Science.gov

Sample records for obese subjects complementary

  1. [Obesity and dyslipidemia in Tunisian bipolar subjects].

    PubMed

    Ezzaher, Asma; Haj Mouhamed, Dhouha; Mechri, Anwar; Neffati, Fadoua; Douki, Wahiba; Gaha, Lotfi; Najjar, Mohamed Fadhel

    2010-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the prevalence of obesity and overweight and their association with lipid parameters in bipolar patients. Our study included 130 patients with bipolar disorder and 130 control subjects aged respectively 37.9 +/- 12.1 and 37.2 +/- 13.1 years. Obesity was evaluated by body mass index (BMI). Concentrations of total cholesterol, triglycerides, cLDL and cHDL were determined by enzymatic methods and ApoA1, ApoB and Lp(a) by techniques immunoturbidimetric. The prevalence of obesity in patients is 30.1% vs 12.3% in controls. A significant increase in BMI was noted in patients compared with controls regardless of sex and tobacco status and in patients aged less than 35 years and those consumers of alcohol. The majority of obese and overweight patients are treated with valproic acid. We found increase in cholesterol (4.41 +/- 1.02 vs 3.90 +/- 0.98 mmol/L), in cLDL (2.13 +/- 1.09 vs 1.29 +/- 0.56 mmol/L) and in Lp(a) (236 +/- 207 vs 163 +/- 150 mg/L) and decrease in HDLc (0.98 +/- 0.28 vs 1.09 +/- 0.36 mmol/L), more frequent at the obese patients and those presenting an overweight. In conclusion, in bipolar patients, obesity and overweight are frequent and associated with perturbations in lipid profile particularly an increase in total cholesterol, cLDL and Lp(a) and decrease in cHDL that increase the risk of cardiovascular disease. PMID:20478770

  2. Complementary and Alternative Medicine for the Treatment of Obesity: A Critical Review

    PubMed Central

    Esteghamati, Alireza; Mazaheri, Tina; Vahidi Rad, Mona; Noshad, Sina

    2015-01-01

    Context: Obesity and its associated morbidities pose a major health hazard to the public. Despite a multiplex of available diet and exercise programs for losing and maintaining weight, over the past years, interest in the use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) for obesity treatment has greatly increased. Evidence Acquisition: We searched PubMed, Google scholar and the Cochrane databases for systemic reviews, review articles, meta-analysis and randomized clinical trials up to December 2013. Results: In this review, the efficacy and safety of the more commonly used CAM methods for the treatment of obesity, namely herbal supplements, acupuncture, and non-invasive body-contouring, are briefly discussed. The evidence supporting the effectiveness and safety of these methods is either lacking or point to a negligible clinical benefit, barely surpassing that of the placebo. Furthermore, several limitations are observed in the available scientific literature. These shortcomings include, without being limited to, uncontrolled trial designs, non-random allocation of subjects to treatment arms, small number of patients enrolled, short durations of follow-up, and ambiguous clinical and laboratory endpoints. Conclusions: Further investigations are necessary to accurately determine the efficacy, safety, standard dosage/procedure, and potential side effects of the various CAM methods currently in use. PMID:25892995

  3. Timing of the introduction of complementary feeding and risk of childhood obesity: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Pearce, J; Taylor, M A; Langley-Evans, S C

    2013-10-01

    The World Health Organisation recommends exclusive breastfeeding until 6 months of age and continued breastfeeding until 2 years of age or beyond. Appropriate complementary foods should be introduced in a timely fashion, beginning when the infant is 6 months old. In developing countries, early or inappropriate complementary feeding may lead to malnutrition and poor growth, but in countries such as the United Kingdom and United States of America, where obesity is a greater public health concern than malnutrition, the relationship to growth is unclear. We conducted a systematic review of the literature that investigated the relationship between the timing of the introduction of complementary feeding and overweight or obesity during childhood. Electronic databases were searched from inception until 30 September 2012 using specified keywords. Following the application of strict inclusion/exclusion criteria, 23 studies were identified and reviewed by two independent reviewers. Data were extracted and aspects of quality were assessed using an adapted Newcastle-Ottawa scale. Twenty-one of the studies considered the relationship between the time at which complementary foods were introduced and childhood body mass index (BMI), of which five found that introducing complementary foods at <3 months (two studies), 4 months (2 studies) or 20 weeks (one study) was associated with a higher BMI in childhood. Seven of the studies considered the association between complementary feeding and body composition but only one study reported an increase in the percentage of body fat among children given complementary foods before 15 weeks of age. We conclude that there is no clear association between the timing of the introduction of complementary foods and childhood overweight or obesity, but some evidence suggests that very early introduction (at or before 4 months), rather than at 4-6 months or >6 months, may increase the risk of childhood overweight. PMID:23736360

  4. Breastfeeding and time of complementary food introduction as predictors of obesity in children.

    PubMed

    Škledar, Mariana Turčić; Milošević, Milan

    2015-03-01

    Although obesity is a multifactorial disorder caused by various behavioural, genetic and environmental influences, early life factors affecting certain critical periods during childhood (prenatal period, adiposity rebound period at 3-5 years and around 5-7 years, as well as puberty) are important in promoting obesity in adulthood. The objective was to determine the association between the birth weight, birth length, breastfeeding and time of introduction of complementary food with obesity among 302 healthy Caucasian children 6-7 years old. Binary logistic regression analysis was used to assess the impact of a number of perinatal and socioeconomic confounding factors on the likelihood for overweight and obesity among children. The level of significance was set at p <0.05. Our findings indicate that duration of breastfeeding for at least 3 months, with introduction of complementary food after the age of 6 months have an important role in preventing obesity. This findings are crucial for planning preventive strategies to prevent further increases in the prevalence of overweight and obesity.

  5. Evaluation of Autonomic Dysfunction in Obese and Non-Obese Hypertensive Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Ganai, Jyoti; Muthukrishnan, Shobitha; Kohli, Sunil

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Obesity and more specifically, visceral obesity, has been consistently associated with hypertension and increased cardiovascular risk. Epidemiological studies indicate that at least two-third of the prevalence of hypertension can be directly attributed to obesity. Studies also suggest that hypertensive patients have impaired cardiac autonomic function. Aim The objective of the study was to examine any added effects of obesity on cardiac autonomic dysfunction in hypertensive patients. Materials and Methods Hypertensive subjects (n=45) between 35-60 years of age were divided into two groups; Group A (n=30) consisted of non-obese hypertensive subjects and Group B (n=15) consisted of obese (BMI≥30kg/m2) hypertensive subjects. Cardiac autonomic function was assessed using four tests – Heart rate response to immediate standing (30:15 ratio), standing to lying ratio (S/L ratio), Blood pressure response to immediate standing and Cold Pressor Test (CPT). Results There were no significant differences for autonomic function tests between obese and non-obese hypertensive subjects (p >0.05). Conclusion The results showed that there are no significant differences in the cardiac autonomic function responses between obese and non-obese hypertensive subjects. PMID:27504394

  6. Serum levels of pancreatic enzymes in lean and obese subjects.

    PubMed

    Kondo, T; Hayakawa, T; Shibata, T; Sato, Y; Toda, Y

    1988-05-01

    Serum amylase and trypsin, but not lipase, were significantly lower in obese subjects than in lean subjects. Serum amylase and trypsin, but not lipase, had significant inverse correlation with body weight. Low serum amylase was associated with low protein, fat and carbohydrate intakes per kg body weight, whereas low serum trypsin was associated with low carbohydrate intake per kg body weight. Low serum pancreatic enzymes readily increased with diet therapy. It is assumed that lowered serum pancreatic enzymes in obese subjects are somehow related to their diet intake. The mechanism through which pancreatic enzymes in the blood reflect the composition of food is unclear.

  7. Nitrogen loss in normal and obese subjects during total fast.

    PubMed

    Göschke, H; Stahl, M; Thölen, H

    1975-07-01

    Healthy volunteers of ideal weight (12 men and 12 women) were fasted for 6 days, and obese but otherwise healthy subjects (20 men, 28 women) for 6--28 days. In all groups studied a significant increase in urinary nitrogen loss from day 1 to day 3 of fasting was followed by a steady decrease. The early rise in urinary nitrogen excretion coincided with a rise in plasma glucagon levels, suggesting a relation of the latter to increased gluconeogenesis from amino acids. At equal weight greater nitrogen losses were found in men than in women, in both normal and obese subjects. In spite of much higher weight and larger energy expenditure and nitrogen loss in obese subjects however was not higher than in normal ones. Mean daily nitrogen losses varied from 14.5 g (normal and obese men early in starvation) to 3.0 g (obese women after a 4-weeks fast). Calculating the amount of calories derived from body protien (urinary nitrogen X 6.25 X 4.1)and taking total energy expenditure from tabular metabolic values, the contribution of protein to total calorie output was found to vary from 15% (normal men 6 day fast) to 5(obese women, 4th week of fasting). The clinical significance of nitrogen loss during therapeutic fasting is discussed.

  8. Lower-Limb Joint Coordination Pattern in Obese Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Ranavolo, Alberto; Donini, Lorenzo M.; Mari, Silvia; Serrao, Mariano; Silvetti, Alessio; Iavicoli, Sergio; Cava, Edda; Asprino, Rosa; Pinto, Alessandro; Draicchio, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    The coordinative pattern is an important feature of locomotion that has been studied in a number of pathologies. It has been observed that adaptive changes in coordination patterns are due to both external and internal constraints. Obesity is characterized by the presence of excess mass at pelvis and lower-limb areas, causing mechanical constraints that central nervous system could manage modifying the physiological interjoint coupling relationships. Since an altered coordination pattern may induce joint diseases and falls risk, the aim of this study was to analyze whether and how coordination during walking is affected by obesity. We evaluated interjoint coordination during walking in 25 obese subjects as well as in a control group. The time-distance parameters and joint kinematics were also measured. When compared with the control group, obese people displayed a substantial similarity in joint kinematic parameters and some differences in the time-distance and in the coupling parameters. Obese subjects revealed higher values in stride-to-stride intrasubjects variability in interjoint coupling parameters, whereas the coordinative mean pattern was unaltered. The increased variability in the coupling parameters is associated with an increased risk of falls and thus should be taken into account when designing treatments aimed at restoring a normal locomotion pattern. PMID:23484078

  9. Adipokines and biochemical changes in Egyptian obese subjects: possible variation with sex and degree of obesity.

    PubMed

    El-Haggar, Sahar Mohamed; Mostafa, Tarek Mohamed

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this study was firstly to evaluate the adipokines and biochemical changes in obese subjects in relation to different grades of obesity and in relation to gender difference (males versus females) and secondly to evaluate the role of TNF-α in obesity. From January 2013 to February 2014, a total number of 120 non-diabetic subjects of both sexes were recruited and randomly selected from Dr. Abd-Elhamid Elsheikh center for physiotherapy and weight control, El-menofia-Egypt. Those subjects were classified according to their sex into two main groups; the female group and the male group. The female group (60 women) was distributed according to BMI into group 1 (15 lean women), group 2 (15 class I obese women), group 3 (15 class II obese women), and group 4 (15 class III obese women). The male group (60 men) was also distributed according to the BMI into group 1 (15 lean men), group 2 (15 class I obese men), group 3 (15 class II obese men), and group 4 (15 class III obese men). All individuals enrolled in the study were submitted to weight and height measurements with subsequent calculation of body mass index. Fasting blood samples were collected from all participants for quantitative determination of blood glucose, serum lipid, TNF-α, leptin, and adiponectin levels. One-way analysis of variance followed by LSD post hoc test was used for comparison of variables. In obese subjects of both sexes, it was found that circulating leptin and TNF-α levels were significantly high (P<0.05) and positively correlated to BMI. In contrast to leptin, adiponectin concentrations were significantly low (P<0.05) and inversely correlated to BMI. Regarding gender difference, although serum leptin and adiponectin levels were higher in women than men, men showed higher atherogenic parameters. We conclude that leptin, TNF-α, and adiponectin were related to both BMI and grades of obesity. Furthermore, TNF-α may play a role in obesity.

  10. How to Estimate Fat Mass in Overweight and Obese Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Donini, Lorenzo Maria; Poggiogalle, Eleonora; del Balzo, Valeria; Lubrano, Carla; Faliva, Milena; Opizzi, Annalisa; Perna, Simone; Pinto, Alessandro; Rondanelli, Mariangela

    2013-01-01

    Background. The prevalence of overweight and obesity is increasing and represents a primary health concern. Body composition evaluation is rarely performed in overweight/obese subjects, and the diagnosis is almost always achieved just considering body mass index (BMI). In fact, whereas BMI can be considered an important tool in epidemiological surveys, different papers stated the limitations of the use of BMI in single individuals. Aim. To assess the determinants of body composition in overweight and obese subjects. Methods. In 103 overweight or obese subjects (74 women, aged 41.5 ± 10 years, and 29 men, aged 43.8 ± 8 years), a multidimensional evaluation was performed including the assessment of body composition using Dual Energy X-Ray Absorptiometry (DXA), anthropometry, bioimpedance analysis (BIA), and biochemical parameters (total cholesterol, triacylglycerol, HDL- and LDL-cholesterol, free fatty acids and glycerol, glucose, insulin, C-reactive protein, plasma acylated and unacylated ghrelin, adiponectin, and leptin serum levels). Results. BMI does not represent the main predictor of FM estimated by DXA; FM from BIA and hip circumference showed a better association with FM from DXA. Moreover, models omitting BMI explained a greater part of variance. These data are confirmed by the predictive value analysis where BMI showed a performance similar to a “coin flip.” PMID:23662101

  11. Behavioral obesity research: Where have all the single subjects gone?

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Jean E.; Gross, Alan M.

    1988-01-01

    Many recent reviews of the literature concerning behavioral treatments of obesity have concluded that behavioral methods have not been as successful in treating this problem as might have been predicted in the early years of behavior modification. Among the many potential reasons for this lack of success is the growing trend to utilize group statistical designs rather than single subject designs to examine the problem of obesity, in spite of the fact that single case methodology has provided the foundation for applied behavior analysis and behavior therapy. Several behavioral journals were surveyed to determine more precisely the trends in types of research strategies utilized in obesity studies. The potential relationship between research methodology and the development of effective treatments is discussed. PMID:22478008

  12. [A study of platelet abnormalities in obese subjects (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Juhan, I; Gabrielli, M; Jouve, R; Calas, M F; Durand-Dessemon, F; Vague, J

    1980-03-01

    In 81 obese subjects the following studies were performed: --measurement of fat mass and its distribution in the body, --exploration of carbohydrate tolerance and lipid plasma level, --assessment of platelet aggregation and coagulation activity, --investigation of the chemical composition of platelet phospholipids. Platelet hyperactivity was demonstrated in certain patients, as evidenced by the presence of irreversible platelet aggregation with low doses of aggregation agents and by an increase in platelet coagulant activity; the latter phenomenon was not accompanied by a change in the biochemical composition of platelet phospholipids. Results of this work showed that platelet activity was not related to body weight and displayed no correlation or a slightly negative one to fat mass excess. Platelet activity was significantly increased in cases where obesity predominated in the upper body (hyperandroid obesity). The classical association of diabetes and atherosclerosis with hyperandroid obesity did not allow us to distinguish between the relative importance of hyperandroid obesity and diabetes in the observed platelet hyperactivity. Regardless of the causal mechanism involved, the relationship between platelet hyperactivity and upper body fat excess should be kept in mind.

  13. Adipocytokine levels in obese and non-obese subjects: an observational study.

    PubMed

    Derosa, Giuseppe; Fogari, Elena; D'Angelo, Angela; Bianchi, Lucio; Bonaventura, Aldo; Romano, Davide; Maffioli, Pamela

    2013-08-01

    We evaluated the levels of some inflammatory adipocytokines in 363 obese and 365 non-obese subjects. We measured: body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC), fasting plasma glucose, fasting plasma insulin (FPI), homeostasis model assessment (HOMA) index, blood pressure, lipid profile, retinol binding protein-4 (RBP-4), vaspin, omentin-1, leptin, interleukin-6 (IL-6), visfatin, resistin, adiponectin (ADN), adipsin, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and high sensitivity C-reactive protein (Hs-CRP). We observed higher BMI, WC, FPI, HOMA index, TC, LDL-C, RBP-4, leptin, IL-6, adipsin, Hs-CRP, vaspin, resistin and TNF-α levels, and lower visfatin, and ADN levels in obese compared to non-obese subjects. Higher WC correlated with lower ADN and visfatin levels, and higher vaspin levels. Higher HOMA index correlated with higher resistin, adipsin, RBP-4, and leptin concentrations, while higher leptin levels correlated with higher TNF-α, Hs-CRP, and IL-6 concentration, and lower ADN values. We confirmed obese subjects' predisposition to develop dysmetabolic disease and hormonal dysfunctions.

  14. Attenuated thermoregulatory responses with increased plasma osmolality in obese subjects during two seasons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanikowska, Dominika; Sato, Maki; Sugenoya, Junichi; Shimizu, Yuuki; Nishimura, Naoki; Inukai, Yoko; Iwase, Satoshi

    2013-09-01

    Obese subjects may be more vulnerable to injury from heat stress, and appear to be less efficient at thermoregulation. Sweat rate, tympanic temperature and osmolality in obese subjects were investigated in Japan during two seasons. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between obesity, thermoregulatory response and season. Five obese (BMI, 32.0 ± 4.9 kg/m2) and five non-obese (BMI, 23.2 ± 2.9 kg/m2) men participated in this experiment at latitude 35°10' N and longitude 136°57.9'E. The average atmospheric temperature was 29.1 ± 1.0 °C in summer and 3.3 ± 1.4 °C in winter. Tympanic temperature and sweat rate were measured during leg water immersion at 42 °C for 30 min. Blood samples were analyzed for plasma osmolality. The relationship between tympanic temperature and sweat rate decreased significantly in obese compared to in non-obese subjects in both seasons, there being a lowered sweat rate for any core temperature in obese subjects. Plasma osmolality was significantly higher in obese than in non-obese subjects in both seasons. Thermal sensation increased significantly in non-obese than in obese in winter but not in summer. Our data show that thermoregulatory responses are attenuated in obese subjects compared with controls, suggesting that obese people are at increased risk of heat-related illnesses.

  15. Myotubes from Severely Obese Type 2 Diabetic Subjects Accumulate Less Lipids and Show Higher Lipolytic Rate than Myotubes from Severely Obese Non-Diabetic Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Bakke, Siril S.; Kase, Eili T.; Moro, Cedric; Stensrud, Camilla; Damlien, Lisbeth; Ludahl, Marianne O.; Sandbu, Rune; Solheim, Brita Marie; Rustan, Arild C.; Hjelmesæth, Jøran; Thoresen, G. Hege; Aas, Vigdis

    2015-01-01

    About 80% of patients with type 2 diabetes are classified as overweight. However, only about 1/3 of severely obese subjects have type 2 diabetes. This indicates that several severely obese individuals may possess certain characteristics that protect them against type 2 diabetes. We therefore hypothesized that this apparent paradox could be related to fundamental differences in skeletal muscle lipid handling. Energy metabolism and metabolic flexibility were examined in human myotubes derived from severely obese subjects without (BMI 44±7 kg/m2) and with type 2 diabetes (BMI 43±6 kg/m2). Lower insulin sensitivity was observed in myotubes from severely obese subjects with type 2 diabetes. Lipolysis rate was higher, and oleic acid accumulation, triacylglycerol content, and fatty acid adaptability were lower in myotubes from severely obese subjects with type 2 diabetes compared to severely obese non-diabetic subjects. There were no differences in lipid distribution and mRNA and protein expression of the lipases HSL and ATGL, the lipase cofactor CGI-58, or the lipid droplet proteins PLIN2 and PLIN3. Glucose and oleic acid oxidation were also similar in cells from the two groups. In conclusion, myotubes established from severely obese donors with established type 2 diabetes had lower ability for lipid accumulation and higher lipolysis rate than myotubes from severely obese donors without diabetes. This indicates that a difference in intramyocellular lipid turnover might be fundamental in evolving type 2 diabetes. PMID:25790476

  16. Seasonal differences in melatonin concentrations and heart rates during sleep in obese subjects in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Maki; Kanikowska, Dominika; Iwase, Satoshi; Shimizu, Yuuki; Nishimura, Naoki; Inukai, Yoko; Sato, Motohiko; Sugenoya, Junichi

    2013-09-01

    During the past several decades, obesity has been increasing globally. In Japan, obesity is defined by a BMI of 25 kg/m2 or over; 28.6 % of men and 20.6 % of women are obese. Obese people have an increased incidence of developing cardiovascular, renal, and hormonal diseases and sleep disorders. Obese people also have shortened sleep durations. We investigated seasonal differences in melatonin concentrations, heart rates, and heart rate variability during sleep in obese subjects in Japan. Five obese (BMI, 32.0 ± 4.9 kg/m2) and five non-obese (BMI, 23.2 ± 2.9 kg/m2) men participated in this study in the summer and winter. Electrocardiograms were measured continuously overnight in a climatic chamber at 26 °C with a relative humidity of 50 %. Saliva samples for melatonin were collected at 2300 hours, 0200 hours, and 0600 hours. We found that melatonin concentrations during sleep in obese subjects were significantly lower than those in non-obese subjects in the winter. Heart rate during sleep in winter was significantly higher than that in summer in both obese and non-obese subjects. Heart rate variability was not significantly different in the summer and winter in both obese and non-obese subjects. Our results show that decreased nocturnal melatonin concentrations during winter in obese men may be related to higher heart rates, and this may suggest that obese men are at an increased risk of a cardiovascular incident during sleep, especially in the winter.

  17. Attenuated thermoregulatory responses with increased plasma osmolality in obese subjects during two seasons.

    PubMed

    Kanikowska, Dominika; Sato, Maki; Sugenoya, Junichi; Shimizu, Yuuki; Nishimura, Naoki; Inukai, Yoko; Iwase, Satoshi

    2013-09-01

    Obese subjects may be more vulnerable to injury from heat stress, and appear to be less efficient at thermoregulation. Sweat rate, tympanic temperature and osmolality in obese subjects were investigated in Japan during two seasons. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between obesity, thermoregulatory response and season. Five obese (BMI, 32.0 ± 4.9 kg/m²) and five non-obese (BMI, 23.2 ± 2.9 kg/m²) men participated in this experiment at latitude 35°10' N and longitude 136°57.9'E. The average atmospheric temperature was 29.1 ± 1.0 °C in summer and 3.3 ± 1.4 °C in winter. Tympanic temperature and sweat rate were measured during leg water immersion at 42 °C for 30 min. Blood samples were analyzed for plasma osmolality. The relationship between tympanic temperature and sweat rate decreased significantly in obese compared to in non-obese subjects in both seasons, there being a lowered sweat rate for any core temperature in obese subjects. Plasma osmolality was significantly higher in obese than in non-obese subjects in both seasons. Thermal sensation increased significantly in non-obese than in obese in winter but not in summer. Our data show that thermoregulatory responses are attenuated in obese subjects compared with controls, suggesting that obese people are at increased risk of heat-related illnesses.

  18. Prevalence and Determinants of Metabolic Health in Subjects with Obesity in Chinese Population

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Ruizhi; Yang, Min; Bao, Yuqian; Li, Hong; Shan, Zhongyan; Zhang, Bo; Liu, Juan; Lv, Qinguo; Wu, Ou; Zhu, Yimin; Lai, Maode

    2015-01-01

    Background: The study was to investigate the prevalence of metabolic health in subjects with obesity in the Chinese population and to identify the determinants related to metabolic abnormality in obese individuals. Methods: 5013 subjects were recruited from seven provincial capitals in China. The obesity and metabolic status were classified based on body mass index (BMI) and the number of abnormalities in common components of metabolic syndrome. Results: 27.9% of individuals with obesity were metabolically healthy. The prevalence of the metabolically healthy obese (MHO) phenotype was significantly decreased with age in women (p trend < 0.001), but not significantly in men (p trend = 0.349). Central obesity (odds ratio [OR] = 4.07, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.93–8.59), longer sedentary time (OR = 1.97, 95%CI = 1.27–3.06), and with a family history of obesity related diseases (hypertension, diabetes, dyslipidemia) (OR = 1.85, 95%CI = 1.26–2.71) were significantly associated with having metabolic abnormality in obese individuals. Higher levels of physical activity and more fruit/vegetable intake had decreased ORs of 0.67 (95%CI = 0.45–0.98) and 0.44 (95%CI = 0.28–0.70), respectively. Conclusion: 27.9% of obese participants are in metabolic health. Central obesity, physical activity, sedentary time, fruits/vegetables intake and family history of diseases are the determinants associated with metabolic status in obesity. PMID:26516886

  19. Sensory and non-sensory factors and the concept of externality in obese subjects.

    PubMed

    Gardner, R M; Brake, S J; Reyes, B; Maestas, D

    1983-08-01

    9 obese and 9 normal subjects performed a psychophysical task in which food- or non-food-related stimuli were briefly flashed tachistoscopically at a speed and intensity near the visual threshold. A signal was presented on one-half the trials and noise only on the other one-half of the trials. Using signal detection theory methodology, separate measures of sensory sensitivity (d') and response bias (beta) were calculated. No differences were noted between obese and normal subjects on measures of sensory sensitivity but significant differences on response bias. Obese subjects had consistently lower response criteria than normal ones. Analysis for subjects categorized by whether they were restrained or unrestrained eaters gave findings identical to those for obese and normal. The importance of using a methodology that separates sensory and non-sensory factors in research on obesity is discussed.

  20. Psychopathology of Eating Disorders: A Controlled Comparison of Bulimic, Obese, and Normal Subjects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williamson, Donald A.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    The Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory, the Symptom Checklist-90, the Beck Depression Inventory, and a body image assessment were administered to 15 bulimic, 15 normal, and 15 obese women. Results showed that bulimics evidenced significantly more psychopathology than did normal and obese subjects; bulimics were more depressed, anxious,…

  1. Oxidative Damage and Inflammation in Obese Diabetic Emirati Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Gariballa, Salah; Kosanovic, Melita; Yasin, Javed; El Essa, Awad

    2014-01-01

    Visceral obesity is more common in the Arab population and more closely related to morbidity, including diabetes and related cardiovascular diseases (CVD). Possible mechanisms that link visceral fat/obesity to diabetes and CVD complications include inflammation and increased oxidative stress; however, few data are available from the Arab population. Our aim was to determine whether increased adiposity in obese diabetic United Arab Emirates citizens is associated with sub-clinical inflammation and/or increased oxidative stress. A hundred diabetic patients who were part of a randomized controlled trial of nutritional supplements had their baseline characteristics assessed from anthropometric and clinical data following informed written consent. We used WHO figures to classify general and central obesity. Fasting blood samples were collected for the measurement of antioxidants and markers of oxidative damage and inflammation. We found that increased adiposity measured by both body mass index and waist circumference was associated with increased C-reactive protein (CRP) and decreased vitamin C after adjusting for age, duration and treatment of diabetes (p < 0.05). Although there is a clear trend of increased inflammatory markers, notably CRP, and decreased antioxidants with increased BMI and waist circumference in both men and women, the results are statistically significant for women only. CRP were also inversely associated with HDL. Overall, we found that BMI underestimates the rates of obesity compared to waist circumference and that increased adiposity is associated with increased inflammation and decreased HDL and antioxidant status. PMID:25375631

  2. Hypoxia Promotes the Inflammatory Response and Stemness Features in Visceral Fat Stem Cells From Obese Subjects.

    PubMed

    Petrangeli, Elisa; Coroniti, Giuseppe; Brini, Anna T; de Girolamo, Laura; Stanco, Deborah; Niada, Stefania; Silecchia, Gianfranco; Morgante, Emanuela; Lubrano, Carla; Russo, Matteo A; Salvatori, Luisa

    2016-03-01

    Low-grade chronic inflammation is a salient feature of obesity and many associated disorders. This condition frequently occurs in central obesity and is connected to alterations of the visceral adipose tissue (AT) microenvironment. Understanding how obesity is related to inflammation may allow the development of therapeutics aimed at improving metabolic parameters in obese patients. To achieve this aim, we compared the features of two subpopulations of adipose-derived stem cells (ASC) isolated from both subcutaneous and visceral AT of obese patients with the features of two subpopulations of ASC from the same isolation sites of non-obese individuals. In particular, the behavior of ASC of obese versus non-obese subjects during hypoxia, which occurs in obese AT and is an inducer of the inflammatory response, was evaluated. Obesity deeply influenced ASC from visceral AT (obV-ASC); these cells appeared to exhibit clearly distinguishable morphology and ultrastructure as well as reduced proliferation, clonogenicity and expression of stemness, differentiation and inflammation-related genes. These cells also exhibited a deregulated response to hypoxia, which induced strong tissue-specific NF-kB activation and an NF-kB-mediated increase in inflammatory and fibrogenic responses. Moreover, obV-ASC, which showed a less stem-like phenotype, recovered stemness features after hypoxia. Our findings demonstrated the peculiar behavior of obV-ASC, their influence on the obese visceral AT microenvironment and the therapeutic potential of NF-kB inhibitors. These novel findings suggest that the deregulated hyper-responsiveness to hypoxic stimulus of ASC from visceral AT of obese subjects may contribute via paracrine mechanisms to low-grade chronic inflammation, which has been implicated in obesity-related morbidity.

  3. Neck Circumference in Overweight/Obese Subjects who Visited the Binjai Supermall in Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    Lindarto, Dharma; Shierly; Syafril, Santi

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Neck circumference (NC) is a simple screening measure for identifying overweight and obesity, it reflects upper-body fat distribution and central obesity. AIM: To determine whether a single measure of NC might be used to identify overweight/obesity. MATERIAL AND METHODS: An observational, analytical, cross-sectional study was done. The subjects consisted of all consecutive subjects who visited Binjai Supermall (North Sumatera Province, Indonesia) between 23rd and 29th September 2015 and agreed to participate in the study. NC, weight, height, body mass index (BMI), and waist circumference (WC) were measured. Overweight and obesity were defined as BMIs of 23.0–24.9 and ≥ 25 kg/m2, respectively. RESULTS: In total, 1554 subjects participated. Of these, 1238 (79.7%) were overweight/obese. NC correlated significantly with weight, height, BMI, and WC. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis showed that for all men and women, the area under the curve of overweight/obesity for NC was 0.83 and 0.79, respectively. The best NC cutoff points for males and females that indicated overweight/obesity were ≥ 37 cm (sensitivity, 78.3% and specificity, 75.5%) and ≥ 33.5 cm (sensitivity, 76.6% and specificity, 66.7%), respectively. CONCLUSION: The NC cutoffs that were identified may be useful for screening for overweight/obesity and related co-morbidities. PMID:27703549

  4. Health-Related Quality of Life and Quality of Sexual Life in Obese Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Di Lazzaro, Luca; Pinto, Alessandro; Migliaccio, Silvia; Lenzi, Andrea; Donini, Lorenzo M.

    2014-01-01

    The increased prevalence of obesity represents, currently, one of the major public health issues, due to its consequences on physical and psychological health status as well as on the psychosocial functioning. As defined by the World Health Organization, sexual health is “a state of physical, emotional, mental, and social well-being in relation to sexuality.” The aim of the present study was to explore the relationship between sexual life in obese subjects and quality of life, psychological status, and disability. Methods. 95 obese subjects were recruited from June 2012 to February 2013 and underwent physical examination and measures for the assessment of quality of life, sexual life, psychological status, and disability. Results. In obese subjects sexual life was related to gender, age, psychological status, disability, and quality of life. Conclusion. As obesity is a multifactorial disease, and is accompanied by multiple comorbidities, it is difficult to identify a single causative factor responsible for the impairment of sexual life in obese subjects; thus, a thorough, multidimensional evaluation including sexual function assessment should be performed in obese people. PMID:24707290

  5. Introduction of complementary feeding before 4months of age increases the risk of childhood overweight or obesity: a meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Wu, Yuanjue; Xiong, Guoping; Chao, Tingting; Jin, Qiu; Liu, Rui; Hao, Liping; Wei, Sheng; Yang, Nianhong; Yang, Xuefeng

    2016-08-01

    The association between the age at introduction of complementary feeding and the risk of overweight or obesity during childhood has been hotly debated, but the result remains uncertain. This meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies attempted to evaluate this association, as well as provide evidence for infant feeding recommendations. The PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane databases were systematically searched for relevant original articles published prior to March 1, 2015 that met predefined inclusion criteria. The pooled relative risks (RRs) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using fix-effect or random-effect models, which were chosen based on heterogeneity among studies. Ten articles consisting of 13 studies, where 8 measured being overweight as an outcome and 5 measured being obese, were included in this meta-analysis. There were a total of 63,605 participants and 11,900 incident cases in the overweight studies, and 56,136 individuals and 3246 incident cases in the obese studies. The pooled results revealed that introducing complementary foods before 4months of age compared to at 4 to 6months was associated with an increased risk of being overweight (RR, 1.18; 95% CI, 1.06-1.31) or obese (RR, 1.33; 95% CI, 1.07-1.64) during childhood. No significant relationship was observed between delaying introduction of complementary foods after 6months of age, and being overweight (RR, 1.01; 95% CI, 0.90-1.13) or obese (RR, 1.02; 95% CI, 0.91-1.14) during childhood. The results of this study suggest that the introduction of complementary foods to infants before 4months of age should be avoided to protect against childhood obesity. PMID:27440530

  6. Introduction of complementary feeding before 4months of age increases the risk of childhood overweight or obesity: a meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Wu, Yuanjue; Xiong, Guoping; Chao, Tingting; Jin, Qiu; Liu, Rui; Hao, Liping; Wei, Sheng; Yang, Nianhong; Yang, Xuefeng

    2016-08-01

    The association between the age at introduction of complementary feeding and the risk of overweight or obesity during childhood has been hotly debated, but the result remains uncertain. This meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies attempted to evaluate this association, as well as provide evidence for infant feeding recommendations. The PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane databases were systematically searched for relevant original articles published prior to March 1, 2015 that met predefined inclusion criteria. The pooled relative risks (RRs) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using fix-effect or random-effect models, which were chosen based on heterogeneity among studies. Ten articles consisting of 13 studies, where 8 measured being overweight as an outcome and 5 measured being obese, were included in this meta-analysis. There were a total of 63,605 participants and 11,900 incident cases in the overweight studies, and 56,136 individuals and 3246 incident cases in the obese studies. The pooled results revealed that introducing complementary foods before 4months of age compared to at 4 to 6months was associated with an increased risk of being overweight (RR, 1.18; 95% CI, 1.06-1.31) or obese (RR, 1.33; 95% CI, 1.07-1.64) during childhood. No significant relationship was observed between delaying introduction of complementary foods after 6months of age, and being overweight (RR, 1.01; 95% CI, 0.90-1.13) or obese (RR, 1.02; 95% CI, 0.91-1.14) during childhood. The results of this study suggest that the introduction of complementary foods to infants before 4months of age should be avoided to protect against childhood obesity.

  7. Bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA) for sarcopenic obesity (SO) diagnosis in young female subjects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Correa, C. H.; Caicedo-Eraso, J. C.; S, Villada-Gomez J.

    2013-04-01

    Sarcopenia is defined as a loss of muscle mass depending of ageing and affecting physical function (definition A). A new definition considers excluding mass reduction criterion (definition B). Obesity is pandemic and occurs at all ages. Sarcopenic obesity (SO) implies both processes. The purpose of this study was to compare the results obtained after applying these 2 definitions in 66 aged 22 ± 2.8 years overweight or obese young college women. Percentage body fat (%BF) and skeletal mass index (SMI) were estimated by BIA, muscle function by handgrip strength test (HGS) and physical performance by Harvard step test (HST). There were 9.1% and 90.9% overweight or obese subjects. Twenty nine subjects (43.9%) had decreased HGS and 22 (33.3%) had impaired physical performance. One obese subject (1.5%) met the criteria for sarcopenic obesity by definition A and 9 (13.6%) by definition B. Although a linear regression (α <0.05) showed a very weak association between these variables (r2 = 0.094, 0.037 and 0.275 respectively) it was observed a tendency for HGS, HST and SMI deterioration when %BF increases. However, other confounding factors must be investigated. Probably as the population gets more obese, the problematic of SO will be found earlier in life.

  8. Healthcare utilization and costs in severely obese subjects before bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Keating, Catherine L; Moodie, Marj L; Bulfone, Liliana; Swinburn, Boyd A; Stevenson, Christopher E; Peeters, Anna

    2012-12-01

    This study examined healthcare utilization and associated costs for a severely obese population before receiving bariatric surgery relative to an age- and sex-matched sample from the Australian general population. Severely obese subjects receiving laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding (LAGB) surgery in 2009 (n = 11,769) were identified. Utilization of medical services and pharmaceuticals in the 3.5 years before surgery were ascertained for each severely obese subject through linkage with Medicare, Australia's universal health insurance scheme. Equivalent data were retrieved for each subject from the matched general population sample (n = 140,000). Severely obese subjects utilized significantly more medical services annually compared to the general population (mean: 22.8 vs. 12.1/person, standardized incidence ratio (SIR): 1.89 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.88-1.89)), translating to twofold higher mean annual costs (Australian $1,140 vs. $567/person). The greatest excess costs in the obese related to consultations with general practitioners, psychiatrists/psychologists and other specialists, investigations for obstructive sleep apnea, and in vitro fertilization. Severely obese subjects also utilized significantly more pharmaceutical prescriptions annually (mean: 11.4 vs. 5.3/person, SIR 2.18 (95% CI: 2.17-2.19)), translating to 2.2-fold higher mean annual costs ($595/person vs. $270/person). The greatest excess costs in the obese related to diabetes drugs, lipid-modifying agents, psychoanaleptics, acid-related disorder drugs, agents acting on the rennin-angiotensin system, immunosuppressants, and obstructive airway disease drugs. Overall, healthcare costs in the severely obese population were more than double those incurred by the general population.

  9. Healthcare utilization and costs in severely obese subjects before bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Keating, Catherine L; Moodie, Marj L; Bulfone, Liliana; Swinburn, Boyd A; Stevenson, Christopher E; Peeters, Anna

    2012-12-01

    This study examined healthcare utilization and associated costs for a severely obese population before receiving bariatric surgery relative to an age- and sex-matched sample from the Australian general population. Severely obese subjects receiving laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding (LAGB) surgery in 2009 (n = 11,769) were identified. Utilization of medical services and pharmaceuticals in the 3.5 years before surgery were ascertained for each severely obese subject through linkage with Medicare, Australia's universal health insurance scheme. Equivalent data were retrieved for each subject from the matched general population sample (n = 140,000). Severely obese subjects utilized significantly more medical services annually compared to the general population (mean: 22.8 vs. 12.1/person, standardized incidence ratio (SIR): 1.89 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.88-1.89)), translating to twofold higher mean annual costs (Australian $1,140 vs. $567/person). The greatest excess costs in the obese related to consultations with general practitioners, psychiatrists/psychologists and other specialists, investigations for obstructive sleep apnea, and in vitro fertilization. Severely obese subjects also utilized significantly more pharmaceutical prescriptions annually (mean: 11.4 vs. 5.3/person, SIR 2.18 (95% CI: 2.17-2.19)), translating to 2.2-fold higher mean annual costs ($595/person vs. $270/person). The greatest excess costs in the obese related to diabetes drugs, lipid-modifying agents, psychoanaleptics, acid-related disorder drugs, agents acting on the rennin-angiotensin system, immunosuppressants, and obstructive airway disease drugs. Overall, healthcare costs in the severely obese population were more than double those incurred by the general population. PMID:22627914

  10. Krill oil significantly decreases 2-arachidonoylglycerol plasma levels in obese subjects.

    PubMed

    Banni, Sebastiano; Carta, Gianfranca; Murru, Elisabetta; Cordeddu, Lina; Giordano, Elena; Sirigu, Anna Rita; Berge, Kjetil; Vik, Hogne; Maki, Kevin C; Di Marzo, Vincenzo; Griinari, Mikko

    2011-01-30

    We have previously shown that krill oil (KO), more efficiently than fish oil, was able to downregulate the endocannabinoid system in different tissues of obese zucker rats.We therefore aimed at investigating whether an intake of 2 g/d of either KO or menhaden oil (MO), which provides 309 mg/d of EPA/DHA 2:1 and 390 mg/d of EPA/DHA 1:1 respectively, or olive oil (OO) for four weeks, is able to modify plasma endocannabinoids in overweight and obese subjects.The results confirmed data in the literature describing increased levels of endocannabinoids in overweight and obese with respect to normo-weight subjects. KO, but not MO or OO, was able to significantly decrease 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG), although only in obese subjects. In addition, the decrease of 2-AG was correlated to the plasma n-6/n-3 phospholipid long chain polyunsaturated fatty acid (LCPUFA) ratio. These data show for the first time in humans that relatively low doses of LCPUFA n-3 as KO can significantly decrease plasma 2-AG levels in obese subjects in relation to decrease of plasma phospholipid n-6/n-3 LCPUFA ratio. This effect is not linked to changes of metabolic syndrome parameters but is most likely due to a decrease of 2-AG biosynthesis caused by the replacement of 2-AG ultimate precursor, arachidonic acid, with n-3 PUFAs, as previously described in obese Zucker rats.

  11. Enhanced ROS production and oxidative damage in subcutaneous white adipose tissue mitochondria in obese and type 2 diabetes subjects.

    PubMed

    Chattopadhyay, Mrittika; Khemka, Vineet Kumar; Chatterjee, Gargi; Ganguly, Anirban; Mukhopadhyay, Satinath; Chakrabarti, Sasanka

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress in the insulin target tissues has been implicated in the pathophysiology of type 2 diabetes. The study has examined the oxidative stress parameters in the mitochondria of subcutaneous white adipose tissue from obese and non-obese subjects with or without type 2 diabetes. An accumulation of protein carbonyls, fluorescent lipid peroxidation products, and malondialdehyde occurs in the adipose tissue mitochondria of obese type 2 diabetic, non-diabetic obese, and non-obese diabetic subjects with the maximum increase noticed in the obese type 2 diabetes patients and the minimum in non-obese type 2 diabetics. The mitochondria from obese type 2 diabetics, non-diabetic obese, and non-obese type 2 diabetics also produce significantly more reactive oxygen species (ROS) in vitro compared to those of controls, and apparently the mitochondrial ROS production rate in each group is proportional to the respective load of oxidative damage markers. Likewise, the mitochondrial antioxidant enzymes like superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase show decreased activities most markedly in obese type 2 diabetes subjects and to a lesser degree in non-obese type 2 diabetes or non-diabetic obese subjects in comparison to control. The results imply that mitochondrial dysfunction with enhanced ROS production may contribute to the metabolic abnormality of adipose tissue in obesity and diabetes.

  12. Antihypertensive effect of alpha- and beta-adrenergic blockade in obese and lean hypertensive subjects.

    PubMed

    Wofford, M R; Anderson, D C; Brown, C A; Jones, D W; Miller, M E; Hall, J E

    2001-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the contribution of the adrenergic system in mediating hypertension in obese and lean patients. Thirteen obese, hypertensive patients with a body mass index (BMI) > or =28 kg/m2 (obese) and nine lean patients with a BMI < or =25 kg/m2 (lean) were recruited. After a 1-week washout period, participants underwent daytime ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM). Participants were then treated with the alpha-adrenergic antagonist doxazosin, titrating to 4 mg QHS in 1 week. In the next week, the beta-adrenergic antagonist atenolol was added at an initial dose of 25 mg/day and titrated to 50 mg/day within 1 week. One month after the addition of atenolol, all patients underwent a second ABPM session. There were no differences between the obese and lean subjects in baseline systolic (SBP), diastolic (DBP), or mean arterial pressures (MAP) measured by office recording or ABPM. However, obese subjects had higher heart rates than lean subjects (87.5+/-2.4 v 76.8+/-4.9 beats/min). After 1 month of treatment with the adrenergic blockers, obese patients had a significantly lower SBP (130.0+/-2.5 v 138.9+/-2.1 mm Hg, P = .02) and MAP (99.6+/-2.3 v 107.0+/-1.5 mm Hg, P = .02) than lean patients. Obese patients also tended to have a lower DBP than lean patients (84.3+/-2.5 v 90.9+/-1.6 mm Hg, P = .057), but there was no significant difference in heart rate after 1 month of adrenergic blockade. These results indicate that blood pressure is more sensitive to adrenergic blockade in obese than in lean hypertensive patients and suggest that increased sympathetic activity may be an important factor in the maintenance of hypertension in obesity.

  13. Subjective Well-Being in Obese Individuals: The Multiple Roles of Exercise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berger, Bonnie G.

    2004-01-01

    This paper focuses on the tangled web of obesity and exercise as it relates to subjective well-being. Many overweight individuals have low levels of subjective well-being as a reflection of "anti-fat" biases and sociocultural considerations. Since exercise helps balance the energy intake-output equation and is associated with mood benefits,…

  14. Role of the DGAT gene C79T single-nucleotide polymorphism in French obese subjects.

    PubMed

    Coudreau, Sylvie Kipfer; Tounian, Patrick; Bonhomme, Geneviève; Froguel, Philippe; Girardet, Jean-Philippe; Guy-Grand, Bernard; Basdevant, Arnaud; Clément, Karine

    2003-10-01

    Acyl-coenzyme A, diacylglycerol acyltransferase (DGAT), is a key enzyme involved in adipose-cell triglyceride storage. A 79-bp T-to-C single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) on the 3' region of the DGAT transcriptional site has been reported to increase promoter activity and is associated with higher BMI in Turkish women. To validate the possible role of this genetic variant in obesity, as well as the variant's possible cellular-functional significance, we performed an association study between the T79C change and several obesity-related phenotypes in 1357 obese French adults and children. The prevalence of the T79C SNP was similar between obese adults and children when each group was compared with the controls. (CC genotype carrier frequencies were 0.25 to 0.29 in the obese groups and 0.21 in controls; p > 0.05.) In each of the obese adult and child groups studied, the T79C variant was not found to be associated with any of the obesity-related phenotypes tested. Although the T79C SNP of the DGAT gene was studied in several groups of white subjects, the association between this SNP and obesity-related phenotypes, previously described, was not confirmed in our population.

  15. Serum adiponectin levels in diabetes, obesity and gender in Punjabi subjects from Faisalabad, Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Najam, Syeda Sadia; Awan, Fazli Rabbi; Baig, Shahid Mahmood

    2014-10-01

    Adiponectin has been associated with common metabolic disorders. The current study was conducted to measure and compare levels of adiponectin with obesity, type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and gender in Punjabi subjects from Faisalabad, Pakistan. Serum adiponectin was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) along with measurements of some clinically important analytes (fasting blood glucose, cholesterol, triglycerides) as well as body mass index (BMI) in 80 subjects. The main results were significantly (p < 0.003) decreased serum adiponectin level in T2DM patients (n = 40) compared to non-diabetic controls (n = 40). In obese subjects, (n = 40) also, there was a decrease, but it was not significant. Adiponectin levels in the subgroups of diabetic and obese patients were also observed, but no significant gender-based differences were found.

  16. Lipid profile and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein levels in obese and non-obese subjects undergoing non-surgical periodontal therapy.

    PubMed

    Zuza, Elizangela P; Barroso, Eliane M; Fabricio, Mariana; Carrareto, Ana Luiza V; Toledo, Benedicto E C; R Pires, Juliana

    2016-01-01

    Periodontal treatment may improve the metabolic control of dyslipidemia. The aim of this study was to evaluate the lipid profile and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) levels in obese and non-obese patients undergoing periodontal therapy. Patients with generalized chronic periodontitis were divided into obese (n = 28) and non-obese groups (n = 26). The periodontal parameters (visible plaque index, gingival bleeding index, probing depth, clinical attachment level, and bleeding on probing), anthropometric measurements (body mass index, waist circumference, and body fat), and serum analyses (triglycerides, total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein, low-density lipoprotein, fasting glucose, glycated hemoglobin, and hs-CRP) were measured at baseline and 90 days after periodontal treatment. The results showed that the obese subjects presented alterations in triglycerides, total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein, and hs-CRP at baseline when compared with non-obese patients (P < 0.05). Periodontal treatment could improve the periodontal parameters in both groups similarly (P > 0.05). Obese subjects showed a significant decrease in the levels of triglycerides, total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein, and hs-CRP post-therapy (P < 0.05), while non-obese patients showed improvement only in hs-CRP (P < 0.05). In conclusion, periodontal treatment could improve the periodontal parameters and circulating hs-CRP in obese and non-obese subjects. Lipid profile was modified only in obese patients post-therapy. (J Oral Sci 58, 423-430, 2016). PMID:27665983

  17. Differences in metabolic biomarkers in the blood and gene expression profiles of peripheral blood mononuclear cells among normal weight, mildly obese and moderately obese subjects.

    PubMed

    Jung, Un Ju; Seo, Yu Ri; Ryu, Ri; Choi, Myung-Sook

    2016-09-01

    We compared metabolic biomarkers in the blood and peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) gene expression profiles among normal weight (BMI, 18·5-23 kg/m2), mildly obese (BMI, 25-27·5 kg/m2) and moderately obese Korean adult men (BMI, 27·5-30 kg/m2). High leptin, lipids (except LDL- and HDL-cholesterol) and apoB levels and low adiponectin and HDL-cholesterol levels were present in the plasma of both mildly and moderately obese subjects. Circulating levels of inflammatory cytokines and markers of insulin resistance, oxidative stress and liver damage were altered in moderately obese subjects but not in mildly obese subjects. PBMC transcriptome data showed enrichment of pathways involved in energy metabolism, insulin resistance, bone metabolism, cancer, inflammation and fibrosis in both mildly and moderately obese subjects. Signalling pathways involved in oxidative phosphorylation, TAG synthesis, carbohydrate metabolism and insulin production; mammalian target of rapamycin, forkhead box O, ras-proximate-1, RAS and transforming growth factor-β signalling; as well as extracellular matrix-receptor interaction were enriched only in moderately obese subjects, indicating that changes in PBMC gene expression profiles, according to metabolic disturbances, were associated with the development and/or aggravation of obesity. In particular, fourteen and fifteen genes differentially expressed only in mildly obese subjects and in both mildly and moderately obese subjects, respectively, could be used as early or stable biomarkers for diagnosing and treating obesity-associated metabolic disturbance. We characterised BMI-associated metabolic and molecular biomarkers in the blood and provided clues about potential blood-based targets for preventing or treating obesity-related complications. PMID:27501771

  18. Fat utilization and arterial hypertension in overweight/obese subjects

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The Respiratory Quotient is a parameter reflecting the utilization of the nutrients by a subject. It is associated with an high rate of subsequent weight gain and with the atherosclerosis. Subjects tending to burn less fat have an increased Respiratory Quotient. Aim of this study was to investigate on the relationship between the Respiratory Quotient and the cardiovascular risk factors. Methods In this cross-sectional study we enrolled 223 individuals of both sexes aged 45–75 ys that were weight stable, receiving a balanced diet, and not affected by debilitating disease or cardiovascular disease. The Respiratory Quotient was measured by Indirect Calorimetry. The measurement of the Blood Pressure was obtained by a mercury sphygmomanometer. Results We enrolled 133 female and 90 male. Systolic blood pressure only was positively correlated to the Respiratory Quotient in univariate and multivariate regression analysis (p=0,017). The prevalence of hypertension was significatively different between the quartiles of the Respiratory Quotient, with the highest prevalence in the IV quartile (p=0,024). Conclusion High value of the Respiratory Quotient, an index of nutrients utilization, is associated to an high prevalence of Hypertension. It is possible that in the subjects with high Respiratory Quotient and high body mass index, the activation of the renin angiotensin system, in concert to the reduction of the utilization of the endogenous fat stores, could increase the risk of hypertension. PMID:23815947

  19. Comparative Analysis of GCF Resistin Levels in Obese Subjects with and without Periodontal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mahendra, Jaideep; Singh, Gurdeep; Pradeep, AR; Sundaravikram; Sekar, Himanshu

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Resistin is an adipocyte derived hormone that has been shown to play a substantial role in the development of insulin resistance. Resistin acts as a pro-inflammatory molecule and stimulates the synthesis and secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Recent studies have reported the association of Gingival Crevicular Fluid (GCF) resistin levels with periodontal condition. Aim The aim of this study was to assess and compare the GCF resistin levels in obese subjects with periodontal health and disease and to correlate the disease severity with GCF resistin levels. Materials and Methods Ninety subjects of both the sexes with age between 20–45 years were selected for the study and were categorized into four groups: 25 obese or overweight subjects with generalized chronic periodontitis (Group-I), 25 obese or overweight subjects with healthy periodontium (Group-II), 25 non-obese subjects with generalized chronic periodontitis (Group-III) and 15 non obese subjects with healthy periodontium (Group-IV). The demographic variables like age, Body Mass Index (BMI), Waist Circumference (WC) were recorded and the clinical periodontal parameters such as Plaque Index (PI), Gingival Index (GI), and Clinical Attachment Level (CAL) were also assessed in all the groups. GCF was collected and assessed for resistin levels. Results The mean GCF resistin levels in Groups I, II, III & IV were 15.14, 9.06, 12.74 and 5.41 ng/dl respectively and the difference in mean GCF resistin level was statistically significant with the p-value<0.001. The mean GCF resistin levels in Group-I was higher compared to Group II and III and the differences in mean GCF resistin levels were statistically significant. GCF resistin levels were positively correlated with BMI, WC and CAL in Group I and CAL correlated with GCF resistin in Group III and this correlation was statistically significant. Conclusion From our study we report that obese subjects with periodontitis have more GCF resistin levels

  20. Disability Affects the 6-Minute Walking Distance in Obese Subjects (BMI>40 kg/m2)

    PubMed Central

    Donini, Lorenzo Maria; Poggiogalle, Eleonora; Mosca, Veronica; Pinto, Alessandro; Brunani, Amelia; Capodaglio, Paolo

    2013-01-01

    Introduction In obese subjects, the relative reduction of the skeletal muscle strength, the reduced cardio-pulmonary capacity and tolerance to effort, the higher metabolic costs and, therefore, the increased inefficiency of gait together with the increased prevalence of co-morbid conditions might interfere with walking. Performance tests, such as the six-minute walking test (6MWT), can unveil the limitations in cardio-respiratory and motor functions underlying the obesity-related disability. Therefore the aims of the present study were: to explore the determinants of the 6-minute walking distance (6MWD) and to investigate the predictors of interruption of the walk test in obese subjects. Methods Obese patients [body mass index (BMI)>40 kg/m2] were recruited from January 2009 to December 2011. Anthropometry, body composition, specific questionnaire for Obesity-related Disabilities (TSD-OC test), fitness status and 6MWT data were evaluated. The correlation between the 6MWD and the potential independent variables (anthropometric parameters, body composition, muscle strength, flexibility and disability) were analysed. The variables which were singularly correlated with the response variable were included in a multivariated regression model. Finally, the correlation between nutritional and functional parameters and test interruption was investigated. Results 354 subjects (87 males, mean age 48.5±14 years, 267 females, mean age 49.8±15 years) were enrolled in the study. Age, weight, height, BMI, fat mass and fat free mass indexes, handgrip strength and disability were significantly correlated with the 6MWD and considered in the multivariate analysis. The determination coefficient of the regression analysis ranged from 0.21 to 0.47 for the different models. Body weight, BMI, waist circumference, TSD-OC test score and flexibility were found to be predictors of the 6MWT interruption. Discussion The present study demonstrated the impact of disability in obese subjects

  1. The relationship between vitamin D status, physical activity and insulin resistance in overweight and obese subjects

    PubMed Central

    Kavadar, Gülis; Demircioğlu, Demet Tekdöş; Özgönenel, Levent; Emre, Tuluhan Yunus

    2015-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) incidence has been increasing worldwide along with the rise of obesity and sedantery lifestyle. Decreased physical activity (PA) and obesity have also been associated with the low vitamin D levels. We aimed to determine the association between PA, vitamin D status and insulin resistance in overweight and obese subjects. A total of 294 (186 female, 108 male) overweight or obese subjects were included in this cross-sectional study. 25-hydroxy vitamin D (25(OH)D), insulin, fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and HbA1c levels were measured in blood samples. Body mass index (BMI), HOMA-index and total score of International Physical Activity Questionnaire-long form (IPAQ)were calculated. Insulin resistant subjects were compared with the non-resistant group. The mean age of the participants was 45±12.25 and 41.39±10.32; 25(OH)D levels were 8.91 ± 4.30 and 17.62 ± 10.47 ng/dL; BMIs were 31.29 ± 4.48 and 28.2 ± 3.16 kg/m², IPAQ total scores were 548.71±382.81 and 998±486.21 in the insulin resistant and nonresistant subjects, respectively. There was a statistically significant difference in terms of 25(OH)D, FPG, insulin levels, IPAQ total score and BMI between the two groups (p = 0.001, p = 0.001, p = 0.001, p = 0.001, p = 0.001). Significantly low 25(OH)D levels, high BMI and low PA in insulin resistant subjects confirm the importance of active lifestyle and the maintenance of normal vitamin D levels in overweight and obese subjects in prevention of T2DM. PMID:26042515

  2. Eating behaviour in treatment-seeking obese subjects - Influence of sex and BMI classes.

    PubMed

    Ernst, Barbara; Wilms, Britta; Thurnheer, Martin; Schultes, Bernd

    2015-12-01

    Obese subjects frequently show an adversely altered eating behaviour. However, little is known on differences in eating behaviour across different degree of obesity. We analysed data on the three factor eating questionnaire assessing cognitive restraint, disinhibition, and hunger that were filled in by 664 obese patients (469 women) who seeked treatment in our Interdisciplinary Obesity Center. Patients were divided in five BMI classes (30 - <35 kg/m(2), 35 - <40 kg/m(2), 40 - <50 kg/m(2), and >50 kg/m(2)). Multivariate regression analyses revealed that sex was significantly related to all three eating behaviour traits (all P < 0.042) but no significant relation to BMI (as a continuous variable) was observed. Women in comparison to men showed significantly higher cognitive restraint (9.7 ± 4.3 vs. 7.7 ± 4.4; P < 0.001) and disinhibition (9.0 ± 3.5 vs. 7.7 ± 3.5; P < 0.001) scores and also showed higher hunger scores (6.9 ± 3.7 vs. 6.3 ± 3.5; P = 0.042). Analyses on different BMI classes revealed that cognitive restraint decreased (P = 0.016) while disinhibition (P = 0.010) and hunger (P = 0.044) increased independently of sex with increasing BMI classes. However, above the obesity grade I class (i.e. BMI 30 - < 35 kg/m(2)) there were no differences in eating behaviour variables between the remaining BMI classes. Data indicate profound differences in eating behaviour between women and men that persist across a wide range of obesity. Furthermore, data suggest that while grade I obese patients show higher cognitive restraint and less disinhibition and hunger scores than more severe obese patients these dimensions of eating behaviour do not systematically vary across higher BMI classes.

  3. Hypercoagulability in overweight and obese subjects who are asymptomatic for thrombotic events.

    PubMed

    Campello, Elena; Zabeo, Eva; Radu, Claudia M; Spiezia, Luca; Gavasso, Sabrina; Fadin, Mariangela; Woodhams, Barry; Vettor, Roberto; Simioni, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    The role of circulating microparticles (MP) of different origin and tissue factor (TF)-bearing in overweight and obese patients with and without metabolic syndrome is still a matter of debate. In a case-control study, the presence of hypercoagulability was evaluated in overweight and obese patients by measuring MP, thrombin generation (TG) and FVIIa-AT complexes. Twenty overweight patients (body mass index [BMI] range 25-29.9 kg/m²), 20 with I degree (30-34.9 kg/m²), 20 with II degree (35-39.9 kg/m²) and 20 with III degree obesity (≥ 40 kg/m²) were enrolled and compared to 40 age and gender-matched normal weight individuals. A significant increase in median levels of all MP subtypes was observed in the three degrees of obese patients compared to controls. Overweight patients had higher levels of annexin V-MP (AMP), endothelial-derived, leukocyte-derived and TF-bearing MP than controls. Obese patients had a significantly shorter median lag time (p< 0.05), higher median peak thrombin (p< 0.01) and increased median endogenous thrombin potential [ETP] (p< 0.001) compared to controls. Overweight subjects had significantly increased ETP compared to controls (p< 0.05). Both AMP levels and ETP were found to positively correlate with BMI, waist circumference, and inflammatory parameters. No significant increase in FVIIa-AT complex was seen in cases compared to controls. We conclude that obesity is associated with overproduction of procoagulant MP and increase TG. Interestingly, hypercoagulability is found in overweight patients free of metabolic syndrome and increases with the severity of obesity. Assessment of MP and TG may be helpful in the early characterisation of the prothrombotic state in obese patients.

  4. Dietary Patterns Differently Associate with Inflammation and Gut Microbiota in Overweight and Obese Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Cotillard, Aurelie; Habi-Rachedi, Fatiha; Brazeilles, Rémi; Gougis, Sophie; Gausserès, Nicolas; Cani, Patrice D.; Fellahi, Soraya; Bastard, Jean-Philippe; Kennedy, Sean P.; Doré, Joel; Ehrlich, Stanislav Dusko; Zucker, Jean-Daniel; Rizkalla, Salwa W.; Clément, Karine

    2014-01-01

    Background Associations between dietary patterns, metabolic and inflammatory markers and gut microbiota are yet to be elucidated. Objectives We aimed to characterize dietary patterns in overweight and obese subjects and evaluate the different dietary patterns in relation to metabolic and inflammatory variables as well as gut microbiota. Design Dietary patterns, plasma and adipose tissue markers, and gut microbiota were evaluated in a group of 45 overweight and obese subjects (6 men and 39 women). A group of 14 lean subjects were also evaluated as a reference group. Results Three clusters of dietary patterns were identified in overweight/obese subjects. Cluster 1 had the least healthy eating behavior (highest consumption of potatoes, confectionary and sugary drinks, and the lowest consumption of fruits that was associated also with low consumption of yogurt, and water). This dietary pattern was associated with the highest LDL cholesterol, plasma soluble CD14 (p = 0.01) a marker of systemic inflammation but the lowest accumulation of CD163+ macrophages with anti-inflammatory profile in adipose tissue (p = 0.05). Cluster 3 had the healthiest eating behavior (lower consumption of confectionary and sugary drinks, and highest consumption of fruits but also yogurts and soups). Subjects in this Cluster had the lowest inflammatory markers (sCD14) and the highest anti-inflammatory adipose tissue CD163+ macrophages. Dietary intakes, insulin sensitivity and some inflammatory markers (plasma IL6) in Cluster 3 were close to those of lean subjects. Cluster 2 was in-between clusters 1 and 3 in terms of healthfulness. The 7 gut microbiota groups measured by qPCR were similar across the clusters. However, the healthiest dietary cluster had the highest microbial gene richness, as evaluated by quantitative metagenomics. Conclusion A healthier dietary pattern was associated with lower inflammatory markers as well as greater gut microbiota richness in overweight and obese

  5. Effect of Laser Acupuncture on Anthropometric Measurements and Appetite Sensations in Obese Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Alan; Tseng, Jason; Chang, Chia-Hao

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. A patient-assessor-blinded, randomized, sham-controlled crossover trial was performed to investigate the effectiveness of laser acupuncture on anthropometric measurements and appetite sensation in obese subjects. Methods. Fifty-two obese subjects were randomly assigned to either the laser acupuncture group or the sham laser acupuncture group. Subjects within each group received the relevant treatment three times a week for 8 weeks. After a two-week washout period, the subjects then received the treatment of the opposite group for another 8 weeks. BMI, body fat percentage, waist-to-hip ratio (WHR), waist circumference, hip circumference, and appetite sensations were measured before and after 8 weeks of treatment. Results. BMI, body fat percentage, WHR, waist circumference, and hip circumference decreased significantly (p < 0.05) in the laser acupuncture group compared to baseline but there was no decrease in those variables in the sham laser acupuncture group. Laser acupuncture significantly improved scores on the fullness, hunger, satiety, desire to eat, and overall well-being relative to the baseline (p < 0.05). Conclusions. Laser acupuncture is well tolerated and improves anthropometric measurements and appetite sensations in obese subjects. PMID:27051454

  6. Serum Resistin Levels Are Associated with Adiposity and Insulin Sensitivity in Obese Hispanic Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Nieva-Vazquez, Adriana; Torres-Rasgado, Enrique; López-López, José G.; Romero, Jose R.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background and Aims: Resistin is involved in the development of obesity and insulin resistance (IR) in mice and may play a similar role in humans through mechanisms that remain unresolved. The objective of this study was to characterize the relationship between resistin levels in obese subjects with and without IR among Hispanic subjects. Material and Methods: A cross-sectional study was performed on 117 nondiabetic Hispanic subjects of both genders that were allocated into three study groups: A control group (n=47) of otherwise healthy individuals in metabolic balance, a group with obesity (OB) (n=36), and a group with obesity and IR (OB-IR) (n=34). Anthropometric and clinical characterization was carried out, and resistin levels were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Results: We found that resistin levels were higher in OB and OB-IR groups when compared to the control group (1331.79±142.15 pg/mL, 1266.28±165.97 pg/mL vs. 959.21±171.43 pg/mL; P<0.05), an effect that was not confounded by age (control, 34.04±10.00 years; OB, 37.30±10.78 years; and OB-IR, 35.67±10.15 years). In addition, we observed a significant correlation (P<0.001) between resistin levels and higher adiposity and insulin sensitivity (IS) in our cohort. Conclusions: Our results suggest that higher resistin levels are associated with higher adiposity and lower IS among obese Hispanic subjects. PMID:24266722

  7. Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels are inversely associated with systemic inflammation in severe obese subjects.

    PubMed

    Bellia, Alfonso; Garcovich, Caterina; D'Adamo, Monica; Lombardo, Mauro; Tesauro, Manfredi; Donadel, Giulia; Gentileschi, Paolo; Lauro, Davide; Federici, Massimo; Lauro, Renato; Sbraccia, Paolo

    2013-02-01

    Obesity is frequently characterized by a reduced vitamin D bioavailability, as well as insulin-resistance and a chronic inflammatory response. We tested the hypothesis of an independent relationship between serum concentrations of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25[OH]D) and several circulating inflammatory markers in a cohort of severely obese individuals. Cross-sectional study was carried out among obese patients undergoing a clinical evaluation before bariatric surgery in our University Hospital. Serum 25(OH)D, fasting and post load glucose and insulin, high-sensitive C-reactive protein (hs CRP), fibrinogen, interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), leptin, adiponectin and lipid profile were collected. Insulin-resistance was assessed by insulin sensitivity index (ISI). Total body fat (FAT kg), total percent body fat (FAT%) and truncal fat mass (TrFAT) were assessed with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. A total of 147 obese subjects (89 women, 37.8 ± 7.1 years) with mean body mass index (BMI) of 43.6 ± 4.3 kg/m(2) were enrolled. Patients in the lowest tertile of 25(OH)D were significantly more obese with a higher amount of TrFAT, more insulin-resistant, and had higher levels of fasting and post-challenge glucose (p < 0.05 for all). In a multivariate regression analysis, serum 25(OH)D was inversely related to significant levels of hs CRP, IL-6 and TNF-α after accounting for age, gender, season of recruitment, BMI, FAT kg and TrFAT (p < 0.01 for all). In extremely obese subjects, 25(OH)D serum concentrations are inversely associated with several biomarkers of systemic inflammation, regardless of the total quantity of fat mass. PMID:21437585

  8. Serum IL-12 Is Increased in Mexican Obese Subjects and Associated with Low-Grade Inflammation and Obesity-Related Parameters

    PubMed Central

    Suárez-Álvarez, K.; Solís-Lozano, L.; Leon-Cabrera, S.; González-Chávez, A.; Gómez-Hernández, G.; Quiñones-Álvarez, M. S.; Serralde-Zúñiga, A. E.; Hernández-Ruiz, J.; Ramírez-Velásquez, J.; Galindo-González, F. J.; Zavala-Castillo, J. C.; De León-Nava, M. A.; Robles-Díaz, G.; Escobedo, G.

    2013-01-01

    Interleukin-(IL-) 12 has been recently suggested to participate during development of insulin resistance in obese mice. Nevertheless, serum IL-12 levels have not been accurately determined in overweight and obese humans. We thus studied serum concentrations of IL-12 in Mexican adult individuals, examining their relationship with low-grade inflammation and obesity-related parameters. A total of 147 healthy individuals, 43 normal weight, 61 overweight, and 43 obese subjects participated in the study. Circulating levels of IL-12, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), leptin, insulin, glucose, total cholesterol, and triglyceride were measured after overnight fasting in all of the study subjects. Waist circumference and body fat percentage were recorded for all the participants. Serum IL-12 was significantly higher in overweight and obese individuals than in normal weight controls. Besides being strongly related with body mass index (r = 0.5154), serum IL-12 exhibited a significant relationship with abdominal obesity (r = 0.4481), body fat percentage (r = 0.5625), serum glucose (r = 0.3158), triglyceride (r = 0.3714), and TNF-α (r = 0.4717). Thus, serum levels of IL-12 are increased in overweight and obese individuals and show a strong relationship with markers of low-grade inflammation and obesity in the Mexican adult population. Further research is needed to understand the role of IL-12 in developing obesity-associated alterations in humans. PMID:23533314

  9. Aspiration Therapy Leads to Weight Loss in Obese Subjects: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Shelby; Stein, Richard; Jonnalagadda, Sreenivasa; Mullady, Daniel; Edmundowicz, Steven

    2014-01-01

    Background & Aims Obese patients rarely achieve long-term weight loss with only lifestyle interventions. We evaluated the use of endoscopic aspiration therapy for obesity. Aspiration therapy involves endoscopic placement of a gastrostomy tube (A-Tube) and the AspireAssist siphon assembly (Aspire Bariatrics, King of Prussia, PA) to aspirate gastric contents 20 minutes after meal consumption. Methods We performed a pilot study of 18 obese subjects who were randomly assigned (2:1) to groups that underwent aspiration therapy for 1 year plus lifestyle therapy (n = 11; mean body mass index, 42.6 ± 1.4 kg/m2) or lifestyle therapy only (n = 7; mean body mass index, 43.4 ± 2.0 kg/m). Lifestyle intervention comprised a 15-session diet and behavioral education program. Results Ten of the 11 subjects who underwent aspiration therapy and 4 of the 7 subjects who underwent lifestyle therapy completed the first year of the study. After 1 year, subjects in the aspiration therapy group lost 18.6% ± 2.3% of their body weight (49.0% ± 7.7% of excess weight loss [EWL]) and those in the lifestyle therapy group lost 5.9% ± 5.0% (14.9% ± 12.2% of EWL) (P < .04). Seven of the 10 subjects in the aspiration therapy group completed an additional year of therapy and maintained a 20.1% ± 3.5% body weight loss (54.6% ± 12.0% of EWL). There were no adverse effects of aspiration therapy on eating behavior and no evidence of compensation for aspirated calories with increased food intake. No episodes of binge eating in the aspiration therapy group or serious adverse were reported. Conclusions In a pilot study, aspiration therapy appears to be a safe and effective long-term weight loss therapy for obesity. ClinicalTrials.gov, Number: NCT00773903. PMID:24012983

  10. Salivary composition in obese vs normal-weight subjects: towards a role in postprandial lipid metabolism?

    PubMed

    Vors, C; Drai, J; Gabert, L; Pineau, G; Laville, M; Vidal, H; Guichard, E; Michalski, M-C; Feron, G

    2015-09-01

    In the pathophysiological context of obesity, oral exposure to dietary fat can modulate lipid digestion and absorption, but underlying in-mouth mechanisms have not been clearly identified. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that salivary components related to dietary fat sensitivity would differ according to body mass index (BMI) and postprandial lipid metabolism in young men. Saliva was collected from nine normal-weight (BMI=22.3±0.5 kg m(-2)) and nine non-morbid obese (BMI=31.7±0.3 kg m(-2)) men before an 8-h postprandial metabolic exploration test involving the consumption of a 40-g fat meal, in which obese subjects revealed a delayed postprandial lipid metabolism. Nine salivary characteristics (flow, protein content, lipolysis, amylase, proteolysis, total antioxidant status, lysozyme, lipocalin 1 and carbonic anhydrase-VI) were investigated. We show that, under fasting conditions, salivary lipolysis was lower in obese vs normal-weight subjects, whereas proteolysis and carbonic anhydrase VI were higher. We reveal through multivariate and Mann-Whitney analysis that differences in fasting salivary lipolysis and proteolysis between both groups are related to differences in postprandial lipid metabolism including exogenous fatty-acid absorption and β-oxidation. These results suggest a potential role of salivary composition on postprandial lipid metabolism and bring novel causal hypotheses on the links between salivary composition, sensitivity to dietary fat oral income and postprandial lipid metabolism according to BMI.

  11. Cortisol metabolism in human obesity: impaired cortisone-->cortisol conversion in subjects with central adiposity.

    PubMed

    Stewart, P M; Boulton, A; Kumar, S; Clark, P M; Shackleton, C H

    1999-03-01

    For a given body mass index (BMI), mortality is higher in patients with central compared to generalized obesity. Glucocorticoids play an important role in determining body fat distribution, but circulating cortisol concentrations are reported to be normal in obese patients. Our recent studies show enhanced conversion of inactive cortisone (E) to active cortisol (F) through the expression of 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11betaHSD1) in cultured omental adipose stromal cells; the autocrine production of F may be a crucial factor in the pathogenesis of central obesity. We have now analyzed F metabolism in subjects with BMIs between 20-25 kg/m2 (group A), 25-30 kg/m2 (group B), and more than 30 kg/m2 (group C; n 12 in each group; six males and six premenopausal females; aged 23-44 yr). Glucose/insulin were measured using a 75-g oral glucose tolerance test, and each subject had total body and regional fat (scapular, waist, hip, and thigh) quantified using dual energy x-ray absorptiometry. Urinary total F metabolites (measured by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry) were increased in subjects with obesity [group A, 11,176 +/- 1,530 microg/24 h (mean +/- SE); group C, 13,661 +/- 1,444], although not significantly so (P = 0.08). There was a significant reduction in the urinary tetrahydrocortisol (THF) +/- 5alpha-THF/tetrahydrocortisone (THE) and the cortol/cortolone ratio in obesity (group A vs. C, 1.06 +/- 0.08 vs. 0.84 +/- 0.04 and 0.41 +/- 0.03 vs. 0.34 +/- 0.03, respectively; both P < 0.05). Urinary free F (UFF) excretion was similar in all three groups, as was the UFF/urinary free E (UFE) ratio. The 0900 h circulating F, E, and ACTH pre- and postovernight 1-mg dexamethasone suppression values were similar in all three groups, but a reduction in the generation of serum F from dexamethasone-suppressed values after oral cortisone acetate (25 mg) was evident in both obese groups [e.g. 546 +/- 37 nmol/L in group A vs. 412 +/- 40 in group B (P < 0.05) and 388

  12. Impact of obesity on diastolic function in subjects < or = 16 years of age.

    PubMed

    Sharpe, Joan Andree; Naylor, Louise Haleh; Jones, Timothy William; Davis, Elizabeth Ann; O'Driscoll, Gerry; Ramsay, James Michael; Green, Daniel John

    2006-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of obesity on diastolic function in children and adolescents. Echocardiographic measurements were compared in 28 obese subjects (14 males, 14 females) and 15 age- and gender-matched lean controls (8 males, 7 females). Two-dimensional ultrasound imaging, M-mode imaging, and pulse-wave conventional and tissue Doppler measurements were used to assess cardiac structure and function at rest. No differences were evident between lean and obese subjects in age (13.3 +/- 0.5 vs 12.4 +/- 0.4 years), height (163 +/- 4 vs 159 +/- 2 cm), or systolic blood pressure (119 +/- 3 vs 123 +/- 2 mm Hg). Body mass (54.6 +/- 4.0 vs 85.8 +/- 3.6 kg, p < 0.0001) and body mass index (20.5 +/- 0.7 vs 33.3 +/- 1.0 kg/m2, p < 0.00001) were significantly greater in the obese subjects, whereas measurements of wall thickness (interventricular septal wall 0.86 +/- 0.04 vs 0.89 +/- 0.02 cm, posterior wall 0.83 +/- 0.04 vs 0.91 +/- 0.02 cm) and fractional shortening (38.6 +/- 1.2% vs 38.8 +/- 1.2%) did not significantly differ. The E/E' ratio (6.86 +/- 0.20 vs 8.30 +/- 0.32, p < 0.01), E' (13.93 +/- 0.38 vs 12.29 +/- 0.44 cm/s, p < 0.05), the E'/A' ratio (2.49 +/- 0.17 vs 2.05 +/- 0.09, p < 0.05), and the deceleration time of early transmitral blood flow velocity (125.3 +/- 7.7 vs 154.5 +/- 6.8 ms, p < 0.01) were significantly different between the groups, suggesting reduced diastolic function in the obese subjects. In conclusion, these data suggest that indexes of diastolic function, including tissue Doppler measures, are significantly impaired in obese young subjects.

