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Sample records for obesity diabetes hypertension

  1. Diabetes screening: a pending issue in hypertense/obese patients

    PubMed Central

    Sepehri, Armina; Gil-Guillén, Vicente Francisco; Ramírez-Prado, Dolores; Navarro-Cremades, Felipe; Cortés, Ernesto; Rizo-Baeza, María Mercedes

    2015-01-01

    The literature about possible cardiovascular consequences of diagnostic inertia in diabetes is scarce. We examined the influence of undetected high fasting blood glucose (FBG) levels on the cardiovascular risk and poor control of cardiovascular risk factors in hypertensive or obese patients, with no previous diagnosis of diabetes mellitus (i.e., diagnostic inertia). A cross-sectional study during a preventive program in a Spanish region was performed in 2003–2004. The participants were aged ≥40 years and did not have diabetes but were hypertensive (n = 5, 347) or obese (n = 7, 833). The outcomes were high cardiovascular risk (SCORE ≥5%), poor control of the blood pressure (≥140/90 mmHg) and class II obesity. The relationship was examined between FBG and the main parameters, calculating the adjusted odd ratios with multivariate models. Higher values of FBG were associated with all the outcomes. A more proactive attitude towards the diagnosis of diabetes mellitus in the hypertensive and obese population should be adopted. PMID:25922799

  2. Family history: an opportunity for early interventions and improved control of hypertension, obesity and diabetes.

    PubMed Central

    van der Sande, M. A.; Walraven, G. E.; Milligan, P. J.; Banya, W. A.; Ceesay, S. M.; Nyan, O. A.; McAdam, K. P.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine whether a family history of high-risk groups for major noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) was a significant risk factor for these conditions among family members in a study population in the Gambia, where strong community and family coherence are important determinants that have to be taken into consideration in promoting lifestyle changes. METHODS: We questioned 5389 adults as to any first-degree family history of major noncommunicable diseases (hypertension, obesity, diabetes and stroke), and measured their blood pressure (BP) and body mass index (BMI). Total blood cholesterol, triglyceride, uric acid, and creatinine concentrations were measured in a stratified subsample, as well as blood glucose (2 hours after ingesting 75 g glucose) in persons aged > or = 35 years. FINDINGS: A significant number of subjects reported a family history of hypertension (8.0%), obesity (5.4%), diabetes (3.3%) and stroke (1.4%), with 14.6% of participants reporting any of these NCDs. Subjects with a family history of hypertension had a higher diastolic BP and BMI, higher cholesterol and uric acid concentrations, and an increased risk of obesity. Those with a family history of obesity had a higher BMI and were at increased risk of obesity. Individuals with a family history of diabetes had a higher BMI and higher concentrations of glucose, cholesterol, triglycerides and uric acid, and their risk of obesity and diabetes was increased. Subjects with a family history of stroke had a higher BMI, as well as higher cholesterol, triglyceride and uric acid concentrations. CONCLUSIONS: A family history of hypertension, obesity, diabetes, or stroke was a significant risk factor for obesity and hyperlipidaemia. With increase of age, more pathological manifestations can develop in this high-risk group. Health professionals should therefore utilize every opportunity to include direct family members in health education. PMID:11357211

  3. Baroreflex sensitivity in children and adolescents: physiology, hypertension, obesity, diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Honzíková, N; Závodná, E

    2016-12-13

    The increased prevalence of obesity in children and its complications have led to a greater interest in studying baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) in children. This review of BRS in children and adolescents includes subtopics on: 1. Resting values of BRS and their reproducibility, 2. Genetics of BRS, 3. The role of a primarily low BRS and obesity in the development of hypertension, and 4. Association of diabetes mellitus, BRS, and obesity. The conclusions specific to this age follow from this review: 1. The mean heart rate (HR) influences the measurement of BRS. Since the mean HR decreases during adolescence, HR should be taken into account. 2. A genetic dependency of BRS was found. 3. Low BRS values may precede pathological blood-pressure elevation in children with white-coat hypertension. We hypothesize that low BRS plays an active role in the emergence of hypertension in youth. A contribution of obesity to the development of hypertension was also found. We hypothesize that both factors, a primarily low BRS and obesity, are partially independent risk factors for hypertension in youths. 4. In diabetics, a low BRS compared to healthy children can be associated with insulin resistance. A reversibility of the BRS values could be possible after weight loss.

  4. Obesity, diabetes, hypertension, and vegetarian status among Seventh-Day Adventists in Barbados: preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Brathwaite, Noel; Fraser, Henry S; Modeste, Naomi; Broome, Hedy; King, Rosaline

    2003-01-01

    A population-based sample of Seventh-Day Adventists was studied to determine the relationship between vegetarian status, body mass index (BMI), obesity, diabetes mellitus (DM), and hypertension, in order to gain a better understanding of factors influencing chronic diseases in Barbados. A systematic sampling from a random start technique was used to select participants for the study. A standard questionnaire was used to collect data on demographic and lifestyle characteristics, to record anthropometrics and blood pressure measurements, and to ascertain the hypertension and diabetes status of participants. The sample population consisted of 407 Barbadian Seventh-Day Adventists (SDAs), who ranged in age from 25 to 74 years. One hundred fifty-three (37.6%) participants were male, and 254 (62.4%) were female, and 43.5% were vegetarians. The prevalence rates of diabetes and hypertension were lower among long-term vegetarians, compared to non-vegetarians, and long-term vegetarians were, on average, leaner than non-vegetarians within the same cohort. A significant association was observed between a vegetarian diet and obesity (vegetarian by definition P=.04, self-reported vegetarian P=.009) in this population. Other components of the study population lifestyle should be further analyzed to determine the roles they may plan in lessening the prevalence rates of obesity, diabetes, and hypertension.

  5. Obesity and hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Shu-Zhong; Lu, Wen; Zong, Xue-Feng; Ruan, Hong-Yun; Liu, Yi

    2016-01-01

    The imbalance between energy intake and expenditure is the main cause of excessive overweight and obesity. Technically, obesity is defined as the abnormal accumulation of ≥20% of body fat, over the individual's ideal body weight. The latter constitutes the maximal healthful value for an individual that is calculated based chiefly on the height, age, build and degree of muscular development. However, obesity is diagnosed by measuring the weight in relation to the height of an individual, thereby determining or calculating the body mass index. The National Institutes of Health have defined 30 kg/m2 as the limit over which an individual is qualified as obese. Accordingly, the prevalence of obesity in on the increase in children and adults worldwide, despite World Health Organization warnings. The growth of obesity and the scale of associated health issues induce serious consequences for individuals and governmental health systems. Excessive overweight remains among the most neglected public health issues worldwide, while obesity is associated with increasing risks of disability, illness and death. Cardiovascular diseases, the leading cause of mortality worldwide, particularly hypertension and diabetes, are the main illnesses associated with obesity. Nevertheless, the mechanisms underlying obesity-associated hypertension or other associated metabolic diseases remains to be adequately investigated. In the present review, we addressed the association between obesity and cardiovascular disease, particularly the biological mechanisms linking obesity and hypertension. PMID:27703502

  6. The diabetes-obesity-hypertension nexus in Qatar: evidence from the World Health Survey

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background As countries develop economically, an “epidemiological transition” occurs whereby a set of chronic diseases increasingly becomes a country’s health challenge. Against this background, this paper examines the most common conditions associated with the prevalence of diabetes in Qatar, with a specific focus on the diabetes-obesity-hypertension nexus. Methods We analyzed data from the World Health Organization’s World Health Survey conducted in the State of Qatar in 2006. The survey included demographic, anthropometric, and blood chemistry measurements. Using multivariate logistical regression analysis, we assessed the most common conditions associated with diabetes, using both objective and subjective measures of diabetes. The objective measures relied on random blood sugar tests, and the subjective measure included respondents who affirmatively answered the question on diabetes diagnosis. We repeated our analysis on respondents who had blood glucose levels high enough to be considered diabetic/glucose intolerant but did not answer affirmatively on the question of diabetes diagnosis. Results When using the objective measure of diabetes, the following conditions appeared significant: obesity (OR = 1.5, 95% CI = 1.2 – 1.9), higher income (OR = 1.4, 95% CI = 1.0 – 1.9), high cholesterol (OR = 1.4, 95% CI = 1.0 – 1.9), having Qatari origin (OR = 1.3, 95% CI = 1.0 – 1.7), and increasing systolic blood pressure (SBP) 120–139 mmHg (OR = 1.5, 95% CI = 1.2 – 2.0), SBP 140–159 mmHg (OR = 2.2, 95% CI = 1.6 – 3.1), SBP > 160 mmHg (OR = 3.2, 95% CI = 2.0 – 5.3). Similar results were obtained using the subjective measure of diabetes as a dependent variable. When applied to the group of respondents that included pre-diabetics and those who did not know they were diabetic, obesity and hypertension appeared as the only statistically significant explanatory variables. Conclusion High

  7. Differences in the management of hypertension, diabetes mellitus and dyslipidemia between obesity classes.

    PubMed

    Martínez-St John, D R J; Palazón-Bru, A; Gil-Guillén, V F; Sepehri, A; Navarro-Cremades, F; Orozco-Beltrán, D; Carratalá-Munuera, C; Cortés, E; Rizo-Baeza, M M

    2016-01-01

    We did not find any paper that assessed clinical inertia in obese patients. Therefore, no paper has compared the clinical inertia rates between morbidly and nonmorbidly obese patients. A cross-sectional observational study was carried out. We analysed 8687 obese patients ⩾40 years of age who attended their health-care center for a checkup as part of a preventive program. The outcome was morbid obesity. Secondary variables were as follows: failure in the management of high blood pressure (HBP), high blood cholesterol (HBC) and high fasting blood glucose (HFBG); gender; personal history of hypertension, dyslipidemia, diabetes, smoking and cardiovascular disease; and age (years). We analysed the association between failures and morbid obesity by calculating the adjusted odds ratio (OR). Of 8687 obese patients, 421 had morbid obesity (4.8%, 95% confidence interval (CI): 4.4-5.3%). The prevalence rates for failures were as follows: HBP, 34.7%; HBC, 35.2%; and HFBG, 12.4%. Associated factors with morbid obesity related with failures were as follows: failure in the management of HBP (OR=1.42, 95% CI: 1.15-1.74, P=0.001); failure in the management of HBC (OR=0.73, 95% CI: 0.58-0.91, P=0.004); and failure in the management of HFBG (OR=2.24, 95% CI: 1.66-3.03, P<0.001). Morbidly obese patients faced worse management for HBP and HFBG, and better management for HBC. It would be interesting to integrate alarm systems to avoid this problem.

  8. [Overweight, obesity, diabetes, and hypertension in endometrial cancer].

    PubMed

    Sanz-Chávez, Tania L N; Vilar-Compte, Diana; de Nicola-Delfín, Luigina; Meneses-García, Abelardo

    2013-01-01

    Introducción: en mujeres posmenopáusicas, el exceso de grasa ha sido asociado con un incremento del riesgo de padecer cáncer de endometrio. El objetivo del estudio fue conocer la frecuencia de sobrepeso, obesidad, diabetes e hipertensión en pacientes con cáncer de endometrio. Métodos: se obtuvieron datos demográficos, clínicos, de laboratorio e histopatológicos de los expedientes electrónicos de las pacientes con diagnóstico de cáncer de endometrio en el periodo comprendido de enero del 2009 a julio del 2011. Posteriormente, se efectuó un análisis descriptivo de la información. Resultados: se incluyó un total de 274 expedientes. El promedio de edad de las pacientes fue de 54 años. El 50.4 % eran posmenopáusicas. En el momento del diagnóstico, 112 casos (48.6 %) se encontraban en etapa clínica I. Del total de pacientes, 104 (37.9 %) presentaron diabetes mellitus, 122 (44.5 %) hipertensión arterial, 194 (72.6 %) sobrepeso u obesidad, y se registraron 24 casos con síndrome metabólico. Conclusiones: para este diagnóstico, los resultados muestran un mayor número de casos de sobrepeso y obesidad en comparación con otros países. Es necesario que se hagan más estudios para evaluar la relación del exceso de grasa como factor de riesgo para el cáncer de endometrio.

  9. [Hyperinsulinemia--the common denominator in type II diabetes mellitus,obesity, hypertension, hypertriglyceridemia and atherosclerosis].

    PubMed

    Málková, J; Andĕl, M; Stolba, P; Kimlová, I

    1994-01-17

    During the last twenty years we witnessed a remarkable increase in knowledge of the mechanism as regards insulin action, the central hormone of metabolic regulations. Interest in cellular and molecular mechanisms of action was conditioned by a high prevalence of insulin resistance and the fact that insulin resistance holds a key position in the pathogenesis of many diseases, in particular atherosclerosis, obesity, hypertension, diabetes mellitus type II, ovarian hyperandrogenism and others. The syndrome of hyperinsulinaemia/insulin resistance is the basic component of the so-called X syndrome defined in 1988 by Reaven. It is encountered in subjects with a normal glucose tolerance but a predisposition for diabetes type II. If this disposition, probably genetic by nature, is potentiated by the central type of obesity and a sedentary lifestyle it can influence the development of hypertension and dyslipidemia. The sum of these factors promotes acceleration of atherosclerosis and frequently its premature manifestations: myocardial infarction and other cardiovascular diseases which hold the first place as regards causes of death on a world wide scale. It is important to identify but also to treat this complex not only metabolic risk factors for macrovascular diseases. It is a paradox that some drugs used as antihypertensives can cause deterioration of insulin resistance, subsequently influence in an adverse manner dyslipidemia and thus increase the metabolic risk of cardiovascular diseases. In the submitted paper the authors tried to summarize hitherto expressed views on the syndrome of hyperinsulinaemia and insulin resistance, using as a basic the results of their own work.

  10. Diabetes, gallbladder disease, obesity, and hypertension among Hispanics in New Mexico.

    PubMed

    Samet, J M; Coultas, D B; Howard, C A; Skipper, B J; Hanis, C L

    1988-12-01

    Because Hispanics in the Southwest are genetically admixed with American Indians, the hypothesis has been advanced that the excess occurrence of diabetes mellitus, obesity, and gallbladder disease in this ethnic group may be genetic in origin and results from genes derived from American Indians. This report describes the prevalence of these diseases in 1,175 adult Hispanic participants in a survey of a New Mexico community conducted in 1984-1985. At nearly all ages, the majority of subjects had a body mass index of 25 kg/m2 or greater, and a substantial proportion exceeded 30 kg/m2. The prevalence of obesity was much greater in these Hispanics than is shown in nationwide data for US whites. Diabetes mellitus was also reported more often by Hispanic subjects in this survey than by US whites nationwide. A report of gallbladder trouble or of gallbladder removal was common in both males and females; the prevalence of gallbladder removal was as high in this population as in Mexican Americans previously studied in Starr County, Texas. In spite of the high prevalence of obesity, hypertension was less frequent among the New Mexico Hispanics than is shown in nationwide data for US whites. These findings complement those of previous surveys in Texas, which have shown a notably high proportion of adults to be obese, to have non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, and to have gallbladder disease. The similar epidemiology of these diseases in the Hispanics of New Mexico and the Mexican Americans of Texas supports the hypothesis that American Indian admixture underlies the development of these conditions in Hispanics throughout the Southwest.

  11. Improvement of diabetes, obesity and hypertension in type 2 diabetic KKA{sup y} mice by bis(allixinato)oxovanadium(IV) complex

    SciTech Connect

    Adachi, Yusuke; Yoshikawa, Yutaka; Yoshida, Jiro; Kodera, Yukihiro . E-mail: kodera_y@wakunaga.co.jp; Katoh, Akira . E-mail: katoh@st.seikei.ac.jp; Takada, Jitsuya . E-mail: takada@hl.rri.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Sakurai, Hiromu . E-mail: sakurai@mb.kyoto-phu.ac.jp

    2006-07-07

    Previously, we found that bis(allixinato)oxovanadium(IV) (VO(alx){sub 2}) exhibits a potent hypoglycemic activity in type 1-like diabetic mice. Since the enhancement of insulin sensitivity is involved in one of the mechanisms by which vanadium exerts its anti-diabetic effects, VO(alx){sub 2} was further tested in type 2 diabetes with low insulin sensitivity. The effect of oral administration of VO(alx){sub 2} was examined in obesity-linked type 2 diabetic KKA{sup y} mice. Treatment of VO(alx){sub 2} for 4 weeks normalized hyperglycemia, glucose intolerance, hyperinsulinemia, hypercholesterolemia and hypertension in KKA{sup y} mice; however, it had no effect on hypoadiponectinemia. VO(alx){sub 2} also improved hyperleptinemia, following attenuation of obesity in KKA{sup y} mice. This is the first example in which a vanadium compound improved leptin resistance in type 2 diabetes by oral administration. On the basis of these results, VO(alx){sub 2} is proposed to enhance not only insulin sensitivity but also leptin sensitivity, which in turn improves diabetes, obesity and hypertension in an obesity-linked type 2 diabetic animal.

  12. Regional variation in the prevalence of overweight/obesity, hypertension and diabetes and their correlates among the adult rural population in India.

    PubMed

    Meshram, I I; Vishnu Vardhana Rao, M; Sudershan Rao, V; Laxmaiah, A; Polasa, K

    2016-04-14

    A community-based, cross-sectional study was carried out in five regions of India by adopting a multistage random sampling procedure. Information was collected from the participants about socio-demographic particulars such as age, sex, occupation, education, etc. Anthropometric measurements such as height, weight and waist and hip circumferences were measured and three measurements of blood pressure were obtained. Fasting blood sugar was assessed using a Glucometer. Data analysis was done using descriptive statistics, χ(2) test for association and logistic regression analysis. A total of 7531 subjects were covered for anthropometry and blood pressure. The overall prevalence of overweight/obesity and abdominal obesity was 29 and 21%, respectively, and was higher in the Southern region (40% each) as compared with other regions. The prevalence of hypertension was 18 and 16% and diabetes was 9·5% each among men and women, respectively. The risk of hypertension and diabetes was significantly higher among adults from the Southern and Western regions, the among elderly, among overweight/obese individuals and those with abdominal obesity. In conclusion, the prevalence of overweight/obesity and hypertension was higher in the Southern region, whereas diabetes was higher in the Southern and Western regions. Factors such as increasing age, male sex, overweight/obesity, and abdominal obesity were important risk factors for hypertension and diabetes. Appropriate health and nutrition education should be given to the community to control these problems.

  13. [Obesity and hypertension].

    PubMed

    Simonyi, Gábor; Kollár, Réka

    2013-11-03

    The frequency of hypertension and obesity is gradually growing in Hungary. At present 68.5% of men and 78% of women are obese. Hypertension and obesity are the most important risk factors of morbidity and mortality from cardiovascular disease. The relationship between increased sympathetic activity and hypertension is well known. Waist circumference and body fat mass correlate significantly with sympathetic activity, in which hyperlipidemia plays also a role. The increased activity of renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system via its vascular and renal effects also contributes to an increase of blood pressure. Increased sympathetic activity with decreasing vagal tone accompanying the imbalance of the autonomous nervous system is independent and significant risk factor of cardiovascular events including sudden cardiac death.

  14. [Obesity, hypertension, and diabetes mellitus among school children in Ouagadougou (Burkina Faso)].

    PubMed

    Ye, D; Drabo, Y J; Ouedraogo, D; Samandoulougou, A; Sawadogo, A

    2001-01-01

    This paper deals with the findings of a survey conducted at the school environnement in Ouagadougou. Three factors of cardiovascular risks were identified: obesity, high blood pressure, and diabete millitus. The survey was based on a sample of 1470 students from primary and secondary schools consisted in taking their blood pressure, measuring they weight and height and glycaemia using dextrostix. Of the 1470 students targeted, 668 were girls and 782 were boys. Their age ranges between 4 and 25 years with average age of 13.8 years. 55 % of the students had an average socio-economic backgrounds. 58 students or 3.94% had high blood pressure including 50 cases of maximum high blood pressure and 8 cases of confirmed high blood pressure (HBP). A diastolic HBP predominance among 48 cases or 3.26% was also recorded. While 1 case showed systolic HBP, 6 were systolo-diastolic. The quetelet index used to determine obesity revealed 28 cases of excess in weight or 1.90% of the cases and 4 cases of obesity, or 0.28%. The predominance of excess in weight was statistically significant among girls. Only 1 case of obesity was associated with high blood pressure. No case of diabetes was identified. The factors of cardiovascular risk seem to be statistically important in school environnement in Ouagadougou. However, an muticentered study is recommended, as it will lead to an exhaustive knowledge of the prevalence of these factors of cardiovascular risk.

  15. Body weight control by a high-carbohydrate/low-fat diet slows the progression of diabetic kidney damage in an obese, hypertensive, type 2 diabetic rat model.

    PubMed

    Ohtomo, Shuichi; Izuhara, Yuko; Nangaku, Masaomi; Dan, Takashi; Ito, Sadayoshi; van Ypersele de Strihou, Charles; Miyata, Toshio

    2010-01-01

    Obesity is one of several factors implicated in the genesis of diabetic nephropathy (DN). Obese, hypertensive, type 2 diabetic rats SHR/NDmcr-cp were given, for 12 weeks, either a normal, middle-carbohydrate/middle-fat diet (MC/MF group) or a high-carbohydrate/low-fat diet (HC/LF group). Daily caloric intake was the same in both groups. Nevertheless, the HC/LF group gained less weight. Despite equivalent degrees of hypertension, hyperglycemia, hyperlipidemia, hyperinsulinemia, and even a poorer glycemic control, the HC/LF group had less severe renal histological abnormalities and a reduced intrarenal advanced glycation and oxidative stress. Mediators of the renoprotection, specifically linked to obesity and body weight control, include a reduced renal inflammation and TGF-beta expression, together with an enhanced level of adiponectin. Altogether, these data identify a specific role of body weight control by a high-carbohydrate/low-fat diet in the progression of DN. Body weight control thus impacts on local intrarenal advanced glycation and oxidative stress through inflammation and adiponectin levels.

  16. Short and long sleep are positively associated with obesity, diabetes, hypertension, and cardiovascular disease among adults in the United States.

    PubMed

    Buxton, Orfeu M; Marcelli, Enrico

    2010-09-01

    Research associates short (and to a lesser extent long) sleep duration with obesity, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease; and although 7-8 h of sleep seems to confer the least health risk, these findings are often based on non-representative data. We hypothesize that short sleep (<7 h) and long sleep (>8 h) are positively associated with the risk of obesity, diabetes, hypertension, and cardiovascular disease; and analyze 2004-2005 US National Health Interview Survey data (n=56,507 observations, adults 18-85) to test this. We employ multilevel logistic regression, simultaneously controlling for individual characteristics (e.g., ethnoracial group, gender, age, education), other health behaviors (e.g., exercise, smoking), family environment (e.g., income, size, education) and geographic context (e.g., census region). Our model correctly classified at least 76% of adults on each of the outcomes studied, and sleep duration was frequently more strongly associated with these health risks than other covariates. These findings suggest a 7-8 h sleep duration directly and indirectly reduces chronic disease risk.

  17. Obesity: A Perspective from Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Susic, Dinko; Varagic, Jasmina

    2017-01-01

    The prevalence of obesity-related hypertension is high worldwide and has become a major health issue. The mechanisms by which obesity relates to hypertensive disease are still under intense research scrutiny, and include altered hemodynamics, impaired sodium homeostasis, renal dysfunction, autonomic nervous system imbalance, endocrine alterations, oxidative stress and inflammation, and vascular injury. Most of these contributing factors interact with each other at multiple levels. Thus, as a multifactorial and complex disease, obesity-related hypertension should be recognized as a distinctive form of hypertension, and specific considerations should apply in planning therapeutic approaches to treat obese individuals with high blood pressure.

  18. New developments in the pathogenesis of obesity-induced hypertension.

    PubMed

    Kotsis, Vasilios; Nilsson, Peter; Grassi, Guido; Mancia, Giuseppe; Redon, Josep; Luft, Frank; Schmieder, Roland; Engeli, Stefan; Stabouli, Stella; Antza, Christina; Pall, Denes; Schlaich, Markus; Jordan, Jens

    2015-08-01

    Obesity is a disorder that develops from the interaction between genotype and environment involving social, behavioral, cultural, and physiological factors. Obesity increases the risk for type 2 diabetes mellitus, hypertension, cardiovascular disease, cancer, musculoskeletal disorders, chronic kidney and pulmonary disease. Although obesity is clearly associated with an increased prevalence of hypertension, many obese individuals may not develop hypertension. Protecting factors may exist and it is important to understand why obesity is not always related to hypertension. The aim of this review is to highlight the knowledge gap for the association between obesity, hypertension, and potential genetic and racial differences or environmental factors that may protect obese patients against the development of hypertension and other co-morbidities. Specific mutations in the leptin and the melaninocortin receptor genes in animal models of obesity without hypertension, the actions of α-melanocyte stimulating hormone, and SNS activity in obesity-related hypertension may promote recognition of protective and promoting factors for hypertension in obesity. Furthermore, gene-environment interactions may have the potential to modify gene expression and epigenetic mechanisms could also contribute to the heritability of obesity-induced hypertension. Finally, differences in nutrition, gut microbiota, exposure to sun light and exercise may play an important role in the presence or absence of hypertension in obesity.

  19. Telmisartan/hydrochlorothiazide versus valsartan/hydrochlorothiazide in obese hypertensive patients with type 2 diabetes: the SMOOTH study

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Arya M; Davidson, Jaime; Koval, Stephen; Lacourcière, Yves

    2007-01-01

    Background The Study of Micardis (telmisartan) in Overweight/Obese patients with Type 2 diabetes and Hypertension (SMOOTH) compared hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ) plus telmisartan or valsartan fixed-dose combination therapies on early morning blood pressure (BP), using ambulatory BP monitoring (ABPM). Methods SMOOTH was a prospective, randomized, open-label, blinded-endpoint, multicentre trial. After a 2- to 4-week, single-blind, placebo run-in period, patients received once-daily telmisartan 80 mg or valsartan 160 mg for 4 weeks, with add-on HCTZ 12.5 mg for 6 weeks (T/HCTZ or V/HCTZ, respectively). At baseline and week 10, ambulatory blood pressure (ABP) was measured every 20 min and hourly means were calculated. The primary endpoint was change from baseline in mean ambulatory systolic and diastolic blood pressure (SBP; DBP) during the last 6 hours of the 24-hour dosing interval. Results In total, 840 patients were randomized. At week 10, T/HCTZ provided significantly greater reductions versus V/HCTZ in the last 6 hours mean ABP (differences in favour of T/HCTZ: SBP 3.9 mm Hg, p < 0.0001; DBP 2.0 mm Hg, p = 0.0007). T/HCTZ also produced significantly greater reductions than V/HCTZ in 24-hour mean ABP (differences in favour of T/HCTZ: SBP 3.0 mm Hg, p = 0.0002; DBP 1.6 mm Hg, p = 0.0006) and during the morning, daytime and night-time periods (p < 0.003). Both treatments were well tolerated. Conclusion In high-risk, overweight/obese patients with hypertension and type 2 diabetes, T/HCTZ provides significantly greater BP lowering versus V/HCTZ throughout the 24-hour dosing interval, particularly during the hazardous early morning hours. PMID:17910747

  20. Association of Angiotensin Converting Enzyme Insertion-Deletion Polymorphism with Hypertension in Emiratis with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Its Interaction with Obesity Status

    PubMed Central

    Alsafar, Habiba; Hassoun, Ahmed; Almazrouei, Shaikha; Kamal, Wala; Almaini, Mustafa; Odama, Unini; Rais, Naushad

    2015-01-01

    The association of Angiotensin Converting Enzyme (ACE) insertion-deletion (I/D) polymorphism with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM) and hypertension has been extensively studied throughout various ethnic populations but largely with inconsistent findings. We investigated these associations in Emirati population and their interaction with obesity status. Saliva samples were collected from a total of 564 Emiratis (277 T2DM and 297 healthy). DNA was extracted and the samples were genotyped for ACE I/D polymorphism by a PCR based method followed by gel electrophoresis. Upon evaluation of the ACE I/D polymorphism amongst all T2DM, hypertensive patients, and respective controls regardless of obesity status, ACE DD genotype was not found to be associated with either T2DM [odds ratio (OR) = 1.34, p = 0.086] or hypertension [odd ratio (OR) = 1.02, p = 0.93]. When the genetic variants amongst the nonobese and obese population were analyzed separately, the risk genotype ACE DD conferred significantly increased risk of hypertension in nonobese population [odds ratio (OR) = 1.80, p = 0.02] but was found to be protective against the hypertension in the obese group ((OR) = 0.54, p = 0.01). However, there was no effect of obesity status on the association of ACE genotypes with T2DM. The risk of hypertension associated with ACE DD is modulated by obesity status and hence future genetic association studies should take obesity into account for the interpretation of data. We also confirmed that ACE I/D polymorphism is not associated with T2DM risk in Emirati population. PMID:26491214

  1. [Pathophysiology of hypertension secondary to obesity].

    PubMed

    García Casilimas, Guihovany Alberto; Martin, Daniel Augusto; Martínez, María Alejandra; Merchán, Claudia Rocío; Mayorga, Carol Anne; Barragán, Andrés Felipe

    2017-03-02

    The obesity is a problem of high morbidity and mortality around the world. Nowadays, has been constituted as a cardiovascular risk factor, often it predisposes to the development of many diseases that diminish quality of life, such as hypertension, dyslipidemia and diabetes. These diseases are related with some of the criteria that should be considered in the diagnosis of metabolic syndrome. During this review, we are going to explain the relationship between obesity, metabolic syndrome and the development of hypertension from neurohumoral, biochemical and mechanical concepts.

  2. Linkage analysis of quantitative traits for obesity, diabetes, hypertension, and dyslipidemia on the island of Kosrae, Federated States of Micronesia.

    PubMed

    Shmulewitz, Dvora; Heath, Simon C; Blundell, Maude L; Han, Zhihua; Sharma, Ratnendra; Salit, Jacqueline; Auerbach, Steven B; Signorini, Stefano; Breslow, Jan L; Stoffel, Markus; Friedman, Jeffrey M

    2006-03-07

    Obesity, diabetes, hypertension, and heart disease are highly heritable conditions that in aggregate are the major causes of morbidity and mortality in the developed world and are growing problems in developing countries. To map the causal genes, we conducted a population screen for these conditions on the Pacific Island of Kosrae. Family history and genetic data were used to construct a pedigree for the island. Analysis of the pedigree showed highly significant heritability for the metabolic traits under study. DNA samples from 2,188 participants were genotyped with 405 microsatellite markers with an average intermarker distance of 11 cM. A protocol using loki, a Markov chain Monte Carlo sampling method, was developed to analyze the Kosraen pedigree for height, a model quantitative trait. Robust quantitative trait loci for height were found on 10q21 and 1p31. This protocol was used to map a set of metabolic traits, including plasma leptin to chromosome region 5q35; systolic blood pressure to 20p12; total cholesterol to 19p13, 12q24, and 16qter; hip circumference to 10q25 and 4q23; body mass index to 18p11 and 20q13; apolipoprotein B to 2p24-25; weight to 18q21; and fasting blood sugar to 1q31-1q43. Several of these same chromosomal regions have been identified in previous studies validating the use of loki. These studies add information about the genetics of the metabolic syndrome and establish an analytical approach for linkage analysis of complex pedigrees. These results also lay the foundation for whole genome scans with dense sets of SNPs aimed to identifying causal genes.

  3. Treatment of obesity-related hypertension in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Halbach, Susan M; Flynn, Joseph

    2013-06-01

    The obesity epidemic has become a common concern among pediatricians, with an estimated 32 % of US children and adolescents classified as overweight and 18 % as obese. Along with the increase in obesity, a growing body of evidence demonstrates that chronic diseases, such as Type 2 diabetes, primary hypertension, and hyperlipidemia, once thought to be confined solely to adulthood, are commonly seen among the obese in childhood. Following a brief summary of the diagnosis and evaluation of hypertension in obese children and adolescents, this review will highlight recent research on the treatment of obesity-related hypertension. Pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic treatment will be discussed. Additionally, current and emerging therapies for the primary treatment of obesity in children and adolescents, which have been gaining in popularity, will be reviewed.

  4. [Mechanisms of hypertension in obesity].

    PubMed

    López de Fez, C M; Gaztelu, M T; Rubio, T; Castaño, A

    2004-01-01

    Obesity is a chronic disease, considered to be an important risk factor in the development of coronary disease, hypertension, renal insufficiency and failure. Obesity contributes to hypertension by mechanisms such as: insulinic resistance and hyperinsulinaemia, increase of adrenergic activity and of concentrations of aldosterone, retention of sodium and water and increase of cardiac wear, alteration of the endothelial function, through molecules such as leptin and adiponectin and genetic factors. Many paths of research remain open. The angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitors (ACEI) and/or the angiotensin II receptor antagonists (ARA II) are first choice medicines because of their beneficial effect on insulinic resistance and sympathetic activity.

  5. Mineralocorticoid receptor activation in obesity hypertension.

    PubMed

    Nagase, Miki; Fujita, Toshiro

    2009-08-01

    Obesity hypertension and metabolic syndrome have become major public health concerns. Nowadays, aldosterone is recognized as an important mediator of cardiovascular and renal damage. In the kidney, aldosterone injures glomerular visceral epithelial cells (podocytes), the final filtration barrier to plasma macromolecules, leading to proteinuria and glomerulosclerosis. Mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) antagonists effectively ameliorate proteinuria in patients or in animal models of hypertension, diabetes mellitus and chronic kidney disease (CKD), as well as in patients who experience 'aldosterone breakthrough.' Recently, clinical and experimental studies have shown that plasma aldosterone concentration is associated with obesity hypertension and metabolic syndrome. We showed that spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR)/cp, an experimental model of obesity hypertension and metabolic syndrome, are prone to glomerular podocyte injury, proteinuria and left ventricular diastolic dysfunction, especially when the animals are fed a high-salt diet. Inappropriate activation of the aldosterone/MR system underlies the renal and cardiac injuries. Adipocyte-derived aldosterone-releasing factors (ARFs), although still unidentified, may account for aldosterone excess and the resultant target organ complication in SHR/cp. On the other hand, recent studies have shown that MR activation triggers target organ disease even in normal or low aldosterone states. We identified a small GTP (guanosine triphosphate)-binding protein, Rac1, as a novel activator of MR, and showed that this ligand-independent MR activation by Rac1 contributes to the nephropathy of several CKD models. We expect that ARFs and Rac1 can be novel therapeutic targets for metabolic syndrome and CKD. Future large-scale clinical trials are awaited to prove the efficacy of MR blockade in patients with obesity hypertension and metabolic syndrome.

  6. Obesity and diabetes.

    PubMed

    Riobó Serván, Pilar

    2013-09-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is characterized by hyperglycemia, insulin resistance, and relative impairment in insulin secretion and its possible long term complications. Its pathogenesis is poorly understood, but both genetic and environmental factors, such as obesity and aging, play a key role. "Diabesity" is a new term which refers to diabetes occurring in the context of obesity. In this article, we will discuss the epidemiology and impact of diabetes and obesity and will also outline the components of the metabolic syndrome and the studies that demonstrate that screening and prevention are possible in an attempt to control this epidemic.

  7. Incidence and risk factors for diabetes, hypertension and obesity after liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Anastácio, Lucilene Rezende; Ribeiro, Hélem de Sena; Ferreira, Livia García; Lima, Agnaldo Soares; Vilela, Eduardo García; Toulson Davisson Correia, María Isabel

    2013-01-01

    Objetivo: Los trastornos metabólicos han sido ampliamente descritos en los pacientes sometidos al transplante hepático (TH). Material y métodos: La incidencia de hipertensión arterial, diabetes mellitus y obesidad además de los factores de riesgo se evaluaron en 144 pacientes post-TH al menos un año después del trasplante (59% hombres, edad promedio 54 años, mediana del tiempo desde el trasplante 4 años). Los factores de riesgo se evaluaron mediante análisis de regresión logística de acuerdo con variables demográficas, socioeconómicas, estilo de vida, así como variables clínicas, antropométricas y dietéticas. Resultados: La incidencia de hipertensión fue del 18,9%, la diabetes, el 14,0% y la obesidad, el 15,9%. Los factores de riesgo para la incidencia de la hipertensión fueron la obesidad abdominal (OR: 2,36, IC: 1,02-5,43, p < 0,05), los antecedentes familiares de hipertensión arterial (OR: 2,75, IC: 1,06-7,19, p < 0,05) y el uso de la ciclosporina (OR: 3,92, IC: 1,05-14,70, p < 0,05). Los factores de riesgo para la incidencia de diabetes fueron niveles más altos de glucosa en ayuno (mg/dL) pre-TH (OR: 1,04, IC: 1,01-1,06, p < 0,05) y el diagnóstico de cirrosis alcohólica como indicación de TH (OR: 2,54, IC: 0,84-7,72, p < 0,05). La incidencia de obesidad después del TH se relacionó con el bajo consumo de la leche (mL) (OR: 1,01, IC: 1,001-10,01, p < 0,05), donante con IMC más grande (kg/m(2)) (OR: 1,34, IC: 1,04-1,74; p < 0,05), mayor índice de masa corporal antes de la enfermedad hepática (kg/m(2)) (OR: 1,79, IC: 1,36-2,36, p < 0,01) y ingreso per cápita dos veces el sueldo mínimo (OR: 5,71, IC: 4,51- 6,86, p < 0,05). Conclusión: El TH se asoció con tasas significativamente más altas de hipertensión, diabetes y obesidad. La incidencia de estos trastornos se relacionó con la terapia inmunosupresora y otros factores de riesgo que comunes en la población general.

  8. Refeeding hypertension in dietary obesity

    SciTech Connect

    Ernsberger, P.; Nelson, D.O. )

    1988-01-01

    A novel model of nutritionally induced hypertension in the rat is described. Dietary obesity was produced by providing sweet milk in addition to regular chow, which elicited a 52% increase in caloric intake. Despite 54% greater body weight gain and 139% heavier retroperitoneal fat pads, 120 days of overfeeding failed to increase systolic pressure in the conscious state or mean arterial pressure under urethan anesthesia. In contrast, mild hypertension developed in intermittantly fasted obese animals. The first 4-day supplemented fast was initiated 4 wk after the introduction of sweet milk, when the animals were 47 g overweight relative to chow-fed controls. Thereafter, 4 days of starvation were alternated with 2 wk of refeeding for a total of 4 cycles. A rapid fall in systolic blood pressure accompanied the onset of supplemented fasting and was maintained thereafter. With refeeding, blood pressure rose precipitously, despite poststarvation anorexia. Blood pressure tended to rise slightly over the remainder of the realimentation period. After the 4th supplemented fast, hypertension was sustained during 30 days of refeeding. Cumulative caloric intake in starved-refed rats fell within 2% of that in chow-fed controls. Refeeding hypertension appeared to be due to increased sympathetic nervous activity, since (1) cardiac {beta}-adrenergic receptors were downregulated, as indicated by a 40% decrease in the maximum binding of ({sup 3}H)dihydroalpranolol; and (2) the decrease in heart rate as a result of {beta}-blockade was enhanced. Refeeding hypertension in the dietary obese rat may be a potential animal model for some forms of human obesity-related hypertension.

  9. Obesity-induced hypertension: interaction of neurohumoral and renal mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Hall, John E; do Carmo, Jussara M; da Silva, Alexandre A; Wang, Zhen; Hall, Michael E

    2015-03-13

    Excess weight gain, especially when associated with increased visceral adiposity, is a major cause of hypertension, accounting for 65% to 75% of the risk for human primary (essential) hypertension. Increased renal tubular sodium reabsorption impairs pressure natriuresis and plays an important role in initiating obesity hypertension. The mediators of abnormal kidney function and increased blood pressure during development of obesity hypertension include (1) physical compression of the kidneys by fat in and around the kidneys, (2) activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, and (3) increased sympathetic nervous system activity. Activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system is likely due, in part, to renal compression, as well as sympathetic nervous system activation. However, obesity also causes mineralocorticoid receptor activation independent of aldosterone or angiotensin II. The mechanisms for sympathetic nervous system activation in obesity have not been fully elucidated but may require leptin and activation of the brain melanocortin system. With prolonged obesity and development of target organ injury, especially renal injury, obesity-associated hypertension becomes more difficult to control, often requiring multiple antihypertensive drugs and treatment of other risk factors, including dyslipidemia, insulin resistance and diabetes mellitus, and inflammation. Unless effective antiobesity drugs are developed, the effect of obesity on hypertension and related cardiovascular, renal and metabolic disorders is likely to become even more important in the future as the prevalence of obesity continues to increase.

  10. The treatment of hypertension in obese patients.

    PubMed

    Wofford, Marion R; Smith, Grant; Minor, Deborah S

    2008-04-01

    Hypertension causes a significant disease burden in all racial and ethnic groups and is directly attributable to excess weight in most cases. The relationship between increasing body mass index and hypertension prevalence has been recognized for decades. Epidemiologic studies clearly demonstrate the correlation between body weight and blood pressure in obese and lean populations. Most patients with hypertension are overweight or obese, and loss of excess weight lowers blood pressure. Although the epidemiologic relationship is clear, the understanding of mechanisms linking hypertension and weight gain is still evolving. Lifestyle modifications and specific pharmacologic agents address many of the known mechanisms; however, blood pressure remains difficult to control in obese hypertensive patients. This review highlights the association of obesity and hypertension, identifies potential mechanisms for this association, and describes nonpharmacologic and pharmacologic strategies that offer potential benefits for the obese patient with hypertension.

  11. Effect of long chain omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids on inflammation and metabolic markers in hypertensive and/or diabetic obese adults: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Ellulu, Mohammed S.; Khaza'ai, Huzwah; Patimah, Ismail; Rahmat, Asmah; Abed, Yehia

    2016-01-01

    Background Obesity is a degree of excess weight that predisposes people to metabolic syndromes via an inflammatory mechanism. Hypertensive and diabetic people have higher risks of developing systemic inflammation. Long chain omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC ω-3 PUFAs) can reduce the cardiovascular events and help against inflammation. Objective To identify the effects of LC ω-3 PUFAs on reducing the levels of inflammatory markers on hypertensive and/or diabetic obese adults. Materials and methods Sixty-four patients, who were hypertensive and/or diabetic obese with high levels of inflammatory markers, from primary healthcare centers of Gaza City, Palestine, enrolled in two groups of an open-label, parallel, randomized, controlled trial for 8 weeks. Thirty-three patients were in the control group, and 31 patients were in the experimental group. The experimental group was treated with a daily dose of 300 mg eicosapentaenoic acid and 200 mg of docosahexaenoic acid. Results Treatment with LC ω-3 PUFAs significantly reduced the level of high sensitivity C reactive protein (hs-CRP) [14.78±10.7 to 8.49±6.69 mg/L, p<0.001], fasting blood glucose (FBG) [178.13±58.54 to 157.32±59.77 mg/dL, p=0.024], and triglyceride (TG) [209.23±108.3 to 167.0±79.9 mg/dL, p<0.05] after 8 weeks of treatment, whereas no significant changes appeared in interleukin 6 (IL-6) and total cholesterol (TC). In the control group, significant reduction was detected for FBG [187.15±64.8 to 161.91±37.9 mg/dL, p<0.05] and TG [202.91±107.0 to 183.45±95.82 mg/dL, p<0.05], and no changes for hs-CRP, IL-6, or TC. By comparing the experimental group with the changes of control group at the endpoint, LC ω-3 PUFAs did not reach the clinical significance in treating effectiveness for any of the clinical variables. Conclusion LC ω-3 PUFAs have recommended effects on health; the obtained results can improve the role of LC ω-3 PUFAs as a protective factor on inflammation and metabolic

  12. Mechanisms of endothelial dysfunction in obesity-associated hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Lobato, N.S.; Filgueira, F.P.; Akamine, E.H.; Tostes, R.C.; Carvalho, M.H.C.; Fortes, Z.B.

    2012-01-01

    Obesity is strongly associated with high blood pressure, dyslipidemia, and type 2 diabetes. These conditions synergistically increase the risk of cardiovascular events. A number of central and peripheral abnormalities can explain the development or maintenance of high blood pressure in obesity. Of great interest is endothelial dysfunction, considered to be a primary risk factor in the development of hypertension. Additional mechanisms also related to endothelial dysfunction have been proposed to mediate the development of hypertension in obese individuals. These include: increase in both peripheral vasoconstriction and renal tubular sodium reabsorption, increased sympathetic activity and overactivation of both the renin-angiotensin system and the endocannabinoid system and insulin resistance. The discovery of new mechanisms regulating metabolic and vascular function and a better understanding of how vascular function can be influenced by these systems would facilitate the development of new therapies for treatment of obesity-associated hypertension. PMID:22488221

  13. Methylglyoxal, obesity, and diabetes.

    PubMed

    Matafome, Paulo; Sena, Cristina; Seiça, Raquel

    2013-06-01

    Methylglyoxal (MG) is a highly reactive compound derived mainly from glucose and fructose metabolism. This metabolite has been implicated in diabetic complications as it is a strong AGE precursor. Furthermore, recent studies suggested a role for MG in insulin resistance and beta-cell dysfunction. Although several drugs have been developed in the recent years to scavenge MG and inhibit AGE formation, we are still far from having an effective strategy to prevent MG-induced mechanisms. This review summarizes the mechanisms of MG formation, detoxification, and action. Furthermore, we review the current knowledge about its implication on the pathophysiology and complications of obesity and diabetes.

  14. Masked Hypertension in Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Franklin, Stanley S.; Thijs, Lutgarde; Li, Yan; Hansen, Tine W.; Boggia, José; Liu, Yanping; Asayama, Kei; Björklund-Bodegård, Kristina; Ohkubo, Takayoshi; Jeppesen, Jørgen; Torp-Pedersen, Christian; Dolan, Eamon; Kuznetsova, Tatiana; Stolarz-Skrzypek, Katarzyna; Tikhonoff, Valérie; Malyutina, Sofia; Casiglia, Edoardo; Nikitin, Yuri; Lind, Lars; Sandoya, Edgardo; Kawecka-Jaszcz, Kalina; Filipovský, Jan; Imai, Yutaka; Wang, Jiguang; Ibsen, Hans; O’Brien, Eoin; Staessen, Jan A.

    2013-01-01

    Although distinguishing features of masked hypertension in diabetics are well known, the significance of antihypertensive treatment on clinical practice decisions has not been fully explored. We analyzed 9691 subjects from the population-based 11-country International Database on Ambulatory Blood Pressure in Relation to Cardiovascular Outcomes. Prevalence of masked hypertension in untreated normotensive participants was higher (P<0.0001) among 229 diabetics (29.3%, n=67) than among 5486 nondiabetics (18.8%, n=1031). Over a median of 11.0 years of follow-up, the adjusted risk for a composite cardiovascular end point in untreated diabetic-masked hypertensives tended to be higher than in normotensives (hazard rate [HR], 1.96; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.97–3.97; P=0.059), similar to untreated stage 1 hypertensives (HR, 1.07; CI, 0.58–1.98; P=0.82), but less than stage 2 hypertensives (HR, 0.53; CI, 0.29–0.99; P=0.048). In contrast, cardiovascular risk was not significantly different in antihypertensive-treated diabetic-masked hypertensives, as compared with the normotensive comparator group (HR, 1.13; CI, 0.54–2.35; P=0.75), stage 1 hypertensives (HR, 0.91; CI, 0.49–1.69; P=0.76), and stage 2 hypertensives (HR, 0.65; CI, 0.35–1.20; P=0.17). In the untreated diabetic-masked hypertensive population, mean conventional systolic/diastolic blood pressure was 129.2±8.0/76.0±7.3 mm Hg, and mean daytime systolic/diastolic blood pressure 141.5±9.1/83.7±6.5 mm Hg. In conclusion, masked hypertension occurred in 29% of untreated diabetics, had comparable cardiovascular risk as stage 1 hypertension, and would require considerable reduction in conventional blood pressure to reach daytime ambulatory treatment goal. Importantly, many hypertensive diabetics when receiving antihypertensive therapy can present with normalized conventional and elevated ambulatory blood pressure that mimics masked hypertension. PMID:23478096

  15. Obesity in the childhood: a link to adult hypertension.

    PubMed

    Virdis, A; Ghiadoni, L; Masi, S; Versari, D; Daghini, E; Giannarelli, C; Salvetti, A; Taddei, S

    2009-01-01

    The rapid increasing prevalence of obesity worldwide represents a serious health hazard. Obesity predisposes to increased risk for diabetes, hypertension, renal failure. Direct mechanisms link visceral adiposity and the atherosclerosis process through the action of adipose-derived proinflammatory cytokines. In particular, hypertension can be considered the most important cardiovascular risk factor linking obesity to the development of cardiovascular disease. Obesity among children and adolescents has also reaching epidemic proportions in the industrialized world. Childhood obesity strongly predisposes to cardiovascular adult mortality. Recent reports documented a tracking of blood pressure from childhood to adulthood and obesity occurring in young age plays a crucial pathogenic role. Indeed, fighting overweight and obesity in the pediatric and adolescent age may prevent the occurrence of adults with hypertension and cardiovascular disease. The main strategies for prevention and treatment of overweight and obesity in childhood, which need to involve community, school and family, are the promotion of lifestyle interventions, including as a correct dietary approach, rich in fruit and vegetables and low-fat dairy products, and physical activity.

  16. Hypertension and Obesity in Dakar, Senegal

    PubMed Central

    Macia, Enguerran; Gueye, Lamine; Duboz, Priscilla

    2016-01-01

    Background Cardiovascular disease is a major public health problem in many sub-Saharan African countries, but data on the main cardiovascular risk factors–hypertension and obesity–are almost nonexistent in Senegal. The aims of this study were therefore (i) to report the prevalence, awareness, treatment and control of hypertension among adults in Dakar, (ii) to assess the prevalence of general and central obesity, and (iii) to analyze the association between hypertension and general and central obesity. Methods A cross-sectional survey was carried out in 2015 on a representative sample of 1000 dwellers of the Senegalese capital aged 20–90. Results The overall prevalence of hypertension was 24.7%. Among hypertensive respondents, 28.4% were aware of their condition; 16.0% were on antihypertensive medication; 4.9% had controlled blood pressure. The frequency of doctor visits was a significant predictor of awareness (OR = 2.16; p<0.05) and treatment (OR = 2.57; p<0.05) of hypertension. The prevalence of underweight, overweight and general obesity were 12.6%, 19.2% and 9.7% respectively. The prevalence of central obesity was 26% by WC and 39.8% by WHtR. General obesity and central obesity by WHtR significantly predicted HTN among men and women, but not central obesity by WC. Conclusions This study has demonstrated a high prevalence of hypertension in Dakar and a high prevalence of obesity among women–particularly among older women. The awareness, treatment, and effective control of hypertension are unacceptably low. The blood pressure of women with general obesity, and men with central obesity, in the community should be monitored regularly to limit the burden of cardiovascular disease in Senegal. PMID:27622534

  17. Pathophysiology and treatment of obesity hypertension.

    PubMed

    Wofford, Marion R; Hall, John E

    2004-01-01

    Excess weight gain accounts for as much as 65-75% of the risk for essential hypertension and also greatly increases the risk for end stage renal disease (ESRD). Obesity raises blood pressure by increasing renal tubular reabsorption, impairing pressure natriuresis, and causing volume expansion due to activation of the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) and renin-angiotensin aldosterone system (RAAS), and by physical compression of the kidneys, especially when visceral obesity is present. The mechanisms of SNS activation in obesity are still unclear but may be due, in part, to hyperleptinemia that stimulates the hypothalamic pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) pathway. With prolonged obesity, there may be a gradual loss of kidney function that worsens with time, exacerbates hypertension, and makes blood pressure more difficult to control. Lifestyle modifications, including weight reduction and increased physical activity, are essential first steps in the management of obesity hypertension and renal disease. Anti-obesity drugs offer potential pharmacotherapy for obesity hypertension, but current drugs are very limited and additional long-term studies are needed to test their safety and efficacy. Clinical trials are also needed to determine the most effective antihypertensive drugs for obese hypertensive patients. Special considerations for the obese patient, in addition to adequately controlling the blood pressure, include correcting the metabolic abnormalities and protecting the kidneys from further injury.

  18. Obesity-related hypertension: possible pathophysiological mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Vaněčková, Ivana; Maletínská, Lenka; Behuliak, Michal; Nagelová, Veronika; Zicha, Josef; Kuneš, Jaroslav

    2014-12-01

    Hypertension is one of the major risk factors of cardiovascular diseases, but despite a century of clinical and basic research, the discrete etiology of this disease is still not fully understood. The same is true for obesity, which is recognized as a major global epidemic health problem nowadays. Obesity is associated with an increasing prevalence of the metabolic syndrome, a cluster of risk factors including hypertension, abdominal obesity, dyslipidemia, and hyperglycemia. Epidemiological studies have shown that excess weight gain predicts future development of hypertension, and the relationship between BMI and blood pressure (BP) appears to be almost linear in different populations. There is no doubt that obesity-related hypertension is a multifactorial and polygenic trait, and multiple potential pathogenetic mechanisms probably contribute to the development of higher BP in obese humans. These include hyperinsulinemia, activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, sympathetic nervous system stimulation, abnormal levels of certain adipokines such as leptin, or cytokines acting at the vascular endothelial level. Moreover, some genetic and epigenetic mechanisms are also in play. Although the full manifestation of both hypertension and obesity occurs predominantly in adulthood, their roots can be traced back to early ontogeny. The detailed knowledge of alterations occurring in the organism of experimental animals during particular critical periods (developmental windows) could help to solve this phenomenon in humans and might facilitate the age-specific prevention of human obesity-related hypertension. In addition, better understanding of particular pathophysiological mechanisms might be useful in so-called personalized medicine.

  19. Structural renal changes in obesity and diabetes.

    PubMed

    Amann, Kerstin; Benz, Kerstin

    2013-01-01

    Overweight, obesity, and associated diseases represent an emerging problem, not only in Western countries but also in the developing world. They are now characterized as epidemic diseases. Obesity is particularly serious because its incidence in children and adolescents increased dramatically: it is estimated that in the United States every eighth adolescent suffers from obesity, which in the long run may reduce life expectancy in the population. Apart from cardiovascular disease (ie, blood pressure, stroke, and coronary heart disease), kidney diseases also have been shown to be associated with obesity. Epidemiologic studies have indicated that obesity can be a risk factor of chronic kidney disease irrespective of the presence or absence of diabetes, arterial hypertension, and other comorbidities. More evidence is accumulated on the link between chronic kidney disease in obesity and abnormalities in adipokine secretion (hyperleptinemia, lack of adiponectin), activation of the renin-angiotensin system, chronic inflammation, endothelial dysfunction, lipid accumulation, impaired renal hemodynamics, and diminished nephron number related to body mass. In general, obesity is known to aggravate the course of many primary renal diseases such as glomerulonephritides, but also impairs renal function after kidney transplantation. Microalbuminuria, proteinuria, hyperfiltration, and impaired renal function are associated with obesity. Histologically, secondary focal segmental sclerosis has been shown to be caused particularly by obesity. Of practical purpose for clinical nephrology, loss of body weight either by lifestyle modification or bariatric surgery improves albuminuria and hyperfiltration in obese patients, making renal disease in obesity accessible for prevention programs. This review specifically addresses the pathogenesis and morphology of renal functional and particularly structural changes in obesity and associated renal disease such as diabetic nephropathy.

  20. Pediatric obesity & type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Dea, Tara L

    2011-01-01

    This article focuses on (a) identifying obesity and other risk factors for developing type 2 diabetes, (b) differentiating between pediatric type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes, and (c) treating pediatric type 2 diabetes. Obesity has significant implications on a child's health, including an increased risk for insulin resistance and progression to type 2 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes in children, characterized by insulin resistance and relative pancreatic b-cell failure due to the increased demand for insulin production, has now reached epidemic proportions. Longitudinal research on pediatric type 2 diabetes, however, is lacking because this epidemic is relatively new. Treatment of type 2 diabetes in children is focused on lifestyle modification with weight management/increased physical activity, and pharmacological management through oral medication or insulin therapy. Because children with type 2 diabetes are at risk for developing diabetes-related complications earlier in life, they need to be closely monitored for comorbidities.

  1. [Obesity and diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Tron'ko, N D; Zak, K P

    2013-12-01

    New literature data and the results of own researches concerning the role of excessive body weight and the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus in humans are presented in the analytical review. Inaccordance with current insights, obesity and type 2 diabetes are considered diseases of inflammatory nature, characterized by systemic chronic low-grade inflammation, where different kinds of cytokines are cardinally involved. Unfavourable life style, i.e. excessive, high-energy, and irrational nutrition--an excessive consumption of animal fats and foods containing the high amount of glucose and starch with an insufficient use of high fiber vegetables, fish and vitamin D, and also sedentary, inactive life style leads to adipocyte hypertrophy and migration of M1 macrophages into the adipose tissue (AT). As a result, there is a low-grade inflammation accompanied by an increased production of proinflammatory cytokines (IL-1, IL-6, TNF-α, etc.), adipokines (leptin, resistin, visfatin etc.) and chemokines (CCL2, CCL5, CCL26 and CX3C). Under the influence of these cytokines, on the one hand, IR "is emerged", and on the other--there is apoptosis of the β-cells, that should be followed by the occurrence of clinically diagnosed type 2 diabetes. However, there is also the opposite system in humans, protecting the organism from the development of type 2 diabetes, and including an increase in the formation of M2 macrophages and the increased formation of secretion of antidiabetic cytokines (IL-4, IL-10, IL-13, etc.) and adiponectin.

  2. The sympathetic nervous system in obesity hypertension.

    PubMed

    Lohmeier, Thomas E; Iliescu, Radu

    2013-08-01

    Abundant evidence supports a role of the sympathetic nervous system in the pathogenesis of obesity-related hypertension. However, the nature and temporal progression of mechanisms underlying this sympathetically mediated hypertension are incompletely understood. Recent technological advances allowing direct recordings of renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA) in conscious animals, together with direct suppression of RSNA by renal denervation and reflex-mediated global sympathetic inhibition in experimental animals and human subjects have been especially valuable in elucidating these mechanisms. These studies strongly support the concept that increased RSNA is the critical mechanism by which increased central sympathetic outflow initiates and maintains reductions in renal excretory function, causing obesity hypertension. Potential determinants of renal sympathoexcitation and the differential mechanisms mediating the effects of renal-specific versus reflex-mediated, global sympathetic inhibition on renal hemodynamics and cardiac autonomic function are discussed. These differential mechanisms may impact the efficacy of current device-based approaches for hypertension therapy.

  3. Role of Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Hypertension and Obesity.

    PubMed

    Lahera, Vicente; de Las Heras, Natalia; López-Farré, Antonio; Manucha, Walter; Ferder, León

    2017-02-01

    Mitochondria are essential for the maintenance of normal physiological function of tissue cells. Mitochondria are subject to dynamic processes in order to establish a control system related to survival or cell death and adaptation to changes in the metabolic environment of cells. Mitochondrial dynamics includes fusion and fission processes, biogenesis, and mitophagy. Modifications of mitochondrial dynamics in organs involved in energy metabolism such as the pancreas, liver, skeletal muscle, and white adipose tissue could be of relevance for the development of insulin resistance, obesity, and type 2 diabetes. Mitochondrial dynamics and the factors involved in its regulation are also critical for neuronal development, survival, and function. Modifications in mitochondrial dynamics in either agouti-related peptide (AgRP) or pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC), circuits which regulates feeding behavior, are related to changes of food intake, energy balance, and obesity development. Activation of the sympathetic nervous system has been considered as a crucial point in the pathogenesis of hypertension among obese individuals and it also plays a key role in cardiac remodeling. Hypertension-related cardiac hypertrophy is associated with changes in metabolic substrate utilization, dysfunction of the electron transport chain, and ATP synthesis. Alterations in both mitochondrial dynamics and ROS production have been associated with endothelial dysfunction, development of hypertension, and cardiac hypertrophy. Finally, it might be postulated that alterations of mitochondrial dynamics in white adipose tissue could contribute to the development and maintenance of hypertension in obesity situations through leptin overproduction. Leptin, together with insulin, will induce activation of sympathetic nervous system with consequences at renal, vascular, and cardiac levels, driving to sodium retention, hypertension, and left ventricular hypertrophy. Moreover, both leptin and insulin will

  4. [Obesity and type 2 diabetes].

    PubMed

    Toplak, Hermann; Hoppichler, Friedrich; Wascher, Thomas C; Schindler, Karin; Ludvik, Bernhard

    2016-04-01

    Obesity and Type 2 Diabetes are nowadays summarized as "diabesity". That is due to the fact that obesity is frequently preceding and the most important risk factor in the increase of Type 2 Diabetes. The body mass index (BMI) is a crude measure of body fatness. Even normal weight persons can have lack in muscles (sarcopenia), which leads to the recommendation to measure waist und body fatness (e.g. BIA). Lifestyle management including nutrition and physical activity are important for diabetes prevention. In the therapy of Type 2 Diabetes body weight is increasingly used as secondary target. Also the choice of the anti-diabetic medication and concomitant medications is increasingly influenced by body weight. The significance of anti-obesity medications in the therapy of type 2 diabetes will have to be clarified by future studies. Bariatric surgery is at present indicated with a BMI above BMI > 35 kg/m(2) and can lead at least to partial diabetes remission but has to be part of a lifelong care concept.

  5. Mechanism of hypertension in diabetic nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Nazar, Chaudhary Muhammad Junaid

    2014-01-01

    High prevalence of hypertension is observed in diabetic patients of both the types. Diabetic nephropathy is one of the major reason for high morbidity, mortality and financial burden in such hypertensive diabetic patients. For this review, electronic databases including PubMed/Medline, Embase, Cochrane and Google scholar were searched from 1990-2013. Multiple inter-related factors are responsible for the development of hypertension and therefore nephropathy in the chronic diabetic patients. Majority of such factors are identified to lead to extensive sodium reabsorption and peripheral vasoconstriction and thus leading to microvascular complications like nephropathy. Management of hypertension by targeting such mediators is the highly recommended therapy for controlling and treating diabetic nephropathy. Clinical trials suggests that drugs inhibiting the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone pathway should be used as the first-line agents for the management of hypertensive diabetic nephropathy patients. These agents are effective in slowing the progression of the end-stage kidney disease as well as lowering albuminuria. Researchers are also investigating the effectiveness of drug combination for better management of hypertension and diabetic nephropathy. The present article is a review of the evidences which explains the underlying pathological changes which leads to the development of nephropathy in a hypertensive diabetic patients. The review also observes the clinical trials for different anti-hypertensive drugs which are recommended for the treatment of such patients. PMID:28197463

  6. Strong independent association between obesity and essential hypertension.

    PubMed

    Movahed, M R; Lee, J Z; Lim, W Y; Hashemzadeh, M; Hashemzadeh, M

    2016-06-01

    Obesity and hypertension (HTN) are major risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Association between obesity and HTN has not been studied in a large populations following adjustment for comorbidities. The goal of this study was to evaluate any association between obesity and HTN after adjusting for baseline characteristics. We used ICD-9 codes for obesity and HTN from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS) databases. Two randomly selected years, 1992 and 2002, were chosen from the databases as two independent samples. We used uni- and multivariable analysis to study any correlation between obesity and HTN. The 1992 database contained a total of 6,195,744 patients. HTN was present in 37.2 % of patients with obesity versus 12% of the control group (OR: 4.36, CI 4.30-4.42, P < 0.001). The 2002 database contained a total of 7,153,982 patients. HTN was present in 50.7% of patients with obesity versus 25.6% of the control group (OR: 2.98, CI 2.96-3.00, P < 0.001). Using multivariable analysis adjusting for gender, hyperlipidaemia, age, smoking, type 2 diabetes and chronic renal failure, obesity remained correlated with HTN in both years (1992: OR 2.69, CI 2.67-2.72, P < 0.001; 2002: OR 2.98, CI 2.96-3.00, P < 0.001). The presence of obesity was found to be strongly and independently associated with HTN. The cause of this correlation is not known warranting further investigation.

  7. A randomized, double blind, cross-over, placebo-controlled clinical trial to assess the effects of Candesartan on the insulin sensitivity on non diabetic, non hypertense subjects with dysglyce mia and abdominal obesity. "ARAMIA"

    PubMed Central

    López-Jaramillo, Patricio; Pradilla, Lina P; Lahera, Vicente; Sieger, Federico A Silva; Rueda-Clausen, Christian F; Márquez, Gustavo A

    2006-01-01

    Background The raising prevalence of type-2 diabetes mellitus and obesity has been recognized as a major problem for public health, affecting both developed and developing countries. Impaired fasting plasma glucose has been previously associated with endothelial dysfunction, higher levels of inflammatory markers and increased risk of developing insulin resistance and cardiovascular events. Besides life-style changes, the blockade of the renin-angiotensin system has been proposed as a useful alternative intervention to improve insulin resistance and decrease the number of new type-2 diabetes cases. The aim of this clinical trial is to study the effect of the treatment with Candesartan, an angiotensin II receptor antagonist, on the insulin resistance, the plasma levels of adipoquines, oxidative stress and prothrombotic markers, in a group of non diabetic, non hypertensive, dysglycemic and obese subjects. Methods and design A randomized, double blind, cross-over, placebo-controlled, clinical trial was designed to assess the effects of Candesartan (up to 32 mg/day during 6 months) on the Homeostasis Model Assessment (HOMA) index, lipid profile, protrombotic state, oxidative stress and plasma levels of inflammatory markers. The participants will be recruited in the "Fundación Cardiovascular de Colombia". Subjects who fullfil selection criteria will receive permanent educational, nutritional and exercise support during their participation in the study. After a 15 days-run-in period with placebo and life-style recommendations, the patients who have a treatment compliance equal or greater than 80% will be randomlly assigned to one of the treatment groups. Group A will receive Candesartan during 6 months and placebo during 6 months. Group B will receive placebo during the first 6 months, and then, Candesartan during the last 6 months. Control visits will be programed monthly and all parameters of interest will be evaluated every 6 months. Hypothesis Treatment with

  8. Understanding and treating hypertension in diabetic populations.

    PubMed

    Volpe, Massimo; Battistoni, Allegra; Savoia, Carmine; Tocci, Giuliano

    2015-10-01

    Hypertension and diabetes frequently occurs in the same individuals in clinical practice. Moreover, the presence of hypertension does increase the risk of new-onset diabetes, as well as diabetes does promote development of hypertension. Whatever the case, the concomitant presence of these conditions confers a high risk of major cardiovascular complications and promotes the use integrated pharmacological interventions, aimed at achieving the recommended therapeutic targets. While the benefits of lowering abnormal fasting glucose levels in patients with hypertension and diabetes have been consistently demonstrated, the blood pressure (BP) targets to be achieved to get a benefit in patients with diabetes have been recently reconsidered. In the past, randomized clinical trials have, indeed, demonstrated that lowering BP levels to less than 140/90 mmHg was associated to a substantial reduction of the risk of developing macrovascular and microvascular complications in hypertensive patients with diabetes. In addition, epidemiological and clinical reports suggested that "the lower, the better" for BP in diabetes, so that levels of BP even lower than 130/80 mmHg have been recommended. Recent randomized clinical trials, however, designed to evaluate the potential benefits obtained with an intensive antihypertensive therapy, aimed at achieving a target systolic BP level below 120 mmHg as compared to those obtained with less stringent therapy, have challenged the previous recommendations from international guidelines. In fact, detailed analyses of these trials showed a paradoxically increased risk of coronary events, mostly myocardial infarction, in those patients who achieved the lowest BP levels, particularly in the high-risk subsets of hypertensive populations with diabetes. In the light of these considerations, the present article will briefly review the common pathophysiological mechanisms, the potential sites of therapeutic interactions and the currently recommended BP

  9. Understanding and treating hypertension in diabetic populations

    PubMed Central

    Battistoni, Allegra; Savoia, Carmine; Tocci, Giuliano

    2015-01-01

    Hypertension and diabetes frequently occurs in the same individuals in clinical practice. Moreover, the presence of hypertension does increase the risk of new-onset diabetes, as well as diabetes does promote development of hypertension. Whatever the case, the concomitant presence of these conditions confers a high risk of major cardiovascular complications and promotes the use integrated pharmacological interventions, aimed at achieving the recommended therapeutic targets. While the benefits of lowering abnormal fasting glucose levels in patients with hypertension and diabetes have been consistently demonstrated, the blood pressure (BP) targets to be achieved to get a benefit in patients with diabetes have been recently reconsidered. In the past, randomized clinical trials have, indeed, demonstrated that lowering BP levels to less than 140/90 mmHg was associated to a substantial reduction of the risk of developing macrovascular and microvascular complications in hypertensive patients with diabetes. In addition, epidemiological and clinical reports suggested that “the lower, the better” for BP in diabetes, so that levels of BP even lower than 130/80 mmHg have been recommended. Recent randomized clinical trials, however, designed to evaluate the potential benefits obtained with an intensive antihypertensive therapy, aimed at achieving a target systolic BP level below 120 mmHg as compared to those obtained with less stringent therapy, have challenged the previous recommendations from international guidelines. In fact, detailed analyses of these trials showed a paradoxically increased risk of coronary events, mostly myocardial infarction, in those patients who achieved the lowest BP levels, particularly in the high-risk subsets of hypertensive populations with diabetes. In the light of these considerations, the present article will briefly review the common pathophysiological mechanisms, the potential sites of therapeutic interactions and the currently recommended

  10. The Role of Aldosterone in Obesity-Related Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Kawarazaki, Wakako; Fujita, Toshiro

    2016-04-01

    Obese subjects often have hypertension and related cardiovascular and renal diseases, and this has become a serious worldwide health problem. In obese subjects, impaired renal-pressure natriuresis causes sodium retention, leading to the development of salt-sensitive hypertension. Physical compression of the kidneys by visceral fat and activation of the sympathetic nervous system, renin-angiotensin systems (RAS), and aldosterone/mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) system are involved in this mechanism. Obese subjects often exhibit hyperaldosteronism, with increased salt sensitivity of blood pressure (BP). Adipose tissue excretes aldosterone-releasing factors, thereby stimulating aldosterone secretion independently of the systemic RAS, and aldosterone/MR activation plays a key role in the development of hypertension and organ damage in obesity. In obese subjects, both salt sensitivity of BP, enhanced by obesity-related metabolic disorders including aldosterone excess, and increased dietary sodium intake are closely related to the incidence of hypertension. Some salt sensitivity-related gene variants affect the risk of obesity, and together with salt intake, its combination is possibly associated with the development of hypertension in obese subjects. With high salt levels common in modern diets, salt restriction and weight control are undoubtedly important. However, not only MR blockade but also new diagnostic modalities and therapies targeting and modifying genes that are related to salt sensitivity, obesity, or RAS regulation are expected to prevent obesity and obesity-related hypertension.

