulic conductivity of the aquifer, ratio of horizontal to vertical hydraulic conductivity, and

  3. Semi-natural areas of Tarim Basin in northwest China: Linkage to desertification.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fang; Zhang, Hongqi; Qin, Yuanwei; Dong, Jinwei; Xu, Erqi; Yang, Yang; Zhang, Geli; Xiao, Xiangming

    2016-12-15

    Semi-natural lands are not intensively managed lands, which have ecological significance in protecting artificial oasis and preventing desertification in arid regions. The significant shrinkage and degradation of semi-natural lands in the land-use intensification process have caused severe desertification. However, there is a knowledge gap regarding the spatio-temporal pattern and detailed classification of semi-natural lands and its quantitative relationship with desertification. Taking the Tarim Basin as an example, we proposed a comprehensive classification system to identify semi-natural lands for 1990, 2000, and 2010, respectively, using multi-source datasets at large scales. Spatio-temporal changes of semi-natural lands were then characterized by map comparisons at decade intervals. Finally, statistical relationships between semi-natural lands and desertification were explored based on 241 watersheds. The area of semi-natural lands in Tarim Basin was 10.77×10 4 km 2 in 2010, and desert-vegetation type, native-oasis type, artificial-oasis type, saline type and wetland type accounted for 59.59%, 14.65%, 11.25%, 9.63% and 4.88% of the total area, respectively. A rapid loss of semi-natural lands (9769.05km 2 ) was demonstrated from 1990 to 2010. In the fragile watersheds, the semi-natural lands were mainly converted to desert; while in the watersheds with advanced oasis agriculture, artificial-oasis type reclaimed to arable land was the major change. The occurrence of desertification was closely related to the type, area proportion and combination patterns of semi-natural lands. Desertification was prone to occur in regions abundant in desert-vegetation type and saline type, while less serious desertification was observed in regions with high proportion of artificial-oasis type and wetland type. Policy intervention and reasonable water resource allocation were encouraged to prevent the substantial loss of semi-natural lands, especially for the water

  4. Hydrogeologic characterization of the Modesto Area, San Joaquin Valley, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burow, Karen R.; Shelton, Jennifer L.; Hevesi, Joseph A.; Weissmann, Gary S.

    2004-01-01

    Hydrogeologic characterization was done to develop an understanding of the hydrogeologic setting near Modesto by maximizing the use of existing data and building on previous work in the region. A substantial amount of new lithologic and hydrologic data are available that allow a more complete and updated characterization of the aquifer system. In this report, geologic units are described, a database of well characteristics and lithology is developed and used to update the regional stratigraphy, a water budget is estimated for water year 2000, a three-dimensional spatial correlation map of aquifer texture is created, and recommendations for future data collection are summarized. The general physiography of the study area is reflected in the soils. The oldest soils, which have low permeability, exist in terrace deposits, in the interfan areas between the Stanislaus, Tuolumne, and Merced Rivers, at the distal end of the fans, and along the San Joaquin River floodplain. The youngest soils have high permeability and generally have been forming on the recently deposited alluvium along the major stream channels. Geologic materials exposed or penetrated by wells in the Modesto area range from pre-Cretaceous rocks to recent alluvium; however, water-bearing materials are mostly Late Tertiary and Quaternary in age. A database containing information from more than 3,500 drillers'logs was constructed to organize information on well characteristics and subsurface lithology in the study area. The database was used in conjunction with a limited number of geophysical logs and county soil maps to define the stratigraphic framework of the study area. Sequences of red paleosols were identified in the database and used as stratigraphic boundaries. Associated with these paleosols are very coarse grained incised valley-fill deposits. Some geophysical well logs and other sparse well information suggest the presence of one of these incised valley-fill deposits along and adjacent to the

  5. 27 CFR 9.78 - Ohio River Valley.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ohio River Valley. 9.78... River Valley. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Ohio River Valley.” (b) Approved maps. The approved maps for determining the boundary of the Ohio River Valley...

  6. Hydrogeology and water quality of the Nutmeg Valley area, Wolcott and Waterbury, Connecticut

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mullaney, J.R.; Mondazzi, R.A.; Stone, J.R.

    1999-01-01

    Hydrogeologic investigations in an industrial area in Wolcott and Waterbury, Connecticut, have provided information on the geology, ground-water flow, and water quality of the area. Ground-water contamination by volatile organic compounds was discovered in the 1980?s in the Nutmeg Valley area, where approximately 43 industries and 25 residences use ground water for industrial and domestic supply. Unconsolidated surficial deposits, including glacial stratified deposits and till, are more than 85 feet thick and are interconnected with the underlying bedrock. The horizontal hydraulic conductivity of the stratified deposits ranges from 0.8 to 21 feet per day. Water in the surficial aquifer generally flows toward discharge points along Old Tannery Brook and the Mad River. Water in the bedrock aquifer flows through low-angle unroofing joints, high-angle fractures, and foliation-parallel fractures. Most high-angle water-bearing fractures strike north with an easterly dip. Most of the water pumped from bedrock wells in the study area comes from shallow fractures that are probably in hydraulic connection with the surficial aquifer. Short-circuit flow between fracture zones in wells is a likely pathway for contaminant transport. During periods of low streamflow, only a small amount of ground water discharges directly to Old Tannery Brook or to the Mad River. The amount of discharge is on the same order of magnitude as the estimated ground-water withdrawals. In northern parts of the valley bottom within the study area, downward vertical hydraulic gradients were present between wells in the surficial and bedrock aquifers. In southern parts of the valley, however, vertical gradients were upward from the bedrock to the surficial aquifer. Vertical gradients can change seasonally in response to different amounts of ground-water recharge and to stresses caused by ground-water withdrawals, which can in turn facilitate the spread of contamination. Vapor-diffusion samplers were

  7. Geologic map of Detrital, Hualapai, and Sacramento Valleys and surrounding areas, northwest Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beard, L. Sue; Kennedy, Jeffrey; Truini, Margot; Felger, Tracey

    2011-01-01

    A 1:250,000-scale geologic map and report covering the Detrital, Hualapai, and Sacramento valleys in northwest Arizona is presented for the purpose of improving understanding of the geology and geohydrology of the basins beneath those valleys. The map was compiled from existing geologic mapping, augmented by digital photogeologic reconnaissance mapping. The most recent geologic map for the area, and the only digital one, is the 1:1,000,000-scale Geologic Map of Arizona. The larger scale map presented here includes significantly more detailed geology than the Geologic Map of Arizona in terms of accuracy of geologic unit contacts, number of faults, fault type, fault location, and details of Neogene and Quaternary deposits. Many sources were used to compile the geology; the accompanying geodatabase includes a source field in the polygon feature class that lists source references for polygon features. The citations for the source field are included in the reference section.

  8. Using SLAM to Look For the Dog Valley Fault, Truckee Area, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cronin, V. S.; Ashburn, J. A.; Sverdrup, K. A.

    2014-12-01

    The Truckee earthquake (9/12/1966, ML6.0) was a left-lateral event on a previously unrecognized NW-trending fault. The Prosser Creek and Boca Dams sustained damage, and the trace of the suspected causative fault passes near or through the site of the then-incomplete Stampede Dam. Another M6 earthquake occurred along the same general trend in 1948 with an epicenter in Dog Valley ~14 km to the NW of the 1966 epicenter. This trend is called the Dog Valley Fault (DVF), and its location on the ground surface is suggested by a prominent but broad zone of geomorphic lineaments near the cloud of aftershock epicenters determined for the 1966 event. Various ground effects of the 1966 event described by Kachadoorian et al. (1967) were located within this broad zone. The upper shoreface of reservoirs in the Truckee-Prosser-Martis basin are now exposed due to persistent drought. We have examined fault strands in a roadcut and exposed upper shoreface adjacent to the NE abutment of Stampede Dam. These are interpreted to be small-displacement splays associated with the DVF -- perhaps elements of the DVF damage zone. We have used the Seismo-Lineament Analysis Method (SLAM) to help us constrain the location of the DVF, based on earthquake focal mechanisms. Seismo-lineaments were computed, using recent revisions in the SLAM code (bearspace.baylor.edu/Vince_Cronin/www/SLAM/), for the 1966 main earthquake and for the better-recorded earthquakes of 7/3/1983 (M4) and 8/30/1992 (M3.2) that are inferred to have occurred along the DVF. Associated geomorphic analysis and some field reconnaissance identified a trend that might be associated with a fault, extending from the NW end of Prosser Creek Reservoir ~32° toward the Stampede Dam area. Triangle-strain analysis using horizontal velocities of local Plate Boundary Observatory GPS sites P146, P149, P150 and SLID indicates that the area rotates clockwise ~1-2°/Myr relative to the stable craton, as might be expected because the study area is

  9. Ground-water discharge determined from estimates of evapotranspiration, Death Valley regional flow system, Nevada and California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Laczniak, Randell J.; Smith, J. LaRue; Elliott, Peggy E.; DeMeo, Guy A.; Chatigny, Melissa A.; Roemer, Gaius J.

    2001-01-01

    each delineated area. Each area, referred to as an ET unit, generally consists of one or more assemblages of local phreatophytes or a unique moist soil environment. Ten ET units are identified throughout the DVRFS based on differences in spectral-reflectance characteristics. Spectral differences are determined from satellite imagery acquired June 21, 1989, and June 13, 1992. The units identified include areas of open playa, moist bare soils, sparse to dense vegetation, and open water. ET rates estimated for each ET unit range from a few tenths of a foot per year for open playa to nearly 9 feet per year for open water. Mean annual ET estimates are computed for each discharge area by summing estimates of annual ET from each ET unit within a discharge area. The estimate of annual ET from each ET unit is computed as the product of an ET unit's acreage and estimated ET rate. Estimates of mean annual ET range from 450 acre-feet in the Franklin Well area to 30,000 acre-feet in Sarcobatus Flat. Ground-water discharge is estimated as annual ET minus that part of ET attributed to local precipitation. Mean annual ground-water discharge estimates range from 350 acre-feet in the Franklin Well area to 18,000 acre-feet in Ash Meadows. Generally, these estimates are greater for the northern discharge areas (Sarcobatus Flat and Oasis Valley) and less for the southern discharge areas (Franklin Lake, Shoshone area, and Tecopa/ California Valley area) than those previously reported.

  10. Reconnaissance of the water resources of the Lonesome Valley area, Yavapai County, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Metzger, Donald G.

    1957-01-01

    In accordance with a request from its cooperating agency, the Arizona State Land Department, the U.S. Geological Survey has made a brief reconnaissance of the water resources of the Lonesome Valley area, Yavapai County, Ariz., to determine the probable hydrologic effects of a proposed dam on Lynx Creek. The construction of this dam has been proposed by the Arizona Game and Fish Department, for recreational and fish-cultural purposes. Data on the geology of the area were furnished by Mrs. Medora M. Krieger, geologist, Geologic Division, U.S. Geological Survey, and the map was prepared by Floyd R. Twenter, geologist, Ground Water Branch.

  11. Scaling relations for large Martian valleys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Som, Sanjoy M.; Montgomery, David R.; Greenberg, Harvey M.

    2009-02-01

    The dendritic morphology of Martian valley networks, particularly in the Noachian highlands, has long been argued to imply a warmer, wetter early Martian climate, but the character and extent of this period remains controversial. We analyzed scaling relations for the 10 large valley systems incised in terrain of various ages, resolvable using the Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) and the Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS). Four of the valleys originate in point sources with negligible contributions from tributaries, three are very poorly dissected with a few large tributaries separated by long uninterrupted trunks, and three exhibit the dendritic, branching morphology typical of terrestrial channel networks. We generated width-area and slope-area relationships for each because these relations are identified as either theoretically predicted or robust terrestrial empiricisms for graded precipitation-fed, perennial channels. We also generated distance-area relationships (Hack's law) because they similarly represent robust characteristics of terrestrial channels (whether perennial or ephemeral). We find that the studied Martian valleys, even the dendritic ones, do not satisfy those empiricisms. On Mars, the width-area scaling exponent b of -0.7-4.7 contrasts with values of 0.3-0.6 typical of terrestrial channels; the slope-area scaling exponent $\\theta$ ranges from -25.6-5.5, whereas values of 0.3-0.5 are typical on Earth; the length-area, or Hack's exponent n ranges from 0.47 to 19.2, while values of 0.5-0.6 are found on Earth. None of the valleys analyzed satisfy all three relations typical of terrestrial perennial channels. As such, our analysis supports the hypotheses that ephemeral and/or immature channel morphologies provide the closest terrestrial analogs to the dendritic networks on Mars, and point source discharges provide terrestrial analogs best suited to describe the other large Martian valleys.

  12. Preliminary hydrogeologic assessment near the boundary of the Antelope Valley and El Mirage Valley groundwater basins, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stamos, Christina L.; Christensen, Allen H.; Langenheim, Victoria

    2017-07-19

    The increasing demands on groundwater for water supply in desert areas in California and the western United States have resulted in the need to better understand groundwater sources, availability, and sustainability. This is true for a 650-square-mile area that encompasses the Antelope Valley, El Mirage Valley, and Upper Mojave River Valley groundwater basins, about 50 miles northeast of Los Angeles, California, in the western part of the Mojave Desert. These basins have been adjudicated to ensure that groundwater rights are allocated according to legal judgments. In an effort to assess if the boundary between the Antelope Valley and El Mirage Valley groundwater basins could be better defined, the U.S. Geological Survey began a cooperative study in 2014 with the Mojave Water Agency to better understand the hydrogeology in the area and investigate potential controls on groundwater flow and availability, including basement topography.Recharge is sporadic and primarily from small ephemeral washes and streams that originate in the San Gabriel Mountains to the south; estimates range from about 400 to 1,940 acre-feet per year. Lateral underflow from adjacent basins has been considered minor in previous studies; underflow from the Antelope Valley to the El Mirage Valley groundwater basin has been estimated to be between 100 and 1,900 acre-feet per year. Groundwater discharge is primarily from pumping, mostly by municipal supply wells. Between October 2013 and September 2014, the municipal pumpage in the Antelope Valley and El Mirage Valley groundwater basins was reported to be about 800 and 2,080 acre-feet, respectively.This study was motivated by the results from a previously completed regional gravity study, which suggested a northeast-trending subsurface basement ridge and saddle approximately 3.5 miles west of the boundary between the Antelope Valley and El Mirage Valley groundwater basins that might influence groundwater flow. To better define potential basement

  13. California's restless giant: the Long Valley Caldera

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hill, David P.; Bailey, Roy A.; Hendley, James W.; Stauffer, Peter H.; Marcaida, Mae

    2014-01-01

    Scientists have monitored geologic unrest in the Long Valley, California, area since 1980. In that year, following a swarm of strong earthquakes, they discovered that the central part of the Long Valley Caldera had begun actively rising. Unrest in the area persists today. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) continues to provide the public and civil authorities with current information on the volcanic hazard at Long Valley and is prepared to give timely warnings of any impending eruption.

  14. 27 CFR 9.76 - Knights Valley.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Knights Valley. 9.76 Section 9.76 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS AMERICAN VITICULTURAL AREAS Approved American Viticultural Areas § 9.76 Knights Valley. (a) Name. The name of the viticultura...

  15. 27 CFR 9.29 - Sonoma Valley.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Sonoma Valley. 9.29 Section 9.29 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS AMERICAN VITICULTURAL AREAS Approved American Viticultural Areas § 9.29 Sonoma Valley. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural...

  16. 27 CFR 9.76 - Knights Valley.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Knights Valley. 9.76 Section 9.76 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS AMERICAN VITICULTURAL AREAS Approved American Viticultural Areas § 9.76 Knights Valley. (a) Name. The name of the viticultura...

  17. 27 CFR 9.29 - Sonoma Valley.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Sonoma Valley. 9.29 Section 9.29 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS AMERICAN VITICULTURAL AREAS Approved American Viticultural Areas § 9.29 Sonoma Valley. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural...

  18. 27 CFR 9.142 - Bennett Valley.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Bennett Valley. 9.142 Section 9.142 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL AMERICAN VITICULTURAL AREAS Approved American Viticultural Areas § 9.142 Bennett Valley. (a) Name. The name of the...

  19. 27 CFR 9.29 - Sonoma Valley.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Sonoma Valley. 9.29 Section 9.29 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL AMERICAN VITICULTURAL AREAS Approved American Viticultural Areas § 9.29 Sonoma Valley. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural...

  20. 27 CFR 9.29 - Sonoma Valley.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Sonoma Valley. 9.29 Section 9.29 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL AMERICAN VITICULTURAL AREAS Approved American Viticultural Areas § 9.29 Sonoma Valley. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural...

  1. 27 CFR 9.53 - Alexander Valley.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Alexander Valley. 9.53 Section 9.53 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL AMERICAN VITICULTURAL AREAS Approved American Viticultural Areas § 9.53 Alexander Valley. (a) Name. The name of the...

  2. 27 CFR 9.53 - Alexander Valley.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Alexander Valley. 9.53 Section 9.53 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS AMERICAN VITICULTURAL AREAS Approved American Viticultural Areas § 9.53 Alexander Valley. (a) Name. The name of the...

  3. 27 CFR 9.76 - Knights Valley.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Knights Valley. 9.76 Section 9.76 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL AMERICAN VITICULTURAL AREAS Approved American Viticultural Areas § 9.76 Knights Valley. (a) Name. The name of the viticultura...

  4. 27 CFR 9.76 - Knights Valley.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Knights Valley. 9.76 Section 9.76 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS AMERICAN VITICULTURAL AREAS Approved American Viticultural Areas § 9.76 Knights Valley. (a) Name. The name of the viticultura...

  5. 27 CFR 9.29 - Sonoma Valley.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Sonoma Valley. 9.29 Section 9.29 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS AMERICAN VITICULTURAL AREAS Approved American Viticultural Areas § 9.29 Sonoma Valley. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural...

  6. 27 CFR 9.142 - Bennett Valley.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Bennett Valley. 9.142 Section 9.142 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS AMERICAN VITICULTURAL AREAS Approved American Viticultural Areas § 9.142 Bennett Valley. (a) Name. The name of the...

  7. 27 CFR 9.142 - Bennett Valley.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Bennett Valley. 9.142 Section 9.142 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS AMERICAN VITICULTURAL AREAS Approved American Viticultural Areas § 9.142 Bennett Valley. (a) Name. The name of the...

  8. 27 CFR 9.142 - Bennett Valley.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Bennett Valley. 9.142 Section 9.142 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS AMERICAN VITICULTURAL AREAS Approved American Viticultural Areas § 9.142 Bennett Valley. (a) Name. The name of the...

  9. 27 CFR 9.53 - Alexander Valley.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Alexander Valley. 9.53 Section 9.53 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS AMERICAN VITICULTURAL AREAS Approved American Viticultural Areas § 9.53 Alexander Valley. (a) Name. The name of the...

  10. 27 CFR 9.76 - Knights Valley.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Knights Valley. 9.76 Section 9.76 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL AMERICAN VITICULTURAL AREAS Approved American Viticultural Areas § 9.76 Knights Valley. (a) Name. The name of the viticultura...

  11. 27 CFR 9.53 - Alexander Valley.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Alexander Valley. 9.53 Section 9.53 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS AMERICAN VITICULTURAL AREAS Approved American Viticultural Areas § 9.53 Alexander Valley. (a) Name. The name of the...

  12. 27 CFR 9.53 - Alexander Valley.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Alexander Valley. 9.53 Section 9.53 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL AMERICAN VITICULTURAL AREAS Approved American Viticultural Areas § 9.53 Alexander Valley. (a) Name. The name of the...

  13. 27 CFR 9.142 - Bennett Valley.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Bennett Valley. 9.142 Section 9.142 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL AMERICAN VITICULTURAL AREAS Approved American Viticultural Areas § 9.142 Bennett Valley. (a) Name. The name of the...

  14. Quantification of the impacts of climate change and human agricultural activities on oasis water requirements in an arid region: a case study of the Heihe River basin, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xingran; Shen, Yanjun

    2018-03-01

    Ecological deterioration in arid regions caused by agricultural development has become a global issue. Understanding water requirements of the oasis ecosystems and the influences of human agricultural activities and climate change is important for the sustainable development of oasis ecosystems and water resource management in arid regions. In this study, water requirements of the main oasis in Heihe River basin during 1986-2013 were analyzed and the amount showed a sharp increase from 10.8 × 108 m3 in 1986 to 19.0 × 108 m3 in 2013. Both human agricultural activities and climate change could lead to the increase in water requirement. To quantify the contributions of agricultural activities and climate change to the increase in water requirements, partial derivative and slope method were used. Results showed that climate change and human agricultural activities, such as oasis expansion and changes in land cropping structure, has contributed to the increase in water requirement at rates of 6.9, 58.1, and 25.3 %, respectively. Overall, human agricultural activities were the dominant forces driving the increase in water requirement. In addition, the contribution of oasis expanding to the increased water requirement was significantly greater than that of other concerned variables. This reveals that controlling the oasis scale is extremely important and effective for balancing water for agriculture and ecosystems and to achieving a sustainable oasis development in arid regions.

  15. 75 FR 81846 - Expansion of the Santa Maria Valley Viticultural Area

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-29

    ... Authority Section 105(e) of the Federal Alcohol Administration Act (FAA Act), 27 U.S.C. 205(e), authorizes... Valley as a ``natural funnel-shaped'' valley.) Temperatures are consistent throughout the gentle west-to...,'' Albert J. Winkler, University of California Press, 1975, pages 61-64). Soils: According to the petition...

  16. Ecological restoration experiments (1992-2007) at the G. A. Pearson Natural Area, Fort Valley Experimental Forest

    Treesearch

    Margaret M. Moore; W. Wallace Covington; Peter Z. Fule; Stephen C. Hart; Thomas E. Kolb; Joy N. Mast; Stephen S. Sackett; Michael R. Wagner

    2008-01-01

    In 1992 an experiment was initiated at the G. A. Pearson Natural Area on the Fort Valley Experimental Forest to evaluate long-term ecosystem responses to two restoration treatments: thinning only and thinning with prescribed burning. Fifteen years of key findings about tree physiology, herbaceous, and ecosystem responses are presented.

  17. Fretted Terrain Valleys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    30 October 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows shallow tributary valleys in the Ismenius Lacus fretted terrain region of northern Arabia Terra. These valleys exhibit a variety of typical fretted terrain valley wall and floor textures, including a lineated, pitted material somewhat reminiscent of the surface of a brain. Origins for these features are still being debated within the Mars science community; there are no clear analogs to these landforms on Earth. This image is located near 39.9oN, 332.1oW. The picture covers an area about 3 km (1.9 mi) wide. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the lower left.

  18. Polarization measurements made on LFRA and OASIS emitter arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geske, Jon; Sparkman, Kevin; Oleson, Jim; Laveigne, Joe; Sieglinger, Breck; Marlow, Steve; Lowry, Heard; Burns, James

    2008-04-01

    Polarization is increasingly being considered as a method of discrimination in passive sensing applications. In this paper the degree of polarization of the thermal emission from the emitter arrays of two new Santa Barbara Infrared (SBIR) micro-bolometer resistor array scene projectors was characterized at ambient temperature and at 77 K. The emitter arrays characterized were from the Large Format Resistive Array (LFRA) and the Optimized Arrays for Space-Background Infrared Simulation (OASIS) scene projectors. This paper reports the results of this testing.

  19. Illinois Valley Industry Retention Program. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, John P.

    The Illinois Valley Industry Retention Program was conceived with the goals of retaining existing industries in the area and saving presently available jobs for the area's citizens. A program committee, formed in March 1982 of representatives from state government, Illinois Valley Community College (IVCC), and local businesses, undertook a survey…

  20. Detection of Cryptosporidium parvum and Cyclospora cayetanensis infections among people living in a slum area in Kathmandu valley, Nepal.

    PubMed

    Bhattachan, Balkrishna; Sherchand, Jeevan Bahadhur; Tandukar, Sarmila; Dhoubhadel, Bhim Gopal; Gauchan, Leesa; Rai, Ganesh

    2017-09-07

    The aim of this study is to determine the prevalence of Cyclospora cayetanensis and Cryptosporidium parvum infections among people living a slum in Kathmandu valley, Nepal. Ten different parasites were detected in the stool samples; the prevalence of any parasite was in 27.1% (71/262). The prevalence of C. cayetanensis and C. parvum were 14.1% (10/71) and 5.6% (4/71), respectively. This study showed high prevalence of intestinal parasitic infections along with the coccidian parasites in the slum area of Kathmandu Valley.

  1. Hydrological Responses of Weather Conditions and Crop Change of Agricultural Area in the Rincon Valley, New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, S.; Sheng, Z.; Abudu, S.

    2017-12-01

    Hydrologic cycle of agricultural area has been changing due to the impacts of climate and land use changes (crop coverage changes) in an arid region of Rincon Valley, New Mexico. This study is to evaluate the impacts of weather condition and crop coverage change on hydrologic behavior of agricultural area in Rincon Valley (2,466km2) for agricultural watershed management using a watershed-scale hydrologic model, SWAT (Soil and Water Assessment Tool). The SWAT model was developed to incorporate irrigation of different crops using auto irrigation function. For the weather condition and crop coverage change evaluation, three spatial crop coverages including a normal (2008), wet (2009), and dry (2011) years were prepared using USDA crop data layer (CDL) for fourteen different crops. The SWAT model was calibrated for the period of 2001-2003 and validated for the period of 2004-2006 using daily-observed streamflow data. Scenario analysis was performed for wet and dry years based on the unique combinations of crop coverages and releases from Caballo Reservoir. The SWAT model simulated the present vertical water budget and horizontal water transfer considering irrigation practices in the Rincon Valley. Simulation results indicated the temporal and spatial variability for irrigation and non-irrigation seasons of hydrologic cycle in agricultural area in terms of surface runoff, evapotranspiration, infiltration, percolation, baseflow, soil moisture, and groundwater recharge. The water supply of the dry year could not fully cover whole irrigation period due to dry weather conditions, resulting in reduction of crop acreage. For extreme weather conditions, the temporal variation of water budget became robust, which requires careful irrigation management of the agricultural area. The results could provide guidelines for farmers to decide crop patterns in response to different weather conditions and water availability.

  2. Groundwater quality in Coachella Valley, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dawson, Barbara J. Milby; Belitz, Kenneth

    2012-01-01

    Groundwater provides more than 40 percent of California’s drinking water. To protect this vital resource, the State of California created the Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The Priority Basin Project of the GAMA Program provides a comprehensive assessment of the State’s groundwater quality and increases public access to groundwater-quality information. Coachella Valley is one of the study areas being evaluated. The Coachella study area is approximately 820 square miles (2,124 square kilometers) and includes the Coachella Valley groundwater basin (California Department of Water Resources, 2003). Coachella Valley has an arid climate, with average annual rainfall of about 6 inches (15 centimeters). The runoff from the surrounding mountains drains to rivers that flow east and south out of the study area to the Salton Sea. Land use in the study area is approximately 67 percent (%) natural, 21% agricultural, and 12% urban. The primary natural land cover is shrubland. The largest urban areas are the cities of Indio and Palm Springs (2010 populations of 76,000 and 44,000, respectively). Groundwater in this basin is used for public and domestic water supply and for irrigation. The main water-bearing units are gravel, sand, silt, and clay derived from surrounding mountains. The primary aquifers in Coachella Valley are defined as those parts of the aquifers corresponding to the perforated intervals of wells listed in the California Department of Public Health database. Public-supply wells in Coachella Valley are completed to depths between 490 and 900 feet (149 to 274 meters), consist of solid casing from the land surface to a depth of 260 to 510 feet (79 to 155 meters), and are screened or perforated below the solid casing. Recharge to the groundwater system is primarily runoff from the surrounding mountains, and by direct infiltration of irrigation. The primary sources of discharge are pumping wells, evapotranspiration, and underflow to

  3. Ground water in the San Joaquin Valley, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kunkel, Fred; Hofman, Walter

    1966-01-01

    Ladies and gentlemen, it is a pleasure to be invited to attend this Irrigation Institute conference and to describe the Geological Survey's program of ground-water studies in the San Joaquin Valley. The U.S. Geological Survey has been making water-resources studies in cooperation with the State of California and other agencies in California for more than 70 years. Three of the earliest Geological Survey Water-Supply Papers--numbers 17, 18, and 19--published in 1898 and 1899, describe "Irrigation near Bakersfield," "Irrigation near Fresno," and "Irrigation near Merced." However, the first Survey report on ground-water occurrence in the San Joaquin Valley was "Ground Water in the San Joaquin Valley," by Mendenhall and others. The fieldwork was done from 1905 to 1910, and the report was published in 1916 as U.S. Geological Survey Water-Supply Paper 398.The current series of ground-water studies in the San Joaquin Valley was begun in 1952 as part of the California Department of Water Resources-U.S. Geological Survey cooperative water-resources program. The first report of this series is Geological Survey Water-Supply Paper 1469, "Ground-Water Conditions and Storage Capacity in the San Joaquin Valley." Other reports are Water-Supply Paper 1618, "Use of Ground-Water Reservoirs for Storage of Surface Water in the San Joaquin Valley;" Water-Supply Paper 1656, "Geology and Ground-Water Features of the Edison-Maricopa Area;" Water-Supply Paper 1360-G, "Ground- Water Conditions in the Mendota-Huron Area;" Water-Supply Paper 1457, "Ground-Water Conditions in the Avenal-McKittrick Area;" and an open-file report, "Geology, Hydrology, and Quality of Water in the Terra Bella-Lost Hills Area."In addition to the preceding published reports, ground-water studies currently are being made of the Kern Fan area, the Hanford- Visalia area, the Fresno area, the Merced area, and of the clays of Tulare Lake. Also, detailed studies of both shallow and deep subsidence in the southern part of

  4. The oasis of Tiout in the southwest of Algeria: Water resources and sustainable development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadidi, Abdelkader; Remini, Boualem; Habi, Mohamed; Saba, Djamel; Benmedjaed, Milloud

    2016-07-01

    The Tiout oasis is located in the municipality of Naama at the south west of Algeria is known by their ksour, the palm plantations and the good quality of their fruit and vegetables, in particular the dates and its varieties. This area contains enormous capacities of subsoil and superficial water. For several centuries, domestic consumption and the irrigation are carried out by the use of the traditional techniques of water collecting such as; the pendulum wells and foggaras them. Currently, this hydraulic heritage encounters technical and social problems, in particular with the contribution of drillings and the motor- pumps. The main issues are quoted: • Beating and draining of the water sources; • Degradation and abandonment of the traditional techniques.This study objective is to make an inventory of all the water sources in the study area, to study the impact of the modern technologies contribution on the ancestral techniques and finally to propose recommendations for the backup of the hydraulic heritage.

  5. Principal facts for gravity stations in the Antelope Valley-Bedell Flat area, west-central Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jewel, Eleanore B.; Ponce, David A.; Morin, Robert L.

    2000-01-01

    In April 2000 the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) established 211 gravity stations in the Antelope Valley and Bedell Flat area of west-central Nevada (see figure 1). The stations were located about 15 miles north of Reno, Nevada, southwest of Dogskin Mountain, and east of Petersen Mountain, concentrated in Antelope Valley and Bedell Flat (figure 2). The ranges in this area primarily consist of normal-faulted Cretaceous granitic rocks, with some volcanic and metavolcanic rocks. The purpose of the survey was to characterize the hydrogeologic framework of Antelope Valley and Bedell Flat in support of future hydrologic investigations. The information developed during this study can be used in groundwater models. Gravity data were collected between latitude 39°37.5' and 40°00' N and longitude 119°37.5' and 120°00' W. The stations were located on the Seven Lakes Mountain, Dogskin Mountain, Granite Peak, Bedell Flat, Fraser Flat, and Reno NE 7.5 minute quadrangles. All data were tied to secondary base station RENO-A located on the campus of the University of Nevada at Reno (UNR) in Reno, Nevada (latitude 39°32.30' N, longitude 119°48.70' W, observed gravity value 979674.69 mGal). The value for observed gravity was calculated by multiple ties to the base station RENO (latitude 39°32.30' N, longitude 119°48.70' W, observed gravity value 979674.65 mGal), also on the UNR campus. The isostatic gravity map (figure 3) includes additional data sets from the following sources: 202 stations from a Geological Survey digital data set (Ponce, 1997), and 126 stations from Thomas C. Carpenter (written commun., 1998).

  6. Interoperability and complementarity of simulation tools for beamline design in the OASYS environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rebuffi, Luca; Sanchez del Rio, Manuel

    2017-08-01

    In the next years most of the major synchrotron radiation facilities around the world will upgrade to 4th-generation Diffraction Limited Storage Rings using multi-bend-achromat technology. Moreover, several Free Electron Lasers are ready-to-go or in phase of completion. These events represent a huge challenge for the optics physicists responsible of designing and calculating optical systems capable to exploit the revolutionary characteristics of the new photon beams. Reliable and robust beamline design is nowadays based on sophisticated computer simulations only possible by lumping together different simulation tools. The OASYS (OrAnge SYnchrotron Suite) suite drives several simulation tools providing new mechanisms of interoperability and communication within the same software environment. OASYS has been successfully used during the conceptual design of many beamline and optical designs for the ESRF and Elettra- Sincrotrone Trieste upgrades. Some examples are presented showing comparisons and benchmarking of simulations against calculated and experimental data.

  7. Pumpernickel Valley Geothermal Project Thermal Gradient Wells

    SciTech Connect

    Z. Adam Szybinski

    2006-01-01

    The Pumpernickel Valley geothermal project area is located near the eastern edge of the Sonoma Range and is positioned within the structurally complex Winnemucca fold and thrust belt of north-central Nevada. A series of approximately north-northeast-striking faults related to the Basin and Range tectonics are superimposed on the earlier structures within the project area, and are responsible for the final overall geometry and distribution of the pre-existing structural features on the property. Two of these faults, the Pumpernickel Valley fault and Edna Mountain fault, are range-bounding and display numerous characteristics typical of strike-slip fault systems. These characteristics, when combined withmore » geophysical data from Shore (2005), indicate the presence of a pull-apart basin, formed within the releasing bend of the Pumpernickel Valley – Edna Mountain fault system. A substantial body of evidence exists, in the form of available geothermal, geological and geophysical information, to suggest that the property and the pull-apart basin host a structurally controlled, extensive geothermal field. The most evident manifestations of the geothermal activity in the valley are two areas with hot springs, seepages, and wet ground/vegetation anomalies near the Pumpernickel Valley fault, which indicate that the fault focuses the fluid up-flow. There has not been any geothermal production from the Pumpernickel Valley area, but it was the focus of a limited exploration effort by Magma Power Company. In 1974, the company drilled one exploration/temperature gradient borehole east of the Pumpernickel Valley fault and recorded a thermal gradient of 160oC/km. The 1982 temperature data from five unrelated mineral exploration holes to the north of the Magma well indicated geothermal gradients in a range from 66 to 249oC/km for wells west of the fault, and ~283oC/km in a well next to the fault. In 2005, Nevada Geothermal Power Company drilled four geothermal gradient wells

  8. 27 CFR 9.66 - Russian River Valley.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Russian River Valley. 9.66 Section 9.66 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL AMERICAN VITICULTURAL AREAS Approved American Viticultural Areas § 9.66 Russian River Valley. (a) Name. The name of the...

  9. 27 CFR 9.66 - Russian River Valley.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Russian River Valley. 9.66 Section 9.66 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS AMERICAN VITICULTURAL AREAS Approved American Viticultural Areas § 9.66 Russian River Valley. (a) Name. The name of the...

  10. 27 CFR 9.66 - Russian River Valley.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Russian River Valley. 9.66 Section 9.66 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS AMERICAN VITICULTURAL AREAS Approved American Viticultural Areas § 9.66 Russian River Valley. (a) Name. The name of the...

  11. 27 CFR 9.66 - Russian River Valley.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Russian River Valley. 9.66 Section 9.66 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL AMERICAN VITICULTURAL AREAS Approved American Viticultural Areas § 9.66 Russian River Valley. (a) Name. The name of the...

  12. 27 CFR 9.64 - Dry Creek Valley.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Dry Creek Valley. 9.64 Section 9.64 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS AMERICAN VITICULTURAL AREAS Approved American Viticultural Areas § 9.64 Dry Creek Valley. (a) Name. The name of the...

  13. 27 CFR 9.64 - Dry Creek Valley.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dry Creek Valley. 9.64 Section 9.64 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS AMERICAN VITICULTURAL AREAS Approved American Viticultural Areas § 9.64 Dry Creek Valley. (a) Name. The name of the...

  14. 27 CFR 9.64 - Dry Creek Valley.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Dry Creek Valley. 9.64 Section 9.64 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL AMERICAN VITICULTURAL AREAS Approved American Viticultural Areas § 9.64 Dry Creek Valley. (a) Name. The name of the...

  15. 27 CFR 9.66 - Russian River Valley.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Russian River Valley. 9.66 Section 9.66 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS AMERICAN VITICULTURAL AREAS Approved American Viticultural Areas § 9.66 Russian River Valley. (a) Name. The name of the...

  16. 27 CFR 9.64 - Dry Creek Valley.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Dry Creek Valley. 9.64 Section 9.64 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL AMERICAN VITICULTURAL AREAS Approved American Viticultural Areas § 9.64 Dry Creek Valley. (a) Name. The name of the...

  17. 27 CFR 9.64 - Dry Creek Valley.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Dry Creek Valley. 9.64 Section 9.64 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS AMERICAN VITICULTURAL AREAS Approved American Viticultural Areas § 9.64 Dry Creek Valley. (a) Name. The name of the...

  18. A groundwater-flow model for the Treasure Valley and surrounding area, southwestern Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bartolino, James R.; Vincent, Sean

    2017-04-17

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in partnership with the Idaho Department of Water Resources (IDWR) and Idaho Water Resource Board (IWRB), will construct a numerical groundwater-flow model of the Treasure Valley and surrounding area. Resource managers will use the model to simulate potential anthropogenic and climatic effects on groundwater for water-supply planning and management. As part of model construction, the hydrogeologic understanding of the aquifer system will be updated with information collected during the last two decades, as well as new data collected for the study.

  19. 42 CFR 484.11 - Condition of participation: Release of patient identifiable OASIS information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Condition of participation: Release of patient... Administration § 484.11 Condition of participation: Release of patient identifiable OASIS information. The HHA and agent acting on behalf of the HHA in accordance with a written contract must ensure the...

  20. OASIS: Ocean-Atmosphere-Sea-Ice-Snowpack Interactions in Polar Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bottenheim, J. W.; Abbatt, J.; Beine, H.; Berg, T.; Bigg, K.; Domine, F.; Leck, C.; Lindberg, S.; Matrai, P.; MacDonald, R.; McConnell, J.; Platt, U.; Raspopov, O.; Shepson, P.; Shumilov, O.; Stutz, J.; Wolff, E.

    2004-05-01

    While Polar regions encompass a large part of the globe, little attention has been paid to the interactions between the atmosphere and its extensive snow-covered surfaces. Recent discoveries in the Arctic and Antarctic show that the top ten centimeters of snow is not simply a white blanket but in fact is a surprisingly reactive medium for chemical reactions in the troposphere. It has been concluded that interlinked physical, chemical, and biological mechanisms, fueled by the sun and occurring in the snow, are responsible for depletion of tropospheric ozone and gaseous mercury. At the same time production of highly reactive compounds (e.g. formaldehyde, nitrogen dioxide) has been observed at the snow surface. Air-snow interactions also have an impact on the chemical composition of the snow and hence the nature and amounts of material released in terrestrial/marine ecosystems during the melting of seasonal snow-packs. Many details of these possibly naturally occurring processes are yet to be discovered. For decades humans have added waste products including acidic particles (sulphates) and toxic contaminants such as gaseous mercury and POPs (persistent organic pollutants) to the otherwise pristine snow surface. Virtually nothing is known about transformations of these contaminants in the snowpack, making it impossible to assess the risk to the polar environment, including humans. This is especially disconcerting when considering that climate change will undoubtedly alter the nature of these transformations involving snow, ice, atmosphere, ocean, and, ultimately, biota. To address these topics an interdisciplinary group of scientists from North America, Europe and Japan is developing a set of coordinated research activities under the banner of the IGBP programs IGAC and SOLAS. The program of Ocean-Atmosphere-Sea Ice-Snowpack (OASIS) interactions has been established with a mission statement aimed at determining the impact of OASIS chemical exchange on tropospheric

  1. Characterization of magnetic spherical fractions in sand deposits for interpretation of environmental change around the El- Zayyan temple, Kharga Oasis, Western Desert, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Makiko; Koizumi, Natsuko; Kato, Sayuri; Kikuchi, Ryohei; Kamei, Hiroyuki

    2014-05-01

    Desertification in North Africa has rapidly advanced over the last 6,000 years. Such environmental changes began in the Early Dynastic Period of Egypt (4200 - 3150 BC), and the occupation of Achaemenid Persian and Roman cultures in Egypt occurred under even drier climates. Kharga is the largest oasis of the five oases, located in the western desert of Egypt that contains a treasure trove of archaeological resources. This oasis has been highlighted to promote resource exploration and development of archaeological tourism since the 1980's. The El-Zayyan temple is located 27 km south of the central Kharga oasis. Zayyan was once called 'Tchonemyris', which has connection with the means of 'huge well' in Greek. Although major portions of the temple were rebuilt in 140 AD during the rule of the Roman Emperor Antoninus Pius, this temple is considered to be originally built in the Ptolemaic period (4c-1c BC). It is likely that the area had a sufficient water supply in the past as the El-Zayyan temple stands at the lowest point (-18 m a.s.l.) in the Kharga oasis. Furthermore, the El-Ghueita temple that stands on a hill top at 68.5 m a.s.l., 4 km northward from the El-Zayyan temple, has given name that means 'beautiful garden' in Greek. From these facts, we can imagine that the past landscape of this area contained green surroundings. The El-Ghueita temple was well known as a production centre of high quality wine since the mid-Dynastic age (2050 -1786 BC). As this area is currently arid, it is expected that there were irrigation facilities to maintain the vast farm land during the ancient period. To deepen our knowledge of how people developed their technologies and conducted their life within the natural environment of a drastic drying period, understanding the process of environmental change on a region scale is necessary. The aim of this study was to extract proxies from sand deposits in the western desert area to estimate the change in the environment. We examined the

  2. 36 CFR 7.26 - Death Valley National Monument.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Death Valley National... INTERIOR SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.26 Death Valley National Monument. (a) Mining. Mining in Death Valley National Monument is subject to the following regulations, which are...