  13. A comparison of measurements of lean body mass derived by bioelectrical impedance, skinfold thickness and total body potassium. A study in obese and non-obese normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Fulcher, G R; Farrer, M; Walker, M; Rodham, D; Clayton, B; Alberti, K M

    1991-05-01

    The measurement of body composition is an important part of metabolic and epidemiological research, but most currently available methods are complex and expensive. We have, therefore, compared measurements of fat mass (FM) and lean body mass (LBM), obtained using a commercially available bioelectrical impedance monitor (The Holtain Body Composition Monitor) (IMP), and by measuring skinfold thickness (SFT), with values obtained by measuring total body potassium (TBK). Twenty subjects, 10 with a body mass index (BMI) less than 30 (kg m-2), (non-obese) and 10 with BMI greater than or equal to 30 (obese) took part in the study. There was a strongly significant linear relationship between LBM calculated from TBK and that calculated from impedance (IMP), in both non-obese and obese groups analysed separately (non-obese: r = 0.92; p less than 0.001 and obese: r = 0.92; p less than 0.001) and together (all: r = 0.89; p less than 0.001). LBM calculated from TBK was strongly linearly correlated with values derived from SFT for non-obese (r = 0.91; p less than 0.001) but not for obese subjects. Mean values of LBM of non-obese subjects derived by each method were not significantly different (TBK: 51.3 +/- 10.40 kg; IMP: 53.18 +/- 10.37 kg; SFT: 48.87 +/- 9.48 kg), but significant differences existed when the subjects were obese (TBK: 51.86 +/- 9.65 kg; IMP: 58.69 +/- 8.55 kg; SFT: 67.61 +/- 8.14 kg; p less than 0.01).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. Hormonal and dietary characteristics in obese human subjects with and without food addiction.

    PubMed

    Pedram, Pardis; Sun, Guang

    2014-12-31

    The concept of food addiction (FA) is a potentially important contributing factor to the development of obesity in the general population; however, little is known about the hormonal and dietary differences between obesity with and without FA. Therefore, the aim of our study was to explore potential biomarkers, including various hormones and neuropeptides, which regulate appetite and metabolism, and dietary components that could potentially differentiate obesity with and without FA. Of the 737 adults recruited from the general Newfoundland population, 58 food-addicted and non-food-addicted overweight/obese individuals (FAO, NFO) matched for age, sex, BMI and physical activity were selected. A total of 34 neuropeptides, gut hormones, pituitary polypeptide hormones and adipokines were measured in fasting serum. We found that the FAO group had lower levels of TSH, TNF-α and amylin, but higher levels of prolactin, as compared to NFO group. The total calorie intake (per kg body weight), the dietary intake of fat (per g/kg body weight, per BMI and per percentage of trunk fat) and the percent calorie intake from fat and carbohydrates (g/kg) was higher in the FAO group compared to the NFO group. The FAO subjects consumed more sugar, minerals (including sodium, potassium, calcium and selenium), fat and its components (such as saturated, monounsaturated and trans fat), omega 3 and 6, vitamin D and gamma-tocopherol compared to the NFO group. To our knowledge, this is the first study indicating possible differences in hormonal levels and micro-nutrient intakes between obese individuals classified with and without food addiction. The findings provide insights into the mechanisms by which FA could contribute to obesity.

  15. Hormonal and Dietary Characteristics in Obese Human Subjects with and without Food Addiction

    PubMed Central

    Pedram, Pardis; Sun, Guang

    2014-01-01

    The concept of food addiction (FA) is a potentially important contributing factor to the development of obesity in the general population; however, little is known about the hormonal and dietary differences between obesity with and without FA. Therefore, the aim of our study was to explore potential biomarkers, including various hormones and neuropeptides, which regulate appetite and metabolism, and dietary components that could potentially differentiate obesity with and without FA. Of the 737 adults recruited from the general Newfoundland population, 58 food-addicted and non-food-addicted overweight/obese individuals (FAO, NFO) matched for age, sex, BMI and physical activity were selected. A total of 34 neuropeptides, gut hormones, pituitary polypeptide hormones and adipokines were measured in fasting serum. We found that the FAO group had lower levels of TSH, TNF-α and amylin, but higher levels of prolactin, as compared to NFO group. The total calorie intake (per kg body weight), the dietary intake of fat (per g/kg body weight, per BMI and per percentage of trunk fat) and the percent calorie intake from fat and carbohydrates (g/kg) was higher in the FAO group compared to the NFO group. The FAO subjects consumed more sugar, minerals (including sodium, potassium, calcium and selenium), fat and its components (such as saturated, monounsaturated and trans fat), omega 3 and 6, vitamin D and gamma-tocopherol compared to the NFO group. To our knowledge, this is the first study indicating possible differences in hormonal levels and micro-nutrient intakes between obese individuals classified with and without food addiction. The findings provide insights into the mechanisms by which FA could contribute to obesity. PMID:25558907

  16. Effect of short-term fasting on lipolytic responsiveness in normal and obese human subjects

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfe, R.R.; Peters, E.J.; Klein, S.; Holland, O.B.; Rosenblatt, J.; Gary, H. Jr.

    1987-02-01

    In this study the rate of lipolysis (fatty acid and glycerol release into blood) has been quantified in both normal weight and obese volunteers after both 15 and 87 h of fasting. In each study, the basal rate and subsequent response to epinephrine infusion were determined. The rate of appearance (R/sub a/) of free fatty acids (FFA) and glycerol were quantified by infusion of (1- TC)palmitate and D-5-glycerol, respectively. Substrate flux rates per unit of body fat mass and lean body mass were calculated from total body water measurements using H2 YO dilution. In normal volunteers, the basal R/sub a/ FFA and R/sub a/ glycerol rose markedly with 87 h of fasting, whereas the increases were more modest in the obese subjects. However, the rate of mobilization of fat, in relation to the lean body mass, was higher in the obese subjects than in the normal subjects after 15 h of fasting, and the values were similar in both groups after 87 h of fasting. There was an increased lipolytic response to epinephrine after fasting in both groups. This increased sensitivity may have resulted from the enhancement of fatty acid-triglyceride substrate cycling that occurred after fasting.

  17. Gastroesophageal reflux in asymptomatic obese subjects: An esophageal impedance-pH study

    PubMed Central

    Akyüz, Filiz; Uyanıkoglu, Ahmet; Ermis, Fatih; Arıcı, Serpil; Akyüz, Ümit; Baran, Bülent; Pinarbasi, Binnur; Gul, Nurdan

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the relationship between reflux and body mass index (BMI) in the asymptomatic obese population using the impedance-pH technique. METHODS: Gastroesophageal reflux is frequent in the obese population. However, the relationship between acid reflux and BMI in asymptomatic obese people is unclear. Forty-six obese (BMI > 25 kg/m2) people were enrolled in this prospective study. We evaluated the demographic findings and 24-h impedance pH values of the whole group. Gas, acid (pH < 4), weak acid (pH = 4-7) and weak alkaline (pH ≥ 7) reflux parameters were analyzed. RESULTS: The mean age of patients was 49.47 ± 12.24 years, and half of them were men. The mean BMI was 30.64 ± 3.95 kg/m2 (25.14-45.58 kg/m2). BMI of 23 was over 30 kg/m2. Seventeen patients had a comorbidity (hypertension, diabetes mellitus, or ischemic heart disease). Endoscopic examination revealed esophagitis in 13 of the 28 subjects (10 Grade A, 3 Grade B). The subjects were divided into two groups according to BMI (< 30 and > 30 kg/m2). Demographic and endoscopic findings, and impedance results were similar in these two groups. However, there was a positive correlation between BMI and total and supine pH < 4 episodes (P = 0.002, r = 0.414; P = 0.000, r = 0.542), pH < 4 reflux time (P = 0.015, r = 0.319; P = 0.003, r = 0.403), and DeMeester score (P = 0.012, r = 0.333). CONCLUSION: Acid reflux is correlated with BMI in asymptomatic obese individuals. PMID:25780302

  18. Natural Course of Metabolically Healthy Overweight/Obese Subjects and the Impact of Weight Change

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Ruizhi; Liu, Chengguo; Wang, Chunmei; Zhou, Biao; Liu, Yi; Pan, Feixia; Zhang, Ronghua; Zhu, Yimin

    2016-01-01

    Few studies have described the characteristics of metabolically healthy individuals with excess fat in the Chinese population. This study aimed to prospectively investigate the natural course of metabolically healthy overweight/obese (MH-OW/OB) adults, and to assess the impact of weight change on developing metabolic abnormalities. During 2009–2010, 525 subjects without any metabolic abnormalities or other obesity-related diseases were evaluated and reevaluated after 5 years. The subjects were categorized into two groups of overweight/obese and normal weight based on the criteria of BMI by 24.0 at baseline. At follow-up, the MH-OW/OB subjects had a significantly increased risk of developing metabolically abnormalities compared with metabolically healthy normal-weight (MH-NW) individuals (risk ratio: 1.35, 95% confidence interval: 1.17–1.49, p value < 0.001). In the groups of weight gain and weight maintenance, the MH-OW/OB subjects was associated with a larger increase in fasting glucose, triglycerides, systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure and decrease in high-density lipoprotein cholesterol comparing with MH-NW subjects. In the weight loss group, no significant difference of changes of metabolic parameters was observed between MH-OW/OB and MH-NW adults. This study verifies that MH-OW/OB are different from MH-NW subjects. Weight management is needed for all individuals since weight change has a significant effect on metabolic health without considering the impact of weight change according to weight status. PMID:27428997

  19. Beneficial Effects of an 8-Week, Very Low Carbohydrate Diet Intervention on Obese Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Yunjuan; Yu, Haoyong; Li, Yuehua; Ma, Xiaojing; Lu, Junxi; Yu, Weihui; Xiao, Yunfeng; Bao, Yuqian; Jia, Weiping

    2013-01-01

    Aim. To investigate the effects of weight loss during an 8-week very low carbohydrate diet (VLCD) on improvement of metabolic parameters, adipose distribution and body composition, and insulin resistance and sensitivity in Chinese obese subjects. Methods. Fifty-three healthy obese volunteers were given an 8-week VLCD. The outcomes were changes in anthropometry, body composition, metabolic profile, abdominal fat distribution, liver fat percent (LFP), and insulin resistance and sensitivity. Results. A total of 46 (86.8%) obese subjects completed the study. The VLCD caused a weight loss of −8.7 ± 0.6 kg (mean ± standard error (SE), P < 0.0001) combined with a significant improvement of metabolic profile. In both male and female, nonesterified fatty acid (NEFA) significantly decreased (−166.2 ± 47.6 μmol/L, P = 0.001) and β-hydroxybutyric acid (BHA) increased (0.15 ± 0.06 mmol/L, P = 0.004) after eight weeks of VLCD intervention. The significant reductions in subcutaneous fat area (SFA), visceral fat area (VFA), and LFP were −66.5 ± 7.9 cm2, −35.3 ± 3.9 cm2, and −16.4 ± 2.4%, respectively (all P values P < 0.0001). HOMA IR and HOMA β significantly decreased while whole body insulin sensitivity index (WBISI) increased (all P values P < 0.001). Conclusion. Eight weeks of VLCD was an effective intervention in obese subjects. These beneficial effects may be associated with enhanced hepatic and whole-body lipolysis and oxidation. PMID:23573151

  20. Fatty Liver Index Associates with Relative Sarcopenia and GH/ IGF- 1 Status in Obese Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Gnessi, Lucio; Mariani, Stefania; Lenzi, Andrea; Donini, Lorenzo Maria

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Recently the association between hepatic steatosis and sarcopenia has been described. GH/IGF-1 axis has been postulated to play a role in linking fatty liver and low muscle mass. The aim of our study was to explore the association between fatty liver index, sarcopenic obesity, insulin sensitivity, and GH/IGF-1 status. Methods 427 subjects [age: 45.65±13.94 years, BMI: 36.92±6.43 kg/m2] were enrolled. Participants were divided into three groups: fatty liver index (FLI) <20, 20≥FLI<60, and FLI≥60. Body composition was assessed by DXA. The truncal fat mass (TrFM) to appendicular skeletal muscle (ASM) ratio was used as an indicator of sarcopenic obesity. ISI-Matsuda index was used. Results BMI, fat mass, and the TrFM/ASM ratio were higher in subjects with FLI≥60. GH, IGF-1 and ISI-Matsuda were lower in the high FLI group (all p<0.05). A significantly positive correlation between FLI and TrFM/ ASM ratio (r = 0.221, p<0.001) was found, whereas FLI levels were negatively correlated with ISI- Matsuda (r = -0.335, p<0.001), GH (r = -0.200, p = 0.006), and IGF- 1 levels (r = -0.157, p = 0.028). Stepwise linear regression analysis showed that GH levels were significantly negatively correlated with FLI, while the TrFM/ ASM ratio was positively associated with FLI, after adjustment for age, BMI, total fat mass, truncal fat mass, fat- free mass, and ISI- Matsuda. Conclusions Impairment of GH/IGF-1 axis seems to be associated to the risk of the development of sarcopenic obesity and ectopic fat deposition in the liver. Metabolic and hormonal derangements as determinants of ectopic fat deposition and body composition deserve to be evaluated in obese subjects. PMID:26741958

  1. Lower physical activity is a risk factor for a clustering of metabolic risk factors in non-obese and obese Japanese subjects: the Takahata study.

    PubMed

    Kaino, Wataru; Daimon, Makoto; Sasaki, Satoshi; Karasawa, Shigeru; Takase, Kaoru; Tada, Kyouko; Wada, Kiriko; Kameda, Wataru; Susa, Shinji; Oizumi, Toshihide; Fukao, Akira; Kubota, Isao; Kayama, Takamasa; Kato, Takeo

    2013-01-01

    In several countries including Japan, people without obesity but with a clustering of metabolic risk factors (MetRFs) were not considered to have the metabolic syndrome (MetS). Here, we examined whether lifestyle characteristics differed between non-obese and obese subjects with or without a clustering of MetRFs. From a population-based cross-sectional study of Japanese subjects aged ≥ 40 years, 1,601 subjects (age: 61.9 ± 10.3 years; 710/891 men/women) were recruited. Physical activity status and daily nutritional intake were estimated using questionnaires. A clustering of MetRFs was defined based on the presence of at least two non-essential risk factors for the diagnosis of the MetS in Japan. Energy intake was not higher in subjects with a clustering of MetRFs compared with those without. Among men, energy expenditure at work was significantly lower in non-obese (9.0 ± 8.2 vs. 11.3 ± 9.3 metabolic equivalents (METs), P = 0.025) and obese (9.0 ± 7.9 vs. 11.6 ± 9.4 METs, P = 0.017) subjects with a clustering of MetRFs than in those without. Multiple logistic regression analysis showed that energy expenditure at work was significantly associated with a clustering of MetRFs after adjusting for possible confounding factors including total energy intake. The ORs (per 1 METs) were 0.970 (95% CI, 0.944-0.997; P = 0.032) in non-obese men and 0.962 (0.926- 0.999; P = 0.043) in obese men. Similar associations were not observed in women. In Japanese males, lower physical activity, but not excessive energy intake, is a risk factor for a clustering of MetRFs independent of their obesity status.

  2. Indirect calorimetry in obese female subjects: Factors influencing the resting metabolic rate

    PubMed Central

    Hagedorn, Theresa; Poggiogalle, Eleonora; Savina, Claudia; Coletti, Cecilia; Paolini, Maddalena; Scavone, Luciano; Neri, Barbara; Donini, Lorenzo Maria

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate selected factors influencing resting energy expenditure (REE) in obese female subjects. METHODS: Seventy seven 61 obese Caucasian women [mean age of 52.93 ± 13.45 years, and mean body mass index (BMI) of 41.78 ± 11.54 kg/m2] were enrolled; measurements of resting metabolic rate (RMR) by a ventilated, open-circuit system, indirect calorimeter were performed after an overnight fast. Body composition as well as medications, physical parameters, blood samples, disease pattern, and smoking were considered. RESULTS: RMR was significantly associated with body weight (r = 0.732, P < 0.001), body height (r = 0.401, P = 0.008), BMI (r = 0.504, P < 0.001), waist circumference (r = 0.602, P < 0.001), mid-upper arm circumference (r = 0.417, P = 0.006), mid-upper arm muscle circumference (r = 0.344, P = 0.028), total body water (r = 0.339, P = 0.035), body temperature (r = 0.409, P = 0.007), smoking (P = 0.031), serum T4 levels (r = 0.331, P = 0.036), obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS; P = 0.023), impaired glucose tolerance (IGT; P = 0.017) and impaired glycaemic status, including hyperinsulinism, IGT and diabetes mellitus (P = 0.003). CONCLUSION: Future research should be prompted to optimize the procedure of indirect calorimetry to achieve clinical benefits in obese subjects. PMID:24520534

  3. Efficacy of Slim339 in reducing body weight of overweight and obese human subjects.

    PubMed

    Toromanyan, Edward; Aslanyan, Gayane; Amroyan, Elmira; Gabrielyan, Emil; Panossian, Alexander

    2007-12-01

    A double-blind, randomized, parallel-group, placebo-controlled study has been carried out in order to evaluate the effect of orally self-administered Slim339, a proprietary fixed combination of Garcinia cambogia extract with calcium pantothenate (standardized for the content of hydroxycitric acid and pantothenic acid) and extracts of Matricaria chamomilla, Rosa damascena, Lavandula officinalis and Cananga odorata, on body weight in overweight and obese volunteers. During a 60-day treatment period, the average reduction in body weight for the group receiving Slim339 (n = 30) was 4.67% compared with 0.63% for the placebo group (n = 28) (p < 0.0001). Weight losses of >or=3 kg were recorded for 23 subjects in the treatment group and only one in the placebo group. It is concluded that Slim339 represents a potential therapy for obesity. PMID:17639559

  4. Upregulation of gingival tissue miR-200b in obese periodontitis subjects.

    PubMed

    Kalea, A Z; Hoteit, R; Suvan, J; Lovering, R C; Palmen, J; Cooper, J A; Khodiyar, V K; Harrington, Z; Humphries, S E; D'Aiuto, F

    2015-03-01

    Increased local immune and inflammatory responses in obese individuals with periodontitis may explain the aggressive clinical presentation and altered treatment response when compared to that of normal weight subjects. Our goal was to identify any differences in microRNA (miRNA) expression profiles of gingival tissue in periodontitis when obesity is present, which may suggest novel molecular pathways that this miRNA network may affect. Total RNA was extracted from gingival tissue biopsies collected from normal weight and obese individuals with periodontitis; miRNA expression profiling was performed with Affymetrix GeneChip miRNA 3.0 arrays; and results were validated with quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). In silico identification of previously confirmed miRNA gene targets was conducted through miRTarBase and miRWalk databases, and pathway enrichment analysis identified enriched miRNA gene sets. Expression of selected genes in the same biopsy samples was tested with qRT-PCR. The gingival tissue miRNA profile of obese patients, compared to that of normal weight patients, showed 13 upregulated and 22 downregulated miRNAs, among which miR-200b was validated by qRT-PCR to be significantly increased in obesity. Functional analysis of 51 experimentally validated miR-200b gene targets identified enrichment of genes involved in cell motility, differentiation, DNA binding, response to stimulus, and vasculature development pathways not previously identified in the obesity-specific disease profile. Furthermore, the expression of the miR-200b gene targets ZEB1/2, GATA2, and KDR was confirmed by qRT-PCR as being lower in obese patients with periodontitis versus normal weight patients, suggesting a role of miR-200b in regulation of a set of gene targets and biological pathways relevant to wound healing and angiogenesis. Functional studies to explore the role of miR-200b in the above processes may offer new insights on putative therapeutic

  5. Green Tea minimally affects Biomarkers of Inflammation in Obese Subjects with Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Basu, Arpita; Du, Mei; Sanchez, Karah; Leyva, Misti J.; Betts, Nancy M.; Blevins, Steve; Wu, Mingyuan; Aston, Christopher E.; Lyons, Timothy J.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Green tea (Camellia sinensis) has shown to exert cardio-protective benefits in observational studies. The objective of this clinical trial was to assess the effects of green tea on features of metabolic syndrome and inflammation in obese subjects. Methods We conducted a randomized controlled trial in obese subjects with metabolic syndrome. Thirty-five subjects [age (mean±SE) 42.5±1.7 years, BMI 36.1±1.3 kg/m2] completed the 8-week study and were randomly assigned to receive green tea (4 cups/day), green tea extract (2 capsules and 4 cups water/day), or no treatment (4 cups water/day). Both the beverage and extract groups had similar dosing of epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), the active green tea polyphenol. Fasting blood samples were collected at screening, four, and eight weeks of the study. Results Green tea beverage or extract supplementation did not significantly alter features of metabolic syndrome or biomarkers of inflammation including adiponectin, C-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin-6 (IL-6), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (sVCAM-1), soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1), leptin, or leptin:adiponectin ratio. However, both green tea beverage and extracts significantly reduced plasma serum amyloid alpha (SAA) versus no treatment (p<0.005). Conclusion This study suggests that the daily consumption of green tea beverage or extracts for 8 weeks was well tolerated but did not affect the features of metabolic syndrome. However, green tea significantly reduced plasma SAA, an independent CVD risk factor, in obese subjects with metabolic syndrome. PMID:20605696

  6. Obesity

    MedlinePlus

    Morbid obesity; Fat - obese ... is because the body stores unused calories as fat. Obesity can be caused by: Eating more food ... use your BMI to estimate how much body fat you have. Your waist measurement is another way ...

  7. Melanocortin 4 receptor sequence variations are seldom a cause of human obesity: the Swedish Obese Subjects, the HERITAGE Family Study, and a Memphis cohort.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Peter; Ukkola, Olavi; Rankinen, Tuomo; Snyder, Eric E; Leon, Arthur S; Rao, D C; Skinner, James S; Wilmore, Jack H; Lönn, Lars; Cowan, George S; Sjöström, Lars; Bouchard, Claude

    2002-10-01

    The prevalence of mutations within and in the flanking regions of the gene encoding the melanocortin 4 receptor was investigated in severely obese and normal-weight subjects from the Swedish Obese Subjects study, the Health, Risk Factors, Exercise Training, and Genetics (HERITAGE) Family study, and a Memphis cohort. A total of 433 white and 95 black subjects (94% females) were screened for mutations by direct sequencing. Three previously described missense variants and nine novel (three missense, six silent) variants were detected. None of them showed significant association with obesity or related phenotypes. In addition, two novel deletions were found in two heterozygous obese women: a -65_-64delTG mutation within the 5' noncoding region and a 171delC frameshift mutation predicted to result in a truncated nonfunctional receptor. No pathogenic mutations were found among obese blacks or nonobese controls. Furthermore, none of the null mutations found in other populations was present in this sample. In conclusion, our results do not support the prevailing notion that sequence variation in the melanocortin 4 receptor gene is a frequent cause of human obesity.

  8. [Knowledges and beliefs related to nutrition of obese and overweight patients subjects: a study in Southern Italy].

    PubMed

    Cirillo, T; Albano, M G; Crozet, C; d'Ivernois, J F

    2006-03-29

    303 obese and overweight south Italian patients (240 women and 63 men), volunteers to participate in a patient education programme delivered by the university hospital of Foggia, have fullfiled a 50 items true/false test exploring the knowledges and the beliefs on obesity, nutrition, physical activities. The majority of the subjects has both low socio economical status and education level. Women have better performed than men (p<0.005) and obese patients, better than overweight subjects (p<0.005). The more frequent mistakes have concerned items on nutrition, meanwhile a better performance has been observed with the items on beliefs. PMID:16646367

  9. Reduced gene expression of UCP2 but not UCP3 in skeletal muscle of human obese subjects.

    PubMed

    Nordfors, L; Hoffstedt, J; Nyberg, B; Thörne, A; Arner, P; Schalling, M; Lönnqvist, F

    1998-08-01

    Massive overweight is an increasing health problem and underlies several complications which in turn result in premature death. The mechanisms underlying the imbalance between energy intake and energy expenditure, that lead to obesity in humans, are still only partly understood. In rodents, heat generation and the burning of calories by the mitochondrial uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) are important for metabolic control. However, UCP1 is exclusively expressed in brown fat which is only present in limited amounts in human adults. The recent characterization of two new uncoupling proteins, UCP2 and UCP3, may elucidate potentially important pathways for energy expenditure regulation in man. The aim of this study was to investigate whether obesity is accompanied by aberrations in UCP2 and UCP3 regulation. Expression of these two genes was examined using in situ hybridization in six lean and six obese, but otherwise healthy, men. The UCP2 expression was decreased by 28 % (p = 0.001) in the abdominal muscle of the obese subjects. No differences in UCP3 expression were observed between obese and control subjects, although there was great variation in the expression between subjects. In conclusion, these data suggest an impaired activity of the mitochondrial uncoupling protein UCP2, but probably not UCP3, in obese subjects. This may result in decreased energy expenditure and contribute to the development and maintenance of obesity. PMID:9726596

  10. Improved Glycemic Control and Vascular Function in Overweight and Obese Subjects by Glyoxalase 1 Inducer Formulation.

    PubMed

    Xue, Mingzhan; Weickert, Martin O; Qureshi, Sheharyar; Kandala, Ngianga-Bakwin; Anwar, Attia; Waldron, Molly; Shafie, Alaa; Messenger, David; Fowler, Mark; Jenkins, Gail; Rabbani, Naila; Thornalley, Paul J

    2016-08-01

    Risk of insulin resistance, impaired glycemic control, and cardiovascular disease is excessive in overweight and obese populations. We hypothesized that increasing expression of glyoxalase 1 (Glo1)-an enzyme that catalyzes the metabolism of reactive metabolite and glycating agent methylglyoxal-may improve metabolic and vascular health. Dietary bioactive compounds were screened for Glo1 inducer activity in a functional reporter assay, hits were confirmed in cell culture, and an optimized Glo1 inducer formulation was evaluated in a randomized, placebo-controlled crossover clinical trial in 29 overweight and obese subjects. We found trans-resveratrol (tRES) and hesperetin (HESP), at concentrations achieved clinically, synergized to increase Glo1 expression. In highly overweight subjects (BMI >27.5 kg/m(2)), tRES-HESP coformulation increased expression and activity of Glo1 (27%, P < 0.05) and decreased plasma methylglyoxal (-37%, P < 0.05) and total body methylglyoxal-protein glycation (-14%, P < 0.01). It decreased fasting and postprandial plasma glucose (-5%, P < 0.01, and -8%, P < 0.03, respectively), increased oral glucose insulin sensitivity index (42 mL ⋅ min(-1) ⋅ m(-2), P < 0.02), and improved arterial dilatation Δbrachial artery flow-mediated dilatation/Δdilation response to glyceryl nitrate (95% CI 0.13-2.11). In all subjects, it decreased vascular inflammation marker soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (-10%, P < 0.01). In previous clinical evaluations, tRES and HESP individually were ineffective. tRES-HESP coformulation could be a suitable treatment for improved metabolic and vascular health in overweight and obese populations. PMID:27207552

  11. [Evaluation of tolerance of a modified protein diet in obese subjects].

    PubMed

    Kolanowski, J; Col-Debeys, C; Brohet, C R

    1983-09-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate the benefits and the potential risks of a very low calorie protein-diet in obese patients with metabolic abnormalities and at increased cardiovascular risk. To this end, the 420 kcal diet (with 50% of energy as protein) was administered for 10 days to 10 grossly obese subjects with glucose intolerance, hyperlipemia, arterial hypertension, ischemic cardiopathy and thrombotic risk related to high levels of fibrinogen factor VIII and reduced fibrinolytic activity. Weights loss averaged 360 g/day with a mean protein loss of 17 g/day occurring essentially during the very early phase of the diet. There was a rapid normalisation of blood pressure, plasma lipids and glycaemia. With the exception of a slightly negative potassium balance other ion remained in balance. There was no change in electrocardiogram, in parameters of blood coagulation or in hepatic and renal function. There was only a moderate increase in ketonaemia and plasma urate. It appears therefore, that an 8 to 10 day very low calorie protein-diet is well tolerated even in obese patients with increased cardiovascular risk, and that it corrects of several metabolic abnormalities without alteration in cardiac, hepatic or renal function.

  12. Increased calf and plantar muscle fibrotic contents in obese subjects may cause ankle instability

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Junwei; Zhang, Lei; Chen, Yong; Zhao, Jianning

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is strongly associated with musculoskeletal disorders of the lower limb, including ankle instability and resulting gait problems. In the present study, we aimed to examine, using paired comparisons of subjects, whether moderate duration of obesity in patients with mild to moderate elevations of body mass index (BMI), changes the fibrous contents of muscles that support the ankle mortices, namely calf and plantar muscles. We attempted to examine these parameters because this shall provide direct evidence of whether obesity directly impacts myoarchitecture and support of the adjoining joints. MRI image segmentation and pixel correlations by grey level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM) and entropy were used to analyse the changes. The differences in the means between groups (both GLCM and entropy) were significant from control lean populations (P<0.0001, ANOVA) for the parameters examined for both the calf and the plantar muscles. Reduction in weight should thus be a first-line approach in preventing these changes that may significantly affect quality of life due to gait disturbances. PMID:27380952

  13. Caloric restriction increases serum testosterone concentrations in obese male subjects by two distinct mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Schulte, D M; Hahn, M; Oberhäuser, F; Malchau, G; Schubert, M; Heppner, C; Müller, N; Güdelhöfer, H; Faust, M; Krone, W; Laudes, M

    2014-04-01

    The concentration of serum testosterone is mainly regulated by the testicular function, which is under control of the central hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. A certain amount of testosterone is converted into β-estradiol by adipose tissue. Obesity in men is often associated with decreased androgen levels. The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of caloric restriction on serum testosterone levels in obese men. Dietary intervention study was performed with a very low calorie diet (800 kcal/d) for 12 weeks. Thirteen obese human male subjects (median body mass index: 42.7 kg/m2) were included. Body composition was assessed by impedance analysis. Insulin sensitivity was estimated by leptin-to-adiponectin ratio (LAR). Testosterone (T), β-estradiol, albumin, sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG), LH, and FSH serum concentrations were measured by enzyme immunoassays. Statistical analysis was performed on baseline and values after 3 months. Caloric restriction significantly increased total testosterone (6.97 nmol/l to 13.21 nmol/l; p=0.001) and SHBG (22.11 nmol/l to 42.12 nmol/l; p=0.001) concentrations in serum. This is caused by a significant improvement of the testicular function (LH/T: 0.36-0.20; p=0.005) and a significant reduction of the T/β-estradiol conversion rate (73.59-104.29; p=0.003). There was a significant negative correlation of improvement of testicular function and LAR (rs=-0.683 (p=0.042)). In obese men caloric restriction significantly increases the serum testosterone concentration. This is achieved by 2 distinct mechanisms, that is, improvement of testicular function and reduced conversion of testosterone to β-estradiol by aromatase activity of the adipose tissue.

  14. Differential regulation of lipid and protein metabolism in obese vs. lean subjects before and after a 72-h fast.

    PubMed

    Bak, Ann Mosegaard; Møller, Andreas Buch; Vendelbo, Mikkel Holm; Nielsen, Thomas Svava; Viggers, Rikke; Rungby, Jørgen; Pedersen, Steen Bønløkke; Jørgensen, Jens Otto Lunde; Jessen, Niels; Møller, Niels

    2016-07-01

    Increased availability of lipids may conserve muscle protein during catabolic stress. Our study was designed to define 1) intracellular mechanisms leading to increased lipolysis and 2) whether this scenario is associated with decreased amino acid and urea fluxes, and decreased muscle amino acid release in obese subjects under basal and fasting conditions. We therefore studied nine lean and nine obese subjects twice, after 12 and 72 h of fasting, using measurements of mRNA and protein expression and phosphorylation of lipolytic and protein metabolic signaling molecules in fat and muscle together with whole body and forearm tracer techniques. Obese subjects displayed increased whole body lipolysis, decreased urea production rates, and decreased forearm muscle protein breakdown per 100 ml of forearm tissue, differences that persisted after 72 h of fasting. Lipolysis per fat mass unit was reduced in obese subjects and, correspondingly, adipose tissue hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) phosphorylation and mRNA and protein levels of the adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL) coactivator CGI58 were decreased. Fasting resulted in higher HSL phosphorylations and lower protein levels of the ATGL inhibitor G0S2. Muscle protein expressions of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and 4EBP1 were lower in obese subjects, and MuRf1 mRNA was higher with fasting in lean but not obese subjects. Phosphorylation and signaling of mTOR decreased with fasting in both groups, whereas ULK1 protein and mRNA levels increased. In summary, obese subjects exhibit increased lipolysis due to a large fat mass with blunted prolipolytic signaling, together with decreased urea and amino acid fluxes both in the basal and 72-h fasted state; this is compatible with preservation of muscle and whole body protein. PMID:27245338

  15. Successful maintenance of body weight reduction after individualized dietary counseling in obese subjects

    PubMed Central

    Stelmach-Mardas, Marta; Mardas, Marcin; Warchoł, Wojciech; Jamka, Małgorzata; Walkowiak, Jarosław

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the effectiveness of individualized dietary counseling in obese subjects based on narrative interview technique on the maintenance of body weight reduction, changes in dietary behaviors, including type of cooking and physical activity. One-hundred subjects out of four-hundred patients met the inclusion criteria. Individually, 45-minute educational program with motivation counseling was performed in 0, 6 and 12 weeks of the study. Patients were advised to follow individually well-balanced diet for 12 weeks. The individuals were asked about the changes in their dietary habits (Food Frequency Questionnaire). The mean percentage of body weight changes from the baseline were as follows: in 6th week- 5.9%, in 12th week - 10.9% and in 52th week - 9.7% (P < 0.0001), however there were no statistically significant changes while comparing body weight in 12th and 52th week. The maintenance of body weight reduction was connected with the dietary habits changes, mainly the type of cooking and increased consumption of vegetable oils. In conclusion, individualized dietary counseling, based on narrative interview technique is an effective intervention for obesity treatment that may help maintain body weight reduction and adapt the pro-healthy changes in type of cooking and sources of dietary fat. PMID:25311271

  16. Successful maintenance of body weight reduction after individualized dietary counseling in obese subjects.

    PubMed

    Stelmach-Mardas, Marta; Mardas, Marcin; Warchoł, Wojciech; Jamka, Małgorzata; Walkowiak, Jarosław

    2014-10-14

    The aim of this study was to describe the effectiveness of individualized dietary counseling in obese subjects based on narrative interview technique on the maintenance of body weight reduction, changes in dietary behaviors, including type of cooking and physical activity. One-hundred subjects out of four-hundred patients met the inclusion criteria. Individually, 45-minute educational program with motivation counseling was performed in 0, 6 and 12 weeks of the study. Patients were advised to follow individually well-balanced diet for 12 weeks. The individuals were asked about the changes in their dietary habits (Food Frequency Questionnaire). The mean percentage of body weight changes from the baseline were as follows: in 6th week- 5.9%, in 12th week - 10.9% and in 52th week - 9.7% (P < 0.0001), however there were no statistically significant changes while comparing body weight in 12th and 52th week. The maintenance of body weight reduction was connected with the dietary habits changes, mainly the type of cooking and increased consumption of vegetable oils. In conclusion, individualized dietary counseling, based on narrative interview technique is an effective intervention for obesity treatment that may help maintain body weight reduction and adapt the pro-healthy changes in type of cooking and sources of dietary fat.

  17. Obesity

    MedlinePlus

    Obesity means having too much body fat. It is different from being overweight, which means weighing too ... what's considered healthy for his or her height. Obesity occurs over time when you eat more calories ...

  18. Ghrelin secretion in severely obese subjects before and after a 3-week integrated body mass reduction program.

    PubMed

    Morpurgo, P S; Resnik, M; Agosti, F; Cappiello, V; Sartorio, A; Spada, A

    2003-08-01

    Ghrelin, the endogenous ligand of GH-secretagogue receptors, has been implicated in the regulation of feeding behavior and energy balance. Aim of the study was to investigate ghrelin levels in fasting conditions and after a standard meal test in obese subjects before and after a 3-week integrated body weight reduction (BWR) program (consisting of energy-restricted diet, exercise training, psychological counselling and nutritional education). Weight, height, fat mass, fat free mass (by impedentiometry), circulating ghrelin, insulin and leptin levels were evaluated in 10 obese subjects (3 male, 7 female; mean age: 35 +/- 9.3 yr; body mass index BMI: 45.2 +/- 10.6 kg/m2) before and after weight reduction. At baseline, obese subjects showed significantly lower ghrelin levels than controls, which were negatively correlated with BMI, weight, insulin and leptin levels. Fasting ghrelin levels were not modified by standard meal test in obese subjects (from 110.8 +/- 69.7 to 91.8 +/- 70.2 pmol/l p=ns), while a significant reduction was observed in controls (from 352.4 +/- 176.7 to 199.0 +/- 105.2 pmol/l; p<0.01). After a 3-week integrated BWR program obese subjects significantly reduced weight, BMI and leptin levels, while no significant changes were found both in fasting ghrelin and in ghrelin response after the meal. In conclusion, 5% weight loss obtained after a short-term period of integrated BWR program is not sufficient to normalize fasting ghrelin levels nor to restore the normal ghrelin suppression after a meal in severely obese subjects.

  19. The effects of UCP-1 polymorphisms on obesity phenotypes among Korean female subjects

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Hyoung Doo; Kim, Kil Soo; Cha, Min Ho; Yoon, Yoosik . E-mail: ysyoon66@naver.com

    2005-09-23

    Three SNPs of UCP-1 including A-3826G, A-1766G, and Ala64Thr (G+1068A) were genotyped among 453 overweight Korean female subjects recruited from an obesity clinic. Four common haplotypes with frequency greater than 0.04 were constructed with three SNPs. For an accurate evaluation of the effects of UCP-1 polymorphism on body fat accumulation, all subjects were tested using computerized tomography to measure the cross-sectional fat tissue areas at abdominal and distal part of the body. By statistical analyses, ht4[GAA] showed a significant association with decreased abdominal fat tissue area (P = 0.02, dominant model), fat tissue area at thigh (P = 0.008, dominant model), body fat mass (P = 0.002, dominant model), and waist-to-hip ratio (P = 0.01, dominant model). In addition, ht3[GAG] was associated with the accelerated reduction of waist-to-hip ratio and body fat mass by very low calorie diet among subjects who finished one-month-weight control program (P = 0.05-0.006)

  20. Neuroadrenergic dysfunction along the diabetes continuum: a comparative study in obese metabolic syndrome subjects.

    PubMed

    Straznicky, Nora E; Grima, Mariee T; Sari, Carolina I; Eikelis, Nina; Lambert, Elisabeth A; Nestel, Paul J; Esler, Murray D; Dixon, John B; Chopra, Reena; Tilbrook, Alan J; Schlaich, Markus P; Lambert, Gavin W

    2012-10-01

    Neuroadrenergic function in type 2 diabetic (T2D) patients without neuropathy is poorly characterized. We therefore compared sympathetic nervous system activity at rest and during an oral glucose tolerance test in obese metabolic syndrome (MetS) subjects classified as glucose intolerant (impaired glucose tolerance [IGT]; n = 17) or treatment-naive T2D (n = 17). Untreated subjects, matched for age (mean 59 ± 1 year), sex, BMI (32.4 ± 0.6 kg/m(2)), and family history of diabetes were studied. We measured resting muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) by microneurography, whole-body norepinephrine kinetics by isotope dilution, insulin sensitivity by euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp (steady-state glucose utilization adjusted for fat-free mass and steady-state insulin concentration [M/I]), and MetS components. T2D subjects had higher resting MSNA burst incidence (67 ± 4 versus 55 ± 3 bursts per 100 heartbeats; P = 0.05) and arterial norepinephrine levels (264 ± 33 versus 167 ± 16 pg/mL; P = 0.02), lower plasma norepinephrine clearance (by 17%; P = 0.03), and reduced neuronal reuptake compared with IGT subjects (by 46%; P = 0.04). Moreover, norepinephrine spillover responses to glucose ingestion were blunted in T2D subjects. The M/I value independently predicted whole-body norepinephrine spillover (r = -0.47; P = 0.008), whereas fasting insulin level related to neuronal norepinephrine reuptake (r = -0.35, P = 0.047). These findings demonstrate that progression to T2D is associated with increased central sympathetic drive, blunted sympathetic responsiveness, and altered norepinephrine disposition.

  1. Unsaturated Oral Fat Load Test Improves Glycemia, Insulinemia and Oxidative Stress Status in Nondiabetic Subjects with Abdominal Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Hervas, Sergio; Navarro, Inmaculada; Real, Jose T.; Artero, Ana; Peiro, Marta; Gonzalez-Navarro, Herminia; Carmena, Rafael; Ascaso, Juan F.

    2016-01-01

    Aims To evaluate the changes in glycemia, insulinemia, and oxidative stress markers during an oral fat load test in nondiabetic subjects with abdominal obesity and to analyze the association between postprandial oxidative stress markers and postprandial glucose and insulin responses. Methods We included 20 subjects with abdominal obesity (waist circumference > 102 cm for men and > 88 cm for women) and 20 healthy lean controls (waist circumference < 102 cm for men and < 88 cm for women). After 12 hours of fasting we performed a standardized fat load test (0–8 hours) with supracal® (50 g/m2). We determined metabolic parameters, oxidized and reduced glutathione, and malondialdehyde. Results In both groups, insulin, HOMA, oxidized/reduced glutathione ratio, and malondialdehyde significantly decreased in the postprandial state after the OFLT. All these parameters were significantly higher in the abdominal obesity group at baseline and during all the postprandial points, but the reduction from the baseline levels was significantly higher in the abdominal obesity group. Conclusion Unsaturated fat improves insulin resistance and oxidative stress status. It is possible that a consumption of unsaturated fat could be beneficial even in subjects with abdominal obesity in postprandial state. PMID:27537847

  2. Prevention of type 2 diabetes in obese at-risk subjects: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Merlotti, Claudia; Morabito, Alberto; Ceriani, Valerio; Pontiroli, Antonio E

    2014-10-01

    Different intervention strategies can prevent new cases of type 2 diabetes (T2DM) in obese subjects. The present systematic review and meta-analysis evaluates the effectiveness of different strategies in prevention of type 2 diabetes in obese subjects. Studies were grouped into five different strategies: (1) physical activity ± diet; (2) anti-diabetic drugs (glitazones, metformin, glinides, alfa-glucosidase inhibitors); (3) antihypertensive drugs (ACE inhibitors, ARB); (4) weight loss-promoting drugs and lipid-lowering drugs (orlistat, bezafibrate, phentermine/topiramate controlled release); and (5) bariatric surgery. Only controlled studies, dealing with subjects BMI ≥ 30 kg/m(2), were included in the analysis, whether randomized or non-randomized studies. Appropriate methodology (PRISMA statement) was adhered to. Publication bias was formally assessed. Eighteen studies (43,669 subjects, 30,774 with impaired glucose tolerance and/or impaired fasting glucose), published in English language as full papers, were analyzed to identify predictors of new cases of T2DM and were included in a meta-analysis (random-effects model) to study the effect of different strategies. Intervention effect (new cases of diabetes) was expressed as odds ratio (OR), with 95 % confidence intervals (CIs). In obese subjects, non-surgical strategies were able to prevent T2DM, with different effectiveness [OR from 0.44 (0.36-0.52) to 0.86 (0.80-0.92)]; in morbidly obese subjects, bariatric surgery was highly effective [OR = 0.10 (0.02-0.49)]. At meta-regression analysis, factors associated with effectiveness were weight loss, young age and fasting insulin levels. Publication bias was present only when considering all studies together. These data indicate that several strategies, with different effectiveness, can prevent T2DM in obese subjects. PMID:25085464

  3. Ondansetron attenuates depression co-morbid with obesity in obese mice subjected to chronic unpredictable mild stress; an approach using behavioral battery tests.

    PubMed

    Kurhe, Yeshwant; Radhakrishnan, Mahesh; Gupta, Deepali

    2014-09-01

    The aim of the present work was to investigate the role of ondansetron on the high fat diet (HFD) induced obese mice for behavioral and biochemical alterations using chronic unpredictable mild stress (CUMS) model of depression. Animals were fed with high fat diet for 14 weeks and subjected to different stress procedures for 4 weeks. Treatment with ondansetron was started on day 15. After day 28 behavioral assays and biochemical estimations were performed. Behavioral paradigms viz. sucrose preference test, locomotor score, forced swim test (FST) and elevated plus maze (EPM), whereas biochemical parameters like plasma glucose, total cholesterol, triglycerides and total proteins were estimated. Results examines that in behavioral assays, ondansetron significantly (P < 0.05) increased sucrose consumption, reduced immobility time in FST, increased the percent entries and time in open arm in EPM. In biochemical assessments elevated plasma glucose, total cholesterol, triglycerides and total proteins were significantly (P < 0.05) reversed by ondansetron treatment in HFD obese animals subjected to CUMS. The study indicates that the obese mice subjected to CUMS exhibited severe depressive-like symptoms and ondansetron significantly reversed the behavioral and biochemical alterations. In the present study the plasma glucose level indicates that, it could be "altered glucose level" playing an important role in depression co-morbid with obesity. Ondansetron through allosteric modulation of serotonergic system elevates the serotonin level and thereby regulates the insulin secretion and hence, reversing the "altered glucose level", could be the possible antidepressive-like mechanism against depression co-morbid with obesity.

  4. Mature adipocyte proteome reveals differentially altered protein abundances between lean, overweight and morbidly obese human subjects.

    PubMed

    Benabdelkamel, Hicham; Masood, Afshan; Almidani, Ghaith M; Alsadhan, Abdulmajeed A; Bassas, Abdulelah F; Duncan, Mark W; Alfadda, Assim A

    2015-02-01

    Overweight (OW) and obese individuals are considered to be graded parts of the scale having increasing weight as a common feature. They may not, however, be part of the same continuum and may differ metabolically. In this study we applied an untargeted proteomic approach to compare protein abundances in mature adipocytes derived from the subcutaneous adipose tissue of overweight and morbidly obese female subjects to those of lean age matched controls. Mature adipocytes were isolated from liposuction samples of abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue collected from both lean (L; n = 7, 23.3 ± 0.4 kg/m(2); mean BMI ± SD), overweight (OW; n = 8, 27.9 ± 0.6 kg/m(2); mean BMI ± SD) and morbidly obese (MOB; n = 7, 44.8 ± 3.8 kg/m(2); mean BMI ± SD) individuals. Total protein extracts were then compared by two-dimensional difference in gel electrophoresis (2D DIGE). One hundred and ten differentially expressed protein spots (i.e., fitting the statistical criteria ANOVA test, p < 0.05; fold-change ≥1.5) were detected, and of these, 89 were identified by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. Of these, 66 protein spots were common to both groups whereas 23 were unique to the MOB group. Significant differences were evident in the abundances of key proteins involved in glucose and lipid metabolism, energy regulation, cytoskeletal structure and redox control signaling pathways. Differences in the abundance of some chaperones were also evident. The differentially abundant proteins were investigated using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) to establish their associations with known biological functions. The network identified in the OW group with the highest score relates to-: cell-to-cell signaling and interaction; in contrast, in the MOB group the major interacting pathways are associated with lipid metabolism, small molecule biochemistry and cancer. The differences in abundance of the differentially regulated proteins were validated by

  5. Complementary Cholesterol-Lowering Response of a Phytosterol/α-Lipoic Acid Combination in Obese Zucker Rats.

    PubMed

    Rideout, Todd C; Carrier, Bradley; Wen, Shin; Raslawsky, Amy; Browne, Richard W; Harding, Scott V

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the cholesterol-lowering effectiveness of a phytosterol/α-lipoic acid (PS/αLA) therapy, thirty-two male Zucker rats were randomly assigned to 1 of 4 diets for 30 days: (i) high fat diet (HF, 40% energy from fat); (ii) HF diet supplemented with 3% phytosterols; (iii) HF diet supplemented with 0.25% αLA; or (iv) HF diet supplemented with PS (3%) and αLA (0.25%, PS/αLA). Compared with the HF diet, combination PS/αLA proved more effective in reducing non-HDL cholesterol (-55%) than either the PS (-24%) or the αLA (-25%) therapies alone. PS supplementation did not affect LDL particle number, however, αLA supplementation reduced LDL particle number when supplemented alone (-47%) or in combination with PS (-54%). Compared with the HF-fed animals, evidence of increased HDL-particle number was evident in all treatment groups to a similar extent (21-22%). PS-mediated interruption of intestinal cholesterol absorption was evident by increased fecal cholesterol loss (+52%) and compensatory increase in HMG-CoA reductase mRNA (1.6 fold of HF), however, αLA supplementation did not affect fecal cholesterol loss. Hepatic mRNA and protein expression patterns suggested that αLA modulated multiple aspects of cholesterol homeostasis including reduced synthesis (HMG-CoA reductase mRNA, 0.7 fold of HF), reduced bile acid synthesis (CYP7a1 expression, 0.17 of HF), and increased cholesterol clearance (reduced PCSK9 mRNA, 0.5 fold of HF; increased LDLr protein, 2 fold of HF). Taken together, this data suggests that PS and αLA work through unique and complementary mechanisms to provide a superior and more comprehensive cholesterol lowering response than either therapy alone.

  6. Effects of Body Weight Reduction on Serum Irisin and Metabolic Parameters in Obese Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Kurose, Satoshi; Shinno, Hiromi; Thi Thu, Ha Cao; Takao, Nana; Tsutsumi, Hiromi; Hasegawa, Takaaki; Nakajima, Toshiaki; Kimura, Yutaka

    2016-01-01

    Background Irisin is a myokine implicated in lipid and glucose metabolism. The objective of this study is to examine the effect of a body weight reduction on the serum irisin level and physical indicators in obese Japanese patients without diabetes. Methods The subjects were 22 patients (male/female, 5/17; age, 46.1±16.0 years; body mass index [BMI], 36.9±5.0 kg/m2) who completed a 6-month body weight reduction program at our clinic. The program included diet, exercise therapy and cognitive behavioral therapy. Blood parameters, body composition, exercise tolerance, homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), and serum irisin were determined before and after intervention, and relationships among changes in these data were examined. Results There were significant decreases in body weight and BMI after the intervention. Irisin before the intervention was significantly positively correlated with HOMA-IR (r=0.434, P<0.05). The mean irisin level showed no significant change after the intervention in all participants. However, improvements in % body fat, subcutaneous fat area, triglycerides, and fasting glucose were significantly greater in patients with an increase in irisin compared to those with a decrease in irisin after the intervention. Patients with an increase in irisin also had significantly lower fasting insulin (9.7±4.8 vs. 16.4±8.2, P<0.05) and HOMA-IR (2.2±1.1 vs. 3.7±1.6, P<0.05) after the intervention, compared to patients with a decrease in irisin. Conclusion Body weight reduction did not alter irisin levels. However, irisin may play important roles in fat and glucose metabolism and insulin resistance, and the effects of body weight reduction on irisin kinetics may be a key for obesity treatment. PMID:27766246

  7. Fate and Complex Pathogenic Effects of Dioxins and Polychlorinated Biphenyls in Obese Subjects before and after Drastic Weight Loss

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min-Ji; Marchand, Philippe; Henegar, Corneliu; Antignac, Jean-Philippe; Alili, Rohia; Poitou, Christine; Bouillot, Jean-Luc; Basdevant, Arnaud; Le Bizec, Bruno; Barouki, Robert; Clément, Karine

    2011-01-01

    Background In humans, persistent organic pollutants (POPs) are stored primarily in adipose tissue. Their total body burden and their contribution to obesity-associated diseases remain unclear. Objectives We characterized POP total body burden and their redistribution in obese individuals before and after drastic weight loss and compared these values with a variety of molecular, biological, and clinical parameters. Methods Seventy-one obese subjects were enrolled and underwent bariatric surgery. Blood and adipose tissue samples were obtained at different times from these individuals as well as from 18 lean women. Results POP content (17 dioxins/furans and 18 polychlorinated biphenyl congeners) in different adipose tissue territories was similar, allowing us to assess total POP body burden from a single biopsy. Total POP body burden was 2 to 3 times higher in obese than in lean individuals. We also found increased expression of some POP target genes in obese adipose tissue. Drastic weight loss led to increased serum POPs and, within 6–12 months, to a significant 15% decrease in total polychlorinated biphenyl body burden. Importantly, serum POP levels were positively correlated with liver toxicity markers and lipid parameters, independently of age and body mass index. Conclusions POP content in adipose tissue and serum correlate with biological markers of obesity-related dysfunctions. Drastic weight loss leads to a redistribution of POPs and to a moderate decrease of their total body burden. PMID:21156398

  8. The effect of leptin on Na(+)-H(+) antiport (NHE 1) activity of obese and normal subjects erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Konstantinou-Tegou, A; Kaloyianni, M; Bourikas, D; Koliakos, G

    2001-10-25

    Obesity is currently considered as a chronic metabolic disease, associated with a high risk of cardiovascular complications. Leptin, an adipocyte-derived hormone has a variety target cells influencing a wide range of processes. Possible counteractions of hyperleptinaemia are currently investigated. The Na(+)-H(+) exchanger (NHE 1) is involved in multiple cellular functions and its activation has been related to hypertension and obesity. NHE 1 is present on erythrocytes and can be stimulated by various hormones. Erythrocytes have on their surface a variety of receptors with mostly unknown function. In the present paper, the effect of leptin on erythrocytes NHE 1 activity has been investigated. For this reason, the intracellular pH and sodium influxes were measured before and after addition of leptin in erythrocyte suspensions from normal and obese individuals. Amiloride, a specific NHE 1 inhibitor, and staurosporine a protein kinase C inhibitor were used to inhibit erythrocyte NHE 1. For the binding study leptin was labeled with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) and the binding on erythrocytes was estimated by Scatchard analysis. NHE 1 activity increased in the presence of leptin but significantly less in the obese than in the control group. Furthermore the concentrations of leptin binding sites on the surface of erythrocytes were lower in erythrocytes drawn from obese individuals than in erythrocytes drawn from normal subjects. Since NHE 1 activity has been associated with insulin resistance and hypertension, the activation of this antiport by leptin may represent a link between adipose tissue hypertrophy and cardiovascular complications of obesity.

  9. Relation of Body Circumferences to Cardiometabolic Disease in Overweight-Obese Subjects.

    PubMed

    Maddaloni, Ernesto; Cavallari, Ilaria; De Pascalis, Mariangela; Keenan, Hillary; Park, Kyoungmin; Manfrini, Silvia; Buzzetti, Raffaella; Patti, Giuseppe; Di Sciascio, Germano; Pozzilli, Paolo

    2016-09-15

    Body circumferences have been proposed as potential anthropometric measures for the assessment of cardiometabolic risk as they are independently associated with insulin resistance and diabetes. The aim of this study was to validate neck and wrist circumference and waist-to-hip ratio as practical markers of metabolic dysfunction and atherosclerosis; 120 subjects who underwent coronary angiography and carotid Doppler ultrasound were enrolled in this cross-sectional study. Exclusion criteria were history of diabetes, acute myocardial infarction, body mass index (BMI) <18.5 or ≥45.0 kg/m(2). Metabolic dysfunction was ascertained by the calculation of visceral adiposity index (VAI) and by diagnosis of metabolic syndrome (MS). Advanced atherosclerotic disease was defined as ≥70% coronary lumen and/or ≥50% carotid lumen stenosis. No association between body circumferences and VAI or MS was found in subjects with BMI <25 kg/m(2). VAI was significantly related to waist-to-hip ratio (R(2) = 0.09, p = 0.008), neck (R(2) = 0.09, p = 0.007), and wrist circumferences (R(2) = 0.05, p = 0.041) in subjects with BMI ≥25 kg/m(2). In overweight subjects, higher gender-specific tertiles of wrist circumference were independently associated with an increased risk of MS (odds ratio 2.57, 95% confidence interval 1.11 to 5.96, p = 0.028). VAI was independently associated with carotid intima-media thickness: β = 0.104, R(2) = 0.118, p = 0.003. Carotid intima-media thickness and MS, but not body circumferences, were associated with advanced atherosclerosis. In conclusion, these data indicate that anthropometric measurements, in particular wrist circumference, can be used as practical tools for assessment of metabolic risk in overweight-obese subjects but not as markers of advanced atherosclerosis. PMID:27457430

  10. Obesity and craniofacial variables in subjects with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome: comparisons of cephalometric values

    PubMed Central

    Cuccia, Antonino M; Campisi, Giuseppina; Cannavale, Rosangela; Colella, Giuseppe

    2007-01-01

    Background The aim of this paper was to determine the most common craniofacial changes in patients suffering Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome (OSAS) with regards to the degree of obesity. Accordingly, cephalometric data reported in the literature was searched and analyzed. Methods After a careful analysis of the literature from 1990 to 2006, 5 papers with similar procedural criteria were selected. Inclusion criteria were: recruitment of Caucasian patients with an apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) >10 as grouped in non-obese (Body Mass Index – [BMI] < 30) vs. obese (BMI ≥ 30). Results A low position of the hyoid bone was present in both groups. In non-obese patients, an increased value of the ANB angle and a reduced dimension of the cranial base (S-N) were found to be the most common finding, whereas major skeletal divergence (ANS-PNS ^Go-Me) was evident among obese patients. No strict association was found between OSAS and length of the soft palate. Conclusion In both non-obese and obese OSAS patients, skeletal changes were often evident; with special emphasis of intermaxillary divergence in obese patients. Unexpectedly, in obese OSAS patients, alterations of oropharyngeal soft tissue were not always present and did not prevail. PMID:18154686

  11. Comparisons of metabolism of apolipoprotein B in normal subjects, obese patients, and patients with coronary heart disease.

    PubMed Central

    Kesäniemi, Y A; Beltz, W F; Grundy, S M

    1985-01-01

    This study was designed to examine the integrated metabolism of apolipoprotein B (apo B) in very low density lipoproteins (VLDL), intermediate density lipoproteins (IDL), and low density lipoproteins (LDL) in normal subjects, obese patients, and a group of patients with coronary heart disease (CHD). Turnover rates of 131I-VLDL-B, 131I-IDL-B, 125I-LDL-B, and [3H]VLDL-triglycerides (TG) were determined by the multicompartmental analysis that used the model described in the preceding article (Beltz, W.F., et al. 1985. J. Clin. Invest. 76: 575-585). Compared with five normal subjects, four obese subjects had increased synthesis rates of both VLDL-B and VLDL-TG. Production of LDL-B was inconsistently raised in these same patients. Five patients with CHD had enhanced production of both VLDL-B and LDL-B, but secretion rates of VLDL-TG were not increased. Thus, in patients with obesity and in those with CHD, synthesis rates of VLDL particles may be abnormally high. In the obese patients, the VLDL appeared to be of normal composition, but in patients with CHD, the VLDL were relatively poor in TG. The study also showed that a significant fraction of VLDL-B is removed directly from the circulation and never reaches LDL regardless of the type of patients. The fraction that does reach LDL is one factor that determines LDL concentrations. PMID:3861622

  12. Structural Chromosome Abnormalities Associated with Obesity: Report of Four New subjects and Review of Literature.

    PubMed

    Dasouki, Majed J; Youngs, Erin L; Hovanes, Karine

    2011-05-01

    Obesity in humans is a complex polygenic trait with high inter-individual heritability estimated at 40-70%. Candidate gene, DNA linkage and genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have allowed for the identification of a large set of genes and genomic regions associated with obesity. Structural chromosome abnormalities usually result in congenital anomalies, growth retardation and developmental delay. Occasionally, they are associated with hyperphagia and obesity rather than growth delay. We report four new individuals with structural chromosome abnormalities involving 10q22.3-23.2, 16p11.2 and Xq27.1-q28 chromosomal regions with early childhood obesity and developmental delay. We also searched and summarized the literature for structural chromosome abnormalities reported in association with childhood obesity. PMID:22043167

  13. Structural Chromosome Abnormalities Associated with Obesity: Report of Four New subjects and Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Dasouki, Majed J; Youngs, Erin L; Hovanes, Karine

    2011-01-01

    Obesity in humans is a complex polygenic trait with high inter-individual heritability estimated at 40–70%. Candidate gene, DNA linkage and genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have allowed for the identification of a large set of genes and genomic regions associated with obesity. Structural chromosome abnormalities usually result in congenital anomalies, growth retardation and developmental delay. Occasionally, they are associated with hyperphagia and obesity rather than growth delay. We report four new individuals with structural chromosome abnormalities involving 10q22.3-23.2, 16p11.2 and Xq27.1-q28 chromosomal regions with early childhood obesity and developmental delay. We also searched and summarized the literature for structural chromosome abnormalities reported in association with childhood obesity. PMID:22043167

  14. The Gut Microbiota from Lean and Obese Subjects Contribute Differently to the Fermentation of Arabinogalactan and Inulin

    PubMed Central

    Aguirre, Marisol; Bussolo de Souza, Carlota; Venema, Koen

    2016-01-01

    Background An aberrant metabolic activity or a compositional alteration of the gut microbiota has been proposed as a factor that makes us more prone to disease. Therefore, we explored the effect of two dietary fibers (arabinogalactan and inulin) on the microbiota from lean and obese subjects during 72 h in vitro fermentation experiments using the validated TNO dynamic in vitro model of the proximal colon: TIM-2. Metabolically, arabinogalactan fermentation showed a higher production of propionate when compared to n-butyrate in the obese microbiota fermentations. In general, lean microbiota produced more n-butyrate from the fermentation of both substrates when compared to the obese microbiota. Furthermore, the obese microbiota extracted more energy from the fermentation of both fibers. Results Compositionally, bacteria belonging to Gemmiger, Dorea, Roseburia, Alistipes, Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium genera were found to be highly abundant or stimulated by the prebiotics in the lean microbiota suggesting a potential role in leanness. Furthermore, a significant correlation between known butyrogenic strains including B. adolescentis, an unclassified Bifidobacterium and F. prausnitzii with this metabolite in the fermentation of inulin in both microbiotas was found. Conclusions Although supplementary in vivo studies are needed, the current study provides more evidence for the consumption of specific ingredients with the aim of modulating the gut microbiota in the context of obesity. PMID:27410967

  15. Influences of normobaric hypoxia training on physical fitness and metabolic risk markers in overweight to obese subjects.

    PubMed

    Wiesner, Susanne; Haufe, Sven; Engeli, Stefan; Mutschler, Harry; Haas, Ute; Luft, Friedrich C; Jordan, Jens

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies suggested that hypoxia and exercise may have a synergistic effect on cardiovascular and metabolic risk factors. We conducted a single blind study in overweight to obese subjects to test the hypothesis that training under hypoxia (HG, n = 24, FiO(2) = 15%) results in similar or even greater improvement in body weight and metabolic risk markers compared with exercise under normoxia (NG, n = 21, FiO(2) = 21%). After an initial metabolic evaluation including incremental exercise testing, subjects trained in normoxic or hypoxic conditions thrice weekly over a 4-week period at a heart rate corresponding to 65% of maximum oxygen uptake (VO(2max)). The experimental groups were similar at the start of the investigation and weight stable during the training period. Subjects in the hypoxia group trained at a significantly lower workload (P < 0.05). Yet, both groups showed similar improvements in VO(2max) and time to exhaustion. Respiratory quotient and lactate at the anaerobic threshold as well as body composition improved more in the hypoxia group. We conclude that in obese subjects, training in hypoxia elicits a similar or even better response in terms of physical fitness, metabolic risk markers, and body composition at a lower workload. The fact that workload and, therefore, mechanic strain can be reduced in hypoxia could be particularly beneficial in obese patients with orthopedic comorbidities.

  16. Effect of physical activity on heart rate variability in normal weight, overweight and obese subjects: results from the SAPALDIA study

    PubMed Central

    Dietrich, Denise Felber; Ackermann-Liebrich, Ursula; Schindler, Christian; Barthélémy, Jean-Claude; Brändli, Otto; Gold, Diane R; Knöpfli, Bruno; Probst-Hensch, Nicole M; Roche, Frédéric; Tschopp, Jean-Marie; von Eckardstein, Arnold; Gaspoz, Jean-Michel

    2011-01-01

    Many studies have demonstrated an association of both a sedentary lifestyle and a high body mass index (BMI) with greater risk for cardiovascular disease. Within the prospective SAPALDIA cohort (Swiss cohort study on Air Pollution and Lung Diseases in Adults), we investigated whether regular exercise was protective against reduced heart rate variability (HRV), a clinically relevant predictor of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, and whether adverse effects of obesity and weight gain on HRV were modified by regular exercise. 24-hour electrocardiograms were recorded in 1712 randomly selected SAPALDIA participants aged ≥50, for whom BMI was assessed in the years 1991 and 2001–2003. Other examinations included an interview investigating health status (especially respiratory and cardiovascular health and health relevant behaviours including physical activity) and measurements of blood pressure, body height and weight. The association between regular physical activity and HRV and interactions with BMI and BMI change was assessed in multivariable linear regression analyses. Compared to sedentary obese subjects, SDNN (standard deviation of all RR intervals) was 14% (95% CI: 8–20%) higher in sedentary normal weight subjects; 19% (CI: 12–27%) higher in normal weight subjects exercising regularly ≥ 2h/week; and 19% (CI:11–28%) higher in obese subjects exercising regularly ≥ 2h/week. Compared with sedentary subjects who gained weight, those who gained weight but did exercise regularly had a 13% higher SDNN (CI: 7–20%). Regular physical exercise has strong beneficial effects on cardiac autonomic nervous function and thus appears to offset the negative effect of obesity on HRV. PMID:18597107

  17. Glucagon-like peptide 1 induces natriuresis in healthy subjects and in insulin-resistant obese men.

    PubMed

    Gutzwiller, Jean-Pierre; Tschopp, Stefan; Bock, Andreas; Zehnder, Carlos E; Huber, Andreas R; Kreyenbuehl, Monika; Gutmann, Heike; Drewe, Jürgen; Henzen, Christoph; Goeke, Burkhard; Beglinger, Christoph

    2004-06-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1-(7-36)-amide (GLP-1) is involved in satiety control and glucose homeostasis. Animal studies suggest a physiological role for GLP-1 in water and salt homeostasis. This study's aim was to define the effects of GLP-1 on water and sodium excretion in both healthy and obese men. Fifteen healthy subjects and 16 obese men (mean body mass index, 36 kg/m2) were examined in a double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study to demonstrate the effects of a 3-h infusion of GLP-1 on urinary sodium excretion, urinary output, and the glomerular filtration rate after an i.v. 9.9-g salt load. Infusion of GLP-1 evoked a dose-dependent increase in urinary sodium excretion in healthy subjects (from 74 +/- 8 to 143 +/- 18 mmol/180 min, P = 0.0013). In obese men, there was a significant increase in urinary sodium excretion (from 59 to 96 mmol/180 min, P = 0.015), a decrease in urinary H+ secretion (from 1.1 to 0.3 pmol/180 min, P = 0.013), and a 6% decrease in the glomerular filtration rate (from 151 +/- 8 to 142 +/- 8 ml/min, P = 0.022). Intravenous infusions of GLP-1 enhance sodium excretion, reduce H+ secretion, and reduce glomerular hyperfiltration in obese men. These findings suggest an action at the proximal renal tubule and a potential renoprotective effect.

  18. Food group preferences and energy balance in moderately obese postmenopausal women subjected to brisk walking program.

    PubMed

    Garnier, Sophie; Vallée, Karine; Lemoine-Morel, Sophie; Joffroy, Sandra; Drapeau, Vicky; Tremblay, Angelo; Auneau, Gérard; Mauriège, Pascale

    2015-07-01

    The objective of the study was to examine the effects of a 16-week walking program on food group preferences and energy balance of sedentary, moderately obese (body mass index, 29-35 kg/m(2)), postmenopausal Caucasian women, aged 60 ± 5 years old. One hundred and fifty-six volunteers were subjected to 3 sessions/week of 45 min of walking at 60% of heart rate reserve. Total energy intake (TEI) and food group preferences (3-day dietary record), total energy expenditure (TEE, 3-day physical activity diary), cardiorespiratory fitness (2-km walking test), anthropometry, and body composition (bioelectrical impedance) were measured before and after walking. Data were statistically analyzed using an ANOVA with repeated measures on 1 factor (time). The modest increase in TEE of 151 ± 24 kcal/day (p < 0.0001) leads to body weight, fat mass losses, and waist girth reduction (p < 0.0001). TEI remained unchanged despite a slight decrease in carbohydrate intake and a minor increase in protein intake (p < 0.05). Analysis of food records revealed a decreased consumption of fruits (p < 0.05) and sweet and fatty foods (p < 0.01), but an increase in oil consumption (p < 0.0001) after walking. Women with the highest body weight loss showed the greatest reduction in the consumption of fruits, sugar, sweet foods, and fatty foods (p < 0.05). Women with the greatest fat mass loss showed the highest decrease in fatty food intake (p < 0.05). In conclusion, although our walking program changed some food group consumption patterns, body weight loss was primarily because of the increased TEE.

  19. Pharmacokinetics of Ceftaroline in Normal Body Weight and Obese (Classes I, II, and III) Healthy Adult Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Justo, Julie Ann; Mayer, Stockton M.; Pai, Manjunath P.; Soriano, Melinda M.; Danziger, Larry H.; Novak, Richard M.

    2015-01-01

    The pharmacokinetic profile of ceftaroline has not been well characterized in obese adults. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the pharmacokinetics of ceftaroline in 32 healthy adult volunteers aged 18 to 50 years in the normal, overweight, and obese body size ranges. Subjects were evenly assigned to 1 of 4 groups based on their body mass index (BMI) and total body weight (TBW) (ranges, 22.1 to 63.5 kg/m2 and 50.1 to 179.5 kg, respectively). Subjects in the lower-TBW groups were matched by age, sex, race/ethnicity, and serum creatinine to the upper-BMI groups. Serial plasma and urine samples were collected over 12 h after the start of the infusion, and the concentrations of ceftaroline fosamil (prodrug), ceftaroline, and ceftaroline M-1 (inactive metabolite) were assayed. Noncompartmental and population pharmacokinetic analyses were used to evaluate the data. The mean plasma ceftaroline maximum concentration and area under the curve were ca. 30% lower in subjects with a BMI of ≥40 kg/m2 compared to those <30 kg/m2. A five-compartment pharmacokinetic model with zero-order infusion and first-order elimination optimally described the plasma concentration-time profiles of the prodrug and ceftaroline. Estimated creatinine clearance (eCLCR) and TBW best explained ceftaroline clearance and volume of distribution, respectively. Although lower ceftaroline plasma concentrations were observed in obese subjects, Monte Carlo simulations suggest the probability of target attainment is ≥90% when the MIC is ≤1 μg/ml irrespective of TBW or eCLCR. No dosage adjustment for ceftaroline appears to be necessary based on TBW alone in adults with comparable eCLCR. Confirmation of these findings in infected obese patients is necessary to validate these findings in healthy volunteers. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT01648127.) PMID:25896707

  20. Baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) antigen in obese and normal weight subjects.

    PubMed

    Salamati, S; Martins, C; Kulseng, B

    2015-02-01

    Baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) and its cell wall components have been used as one of the alternatives to antibiotic growth promoters in the feed industry. Antibodies to cell wall mannan of this yeast (ASCA) have been traditionally used in the study of Crohn's disease (CD). We applied ASCA in relation to obesity. This study aims (i) to determine the concentration of ASCA (immunoglobulin A [IgA] and immunoglobulin G [IgG]) in obese compared with normal weight individuals and (ii) to determine if there is a correlation between ASCA concentrations, obesity indices and C-reactive protein. Forty obese individuals (body mass index [BMI] > 35 kg m(-2) ) and 18 healthy (BMI < 25 kg m(-2) ) volunteers participated in this case-control study. Binding activity of serum IgA and IgG to the cell wall mannan of S. cerevisiae was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. More than one-third of the obese individual (35%) showed elevated titres of ASCA compared with the control group (5%). This antibody was positively associated with weight (P = 0.01), BMI (P = 0.02) and waist circumference (P = 0.02), but not with C-reactive protein. It seems that ASCA are not only specific for CD but are also associated with obesity. S. cerevisiae or a related antigen may play a role in the matrix of this complex condition.