  11. The Role of Aldosterone in Obesity-Related Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Kawarazaki, Wakako

    2016-01-01

    Obese subjects often have hypertension and related cardiovascular and renal diseases, and this has become a serious worldwide health problem. In obese subjects, impaired renal-pressure natriuresis causes sodium retention, leading to the development of salt-sensitive hypertension. Physical compression of the kidneys by visceral fat and activation of the sympathetic nervous system, renin–angiotensin systems (RAS), and aldosterone/mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) system are involved in this mechanism. Obese subjects often exhibit hyperaldosteronism, with increased salt sensitivity of blood pressure (BP). Adipose tissue excretes aldosterone-releasing factors, thereby stimulating aldosterone secretion independently of the systemic RAS, and aldosterone/MR activation plays a key role in the development of hypertension and organ damage in obesity. In obese subjects, both salt sensitivity of BP, enhanced by obesity-related metabolic disorders including aldosterone excess, and increased dietary sodium intake are closely related to the incidence of hypertension. Some salt sensitivity-related gene variants affect the risk of obesity, and together with salt intake, its combination is possibly associated with the development of hypertension in obese subjects. With high salt levels common in modern diets, salt restriction and weight control are undoubtedly important. However, not only MR blockade but also new diagnostic modalities and therapies targeting and modifying genes that are related to salt sensitivity, obesity, or RAS regulation are expected to prevent obesity and obesity-related hypertension. PMID:26927805

  12. Soluble adhesion molecules (sICAM-1, sVCAM-1) and selectins (sE selectin, sP selectin, sL selectin) levels in children and adolescents with obesity, hypertension, and diabetes.

    PubMed

    Glowinska, Barbara; Urban, Miroslawa; Peczynska, Jadwiga; Florys, Bozena

    2005-08-01

    The attachment of monocytes and lymphocytes to endothelial cells, which initiates atherosclerosis, arises under the influence of adhesion molecules. The preclinical phase of this disease lasts many decades, and this provides an opportunity for the presymptomatic detection of high-risk subjects. We evaluated levels of the adhesion molecules: sICAM-1 (soluble intercellular adhesion molecule 1), sVCAM-1 (soluble vascular adhesion molecule 1), sE selectin, sP selectin, and sL selectin in children with atherosclerosis risk factors (n = 123, mean age 15.1 years) (obese [n = 17], hypertensive [n = 25], obese with hypertension [n = 30], type 1 diabetic [n = 51]). Twenty-seven healthy children formed the control group, mean age 15.2 years. sICAM-1 was higher in the study group compared with control (314.1 +/- 61 vs 264.9 +/- 55 ng/mL, P < .01). The same was found for sVCAM-1 (513.7 +/- 187 vs 407.9 +/- 76 ng/mL, P < .05) and E selectin (86.04 +/- 33.6 vs 62.1 +/- 20.3 ng/mL, P < .01). sP-selectin and sL-selectin levels were not different compared with controls. E selectin correlated with body mass index (BMI; r = 0.18, P = .03), total cholesterol (r = 0.2, P = .016), and triglycerides (r = 0.22, P = .008). sICAM-1 correlated with BMI (r = 0.19, P = .019) and systolic blood pressure (r = 0.13, P = .045). In multiple linear regression analysis, sE selectin was found to be associated with triglycerides (R2 = 0.29, P = .045), sICAM-1 dependent on BMI (R2 = 0.58, P = .047), and sVCAM-1 dependent on total cholesterol (R2 = 0.51, P = .006). Elevated concentrations of sICAM-1, sVCAM-1, and E selectin were found in obese, hypertensive, and diabetic children. We conclude that endothelial activation appears in these children, and adhesion molecules are related to the earliest stages of atherosclerosis.

  13. Pathophysiology of hypertension in obese children: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Wirix, A J G; Kaspers, P J; Nauta, J; Chinapaw, M J M; Kist-van Holthe, J E

    2015-10-01

    Hypertension is increasingly common in overweight and obese children. The mechanisms behind the development of hypertension in obesity are complex, and evidence is limited. In order to effectively treat obese children for hypertension, it is important to have a deeper understanding of the pathophysiology of hypertension in obese children. The present review summarizes the main factors associated with hypertension in obese children and discusses their potential role in its pathophysiology. Systematic searches were conducted in PubMed and EMBASE for articles published up to October 2014. In total, 60 relevant studies were included. The methodological quality of the included studies ranged from weak to strong. Several factors important in the development of hypertension in obese children have been suggested, including endocrine determinants, such as corticosteroids and adipokines, sympathetic nervous system activity, disturbed sodium homeostasis, as well as oxidative stress, inflammation and endothelial dysfunction. Understanding the pathophysiology of hypertension in overweight and obese children is important and could have implications for its screening and treatment. Based on solely cross-sectional observational studies, it is impossible to infer causality. Longitudinal studies of high methodological quality are needed to gain more insight into the complex mechanisms behind the development of hypertension in obese children.

  14. The role of the sympathetic nervous system in obesity-related hypertension.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Alexandre A; do Carmo, Jussara; Dubinion, John; Hall, John E

    2009-06-01

    Obesity is recognized as a major health problem throughout the world. Excess weight is a major cause of increased blood pressure in most patients with essential hypertension and greatly increases the risk for diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, and end-stage renal disease. Although the mechanisms by which obesity raises blood pressure are not completely understood, increased renal sodium reabsorption, impaired pressure natriuresis, and volume expansion appear to play important roles. Several potential mechanisms have been suggested to contribute to altered kidney function and hypertension in obesity, including activation of the sympathetic nervous system and the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, as well as physical compression of the kidneys, especially when visceral obesity is present. Activation of the sympathetic nervous system in obesity may be due, in part, to hyperleptinemia and other factors secreted by adipocytes and the gastrointestinal tract, activation of the central nervous system melanocortin pathway, and baroreceptor dysfunction.

  15. Obesity, Diabetes and Cancer: A Mechanistic Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Cifarelli, V; Hursting, SD

    2016-01-01

    Nearly 35% of adults and 20% of children in the United States are obese, defined as having a body mass index (BMI) ≥ 30 kg/m2. Obesity is an established risk factor for many cancers, and obesity-associated metabolic perturbations often manifest in Type 2 diabetes mellitus and/or the metabolic syndrome. As part of the growth-promoting, proinflammatory microenvironment of the obese and/or diabetic state, crosstalk between macrophages, adipocytes, and epithelial cells occurs via metabolically-regulated hormones, cytokines, and other mediators to enhance cancer risk and/or progression. This review synthesizes the evidence on key biological mechanisms underlying the associations between obesity, diabetes and cancer, with particular emphasis on enhancements in growth factor signaling, inflammation, and vascular integrity processes. These interrelated pathways represent mechanistic targets for disrupting the obesity-diabetes-cancer link, and several diabetes drugs, such as metformin and rosiglitazone, are being intensely studied for repurposing as cancer chemopreventive agents.

  16. Evaluation of Autonomic Dysfunction in Obese and Non-Obese Hypertensive Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Ganai, Jyoti; Muthukrishnan, Shobitha; Kohli, Sunil

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Obesity and more specifically, visceral obesity, has been consistently associated with hypertension and increased cardiovascular risk. Epidemiological studies indicate that at least two-third of the prevalence of hypertension can be directly attributed to obesity. Studies also suggest that hypertensive patients have impaired cardiac autonomic function. Aim The objective of the study was to examine any added effects of obesity on cardiac autonomic dysfunction in hypertensive patients. Materials and Methods Hypertensive subjects (n=45) between 35-60 years of age were divided into two groups; Group A (n=30) consisted of non-obese hypertensive subjects and Group B (n=15) consisted of obese (BMI≥30kg/m2) hypertensive subjects. Cardiac autonomic function was assessed using four tests – Heart rate response to immediate standing (30:15 ratio), standing to lying ratio (S/L ratio), Blood pressure response to immediate standing and Cold Pressor Test (CPT). Results There were no significant differences for autonomic function tests between obese and non-obese hypertensive subjects (p >0.05). Conclusion The results showed that there are no significant differences in the cardiac autonomic function responses between obese and non-obese hypertensive subjects. PMID:27504394

  17. Influence of obesity and hypertension on the severity of periodontitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Perlstein, M I; Bissada, N F

    1977-05-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate the extent to which obesity and/or hypertension may modify the response of rats' periodontium to chronic gingival irritation. Forty-four normal, spontaneously hypertensive, obese, and obese-hypertensive rats were used. Histopathologic evaluation of the periodontal structure showed both hyperplasia and hypertrophy of the walls of blood vessels supplying the periodontium in the hypertensive and obese-hypertensive animals. The results also indicated that obesity significantly contributed to e severity of periodontal disease. Hypertension alone was not a significant factor. The obese-hypertensive rats showed the most severe periodontal response to local irritation.

  18. Dietary proteins in obesity and in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Keller, Ulrich

    2011-03-01

    balance may play an important role for the increasing number of elderly obese subjects in our industrialized societies, since proteins exert beneficial effects in the conditions of overweight, metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular risk factors, bone health, and sarcopenia. Adverse effects of increased dietary proteins have been observed in subjects with renal impairment- this problem is frequently observed in the elderly, hypertensive, and diabetic population. Nevertheless, dietary proteins deserve more attention than they have received in the past.

  19. ERICA: prevalences of hypertension and obesity in Brazilian adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Bloch, Katia Vergetti; Klein, Carlos Henrique; Szklo, Moyses; Kuschnir, Maria Cristina C; Abreu, Gabriela de Azevedo; Barufaldi, Laura Augusta; da Veiga, Gloria Valeria; Schaan, Beatriz; da Silva, Thiago Luiz Nogueira; de Vasconcellos, Maurício Teixeira Leite

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To estimate the prevalence of arterial hypertension and obesity and the population attributable fraction of hypertension that is due to obesity in Brazilian adolescents. METHODS Data from participants in the Brazilian Study of Cardiovascular Risks in Adolescents (ERICA), which was the first national school-based, cross-section study performed in Brazil were evaluated. The sample was divided into 32 geographical strata and clusters from 32 schools and classes, with regional and national representation. Obesity was classified using the body mass index according to age and sex. Arterial hypertension was defined when the average systolic or diastolic blood pressure was greater than or equal to the 95th percentile of the reference curve. Prevalences and 95% confidence intervals (95%CI) of arterial hypertension and obesity, both on a national basis and in the macro-regions of Brazil, were estimated by sex and age group, as were the fractions of hypertension attributable to obesity in the population. RESULTS We evaluated 73,399 students, 55.4% female, with an average age of 14.7 years (SD = 1.6). The prevalence of hypertension was 9.6% (95%CI 9.0-10.3); with the lowest being in the North, 8.4% (95%CI 7.7-9.2) and Northeast regions, 8.4% (95%CI 7.6-9.2), and the highest being in the South, 12.5% (95%CI 11.0-14.2). The prevalence of obesity was 8.4% (95%CI 7.9-8.9), which was lower in the North region and higher in the South region. The prevalences of arterial hypertension and obesity were higher in males. Obese adolescents presented a higher prevalence of hypertension, 28.4% (95%CI 25.5-31.2), than overweight adolescents, 15.4% (95%CI 17.0-13.8), or eutrophic adolescents, 6.3% (95%CI 5.6-7.0). The fraction of hypertension attributable to obesity was 17.8%. CONCLUSIONS ERICA was the first nationally representative Brazilian study providing prevalence estimates of hypertension in adolescents. Regional and sex differences were observed. The study indicates

  20. Mechanism linking diabetes mellitus and obesity

    PubMed Central

    Al-Goblan, Abdullah S; Al-Alfi, Mohammed A; Khan, Muhammad Z

    2014-01-01

    Body mass index has a strong relationship to diabetes and insulin resistance. In obese individuals, the amount of nonesterified fatty acids, glycerol, hormones, cytokines, proinflammatory markers, and other substances that are involved in the development of insulin resistance, is increased. The pathogenesis in the development of diabetes is based on the fact that the β-islet cells of the pancreas are impaired, causing a lack of control of blood glucose. The development of diabetes becomes more inevitable if the failure of β-islet cells of the pancreas is accompanied by insulin resistance. Weight gain and body mass are central to the formation and rising incidence of type 1 and type 2 diabetes. This literature review will demonstrate the facts that link obesity with insulin resistance and pancreatic β-cell dysfunction. In conclusion, new approaches in managing and preventing diabetes in obese individuals must be studied and investigated based on the facts. PMID:25506234

  1. Obesity-linked diabetes in the Arab world: a review.

    PubMed

    Abuyassin, B; Laher, I

    2015-09-08

    The Arab world is experiencing an epidemic of obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus. This review summarizes the major pathological factors linking obesity to diabetes, focussing on current epidemiological data related to obese diabetic patients in the Arab world, the etiology of the disease and the genetic determinants of diabetes and obesity. There are alarming data related to the rising prevalence of obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus in children of Arab ethnicity. Replication studies identify several genetic variants in Arabs with obesitylinked diabetes. For example, variants of the ADIPOQ gene (the rs266729 single-nucleotide polymorphism) are associated with obesity and diabetes in various Arab countries. Gaps exist in our information about diabetes and obesity in Arab populations in relation to ethnic-specific cut-off points for diagnosis and treatment of diabetes. Further genome-wide association studies in obese and diabetic Arab populations could add to our understanding of the pathophysiology, prevention and reversal of this disease.

  2. Obese and diabetic patients with end-stage renal disease: Peritoneal dialysis or hemodialysis?

    PubMed

    Ekart, Robert; Hojs, Radovan

    2016-07-01

    Obesity is a chronic disease that is increasingly prevalent around the world and is a well-recognized risk factor for type 2 diabetes and hypertension, leading causes of end-stage renal disease (ESRD). The obese diabetic patient with ESRD is a challenge for the nephrologist with regard to the type of renal replacement therapy that should be suggested and offered to the patient. There is no evidence that either peritoneal dialysis or hemodialysis is contraindicated in obese ESRD patients. In the literature, we can find a discrepancy in the impact of obesity on mortality among hemodialysis vs. peritoneal dialysis patients. Several studies in hemodialysis patients suggest that a higher BMI confers a survival advantage - the so-called "reverse epidemiology". In contrast, the literature among obese peritoneal dialysis patients is inconsistent, with various studies reporting an increased risk of death, no difference, or a decreased risk of death. Many of these studies only spanned across a few years, and this is probably too short of a time frame for a realistic assessment of obesity's impact on mortality in ESRD patients. The decision for dialysis modality in an obese diabetic patient with ESRD should be individualized. According to the results of published studies, we cannot suggest PD or HD as a better solution for all obese diabetic patients. The obese patient should be educated about all their dialysis options, including home dialysis therapies. In this review, the available literature related to the dialysis modality in obese patients with diabetes and ESRD was reviewed.

  3. Non-Obese Diabetes and Its Associated Factors in an Underdeveloped Area of South China, Guangxi

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Zhenzhu; Fang, Zhifeng; Huang, Wei; Liu, Zhanhua; Chen, Yuzhu; Li, Zhongyou; Zhu, Ting; Wang, Qichun; Simpson, Steve; Taylor, Bruce V.; Lin, Rui

    2016-01-01

    Background: Little research has been conducted on the prevalence of diabetes mellitus in underdeveloped areas in China, especially stratified into obesity and non-obese diabetes. The aim of the present study was to investigate the prevalence and associated factors of non-obese diabetes in an underdeveloped area in South China, Guangxi. Methods: Data derived from the Chinese Health and Nutrition Survey 2010–2012 involved a sample of 3874 adults from Guangxi. Questionnaires and oral glucose-tolerance tests were conducted, and fasting and 2-h glucose levels and serum lipids were measured. Logistic regression analysis was performed to assess associated factors for non-obese diabetes. Results: 68.2% and 62.2% of instances of newly detected diabetes were those of non-obese diabetes based on BMI (NODB) and based on WC (NODW), respectively. The male sex, an age older than 50 years, lower education, hypertension, and hypertriglyceridemia were significantly associated with a higher risk of both NODB and NODW, while some associated factors for NODB were found different from those associated with NODW, and an interaction effect was found to increase the risk of NODW. Conclusions: Our study indicated that non-obese diabetes was highly prevalent in an underdeveloped area of South China. Non-obese diabetes should be considered for increased public attention in these areas. PMID:27706056

  4. Impact of obesity and nitric oxide synthase gene G894T polymorphism on essential hypertension.

    PubMed

    Wrzosek, M; Sokal, M; Sawicka, A; Wlodarczyk, M; Glowala, M; Wrzosek, M; Kosior, M; Talalaj, M; Biecek, P; Nowicka, G

    2015-10-01

    Hypertension is a multifactorial disease caused by environmental, metabolic and genetic factors, but little is currently known on the complex interplay between these factors and blood pressure. The aim of the present study was to assess the potential impact of obesity, and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) I/D polymorphism and endothelial nitric oxide synthase gene (NOS3) 4a/4b, G894T and -T786C variants on the essential hypertension. The study group consisted of 1,027 Caucasian adults of Polish nationality (45.5 ± 13.6 years old), of which 401 met the criteria for hypertension. Body weight, height and blood pressure were measured and data on self-reported smoking status were collected. Fasting blood glucose, total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol, triglycerides were determined by standard procedures. The ACE I/D polymorphism and three polymorphisms in NOS3 gene (4a/4b, G894T, -T786C) were detected by the PCR method. Multivariable logistic regression demonstrated that age above 45 years, diabetes, dyslipidemia, smoking and male sex are important risk factors for hypertension and no significant influence of variants in ACE and NOS3 genes on this risk was recognized. Obese subjects had a 3.27-times higher risk (OR = 3.27, 95% CI: 2.37 - 4.52) of hypertension than non-obese, and in obese the NOS3 894T allele was associated with 1.37 fold higher risk of hypertension (P = 0.031). The distribution of NOS3 G894T genotypes supported the co-dominant (OR = 1.35, P = 0.034, Pfit = 0.435) or recessive (OR = 2.00, P = 0.046, Pfit = 0.286), but not dominant model of inheritance (P = 0.100). The study indicates that in obese NOS3 G894T polymorphism may enhance hypertension risk. However, in the presence of such strong risk factors as age, diabetes and smoking, the impact of this genetic variant seems to be attenuated. Further studies are needed to reveal the usefulness of G894T polymorphism in hypertension risk assessment in obese.

  5. Diabetes and incident heart failure in hypertensive and normotensive participants of the Strong Heart Study

    PubMed Central

    de Simone, Giovanni; Devereux, Richard B.; Chinali, Marcello; Lee, Elisa T.; Galloway, James M.; Barac, Ana; Panza, Julio A.; Howard, Barbara V.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives Type 2 diabetes is accepted as a cause of heart failure (HF), but direct cause-effect evidence independent of incident myocardial infarction, hypertension and other coexisting risk factors is less well studied. We tested the hypothesis that diabetes predisposes to HF independently of hypertension and intercurrent myocardial infarction (MI). Methods We evaluated 12-year incident HF in 2740 participants (1781 women) without prevalent cardiovascular (CV) or severe kidney disease, at the time of the 1st exam of the Strong Heart Study cohort. Intercurrent myocardial infarction was censored as a competing risk event. Results Diabetes was present in 1206 individuals (44%), and impaired fasting glucose (IFG) in 391 (14%). Diabetic participants more frequently had hypertension and central obesity (both p<0.0001). Incident HF was ascertained in 64 participants with normal fasting glucose (NFG, 6%), 26 (7%) with IFG and 201 with diabetes (17%, Hazard ratio [HR]= 4.04 vs. NFG; p<0.0001). In Cox analysis adjusting for age, sex, obesity, central fat distribution, hypertension, antihypertensive medications, prevalent atrial fibrillation, GFR, urinary albumin/creatinine ratio, plasma cholesterol, Hb1Ac, smoking habit, alcohol use, educational level and physical activity, diabetes was associated with a 2-fold greater risk of incident HF than NFG (HR=2.45, p<0.0001). Diabetes maintained 1.5-fold greater risk of HF than NFG (p<0.03) even when intercurrent myocardial infarction (n=221) was censored as a competing risk event, similar to the adjusted HR for HF in hypertension. Conclusion Type 2 diabetes is a potent, independent risk factor for HF. Risk of HF in diabetic subjects cannot be fully explained by incident MI and coexisting CV risk factors. Mechanisms directly related to diabetes and impairing cardiac function should be studied and identified. PMID:19844184

  6. [Advances in arterial hypertension and diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Cordero, Alberto; Lekuona, Iñaki; Galve, Enrique; Mazón, Pilar

    2012-01-01

    In 2011, the importance of hypertension and diabetes mellitus as the two main risk factors responsible for the development of cardiovascular disease became clear, as did their significance as major public health issues. Compared with previous years, in which publication of the results of large clinical trials dominated scientific progress, in the last year, the focus has shifted to evidence that novel mechanisms associated with blood pressure, glucose metabolism and diabetes can influence cardiovascular disease. Of particular importance were clinical trials in the area of renal dysfunction, such as the SHARP and ROADMAP trials.

  7. Increased alloreactivity and adverse outcomes in obese kidney transplant recipients are limited to those with diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Schachtner, Thomas; Stein, Maik; Reinke, Petra

    2017-02-01

    Previous studies on patient and allograft outcomes of obese kidney transplant recipients (KTRs) remain controversial. To what extent obesity-related comorbidities contribute to adverse outcomes, however, hasn't been addressed. We studied all KTRs from 2005 to 2012. 29 (4%), 317 (48%), 217 (33%), 76 (12%), and 21 KTRs (4%) were identified as underweight, normal-weight, overweight, obese, and morbid obese, respectively. 33 of 97 obese KTRs (34%) had pre-existent diabetes. Samples were collected before transplantation and at +1, +2, +3months posttransplantation. Donor-reactive T-cells were measured using an interferon-γ Elispot assay. Obese KTRs showed an increased incidence pre-existent diabetes (p<0.001), but no differences for hypertension and coronary artery disease (p>0.05). Among obese KTRs, those with pre-existent diabetes showed inferior patient and allograft survival, worse allograft function, delayed graft function, and prolonged hospitalization (p<0.05). Interestingly, no differences were observed between obese non-diabetic, normal-weight diabetic, and normal-weight non-diabetic KTRs (p>0.05). Obese diabetic KTRs showed higher frequencies of donor-reactive T-cells pretransplantation (p<0.05). Our results suggest that the increased risk of mortality, allograft loss, delayed graft function, and prolonged hospitalization in obese KTRs is limited to those with diabetes. A state of obesity-related inflammation plus hyperglycemia may trigger increased alloreactivity and should call for adequate immunosuppression.

  8. Management of diabetes mellitus and hypertension at UNRWA primary health care facilities in Lebanon.

    PubMed

    Yusef, J I

    2000-01-01

    A cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted at all UNRWA primary health care facilities in Lebanon Field, to assess the quality of care of diabetes mellitus and hypertension. The study reviewed 2202 records of diabetic and hypertensive patients. Both diseases were present at an early age (< 40 years), with family history, obesity and sedentary lifestyle being the main risk factors. The major complication was cardiovascular disease followed by retinopathy. Action-oriented measures to improve the organization and management of the health care services were identified.

  9. Prioritizing Environmental Chemicals for Obesity and Diabetes ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Background: Diabetes and obesity are major threats to public health in the US and abroad. Understanding the role chemicals in our environment play in the development of these conditions is an emerging issue in environmental health, although identifying and prioritizing chemicals for testing beyond those already implicated in the literature is a challenge. This review is intended to help researchers generate hypotheses about chemicals potentially contributing to diabetes and obesity-related health outcomes by summarizing relevant findings from the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ToxCast high-throughput screening (HTS) program. Objectives: To develop new hypotheses around environmental chemicals of potential interest for diabetes- or obesity-related outcomes using high throughput screening data. Methods: Identify ToxCast assay targets relevant to several biological processes related to diabetes and obesity (insulin sensitivity in peripheral tissue, pancreatic islet and beta cell function, adipocyte dierentiation, and feeding behavior) and present chemical screening data against those assay targets to identify chemicals of potential interest. Discussion: Results of this screening-level analysis suggest that the spectrum of environmental chemicals to consider in research related to diabetes and obesity is much broader than indicated from research papers and reviews published in the peer-reviewed literature. Testing of hypotheses based on ToxCast data will a

  10. Longitudinal relations between obesity and hypertension following pediatric renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Denburg, Michelle R; Pradhan, Madhura; Shults, Justine; Jones, Abigail; Palmer, Jo Ann; Baluarte, H Jorge; Leonard, Mary B

    2010-10-01

    Obesity and hypertension frequently complicate renal transplantation (RTxp). The objective was to assess relations among obesity, hypertension, and glucocorticoids in pediatric RTxp recipients. A retrospective cohort study was carried out in 141 RTxp recipients, 2-21 years of age, with >or=12 months of follow-up. Body mass index Z-score (BMI-Z), systolic and diastolic blood pressure Z-scores (SBP-Z and DBP-Z), and medications at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months and annually thereafter were recorded. Quasi-least squares regression analysis was used. The prevalence of obesity (BMI>or=95th percentile) increased from 13% at baseline to >30% from 3 months onward. Greater glucocorticoid exposure (mg/kg/day) was associated with greater increases in BMI-Z (p<0.001). This association was greater in males, younger recipients, and those with lower baseline BMI-Z (all interactions p<0.02). The prevalence of systolic hypertension (SBP>or=95th percentile) was 73% at 1 month and >or=40% at all follow-up visits. Greater glucocorticoid exposure (p<0.001) and increases in BMI-Z (p=0.005) were independent determinants of SBP-Z over time. Cyclosporine (versus tacrolimus) was independently associated with greater SBP-Z and DBP-Z (p=0.001). Sustained obesity and hypertension frequently complicated pediatric RTxp. Obesity was an independent determinant of systolic hypertension. Strategies are needed to prevent obesity and its impact on hypertension, cardiovascular disease, and allograft survival.

  11. Prevalence and Associated Factors of Diabetes and Impaired Fasting Glucose in Chinese Hypertensive Adults Aged 45 to 75 Years

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yan; Ma, Wei; Fan, Fangfang; Wang, Binyan; Xing, Houxun; Tang, Genfu; Wang, Xiaobin; Xu, Xin; Xu, Xiping; Huo, Yong

    2012-01-01

    Objective This study examined the prevalence of impaired fasting glucose (IFG) and diabetes and their associated factors in 17,184 Chinese hypertensive adults aged 45–75 years. Methods A cross-sectional investigation was carried out in a rural area of Lianyungang, China. Previously undiagnosed diabetes [fasting plasma glucose (FPG) ≥7.0mmol/l] and IFG (6.1–6.9mmol/l) were defined based on FPG concentration. Previously diagnosed diabetes was determined on the basis of self-report. Total diabetes included both previously diagnosed diabetes and previously undiagnosed diabetes. Results The prevalence of previously diagnosed diabetes, undiagnosed diabetes, and IFG were 3.4%, 9.8%, and 14.1%, respectively. About 74.2% of the participants with diabetes had not previously been diagnosed. In the multivariable logistic-regression model, older age, men, antihypertensive treatment, obesity (BMI ≥25kg/m2), abdominal obesity (waist circumference ≥90cm for men and ≥80cm for women), non-current smoking, a family history of diabetes, higher heart rate, lower physical activity levels, and inland residence (versus coastal) were significantly associated with both total diabetes and previously undiagnosed diabetes. Furthermore, methylene- tetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) 677 TT genotype was an independent associated factor for total diabetes, and current alcohol drinking was an independent associated factor for previously undiagnosed diabetes. At the same time, older age, men, abdominal obesity, non-current smoking, current alcohol drinking, a family history of diabetes, higher heart rate, and inland residence (versus coastal) were important independent associated factors for IFG. Conclusion In conclusion, we found a high prevalence of diabetes in Chinese hypertensive adults. Furthermore, about three out of every four diabetic adults were undiagnosed. Our results suggest that population-level measures aimed at the prevention, identification (even if only based on the FPG

  12. The brain melanocortin system, sympathetic control, and obesity hypertension.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Alexandre A; do Carmo, Jussara M; Wang, Zhen; Hall, John E

    2014-05-01

    Excess weight gain is the most significant, preventable cause of increased blood pressure (BP) in patients with primary (essential) hypertension and increases the risk for cardiovascular and renal diseases. In this review, we discuss the role of the brain melanocortin system in causing increased sympathetic activity in obesity and other forms of hypertension. In addition, we highlight potential mechanisms by which the brain melanocortin system modulates metabolic and cardiovascular functions.

  13. Obesity-related hypertension: pathogenesis, cardiovascular risk, and treatment--a position paper of the The Obesity Society and The American Society of Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Landsberg, Lewis; Aronne, Louis J; Beilin, Lawrence J; Burke, Valerie; Igel, Leon I; Lloyd-Jones, Donald; Sowers, James

    2013-01-01

    In light of the worldwide epidemic of obesity, and in recognition of hypertension as a major factor in the cardiovascular morbidity and mortality associated with obesity, The Obesity Society and The American Society of Hypertension agreed to jointly sponsor a position paper on obesity-related hypertension to be published jointly in the journals of each society. The purpose is to inform the members of both societies, as well as practicing clinicians, with a timely review of the association between obesity and high blood pressure, the risk that this association entails, and the options for rational, evidenced-based treatment. The position paper is divided into six sections plus a summary as follows: pathophysiology, epidemiology and cardiovascular risk, the metabolic syndrome, lifestyle management in prevention and treatment, pharmacologic treatment of hypertension in the obese, and the medical and surgical treatment of obesity in obese hypertensive patients.

  14. Obesity-related hypertension: pathogenesis, cardiovascular risk, and treatment: a position paper of The Obesity Society and the American Society of Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Landsberg, Lewis; Aronne, Louis J; Beilin, Lawrence J; Burke, Valerie; Igel, Leon I; Lloyd-Jones, Donald; Sowers, James

    2013-01-01

    In light of the worldwide epidemic of obesity, and in recognition of hypertension as a major factor in the cardiovascular morbidity and mortality associated with obesity, The Obesity Society and the American Society of Hypertension agreed to jointly sponsor a position paper on obesity-related hypertension to be published jointly in the journals of each society. The purpose is to inform the members of both societies, as well as practicing clinicians, with a timely review of the association between obesity and high blood pressure, the risk that this association entails, and the options for rational, evidenced-based treatment. The position paper is divided into six sections plus a summary as follows: pathophysiology, epidemiology and cardiovascular risk, the metabolic syndrome, lifestyle management in prevention and treatment, pharmacologic treatment of hypertension in the obese, and the medical and surgical treatment of obesity in obese hypertensive patients.

  15. Bariatric Surgery for People with Diabetes and Morbid Obesity

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    to bariatric surgery and the improvement of diabetes from the full evidence-based analysis of bariatric surgery for the treatment of morbid obesity completed by the Medical Advisory Secretariat (MAS) in January 2005. To view the full report, please visit the MAS website at: http://www.health.gov.on.ca/english/providers/program/mas/tech/techmn.html. Clinical Need: Condition and Target Population Obesity is defined as an excessive accumulation of body fat as measured by the body mass index (BMI) and calculated as body weight in kilograms (kg) divided by height in metres squared (m2). People with a BMI over 30 kg/m2 are considered obese in most countries. The condition is associated with the development of several diseases, including hypertension, diabetes mellitus (type 2 diabetes), hyperlipidemia, coronary artery disease, obstructive sleep apnea, depression, and cancers of the breast, uterus, prostate, and colon. Clinically severe, or morbid obesity, is commonly defined by a BMI of at least 40 kg/m2, or a BMI of at least 35 kg/m2 if there are comorbid conditions such as diabetes, cardiovascular disease, or arthritis. The prevalence of morbid obesity among people with type 2 diabetes has been examined and of 2,460 patients with type 2 diabetes, 52% (n = 1,279) were obese (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m2) and 23% (n = 561) had a BMI ≥ 35 kg/m2. Bariatric Surgery Men and women with morbid obesity may be eligible for surgical intervention. There are numerous surgical options available, all of which can be divided into two general types, both of which can be performed either as open surgery or laparoscopically: malabsorptive - bypassing parts of the gastrointestinal tract to limit the absorption of food, and restrictive - decreasing the size of the stomach in order for the patient to feel satiated with a smaller amount food Surgery for morbid obesity is usually considered a last resort for people who have attempted first-line medical management (e.g. diet, behaviour modification

  16. Prevalence of Hypertension in Boloor Diabetes Study (BDS-II) and its Risk Factors

    PubMed Central

    Adhikari, Prabha; Pathak, Rahul; Kotian, Mangalore Shashidhar; Ullal, Sheetal

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Hypertension is a major public health problem in India and worldwide. Since hypertension is often asymptomatic, it commonly remains undetected, leading to serious complications if untreated. Hypertension is one of the leading causes of end stage renal disease. It doubles the risk of developing coronary artery disease, increases the risk of congestive heart failure by four folds and that of cerebrovascular disease and stroke by seven folds. Hypertension is directly responsible for 57% of all stroke deaths and 42% of coronary heart disease deaths in India. Aim To identify prevalence and risk factors for hypertension in a semi urban population of Mangalore, who participated in Boloor Diabetes Study (BDS-II). Materials and Methods This cross-sectional study was conducted on 551 subjects aged ≥ 20 years who were randomly selected. Hypertension was diagnosed and classified according to Joint National Committee 7 (JNC) criteria. Blood pressure was measured by a doctor using calibrated sphygmomanometer. Anthropometric measurements, lipid and glucose estimations were done for all subjects. Statistical analysis was done using Chi-square test and student’s t-test (unpaired). Multivariate logistic regression analysis was done using hypertension as dependent variable and the various risk factors as independent variables. Results Overall prevalence of hypertension in the community was 41% (227/551) (40.9% in men, 41.3% in women). Prehypertension was found in 40% (223/551) (45.4% in men, 38.1% in women), and only 18.3% (101/551) had normal blood pressure. Stage I hypertension was seen in 29.7% (164/551) (28.9% in men, 30.1% in women). Stage II hypertension was seen in 11.4% (63/551) (12% in men, 11% in women). Age, obesity, diabetes, serum cholesterol and serum triglycerides were strongly associated with hypertension. Only 46% (254/551) of the hypertensive subjects were aware that they were hypertensive. Conclusion Prevalence of hypertension was high in this

  17. Hypertension in the elderly diabetic: therapeutic aspects.

    PubMed

    Frank, H J

    1988-11-01

    Elderly diabetic patients with hypertension present a difficult medical management problem. The guidelines published by the 1987 Working Group on Hypertension in Diabetes in the United States suggest a stepped care approach to drug therapy in these patients. The stepped care strategy is to add a series of antihypertensive medications sequentially until the blood pressure is controlled. The first step includes one of the following: thiazide diuretics, beta-blockers, alpha-adrenergic inhibitors, angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors or calcium channel blockers. The second step adds a second agent from the same group, while the third step adds a vasodilator and step four adds a drug like guanethidine if the combination of other drugs fails. This approach presents many perils in the aged patient with diabetes. In these patients the physician should: (1) limit the use of diuretics and beta-blockers; (2) favour the use of calcium channel blockers and ACE inhibitors; (3) use a substitution approach rather than a stepped care approach; and (4) use monotherapy if possible.

  18. Elevated Urinary T Helper 1 Chemokine Levels in Newly Diagnosed Hypertensive Obese Children

    PubMed Central

    Övünç Hacıhamdioğlu, Duygu; Zeybek, Cengiz; Gök, Faysal; Pekel, Aysel; Muşabak, Uğur

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Increasing evidence suggests that T helper (Th) cells play a significant role in the pathogenesis of hypertension. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of obesity and anti-hypertensive treatment on urinary Th1 chemokines. Methods: The study groups consisted of three types of patients: hypertensive obese, healthy, and non-hypertensive obese. Pre-treatment and post-treatment samples of the hypertensive obese group and one sample from the other two groups were evaluated for urinary chemokine: regulated on activation, normal T cell expressed and secreted (RANTES), interferon-gamma-inducible protein 10 (IP10), and monokine induced by interferon-gamma (MIG). In the hypertensive obese group, urine microalbumin: creatinine ratio was examined before and after treatment. We recommended lifestyle changes to all patients. Captopril was started in those who could not be controlled with lifestyle changes and those who had stage 2 hypertension. Results: Twenty-four hypertensive obese (mean age 13.1), 27 healthy (mean age 11.2) and 22 non-hypertensive obese (mean age 11.5) children were investigated. The pre-treatment urine albumin: creatinine ratio was positively correlated with pre-treatment MIG levels (r=0.41, p<0.05). RANTES was significantly higher in the pre-treatment hypertensive and non-hypertensive obese group than in the controls. The urinary IP10 and MIG levels were higher in the pre-treatment hypertensive obese group than in the non-hypertensive obese. Comparison of the pre- and post-treatment values indicated significant decreases in RANTES, IP10, and MIG levels in the hypertensive obese group (p<0.05). Conclusion: Th1 cells could be activated in obese hypertensive children before the onset of clinical indicators of target organ damage. Urinary RANTES seemed to be affected by both hypertension and obesity, and urinary IP10 and MIG seemed to be affected predominantly by hypertension. PMID:26831550

  19. Obesity, hypertension and genetic variation in the TIGER Study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Obesity and hypertension are multifactoral conditions in which the onset and severity of the conditions are influenced by the interplay of genetic and environmental factors. We hypothesize that multiple genes and environmental factors account for a significant amount of variation in BMI and blood pr...

  20. Diabetes, hypertension, sanitation, and health education by high school students in Guyana, South America

    PubMed Central

    Jindal, R. M.; Mehta, K.; Soni, R.; Doyle, A.; Patel, T. G.

    2016-01-01

    We initiated a program for early detection of diabetes and hypertension, the main causes of kidney failure in Guyana, South America. We trained local high school students with the goal that these students would stay in the villages for long-term, become health advocates and shift the reliance away from physicians. This project involved 7 high school students who were taught to monitor the health of one village of 1000–1500 population each. The program will be implemented for 3 years in which the entire population of seven villages (approximately 10,000 people) will be covered. This represents 1.3% population in Guyana. We present data from the pilot study from the sample of 619 people. The prevalence of diabetes mellitus was 13.9%. Among diabetics, 33.7% were using insulin and 86% oral hypoglycemic agents. Prevalence of hypertension was 29.4%, 63.2% were overweight and 17% were obese. About 9.9% patients were unaware about the existence of hypertension. We have shown in our study that high school students can be used to collect health data and monitor diabetes and hypertension. There was also a significant incidence of undetected diabetes and hypertension. PMID:27194834

  1. Maternal diabetes programs hypertension and kidney injury in offspring.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yun-Wen; Chenier, Isabelle; Tran, Stella; Scotcher, Michael; Chang, Shiao-Ying; Zhang, Shao-Ling

    2010-07-01

    We investigated whether maternal diabetes programs the offspring to develop hypertension and kidney injury in adulthood and examined potential underlying mechanisms. In a murine model we studied the offspring of three groups of dams (non-diabetic, diabetic, and diabetic treated with insulin). Mean systolic blood pressure in the offspring was monitored from 8 to 20 weeks. Body and kidney weights in the offspring of diabetic mothers were significantly lower than in offspring of non-diabetic mothers. Offspring of diabetic mothers developed hypertension, microalbuminuria, and glucose intolerance. Increased accumulation of extracellular matrix proteins in the glomeruli and marked upregulation of angiotensinogen, angiotensin II type 1 receptor, angiotensin-converting enzyme, transforming growth factor beta-1 (TGF-beta1), and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) gene expression were evident in the renal cortex of hypertensive offspring of diabetic mothers. By contrast, angiotensin-converting enzyme-2 (ACE2) gene expression was lower in the hypertensive offspring of diabetic mothers than in that of non-diabetic mothers. These changes were prevented in the offspring of insulin-treated diabetic mothers. These data indicate that maternal diabetes induces perinatal programming of hypertension, renal injury, and glucose intolerance in the offspring and suggest a central role for the activation of the intrarenal renin-angiotensin system and TGF-beta1 gene expression in this process.

  2. Central Obesity and Disease Risk in Japanese Americans

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-08

    Cardiovascular Diseases; Heart Diseases; Atherosclerosis; Hypertension; Obesity; Diabetes Mellitus, Non-insulin Dependent; Hyperinsulinism; Insulin Resistance; Coronary Arteriosclerosis; Diabetes Mellitus; Metabolic Syndrome X

  3. Peptide Vaccines for Hypertension and Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Nakagami, Hironori; Koriyama, Hiroshi; Morishita, Ryuichi

    2014-11-26

    Vaccines are commonly used as a preventive medicine for infectious diseases worldwide; however, the trial for an amyloid beta vaccine against Alzheimer's disease will open a new concept in vaccination. In case of therapeutic vaccines for cancer, their targets are usually specific antigens in cancer cells, allowing activated cytotoxic T cells (CTLs) to attach and remove the antigen-presenting cancer cells. In our therapeutic vaccines against hypertension, the target is angiotensin II (Ang II) and induced anti-Ang II antibodies could efficiently ameliorate high blood pressure. Similarly, we developed the therapeutic vaccine against DPP4 for diabetes mellitus. However, because Ang II or DPP4 is an endogenous hormone, we must avoid autoimmune disease induced by these vaccines. Therefore, our system was used to design a therapeutic vaccine that elicits anti-Ang II or DPP4 antibodies without CTL activation against Ang II or DPP4. In this review, we will describe our concept of therapeutic vaccines for hypertension and diabetes mellitus.

  4. Plasma renin activity and hypertension in diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Christlieb, A R; Kaldany, A; D'Elia, J A

    1976-10-01

    Plasma renin activity (PRA) was determined in 48 patients with diabetes mellitus in sodium balance on a 10-20 mEq. Na diet. Nine were normotensive (group I), 11 11 were hypertensive without diabetic nephropathy (group III). Results were compared with those in 16 normal subjects and 49 nondiabetic patients with essential hypertension in similar Na balance. Mean supine PRA did not differ significantly among groups I and II, normal subjects, and patients with essential hypertension. Group III diabetics had a supine PRA of 2.4 +/- 0.4 ng./ml./hr. (x +/- S.E.M.), significantly lower than the other diabetic groups (P less than 0.005) and normal subjects (P less than 0.05). Upright PRA was 12.8 +/- 2.2 in group I diabetics, similar to that in normal subjects (13.3 +/- 2.3), and 8.1 +/- 1.4 in group II diabetics, similar to that in essential hypertensives (6.8 +/- 0.8). In group III diabetics, upright PRA was 4.0 +/- 0.5, significantly lower than that in any other group. These results suggest that (1) PRA is normal in normotensive diabetics, (2) upright PRA in diabetics with hypertension but no nephropathy is similar to that in essential hypertension, and (3) patients with diabetes, hypertension, and nephropathy have "low renin hypertension," explaining the virtual absence of malignant hypertension in this group. Although the major mechanism for this low PRA may be volume expansion, indicating the need for potent diuretics, other mechanisms include hyalinization of the afferent arteriole, decreased cathecholamine stimulation of renin release, and inadequate conversion of prorenin to renin.

  5. Arterial stiffening precedes systolic hypertension in diet-induced obesity.

    PubMed

    Weisbrod, Robert M; Shiang, Tina; Al Sayah, Leona; Fry, Jessica L; Bajpai, Saumendra; Reinhart-King, Cynthia A; Lob, Heinrich E; Santhanam, Lakshmi; Mitchell, Gary; Cohen, Richard A; Seta, Francesca

    2013-12-01

    Stiffening of conduit arteries is a risk factor for cardiovascular morbidity. Aortic wall stiffening increases pulsatile hemodynamic forces that are detrimental to the microcirculation in highly perfused organs, such as the heart, brain, and kidney. Arterial stiffness is associated with hypertension but presumed to be due to an adaptive response to increased hemodynamic load. In contrast, a recent clinical study found that stiffness precedes and may contribute to the development of hypertension although the mechanisms underlying hypertension are unknown. Here, we report that in a diet-induced model of obesity, arterial stiffness, measured in vivo, develops within 1 month of the initiation of the diet and precedes the development of hypertension by 5 months. Diet-induced obese mice recapitulate the metabolic syndrome and are characterized by inflammation in visceral fat and aorta. Normalization of the metabolic state by weight loss resulted in return of arterial stiffness and blood pressure to normal. Our findings support the hypothesis that arterial stiffness is a cause rather than a consequence of hypertension.

  6. Obesity and health (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Obesity increases a person's risk of illness and death due to diabetes, stroke, heart disease, hypertension, high cholesterol, and kidney and gallbladder disease. Obesity may increase the risk for some types of ...

  7. Phenotypic Type 2 Diabetes in Obese Youth

    PubMed Central

    Tfayli, Hala; Bacha, Fida; Gungor, Neslihan; Arslanian, Silva

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE— Some obese youth with a clinical diagnosis of type 2 diabetes have evidence of islet cell autoimmunity with positive autoantibodies. In this study, we investigated the differences in insulin sensitivity and secretion between autoantibody-negative (Ab−) and -positive (Ab+) youth with clinically diagnosed type 2 diabetes in comparison with control subjects. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS— Sixteen Ab− and 26 Ab+ clinically diagnosed type 2 diabetic patients and 39 obese control youth underwent evaluation of insulin sensitivity (3-h hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp), substrate oxidation (indirect calorimetry), first- and second-phase insulin secretion (2-h hyperglycemic clamp), body composition and abdominal adiposity (dual energy X-ray absorptiometry and computed tomography scan, respectively), and glucose disposition index (first-phase insulin secretion × insulin sensitivity). RESULTS— Insulin-stimulated total, oxidative, and nonoxidative glucose disposal, and suppression of fat oxidation during hyperinsulinemia were significantly lower in Ab− compared with Ab+ clinically diagnosed type 2 diabetic and control subjects with no difference between the latter two. First- and second-phase insulin secretion and C-peptide were lower in Ab+ compared with Ab− type 2 diabetes. Glucose disposition index was not different between the Ab− and Ab+ clinically diagnosed type 2 diabetic patients, but both were significantly lower than that in control subjects. Systolic blood pressure and alanine aminotransferase were higher in Ab− versus Ab+ clinically diagnosed type 2 diabetic patients, whereas the frequency of ketonuria at diagnosis was higher in Ab+ versus Ab− patients. CONCLUSIONS— Islet-cell Ab− clinically diagnosed type 2 diabetic youth are characterized by severe insulin resistance and relative insulin deficiency, whereas Ab+ youth have severe insulin deficiency and β-cell failure. The former group has additional features of insulin

  8. The investigation of the some body parameters of obese and (obese+diabetes) patients with using bioelectrical impedance analysis techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yerlikaya, Emrah; Karageçili, Hasan; Aydin, Ruken Zeynep

    2016-04-01

    Obesity is a key risk for the development of hyperglycemia, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, insulin resistance and is totally referred to as the metabolic disorders. Diabetes mellitus, a metabolic disorder, is related with hyperglycemia, altered metabolism of lipids, carbohydrates and proteins. The minimum defining characteristic feature to identify diabetes mellitus is chronic and substantiated elevation of circulating glucose concentration. In this study, it is aimed to determine the body composition analyze of obese and (obese+diabetes) patients.We studied the datas taken from three independent groups with the body composition analyzer instrument. The body composition analyzer calculates body parameters, such as body fat ratio, body fat mass, fat free mass, estimated muscle mass, and base metabolic rate on the basis of data obtained by Dual Energy X-ray Absorptiometry using Bioelectrical Impedance Analysis. All patients and healthy subjects applied to Siirt University Medico and their datas were taken. The Statistical Package for Social Sciences version 21 was used for descriptive data analysis. When we compared and analyzed three groups datas, we found statistically significant difference between obese, (obese+diabetes) and control groups values. Anova test and tukey test are used to analyze the difference between groups and to do multiple comparisons. T test is also used to analyze the difference between genders. We observed the statistically significant difference in age and mineral amount p<0.00 between (diabetes+obese) and obese groups. Besides, when these patient groups and control group were analyzed, there were significant difference between most parameters. In terms of education level among the illiterate and university graduates; fat mass kg, fat percentage, internal lubrication, body mass index, water percentage, protein mass percentage, mineral percentage p<0.05, significant statistically difference were observed. This difference especially may result

  9. Phytotherapy of hypertension and diabetes in oriental Morocco.

    PubMed

    Ziyyat, A; Legssyer, A; Mekhfi, H; Dassouli, A; Serhrouchni, M; Benjelloun, W

    1997-09-01

    In order to select the main medicinal plants used in folk medicine to treat arterial hypertension and/or diabetes, a survey was undertaken in different areas of oriental Morocco. The patients (370 women and 256 men) were divided into three groups: diabetics (61%), hypertensives (23%) and hypertensive diabetic persons (16%). On average, 67.51% of patients regularly use medicinal plants. This proportion is perceptibly the same in all groups and does not depend on sex, age and socio-cultural level. This result shows that phytotherapy is widely adopted in northeastern Morocco. For diabetes, 41 plants were cited, of which the most used were Trigonella foenum-graecum L. (Leguminosae), Globularia alypum L. (Globulariaceae), Artemisia herba-alba Asso. (Compositae), Citrullus colocynthis (L.) Schrad. (Cucurbitaceae) and Tetraclinis articulata Benth. (Cupressaceae). In the hypertension's therapy 18 vegetal species were reported, of which the most used were Allium sativum L. (Liliaceae), Olea europea L. (Oleaceae), Arbutus unedo L. (Ericaceae), Urtica dioica L. (Urticaceae) and Petroselinum crispum A.W. Hill (Apiaceae). Among the 18 species used for hypertension, 14 were also employed for diabetes. Moreover, these two diseases were associated in 41% of hypertensives. These findings suggest that hypertension observed in this region would be in a large part related to diabetes.

  10. The Hypertension in Diabetes Study (HDS): a catalyst for change.

    PubMed

    Williams, B

    2008-08-01

    Hypertension is now established as a major risk factor for premature cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in people with Type 2 diabetes and all modern treatment guidelines recommend the routine treatment of hypertension in these patients. However, these developments have been relatively recent. Only a decade ago, outside of small studies in patients with nephropathy, there was little evidence with regard to the efficacy and safety of treating elevated blood pressure in people with Type 2 diabetes. Consequently, for many patients, elevated blood pressure remained undetected and untreated. This changed with the publication of the Hypertension in Diabetes Study (HDS) in 1998. This study revealed that hypertension was very common in people with Type 2 diabetes and demonstrated the dramatic benefits of blood pressure lowering in reducing their risk of major macrovascular and microvascular complications. The unequivocal evidence from this study provided a much-needed catalyst for change, propelling blood pressure measurement and its treatment to the forefront of risk management in these patients. Many studies have followed and many questions remain with regard to the preferred anti-hypertensive treatment strategy and optimal treatment targets for blood pressure. In the meantime, many millions of patients with Type 2 diabetes worldwide have benefited and will continue to benefit from the therapeutic insights gained from the treatment of blood pressure in the 1148 patients enrolled in the Hypertension in Diabetes Study in the UK Prospective Diabetes Study.

  11. Bariatric Surgery to Correct Morbid Obesity Also Ameliorates Atherosclerosis in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yong; Zhang, Cuihua

    2009-01-01

    Morbid obesity, a physiological dysfunction in humans associated with environmental, genetic and endocrinological origins, has significantly increased in the past few decades in the USA. Many methods have emerged for treating morbid obesity, such as diets, exercise, behavior modification, liposuction, drugs, and surgery; among these, bariatric surgery reduces weight and appears to have other curative effects. Roux-en-Y gastric bypass is the principal form of bariatric surgery, followed by laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding, gastric sleeve operation, duodenojejunal bypass and biliopancreatic diversion. This weight-loss surgery may also affect comorbidities of morbid obesity, such as type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D), atherosclerosis, hypertension and steatohepatitis. Weight-loss surgery, for example, is associated with a more than 80% diabetes (data indicates > 80%) remission rate in severely obese persons. Empirical evidence also suggests that the use of bariatric surgery reduces atherosclerosis, and may ameliorate other comorbities. This warrants closer examination. PMID:19915685

  12. [Epigenetics of childhood obesity and diabetes].

    PubMed

    Valladares-Salgado, Adán; Suárez-Sánchez, Fernando; Burguete-García, Ana I; Cruz, Miguel

    2014-01-01

    Obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) result from sedentary lifestyle, high-carbohydrate diets and genetic predisposition. Epigenetics is a form of genetic regulation in specialized cells that does not involve changes in the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) sequence, but it can be inherited to one or more generations through mitosis or meiosis. Children whose mothers develop gestational diabetes are more likely to become obese and diabetic in adult life. DNA methylation is a major mechanism in the regulation of transcription and gene expression of several genes. High levels of glucose and insulin during pregnancy modify the risk of developing T2DM, suggesting that the expression pattern is modified due to cell memory in a specific tissue. If T2DM is linked to adaptation in utero, the obvious primary prevention is to protect the fetal development. Future epidemiological studies need to employ more accurate indicators or markers of development to show the relationship between a specific disease and the exposure to environmental factors. The mechanisms by which malnutrition, and intrauterine growth retardation produce changes in the metabolism of glucose and insuline are worth to explore in order to control obesity and T2DM.

  13. Central nervous system dysfunction in obesity-induced hypertension.

    PubMed

    Head, Geoffrey A; Lim, Kyungjoon; Barzel, Benjamin; Burke, Sandra L; Davern, Pamela J

    2014-09-01

    The activation of the sympathetic nervous system is a major mechanism underlying both human and experimental models of obesity-related hypertension. While insulin and the adipokine leptin have long been thought to contribute to obesity-related neurogenic mechanisms, the evidence is now very strong that they play a major role, shown particularly in animal studies using selective receptor antagonists. There is not just maintenance of leptin's sympatho-excitatory actions as previously suggested but considerable amplification particularly in renal sympathetic nervous activity. Importantly, these changes are not dependent on short-term elevation or reduction in plasma leptin or insulin, but require some weeks to develop indicating a slow "neural adaptivity" within hypothalamic signalling. These effects can be carried across generations even when offspring are raised on a normal diet. A better understanding of the underlying mechanism should be a high research priority given the prevalence of obesity not just in the current population but also for future generations.

  14. Anti-oxidants show an anti-hypertensive effect in diabetic and hypertensive subjects.

    PubMed

    Ceriello, A; Giugliano, D; Quatraro, A; Lefebvre, P J

    1991-12-01

    1. In this study an acute anti-hypertensive effect of three anti-oxidant agents (vitamin C, thiopronine and glutathione) in hypertensive subjects and in both hypertensive and non-hypertensive diabetic patients is reported. 2. The anti-oxidants had no effect on blood pressure in healthy normal subjects at a dose of 6 mmol, but thiopronine and glutathione produced a significant hypotensive effect at a dose of 12 mmol. 3. These data suggest that anti-oxidants might have a dilatatory effect and that an imbalance of the nitric oxide-free radical interaction might facilitate the development of hypertension in humans.

  15. Obesity & Diabetes: An experience at a public sector tertiary care hospital

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Zeeshan; Ahmed, Syed Masroor; Nageen, Ayesha; Tanveer Alam, Muhammad; Sohrab, Shabnam

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To detect the frequency of Obesity in type 2 diabetic patients. Methods: It was a Cross Sectional study carried out at Diabetes Clinic, Medical Unit III, Jinnah Postgraduate Medical Centre Karachi from 1st Jan 2012 to 30th June 2012. Three hundred and eighty seven (387) type II diabetic patients of either sex and any age were included in the study. Non-purposive convenience sampling technique was used to enroll patients in the study. History regarding diabetes, hypertension (HTN), Cerebrovascular Accidents (CVA), smoking and other tobacco exposure was taken. Physical examination was carried out and height, weight, body mass index (BMI), blood pressure, peripheral pulses and ankle-brachial index (ABI) was calculated. Categorical variables such as Gender, Age groups, BMI groups, HTN, smoking, hyperlipidemia and ABI were expressed as frequencies and proportions. Means with standard deviations were calculated for continuous variables such as age, duration of diabetes, BMI, duration of HTN and duration dyslipidemia. For categorical variables, differences between patients were tested using the chi-square test. P value of ≤ 0.05 was considered significant. Results: Males were 128 in number (33%) and female were 259 in number (67%). Mean age was 52 yrs (+/- 9.67) and the mean duration of diabetes was 9.36 yrs (+/- 6.39). Hypertension was seen in 210 people (54%). 49(12.7%) were smokers and 39(10%) chewed tobacco. Normal BMI was seen in 62 patients (16%), 44 (11.4%) were overweight and 281(72.6%) was obese. Obesity was much more prevalent amongst the female gender that is 208(80%) versus male which was 73 (57%) and this was statistically significant (p-value 0.001). Hypertension was also more prevalent in obese patients and was statistically significant (p-value 0.04). Statistically significant lower mean BMI was found in smokers, tobacco chewers and/or had exposure to tobacco (0.001, 0.04, and 0.001 respectively). Conclusion: The study shows that there is a

  16. Arsenic and diabetes and hypertension in human populations: A review

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C.-J. Wang, S.-L.; Chiou, J.-M.; Tseng, C.-H.; Chiou, H.-Y.; Hsueh, Y.-M.; Chen, S.-Y.; Wu, M.-M.; Lai, M.-S.

    2007-08-01

    Long-term exposure to ingested arsenic from drinking water has been well documented to be associated with an increased risk of diabetes mellitus and hypertension in a dose-response relationship among residents of arseniasis-endemic areas in southwestern Taiwan and Bangladesh. An increased risk of self-reported hypertension but not diabetes was reported in a community-based study of residents who consumed drinking water with a low level of arsenic. Increased glycosylated hemoglobin level and systolic blood pressure were observed in workers occupationally exposed to arsenic. Inconsistent findings of arsenic and diabetes in occupational studies may result from the healthy worker effect and the variation in exposure measurement, age composition, number of patients, accuracy in diagnosis and classification of underlying causes of death, competing causes of death, and method to detect diabetes. The dose-response relationship and toxicological mechanisms of arsenic-induced diabetes and hypertension need further elucidation.

  17. Molecular Mechanisms of the Anti-Obesity and Anti-Diabetic Properties of Flavonoids

    PubMed Central

    Kawser Hossain, Mohammed; Abdal Dayem, Ahmed; Han, Jihae; Yin, Yingfu; Kim, Kyeongseok; Kumar Saha, Subbroto; Yang, Gwang-Mo; Choi, Hye Yeon; Cho, Ssang-Goo

    2016-01-01

    Obesity and diabetes are the most prevailing health concerns worldwide and their incidence is increasing at a high rate, resulting in enormous social costs. Obesity is a complex disease commonly accompanied by insulin resistance and increases in oxidative stress and inflammatory marker expression, leading to augmented fat mass in the body. Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a metabolic disorder characterized by the destruction of pancreatic β cells or diminished insulin secretion and action insulin. Obesity causes the development of metabolic disorders such as DM, hypertension, cardiovascular diseases, and inflammation-based pathologies. Flavonoids are the secondary metabolites of plants and have 15-carbon skeleton structures containing two phenyl rings and a heterocyclic ring. More than 5000 naturally occurring flavonoids have been reported from various plants and have been found to possess many beneficial effects with advantages over chemical treatments. A number of studies have demonstrated the potential health benefits of natural flavonoids in treating obesity and DM, and show increased bioavailability and action on multiple molecular targets. This review summarizes the current progress in our understanding of the anti-obesity and anti-diabetic potential of natural flavonoids and their molecular mechanisms for preventing and/or treating obesity and diabetes. PMID:27092490

  18. Molecular Mechanisms of the Anti-Obesity and Anti-Diabetic Properties of Flavonoids.

    PubMed

    Kawser Hossain, Mohammed; Abdal Dayem, Ahmed; Han, Jihae; Yin, Yingfu; Kim, Kyeongseok; Kumar Saha, Subbroto; Yang, Gwang-Mo; Choi, Hye Yeon; Cho, Ssang-Goo

    2016-04-15

    Obesity and diabetes are the most prevailing health concerns worldwide and their incidence is increasing at a high rate, resulting in enormous social costs. Obesity is a complex disease commonly accompanied by insulin resistance and increases in oxidative stress and inflammatory marker expression, leading to augmented fat mass in the body. Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a metabolic disorder characterized by the destruction of pancreatic β cells or diminished insulin secretion and action insulin. Obesity causes the development of metabolic disorders such as DM, hypertension, cardiovascular diseases, and inflammation-based pathologies. Flavonoids are the secondary metabolites of plants and have 15-carbon skeleton structures containing two phenyl rings and a heterocyclic ring. More than 5000 naturally occurring flavonoids have been reported from various plants and have been found to possess many beneficial effects with advantages over chemical treatments. A number of studies have demonstrated the potential health benefits of natural flavonoids in treating obesity and DM, and show increased bioavailability and action on multiple molecular targets. This review summarizes the current progress in our understanding of the anti-obesity and anti-diabetic potential of natural flavonoids and their molecular mechanisms for preventing and/or treating obesity and diabetes.

  19. Links between Childhood and Adult Social Circumstances and Obesity and Hypertension in the Mexican Population

    PubMed Central

    Beltrán-Sánchez, Hiram; Crimmins, Eileen M.; Teruel, Graciela M.; Thomas, Duncan

    2011-01-01

    Objectives This study examines links between early life circumstances and adult socioeconomic status and obesity and hypertension in the adult Mexican population. Methods We use data from the Mexican Family Life Survey (MxFLS) collected in 2002 for people aged 20 or older (N=14, 280). Results We found that men with low education and women with more education have significantly lower obesity. Women with higher education also have significantly less hypertension. Obesity triples the likelihood of hypertension among both men and women. Better childhood experiences are associated with less hypertension among women, but more hypertension among men in rural areas. Discussion Recent changes in income, nutrition, and infection in Mexico may be responsible for the observed high prevalence of overweight and obesity and the extremely high odds of hypertension among obese young adults. PMID:21948773

  20. Combating Combination of Hypertension and Diabetes in Different Rat Models

    PubMed Central

    Rosenthal, Talma; Younis, Firas; Alter, Ariela

    2010-01-01

    Rat experimental models are used extensively for studying physiological mechanisms and treatments of hypertension and diabetes co-existence. Each one of these conditions is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD), and the combination of the two conditions is a potent enhancer of CVD. Five major animal models that advanced our understanding of the mechanisms and therapeutic approaches in humans are discussed in this review: Zucker, Goto-Kakizaki, SHROB, SHR/NDmcr-cp and Cohen Rosenthal diabetic hypertensive (CRDH) rats. The use of various drugs, such as angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors (ACEIs), various angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs), and calcium channel blockers (CCBs), to combat the effects of concomitant pathologies on the combination of diabetes and hypertension, as well as the non-pharmacological approach are reviewed in detail for each rat model. Results from experiments on these models indicate that classical factors contributing to the pathology of hypertension and diabetes combination—Including hypertension, hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia and hyperlipidemia—can now be treated, although these treatments do not completely prevent renal complications. Animal studies have focused on several mechanisms involved in hypertension/diabetes that remain to be translated into clinical medicine, including hypoxia, oxidative stress, and advanced glycation. Several target molecules have been identified that need to be incorporated into a treatment modality. The challenge continues to be the identification and interpretation of the clinical evidence from the animal models and their application to human treatment. PMID:27713282

  1. Metabolomic analyses for atherosclerosis, diabetes, and obesity

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Insulin resistance associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), obesity, and atherosclerosis is a global health problem. A portfolio of abnormalities of metabolic and vascular homeostasis accompanies T2DM and obesity, which are believed to conspire to lead to accelerated atherosclerosis and premature death. The complexity of metabolic changes in the diseases presents challenges for a full understanding of the molecular pathways contributing to the development of these diseases. The recent advent of new technologies in this area termed “Metabolomics” may aid in comprehensive metabolic analysis of these diseases. Therefore, metabolomics has been extensively applied to the metabolites of T2DM, obesity, and atherosclerosis not only for the assessment of disease development and prognosis, but also for the biomarker discovery of disease diagnosis. Herein, we summarize the recent applications of metabolomics technology and the generated datasets in the metabolic profiling of these diseases, in particular, the applications of these technologies to these diseases at the cellular, animal models, and human disease levels. In addition, we also extensively discuss the mechanisms linking the metabolic profiling in insulin resistance, T2DM, obesity, and atherosclerosis, with a particular emphasis on potential roles of increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and mitochondria dysfunctions. PMID:24252331

  2. Childhood obesity affects adult metabolic syndrome and diabetes.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yajun; Hou, Dongqing; Zhao, Xiaoyuan; Wang, Liang; Hu, Yuehua; Liu, Junting; Cheng, Hong; Yang, Ping; Shan, Xinying; Yan, Yinkun; Cruickshank, J Kennedy; Mi, Jie

    2015-09-01

    We seek to observe the association between childhood obesity by different measures and adult obesity, metabolic syndrome (MetS), and diabetes. Thousand two hundred and nine subjects from "Beijing Blood Pressure Cohort Study" were followed 22.9 ± 0.5 years in average from childhood to adulthood. We defined childhood obesity using body mass index (BMI) or left subscapular skinfold (LSSF), and adult obesity as BMI ≥ 28 kg/m(2). MetS was defined according to the joint statement of International Diabetes Federation and American Heart Association with modified waist circumference (≥ 90/85 cm for men/women). Diabetes was defined as fasting plasma glucose ≥ 7.0 mmol/L or blood glucose 2 h after oral glucose tolerance test ≥ 11.1 mmol/L or currently using blood glucose-lowering agents. Multiple linear and logistic regression models were used to assess the association. The incidence of adult obesity was 13.4, 60.0, 48.3, and 65.1 % for children without obesity, having obesity by BMI only, by LSSF only, and by both, respectively. Compared to children without obesity, children obese by LSSF only or by both had higher risk of diabetes. After controlling for adult obesity, childhood obesity predicted independently long-term risks of diabetes (odds ratio 2.8, 95 % confidence interval 1.2-6.3) or abdominal obesity (2.7, 1.6-4.7) other than MetS as a whole (1.2, 0.6-2.4). Childhood obesity predicts long-term risk of adult diabetes, and the effect is independent of adult obesity. LSSF is better than BMI in predicting adult diabetes.