  3. Hydrogeology of shallow basin-fill deposits in areas of Salt Lake Valley, Salt Lake County, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thiros, Susan A.

    2003-01-01

    A study of recently developed residential/commercial areas of Salt Lake Valley, Utah, was done from 1999 to 2001 in areas in which shallow ground water has the potential to move to a deeper aquifer that is used for public supply. Thirty monitoring wells were drilled and sampled in 1999 as part of the study. The ground water was either under unconfined or confined conditions, depending on depth to water and the presence or absence of fine-grained deposits. The wells were completed in the shallowest water-bearing zone capable of supplying water. Monitoring-well depths range from 23 to 154 feet. Lithologic, geophysical, hydraulic-conductivity, transmissivity, water-level, and water-temperature data were obtained for or collected from the wells.Silt and clay layers noted on lithologic logs correlate with increases in electrical conductivity and natural gamma radiation shown on many of the electromagnetic-induction and natural gamma logs. Relatively large increases in electrical conductivity, determined from the electromagnetic-induction logs, with no major changes in natural gamma radiation are likely caused by increased dissolved-solids content in the ground water. Some intervals with high electrical conductivity correspond to areas in which water was present during drilling.Unconfined conditions were present at 7 of 20 monitoring wells on the west side and at 2 of 10 wells on the east side of Salt Lake Valley. Fine-grained deposits confine the ground water. Anthropogenic compounds were detected in water sampled from most of the wells, indicating a connection with the land surface. Data were collected from 20 of the monitoring wells to estimate the hydraulic conductivity and transmissivity of the shallow ground-water system. Hydraulic-conductivity values of the shallow aquifer ranged from 30 to 540 feet per day. Transmissivity values of the shallow aquifer ranged from 3 to 1,070 feet squared per day. There is a close linear relation between transmissivity determined

  4. Hydrologic Evaluation of the Jungo Area, Southern Desert Valley, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lopes, Thomas J.

    2010-01-01

    RecologyTM, the primary San Francisco waste-disposal entity, is proposing to develop a Class 1 landfill near Jungo, Nevada. The proposal calls for the landfill to receive by rail about 20,000 tons of waste per week for up to 50 years. On September 22, 2009, the Interior Appropriation (S.A. 2494) was amended to require the U.S. Geological Survey to evaluate the proposed Jungo landfill site for: (1) potential water-quality impacts on nearby surface-water resources, including Rye Patch Reservoir and the Humboldt River; (2) potential impacts on municipal water resources of Winnemucca, Nevada; (3) locations and altitudes of aquifers; (4) how long it will take waste seepage from the site to contaminate local aquifers; and (5) the direction and distance that contaminated groundwater would travel at 95 and 190 years. This evaluation was based on review of existing data and information. Desert Valley is tributary to the Black Rock Desert via the Quinn River in northern Desert Valley. The Humboldt River and Rye Patch Reservoir would not be affected by surface releases from the proposed Jungo landfill site because they are in the Humboldt basin. Winnemucca, on the Humboldt River, is 30 miles east of the Jungo landfill site and in the Humboldt basin. Groundwater-flow directions indicate that subsurface flow near the proposed Jungo landfill site is toward the south-southwest. Therefore, municipal water resources of Winnemucca would not be affected by surface or subsurface releases from the proposed Jungo landfill site. Basin-fill aquifers underlie the 680-square-mile valley floor in Desert Valley. Altitudes around the proposed Jungo landfill site range from 4,162 to 4,175 feet. Depth to groundwater is fairly shallow in southern Desert Valley and is about 60 feet below land surface at the proposed Jungo landfill site. A groundwater divide exists about 7 miles north of the proposed Jungo landfill site. Groundwater north of the divide flows north towards the Quinn River. South of

  5. 3D Groundwater Flow Model in the Arid Region of Tafilalet Oasis System (South East of Morocco)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouaamlat, I.; Larabi, A.; Faouzi, M.

    2013-05-01

    The plain of Tafilalet contains an important oasis located in the Southeast of Morocco in a pre-Saharan area, characterized by an arid climate with a large deficit water budget. It has a behavior of a large depression resulting from erosion of a set of geological coverage during the Quaternary period. It also forms a small Mesopotamia crossed by two main rivers from the mountains of the High Atlas: Ziz and Rheris. The oasis of Tafilalet is an area of old traditions irrigation where agriculture is the main activity of the region that represents approximately 37% of the total area (637 km2). In this study, a three-dimensional model of groundwater flow was developed for the aquifer system of Tafilalet, to assist the decision makers as a "management tool" in order to assess alternative schemes for development and exploitation of groundwater resources in the Tafilalet plain, using Modflow2000 code. It is the first mathematical model performed for this oasis plain, taking into account the most possible real hydrogeological conditions and using the geographical information system (GIS) for the organisation and treatment of data and applying a multidisciplinary approach combining geostatistical and hydrogeological modeling. The conceptual model, in terms of hydrogeological modeling was therefore considered as a monolayer model and the aquifer system is mainly heterogeneous with lateral different hydraulic conductivities, which are ranging from 3.10-7 to 5.10-2 m/s, but most of them are located between 2.10-4 and 8.10-3 m/s. The results of the model calibration under steady state (1960) and transient state conditions, starting from this time, show reasonable agreement between observed and simulated water levels for the observation wells. After calibration, the model contributed to better groundwater characterization, the hydrodynamic parameters obtained from the model are much representative of reality. As a management tool, this model can help the manager to take

  6. Sensitivity of the reference evapotranspiration to key climatic variables during the growing season in the Ejina oasis northwest China.

    PubMed

    Hou, Lan-Gong; Zou, Song-Bing; Xiao, Hong-Lang; Yang, Yong-Gang

    2013-01-01

    The standardized FAO56 Penman-Monteith model, which has been the most reasonable method in both humid and arid climatic conditions, provides reference evapotranspiration (ETo) estimates for planning and efficient use of agricultural water resources. And sensitivity analysis is important in understanding the relative importance of climatic variables to the variation of reference evapotranspiration. In this study, a non-dimensional relative sensitivity coefficient was employed to predict responses of ETo to perturbations of four climatic variables in the Ejina oasis northwest China. A 20-year historical dataset of daily air temperature, wind speed, relative humidity and daily sunshine duration in the Ejina oasis was used in the analysis. Results have shown that daily sensitivity coefficients exhibited large fluctuations during the growing season, and shortwave radiation was the most sensitive variable in general for the Ejina oasis, followed by air temperature, wind speed and relative humidity. According to this study, the response of ETo can be preferably predicted under perturbation of air temperature, wind speed, relative humidity and shortwave radiation by their sensitivity coefficients.

  7. Differences and Commonalities: Farmer Stratifications in the San Luis Valley Research/Extension Project Area. ARE Research Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eckert, Jerry B.

    A research project in the San Luis Valley of Colorado sought to isolate a few unique farm types that could become target groups for the design and implementation of agricultural research and extension programs. Questionnaires were completed by 44 of 65 farmers in one watershed area of Conejos County. Analysis revealed a complex pattern of…

  8. Shallow ground-water quality beneath rice areas in the Sacramento Valley, California, 1997

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dawson, Barbara J.

    2001-01-01

    In 1997, the U.S. Geological Survey installed and sampled 28 wells in rice areas in the Sacramento Valley as part of the National Water-Quality Assessment Program. The purpose of the study was to assess the shallow ground-water quality and to determine whether any effects on water quality could be related to human activities and particularly rice agriculture. The wells installed and sampled were between 8.8 and 15.2 meters deep, and water levels were between 0.4 and 8.0 meters below land surface. Ground-water samples were analyzed for 6 field measurements, 29 inorganic constituents, 6 nutrient constituents, dissolved organic carbon, 86 pesticides, tritium (hydrogen- 3), deuterium (hydrogen-2), and oxygen-18. At least one health-related state or federal drinking-water standard (maximum contaminant or long-term health advisory level) was exceeded in 25 percent of the wells for barium, boron, cadmium, molybdenum, or sulfate. At least one state or federal secondary maximum contaminant level was exceeded in 79 percent of the wells for chloride, iron, manganese, specific conductance, or dissolved solids. Nitrate and nitrite were detected at concentrations below state and federal 2000 drinking-water standards; three wells had nitrate concentrations greater than 3 milligrams per liter, a level that may indicate impact from human activities. Ground-water redox conditions were anoxic in 26 out of 28 wells sampled (93 percent). Eleven pesticides and one pesticide degradation product were detected in ground-water samples. Four of the detected pesticides are or have been used on rice crops in the Sacramento Valley (bentazon, carbofuran, molinate, and thiobencarb). Pesticides were detected in 89 percent of the wells sampled, and rice pesticides were detected in 82 percent of the wells sampled. The most frequently detected pesticide was the rice herbicide bentazon, detected in 20 out of 28 wells (71 percent); the other pesticides detected have been used for rice, agricultural

  9. Geology, hydrology, and water quality of the Tracy-Dos Palos area, San Joaquin Valley, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hotchkiss, W.R.; Balding, G.O.

    1971-01-01

    The Tracy-Dos Palos area includes about 1,800 square miles on the northwest side of the San Joaquin Valley. The Tulare Formation of Pliocene and Pleistocene age, terrace deposits of Pleistocene age, and alluvium and flood-basin deposits of Pleistocene and Holocene age constitute the fresh ground-water reservoir Pre-Tertiary and Tertiary sedimentary and crystalline rocks, undifferentiated, underlie the valley and yield saline water. Hydrologically most important, the Tulare Formation is divided into a lower water-bearing zone confined by the Corcoran Clay Member and an upper zone that is confined, semiconfined, and unconfined in different parts of the area. Alluvium and flood-basin deposits are included in the upper zone. Surficial alluvium and flood-basin deposits contain a shallow water-bearing zone. Lower zone wells were flowing in 1908, but subsequent irrigation development caused head declines and land subsidence. Overdraft in both zones ended in 1951 with import of surface water. Bicarbonate water flows into the area from the Sierra Nevada and Diablo Range. Diablo Range water is higher in sulfate, chloride, and dissolved solids. Upper zone water averages between 400 and 1,200 mg/l (milligrams per liter) dissolved solids and water hardness generally exceeds 180 mg/l as calcium carbonate. Nitrate, fluoride, iron, and boron occur in excessive concentrations in water from some wells. Dissolved constituents in lower zone water generally are sodium chloride and sodium sulfate with higher dissolved solids concentration than water from the upper zone. The foothills of the Diablo Range provide favorable conditions for artificial recharge, but shallow water problems plague about 50 percent of the area and artificial recharge is undesirable at this time.

  10. Hydrogeologic Framework and Ground Water in Basin-Fill Deposits of the Diamond Valley Flow System, Central Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tumbusch, Mary L.; Plume, Russell W.

    2006-01-01

    The Diamond Valley flow system, an area of about 3,120 square miles in central Nevada, consists of five hydrographic areas: Monitor, Antelope, Kobeh, and Diamond Valleys and Stevens Basin. Although these five areas are in a remote part of Nevada, local government officials and citizens are concerned that the water resources of the flow system eventually could be further developed for irrigation or mining purposes or potentially for municipal use outside the study area. In order to better understand the flow system, the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with Eureka, Lander, and Nye Counties and the Nevada Division of Water Resources, is conducting a multi-phase study of the flow system. The principal aquifers of the Diamond Valley flow system are in basin-fill deposits that occupy structural basins comprised of carbonate rocks, siliciclastic sedimentary rocks, igneous intrusive rocks, and volcanic rocks. Carbonate rocks also function as aquifers, but their extent and interconnections with basin-fill aquifers are poorly understood. Ground-water flow in southern Monitor Valley is from the valley margins toward the valley axis and then northward to a large area of discharge by evapotranspiration (ET) that is formed south of a group of unnamed hills near the center of the valley. Ground-water flow from northern Monitor Valley, Antelope Valley, and northern and western parts of Kobeh Valley converges to an area of ground-water discharge by ET in central and eastern Kobeh Valley. Prior to irrigation development in the 1960s, ground-water flow in Diamond Valley was from valley margins toward the valley axis and then northward to a large discharge area at the north end of the valley. Stevens Basin is a small upland basin with internal drainage and is not connected with other parts of the flow system. After 40 years of irrigation pumping, a large area of ground-water decline has developed in southern Diamond Valley around the irrigated area. In this part of Diamond

  11. Ground water in Fountain and Jimmy Camp Valleys, El Paso County, Colorado with a section on Computations of drawdowns caused by the pumping of wells in Fountain Valley

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jenkins, Edward D.; Glover, Robert E.

    1964-01-01

    The part of Fountain Valley considered in this report extends from Colorado Springs to the Pueblo County line. It is 23 miles long and has an area of 26 square miles. The part of Jimmy Camp Valley discussed is 11 miles long and has an area of 9 square miles. The topography is characterized by level flood plains and alluvial terraces that parallel the valley and by rather steep hills along the valley sides. The climate is semiarid, average annual precipitation being about 13 inches. Farming and stock raising are the principal occupations in the valleys; however, some of the agricultural land near Colorado Springs is being used for housing developments. The Pierre Shale and alluvium underlie most of the area, and mesa gravel caps the shale hills adjacent to Fountain Valley. The alluvium yields water to domestic, stock, irrigation, and public-supply wells and is capable of yielding large quantities of water for intermittent periods. Several springs issue along the sides of the valley at the contact of the mesa gravel and the underlying Pierre Shale. The water table ranges in depth from less than 10 feet along the bottom lands to about 80 feet along the sides of the valleys; the saturated thickness ranges from less than a foot to about 50 feet. The ground-water reservoir in Fountain Valley is recharged by precipitation that falls within the area, by percolation from Fountain Creek, which originates in the Pikes Peak, Monument Valley, and Rampart Range areas, and by seepage from irrigation water. This reservoir contains about 70,000 acre-feet of ground water in storage. The ground-water reservoir in Jimmy Camp Valley is recharged from precipitation that falls within the area, by percolation from Jimmy Camp Creek during periods of streamflow, and by seepage from irrigation water. The Jimmy Camp ground-water reservoir contains about 25,000 acre-feet of water in storage. Ground water is discharged from the area by movement to the south, by evaporation and transpiration in

  12. 27 CFR 9.100 - Mesilla Valley.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Mesilla Valley. 9.100 Section 9.100 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT... Mesilla Valley viticultural area is located within Dona Ana County, New Mexico, and El Paso County, Texas...

  13. 27 CFR 9.100 - Mesilla Valley.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Mesilla Valley. 9.100 Section 9.100 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT... Mesilla Valley viticultural area is located within Dona Ana County, New Mexico, and El Paso County, Texas...

  14. 27 CFR 9.119 - Middle Rio Grande Valley.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Middle Rio Grande Valley. 9.119 Section 9.119 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS AMERICAN VITICULTURAL AREAS Approved American Viticultural Areas § 9.119 Middle Rio Grande Valley. (a) Name. The...

  15. 27 CFR 9.119 - Middle Rio Grande Valley.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Middle Rio Grande Valley. 9.119 Section 9.119 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS AMERICAN VITICULTURAL AREAS Approved American Viticultural Areas § 9.119 Middle Rio Grande Valley. (a) Name. The...

  16. Electromagnetic surveys to detect clay-rich sediment in the Rio Grande inner valley, Albuquerque area, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bartolino, James R.; Sterling, Joseph M.

    2000-01-01

    Information on the presence of clay-rich layers in the inner-valley alluvium is essential for quantifying the amount of water transmitted between the Rio Grande and the Santa Fe Group aquifer system. This report describes a study that used electromagnetic surveys to provide this information. In the first phase of the study, electromagnetic soundings were made using time-domain and frequency-domain electro- magnetic methods. On the basis of these initial results, the time- domain method was judged ineffective because of cultural noise in the study area, so subsequent surveys were made using the frequency-domain method. For the second phase of the study, 31 frequency-domain electromagnetic surveys were conducted along the inner valley and parallel to the Rio Grande in the Albuquerque area in the spring and summer of 1997 to determine the presence of hydrologically significant clay-rich layers buried in the inner-valley alluvium. For this report, the 31 survey sections were combined into 10 composite sections for ease of interpretation. Terrain-conductivity data from the surveys were modeled using interpretation software to produce geoelectric cross sections along the survey lines. This modeling used lithologic logs from two wells installed near the survey lines: the Bosque South and Rio Bravo 5 wells. Because of cultural interference, location of the wells and soundings, complex stratigraphy, and difficulty interpreting lithology, such interpretation was inconclusive. Instead, a decision process based on modeling results was developed using vertical and horizontal dipole 40-meter intercoil spacing terrain-conductivity values. Values larger than or equal to 20 millisiemens per meter were interpreted to contain a hydrologically significant thickness of clay-rich sediment. Thus, clay-rich sediment was interpreted to underlie seven segments of the 10 composited survey lines, totaling at least 2,660 meters of the Rio Grande inner valley. The longest of these clay

  17. Annual ground-water discharge by evapotranspiration from areas of spring-fed riparian vegetation along the eastern margin of Death Valley, 2000-02

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Laczniak, Randell J.; Smith, J. LaRue; DeMeo, Guy A.

    2006-01-01

    Flow from major springs and seeps along the eastern margin of Death Valley serves as the primary local water supply and sustains much of the unique habitat in Death Valley National Park. Together, these major spring complexes constitute the terminus of the Death Valley Regional Ground-Water Flow System--one of the larger flow systems in the Southwestern United States. The Grapevine Springs complex is the least exploited for water supply and consequently contains the largest area of undisturbed riparian habitat in the park. Because few estimates exist that quantify ground-water discharge from these spring complexes, a study was initiated to better estimate the amount of ground water being discharged annually from these sensitive, spring-fed riparian areas. Results of this study can be used to establish a basis for estimating water rights and as a baseline from which to assess any future changes in ground-water discharge in the park. Evapotranspiration (ET) is estimated volumetrically as the product of ET-unit (general vegetation type) acreage and a representative ET rate. ET-unit acreage is determined from high-resolution multi-spectral imagery; and a representative ET rate is computed from data collected in the Grapevine Springs area using the Bowen-ratio solution to the energy budget, or from rates given in other ET studies in the Death Valley area. The ground-water component of ET is computed by removing the local precipitation component from the ET rate. Two different procedures, a modified soil-adjusted vegetation index using the percent reflectance of the red and near-infrared wavelengths and land-cover classification using multi-spectral imagery were used to delineate the ET units within each major spring-discharge area. On the basis of the more accurate procedure that uses the vegetation index, ET-unit acreage for the Grapevine Springs discharge area totaled about 192 acres--of which 80 acres were moderate-density vegetation and 112 acres were high

  18. OASIS Observation and Analysis of Smectic Islands in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tin, Padetha

    2014-01-01

    The Observation and Analysis of Smectic Islands in Space (OASIS) project comprises a series of experiments that will probe the interfacial and hydrodynamic behavior of freely suspended liquid crystal films in space. These are the thinnest known stable condensed phase structures, making them ideal for studies of fluctuation and interface phenomena. The experiments seek to verify theories of coarsening dynamics, hydrodynamic flow, relaxation of hydrodynamic perturbations, and hydrodynamic interactions of a near two-dimensional structure. The effects of introducing islands or droplets on a very thin bubble will be studied, both as controllable inclusions that modify the flow and as markers of flow.

  19. Quality and sources of shallow ground water in areas of recent residential development in Salt Lake Valley, Salt Lake County, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thiros, Susan A.

    2003-01-01

    Residential and commercial development of about 80 square miles that primarily replaced undeveloped and agricultural areas occurred in Salt Lake Valley, Utah, from 1963 to 1994. This study evaluates the occurrence and distribution of natural and anthropogenic compounds in shallow ground water underlying recently developed (post 1963) residential and commercial areas. Monitoring wells from 23 to 153 feet deep were installed at 30 sites. Water-quality data for the monitoring wells consist of analyses of field parameters, major ions, trace elements, nutrients, dissolved organic carbon, pesticides, and volatile organic compounds.Dissolved-solids concentration ranged from 134 to 2,910 milligrams per liter (mg/L) in water from the 30 monitoring wells. Dissolved arsenic concentration in water from 12 wells exceeded the drinking-water maximum contaminant level of 10 micrograms per liter. Water from monitoring wells in the northwestern part of the valley generally contained higher arsenic concentrations than did water from other areas. Nitrate concentration in water sampled from 26 of the 30 monitoring wells (86.7 percent) was higher than a background level of 2 mg/L, indicating a possible human influence. Nitrate concentrations ranged from less than 0.05 to 13.3 mg/L.Fifteen of the 104 pesticides and pesticide degradation products analyzed for were detected in 1 or more water samples from the monitoring wells. No pesticides were detected at concentrations that exceeded U.S. Environmental Protection Agency drinking-water standards or guidelines for 2002. The high detection frequency of atrazine, a restricted-use pesticide, in residential areas on the west side of Salt Lake Valley may be the result of application in agricultural or industrial areas that have been converted to residential uses or application in areas upgradient from the residential areas that was then transported by ground water.Fifteen of the 86 volatile organic compounds analyzed for were detected in 1 or

  20. A multiscale dataset for understanding complex eco-hydrological processes in a heterogeneous oasis system

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xin; Liu, Shaomin; Xiao, Qin; Ma, Mingguo; Jin, Rui; Che, Tao; Wang, Weizhen; Hu, Xiaoli; Xu, Ziwei; Wen, Jianguang; Wang, Liangxu

    2017-01-01

    We introduce a multiscale dataset obtained from Heihe Watershed Allied Telemetry Experimental Research (HiWATER) in an oasis-desert area in 2012. Upscaling of eco-hydrological processes on a heterogeneous surface is a grand challenge. Progress in this field is hindered by the poor availability of multiscale observations. HiWATER is an experiment designed to address this challenge through instrumentation on hierarchically nested scales to obtain multiscale and multidisciplinary data. The HiWATER observation system consists of a flux observation matrix of eddy covariance towers, large aperture scintillometers, and automatic meteorological stations; an eco-hydrological sensor network of soil moisture and leaf area index; hyper-resolution airborne remote sensing using LiDAR, imaging spectrometer, multi-angle thermal imager, and L-band microwave radiometer; and synchronical ground measurements of vegetation dynamics, and photosynthesis processes. All observational data were carefully quality controlled throughout sensor calibration, data collection, data processing, and datasets generation. The data are freely available at figshare and the Cold and Arid Regions Science Data Centre. The data should be useful for elucidating multiscale eco-hydrological processes and developing upscaling methods. PMID:28654086

  1. Ecological restoration experiments (1992-2007) at the G.A. Pearson Natural Area, Fort Valley Experimental Forest (P-53)

    Treesearch

    Margaret M. Moore; Wallace Covington; Peter Z. Fulé; Stephen C. Hart; Thomas E. Kolb; Joy N. Mast; Stephen S. Sackett; Michael R. Wagner

    2008-01-01

    In 1992 an experiment was initiated at the G. A. Pearson Natural Area on the Fort Valley Experimental Forest to evaluate long-term ecosystem responses to two restoration treatments: thinning only and thinning with prescribed burning. Fifteen years of key findings about tree physiology, herbaceous, and ecosystem responses are presented.

  2. Geohydrology of the Valley-Fill Aquifer in the Norwich-Oxford-Brisben Area, Chenango County, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hetcher, Kari K.; Miller, Todd S.; Garry, James D.; Reynolds, Richard J.

    2003-01-01

    This set of maps and geohydrologic sections depicts the geology and hydrology of aquifers in the 21.9-square-mile reach of the Chenango River valley between Brisben and North Norwich, N.Y. This report depicts the principal geographic features of the study area; locations of domestic, commercial, and municipal wells from which data were obtained to construct water-table and saturated-thickness maps and five geohydrologic sections; surficial geology; water-table altitude; generalized saturated thickness of the unconfined (water-table) aquifer; generalized thickness of the discontinuous series of confined aquifers; and five geohydrologic sections, all of which are in the northern part of the study area.The unconsolidated material in the Chenango River valley consists primarily of three types of deposits: (1) glaciofluvial material consisting of stratified coarse-grained sediment (sand and gravel) that was deposited by meltwater streams flowing above, below, or next to a glacier; (2) glaciolacustrine material consisting of stratified fine-grained sediment (very fine sand, silt, and clay) that was deposited in lakes that formed at the front of a glacier; and (3) recent alluvial material consisting of stratified fine-to-medium grained sediment (fine-to-medium sand and silt) that was deposited on flood plains.The water-table map was compiled from water-level data obtained from wells completed in the unconfined aquifer, and from altitudes of stream and river surfaces indicated on 1:24,000-scale topographic maps. Depth to the water table ranged from less than 5 feet below land surface near major streams to more than 75 feet on some of the kame terraces along the valley walls. Saturated thickness of the unconfined aquifer ranged from less than 1 foot near Norwich to more than 200 feet at a kame delta north of Oxford.A discontinuous series of confined aquifers is present throughout much of the Chenango River valley north of Oxford. These aquifers consist of kame deposits

  3. Diurnal and seasonal variations in carbon dioxide exchange in ecosystems in the Zhangye oasis area, Northwest China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Sun, Rui; Xu, Ziwei; Qiao, Chen; Jiang, Guoqing

    2015-01-01

    Quantifying carbon dioxide exchange and understanding the response of key environmental factors in various ecosystems are critical to understanding regional carbon budgets and ecosystem behaviors. For this study, CO2 fluxes were measured in a variety of ecosystems with an eddy covariance observation matrix between June 2012 and September 2012 in the Zhangye oasis area of Northwest China. The results show distinct diurnal variations in the CO2 fluxes in vegetable field, orchard, wetland, and maize cropland. Diurnal variations of CO2 fluxes were not obvious, and their values approached zero in the sandy desert, desert steppe, and Gobi ecosystems. Additionally, daily variations in the Gross Primary Production (GPP), Ecosystem Respiration (Reco) and Net Ecosystem Exchange (NEE) were not obvious in the sandy desert, desert steppe, and Gobi ecosystems. In contrast, the distributions of the GPP, Reco, and NEE show significant daily variations, that are closely related to the development of vegetation in the maize, wetland, orchard, and vegetable field ecosystems. All of the ecosystems are characterized by their carbon absorption during the observation period. The ability to absorb CO2 differed significantly among the tested ecosystems. We also used the Michaelis-Menten equation and exponential curve fitting methods to analyze the impact of Photosynthetically Active Radiation (PAR) on the daytime CO2 flux and impact of air temperature on Reco at night. The results show that PAR is the dominant factor in controlling photosynthesis with limited solar radiation, and daytime CO2 assimilation increases rapidly with PAR. Additionally, the carbon assimilation rate was found to increase slowly with high solar radiation. The light response parameters changed with each growth stage for all of the vegetation types, and higher light response values were observed during months or stages when the plants grew quickly. Light saturation points are different for different species. Nighttime

  4. Psychometrics of a Brief Measure of Anxiety to Detect Severity and Impairment: The Overall Anxiety Severity and Impairment Scale (OASIS)

    PubMed Central

    Norman, Sonya B.; Campbell-Sills, Laura; Hitchcock, Carla A.; Sullivan, Sarah; Rochlin, Alexis; Wilkins, Kendall C.; Stein, Murray B.

    2010-01-01

    Brief measures of anxiety related severity and impairment that can be used across anxiety disorders and with subsyndromal anxiety are lacking. The Overall Anxiety Severity and Impairment Scale (OASIS) have shown strong psychometric properties with college students and primary care patients. This study examines sensitivity, specificity, and efficiency of an abbreviated version of the OASIS that takes only 2–3 minutes to complete using a non-clinical (college student) sample. 48 participants completed the OASIS and SCID for anxiety disorders, 21 had a diagnosis of ≥1 anxiety disorder, and 4 additional participants had a subthreshold diagnosis. A cut-score of 8 best discriminated those with anxiety disorders from those without, successfully classifying 78% of the sample with 69% sensitivity and 74% specificity. Results from a larger sample (n=171) showed a single factor structure and excellent convergent and divergent validity. The availability of cut-scores for a non-clinical sample furthers the utility of this measure for settings where screening or brief assessment of anxiety is needed. PMID:20609450

  5. Deep electrical investigations in the Long Valley geothermal area, California

    SciTech Connect

    Stanley, W.D.; Jackson, D.B.; Zohdy, A.A.R.

    1976-02-10

    Direct current resistivity and time domain electromagnetic techniques were used to study the electrical structure of the Long Valley geothermal area. A resistivity map was compiled from 375 total field resistivity measurements. Two significant zones of low resistivity were detected, one near Casa Diablo Hot Springs and one surrounding the Cashbaugh Ranch-Whitmore Hot Springs area. These anomalies and other parts of the caldera were investigated in detail with 49 Schlumberger dc soundings and 13 transient electromagnetic soundings. An extensive conductive zone of 1- to 10-..cap omega..m resistivity was found to be the cause of the total field resistivity lows. Drillmore » hole information indicates that the shallow parts of the conductive zone in the eastern part of the caldera contain water of only 73/sup 0/C and consist of highly zeolitized tuffs and ashes in the places that were tested. A deeper zone near Whitmore Hot Springs is somewhat more promising in potential for hot water, but owing to the extensive alteration prevalent in the caldera the presence of hot water cannot be definitely assumed. The resistivity results indicate that most of the past hydrothermal activity, and probably most of the present activity, is controlled by fracture systems related to regional Sierran faulting.« less

  6. 42 CFR 488.68 - State Agency responsibilities for OASIS collection and data base requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...— (1) Instruct each HHA on the administration of the data set, privacy/confidentiality of the data set, and integration of the OASIS data set into the facility's own record keeping system; (2) Instruct each... and data base requirements. 488.68 Section 488.68 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID...

  7. 42 CFR 488.68 - State Agency responsibilities for OASIS collection and data base requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...— (1) Instruct each HHA on the administration of the data set, privacy/confidentiality of the data set, and integration of the OASIS data set into the facility's own record keeping system; (2) Instruct each... and data base requirements. 488.68 Section 488.68 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID...

  8. 42 CFR 488.68 - State Agency responsibilities for OASIS collection and data base requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...— (1) Instruct each HHA on the administration of the data set, privacy/confidentiality of the data set, and integration of the OASIS data set into the facility's own record keeping system; (2) Instruct each... and data base requirements. 488.68 Section 488.68 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID...

  9. 42 CFR 488.68 - State Agency responsibilities for OASIS collection and data base requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...— (1) Instruct each HHA on the administration of the data set, privacy/confidentiality of the data set, and integration of the OASIS data set into the facility's own record keeping system; (2) Instruct each... and data base requirements. 488.68 Section 488.68 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID...

  10. Groundwater quality in the Antelope Valley, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dawson, Barbara J. Milby; Belitz, Kenneth

    2012-01-01

    Groundwater provides more than 40 percent of California’s drinking water. To protect this vital resource, the State of California created the Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The Priority Basin Project of the GAMA Program provides a comprehensive assessment of the State’s groundwater quality and increases public access to groundwater-quality information. Antelope Valley is one of the study areas being evaluated. The Antelope study area is approximately 1,600 square miles (4,144 square kilometers) and includes the Antelope Valley groundwater basin (California Department of Water Resources, 2003). Antelope Valley has an arid climate and is part of the Mojave Desert. Average annual rainfall is about 6 inches (15 centimeters). The study area has internal drainage, with runoff from the surrounding mountains draining towards dry lakebeds in the lower parts of the valley. Land use in the study area is approximately 68 percent (%) natural (mostly shrubland and grassland), 24% agricultural, and 8% urban. The primary crops are pasture and hay. The largest urban areas are the cities of Palmdale and Lancaster (2010 populations of 152,000 and 156,000, respectively). Groundwater in this basin is used for public and domestic water supply and for irrigation. The main water-bearing units are gravel, sand, silt, and clay derived from surrounding mountains. The primary aquifers in Antelope Valley are defined as those parts of the aquifers corresponding to the perforated intervals of wells listed in the California Department of Public Health database. Public-supply wells in Antelope Valley are completed to depths between 360 and 700 feet (110 to 213 meters), consist of solid casing from the land surface to a depth of 180 to 350 feet (55 to 107 meters), and are screened or perforated below the solid casing. Recharge to the groundwater system is primarily runoff from the surrounding mountains, and by direct infiltration of irrigation and sewer and septic

  11. Map showing depth to pre-Cenozoic basement in the Death Valley ground-water model area, Nevada and California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blakely, R.J.; Ponce, D.A.

    2001-01-01

    A depth to basement map of the Death Valley groundwater model area was prepared using over 40,0000 gravity stations as part of an interagency effort by the U.S. Geological Survey and the U.S. Department of Energy to help characterize the geology and hydrology of southwest Nevada and parts of California.

  12. Trypanosoma mega (Kinetoplastida) from Bufo viridis in Siwah Oasis, Egypt.

    PubMed

    Ashour, A A; Gaafar, N A

    1997-04-01

    A large pleomorphic trypanosome, identified as Trypanosoma mega, is described from the toad Bufo viridis collected from Siwah Oasis at the Western Desert of Egypt. The prevalence of the trypanosome is 83.3%. Three trypanosome forms are described, small, intermediate and large stumpy form. Observations were also made on the lysed (diffused) trypanosomes. This is the first record of T. mega from B. viridis in Egypt which represents a new host and new geographical location. The measurements of the present trypanosome are given and compared with related forms previously described from Egypt.

  13. Geohydrological characterization, water-chemistry, and ground-water flow simulation model of the Sonoma Valley area, Sonoma County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Farrar, Christopher D.; Metzger, Loren F.; Nishikawa, Tracy; Koczot, Kathryn M.; Reichard, Eric G.; Langenheim, V.E.

    2006-01-01

    changes by region. In recent years, pumping depressions have developed southeast of Sonoma and southwest of El Verano. Water-chemistry data for samples collected from 75 wells during 2002-04 indicate that the ground-water quality in the study area generally is acceptable for potable use. The water from some wells, however, contains one or more constituents in excess of the recommended standards for drinking water. The chemical composition of water from creeks, springs, and wells sampled for major ions plot within three groups on a trilinear diagram: mixed-bicarbonate, sodium-mixed anion, and sodium-bicarbonate. An area of saline ground water in the southern part of the Sonoma Valley appears to have shifted since the late 1940s and early 1950s, expanding in one area, but receding in another. Sparse temperature data from wells southwest of the known occurrence of thermal water suggest that thermal water may be present beneath a larger part of the valley than previously thought. Thermal water contains higher concentrations of dissolved minerals than nonthermal waters because mineral solubilities generally increase with temperature. Geohydrologic Characterization, Water-Chemistry, and Ground-Water Flow Simulation Model of the Sonoma Valley Area, Sonoma County, California Oxygen-18 (d18 O) and deuterium (dD) values for water from most wells plot along the global meteoric water line, indicating that recharge primarily is derived from the direct infiltration of precipitation or the infiltration of seepage from creeks. Samples from shallow- and intermediate-depth wells located near Sonoma Creek and (or) in the vicinity of Shellville plot to the right of the global meteoric water line, indicating that these waters are partly evaporated. The d18 O and dD composition of water from sampled wells indicates that water from wells deeper than 200 feet is isotopically lighter (more negative) than water from wells less than 200 feet deep, possibly indicating that older ground wate

  14. The Inter-Valley Soil Comparative Survey: the ecology of Dry Valley edaphic microbial communities

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Charles K; Barbier, Béatrice A; Bottos, Eric M; McDonald, Ian R; Cary, Stephen Craig

    2012-01-01

    Recent applications of molecular genetics to edaphic microbial communities of the McMurdo Dry Valleys and elsewhere have rejected a long-held belief that Antarctic soils contain extremely limited microbial diversity. The Inter-Valley Soil Comparative Survey aims to elucidate the factors shaping these unique microbial communities and their biogeography by integrating molecular genetic approaches with biogeochemical analyses. Although the microbial communities of Dry Valley soils may be complex, there is little doubt that the ecosystem's food web is relatively simple, and evidence suggests that physicochemical conditions may have the dominant role in shaping microbial communities. To examine this hypothesis, bacterial communities from representative soil samples collected in four geographically disparate Dry Valleys were analyzed using molecular genetic tools, including pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA gene PCR amplicons. Results show that the four communities are structurally and phylogenetically distinct, and possess significantly different levels of diversity. Strikingly, only 2 of 214 phylotypes were found in all four valleys, challenging a widespread assumption that the microbiota of the Dry Valleys is composed of a few cosmopolitan species. Analysis of soil geochemical properties indicated that salt content, alongside altitude and Cu2+, was significantly correlated with differences in microbial communities. Our results indicate that the microbial ecology of Dry Valley soils is highly localized and that physicochemical factors potentially have major roles in shaping the microbiology of ice-free areas of Antarctica. These findings hint at links between Dry Valley glacial geomorphology and microbial ecology, and raise previously unrecognized issues related to environmental management of this unique ecosystem. PMID:22170424

  15. Knickpoints and Hanging Valleys of Licus Vallis, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goudge, T. A.; Fassett, C.

    2016-12-01

    Licus Vallis is a 350 km long valley system located along the dichotomy boundary on Mars. The main trunk of the valley is incised 200-700 m into the surrounding terrain. The valley heads at an outlet breach of a shallow, 30 km diameter impact crater, and is also fed by a system of tributaries incised into the plateau surrounding Licus Vallis. Many of the tributary valleys, as well as the main stem of the valley fed by the paleolake outlet, have profiles that are not smoothly graded, but rather have distinct reaches with concave downward topography. These sections are either knickpoints or hanging valleys that develop in response to changes in the effective local base level, changes in climate conditions during incision of the valley, or lithologic boundaries in the substrate. Here we present remote sensing observations from images and topography to test these competing hypotheses and further characterize the evolution of this large valley system. Slope-watershed area relationships for the tributaries and main trunk valley are used to distinguish between knickpoints and hanging valleys. Analysis of orbital images does not reveal any distinct layer above which knickpoints develop, and the elevation of knickpoints show no systematic trends that might be expected of a regional lithologic unit(s). Our preliminary results suggest that the distance of knickpoint retreat is correlated with the position of the tributary valley and not the watershed area. Downstream valleys have retreated the most, suggesting they have had the most time to adjust to lowering of the local base level associated with incision of the main valley. These results are most consistent with a wave of incision sweeping up the valley system as it adjusts to a low base level in the northern plains. This conclusion is also consistent with observations of the incision depth of Licus Vallis, which increases approximately linearly downstream. Understanding this signature of base level control on the incision

  16. Geophysical reconnaissance of Lemmon Valley, Washoe County, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schaefer, Donald H.; Maurer, Douglas K.

    1981-01-01

    Rapid growth in the Lemmon Valley area, Nevada, during recent years has put increasing importance on knowledge of stored ground water for the valley. Data that would fill voids left by previous studies are depth to bedrock and depth to good-quality water beneath the two playas in the valley. Depths to bedrock calculated from a gravity survey in Lemmon Valley indicate that the western part of Lemmon Valley is considerably deeper than the eastern part. Maximum depth in the western part is about 2 ,600 feet below land surface. This depression approximately underlies the Silver Lake playa. A smaller, shallower depression with a maximum depth of about 1,500 feet below land surface exists about 2.5 miles north of the playa. The eastern area is considerably shallower. The maximum calculated depth to bedrock is about 1,000 feet below land surface, but the depth throughout most the eastern area is only about 400 feet below land surface. An electrical resistivity survey in Lemmon Valley consisting of 10 Schlumberger soundings was conducted around the playas. The maximum depth of poor-quality water (characterized by a resistivity less than 20 ohm-meters) differed considerably from place to place. Maximum depths of poor-quality water beneath the playa east of Stead varied from about 120 feet to almost 570 feet below land surface. At the Silver Lake playa, the maximum depths varied from about 40 feet in the west to 490 feet in the east. (USGS)

  17. Rift Valley fever outbreak, southern Mauritania, 2012.

    PubMed

    Sow, Abdourahmane; Faye, Ousmane; Ba, Yamar; Ba, Hampathé; Diallo, Diawo; Faye, Oumar; Loucoubar, Cheikh; Boushab, Mohamed; Barry, Yahya; Diallo, Mawlouth; Sall, Amadou Alpha

    2014-02-01

    After a period of heavy rainfall, an outbreak of Rift Valley fever occurred in southern Mauritania during September-November 2012. A total of 41 human cases were confirmed, including 13 deaths, and 12 Rift Valley fever virus strains were isolated. Moudjeria and Temchecket Departments were the most affected areas.

  18. Valley Near Nilus Chaos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-504, 5 October 2003

    This August 2003 Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a valley near Nilus Chaos, around 25.2oN, 80.3oW. The scene has a uniform albedo, indicating that all of the landforms are probably mantled by fine, bright dust. Dark streaks on the valley walls indicate places where recent dust avalanches have occurred. The ripple-like dune features on the valley floor were formed by wind, but today they are inactive and covered with dust. A few craters, created by impacting debris, have formed on the dunes, again attesting to their inactivity in the modern martian environment. The image covers an area 3 km (1.9 mi) wide; it is illuminated by sunlight from the lower left.

  19. [Spatial differentiation and impact factors of Yutian Oasis's soil surface salt based on GWR model].

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yu Yun; Wahap, Halik; Guan, Jing Yun; Lu, Long Hui; Zhang, Qin Qin

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, topsoil salinity data gathered from 24 sampling sites in the Yutian Oasis were used, nine different kinds of environmental variables closely related to soil salinity were selec-ted as influencing factors, then, the spatial distribution characteristics of topsoil salinity and spatial heterogeneity of influencing factors were analyzed by combining the spatial autocorrelation with traditional regression analysis and geographically weighted regression model. Results showed that the topsoil salinity in Yutian Oasis was not of random distribution but had strong spatial dependence, and the spatial autocorrelation index for topsoil salinity was 0.479. Groundwater salinity, groundwater depth, elevation and temperature were the main factors influencing topsoil salt accumulation in arid land oases and they were spatially heterogeneous. The nine selected environmental variables except soil pH had significant influences on topsoil salinity with spatial disparity. GWR model was superior to the OLS model on interpretation and estimation of spatial non-stationary data, also had a remarkable advantage in visualization of modeling parameters.