  1. Elevation of Fasting Ghrelin in Healthy Human Subjects Consuming a High-Salt Diet: A Novel Mechanism of Obesity?

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yong; Li, Fenxia; Liu, Fu-Qiang; Chu, Chao; Wang, Yang; Wang, Dan; Guo, Tong-Shuai; Wang, Jun-Kui; Guan, Gong-Chang; Ren, Ke-Yu; Mu, Jian-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Overweight/obesity is a chronic disease that carries an increased risk of hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and premature death. Several epidemiological studies have demonstrated a clear relationship between salt intake and obesity, but the pathophysiologic mechanisms remain unknown. We hypothesized that ghrelin, which regulates appetite, food intake, and fat deposition, becomes elevated when one consumes a high-salt diet, contributing to the progression of obesity. We, therefore, investigated fasting ghrelin concentrations during a high-salt diet. Thirty-eight non-obese and normotensive subjects (aged 25 to 50 years) were selected from a rural community in Northern China. They were sequentially maintained on a normal diet for three days at baseline, a low-salt diet for seven days (3 g/day, NaCl), then a high-salt diet for seven days (18 g/day). The concentration of plasma ghrelin was measured using an immunoenzyme method (ELISA). High-salt intake significantly increased fasting ghrelin levels, which were higher during the high-salt diet (320.7 ± 30.6 pg/mL) than during the low-salt diet (172.9 ± 8.9 pg/mL). The comparison of ghrelin levels between the different salt diets was statistically-significantly different (p < 0.01). A positive correlation between 24-h urinary sodium excretion and fasting ghrelin levels was demonstrated. Our data indicate that a high-salt diet elevates fasting ghrelin in healthy human subjects, which may be a novel underlying mechanism of obesity. PMID:27240398

  2. Effects of Age, Sex, and Obesity on the Single-Dose Pharmacokinetics of Omarigliptin in Healthy Subjects.

    PubMed

    Addy, Carol; Tatosian, Daniel A; Glasgow, Xiaoli S; Iii, Isaias Noel Gendrano; Sisk, Christine McCrary; Kauh, Eunkyung A; Stoch, S Aubrey; Wagner, John A

    2016-09-01

    Omarigliptin is being developed as a potent, once-weekly, oral dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. This double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study evaluated the effects of age, sex, and obesity on the pharmacokinetics of omarigliptin in healthy subjects. A single oral dose of omarigliptin 10 mg (n = 6/panel) or placebo (n = 2/panel) was administered in the fasted state to elderly nonobese men and women, young obese (30 ≤ body mass index [BMI] ≤ 35 kg/m(2) ) men and women, and young nonobese women of nonchildbearing potential. Plasma was collected at selected postdose times for evaluation of omarigliptin concentrations. Pharmacokinetic parameters were compared with historical data from a previously-conducted single-dose study in young, healthy, nonobese men. There were no clinically significant differences in omarigliptin AUC0-∞ , the primary pharmacokinetic parameter for assessing efficacy and safety, based on age, sex, or BMI (pooled nonobese elderly versus pooled nonobese young, young nonobese female versus young nonobese male, and pooled young obese versus pooled young nonobese). There were no serious adverse events or hypoglycemic events attributable to omarigliptin administration. Demographic factors and BMI had no meaningful effect on omarigliptin pharmacokinetics, suggesting that dose adjustment based on age, sex, or obesity is not required. PMID:27627193

  3. The gene expression of the main lipogenic enzymes is downregulated in visceral adipose tissue of obese subjects.

    PubMed

    Ortega, Francisco J; Mayas, Dolores; Moreno-Navarrete, José M; Catalán, Victoria; Gómez-Ambrosi, Javier; Esteve, Eduardo; Rodriguez-Hermosa, Jose I; Ruiz, Bartomeu; Ricart, Wifredo; Peral, Belen; Fruhbeck, Gema; Tinahones, Francisco J; Fernández-Real, José M

    2010-01-01

    Contradictory findings regarding the gene expression of the main lipogenic enzymes in human adipose tissue depots have been reported. In this cross-sectional study, we aimed to evaluate the mRNA expression of fatty acid synthase (FAS) and acetyl-CoA carboxilase (ACC) in omental and subcutaneous (SC) fat depots from subjects who varied widely in terms of body fat mass. FAS and ACC gene expression were evaluated by real time-PCR in 188 samples of visceral adipose tissue which were obtained during elective surgical procedures in 119 women and 69 men. Decreased sex-adjusted FAS (-59%) and ACC (-49%) mRNA were found in visceral adipose tissue from obese subjects, with and without diabetes mellitus type 2 (DM-2), compared with lean subjects (both P < 0.0001). FAS mRNA was also decreased (-40%) in fat depots from overweight subjects (P < 0.05). Indeed, FAS mRNA was significantly and positively associated with ACC gene expression (r = 0.316, P < 0.0001) and negatively with BMI (r = -0.274), waist circumference (r = -0.437), systolic blood pressure (r = -0.310), serum glucose (r = -0.277), and fasting triglycerides (r = -0.226), among others (all P < 0.0001). Similar associations were observed for ACC gene expression levels. In a representative subgroup of nonobese (n = 4) and obese women (n = 6), relative FAS gene expression levels significantly correlated (r = 0.657, P = 0.034; n = 10) with FAS protein values. FAS protein levels were also inversely correlated with blood glucose (r = -0.640, P = 0.046) and fasting triglycerides (r = -0.832, P = 0.010). In conclusion, the gene expression of the main lipogenic enzymes is downregulated in visceral adipose tissue from obese subjects.

  4. Complementary medicine.

    PubMed Central

    Spiegel, D; Stroud, P; Fyfe, A

    1998-01-01

    The widespread use of complementary and alternative medicine techniques, often explored by patients without discussion with their primary care physician, is seen as a request from patients for care as well as cure. In this article, we discuss the reasons for the growth of and interest in complementary and alternative medicine in an era of rapidly advancing medical technology. There is, for instance, evidence of the efficacy of supportive techniques such as group psychotherapy in improving adjustment and increasing survival time of cancer patients. We describe current and developing complementary medicine programs as well as opportunities for integration of some complementary techniques into standard medical care. PMID:9584661

  5. Obesity Indexes and Total Mortality among Elderly Subjects at High Cardiovascular Risk: The PREDIMED Study

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-González, Miguel A.; García-Arellano, Ana; Toledo, Estefanía; Bes-Rastrollo, Maira; Bulló, Mónica; Corella, Dolores; Fito, Montserrat; Ros, Emilio; Lamuela-Raventós, Rosa Maria; Rekondo, Javier; Gómez-Gracia, Enrique; Fiol, Miquel; Santos-Lozano, Jose Manuel; Serra-Majem, Lluis; Martínez, J. Alfredo; Eguaras, Sonia; Sáez-Tormo, Guillermo; Pintó, Xavier; Estruch, Ramon

    2014-01-01

    Background Different indexes of regional adiposity have been proposed for identifying persons at higher risk of death. Studies specifically assessing these indexes in large cohorts are scarce. It would also be interesting to know whether a dietary intervention may counterbalance the adverse effects of adiposity on mortality. Methods We assessed the association of four different anthropometric indexes (waist-to-height ratio (WHtR), waist circumference (WC), body mass index (BMI) and height) with all-cause mortality in 7447 participants at high cardiovascular risk from the PREDIMED trial. Forty three percent of them were men (55 to 80 years) and 57% were women (60 to 80 years). All of them were initially free of cardiovascular disease. The recruitment took place in 11 recruiting centers between 2003 and 2009. Results After adjusting for age, sex, smoking, diabetes, hypertension, intervention group, family history of coronary heart disease, and leisure-time physical activity, WC and WHtR were found to be directly associated with a higher mortality after 4.8 years median follow-up. The multivariable-adjusted HRs for mortality of WHtR (cut-off points: 0.60, 0.65, 0.70) were 1.02 (0.78–1.34), 1.30 (0.97–1.75) and 1.55 (1.06–2.26). When we used WC (cut-off points: 100, 105 and 110 cm), the multivariable adjusted Hazard Ratios (HRs) for mortality were 1.18 (0.88–1.59), 1.02 (0.74–1.41) and 1.57 (1.19–2.08). In all analyses, BMI exhibited weaker associations with mortality than WC or WHtR. The direct association between WHtR and overall mortality was consistent within each of the three intervention arms of the trial. Conclusions Our study adds further support to a stronger association of abdominal obesity than BMI with total mortality among elderly subjects at high risk of cardiovascular disease. We did not find evidence to support that the PREDIMED intervention was able to counterbalance the harmful effects of increased adiposity on total mortality. Trial

  6. Breast Cancer 1 (BrCa1) May Be behind Decreased Lipogenesis in Adipose Tissue from Obese Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Ortega, Francisco J.; Moreno-Navarrete, José M.; Mayas, Dolores; García-Santos, Eva; Gómez-Serrano, María; Rodriguez-Hermosa, José I.; Ruiz, Bartomeu; Ricart, Wifredo; Tinahones, Francisco J.; Frühbeck, Gema; Peral, Belen; Fernández-Real, José M.

    2012-01-01

    Context Expression and activity of the main lipogenic enzymes is paradoxically decreased in obesity, but the mechanisms behind these findings are poorly known. Breast Cancer 1 (BrCa1) interacts with acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) reducing the rate of fatty acid biosynthesis. In this study, we aimed to evaluate BrCa1 in human adipose tissue according to obesity and insulin resistance, and in vitro cultured adipocytes. Research Design and Methods BrCa1 gene expression, total and phosphorylated (P-) BrCa1, and ACC were analyzed in adipose tissue samples obtained from a total sample of 133 subjects. BrCa1 expression was also evaluated during in vitro differentiation of human adipocytes and 3T3-L1 cells. Results BrCa1 gene expression was significantly up-regulated in both omental (OM; 1.36-fold, p = 0.002) and subcutaneous (SC; 1.49-fold, p = 0.001) adipose tissue from obese subjects. In parallel with increased BrCa1 mRNA, P-ACC was also up-regulated in SC (p = 0.007) as well as in OM (p = 0.010) fat from obese subjects. Consistent with its role limiting fatty acid biosynthesis, both BrCa1 mRNA (3.5-fold, p<0.0001) and protein (1.2-fold, p = 0.001) were increased in pre-adipocytes, and decreased during in vitro adipogenesis, while P-ACC decreased during differentiation of human adipocytes (p = 0.005) allowing lipid biosynthesis. Interestingly, BrCa1 gene expression in mature adipocytes was restored by inflammatory stimuli (macrophage conditioned medium), whereas lipogenic genes significantly decreased. Conclusions The specular findings of BrCa1 and lipogenic enzymes in adipose tissue and adipocytes reported here suggest that BrCa1 might help to control fatty acid biosynthesis in adipocytes and adipose tissue from obese subjects. PMID:22666314

  7. Expression of CD73 and A2A receptors in cells from subjects with obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Guzman-Flores, Juan M; Cortez-Espinosa, Nancy; Cortés-Garcia, Juan D; Vargas-Morales, Juan M; Cataño-Cañizalez, Yolanda G; Rodríguez-Rivera, Jaime G; Portales-Perez, Diana P

    2015-08-01

    Regulatory T cells have various mechanisms to suppress the inflammatory response, among these, the modulation of the microenvironment through adenosine and with the participation of CD39, CD73 and A2A. The aim of this study was to assess the expression of CD73 and A2A in immune cells and the effect of activation of A2A by an adenosine analogue on apoptosis in patients with obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D). CD73 and A2A expression were analyzed by flow cytometry in lymphocyte subpopulations from patients with obesity (n = 22), T2D (n = 22), and healthy subjects (n = 20). Lymphocytes were treated with the selective A2A antagonist (ZM241385) or the selective A2A agonist (CGS21680), and apoptotic cells were detected by Annexin V. We found an increased expression of CD39 coupled to a decrease in CD73 in the patient groups with obesity and T2D compared to the control group in the different studied lymphocyte subpopulations. A2A expression was found to be increased in different subpopulations of lymphocytes from T2D patients. We also detected positive correlations between CD39+ cells and age and BMI. Meanwhile, CD73+ cells showed negative correlations with age, WHR, BMI, FPG, HbAc1, triglycerides and cholesterol. Moreover, an increase in the percentage of apoptotic cells from T2D patients with regard to the groups with obesity and control was observed. In addition, the CD8+ T cells of patients with T2D exhibited decreased apoptosis when treated with the A2A agonist. In conclusion, our data suggest a possible role for CD73 and A2A in inflammation observed in patients with T2D and obesity mediated via apoptosis.

  8. Faecalibacterium prausnitzii phylotypes in type two diabetic, obese, and lean control subjects.

    PubMed

    Hippe, B; Remely, M; Aumueller, E; Pointner, A; Magnet, U; Haslberger, A G

    2016-09-01

    Faecalibacterium prausnitzii is one of the main butyrate producers in the healthy human gut. Information on its genetic diversity is lacking, although two genetic phylotypes have been differentiated. In the present study, F. prausnitzii phylotypes were examined in faeces of obese and type two diabetes with similar eating behaviour compared to a lean control group. The purpose of the study was to analyse if an excessive butyrate production induced by different F. prausnitzii phylotypes discriminates between obese developing type two diabetes or not. The faecal samples were analysed for the total abundance of F. prausnitzii 16S rRNA copies, fragment lengths polymorphism, high resolution melt curve analysis (HRM) and the butyryl-CoA:acetate CoA-transferase gene copies and melt curve variances. The diabetic group was found to differ significantly from the lean control group in the results of qPCR, butyryl-CoA:acetyate CoA-transferase gene melt curve, and HRM. F. prausnitzii phylotypes differed in obese with and without developed diabetes type two. Different phylotypes of F. prausnitzii may lead to differences in the inflammatory genesis in the host. F. prausnitzii phylotypes may have an influence on developing type two diabetes and might also act as starting points for prevention and therapy of obesity associated disease.

  9. A prospective study of weight maintenance in obese subjects reduced to normal body weight without weight-loss training.

    PubMed

    Hensrud, D D; Weinsier, R L; Darnell, B E; Hunter, G R

    1994-11-01

    We examined the pattern of weight maintenance in 24 obese women [body mass index (BMI; in kg/m2) 27.6 +/- 0.4 who were provided foods for a balanced deficit diet until each had lost > or = 10 kg and attained normal body weight (BMI 22.9 +/- 0.4). At 1 y subjects had regained a mean of 42% of their weight loss, which increased to 87% at 4 y. At 4 y 44% of patients had regained < 75%, whereas 37% had regained > or = 100% of the weight originally lost. The amount of weight gained was markedly different from that observed in 24 pair-matched never-obese control subjects over the same length of follow-up. Because the results reported herein were obtained without teaching the subjects weight-control skills, they may be regarded as reflective of the natural history of weight maintenance in this population and may serve as a reference for various weight-intervention programs. The pattern of weight rebound observed in this study is very similar to the pattern observed in combined results from published diet and behavioral-modification programs, which raises important questions regarding the efficacy of these approaches in long-term weight maintenance.

  10. Complementary medicine.

    PubMed

    Schimpff, S C

    1997-07-01

    Complementary medicine can be described as additional approaches to care outside of mainstream medical practice but frequently based on traditional practices of nonwestern cultures. These include acupuncture, meditation, massage, diet manipulation, and many others. Recent reviews demonstrate wide and frequent use of these measures, often without concurrent discussion with the patient's physician. One estimate is that more than $13 billion is spent annually on complementary techniques in the United States alone. Many patients with cancer turn to these techniques. Care givers need to recognize this trend, learn about complementary medicine, and guide patients in their proper application when appropriate.

  11. Effects of Acute Ingestion of Native Banana Starch on Glycemic Response Evaluated by Continuous Glucose Monitoring in Obese and Lean Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez-Domínguez, Guadalupe; Ble-Castillo, Jorge L.; Aparicio-Trápala, María A.; Juárez-Rojop, Isela E.; Tovilla-Zárate, Carlos A.; Ble-Castillo, Deysi J.; García-Vázquez, Carlos; Olvera-Hernández, Viridiana; Pérez-Pimienta, Bedelia; Diaz-Zagoya, Juan C.; Mendez, José D.

    2015-01-01

    An abnormal glycemic profile, including postprandial glycemia and acute glucose spikes, precedes the onset of overt diabetes in obese subjects. Previous studies have shown the beneficial effects of chronic native banana starch (NBS) supplementation. In this study, we examined the effects of acute ingestion of NBS on glycemic profiles by means of continuous glucose monitoring in obese and lean subjects. In a crossover study, obese and lean subjects consumed beverages containing either 38.3 g of NBS or 38.3 g of digestible corn starch (DCS) twice daily during 4 days. On day 5, a 3-h meal tolerance test (MTT) was performed to evaluate glucose and insulin responses. After 1 week of washout period, treatments were inverted. NBS supplementation reduced the 48-h glycemia AUC in lean, obese, and in the combined group of lean and obese subjects in comparison with DCS. Postprandial glucose and insulin responses at MTT were reduced after NBS in comparison with DCS in all groups. However, no changes were observed in glycemic variability (GV) indexes between groups. In conclusion, acute NBS supplementation improved postprandial glucose and insulin responses in obese and lean subjects during 48 h of everyday life and at MTT. Further research to elucidate the mechanism behind these changes is required. PMID:26154657

  12. EVALUATION OF THE THORACOABDOMINAL MOBILITY OF OBESE SUBJECTS IN PRE-BARIATRIC SURGERY

    PubMed Central

    VELOSO, Ana Paula Limongi Richardelli; CUSMANICH, Karla Garcez

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Obesity can affect the thorax, diaphragm, and alterations in respiratory function even if the lungs are within normality. The respiratory compliance is very reduced by the increase in fat mass. Aim: To evaluate the effect of the physical therapeutic respiratory exercises on the thoracoabdominal mobility of obese individuals in pre-bariatric surgery Methods: Cross-sectional and descriptive study, which used the cirtometry (axillary, xiphoid and abdominal) to evaluate the mobility of 74 individuals, 27 men and 47 women, in pre-bariatric surgery, assisted by the team EMAD, after eight weeks of physiotherapy, following a protocol of exercises, reevaluating and compared the measures pre and post intervention. Results: Had positive correlation abdominal mobility in the total volume of all participants (p=0.010) and also for all the measures in the measurement of residual volume in three levels (p=0.000). Comparing genders, in total volume, cirtometry abdominal greater for women (p=0.015) when compared to men and residual volume, significance for either men or women in all measurements (p=0.000). Conclusion: Obese patients that underwent the physiotherapeutic treatment during the preoperative period, had pré respiratory dynamics improved by the increase in the mobility of the chest cavity and by the improvement of respiratory conscience. PMID:27683774

  13. In vitro characterization of the impact of different substrates on metabolite production, energy extraction and composition of gut microbiota from lean and obese subjects.

    PubMed

    Aguirre, Marisol; Jonkers, Daisy M A E; Troost, Freddy J; Roeselers, Guus; Venema, Koen

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of galacto-oligosaccharides, lactulose, apple fiber and sugar beet pectin on the composition and activity of human colonic microbiota of lean and obese healthy subjects using an in vitro model of the proximal colon: TIM-2. Substrate fermentation was assessed by measuring the production of short-chain and branched-chain fatty acids, lactate and ammonia and by studying the composition of the bacterial communities over time. The results suggest that energy harvest (in terms of metabolites) of lean and obese microbiotas is different and may depend on the fermentable substrate. For galacto-oligosaccharides and lactulose, the cumulative amount of short-chain fatty acids plus lactate produced in TIM-2 was lower in the fermentation experiments with the lean microbiota (123 and 155 mmol, respectively) compared to the obese (162 and 173 mmol, respectively). This was reversed for the pectin and the fiber. The absolute amount produced of short-chain fatty acids including lactate was higher after 72 h in the fermentation experiments with apple fiber-L (108 mmol) than with apple fiber-O (92 mmol). Sugar beet-L was also higher (130 mmol) compared to sugar beet-O (103 mmol). Galacto-oligosaccharides and lactulose boosted the balance of health-promoting over toxic metabolites produced by the microbiota from obese subjects. Firmicutes were more predominant in the inoculum prepared from feces of obese subjects compared to lean subjects. The average abundance at time zero was 92% and 74%, respectively. On the other hand, Bacteroidetes were more dominant in the microbiota prepared with homogenates from lean subjects with an average abundance of 22% compared with the microbiota prepared with homogenates from obese subjects (3.6%). This study brings evidence that different fermentable carbohydrates are fermented differently by lean and obese microbiotas, which contributes to the understanding of the role of diet and the microbiota in

  14. In vitro characterization of the impact of different substrates on metabolite production, energy extraction and composition of gut microbiota from lean and obese subjects.

    PubMed

    Aguirre, Marisol; Jonkers, Daisy M A E; Troost, Freddy J; Roeselers, Guus; Venema, Koen

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of galacto-oligosaccharides, lactulose, apple fiber and sugar beet pectin on the composition and activity of human colonic microbiota of lean and obese healthy subjects using an in vitro model of the proximal colon: TIM-2. Substrate fermentation was assessed by measuring the production of short-chain and branched-chain fatty acids, lactate and ammonia and by studying the composition of the bacterial communities over time. The results suggest that energy harvest (in terms of metabolites) of lean and obese microbiotas is different and may depend on the fermentable substrate. For galacto-oligosaccharides and lactulose, the cumulative amount of short-chain fatty acids plus lactate produced in TIM-2 was lower in the fermentation experiments with the lean microbiota (123 and 155 mmol, respectively) compared to the obese (162 and 173 mmol, respectively). This was reversed for the pectin and the fiber. The absolute amount produced of short-chain fatty acids including lactate was higher after 72 h in the fermentation experiments with apple fiber-L (108 mmol) than with apple fiber-O (92 mmol). Sugar beet-L was also higher (130 mmol) compared to sugar beet-O (103 mmol). Galacto-oligosaccharides and lactulose boosted the balance of health-promoting over toxic metabolites produced by the microbiota from obese subjects. Firmicutes were more predominant in the inoculum prepared from feces of obese subjects compared to lean subjects. The average abundance at time zero was 92% and 74%, respectively. On the other hand, Bacteroidetes were more dominant in the microbiota prepared with homogenates from lean subjects with an average abundance of 22% compared with the microbiota prepared with homogenates from obese subjects (3.6%). This study brings evidence that different fermentable carbohydrates are fermented differently by lean and obese microbiotas, which contributes to the understanding of the role of diet and the microbiota in

  15. In Vitro Characterization of the Impact of Different Substrates on Metabolite Production, Energy Extraction and Composition of Gut Microbiota from Lean and Obese Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Aguirre, Marisol; Jonkers, Daisy M. A. E.; Troost, Freddy J.; Roeselers, Guus; Venema, Koen

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of galacto-oligosaccharides, lactulose, apple fiber and sugar beet pectin on the composition and activity of human colonic microbiota of lean and obese healthy subjects using an in vitro model of the proximal colon: TIM-2. Substrate fermentation was assessed by measuring the production of short-chain and branched-chain fatty acids, lactate and ammonia and by studying the composition of the bacterial communities over time. The results suggest that energy harvest (in terms of metabolites) of lean and obese microbiotas is different and may depend on the fermentable substrate. For galacto-oligosaccharides and lactulose, the cumulative amount of short-chain fatty acids plus lactate produced in TIM-2 was lower in the fermentation experiments with the lean microbiota (123 and 155 mmol, respectively) compared to the obese (162 and 173 mmol, respectively). This was reversed for the pectin and the fiber. The absolute amount produced of short-chain fatty acids including lactate was higher after 72 h in the fermentation experiments with apple fiber-L (108 mmol) than with apple fiber-O (92 mmol). Sugar beet-L was also higher (130 mmol) compared to sugar beet-O (103 mmol). Galacto-oligosaccharides and lactulose boosted the balance of health-promoting over toxic metabolites produced by the microbiota from obese subjects. Firmicutes were more predominant in the inoculum prepared from feces of obese subjects compared to lean subjects. The average abundance at time zero was 92% and 74%, respectively. On the other hand, Bacteroidetes were more dominant in the microbiota prepared with homogenates from lean subjects with an average abundance of 22% compared with the microbiota prepared with homogenates from obese subjects (3.6%). This study brings evidence that different fermentable carbohydrates are fermented differently by lean and obese microbiotas, which contributes to the understanding of the role of diet and the microbiota in

  16. Complementary Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... someone living with PD, this section focuses on herbs, vitamins and supplements. If you are considering complementary ... product recommendations regarding such products. Key Points Most herbs and supplements have not been rigorously studied as ...

  17. The relationship between serum 25-hydroxy vitamin D concentration and obesity in type 2 diabetic patients and healthy subjects

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Both obesity and type 2 diabetes are associated with hypovitaminosis D. The aims of this study were to investigate the association of serum 25-hydroxy vitamin D (25(OH) D) and parathyroid hormone (PTH) concentration with body mass index (BMI) in type 2 diabetic patients compared to control subjects and their predicting role in obesity. Methods This cross-sectional study was conducted on 200 subjects (100 type 2 diabetics and 100 healthy controls). Concentration of 25(OH) D, calcium, phosphorous, parathyroid hormone (PTH), fasting blood glucose, HbA1c, serum insulin, homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) was determined in the fasting samples. Anthropometric measurements including body mass index (BMI) were also measured. Results Eighty-five percent of type 2 diabetics and 79% of healthy subjects were suffering from vitamin D deficiency or insufficiency. Serum concentration of 25(OH) D (22.08 ± 15.20 ng/ml) (r = −0.11, P = 0.04) and calcium (8.94 ± 0.59 mg/dl) (r = −2.25, P = 0.04) has significant statistically with BMI in type 2 diabetic patients. Serum concentration of PTH has non-significantly associated with BMI in diabetic patients and healthy subjects. Conclusion Serum levels of vitamin D inversely and PTH positively are associated with BMI after adjusted for age, gender and serum calcium in both type 2 diabetic patients and healthy subjects. These associations were statistically significant for serum concentration of vitamin D and calcium only in diabetic patients. So the status of vitamin D is considered as an important factor in type 2 diabetic patients. PMID:23497722

  18. Cardiorespiratory Fitness and Insulin Sensitivity in Overweight or Obese Subjects May Be Linked Through Intrahepatic Lipid Content

    PubMed Central

    Haufe, Sven; Engeli, Stefan; Budziarek, Petra; Utz, Wolfgang; Schulz-Menger, Jeanette; Hermsdorf, Mario; Wiesner, Susanne; Otto, Christoph; Haas, Verena; de Greiff, Armin; Luft, Friedrich C.; Boschmann, Michael; Jordan, Jens

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Low cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) predisposes one to cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes in part independently of body weight. Given the close relationship between intrahepatic lipid content (IHL) and insulin sensitivity, we hypothesized that the direct relationship between fitness and insulin sensitivity may be explained by IHL. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We included 138 overweight to obese, otherwise healthy subjects (aged 43.6 ± 8.9 years, BMI 33.8 ± 4 kg/m2). Body composition was estimated by bioimpedance analyses. Abdominal fat distribution, intramyocellular, and IHL were assessed by magnetic resonance spectroscopy and tomography. Incremental exercise testing was performed to estimate an individual's CRF. Insulin sensitivity was determined during an oral glucose tolerance test. RESULTS For all subjects, CRF was related to insulin sensitivity (r = 0.32, P < 0.05), IHL (r = −0.27, P < 0.05), and visceral (r = −0.25, P < 0.05) and total fat mass (r = −0.32, P < 0.05), but not to intramyocellular lipids (r = −0.08, NS). Insulin sensitivity correlated significantly with all fat depots. In multivariate regression analyses, independent predictors of insulin sensitivity were IHL, visceral fat, and fitness (r2 = −0.43, P < 0.01, r2 = −0.34, and r2 = 0.29, P < 0.05, respectively). However, the positive correlation between fitness and insulin sensitivity was abolished after adjustment for IHL (r = 0.16, NS), whereas it remained significant when adjusted for visceral or total body fat. Further, when subjects were grouped into high versus low IHL, insulin sensitivity was higher in those subjects with low IHL, irrespective of fitness levels. CONCLUSIONS Our study suggests that the positive effect of increased CRF on insulin sensitivity in overweight to obese subjects may be mediated indirectly through IHL reduction. PMID:20357364

  19. Complementary Study

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, H.

    2009-02-19

    In this lecture, it is emphasized that sufficient resolution of scientific issues for a fusion energy reactor can be given by complementary studies. Key scientific issues for a fusion energy reactor and ITER addressed by a complementary study in the Large Helical Device (LHD) are discussed. It should be noted that ITER is definitely a necessary condition but not a sufficient condition. Helical systems including stellarators and heliotrons are defined as alternative concepts. These approaches also aim at a fusion energy reactor based on their own concept and simultaneously benefit progress in tokamaks, more specifically ITER itself. The exact science to manage a 3-D geometry has been being developed in helical systems. A physical model with much accuracy and breadth will demonstrate its applicability to ITER. Topics to validate ''complementary'' approaches such as 3-D equilibrium, interchange MHD mode, control of radial electric field and structure formation, dynamics of a magnetic island, density limit and edge plasmas are discussed. Complementary is not Supplementary. ITER is complementary to development of a helical fusion energy reactor as well. Complementary approaches transcend existing disciplinary horizons and enable big challenges.

  20. Internal Fat and Cardiometabolic Risk Factors Following a Meal-Replacement Regimen vs. Comprehensive Lifestyle Changes in Obese Subjects

    PubMed Central

    König, Daniel; Zdzieblik, Denise; Deibert, Peter; Berg, Aloys; Gollhofer, Albert; Büchert, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of a meal-replacement regimen vs. comprehensive lifestyle changes in overweight or obese subjects on intra-abdominal fat stores (Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) measurements) and cardiometabolic risk factors. Forty-two obese men (n = 18) and women (n = 24) (age 49 ± 8 years; weight 96.3 ± 12.1 kg; BMI 32.7 ± 2.3 kg/m2) were selected for this randomized parallel-group design investigation. Subjects in the lifestyle group (LS-G; n = 22) received dietary counselling sessions and instructions how to increase physical activity. In the meal replacement group (MR-G; n = 20) meals were replaced by a low-calorie drink high in soy protein. After six months, subjects in the LS-G lost 8.88 ± 6.24 kg and subjects in the MR-G lost 7.1 ± 2.33 kg; p < 0.01 for changes within groups; no significant differences were found between the groups. Lean body mass remained constant in both intervention groups. MRI analyses showed that internal fat was significantly reduced in both groups to a comparable amount; the higher fat loss in the LS-G in the abdominal area was due to a higher reduction in subcutaneous fat. Both interventions significantly reduced components of the cardiometabolic risk profile and leptin levels. The decrease in the adipokines fetuin A and resistin was more pronounced in the MR-G. In conclusion, both interventions significantly reduced body weight, total fat mass and internal abdominal fat while preserving lean body mass. The reduction in the adipokines fetuin A and resistin was more pronounced in the meal replacement group suggesting an additional effect of soy protein components. PMID:26633473

  1. An obesity provoking behaviour negatively influences young normal weight subjects' health related quality of life and causes depressive symptoms.

    PubMed

    Ernersson, Asa; Frisman, Gunilla Hollman; Sepa Frostell, Anneli; Nyström, Fredrik H; Lindström, Torbjörn

    2010-12-01

    In many parts of the world the prevalence of a sedentary lifestyle in combination with high consumption of food has increased, which contributes to increased risk for becoming overweight. Our primary aim was, in an intervention, to examine the influence on health related quality of life (HRQoL) and mood in young normal weight subjects of both sexes, when adopting an obesity provoking behaviour by increasing the energy intake via fast food and simultaneously adopting a sedentary lifestyle. A secondary aim was to follow-up possible long-term effects on HRQoL and mood 6 and 12 months after this short-term intervention. In this prospective study, 18 healthy normal weight subjects (mean age 26±6.6 years), mainly university students were prescribed doubled energy intake, and maximum 5000 steps/day, during 4 weeks. An age and sex matched control group (n=18), who were asked to have unchanged eating habits and physical activity, was recruited. Before and after the intervention questionnaires including Short Form-36, Hospital Anxiety Depression scale, Center of Epidemiological Studies Depression scale, Sense of Coherence and Mastery scale were completed by the subjects in the intervention group and by the controls with 4 weeks interval. Six and 12 months after the intervention the subjects underwent the same procedure as at baseline and the controls completed the same questionnaires. During the intervention, subjects in the intervention group increased their bodyweight and developed markedly lower physical and mental health scores on Short Form-36 as well as depressive symptoms while no changes appeared in the controls. The increase of depressive symptoms was associated with increases of energy intake, body weight and body fat. When followed up, 6 and 12 months after the intervention, physical and mental health had returned completely to baseline values, despite somewhat increased body weight. In conclusion, adopting obesity provoking behaviour for 4 weeks decreases HRQo

  2. Gut hormone secretion, gastric emptying, and glycemic responses to erythritol and xylitol in lean and obese subjects.

    PubMed

    Wölnerhanssen, Bettina K; Cajacob, Lucian; Keller, Nino; Doody, Alison; Rehfeld, Jens F; Drewe, Juergen; Peterli, Ralph; Beglinger, Christoph; Meyer-Gerspach, Anne Christin

    2016-06-01

    With the increasing prevalence of obesity and a possible association with increasing sucrose consumption, nonnutritive sweeteners are gaining popularity. Given that some studies indicate that artificial sweeteners might have adverse effects, alternative solutions are sought. Xylitol and erythritol have been known for a long time and their beneficial effects on caries prevention and potential health benefits in diabetic patients have been demonstrated in several studies. Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and cholecystokinin (CCK) are released from the gut in response to food intake, promote satiation, reduce gastric emptying (GE), and modulate glucose homeostasis. Although glucose ingestion stimulates sweet taste receptors in the gut and leads to incretin and gastrointestinal hormone release, the effects of xylitol and erythritol have not been well studied. Ten lean and 10 obese volunteers were given 75 g of glucose, 50 g of xylitol, or 75 g of erythritol in 300 ml of water or placebo (water) by a nasogastric tube. We examined plasma glucose, insulin, active GLP-1, CCK, and GE with a [(13)C]sodium acetate breath test and assessed subjective feelings of satiation. Xylitol and erythritol led to a marked increase in CCK and GLP-1, whereas insulin and plasma glucose were not (erythritol) or only slightly (xylitol) affected. Both xylitol and erythritol induced a significant retardation in GE. Subjective feelings of appetite were not significantly different after carbohydrate intake compared with placebo. In conclusion, acute ingestion of erythritol and xylitol stimulates gut hormone release and slows down gastric emptying, whereas there is no or only little effect on insulin release. PMID:27117004

  3. Gut hormone secretion, gastric emptying, and glycemic responses to erythritol and xylitol in lean and obese subjects.

    PubMed

    Wölnerhanssen, Bettina K; Cajacob, Lucian; Keller, Nino; Doody, Alison; Rehfeld, Jens F; Drewe, Juergen; Peterli, Ralph; Beglinger, Christoph; Meyer-Gerspach, Anne Christin

    2016-06-01

    With the increasing prevalence of obesity and a possible association with increasing sucrose consumption, nonnutritive sweeteners are gaining popularity. Given that some studies indicate that artificial sweeteners might have adverse effects, alternative solutions are sought. Xylitol and erythritol have been known for a long time and their beneficial effects on caries prevention and potential health benefits in diabetic patients have been demonstrated in several studies. Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and cholecystokinin (CCK) are released from the gut in response to food intake, promote satiation, reduce gastric emptying (GE), and modulate glucose homeostasis. Although glucose ingestion stimulates sweet taste receptors in the gut and leads to incretin and gastrointestinal hormone release, the effects of xylitol and erythritol have not been well studied. Ten lean and 10 obese volunteers were given 75 g of glucose, 50 g of xylitol, or 75 g of erythritol in 300 ml of water or placebo (water) by a nasogastric tube. We examined plasma glucose, insulin, active GLP-1, CCK, and GE with a [(13)C]sodium acetate breath test and assessed subjective feelings of satiation. Xylitol and erythritol led to a marked increase in CCK and GLP-1, whereas insulin and plasma glucose were not (erythritol) or only slightly (xylitol) affected. Both xylitol and erythritol induced a significant retardation in GE. Subjective feelings of appetite were not significantly different after carbohydrate intake compared with placebo. In conclusion, acute ingestion of erythritol and xylitol stimulates gut hormone release and slows down gastric emptying, whereas there is no or only little effect on insulin release.

  4. Are there healthy obese?

    PubMed

    Griera Borrás, José Luis; Contreras Gilbert, José

    2014-01-01

    It is currently postulated that not all obese individuals have to be considered as pathological subjects. From 10% to 20% of obese people studied do not show the metabolic changes common in obese patients. The term "healthy obese" has been coined to refer to these patients and differentiate them from the larger and more common group of pathological obese subjects. However, the definition of "healthy obese" is not clear. Use of "healthy obese" as a synonym for obese without metabolic complications is risky. Clinical markers such as insulin resistance are used to identify this pathology. It is not clear that healthy obese subjects have lower morbidity and mortality than pathologically obese patients. According to some authors, healthy obese would represent an early stage in evolution towards pathological obesity. There is no agreement as to the need to treat healthy obese subjects.

  5. Are there healthy obese?

    PubMed

    Griera Borrás, José Luis; Contreras Gilbert, José

    2014-01-01

    It is currently postulated that not all obese individuals have to be considered as pathological subjects. From 10% to 20% of obese people studied do not show the metabolic changes common in obese patients. The term "healthy obese" has been coined to refer to these patients and differentiate them from the larger and more common group of pathological obese subjects. However, the definition of "healthy obese" is not clear. Use of "healthy obese" as a synonym for obese without metabolic complications is risky. Clinical markers such as insulin resistance are used to identify this pathology. It is not clear that healthy obese subjects have lower morbidity and mortality than pathologically obese patients. According to some authors, healthy obese would represent an early stage in evolution towards pathological obesity. There is no agreement as to the need to treat healthy obese subjects. PMID:24210176

  6. Short term effects of a low-carbohydrate diet in overweight and obese subjects with low HDL-C levels

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to evaluate short-term effects of a low-carbohydrate diet in overweight and obese subjects with low HDL-C levels. Methods Overweight (BMI between 25-30 kg/m2) or obese (BMI over 30 kg/m2) subjects with low HDL-C levels (men with HDL-C <1.03, women <1.29 mmol/l) were invited to the study. A 1400 kcal 75-gram carbohydrate (CHO) diet was given to women and an 1800 kcal 100-gram CHO diet was given to men for four weeks. The distribution of daily energy of the prescribed diet was 21-22% from CHO, 26-29% from protein and 49-53% from fat. Subjects completed a three-day dietary intake record before each visit. Anthropometric indices, body fat ratio, blood lipids, glucose and insulin were measured. Baseline and week-four results were compared with a Wilcoxon signed ranks test. Results Twenty-five women and 18 men participated. Basal median LDL-C level of men was 3.11 and basal median LDL-C level of women was 3.00 mmol/l. After four weeks of a low-carbohydrate diet, the median energy intake decreased from 1901 to 1307 kcal/day, daily energy from carbohydrate from 55% to 33%, body weight from 87.7 to 83.0 kg and HDL-C increased from 0.83 to 0.96 mmol/l in men (p < 0.002, for all). After four weeks of a low-carbohydrate diet, the median energy intake tended to decrease (from 1463 to 1243 kcal, p = 0.052), daily energy from carbohydrate decreased from 53% to 30% (p < 0.001) and body weight decreased from 73.2 to 70.8 kg (p < 0.001) in women, but HDL-C did not significantly change (from 1.03 to 1.01 mmol/l, p = 0.165). There were significant decreases in body mass index, waist circumference, body fat ratio, systolic blood pressure, total cholesterol, triglyceride and insulin levels in all subjects. Conclusions HDL-C levels increased significantly with energy restriction, carbohydrate restriction and weight loss in men. HDL-C levels didn't change in women in whom there was no significant energy restriction but a significant carbohydrate

  7. Bariatric Surgery Restores Cardiac and Sudomotor Autonomic C-Fiber Dysfunction towards Normal in Obese Subjects with Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Lieb, David C.; Wohlgemuth, Stephen D.

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim was to evaluate the impact of bariatric surgery on cardiac and sudomotor autonomic C-fiber function in obese subjects with and without Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), using sudorimetry and heart rate variability (HRV) analysis. Method Patients were evaluated at baseline, 4, 12 and 24 weeks after vertical sleeve gastrectomy or Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. All subjects were assessed using SudoscanTM to measure electrochemical skin conductance (ESC) of hands and feet, time and frequency domain analysis of HRV, Neurologic Impairment Scores of lower legs (NIS-LL), quantitative sensory tests (QST) and sural nerve conduction studies. Results Seventy subjects completed up to 24-weeks of follow-up (24 non-T2DM, 29 pre-DM and 17 T2DM). ESC of feet improved significantly towards normal in T2DM subjects (Baseline = 56.71±3.98 vs 12-weeks = 62.69±3.71 vs 24-weeks = 70.13±2.88, p<0.005). HRV improved significantly in T2DM subjects (Baseline sdNN (sample difference of the beat to beat (NN) variability) = 32.53±4.28 vs 12-weeks = 44.94±4.18 vs 24-weeks = 49.71±5.19, p<0,001 and baseline rmsSD (root mean square of the difference of successive R-R intervals) = 23.88±4.67 vs 12-weeks = 38.06±5.39 vs 24-weeks = 43.0±6.25, p<0.0005). Basal heart rate (HR) improved significantly in all groups, as did weight, body mass index (BMI), percent body fat, waist circumference and high-density lipoprotein (HDL). Glycated hemoglobin (HbA1C), insulin and HOMA2-IR (homeostatic model assessment) levels improved significantly in pre-DM and T2DM subjects. On multiple linear regression analysis, feet ESC improvement was independently associated with A1C, insulin and HOMA2-IR levels at baseline, and improvement in A1C at 24 weeks, after adjusting for age, gender and ethnicity. Sudomotor function improvement was not associated with baseline weight, BMI, % body fat or lipid levels. Improvement in basal HR was also independently associated with A1C, insulin and HOMA2-IR levels at

  8. Dietary Interventions and Changes in Cardio-Metabolic Parameters in Metabolically Healthy Obese Subjects: A Systematic Review with Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Stelmach-Mardas, Marta; Walkowiak, Jarosław

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this systematic review was to assess the effect of diet on changes in parameters describing the body size phenotype of metabolically healthy obese subjects. The databases Medline, Scopus, Web of Knowledge and Embase were searched for clinical studies carried out between 1958 and June 2016 that reported the effect of dietary intervention on BMI, blood pressure, concentration of fasting triglyceride (TG), high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), fasting glucose level, the homoeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) and high sensitivity C-Reactive Protein (hsCRP) in metabolically healthy, obese subjects. Twelve clinical studies met inclusion criteria. The combined analyzed population consists of 1827 subjects aged 34.4 to 61.1 with a BMI > 30 kg/m2. Time of intervention ranged from eight to 104 weeks. The baseline characteristics related to lipid profile were more favorable for metabolically healthy obese than for metabolically unhealthy obese. The meta-analyses revealed a significant associations between restricted energy diet and BMI (95% confidence interval (CI): −0.88, −0.19), blood pressure (systolic blood pressure (SBP): −4.73 mmHg; 95% CI: −7.12, −2.33; and diastolic blood pressure (DBP): −2.75 mmHg; 95% CI: −4.30, −1.21) and TG (−0.11 mmol/l; 95% CI: −0.16, −0.06). Changes in fasting glucose, HOMA-IR and hsCRP did not show significant changes. Sufficient evidence was not found to support the use of specific diets in metabolically healthy obese subjects. This analysis suggests that the effect of caloric restriction exerts its effects through a reduction in BMI, blood pressure and triglycerides in metabolically healthy obese (MHO) patients. PMID:27483307

  9. Effect of a satiating meal on the concentrations of procolipase propeptide in the serum and urine of normal and morbidly obese subjects.

    PubMed

    Bowyer, R C; Rowston, W M; Jehanli, A M; Lacey, J H; Hermon-Taylor, J

    1993-11-01

    The effect of a satiating meal on the serum and urinary concentrations of procolipase propeptide (Ala-Pro-Gly-Pro-Arg, APGPR) immunoreactivity, as measured by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) specific for free APGPR, has been studied in normal and morbidly obese human subjects. The normal subjects displayed a biphasic response with coordinate increases in both serum and urine APGPR immunoreactivity both occurring within the first two hours after the meal. In two of three of the morbidly obese subjects, this early rise in APGPR concentration in urine was not seen but was followed by a slow rise in urinary APGPR immunoreactivity at four to six hours. In both the normal and obese groups, the urinary immunoreactive signal was found to coelute with synthetic APGPR on gel chromatography. In rats, procolipase propeptide (Val-Pro-Asp-Pro-Arg, VPDPR) specifically inhibits fat intake early in the postprandial period when given peripherally or centrally. This study suggests that in humans APGPR reaches the circulation shortly after feeding and is excreted in the urine. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that human procolipase propeptide may also act as a satiety signal. In addition the late appearance of the peptide in some of the morbidly obese patients could be associated with perturbation of appetite control in these subjects.

  10. Risk of obesity and type 2 diabetes with tumor necrosis factor-α 308G/A gene polymorphism in metabolic syndrome and coronary artery disease subjects.

    PubMed

    Sobti, Ranbir Chander; Kler, Rupinder; Sharma, Yash Paul; Talwar, Kewal Krishan; Singh, Neha

    2012-01-01

    Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha (TNF-α) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance and obesity. The increased expression of TNF-α in adipose tissue is known to induce insulin resistance, and a polymorphism at position -308 in the promoter region of TNF-α gene may lead to its increased transcription in adipocytes. The objective of this work was to determine the role of TNFα-308G/A gene polymorphism in metabolic syndrome (MetS) and coronary artery disease (CAD) with obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). A total of 250 MetS and 224 CAD patients and 214 controls were studied. TNFα-308G/A polymorphism was detected from the whole blood genomic DNA using PCR-amplification refractory mutation system. The 2 × 2 contingency tables and multiple regression analysis were used for determining the association of genotypes with obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in MetS and CAD subjects. In CAD subjects with T2DM, the AG genotypes showed a very strong association (P < 0.0001; OR 0.194, 95%CI 0.103-0.365). In CAD subjects with obesity, the AA (P = 0.049; OR 2.449) and AG genotypes showed a strong association (P < 0.0001; OR 0.206). In both males and females, AG genotype and G allele (P < 0.0001) showed a strong association with T2DM. In MetS subjects with T2DM, there was a strong association with AG (P = 0.002; OR 4.483) as well as AA+AG genotypes (P = 0.002; OR 4.255). The AA and AG genotype (P = 0.001; OR 5.497) in males showed a strong 4.6- and 5.4-fold risks, respectively, with obesity. In females, only AG genotype showed a strong 4.5-fold risk with obesity (P = 0.001). In MetS subjects with obesity, the AA genotype (P = 0.043; OR 3.352) as well as AG showed a very strong association (P = 0.001; OR 5.011). The AG genotypes showed a high 3.5-fold risk with T2DM in females (P = 0.011). In CAD subjects, AG genotype showed a protective effect in both obese males and females (P < 0.0001). Heterozygous TNFα-308G/A gene variant may be an important

  11. Effect of sitagliptin on epicardial fat thickness in subjects with type 2 diabetes and obesity: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Lima-Martínez, Marcos M; Paoli, Mariela; Rodney, Marianela; Balladares, Nathalie; Contreras, Miguel; D'Marco, Luis; Iacobellis, Gianluca

    2016-03-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the effect of sitagliptin addition on the epicardial adipose tissue (EAT) thickness in subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus inadequately controlled on metformin monotherapy. This was a 24-week interventional pilot study in 26 consecutive type 2 diabetic patients, 14 females and 12 males average age of 43.8 ± 9.0 years, with Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) ≥ 7% on metformin monotherapy. Subjects who met the inclusion criteria were added on sitagliptin and started on sitagliptin/metformin combination at the dosage of 50 mg/1000 mg twice daily. EAT and visceral and total body fat were measured, respectively, with echocardiography and bioelectrical impedance analysis at baseline and after 24 weeks of sitagliptin/metformin treatment in each subject. HbA1c and plasma lipids were also measured. EAT decreased significantly from 9.98 ± 2.63 to 8.10 ± 2.11 mm, p = 0.001, accounting for a percentage of reduction (∆%) of -15% after 24 weeks of sitagliptin addition, whereas total body fat percentage, visceral fat, and body mass index (BMI), decreased by 8, 12, and 7%, respectively (p = 0.001 for all). After 6 month, EAT ∆% was significantly correlated with ∆% of visceral fat (r = 0.456; p = 0.01), whereas no correlation with either BMI ∆% (r = 0.292; p = 0.147) or HbA1c ∆% was found. The addition of Sitagliptin produced a significant and rapid reduction of EAT, marker of organ-specific visceral fat, in overweight/obese individuals with type 2 diabetes inadequately controlled on metformin monotherapy. EAT as measured with ultrasound can serve as no invasive and accurate marker of visceral fat changes during pharmaceutical interventions targeting the fat. PMID:26233684

  12. Effect of sitagliptin on epicardial fat thickness in subjects with type 2 diabetes and obesity: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Lima-Martínez, Marcos M; Paoli, Mariela; Rodney, Marianela; Balladares, Nathalie; Contreras, Miguel; D'Marco, Luis; Iacobellis, Gianluca

    2016-03-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the effect of sitagliptin addition on the epicardial adipose tissue (EAT) thickness in subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus inadequately controlled on metformin monotherapy. This was a 24-week interventional pilot study in 26 consecutive type 2 diabetic patients, 14 females and 12 males average age of 43.8 ± 9.0 years, with Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) ≥ 7% on metformin monotherapy. Subjects who met the inclusion criteria were added on sitagliptin and started on sitagliptin/metformin combination at the dosage of 50 mg/1000 mg twice daily. EAT and visceral and total body fat were measured, respectively, with echocardiography and bioelectrical impedance analysis at baseline and after 24 weeks of sitagliptin/metformin treatment in each subject. HbA1c and plasma lipids were also measured. EAT decreased significantly from 9.98 ± 2.63 to 8.10 ± 2.11 mm, p = 0.001, accounting for a percentage of reduction (∆%) of -15% after 24 weeks of sitagliptin addition, whereas total body fat percentage, visceral fat, and body mass index (BMI), decreased by 8, 12, and 7%, respectively (p = 0.001 for all). After 6 month, EAT ∆% was significantly correlated with ∆% of visceral fat (r = 0.456; p = 0.01), whereas no correlation with either BMI ∆% (r = 0.292; p = 0.147) or HbA1c ∆% was found. The addition of Sitagliptin produced a significant and rapid reduction of EAT, marker of organ-specific visceral fat, in overweight/obese individuals with type 2 diabetes inadequately controlled on metformin monotherapy. EAT as measured with ultrasound can serve as no invasive and accurate marker of visceral fat changes during pharmaceutical interventions targeting the fat.

  13. Onion peel extract reduces the percentage of body fat in overweight and obese subjects: a 12-week, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ji-Sook; Cha, Yong-Jun; Lee, Kyung-Hea

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES The anti-obesity effect of quercetin-rich onion peel extract (OPE) was suggested in rats, but information from human studies is limited. This study aimed to investigate the effects of OPE on the body composition of overweight and obese subjects. MATERIALS/METHODS In this 12-week, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study, parallel clinical trials were performed in overweight and obese Korean subjects. Randomly assigned subjects were instructed to take daily either the placebo (male, 6 and female, 30) or OPE capsules containing 100 mg of quercetin (male, 5 and female, 31). Body composition was measured by using bioimpedance and dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). Resting energy expenditure (REE) and respiratory quotient (RQ) were evaluated by using indirect calorie measurement methods. Fasting blood levels of glucose, insulin, lipids, and leptin were determined. RESULTS Quercetin-rich OPE supplementation significantly reduced the weight and percentage of body fat as measured by DXA (P = 0.02). These effects were not shown in the control group. Levels of blood glucose (P = 0.04) and leptin (P = 0.001 for placebo, P = 0.002 for OPE) decreased in both groups. Significant increases in REE and RQ were observed in both groups (P = 0.003 for placebo, P = 0.006 for OPE) and in the OPE group alone (P = 0.02), respectively. CONCLUSIONS Quercetin-rich OPE supplementation changed the body composition of the overweight and obese subjects. This result suggests a beneficial role of the anti-obesity effect of OPE human subjects. PMID:27087901

  14. Complementary corner.

    PubMed

    2003-01-01

    Interest in nutritional health products stems from a number of observations. These include documented nutritional/vitamin deficiencies even in early stages of HIV infection and malnutrition associated with increased risk of HIV disease progression. There is great controversy, however, over whether or not using supplements is always a good idea and if it provides benefits in the long run. There has also been long-standing interest in complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) approaches to managing HIV infection and various conditions associated with HIV. The CAMs most commonly used by people living with HIV are not drugs, herbs or other pharmacologic agents, but rather things like meditation, massage, energy healing, acupuncture and the like. The following article contains summary highlights of studies of nutritional health products and CAM approaches in the setting of HIV presented at the World AIDS Conference in Barcelona.

  15. Genes and lifestyle factors in obesity: results from 12 462 subjects from MONICA/KORA

    PubMed Central

    Holzapfel, Christina; Grallert, Harald; Huth, Cornelia; Wahl, Simone; Fischer, Beate; Döring, Angela; Rückert, Ina M; Hinney, Anke; Hebebrand, Johannes; Wichmann, H.-Erich; Hauner, Hans; Illig, Thomas; Heid, Iris M

    2011-01-01

    Background Data from meta-analyses of genome-wide association studies provided evidence for an association of polymorphisms with body mass index (BMI), and gene expression results indicated a role of these variants in the hypothalamus. It was consecutively hypothesized that these associations might be evoked by a modulation of nutritional intake or energy expenditure. Objective It was our aim to investigate the association of these genetic factors with BMI in a large homogenous population-based sample to explore the association of these polymorphisms with lifestyle factors related to nutritional intake or energy expenditure, and whether such lifestyle factors could be mediators of the detected single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-association with BMI. It was a further aim to compare the proportion of BMI explained by genetic factors with the one explained by lifestyle factors. Design The association of seven polymorphisms in or near the genes NEGR1, TMEM18, MTCH2, FTO, MC4R, SH2B1and KCTD15 was analyzed in 12 462 subjects from the population-based MONICA/KORA Augsburg study. Information on lifestyle factors was based on standardized questionnaires. For statistical analysis, regression-based models were used. Results The minor allele of polymorphism rs6548238 C>T (TMEM18) was associated with lower BMI (−0.418 kg/m2, p=1.22×10−8), and of polymorphisms rs9935401 G>A (FTO) and rs7498665 A>G (SH2B1) with increased BMI (0.290 kg/m2, p=2.85×10−7 and 0.145 kg/m2, p=9.83×10−3). The other polymorphisms were not significantly associated. Lifestyle factors were correlated with BMI and explained 0.037 % of the BMI variance as compared to 0.006 % of explained variance by the associated genetic factors. The genetic variants associated with BMI were not significantly associated with lifestyle factors and there was no evidence of lifestyle factors mediating the SNP-BMI association. Conclusions Our data first confirm the findings for TMEM18 with BMI in a single study on

  16. Higher baseline irisin concentrations are associated with greater reductions in glycemia and insulinemia after weight loss in obese subjects

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-Legarrea, P; de la Iglesia, R; Crujeiras, A B; Pardo, M; Casanueva, F F; Zulet, M A; Martinez, J A

    2014-01-01

    Irisin is assumed to be a relevant link between muscle and weight maintenance as well as to mediate exercise benefits on health. The aim of this study was to assess the possible associations between irisin levels and glucose homeostasis in obese subjects with metabolic syndrome (MetS) following an energy-restricted treatment. Ninety-six adults with excessive body weight and MetS features underwent a hypocaloric dietary pattern for 8 weeks, within the RESMENA randomized controlled trial (www.clinicaltrials.gov; NCT01087086). After the intervention, dietary restriction significantly reduced body weight and evidenced a dietary-induced decrease in circulating levels of irisin in parallel with improvements on glucose homeostasis markers. Interestingly, participants with higher irisin values at baseline (above the median) showed a greater reduction on glucose (P=0.022) and insulin (P=0.021) concentrations as well as on the homeostasis model assessment index (P=0.008) and triglycerides (P=0.006) after the dietary intervention, compared with those presenting low-irisin baseline values (below the median). Interestingly, a positive correlation between irisin and carbohydrate intake was found at the end of the experimental period. In conclusion, irisin appears to be involved in glucose metabolism regulation after a dietary-induced weight loss. PMID:24567125

  17. Complementary Effects of Genetic Variations in LEPR on Body Composition and Soluble Leptin Receptor Concentration after 3-Month Lifestyle Intervention in Prepubertal Obese Children.

    PubMed

    Gajewska, Joanna; Kuryłowicz, Alina; Mierzejewska, Ewa; Ambroszkiewicz, Jadwiga; Chełchowska, Magdalena; Weker, Halina; Puzianowska-Kuźnicka, Monika

    2016-01-01

    In obese individuals, weight loss might be affected by variants of the adipokine-encoding genes. We verified whether selected functional single nucleotide polymorphisms in LEP, LEPR and ADIPOQ are associated with changes in serum levels of the respective adipokines and weight loss in 100 prepubertal obese (SDS-BMI > 2) Caucasian children undergoing lifestyle intervention. Frequencies of the -2548G > A LEP, Q223R LEPR, K656N LEPR, -11377C > G and -11426A > G ADIPOQ polymorphisms were analyzed by restriction fragment length polymorphism. Serum adipokine and soluble leptin receptor (sOB-R) concentrations were measured using the ELISA method. Among the analyzed polymorphisms, only LEPR polymorphisms were associated with changes of SDS-BMI or sOB-R concentrations in children after therapy. Carriers of the wild-type K665N and at least one minor Q223R allele had the greatest likelihood of losing weight (OR = 5.09, p = 0.006), an increase in sOB-R (ptrend = 0.022) and decrease in SDS-BMI correlated with the decrease of fat mass (p < 0.001). In contrast, carrying of the wild-type Q223R and at least one minor K665N allele were associated with a decrease in sOB-R concentrations and a decrease in SDS-BMI correlated with a decrease in fat-free mass (p = 0.002). We suggest that the combination of different LEPR variants, not a single variant, might determine predisposition to weight loss in the prepubertal period. PMID:27240401

  18. Accumulation of triglyceride-rich lipoprotein in subjects with abdominal obesity: the biguanides and the prevention of the risk of obesity (BIGPRO) 1 study.

    PubMed

    Bard, J M; Charles, M A; Juhan-Vague, I; Vague, P; André, P; Safar, M; Fruchart, J C; Eschwege, E

    2001-03-01

    The present study represents a new insight into the Biguanides and the Prevention of the Risk of Obesity (BIGPRO) 1 study population at inclusion. This population, selected basically on the basis of a high waist-to-hip ratio (>/=0.95 for men and >/=0.80 for women), is supposed to represent a group of patients with insulin resistance. The present study was undergone to establish whether apolipoprotein C-III (apoC-III) and apolipoprotein E (apoE) associated with apo B (apoC-III LpB and apoE LpB, respectively), considered to be markers of remnant accumulation, play a role in the hypertriglyceridemia associated with insulin resistance and whether they are related to other biological abnormalities frequently observed in this syndrome. In this population, the concentration of the markers of remnant accumulation increases with triglyceride levels. Therefore, correlation studies were realized to assess the relative effect of insulin and the markers of remnant accumulation on triglyceride plasma level. As a first attempt, a simple correlation analysis revealed that insulin is positively related to the markers of remnant accumulation only in hypertriglyceridemic patients (triglycerides >/=1.7 mmol/L). To assess the independent contribution of these markers, insulin, and other parameters related to the plasma triglyceride concentration, a stepwise multiple regression analysis was run. Results revealed that insulin and the markers of remnant accumulation (specifically, apoE LpB) are independent contributors to the plasma triglyceride concentration. Markers of the endothelial damage, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, tissue plasminogen activator, and von Willebrand factor, which are often increased in the case of insulin resistance, were tested for their correlation with the markers of remnant accumulation. Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 is positively correlated with these markers only in hypertriglyceridemic male subjects. It is concluded that increased insulin levels

  19. Challenges in the management of type 2 diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular risk factors in obese subjects: what is the evidence and what are the myths?

    PubMed

    Chhabra, Lovely; Liti, Besiana; Kuraganti, Gayatri; Kaul, Sudesh; Trivedi, Nitin

    2013-01-01

    The increasing worldwide prevalence of diabetes mellitus and obesity has projected concerns for increasing burden of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. The dangers of obesity in adults and children have received more attention than ever in the recent years as more research data becomes available regarding the long-term health outcomes. Weight loss in obese and overweight subjects can be induced via intensive lifestyle modifications, medications, and/or bariatric surgery. These methods have been shown to confer overall health benefits; however, their effect on remission of preexisting diabetes mellitus and reduction in cardiovascular risk has been variable. Recent research data has offered a much better understanding of the pathophysiology and outcomes of these management strategies in obese patients. In this paper, the authors have summarized the results of major studies on remission of type 2 diabetes mellitus and reduction of cardiovascular events by weight loss induced by different methods. Furthermore, the paper aims to clarify various prevailing myths and practice patterns about obesity management among clinicians.

  20. Adipocytes, like their progenitors, contribute to inflammation of adipose tissues through promotion of Th-17 cells and activation of monocytes, in obese subjects.

    PubMed

    Chehimi, Marwa; Robert, Maud; Bechwaty, Michel El; Vial, Guillaume; Rieusset, Jennifer; Vidal, Hubert; Pirola, Luciano; Eljaafari, Assia

    2016-01-01

    Recently, we have reported that adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ASC) harvested from obese donors induce a pro-inflammatory environment when co-cultured with peripheral blood mononuclear cells (MNC), with a polarization of T cells toward the Th17 cell lineage, increased secretion of IL-1β and IL-6 pro-inflammatory cytokines, and down-regulation of Th1 cytokines, such as IFNγ and TNFα. However, whether differentiated adipocytes, like the aforementioned ASC, are pro-inflammatory in obese subject AT remained to be investigated. Herein, we isolated ASC from AT of obese donors and differentiated them into adipocytes, for either 8 or 14 d. We analyzed their capacity to activate blood MNC after stimulation with phytohemagglutinin A (PHA), or not, in co-culture assays. Our results showed that co-cultures of MNC with adipocytes, like with ASC, increased IL-17A, IL-1β, and IL-6 pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion. Moreover, like ASC, adipocytes down-regulated TNFα secretion by Th1 cells. As adipocytes differentiated from ASC of lean donors also promoted IL-17A secretion by MNC, an experimental model of high-fat versus chow diet mice was used and supported that adipocytes from obese, but not lean AT, are able to mediate IL-17A secretion by PHA-activated MNCs. In conclusion, our results suggest that, as ASC, adipocytes in obese AT might contribute to the establishment of a low-grade chronic inflammation state. PMID:27617173

  1. Mechanisms Regulating Insulin Response to Intragastric Glucose in Lean and Non-Diabetic Obese Subjects: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Parallel-Group Trial

    PubMed Central

    Meyer-Gerspach, Anne Christin; Cajacob, Lucian; Riva, Daniele; Herzog, Raphael; Drewe, Juergen; Beglinger, Christoph; Wölnerhanssen, Bettina K.

    2016-01-01

    Background/Objectives The changes in blood glucose concentrations that result from an oral glucose challenge are dependent on the rate of gastric emptying, the rate of glucose absorption and the rate of insulin-driven metabolism that include the incretins, glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide (GIP) and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1). The rate of insulin-driven metabolism is clearly altered in obese subjects, but it is controversial which of these factors is predominant. We aimed to quantify gastric emptying, plasma insulin, C-peptide, glucagon and glucose responses, as well as incretin hormone secretions in obese subjects and healthy controls during increasing glucose loads. Subjects/Methods The study was conducted as a randomized, double-blind, parallel-group trial in a hospital research unit. A total of 12 normal weight (6 men and 6 women) and 12 non-diabetic obese (BMI > 30, 6 men and 6 women) participants took part in the study. Subjects received intragastric loads of 10 g, 25 g and 75 g glucose dissolved in 300 ml tap water. Results Main outcome measures were plasma GLP-1 and GIP, plasma glucagon, glucose, insulin, C-peptide and gastric emptying. The primary findings are: i) insulin resistance (P < 0.001) and hyperinsulinemia (P < 0.001); ii) decreased insulin disposal (P < 0.001); iii) trend for reduced GLP-1 responses at 75 g glucose; and iv) increased fasting glucagon levels (P < 0.001) in obese subjects. Conclusions It seems that, rather than changes in incretin secretion, fasting hyperglucagonemia and consequent hyperglycemia play a role in reduced disposal of insulin, contributing to hyperinsulinemia and insulin resistance. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01875575 PMID:26942445

  2. Relationship between natriuresis and changes in plasma atrial natriuretic factor, renin activity and aldosterone levels in fasting obese subjects.

    PubMed

    Donckier, J E; Kolanowski, J; Berbinschi, A; Gerard, G; Ketelslegers, J M

    1990-01-01

    This study was conducted to assess whether changes in atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) secretion could account for the natriuresis of the early phase of fasting. To this end, 8 AM (supine) and 10 AM (standing) plasma ANF concentrations were determined daily and compared with plasma renin activity and aldosterone levels in 8 obese subjects submitted to a 7-day total fast. Depiste constant daily sodium intake (51 mmol), urinary sodium excretion increased from 35 +/- 7 to 109 +/- 8 mmol/day after 4 days of fast (p less than 0.001) and declined thereafter. Urinary ketone excretion progressively increased over the whole period of fasting (p less than 0.001). Interestingly, fasting induced a decrease in plasma ANF concentrations (p less than 0.05). A contrast analysis revealed no significant change in ANF during the initial natriuretic phase of fasting but a decrease at the end of fasting averaging 36% (p less than 0.05) and 18% (p less than 0.05) at 8 and 10 AM respectively. In contrast, plasma aldosterone rose during fasting (p less than 0.05), the difference being significant at the end of fasting (p less than 0.01). Plasma renin activity and cortisol did not change significantly over the fasting period. Postural and/or diurnal changes of ANF, aldosterone, renin and cortisol were preserved during fasting (p less than 0.01). Postural changes of ANF were, however, attenuated at the end of fasting (p less than 0.05). These data indicate that the fasting natriuresis cannot be explained by changes in ANF levels but that the loss of sodium may contribute to a decline of basal ANF levels, with an attenuation of their physiological postural changes, and to a stimulation of the aldosterone secretion.

  3. Effect of an isocaloric diet containing fiber-enriched flour on anthropometric and biochemical parameters in healthy non-obese non-diabetic subjects

    PubMed Central

    Briganti, Silvia; Ermetici, Federica; Malavazos, Alexis E.; Dozio, Elena; Giubbilini, Paola; Rigolini, Roberta; Goggi, Silvia; Morricone, Lelio; Romanelli, Massimiliano Marco Corsi

    2015-01-01

    We studied the effect of soluble fiber-enriched products on anthropometric and biochemical variables in 30 healthy non-obese, non-diabetic subjects. This was a randomized, controlled crossover, single-blind, dietary intervention study performed for 8 weeks. Subjects received an isocaloric diet with fiber-enriched products for the first 4 weeks and with regular flour products for the following 4 weeks, or vice versa. Weight, height, measures of fat distribution (waist, hip circumference), glucose, insulin and triglycerides were measured at baseline, after 4 and 8 weeks of intervention. BMI and insulin sensitivity indices were calculated. Weight and BMI decreased in the first period of isocaloric diet in both groups, regardless of the type of flour consumed (weight p<0.01, p<0.001 respectively; BMI p = 0.01, p<0.001 respectively). At the end of the 8 weeks, weight and BMI further decreased in the group consuming the fiber-enriched diet (p<0.01). Insulin resistance, estimated with the Homeostasis Model Assessment index and the Lipid Accumulation Product index, improved in all subjects after the fiber-enriched flour diet (p = 0.03, p = 0.02, respectively). In conclusion, an isocaloric diet supplemented with fiber-enriched products may improve measures of fatness and insulin sensitivity in healthy non-obese non-diabetic subjects. We might hypothesize a similar effect also in subjects with metabolic abnormalities. PMID:26566307

  4. Complementary and Other Interventions

    MedlinePlus

    ... Treatment of ADHD Complementary and Other Interventions Coaching Neurofeedback (EEG Biofeedback) Fish Oil Supplements and ADHD Carrying Your ... and Other Interventions Complementary and Other Interventions Coaching Neurofeedback (EEG Biofeedback) Fish Oil Supplements and ADHD Complementary and ...

  5. Could Intermittent Energy Restriction and Intermittent Fasting Reduce Rates of Cancer in Obese, Overweight, and Normal-Weight Subjects? A Summary of Evidence.

    PubMed

    Harvie, Michelle N; Howell, Tony

    2016-07-01

    Animal studies and human observational data link energy restriction (ER) to reduced rates of carcinogenesis. Most of these studies have involved continuous energy restriction (CER), but there is increasing public and scientific interest in the potential health and anticancer effects of intermittent energy restriction (IER) or intermittent fasting (IF), which comprise periods of marked ER or total fasting interspersed with periods of normal eating. This review summarizes animal studies that assessed tumor rates with IER and IF compared with CER or ad libitum feed consumption. The relevance of these animal data to human cancer is also considered by summarizing available human studies of the effects of IER or IF compared with CER on cancer biomarkers in obese, overweight, and normal-weight subjects. IER regimens that include periods of ER alternating with ad libitum feed consumption for 1, 2, or 3 wk have been reported to be superior to CER in reducing tumor rates in most spontaneous mice tumor models. Limited human data from short-term studies (≤6 mo) in overweight and obese subjects have shown that IER can lead to greater improvements in insulin sensitivity (homeostasis model assessment) than can CER, with comparable reductions in adipokines and inflammatory markers and minor changes in the insulin-like growth factor axis. There are currently no data comparing IER or IF with CER in normal-weight subjects. The benefits of IER in these short-term trials are of interest, but not sufficient evidence to recommend the use of IER above CER. Longer-term human studies of adherence to and efficacy and safety of IER are required in obese and overweight subjects, as well as normal-weight subjects. PMID:27422504

  6. Efficacy and tolerability of a novel herbal formulation for weight management in obese subjects: a randomized double blind placebo controlled clinical study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The effect of an herbal formulation LI85008F on weight loss in obese human subjects was evaluated in an 8-weeks randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study (Clinical Trial Registration no. ISRCTN37381706). Fifty obese subjects (Body mass index 30 to 40 kg/m², 29.3% male; 70.7% female; ages 27–50 years) were randomized into two groups; placebo (n = 25) and LI85008F formulation (n = 25). The participants received either 900 mg/day of LI85008F formulation in three divided doses or three identical placebo capsules and all of them remained on a calorie-controlled diet (2000 cal/day) and 30 min walking for 5 days a week during the entire duration of the study. Results and discussion At the end of the trial period, LI85008F supplemented group showed significant net reductions in body weight and Body Mass Index (BMI). The participants who received the herbal formulation, showed reduced fasting blood glucose, LDL, LDL/HDL ratio, and triglycerides. At the end of the study, LI85008F supplementation also provided 21.26% (p = 0.012) increase in serum adiponectin level, compared with the placebo group. No major adverse events were reported by the participants in the study duration. In addition, Adipokine profiling study in 3T3-L1 adipocytes demonstrates that LI85008F modulates key regulatory factors of adipogenic differentiation and insulin sensitivity, such as Adiponectin, Pref-1, and resistin. Conclusion The herbal formulation LI85008F (Adipromin) is prepared from commonly used medicinal plants extracts, which provides useful and safe application for weight loss in obese humans. It also demonstrates potential promise in controlling healthy blood glucose level in obesity linked type 2 diabetes. PMID:22995673

  7. Metabolic Effects of a Growth Hormone-Releasing Factor in Obese Subjects with Reduced Growth Hormone Secretion: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Makimura, Hideo; Feldpausch, Meghan N.; Rope, Alison M.; Hemphill, Linda C.; Torriani, Martin; Lee, Hang

    2012-01-01

    Context: Obesity is associated with reduced GH secretion and increased cardiovascular disease risk. Objective: We performed this study to determine the effects of augmenting endogenous GH secretion on body composition and cardiovascular disease risk indices in obese subjects with reduced GH secretion. Design, Patients and Methods: A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study was performed involving 60 abdominally obese subjects with reduced GH secretion. Subjects received tesamorelin, a GHRH1–44 analog, 2 mg once daily, or placebo for 12 months. Abdominal visceral adipose tissue (VAT) was assessed by abdominal computed tomography scan, and carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT) was assessed by ultrasound. Treatment effect was determined by longitudinal linear mixed-effects modeling. Results: VAT [−16 ± 9 vs.19 ± 9 cm2, tesamorelin vs. placebo; treatment effect (95% confidence interval): −35 (−58, −12) cm2; P = 0.003], cIMT (−0.03 ± 0.01 vs. 0.01 ± 0.01 mm; −0.04 (−0.07, −0.01) mm; P = 0.02), log C-reactive protein (−0.17 ± 0.04 vs. −0.03 ± 0.05 mg/liter; −0.15 (−0.30, −0.01) mg/liter, P = 0.04), and triglycerides (−26 ± 16 vs. 12 ± 8 mg/dl; −37 (−67, −7) mg/dl; P = 0.02) improved significantly in the tesamorelin group vs. placebo. No significant effects on abdominal sc adipose tissue (−6 ± 6 vs. 3 ± 11 cm2; −10 (−32, +13) cm2; P = 0.40) were seen. IGF-I increased (86 ± 21 vs. −6 ± 8 μg/liter; 92 (+52, +132) μg/liter; P < 0.0001). No changes in fasting, 2-h glucose, or glycated hemoglobin were seen. There were no serious adverse events or differences in adverse events between the groups. Conclusion: Among obese subjects with relative reductions in GH, tesamorelin selectively reduces VAT without significant effects on sc adipose tissue and improves triglycerides, C-reactive protein, and cIMT, without aggravating glucose. PMID:23015655

  8. Effects of oral and intravenous fat load on blood pressure, endothelial function, sympathetic activity, and oxidative stress in obese healthy subjects

    PubMed Central

    Gosmanov, Aidar R.; Smiley, Dawn D.; Robalino, Gonzalo; Siquiera, Joselita; Khan, Bobby; Le, Ngoc-Anh; Patel, Riyaz S.; Quyyumi, Arshed A.; Peng, Limin; Kitabchi, Abbas E.