  3. Trandolapril/verapamil combination in hypertensive diabetic patients

    PubMed Central

    García Donaire, José A; Ruilope, Luis M

    2007-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are directly affected by arterial hypertension. When associated with diabetes mellitus, the potential deleterious effects are well amplified. Both conditions play a central role in the pathogenesis of coronary artery disease, heart failure, stroke, and renal insufficiency. Prevalence of hypertension is much higher among diabetic than non-diabetic patients, and the hypertensive patient is more likely to develop type 2 diabetes. Current international guidelines recommend aggressive reductions in blood pressure (BP) in hypertensive patients with additional risk factors, including cardiovascular risk factors, and emphasize the relevance of intensive reduction in patients with diabetes mellitus; a goal of 130/80 mm Hg is required. To achieve BP target a combination of antihypertensives will be needed, and the use of long-acting drugs that are able to provide 24-hour efficacy with a once-daily dosing confers the noteworthy advantages of compliance improvement and BP variation lessening. Lower dosages of the individual treatments of the combination therapy can be administered for the same antihypertensive efficiency as that attained with high dosages of monotherapy. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and calcium-channel blockers as a combination have theoretically compelling advantages for vessel homeostasis. Trandolapril/verapamil sustained release combination has showed beneficial effects on cardiac and renal systems as well as its antihypertensive efficacy, with no metabolic disturbances. This combination can be considered as an effective therapy for the diabetic hypertensive population. PMID:17583177

  4. TRP Channels as Therapeutic Targets in Diabetes and Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Zsombok, Andrea; Derbenev, Andrei V.

    2016-01-01

    During the last three to four decades the prevalence of obesity and diabetes mellitus has greatly increased worldwide, including in the United States. Both the short- and long-term forecasts predict serious consequences for the near future, and encourage the development of solutions for the prevention and management of obesity and diabetes mellitus. Transient receptor potential (TRP) channels were identified in tissues and organs important for the control of whole body metabolism. A variety of TRP channels has been shown to play a role in the regulation of hormone release, energy expenditure, pancreatic function, and neurotransmitter release in control, obese and/or diabetic conditions. Moreover, dietary supplementation of natural ligands of TRP channels has been shown to have potential beneficial effects in obese and diabetic conditions. These findings raised the interest and likelihood for potential drug development. In this mini-review, we discuss possibilities for better management of obesity and diabetes mellitus based on TRP-dependent mechanisms. PMID:27548188

  5. [Azilsartan Medoxomil Capabilities in Arterial Hypertension and Obesity].

    PubMed

    Vasyuk, Y A; Shupenina, E Y; Nesvetov, V V; Nesterova, E A; Golubkova, E I

    2016-12-01

    Arterial hypertension (AH) is one of the most common cardiovascular disease. Angiotensin II (AT II), the hormone of renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, realizes its negative effects through AT 1 receptors - application point of angiotensin receptor blockers (ARB). Due to different dissociation AT 1 receptors properties some ARBs are more effective than others. Multiply multicenter randomized and observational studies approve the effectiveness and safety of azilsartan medoxomil in patients with AH 1-2 grade. Several preclinical studies have shown the additional properties of azilsartan, including increase of insulin sensitivity, cardio- and nephron protection in obesity. In our clinical case we showed the positive influence of azilsartan medoxomil on clinic and ambulatory blood pressure, 24-hour aortic stiffness parameters, longitudinal left ventricular strain in patient with AH and obesity.

  6. Diabetes, Diet-Health Behavior, and Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Anders, Sven; Schroeter, Christiane

    2015-01-01

    High-quality diets play an important role in diabetes prevention. Appropriate dietary adherence can improve insulin sensitivity and glycemic control, and thus contribute to lifestyle improvement. However, previous research suggests that dietary adherence is arguably among the most difficult cornerstones of diabetes management. The objectives of this study are (1) to estimate whether and to what extent individuals diagnosed with diabetes show significant differences in diet quality [healthy eating index (HEI)] compared to healthy individuals, (2) to quantify whether and to what extent diabetics experience significantly higher outcomes of body mass index (BMI), and (3) to estimate whether and to what extent dietary supplementation impacts diabetes patient’s diet quality and/or BMI outcomes. We use data from the 2007–2008 U.S. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). The NHANES is the primary, randomized, and nationally representative survey used to assess the health and nutritional status in the U.S. We apply propensity score matching (PSM) to account for selection bias and endogeneity between self-reported diet and health behavir (treatment) and BMI outcomes. We control for an individual’s BMI as to capture the impact of past dietary behavior in its impact on HEI. Matching results suggest that regular dietary supplement consumption is associated with significant lower BMI outcomes of almost 1 kg/m2. The close relationship between diabetes and obesity has been at the center of the diet-health policy debate across Canada and the U.S. Knowledge about this linkage may help to improve the understanding of the factors that impact dietary choices and their overall health outcomes, which may lead to a more efficient and effective promotion of dietary guidelines, healthy food choices, and targeted consumer health and lifestyle policies. PMID:25852643

  7. Obesity and type 1 diabetes mellitus management.

    PubMed

    Chillarón, J J; Benaiges, D; Mañé, L; Pedro-Botet, J; Flores Le-Roux, J A

    2015-03-01

    Patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) traditionally had a low body mass index and microangiopathic complications were common. The Diabetes Control and Complications Trial, published in 1993, demonstrated that therapy aimed at maintaining HbA1c levels as close to normal as feasible reduced the incidence of microangiopathy. Since then, the use of intensive insulin therapy to optimise metabolic control became generalised, with two main side effects: a higher rate of severe hypoglycaemia and increased weight gain. Approximately 50% of patients with T1DM are currently obese or overweight, which reduces or nullifies the benefits of good metabolic control, and which has other negative consequences; therefore, strategies to achieve weight control in patients with T1DM are necessary. At present, treatment with GLP-1 and SGLT-2 inhibitors has yielded promising short-term results that need to be confirmed in studies with larger numbers of patients and long-term follow-up. It is possible that, in coming years, the applicability of bariatric surgery in obese patients with T1DM will be similar to that of the general population or T2DM.

  8. Are the Rates of Hypertension and Diabetes Higher in People from Lower Socioeconomic Status in Bangladesh? Results from a Nationally Representative Survey

    PubMed Central

    Tareque, Md. Ismail; Koshio, Atsushi; Tiedt, Andrew D.; Hasegawa, Toshihiko

    2015-01-01

    Objective A well-established belief regarding inequalities in health around the world is that hypertension and diabetes are higher in groups of lower socioeconomic status. We examined whether rates of hypertension, diabetes, and the coexistence of hypertension and diabetes are higher in people from a lower socioeconomic status than in those from a higher socioeconomic status in Bangladesh. Methods We investigated a nationally representative dataset from the 2011 Bangladesh Demographic and Health Survey with objective measures for hypertension and diabetes. A wealth index was constructed from data on household assets using principal components analysis. Chi-square tests and logistic regressions were performed to test the associations between wealth level, hypertension and diabetes. Findings People from the highest wealth quintile were significantly more likely to have hypertension (Adjusted odds ratios [AOR] = 1.65, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.22-2.25), diabetes (AOR = 1.81, 95% CI = 1.21-2.71), and the coexistence of hypertension and diabetes (AOR = 2.17, 95% CI = 1.05-4.49) than people from the lowest wealth quintile. The odds of having hypertension, diabetes, and their coexistence were higher for older people, women, people who engaged in less physical labor, and people who were overweight and obese. Conclusion Wealthier people, particularly people from the fourth and highest wealth quintiles, should be careful to avoid unhealthy lifestyles to prevent hypertension and diabetes. Health policy makers and planners are urged to target wealthier strata in terms of hypertension and diabetes initiatives while paying special attention to older people, women, people who engage in less physical labor, and individuals who are overweight. PMID:26017066

  9. Association between metabolic syndrome, obesity, diabetes mellitus and oncological outcomes of bladder cancer: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Cantiello, Francesco; Cicione, Antonio; Salonia, Andrea; Autorino, Riccardo; De Nunzio, Cosimo; Briganti, Alberto; Gandaglia, Giorgio; Dell'Oglio, Paolo; Capogrosso, Paolo; Damiano, Rocco

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome is a cluster of several metabolic abnormalities, its prevalence is increasing worldwide. To summarize the most recent evidence regarding the relationship between metabolic syndrome, its components and the oncological outcomes in bladder cancer patients, a National Center for Biotechnology Information PubMed search for relevant articles either published or e-published up to March 2014 was carried out by combining the following Patient population, Intervention, Comparison, Outcome terms: metabolic syndrome, obesity, body mass index, hyperglycemia, insulin resistance, diabetes, hypertension, dyslipidemia, bladder cancer, risk, mortality, cancer specific survival, disease recurrence and progression. Metabolic syndrome is a complex, highly prevalent disorder, and central obesity, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia and hypertension are its main components. Published findings would suggest that metabolic syndrome per se might be associated with an increased risk of bladder cancer in male patients, but it did not seem to confer a risk of worse prognosis. Considering the primary components of metabolic syndrome (hypertension, obesity and dyslipidemia), available data are uncertain, and it is no possible to reach a conclusion yet on either a direct or an indirect association with bladder cancer risk and prognosis. Only with regard to type 2 diabetes mellitus, available data would suggest a potential negative correlation. However, as the evaluation of bladder cancer risk and prognosis in patients with metabolic disorders is certainly complex, further studies are urgently required to better assess the actual role of these metabolic disorders.

  10. Therapeutic phytogenic compounds for obesity and diabetes.

    PubMed

    Jung, Hee Soong; Lim, Yun; Kim, Eun-Kyoung

    2014-11-21

    Natural compounds have been used to develop drugs for many decades. Vast diversities and minimum side effects make natural compounds a good source for drug development. However, the composition and concentrations of natural compounds can vary. Despite this inconsistency, half of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved pharmaceuticals are natural compounds or their derivatives. Therefore, it is essential to continuously investigate natural compounds as sources of new pharmaceuticals. This review provides comprehensive information and analysis on natural compounds from plants (phytogenic compounds) that may serve as anti-obesity and/or anti-diabetes therapeutics. Our growing understanding and further exploration of the mechanisms of action of the phytogenic compounds may afford opportunities for development of therapeutic interventions in metabolic diseases.

  11. Sugar intake, obesity, and diabetes in India.

    PubMed

    Gulati, Seema; Misra, Anoop

    2014-12-22

    Sugar and sweet consumption have been popular and intrinsic to Indian culture, traditions, and religion from ancient times. In this article, we review the data showing increasing sugar consumption in India, including traditional sources (jaggery and khandsari) and from sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs). Along with decreasing physical activity, this increasing trend of per capita sugar consumption assumes significance in view of the high tendency for Indians to develop insulin resistance, abdominal adiposity, and hepatic steatosis, and the increasing "epidemic" of type 2 diabetes (T2DM) and cardiovascular diseases. Importantly, there are preliminary data to show that incidence of obesity and T2DM could be decreased by increasing taxation on SSBs. Other prevention strategies, encompassing multiple stakeholders (government, industry, and consumers), should target on decreasing sugar consumption in the Indian population. In this context, dietary guidelines for Indians show that sugar consumption should be less than 10% of total daily energy intake, but it is suggested that this limit be decreased.

  12. Therapeutic Phytogenic Compounds for Obesity and Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Hee Soong; Lim, Yun; Kim, Eun-Kyoung

    2014-01-01

    Natural compounds have been used to develop drugs for many decades. Vast diversities and minimum side effects make natural compounds a good source for drug development. However, the composition and concentrations of natural compounds can vary. Despite this inconsistency, half of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved pharmaceuticals are natural compounds or their derivatives. Therefore, it is essential to continuously investigate natural compounds as sources of new pharmaceuticals. This review provides comprehensive information and analysis on natural compounds from plants (phytogenic compounds) that may serve as anti-obesity and/or anti-diabetes therapeutics. Our growing understanding and further exploration of the mechanisms of action of the phytogenic compounds may afford opportunities for development of therapeutic interventions in metabolic diseases. PMID:25421245

  13. Sleep, circadian dysrhythmia, obesity and diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Sridhar, Gumpeny Ramachandra; Sanjana, Narasimhadevara Santhi Nirmala

    2016-01-01

    Synchrony of biological processes with environmental cues developed over millennia to match growth, reproduction and senescence. This entails a complex interplay of genetic, metabolic, chemical, light, hormonal and hedonistic factors across life forms. Sleep is one of the most prominent rhythms where such a match is established. Over the past 100 years or so, it has been possible to disturb the synchrony between sleep-wake cycle and environmental cues. Development of electric lights, shift work and continual accessibility of the internet has disrupted this match. As a result, many non-communicable diseases such as obesity, insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes, coronary artery disease and malignancies have been attributed in part to such disruption. In this presentation a review is made of the origin and evolution of sleep studies, the pathogenic mediators for such asynchrony, clinical evidence and relevance and suggested management options to deal with the disturbances. PMID:27895820

  14. [Estrogen receptor alpha in obesity and diabetes].

    PubMed

    Cahua-Pablo, José Ángel; Flores-Alfaro, Eugenia; Cruz, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Estradiol (E2) is an important hormone in reproductive physiology, cardiovascular, skeletal and in the central nervous system (CNS). In human and rodents, E2 and its receptors are involved in the control of energy and glucose metabolism in health and metabolic diseases. The estrogen receptor (ER) belongs to the superfamily of nuclear receptors (NR), which are transcription factors that regulate gene expression. Three ER, ER-alpha, ER-beta and the G protein-coupled ER (GPER; also called GPR30) in tissues are involved in glucose and lipid homeostasis. Also, it may have important implications for risk factors associated with metabolic syndrome (MS), insulin resistance (IR), obesity and type 2 diabetes (T2D).

  15. The association of leptin with dyslipidemia, arterial hypertension and obesity in Kyrgyz (Central Asian nation) population

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Leptin, an adipocytokine produced by adipose tissue, along with the traditional cardiometabolic risk factors, contributes to the development of cardiovascular complications. At the same time, ethnic features of adipocytokines have been insufficiently investigated, especially among Asians, who have an increased risk of cardiovascular complications compared with Europeans. Aim of study was to investigate the relationship between leptin levels and age, gender, anthropometric parameters, lipid parameters, arterial hypertension (AH), and obesity in the adult population of ethnic Kyrgyz people living in Central Asia. Results In total, 322 ethnic Kyrgyz (145 men, 177 women) aged ≥ 30 years were studied. Waist and hip circumference, body mass index, blood glucose, lipids, leptin, and homeostatic model assessment were measured. Patients in the upper quartile of leptin levels had high values of BMI, WC, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, glucose, and HOMA index compared with patients with lower leptin levels. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome and AH increased with higher levels of leptin. Leptin positively correlated with BMI, WC, triglycerides, and glucose concentrations in patients of both sexes. According to the multivariate logistic regression analysis, elevated leptin levels increased by 30 times the risk of obesity in men, regardless of the presence of type 2 diabetes, and 17.7 times in women. Conclusion Leptin is associated with general and abdominal obesity, dyslipidemia, and insulin resistance in Kyrgyz patients. PMID:24981337

  16. The Diabetic Nephropathy and the Development of Hypertension in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Zuccollo, Adriana; Navarro, Monica

    2001-01-01

    The present study was designed to examine the development of hypertension in diabetic rats treated with streptozotocin (STZ, 1mg/g bw). The rats were studied at 3, 6, 9, 12 and 15 weeks. From the third week the rats were divided in diabetic rats according their glycemias and controls, along 15 weeks. After the third week a group, of rats showed increased urinary protein excretion (93, 134, 155 and 191%) compared to controls. In this group of rats the urinary kallikrein excretion was lower than control and the systolic blood pressure became significantly elevated between 3 and 6 weeks and persisted up to 15 weeks. On the other hand a group of diabetic rats were normotensive with urinary protein excretion similar to controls and urinary kallikrein lower compared to control but significantly higher compared diabetic hypertensive rats. These data suggest that the association of progressive diabetic nephropathy with abnormal endothelium-dependent vasodilation may produce a high prevalence of hypertensive diabetes. PMID:12369707

  17. Monocyte Chemoattractant Protein 1 (MCP-1) in Obesity and Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Panee, Jun

    2012-01-01

    Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) is the first discovered and most extensively studied CC chemokine, and the amount of studies on its role in the etiologies of obesity- and diabetes-related diseases have increased exponentially during the past 2 decades. This review attempted to provide a panoramic perspective of the history, regulatory mechanisms, functions, and therapeutic strategies of this chemokine. The highlights of this review include the roles of MCP-1 in the development of obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, insulitis, diabetic nephropathy, and diabetic retinopathy. Therapies that specifically or non-specifically inhibit MCP-1 overproduction have been summarized. PMID:22766373

  18. The Renin Angiotensin Aldosterone System in Obesity and Hypertension: Roles in the Cardiorenal Metabolic Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cabandugama, Peminda K; Gardner, Michael J; Sowers, James R

    2017-01-01

    In the United States, more than 50 million people have blood pressure at or above 120/80 mm Hg. All components of cardiorenal metabolic syndrome (CRS) are linked to metabolic abnormalities and obesity. A major driver for CRS is obesity. Current estimates show that many of those with hypertension and CRS show some degree of systemic and cardiovascular insulin resistance. Several pathophysiologic factors participate in the link between hypertension and CRS. This article updates recent literature with a focus on the function of insulin resistance, obesity, and renin angiotensin aldosterone system-mediated oxidative stress on endothelial dysfunction and the pathogenesis of hypertension.

  19. Association between obesity and depression in patients with diabetes mellitus type 2; a study protocol

    PubMed Central

    De la Cruz-Cano, Eduardo; Tovilla-Zarate, Carlos Alfonso; Reyes-Ramos, Emilio; Gonzalez-Castro, Thelma Beatriz; Juarez-Castro, Isela; López-Narváez, Maria Lilia; Fresan, Ana

    2015-01-01

    Background: Diabetes mellitus and depression are highly prevalent conditions throughout the world and have significant impact on health outcomes. It has been estimated that diabetes mellitus type 2 affects about 246 million people in the world; nevertheless, incidence varies among countries. There is evidence that depression is associated with a poor metabolic control in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus that present other health problems (such as hypertension and obesity). The aim of this study protocol is to determine if obesity increases the risk for depression in patient with diabetes type 2. Methods: The analysis will be reported following the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA).The studies suitable for inclusion will be assessed by the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale (NOS) to determine their methodological quality. To identify the studies of interest, we will search on PubMed and EBSCO databases. We will use the following keyword combinations: "Diabetes Mellitus type 2 AND obesity AND depression", "depression AND Diabetes Mellitus type 2", "Diabetes Mellitus type 2 AND body mass index cross sectional study", "depression AND obesity cross-sectional study". Causes for exclusion will be publications that studied patients diagnosed with diabetes mellitus type 1; articles that focused on the treatment and complications of diabetes mellitus type 2; publications that have studied other clinical or psychiatric conditions (for instance, seizure disorder or history of schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, psychotic symptoms or dementia). Conclusion: The results of this study will form the basis for a better understanding of the association between obesity and depression in patients with diabetes mellitus type 2, and will allow development of prediction tools and better interventions. It is evident that several modifiable and non-modifiable risk factors play an important role in the pathogenesis of diabetes among population. Currently

  20. Prospective study of obesity, hypertension, high cholesterol, and risk of restless legs syndrome.

    PubMed

    De Vito, Katerina; Li, Yanping; Batool-Anwar, Salma; Ning, Yi; Han, Jiali; Gao, Xiang

    2014-07-01

    Because previous cross-sectional studies suggest an association between metabolic disorders and restless legs syndrome (RLS), we prospectively evaluated whether obesity, hypercholesterolemia, and hypertension were associated with increased risk of RLS. Our study consisted of 42,728 female participants from the Nurses' Health Study II and 12,812 male participants from the Health Professionals Follow-up Study, free of RLS at baseline (2002 for men and 2005 for women), and free of diabetes and arthritis through follow-up (2002-2008 for men and 2005-2009 for women). RLS symptoms were assessed using the International RLS Study Group's standardized questionnaire. We considered RLS symptoms a "case" if the symptoms occurred ≥5 times/month and met International RLS Study Group criteria. We found that obesity was associated with an increased risk RLS among both men and women (P difference for sex >0.5). The pooled multivariate-adjusted odds ratio (OR) for RLS was 1.57 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.33-1.85; P trend <0.0001) for body mass index >30 versus ≤23 kg/m(2) and 1.56 (95% CI: 1.29-1.89; P trend = 0.0001) comparing two extreme waist circumference quintiles, adjusting for age, ethnicity, smoking, physical activity, use of antidepressant, and other covariates. A similar significant association was found for high cholesterol; the pooled adjusted OR for total serum cholesterol >240 versus <159 mg/dL was 1.33 (95% CI: 1.11-1.60; P trend = 0.002). There was no significant association between hypertension and RLS risk (adjusted OR: 0.90; 95% CI: 0.79-1.02). In this large, prospective study, we found that obesity and high cholesterol, but not high blood pressure, were significantly associated with an increased risk of developing RLS. © 2014 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  1. Obesity, diabetes, and risk of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Palacios, Natalia; Gao, Xiang; McCullough, Marjorie L; Jacobs, Eric J; Patel, Alpa V; Mayo, Tinisha; Schwarzschild, Michael A; Ascherio, Alberto

    2011-10-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate whether obesity and diabetes are related to risk of Parkinson's disease. We prospectively followed 147,096 participants in the Cancer Prevention Study II Nutrition Cohort from 1992 to 2005. Participants provided information on anthropometric variables and medical history at baseline and on waist circumference in 1997. Incident cases of Parkinson's disease (n = 656) were confirmed by treating neurologists and medical record review. Relative risks were estimated using proportional hazards models, adjusting for age, gender, smoking, and other risk factors. Neither body mass index nor waist circumference significantly predicted Parkinson's disease risk. Relative risk comparing individuals with a baseline body mass index of ≥ 30 to those with a body mass index <23 was 1.00 (95% confidence interval: 0.75, 1.34; P trend: 0.79), and that comparing individuals with a waist circumference in the top category (≥ 40.3 inches in men and ≥ 35 inches in women) to those in the bottom category (<34.5 inches in men and <28 inches in women) was 1.35 (95% confidence interval: 0.95, 1.93; P trend: 0.08). History of diabetes was not significantly associated with Parkinson's disease risk (combined relative risks = 0.88; 95% confidence interval: 0.62, 1.25; P heterogeneity = 0.96). In addition, neither body mass index at age 18 nor changes in weight between age 18 and baseline were significantly associated with Parkinson's disease risk. The results did not differ significantly by gender. Our results do not provide evidence for a relationship between body mass index, weight change, waist circumference, or baseline diabetes and risk of Parkinson's disease.

  2. Reactive oxygen species and the central nervous system in salt-sensitive hypertension: possible relationship with obesity-induced hypertension.

    PubMed

    Ando, Katsuyuki; Fujita, Megumi

    2012-01-01

    1. There are multiple and complex mechanisms of salt-induced hypertension; however, central sympathoexcitation plays an important role. In addition, the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is increased in salt-sensitive hypertensive humans and animals. Thus, we hypothesized that brain ROS overproduction may increase blood pressure (BP) by central sympathostimulation. 2. Recently, we demonstrated that ROS levels were elevated in the hypothalamus of salt-sensitive hypertensive animals. Moreover, intracerebroventricular anti-oxidants suppressed BP and renal sympathetic nerve activity more in salt-sensitive than non-salt-sensitive hypertensive rats. Thus, brain ROS overproduction increased BP through central sympathoexcitation in salt-sensitive hypertension. 3. Salt sensitivity of BP is enhanced in obesity and metabolic syndrome. Interestingly, it is also suggested that, in obesity-induced hypertension models, increases in BP are caused by brain ROS-induced central sympathoexcitation. 4. Recent studies suggest that increased ROS production in the brain and central sympathoexcitation may share a common pathway that increases BP in both salt- and obesity-induced hypertension.

  3. Cardiac abnormalities in youth with obesity and type 2 diabetes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Childhood obesity has been linked to cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk in adulthood. Of great concern is the expected increase in the population's CVD burden in relation to childhood obesity. This is compounded by the risk related to chronic hyperglycemia exposure in youth with type 2 diabetes. We h...

  4. Protective Effect of Gymnema sylvestre Ethanol Extract on High Fat Diet-induced Obese Diabetic Wistar Rats.

    PubMed

    Kumar, V; Bhandari, Uma; Tripathi, C D; Khanna, Geetika

    2014-07-01

    Obesity is associated with numerous co-morbidities such as cardiovascular diseases, type 2 diabetes, hypertension and others. Therefore, the present study was planned to investigate the effect of water- soluble fraction of Gymnema sylvestre ethanol extract on biochemical and molecular alterations in obese diabetic rats. Diabetes was induced by single i.v. injection of streptozotocin (45 mg/kg) via tail vein. Obesity was induced by oral feeding of high fat diet for a period of 28 days in diabetic rats. Body weight gain, food intake, water intake, hemodynamic parameters (systolic, diastolic, mean arterial blood pressures and heart rate), serum biochemical parameters (leptin, insulin, lipid levels, apolipoprotein B and glucose), cardiomyocyte apoptosis (cardiac caspase-3, Na(+)/K(+) ATPase activity and DNA fragmentation) organs and visceral fat pad weight and oxidative stress parameters were measured. Oral treatment with water soluble fraction of Gymnema sylvestre ethanol extracts (120 mg/kg/p.o.) for a period of 21 days, resulted in significant reduction in heart rate, mean arterial pressure, serum leptin, insulin, apolipoprotein B, lipids, glucose, cardiac caspase-3 levels, Na(+)/K(+) ATPase activity and DNA laddering, visceral fat pad and organ's weight and improved the antioxidant enzymes levels in the high fat diet induced obesity in diabetic rats. The results of present study reveal that water soluble fraction of Gymnema sylvestre ethanol extract could be useful intervention in the treatment of obesity and type-2 diabetes mellitus.

  5. Hepcidin and iron metabolism in non-diabetic obese and type 2 diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yue; Yin, Hui-qing; Liu, Hao-ling; Xiu, Lei; Peng, Xiao-yu

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the changes of iron levels and hepatic regulatory molecules expression involved in iron metabolism in non-diabetic obese/type 2 diabetic rat models. Male Wistar rats were divided into 3 groups: control group, non-diabetic obese group and type 2 diabetic group (n=20 each). The rats were evaluated physiologically and biochemically. The hepatic histopathological changes were observed using haematoxylin and eosin (HE) staining. The mRNA expression patterns of hepcidin, interleukin-6 (IL-6), hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) and ferroportin (Fpn) in the rat liver in control group, non-diabetic obese group and type 2 diabetic group were analyzed by real-time RT-PCR. The protein expression patterns of hepcidin in liver of each group were further analyzed by immunohistochemistry and Western blotting. As compared with control group, the ferritin in non-diabetic obese group and type 2 diabetic group was increased significantly (P<0.001). However, there was no significant difference in soluble transferring receptor (sTfR):ferritin ratio among the three groups (P>0.05). The real-time RT-PCR, immunohistochemistry and Western blotting results all revealed that the expression levels of hepcidin in non-diabetic obese group and type 2 diabetic group were elevated significantly as compared with those in control group (P<0.001). The expression levels of hepcidin mRNA between non-diabetic obese group and type 2 diabetic group showed no significant difference (P>0.05). However, the protein expression levels of hepcidin in type 2 diabetic group were significantly higher than those in non-diabetic obese group (P<0.05). Compared to control group, the expression levels of IL-6 mRNA in non-diabetic obese group and type 2 diabetic group were increased significantly and the expression levels of Fpn mRNA decreased (P<0.05). However, the expression levels of HIF mRNA had no significant difference among three groups. It is suggested that iron metabolism is

  6. [Vitamin D, obesity, and diabetes:new technology toward drug development against metabolic diseases].

    PubMed

    Miyata, Yugo; Shimomura, Iichiro

    2016-03-01

    Obesity and diabetes are rapidly reaching epidemic proportions in many parts of world and are becoming one of the major public health problems. Many studies have been performed to develop treatments for obesity and diabetes. In clinical aspect, for example, vitamin D was assumed to be a causal factor of obesity and diabetes, and the effect of vitamin D supplementation on the patients was assessed. In addition to clinical study, basic researchers have tried to elucidate the mechanisms of obesity and diabetes. Recent studies show novel techniques for finding etiologic factors in obesity and diabetes. These effort will accelerate progress toward total eradication of obesity and diabetes.

  7. Renal Denervation Normalizes Arterial Pressure With No Effect on Glucose Metabolism or Renal Inflammation in Obese Hypertensive Mice.

    PubMed

    Asirvatham-Jeyaraj, Ninitha; Fiege, Jessica K; Han, Ruijun; Foss, Jason; Banek, Christopher T; Burbach, Brandon J; Razzoli, Maria; Bartolomucci, Alessandro; Shimizu, Yoji; Panoskaltsis-Mortari, Angela; Osborn, John W

    2016-10-01

    Hypertension often occurs in concurrence with obesity and diabetes mellitus, commonly referred to as metabolic syndrome. Renal denervation (RDNx) lowers arterial pressure (AP) and improves glucose metabolism in drug-resistant hypertensive patients with high body mass index. In addition, RDNx has been shown to reduce renal inflammation in the mouse model of angiotensin II hypertension. The present study tested the hypothesis that RDNx reduces AP and renal inflammation and improves glucose metabolism in obesity-induced hypertension. Eight-week-old C57BL/6J mice were fed either a low-fat diet (10 kcal%) or a high-fat diet (45 kcal%) for 10 weeks. Body weight, food intake, fasting blood glucose, and glucose metabolism (glucose tolerance test) were measured. In a parallel study, radiotelemeters were implanted in mice for AP measurement. High fat-fed C57BL/6J mice exhibited an inflammatory and metabolic syndrome phenotype, including increased fat mass, increased AP, and hyperglycemia compared with low-fat diet mice. RDNx, but not Sham surgery, normalized AP in high-fat diet mice (115.8±1.5 mm Hg in sham versus 96.6±6.7 mm Hg in RDNx). RDNx had no significant effect on AP in low-fat diet mice. Also, RDNx had no significant effect on glucose metabolism or renal inflammation as measured by the number of CD8, CD4, and T helper cells or levels of inflammatory cytokines in the kidneys. These results indicate that although renal nerves play a role in obesity-induced hypertension, they do not contribute to impaired glucose metabolism or renal inflammation in this model.

  8. Preventive Effect of Boiogito on Metabolic Disorders in the TSOD Mouse, a Model of Spontaneous Obese Type II Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Tsutomu; Akase, Tomoko; Kosugi, Mitsutaka; Aburada, Masaki

    2011-01-01

    "Boiogito" is a Kampo preparation which has been used since ancient times in patients with obesity of the "asthenic constitution" type, so-called "watery obesity", and its effect has been recognized clinically. In this study, we investigated the anti-obesity effect of Boiogito in the TSOD (Tsumura Suzuki Obese Diabetes) mouse, a model of spontaneous obese type II diabetes mellitus. Boiogito showed a significant anti-obesity effect in TSOD mice by suppressing body weight gain in a dosage-dependent manner. In addition, Boiogito showed significant ameliorative effects on features of metabolic syndrome such as hyperinsulinemia, fasting hyperglycemia and abnormal lipid metabolism. Regarding lipid accumulation in TSOD mice, Boiogito showed a significant suppressive effect on accumulation of subcutaneous fat, but the effect on the visceral fat accumulation that constitutes the basis of metabolic syndrome was weak, and the suppressive effect on insulin resistance was also weak. Furthermore, Boiogito did not alleviate the abnormal glucose tolerance, the hypertension or the peripheral neuropathy characteristically developed in the TSOD mice. In contrast, in the TSNO (Tsumura Suzuki Non-Obesity) mice used as controls, Boiogito suppressed body weight gain and accumulation of subcutaneous and visceral fat. The above results suggested that Boiogito is effective as an anti-obesity drug against obesity of the "asthenic constitution" type in which subcutaneous fat accumulates, but cannot be expected to exert a preventive effect against various symptoms of metabolic syndrome that are based on visceral fat accumulation.

  9. Obesity, insulin resistance and diabetes--a worldwide epidemic.

    PubMed

    Seidell, J C

    2000-03-01

    Obesity is now commonly defined in adults as a BMI > 30 kg/m2. The prevalence of obesity in established market economies (Europe, USA, Canada, Australia, etc.) varies greatly, but a weighed estimate suggests an average prevalence in the order of 15-20%. The prevalence in these countries generally shows increasing trends over time. Obesity is also relatively common in Latin America, but much less so in sub-Saharan Africa and Asia where the majority of the world population lives. Nevertheless obesity rates are increasing there as well and, more importantly, rates of diabetes are increasing even more quickly, particularly in Asian countries. The risks of type 2 diabetes mellitus in these countries tend to increase sharply at levels of BMI generally classified as acceptable in European and North American white people. There have been suggestions to adopt specific classifications of obesity in Asians (e.g. BMI 23 for overweight and 25 or 27 kg/m2 for obesity) and this will greatly affect the prevalence estimates of obesity worldwide (currently at about 250 million people). Particularly for health promotion purposes BMI may be replaced by a classification based on waist circumference, but also specific classifications for different ethnic groups may be necessary. The number of diabetics has been projected to increase from 135 million in 1995 to 300 million in 2025. Much of this increase will be seen in Asia. In summary, both obesity and type 2 diabetes are common consequences of changing lifestyles (increased sedentary lifestyles and increased energy density of diets). Both are potentially preventable through lifestyle modification on a population level, but this requires a coherent and multifaceted strategy. Such strategies are not developed or implemented. These developments point toward the great urgency to develop global and national plans for adequate prevention and management of obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  10. Lifestyle and genetics in obesity and type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Temelkova-Kurktschiev, T; Stefanov, T

    2012-01-01

    Obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus are multifactorial health threats caused by a complex interplay between genetic predisposition and the environment with dramatically increasing worldwide prevalence. The role of heritability in their etiology is well recognized, however, the numerous attempts made in order certain genetic variants determining individual susceptibility to be identified have had limited success, until recently. At present the advancements in human genetics and the utilization of the genome-wide association approach have led to the identification of over 20 genetic loci associated with, respectively obesity and type 2 diabetes. Most of the genes identified to date, however, have modest effect on disease risk suggesting that both diseases are unlikely to develop without the individual being exposed to obesity- and/or type 2 diabetes-promoting environment. Indeed, unhealthy lifestyle, characterized by physical inactivity and food overconsumption is an unequivocally established risk factor for obesity and type 2 diabetes. Numerous epidemiological studies and randomized controlled trials, on the other hand, have demonstrated that lifestyle modification is effective in obesity and type 2 diabetes prevention. Furthermore, gene-lifestyle interaction studies suggest that genetic susceptibility to obesity and type 2 diabetes may be partially or totally kept under control by healthy lifestyle or lifestyle modification and that lifestyle determines whether an individual is likely to develop the disease. Inherited factors, however, seem to influence individual response to a lifestyle intervention program and even the motivation for lifestyle change. Personalized interventions according to genotype may be, therefore, considered in the future. By then lifestyle modification targeting dietary change and increased physical activity may be recommended for successful obesity and type 2 diabetes prevention irrespectively of genetic susceptibility.

  11. Sugar Intake, Obesity, and Diabetes in India

    PubMed Central

    Gulati, Seema; Misra, Anoop

    2014-01-01

    Sugar and sweet consumption have been popular and intrinsic to Indian culture, traditions, and religion from ancient times. In this article, we review the data showing increasing sugar consumption in India, including traditional sources (jaggery and khandsari) and from sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs). Along with decreasing physical activity, this increasing trend of per capita sugar consumption assumes significance in view of the high tendency for Indians to develop insulin resistance, abdominal adiposity, and hepatic steatosis, and the increasing “epidemic” of type 2 diabetes (T2DM) and cardiovascular diseases. Importantly, there are preliminary data to show that incidence of obesity and T2DM could be decreased by increasing taxation on SSBs. Other prevention strategies, encompassing multiple stakeholders (government, industry, and consumers), should target on decreasing sugar consumption in the Indian population. In this context, dietary guidelines for Indians show that sugar consumption should be less than 10% of total daily energy intake, but it is suggested that this limit be decreased. PMID:25533007

  12. Obesity-induced hypertension: role of sympathetic nervous system, leptin, and melanocortins.

    PubMed

    Hall, John E; da Silva, Alexandre A; do Carmo, Jussara M; Dubinion, John; Hamza, Shereen; Munusamy, Shankar; Smith, Grant; Stec, David E

    2010-06-04

    Excess weight gain contributes to increased blood pressure in most patients with essential hypertension. Although the mechanisms of obesity hypertension are not fully understood, increased renal sodium reabsorption and impaired pressure natriuresis play key roles. Several mechanisms contribute to altered kidney function and hypertension in obesity, including activation of the sympathetic nervous system, which appears to be mediated in part by increased levels of the adipocyte-derived hormone leptin, stimulation of pro-opiomelanocortin neurons, and subsequent activation of central nervous system melanocortin 4 receptors.

  13. Social distribution of diabetes, hypertension and related risk factors in Barbados: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Howitt, Christina; Hambleton, Ian R; Rose, Angela M C; Hennis, Anselm; Samuels, T Alafia; George, Kenneth S; Unwin, Nigel

    2015-01-01

    Objective To describe the distribution of diabetes, hypertension and related behavioural and biological risk factors in adults in Barbados by gender, education and occupation. Design Multistage probability sampling was used to select a representative sample of the adult population (≥25 years). Participants were interviewed using standard questionnaires, underwent anthropometric and blood pressure measurements, and provided fasting blood for glucose and cholesterol measurements. Standard WHO definitions were used. Data were weighted for sampling and non-response, and were age and sex standardised to the 2010 Barbados population. Weighted prevalence estimates were calculated, and prevalence ratios were calculated for behavioural and biological risk factors by demographic and socioeconomic group. Results Study response rate was 55.0%, with 764 women, 470 men. Prevalence of obesity was 33.8% (95% CI 30.7% to 37.1%); hypertension 40.6% (95% CI 36.5% to 44.9%); and diabetes 18.7% (95% CI 16.2% to 21.4%). Compared with women, men were less likely to be obese (prevalence ratio 0.5; 95% CI 0.4 to 0.7), or physically inactive (0.5; 0.4 to 0.6), but more likely to smoke tobacco (4.1; 2.5 to 6.7) and consume large amounts of alcohol in a single episode (4.6; 2.7 to 7.6). Both diabetes (0.83; 0.65 to 1.05) and hypertension (0.89; 0.79 to 1.02) were lower in men, but not significantly so. In women, higher educational level was related to higher fruit and vegetable intake, more physical activity, less diabetes and less hypercholesterolaemia (p 0.01–0.04). In men, higher education was related only to less smoking (p 0.04). Differences by occupation were limited to smoking in men and hypercholesterolaemia in women. Conclusions In this developing country population, sex appears to be a much stronger determinant of behavioural risk factors, as well as obesity and its related risks, than education or occupation. These findings have implications for meeting the commitments made

  14. Potential health concerns of dietary phosphorus: cancer, obesity, and hypertension.

    PubMed

    Anderson, John J B

    2013-10-01

    Adult Americans typically consume on average 1400 mg, or more, of phosphorus (P) daily in meals, which almost doubles the recommended dietary allowance. After a meal phosphorus is rapidly absorbed at a high efficiency and hormonal mechanisms act swiftly to maintain the serum inorganic phosphate (Pi) concentration within fairly narrow limits. Both parathyroid hormone (PTH) and fibroblast growth factor-23 (FGF-23) reduce serum phosphate during postprandial periods through homeostatic actions on the kidney. However, it is speculated that exposure of cells to a brief high-serum Pi concentration may signal alterations in cell functions that lead to deleterious effects. Elevation of serum FGF-23 or PTH may also be harmful to specific cell types. Examples of possible adverse health effects include cancer, obesity, and hypertension. Here I review potential mechanisms through which high-P intake may contribute to cell metabolic abnormalities and the development of chronic disease; high-dietary phosphorus, especially from foods processed with phosphate salts, may be associated with these chronic diseases. Further investigation is needed to establish the significance of high-phosphate diets within a large segment of the U.S. population with normal renal function.

  15. Risk factor control in hypertensive and diabetic subjects attended by the Family Health Strategy in the State of Pernambuco, Brazil: the SERVIDIAH study.

    PubMed

    Fontbonne, Annick; Cesse, Eduarda Ângela Pessoa; Sousa, Islândia Maria Carvalho de; Souza, Wayner Vieira de; Chaves, Vera Lúcia de Vasconcelos; Bezerra, Adriana Falangola Benjamin; Carvalho, Eduardo Freese de

    2013-06-01

    The SERVIDIAH study (Evaluation of Health Services for Diabetic and Hypertensive Subjects) was conducted in 2010 in the State of Pernambuco, Brazil. A multi-stage random sample of 785 hypertensive and 823 diabetic patients was drawn from 208 Family Health Strategy (FHS) units selected throughout 35 municipalities. Patients underwent a structured interview and weight, height, blood pressure and HbA1c levels (for diabetic patients) were measured. Mean age was approximately 60 years, and women were overrepresented in the sample (70%). 43.7% of hypertensive subjects and 25.8% of diabetic subjects achieved adequate blood pressure control and 30.5% of diabetic subjects had HbA1c levels below 7%. Despite 70% of the patients being overweight or obese, few had adhered to a weight-loss diet. The study of this representative sample of hypertensive and diabetic patients attended by the FHS in the State of Pernambuco shows that improvements in the management of hypertension and diabetes are needed in order to prevent the occurrence of serious and costly complications, especially given the context of increasing incidence of these two conditions.

  16. Is the Association of Hypertension with Cardiovascular Events Stronger Among the Lean and Normal Weight than Among the Overweight and Obese? The Mesa Study

    PubMed Central

    Colangelo, Laura A; Vu, Thanh-Huyen T; Szklo, Moyses; Burke, Gregory L; Sibley, Christopher; Liu, Kiang

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies that suggest the association of hypertension with cardiovascular disease (CVD) events is stronger in the lean/normal weight than in the obese have either included smokers, diabetics, or cancer patients, or did not account for central obesity. This study examines the interaction of adiposity with hypertension on CVD events using BMI-based definitions of overweight and obesity as well as waist circumference (WC) to assess adiposity. In the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis, we classified 3657 nonsmoking men and women, free of baseline clinical CVD, diabetes and cancer, into 7 BMI-WC combinations defined by ethnicity-specific BMI (normal, overweight, class 1 obese, and class 2/3 obese) and ethnicity- and sex-specific WC categories (optimal or nonoptimal). Adjusted absolute event rates per 1000 person-years and relative risks (RRs) (95% confidence intervals) for CVD events for hypertension (BP ≥ 140/90 or taking medication) vs. no hypertension computed within adiposity categories were: 9.3 vs. 1.9 and 4.96 (2.56-9.60) for normal BMI/optimal WC, 13.2 vs. 4.2 and 3.13 (0.99-9.86) for normal BMI/nonoptimal WC, 9.0 vs. 4.5 and 2.00 (1.19-3.36) for overweight BMI/optimal WC, 8.4 vs. 5.6 and 1.50 (0.88-2.54) for overweight BMI/nonoptimal WC,14.1 vs. 2.1 and 6.75 (0.69-65.57) for class 1 obese/optimal WC, 10.1 vs. 3.7 and 2.69 (1.41-5.16) for class 1 obese/nonoptimal WC, and 9.9 vs. 6.9 and 1.45(0.60-3.52) for class 2/3 obese/WC pooled. This study found a large RR of CVD events associated with hypertension for normal BMI participants and more importantly similarly high absolute risks for both normal and obese BMI with hypertension. PMID:26077561

  17. Is the association of hypertension with cardiovascular events stronger among the lean and normal weight than among the overweight and obese? The multi-ethnic study of atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Colangelo, Laura A; Vu, Thanh-Huyen T; Szklo, Moyses; Burke, Gregory L; Sibley, Christopher; Liu, Kiang

    2015-08-01

    Previous studies that suggest the association of hypertension with cardiovascular disease (CVD) events is stronger in the lean/normal weight than in the obese have either included smokers, diabetics, or cancer patients, or did not account for central obesity. This study examines the interaction of adiposity with hypertension on CVD events using body mass index (BMI)-based definitions of overweight and obesity, as well as waist circumference (WC) to assess adiposity. In the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis, we classified 3657 nonsmoking men and women, free of baseline clinical CVD, diabetes mellitus and cancer, into 7 BMI-WC combinations defined by ethnicity-specific BMI (normal, overweight, class 1 obese, and class 2/3 obese) and ethnicity- and sex-specific WC categories (optimal or nonoptimal). Adjusted absolute event rates per 1000 person-years and relative risks (95% confidence intervals) for CVD events for hypertension (blood pressure ≥140/90 or taking medication) versus no hypertension computed within adiposity categories were 9.3 versus 1.9 and 4.96 (2.56-9.60) for normal BMI/optimal WC, 13.2 versus 4.2 and 3.13 (0.99-9.86) for normal BMI/nonoptimal WC, 9.0 versus 4.5 and 2.00 (1.19-3.36) for overweight BMI/optimal WC, 8.4 versus 5.6 and 1.50 (0.88-2.54) for overweight BMI/nonoptimal WC,14.1 versus 2.1 and 6.75 (0.69-65.57) for class 1 obese/optimal WC, 10.1 versus 3.7 and 2.69 (1.41-5.16) for class 1 obese/nonoptimal WC, and 9.9 versus 6.9 and 1.45(0.60-3.52) for class 2/3 obese/WC pooled. This study found a large relative risk of CVD events associated with hypertension for normal BMI participants and more importantly similarly high absolute risks for both normal and obese BMI with hypertension.

  18. Obesity and the role of lifestyle and dietary intervention in the management of pediatric hypertension.

    PubMed

    Batisky, Donald L

    2010-01-01

    As the prevalence of hypertension in children and adolescents increases within the context of the epidemic of obesity, it is important to recognize that while hypertension may be secondary to an underlying disorder, one must not overlook the impact that overweight and obesity have on the condition. While considering options for the overall management of hypertension in the context of overweight and obesity one should incorporate strategies that focus on therapeutic lifestyle changes, as discussed in the Fourth Report on Blood Pressure in Children and Adolescents. The strategies that will be discussed in this article include weight loss, exercise and dietary interventions. These treatment strategies require a great deal of motivation on the part of the patient, the patient's family and the patient's care providers. Not all strategies will be effective for every individual, but to some extent all patients being treated for hypertension should incorporate elements of therapeutic lifestyle changes into their treatment regimen.

  19. Preventive Effect of Boiogito on Metabolic Disorders in the TSOD Mouse, a Model of Spontaneous Obese Type II Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Shimada, Tsutomu; Akase, Tomoko; Kosugi, Mitsutaka; Aburada, Masaki

    2011-01-01

    “Boiogito” is a Kampo preparation which has been used since ancient times in patients with obesity of the “asthenic constitution” type, so-called “watery obesity”, and its effect has been recognized clinically. In this study, we investigated the anti-obesity effect of Boiogito in the TSOD (Tsumura Suzuki Obese Diabetes) mouse, a model of spontaneous obese type II diabetes mellitus. Boiogito showed a significant anti-obesity effect in TSOD mice by suppressing body weight gain in a dosage-dependent manner. In addition, Boiogito showed significant ameliorative effects on features of metabolic syndrome such as hyperinsulinemia, fasting hyperglycemia and abnormal lipid metabolism. Regarding lipid accumulation in TSOD mice, Boiogito showed a significant suppressive effect on accumulation of subcutaneous fat, but the effect on the visceral fat accumulation that constitutes the basis of metabolic syndrome was weak, and the suppressive effect on insulin resistance was also weak. Furthermore, Boiogito did not alleviate the abnormal glucose tolerance, the hypertension or the peripheral neuropathy characteristically developed in the TSOD mice. In contrast, in the TSNO (Tsumura Suzuki Non-Obesity) mice used as controls, Boiogito suppressed body weight gain and accumulation of subcutaneous and visceral fat. The above results suggested that Boiogito is effective as an anti-obesity drug against obesity of the “asthenic constitution” type in which subcutaneous fat accumulates, but cannot be expected to exert a preventive effect against various symptoms of metabolic syndrome that are based on visceral fat accumulation. PMID:19208721

  20. Nutrigenomic basis of beneficial effects of chromium(III) on obesity and diabetes.

    PubMed

    Lau, Francis C; Bagchi, Manashi; Sen, Chandan K; Bagchi, Debasis

    2008-10-01

    Insulin resistance has been shown to be the major contributing factor to the metabolic syndrome, which comprises a cluster of risk factors for metabolic aberrations such as obesity, dyslipidemia, hypertension, and hyperglycemia. Additionally, insulin resistance has been associated with the occurrence of cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. Epidemiological studies indicate that obesity and diabetes have become alarmingly prevalent in recent years. Substantial evidence suggests that dietary interventions and regular exercise greatly improve body mass index and lipid profile as well as alleviate insulin resistance. Therefore, dietary supplements such as insulin-sensitizing agents may be beneficial in the prevention and treatment of obesity and type 2 diabetes. Numerous in vitro and in vivo studies suggest that chromium supplements, particularly niacin-bound chromium or chromium-nicotinate, may be effective in attenuating insulin resistance and lowering plasma cholesterol levels. Utilizing the powerful technology of nutrigenomics to identify the genes regulated by chromium supplementation may shed some light on the underlying mechanisms of chromium-gene interactions, and thus provide strategies to mitigate and prevent insulin-resistance-related disorders.

  1. MicroRNAs and type 2 diabetes/obesity.

    PubMed

    Dehwah, Mustafa Abdo Saif; Xu, Aimin; Huang, Qingyang

    2012-01-01

    MicroRNAs belong to a newly identified class of small non-coding RNAs that have been widely implicated in the fine-tuning of many physiological processes such as the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes (T2D) and obesity. Microarray studies have highlighted an altered profile of miRNA expression in insulin target tissues in diabetic and obese models. Emerging evidences suggest that miRNAs play significant roles in insulin production, secretion and actions, as well as in diverse aspects of glucose homeostasis and adipocyte differentiation. The identification of tissue-specific miRNAs implicated in T2D and obesity might be useful for the future development of effective strategies for early diagnosis and therapeutic intervention of obesity-related medical complications.

  2. Bariatric surgery: an IDF statement for obese Type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, J B; Zimmet, P; Alberti, K G; Rubino, F

    2011-01-01

    The International Diabetes Federation Taskforce on Epidemiology and Prevention of Diabetes convened a consensus working group of diabetologists, endocrinologists, surgeons and public health experts to review the appropriate role of surgery and other gastrointestinal interventions in the treatment and prevention of Type 2 diabetes. The specific goals were: to develop practical recommendations for clinicians on patient selection; to identify barriers to surgical access and suggest interventions for health policy changes that ensure equitable access to surgery when indicated; and to identify priorities for research. Bariatric surgery can significantly improve glycaemic control in severely obese patients with Type 2 diabetes. It is an effective, safe and cost-effective therapy for obese Type 2 diabetes. Surgery can be considered an appropriate treatment for people with Type 2 diabetes and obesity not achieving recommended treatment targets with medical therapies, especially in the presence of other major co-morbidities. The procedures must be performed within accepted guidelines and require appropriate multidisciplinary assessment for the procedure, comprehensive patient education and ongoing care, as well as safe and standardized surgical procedures. National guidelines for bariatric surgery need to be developed for people with Type 2 diabetes and a BMI of 35 kg/m2 or more. PMID:21480973

  3. Sympathetic nervous system in obesity-related hypertension: mechanisms and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Kalil, Graziela Z; Haynes, William G

    2012-01-01

    Obesity markedly increases the risk of hypertension and cardiovascular disease, which may be related to activation of the sympathetic nervous system (SNS). Sympathetic overactivity directly and indirectly contributes to blood pressure (BP) elevation in obesity, including stimulation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS). The adipocyte-derived peptide leptin suppresses appetite, increases thermogenesis, but also raises SNS activity and BP. Obese individuals exhibit hyperleptinemia but are resistant to its appetite-suppressing actions. Interestingly, animal models of obesity exhibit preserved sympathoexcitatory and pressor actions of leptin, despite resistance to its anorexic and metabolic actions, suggesting selective leptin resistance. Disturbance of intracellular signaling at specific hypothalamic neural networks appears to underlie selective leptin resistance. Delineation of these pathways should lead to novel approaches to treatment. In the meantime, treatment of obesity-hypertension has relied on antihypertensive drugs. Although sympathetic blockade is mechanistically attractive in obesity-hypertension, in practice its effects are disappointing because of adverse metabolic effects and inferior outcomes. On the basis of subgroup analyses of obese patients in large randomized clinical trials, drugs such as diuretics and RAAS blockers appear superior in preventing cardiovascular events in obesity--hypertension. An underused alternative approach to obesity-hypertension is induction of weight loss, which reduces circulating leptin and insulin, partially reverses resistance to these hormones, decreases sympathetic activation and improves BP and other risk factors. Though weight loss induced by lifestyle is often modest and transient, carefully selected pharmacological weight loss therapies can produce substantial and sustained antihypertensive effects additive to lifestyle interventions.

  4. TRC150094 attenuates progression of nontraditional cardiovascular risk factors associated with obesity and type 2 diabetes in obese ZSF1 rats

    PubMed Central

    Zambad, Shitalkumar P; Munshi, Siralee; Dubey, Amita; Gupta, Ram; Busiello, Rosa Anna; Lanni, Antonia; Goglia, Fernando; Gupta, Ramesh C; Chauthaiwale, Vijay; Dutt, Chaitanya

    2011-01-01

    Chronic overnutrition and consequential visceral obesity is associated with a cluster of risk factors for cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Moreover, individuals who have a triad of hypertension, dysglycemia, and elevated triglycerides along with reduced high-density lipoprotein cholesterol have a greater residual cardiovascular risk even after factoring for the traditional risk factors such as age, smoking, diabetes, and elevated low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. In our previous study we demonstrated that TRC150094, when administered to rats receiving a high-fat diet, stimulated mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation (FAO) and reduced visceral adiposity, opening an interesting perspective for a possible clinical application. In the present study, oral administration of TRC150094 to obese Zucker spontaneously hypertensive fatty rats (obese ZSF1) improved glucose tolerance and glycemic profile as well as attenuated a rise in blood pressure. Obese ZSF1 rats treated with TRC150094 also showed reduced hepatic steatosis, reduced progression of nephropathy, and improved skeletal muscle function. At the cellular level, TRC150094 induced a significant increase in mitochondrial respiration as well as an increased FAO in liver and skeletal muscle, ultimately resulting in reduced hepatic as well as total body fat accumulation, as evaluated by magnetic resonance spectroscopy and magnetic resonance imaging, respectively. If reproduced in humans, these results could confirm that TRC150094 may represent an attractive therapeutic agent to counteract multiple residual cardiovascular risk components. PMID:21448317

  5. How effective are antioxidant supplements in obesity and diabetes?

    PubMed

    Abdali, Daniyal; Samson, Sue E; Grover, Ashok Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is a central health issue due to its epidemic prevalence and its association with type 2 diabetes and other comorbidities. Obesity is not just being overweight. It is a metabolic disorder due to the accumulation of excess dietary calories into visceral fat and the release of high concentrations of free fatty acids into various organs. It represents a state of chronic oxidative stress and low-grade inflammation whose intermediary molecules may include leptin, adiponectin and cytokines. It may progress to hyperglycemia, leading to type 2 diabetes. Whether or not dietary antioxidant supplements are useful in the management of obesity and type 2 diabetes is discussed in this review. Only the benefits for obesity and diabetes are examined here. Other health benefits of antioxidants are not considered. There are difficulties in comparing studies in this field because they differ in the time frame, participants' ethnicity, administration of antioxidant supplements, and even in how obesity was measured. However, the literature presents reasonable evidence for marginal benefits of supplementation with zinc, lipoic acid, carnitine, cinnamon, green tea, and possibly vitamin C plus E, although the evidence is much weaker for omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, coenzyme Q10, green coffee, resveratrol, or lycopene. Overall, antioxidant supplements are not a panacea to compensate for a fast-food and video-game way of living, but antioxidant-rich foods are recommended as part of the lifestyle. Such antioxidant foods are commonly available.

  6. Obesity and Coronary Artery Calcium in Diabetes: The Coronary Artery Calcification in Type 1 Diabetes (CACTI) Study

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Ticiana C.; Veyna, Adrienne M.; Haarhues, Michelle D.; Kinney, Gregory L.; Rewers, Marian

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background The aim was to examine whether excess weight is associated with coronary artery calcium (CAC), independent of metabolic parameters in adults with type 1 diabetes (T1D). Methods Subjects between 19 and 56 years of age with T1D (n=621) from the Coronary Artery Calcification in Type 1 Diabetes study were classified as abnormal on four metabolic parameters: blood pressure ≥130/85 mm Hg or on antihypertensive treatment; high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol of <40 mg/dL for men or <50 mg/dL for women; triglycerides of ≥150 mg/dL; or C-reactive protein of ≥3 μg/mL. Study participants with two or more abnormal parameters were classified as metabolically abnormal. Weight categories by body mass index were normal (<25 kg/m2), overweight (25 to <30 kg/m2), and obese (≥30 kg/m2). CAC was measured at two visits 6.0±0.5 years apart. Progression of CAC was defined as an increase in square root transformed CAC volume of ≥2.5 mm3 or development of clinical coronary artery disease. Results Among subjects with T1D, 48% of normal, 61% of overweight, and 73% of obese participants were classified as metabolically abnormal (P<0.0001). Overweight and obesity were independently associated with presence of CAC, independent of presence of metabolically abnormal. Obesity but not overweight was associated with CAC progression, independent of the other cardiovascular risk factors. Conclusions Although obesity is known to increase cardiovascular disease risk through inducing metabolic abnormalities such as dyslipidemia, hypertension, and inflammation, it is also a strong predictor of subclinical atherosclerosis progression in adults with T1D independent of these factors. PMID:21770813

  7. Serotonin as a New Therapeutic Target for Diabetes Mellitus and Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Chang-Myung; Park, Sangkyu

    2016-01-01

    Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine [5-HT]) is a monoamine that has various functions in both neuronal and non-neuronal systems. In the central nervous system, 5-HT regulates mood and feeding behaviors as a neurotransmitter. Thus, there have been many trials aimed at increasing the activity of 5-HT in the central nervous system, and some of the developed methods are already used in the clinical setting as anti-obesity drugs. Unfortunately, some drugs were withdrawn due to the development of unwanted peripheral side effects, such as valvular heart disease and pulmonary hypertension. Recent studies revealed that peripheral 5-HT plays an important role in metabolic regulation in peripheral tissues, where it suppresses adaptive thermogenesis in brown adipose tissue. Inhibition of 5-HT synthesis reduced the weight gain and improved the metabolic dysfunction in a diet-induced obesity mouse model. Genome-wide association studies also revealed genetic associations between the serotonergic system and obesity. Several genetic polymorphisms in tryptophan hydroxylase and 5-HT receptors were shown to have strong associations with obesity. These results support the clinical significance of the peripheral serotonergic system as a therapeutic target for obesity and diabetes. PMID:27126880

  8. Maternal obesity and the developmental programming of hypertension: a role for leptin.

    PubMed

    Taylor, P D; Samuelsson, A-M; Poston, L

    2014-03-01

    Mother-child cohort studies have established that both pre-pregnancy body mass index (BMI) and gestational weight gain are independently associated with cardio-metabolic risk factors in young adult offspring, including systolic and diastolic blood pressure. Animal models in sheep and non-human primates provide further evidence for the influence of maternal obesity on offspring cardiovascular function, whilst recent studies in rodents suggest that perinatal exposure to the metabolic milieu of maternal obesity may permanently change the central regulatory pathways involved in blood pressure regulation. Leptin plays an important role in the central control of appetite, is also involved in activation of efferent sympathetic pathways to both thermogenic and non-thermogenic tissues, such as the kidney, and is therefore implicated in obesity-related hypertension. Leptin is also thought to have a neurotrophic role in the development of the hypothalamus, and altered neonatal leptin profiles secondary to maternal obesity are associated with permanently altered hypothalamic structure and function. In rodent studies, maternal obesity confers persistent sympathoexcitatory hyper-responsiveness and hypertension acquired in the early stages of development. Experimental neonatal hyperleptinaemia in naive rat pups provides further evidence of heightened sympathetic tone and proof of principle that hyperleptinaemia during a critical window of hypothalamic development may directly lead to adulthood hypertension. Insight from these animal models raises the possibility that early-life exposure to leptin in humans may lead to early onset essential hypertension. Ongoing mother-child cohort and intervention studies in obese pregnant women provide a unique opportunity to address associations between maternal obesity and offspring cardiovascular function. The goal of the review is to highlight the potential importance of leptin in the developmental programming of hypertension in obese

  9. Grip Strength as a Marker of Hypertension and Diabetes in Healthy Weight Adults

    PubMed Central

    Mainous, Arch G.; Tanner, Rebecca J.; Anton, Stephen D.; Jo, Ara

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Muscle strength may play a role in cardiometabolic disease. We examined the relationship between hand grip strength and diabetes and hypertension in a sample of healthy weight adults. Methods In 2015, we analyzed the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2011–2012 for adults aged ≥20 years with healthy BMIs (between 18.5 and <25 kg/m2) and no history of cardiovascular disease (unweighted n=1,469; weighted n=61,672,082). Hand grip strength was assessed with a dynamometer. Diabetes was based on hemoglobin A1c level and reported diabetes diagnosis. Hypertension was based on measured blood pressure and reported hypertension diagnosis. Results Individuals with undiagnosed diabetes compared with individuals without diabetes had lower grip strength (51.9 vs 69.8, p=0.0001), as well as among individuals with diagnosed diabetes compared with individuals without diabetes (61.7 vs 69.8, p=0.008). Mean grip strength was lower among individuals with undiagnosed hypertension compared with individuals without hypertension (63.5 vs 71.5, p=0.008) as well as among individuals with diagnosed hypertension compared with those without hypertension (60.8 vs 71.5, p<0.0001). In adjusted analyses controlling for age, sex, race, smoking status, and first-degree relative with disease, mean grip strength was lower for undiagnosed diabetes (β= −10.02, p<0.0001) and diagnosed diabetes (β= −8.21, p=0.03) compared with individuals without diabetes. In adjusted analyses, grip strength was lower among individuals with undiagnosed hypertension (β= −6.6, p=0.004) and diagnosed hypertension (β= −4.27, p=0.04) compared with individuals without hypertension. Conclusions Among healthy weight adults, combined grip strength is lower in individuals with diagnosed and undiagnosed diabetes and hypertension. PMID:26232901

  10. Obesity and diabetes genetic variants associated with gestational weight gain

    PubMed Central

    Stuebe, Alison M.; Lyon, Helen; Herring, Amy; Ghosh, Joyee; Wise, Alison; North, Kari E.; Siega-Riz, Anna Maria

    2011-01-01

    Objective To determine whether genetic variants associated with diabetes and obesity predict gestational weight gain. Study Design 960 participants in the Pregnancy, Infection and Nutrition cohorts were genotyped for 27 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with diabetes and obesity. Results Among white and black women (n=960), KCNQ1 risk allele carriage was directly associated with weight gain (p < 0.01). In Bayesian hierarchical models among white women (N=628), we found posterior odds ratios > 3 for inclusion of TCF2 and THADA SNPs in our models. Among black women (n=332), we found associations between risk allele carriage and weight gain for the THADA and INSIG2 SNPs. In Bayesian variable selection models, we found an interaction between the TSPAN8 risk allele and pre-gravid obesity, with lower weight gain among obese risk allele carriers. Conclusion We found evidence that diabetes and obesity risk alleles interact with maternal pre-gravid BMI to predict gestational weight gain. PMID:20816152

  11. Epigenetics in adipose tissue, obesity, weight loss and diabetes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Given the role that the diet and other environmental factors play in the development of obesity and type 2 diabetes, the implication of different epigenetic processes is being investigated. Although it is well known that the environmental factors can cause cell type-dependent epigenetic changes, inc...

  12. Cancer, obesity, diabetes, and antidiabetic drugs: is the fog clearing?

    PubMed

    Klil-Drori, Adi J; Azoulay, Laurent; Pollak, Michael N

    2017-02-01

    The prevalence of obesity, of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), and of cancer are all increasing globally. The relationships between these diseases are complex, and thus difficult to elucidate; nevertheless, evidence supports the hypothesis that obesity increases the risks of both T2DM and certain cancers. Further complexity arises from controversial evidence that specific drugs used in the treatment of T2DM increase or decrease cancer risk or influence cancer prognosis. Herein, we review the current evidence from studies that have addressed these relationships, and summarize the methodological challenges that are frequently encountered in such research. We also outline the physiology that links obesity, T2DM, and neoplasia. Finally, we outline the practical principles relevant to the increasingly common challenge of managing patients who have been diagnosed with both diabetes and cancer.

  13. Obesity, diabetes, and length of time in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Tsujimoto, Tetsuro; Kajio, Hiroshi; Sugiyama, Takehiro

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Obesity prevalence remains high in the United States (US), and is rising in most other countries. This is a repeated cross-sectional study using a nationally representative sample of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 1999 to 2012. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were separately performed for adults (n = 37,639) and children/adolescents (n = 28,282) to assess the associations between the length of time in the US, and the prevalences of obesity and diabetes. In foreign-born adults, the prevalences of both obesity and diabetes increased with the length of time in the US, and ≥20 years in the US was associated with significantly higher rates of obesity (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 2.32, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.22–4.40, P = 0.01) and diabetes (aOR 4.22, 95% CI 1.04–17.08, P = 0.04) compared with <1 year in the US. In children/adolescents, obesity prevalence was significantly higher in those born in the US than those who had been in the US for <1 year (aOR 3.15, 95% CI 1.51–6.56, P = 0.002). When analyzed by year, obesity prevalence was significantly higher in US-born than in foreign-born adults from 1999 to 2012. On the other hand, the gap in obesity prevalence between US-born and foreign-born children/adolescents decreased from 1999 to 2011 due to a rapid increase in obesity prevalence among the foreign-born population, until there was no significant difference in 2011 to 2012. This study revealed that the risks of obesity and diabetes have increased in foreign-born US residents with time living in the US. However, the obesity gap between US-born and foreign-born populations is closing. PMID:27583867

  14. Population-attributable fraction of hypertension associated with obesity, abdominal obesity, and the joint effect of both in the Central Provinces of Iran.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, Masoud; Mirzaei, Masoud

    2017-03-01

    The prevalence of obesity has been increasing in Iran over the past decade. This study aimed to determine the population-attributable fraction (PAF) of hypertension associated with obesity, abdominal obesity, and the joint effect of both in the central provinces of Iran. Prevalence of hypertension was extracted from the Iranian Ministry of Health Non-Communicable Disease Risk Factor InfoBase 2009. Measure of association between obesity and hypertension was extracted from Tehran Lipid and Glucose Study, for males and females, in order to calculate the PAF of hypertension associated with obesity. Age standardization of the reported prevalence of obesity was done using the World Health Organization method. The PAF of hypertension associated with the joint effect of obesity and abdominal obesity in females was highest in Semnan Province: 22.7 [95% confidence interval (CI): 4.2-35.6], followed by Qom 21.09 (95% CI: 3.7-33.1), and Yazd 20.3 (95% CI: 3.5-32.1). In males, the highest PAF was observed in Qom Province 31.07 (95% CI: 16.7-41.1), followed by Semnan 29.6 (95% CI: 15.9-39.3), Qazvin 25.9 (95% CI: 13.7-34.5), Tehran 24.2 (95% CI: 12.7-32.3), and Isfahan 20.4 (95% CI: 3.5-27.4). Prevalence of hypertension is higher in more developed provinces. PAFs suggest that a sizable share of hypertension in these provinces is associated with obesity. It is recommended that health promotion programs focus on obesity in the provinces with a higher share of hypertension due to obesity.

  15. [THE INFLUENCE OF ABDOMINAL OBESITY ON LEFT VENTRICULAR MYOCARDIALREMODELING IN PATIENTS WITH ARTERIAL HYPERTENSION].