  20. White Oak Creek Watershed: Melton Valley Area Remedial Investigation Report, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee: Volume 3 Appendix C

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    This report provides details on the baseline ecological risk assessment conducted in support of the Remedial Investigation (RI) Report for the Melton Valley areas of the White Oak Creek watershed (WOCW). The RI presents an analysis meant to enable the US Department of Energy (DOE) to pursue a series of remedial actions resulting in site cleanup and stabilization. The ecological risk assessment builds off of the WOCW screening ecological risk assessment. All information available for contaminated sites under the jurisdiction of the US Department of Energy`s Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act Federal Facilities Agreement within the White Oakmore » Creek (WOC) RI area has been used to identify areas of potential concern with respect to the presence of contamination posing a potential risk to ecological receptors within the Melton Valley area of the White Oak Creek watershed. The risk assessment report evaluates the potential risks to receptors within each subbasin of the watershed as well as at a watershed-wide scale. The WOC system has been exposed to contaminant releases from Oak Ridge National Laboratory and associated operations since 1943 and continues to receive contaminants from adjacent waste area groupings.« less

  1. 27 CFR 9.37 - California Shenandoah Valley.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false California Shenandoah Valley. 9.37 Section 9.37 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU...) Boundaries. The Shenandoah Valley viticultural Area is located in portions of Amador and El Dorado Counties...

  2. 27 CFR 9.37 - California Shenandoah Valley.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false California Shenandoah Valley. 9.37 Section 9.37 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU...) Boundaries. The Shenandoah Valley viticultural Area is located in portions of Amador and El Dorado Counties...

  3. 27 CFR 9.25 - San Pasqual Valley.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    .... They are entitled: (1) “Escondido Quadrangle, California—San Diego County”, 7.5 minute series; (2) “San Pasqual Quadrangle, California—San Diego County”, 7.5 minute series; (3) “Valley Center Quadrangle, California—San Diego County”, 7.5 minute series. (c) Boundaries. The San Pasqual Valley viticultural area is...

  4. 27 CFR 9.25 - San Pasqual Valley.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    .... They are entitled: (1) “Escondido Quadrangle, California—San Diego County”, 7.5 minute series; (2) “San Pasqual Quadrangle, California—San Diego County”, 7.5 minute series; (3) “Valley Center Quadrangle, California—San Diego County”, 7.5 minute series. (c) Boundaries. The San Pasqual Valley viticultural area is...

  5. 27 CFR 9.25 - San Pasqual Valley.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    .... They are entitled: (1) “Escondido Quadrangle, California—San Diego County”, 7.5 minute series; (2) “San Pasqual Quadrangle, California—San Diego County”, 7.5 minute series; (3) “Valley Center Quadrangle, California—San Diego County”, 7.5 minute series. (c) Boundaries. The San Pasqual Valley viticultural area is...

  6. 27 CFR 9.25 - San Pasqual Valley.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    .... They are entitled: (1) “Escondido Quadrangle, California—San Diego County”, 7.5 minute series; (2) “San Pasqual Quadrangle, California—San Diego County”, 7.5 minute series; (3) “Valley Center Quadrangle, California—San Diego County”, 7.5 minute series. (c) Boundaries. The San Pasqual Valley viticultural area is...

  7. 27 CFR 9.25 - San Pasqual Valley.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    .... They are entitled: (1) “Escondido Quadrangle, California—San Diego County”, 7.5 minute series; (2) “San Pasqual Quadrangle, California—San Diego County”, 7.5 minute series; (3) “Valley Center Quadrangle, California—San Diego County”, 7.5 minute series. (c) Boundaries. The San Pasqual Valley viticultural area is...

  8. Detection and Response for Rift Valley fever

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Rift Valley fever is a viral disease that impacts domestic livestock and humans in Africa and the Middle East, and poses a threat to military operations in these areas. We describe a Rift Valley fever Risk Monitoring website, and its ability to predict risk of disease temporally and spatially. We al...

  9. Hydrology and numerical simulation of groundwater movement and heat transport in Snake Valley and surrounding areas, Juab, Miller, and Beaver Counties, Utah, and White Pine and Lincoln Counties, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Masbruch, Melissa D.; Gardner, Philip M.; Brooks, Lynette E.

    2014-01-01

    Snake Valley and surrounding areas, along the Utah-Nevada state border, are part of the Great Basin carbonate and alluvial aquifer system. The groundwater system in the study area consists of water in unconsolidated deposits in basins and water in consolidated rock underlying the basins and in the adjacent mountain blocks. Most recharge occurs from precipitation on the mountain blocks and most discharge occurs from the lower altitude basin-fill deposits mainly as evapotranspiration, springflow, and well withdrawals.The Snake Valley area regional groundwater system was simulated using a three-dimensional model incorporating both groundwater flow and heat transport. The model was constructed with MODFLOW-2000, a version of the U.S. Geological Survey’s groundwater flow model, and MT3DMS, a transport model that simulates advection, dispersion, and chemical reactions of solutes or heat in groundwater systems. Observations of groundwater discharge by evapotranspiration, springflow, mountain stream base flow, and well withdrawals; groundwater-level altitudes; and groundwater temperatures were used to calibrate the model. Parameter values estimated by regression analyses were reasonable and within the range of expected values.This study represents one of the first regional modeling efforts to include calibration to groundwater temperature data. The inclusion of temperature observations reduced parameter uncertainty, in some cases quite significantly, over using just water-level altitude and discharge observations. Of the 39 parameters used to simulate horizontal hydraulic conductivity, uncertainty on 11 of these parameters was reduced to one order of magnitude or less. Other significant reductions in parameter uncertainty occurred in parameters representing the vertical anisotropy ratio, drain and river conductance, recharge rates, and well withdrawal rates.The model provides a good representation of the groundwater system. Simulated water-level altitudes range over

  10. The critical role of local policy effects in arid watershed groundwater resources sustainability: A case study in the Minqin oasis, China.

    PubMed

    Hao, Yuanyuan; Xie, Yaowen; Ma, Jinhui; Zhang, Wenpei

    2017-12-01

    Designed as a watershed groundwater restoration policy (WGRP), the Comprehensive Treatment Program of the Shiyang River Basin (CTSRB) was launched in 2006 to restore the groundwater resources in the Minqin oasis, northwestern China. This study sought to verify the recovery effects of CTSRB implementation from the perspective of groundwater depth. We reconstructed the spatio-temporal distribution of groundwater depth at interannual and pixel scales by using digital groundwater depth models (DGDMs), based on the ordinary kriging interpolation method. Using DGDMs data, various measures of the groundwater table (e.g., regional depths, surface areas, depletion cones, and conditions in irrigated regions including Ba, Quanshan, and Hu) were quantitatively analyzed and compared for the pre-CTSRB (2001-2006), CTSRB I (2006-2010), and CTSRB II (2010-2015) periods, for which spatial trends in the annual amplitudes of groundwater depth were compared. Finally, strategies that impacted the groundwater behavior before and during the CTSRB periods, possible indirect and adverse effects, and long-term strategies and prospects were discussed. The results showed that groundwater depth first declined sharply, before increasing slowly and stabilizing after implementation of the CTSRB. Areas of greater groundwater depth (<-20m) and four groundwater depletion cones expanded during the pre-CTSRB period, whereas variable shrinking trends were detected during the CTSRB period. Spatial analysis showed that groundwater recovery mainly occurred along the periphery of the three irrigated regions, among which recovery effects in Hu were more obvious than those in Quanshan and Ba, with pumping-well densities the main reason for the difference. Therefore, various strategies (increasing the surface water supply, reducing groundwater mining, and some other auxiliary measures) of CTSRB together supported groundwater recovery in the Minqin oasis. Overall, this research demonstrates an innovative

  11. Hydrologic and geologic characteristics of the Yucca Mountain site relevant to the performance of a potential repository: Day 1, Las Vegas, Nevada to Pahrump, Nevada: Stop 6A. Keane Wonder Spring and regional groundwater flow in the Death Valley region

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Steinkampf, W.C.

    2000-01-01

    Yucca Mountain, located ~100 mi northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada, has been designated by Congress as a site to be characterized for a potential mined geologic repository for high-level radioactive waste. This field trip will examine the regional geologic and hydrologic setting for Yucca Mountain, as well as specific results of the site characterization program, The first day focuses on the regional seeing with emphasis on current and paleo hydrology, which are both of critical concern for predicting future performance of a potential repository. Morning stops will be in southern Nevada and afternoon stops will be in Death Valley. The second day will be spent at Yucca Mountain. The filed trip will visit the underground testing sites in the "Exploratory Studies Facility" and the "Busted Butte Unsaturated Zone Transport Field Test" plus several surface-based testing sites. Much of the work at the site has concentrated on studies of the unsaturated zone, and element of the hydrologic system that historically has received little attention. Discussions during the second day will comprise selected topics of Yucca Mountain geology, mic hazard in the Yucca Mountain area. Evening discussions will address modeling of regional groundwater flow, the geology and hydrology of Yucca Mountain to the performance of a potential repository. Day 3 will examine the geologic framework and hydrology of the Pahute Mesa-Oasis Valley Groundwater Basin and then will continue to Reno via Hawthorne, Nevada and the Walker Lake area.

  12. Psychometrics of the Overall Anxiety Severity and Impairment Scale (OASIS) in a sample of women with and without trauma histories.

    PubMed

    Norman, Sonya B; Allard, Carolyn B; Trim, Ryan S; Thorp, Steven R; Behrooznia, Michelle; Masino, Tonya T; Stein, Murray B

    2013-04-01

    Many women have unidentified anxiety or trauma histories that can impact their health and medical treatment-seeking behavior. This study examined the sensitivity, specificity, efficiency, and sensitivity to change of the Overall Anxiety Severity and Impairment Scale (OASIS) for identifying an anxiety disorder in a female sample with and without trauma history related to intimate partner violence (IPV). Forty-three women with full or partial PTSD from IPV and 41 women without PTSD completed the OASIS. All participants with trauma history completed the Clinician Administered PTSD Scale. This report is a secondary analysis of a study on the neurobiology of psychological trauma in survivors of IPV recruited from the community. A cut-score of 5 best discriminated those with PTSD from those without, successfully classifying 91% of the sample with 93% sensitivity and 90% specificity. The measure showed strong sensitivity to change in a subsample of 20 participants who completed PTSD treatment and strong convergent and divergent validity in the full sample. This study suggests that the OASIS can identify the presence of an anxiety disorder among a female sample of IPV survivors when PTSD is present.

  13. Delineation of areas contributing recharge to selected public-supply wells in Glacial Valley-Fill and Wetland Settings, Rhode Island

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Friesz, Paul J.

    2004-01-01

    Areas contributing recharge and sources of water to one proposed and seven present public-supply wells, screened in sand and gravel deposits and clustered in three study areas, were determined on the basis of calibrated, steady-state ground-water-flow models representing average hydrologic conditions. The area contributing recharge to a well is defined as the surface area where water recharges the ground water and then flows toward and discharges to the well. In Cumberland and Lincoln, public-supply well fields on opposite sides of the Blackstone River are in a narrow valley bordered by steep hillslopes. Ground-water-level and river-stage measurements indicated that river water was infiltrating the aquifer and flowing toward the wells during pumping conditions. Simulated areas contributing recharge to the Cumberland well field operating alone for both average (324 gallons per minute) and maximum (1,000 gallons per minute) pumping rates extend on both sides of the river to the lateral model boundaries, which is the contact between the valley and uplands. The area contributing recharge at the average pumping rate is about 0.05 square mile and the well field derives 72 percent of pumped water from upland runoff. At the maximum pumping rate, the area contributing recharge extends farther up and down the valley to 0.12 square mile and the primary source of water to the well field was infiltrated river water (53 percent). Upland areas draining toward the areas contributing recharge encompass 0.58 and 0.66 square mile for the average and maximum rates, respectively. By incorporating the backup Lincoln well-field withdrawals (2,083 gallons per minute) into the model, the area contributing recharge to the Cumberland well field operating at its maximum rate is reduced to 0.08 square mile; part of the simulated area which contributes recharge to the Cumberland well field when it is operating alone contributes instead to the Lincoln well field when both well fields are pumped

  14. Groundwater quality in the Owens Valley, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dawson, Barbara J. Milby; Belitz, Kenneth

    2012-01-01

    Groundwater provides more than 40 percent of California’s drinking water. To protect this vital resource, the State of California created the Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The Priority Basin Project of the GAMA Program provides a comprehensive assessment of the State’s groundwater quality and increases public access to groundwater-quality information. Owens Valley is one of the study areas being evaluated. The Owens study area is approximately 1,030 square miles (2,668 square kilometers) and includes the Owens Valley groundwater basin (California Department of Water Resources, 2003). Owens Valley has a semiarid to arid climate, with average annual rainfall of about 6 inches (15 centimeters). The study area has internal drainage, with runoff primarily from the Sierra Nevada draining east to the Owens River, which flows south to Owens Lake dry lakebed at the southern end of the valley. Beginning in the early 1900s, the City of Los Angeles began diverting the flow of the Owens River to the Los Angeles Aqueduct, resulting in the evaporation of Owens Lake and the formation of the current Owens Lake dry lakebed. Land use in the study area is approximately 94 percent (%) natural, 5% agricultural, and 1% urban. The primary natural land cover is shrubland. The largest urban area is the city of Bishop (2010 population of 4,000). Groundwater in this basin is used for public and domestic water supply and for irrigation. The main water-bearing units are gravel, sand, silt, and clay derived from surrounding mountains. Recharge to the groundwater system is primarily runoff from the Sierra Nevada, and by direct infiltration of irrigation. The primary sources of discharge are pumping wells, evapotranspiration, and underflow to the Owens Lake dry lakebed. The primary aquifers in Owens Valley are defined as those parts of the aquifers corresponding to the perforated intervals of wells listed in the California Department of Public Health database

  15. [The design and implementation of the web typical surface object spectral information system in arid areas based on .NET and SuperMap].

    PubMed

    Xia, Jun; Tashpolat, Tiyip; Zhang, Fei; Ji, Hong-jiang

    2011-07-01

    The characteristic of object spectrum is not only the base of the quantification analysis of remote sensing, but also the main content of the basic research of remote sensing. The typical surface object spectral database in arid areas oasis is of great significance for applied research on remote sensing in soil salinization. In the present paper, the authors took the Ugan-Kuqa River Delta Oasis as an example, unified .NET and the SuperMap platform with SQL Server database stored data, used the B/S pattern and the C# language to design and develop the typical surface object spectral information system, and established the typical surface object spectral database according to the characteristics of arid areas oasis. The system implemented the classified storage and the management of typical surface object spectral information and the related attribute data of the study areas; this system also implemented visualized two-way query between the maps and attribute data, the drawings of the surface object spectral response curves and the processing of the derivative spectral data and its drawings. In addition, the system initially possessed a simple spectral data mining and analysis capabilities, and this advantage provided an efficient, reliable and convenient data management and application platform for the Ugan-Kuqa River Delta Oasis's follow-up study in soil salinization. Finally, It's easy to maintain, convinient for secondary development and practically operating in good condition.

  16. Agricultural Development, Land Change, and Livelihoods in Tanzania's Kilombero Valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connors, John Patrick

    The Kilombero Valley lies at the intersection of a network of protected areas that cross Tanzania. The wetlands and woodlands of the Valley, as well as the forest of surrounding mountains are abundant in biodiversity and are considered to be critical areas for conservation. This area, however, is also the home to more than a half million people, primarily poor smallholder farmers. In an effort to support the livelihoods and food security of these farmers and the larger Tanzanian population, the country has recently targeted a series of programs to increase agricultural production in the Kilombero Valley and elsewhere in the country. Bridging concepts and methods from land change science, political ecology, and sustainable livelihoods, I present an integrated assessment of the linkages between development and conservation efforts in the Kilombero Valley and the implications for food security. This dissertation uses three empirical studies to understand the process of development in the Kilombero Valley and to link the priorities and perceptions of conservation and development efforts to the material outcomes in food security and land change. The first paper of this dissertation examines the changes in land use in the Kilombero Valley between 1997 and 2014 following the privatization of agriculture and the expansion of Tanzania's Kilimo Kwanza program. Remote sensing analysis reveals a two-fold increase in agricultural area during this short time, largely at the expense of forest. Protected areas in some parts of the Valley appear to be deterring deforestation, but rapid agricultural growth, particularly surrounding a commercial rice plantation, has led to loss of extant forest and sustained habitat fragmentation. The second paper focuses examines livelihood strategies in the Valley and claims regarding the role of agrobiodiversity in food security. The results of household survey reveal no difference or lower food security among households that diversify their

  17. Development of an Interactive Shoreline Management Tool for the Lower Wood River Valley, Oregon - Phase I: Stage-Volume and Stage-Area Relations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haluska, Tana L.; Snyder, Daniel T.

    2007-01-01

    This report presents the parcel and inundation area geographic information system (GIS) layers for various surface-water stages. It also presents data tables containing the water stage, inundation area, and water volume relations developed from analysis of detailed land surface elevation derived from Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data recently collected for the Wood River Valley at the northern margin of Agency Lake in Klamath County, Oregon. Former shoreline wetlands that have been cut off from Upper Klamath and Agency Lakes by dikes might in the future be reconnected to Upper Klamath and Agency Lakes by breaching the dikes. Issues of interest associated with restoring wetlands in this way include the area that will be inundated, the volume of water that may be stored, the change in wetland habitat, and the variation in these characteristics as surface-water stage is changed. Products from this analysis can assist water managers in assessing the effect of breaching dikes and changing surface-water stage. The study area is in the approximate former northern margins of Upper Klamath and Agency Lakes in the Wood River Valley.

  18. Climate Influence on Emerging Risk Areas for Rift Valley Fever Epidemics in Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Mweya, Clement N; Mboera, Leonard E G; Kimera, Sharadhuli I

    2017-07-01

    Rift Valley Fever (RVF) is a climate-related arboviral infection of animals and humans. Climate is thought to represent a threat toward emerging risk areas for RVF epidemics globally. The objective of this study was to evaluate influence of climate on distribution of suitable breeding habitats for Culex pipiens complex, potential mosquito vector responsible for transmission and distribution of disease epidemics risk areas in Tanzania. We used ecological niche models to estimate potential distribution of disease risk areas based on vectors and disease co-occurrence data approach. Climatic variables for the current and future scenarios were used as model inputs. Changes in mosquito vectors' habitat suitability in relation to disease risk areas were estimated. We used partial receiver operating characteristic and the area under the curves approach to evaluate model predictive performance and significance. Habitat suitability for Cx. pipiens complex indicated broad-scale potential for change and shift in the distribution of the vectors and disease for both 2020 and 2050 climatic scenarios. Risk areas indicated more intensification in the areas surrounding Lake Victoria and northeastern part of the country through 2050 climate scenario. Models show higher probability of emerging risk areas spreading toward the western parts of Tanzania from northeastern areas and decrease in the southern part of the country. Results presented here identified sites for consideration to guide surveillance and control interventions to reduce risk of RVF disease epidemics in Tanzania. A collaborative approach is recommended to develop and adapt climate-related disease control and prevention strategies.

  19. Predicted liquefaction in the greater Oakland area and northern Santa Clara Valley during a repeat of the 1868 Hayward Fault (M6.7-7.0) earthquake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holzer, Thomas L.; Noce, Thomas E.; Bennett, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    Probabilities of surface manifestations of liquefaction due to a repeat of the 1868 (M6.7-7.0) earthquake on the southern segment of the Hayward Fault were calculated for two areas along the margin of San Francisco Bay, California: greater Oakland and the northern Santa Clara Valley. Liquefaction is predicted to be more common in the greater Oakland area than in the northern Santa Clara Valley owing to the presence of 57 km2 of susceptible sandy artificial fill. Most of the fills were placed into San Francisco Bay during the first half of the 20th century to build military bases, port facilities, and shoreline communities like Alameda and Bay Farm Island. Probabilities of liquefaction in the area underlain by this sandy artificial fill range from 0.2 to ~0.5 for a M7.0 earthquake, and decrease to 0.1 to ~0.4 for a M6.7 earthquake. In the greater Oakland area, liquefaction probabilities generally are less than 0.05 for Holocene alluvial fan deposits, which underlie most of the remaining flat-lying urban area. In the northern Santa Clara Valley for a M7.0 earthquake on the Hayward Fault and an assumed water-table depth of 1.5 m (the historically shallowest water level), liquefaction probabilities range from 0.1 to 0.2 along Coyote and Guadalupe Creeks, but are less than 0.05 elsewhere. For a M6.7 earthquake, probabilities are greater than 0.1 along Coyote Creek but decrease along Guadalupe Creek to less than 0.1. Areas with high probabilities in the Santa Clara Valley are underlain by young Holocene levee deposits along major drainages where liquefaction and lateral spreading occurred during large earthquakes in 1868 and 1906.

  20. Effects of Climate and Social Change on Pasture Productivity and Area in the Alay Valley, Kyrgyzstan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, L.; Smithwick, E. A. H.

    2017-12-01

    The high elevation Alay Valley, located in the central Asian country of Kyrgyzstan, has experienced substantial socio-political and environmental changes in recent decades, resulting from the collapse of the Soviet Union and an increase in average annual temperature from 1.8 C to 2.7 C between 1990 and 2014. However, the consequences of these changes on pastureland productivity and area has not been previously assessed, despite the critical cultural and economic importance of pasturelands for sustaining livelihoods in this region. We assessed spatial and temporal patterns of soil moisture, pasture productivity and pasture area in the Alay Valley. Supervised classification was performed on Landsat imagery over the study region to distinguish pastures and agricultural land in order to relate changes in soil moisture to specific land classes. Root Zone Soil Moisture (RZSM) was estimated between May 2015 and June 2017 from Soil Moisture Active Passive L4 RZSM product. Average monthly NDVI for 2016 was calculated to obtain seasonal patterns in productivity of the pasturelands in the region. Results show that annual RZSM trends closely matched those of precipitation, as RZSM peaks during May (the wettest month) and decreases during the dry summer. The NDVI trend is also notable as it peaks very early in June before declining due to limited precipitation and grazing practices. There has been a sharp increase in pasturelands encompassing the bank of the Kyzyl Suu river from 1993 to 2016. Likely due to turmoil from collapse of the USSR, the area of pasturelands decreased slightly from 59.98 to 55.99 km^2 from 1993-1994, corresponding with a decline in livestock count and GDP per capita. The area of pasturelands has since recovered and is hovering around 104.47 - 107.95 km^2 between 2009-2016. Overall results highlight both sensitivity and resilience of high elevation pasture to coupled socio-environmental drivers.

  1. 27 CFR 9.214 - Haw River Valley.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Haw River Valley. 9.214... River Valley. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Haw River Valley”. For purposes of part 4 of this chapter, “Haw River Valley” and “Haw River” are terms of viticultural...

  2. Geology of the Greenwater Range, and the dawn of Death Valley, California—Field guide for the Death Valley Natural History Conference, 2013

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Calzia, J.P.; Rämö, O.T.; Jachens, Robert; Smith, Eugene; Knott, Jeffrey

    2016-05-02

    Much has been written about the age and formation of Death Valley, but that is one—if not the last—chapter in the fascinating geologic history of this area. Igneous and sedimentary rocks in the Greenwater Range, one mountain range east of Death Valley, tell an earlier story that overlaps with the formation of Death Valley proper. This early story has been told by scientists who have studied these rocks for many years and continue to do so. This field guide was prepared for the first Death Valley Natural History Conference and provides an overview of the geology of the Greenwater Range and the early history (10–0 Ma) of Death Valley.

  3. Uranium in Holocene valley-fill sediments, and uranium, radon, and helium in waters, Lake Tahoe-Carson Range area, Nevada and California, U.S.A.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Otton, J.K.; Zielinski, R.A.; Been, J.M.

    1989-01-01

    Uraniferous Holocene sediments occur in the Carson Range of Nevada and California, U.S.A., between Lake Tahoe and Carson Valley. The hosts for the uranium include peat and interbedded organic-rich sand, silt, and mud that underly valley floors, fens, and marshes along stream valleys between the crest of the range and the edge of Lake Tahoe. The known uranium accumulations extend along the Carson Range from the area just southeast of South Lake Tahoe northward to the area just east of Carson City; however, they almost certainly continue beyond the study area to the north, west, and south. Due to the young age of the accumulations, uranium in them is in gross disequilibrium with its highly radioactive daughter products. These accumulations have thus escaped discovery with radiation detection equipment in the past. The uranium content of these sediments approaches 0.6 percent; however, the average is in the range of 300-500 ppm. Waters associated with these sediments locally contain as much as 177 ppb uranium. Modest levels of helium and radon also occur in these waters. Uraniferous waters are clearly entering the private and public water supply systems in some parts of the study area; however, it is not known how much uranium is reaching users of these water supplies. Many of the waters sampled in the study area exceed the published health effects guidance level of the Environmental Protection Agency. Regulatory standards for uranium in waters have not been published, however. Much uranium is stored in the sediments along these stream valleys. Estimates for a marsh and a fen along one drainage are 24,000 and 15,000 kg, respectively. The potential effects of man-induced environmental changes on the uranium are uncertain. Laboratory studies of uraniferous sediment rich in organic matter may allow us to evaluate the potential of liberating uranium from such sediments and creating transient increases in the level of uranium moving in water in the natural environment

  4. Records of wells, water levels, and chemical quality of ground water in the French Prairie-Mission Bottom area, northern Willamette Valley, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Price, Don

    1961-01-01

    An investigation of the ground-water resources of the northern Willamette Valley was begun in 1960 as a cooperative program between the Ground Water Branch, U.S. Geological Survey, and the Oregon State Engineer. The northern Willamette Valley area is one of the fastest growing areas of ground-water use within the state. The purpose of the investigation is to obtain an understanding of the availability, movement, and chemical quality of the ground-water resources of the area. This information is needed to attain an optimum development of the ground-water resources of the area and to aid in the prevention of problems of overdevelopment and pollution. The first phase of the program was the collection of well records, water level records, and chemical quality data in the central part of this area, which is known as the French Prairie-Mission Bottom area. The records collected in this phase of the study are essential in the preparation of an interpretive report describing the occurrence and movement of ground-water in the French Prairie-Mission Bottom area. These records, which will not be included in the interpretive report that is being prepared at this time, are being made available in this publication to aid in the location and the development of the ground-water resources of the area, and to serve as a supplement to the forthcoming interpretive report.

  5. 27 CFR 9.44 - Solano County Green Valley.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Solano County Green Valley. 9.44 Section 9.44 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU... Solano County Green Valley. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is...

  6. A review of research on ecosystem of arid area using RS-GIS in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Hongling

    2007-06-01

    Arid area is classical mountain-oasis-desert ecosystem in North-west China. As the ecosystem has its nature geography character obviously, it has superior to research with remote-sensing and geography information system. The study on arid ecosystem in RS-GIS' way is focused on that the landscape spatial pattern of complex MODS ecosystem, the dynamic development of Land use/land cover, the security of ecological environment of eco-tone and so on. At the same time, the research on the single system is more and more, which has provided more ways and deeper fields of arid area using RS-GIS. Through the use of RS-GIS, desertification, oasis' development, urbanization etc. can be known, which would provide precaution for human-being and suitable ways to adjust the problems.

  7. Geoenvironmental studies on conservation of archaeological sites at Siwa oasis, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibrahim, Hani A. M.; Kamh, Gamal E.

    2006-02-01

    Siwa oasis is located in the extreme western part of the Egyptian western desert. There are several archaeological sites in the oasis; the most distinct ones are Alexander the Great temple at Aghormi hill and the Gebel El Mota tomb excavations. They have suffered due to deterioration and cracks of different kinds and some parts are getting worse as rock falls occur. From field inspection and lab analysis, it is clear that lithology plays an important role on the extent of damage. Alexander the Great temple was built over the northern edge of Aghormi hill, which consists of two distinct beds—an upper limestone bed and a lower shale one. From field survey and laboratory analysis, the shale is considered as a high expanded bed and weak in its bearing capacity, as its clay content (mainly smectite) experienced swelling due to wetting from the ground water spring underneath. Consequently, the upper limestone bed suffered from map cracking associated with rock falls due to the differential settlement of the swelled lower shale one. The temple was threatened by slope instability and had experienced many cracks. At Gabal El Mota tomb excavations, it was noticed that a comparison of tombs of the same opening size revealed that those that excavated on shale beds had cracked much more than those that excavated on limestone. This may be attributed to the low bearing capacity of excavated shale walls. The remedial measures suggested to overcome the stability problems on these archaeological sites are grouting or construction of retaining walls.

  8. [Effects of different disturbance modes on the morphological characteristics and aboveground biomass of Alhagi sparsifolia in oasis-desert ecotone].

    PubMed

    Li, Hai-Feng; Zeng, Fan-Jiang; Gui, Dong-Wei; An, Gui-Xiang; Liu, Zhen; Zhang, Li-Gang; Liu, Bo

    2012-01-01

    Taking Cele oasis at the southern fringe of Taklimakan Desert as a case, this paper studied the effects of different disturbances (burning in spring, cutting in spring, and cutting in fall) on the morphological characteristics and aboveground biomass of natural vegetation Alhagi sparsifolia in the ecotone of oasis-desert. Burning in spring decreased the A. sparsifolia plant height, crown width, and biomass significantly, being harmful to the regeneration and growth of the vegetation. Cutting in spring decreased the A. sparsifolia plant height, crown width, and biomass but increased the leaf biomass, thorn length, and thorn diameter, whereas cutting in fall decreased the plant height and crown width but increased the ramification amount and biomass of A. sparsifolia. Moderate cutting in fall could benefit the protection of A. sparsifolia at the southern fringe of Taklimakan Desert.

  9. Organisms of the Hubbard Brook Valley, New Hampshire

    Treesearch

    Richard T. Holmes; Gene E. Likens

    1999-01-01

    Lists the organisms, both plant and animal, that have been identified by scientists engaged in multidisciplinary ecological research in the Hubbard Brook Valley, New Hampshire, during the past three decades. The Valley encompasses the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest, Mirror Lake, and nearby areas within the White Mountain region of Grafton County. The species lists...

  10. Technical Analysis of In-Valley Drainage Management Strategies for the Western San Joaquin Valley, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Presser, Theresa S.; Schwarzbach, Steven E.

    2008-01-01

    The western San Joaquin Valley is one of the most productive farming areas in the United States, but salt-buildup in soils and shallow groundwater aquifers threatens this area?s productivity. Elevated selenium concentrations in soils and groundwater complicate drainage management and salt disposal. In this document, we evaluate constraints on drainage management and implications of various approaches to management considered in: *the San Luis Drainage Feature Re-Evaluation (SLDFRE) Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) (about 5,000 pages of documentation, including supporting technical reports and appendices); *recent conceptual plans put forward by the San Luis Unit (SLU) contractors (i.e., the SLU Plans) (about 6 pages of documentation); *approaches recommended by the San Joaquin Valley Drainage Program (SJVDP) (1990a); and *other U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) models and analysis relevant to the western San Joaquin Valley. The alternatives developed in the SLDFRE EIS and other recently proposed drainage plans (refer to appendix A for details) differ from the strategies proposed by the San Joaquin Valley Drainage Program (1990a). The Bureau of Reclamation (USBR) in March 2007 signed a record of decision for an in-valley disposal option that would retire 194,000 acres of land, build 1,900 acres of evaporation ponds, and develop a treatment system to remove salt and selenium from drainwater. The recently proposed SLU Plans emphasize pumping drainage to the surface, storing approximately 33% in agricultural water re-use areas, treating selenium through biotechnology, enhancing the evaporation of water to concentrate salt, and identifying ultimate storage facilities for the remaining approximately 67% of waste selenium and salt. The treatment sequence of reuse, reverse osmosis, selenium bio-treatment, and enhanced solar evaporation is unprecedented and untested at the scale needed to meet plan requirements. All drainage management strategies that have been proposed

  11. Natural hazards in Slovene karst areas: Flood risk areas in the Upper Pivka valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravbar, N.; Kovacic, G.

    2009-04-01

    An overview of exceptional natural processes or natural hazards from the human perspective in Slovene karst areas is made. Some types of natural hazards are typical for karst due to the process of karstification and resulting geomorphological and hydrological characteristics of karst landscapes (presence of voids within the rock, absence of superficial flow and presence of specific karst groundwater flow system), while the others occur evenly in all types of landscapes. However, their impact is different in karst as it is in the non-karst landscapes. Examples of particular phenomenon or events, their frequency of occurrence, expansion and caused damage are presented. Special emphasis is laid on high waters in karst poljes, shallow karst areas or contact karst, where flooding emerges due to the raise of karst groundwater table as a consequence of intensive precipitation or snowmelt. Flooding in karst can also appear due to insufficient swallow capacities of the underground channels, which are not capable of conducting surpluses of inflowing water. In opposite to flash floods, the karst floods are more predictable, since they usually occur in the same areas to the same elevation and in the same season of the year. Inhabitants are easily adapted to this phenomenon, setting the settlements and other important infrastructure on elevations above the highest recorded water level. Usually such flooding does not pose serious threat and causes no serious flood damage, except during extreme events, as it was in the case of the autumn 2000 floods. Case study of the Upper Pivka valley, where floods usually cover around 6.6 km2, is treated and explained. During the intensive rain period from September to November 2000, the groundwater table rose for about 20-35 m above the usual level, causing flooding also in the areas, where they have never been recorded before. Precise mapping of the flooded area extents in the discussed area and the height of the water levels was performed

  12. Extraction of Martian valley networks from digital topography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stepinski, T. F.; Collier, M. L.

    2004-01-01

    We have developed a novel method for delineating valley networks on Mars. The valleys are inferred from digital topography by an autonomous computer algorithm as drainage networks, instead of being manually mapped from images. Individual drainage basins are precisely defined and reconstructed to restore flow continuity disrupted by craters. Drainage networks are extracted from their underlying basins using the contributing area threshold method. We demonstrate that such drainage networks coincide with mapped valley networks verifying that valley networks are indeed drainage systems. Our procedure is capable of delineating and analyzing valley networks with unparalleled speed and consistency. We have applied this method to 28 Noachian locations on Mars exhibiting prominent valley networks. All extracted networks have a planar morphology similar to that of terrestrial river networks. They are characterized by a drainage density of approx.0.1/km, low in comparison to the drainage density of terrestrial river networks. Slopes of "streams" in Martian valley networks decrease downstream at a slower rate than slopes of streams in terrestrial river networks. This analysis, based on a sizable data set of valley networks, reveals that although valley networks have some features pointing to their origin by precipitation-fed runoff erosion, their quantitative characteristics suggest that precipitation intensity and/or longevity of past pluvial climate were inadequate to develop mature drainage basins on Mars.

  13. Hydrogeology of the Ramapo River-Woodbury Creek valley-fill aquifer system and adjacent areas in eastern Orange County, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heisig, Paul M.

    2015-01-01

    Valley-fill aquifers are modest resources within the area, as indicated by the common practice of completing supply wells in the underlying bedrock rather than the overlying glacial deposits. Groundwater turbidity problems curtail use of the resource. However, additional groundwater resources have been identified by test drilling, and there are remaining untested areas. New groundwater supplies that stress localized aquifer areas will alter the groundwater flow system. Considerations include potential water-quality degradation from nearby land use(s) and, where withdrawals induce infiltration of surface-water, balancing withdrawals with flow requirements for downstream users or for maintenance of stream ecological health.

  14. Groundwater-Mining-Induced Subsidence and Earth Fissures in Cedar Valley, Southwestern Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knudsen, T. R.; Inkenbrandt, P.; Lund, W. R.; Lowe, M.; Bowman, S. D.

    2014-12-01

    Groundwater pumping in excess of recharge (groundwater mining) has lowered the potentiometric surface in Cedar Valley, southwestern Utah, by as much as 114 feet since 1939. Lowering the potentiometric surface (head decline) has caused permanent compaction of fine-grained sediments of the Cedar Valley aquifer. Recently acquired interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) imagery shows that land subsidence is occurring over an ~100 square-mile area, including two pronounced subsidence bowls in the northeastern (Enoch graben) and southwestern (Quichapa Lake area) parts of the valley. A lack of accurate historical benchmark elevation data over much of the valley prevents detailed long-term quantification of subsidence. In response to the land subsidence, earth fissures have formed along the margins of the Enoch graben and north and west of Quichapa Lake. Our initial inventory of Cedar Valley fissures, which relied on aerial-photography analysis, identified 3.9 miles of fissures in 2009. With newly acquired light detection and ranging (LiDAR) coverage in 2011, we more than doubled the total length of mapped fissures to 8.3 miles. Fissures on the west side of the Enoch graben exhibit ongoing vertical surface displacement with rates as high as 1.7 inches/year. The largest Enoch-graben-west fissure has displaced street surfaces, curb and gutter, and sidewalks, and has reversed the flow direction of a sewer line in a partially developed subdivision. Several Cedar Valley fissures are closely associated with, and in some places coincident with, mapped Quaternary faults. While the majority of Cedar Valley fissures are mapped in agricultural areas, continued groundwater mining and resultant subsidence will likely cause existing fissures to lengthen and new fissures to form that may eventually impact other developed areas of the valley.

  15. Forest area and distribution in the Mississippi alluvial valley: Implications for breeding bird conservation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Twedt, D.J.; Loesch, C.R.

    1999-01-01

    Knowing the current forest distribution and patch size characteristics is integral to the development of geographically defined, habitat-based conservation objectives for breeding birds. Towards this end, we classified 2.6 million ha of forest cover within the Mississippi Alluvial Valley using 1992 thematic mapper satellite imagery. Although historically this area, from southern Illinois to southern Louisiana, was dominated by forested wetlands, forest cover remains on less than 25% of the floodplain. Remaining forest cover is comprised of > 38,000 discrete forest patches > 2 ha. Mean patch area (64.1?5.2 ha; 0 ?SE) was highly skewed towards small fragment size. Larger patches had a higher proportion of more hydric forest cover classes than did smaller patches which had a higher proportion of less hydric forest cover classes. Public lands accounted for 16% of remaining forested wetlands. Fewer than 100 forest patches exceeded our hypothesized habitat objective (4000 ha minimum contiguous forest area) intended to support self-sustaining populations of forest breeding birds. To increase the number of forest patches exceeding 4000 ha contiguous area, and thereby increase the likelihood of successful forest bird conservation, we recommend afforestation adjoining existing forest fragments ?1012 ha and focused within designated Forest Bird Conservation Regions.

  16. New geologic mapping of the northwestern Willamette Valley, Oregon, and its American Viticultural Areas (AVAs)—A foundation for understanding their terroir

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wells, Ray E.; Haugerud, Ralph A.; Niem, Alan; Niem, Wendy; Ma, Lina; Madin, Ian; Evarts, Russell C.

    2018-04-10

    A geologic map of the greater Portland, Oregon, metropolitan area is planned that will document the region’s complex geology (currently in review: “Geologic map of the greater Portland metropolitan area and surrounding region, Oregon and Washington,” by Wells, R.E., Haugerud, R.A., Niem, A., Niem, W., Ma, L., Evarts, R., Madin, I., and others). The map, which is planned to be published as a U.S. Geological Survey Scientific Investigations Map, will consist of 51 7.5′ quadrangles covering more than 2,500 square miles, and it will represent more than 100 person-years of geologic mapping and studies. The region was mapped at the relatively detailed scale of 1:24,000 to improve understanding of its geology and its earthquake hazards. More than 100 geologic map units will record the 50-million-year history of volcanism, sedimentation, folding, and faulting above the Cascadia Subduction Zone. The geology contributes to the varied terroir of four American Viticultural Areas (AVAs) in the northwestern Willamette Valley: the Yamhill-Carlton, Dundee Hills, Chehalem Mountains, and Ribbon Ridge AVAs. Terroir is defined as the environmental conditions, especially climate and soils, that influence the quality and character of a region’s crops—in this case, grapes for wine.On this new poster (“New geologic mapping of the northwestern Willamette Valley, Oregon, and its American Viticultural Areas (AVAs)—A foundation for understanding their terroir”), we present the geologic map at a reduced scale (about 1:175,000) to show the general distribution of geologic map units, and we highlight, discuss, and illustrate six major geologic events that helped shape the region and form its terrior. We also discuss the geologic elements that contribute to the character of each of the four AVAs in the northwestern Willamette Valley.

  17. OASYS (OrAnge SYnchrotron Suite): an open-source graphical environment for x-ray virtual experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rebuffi, Luca; Sanchez del Rio, Manuel

    2017-08-01

    The evolution of the hardware platforms, the modernization of the software tools, the access to the codes of a large number of young people and the popularization of the open source software for scientific applications drove us to design OASYS (ORange SYnchrotron Suite), a completely new graphical environment for modelling X-ray experiments. The implemented software architecture allows to obtain not only an intuitive and very-easy-to-use graphical interface, but also provides high flexibility and rapidity for interactive simulations, making configuration changes to quickly compare multiple beamline configurations. Its purpose is to integrate in a synergetic way the most powerful calculation engines available. OASYS integrates different simulation strategies via the implementation of adequate simulation tools for X-ray Optics (e.g. ray tracing and wave optics packages). It provides a language to make them to communicate by sending and receiving encapsulated data. Python has been chosen as main programming language, because of its universality and popularity in scientific computing. The software Orange, developed at the University of Ljubljana (SLO), is the high level workflow engine that provides the interaction with the user and communication mechanisms.

  18. Development of low-cost technology for the removal of iron and manganese from ground water in siwa oasis.

    PubMed

    El-Naggar, Hesham M

    2010-01-01

    Ground water is the only water resource for Siwa Oasis. It is obtained from natural freshwater wells and springs fed by the Nubian aquifer. Water samples collected from Siwa Oasis had relatively higher iron (Fe) and manganese (Mn) than the permissible limits specified in WHO Guidelines and Egyptian Standards for drinking water quality. Aeration followed by sand filtration is the most commonly used method for the removal of iron from ground water. The study aimed at development of low-cost technology for the removal of iron and manganese from ground water in Siwa Oasis. The study was carried out on Laboratory-scale columns experiments sand filters with variable depths of 15, 30, 45, 60, 75, 90 cm and three graded types of sand were studied. The graded sand (E.S. =0.205 mm, U.C. =3.366, depth of sand = 60 cm and filtration rate = 1.44 m3/m2/hr) was the best type of filter media. Iron and manganese concentrations measured in ground water with aeration only, decreased with an average removal percentage of 16%, 13% respectively. Iron and manganese concentrations after filtration with aeration came down to 0.1123, 0.05 mg/L respectively in all cases from an initial concentration of 1.14, 0.34 mg/L respectively. Advantages of such treatment unit included simplicity, low cost design, and no need for chemical addition. In addition, the only maintenance required was periodic washing of the sand filter or replacement of the sand in order to maintain reasonable flow rate through the system.