    2010-01-01

    We compared the effects of high and low oral and intravenous (iv) fat load on blood pressure (BP), endothelial function, autonomic nervous system, and oxidative stress in obese healthy subjects. Thirteen obese subjects randomly received five 8-h infusions of iv saline, 20 (32 g, low iv fat) or 40 ml/h intralipid (64 g, high iv fat), and oral fat load at 32 (low oral) or 64 g (high oral). Systolic BP increased by 14 ± 10 (P = 0.007) and 12 ± 9 mmHg (P = 0.007) after low and high iv lipid infusions and by 13 ± 17 (P = 0.045) and 11 ± 11 mmHg (P = 0.040) after low and high oral fat loads, respectively. The baseline flow-mediated dilation was 9.4%, and it decreased by 3.8 ± 2.1 (P = 0.002) and 4.1 ± 3.1% (P < 0.001) after low and high iv lipid infusion and by 3.8 ± 1.8 (P = 0.002) and 5.0 ± 2.5% (P < 0.001) after low and high oral fat load, respectively. Oral and iv fat load stimulated oxidative stress, increased heart rate, and decreased R-R interval variability. Acute iv fat load decreased blood glucose by 6–10 mg/dl (P < 0.05) without changes in insulin concentration, whereas oral fat increased plasma insulin by 3.7–4.0 μU/ml (P < 0.01) without glycemic variations. Intravenous saline and both oral and iv fat load reduced leptin concentration from baseline (P < 0.01). In conclusion, acute fat load administered orally or intravenously significantly increased blood pressure, altered endothelial function, and activated sympathetic nervous system by mechanisms not likely depending on changes in leptin, glucose, and insulin levels in obese healthy subjects. Thus, fat load, independent of its source, has deleterious hemodynamic effects in obese subjects. PMID:20923960

  9. In vitro fermentation of commercial α-gluco-oligosaccharide by faecal microbiota from lean and obese human subjects.

    PubMed

    Sarbini, Shahrul R; Kolida, Sofia; Gibson, Glenn R; Rastall, Robert A

    2013-06-01

    The fermentation selectivity of a commercial source of a-gluco-oligosaccharides (BioEcolians; Solabia) was investigated in vitro. Fermentation by faecal bacteria from four lean and four obese healthy adults was determined in anaerobic, pH-controlled faecal batch cultures. Inulin was used as a positive prebiotic control. Samples were obtained at 0, 10, 24 and 36 h for bacterial enumeration by fluorescent in situ hybridisation and SCFA analyses. Gas production during fermentation was investigated in non-pH-controlled batch cultures. a-Gluco-oligosaccharides significantly increased the Bifidobacterium sp. population compared with the control. Other bacterial groups enumerated were unaffected with the exception of an increase in the Bacteroides–Prevotella group and a decrease in Faecalibacterium prausnitzii on both a-gluco-oligosaccharides and inulin compared with baseline. An increase in acetate and propionate was seen on both substrates. The fermentation of a-gluco-oligosaccharides produced less total gas at a more gradual rate of production than inulin. Generally, substrates fermented with the obese microbiota produced similar results to the lean fermentation regarding bacteriology and metabolic activity. No significant difference at baseline (0 h) was detected between the lean and obese individuals in any of the faecal bacterial groups studied.

  10. Complementary media of electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Katsuyoshi

    2006-04-01

    The concept of complementary media, which cause negative refraction and make perfect lenses, was first introduced to electromagnetic waves. This paper extends it to general waves by expressing the complementarity in terms of a transfer matrix. As an example, complementary media of electrons are discussed theoretically. An application of complementary media to subsurface imaging by scanning tunnelling microscopy is described. For realistic materials the formulation of complementary media is extended to take account of the scattering at interfaces, and effectively complementary systems formed by interfaces are discussed. Interfaces of the graphitic lattice forming complementary systems are designed.

  11. Expression of the Bitter Taste Receptor, T2R38, in Enteroendocrine Cells of the Colonic Mucosa of Overweight/Obese vs. Lean Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Latorre, Rocco; Huynh, Jennifer; Mazzoni, Maurizio; Gupta, Arpana; Bonora, Elena; Clavenzani, Paolo; Chang, Lin; Mayer, Emeran A.; De Giorgio, Roberto; Sternini, Catia

    2016-01-01

    Bitter taste receptors (T2Rs) are expressed in the mammalian gastrointestinal mucosa. In the mouse colon, T2R138 is localized to enteroendocrine cells and is upregulated by long-term high fat diet that induces obesity. The aims of this study were to test whether T2R38 expression is altered in overweight/obese (OW/OB) compared to normal weight (NW) subjects and characterize the cell types expressing T2R38, the human counterpart of mouse T2R138, in human colon. Colonic mucosal biopsies were obtained during colonoscopy from 35 healthy subjects (20 OW/OB and 15 NW) and processed for quantitative RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry using antibodies to T2R38, chromogranin A (CgA), glucagon like peptide-1 (GLP-1), cholecystokinin (CCK), or peptide YY (PYY). T2R38 mRNA levels in the colonic mucosa of OW/OB were increased (> 2 fold) compared to NW subjects but did not reach statistical significance (P = 0.06). However, the number of T2R38 immunoreactive (IR) cells was significantly increased in OW/OB vs. NW subjects (P = 0.01) and was significantly correlated with BMI values (r = 0.7557; P = 0.001). In both OW/OB and NW individuals, all T2R38-IR cells contained CgA-IR supporting they are enteroendocrine. In both groups, T2R38-IR colocalized with CCK-, GLP1- or PYY-IR. The overall CgA-IR cell population was comparable in OW/OB and NW individuals. This study shows that T2R38 is expressed in distinct populations of enteroendocrine cells in the human colonic mucosa and supports T2R38 upregulation in OW/OB subjects. T2R38 might mediate host functional responses to increased energy balance and intraluminal changes occurring in obesity, which could involve peptide release from enteroendocrine cells. PMID:26866366

  12. Expression of the Bitter Taste Receptor, T2R38, in Enteroendocrine Cells of the Colonic Mucosa of Overweight/Obese vs. Lean Subjects.

    PubMed

    Latorre, Rocco; Huynh, Jennifer; Mazzoni, Maurizio; Gupta, Arpana; Bonora, Elena; Clavenzani, Paolo; Chang, Lin; Mayer, Emeran A; De Giorgio, Roberto; Sternini, Catia

    2016-01-01

    Bitter taste receptors (T2Rs) are expressed in the mammalian gastrointestinal mucosa. In the mouse colon, T2R138 is localized to enteroendocrine cells and is upregulated by long-term high fat diet that induces obesity. The aims of this study were to test whether T2R38 expression is altered in overweight/obese (OW/OB) compared to normal weight (NW) subjects and characterize the cell types expressing T2R38, the human counterpart of mouse T2R138, in human colon. Colonic mucosal biopsies were obtained during colonoscopy from 35 healthy subjects (20 OW/OB and 15 NW) and processed for quantitative RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry using antibodies to T2R38, chromogranin A (CgA), glucagon like peptide-1 (GLP-1), cholecystokinin (CCK), or peptide YY (PYY). T2R38 mRNA levels in the colonic mucosa of OW/OB were increased (> 2 fold) compared to NW subjects but did not reach statistical significance (P = 0.06). However, the number of T2R38 immunoreactive (IR) cells was significantly increased in OW/OB vs. NW subjects (P = 0.01) and was significantly correlated with BMI values (r = 0.7557; P = 0.001). In both OW/OB and NW individuals, all T2R38-IR cells contained CgA-IR supporting they are enteroendocrine. In both groups, T2R38-IR colocalized with CCK-, GLP1- or PYY-IR. The overall CgA-IR cell population was comparable in OW/OB and NW individuals. This study shows that T2R38 is expressed in distinct populations of enteroendocrine cells in the human colonic mucosa and supports T2R38 upregulation in OW/OB subjects. T2R38 might mediate host functional responses to increased energy balance and intraluminal changes occurring in obesity, which could involve peptide release from enteroendocrine cells. PMID:26866366

  13. Composition of weight lost during short-term weight reduction. Metabolic responses of obese subjects to starvation and low-calorie ketogenic and nonketogenic diets.

    PubMed Central

    Yang, M U; Van Itallie, T B

    1976-01-01

    The effects of starvation, an 800-kcal mixed diet and an 800-kcal ketogenic (low carbohydrate-high fat) diet on the composition of weight lost were determined in each of six obese subjects during three 10-day periods.The energy-nitrogen balance method was used to quantify the three measurable components of weight loss; protein, fat, and water. On the 800-kcal ketogenic diet, subjects lost (mean +/- SE) 466.6 +/-51.3 g/day; on the isocaloric mixed diet, which provided carbohydrate and fat in conventional proportions, they lost 277.9+/- 32.1 g/day. Composition of weight lost (percentage) during the ketogenic diet was water 61.2, fat 35.0, protein 3.8. During the mixed diet, composition of loss was water 37.1, fat 59.5, protein 3.4... PMID:956398

  14. SERPINE1, PAI-1 protein coding gene, methylation levels and epigenetic relationships with adiposity changes in obese subjects with metabolic syndrome features under dietary restriction

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-Legarrea, Patricia; Mansego, Maria Luisa; Zulet, Marian Angeles; Martinez, Jose Alfredo

    2013-01-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1) has been associated with metabolic disorders, through different mechanisms, which could involve changes in DNA methylation. This work aimed to assess the potential relationships of the cytosine methylation levels within SERPINE1 gene transcriptional regulatory region, which codes for PAI-1, in peripheral white blood cells with anthropometrical, metabolic and inflammatory features. Forty-six obese subjects with metabolic syndrome features followed Control or Metabolic Syndrome Reduction in Navarra (RESMENA) energy-restricted (−30%E) diets for 8 weeks. SERPINE1 transcriptional regulatory region methylation at baseline was analyzed by a microarray technical. Both dietary strategies reduced anthropometric and biochemical parameters. The Control group significantly reduced plasma PAI-1 concentrations but not the RESMENA group. Participants from both nutritional interventions with higher SERPINE1 methylation levels at baseline showed significantly major reductions in body weight, total fat mass, android fat mass, total cholesterol and triglycerides, as compared with those with lower initial SERPINE1 methylation levels. In conclusion, the DNA methylation levels of SERPINE1 transcriptional regulatory region were associated with some metabolic and anthropometric changes in obese subjects with metabolic syndrome under energy restriction, suggesting a complex epigenetic network in the regulation of this recognized pro-inflammatory marker. (www.clinicaltrials.gov; NCT01087086) PMID:24249967

  15. Complementary and Alternative Medicine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Help a Friend Who Cuts? Complementary and Alternative Medicine KidsHealth > For Teens > Complementary and Alternative Medicine Print ... replacement. continue How Is CAM Different From Conventional Medicine? Conventional medicine is based on scientific knowledge of ...

  16. Complementary and Integrative Medicine

    MedlinePlus

    ... medical treatments that are not part of mainstream medicine. When you are using these types of care, it may be called complementary, integrative, or alternative medicine. Complementary medicine is used together with mainstream medical ...

  17. Decreased expression of microRNA-21 is associated with increased cytokine production in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of obese type 2 diabetic and non-diabetic subjects.

    PubMed

    Mazloom, Hossein; Alizadeh, Samira; Esfahani, Ensieh Nasli; Razi, Farideh; Meshkani, Reza

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the role of miR-21 in inflammatory responses in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of type 2 diabetic (T2D) and healthy subjects. 20 healthy and 20 T2D subjects were enrolled in the study. miR-21 expression in PBMCs of the subjects was measured using real-time PCR. IL-6 and TNF-α levels in culture supernatants were quantified using ELISA. miR-21 expression was not significantly different between the diabetic and nondiabetic groups. A downregulation of miR-21 expression was observed in PBMCs of obese subjects in both diabetic and nondiabetic groups. In addition, miR-21 expression was negatively correlated with weight, waist circumference, body mass index, and triglyceride in both the diabetic and nondiabetic groups. Our results also demonstrated that the PBMCs of obese subjects significantly secreted a higher level of IL-6 and TNF-α in comparison with the PBMCs of nonobese subjects. Furthermore, a significant inverse correlation between miR-21 expression and TNF-α and IL-6 production from the PBMCs was observed. These data suggest that miR-21 expression is decreased in PBMCs of obese subjects and reduced expression appears to be associated with increased secreted cytokine level in media of PBMCs of obese subjects. PMID:27370645

  18. Decreased expression of microRNA-21 is associated with increased cytokine production in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of obese type 2 diabetic and non-diabetic subjects.

    PubMed

    Mazloom, Hossein; Alizadeh, Samira; Esfahani, Ensieh Nasli; Razi, Farideh; Meshkani, Reza

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the role of miR-21 in inflammatory responses in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of type 2 diabetic (T2D) and healthy subjects. 20 healthy and 20 T2D subjects were enrolled in the study. miR-21 expression in PBMCs of the subjects was measured using real-time PCR. IL-6 and TNF-α levels in culture supernatants were quantified using ELISA. miR-21 expression was not significantly different between the diabetic and nondiabetic groups. A downregulation of miR-21 expression was observed in PBMCs of obese subjects in both diabetic and nondiabetic groups. In addition, miR-21 expression was negatively correlated with weight, waist circumference, body mass index, and triglyceride in both the diabetic and nondiabetic groups. Our results also demonstrated that the PBMCs of obese subjects significantly secreted a higher level of IL-6 and TNF-α in comparison with the PBMCs of nonobese subjects. Furthermore, a significant inverse correlation between miR-21 expression and TNF-α and IL-6 production from the PBMCs was observed. These data suggest that miR-21 expression is decreased in PBMCs of obese subjects and reduced expression appears to be associated with increased secreted cytokine level in media of PBMCs of obese subjects.

  19. Effects of low-fat dairy consumption on markers of low-grade systemic inflammation and endothelial function in overweight and obese subjects: an intervention study.

    PubMed

    van Meijl, Leonie E C; Mensink, Ronald P

    2010-11-01

    Although increased concentrations of plasma inflammatory markers are not one of the criteria to diagnose the metabolic syndrome, low-grade systemic inflammation is receiving large attention as a metabolic syndrome component and cardiovascular risk factor. As several epidemiological studies have suggested a negative relationship between low-fat dairy consumption and the metabolic syndrome, we decided to investigate the effects of low-fat dairy consumption on inflammatory markers and adhesion molecules in overweight and obese subjects in an intervention study. Thirty-five healthy subjects (BMI>27 kg/m²) consumed, in a random order, low-fat dairy products (500 ml low-fat milk and 150 g low-fat yogurt) or carbohydrate-rich control products (600 ml fruit juice and three fruit biscuits) daily for 8 weeks. Plasma concentrations of TNF-α were decreased by 0.16 (SD 0.50) pg/ml (P = 0.070), and soluble TNF-α receptor-1 (s-TNFR-1) was increased by 110.0 (SD 338.4) pg/ml (P = 0.062) after the low-fat dairy period than after the control period. s-TNFR-2 was increased by 227.0 (SD 449.0) pg/ml (P = 0.020) by the dairy intervention. As a result, the TNF-α index, defined as the TNF-α:s-TNFR-2 ratio, was decreased by 0.000053 (SD 0.00012) (P = 0.015) after the dairy diet consumption. Low-fat dairy consumption had no effect on IL-6, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, intracellular adhesion molecule-1 and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 concentrations. The present results indicate that in overweight and obese subjects, low-fat dairy consumption for 8 weeks may increase concentrations of s-TNFR compared with carbohydrate-rich product consumption, but that it has no effects on other markers of chronic inflammation and endothelial function.

  20. Expectancy, self-efficacy, and placebo effect of a sham supplement for weight loss in obese subjects

    PubMed Central

    Tippens, Kimberly M; Purnell, Jonathan Q; Gregory, William L; Connelly, Erin; Hanes, Douglas; Oken, Barry; Calabrese, Carlo

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the role of expectancy in the placebo effect of a sham dietary supplement for weight loss in 114 obese adults. All participants received lifestyle education and were randomized to one of three conditions: 1) a daily placebo capsule and told that they were taking an active weight loss supplement; 2) daily placebo and told they had a 50% random chance of receiving either the active or placebo; or 3) no capsules. At 12 weeks, weight loss and metabolic outcomes were similar among the three groups. Participants in both groups that took capsules showed decreased weight loss self-efficacy and increased expectations of benefit from dietary supplements. Participants not taking capsules showed the opposite. Adverse events were more frequently reported in groups taking capsules than those who were not. These findings suggest that supplements without weight loss effects may have nocebo effects through diminished self-efficacy. PMID:24695007

  1. Sitagliptin/Metformin Versus Insulin Glargine Combined With Metformin in Obese Subjects With Newly Diagnosed Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Ming; Xia, Libin; Cao, Jingzhu; Zou, Dajin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To compare the therapeutic effects of different regimens in Chinese obese type 2 diabetic mellitus (T2DM) patients. From October 2013 to July 2014, a total of 166 T2DM outpatients who attended the Shanghai Changhai Hospital and the Yijishan Hospital of Wannan Medical College were randomly assigned into an experimental sitagliptin/metformin combined with low caloric diet group (n = 115) and an insulin glargine combined with metformin control group (n = 51). Inclusion criteria were body mass index (BMI) ≥ 25 kg/m2 and diagnosed with T2DM with glycosylated hemoglobin (glycated hemoglobin A1C [HbA1c]) >9%. Main outcome parameters were fasting plasma glucose, postprandial plasma glucose, BMI, HbA1c, fasting C-peptide, 2-h postprandial C-peptide, triglyceride (TG), total cholesterol (TC), high-density cholesterol (HDL-C), and low-density cholesterol (LDL-C), which were determined by the 75 g steamed-bun meal tolerance test before and 4, 8, 12, and 24 weeks after the treatment started. Treatment costs and life quality were also assessed. BMI, HbA1C, TG, TC, and LDL were significantly more reduced (P < 0.000) and HbA1c significantly better improved in the experimental group than in the control group (<6.5% in 24 [20.87%] vs 2 [3.92%], P < 0.001; <7% in 65 [56.52%] vs 12 [23.53%], P < 0.001). Quality of life scores in the experimental group increased more than in the control group (P < 0.001). The costs for the experimental group medication were less than for other regimens. For obese T2DM patients diagnosed with a glycosylated hemoglobin level >9%, oral sitagliptin/metformin combined with a low caloric diet effectively and economically maintained glycemic control and significantly improved life quality. PMID:26986104

  2. Sitagliptin/Metformin Versus Insulin Glargine Combined With Metformin in Obese Subjects With Newly Diagnosed Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Ji, Ming; Xia, Libin; Cao, Jingzhu; Zou, Dajin

    2016-03-01

    To compare the therapeutic effects of different regimens in Chinese obese type 2 diabetic mellitus (T2DM) patients. From October 2013 to July 2014, a total of 166 T2DM outpatients who attended the Shanghai Changhai Hospital and the Yijishan Hospital of Wannan Medical College were randomly assigned into an experimental sitagliptin/metformin combined with low caloric diet group (n = 115) and an insulin glargine combined with metformin control group (n = 51). Inclusion criteria were body mass index (BMI) ≥ 25 kg/m and diagnosed with T2DM with glycosylated hemoglobin (glycated hemoglobin A1C [HbA1c]) >9%. Main outcome parameters were fasting plasma glucose, postprandial plasma glucose, BMI, HbA1c, fasting C-peptide, 2-h postprandial C-peptide, triglyceride (TG), total cholesterol (TC), high-density cholesterol (HDL-C), and low-density cholesterol (LDL-C), which were determined by the 75 g steamed-bun meal tolerance test before and 4, 8, 12, and 24 weeks after the treatment started. Treatment costs and life quality were also assessed. BMI, HbA1C, TG, TC, and LDL were significantly more reduced (P < 0.000) and HbA1c significantly better improved in the experimental group than in the control group (<6.5% in 24 [20.87%] vs 2 [3.92%], P < 0.001; <7% in 65 [56.52%] vs 12 [23.53%], P < 0.001). Quality of life scores in the experimental group increased more than in the control group (P < 0.001). The costs for the experimental group medication were less than for other regimens. For obese T2DM patients diagnosed with a glycosylated hemoglobin level >9%, oral sitagliptin/metformin combined with a low caloric diet effectively and economically maintained glycemic control and significantly improved life quality.

  3. Sitagliptin/Metformin Versus Insulin Glargine Combined With Metformin in Obese Subjects With Newly Diagnosed Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Ji, Ming; Xia, Libin; Cao, Jingzhu; Zou, Dajin

    2016-03-01

    To compare the therapeutic effects of different regimens in Chinese obese type 2 diabetic mellitus (T2DM) patients. From October 2013 to July 2014, a total of 166 T2DM outpatients who attended the Shanghai Changhai Hospital and the Yijishan Hospital of Wannan Medical College were randomly assigned into an experimental sitagliptin/metformin combined with low caloric diet group (n = 115) and an insulin glargine combined with metformin control group (n = 51). Inclusion criteria were body mass index (BMI) ≥ 25 kg/m and diagnosed with T2DM with glycosylated hemoglobin (glycated hemoglobin A1C [HbA1c]) >9%. Main outcome parameters were fasting plasma glucose, postprandial plasma glucose, BMI, HbA1c, fasting C-peptide, 2-h postprandial C-peptide, triglyceride (TG), total cholesterol (TC), high-density cholesterol (HDL-C), and low-density cholesterol (LDL-C), which were determined by the 75 g steamed-bun meal tolerance test before and 4, 8, 12, and 24 weeks after the treatment started. Treatment costs and life quality were also assessed. BMI, HbA1C, TG, TC, and LDL were significantly more reduced (P < 0.000) and HbA1c significantly better improved in the experimental group than in the control group (<6.5% in 24 [20.87%] vs 2 [3.92%], P < 0.001; <7% in 65 [56.52%] vs 12 [23.53%], P < 0.001). Quality of life scores in the experimental group increased more than in the control group (P < 0.001). The costs for the experimental group medication were less than for other regimens. For obese T2DM patients diagnosed with a glycosylated hemoglobin level >9%, oral sitagliptin/metformin combined with a low caloric diet effectively and economically maintained glycemic control and significantly improved life quality. PMID:26986104

  4. Obesity Associated Modulation of miRNA and Co-Regulated Target Transcripts in Human Adipose Tissue of Non-Diabetic Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Neeraj K.; Varma, Vijayalakshmi; Ma, Lijun; Hasstedt, Sandra J.; Das, Swapan K.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Micro RNAs (miRNAs) are a class of non-coding regulatory RNAs. We performed a transcriptome-wide analysis of subcutaneous adipose tissue and in vitro studies to identify miRNAs and co-regulated target transcripts associated with insulin sensitivity (SI) and obesity in human. Methods: We selected 20 insulin-resistant (IR, SI=2.0±0.7) and 20 insulin-sensitive (IS, SI=7.2±2.3) subjects from a cohort of 117 metabolically characterized non-diabetic Caucasians for comparison. Results: After global profiling, 3 miRNAs had marginally different expressions between IR and IS subjects. A total of 14 miRNAs were significantly correlated with %fat mass, body mass index (BMI), or SI. The qRT-PCR validated the correlation of miR-148a-3p with BMI (r=-0.70, P=2.73X10-6). MiRNA target filtering analysis identified DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1) as one of the target genes of miR-148a-3p. DNMT1 expression in adipose tissue was positively correlated with BMI (r=0.47, p=8.42X10-7) and was inversely correlated with miR-148a-3p (r=-0.34). Differentiation of SGBS preadipocytes showed up-regulation of miR-148a-3p and down-regulation of DNMT1 in differentiated adipocytes. After transfecting miR-148a-3p mimics into HeLa-S3 cells, DNMT1 was down-regulated, while transfection of adipose stem cells with miR-148a-3p inhibitor up-regulated DNMT1. Conclusions: Our results indicate that miR-148a-3p-mediated regulation of DNMT1 expression may play a mechanistic role in obesity. PMID:26527284

  5. Cortisol response and desire to binge following psychological stress: comparison between obese subjects with and without binge eating disorder.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, Noa; Bloch, Miki; Ben Avi, Irit; Rouach, Vanessa; Schreiber, Shaul; Stern, Naftali; Greenman, Yona

    2013-07-30

    While stress and negative affect are known to precede "emotional eating", this relationship is not fully understood. The objective of this study was to explore the relationship between induced psychological stress, hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis activity, and eating behavior in binge eating disorder (BED). The Trier Social Stress Test (TSST) was applied in obese participants with (n=8) and without BED (n=8), and normal weight controls (n=8). Psychological characteristics, eating-related symptoms, and cortisol secretion were assessed. Baseline stress, anxiety and cortisol measures were similar in all groups. At baseline desire to binge was significantly higher among the BED group. While the TSST induced an increase in cortisol levels, a blunted cortisol response was observed in the BED group. In the BED group, a positive correlation was found between cortisol (area under the curve) levels during the TSST and the change in VAS scores for desire to binge. Post-TSST desire to binge and sweet craving were significantly higher in the BED group and correlated positively with stress, anxiety, and cortisol response in the BED group only. These results suggest chronic down-regulation of the HPA axis in participants with BED, and a relationship between psychological stress, the acute activation of the HPA axis, and food craving.

  6. Resveratrol Does Not Influence Metabolic Risk Markers Related to Cardiovascular Health in Overweight and Slightly Obese Subjects: A Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Crossover Trial

    PubMed Central

    van der Made, Sanne M.; Plat, Jogchum; Mensink, Ronald P.

    2015-01-01

    Background In vitro and animal studies have shown positive effects of resveratrol on lipid and lipoprotein metabolism, but human studies specifically designed to examine these effects are lacking. Objective The primary outcome parameter of this study in overweight and slightly obese subjects was the effect of resveratrol on apoA-I concentrations. Secondary outcome parameters were effects on other markers of lipid and lipoprotein metabolism, glucose metabolism, and markers for inflammation and endothelial function. Design This randomized, placebo-controlled crossover study was conducted in 45 overweight and slightly obese men (n = 25) and women (n = 20) with a mean age of 61 ± 7 years. Subjects received in random order resveratrol (150 mg per day) or placebo capsules for 4 weeks, separated by a 4-week wash-out period. Fasting blood samples were collected at baseline and at the end of each intervention period. Results Compliance was excellent as indicated by capsule count and changes in resveratrol and dihydroresveratrol concentrations. No difference between resveratrol and placebo was found in any of the fasting serum or plasma metabolic risk markers (mean ± SD for differences between day 28 values of resveratrol vs. placebo: apoA-I; 0.00 ± 0.12 g/L (P = 0.791), apoB100; -0.01 ± 0.11 g/L (P = 0.545), HDL cholesterol; 0.00 ± 0.09 mmol/L (P = 0.721), LDL cholesterol -0.03 ± 0.57 mmol/L (P = 0.718), triacylglycerol; 0.10 ± 0.54 mmol/L (P = 0.687), glucose; -0.08 ± 0.28 mmol/L (P = 0.064), insulin; -0.3 ± 2.5 mU/L (P = 0.516)). Also, no effects on plasma markers for inflammation and endothelial function were observed. No adverse events related to resveratrol intake were observed. Conclusion 150 mg of daily resveratrol intake for 4 weeks does not change metabolic risk markers related to cardiovascular health in overweight and slightly obese men and women. Effects on glucose metabolism warrant further study. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01364961 PMID

  7. Vitamin D receptor Cdx-2-dependent response of central obesity to vitamin D intake in the subjects with type 2 diabetes: a randomised clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Shab-Bidar, Sakineh; Neyestani, Tirang R; Djazayery, Abolghassem

    2015-11-14

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of daily intake of vitamin D-fortified yogurt drink (doogh) on central obesity indicators in subjects with type 2 diabetes (T2D) and the possible modulation of this effect by vitamin D receptor (VDR) Cdx-2 genotypes. A total of sixty T2D subjects were randomly allocated to two groups to receive either plain doogh (PD; n 29, containing 170 mg Ca and no vitamin D/250 ml) or vitamin D3-fortified doogh (FD; n 31, containing 170 mg Ca and 12·5 μg/250 ml) twice a day for 12 weeks. 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D), glycaemic as well as adiposity indicators were evaluated before and after the intervention. VDR-Cdx-2 genotypes in extended number of T2D subjects in the FD group (n 60) were determined as AA, GA and GG. After 12 weeks, in FD compared with PD, serum 25(OH)D increased (+35·4 v. -4·8 nmol/l; P<0·001) and mean changes of waist circumference (WC; -1·3 v. +1·6 cm; P=0·02), body fat mass (FM; -1·9 v. +0·60 %; P=0·008), truncal fat (TF; -1·1 v. 0·13 %; P=0·003) and visceral adipose tissue (-0·80 v. +0·37 AU; P<0·001) decreased significantly. Circulating 25(OH)D was raised only in the AA group (34·8 nmo/l in AA group v. -6·4 nmol/l in AG and -1·6 nmol/l in GG groups; P<0·001), which was accompanied by a significant decrease in changes of WC (P=0·004), FM% (P=0·01) and TF% (P<0·001) in the AA genotype. Daily intake of vitamin D-FD for 12 weeks improved the central obesity indices in T2D subjects, and the improvement was more pronounced in the carriers of the AA genotype of VDR-Cdx-2. PMID:26346470

  8. Normal weight obesity and mortality in United States subjects ≥60 years of age (from the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey).

    PubMed

    Batsis, John A; Sahakyan, Karine R; Rodriguez-Escudero, Juan P; Bartels, Stephen J; Somers, Virend K; Lopez-Jimenez, Francisco

    2013-11-15

    Current body mass index (BMI) strata likely misrepresent the accuracy of true adiposity in older adults. Subjects with normal BMI with elevated body fat may metabolically have higher cardiovascular and overall mortality than previously suspected. We identified 4,489 subjects aged ≥60 years (BMI = 18.5 to 25 kg/m(2)) with anthropometric and bioelectrical impedance measurements from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys III (1988 to 1994) and mortality data linked to the National Death Index. Normal weight obesity (NWO) was classified in 2 ways: creation of tertiles with highest percentage of body fat and body fat percent cutoffs (men >25% and women >35%). We compared overall and cardiovascular mortality rates, models adjusted for age, gender, smoking, race, diabetes, and BMI. The final sample included 1,528 subjects, mean age was 70 years, median (interquartile range) follow-up was 12.9 years (range 7.5 to 15.3) with 902 deaths (46.5% cardiovascular). Prevalence of NWO was 27.9% and 21.4% in men and 20.4% and 31.3% in women using tertiles and cutoffs, respectively. Subjects with NWO had higher rates of abnormal cardiovascular risk factors. Lean mass decreased, whereas leptin increased with increasing tertile. There were no gender-specific differences in overall mortality. Short-term mortality (<140 person-months) was higher in women, whereas long-term mortality (>140 person-months) was higher in men. We highlight the importance of considering body fat in gender-specific risk stratification in older adults with normal weight. In conclusion, NWO in older adults is associated with cardiometabolic dysregulation and is a risk for cardiovascular mortality independent of BMI and central fat distribution.

  9. Impact of intermittent hypoxia and exercise on blood pressure and metabolic features from obese subjects suffering sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome.

    PubMed

    González-Muniesa, P; Lopez-Pascual, A; de Andrés, J; Lasa, A; Portillo, M P; Arós, F; Durán, J; Egea, C J; Martinez, J A

    2015-09-01

    Strategies designed to reduce adiposity and cardiovascular-accompanying manifestations have been based on nutritional interventions conjointly with physical activity programs. The aim of this 13-week study was to investigate the putative benefits associated to hypoxia plus exercise on weight loss and relevant metabolic and cardiorespiratory variables, when prescribed to obese subjects with sleep apnea syndrome following dietary advice. The participants were randomly distributed in the following three groups: control, normoxia, and hypoxia. All the subjects received dietary advice while, additionally, normoxia group was trained under normal oxygen concentration and Hypoxia group under hypoxic conditions. There was a statistically significant decrease in fat-free mass (Kg) and water (%) on the control compared to normoxia group (p < 0.05 and p < 0.01, respectively). Body weight, body mass index, and waist circumference decreased in all the groups after the study. Moreover, leukocyte count was increased after the intervention in hypoxia compared to control group (p < 0.05). There were no statistically significant variations within groups in other variables, although changes in appetite were found after the 13-week period. In addition, associations between the variations in the leukocyte count and fat mass have been found. The hypoxia group showed some specific benefits concerning appetite and cardiometabolic-related measurements as exertion time and diastolic blood pressure, with a therapeutical potential.

  10. Change in weight and body composition in obese subjects following a hypocaloric diet plus different training programs or physical activity recommendations.

    PubMed

    Benito, Pedro J; Bermejo, Laura M; Peinado, Ana B; López-Plaza, Bricia; Cupeiro, Rocío; Szendrei, Barbara; Calderón, Francisco J; Castro, Eliane A; Gómez-Candela, Carmen

    2015-04-15

    The aim of the present study was to compare the effects of different physical activity programs, in combination with a hypocaloric diet, on anthropometric variables and body composition in obese subjects. Ninety-six obese (men: n = 48; women: n = 48; age range: 18-50 yr) participated in a supervised 22-wk program. They were randomized into four groups: strength training (S; n = 24), endurance training (E; n = 26), combined strength + endurance training (SE; n = 24), and physical activity recommendations (C; n = 22). In addition, all groups followed the same hypocaloric diet. At baseline and at the end of the intervention, dietetic and physical activity variables were assessed using validated questionnaires. Anthropometric variables were recorded along with body composition variables measured using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry techniques. At the end of the intervention, significant improvements were seen within groups in terms of body weight (S: -9.21 ± 0.83 kg; E: -10.55 ± 0.80 kg; SE: -9.88 ± 0.85 kg; C: -8.69 ± 0.89 kg), and total fat mass (S: -5.24 ± 0.55%; E: -5.35 ± 0.55%; SE: -4.85 ± 0.56%; C: -4.89 ± 0.59%). No differences were seen between groups at this time in terms of any other anthropometric or body composition variables examined. All groups increased their total physical activity in metabolic equivalents (MET) per week during the intervention, but with no difference between groups (S: 976 ± 367 MET-min/wk; E: 954 ± 355 MET-min/wk; SE: 1 329 ± 345 MET-min/wk; C: 763 ± 410 MET-min/wk). This study shows that, when combined with a hypocaloric diet, exercise training and adherence to physical activity recommendations are equally effective at reducing body weight and modifying body composition in the treatment of obesity (Clinical Trials Gov. number: NCT01116856). PMID:25722378

  11. Diet and exercise reduce low-grade inflammation and macrophage infiltration in adipose tissue but not in skeletal muscle in severely obese subjects.

    PubMed

    Bruun, Jens M; Helge, Jørn W; Richelsen, Bjørn; Stallknecht, Bente

    2006-05-01

    Obesity is associated with low-grade inflammation, insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. This study investigated the effect of a 15-wk lifestyle intervention (hypocaloric diet and daily exercise) on inflammatory markers in plasma, adipose tissue (AT), and skeletal muscle (SM) in 27 severely obese subjects (mean body mass index: 45.8 kg/m2). Plasma samples, subcutaneous abdominal AT biopsies, and vastus lateralis SM biopsies were obtained before and after the intervention and analyzed by ELISA and RT-PCR. The intervention reduced body weight (P < 0.001) and increased insulin sensitivity (homeostasis model assessment; P < 0.05). Plasma adiponectin (P < 0.001) increased, and C-reactive protein (P < 0.05), IL-6 (P < 0.01), IL-8 (P < 0.05), and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (P < 0.01) decreased. AT inflammation was reduced, determined from an increased mRNA expression of adiponectin (P < 0.001) and a decreased expression of macrophage-specific markers (CD14, CD68), IL-6, IL-8, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (P < 0.01). After adjusting for macrophage infiltration in AT, only IL-6 mRNA was decreased (P < 0.05). Only very low levels of inflammatory markers were found in SM. The intervention had no effect on adiponectin receptor 1 and 2 mRNA in AT or SM. Thus hypocaloric diet and increased physical activity improved insulin sensitivity and reduced low-grade inflammation. Markers of inflammation were particularly reduced in AT, whereas SM does not contribute to this attenuation of whole body inflammation.

  12. Cocoa extract intake for 4 weeks reduces postprandial systolic blood pressure response of obese subjects, even after following an energy-restricted diet

    PubMed Central

    Ibero-Baraibar, Idoia; Suárez, Manuel; Arola-Arnal, Anna; Zulet, M. Angeles; Martinez, J. Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    Background Cardiometabolic profile is usually altered in obesity. Interestingly, the consumption of flavanol-rich foods might be protective against those metabolic alterations. Objective To evaluate the postprandial cardiometabolic effects after the acute consumption of cocoa extract before and after 4 weeks of its daily intake. Furthermore, the bioavailability of cocoa extract was investigated. Design Twenty-four overweight/obese middle-aged subjects participated in a 4-week intervention study. Half of the volunteers consumed a test meal enriched with 1.4 g of cocoa extract (415 mg flavanols), while the rest of the volunteers consumed the same meal without the cocoa extract (control group). Glucose and lipid profile, as well as blood pressure and cocoa metabolites in plasma, were assessed before and at 60, 120, and 180 min post-consumption, at the beginning of the study (Postprandial 1) and after following a 4-week 15% energy-restricted diet including meals containing or not containing the cocoa extract (Postprandial 2). Results In the Postprandial 1 test, the area under the curve (AUC) of systolic blood pressure (SBP) was significantly higher in the cocoa group compared with the control group (p=0.007), showing significant differences after 120 min of intake. However, no differences between groups were observed at Postprandial 2. Interestingly, the reduction of postprandial AUC of SBP (AUC_Postprandial 2-AUC_Postprandial 1) was higher in the cocoa group (p=0.016). Furthermore, cocoa-derived metabolites were detected in plasma of the cocoa group, while the absence or significantly lower amounts of metabolites were found in the control group. Conclusions The daily consumption of cocoa extract within an energy-restricted diet for 4 weeks resulted in a greater reduction of postprandial AUC of SBP compared with the effect of energy-restricted diet alone and independently of body weight loss. These results suggest the role of cocoa flavanols on postprandial blood

  13. Complementary and Alternative Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Mary Lou

    2002-01-01

    Complementary and alternative therapies are increasingly used by many pregnant women in the United States; however, limited research is available on many therapies. The number of studies should increase with the establishment of the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine by the National Institutes of Health. This column reviews recent studies of both herbal medicines and alternative therapies used in pregnancy. PMID:17273285

  14. Complementary and Alternative Medicine.

    PubMed

    Quezada, Sandra M; Briscoe, Jessica; Cross, Raymond K

    2016-06-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease is a complex, chronic, multifactorial inflammatory disorder of the digestive tract. Standard therapies include immunosuppressive and biological treatments, but there is increasing interest in the potential benefit of complementary and alternative medicine for the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease. Given the high prevalence of use of complementary and alternative medicine among inflammatory bowel disease patients, gastroenterologists must remain knowledgeable regarding the risks and benefits of these treatment options. This article reviews the updated scientific data on the use of biologically based complementary and alternative therapies for the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease.

  15. The urinary metabolomic profile following the intake of meals supplemented with a cocoa extract in middle-aged obese subjects.

    PubMed

    Ibero-Baraibar, Idoia; Romo-Hualde, Ana; Gonzalez-Navarro, Carlos J; Zulet, M Angeles; Martinez, J Alfredo

    2016-04-01

    Metabolomics is used to assess the compliance and bioavailability of food components, as well as to evaluate the metabolic changes associated with food consumption. This study aimed to analyze the effect of consuming ready-to-eat meals containing a cocoa extract, within an energy restricted diet on urinary metabolomic changes. Fifty middle-aged volunteers [30.6 (2.3) kg m(-2)] participated in a 4-week randomised, parallel and double-blind study. Half consumed meals supplemented with 1.4 g of cocoa extract (645 mg polyphenols) while the remaining subjects received meals without cocoa supplementation. Ready-to-eat meals were included within a 15% energy restricted diet. Urine samples (24 h) were collected at baseline and after 4 weeks and were analyzed by high-performance-liquid chromatography-time-of-flight-mass-spectrometry (HPLC-TOF-MS) in negative and positive ionization modes followed by multivariate analysis. The relationship between urinary metabolites was evaluated by the Spearman correlation test. Interestingly, the principal component analysis discriminated among the baseline group, control group at the endpoint and cocoa group at the endpoint (p < 0.01), although in the positive ionization mode the baseline and control groups were not well distinguished. Metabolites were related to theobromine metabolism (3-methylxanthine and 3-methyluric acid), food processing (L-beta-aspartyl-L-phenylalanine), flavonoids (2,5,7,3',4'-pentahydroxyflavanone-5-O-glucoside and 7,4'-dimethoxy-6-C-methylflavanone), catecholamine (3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylglycol-sulphate) and endogenous metabolism (uridine monophosphate). These metabolites were present in higher (p < 0.001) amounts in the cocoa group. 3-Methylxanthine and l-beta-aspartyl-L-phenylalanine were confirmed with standards. Interestingly, 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylglycol-sulphate was positively correlated with 3-methylxanthine (rho = 0.552; p < 0.001) and 7,4'-dimethoxy-6-C-methylflavanone (rho = 447; p = 0.002). In

  16. Complementary and Integrative Therapies

    MedlinePlus

    ... correctly • Supplement is free of harmful contents like pesticides and heavy metals (such as lead, arsenic or ... 1-888-644-6226 http://nccam.nih.gov Natural Medicines Information on complementary therapies http://naturaldatabase.therapeuticresearch. ...

  17. Comparative effect of a 1 h session of electrical muscle stimulation and walking activity on energy expenditure and substrate oxidation in obese subjects.

    PubMed

    Grosset, Jean-François; Crowe, Louis; De Vito, Giuseppe; O'Shea, Donal; Caulfield, Brian

    2013-01-01

    It has previously been shown that low-frequency neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) techniques can induce increases in energy expenditure similar to those associated with exercise. This study investigated the metabolic and cardiovascular effects of a 1 h session of lower limb NMES and compared cardiovascular response with that observed during walking in nine obese subjects (three males) (age = 43.8 ± 3.0 years; body mass index (BMI) = 41.5 ± 1.8 kg/m(2)). The NMES protocol consisted of delivering a complex pulse pattern to the thigh muscles for 1 h. The walking test consisted of five 4-min bouts starting at 2 km/h with 1 km/h increments up to 6 km/h. In both tests, an open-circuit gas analyser was used to assess O(2) consumption ([Formula: see text]O(2)), CO(2) production ([Formula: see text]CO(2)), respiratory exchange ratio (RER), and heart rate (HR). Rates of fat oxidation (RFO) and carbohydrate oxidation (CHO) were estimated by indirect calorimetry. One hour of NMES significantly increased [Formula: see text]O(2), HR, RER, and mean energy expenditure compared with resting values, reaching 8.7 ± 1.3 mL·min(-2)·kg(-1) (47% of [Formula: see text]O(2peak)), 114.8 ± 7.5 bpm, 0.95, and 318.5 ± 64.3 kcal/h, respectively. CHO, but not RFO, increased during 1 h of NMES. With NMES, CHO was greater and RFO was less than at all walking speeds except 6 km/h. Lactate also increased more with NMES, to 3.5 ± 0.7 mmol versus a maximum of 1.5 ± 0.3 mmol with the walking protocol. These results suggest that NMES can be used in an obese population to induce an effective cardiovascular exercise response. In fact, the observed increase in energy expenditure induced by 1 h of NMES is clinically important and comparable with that recommended in weight management programs.

  18. Association between ferritin, high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) and relative abundance of Hepcidin mRNA with the risk of type 2 diabetes in obese subjects.

    PubMed

    Andrews Guzmán, Mónica; Arredondo Olguín, Miguel

    2014-09-01

    Obesity and Type 2 diabetes mellitus share a strong pro-inflammatory profile. It has been observed that iron is a risk factor in the development of type 2 diabetes. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between iron nutritional status and inflammation with the risk of type 2 diabetes development in obese subjects. We studied 30 obese men with type 2 diabetes (OBDM); 30 obese subjects without diabetes (OB) and 30 healthy subjects (Cn). We isolated peripheral mononuclear cells (PMCs) and challenged them with high Fe concentrations. Total mRNA was isolated and relative abundance of TNF-, IL-6 and hepcidin were determined by qPCR. Iron status, biochemical, inflammatory and oxidative stress parameters were also characterized. OBDM and OB patients showed increased hsCRP levels compared to the Cn group. OBDM subjects showed higher levels of ferritin than the Cn group. TNF-α and IL-6 mRNA relative abundances were increased in OBDM PMCs treated with high/Fe. Hepcidin mRNA was increased with basal and high iron concentration. We found that the highest quartile of ferritin was associated with an increased risk of type 2 diabetes when it was adjusted to BMI and HOMA-IR; this association was independent of the inflammatory status. The highest level of hepcidin gene expression also showed a trend of increased risk of diabetes, however it was not significant. Levels of hsCRP over 2 mg/L showed a significant trend of increasing the risk of diabetes. In conclusion, iron may stimulate the expression of pro-inflammatory genes (TNF-α and IL- 6), and both hepcidin and ferritin gene expression levels could be a risk factor for the development of type 2 diabetes. Subjects that have an increased cardiovascular risk also have a major risk to develop type 2 diabetes, which is independent of the BMI and insulin resistance state.

  19. Randomised comparison of diets for maintaining obese subjects' weight after major weight loss: ad lib, low fat, high carbohydrate diet v fixed energy intake.

    PubMed Central

    Toubro, S.; Astrup, A.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To compare importance of rate of initial weight loss for long term outcome in obese patients and to compare efficacy of two different weight maintenance programmes. DESIGN: Subjects were randomised to either rapid or slow initial weight loss. Completing patients were re-randomised to one year weight maintenance programme of ad lib diet or fixed energy intake diet. Patients were followed up one year later. SETTING: University research department in Copenhagen, Denmark. SUBJECTS: 43 (41 women) obese adults (body mass index 27-40) who were otherwise healthy living in or around Copenhagen. INTERVENTIONS: 8 weeks of low energy diet (2 MJ/day) or 17 weeks of conventional diet (5 MJ/day), both supported by an anorectic compound (ephedrine 20 mg and caffeine 200 mg thrice daily); one year weight maintenance programme of ad lib, low fat, high carbohydrate diet or fixed energy intake diet (< or = 7.8 MJ/day), both with reinforcement sessions 2-3 times monthly. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Mean initial weight loss and proportion of patients maintaining a weight loss of > 5 kg at follow up. RESULTS: Mean initial weight loss was 12.6 kg (95% confidence interval 10.9 to 14.3 kg) in rapid weight loss group and 12.6 (9.9 to 15.3) kg in conventional diet group. Rate of initial weight loss had no effect on weight maintenance after 6 or 12 months of weight maintenance or at follow up. After weight maintenance programme, the ad lib group had maintained 13.2 (8.1 to 18.3) kg of the initial weight loss of 13.5 (11.4 to 15.5) kg, and the fixed energy intake group had maintained 9.7 (6.1 to 13.3) kg of the initial 13.8 (11.8 to 15.7) kg weight loss (group difference 3.5 (-2.4 to 9.3) kg). Regained weight at follow up was greater in fixed energy intake group than in ad lib group (11.3 (7.1 to 15.5) kg v 5.4 (2.3 to 8.6) kg, group difference 5.9 (0.7 to 11.1) kg, P < 0.03). At follow up, 65% of ad lib group and 40% of fixed energy intake group had maintained a weight loss of > 5 kg (P

  20. Cardiolipin profiles as a potential biomarker of mitochondrial health in diet-induced obese mice subjected to exercise, diet-restriction and ephedrine treatment.

    PubMed

    Faber, Catherine; Zhu, Zhaohai J; Castellino, Stephen; Wagner, David S; Brown, Roger H; Peterson, Richard A; Gates, Lisa; Barton, Joanna; Bickett, Mark; Hagerty, Laura; Kimbrough, Carie; Sola, Mario; Bailey, David; Jordan, Holly; Elangbam, Chandikumar S

    2014-11-01

    Cardiolipin (CL) is crucial for mitochondrial energy metabolism and structural integrity. Alterations in CL quantity or CL species have been associated with mitochondrial dysfunction in several pathological conditions and diseases, including mitochondrial dysfunction-related compound attrition and post-market withdrawal of promising drugs. Here we report alterations in the CL profiles in conjunction with morphology of soleus muscle (SM) and brown adipose tissue (BAT) in diet-induced obese (DIO) mice, subjected to ephedrine treatment (EPH: 200 mg kg(-1)  day(-1) orally), treadmill exercise (EX: 10 meters per min, 1 h per day), or dietary restriction (DR: 25% less of mean food consumed by the EX group) for 7 days. Mice from the DR and EPH groups had a significant decrease in percent body weight and reduced fat mass compared with DIO controls. Morphologic alterations in the BAT included brown adipocytes with reduced cytoplasmic lipid droplets and increased cytoplasmic eosinophilia in the EX, DR and EPH groups. Increased cytoplasmic eosinophilia in the BAT was ultrastructurally manifested by increased mitochondrial cristae, fenestration of mitochondrial cristae, increased electron density of mitochondrial matrix, and increased complexity of shape and elongation of mitochondria. Mitochondrial ultrastructural alterations in the SM of the EX and DR groups included increased mitochondrial cristae, cup-shaped mitochondria and mitochondrial degeneration. All four CL species (tri-linoleoyl-mono-docosahexaenoyl, tetralinoleoyl, tri-linoleoyl-mono-oleoyl, and di-linoleoyl-di-oleoyl) were increased in the BAT of the DR and EPH groups and in the SM of the EPH and EX groups. In conclusion, cardiolipin profiling supported standard methods for assessing mitochondrial biogenesis and health, and may serve as a potential marker of mitochondrial dysfunction in preclinical toxicity studies.

  1. Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics of High-Dose Human Regular U-500 Insulin Versus Human Regular U-100 Insulin in Healthy Obese Subjects

    PubMed Central

    de la Peña, Amparo; Riddle, Matthew; Morrow, Linda A.; Jiang, Honghua H.; Linnebjerg, Helle; Scott, Adam; Win, Khin M.; Hompesch, Marcus; Mace, Kenneth F.; Jacobson, Jennie G.; Jackson, Jeffrey A.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Human regular U-500 (U-500R) insulin (500 units/mL) is increasingly being used clinically, yet its pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacodynamics (PD) have not been well studied. Therefore, we compared PK and PD of clinically relevant doses of U-500R with the same doses of human regular U-100 (U-100R) insulin (100 units/mL). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS This was a single-site, randomized, double-blind, crossover euglycemic clamp study. Single subcutaneous injections of 50- and 100-unit doses of U-500R and U-100R were administered to 24 healthy obese subjects. RESULTS Both overall insulin exposure (area under the serum insulin concentration versus time curve from zero to return to baseline [AUC0-t’]) and overall effect (total glucose infused during a clamp) were similar between formulations at both 50- and 100-unit doses (90% [CI] of ratios contained within [0.80, 1.25]). However, peak concentration and effect were significantly lower for U-500R at both doses (P < 0.05). Both formulations produced relatively long durations of action (18.3 to 21.5 h). Time-to-peak concentration and time to maximum effect were significantly longer for U-500R than U-100R at the 100-unit dose (P < 0.05). Time variables reflective of duration of action (late tRmax50, tRlast) were prolonged for U-500R versus U-100R at both doses (P < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS Overall exposure to and action of U-500R insulin after subcutaneous injection were no different from those of U-100R insulin. For U-500R, peaks of concentration and action profiles were blunted and the effect after the peak was prolonged. These findings may help guide therapy with U-500R insulin for highly insulin-resistant patients with diabetes. PMID:21994429

  2. The association between circulating secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine (SPARC) and glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA(1c)) during lifestyle-modified weight reduction intervention in obese male subjects.

    PubMed

    Kotani, K; Yamada, T; Taniguchi, N

    2011-01-01

    The physiological role and clinical relevance of circulating secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine (SPARC, or osteonectin) is still poorly understood. This study investigated the correlation between circulating SPARC and metabolic variables, including glucose and glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA(1c)), during a diet and exercise modified weight reduction intervention programme. Changes in plasma SPARC levels and several metabolic variables were analysed in asymptomatically obese, nondiabetic, male subjects before and after weight reduction intervention. Body mass index and blood pressure, serum cholesterol and HbA(1c) levels were all significantly reduced after weight reduction intervention. Multiple regression analysis demonstrated that changes in SPARC levels were significantly and positively correlated with HbA(1c). The relationship between SPARC and HbA(1c) may merit further investigation with regard to its association with postprandial or long-term glucose variation in obese male subjects.

  3. Complementary Coffee Cups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banchoff, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    What may have been the birth of a new calculus problem took place when the author noticed that two coffee cups, one convex and one concave, fit nicely together, and he wondered which held more coffee. The fact that their volumes were about equal led to the topic of this article: complementary surfaces of revolution with equal volumes.

  4. Mutually Exclusive, Complementary, or . . .

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schloemer, Cathy G.

    2016-01-01

    Whether students are beginning their study of probability or are well into it, distinctions between complementary sets and mutually exclusive sets can be confusing. Cathy Schloemer writes in this article that for years she used typical classroom examples but was not happy with the student engagement or the level of understanding they produced.…

  5. Childhood Obesity. Special Reference Briefs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winick, Myron

    This reference brief deals with the problem of childhood obesity and how it can lead to obesity in the adult. Eighty-four abstracts are presented of studies on the identification, prevention, and treatment of obesity in children, focusing on diet and psychological attitudes. Subjects of the studies were children ranging in age from infancy through…

  6. Complementary medicine for depression.

    PubMed

    Pilkington, Karen; Rampes, Hagen; Richardson, Janet

    2006-11-01

    Surveys have demonstrated that complementary medicine use for depression is widespread, although patterns of use vary. A series of systematic reviews provide a summary of the current evidence for acupuncture, aromatherapy and massage, homeopathy, meditation, reflexology, herbal medicine, yoga, and several dietary supplements and relaxation techniques. The quantity and quality of individual studies vary widely, but research interest in complementary therapies is increasing, particularly in herbal and nutritional products. Major questions are still to be answered with respect to the effectiveness and appropriate role of these therapies in the management of depression. Areas for further research and some of the potential challenges to research design are discussed. Finally, several ongoing developments in information provision on this topic are highlighted.

  7. Shamanism and complementary therapy.

    PubMed

    Money, M

    1997-10-01

    Shamanism is an ancient tradition which may offer profound insights into the healing process and to our whole understanding of health. It has an extensive historical and geographical distribution, and may contain elements essential to our understanding of humanity. This paper outlines the origin and nature of shamanic practice, and considers its implications for a number of current healing issues. Several areas of potential relevance to complementary practitioners are explored. These include the shamanic concepts of illness, change and growth; illness and healing as rites of passage; death and dying; and the use of imagery in healing. This paper suggests that complementary practitioners may find some shamanic principles highly congruent with their own practice.

  8. Shamanism and complementary therapy.

    PubMed

    Money, M

    2000-11-01

    Shamanism is an ancient tradition which may offer profound insights into the healing process and to our whole understanding of health. It has an extensive historical and geographical distribution, and may contain elements essential to our understanding of humanity. This paper outlines the origin and nature of shamanic practice, and considers its implications for a number of current healing issues. Several areas of potential relevance to complementary practitioners are explored. These include the shamanic concepts of illness, change and growth; illness and healing as rites of passage; death and dying; and the use of imagery in healing. This paper suggests that complementary practitioners may find some shamanic principles highly congruent with their own practice.

  9. A Note on Complementary Medicines

    MedlinePlus

    ... manipulation, and acupuncture are types of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) currently being used by millions of Americans. ... conventional care. The National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM), part of NIH since 1999, funds and ...

  10. Combined Supplementation with Grape Pomace and Omija Fruit Ethanol Extracts Dose-Dependently Improves Body Composition, Plasma Lipid Profiles, Inflammatory Status, and Antioxidant Capacity in Overweight and Obese Subjects.

    PubMed

    Han, Hye Jin; Jung, Un Ju; Kim, Hye-Jin; Cho, Su-Jung; Kim, Ae Hyang; Han, Youngji; Choi, Myung-Sook

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the efficacy of combined grape pomace and omija fruit ethanol extracts (GO) on metabolic disorders in overweight or obese subjects. Seventy-six subjects (30-70 years, body mass index ≥23.0 kg/m2) were divided into control (starch, 4 g/day, n = 24), low-GO (low dose GO, grape pomace extract [342.5 mg/day] + omija fruit extract [57.5 mg/day], n = 26), and high-GO (high dose GO, grape pomace extract [685 mg/day] + omija fruit extract [115 mg/day], n = 26) groups. Body composition, nutrient intake, plasma lipid profiles, inflammation, antioxidant capacity, and hepatotoxicity markers were assessed in all subjects at the baseline and 10 weeks after taking the supplements. The body weight and body fat of overweight or obese subjects was not significantly altered in the low-GO and high-GO groups. However, the high-GO supplement significantly decreased the baseline-adjusted final plasma total-cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-cholesterol, and non-high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol levels and increased the baseline-adjusted final plasma apolipoprotein (apo) A-1 level compared with that of the control group. In addition, the high-GO supplement significantly lowered apo B, apo B/apo A-1, lipoprotein a (Lp[a]), atherogenic index, interleukin (IL)-1β, tumor necrosis factor-α, and elevated erythrocyte antioxidant capacity compared with the control group or the baseline levels. The low-GO supplement decreased the plasma IL-1β level and elevated erythrocyte superoxide dismutase activity compared with that at baseline. However, in general, high-GO exerted a greater effect than low-GO. There were no significant differences in activities of plasma glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase and glutamate pyruvate transaminase between the groups. This study is a preliminary clinical study to verify that GO could be beneficial for amelioration of obesity-related dyslipidemia, inflammation, and oxidative stress

  11. Dietary Polyphenols and Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Meydani, Mohsen; Hasan, Syeda T.

    2010-01-01

    The prevalence of overweight and obesity and their associated metabolic disorders are considered a major threat to the public’s health. While several diet and exercise programs are available for weight loss and prevention of weight regain, progress is often slow and disappointing. Recently, natural bioactive phytochemicals present in foods have been discovered for their potential health benefit effects on the prevention of chronic disorders such as cancer, cardiovascular disease, inflammatory and metabolic diseases including obesity. Polyphenols are a class of naturally-occurring phytochemicals, of which some such as catechins, anthocynines, resveratrol and curcumin have been shown to modulate physiological and molecular pathways that are involved in energy metabolism, adiposity, and obesity. The potential in vivo, beneficial effects of these polyphenols on adiposity and obesity as complementary agents in the up-regulation of energy expenditure have emerged by investigating these compounds in cell cultures, animal models of obesity and in some human clinical and epidemiological studies. In this brief review, the efficacy of the above-named polyphenols and their potential efficacy to modulate obesity and some associated disorders are discussed. PMID:22254051

  12. College Women's Attitudes Toward Obesity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chambless, Jim R.; Anderson, Eugene R.

    This study was undertaken to determine the relationship between college women's attitudes toward obesity and their own body weight. Subjects were placed in three categories: (1) acceptable level of body fat, (2) overweight, and (3) obese. Correlational techniques were used to determine the relationship between the subjects percent of body fat and…

  13. [Obesity and quality of life].

    PubMed

    Da Silva, M Paes; Jorge, Z; Domingues, A; Nobre, E Lacerda; Chambel, P; De Castro, J Jácome

    2006-01-01

    Obesity is considered one of the most relevant health problems of modern societies, as it constitutes a predominant risk factor in the development of various other diseases. The negative impact of obesity on the quality of life of individuals has been the subject of diverse research. The results of a test carried out at Gothenburg University in Sweden suggest that severe obesity is a debilitating factor both for health and psychosocial functioning. Research carried out in Madrid permitted identification of a profile of obese patients with impaired quality of life, which has enabled prophylactic intervention or early treatment of these cases to be considered. The results of a study carried out in the USA propose that pain would appear to be directly related with quality of life and could be considered a covariant of obesity, and should therefore be taken into account in obesity treatments. A study carried out in Oxford concluded that obese subjects or subjects with another chronic disease presented a deterioration in physical wellbeing, however only subjects with another chronic disease (without associated obesity) presented a deterioration in psychological wellbeing. The majority of studies suggest the negative influence of obesity and overweight on health and psychosocial functioning, however it is not possible to clearly define a linear relation between obesity and diminished quality of life.

  14. Impact of GNB3-C825T, ADRB3-Trp64Arg, UCP2-3′UTR 45 bp del/ins, and PPARγ-Pro12Ala Polymorphisms on Bofutsushosan Response in Obese Subjects: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Park, Junghyun; Bose, Shambhunath; Hong, Sun-Woo; Lee, Dong-Ki; Yoo, Jae-Wook; Lim, Chi-Yeon; Lee, Myeongjong

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Obesity is known to be influenced by a number of genes, including the β3 subunit of G protein (GNB3), β3-adrenergic receptor (ADRB3), uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2), and peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma (PPARγ). The single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the above genes, such as GNB3-C825T, ADRB3-Trp64Arg, UCP2-3′UTR 45 bp del/ins, and PPARγ-Pro12Ala, are associated with obesity and body mass index. The present study evaluates the impact of Bofutsushosan, a traditional Eastern Asian herbal medicine with known anti-obesity properties, on obese subjects according to the presence of the above-mentioned SNPs. Upon randomization, the volunteers were allocated to receive Bofutsushosan (n=55) or placebo (n=56) treatments for 8 weeks. Following the treatment schedule, significant reductions in total cholesterol and significant improvement in the Korean version of obesity-related quality of life scale were seen in the Bofutsushosan-treated group, but not in placebo. Bofutsushosan exerted significant anti-obesity effects on a number of parameters in the carriers of the GNB3-825T allele, but only on waist circumference in the GNB3-C/C homozygote. Significant anti-obesity impact of Bofutsushosan was also seen on a number of obesity-indices in both ADRB3-Arg64 carriers and ADRB3-Trp64 homozygotes, as well as in UCP2-D/D carriers, but not in UCP2-D/I+I/I variants. The effect of Bofutsushosan was more pronounced in PPARγ-Pro/Pro genotype compared to PPARγ-Pro/Ala variants. Thus, the results revealed differential responses of the subjects to the anti-obesity effects of Bofutsushosan treatment according to the polymorphism of the vital obesity-related genes. Our study provides new insight into individualized clinical applications of Bofutsushosan for obesity. PMID:24827746

  15. The HOT (Healthy Outcome for Teens) project. Using a web-based medium to influence attitude, subjective norm, perceived behavioral control and intention for obesity and type 2 diabetes prevention.

    PubMed

    Muzaffar, Henna; Chapman-Novakofski, Karen; Castelli, Darla M; Scherer, Jane A

    2014-01-01

    We hypothesized that Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) constructs (behavioral belief, attitude, subjective norm, perceived behavioral control, knowledge and behavioral intention) regarding preventive behaviors for obesity and type 2 diabetes will change favorably after completing the web-based intervention, HOT (Healthy Outcome for Teens) project, grounded in the TPB; and that passive online learning (POL) group will improve more than the active online learning (AOL) group. The secondary hypothesis was to determine to what extent constructs of the TPB predict intentions. 216 adolescents were recruited, 127 randomly allocated to the treatment group (AOL) and 89 to the control group (POL). The subjects completed a TPB questionnaire pre and post intervention. Both POL and AOL groups showed significant improvements from pretest to posttest survey. However, the results indicated no significant difference between POL and AOL for all constructs except behavioral belief. Correlational analysis indicated that all TPB constructs were significantly correlated with intentions for pretest and posttest for both groups. Attitude and behavioral control showed strongest correlations. Regression analysis indicated that TPB constructs were predictive of intentions and the predictive power improved post intervention. Behavioral control consistently predicted intentions for all categories and was the strongest predictor for pretest scores. For posttest scores, knowledge and attitude were the strongest predictors for POL and AOL groups respectively. Thus, HOT project improved knowledge and the TPB constructs scores for targeted behaviors, healthy eating and physical activity, for prevention of obesity and type 2 diabetes.

  16. The HOT (Healthy Outcome for Teens) project. Using a web-based medium to influence attitude, subjective norm, perceived behavioral control and intention for obesity and type 2 diabetes prevention.

    PubMed

    Muzaffar, Henna; Chapman-Novakofski, Karen; Castelli, Darla M; Scherer, Jane A

    2014-01-01

    We hypothesized that Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) constructs (behavioral belief, attitude, subjective norm, perceived behavioral control, knowledge and behavioral intention) regarding preventive behaviors for obesity and type 2 diabetes will change favorably after completing the web-based intervention, HOT (Healthy Outcome for Teens) project, grounded in the TPB; and that passive online learning (POL) group will improve more than the active online learning (AOL) group. The secondary hypothesis was to determine to what extent constructs of the TPB predict intentions. 216 adolescents were recruited, 127 randomly allocated to the treatment group (AOL) and 89 to the control group (POL). The subjects completed a TPB questionnaire pre and post intervention. Both POL and AOL groups showed significant improvements from pretest to posttest survey. However, the results indicated no significant difference between POL and AOL for all constructs except behavioral belief. Correlational analysis indicated that all TPB constructs were significantly correlated with intentions for pretest and posttest for both groups. Attitude and behavioral control showed strongest correlations. Regression analysis indicated that TPB constructs were predictive of intentions and the predictive power improved post intervention. Behavioral control consistently predicted intentions for all categories and was the strongest predictor for pretest scores. For posttest scores, knowledge and attitude were the strongest predictors for POL and AOL groups respectively. Thus, HOT project improved knowledge and the TPB constructs scores for targeted behaviors, healthy eating and physical activity, for prevention of obesity and type 2 diabetes. PMID:24099704

  17. [Inflammation, adipokines and obesity].

    PubMed

    Clément, K; Vignes, S

    2009-09-01

    In obese subjects, there is a "low grade" inflammatory state characterized by the moderate but chronic systemic rise of a panel of molecules (adipokines), which carry out, in addition to pro- or anti-inflammatory actions, several immune or metabolic functions, associated with a macrophagic infiltration in adipose tissue. These two factors provide a better understanding of the pathophysiology of obesity and its potential metabolic, cardiovascular or hepatic complications. A small or even moderate reduction of weight significantly reduces circulating inflammatory markers, modulates adipose tissue profile of inflammatory genes and the risks associated with obesity.

  18. Complementary therapies in health care.

    PubMed

    van der Riet, Pamela

    2011-03-01

    In the past two decades, complementary therapies have grown in popularity in Western countries. The interest in complementary therapies could be explained by a "new consciousness" and the shift to a postmodern society. These therapies, embracing holistic practice, are derived from traditions of Eastern healing. There are many advantages of the complementary therapies that are playing a therapeutic role in the health care of individuals and, through the use of such therapies, nursing is developing a richness in holistic care. However, there are still barriers to be overcome; namely, the reluctance to accept complementary therapies in many contemporary healthcare settings. Through research and education, these barriers can be overcome.

  19. Complementary Barrier Infrared Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ting, David Z.; Bandara, Sumith V.; Hill, Cory J.; Gunapala, Sarath D.

    2009-01-01

    The complementary barrier infrared detector (CBIRD) is designed to eliminate the major dark current sources in the superlattice infrared detector. The concept can also be applied to bulk semiconductor- based infrared detectors. CBIRD uses two different types of specially designed barriers: an electron barrier that blocks electrons but not holes, and a hole barrier that blocks holes but not electrons. The CBIRD structure consists of an n-contact, a hole barrier, an absorber, an electron barrier, and a p-contact. The barriers are placed at the contact-absorber junctions where, in a conventional p-i-n detector structure, there normally are depletion regions that produce generation-recombination (GR) dark currents due to Shockley-Read- Hall (SRH) processes. The wider-bandgap complementary barriers suppress G-R dark current. The barriers also block diffusion dark currents generated in the diffusion wings in the neutral regions. In addition, the wider gap barriers serve to reduce tunneling dark currents. In the case of a superlattice-based absorber, the superlattice itself can be designed to suppress dark currents due to Auger processes. At the same time, the barriers actually help to enhance the collection of photo-generated carriers by deflecting the photo-carriers that are diffusing in the wrong direction (i.e., away from collectors) and redirecting them toward the collecting contacts. The contact layers are made from materials with narrower bandgaps than the barriers. This allows good ohmic contacts to be made, resulting in lower contact resistances. Previously, THALES Research and Technology (France) demonstrated detectors with bulk InAsSb (specifically InAs0.91Sb0.09) absorber lattice-matched to GaSb substrates. The absorber is surrounded by two wider bandgap layers designed to minimize impedance to photocurrent flow. The wide bandgap materials also serve as contacts. The cutoff wavelength of the InAsSb absorber is fixed. CBIRD may be considered as a modified

  20. Colonic metaproteomic signatures of active bacteria and the host in obesity.

    PubMed

    Kolmeder, Carolin A; Ritari, Jarmo; Verdam, Froukje J; Muth, Thilo; Keskitalo, Salla; Varjosalo, Markku; Fuentes, Susana; Greve, Jan Willem; Buurman, Wim A; Reichl, Udo; Rapp, Erdmann; Martens, Lennart; Palva, Airi; Salonen, Anne; Rensen, Sander S; de Vos, Willem M

    2015-10-01

    Obesity is associated with the intestinal microbiota in humans but the underlying mechanisms are yet to be fully understood. Our previous phylogenetic study showed that the faecal microbiota profiles of nonobese versus obese and morbidly obese individuals differed. Here, we have extended this analysis with a characterization of the faecal metaproteome, in order to detect differences at a functional level. Proteins were extracted from crude faecal samples of 29 subjects, separated by 1D gel electrophoresis and characterized using RP LC-MS/MS. The peptide data were analyzed in database searches with two complementary algorithms, OMSSA and X!Tandem, to increase the number of identifications. Evolutionary genealogy of genes: nonsupervised orthologous groups (EggNOG) database searches resulted in the functional annotation of over 90% of the identified microbial and human proteins. Based on both bacterial and human proteins, a clear clustering of obese and nonobese samples was obtained that exceeded the phylogenetic separation in dimension. Moreover, integration of the metaproteomics and phylogenetic datasets revealed notably that the phylum Bacteroidetes was metabolically more active in the obese than nonobese subjects. Finally, significant correlations between clinical measurements and bacterial gene functions were identified. This study emphasizes the importance of integrating data of the host and microbiota to understand their interactions. PMID:26255997

  1. Colonic metaproteomic signatures of active bacteria and the host in obesity.

    PubMed

    Kolmeder, Carolin A; Ritari, Jarmo; Verdam, Froukje J; Muth, Thilo; Keskitalo, Salla; Varjosalo, Markku; Fuentes, Susana; Greve, Jan Willem; Buurman, Wim A; Reichl, Udo; Rapp, Erdmann; Martens, Lennart; Palva, Airi; Salonen, Anne; Rensen, Sander S; de Vos, Willem M

    2015-10-01

    Obesity is associated with the intestinal microbiota in humans but the underlying mechanisms are yet to be fully understood. Our previous phylogenetic study showed that the faecal microbiota profiles of nonobese versus obese and morbidly obese individuals differed. Here, we have extended this analysis with a characterization of the faecal metaproteome, in order to detect differences at a functional level. Proteins were extracted from crude faecal samples of 29 subjects, separated by 1D gel electrophoresis and characterized using RP LC-MS/MS. The peptide data were analyzed in database searches with two complementary algorithms, OMSSA and X!Tandem, to increase the number of identifications. Evolutionary genealogy of genes: nonsupervised orthologous groups (EggNOG) database searches resulted in the functional annotation of over 90% of the identified microbial and human proteins. Based on both bacterial and human proteins, a clear clustering of obese and nonobese samples was obtained that exceeded the phylogenetic separation in dimension. Moreover, integration of the metaproteomics and phylogenetic datasets revealed notably that the phylum Bacteroidetes was metabolically more active in the obese than nonobese subjects. Finally, significant correlations between clinical measurements and bacterial gene functions were identified. This study emphasizes the importance of integrating data of the host and microbiota to understand their interactions.

  2. Coleus forskohlii Extract Supplementation in Conjunction with a Hypocaloric Diet Reduces the Risk Factors of Metabolic Syndrome in Overweight and Obese Subjects: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Loftus, Hayley L; Astell, Katie J; Mathai, Michael L; Su, Xiao Q

    2015-11-17

    Limited studies have shown that Coleus forskohlii extract may aid in weight management. This randomized, double blind placebo-controlled clinical study assessed the effects of supplementation with C. forskohlii extract on key markers of obesity and metabolic parameters in overweight and obese individuals. Thirty participants completed the trial and they were randomly assigned to receive either 250 mg of C. forskohlii extract (n = 15) or a placebo twice daily for 12 weeks. All participants were advised to follow a hypocaloric diet throughout the study. Body weight, body mass index (BMI), waist and hip circumference, and waist to hip ratio, were monitored fortnightly. Dietary intake was assessed at the baseline and weeks 4, 8 and 12. Appetite was assessed using visual analogue scales and blood samples were analyzed for plasma lipids, ghrelin, leptin, glucose and insulin at the baseline and end of the intervention. Significant reductions to waist and hip circumference (p = 0.02; p = 0.01, respectively) were recorded in both experimental and placebo groups after the 12 week intervention. Furthermore, high density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C) was significantly increased (p = 0.01) in both groups. The experimental group showed a favorable improvement in insulin concentration and insulin resistance (p = 0.001; 0.01 respectively) compared to the placebo group. These findings suggest that C. forskohlii extract in conjunction with a hypocaloric diet may be useful in the management of metabolic risk factors.

  3. Skeletal muscle alkaline Pi pool is decreased in overweight-to-obese sedentary subjects and relates to mitochondrial capacity and phosphodiester content

    PubMed Central

    Valkovič, Ladislav; Chmelík, Marek; Ukropcová, Barbara; Heckmann, Thomas; Bogner, Wolfgang; Frollo, Ivan; Tschan, Harald; Krebs, Michael; Bachl, Norbert; Ukropec, Jozef; Trattnig, Siegfried; Krššák, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Defects in skeletal muscle energy metabolism are indicative of systemic disorders such as obesity or type 2 diabetes. Phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy (31P-MRS), in particularly dynamic 31P-MRS, provides a powerful tool for the non-invasive investigation of muscular oxidative metabolism. The increase in spectral and temporal resolution of 31P-MRS at ultra high fields (i.e., 7T) uncovers new potential for previously implemented techniques, e.g., saturation transfer (ST) or highly resolved static spectra. In this study, we aimed to investigate the differences in muscle metabolism between overweight-to-obese sedentary (Ob/Sed) and lean active (L/Ac) individuals through dynamic, static, and ST 31P-MRS at 7T. In addition, as the dynamic 31P-MRS requires a complex setup and patient exercise, our aim was to identify an alternative technique that might provide a biomarker of oxidative metabolism. The Ob/Sed group exhibited lower mitochondrial capacity, and, in addition, static 31P-MRS also revealed differences in the Pi-to-ATP exchange flux, the alkaline Pi-pool, and glycero-phosphocholine concentrations between the groups. In addition to these differences, we have identified correlations between dynamically measured oxidative flux and static concentrations of the alkaline Pi-pool and glycero-phosphocholine, suggesting the possibility of using high spectral resolution 31P-MRS data, acquired at rest, as a marker of oxidative metabolism. PMID:26838588

  4. Plasma Periostin Levels Are Increased in Chinese Subjects with Obesity and Type 2 Diabetes and Are Positively Correlated with Glucose and Lipid Parameters

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Yuanyuan; Qu, Hua; Wang, Hang; Wei, Huili; Wu, Jing; Duan, Yang; Liu, Dan; Deng, Huacong

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the relations among plasma periostin, glucose and lipid metabolism, insulin resistance and inflammation in Chinese patients with obesity (OB), and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Plasma periostin levels in the T2DM group were significantly higher than the NGT group (P < 0.01). Patients with both OB and T2DM had the highest periostin levels. Correlation analysis showed that plasma periostin levels were positively correlated with weight, waist circumference (WC), body mass index (BMI), waist-hip ratio (WHR), fasting plasma glucose (FPG), 2 h postchallenge plasma glucose (2 h PG), glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), triglyceride (TG), total cholesterol (TC), fasting insulin (FINS), homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), TNF-α, and IL-6 (P < 0.05 or 0.001) and negatively correlated with high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) (P < 0.001). Multiple linear regression analysis showed that TG, TNF-α, and HOMA-IR were independent related factors in influencing the levels of plasma periostin (P < 0.001). These results suggested that Chinese patients with obesity and T2DM had significantly higher plasma periostin levels. Plasma periostin levels were strongly associated with plasma TG, chronic inflammation, and insulin resistance. PMID:27313402

  5. Effects of glucomannan-enriched, aronia juice-based supplement on cellular antioxidant enzymes and membrane lipid status in subjects with abdominal obesity.