    PubMed

    Poteklzin, N P; Sarkisov, K A; Orlov, F A; Alatortseva, I A; Starovoitova, L M; Drozdova, I N

    2015-01-01

    The obesity dependence of selected clinical and instrumental characteristics of 10 male patients with arterial hypertension (AH) was evaluated Group I included 79 patients with grade II hypertensive disease (HD), normal body weight and waist circumference. Group 2 comprised 61 patients with grade II HD and abdominal obesity. Patients of both groups showed high frequency of left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy (59.2 and 73.8% respectively). Concentric LV hypertrophy prevailed in group I and eccentric hypertrophy in group 2. 24 hr ECG monitoring showed that signs of relative coronary insufficiency were recorded more frequently in group 2 and cardiac rhythm disturbances in group I.

  16. Empowerment in the Treatment of Diabetes and Obesity

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    As the available therapies for diabetes and obesity are not effective enough, diabetologists and educators search for new methods to collaborate with patients in order to support their health behaviors. The aim of this review is to discuss perspectives for the development of new empowerment-type therapies in the treatment of diabetes/obesity. Empowerment is a process whereby patients gain the necessary knowledge to influence their own behavior to improve the quality of their lives. It is carried out in five stages: (1) identify the problem, (2) explain the feelings and meanings, (3) build a plan, (4) act, and (5) experience and assess the execution. Although many years have passed since the advent and popularization of the concept of empowerment, the area remains controversial, mainly with regard to the methodology of therapy. Some previous studies have confirmed the positive effect of empowerment on body weight, metabolic control, and quality of life of patients with type 2 diabetes; however, few studies have been conducted in patients with type 1 diabetes. There is still a need to confirm the effectiveness of empowerment in accordance with Evidence Based Medicine by performing long-term observational studies in a large group of patients. In future, empowerment may become part of the standard of care for patients with diabetes and/or obesity. PMID:28090541

  17. Vascular health in children and adolescents: effects of obesity and diabetes.

    PubMed

    Short, Kevin R; Blackett, Piers R; Gardner, Andrew W; Copeland, Kenneth C

    2009-01-01

    The foundations for cardiovascular disease in adults are laid in childhood and accelerated by the presence of comorbid conditions, such as obesity, diabetes, hypertension, and dyslipidemia. Early detection of vascular dysfunction is an important clinical objective to identify those at risk for subsequent cardiovascular morbidity and events, and to initiate behavioral and medical interventions to reduce risk. Typically, cardiovascular screening is recommended for young adults, especially in people with a family history of cardiovascular conditions. Children and adolescents were once considered to be at low risk, but with the growing health concerns related to sedentary lifestyle, poor diet and obesity, cardiovascular screening may be needed earlier so that interventions to improve cardiovascular health can be initiated. This review describes comorbid conditions that increase cardiovascular risk in youth, namely obesity and diabetes, and describes noninvasive methods to objectively detect vascular disease and quantify vascular function and structure through measurements of endothelial function, arterial compliance, and intima-media thickness. Additionally, current strategies directed toward prevention of vascular disease in these populations, including exercise, dietary interventions and pharmacological therapy are described.

  18. "Obesity" and "Clinical Obesity" Men's understandings of obesity and its relation to the risk of diabetes: A qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Weaver, Nicola F; Hayes, Louise; Unwin, Nigel C; Murtagh, Madeleine J

    2008-01-01

    Background The 2007 Wanless report highlights the ever increasing problem of obesity and the consequent health problems. Obesity is a significant cause of diabetes. An increasing evidence base suggests that in terms of reducing diabetes and CVD risk, it is better to be "fit and fat" than unfit and of normal weight. There has been very little previous research into the understandings that men in the general population hold about the issues of weight, exercise and health; we therefore undertook this study in order to inform the process of health promotion and diabetes prevention in this group. Methods A qualitative study in North East England General Practice using a purposive sample of men aged 25 and 45 years (selection process designed to include 'normal', 'overweight' and 'obese' men). One to one audio-recorded semi structured interviews focused on: overweight and obesity, diet, physical activity and diabetes. Transcripts were initially analysed using framework analysis. Emerging themes interlinked. Results The men in this study (n = 17) understand the word obesity differently from the clinical definition; "obesity" was used as a description of those with fat in a central distribution, and understandings of the term commonly take into account fitness as well as weight. Men in their late 30s and early 40s described becoming more aware of health issues. Knowledge of what constitutes a 'healthy lifestyle' was generally good, but men described difficulty acting upon this knowledge for various reasons e.g. increasing responsibilities at home and at work. Knowledge of diabetes and the link between obesity and diabetes was poor. Conclusion Men in this study had a complex understanding of the interlinked importance of weight and fitness in relation to health. Obesity is understood as a description of people with centrally distributed fat, in association with low fitness levels. There is a need to increase understanding of the causes and consequences of diabetes

  19. Cardiovascular disease, hypertension, dyslipidaemia and obesity in patients with hypothalamic‐pituitary disease

    PubMed Central

    Deepak, D; Furlong, N J; Wilding, J P H; MacFarlane, I A

    2007-01-01

    Objective Adults with hypothalamic‐pituitary disease have increased morbidity and mortality from cardiovascular disease (CVD). Therefore, the prevalence of CVD and adequacy of treatment of cardiovascular risk factors (according to current treatment guidelines) was studied in a large group of patients with hypothalamic‐pituitary disease. Study design In 2005, 152 consecutive adult patients with hypothalamic‐pituitary disease attending our neuro‐endocrine centre were clinically examined and blood pressure (BP), lipid profile, type 2 diabetes mellitus, body composition and smoking status were assessed. Results Of the 152 patients, 36.8% had treated hypertension and 28.2% had treated dyslipidaemia. Many of these patients had inadequate BP control (BP >140/85 mm Hg, 44.6%) and undesirable lipid levels (total cholesterol >4.0 mmol/l, 69%). Also, many of the untreated patients had BP and lipid levels which should have been considered for treatment (26 patients (27%) and 83 patients (76%), respectively). Smoking was admitted in 18% of patients. Central adiposity was present in 86% and obesity (body mass index ⩾30) was present in 50%. Conclusions Cardiovascular risk factors are highly prevalent and often inadequately treated in adult patients with hypothalamic‐pituitary disease. Aggressive treatment of these factors is essential to reduce mortality and morbidity from CVD in these patients. PMID:17403957

  20. Obesity and kidney disease: Beyond the hyperfiltration.

    PubMed

    Mascali, A; Franzese, O; Nisticò, S; Campia, U; Lauro, D; Cardillo, C; Di Daniele, N; Tesauro, M

    2016-09-01

    In industrialized countries, overweight and obesity account for approximately 13.8% and 24.9% of the kidney disease observed in men and women, respectively. Moreover, obesity-associated glomerulopathy is now considered as "an emerging epidemic." Kidney function can be negatively impacted by obesity through several mechanisms, either direct or indirect. While it is well established that obesity represents the leading risk factor for type 2 diabetes and hypertension, awareness that obesity is associated with direct kidney damage independently of hypertension and diabetes is still not widespread. In this paper we will discuss the emerging role of adipose tissue, particularly in the visceral depot, in obesity-induced chronic kidney damage.

  1. Alterations of Urinary Microbiota in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus with Hypertension and/or Hyperlipidemia

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fengping; Ling, Zongxin; Xiao, Yonghong; Yang, Qing; Wang, Baohong; Zheng, Li; Jiang, Ping; Li, Lanjuan; Wang, Wei

    2017-01-01

    Evidence shows urine specimens from different women have different populations of bacteria. The co-occurrence of hypertension and hyperlipidemia in those with diabetes may alter the composition of urine and the microenviroment of the bladder in which bacteria live. The aim of this study was to characterize the urinary microbiota in women with type 2 diabetes mellitus only and those with diabetes plus hypertension and/or hyperlipidemia, and to explore whether the composition of the urinary microbiota is affected by fasting blood glucose, blood pressure, and blood lipids. We enrolled 28 individuals with diabetes only, 24 with diabetes plus hypertension, 7 with diabetes plus hyperlipidemia, and 11 with diabetes plus both hypertension and hyperlipidemia. Modified midstream urine collection technique was designed to obtain urine specimens. Bacterial genomic DNA was isolated using magnetic beads and the urinary microbiota was analyzed using the Illumina MiSeq Sequencing System based on the V3-V4 hypervariable regions of the 16S rRNA gene. Among the four cohorts, the diabetes plus hypertension cohort had the highest relative abundance of Proteobacteria. In contrast, the diabetes plus hyperlipidemia cohort had the lowest relative abundance of Proteobacteria. In addition, Escherichia and Gardnerella were not found in the diabetes plus hyperlipidemia cohort but they were found in all of the other cohorts. Cetobacterium was only present in the diabetes plus hypertension cohort. The most abundant bacteria in the diabetes only and diabetes plus hyperlipidemia cohorts was Lactobacillus, while Prevotella was the most abundant bacteria in the diabetes plus hypertension and diabetes plus hypertension and hyperlipidemia cohorts. Moreover, the relative abundance of Lactobacillus was significantly lower in the diabetes plus hypertension cohort than in the diabetes only and diabetes plus hyperlipidemia cohorts. Several bacteria were correlated with the participants' fasting blood

  2. Alterations of Urinary Microbiota in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus with Hypertension and/or Hyperlipidemia.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fengping; Ling, Zongxin; Xiao, Yonghong; Yang, Qing; Wang, Baohong; Zheng, Li; Jiang, Ping; Li, Lanjuan; Wang, Wei

    2017-01-01

    Evidence shows urine specimens from different women have different populations of bacteria. The co-occurrence of hypertension and hyperlipidemia in those with diabetes may alter the composition of urine and the microenviroment of the bladder in which bacteria live. The aim of this study was to characterize the urinary microbiota in women with type 2 diabetes mellitus only and those with diabetes plus hypertension and/or hyperlipidemia, and to explore whether the composition of the urinary microbiota is affected by fasting blood glucose, blood pressure, and blood lipids. We enrolled 28 individuals with diabetes only, 24 with diabetes plus hypertension, 7 with diabetes plus hyperlipidemia, and 11 with diabetes plus both hypertension and hyperlipidemia. Modified midstream urine collection technique was designed to obtain urine specimens. Bacterial genomic DNA was isolated using magnetic beads and the urinary microbiota was analyzed using the Illumina MiSeq Sequencing System based on the V3-V4 hypervariable regions of the 16S rRNA gene. Among the four cohorts, the diabetes plus hypertension cohort had the highest relative abundance of Proteobacteria. In contrast, the diabetes plus hyperlipidemia cohort had the lowest relative abundance of Proteobacteria. In addition, Escherichia and Gardnerella were not found in the diabetes plus hyperlipidemia cohort but they were found in all of the other cohorts. Cetobacterium was only present in the diabetes plus hypertension cohort. The most abundant bacteria in the diabetes only and diabetes plus hyperlipidemia cohorts was Lactobacillus, while Prevotella was the most abundant bacteria in the diabetes plus hypertension and diabetes plus hypertension and hyperlipidemia cohorts. Moreover, the relative abundance of Lactobacillus was significantly lower in the diabetes plus hypertension cohort than in the diabetes only and diabetes plus hyperlipidemia cohorts. Several bacteria were correlated with the participants' fasting blood

  3. Opposing tissue-specific roles of angiotensin in the pathogenesis of obesity, and implications for obesity-related hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Littlejohn, Nicole K.

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic disease, specifically obesity, has now become the greatest challenge to improving cardiovascular health. The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) exists as both a circulating hormone system and as a local paracrine signaling mechanism within various tissues including the brain, kidney, and adipose, and this system is strongly implicated in cardiovascular health and disease. Growing evidence also implicates the RAS in the control of energy balance, supporting the concept that the RAS may be mechanistically involved in the pathogenesis of obesity and obesity hypertension. Here, we review the involvement of the RAS in the entire spectrum of whole organism energy balance mechanisms, including behaviors (food ingestion and spontaneous physical activity) and biological processes (digestive efficiency and both aerobic and nonaerobic resting metabolic rates). We hypothesize that opposing, tissue-specific effects of the RAS to modulate these various components of energy balance can explain the apparently paradoxical results reported by energy-balance studies that involve stimulating, versus disrupting, the RAS. We propose a model in which such opposing and tissue-specific effects of the RAS can explain the failure of simple, global RAS blockade to result in weight loss in humans, and hypothesize that obesity-mediated uncoupling of endogenous metabolic rate control mechanisms can explain the phenomenon of obesity-related hypertension. PMID:26491099

  4. Opposing tissue-specific roles of angiotensin in the pathogenesis of obesity, and implications for obesity-related hypertension.

    PubMed

    Littlejohn, Nicole K; Grobe, Justin L

    2015-12-15

    Metabolic disease, specifically obesity, has now become the greatest challenge to improving cardiovascular health. The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) exists as both a circulating hormone system and as a local paracrine signaling mechanism within various tissues including the brain, kidney, and adipose, and this system is strongly implicated in cardiovascular health and disease. Growing evidence also implicates the RAS in the control of energy balance, supporting the concept that the RAS may be mechanistically involved in the pathogenesis of obesity and obesity hypertension. Here, we review the involvement of the RAS in the entire spectrum of whole organism energy balance mechanisms, including behaviors (food ingestion and spontaneous physical activity) and biological processes (digestive efficiency and both aerobic and nonaerobic resting metabolic rates). We hypothesize that opposing, tissue-specific effects of the RAS to modulate these various components of energy balance can explain the apparently paradoxical results reported by energy-balance studies that involve stimulating, versus disrupting, the RAS. We propose a model in which such opposing and tissue-specific effects of the RAS can explain the failure of simple, global RAS blockade to result in weight loss in humans, and hypothesize that obesity-mediated uncoupling of endogenous metabolic rate control mechanisms can explain the phenomenon of obesity-related hypertension.

  5. Prevalence of hypertension, obesity, hematuria and proteinuria amongst healthy adolescents living in Western Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Hothan, Kholoud A.; Alasmari, Bashaer A.; Alkhelaiwi, Omniya K.; Althagafi, Khalid M.; Alkhaldi, Abdulaziz A.; Alfityani, Ahmed K.; Aladawi, Mohannad M.; Sharief, Sara N.; Desoky, Sherif El; Kari, Jameela A.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the prevalence of hypertension, obesity, hematuria, and proteinuria among healthy adolescents and to determine the associated risk factors. Methods: This is a cross-sectional study of 8 intermediate schools in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia between March 2015 and June 2015. Samples were selected randomly and equal proportions from each school for both genders were ensured. Both blood pressure and body mass index were measured and a brief questionnaire was filled out for the specified studied group. Urine dipstick analysis was carried out for 294 children. A second questionnaire was completed for hypertensive and obese subjects in addition to those with hematuria and proteinuria. Results: A total of 401 children (200 males) with a mean (SD) age of 13.87 (1.27) were included. Hypertension was found in 17.2% with a male to female ratio of 1.4:1. Pre-hypertension was found in 4.2% of our sample with a male to female ratio of 2.1:1. Obesity was found in 19.2% with a male to female ratio of 1.5:1. Obesity was found to be the most significant risk factor for hypertension with a related risk: 2.87, 95% and confidence interval: 1.9-4.3. For urine abnormalities, 10.2% of samples were positive for proteinuria, 17% for hematuria, and 3.1% for both. Conclusion: It was found that there is a positive correlation between the incidence of obesity and hypertension in adolescents. Hematuria and proteinuria were also found to be high. Screening and prevention programs are therefore recommended. PMID:27652364

  6. Influence of hypertension, obesity and nicotine abuse on quantitative and qualitative changes in acute-phase proteins in patients with essential hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Cymerys, Maciej; Bogdański, Paweł; Pupek-Musialik, Danuta; Jabłecka, Anna; Łącki, Jan; Korczowska, Izabela; Dytfeld, Joanna

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background Hypertension is a powerful risk factor for cardiovascular disease and frequently occurs in conjunction with obesity. Accumulative evidence suggests a link between inflammation and hypertension. The aim of study was to evaluate whether blood pressure, obesity and smoking may influence acute-phase response. Material/Methods Ninety-two patients with essential hypertension and 75 healthy volunteers as a control group were studied. In all subjects assessment of hsCRP, α1-acid glycoprotein (AGP), α1-antichymotrypsin, transferrin, α1-antitrypsin, and C3 and C4 complement were performed. Evaluation of glycosylation profile and reactivity coefficient (RC) for AGP was done by means of affinity immunoelectrophoresis with concanavalin A as a ligand. Results When compared to the controls, hypertensive subjects presented significantly higher hsCRP concentrations and lower transferrin level. Hypertensive patients had elevated AGP-AC. The intensification of the inflammatory reaction was greater in the subgroup of hypertensive patients smoking cigarettes. In obese hypertensives, elevated serum C3 complement level was found. Conclusions We conclude that arterial hypertension may evoke the acute-phase response in humans. Markers of acute-phase response are particularly strongly expressed in smokers. Serum C 3 complement, but not other APPs, is elevated in hypertension coexisting with obesity. PMID:22534714

  7. Longitudinal Study of Hypertensive Subjects With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: Overall and Cardiovascular Risk.

    PubMed

    Safar, Michel E; Gnakaméné, Jean-Barthélémy; Bahous, Sola Aoun; Yannoutsos, Alexandra; Thomas, Frédérique

    2017-04-10

    Despite adequate glycemic and blood pressure control, treated type 2 diabetic hypertensive subjects have a significantly elevated overall/cardiovascular risk. We studied 244 816 normotensive and 99 720 hypertensive subjects (including 7480 type 2 diabetics) attending medical checkups between 1992 and 2011. We sought to identify significant differences in overall/cardiovascular risk between hypertension with and without diabetes mellitus. Mean follow-up was 12.7 years; 14 050 all-cause deaths were reported. From normotensive to hypertensive populations, a significant progression in overall/cardiovascular mortality was observed. Mortality was significantly greater among diabetic than nondiabetic hypertensive subjects (all-cause mortality, 14.05% versus 7.43%; and cardiovascular mortality, 1.28% versus 0.7%). No interaction was observed between hemodynamic measurements and overall/cardiovascular risk, suggesting that blood pressure factors, even during drug therapy, could not explain the differences in mortality rates between diabetic and nondiabetic hypertensive patients. Using cross-sectional regression models, a significant association was observed between higher education levels, lower levels of anxiety and depression, and reduced overall mortality in diabetic hypertensive subjects, while impaired renal function, a history of stroke and myocardial infarction, and increased alcohol and tobacco consumption were significantly associated with increased mortality. Blood pressure and glycemic control alone cannot reverse overall/cardiovascular risk in diabetics with hypertension. Together with cardiovascular measures, overall prevention should include recommendations to reduce alcohol and tobacco consumption and improve stress, education levels, and physical activity.

  8. Diabetes Remission after Nonsurgical Intensive Lifestyle Intervention in Obese Patients with Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Mottalib, Adham; Sakr, Mahmoud; Shehabeldin, Mohamed; Hamdy, Osama

    2015-01-01

    Partial or complete remission from type 2 diabetes was recently observed after bariatric surgeries. Limited data is available about the possibility of inducing diabetes remission through intensive weight reduction. We retrospectively evaluated diabetes remissions after one year of the Weight Achievement and Intensive Treatment (Why WAIT) program, a 12-week intensive program for diabetes weight management in real-world clinical practice. Among 120 obese patients with type 2 diabetes who completed the program, 88 patients returned for follow-up at one year. Nineteen patients (21.6%) had major improvement in their glycemic control, defined as achieving an A1C <6.5% after one year. Four patients (4.5%) achieved either partial or complete diabetes remission defined as A1C <6.5% and <5.7%, respectively, on no antihyperglycemic medications for one year; 2 achieved partial remission (2.3%) and 2 achieved complete remission (2.3%). At the time of intervention, patients who achieved diabetes remission had shorter diabetes duration (<5 years) and lower A1C (<8%) and were treated with fewer than 2 oral medications. They achieved a weight reduction of >7% after 12 weeks. These results indicate that a subset of obese patients with type 2 diabetes is appropriate for intensive lifestyle intervention with the aim of inducing diabetes remission. PMID:26114120

  9. [Hypertension in children and adolescence].

    PubMed

    Lomelí, Catalina; Rosas, Martín; Mendoza-González, Celso; Méndez, Arturo; Lorenzo, José Antonio; Buendía, Alfonso; Férez-Santander, Sergio Mario; Attie, Fause

    2008-01-01

    The epidemic of childhood obesity, the risk of developing left ventricular hypertrophy, and evidence of the early development of atherosclerosis in children would make the detection of and intervention in childhood hypertension important to reduce long-term health risks; however, supporting data are lacking. Secondary hypertension is more common in preadolescent children, with most cases caused by renal disease. Primary or essential hypertension is more common in adolescents and has multiple risk factors, including obesity and a family history of hypertension. Evaluation involves a through history and physical examination, laboratory tests, and specialized studies. Management is multifaceted. Nonpharmacologic treatments include weight reduction, exercise, and dietary modifications. Although the evidence of first line therapy for hypertension is still controversial, the recommendations for pharmacologic treatment are based on symptomatic hypertension, evidence of end-organ damage, stage 2 of hypertension, or stage 1 of hypertension unresponsive to lifestyle modifications, and hypertension with diabetes mellitus.

  10. Plasma adipokine and inflammatory marker concentrations are altered in obese, as opposed to non-obese, type 2 diabetes patients.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Dominique; Dendale, Paul; Beelen, Milou; Jonkers, Richard A M; Mullens, Annelies; Corluy, Luk; Meeusen, Romain; van Loon, Luc J C

    2010-06-01

    Elevated plasma free fatty acid (FFA), inflammatory marker, and altered adipokine concentrations have been observed in obese type 2 diabetes patients. It remains unclear whether these altered plasma concentrations are related to the diabetic state or presence of obesity. In this cross-sectional observational study, we compare basal plasma FFA, inflammatory marker, and adipokine concentrations between obese and non-obese type 2 diabetes patients and healthy, non-obese controls. A total of 20 healthy, normoglycemic males (BMI <30 kg/m(2)), 20 non-obese (BMI <30 kg/m(2)) and 20 obese (BMI >35 kg/m(2)) type 2 diabetes patients were selected to participate in this study. Groups were matched for age and habitual physical activity level. Body composition, glycemic control, and exercise performance capacity were assessed. Basal blood samples were collected to determine plasma leptin, adiponectin, resistin, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha), interleukin-6 (IL-6), high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) and FFA concentrations. Plasma FFA, inflammatory marker (hsCRP, IL-6, TNFalpha), adipokine (adiponectin, resistin, leptin), and triglyceride concentrations did not differ between non-obese diabetes patients and healthy, normoglycemic controls. Plasma FFA, IL-6, hsCRP, leptin, and triglyceride levels were significantly higher in the obese diabetes patients when compared with the healthy normoglycemic controls (P < 0.05). Furthermore, plasma hsCRP and leptin levels were significantly higher in the obese versus non-obese diabetes patients (P < 0.05). Significant correlations between plasma parameters and glycemic control were observed, but disappeared after adjusting for trunk adipose tissue mass. Elevated plasma leptin, hsCRP, IL-6, and FFA concentrations are associated with obesity and not necessarily with the type 2 diabetic state.

  11. Obesity and Hyperlipidemia are Risk Factors for Early Diabetic Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Smith, A. Gordon; Singleton, J. Robinson

    2013-01-01

    The Utah Diabetic Neuropathy Study (UDNS) examined 218 type 2 diabetic subjects without neuropathy symptoms, or with symptoms of < 5 years, in order to evaluate risk factors for neuropathy development. Each subject completed symptom questionnaires, the Utah Early Neuropathy Scale (UENS), nerve conduction studies (NCS), quantitative sensory testing (QST) for vibration and cold detection, quantitative sudomotor axon reflex testing (QSART), and skin biopsy with measurement of intraepidermal nerve fiber density (IENFD). Those with abnormalities of ≥ 3 were classified as having probable, and those with 1–2 as possible neuropathy. The relationship between glycemic control, lipid parameters (high density lipoprotein and triglyceride levels), blood pressure, and obesity, and neuropathy risk was examined. There was a significant relationship between the number of abnormalities among these features and neuropathy status (p<0.01). Hypertriglyceridemia, obesity and 3 or more abnormalities increased neuropathy risk (risk ratios 2.1 p<0.03, 2.9 p>0.02 and 3.0 p<0.004 respectively). Multivariate analysis found obesity and triglycerides were related to loss of small unmyelinated axons based on IENFD whereas elevated hemoglobin A1c was related to large myelinated fiber loss (motor conduction velocity). These findings indicate obesity and hypertriglyceridemia significantly increase risk for peripheral neuropathy, independent of glucose control. Obesity/hypertriglyceridemia and hyperglycemia may have differential effects on small versus large fibers. PMID:23731827

  12. Obesity and hyperlipidemia are risk factors for early diabetic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Smith, A Gordon; Singleton, J Robinson

    2013-01-01

    The Utah Diabetic Neuropathy Study (UDNS) examined 218 type 2 diabetic subjects without neuropathy symptoms, or with symptoms of<5 years, in order to evaluate risk factors for neuropathy development. Each subject completed symptom questionnaires, the Utah Early Neuropathy Scale (UENS), nerve conduction studies (NCS), quantitative sensory testing (QST) for vibration and cold detection, quantitative sudomotor axon reflex testing (QSART), and skin biopsy with measurement of intraepidermal nerve fiber density (IENFD). Those with abnormalities of≥3 were classified as having probable, and those with 1-2 as possible neuropathy. The relationship between glycemic control, lipid parameters (high density lipoprotein and triglyceride levels), blood pressure, and obesity, and neuropathy risk was examined. There was a significant relationship between the number of abnormalities among these features and neuropathy status (p<0.01). Hypertriglyceridemia, obesity and 3 or more abnormalities increased neuropathy risk (risk ratios 2.1 p<0.03, 2.9 p>0.02 and 3.0 p<0.004 respectively). Multivariate analysis found obesity and triglycerides were related to loss of small unmyelinated axons based on IENFD whereas elevated hemoglobin A1c was related to large myelinated fiber loss (motor conduction velocity). These findings indicate obesity and hypertriglyceridemia significantly increase risk for peripheral neuropathy, independent of glucose control. Obesity/hypertriglyceridemia and hyperglycemia may have differential effects on small versus large fibers.

  13. A proteomic approach to obesity and type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    López-Villar, Elena; Martos-Moreno, Gabriel Á; Chowen, Julie A; Okada, Shigeru; Kopchick, John J; Argente, Jesús

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of obesity and type diabetes 2 has increased dramatically resulting in an increased interest in its biomedical relevance. However, the mechanisms that trigger the development of diabetes type 2 in obese patients remain largely unknown. Scientific, clinical and pharmaceutical communities are dedicating vast resources to unravel this issue by applying different omics tools. During the last decade, the advances in proteomic approaches and the Human Proteome Organization have opened and are opening a new door that may be helpful in the identification of patients at risk and to improve current therapies. Here, we briefly review some of the advances in our understanding of type 2 diabetes that have occurred through the application of proteomics. We also review, in detail, the current improvements in proteomic methodologies and new strategies that could be employed to further advance our understanding of this pathology. By applying these new proteomic advances, novel therapeutic and/or diagnostic protein targets will be discovered in the obesity/Type 2 diabetes area. PMID:25960181

  14. A proteomic approach to obesity and type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    López-Villar, Elena; Martos-Moreno, Gabriel Á; Chowen, Julie A; Okada, Shigeru; Kopchick, John J; Argente, Jesús

    2015-07-01

    The incidence of obesity and type diabetes 2 has increased dramatically resulting in an increased interest in its biomedical relevance. However, the mechanisms that trigger the development of diabetes type 2 in obese patients remain largely unknown. Scientific, clinical and pharmaceutical communities are dedicating vast resources to unravel this issue by applying different omics tools. During the last decade, the advances in proteomic approaches and the Human Proteome Organization have opened and are opening a new door that may be helpful in the identification of patients at risk and to improve current therapies. Here, we briefly review some of the advances in our understanding of type 2 diabetes that have occurred through the application of proteomics. We also review, in detail, the current improvements in proteomic methodologies and new strategies that could be employed to further advance our understanding of this pathology. By applying these new proteomic advances, novel therapeutic and/or diagnostic protein targets will be discovered in the obesity/Type 2 diabetes area.

  15. Mortality as a function of obesity and diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Pettitt, D J; Lisse, J R; Knowler, W C; Bennett, P H

    1982-03-01

    Mortality according to body mass index (weight/height2) was studied in 2197 Pima Indians aged 15-74 years, as part of the longitudinal study of diabetes begun in 1965 in the Gila River Indian Community of Arizona. The Pima Indians are a population with a high prevalence of obesity, and they have the highest known incidence of type II (non-insulin dependent) diabetes mellitus. Among males, mortality was greatest in those with a body mass index of at least 40 kg/m2, but obesity had little effect on mortality at body mass indices below 40 kg/m2. Age-specific death rates in women were not consistently related to obesity, although mortality in subjects with diabetes was higher than in those without. In men, diabetes had little effect on mortality. In this study, as in several other mortality studies, the lowest mortality rates were experienced by people with body weights well above those recommended as "desirable" by the Society of Actuaries in 1959. Thus, the applicability of the "desirable" weight standards in common use is questioned.

  16. Using Multistate Observational Studies to Determine Role of Hypertension and Diabetes as Risk Factors for Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Mitasha; Raj, Des; Raina, Sunil Kumar; Gandhi, Manoj Kumar; Chander, Vishav

    2016-01-01

    Background: Evidence suggests that modifiable risk factors which can be targeted by prevention are vascular diseases, such as diabetes, midlife hypertension (HTN), midlife obesity, midlife cholesterol, mid- and late-life depression as well as lifestyle factors such as smoking, physical inactivity, and poor diet. Methods: A comprehensive search of the National Library of Medicine's PubMed database and Google Scholar was conducted. A combinations of medical subject headings and free text words that included search terms related to the exposure (e.g., prevalence, HTN, raised BP, high BP, diabetes, high blood sugar, DM, India, state), were combined with search terms related to the outcomes (e.g., prevalence, disease burden, estimate, dementia, India). The filters included were English for the language category and humans for the study category. Results: The PubMed search initially identified 269 references, and a total of 204 abstracts were screened by inclusion criteria. Full-text assessment of 136 articles on prevalence of dementia resulted in 20 relevant articles from which the different regions of the country were identified. Based on the search conducted according to the regions; 287abstracts of the prevalence of HTN and 577 on the prevalence of diabetes mellitus were screened. There were 43 full-text articles on the prevalence of HTN and diabetes from the regions where the prevalence of dementia was available. Of these potentially relevant articles were 14 in number. Conclusion: Despite the uncertainty in the role, the data analysis, therefore, points to a role in the prevention of HTN and diabetes to prevent dementia. PMID:28163495

  17. iNOS inhibition improves autonomic dysfunction and oxidative status in hypertensive obese rats.

    PubMed

    da Cunha, Natalia Veronez; Lopes, Fernanda Novi Cortegoso; Panis, Carolina; Cecchini, Rubens; Pinge-Filho, Phileno; Martins-Pinge, Marli Cardoso

    2017-01-01

    It has been suggested that nitric oxide (NO) from iNOS source is involved in inflammation and oxidative stress, and hypertension in obese subjects involves an inflammatory process. However, no study evaluated the participation of iNOS inhibition on cardiovascular, autonomic, and inflammatory parameters in obese rats. Obesity was induced by the administration of 4 mg/g body weight of monosodium glutamate (MSG) or equimolar saline (CTR) in newborn rats. On the 60th day, treatment with aminoguanidine (Amino, 50 mg/kg), an iNOS inhibitor, or 0.9% saline, was started. On the 90th day, mean arterial pressure (MAP) and heart rate (HR) were recorded in conscious rats and autonomic modulation was conducted with the CardioSeries software. Plasma samples were collected to assess lipid peroxidation and prostaglandins (PGE2). In addition, iNOS immunohistochemistry in cardiac tissue was evaluated. MSG rats showed hypertension compared to CTR, and Amino treatment did not reverse it. Obese rats presented increased sympathetic and decreased parasympathetic modulation to the heart, reverted by Amino treatment. Plasma PGE2 was increased in obese rats, and Amino treatment decreased. Obese rats presented increased plasma lipoperoxidation, which was decreased after Amino treatment. Also, cardiac iNOS immunohistochemistry was decreased after Amino treatment. Our data suggest that iNOS activation is involved in the systemic and cardiac mechanisms of oxidative stress, inflammation, and autonomic dysfunction derived from obesity.

  18. Estrogen exposure, obesity and thyroid disease in women with severe pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Severe pulmonary hypertension is a lethal group of disorders which preferentially afflicts women. It appears that in recent years the patient profile has shifted towards older, obese, and postmenopausal women, suggesting that endocrine factors may be important. Several studies have revealed an increased prevalence of thyroid disease in these patients, but no studies have evaluated for a coexistence of endocrine factors. In particular, no studies have attempted to evaluate for concurrent thyroid disease, obesity and long-term estrogen exposure in patients. 88 patients attending the Pulmonary Hypertension Association 8th International meeting completed a questionnaire and were interviewed. Information was collected regarding reproductive history, height, weight, and previous diagnosis of thyroid disease. 46% met criteria for obesity. 41% reported a diagnosis of thyroid disease. 81% of women reported prior use of hormone therapy. 70% reported greater than 10 years of exogenous hormone use. 74% of female patients reported two or more of potentially disease modifying endocrine factors (obesity, thyroid disease or estrogen therapy). The coexistent high prevalence in our cohort of exogenous estrogen exposure, thyroid disease and obesity suggests that an interaction of multiple endocrine factors might contribute to the pathogenesis of pulmonary hypertension and may represent epigenetic modifiers in genetically-susceptible individuals. PMID:19748850

  19. Leptin Induces Hypertension and Endothelial Dysfunction via Aldosterone-Dependent Mechanisms in Obese Female Mice.

    PubMed

    Huby, Anne-Cécile; Otvos, Laszlo; Belin de Chantemèle, Eric J

    2016-05-01

    Obesity is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease in males and females. Whether obesity triggers cardiovascular disease via similar mechanisms in both the sexes is, however, unknown. In males, the adipokine leptin highly contributes to obesity-related cardiovascular disease by increasing sympathetic activity. Females secrete 3× to 4× more leptin than males, but do not exhibit high sympathetic tone with obesity. Nevertheless, females show inappropriately high aldosterone levels that positively correlate with adiposity and blood pressure (BP). We hypothesized that leptin induces hypertension and endothelial dysfunction via aldosterone-dependent mechanisms in females. Leptin control of the cardiovascular function was analyzed in female mice sensitized to leptin via the deletion of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1b (knockout) and in agouti yellow obese hyperleptinemic mice (Ay). Hypersensitivity to leptin (wild-type, 115 ± 2; protein tyrosine phosphatase 1b knockout, 124 ± 2 mm Hg; P<0.05) and obesity elevated BP (a/a, 113 ± 1; Ay, 128 ± 7 mm Hg; P<0.05) and impaired endothelial function. Chronic leptin receptor antagonism restored BP and endothelial function in protein tyrosine phosphatase 1b knockout and Ay mice. Hypersensitivity to leptin and obesity reduced BP response to ganglionic blockade in both strains and plasma catecholamine levels in protein tyrosine phosphatase 1b knockout mice. Hypersensitivity to leptin and obesity significantly increased plasma aldosterone levels and adrenal CYP11B2 expression. Chronic leptin receptor antagonism reduced aldosterone levels. Furthermore, chronic leptin and mineralocorticoid receptor blockade reduced BP and improved endothelial function in both leptin-sensitized and obese hyperleptinemic female mice. Together, these data demonstrate that leptin induces hypertension and endothelial dysfunction via aldosterone-dependent mechanisms in female mice and suggest that obesity leads to cardiovascular disease via sex

  20. Leptin Induces Hypertension and Endothelial Dysfunction via Aldosterone-Dependent Mechanisms in Obese Female Mice

    PubMed Central

    Huby, Anne-Cecile; Otvos, Laszlo; Belin de Chantemèle, Eric J.

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease in males and females. Whether obesity triggers cardiovascular disease via similar mechanisms in both the sexes is, however, unknown. In males, the adipokine leptin highly contributes to obesity-related cardiovascular disease by increasing sympathetic activity. Females secrete 3× to 4× more leptin than males, but do not exhibit high sympathetic tone with obesity. Nevertheless, females show inappropriately high aldosterone levels that positively correlate with adiposity and blood pressure (BP). We hypothesized that leptin induces hypertension and endothelial dysfunction via aldosterone-dependent mechanisms in females. Leptin control of the cardiovascular function was analyzed in female mice sensitized to leptin via the deletion of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1b (knockout) and in agouti yellow obese hyperleptinemic mice (Ay). Hypersensitivity to leptin (wild-type, 115±2; protein tyrosine phosphatase 1b knockout, 124±2 mm Hg; P<0.05) and obesity elevated BP (a/a, 113±1; Ay, 128±7 mm Hg; P<0.05) and impaired endothelial function. Chronic leptin receptor antagonism restored BP and endothelial function in protein tyrosine phosphatase 1b knockout and Ay mice. Hypersensitivity to leptin and obesity reduced BP response to ganglionic blockade in both strains and plasma catecholamine levels in protein tyrosine phosphatase 1b knockout mice. Hypersensitivity to leptin and obesity significantly increased plasma aldosterone levels and adrenal CYP11B2 expression. Chronic leptin receptor antagonism reduced aldosterone levels. Furthermore, chronic leptin and mineralocorticoid receptor blockade reduced BP and improved endothelial function in both leptin-sensitized and obese hyperleptinemic female mice. Together, these data demonstrate that leptin induces hypertension and endothelial dysfunction via aldosterone-dependent mechanisms in female mice and suggest that obesity leads to cardiovascular disease via sex

  1. Prevalence of metabolic syndrome and obesity-associated hypertension in the racial ethnic minorities of the United States.

    PubMed

    Falkner, Bonita; Cossrow, Nicole D F H

    2014-07-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a clinical condition that includes multiple cardiovascular disease risk factors, including obesity, high blood pressure or hypertension, dyslipidemia, and abnormal glucose metabolism. The core metabolic abnormality in MetS is insulin resistance, or impaired insulin-mediated glucose regulation that results in elevated plasma insulin concentration. MetS greatly increases the risk for diabetes, atherosclerosis, and adverse metabolic and cardiovascular outcomes. The syndrome is present in over 25 % of adults in the U.S., with higher rates among racial/ethnic minority groups. Although commonly associated with adult diseases and aging, MetS has also been described in children and adolescents, but at a much lower prevalence of approximately 4-5 %. Because obesity is a key component of the syndrome, the growing childhood epidemic has raised awareness of MetS in children. The rate of MetS among obese children and adolescents is approximately 30 %, with similar racial/ethnic disparity among minority groups as among adults.

  2. CYP7A1 genotypes and haplotypes associated with hypertension in an obese Han Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Fu, Lingyu; Zhao, Yanyan; Wu, Xiaomei; Liu, Hong; Shi, Jingpu; Lu, Jingyu; Zhou, Bo

    2011-06-01

    This study investigated the association between single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs; rs3808607 and rs1125226) within the CYP7A1 promoter and hypertension susceptibility in a Han Chinese population. From 2003 through 2006, a population-based case-control study was performed in a cohort of 1187 randomly selected Han Chinese subjects. A sib-pair study for a transmission disequilibrium test analysis was carried out in 76 hypertensive (HT) families (n=312) from northeastern Liaoning province. SNPs were detected using real-time PCR. No significant differences were found in the genotype or allele frequencies of either SNP (P>0.05), with no excessive allele sharing. For rs3808607, the frequency of the AA genotype in obese hypertensive patients was 31.91%, significantly higher than in normotensive (NT) subjects (12.73%; odds ratio (OR)=3.21, 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.35-7.66). For rs3808607, the AA genotype frequency was significantly higher in obese male HT subjects (27.87%) than in matched NTs (7.41%; OR=4.83, 95% CI=1.03-22.65). After adjustment for environmental risk factors in obese participants, the AA genotype was associated with hypertension (OR=3.395, 95% CI=1.412-8.162). Among subjects with body mass index 28 kg m(-2), the HT and NT groups had significantly different frequencies of Hap I (C/C) and Hap IV (A/A). The frequencies of rs3808607 alleles in the CYP7A1 gene differed significantly between obese HT and NT men. Haplotypes I and IV were associated with hypertension in obese participants.

  3. Oleuropein offers cardioprotection in rats with simultaneous type 2 diabetes and renal hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Nekooeian, Ali Akbar; Khalili, Azadeh; Khosravi, Mohammad Bagher

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The study aimed at examining the role of oxidative stress in cadioprotective effects of oleuropein in a rat model of simultaneous type 2 diabetes and renal hypertension. Materials and Methods: Five groups of male Sprague-Dawley rats including a control group, a diabetic-hypertensive group receiving vehicle, and three diabetic-hypertensive groups receiving oleuropein at 20, 40, or 60 mg/kg/day were used. Blood pressure and glucose, serum malondialdehyde, and erythrocyte superoxide dismutase were measured, and animal's hearts with ischemia/reperfusion injuries were used using Langendorff technique. Results: Blood pressure, blood glucose, serum malondialdehyde, infarct size, coronary effluent creatine kinase-MB, and coronary resistance of diabetic-hypertensive group were significantly higher than those of the control group, while those of the oleuropein-receiving groups were significantly lower than those of the diabetic hypertensive group receiving the vehicle. Erythrocyte superoxide dismutase, left ventricular developed pressure, and rate of rise and rate of decrease of ventricular pressure of diabetic-hypertensive group were significantly lower than those of the control group. These parameters as well as heart rate of oleuropein-receiving groups were significantly higher than those of the diabetic-hypertensive group. Conclusion: The findings indicate that oleuropein offered cardioprotection, which might be partly mediated by its antioxidant properties. PMID:25097277

  4. Managing hypertension in diabetic patients – focus on trandolapril/verapamil combination

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Sanjib Kumar; Ruggenenti, Piero; Remuzzi, Giuseppe

    2007-01-01

    Hypertensive diabetes individuals are at higher risk for cardiovascular events and progression to end stage renal disease. Several well conducted clinical trials indicate that aggressive treatment of hypertension in individual with diabetes reduces these complications. Combinations of two or more antihypertensive drugs are frequently required to reach the target blood pressure and to improve the cardiovascular and renal outcomes in these patients. There are physiological and clinical rationales for renin-angiotensin system blockade in hypertensive diabetics. Trandolapril/verapamil sustained released (SR) is a fixed-dose combination of trandolapril and a sustained release formulation of verapamil and indicated in treatment of hypertension in patients who require more than one drug to reach target blood pressure. The antihypertensive efficacy of trandolapril/verapamil SR has been evaluated extensively in large trials. In the INVEST trial, a verapamil SR-based treatment strategy that included trandolapril in most patients was effective in reducing the primary outcome in hypertensive patients with coronary artery disease. The new onset of diabetes was also significantly lower in the verapamil SR/trandolapril treatment group in comparison with those on the atenolol/hydroclorothiazide treatment group. The BErgamo NEphrologic DIabetes Complications Trial (BENEDICT) documented that in hypertensive diabetes and normoalbuminuria, trandolapril plus verapamil or trandolapril alone delayed the onset of microalbuminuria independent of their blood pressure-reducing effect. Thus, trandolapril/verapamil is an effective option for treatment of hypertensive diabetes patients requiring more than one agent to achieve target blood pressure. PMID:17969376

  5. Comparative Study of Epidemiological and Anthropological Aspects of Diabetes and Hypertension in Cameroon

    PubMed Central

    Tsabang, N; Fongnzossie, E; Donfack, D; Yedjou, CG; Tchounwou, PB; Minkande, JZ; Nouedou, C; Van, PD; Sonwa

    2016-01-01

    The traditional medicine in Africa in general and specifically in Cameroon does not manage diabetes and arterial hypertension very well. Yet, these pathologies are becoming more prevalent among the populations that need adequate knowledge to fight against them. Therefore the present study was designed to determine the knowledge, attitudes and practices of indigenous people regarding diabetes and hypertension control, and to assess the epidemiological aspects of these diseases in order to reinforce their health education and promote a better health care through traditional medicine. To achieve this objective, 1,131 households including 70 traditional healers, 114 diabetics, 167 hypertensive patients, 30 hypertensive patients-diabetics and other Cameroonians were questioned on their ethnomedical knowledge of diabetes and arterial hypertension. Fifty-eight randomly distributed tribes were taking in account. The elucidation of anthropological and epidemiological aspects of diabetes and hypertension improved the beliefs of indigenous people and facilitated the modernization of diabetes and hypertension comprehension that remained focused on the elucidation of diseases' causes and complications, as well as on the behaviors that could help translate biomedical terms into locally meaningful metaphors. PMID:27708987

  6. Predisposition to essential hypertension and renal hemodynamics in recent-onset insulin-dependent diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Hannedouche, T P; Marques, L P; Guicheney, P; Lacour, B; Boitard, C; Grünfeld, J P

    1992-10-01

    The offspring of essential hypertensive parents have been found to exhibit abnormalities in renal hemodynamics and sodium handling before the eventual occurrence of hypertension. The reported abnormalities represent a wide spectrum of changes including increased GFR, normal or decreased RPF, slight increase in blood pressure (although within the normal range), and an exaggerated natriuresis response to a sodium load. The heterogeneity of these abnormalities may reflect the specific conditions of the studies, the lability of the changes, or different subgroups of subjects with genetic predisposition to essential hypertension. Several lines of evidence have suggested a relationship between hypertension and the development of diabetic nephropathy in insulin-dependent diabetics. This laboratory has found that recent-onset insulin-dependent diabetics can exhibit renal hemodynamics abnormalities very early in the course of diabetes according to a positive or negative family history of essential hypertension. These changes include increased GFR and mean arterial pressure, but no differences in renal sodium and lithium handling in diabetics with a genetic predisposition to essential hypertension. In addition, diabetics with a positive family history of essential hypertension exhibited a more-marked vasodilative response to an acute interruption of the renin-angiotensin system, further suggesting inadequate angiotensin modulation of renal vascular tone. The significance of these abnormalities in relation to the development of diabetic nephropathy requires further investigation.

  7. [Arterial hypertension among adolescents in Rio de Janeiro: prevalence and association with physical activity and obesity].

    PubMed

    Corrêa-Neto, Victor Gonçalves; Sperandei, Sandro; Silva, Luis Aureliano Imbiriba; Maranhão-Neto, Geraldo de Albuquerque; Palma, Alexandre

    2014-06-01

    The scope of this study was to identify the prevalence of systemic arterial hypertension among adolescent students (aged 17-19 years) in the third and final year of high school in state schools in the municipality of Rio de Janeiro, and to investigate associations between systemic arterial hypertension and obesity and physical activity levels. Data on arterial pressure, body mass index and physical activity were gathered. The analysis included 854 individuals. Descriptive statistical analysis was applied to the sample, along with a Poisson regression model to determine the impact of the variables on the prevalence of systemic arterial hypertension. The prevalence of systemic arterial hypertension was 19.4%. Male sex, overweight and obesity presented significant positive associations with systemic arterial hypertension (p < 0.05), while physical activity was not shown to be significantly associated with systemic arterial hypertension (p > 0.05). The nature of these relationships should be interpreted in the light of reflection and not of passive labeling based on hegemonic concepts.

  8. IgG receptor FcγRIIB plays a key role in obesity-induced hypertension.

    PubMed

    Sundgren, Nathan C; Vongpatanasin, Wanpen; Boggan, Brigid-Meghan D; Tanigaki, Keiji; Yuhanna, Ivan S; Chambliss, Ken L; Mineo, Chieko; Shaul, Philip W

    2015-02-01

    There is a well-recognized association between obesity, inflammation, and hypertension. Why obesity causes hypertension is poorly understood. We previously demonstrated using a C-reactive protein (CRP) transgenic mouse that CRP induces hypertension that is related to NO deficiency. Our prior work in cultured endothelial cells identified the Fcγ receptor IIB (FcγRIIB) as the receptor for CRP whereby it antagonizes endothelial NO synthase. Recognizing known associations between CRP and obesity and hypertension in humans, in the present study we tested the hypothesis that FcγRIIB plays a role in obesity-induced hypertension in mice. Using radiotelemetry, we first demonstrated that the hypertension observed in transgenic mouse-CRP is mediated by the receptor, indicating that FcγRIIB is capable of modifying blood pressure. We then discovered in a model of diet-induced obesity yielding equal adiposity in all study groups that whereas FcγRIIB(+/+) mice developed obesity-induced hypertension, FcγRIIB(-/-) mice were fully protected. Levels of CRP, the related pentraxin serum amyloid P component which is the CRP-equivalent in mice, and total IgG were unaltered by diet-induced obesity; FcγRIIB expression in endothelium was also unchanged. However, whereas IgG isolated from chow-fed mice had no effect, IgG from high-fat diet-fed mice inhibited endothelial NO synthase in cultured endothelial cells, and this was an FcγRIIB-dependent process. Thus, we have identified a novel role for FcγRIIB in the pathogenesis of obesity-induced hypertension, independent of processes regulating adiposity, and it may entail an IgG-induced attenuation of endothelial NO synthase function. Approaches targeting FcγRIIB may potentially offer new means to treat hypertension in obese individuals.

  9. Central role for melanocortin-4 receptors in offspring hypertension arising from maternal obesity

    PubMed Central

    Samuelsson, Anne-Maj S.; Mullier, Amandine; Maicas, Nuria; Oosterhuis, Nynke R.; Eun Bae, Sung; Novoselova, Tatiana V.; Chan, Li F.; Pombo, Joaquim M.; Taylor, Paul D.; Joles, Jaap A.; Coen, Clive W.; Balthasar, Nina; Poston, Lucilla

    2016-01-01

    Melanocortin-4 receptor (Mc4r)–expressing neurons in the autonomic nervous system, particularly in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVH), play an essential role in blood pressure (BP) control. Mc4r-deficient (Mc4rKO) mice are severely obese but lack obesity-related hypertension; they also show a reduced pressor response to salt loading. We have previously reported that lean juvenile offspring born to diet-induced obese rats (OffOb) exhibit sympathetic-mediated hypertension, and we proposed a role for postnatally raised leptin in its etiology. Here, we test the hypothesis that neonatal hyperleptinemia due to maternal obesity induces persistent changes in the central melanocortin system, thereby contributing to offspring hypertension. Working on the OffOb paradigm in both sexes and using transgenic technology to restore Mc4r in the PVH of Mc4rKO (Mc4rPVH) mice, we have now shown that these mice develop higher BP than Mc4rKO or WT mice. We have also found that experimental hyperleptinemia induced in the neonatal period in Mc4rPVH and WT mice, but not in the Mc4rKO mice, leads to heightened BP and severe renal dysfunction. Thus, Mc4r in the PVH appears to be required for early-life programming of hypertension arising from either maternal obesity or neonatal hyperleptinemia. Early-life exposure of the PVH to maternal obesity through postnatal elevation of leptin may have long-term consequences for cardiovascular health. PMID:27791019

  10. Secular trends of the impact of overweight and obesity on hypertension in Japan, 1980-2010.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Masato; Ohkubo, Takayoshi; Murakami, Yoshitaka; Takashima, Naoyuki; Kadota, Aya; Miyagawa, Naoko; Saito, Yoshino; Nishi, Nobuo; Okuda, Nagako; Kiyohara, Yutaka; Nakagawa, Hideaki; Nakamura, Yoshikazu; Fujiyoshi, Akira; Abbott, Robert D; Okamura, Tomonori; Okayama, Akira; Ueshima, Hirotsugu; Miura, Katsuyuki

    2015-11-01

    The prevalence of overweight (body mass index (BMI)=25.0-29.9 kg m(-)(2)) and obesity (⩾30.0 kg m(-)(2)) has been increasing over the last several decades in Japan. We examined trends of the impact of overweight and obesity on hypertension (systolic/diastolic blood pressure ⩾140/90 mm Hg or antihypertensive drugs use) using four national surveys in Japan, from which the participants were randomly sampled from the entire population. Study participants aged 30-79 years were selected for each survey (10 370 in 1980, 8005 in 1990, 5327 in 2000 and 2547 in 2010). The results showed that the impact of overweight and obesity on hypertension had increased significantly (P=0.040 and 0.006 in men and women, respectively). From 1980 to 2010, the multivariable-adjusted odds ratios for hypertension, comparing overweight and obesity with normal weight (BMI =18.5-24.9 kg m(-)(2)), went from 1.94 (95% confidence intervals: 1.64, 2.28) to 2.82 (2.07, 3.83) in men, and from 2.37 (2.05, 2.73) to 3.48 (2.57, 4.72) in women. Most of the association was observed in overweight participants, as only 3% of the Japanese were obese. In addition to the relationship between excessive BMI and other adverse health conditions, the rise in the association with hypertension increases the urgency in addressing weight control. We need to address the overweight and obesity epidemic.

  11. The relationship between blood pressure variability, obesity and left atrial phasic function in hypertensive population.

    PubMed

    Tadic, Marijana; Cuspidi, Cesare; Ilic, Irena; Suzic-Lazić, Jelena; Zivanovic, Vladimir; Jozika, Ljilja; Celic, Vera

    2016-04-01

    We sought to investigate the relationship between blood pressure (BP) variability and left atrial (LA) phasic function assessed by volumetric and speckle tracking method in normal-weight, overweight and obese hypertensive patients. This cross-sectional study included 164 untreated hypertensive subjects who underwent a 24-h ambulatory BP monitoring and complete two-dimensional echocardiographic examination (2DE). All the patients were separated into three groups according to their body mass index (BMI): normal-weight patients (BMI < 25 kg/m(2)), overweight patients (25 ≤ BMI < 30 kg/m(2)), and obese patients (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m(2)). Daytime, nighttime and 24 h BP variability indices were higher in obese hypertensive subjects than in lean patients. Maximum and minimum LA volumes and volume indexes gradually and significantly increased, whereas pre-A LAV decreased, from normal-weight to obese subjects. Total and passive LA emptying fractions, representing LA reservoir and conduit function, gradually reduced from lean to obese individuals. Active LA EF, the parameter of LA booster pump function, increased in the same direction. Similar results were obtained by 2DE strain analysis. BP variability parameters were associated with structural, functional and mechanical parameters of LA remodeling in the whole study population. The parameters of LA reservoir function were negatively related with BP variability indices, whereas the parameters of LA pump function were positively related with BP variability indices. Obesity significantly impacts BP variability and LA phasic function in untreated hypertensive subjects. BP variability is associated with LA remodeling independent of BP, left ventricular systolic and diastolic function.

  12. Validity of Canadian discharge abstract data for hypertension and diabetes from 2002 to 2013

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Jason; Southern, Danielle; Beck, Cynthia A.; James, Matthew; Lu, Mingshan; Quan, Hude

    2016-01-01

    Background: Surveillance using coded administrative health data has shown that the prevalence of hypertension and diabetes in Canada increased substantially between 1998 to 2008. These findings require an assumption that the validity of hypertension and diabetes coding is stable over time. We tested this assumption by examining temporal trends in the validity of coding for hypertension and diabetes in the Canadian hospital Discharge Abstract Database. Methods: We used the Alberta Provincial Project for Outcome Assessment in Coronary Heart Disease (APPROACH) database, a clinical registry, as the reference standard to evaluate the validity of the Discharge Abstract Database in recording hypertension and diabetes in Alberta. The APPROACH database contains data for all Alberta residents who have undergone cardiac catheterization and includes prospective ascertainment of comorbid conditions before each procedure. We linked patient data between the 2 databases for 2002 to 2013 using patient provincial health number. Temporal trends in sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value and Cohen κ were calculated for both hypertension and diabetes in the Discharge Abstract Database. Results: We matched 63 483 patients between the APPROACH database and the Discharge Abstract Database. The validity of the Discharge Abstract Database for hypertension and diabetes remained mostly consistent over time. Between 2002 and 2013, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value ranged from 66% to 87% for hypertension and from 81% to 98% for diabetes; the corresponding κ scores ranged from 0.50 to 0.62 and from 0.80 to 0.89. No significant differences in the validity of coding were found across age, sex or hospital location subgroups. Interpretation: The validity of coding for hypertension and diabetes in the Discharge Abstract Database remained fairly consistent between 2002 and 2013. Our findings support the use of

  13. Association of socioeconomic status with diagnosis, treatment and control of hypertension in diabetic hypertensive individuals in Bangladesh: a population-based cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    H, Syed Emdadul; Islam, Md. Jahirul; Mostofa, Md. Golam; Saadat, Khandakar ASM

    2015-01-01

    Objectives This study aimed to examine if socioeconomic status could affect the likelihood of diagnosis, treatment and control of hypertension in diabetic hypertensive individuals. Design Cross-sectional nationally representative study. Settings Bangladesh. Participants This paper used data from the 2011 Bangladesh Demographic Health Survey. The analyses were based on the responses of 339 diabetes hypertensive individuals. Main outcome measures Diagnosis, treatment and control of hypertension. Results The age-adjusted prevalence of hypertension in diabetes individuals was 38.4% in the study population. Among diabetic hypertensive subjects only 65.7% had been diagnosed, 58.4% were receiving treatment and 42% controlled their hypertension. Individuals from high socioeconomic status (AOR 2.60; 95% CI 1.16–5.83) had an increased likelihood of reporting diagnosis of hypertension. Individuals from medium (AOR 2.22; 95% CI 1.11–4.46) and high socioeconomic status (AOR 3.47; 95% CI 1.59–7.58) had increased chance of receiving treatment. In addition, individuals belonging to high socioeconomic status (AOR 2.53; 95% CI 1.14–5.63) were more likely to report of controlling hypertension. Conclusions This study indicated that hypertension is more prevalent among diabetic patients. Furthermore, diabetic hypertensive patients from the low socioeconomic status group are also less likely to be diagnosed and also less likely to receive treatment for hypertension. In addition, diabetic hypertensive patients from the low socioeconomic status were less likely to control hypertension compared with an individual belonging to the high socioeconomic status group. This reduced likelihood of receiving proper treatment will lead to a rapid increase in the prevalence of macrovascular and microvascular diseases among diabetic hypertensive patients. PMID:26688743

  14. [State of the dopamine system activity, as one of factors for the development of arterial hypertension and obesity].

    PubMed

    Lyzogub, V H; Dolynna, O V; Bogdan, T V; Sobol', V O

    2012-01-01

    The discovery of 5 subtypes of dopamine receptors revealed their important role in development of arterial hypertension and obesity. Reduce of their functional activity or number with age conduces to the increase of tone of the sympathetic nervous system, dyspoiesis of leptin, hyperphagia, development of obesity and arterial hypertension. Prescription of dopamine agonists conduces to reduction of in, normalization of leptin, diminishing of appetite and body mass, decrease of blood pressure. Combination of arterial hypertension and obesity is recommended to determine dopamine excretion and to appoint dopamine agonists at level of < 600 nmol/24 hours.

  15. Insulinotropic effects of GPR120 agonists are altered in obese diabetic and obese non-diabetic states.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dan; So, Wing Yan; Wang, Yi; Wu, Shang Ying; Cheng, Qianni; Leung, Po Sing

    2017-02-01

    G-protein-coupled receptor 120 (GPR120) is a putative target for obesity and diabetes therapies. However, it remains controversial whether resident GPR120 plays a direct regulatory role in islet β-cell insulin secretion. The present study examined this issue in isolated rodent islets and rat β-cell line INS-1E, and assessed the role of GPR120 in islet insulin secretion in obese non-diabetic (OND) and diabetic states. GPR120 expression was detected in rodent islet β-cells. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and synthetic GPR120 agonist GSK137647 (GSK) augmented insulin release from rat/mouse islets and INS-1E; DHA effects were partially mediated by GPR40. GPR120 knockdown and overexpression attenuated and enhanced DHA effects in INS-1E respectively. DHA and GSK improved postprandial hyperglycaemia of diabetic mice. Inhibition of calcium signalling in INS-1E reduced GPR120 activation-induced insulinotropic effects. The insulinotropic effects of DHA/GSK were amplified in OND rat islets, but diminished in diabetic rat islets. GPR120 and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) expression were elevated in OND islets and palmitic acid (PA)-treated INS-1E, but reduced in diabetic islets and high glucose-treated INS-1E. PPARγ activation increased GPR120 expression in rat islets and INS-1E. DHA and GSK induced protein kinase B (Akt)/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) phosphorylation in rodent islets and INS-1E, and these effects were altered in OND and diabetic states. Taken together, the present study indicates that (i) GPR120 activation has an insulinotropic influence on β-cells with the involvement of calcium signalling; (ii) GPR120 expression in β-cells and GPR120-mediated insulinotropic effects are altered in OND and diabetic states in distinct ways, and these alterations may be mediated by PPARγ.

  16. Preoperative characteristics predicting intraoperative hypotension and hypertension among hypertensives and diabetics undergoing noncardiac surgery.

    PubMed Central

    Charlson, M E; MacKenzie, C R; Gold, J P; Ales, K L; Topkins, M; Shires, G T

    1990-01-01

    We prospectively studied patients with hypertension and diabetes undergoing elective noncardiac surgery with general anesthesia to test the hypothesis that patients at high risk for prognostically significant intraoperative hemodynamic instability could be identified by their preoperative characteristics. Specifically we hypothesized that patients with a low functional capacity, decreased plasma volume, or significant cardiac comorbidity would be at high risk for intraoperative hypotension and those with a history of severe hypertension would be at risk for intraoperative hypertension. Patients who had a preoperative mean arterial pressure (MAP) greater than or equal to 110, a walking distance of less than 400 m, or a plasma volume less than 3000 cc were at increased risk of intraoperative hypotension (i.e., more than 1 hour of greater than or equal to 20 mmHg decreases in the MAP). Hypotension was also more common among patients having intra-abdominal or vascular surgery, and among those who had operations longer than 2 hours. Patients older than 70 years or with a decreased plasma volume were at increased risk of having more than 15 minutes of intraoperative elevations of greater than or equal to 20 mmHg over the preoperative MAP in combination with intraoperative hypotension; this was also more common when surgery lasted more than 2 hours. Patients who had intraoperative hypotension tended to have an immediate decrease in MAP at the onset of anesthesia and were often purposefully maintained at MAPs less than their usual level during surgery with fentanyl and neuromuscular blocking agents. Patients who had intraoperative hyper/hypotension tended to have repeated elevations in MAP above their preoperative levels during the course of surgery, and such elevations precipitated interventions with neuromuscular blocking agents and/or fentanyl. Neither pattern was more common among patients who developed net intraoperative negative fluid balances. Both hypotension and

  17. Epicardial fat thickness: distribution and association with diabetes mellitus, hypertension and the metabolic syndrome in the ELSA-Brasil study.

    PubMed

    Graeff, Daniela Bertol; Foppa, Murilo; Pires, Julio Cesar Gall; Vigo, Alvaro; Schmidt, Maria Ines; Lotufo, Paulo Andrade; Mill, Jose Geraldo; Duncan, Bruce Bartholow

    2016-04-01

    Epicardial fat thickness (EFT) has emerged as a marker of cardiometabolic risk, but its clinical use warrants proper knowledge of its distribution and associations in populations. We aimed to describe the distribution of EFT, its demographic correlates and independent associations with diabetes, hypertension and metabolic syndrome (MS) in free-living Brazilian adults. From the baseline echocardiography of the Brazilian Longitudinal Study of Adult Health (ELSA-Brasil)-a cohort study of civil servants aged 35-74 years-EFT was measured from a randomly selected sample of 998 participants as the mean of two paraesternal windows obtained at end systole (EFTsyst) and end diastole (EFTdiast). From the 421 individuals free of diabetes, hypertension and MS, we defined EFT reference values and the EFTsyst 75th percentile cut-off. Median EFTsyst was 1.5 (IQR 0-2.6) mm; a large proportion (84 %) had EFTdiast = 0. EFT was higher in women and lower in blacks, and increased with age and BMI. Although EFT was higher in those with diabetes, hypertension, and MS, EFT associations were reduced when adjusted for age, sex and ethnicity, and were non-significant after adjusting for obesity measures. In conclusion, the amount of EFT in this large multiethnic population is smaller than reported in other populations. EFT reference values varied across demographic and clinical variables, EFT associations with cardiometabolic variables being largely explained by age, sex, ethnicity and central obesity. Although EFT can help identify individuals at increased cardiometabolic risk, it will likely have a limited additional role compared to current risk stratification strategies.

  18. Prevalence of the metabolic syndrome among Korean adults using the new International Diabetes Federation definition and the new abdominal obesity criteria for the Korean people.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hee Man; Kim, Dae Jung; Jung, In Hyun; Park, Chanwang; Park, Jong

    2007-07-01

    This study was performed to compare the prevalence of the metabolic syndrome according to the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) and National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP) definitions, and abdominal obesity criteria of WHO and the Korean Society for the Study of Obesity (KSSO) in Korean adults. A total of 4452 adults aged > or =20 years from the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2001 were analyzed. The prevalence of the metabolic syndrome estimated by NCEP definition with WHO criteria, NCEP with KSSO, IDF with WHO, and IDF with KSSO were 26.7%, 23.7%, 23.8% and 17.5%, respectively. The agreement percent among the four definitions ranged from 88.7% to 100% in men, and from 85.6% to 94.9% in women. The NCEP-defined metabolic syndrome was more strongly associated with hypertension and diabetes than the IDF-defined metabolic syndrome (age-adjusted odds ratio: 5.1 versus 3.6 for hypertension and 6.4 versus 3.2 for diabetes in men, respectively; 5.4 versus 3.4-4.3 for hypertension and 11.1 versus 3.8-4.2 for diabetes in women, respectively). Both definitions of the metabolic syndrome were associated with coronary heart disease or stroke only in women. Prospective studies are warranted to evaluate the predictive ability of the new definition of the metabolic syndrome and the new criteria of abdominal obesity for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in Korean adults.

  19. Targeting nocturnal hypertension in type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Rossen, Niklas Blach; Knudsen, Søren Tang; Fleischer, Jesper; Hvas, Anne-Mette; Ebbehøj, Eva; Poulsen, Per Løgstrup; Hansen, Klavs Würgler

    2014-11-01

    Several studies in different populations have suggested that nighttime blood pressure (BP) is a stronger predictor of cardiovascular events than daytime BP. Consequently, treatment strategies to target nighttime BP have come into focus. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of change of administration time of antihypertensive drugs. We included 41 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and nocturnal hypertension (nighttime systolic BP >120 mm Hg) in an open-label, crossover study. Patients were randomized to 8 weeks of either morning or bedtime administration of all of the individual's once-daily antihypertensive drugs, followed by 8 weeks of switched dosing regimen. Bedtime administration of antihypertensive drugs resulted in a significant reduction in nighttime (7.5 mm Hg; P<0.001) and 24-hour (3.1 mm Hg; P=0.014) systolic BP, with a nonsignificant reduction in daytime (1.3 mm Hg; P=0.336) systolic BP. We did not find morning BP surge to be different between dosing regimens. Levels of C-reactive protein were significantly lower with bedtime administration, which may indicate an effect on low-grade inflammation. We found no difference in urinary albumin excretion, regardless of albuminuria status. Urinary sodium/creatinine was significantly increased and urinary osmolality significantly reduced with bedtime administration, which can be interpreted as increased nocturnal natriuresis. In patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and nocturnal hypertension, administration of once-daily antihypertensive drugs at bedtime may be favorable. The increased nocturnal natriuresis may reflect increased effect of bedtime-administered thiazides and renin-angiotensin system inhibitors, suggesting a potential mechanism of the observed effects on BP with chronotherapeutic intervention.

  20. TWEAK: A New Player in Obesity and Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Vendrell, Joan; Chacón, Matilde R.