  19. Water resources of Beaver Valley, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, Willis Thomas

    1908-01-01

    Location and extent of area examined. Beaver Valley is located in Beaver County, in southwestern Utah, about 175 miles south of Salt Lake. It lies between the Tushar Mountains on the east and the Beaver Mountains on the west. The principal town of the valley is Beaver, which is most conveniently reached from Milford, a station on the San Pedro, Los Angeles and Salt Lake Railroad. The valley, together with its neighboring highlands, occupies the eastern third of Beaver County, an area of about 1,200 square miles. A large part of this area, however, is rocky upland and unproductive desert, the tillable land comprising a comparatively small area in the immediate vicinity of the streams.Purpose and scope of work. The purpose of this paper is to present information concerning the waters of Beaver Valley and to point out ways and means of increasing their usefulness. The presence of a large amount of water in Beaver Valley results from local topograhic conditions, the water being supplied by precipitation in the highland to the east. Its conservation and distribution result from geologic conditions, the water being held in loose gravel and sand, which are more or less confined between ridges of consolidated rocks. The rock basins were formed partly by erosion and partly by faulting and surface deformation. In order to accomplish the purpose in view it is therefore necessary to describe the geographic and geologic conditions in Beaver Valley and neighboring regions.The investigation included the determination of the flow of streams and springs, of the manner of occurrence and quantity of the underground waters as shown by the geologic and geographic conditions of the region and by the distribution of springs and wells, and of the chemical character of the waters with reference to their adaptability to domestic use and to irrigation. The chemical data were obtained (a) by field assays, which are approximately correct and probably of sufficient accuracy to be of value in

  20. Dawn in the Apollo Valley

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-12-18

    Beam Wave Guide antennas at Goldstone, known as the Beam Waveguide Cluster. They are located in an area at Goldstone called Apollo Valley. The Goldstone Deep Space Communications Complex is located in the Mojave Desert in California, USA.

  1. Triggered surface slips in the Coachella Valley area associated with the 1992 Joshua Tree and Landers, California, Earthquakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rymer, M.J.

    2000-01-01

    The Coachella Valley area was strongly shaken by the 1992 Joshua Tree (23 April) and Landers (28 June) earthquakes, and both events caused triggered slip on active faults within the area. Triggered slip associated with the Joshua Tree earthquake was on a newly recognized fault, the East Wide Canyon fault, near the southwestern edge of the Little San Bernardino Mountains. Slip associated with the Landers earthquake formed along the San Andreas fault in the southeastern Coachella Valley. Surface fractures formed along the East Wide Canyon fault in association with the Joshua Tree earthquake. The fractures extended discontinuously over a 1.5-km stretch of the fault, near its southern end. Sense of slip was consistently right-oblique, west side down, similar to the long-term style of faulting. Measured offset values were small, with right-lateral and vertical components of slip ranging from 1 to 6 mm and 1 to 4 mm, respectively. This is the first documented historic slip on the East Wide Canyon fault, which was first mapped only months before the Joshua Tree earthquake. Surface slip associated with the Joshua Tree earthquake most likely developed as triggered slip given its 5 km distance from the Joshua Tree epicenter and aftershocks. As revealed in a trench investigation, slip formed in an area with only a thin (<3 m thick) veneer of alluvium in contrast to earlier documented triggered slip events in this region, all in the deep basins of the Salton Trough. A paleoseismic trench study in an area of 1992 surface slip revealed evidence of two and possibly three surface faulting events on the East Wide Canyon fault during the late Quaternary, probably latest Pleistocene (first event) and mid- to late Holocene (second two events). About two months after the Joshua Tree earthquake, the Landers earthquake then triggered slip on many faults, including the San Andreas fault in the southeastern Coachella Valley. Surface fractures associated with this event formed discontinuous

  2. Color Image of Death Valley, California from SIR-C

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-09-27

    This radar image shows the area of Death Valley, California and the different surface types in the area. Radar is sensitive to surface roughness with rough areas showing up brighter than smooth areas, which appear dark.

  3. Rates of evapotranspiration, recharge from precipitation beneath selected areas of native vegetation, and streamflow gain and loss in Carson Valley, Douglas County, Nevada, and Alpine County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Maurer, Douglas K.; Berger, David L.; Tumbusch, Mary L.; Johnson, Michael J.

    2006-01-01

    Rapid growth and development in Carson Valley is causing concern over the continued availability of water resources to sustain such growth into the future. A study to address concerns over water resources and to update estimates of water-budget components in Carson Valley was begun in 2003 by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with Douglas County, Nevada. This report summarizes micrometeorologic, soil-chloride, and streambed-temperature data collected in Carson Valley from April 2003 through November 2004. Using these data, estimates of rates of discharge by evapotranspiration (ET), rates of recharge from precipitation in areas of native vegetation on the eastern and northern sides of the valley, and rates of recharge and discharge from streamflow infiltration and seepage on the valley floor were calculated. These rates can be used to develop updated water budgets for Carson Valley and to evaluate potential effects of land- and water-use changes on the valley's water budget. Data from eight ET stations provided estimates of annual ET during water year 2004, the sixth consecutive year of a drought with average or below average precipitation since 1999. Estimated annual ET from flood-irrigated alfalfa where the water table was from 3 to 6 feet below land surface was 3.1 feet. A similar amount of ET, 3.0 feet, was estimated from flood-irrigated alfalfa where the water table was about 40 feet below land surface. Estimated annual ET from flood-irrigated pasture ranged from 2.8 to 3.2 feet where the water table ranged from 2 to 5 feet below land surface, and was 4.4 feet where the water table was within 2 feet from land surface. Annual ET estimated from nonirrigated pasture was 1.7 feet. Annual ET estimated from native vegetation was 1.9 feet from stands of rabbitbrush and greasewood near the northern end of the valley, and 1.5 feet from stands of native bitterbrush and sagebrush covering alluvial fans along the western side of the valley. Uncertainty in most ET

  4. Reflections upon the Development of a Dementia Screening Service for Individuals with Down's Syndrome across the Hyndburn and Ribble Valley Area

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cairns, Victoria; Lamb, Isobel; Smith, Esther

    2011-01-01

    The high prevalence of dementia in individuals with Down's syndrome has led learning disability services in the Hyndburn and Ribble Valley (HRV) area to develop a screening service to address this need; this paper offers reflections upon this process by its members after the first 12 months of operation. A multidisciplinary team comprising…

  5. Solar energy innovation and Silicon Valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    2015-03-01

    The growth of the U. S. and global solar energy industry depends on a strong relationship between science and engineering innovation, manufacturing, and cycles of policy design and advancement. The mixture of the academic and industrial engine of innovation that is Silicon Valley, and the strong suite of environmental policies for which California is a leader work together to both drive the solar energy industry, and keep Silicon Valley competitive as China, Europe and other area of solar energy strength continue to build their clean energy sectors.

  6. Water resources of Parowan Valley, Iron County, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marston, Thomas M.

    2017-08-29

    . Groundwater flows from the high-altitude recharge areas downward toward the basin-fill aquifer in Parowan Valley. Almost all groundwater discharge occurs as withdrawals from irrigation wells in the valley with a small amount of discharge from phreatophytic evapotranspiration. Subsurface groundwater discharge to Cedar Valley is likely minimal. Withdrawals from wells during 2013 were about 32,000 acre-ft. The estimated withdrawals from wells from 1994 to 2013 have ranged from 22,000 to 39,000 acre-ft per year. Declining water levels are an indication of the estimated average annual decrease in groundwater storage of 15,000 acre-ft from 1994 to 2013.Groundwater and surface-water samples were collected from 46 sites in Parowan Valley and Cedar Valley near the town of Enoch during June 2013. Groundwater samples from 34 wells were submitted for geochemical analysis. The total dissolved-solids concentration in water from these wells ranged from 142 to 886 milligrams per liter. Results of stable isotope analysis of oxygen and deuterium from groundwater and surface-water samples indicate that most of the groundwater in Parowan Valley and in Cedar Valley near Enoch is similar in isotopic composition to water from mountain streams, which reflects meteoric water recharged in high-altitude areas east of the valley. In addition, results of stable isotope analysis of a subset of samples from wells located near Little Salt Lake may indicate recharge of precipitation that occurred during cooler climatic conditions of the Pleistocene Epoch.

  7. Groundwater quality in the Indian Wells Valley, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dawson, Barbara J. Milby; Belitz, Kenneth

    2012-01-01

    Groundwater provides more than 40 percent of California’s drinking water. To protect this vital resource, the State of California created the Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The Priority Basin Project of the GAMA Program provides a comprehensive assessment of the State’s groundwater quality and increases public access to groundwater-quality information. Indian Wells Valley is one of the study areas being evaluated. The Indian Wells study area is approximately 600 square miles (1,554 square kilometers) and includes the Indian Wells Valley groundwater basin (California Department of Water Resources, 2003). Indian Wells Valley has an arid climate and is part of the Mojave Desert. Average annual rainfall is about 6 inches (15 centimeters). The study area has internal drainage, with runoff from the surrounding mountains draining towards dry lake beds in the lower parts of the valley. Land use in the study area is approximately 97.0 percent (%) natural, 0.4% agricultural, and 2.6% urban. The primary natural land cover is shrubland. The largest urban area is the city of Ridgecrest (2010 population of 28,000). Groundwater in this basin is used for public and domestic water supply and for irrigation. The main water-bearing units are gravel, sand, silt, and clay derived from the Sierra Nevada to the west and from the other surrounding mountains. Recharge to the groundwater system is primarily runoff from the Sierra Nevada and to the west and from the other surrounding mountains. Recharge to the groundwater system is primarily runoff from the Sierra Nevada and direct infiltration from irrigation and septic systems. The primary sources of discharge are pumping wells and evapotranspiration near the dry lakebeds. The primary aquifers in the Indian Wells study area are defined as those parts of the aquifers corresponding to the perforated intervals of wells listed in the California Department of Public Health database. Public-supply wells in

  8. Lithologic controls on valley width and strath terrace formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schanz, Sarah A.; Montgomery, David R.

    2016-04-01

    Valley width and the degree of bedrock river terrace development vary with lithology in the Willapa and Nehalem river basins, Pacific Northwest, USA. Here, we present field-based evidence for the mechanisms by which lithology controls floodplain width and bedrock terrace formation in erosion-resistant and easily friable lithologies. We mapped valley surfaces in both basins, dated straths using radiocarbon, compared valley width versus drainage area for basalt and sedimentary bedrock valleys, and constructed slope-area plots. In the friable sedimentary bedrock, valleys are 2 to 3 times wider, host flights of strath terraces, and have concavity values near 1; whereas the erosion-resistant basalt bedrock forms narrow valleys with poorly developed, localized, or no bedrock terraces and a channel steepness index half that of the friable bedrock and an average channel concavity of about 0.5. The oldest dated strath terrace on the Willapa River, T2, was active for nearly 10,000 years, from 11,265 to 2862 calibrated years before present (cal YBP), whereas the youngest terrace, T1, is Anthropocene in age and recently abandoned. Incision rates derived from terrace ages average 0.32 mm y- 1 for T2 and 11.47 mm y- 1 for T1. Our results indicate bedrock weathering properties influence valley width through the creation of a dense fracture network in the friable bedrock that results in high rates of lateral erosion of exposed bedrock banks. Conversely, the erosion-resistant bedrock has concavity values more typical of detachment-limited streams, exhibits a sparse fracture network, and displays evidence for infrequent episodic block erosion and plucking. Lithology thereby plays a direct role on the rates of lateral erosion, influencing valley width and the potential for strath terrace planation and preservation.

  9. Simulation of Ground-Water Flow and Areas Contributing Recharge to Production Wells in Contrasting Glacial Valley-Fill Settings, Rhode Island

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Friesz, Paul J.; Stone, Janet Radway

    2007-01-01

    Areas contributing recharge and sources of water to a production well field in the Village of Harrisville and to a production well field in the Town of Richmond were delineated on the basis of calibrated, steady-state ground-water-flow models representing average hydrologic conditions. The study sites represent contrasting glacial valley-fill settings. The area contributing recharge to a well is defined as the surface area where water recharges the ground water and then flows toward and discharges to the well. In Harrisville, the production well field is composed of three wells in a narrow, approximately 0.5-mile-wide, valley-fill setting on opposite sides of Batty Brook, a small intermittent stream that drains 0.64 square mile at its confluence with the Clear River. Glacial stratified deposits are generally less areally extensive than previously published. The production wells are screened in a thin (30 feet) but transmissive aquifer. Paired measurements of ground-water and surface-water levels indicated that the direction of flow between the brook and the aquifer was generally downward during pumping conditions. Long-term mean annual streamflow from two streams upgradient of the well field totaled 0.72 cubic feet per second. The simulated area contributing recharge for the 2005 average well-field withdrawal rate of 224 gallons per minute extended upgradient to ground-water divides in upland areas and encompassed 0.17 square mile. The well field derived 62 percent of pumped water from intercepted ground water and 38 percent from infiltrated stream water from the Batty Brook watershed. For the maximum simulated well-field withdrawal of 600 gallons per minute, the area contributing recharge expanded to 0.44 square mile to intercept additional ground water and infiltration of stream water; the percentage of water derived from surface water, however, was the same as for the average pumping rate. Because of the small size of Batty Brook watershed, most of the

  10. Groundwater-level change and evaluation of simulated water levels for irrigated areas in Lahontan Valley, Churchill County, west-central Nevada, 1992 to 2012

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, David W.; Buto, Susan G.; Welborn, Toby L.

    2016-09-14

    The acquisition and transfer of water rights to wetland areas of Lahontan Valley, Nevada, has caused concern over the potential effects on shallow aquifer water levels. In 1992, water levels in Lahontan Valley were measured to construct a water-table map of the shallow aquifer prior to the effects of water-right transfers mandated by the Fallon Paiute-Shoshone Tribal Settlement Act of 1990 (Public Law 101-618, 104 Stat. 3289). From 1992 to 2012, approximately 11,810 water-righted acres, or 34,356 acre-feet of water, were acquired and transferred to wetland areas of Lahontan Valley. This report documents changes in water levels measured during the period of water-right transfers and presents an evaluation of five groundwater-flow model scenarios that simulated water-level changes in Lahontan Valley in response to water-right transfers and a reduction in irrigation season length by 50 percent.Water levels measured in 98 wells from 2012 to 2013 were used to construct a water-table map. Water levels in 73 of the 98 wells were compared with water levels measured in 1992 and used to construct a water-level change map. Water-level changes in the 73 wells ranged from -16.2 to 4.1 feet over the 20-year period. Rises in water levels in Lahontan Valley may correspond to annual changes in available irrigation water, increased canal flows after the exceptionally dry and shortened irrigation season of 1992, and the increased conveyance of water rights transferred to Stillwater National Wildlife Refuge. Water-level declines generally occurred near the boundary of irrigated areas and may be associated with groundwater pumping, water-right transfers, and inactive surface-water storage reservoirs. The largest water-level declines were in the area near Carson Lake.Groundwater-level response to water-right transfers was evaluated by comparing simulated and observed water-level changes for periods representing water-right transfers and a shortened irrigation season in areas near Fallon

  11. Gravity Data from Newark Valley, White Pine County, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mankinen, Edward A.; McKee, Edwin H.

    2007-01-01

    The Newark Valley area, eastern Nevada is one of thirteen major ground-water basins investigated by the BARCAS (Basin and Range Carbonate Aquifer Study) Project. Gravity data are being used to help characterize the geophysical framework of the region. Although gravity coverage was extensive over parts of the BARCAS study area, data were sparse for a number of the valleys, including the northern part of Newark Valley. We addressed this lack of data by establishing seventy new gravity stations in and around Newark Valley. All available gravity data were then evaluated to determine their reliability, prior to calculating an isostatic residual gravity map to be used for subsequent analyses. A gravity inversion method was used to calculate depths to pre-Cenozoic basement rock and estimates of maximum alluvial/volcanic fill. The enhanced gravity coverage and the incorporation of lithologic information from several deep oil and gas wells yields a view of subsurface shape of the basin and will provide information useful for the development of hydrogeologic models for the region.

  12. Scaling relationships and concavity of small valley networks on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penido, Julita C.; Fassett, Caleb I.; Som, Sanjoy M.

    2013-01-01

    Valley networks are widely interpreted as the preserved erosional record of water flowing across the martian surface. The manner in which valley morphometric properties scale with drainage area has been widely examined on Earth. Earlier studies assessing these properties on Mars have suggested that martian valleys are morphometrically distinct from those on Earth. However, these earlier measurements were generally made on large valley systems because of the limited topographic data available. In this study, we determine the scaling properties of valley networks at smaller scales than have been previously assessed, using digital elevation models from the High Resolution Stereo Camera (HRSC). We find a Hack's law exponent of 0.74, larger than on Earth, and our measurements also reveal that individual small valleys have concave up, concave down, and quasi-linear longitudinal profiles, consistent with earlier studies of dissected terrain on Mars. However, for many valleys, widths are observed to increase downstream similarly to how they scale in terrestrial channels. The similarities and differences between valley networks on Mars and Earth are consistent with the idea that valleys on Mars are comparatively immature, and precipitation was a likely mechanism for delivering water to these networks.

  13. Recharge of valley-fill aquifers in the glaciated northeast from upland runoff

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, J.H.; Morrissey, D.J.

    1996-01-01

    Channeled and unchanneled runoff from till-covered bedrock uplands is a major source of recharge to valley-fill aquifers in the glaciated northeastern United States. Streamflow measurements and model simulation of average steady-state conditions indicate that upland runoff accounted for more recharge to two valley-fill aquifers in moderately high topographic-relief settings than did direct infiltration of precipitation. Recharge from upland runoff to a modeled valley-fill aquifer in an area of lower relief was significant but less than that from direct infiltration of precipitation. The amount of upland runoff available for recharging valley-fill aquifers in the glaciated Northeast ranges from about 1.5 to 2.5 cubic feet per second per square mile of drainage area that borders the aquifer. Stream losses from tributaries that drain the uplands commonly range from 0.3 to 1.5 cubic feet per second per 1,000 feet of wetted channel where the tributaries cross alluvial fans in the main valleys. Recharge of valley-fill aquifers from channeled runoff was estimated from measured losses and average runoff rates and was represented in aquifer models as specified fluxes or simulated by head-dependent fluxes with streamflow routing in the model cells that represent the tributary streams. Unchanneled upland runoff, which includes overland and subsurface flow, recharges the valley-fill aquifers at the contact between the aquifer and uplands near the base of the bordering till-covered hillslopes. Recharge from unchanneled runoff was estimated from average runoff rates and the hillslope area that borders the aquifer and was represented as specified fluxes to model-boundary cells along the valley walls.

  14. Meteorology drives ambient air quality in a valley: a case of Sukinda chromite mine, one among the ten most polluted areas in the world.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Soumya Ranjan; Pradhan, Rudra Pratap; Prusty, B Anjan Kumar; Sahu, Sanjat Kumar

    2016-07-01

    The ambient air quality (AAQ) assessment was undertaken in Sukinda Valley, the chromite hub of India. The possible correlations of meteorological variables with different air quality parameters (PM10, PM2.5, SO2, NO2 and CO) were examined. Being the fourth most polluted area in the globe, Sukinda Valley has always been under attention of researchers, for hexavalent chromium contamination of water. The monitoring was carried out from December 2013 through May 2014 at six strategic locations in the residential and commercial areas around the mining cluster of Sukinda Valley considering the guidelines of Central Pollution Control Board (CPCB). In addition, meteorological parameters viz., temperature, relative humidity, wind speed, wind direction and rainfall, were also monitored. The air quality data were subjected to a general linear model (GLM) coupled with one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) test for testing the significant difference in the concentration of various parameters among seasons and stations. Further, a two-tailed Pearson's correlation test helped in understanding the influence of meteorological parameters on dispersion of pollutants in the area. All the monitored air quality parameters varied significantly among the monitoring stations suggesting (i) the distance of sampling location to the mine site and other allied activities, (ii) landscape features and topography and (iii) meteorological parameters to be the forcing functions. The area was highly polluted with particulate matters, and in most of the cases, the PM level exceeded the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS). The meteorological parameters seemed to play a major role in the dispersion of pollutants around the mine clusters. The role of wind direction, wind speed and temperature was apparent in dispersion of the particulate matters from their source of generation to the surrounding residential and commercial areas of the mine.

  15. Evidence for precipitation on Mars from dendritic valleys in the Valles Marineris area.

    PubMed

    Mangold, Nicolas; Quantin, Cathy; Ansan, Véronique; Delacourt, Christophe; Allemand, Pascal

    2004-07-02

    Dendritic valleys on the plateau and canyons of the Valles Marineris region were identified from Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) images taken by Mars Odyssey. The geomorphic characteristics of these valleys, especially their high degree of branching, favor formation by atmospheric precipitation. The presence of inner channels and the maturity of the branched networks indicate sustained fluid flows over geologically long periods of time. These fluvial landforms occur within the Late Hesperian units (about 2.9 to 3.4 billion years old), when Mars was thought to have been cold. Our results suggest a period of warmer conditions conducive to hydrological activity.

  16. Diversity and cold adaptation of microorganisms isolated from the Schirmacher Oasis, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mojib, Nazia; Bej, Asim K.; Hoover, Richard

    2008-08-01

    We have investigated the feasibility of the PCR amplification of the 16S rRNA genes from eubacteria and Archea on samples collected on Whatman FTA filters from Schirmacher Oasis for the study of culture-independent analysis of the microbial diversity. Both conventional PCR and real-time TaqmaTM PCR successfully amplified the targeted genes. A number of diverse groups of psychrotolerant microorganisms with various pigments have been isolated when cultured on agar medium. 16S rRNA gene analysis of these isolates helped us to identify closest taxonomic genus Pseudomonas, Frigoribacterium, Arthrobacter, Flavobacterium, and Janthinobacterium. It is possible that the pigments play protective role from solar UV radiation, which is prevalent in Antarctic continent especially during Austral summer months. Study of the expression of cold adaptive protein CapB and ice-binding protein IBP using western blots showed positive detection of both or either of these proteins in 6 out of 8 isolates. Since the CapB and IBP protein structure greatly varies in microorganisms, it is possible that the 2 isolates with negative results could have a different class of these proteins. The expression of the CapB and the IBP in these isolates suggest that these proteins are essential for the survival in the Antarctic cold and subzero temperatures and protect themselves from freeze-damage. The current study provided sufficient data to further investigate the rich and diverse biota of psychrotolerant extremophiles in the Antarctic Schirmacher Oasis using both culture-independent and culture-based approaches; and understand the mechanisms of cold tolerance.

  17. Geologic Map of the Warm Spring Canyon Area, Death Valley National Park, Inyo County, California, With a Discussion of the Regional Significance of the Stratigraphy and Structure

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wrucke, Chester T.; Stone, Paul; Stevens, Calvin H.

    2007-01-01

    Warm Spring Canyon is located in the southeastern part of the Panamint Range in east-central California, 54 km south of Death Valley National Park headquarters at Furnace Creek Ranch. For the relatively small size of the area mapped (57 km2), an unusual variety of Proterozoic and Phanerozoic rocks is present. The outcrop distribution of these rocks largely resulted from movement on the east-west-striking, south-directed Butte Valley Thrust Fault of Jurassic age. The upper plate of the thrust fault comprises a basement of Paleoproterozoic schist and gneiss overlain by a thick sequence of Mesoproterozoic and Neoproterozoic rocks, the latter of which includes diamictite generally considered to be of glacial origin. The lower plate is composed of Devonian to Permian marine formations overlain by Jurassic volcanic and sedimentary rocks. Late Jurassic or Early Cretaceous plutons intrude rocks of the area, and one pluton intrudes the Butte Valley Thrust Fault. Low-angle detachment faults of presumed Tertiary age underlie large masses of Neoproterozoic dolomite in parts of the area. Movement on these faults predated emplacement of middle Miocene volcanic rocks in deep, east-striking paleovalleys. Excellent exposures of all the rocks and structural features in the area result from sparse vegetation in the dry desert climate and from deep erosion along Warm Spring Canyon and its tributaries.

  18. Surficial Geologic Map of the Death Valley Junction 30' x 60' Quadrangle, California and Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Slate, Janet L.; Berry, Margaret E.; Menges, Christopher M.

    2009-01-01

    This surficial geologic map of the Death Valley Junction 30' x 60' quadrangle was compiled digitally at 1:100,000 scale. The map area covers the central part of Death Valley and adjacent mountain ranges - the Panamint Range on the west and the Funeral Mountains on the east - as well as areas east of Death Valley including some of the Amargosa Desert, the Spring Mountains and Pahrump Valley. Shaded relief delineates the topography and appears as gray tones in the mountain ranges where the bedrock is undifferentiated and depicted as a single unit.

  19. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 9): San Fernando Valley (Area 1), CA. (Second Remedial Action), June 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-06-30

    The San Fernando Valley Basin (SFVB) Area 1 site is one of four Superfund sites (including SFVB Areas 2, 3, and 4) being remediated as one large site. The SFVB lies within the approximately 32B,500-acre Upper Los Angeles River area. The remedial action is for the Burbank Well Field operable unit of the SFVB Area 1 site, located within the city of Burbank, California, and addresses a portion of the overall ground-water problem in the SFVB Areas 1, 2, 3, and 4 sites. The primary contaminants of concern are VOCs including TCE and PCE. The selected remedial action for themore » site includes pumping and treatment of ground water contaminated with TCE exceeding 100 microg/l or PCE exceeding 5 microg/l using air or stream stripping, with vapor phase GAC adsorption units if air stripping is used, and discharge to the municipal-water-supply distribution system; and ground water monitoring.« less

  20. Hydrology of Northern Utah Valley, Utah County, Utah, 1975-2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cederberg, Jay R.; Gardner, Philip M.; Thiros, Susan A.

    2009-01-01

    The ground-water resources of northern Utah Valley, Utah, were assessed during 2003-05 to describe and quantify components of the hydrologic system, determine a hydrologic budget for the basin-fill aquifer, and evaluate changes to the system relative to previous studies. Northern Utah Valley is a horst and graben structure with ground water occurring in both the mountain-block uplands surrounding the valley and in the unconsolidated basin-fill sediments. The principal aquifer in northern Utah Valley occurs in the unconsolidated basin-fill deposits where a deeper unconfined aquifer occurs near the mountain front and laterally grades into multiple confined aquifers near the center of the valley. Sources of water to the basin-fill aquifers occur predominantly as either infiltration of streamflow at or near the interface of the mountain front and valley or as subsurface inflow from the adjacent mountain blocks. Sources of water to the basin-fill aquifers were estimated to average 153,000 (+/- 31,500) acre-feet annually during 1975-2004 with subsurface inflow and infiltration of streamflow being the predominant sources. Discharge from the basin-fill aquifers occurs in the valley lowlands as flow to waterways, drains, ditches, springs, as diffuse seepage, and as discharge from flowing and pumping wells. Ground-water discharge from the basin-fill aquifers during 1975-2004 was estimated to average 166,700 (+/- 25,900) acre-feet/year where discharge to wells for consumptive use and discharge to waterways, drains, ditches, and springs were the principal sources. Measured water levels in wells in northern Utah Valley declined an average of 22 feet from 1981 to 2004. Water-level declines are consistent with a severe regional drought beginning in 1999 and continuing through 2004. Water samples were collected from 36 wells and springs throughout the study area along expected flowpaths. Water samples collected from 34 wells were analyzed for dissolved major ions, nutrients, and

  1. Valley-dependent band structure and valley polarization in periodically modulated graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Wei-Tao

    2016-08-01

    The valley-dependent energy band and transport property of graphene under a periodic magnetic-strained field are studied, where the time-reversal symmetry is broken and the valley degeneracy is lifted. The considered superlattice is composed of two different barriers, providing more degrees of freedom for engineering the electronic structure. The electrons near the K and K' valleys are dominated by different effective superlattices. It is found that the energy bands for both valleys are symmetric with respect to ky=-(AM+ξ AS) /4 under the symmetric superlattices. More finite-energy Dirac points, more prominent collimation behavior, and new crossing points are found for K' valley. The degenerate miniband near the K valley splits into two subminibands and produces a new band gap under the asymmetric superlattices. The velocity for the K' valley is greatly renormalized compared with the K valley, and so we can achieve a finite velocity for the K valley while the velocity for the K' valley is zero. Especially, the miniband and band gap could be manipulated independently, leading to an increase of the conductance. The characteristics of the band structure are reflected in the transmission spectra. The Dirac points and the crossing points appear as pronounced peaks in transmission. A remarkable valley polarization is obtained which is robust to the disorder and can be controlled by the strain, the period, and the voltage.

  2. Hydrology of the San Luis Valley, south-central Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Emery, P.A.; Boettcher, A.J.; Snipes, R.J.; Mcintyre, H.J.

    1969-01-01

    An investigation of the water resources of the Colorado part of the San Luis Valley was begun in 1966 by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Colorado Water Conservation Board. (See index map, fig. 1). The purpose of the investigation is to provide information for planning and implementing improved water-development and management practices. The major water problems in the San Luis Valley include (1) waterlogging, (2) waste of water by nonbeneficial evapotranspiration, (3) deterioration of ground-water chemical quality, and (4) failure of Colorado to deliver water to New Mexico and Texas in accordance with the Rio Grande Compact. This report describes the hydrologic environment, extent of water-resource development, and some of the problems related to that development. Information presented is based on data collected from 1966 to 1968 and on previous studies. Subsequent reports are planned as the investigation progresses. The San Luis Valley extends about 100 miles from Poncha Pass near the northeast corner of Saguache County, Colo., to a point about 16 miles south of the Colorado-New Mexico State line. The total area is 3,125 square miles, of which about 3,000 are in Colorado. The valley is nearly flat except for the San Luis Hills and a few other small areas. The Colorado part of the San Luis Valley, which is described in this report, has an average altitude of about 7,700 feet. Bounding the valley on the west are the San Juan Mountains and on the east the Sangre de Cristo Mountains. Most of the valley floor is bordered by alluvial fans deposited by streams originating in the mountains, the most extensive being the Rio Grande fan (see block diagram, fig. 2 in pocket). Most of the streamflow is derived from snowmelt from 4,700 square miles of watershed in the surrounding mountains. The northern half of the San Luis Valley is internally drained and is referred to as the closed basin. The lowest part of this area is known locally as the "sump." The

  3. Hydrologic reconnaissance of Curlew Valley, Utah and Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bolke, E.L.; Price, Don

    1969-01-01

    This report is the fifth in a series of reports prepared by the U. S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Utah Department of Natural Resources, Division of Water Rights, that describe the water resources of selected basins in western Utah. Previously published reports in this series are listed on page 35 and the areas covered by them are shown in figure 1. The purpose of this report is to present available hydrologic data on the Utah part of Curlew Valley, to provide an evaluation of the potential water-resource development of the valley, and to identify needed studies that would help provide an understanding of the valley's water supply.

  4. User's Guide to OASIS, Oceanic and Atmospheric Scientific Information System. Key to Oceanic and Atmospheric Information Sources No. 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (DOC), Washington, DC. Environmental Data Service.

    OASIS (Oceanic and Atmospheric Scientific Information System) is an information retrieval service that furnishes ready reference to the technical literature and research efforts concerning the environmental sciences and marine and coastal resources. It provides computerized searches of both NOAA (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration)…

  5. A summary of the geology and mineral resources of the Paris Plateau-House Rock Valley area, Coconino County, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Green, Morris W.; Pierson, C.T.; Bauer, D.P.; Umshler, D.B.

    1977-01-01

    The Paria Plateau-House Rock Valley area of north-central Arizona is located on the southwestern edge Of the Colorado Plateau physiographic province in an area underlain by about 5,000 meters of fossiliferous marine and continental sedimentary rock ranging in age from Precambrian through Quaternary. The area, which lies north of the Grand and Marble Canyons, is bounded on the west by the East Kaibab monocline and on the east by the Echo monocline. The Paria Plateau, bounded on the South by the scenic Vermilion Cliffs, is composed of continental red-beds of Triassic and Jurassic age, which dip gently northward at 2? to ? away from the north end of the Marble Platform upon which the Paria Plateau sits.

  6. Groundwater quality in the Monterey Bay and Salinas Valley groundwater basins, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kulongoski, Justin T.; Belitz, Kenneth

    2011-01-01

    The Monterey-Salinas study unit is nearly 1,000 square miles and consists of the Santa Cruz Purisima Formation Highlands, Felton Area, Scotts Valley, Soquel Valley, West Santa Cruz Terrace, Salinas Valley, Pajaro Valley, and Carmel Valley groundwater basins (California Department of Water Resources, 2003; Kulongski and Belitz, 2011). These basins were grouped into four study areas based primarily on geography. Groundwater basins in the north were grouped into the Santa Cruz study area, and those to the south were grouped into the Monterey Bay, the Salinas Valley, and the Paso Robles study areas (Kulongoski and others, 2007). The study unit has warm, dry summers and cool, moist winters. Average annual rainfall ranges from 31 inches in Santa Cruz in the north to 13 inches in Paso Robles in the south. The study areas are drained by several rivers and their principal tributaries: the Salinas, Pajaro, and Carmel Rivers, and San Lorenzo Creek. The Salinas Valley is a large intermontane valley that extends southeastward from Monterey Bay to Paso Robles. It has been filled, up to a thickness of 2,000 feet, with Tertiary and Quaternary marine and terrestrial sediments that overlie granitic basement. The Miocene-age Monterey Formation and Pliocene- to Pleistocene-age Paso Robles Formation, and Pleistocene to Holocene-age alluvium contain freshwater used for supply. The primary aquifers in the study unit are defined as those parts of the aquifers corresponding to the perforated intervals of wells listed in the California Department of Public Health database. Public-supply wells are typically drilled to depths of 200 to 650 feet, consist of solid casing from the land surface to depths of about 175 to 500 feet, and are perforated below the solid casing. Water quality in the primary aquifers may differ from that in the shallower and deeper parts of the aquifer system. Groundwater movement is generally from the southern part of the Salinas Valley north towards the Monterey Bay

  7. GIS- and field based mapping of geomorphological changes in a glacier retreat area: A case study from the Kromer valley, Silvretta Alps (Austria)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guttmann, Markus; Pöppl, Ronald

    2017-04-01

    Global warming results in an ongoing retreat of Alpine glaciers, leaving behind large amounts of easily erodible sediments. As a consequence processes like rockfalls, landslides and debris flows as well as fluvial processes occur more frequently in pro- and paraglacial areas, often involving catastrophic consequences for humans and infrastructure in the affected valleys. The main objective of the presented work was to map and spatially quantify glacier retreat and geomorphological changes in the Kromer valley, Silvretta Alps (Austria) by applying GIS- and field-based geomorphological mapping. In total six geomorphological maps (1950s, 1970s, 2001, 2006, 2012, and 2016) were produced and analyzed in the light of the study aim. First results have shown a significant decrease of total glaciated area from 96 ha to 53 ha which was accompanied by increased proglacial geomorphic activity (i.e. fluvial processes, rockfalls, debris flows, shallow landslides) in the last 15 years. More detailed results will be presented at the EGU General Assembly 2017.

  8. Appraisal of the water resources of Death Valley, California-Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, Glenn Allen

    1977-01-01

    The hydrologic system in Death Valley is probably in a steady-state condition--that is, recharge and discharge are equal, and net changes in the quantity of ground water in storage are not occurring. Recharge to ground water in the valley is derived from interbasin underflow and from local precipitation. The two sources may be of the same magnitude. Ground water beneath the valley moves toward the lowest area, a 200-square-mile saltpan, much of which is underlain by rock salt and other saline minerals, probably to depths of hundreds of feet or even more than 1,000 feet. Some water discharges from the saltpan by evaportranspiration. Water beneath the valley floor, excluding the saltpan, typically contains between 3,000 and 5,000 milligrams per liter of dissolved solids. Water from most springs and seeps in the mountains contains a few hundred to several hundred milligrams per liter of dissolved solids. Water from large springs that probably discharge from interbasin flow systems typically contains between 500 and 1,000 milligrams per liter dissolved solids. Present sites of intensive use by man are supplied by springs, with the exception of the Stovepipe Wells Hotel area. Potential sources of supply for this area include (1) Emigrant Spring area, (2) Cottonwood Spring, and (3) northern Mesquite Flat. (Woodard-USGS)

  9. The Imperial Valley of California is critical to wintering Mountain Plovers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wunder, Michael B.; Knopf, F.L.

    2003-01-01

    We surveyed Mountain Plovers (Charadrius montanus) wintering in the Imperial Valley of California in January 2001, and also recorded the types of crop fields used by plovers in this agricultural landscape. We tallied 4037 plovers in 36 flocks ranging in size from 4 to 596 birds. Plovers were more common on alfalfa and Bermudagrass fields than other field types. Further, most birds were on alfalfa fields that were currently being (or had recently been) grazed, primarily by domestic sheep. Plovers used Bermudagrass fields only after harvest and subsequent burning. Examination of Christmas Bird Count data from 1950–2000 indicated that the Mountain Plover has abandoned its historical wintering areas on the coastal plains of California. Numbers in the Central Valley seem to have undergone recent declines also. We believe that the cultivated landscape of the Imperial Valley provides wintering habitats for about half of the global population of Mountain Plovers. We attribute the current importance of the Imperial Valley for Mountain Plovers to loss of native coastal and Central Valley habitats rather than to a behavioral switching of wintering areas through time. Future changes in specific cropping or management practices in the Imperial Valley will have a major impact on the conservation status of this species.

  10. Hydrogeologic framework of the Wood River Valley aquifer system, south-central Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bartolino, James R.; Adkins, Candice B.

    2012-01-01

    The Wood River Valley contains most of the population of Blaine County and the cities of Sun Valley, Ketchum, Hailey, and Bellevue. This mountain valley is underlain by the alluvial Wood River Valley aquifer system, which consists primarily of a single unconfined aquifer that underlies the entire valley, an underlying confined aquifer that is present only in the southernmost valley, and the confining unit that separates them. The entire population of the area depends on groundwater for domestic supply, either from domestic or municipal-supply wells, and rapid population growth since the 1970s has caused concern about the long-term sustainability of the groundwater resource. As part of an ongoing U.S. Geological Survey effort to characterize the groundwater resources of the Wood River Valley, this report describes the hydrogeologic framework of the Wood River Valley aquifer system. Although most of the Wood River Valley aquifer system is composed of Quaternary-age sediments and basalts of the Wood River Valley and its tributaries, older igneous, sedimentary, or metamorphic rocks that underlie these Quaternary deposits also are used for water supply. It is unclear to what extent these rocks are hydraulically connected to the main part of Wood River Valley aquifer system and thus whether they constitute separate aquifers. Paleozoic sedimentary rocks in and near the study area that produce water to wells and springs are the Phi Kappa and Trail Creek Formations (Ordovician and Silurian), the Milligen Formation (Devonian), and the Sun Valley Group including the Wood River Formation (Pennsylvanian-Permian) and the Dollarhide Formation (Permian). These sedimentary rocks are intruded by granitic rocks of the Late Cretaceous Idaho batholith. Eocene Challis Volcanic Group rocks overlie all of the older rocks (except where removed by erosion). Miocene Idavada Volcanics are found in the southern part of the study area. Most of these rocks have been folded, faulted, and

  11. Home destruction examination: Grass Valley Fire, Lake Arrowhead, California

    Treesearch

    Jack D. Cohen; Richard D. Stratton

    2008-01-01

    The Grass Valley Fire started October 22, 2007 at approximately 0508, one-mile west of Lake Arrowhead in the San Bernardino Mountains. Fuel and weather conditions were extreme due to drought, dry Santa Ana winds, and chaparral and conifer vegetation on steep terrain. The fire proceeded south through the Grass Valley drainage one-mile before impacting an area of dense...

  12. Rock-fall potential in the Yosemite Valley, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wieczorek, G.F.; Morrissey, M.M.; Iovine, Giulio; Godt, Jonathan

    1999-01-01

    We used two methods of estimating rock-fall potential in the Yosemite Valley, California based on (1) physical evidence of previous rock-fall travel, in which the potential extends to the base of the talus, and (2) theoretical potential energy considerations, in which the potential can extend beyond the base of the talus, herein referred to as the rock-fall shadow. Rock falls in the valley commonly range in size from individual boulders of less than 1 m3 to moderate-sized falls with volumes of about 100,000 m3. Larger rock falls exceeding 100,000 m3, referred to as rock avalanches, are considered to be much less likely to occur based on the relatively few prehistoric rock-fall avalanche deposits in the Yosemite Valley. Because the valley has steep walls and is relatively narrow, there are no areas that are absolutely safe from large rock avalanches. The map shows areas of rock-fall potential, but does not predict when or how frequently a rock fall will occur. Consequently, neither the hazard in terms of probability of a rock fall at any specific location, nor the risk to people or facilities to such events can be assessed from this map.

  13. "Seeing Another/Seeing Oneself": Nondisabled Audiences' Perspectives on Disability in Two South Korean Films, "Oasis" (2002) and "Malaton" (2005)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woo, Chung Wan

    2012-01-01

    Using qualitative research methods, this dissertation closely examines discourses and representations of disability from the cinematic images of disabled characters and their families in two South Korean films, "Oasis" (C. Lee, 2002) and "Malaton" (Y. Jung, 2005) as well as from the responses of nineteen Korean graduate…

  14. Touristic infrastructure of municipalities in the border section of Bug valley's Dołhobyczów-Włodawa in the context of existing protected areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kałamucka, Wioletta; Kałamucki, Krzysztof

    2011-01-01

    This article presents results of research concerning tourist infrastructure in some districts located in the Bug river valley, in the context of protected areas. The territory examined includes 9 rural districts and 2 towns in the immediate neighborhood of the river. These administrative units are characterized by great natural value. Their total area is 687,7 km2 that makes 6,7% of the whole Lublin voivodship. On the other hand, the share of protected areas (without Natura 2000) is twice as high - 11,1%. Protected areas makes 37,6% of the territory under study. In some units, share of protected areas is very high: Dubienka - 72%, Horodło - 69,5%. In 2009 in the region examined there were 48 objects of collective accommodation - 16,8% of total number in the voivodship. 83,6% of all objects were situated in Włodawa. Characteristic feature of accommodation is seasonality. There are only 7 objects that functions the whole year and year-round lodging places (280) makes barely 9,3% of the totality. Comparing tourist management with presence of areas of the highest natural values, one can see strong correlation between these two indexes only in rural unit - Włodawa, located within the borders of Biosphere Reserves "Polesie Zachodnie" (West Polesie) In case of other units such a interdependance does not exist. On the contrary, there is opposite relation. In Dołhobyczów, Mircze, Horodło, where apart from areas of Natura 2000, in the Bug river valley landscapes protected areas and landscapes parks were created, tourist infrastructure is insignificant or even does not exist. The existence of large protected areas and natural value make it possible to develop various forms of environmentally friendly tourism - tourism qualified, especially fishing and canoeing, hiking, biking, nature education tourism. Tourist service centers should be located outside the valley. Due to the high natural values, caution is advisable to adapt the area for tourism. Such decisions should

  15. Habitat and Populations of the Valley Elderberry Longhorn Beetle Along the Sacramento River

    Treesearch

    F. Jordan Lang; James D. Jokerst; Gregory E. Sutter

    1989-01-01

    Prior to 1985, the valley elderberry longhorn beetle, a threatened species protected under the federal Endangered Species Act, was known only from northern California riparian areas along the American River and Putah Creek in the Sacramento Valley, and along several rivers in the northern San Joaquin Valley. During 1985-1987, our study extended the known range of the...