    PubMed

    Kardum, Nevena; Petrović-Oggiano, Gordana; Takic, Marija; Glibetić, Natalija; Zec, Manja; Debeljak-Martacic, Jasmina; Konić-Ristić, Aleksandra

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the effects of a 4-week-long consumption of glucomannan-enriched, aronia juice-based supplement on anthropometric parameters, membrane fatty acid profile, and status of antioxidant enzymes in erythrocytes obtained from postmenopausal women with abdominal obesity. Twenty women aged 45-65 with a mean body mass index (BMI) of 36.1 ± 4.4 kg/m(2) and waist circumference of 104.8 ± 10.1 cm were enrolled. Participants were instructed to consume 100 mL of supplement per day as part of their regular diet. A significant increase in the content of n-3 (P < 0.05) polyunsaturated fatty acids in membrane phospholipids was observed, with a marked increase in the level of docosahexaenoic fatty acid (P < 0.05). Accordingly, a decrease in the n-6 and n-3 fatty acids ratio was observed (P < 0.05). The observed effects were accompanied with an increase in glutathione peroxidase activity (P < 0.05). Values for BMI (P < 0.001), waist circumference (P < 0.001), and systolic blood pressure (P < 0.05) were significantly lower after the intervention. The obtained results indicate a positive impact of tested supplement on cellular oxidative damage, blood pressure, and anthropometric indices of obesity.

  6. Effects of Glucomannan-Enriched, Aronia Juice-Based Supplement on Cellular Antioxidant Enzymes and Membrane Lipid Status in Subjects with Abdominal Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Petrović-Oggiano, Gordana; Glibetić, Natalija; Zec, Manja; Debeljak-Martacic, Jasmina; Konić-Ristić, Aleksandra

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the effects of a 4-week-long consumption of glucomannan-enriched, aronia juice-based supplement on anthropometric parameters, membrane fatty acid profile, and status of antioxidant enzymes in erythrocytes obtained from postmenopausal women with abdominal obesity. Twenty women aged 45–65 with a mean body mass index (BMI) of 36.1 ± 4.4 kg/m2 and waist circumference of 104.8 ± 10.1 cm were enrolled. Participants were instructed to consume 100 mL of supplement per day as part of their regular diet. A significant increase in the content of n-3 (P < 0.05) polyunsaturated fatty acids in membrane phospholipids was observed, with a marked increase in the level of docosahexaenoic fatty acid (P < 0.05). Accordingly, a decrease in the n-6 and n-3 fatty acids ratio was observed (P < 0.05). The observed effects were accompanied with an increase in glutathione peroxidase activity (P < 0.05). Values for BMI (P < 0.001), waist circumference (P < 0.001), and systolic blood pressure (P < 0.05) were significantly lower after the intervention. The obtained results indicate a positive impact of tested supplement on cellular oxidative damage, blood pressure, and anthropometric indices of obesity. PMID:25574495

  7. Coleus forskohlii Extract Supplementation in Conjunction with a Hypocaloric Diet Reduces the Risk Factors of Metabolic Syndrome in Overweight and Obese Subjects: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Loftus, Hayley L.; Astell, Katie J.; Mathai, Michael L.; Su, Xiao Q.

    2015-01-01

    Limited studies have shown that Coleus forskohlii extract may aid in weight management. This randomized, double blind placebo-controlled clinical study assessed the effects of supplementation with C. forskohlii extract on key markers of obesity and metabolic parameters in overweight and obese individuals. Thirty participants completed the trial and they were randomly assigned to receive either 250 mg of C. forskohlii extract (n = 15) or a placebo twice daily for 12 weeks. All participants were advised to follow a hypocaloric diet throughout the study. Body weight, body mass index (BMI), waist and hip circumference, and waist to hip ratio, were monitored fortnightly. Dietary intake was assessed at the baseline and weeks 4, 8 and 12. Appetite was assessed using visual analogue scales and blood samples were analyzed for plasma lipids, ghrelin, leptin, glucose and insulin at the baseline and end of the intervention. Significant reductions to waist and hip circumference (p = 0.02; p = 0.01, respectively) were recorded in both experimental and placebo groups after the 12 week intervention. Furthermore, high density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C) was significantly increased (p = 0.01) in both groups. The experimental group showed a favorable improvement in insulin concentration and insulin resistance (p = 0.001; 0.01 respectively) compared to the placebo group. These findings suggest that C. forskohlii extract in conjunction with a hypocaloric diet may be useful in the management of metabolic risk factors. PMID:26593941

  8. Activation of heat shock response to treat obese subjects with type 2 diabetes: a prospective, frequency-escalating, randomized, open-label, triple-arm trial

    PubMed Central

    Kondo, Tatsuya; Goto, Rieko; Ono, Kaoru; Kitano, Sayaka; Suico, Mary Ann; Sato, Miki; Igata, Motoyuki; Kawashima, Junji; Motoshima, Hiroyuki; Matsumura, Takeshi; Kai, Hirofumi; Araki, Eiichi

    2016-01-01

    Activation of heat shock response (HSR) improves accumulated visceral adiposity and metabolic abnormalities in type 2 diabetes. To identify the optimal intervention strategy of the activation of the HSR provided by mild electrical stimulation (MES) with heat shock (HS) in type 2 diabetes. This study was a prospective, frequency-escalating, randomized, open-label, triple-arm trial in Japan. A total of 60 obese type 2 diabetes patients were randomized into three groups receiving two, four, or seven treatments per week for 12 weeks. No adverse events were identified. MES + HS treatment (when all three groups were combined), significantly improved visceral adiposity, glycemic control, insulin resistance, systemic inflammation, renal function, hepatic steatosis and lipid profile compared to baseline. The reduction in HbA1c was significantly greater among those treated four times per week (−0.36%) or seven times per week (−0.65%) than among those treated two times per week (−0.10%). The relative HbA1c levels in seven times per week group was significantly decreased when adjusted by two times per week group (−0.55%. p = 0.001). This research provides the positive impact of MES + HS to treat obese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. PMID:27759092

  9. [Integrating complementary medicines into care].

    PubMed

    Graz, Bertrand

    2016-04-01

    More and more research is being carried out into complementary medicines. It is no longer possible to say that these treatments have no scientific basis, as for some, their efficacy has been proven by clinical studies. Health services must move beyond ideological arguments and integrate safe and cost-effective complementary medicines.

  10. [Integrating complementary medicines into care].

    PubMed

    Graz, Bertrand

    2016-04-01

    More and more research is being carried out into complementary medicines. It is no longer possible to say that these treatments have no scientific basis, as for some, their efficacy has been proven by clinical studies. Health services must move beyond ideological arguments and integrate safe and cost-effective complementary medicines. PMID:27063880

  11. Obesity Epidemiology

    PubMed Central

    Haidar, Yarah M.; Cosman, Bard C.

    2011-01-01

    Obesity has progressed in a few decades from a public health footnote in developed countries to a top-priority international issue. Because obesity implies increased morbidity and mortality from chronic, debilitating disorders, it is a major burden on individuals and health systems in both developing and developed countries. Obesity is a complex disorder unequally affecting all age groups and socioeconomic classes. Of special concern is increasing childhood obesity. This review presents the extent of the obesity epidemic and its impact worldwide by way of introduction to a discussion of colon and rectal surgery in the obese patient. PMID:23204935

  12. Altered Plasma Lysophosphatidylcholines and Amides in Non-Obese and Non-Diabetic Subjects with Borderline-To-Moderate Hypertriglyceridemia: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Saem; Lee, Sang-Hyun; Lee, Jong Ho

    2015-01-01

    Hypertriglyceridemia (HTG) is a risk factor for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (CVD). We investigated alterations in plasma metabolites associated with borderline-to-moderate HTG (triglycerides (TG) 150-500 mg/dL). Using UPLC-LTQ-Orbitrap mass spectrometry analysis, the metabolomics profiles of 111 non-diabetic and non-obese individuals with borderline-to-moderate HTG were compared with those of 111 age- and sex-matched controls with normotriglyceridemia (NTG, TG <150 mg/dL). When compared to the NTG control group, the HTG group exhibited higher plasma levels of lysophosphatidylcholines (lysoPCs), including C14:0 (q = 0.001) and C16:0 (q = 1.8E-05), and several amides, including N-ethyldodecanamide (q = 2.9E-05), N-propyldodecanamide (q = 3.5E-05), palmitoleamide (q = 2.9E-06), and palmitic amide (q = 0.019). The metabolomic profiles of the HTG group also exhibited lower plasma levels of cis-4-octenedioic acid (q<1.0E-9) and docosanamide (q = 0.002) compared with those of the NTG controls. LysoPC 16:0 and palmitoleamide emerged as the primary metabolites able to discriminate the HTG group from the NTG group in a partial least-squares discriminant analysis and were positively associated with the fasting triglyceride levels. We identified alterations in lysoPCs, amides, and cis-4-octenedioic acid among non-diabetic and non-obese individuals with borderline-to-moderate HTG. These results provide novel insights into the metabolic alterations that occur in the early metabolic stages of HTG. This information may facilitate the design of early interventions to prevent disease progression. PMID:25856314

  13. Effects of a 12-month moderate weight loss intervention on insulin sensitivity and inflammation status in nondiabetic overweight and obese subjects.

    PubMed

    Ho, T P; Zhao, X; Courville, A B; Linderman, J D; Smith, S; Sebring, N; Della Valle, D M; Fitzpatrick, B; Simchowitz, L; Celi, F S

    2015-04-01

    Weight loss intervention is the principal non-pharmacological method for prevention and treatment of type 2 diabetes. However, little is known whether it influences insulin sensitivity directly or via its anti-inflammatory effect. The aim of this study was to assess the independent role of changes in inflammation status and weight loss on insulin sensitivity in this population.Overweight and obese nondiabetic participants without co-morbidities underwent a one-year weight loss intervention focused on caloric restriction and behavioral support. Markers of inflammation, body composition, anthropometric para-meters, and insulin sensitivity were recorded at baseline, 6, and 12 months. Insulin sensitivity was assessed with frequently sampled intravenous glucose tolerance test and Minimal Model. Twenty-eight participants (F: 15, M: 13, age 39±5 years, BMI 33.2±4.6 kg/m(2)) completed the study, achieving 9.4±6.9% weight loss, which was predominantly fat mass (7.7±5.6 kg, p<0.0001). Dietary intervention resulted in significant decrease in leptin, leptin-to-adiponectin ratio, hs-CRP, and IL-6 (all p<0.02), and improvement in HOMA-IR and Insulin Sensitivity Index (SI) (both p<0.001). In response to weight loss IL-1β, IL-2, leptin, and resistin were significantly associated with insulin, sensitivity, whereas sICAM-1 had only marginal additive effect. Moderate weight loss in otherwise healthy overweight and obese individuals resulted in an improvement in insulin sensitivity and in the overall inflammation state; the latter played only a minimal independent role in modulating insulin sensitivity.

  14. Hormonal contraception increases risk of asthma among obese but decreases it among nonobese subjects: a prospective, population-based cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Burgess, John A.; Lau, Melisa Y.Z.; Lowe, Adrian J.; Gurrin, Lyle C.; Hopper, John L.; Giles, Graham G.; Johns, David P.; Walters, E. Haydn; Abramson, Michael J.; Gómez Real, Francisco; Dharmage, Shyamali C.

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiological data on asthma suggest a sex difference that varies with age. Hormonal effects have been suggested as a possible explanation for these differences but there is a scarcity of evidence on these relationships. Our objective was to examine the relationship between reproductive factors and asthma risk among females and to examine whether body mass index (BMI) modifies this relationship. Female participants in the 2004 fifth decade follow-up postal survey of the Tasmanian Longitudinal Health Study formed the study population. Reproductive history and data on hormonal contraceptive (HC) use were collected on 2764 females. Multiple logistic regression was used to assess the association between the reproductive factors and current asthma. The mean age of participants was 43 years and the prevalence of middle-aged current asthma was 12.8%. Females with very early menarche (≤10 years) had higher odds of middle-aged current asthma (OR 1.91, 95% CI 1.14–3.2). Pregnancy history (number of births and age at first pregnancy) were not associated with current asthma risk at 44 years. Ever having used HCs, years of use and age started using HCs were not individually associated with current asthma risk. However, body mass index significantly modified the relationship between HC use and asthma. We found increasing years of pill use was associated with a significantly increased risk of current asthma in overweight/obese women but a reduced risk in normal weight women (interaction p=0.015). Hormonal effects from use of HCs and early menarche may contribute to the sex differential in asthma risk. Our findings suggest that in obese women with a history of long-term HC use may be at an increased risk of chronic respiratory disease, and regular monitoring for asthma and asthma symptoms may be recommended. PMID:27730150

  15. A randomized, double blind, cross-over, placebo-controlled clinical trial to assess the effects of Candesartan on the insulin sensitivity on non diabetic, non hypertense subjects with dysglyce mia and abdominal obesity. "ARAMIA"

    PubMed Central

    López-Jaramillo, Patricio; Pradilla, Lina P; Lahera, Vicente; Sieger, Federico A Silva; Rueda-Clausen, Christian F; Márquez, Gustavo A

    2006-01-01

    Background The raising prevalence of type-2 diabetes mellitus and obesity has been recognized as a major problem for public health, affecting both developed and developing countries. Impaired fasting plasma glucose has been previously associated with endothelial dysfunction, higher levels of inflammatory markers and increased risk of developing insulin resistance and cardiovascular events. Besides life-style changes, the blockade of the renin-angiotensin system has been proposed as a useful alternative intervention to improve insulin resistance and decrease the number of new type-2 diabetes cases. The aim of this clinical trial is to study the effect of the treatment with Candesartan, an angiotensin II receptor antagonist, on the insulin resistance, the plasma levels of adipoquines, oxidative stress and prothrombotic markers, in a group of non diabetic, non hypertensive, dysglycemic and obese subjects. Methods and design A randomized, double blind, cross-over, placebo-controlled, clinical trial was designed to assess the effects of Candesartan (up to 32 mg/day during 6 months) on the Homeostasis Model Assessment (HOMA) index, lipid profile, protrombotic state, oxidative stress and plasma levels of inflammatory markers. The participants will be recruited in the "Fundación Cardiovascular de Colombia". Subjects who fullfil selection criteria will receive permanent educational, nutritional and exercise support during their participation in the study. After a 15 days-run-in period with placebo and life-style recommendations, the patients who have a treatment compliance equal or greater than 80% will be randomlly assigned to one of the treatment groups. Group A will receive Candesartan during 6 months and placebo during 6 months. Group B will receive placebo during the first 6 months, and then, Candesartan during the last 6 months. Control visits will be programed monthly and all parameters of interest will be evaluated every 6 months. Hypothesis Treatment with

  16. Childhood Obesity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yuca, Sevil Ari, Ed.

    2012-01-01

    This book aims to provide readers with a general as well as an advanced overview of the key trends in childhood obesity. Obesity is an illness that occurs due to a combination of genetic, environmental, psychosocial, metabolic and hormonal factors. The prevalence of obesity has shown a great rise both in adults and children in the last 30 years.…

  17. Obesity management

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rates of obesity in the United States have increased dramatically over the past 30 years. Approximately 35% of children and 66% of adults are currently considered overweight or obese. Although obesity is seen in all ethnicities and economic classes, ethnic minorities and those of lower socioeconomic...

  18. The Effect of Normally Consumed Amounts of Sucrose or High Fructose Corn Syrup on Lipid Profiles, Body Composition and Related Parameters in Overweight/Obese Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Lowndes, Joshua; Sinnett, Stephanie; Pardo, Sabrina; Nguyen, Von T.; Melanson, Kathleen J.; Yu, Zhiping; Lowther, Britte E.; Rippe, James M.

    2014-01-01

    The American Heart Association (AHA) has advocated that women and men not consume more than 100 and 150 kcal/day, respectively, from added sugars. These levels are currently exceeded by over 90% of the adult population in the United States. Few data exist on longer-term metabolic effects when sucrose and High Fructose Corn Syrup (HFCS), the principal sources of added dietary sugars, are consumed at levels typical of the general population. Sixty five overweight and obese individuals were placed on a eucaloric (weight stable) diet for 10-weeks, which incorporated sucrose- or HFCS-sweetened, low-fat milk at 10% or 20% of calories in a randomized, double-blinded study. All groups responded similarly (interaction p > 0.05). There was no change in body weight in any of the groups over the 10-week study, or in systolic or diastolic blood pressure. Likewise, there were no changes in total cholesterol, triglycerides, low-density lipoprotein (LDL), or apolipoprotein B (Apo B). We conclude that (1) when consumed as part of a eucaloric diet fructose—when given with glucose (as normally consumed) does not promote weight gain or an atherogenic lipid profile even when consumed at two to four times the level recently recommended by the AHA. (2) There were no differences between HFCS and sucrose on these parameters. PMID:24642950

  19. The effect of normally consumed amounts of sucrose or high fructose corn syrup on lipid profiles, body composition and related parameters in overweight/obese subjects.

    PubMed

    Lowndes, Joshua; Sinnett, Stephanie; Pardo, Sabrina; Nguyen, Von T; Melanson, Kathleen J; Yu, Zhiping; Lowther, Britte E; Rippe, James M

    2014-01-01

    The American Heart Association (AHA) has advocated that women and men not consume more than 100 and 150 kcal/day, respectively, from added sugars. These levels are currently exceeded by over 90% of the adult population in the United States. Few data exist on longer-term metabolic effects when sucrose and High Fructose Corn Syrup (HFCS), the principal sources of added dietary sugars, are consumed at levels typical of the general population. Sixty five overweight and obese individuals were placed on a eucaloric (weight stable) diet for 10-weeks, which incorporated sucrose- or HFCS-sweetened, low-fat milk at 10% or 20% of calories in a randomized, double-blinded study. All groups responded similarly (interaction p > 0.05). There was no change in body weight in any of the groups over the 10-week study, or in systolic or diastolic blood pressure. Likewise, there were no changes in total cholesterol, triglycerides, low-density lipoprotein (LDL), or apolipoprotein B (Apo B). We conclude that (1) when consumed as part of a eucaloric diet fructose--when given with glucose (as normally consumed) does not promote weight gain or an atherogenic lipid profile even when consumed at two to four times the level recently recommended by the AHA. (2) There were no differences between HFCS and sucrose on these parameters. PMID:24642950

  20. The effect of normally consumed amounts of sucrose or high fructose corn syrup on lipid profiles, body composition and related parameters in overweight/obese subjects.

    PubMed

    Lowndes, Joshua; Sinnett, Stephanie; Pardo, Sabrina; Nguyen, Von T; Melanson, Kathleen J; Yu, Zhiping; Lowther, Britte E; Rippe, James M

    2014-01-01

    The American Heart Association (AHA) has advocated that women and men not consume more than 100 and 150 kcal/day, respectively, from added sugars. These levels are currently exceeded by over 90% of the adult population in the United States. Few data exist on longer-term metabolic effects when sucrose and High Fructose Corn Syrup (HFCS), the principal sources of added dietary sugars, are consumed at levels typical of the general population. Sixty five overweight and obese individuals were placed on a eucaloric (weight stable) diet for 10-weeks, which incorporated sucrose- or HFCS-sweetened, low-fat milk at 10% or 20% of calories in a randomized, double-blinded study. All groups responded similarly (interaction p > 0.05). There was no change in body weight in any of the groups over the 10-week study, or in systolic or diastolic blood pressure. Likewise, there were no changes in total cholesterol, triglycerides, low-density lipoprotein (LDL), or apolipoprotein B (Apo B). We conclude that (1) when consumed as part of a eucaloric diet fructose--when given with glucose (as normally consumed) does not promote weight gain or an atherogenic lipid profile even when consumed at two to four times the level recently recommended by the AHA. (2) There were no differences between HFCS and sucrose on these parameters.

  1. The neuroendocrinology of obesity.

    PubMed

    Lustig, R H

    2001-09-01

    The regulation of energy balance is enormously complex, with numerous genetic, hormonal, neural/behavioral, and societal influences. Although the current epidemic of obesity has its underpinnings in the changes in culture during the last half century, the role of the neuroendocrine system in the genesis of obesity is physiologically and therapeutically unavoidable. Increased understanding of this system has suggested organic etiologies (and therapies) for some rare and not-so-rare forms of obesity. With so many inputs, it is not implausible that dysfunction of other parts of this feedback system will be found to explain other forms of obesity in the future. Fortunately or unfortunately, diet and exercise remain the mainstays of obesity therapy. Most diet-exercise programs result in an acute 11-kg weight loss in adults; the question is whether it can be sustained without significant long-term behavior modification. In the European Sibutramine Trial of Obesity Reduction and Maintenance (STORM), 42% of treated patients dropped out; of those remaining, 77% of subjects lost more than 5% of initial body weight, but only 43% of these individuals maintained greater than 80% of this loss over 2 years. Could there be an organic component in persons who do not respond? Obesity pharmacotherapies sometimes have beneficial acute effects, but these effects are impermanent; discontinuation tends to result in a rebound weight gain, suggesting that the etiology of the obesity is still present. A useful guiding principle is that patients who do not respond to diet and exercise should undergo an initial medical evaluation, including assessments of birth weight, past medical history, weight history, family history, diet, exercise, and fasting insulin and thyroid levels. As the nosology of obesity improves, diagnostic efficiency and therapeutic success should increase, leading to a decrease in associated morbidity, mortality, and socioeconomic ramifications.

  2. Childhood obesity.

    PubMed

    Dean, Erin

    2016-08-31

    Essential facts Nearly one third of children aged 2-15 in England are overweight or obese. Younger generations are becoming obese at earlier ages and staying so for longer. Reducing obesity levels is a major public health challenge as the condition doubles the risk of dying prematurely. Obese adults are more likely to develop health conditions such as heart disease, type 2 diabetes and depression. Treating conditions related to obesity is a major financial burden on the NHS, costing more than £5 billion a year. PMID:27577286

  3. Complementary and Alternative Methods and Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... My Saved Articles » My ACS » Complementary and Alternative Methods and Cancer Download Printable Version [PDF] » ( En español ) ... with cancer here. What are complementary and alternative methods? How are complementary methods used to manage cancer? ...

  4. Complementary and Alternative Medicine in Cancer Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ask about Your Treatment Research Complementary and Alternative Medicine for Patients Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is ... based on scientific evidence from research studies. Complementary medicine refers to treatments that are used with standard ...

  5. Prevalence of obesity in Bombay.

    PubMed

    Dhurandhar, N V; Kulkarni, P R

    1992-05-01

    Obesity has been reported in developed as well as developing countries. However, data on a large sample of the Indian population are lacking. This study analysed the prevalence of obesity among 1,784 adults in Bombay from various sections of society. Since the prevalence of obesity depends upon the criteria used, prevalence was judged by three criteria viz. percentage excess of body weight, body mass index, and body fat content. The data were classified and analysed according to occupation, age group, income, diet type, and also with respect to family history of obesity. The three methods gave a different prevalence of obesity. In general, the criterion of body mass index under-estimated, and body fat content over-estimated the prevalence as compared to that obtained by percentage excess body weight. An extremely high prevalence of obesity was found in all sub-groups of the sample. As judged by a body mass index of 25 and above, male students had the lowest (10.7%) and male medical doctors had the highest (53.1%) prevalence of obesity. Prevalence was highest for the age group 31-50 years for males and females, and declined on either side of this age range. Prevalence was directly proportional to financial income, and subjects with a family history of obesity had a greater prevalence of obesity compared to those without. This study indicates the gravity of the problem of obesity in Bombay, and provides directions for nutritional planning in the future.

  6. The Biomechanical Implications of Obesity in K-12 Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strohmeyer, Scott

    2007-01-01

    Few biomechanical studies have examined obese individuals as primary subjects. However, some mechanical differences have been identified between overweight or obese individuals and nonoverweight movers. It is not clear how obesity affects the onset of osteoarthritis, for example, but it is evident that obesity does place significant limitations on…

  7. Integrative Medicine and Complementary and Alternative Therapies

    MedlinePlus

    ... 000 this month to find cures. Loading... Integrative Medicine and Complementary and Alternative Therapies Integrative Medicine and Complementary and Alternative Therapies SHARE: Print Glossary ...

  8. Dual Peroxisome Proliferator–Activated Receptor α/δ Agonist GFT505 Improves Hepatic and Peripheral Insulin Sensitivity in Abdominally Obese Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Cariou, Bertrand; Hanf, Rémy; Lambert-Porcheron, Stéphanie; Zaïr, Yassine; Sauvinet, Valérie; Noël, Benoit; Flet, Laurent; Vidal, Hubert; Staels, Bart; Laville, Martine

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The development of new insulin sensitizers is an unmet need for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. We investigated the effect of GFT505, a dual peroxisome proliferator–activated receptor (PPAR)-α/δ agonist, on peripheral and hepatic insulin sensitivity. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Twenty-two abdominally obese insulin-resistant males (homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance >3) were randomly assigned in a randomized crossover study to subsequent 8-week treatment periods with GFT505 (80 mg/day) or placebo, followed by a two-step hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic insulin clamp with a glucose tracer to calculate endogenous glucose production (EGP). The primary end point was the improvement in glucose infusion rate (GIR). Gene expression analysis was performed on skeletal muscle biopsy specimens. RESULTS GFT505 improved peripheral insulin sensitivity, with a 21% (P = 0.048) increase of the GIR at the second insulin infusion period. GFT505 also enhanced hepatic insulin sensitivity, with a 44% (P = 0.006) increase of insulin suppression of EGP at the first insulin infusion period. Insulin-suppressed plasma free fatty acid concentrations were significantly reduced on GFT505 treatment (0.21 ± 0.07 vs. 0.27 ± 0.11 mmol/L; P = 0.006). Neither PPARα nor PPARδ target genes were induced in skeletal muscle, suggesting a liver-targeted action of GFT505. GFT505 significantly reduced fasting plasma triglycerides (−21%; P = 0.003) and LDL cholesterol (−13%; P = 0.0006), as well as liver enzyme concentrations (γ-glutamyltranspeptidase: −30.4%, P = 0.003; alanine aminotransferase: −20.5%, P = 0.004). There was no safety concern or any indication of PPARγ activation with GFT505. CONCLUSIONS The dual PPARα/δ agonist GFT505 is a liver-targeted insulin-sensitizer that is a promising drug candidate for the treatment of type 2 diabetes and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. PMID:23715754

  9. Prevalence and clinical characteristics of unremembered nocturnal eating in diabetic subjects: Kurume sleep trouble in obesity and metabolic disorders (KUSTOMED) study.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Kentaro; Nakayama, Hitomi; Kato, Tomoko; Tajiri, Yuji; Sato, Shuichi; Hirao, Saori; Oshige, Tamami; Hara, Kento; Iwata, Shinpei; Kato, Naoka; Sasaki, Yuko; Hasuo, Rika; Yoshinobu, Satoko; Mitsuzaki, Kenshi; Kato, Tamotsu; Hashinaga, Toshihiko; Muraishi, Kazuhisa; Ohki, Tsuyoshi; Kaku, Hiroh

    2013-01-01

    Nighttime food intake is associated with weight gain and higher HbA1c levels. We experienced night eaters who have no memory of their nocturnal eating in the morning. In this study, the curious night eating behavior was designated as "unremembered nocturnal eating syndrome (UNES)". We screened 1,169 patients with diabetes for sleep quality and abnormal eating behavior at night using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index questionnaire with an additional question regarding UNES. When abnormal nocturnal eating behavior was noted, detailed clinical information was extracted from interviews with the patients. We identified 9 patients who experienced UNES. They had a higher BMI compared with subjects who reported no such episodes. Among them, 6 patients who consumed food at night without memory 2-5 times per month or more had significantly higher HbA1c levels. Continuous glucose monitoring in a patient with type 1 diabetes revealed an abrupt elevation of glucose levels from midnight when some foods were consumed. Eight of the 9 patients were taking benzodiazepine and/or non-benzodiazepine hypnotic agents when they experienced the episodes. The prevalence of UNES was 0.8% in all subjects and 4% in those taking hypnotic drugs. The ratio of hypnotic drug use in subjects with UNES was significantly higher than for individuals without UNES (89% vs. 17%, p<0.0001). Although UNES seems to be etiologically heterogeneous, hypnotics-induced parasomnia and/or anterograde amnesia may be associated with the behavior. UNES is not rare in diabetic patients on hypnotic medicine and may be a hidden cause of unexpected morning hyperglycemia.

  10. Dietary treatments of obesity.

    PubMed

    Bennett, W

    1987-01-01

    Dietary treatment of obesity is based on one or another of two premises: that the obese eat too much or that they eat the wrong things. The first is a tautology lacking explanatory power. The second is a meaningful and promising hypothesis but has yet to be effectively applied. At present, virtually all outpatient treatments of obesity, including behavior modification, are based on the first premise and consist of strategies for reducing the subject's caloric intake. Most such interventions produce short-term weight loss. Regain after the end of treatment remains the usual outcome. A survey of studies published in the period 1977-1986 and reporting on dietary or behavioral treatment of obesity reveals that the maximum percentage of body weight lost is, on average, 8.5 percent--no different from the value, 8.9%, in similar studies from 1966-1976, as reviewed by Wing and Jeffery. The principal determinant of success in such programs appears to be the intake weight of the subjects: the higher the intake weight, the more successful the intervention will appear to be. The goals and research methods of studies on dietary treatments for obesity are overdue for ethical as well as scientific reevaluation. The same may be said for the numerous programs providing such treatment outside the context of research.

  11. Obesity vaccines.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, Mariana P

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is one of the largest and fastest growing public health problems in the world. Last century social changes have set an obesogenic milieu that calls for micro and macro environment interventions for disease prevention, while treatment is mandatory for individuals already obese. The cornerstone of overweight and obesity treatment is diet and physical exercise. However, many patients find lifestyle modifications difficult to comply and prone to failure in the long-term; therefore many patients consider anti-obesity drugs an important adjuvant if not a better alternative to behavioral approach or obesity surgery. Since the pharmacological options for obesity treatment remain quite limited, this is an exciting research area, with new treatment targets and strategies on the horizon. This review discusses the development of innovative therapeutic agents, focusing in energy homeostasis regulation and the use of molecular vaccines, targeting hormones such as somatostatin, GIP and ghrelin, to reduce body weight.

  12. Effects of non-specific vs individualized exercise training protocols on aerobic, anaerobic and strength performance in severely obese subjects during a short-term body mass reduction program.

    PubMed

    Lafortuna, C L; Resnik, M; Galvani, C; Sartorio, A

    2003-03-01

    The purpose of the present study was to compare aerobic, anaerobic and strength performance changes induced by two short-term (3-week) body mass reduction programs based on the same low-calory diet (1200-1500 kcal/day), nutritional education and psychological counseling, but entailing different exercise training protocols. An individualized, low-volume and moderate-intensity exercise training (IET) was contrasted with a non-specific, high-volume, low-intensity exercise training (NET). Thirty obese in-patients (12 males, 18 females; mean age +/- SD: 33.9 +/- 9.4 yr, range: 19-51yr; mean BMI: 40.5 +/- 3.8 kg/m2, range: 35.3-51.4 kg/m2) were randomly divided in two gender-matched groups of 15 subjects each undergoing a different exercise training protocol. Maximum oxygen uptake (VO2max) determined with a submaximal indirect test on a bicycle ergometer, lower limb maximum power output (W(max)) determined with the jumping method, global motor capabilities determined by analysis of locomotor pattern during a short (8 m) running, maximum strength (1-RM) of upper and lower limb muscle groups determined with isotonic machines were tested before and after the program. Adherence to an individual exercise activity and maintenance of body weight (bw) loss were evaluated with a telephonic interview 6 months after the completion of the program. In both groups a significant (p < 0.001) and comparable weight loss was observed (IET: -4.27%; NET: -4.17%). In both groups VO2max and W(max) increased significantly (p < 0.05-0.001) when expressed relatively to body mass, while in absolute terms they were significantly (p < 0.001) improved only in IET group. 1-RM in all tested muscle groups was significantly increased in both IET and NET subjects (p < 0.001-0.01), but improvements were significantly greater in IET as compared with NET (p < 0.05-0.001). The analysis of locomotor pattern during the short running indicated that IET subjects significantly improved their global motor

  13. Complementary Colours for a Physicist

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Babic, Vitomir; Cepic, Mojca

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports on a simple experiment which enables splitting incident light into two different modes, each having a colour exactly complementary to the other. A brief historical development of colour theories and differences in a physicist's point of view with respect to an artist's one is discussed. An experimental system for producing…

  14. Childhood obesity.

    PubMed

    Strauss, R

    1999-01-01

    Approximately 10% of children are obese. Twin and adoption studies demonstrate a large genetic component to obesity, especially in adults. However, the increasing prevalence of obesity over the last 20 years can only be explained by environmental factors. In most obese individuals, no measurable differences in metabolism can be detected. Few children engage in regular physical activity. Obese children and adults uniformly underreport the amount of food they eat. Obesity is particularly related to increased consumption of high-fat foods. BMI is a quick and easy way to screen for childhood obesity. Treating childhood obesity relies on positive family support and lifestyle changes involving the whole family. Food preferences are influenced early by parental eating habits, and when developed in childhood, they tend to remain fairly constant into adulthood. Children learn to be active or inactive from their parents. In addition, physical activity (or more commonly, physical inactivity) habits that are established in childhood tend to persist into adulthood. Weight loss is usually followed by changes in appetite and metabolism, predisposing individuals to regain their weight. However, when the right family dynamics exist--a motivated child with supportive parents--long-term success is possible.

  15. Complementary and alternative methods in cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Oppenheim, William L

    2009-10-01

    There are no published studies specifically addressing complementary and alternative treatments in adults with cerebral palsy (CP). However, national surveys of adults with chronic disabilities document that a majority of them use such treatments, that they are willing to pay out of pocket, if necessary, and that they believe that pursuing such treatment relieves pain, reduces stress and anxiety, and leads to improved feelings of fitness and well-being. Individuals enjoy taking charge of their own health care decisions, and frequently feel more in control with these therapies than with more traditional methods. In contrast to adults, there is some information on complementary and alternative methods (CAM) in children with CP. This article discusses some of the CAM used in children that may be carried over into adulthood, as well as the pitfalls for patients and conventional physicians as they try to sort out what might be helpful and what might be harmful in this arena. Practitioners of both conventional and CAM therapies believe that exercise can be beneficial; accordingly, activities such as recreational sports, yoga, and hippotherapy may be continued from childhood into adulthood. General treatments for stress and anxiety, through such activities as yoga and meditation, though not directed at CP per se, may be more popular for adults than children. Research in this area should first identify what methods are being utilized and then subject these methods to well-designed outcome studies that take into account any associated risks.

  16. Dietary strawberries increase proliferative response of CD3/CD28-activated CD8+ T cells and production of TNF-alpha in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated monocytes from obese human subjects

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Obesity increases the risk of developing bacterial and viral infections compared to normal weight. In a 7 wk double-blind, randomized, crossover trial, twenty obese volunteers (20-50 y old, BMI between 30-40 kg/m2) were fed freeze-dried strawberry powder or strawberry-flavored placebo preparations ...

  17. Gastrointestinal Symptoms in Morbid Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Huseini, Mustafa; Wood, G. Craig; Seiler, Jamie; Argyropoulos, George; Irving, Brian A.; Gerhard, Glenn S.; Benotti, Peter; Still, Christopher; Rolston, David D. K.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Several reports have shown an increased prevalence of gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms in obese subjects in community-based studies. To better understand the role of the GI tract in obesity, and because there are limited clinic-based studies, we documented the prevalence of upper and lower GI symptoms in morbidly obese individuals in a clinic setting. Objective: The aim of our study was to compare the prevalence of GI symptoms in morbidly obese individuals in a weight management clinic with non-obese individuals with similar comorbidities as morbidly obese individuals in an Internal Medicine clinic. Methods: Class II and III obese patients BMI >35 kg/m2 (N = 114) and 182 non-obese patients (BMI <25 kg/m2) completed the GI symptoms survey between August 2011 and April 2012 were included in this study. The survey included 24 items pertaining to upper and lower GI symptoms. The participants rated the frequency of symptoms as absent (never, rarely) or present (occasionally, frequently). The symptoms were clustered into five categories: oral symptoms, dysphagia, gastroesophageal reflux, abdominal pain, and bowel habits. Responses to each symptom cluster were compared between obese group and normal weight groups using logistic regression. Results: Of the 24 items, 18 had a higher frequency in the obese group (p < 0.005 for each). After adjusting for age and gender, the obese patients were more likely to have upper GI symptoms: any oral symptom (OR = 2.3, p = 0.0013), dysphagia (OR 2.9, p = 0.0006), and any gastroesophageal reflux (OR 3.8, p < 0.0001). Similarly, the obese patients were more likely to have lower GI symptoms: any abdominal pain (OR = 1.7, p = 0.042) and altered bowel habits (OR = 2.8, p < 0.0001). Conclusion: These observations suggest a statistically significant increase in frequency of both upper and lower GI symptoms in morbidly obese patients when compared to non-obese subjects. PMID:25593922

  18. Selling Complementary Patents: Experimental Investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Bjornstad, David J; Santore, Rudy; McKee, Michael

    2010-02-01

    Production requiring licensing groups of complementary patents implements a coordination game among patent holders, who can price patents by choosing among combinations of fixed and royalty fees. Summed across patents, these fees become the total producer cost of the package of patents. Royalties, because they function as excise taxes, add to marginal costs, resulting in higher prices and reduced quantities of the downstream product and lower payoffs to the patent holders. Using fixed fees eliminates this inefficiency but yields a more complex coordination game in which there are multiple equilibria, which are very fragile in that small mistakes can lead the downstream firm to not license the technology, resulting in inefficient outcomes. We report on a laboratory market investigation of the efficiency effects of coordinated pricing of patents in a patent pool. We find that pool-like pricing agreements can yield fewer coordination failures in the pricing of complementary patents.

  19. A Drosophila complementary DNA resource

    SciTech Connect

    Rubin, Gerald M.; Hong, Ling; Brokstein, Peter; Evans-Holm, Martha; Frise, Erwin; Stapleton, Mark; Harvey, Damon A.

    2000-03-24

    Collections of nonredundant, full-length complementary DNA (cDNA) clones for each of the model organisms and humans will be important resources for studies of gene structure and function. We describe a general strategy for producing such collections and its implementation, which so far has generated a set of cDNAs corresponding to over 40% of the genes in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster.

  20. Metabolically healthy obesity--does it exist?

    PubMed

    Boonchaya-anant, Patchaya; Apovian, Caroline M

    2014-10-01

    The prevalence of obesity has been increasing worldwide over the past 30 years and is a major public health concern. Obesity is known to be associated with metabolic disturbances including insulin resistance and inflammation; however, there is a subset of obese subjects who have normal metabolic profiles, and they have been identified as the metabolically healthy obese (MHO). Several studies have described MHO as obese individuals who have high levels of insulin sensitivity and the absence of diabetes, dyslipidemia, or hypertension. The prevalence of MHO varies from 20 to 30% among obese individuals. This review will discuss the MHO phenotype; the differences between MHO and metabolically unhealthy obese (MUO) individuals; and the possible underlying mechanisms including adipocyte differentiation, immune regulation, and cellular energy metabolism. PMID:25092577

  1. Office of Cancer Complementary and Alternative Medicine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information FAQs about OCCAM Talking about Complementary and Alternative Medicine with Health Care Providers: A Workbook and Tips ... your health care provider(s) about your complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use during and after your cancer care. ...

  2. Dosing dilemmas in obese children.

    PubMed

    Mulla, H; Johnson, T N

    2010-08-01

    With the epidemic of childhood obesity, it is not uncommon for prescribers to puzzle over an appropriate drug dose for an obese child. Defining the optimum therapeutic dose of a drug relies on an understanding of pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. Both these processes can be affected by body composition and the physiological changes that occur in obese children. As a rule of thumb, 75% of excess weight in obese subjects is fat mass, and the remainder lean mass. Although it is reasonable to assume that increases in fat mass alter the distribution of lipophilic drugs and increases in lean mass alter drug clearance, good quality and consistent clinical data supporting these assumptions are lacking for the majority of drugs. The relatively few clinical studies that have evaluated the impact of obesity have often been limited by poor design and insufficient sample size. Moreover, clinical studies conducted during drug development rarely include (or are required to include) obese subjects. Guidance on dosing obese children ought to be provided by drug manufacturers. This could be achieved by including obese patients in studies where possible, enabling the effect of body size on pharmacotherapy to be evaluated. This approach could be further augmented by the use of physiologically based-pharmacokinetic models during early (preclinical) development to predict the impact of obesity on drug disposition, and subsequent clinical studies later in development to provide confirmatory proof. In the meantime, for the majority of drugs already prescribed in children, particularly those where the therapeutic range is narrow or there is significant toxicity, the lack of a validated body size descriptor to use at the bedside means the choice of dose will rely on empirical experience and application of the precautionary principle. PMID:20585055

  3. Conjectured strong complementary information tradeoff.

    PubMed

    Renes, Joseph M; Boileau, Jean-Christian

    2009-07-10

    We conjecture a new entropic uncertainty principle governing the entropy of complementary observations made on a system given side information in the form of quantum states, generalizing the entropic uncertainty relation of Maassen and Uffink [Phys. Rev. Lett. 60, 1103 (1988)]. We prove a special case for certain conjugate observables by adapting a similar result found by Christandl and Winter pertaining to quantum channels [IEEE Trans. Inf. Theory 51, 3159 (2005)], and discuss possible applications of this result to the decoupling of quantum systems and for security analysis in quantum cryptography. PMID:19659187

  4. American Academy of Pediatrics. The use of complementary and alternative medicine in pediatrics.

    PubMed

    Kemper, Kathi J; Vohra, Sunita; Walls, Richard

    2008-12-01

    The American Academy of Pediatrics is dedicated to optimizing the well-being of children and advancing family-centered health care. Related to these goals, the American Academy of Pediatrics recognizes the increasing use of complementary and alternative medicine in children and, as a result, the need to provide information and support for pediatricians. From 2000 to 2002, the American Academy of Pediatrics convened and charged the Task Force on Complementary and Alternative Medicine to address issues related to the use of complementary and alternative medicine in children and to develop resources to educate physicians, patients, and families. One of these resources is this report describing complementary and alternative medicine services, current levels of utilization and financial expenditures, and associated legal and ethical considerations. The subject of complementary and alternative medicine is large and diverse, and consequently, an in-depth discussion of each method of complementary and alternative medicine is beyond the scope of this report. Instead, this report will define terms; describe epidemiology; outline common types of complementary and alternative medicine therapies; review medicolegal, ethical, and research implications; review education and training for complementary and alternative medicine providers; provide resources for learning more about complementary and alternative medicine; and suggest communication strategies to use when discussing complementary and alternative medicine with patients and families.

  5. Adipose Tissue-Derived Stem Cells From Obese Subjects Contribute to Inflammation and Reduced Insulin Response in Adipocytes Through Differential Regulation of the Th1/Th17 Balance and Monocyte Activation.

    PubMed

    Eljaafari, Assia; Robert, Maud; Chehimi, Marwa; Chanon, Stephanie; Durand, Christine; Vial, Guillaume; Bendridi, Nadia; Madec, Anne-Marie; Disse, Emmanuel; Laville, Martine; Rieusset, Jennifer; Lefai, Etienne; Vidal, Hubert; Pirola, Luciano

    2015-07-01

    Obesity, through low-grade inflammation, can drive insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. While infiltration of adipose tissue (AT) with mononuclear cells (MNCs) is well established in obesity, the functional consequences of these interactions are less understood. Herein, we cocultured human adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) from obese individuals with MNCs and analyzed their reciprocal behavior. Presence of ASCs 1) enhanced interleukin (IL)-17A secretion by Th17 cells, 2) inhibited γ-interferon and tumor necrosis factor α secretion by Th1 cells, and 3) increased monocyte-mediated IL-1β secretion. IL-17A secretion also occurred in stromal vascular fractions issued from obese but not lean individuals. Th17 polarization mostly depended on physical contacts between ASCs and MNCs-with a contribution of intracellular adhesion molecule-1-and occurred through activation of the inflammasome and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase pathways. ASCs favored STAT3 over STAT5 transcription factor binding on STAT binding sites within the IL-17A/F gene locus. Finally, conditioned media from activated ASC-MNC cocultures inhibited adipocyte differentiation mRNA markers and impaired insulin-mediated Akt phosphorylation and lipolysis inhibition. In conclusion, we report that obese- but not lean-derived ASCs induce Th17 promotion and monocyte activation. This proinflammatory environment, in turn, inhibits adipogenesis and adipocyte insulin response. The demonstration of an ASC-Th17-monocyte cell axis reveals a novel proinflammatory process taking place in AT during obesity and defines novel putative therapeutic targets.

  6. Obesity and carotid artery remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Kozakova, M; Palombo, C; Morizzo, C; Højlund, K; Hatunic, M; Balkau, B; Nilsson, P M; Ferrannini, E

    2015-01-01

    Background/Objective: The present study tested the hypothesis that obesity-related changes in carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) might represent not only preclinical atherosclerosis but an adaptive remodeling meant to preserve circumferential wall stress (CWS) in altered hemodynamic conditions characterized by body size-dependent increase in stroke volume (SV) and blood pressure (BP). Subjects/Methods: Common carotid artery (CCA) luminal diameter (LD), IMT and CWS were measured in three different populations in order to study: (A) cross-sectional associations between SV, BP, anthropometric parameters and CCA LD (266 healthy subjects with wide range of body weight (24–159 kg)); (B) longitudinal associations between CCA LD and 3-year IMT progression rate (ΔIMT; 571 healthy non-obese subjects without increased cardiovascular (CV) risk); (C) the impact of obesity on CCA geometry and CWS (88 obese subjects without CV complications and 88 non-obese subjects matched for gender and age). Results: CCA LD was independently associated with SV that was determined by body size. In the longitudinal study, baseline LD was an independent determinant of ΔIMT, and ΔIMT of subjects in the highest LD quartile was significantly higher (28±3 μm) as compared with those in the lower quartiles (8±3, 16±4 and 16±3 μm, P=0.001, P<0.05 and P=0.01, respectively). In addition, CCA CWS decreased during the observational period in the highest LD quartile (from 54.2±8.6 to 51.6±7.4 kPa, P<0.0001). As compared with gender- and age-matched lean individuals, obese subjects had highly increased CCA LD and BP (P<0.0001 for both), but only slightly higher CWS (P=0.05) due to a significant increase in IMT (P=0.005 after adjustment for confounders). Conclusions: Our findings suggest that in obese subjects, the CCA wall thickens to compensate the luminal enlargement caused by body size-induced increase in SV, and therefore, to normalize the wall stress. CCA diameter in obesity could

  7. Does Metabolically Healthy Obesity Exist?

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz-Garach, Araceli; Cornejo-Pareja, Isabel; Tinahones, Francisco J.

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between obesity and other metabolic diseases have been deeply studied. However, there are clinical inconsistencies, exceptions to the paradigm of “more fat means more metabolic disease”, and the subjects in this condition are referred to as metabolically healthy obese (MHO).They have long-standing obesity and morbid obesity but can be considered healthy despite their high degree of obesity. We describe the variable definitions of MHO, the underlying mechanisms that can explain the existence of this phenotype caused by greater adipose tissue inflammation or the different capacity for adipose tissue expansion and functionality apart from other unknown mechanisms. We analyze whether these subjects improve after an intervention (traditional lifestyle recommendations or bariatric surgery) or if they stay healthy as the years pass. MHO is common among the obese population and constitutes a unique subset of characteristics that reduce metabolic and cardiovascular risk factors despite the presence of excessive fat mass. The protective factors that grant a healthier profile to individuals with MHO are being elucidated. PMID:27258304

  8. Laboratory eating behavior in obesity.

    PubMed

    Laessle, Reinhold G; Lehrke, Sonja; Dückers, Sabine

    2007-09-01

    The eating behavior of 49 obese and 47 normal weight controls of both sexes was compared in laboratory. A universal eating monitor according to the Kissileff-instrument was used to obtain cumulative intake curves with chocolate pudding as laboratory food. Compared to controls the obese had a significantly higher initial eating rate (p<.002), larger spoonfuls (p<.005), and a greater total intake (p<.03) for the laboratory food. For initial eating rate a significant sex x weight interaction was found (p<.04). Higher values for males emerged only for overweight, but not for normal weight subjects. On the one hand, these data suggest an eating behavior of obese, which will promote a high energy intake in the natural environment. On the other hand, the observed differences can also be interpreted as a consequence of cognitive factors, impacting the eating behavior of obese under specific conditions.

  9. [Alternative and complementary therapies in multiple sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Schwarz, S; Leweling, H; Meinck, H-M

    2005-08-01

    Most MS patients use unconventional therapies, usually as complementary measures in addition to the conventional treatment. Only a few adequate clinical trials exist in this field. By definition, the efficacy of these therapies is unproven. Moreover, the possible risks are also largely unknown. Some therapies rely on rational pathophysiological considerations, other must be regarded as potentially harmful. The influence of diet on MS is unproven. Possibly, unsaturated fatty acids are beneficial. However, a few randomized trials yielded inconclusive results. Long-term supplementation of Vitamin D is associated with a decreased MS incidence. There is, however, insufficient evidence for an influence of Vitamin D on the course of the disease. Because of the high prevalence of osteoporosis in MS patients, prophylaxis with Vitamin D and Calcium is widely accepted. The effects of various minerals, selenium, antioxidant compounds, fish oil or vitamins remain speculative. Many patients use cannabis to alleviate spasticity and pain. Small series indicated positive effects, but randomized trials were negative for spasticity. However, many patients report subjective improvement under cannabis even if their objective parameters remain unchanged. Hyperbaric oxygenation was the subject of several small studies with heterogeneous results which, overall, do not support its use. Generally, physical therapies are perceived as an established therapy for MS. Short-term effects are probable, whereas the possible favourable long-term effects are unclear. PMID:16052439

  10. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression ex vivo in obesity.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chun-Jung; Mari, David C; Whitehurst, Michael; Slusher, Aaron; Wilson, Alan; Shibata, Yoshimi

    2014-01-17

    Obesity is associated with an increased risk in neurodegenerative diseases. To counteract the neuronal damage, the human body increases brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression, leading to neuronal survival and plasticity. Recently, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) have been found to release BDNF as a potential neuroprotective role of inflammation. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine whether lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced PBMC activation would lead to differences in BDNF and inflammatory responses between obese and non-obese subjects. Thirty-one subjects (14 obese and 17 non-obese), ages 18 to 30years, were recruited. PBMCs were cultured for 24h with 10ng/mL LPS. BDNF, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and interleukin-6 (IL-6) were measured in both plasma and cell culture supernatants. Our results did not illustrate any differences in plasma BDNF levels between obese and non-obese groups. However, obese subjects elicited a greater plasma IL-6 production, which was positively associated with plasma BDNF. Furthermore, LPS-induced PBMCs expressed significantly higher BDNF and IL-6 levels in obese subjects compared to the non-obese subjects. Finally, these BDNF levels were positively correlated with IL-6 response ex vivo. These findings suggest that under a high inflammatory state, PBMCs produce greater BDNF and IL-6 expression which may play a collaborative role to protect against neuronal damage associated with obesity. PMID:24140987

  11. Multiple complementary gas distribution assemblies

    DOEpatents

    Ng, Tuoh-Bin; Melnik, Yuriy; Pang, Lily L; Tuncel, Eda; Nguyen, Son T; Chen, Lu

    2016-04-05

    In one embodiment, an apparatus includes a first gas distribution assembly that includes a first gas passage for introducing a first process gas into a second gas passage that introduces the first process gas into a processing chamber and a second gas distribution assembly that includes a third gas passage for introducing a second process gas into a fourth gas passage that introduces the second process gas into the processing chamber. The first and second gas distribution assemblies are each adapted to be coupled to at least one chamber wall of the processing chamber. The first gas passage is shaped as a first ring positioned within the processing chamber above the second gas passage that is shaped as a second ring positioned within the processing chamber. The gas distribution assemblies may be designed to have complementary characteristic radial film growth rate profiles.

  12. Are MTHFR C677T and MTRR A66G Polymorphisms Associated with Overweight/Obesity Risk? From a Case-Control to a Meta-Analysis of 30,327 Subjects.

    PubMed

    Fan, Shu-Jun; Yang, Bo-Yi; Zhi, Xue-Yuan; He, Miao; Wang, Da; Wang, Yan-Xun; Wang, Yi-Nuo; Wei, Jian; Zheng, Quan-Mei; Sun, Gui-Fan

    2015-01-01

    Several studies have examined the associations of methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) C677T and methionine synthase reductase (MTRR) A66G polymorphisms with being overweight/obesity. However, the results are still controversial. We therefore conducted a case-control study (517 cases and 741 controls) in a Chinese Han population and then performed a meta-analysis by combining previous studies (5431 cases and 24,896 controls). In our case-control study, the MTHFR C677T polymorphism was not significantly associated with being overweight/obesity when examining homozygous codominant, heterozygous codominant, dominant, recessive and allelic genetic models. The following meta-analysis confirmed our case-control results. Heterogeneity was minimal in the overall analysis, and sensitivity analyses and publication bias tests indicated that the meta-analytic results were reliable. Similarly, both the case-control study and meta-analysis found no significant association between the MTRR A66G polymorphism and being overweight/obesity. However, sensitivity analyses showed that the associations between the MTRR A66G polymorphism and being overweight/obesity became significant in the dominant, heterozygous codominant and allelic models after excluding our case-control study. The results from our case-control study and meta-analysis suggest that both of the two polymorphisms are not associated with being overweight/obesity. Further large-scale population-based studies, especially for the MTRR A66G polymorphism, are still needed to confirm or refute our findings. PMID:26016497

  13. Are MTHFR C677T and MTRR A66G Polymorphisms Associated with Overweight/Obesity Risk? From a Case-Control to a Meta-Analysis of 30,327 Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Shu-Jun; Yang, Bo-Yi; Zhi, Xue-Yuan; He, Miao; Wang, Da; Wang, Yan-Xun; Wang, Yi-Nuo; Wei, Jian; Zheng, Quan-Mei; Sun, Gui-Fan

    2015-01-01

    Several studies have examined the associations of methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) C677T and methionine synthase reductase (MTRR) A66G polymorphisms with being overweight/obesity. However, the results are still controversial. We therefore conducted a case-control study (517 cases and 741 controls) in a Chinese Han population and then performed a meta-analysis by combining previous studies (5431 cases and 24,896 controls). In our case-control study, the MTHFR C677T polymorphism was not significantly associated with being overweight/obesity when examining homozygous codominant, heterozygous codominant, dominant, recessive and allelic genetic models. The following meta-analysis confirmed our case-control results. Heterogeneity was minimal in the overall analysis, and sensitivity analyses and publication bias tests indicated that the meta-analytic results were reliable. Similarly, both the case-control study and meta-analysis found no significant association between the MTRR A66G polymorphism and being overweight/obesity. However, sensitivity analyses showed that the associations between the MTRR A66G polymorphism and being overweight/obesity became significant in the dominant, heterozygous codominant and allelic models after excluding our case-control study. The results from our case-control study and meta-analysis suggest that both of the two polymorphisms are not associated with being overweight/obesity. Further large-scale population-based studies, especially for the MTRR A66G polymorphism, are still needed to confirm or refute our findings. PMID:26016497

  14. Obesity in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Ismail, M N; Chee, S S; Nawawi, H; Yusoff, K; Lim, T O; James, W P T

    2002-08-01

    This study was undertaken to assess the recent data on Malaysian adult body weights and associations of ethnic differences in overweight and obesity with comorbid risk factors, and to examine measures of energy intake, energy expenditure, basal metabolic rate (BMR) and physical activity changes in urban and rural populations of normal weight. Three studies were included (1) a summary of a national health morbidity survey conducted in 1996 on nearly 29 000 adults > or =20 years of age; (2) a study comparing energy intake, BMR and physical activity levels (PALs) in 409 ethnically diverse, healthy adults drawn from a population of 1165 rural and urban subjects 18-60 years of age; and (3) an examination of the prevalence of obesity and comorbid risk factors that predict coronary heart disease and type 2 diabetes in 609 rural Malaysians aged 30-65 years. Overweight and obesity were calculated using body mass index (BMI) measures and World Health Organization (WHO) criteria. Energy intake was assessed using 3-d food records, BMR and PALs were assessed with Douglas bags and activity diaries, while hypertension, hyperlipidaemia and glucose intolerance were specified using standard criteria. The National Health Morbidity Survey data revealed that in adults, 20.7% were overweight and 5.8% obese (0.3% of whom had BMI values of >40.0 kg m(-2)); the prevalence of obesity was clearly greater in women than in men. In women, obesity rates were higher in Indian and Malay women than in Chinese women, while in men the Chinese recorded the highest obesity prevalences followed by the Malay and Indians. Studies on normal healthy subjects indicated that the energy intake of Indians was significantly lower than that of other ethnic groups. In women, Malays recorded a significantly higher energy intake than the other groups. Urban male subjects consumed significantly more energy than their rural counterparts, but this was not the case in women. In both men and women, fat intakes (%) were

  15. Obesity in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Ismail, M N; Chee, S S; Nawawi, H; Yusoff, K; Lim, T O; James, W P T

    2002-08-01

    This study was undertaken to assess the recent data on Malaysian adult body weights and associations of ethnic differences in overweight and obesity with comorbid risk factors, and to examine measures of energy intake, energy expenditure, basal metabolic rate (BMR) and physical activity changes in urban and rural populations of normal weight. Three studies were included (1) a summary of a national health morbidity survey conducted in 1996 on nearly 29 000 adults > or =20 years of age; (2) a study comparing energy intake, BMR and physical activity levels (PALs) in 409 ethnically diverse, healthy adults drawn from a population of 1165 rural and urban subjects 18-60 years of age; and (3) an examination of the prevalence of obesity and comorbid risk factors that predict coronary heart disease and type 2 diabetes in 609 rural Malaysians aged 30-65 years. Overweight and obesity were calculated using body mass index (BMI) measures and World Health Organization (WHO) criteria. Energy intake was assessed using 3-d food records, BMR and PALs were assessed with Douglas bags and activity diaries, while hypertension, hyperlipidaemia and glucose intolerance were specified using standard criteria. The National Health Morbidity Survey data revealed that in adults, 20.7% were overweight and 5.8% obese (0.3% of whom had BMI values of >40.0 kg m(-2)); the prevalence of obesity was clearly greater in women than in men. In women, obesity rates were higher in Indian and Malay women than in Chinese women, while in men the Chinese recorded the highest obesity prevalences followed by the Malay and Indians. Studies on normal healthy subjects indicated that the energy intake of Indians was significantly lower than that of other ethnic groups. In women, Malays recorded a significantly higher energy intake than the other groups. Urban male subjects consumed significantly more energy than their rural counterparts, but this was not the case in women. In both men and women, fat intakes (%) were

  16. Obesity, Body Image, Depression, and Weight-control Behaviour Among Female University Students in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Jun, Eun Mi; Choi, Seung Bae

    2014-01-01

    Background: Obesity has become epidemic worldwide and 31.0% of Korean adults are obese. Obesity is the main cause of chronic diseases, such as diabetes, hypertension, cardiac disease, and cancer. The purpose of the study was to examine obesity, body image, depression, and weight-control behaviour among Korean female university students and investigate the differences in body image, depression, and weight-control behaviour with respect to obesity. Methods: This study examined obesity, body image, depression, and weight control in 700 female university students from 4 universities in South Korea. To evaluate obesity, both objective obesity (body mass index [BMI]) and subjective obesity (subjectively perceived) were measured. Results: There was a significant difference between objective and subjective obesity (χ2 = 231.280, P < 0.001). In addition, the objective obesity group had the lowest body image score (F = 19.867, P < 0.001) and difference in weight-control behaviour (F = 3.145, P = 0.045). Further, the subjective obesity group had the lowest body image score (F = 58.281, P < 0.001). The results revealed a statistically significant difference in body image and weight-control behaviour with respect to objective obesity. Conclusion: Objective and subjective obesity was negatively associated with body image, and no relationships between objective or subjective obesity and depression. PMID:25337594

  17. [Role of probiotics in obesity management].

    PubMed

    Prados-Bo, Andreu; Gómez-Martínez, Sonia; Nova, Esther; Marcos, Ascensión

    2015-02-07

    Obesity is a major public health issue as it is related to several chronic disorders, including type-2 diabetes, high blood pressure, dyslipemia, cardiovascular diseases and cancer, among others. Novel research shows that the gut microbiota is involved in obesity and metabolic disorders, revealing that obese animal and human subjects have alterations in the composition of the gut microbiota compared to their lean counterparts. Moreover, it has been observed in germ-free mice that transplantation of the microbiota of either obese or lean mice influences body weight, suggesting that the gut ecosystem is a relevant target for weight management. Certain strains of probiotics may regulate body weight by influencing the host's metabolic, neuroendocrine and immune functions. Taken together, our knowledge about the influence of gut microbiota on obesity is progressing. Therefore, modulation of its composition through probiotics may provide new opportunities to manage overweight and obesity.

  18. [Role of probiotics in obesity management].

    PubMed

    Prados-Bo, Andreu; Gómez-Martínez, Sonia; Nova, Esther; Marcos, Ascensión

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is a major public health issue as it is related to several chronic disorders, including type-2 diabetes, high blood pressure, dyslipemia, cardiovascular diseases and cancer, among others. Novel research shows that the gut microbiota is involved in obesity and metabolic disorders, revealing that obese animal and human subjects have alterations in the composition of the gut microbiota compared to their lean counterparts. Moreover, it has been observed in germ-free mice that transplantation of the microbiota of either obese or lean mice influences body weight, suggesting that the gut ecosystem is a relevant target for weight management. Certain strains of probiotics may regulate body weight by influencing the host's metabolic, neuroendocrine and immune functions. Taken together, our knowledge about the influence of gut microbiota on obesity is progressing. Therefore, modulation of its composition through probiotics may provide new opportunities to manage overweight and obesity. PMID:25659049

  19. Obesity changes the human gut mycobiome

    PubMed Central

    Mar Rodríguez, M.; Pérez, Daniel; Javier Chaves, Felipe; Esteve, Eduardo; Marin-Garcia, Pablo; Xifra, Gemma; Vendrell, Joan; Jové, Mariona; Pamplona, Reinald; Ricart, Wifredo; Portero-Otin, Manuel; Chacón, Matilde R.; Fernández Real, José Manuel

    2015-01-01

    The human intestine is home to a diverse range of bacterial and fungal species, forming an ecological community that contributes to normal physiology and disease susceptibility. Here, the fungal microbiota (mycobiome) in obese and non-obese subjects was characterized using Internal Transcribed Spacer (ITS)-based sequencing. The results demonstrate that obese patients could be discriminated by their specific fungal composition, which also distinguished metabolically “healthy” from “unhealthy” obesity. Clusters according to genus abundance co-segregated with body fatness, fasting triglycerides and HDL-cholesterol. A preliminary link to metabolites such as hexadecanedioic acid, caproic acid and N-acetyl-L-glutamic acid was also found. Mucor racemosus and M. fuscus were the species more represented in non-obese subjects compared to obese counterparts. Interestingly, the decreased relative abundance of the Mucor genus in obese subjects was reversible upon weight loss. Collectively, these findings suggest that manipulation of gut mycobiome communities might be a novel target in the treatment of obesity. PMID:26455903

  20. Obesity changes the human gut mycobiome.

    PubMed

    Mar Rodríguez, M; Pérez, Daniel; Javier Chaves, Felipe; Esteve, Eduardo; Marin-Garcia, Pablo; Xifra, Gemma; Vendrell, Joan; Jové, Mariona; Pamplona, Reinald; Ricart, Wifredo; Portero-Otin, Manuel; Chacón, Matilde R; Fernández Real, José Manuel

    2015-10-12

    The human intestine is home to a diverse range of bacterial and fungal species, forming an ecological community that contributes to normal physiology and disease susceptibility. Here, the fungal microbiota (mycobiome) in obese and non-obese subjects was characterized using Internal Transcribed Spacer (ITS)-based sequencing. The results demonstrate that obese patients could be discriminated by their specific fungal composition, which also distinguished metabolically "healthy" from "unhealthy" obesity. Clusters according to genus abundance co-segregated with body fatness, fasting triglycerides and HDL-cholesterol. A preliminary link to metabolites such as hexadecanedioic acid, caproic acid and N-acetyl-L-glutamic acid was also found. Mucor racemosus and M. fuscus were the species more represented in non-obese subjects compared to obese counterparts. Interestingly, the decreased relative abundance of the Mucor genus in obese subjects was reversible upon weight loss. Collectively, these findings suggest that manipulation of gut mycobiome communities might be a novel target in the treatment of obesity.

  1. Obesity and late-onset hypogonadism.

    PubMed

    Corona, G; Vignozzi, L; Sforza, A; Mannucci, E; Maggi, M

    2015-12-15

    Obesity and male hypogonadism (HG) are often associated, as demonstrated in all cross-sectional studies. Prospective studies have indicated that i) having HG at baseline increases the risk of visceral obesity (and metabolic syndrome) and that ii) obesity induces incident HG. Hence, there is a bidirectional relationship between the two conditions. This is the main topic of this review, along with some pathogenic considerations. Meta-analysis of intervention studies indicates that treating obesity is a very efficient treatment for obesity-induced HG. The mechanism by which obesity induces HG has not yet been completely understood, but dietary-induced hypothalamic inflammation, along with a decreased GnRH release, is plausible. Among patients seeking medical care for obesity, the proportion of HG is relatively high. The prevalence of obesity among patients referring for sexual dysfunction is also elevated. Hence, in symptomatic, obese, hypogonadal subjects, testosterone supplementation (TS) can be considered. Whereas long-term uncontrolled register studies suggest that TS could decrease weight, analysis of controlled studies only support a parallel increase in lean mass and decrease in fat mass, with a resulting null effect on weight. Considering that T induces an increase in muscle mass, it is conceivable that the amount of activity obese people can undertake after TS will increase, allowing a closer adherence to physical exercise programs. Some studies, here meta-analyzed, support this concept.

  2. The public health impact of obesity.

    PubMed

    Visscher, T L; Seidell, J C

    2001-01-01

    The increase in obesity worldwide will have an important impact on the global incidence of cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes mellitus, cancer, osteoarthritis, work disability, and sleep apnea. Obesity has a more pronounced impact on morbidity than on mortality. Disability due to obesity-related cardiovascular diseases will increase particularly in industrialized countries, as patients survive cardiovascular diseases in these countries more often than in nonindustrialized countries. Disability due to obesity-related type 2 diabetes will increase particularly in industrializing countries, as insulin supply is usually insufficient in these countries. As a result, in these countries, an increase in disabling nephropathy, arteriosclerosis, neuropathy, and retinopathy is expected. Increases in the prevalence of obesity will potentially lead to an increase in the number of years that subjects suffer from obesity-related morbidity and disability. A 1% increase in the prevalence of obesity in such countries as India and China leads to 20 million additional cases of obesity. Prevention programs will stem the obesity epidemic more efficiently than weight-loss programs. However, only a few prevention programs have been developed or implemented, and the success rates reported to date have been low. Obesity prevention programs should be high on the scientific and political agenda in both industrialized and industrializing countries. PMID:11274526

  3. Whole blood filterability in elderly obese women.

    PubMed

    Gelmini, G; Butturini, L; Cucinotta, D; Delsignore, R; Coiro, V

    1987-01-01

    In order to establish whether obesity alters whole blood filterability, the corrected whole blood filtration (VRBC) was measured in 54 elderly obese women (mean age +/- SE = 67 +/- 2 years) without (n = 15) or with associated cardiovascular risk factors such as impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) (n = 11), non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) (n = 14) or hypertension (n = 14). Twenty-two age matched women with normal body weight participated as controls. VRBC values were similar in normal controls and obese women with normal glucose tolerance (NGT), whereas they were significantly lower in obese subjects with hypertension, NIDDM or IGT. When subjects with normal and impaired glucose tolerance were combined, a significant negative correlation was found between glucose incretory areas during OGTT and VRBC values. These data demonstrate that obesity per se does not alter whole blood filterability; furthermore, our results indicate that this modification is a precocious and sensitive index of altered glucose metabolism.

  4. Maternal obesity during conception programs offspring's body composition: Modulation of fatty acid synthase expression

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The risk of obesity in later life is subject to programming during gestation. To examine whether in utero exposure to maternal obesity increases the risk of obesity in the offspring, we have developed an overfeeding-based model of maternal obesity in rats by intragastric feeding of diets using total...

  5. Timing of introduction of complementary food: short- and long-term health consequences.

    PubMed

    Przyrembel, Hildegard

    2012-01-01

    Complementary food is needed when breast milk (or infant formula) alone is no longer sufficient for both nutritional and developmental reasons. The timing of its introduction, therefore, is an individual decision, although 6 months of exclusive breastfeeding can be recommended for most healthy term infants. The new foods are intended to 'complement' ongoing breastfeeding with those dietary items whose intake has become marginal or insufficient. Both breastfeeding and complementary feeding can have direct or later consequences on health. The evaluation of consequences of both early and late introduction of complementary food can neither disregard the effect of breastfeeding compared to formula feeding nor the composition or quality of the complementary food. Possible short-term health effects concern growth velocity and infections, and possible long-term effects may relate to atopic diseases, type 1 and 2 diabetes, obesity and neuromuscular development. On the basis of the currently available evidence, it is impossible to exactly determine the age when risks related to the start of complementary feeding are lowest or highest for most of these effects, with the possible exception of infections and early growth velocity. The present knowledge on undesirable health effects, however, is mainly based on observational studies, and although some mechanisms have been proposed, further prospective studies have to clarify these unsolved issues. Even less evidence on the consequences of the timing of complementary food introduction is available for formula-fed infants. PMID:22555185

  6. Complementary feeding patterns in Europe with a special focus on Italy.

    PubMed

    Caroli, M; Mele, R M; Tomaselli, M A; Cammisa, M; Longo, F; Attolini, E

    2012-10-01

    Early nutrition is considered to be crucial for development of persistent obesity in later life. The aim of this paper is to present an overview of complementary feeding patterns across European countries. Most European infants introduce solid foods earlier than 6 completed months of age as recommended by WHO. The commonest risk factors for early introduction of solid foods have been shown to be smoking mothers of young age, low SES and no breastfeeding. The foods most frequently introduced as first solids are fruit and cereals followed by other foods that vary depending on the country of residence and the infants' type of feeding. Insufficient updated information has been made available in Europe in terms of infants' nutrient intake during complementary feeding, as well as on the potential acute metabolic effects of complementary feeding. Websites, e-forums and blogs on complementary feeding are widely spread in the web. The recipes and daily menus published in food industry websites are often nutritionally incorrect. Baby led-weaning (BLW) is based on the principle that babies, upon being started on complementary foods, should be allowed to eat whatever food they want (regular family foods included) in its normal shape. No nutrient intake and metabolic data are nevertheless available about BLW. The current scenario in terms of our understanding of complementary feeding in Europe opens several new research avenues. Not using and not improving our current knowledge of nutrition to improve children's health represents an infringement of children's rights.

  7. Obesity genes and insulin resistance

    PubMed Central

    Belkina, Anna C.; Denis, Gerald V.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose of review The exploding prevalence of insulin resistance and Type 2 diabetes (T2D) linked to obesity has become an alarming public health concern. Worldwide, approximately 171 million people suffer from obesity-induced diabetes and public health authorities expect this situation to deteriorate rapidly. An interesting clinical population of ‘metabolically healthy but obese’ (MHO) cases is relatively protected from T2D and its associated cardiovascular risk. The molecular basis for this protection is not well understood but is likely to involve reduced inflammatory responses. The inflammatory cells and pathways that respond to overnutrition are the primary subject matter for this review. Recent findings The chance discovery of a genetic mutation in the Brd2 gene, which is located in the class II major histocompatibility complex and makes mice enormously fat but protects them from diabetes, offers revolutionary new insights into the cellular mechanisms that link obesity to insulin resistance and T2D. These Brd2-hypomorphic mice have reduced inflammation in fat that is normally associated with insulin resistance, and resemble MHO patients, suggesting novel therapeutic pathways for obese patients at risk for T2D. Summary Deeper understanding of the functional links between genes that control inflammatory responses to diet-induced obesity is crucial to the development of therapies for obese, insulin-resistant patients. PMID:20585247

  8. Dicarbonyl stress in clinical obesity.

    PubMed

    Masania, Jinit; Malczewska-Malec, Malgorzata; Razny, Urszula; Goralska, Joanna; Zdzienicka, Anna; Kiec-Wilk, Beata; Gruca, Anna; Stancel-Mozwillo, Julita; Dembinska-Kiec, Aldona; Rabbani, Naila; Thornalley, Paul J

    2016-08-01

    The glyoxalase system in the cytoplasm of cells provides the primary defence against glycation by methylglyoxal catalysing its metabolism to D-lactate. Methylglyoxal is the precursor of the major quantitative advanced glycation endproducts in physiological systems - arginine-derived hydroimidazolones and deoxyguanosine-derived imidazopurinones. Glyoxalase 1 of the glyoxalase system was linked to anthropometric measurements of obesity in human subjects and to body weight in strains of mice. Recent conference reports described increased weight gain on high fat diet-fed mouse with lifelong deficiency of glyoxalase 1 deficiency, compared to wild-type controls, and decreased weight gain in glyoxalase 1-overexpressing transgenic mice, suggesting a functional role of glyoxalase 1 and dicarbonyl stress in obesity. Increased methylglyoxal, dicarbonyl stress, in white adipose tissue and liver may be a mediator of obesity and insulin resistance and thereby a risk factor for development of type 2 diabetes and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Increased methylglyoxal formation from glyceroneogenesis on adipose tissue and liver and decreased glyoxalase 1 activity in obesity likely drives dicarbonyl stress in white adipose tissue increasing the dicarbonyl proteome and related dysfunction. The clinical significance will likely emerge from on-going clinical evaluation of inducers of glyoxalase 1 expression in overweight and obese subjects. Increased transcapillary escape rate of albumin and increased total body interstitial fluid volume in obesity likely makes levels of glycation of plasma protein unreliable indicators of glycation status in obesity as there is a shift of albumin dwell time from plasma to interstitial fluid, which decreases overall glycation for a given glycemic exposure. PMID:27338619

  9. [Obesity and the prognosis of heart failure: the obesity paradox, myth or reality?].