    2013-01-01

    Obesity and type 2 diabetes (T2D) are associated with chronic low-grade inflammation. Mounting evidence suggests the involvement of an inflammatory switch in adipose tissue, both in mature adipocytes and immune-competent cells from the stromal vascular compartment, in the progression of obesity and insulin resistance. Several inflammatory cytokines secreted by obese adipose tissue, including TNFα and IL-6 have been described as hallmark molecules involved in this process, impairing insulin signaling in insulin-responsive organs. An increasing number of new molecules affecting the local and systemic inflammatory imbalance in obesity and T2D have been identified. In this complex condition, some molecules may exhibit opposing actions, depending on the cell type and on systemic or local influences. Tumor necrosis factor weak inducer of apoptosis (TWEAK), a cytokine of the tumor necrosis (TNF) superfamily, is gaining attention as an important player in chronic inflammatory diseases. TWEAK can exist as a full-length membrane-associated (mTWEAK) form and as a soluble (sTWEAK) form and, by acting through its cognate receptor Fn14, can control many cellular activities including proliferation, migration, differentiation, apoptosis, angiogenesis, and inflammation. Notably, sTWEAK has been proposed as a biomarker of cardiovascular diseases. Here, we will review the recent findings relating to TWEAK and its receptor within the context of obesity and the associated disorder T2D. PMID:24416031

  1. Vitamin D: Link between Osteoporosis, Obesity, and Diabetes?

    PubMed Central

    Cândido, Flávia Galvão; Bressan, Josefina

    2014-01-01

    Vitamin D (1,25(OH)2D3) is a steroid hormone that has a range of physiological functions in skeletal and nonskeletal tissues, and can contribute to prevent and/or treat osteoporosis, obesity, and Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). In bone metabolism, vitamin D increases the plasma levels of calcium and phosphorus, regulates osteoblast and osteoclast the activity, and combats PTH hypersecretion, promoting bone formation and preventing/treating osteoporosis. This evidence is supported by most clinical studies, especially those that have included calcium and assessed the effects of vitamin D doses (≥800 IU/day) on bone mineral density. However, annual megadoses should be avoided as they impair bone health. Recent findings suggest that low serum vitamin D is the consequence (not the cause) of obesity and the results from randomized double-blind clinical trials are still scarce and inconclusive to establish the relationship between vitamin D, obesity, and T2DM. Nevertheless, there is evidence that vitamin D inhibits fat accumulation, increases insulin synthesis and preserves pancreatic islet cells, decreases insulin resistance and reduces hunger, favoring obesity and T2DM control. To date, there is not enough scientific evidence to support the use of vitamin D as a pathway to prevent and/or treat obesity and T2DM. PMID:24747593

  2. Vitamin D: link between osteoporosis, obesity, and diabetes?

    PubMed

    Cândido, Flávia Galvão; Bressan, Josefina

    2014-04-17

    Vitamin D (1,25(OH)2D3) is a steroid hormone that has a range of physiological functions in skeletal and nonskeletal tissues, and can contribute to prevent and/or treat osteoporosis, obesity, and Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). In bone metabolism, vitamin D increases the plasma levels of calcium and phosphorus, regulates osteoblast and osteoclast the activity, and combats PTH hypersecretion, promoting bone formation and preventing/treating osteoporosis. This evidence is supported by most clinical studies, especially those that have included calcium and assessed the effects of vitamin D doses (≥800 IU/day) on bone mineral density. However, annual megadoses should be avoided as they impair bone health. Recent findings suggest that low serum vitamin D is the consequence (not the cause) of obesity and the results from randomized double-blind clinical trials are still scarce and inconclusive to establish the relationship between vitamin D, obesity, and T2DM. Nevertheless, there is evidence that vitamin D inhibits fat accumulation, increases insulin synthesis and preserves pancreatic islet cells, decreases insulin resistance and reduces hunger, favoring obesity and T2DM control. To date, there is not enough scientific evidence to support the use of vitamin D as a pathway to prevent and/or treat obesity and T2DM.

  3. Diabetes and Hypertension among Patients Receiving Antiretroviral Treatment Since 1998 in Senegal: Prevalence and Associated Factors

    PubMed Central

    Diouf, Assane; Cournil, Amandine; Ba-Fall, Khadidiatou; Ngom-Guèye, Ndèye Fatou; Eymard-Duvernay, Sabrina; Ndiaye, Ibrahima; Batista, Gilbert; Guèye, Papa Mandoumbé; Bâ, Pape Samba; Taverne, Bernard; Delaporte, Eric; Sow, Papa Salif

    2012-01-01

    Cardiovascular risk factors in people on antiretroviral treatment (ART) are poorly documented in resource-constrained settings. A cross-sectional study was conducted in 2009 to assess prevalence of diabetes and hypertension in a sample of 242 HIV-infected patients who had initiated ART between 1998 and 2002 in Dakar, Senegal (ANRS 1215 observational cohort). World Health Organization (WHO) criteria were applied to diagnose diabetes and hypertension. Multiple logistic regressions were used to identify factors associated with diabetes and hypertension. Patients had a median age of 46 years and had received ART for a median duration of about 9 years. 14.5% had diabetes and 28.1% had hypertension. Long duration of ART (≥119 months), older age, higher body mass index (BMI), and higher levels of total cholesterol were associated with higher risks of diabetes. Older age, higher BMI at ART initiation, and higher levels of triglycerides were associated with higher risk of hypertension. This study shows that diabetes and hypertension were frequent in these Senegalese HIV patients on ART. It confirms the association between duration of ART and diabetes and highlights the need to implement programs for prevention of cardiovascular risk factors in HIV patients from resource-constrained settings. PMID:24052880

  4. B cell secretion and insulin sensitivity in hypertensive and normotensive obese subjects.

    PubMed

    Bonora, E; Moghetti, P; Zenere, M; Tosi, F; Travia, D; Muggeo, M

    1990-09-01

    To test the hypothesis that in obesity hypertension is associated with more pronounced hyperinsulinaemia and insulin resistance we compared plasma insulin levels and insulin sensitivity in a group of 6 obese subjects with untreated hypertension and in a group of 6 obese subjects with normal blood pressure. The two groups were similar for sex, age, body mass index and glucose tolerance. Six nonobese subjects served as controls. The study consisted of a 2-h hyperglycaemic clamp (steady-state plasma glucose = 11 mmol/l) and a 15-min insulin tolerance test (0.1 U/kg body wt). During hyperglycaemic clamp, insulin and C-peptide plasma levels were similar in normotensive and hypertensive obese subjects: the area under the plasma insulin curve was 36,000 +/- 3000 pmol/l X 120 min in the former and 34,000 +/- 1000 pmol/l X 120 min in the latter; the area under the plasma C-peptide curve was 298,000 +/- 26,000 pmol/l X 120 min in the former and 246,000 +/- 26,000 pmol/l X 120 min in the latter (P = n.s.). The ratio M/I between the amount of glucose metabolized (M) and the mean plasma insulin levels (I) during hyperglycaemic clamp was similar in the two groups: 0.59 +/- 0.09 in normotensive and 0.58 +/- 0.08 mg/min X m2 per pmol/l in hypertensive obese subjects (P = n.s.). Also the rate coefficient of glucose disappearance from plasma (K(itt)) after i.v. insulin injection was similar in the two groups (4.08 +/- 0.51 vs. 3.87 +/- 0.53 per cent/min).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. Fat utilization and arterial hypertension in overweight/obese subjects

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The Respiratory Quotient is a parameter reflecting the utilization of the nutrients by a subject. It is associated with an high rate of subsequent weight gain and with the atherosclerosis. Subjects tending to burn less fat have an increased Respiratory Quotient. Aim of this study was to investigate on the relationship between the Respiratory Quotient and the cardiovascular risk factors. Methods In this cross-sectional study we enrolled 223 individuals of both sexes aged 45–75 ys that were weight stable, receiving a balanced diet, and not affected by debilitating disease or cardiovascular disease. The Respiratory Quotient was measured by Indirect Calorimetry. The measurement of the Blood Pressure was obtained by a mercury sphygmomanometer. Results We enrolled 133 female and 90 male. Systolic blood pressure only was positively correlated to the Respiratory Quotient in univariate and multivariate regression analysis (p=0,017). The prevalence of hypertension was significatively different between the quartiles of the Respiratory Quotient, with the highest prevalence in the IV quartile (p=0,024). Conclusion High value of the Respiratory Quotient, an index of nutrients utilization, is associated to an high prevalence of Hypertension. It is possible that in the subjects with high Respiratory Quotient and high body mass index, the activation of the renin angiotensin system, in concert to the reduction of the utilization of the endogenous fat stores, could increase the risk of hypertension. PMID:23815947

  6. Overweight and obesity in youth with type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Minges, Karl E; Whittemore, Robin; Grey, Margaret

    2013-01-01

    Overweight and obesity in youth with type 1 diabetes (T1D) is now prevalent and accounts for significant health consequences, including cardiovascular complications and dual diagnosis of type 2 diabetes. Physical activity and lifestyle are modifiable and play an important role in the prevention and management of excessive weight, but it is unclear how these factors relate to overweight and obese youth with T1D. Thus, a systematic review was conducted to examine how physical activity, sedentary behavior, sleep, and diet are related to overweight/obesity in youth with T1D. Seven observational and intervention studies published between 1990 and 2013 were included in the review. Prevalence of overweight ranged from 12.5% to 33.3%. Overweight in youth with T1D was associated with infrequent napping, increased screen time, and skipping breakfast and dinner but was not related to time engaged in physical activity. Weight-related interventions indicated modest weight loss along with improved glycemic control. In light of this review, there is a need for high quality research that examines all levels of activity in youth with T1D to identify lifestyle modification targets for weight prevention and management.

  7. Beneficial effects of melatonin on obesity and lipid profile in young Zucker diabetic fatty rats.

    PubMed

    Agil, Ahmad; Navarro-Alarcón, Miguel; Ruiz, Rosario; Abuhamadah, Sawsan; El-Mir, Mohamad-Yehia; Vázquez, Gumersindo Fernández

    2011-03-01

    The study objective was to investigate the effects of melatonin on obesity and obesity-associated systolic hypertension and dyslipidemia in young male Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF) rats, an experimental model of the metabolic syndrome. ZDF rats (n=30) and lean littermates (ZL) (n=30) were used. At 6wk of age, both lean and fatty animals were subdivided into three groups (n=10): naive (N), vehicle-treated (V), and melatonin-treated (M) (10mg/kg/day) for 6wk. Vehicle and melatonin were added to the drinking water. Melatonin reduced mean weight gain (51±2/100g BW) versus N-ZDF group (58±3, P<0.05) without food intake differences. M-ZDF rats showed an apparent reduction in systolic hypertension that proved not to be statistically significant, and a significant improvement in dyslipidemia, with a reduction in hypertriglyceridemia from 580±40 to 420.6±40.9mg/dL (P<0.01). Melatonin raised high-density-lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol in ZDF (from 81.6±4.9 to 103.1±4.5mg/dL, P<0.01) and ZL rats (from 62.8±4.8 to 73.5±4.8mg/dL, P<0.05) and significantly reduced low-density-lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol in ZDF rats from 5.20±0.4 to 4.14±0.3 mg/dL (P<0.05) but had no effect on total cholesterol levels. To our knowledge, this is the first evidence of a positive effect of melatonin on overweight and lipid pattern of obese Zucker diabetic rats, supporting the proposition that melatonin administration may ameliorate overweight and lipid metabolism in humans. Because these benefits occurred in youth, before advanced metabolic and vascular complications, melatonin might help to prevent cardiovascular disease associated with obesity and dyslipidemia.

  8. Family Networks of Obesity and Type 2 Diabetes in Rural Appalachia

    PubMed Central

    Pancoska, Petr; Buch, Shama; Cecchetti, Alfred; Parmanto, Bambang; Vecchio, Marcella; Groark, Stephen; Paulsen, Stephanie; Bardwell, Genevieve; Morton, Cathy; Chester, Ann; Branch, Robert

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of obesity and diabetes has been studied in adolescent and adult populations in poor, medically underserved rural Appalachia of West Virginia. A web-based questionnaire about obesity and diabetes was obtained in 989 family members of 210 Community Based Clinical Research (CBPR) trained adolescent members of a network of 18 science clubs, incorporating 142 families. After age-correction in <20 years old, 50% of both adolescents and adults were obese. The frequency distribution of obesity was trimodal. In the overall population 10.4% had type 2 diabetes, while 24% of adult, obese subjects had type 2 diabetes. A new metric, the family diabetes risk potential, identified a trimodal distribution of risk potential. In the lowest most common distribution 43% of families had a diabetic family member. In the intermediate distribution, 69% had a diabetic family member, and in the distribution with highest scores all the families had a diabetic member. In conclusion, the poorest counties of rural Appalachia are at crisis level with the prevalence of obesity and diabetes. The distribution of age-corrected obesity and family diabetes risk potential are not normally distributed. We suggest that targeting individual family units at greatest risk offers the most efficient strategy for ameliorating this epidemic. PMID:20443933

  9. Adaptation and validation of the Distress Scale for Mexican patients with type 2 diabetes and hypertension: a cross-sectional survey

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Vega, Ingrid Patricia; Doubova, Svetlana V; Aguirre-Hernandez, Rebeca; Infante-Castañeda, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to adapt and validate the Distress Scale for Mexican patients with type 2 diabetes and hypertension (DSDH17M). Setting Two family medicine clinics affiliated with the Mexican Institute of Social Security. Participants 722 patients with type 2 diabetes and/or hypertension (235 patients with diabetes, 233 patients with hypertension and 254 patients with both diseases). Design A cross-sectional survey. Methods The validation procedures included: (1) content validity using a group of experts, (2) construct validity from exploratory factor analysis, (3) internal consistency using Cronbach's α, (4) convergent validity between DSDH17M and anxiety and depression using the Spearman correlation coefficient, (5) discriminative validity through the Wilcoxon rank-sum test and (6) test–retest reliability using intraclass correlation coefficient. Results The DSDH17M has 17 items and three factors explaining 67% of the total variance. Cronbach α ranged from 0.83 to 0.91 among factors. The first factor of ‘Regime-related Distress and Emotional Burden’ moderately correlated with anxiety and depression scores. Discriminative validity revealed that patients with obesity, those with stressful events and those who did not adhere to pharmacological treatment had significantly higher distress scores in all DSDH17M domains. Test–retest intraclass correlation coefficient for DSDH17M ranged from 0.92 to 0.97 among factors. Conclusions DSDH17M is a valid and reliable tool to identify distress of patients with type 2 diabetes and hypertension. PMID:26936903

  10. Similarities and differences in early retinal phenotypes in hypertension and diabetes.

    PubMed

    Grosso, Andrea; Cheung, Ning; Veglio, Franco; Wong, Tien Yin

    2011-09-01

    The use of retinal photography in clinical practice and research has substantially increased the knowledge about the epidemiology, natural history and significance of diabetic and hypertensive retinopathy. Early retinopathy signs, including retinal microaneurysms, blot hemorrhages, cotton-wool spots and hard exudates, are common vascular abnormalities found in middle-aged to older people with diabetes and hypertension. The presence of these early retinopathy signs is associated with an increased risk of systemic vascular diseases, such as stroke, cognitive impairment, coronary heart disease, heart failure and nephropathy. These retinopathy lesions may therefore be considered as biomarkers of systemic microvascular processes caused by diabetes and hypertension. Nevertheless, whereas the interest in retinopathy assessment continues to grow, a core concept remains undefined: what is the relative importance and contribution of diabetes and hypertension in the development of early retinopathy signs? The answer of this fundamental question holds the key to better understanding of the systemic associations of early hypertensive and diabetic retinopathy. In this review, we summarize the similarities and differences of early retinopathy signs seen in diabetes and hypertension, and discuss the conceptual relevance from epidemiological, pathophysiological, and clinical perspectives.

  11. Health-related quality of life and help seeking among American Indians with diabetes and hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Beals, Janette; Whitesell, Nancy R.; Roubideaux, Yvette; Manson, Spero M.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the Health-Related Quality of Life (HRQoL) of American Indians with diabetes, hypertension, or both conditions using the SF36; and to explore how the HRQoL is associated with help seeking among American Indians with and without these chronic conditions. Methods We analyzed data obtained from respondents with diabetes and/or hypertension who participated in a large epidemiological study of two culturally distinct American Indian tribes. Comparison data were provided by an age, gender, and tribe matched sample from the same study who did not report either condition. Results The respondents with both diabetes and hypertension had the lowest HRQoL on all eight subscales of SF36. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) showed that the assumption of equivalent factor loadings for participants with and without diabetes and/or hypertension was not satisfied. Biomedical service use was significantly associated with the SF36 physical health factor in those with hypertension only. Help seeking from traditional healers was significantly negatively related to physical factor scores for all the respondents except those with diabetes only. Conclusions Participants with comorbid diabetes and hypertension had worse HRQoL. The relationships between HRQoL and different types of help seeking varied depending on the comorbidity status of the respondents. PMID:19526380

  12. Sympathetic Nervous System, Hypertension, Obesity and Metabolic Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Seravalle, Gino; Grassi, Guido

    2016-09-01

    Experimental and clinical studies have clearly shown the role of the sympathetic nervous system in the pathophysiology of several cardiovascular and non-cardiovascular diseases. This short review will be aimed at focusing and discussing the new information collected on two specific clinical conditions such as obesity and metabolic syndrome. The paper will briefly describe the four main mechanisms that represent the common link between these two pathophysiological conditions and that through the sympathetic nervous system contribute to increase the cardiovascular risk.

  13. Obesity and diabetes in TNF-alpha receptor- deficient mice.

    PubMed Central

    Schreyer, S A; Chua, S C; LeBoeuf, R C

    1998-01-01

    TNF-alpha may play a role in mediating insulin resistance associated with obesity. This concept is based on studies of obese rodents and humans, and cell culture models. TNF elicits cellular responses via two receptors called p55 and p75. Our purpose was to test the involvement of TNF in glucose homeostasis using mice lacking one or both TNF receptors. C57BL/6 mice lacking p55 (p55(-)/-), p75, (p75(-)/-), or both receptors (p55(-)/-p75(-)/-) were fed a high-fat diet to induce obesity. Marked fasting hyperinsulinemia was seen for p55(-)/-p75(-)/- males between 12 and 16 wk of feeding the high-fat diet. Insulin levels were four times greater than wild-type mice. In contrast, p55(-)/- and p75(-)/- mice exhibited insulin levels that were similar or reduced, respectively, as compared with wild-type mice. In addition, high-fat diet-fed p75(-)/- mice had the lowest body weights and leptin levels, and improved insulin sensitivity. Obese (db/db) mice, which are not responsive to leptin, were used to study the role of p55 in severe obesity. Male p55(-)/-db/db mice exhibited threefold higher insulin levels and twofold lower glucose levels at 20 wk of age than control db/db expressing p55. All db/db mice remained severely insulin resistant based on fasting plasma glucose and insulin levels, and glucose and insulin tolerance tests. Our data do not support the concept that TNF, acting via its receptors, is a major contributor to obesity-associated insulin resistance. In fact, data suggest that the two TNF receptors work in concert to protect against diabetes. PMID:9664082

  14. Obesity and Diabetes: The Increased Risk of Cancer and Cancer-Related Mortality

    PubMed Central

    LeRoith, Derek

    2015-01-01

    Obesity and type 2 diabetes are becoming increasingly prevalent worldwide, and both are associated with an increased incidence and mortality from many cancers. The metabolic abnormalities associated with type 2 diabetes develop many years before the onset of diabetes and, therefore, may be contributing to cancer risk before individuals are aware that they are at risk. Multiple factors potentially contribute to the progression of cancer in obesity and type 2 diabetes, including hyperinsulinemia and insulin-like growth factor I, hyperglycemia, dyslipidemia, adipokines and cytokines, and the gut microbiome. These metabolic changes may contribute directly or indirectly to cancer progression. Intentional weight loss may protect against cancer development, and therapies for diabetes may prove to be effective adjuvant agents in reducing cancer progression. In this review we discuss the current epidemiology, basic science, and clinical data that link obesity, diabetes, and cancer and how treating obesity and type 2 diabetes could also reduce cancer risk and improve outcomes. PMID:26084689

  15. Epigenetics in adipose tissue, obesity, weight loss, and diabetes.

    PubMed

    Martínez, J Alfredo; Milagro, Fermín I; Claycombe, Kate J; Schalinske, Kevin L

    2014-01-01

    Given the role that diet and other environmental factors play in the development of obesity and type 2 diabetes, the implication of different epigenetic processes is being investigated. Although it is well known that external factors can cause cell type-dependent epigenetic changes, including DNA methylation, histone tail modifications, and chromatin remodeling, the regulation of these processes, the magnitude of the changes and the cell types in which they occur, the individuals more predisposed, and the more crucial stages of life remain to be elucidated. There is evidence that obese and diabetic people have a pattern of epigenetic marks different from nonobese and nondiabetic individuals. The main long-term goals in this field are the identification and understanding of the role of epigenetic marks that could be used as early predictors of metabolic risk and the development of drugs or diet-related treatments able to delay these epigenetic changes and even reverse them. But weight gain and insulin resistance/diabetes are influenced not only by epigenetic factors; different epigenetic biomarkers have also been identified as early predictors of weight loss and the maintenance of body weight after weight loss. The characterization of all the factors that are able to modify the epigenetic signatures and the determination of their real importance are hindered by the following factors: the magnitude of change produced by dietary and environmental factors is small and cumulative; there are great differences among cell types; and there are many factors involved, including age, with multiple interactions between them.

  16. Mouse Models of Diabetes, Obesity and Related Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Glastras, Sarah J.; Chen, Hui; Teh, Rachel; McGrath, Rachel T.; Chen, Jason; Pollock, Carol A.; Wong, Muh Geot; Saad, Sonia

    2016-01-01

    Multiple rodent models have been used to study diabetic kidney disease (DKD). The purpose of the present study was to compare models of diabetes and obesity-induced metabolic syndrome and determine differences in renal outcomes. C57BL/6 male mice were fed either normal chow or high fat diet (HFD). At postnatal week 8, chow-fed mice were randomly assigned to low-dose streptozotocin (STZ, 55 mg/kg/day, five consecutive days) or vehicle control, whereas HFD-fed mice were given either one high-dose of STZ (100 mg/kg) or vehicle control. Intraperitoneal glucose tolerance tests were performed at Week 14, 20 and 30. Urinary albumin to creatinine ratio (ACR) and serum creatinine were measured, and renal structure was assessed using Periodic Acid Schiff (PAS) staining at Week 32. Results showed that chow-fed mice exposed to five doses of STZ resembled type 1 diabetes mellitus with a lean phenotype, hyperglycaemia, microalbuminuria and increased serum creatinine levels. Their kidneys demonstrated moderate tubular injury with evidence of tubular dilatation and glycogenated nuclear inclusion bodies. HFD-fed mice resembled metabolic syndrome as they were obese with dyslipidaemia, insulin resistance, and significantly impaired glucose tolerance. One dose STZ, in addition to HFD, did not worsen metabolic features (including fasting glucose, non esterified fatty acid, and triglyceride levels). There were significant increases in urinary ACR and serum creatinine levels, and renal structural changes were predominantly related to interstitial vacuolation and tubular dilatation in HFD-fed mice. PMID:27579698

  17. Epigenetics in Adipose Tissue, Obesity, Weight Loss, and Diabetes12

    PubMed Central

    Martínez, J. Alfredo; Milagro, Fermín I.; Claycombe, Kate J.; Schalinske, Kevin L.

    2014-01-01

    Given the role that diet and other environmental factors play in the development of obesity and type 2 diabetes, the implication of different epigenetic processes is being investigated. Although it is well known that external factors can cause cell type-dependent epigenetic changes, including DNA methylation, histone tail modifications, and chromatin remodeling, the regulation of these processes, the magnitude of the changes and the cell types in which they occur, the individuals more predisposed, and the more crucial stages of life remain to be elucidated. There is evidence that obese and diabetic people have a pattern of epigenetic marks different from nonobese and nondiabetic individuals. The main long-term goals in this field are the identification and understanding of the role of epigenetic marks that could be used as early predictors of metabolic risk and the development of drugs or diet-related treatments able to delay these epigenetic changes and even reverse them. But weight gain and insulin resistance/diabetes are influenced not only by epigenetic factors; different epigenetic biomarkers have also been identified as early predictors of weight loss and the maintenance of body weight after weight loss. The characterization of all the factors that are able to modify the epigenetic signatures and the determination of their real importance are hindered by the following factors: the magnitude of change produced by dietary and environmental factors is small and cumulative; there are great differences among cell types; and there are many factors involved, including age, with multiple interactions between them. PMID:24425725

  18. Knowledge and Lifestyle-Associated Prevalence of Obesity among Newly Diagnosed Type II Diabetes Mellitus Patients Attending Diabetic Clinic at Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital, Kumasi, Ghana: A Hospital-Based Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Obirikorang, Yaa; Obirikorang, Christian; Odame Anto, Enoch; Acheampong, Emmanuel; Dzah, Nyalako; Akosah, Caroline Nkrumah; Nsenbah, Emmanuella Batu

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the knowledge and prevalence of obesity among Ghanaian newly diagnosed type 2 diabetics. This cross-sectional study was conducted among diagnosed type 2 diabetics. Structured questionnaire was used to obtain data. Anthropometric measurements and fasting blood sugar levels were also assessed. Participants had adequate knowledge about the general concept of obesity (72.0%) and method of weight measurement (98.6%) but were less knowledgeable of ideal body weight (4.2%). The commonly known cause, complication, and management of obesity were poor diet (76.9%), hypertension (81.8%), and diet modification (86.7%), respectively. The anthropometric measures were higher among females compared to males. Prevalence of obesity was 61.3% according to WHR classification, 40.8% according to WHtR classification, 26.1% according to WC, and 14.8% according to BMI classification. Being female was significantly associated with high prevalence of obesity irrespective of the anthropometric measure used (p < 0.05). Taking of snacks in meals, eating meals late at night, physical inactivity, excessive fast food intake, and alcoholic beverage intake were associated with increased prevalence of obesity (p < 0.05). Prevalence of obesity is high among diabetic patient and thus increasing effort towards developing and making education programs by focusing on adjusting to lifestyle modifications is required. PMID:26881262

  19. Knowledge and Lifestyle-Associated Prevalence of Obesity among Newly Diagnosed Type II Diabetes Mellitus Patients Attending Diabetic Clinic at Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital, Kumasi, Ghana: A Hospital-Based Cross-Sectional Study.

    PubMed

    Obirikorang, Yaa; Obirikorang, Christian; Odame Anto, Enoch; Acheampong, Emmanuel; Dzah, Nyalako; Akosah, Caroline Nkrumah; Nsenbah, Emmanuella Batu

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the knowledge and prevalence of obesity among Ghanaian newly diagnosed type 2 diabetics. This cross-sectional study was conducted among diagnosed type 2 diabetics. Structured questionnaire was used to obtain data. Anthropometric measurements and fasting blood sugar levels were also assessed. Participants had adequate knowledge about the general concept of obesity (72.0%) and method of weight measurement (98.6%) but were less knowledgeable of ideal body weight (4.2%). The commonly known cause, complication, and management of obesity were poor diet (76.9%), hypertension (81.8%), and diet modification (86.7%), respectively. The anthropometric measures were higher among females compared to males. Prevalence of obesity was 61.3% according to WHR classification, 40.8% according to WHtR classification, 26.1% according to WC, and 14.8% according to BMI classification. Being female was significantly associated with high prevalence of obesity irrespective of the anthropometric measure used (p < 0.05). Taking of snacks in meals, eating meals late at night, physical inactivity, excessive fast food intake, and alcoholic beverage intake were associated with increased prevalence of obesity (p < 0.05). Prevalence of obesity is high among diabetic patient and thus increasing effort towards developing and making education programs by focusing on adjusting to lifestyle modifications is required.

  20. Metabolic syndrome, dyslipidemia, hypertension and type 2 diabetes in youth: from diagnosis to treatment

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Overweight and obesity in youth is a worldwide public health problem. Overweight and obesity in childhood and adolescents have a substantial effect upon many systems, resulting in clinical conditions such as metabolic syndrome, early atherosclerosis, dyslipidemia, hypertension and type 2 diabetes (T2D). Obesity and the type of body fat distribution are still the core aspects of insulin resistance and seem to be the physiopathologic links common to metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular disease and T2D. The earlier the appearance of the clustering of risk factors and the higher the time of exposure, the greater will be the chance of developing coronary disease with a more severe endpoint. The age when the event may occur seems to be related to the presence and aggregation of risk factors throughout life. The treatment in this age-group is non pharmacological and aims at promoting changes in lifestyle. However, pharmacological treatments are indicated in special situations. The major goals in dietary treatments are not only limited to weight loss, but also to an improvement in the quality of life. Modification of risk factors associated to comorbidities, personal satisfaction of the child or adolescent and trying to establish healthy life habits from an early age are also important. There is a continuous debate on the best possible exercise to do, for children or adolescents, in order to lose weight. The prescription of physical activity to children and adolescents requires extensive integrated work among multidisciplinary teams, patients and their families, in order to reach therapeutic success. The most important conclusion drawn from this symposium was that if the growing prevalence of overweight and obesity continues at this pace, the result will be a population of children and adolescents with metabolic syndrome. This would lead to high mortality rates in young adults, changing the current increasing trend of worldwide longevity. Government actions and a better

  1. [Type 2 diabetes mellitus and obesity: should we treat the obesity or the diabetes?].

    PubMed

    García, Santiago Durán; Sanz, Santiago Durán; Sanz, Alejandro Durán

    2013-09-01

    In this article, we review the results that can be expected after significant weight loss in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. We provide consensus-based documentation supported by the American Diabetes Association, the European Association for the Study of Diabetes, and the International Diabetes Federation on the importance of physical exercise, metabolic-bariatric surgery, and drug therapy. Lastly, we report the results of studies published in the last few years on glucagon-like peptide-1 analogs and the new family of oral drugs known as gliflozins, specifically studies published on dapagliflozin.

  2. Crosstalk between obesity and MMP-9 in cardiac remodelling -a cross-sectional study in apparent treatment-resistant hypertension.

    PubMed

    Ritter, Alessandra Mileni Versuti; de Faria, Ana Paula; Barbaro, Natália; Sabbatini, Andréa Rodrigues; Corrêa, Nathália Batista; Brunelli, Veridiana; Amorim, Rivadavio; Modolo, Rodrigo; Moreno, Heitor

    2017-04-01

    The balance between matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) and their tissue inhibitors (TIMP) plays a key role in the development of hypertension and obesity. We aimed to evaluate the levels of MMP-2 and 9 and TIMP-2 and -1 in obese and non-obese apparent treatment-resistant hypertensive subjects (aTRH) and its association with cardiac hypertrophy. This cross-sectional study enrolled 122 subjects and divided into obese aTRH (n = 67) and non-obese (n = 55) group. Clinical and biochemical data were compared between both groups, including office BP, ambulatory BP, plasma MMP-2 and 9, TIMP-2 and 1 and left ventricular mass index (LVMI). We found higher MMP-9 levels and MMP-9/TIMP-1 ratio in obese aTRH subjects but no difference in MMP-2 and TIMP-1 levels. Obesity influenced MMP-9 levels [β = 20.8 SE =8.6, p = 0.02) independently of potential confounders. In addition, we found a positive correlation between MMP-9 and anthropomorphic parameters. Finally, obese aTRH subjects with left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) had greater MMP-9 levels compared with non-obese with LVH. Our study suggests that MMP-9 levels are influenced by obesity and may directly participate in the progressive LV remodelling process, suggesting a possible role for a higher cardiovascular risk in apparent resistant hypertensive subjects.

  3. Resistin/ADSF/FIZZ3 in obesity and diabetes.

    PubMed

    Sul, Hei Sook

    2004-08-01

    The role of adipocyte-secreted resistin/adipocyte-specific secretory factor (ADSF)/FIZZ3 in obesity and diabetes has been controversial at best. Recently generated resn knockout mice showed normal glucose and insulin sensitivity with lower fasting glucose levels. Upon feeding with a high-fat diet, the knockout mice exhibited increased glucose tolerance with decreased hepatic glucose output, possibly due to phosphorylation and activation of AMP-activated protein kinase and suppression of gluconeogenic genes. In comparison, transgenic mice overexpressing a dominant negative form of resistin/ADSF/FIZZ3 showed increased adiposity with elevated leptin and adiponectin levels, accompanying enhanced glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity both on chow and high-fat diets. Although its underlying mechanisms need further elucidation, the in vivo studies demonstrate a role of resistin/ADSF/FIZZ3 in obesity and insulin resistance.

  4. A "Family-Based" Approach to the Treatment of Obese Type II Diabetic Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wing, Rena R.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Assigned 49 obese diabetic patients with obese spouses (diabetic or nondiabetic) to an alone or together (with spouses) treatment condition of behavioral weight control program. Found no significant differences in weight losses of patients at posttreatment or one-year followup, but did find that women did better when treated with their spouses,…

  5. Role of renal medullary oxidative and/or carbonyl stress in salt-sensitive hypertension and diabetes.

    PubMed

    Mori, Takefumi; Ogawa, Susumu; Cowely, Allen W; Ito, Sadayoshi

    2012-01-01

    1. Salt-sensitive hypertension is commonly associated with diabetes, obesity and chronic kidney disease. The present review focuses on renal mechanisms involved in the development of this type of hypertension. 2. The renal medullary circulation plays an important role in the development of salt-sensitive hypertension. In vivo animal studies have demonstrated that the balance between nitric oxide (NO) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the renal medulla is an important element of salt-sensitive hypertension. The medullary thick ascending limb (mTAL) in the outer medulla is an important source of NO and ROS production and we have explored the mechanisms that stimulate their production, as well as the effects of NO superoxide and hydrogen peroxide on mTAL tubular sodium reabsorption and the regulation of medullary blood flow. 3. Angiotensin II-stimulated NO produced in the mTAL is able to diffuse from the renal mTAL to the surrounding vasa recta capillaries, providing a mechanism by which to increase medullary blood flow and counteract the direct vasoconstrictor effects of angiotensin II. Enhanced oxidative stress attenuates NO diffusion in this region. 4. Carbonyl stress, like oxidative stress, can also play an important role in the pathogenesis of chronic kidney disease, such as insulin resistance, salt-sensitive hypertension and renal vascular complications. 5. Despite the large number of studies undertaken in this area, there is as yet no drug available that directly targets renal ROS. Oxidative and/or carbonyl stress may be the next target of drug discovery to protect against salt-sensitive hypertension and associated end-organ damage.

  6. Obesity and periodontal disease in diabetic pregnant women.

    PubMed

    Chapper, Ana; Munch, Artur; Schermann, Camila; Piacentini, Carolina Carraro; Fasolo, Maria Thereza Martins

    2005-01-01

    This cross-sectional study investigated the impact of pregestational overweight and obesity on periodontal status of patients with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). Sixty pregnant women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) were recruited for the study. According to the pregestational body mass index (BMI), patients were classified into 3 groups: normal, overweight or obese. The periodontal assessment parameters were the presence of gingival bleeding (GB) and bleeding on probing (BOP) per tooth. Clinical attachment loss (CAL) was assessed per tooth and classified according to following values: 1) absence of attachment loss; 2) between 1 and 2 mm, 3) between 3 and 5 mm; and 4) CAL > or = 6 mm. The means of individual percentage of teeth with GB and BOP and the means of the individual classified values of CAL were compared through ANOVA. Differences between the groups were established through post hoc Bonferroni test for multiple comparisons (p < 0.05). The analysis revealed significant differences between the normal group and the obese group considering GB (52.76% +/- 27.99% and 78.85% +/- 27.44%, respectively) and CAL (2.21 +/- 0.41 and 2.61 +/- 0.54, respectively). Although an increase was found in BOP as the BMI increased (ranging from 55.65% to 75.31%), no statistically significant differences were found among the groups. Patients with GDM and pregestational obesity had significantly more gingivitis and periodontal attachment loss that those with normal pregestational BMI. Periodontal treatment should be considered in the establishment of future recommendations for metabolic control for this special group of patients.

  7. Elevated uric acid and obesity-related cardiovascular disease risk factors among hypertensive youth

    PubMed Central

    Reschke, Lauren D.; Miller, Edgar R.; Fadrowski, Jeffrey J.; Loeffler, Lauren F.; Holmes, Kathryn W.; Appel, Lawrence J.; Brady, Tammy M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Uric acid (UA) is associated with high blood pressure in adolescents and left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) and cardiovascular disease (CVD) in adults. We sought to determine if UA is independently associated with CVD risk factors and left ventricular mass (LVM) over time in hypertensive youth. Methods One-year prospective observational study of hypertensive children aged 3-19 years. Cross-sectional and longitudinal associations of serum UA with CVD risk factors and LVM were explored. Results At baseline: mean age 13.8 years, mean UA 5.5 mg/dL, 24 % with elevated UA, 51 % overweight/obese, and 39 % with LVH. Measures of adiposity, low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, high-sensitivity CRP, LVM and LVH were all significantly associated with elevated UA at baseline, but not with change over time. Each 1 mg/dL increase in baseline UA was associated with 2.5 g/m2.7 greater LVM index at follow-up (95% CI 0.64, 4.39; p=0.01); after adjustment for age, sex, race, body mass index z-score, change in UA, time, BP and medication use, this association was no longer significant. Conclusions Hypertensive children with elevated UA have a higher prevalence of obesity-related CVD risk factors. Among hypertensive children, UA may be a marker of adiposity and not an independent CVD risk factor. PMID:26135139

  8. Racializing narratives: obesity, diabetes and the "Aboriginal" thrifty genotype.

    PubMed

    Fee, Margery

    2006-06-01

    This post-colonial reading of narratives of obesity, diabetes, and the hypothesized "thrifty genotype" ascribed to Aboriginal peoples shows how scientific and popular texts support the belief in biological "race." Although the scientific consensus is that "race" is not a empirical category, many scientists use it without comment as a "crude proxy" for presumed genetic differences. The division between science and the social sciences/humanities protects such confusing practices from full scientific and social critique, something interdisciplinary research teams, science studies and improved peer review could provide.

  9. Serum Circulating microRNA Profiling for Identification of Potential Type 2 Diabetes and Obesity Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Pescador, Nuria; Pérez-Barba, Milagros; Ibarra, José María; Corbatón, Arturo; Martínez-Larrad, María Teresa; Serrano-Ríos, Manuel

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aim MicroRNAs are small non-coding RNAs that play important regulatory roles in a variety of biological processes, including complex metabolic processes, such as energy and lipid metabolism, which have been studied in the context of diabetes and obesity. Some particular microRNAs have recently been demonstrated to abundantly and stably exist in serum and to be potentially disease-specific. The aim of this profiling study was to characterize the expression of miRNA in serum samples of obese, nonobese diabetic and obese diabetic individuals to determine whether miRNA expression was deregulated in these serum samples and to identify whether any observed deregulation was specific to either obesity or diabetes or obesity with diabetes. Patients and Methods Thirteen patients with type 2 diabetes, 20 obese patients, 16 obese patients with type 2 diabetes and 20 healthy controls were selected for this study. MiRNA PCR panels were employed to screen serum levels of 739 miRNAs in pooled samples from these four groups. We compared the levels of circulating miRNAs between serum pools of each group. Individual validation of the twelve microRNAs selected as promising biomarkers was carried out using RT-qPCR. Results Three serum microRNAs, miR-138, miR-15b and miR-376a, were found to have potential as predictive biomarkers in obesity. Use of miR-138 or miR-376a provides a powerful predictive tool for distinguishing obese patients from normal healthy controls, diabetic patients, and obese diabetic patients. In addition, the combination of miR-503 and miR-138 can distinguish diabetic from obese diabetic patients. Conclusion This study is the first to show a panel of serum miRNAs for obesity, and compare them with miRNAs identified in serum for diabetes and obesity with diabetes. Our results support the use of some miRNAs extracted from serum samples as potential predictive tools for obesity and type 2 diabetes. PMID:24204780

  10. [Carbohydrate metabolism disorders among obese children and adolescents. Diabetes mellitus type 2].

    PubMed

    Sergeyev, E; Wagner, I; Neef, M; Adler, M; Körner, A; Kiess, W

    2013-04-01

    As obesity has become more prevalent, the incidence of type 2 diabetes mellitus in children and adolescents has also increased. Obesity during adolescence leads to an increased risk for disease and premature death during adulthood, independent of obesity during adulthood. Obesity is the major risk factor impacting insulin sensitivity. Subjects with insulin resistance are at risk for progression to diabetes. Type 2 diabetes mellitus in obese children and adolescents is frequently asymptomatic. It is essential to identify children at high risk who need aggressive lifestyle modification focused on weight reduction and increased physical activity. Early detection and therapy of obese children and adolescents with type 2 diabetes may reduce the risk of cardiometabolic consequences and other long-term complications in adulthood.

  11. Diabetes and Hypertension Consistently Predict the Presence and Extent of Coronary Artery Calcification in Symptomatic Patients: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Nicoll, Rachel; Zhao, Ying; Ibrahimi, Pranvera; Olivecrona, Gunilla; Henein, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Background: The relationship of conventional cardiovascular risk factors (age, gender, ethnicity, diabetes, dyslipidaemia, hypertension, obesity, exercise, and the number of risk factors) to coronary artery calcification (CAC) presence and extent has never before been assessed in a systematic review and meta-analysis. Methods: We included only English language studies that assessed at least three conventional risk factors apart from age, gender, and ethnicity, but excluded studies in which all patients had another confirmed condition such as renal disease. Results: In total, 10 studies, comprising 15,769 patients, were investigated in the systematic review and seven studies, comprising 12,682 patients, were included in the meta-analysis, which demonstrated the importance of diabetes and hypertension as predictors of CAC presence and extent, with age also predicting CAC presence. Male gender, dyslipidaemia, family history of coronary artery disease, obesity, and smoking were overall not predictive of either CAC presence or extent, despite dyslipidaemia being a key risk factor for coronary artery disease (CAD). Conclusion: Diabetes and hypertension consistently predict the presence and extent of CAC in symptomatic patients. PMID:27608015

  12. Obesity diabetes and the role of bile acids in metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Owens, Daphne

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Bile acids have many activities over and above their primary function in aiding absorption of fat and fat soluble vitamins. Bile acids are synthesized from cholesterol, and thus are involved in cholesterol homeostasis. Bile acids stimulate glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP1) production in the distal small bowel and colon, stimulating insulin secretion, and therefore, are involved in carbohydrate and fat metabolism. Bile acids through their insulin sensitising effect play a part in insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Bile acid metabolism is altered in obesity and diabetes. Both dietary restriction and weight loss due to bariatric surgery, alter the lipid carbohydrate and bile acid metabolism. Recent research suggests that the forkhead transcription factor FOXO is a central regulator of bile, lipid, and carbohydrate metabolism, but conflicting studies mean that our understanding of the complexity is not yet complete. PMID:28191525

  13. Severity of pulmonary hypertension and obesity are not associated with worse functional outcomes after pulmonary thromboendarterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Le, Catherine N.; Robbins, Ivan M.; Petracek, Michael R.; Pugh, Meredith E.; Brittain, Evan L.; Hemnes, Anna R.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Predictors of functional outcomes in patients with chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) undergoing pulmonary thromboendarterectomy (PTE) are important to identify preoperatively. We hypothesized that baseline severity of pulmonary hypertension and obesity would not be associated with 6-month functional outcomes after PTE. Clinical and hemodynamic data were collected on consecutive patients undergoing PTE from 2008 to 2014. Patients were stratified according to baseline pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) and body mass index (BMI). Six-minute walk distance (6MWD), New York Heart Association functional class (FC), and echocardiography were assessed in each group at baseline and 6 months after PTE. Regression analyses were performed to evaluate for associations between functional outcomes and baseline PVR and BMI. Forty-two patients underwent PTE and had 6-month follow up data. In comparisons of patients with high and low baseline PVR, the baseline characteristics, distribution of disease, 6MWD, and FC were similar. Postoperative hemodynamics for both groups were similar. At 6 months, both groups achieved improvements in FC, and there were no between-group differences in the change in 6MWD or FC. In comparisons of obese and nonobese patients, perioperative and FC improvement were similar; however, obese patients achieved a greater improvement in 6MWD than nonobese patients (P = 0.04). In conclusion, our data suggest that baseline severity of CTEPH and obesity were not associated with worse functional outcome. Further studies are needed to confirm these results, as these findings could have implications for patient selection for PTE. PMID:27252843

  14. B lymphocytes not required for progression from insulitis to diabetes in non-obese diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Charlton, B; Zhang, M D; Slattery, R M

    2001-12-01

    Previous studies have implicated B lymphocytes in the pathogenesis of diabetes in the non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse. While it is clear that B lymphocytes are necessary, it has not been clear at which stage of disease they play a role; early, late or both. To clarify when B lymphocytes are needed, T lymphocytes were transferred from 5-week-old NOD female mice to age-matched NOD/severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) recipient mice. NOD/SCID mice, which lack functionally mature T and B lymphocytes, do not normally develop insulitis or insulin-dependent diabetes melitus (IDDM). The NOD/SCID mice that received purified T lymphocytes from 5-week-old NOD mice subsequently developed insulitis and diabetes even though they did not have detectable B lymphocytes. This suggests that while B lymphocytes may be essential for an initial priming event they are not requisite for disease progression in the NOD mouse.

  15. Melatonin reduces hepatic mitochondrial dysfunction in diabetic obese rats.

    PubMed

    Agil, Ahmad; El-Hammadi, Mazen; Jiménez-Aranda, Aroa; Tassi, Mohamed; Abdo, Walied; Fernández-Vázquez, Gumersindo; Reiter, Russel J

    2015-08-01

    Hepatic mitochondrial dysfunction is thought to play a role in the development of liver steatosis and insulin resistance, which are both common characteristics of obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). It was hypothesized that the antioxidant properties of melatonin could potentially improve the impaired functions of hepatic mitochondria in diabetic obese animals. Male Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF) rats and lean littermates (ZL) were given either melatonin (10 mg/kg BW/day) orally for 6 wk (M-ZDF and M-ZL) or vehicle as control groups (C-ZDF and C-ZL). Hepatic function was evaluated by measurement of serum alanine transaminase and aspartate transaminase levels, liver histopathology and electron microscopy, and hepatic mitochondrial functions. Several impaired functions of hepatic mitochondria were observed in C-ZDF in comparison with C-ZL rats. Melatonin treatment to ZDF rats decreases serum levels of ALT (P < 0.001), alleviates liver steatosis and vacuolation, and also mitigates diabetic-induced mitochondrial abnormalities, glycogen, and lipid accumulation. Melatonin improves mitochondrial dysfunction in M-ZDF rats by increasing activities of mitochondrial citrate synthase (P < 0.001) and complex IV of electron transfer chain (P < 0.05) and enhances state 3 respiration (P < 0.001), respiratory control index (RCR) (P < 0.01), and phosphorylation coefficient (ADP/O ratio) (P < 0.05). Also melatonin augments ATP production (P < 0.05) and diminishes uncoupling protein 2 levels (P < 0.001). These results demonstrate that chronic oral melatonin reduces liver steatosis and mitochondria dysfunction in ZDF rats. Therefore, it may be beneficial in the treatment of diabesity.

  16. [Systemic arterial hypertension in child and adolescent].

    PubMed

    Rosas-Peralta, Martín; Medina-Concebida, Luz Elena; Borrayo-Sánchez, Gabriela; Madrid-Miller, Alejandra; Ramírez-Arias, Erick; Pérez-Rodríguez, Gilberto

    2016-01-01

    The epidemic of childhood obesity, the risk of developing left ventricular hypertrophy, and evidence of the early development of atherosclerosis in children would make the detection of and intervention in childhood hypertension important to reduce long-term health risks; however, supporting data are lacking. Secondary hypertension is more common in preadolescent children, with most cases caused by renal disease. Primary or essential hypertension is more common in adolescents and has multiple risk factors, including obesity and a family history of hypertension. Evaluation involves a through history and physical examination, laboratory tests, and specialized studies. Management is multifaceted. Nonpharmacologic treatments include weight reduction, exercise, and dietary modifications. Although the evidence of first line therapy for hypertension is still controversial, the recommendations for pharmacologic treatment are based on symptomatic hypertension, evidence of end-organ damage, stage 2 of hypertension, or stage 1 of hypertension unresponsive to lifestyle modifications, and hypertension with diabetes mellitus where is the search for microalbuminuria justified.

  17. New insights on diabetes mellitus and obesity in Africa-part 1: prevalence, pathogenesis and comorbidities.

    PubMed

    Kengne, Andre Pascal; Echouffo-Tcheugui, Justin-Basile; Sobngwi, Eugene; Mbanya, Jean-Claude

    2013-07-01

    Evidence continues to accumulate on the rising burden of diabetes mellitus at a higher pace in Africa. In a series of two papers, we sought to summarise recent evidence on diabetes and obesity in Africa based on a systematic review of studies published between January 2002 and October 2012. This first paper on the prevalence, pathogenesis and comorbidities shows that the increase in diabetes prevalence has paralleled that of obesity in Africa. Recent surveys on diabetes and obesity have been largely suboptimal. Hence, the need for more representative and robust continent-wide prevalence figures, which may be somehow achieved through pooling of existing data. Prospective studies linking environmental risk factors to disease occurrence and outcomes remain scarce, and genetic factors for diabetes or obesity have not been extensively assessed. The health consequences of diabetes are manifold, and include a complex interaction with other conditions like HIV infection and sickle cell disease/trait.

  18. Association of obesity and leptin with insulin resistance in type 2 diabetes mellitus in Indian population.

    PubMed

    Das, Piyali; Bhattacharjee, Debojyoti; Bandyopadhyay, Subir Kumar; Bhattacharya, Gorachand; Singh, Ramji

    2013-01-01

    Obesity and diabetes mellitus are two modern epidemics. But their interrelationship is debated. Here we explored the probable association among obesity, leptin and insulin resistance in type 2 diabetes mellitus. 60 recent onset (< 5 years) diabetics and age-sex matched 33 non diabetic controls were assessed for physical and chemical parameters like Body Mass Index, abdominal circumference, waist/hip ratio, fasting blood glucose, insulin and leptin. Degree of insulin resistance was calculated by HOMA-IR method (Homeostatic Model Assessment). All the physical parameters showed positive correlation with leptin and the HOMA-IR score, strength of association being highest between insulin resistance and abdominal circumference. Leptin and insulin resistance showed no correlation. Findings were lower in controls. Study concluded that, obesity mainly central type might be responsible for insulin resistance in type 2 diabetes mellitus where as leptin, a potential marker for obesity, may not. This perhaps points towards the multifactorial causation of insulin resistance in type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  19. Type 2 diabetes, but not obesity, prevalence is positively associated with ambient temperature

    PubMed Central

    Speakman, John R.; Heidari-Bakavoli, Sahar

    2016-01-01

    Cold exposure stimulates energy expenditure and glucose disposal. If these factors play a significant role in whole body energy balance, and glucose homeostasis, it is predicted that both obesity and type 2 diabetes prevalence would be lower where it is colder. Previous studies have noted connections between ambient temperature and obesity, but the direction of the effect is confused. No previous studies have explored the link of type 2 diabetes to ambient temperature. We used county level data for obesity and diabetes prevalence across the mainland USA and matched this to county level ambient temperature data. Average ambient temperature explained 5.7% of the spatial variation in obesity and 29.6% of the spatial variation in type 2 diabetes prevalence. Correcting the type 2 diabetes data for the effect of obesity reduced the explained variation to 26.8%. Even when correcting for obesity, poverty and race, ambient temperature explained 12.4% of the variation in the prevalence of type 2 diabetes, and this significant effect remained when latitude was entered into the model as a predictor. When obesity prevalence was corrected for poverty and race the significant effect of temperature disappeared. Enhancing energy expenditure by cold exposure will likely not impact obesity significantly, but may be useful to combat type 2 diabetes. PMID:27477955

  20. Obesity Epidemiology Worldwide.

    PubMed

    Arroyo-Johnson, Cassandra; Mincey, Krista D

    2016-12-01

    Obesity continues to be a public health concern across the globe. Obesity has a demonstrated association with health behaviors and health outcomes, such as diabetes, hypertension, and cancer. Over the past 2 decades, obesity has increased worldwide and remains highest in the United States. It is critical to understand the definition of obesity, using body mass index appropriately, recent estimates, and risk factors as a framework within which clinicians should work to help reduce the burden of obesity. This framework, including the Healthy People 2020 place-based approach to social determinants of health, is described in this article.

  1. Effect of Spirulina maxima Supplementation on Calcium, Magnesium, Iron, and Zinc Status in Obese Patients with Treated Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Suliburska, J; Szulińska, M; Tinkov, A A; Bogdański, P

    2016-09-01

    The effects of Spirulina maxima supplementation on calcium, magnesium, iron, and zinc status were studied in a double-blind placebo-controlled trial of 50 obese subjects with treated hypertension, each randomized to receive 2 g of spirulina or a placebo daily for 3 months. At baseline and after treatment, the calcium, magnesium, iron, and zinc concentration in plasma was assessed. It was found that 3 months of S. maxima supplementation resulted in a significant decrease in the iron level in the plasma of obese patients. In conclusion, this is the first clinical study on the influence of spirulina supplementation on mineral status in obese patients with hypertension. Spirulina supplementation affects the iron status of obese Caucasians with well-treated hypertension.

  2. ACE Gene I/D Polymorphism and Obesity in 1,574 Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Min; Huang, Yan-Mei; Wang, Ying-Hui; Chen, Yin-Ling; Geng, Li-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Association between ACE gene I/D polymorphism and the risk of overweight/obesity remains controversial. We investigated the possible relationship between ACE gene I/D polymorphism and obesity in Chinese type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients. In this study, obesity was defined as a body mass index (BMI) value ≥ 25 kg/m2 and subjects were classified into 4 groups (lean, normal, overweight, and obese). PCR (polymerase chain reaction) was used to detect the ACE gene I/D polymorphism in T2DM patients. Metabolic measurements including blood glucose, lipid profile, and blood pressure were obtained. Frequencies of the ACE genotypes (DD, ID, and II) were not significant among the 4 groups of BMI-defined patients (P = 0.679) while ACE II carriers showed higher systolic blood pressure (SBP) and pulse pressure (PP) (all P < 0.050). Hyperglycemia, hypertension, and dyslipidemia in these T2DM patients were found to be significantly associated with BMI. In conclusion, the relationship of ACE gene I/D polymorphism with obesity is insignificant in Chinese patients with T2DM. SBP and PP might be higher in the ACE II carriers than in the DD and ID carriers. PMID:28115791

  3. Effect of Diabetes and Obesity on Disparities in Prostate Cancer Outcomes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0503 TITLE: “Effect of Diabetes and Obesity on Disparities in Prostate Cancer Outcomes PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Bettina F...RETURN YOUR FORM TO THE ABOVE ADDRESS. 1. REPORT DATE October 2015 2. REPORT TYPE Annual 3. DATES COVERED 20154. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Effect of Diabetes ... diabetes (at prostate cancer diagnosis and during follow- up) and prostate cancer recurrence and mortality; as well as the combined effect of obesity

  4. Effects of dopamine on leptin release and leptin gene (OB) expression in adipocytes from obese and hypertensive patients

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez-Aguilar, Cleto; Alvarez-Paredes, Alfonso Rafael; Lindholm, Bengt; Stenvinkel, Peter; García-López, Elvia; Mejía-Rodríguez, Oliva; López-Meza, Joel Edmundo; Amato, Dante; Paniagua, Ramon

    2013-01-01

    Background A reduction of dopaminergic (DAergic) activity with increased prolactin levels has been found in obese and hypertensive patients, suggesting its involvement as a pathophysiological mechanism promoting hypertension. Similarly, leptin action increasing sympathetic activity has been proposed to be involved in mechanisms of hypertension. The aim of this study was to analyze the effects of DA, norepinephrine (NE), and prolactin on leptin release and leptin gene (OB) expression in adipocytes from obese and hypertensive patients. Methods Leptin release and OB gene expression were analyzed in cultured adipocytes from 16 obese and hypertensive patients treated with DA (0.001, 0.01, 0.1, and 1.0 μmol/L), NE (1.0 μmol/L), insulin (0.1 μmol/L), and prolactin (1.0 μmol/L), and from five nonobese and normotensive controls treated with DA (1 μmol/L), NE (1 μmol/L), insulin (0.1 μmol/L), and prolactin (1.0 μmol/L). Results A dose-related reduction of leptin release and OB gene messenger ribonucleic acid expression under different doses of DA was observed in adipocytes from obese hypertensive patients. Whereas prolactin treatment elicited a significant increase of both leptin release and OB gene expression, NE reduced these parameters. Although similar effects of DA and NE were observed in adipocytes from controls, baseline values in controls were reduced to 20% of the value in adipocytes from obese hypertensive patients. Conclusion These results suggest that DAergic deficiency contributes to metabolic disorders linked to hyperleptinemia in obese and hypertensive patients. PMID:24348062

  5. Sugar, uric acid, and the etiology of diabetes and obesity.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Richard J; Nakagawa, Takahiko; Sanchez-Lozada, L Gabriela; Shafiu, Mohamed; Sundaram, Shikha; Le, Myphuong; Ishimoto, Takuji; Sautin, Yuri Y; Lanaspa, Miguel A

    2013-10-01

    The intake of added sugars, such as from table sugar (sucrose) and high-fructose corn syrup has increased dramatically in the last hundred years and correlates closely with the rise in obesity, metabolic syndrome, and diabetes. Fructose is a major component of added sugars and is distinct from other sugars in its ability to cause intracellular ATP depletion, nucleotide turnover, and the generation of uric acid. In this article, we revisit the hypothesis that it is this unique aspect of fructose metabolism that accounts for why fructose intake increases the risk for metabolic syndrome. Recent studies show that fructose-induced uric acid generation causes mitochondrial oxidative stress that stimulates fat accumulation independent of excessive caloric intake. These studies challenge the long-standing dogma that "a calorie is just a calorie" and suggest that the metabolic effects of food may matter as much as its energy content. The discovery that fructose-mediated generation of uric acid may have a causal role in diabetes and obesity provides new insights into pathogenesis and therapies for this important disease.

  6. The endocannabinoid system in obesity and type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Di Marzo, V

    2008-08-01

    Endocannabinoids (ECs) are defined as endogenous agonists of cannabinoid receptors type 1 and 2 (CB1 and CB2). ECs, EC anabolic and catabolic enzymes and cannabinoid receptors constitute the EC signalling system. This system participates in the control of lipid and glucose metabolism at several levels, with the possible endpoint of the accumulation of energy as fat. Following unbalanced energy intake, however, the EC system becomes dysregulated, and in most cases overactive, in several organs participating in energy homeostasis, particularly, in intra-abdominal adipose tissue. This dysregulation might contribute to excessive visceral fat accumulation and reduced adiponectin release from this tissue, and to the onset of several cardiometabolic risk factors that are associated with obesity and type 2 diabetes. This phenomenon might form the basis of the mechanism of action of CB1 antagonists/inverse agonists, recently developed by several pharmaceutical companies as adjuvants to lifestyle modification for weight reduction, glycaemic control and dyslipidaemia in obese and type 2 diabetes patients. It also helps to explain why some of the beneficial actions of these new therapeutics appear to be partly independent from weight loss.

  7. Canagliflozin: Effects in overweight and obese subjects without diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Bays, Harold E; Weinstein, Richard; Law, Gordon; Canovatchel, William

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effects of canagliflozin, a sodium glucose co-transporter 2 inhibitor, on body weight in overweight and obese subjects (body mass index [BMI] ≥27 and <50 kg/m2). Methods This 12-week, Phase 2b, randomized, double-blind study enrolled 376 subjects without diabetes mellitus who received canagliflozin 50, 100, or 300 mg or placebo once daily. The primary endpoint was the percent change in body weight from baseline through Week 12. Results Canagliflozin increased urinary glucose excretion in a dose-dependent manner and produced statistically significant reductions in body weight compared with placebo (least squares mean percent changes from baseline of −2.2%, −2.9%, −2.7%, and −1.3% with canagliflozin 50, 100, and 300 mg and placebo; P < 0.05 for all comparisons). Overall adverse event (AE) rates were similar across groups. Canagliflozin was associated with higher rates of genital mycotic infections in women, which were generally mild and led to few study discontinuations. Osmotic diuresis-related AE rates were low and similar across groups. Conclusions In overweight and obese subjects without diabetes mellitus, canagliflozin significantly reduced body weight compared with placebo and was generally well tolerated. PMID:24227660

  8. Minireview: Epigenetics of obesity and diabetes in humans.

    PubMed

    Slomko, Howard; Heo, Hye J; Einstein, Francine H

    2012-03-01

    Understanding the determinants of human health and disease is overwhelmingly complex, particularly for common, late-onset, chronic disorders, such as obesity and diabetes. Elucidating the genetic and environmental factors that influence susceptibility to disruptions in energy homeostasis and metabolic regulation remain a challenge, and progress will entail the integration of multiple assessments of temporally dynamic environmental exposures in the context of each individual's genotype. To meet this challenge, researchers are increasingly exploring the epigenome, which is the malleable interface of gene-environment interactions. Epigenetic variation, whether innate or induced, contributes to variation in gene expression, the range of potential individual responses to internal and external cues, and risk for metabolic disease. Ultimately, advancement in our understanding of chronic disease susceptibility in humans will depend on refinement of exposure assessment tools and systems biology approaches to interpretation. In this review, we present recent progress in epigenetics of human obesity and diabetes, existing challenges, and the potential for new approaches to unravel the complex biology of metabolic dysregulation.

  9. Obstructive Sleep Apnea Among Obese Patients With Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Gary D.; Sanders, Mark H.; Millman, Richard; Zammit, Gary; Borradaile, Kelley E.; Newman, Anne B.; Wadden, Thomas A.; Kelley, David; Wing, Rena R.; Pi Sunyer, F. Xavier; Darcey, Valerie; Kuna, Samuel T.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To assess the risk factors for the presence and severity of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) among obese patients with type 2 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Unattended polysomnography was performed in 306 participants. RESULTS Over 86% of participants had OSA with an apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) ≥5 events/h. The mean AHI was 20.5 ± 16.8 events/h. A total of 30.5% of the participants had moderate OSA (15 ≤ AHI <30), and 22.6% had severe OSA (AHI ≥30). Waist circumference (odds ratio 1.1; 95% CI 1.0–1.1; P = 0.03) was significantly related to the presence of OSA. Severe OSA was most likely in individuals with a higher BMI (odds ratio 1.1; 95% CI 1.0–1.2; P = 0.03). CONCLUSIONS Physicians should be particularly cognizant of the likelihood of OSA in obese patients with type 2 diabetes, especially among individuals with higher waist circumference and BMI. PMID:19279303

  10. Role of the Gut Microbiome in Obesity and Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Barlow, Gillian M; Yu, Allen; Mathur, Ruchi

    2015-12-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and obesity represent two of the biggest global health challenges of this century and are associated with significant comorbidities and healthcare costs. Although multiple factors undoubtedly contribute to the development and progression of DM and obesity, research over the last decade has demonstrated that the microbes that colonize the human gut may play key contributory roles. Gut microbes are now known to codevelop with the human host and are strongly influenced by mode of birth and early diet and nutrition, as well as environmental and other factors including antibiotic exposure. Gut microbes contribute to human health through roles in polysaccharide breakdown, nutrient absorption, inflammatory responses, gut permeability, and bile acid modification. Numerous studies have suggested that disruptions in the relative proportions of gut microbial populations may contribute to weight gain and insulin resistance, including alterations in Gammaproteobacteria and Verrucomicrobia and the ratios of Firmicutes to Bacteroidetes in weight gain and possible alterations in butyrate-producing bacteria such as Faecalibacterium prausnitzii in DM. In addition, it has been shown that the methanogenic Archaea may contribute to altered metabolism and weight gain in the host. However, the majority of studies are performed with stool or colonic samples and may not be representative of the metabolically active small intestine. Studies predominantly in rodent models are beginning to elucidate the mechanisms by which gut microbes contribute to DM and obesity, but much remains to be learned before we can begin to approach targeted treatments.

  11. Minireview: Epigenetic programming of diabetes and obesity: animal models.

    PubMed

    Seki, Yoshinori; Williams, Lyda; Vuguin, Patricia M; Charron, Maureen J

    2012-03-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests that the intrauterine (IU) environment has a significant and lasting effect on the long-term health of the growing fetus and the development of metabolic disease in later life as put forth in the fetal origins of disease hypothesis. Metabolic diseases have been associated with alterations in the epigenome that occur without changes in the DNA sequence, such as cytosine methylation of DNA, histone posttranslational modifications, and micro-RNA. Animal models of epigenetic modifications secondary to an altered IU milieu are an invaluable tool to study the mechanisms that determine the development of metabolic diseases, such as diabetes and obesity. Rodent and nonlitter bearing animals are good models for the study of disease, because they have similar embryology, anatomy, and physiology to humans. Thus, it is feasible to monitor and modify the IU environment of animal models in order to gain insight into the molecular basis of human metabolic disease pathogenesis. In this review, the database of PubMed was searched for articles published between 1999 and 2011. Key words included epigenetic modifications, IU growth retardation, small for gestational age, animal models, metabolic disease, and obesity. The inclusion criteria used to select studies included animal models of epigenetic modifications during fetal and neonatal development associated with adult metabolic syndrome. Experimental manipulations included: changes in the nutritional status of the pregnant female (calorie-restricted, high-fat, or low-protein diets during pregnancy), as well as the father; interference with placenta function, or uterine blood flow, environmental toxin exposure during pregnancy, as well as dietary modifications during the neonatal (lactation) as well as pubertal period. This review article is focused solely on studies in animal models that demonstrate epigenetic changes that are correlated with manifestation of metabolic disease, including diabetes

  12. The goal of blood pressure in the hypertensive patient with diabetes is defined: now the challenge is go from recommendations to practice

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The recent Latin American and European guidelines published this year has proposed as a goal for blood pressure control in patients with diabetes type 2 a value similar or inferior to 140/90 mmHg. High blood pressure is the leading cause of cardiovascular diseases and deaths globally. Although once hypertension is detected, 80% of individuals are on a pharmacologic therapy only a minority is controlled. Diabetes also is a risk factor for other serious chronic diseases, including cardiovascular disease. Whether specifically targeting lower fasting glucose levels can reduce cardiovascular outcomes remains unknown. Hypertension is present in 20% to 60% of patients with type 2 diabetes, depending on age, ethnicity, obesity, and the presence of micro or macro albuminuria. High blood pressure substantially increases the risk of both macro and micro vascular complications, doubling the risk of all-cause mortality and stroke, tripling the risk of coronary heart disease and significantly hastening the progression of diabetic nephropathy, retinopathy, and neuropathy. Thus, blood pressure lowering is a major priority in preventing cardiovascular and renal events in patients with diabetes and hypertension. During many years the BP goals recommended in patients with diabetes were more aggressive than in patients without diabetes. As reviewed in this article many clinical trials have demonstrated not only the lack of benefits of lowering the BP below 130/80 mmHg, but also the J-shaped relationship in DM patients. Overall we discuss the importance of define the group of patients in whom significant BP reduction could be particularly dangerous and, on the other hand, those with a high risk of stroke who could benefit most from an intensive hypotensive therapy. In any case, the big challenge now is avoid the therapeutic inertia (leaving diabetic patients with BP values of 140/90 mmHg or higher) at all costs, as this would lead to an unacceptable toll in terms of human lives

  13. Chronic Kidney Disease, Obesity, and Hypertension: The Role of Leptin and Adiponectin

    PubMed Central

    Tesauro, M.; Mascali, A.; Franzese, O.; Cipriani, S.; Cardillo, C.; Di Daniele, N.