  16. Increased body mass of ducks wintering in California's Central Valley

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fleskes, Joseph P.; Yee, Julie L.; Yarris, Gregory S.; Loughman, Daniel L.

    2016-01-01

    Waterfowl managers lack the information needed to fully evaluate the biological effects of their habitat conservation programs. We studied body condition of dabbling ducks shot by hunters at public hunting areas throughout the Central Valley of California during 2006–2008 compared with condition of ducks from 1979 to 1993. These time periods coincide with habitat increases due to Central Valley Joint Venture conservation programs and changing agricultural practices; we modeled to ascertain whether body condition differed among waterfowl during these periods. Three dataset comparisons indicate that dabbling duck body mass was greater in 2006–2008 than earlier years and the increase was greater in the Sacramento Valley and Suisun Marsh than in the San Joaquin Valley, differed among species (mallard [Anas platyrhynchos], northern pintail [Anas acuta], America wigeon [Anas americana], green-winged teal [Anas crecca], and northern shoveler [Anas clypeata]), and was greater in ducks harvested late in the season. Change in body mass also varied by age–sex cohort and month for all 5 species and by September–January rainfall for all except green-winged teal. The random effect of year nested in period, and sometimes interacting with other factors, improved models in many cases. Results indicate that improved habitat conditions in the Central Valley have resulted in increased winter body mass of dabbling ducks, especially those that feed primarily on seeds, and this increase was greater in regions where area of post-harvest flooding of rice and other crops, and wetland area, has increased. Conservation programs that continue to promote post-harvest flooding and other agricultural practices that benefit wintering waterfowl and continue to restore and conserve wetlands would likely help maintain body condition of wintering dabbling ducks in the Central Valley of California.

  17. 40 CFR 81.48 - Champlain Valley Interstate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.48 Champlain Valley Interstate Air Quality Control Region. The Champlain Valley Interstate Air Quality Control Region (Vermont-New York) has been revised to consist of the...

  18. 40 CFR 81.48 - Champlain Valley Interstate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.48 Champlain Valley Interstate Air Quality Control Region. The Champlain Valley Interstate Air Quality Control Region (Vermont-New York) has been revised to consist of the...

  19. 40 CFR 81.48 - Champlain Valley Interstate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.48 Champlain Valley Interstate Air Quality Control Region. The Champlain Valley Interstate Air Quality Control Region (Vermont-New York) has been revised to consist of the...

  20. 40 CFR 81.48 - Champlain Valley Interstate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.48 Champlain Valley Interstate Air Quality Control Region. The Champlain Valley Interstate Air Quality Control Region (Vermont-New York) has been revised to consist of the...

  1. 40 CFR 81.48 - Champlain Valley Interstate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.48 Champlain Valley Interstate Air Quality Control Region. The Champlain Valley Interstate Air Quality Control Region (Vermont-New York) has been revised to consist of the...

  2. The First Prediction of a Rift Valley Fever Outbreak

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anyamba, Assaf; Chretien, Jean-Paul; Small, Jennifer; Tucker, Compton J.; Formenty, Pierre; Richardson, Jason H.; Britch, Seth C.; Schnabel, David C.; Erickson, Ralph L.; Linthicum, Kenneth J.

    2009-01-01

    El Nino/Southern Oscillation (ENSO) related anomalies were analyzed using a combination of satellite measurements of elevated sea surface temperatures, and subsequent elevated rainfall and satellite derived normalized difference vegetation index data. A Rift Valley fever risk mapping model using these climate data predicted areas where outbreaks of Rift Valley fever in humans and animals were expected and occurred in the Horn of Africa from December 2006 to May 2007. The predictions were subsequently confirmed by entomological and epidemiological field investigations of virus activity in the areas identified as at risk. Accurate spatial and temporal predictions of disease activity, as it occurred first in southern Somalia and then through much of Kenya before affecting northern Tanzania, provided a 2 to 6 week period of warning for the Horn of Africa that facilitated disease outbreak response and mitigation activities. This is the first prospective prediction of a Rift Valley fever outbreak.

  3. Observations on the epidemiology of Rift Valley fever in Kenya.

    PubMed

    Davies, F G

    1975-10-01

    The epizootic range of Rift Valley fever in Kenya is defined from the results of virus isolations during epizootics, and form an extensive serological survey of cattle which were exposed during an epizootic. A study of the sera from a wide range of wild bovidae sampled immediately after the epizootic, showed that they did not act as reservoir or amplifying hosts for RVF. Virus isolation attempts from a variety of rodents proved negative. Rift Valley fever did not persist between epizootics by producing symptomless abortions in cattle in areas within its epizootic range. A sentinel herd sampled annually after an epizootic in 1968 revealed not one single seroconversion from 1969 to 1974. Certain forest and forest edge situations were postulated as enzootic for Rift Valley fever, and a small percentage of seroconversions were detected in cattle in these areas, born four years after the last epizootic. This has been the only evidence for the persistence of the virus in Kenya since 1968, and may be a part of the interepizootic maintenance cycle for Rift Valley fever in Kenya, which otherwise remains unknown.

  4. Extinction dynamics of a discrete population in an oasis.

    PubMed

    Berti, Stefano; Cencini, Massimo; Vergni, Davide; Vulpiani, Angelo

    2015-07-01

    Understanding the conditions ensuring the persistence of a population is an issue of primary importance in population biology. The first theoretical approach to the problem dates back to the 1950s with the Kierstead, Slobodkin, and Skellam (KiSS) model, namely a continuous reaction-diffusion equation for a population growing on a patch of finite size L surrounded by a deadly environment with infinite mortality, i.e., an oasis in a desert. The main outcome of the model is that only patches above a critical size allow for population persistence. Here we introduce an individual-based analog of the KiSS model to investigate the effects of discreteness and demographic stochasticity. In particular, we study the average time to extinction both above and below the critical patch size of the continuous model and investigate the quasistationary distribution of the number of individuals for patch sizes above the critical threshold.

  5. OASIS connections: results from an evaluation study.

    PubMed

    Czaja, Sara J; Lee, Chin Chin; Branham, Janice; Remis, Peggy

    2012-10-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate a community-based basic computer and Internet training program designed for older adults, provide recommendations for program refinement, and gather preliminary information on program sustainability. The program was developed by the OASIS Institute, a nonprofit agency serving older adults and implemented in 4 cities by community trainers across the United States. One hundred and ninety-six adults aged 40-90 years were assigned to the training or a wait-list control group. Knowledge of computers and the Internet, attitudes toward computers, and computer/Internet use were assessed at baseline, posttraining, and 3 months posttraining. The program was successful in increasing the computer/Internet skills of the trainees. The data indicated a significant increase in computer and Internet knowledge and comfort with computers among those who received the training. Further, those who completed the course reported an increase in both computer and Internet use 3 months posttraining. The findings indicate that a community-based computer and Internet training program delivered by community instructors can be effective in terms of increasing computer and Internet skills and comfort with computer technology among older adults.

  6. Mapping Ecosystem Services in the Jordan Valley, Jordan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luz, Ana; Marques, Ana; Ribeiro, Inês; Alho, Maria; Catarina Afonso, Ana; Almeida, Erika; Branquinho, Cristina; Talozi, Samer; Pinho, Pedro

    2016-04-01

    In the last decade researchers started using ecosystem services as a new framework to understand the relationships between environment and society. Habitat quality and water quality are related with ecosystem services regulation and maintenance, or even provision. According to the Common International Classification of Ecosystem Services (CICES) both habitat quality and water quality are associated with lifecycle maintenance, habitat and gene pool protection, and water conditions, among others. As there is increased pressure on habitats and rivers especially for agricultural development, mapping and evaluating habitat and water quality has important implications for resource management and conservation, as well as for rural development. Here, we model and map habitat and water quality in the Jordan Valley, Jordan. In this study, we aim to identify and analyse ecosystem services both through 1) habitat quality and 2) water quality modelling using InVest, an integrated valuation of ecosystem services and tradeoffs. The data used in this study mainly includes the LULC, Jordan River watershed and main threats and pollutants in the study area, such as agriculture, industry, fish farms and urbanization. Results suggest a higher pressure on natural habitats in the Northern region of the Jordan Valley, where industry is dominant. Agriculture is present along the Jordan Valley and limits the few natural forested areas. Further, water pollution is mainly concentrated in disposal sites due to the low flow of the Jordan River. Our results can help to identify areas where natural resources and water resource management is most needed in the Jordan Valley. Acknowledgements: Transbasin FP7 project

  7. Imaging Radar Applications in the Death Valley Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farr, Tom G.

    1996-01-01

    Death Valley has had a long history as a testbed for remote sensing techniques (Gillespie, this conference). Along with visible-near infrared and thermal IR sensors, imaging radars have flown and orbited over the valley since the 1970's, yielding new insights into the geologic applications of that technology. More recently, radar interferometry has been used to derive digital topographic maps of the area, supplementing the USGS 7.5' digital quadrangles currently available for nearly the entire area. As for their shorter-wavelength brethren, imaging radars were tested early in their civilian history in Death Valley because it has a variety of surface types in a small area without the confounding effects of vegetation. In one of the classic references of these early radar studies, in a semi-quantitative way the response of an imaging radar to surface roughness near the radar wavelength, which typically ranges from about 1 cm to 1 m was explained. This laid the groundwork for applications of airborne and spaceborne radars to geologic problems in and regions. Radar's main advantages over other sensors stems from its active nature- supplying its own illumination makes it independent of solar illumination and it can also control the imaging geometry more accurately. Finally, its long wavelength allows it to peer through clouds, eliminating some of the problems of optical sensors, especially in perennially cloudy and polar areas.

  8. Analytical results and sample locality map of stream-sediment, heavy mineral-concentrate, rock and water samples from the Skedaddle (CA-020- 612) and Dry Valley Rim (CA-020-615) Wilderness Study Areas, Lassen County, California, and Washoe County, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Adrian, B.M.; Frisken, J.G.; Bradley, L.A.; Taylor, Cliff D.; McHugh, J.B.

    1987-01-01

    In the summer of 1985, the U.S. Geological Survey conducted a reconnaissance geochemical survey of the Skedaddle (CA-020-612) and Dry Valley Rim (CA-020-615) Wilderness Study Areas in Lassen County, California, and Washoe County, Nevada.Skedaddle and Dry Valley Rim are contiguous wilderness study areas (WSA) located in the eastern part of the Modoc Plateau in Lassen County, northeastern California, and Washoe County, northwestern Nevada (fig. 1). The Skedaddle study area encompasses 39,420 acres and the Dry Valley Rim study area encompasses 54,480 acres of Bureau of Land Management administered public land about 25 mi east of Susanville, California. The Skedaddle study area is bounded on the east by the Skedaddle road, on the north by the Smoke Creek Road, on the south by the Wendel road, and on the west by the rim west of Wendel Canyon. The Dry Valley Rim study area is bounded on the east by the lower Smoke Creek road, the Dry Valley road, and the Pipe Springs Road. The northern boundary is the Smoke Creek Ranch road, the southern boundary the Wendel road, and the western boundary the east-side Skedaddle road. Access to the study areas is provided by several light-duty dirt roads and ways that join the boundary roads. Elevations range from 3,800 (1158 m) to 7,552 ft (2302 m). Steep rim rock walls and talus-covered canyons are common in the eastern third of the Dry Valley Rim study area, and the western third of the Skedaddle study area, while the majority of both study areas is gradually sloping, covered only by sparse sagebrush. Existing geologic maps that cover the two study areas consist of Lydon and others (I960), Bonham (1969), and Diggles and others (1986).The Skedaddle Wilderness Study Area consists of two parallel ridges, the Skedaddle Mountains and the Amedee Mountains. The ridges bound the Wendel and Spencer basins, an area of bleached and silicified rocks. Dry Valley Rim is a 17-mi (5.2 m)-long north-south-trending fault block that is situated 1,500 ft

  9. 22. VIEW EAST TOWARDS WAIKOLU VALLEY OF PIPELINE ALONG PALI. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. VIEW EAST TOWARDS WAIKOLU VALLEY OF PIPELINE ALONG PALI. EYE BOLTS IN ROCK FACE AT RIGHT WERE USED BRIEFLY IN PLACE OF PIERS TO SUSPEND PIPE BY CHAIN BECAUSE THE CONCRETE PIERS WERE SUSCEPTIBLE TO HEAVY WAVE ACTION IN THIS AREA. - Kalaupapa Water Supply System, Waikolu Valley to Kalaupapa Settlement, Island of Molokai, Kalaupapa, Kalawao County, HI

  10. Heterotrophic bacteria in soils of Larsemann Oasis of East Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Churilin, Nikita; Soina, Vera

    2015-04-01

    The study of diversity and functional state of microorganisms in subsurface rocks layers, their participation in the biochemical weathering and formation of organic horizons of soils is important for understanding ecology and microorganisms in Antarctic soils. The study of cultured forms of microorganisms and their potential viability is still relevant to characterize the physiological state, biological activity and resilience of microorganisms involved in the initial soil formation. Improvement of isolation techniques of viable bacteria from the extreme habitats has a particular importance for rising the efficiency of environmental monitoring. The aim of the study was to investigate the viable heterotrophic bacteria involved in the formation of soils from wet valleys Larsemann Oasis, which is one of the warmest ice-free space of East Antarctica. Soil samples were taken from the intermountain humid valleys, where silt-gravelly substrates formed moss, algae, lichen cover. We used nutrient solutions (trypticase soy, R2A and glucose-peptone) to isolate cultured bacteria and study their morphological types in the light microscope. The total number of microorganisms was determined by fluorescent microscopy with acridine orange. SEM was used for morphological studies of bacterial communities in situ. To activate the growth processes we added into nutrient solutions various regulatory metabolites that have dose-dependence and operate at the community level. Physiological and functional conditions were determined by the duration of the lag phase and specific growth rate of bacterial communities in nutrient solutions containing various organic substrates. Soils form under protection of «stone pavement» and organisms leave the surface, so the forming organo-mineral horizon occurs inside of rock, thus the microprofile can form on both sides of the organic horizons. UV radiation, lack of moisture and strong wind are main limiting factors for microorganisms' growth in

  11. Modeling of Dust Levels Associated with Potential Utility-Scale Solar Development in the San Luis Valley-Taos Plateau Study Area

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Y. -S.; Kotamarthi, R.; Hartmann, H. M.

    The San Luis Valley (SLV)–Taos Plateau study area in south-central Colorado and north-central New Mexico is a large alpine valley surrounded by mountains with an area of approximately 6,263,000 acres (25,345 km 2) (Figure ES.1-1). This area receives ample sunshine throughout the year, making it an ideal location for solar energy generation, and there are currently five photovoltaic facilities operating on private lands in the SLV, ranging in capacity from 1 to 30 megawatt (MW). In 2012 the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) launched its Solar Energy Program, which included the identification of four solar energy zones (SEZs) in themore » SLV totaling 16,308 acres (66 km 2), as well as over 50,000 (202 km 2) acres of other BLM-administered lands potentially available for application for solar development. The SEZ areas, named Antonito Southeast, De Tilla Gulch, Fourmile East, and Los Mogotes East, were defined by the BLM as areas well-suited for utility-scale (i.e., larger than 20 MW) production of solar energy where solar energy development would be prioritized (BLM 2012). Nonetheless, it was recognized that solar development in the SEZs would result in some unavoidable adverse impacts, and so the BLM initiated a solar regional mitigation strategy (SRMS) study for three of the SEZs (BLM and Argonne 2016). The SRMS is designed to identify residual impacts of solar development in the SEZs (that is, those that cannot be avoided or minimized onsite), identify those residual impacts that warrant compensatory mitigation when considering the regional status and trends of the resources, identify appropriate regional compensatory mitigation locations and actions to address those residual impacts, and recommend appropriate fees to implement those compensatory mitigation measures.« less

  12. Preliminary results of hydrogeologic investigations Humboldt River Valley, Winnemucca, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cohen, Philip M.

    1964-01-01

    Most of the ground water of economic importance and nearly all the ground water closely associated with the flow o# the Humboldt River in the. 40-mile reach near Winnemucca, Nev., are in unconsolidated sedimentary deposits. These deposits range in age from Pliocene to Recent and range in character from coarse poorly sorted fanglomerate to lacustrine strata of clay, silt, sand, and gravel. The most permeable deposit consists of sand and gravel of Lake Lahontan age--the so-called medial gravel unit--which is underlain and overlain by fairly impermeable silt and clay also of Lake Lahontan age. The ultimate source of nearly all the water in the study area is precpitation within the drainage basin of the Humboldt River. Much of this water reaches the study, area as flow or underflow of the Humboldt River and as underflow from other valleys tributary to the study area. Little if any flow from the tributary streams in the study area usually reaches the Humboldt River. Most of the tributary streamflow within the study area evaporates or is transpired by vegetation, but a part percolates downward through unconsolidated deposits of the alluvial fans flanking the mountains and move downgradient as ground-water underflow toward the Humboldt River. Areas that contribute significant amounts of ground-water underflow to. the valley of the Humboldt River within the study area are (1) the valley of the Humboldt River upstream from the study area, (2) the Pole Creek-Rock Creek area, (3) Paradise Valley, and (4) Grass Valley and the northwestern slope of the Sonoma Range. The total average underflow from these areas in the period 1949-61 was about 14,000-19,000 acre-feet per year. Much of this underflow discharged into the Humboldt River within the study area and constituted a large part of the base flow of the river. Streamflow in the Humboldt River increases substantially in the early spring, principally because of runoff to the river in the reaches upstream from the study area

  13. Isotopic Variability in Central Valley Precipitation Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keene, D.; Sowers, T.; Wagner, A. J.

    2017-12-01

    Wintertime precipitation in the Sacramento Valley is characterized by two regimes: northerly storms generated by the polar jet stream and southerly storms generated by subtropical atmospheric rivers (ARs). Polar jet stream storms account for the majority of storm activity in the central valley, but the amount of subtropical moisture available for transport tends to increase during El Niño years. However, during the El Niño of 2015-2016, California continued to experience drought conditions with the Sacramento area receiving below average wintertime precipitation. Although the 2016-2017 winter was not an El Niño year, the Sacramento area received more than 190% of its average precipitation from ARs in the opening months of 2017. While this suggests that ARs are a significant part of California's hydrologic cycle independent of El Niño, it has not been established whether these storms have an isotopically distinct signature compared to those generated by the polar jet stream or if their signature covaries with ENSO. To investigate the potential isotopic variability of ARs, rainwater was collected over a period of three years in the Sacramento Valley and the surrounding areas and analyzed for δD and δ18O. Since El Niño is generally considered to cause an increase in the amount of available subtropical moisture delivered to the Sacramento valley, we would expect precipitation during those years to be less depleted than precipitation in non-El Niño years. On average, δD and δ18O values of precipitation during the 2015-2016 winter were not significantly different compared to precipitation from 2016-2017 even though 2016-2017 was dominated by historic amounts of AR rainfall. This suggests that the frequency and intensity of atmospheric river storm events may not be intimately linked with the ENSO cycle.

  14. Structural and lithologic study of northern coast ranges and Sacramento Valley, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rich, E. I. (Principal Investigator)

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Analysis of ERTS-1 imagery of the Northern California Coast Ranges has disclosed a potential relation between a heretofore unrecognized fracture system and known deposits of mercury and geothermally active areas in the Coast Range and between oil and gas fields in the Sacramento Valley. Three potentially important systems of linear elements within the Coast Ranges, detected on ERTS-1 imagery, may represent fault systems or zones of shearing because topographic offset and stratigraph disruption can be seen along one or two of the lineations. One of the systems in subparallel to the San Andreas fault and is confined to the Pacific Coastal Belt. Another set is confined to the central core of the Coast Ranges. The third set of linear features (Valley System) has not heretofore been recognized. Some of the known mercury deposits and geothermally active areas near Clear Lake, in the Coast Ranges, are along the Valley System or at the intersection of the Central and Valley Systems. The plotted locations of some of the oil and gas fields in the Sacramento Valley are associated with the Valley and/or Central Systems. If these relations prove reliable, the ERTS-1 imagery may prove to be an extremely useful exploration tool.

  15. Tafilalet OASIS System: Water Resources Management and Investigation by GIS and Groundwater Flow Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouaamlat, I.; Larabi, A.; Faouzi, M.

    2014-12-01

    The geographical location of Tafilalet oasis system (TOS) in the south of the valley of Ziz (Morocco) offers him a particular advantage on the plane of water potential. The surface water which comes from humid regions of the High Atlas and intercepted by a dam then converged through the watercourse of Ziz towards the plain of the TOS, have created the conditions for the formation of a water table relatively rich with regard to the local climatic conditions (arid climate with recurrent drought). Given the role of the water table in the economic development of the region, a hydrogeological study was conducted to understand the impact of artificial recharge and recurrent droughts on the development of the groundwater reserves of TOS. In this study, a three-dimensional model of groundwater flow was developed for the TOS, to assist the decision makers as a "management tool" in order to assess alternative schemes for development and exploitation of groundwater resources based on the variation of artificial recharge and drought. The results from this numerical investigation of the TOS aquifer shows that the commissioning of the dam to control the flows of extreme flood and good management of water releases, has avoided the losses of irrigation water and consequently the non-overexploitation of the groundwater. So that with one or two water releases per year from the dam of flow rate more than 28 million m3/year it is possible to reconstruct the volume of water abstracted by wells. The idea of lowering water table by pumping wells is not exactly true, as well the development of groundwater abstraction has not prevented the wound of water table in these last years, the pumping wells accompanied more than it triggers the lowering of water table and it is mainly the succession of dry periods causing the decreases of the piezometric level. This situation confirms the important role that groundwater plays as a "buffer" during the drought periods.

  16. Larger benthic foraminiferal turnover across the Eocene-Oligocene transition at Siwa Oasis, Western Desert, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orabi, H.; El Beshtawy, M.; Osman, R.; Gadallah, M.

    2015-05-01

    In the Eocene part of the Siwa Oasis, the larger foraminifera are represented by the genera Nummulites, Arxina, Operculina, Sphaerogypsina, Asterocyclina, Grzybowskia, Silvestriella, Gaziryina and Discocyclina in order of abundance. Operculina continues up to the early Oligocene as modern representatives in tropical regions, while the other genera became extinct. Nevertheless, the most common larger foraminiferal genus Lepidocyclina (Nephrolepidina) appears only in the lowermost Oligocene. In spite of the Eocene-Oligocene (E/O) transition is thought to have been attended by major continental cooling at northern middle and high latitudes, we discover that at the Siwa Oasis, there is a clear warming trend from the late Eocene (extinction level of Nummulites, Sphaerogypsina, Asterocyclina, Grzybowskia, Silvestriella and Discocyclina) to the early Oligocene is observed due to the high abundance of Operculina and occurrence of kaolinite and gypsiferous shale deposits in both Qatrani and El Qara formations (Oligocene) at this transition. The El Qara Formation is a new rock unit proposed herein for the Oligocene (Rupelian age) in the first time. Several episodes of volcanic activity occurred in Egypt during the Cenozoic. Mid Tertiary volcanicity was widespread and a number of successive volcanic pulses are starting in the late Eocene. The release of mantle CO2 from this very active volcanic episode may have in fact directly caused the warm Eocene-Oligocene greenhouse climate effect.

  17. Modelling the effect of buried valleys on groundwater flow: case study in Ventspils vicinity, Latvia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delina, Aija; Popovs, Konrads; Bikse, Janis; Retike, Inga; Babre, Alise; Kalvane, Gunta

    2015-04-01

    Buried subglacial valleys are widely distributed in glaciated regions and they can have great influence on groundwater flow and hence on groundwater resources. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of the buried valleys on groundwater flow in a confined aquifer (Middle Devonian Eifelian stage Arukila aquifer, D2ar) applying numerical modelling. The study area is located at vicinity of Ventspils Town, near wellfield Ogsils where number of the buried valleys with different depth and filling material are present. Area is located close to the Baltic Sea at Piejūra lowland Rinda plain and regional groundwater flow is towards sea. Territory is covered by thin layer of Quaternary sediments in thicknesses of 10 to 20 meters although Prequaternary sediments are exposed at some places. Buried valleys are characterized as narrow, elongated and deep formations that is be filled with various, mainly Pleistocene glacigene sediments - either till loam of different ages or sand and gravel or interbedding of both above mentioned. The filling material of the valleys influences groundwater flow in the confined aquifers which is intercepted by the valleys. It is supposed that glacial till loam filled valleys serves as a barrier to groundwater flow and as a recharge conduit when filled with sand and gravel deposits. Numerical model was built within MOSYS modelling system (Virbulis et al. 2012) using finite element method in order to investigate buried valley influence on groundwater flow in the study area. Several conceptual models were tested in numerical model depending on buried valley filling material: sand and gravel, till loam or mixture of them. Groundwater flow paths and travel times were studied. Results suggested that valley filled with glacial till is acting as barrier and it causes sharp drop of piezometric head and downward flow. Valley filled with sand and gravel have almost no effect on piezometric head distribution, however it this case buried valleys

  18. Comparison of the Microbial Diversity and Abundance Between the Freshwater Land-Locked Lakes of Schirmacher Oasis and the Perennially Ice-Covered Lake Untersee in East Antarctica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Jonathan; Hoover, Richard B.; Swain, Ashit; Murdock, Chris; Bej, Asim K.

    2010-01-01

    Extreme conditions such as low temperature, dryness, and constant UV-radiation in terrestrial Antarctica are limiting factors of the survival of microbial populations. The objective of this study was to investigate the microbial diversity and enumeration between the open water lakes of Schirmacher Oasis and the permanently ice-covered Lake Untersee. The lakes in Schirmacher Oasis possessed abundant and diverse group of microorganisms compared to the Lake Untersee. Furthermore, the microbial diversity between two lakes in Schirmacher Oasis (Lake L27C and L47) was compared by culture-based molecular approach. It was determined that L27Chad a richer microbial diversity representing 5 different phyla and 7 different genera. In contrast L47 consisted of 4 different phyla and 6 different genera. The difference in microbial community could be due to the wide range of pH between L27C (pH 9.1) and L47 (pH 5.7). Most of the microbes isolated from these lakes consisted of adaptive biological pigmentation. Characterization of the microbial community found in the freshwater lakes of East Antarctica is important because it gives a further glimpse into the adaptation and survival strategies found in extreme conditions.

  19. 77 FR 33237 - Saline Valley Warm Springs Management Plan/Environmental Impact Statement, Death Valley National...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-05

    ... Valley Warm Springs Management Plan/Environmental Impact Statement, Death Valley National Park, Inyo... an Environmental Impact Statement for the Saline Valley Warm Springs Management Plan, Death Valley... analysis process for the Saline Valley Warm Springs Management Plan for Death Valley [[Page 33238...

  20. Measuring ground movement in geothermal areas of Imperial Valley, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lofgren, B. E.

    1974-01-01

    Significant ground movement may accompany the extraction of large quantities of fluids from the subsurface. In Imperial Valley, California, one of the potential hazards of geothermal development is the threat of both subsidence and horizontal movement of the land surface. Regional and local survey nets are being monitored to detect and measure possible ground movement caused by future geothermal developments. Precise measurement of surface and subsurface changes will be required to differentiate man-induced changes from natural processes in this tectonically active region.

  1. Forest resources of the Susitna Valley, Alaska.

    Treesearch

    Karl M. Hegg

    1970-01-01

    This report summarizes the data from the first intensive inventory of the forests in the Susitna Valley, Alaska, conducted during the period 1964-65. The primary purposes of the inventory were to determine the total area of forested lands, the commercial forest area and timber volume, and the condition and growth of this resource, and to report on...

  2. Numerical Simulation of Nocturnal Drainage Flows in Idealized Valley-Tributary Systems.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Steen, Lance B.

    2000-11-01

    Numerical simulations of nocturnal drainage flow and transport in idealized valley-tributary systems are compared with the Atmospheric Science in Complex Terrain (ASCOT) meteorological field data and tracer studies from the Brush Creek valley of western Colorado. Much of the general valley-tributary flow behavior deduced from observations is qualitatively reproduced in the numerical results. The spatially complex, unsteady nature of the tributary flow found in the field data is also seen in the simulations. Oscillations in the simulated tributary flow are similar to some field observations. However, observed oscillations in the valley flow at the mouth of the tributary could not be reproduced in the numerical results. Thus, hypotheses of strongly coupled valley-tributary flow oscillations, based on field data, cannot be supported by these simulations. Along-valley mass flux calculations based on model results for the valley-tributary system indicate an increase of 5%-10% over a valley without a tributary. Enhanced valley mass fluxes were found from 8 km above the tributary to almost the valley mouth. However, the valley mass fluxes for topography with and without a tributary were nearly equal at the valley outflow. ASCOT field data suggested a tributary mass flow contribution of 5%-15% for a Brush Creek tributary of similar drainage area to the model tributary employed here. Numerical simulations of transport in the nocturnal valley-tributary flow strongly support ASCOT tracer studies in the Pack Canyon tributary of Brush Creek. These results suggest that the valley-tributary interaction can significantly increase plume dispersion under stable conditions. Overall, the simulation results presented here indicate that simple terrain geometries are able to capture many of the salient features of drainage flow in real valley-tributary systems.

  3. A hierarchical network approach for modeling Rift Valley fever epidemics with applications in North America

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Rift Valley fever (RVF) is a vector-borne zoonotic disease which causes high morbidity and mortality in livestock. In the event Rift Valley fever virus is introduced to the United States or other non-endemic areas, understanding the potential patterns of spread and the areas at risk based on disease...

  4. Death Valley, California

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1994-04-11

    STS059-S-026 (11 April 1994) --- This is an image of Death Valley, California, centered at 36.629 degrees north latitude, 117.069 degrees west longitude. The image shows Furnace Creek alluvial fan and Furnace Creek Ranch at the far right, and the sand dunes near Stove Pipe Wells at the center. The dark fork-shaped feature between Furnace Creek fan and the dunes is a smooth flood-plain which encloses Cottonball Basin. The SIR-C/X-SAR supersite is an area of extensive field investigations and has been visited by both Space Radar Lab astronaut crews. Elevations in the Valley range from 70 meters below sea level, the lowest in the United States, to more than 3300 meters above sea level. Scientists are using SIR-C/X-SAR data from Death Valley to help answer a number of different questions about the Earth's geology. One question concerns how alluvial fans are formed and change through time under the influence of climatic changes and earthquakes. Alluvial fans are gravel deposits that wash down from the mountains over time. They are visible in the image as circular, fan-shaped bright areas extending into the darker valley floor from the mountains. Information about the alluvial fans help scientists study Earth's ancient climate. Scientists know the fans are bulit up through climatic and tectonic processes and they will use the SIR-C/X-SAR data to understand the nature and rates of weathering processes on the fans, soil formation, and the transport of sand and dust by the wind. SIR-C/X-SAR's sensitivity to centimeter-scale (or inch-scale) roughness provides detailed maps of surface texture. Such information can be used to study the occurrence and movement of dust storms and sand dunes. the goal of these studies is to gain a better understanding of the record of past climatic changes and the effects of those changes on a sensitive environment. This may lead to a better ability to predict future response of the land to different potential global cimate-change scenarios

  5. Fog and Haze in California's San Joaquin Valley

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    This illustration features images of southern California and southwestern Nevada acquired on January 3, 2001 (Terra orbit 5569), and includes data from three of MISR's nine cameras. The San Joaquin Valley, which comprises the southern extent of California's Central Valley, covers much of the viewed area. Also visible are several of the Channel Islands near the bottom, and Mono and Walker Lakes, which stand out as darker patches near the top center, especially in the vertical and backward oblique images. Near the lower right of each image is the Los Angeles Basin, with the distinctive chevron shape of the Mojave Desert to its north.

    The Central Valley is a well-irrigated and richly productive agricultural area situated between the Coast Range and the snow-capped Sierra Nevadas. During the winter, the region is noted for its hazy overcasts and a low, thick ground fog known as the Tule. Owing to the effects of the atmosphere on reflected sunlight, dramatic differences in the MISR images are apparent as the angle of view changes. An area of thick, white fog in the San Joaquin Valley is visible in all three of the images. However, the pervasive haze that fills most of the valley is only slightly visible in the vertical view. At the oblique angles, the haze is highly distinguishable against the land surface background, particularly in the forward-viewing direction. Just above image center, the forward view also reveals bluish-tinged plumes near Lava Butte in Sequoia National Forest, where the National Interagency Coordination Center reported an active forest fire.

    The changing surface visibility in the multi-angle data allows us to derive the amount of atmospheric haze. In the lower right quadrant is a map of haze amount determined from automated processing of the MISR imagery. Low amounts of haze are shown in blue, and a variation in hue through shades of green, yellow, and red indicates progressively larger amounts of airborne particulates. Due to the

  6. A network-based meta-population approach to model Rift Valley fever epidemics

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) has been expanding its geographical distribution with important implications for both human and animal health. The emergence of Rift Valley fever (RVF) in the Middle East, and its continuing presence in many areas of Africa, has negatively impacted both medical and vet...

  7. Diversity of inland valleys and opportunities for agricultural development in Sierra Leone.

    PubMed

    Dossou-Yovo, Elliott Ronald; Baggie, Idriss; Djagba, Justin Fagnombo; Zwart, Sander Jaap

    2017-01-01

    Inland valleys are becoming increasingly important agricultural production areas for rural households in sub-Saharan Africa due to their relative high and secure water availability and soil fertility. In addition, inland valleys are important as water buffer and biodiversity hot spots and they provide local communities with forest, forage, and fishing resources. As different inland-valley ecosystem functions may conflict with agricultural objectives, indiscriminate development should be avoided. This study aims to analyze the diversity of inland valleys in Sierra Leone and to develop guidelines for more precise interventions. Land use, biophysical and socio-economic data were analyzed on 257 inland valleys using spatial and multivariate techniques. Five cluster groups of inland valleys were identified: (i) semi-permanently flooded with high soil organic carbon (4.2%) and moderate available phosphorus (10.2 ppm), mostly under natural vegetation; (ii) semi-permanently flooded with low soil organic carbon (1.5%) and very low available phosphorus (3.1 ppm), abandoned by farmers; (iii) seasonally flooded with moderate soil organic carbon (3.1%) and low available phosphorus (8.3 ppm), used for rainfed rice and off-season vegetables produced without fertilizer application for household consumption and market; (iv) well drained with moderate soil organic carbon (3.8%) and moderate available phosphorus (10.0 ppm), used for rainfed rice and off-season vegetables produced with fertilizer application for household consumption and market; and (v) well drained with moderate soil organic carbon (3.6%) and moderate available phosphorus (11 ppm), used for household consumption without fertilizer application. Soil organic carbon, available phosphorus, hydrological regime, physical accessibility and market opportunity were the major factors affecting agricultural intensification of inland valleys. Opening up the areas in which inland valleys occur through improved roads and markets

  8. Valley s'Asymmetric Characteristics of the Loess Plateau in Northwestern Shanxi Based on DEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, J.

    2016-12-01

    The valleys of the Loess Plateau in northwestern Shanxi show great asymmetry. This study using multi-scale DEMs, high-resolution satellite images and digital terrain analysis method, put forward a quantitative index to describe the asymmetric morphology. Several typical areas are selected to test and verify the spatial variability. Results show: (1) Considering the difference of spatial distribution, Pianguanhe basin, Xianchuanhe basin and Yangjiachuan basin are the areas where show most significant asymmetric characteristics . (2) Considering the difference of scale, the shape of large-scale valleys represents three characteristics: randomness, equilibrium and relative symmetry, while small-scale valleys show directionality and asymmetry. (3) Asymmetric morphology performs orientation, and the east-west valleys extremely obvious. Combined with field survey, its formation mechanism can be interpreted as follows :(1)Loess uneven distribution in the valleys. (2) The distribution diversities of vegetation, water , heat conditions and other factors, make a difference in water erosion capability which leads to asymmetric characteristics.

  9. Comparison of inversion models using AIRSAR data for Death Valley, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kierein-Young, Kathryn S.

    1993-01-01

    Polarimetric Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (AIRSAR) data were collected for the Geologic Remote Sensing Field Experiment (GRSFE) over Death Valley, California, USA, in September 1989. AIRSAR is a four-look, quid-polarizaiton, three frequency instrument. It collects measurements at C-band (5.66 cm), L-band (23.98 cm), and P-band (68.13 cm), and has a GIFOV of 10 meters and a swath width of 12 kilometers. Because the radar measures at three wavelengths, different scales of surface roughness are measured. Also, dielectric constants can be calculated from the data. The scene used in this study is in Death Valley, California and is located over Trail Canyon alluvial fan, the valley floor, and Artists Drive alluvial fan. The fans are very different in mineralogic makeup, size, and surface roughness. Trail Canyon fan is located on the west side of the valley at the base of the Panamint Range and is a large fan with older areas of desert pavement and younger active channels. The source for the material on southern part of the fan is mostly quartzites and there is an area of carbonate source on the northern part of the fan. Artists Drive fan is located at the base of the Black Mountains on the east side of the valley and is a smaller, young fan with its source mostly from volcanic rocks. The valley floor contains playa and salt deposits that range from smooth to Devil's Golf course type salt pinnacles.

  10. Ground-water resources investigation in the Amran Valley, Yeman Arab Republic

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tibbitts, G. Chase; Aubel, James

    1980-01-01

    A program of hydrologic studies and exploratory drilling was conducted intermittently between 1974 and 1978 to evaluate the water-bearing properties of the unconsolidated alluvial sediments and associated rocks in the semi-arid Amran Valley basin, an 800-square-kilometer area in north-central Yemen Arab Republic. Inventory data from 395 wells were compiled, observation well and rain-gage networks were established and 16 standard complete chemical analyses were made for samples from selected wells. The water resources of the area were overexploited. The chemical quality of the water is generally good. Four aquifer tests were run to determine transmissivity and storage characteristics. The pumping tests show that groundwater occurs under semi-confined leaky-aquifer conditions in the valley fill. Wells drilled in the alluvial fill of the south-central part of the valley have the highest yields. Wells penetrating the limestone and volcanic rocks generally have little or no yield except in fracture zones. Basalt flows occur interbedded with the wadi alluvium at several depths. Cropping out rocks in the Amran Valley range in age from late Jurassic to Holocene. (USGS)

  11. Water in the Humboldt River Valley near Winnemucca, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cohen, Philip M.

    1966-01-01

    Most of the work of the interagency Humboldt River Research Project in the Winnemucca reach of the Humboldt River valley has been completed. More than a dozen State and Federal agencies and several private organizations and individuals participated in the study. The major objective of the project, which began in 1959, is to evaluate the water resources of the entire Humboldt River basin. However, because of the large size of the basin, most of the work during the first 5 years of the project was done in the Winnemucca area. The purpose of this report is to summarize briefly and simply the information regarding the water resources of the Winnemucca area-especially the quantitative aspects of the flow system-given in previous reports of the project. The Winnemucca reach of the Humboldt River valley, which is in north-central Nevada, is about 200 miles downstream from the headwaters of the Humboldt River and includes that part of the valley between the Comus and Rose Creek gaging stations. Average annual inflow to the storage area (the valley lowlands) in the Winnemucca reach in water years 1949-62 was about 250,000 acre-feet. Of this amount, about 68 percent was Humboldt River streamflow, as measured at the Comus gaging station, 23 percent was precipitation directly on the storage area, 6 percent was ground-water inflow, and about 3 percent was tributary streamflow. Average annual streamflow at the Rose Creek gaging station during the same period was about 155,000 acre-feet, or about 17,000 acre-feet less than that at the Comus gaging station. Nearly all the streamflow lost was consumed by evapotranspiration in the project area. Total average annual evapotranspiration loss during the period was about 115,000 acre-feet, or about 42 percent of the total average annual outflow. The most abundant ions in the ground and surface water in the area are commonly sodium and bicarbonate. Much of the water has a dissolved-solids content that ranges from 500 to 750 parts per

  12. Morphology of large valleys on Hawaii - Evidence for groundwater sapping and comparisons with Martian valleys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kochel, R. Craig; Piper, Jonathan F.

    1986-01-01

    Morphometric data on the runoff and sapping valleys on the slopes of Hawaii and Molokai in Hawaii are analyzed. The analysis reveals a clear distinction between the runoff valleys and sapping valleys. The Hawaiian sapping valleys are characterized by: (1) steep valley walls and flat floors, (2) amphitheater heads, (3) low drainage density, (4) paucity of downstream tributaries, (5) low frequency of up-dip tributaries, and (6) structural and stratigraphic control on valley patterns. The characteristics of the Hawaiian sapping valleys are compared to Martian valleys and experimental systems, and good correlation between the data is detected. Flume experiments were also conducted to study the evolution of sapping valleys in response to variable structure and stratigraphy.

  13. First Encounters: Native Americans and Europeans in the Mississippi Valley. [CD-ROM].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sabo, George, III; Restrepo, Luis Fernando; Jones, Linda

    This CD-ROM provides interactive, multimedia software that enables students to investigate many aspects of Native American and European encounters in the Mississippi Valley through study of original historical sources, including texts, maps, artworks, and archaeological finds. The Lower Mississippi Valley was chosen as the study area because of…

  14. Hydrologic effects of stress-relief fracturing in an Appalachian Valley

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wyrick, Granville G.; Borchers, James W.