    PubMed

    Bounhoure, Jean-Paul; Galinier, Michel; Roncalli, Jerôme; Massabuau, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    Obesity has now reached epidemic proportions worldwide. Obesity is associated with numerous comorbidities, including hypertension, lipid disorders and type II diabetes, and is also a major cause of cardiovascular disease, coronary disease, heart failure, atrial fibrillation, and sudden death. Obesity is the main cause of heart failure in respectively 11% and 14% of cases in men and women. The Framingham study showed that, after correction for other risk factors, each point increase in the body mass index raises the risk of heart failure by 5% in men and 7% in women. Obesity increases the heart workload, causes left ventricular hypertrophy, and impairs both diastolic and systolic function. The most common form of heart failure is diastolic dysfunction, and heart failure in obese individuals is associated with preserved systolic function. Despite these comorbidities and the severity of heart failure, numerous studies have revealed an "obesity paradox" in which overweight and obese individuals with heart failure appear to have a better prognosis than non overweight subjects. This review summarizes the adverse cardiac effects of this nutritional disease, the results of some studies supporting the obesity paradox, the better survival rate of obese patients with heart failure. Potential explanations for these surprising data include the possibility that a number of obese patients may simply not have heart failure, as well as methodological bias, and protective effects of adipose tissue. Further studies of large populations are needed to determine how obesity may improve the prognosis of heart failure.

  10. Obesity, growth hormone and exercise.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Gwendolyn A; Kraemer, William J; Comstock, Brett A; Dunn-Lewis, Courtenay; Maresh, Carl M; Volek, Jeff S

    2013-09-01

    Growth hormone (GH) is regulated, suppressed and stimulated by numerous physiological stimuli. However, it is believed that obesity disrupts the physiological and pathological factors that regulate, suppress or stimulate GH release. Pulsatile GH has been potently stimulated in healthy subjects by both aerobic and resistance exercise of the right intensity and duration. GH modulates fuel metabolism, reduces total fat mass and abdominal fat mass, and could be a potent stimulus of lipolysis when administered to obese individuals exogenously. Only pulsatile GH has been shown to augment adipose tissue lipolysis and, therefore, increasing pulsatile GH response may be a therapeutic target. This review discusses the factors that cause secretion of GH, how obesity may alter GH secretion and how both aerobic and resistance exercise stimulates GH, as well as how exercise of a specific intensity may be used as a stimulus for GH release in individuals who are obese. Only five prior studies have investigated exercise as a stimulus of endogenous GH in individuals who are obese. Based on prior literature, resistance exercise may provide a therapeutic target for releasing endogenous GH in individuals who are obese if specific exercise programme variables are utilized. Biological activity of GH indicates that this may be an important precursor to beneficial changes in body fat and lean tissue mass in obese individuals. However, additional research is needed including what molecular GH variants are acutely released and involved at target tissues as a result of different exercise stimuli and what specific exercise programme variables may serve to stimulate GH in individuals who are obese.

  11. Complementary therapies: the appeal to general practitioners.

    PubMed

    Eastwood, H L

    2000-07-17

    Pragmatism--among consumers seeking a cure and among general practitioners seeking clinical results and more patients--is not a complete explanation for the burgeoning of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) in Western societies. Instead, this growth is substantially a result of pervasive and rapid social change, alternatively termed 'globalisation' and 'postmodernisation'. Globalisation and postmodernisation are creating a new social reality, of which a prominent characteristic is the proliferation of consumer choice. GPs are enmeshed in this social change and subject to the trend to greater choice--both their patients' and their own. On the one hand, GPs are reacting to social change as "economic pragmatists", responding to consumers' increasing demand for CAM. On the other hand, GPs themselves are acting as agents of social change by acknowledging the limitations of orthodox biomedical treatments and promoting CAM as part of their service delivery. Lack of scientific validation of CAM has not prevented GPs' use of such therapies. The phrase "clinical legitimacy" can be seen as a trump card that overrides "scientific legitimacy". It is the shibboleth of a postmodern movement among GPs towards healing and the "art" of medicine, as opposed to the "science" of medicine per se. PMID:10937039

  12. [The situation of complementary medicine in Germany].

    PubMed

    Albrecht, Henning

    2013-01-01

    With the amendment of the German Medicinal Products Act in 1976 and the inclusion of naturopathy and homeopathy into the German Medical Licensure Act from 1988, the German government set up a comparatively favorable framework for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM). But no comprehensive integration into the academic operating systems followed, because the universities as well as the legislative body seemed to have no further interest in CAM. Therefore, research projects in the field and suitable professorships had and still have to be financed by third-party funds. Notwithstanding the success of several CAM-projects, no sustainable development could be established: When the third-party funding runs off and the protagonists retire the institutional structures are supposed to vanish as well. Although the public demand for CAM is high in Germany, the administration detached homeopathy as a compulsory subject from the German Medical Licensure Act in 2002 and restricted severely the refunding of naturopathic medicines by the statutory health insurance in 2004. Moreover, the trend for CAM bashing takes root in the media. Unfortunately the CAM scene does not close ranks and is incapable to implement fundamental data collection processes into daily clinical routine: A wide range of data could justify further efforts to the government as well as to the scientific community. To say something positive, it must be mentioned that the scientific standard of CAM research is high for the most part and that third-party funded projects deliver remarkable results ever and on.

  13. Complementary therapies: the appeal to general practitioners.

    PubMed

    Eastwood, H L

    2000-07-17

    Pragmatism--among consumers seeking a cure and among general practitioners seeking clinical results and more patients--is not a complete explanation for the burgeoning of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) in Western societies. Instead, this growth is substantially a result of pervasive and rapid social change, alternatively termed 'globalisation' and 'postmodernisation'. Globalisation and postmodernisation are creating a new social reality, of which a prominent characteristic is the proliferation of consumer choice. GPs are enmeshed in this social change and subject to the trend to greater choice--both their patients' and their own. On the one hand, GPs are reacting to social change as "economic pragmatists", responding to consumers' increasing demand for CAM. On the other hand, GPs themselves are acting as agents of social change by acknowledging the limitations of orthodox biomedical treatments and promoting CAM as part of their service delivery. Lack of scientific validation of CAM has not prevented GPs' use of such therapies. The phrase "clinical legitimacy" can be seen as a trump card that overrides "scientific legitimacy". It is the shibboleth of a postmodern movement among GPs towards healing and the "art" of medicine, as opposed to the "science" of medicine per se.

  14. Alterations in peripheral blood lymphocyte cytokine expression in obesity

    PubMed Central

    O'Rourke, R W; Kay, T; Lyle, E A; Traxler, S A; Deveney, C W; Jobe, B A; Roberts, C T; Marks, D; Rosenbaum, J T

    2006-01-01

    Obesity is characterized by alterations in immune and inflammatory function. In order to evaluate the potential role of cytokine expression by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) in obesity-associated inflammation, we studied serum protein levels and mRNA levels in PBMC of interleukin (IL)-6, IL-1β, tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α and IL-1Ra in nine lean and 10 obese subjects. Serum IL-1β was undetectable, IL-1Ra serum levels were elevated, serum levels of TNF-α were decreased and serum levels of IL-6 were similar in obese subjects compared to lean subjects, while transcript levels of IL-6, IL-1β and TNF-α, but not IL-1Ra, were decreased in PBMC from obese subjects. PBMC from obese subjects did, however, up-regulate cytokine expression in response to leptin. Thus, obesity-associated changes in IL-1Ra serum levels and IL-6 mRNA levels were not correlated with changes in cognate mRNA and serum levels, respectively, while TNF-α serum levels and PBMC mRNA levels were both decreased in obese patients. While immune alterations in obesity are manifest in peripheral blood lymphocytes, the general lack of correlation between altered serum levels and altered PBMC gene expression suggests that PBMC may not be the source of aberrant serum cytokine levels in obesity. PMID:16968396

  15. Early cardiac abnormalities in obese children: importance of obesity per se versus associated cardiovascular risk factors.

    PubMed

    Van Putte-Katier, Nienke; Rooman, Raoul P; Haas, Lenneke; Verhulst, Stijn L; Desager, Kristien N; Ramet, José; Suys, Bert E

    2008-08-01

    We investigated whether obese children and adolescents have early echocardiographic signs of subclinical cardiac dysfunction and evaluated the respective influence of obesity per se versus parameters of carbohydrate and lipid metabolism that are frequently abnormal in obese subjects. The role of tissue Doppler imaging as a screening tool for these abnormalities was explored. Blood pressure and echocardiographic parameters, including tissue Doppler measurements of the septal mitral annulus were evaluated in 49 obese children and adolescents and 45 age and sex matched controls. The respective influence of obesity versus parameters of carbohydrate and lipid metabolism was examined with linear regression analysis. Obese subjects showed significantly larger left ventricular wall dimensions (posterior wall, septum, and left ventricular mass index) and signs of early diastolic filling abnormalities on conventional and tissue Doppler echocardiography compared with nonobese subjects. Multiple regression analysis showed that mainly BMI-SD scores and/or body surface area explained significant proportions of the variance of the early cardiac abnormalities. In conclusion, young, obese children and adolescents have significant changes in left ventricular wall dimensions and early diastolic filling compared with nonobese subjects. Obesity per se and not the parameters of carbohydrate and lipid metabolism predicted the early cardiac abnormalities.

  16. Adequacy of family foods for complementary feeding

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The WHO recommends that complementary foods be introduced to all infants at age 6 mo and that breastfeeding be continued until age 18–24 mo. Beginning at age 6 mo, complementary foods should be pureed, mashed, or semisolid, but by age 12 mo the child should be able to eat solid foods that are consum...

  17. [Bridge between scientific medicine and complementary medicine--utopia?].

    PubMed

    Nager, F

    1994-12-20

    In this keynote presentation on a complex and controversial subject, I attempt to answer the following questions: 1. What is scientific medicine, what is alternative medicine? 2. Why is there in our days an increasing trend in the population towards concepts and methods of alternative (complementary) medicine? 3. Why are many scientific physicians defensive, sceptical and opposed to alternative medicine? 4. Are traditional and alternative medicine fundamentally irreconcilable worlds? The author believes that complementary medicine is beneficial and justified especially in private practice, above all in the many patients suffering from psychosomatic, psychovegetative, neurotic, depressive, functional disorders, with feelings of ill-health and often with marked subjective symptoms but in which no severe organic disease is present. In these types of patients alternative methods are often 'more gentle' and cost-effective. The doctor's personality, his empathy, his willingness to communicate are decisive factors for their effectiveness. Certain methods of complementary medicine should be increasingly integrated into our hospitals and be learnt and critically assessed locally by the scientific physicians. Scientific medicine is and remains the indispensable solid foundation for correctly indicating the use of alternative therapeutic methods.

  18. Structural and Functional Brain Connectivity of People with Obesity and Prediction of Body Mass Index Using Connectivity.

    PubMed

    Park, Bo-yong; Seo, Jongbum; Yi, Juneho; Park, Hyunjin

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is a medical condition affecting billions of people. Various neuroimaging methods including magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have been used to obtain information about obesity. We adopted a multi-modal approach combining diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and resting state functional MRI (rs-fMRI) to incorporate complementary information and thus better investigate the brains of non-healthy weight subjects. The objective of this study was to explore multi-modal neuroimaging and use it to predict a practical clinical score, body mass index (BMI). Connectivity analysis was applied to DTI and rs-fMRI. Significant regions and associated imaging features were identified based on group-wise differences between healthy weight and non-healthy weight subjects. Six DTI-driven connections and 10 rs-fMRI-driven connectivities were identified. DTI-driven connections better reflected group-wise differences than did rs-fMRI-driven connectivity. We predicted BMI values using multi-modal imaging features in a partial least-square regression framework (percent error 15.0%). Our study identified brain regions and imaging features that can adequately explain BMI. We identified potentially good imaging biomarker candidates for obesity-related diseases.

  19. Structural and Functional Brain Connectivity of People with Obesity and Prediction of Body Mass Index Using Connectivity.

    PubMed

    Park, Bo-yong; Seo, Jongbum; Yi, Juneho; Park, Hyunjin

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is a medical condition affecting billions of people. Various neuroimaging methods including magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have been used to obtain information about obesity. We adopted a multi-modal approach combining diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and resting state functional MRI (rs-fMRI) to incorporate complementary information and thus better investigate the brains of non-healthy weight subjects. The objective of this study was to explore multi-modal neuroimaging and use it to predict a practical clinical score, body mass index (BMI). Connectivity analysis was applied to DTI and rs-fMRI. Significant regions and associated imaging features were identified based on group-wise differences between healthy weight and non-healthy weight subjects. Six DTI-driven connections and 10 rs-fMRI-driven connectivities were identified. DTI-driven connections better reflected group-wise differences than did rs-fMRI-driven connectivity. We predicted BMI values using multi-modal imaging features in a partial least-square regression framework (percent error 15.0%). Our study identified brain regions and imaging features that can adequately explain BMI. We identified potentially good imaging biomarker candidates for obesity-related diseases. PMID:26536135

  20. Obesity and Cancer Risk

    MedlinePlus

    ... cancer screening among obese adults. National Collaborative on Childhood Obesity Research (NCCOR) NCCOR brings together four of the nation’s leading funders of childhood obesity research: the CDC, NIH, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, ...

  1. Obesity Prevalence Maps

    MedlinePlus

    ... Physical Activity Overweight & Obesity Healthy Weight Breastfeeding Micronutrient Malnutrition State and Local Programs Adult Obesity Prevalence Maps ... Physical Activity Overweight & Obesity Healthy Weight Breastfeeding Micronutrient Malnutrition State and Local Programs File Formats Help: How ...

  2. Obesity and Hispanic Americans

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Data > Minority Population Profiles > Hispanic/Latino > Obesity Obesity and Hispanic Americans Among Mexican American women, 77 ... ss6304.pdf [PDF | 3.38MB] HEALTH IMPACT OF OBESITY More than 80 percent of people with type ...

  3. Obesity and African Americans

    MedlinePlus

    ... Data > Minority Population Profiles > Black/African American > Obesity Obesity and African Americans African American women have the ... ss6304.pdf [PDF | 3.38MB] HEALTH IMPACT OF OBESITY More than 80 percent of people with type ...

  4. [Pharmacological therapy of obesity].

    PubMed

    Pagotto, Uberto; Vanuzzo, Diego; Vicennati, Valentina; Pasquali, Renato

    2008-04-01

    uric acid as well and it increases HDL cholesterol; in diabetics it improves glycated hemoglobin. Sibutramine has conflicting effects on blood pressure: in some studies there was a minimal decrease, in some others a modest increase. In all the studies this drug increased pulse rate. Sibutramine is not recommended in patients with uncontrolled hypertension, or in case of history of cardio- and cerebrovascular disease. Orlistat is a pancreatic lipase inhibitor that reduces fat absorption by partially blocking the hydrolysis of dietary triglycerides. A recent meta-analysis evaluated 22 studies lasting for at least 12 months, in obese patients with a mean body mass index of 36.7 kg/m2, where orlistat was associated with hypocaloric diet or behavioral interventions: the net average weight loss was 2.89 kg (confidence interval 2.27-3.51 kg). Considering the principal studies, attrition rate ranged from 33 to 57%. Orlistat significantly decreases waist circumference, blood pressure, total and LDL cholesterol, but has no effect on HDL and triglycerides. This drug significantly reduced the incidence of diabetes only in subjects with impaired glucose tolerance. The major adverse effects with orlistat are mainly gastrointestinal (fatty and oily stool, fecal urgency, oily spotting, fecal incontinence) and attenuate over time. Orlistat should be avoided in patients with chronic malabsorption and cholestasis. Rimonabant is a selective antagonist of cannabinoid type 1 receptor. This drug, by inhibiting the overactivation of the endocannabinoid system, produces anorectic stimuli at the central nervous level, but also has effects on the peripheral systems involved in metabolism control, such as liver, adipose tissue, skeletal muscles, endocrine pancreas, and gastrointestinal apparatus, influencing many processes partially unknown. An ample experimental program named RIO (Rimonabant In Obesity) involved about 6600 obese or overweight patients to identify the effects of rimonabant in

  5. Complementary therapies for acne vulgaris

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Huijuan; Yang, Guoyan; Wang, Yuyi; Liu, Jian Ping; Smith, Caroline A; Luo, Hui; Liu, Yueming

    2015-01-01

    Background Acne is a chronic skin disease characterised by inflamed spots and blackheads on the face, neck, back, and chest. Cysts and scarring can also occur, especially in more severe disease. People with acne often turn to complementary and alternative medicine (CAM), such as herbal medicine, acupuncture, and dietary modifications, because of their concerns about the adverse effects of conventional medicines. However, evidence for CAM therapies has not been systematically assessed. Objectives To assess the effects and safety of any complementary therapies in people with acne vulgaris. Search methods We searched the following databases from inception up to 22 January 2014: the Cochrane Skin Group Specialised Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2014, Issue 1), MEDLINE (from 1946), Embase (from 1974), PsycINFO (from 1806), AMED (from 1985), CINAHL (from 1981), Scopus (from 1966), and a number of other databases listed in the Methods section of the review. The Cochrane CAM Field Specialised Register was searched up to May 2014. We also searched five trials registers and checked the reference lists of articles for further references to relevant trials. Selection criteria We included parallel-group randomised controlled trials (or the first phase data of randomised cross-over trials) of any kind of CAM, compared with no treatment, placebo, or other active therapies, in people with a diagnosis of acne vulgaris. Data collection and analysis Three authors collected data from each included trial and evaluated the methodological quality independently. They resolved disagreements by discussion and, as needed, arbitration by another author. Main results We included 35 studies, with a total of 3227 participants. We evaluated the majority as having unclear risk of selection, attrition, reporting, detection, and other biases. Because of the clinical heterogeneity between trials and the incomplete data reporting, we could only include four

  6. Complementary therapies for acne vulgaris

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Huijuan; Yang, Guoyan; Wang, Yuyi; Liu, Jian Ping; Smith, Caroline A; Luo, Hui; Liu, Yueming

    2015-01-01

    Background Acne is a chronic skin disease characterised by inflamed spots and blackheads on the face, neck, back, and chest. Cysts and scarring can also occur, especially in more severe disease. People with acne often turn to complementary and alternative medicine (CAM), such as herbal medicine, acupuncture, and dietary modifications, because of their concerns about the adverse effects of conventional medicines. However, evidence for CAM therapies has not been systematically assessed. Objectives To assess the effects and safety of any complementary therapies in people with acne vulgaris. Search methods We searched the following databases from inception up to 22 January 2014: the Cochrane Skin Group Specialised Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2014, Issue 1), MEDLINE (from 1946), Embase (from 1974), PsycINFO (from 1806), AMED (from 1985), CINAHL (from 1981), Scopus (from 1966), and a number of other databases listed in the Methods section of the review. The Cochrane CAM Field Specialised Register was searched up to May 2014. We also searched five trials registers and checked the reference lists of articles for further references to relevant trials. Selection criteria We included parallel-group randomised controlled trials (or the first phase data of randomised cross-over trials) of any kind of CAM, compared with no treatment, placebo, or other active therapies, in people with a diagnosis of acne vulgaris. Data collection and analysis Three authors collected data from each included trial and evaluated the methodological quality independently. They resolved disagreements by discussion and, as needed, arbitration by another author. Main results We included 35 studies, with a total of 3227 participants. We evaluated the majority as having unclear risk of selection, attrition, reporting, detection, and other biases. Because of the clinical heterogeneity between trials and the incomplete data reporting, we could only include four

  7. Interventions for treating obesity in children.

    PubMed

    De Miguel-Etayo, Pilar; Bueno, Gloria; Garagorri, Jesús M; Moreno, Luis A

    2013-01-01

    Childhood obesity remains an important public health concern and prevention programmes should be the priority in order to decrease the prevalence of obesity. The aim of this review is to summarize the most effective types of intervention for treating obesity in children and adolescents. A number of identified strategies used to treat childhood obesity range from lifestyle approaches, pharmacotherapy to surgical intervention. Dietary treatment of obese children and adolescents should aim to ensure adequate growth and development by reducing excessive fat mass accumulation, avoiding loss of lean body mass, improving well-being and self-esteem, and preventing cyclical weight regain. Management protocols involve behaviour modifications, family support, and lifestyle changes which are difficult to put into practice and may require multidisciplinary professional teams. The cornerstone of weight loss programmes is to achieve a negative energy balance. There is evidence that dietary interventions are more effective in achieving weight loss when combined with other strategies, such as increasing physical activity levels and/or psychological interventions to promote behavioural changes. Psychological interventions have been employed in an effort to achieve long-term maintenance of behavioural change. Childhood obesity treatments should involve a combination of lifestyle changes including strategies to reduce energy intake, increase physical activity, reduce sedentary activities, facilitate family involvement and change behaviours associated with eating and physical activity. However, drug therapy in obese children must not be used as isolated treatment but as complementary to the traditional treatments of diet, physical activity and lifestyle changes. Besides, surgical procedures have been used to treat severe morbid obesity in children and adolescents when more conservative treatments have proven to be inadequate. PMID:24029793

  8. Meditation as a complementary therapy in cancer.

    PubMed

    Tacón, Anna M

    2003-01-01

    The number of cancer patients seeking complementary therapies to deal with their disease has increased steadily in recent decades. Complementary therapies can be helpful to cancer patients because they address some of the pervasive psychosocial difficulties associated with this disease. One mind-body technique is meditation. While programs using meditation have been developed for specific health populations, such as heart disease and addictions, an equivalent, well-established program for cancer patients is lacking. This article reviews the literature and proposes a complementary meditation program designed specifically for use with cancer patients.

  9. Single-pixel complementary compressive sampling spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Ruo-Ming; Liu, Xue-Feng; Yao, Xu-Ri; Yu, Wen-Kai; Zhai, Guang-Jie

    2016-05-01

    A new type of compressive spectroscopy technique employing a complementary sampling strategy is reported. In a single sequence of spectral compressive sampling, positive and negative measurements are performed, in which sensing matrices with a complementary relationship are used. The restricted isometry property condition necessary for accurate recovery of compressive sampling theory is satisfied mathematically. Compared with the conventional single-pixel spectroscopy technique, the complementary compressive sampling strategy can achieve spectral recovery of considerably higher quality within a shorter sampling time. We also investigate the influence of the sampling ratio and integration time on the recovery quality.

  10. Complementary and Alternative Medicine for Osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    Hejazi, Zahra Alsadat; Namjooyan, Forough; Khanifar, Marjan

    2016-01-01

    Background: A systemic skeletal disease is characterized by low bone mass and micro-architectural deterioration with a consequent increase in bone fragility and susceptibility to fracture. Asia has the highest increment in the elderly population; therefore, osteoporotic fracture should be a noticeable health issue. The incidence rate of hip fractures in Asia could rise to 45% by the year 2050. Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is a group of various medical and health care systems, practices, and products that are not presently considered as part of formal medicine. CAMs have been described as “diagnosis, treatment, and/or prevention which complements mainstream medicine as a holistic, subjective and various natural approaches to medical problems by contributing to a common whole, satisfying claims not met by orthodoxy, or diversifying the conceptual frameworks of medicine”. Methods: Peer-reviewed publications were identified through a search in Scopus, Science Direct, Cochrane, PubMed, and Google scholar using keywords “osteopenia”, “osteoporosis”, “menopause”, “CAM”, “phytoestrogens”, “phytotherapy” and “herbal medicine”. The search was completed in July 2015 and was limited to articles published in English. Relevant articles were identified based on the expertise and clinical experience of the authors. Results: We categorized our results in different classifications including: lifestyle modifications (cigarette, alcohol, exercise and food regimen), supportive cares (intake supplements including vitamin D, C and K), treatments synthetic (routine and newer options for hormone replacement and none hormonal therapies) and natural options (different types of CAM including herbal medicines, yoga and chiropractic). Conclusion: Established osteoporosis is difficult to treat because bone density has fallen below the fracture threshold and trabecular elements may have been lost. Antiresorptive agents can be used to prevent further

  11. IBD and Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Alternative Medicine (CAM) Go Back Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) Email Print + Share Crohn’s disease and ulcerative ... Energy Medicine, and Biologically-Based Practices. Mind-Body Medicine Mind-body medicine is a set of interventions ...

  12. Complementary and Alternative Treatment for Allergic Conditions.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Juan; Grine, Kristen

    2016-09-01

    This article explains the proposed pathophysiology, evidence of efficacy, and adverse effects of several complementary and alternative medicine modalities, for the treatment of allergic conditions, such as traditional Chinese medicine formula, herbal treatments, acupuncture, and homeopathy. PMID:27545740

  13. Alternative (Complementary) Therapies for HIV/AIDS

    MedlinePlus

    ... For example, some people combine yoga with meditation. Physical (body) therapies Physical, or body, therapies include such activities as ... with specific health problems. Complementary therapies can include physical therapies (such as yoga and acupuncture), relaxation techniques (such ...

  14. Homogenization analysis of complementary waveguide metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landy, Nathan; Hunt, John; Smith, David R.

    2013-11-01

    We analyze the properties of complementary metamaterials as effective inclusions patterned into the conducting walls of metal waveguide structures. We show that guided wave metamaterials can be homogenized using the same retrieval techniques used for volumetric metamaterials, leading to a description in which a given complementary element is conceptually replaced by a block of material within the waveguide whose effective permittivity and permeability result in equivalent scattering characteristics. The use of effective constitutive parameters for waveguide materials provides an alternative point-of-view for the design of waveguide and microstrip based components, including planar lenses and filters, as well as devices with derived from a bulk material response. In addition to imparting effective constitutive properties to the waveguide, complementary metamaterials also couple energy from waveguide modes into radiation. Thus, complementary waveguide metamaterials can be used to modify and optimize a variety of antenna structures.

  15. Complementary and Alternative Therapies for Chronic Constipation

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Chronic constipation, an ancient disease, is prevalent, and costly in the general population. Complementary and alternative therapies are frequently used for constipation. This review introduces various methods of complementary and alternative therapies, including acupuncture, moxibustion, massage, and herbal medicine. Efficacy, safety, influence factors, sham control design, and mechanisms of these therapies are discussed and evaluated. Acupuncture or electroacupuncture was found to be most commonly used for constipation among these complementary and alternative therapies, followed by herbal medicine. Although only a small number of clinical studies are flawless, our review of the literature seems to suggest that acupuncture or electroacupuncture and herbal medicine are effective in treating constipation, whereas findings on massage and moxibustion are inconclusive. More well-designed clinical trials are needed to improve and prove the efficacy of the complementary and alternative therapies for constipation; mechanistic studies that would lead to wide spread use and improvement of the methods are also discussed in this review. PMID:26064163

  16. The neuroendocrinology of childhood obesity.

    PubMed

    Lustig, R H

    2001-08-01

    The regulation of energy balance is enormously complex, with numerous genetic, hormonal, neural and behavioral, and societal influences. Although the current epidemic of obesity clearly has its underpinnings in the changes in culture during the past half-century (see other articles in this issue), the role of the neuroendocrine system in the genesis of obesity, as described in this article, is physiologically and therapeutically unavoidable. An understanding of this system has suggested organic causes (and therapies) for some rare and not-so-rare forms of obesity. With so many inputs, it is not far-fetched to assume that dysfunction of other parts of this feedback system will be found to explain other forms of obesity in the future. What does this mean for obese children entering the pediatrician's office? Fortunately or unfortunately, diet and exercise are the mainstays of obesity therapy for children and adults. Most diet-exercise programs result in an acute 11-kg weight loss in adults; the question is whether it can be sustained without significant long-term behavioral modification. For instance, the European Sibutramine Trial of Obesity Reduction and Maintenance trial showed that 42% of treated subjects drop out; of those remaining, 77% of subjects lost more than 5% of initial body weight, but only 43% of those maintained more than 80% of this over 2 years. Could there be an organic component in those who do not respond? Of course, obesity pharmacotherapies sometimes have beneficial acute effects, but these drugs work for only as long as they are consumed; discontinuation tends to result in a "rebound" weight gain, suggesting that the cause of the obesity is still present. Furthermore, in 2001, there are no obesity drugs approved for children. A useful guiding principle is that children deserve at the minimum an initial medical evaluation, including birth weight, medical history, family history, dietary evaluation, and exercise assessment. Perhaps the most

  17. AMED: The Allied and Complementary Medicine Database.

    PubMed

    Vardell, Emily

    2016-01-01

    AMED: The Allied and Complementary Medicine Database is a resource from the Health Care Information Service of the British Library. AMED offers access to complementary and alternative medicine topics, such as acupuncture, chiropractic, herbalism, homeopathy, hospice care, hypnosis, palliative care, physiotherapy, podiatry, and rehabilitation. This column features a sample search to demonstrate the type of information available within AMED. AMED is available through the EBSCOhost and OVID platforms. PMID:27657370

  18. AMED: The Allied and Complementary Medicine Database.

    PubMed

    Vardell, Emily

    2016-01-01

    AMED: The Allied and Complementary Medicine Database is a resource from the Health Care Information Service of the British Library. AMED offers access to complementary and alternative medicine topics, such as acupuncture, chiropractic, herbalism, homeopathy, hospice care, hypnosis, palliative care, physiotherapy, podiatry, and rehabilitation. This column features a sample search to demonstrate the type of information available within AMED. AMED is available through the EBSCOhost and OVID platforms.

  19. Complementary computer generated holography for aesthetic watermarking.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Christophe; Lemonnier, Olivier; Laulagnet, Fabien; Fargeix, Alain; Tissot, Florent; Armand, Marie Françoise

    2012-02-27

    We present herein an original solution for the watermarking of holograms in binary graphic arts without unaesthetic diffractive effect. It is based on the Babinet principle of complementary diffractive structures adapted to Lohmann-type computer generated holograms. We introduce the concept and demonstrate its interest for anti-counterfeiting applications with the decoding of a hidden data matrix. A process of thermal lithography is used for the manufacturing of binary graphic arts containing complementary computer generated holograms.

  20. Genetics of Obesity.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Apurva; Srivastava, Neena; Mittal, Balraj

    2016-10-01

    Numerous classical genetic studies have proved that genes are contributory factors for obesity. Genes are directly responsible for obesity associated disorders such as Bardet-Biedl and Prader-Willi syndromes. However, both genes as well as environment are associated with obesity in the general population. Genetic epidemiological approaches, particularly genome-wide association studies, have unraveled many genes which play important roles in human obesity. Elucidation of their biological functions can be very useful for understanding pathobiology of obesity. In the near future, further exploration of obesity genetics may help to develop useful diagnostic and predictive tests for obesity treatment. PMID:27605733

  1. Myths about childhood obesity.

    PubMed

    Bandini, L G; Dietz, W H

    1992-10-01

    Childhood obesity is a multifactorial and complex disease. Myths such as those that we have described may distract our patients from the underlying behaviors that contribute to the disease or may deflect the blame perceived by obese patients and their parents. Myths that suggest that the obese are inactive, eat differently, or eat more junk food suggest that obese individuals are socially deviant and justifies the intense discrimination directed against them. The myth that obesity represents an untreatable disease helps free health-care professionals from the responsibility to understand and care for obese children. Dispelling the myths about childhood obesity represents a critical step in prevention and treatment.

  2. [White adipose tissue dysfunction observed in obesity].

    PubMed

    Lewandowska, Ewa; Zieliński, Andrzej

    2016-05-01

    Obesity is a disease with continuingly increasing prevalence. It occurs worldwide independently of age group, material status or country of origin. At these times the most common reasons for obesity are bad eating habits and dramatic reduction of physical activity, which cause the energy imbalance of organism. Fundamental alteration observed in obese subjects is white adipose tissue overgrowth, which is linked to increased incidence of obesity-related comorbidities, such as: cardiovascular diseases, type 2 diabetes or digestive tract diseases. What is more, obesity is also a risk factor for some cancers. Special risk for diseases linked to excessive weight is associated with overgrowth of visceral type of adipose tissue. Adipose tissue, which is the main energy storehouse in body and acts also as an endocrine organ, undergoes both the morphological and the functional changes in obesity, having a negative impact on whole body function. In this article we summarize the most important alterations in morphology and function of white adipose tissue, observed in obese subjects.

  3. [White adipose tissue dysfunction observed in obesity].

    PubMed

    Lewandowska, Ewa; Zieliński, Andrzej

    2016-05-01

    Obesity is a disease with continuingly increasing prevalence. It occurs worldwide independently of age group, material status or country of origin. At these times the most common reasons for obesity are bad eating habits and dramatic reduction of physical activity, which cause the energy imbalance of organism. Fundamental alteration observed in obese subjects is white adipose tissue overgrowth, which is linked to increased incidence of obesity-related comorbidities, such as: cardiovascular diseases, type 2 diabetes or digestive tract diseases. What is more, obesity is also a risk factor for some cancers. Special risk for diseases linked to excessive weight is associated with overgrowth of visceral type of adipose tissue. Adipose tissue, which is the main energy storehouse in body and acts also as an endocrine organ, undergoes both the morphological and the functional changes in obesity, having a negative impact on whole body function. In this article we summarize the most important alterations in morphology and function of white adipose tissue, observed in obese subjects. PMID:27234867

  4. Thermal stresses in composite tubes using complementary virtual work

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyer, M. W.; Cooper, D. E.

    1988-01-01

    This paper addresses the computation of thermally induced stresses in layered, fiber-reinforced composite tubes subjected to a circumferential gradient. The paper focuses on using the principle of complementary virtual work, in conjunction with a Ritz approximation to the stress field, to study the influence on the predicted stresses of including temperature-dependent material properties. Results indicate that the computed values of stress are sensitive to the temperature dependence of the matrix-direction compliance and matrix-direction thermal expansion in the plane of the lamina. There is less sensitivity to the temperature dependence of the other material properties.

  5. Thyroid Disease and Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM)

    MedlinePlus

    ... to Donate Thyroid Disease and Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) WHAT IS A THYROID NODULE? The term ... type of evaluation. WHAT IS COMPLEMENTARY AND ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE (CAM)? Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) is defined ...

  6. Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM): Expanding Horizons of Health Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... Javascript on. The National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM) is this year celebrating 10 years of ... This year, the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM) celebrates its 10th anniversary. We explore complementary ...

  7. Subject Classification.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Gayle; And Others

    Three newspaper librarians described how they manage the files of newspaper clippings which are a necessary part of their collections. The development of a new subject classification system for the clippings files was outlined. The new subject headings were based on standard subject heading lists and on local need. It was decided to use a computer…

  8. Progress in complementary and alternative medicine research: Yale Research Symposium on Complementary and Integrative Medicine.

    PubMed

    Millet, John D

    2010-09-01

    Integrative Medicine at Yale and the Yale Center for Continuing Medical Education (CME) sponsored the Yale Research Symposium on Complementary and Integrative Medicine in March 2010 at the university's School of Medicine. Delivering the keynote address, Dr. Josephine P. Briggs, Director of the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM) at the National Institutes of Health (NIH), highlighted recent progress made in the field of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM).

  9. Complementary Therapy in Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Aquino, C. I.; Nori, S. L.

    2014-01-01

    Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS) is an endocrine disease. PCOS afflicts 5 to 10 % of women of reproductive age. The symptoms are: amenorrhea, oligomenorrhea, hirsutism, obesity, infertility, chronic hyperandrogenic anovulation and acne. Other risk factors aggravate this condition: insulin resistance, obesity, hypertension, dyslipidemia, inflammation and subclinical cardiovascular disease. Anxiety, depression and reduced quality of life are also common. This review highlights the mechanisms and the beneficial effects of acupuncture, exercise and resveratrol on animal models and on humans affected by PCOS. PMID:24809037

  10. Comparison of VO2max in obese and non-obese young Indian population.

    PubMed

    Patkar, Kshitija Umesh; Joshi, Anjali S

    2011-01-01

    Incidence of obesity in early life is increasing nowadays because of faulty food habits and lack of exercise. This study was aimed to find out whether obesity affects cardiorespiratory efficiency of young adults. As VO2max is the most accepted indicator of cardiorespiratory efficiency it was compared in 30 obese and 30 non-obese subjects aged around 18-20 years. VO2mx was estimated by Queen's college step test. Various other parameters measured and calculated are weight, height, BMI, skin fold thickness, percentage body fat, lean body mass, fat mass. The results showed that cardiorespiratory efficiency (absolute VO2max & VO2max/kg lean body mass) was not affected (P > 0.05) in obese group in both sexes. Ability to do exhausting work (VO2max/kg body weight) was less in obese group (P = 0.001) compared to non-obese group & in obese males (P < 0.01) as compared to non-obese males. Percentage body fat (r = -0.416), triceps skin fold thickness (r = -0.427) and calf skin fold thickness (r = -0.381) strongly correlate to VO2max/kg body weight. Therefore the exercise programs can be best designed to increase caloric expenditure and thus to decrease body fat rather than to improve aerobic fitness.

  11. Populus balsamifera Extract and Its Active Component Salicortin Reduce Obesity and Attenuate Insulin Resistance in a Diet-Induced Obese Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Harbilas, Despina; Vallerand, Diane; Brault, Antoine; Saleem, Ammar; Arnason, John T; Musallam, Lina; Haddad, Pierre S

    2013-01-01

    Populus balsamifera L. (BP) is a medicinal plant stemming from the traditional pharmacopoeia of the Cree of Eeyou Istchee (CEI-Northern Quebec). In vitro screening studies revealed that it strongly inhibited adipogenesis in 3T3-L1 adipocytes, suggesting potential antiobesity activity. Salicortin was identified, through bioassay-guided fractionation, as the active component responsible for BP's activity. The present study aimed to assess the potential of BP and salicortin at reducing obesity and features of the metabolic syndrome, in diet-induced obese C57Bl/6 mice. Mice were subjected to high fat diet (HFD) for sixteen weeks, with BP (125 or 250 mg/kg) or salicortin (12.5 mg/kg) introduced in the HFD for the last eight of the sixteen weeks. BP and salicortin effectively reduced whole body and retroperitoneal fat pad weights, as well as hepatic triglyceride accumulation. Glycemia, insulinemia, leptin, and adiponectin levels were also improved. This was accompanied by a small yet significant reduction in food intake in animals treated with BP. BP and salicortin (slightly) also modulated key components in signaling pathways involved with glucose regulation and lipid oxidation in the liver, muscle, and adipose tissue. These results confirm the validity of the CEI pharmacopoeia as alternative and complementary antiobesity and antidiabetic therapies.

  12. Populus balsamifera Extract and Its Active Component Salicortin Reduce Obesity and Attenuate Insulin Resistance in a Diet-Induced Obese Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Harbilas, Despina; Vallerand, Diane; Brault, Antoine; Saleem, Ammar; Arnason, John T.; Musallam, Lina; Haddad, Pierre S.

    2013-01-01

    Populus balsamifera L. (BP) is a medicinal plant stemming from the traditional pharmacopoeia of the Cree of Eeyou Istchee (CEI—Northern Quebec). In vitro screening studies revealed that it strongly inhibited adipogenesis in 3T3-L1 adipocytes, suggesting potential antiobesity activity. Salicortin was identified, through bioassay-guided fractionation, as the active component responsible for BP's activity. The present study aimed to assess the potential of BP and salicortin at reducing obesity and features of the metabolic syndrome, in diet-induced obese C57Bl/6 mice. Mice were subjected to high fat diet (HFD) for sixteen weeks, with BP (125 or 250 mg/kg) or salicortin (12.5 mg/kg) introduced in the HFD for the last eight of the sixteen weeks. BP and salicortin effectively reduced whole body and retroperitoneal fat pad weights, as well as hepatic triglyceride accumulation. Glycemia, insulinemia, leptin, and adiponectin levels were also improved. This was accompanied by a small yet significant reduction in food intake in animals treated with BP. BP and salicortin (slightly) also modulated key components in signaling pathways involved with glucose regulation and lipid oxidation in the liver, muscle, and adipose tissue. These results confirm the validity of the CEI pharmacopoeia as alternative and complementary antiobesity and antidiabetic therapies. PMID:23781256

  13. Residual obesity stigma: an experimental investigation of bias against obese and lean targets differing in weight-loss history.

    PubMed

    Latner, Janet D; Ebneter, Daria S; O'Brien, Kerry S

    2012-10-01

    This study investigated stigma directed at formerly obese persons who lost weight and became lean (through behavioral or surgical methods), or lost weight but remained obese, relative to weight-stable obese and weight-stable lean persons. This study also compared stigma directed at obese persons following exposure to descriptions of persons who lost weight vs. remained weight stable. In a between-subject experimental design, participants (n = 273) were randomly assigned to read vignettes describing targets varying across two dimensions, weight stability (i.e., weight stable or weight lost) and current weight (i.e., currently obese or currently lean). Participants completed measures of stigma against specific targets and measures of stigma against obese individuals in general. Lean individuals who were formerly obese were stigmatized more on attractiveness than weight-stable lean individuals, and as much as currently obese individuals. Stigma across domains was greater among currently obese individuals (regardless of whether they had lost weight from a higher weight) than among currently lean individuals. After reading vignettes describing weight loss, participants demonstrated greater obesity stigma than after reading vignettes describing weight-stable individuals. These results suggest that residual stigma remains against people who have previously been obese, even when they have lost substantial amounts of weight and regardless of their weight-loss method. Exposure to portrayals of the malleability of body weight, such as those promoted in the popular media, may significantly worsen obesity stigma. PMID:22395810

  14. Obesity prevention: Comparison of techniques and potential solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zulkepli, Jafri; Abidin, Norhaslinda Zainal; Zaibidi, Nerda Zura

    2014-12-01

    Over the years, obesity prevention has been a broadly studied subject by both academicians and practitioners. It is one of the most serious public health issue as it can cause numerous chronic health and psychosocial problems. Research is needed to suggest a population-based strategy for obesity prevention. In the academic environment, the importance of obesity prevention has triggered various problem solving approaches. A good obesity prevention model, should comprehend and cater all complex and dynamics issues. Hence, the main purpose of this paper is to discuss the qualitative and quantitative approaches on obesity prevention study and to provide an extensive literature review on various recent modelling techniques for obesity prevention. Based on these literatures, the comparison of both quantitative and qualitative approahes are highlighted and the justification on the used of system dynamics technique to solve the population of obesity is discussed. Lastly, a potential framework solution based on system dynamics modelling is proposed.

  15. The relation between childhood obesity and adenotonsillar hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Daar, Ghaniya; Sarı, Kamran; Gencer, Zeliha Kapusuz; Ede, Hüseyin; Aydın, Reha; Saydam, Levent

    2016-02-01

    Childhood obesity is a common and significant public health problem all over the world. As a well-known fact obese children have an increased risk of obesity-associated comorbidities, including obstructive sleep apnea, diabetes, and cardiovascular disorders at an earlier age compared to their normal weight peers. They also have an increased risk of poor self-esteem, greater body dissatisfaction, and increased peer teasing that lead to a lower health-related quality of life. While the presence of adenoid hypertrophy and increased rate of obstructive sleep apnea frequently co-exists in majority of cases. We have limited knowledge about the effect of adenotonsillar hypertrophy on development of childhood obesity. In this study, we aimed to investigate the association between obesity, presence of adenotonsillar hypertrophy and the quality of life parameters in obese children as measured by the OSA-18 quality of life questionnaire. Fifty obese children aged between 3 and 18 years and 50 age- and gender-matched otherwise children were enrolled to the study. All subjects were routinely examined by the otolaryngologist before enrollment. The size of adenoid hypertrophy was measured using lateral cephalometric radiographs. The tonsils were also graded using the schema recommended by Brodsky et al. We used OSA-18 questionnaires to evaluate the subjects' quality of life issues. We found, 34 % of obese group had tonsillar hypertrophy while the rate was 6 % in control group. Similarly 16 % of obese group had tonsillar hypertrophy compared to only 4 % in non-obese group. It was also noted that total OSA-18 scores of obese group were significantly higher than those of non-obese group. In subgroup analysis of obese group, total OSA-18 score of obese subjects with either adenoid and/or tonsillar hypertrophy was significantly higher than that of obese subjects without adenoid or tonsillar hypertrophy. As the related literature suggests that the impact of adenotonsillar size on OSA

  16. Evidence in Obese Children: Contribution of Hyperlipidemia, Obesity-Inflammation, and Insulin Sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chi-Jen; Jian, Deng-Yuan; Lin, Ming-Wei; Zhao, Jun-Zhi; Ho, Low-Tone; Juan, Chi-Chang

    2015-01-01

    Background Evidence shows a high incidence of insulin resistance, inflammation and dyslipidemia in adult obesity. The aim of this study was to assess the relevance of inflammatory markers, circulating lipids, and insulin sensitivity in overweight/obese children. Methods We enrolled 45 male children (aged 6 to 13 years, lean control = 16, obese = 19, overweight = 10) in this study. The plasma total cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, triglyceride, glucose and insulin levels, the circulating levels of inflammatory factors, such as TNF-α, IL-6, and MCP-1, and the high-sensitive CRP level were determined using quantitative colorimetric sandwich ELISA kits. Results Compared with the lean control subjects, the obese subjects had obvious insulin resistance, abnormal lipid profiles, and low-grade inflammation. The overweight subjects only exhibited significant insulin resistance and low-grade inflammation. Both TNF-α and leptin levels were higher in the overweight/obese subjects. A concurrent correlation analysis showed that body mass index (BMI) percentile and fasting insulin were positively correlated with insulin resistance, lipid profiles, and inflammatory markers but negatively correlated with adiponectin. A factor analysis identified three domains that explained 74.08% of the total variance among the obese children (factor 1: lipid, 46.05%; factor 2: obesity-inflammation, 15.38%; factor 3: insulin sensitivity domains, 12.65%). Conclusions Our findings suggest that lipid, obesity-inflammation, and insulin sensitivity domains predominantly exist among obese children. These factors might be applied to predict the outcomes of cardiovascular diseases in the future. PMID:26011530

  17. Obesity and growth during childhood and puberty.

    PubMed

    Marcovecchio, M Loredana; Chiarelli, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    Growth during childhood and adolescence occurs at different rates and is influenced by the interaction between genetic and environmental factors. Nutritional status plays an important role in regulating growth, and excess body weight early in life can influence growth patterns. Childhood obesity is a growing and alarming problem, associated with several short-term and long-term metabolic and cardiovascular complications. In addition, there is evidence suggesting that excess adiposity during childhood influences growth patterns and pubertal development. Several studies have shown that during prepubertal years obese children have higher height velocity and accelerated bone age compared to lean subjects. However, this prepubertal advantage in growth tends to gradually decrease during puberty, when obese children show a reduced growth spurt compared with lean subjects. Growth hormone (GH) secretion in obese children is reduced, therefore suggesting that increased growth is GH independent. Factors which have been implicated in the accelerated growth in obese children include increased leptin and insulin levels, adrenal androgens, insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1, IGF-binding protein-1 and GH-binding proteins. Excess body weight during childhood can also influence pubertal development, through an effect on timing of pubertal onset and levels of pubertal hormonal levels. There is clear evidence indicating that obesity leads to early appearance of pubertal signs in girls. In addition, obese girls are also at increased risk of hyperandrogenism. In boys, excess adiposity has been associated with advanced puberty in some studies, whereas others have reported a delay in pubertal onset. The existing evidence on the association between childhood and adolescence obesity underlines a further reason for fighting the epidemics of childhood obesity; that is preventing abnormal growth and pubertal patterns.

  18. [Complementary and alternative medicine in oncology].

    PubMed

    Hübner, J

    2013-06-01

    Complementary and alternative medicine are frequently used by cancer patients. The main benefit of complementary medicine is that it gives patients the chance to become active. Complementary therapy can reduce the side effects of conventional therapy. However, we have to give due consideration to side effects and interactions: the latter being able to reduce the effectiveness of cancer therapy and so to jeopardise the success of therapy. Therefore, complementary therapy should be managed by the oncologist. It is based on a common concept of cancerogenesis with conventional therapy. Complement therapy can be assessed in studies. Alternative medicine in contrast rejects common rules of evidence-based medicine. It starts from its own concepts of cancerogenesis, which is often in line with the thinking of lay persons. Alternative medicine is offered as either "alternative" to recommended cancer treatment or is used at the same time but without due regard for the interactions. Alternative medicine is a high risk to patients. In the following two parts of the article, the most important complementary and alternative therapies cancer patients use nowadays are presented and assessed according to published evidence.

  19. Accuracy of aggregate 2- and 3-component models of body composition relative to 4-component for the measurement of changes in fat mass during weight loss in overweight and obese subjects.

    PubMed

    Lara, Jose; Johnstone, Alexandra M; Wells, Jonathan; Jebb, Susan; Siervo, Mario

    2014-08-01

    The 4-component (4-C) model is the reference method to measure fat mass (FM). Simpler 2-component (2-C) models are widely used to assess FM. We hypothesised that an aggregate 2-C model may improve accuracy of FM assessment during weight loss (WL). One hundred and six overweight and obese men and women were enrolled in different WL programs (fasting, very low energy diet, low energy diet). Body density, bone mineral content, and total body water were measured. FM was calculated using 2-C, 3-C, and 4-C models. Aggregate equations for 2-C, 3-C, and 4-C models were calculated, with the aggregate 4-C model assumed as the reference method. The aggregate approach postulates that the average of the individual estimates obtained from each model is more accurate than the best single measurement. The average WL was -7.5 kg. The agreement between 3-C and 4-C models for FM change was excellent (R(2) = 0.99). The aggregate 2-C equation was more accurate than individual 2-C estimates in measuring changes in FM. The aggregate model was characterised by a lower measurement error at baseline and post-WL. The relationship between the aggregate 3-C and 4-C component models was highly linear (R(2) = 0.99), whereas a lower linearity was found for the aggregate 2-C and 4-C model (R(2) = 0.72). The aggregate 2-C model is characterised by a greater accuracy than commonly applied 2-C equations for the measurement of FM during WL in overweight and obese men and women.

  20. From obesity to diabetes.

    PubMed

    Keller, U

    2006-07-01

    The prevalence of obesity has been increasing dramatically in the last decades in the whole world, not only in industrialized countries but also in developing areas. A major complication of obesity is insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Diabetes is also rapidly increasing world-wide--reaching a prevalence in adults of approx. 5-6% in Central Europe and in the US, and more than 50% in specific, genetically prone populations. This article reviews pathogenetic mechanisms linking obesity and type 2 diabetes. Emphasis is placed on the observation that excessive amounts of adipocytes are associated with an impairment of insulin sensitivity, a key feature of the "metabolic syndrome". This is a cluster of metabolic abnormalities such as type 2 diabetes, hypertension and dyslipidemia; all of them are enhanced by the presence of visceral (abdominal) obesity and all contribute to the increased cardiovascular risk observed in these patients. Besides release of free fatty acids, adipocytes secrete substances that contribute to peripheral insulin resistance, including adiponectin, resistin, TNF-alpha and interleukin 6. Increased turnover of free fatty acids interferes with intracellular metabolism of glucose in the muscle, and they exert lipotoxic effect on pancreatic beta-cells. The pre-receptor metabolism of cortisol is enhanced in visceral adipose tissue by activation of 11 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1. A new class of anti-diabetic drugs (thiazolidinediones, or glitazones) bind to peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR-gamma) and lower thereby plasma free fatty acids and cytokine production in adipocytes, in addition to a decrease of resistin and an increase in adiponectin observed in animals, resulting in an overall increase in insulin sensitivity and in an improvement of glucose homeostasis. However, the first step to avoid insulin resistance and prevent the development of diabetes should be a reduction in body weight in overweight subjects, and an

  1. Integrative medicine: complementary therapies and supplements.

    PubMed

    Cassileth, Barrie R; Gubili, Jyothirmai; Simon Yeung, K

    2009-04-01

    Many patients with cancer or other urologic disorders use complementary therapies in an effort to control symptoms and to prevent and treat disease. Complementary modalities are adjuncts to mainstream treatment. These safe, evidence-based therapies reduce symptoms associated with treatment of urologic cancers and other illnesses. They are to be distinguished from 'alternative therapies', which are unproven, potentially harmful, and often promoted as substitutes for mainstream medical care. Accumulating evidence supports the beneficial impact of complementary therapies, such as acupuncture, yoga, meditation and physical activity, on physical and emotional symptoms associated with cancer treatment, for which there are few effective standard interventions. Herbs and other dietary supplements are unlikely to be beneficial, and might be problematic or dangerous when taken during cancer treatment.

  2. Effect of Maternal Age at Childbirth on Obesity in Postmenopausal Women

    PubMed Central

    We, Ji-Sun; Han, Kyungdo; Kwon, Hyuk-Sang; Kil, Kicheol

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The object of this study was to assess the obesity in postmenopausal women, according to age at childbirth. We analyzed the association between age at first childbirth, age at last childbirth, parity, and subject obesity status (general obesity; BMI >25 kg/m2, nongeneral obesity; BMI ≤25 kg/m2, abdominal obesity; waist circumference >85 cm, nonabdominal obesity; waist circumference ≤85 cm), using data from a nationwide population-based survey, the 2010 to 2012 Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Data from a total of 4382 postmenopausal women were analyzed using multivariate regression analysis with complex survey design sampling. And, the subjects were subdivided into groups according to obesity or not. Age, smoking, alcohol consumption, exercise, education, income level, number of pregnancies, oral contraceptive uses, breast feeding experience were adjusted as the confounders. The prevalence of general obesity among Korean postmenopausal women was 37.08%. Women with general obesity and abdominal obesity were significantly younger at first childbirth compared with women with nongeneral obesity and no abdominal obesity (23.89 ± 0.1 vs. 23.22 ± 0.1, P <0.001). Age at first childbirth was inversely associated with obesity, while age at last childbirth was not associated with obesity or abdominal obesity. Women with a higher number of pregnancies were also more likely to have obesity and abdominal obesity. Age at first childbirth remained significantly associated with obesity, after adjusting for confounding factors. Obesity in postmenopausal women is associated with first childbirth at a young age, and higher parity. Further research is needed to clarify the association between obesity and reproductive characteristics. PMID:27175656

  3. [The obese woman: pregnancy and contraception].

    PubMed

    Seffert, P

    1985-10-01

    Obesity is a risk factor for women in both pregnancy and contraception. Obesity per se does not cause sterility, but problems in gonadotropic function can arise during periods of rapid weight gain in bulimic episodes. Dysovulation is more common in such cases than amenorrhea. In established obesity, anovulation may occur, as demonstrated by the temperature curve and hormonal levels, but it is usually due to other factors such as ovarian polycystic syndrome or Cushing's syndrome. The main problems of obesity during pregnancy are carbohydrate metabolic disorders and hypertension. In 1 study, hypertension was found in 42.4% of pregnancies of obese women vs. 5.84% in controls; 22% of cases were severe, with blood pressure over 160/100. Carbohydrate metabolic difficulties were found in 11.8% of obese subjects vs. 1.2% of controls. The main consequence of maternal obesity on the child is macrosomy; occurring in 21.3% of births vs. 5.8% in controls. 5.1% of births to obese women are postmature vs. .7% in controls. The rate of cesareans for obese women is high. Improved fetal prognosis in pregnancies of obese women requires increased clinical surveillance for signs of hypertension or excessive weight gain and laboratory monitoring of glucose metabolism every month or even every 2 weeks. A sonogram should be done to detect macrosomy. A careful diet of 1200-1500 calories per day is recommended. 40% should be protein and 30% lipid. Rapid-absorption sugars should be excluded. Oral contraceptives appear to cause weight gain because estrogen stimulates the appetite and progestins have an anabolizing action. If weight gain exceeds 3 kg, a low dose pill and a restrictive diet should be recommended. OCs should be terminated if weight gain continues, and anomalies of glucose or lipid metabolism should be ruled out. Obesity constitutes a relative contraindication for use of combined OCs. Combined OCs may aggravate the obesity. Obesity on the other hand is a risk factor for

  4. Complementary therapies for cancer-related symptoms.

    PubMed

    Deng, Gary; Cassileth, Barrie R; Yeung, K Simon

    2004-01-01

    Relief of cancer-related symptoms is essential in the supportive and palliative care of cancer patients. Complementary therapies such as acupuncture, mind-body techniques, and massage therapy can help when conventional treatment does not bring satisfactory relief or causes undesirable side effects. Controlled clinical trials show that acupuncture and hypnotherapy can reduce pain and nausea. Meditation, relaxation therapy, music therapy, and massage mitigate anxiety and distress. Pilot studies suggest that complementary therapies may treat xerostomia, hot flashes, and fatigue. Botanicals or dietary supplements are popular but often problematic. Concurrent use of herbal products with mainstream medical treatment should be discouraged.

  5. Arithmetic, mutually unbiased bases and complementary observables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheppeard, M. D.

    2010-02-01

    Complementary observables in quantum mechanics may be viewed as Frobenius structures in a dagger monoidal category, such as the category of finite dimensional Hilbert spaces over the complex numbers. On the other hand, their properties crucially depend on the discrete Fourier transform and its associated quantum torus, requiring only the finite fields that underlie mutually unbiased bases. In axiomatic topos theory, the complex numbers are difficult to describe and should not be invoked unnecessarily. This paper surveys some fundamentals of quantum arithmetic using finite field complementary observables, with a view considering more general axiom systems.

  6. [Predisposition - obesity phenotype].

    PubMed

    Blüher, M

    2014-05-01

    Obesity belongs to the five most important health burdens in modern societies and reaches with ~20 % prevalence in Germany epidemic proportions. Obesity significantly increases the risk of developing metabolic (e. g. type 2 diabetes), cardiovascular, orthopaedic, psychologic and other disorders. Despite the well established epidemiologic relationship between obesity and these co-morbidities, there is a subgroup of metabolically healthy obese patients, which seems to be protected against metabolic and cardiovascular obesity related disorders. Compared to metabolically unhealthy or high risk obese patients, metabolically healthy obese individuals are characterized by preserved insulin sensitivity, lower liver fat content, lower visceral fat mass, as well as normal adipose tissue function. Noteworthy, metabolically healthy obese individuals do not significantly improve their obesity-associated risk for the development of type 2 diabetes and vascular diseases. Therefore, distinction between metabolically healthy from high-risk obese phenotypes will facilitate the identification of the obese person who will benefit the most from early lifestyle, pharmacological or bariatric surgery interventions. A stratified treatment approach considering these different obesity phenotypes should be introduced into clinical management of obese patients.

  7. 15 CFR 784.6 - Post complementary access activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Post complementary access activities... COMPLEMENTARY ACCESS § 784.6 Post complementary access activities. Upon receiving the IAEA's final report on.... BIS also will send locations a post complementary access letter detailing the issues that...

  8. 15 CFR 784.6 - Post complementary access activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Post complementary access activities... COMPLEMENTARY ACCESS § 784.6 Post complementary access activities. Upon receiving the IAEA's final report on.... BIS also will send locations a post complementary access letter detailing the issues that...

  9. 15 CFR 784.6 - Post complementary access activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Post complementary access activities... COMPLEMENTARY ACCESS § 784.6 Post complementary access activities. Upon receiving the IAEA's final report on.... BIS also will send locations a post complementary access letter detailing the issues that...

  10. Obesity and diabetes gene discovery approaches.

    PubMed

    Walder, K; Segal, D; Jowett, J; Blangero, J; Collier, G R

    2003-01-01

    New treatments are currently required for the common metabolic diseases obesity and type 2 diabetes. The identification of physiological and biochemical factors that underlie the metabolic disturbances observed in obesity and type 2 diabetes is a key step in developing better therapeutic outcomes. The discovery of new genes and pathways involved in the pathogenesis of these diseases is critical to this process, however identification of genes that contribute to the risk of developing these diseases represents a significant challenge as obesity and type 2 diabetes are complex diseases with many genetic and environmental causes. A number of diverse approaches have been used to discover and validate potential new targets for obesity and diabetes. To date, DNA-based approaches using candidate gene and genome-wide linkage analysis have had limited success in identifying genomic regions or genes involved in the development of these diseases. Recent advances in the ability to evaluate linkage analysis data from large family pedigrees using variance components based linkage analysis show great promise in robustly identifying genomic regions associated with the development of obesity and diabetes. RNA-based technologies such as cDNA microarrays have identified many genes differentially expressed in tissues of healthy and diseased subjects. Using a combined approach, we are endeavouring to focus attention on differentially expressed genes located in chromosomal regions previously linked with obesity and/or diabetes. Using this strategy, we have identified Beacon as a potential new target for obesity and diabetes.

  11. Obesity and Anesthesia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Apnea and Anesthesia Smoking and Anesthesia Outpatient Surgery Obesity and Anesthesia More than one-third of Americans ... Sleep Apnea, a chronic medical problem common with obesity, can present with serious breathing problems before, during, ...

  12. Reducing Childhood Obesity

    MedlinePlus

    ... Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Reducing Childhood Obesity Past Issues / Summer 2007 Table of Contents For ... page please turn Javascript on. The We Can! childhood obesity-prevention program involves parents, caregivers, and community leaders ...

  13. Obesity: Pathophysiology and Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yi; Liu, Ju; Yao, Jianliang; Ji, Gang; Qian, Long; Wang, Jing; Zhang, Guansheng; Tian, Jie; Nie, Yongzhan; Zhang, Yi Edi.; Gold, Mark S.; Liu, Yijun

    2014-01-01

    Obesity presents a major health hazard of the 21st century. It promotes co-morbid diseases such as heart disease, type 2 diabetes, obstructive sleep apnea, certain types of cancer, and osteoarthritis. Excessive energy intake, physical inactivity, and genetic susceptibility are main causal factors for obesity, while gene mutations, endocrine disorders, medication, or psychiatric illnesses may be underlying causes in some cases. The development and maintenance of obesity may involve central pathophysiological mechanisms such as impaired brain circuit regulation and neuroendocrine hormone dysfunction. Dieting and physical exercise offer the mainstays of obesity treatment, and anti-obesity drugs may be taken in conjunction to reduce appetite or fat absorption. Bariatric surgeries may be performed in overtly obese patients to lessen stomach volume and nutrient absorption, and induce faster satiety. This review provides a summary of literature on the pathophysiological studies of obesity and discusses relevant therapeutic strategies for managing obesity. PMID:25412152

  14. Defining Overweight and Obesity

    MedlinePlus

    ... Physical Activity Overweight & Obesity Healthy Weight Breastfeeding Micronutrient Malnutrition State and Local Programs Defining Adult Overweight and ... Physical Activity Overweight & Obesity Healthy Weight Breastfeeding Micronutrient Malnutrition State and Local Programs File Formats Help: How ...

  15. Obesity Hypoventilation Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Twitter. What Is Obesity Hypoventilation Syndrome? Obesity hypoventilation (HI-po-ven-tih-LA-shun) syndrome (OHS) is ... e-DE-mah), pulmonary hypertension (PULL-mun-ary HI-per-TEN-shun), cor pulmonale (pul-meh-NAL- ...

  16. Endocrine system and obesity.

    PubMed

    Ashburn, Doyle D; Reed, Mary Jane

    2010-10-01

    Obesity is associated with significant alterations in endocrine function. An association with type 2 diabetes mellitus and dyslipidemia has been well documented. This article highlights the complexities of treating endocrine system disorders in obese patients.

  17. Obesity and health (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Obesity increases a person's risk of illness and death due to diabetes, stroke, heart disease, hypertension, high cholesterol, and kidney and gallbladder disease. Obesity may increase the risk for some types of ...

  18. [Obesity and sugar: allies or enemies].

    PubMed

    Lisbona Catalán, Arturo; Palma Milla, Samara; Parra Ramírez, Paola; Gómez Candela, Carmen

    2013-07-01

    In the last three decades, the prevalence of obesity in developed countries has reached epidemic proportions, and continues rising. Many factors have influence on the incidence of obesity, and with the decline of physical activity, overeating plays a role in the emergence of this public health problem. Although a clear relationship between fat intake and weight gain has been established, the role of carbohydrates and more specifically from sucrose and the development of obesity is more controversial. Much of this controversy is due to the growing demand for sweetened drinks and caloric increase posed by these in the diet. Despite multiple studies and communications on this subject in recent years, there are still many areas of uncertainty about the role played by diets rich in sugars over the increase in obesity in last years.

  19. Complementary and Alternative Therapies for Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roizen, Nancy J.

    2005-01-01

    In their role as committed advocates, parents of children with Down syndrome have always sought alternative therapies, mainly to enhance cognitive function but also to improve their appearance. Nutritional supplements have been the most frequent type of complementary and alternative therapy used. Cell therapy, plastic surgery, hormonal therapy,…

  20. Complementary and integrative treatments: adenotonsillar disease.

    PubMed

    Billings, Kathleen R; Maddalozzo, John

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this article is to familiarize the otolaryngologist with complementary and integrative treatment options for the management of sore throat and tonsillitis. A review of the available literature will provide insight into available treatment options with these therapies. Current medical and surgical approaches to therapy for adenotonsillar disease will be reviewed.

  1. Polish Complementary Schools in Iceland and England

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zielinska, Malgorzata; Kowzan, Piotr; Ragnarsdóttir, Hanna

    2014-01-01

    Since 2004, the opening of labour markets has spurred a considerable number of Poles to emigrate e.g. to Iceland and England. Families with school age children have had the challenge of adapting to foreign environments and school systems. Polish complementary schools have played an important, albeit ambivalent, role in this process. Through focus…

  2. Complementary Schools, Past, Present and Future

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Wei

    2006-01-01

    Complementary schools for immigrant and ethnic minority children in the UK have been an important socio-political, educational movement in the country for nearly half a century. They have made a major impact on the lives of thousands of children of different ethnic backgrounds, attracted public debates vis-a-vis the government's involvement in…

  3. Thinking about Complementary and Alternative Medicine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Free Copy This booklet covers: What complementary and alternative medicine is (CAM) is and why people use it The different types of CAM (mind-body methods, biologically based practices, body-based practices, energy medicine, and whole medical systems. How to talk ...

  4. Recommendations on complementary feeding for healthy, full-term infants.

    PubMed

    Alvisi, Patrizia; Brusa, Sandra; Alboresi, Stefano; Amarri, Sergio; Bottau, Paolo; Cavagni, Giovanni; Corradini, Barbara; Landi, Linda; Loroni, Leonardo; Marani, Miris; Osti, Irene M; Povesi-Dascola, Carlotta; Caffarelli, Carlo; Valeriani, Luca; Agostoni, Carlo

    2015-04-28

    Weaning (or introduction of complementary feeding) is a special and important moment in the growth of a child, both for the family and the infant itself, and it can play a major role in the child's future health. Throughout the years, various weaning modes have come in succession, the latest being baby-led weaning; the timing for introducing foods and the requirements of which sort of nutrient for weaning have also changed over time. Furthermore, the role played by nutrition, especially in the early stages of life, for the onset of later non-communicable disorders, such as diabetes, obesity or coeliac disease has also been increasingly highlighted.Members of Italian Society of Gastroenterology, Hepathology and Pediatric Nutrition (SIGENP) and the Italian Society of Allergology and Pediatric Immunology (SIAIP) Emilia Romagna here propose a practical approach for pediatricians to deal with daily practice. The four main areas for discussion were weaning in relation with the onset of allergic diseases, coeliac disease, diabetes and metabolic syndrome, the nutrition requirements to take into account for assessing the diet of infants under one year of age and about the practice of baby-led weaning focusing on limits and benefits, respectively.

  5. Obesity and Psychoanalysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rand, Colleen S.; Stunkard, Albert J.

    This report describes a collaborative study undertaken by 72 psychoanalysts in an effort to (1) collect systematic data about obese patients in psychoanalysis and (2) assess the effect of psychoanalysis in the treatment of obesity. A total of 84 obese and 63 normal weight patients was studied. Each analyst completed a detailed questionnaire on his…

  6. Childhood environment and obesity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    US children are at risk for developing childhood obesity. Currently, 23% of children ages 2–5 are overweight or obese, i.e., at or above the 85th percentile. This prevalence becomes even higher as children age, with 34% of children ages 6–11 being overweight or obese. Ethnic minority children are at...

  7. Obesity, Physical Activity - Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilliam, Thomas B.

    Childhood obesity starts at a very early age, and preventive measures taken early enough may retard the development of fat cells. It appears that physical activity plays an important role in reducing obesity. The activity program must start early, in preschool days. It is felt that screening children for obesity when they first enter school and…

  8. Childhood Obesity: An Overview

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reilly, John J.

    2007-01-01

    This article reviews recent research evidence, largely from systematic reviews, on a number of aspects of childhood obesity: its definition and prevalence; consequences; causes and prevention. The basis of the body mass index (BMI) as a means of defining obesity in children and adolescents is discussed: a high BMI for age constitutes obesity. In…

  9. The Complexity of Obesity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, Katti

    2010-01-01

    With Americans fatter and more malnourished than ever--almost two-thirds of the population is considered overweight or obese compared with 56 percent in the late 1980s and early 1990s, and people of color and the poor are the most obese of all--federal and university researchers and outreach workers from various anti-obesity organizations aim to…

  10. Childhood obesity: trends and potential causes.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Patricia M; Butcher, Kristin E

    2006-01-01

    The increase in childhood obesity over the past several decades, together with the associated health problems and costs, is raising grave concern among health care professionals, policy experts, children's advocates, and parents. Patricia Anderson and Kristin Butcher document trends in children's obesity and examine the possible underlying causes of the obesity epidemic. They begin by reviewing research on energy intake, energy expenditure, and "energy balance," noting that children who eat more "empty calories" and expend fewer calories through physical activity are more likely to be obese than other children. Next they ask what has changed in children's environment over the past three decades to upset this energy balance equation. In particular, they examine changes in the food market, in the built environment, in schools and child care settings, and in the role of parents-paying attention to the timing of these changes. Among the changes that affect children's energy intake are the increasing availability of energy-dense, high-calorie foods and drinks through schools. Changes in the family, particularly an increase in dual-career or single-parent working families, may also have increased demand for food away from home or pre-prepared foods. A host of factors have also contributed to reductions in energy expenditure. In particular, children today seem less likely to walk to school and to be traveling more in cars than they were during the early 1970s, perhaps because of changes in the built environment. Finally, children spend more time viewing television and using computers. Anderson and Butcher find no one factor that has led to increases in children's obesity. Rather, many complementary changes have simultaneously increased children's energy intake and decreased their energy expenditure. The challenge in formulating policies to address children's obesity is to learn how best to change the environment that affects children's energy balance.

  11. Obesity and Cecal Intubation Time

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Deepanshu; Goyal, Abhinav; Uribe, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims: Obesity is a much-debated factor with conflicting evidence regarding its association with cecum intubation rates during colonoscopy. We aimed to identify the association between cecal intubation (CI) time and obesity by eliminating confounding factors. Methods: A retrospective chart review of subjects undergoing outpatient colonoscopy was conducted. The population was categorized by sex and obesity (body mass index [BMI, kg/m2]: I, <24.9; II, 25 to 29.9; III, ≥30). CI time was used as a marker for a difficult colonoscopy. Mean CI times (MCT) were compared for statistical significance using analysis of variance tests. Results: A total of 926 subjects were included. Overall MCT was 15.7±7.9 minutes, and it was 15.9±7.9 and 15.5±7.9 minutes for men and women, respectively. MCT among women for BMI category I, II, and III was 14.4±6.5, 15.5±8.3, and 16.2±8.1 minutes (p=0.55), whereas for men, it was 16.3±8.9, 15.9±8.0, and 15.6±7.2 minutes (p=0.95), respectively. Conclusions: BMI had a positive association with CI time for women, but had a negative association with CI for men. PMID:26867549

  12. Myocardial tissue phase mapping reveals impaired myocardial tissue velocities in obesity.

    PubMed

    Rider, Oliver J; Ajufo, Ezimamaka; Ali, Mohammed K; Petersen, Steffen E; Nethononda, Richard; Francis, Jane M; Neubauer, Stefan

    2015-02-01

    Although obesity is linked to heart failure on a population level, not all obese subjects develop cardiac failure. As a result, identifying obese subjects with subclinical changes in myocardial velocities may enable earlier detection of those susceptible to developing overt heart failure. As echocardiography is limited in obesity due to limited acoustic window, we used phase contrast magnetic resonance imaging to assess myocardial velocities in obese and normal weight subjects. Normal weight (BMI 23 ± 3; n = 40) and obese subjects (BMI 37 ± 7; n = 59) without identifiable cardiovascular risk factors underwent MRI (1.5 Tesla) to determine left ventricular myocardial velocities using phase contrast tissue phase mapping. Systolic function was not different between normal and obese subjects (LVEF 67 ± 5 vs 68 ± 4, p = 0.22). However, obesity was associated with significantly impaired peak radial and longitudinal diastolic myocardial velocity (by 13 and 19 % respectively, both p < 0.001). In addition time-to-peak longitudinal diastolic velocity was delayed in obesity (by 39 ms, p < 0.001). In addition, peak longitudinal diastolic strain was 20 % lower in obesity (p = 0.015) and time-to-peak longitudinal diastolic strain rate significantly delayed in obesity (by 92 ms, p < 0.001).Although peak radial systolic velocity was similar between obese and normal weight subjects (p = 0.14) peak longitudinal systolic velocity was 7 % lower in the obese cohort (p = 0.02). In obesity without co-morbidities, tissue phase mapping has shown subclinical changes in systolic and diastolic function. Given the link between obesity and heart failure, early detection of changes may become clinically important to prevent disease progression.

  13. Evaluation of employees in public day care centers knowledge about breastfeeding and complementary feeding

    PubMed Central

    Souza, Joelânia Pires de O.; Prudente, Amanda Moura; Silva, Dyene Aparecida; Pereira, Leandro Alves; Rinaldi, Ana Elisa M.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the knowledge of public day care centers employees about breastfeeding and complementary feeding. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was conducted in 15 public day care centers randomly selected in the city of Uberlandia, Southeast Brazil. A questionnaire applied to school principals, teachers, educators and general services assistants (GSA) included demographic and socioeconomic variables and questions about knowledge on breastfeeding, complementary feeding besides employees' perceptions about these subjects. Kruskal-Wallis with multiple comparison and chi-square tests were used to compare variables by professional category. RESULTS: 304 employees participated in the study. The highest percentages of correct answers were noted for questions about exclusive breastfeeding: definition - 97% (n=296) and duration - 65% (n=199). Regarding complementary feeding, 61% (n=187) correctly answered about the appropriate age to introduce it, with a lower percentage for meat (56%; n=170) and sugar (16%; n=50). Concerning employees' perceptions, 9% (n=29) believed that there is weak breast milk, 79% (n=241) and 51% (n=157) reported the negative influence of bottle feeding and pacifier use on breastfeeding. Among the interviewed subjects, 77% (n=234) answered that they had a positive influence on the quality of the food given to the children. There were no differences in the answers according to professional category, except for the negative influence of pacifiers on breastfeeding. CONCLUSIONS: Employees of public day care centers knew more about breastfeeding than about complementary feeding. Educational activities about breastfeeding and complementary feeding are necessary for day care centers employees. PMID:24473953

  14. Childhood obesity affects adult metabolic syndrome and diabetes.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yajun; Hou, Dongqing; Zhao, Xiaoyuan; Wang, Liang; Hu, Yuehua; Liu, Junting; Cheng, Hong; Yang, Ping; Shan, Xinying; Yan, Yinkun; Cruickshank, J Kennedy; Mi, Jie

    2015-09-01

    We seek to observe the association between childhood obesity by different measures and adult obesity, metabolic syndrome (MetS), and diabetes. Thousand two hundred and nine subjects from "Beijing Blood Pressure Cohort Study" were followed 22.9 ± 0.5 years in average from childhood to adulthood. We defined childhood obesity using body mass index (BMI) or left subscapular skinfold (LSSF), and adult obesity as BMI ≥ 28 kg/m(2). MetS was defined according to the joint statement of International Diabetes Federation and American Heart Association with modified waist circumference (≥ 90/85 cm for men/women). Diabetes was defined as fasting plasma glucose ≥ 7.0 mmol/L or blood glucose 2 h after oral glucose tolerance test ≥ 11.1 mmol/L or currently using blood glucose-lowering agents. Multiple linear and logistic regression models were used to assess the association. The incidence of adult obesity was 13.4, 60.0, 48.3, and 65.1 % for children without obesity, having obesity by BMI only, by LSSF only, and by both, respectively. Compared to children without obesity, children obese by LSSF only or by both had higher risk of diabetes. After controlling for adult obesity, childhood obesity predicted independently long-term risks of diabetes (odds ratio 2.8, 95 % confidence interval 1.2-6.3) or abdominal obesity (2.7, 1.6-4.7) other than MetS as a whole (1.2, 0.6-2.4). Childhood obesity predicts long-term risk of adult diabetes, and the effect is independent of adult obesity. LSSF is better than BMI in predicting adult diabetes.