    2012-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease is a major public health problem and characterized by a progressive loss in renal function over a period of months or years as defined by structural or functional abnormalities of the kidney. Several elements contribute to determine a progression of the kidney injury, inducing a worsening of renal damage and accelerating the decline of renal function: obesity and hypertension are two known factors of kidney progression. Remarkable improvements have been recently achieved in the study of the endocrine features of the adipose tissue and have been able to produce hormone-like peptides named adipokines or adipocytokines. Among these adipocytokines, which represent a link between obesity, hypertension, and chronic nephropathy, leptins and adiponectin appear to play an important role. Leptin not only is a prohypertension element (renal progression factor) through the activation sympathetic nervous, but also is able to induce prosclerotic effects directly on the kidney. In contrast, a decline of adiponectin levels has been shown to be related to a picture of hypertension: an endothelial dysfunction has been described as the main pathogenic mechanism responsible for this phenomenon. PMID:23320148

  14. Depression Amplifies the Influence of Central Obesity on 10-Year Incidence of Diabetes: Findings from MIDUS

    PubMed Central

    Karlamangla, Arun

    2016-01-01

    Background Central obesity is a major risk factor for diabetes but many obese individuals never develop diabetes, suggesting the presence of important effect modifiers. Depression has emerged as a key risk factor for poor glycemic control, but to our knowledge, no previous work has investigated whether depression amplifies the effect of central obesity on glucoregulation. Methods and Findings We used a national sample of adults without prevalent diabetes (MIDUS; N = 919) to test for synergy between central obesity and depression in the development of diabetes 10 years later. We found that depression amplified the association of waist-to-hip ratio (WHR) with incident diabetes adjusted for age, race, gender, education, physical activity, and sleep problems (p = 0.01 for test of interaction). The relative risk for incident diabetes per every 0.1 increment in WHR was 1.75 (95% CI: 1.31; 2.33) in those without depression and 3.78 in those with depression (95% CI: 2.14; 6.66). Conclusions These results confirm the role of depression as a robust risk factor for the development of diabetes and for the first time, demonstrate a synergy between depression and central obesity. Identifying and addressing depression could prove to be an effective approach to preventing diabetes in at risk individuals. Ultimately, elucidating the interplay among risk factors from different domains will be key to understanding multifactorial diseases such as diabetes and informing theory-based, patient-centered interventions aimed at reducing diabetes risk. PMID:27755576

  15. The relationship between obesity and transforming growth factor beta on renal damage in essential hypertension.

    PubMed

    Torun, Dilek; Ozelsancak, Ruya; Turan, Inci; Micozkadioglu, Hasan; Sezer, Siren; Ozdemir, Fatma Nurhan

    2007-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of obesity on renal functions and the possible relationship between TGF-beta1 and obesity in hypertensive patients. Seventy newly diagnosed, hypertensive patients (male/female 36/34, aged 45.0 +/- 8.0 years) and 30 (male/female 17/13, aged 41.8 +/- 7.7 years) normotensive controls were included. Patients in both groups were analyzed for serum levels of glucose, creatinine, uric acid, lipids, and TGF-beta1. A 24-hour urine sample was also obtained; creatinine clearance rate and urinary albumin excretion (UEA) were investigated. TGF-beta1 levels were significantly higher (40.7 +/- 13.6 versus 34.2 +/- 12.1 pg/mL, P = 0.02), and creatinine clearance was significantly lower in patients compared with controls (98.9 +/- 25.5 versus 124.5 +/- 23.1 mL/min. per. 1.73 m(2), P = 0.001). Serum TGF-beta1 levels (45.2 +/- 14 versis 38.0 +/- 12.8 pg/mL, P = 0.03), creatinine clearance rates (109.8 29.9 versus 93.0 +/- 20.8 mL/min. per. 1.73 m(2), P = 0.001), and urinary albumin excretion (55.7 +/- 62.0 versus 12.7 +/- 12.6 mg/24 h, P = 0.002) were higher in obese hypertensive patients than in nonobese patients. In hypertensive patients, TGF-beta1 levels correlated with body mass index (r = 0.296, P = 0.01) and creatinine clearance (r = 0.238, P = 0.04). The results suggest that increased body mass index is associated with increased creatinine clearance, urinary albumin excretion, and TGF-beta1 levels in essential hypertension. In addition, TGF-beta1 is positively correlated with body mass index and creatinine clearance in patients with essential hypertension.

  16. Constrictor prostanoids and uridine adenosine tetraphosphate: vascular mediators and therapeutic targets in hypertension and diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Takayuki; Goulopoulou, Styliani; Taguchi, Kumiko; Tostes, Rita C; Kobayashi, Tsuneo

    2015-01-01

    Vascular dysfunction plays a pivotal role in the development of systemic complications associated with arterial hypertension and diabetes. The endothelium, or more specifically, various factors derived from endothelial cells tightly regulate vascular function, including vascular tone. In physiological conditions, there is a balance between endothelium-derived factors, that is, relaxing factors (endothelium-derived relaxing factors; EDRFs) and contracting factors (endothelium-derived contracting factors; EDCFs), which mediate vascular homeostasis. However, in disease states, such as diabetes and arterial hypertension, there is an imbalance between EDRF and EDCF, with a reduction of EDRF signalling and an increase of EDCF signalling. Among EDCFs, COX-derived vasoconstrictor prostanoids play an important role in the development of vascular dysfunction associated with hypertension and diabetes. Moreover, uridine adenosine tetraphosphate (Up4A), identified as an EDCF in 2005, also modulates vascular function. However, the role of Up4A in hypertension- and diabetes-associated vascular dysfunction is unclear. In the present review, we focused on experimental and clinical evidence that implicate these two EDCFs (vasoconstrictor prostanoids and Up4A) in vascular dysfunction associated with hypertension and diabetes. PMID:26031319

  17. Abdominal obesity validates the association between elevated alanine aminotransferase and newly diagnosed diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Yueh, Chen-Yu; Yang, Yao-Hsu; Sung, Yi-Ting; Lee, Li-Wen

    2014-01-01

    To examine how elevated alanine aminotransferase (ALT) could be associated with newly diagnosed diabetes mellitus. We conducted a cross-sectional analysis on a mass health examination. The odds ratios (ORs) for diabetes mellitus and newly diagnosed diabetes mellitus were compared between people with and without abdominal obesity, together with and without elevated ALT levels. 5499 people were included in this study. Two hundred fifty two (4.6%) fulfilled the diagnosis of diabetes mellitus with 178 (3.2%) undiagnosed before. Metabolic syndrome was vigorously associated with diabetes mellitus and newly diagnosed diabetes mellitus (12.4% vs. 1.4% and 9.0% vs. 0.9%), but elevated ALT alone was not. However, coexisting with obesity, elevated ALTs were robustly associated with diabetes mellitus and newly diagnosed diabetes mellitus. For the incidence of newly diagnosed diabetes mellitus, in comparison to non-obese people with normal ALT (1.7%, OR = 1), obese people especially with elevated ALT levels had significantly higher ORs (obese with ALT ≤ 40 U/L: 4.7%, OR 1.73, 95% CI 1.08-2.77, P 0.023; ALT 41-80 U/L: 6.8%, OR 2.06, 95% CI 1.20-3.55, P 0.009; ALT 81-120 U/L: 8.8%, OR 3.07, 95% CI 1.38-6.84, P 0.006; ALT > 120 U/L: 18.2%, OR 7.44, 95% CI 3.04-18.18, P < 0.001). Abdominal obesity validates the association between elevated alanine aminotransferase and diabetes mellitus and newly diagnosed diabetes mellitus. People with abdominal obesity, especially with coexisting elevated ALT levels should be screened for undiagnosed diabetes mellitus.

  18. Angiotensin AT2 receptor agonist prevents salt-sensitive hypertension in obese Zucker rats

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Quaisar; Patel, Sanket

    2015-01-01

    High-sodium intake is a risk factor for the pathogenesis of hypertension, especially in obesity. The present study is designed to investigate whether angiotensin type 2 receptor (AT2R) activation with selective agonist C21 prevents high-sodium diet (HSD)-induced hypertension in obese animals. Male obese rats were treated with AT2R agonist C21 (1 mg·kg−1·day−1, oral) while maintained on either normal-sodium diet (NSD; 0.4%) or HSD (4%) for 2 wk. Radiotelemetric recording showed a time-dependent increase in systolic blood pressure in HSD-fed obese rats, being maximal increase (∼27 mmHg) at day 12 of the HSD regimen. C21 treatment completely prevented the increase in blood pressure of HSD-fed rats. Compared with NSD controls, HSD-fed obese rats had greater natriuresis/diuresis and urinary levels of nitrates, and these parameters were further increased by C21 treatment. Also, C21 treatment improved glomerular filtration rate in HSD-fed rats. HSD-fed rats expressed higher level of cortical ANG II, which was reduced to 50% by C21 treatment. HSD feeding and/or C21 treatment had no effects on cortical renin activity and the expression of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) and chymase, which are ANG II-producing enzymes. However, ANG(1–7) concentration and ACE2 activity in the renal cortex were reduced by HSD feeding, and C21 treatment rescued both the parameters. Also, C21 treatment reduced the cortical expression of AT1R in HSD-fed rats, but had no effect of AT2R expression. We conclude that chronic treatment with the AT2R agonist C21 prevents salt-sensitive hypertension in obese rats, and a reduction in the renal ANG II/AT1R and enhanced ACE2/ANG(1–7) levels may play a potential role in this phenomenon. PMID:25855512

  19. Angiotensin AT2 receptor agonist prevents salt-sensitive hypertension in obese Zucker rats.

    PubMed

    Ali, Quaisar; Patel, Sanket; Hussain, Tahir

    2015-06-15

    High-sodium intake is a risk factor for the pathogenesis of hypertension, especially in obesity. The present study is designed to investigate whether angiotensin type 2 receptor (AT2R) activation with selective agonist C21 prevents high-sodium diet (HSD)-induced hypertension in obese animals. Male obese rats were treated with AT2R agonist C21 (1 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1), oral) while maintained on either normal-sodium diet (NSD; 0.4%) or HSD (4%) for 2 wk. Radiotelemetric recording showed a time-dependent increase in systolic blood pressure in HSD-fed obese rats, being maximal increase (∼27 mmHg) at day 12 of the HSD regimen. C21 treatment completely prevented the increase in blood pressure of HSD-fed rats. Compared with NSD controls, HSD-fed obese rats had greater natriuresis/diuresis and urinary levels of nitrates, and these parameters were further increased by C21 treatment. Also, C21 treatment improved glomerular filtration rate in HSD-fed rats. HSD-fed rats expressed higher level of cortical ANG II, which was reduced to 50% by C21 treatment. HSD feeding and/or C21 treatment had no effects on cortical renin activity and the expression of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) and chymase, which are ANG II-producing enzymes. However, ANG(1-7) concentration and ACE2 activity in the renal cortex were reduced by HSD feeding, and C21 treatment rescued both the parameters. Also, C21 treatment reduced the cortical expression of AT1R in HSD-fed rats, but had no effect of AT2R expression. We conclude that chronic treatment with the AT2R agonist C21 prevents salt-sensitive hypertension in obese rats, and a reduction in the renal ANG II/AT1R and enhanced ACE2/ANG(1-7) levels may play a potential role in this phenomenon.

  20. Prevalence and factors associated with hypertension and obesity among civil servants in Kaduna, Kaduna State, June 2012

    PubMed Central

    Oladimeji, Abisola Monisola; Fawole, Olufunmilayo; Nguku, Patrick; Nsubuga, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Non-communicable diseases (NCDs) are a leading cause of adult mortality globally, accounting for 63% of all deaths in 2008 with nearly 80% of those deaths occurring in developing countries. These NCDs which include hypertension and obesity alongside their complications accounted for 27% of all deaths in Nigeria, in 2008. We conducted a study among Kaduna State civil servants to determine the prevalence of hypertension, overweight/obesity and also to identify associated behavioural factors. Methods A cross-sectional design, with multi-stage cluster sampling technique was used. A structured questionnaire was used in gathering data on socio-demographics, physical activity, dietary habit, tobacco, and alcohol consumption. Blood pressure, body weight and height were measured, and body mass index (BMI) calculated. Descriptive statistics and logistic regression were used in identifying associations between these behavioural factors and hypertension/overweight/obesity. Results A total of 801 civil servants, mean age 43±9 years were interviewed, of which 62% were male. Prevalence of hypertension, overweight and obesity were 29%, 35% and 27% respectively. Physical inactivity was the most prevalent behavioural factor, 91%, followed by unhealthy diet 90%, and cigarette smoking 6%. Prevalence of overweight/obesity was higher among the senior cadre than the junior cadre (69% versus 54%, p<0.01). Increasing age was an independent predictor of hypertension. Female respondents were four times more likely to be overweight/obese than males (AOR=3.7, 95%CI 2.5-5.4). Conclusion Hypertension and overweight/obesity with their behavioural risks are prevalent among civil servants in Kaduna. Age and gender-specific public health strategies to promote healthy- living in the workplace are being advocated for with concerned authorities. PMID:25328632

  1. Comparison of Clinical Outcomes Following Acute Myocardial Infarctions in Hypertensive Patients With or Without Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Min Goo; Ahn, Youngkeun; Chae, Shung Chull; Hur, Seung Ho; Hong, Taek Jong; Kim, Young Jo; Seong, In Whan; Chae, Jei Keon; Rhew, Jay Young; Chae, In Ho; Cho, Myeong Chan; Bae, Jang Ho; Rha, Seung Woon; Kim, Chong Jim; Choi, Donghoon; Jang, Yang Soo; Yoon, Junghan; Chung, Wook Sung; Cho, Jeong Gwan; Seung, Ki Bae; Park, Seung Jung

    2009-01-01

    Background and Objectives It is thought that patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) have a poor prognosis after an acute myocardial infarction (AMI), but the effect of diabetes on the outcomes of hypertensive patients with AMIs has not been elucidated in the Korean population. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of diabetes on long-term clinical outcomes following AMIs in patients with hypertension. Subjects and Methods Using data from the Korea Acute Myocardial Infarction Registry (November 2005 to December 2006), 2,233 hypertensive patients with AMIs were grouped as follows based on the presence of DM: group I, diabetic hypertension (n=892, 544 men, mean age=66.2±10.9 years); and group II, non-diabetic hypertension (n=1341, 938 men, mean age=63.9±12.8 years). The primary study outcomes included in-hospital death and major adverse cardiac events (MACE; cardiac death, myocardial infarction (MI), repeat percutaneous coronary intervention, and coronary artery bypass surgery) at the 1 year follow-up. Results Hypertensive patients with DM were older and more likely to be women. The diabetic group had lower blood pressure (p<0.001), a lower left ventricular ejection fraction (p<0.001), a more severe degree of heart failure (p<0.001), a longer duration of coronary care unit admission (p<0.001), and a higher incidence of hyperlipidemia (p=0.007). The N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide level (4602.5±8710.6 pg/mL vs. 2320.8±5837.9 pg/mL, p<0.001) was higher and the creatinine clearance (62.4±29.9 mL/min vs. 73.0±40.8 mL/min, p<0.001) was lower in the diabetic group than the non-diabetic group. Coronary angiographic findings revealed more frequent involvement of the left main stem (p=0.002) and multiple vessels (p<0.001) in the diabetic group. The rate of in-hospital death was higher in the diabetic group (p<0.001). During follow-up, the rates of composite MACE at 1 month, 6 months, and 12 months were higher in the diabetic group (p<0

  2. Hypertension Is a Major Contributor to 20-Hydroxyeicosatetraenoic Acid–Mediated Kidney Injury in Diabetic Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Gangadhariah, Mahesha H.; Luther, James M.; Garcia, Victor; Paueksakon, Paisit; Zhang, Ming-Zhi; Hayward, Simon W.; Love, Harold D.; Falck, John R.; Manthati, Vijaya L.; Imig, John D.; Schwartzman, Michal L.; Zent, Roy; Capdevila, Jorge H.

    2015-01-01

    In the kidney, 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (20-HETE) is a primary cytochrome P450 4 (Cyp4)–derived eicosanoid that enhances vasoconstriction of renal vessels and induces hypertension, renal tubular cell hypertrophy, and podocyte apoptosis. Hypertension and podocyte injury contribute to diabetic nephropathy and are strong predictors of disease progression. In this study, we defined the mechanisms whereby 20-HETE affects the progression of diabetic nephropathy. We used Cyp4a14KO male mice that exhibit androgen-sensitive hypertension due to increased Cyp4a12-mediated 20-HETE production. We show that, upon induction of diabetes type 1 via streptozotocin injection, Cyp4a14KO male mice developed worse renal disease than streptozotocin-treated wild-type mice, characterized by increased albuminuria, mesangial expansion, glomerular matrix deposition, and thickness of the glomerular basement membranes. Castration blunted androgen-mediated Cyp4a12 synthesis and 20-HETE production, normalized BP, and ameliorated renal damage in diabetic Cyp4a14KO mice. Notably, treatment with a 20-HETE antagonist or agents that normalized BP without affecting Cyp4a12 expression and 20-HETE biosynthesis also ameliorated diabetes-mediated renal damage and albuminuria in Cyp4a14KO male mice. Taken together, these results suggest that hypertension is the major contributor to 20-HETE–driven diabetes-mediated kidney injury. PMID:25071086

  3. Common drugs for stabilization of renal function in the progression of diabetic nephropathy and their relations with hypertension therapy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuxuan; Wang, Chengcheng; Zhang, Xiuli; Gu, Harvest F; Wu, Liang

    2017-02-14

    Diabetic nephropathy is characterized by hypertension, progressive albuminuria, glomerulosclerosis and declines in glomerular filtration rate leading to end stage renal disease. Although the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy is not fully understood, current treatment of the patients with diabetic nephropathy is mainly based upon the control of hyperglycaemia and management of blood pressures. Several drugs, which are originally developed for hypertension therapy, have been adopted for stabilization of renal function in diabetic nephropathy. In this review, we first discuss the relationships between diabetic nephropathy and hypertension particularly in the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system. We then summarize chemical structures, pharmacological characteristics and clinical studies of the common drugs used for treatment of diabetic nephropathy, while these drugs have effects against hypertension. This review may provide the constructive information for further drug development in diabetic nephropathy.

  4. Neighborhoods, Obesity, and Diabetes — A Randomized Social Experiment

    PubMed Central

    Ludwig, Jens; Sanbonmatsu, Lisa; Gennetian, Lisa; Adam, Emma; Duncan, Greg J.; Katz, Lawrence F.; Kessler, Ronald C.; Kling, Jeffrey R.; Lindau, Stacy Tessler; Whitaker, Robert C.; McDade, Thomas W.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND The question of whether neighborhood environment contributes directly to the development of obesity and diabetes remains unresolved. The study reported on here uses data from a social experiment to assess the association of randomly assigned variation in neighborhood conditions with obesity and diabetes. METHODS From 1994 through 1998, the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) randomly assigned 4498 women with children living in public housing in high-poverty urban census tracts (in which ≥40% of residents had incomes below the federal poverty threshold) to one of three groups: 1788 were assigned to receive housing vouchers, which were redeemable only if they moved to a low-poverty census tract (where <10% of residents were poor), and counseling on moving; 1312 were assigned to receive unrestricted, traditional vouchers, with no special counseling on moving; and 1398 were assigned to a control group that was offered neither of these opportunities. From 2008 through 2010, as part of a long-term follow-up survey, we measured data indicating health outcomes, including height, weight, and level of glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c). RESULTS As part of our long-term survey, we obtained data on body-mass index (BMI, the weight in kilograms divided by the square of the height in meters) for 84.2% of participants and data on glycated hemoglobin level for 71.3% of participants. Response rates were similar across randomized groups. The prevalences of a BMI of 35 or more, a BMI of 40 or more, and a glycated hemoglobin level of 6.5% or more were lower in the group receiving the low-poverty vouchers than in the control group, with an absolute difference of 4.61 percentage points (95% confidence interval [CI], −8.54 to −0.69), 3.38 percentage points (95% CI, −6.39 to −0.36), and 4.31 percentage points (95% CI, −7.82 to −0.80), respectively. The differences between the group receiving traditional vouchers and the control group were not significant

  5. The contribution of FTO and UCP-1 SNPs to extreme obesity, diabetes and cardiovascular risk in Brazilian individuals

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Obesity has become a common human disorder associated with significant morbidity and mortality and adverse effects on quality of life. Sequence variants in two candidate genes, FTO and UCP-1, have been reported to be overrepresented in obese Caucasian population. The association of these genes polymorphisms with the obesity phenotype in a multiethnic group such as the Brazilian population has not been previously reported. Methods To assess the putative contribution of both FTO and UCP-1 to body mass index (BMI) and cardiovascular risk we genotyped SNPs rs9939609 (FTO) and rs6536991, rs22705565 and rs12502572 (UCP-1) from 126 morbidly obese subjects (BMI 42.9 ± 5.6 kg/m2, mean ± SE) and 113 normal-weight ethnically matched controls (BMI 22.6 ± 3.5 kg/m2, mean ± SE). Waist circumference, blood pressure, glucose and serum lipids were also measured. Each sample was also genotyped for 40 biallelic short insertion/deletion polymorphism (indels) for ethnic assignment and to estimate the proportion of European, African and Amerindian biogeographical ancestry in the Brazilian population. Results Cases did not differ from controls in the proportions of genomic ancestry. The FTO SNP rs9939609 and UCP-1 SNP rs6536991 were significantly associated with BMI (p= 0.04 and p<0.0001 respectively). An allele dose dependent tendency was observed for BMI for rs6536991 sample of controls. No other significant associations between any SNP and hypertension, hyperlipidemia and diabetes were noted after correction for BMI and no significant synergistic effect between FTO and UCP-1 SNPs with obesity were noted. There was not an association between rs9939609 (FTO) and rs6536991 (UCP-1) in with maximum weight loss after 1 year in 94 obese patients who underwent bariatric surgery. Conclusion Our data are consistent with FTO rs9939609 and UCP-1 rs6536991 common variants as contributors to obesity in the Brazilian population. PMID:23134754

  6. Validation of diabetes mellitus and hypertension diagnosis in computerized medical records in primary health care

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Computerized Clinical Records, which are incorporated in primary health care practice, have great potential for research. In order to use this information, data quality and reliability must be assessed to prevent compromising the validity of the results. The aim of this study is to validate the diagnosis of hypertension and diabetes mellitus in the computerized clinical records of primary health care, taking the diagnosis criteria established in the most prominently used clinical guidelines as the gold standard against which what measure the sensitivity, specificity, and determine the predictive values. The gold standard for diabetes mellitus was the diagnostic criteria established in 2003 American Diabetes Association Consensus Statement for diabetic subjects. The gold standard for hypertension was the diagnostic criteria established in the Joint National Committee published in 2003. Methods A cross-sectional multicentre validation study of diabetes mellitus and hypertension diagnoses in computerized clinical records of primary health care was carried out. Diagnostic criteria from the most prominently clinical practice guidelines were considered for standard reference. Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values, and global agreement (with kappa index), were calculated. Results were shown overall and stratified by sex and age groups. Results The agreement for diabetes mellitus with the reference standard as determined by the guideline was almost perfect (κ = 0.990), with a sensitivity of 99.53%, a specificity of 99.49%, a positive predictive value of 91.23% and a negative predictive value of 99.98%. Hypertension diagnosis showed substantial agreement with the reference standard as determined by the guideline (κ = 0.778), the sensitivity was 85.22%, the specificity 96.95%, the positive predictive value 85.24%, and the negative predictive value was 96.95%. Sensitivity results were worse in patients who also had diabetes and in

  7. Role of PUFAs, the precursors of endocannabinoids, in human obesity and type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Dain, Alejandro; Repossi, Gaston; Das, Undurti N; Eynard, Aldo Renato

    2010-06-01

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) serve as precursors of the endocannabinoids (ECs) that are bioactive lipids molecules. Recent studies revealed that ECs participate in several physiological and pathological processes including obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Here we review the experimental and clinical aspects of the role of endocannabinoids in obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus and the modification of the endocannabinoids by exogenously administered PUFAs. Based on these evidences, we propose that the endocannabinoid system (ECS) can be modulated by exogenous manipulation of PUFAs that could help in the prevention and management of human diseases such as obesity, metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  8. Neighborhood Social Cohesion and Prevalence of Hypertension and Diabetes in a South Asian Population.

    PubMed

    Lagisetty, Pooja A; Wen, Ming; Choi, Hwajung; Heisler, Michele; Kanaya, Alka M; Kandula, Namratha R

    2016-12-01

    South Asians have a high burden of cardiovascular disease compared to other racial/ethnic groups in the United States. Little has been done to evaluate how neighborhood environments may influence cardiovascular risk factors including hypertension and type 2 diabetes in this immigrant population. We evaluated the association of perceived neighborhood social cohesion with hypertension and type 2 diabetes among 906 South Asian adults who participated in the Mediators of Atherosclerosis in South Asians Living in America Study. Multivariable logistic regression adjusted for demographic, socioeconomic, psychosocial, and physiologic covariates. Subgroup analyses examined whether associations differed by gender. South Asian women living in neighborhoods with high social cohesion had 46 % reduced odds of having hypertension than those living in neighborhoods with low social cohesion (OR 0.54, 95 % CI 0.30-0.99). Future research should determine if leveraging neighborhood social cohesion prevents hypertension in South Asian women.

  9. Earlier Age of Onset of Chronic Hypertension and Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus After a Hypertensive Disorder of Pregnancy or Gestational Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Heida, Karst Y; Franx, Arie; van Rijn, Bas B; Eijkemans, Marinus J C; Boer, Jolanda M A; Verschuren, Monique W M; Oudijk, Martijn A; Bots, Michiel L; van der Schouw, Yvonne T

    2015-12-01

    A prospective cohort study was conducted to assess the impact of a history of hypertensive disorder of pregnancy (HDP) or gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) on the risk and age of onset of hypertension, type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D), and cardiovascular disease (CVD) later in life, independent of hypertension and T2D. Between 1993 and 1997, 22 265 ever-pregnant women were included from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition-NL study, aged 20 to 70 years at baseline. Details on complications of pregnancy and known hypertension were obtained by questionnaire. Blood pressure was measured at enrollment. Participants were followed for the occurrence of CVD events. Data were analyzed using ANCOVA, multivariable logistic regression, and Cox proportional hazard (with HDP and GDM as time-dependent variables for T2D and CVD) models. At enrollment, women with a HDP reported diagnosis of hypertension 7.7 years earlier (95% confidence interval [CI] 6.9-8.5) and women with GDM reported diagnosis of T2D 7.7 years earlier (95% CI 5.8-9.6) than women without pregnancy complications. After adjustment for potential confounders, HDP was associated with presence of hypertension at enrollment (odds ratio 2.12, 95% CI 1.98-2.28) and onset of CVD later in life (hazard ratio 1.21, 95% CI 1.10-1.32). After including the intermediates hypertension and T2D in the model, the risk of CVD later in life decreased (hazard ratio 1.09, 95% CI 1.00-1.20). GDM was associated with an increased risk of developing T2D later in life (hazard ratio 3.68, 95% CI 2.77-4.90), but not with risk of CVD. HDP and GDM have a substantial impact on the risk of CVD and are potentially important indicators for preventive cardiovascular risk management.

  10. Multiple mechanisms involved in diabetes protection by lipopolysaccharide in non-obese diabetic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jun; Cao, Hui; Wang, Hongjie; Yin, Guoxiao; Du, Jiao; Xia, Fei; Lu, Jingli; Xiang, Ming

    2015-06-15

    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) activation has been proposed to be important for islet cell inflammation and eventually β cell loss in the course of type 1 diabetes (T1D) development. However, according to the “hygiene hypothesis”, bacterial endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS), an agonist on TLR4, inhibits T1D progression. Here we investigated possible mechanisms for the protective effect of LPS on T1D development in non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice. We found that LPS administration to NOD mice during the prediabetic state neither prevented nor reversed insulitis, but delayed the onset and decreased the incidence of diabetes, and that a multiple-injection protocol is more effective than a single LPS intervention. Further, LPS administration suppressed spleen T lymphocyte proliferation, increased the generation of CD4{sup +}CD25{sup +}Foxp3{sup +} regulatory T cells (Tregs), reduced the synthesis of strong Th1 proinflammatory cytokines, and downregulated TLR4 and its downstream MyD88-dependent signaling pathway. Most importantly, multiple injections of LPS induced a potential tolerogenic dendritic cell (DC) subset with low TLR4 expression without influencing the DC phenotype. Explanting DCs from repeated LPS-treated NOD mice into NOD/SCID diabetic mice conferred sustained protective effects against the progression of diabetes in the recipients. Overall, these results suggest that multiple mechanisms are involved in the protective effects of LPS against the development of diabetes in NOD diabetic mice. These include Treg induction, down-regulation of TLR4 and its downstream MyD88-dependent signaling pathway, and the emergence of a potential tolerogenic DC subset. - Highlights: • Administration of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) prevented type 1 diabetes in NOD mice. • Downregulating TLR4 level and MyD88-dependent pathway contributed to protection of LPS. • LPS administration also hampered DC maturation and promoted Treg differentiation.

  11. Metabolic and biochemical changes in streptozotocin induced obese-diabetic rats treated with Phyllanthus niruri extract.

    PubMed

    Mediani, Ahmed; Abas, Faridah; Maulidiani, M; Khatib, Alfi; Tan, Chin Ping; Ismail, Intan Safinar; Shaari, Khozirah; Ismail, Amin; Lajis, N H

    2016-09-05

    Herbal medicine has been proven to be an effective therapy offering a variety of benefits, such as moderate reduction in hypoglycemia, in the treatment and prevention of obesity and diabetes. Phyllanthus niruri has been used as a treatment for diabetes mellitus. Herein, the induction of type 2 diabetes in Sprague-Dawley rats was achieved by a low dose of streptozotocin (STZ) (25mg/kgbw). Here, we evaluated the in vivo antidiabetic properties of two concentrations (250 and 500mg/kg bw) of P. niruri via metabolomics approach. The administration of 500mg/kgbw of P. niruri extract caused the metabolic disorders of obese diabetic rats to be improved towards the normal state. The extract also clearly decreased the serum glucose level and improved the lipid profile in obese diabetic rats. The results of this study may contribute towards better understanding the molecular mechanism of this medicinal plant in managing diabetes mellitus.

  12. Effect of maternal diabetes on longevity in offspring of spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Iwase, M; Wada, M; Shinohara, N; Yoshizumi, H; Yoshinari, M; Fujishima, M

    1995-01-01

    We studied the effect of maternal diabetes induced by neonatal streptozotocin treatment on the longevity of the male offspring in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). Maternal diabetes significantly decreased the survival in the offspring as compared with the control (p < 0.01). Mean age at death was 14.9 +/- 0.6 months in the offspring from the diabetic dams and 17.9 +/- 1.1 months in that from the control. The life span was significantly correlated with the birth weight (rs = 0.55, p = 0.009). These findings suggest that a diabetic pregnancy may accelerate an age-related degenerative process of the offspring in SHR.

  13. Anti-Diabetic Activity and Metabolic Changes Induced by Andrographis paniculata Plant Extract in Obese Diabetic Rats.

    PubMed

    Akhtar, Muhammad Tayyab; Bin Mohd Sarib, Mohamad Syakir; Ismail, Intan Safinar; Abas, Faridah; Ismail, Amin; Lajis, Nordin Hj; Shaari, Khozirah

    2016-08-09

    Andrographis paniculata is an annual herb and widely cultivated in Southeast Asian countries for its medicinal use. In recent investigations, A. paniculata was found to be effective against Type 1 diabetes mellitus (Type 1 DM). Here, we used a non-genetic out-bred Sprague-Dawley rat model to test the antidiabetic activity of A. paniculata against Type 2 diabetes mellitus (Type 2 DM). Proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (¹H-NMR) spectroscopy in combination with multivariate data analyses was used to evaluate the A. paniculata and metformin induced metabolic effects on the obese and obese-diabetic (obdb) rat models. Compared to the normal rats, high levels of creatinine, lactate, and allantoin were found in the urine of obese rats, whereas, obese-diabetic rats were marked by high glucose, choline and taurine levels, and low lactate, formate, creatinine, citrate, 2-oxoglutarate, succinate, dimethylamine, acetoacetate, acetate, allantoin and hippurate levels. Treatment of A. paniculata leaf water extract was found to be quite effective in restoring the disturbed metabolic profile of obdb rats back towards normal conditions. Thisstudy shows the anti-diabetic potential of A. paniculata plant extract and strengthens the idea of using this plant against the diabetes. Further classical genetic methods and state of the art molecular techniques could provide insights into the molecular mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of diabetes mellitus and anti-diabetic effects of A. paniculata water extract.

  14. Isotopic test of capillary permeability to albumin in diabetic patients: effects of hypertension, microangiopathy, and duration of diabetes

    SciTech Connect

    Valensi, P.; Attali, J.R.; Behar, A.; Sebaoun, J.

    1987-09-01

    Capillary permeability to albumin (CPA) was studied by performing an isotopic noninvasive test with venous compression on 87 nonselected diabetics with no edema, no cardiac failure, and no peripheral vascular disease. Excessive albumin retention (AR greater than or equal to 8%) ten minutes after removal of the compression was found in 27 patients (31%). The radioactivity disappearance curve was then analyzed using the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT). An abnormal isotopic CPA test was thus found in at least 45 out of the 87 patients. The prevalence of an abnormal test was not different in type 1 and type 2 diabetics. We studied the independent effects of hypertension, presence of specific clinical signs of microangiopathy (retinopathy and/or significant proteinuria), and duration of diabetes. Among diabetics free of specific clinical signs of microangiopathy, the prevalence of an AR greater than or equal to 8% was significantly higher in those with hypertension (11/19) than in those with normal blood pressure (2/28) and in nondiabetic hypertensive patients (0/16). Among normotensive diabetics, the prevalence of an abnormal test was higher, but not significantly, in patients with specific clinical signs of microangiopathy (8/11) than in those free of them (7/18). Seven normotensive diabetics without specific clinical signs of microangiopathy had an abnormal test; five of them had had diabetes for more than five years. The prevalence of diabetes of more than five years duration was significantly higher in patients with an abnormal test (35/45) than in normotensive diabetics free of specific clinical signs of microangiopathy with a normal test (4/11).

  15. Foods, obesity, and diabetes-are all calories created equal?

    PubMed

    Mozaffarian, Dariush

    2017-01-01

    Diet has become one of the top risk factors for poor health. The incidence of cardiometabolic disease in the United Sates, in Mexico, and in most countries is driven fundamentally by changes in diet quality. Weight gain has been typically framed as a problem of excess caloric intake, but, as reviewed in this paper, subtle changes in the quality of diet are associated with long-term weight gain. In order to successfully address obesity and diabetes, researchers and policy makers have to better understand how weight gain in the long term is modulated and to change the focus of research and public policy from one based on counting calories to one based on diet quality and its determinants at various levels.

  16. Preventive Effect of Pine Bark Extract (Flavangenol) on Metabolic Disease in Western Diet-Loaded Tsumura Suzuki Obese Diabetes Mice

    PubMed Central

    Shimada, Tsutomu; Kosugi, Mitsutaka; Tokuhara, Daisuke; Tsubata, Masahito; Kamiya, Tomoyasu; Sameshima, Mayu; Nagamine, Rika; Takagaki, Kinya; Miyamoto, Ken-ichi; Aburada, Masaki

    2011-01-01

    It is known that the metabolic syndrome has a multi-factorial basis involving both genetic and environmental risk factors. In this study, Tsumura Suzuki Obese Diabetes (TSOD) mice, a mouse model of multi-factorial, hereditary, obese type II diabetes, were given a Western diet (WTD) as an environmental factor to prepare a disease model (TSOD-WTD) and to investigate the preventive effects of Pine bark extract (Flavangenol) against obesity and various features of metabolic disease appearing in this animal model. In contrast to control Tsumura Suzuki Non-obesity (TSNO) mice, TSOD mice were obese and suffered from other metabolic complications. WTD-fed TSOD mice developed additional features such as hyperinsulinemia, abnormal glucose/lipid metabolism and fatty liver. The treatment with Flavangenol had a suppressive effect on increase in body weight and accumulation of visceral and subcutaneous fat, and also showed preventive effects on symptoms related to insulin resistance, abnormal glucose/lipid metabolism and hypertension. Flavangenol also increased the plasma concentration of adiponectin and decreased the plasma concentration of TNF-α. We next investigated the effect of Flavangenol on absorption of meal-derived lipids. Flavangenol suppressed absorption of neutral fat in an olive-oil-loading test (in vivo) and showed an inhibitory effect on pancreatic lipase (in vitro). The above results suggest that Flavangenol has a preventive effect on severe metabolic disease due to multiple causes that involve both genetic and environmental risk factors. The mechanism of action might involve a partial suppressive effect of meal-derived lipids on absorption. PMID:21607011

  17. Impact of obesity and binge eating disorder on patients with idiopathic intracranial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Raggi, Alberto; Curone, Marcella; Bianchi Marzoli, Stefania; Chiapparini, Luisa; Ciasca, Paola; Ciceri, Elisa Fm; Erbetta, Alessandra; Faragò, Giuseppe; Leonardi, Matilde; D'Amico, Domenico

    2017-03-01

    Background Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) is associated with obesity, and obesity is associated with binge eating disorder (BED). The aim of this paper is to address the presence and impact of BED in patients undergoing an IIH diagnostic protocol. Methods This was a cross-sectional study. Consecutive patients suspected of IIH underwent neurological, neuro-ophthalmologic and psychological examinations, neuroimaging studies and intracranial pressure (ICP) measurements through lumbar puncture in the recumbent position. IIH diagnosis was based on International Classification of Headache Disorders, 2nd Edition criteria; BED diagnosis was based on Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 5th Edition criteria. The presence of oligoclonal bands (OCBs) in the cerebrospinal fluid was also assessed. Results Forty-five patients were enrolled: 33 were diagnosed with IIH and five of them (15%) were obese with BED. Compared to non-obese patients, those who were obese, and particularly those who were obese with BED, were more likely to have an IIH diagnosis (χ(2 )= 14.3; p = 0.001), ICP > 200 mmH2O (χ(2 )= 12.7; p = 0.002) and history of abuse or neglect (χ(2 )= 11.2; p = 0.004). No association with OCBs was found. Conclusions We reported for the first time the presence of BED among patients with IIH and showed that BED is associated to IIH, ICP and history of abuse or neglect.

  18. Obesity and insulin resistance in resistant hypertension: implications for the kidney.

    PubMed

    Rao, Akhilesh; Pandya, Vishwam; Whaley-Connell, Adam

    2015-05-01

    There is recognition that the obesity epidemic contributes substantially to the increasing incidence of CKD and resistant hypertension (HTN). The mechanisms by which obesity promotes resistance are an area of active interest and intense investigation. It is thought that increases in visceral adiposity lead to a proinflammatory, pro-oxidative milieu that promote resistance to the metabolic actions of insulin. This resistance to insulin at the level of skeletal muscle tissue impairs glucose disposal/utilization through actions on the endothelium that include vascular rarefaction, reductions in vascular relaxation, and vascular remodeling. Insulin resistance derived from increased adipose tissue and obesity has system-wide implications for other tissue beds such as the kidney that affects blood pressure regulation. The additional autocrine and paracrine activities of adipose tissue contribute to inappropriate activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system and the sympathetic nervous system that promote kidney microvascular remodeling, stiffness, and sodium (Na(+)) retention that in turn promote HTN and in the CKD patient, resistance. In this review, we will summarize the important mechanisms that link obesity to CKD as they relate to resistant HTN.

  19. Hypertension, Diabetes Type II, and Their Association: Role of Arterial Stiffness.

    PubMed

    Smulyan, Harold; Lieber, Ari; Safar, Michel E

    2016-01-01

    In patients with both hypertension and type II diabetes, the systolic blood pressure (SBP) increases linearly with age, while that of diastolic blood pressure (DBP) declines curvilinearly as early as age 45, all suggesting the development of increased arterial stiffness. Increased stiffness is an important, independent, and significant risk predictor in subjects with hypertension and diabetes. In patients with both diseases, stiffness assessed at the same mean arterial pressure (MAP) was significantly higher in diabetic patients. Arterial stiffness is related to age, heart rate (HR), and MAP, but in diabetic patients, it also related to diabetes duration and insulin treatment (IT). In the metabolic syndrome (MetSyn), diabetes also acts on the small arteries through capillary rarefaction to reduce the effective length of the arterial tree, increases the reflected pulse wave and thus the pulse pressure (PP). These studies indicate that diabetes and hypertension additively contribute to increased pulsatility and suggest that any means to reduce stiffness would be beneficial in these conditions.

  20. The non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse as a model of human type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Kachapati, Kritika; Adams, David; Bednar, Kyle; Ridgway, William M

    2012-01-01

    The non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse spontaneously develops type 1 diabetes (T1D) and has thus served as a model for understanding the genetic and immunological basis, and treatment, of T1D. Since its initial description in 1980, however, the field has matured and recognized that prevention of diabetes in NOD mice (i.e., preventing the disease from occurring by an intervention prior to frank diabetes) is relatively easy to achieve and does not correlate well with curing the disease (after the onset of frank hyperglycemia). Hundreds of papers have described the prevention of diabetes in NOD mice but only a handful have described its actual reversal. The paradoxical conclusion is that preventing the disease in NOD mice does not necessarily tell us what caused the disease nor how to reverse it. The NOD mouse model is therefore best used now, with respect to human disease, as a way to understand the genetic and immunologic causes of and as a model for trying to reverse disease once hyperglycemia occurs. We describe how genetic approaches to identifying causative gene variants can be adapted to identify novel therapeutic agents for reversing new-onset T1D.

  1. Liraglutide for Type 2 diabetes and obesity: a 2015 update.

    PubMed

    Iepsen, Eva Winning; Torekov, Signe Sørensen; Holst, Jens Juul

    2015-01-01

    Subcutaneous liraglutide (Victoza(®), Novo Nordisk) was approved for the treatment of Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in Europe in 2009 and in the USA in 2010. In December 2014, liraglutide 3.0 mg was approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and in March 2015 by the European Medicines Agency (EMA) for the treatment of chronic weight management under the brand name Saxenda(®) Novo Nordisk. Liraglutide causes a glucose-dependent increase in insulin secretion, decreases glucagon secretion and promotes weight loss by inhibiting appetite. Liraglutide probably induces satiety through activation of different areas in the hind brain and possibly by preserving free leptin levels. Recently, liraglutide has been suggested to protect against prediabetes and seems to prevent bone loss by increasing bone formation following diet-induced weight loss in obesity. This article not only covers the major clinical trials evaluating the effects of liraglutide in obesity and T2DM but also provides novel insights into the pharmacological mechanisms of liraglutide.

  2. Chlorinated persistent organic pollutants, obesity, and type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Duk-Hee; Porta, Miquel; Jacobs, David R; Vandenberg, Laura N

    2014-08-01

    Persistent organic pollutants (POPs) are lipophilic compounds that travel with lipids and accumulate mainly in adipose tissue. Recent human evidence links low-dose POPs to an increased risk of type 2 diabetes (T2D). Because humans are contaminated by POP mixtures and POPs possibly have nonmonotonic dose-response relations with T2D, critical methodological issues arise in evaluating human findings. This review summarizes epidemiological results on chlorinated POPs and T2D, and relevant experimental evidence. It also discusses how features of POPs can affect inferences in humans. The evidence as a whole suggests that, rather than a few individual POPs, background exposure to POP mixtures-including organochlorine pesticides and polychlorinated biphenyls-can increase T2D risk in humans. Inconsistent statistical significance for individual POPs may arise due to distributional differences in POP mixtures among populations. Differences in the observed shape of the dose-response curves among human studies may reflect an inverted U-shaped association secondary to mitochondrial dysfunction or endocrine disruption. Finally, we examine the relationship between POPs and obesity. There is evidence in animal studies that low-dose POP mixtures are obesogenic. However, relationships between POPs and obesity in humans have been inconsistent. Adipose tissue plays a dual role of promoting T2D and providing a relatively safe place to store POPs. Large prospective studies with serial measurements of a broad range of POPs, adiposity, and clinically relevant biomarkers are needed to disentangle the interrelationships among POPs, obesity, and the development of T2D. Also needed are laboratory experiments that more closely mimic real-world POP doses, mixtures, and exposure duration in humans.

  3. Evaluation of oxidative stress and antioxidant status in diabetic and hypertensive women during labor.

    PubMed

    Al-Shebly, Mashael M; Mansour, Mahmoud A

    2012-01-01

    Pregnancy in insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus is associated with a greater incidence of fetal abnormality. Animal studies suggested that increased free-radical production and antioxidant depletion may contribute to this risk. The objective of this work was to evaluate oxidative stress and antioxidant capacity in hypertensive, diabetics, and healthy control women during labor. Simultaneous determination of antioxidant enzymes activities, namely glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), glutathione reductase (GSH-red), superoxide dismutase (SOD), total antioxidant, and lipid peroxides measured as thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS) levels, were carried out in maternal plasma during labor. Plasma GSH-Px activity was found to be significantly increased as it doubled in hypertensive, and diabetic women when compared with healthy control women (P < 0.05). In contrast, plasma SOD activity was significantly decreased in both groups when compared to the control group (P < 0.05). No significant differences were detected in GSH-Red activity between diabetic, hypertensive and control groups. Alterations in antioxidant enzyme activities were accompanied by a significant increase in the levels of plasma lipid peroxides in hypertensive and diabetic women during labor. Plasma levels of total antioxidants were significantly increased in diabetic women as compared with the control group. Based on our results, it may be concluded that enhanced generation of oxidative stress causes alteration of antioxidant capacity in diabetic and hypertensive women during labor. Alterations in antioxidant and prooxidant components may result in various complications including peroxidation of vital body molecules which may be regarded as an increased risk factor for pregnant women as well as the fetus.

  4. Prevalence of diabetes and unrecognized diabetes in hypertensive patients aged 40 to 79 years in southwest China

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ya; Hu, Rong; Ouyang, Ling-yun; Liu, Jian-xiong; Li, Xiu-jun; Yi, Yan-jing; Wang, Tzung-Dau; Zhao, Shui-ping

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to assess the prevalence of diabetes and unrecognized diabetes in hypertensive patients aged 40 to 79 years in Southwest China. From September 2013 to March 2014, a cross-sectional survey was conducted in 4021 hypertensive patients aged 40 to 79 years living in Chengdu and Chongqing, China. Fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and 2h plasma glucose (2-hPG) in an oral glucose-tolerance test (OGTT) were used for assessments. Whether the patients previously had diabetes (DM) was determined by their own reports. The survey was carried out by the same questionnaire for all respondents. DM prevalence was 32.0% in hypertensive patients aged 40 to 79 years in Southwest China, with the rates of 29.6% and 33.5% in men and women, respectively (P<0.001). DM prevalence increased with age age and body-mass index. DM prevalence rates were 16.9%, 24.7%, 38.2% and 41.9% in hypertensive patients aged 40–49, 50–59, 60–69 and over 70, respectively. DM prevalence were 30.6%, 27.9%, 37.1%, and 37.4%, for BMI<18.5, 18.5–24.9, 25.0–29.9, and ≥30, respectively. Prevalence of unrecognized DM were 20.8% in hypertensive patients aged 40 to 79 years in Southwest China. Using only fasting blood glucose testing without OGTT would have resulted in 65.0% of missed DM diagnosis in these newly diagnosed patients. The prevalence of DM and unrecognized DM were high in hypertensive patients aged 40 to 79 years in Southwest China.These findings indicate that hypertensive patients aged 40 to 79 years should regularly submit to community-based OGTT screening for timely DM diagnosis. PMID:28192474

  5. The Hospitalization Costs of Diabetes and Hypertension Complications in Zimbabwe: Estimations and Correlations

    PubMed Central

    Mutowo, Mutsa P.; Lorgelly, Paula K.; Laxy, Michael; Mangwiro, John C.; Owen, Alice J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Treating complications associated with diabetes and hypertension imposes significant costs on health care systems. This study estimated the hospitalization costs for inpatients in a public hospital in Zimbabwe. Methods. The study was retrospective and utilized secondary data from medical records. Total hospitalization costs were estimated using generalized linear models. Results. The median cost and interquartile range (IQR) for patients with diabetes, $994 (385–1553) mean $1319 (95% CI: 981–1657), was higher than patients with hypertension, $759 (494–1147) mean $914 (95% CI: 825–1003). Female patients aged below 65 years with diabetes had the highest estimated mean costs ($1467 (95% CI: 1177–1828)). Wound care had the highest estimated mean cost of all procedures, $2884 (95% CI: 2004–4149) for patients with diabetes and $2239 (95% CI: 1589–3156) for patients with hypertension. Age below 65 years, medical procedures (amputation, wound care, dialysis, and physiotherapy), the presence of two or more comorbidities, and being prescribed two or more drugs were associated with significantly higher hospitalization costs. Conclusion. Our estimated costs could be used to evaluate and improve current inpatient treatment and management of patients with diabetes and hypertension and determine the most cost-effective interventions to prevent complications and comorbidities. PMID:27403444

  6. Gut hormones and endothelial dysfunction in patients with obesity and diabetes.

    PubMed

    Iantorno, M; Campia, U; Di Daniele, N; Nistico, S; Forleo, G B; Cardillo, C; Tesauro, M

    2014-01-01

    Overweight and obesity are the fifth leading risk for global deaths and its prevalence has doubled since 1980. At least 2.8 million adults, worldwide, die each year as a result of being overweight or obese. The deleterious effects of obesity are tightly related to diabetes, as they are often clinically present in combination to confer increased cardiovascular mortality. Thus, patients with diabetes and obesity are known to develop accelerated atherosclerosis characterized by a dysfunctional endothelium and decreased nitric oxide bioavailability. Recent clinical studies support, indeed, the use of incretin-based antidiabetic therapies for vascular protection. Thus, attention has been focusing on gut hormones and their role, not only in the regulation of appetite but also in vascular health. Intervention directed at modulating these molecules has the potential to decrease mortality of patients with diabetes and obesity. This review will cover part of the ongoing research to understand the role of gut hormones on endothelial function and vascular health.

  7. Exotic Fruits as Therapeutic Complements for Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Devalaraja, Samir; Jain, Shalini; Yadav, Hariom

    2011-01-01

    The prevalence and severity of obesity, type 2-diabetes, and the resultant metabolic syndrome are rapidly increasing. As successful preventive and therapeutic strategies for these life-threatening health ailments often come with adverse side effects, nutritional elements are widely used in many countries as preventive therapies to prevent or manage metabolic syndrome. Fruits are important dietary components, and contain various bioactive constituents. Many of these constituents have been proven to be useful to manage and treat various chronic diseases such as diabetes, obesity, cancer and cardiovascular diseases. Although exotic fruits are understudied throughout the world due to their limited regional presence, many studies reveal their potent ability to ameliorate metabolic derangements and the resultant conditions i.e. diabetes and obesity. The aim of this article is to review the role of exotic fruits and their constituents in the regulation of metabolic functions, which can beneficially alter diabetes and obesity pathophysiology. PMID:21857774

  8. Leptin and Its Relation to Obesity and Insulin in the SHR/N-corpulent Rat, A Model of Type II Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Bhathena, Sam J.; Hansen, Carl T.

    2001-01-01

    The spontaneously hypertensive/NIH-corpulent (SHR/N-cp) rat is a genetic animal model that exhibits obesity, metabolic features of hyperinsulinemia, hyperglycemia, and hyperlipidemia, which are characteristic of type II diabetes and mild hypertension. To determine the role of leptin, the protein product of the ob gene, in the development of obesity and diabetes in this model, we measured steady-state circulating levels of leptin in obese and lean SHR/N-cp rats and examined the relation between plasma leptin levels and metabolic variables at the stage of established obesity in these animals. Mean fasting plasma leptin concentration was 8-fold higher in obese than in lean rats (p<0.01). This was associated with a 6-fold elevation in plasma insulin in the obese group. Fasting levels of plasma glucose, cholesterol, and triglyceride were all significantly higher in obese rats than in lean controls. Spearman correlation analysis showed a significant positive correlation between plasma leptin concentration and body weight among the animals (r=0.73, p<0.01). Similarly, plasma insulin concentration was significantly correlated with BW in all animals (r=0.54, p<0.05). There was also a significant positive.correlation between plasma leptin and plasma insulin in the entire group (r=0.70, p<0.01). However, this relationship was significant only for lean rats but not for obese rats (r=0.59, p<0.05 for lean rats, and r=0.23, p=NS, for obese rats). Plasma leptin also correlated positively with fasting plasma glucose (r=0.75, p<0.05), total cholesterol (r=0.63, p<0.05), and triglyceride (r=0.67, p <0.05). The marked elevation of plasma leptin in obese SHR/N-cp rats suggests that obesity in this animal model is related to up-regulation of the ob gene. Circulating leptin appears to be one of the best biological markers of obesity and that hyperleptinemia is closely associated with several metabolic risk factors related to insulin resistance in the diabesity syndrome. PMID:12369710

  9. Considerations on pig models for appetite, metabolic syndrome and obese type 2 diabetes: From food intake to metabolic disease.

    PubMed

    Koopmans, Sietse Jan; Schuurman, Teun

    2015-07-15

    (Mini)pigs have proven to be a valuable animal model in nutritional, metabolic and cardiovascular research and in some other biomedical research areas (toxicology, neurobiology). The large resemblance of (neuro)anatomy, the gastro-intestinal tract, body size, body composition, and the omnivorous food choice and appetite of the pig are additional reasons to select this large animal species for (preclinical) nutritional and pharmacological studies. Both humans and pigs are prone to the development of obesity and related cardiovascular diseases such as hypertension and atherosclerosis. Bad cholesterol (LDL) is high and good cholesterol (HDL) is low in pigs, like in humans. Disease-relevant pig models fill the gap between rodent models and primate species including humans. Diet-induced obese pigs show a phenotype related to the metabolic syndrome including high amounts of visceral fat, fatty organs, insulin resistance and high blood pressure. However, overt hyperglycaemia does not develop within 6 months after initiation of high sugar-fat feeding. Therefore, to accelerate the induction of obese type 2 diabetes, obese pigs can be titrated with streptozotocin, a chemical agent which selectively damages the insulin-producing pancreatic beta-cells. However, insulin is required to maintain obesity. With proper titration of streptozotocin, insulin secretion can be restrained at such a level that hyperglycaemia will be induced but lipolysis is still inhibited due to the fact that inhibition of lipolysis is more sensitive to insulin compared to stimulation of glucose uptake. This strategy may lead to a stable hyperglycaemic, non-ketotic obese pig model which remains anabolic with time without the necessity of exogenous insulin treatment.

  10. Association of Oxidative Stress and Obesity with Insulin Resistance in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Das, P; Biswas, S; Mukherjee, S; Bandyopadhyay, S K

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress occurs due to delicate imbalance between pro-oxidant and anti oxidant forces in our system. It has been found to be associated with many morbidities but its association with obesity and insulin resistance is still controversial. Here in our study we examined 167 patients of recent onset type 2 diabetes mellitus and 60 age sex matched non-diabetic control. Body Mass Index (BMI), abdominal circumference, fasting blood glucose, serum insulin and plasma Malondealdehyde (MDA, marker for oxidative stress) were measured in them. On the basis of BMI, subjects were divided into obese (BMI≥25) and non obese (BMI<25) groups. Insulin resistance scores were calculated by Homeostatic Model Assessment-Insulin Resistance (HOMA-IR) method. Physical parameters (BMI, abdominal circumference) as well as levels of insulin and MDA were found to be significantly higher in subjects with diabetes than their non diabetic controls. The said parameters also showed significant difference in obese and non-obese sub groups. Insulin resistance score showed positive correlation with BMI, abdominal circumference, and plasma MDA, strength of association being highest with abdominal circumference. Plasma MDA was found to have positive correlation with physical parameters. Study concludes that, obesity mainly central type may predispose to insulin resistance and oxidative stress may be a crucial factor in its pathogenesis. Thus, oxidative stress may be the connecting link between obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus, two on going global epidemics.

  11. Risk factors of hypertensive pregnancies in women with diabetes and the influence on their future life.

    PubMed

    Gordin, Daniel; Forsblom, Carol; Groop, Per-Henrik; Teramo, Kari; Kaaja, Risto

    2014-11-01

    Diabetic women carry a 2-4 times increased risk of a hypertensive pregnancy compared to non-diabetic people. This risk is related to presence of diabetic nephropathy, but also poor glycaemic control. Efforts to improve glycaemic control have decreased perinatal morbidity and mortality related to diabetic nephropathy. Despite good glycaemic control, overt nephropathy is associated with a variety of pregnancy complications, such as fetal growth restriction and pre-eclampsia. General population studies show that women with a history of pre-eclampsia are more prone to develop cardiovascular disease later in life than women with a history of normotensive pregnancy. Furthermore, recent data regarding the long-term effects of hypertensive pregnancies on late diabetic complications indicate that these women should be followed and treatment should be started early. In this review we summarize data on risk factors and long-term effects of hypertensive pregnancies on late diabetic complications that may be of clinical relevance in the prevention of these complications.

  12. A Metabolomic Approach to Understanding the Metabolic Link between Obesity and Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Park, Seokjae; Sadanala, Krishna Chaitanya; Kim, Eun-Kyoung

    2015-01-01

    Obesity and diabetes arise from an intricate interplay between both genetic and environmental factors. It is well recognized that obesity plays an important role in the development of insulin resistance and diabetes. Yet, the exact mechanism of the connection between obesity and diabetes is still not completely understood. Metabolomics is an analytical approach that aims to detect and quantify small metabolites. Recently, there has been an increased interest in the application of metabolomics to the identification of disease biomarkers, with a number of well-known biomarkers identified. Metabolomics is a potent approach to unravel the intricate relationships between metabolism, obesity and progression to diabetes and, at the same time, has potential as a clinical tool for risk evaluation and monitoring of disease. Moreover, metabolomics applications have revealed alterations in the levels of metabolites related to obesity-associated diabetes. This review focuses on the part that metabolomics has played in elucidating the roles of metabolites in the regulation of systemic metabolism relevant to obesity and diabetes. It also explains the possible metabolic relation and association between the two diseases. The metabolites with altered profiles in individual disorders and those that are specifically and similarly altered in both disorders are classified, categorized and summarized. PMID:26072981

  13. Common Variations in Perilipin Gene, Central Obesity, and Risk of Type 2 diabetes in US Women

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objective: The variations in perilipin gene (PLIN) were previously associated with obesity and insulin sensitivity. We examined whether PLIN variability was associated with diabetes risk and whether obesity status modified such associations. Research Methods and Procedures: We conducted a nested cas...

  14. Genetic variants in IRS2 may contribute to obesity and diabetes familial risk in Hispanic children

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    IRS2 is a key regulator of glucose homeostasis and an obesity candidate gene, however, its role in children’s susceptibility to obesity and diabetes risk is unknown. Our specific aim was to identify genetic variants explaining a statistically significant quantitative trait locus on chromosome 13q fo...

  15. Alloxan diabetes in spontaneously hypertensive rats: gravimetric, metabolic and histopathological alterations.

    PubMed Central

    Iams, S. G.; Wexler, B. C.

    1977-01-01

    In order to investigate the combined effects of diabetes and hypertension on the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease, adult male and female SHR rats which develop hypertension spontaneously were given a single, 10 mg or 15 mg/100 g body wt. injection of alloxan s.c. to induce moderate or severe diabetes. Insulin was deliberately withheld. Animals were examined by autopsy daily for 7 days post-alloxan and after 4 and 8 weeks. Mortality was high--only 52% of the males survived as against 80% of the females. Most deaths occurred on Day 5 and were associated with adrenal haemorrhage and hyperplasia, thymus galnd involution, fatty liver and marked hypotension despite elevated aldosterone levels. During the first week, corticosterone levels increased significantly in the male; in females they showed little change. After 4 weeks, the severly diabetic animals became emaciated and moribund; corticosterone and aldosterone levels fell to very low levels despite adrenal hyperplasia. The beta cells of the moderately diabetic animals eventually lost their ability to secrete insulin and these animals too became cachetic and moribund with concomitant elevation of lipid, glucose and BUN levels, as well as myocardial infarction, fatty liver, and generalized hyalin arteriolo-, arterio-, and nephrosclerosis. It is suggested that the combined hormonal and metabolic alterations of diabetes and hypertension reinforced one another in these spontaneously hypertensive rats, leading to intense stimulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal system, the exacerbation of those cardiovascular degenerative changes known to be associated with uncontrolled diabetes or hypertension, eventual impaired adrenocortical steroidogenesis, hypotension and death. Images Fig. 9 Fig. 10 Fig. 11 Fig. 12 Fig. 13 Fig. 14 Fig. 15 PMID:861167

  16. Bariatric surgery and diabetes.

    PubMed

    Collier, Andrew

    2012-12-01

    Obesity is a relatively new and serious world-wide epidemic. Obesity is a stronger predictor in mortality than either poverty or smoking, and obesity is also now more prevalent than malnutrition. The prevalence of obesity continues to increase, ironically, the rate of increase of obesity is highest amongst the morbidly obesity. Obesity is the result of many factors resulting in concert, including poor dietary habits, reduced physical activity and genetic predisposition. With the rapid increase in obesity there has been a pronounced increase in obesity-related metabolic disorders including type 2 diabetes, hyperlipidemia, hypertension and many others. These co-morbidities are responsible for more than 2.5 million deaths, worldwide. The loss of life expectancy due to obesity is profound. In comparison to a normal weight individual Caucasian, a 25-year-old morbidly obese man has a 22% reduction in the expected remaining life span, representing an approximate loss of 12 years of life.

  17. Correlation between the levels of circulating adhesion molecules and atherosclerosis in hypertensive type-2 diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Rubio-Guerra, Alberto Francisco; Vargas-Robles, Hilda; Serrano, Alberto Maceda; Vargas-Ayala, German; Rodriguez-Lopez, Leticia; Escalante-Acosta, Bruno Alfonso

    2010-01-01

    Endothelial dysfunction is a common feature in type-2 diabetic patients and in hypertension, and is associated with inflammation, increased levels of circulating soluble adhesion molecules, and atherosclerosis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between the levels of circulating soluble adhesion molecules and the degree of atherosclerosis in hypertensive type-2 diabetic patients. We studied 30 hypertensive type-2 diabetic patients in whom VCAM-1, ICAM-1, and E-selectin were measured by ELISA. Additionally, the intimal-medial thickness of both the common and internal carotid arteries was measured (B-mode ultrasound). The levels of circulating adhesion molecules and maximal carotid artery intimal-medial thicknesses were correlated using the Spearman correlation coefficient test. Statistical analysis was performed with ANOVA. We found significant correlations between ICAM-1 (r = 0.5) levels and maximal carotid artery intimal-medial thickness these patients. No correlation was observed with E-selectin and VCAM-1. Our results suggest that ICAM-1 is associated and correlated with the degree of atherosclerosis in type-2 diabetic hypertensive patients.

  18. Cardiac pathology in the hypertensive diabetic rat. Biventricular damage with right ventricular predominance.

    PubMed Central

    Fein, F. S.; Cho, S.; Zola, B. E.; Miller, B.; Factor, S. M.

    1989-01-01

    The hypertensive-diabetic rat is a new small animal model of cardiomyopathy characterized by ventricular damage. To determine the extent of pathology in this model, quantitation of light microscopic changes in hearts from 15 hypertensive-diabetic rats and 15 age-matched controls was performed. The fraction of myocardium involved by interstitial fibrosis, myocyte necrosis, replacement fibrosis, vascular sclerosis and perivascular fibrosis was computed separately for right and left ventricles. Spontaneously dying as well as deliberately killed hypertensive-diabetic rats were studied. Spontaneously dying animals had higher systolic blood pressures compared with rats killed deliberately. Body weights were lower and lung weights higher in the former group. Left and right ventricular necrosis and fibrosis were increased in spontaneously dying compared with deliberately killed rats. The degree of right ventricular necrosis and fibrosis paralleled that in the left ventricle, but was, unexpectedly, several times greater in magnitude. Thus, quantitative histology in the hypertensive-diabetic rat reveals more cardiac necrosis and fibrosis, in either ventricle, from spontaneously dying animals compared with deliberately killed rats. This damage, coupled with major functional alterations in the viable myocardium, may lead to congestive heart failure or arrhythmia. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:2719080

  19. Multimorbidity and Persistent Depression among Veterans with Diabetes, Heart Disease, and Hypertension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Findley, Patricia; Shen, Chan; Sambamoorthi, Usha

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the association between multimorbidity and persistent depression among cohorts of veterans with diabetes, heart disease, or hypertension. The retrospective longitudinal analysis used national administrative data on around 1.38 million Veteran Health Administration clinic users merged with Medicare claims data.…

  20. Clinical and biochemical effects of a 3-week program of diet combined with spa therapy in obese and diabetic patients: a pilot open study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fioravanti, Antonella; Adamczyk, Przemysław; Pascarelli, Nicola Antonio; Giannitti, Chiara; Urso, Renato; Tołodziecki, Michał; Ponikowska, Irena

    2015-07-01

    Obesity is a major risk factor for arterial hypertension, coronary artery disease, dyslipidemias, and type 2 diabetes. Spa therapy has long been used for treating obesity and its comorbidities. Enlargement of adipose tissue has been linked to a dysregulation of adipokine secretion and adipose tissue inflammation. Adipokines are currently investigated as potential drug targets in these conditions. Our primary aim was to assess the clinical efficacy of a 3-week program of diet combined with spa therapy in obese patients with and without type 2 diabetes. The secondary aim was to examine whether this combined program influences the response of serum levels of leptin, adiponectin, visfatin, and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein. Fifty obese males were enrolled and 21 of these featured a type 2 diabetes. During the 3-week period of the study, the patients were on a 1,000-kcal diet and were involved in mineral bath and total body's mud-pack applications (15 procedures). Patients were assessed at baseline and at the end of the therapy for clinical and biochemical parameters (total cholesterol, triglycerides, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, glycemia, and adipokines). We showed that a 3-week program of spa therapy in obese patients induced significant decrease of body weight, body mass index, triglycerides, total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, glycemia, and serum levels of leptin and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein. So, a cycle of mud-bath therapy associated with a controlled diet may be a promising treatment for obesity and type 2 diabetes decreasing body weight and many risk factors for atherosclerosis and metabolic syndrome.

  1. Guidelines updates in the treatment of obesity or metabolic syndrome and hypertension.

    PubMed

    Cerezo, César; Segura, Julian; Praga, Manuel; Ruilope, Luis M

    2013-06-01

    Obesity and overweight are nowadays very prevalent worldwide. They are known to be linked with an increased risk of developing cardiovascular comorbidities and mortality. Abdominal obesity is frequently associated with a collection of metabolic disorders that include elevated blood pressure, characteristic lipid abnormalities (low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and high triglycerides) and increased fasting glucose, with an underlying situation of insulin resistance, which has been defined as metabolic syndrome, conferring a high cardiovascular risk profile to these subjects. A multidisciplinary approach is required, including lifestyle changes and pharmacological and surgical approaches. Intensive management of all the risk factors of the metabolic syndrome is also needed to reduce body weight and waist circumference, lessen insulin resistance and avoid the development of new-onset diabetes and cardiovascular disease associated with this entity. This article will review the recently published literature and guideline updates on this topic, although it is not yet included in the highlights.

  2. Hypovitaminosis D and nocturnal hypertension in obese children: an interesting link.

    PubMed

    Banzato, C; Maffeis, C; Maines, E; Cavarzere, P; Gaudino, R; Fava, C; Minuz, P; Boner, A; Antoniazzi, F

    2014-06-01

    In adults, low levels of vitamin D are associated with hypertension. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between 24-h blood pressure (BP) patterns and vitamin D levels in obese children. We recorded anthropometric parameters, took blood samples for 25-hydroxivitamin D measurements and monitored ambulatory BP (ABP) in 32 obese children (male/female: 21/11, age 7-16 years). Subjects in the lower tertiles had higher homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance, nighttime systolic and diastolic ABP, nighttime systolic and diastolic ABP load, 24-h ABP index and nighttime systolic and diastolic ABP index than those in the higher tertile. Vitamin D correlated negatively with 24-h and nighttime systolic ABP, 24-h systolic ABP load, nighttime systolic and diastolic ABP load, 24-h systolic ABP index and nighttime systolic ABP index. The percentage of subjects with pathological 24-h systolic BP (SBP) load, nighttime SBP load, nighttime diastolic BP (DBP) load, nighttime SBP index and nighttime DBP index increased progressively as the vitamin deficiency categories increased (χ(2)=10.26, P<0.05; χ(2)=16.34, P<0.01; χ(2)=10.23, P<0.05; χ(2)=10.38 and χ(2)=10.06, P <0.01). Low levels of vitamin D in obese children were associated with a higher BP burden, especially at night.

  3. Socioeconomic Gradient in Childhood Obesity and Hypertension: A Multilevel Population-Based Study in a Chinese Community

    PubMed Central

    Ip, Patrick; Ho, Frederick Ka Wing; So, Hung-Kwan; Chan, Dorothy Fung-ying; Ho, Matthew; Tso, Winnie; Nelson, E. Anthony S.