    1981-01-01

    A hydrologic study at Twin Falls State Park, Wyoming County, West Virginia, was made to determine how fracture systems affect the occurrence and movement of ground water in a typical valley of the Appalachian Plateaus Physiographic Province. Twin Falls was selected because it is generally unaffected by factors that would complicate an analysis of the data. The study area was the Black Fork Valley at Twin Falls. The valley is about 3 miles long and 400 to 600 feet wide and is cut into massive sandstone units interbedded with thin coal and shale beds. The study was made to determine how aquifer characteristics were related to fracture systems in this valley, so that the relation could be applied to studies of other valleys. Two sites were selected for test drilling, pumping tests, and geophysical studies. One site is in the upper part of the valley, and the second is near the lower central part. At both sites, ground water occurs mainly in horizontal bedding-plane fractures under the valley floor and in nearly vertical and horizontal slump fractures along the valley wall. The aquifer is under confined conditions under the valley floor and unconfined conditions along the valley wall. The fractures pinch out under the valley walls, which form impermeable barriers. Tests of wells near the valley center indicated a change in storage coefficient as the cone of depression caused by pumping reached the confined-unconfined boundaries; the tests also indicated barrier-image effects when the cone reached the impermeable boundaries. Drawdown from pumping near the center of the valley affected water levels at both sites, indicating a hydraulic connection from the upper to the lower end of the valley. Stream gain-and-loss studies show that ground water discharges to the stream from horizontal fractures beneath Black Fork Falls, near the mouth of Black Fork. The fracture systems that constitute most of the transmissive part of the aquifer at Twin Falls are like those described as

  15. The Central Valley Hydrologic Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faunt, C.; Belitz, K.; Hanson, R. T.

    2009-12-01

    Historically, California’s Central Valley has been one of the most productive agricultural regions in the world. The Central Valley also is rapidly becoming an important area for California’s expanding urban population. In response to this competition for water, a number of water-related issues have gained prominence: conjunctive use, artificial recharge, hydrologic implications of land-use change, subsidence, and effects of climate variability. To provide information to stakeholders addressing these issues, the USGS made a detailed assessment of the Central Valley aquifer system that includes the present status of water resources and how these resources have changed over time. The principal product of this assessment is a tool, referred to as the Central Valley Hydrologic Model (CVHM), that simulates surface-water flows, groundwater flows, and land subsidence in response to stresses from human uses and from climate variability throughout the entire Central Valley. The CVHM utilizes MODFLOW combined with a new tool called “Farm Process” to simulate groundwater and surface-water flow, irrigated agriculture, land subsidence, and other key processes in the Central Valley on a monthly basis. This model was discretized horizontally into 20,000 1-mi2 cells and vertically into 10 layers ranging in thickness from 50 feet at the land surface to 750 feet at depth. A texture model constructed by using data from more than 8,500 drillers’ logs was used to estimate hydraulic properties. Unmetered pumpage and surface-water deliveries for 21 water-balance regions were simulated with the Farm Process. Model results indicate that human activities, predominately surface-water deliveries and groundwater pumping for irrigated agriculture, have dramatically influenced the hydrology of the Central Valley. These human activities have increased flow though the aquifer system by about a factor of six compared to pre-development conditions. The simulated hydrology reflects spatial

  16. 27 CFR 9.165 - Applegate Valley.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... within Jackson and Josephine Counties, and entirely within the existing Rogue Valley viticultural area. The boundaries are as follows: (1) Beginning at the confluence of the Applegate River with the Rogue... until it joins the northern boundary of the Rogue River National Forest; (7) Then easterly along the...

  17. Valley City State College Planning Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valley City State Coll., ND.

    The Valley City State College, North Dakota, planning manual, which was based on the Futures Creating Paradigm methodology, is presented. The paradigm is a methodology for interdisciplinary policy planning and establishment of objectives and goals. The first planning stage involved preparing comprehensive narratives in the following areas likely…

  18. Hydrogeology of a drift-filled bedrock valley near Lino Lakes, Anoka County, Minnesota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Winter, T.C.; Pfannkuch, H.O.

    1976-01-01

    The bedrock surface of east-central Minnesota is dissected by an intricate network of valleys. Outside the bedrock valley at site B, 3 mi (4. 8 km) from site A, 100 ft (30 m) of drift overlies the bedrock surface. Observation wells were installed at the two sites to determine the vertical ground-water movement between the various aquifer units and the lateral movement between the two sites. An aquifer test of the lowest valley-fill aquifer at site A showed that the observation well completed in the same aquifer as the pumping well responded immediately; whereas a lag of about 100 min occurred between the lower valley fill and uppermost body of sand and gravel. This indicates that the hydraulic connection between these two layers is poor at the immediate site. Test results show that the lower sand-and-gravel aquifer has a transmissivity between 14,000 and 27,000 ft2/d (1,300 and 2,500 m2/d). Although the hydraulic gradient is vertically downward in the valley, much of the drift fill is poorly permeable. This suggests that the quantity of downward-percolating water reaching the lowest valley-fill aquifer is relatively small at the test site. Because valley cut through a number of bedrock aquifers in the region, they could potentially be an important avenue of contamination from land-surface waste. In addition, the vast network of bedrock valleys in the Twin Cities area might cause contaminants to disseminate rather rapidly throughout a large area.

  19. Comparison of sediment supply to San Francisco Bay from watersheds draining the Bay Area and the Central Valley of California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McKee, L.J.; Lewicki, M.; Schoellhamer, D.H.; Ganju, N.K.

    2013-01-01

    Quantifying suspended sediment loads is important for managing the world's estuaries in the context of navigation, pollutant transport, wetland restoration, and coastal erosion. To address these needs, a comprehensive analysis was completed on sediment supply to San Francisco Bay from fluvial sources. Suspended sediment, optical backscatter, velocity data near the head of the estuary, and discharge data obtained from the output of a water balance model were used to generate continuous suspended sediment concentration records and compute loads to the Bay from the large Central Valley watershed. Sediment loads from small tributary watersheds around the Bay were determined using 235 station-years of suspended sediment data from 38 watershed locations, regression analysis, and simple modeling. Over 16 years, net annual suspended sediment load to the head of the estuary from its 154,000 km2 Central Valley watershed varied from 0.13 to 2.58 (mean = 0.89) million metric t of suspended sediment, or an average yield of 11 metric t/km2/yr. Small tributaries, totaling 8145 km2, in the nine-county Bay Area discharged between 0.081 and 4.27 (mean = 1.39) million metric t with a mean yield of 212 metric t/km2/yr. The results indicate that the hundreds of urbanized and tectonically active tributaries adjacent to the Bay, which together account for just 5% of the total watershed area draining to the Bay and provide just 7% of the annual average fluvial flow, supply 61% of the suspended sediment. The small tributary loads are more variable (53-fold between years compared to 21-fold for the inland Central Valley rivers) and dominated fluvial sediment supply to the Bay during 10 out of 16 yr. If San Francisco Bay is typical of other estuaries in active tectonic or climatically variable coastal regimes, managers responsible for water quality, dredging and reusing sediment accumulating in shipping channels, or restoring wetlands in the world's estuaries may need to more carefully

  20. [Assessment of farmland soil quality under different utilization intensity in arid area].

    PubMed

    Gui, Dong-Wei; Mu, Gui-Jin; Lei, Jia-Qiang; Zeng, Fan-Jiang; Wang, Hui

    2009-04-01

    Based on the 2005-2007 experimental data in Cele oasis in the southern margin of Tarim Basin of Xinjiang, the soil quality of four typical types of farmland with different utilization intensity, i.e., farmland with high input, farmland with normal input, newly reclaimed farmland, and farmland in oasis' interior, was analyzed and assessed by using sustainable yield index, soil improvement index, and soil quality synthesis index. Among the farmlands, there were significant differences in the contents of soil organic matter, available nitrogen, and available phosphorus. Newly reclaimed farmland had the lowest level of soil quality, while the farmland in oasis' interior had relatively higher soil quality. This study could help the reasonable exploitation and utilization of farmlands in Cele oasis, and the protection of local farmland eco-environment.

  1. Groundwater availability of the Central Valley Aquifer, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Faunt, Claudia C.

    2009-01-01

    California's Central Valley covers about 20,000 square miles and is one of the most productive agricultural regions in the world. More than 250 different crops are grown in the Central Valley with an estimated value of $17 billion per year. This irrigated agriculture relies heavily on surface-water diversions and groundwater pumpage. Approximately one-sixth of the Nation's irrigated land is in the Central Valley, and about one-fifth of the Nation's groundwater demand is supplied from its aquifers. The Central Valley also is rapidly becoming an important area for California's expanding urban population. Since 1980, the population of the Central Valley has nearly doubled from 2 million to 3.8 million people. The Census Bureau projects that the Central Valley's population will increase to 6 million people by 2020. This surge in population has increased the competition for water resources within the Central Valley and statewide, which likely will be exacerbated by anticipated reductions in deliveries of Colorado River water to southern California. In response to this competition for water, a number of water-related issues have gained prominence: conservation of agricultural land, conjunctive use, artificial recharge, hydrologic implications of land-use change, and effects of climate variability. To provide information to stakeholders addressing these issues, the USGS Groundwater Resources Program made a detailed assessment of groundwater availability of the Central Valley aquifer system, that includes: (1) the present status of groundwater resources; (2) how these resources have changed over time; and (3) tools to assess system responses to stresses from future human uses and climate variability and change. This effort builds on previous investigations, such as the USGS Central Valley Regional Aquifer System and Analysis (CV-RASA) project and several other groundwater studies in the Valley completed by Federal, State and local agencies at differing scales. The

  2. Is it working? A look at the changing nutrient practices in Oregon's Southern Willamette Valley Groundwater Management Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearlstein, S.; Compton, J.; Eldridge, A.; Henning, A.; Selker, J. S.; Brooks, J. R.; Schmitz, D.

    2016-12-01

    Groundwater nitrate contamination affects thousands of households in the southern Willamette Valley and many more across the Pacific Northwest. The southern Willamette Valley Groundwater Management Area (SWV GWMA) was established in 2004 due to nitrate levels in the groundwater exceeding the human health standard of 10 mg nitrate-N L-1. Much of the nitrogen inputs to the GWMA comes from agricultural nitrogen use, and thus efforts to reduce N inputs to groundwater are focused upon improving N management. Previous work in the 1990s in the Willamette Valley by researchers at Oregon State University determined the importance of cover crops and irrigation practices and made recommendations to the local farm community for reducing nitrogen (N) leaching. We are currently re-sampling many of the same fields studied by OSU to examine the influence of current crops and nutrient management practices on nitrate leaching below the rooting zone. This study represents important crops currently grown in the GWMA and includes four grass fields, three vegetable row-crop fields, two peppermint and wheat fields, and one each of hazelnuts and blueberries. New nutrient management practices include slow release fertilizers and precision agriculture approaches in some of the fields. Results from the first two years of sampling show nitrate leaching is lower in some crops like row crops grown for seed and higher in others like perennial rye grass seed when compared to the 1990s data. We will use field-level N input-output balances in order to determine the N use efficiency and compare this across crops and over time. The goal of this project is to provide information and tools that will help farmers, managers and conservation groups quantify the water quality benefits of management practices they are conducting or funding.

  3. Merging seismic and MT in Garden Valley, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Telleen, K.E.

    1986-04-01

    In the northern part of Garden Valley, Nevada, a 1978 regional seismic program encountered a large area of poor to no-reflection data. Surface geology suggested that a large high structure might underlie the valley floor, and that shallowly buried basalts were causing the poor data. The implied strongly layered structure of electrical resistivity - resistive basalt on conductive Tertiary clastics on resistive paleozoic carbonates - formed an ideal theater for the magnetotelluric method. In 1984, Conoco acquired 48 magnetotelluric sites on about a half-mile grid. These data supported the presence of a buried high block in the Paleozoic rocks andmore » allowed confident mapping of its outlines. In addition, the magnetotelluric survey showed a thin, shallowly buried resistor coextensive with the seismic no-reflection area. In 1985, a high-effort repeat of the earlier no-reflection seismic line confirmed the high block, improved the fault interpretation, and provided weak guidance on the depth of the targeted Paleozoic rocks. Because Garden Valley's Paleozoic stratigraphy differs negligibly from that at nearby Grant Canyon field, the high block constitutes an attractive prospect - possibly the first one found in Nevada due largely to magnetotelluric surveying.« less

  4. Bedrock mapping of buried valley networks using seismic reflection and airborne electromagnetic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oldenborger, G. A.; Logan, C. E.; Hinton, M. J.; Pugin, A. J.-M.; Sapia, V.; Sharpe, D. R.; Russell, H. A. J.

    2016-05-01

    In glaciated terrain, buried valleys often host aquifers that are significant groundwater resources. However, given the range of scales, spatial complexity and depth of burial, buried valleys often remain undetected or insufficiently mapped. Accurate and thorough mapping of bedrock topography is a crucial step in detecting and delineating buried valleys and understanding formative valley processes. We develop a bedrock mapping procedure supported by the combination of seismic reflection data and helicopter time-domain electromagnetic data with water well records for the Spiritwood buried valley aquifer system in Manitoba, Canada. The limited spatial density of water well bedrock observations precludes complete depiction of the buried valley bedrock topography and renders the water well records alone inadequate for accurate hydrogeological model building. Instead, we leverage the complementary strengths of seismic reflection and airborne electromagnetic data for accurate local detection of the sediment-bedrock interface and for spatially extensive coverage, respectively. Seismic reflection data are used to define buried valley morphology in cross-section beneath survey lines distributed over a regional area. A 3D model of electrical conductivity is derived from inversion of the airborne electromagnetic data and used to extrapolate buried valley morphology over the entire survey area. A spatially variable assignment of the electrical conductivity at the bedrock surface is applied to different features of the buried valley morphology identified in the seismic cross-sections. Electrical conductivity is then used to guide construction of buried valley shapes between seismic sections. The 3D locus of points defining each morphological valley feature is constructed using a path optimization routine that utilizes deviation from the assigned electrical conductivities as the cost function. Our resulting map represents a bedrock surface of unprecedented detail with more

  5. Estimates of evapotranspiration from the Ruby Lake National Wildlife Refuge area, Ruby Valley, northeastern Nevada, May 1999-October 2000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Berger, David L.; Johnson, Michael J.; Tumbusch, Mary L.; Mackay, Jeffrey

    2001-01-01

    The Ruby Lake National Wildlife Refuge in Ruby Valley, Nevada, contains the largest area of perennial wetlands in northeastern Nevada and provides habitat to a large number of migratory and nesting waterfowl. The long-term preservation of the refuge depends on the availability of sufficient water to maintain optimal habitat conditions. In the Ruby Valley water budget, evapotranspiration (ET) from the refuge is one of the largest components of natural outflow. To help determine the amount of inflow needed to maintain wetland habitat, estimates of ET for May 1999 through October 2000 were made at major habitats throughout the refuge. The Bowen-ratio method was used to estimate daily ET at four sites: over open water, in a moderate-to-dense cover of bulrush marsh, in a moderate cover of mixed phreatophytic shrubs, and in a desert-shrub upland. The eddy-correlation method was used to estimate daily ET for periods of 2 to 12 weeks at a meadow site and at four sites in a sparse-to-moderate cover of phreatophytic shrubs. Daily ET rates ranged from less than 0.010 inch per day at all of the sites to a maximum of 0.464 inch per day at the open-water site. Average daily ET rates estimated for open water and a bulrush marsh were about four to five times greater than in areas of mixed phreatophytic shrubs, where the depth to ground water is less than 5 feet. Based on the seasonal distribution of major habitats in the refuge and on winter and summer ET rates, an estimated total of about 89,000 acre-feet of water was consumed by ET during October 1999-September 2000 (2000 water year). Of this total, about 49,800 acre-feet was consumed by ET in areas of open water and bulrush marsh.

  6. Fretted Terrain Valley in Coloe Fossae Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 1 Click on image for larger version

    The image in figure 1 shows lineated valley fill in one of a series of enclosed, intersecting troughs known as Coloe (Choloe) Fossae. Lineated valley fill consists of rows of material in valley centers that are parallel to the valley walls. It is probably made of ice-rich material and boulders that are left behind when the ice-rich material sublimates. Very distinct rows can be seen near the south (bottom) wall of the valley. Lineated valley fill is thought to result from mass wasting (downslope movement) of ice-rich material from valley walls towards their centers. It is commonly found in valleys near the crustal dichotomy that separates the two hemispheres of Mars. The valley shown here joins four other valleys with lineated fill near the top left corner of this image. Their juncture is a topographic low, suggesting that the lineated valley fill from the different valleys may be flowing or creeping towards the low area (movement towards the upper left of the image). The valley walls appear smooth at first glance but are seen to be speckled with small craters several meters in diameter at HiRISE resolution (see contrast-enhanced subimage). This indicates that at least some of the wall material has been stable to mass wasting for some period of time. Also seen on the valley wall are elongated features shaped like teardrops. These are most likely slightly older craters that have been degraded due to potentially recent downhill creep. It is unknown whether the valley walls are shedding material today. The subimage is approximately 140 x 400 m (450 x 1280 ft).

    Image PSP_001372_2160 was taken by the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera onboard the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter spacecraft on November 11, 2006. The complete image is centered at 35.5 degrees latitude, 56.8 degrees East longitude. The range to the target site was 290.3 km (181

  7. Groundwater quality in the Santa Clara River Valley, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burton, Carmen A.; Landon, Matthew K.; Belitz, Kenneth

    2011-01-01

    The Santa Clara River Valley (SCRV) study unit is located in Los Angeles and Ventura Counties, California, and is bounded by the Santa Monica, San Gabriel, Topatopa, and Santa Ynez Mountains, and the Pacific Ocean. The 460-square-mile study unit includes eight groundwater basins: Ojai Valley, Upper Ojai Valley, Ventura River Valley, Santa Clara River Valley, Pleasant Valley, Arroyo Santa Rosa Valley, Las Posas Valley, and Simi Valley (California Department of Water Resources, 2003; Montrella and Belitz, 2009). The SCRV study unit has hot, dry summers and cool, moist winters. Average annual rainfall ranges from 12 to 28 inches. The study unit is drained by the Ventura and Santa Clara Rivers, and Calleguas Creek. The primary aquifer system in the Ventura River Valley, Ojai Valley, Upper Ojai Valley, and Simi Valley basins is largely unconfined alluvium. The primary aquifer system in the remaining groundwater basins mainly consists of unconfined sands and gravels in the upper portion and partially confined marine and nonmarine deposits in the lower portion. The primary aquifer system in the SCRV study unit is defined as those parts of the aquifers corresponding to the perforated intervals of wells listed in the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) database. Public-supply wells typically are completed in the primary aquifer system to depths of 200 to 1,100 feet below land surface (bls). The wells contain solid casing reaching from the land surface to a depth of about 60-700 feet, and are perforated below the solid casing to allow water into the well. Water quality in the primary aquifer system may differ from the water in the shallower and deeper parts of the aquifer. Land use in the study unit is approximately 40 percent (%) natural (primarily shrubs, grassland, and wetlands), 37% agricultural, and 23% urban. The primary crops are citrus, avocados, alfalfa, pasture, strawberries, and dry beans. The largest urban areas in the study unit are the cities of

  8. Modeling the intraurban variation in nitrogen dioxide in urban areas in Kathmandu Valley, Nepal.

    PubMed

    Gurung, Anobha; Levy, Jonathan I; Bell, Michelle L

    2017-05-01

    With growing urbanization, traffic has become one of the main sources of air pollution in Nepal. Understanding the impact of air pollution on health requires estimation of exposure. Land use regression (LUR) modeling is widely used to investigate intraurban variation in air pollution for Western cities, but LUR models are relatively scarce in developing countries. In this study, we developed LUR models to characterize intraurban variation of nitrogen dioxide (NO 2 ) in urban areas of Kathmandu Valley, Nepal, one of the fastest urbanizing areas in South Asia. Over the study area, 135 monitoring sites were selected using stratified random sampling based on building density and road density along with purposeful sampling. In 2014, four sampling campaigns were performed, one per season, for two weeks each. NO 2 was measured using duplicate Palmes tubes at 135 sites, with additional information on nitric oxide (NO), NO 2 , and nitrogen oxide (NOx) concentrations derived from Ogawa badges at 28 sites. Geographical variables (e.g., road network, land use, built area) were used as predictor variables in LUR modeling, considering buffers 25-400m around each monitoring site. Annual average NO 2 by site ranged from 5.7 to 120ppb for the study area, with higher concentrations in the Village Development Committees (VDCs) of Kathmandu and Lalitpur than in Kirtipur, Thimi, and Bhaktapur, and with variability present within each VDC. In the final LUR model, length of major road, built area, and industrial area were positively associated with NO 2 concentration while normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) was negatively associated with NO 2 concentration (R 2 =0.51). Cross-validation of the results confirmed the reliability of the model. The combination of passive NO 2 sampling and LUR modeling techniques allowed for characterization of nitrogen dioxide patterns in a developing country setting, demonstrating spatial variability and high pollution levels. Copyright © 2017

  9. 3-D View of Death Valley, California

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2001-07-21

    This 3-D perspective view looking north over Death Valley, California, was produced by draping ASTER nighttime thermal infrared data over topographic data from the US Geological Survey. The ASTER data were acquired April 7, 2000 with the multi-spectral thermal infrared channels, and cover an area of 60 by 80 km (37 by 50 miles). Bands 13, 12, and 10 are displayed in red, green and blue respectively. The data have been computer enhanced to exaggerate the color variations that highlight differences in types of surface materials. Salt deposits on the floor of Death Valley appear in shades of yellow, green, purple, and pink, indicating presence of carbonate, sulfate, and chloride minerals. The Panamint Mtns. to the west, and the Black Mtns. to the east, are made up of sedimentary limestones, sandstones, shales, and metamorphic rocks. The bright red areas are dominated by the mineral quartz, such as is found in sandstones; green areas are limestones. In the lower center part of the image is Badwater, the lowest point in North America. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA02663

  10. 78 FR 27168 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Alaska: Mendenhall Valley PM10...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-09

    ... micrometers (PM 10 ) submitted by the State of Alaska on May 8, 2009 for the Mendenhall Valley nonattainment area (Mendenhall Valley NAA), and the State's request to redesignate the area to attainment for the... comments. Email: [email protected] Mail: Mr. Keith Rose, U.S. EPA Region 10, Office of Air, Waste...

  11. Surface Deformation in Quetta Valley, Balochistan, Pakistan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, J.; Shuhab, K.; Wulamu, A.; Crupa, W.; Khan, A. S.; Kakar, D. M.; Kasi, A.

    2015-12-01

    In February 2011, several ground fissures up to ~1.8 km in length appeared in the Quetta Valley, Balochsitan, Pakistan. It is not clear what caused the sudden occurrence of these fissures. The region is tectonically active and bounded to the west by several regional strike-slip faults including the north-south striking left-lateral Chaman fault system that slips at ~10 mm per year. Several large earthquakes have occurred recently in this area, one fatal 6.4 magnitude (Mw) earthquake occurred on October 28th, 2008. Some parts of Quetta Valley are subsiding; GPS data from two stations in Quetta that span mid-2006 - 2009 recorded subsidence rates of ~10 cm per year. Although subsidence in urban areas is generally attributed to groundwater depletion, it is not clear whether ground fissures are caused by water withdrawal or related to tectonics of the region. This study is designed to quantify and assess the source of surface deformation in Quetta Valley using InSAR, GPS, seismic and earthquake centroid moment tensor data. To detect and map the spatial-temporal features of the processes that led to the surface deformation, we used two time series, i.e., 15 European Remote Sensing (ERS-1/2) satellite images from 1992 - 1999 and 27 ENVISAT images spanning 2003 - 2010. A Differential Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (DInSAR) Small Baseline Subset (SBAS) technique was used to investigate surface deformation. Eleven continuous-GPS stations within the InSAR antenna footprint were compared with the InSAR time series for quality control. Preliminary InSAR results revealed that the areas in and around the fissures are subsiding at 5 cm per year. Five seismic lines totaling ~60 km, acquired in 2003, were used to interpret faults beneath Holocene alluvium in the Quetta Valley. One of the blind faults is a north-south striking thrust fault mapped north into the Takatu range. However, a focal mechanism for the 2008 earthquake in this region indicated northwest

  12. MX Siting Investigation. Gravity Survey - Big Smokey Valley, Nevada.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-11-28

    Monte Cristo Range, on the south by Lone Mountain arid Tonopah, Nevada, and on the north by the T1i7 ,abhv i a7e. True area covered by this report lies...Royston Hills and Monte Cristo Range) are chiefly Tertiary tuffs, rhyolites, andesites, and basalts. Basin-fill deposits within the valley reach combined...east of Royston Hills and Monte Cristo Range. At the southern end where the valley bifurcates, faults are interpreted to be near both flanks of Lone

  13. The Politics of Place: Official, Intermediate and Community Discourses in Depopulated Rural Areas of Central Spain. The Case of the Riaza River Valley (Segovia, Spain)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paniagua, Angel

    2009-01-01

    This paper provides theoretical and methodological arguments to study the politics of space in small marginal and depopulated areas of Spain. The case for research is the Riaza river valley in the province of Segovia. Usually the analysis of rural space (and the geographical space in general) provides opposing presentations: vertical, between…

  14. Valley Fever (Coccidioidomycosis) Statistics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Valley fever may be under-recognized. 2 , 3 Public health surveillance for Valley fever Valley fever is reportable ... MMWR) . Check with your local, state, or territorial public health department for more information about disease reporting requirements ...

  15. Digital tabulation of stratigraphic data from oil and gas wells in Cuyama Valley and surrounding areas, central California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sweetkind, Donald S.; Bova, Shiera C.; Langenheim, V.E.; Shumaker, Lauren E.; Scheirer, Daniel S.

    2013-01-01

    Stratigraphic information from 391 oil and gas exploration wells from Cuyama Valley, California, and surrounding areas are herein compiled in digital form from reports that were released originally in paper form. The Cuyama Basin is located within the southeasternmost part of the Coast Ranges and north of the western Transverse Ranges, west of the San Andreas fault. Knowledge of the location and elevation of stratigraphic tops of formations throughout the basin is a first step toward understanding depositional trends and the structural evolution of the basin through time, and helps in understanding the slip history and partitioning of slip on San Andreas and related faults.

  16. Space Radar Image of Owens Valley, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This is a three-dimensional perspective view of Owens Valley, near the town of Bishop, California that was created by combining two spaceborne radar images using a technique known as interferometry. Visualizations like this one are helpful to scientists because they clarify the relationships of the different types of surfaces detected by the radar and the shapes of the topographic features such as mountains and valleys. The view is looking southeast along the eastern edge of Owens Valley. The White Mountains are in the center of the image, and the Inyo Mountains loom in the background. The high peaks of the White Mountains rise more than 3,000 meters (10,000 feet) above the valley floor. The runways of the Bishop airport are visible at the right edge of the image. The meandering course of the Owens River and its tributaries appear light blue on the valley floor. Blue areas in the image are smooth, yellow areas are rock outcrops, and brown areas near the mountains are deposits of boulders, gravel and sand known as alluvial fans. The image was constructed by overlaying a color composite radar image on top of a digital elevation map. The radar data were taken by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) on board the space shuttle Endeavour in October 1994. The digital elevation map was produced using radar interferometry, a process in which radar data are acquired on different passes of the space shuttle. The two data passes are compared to obtain elevation information. The elevation data were derived from a 1,500-km-long (930-mile) digital topographic map processed at JPL. Radar image data are draped over the topography to provide the color with the following assignments: red is L-band vertically transmitted, vertically received; green is C-band vertically transmitted, vertically received; and blue is the ratio of C-band vertically transmitted, vertically received to L-band vertically transmitted, vertically received. This image is

  17. Scenario earthquake hazards for the Long Valley Caldera-Mono Lake area, east-central California (ver. 2.0, January 2018)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chen, Rui; Branum, David M.; Wills, Chris J.; Hill, David P.

    2014-06-30

    As part of the U.S. Geological Survey’s (USGS) multi-hazards project in the Long Valley Caldera-Mono Lake area, the California Geological Survey (CGS) developed several earthquake scenarios and evaluated potential seismic hazards, including ground shaking, surface fault rupture, liquefaction, and landslide hazards associated with these earthquake scenarios. The results of these analyses can be useful in estimating the extent of potential damage and economic losses because of potential earthquakes and also for preparing emergency response plans.The Long Valley Caldera-Mono Lake area has numerous active faults. Five of these faults or fault zones are considered capable of producing magnitude ≥6.7 earthquakes according to the Uniform California Earthquake Rupture Forecast, Version 2 (UCERF 2) developed by the 2007 Working Group on California Earthquake Probabilities (WGCEP) and the USGS National Seismic Hazard Mapping Program. These five faults are the Fish Slough, Hartley Springs, Hilton Creek, Mono Lake, and Round Valley Faults. CGS developed earthquake scenarios for these five faults in the study area and for the White Mountains Fault Zone to the east of the study area.In this report, an earthquake scenario is intended to depict the potential consequences of significant earthquakes. A scenario earthquake is not necessarily the largest or most damaging earthquake possible on a recognized fault. Rather it is both large enough and likely enough that emergency planners should consider it in regional emergency response plans. In particular, the ground motion predicted for a given scenario earthquake does not represent a full probabilistic hazard assessment, and thus it does not provide the basis for hazard zoning and earthquake-resistant building design.Earthquake scenarios presented here are based on fault geometry and activity data developed by the WGCEP, and are consistent with the 2008 Update of the United States National Seismic Hazard Maps (NSHM). Alternatives

  18. Valley polarization in bismuth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fauque, Benoit

    2013-03-01

    The electronic structure of certain crystal lattices can contain multiple degenerate valleys for their charge carriers to occupy. The principal challenge in the development of valleytronics is to lift the valley degeneracy of charge carriers in a controlled way. In bulk semi-metallic bismuth, the Fermi surface includes three cigar-shaped electron valleys lying almost perpendicular to the high symmetry axis known as the trigonal axis. The in-plane mass anisotropy of each valley exceeds 200 as a consequence of Dirac dispersion, which drastically reduces the effective mass along two out of the three orientations. According to our recent study of angle-dependent magnetoresistance in bismuth, a flow of Dirac electrons along the trigonal axis is extremely sensitive to the orientation of in-plane magnetic field. Thus, a rotatable magnetic field can be used as a valley valve to tune the contribution of each valley to the total conductivity. As a consequence of a unique combination of high mobility and extreme mass anisotropy in bismuth, the effect is visible even at room temperature in a magnetic field of 1 T. Thus, a modest magnetic field can be used as a valley valve in bismuth. The results of our recent investigation of angle-dependent magnetoresistance in other semi-metals and doped semiconductors suggest that a rotating magnetic field can behave as a valley valve in a multi-valley system with sizeable mass anisotropy.

  19. Subglacial tunnel valleys dissecting the Alpine landscape - an example from Bern, Switzerland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dürst Stucki, Mirjam; Reber, Regina; Schlunegger, Fritz

    2010-05-01

    The morphology of the Alpine and adjacent landscapes is directly related to glacial erosion and associated sediment transport. Here we report the effects of glacio-hydrologic erosion on bedrock topography in the Swiss Mittelland. Specifically, we identify the presence of subsurface valleys beneath the city of Bern in Switzerland and discuss their genesis. Detailed stratigraphic investigations of more than 4000 borehole data within a 430 km2-large area reveal the presence of a network of >200 m-deep and 1000 m-wide valleys. They are flat floored with steep sided walls and are filled by Quaternary fluvio-glacial deposits. The main valley beneath Bern is straight and oriented towards the NNW, with valley flanks more than 20° steep. The valley bottom has an irregular undulating profile along the thalweg, with differences between sills and hollows higher than 50-100 m over a reach of 4 kilometers length. Approximately 200 m high bedrock uplands flank the valley network. The uplands are dissected by up to 80 m-deep and 500 m-broad hanging valleys that currently drain away from the axis of the main valley. We interpret the valleys beneath the city of Bern to be a tunnel valley network which originated from subglacial erosion by melt water. The upland valleys are hanging with respect to the trunk system, indicating that these incipient upland systems as well as the main gorge beneath Bern formed by glacial melt water under hydrostatic pressure. This explains the ascending flow of glacial water from the base towards the higher elevation hanging valleys where high water discharge resulted in the formation of broad valley geometries. Similarly, we relate efficient erosion, excavation of bedrock and the formation of the tunnel valley network with >20° steep shoulders to confined flow under pressure, caused by the overlying ice.

  20. Beaver assisted river valley formation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Westbrook, Cherie J.; Cooper, D.J.; Baker, B.W.

    2011-01-01

    We examined how beaver dams affect key ecosystem processes, including pattern and process of sediment deposition, the composition and spatial pattern of vegetation, and nutrient loading and processing. We provide new evidence for the formation of heterogeneous beaver meadows on riverine system floodplains and terraces where dynamic flows are capable of breaching in-channel beaver dams. Our data show a 1.7-m high beaver dam triggered overbank flooding that drowned vegetation in areas deeply flooded, deposited nutrient-rich sediment in a spatially heterogeneous pattern on the floodplain and terrace, and scoured soils in other areas. The site quickly de-watered following the dam breach by high stream flows, protecting the deposited sediment from future re-mobilization by overbank floods. Bare sediment either exposed by scouring or deposited by the beaver flood was quickly colonized by a spatially heterogeneous plant community, forming a beaver meadow. Many willow and some aspen seedlings established in the more heavily disturbed areas, suggesting the site may succeed to a willow carr plant community suitable for future beaver re-occupation. We expand existing theory beyond the beaver pond to include terraces within valleys. This more fully explains how beavers can help drive the formation of alluvial valleys and their complex vegetation patterns as was first postulated by Ruedemann and Schoonmaker in 1938. ?? 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Lead-rich sediments, Coeur d'Alene River Valley, Idaho: area, volume, tonnage, and lead content

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bookstrom, Arthur A.; Box, Stephen E.; Campbell, Julie K.; Foster, Kathryn I.; Jackson, Berne L.

    2001-01-01

    In north Idaho, downstream from the Coeur d?Alene (CdA) silver-lead-zinc mining district, lead-rich sediments, containing at least 1,000 ppm of lead, cover approximately 61 km2 (or 73 percent) of the 84-km2 floor of the CdA River valley, from the confluence of its North and South Forks to the top of its delta-front slope, in CdA Lake. Concentrations of lead (Pb) in surface sediments range from 15 to about 38,500 ppm, and average 3,370 ppm, which is 112 times the mean background concentration (30 ppm) of Pb in uncontaminated sediments of the CdA and St. Joe River valleys. Most of the highest concentrations of Pb are in sediments within or near the river channel, or near the base of the stratigraphic section of Pb-rich sediments. Ranges of Pb concentration in Pb-rich sediments gradually decrease with increasing distance from the river and its distributaries. Ranges of thickness of Pb-rich sediments generally decrease abruptly with increasing distance from the river, from about 3 + 3 m in the river channel to about 1 + 1m on upland riverbanks, levees and sand splays, to about 0.3 + 0.3 m in back-levee marshes and lateral lakes. Thickness of Pb-rich dredge spoils (removed from the river and deposited on Cataldo-Mission Flats) is mostly in the range 4 + 4 m, thinning away from an outfall zone north and west of the river, near the formerly dredged channel reach near Cataldo Landing. We attribute lateral variation in ranges of thickness and Pb content of Pb-rich sediments to the dynamic balance between decreasing floodwater flow velocity with increasing distance from the river and the quantity, size, density, and Pb content of particles mobilized, transported, and deposited. We present alternative median- and mean-based estimates of the volume of Pbrich sediments, their wet and dry tonnage, and their tonnage of contained Pb. We calculate separate pairs of estimates for 23 Estimation Units, each of which corresponds to a major depositional environment, divided into down-valley

  2. The Oasis impact structure, Libya: geological characteristics from ALOS PALSAR-2 data interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Gasselt, Stephan; Kim, Jung Rack; Choi, Yun-Soo; Kim, Jaemyeong

    2017-02-01

    Optical and infrared remote sensing may provide first-order clues for the identification of potential impact structures on the Earth. Despite the free availability of at least optical image data at highest resolution, research has shown that remote sensing analysis always remains inconclusive and extensive groundwork is needed for the confirmation of the impact origin of such structures. Commonly, optical image data and digital terrain models have been employed mainly for such remote sensing studies of impact structures. With the advent of imaging radar data, a few excursions have been made to also employ radar datasets. Despite its long use, capabilities of imaging radar for studying surface and subsurface structures have not been exploited quantitatively when applied for the identification and description of such features due to the inherent complexity of backscatter processes. In this work, we make use of higher-level derived radar datasets in order to gain clearer qualitative insights that help to describe and identify potential impact structures. We make use of high-resolution data products from the ALOS PALSAR-1 and ALOS PALSAR-2 L-band sensors to describe the heavily eroded Oasis impact structure located in the Libyan Desert. While amplitude radar data with single polarization have usually been utilized to accompany the suite of remote sensing datasets when interpreting impact structures in the past, we conclude that the integration of amplitude data with HH/HV/HH-HV polarization modes in standard and, in particular, in Ultra-Fine mode, as well as entropy-alpha decomposition data, significantly helps to identify and discriminate surface units based on their consolidation. Based on the overarching structural pattern, we determined the diameter of the eroded Oasis structure at 15.6 ± 0.5 km.

  3. The T-REX valley wind intercomparison project

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidli, J; Billings, B J; Burton, R

    2008-08-07

    An accurate simulation of the evolution of the atmospheric boundary layer is very important, as the evolution of the boundary layer sets the stage for many weather phenomena, such as deep convection. Over mountain areas the evolution of the boundary layer is particularly complex, due to the nonlinear interaction between boundary layer turbulence and thermally-induced mesoscale wind systems, such as the slope and valley winds. As the horizontal resolution of operational forecasts progresses to finer and finer resolution, more and more of the thermally-induced mesoscale wind systems can be explicitly resolved, and it is very timely to document the currentmore » state-of-the-art of mesoscale models at simulating the coupled evolution of the mountain boundary layer and the valley wind system. In this paper we present an intercomparison of valley wind simulations for an idealized valley-plain configuration using eight state-of-the-art mesoscale models with a grid spacing of 1 km. Different sets of three-dimensional simulations are used to explore the effects of varying model dynamical cores and physical parameterizations. This intercomparison project was conducted as part of the Terrain-induced Rotor Experiment (T-REX; Grubisic et al., 2008).« less

  4. Ground-water quality in east-central Idaho valleys

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parliman, D.J.

    1982-01-01

    From May through November 1978, water quality, geologic, and hydrologic data were collected for 108 wells in the Lemhi, Pahsimeroi, Salman River (Stanley to Salmon), Big Lost River, and Little Lost River valleys in east-central Idaho. Data were assembled to define, on a reconnaissance level, water-quality conditions in major aquifers and to develop an understanding of factors that affected conditions in 1978 and could affect future ground-water quality. Water-quality characteristics determined include specific conductance, pH, water temperature, major dissolved cations, major dissolved anions, and coliform bacteria. Concentrations of hardness, nitrite plus nitrate, coliform bacteria, dissolved solids, sulfate, chloride, fluoride , iron, calcium, magnesium, sodium, potassium or bicarbonate exceed public drinking water regulation limits or were anomalously high in some water samples. Highly mineralized ground water probably is due to the natural composition of the aquifers and not to surface contamination. Concentrations of coliform bacteria that exceed public drinking water limits and anomalously high dissolved nitrite-plus-nitrite concentrations are from 15- to 20-year old irrigation wells in heavily irrigated or more densely populated areas of the valleys. Ground-water quality and quantity in most of the study area are sufficient to meet current (1978) population and economic demands. Ground water in all valleys is characterized by significant concentrations of calcium, magnesium, and bicarbonate plus carbonate ions. Variations in the general trend of ground-water composition (especially in the Lemhi Valley) probably are most directly related to variability in aquifer lithology and proximity of sampling site to source of recharge. (USGS)

  5. NNSS Soils Monitoring: Plutonium Valley (CAU 366) FY2016

    SciTech Connect

    Nikolich, George; Mizell, Steve; McCurdy, Greg

    2017-10-01

    Desert Research Institute (DRI) is conducting a field assessment of the potential for contaminated soil transport from the Plutonium Valley Contamination Area (CA) as a result of wind transport and storm runoff in support of National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) efforts to complete regulatory closure of the contamination areas. The DRI work is intended to confirm the likely mechanism(s) of transport and determine the meteorological conditions that might cause movement of contaminated soils. The emphasis of the work is on collecting sediment transported by channelized storm runoff at the Plutonium Valley investigation sites. These data will inform closure plans thatmore » are being developed, which will facilitate the appropriate closure design and post-closure monitoring.« less

  6. Imaging Radar in the Mojave Desert-Death Valley Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farr, Tom G.

    2001-01-01

    The Mojave Desert-Death Valley region has had a long history as a test bed for remote sensing techniques. Along with visible-near infrared and thermal IR sensors, imaging radars have flown and orbited over the area since the 1970's, yielding new insights into the geologic applications of these technologies. More recently, radar interferometry has been used to derive digital topographic maps of the area, supplementing the USGS 7.5' digital quadrangles currently available for nearly the entire area. As for their shorter-wavelength brethren, imaging radars were tested early in their civilian history in the Mojave Desert-Death Valley region because it contains a variety of surface types in a small area without the confounding effects of vegetation. The earliest imaging radars to be flown over the region included military tests of short-wavelength (3 cm) X-band sensors. Later, the Jet Propulsion Laboratory began its development of imaging radars with an airborne sensor, followed by the Seasat orbital radar in 1978. These systems were L-band (25 cm). Following Seasat, JPL embarked upon a series of Space Shuttle Imaging Radars: SIRA (1981), SIR-B (1984), and SIR-C (1994). The most recent in the series was the most capable radar sensor flown in space and acquired large numbers of data swaths in a variety of test areas around the world. The Mojave Desert-Death Valley region was one of those test areas, and was covered very well with 3 wavelengths, multiple polarizations, and at multiple angles. At the same time, the JPL aircraft radar program continued improving and collecting data over the Mojave Desert Death Valley region. Now called AIRSAR, the system includes 3 bands (P-band, 67 cm; L-band, 25 cm; C-band, 5 cm). Each band can collect all possible polarizations in a mode called polarimetry. In addition, AIRSAR can be operated in the TOPSAR mode wherein 2 antennas collect data interferometrically, yielding a digital elevation model (DEM). Both L-band and C-band can be

  7. Geohydrology of the Unconsolidated Valley-Fill Aquifer in the Meads Creek Valley, Schuyler and Steuben Counties, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, Todd S.; Bugliosi, Edward F.; Reddy, James E.