  15. Obesity in obstetrics.

    PubMed

    Liat, Salzer; Cabero, Luis; Hod, Moshe; Yogev, Yariv

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is a rising global epidemic. Obesity during pregnancy is associated with increased maternal and fetal risks, which is inversely correlated with the severity level of obesity. Other comorbidities are common (diabetes mellitus, hypertensive disorders, etc.) and contribute to an even increased risk. Maternal obesity during pregnancy contributes also to offspring obesity and noncommunicable diseases later in life in a vicious cycle. Managing these problems, and potentially reducing their risk, can pose a challenge in obstetric care. It is important to provide preconception nutritional and exercise care, and guidance during pregnancy and post pregnancy for appropriate weight loss.

  16. Obesity and hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Shu-Zhong; Lu, Wen; Zong, Xue-Feng; Ruan, Hong-Yun; Liu, Yi

    2016-01-01

    The imbalance between energy intake and expenditure is the main cause of excessive overweight and obesity. Technically, obesity is defined as the abnormal accumulation of ≥20% of body fat, over the individual's ideal body weight. The latter constitutes the maximal healthful value for an individual that is calculated based chiefly on the height, age, build and degree of muscular development. However, obesity is diagnosed by measuring the weight in relation to the height of an individual, thereby determining or calculating the body mass index. The National Institutes of Health have defined 30 kg/m2 as the limit over which an individual is qualified as obese. Accordingly, the prevalence of obesity in on the increase in children and adults worldwide, despite World Health Organization warnings. The growth of obesity and the scale of associated health issues induce serious consequences for individuals and governmental health systems. Excessive overweight remains among the most neglected public health issues worldwide, while obesity is associated with increasing risks of disability, illness and death. Cardiovascular diseases, the leading cause of mortality worldwide, particularly hypertension and diabetes, are the main illnesses associated with obesity. Nevertheless, the mechanisms underlying obesity-associated hypertension or other associated metabolic diseases remains to be adequately investigated. In the present review, we addressed the association between obesity and cardiovascular disease, particularly the biological mechanisms linking obesity and hypertension. PMID:27703502

  17. Challenges in obesity research.

    PubMed

    Palou, Andreu; Bonet, M Luisa

    2013-09-01

    Obesity is the main nutritional problem and one of the most important health problems in developed societies. Central to the challenge of obesity prevention and management is a thoroughly understanding of its determinants. Multiple socio-cultural, socio-economic, behavioural and biological factors--often interrelated and many of them still unknown or poorly understood--can contribute to the establishment and perpetuation of obese phenotypes. Here, we address current research challenges regarding basic aspects of obesity and emerging science for its control, including brown adipose tissue thermogenesis and browning of white fat as possible therapeutic targets for obesity, the influence of the microbioma, and genetics, epigenetics, nutrigenomics and nutrigenetics of obesity. We also highlight hot topics in relation to food and lifestyle as determinants of obesity, including the brain mechanisms underlying environmental motivation to eat, the biological control of spontaneous physical activity, the possible role of concrete foods and food components, and the importance of early life nutrition and environment. Challenges regarding the connections of obesity with other alterations and pathologies are also briefly addressed, as well as social and economical challenges in relation to healthy food production and lifestyle for the prevention of obesity, and technological challenges in obesity research and management. The objective is to give a panoramic of advances accomplished and still ahead relevant to the different stakeholders engaged in understanding and combating obesity.

  18. Gastrointestinal Morbidity in Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Acosta, Andres; Camilleri, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is a complex disease that results from increased energy intake and decreased energy expenditure. The gastrointestinal system plays a key role in the pathogenesis of obesity and facilitates caloric imbalance. Changes in gastrointestinal hormones and the inhibition of mechanisms that curtail caloric intake result in weight gain. It is not clear if the gastrointestinal role in obesity is a cause or an effect of this disease. Obesity is often associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and cardiovascular diseases (CVD). Obesity is also associated with gastrointestinal disorders, which are more frequent and present earlier than T2DM and CVD. Diseases such as gastro-esophageal reflux disease, cholelithiasis or non-alcoholic steatohepatitis are directly related to body weight and abdominal adiposity. Our objective is to assess the role of each gastrointestinal organ in obesity and the gastrointestinal morbidity resulting in those organs from effects of obesity. PMID:24602085

  19. Obesity in women.

    PubMed

    Azarbad, Leila; Gonder-Frederick, Linda

    2010-06-01

    Obesity carries a unique disease burden on women and is influenced by a variety of biological, hormonal, environmental, and cultural factors. Reproductive transitions, such as pregnancy and menopause, increase the risk for obesity. Psychologically, obese women experience greater weight-related stigma and discrimination and are at increased risk for depression than obese men. Women are also particularly susceptible to psychological stress, sleep debt, and lack of physical activity, all of which are risk factors for the development of excess weight. Obesity risk is increased among women with psychiatric disorders and those who use certain psychotropic medications. Obesity treatment should take into consideration degree of obesity, health risks, past weight loss attempts, and individual differences in motivation and readiness for treatment.

  20. Obesity and systolic blood pressure in young adult men born small for gestational age.

    PubMed

    Laganović, Mario; Lela, Ivana Vuković; Premuzić, Vedran; Karanović, Sandra; Vrdoljak, Ana; Jelaković, Bojan

    2013-09-01

    Individuals born small for gestational age (SGA) are supposed to be at higher risk to develop cardiovascular disorders, and recent report showed that concurrent obesity influences blood pressure (BP) in SGA children. Our aim was to investigate the impact of obesity and birth weight on blood pressure values in young adult men born SGA and controls born after normal pregnancy, Normotensive, non-treated adult men were enrolled (N = 185; mean age 21.29 +/- 0.9 years). Birth parameters were obtained from medical records and SGA was defined as birth weight (BW) under 10th percentile for gestational age and obesity as BMI > 25 kg/m2. According to the presence or absence of obesity and BW the subjects were divided into four groups: (1) non-obese with normal BW (N = 50), (2) non-obese SGA (N = 67), (3) obese with normal BW (N = 40), (4) obese SGA (N = 28). BP was measured using Omron M6 and Spacelab 90207 device following the ESH/ESC guidelines. Systolic BP, 24-hour BP variability and pulse pressure were significantly higher in SGA subjects than in those with normal BW (p < 0.05). The highest 24-hour and daytime systolic BP values as well as 24-hour pulse pressure were found in the subgroup of obese SGA subjects (p < 0.001). Significant differences for the above parameters were observed between obese SGA group and non-obese SGA group (p < 0.05). Obese SGA subjects had higher 24-hour and daytime systolic BP values compared to obese normal BW group. No difference was found in BP between non-obese SGA and non-obese group with normal BW (p > 0.05). In addition to BW and shorter pregnancy duration, obesity concurrently and significantly determines systolic BP in young normotensive men and point to a need for more aggressive implementation of healthy lifestyle as early as possible.

  1. Proteomics Analysis of Human Obesity Reveals the Epigenetic Factor HDAC4 as a Potential Target for Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Abu-Farha, Mohamed; Tiss, Ali; Abubaker, Jehad; Khadir, Abdelkrim; Al-Ghimlas, Fahad; Al-Khairi, Irina; Baturcam, Engin; Cherian, Preethi; Elkum, Naser; Hammad, Maha; John, Jeena; Kavalakatt, Sina; Warsame, Samia; Behbehani, Kazem; Dermime, Said; Dehbi, Mohammed

    2013-01-01

    Sedentary lifestyle and excessive energy intake are prominent contributors to obesity; a major risk factors for the development of insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. Elucidating the molecular mechanisms underlying these chronic conditions is of relevant importance as it might lead to the identification of novel anti-obesity targets. The purpose of the current study is to investigate differentially expressed proteins between lean and obese subjects through a shot-gun quantitative proteomics approach using peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) extracts as well as potential modulation of those proteins by physical exercise. Using this approach, a total of 47 proteins showed at least 1.5 fold change between lean and obese subjects. In obese, the proteomic profiling before and after 3 months of physical exercise showed differential expression of 38 proteins. Thrombospondin 1 (TSP1) was among the proteins that were upregulated in obese subjects and then decreased by physical exercise. Conversely, the histone deacetylase 4 (HDAC4) was downregulated in obese subjects and then induced by physical exercise. The proteomic data was further validated by qRT-PCR, Western blot and immunohistochemistry in both PBMCs and adipose tissue. We also showed that HDAC4 levels correlated positively with maximum oxygen consumption (VO2 Max) but negatively with body mass index, percent body fat, and the inflammatory chemokine RANTES. In functional assays, our data indicated that ectopic expression of HDAC4 significantly impaired TNF-α-dependent activation of NF-κB, establishing thus a link between HDAC4 and regulation of the immune system. Together, the expression pattern of HDAC4 in obese subjects before and after physical exercise, its correlation with various physical, clinical and metabolic parameters along with its inhibitory effect on NF-κB are suggestive of a protective role of HDAC4 against obesity. HDAC4 could therefore represent a potential

  2. HLA ASSOCIATIONS IN OBESE WHITE AND BLACK ADULTS

    PubMed Central

    Butler, Merlin G.; Walton, Dominique; Zhu, Weitong; Niblack, Gary

    2016-01-01

    We summarized HLA-A and -B data from 1095 black and white adult men and women with or without obesity to determine if specific HLA tissue types are overrepresented in obese individuals compared with nonobese. None of the three HLA types (Aw30, B18, Bw35) previously reported to relate to obesity was overrepresented in obese subjects in our study. However, B14 and B41 haplotypes were overrepresented in obese white men compared with nonobese men, and B7 was overrepresented in obese black men compared with nonobese men. Additional research will be required to confirm the HLA associations we found and to determine if methodologic differences could account for the differences among the previous studies.

  3. Obesity as an emerging risk factor for iron deficiency.

    PubMed

    Aigner, Elmar; Feldman, Alexandra; Datz, Christian

    2014-09-11

    Iron homeostasis is affected by obesity and obesity-related insulin resistance in a many-facetted fashion. On one hand, iron deficiency and anemia are frequent findings in subjects with progressed stages of obesity. This phenomenon has been well studied in obese adolescents, women and subjects undergoing bariatric surgery. On the other hand, hyperferritinemia with normal or mildly elevated transferrin saturation is observed in approximately one-third of patients with metabolic syndrome (MetS) or nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). This constellation has been named the "dysmetabolic iron overload syndrome (DIOS)". Both elevated body iron stores and iron deficiency are detrimental to health and to the course of obesity-related conditions. Iron deficiency and anemia may impair mitochondrial and cellular energy homeostasis and further increase inactivity and fatigue of obese subjects. Obesity-associated inflammation is tightly linked to iron deficiency and involves impaired duodenal iron absorption associated with low expression of duodenal ferroportin (FPN) along with elevated hepcidin concentrations. This review summarizes the current understanding of the dysregulation of iron homeostasis in obesity.

  4. Are Dietary Intakes Related to Obesity in Children?

    PubMed Central

    Papandreou, Dimitrios; Makedou, Kali; Zormpa, Areti; Karampola, Maria; Ioannou, Anastasia; Hitoglou-Makedou, Areti

    2016-01-01

    AIM: The purpose of this study was to report obesity status and identify any dietary substances that may be related to obesity in healthy school children from Northern Greece. METHODS: Four hundred and twenty-five (n = 425) children were randomly selected to participate in the study. A 24-h recall of three days (two weekdays and one weekend day) was used to analyze the dietary data of the subjects. RESULTS: Out of 425 subjects, 146 (34.3%) of them were found to be overweight and obese. Energy, protein, carbohydrate and thiamin intake was statistically positively correlated with obesity while dietary iron intake was statistically negatively correlated with obesity. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that the children with dietary iron deficiency were 1.128 (95% CI: 0.002, 0.161 P < 0.031) times more likely of being obese compared to the normal group after adjustment for energy intake. CONCLUSIONS: Although most of the dietary intakes of our subjects were adequate, special consideration should be given to energy, carbohydrate, protein, and sugar and iron intake especially and its relation to obesity. Furthermore, additional studies are required to investigate any possible relation of low dietary iron consumption and obesity. PMID:27335587

  5. Association of Obesity with Proteasomal Gene Polymorphisms in Children

    PubMed Central

    Kupca, Sarmite; Paramonova, Natalija; Sugoka, Olga; Rinkuza, Irena; Trapina, Ilva; Daugule, Ilva; Sipols, Alfred J.; Rumba-Rozenfelde, Ingrida

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to ascertain possible associations between childhood obesity, its anthropometric and clinical parameters, and three loci of proteasomal genes rs2277460 (PSMA6 c.-110C>A), rs1048990 (PSMA6 c.-8C>G), and rs2348071 (PSMA3 c. 543+138G>A) implicated in obesity-related diseases. Obese subjects included 94 otherwise healthy children in Latvia. Loci were genotyped and then analyzed using polymerase chain reactions, with results compared to those of 191 nonobese controls. PSMA3 SNP frequency differences between obese children and controls, while not reaching significance, suggested a trend. These differences, however, proved highly significant (P < 0.002) in the subset of children reporting a family history of obesity. Among obese children denying such history, PSMA6 c.-8C>G SNP differences, while being nonsignificant, likewise suggested a trend in comparison to the nonobese controls. No PSMA6 c.-110C>A SNP differences were detected in the obese group or its subsets. Finally, PSMA3 SNP differences were significantly associated (P < 0.05) with circulating low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL) levels. Our results clearly implicate the PSMA3 gene locus as an obesity risk factor in those Latvian children with a family history of obesity. While being speculative, the clinical results are suggestive of altered circulatory LDL levels playing a possible role in the etiology of obesity in the young. PMID:24455213

  6. Complementary Proteomic Analysis of Protein Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Greco, Todd M.; Miteva, Yana; Conlon, Frank L.; Cristea, Ileana M.

    2013-01-01

    Proteomic characterization of protein complexes leverages the versatile platform of liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry to elucidate molecular and cellular signaling processes underlying the dynamic regulation of macromolecular assemblies. Here, we describe a complementary proteomic approach optimized for immunoisolated protein complexes. As the relative complexity, abundance, and physiochemical properties of proteins can vary significantly between samples, we have provided (1) complementary sample preparation workflows, (2) detailed steps for HPLC and mass spectrometric method development, and (3) a bioinformatic workflow that provides confident peptide/protein identification paired with unbiased functional gene ontology analysis. This protocol can also be extended for characterization of larger complexity samples from whole cell or tissue Xenopus proteomes. PMID:22956100

  7. [Complementary and alternative medicine for insomnia].

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Hidehisa; Machino, Akihiko; Shishida, Kazuhiro; Yoshino, Atsuo; Yamawaki, Shigeto

    2015-06-01

    Frequency of insomnia is increasing with age. Benzodiazepine receptor agonist has been prescribed for insomnia in the elderly, but there are some patients who complain the effect is not sufficient. Adherence for sleeping pills is very low in elderly Japanese, because there has been strong stigma against sleeping pills. Complementary and alternative medicine for insomnia is widely used in elderly Japanese. Sedative antidepressants, novel antipsychotics, anti-histamine drugs, and supplements are used for insomnia as complementary and alternative medicine. But evidence of these drugs for insomnia is insufficient. In this paper, we outline the previous reports such as the advantages and disadvantages of these drugs for the treatment of insomnia in the elderly. PMID:26065137

  8. Complementary methods of transverse emittance measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Zagel, James; Hu, Martin; Jansson, Andreas; Thurman-Keup, Randy; Yan, Ming-Jen; /Fermilab

    2008-05-01

    Several complementary transverse emittance monitors have been developed and used at the Fermilab accelerator complex. These include Ionization profile Monitors (IPM), Flying Wires, Schottky detectors and a Synchrotron Light Monitor (Synchlite). Mechanical scrapers have also been used for calibration purposes. This paper describes the various measurement devices by examining their basic features, calibration requirements, systematic uncertainties, and applications to collider operation. A comparison of results from different kinds of measurements is also presented.

  9. [Complementary care approaches, towards more humanity].

    PubMed

    Svandra, Philippe

    2016-04-01

    Modern medicine, with its cutting-edge technology, questions the notions of dehumanisation, over-medicalisation, the relationship to care. It seems to be aimed more at the disease than the patient. Complementary care approaches, which also encompass conventional medicine, guide and support the patient. Today, they have a role in giving back to the patient a feeling of being present in the world and testify to different approaches.

  10. Complementary arsenic speciation methods: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nearing, Michelle M.; Koch, Iris; Reimer, Kenneth J.

    2014-09-01

    The toxicity of arsenic greatly depends on its chemical form and oxidation state (speciation) and therefore accurate determination of arsenic speciation is a crucial step in understanding its chemistry and potential risk. High performance liquid chromatography with inductively coupled mass spectrometry (HPLC-ICP-MS) is the most common analysis used for arsenic speciation but it has two major limitations: it relies on an extraction step (usually from a solid sample) that can be incomplete or alter the arsenic compounds; and it provides no structural information, relying on matching sample peaks to standard peaks. The use of additional analytical methods in a complementary manner introduces the ability to address these disadvantages. The use of X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) with HPLC-ICP-MS can be used to identify compounds not extracted for HPLC-ICP-MS and provide minimal processing steps for solid state analysis that may help preserve labile compounds such as those containing arsenicsbnd sulfur bonds, which can degrade under chromatographic conditions. On the other hand, HPLC-ICP-MS is essential in confirming organoarsenic compounds with similar white line energies seen by using XAS, and identifying trace arsenic compounds that are too low to be detected by XAS. The complementary use of electrospray mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) with HPLC-ICP-MS provides confirmation of arsenic compounds identified during the HPLC-ICP-MS analysis, identification of unknown compounds observed during the HPLC-ICP-MS analysis and further resolves HPLC-ICP-MS by identifying co-eluting compounds. In the complementary use of HPLC-ICP-MS and ESI-MS, HPLC-ICP-MS helps to focus the ESI-MS selection of ions. Numerous studies have shown that the information obtained from HPLC-ICP-MS analysis can be greatly enhanced by complementary approaches.

  11. Some realizable joint measurements of complementary observables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busch, Paul

    1987-09-01

    Noncommuting quantum observables, if considered as unsharp observables, are simultaneously measurable. This fact is exemplified for complementary observables in two-dimensional state spaces. Two proposals of experimentally feasible joint measurements are presented for pairs of photon or neutron polarization observables and for path and interference observables in a photon split-beam experiment. A recent experiment proposed and performed by Mittelstaedt, Prieur, and Schieder in Cologne is interpreted as a partial version of the latter example.

  12. Complementary heterojunction FET technology for space application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larue, George

    1993-01-01

    A 32-bit serial integer multiplier was designed to investigate the yield and performance of complementary heterojunction FET (CHFET) technology. This is the largest reported CHFET logic circuit. The maximum operating frequency was 500 MHz. Very low power dissipation of 3 mW was obtained at 5 MHz operation. Single-event upset (SEU) characteristics of CHFET devices and latches were also measured and indicates the potential for SEU hard circuits for space and military applications.

  13. High fat diet and in utero exposure to maternal obesity disrupts circadian rhythm and leads to metabolic programming of liver in rat offspring

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The risk of obesity in adulthood is subject to programming beginning at conception. In animal models, exposure to maternal obesity and high fat diets influences the risk of obesity in the offspring. Among other long-term changes, offspring from obese rats develop hyperinsulinemia, hepatic steatosi...

  14. Suppressed cytokine production in whole blood cultures is related to iron status and is partially corrected following weight reduction in morbidly obese pre-menopausal women

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Assess ex vivo whole-blood cytokine production and its association with iron status in obese versus non-obese women. Determine the change in ex vivo whole-blood cytokine production six months after restrictive bariatric surgery in the obese group. Subjects were 17 obese (BMI: 46.6 ±7.9 kg/m2) and 1...

  15. Ameliorative effects of adrenalectomy on the hyperphagia, hyperlipidaemia, hyperglycaemia and hypertension of obese, spontaneously hypertensive rats (Obese/SHR).

    PubMed

    Wexler, B C; McMurtry, J P

    1981-04-01

    Genetically obese and hypertensive rats (Obese/SHR) were subjected to sham or bilateral adrenalectomy at 4-5 weeks of age with the onset of hyperphagia. The sham-operated Obese/SHR ate voraciously and by 180 days of age males weighed 700 g and females 590 g. The adrenalectomized Obese/SHR ate much less and weighed 325 and 225 g. The systolic blood pressure of the intact Obese/SHR ranged from 160 to 170 mmHg, whereas the blood pressure of the adrenalectomized animals ranged from 108 to 110 mmHg. The thymi of the intact Obese/SHR were massive compared to those of the adrenalectomized rats. Adrenalectomy effectively reduced the hyperinsulinaemia, adiposity, hyperlipidaemia, hyperglycaemia, and elevated BUN levels of the obese rats. Several obese rats had old or new myocardial infarcts, fatty livers, giant-sized islets of Langerhans, nodular and hyperaemic adrenal glands, narrow zona glomerulosa devoid of lipid, vacuolated inner cortical zones, foci of intimal fibrinohyalin deposits in mesenteric arteries, early glomerulosclerosis, and large, rounded bladder calculi. The adrenalectomized Obese/SHR displayed none of these stigmata. It is suggested that the genetically programmed obesity and hypertension in these SHR are mediated by abnormal activity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal-gonadal axis, may be likened to Cushing's disease in the human, and is associated with accelerated ageing.

  16. Functional connectivity in obesity during reward processing.

    PubMed

    García-García, I; Jurado, M A; Garolera, M; Segura, B; Marqués-Iturria, I; Pueyo, R; Vernet-Vernet, M; Sender-Palacios, M J; Sala-Llonch, R; Ariza, M; Narberhaus, A; Junqué, C

    2013-02-01

    Obesity is a health problem that has become a major focus of attention in recent years. There is growing evidence of an association between obesity and differences in reward processing. However, it is not known at present whether these differences are linked exclusively to food, or whether they can be detected in other rewarding stimuli. We compared responses to food, rewarding non-food and neutral pictures in 18 young adults with obesity and 19 normal-weight subjects using independent component analysis. Both groups modulated task-related activity in a plausible way. However, in response to both food and non-food rewarding stimuli, participants with obesity showed weaker connectivity in a network involving activation of frontal and occipital areas and deactivation of the posterior part of the default mode network. In addition, obesity was related with weaker activation of the default mode network and deactivation of frontal and occipital areas while viewing neutral stimuli. Together, our findings suggest that obesity is related to a different allocation of cognitive resources in a fronto-occipital network and in the default mode network. PMID:23103690

  17. Matrix metalloproteinases in exercise and obesity

    PubMed Central

    Jaoude, Jonathan; Koh, Yunsuk

    2016-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are zinc- and calcium-dependent endoproteinases that have the ability to break down extracellular matrix. The large range of MMPs’ functions widens their spectrum of potential role as activators or inhibitors in tissue remodeling, cardiovascular diseases, and obesity. In particular, MMP-1, -2, and -9 may be associated with exercise and obesity. Thus, the current study reviewed the effects of different types of exercise (resistance and aerobic) on MMP-1, -2, and -9. Previous studies report that the response of MMP-2 and -9 to resistance exercise is dependent upon the length of exercise training, since long-term resistance exercise training increased both MMP-2 and -9, whereas acute bout of resistance exercise decreased these MMPs. Aerobic exercise produces an inconsistent result on MMPs, although some studies showed a decrease in MMP-1. Obesity is related to a relatively lower level of MMP-9, indicating that an exercise-induced increase in MMP-9 may positively influence obesity. A comprehensive understanding of the relationship between exercise, obesity, and MMPs does not exist yet. Future studies examining the acute and chronic responses of these MMPs using different subject models may provide a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms that are associated with exercise, obesity, and cardiovascular disease. PMID:27471391

  18. The obesity paradox and cardiorespiratory fitness.

    PubMed

    McAuley, Paul A; Smith, Nancy S; Emerson, Brian T; Myers, Jonathan N

    2012-01-01

    Cardiorespiratory fitness as an explanation for the obesity paradox warrants further examination. We evaluated independent and joint associations of cardiorespiratory fitness and adiposity with all-cause mortality in 811 middle-aged (age, 53.3 ± 7.2 years) male never smokers without documented cardiopulmonary disease or diabetes from the Veterans Exercise Testing Study (VETS). Cardiorespiratory fitness was quantified in metabolic equivalents (METs) using final treadmill speed and grade achieved on a maximal exercise test. Subjects were grouped for analysis by METs: unfit (lowest third) and fit (upper two-thirds); and by body mass index (kg/m(2)): nonobese (18.5-29.9) and obese (≥30.0). Associations of baseline fitness and adiposity measures with all-cause mortality were determined by Cox proportional hazards analysis adjusted for age, ethnicity, hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, family history of coronary artery disease, and cardiovascular medication use. In multivariate analysis, mortality risk for obese/fit men did not differ significantly from the nonobese/fit reference group. However, compared to the reference group, nonobese and obese unfit men were 2.2 (P = 0.01) and 1.9 (P = 0.03) times more likely to die, respectively. Cardiorespiratory fitness altered the obesity paradox such that mortality risk was lower for both obese and nonobese men who were fit.

  19. Diffusing obesity myths.

    PubMed

    Ramos Salas, X; Forhan, M; Sharma, A M

    2014-06-01

    Misinformation or myths about obesity can lead to weight bias and obesity stigma. Counteracting myths with facts and evidence has been shown to be effective educational tools to increase an individuals' knowledge about a certain condition and to reduce stigma.The purpose of this study was to identify common obesity myths within the healthcare and public domains and to develop evidence-based counterarguments to diffuse them. An online search of grey literature, media and public health information sources was conducted to identify common obesity myths. A list of 10 obesity myths was developed and reviewed by obesity experts and key opinion leaders. Counterarguments were developed using current research evidence and validated by obesity experts. A survey of obesity experts and health professionals was conducted to determine the usability and potential effectiveness of the myth-fact messages to reduce weight bias. A total of 754 individuals responded to the request to complete the survey. Of those who responded, 464 (61.5%) completed the survey. All 10 obesity myths were identified to be deeply pervasive within Canadian healthcare and public domains. Although the myth-fact messages were endorsed, respondents also indicated that they would likely not be sufficient to reduce weight bias. Diffusing deeply pervasive obesity myths will require multilevel approaches. PMID:25826775

  20. Obesity and reproduction.

    PubMed

    Bray, G A

    1997-10-01

    Obesity produces a variety of alterations in the reproductive system and, similarly, manipulations of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis produce changes in food intake, body weight and fat distribution. In men, the primary effects of obesity are a weight related reduction in testosterone and, with massive overweight, a reduction in free testosterone. In females, the weight-related development of menarche leads to earlier menarche in obese girls than in normal weight girls. One explanation for the relationship of fatness to menarche may be the ob protein (leptin) which is defective in the obese (ob/ob) mouse. Leptin is secreted by adipose tissue in proportion to the quantity of fat and may serve as a signal to the hypothalamus that fat stores are adequate to nourish a conceptus to term. In women, parity affects obesity and obesity in turn affects the regularity of the menstrual cycle. In many experimental animals with obesity, particularly the genetic forms of obesity, there is complete infertility in the females and marked impairment of reproductive function in the males. In animals with hypothalamic lesions, there is a gender effect on the magnitude of weight gain associated with the sexually dimorphic regions in the medial preoptic area. Castration with removal of oestrogen is followed by obesity in female animals and this can be prevented, as can most forms of obesity, by adrenalectomy. The inhibitory effects of oestrogen on food intake may result from suppression of neuropeptide-Y or galanin peptidergic systems in the arcuate nucleus or medial preoptic area.

  1. Association of Plasma Viscosity with Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Obesity: As an old marker, a new insight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meltem, Ercan; Dildar, Konukoglu; Tijen, Yeşim Erdem

    2007-04-01

    Although obesity is related with cardiovascular disease, the exact mechanism of the relationship is not fully understood. We aim to examine the relationship between plasma viscosity and obesity as a cardiovascular disease risk factor in obese and non-obese groups. We recruited 75 obese subjects who were admitted to the Cerrahpasa Medical Faculty. Plasma viscosity and lipid profile were measured and atherogenic index was calculated as atherogenic risk factors. Plasma viscosity, total cholesterol and LDL-cholesterol levels and atherogenic index were significantly increased in obese group compared to non-obese group for each. Plasma viscosity was weakly correlated with total cholesterol and atherogenic index only in the obese group. Plasma viscosity, an early atherosclerotic risk factor, might be helpful in the assessment of cardiovascular risk in obese subjects.

  2. Physical activity and fitness in obese children.

    PubMed

    Huttunen, N P; Knip, M; Paavilainen, T

    1986-01-01

    Daily physical activity and physical fitness were studied in 31 obese and 31 normal-weight children matched for age and sex. The ages of the children ranged from 5.7 to 16.1 years. The history of their physical activity was examined using a questionnaire completed by the child and the parents. Physical fitness was measured using a two-stage exercise test on a bicycle ergometer. There were no significant differences in daily activities between the obese and the non-obese children, while the sports grades at school were lower and participation in the training teams of sports clubs was less frequent among obese than normal-weight subjects. The obese children were physically less fit than the normal-weight subjects as judged from the pedalling time in exercise test (P less than 0.05) and from the maximum oxygen consumption (VO2 max) related to lean body mass (LBM) (P less than 0.001). Twenty-seven children participated for 1 year in a weight-reduction programme which comprised individual nutrition counselling, guidance on physical activities and supportive therapy. The reduction in weight was successful in 25 out of 27 children and VO2 max increased on average from 44.2 to 47.1 ml/min/kg of LBM (P less than 0.025). There was no change in the time used for physical activities during the weight reduction period although the children's participation in the training teams of sports clubs increased. It was concluded that obese children are less fit than their non-obese counterparts. Weight reduction results, however, in an improvement of the maximum oxygen consumption towards normal.

  3. Morbid obesity impacts mortality in blunt trauma.

    PubMed

    Christmas, A Britton; Reynolds, Jennifer; Wilson, Ashley K; Franklin, Glen A; Miller, Frank B; Richardson, J David; Rodriguez, Jorge L

    2007-11-01

    Twenty-six per cent of adults in the Unites States are obese and trauma remains a major cause of death. We assessed the impact of morbid obesity on mortality in patients with blunt trauma. We reviewed the records of patients with a body mass index 40 kg/m2 or greater injured by blunt trauma from 1993 to 2003 and compared them with a 4:1 control population with a normal body mass index and matched for sex and constellation of injuries. For comparison, patients were categorized by Injury Severity Score 9 or less or Injury Severity Score 10 or greater. Student t test and chi2 were used for statistical analysis. P < 0.05 was considered significant. One hundred seven morbidly obese patients were identified and compared with 458 control subjects with a normal body mass index and matched for sex and constellation of injuries. Although the morbidly obese patients were found to be significantly younger, those who incurred multiorgan injury experienced a significantly longer hospital length of stay and displayed a greater than fourfold increase in mortality when compared with the control subjects. Furthermore, the number of morbidly obese patients admitted over the 10-year period significantly increased by fourfold (0.4% to 1.5%). Over the last decade, there has been a significant increase in morbidly obese patients cared for in our trauma center. Although these patients were significantly younger with a similar Glasgow Coma Score as that of the control population, morbid obesity significantly increased mortality when the injury from blunt trauma transitioned from a single to a multiorgan injury.

  4. The effects of complementary and alternative medicine on the speech of patients with depression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraas, Michael; Solloway, Michele

    2001-05-01

    It is well documented that patients suffering from depression exhibit articulatory timing deficits and speech that is monotonous and lacking pitch variation. Traditional remediation of depression has left many patients with adverse side effects and ineffective outcomes. Recent studies indicate that many Americans are seeking complementary and alternative forms of medicine to supplement traditional therapy approaches. The current investigation wishes to determine the efficacy of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) on the remediation of speech deficits associated with depression. Subjects with depression and normal controls will participate in an 8-week treatment session using polarity therapy, a form of CAM. Subjects will be recorded producing a series of spontaneous and narrative speech samples. Acoustic analysis of mean fundamental frequency (F0), variation in F0 (standard deviation of F0), average rate of F0 change, and pause and utterance durations will be conducted. Differences pre- and post-CAM therapy between subjects with depression and normal controls will be discussed.

  5. Dysfunction of human subcutaneous fat arterioles in obesity alone or obesity associated with Type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Georgescu, Adriana; Popov, Doina; Constantin, Anamaria; Nemecz, Miruna; Alexandru, Nicoleta; Cochior, Daniel; Tudor, Aura

    2011-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the effects of obesity alone and obesity associated with Type 2 diabetes on the structure, vascular reactivity and response to insulin of isolated human subcutaneous fat arterioles; these effects were correlated with the expression of insulin signalling proteins. Periumbilical subcutaneous adipose tissue was explanted during surgery, small arterioles (internal diameter 220 ± 40 μm) were dissected out and investigated by electron microscopy, myography and immunoblotting. Compared with the subcutaneous arterioles of lean subjects, obesity activated the endothelium, enhanced the accumulation of collagen within vascular wall and increased the sensitivity of adrenergic response; obesity also diminished eNOS (endothelial NO synthase) protein expression, NO production, and endothelium-dependent and insulin-induced vasodilatation, as well as the protein expression of both IRS (insulin receptor substrates)-1 and IRS-2 and of the downstream molecules in the insulin signalling pathway, such as PI3K (phosphoinositide 3-kinase), phospho-Akt and Akt. When obesity was associated with Type 2 diabetes, these changes were significantly augmented. In conclusion, obesity alone or obesity associated with Type 2 diabetes alters human periumbilical adipose tissue arterioles in terms of structure, function and biochemsitry, including diminished eNOS expression and reduced levels of IRS-1, IRS-2, PI3K and Akt in the insulin signalling pathway. PMID:20979575

  6. Abdominal obesity is an independent risk factor for increased carotid intima- media thickness in obese children.

    PubMed

    Hacihamdioğlu, Bülent; Okutan, Vedat; Yozgat, Yilmaz; Yildirim, Düzgün; Kocaoğlu, Murat; Lenk, Mustafa Koray; Ozcan, Okan

    2011-01-01

    We aimed in this study to investigate carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) in obese children and evaluate the relationship of IMT to various cardiovascular risk factors. One-hundred four obese children (9.3 +/- 2.5 years) and 30 healthy age-matched control subjects were enrolled in the study. All children were assessed for fasting levels of glucose, insulin, lipid profile, skinfold thickness (SFT), waist circumference (WC), and blood pressure (BP). Insulin resistance was estimated by the homeostasis model assessment (HOMA) index. Carotid IMT measurements and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) were diagnosed with ultrasonographic findings. IMT was significantly higher in obese children compared to controls (0.49 +/- 0.05 vs. 0.40 +/- 0.02 mm, p < 0.001). Significant positive correlations were found between increased carotid IMT and body fat percentage (BFP), body mass index (BMI), age, height, systolic BP, WC, SFT, triglyceride and insulin levels, and insulin resistance index. In a linear logistic regression analysis, the only parameter affecting the increase in carotid IMT was WC (beta: 0.589, p < 0.001). Furthermore, IMT was increased significantly in obese children with NAFLD when compared to obese children without NAFLD (0.54 +/- 0.04 vs. 0.48 +/- 0.05 mm, p < 0.001). Children with abdominal obesity are at increased risk for atherosclerosis, and WC can be used to determine the atherosclerosis risk in obese children.

  7. Special Section: Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM): Time to Talk

    MedlinePlus

    ... with your health care providers any complementary and alternative medicines you take or are thinking about starting. Photo: ... and older use some form of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). But less than one-third who use ...

  8. A Survey of Medical Students' Knowledge and Attitudes Toward Complementary and Alternative Medicine in Urmia, Iran.

    PubMed

    Sadeghi, Mahshid; Rabiepoor, Soheila; Forough, Aida Sefidani; Jabbari, Shiva; Shahabi, Shahram

    2016-10-01

    Personal beliefs of medical students may interfere with their tendency for learning Complementary and Alternative Medicine concepts. This study aimed to investigate the knowledge and attitudes of medical students toward complementary and alternative medicine in Urmia, Iran. A structured questionnaire was used as data collection instrument. One hundred questionnaires were returned. Thirty-one percent of students reported use of alternative medicine for at least once. Iranian Traditional Medicine was the main type of alternative medicine used by medical students (93.5%). Neuromuscular disorders were the main indication of alternative medicine use among students (34.4%). Ninety percent of participants demonstrated competent knowledge about acupuncture while the lowest scores belonged to homeopathy (12%). Study results showed that 49% of medical students had positive attitudes and demonstrated a willingness to receive training on the subject. Thus, there appears a necessity to integrate complementary and alternative medicine into the medical curriculum, by taking expectations and feedbacks of medical students into consideration.

  9. [The pharmacotherapy of obesity].

    PubMed

    Budai, Kinga Anna; Mirzahosseini, Arash; Noszál Béla; Tóth, Gergő

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is considered the most concerning and blatantly visible--yet most neglected--public health problem by the WHO. The steadily increasing number of overweight and obese people has reached 2.3 billion and 700 million worldwide, respectively. Obesity is a complex condition, one that presents serious health risks with respect to type 2 diabetes, ischemic heart disease, and hypertension, therefore controlling the global obesity epidemic decreases not only health problems, but also expenditure. The underlying cause of obesity is a metabolic disorder of genetic, central nervous system or endocrine etiology that manifests in increased nutritional intake and/or decreased physical activity ultimately leading to excessive lipogenesis. The natural treatment of obesity, that is often advised, is comprised of healthy lifestyle choices, namely low-calorie diet and exercise. However, the pharmaceutic treatment of obesity is just as important; having a better compliance rate, anti-obesity drugs also improve quality of life and patient-care outcome concerning accompanying diseases. In most countries only one drug is currently available against obesity: orlistat, which is a specific and irreversible lipase inhibitor. One of the reasons for the scarce number of anti-obesity drugs is the complex pathomechanism involved in obesity. Interference with the intricate biochemical processes that govern alimentation may lead to widespread adverse effects. The advances of the field however, have prompted novel drug leads. In the past few years FDA has approved new drugs for the treatment of obesity, recently liraglutide in 2014. The approval of drug combinations, such as phentermine/topiramate and bupropion/naltrexone are also noteworthy, the components of which have been previously approved, but not necessarily for obesity as main indication. Furthermore, there are many anti-obesity drug candidates currently in clinical phase trials, with promisingly modest adverse effect profiles; hence

  10. [The pharmacotherapy of obesity].

    PubMed

    Budai, Kinga Anna; Mirzahosseini, Arash; Noszál Béla; Tóth, Gergő

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is considered the most concerning and blatantly visible--yet most neglected--public health problem by the WHO. The steadily increasing number of overweight and obese people has reached 2.3 billion and 700 million worldwide, respectively. Obesity is a complex condition, one that presents serious health risks with respect to type 2 diabetes, ischemic heart disease, and hypertension, therefore controlling the global obesity epidemic decreases not only health problems, but also expenditure. The underlying cause of obesity is a metabolic disorder of genetic, central nervous system or endocrine etiology that manifests in increased nutritional intake and/or decreased physical activity ultimately leading to excessive lipogenesis. The natural treatment of obesity, that is often advised, is comprised of healthy lifestyle choices, namely low-calorie diet and exercise. However, the pharmaceutic treatment of obesity is just as important; having a better compliance rate, anti-obesity drugs also improve quality of life and patient-care outcome concerning accompanying diseases. In most countries only one drug is currently available against obesity: orlistat, which is a specific and irreversible lipase inhibitor. One of the reasons for the scarce number of anti-obesity drugs is the complex pathomechanism involved in obesity. Interference with the intricate biochemical processes that govern alimentation may lead to widespread adverse effects. The advances of the field however, have prompted novel drug leads. In the past few years FDA has approved new drugs for the treatment of obesity, recently liraglutide in 2014. The approval of drug combinations, such as phentermine/topiramate and bupropion/naltrexone are also noteworthy, the components of which have been previously approved, but not necessarily for obesity as main indication. Furthermore, there are many anti-obesity drug candidates currently in clinical phase trials, with promisingly modest adverse effect profiles; hence

  11. The effects of community environmental factors on obesity among Korean adults: a multilevel analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Nan-He; Kwon, Soonman

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study explored multidimensional factors related to obesity by dividing them into individual and environmental factors, and performed multilevel analysis to investigate community environmental effects. METHODS: Data from the 2011 and 2012 Community Health Surveys were used for the analysis. Community-level variables, constructed from various regional statistics, were included in the model as environmental factors. Respondents with body mass index (BMI)≥25 were defined as obese, and a multilevel logistic regression analysis was conducted to analyze individual and environmental factors related to obesity. Moreover, a stratified analysis was conducted to compare factors related to obesity between men and women. RESULTS: Of 337,136 samples, 82,887 (24.6%) were obese, with BMI≥25. Sociodemographic characteristics at the individual level were mostly significantly related to obesity; however, while there were more obese men subjects among those with high socioeconomic status, there were more obese women among those with low socioeconomic status. There were fewer obese respondents among those who regularly walked and more obese respondents among those who reported short sleep duration or were highly stressed. At the community level, people living in areas with high socioeconomic status, high satisfaction with safety and public transportation, and high accessibility to sports facilities in their community had lower obesity risks. CONCLUSIONS: Community-level environmental factors affected obesity, especially perceived community environment, more significant than physical environment. Thus, it is necessary to develop effective obesity prevention and management strategies by considering potential community environmental factors that affect obesity. PMID:25666167

  12. Relationship between bread and obesity.

    PubMed

    Serra-Majem, Luis; Bautista-Castaño, Inmaculada

    2015-04-01

    Some studies have indicated that promoting the Mediterranean diet pattern as a model of healthy eating may help to prevent weight gain and the development of overweight/obesity. Bread consumption, which has been part of the traditional Mediterranean diet, has continued to decline in Spain and in the rest of the world, because the opinion of the general public is that bread fattens. The present study was conducted to assess whether or not eating patterns that include bread are associated with obesity and excess abdominal adiposity, both in the population at large or in subjects undergoing obesity management. The results of the present review indicate that reducing white bread, but not whole-grain bread, consumption within a Mediterranean-style food pattern setting is associated with lower gains in weight and abdominal fat. It appears that the different composition between whole-grain bread and white bread varies in its effect on body weight and abdominal fat. However, the term 'whole-grain bread' needs to be defined for use in epidemiological studies. Finally, additional studies employing traditional ways of bread production should analyse this effect on body-weight and metabolic regulation.

  13. Thinking Evolutionarily About Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Genné-Bacon, Elizabeth A.

    2014-01-01

    Obesity, diabetes, and metabolic syndrome are growing worldwide health concerns, yet their causes are not fully understood. Research into the etiology of the obesity epidemic is highly influenced by our understanding of the evolutionary roots of metabolic control. For half a century, the thrifty gene hypothesis, which argues that obesity is an evolutionary adaptation for surviving periods of famine, has dominated the thinking on this topic. Obesity researchers are often not aware that there is, in fact, limited evidence to support the thrifty gene hypothesis and that alternative hypotheses have been suggested. This review presents evidence for and against the thrifty gene hypothesis and introduces readers to additional hypotheses for the evolutionary origins of the obesity epidemic. Because these alternate hypotheses imply significantly different strategies for research and clinical management of obesity, their consideration is critical to halting the spread of this epidemic. PMID:24910556

  14. Pediatric obesity. An introduction.

    PubMed

    Yanovski, Jack A

    2015-10-01

    The prevalence of child and adolescent obesity in the United States increased dramatically between 1970 and 2000, and there are few indications that the rates of childhood obesity are decreasing. Obesity is associated with myriad medical, psychological, and neurocognitive abnormalities that impact children's health and quality of life. Genotypic variation is important in determining the susceptibility of individual children to undue gains in adiposity; however, the rapid increase in pediatric obesity prevalence suggests that changes to children's environments and/or to their learned behaviors may dramatically affect body weight regulation. This paper presents an overview of the epidemiology, consequences, and etiopathogenesis of pediatric obesity, serving as a general introduction to the subsequent papers in this Special Issue that address aspects of childhood obesity and cognition in detail.

  15. Obesity in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Lim, Chu Chin; Mahmood, Tahir

    2015-04-01

    The prevalence of obesity has reached alarming proportions globally, and continues to rise in both developed and developing countries. Maternal obesity has become one of the most commonly occurring risk factors in obstetric practice. The 2003-2005 report of the Confidential Enquiries into Maternal Deaths in the United Kingdom highlighted obesity as a significant risk for maternal death [1]. More than half of all women who died from direct or indirect causes were either overweight or obese. For the mother, obesity increases the risk of obstetric complications during the antenatal, intrapartum and postnatal period, as well as contributing to technical difficulties with fetal assessment. The offspring of obese mothers also have a higher rate of perinatal morbidity and an increased risk of long-term health problems.

  16. [Skin diseases and obesity].

    PubMed

    Guerra-Segovia, Carolina; Ocampo-Candiani, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is a public health problem worldwide. It predominates in industrialized countries; however, it is prevalent in all nations. It is defined as a condition of excess adipose tissue and is the result of changes in lifestyle, excessive consumption of energy-dense foods with poor nutritional value, physical inactivity and the reduction of open space where one can practice a sport. Although obesity is associated with multiple diseases, it is important to stress that the metabolic changes caused by it affect skin physiology and play a predisposing factor for the development of skin diseases. Very little has been studied on the impact of obesity on the skin. The purpose of this article is to review the most frequently skin diseases in obesity. Some skin pathologies in obesity are caused by changes in skin physiology, others are related to insulin resistance or constitute an exacerbating factor for dermatitis. This article covers the clinical features of obesity related skin disease and its management.

  17. [Obesity and gastrointestinal motility].

    PubMed

    Lee, Joon Seong

    2006-08-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) motility has a crucial role in the food consumption, digestion and absorption, and also controls the appetite and satiety. In obese patients, various alterations of GI motility have been investigated. The prevalence of GERD and esophageal motor disorders in obese patients are higher than those of general population. Gastric emptying of solid food is generally accelerated and fasting gastric volume especially in distal stomach is larger in obese patients without change in accommodation. Contractile activity of small intestine in fasting period is more prominent, but orocecal transit is delayed. Autonomic dysfunction is frequently demonstrated in obese patients. These findings correspond with increased appetite and delayed satiety in obese patients, but causes or results have not been confirmed. Therapeutic interventions of these altered GI motility have been developed using botulinum toxin, gastric electrical stimulation in obese patients. Novel agents targeted for GI hormone modulation (such as ghrelin and leptin) need to be developed in the near future. PMID:16929152

  18. Association of FTO rs9939609 SNP with Obesity and Obesity- Associated Phenotypes in a North Indian Population

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Jai; Mittal, Balraj; Srivastava, Apurva; Awasthi, Shally; Srivastava, Neena

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Obesity is a common disorder that has a significant impact on morbidity and mortality. Twin and adoption studies support the genetic influence on variation of obesity, and the estimates of the heritability of body mass index (BMI) is significantly high (30 to 70%). Variants in the fat mass and obesity-associated (FTO) gene have been associated with obesity and obesity-related phenotypes in different populations. The aim of this study was to examine the association of FTO rs9939609 with obesity and related phenotypes in North Indian subjects.   Methods Gene variants were investigated for association with obesity in 309 obese and 333 non-obese patients. Genotyping of the FTO rs9939609 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) was analyzed using Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism Analysis of PCR-Amplified Fragments. We also measured participants fasting glucose and insulin levels, lipid profile, percentage body fat, fat mass and fat free mass.   Results Waist to hip ratio, systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, percentage body fat, fat mass, insulin concentration, and homeostasis model assessment index (HOMA-Index) showed a significant difference between the study groups. Significant associations were found for FTO rs9939609 SNP with obesity and obesity-related phenotypes. The significant associations were observed between the rs9939609 SNP and blood pressure, fat mass, insulin, and HOMA-index under a different model.   Conclusion This study presents significant association between FTO rs9939609 and obesity defined by BMI and also established the strong association with several measures of obesity in North Indian population. PMID:27168919

  19. Reference trajectory generation for rehabilitation robots: complementary limb motion estimation.

    PubMed

    Vallery, Heike; van Asseldonk, Edwin H F; Buss, Martin; van der Kooij, Herman

    2009-02-01

    For gait rehabilitation robots, an important question is how to ensure stable gait, while avoiding any interaction forces between robot and human in case the patient walks correctly. To achieve this, the definition of "correct" gait needs to adapted both to the individual patient and to the situation. Recently, we proposed a method for online trajectory generation that can be applied for hemiparetic subjects. Desired states for one (disabled) leg are generated online based on the movements of the other (sound) leg. An instantaneous mapping between legs is performed by exploiting physiological interjoint couplings. This way, the patient generates the reference motion for the affected leg autonomously. The approach, called Complementary Limb Motion Estimation (CLME), is implemented on the LOPES gait rehabilitation robot and evaluated with healthy subjects in two different experiments. In a previously described study, subjects walk only with one leg, while the robot's other leg acts as a fake prosthesis, to simulate complete loss of function in one leg. This study showed that CLME ensures stable gait. In a second study, to be presented in this paper, healthy subjects walk with both their own legs to assess the interference with self-determined walking. Evaluation criteria are: Power delivered to the joints by the robot, electromyography (EMG) distortions, and kinematic distortions, all compared to zero torque control, which is the baseline of minimum achievable interference. Results indicate that interference of the robot is lower with CLME than with a fixed reference trajectory, mainly in terms of lowered exchanged power and less alteration of EMG. This implies that subjects can walk more naturally with CLME, and they are assisted less by the robot when it is not needed. Future studies with patients are yet to show whether these properties of CLME transfer to the clinical domain.

  20. Health behaviors and risk factors in those who use complementary and alternative medicine

    PubMed Central

    Nahin, Richard L; Dahlhamer, James M; Taylor, Beth L; Barnes, Patricia M; Stussman, Barbara J; Simile, Catherine M; Blackman, Marc R; Chesney, Margaret A; Jackson, Morgan; Miller, Heather; McFann, Kim K

    2007-01-01

    Background Surveys have generally found that individuals more likely to use complementary and alternative medicine are female, live in the western United States, are likely to have a health complaint, and have a higher socioeconomic status than do nonusers. What is not known is the extent to which those who use complementary and alternative medicine also engage in positive health behaviors, such as smoking cessation or increased physical activity and/or exhibit fewer health risk factors such as obesity. This has been identified as a key research question in a recent Institute of Medicine report. In the present study we sought to determine whether the use of complementary and alternative medicine is associated with health behaviors or risk factors known to impact on health status. Methods The current study is a cross-sectional regression analysis using data from the 2002 National Health Interview Survey. Data were collected in-person from 31,044 adults throughout the 50 states and the District of Columbia. Results After controlling for a range of other factors, we found that engaging in leisure-time physical activity, having consumed alcohol in one's life but not being a current heavy drinker, and being a former smoker are independently associated with the use of CAM. Obese individuals are slightly less likely to use CAM than individuals with a healthy body-mass index. No significant associations were observed between receipt of an influenza vaccine and CAM use. Conclusion Those engaging in positive health behaviors and exhibiting fewer health risk factors are more likely to use CAM than those who forgo positive health behaviors or exhibit more health risk factors. The fact that users of CAM tend to pursue generally healthy lifestyles suggests that they may be open to additional recommendations toward optimizing their health. PMID:17723149

  1. Health, obesity, and earnings.

    PubMed Central

    McLean, R A; Moon, M

    1980-01-01

    Published reports and economic theory suggest that a worker's earnings may be affected by his degree of obesity. The purpose of this research was to estimate the size of such an effect. The earnings-obesity hypothesis was tested with data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Mature Men. Results of the test suggest that, for members of that sample, there is no earnings-depressant effect due to obesity. PMID:7406084

  2. Metabolic and Cardiovascular Implications of a Metabolically Healthy Obesity Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Mi Hae

    2014-01-01

    Metabolically healthy obesity (MHO) is a new concept in which an individual may exhibit an obese phenotype in the absence of any metabolic abnormalities. There are a number of definitions of MHO that utilize a variety of components. The findings of clinical and basic studies indicate that subjects with MHO do not exhibit an increased mortality, an increased risk of cardiovascular disease, or an increased risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus, as compared to normal-weight controls. Although these findings imply that metabolic health is a more important factor than obesity, several studies have shown that subjects with MHO have a similar risk of metabolic or cardiovascular diseases as those with metabolically unhealthy obesity. Thus, there is still debate regarding not only the implications of the MHO phenotype but its very existence. Accordingly, future studies should focus on developing a unified definition of MHO and distinguishing subjects who will be at a high risk for metabolic and cardiovascular diseases. PMID:25559571

  3. Predictors of College Students' Use of Complementary and Alternative Medicine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chng, Chwee Lye; Neill, Kweethai; Fogle, Peggy

    2003-01-01

    This study assessed the use of complementary and alternative medicine among college students (N=913), the relationships between health locus of control with use of complementary and alternative medicine, and health local of control with attitudes toward complementary and alternative medicine and what predicts their use. A majority (66%, n-913) of…

  4. DBS for Obesity.

    PubMed

    Franco, Ruth; Fonoff, Erich T; Alvarenga, Pedro; Lopes, Antonio Carlos; Miguel, Euripides C; Teixeira, Manoel J; Damiani, Durval; Hamani, Clement

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is a chronic, progressive and prevalent disorder. Morbid obesity, in particular, is associated with numerous comorbidities and early mortality. In patients with morbid obesity, pharmacological and behavioral approaches often have limited results. Bariatric surgery is quite effective but is associated with operative failures and a non-negligible incidence of side effects. In the last decades, deep brain stimulation (DBS) has been investigated as a neurosurgical modality to treat various neuropsychiatric disorders. In this article we review the rationale for selecting different brain targets, surgical results and future perspectives for the use of DBS in medically refractory obesity. PMID:27438859

  5. [Obesity in Mexico].

    PubMed

    Dávila-Torres, Javier; González-Izquierdo, José Jesús; Barrera-Cruz, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Excess body weight (overweight and obesity) is currently recognized as one of the most important challenges of public health in the world, given its size, speed of growth and the negative effect it has on the health of the population that suffers. Overweight and obesity significantly increases the risk of chronic no communicable diseases, premature mortality and the social cost of health. An estimated 90 % of cases of type 2 diabetes mellitus attributable to overweight and obesity. Today, Mexico is second global prevalence of obesity in the adult population, which is ten times higher than that of countries like Japan and Korea. With regard to children, Mexico ranks fourth worldwide obesity prevalence, behind Greece, USA and Italy. In our country, over 70 % of the adult population, between 30 and 60 years are overweight. The prevalence of overweight is higher in men than females, while the prevalence of obesity is higher in women than men. Until 2012, 26 million Mexican adults are overweight and 22 million obese, which represents a major challenge for the health sector in terms of promoting healthy lifestyles in the population and development of public policies to reverse this scenario epidemiology. Mexico needs to plan and implement strategies and action cost effective for the prevention and control of obesity of children, adolescents and adults. Global experience shows that proper care of obesity and overweight, required to formulate and coordinate multisectoral strategies and efficient for enhancing protective factors to health, particularly to modify individual behavior, family and community.

  6. Obesity in show cats.

    PubMed

    Corbee, R J

    2014-12-01

    Obesity is an important disease with a high prevalence in cats. Because obesity is related to several other diseases, it is important to identify the population at risk. Several risk factors for obesity have been described in the literature. A higher incidence of obesity in certain cat breeds has been suggested. The aim of this study was to determine whether obesity occurs more often in certain breeds. The second aim was to relate the increased prevalence of obesity in certain breeds to the official standards of that breed. To this end, 268 cats of 22 different breeds investigated by determining their body condition score (BCS) on a nine-point scale by inspection and palpation, at two different cat shows. Overall, 45.5% of the show cats had a BCS > 5, and 4.5% of the show cats had a BCS > 7. There were significant differences between breeds, which could be related to the breed standards. Most overweight and obese cats were in the neutered group. It warrants firm discussions with breeders and cat show judges to come to different interpretations of the standards in order to prevent overweight conditions in certain breeds from being the standard of beauty. Neutering predisposes for obesity and requires early nutritional intervention to prevent obese conditions. PMID:24612018

  7. DBS for Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Franco, Ruth; Fonoff, Erich T.; Alvarenga, Pedro; Lopes, Antonio Carlos; Miguel, Euripides C.; Teixeira, Manoel J.; Damiani, Durval; Hamani, Clement

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is a chronic, progressive and prevalent disorder. Morbid obesity, in particular, is associated with numerous comorbidities and early mortality. In patients with morbid obesity, pharmacological and behavioral approaches often have limited results. Bariatric surgery is quite effective but is associated with operative failures and a non-negligible incidence of side effects. In the last decades, deep brain stimulation (DBS) has been investigated as a neurosurgical modality to treat various neuropsychiatric disorders. In this article we review the rationale for selecting different brain targets, surgical results and future perspectives for the use of DBS in medically refractory obesity. PMID:27438859

  8. Hypothalamic obesity in children.

    PubMed

    Bereket, A; Kiess, W; Lustig, R H; Muller, H L; Goldstone, A P; Weiss, R; Yavuz, Y; Hochberg, Z

    2012-09-01

    Hypothalamic obesity is an intractable form of obesity syndrome that was initially described in patients with hypothalamic tumours and surgical damage. However, this definition is now expanded to include obesity developing after a variety of insults, including intracranial infections, infiltrations, trauma, vascular problems and hydrocephalus, in addition to acquired or congenital functional defects in central energy homeostasis in children with the so-called common obesity. The pathogenetic mechanisms underlying hypothalamic obesity are complex and multifactorial. Weight gain results from damage to the ventromedial hypothalamus, which leads, variously, to hyperphagia, a low-resting metabolic rate; autonomic imbalance; growth hormone-, gonadotropins and thyroid-stimulating hormone deficiency; hypomobility; and insomnia. Hypothalamic obesity did not receive enough attention, as evidenced by rarity of studies in this group of patients. A satellite symposium was held during the European Congress of Obesity in May 2011, in Istanbul, Turkey, to discuss recent developments and concepts regarding pathophysiology and management of hypothalamic obesity in children. An international group of leading researchers presented certain aspects of the problem. This paper summarizes the highlights of this symposium. Understanding the central role of the hypothalamus in the regulation of feeding and energy metabolism will help us gain insights into the pathogenesis and management of common obesity.

  9. Safety of obesity drugs.

    PubMed

    Greenway, Frank L; Caruso, Mary K

    2005-11-01

    The safety of obesity drugs has historically been poor. This and the stigmatisation of obesity in society ensured that a higher standard of safety for obesity drugs must be met. The authors review the safety disasters of obesity drugs that were withdrawn. The authors then review the safety of presently available drugs--benzphetamine, phendimetrazine, diethylpropion, phentermine, sibutramine and orlistat. The safety of rimonabant, a drug with a pending new drug application that has an independent effect on metabolic syndrome, is also reviewed. The authors compare the stage of obesity drug development to that of hypertension in the 1950s. As new and safer drugs with more downstream mechanisms are developed that have independent effects on the cardiovascular risks associated with obesity, third party reimbursement for obesity medicine is likely to improve. This may lead to obesity being treated like hypertension and other chronic diseases with long-term medication. With improved technological tools, the authors believe this process will be more rapid for obesity than it was for hypertension.

  10. Treating Obesity As a Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... a Healthy Heart Healthy Kids Our Kids Programs Childhood Obesity What is childhood obesity? Overweight in Children BMI in Children Is Childhood Obesity an Issue in Your Home? Addressing your Child's ...

  11. Obesity in Infants to Preschoolers

    MedlinePlus

    ... a Healthy Heart Healthy Kids Our Kids Programs Childhood Obesity What is childhood obesity? Overweight in Children BMI in Children Is Childhood Obesity an Issue in Your Home? Addressing your Child's ...

  12. Diet and obesity among Chamorro and Filipino adults on Guam

    PubMed Central

    Guerrero, Rachael T Leon; Paulino, Yvette C; Novotny, Rachel; Murphy, Suzanne P

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the body mass index (BMI) and dietary intakes of Chamorro (n=66) and Filipino (n=61) adults, ages 25–65 years, living in Guam. Participants were recruited via community-based sampling; however, recruitment was targeted to ensure approximately equal numbers from each ethnic group, equal numbers of men and women within each ethnic group, and proportional representation of the main geographic areas of the island. In addition, subjects were recruited and stratified based on the 2000 Guam Census Data to assure proportional distribution by age. Dietary energy density (ED) was calculated as kcal/g and compared by gender, ethnicity, and obesity status. Mean BMI for Chamorros was significantly higher than for Filipinos, and a significantly higher proportion of Chamorros (49%) were obese compared to Filipinos (20%). Chamorros reported higher ED than Filipinos (1.9 kcal/g versus 1.6 kcal/g), although the difference was significant among males only. Non-obese subjects had a lower ED than obese subjects (1.9 versus 2.3 kcal/g). Overweight and obese subjects both reported a significantly higher % energy consumed as sugar-sweetened beverages than healthy weight subjects (8% and 9% versus 3%). Differences in ED may contribute to differences in obesity rates between Chamorros and Filipinos in Guam, particularly among men, and lowering ED may be an appropriate goal for nutrition interventions. PMID:18586639

  13. Effect of Maternal Age at Childbirth on Obesity in Postmenopausal Women: A Nationwide Population-Based Study in Korea.

    PubMed

    We, Ji-Sun; Han, Kyungdo; Kwon, Hyuk-Sang; Kil, Kicheol

    2016-05-01

    The object of this study was to assess the obesity in postmenopausal women, according to age at childbirth.We analyzed the association between age at first childbirth, age at last childbirth, parity, and subject obesity status (general obesity; BMI >25 kg/m, nongeneral obesity; BMI ≤25 kg/m, abdominal obesity; waist circumference >85 cm, nonabdominal obesity; waist circumference ≤85 cm), using data from a nationwide population-based survey, the 2010 to 2012 Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Data from a total of 4382 postmenopausal women were analyzed using multivariate regression analysis with complex survey design sampling. And, the subjects were subdivided into groups according to obesity or not. Age, smoking, alcohol consumption, exercise, education, income level, number of pregnancies, oral contraceptive uses, breast feeding experience were adjusted as the confounders.The prevalence of general obesity among Korean postmenopausal women was 37.08%. Women with general obesity and abdominal obesity were significantly younger at first childbirth compared with women with nongeneral obesity and no abdominal obesity (23.89 ± 0.1 vs. 23.22 ± 0.1, P <0.001). Age at first childbirth was inversely associated with obesity, while age at last childbirth was not associated with obesity or abdominal obesity. Women with a higher number of pregnancies were also more likely to have obesity and abdominal obesity. Age at first childbirth remained significantly associated with obesity, after adjusting for confounding factors.Obesity in postmenopausal women is associated with first childbirth at a young age, and higher parity. Further research is needed to clarify the association between obesity and reproductive characteristics. PMID:27175656

  14. Association of Neck Circumference with Obesity in Female College Students

    PubMed Central

    Papandreou, Dimitrios; Noor, Zujaja Tul; Rashed, Maitha; Jaberi, Hadeel Al

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Obesity levels have been dramatically increased in the United Arab Emirates over the last few years. High levels of body Mass Index, waist circumference, and percent of total body fat as a measure of obesity have found to be related to cardiovascular risk factors and other diseases. Neck circumference is a new tool that has been linked to obesity. However, no studies in UAE have been conducted yet. AIM: The purpose of this study was to measure the obesity levels in a college population and to correlate them with NC and other anthropometrical indexes. METHODS AND SUBJECTS: Two hundred forty three (243) female students aged 18-25 were conveniently selected to participate in the study. Anthropometrical indexes were obtained from all subjects e after fasting. RESULTS: The prevalence of overweight and obesity together was found to be 28.4 % (n = 69). Pearson correlation showed that WC, NC and BF (%) were significantly positively related to obesity, (r = 0.790; r = 0.758; r = 0.767, p < 0.001), respectively. In multiple regression analysis, only NC (Beta: 1.627, 95 %CI: 0.370, 2.846, p < 0.001) and WC (Beta: 0.464, 95 %CI: 0.135, 0.664, p < 0.001) were found to be independently associated with obesity. CONCLUSION: NC was found to be independently associated with obesity levels in Emirati college students. PMID:27275290

  15. Obesity-related changes in prolonged repetitive lifting performance.

    PubMed

    Ghesmaty Sangachin, Mahboobeh; Cavuoto, Lora A

    2016-09-01

    Despite the rising prevalence of obesity, little is known about its moderating effects on injury risk factors, such as fatigue, in occupational settings. This study investigated the effect of obesity, prolonged repetitive lifting and their interaction on lifting performance of 14 participants, 7 obese (mean body mass index (BMI): 33.2 kg m(-2)) and 7 non-obese (mean BMI: 22.2 kg m(-2)) subjects. To present a physically challenging task, subjects performed repetitive lifting for 1 h at 120% of their maximum acceptable weight of lift. Generalized linear mixed models were fit to posture and acceleration data. The obese group bent to a ∼10° lower peak trunk sagittal flexion angle, had 17% lower root mean square (RMS) jerk and took 0.8 s longer per lift. Over time, the obese group increased their trunk transverse and sagittal posterior accelerations while the non-obese maintained theirs. Although the majority of lifting variables were unaffected by BMI or its interaction with prolonged lifting duration, the observed differences, combined with a greater upper body mass, necessitate a more cautious use of existing psychophysical lifting limits for individuals who are obese, particularly when fatigued.

  16. Impact of obesity-related genes in Spanish population

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The objective was to investigate the association between BMI and single nucleotide polymorphisms previously identified of obesity-related genes in two Spanish populations. Forty SNPs in 23 obesity-related genes were evaluated in a rural population characterized by a high prevalence of obesity (869 subjects, mean age 46 yr, 62% women, 36% obese) and in an urban population (1425 subjects, mean age 54 yr, 50% women, 19% obese). Genotyping was assessed by using SNPlex and PLINK for the association analysis. Results Polymorphisms of the FTO were significantly associated with BMI, in the rural population (beta 0.87, p-value <0.001). None of the other SNPs showed significant association after Bonferroni correction in the two populations or in the pooled analysis. A weighted genetic risk score (wGRS) was constructed using the risk alleles of the Tag-SNPs with a positive Beta parameter in both populations. From the first to the fifth quintile of the score, the BMI increased 0.45 kg/m2 in Hortega and 2.0 kg/m2 in Pizarra. Overall, the obesity predictive value was low (less than 1%). Conclusion The risk associated with polymorphisms is low and the overall effect on BMI or obesity prediction is minimal. A weighted genetic risk score based on genes mainly acting through central nervous system mechanisms was associated with BMI but it yields minimal clinical prediction for the obesity risk in the general population. PMID:24267414

  17. Muscle force and power in obese and overweight children.

    PubMed

    Rauch, R; Veilleux, L-N; Rauch, F; Bock, D; Welisch, E; Filler, G; Robinson, T; Burrill, E; Norozi, K

    2012-06-01

    The study investigated differences in skeletal muscle function between obese and non-obese children using a force platform. Forty obese children and adolescents (age range 8 to 18 years; 21 girls) and 40 age- and sex-matched controls performed two tests: (1) single two-legged jump, a countermovement jump for maximal height; (2) multiple one-legged hopping on the forefoot, a test of maximal force. In the single two-legged jump, obese subjects had higher absolute peak force (1.62 kN vs 1.09 kN) and peak power (2.46 kW vs 2.06 kW), but lower body weight-related peak force (2.10 vs 2.33) and lower peak power per body mass (30.9 W/kg vs 41.6 W/kg). Jump height (29.3 cm vs 37.5 cm) and maximal vertical velocity (1.92 ms(-1) vs 2.31 ms(-1)) were reduced in obese children. In multiple one-legged hopping, obese subjects had 72% and 84% higher absolute peak force on the left and right foot, respectively. However, forces relative to body weight were 24% and 23% lower in the obese group than in the control group. In conclusion, obese children and adolescents have increased muscle force and power. This partly compensates for the effect of high body weight on muscle performance.

  18. Complementary and Alternative Approaches to Menopause.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Maida

    2015-09-01

    Given the persistent confusion about the risks and benefits of hormone therapy since 2002 and the first publication from the Women's Health Initiative's primary findings, women and health care providers are increasingly motivated to find effective, nonhormonal approaches to treat menopause-related symptoms. Complementary and alternative medicine has grown increasingly popular in the last decade. A wide array of botanic medicines is offered as an alternative approach to hormone therapy for menopause, but data documenting efficacy and safety are limited. None of the available botanicals is as effective as hormone therapy in the management of vasomotor symptoms. PMID:26316247

  19. Complementary and alternative treatments in sports medicine.

    PubMed

    Malone, Michael A; Gloyer, Kathryn

    2013-12-01

    Many patients suffering from pain and dysfunction attributable to musculoskeletal conditions will use some form of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). Unfortunately, there is a paucity of both the quantity and quality of CAM treatments for specific musculoskeletal conditions. Many CAM treatments are used for a variety of musculoskeletal conditions, but may be more commonly used for specific conditions. This article addresses the use of CAM for specific musculoskeletal conditions, followed by a review of other CAM treatments and their potential indications for a multitude of conditions, based on the current medical literature and traditional use.

  20. Complementary and Alternative Therapies in ALS

    PubMed Central

    Bedlack, Richard S.; Joyce, Nanette; Carter, Gregory T.; Pagononi, Sabrina; Karam, Chafic

    2015-01-01

    Synopsis Given the severity of their illness and lack of effective disease modifying agents, it is not surprising that most patients with ALS consider trying complementary and alternative therapies. Some of the most commonly considered alternative therapies include special diets, nutritional supplements, cannabis, acupuncture, chelation and energy healing. This chapter reviews these in detail. We also describe 3 models by which physicians may frame discussions about alternative therapies: paternalism, autonomy and shared decision making. Finally, we review a program called ALSUntangled which using shared shared decision making to review alternative therapies for ALS. PMID:26515629

  1. Complementary Flavonoid Prenylations by Fungal Indole Prenyltransferases.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Kang; Yu, Xia; Xie, Xiulan; Li, Shu-Ming

    2015-09-25

    Flavonoids are found mainly in plants and exhibit diverse biological and pharmacological activities, which can often be enhanced by prenylations. In plants, such reactions are catalyzed by membrane-bound prenyltransferases. In this study, the prenylation of nine flavonoids from different classes by a soluble fungal prenyltransferase (AnaPT) involved in the biosynthesis of the prenylated indole alkaloid acetylaszonalenin is demonstrated. The behavior of AnaPT toward flavonoids regarding substrate acceptance and prenylation positions clearly differs from that of the indole prenyltransferase 7-DMATS. The two enzymes are therefore complementary in flavonoid prenylations.

  2. Gas exchange during exercise in obese children.

    PubMed

    Zanconato, S; Baraldi, E; Santuz, P; Rigon, F; Vido, L; Da Dalt, L; Zacchello, F

    1989-06-01

    Twenty-three obese children, aged 9 to 14 years, ranging in percentage overweight from 26% to 83% (median 51.6% +/- 16.3%), and 37 normal-weight children, matched for sex, age and height, performed a maximal exercise test on a treadmill. Cardiorespiratory performance was assessed by determination of the ventilatory anaerobic threshold (VAT) expressed in ml O2/min per kg and as a percent of maximal oxygen uptake (% VO2max). VAT and VO2max related to body weight were significantly lower (P less than 0.01) in the obese than in the normal-weight children. VAT % VO2max was similar in the two groups. A significant correlation was found between VAT and VO2max both in the obese (r = 0.85) and in the control groups (r = 0.79). The habitual level of physical activity was lower in the obese subjects compared to the control subjects (P less than 0.001). In conclusion our study shows that physical fitness of overweight children is quantitatively lowered and that it can be assessed by VAT. VAT does not require a maximal test and is particularly useful in the ergometric study of subjects with exercise intolerance.

  3. Human obese gene: molecular screening in Japanese and Asian Indian NIDDM patients associated with obesity.

    PubMed

    Niki, T; Mori, H; Tamori, Y; Kishimoto-Hashirmoto, M; Ueno, H; Araki, S; Masugi, J; Sawant, N; Majithia, H R; Rais, N

    1996-05-01

    The mouse obese (ob) gene has recently been isolated through the positional cloning technique and has been proved to result in the obese and NIDDM phenotype in mice when mutated (Nature 372:425-432, 1994). More recently, it has been demonstrated, by experiments with recombinant ob protein, that ob gene product can cause mice, including ob/ob mice, diet-induced obesity mice, and normal mice, to lower their food intake and body weight (Science 269:540-549, 1995). To investigate the genetic and/or environmental influences underlying the development of NIDDM associated with obesity, we isolated and partially sequenced the human obese (OB) gene. The human OB gene isolated in this study encoded 167 amino acids and its open reading frame was revealed to be divided into two parts with an intermediate intron of approximately 2.4 kb. Using the single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) technique, we screened Japanese and Asian Indian subjects for mutations in the protein coding regions of the OB gene. A total of 75 NIDDM patients with obesity (54 Japanese and 21 Asian Indians), 40 NIDDM patients without obesity (34 Japanese and 6 Asian Indians), and 34 Japanese patients with simple obesity showed no abnormal SSCP patterns in either component of the coding sequences. These results suggested that mutations in the coding regions of the OB gene are not likely to be commonly identifiable and that there would likely be a kind of obesity-associated NIDDM not caused by mutations of the OB gene. PMID:8621021

  4. Are the obese at greater risk for depression?

    PubMed

    Roberts, R E; Kaplan, G A; Shema, S J; Strawbridge, W J

    2000-07-15

    Two waves of data from a community-based study (Alameda County Study, 1994-1995) were used to investigate the association between obesity and depression. Depression was measured with 12 items covering Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders: DSM-IV diagnostic criteria for major depressive episode. Following US Public Health Service criteria, obese subjects were defined as those with body mass index scores at the 85th percentile or higher. Covariates were age, sex, education, marital status, social isolation and social support, chronic medical conditions, functional impairment, life events, and financial strain. Results were mixed. In cross-sectional analyses, greater odds for depression in 1994 were observed for the obese, with and without adjustment for covariates. When obesity and depression were examined prospectively, controlling for other variables, obesity in 1994 predicted depression in 1995 (odds ratio (OR) = 1.73, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.04, 2.87). When the data were analyzed with obesity defined as a body mass index of > or = 30, cross-sectional results were the same. However, the prospective multivariate analyses were not significant (OR = 1.43, 95% CI: 0.85, 2.43). Although these data do not resolve the role of obesity as a risk factor for depression, overall the results suggest an association between obesity and depression. The authors found no support for the "jolly fat" hypothesis (obesity reduces risk of depression). However, there has been sufficient disparity of results thus far to justify continued research.