    2016-01-01

    Background This study aims to assess evidence for any socioeconomic gradients in childhood obesity and hypertension in a population-representative sample in Hong Kong, China. Methods The data of a stratified random sampled growth survey collected in 2005–2006 was matched with a population by-census. Obesity was defined using the International Obesity Task Force standard and hypertension was defined using the Hong Kong norm table. Family socioeconomic status (SES) was measured by maternal education level. Neighbourhood SES was measured by median household income of the neighbourhood. Multilevel Poisson regression models with robust standard error were used to test the association. Body mass indices of children’s parents were included as potential confounders. Intra-school/neighbourhood correlations were adjusted using random factors. Results Totally 14842 children (age 6–19 years) included in the analysis, in which 16.6% of them were overweight or obese. Children whose mother only completed secondary school or below had higher risk of childhood obesity (RR 1.41, 95% CI 1.13–1.76, p = 0.003) and hypertension (RR 1.18, 95% CI 1.01–1.36, p = 0.03). Meanwhile, children in the lowest neighbourhood SES group had higher risk of childhood underweight (RR 1.61, 95% CI 1.04–2.49, p = 0.03), overweight (RR 1.35, 95% CI 1.05–1.72, p = 0.02), and obesity (RR 2.07, 95% CI 1.11–3.88, p = 0.02). Conclusions Socioeconomic gradient in childhood obesity and hypertension existed in Hong Kong, one of the most developed cities in China. These results have implications for policymakers and public health experts and highlight the need to monitor trends in other parts of China. PMID:27258094

  4. Oxidative Stress Causes Imbalance of Renal Renin Angiotensin System (RAS) Components and Hypertension in Obese Zucker Rats

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Hao; Wang, Xinquan; Chen, Caiyu; Wang, Jialiang; Zou, Xue; Li, Chuanwei; Xu, Zaicheng; Yang, Xiaoli; Shi, Weibin; Zeng, Chunyu

    2015-01-01

    Background Oxidative stress plays an important role in the pathogenesis of hypertension, especially in obesity‐related hypertension. The natriuretic and antinatriuretic components of the renal renin angiotensin system (RAS) maintain sodium homeostasis and blood pressure. Here, we test the hypothesis that increased oxidative stress leads to the imbalance of RAS components and hypertension in obese Zucker rats. Methods and Results Lean and obese rats received vehicle or tempol, a superoxide dismutase mimetic in the drinking water for 4 weeks. Compared with vehicle‐treated lean rats, vehicle‐treated obese rats exhibited higher blood pressure and increased renal oxidative stress, accompanied by increased diuretic and natriuretic responses to AT1R antagonist (Candesartan) and AT2R agonist (CGP‐42112A) and reduced diuretic and natriuretic response to MasR agonist (Ang‐[1 to 7]). Moreover, obese rats had higher ACE, AT1R and AT2R, lower ACE2 and MasR expressions in the kidney. All of the above‐mentioned abnormalities were reversed to some degree by tempol treatment. In primary cultures of renal proximal tubular (RPT) cells from lean and obese rats, tempol treatment also increased AT2R, ACE2, and MasR expressions but decreased AT1R and ACE expressions in obese rats. Conclusions Taken together, our study indicated that the imbalance of renal RAS components was associated with increased oxidative stress in obese rats. Furthermore, antioxidant treatment with tempol reversed the imbalance of renal RAS components and led to diuresis and natriuresis, which, at least in part, explains the blood pressure‐lowering effect of antioxidant supplementation in obesity‐related hypertension. PMID:25687731

  5. A positive family history of hypertension might be associated with an accelerated onset of type 2 diabetes: Results from the National Center Diabetes Database (NCDD-02).

    PubMed

    Yamamoto-Honda, Ritsuko; Takahashi, Yoshihiko; Mori, Yasumichi; Yamashita, Shigeo; Yoshida, Yoko; Kawazu, Shoji; Iwamoto, Yasuhiko; Kajio, Hiroshi; Yanai, Hidekatsu; Mishima, Shuichi; Handa, Nobuhiro; Shimokawa, Kotaro; Yoshida, Akiko; Watanabe, Hiroki; Ohe, Kazuhiko; Shimbo, Takuro; Noda, Mitsuhiko

    2017-03-18

    Type 2 diabetes, which is characterized by a combination of decreased insulin secretion and decreased insulin sensitivity, can be delayed or prevented by healthy lifestyle behaviors. Therefore, it is important that the population in general understands their personal risk at an early age to reduce their chances of ever developing the disease. A family history of hypertension is known to be associated with insulin resistance, but the effect of a family history of hypertension on the onset of type 2 diabetes has not well been examined. We performed a retrospective study examining patient age at the time of the diagnosis of type 2 diabetes by analyzing a dataset of 1,299 patients (1,021 men and 278 women) who had been diagnosed as having type 2 diabetes during a health checkup. The mean ± standard deviation of the patient age at the time of the diagnosis of diabetes was 49.1 ± 10.4 years for patients with a family history of hypertension and 51.8 ± 11.4 years for patients without a family history of hypertension (p < 0.001). A multivariate linear regression analysis showed a significant association between a family history of hypertension and a younger age at the time of the diagnosis of type 2 diabetes, independent of a family history of diabetes mellitus and a male sex, suggesting that a positive family history of hypertension might be associated with the accelerated onset of type 2 diabetes.

  6. Prenatal origin of obesity and their complications: Gestational diabetes, maternal overweight and the paradoxical effects of fetal growth restriction and macrosomia.

    PubMed

    Ornoy, Asher

    2011-09-01

    Pregestational (PGDM) and gestational (GDM) diabetes may be associated with a variety of fetal effects including increased rate of spontaneous abortions, intrauterine fetal death, congenital anomalies, neurodevelopmental problems and increased risk of perinatal complications. Additional problems of concern are fetal growth disturbances causing increased or decreased birth weight. Optimal control of maternal blood glucose is known to reduce these changes. Among the long lasting effects of these phenomena are a high rate of overweight and obesity at childhood and a high tendency to develop the "metabolic syndrome" characterized by hypertension, cardio-vascular complications and type 2 diabetes. Similarly, maternal overweight and obesity during pregnancy or excessive weight gain are also associated with increased obesity and complications in the offspring. Although there are different causes for fetal growth restriction (FGR) or for fetal excessive growth (macrosomis), paradoxically both are associated with the "metabolic syndrome" and its long term consequences. The exact mechanism(s) underlying these long term effects on growth are not fully elucidated, but they involve insulin resistance, fetal hyperleptinemia, hypothalamic changes and most probably epigenetic changes. Preventive measures to avoid the metabolic syndrome and its complications seem to be a tight dietary control and physical activity in the children born to obese or diabetic mothers or who had antenatal growth disturbances for other known or unknown reasons.

  7. Diabetes Is the Main Factor Accounting for Hypomagnesemia in Obese Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Lecube, Albert; Baena-Fustegueras, Juan Antonio; Fort, José Manuel; Pelegrí, Dolors; Hernández, Cristina; Simó, Rafael

    2012-01-01

    Objective Type 2 diabetes (T2DM) and obesity are associated with magnesium deficiency. We aimed to determine whether the presence of type 2 diabetes and the degree of metabolic control are related to low serum magnesium levels in obese individuals. Methods A) Case-control study: 200 obese subjects [50 with T2DM (cases) and 150 without diabetes (controls)] prospectively recruited. B) Interventional study: the effect of bariatric surgery on serum magnesium levels was examined in a subset of 120 obese subjects (40 with type 2 diabetes and 80 without diabetes). Results Type 2 diabetic patients showed lower serum magnesium levels [0.75±0.07 vs. 0.81±0.06 mmol/L; mean difference −0.06 (95% CI −0.09 to −0.04); p<0.001] than non-diabetic patients. Forty-eight percent of diabetic subjects, but only 15% of non-diabetic subjects showed a serum magnesium concentration lower than 0.75 mmol/L. Significant negative correlations between magnesium and fasting plasma glucose, HbA1c, HOMA-IR, and BMI were detected. Multiple linear regression analysis showed that fasting plasma glucose and HbA1c independently predicted serum magnesium. After bariatric surgery serum magnesium increased only in those patients in whom diabetes was resolved, but remain unchanged in those who not, without difference in loss weight between groups. Changes in serum magnesium negatively correlated with changes in fasting plasma glucose and HbA1c. Absolute changes in HbA1c independently predicted magnesium changes in the multiple linear regression analysis. Conclusions Our results provide evidence that the presence of diabetes and the degree of metabolic control are essential in accounting for the lower levels of magnesium that exist in obese subjects. PMID:22291997

  8. T-wave axis deviation and left ventricular hypertrophy interaction in diabetes and hypertension.

    PubMed

    Assanelli, Deodato; Di Castelnuovo, Augusto; Rago, Livia; Badilini, Fabio; Vinetti, Giovanni; Gianfagna, Francesco; Salvetti, Massimo; Zito, Francesco; Donati, Maria Benedetta; de Gaetano, Giovanni; Iacoviello, Licia

    2013-01-01

    Electrocardiographic signs of left ventricular hypertrophy (ECG-LVH) and T-wave axis (TA) deviation are independent predictors of fatal and non fatal events. We assessed the prevalence of ECG-LVH, TA abnormalities and their combination according to the presence or absence of diabetes and/or hypertension in a large sample of the adult general Italian population. Data from 10,184 women (54 ± 11 years) and 8775 men (54 ± 11 years) were analyzed from the Moli-sani cohort, a database of randomly recruited adults (age >35) from the general population of Molise, a central region of Italy that includes collection of standard 12-lead resting ECG. Subjects with previous myocardial infarction, angina, cerebrovascular disease or left bundle brunch block or missing values for TA or ECG-LVH have been excluded. TA was measured from the standard 12-lead ECG and it was defined as the rotation of the T wave in the frontal plane as computed by a proprietary algorithm (CalECG/Bravo, AMPS-LLC, NY). ECG-LVH was defined as Sokolow Lyon voltage (SLv) >35 mm or Cornell voltage duration Product (CP) >= 2440 mm*ms. Among subjects with ECG-LVH, prevalence of hypertension was 59.0% and 49.7%, respectively for men and women, whereas that of diabetes was 10.7% and 5.7%. In hypertensives, TA was normal in 72.3% of subjects, borderline in 24.8% and abnormal in 2.9%. In diabetics, TA was normal in 70.4% of subjects, borderline in 26.5% and abnormal in 3.1%. In both hypertensive and diabetic subjects, the prevalence of ECG-LVH, was significantly greater in subjects with borderline or abnormal TA. Hypertension was an independent predictor of abnormal TA (odd ratio: 1.38, P = .025). These results suggest that hypertension might play a relevant role in the pathogenesis of TA deviation.

  9. "Let's Move!" to End Childhood Obesity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Obama, Michelle

    2011-01-01

    Childhood obesity rates in America have tripled in the last three decades. Almost one in three children are considered overweight or obese. Pediatricians are now treating children for adult diseases like type II diabetes and hypertension. All parents want the best for their children. They want children to succeed in school, fulfill their dreams,…

  10. Na+/H+ exchange in hypertension and in diabetes mellitus--facts and hypotheses.

    PubMed

    Siffert, W; Düsing, R

    1996-01-01

    An enhancement of Na+/H+ exchange (NHE) in blood cells of selected patients with essential hypertension and with diabetic nephropathy has been described by various investigators. Recent studies have shown that enhanced NHE activity persists in immortalized lymphoblasts from these patients after prolonged cell culture and, thus, appears to be under genetic control. Available evidence strongly argues against a mutation in the encoding gene or an overexpression of the NHE. Immortalized cells from hypertensive patients with enhanced NHE activity display two-fold enhanced agonist-induced rises of the cytosolic free Ca2+ concentration and the underlying reason was identified as an increased activation of pertussis toxin (PTX)-sensitive G proteins. The molecular mechanism(s) of this phenomenon have not yet been elucidated. It appears likely that similar changes contribute to the enhanced NHE activity phenotype in diabetic nephropathy, although experimental evidence for this is still lacking. An enhanced activation of PTX-sensitive G proteins could explain many of the hitherto unexplained phenomena in essential hypertension, e.g. inheritance, increased vasoconstriction, hypertrophy of remodeling of arterial blood vessels and the heart, enhanced platelet aggregation etc. In diabetes the same defect could provide the basis for the susceptibility to nephropathy, e.g. by enhancing the deleterious effects of autocrine and paracrine growth factors. Thus, the experimental approach of immortalizing blood cells from patients with essential hypertension and diabetic nephropathy has opened new horizons in the identification of genetically fixed abnormalities in intracellular signal transduction which could contribute to both pathologies and which can now be studied without the confounding influences of the diabetic or hypertensive in vivo milieu.

  11. Hypertension influences the exponential progression of inflammation and oxidative stress in streptozotocin-induced diabetic kidney

    PubMed Central

    Muthaian, Rupadevi; Pakirisamy, Rajaa Muthu; Parasuraman, Subramani; Raveendran, Ramasamy

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the association of hypertension coexisting with diabetes mellitus with oxidative stress and inflammation in the kidneys of streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats. Materials and Methods: Male Wistar rats were used for the experiments. Blood glucose (BG), urea, blood pressure (BP), and heart rate (HR) were analyzed before and 48 h after STZ injection. Further, these parameters were monitored up to 3 months of diabetes induction. Subsequently, the inflammatory markers (C-reactive protein, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and nitrate) and oxidative stress markers were estimated after 3 months of diabetes induction in the kidney homogenate. Histological analysis of renal tissue was also carried out. Results: Linear elevation of BG, urea, mean arterial pressure (MAP), and HR was observed up to 3 months of diabetes induction. In the same manner, inflammatory and oxidative stress markers were also found to be significantly increased. Notably, the histological analysis revealed the signs of nephropathy such as increased mesangial cell number, thickness of basement membrane, and renal artery. Inflammatory and oxidative stress markers positively correlated with elevated BP and BG, but the correlation was better with BP rather than BG. Conclusion: Hypertension has a strong implication in the increased oxidative stress and inflammation of diabetic kidney at the very early stage of diabetes mellitus. PMID:28163536

  12. Salivary inflammatory markers and microbiome in normoglycemic lean and obese children compared to obese children with type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Sabharwal, Amarpeet; Tsompana, Maria; Berman, Harvey A.; Haase, Elaine M.; Miecznikowski, Jeffrey C.

    2017-01-01

    Background There is emerging evidence linking diabetes with periodontal disease. Diabetes is a well-recognized risk factor for periodontal disease. Conversely, pro-inflammatory molecules released by periodontally-diseased tissues may enter the circulation to induce insulin resistance. While this association has been demonstrated in adults, there is little information regarding periodontal status in obese children with and without type 2 diabetes (T2D). We hypothesized that children with T2D have higher rates of gingivitis, elevated salivary inflammatory markers, and an altered salivary microbiome compared to children without T2D. Methods Three pediatric cohorts ages 10–19 years were studied: lean (normal weight—C), obese (Ob), and obese with T2D (T2D). Each subject completed an oral health survey, received a clinical oral examination, and provided unstimulated saliva for measurement of inflammatory markers and microbiome analysis. Results The diabetes group was less likely to have had a dental visit within the last six months. Body mass index (BMI) Z-scores and waist circumference/height ratios were similar between Ob and T2D cohorts. The number of carious lesions and fillings were similar for all three groups. The gingival index was greater in the T2D group compared to the Ob and C groups. Although salivary microbial diversity was minimal between groups, a few differences in bacterial genus composition were noted. Conclusions Obese children with T2D show a trend toward poorer oral health compared to normal weight and obese children without T2D. This study characterizes the salivary microbiome of children with and without obesity and T2D. This study supports a modest link between T2D and periodontal inflammation in the pediatric population. PMID:28253297

  13. Insulin resistance is associated with gallstones even in non-obese, non-diabetic Korean men.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yoosoo; Sung, Eunju; Ryu, Seungho; Park, Yong-Woo; Jang, Yu Mi; Park, Minseon

    2008-08-01

    It remains unclear as to whether insulin resistance alone or in the presence of wellknown risk factors, such as diabetes or obesity, is associated with gallstones in men. The aim of this study was to determine whether insulin resistance is associated independently with gallstone disease in non-diabetic men, regardless of obesity. Study subjects were 19,503 Korean men, aged 30-69 yr, with fasting blood glucose level <126 mg/dL and without a documented history of diabetes. Gallbladder status was assessed via abdominal ultrasonography after overnight fast. Body mass index and waist circumference were measured. Insulin resistance was estimated by the Homeostasis Model Assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR). The prevalence of obesity, abdominal obesity, and metabolic syndrome in the subjects with gallstones were higher than in those without. The prevalence of elevated HOMA (>75 percentile) in subjects with gallstones was significantly higher than in those without, and this association remained even after the obesity stratification was applied. In multiple logistic regression analyses, only age and HOMA proved to be independent predictors of gallstones. Insulin resistance was positively associated with gallstones in non-diabetic Korean men, and this occurred regardless of obesity. Gallstones appear to be a marker for insulin resistance, even in non-diabetic, nonobese men.

  14. New options for the treatment of obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus (narrative review) ☆, ☆ ☆, ★

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Robert R.; Chilton, Robert; Garvey, W. Timothy

    2014-01-01

    Moderate weight loss (>5%), which has been associated with improvements in glycemic parameters in patients with dysglycemia, also reduces the presence of other comorbidities, including dyslipidemia and hypertension, culminating in a reduced risk of cardiovascular disease. Lifestyle changes are the recommended preliminary approach to weight loss, with an initial weight-loss goal of 10% of body weight achieved over 6 months at a rate of 1–2 pounds per week selected as an appropriate target to decrease the severity of obesity-related risk factors. Implementing and maintaining the lifestyle changes associated with weight loss can, however, be challenging for many patients. Therefore, additional interventions sometimes may be necessary. Bariatric surgery can also be a highly effective option for weight loss and comorbidity reduction, but surgery carries considerable risks and is still applicable only to selected patients with type 2 diabetes. Thus, attention is turning to the use of weight-loss medications, including 2 recently approved compounds: twice-daily lorcaserin and a once-daily combination of phentermine and topiramate extended-release, both shown to be safe and effective therapies in the management of obesity in patients with type 2 diabetes. PMID:23726071

  15. Very severely obese patients have a high prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Vinciguerra, Federica; Baratta, Roberto; Farina, Maria Grazia; Tita, Patrizia; Padova, Giuseppa; Vigneri, Riccardo; Frittitta, Lucia

    2013-06-01

    The prevalence of very severe obesity has increased progressively and faster than other classes of obesity over the last years. It is unclear whether the prevalence of obesity-related complications and health risks increases progressively or reaches a plateau above a certain degree of obesity. The aim of our study was to investigate whether the severity of obesity was correlated with the prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), impaired fasting glucose, impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), metabolic syndrome (MS), and cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) in a large cohort of patients with different degrees of obesity. A cross-sectional study was conducted in 938 obese patients without a previous diagnosis of diabetes. Patients were assigned to different categories of obesity: mild-moderate obesity (BMI 30-39.9 kg/m(2)), morbid obesity (BMI 40-49.9 kg/m(2)), and super-obesity (SO, BMI ≥50 kg/m(2)). The prevalence of IGF, IGT, screen-detected T2DM, MS, and CVD was higher in SO patients than in the other groups. Interestingly, the association between SO and either MS or CVD was independent of glucose tolerance status, indicating that factors other than glucose metabolism also favor cardio-metabolic complications in obese patients. In patients without screen-detected T2DM (n = 807), insulin sensitivity and secretion OGTT-derived indexes indicated that SO patients had the worst glucose homeostasis relative to the other categories of obesity, which was indicated by the most reduced disposition index in these patients, a predictor of future T2DM. In conclusion, SO patients have an extremely high prevalence of glucose metabolism deterioration, and cardio-metabolic complications are more prevalent in these patients compared to less obese patients.

  16. Elevation of circulating LOX-1 ligand levels in Zucker obese and diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Wakabayashi, Ichiro; Shimomura, Tomoko; Nakanishi, Mamoru; Uchida, Kagehiro

    2015-01-01

    LOX-1 ligands containing apolipoprotein B (LAB) reflect ligand activity of LOX-1, which is a key molecule for initiation of atherosclerosis. The Zucker rat is a well-known model used for research on obesity and diabetes. Blood levels of LAB were compared among Zucker fatty (ZF), Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF) and Zucker lean (ZL) rats. Log-transformed LAB was significantly higher in ZF and ZDF rats than in control ZL rats, while no significant difference was found in log-transformed LAB of ZF and ZDF rats. This study for the first time demonstrated that circulating LOX-1 ligands were elevated in obesity and diabetes model rats.

  17. Electrocardiographic detection of hypertensive left atrial enlargement in the presence of obesity: re-calibration against cardiac magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, J C L; Erdei, T; Dastidar, A G; McIntyre, B; Burchell, A E; Ratcliffe, L E K; Hart, E C; Hamilton, M C K; Paton, J F R; Nightingale, A K; Manghat, N E

    2017-03-01

    Left atrial enlargement (LAE) has adverse prognostic implications in hypertension. We sought to determine the accuracy of five electrocardiogram (ECG) criteria for LAE in hypertension relative to cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) gold standard and investigate the effect of concomitant obesity. One hundred and thirty consecutive patients (age: 51.4±15.1 years, 47% male, 51% obese, systolic blood pressure (BP): 171±29 mm Hg, diastolic BP: 97±15 mm Hg) referred for CMR (1.5 T) from a tertiary hypertension clinic were included. Patients with concomitant cardiac pathology were excluded. ECGs were assessed blindly for the following: (1) P-wave >110 ms, (2) P-mitrale, (3) P-wave axis <30°, (4) area of negative P-terminal force in V1 >40 ms.mm and (5) positive P-terminal force in augmented vector left (aVL) >0.5 mm. Left atrial volume ≥55 ml m(-2), measured blindly by CMR, was defined as LAE. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, accuracy and area under the receiver operator curve were calculated. The prevalence of LAE by CMR was 26%. All the individual ECG LAE criteria were more specific than sensitive, with specificities ranging from 70% (P-axis <30(o)) to 99% (P-mitrale). Obesity attenuated the specificity of most of the individual ECG LAE criteria. Obesity correlated with significant lower specificity (48% vs 65%, P<0.05) and a trend towards lower sensitivity (59 vs 43%, P=0.119) when ≥1 ECG LAE criteria were present. Individual ECG criteria of LAE in hypertension are specific, but not sensitive, at identifying LAE. The ECG should not be used to excluded LAE in hypertension, particularly in obese subjects.

  18. The role of obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus in the development of male obesity-associated secondary hypogonadism.

    PubMed

    Saboor Aftab, S A; Kumar, S; Barber, T M

    2013-03-01

    Obesity, secondary (hypogonadotrophic) hypogonadism (SH), sleep disorders [such as obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA)] and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in men have complex interlinks both with respect to mutual aetiopathogenesis as well as therapeutics. Correction of the attendant hypogonadism in obese men may serve to break this link and have beneficial effects beyond restoration of normal sexual function. Male obesity-associated secondary hypogonadism (MOSH) should be regarded as a distinct clinical entity and subtype of SH. A high index of suspicion for the presence of MOSH must be maintained by clinicians when assessing obese men. The pathogenesis of MOSH remains incompletely understood. Furthermore, the optimal management of MOSH and its associated sequelae will require long-term prospective studies that in turn will inform the development of future clinical guidelines for this important and prevalent condition.

  19. Some pharmacological effects of cinnamon and ginger herbs in obese diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    Shalaby, Mostafa Abbas; Saifan, Hamed Yahya

    2014-01-01

    Aims: The present study was designed to assess some pharmacological effects of cinnamon (CAE) and ginger (GAE) aqueous extracts in obese diabetic rats, and to elucidate the potential mechanisms. Materials and Methods: Forty-two Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized into 6 equal groups. Group 1 was a negative control and the other groups were rendered obese by feeding rats on high-fat diet for 4 weeks. The obese rats were subcutaneously injected with alloxan for 5*days to induce diabetes. Group 2 was a positive control, and Groups 3, 4, 5 and 6 were orally given CAE in doses 200 and 400 mg/kg and GAE in the same doses, respectively for 6 weeks. Blood samples were collected for serum biochemical analyses. Kidneys were dissected out to assay activity of tissue antioxidant enzymes: Superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase and catalase. Results: CAE and GAE significantly reduced body weight and body fat mass; normalized serum levels of liver enzymes; improved lipid profile; decreased blood glucose and leptin and increased insulin serum levels in obese diabetic rats. Both extracts also increased activity of kidney antioxidant enzymes. Conclusion: CAE and GAE exhibit anti-obesity, hepatoprotective, hypolipidemic, antidiabetic and anti-oxidant effects in obese diabetic rats. These results confirm the previous reports on both extracts. The potential mechanisms underlying these effects are fully discussed and clarified. Our results affirm the traditional use of cinnamon and ginger for treating patients suffering from obesity and diabetes. The obese diabetic rat model used in this study is a novel animal model used in pharmacology researches. PMID:26401364

  20. Insulin resistance in Mexican Americans--a precursor to obesity and diabetes?

    PubMed

    McCarty, M F

    1993-10-01

    Mexican Americans appear to have a strong genetic predisposition to insulin resistance, android obesity, and type II diabetes, apparently as a function of Native American genetic heritage. Theoretical considerations suggest that insulin resistance may be a primary factor that plays a causative role in the induction of both obesity and diabetes. Measures which promote optimal insulin sensitivity--chromium picolinate, brewer's yeast, soluble fiber supplements, metformin, very-low-fat diet, exercise training--may have value for preventing, treating, or retarding the onset of obesity and diabetes, and merit clinical evaluation in this regard. Correction of insulin resistance may also lessen cardiovascular risk, in part by reducing LDL cholesterol and improving risk factors associated with Syndrome X. These comments are likely to be valid for other Native American groups at high risk for diabetes.

  1. Changes in diagnosed diabetes, obesity, and physical inactivity prevalence in US counties, 2004-2012

    PubMed Central

    Kirtland, Karen; Lin, Ji; Shrestha, Sundar; Thompson, Ted; Albright, Ann; Gregg, Edward W.

    2017-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that prevalence of diagnosed diabetes in the United States reached a plateau or slowed around 2008, and that this change coincided with obesity plateaus and increases in physical activity. However, national estimates can obscure important variations in geographic subgroups. We examine whether a slowing or leveling off in diagnosed diabetes, obesity, and leisure time physical inactivity prevalence is also evident across the 3143 counties of the United States. We used publicly available county estimates of the age-adjusted prevalence of diagnosed diabetes, obesity, and leisure-time physical inactivity, which were generated by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Using a Bayesian multilevel regression that included random effects by county and year and applied cubic splines to smooth these estimates over time, we estimated the average annual percentage point change (APPC) from 2004 to 2008 and from 2008 to 2012 for diabetes, obesity, and physical inactivity prevalence in each county. Compared to 2004–2008, the median APPCs for diabetes, obesity, and physical inactivity were lower in 2008–2012 (diabetes APPC difference = 0.16, 95%CI 0.14, 0.18; obesity APPC difference = 0.65, 95%CI 0.59, 0.70; physical inactivity APPC difference = 0.43, 95%CI 0.37, 0.48). APPCs and APPC differences between time periods varied among counties and U.S. regions. Despite improvements, levels of these risk factors remained high with most counties merely slowing rather than reversing, which suggests that all counties would likely benefit from reductions in these risk factors. The diversity of trajectories in the prevalence of these risk factors across counties underscores the continued need to identify high risk areas and populations for preventive interventions. Awareness of how these factors are changing might assist local policy makers in targeting and tracking the impact of efforts to reduce diabetes, obesity and physical inactivity. PMID

  2. Changes in diagnosed diabetes, obesity, and physical inactivity prevalence in US counties, 2004-2012.

    PubMed

    Geiss, Linda S; Kirtland, Karen; Lin, Ji; Shrestha, Sundar; Thompson, Ted; Albright, Ann; Gregg, Edward W

    2017-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that prevalence of diagnosed diabetes in the United States reached a plateau or slowed around 2008, and that this change coincided with obesity plateaus and increases in physical activity. However, national estimates can obscure important variations in geographic subgroups. We examine whether a slowing or leveling off in diagnosed diabetes, obesity, and leisure time physical inactivity prevalence is also evident across the 3143 counties of the United States. We used publicly available county estimates of the age-adjusted prevalence of diagnosed diabetes, obesity, and leisure-time physical inactivity, which were generated by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Using a Bayesian multilevel regression that included random effects by county and year and applied cubic splines to smooth these estimates over time, we estimated the average annual percentage point change (APPC) from 2004 to 2008 and from 2008 to 2012 for diabetes, obesity, and physical inactivity prevalence in each county. Compared to 2004-2008, the median APPCs for diabetes, obesity, and physical inactivity were lower in 2008-2012 (diabetes APPC difference = 0.16, 95%CI 0.14, 0.18; obesity APPC difference = 0.65, 95%CI 0.59, 0.70; physical inactivity APPC difference = 0.43, 95%CI 0.37, 0.48). APPCs and APPC differences between time periods varied among counties and U.S. regions. Despite improvements, levels of these risk factors remained high with most counties merely slowing rather than reversing, which suggests that all counties would likely benefit from reductions in these risk factors. The diversity of trajectories in the prevalence of these risk factors across counties underscores the continued need to identify high risk areas and populations for preventive interventions. Awareness of how these factors are changing might assist local policy makers in targeting and tracking the impact of efforts to reduce diabetes, obesity and physical inactivity.

  3. DNA methylation in obesity and type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    de Mello, Vanessa Derenji Ferreira; Pulkkinen, Leena; Lalli, Marianne; Kolehmainen, Marjukka; Pihlajamäki, Jussi; Uusitupa, Matti

    2014-05-01

    To elucidate the mechanisms related to the development of type 2 diabetes (T2D) and other degenerative diseases at a molecular level, a better understanding of the changes in the chromatin structure and the corresponding functional changes in molecular pathways is still needed. For example, persons with low birth weight are at a high risk for development of T2D later in life, suggesting that the intrauterine environment contributes to the disease. One of the hypotheses is that epigenetic regulation, including changes in DNA methylation leading to modifications in chromatin structure, are behind metabolic alterations, e.g. leading to the phenomenon termed metabolic memory. Altered DNA methylation has been shown to affect healthy aging and also to promote age-related health problems. There is suggestive evidence that lifestyle changes including weight loss can have an impact on DNA methylation and consequently gene expression. In this review we provide an overview of human studies investigating DNA methylation in obesity and T2D and associated risk factors behind these diseases.

  4. Synergistic Interaction of Hypertension and Diabetes in Promoting Kidney Injury and the Role of Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhen; do Carmo, Jussara M; Aberdein, Nicola; Zhou, Xinchun; Williams, Jan M; da Silva, Alexandre A; Hall, John E

    2017-05-01

    Diabetes mellitus and hypertension are major risk factors for chronic kidney injury, together accounting for >70% of end-stage renal disease. In this study, we assessed interactions of hypertension and diabetes mellitus in causing kidney dysfunction and injury and the role of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Hypertension was induced by aorta constriction (AC) between the renal arteries in 6-month-old male Goto-Kakizaki (GK) type 2 diabetic and control Wistar rats. Fasting plasma glucose averaged 162±11 and 87±2 mg/dL in GK and Wistar rats, respectively. AC produced hypertension in the right kidney (above AC) and near normal blood pressure in the left kidney (below AC), with both kidneys exposed to the same levels of glucose, circulating hormones, and neural influences. After 8 weeks of AC, blood pressure above the AC (and in the right kidney) increased from 109±1 to 152±5 mm Hg in GK rats and from 106±4 to 141±5 mm Hg in Wistar rats. The diabetic-hypertensive right kidneys in GK-AC rats had much greater increases in albumin excretion and histological injury compared with left kidneys (diabetes mellitus only) of GK rats or right kidneys (hypertension only) of Wistar-AC rats. Marked increases in ER stress and oxidative stress indicators were observed in diabetic-hypertensive kidneys of GK-AC rats. Inhibition of ER stress with tauroursodeoxycholic acid for 6 weeks reduced blood pressure (135±4 versus 151±4 mm Hg), albumin excretion, ER and oxidative stress, and glomerular injury, while increasing glomerular filtration rate in hypertensive-diabetic kidneys. These results suggest that diabetes mellitus and hypertension interact synergistically to promote kidney dysfunction and injury via ER stress.

  5. Effects of moxonidine vs. metoprolol on blood pressure and metabolic control in hypertensive subjects with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Jacob, S; Klimm, H-J; Rett, K; Helsberg, K; Häring, H-U; Gödicke, J

    2004-06-01

    Subjects with type 2 diabetes experience an increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, related to a high prevalence of hypertension, dyslipidemia, and obesity. Antihypertensive treatment with beta-adrenergic receptor blockers may have deleterious metabolic consequences, including worsening of lipid profiles and insulin sensitivity. The centrally-acting sympatholytic agent moxonidine may improve these variables. In this randomised, double-blind multicenter study, the effects of two widely used antihypertensive agents--moxonidine (MOX) and the beta (1)-selective adrenergic receptor blocker metoprolol (MET)--on blood pressure and metabolic control were directly compared in hypertensive subjects with type 2 diabetes. Patients received either MOX (0.2 - 0.6 mg/d) or MET (50 - 150 mg/d) for 12 weeks, intending comparable blood pressure control. In total 200 patients were randomized. Here we report results from the per protocol population consisting of 127 patients (MOX 66, MET 61) but similar results were found in the ITT population. Reductions in systolic (SBP) and diastolic (DBP) blood pressures after 12 weeks were similar in both groups: In the MOX group, mean SBP (+/- SD) decreased from 154 +/- 12 to 142 +/- 17 mmHg and mean DBP from 91 +/- 9 to 83 +/- 9 mmHg. In the MET group, mean SBP decreased from 152 +/- 13 to 140 +/- 15 mmHg, and mean DBP from 90 +/- 8 to 84 +/- 10 mmHg. Mean HbA (1C) values did not differ between groups after 12 weeks (MOX 8.1 +/- 1.4 Hb%, MET 8.1 +/- 1.5 Hb%, intention-to-treat population). However, fasting plasma glucose decreased in the MOX group (median change - 5 mg/dl), but increased in the MET group (+ 16 mg/dl; p < 0.05). Median changes in the insulin resistance index (HOMA (IR)) were + 0.56 micro IU x mol/L (2) in the MET group, and - 0.27 micro IU x mol/L (2) in the MOX group. Correspondingly, fasting triglycerides increased with a median change of + 29.5 mg/dL in the MET group, but decreased in the MOX group (- 27.5 mg/dl; p

  6. A study of cardiovascular function in Tsumura Suzuki obese diabetes, a new model mouse of type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Kawada, Tomie; Miyata, Shigeo; Shimada, Tsutomu; Sanzen, Yoshiki; Ito, Minami; Hemmi, Chieko; Iizuka, Seiichi; Suzuki, Wataru; Mihara, Kiyoshi; Aburada, Masaki; Nakazawa, Mikio

    2010-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a well known and important risk factor for cardiovascular diseases, including heart failure. A new model of Type 2 diabetes, Tsumura Suzuki Obese Diabetes (TSOD) mice, was introduced recently into the research field of diabetes. The cardiac functions of TSOD mice were studied in comparison with Tsumura Suzuki Non Obesity (TSNO, non-diabetic control) mice, for the first time. In vivo cardiovascular functions were measured by echocardiography and cardiac catheterization at 7, 12 and 18 months old. TSOD mice had no deterioration of cardiac function despite the long-term persistence of severe obesity, hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia and hyperlipidemia, including high density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol. No histopathological abnormalities were observed in the heart of TSOD mice, while several histological abnormalities were observed in the pancreas and kidney of TSOD mice. To investigate vascular endothelium function at 7 months old, intravenous injection of acetylcholine (ACh; 1, 3, 10 microg/kg)- and N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME; 50 mg/kg)-induced mean blood pressure (BP) changes were used. ACh decreased whereas L-NAME increased BP, and no significant differences in BP changes were observed between TSOD and TSNO mice. Moreover, ACh-induced relaxation of the thoracic aortae isolated from TSOD and TSNO mice with intact endothelium were not significantly different. These findings suggest that vascular endothelial cells in TSOD mice are not impaired. It was clearly demonstrated that despite obvious diabetes, cardiac functions of TSOD mice were not impaired even at 18 months old.

  7. The importance of the Non Obese Diabetic (NOD) mouse model in autoimmune diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Pearson, James A; Wong, F. Susan; Wen, Li

    2016-01-01

    Type 1 Diabetes (T1D) is an autoimmune disease characterized by the pancreatic infiltration of immune cells resulting in T cell-mediated destruction of the insulin-producing beta cells. The successes of the Non Obese Diabetic (NOD) mouse model have come in multiple forms including identifying key genetic and environmental risk factors e.g. Idd loci and effects of microorganisms including the gut microbiota, respectively, and how they may contribute to disease susceptibility and pathogenesis. Furthermore, the NOD model also provides insights into the roles of the innate immune cells as well as the B cells in contributing to the T cell-mediated disease. Unlike many autoimmune disease models, the NOD mouse develops spontaneous disease and has many similarities to human T1D. Through exploiting these similarities many targets have been identified for immune-intervention strategies. Although many of these immunotherapies did not have a significant impact on human T1D, they have been shown to be effective in the NOD mouse in early stage disease, which is not equivalent to trials in newly-diagnosed patients with diabetes. However, the continued development of humanized NOD mice would enable further clinical developments, bringing T1D research to a new translational level. Therefore, it is the aim of this review to discuss the importance of the NOD model in identifying the roles of the innate immune system and the interaction with the gut microbiota in modifying diabetes susceptibility. In addition, the role of the B cells will also be discussed with new insights gained through B cell depletion experiments and the impact on translational developments. Finally, this review will also discuss the future of the NOD mice and the development of humanized NOD mice, providing novel insights into human T1D. PMID:26403950

  8. Healthy lifestyles in Europe: prevention of obesity and type II diabetes by diet and physical activity.

    PubMed

    Astrup, A

    2001-04-01

    The prevalence of obesity is increasing rapidly in all age groups in most EU-countries and is one of the fastest growing epidemics, now affecting 10-40% of the adult population. Obesity increases the risk of serious co-morbidities such as type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, certain cancers and reduced life expectancy, and these complications may account for 5-10% of all health costs in EU countries. The risk of diabetes is particularly increased by obesity, and 80-95% of the increase in diabetes can be attributed to obesity and overweight with abdominal fat distribution. There is robust evidence from cross-sectional and longitudinal studies to support that an energy-dense, high fat diet and physical inactivity are independent risk factors for weight gain and obesity. Furthermore, interaction between dietary fat and physical fitness determine fat balance, so that the obesity promoting effect of a high fat diet is enhanced in susceptible subjects, particularly in sedentary individuals with a genetic predisposition to obesity. Ad libitum consumption of diets low in fat and high in protein and complex carbohydrates, with a low glycaemic index, contributes to the prevention of weight gain in normal weight subjects. It also causes a spontaneous weight loss of 3-4 kg in overweight subjects, and has beneficial effects on risk factors for diabetes and CVD. To prevent obesity and diabetes there are grounds for recommending the combination of increasing daily physical activity level to a PAL-value of at least 1.8 and reducing dietary fat content to 20-25 energy-% in sedentary subjects, and to 25-35% in more physically active individuals.

  9. The independent effects of maternal obesity and gestational diabetes on the pregnancy outcomes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Obesity and gestational diabetes (GDM) in pregnancy are recognized risk factors for adverse outcomes, including cesarean section (CS), macrosomia and preeclampsia. The aim of this study was to investigate the independent effect of GDM and obesity on the adverse pregnancy outcomes at term. Methods A retrospective cohort of postpartum women, in King Khalid University Hospital, were stratified according to body mass index (obese ≥30 kg/m2, non-obese <30 kg/m2) and the results of GDM screening into the following groups, women with no obesity and no GDM (reference group), women with no obesity but with GDM, women with obesity but no GDM and women with both GDM and obesity. Adverse pregnancy outcomes included high birth weight, macrosomia, CS delivery and preeclampsia. Multiple logistic regression used to examine independent associations of GDM and obesity with macrosomia and CS. Results 2701 women were included, 44% of them were obese and 15% had GDM. 63% of the women with GDM were obese. There was significant increase in the percentage of macrosomia, P < 0.001, high birth weight, P < 0.001, CS, P < 0.001 and preeclampsia, P < 0.001 in women with GDM and obesity compared to the reference group. Obesity increased the estimated risk of CS delivery, odds ratio (OR) 2.16, confidence intervals (CI) 1.74-2.67. The combination of GDM and obesity increased the risk of macrosomia OR 3.45, CI 2.05-5.81 and the risk of CS delivery OR 2.26, CI 1.65-3.11. Conclusion Maternal obesity and GDM were independently associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes. The combination of both conditions further increase the risk. PMID:24923207

  10. [Effects of diabetes and obesity on the higher brain functions in rodents].

    PubMed

    Asato, Megumi; Ikeda, Hiroko; Kamei, Junzo

    2012-11-01

    Metabolic disorders, such as diabetes and obesity, have been indicated to disturb the function of the central nervous system (CNS) as well as several peripheral organs. Clinically, it is well recognized that the prevalence of anxiety and depression is higher in diabetic and obesity patients than in the general population. We have recently indicated that streptozotocin-induced diabetic and diet-induced obesity mice have enhanced fear memory and higher anxiety-like behavior in several tests such as the conditioned fear, tail-suspension, hole-board and elevated open-platform tests. The changes in fear memory and anxiety-like behavior of diabetic and obese mice are due to the dysfunction of central glutamatergic and monoaminergic systems, which is mediated by the changes of intracellular signaling. These results suggest that metabolic disorders strongly affect the function of the CNS and disturb the higher brain functions. These dysfunctions of the CNS in diabetes and obesity are involved in the increased prevalence of anxiety disorders and depression. Normalization of these dysfunctions in the CNS will be a new attractive target to treat the metabolic disorders and their complications.

  11. Are obesity-related insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes autoimmune diseases?

    PubMed

    Tsai, Sue; Clemente-Casares, Xavier; Revelo, Xavier S; Winer, Shawn; Winer, Daniel A

    2015-06-01

    Obesity and associated insulin resistance predispose individuals to develop chronic metabolic diseases, such as type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Although these disorders affect a significant proportion of the global population, the underlying mechanisms of disease remain poorly understood. The discovery of elevated tumor necrosis factor-α in adipose tissue as an inducer of obesity-associated insulin resistance marked a new era of understanding that a subclinical inflammatory process underlies the insulin resistance and metabolic dysfunction that precedes type 2 diabetes. Advances in the field identified components of both the innate and adaptive immune response as key players in regulating such inflammatory processes. As antigen specificity is a hallmark of an adaptive immune response, its role in modulating the chronic inflammation that accompanies obesity and type 2 diabetes begs the question of whether insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes can have autoimmune components. In this Perspective, we summarize current data that pertain to the activation and perpetuation of adaptive immune responses during obesity and discuss key missing links and potential mechanisms for obesity-related insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes to be considered as potential autoimmune diseases.

  12. Intestinal Dysbiosis, Gut Hyperpermeability and Bacterial Translocation: Missing Links Between Depression, Obesity and Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Slyepchenko, Anastasiya; Maes, Michael; Machado-Vieira, Rodrigo; Anderson, George; Solmi, Marco; Sanz, Yolanda; Berk, Michael; Köhler, Cristiano A; Carvalho, André F

    2016-01-01

    The comorbid prevalence of major depressive disorder (MDD) with obesity and type II diabetes mellitus reflects the existence of a subset of individuals with a complex common pathophysiology and overlapping risk factors. Such comorbid disease presentations imply a number of difficulties, including: decreased treatment responsivity and adherence; altered glycemic control and increased risk of wider medical complications. A number of factors link MDD to metabolic-associated disorders, including: higher rates of shared risk factors such as poor diet and physical inactivity and biological elements including increased inflammation; insulin resistance; oxidative and nitrosative stress; and mitochondrial dysfunction. All of these biological factors have been extensively investigated in the pathophysiology of obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus as well as MDD. In this review, we aim to: (1) overview the epidemiological links between MDD, obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus; (2) discuss the role of synergistic neurotoxic effects in MDD comorbid with obesity, and type 2 diabetes mellitus; (3) review evidence of intestinal dysbiosis, leaky gut and increased bacterial translocation, in the pathophysiology of MDD, obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus; and (4) propose a model in which the gut-brain axis could play a pivotal role in the comorbidity of these disorders.

  13. Telmisartan protects against diabetic vascular complications in a mouse model of obesity and type 2 diabetes, partially through peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-{gamma}-dependent activity

    SciTech Connect

    Toyama, Kensuke; Nakamura, Taishi; Kataoka, Keiichiro; Yasuda, Osamu; Fukuda, Masaya; Tokutomi, Yoshiko; Dong, Yi-Fei; Ogawa, Hisao; Kim-Mitsuyama, Shokei

    2011-07-08

    Highlights: {yields} Telmisartan, an angiotensin receptor blocker, acts as a partial PPAR{gamma} agonist. {yields} The protective effects of telmisartan against diabetic vascular injury were associated with attenuation of vascular NF{kappa}B activation and TNF {alpha}. {yields} PPAR{gamma} activity of telmisartan was involved in the normalization of vascular PPAR{gamma} downregulation in diabetic mice. {yields} We provided the first evidence indicating that PPAR{gamma} activity of telmisartan contributed to the protective effects of telmisartan against diabetic vascular complication. -- Abstract: Experimental and clinical data support the notion that peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma} (PPAR{gamma}) activation is associated with anti-atherosclerosis as well as anti-diabetic effect. Telmisartan, an angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB), acts as a partial PPAR{gamma} agonist. We hypothesized that telmisartan protects against diabetic vascular complications, through PPAR{gamma} activation. We compared the effects of telmisartan, telmisartan combined with GW9662 (a PPAR{gamma} antagonist), and losartan with no PPAR{gamma} activity on vascular injury in obese type 2 diabetic db/db mice. Compared to losartan, telmisartan significantly ameliorated vascular endothelial dysfunction, downregulation of phospho-eNOS, and coronary arterial remodeling in db/db mice. More vascular protective effects of telmisartan than losartan were associated with greater anti-inflammatory effects of telmisartan, as shown by attenuation of vascular nuclear factor kappa B (NF{kappa}B) activation and tumor necrosis factor {alpha}. Coadministration of GW9662 with telmisartan abolished the above mentioned greater protective effects of telmisartan against vascular injury than losartan in db/db mice. Thus, PPAR{gamma} activity appears to be involved in the vascular protective effects of telmisartan in db/db mice. Moreover, telmisartan, but not losartan, prevented the downregulation of

  14. [Obesity as risk factor associated with hypertension among nursing professionals of a national philanthropy health institution].

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Aline Furtado Carlos; Nogueira, Maria Suely

    2010-06-01

    The present study analyzed the relationship between obesity and high blood pressure among nursing professionals of a philanthropic institution, with a view to the early detection of possible cases of hypertension. The study population consisted of 147 nursing professionals of ages between 20-70 years. The researcher performed structured, individual, interviews at the work site of those professionals, 91.8% of which were women; 29.2% were older than 40 years; 11.6% had a SBP > or = 140 mmHg and 6.8% DBP > or = 90 mmHg; 12.2% had obesity class I-II; 38.1% of women with a WHP > or = 0.85, 12.2% in the age range of 40-49 years; 2.1% of men with a WHR > or = 1.0, 1.4% in the age range of 40-49 years. It was found that, though nursing professionals know the severity of the disease and the importance of changing their life habits, they still find it difficult to adopt that behavior, which suggests the need to implement educational programs at the work site to help them to change their behaviors.

  15. Administration of 17β-estradiol to ovariectomized obese female mice reverses obesity-hypertension through an ACE2-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Shoemaker, Robin; Thatcher, Sean E; Batifoulier-Yiannikouris, Frederique; English, Victoria L; Cassis, Lisa A

    2015-06-15

    We recently demonstrated that female mice are resistant to the development of obesity-induced hypertension through a sex hormone-dependent mechanism that involved adipose angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2). In this study, we hypothesized that provision of 17β-estradiol (E2) to ovariectomized (OVX) high-fat (HF)-fed female hypertensive mice would reverse obesity-hypertension through an ACE2-dependent mechanism. Pilot studies defined dose-dependent effects of E2 in OVX female mice on serum E2 concentrations and uterine weights. An E2 dose of 36 μg/ml restored normal serum E2 concentrations and uterine weights. Therefore, HF-fed OVX female Ace2(+/+) and Ace2(-/-) mice were administered vehicle or E2 (36 μg/ml) for 16 wk. E2 administration significantly decreased body weights of HF-fed OVX female Ace2(+/+) and Ace2(-/-) mice of either genotype. At 15 wk, E2 administration decreased systolic blood pressure (SBP) of OVX HF-fed Ace2(+/+) but not Ace2(-/-) females during the light but not the dark cycle. E2-mediated reductions in SBP in Ace2(+/+) females were associated with significant elevations in adipose ACE2 mRNA abundance and activity and reduced plasma ANG II concentrations. In contrast to females, E2 administration had no effect on any parameter quantified in HF-fed male hypertensive mice. In 3T3-L1 adipocytes, E2 promoted ACE2 mRNA abundance through effects at estrogen receptor-α (ERα) and resulted in ERα-mediated binding at the ACE2 promoter. These results demonstrate that E2 administration to OVX females reduces obesity-induced elevations in SBP (light cycle) through an ACE2-dependent mechanism. Beneficial effects of E2 to decrease blood pressure in OVX obese females may result from stimulation of adipose ACE2.

  16. Exercise increases hexokinase II mRNA, but not activity in obesity and type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Cusi, K J; Pratipanawatr, T; Koval, J; Printz, R; Ardehali, H; Granner, D K; Defronzo, R A; Mandarino, L J

    2001-05-01

    Glucose phosphorylation, catalyzed by hexokinase, is the first committed step in glucose uptake in skeletal muscle. Hexokinase II (HKII) is the isoform that is present in muscle and is regulated by insulin and muscle contraction. Glucose phosphorylation and HKII expression are both reduced in obese and type 2 diabetic subjects. A single bout of exercise increases HKII mRNA and activity in muscle from healthy subjects. The present study was performed to determine if a moderate exercise increases HKII mRNA expression and activity in patients with type 2 diabetes. Muscle biopsies were performed before and 3 hours after a single bout of cycle ergometer exercise in obese and type 2 diabetic patients. HKII mRNA and activity and glycogen synthase activity were determined in the muscle biopsies. Exercise increased HKII mRNA in obese and diabetic subjects by 1.67 +/- 0.34 and 1.87 +/- 0.26-fold, respectively (P <.05 for both). Exercise did not significantly increase HKI mRNA. When HKII mRNA increases were compared with the 2.26 +/- 0.36-fold increase in HKII mRNA previously reported for healthy lean subjects, no statistically significant differences were found. In contrast to the increase in HKII activity observed after exercise by lean healthy controls, exercise did not increase HKII activity in obese nondiabetic or diabetic subjects. Exercise increased glycogen synthase activity (GS(0.1) and GS(FV)) significantly in both obese nondiabetic and type 2 diabetic patients. The present results indicate that there is a posttranscriptional defect in the response of HKII expression to exercise in obese and type 2 diabetic subjects. This defect may contribute to reduced HKII activity and glucose uptake in these patients.

  17. Salacia root, a unique Ayurvedic medicine, meets multiple targets in diabetes and obesity.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuhao; Huang, Tom Hsun-Wei; Yamahara, Johji

    2008-05-23

    In many traditional schools of medicine it is claimed that a balanced modulation of several targets can provide a superior therapeutic effect and decrease in side effect profile compared to a single action from a single selective ligand, especially in the treatment of certain chronic and complex diseases, such as diabetes and obesity. Diabetes and obesity have a multi-factorial basis involving both genetic and environmental risk factors. A wide array of medicinal plants and their active constituents play a role in the prevention and treatment of diabetes. Salacia roots have been used in Ayurvedic medicine for diabetes and obesity since antiquity, and have been extensively consumed in Japan, the United States and other countries as a food supplement for the prevention of obesity and diabetes. Recent pharmacological studies have demonstrated that Salacia roots modulate multiple targets: peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha-mediated lipogenic gene transcription, angiotensin II/angiotensin II type 1 receptor, alpha-glucosidase, aldose reductase and pancreatic lipase. These multi-target actions may mainly contribute to Salacia root-induced improvement of type 2 diabetes and obesity-associated hyperglycemia, dyslipidemia and related cardiovascular complications seen in humans and rodents. The results of bioassay-guided identification indicate that mangiferin, salacinol, kotalanol and kotalagenin 16-acetate are at least in part responsible for these multi-target regulatory activities of Salacia roots. The evidence suggests that this unique traditional medicine fulfills a multiple-target strategy in the prevention and treatment of diabetes and obesity. Although toxicological studies have suggested minimal adverse effects of the herbal medicine in rodents, a clinical trial is crucial to further confirm the safety of Salacia roots. In addition, further mechanistic studies are necessary in order to allow a better understanding of how use of Salacia root may

  18. Portal Hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    ... Obesity to Liver Cancer Additional Content Medical News Portal Hypertension By Steven K. Herrine, MD, Thomas Jefferson ... Liver Hepatic Encephalopathy Jaundice in Adults Liver Failure Portal Hypertension (See also Overview of Liver Disease .) Portal ...

  19. Work, Diabetes and Obesity: A Seven Year Follow-Up Study among Danish Health Care Workers

    PubMed Central

    Poulsen, Kjeld; Cleal, Bryan; Clausen, Thomas; Andersen, Lars L.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The rise in prevalence of diabetes is alarming and research ascribes most of the increase to lifestyle. However, little knowledge exists about the influence of occupational factors on the risk for developing diabetes. This study estimates the importance of work and lifestyle as risk factors for developing diabetes mellitus among healthcare workers and explores the association of work factors and obesity, which is a risk factor for diabetes. Methods Questionnaire-based prospective cohort study among 7,305 health care workers followed for seven years in the Danish National Diabetes Register. We used bivariate comparisons to give an unadjusted estimate of associations, followed by adjusted survival analysis and logistic regression models to estimate the influences of potential risk factors related to job, health and lifestyle on diabetes and obesity. Results During seven years of follow up, 3.5% of participants developed diabetes, associated with obesity (HR  =  6.53; 95% CI 4.68–9.10), overweight (HR  =  2.89; CI 2.11–3.96) age 50–69 y (HR  =  2.27; 95% CI 1.57–3.43) and high quality of leadership (HR  =  1.60; CI 1.19–2.16). Obesity at baseline was most common among the youngest employees, and was mainly associated with developing diabetes (OR  =  3.84; CI 2.85–5.17), impaired physical capacity and physical inactivity. In the occupational setting, obesity was associated with shift work, severe musculoskeletal pain, low influence, but also by good management, fewer role conflicts and a positive work-life balance. Looking only at non-smokers, removed the influence of age and pain. However, non-smokers also had higher depression scores and more role conflicts. Conclusions Confirming obesity as the strongest risk factor for developing diabetes, the present study identified few occupational risk factors. However, obesity, the key risk factor for diabetes, had a more variable relation with work than did diabetes. PMID:25068830

  20. The complexities of obesity and diabetes with the development and progression of pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Bao, Bin; Wang, Zhiwei; Li, Yiwei; Kong, Dejuan; Ali, Shadan; Banerjee, Sanjeev; Ahmad, Aamir; Sarkar, Fazlul H

    2011-04-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) is one of the most lethal malignant diseases with the worst prognosis. It is ranked as the fourth leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the United States. Many risk factors have been associated with PC. Interestingly, large numbers of epidemiological studies suggest that obesity and diabetes, especially type-2 diabetes, are positively associated with increased risk of PC. Similarly, these chronic diseases (obesity, diabetes, and cancer) are also a major public health concern. In the U.S. population, 50 percent are overweight, 30 percent are medically obese, and 10 percent have diabetes mellitus (DM). Therefore, obesity and DM have been considered as potential risk factors for cancers; however, the focus of this article is restricted to PC. Although the mechanisms responsible for the development of these chronic diseases leading to the development of PC are not fully understood, the biological importance of the activation of insulin, insulin like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and its receptor (IGF-1R) signaling pathways in insulin resistance mechanism and subsequent induction of compensatory hyperinsulinemia has been proposed. Therefore, targeting insulin/IGF-1 signaling with anti-diabetic drugs for lowering blood insulin levels and reversal of insulin resistance could be useful strategy for the prevention and/or treatment of PC. A large number of studies have demonstrated that the administration of anti-diabetic drugs such as metformin and thiazolidinediones (TZD) class of PPAR-γ agonists decreases the risk of cancers, suggesting that these agents might be useful anti-tumor agents for the treatment of PC. In this review article, we will discuss the potential roles of metformin and TZD anti-diabetic drugs as anti-tumor agents in the context of PC and will further discuss the complexities and the possible roles of microRNAs (miRNAs) in the pathogenesis of obesity, diabetes, and PC.

  1. Non-Obese Diabetic Mice Rapidly Develop Dramatic Sympathetic Neuritic Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Robert E.; Dorsey, Denise A.; Beaudet, Lucie N.; Frederick, Kathy E.; Parvin, Curtis A.; Plurad, Santiago B.; Levisetti, Matteo G.

    2003-01-01

    To address the pathogenesis of diabetic autonomic neuropathy, we have examined the sympathetic nervous system in non-obese diabetic (NOD) and streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic mice, two models of type 1 diabetes, and the db/db mouse, a model of type 2 diabetes. After only 3 to 5 weeks of diabetes, NOD mice developed markedly swollen axons and dendrites (“neuritic dystrophy”) in the prevertebral superior mesenteric and celiac ganglia (SMG-CG), similar to the pathology described in diabetic STZ- and BBW-rat and man. Comparable changes failed to develop in the superior cervical ganglia of the NOD mouse or in the SMG-CG of non-diabetic NOD siblings. STZ-induced diabetic mice develop identical changes, although at a much slower pace and to a lesser degree than NOD mice. NOD-SCID mice, which are genetically identical to NOD mice except for the absence of T and B cells, do not develop diabetes or neuropathology comparable to diabetic NOD mice. However, STZ-treated NOD-SCID mice develop severe neuritic dystrophy, evidence against an exclusively autoimmune pathogenesis for autonomic neuropathy in this model. Chronically diabetic type 2 db/db mice fail to develop neuritic dystrophy, suggesting that hyperglycemia alone may not be the critical and sufficient element. The NOD mouse appears to be a valuable model of diabetic sympathetic autonomic neuropathy with unambiguous, rapidly developing neuropathology which corresponds closely to the characteristic pathology of other rodent models and man. PMID:14578206

  2. Hydroalcoholic extract of Allium eriophyllum leaves attenuates cardiac impairment in rats with simultaneous type 2 diabetes and renal hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Janahmadi, Z.; Nekooeian, A.A.; Mozafari, M.

    2015-01-01

    Some species of Allium family have been shown to offer cardioprotection in animal studies. This study aimed at examining possible role of oxidative stress in the cardioprotective effects of hydroalcoholic extract of Allium eriophyllum in rats with simultaneous type 2 diabetes and renal hypertension. Six groups of male Spargue-Dawley rats (8-10 rats each) including a sham-control, a diabetic group, a renal hypertensive group, three groups of animals with simultaneous diabetes and hypertension receiving vehicle, or the extract at 30 or 100 mg/kg/day were used. Four weeks after receiving vehicle or extract, blood pressure, fasting blood glucose, and serum superoxide dismutase and glutathione reductase levels were measured, and isolated heart studies were performed. Systolic blood pressure, fasting blood glucose, coronary effluent creatine kinase-MB, infarct size and coronary resistance of diabetic hypertensive group receiving vehicle were significantly higher than those of the sham-control group and treatment with the extract prevented the increase of these variables. Moreover, rate of rise and decrease of left ventricular pressure, left ventricular developed pressure, rate pressure product and serum levels of superoxide dismutase and glutathione reductase of diabetic hypertensive group receiving vehicle were significantly lower than those the sham-control group, and treatment with the extract prevented the decrease of these variables. The findings indicate that hydroalcoholic extract of A. eriophyllum leaves, possibly by an antioxidant mechanism, protected against simultaneous diabetes and hypertension-induced cardiac dysfunction. PMID:26487889

  3. Is Acanthosis Nigricans a Reliable Indicator for Risk of Type 2 Diabetes in Obese Children and Adolescents?: A Systematic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abraham, Cilymol; Rozmus, Cathy L.

    2012-01-01

    Obesity and type 2 diabetes is becoming a major health problem affecting children and adolescents in the United States. This article reviews the current literature examining the association between the presence of acanthosis nigricans (AN) and risk for developing type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in obese children and adolescents. Ethnicity, family…

  4. Analysis of the membrane fluidity of erythrocyte ghosts in diabetic, spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Hernández, Ismael H; Avendaño-Flores, Yesica S; Mejía-Zepeda, Ricardo

    2010-12-01

    Diabetes and hypertension are closely related diseases associated with changes in membrane fluidity. Here, we measured the membrane fluidity of erythrocyte ghosts from spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR), with or without streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetes, at the ages of 1, 3 and 6 months, by introducing the use of the intramolecular excimer forming dipyrenylpropane (DPyP) in this model. Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) was induced in 48-h-old, newborn male SHR by intraperitoneal injection of STZ. We found lower excimer to monomer (I (e)/I (m)) DPyP ratios in diabetic SHR than in control SHR at 3 and 6 months old, indicating a decrease in membrane fluidity. Simultaneously, the composition of fatty acids was determined and it was found that the unsaturated to saturated fatty acids ratio (U/S) was compatible with changes in membrane fluidity. These results suggest that the change in fatty acid composition of erythrocyte ghosts contributes significantly to the decreased membrane fluidity detected with DPyP in diabetic SHR.

  5. Is waist circumference ≥102/88cm better than body mass index ≥30 to predict hypertension and diabetes development regardless of gender, age group, and race/ethnicity? Meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Seo, Dong-Chul; Choe, Siyoung; Torabi, Mohammad R

    2017-04-01

    Between body mass index (BMI) ≥30 and waist circumference (WC) ≥102/88cm, we investigated which of the two measures is a better predictor of two of the most common chronic diseases - diabetes mellitus and hypertension while also examining differential association by gender, age group, and race/ethnicity. Meta-analysis was conducted for all longitudinal studies with at least 12months of follow-up published up to April 2015. Ratio of relative risk (rRR) and relative risk of diseases were computed and compared by baseline obesity measurement. The final sample included 23 longitudinal observation studies involving 62 study arms with 259,200 individuals. WC≥102/88cm was a better predictor than BMI≥30 for development of diabetes (rRR=0.81, 95% CI=0.68-0.96), but not for hypertension (rRR=0.92, 95% CI=0.80-1.06). Subgroup analyses showed WC≥102/88cm was a better predictor for diabetes in women than men, and for ages 60 and older than other ages. Only WC≥102/88cm, not BMI≥30, predicted development of hypertension among Hispanic/Latinos. Neither BMI≥30 nor WC≥102/88cm were significant predictors of hypertension when age group was controlled. Central obesity may be a more serious risk factor for diabetes development in women and for older ages. The predictive power of BMI≥30 or WC≥102/88cm in hypertension development should not be emphasized as either could mask the effect of age.

  6. Implementation of management strategies for diabetes and hypertension: from local to global health in cardiovascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Bloomfield, Gerald S; Wang, Tracy Y; Boulware, L Ebony; Califf, Robert M; Hernandez, Adrian F; Velazquez, Eric J; Peterson, Eric D; Li, Jennifer S

    2015-03-01

    Diabetes and hypertension are chronic conditions that are growing in prevalence as major causal factors of cardiovascular disease (CVD). The need for chronic-illness surveillance, population-risk management, and successful treatment interventions are crucial for reducing the burden of future CVD. Addressing these problems will require population-risk stratification, task-sharing and -shifting, and community-as well as network-based care. Information technology tools also provide new opportunities for identifying those at risk and for implementing comprehensive approaches to achieving the goal of improved health locally, regionally, nationally, and globally. This article discusses ongoing efforts at one university health center in the implementation of management strategies for diabetes and hypertension at the local, regional, national, and global levels.

  7. Obesity and diabetes, the built environment, and the 'local' food economy in the United States, 2007.

    PubMed

    Salois, Matthew J

    2012-01-01

    Obesity and diabetes are increasingly attributed to environmental factors, however, little attention has been paid to the influence of the 'local' food economy. This paper examines the association of measures relating to the built environment and 'local' agriculture with U.S. county-level prevalence of obesity and diabetes. Key indicators of the 'local' food economy include the density of farmers' markets and the presence of farms with direct sales. This paper employs a robust regression estimator to account for non-normality of the data and to accommodate outliers. Overall, the built environment is associated with the prevalence of obesity and diabetes and a strong local' food economy may play an important role in prevention. Results imply considerable scope for community-level interventions.

  8. Transcriptomic analysis of visceral adipose from healthy and diabetic obese subjects

    PubMed Central

    Mathur, Sandeep Kumar; Jain, Priyanka; Mathur, Prashant; Punjabi, Poonam; Agarwal, Atima; Sharma, Abhay

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the role of visceral fat accumulation in the occurrence and progression of metabolic syndrome is of considerable interest. In order to understand the difference between visceral tissue biology of healthy and unhealthy obese individuals, we have used microarray profiling to compare genome-wide expression differences between visceral adipose tissue biopsies obtained from obese diabetics, and those from age and body mass index (BMI) matched normal glucose tolerance subjects. Whereas genes upregulated in diabetics showed enrichment of natural killer cell mediated cytotoxicity, the downregulated genes showed enrichment of biosynthesis of unsaturated fatty acids. Given the known inhibitory effect of unsaturated fatty acids on inflammation and natural killer cell number or activity, our results suggest that visceral inflammation resulting from decreased levels of unsaturated fatty acids may underlie progression of diabetes in obese individuals. PMID:23869300

  9. Blunted sympathoinhibitory responses in obesity-related hypertension are due to aberrant central but not peripheral signalling mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    How, Jackie M Y; Wardak, Suhail A; Ameer, Shaik I; Davey, Rachel A; Sartor, Daniela M

    2014-01-01

    The gut hormone cholecystokinin (CCK) acts at subdiaphragmatic vagal afferents to induce renal and splanchnic sympathoinhibition and vasodilatation, via reflex inhibition of a subclass of cardiovascular-controlling neurons in the rostroventrolateral medulla (RVLM). These sympathoinhibitory and vasodilator responses are blunted in obese, hypertensive rats and our aim in the present study was to determine whether this is attributable to (i) altered sensitivity of presympathetic vasomotor RVLM neurons, and (ii) aberrant peripheral or central signalling mechanisms. Using a diet-induced obesity model, male Sprague–Dawley rats exhibited either an obesity-prone (OP) or obesity-resistant (OR) phenotype when placed on a medium high fat diet for 13–15 weeks; control animals were placed on a low fat diet. OP animals had elevated resting arterial pressure compared to OR/control animals (P < 0.05). Barosensitivity of RVLM neurons was significantly attenuated in OP animals (P < 0.05), suggesting altered baroreflex gain. CCK induced inhibitory responses in RVLM neurons of OR/control animals but not OP animals. Subdiaphragmatic vagal nerve responsiveness to CCK and CCK1 receptor mRNA expression in nodose ganglia did not differ between the groups, but CCK induced significantly less Fos-like immunoreactivity in both the nucleus of the solitary tract and the caudal ventrolateral medulla of OP animals compared to controls (P < 0.05). These results suggest that blunted sympathoinhibitory and vasodilator responses in obesity-related hypertension are due to alterations in RVLM neuronal responses, resulting from aberrant central but not peripheral signalling mechanisms. In obesity, blunted sympathoinhibitory mechanisms may lead to increased regional vascular resistance and contribute to the development of hypertension. PMID:24492842

  10. Country of birth affects blood pressure in the French hypertensive diabetic population

    PubMed Central

    Aoun Bahous, Sola; Thomas, Frédérique; Pannier, Bruno; Danchin, Nicolas; Safar, Michel E.