    2008-01-01

    percent was from losing reaches of tributaries, 38 percent was unchanneled flow from hillsides that slope toward the valley (this estimate includes runoff and shallow ground-water inflow from till and bedrock), and the remaining 2 percent was from deep ground-water inflow from till and bedrock to the sides and bottom of the aquifer. Nearly all (94 percent) of the water discharged from the aquifer is equivalent to the streamflow gain in Meads Creek; the remaining 6 percent discharges as deep outflow to unconsolidated deposits in the Cohocton River valley. Several characteristics of the Meads Creek valley may contribute to flooding in the downstream area: (1) the southward decrease in the ground-water gradient impedes the ability of the aquifer to transmit water southward and can cause water levels to rise, (2) a high water table, typically only 5 to 10 feet below land surface, results in little storage capacity to absorb water from large storms, (3) a downstream narrowing of the valley impedes the southward flow of ground water and can cause water levels to rapidly rise during periods of prolonged or heavy precipitation, and (4) the upland slopes (till-covered bedrock) produce rapid runoff that recharges the aquifer. The combined effect of these conditions limits the ability of the aquifer to transmit sudden, large increases in recharge from precipitation and thereby provides a high potential for flooding in the southern third of the valley.

  8. Volume of Valley Networks on Mars and Its Hydrologic Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, W.; Cang, X.; Howard, A. D.; Heo, J.

    2015-12-01

    Valley networks on Mars are river-like features that offer the best evidence for water activities in its geologic past. Previous studies have extracted valley network lines automatically from digital elevation model (DEM) data and manually from remotely sensed images. The volume of material removed by valley networks is an important parameter that could help us infer the amount of water needed to carve the valleys. A progressive black top hat (PBTH) transformation algorithm has been adapted from image processing to extract valley volume and successfully applied to simulated landform and Ma'adim Valles, Mars. However, the volume of valley network excavation on Mars has not been estimated on a global scale. In this study, the PBTH method was applied to the whole Mars to estimate this important parameter. The process was automated with Python in ArcGIS. Polygons delineating the valley associated depressions were generated by using a multi-flow direction growth method, which started with selected high point seeds on a depth grid (essentially an inverted valley) created by PBTH transformation and grew outward following multi-flow direction on the depth grid. Two published versions of valley network lines were integrated to automatically select depression polygons that represent the valleys. Some crater depressions that are connected with valleys and thus selected in the previous step were removed by using information from a crater database. Because of large distortion associated with global dataset in projected maps, the volume of each cell within a valley was calculated using the depth of the cell multiplied by the spherical area of the cell. The volumes of all the valley cells were then summed to produce the estimate of global valley excavation volume. Our initial result of this estimate was ~2.4×1014 m3. Assuming a sediment density of 2900 kg/m3, a porosity of 0.35, and a sediment load of 1.5 kg/m3, the global volume of water needed to carve the valleys was

  9. Wetland survey of the X-10 Bethel Valley and Melton Valley groundwater operable units at Oak Ridge National Labortory Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Rosensteel, B.A.

    1996-03-01

    Executive Order 11990, Protection of Wetlands, (May 24, 1977) requires that federal agencies avoid, to the extent possible, adverse impacts associated with the destruction and modification of wetlands and that they avoid direct and indirect support of wetlands development when there is a practicable alternative. In accordance with Department of Energy (DOE) Regulations for Compliance with Floodplains and Wetlands Environmental Review Requirements (Subpart B, 10 CFR 1022.11), surveys for wetland presence or absence were conducted in both the Melton Valley and the Bethel Valley Groundwater Operable Units (GWOU) on the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) from October 1994 through Septembermore » 1995. As required by the Energy and Water Development Appropriations Act of 1992, wetlands were identified using the criteria and methods set forth in the Wetlands Delineation Manual (Army Corps of Engineers, 1987). Wetlands were identified during field surveys that examined and documented vegetation, soils, and hydrologic evidence. Most of the wetland boundary locations and wetland sizes are approximate. Boundaries of wetlands in Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 2 and on the former proposed site of the Advanced Neutron Source in the upper Melton Branch watershed were located by civil survey during previous wetland surveys; thus, the boundary locations and areal sizes in these areas are accurate. The wetlands were classified according to the system developed by Cowardin et al. (1979) for wetland and deepwater habitats of the United States. A total of 215 individual wetland areas ranging in size from 0.002 ha to 9.97 ha were identified in the Bethel Valley and Melton Valley GWOUs. The wetlands are classified as palustrine forested broad-leaved deciduous (PFO1), palustrine scrub-shrub broad-leaved deciduous (PSS1), and palustrine persistent emergent (PEM1).« less

  10. 40 CFR 81.81 - Merrimack Valley-Southern New Hampshire Interstate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.81 Merrimack Valley-Southern New Hampshire Interstate Air Quality Control Region. The Merrimack Valley Southern New Hampshire Interstate Air Quality Control Region (Massachusetts-New Hampshire) consists of the territorial area encompassed by the boundaries of the following...

  11. 40 CFR 81.81 - Merrimack Valley-Southern New Hampshire Interstate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.81 Merrimack Valley-Southern New Hampshire Interstate Air Quality Control Region. The Merrimack Valley Southern New Hampshire Interstate Air Quality Control Region (Massachusetts-New Hampshire) consists of the territorial area encompassed by the boundaries of the following...

  12. 40 CFR 81.81 - Merrimack Valley-Southern New Hampshire Interstate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.81 Merrimack Valley-Southern New Hampshire Interstate Air Quality Control Region. The Merrimack Valley Southern New Hampshire Interstate Air Quality Control Region (Massachusetts-New Hampshire) consists of the territorial area encompassed by the boundaries of the following...

  13. 40 CFR 81.81 - Merrimack Valley-Southern New Hampshire Interstate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.81 Merrimack Valley-Southern New Hampshire Interstate Air Quality Control Region. The Merrimack Valley Southern New Hampshire Interstate Air Quality Control Region (Massachusetts-New Hampshire) consists of the territorial area encompassed by the boundaries of the following...

  14. 40 CFR 81.81 - Merrimack Valley-Southern New Hampshire Interstate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.81 Merrimack Valley-Southern New Hampshire Interstate Air Quality Control Region. The Merrimack Valley Southern New Hampshire Interstate Air Quality Control Region (Massachusetts-New Hampshire) consists of the territorial area encompassed by the boundaries of the following...

  15. Fox Valley Technical Institute Economic Development Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox Valley Technical Inst., Appleton, WI.

    Designed as an operating blueprint for Fox Valley Technical Institute's (FVTI's) economic development efforts, this guide incorporates the necessary operation procedures, descriptions, and resources for those involved in FVTI's effort to assist existing businesses to expand and to attract new businesses to the area. Introductory material describes…

  16. Determination of water-soluble ions in soils from the dry valleys of Antarctica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bustin, R.

    1981-01-01

    The soil chemistry of the dry valleys of Antarctica was studied. These valleys furnish a terrestrial analog for the surface of Mars. The abundance of the water-soluble ions magnesium, calcium, potassium, sodium chloride, and nitrate in soil samples was determined. All samples examined contained water-soluble salts reflecting the aridity of the area. Movement of salts to low-lying areas was verified. Upward ionic migration was evident in all core samples. Of all cations observed, sodium showed the greatest degree of migration.

  17. Evaluation of Irrigation Water Use Efficiency and Water-saving in the Middle Oasis of Heihe River Basin Using a Distributed Agro-hydrological Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Y.; Huang, G., Sr.; Xu, X.; Huang, Q.; Huo, Z.

    2015-12-01

    Severe water scarcity and unreasonable allocation are threatening the eco-environment in the Heihe River basin (HRB), an arid and semi-arid watershed in Northwest China. The water use in the middle oasis accounts for about 70% of the total water use in the HRB, in which over 85% are consumed by irrigated agriculture. Thus the regional assessment and improvement of irrigation water use are quite essential for water-saving and eco-environmental sustainability. This paper applied a distributed agro-hydrological model (SWAP-EPIC) integrated with ArcGIS to investigate the irrigation water use efficiency (WUE) in the middle oasis. The detailed distributed data in 2012, including soil properties, irrigation schedules, crop pattern and calendar, were collected and used in the regional simulation. The spatial-temporal distribution of LAI and evapotranspiration (ETa) from remote sensing were used as observations to calibrate the model. Results showed that the simulation data was in a good agreement with the observation one. The relative WUE (i.e. divided by the mean value) ranged from 0.77 to 1.33 in different canal command areas. Large spatial variations of WUE were mainly caused by the non-uniform distribution of irrigation water. The present irrigation performance was poor, and only 50% of total irrigation amount was finally utilized through evapotranspiration in the whole district. While nearly 24% of the irrigation water were lost through field deep percolation and 26% were wasted in canal conveyance. Further analysis of water-saving scenarios was conducted through applying the improved irrigation schedule for each crop-soil unites and increasing the canal conveyance efficiency. Prediction showed that 15% of total irrigation amount can be saved without reduction of crop yield.

  18. Why transition risk to psychosis is not declining at the OASIS ultra high risk service: The hidden role of stable pretest risk enrichment.

    PubMed

    Fusar-Poli, P; Palombini, E; Davies, C; Oliver, D; Bonoldi, I; Ramella-Cravaro, V; McGuire, P

    2018-02-01

    The reason for declining risk to psychosis across individuals assessed and meeting Ultra High Risk (UHR) criteria is still unclear. No studies have investigated the potential substantial role of the underlying risk enrichment across all the individuals undergoing an UHR assessment. Cohort study including all non-psychotic subjects who were assessed on suspicion of psychosis risk by the OASIS UHR service in the period 2001 to 2015. Posttest (after UHR assessment) and pretest risk (before UHR assessment) of psychosis were stratified and compared across three time periods (2001-2005, 2006-2010, 2011-2015) with Cox analysis and modulating factors were investigated. The posttest risk of psychosis at the OASIS service has increased from the initial pilot years of the service (2001-2005) and then stabilised and not declined over the following decade (2006-2010 and 2011-2015). This was paralleled by a similar course of pretest risk for psychosis. Stability of pretest risk for psychosis over the past decade was associated with a lack of change in ethnicity and to counterweighting changes in the type of referral sources over different time periods. The time course of transition risk to psychosis in UHR services is strictly associated with the time course of pretest risk enrichment. If the latter remains stable over time, as for the OASIS service, no declining transition risk is observed over the most recent years. Pretest risk enrichment is determined by recruitment and sampling strategies. This study confirms the need to control these factors in the UHR field. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Ground water in the Escalante Valley, Beaver, Iron, and Washington Counties, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fix, Philip F.; Nelson, W.B.; Lofgren, B.E.; Butler, R.G.

    1950-01-01

    Escalante Valley in southwestern Utah is one of the largest and most important ground-water areas of the State, with 1,300 square miles of arid land and an additional 1,500 square miles in its tributary drainage basin. Ground water is obtained from gravel and sand beds in the unconsolidated valley fill. In 1950 more irrigation wells were pumped than in any other basin of Utah, and their total pumpage exceeded 80,000 acre-feet. Farming is done chiefly in the Beryl-Enterprise district at the south (upper) end of the valley, where it depends almost entirely upon ground water, and in the Milford and Minersville districts in the northeast-central part of the valley. This progress report concerns chiefly the Beryl-Enterprise and Milford districts.

  20. A recombinant Rift Valley fever virus glycoprotein subunit vaccine confers full protection against Rift Valley fever challenge in sheep

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) is a mosquito-borne zoonotic pathogen causing disease outbreaks in Africa and the Arabian Peninsula. The virus has great potential for transboundary spread due to the presence of competent vectors in non-endemic areas. There is currently no fully licensed vaccine suita...

  1. Ground-water potentialities in the Crescent Valley, Eureka and Lander Counties, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zones, Christie Paul

    1961-01-01

    The Crescent Valley is an intermontane basin in Eureka and Lander Counties, just south of the Humboldt River in north-central Nevada. The valley floor, with an area of about 150 square miles, has a shape that more nearly resembles a Y than a crescent, although the valley apparently was named after the arc described by its southern part and northeastern arm. The northwestern arm of the Y extends northward to the small railroad town of Beowawe on the Humboldt River; the northeastern arm lies east of the low Dry Hills. The leg of the Y extends southwestward toward a narrow gap which separates the Crescent Valley from the Carico Lake Valley. The total drainage area of the Crescent Valley-about 700 square miles--includes also the slopes of the bordering mountain ranges: the Shoshone Range to the west, the Cortez Mountains to the east, and the Toiyabe Range to the south. The early history of the Crescent Valley was dominated by mining of silver and gold, centered at Lander in the Shoshone Range and at Cortez and Mill Canyon in the Cortez Mountains, but in recent years the only major mining activity has been at Gold Acres; there open-pit mining of low-grade gold ore has supported a community of about 200. For many years the only agricultural enterprises in the valley were two cattle ranches, but recently addition lands have been developed for the raising of crops in the west-central part of the valley. The average annual precipitation upon the floor of the Crescent Valley is probably less than 7 inches, of which only a little more than 1 inch formally falls during the growing season (from June through September). This is far less than the requirement of any plants of economic value, and irrigation is essential to agricultural development. Small perennial streams rising in the mountains have long been utilized for domestic supply, mining and milling activities of the past, and irrigation, and recently some large wells have been developed for irrigation. In 1956 the total

  2. [Archaeal diversity in permafrost deposits of Bunger Hills Oasis and King George Island (Antarctica) according to the 16S rRNA gene sequencing].

    PubMed

    Karaevskaia, E S; Demchenko, L S; Demidov, N É; Rivkina, E M; Bulat, S A; Gilichinskiĭ, D A

    2014-01-01

    Archaeal communities of permafrost deposits of King George Island and Bunger Hills Oasis (Antarctica) differing in the content of biogenic methane were analyzed using clone libraries of two 16S rRNA gene regions. Phylotypes belonging to methanogenic archaea were identified in all horizons.

  3. Optical manipulation of valley pseudospin

    DOE PAGES

    Ye, Ziliang; Sun, Dezheng; Heinz, Tony F.

    2016-09-19

    The coherent manipulation of spin and pseudospin underlies existing and emerging quantum technologies, including quantum communication and quantum computation. Valley polarization, associated with the occupancy of degenerate, but quantum mechanically distinct valleys in momentum space, closely resembles spin polarization and has been proposed as a pseudospin carrier for the future quantum electronics. Valley exciton polarization has been created in the transition metal dichalcogenide monolayers using excitation by circularly polarized light and has been detected both optically and electrically. In addition, the existence of coherence in the valley pseudospin has been identified experimentally. The manipulation of such valley coherence has, however,more » remained out of reach. In this paper, we demonstrate all-optical control of the valley coherence by means of the pseudomagnetic field associated with the optical Stark effect. Using below-bandgap circularly polarized light, we rotate the valley exciton pseudospin in monolayer WSe 2 on the femtosecond timescale. Both the direction and speed of the rotation can be manipulated optically by tuning the dynamic phase of excitons in opposite valleys. Finally, this study unveils the possibility of generation, manipulation, and detection of the valley pseudospin by coupling to photons.« less

  4. Geology and water resources of Owens Valley, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hollett, Kenneth J.; Danskin, Wesley R.; McCaffrey, William F.; Walti, Caryl L.

    1991-01-01

    Owens Valley, a long, narrow valley located along the east flank of the Sierra Nevada in east-central California, is the main source of water for the city of Los Angeles. The city diverts most of the surface water in the valley into the Owens River-Los Angeles Aqueduct system, which transports the water more than 200 miles south to areas of distribution and use. Additionally, ground water is pumped or flows from wells to supplement the surface-water diversions to the river-aqueduct system. Pumpage from wells needed to supplement water export has increased since 1970, when a second aqueduct was put into service, and local concerns have been expressed that the increased pumpage may have had a detrimental effect on the environment and the indigenous alkaline scrub and meadow plant communities in the valley. The scrub and meadow communities depend on soil moisture derived from precipitation and the unconfined part of a multilayered aquifer system. This report, which describes the hydrogeology of the aquifer system and the water resources of the valley, is one in a series designed to (1) evaluate the effects that groundwater pumping has on scrub and meadow communities and (2) appraise alternative strategies to mitigate any adverse effects caused by, pumping. Two principal topographic features are the surface expression of the geologic framework--the high, prominent mountains on the east and west sides of the valley and the long, narrow intermountain valley floor. The mountains are composed of sedimentary, granitic, and metamorphic rocks, mantled in part by volcanic rocks as well as by glacial, talus, and fluvial deposits. The valley floor is underlain by valley fill that consists of unconsolidated to moderately consolidated alluvial fan, transition-zone, glacial and talus, and fluvial and lacustrine deposits. The valley fill also includes interlayered recent volcanic flows and pyroclastic rocks. The bedrock surface beneath the valley fill is a narrow, steep-sided graben

  5. Dispersion of Perfluorocarbon Tracers within the Salt Lake Valley during VTMX 2000

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fast, Jerome D.; Allwine, K. Jerry; Dietz, Russell N.; Clawson, Kirk L.; Torcolini, Joel C.

    2006-06-01

    Six perfluorocarbon tracer experiments were conducted in Salt Lake City, Utah, during October 2000 as part of the Vertical Transport and Mixing (VTMX) field campaign. Four tracers were released at different sites to obtain information on dispersion during stable conditions within down-valley flow, canyon outflow, and interacting circulations in the downtown area. Some of the extensive tracer data that were collected are presented in the context of the meteorological field campaign measurements. Tracer measurements at building-top sites in the downtown area and along the lower slopes of the Wasatch Front indicated that vertical mixing processes transported material up to at least 180 m above the valley floor, although model simulations suggest that tracers were transported upward to much higher elevations. Tracer data provided evidence of downward mixing of canyon outflow, upward mixing within down-valley flow, horizontal transport above the surface stable layer, and transport within horizontal eddies produced by the interaction of canyon and down-valley flows. Although point meteorological measurements are useful in evaluating the forecasts produced by mesoscale models, the tracer data provide valuable information on how the time-varying three-dimensional mean and turbulent motions over urban and valley spatial scales affect dispersion. Although the mean tracer transport predicted by the modeling system employed in this study was qualitatively similar to the measurements, improvements are needed in the treatment of turbulent vertical mixing.

  6. Structure and Velocities of the Northeastern Santa Cruz Mountains and the Western Santa Clara Valley, California, from the SCSI-LR Seismic Survey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Catchings, R.D.; Goldman, M.R.; Gandhok, G.

    2006-01-01

    Introduction: The Santa Clara Valley is located in the southern San Francisco Bay area of California and generally includes the area south of the San Francisco Bay between the Santa Cruz Mountains on the southwest and the Diablo Ranges on the northeast. The area has a population of approximately 1.7 million including the city of San Jose, numerous smaller cities, and much of the high-technology manufacturing and research area commonly referred to as the Silicon Valley. Major active strands of the San Andreas Fault system bound the Santa Clara Valley, including the San Andreas fault to the southwest and the Hayward and Calaveras faults to the northeast; related faults likely underlie the alluvium of the valley. This report focuses on subsurface structures of the western Santa Clara Valley and the northeastern Santa Cruz Mountains and their potential effects on earthquake hazards and ground-water resource management in the area. Earthquake hazards and ground-water resources in the Santa Clara Valley are important considerations to California and the Nation because of the valley's preeminence as a major technical and industrial center, proximity to major earthquakes faults, and large population. To assess the earthquake hazards of the Santa Clara Valley better, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has undertaken a program to evaluate potential earthquake sources and potential effects of strong ground shaking within the valley. As part of that program, and to better assess water resources of the valley, the USGS and the Santa Clara Valley Water District (SCVWD) began conducting collaborative studies to characterize the faults, stratigraphy, and structures beneath the alluvial cover of the Santa Clara Valley in the year 2000. Such geologic features are important to both agencies because they directly influence the availability and management of groundwater resources in the valley, and they affect the severity and distribution of strong shaking from local or regional

  7. COHORT OF WOMEN LIVING IN OR NEAR A HIGHLY INDUSTRIALIZED AREA OF KANAWHA RIVER VALLEY IN WEST VIRGINIA: ENDOMETRIOSIS AND BLOOD LEVELS OF DIOXIN AND DIOXIN-LIKE CHEMICALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Introduction Historical releases of dioxin and dioxin-like chemicals with subsequent impacts to environmental media in the Kanawha River Valley (KRV) of West Virginia have been well documented.' The bulk of dioxin found in this area appears to be derived from the production of 2,...

  8. Virgin Valley opal district, Humboldt County, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Staatz, Mortimer Hay; Bauer, Herman L.

    1951-01-01

    The Virgin Valley opal district, Humboldt County, Nevada, is near the Oregon-Nevada border in the Sheldon Game Refuge. Nineteen claims owned by Jack and Toni Crane were examined, sampled, and tested radiometrically for uranium. Numerous discontinuous layers of opal are interbedded with a gently-dipping series of vitric tuff and ash which is at least 300 ft thick. The tuff and ash are capped by a dark, vesicular basalt in the eastern part of the area and by a thin layer of terrace qravels in the area along the west side of Virgin Valley. Silicification of the ash and tuff has produced a rock that ranges from partly opalized rock that resembles silicified shale to completely altered rock that is entirely translucent, and consists of massive, brown and pale-green opal. Carnotite, the only identified uranium mineral, occurs as fracture coatings or fine layers in the opal; in places, no uranium minerals are visible in the radioactive opal. The opal layers are irregular in extent and thickness. The exposed length of the layers ranges from 8 to 1, 200 ft or more, and the thickness of the layers ranges from 0. 1 to 3. 9 ft. The uranium content of each opal layer, and of different parts of the same layer, differs widely. On the east side of Virgin Valley four of the seven observed opal layers, nos. 3, 4, 5, and 7, are more radioactive than the average; and the uranium content ranges from 0. 002 to 0. 12 percent. Two samples, taken 5 ft apart across opal layer no. 7, contained 0. 003 and 0. -049 percent uranium. On the west side of the valley only four of the fifteen observed opal layers, nos; 9, , 10, 14, and 15, are more radioactive than the average; and the uranium content ranges from 0. 004 to 0. 047 percent. Material of the highest grade was found in a small discontinuous layer of pale-green opal (no. 4) on the east side of Virgin Valley. The grade of this layer ranged from 0. 027 to 0. 12 percent uranium.

  9. Space Radar Image of Saline Valley, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This is a three-dimensional perspective view of Saline Valley, about 30 km (19 miles) east of the town of Independence, California created by combining two spaceborne radar images using a technique known as interferometry. Visualizations like this one are helpful to scientists because they clarify the relationships of the different types of surfaces detected by the radar and the shapes of the topographic features such as mountains and valleys. The view is looking southwest across Saline Valley. The high peaks in the background are the Inyo Mountains, which rise more than 3,000 meters (10,000 feet) above the valley floor. The dark blue patch near the center of the image is an area of sand dunes. The brighter patches to the left of the dunes are the dry, salty lake beds of Saline Valley. The brown and orange areas are deposits of boulders, gravel and sand known as alluvial fans. The image was constructed by overlaying a color composite radar image on top of a digital elevation map. The radar image was taken by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-bandSynthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) on board the space shuttleEndeavour in October 1994. The digital elevation map was producedusing radar interferometry, a process in which radar data are acquired on different passes of the space shuttle. The two data passes are compared to obtain elevation information. The elevation data were derived from a 1,500-km-long (930-mile) digital topographic map processed at JPL. Radar image data are draped over the topography to provide the color with the following assignments: red is L-band vertically transmitted, vertically received; green is C-band vertically transmitted, vetically received; and blue is the ratio of C-band vertically transmitted, vertically received to L-band vertically transmitted, vertically received. This image is centered near 36.8 degrees north latitude and 117.7 degrees west longitude. No vertical exaggeration factor has been applied to the data. SIR-C/X-SAR, a joint

  10. Sulphur and oxygen isotopic characters of dissolved sulphate in groundwater from the Pleistocene aquifer in the southern Jordan Valley (Jericho area, Palestine).

    PubMed

    Khayat, Saed; Hötzl, Heinz; Geyer, Stefan; Ali, Wasim; Knöller, Kay; Strauch, Gerhard

    2006-09-01

    Sulphate and chloride concentrations in the shallow Pleistocene aquifer systems in the lower Jordan valley area indicate a general trend of increasing salinity eastward and southward. This study was conducted in one of the important sub-basins feeding the Pleo-Pleistocene aquifer in the Jericho area in the southern part of the valley using S and O isotopes of dissolved sulphate. The results show that sulphate has mainly two contributions to the groundwater. One is the surface seepage, which is present as a salty leachate form with the positive delta34Ssulphate values of primary gypsum in Lisan and Samara formations, and the second is the upwelling saline water which was in contact with a deep secondary gypsum, aragonites and salty rocks and rose up under heavy abstraction with depleted 34S in sulphate and relatively high sulphate and chloride content. The latest was clearly shown in the Arab Project wells to the east that is undergoing a continuous heavy abstraction. The isotopic signatures of S and O in these wells to the east show that this depleted 34S and highly concentrated sulphate might also indicate a dissolved sulphate originating from pyrite oxidation that results from the interaction with a pyrite-rich aquifer, which can well up with salty water under heavy abstraction and is oxidised in the upper aerobic shallow aquifer.

  11. Study on Plan of Rural Waterfront Greenway in Beijing Based On Valley Economy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Li; Ma, Xiaoyan

    2018-01-01

    Valley economy is a major strategy for the development of Beijing mountainous area. This paper tried to apply the theory of rural waterfront greenway in valley, propose the grade system of rural greenway, which has important meaning to the refining of ecological network, the integration of tourism resources, and the promotion of agricultural industry in rural area. By way of illustration, according to the detailed analysis of the hydrology, altitude, slope, aspect, soil and vegetation conditions by GIS, the waterfront greenway, named ‘four seasons flowers’, in Yanqing county area was planned, so as to provide scientific guidance for the rural waterfront greenway construction.

  12. SURFEX v8.0 interface with OASIS3-MCT to couple atmosphere with hydrology, ocean, waves and sea-ice models, from coastal to global scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voldoire, Aurore; Decharme, Bertrand; Pianezze, Joris; Lebeaupin Brossier, Cindy; Sevault, Florence; Seyfried, Léo; Garnier, Valérie; Bielli, Soline; Valcke, Sophie; Alias, Antoinette; Accensi, Mickael; Ardhuin, Fabrice; Bouin, Marie-Noëlle; Ducrocq, Véronique; Faroux, Stéphanie; Giordani, Hervé; Léger, Fabien; Marsaleix, Patrick; Rainaud, Romain; Redelsperger, Jean-Luc; Richard, Evelyne; Riette, Sébastien

    2017-11-01

    This study presents the principles of the new coupling interface based on the SURFEX multi-surface model and the OASIS3-MCT coupler. As SURFEX can be plugged into several atmospheric models, it can be used in a wide range of applications, from global and regional coupled climate systems to high-resolution numerical weather prediction systems or very fine-scale models dedicated to process studies. The objective of this development is to build and share a common structure for the atmosphere-surface coupling of all these applications, involving on the one hand atmospheric models and on the other hand ocean, ice, hydrology, and wave models. The numerical and physical principles of SURFEX interface between the different component models are described, and the different coupled systems in which the SURFEX OASIS3-MCT-based coupling interface is already implemented are presented.

  13. Potential effects of groundwater pumping on water levels, phreatophytes, and spring discharges in Spring and Snake Valleys, White Pine County, Nevada, and adjacent areas in Nevada and Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Halford, Keith J.; Plume, Russell W.

    2011-01-01

    Assessing hydrologic effects of developing groundwater supplies in Snake Valley required numerical, groundwater-flow models to estimate the timing and magnitude of capture from streams, springs, wetlands, and phreatophytes. Estimating general water-table decline also required groundwater simulation. The hydraulic conductivity of basin fill and transmissivity of basement-rock distributions in Spring and Snake Valleys were refined by calibrating a steady state, three-dimensional, MODFLOW model of the carbonate-rock province to predevelopment conditions. Hydraulic properties and boundary conditions were defined primarily from the Regional Aquifer-System Analysis (RASA) model except in Spring and Snake Valleys. This locally refined model was referred to as the Great Basin National Park calibration (GBNP-C) model. Groundwater discharges from phreatophyte areas and springs in Spring and Snake Valleys were simulated as specified discharges in the GBNP-C model. These discharges equaled mapped rates and measured discharges, respectively. Recharge, hydraulic conductivity, and transmissivity were distributed throughout Spring and Snake Valleys with pilot points and interpolated to model cells with kriging in geologically similar areas. Transmissivity of the basement rocks was estimated because thickness is correlated poorly with transmissivity. Transmissivity estimates were constrained by aquifer-test results in basin-fill and carbonate-rock aquifers. Recharge, hydraulic conductivity, and transmissivity distributions of the GBNP-C model were estimated by minimizing a weighted composite, sum-of-squares objective function that included measurement and Tikhonov regularization observations. Tikhonov regularization observations were equations that defined preferred relations between the pilot points. Measured water levels, water levels that were simulated with RASA, depth-to-water beneath distributed groundwater and spring discharges, land-surface altitudes, spring discharge at

  14. Chuckwalla Valley multiple-well monitoring site, Chuckwalla Valley, Riverside County

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Everett, Rhett

    2013-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Bureau of Land Management, is evaluating the geohydrology and water availability of the Chuckwalla Valley, California. As part of this evaluation, the USGS installed the Chuckwalla Valley multiple-well monitoring site (CWV1) in the southeastern portion of the Chuckwalla Basin. Data collected at this site provide information about the geology, hydrology, geophysics, and geochemistry of the local aquifer system, thus enhancing the understanding of the geohydrologic framework of the Chuckwalla Valley. This report presents construction information for the CWV1 multiple-well monitoring site and initial geohydrologic data collected from the site.

  15. Surface Sediment Geochemistry in and around the Hudson Shelf Valley Offshore of New York

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mecray, E. L.; ten Brink, M. B.; Butman, B.; Denny, J.; Murray, R. W.

    2001-05-01

    The Hudson Shelf Valley, an ancient submerged portion of the Hudson River, extends across the continental shelf offshore of New York and New Jersey. Between 1959 and 1987, the area near the head of the valley was used for disposal of approximately 1.20 x 108 m3 of dredged material and sewage sludge. The distribution of metal concentrations and sediment characteristics were used to investigate the transport and fate of the sediments and their associated contaminants. Surface (0-2cm) sediments collected at 440 stations throughout the New York Bight between 1993 and 1998 were used to establish the regional distribution of pollutant metals, grain size, organic carbon, and Clostridium perfringens spores. Sediments in the New York Bight are generally sandy, however fine-grained sediments are found in the axis of the Valley. Statistical methods identified common sources and chemical mobility within groups of anthropogenic and naturally-occurring elements. High metal concentrations, fine-grained sediments, and higher organic carbon concentrations co-occur in depo-centers within the Valley. Normalization of the metal concentrations to these factors shows higher metal concentrations on the fine-grained particles in sandy areas of the Bight, particularly along the southern shore of Long Island. These distributions have implications for evaluating the impact of the mass distribution for contaminated metals in different habitats and areas. Decreasing concentrations of pollutants with time are observed, reflecting reduced contaminant loading in the upper region of the Valley; however, concentrations are still above natural background levels.

  16. Rio Grande Valley State Park maintenance, improvements, and developments

    Treesearch

    Tony Barron

    1996-01-01

    Managing the Rio Grande Valley State Park as a valued riparian-wetland area is very important as it encourages conditions for the growth of vegetation. This growth supports a riparian community consisting of various insects, animals, birds, and fish, as well as other wildlife. Human activity in riparian areas has led to historic use patterns causing erosion, re-...

  17. Sacramento Valley, CA, USA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The Sacramento Valley (40.5N, 121.5W) of California is the northern extension of the Central Valley, main agriculture region of the state. Hundreds of truck farms, vineyards and orchards can be seen throughout the length and breadth of the valley which was reclaimed from the desert by means of intensive and extensive irrigation projects.

  18. Land-cover mapping of Red Rock Canyon National Conservation Area and Coyote Springs, Piute-Eldorado Valley, and Mormon Mesa Areas of Critical Environmental Concern, Clark County, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, J. LaRue; Damar, Nancy A.; Charlet, David A.; Westenburg, Craig L.

    2014-01-01

    DigitalGlobe’s QuickBird satellite high-resolution multispectral imagery was classified by using Visual Learning Systems’ Feature Analyst feature extraction software to produce land-cover data sets for the Red Rock Canyon National Conservation Area and the Coyote Springs, Piute-Eldorado Valley, and Mormon Mesa Areas of Critical Environmental Concern in Clark County, Nevada. Over 1,000 vegetation field samples were collected at the stand level. The field samples were classified to the National Vegetation Classification Standard, Version 2 hierarchy at the alliance level and above. Feature extraction models were developed for vegetation on the basis of the spectral and spatial characteristics of selected field samples by using the Feature Analyst hierarchical learning process. Individual model results were merged to create one data set for the Red Rock Canyon National Conservation Area and one for each of the Areas of Critical Environmental Concern. Field sample points and photographs were used to validate and update the data set after model results were merged. Non-vegetation data layers, such as roads and disturbed areas, were delineated from the imagery and added to the final data sets. The resulting land-cover data sets are significantly more detailed than previously were available, both in resolution and in vegetation classes.

  19. Ground water in Tooele Valley, Tooele County, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thomas, H.E.

    1946-01-01

    Tooele Valley is a typical basin of the Basin and Range Province located about 30 miles southwest of Salt Lake City. It is roughly 15 miles long and 10 miles wide and has a population of about 7,000. Bordered on the west by the Stansbury Range, on the east by the Oquirrh Range, and on the south by South Mountain, it opens northward to Great Salt Lake. The bordering mountain ranges are formed by Paleozoic rocks ranging in age from Lower Cambrian to Pennsylvanian but with the Ordovician and Silurian periods unrepresented. There is no sedimentary record of the interval between Pennsylvanian and Tertiary times, and the Tertiary, Quaternary, and Recent sediments are of continental origin. These continental deposits play the dominant role in the ground-water hydrology of the basin, and were mapped and studied in detail. Pleistocene sediments are of major importance because they form the surface rock over most of the area, and give rise to conditions which yield water by artesian flow in the lower part of the valley.The development of the present land forms in this area began with the folding of Paleozoic and probably Mesozoic sediments during the Laramide revolution. The cycle of highland erosion and lowland deposition thus initiated has continued through recurrent uplift along Basin-Range faults to the present day. The principal physiographic subdivisions of the valley were developed as a result of the Basin-Range faulting, which began early in the Tertiary and has continued to Recent times.There are about 1,100 wells in Tooele Valley, about 90 per cent of which yield or have yielded water by artesian flow. Most of them are located in the lower part of the valley below an altitude of 4,400 feet. These wells and many of the springs derive their water from the unconsolidated Quaternary sediments, which include discontinuous, lenticular and commonly elongated bodies of sand, clay, gravel, and boulders of alluvial origin alternating and inter-fingered with lacustrine beds

  20. Monitoring CO2 emissions in tree kill areas near the resurgent dome at Long Valley Caldera, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bergfeld, D.; Evans, William C.

    2011-01-01

    We report results of yearly measurements of the diffuse CO2 flux and shallow soil temperatures collected since 2006 across two sets of tree-kill areas at Long Valley Caldera, California. These data provide background information about CO2 discharge during a period with moderate seismicity, but little to no deformation. The tree kills are located at long-recognized areas of weak thermal fluid upflow, but have expanded in recent years, possibly in response to geothermal fluid production at Casa Diablo. The amount of CO2 discharged from the older kill area at Basalt Canyon is fairly constant and is around 3-5 tonnes of CO2 per day from an area of about 15,000 m2. The presence of isobutane in gas samples from sites in and around Basalt Canyon suggests that geothermal fluid production directly effects fluid upflow in the region close to the power plant. The average fluxes at Shady Rest are lower than average fluxes at Basalt Canyon, but the area affected by fluid upflow is larger. Total CO2 discharged from the central portion of the kill area at Shady Rest has been variable, ranging from 6 to11 tonnes per day across 61,000 m2. Gas collected at Shady Rest contains no detectable isobutane to link emissions chemically to geothermal fluid production, but two samples from 2009-10 have detectable H2S and suggest an increasing geothermal character of emitted gas. The appearance of this gas at the surface may signal increased drawdown of water levels near the geothermal productions wells.

  1. Effects of Groundwater Development on Uranium: Central Valley, California, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jurgens, Bryant C.; Fram, Miranda S.; Belitz, Kenneth; Burow, Karen R.; Landon, Matthew K.

    2009-01-01

    Uranium (U) concentrations in groundwater in several parts of the eastern San Joaquin Valley, California, have exceeded federal and state drinking water standards during the last 20 years. The San Joaquin Valley is located within the Central Valley of California and is one of the most productive agricultural areas in the world. Increased irrigation and pumping associated with agricultural and urban development during the last 100 years have changed the chemistry and magnitude of groundwater recharge, and increased the rate of downward groundwater movement. Strong correlations between U and bicarbonate suggest that U is leached from shallow sediments by high bicarbonate water, consistent with findings of previous work in Modesto, California. Summer irrigation of crops in agricultural areas and, to lesser extent, of landscape plants and grasses in urban areas, has increased Pco2 concentrations in the soil zone and caused higher temperature and salinity of groundwater recharge. Coupled with groundwater pumping, this process, as evidenced by increasing bicarbonate concentrations in groundwater over the last 100 years, has caused shallow, young groundwater with high U concentrations to migrate to deeper parts of the groundwater system that are tapped by public-supply wells. Continued downward migration of U-affected groundwater and expansion of urban centers into agricultural areas will likely be associated with increased U concentrations in public-supply wells. The results from this study illustrate the potential longterm effects of groundwater development and irrigation-supported agriculture on water quality in arid and semiarid regions around the world.

  2. Groundwater quality in the shallow aquifers of the Monterey Bay, Salinas Valley, and adjacent highland areas, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burton, Carmen

    2018-05-30

    Groundwater provides more than 40 percent of California’s drinking water. To protect this vital resource, the State of California created the Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The Priority Basin Project of the GAMA Program provides a comprehensive assessment of the State’s groundwater quality and increases public access to groundwater-quality information. The shallow aquifers of the groundwater basins around Monterey Bay, the Salinas Valley, and the highlands adjacent to the Salinas Valley constitute one of the study units.

  3. Lead in roadway dusts from different functional areas in a typical valley city, NW China: contamination and exposure risk.

    PubMed

    Pan, Huiyun; Lu, Xinwei; Lei, Kai

    2018-01-01

    Lead contamination and exposure risk assessment in roadway dusts from four different functional areas in a typical valley city in northwest China (Xi'an) were conducted in this study. A total of 130 roadway dust samples from park area (PA), traffic area (TA), educational area (EA), and residential area (RA) were collected and Pb concentrations in the samples were determined by using XRF (X-ray fluorescence). Geo-accumulation index (I geo ) and enrichment factor (EF) were applied to assess Pb contamination level and the hazard indexes (HI) of Pb were calculated to evaluate the exposure risks to children and adults. The results showed that roadway dusts from all four functional areas had elevated Pb concentrations and pollution characteristics of Pb were discrepant in different functional areas. The mean concentration of Pb in roadway dusts from PA, TA, EA, and RA was 147.4, 74.8, 119.6, and 161.0 mg kg -1 , respectively. The I geo and EF of Pb were mostly 1-3 and 2-20, which indicated moderate to high Pb contamination in roadway dusts. High contamination level of Pb in RA and EA should receive priority for prevention and control. Exposure risk assessment of Pb from roadway dusts was mainly in the acceptable range, but the potential risk of Pb exposure to children should be continuously concerned.

  4. Hydrogeologic and geochemical characterization of groundwater resources in Rush Valley, Tooele County, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gardner, Philip M.; Kirby, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    The water resources of Rush Valley were assessed during 2008–2010 with an emphasis on refining the understanding of the groundwater-flow system and updating the groundwater budget. Surface-water resources within Rush Valley are limited and are generally used for agriculture. Groundwater is the principal water source for most other uses including supplementing irrigation. Most groundwater withdrawal in Rush Valley is from the unconsolidated basin-fill aquifer where conditions are generally unconfined near the mountain front and confined at lower altitudes near the valley center. Productive aquifers also occur in fractured bedrock along the valley margins and beneath the basin-fill deposits in some areas.Drillers’ logs and geophysical gravity data were compiled and used to delineate seven hydrogeologic units important to basin-wide groundwater movement. The principal basin-fill aquifer includes the unconsolidated Quaternary-age alluvial and lacustrine deposits of (1) the upper basin-fill aquifer unit (UBFAU) and the consolidated and semiconsolidated Tertiary-age lacustrine and alluvial deposits of (2) the lower basin-fill aquifer unit (LBFAU). Bedrock hydrogeologic units include (3) the Tertiary-age volcanic unit (VU), (4) the Pennsylvanian- to Permian-age upper carbonate aquifer unit (UCAU), (5) the upper Mississippian- to lower Pennsylvanian-age upper siliciclastic confining unit (USCU), (6) the Middle Cambrian- to Mississippian-age lower carbonate aquifer unit (LCAU), and (7) the Precambrian- to Lower Cambrian-age noncarbonate confining unit (NCCU). Most productive bedrock wells in the Rush Valley groundwater basin are in the UCAU.Average annual recharge to the Rush Valley groundwater basin is estimated to be about 39,000 acre-feet. Nearly all recharge occurs as direct infiltration of snowmelt and rainfall within the mountains with smaller amounts occurring as infiltration of streamflow and unconsumed irrigation water at or near the mountain front. Groundwater

  5. Shaded relief aeromagnetic map of the Santa Clara Valley and vicinity, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roberts, Carter W.; Jachens, Robert C.

    2003-01-01

    This aeromagnetic map covers the southern portion of San Francisco Bay, the Santa Clara Valley and surrounding mountains, part of which has been modelled in threedimensions (Jachens and other, 2001). The magnetic anomaly map has been compiled from existing digital data. Data was obtained from six aeromagnetic surveys that were flown at different times, spacings and elevations. The International Geomagnetic Reference Field (IGRF) for the date of each survey had been removed in the initial processing. The resulting residual magnetic anomalies were analytically continued onto a common surface 305 m (1000 ft) above terrain. Portions of each survey were substantially above the specified flight height listed in the table. The surveys were then merged together using a commercial software package called Oasis Montage. The gray lines on the map indicate the extent of each survey. The program used these regions of overlap to determine the best fit between surveys. Black dots show probable edges of magnetic bodies defined by the maximum horizontal gradient determined using a computer program by Blakely (1995). Crystalline rocks generally contain sufficient magnetic minerals to cause variations in the Earth’s magnetic field that can be mapped by aeromagnetic surveys. Sedimentary rocks are generally weakly magnetized and consequently have a small effect on the magnetic field: thus a magnetic anomaly map can be used to “see through” the sedimentary rock cover and can convey information on lithologic contrasts and structural trends related to the underlying crystalline basement (see Nettleton,1971; Blakely, 1995). Faults often cut magnetic bodies and offset magnetic anomalies can thus be used to help determine fault motion. Serpentinite, which is highly magnetic, is often found along faults. On this map areas of low magnetic anomalies are shown in blues and green while highs are shown in reds and magentas. Faults are from Brabb and others, 1998a,1998b, Graymer and others

  6. Dynamic Conservation of Date Palms: The Future of a Genetic Resource at the Nexus of Climate Change, Desertification and Salinity Stress in Oasis Ecosystems

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The date palm (Phoenix dactylifera) is the only indigenous, wild desert plant definitely domesticated in its native harsh environment, and along with the camel (Camelus dromedarius), was responsible for opening the vast desert territories for human activity and the development of oasis ecosystems, w...