  5. New pharmacological treatments for the management of obesity.

    PubMed

    Hurt, Ryan T; Edakkanambeth Varayil, Jithinraj; Ebbert, Jon O

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is quickly becoming the leading preventable cause of death in the USA. Over 60 obesity-related comorbidities exist which increase the complexity and cost of medical care in obese patients. Even a moderate weight loss of 5 % can reduce morbidity associated with these conditions. Lifestyle modification through caloric restriction and enhanced exercise and physical activity remain the first line treatment for obesity. The development of pharmacologic agents for the treatment of obesity has been challenged by both lack of efficacy and serious adverse side effects leading to their removal from market. Two new agents were recently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration to complement lifestyle modification in obese (BMI ≥30 kg/m(2)) and overweight patients (BMI ≥27 kg/m(2) and one obesity-related comorbidity). Lorcaserin is a novel serotonin 5-HT2C selective agonist which has been shown in three phase III studies to significantly reduce weight and cardiovascular risk factors such as diabetes. Phentermine/topiramate extended release (ER) is a novel combination of two agents which have individually been shown to significantly reduce weight. The combination agent phentermine/topiramate ER has been shown to reduce weight in overweight and obese subjects in a number of studies. This article reviews the pharmacology, clinical efficacy, and safety of these new agents compared to past and other presently available medications for the treatment of obesity. PMID:24828101

  6. Molecular analysis of gut microbiota in obesity among Indian individuals.

    PubMed

    Patil, Deepak P; Dhotre, Dhiraj P; Chavan, Sachin G; Sultan, Armiya; Jain, Dhawal S; Lanjekar, Vikram B; Gangawani, Jayshree; Shah, Poonam S; Todkar, Jayshree S; Shah, Shashank; Ranade, Dilip R; Patole, Milind S; Shouche, Yogesh S

    2012-09-01

    Obesity is a consequence of a complex interplay between the host genome and the prevalent obesogenic factors among the modern communities. The role of gut microbiota in the pathogenesis of the disorder was recently discovered; however, 16S-rRNA-based surveys revealed compelling but community-specific data. Considering this, despite unique diets, dietary habits and an uprising trend in obesity, the Indian counterparts are poorly studied. Here, we report a comparative analysis and quantification of dominant gut microbiota of lean, normal, obese and surgically treated obese individuals of Indian origin. Representative gut microbial diversity was assessed by sequencing fecal 16S rRNA libraries for each group (n=5) with a total of over 3000 sequences. We detected no evident trend in the distribution of the predominant bacterial phyla, Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes. At the genus level, the bacteria of genus Bacteroides were prominent among the obese individuals, which was further confirmed by qPCR (P less than 0.05). In addition, a remarkably high archaeal density with elevated fecal SCFA levels was also noted in the obese group. On the contrary, the treated-obese individuals exhibited comparatively reduced Bacteroides and archaeal counts along with reduced fecal SCFAs. In conclusion, the study successfully identified a representative microbial diversity in the Indian subjects and demonstrated the prominence of certain bacterial groups in obese individuals; nevertheless, further studies are essential to understand their role in obesity.

  7. Association analysis of APOA5 rs662799 and rs3135506 polymorphisms with obesity in Moroccan patients.

    PubMed

    Lakbakbi El Yaagoubi, F; Charoute, H; Bakhchane, A; Ajjemami, M; Benrahma, H; Errouagui, A; Kandil, M; Rouba, H; Barakat, A

    2015-12-01

    The aim of the present study is to explore the association between the APOA5 polymorphisms and haplotypes with obesity in Moroccan patients. The study was performed in 459 subjects, Obese (n=164) and non-obese (n=295). All subjects were genotyped for the APOA5 -1131T>C (rs662799) and c.56C>G (rs3135506) polymorphisms. The contribution of APOA5 polymorphisms and haplotypes in the increased risk of obesity were explored using logistic regression analyses. The -1131T>C and c.56C>G polymorphisms were significantly associated with obesity. Both polymorphisms were strongly associated with increased BMI. Analysis of constructed haplotypes showed a significant association between CG haplotype and susceptibility to obesity (OR [95%CI]=3.09 [1.93-4.97]; P<0.001). These results support a potential role for APOA5 common variants and related haplotypes as risk factors for obesity.

  8. Haplogroup T Is an Obesity Risk Factor: Mitochondrial DNA Haplotyping in a Morbid Obese Population from Southern Italy

    PubMed Central

    Liguori, Rosario; Mazzaccara, Cristina; Pezzuti, Massimo; Contaldo, Franco; Pasanisi, Fabrizio

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) haplogroups have been associated with the expression of mitochondrial-related diseases and with metabolic alterations, but their role has not yet been investigated in morbid obese Caucasian subjects. Therefore, we investigated the association between mitochondrial haplogroups and morbid obesity in patients from southern Italy. The mtDNA D-loop of morbid obese patients (n = 500; BMI > 40 kg/m2) and controls (n = 216; BMI < 25 kg/m2) was sequenced to determine the mtDNA haplogroups. The T and J haplogroup frequencies were higher and lower, respectively, in obese subjects than in controls. Women bearing haplogroup T or J had twice or half the risk of obesity. Binomial logistic regression analysis showed that haplogroup T and systolic blood pressure are risk factors for a high degree of morbid obesity, namely, BMI > 45 kg/m2 and in fact together account for 8% of the BMI. In conclusion, our finding that haplogroup T increases the risk of obesity by about two-fold, suggests that, besides nuclear genome variations and environmental factors, the T haplogroup plays a role in morbid obesity in our study population from southern Italy. PMID:23936828

  9. Complementary and alternative medicine: impact on dentistry.

    PubMed

    Little, James W

    2004-08-01

    Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) represent a group of diverse medical and health care systems, practices, and products that are not considered to be part of conventional medicine. Biofeedback, acupuncture, herbal medication, massage, bioelectromagnetic therapy, meditation, and music therapy are examples of CAM treatments. Some dentists in the United States have used some of these treatments and products in their practices. Complementary medicines include herbal remedies, homeopathic medicines, and essential oils. There has been an increase in the use of herbal medicines in the US over the last 15-20 years. There is a public belief that these medicines are safe because they are made from natural sources. However, some of these products have associated adverse effects including toxicity and drug interactions. The health history taken by the dentist should include questions regarding the taking of herbal and over-the-counter medications. The dentist needs to be informed regarding the herbal and over-the-counter products that may impact the delivery of safe and effective dental treatment. In addition, the use of CAM treatments in dentistry should be based on evidence of effectiveness and safety as demonstrated in randomized clinical trials.

  10. Complementary therapy and survival in glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Mulpur, Bhageeradh H.; Nabors, L. Burt; Thompson, Reid C.; Olson, Jeffrey J.; LaRocca, Renato V.; Thompson, Zachary; Egan, Kathleen M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Complementary therapy (CAM) is common in cancer patients. We undertook this study to assess the association of complementary therapy usage with mortality in glioblastoma (GBM) patients. Methods The analysis was based on 470 patients. Information on current use of CAM was collected in structured interviews conducted a median of 6 weeks following GBM diagnosis. Proportional hazards regression was used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) for GBM-related death according to the use of individual supplements with multivariate adjustment for known prognostic factors including age, KPS, and extent of tumor resection (ESR). Results Use of CAM agents was common, with 77% of the cohort reporting CAM usage. No mortality association was observed with the use of multivitamins (HR = 0.91; P = .40) or omega-3 fatty acids (HR = 1.07; P = .69). Patients taking vitamin D as an individual supplement (containing higher dosages than in a multivitamin) had reduced mortality when compared with nonusers (age-adjusted HR = 0.68; P = .02). However, the association was diminished after adjustment for KPS and ESR (HR = 0.74; P = .09). Use of herbal supplements was also associated with reduced mortality (HR = 0.58; P = .04). Vitamin E users had a nonsignificantly higher mortality when compared with nonusers (HR = 1.54; P = .09). Conclusions Use of CAM is common in GBM patients. These exploratory analyses suggest no mortality association with the use of multivitamins or omega-3 fatty acids. Associations observed with vitamins D and E merit further investigation. PMID:26649185

  11. [Genetics of pediatric obesity].

    PubMed

    Peralta-Romero, José de Jesús; Gómez-Zamudio, Jaime Héctor; Estrada-Velasco, Bárbara; Karam-Araujo, Roberto; Cruz-López, Miguel

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is a major health problem around the globe. The statistics of overweight and obesity at early ages have reached alarming levels and placed our country in the first place in regard to childhood obesity. In the development of obesity two major factors take part, one genetic and the other one environmental. From the perspective of environmental changes both overweight and obesity result from the imbalance in the energy balance: people ingest more energy than they expend. Despite people live in the same obesogenic environment not all of them develop obesity; it requires genetic factors for this to happen. This review focuses on the description of the main methodologies to find genetic markers, as well as the main loci in candidate genes, whose single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are associated with obesity and its comorbidities in children, highlighting the association of these genes in the Mexican population. Knowledge of the genetic markers associated with obesity will help to understand the molecular and physiological mechanisms, the genetic background and changes in body mass index in the Mexican population. This information is useful for the planning of new hypotheses in the search for new biomarkers that can be used in a predictive and preventive way, as well as for the development of new therapeutic strategies.

  12. [OBESITY AND GYNECOLOGICAL CANCER].

    PubMed

    Stoianov, R; Chakalova, G

    2016-01-01

    An analysis of 329 patients with gynecological cancer, 120 of them were without obesity and 209 of them were with obesity. Only 36.47% of the cases were with normal weight. There is a trend of increasing obesity with age, with a peak in the age group 60-69 years. The distribution of patients according to BMI and stage of the disease there is a downward trend in the obesity with increasing stage. In both groups of patients (with and without obesity), the volume and type of surgery were carried out depending on the type of tumor process (localization) and stage of the disease. Radical histerectomy with pelvic lymph node dissection (with or without omentectomy) is carried out in 141 patients, of which only 6 were of normal weight, and 135 patients (95.7%) were of different stage of obesity. Total hysterectomy with pelvic lymph node dissection (with or without omentectomy) is carried out in 123 patients, of which only 2 were of normal weight, and 121 patients (98.4%) were of different stage of obesity. Our results show that the volume of surgery in patients with gynecological cancer does not depend the obesity and depend the stage of disease.

  13. [Obesity and heart].

    PubMed

    Svačina, Štěpán

    2014-12-01

    Cardiovascular complications of obesity are traditionally considered an important complication of obesity. Obesity itself is probably not direct cause of atherosclerosis or coronary heart disease. This may occur indirectly in metabolic complications of obesity, especially diabetes and metabolic syndrome. However, thrombogenicity potential of obesity contributes to embolism and atherosclerosis development. In cardiology is well-known a phenomenon of obesity paradox when obese patients have better prognosis than thin. This is the case of heart failure and some other cardiovascular diseases. Recently, a new concept has emerged of myokines - hormones from muscle tissue that have extensive protective effects on organism and probably on heart. Whether heart is a source of myokines is uncertain. However, undoubted importance has epicardial and pericardial fatty tissue. The epicardial fatty tissue has mainly protective effects on myocardium. This fatty tissue may produce factors of inflammation affecting the myocardium. Relationship between amount of epicardial fatty tissue and coronary heart disease is rather pathogenic. Currently, it is certain that obesity brings more metabolic and cancer complications than cardiovascular and accurate contribution to pathogenic or protective character of fatty tissue in cardiology requires further research. Nevertheless, the conclusion is that adipose tissue of organism and around the heart may be in some circumstances beneficial.

  14. Battling the Obesity Epidemic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Mark; Moag-Stahlberg, Alicia

    2002-01-01

    Describes causes of overweight and obesity in children; cites research linking good nutrition and a child's capacity to learn; includes six Web-based links to resources to help principals and teachers reduce the serious problem of overweight and obese children. (PKP)

  15. [Neuroendocrine disturbances in obesity].

    PubMed

    Isidro, M L; Alvarez, P; Martínez, T; Cordido, F

    2004-01-01

    Obesity is associated with different disturbances in endocrine function. Both spontaneous growth hormone (GH) secretion and its response to several stimuli have shown to be reduced in obese patients. The GH responses to GH-releasing hormone and other challenges by pyridostigmine suggest that the reduction in GH secretion is related to an increased somatostatinergic tone. Other experiments point to a down-regulation of somatostatin receptors in the somatotroph cell. Ghrelin administration is followed by a massive GH release, but the possibility that ghrelin or GHRH deficiency are the cause of GH deficiency in obesity is unlikely. The increase in free fatty acids in obesity might be related to GH reduction, since acipimox administration is able to reverse GH secretion. In women, abdominal obesity is associated with hyperandrogenism and low sex hormone-binding globulin levels. Obese men have low testosterone and gonadotrophin concentrations, specially in cases of morbid obesity. An increase in hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis activity and some resistance to dexamethasone suppression have been described in abdominal obesity. This effect may be due to neuroendocrine alterations related to a genetic origin. Adrenal hyperfunction may favour cardiovascular and metabolic complications. There are no disturbances in thyroid function. Sometimes a reduction in prolactin response to several stimuli has been reported. This effect may be due to hyperinsulinaemia or to disturbances in the dopaminergic tone.

  16. Childhood Obesity. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Summerfield, Liane M.

    In this discussion of childhood obesity, the medical and psychological problems associated with the condition are noted. Childhood obesity most likely results from an interaction of nutritional, psychological, familial, and physiological factors. Three factors--the family, low-energy expenditure, and heredity--are briefly examined. Early…

  17. Effective management of obesity.

    PubMed

    Shepherd, Todd M

    2003-01-01

    Successful treatment of obesity usually requires multiple interventions. The choice of therapies should be guided by the initial assessment of a patient's degree of obesity and comorbid conditions, if present. A variety of interventions can achieve short-term weight loss, but rebound weight gain is common when therapy is stopped. Thus, programs for weight maintenance are critical to ultimate success.

  18. Gender, Obesity, and Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crosnoe, Robert

    2007-01-01

    Obesity is a health condition, but its consequences extend far beyond the realm of health. To illuminate an important route by which the experience of obesity can filter into the status attainment process, this study drew on nationally representative data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health to test a social psychological…

  19. Effective Obesity Treatments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Lynda H.; Calvin, James E., III; Calvin, James E., Jr.

    2007-01-01

    To curb the epidemic of obesity in the United States, revised Medicare policy allows support for efficacious obesity treatments. This review summarizes the evidence from rigorous randomized trials (9 lifestyle trials, 5 drug trials, and 2 surgical trials) on the efficacy and risk-benefit profile of lifestyle, drug, and surgical interventions aimed…

  20. Obesity drug therapy.

    PubMed

    Baretić, M

    2013-09-01

    Obesity is a chronic disease, and it requires chronic therapy. Hypertension, dyslipidemia, diabetes and cardiovascular diseases are leading causes of mortality in the modern world. All of them are strongly linked to obesity. While treating obesity, those conditions are also managed. Obese patients should always be treated through lifestyle interventions, though the results of such interventions are modest. Pharmacotherapy is a second step in the treatment of obesity, approved only when weight loss targets were not reached through lifestyle intervention. During the history of antiobesity drugs, many of them were withdrawn because of their side effects. Various guidelines recommend prescribing drug therapy for obesity through consideration of the potential benefits and limitations. Orlistat deactivates intestinal lipase and inhibits intestinal fat lipolysis. It is actually the only drug on the European market approved for the treatment of obesity. Orlistat therapy reduces weight to a modest extent, but it reduces the incidence of diabetes beyond the result achieved with lifestyle changes. Recently, some effective antiobesity drugs like sibutramine and rimonabant have been removed from the market due to their side effects. The new combination of topimarate and fentermine is approved in the US but not in Europe. The cost effectiveness of long-term pharmacotherapy of obesity is still an unresolved question. PMID:24126545

  1. Obesity and kidney protection

    PubMed Central

    Chandra, Aravind; Biersmith, Michael; Tolouian, Ramin

    2014-01-01

    Context: Obesity, both directly and indirectly, increases the risk for a variety of disease conditions including diabetes, hypertension, liver disease, and certain cancers, which in turn, decreases the overall lifespan in both men and women. Though the cardiovascular risks of obesity are widely acknowledged, less often identified is the relationship between obesity and renal function. Evidence Acquisitions: Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ), Google Scholar, PubMed, EBSCO and Web of Science has been searched. Results: The concept of the “Metabolic Syndrome“ helps us to understand this close link between obesity, diabetes, hypertension, and renal dysfunction. An elevated body mass index has shown to be one of the major determinants of glomerular hyperfiltration that lead to the development of chronic kidney disease. Interestingly, weight loss can lead to attenuation of hyperfiltration in severely obese patients suggesting a possible therapeutic option to combat obesity-related hyperfiltration. Conclusions: Various treatment strategies had been suggested to decrease impact of obesity on kidneys. These are blood pressure controling, inhibition of the renin-angiotensinaldosterone axis, improving glycemic control, improving dyslipidemia, improving protein uriaand lifestyle modifications. Regardless of the numerous pharmacotherapies, the focus should be on the root cause: obesity. PMID:25093156

  2. Obesity: A Bibliographic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGowan, Beth

    2012-01-01

    The study of obesity is a relatively new interdisciplinary academic field. The community college library shelves should contain two types of resources. First, several kinds of reference materials, and second, a host of broader materials that place the discussion of obesity within a cultural framework. This overview is divided into two major…

  3. Impact of fitness versus obesity on routinely measured cardiometabolic risk in young, healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Vranian, Michael N; Keenan, Tanya; Blaha, Michael J; Silverman, Michael G; Michos, Erin D; Minder, C Michael; Blumenthal, Roger S; Nasir, Khurram; Meneghelo, Romeu S; Santos, Raul D

    2013-04-01

    Obesity demonstrates a direct relation with cardiovascular risk and all-cause mortality, while cardiorespiratory fitness demonstrates an inverse relation. In clinical practice, several cardiometabolic (CM) risk factors are commonly measured to gauge cardiovascular risk, but the interaction between fitness and obesity with regard to CM risk has not been fully explored. In this study, 2,634 Brazilian adults referred for employer-sponsored heath exams were assessed. Obesity was defined as body mass index >30 kg/m(2) or waist circumference >102 cm in men or >88 cm in women when body mass index was 25 to 30 kg/m(2). Fitness was quantified by stage achieved on an Ellestad treadmill stress test, with those completing stage 4 considered fit. Hepatic steatosis was determined by ultrasound. CM risk factors were compared after stratifying patients into 4 groups: fit and normal weight, fit and obese, unfit and normal weight, and unfit and obese. Approximately 22% of patients were obese; 12% were unfit. Fitness and obesity were moderately correlated (ρ = 0.38 to 0.50). The sample included 6.5% unfit and normal-weight subjects and 16% fit and obese subjects. In overweight and obese patients, fitness was negatively associated with CM risk (p <0.01 for all values). In fit patients, increasing body mass index was positively associated with CM risk (p <0.01 for all values). In instances of discordance between fitness and obesity, obesity was the stronger determinant of CM risk. In conclusion, fitness and obesity are independently associated with CM risk. The effects of fitness and obesity are additive, but obesity is more strongly associated with CM risk when fitness and obesity are discordant. These findings underscore the need for weight loss in obese patients and suggest an unmeasured benefit of fitness.

  4. Levels of Neopterin and other Inflammatory Markers in Obese and Non-Obese Patients with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Agacayak, Elif; Tunc, Senem Yaman; Sak, Sibel; Basaranoglu, Serdar; Yüksel, Hatice; Turgut, Abdulkadir; Gul, Talip

    2015-01-01

    Background We aimed to measure the levels of inflammatory markers and neopterin in obese and non-obese patients with PCOS by using 2 separate control groups with matching body mass index (BMI). Material/Methods A total of 60 women of reproductive age with (n=30) and without (n=30) PCOS were included in this study. Based on their BMI, patients with PCOS were divided into 2 groups as obese (n=15) and non-obese (n=15) PCOS groups. In addition, 2 BMI-matched control groups were formed. Neopterin, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-6 (IL-6), C-reactive protein (CRP), neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (N/L ratio), and vitamin B12 were assessed by complete blood count. Results No significant difference was found between patients with PCOS and control subjects in neopterin, IL-6, TNF-α, and CRP levels. However, N/L ratio levels were significantly higher (p 0.045) and vitamin B12 levels were significantly lower (p 0.033) in patients with PCOS compared to control subjects. No statistically significant difference was found between obese and non-obese patients with PCOS and control subjects in neopterin, IL-6, TNF-α, and N/L ratio levels. However, CRP levels were significantly higher in obese patients with PCOS compared to obese control subjects (p 0.007). Conclusions It can be concluded that inflammatory activity is increased in patients with PCOS, can lead to an increased risk for atherosclerosis, and this increase is not caused by obesity but rather by the polycystic ovary syndrome itself. However, studies with larger sample sizes are needed in this area. PMID:26292090

  5. Shamanism as a healing paradigm for complementary therapy.

    PubMed

    Money, M

    2001-08-01

    Any healing process--whether recovery from infection, physical trauma, or psychological distress--must entail the stimulation and direction of the body's own restorative functions. In former times these functions were called the vis mediatrix naturae. Arguably best articulated within traditional Chinese medicine (e.g. Reid 1993), many complementary therapies have identified this principle. The immune system is implicated in the operation of these healing processes, and immune system functions are modulated by both internal and external variables. External variables include the nature of the infection or trauma. Internal variables include the meaning of the illness to the patient or the patient's imagery surrounding the illness. It follows that any modulation of internal variables that increases immune function will therefore be highly beneficial in the healing process. Sometimes such modulation happens spontaneously, when it may be referred to as the placebo effect, or a good bedside manner, or spontaneous remission. Sometimes such modulation may be brought about intentionally either by the patient or by a therapist or healer. One body of technique for such modulation is shamanism, which pays particular attention to bridging the internal world of the patient to the external world where the problem originates. Shamanic practice is specifically focused on this healing task, and has its own toolkit of techniques for the modification of consciousness, the manipulation of imagery and meaning, and the generation of a healing milieu and therapeutic images from its mythic content. Early concerns about the mental health of shamanic practitioners are now thoroughly resolved (e.g. Stephen & Suryani 2000). Indeed, the relevance of shamanism to positive mental health is currently being explored (e.g. Money 1994, Singh 1999). Its relevance to social work (Voss et al. 1999) and to the near death experience (Green 1998) are also subjects of academic inquiry. The shamanic corpus

  6. Infant Gut Microbiota Development Is Driven by Transition to Family Foods Independent of Maternal Obesity.

    PubMed

    Laursen, Martin Frederik; Andersen, Louise B B; Michaelsen, Kim F; Mølgaard, Christian; Trolle, Ellen; Bahl, Martin Iain; Licht, Tine Rask

    2016-01-01

    The first years of life are paramount in establishing our endogenous gut microbiota, which is strongly affected by diet and has repeatedly been linked with obesity. However, very few studies have addressed the influence of maternal obesity on infant gut microbiota, which may occur either through vertically transmitted microbes or through the dietary habits of the family. Additionally, very little is known about the effect of diet during the complementary feeding period, which is potentially important for gut microbiota development. Here, the gut microbiotas of two different cohorts of infants, born either of a random sample of healthy mothers (n = 114), or of obese mothers (n = 113), were profiled by 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing. Gut microbiota data were compared to breastfeeding patterns and detailed individual dietary recordings to assess effects of the complementary diet. We found that maternal obesity did not influence microbial diversity or specific taxon abundances during the complementary feeding period. Across cohorts, breastfeeding duration and composition of the complementary diet were found to be the major determinants of gut microbiota development. In both cohorts, gut microbial composition and alpha diversity were thus strongly affected by introduction of family foods with high protein and fiber contents. Specifically, intake of meats, cheeses, and Danish rye bread, rich in protein and fiber, were associated with increased alpha diversity. Our results reveal that the transition from early infant feeding to family foods is a major determinant for gut microbiota development. IMPORTANCE The potential influence of maternal obesity on infant gut microbiota may occur either through vertically transmitted microbes or through the dietary habits of the family. Recent studies have suggested that the heritability of obesity may partly be caused by the transmission of "obesogenic" gut microbes. However, the findings presented here suggest that maternal obesity per

  7. Infant Gut Microbiota Development Is Driven by Transition to Family Foods Independent of Maternal Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Laursen, Martin Frederik; Andersen, Louise B. B.; Michaelsen, Kim F.; Mølgaard, Christian; Trolle, Ellen; Bahl, Martin Iain

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The first years of life are paramount in establishing our endogenous gut microbiota, which is strongly affected by diet and has repeatedly been linked with obesity. However, very few studies have addressed the influence of maternal obesity on infant gut microbiota, which may occur either through vertically transmitted microbes or through the dietary habits of the family. Additionally, very little is known about the effect of diet during the complementary feeding period, which is potentially important for gut microbiota development. Here, the gut microbiotas of two different cohorts of infants, born either of a random sample of healthy mothers (n = 114), or of obese mothers (n = 113), were profiled by 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing. Gut microbiota data were compared to breastfeeding patterns and detailed individual dietary recordings to assess effects of the complementary diet. We found that maternal obesity did not influence microbial diversity or specific taxon abundances during the complementary feeding period. Across cohorts, breastfeeding duration and composition of the complementary diet were found to be the major determinants of gut microbiota development. In both cohorts, gut microbial composition and alpha diversity were thus strongly affected by introduction of family foods with high protein and fiber contents. Specifically, intake of meats, cheeses, and Danish rye bread, rich in protein and fiber, were associated with increased alpha diversity. Our results reveal that the transition from early infant feeding to family foods is a major determinant for gut microbiota development. IMPORTANCE The potential influence of maternal obesity on infant gut microbiota may occur either through vertically transmitted microbes or through the dietary habits of the family. Recent studies have suggested that the heritability of obesity may partly be caused by the transmission of “obesogenic” gut microbes. However, the findings presented here suggest that

  8. Infant Gut Microbiota Development Is Driven by Transition to Family Foods Independent of Maternal Obesity.

    PubMed

    Laursen, Martin Frederik; Andersen, Louise B B; Michaelsen, Kim F; Mølgaard, Christian; Trolle, Ellen; Bahl, Martin Iain; Licht, Tine Rask

    2016-01-01

    The first years of life are paramount in establishing our endogenous gut microbiota, which is strongly affected by diet and has repeatedly been linked with obesity. However, very few studies have addressed the influence of maternal obesity on infant gut microbiota, which may occur either through vertically transmitted microbes or through the dietary habits of the family. Additionally, very little is known about the effect of diet during the complementary feeding period, which is potentially important for gut microbiota development. Here, the gut microbiotas of two different cohorts of infants, born either of a random sample of healthy mothers (n = 114), or of obese mothers (n = 113), were profiled by 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing. Gut microbiota data were compared to breastfeeding patterns and detailed individual dietary recordings to assess effects of the complementary diet. We found that maternal obesity did not influence microbial diversity or specific taxon abundances during the complementary feeding period. Across cohorts, breastfeeding duration and composition of the complementary diet were found to be the major determinants of gut microbiota development. In both cohorts, gut microbial composition and alpha diversity were thus strongly affected by introduction of family foods with high protein and fiber contents. Specifically, intake of meats, cheeses, and Danish rye bread, rich in protein and fiber, were associated with increased alpha diversity. Our results reveal that the transition from early infant feeding to family foods is a major determinant for gut microbiota development. IMPORTANCE The potential influence of maternal obesity on infant gut microbiota may occur either through vertically transmitted microbes or through the dietary habits of the family. Recent studies have suggested that the heritability of obesity may partly be caused by the transmission of "obesogenic" gut microbes. However, the findings presented here suggest that maternal obesity per

  9. Enhanced Adipogenic and Lipogenic Signatures in White Adipose Tissue of Offspring Exposed to Maternal Obesity In Utero

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The risk of obesity throughout life is subject to programming beginning early in development. Exposure to maternal obesity (MO) at conception and during gestation increases the risk of obesity in adult-life. MO was induced in female Sprague Dawley rats via overfeeding of liquid diets (30% excess cal...

  10. [Obesity in elderly].

    PubMed

    Lechleitner, Monika

    2016-03-01

    The prevalence of obesity is increasing also in the elderly population. The European Euronut-Seneca study described an obesity prevalence of 12-41% in elderly women and of 8-24% in elderly men. Obesity in the elderly is related to the cardiometabolic risk, but also to degenerative joint diseases and impaired physical functions. Some discrepancies are caused by the description of a so-called obesity paradox with a more favourable prognosis for certain diseases in the presence of overweight compared to normal or reduced body weight. The so-called sarcopenic obesity is associated with the worst prognosis.Preventive and therapeutic regimens should consider the increased risk of malnutrition in elderly. The combinations of individually tailored nutritional recommendations and physical exercise is of advantage for the prognosis of comorbidities and the quality of life. PMID:26820990

  11. Paediatric asthma and obesity.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Sean R; Platts-Mills, Thomas A E

    2006-12-01

    None of the explanations proposed for the increase in paediatric asthma have been adequate. It is becoming apparent that the cause of the increase in asthma must be multi-factorial. Increasing attention has been focused on the role of lifestyle in the development of asthma. Lifestyle changes that have occurred in children are those in diet and decreased physical activity, with obesity being the product of these changes. The increase in asthma, obesity and a sedentary lifestyle have occurred together. However, a temporal relationship between asthma, obesity and decreased physical activity has not been determined in the paediatric literature. Limited data suggest that decreased physical activity could be playing a role in the aetiology of asthma independent of obesity. Furthermore, there has been substantial research on the benefits of exercise programmes for paediatric patients with asthma. Longitudinal trials monitoring physical activity, obesity and the development of asthma are needed. PMID:17098637

  12. Obesity and cancer.

    PubMed

    Brawer, Rickie; Brisbon, Nancy; Plumb, James

    2009-09-01

    Obesity has become the second leading preventable cause of disease and death in the United States, trailing only tobacco use. Weight control, dietary choices, and levels of physical activity are important modifiable determinants of cancer risk. Physicians have a key role in integrating multifactorial approaches to prevention and management into clinical care and advocating for systemic prevention efforts. This article provides an introduction to the epidemiology and magnitude of childhood and adult obesity; the relationship between obesity and cancer and other chronic diseases; potential mechanisms postulated to explain these relationships; a review of recommended obesity treatment and assessment guidelines for adults, adolescents, and children; multilevel prevention strategies; and an approach to obesity management in adults using the Chronic Care Model.

  13. Risk Factors for Subclinical Atherosclerosis in Diabetic and Obese Children

    PubMed Central

    Faienza, Maria Felicia; Acquafredda, Angelo; Tesse, Riccardina; Luce, Vincenza; Ventura, Annamaria; Maggialetti, Nicola; Monteduro, Mariantonietta; Giordano, Paola; Cavallo, Luciano

    2013-01-01

    Background. Increased carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT) is considered a marker of early-onset atherosclerosis and it seems to predict cardiovascular events both in obese and diabetic subjects. We aimed to evaluate early signs of atherosclerosis and investigate for predisposing factors in children and adolescents affected by type 1 diabetes (T1DM) or obesity, comparing them with healthy controls. Methods. Out of 71 enrolled subjects (mean age 12.8 ± 2.3 years), 26 had T1DM and 24 were obese, while 21 age- and sex-matched subjects acted as controls. cIMT was measured using standardized methods. Serum glucose, insulin, cholesterol, triglycerides and C-reactive protein levels were evaluated. An oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) was performed in obese subjects. Results. Diabetic and obese individuals showed higher cIMT mean values than healthy controls (p<0.005). cIMT of the three examined segments correlated positively with fasting glucose levels and negatively with units of insulin/kg/day administered in T1DM individuals. A positive correlation between insulin levels (basal and after oral glucose load) and cIMT of common, internal and external carotid artery was found in obese subjects (p<0.03). High density cholesterol levels represented a protective factor for cIMT in this latter group of the study population. Conclusions. Our findings show that cIMT correlates with high insulin levels (a sign of insulin resistance) in obese patients and with high fasting glucose levels (a sign of relative insulin deficiency) in T1DM subjects, confirming the need of reducing hyperinsulinism and monitoring blood glucose levels in these subjects to prevent atherosclerosis. PMID:23423872

  14. Factors associated with obesity in Indonesian adolescents.

    PubMed

    Collins, Allison E; Pakiz, Bilge; Rock, Cheryl L

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. To investigate adolescent eating, activity, and behavioral patterns, and attitudes and their associations with obesity in selected communities in Indonesia. DESIGN. A cross-sectional questionnaire and physical measurement-based study in three communities of varying modernization levels in Indonesia (Yogyakarta, Kuta, and Jakarta). Subjects. 1758 middle school students (aged 12-15 years) recruited at six different schools: one public and one private school in each of the three target communities. MEASUREMENTS. The questionnaire collected data on demographic characteristics (age, gender, ethnicity, estimated household income); fast food eating habits (frequency, types of food/restaurant, general beliefs about fast foods); television, computer, and Play Station usage; physical activity (hrs/wk of participation in physical activity, transportation means for attending school); and eating habits (frequency of consuming selected foods and beverages). Student's height and weights were obtained, body mass index (BMI: weight [kg]/height [m(2)]) was calculated, and obesity was defined as ≥95%, using the BMI-for-age cut-offs from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) charts. RESULTS. Chi-square analysis revealed associations between obesity and community setting, family income, use of a computer or Play Station, type of transportation to school, and beliefs about fast foods (P<0.01). According to the logistic regression analysis, adolescents from families with incomes over Rp 2 mil were three times as likely to be obese (95% CI 1.9, 4.9) and boys were 2.6 times more likely to be obese (95% CI 1.5, 4.5). CONCLUSION. Greater likelihood of obesity among Indonesian adolescents who spend greater amounts of time using a computer or Play Station suggests that such sedentary activities may be replacing physical activity, promoting an energy imbalance, and subsequently, an increased risk for obesity. PMID:17852550

  15. Novel insights of dietary polyphenols and obesity

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shu; Moustaid-Moussa, Naima; Chen, Lixia; Mo, Huanbiao; Shastri, Anuradha; Su, Rui; Bapat, Priyanka; Kwun, InSook; Shen, Chwan-Li

    2013-01-01

    Prevalence of obesity has steadily increased over the past three decades both in the United States and worldwide. Recent studies have shown the role of dietary polyphenols in the prevention of obesity and obesity-related chronic diseases. Here we evaluated the impact of commonly consumed polyphenols, including green tea catechins and epigallocatechin gallates, resveratrol, and curcumin, on obesity and obesity-related-inflammation. Cellular studies demonstrated that these dietary polyphenols reduce viability of adipocytes and proliferation of preadipocytes, suppress adipocyte differentiation and triglyceride accumulation, stimulate lipolysis and fatty acid β-oxidation, and reduce inflammation. Concomitantly, the polyphenols modulate signaling pathways including the AMP-activated protein kinase, peroxisome proliferator activated receptor γ, CCAAT/enhancer binding protein α, PPAR gamma activator 1-alpha, sirtuin 1, sterol regulatory element binding protein-1c, uncoupling proteins 1 and 2, and nuclear factor kappa B that regulate adipogenesis, antioxidant and anti-inflammatory responses. Animal studies strongly suggest that commonly consumed polyphenols described in this review have a pronounced effect on obesity as shown by lower body weight, fat mass, and triglycerides through enhancing energy expenditure and fat utilization, and modulating glucose hemostasis. Limited human studies have been conducted in this area, and are inconsistent about the anti-obesity impact of dietary polyphenols, probably due to the various study designs and lengths, variation among subjects (age, gender, ethnicity), chemical forms of the dietary polyphenols used and confounding factors such as other weight reducing agents. Future randomized controlled trials are warranted to reconcile the discrepancies between preclinical efficacies and inconclusive clinic outcomes of these polyphenols. PMID:24314860

  16. Gene-PUFA interactions and obesity risk.

    PubMed

    Jourdan, C; Kloiber, S; Nieters, A; Seiler, H; Himmerich, H; Kohli, M A; Lucae, S; Wolfram, G; Gieger, C; Wichmann, H-E; Linseisen, J

    2011-10-01

    Although there are indications for modulatory effects of PUFA on associations between SNP and obesity risk, scientific evidence in human subjects is still scarce. The present analyses investigated interaction effects between SNP in candidate genes for obesity and PUFA in erythrocyte membranes on obesity risk. Within the second Bavarian Food Consumption Survey (cross-sectional, population-based), 568 adults provided blood samples. Fatty acid composition of erythrocyte membranes was analysed by means of GC. Genotyping was performed for twenty-one genes, including cytokines, adipokines, neurotransmitters and transcription factors. In addition, plasma IL-6 concentrations were analysed. For the statistical analysis, a logistic regression model assuming additive genetic effects was chosen. About 20 % of the study participants were classified as obese (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m(2)). Several significant gene-PUFA interactions were found, indicating regulatory effects of PUFA by gene variants of IL-2, IL-6, IL-18, TNF receptor family member 1B and 21, leptin receptor and adiponectin on obesity risk. After stratification by genotype, the strongest effects were found for rs2069779 (IL-2) and all tested PUFA as well as for rs1800795 (IL-6) and linoleic or arachidonic acid. The obesity risk of minor allele carriers significantly decreased with increasing fatty acid content. The genetic PUFA-IL-6 interaction was also reflected in plasma IL-6 concentrations. If replicated in a prospective study with sufficient statistical power, the results would indicate a beneficial effect of high PUFA supply for a substantial proportion of the population with respect to obesity risk.

  17. Current mapping of obesity.

    PubMed

    Pérez Rodrigo, Carmen

    2013-09-01

    Obesity is a major risk factor for non-communicable diseases (NCDs), such as diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, and cancers. The worldwide prevalence of obesity has almost doubled between 1980 and 2008. In some regions, such as Europe, the Eastern Mediterranean and the Americas, more than 50% of women are overweight. Tonga, Nauru and the Cook Islands show the highest prevalence of obesity worldwide, above 60% in men and in women. China and the United States are the countries that experienced the largest absolute increase in the number of overweight and obese people between 1980 and 2008, followed by Brazil and Mexico. The regions with the largest increase in the prevalence of female obesity were Central Latin America, Oceania and Southern Latin America. Updated data provide evidence that the progression of the epidemic has effectively slowed for the past ten years in several countries. In low-income countries obesity is generally more prevalent among the better-off, while disadvantaged groups are increasingly affected as countries grow. Many studies have shown an overall socio-economic gradient in obesity in modern industrialized societies. Rates tend to decrease progressively with increasing socio-economic status. Children obesity rates in Spain are amongst the highest in the OECD. One in 3 children aged 13 to 14 are overweight. Overweight in infants and young children is observed in the upper middle-income countries. However, the fastest growth occurs in the group of lower middle-income countries. There is a growing body of evidence for an inverse association between SES and child obesity in developed countries. The prevalence of overweight and obesity is high in all age groups in many countries, but especially worrying in children and adolescents in developed countries and economies in transition.

  18. The Obesity Epidemic and Consequences for Rheumatoid Arthritis Care

    PubMed Central

    George, Michael D.; Baker, Joshua F.

    2016-01-01

    With the prevalence of obesity increasing dramatically worldwide over the past several decades, an increasing body of literature has examined the impact of obesity in the context of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Epidemiologic studies suggest that obesity may be associated with a modestly increased risk for the development of RA, although these studies have shown conflicting results. Among patients with established RA, obesity has been observed to be associated with greater subjective measures of disease activity and poor treatment response, but also with a decreased risk of joint damage and lower mortality. A comprehensive evaluation of the influence of obesity on the measurement of disease, response to therapies, and long-term prognosis is critical in order to understand these observations. This review therefore focuses on recent observations, potential explanations for these findings, and implications for clinicians and investigators caring for and studying patients with RA. PMID:26739963

  19. The Obesity Epidemic and Consequences for Rheumatoid Arthritis Care.

    PubMed

    George, Michael D; Baker, Joshua F

    2016-01-01

    With the prevalence of obesity increasing dramatically worldwide over the past several decades, an increasing body of literature has examined the impact of obesity in the context of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Epidemiologic studies suggest that obesity may be associated with a modestly increased risk for the development of RA, although these studies have shown conflicting results. Among patients with established RA, obesity has been observed to be associated with greater subjective measures of disease activity and poor treatment response, but also with a decreased risk of joint damage and lower mortality. A comprehensive evaluation of the influence of obesity on the measurement of disease, response to therapies, and long-term prognosis is critical in order to understand these observations. This review therefore focuses on recent observations, potential explanations for these findings, and implications for clinicians and investigators caring for and studying patients with RA.

  20. Childhood obesity and obstructive sleep apnea syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Muzumdar, Hiren

    2010-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of obesity in children seems to be associated with an increased prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) in children. Possible pathophysiological mechanisms contributing to this association include the following: adenotonsillar hypertrophy due to increased somatic growth, increased critical airway closing pressure, altered chest wall mechanics, and abnormalities of ventilatory control. However, the details of these mechanisms and their interactions have not been elucidated. In addition, obesity and OSAS are both associated with metabolic syndrome, which is a constellation of features such as hypertension, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, abdominal obesity, and prothrombotic and proinflammatory states. There is some evidence that OSAS may contribute to the progression of metabolic syndrome with a potential for significant morbidity. The treatment of OSAS in obese children has not been standardized. Adenotonsillectomy is considered the primary intervention followed by continuous positive airway pressure treatment if OSAS persists. Other methods such as oral appliances, surgery, positional therapy, and weight loss may be beneficial for individual subjects. The present review discusses these issues and suggests an approach to the management of obese children with snoring and possible OSAS. PMID:19875714

  1. Obesity: single house for many evils.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ashwini; Nayak, Bibhukalyan P; Kumar, Awanish

    2016-12-01

    World Health Organization (WHO) considers obesity as one of the fastest growing metabolic disorders other than diabetes. It is a complex interplay of lifestyle and associated genes. Obesity has been considered as a disease with multiple targets and very often compared in this sense with its sibling disease type 2 diabetes. The disease is pathology of the adipocytes and develops as a result of hypertrophy and hyperplasia of these cells, former being the major concern but its effects could be seen on various organs in the form of cardio-vascular disease, stroke, cancer, diabetes, sexual dysfunction, respiratory problems and many more. An increase in the lipid content of the adipocytes changes the physiology of these cells towards more inflammatory phenotype. The array of molecules or adipokines secreted by these cells varies in concentration and type among healthy and obese subjects. On one hand where adiponectin concentration decreases, the resistin concentration increases resulting in insulin resistance among many other adipokine related effects. Specifically, an obese person develops hyperlipidemia, insulin resistance, vascular blockage, sleep apnoea, cancer etc. This review is an attempt to focus, in detail, about obesity related complications. PMID:27600644

  2. Antimonide superlattice complementary barrier infrared detector (CBIRD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ting, David Z.-Y.; Soibel, Alexander; Hill, Cory J.; Nguyen, Jean; Keo, Sam A.; Rafol, B., , Sir; Yang, Baohua; Lee, Mike C.; Mumolo, Jason M.; Liu, John K.; Höglund, Linda; Gunapala, Sarath D.

    2011-05-01

    The nearly lattice-matched InAs/GaSb/AlSb (antimonide) material system offers tremendous flexibility in realizing high-performance infrared detectors. Antimonide-based superlattice infrared absorbers can be customized to have cutoff wavelengths ranging from the short-wave infrared (SWIR) to the very long-wave infrared (VLWIR). They can be used in constructing sophisticated heterostructures to enable advanced infrared photodetector designs. In particular, they facilitate the construction of unipolar barriers, which can block one carrier type but allow the un-impeded flow of the other. Unipolar barriers are used to implement the barrier infrared detector (BIRD) design for increasing the collection efficiency of photo-generated carriers, and reducing dark current generation without impeding photocurrent flow. We report our recent efforts in achieving state-of-the-art performance in antimonide superlattice based long-wavelength infrared photodetectors using a complementary barrier infrared detector (CBIRD) design.

  3. Alternative, complementary and traditional medicine in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Talib, N

    2006-09-01

    This paper sets out the practice of traditional, alternative and/or complementary medicine in Malaysia. It gives an overview of the types of alternative medicine available, and the legal regulation, or lack of it within the current setting. The relevant policies and governmental action in this area are highlighted. Relevant case law decisions in this area are also included. The practice of spiritual healing as one form of traditional medicine, and its role within the spectrum of alternative medicine is dealt with briefly. The significant question of integration of alternative medicine within the existing allopathic system is addressed. The paper concludes that as interest in, and usage of alternative medicine is not likely to decrease, certain measures must be taken by the relevant authorities to ensure among others, the safety and efficacy of these medicines.

  4. Complementary and Integrative Approaches for Pediatric Headache.

    PubMed

    Kedia, Sita

    2016-02-01

    In this article, the use of complementary and integrative medicine for the management of pediatric headache is reviewed. Despite limited numbers of studies for pediatric headaches, children and families seek these services. Integrative medicine focuses on treating the whole person, integrating conventional medicine with mind-body-spirit methods. Nutriceuticals include dietary supplements in the form of vitamins (vitamin D), minerals (magnesium), coenzyme Q, butterbur, and melatonin. Acupuncture, stimulation, physical therapy and Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulations (TENS) or Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) may also be useful in selected patients. The efficacy of all these therapeutic alternatives in pediatric headache is presented here. Primary care providers, neurologists, and headache specialists alike need to be informed of such interventions and integrate these approaches, when appropriate, in the management of children with headaches. PMID:27017022

  5. Complementary and alternative medicine for gastrointestinal disorders.

    PubMed

    Tillisch, Kirsten

    2007-06-01

    Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is a growing area of public interest. With increasing numbers of patients using these modalities, it is essential that Western medical practitioners become familiar with the available CAM literature to facilitate better patient care. While the volume of CAM research in gastrointestinal disorders has increased, there are still few modalities for which definitive conclusions can be made. This review will provide an overview of current knowledge of CAM therapies for functional gastrointestinal disorders, inflammatory bowel disease and liver disease. An understanding of this evolving literature is useful in discussing these therapies with patients who use, or are considering using, them. As we learn more about these CAM modalities, integration of those shown to be effective into our conventional practice and avoidance of those shown to be risky or of little use will be of benefit both to patients and practitioners.

  6. Threefold Complementary Approach to Holographic QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; de Teramond, Guy F.; Dosch, Hans Gunter

    2013-12-27

    A complementary approach, derived from (a) higher-dimensional anti-de Sitter (AdS) space, (b) light-front quantization and (c) the invariance properties of the full conformal group in one dimension leads to a nonperturbative relativistic light-front wave equation which incorporates essential spectroscopic and dynamical features of hadron physics. The fundamental conformal symmetry of the classical QCD Lagrangian in the limit of massless quarks is encoded in the resulting effective theory. The mass scale for confinement emerges from the isomorphism between the conformal group andSO(2,1). This scale appears in the light-front Hamiltonian by mapping to the evolution operator in the formalism of de Alfaro, Fubini and Furlan, which retains the conformal invariance of the action. Remarkably, the specific form of the confinement interaction and the corresponding modification of AdS space are uniquely determined in this procedure.

  7. Ultra-stable oscillator with complementary transistors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleinberg, L. L. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A high frequency oscillator, having both good short and long term stability, is formed by including a piezoelectric crystal in the base circuit of a first bi-polar transistor circuit, the bi-polar transistor itself operated below its transitional frequency and having its emitter load chosen so that the input impedance, looking into the base thereof, exhibits a negative resistance in parallel with a capacitive reactance. Combined with this basic circuit is an auxiliary, complementary, second bi-polar transistor circuit of the same form with the piezoelectric crystal being common to both circuits. By this configuration small changes in quiescent current are substantially cancelled by opposite variations in the second bi-polar transistor circuit, thereby achieving from the oscillator a signal having its frequency of oscillation stable over long time periods as well as short time periods.

  8. COORDINATION DYNAMICS OF THE COMPLEMENTARY NATURE

    PubMed Central

    Engstrøm, David A.; Scott Kelso, JA

    2009-01-01

    Summary Niels Bohr’s maxim contraria sunt complementa indicated his strong suspicion that the complementarity interpretation of quantum mechanics might someday be expanded into a generalized principle. It now appears that such a principle has been found in metastability which appears at the scale of living things. Metastability has been proposed as a principle of brain~behavior, and is captured in the extended or ‘broken-symmetry’ version of the HKB model of coordination dynamics. The metastable regime of coordination dynamics reconciles the tendency of specialized brain regions to express autonomy (segregation) and their simultaneous tendency to work together as a synergetic whole (integration). There is growing evidence from recent studies in the brain and behavioral sciences that the complementary nature of integrating and segregating tendencies is essential to the way human brain~minds work. PMID:20634938

  9. [Protocol for complementary and alternative medicine within the Dutch mental health services].

    PubMed

    Hoenders, H J R; Appelo, M T; van den Brink, H; Hartogs, B M A; Berger, C J J

    2010-01-01

    Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is the subject of heated debate. There are many prejudices for and against CAM. At the centre for Integrative Psychiatry (CIP) of Lentis CAM is offered alongside conventional treatments, but under strict conditions. Because of the controversy surrounding CAM and the potential health risks involved, the CIP in Lentis has formulated a protocol for CAM which is presented in this article. PMID:20458681

  10. Effects of living at two ambient temperatures on 24-h blood pressure and neuroendocrine function among obese and non-obese humans: a pilot study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanikowska, Dominika; Sato, Maki; Iwase, Satoshi; Shimizu, Yuuki; Nishimura, Naoki; Inukai, Yoko; Sugenoya, Junichi

    2013-05-01

    The effects of environmental temperature on blood pressure and hormones in obese subjects in Japan were compared in two seasons: summer vs winter. Five obese (BMI, 32 ± 5 kg/m2) and five non-obese (BMI, 23 ±3 kg/m2) men participated in this experiment at latitude 35°10' N and longitude 136°57.9' E. The average environmental temperature was 29 ± 1 °C in summer and 3 ± 1 °C in winter. Blood samples were analyzed for leptin, ghrelin, catecholamines, thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), free thyroxine (fT4), free triiodothyronine (fT3), total cholesterol, triglycerides, insulin and glucose. Blood pressure was measured over the course of 24 h in summer and winter. A Japanese version of the Profile of Mood States (POMS) questionnaire was also administered each season. Systolic and diastolic blood pressures in obese men were significantly higher in winter (lower environmental temperatures) than in summer (higher environmental temperatures). Noradrenaline and dopamine concentrations were also significantly higher at lower environmental temperatures in obese subjects, but ghrelin, TSH, fT3, fT4, insulin and glucose were not significantly different in summer and winter between obese and non-obese subjects. Leptin, total cholesterol and triglyceride concentrations were significantly higher in winter in obese than non-obese men. Results from the POMS questionnaire showed a significant rise in Confusion at lower environmental temperatures (winter) in obese subjects. In this pilot study, increased blood pressure may have been due to increased secretion of noradrenaline in obese men in winter, and the results suggest that blood pressure control in obese men is particularly important in winter.

  11. Complementary therapies for osteoarthritis: are they effective?

    PubMed

    Shengelia, Rouzi; Parker, Samantha J; Ballin, Mary; George, Teena; Reid, M Carrington

    2013-12-01

    Increasing interest has focused on complementary management modalities, including tai chi, acupuncture, yoga, and massage therapy, as treatments for osteoarthritis (OA). This review article synthesizes evidence from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and systematic reviews (SRs) that examined one or more of the above as treatments for OA. Medline, Pubmed, and Cinahl databases were searched to identify English-language articles using an RCT design or that conducted a SR of published studies and presented data on symptom or functional outcomes. Two authors independently abstracted relevant information (e.g., study sample, intervention characteristics, treatment effects, safety data). Retained articles (n = 29) included those that evaluated tai chi (8 RCTs, 2 SRs), acupuncture (11 RCTs, 4 SRs), yoga (2 RCTs), and massage therapy (2 RCTs). Available evidence indicates that tai chi, acupuncture, yoga, and massage therapy are safe for use by individuals with OA. Positive short-term (≤6 months) effects in the form of reduced pain and improved self-reported physical functioning were found for all 4 treatments. Limited information exists regarding the relative effectiveness of the therapies (e.g., yoga vs. tai chi vs. acupuncture), as well as treatment effects in persons with joint involvement besides the knee and in distinct patient subgroups (e.g., older vs. younger adults, persons with mild vs. moderate vs. advanced disease). Complementary therapies can reduce pain and improve function in adults with OA. Research is needed to evaluate long-term benefits of the treatments, as well as their relative effects among diverse patient subgroups. PMID:24315281

  12. Effect of Obesity and Leptin Level on Migraineurs

    PubMed Central

    Ligong, Zhang; Jinjin, Qin; Chunfu, Chen; Congcong, Li; Xiaojun, Diao

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to analyze the effects of obesity and leptin levels on patients with migraine, and to observe the change of leptin levels in migraineurs. Material/Methods We enrolled 52 migraine patients from the Headache Clinic in Shandong Provincial Hospital into a randomized controlled trial with another 52 age-, sex-, and BMI-matched healthy subjects as controls. Leptin levels in all subjects were determined by radioimmunoassay. Results Compared with the control group, the migraineurs revealed no significant change in leptin levels (P>0.05). Multivariate Logistic regression analysis showed that neither abdominal obesity nor leptin had significant impact on migraine clinical features. Total body obesity had a significant effect on the frequency (OR=4.248), duration (OR=3.167), and intensity (OR=5.225) of the headache. Conclusions Total body obesity affected headache frequency, intensity, and duration, while leptin levels did not. PMID:26508370

  13. Perceptions of the Causes of Obesity and Responsiveness to Treatment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartigan, Kevin J.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Examined whether obese subjects' causal attributions of their weight problems to ability, effort, task difficulty, and luck affect how much weight they lose as a function of treatment. Results indicated the most powerful predictor of positive weight status was subjects' perception that they had the ability to lose weight. (Author)

  14. [Eating disorders and obesity].

    PubMed

    Wolf, L M; Houdent, C

    1989-02-16

    In most cases, obesity does not stem from a specific psychologic disturbance. Some obese people overeat, as do their family or their socio-professional peers, and this cannot be considered a pathologic behaviour. Many obese patients increase their energy intake when frustrated, anxious, or tired, like many normal individuals who enjoy a better weight regulation. But when obesity increases suddenly and/or severely in these circumstances, and in gross obesity, abnormal feeding behaviour is usually responsible: prandial or, more often extraprandial overeating (nibbling, gorging, binge eating, night eating, excess alcohol, carbohydrate craving). Serotoninergic mechanisms of the latter have focused wide interest. Conflicting situations and/or anxiety are usually a factor in child obesity. Deppreciated self-image and feelings of culpability, partly secondary to obesity itself and dietary failures often contribute to feeding disturbances, sometimes surreptitious, carrying a risk of vicious circle. But weight reduction itself, while improving self image, carries a risk of unmasking depressive tendencies, especially when too quick. Hence the importance of careful and comprehensive management.

  15. Obesity and Economic Environments

    PubMed Central

    Sturm, Roland; An, Ruopeng

    2014-01-01

    This review summarizes our understanding of economic factors during the obesity epidemic and dispels some widely held, but incorrect, beliefs: Rising obesity rates coincided with increases in leisure time (rather than increased work hours), increased fruit and vegetable availability (rather than a decline of healthier foods), and increased exercise uptake. As a share of disposable income, Americans now have the cheapest food available in history, which fueled the obesity epidemic. Weight gain was surprisingly similar across sociodemographic groups or geographic areas, rather than specific to some groups (at every point in time, however, there are clear disparities). It suggests that if we want to understand the role of the environment in the obesity epidemic, we need to understand changes over time affecting all groups, not differences between subgroups at a given time. Although economic and technological changes in the environment drove the obesity epidemic, the evidence for effective economic policies to prevent obesity remains limited. Taxes on foods with low nutritional value could nudge behavior towards healthier diets, as could subsidies/discounts for healthier foods. However, even a large price change for healthy foods could only close a part of the gap between dietary guidelines and actual food consumption. Political support has been lacking for even moderate price interventions in the US and this may continue until the role of environment factors is accepted more widely. As opinion leaders, clinicians play an important role to shape the understanding of the causes of obesity. PMID:24853237

  16. Epigenetics of Obesity.

    PubMed

    Lopomo, A; Burgio, E; Migliore, L

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is a metabolic disease, which is becoming an epidemic health problem: it has been recently defined in terms of Global Pandemic. Over the years, the approaches through family, twins and adoption studies led to the identification of some causal genes in monogenic forms of obesity but the origins of the pandemic of obesity cannot be considered essentially due to genetic factors, because human genome is not likely to change in just a few years. Epigenetic studies have offered in recent years valuable tools for the understanding of the worldwide spread of the pandemic of obesity. The involvement of epigenetic modifications-DNA methylation, histone tails, and miRNAs modifications-in the development of obesity is more and more evident. In the epigenetic literature, there are evidences that the entire embryo-fetal and perinatal period of development plays a key role in the programming of all human organs and tissues. Therefore, the molecular mechanisms involved in the epigenetic programming require a new and general pathogenic paradigm, the Developmental Origins of Health and Disease theory, to explain the current epidemiological transition, that is, the worldwide increase of chronic, degenerative, and inflammatory diseases such as obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, neurodegenerative diseases, and cancer. Obesity and its related complications are more and more associated with environmental pollutants (obesogens), gut microbiota modifications and unbalanced food intake, which can induce, through epigenetic mechanisms, weight gain, and altered metabolic consequences. PMID:27288829

  17. Obesity and economic environments.

    PubMed

    Sturm, Roland; An, Ruopeng

    2014-01-01

    This review summarizes current understanding of economic factors during the obesity epidemic and dispels some widely held, but incorrect, beliefs. Rising obesity rates coincided with increases in leisure time (rather than increased work hours), increased fruit and vegetable availability (rather than a decline in healthier foods), and increased exercise uptake. As a share of disposable income, Americans now have the cheapest food available in history, which fueled the obesity epidemic. Weight gain was surprisingly similar across sociodemographic groups or geographic areas, rather than specific to some groups (at every point in time; however, there are clear disparities). It suggests that if one wants to understand the role of the environment in the obesity epidemic, one needs to understand changes over time affecting all groups, not differences between subgroups at a given time. Although economic and technological changes in the environment drove the obesity epidemic, the evidence for effective economic policies to prevent obesity remains limited. Taxes on foods with low nutritional value could nudge behavior toward healthier diets, as could subsidies/discounts for healthier foods. However, even a large price change for healthy foods could close only part of the gap between dietary guidelines and actual food consumption. Political support has been lacking for even moderate price interventions in the United States and this may continue until the role of environmental factors is accepted more widely. As opinion leaders, clinicians play an important role in shaping the understanding of the causes of obesity.

  18. Obesity and heart failure.

    PubMed

    De Pergola, Giovanni; Nardecchia, Adele; Giagulli, Vito Angelo; Triggiani, Vincenzo; Guastamacchia, Edoardo; Minischetti, Manuela Castiglione; Silvestris, Franco

    2013-03-01

    Epidemiological studies have recently shown that obesity, and abdominal obesity in particular, is an independent risk factor for the development of heart failure (HF). Higher cardiac oxidative stress is the early stage of heart dysfunction due to obesity, and it is the result of insulin resistance, altered fatty acid and glucose metabolism, and impaired mitochondrial biogenesis. Extense myocyte hypertrophy and myocardial fibrosis are early microscopic changes in patients with HF, whereas circumferential strain during the left ventricular (LV) systole, LV increase in both chamber size and wall thickness (LV hypertrophy), and LV dilatation are the early macroscopic and functional alterations in obese developing heart failure. LV hypertrophy leads to diastolic dysfunction and subendocardial ischemia in obesity, and pericardial fat has been shown to be significantly associated with LV diastolic dysfunction. Evolving abnormalities of diastolic dysfunction may include progressive hypertrophy and systolic dysfunction, and various degrees of eccentric and/or concentric LV hypertrophy may be present with time. Once HF is established, overweight and obese have a better prognosis than do their lean counterparts with the same level of cardiovascular disease, and this phenomenon is called "obesity paradox". It is mainly due to lower muscle protein degradation, brain natriuretic peptide circulating levels and cardio-respiratory fitness than normal weight patients with HF.

  19. Maximal aerobic power during running and cycling in obese and non-obese children.

    PubMed

    Maffeis, C; Schena, F; Zaffanello, M; Zoccante, L; Schutz, Y; Pinelli, L

    1994-01-01

    The maximal aerobic capacity while running and cycling was measured in 22 prepubertal children (mean age +/- SD 9.5 +/- 0.8 years): 14 obese (47.3 +/- 10 kg) and 8 non-obese (31.1 +/- 6.1 kg). Oxygen consumption (VO2) and carbon dioxide production were measured by an open circuit method. Steady state VO2 was determined at different levels of exercise up to the maximal power on the cycloergometer (92 W in obese and 77 W in non-obese subjects) and up to the maximal running speed on the treadmill at a 2% slope (8.3 km/h in obese and 9.0 km/h in lean children). Expressed in absolute values, the VO2max in obese children was significantly higher than in controls (1.55 +/- 0.29 l/min versus 1.23 +/- 0.22 l/min, p < 0.05) for the treadmill test and comparable in the two groups (1.4 +/- 0.2 l/min versus 1.16 +/- 0.2 l/min, ns) for the cycloergometer test. When VO2max was expressed per kg fat free mass, the difference between the two groups disappeared for both tests. These data suggest that obese children had no limitation of maximal aerobic power. Therefore, the magnitude of the workload prescribed when a physical activity program is intended for the therapy of childhood obesity, it should be designed to increase caloric output rather than to improve cardiorespiratory fitness.

  20. Are blur and disparity complementary cues to depth?

    PubMed

    Langer, Michael S; Siciliano, Ryan A

    2015-02-01

    The image blur and binocular disparity of a 3D scene point both increase with distance in depth away from fixation. Perceived depth from disparity has been studied extensively and is known to be most precise near fixation. Perceived depth from blur is much less well understood. A recent experiment (Held, R. T, Cooper, E. A., & Banks, M. S. (2012). Current Biology, 22, 426-431) which used a volumetric stereo display found evidence that blur and disparity are complementary cues to depth, namely the disparity cue dominates over the blur cue near the fixation depth and blur dominates over disparity at depths that are far from fixation. Here we present a similar experiment but which used a traditional 3D display so that blur was produced by image processing rather than by the subjects' optics. Contrary to Held et al., we found that subjects did not rely more on blur to discriminate depth at distances far from fixation, even though a sufficient level of blur was available to do so. The discrepancy between the findings of the two studies can be explained in at least two ways. First, Held et al.'s subjects received trial-to-trial feedback in a training phase and may have learned how to perform the task using blur discrimination. Second, Held et al.'s volumetric stereo display may have provided other optical cues that indicated that the blur was real rather than rendered. The latter possibility would have significant implications about how depth is perceived from blur under different viewing conditions.

  1. The associations between chronotype, a healthy diet and obesity.

    PubMed

    Maukonen, Mirkka; Kanerva, Noora; Partonen, Timo; Kronholm, Erkki; Konttinen, Hanna; Wennman, Heini; Männistö, Satu

    2016-01-01

    Unhealthy diet has been associated with obesity. Evening type has been associated with unhealthier food and nutrient intake that could predict a higher risk of obesity among them as compared to morning type. However, thus far no study has examined the interrelationships between chronotype, a healthy diet and obesity. We examined whether a healthy diet mediates the association between chronotype and obesity and whether chronotype modifies the association between a healthy and obesity. The National FINRISK 2007 Study included 4421 subjects aged 25-74 years. Diet was assessed using a validated food frequency questionnaire. Baltic Sea diet score (BSDS), including nine dietary components, was used as a measure of adherence to a healthy Nordic diet. Weight, height, body fat percentage and waist circumference were measured, and body mass index values were calculated. Chronotype was assessed using a shortened version of Horne and Östberg's morningness-eveningness questionnaire (MEQ). The sum score calculated from MEQ was either used as a continuous variable or divided into tertiles of which the lowest tertile demonstrated evening preference and the highest tertile demonstrated morning preference. A series of regression analyses were conducted to determine whether the BSDS mediates the association between chronotype and obesity. Likelihood ratio test was used to determine whether chronotype modifies the association between the BSDS and the obesity measures. After testing the interaction, chronotype-stratified analysis for the association between the BSDS and obesity measures was determined by linear regression. Generally, the evening types had lower adherence to the BSDS and were more often smokers (men), physically inactive and had lower perceived health than the other chronotypes (p < 0.05). The poorer health behavior of this group, however, was not manifested in their obesity measures, and no evidence that the BSDS would mediate the association between chronotype and

  2. [Epidemiology of obesity in the work milieu, Douala, Cameroon].

    PubMed

    Fouda, A A Bita; Lemogoum, D; Manga, J Owona; Il Dissongo, J; Tobbit, R; Moyo, D F Ngounou; Sume, G Etapelong; Kollo, B

    2012-01-01

    Obesity is a worldwide public health problem, and its burden has been poorly explored in Cameroon, especially in work place. We therefore carried out in April 2010, an analytic cross-sectional study aiming to determine the prevalence of obesity, associated risk factors and health risk in six randomly selected enterprises based in Douala. Among the 552 participants, 383 (69.4%) were males. Most of the workers (55.4%) were aged less than 35 years old. There was 191 (34.60%) office staff as against 361 (65.40%) labourers. In each participant, blood pressures, and fasting blood glucose were recorded, as well as obesity indexes comprising body mass index and waist circumference. They were calculated and data analyzed using SPSS 16 and Win Pepi 11.8. The prevalence of obesity in workers was 23.4%, and was more pronounced in women than in men (36.1% vs 17.8%; P < 0.005). The workers aged > or = 45 years old exhibited highest obesity rate than other age group (P = 0.03). Importantly, the prevalence of hypertension was two fold greater in obese workers than non obese (P < 0.005; RR = 2.1; IC 95%: 1.57-2.83). 271 (49.1%) of the workers were overweight. Among the obese subjects, those with visceral obesity: 56 (43.4%) females with a waist circumference > 88 cm and 41 (31.8%) men with a waist circumference > 102 cm were at very high health risk. Obesity was significantly associated with excessive alcohol consumption (P = 0.013) and high salt diet (P = 0.022). This study reveals a high burden of obesity in the work place in Douala and outlines the urgent needs of implementation of prevention programme in that milieu. PMID:22891584

  3. The Adipose Transcriptional Response to Insulin Is Determined by Obesity, Not Insulin Sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Rydén, Mikael; Hrydziuszko, Olga; Mileti, Enrichetta; Raman, Amitha; Bornholdt, Jette; Boyd, Mette; Toft, Eva; Qvist, Veronica; Näslund, Erik; Thorell, Anders; Andersson, Daniel P; Dahlman, Ingrid; Gao, Hui; Sandelin, Albin; Daub, Carsten O; Arner, Peter

    2016-08-30

    Metabolically healthy obese subjects display preserved insulin sensitivity and a beneficial white adipose tissue gene expression pattern. However, this observation stems from fasting studies when insulin levels are low. We investigated adipose gene expression by 5'Cap-mRNA sequencing in 17 healthy non-obese (NO), 21 insulin-sensitive severely obese (ISO), and 30 insulin-resistant severely obese (IRO) subjects, before and 2 hr into a hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp. ISO and IRO subjects displayed a clear but globally similar transcriptional response to insulin, which differed from the small effects observed in NO subjects. In the obese, 231 genes were altered; 71 were enriched in ISO subjects (e.g., phosphorylation processes), and 52 were enriched in IRO subjects (e.g., cellular stimuli). Common cardio-metabolic risk factors and gender do not influence these findings. This study demonstrates that differences in the acute transcriptional response to insulin are primarily driven by obesity per se, challenging the notion of healthy obese adipose tissue, at least in severe obesity. PMID:27545890

  4. Eating disorders and obesity.

    PubMed

    Stunkard, Albert J

    2011-12-01

    In conclusion, 2 types of disordered eating behaviors affect some overweight and obese persons. BED and NES present an excellent opportunity to recognize, treat, and prevent these disorders that, at the least, maintain, and at worst, promote, overweight and obesity. Articles in this volume by Wilson and co-workers and Allison and colleagues discuss current treatment options for BED and NES, respectively. Clinicians are encouraged to evaluate the presence of BED and NES in all patients who seek treatment for their obesity. Although the prevalence of these 2 eating disorders is relatively low, both are associated with significant distress and dysfunction that can be ameliorated with effective treatment. PMID:22098802

  5. Reinforcement pathology and obesity.

    PubMed

    Carr, Katelyn A; Daniel, Tinuke Oluyomi; Lin, Henry; Epstein, Leonard H

    2011-09-01

    Obesity is, in part, a result of positive energy balance or energy intake exceeding physiological needs. Excess energy intake is determined by a series of food choices over time. These choices involve both motivational and executive function processes. Problems arise when there is excessive motivation to eat and low impulse control, a situation we have termed reinforcement pathology. Motivational and executive function processes have also been implicated in the development of drug dependence and addiction. In this review we discuss the application of reinforcement pathology to obesity, and implications of this approach for obesity treatment. PMID:21999693

  6. [Obesity Paradox and Stroke].

    PubMed

    Baumgartner, Ralf; Oesch, Lisa; Sarikaya, Hakan

    2016-07-01

    The obesity paradox suggests that overweight and obese patients of older age may have higher survival rates after stroke as compared to normalweight patients. However, the results need a cautious interpretation due to selection bias, treatment bias and different patients’ characteristics. Moreover, randomized studies that prove a benefit of weight reduction are still lacking. As obesity is an independet risk factor for stroke, weight reduction should still be recommended in overweight patients. Randomized-controlled studies are needed to prove the effect of weight reduction on morbidity and mortality after stroke. PMID:27381308

  7. A perspective on obesity.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Ruth W; Broadnax, Pier A

    2003-01-01

    This article represents another approach to the topic of obesity in African-American women. It will not give the usual statistical data on obesity in African American women, because as African-American women, it is known that a greater majority is at risk. Instead the article represents a historical, cultural and psychosocial journey in attempting to understand obesity in African-American women from this perspective. The following thoughts are reflective of interactions with African-American women who have struggled with their weight and who have strived to understand the dynamics of their dilemma of being overweight and/or obese in America. This article explains that obesity in African-American women is more than an alteration in ones physiological processes. For some African-American women obesity is the essence of ones being and it has had a deleterious impact on them. Obesity in the African-American woman is not as simplistic as perceived. It is more than the management of the intake of food. Obesity is also more than the type of food that African-American women prepare and consume. Obesity in this sense maybe linked to the very essence of the women's cultural, historical and psychosocial well being. Being large can be a familial characteristic bearing no connection to the consumption and preparation of food. Important to the latter concept, and essential to the understanding of obesity in African-American women, it needs to be remembered that food may have many symbolic meanings. The symbols may be of a cultural and psychological nature and could be consciously unknown to the individual. Whatever the situation, it needs to be clear that for many African-Americans, obesity is not merely a medical problem. Being obese in America, and particularly for African-American women, has a far-reaching effect. It has reek havoc on the cultural psyche of the African-American women. The popular cultural concept conveyed by all types of media, is one of being thin and

  8. Obesity in women.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Donna H; Braverman-Panza, Jill

    2014-02-01

    Obesity is a common disorder affecting approximately 1 in 3 women. Assessment should consist of measuring BMI and waist circumference, a thorough history regarding nutrition, physical activity, and prior attempts at weight loss, and identification of obesity-related comorbidities. As a chronic disease, obesity requires management using a chronic care model employing multimodal therapy. Behavioral therapy to bring about changes in nutrition and physical activity can be supplemented with long-term use of medications (lorcaserin, orlistat, phentermine/topiramate) to help patients both achieve and maintain meaningful weight loss. PMID:24527479

  9. Pharmacotherapy for Obesity.

    PubMed

    Saunders, Katherine H; Shukla, Alpana P; Igel, Leon I; Kumar, Rekha B; Aronne, Louis J

    2016-09-01

    Successful treatment of obesity requires a multidisciplinary approach including diet, exercise and behavioral modification. As lifestyle changes are not sufficient for some patients, pharmacologic therapies should be considered as adjuncts to lifestyle interventions. In this article, we review clinical indications, mechanisms of action, dosing/administration, side effects, drug interactions and contraindications for the six most widely prescribed obesity medications. We also summarize the efficacy data from phase 3 trials which led to drug approval. As multiple agents are sometimes required for clinically significant weight loss, the future of obesity medicine will likely involve combinations of agents in addition to behavioral counseling. PMID:27519128

  10. Reinforcement pathology and obesity.

    PubMed

    Carr, Katelyn A; Daniel, Tinuke Oluyomi; Lin, Henry; Epstein, Leonard H

    2011-09-01

    Obesity is, in part, a result of positive energy balance or energy intake exceeding physiological needs. Excess energy intake is determined by a series of food choices over time. These choices involve both motivational and executive function processes. Problems arise when there is excessive motivation to eat and low impulse control, a situation we have termed reinforcement pathology. Motivational and executive function processes have also been implicated in the development of drug dependence and addiction. In this review we discuss the application of reinforcement pathology to obesity, and implications of this approach for obesity treatment.

  11. Obesity and diabetes.

    PubMed

    Riobó Serván, Pilar

    2013-09-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is characterized by hyperglycemia, insulin resistance, and relative impairment in insulin secretion and its possible long term complications. Its pathogenesis is poorly understood, but both genetic and environmental factors, such as obesity and aging, play a key role. "Diabesity" is a new term which refers to diabetes occurring in the context of obesity. In this article, we will discuss the epidemiology and impact of diabetes and obesity and will also outline the components of the metabolic syndrome and the studies that demonstrate that screening and prevention are possible in an attempt to control this epidemic.

  12. Nutrition in pregnancy and early childhood and associations with obesity in developing countries.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhenyu; Huffman, Sandra L

    2013-01-01

    Concerns about the increasing rates of obesity in developing countries have led many policy makers to question the impacts of maternal and early child nutrition on risk of later obesity. The purposes of the review are to summarise the studies on the associations between nutrition during pregnancy and infant feeding practices with later obesity from childhood through adulthood and to identify potential ways for preventing obesity in developing countries. As few studies were identified in developing countries, key studies in developed countries were included in the review. Poor prenatal dietary intakes of energy, protein and micronutrients were shown to be associated with increased risk of adult obesity in offspring. Female offspring seem to be more vulnerable than male offspring when their mothers receive insufficient energy during pregnancy. By influencing birthweight, optimal prenatal nutrition might reduce the risk of obesity i