  7. Geohydrology and Water Quality of the Valley-Fill Aquifer System in the Upper Sixmile Creek and West Branch Owego Creek Valleys in the Town of Caroline, Tompkins County, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, Todd S.

    2009-01-01

    In 2002, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Town of Caroline and Tompkins County Planning Department, began a study of the valley-fill aquifer system in upper Sixmile Creek and headwaters of West Branch Owego Creek valleys in the Town of Caroline, NY. The purpose of the study is to provide geohydrologic data to county and town planners as they develop a strategy to manage and protect their water resources. The first aquifer reach investigated in this series is in the Town of Caroline and includes the upper Sixmile Creek valley and part of West Branch Owego Creek valley. The portions of the valley-fill aquifer system that are comprised of saturated coarse-grained sediments including medium to coarse sand and sandy gravel form the major aquifers. Confined sand and gravel units form the major aquifers in the western and central portions of the upper Sixmile Creek valley, and an unconfined sand and gravel unit forms the major aquifer in the eastern portion of the upper Sixmile Creek valley and in the headwaters of the West Branch Owego Creek valley. The valley-fill deposits are thinnest near the edges of the valley where they pinch out along the till-mantled bedrock valley walls. The thickness of the valley fill in the deepest part of the valley, at the western end of the study area, is about 100 feet (ft); the thickness is greater than 165 ft on top of the Valley Heads Moraine in the central part of the valley. An estimated 750 people live over and rely on groundwater from the valley-fill aquifers in upper Sixmile Creek and West Branch Owego Creek valleys. Most groundwater withdrawn from the valley-fill aquifers is pumped from wells with open-ended 6-inch diameter casings; the remaining withdrawals are from shallow dug wells or cisterns that collect groundwater that discharges to springs (especially in the Brooktondale area). The valley-fill aquifers are the sources of water for about 200 households, several apartment complexes, two mobile home parks

  8. The Skagit Valley Controversy: A Case History in Environmental Politics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perry, Thomas I., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    Citizens of the Skagit Valley became concerned when that area was to be flooded to produce energy for the United States. Through political citizen action, they saved this area from ecological destruction and set a precedent for further environmental policy decisions. The importance of environmental impact assessment became evident. (MA)

  9. Nitrogen and sulfur deposition and forest nutrient status in the Valley of Mexico

    Treesearch

    M. E. Fenn; L. I. de Bauer; A. Quevedo-Nolasco; Rodriquez-Frausto-C.

    1999-01-01

    Mexico City experiences some of the most severe air pollution in the world. Ozone injury has been documented in sensitive tree species in urban and forested areas in the Valley of Mexico. However, little is known of the levels of other atmospheric pollutants and their ecological effects on forests in the Valley of Mexico. In this study bulk throughfall deposition of...

  10. Nitrogen and sulfur desposition and forest nutrient status in the valley of Mexico

    Treesearch

    Mark E. Fenn; L.I. De Baur; A. Quevedo-Nolasco; C. Rodriguez-Frausto

    1999-01-01

    Mexico City experiences some of the most severe air pollution in the world. Ozone injury has been documented in sensitive tree species in urban and forested areas in the Valley of Mexico. However, little is known of the levels of other atmospheric pollutants and their ecological effects on forests in the Valley of Mexico. In this study bulk throughfall deposition of...

  11. Geohydrology of the Antelope Valley Area, California and design for a ground-water-quality monitoring network

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Duell, L.F.

    1987-01-01

    A basinwide ideal network and an actual network were designed to identify ambient groundwater quality, trends in groundwater quality, and degree of threat from potential pollution sources in Antelope Valley, California. In general, throughout the valley groundwater quality has remained unchanged, and no specific trends are apparent. The main source of groundwater for the valley is generally suitable for domestic, irrigation, and most industrial uses. Water quality data for selected constituents of some network wells and surface-water sites are presented. The ideal network of 77 sites was selected on the basis of site-specific criteria, geohydrology, and current land use (agricultural, residential, and industrial). These sites were used as a guide in the design of the actual network consisting of 44 existing wells. Wells are currently being monitored and were selected whenever possible because of budgetary constraints. Of the remaining ideal sites, 20 have existing wells not part of a current water quality network, and 13 are locations where no wells exist. The methodology used for the selection of sites, constituents monitored, and frequency of analysis will enable network users to make appropriate future changes to the monitoring network. (USGS)

  12. Structural evolution of the east Sierra Valley system (Owens Valley and vicinity), California: a geologic and geophysical synthesis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stevens, Calvin H.; Stone, Paul; Blakely, Richard J.

    2013-01-01

    The tectonically active East Sierra Valley System (ESVS), which comprises the westernmost part of the Walker Lane-Eastern California Shear Zone, marks the boundary between the highly extended Basin and Range Province and the largely coherent Sierra Nevada-Great Valley microplate (SN-GVm), which is moving relatively NW. The recent history of the ESVS is characterized by oblique extension partitioned between NNW-striking normal and strike-slip faults oriented at an angle to the more northwesterly relative motion of the SN-GVm. Spatially variable extension and right-lateral shear have resulted in a longitudinally segmented valley system composed of diverse geomorphic and structural elements, including a discontinuous series of deep basins detected through analysis of isostatic gravity anomalies. Extension in the ESVS probably began in the middle Miocene in response to initial westward movement of the SN-GVm relative to the Colorado Plateau. At ca. 3-3.5 Ma, the SN-GVm became structurally separated from blocks directly to the east, resulting in significant basin-forming deformation in the ESVS. We propose a structural model that links high-angle normal faulting in the ESVS with coeval low-angle detachment faulting in adjacent areas to the east.

  13. Geophysical Data from Spring Valley to Delamar Valley, East-Central Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mankinen, Edward A.; Roberts, Carter W.; McKee, Edwin H.; Chuchel, Bruce A.; Morin, Robert L.

    2007-01-01

    Cenozoic basins in eastern Nevada and western Utah constitute major ground-water recharge areas in the eastern part of the Great Basin and these were investigated to characterize the geologic framework of the region. Prior to these investigations, regional gravity coverage was variable over the region, adequate in some areas and very sparse in others. Cooperative studies described herein have established 1,447 new gravity stations in the region, providing a detailed description of density variations in the middle to upper crust. All previously available gravity data for the study area were evaluated to determine their reliability, prior to combining with our recent results and calculating an up-to-date isostatic residual gravity map of the area. A gravity inversion method was used to calculate depths to pre-Cenozoic basement rock and estimates of maximum alluvial/volcanic fill in the major valleys of the study area. The enhanced gravity coverage and the incorporation of lithologic information from several deep oil and gas wells yields a much improved view of subsurface shapes of these basins and provides insights useful for the development of hydrogeologic models for the region.

  14. Student Action for the Valley Environment (SAVE).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phoenix Union High School District, AZ.

    A multi-disciplinary approach to environmental studies for high school students, combining the areas of earth science, social science, and health education, is developed in this guide. Student Action for the Valley Environment (SAVE) is primarily a simulation program concerned with a serious problem of today--the survival of life in the cities. It…

  15. Preliminary subsidence investigation of Sacramento Valley, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lofgren, B.E.; Ireland, R.L.

    1973-01-01

    Although a number of agencies have made leveling surveys in Sacramento Valley and a valleywide network of first- and second-order control exists, few areas have sufficient control for determining whether land subsidence has occurred and if so, how much, within the time span of vertical control. Available data suggest that 0.2 to 0.9 foot (0.06 to 0.3 m) of subsidence probably has occurred from 1935-42 to 1964 in an extensive agricultural area of heavy ground-water pumping between Zamora and Davis, and that as much as 2 feet (0.6 m) of subsidence has occurred in at least two areas of pumping overdraft--east of Zamora, and west of Arbuckle. A comparison of maps showing long-term water-level decline and average annual ground-water pumpage indicates several other areas of probable subsidence. In six general areas--northwest of Sacramento; northeast of Sacramento; southeast of Yuba City; 10 miles (16 km) north of Willows; 20 miles (32 km) north of Willows; and especially in the Arbuckle area,ground-water declines have quite probably produced significant subsidence. In two areas of most intensive pumping, no long-term water-level declines have occurred, and no subsidence is indicated. If problems of land subsidence are of concern in Sacramento Valley, and if estimates of historic subsidence or subsidence potential are needed, serious consideration should be given to a field program of basic-data collection. Second-order leveling along a few carefully selected lines of existing control, and the installation and operation of two or three compaction recorders in areas of continuing water-level decline, would provide helpful data for estimating .past and future subsidence.

  16. BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS OF UTAH VALLEY PARTICLES: A REVIEW

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Utah Valley provided a unique opportunity to evaluate the health effects of particulate matter (PM) in humans. The area has had intermittently high particle levels with the principal point source being a steel mill. Due to a labor dispute, the mill was shut down. The closu...

  17. Evaluation of evapotranspiration and deep percolation under mulched drip irrigation in an oasis of Tarim basin, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xianwen; Jin, Menggui; Zhou, Nianqing; Huang, Jinou; Jiang, Simin; Telesphore, Habiyakare

    2016-07-01

    Mulched drip irrigation for cotton field is an effective measure for the utilization of saline water, and the regulation of soil water and salt. However, the reasonable methods for quantifying actual evapotranspiration (ET) and deep percolation of recharge to groundwater are still not very well understood, which restricts the accurate regulation of soil water and salt for cotton growth in oasis. In this paper, a set of experiments of mulched drip irrigation with brackish water were conducted in a typical arid region of Tarim basin in southern Xinjiang, China. The irrigation events were recorded, and ET and fluctuations of groundwater table were carefully measured for two consecutive irrigation periods of flowering and bolling stages. A group of upscaling conversion methods were used to quantify the ET, in which canopy structure was considered to estimate the transpiration from leaf scale to a unit of field scale. The groundwater table had a significant response to the irrigation events, thus the deep percolation was estimated using water-table fluctuation method (WTF). Results showed that during the two irrigation events of flowering and bolling stages, the total ET was 31.1 mm with the soil surface evaporation of only 0.4 mm. The total percolation of recharge to groundwater was 48.2 mm which contributed to the groundwater run-off of 22.1 mm. Transpiration of 30.7 mm accounted for 98.6% of the total ET of 31.1 mm and 34.3% of the irrigation water of 90.6 mm. Compared with transpiration, the deep percolation accounted for 53.2% of irrigation water, indicating a serious excessive irrigation that recharged to groundwater. Soil salt budget showed that the salt leached into groundwater was 1.56 times of the input from brackish irrigation water and fertilization during the two irrigation periods. Even for the irrigation practice with brackish water, the accumulated salt of soil profile could also be leached out under large amount of irrigation water (e.g. 90.6 mm for the

  18. Martian channels and valleys - Their characteristics, distribution, and age

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carr, M. H.; Clow, G. D.

    1981-01-01

    The distribution and ages of Martian channels and valleys, which are generally believed to have been cut by running water, are examined with particular emphasis on the small branching networks referred to as runoff channels or valley networks. Valleys at latitudes from 65 deg S to 65 deg N were surveyed on Viking images at resolutions between 125 and 300 m. Almost all of the valleys are found in the old cratered terrain, in areas characterized by high elevations, low albedos and low violet/red ratios. The networks are deduced to have formed early in the history of the planet, with a formation rate declining rapidly shortly after the decline of the cratering rate 3.9 billion years ago. Two types of outflow channels are distinguished: unconfined, in which broad swaths of terrain are scoured, and confined, in which flow is restricted to discrete channels. Both types start at local sources, and have formed episodically throughout Martian history. Fretted channels, found mainly in two latitude belts characterized by relatively rapid erosion along escarpments, are explained by the lateral enlargement of other channels by mass wasting.

  19. Sacramento Valley, CA, USA

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1973-06-22

    SL2-04-179 (22 June 1973) --- The Sacramento Valley (40.5N, 121.5W) of California is the northern extension of the Central Valley, main agriculture region of the state. Hundreds of truck farms, vineyards and orchards can be seen throughout the length and breadth of the valley which was reclaimed from the desert by means of intensive and extensive irrigation projects. Photo credit: NASA

  20. Ground-water resources of the Caguas-Juncos Valley, Puerto Rico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Puig, J.C.; Rodriguez, J.M.

    1993-01-01

    ?The Caguas-Juncos valley, which occupies an area of 35 square miles in east-central Puerto Rico, is underlain by the largely unconfined alluvial aquifer. Withdrawals from this aquifer for public water supply and for agricultural, industrial, and domestic water uses totalled about 3.0 million gallons per day in 1988. Some wells in the valley yield as much as 310 gallons per minute from the alluvial deposits along Rio Gurabo near Gurabo and near Juncos. Wells used at dairy farms in the area commonly yield about 30 gallons per minute. The potentiometric surface of the alluvial aquifer varies seasonally and generally is highest near the end of December and lowest in April. Transmissivity of the alluvial aquifer, estimated from specific capacity and slug test data, ranges from 65 to 4,800 feet squared per day. The estimated specific yield of the water-table is about 10 to 15 percent. The amount of water stored in the aquifer is estimated to be about 122,000 acre-feet. Analyses of ground-water samples revealed the presence of two distinct problems-- high natural concentrations of iron and manganese, and localized areas of human- related contamination scattered throughout the valley. The ground water is a calcium-bicarbonate type and typically has dissolved solids concentrations of less than 500 milligrams per liter.

  1. Observation of acoustic valley vortex states and valley-chirality locked beam splitting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Liping; Qiu, Chunyin; Lu, Jiuyang; Wen, Xinhua; Shen, Yuanyuan; Ke, Manzhu; Zhang, Fan; Liu, Zhengyou

    2017-05-01

    We report an experimental observation of the classical version of valley polarized states in a two-dimensional hexagonal sonic crystal. The acoustic valley states, which carry specific linear momenta and orbital angular momenta, were selectively excited by external Gaussian beams and conveniently confirmed by the pressure distribution outside the crystal, according to the criterion of momentum conservation. The vortex nature of such intriguing bulk crystal states was directly characterized by scanning the phase profile inside the crystal. In addition, we observed a peculiar beam-splitting phenomenon, in which the separated beams are constructed by different valleys and locked to the opposite vortex chirality. The exceptional sound transport, encoded with valley-chirality locked information, may serve as the basis of designing conceptually interesting acoustic devices with unconventional functions.

  2. Titan's fluvial valleys: Morphology, distribution, and spectral properties

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Langhans, M.H.; Jaumann, R.; Stephan, K.; Brown, R.H.; Buratti, B.J.; Clark, R.N.; Baines, K.H.; Nicholson, P.D.; Lorenz, R.D.; Soderblom, L.A.; Soderblom, J.M.; Sotin, Christophe; Barnes, J.W.; Nelson, R.

    2012-01-01

    Titan's fluvial channels have been investigated based on data obtained by the Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) instrument and the Visible and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) onboard the Cassini spacecraft. In this paper, a database of fluvial features is created based on radar-SAR data aiming to unveil the distribution and the morphologic and spectral characteristics of valleys on Titan on a global scale. It will also study the spatial relations between fluvial valleys and Titan's geologic units and spectral surface units which have become accessible thanks to Cassini-VIMS data. Several distinct morphologic types of fluvial valleys can be discerned by SAR-images. Dendritic valley networks appear to have much in common with terrestrial dendritic systems owing to a hierarchical and tree-shaped arrangement of the tributaries which is indicative of an origin from precipitation. Dry valleys constitute another class of valleys resembling terrestrial wadis, an indication of episodic and strong flow events. Other valley types, such as putative canyons, cannot be correlated with rainfall based on their morphology alone, since it cannot be ruled out that they may have originated from volcanic/tectonic action or groundwater sapping. Highly developed and complex fluvial networks with channel lengths of up to 1200 km and widths of up to 10 km are concentrated only at a few locations whereas single valleys are scattered over all latitudes. Fluvial valleys are frequently found in mountainous areas. Some terrains, such as equatorial dune fields and undifferentiated plains at mid-latitudes, are almost entirely free of valleys. Spectrally, fluvial terrains are often characterized by a high reflectance in each of Titan's atmospheric windows, as most of them are located on Titan's bright 'continents'. Nevertheless, valleys are spatially associated with a surface unit appearing blue due to its higher reflection at 1.3??m in a VIMS false color RGB composite with R: 1.59/1.27??m, G: 2

  3. High-resolution seismic reflection/refraction imaging from Interstate 10 to Cherry Valley Boulevard, Cherry Valley, Riverside County, California: implications for water resources and earthquake hazards

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gandhok, G.; Catchings, R.D.; Goldman, M.R.; Horta, E.; Rymer, M.J.; Martin, P.; Christensen, A.

    1999-01-01

    This report is the second of two reports on seismic imaging investigations conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) during the summers of 1997 and 1998 in the Cherry Valley area in California (Figure 1a). In the first report (Catchings et al., 1999), data and interpretations were presented for four seismic imaging profiles (CV-1, CV-2, CV-3, and CV-4) acquired during the summer of 1997 . In this report, we present data and interpretations for three additional profiles (CV-5, CV-6, and CV-7) acquired during the summer of 1998 and the combined seismic images for all seven profiles. This report addresses both groundwater resources and earthquake hazards in the San Gorgonio Pass area because the shallow (upper few hundred meters) subsurface stratigraphy and structure affect both issues. The cities of Cherry Valley and Beaumont are located approximately 130 km (~80 miles) east of Los Angeles, California along the southern alluvial fan of the San Bernardino Mountains (see Figure 1b). These cities are two of several small cities that are located within San Gorgonio Pass, a lower-lying area between the San Bernardino and the San Jacinto Mountains. Cherry Valley and Beaumont are desert cities with summer daytime temperatures often well above 100 o F. High water usage in the arid climate taxes the available groundwater supply in the region, increasing the need for efficient management of the groundwater resources. The USGS and the San Gorgonio Water District (SGWD) work cooperatively to evaluate the quantity and quality of groundwater supply in the San Gorgonio Pass region. To better manage the water supplies within the District during wet and dry periods, the SGWD sought to develop a groundwater recharge program, whereby, excess water would be stored in underground aquifers during wet periods (principally winter months) and retrieved during dry periods (principally summer months). The SGWD preferred a surface recharge approach because it could be less expensive than a

  4. Estimates of natural ground-water discharge and characterization of water quality in Dry Valley, Washoe County, West-Central Nevada, 2002-2003

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Berger, David L.; Maurer, Douglas K.; Lopes, Thomas J.; Halford, Keith J.

    2004-01-01

    The Dry Valley Hydrographic Area is being considered as a potential source area for additional water supplies for the Reno-Sparks area, which is about 25 miles south of Dry Valley. Current estimates of annual ground-water recharge to Dry Valley have a considerable range. In undeveloped valleys, such as Dry Valley, long-term ground-water discharge can be assumed the same as long-term ground-water recharge. Because estimating ground-water discharge has more certainty than estimating ground-water recharge from precipitation, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with Washoe County, began a three-year study to re-evaluate the ground-water resources by estimating natural ground-water discharge and characterize ground-water quality in Dry Valley. In Dry Valley, natural ground-water discharge occurs as subsurface outflow and by ground-water evapotranspiration. The amount of subsurface outflow from the upper part of Dry Valley to Winnemucca and Honey Lake Valleys likely is small. Subsurface outflow from Dry Valley westward to Long Valley, California was estimated using Darcy's Law. Analysis of two aquifer tests show the transmissivity of poorly sorted sediments near the western side of Dry Valley is 1,200 to 1,500 square feet per day. The width of unconsolidated sediments is about 4,000 feet between exposures of tuffaceous deposits along the State line, and decreases to about 1,500 feet (0.5 mile) west of the State line. The hydraulic gradient east and west of the State line ranges from 0.003 to 0.005 foot per foot. Using these values, subsurface outflow to Long Valley is estimated to be 50 to 250 acre-feet per year. Areas of ground-water evapotranspiration were field mapped and partitioned into zones of plant cover using relations derived from Landsat imagery acquired July 8, 2002. Evapotranspiration rates for each plant-cover zone were multiplied by the corresponding area and summed to estimate annual ground-water evapotranspiration. About 640 to 790 acre-feet per

  5. Orbital and Rover-based Exploration of Perseverance Valley, Endeavour Crater, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, A. M.; Arvidson, R. E.; Duran Vinent, O.; Craddock, R. A.; Holo, S.; Gadal, C.; Blois, G.; Palucis, M. C.; Goudge, T. A.; Morgan, A. M.; Day, M.; Sullivan, R. J., Jr.; Umurhan, O. M.; Pähtz, T.; Birch, S.; Morgan, A. M.; Goudge, T. A.; Palucis, M. C.; Arvidson, R. E.; Duran Vinent, O.; Craddock, R. A.; Holo, S.; Blois, G.; Gadal, C.; Morgan, A. M.; Sullivan, R. J., Jr.; Day, M.; Arvidson, R. E.

    2017-12-01

    Perseverance Valley, based on orbital observations from the Mars Reconnaisance Orbiter HiRISE image data, is a 180 m long, 20 m wide anastomosing shallow channel system superimposed on the Cape Byron rim segment of the 22 km diameter Noachian-age Endeavour Crater on Mars. Several impact craters are superimposed on the valley system, indicating antiquity, although the valley's high degree of preservation indicates that it formed after significant regional-scale fluvial erosion and diffusive smoothing of Endeavour and its rim segments. The valley cuts into the inner, eastern rim on a 10˚ to 15˚ slope, and starts at a local low area on the rim crest. A set of shallow channels, some lined with perimeter rocks, extends from the west to meet the entrance to the valley. The western rim tilts to the west 0.8˚ and thus the channels tilt away from the valley entrance. The Mars Rover Opportunity has explored the western shallow channels leading up to the entrance to the valley. As of this writing Opportunity is located on the southern side of the valley entrance, with the Athena Science Team waiting until after solar conjunction to command the rover to descend into the valley to search for geomorphic and sedimentologic evidence related to valley formation. Wind erosion along radial fractures extending into and down Cape Byron is a possibility. Debris flows are also under consideration, perhaps enabled by melting ice at the rim crest. Dry avalanches are unlikely due to the low slopes. A fluvial origin is a strong contender based on models that show it is possible to have had a western catchment present when the Burns formation hydrated sulfates were being emplaced, followed by self-compaction of these sediments that tilted the western plains away from the rim crest. The key to testing among the various hypotheses for formation of the valley and shallow channels leading into the entrance will be the detailed stereo and multispectral imaging observations Opportunity will make

  6. Dry Valleys, Antarctica

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-11-02

    The McMurdo Dry Valleys are a row of valleys west of McMurdo Sound, Antarctica. They are so named because of their extremely low humidity and lack of snow and ice cover. This image was acquired December 8, 2002 by NASA Terra spacecraft.

  7. Geology and water resources of the Spanish Valley area, Grand and San Juan Counties, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sumsion, C.T.

    1971-01-01

    This water-resources investigation was initiated in order to provide an estimate of the average annual water yield of the Mill Creek-Pack Creek drainage basin, the parts of that total yield available as surface water and ground water, the amount of ground water that might be recovered for beneficial use, and the effect of this use on the usable ground-water storage within the valley fill in Spanish and Moab Valleys. Detailed information has been sought which is basic to the establishment of sound policies for the development and management of water resources. The investigation was carried out as part of water-resources investigations in Utah with the Utah Division of Water Rights, Department of Natural Resources. Fieldwork was done during the period July 1967-November 1969.

  8. Hydrogeologic framework of Antelope Valley and Bedell Flat, Washoe County, west-central Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Berger, D.L.; Ponce, D.A.; Ross, W.C.

    2001-01-01

    Description of the hydrogeologic framework of Antelope Valley and Bedell Flat in west-central Nevada adds to the general knowledge of regional ground-water flow north of the Reno-Sparks metropolitan area. The hydrogeologic framework is defined by the rocks and deposits that transmit ground water or impede its movement and by the combined thickness of Cenozoic deposits. When data are lacking about the subsurface geology of an area, geophysical methods can be used to provide additional information. In this study, gravimetric and seismic-refraction methods were used to infer the form of structural features and to estimate the thickness of Cenozoic deposits in each of the two valleys. In Antelope Valley, the thickness of these deposits probably does not exceed about 300 feet, suggesting that ground-water storage in the basin-fill aquifer is limited. Beneath Bedell Flat is an elongated, northeast-trending structural depression in the pre-Cenozoic basement; the maximum thickness of Cenozoic deposits is about 2,500 feet beneath the south-central part of the valley. Shallow ground water in the northwest corner of Bedell Flat may be a result of decreasing depth to the pre-Cenozoic basement.

  9. Characterization and simulation of ground-water flow in the Kansas River Valley at Fort Riley, Kansas, 1990-98

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Myers, Nathan C.

    2000-01-01

    Hydrologic data and a ground-water flow model were used to characterize ground-water flow in the Kansas River alluvial aquifer at Fort Riley in northeast Kansas. The ground-water flow model was developed as a tool to project ground-water flow and potential contaminant-transport paths in the alluvial aquifer on the basis of past hydrologic conditions. The model also was used to estimate historical and hypothetical ground-water flow paths with respect to a private- and several public-supply wells. The ground-water flow model area extends from the Smoky Hill and Republican Rivers downstream to about 2.5 miles downstream from the city of Ogden. The Kansas River Valley has low relief and, except for the area within the Fort Riley Military Reservation, is used primarily for crop production. Sedimentary deposits in the Kansas River Valley, formed after the ancestral Kansas River eroded into bedrock, primarily are alluvial sediment deposited by the river during Quaternary time. The alluvial sediment consists of as much as about 75 feet of poorly sorted, coarse-to-fine sand, silt, and clay, 55 feet of which can be saturated with ground water. The alluvial aquifer is unconfined and is bounded on the sides and bottom by Permian-age shale and limestone bedrock. Hydrologic data indicate that ground water in the Kansas River Valley generally flows in a downstream direction, but flow direction can be quite variable near the Kansas River due to changes in river stage. Ground-water-level changes caused by infiltration of precipitation are difficult to detect because they are masked by larger changes caused by fluctuation in Kansas River stage. Ratios of strontium isotopes Sr87 and Sr86 in water collected from wells in the Camp Funston Area indicate that the ground water along the northern valley wall originates, in part, from upland areas north of the river valley. Water from Threemile Creek, which flows out of the uplands north of the river valley, had Sr87:Sr86 ratios similar to

  10. Ground-Water Occurrence and Movement, 2006, and Water-Level Changes in the Detrital, Hualapai, and Sacramento Valley Basins, Mohave County, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anning, David W.; Truini, Margot; Flynn, Marilyn E.; Remick, William H.

    2007-01-01

    Ground-water levels for water year 2006 and their change over time in Detrital, Hualapai, and Sacramento Valley Basins of northwestern Arizona were investigated to improve the understanding of current and past ground-water conditions in these basins. The potentiometric surface for ground water in the Basin-Fill aquifer of each basin is generally parallel to topography. Consequently, ground-water movement is generally from the mountain front toward the basin center and then along the basin axis toward the Colorado River or Lake Mead. Observed water levels in Detrital, Hualapai, and Sacramento Valley Basins have fluctuated during the period of historic water-level records (1943 through 2006). In Detrital Valley Basin, water levels in monitored areas have either remained the same, or have steadily increased as much as 3.5 feet since the 1980s. Similar steady conditions or water-level rises were observed for much of the northern and central parts of Hualapai Valley Basin. During the period of historic record, steady water-level declines as large as 60 feet were found in wells penetrating the Basin-Fill aquifer in areas near Kingman, northwest of Hackberry, and northeast of Dolan Springs within the Hualapai Valley Basin. Within the Sacramento Valley Basin, during the period of historic record, water-level declines as large as 55 feet were observed in wells penetrating the Basin-Fill aquifer in the Kingman and Golden Valley areas; whereas small, steady rises were observed in Yucca and in the Dutch Flat area.

  11. Exploring health-related quality of life and social functioning in adolescents with inflammatory bowel diseases after attending camp oasis and participating in a Facebook group.

    PubMed

    Plevinsky, Jill M; Greenley, Rachel N

    2014-09-01

    Youth with inflammatory bowel diseases are at risk for impaired health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and problems with social functioning. This study examined the impact of attending Camp Oasis (a disease-specific weeklong camp experience) on the HRQoL and social functioning of youth with inflammatory bowel diseases. Additionally, the study collected pilot data on whether a postcamp Facebook group contributed to maintenance or enhancement of these factors. Twenty-one youth ages 14 to 17 years who attended Camp Oasis and were Facebook users participated. HRQoL and social functioning (i.e., social support and social connectedness) were assessed through validated youth-report questionnaires at precamp, postcamp, and post-Facebook group. The Facebook group was 8 weeks in duration and encouraged campers to continue interacting in a private, protected setting. Analyses of effect sizes (i.e., Cohen's d) indicated medium and statistically significant increases in HRQoL from precamp to postcamp (d = 0.40) and small increases in social functioning (d = 0.15-0.24). Additional improvements in social functioning were seen from postcamp to post-Facebook group (d = 0.21-0.32), and overall improvements were observed in all domains (d = 0.17-0.52). Findings replicated those of previous research in documenting the value of Camp Oasis on enhancing HRQoL. Both the camp experience and the Facebook group contributed to improvements in youth social functioning. Thus, supplementing the camp experience with membership in an online community may enhance social functioning in adolescents with inflammatory bowel diseases.

  12. Maja Valley and the Chryse outflow complex sites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, Jim W.

    1994-01-01

    This candidate landing site is located at 19 deg N, 53.5 deg W near the mouth of a major outflow channel. Maja Valles, and two 'valley network' channel systems, Maumee and Vedra Valles. The following objectives are to be analyzed in this region: (1) origin and paleohydrology of outflow and valley network channels; (2) fan delta complex composition (the deposit located in this area is one of the few identified at the mouth s of any channels on the planet); and (3) analysis of any paleolake sediments (carbonates, evaporites). The primary objectives of the Chryse Outflow Complex region (Ares, Tiu, Mawrth, Simud, and Shalbatana Valles) would be outflow channel dynamics (paleohydrology) of five different channel systems.

  13. Osteoarthritis of the knee and hip and activity: a systematic international review and synthesis (OASIS).

    PubMed

    Vignon, Eric; Valat, Jean-Pierre; Rossignol, Michel; Avouac, Bernard; Rozenberg, Sylvie; Thoumie, Philippe; Avouac, Jérôme; Nordin, Margareta; Hilliquin, Pascal

    2006-07-01

    The goal of this study was to determine which activities in four domains, daily life, exercises, sports and occupational activities, should be recommended, in favor or against, for the patient suffering from knee or hip OA. Scientific literature was searched in Medline, Embase and Cochrane databases for articles in French or English, reporting original data. The articles were evaluated with standardized epidemiological criteria. Seventy-two articles were retained. Recommendations were graded according to the level of scientific evidence (A high, B moderate, C clinical consensus) and were formulated for primary care. For activity of daily life (ADL), the OASIS group states with a moderate level of scientific evidence, that ADL are a risk factor for knee OA and that risk increases with intensity and duration of activity. The group concludes that healthy subjects as well as OA patients in general can pursue a high level of physical activity, provided the activity is not painful and does not predispose to trauma (grade B). Radiographic or clinical OA is not a contraindication to promoting activity in patients who have a sedentary lifestyle (grade C). For exercises and other structured activities pursued with a goal of health improvement, the group states with a high level of scientific evidence that they have a favourable effect on pain and function in the sedentary knee OA patient. The OASIS group recommends the practice of exercises and other structured activities for the sedentary patient with knee OA (grade A). Static exercises are not favored over dynamic exercises, availability, preference and tolerance being the criteria for the choice of an exercise (grade A). As results deteriorate when exercises are stopped, they should be performed at a frequency of between one and three times per week (grade B). Professional assistance can be useful in improving initial compliance and perseverance (grade B). There is no scientific argument to support halting exercise in

  14. Iron and nutrient content of wind-erodible sediment in the ephemeral river valleys of Namibia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dansie, A. P.; Wiggs, G. F. S.; Thomas, D. S. G.

    2017-08-01

    Research concerning the global distribution of aeolian dust sources has principally focussed on salt/clay pan and desiccated lacustrine emission areas. In southern Africa such sources are identified as Etosha Pan in northern Namibia and Makgadikgadi Pans in northern Botswana. Dust emitting from ephemeral river valleys, however, has been largely overlooked. Rivers are known nutrient transport pathways and the flooding regimes of ephemeral river valleys frequently replenish stores of fine sediment which, on drying, can become susceptible to aeolian erosion. Such airborne sediment may be nutrient rich and thus be significant for the fertilisation of marine waters once deposited. This study investigates the dust source sediments from three ephemeral river valleys in Namibia in terms of their particle size distribution and their concentrations of bioavailable N, P and Fe. We compare the nutrient content of these sediments from the ephemeral river valleys to those collected from Etosha and Makgadikgadi Pans and consider their relative ocean fertilising potential. Our results show that the ephemeral river valleys contain fine grained sediment similar in physical character to Etosha and Makgadikgadi Pans yet they have up to 43 times greater concentrations of bioavailable iron and enriched N and P macronutrients that are each important for ocean fertilisation. The known dust-emitting river valleys of Namibia may therefore be contributing a greater fertilisation role in the adjacent marine system than previously considered, and not-yet investigated. Given this finding a re-assessment of the potential role of ephemeral river valleys in providing nutrient-rich sediment into the aeolian and marine systems in other dryland areas is necessary.

  15. Ground-water conditions in southern Utah Valley and Goshen Valley, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cordova, R.M.

    1970-01-01

    The investigation of ground-water conditions in southern Utah Valley and Goshen Valley, Utah, was made by the U. S. Geological Survey as part of a cooperative program with the Utah Department of Natural Resources, Division of Water Rights, to investigate the water resources of the State. The purposes of the investigation were to (1) determine the occurrence, recharge, discharge, movement, storage, chemical quality, and availability of ground water; (2) appraise the effects of increased withdrawal of water from wells; and (3) evaluate the effect of the Central Utah Project on the ground-water reservoir and the water supply of Utah Lake.This report presents a description of the aquifer system in the two valleys, a detailed description of the ground-water resources, and conclusions about potential development and its effect on the hydrologic conditions in the valleys. Two supplementary reports are products of the investigation. A basic-data release (Cordova, 1969) contains most of the basic data collected for the investigation, including well characteristics, drillers' logs, water levels, pumpage from wells, chemical analyses of ground and surface waters, and discharge of selected springs, drains, and streams. An interpretive report (Cordova and Mower, 1967) contains the results of a large-scale aquifer test in southern Utah Valley.

  16. Monitoring alkylphenols in water using the polar organic chemical integrative sampler (POCIS): Determining sampling rates via the extraction of PES membranes and Oasis beads.

    PubMed

    Silvani, Ludovica; Riccardi, Carmela; Eek, Espen; Papini, Marco Petrangeli; Morin, Nicolas A O; Cornelissen, Gerard; Oen, Amy M P; Hale, Sarah E

    2017-10-01

    Polar organic chemical integrative samplers (POCIS) have previously been used to monitor alkylphenol (AP) contamination in water and produced water. However, only the sorbent receiving phase of the POCIS (Oasis beads) is traditionally analyzed, thus limiting the use of POCIS for monitoring a range of APs with varying hydrophobicity. Here a "pharmaceutical" POCIS was calibrated in the laboratory using a static renewal setup for APs (from 2-ethylphenol to 4-n-nonylphenol) with varying hydrophobicity (log K ow between 2.47 and 5.76). The POCIS sampler was calibrated over its 28 day integrative regime and sampling rates (R s ) were determined. Uptake was shown to be a function of AP hydrophobicity where compounds with log K ow  < 4 were preferentially accumulated in Oasis beads, and compounds with log K ow  > 5 were preferentially accumulated in the PES membranes. A lag phase (over a 24 h period) before uptake in to the PES membranes occurred was evident. This work demonstrates that the analysis of both POCIS phases is vital in order to correctly determine environmentally relevant concentrations owing to the fact that for APs with log K ow  ≤ 4 uptake, to the PES membranes and the Oasis beads, involves different processes compared to APs with log K ow  ≥ 4. The extraction of both the POCIS matrices is thus recommended in order to assess the concentration of hydrophobic APs (log K ow  ≥ 4), as well as hydrophilic APs, most effectively. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  17. Selected hydrologic data for Cedar Valley, Iron County, southwestern Utah, 1930-2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Howells, James H.; Mason, James L.; Slaugh, Bradley A.

    2001-01-01

    This report presents hydrologic data collected by the U. S. Geological Survey from 1930 to 2001 with emphasis on data collected from 1997 to 2001 as part of a study of ground-water resources in Cedar Valley, Iron County, southwestern Utah (fig. 1). Data collected prior to this study are also presented to show long-term trends. Data were collected during this study in cooperation with the Central Iron County Water Conservancy District; Utah Department of Natural Resources, Division of Water Resources; Utah Department of Environmental Quality, Division of Water Quality; Cedar City; and Enoch City; as part of a study to better understand the ground-water resources of Cedar Valley and to assess possible effects of increased ground-water withdrawal on water quality. Quality of ground water in Cedar Valley is variable and water suppliers need to know if additional water resources can be developed without drawing water of lower quality into public-supply wells.Cedar Valley is in central Iron County at the transitional boundary between the Basin and Range and Colorado Plateau physiographic provinces described by Hunt (1974) and covers about 570 mi2. Additional data from wells west of Cedar Valley and to the south in the vicinity of Kanarraville in the Virgin River drainage (Colorado River Basin) adjacent to the study area are included. Cedar Valley is bounded on the east by the Markagunt Plateau and Red Hills, on the southwest by the Harmony Mountains, on the west by a complex of low hills, and on the north by the Black Mountains. Altitudes in the study area range from about 5,300 ft in Mud Spring Canyon to about 10,400 ft at Blowhard Mountain to the east.

  18. Aeromagnetic survey map of Sacramento Valley, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Langenheim, Victoria E.

    2015-01-01

    Three aeromagnetic surveys were flown to improve understanding of the geology and structure in the Sacramento Valley. The resulting data serve as a basis for geophysical interpretations, and support geological mapping, water and mineral resource investigations, and other topical studies. Local spatial variations in the Earth's magnetic field (evident as anomalies on aeromagnetic maps) reflect the distribution of magnetic minerals, primarily magnetite, in the underlying rocks. In many cases the volume content of magnetic minerals can be related to rock type, and abrupt spatial changes in the amount of magnetic minerals commonly mark lithologic or structural boundaries. Bodies of serpentinite and other mafic and ultramafic rocks tend to produce the most intense positive magnetic anomalies (for example, in the northwest part of the map). These rock types are the inferred sources, concealed beneath weakly magnetic, valley-fill deposits, of the most prominent magnetic features in the map area, the magnetic highs that extend along the valley axis. Cenozoic volcanic rocks are also an important source of magnetic anomalies and coincide with short-wavelength anomalies that can be either positive (strong central positive anomaly flanked by lower-amplitude negative anomalies) or negative (strong central negative anomaly flanked by lower-amplitude positive anomalies), reflecting the contribution of remanent magnetization. Rocks with more felsic compositions or even some sedimentary units also can cause measurable magnetic anomalies. For example, the long, linear, narrow north-trending anomalies (with amplitudes of <50 nanoteslas [nT]) along the western margin of the valley coincide with exposures of the Mesozoic Great Valley sequence. Note that isolated, short-wavelength anomalies, such as those in the city of Sacramento and along some of the major roads, are caused by manmade features.

  19. Effects of Groundwater Development on Uranium: Central Valley, California, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jurgens, B.C.; Fram, M.S.; Belitz, K.; Burow, K.R.; Landon, M.K.

    2010-01-01

    Uranium (U) concentrations in groundwater in several parts of the eastern San Joaquin Valley, California, have exceeded federal and state drinking water standards during the last 20 years. The San Joaquin Valley is located within the Central Valley of California and is one of the most productive agricultural areas in the world. Increased irrigation and pumping associated with agricultural and urban development during the last 100 years have changed the chemistry and magnitude of groundwater recharge, and increased the rate of downward groundwater movement. Strong correlations between U and bicarbonate suggest that U is leached from shallow sediments by high bicarbonate water, consistent with findings of previous work in Modesto, California. Summer irrigation of crops in agricultural areas and, to lesser extent, of landscape plants and grasses in urban areas, has increased Pco2 concentrations in the soil zone and caused higher temperature and salinity of groundwater recharge. Coupled with groundwater pumping, this process, as evidenced by increasing bicarbonate concentrations in groundwater over the last 100 years, has caused shallow, young groundwater with high U concentrations to migrate to deeper parts of the groundwater system that are tapped by public-supply wells. Continued downward migration of U-affected groundwater and expansion of urban centers into agricultural areas will likely be associated with increased U concentrations in public-supply wells. The results from this study illustrate the potential long-term effects of groundwater development and irrigation-supported agriculture on water quality in arid and semiarid regions around the world. Journal compilation ?? 2009 National Ground Water Association. No claim to original US government works.

  20. space Radar Image of Long Valley, California

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-05-01

    An area near Long Valley, California, was mapped by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C and X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar aboard the space shuttle Endeavor on April 13, 1994, during the first flight of the radar instrument, and on October 4, 1994, during the second flight of the radar instrument. The orbital configurations of the two data sets were ideal for interferometric combination -- that is overlaying the data from one image onto a second image of the same area to create an elevation map and obtain estimates of topography. Once the topography is known, any radar-induced distortions can be removed and the radar data can be geometrically projected directly onto a standard map grid for use in a geographical information system. The 50 kilometer by 50 kilometer (31 miles by 31 miles) map shown here is entirely derived from SIR-C L-band radar (horizontally transmitted and received) results. The color shown in this image is produced from the interferometrically determined elevations, while the brightness is determined by the radar backscatter. The map is in Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) coordinates. Elevation contour lines are shown every 50 meters (164 feet). Crowley Lake is the dark feature near the south edge of the map. The Adobe Valley in the nort