    2015-01-01

    In a population of 56,242 individuals living in France, we showed that individuals born in France have significantly different levels of blood pressure (BP) and cardiovascular (CV) risk factors than African and Asian populations born in their own country but living long-term in France (average duration of stay, 5–10 years). The objective of our study was to investigate the impact of country of birth on BP and CV risk factors in a subpopulation of 9245 patients selected solely on the diagnosis of hypertension, either alone or with simultaneous type 2 diabetes. In the subgroup of individuals with hypertension alone, brachial systolic, diastolic, mean and pulse pressure (PP), heart rate (HR), augmentation index and PP amplification were significantly higher in African-born than French- and Asian-born populations. In the subgroup of individuals with both hypertension and diabetes, only augmentation index, PP amplification and brachial and central PP, but not brachial systolic, diastolic, mean BP, and HR, were elevated when the African-born subgroup was compared to the French- and Asian-born populations. Increased body mass index (BMI), waist-hip ratio (WHR), and deprivation scores, but not increased plasma lipids or glycemia, were consistently associated with the African-born population. The combination of diabetes and hypertension in African populations was associated with increased aortic stiffness and PP, together with greater body weight and WHR. In individuals with increased PP and hence systolic hypertension, increased PP requires systolic BP to be reduced whereas notable reductions in diastolic BP may have deleterious consequences. PMID:26388785

  11. Saturated fatty acids activate ERK signaling to downregulate hepatic sortilin 1 in obese and diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Bi, Lipeng; Chiang, John Y L; Ding, Wen-Xing; Dunn, Winston; Roberts, Benjamin; Li, Tiangang

    2013-10-01

    Hepatic VLDL overproduction is a characteristic feature of diabetes and an important contributor to diabetic dyslipidemia. Hepatic sortilin 1 (Sort1), a cellular trafficking receptor, is a novel regulator of plasma lipid metabolism and reduces plasma cholesterol and triglycerides by inhibiting hepatic apolipoprotein B production. Elevated circulating free fatty acids play key roles in hepatic VLDL overproduction and the development of dyslipidemia. This study investigated the regulation of hepatic Sort1 in obesity and diabetes and the potential implications in diabetic dyslipidemia. Results showed that hepatic Sort1 protein was markedly decreased in mouse models of type I and type II diabetes and in human individuals with obesity and liver steatosis, whereas increasing hepatic Sort1 expression reduced plasma cholesterol and triglycerides in mice. Mechanistic studies showed that the saturated fatty acid palmitate activated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and inhibited Sort1 protein by mechanisms involving Sort1 protein ubiquitination and degradation. Consistently, hepatic ERK signaling was activated in diabetic mice, whereas blocking ERK signaling by an ERK inhibitor increased hepatic Sort1 protein in mice. These results suggest that increased saturated fatty acids downregulate liver Sort1 protein, which may contribute to the development of dyslipidemia in obesity and diabetes.

  12. The Effects of Shift Work on Sleeping Quality, Hypertension and Diabetes in Retired Workers

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yanjun; Liu, Yuewei; Huang, Xiji; Rong, Yi; He, Meian; Wang, Youjie; Yuan, Jing; Wu, Tangchun; Chen, Weihong

    2013-01-01

    Background Shift work has been associated with adverse health effects by disturbing circadian rhythms. However,its potential long-term health effects and the persistent effects after leaving shifts have not been well established. Methods and Results We studied 26,463 workers from Tongji-Dongfeng Cohort in China. All the participants are retired employees of Dongfeng Motor Company. Information on demographics, occupational history and medical history were gathered through questionnaires. After adjusting potential confounders in the logistic regression models, shift work was associated with poor sleeping quality, diabetes and hypertension independently. We observed significant effects of shift work on poor sleeping quality, diabetes and hypertension; the ORs (95%CI) are 1.18 (1.09–1.27), 1.10 (1.03–1.17) and 1.05 (1.01–1.09) respectively. In the further analysis, we found elevated ORs (95%CI) for participants with poor sleeping quality, the ORs (95%CI) are 1.34 (1.08–1.60), 1.13 (1.05–1.21), 1.05 (1.03–1.07) and 1.05 (1.01–1.09) for 1–4, 5–9, 10–19, ≥20 years of shift work respectively. However, with the extension of leaving shift work duration, the effects of shift work on sleep quality gradually reduced. Conclusions Shift work may be an independent risk factor for sleeping quality, diabetes and hypertension even in retired workers. Applicable intervention strategies are needed for prevention of sleep loss, diabetes, and hypertension for shift workers. PMID:23976988

  13. Functional Vascular Study in Hypertensive Subjects with Type 2 Diabetes Using Losartan or Amlodipine

    PubMed Central

    Pozzobon, Cesar Romaro; Gismondi, Ronaldo A. O. C.; Bedirian, Ricardo; Ladeira, Marcia Cristina; Neves, Mario Fritsch; Oigman, Wille

    2014-01-01

    Background Antihypertensive drugs are used to control blood pressure (BP) and reduce macro- and microvascular complications in hypertensive patients with diabetes. Objectives The present study aimed to compare the functional vascular changes in hypertensive patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus after 6 weeks of treatment with amlodipine or losartan. Methods Patients with a previous diagnosis of hypertension and type 2 diabetes mellitus were randomly divided into 2 groups and evaluated after 6 weeks of treatment with amlodipine (5 mg/day) or losartan (100 mg/day). Patient evaluation included BP measurement, ambulatory BP monitoring, and assessment of vascular parameters using applanation tonometry, pulse wave velocity (PWV), and flow-mediated dilation (FMD) of the brachial artery. Results A total of 42 patients were evaluated (21 in each group), with a predominance of women (71%) in both groups. The mean age of the patients in both groups was similar (amlodipine group: 54.9 ± 4.5 years; losartan group: 54.0 ± 6.9 years), with no significant difference in the mean BP [amlodipine group: 145 ± 14 mmHg (systolic) and 84 ± 8 mmHg (diastolic); losartan group: 153 ± 19 mmHg (systolic) and 90 ± 9 mmHg (diastolic)]. The augmentation index (30% ± 9% and 36% ± 8%, p = 0.025) and augmentation pressure (16 ± 6 mmHg and 20 ± 8 mmHg, p = 0.045) were lower in the amlodipine group when compared with the losartan group. PWV and FMD were similar in both groups. Conclusions Hypertensive patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus treated with amlodipine exhibited an improved pattern of pulse wave reflection in comparison with those treated with losartan. However, the use of losartan may be associated with independent vascular reactivity to the pressor effect. PMID:25014057

  14. Breastfeeding and Maternal Hypertension and Diabetes: A Population-Based Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Bing-Zhen; Zhang, Hui-Ying; Liu, Hai-Hang; Li, Hong-Juan

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective: This study aimed to assess the association of breastfeeding and maternal hypertension and diabetes in Beijing, China. Subjects and Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted in four urban communities of Beijing, China, with 9,128 parous women 40–81 years of age who had had only one lifetime birth. Each participant completed a detailed survey and accepted blood pressure measurement and blood glucose testing. Moreover, self-reported hypertension and diabetes were confirmed by review of medical records. Results: After the analysis was adjusted for the potential confounders, including age, body mass index (BMI), waist to hip ratio (WHR), working status, educational level, drinking, smoking, family history of hypertension, age of menarche, menopause, oral contraceptive use, age of child-bearing, and postpartum BMI, the odd ratio (OR) of hypertension was 1.18 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.05–1.32) for women who did not breastfeed, compared with women who did. In addition, the ORs for >0 to 6 months, >6 to 12 months, and >12 months of breastfeeding were 0.87 (95% CI, 0.76–0.99), 0.83 (95% CI, 0.68–1.00), and 0.79 (95% CI, 0.65–0.97), respectively, compared with women who did not breastfeed. With adjustment for age, WHR, working status, educational level, family history of diabetes, and postpartum BMI, women who did not breastfeed increased the risk of diabetes (OR=1.30; 95% CI, 1.11–1.53) compared with women who did. Moreover, women who breastfed for >0 to 6 months (OR=0.81; 95% CI, 0.67–0.98) and >6 to 12 months (OR=0.46; 95% CI, 0.26–0.84) had a lower risk of diabetes, compared with women who did not breastfeed. Conclusions: Chinese mothers who did not breastfeed were more likely to develop hypertension and diabetes in later life. PMID:25785993

  15. Do Interactions Between Gut Ecology and Environmental Chemicals Contribute to Obesity and Diabetes?

    PubMed Central

    Snedeker, Suzanne M.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Gut microbiota are important factors in obesity and diabetes, yet little is known about their role in the toxicodynamics of environmental chemicals, including those recently found to be obesogenic and diabetogenic. Objectives: We integrated evidence that independently links gut ecology and environmental chemicals to obesity and diabetes, providing a framework for suggesting how these environmental factors may interact with these diseases, and identified future research needs. Methods: We examined studies with germ-free or antibiotic-treated laboratory animals, and human studies that evaluated how dietary influences and microbial changes affected obesity and diabetes. Strengths and weaknesses of studies evaluating how environmental chemical exposures may affect obesity and diabetes were summarized, and research gaps on how gut ecology may affect the disposition of environmental chemicals were identified. Results: Mounting evidence indicates that gut microbiota composition affects obesity and diabetes, as does exposure to environmental chemicals. The toxicology and pharmacology literature also suggests that interindividual variations in gut microbiota may affect chemical metabolism via direct activation of chemicals, depletion of metabolites needed for biotransformation, alteration of host biotransformation enzyme activities, changes in enterohepatic circulation, altered bioavailability of environmental chemicals and/or antioxidants from food, and alterations in gut motility and barrier function. Conclusions: Variations in gut microbiota are likely to affect human toxicodynamics and increase individual exposure to obesogenic and diabetogenic chemicals. Combating the global obesity and diabetes epidemics requires a multifaceted approach that should include greater emphasis on understanding and controlling the impact of interindividual gut microbe variability on the disposition of environmental chemicals in humans. PMID:22042266

  16. METABOLIC ASTHMA: IS THERE A LINK BETWEEN OBESITY, DIABETES AND ASTHMA?

    PubMed Central

    Perez, Miriam K.; Piedimonte, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    SYNOPSIS Childhood asthma and obesity have reached epidemic proportions worldwide, and the latter is also contributing to increasing rates of related metabolic disorders like diabetes. Yet, the relationship between asthma, obesity, and abnormal metabolism is not well understood, nor has it been adequately explored in children. This article discusses the concept of “metabolic asthma” and the recent hypothesis that early derangement in lipid and glucose metabolism is independently associated to increased risk for asthma. PMID:25282290

  17. Prevalence of undiagnosed diabetes and pre-diabetes among hypertensive patients attending Kiambu district Hospital, Kenya: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Meme, Nkatha; Amwayi, Samuel; Nganga, Ziporrah; Buregyeya, Esther

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Hypertension (HTN) and diabetes mellitus (DM) are two common non-communicable diseases (NCDs) that are closely linked: one cannot be properly managed without attention to the other. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of undiagnosed diabetic and pre-diabetic states that is abnormal glucose regulation (AGR) and factors associated with it among hypertensive patients in Kiambu Hospital, Kenya. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional study from February 2014 to April 2014. Hypertensive patients aged ≥18 attending the out-patient medical clinic were included in the study. Pregnant and known diabetic patients were excluded. Data was collected on socio-demographics, behavior, and anthropometrics. Diabetes status was based on a Glycated Haemoglobin (HbA1C) classification of ≥6.5% for diabetes, 6.0-6.4% for pre-diabetes and ≤6.0% for normal. AGR was the dependable variable and included two diabetic categories; diabetes and pre-diabetes. Results We enrolled 334 patients into the study: the mean age was 59 years (Standard deviation= 14.3). Of these patients 254 (76%) were women. Thirty two percent (107/334; 32%) were found to have AGR, with 14% (46) having un-diagnosed DM and 18%(61) with pre-diabetes. Factors associated with AGR were age ≥45 (OR = 3.23; 95% CI 1.37 ≥ 7.62), basal metabolic index (BMI) ≥ 25 Kg/m2 (OR= 3.13; 95% CI 1.53 - 6.41), low formal education (primary/none)(OR= 2; 95%CI 1.08 - 3.56) and family history of DM (OR = 2.19; 95%CI 1.16 - 4.15). Conclusion There was a high prevalence of undiagnosed AGR among hypertensive patients. This highlights the need to regularly screen for AGR among hypertensive patients as recommended by WHO. PMID:26966482

  18. Safety and benefits of a tablet combining losartan and hydrochlorothiazide in Japanese diabetic patients with hypertension.

    PubMed

    Kinouchi, Kenichiro; Ichihara, Atsuhiro; Sakoda, Mariyo; Kurauchi-Mito, Asako; Itoh, Hiroshi

    2009-12-01

    This study was conducted to determine the effects of a tablet combining losartan/hydrochlorothiazide (L/HCTZ) in comparison with losartan alone in Japanese diabetic patients with hypertension. Thirty consecutive Japanese diabetic patients with hypertension were randomly assigned to group A, receiving losartan alone for the first 3 months, then L/HCTZ for the next 3 months, or group B, receiving L/HCTZ for the first 3 months, then losartan alone for the next 3 months. Clinical and biological parameters were obtained before, and 3 and 6 months after the start of this study. The decreases in systolic and diastolic blood pressure (BP) during treatment with L/HCTZ were significantly greater than in treatment with losartan alone. Both treatments significantly and similarly decreased urinary albumin excretion, the cardio-ankle vascular index (CAVI) and augmentation index (AI). There was no significant difference in metabolic change during both the mono- and combination pharmacotherapies. The tablet combining L/HCTZ significantly reduced systolic and diastolic BP compared with the losartan monotherapy, and offered benefits similar to losartan monotherapy for albuminuria, arterial stiffness assessed by the CAVI and AI, and metabolic effects. Thus, the L/HCTZ tablet could be a useful drug for Japanese diabetic patients with hypertension.

  19. Treatment of Diabetes and/or Hypertension Using Medicinal Plants in Cameroon.

    PubMed

    Tsabang, N; Yedjou, C G; Tsambang, Lwd; Tchinda, A T; Donfagsiteli, N; Agbor, G A; Tchounwou, Pbb; Nkongmeneck, B A

    Medicinal plants have served as valuable starting materials for drug development in both developing and developed countries. Today, more than 80% of the people living in Africa were depended on medicinal plants based medicines to satisfy their healthcare needs. The main goal of the present study was to collect and document information on herbal remedies traditionally used for the treatment of diabetes and/or hypertension in Cameroon. To reach this objective, data were collected from 328 patients who have been diagnosed at least once by a physician as diabetics and/or hypertension patients. One hundred and eighty two (182) among them took for a period of 10 days different varieties of medicinal plants which were prepared in form of decoction, maceration and infusion and administered orally twice or three times daily. As result, 70% of patients who used plants were relieved at the end of the treatment. Thirty-three plants have been recorded and documented for the treatment of diabetes and/or hypertension. The results of this study can stimulate a sustainable development by providing the basis for drugs discovery and by documenting biodiversity for long time exploitation.

  20. Free access to hypertension and diabetes medicines among the elderly: a reality yet to be constructed.

    PubMed

    Paniz, Vera Maria Vieira; Fassa, Anaclaudia Gastal; Facchini, Luiz Augusto; Piccini, Roberto Xavier; Tomasi, Elaine; Thumé, Elaine; da Silveira, Denise Silva; Rodrigues, Maria Aparecida; Domingues, Marlos Rodrigues; Bertoldi, Andréa Dâmaso

    2010-06-01

    The study evaluated free access to hypertension and diabetes medicines and the reasons reported for lack of access. The sample included 4,003 elderly people living in Primary Care Unit coverage areas from 41 Southern and Northeastern Brazilian cities. Free access was higher in the Northeast (62.4%). The strategy of the Family Health Program (Programa Saúde da Família - PSF) was more effective in providing access than the traditional model, with higher results in the Northeast (61.2%) than in the South (39.6%). Around 20% of medicines included in the Hypertension and Diabetes Program and 26% of those included in the National Essential Medicines List (RENAME) were paid out of pocket. In the Northeast, 25% of insulin and 32% of oral antidiabetics were paid out of pocket. Unavailability in the public sector and a lack of money determined the lack of access. Although the PSF, Hypertension and Diabetes Program and RENAME expanded free access, supplies were insufficient. A greater connection between programs and a clear definition of responsibilities can improve medicine acquisition process, increasing the effectiveness of pharmaceutical assistance.

  1. The immune system’s involvement in obesity-driven type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Shu, Chengyi Jenny; Benoist, Christophe; Mathis, Diane

    2012-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes is now a worldwide epidemic, strongly correlated with an elevated incidence of obesity. Obesity-associated adipose tissue inflammation is a major cause of the decreased insulin sensitivity seen in type 2 diabetes. Recent studies have shed light on the crosstalk between the immune system and organismal metabolism. This review discusses the connection between inflammation in adipose tissue and systemic insulin resistance, focusing on the roles of innate and adaptive immune cell subsets in the pathogenesis of this metabolic disease. PMID:23333525

  2. Are epigenetic drugs for diabetes and obesity at our door step?

    PubMed

    Arguelles, Andrix O; Meruvu, Sunitha; Bowman, John D; Choudhury, Mahua

    2016-03-01

    Recent interest in epigenetics has focused on small molecules aimed at modifying disease-specific gene expression, including diabetes and obesity. Several major classes of epigenetic modifier include drugs already in the marketplace as well as several in various stages of study. These classes include histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi), histone acetyltransferase inhibitors (HATi), protein arginine methyltransferase inhibitors (PRMTis), DNA methyltransferase inhibitors (DNMTis), histone demethylating inhibitors (HDMis), and sirtuin-activating compounds (STACs). In this review, we discuss drugs with epigenetic properties that have been identified as potential therapeutic agents in the treatment of diabetes and obesity, including those currently in clinical trials.

  3. Dopamine Adaptations as a Common Pathway for Neurocognitive Impairment in Diabetes and Obesity: A Neuropsychological Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Small, Dana M.

    2017-01-01

    Evidence accumulates linking obesity and diabetes with cognitive dysfunction. At present the mechanism(s) underlying these associations and the relative contribution of diet, adiposity, and metabolic dysfunction are unknown. In this perspective key gaps in knowledge are outlined and an initial sketch of a neuropsychological profile is developed that points toward a critical role for dopamine (DA) adaptations in neurocognitive impairment secondary to diabetes and obesity. The precise mechanisms by which diet, metabolic dysfunction, and adiposity influence the DA system to impact cognition remains unclear and is an important direction for future research.

  4. Management of Hypertension in Diabetic Nephropathy: How Low Should We Go?

    PubMed

    Sternlicht, Hillel; Bakris, George L

    2016-01-01

    Hypertension is a frequent comorbidity often following the development of diabetic nephropathy among individuals with type 1 diabetes and affecting most patients with type 2 diabetes at the time of diagnosis. Multiple prospective randomized placebo-controlled trials demonstrate that tight blood pressure control among patients with diabetic nephropathy reduces the rates of macrovascular and microvascular complications. While randomized trials exist and support a blood pressure goal of <140/90 mm Hg for patients with nondiabetic kidney disease, there are no prospective data regarding a specific blood pressure goal on progression of diabetic nephropathy. Retrospective data analyses from trials show a linear relationship between either baseline or achieved study blood pressure and progression of nephropathy. Very high albuminuria is a hallmark of diabetic nephropathy with reductions by either angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEi) or angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB) monotherapy associated with slowed nephropathy progression. However, combination antihypertensive therapy, while decreasing proteinuria, augments the risk of hyperkalemia, hypotension, and kidney dysfunction. Given the lack of trial data for a BP goal among patients with diabetic nephropathy, prospective trials are needed to define the optimal blood pressure necessary to preserve kidney function. At present, guideline blood pressure goals of less than 140/90 mm Hg and the use of ACEi or ARB therapy for those with more than 300 mg of albuminuria are mandated.

  5. Obesity: genetic, molecular, and environmental aspects.

    PubMed

    Barness, Lewis A; Opitz, John M; Gilbert-Barness, Enid

    2007-12-15

    Obesity has emerged as one of the most serious public health concerns in the 21st century. Obese children tend to become obese adults. The dramatic rise in pediatric obesity closely parallels the rapid increase in the prevalence of adult obesity. As overweight children become adults they face the multitude of health problems associated with obesity at younger ages. The morbidity and mortality associated with obesity continue to increase. Obesity is one of the leading causes of preventable death. Complications of obesity include cardiovascular risks, hypertension, dyslipidemia, endothelial dysfunction, type 2 diabetes mellitus and impaired glucose tolerance, acanthosis nigricans, hepatic steatosis, premature puberty, hypogonadism and polycystic ovary syndrome, obstructive sleep disorder, orthopedic complications, cholelithiasis and pseudotumor cerebri. Genetic and molecular and environmental factors play an important role in the assessment and management of obesity.

  6. Development of diabetes in non-obese diabetic mice promotes Chlamydia pneumoniae dissemination from lung to peripheral blood

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, Hiroyuki; Oshio, Ichiro; Osaki, Takako; Kurata, Satoru; Yamamoto, Yoshimasa; Kamiya, Shigeru

    2006-01-01

    We examined a possible association between development of diabetes in non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice and dissemination of Chlamydia (Chlamydophila) pneumoniae from lung to peripheral blood. By real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) with primers for C. pneumoniae 16S rRNA, following multiple intranasal inoculations, we detected bacteria in lung in NOD mice with diabetes (38.5%) as well as Institute of Cancer Research, USA (ICR) mice (40%), but prevalence of bacteria in NOD mice without diabetes (pre-diabetic NOD mice and non-diabetic retired NOD mice) was very low (4.8%). The bacteria were only detected in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) cultured with hydrocortisone of the NOD mice with diabetes (53.8%). Results of immunostaining with fluorescein isothiocyanate-conjugated antichlamydia monoclonal antibody also showed the presence of bacterial antigens in the lungs and the PBMCs judged as positive by the RT-PCR. However, C. pneumoniae from cultured PBMCs of all NOD mice was undetected by cultivation method with inclusion-forming units assay. In addition, no influence of C. pneumoniae intranasal inoculation on development of diabetes in NOD mice was confirmed. Thus, the development of diabetes in NOD mouse appears to be one of critical factors for promoting the dissemination of C. pneumoniae from lung to peripheral blood. PMID:16623756

  7. Peroxisome proliferator activated receptors at the crossroad of obesity, diabetes, and pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Polvani, Simone; Tarocchi, Mirko; Tempesti, Sara; Bencini, Lapo; Galli, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is the fourth cause of cancer death with an overall survival of 5% at five years. The development of PDAC is characteristically associated to the accumulation of distinctive genetic mutations and is preceded by the exposure to several risk factors. Epidemiology has demonstrated that PDAC risk factors may be non-modifiable risks (sex, age, presence of genetic mutations, ethnicity) and modifiable and co-morbidity factors related to the specific habits and lifestyle. Recently it has become evident that obesity and diabetes are two important modifiable risk factors for PDAC. Obesity and diabetes are complex systemic and intertwined diseases and, over the years, experimental evidence indicate that insulin-resistance, alteration of adipokines, especially leptin and adiponectin, oxidative stress and inflammation may play a role in PDAC. Peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-γ (PPARγ) is a nuclear receptor transcription factor that is implicated in the regulation of metabolism, differentiation and inflammation. PPARγ is a key regulator of adipocytes differentiation, regulates insulin and adipokines production and secretion, may modulate inflammation, and it is implicated in PDAC. PPARγ agonists are used in the treatment of diabetes and oxidative stress-associated diseases and have been evaluated for the treatment of PDAC. PPARγ is at the cross-road of diabetes, obesity, and PDAC and it is an interesting target to pharmacologically prevent PDAC in obese and diabetic patients. PMID:26937133

  8. Peroxisome proliferator activated receptors at the crossroad of obesity, diabetes, and pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Polvani, Simone; Tarocchi, Mirko; Tempesti, Sara; Bencini, Lapo; Galli, Andrea

    2016-02-28

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is the fourth cause of cancer death with an overall survival of 5% at five years. The development of PDAC is characteristically associated to the accumulation of distinctive genetic mutations and is preceded by the exposure to several risk factors. Epidemiology has demonstrated that PDAC risk factors may be non-modifiable risks (sex, age, presence of genetic mutations, ethnicity) and modifiable and co-morbidity factors related to the specific habits and lifestyle. Recently it has become evident that obesity and diabetes are two important modifiable risk factors for PDAC. Obesity and diabetes are complex systemic and intertwined diseases and, over the years, experimental evidence indicate that insulin-resistance, alteration of adipokines, especially leptin and adiponectin, oxidative stress and inflammation may play a role in PDAC. Peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-γ (PPARγ) is a nuclear receptor transcription factor that is implicated in the regulation of metabolism, differentiation and inflammation. PPARγ is a key regulator of adipocytes differentiation, regulates insulin and adipokines production and secretion, may modulate inflammation, and it is implicated in PDAC. PPARγ agonists are used in the treatment of diabetes and oxidative stress-associated diseases and have been evaluated for the treatment of PDAC. PPARγ is at the cross-road of diabetes, obesity, and PDAC and it is an interesting target to pharmacologically prevent PDAC in obese and diabetic patients.

  9. Hypertensive disorders during pregnancy and risk of type 2 diabetes in later life: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zengfang; Wang, Zengyan; Wang, Luang; Qiu, Mingyue; Wang, Yangang; Hou, Xu; Guo, Zhong; Wang, Bin

    2017-03-01

    Many studies assessed the association between hypertensive disorders during pregnancy and risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus in later life, but contradictory findings were reported. A systemic review and meta-analysis was carried out to elucidate type 2 diabetes mellitus risk in women with hypertensive disorders during pregnancy. Pubmed, Embase, and Web of Science were searched for cohort or case-control studies on the association between hypertensive disorders during pregnancy and subsequent type 2 diabetes mellitus. Random-effect model was used to pool risk estimates. Bayesian meta-analysis was carried out to further estimate the type 2 diabetes mellitus risk associated with hypertensive disorders during pregnancy. Seventeen cohort or prospective matched case-control studies were finally included. Those 17 studies involved 2,984,634 women and 46,732 type 2 diabetes mellitus cases. Overall, hypertensive disorders during pregnancy were significantly correlated with type 2 diabetes mellitus risk (relative risk = 1.56, 95 % confidence interval 1.21-2.01, P = 0.001). Preeclampsia was significantly and independently correlated with type 2 diabetes mellitus risk (relative risk = 2.25, 95 % confidence interval 1.73-2.90, P < 0.001). In addition, gestational hypertension was also significantly and independently correlated with subsequent type 2 diabetes mellitus risk (relative risk = 2.06, 95 % confidence interval 1.57-2.69, P < 0.001). The pooled estimates were not significantly altered in the subgroup analyses of studies on preeclampsia or gestational hypertension. Bayesian meta-analysis showed the relative risks of type 2 diabetes mellitus risk for individuals with hypertensive disorders during pregnancy, preeclampsia, and gestational hypertension were 1.59 (95 % credibility interval: 1.11-2.32), 2.27 (95 % credibility interval: 1.67-2.97), and 2.06 (95 % credibility interval: 1.41-2.84), respectively. Publication bias was not evident

  10. Hypertensive response to exercise in dipper and non-dipper normotensive diabetics.

    PubMed

    Kucukdurmaz, Zekeriya; Karavelioglu, Yusuf; Karapinar, Hekim; Gul, Ibrahim; Yilmaz, Ahmet; Yarlioglues, Mikail; Akpek, Mahmut; Kaya, Mehmet Gungor

    2014-01-01

    Non-dipper blood pressure (NDP) as an indicator of autonomic dysfunction could be associated with hypertensive response to exercise (HRE) in diabetic patients. HRE was determined as a predictor of development of unborn hypertension. We aimed to investigate if any correlation among NDP and HRE in normotensive type 2 diabetic patients. A total of 59 consecutive type 2 diabetic patients without history of hypertension and with normal blood pressure (BP) on ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) were enrolled to the study. We divided the study population in to two groups depending on their BP on ABPM as dipper (group 1) or non-dipper (group 2). There were 22 patients (mean age 49.5 ± 7 and 10 male) in group 1 and 37 patients (mean age 53.1 ± 10 and 14 male) in group 2. Daytime diastolic and mean BP of dippers and night time systolic and mean BP of non-dippers were significantly higher. HRE was not significantly different between groups (59% vs. 62%, p = 0.820). Hemodynamic parameters during the exercise test were similar. At multivariate linear regression analysis, resting office systolic blood pressure (SBP) (r = 0.611, p < 0.001), male sex (r = 0.266, p = 0.002) and age (r = 0.321, p = 0.010) were independently correlated with peak exercises SBP. Logistic regression analyses identified the resting office SBP (OR 1.191, 95% CI 1.080-1.313; p < 0.001) and age (OR 1.161, 95% CI 1.038-1.298; p = 0.012) were independent predictors of HRE. This study revealed that HRE is not related with non-dipper BP in diabetic patients. This study could inspire to further studies to explore the main reasons of HRE in diabetes mellitus.

  11. Effect of the Obesity Epidemic on Kidney Transplantation: Obesity Is Independent of Diabetes as a Risk Factor for Adverse Renal Transplant Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Kwan, Jennifer M.; Hajjiri, Zahraa; Metwally, Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    Background Obesity is a growing epidemic in most developed countries including the United States resulting in an increased number of obese patients with end-stage renal disease. A previous study has shown that obese patients with end-stage renal disease have a survival benefit with transplantation compared with dialysis. However, due to serious comorbidities, many centers place restrictions on the selection of obese patients for transplantation. Further, due to obese patients having an increased risk of diabetes, it is unclear whether obesity can be an independent risk, independent of diabetes for increasing adverse renal transplant outcomes. Methods To investigate the role of obesity in kidney transplantation, we used the Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients database. After filtering for subjects that had the full set of covariates including age, gender, graft type, ethnicity, diabetes, peripheral vascular disease, dialysis time and time period of transplantation for our analysis, 191,091 subjects were included in the analyses. Using multivariate logistic regression analyses adjusted for covariates we determined whether obesity is an independent risk factor for adverse outcomes such as delayed graft function, acute rejection, urine protein and graft failure. Cox regression modeling was used to determine hazard ratios of graft failure. Results Using multivariate model analyses, we found that obese patients have significantly increased risk of adverse transplant outcomes, including delayed graft function, graft failure, urine protein and acute rejection. Cox regression modeling hazard ratios showed that obesity also increased risk of graft failure. Life-table survival curves showed that obesity may be a risk factor independent of diabetes mellitus for a shorter time to graft failure. Conclusions A key observation in our study is that the risks for adverse outcome of obesity are progressive with increasing body mass index. Furthermore, pre-obese overweight

  12. Reduction of plasma aldosterone and arterial stiffness in obese pre- and stage1 hypertensive subjects after aerobic exercise

    PubMed Central

    Collier, SR; Sandberg, K; Moody, AM; Frechette, V; Curry, CD; Ji, H; Gowdar, R; Chaudhuri, D; Meucci, M

    2017-01-01

    Obesity-related hypertension is associated with increased activity of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS), increasing arterial stiffness. Aerobic exercise decreases pulse wave velocity (PWV), therefore a treatment option for hypertension and obesity. Assess RAAS activity and PWV before and after 4 weeks of aerobic training in unmedicated, pre-to-stage-1 hypertensives. Ten obese subjects (52±3.2 years, body mass index=33.5±1.4) performed 30 min of aerobic exercise on a treadmill 3 days per week at 65% of peak oxygen consumption (VO2peak). Descriptive characteristics, systolic and diastolic blood pressure (SBP and DBP), PWV, and a blood draw was performed at baseline, following the 4-week control and training interventions. No differences in descriptive characteristics during the control period were observed, however, a significant decrease in plasma aldosterone (ALDO) (255.4±75 to 215.8±66 pg ml−1, P=0.001), SBP (140±12 to 136±10.4 mm Hg; P=0.02), DBP (89±4.2 to 85±6.3 mm Hg; P =0.03) and central PWV (11.2±0.6 to 9.8±0.8 m s−1; P=0.04) was shown pre-to-post exercise training. Four weeks of moderate-intensity aerobic training in obese, hypertensives decreases plasma ALDO independently of body weight and is significantly correlated to decreases in PWV reductions. PMID:24785976

  13. Genetic polymorphisms associated with overweight and obesity in uncontrolled Type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Kasim, Nor Bahirah; Huri, Hasniza Zaman; Vethakkan, Shireene Ratna; Ibrahim, Luqman; Abdullah, Bashar Mudhaffar

    2016-01-01

    Generally, obese and overweight individuals display higher free fatty acid levels, which stimulate insulin resistance. The combination of overweight or obesity with insulin resistance can trigger Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and are primary contributing factors to the development of uncontrolled T2DM. Genetic polymorphisms also play an important role as they can impact a population's susceptibility to becoming overweight or obese and developing related chronic complications, such as uncontrolled T2DM. This review specifically examines the genetic polymorphisms associated with overweight and obesity in patients with uncontrolled T2DM. Particularly, gene polymorphisms in ADIPOQ (rs1501299 and rs17300539), LepR (rs1137101 and rs1045895), IRS2 (rs1805092), GRB14 (rs10195252 and rs3923113) and PPARG (rs1801282) have been associated with overweight and obesity in uncontrolled T2DM.

  14. Cigarette smoking and renal cell carcinoma risk among black and white Americans: effect modification by hypertension and obesity

    PubMed Central

    Cote, Michele L.; Colt, Joanne S.; Schwartz, Kendra L.; Wacholder, Sholom; Ruterbusch, Julie J.; Davis, Faith; Purdue, Mark; Graubard, Barry I.; Chow, Wong-Ho

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Incidence of kidney cancer has been increasing over the past three decades, with more rapid increases and higher incidence rates among blacks than whites in the United States. An association between cigarette smoking and renal cell carcinoma (RCC), the most common form of kidney cancer, has been reported for whites, but the association in blacks is less clear. Methods The association between smoking and RCC was examined in 1,217 incident cases and 1,235 population controls frequency-matched on age, race, gender and study site in the Kidney Cancer Study in Detroit, MI and Chicago, IL. Results In white individuals, increasing duration and number of pack years of were both associated with increased risk of RCC after adjusting for age, gender, education, study site, body mass index (BMI) and history of hypertension (p-trend=0.0002 and p-trend=0.002, respectively). Among black individuals, RCC risk increased with duration of smoking (p- trend=0.02), but not other measures. Compared to current smokers, RCC risk decreased with increasing years of smoking cessation among both whites and blacks (p- trend=0.01 and 0.02, respectively). When examining risk according to hypertension history, associations between smoking and RCC risk were observed only among individuals who reported never having been diagnosed with hypertension. Similarly, cigarette smoking was associated with increased risk of RCC among non-obese individuals, but not among those with BMI≥30 kg/m2. Conclusion Our observation that smoking is associated with RCC only in non-obese individuals and those with no history of hypertension are novel findings Impact The complex relationships between RCC, smoking, hypertension and obesity require additional confirmation. PMID:22426145

  15. Oxidative stress associated to dysfunctional adipose tissue: a potential link between obesity, type 2 diabetes mellitus and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Crujeiras, A B; Díaz-Lagares, A; Carreira, M C; Amil, M; Casanueva, F F

    2013-04-01

    Diabetes mellitus and breast cancer are two important health problems. Type 2 diabetes (T2DM) and obesity are closely linked with both being associated with breast cancer. Despite abundant epidemiological data, there is no definitive evidence regarding the mechanisms responsible for this association. The proposed mechanisms by which diabetes affects breast cancer risk and prognosis are the same as the mechanisms hypothesised for the contribution of obesity to breast cancer risk. The obesity-induced inflammation promoted by adipose tissue dysfunction is a key feature, which is thought to be an important link between obesity and cancer. Inflammation induces an increase in free radicals and subsequently promotes oxidative stress, which may create a microenvironment favourable to the tumor development in obese persons. Oxidative stress is also proposed as the link between obesity and diabetes mellitus. Therefore, obesity-related oxidative stress could be a direct cause of neoplastic transformation associated with obesity and T2DM in breast cancer cells. This review is focused on the role of obesity-related oxidative stress in the context of chronic inflammation, on the time of breast cancer onset and progression, which provide targets for preventive and therapeutic strategies in the fields of diabetes and obesity-related breast cancer.

  16. Natriuresis and blood pressure reduction in hypertensive patients with diabetes mellitus: the NESTOR study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Agnoletti, Davide; Wang, Ji-Guang; Xu, Yawei; Safar, Michel E

    2015-01-01

    The antihypertensive effect of indapamide has never been clearly understood, particularly in hypertensive patients with diabetes mellitus. A total of 565 patients were randomly selected to receive either indapamide 1.5 mg or enalapril 10 mg daily for 12 months. Brachial blood pressure (BP) and plasma and urinary electrolytes were measured at baseline and at the end of follow-up. Sodium and potassium levels and excretion rates were measured in overnight urine collections. After 12 months' treatment, similar significant reductions were observed in systolic and diastolic BP and pulse pressure levels in both treatment arms (P < .001). However, age, body mass index, diabetes duration, and plasma sodium reductions were shown to be major, independent factors influencing BP reduction with indapamide, but not with enalapril. Regression coefficients were positive for age and plasma sodium reductions (P ≤ .009) but negative for body mass index and diabetes duration (P ≤ .008). Similar findings were observed for pulse pressure. These results were more notable in elderly patients, did not differ regardless of whether BP reduction was measured in absolute or percent values, and were associated with increased sodium and potassium excretion rates.Indapamide is more effective than enalapril at reducing BP in elderly diabetic hypertensives with marked sodium retention.

  17. Acute effect of calcium blocker on renal hemodynamics in diabetic spontaneously hypertensive rat.

    PubMed

    Kaizu, K; Ling, Q Y; Uriu, K; Ikeda, M; Eto, S

    1995-01-01

    This study was done to examine the acute effect of a calcium channel blocker on renal hemodynamics in the diabetic spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR). Streptozotocin was used to induce diabetes, and barnidipine (B) was used as a calcium blocker. Renal blood flow (RBF) and glomerular filtration rate (GFR) were measured by a clearance method with paraaminohypurate (PAH) and inulin, respectively. Rats were divided into two groups: nondiabetic SHR, N-SHR; diabetic SHR, DM-SHR. B increased RBF in N-SHR (7.44 +/- 1.99 versus 8.50 +/- 1.97 mL/min/g.kw) while there was no change in DM-SHR. B reduced renovascular resistance (RVR) in DM-SHR and N-SHR. B increased GFR in N-SHR (1.15 +/- 0.24 versus 1.34 +/- 0.25 mL/min/g.kw), in spite of no changes in DM-SHR. B did not modify filtration fraction (FF) in both groups. These results indicate (1) in SHR, B exerts beneficial effects on hypertensive renal damage by reducing mean arterial pressure (MAP), RVR, RBF, and GFR; (2) in diabetic SHR, B is less effective in restoring renal hyperfiltration in spite of reducing RVR.

  18. Low serum amylase and obesity, diabetes and metabolic syndrome: A novel interpretation

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, Kei

    2016-01-01

    For the last decade, low serum amylase (hypoamylasemia) has been reported in certain common cardiometabolic conditions such as obesity, diabetes (regardless of type), and metabolic syndrome, all of which appear to have a common etiology of insufficient insulin action due to insulin resistance and/or diminished insulin secretion. Some clinical studies have shown that salivary amylase may be preferentially decreased in obese individuals, whereas others have revealed that pancreatic amylase may be preferentially decreased in diabetic subjects with insulin dependence. Despite this accumulated evidence, the clinical relevance of serum, salivary, and pancreatic amylase and the underlying mechanisms have not been fully elucidated. In recent years, copy number variations (CNVs) in the salivary amylase gene (AMY1), which range more broadly than the pancreatic amylase gene (AMY2A and AMY2B), have been shown to be well correlated with salivary and serum amylase levels. In addition, low CNV of AMY1, indicating low salivary amylase, was associated with insulin resistance, obesity, low taste perception/satiety, and postprandial hyperglycemia through impaired insulin secretion at early cephalic phase. In most populations, insulin-dependent diabetes is less prevalent (minor contribution) compared with insulin-independent diabetes, and obesity is highly prevalent compared with low body weight. Therefore, obesity as a condition that elicits cardiometabolic diseases relating to insulin resistance (major contribution) may be a common determinant for low serum amylase in a general population. In this review, the novel interpretation of low serum, salivary, and pancreas amylase is discussed in terms of major contributions of obesity, diabetes, and metabolic syndrome. PMID:27022442

  19. [The link between trace elements and metabolic syndrome/oxidative stress in essential hypertension with or without type 2 diabetes].

    PubMed

    Gouaref, Ines; Bellahsene, Zina; Zekri, Samia; Alamir, Barkahoum; Koceir, Elhadj-Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between trace elements (TE) and essential hypertension (EH) is subtle and complex. This relationship is mediated by endothelial dysfunction, insulin resistance, oxidative stress (OS) and athero-inflammatory state. The aim of this study was to examine the TE impact; particularly selenium (Se), zinc (Zn), copper (Cu) and manganese (Mn) as predictive type 2 diabetes biomarkers in a hypertensive subject. The study was undertaken on 400 adult patients (40-60 years), who were divided in 4 groups: hypertensive (H), type 2 diabetes (T2D), hypertensive-diabetic (HD) and healthy group. Patients were phenotyped regarding their metabolic syndrome profile using the NCEP/ATPIII criteria. Hypertension was defined as systolic (SBP) and diastolic (DBP) blood pressure ≥ 140/90 mmHg, respectively. The SBP and DBP measurements by electronic blood pressure using Omron 705 CP(®) type. Insulin resistance was assessed by Homa-IR model. Metabolic and inflammatory parameters were determined by Cobas Integra(®); the TE investigated by mass spectrometric atomic absorption; the OS markers evaluated by Randox kits. Serum Se concentrations are reduced in all groups, concomitantly with a marked depletion GPx activity in the HD group. However, Zn levels were decreased than in H and HD groups, but unchanged in T2D group. In contrast, Mn levels are increased in all groups; whereas the Cu levels increased only in H and HD groups, concomitantly with cytosolic SOD-Cu/Zn and mitochondrial SOD-Mn depletion. The Zn/Cu ratio decreases significantly in hypertensive group but not in diabetics groups. It appears that Zn/Cu ratio reflects the transition from hypertension phase to hypertension associated with T2D. Ultimately, TE plays an important role in the hypertension pathophysiology and can be considered as predictive T2D biomarkers in hypertensive patients.

  20. [Ameliorative effects on retinal disorder in diabetic SHRSP (stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rat)].

    PubMed

    Nagisa, Yasutaka; Shintani, Asae; Nakagawa, Shizue

    2002-10-01

    The results of the EUCLID highlighted the importance of the renin-angiotensin system in the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy. We aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of candesartan cilexetil(TCV-116), a potent angiotensin II receptor antagonist, in ameliorating retinal disorders in stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats(SHRSP) with storeptozotocin(STZ)-induced diabetes. Retinal VEGF mRNA expression was significantly higher and the latencies of oscillatory potentials were significantly elongated in STZ-treated SHRSP compared with a non-treated SHRSP group matched for age. Treatment with TCV-116(3 mg/kg) significantly diminished retinal VEGF mRNA expression and the latencies of oscillatory potentials, but had no effect on plasma glucose concentrations. These results suggest that TCV-116 is effective in preventing the development of diabetic retinopathy already in the early stages.

  1. Impact of bariatric surgery on life expectancy in severely obese patients with diabetes: A Decision analysis

    PubMed Central

    Schauer, Daniel P.; Arterburn, David E.; Livingston, Edward H.; Coleman, Karen J.; Sidney, Steve; Fisher, David; O'Connor, Patrick; Fischer, David; Eckman, Mark H.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To create a decision analytic model to estimate the balance between treatment risks and benefits for severely obese patients with diabetes. Summary Background Data Bariatric surgery leads to many desirable metabolic changes, but long-term impact of bariatric surgery on life expectancy in patients with diabetes has not yet been quantified. Methods We developed a Markov state transition model with multiple Cox proportional hazards models and logistic regression models as inputs to compare bariatric surgery versus no surgical treatment for severely obese diabetic patients. The model is informed by data from three large cohorts: 1) 159,000 severely obese diabetic patients (4,185 had bariatric surgery) from 3 HMO Research Network sites, 2) 23,000 subjects from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS), and 3) 18,000 subjects from the National Health Interview Survey linked to the National Death Index. Results In our main analyses, we found that a 45 year-old female with diabetes and a BMI of 45 kg/m2 gained an additional 6.7 years of life expectancy with bariatric surgery (38.4 years with surgery vs. 31.7 without). Sensitivity analyses revealed that the gain in life expectancy decreased with increasing BMI, until a BMI of 62 kg/m2 is reached, at which point nonsurgical treatment was associated with greater life expectancy. Similar results were seen for both men and women in all age groups. Conclusions For most severely obese patients with diabetes, bariatric surgery appears to improve life expectancy; however, surgery may reduce life expectancy for the super obese with BMIs over 62 kg/m2. PMID:25844968

  2. Microbiota and epigenetic regulation of inflammatory mediators in type 2 diabetes and obesity.

    PubMed

    Remely, M; Aumueller, E; Jahn, D; Hippe, B; Brath, H; Haslberger, A G

    2014-03-01

    Metabolic syndrome is associated with alterations in the structure of the gut microbiota leading to low-grade inflammatory responses. An increased penetration of the impaired gut membrane by bacterial components is believed to induce this inflammation, possibly involving epigenetic alteration of inflammatory molecules such as Toll-like receptors (TLRs). We evaluated changes of the gut microbiota and epigenetic DNA methylation of TLR2 and TLR4 in three groups of subjects: type 2 diabetics under glucagon-like peptide-1 agonist therapy, obese individuals without established insulin resistance, and a lean control group. Clostridium cluster IV, Clostridium cluster XIVa, lactic acid bacteria, Faecalibacterium prausnitzii and Bacteroidetes abundances were analysed by PCR and 454 high-throughput sequencing. The epigenetic methylation in the regulatory region of TLR4 and TLR2 was analysed using bisulfite conversion and pyrosequencing. We observed a significantly higher ratio of Firmicutes/ Bacteroidetes in type 2 diabetics compared to lean controls and obese. Major differences were shown in lactic acid bacteria, with the highest abundance in type 2 diabetics, followed by obese and lean participants. In comparison, F. prausnitzii was least abundant in type 2 diabetics, and most abundant in lean controls. Methylation analysis of four CpGs in the first exon of TLR4 showed significantly lower methylation in obese individuals, but no significant difference between type 2 diabetics and lean controls. Methylation of seven CpGs in the promoter region of TLR2 was significantly lower in type 2 diabetics compared to obese subjects and lean controls. The methylation levels of both TLRs were significantly correlated with body mass index. Our data suggest that changes in gut microbiota and thus cell wall components are involved in the epigenetic regulation of inflammatory reactions. An improved diet targeted to induce gut microbial balance and in the following even epigenetic changes of

  3. New insights on diabetes mellitus and obesity in Africa-Part 2: prevention, screening and economic burden.

    PubMed

    Kengne, Andre Pascal; Sobngwi, Eugene; Echouffo-Tcheugui, Justin-Basile; Mbanya, Jean-Claude

    2013-08-01

    Evidence has been accumulating on the importance of the rising burden of diabetes mellitus on the African continent at an increasingly higher pace. In the first paper of this series of two companion papers, recent evidence on the prevalence, pathogenesis and comorbidities of obesity and diabetes mellitus in Africa were summarised. In this second paper, we focus on recent developments pertaining to the prevention, screening and the economic burden of diabetes and obesity on the continent. There are indications that awareness on diabetes and chronic diseases at large has increased in Africa in recent times. However, the care for diabetes largely remains suboptimal in most countries, which are not adequately prepared to face the prevention and control of diabetes, as the costs of caring for the condition pose a tremendous challenge to most local economies. Moreover, translation strategies to prevent and control diabetes and obesity, on the continent, are still to be evaluated.

  4. The role of dietary potassium in hypertension and diabetes.

    PubMed

    Ekmekcioglu, Cem; Elmadfa, Ibrahim; Meyer, Alexa L; Moeslinger, Thomas

    2016-03-01

    Potassium is an essential mineral which plays major roles for the resting membrane potential and the intracellular osmolarity. In addition, for several years, it has been known that potassium also affects endothelial and vascular smooth muscle functions and it has been repeatedly shown that an increase in potassium intake shifts blood pressure to a more preferable level. Meanwhile, the blood pressure lowering effects of potassium were presented in several intervention trials and summarized in a handful of meta-analyses. Furthermore, accumulating epidemiological evidence from, especially, the last decade relates low dietary potassium intake or serum potassium levels to an increased risk for insulin resistance or diabetes. However, intervention trials are required to confirm this association. So, in addition to reduction of sodium intake, increasing dietary potassium intake may positively affect blood pressure and possibly also glucose metabolism in many populations. This concise review not only summarizes the studies linking potassium to blood pressure and diabetes but also discusses potential mechanisms involved, like vascular smooth muscle relaxation and endothelium-dependent vasodilation or stimulation of insulin secretion in pancreatic β-cells, respectively.

  5. [Hypertension].

    PubMed

    Ohishi, Mitsuru

    2014-04-01

    Hypertension is well known to one of the risk factors to reduce cognitive function, however, it is still unclear whether anti-hypertensive therapy is effective to prevent development of dementia or Alzheimer's disease. Epidemiological studies suggested antihypertensive therapy from the middle-age could reduce risk of dementia. The meta-analysis including HYVET also suggested blood pressure lowering from the elderly might be also effective to prevent development of dementia. The network meta-analysis and the cohort study using mega-data bank suggested ARB might be effective to prevent development of dementia or Alzheimer's disease compared to administration with other anti-hypertensive drugs. Although the further major clinical investigation is required, anti-hypertensive treatment might be useful to manage hypertensive patients with dementia.

  6. Role of AT1 receptors in permeability of the blood-brain barrier in diabetic hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Awad, Azza S

    2006-09-01

    The precise mechanisms of vascular diseases in patients with diabetic hypertensive are not clearly understood. There are evidences of alteration in permeability of blood-brain barrier (BBB) in diabetic hypertensive rats. This study sought to examine the effect of candesartan on the systolic blood pressure and the brain endothelial barrier function and antioxidant enzymes in rat brain. Five groups of eight male Sprague-Dawley rats include: control group (gpI), diabetic hypertensive group (gpII), diabetic hypertensive group treated with candesartan (gpIII), diabetic hypertensive rats with epinephrine (gpIV) and diabetic hypertensive rats with epinephrine treated with candesartan (gpV). Diabetes was induced by single injection of 55 mg kg(-1) streptozotocin (STZ) i.p. Blood glucose was measured, rats with blood glucose higher than 300 mg/dl were identified as diabetic. After induction of diabetes, rats received L-NAME (0.5 mg/ml in drinking water for 1 week) starting on the day 4 after STZ injection. Systolic blood pressure (SBP) was recorded two times, at day 0 (before starting L-NAME) and at day 7 (after L-NAME treatment). Also, body weight was measured two times, at initial time (before STZ injection) and terminal (at the last day in the experiment). On the day of acute experiment, rats were anesthetized with sodium pentobarbital (35 mg/kg, i.p.). The integrity of the BBB was investigated using Evans blue (EB) dye (4 ml/kg, 2%). Epinephrine was used (40 micro g/kg) to increase the permeability of the brain. After decapitation, first the brain was removed, next homogenized and then the content of EB dye in the brain was measured. Another five groups of rats manipulated with the same manner except EB dye injection. These second group to evaluate antioxidant enzymes, reduced glutathione (GSH), lipid peroxides and superoxide dismutase (SOD) in brain homogenate. This study indicates that, in diabetic hypertensive rats, epinephrine administration leads to increase in

  7. Angiotensin-(1-7): A Novel Peptide to Treat Hypertension and Nephropathy in Diabetes?

    PubMed Central

    Padda, Ranjit Singh; Shi, Yixuan; Lo, Chao-Sheng; Zhang, Shao-Ling; Chan, John S.D.

    2015-01-01

    The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) plays a pivotal role in mammalian homeostasis physiology. The RAS can be delineated into a classical RAS (the pressor arm) including angiotensinogen (Agt), renin, angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE), angiotensin II (Ang II) and angiotensin type 1 receptor (AT1R), and a counterbalancing novel RAS (the depressor arm) including Agt, renin, angiotensin-converting enzyme-2 (ACE-2), angiotensin-(1-7) (Ang 1-7) and Ang 1-7 receptor (or Mas receptor (MasR)). Hyperglycemia (diabetes) induces severe tissue oxidative stress, which stimulates the pressor arm of the renal RAS axis and leads to an increase in ACE/ACE-2 ratio, with excessive formation of Ang II. There is a growing body of evidence for beneficial effects of the depressor arm of RAS (ACE-2/Ang 1-7/MasR) axis in diabetes, hypertension and several other diseased conditions. Evidence from in vitro, in vivo and clinical studies reflects anti-oxidant, anti-fibrotic, and anti-inflammatory properties of Ang 1-7. Most of the currently available therapies only target suppression of the pressor arm of RAS with angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) and ACE inhibitors (ACEi). However, it is time to consider simultaneous activation of the depressor arm for more effective outcomes. This review summarizes the recent updates on the protective role of Ang 1-7 in hypertension and kidney injury in diabetes, as well as the possible underlying mechanism(s) of Ang 1-7 action, suggesting that the ACE-2/Ang 1-7/MasR axis can be developed as a therapeutic target for the treatment of diabetes-induced hypertension and renal damage. PMID:26793405

  8. Angiotensin-(1-7): A Novel Peptide to Treat Hypertension and Nephropathy in Diabetes?

    PubMed

    Padda, Ranjit Singh; Shi, Yixuan; Lo, Chao-Sheng; Zhang, Shao-Ling; Chan, John S D

    2015-10-14

    The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) plays a pivotal role in mammalian homeostasis physiology. The RAS can be delineated into a classical RAS (the pressor arm) including angiotensinogen (Agt), renin, angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE), angiotensin II (Ang II) and angiotensin type 1 receptor (AT1R), and a counterbalancing novel RAS (the depressor arm) including Agt, renin, angiotensin-converting enzyme-2 (ACE-2), angiotensin-(1-7) (Ang 1-7) and Ang 1-7 receptor (or Mas receptor (MasR)). Hyperglycemia (diabetes) induces severe tissue oxidative stress, which stimulates the pressor arm of the renal RAS axis and leads to an increase in ACE/ACE-2 ratio, with excessive formation of Ang II. There is a growing body of evidence for beneficial effects of the depressor arm of RAS (ACE-2/Ang 1-7/MasR) axis in diabetes, hypertension and several other diseased conditions. Evidence from in vitro, in vivo and clinical studies reflects anti-oxidant, anti-fibrotic, and anti-inflammatory properties of Ang 1-7. Most of the currently available therapies only target suppression of the pressor arm of RAS with angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) and ACE inhibitors (ACEi). However, it is time to consider simultaneous activation of the depressor arm for more effective outcomes. This review summarizes the recent updates on the protective role of Ang 1-7 in hypertension and kidney injury in diabetes, as well as the possible underlying mechanism(s) of Ang 1-7 action, suggesting that the ACE-2/Ang 1-7/MasR axis can be developed as a therapeutic target for the treatment of diabetes-induced hypertension and renal damage.

  9. Metabolomics - the complementary field in systems biology: a review on obesity and type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Abu Bakar, Mohamad Hafizi; Sarmidi, Mohamad Roji; Cheng, Kian-Kai; Ali Khan, Abid; Suan, Chua Lee; Zaman Huri, Hasniza; Yaakob, Harisun

    2015-07-01

    Metabolomic studies on obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus have led to a number of mechanistic insights into biomarker discovery and comprehension of disease progression at metabolic levels. This article reviews a series of metabolomic studies carried out in previous and recent years on obesity and type 2 diabetes, which have shown potential metabolic biomarkers for further evaluation of the diseases. Literature including journals and books from Web of Science, Pubmed and related databases reporting on the metabolomics in these particular disorders are reviewed. We herein discuss the potential of reported metabolic biomarkers for a novel understanding of disease processes. These biomarkers include fatty acids, TCA cycle intermediates, carbohydrates, amino acids, choline and bile acids. The biological activities and aetiological pathways of metabolites of interest in driving these intricate processes are explained. The data from various publications supported metabolomics as an effective strategy in the identification of novel biomarkers for obesity and type 2 diabetes. Accelerating interest in the perspective of metabolomics to complement other fields in systems biology towards the in-depth understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the diseases is also well appreciated. In conclusion, metabolomics can be used as one of the alternative approaches in biomarker discovery and the novel understanding of pathophysiological mechanisms in obesity and type 2 diabetes. It can be foreseen that there will be an increasing research interest to combine metabolomics with other omics platforms towards the establishment of detailed mechanistic evidence associated with the disease processes.

  10. Exploring the role of BCHE in the onset of Diabetes, Obesity and Neurological Disorders.

    PubMed

    Rao, Allam Appa; Jyothsna, Gundlapally; Shalini, Pulipati; Kumar, Amit; Bhattacharya, Anupam; Kashyap, Amita

    2012-01-01

    Diabetes, Obesity and Neurological disturbances, most often show co-occurrence. There has been an extensive research in this domain, but the exact mechanism underlying the co-occurrence of the three conditions is still an enigma. The current paper is an approach to establish the role of Butyryl cholinesterase (BCHE) in Diabetes, Obesity and Neurological disorders by performing a comparative analysis with Neuroligin (NLGN2) a protein belonging to the same family. BCHE has its role in glucose regulation, Lipid metabolism and nerve signaling. Emphasis is laid on BCHE's diverse functions whose impediment affects the above mentioned metabolic pathways. Insilco techniques were employed to analyze the sequence, structural and functional similarities of the two proteins. A point mutation is focused which is common to both BCHE and Neuroligin. The mutation occurs at the homologous position in both the proteins making them deficient. This affects the three metabolic pathways leading to the respective disorders. The work describes the pathway that describes the role of BCHE in the onset of obesity mediated diabetes. The pathway further explains the association between Diabetes, Obesity and neurological disturbances.

  11. Are Self-Management Interventions Suitable for All? Comparing Obese Versus Nonobese Type 2 Diabetes Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kroese, Floor M.; Adriaanse, Marieke A.; De Ridder, Denise T. D.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the current study was to compare obese and nonobese type 2 diabetes patients at baseline and after participating in an existing self-management intervention (i.e., "Beyond Good Intentions") on cognitive, self-care, and behavioral measures to examine whether both groups are equally prepared and able to adopt…

  12. Effectiveness of lifestyle interventions for individuals with severe obesity and type 2 diabetes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    OBJECTIVEdRates of severe obesity (BMI$40 kg/m2) are on the rise, and effective treatment options are needed.We examined the effect of an intensive lifestyle intervention (ILI) on weight loss, cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk, and program adherence in participants with type 2 diabetes who were seve...

  13. Lifestyle change and mobility in obese adults with type 2 diabetes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus often have limitations in mobility that increase with age. An intensive lifestyle intervention that produces weight loss and improves fitness could slow the loss of mobility in such patients. We randomly assigned 5145 overweight or obese adults between the ages o...

  14. Lifestyle change and mobility in obese adults with type 2 diabetes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background Adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus often have limitations in mobility that increase with age. An intensive lifestyle intervention that produces weight loss and improves fitness could slow the loss of mobility in such patients. Methods We randomly assigned 5145 overweight or obese adults...

  15. Indices of insulin secretion during a liquid mixed-meal test in obese youth with diabetes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To compare indices of insulin secretion, insulin sensitivity (IS),and oral disposition index (oDI) during the liquid mixed-meal test in obese youth with clinically diagnosed type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and negative autoantibodies (Ab-) versus those with T2DM and positive autoantibodies (Ab+) to ...

  16. Anti-obesity effects of onion extract in Zucker diabetic fatty rats.

    PubMed

    Yoshinari, Orie; Shiojima, Yoshiaki; Igarashi, Kiharu

    2012-10-22

    Anti-obesity effects of onion extract were determined in obesity and diabetes-prone Zucker diabetic fatty rats by measuring the efficacy of markers concerned with diabetes and obesity. Body and adipose tissue weights in 5% of onion extract-fed group were found to be significantly lower than the control group without onion extract. Fasting blood glucose and HOMA-IR levels were also improved, although the serum insulin and leptin levels did not show any remarkable difference. Serum triglyceride and free fatty acid levels in both the 3% and 5%-fed group were found to be reduced compared to the control group. Additionally the feeding of the onion extract increased the glucose tolerance. These results suggest that dietary onion extract is beneficial for improving diabetes by decreasing lipid levels. We also examined differentiation ability of rat white preadipocyte cells using the onion extract and its sulfur-containing components. Cycloalliin, S-methyl-L-cysteine, S-propyl-L-cysteine sulfoxide, dimethyl trisulfide, especially S-methyl-L-cysteine sulfoxide were reported to be effective in inhibiting formation of oil drop in the cells, suggesting that these compounds may be involved in the anti-obesity effect of the onion extract.

  17. INFLUENCE OF TYPE II DIABETES AND OBESITY ON THE DISPOSITION AND ELIMINATION OF TCDD IN MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    INFLUENCE OF TYPE II DIABETES AND OBESITY ON THE DISPOSTION AND ELIMINATION OF TCDD IN MICE. MJ DeVito', JJ Diliberto', DG Ross', C Emond2, VM Richardson', and LS Birnbaum', 'ETD, NHEERL, ORD, US EPA, RTP, NC, 27711, USA, 2National Research Council.
    One possible explanation fo...

  18. Oxidative stress and susceptibility to mitochondrial permeability transition precedes the onset of diabetes in autoimmune non-obese diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Malaguti, C; La Guardia, P G; Leite, A C R; Oliveira, D N; de Lima Zollner, R L; Catharino, R R; Vercesi, A E; Oliveira, H C F

    2014-12-01

    Beta cell destruction in type 1 diabetes (TID) is associated with cellular oxidative stress and mitochondrial pathway of cell death. The aim of this study was to determine whether oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction are present in T1D model (non-obese diabetic mouse, NOD) and if they are related to the stages of disease development. NOD mice were studied at three stages: non-diabetic, pre-diabetic, and diabetic and compared with age-matched Balb/c mice. Mitochondria respiration rates measured at phosphorylating and resting states in liver and soleus biopsies and in isolated liver mitochondria were similar in NOD and Balb/c mice at the three disease stages. However, NOD liver mitochondria were more susceptible to calcium-induced mitochondrial permeability transition as determined by cyclosporine-A-sensitive swelling and by decreased calcium retention capacity in all three stages of diabetes development. Mitochondria H2O2 production rate was higher in non-diabetic, but unaltered in pre-diabetic and diabetic NOD mice. The global cell reactive oxygen species (ROS), but not specific mitochondria ROS production, was significantly increased in NOD lymphomononuclear and stem cells in all disease stages. In addition, marked elevated rates of 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein (H2DCF) oxidation were observed in pancreatic islets from non-diabetic NOD mice. Using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry (MS) and lipidomic approach, we identified oxidized lipid markers in NOD liver mitochondria for each disease stage, most of them being derivatives of diacylglycerols and phospholipids. These results suggest that the cellular oxidative stress precedes the establishment of diabetes and may be the cause of mitochondrial dysfunction that is involved in beta cell death.

  19. Influence of blood pressure variability on early carotid atherosclerosis in hypertension with and without diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Dan; Li, Chunyue; Chen, Yujie; Xiong, Huahua; Tian, Xiaohong; Wu, Wanqing; Huang, Wenhua; Zhang, Yuan-Ting; Zhang, Heye

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) has been one widely used index of early carotid atherosclerosis. We speculated that the influence of blood pressure variability (BPV) on early carotid atherosclerosis may be varied by the location of the carotid artery and diabetes history. Thus, the goal of this study was to evaluate the effects of BPV on early arteriosclerosis progression in different segments of the carotid artery for hypertension with and without diabetes. A total of 148 hypertension patients who underwent 24 hours ambulatory blood pressure (BP) monitoring and carotid ultrasonography were enrolled in this study. Of them, 84 subjects were without diabetes, and 64 subjects were with diabetes. Short-term BPV during daytime, nighttime, and over 24 hours were evaluated through standard deviation (SD) and average real variability (ARV). We measured carotid IMT at left and right common carotid artery (CCA), carotid bulb, and the origin of the internal carotid artery (ICA). The associations between segment-specific measurements of carotid IMT and 24 hours ambulatory BPV were analyzed. We found that IMT at the common carotid artery (CCA-IMT) and IMT at the internal carotid artery (ICA-IMT) were more closely associated with BPV than was carotid bulb IMT. In addition, for all subjects, BPV was clearly associated with left CCA-IMT but not with right CCA-IMT. Furthermore, in diabetes patients, nighttime systolic BPV was independently related to mean CCA-IMT (P < 0.01) and mean bulb IMT (P < 0.01). In contrast, in nondiabetes patients, daytime and 24 hours systolic BPV was positively associated with mean CCA-IMT (P < 0.05), but not independent after adjusting for baseline characteristics such as age and sex. The findings of our study indicate a segment-specific association between carotid IMT and 24 hours ambulatory BPV, and the associations also vary according to the diabetes history. We conclude that BPV plays a distinct role in early

  20. Influence of blood pressure variability on early carotid atherosclerosis in hypertension with and without diabetes.

    PubMed

    Wu, Dan; Li, Chunyue; Chen, Yujie; Xiong, Huahua; Tian, Xiaohong; Wu, Wanqing; Huang, Wenhua; Zhang, Yuan-Ting; Zhang, Heye

    2016-06-01

    Carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) has been one widely used index of early carotid atherosclerosis. We speculated that the influence of blood pressure variability (BPV) on early carotid atherosclerosis may be varied by the location of the carotid artery and diabetes history. Thus, the goal of this study was to evaluate the effects of BPV on early arteriosclerosis progression in different segments of the carotid artery for hypertension with and without diabetes.A total of 148 hypertension patients who underwent 24 hours ambulatory blood pressure (BP) monitoring and carotid ultrasonography were enrolled in this study. Of them, 84 subjects were without diabetes, and 64 subjects were with diabetes. Short-term BPV during daytime, nighttime, and over 24 hours were evaluated through standard deviation (SD) and average real variability (ARV). We measured carotid IMT at left and right common carotid artery (CCA), carotid bulb, and the origin of the internal carotid artery (ICA). The associations between segment-specific measurements of carotid IMT and 24 hours ambulatory BPV were analyzed.We found that IMT at the common carotid artery (CCA-IMT) and IMT at the internal carotid artery (ICA-IMT) were more closely associated with BPV than was carotid bulb IMT. In addition, for all subjects, BPV was clearly associated with left CCA-IMT but not with right CCA-IMT. Furthermore, in diabetes patients, nighttime systolic BPV was independently related to mean CCA-IMT (P < 0.01) and mean bulb IMT (P < 0.01). In contrast, in nondiabetes patients, daytime and 24 hours systolic BPV was positively associated with mean CCA-IMT (P < 0.05), but not independent after adjusting for baseline characteristics such as age and sex.The findings of our study indicate a segment-specific association between carotid IMT and 24 hours ambulatory BPV, and the associations also vary according to the diabetes history. We conclude that BPV plays a distinct role in early carotid

  1. Investigating parent of origin effects in studies of Type 2 Diabetes and Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Rampersaud, Evadnie; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Naj, Adam C.; Pollin, Toni I.

    2010-01-01

    The role of parent-of-origin effects (POE) in the etiology of complex diseases such as type 2 diabetes (T2DM) and obesity is currently of intense interest, but still largely unclear. POE are transmittable genetic effects whereby the expression of the phenotype in the offspring depends upon whether the transmission originated from the mother or father. In mammals, POE can be caused by genetic imprinting, intrauterine effects, or maternally inherited mitochondrial genes. In this paper, we describe the different mechanisms underlying POE, characterize known examples of POE in rare forms of diabetes, and review the evidence from linkage and association studies for POE in T2DM and obesity. Finally, we summarize some of the new and established statistical and experimental approaches commonly used to detect POE. Through this paper, we hope emphasizes the potentially significant importance of POE in the etiology of T2DM and obesity. PMID:18991601

  2. Metabolic Basis of Ethnic Differences in Diabetes Risk in Overweight and Obese Youth

    PubMed Central

    Alderete, TL; Toledo-Corral, CM; Goran, MI

    2015-01-01

    The global pandemic of childhood obesity has led to increased risk for prediabetes and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Studies have shown decreased insulin sensitivity and/or secretion with increasing adiposity and consistently observed greater risk for T2DM in obese, non-Caucasian youth. In the current review we describe recent advances in understanding how obesity and metabolic status in children and adolescents confers various risk profiles for T2DM among Latinos, African-Americans, Caucasians, Asians and Native Americans. These possible determinants include ectopic fat distribution, adipose tissue inflammation and fibrosis, and elevated plasma levels of non-esterified free fatty acids. Future work should aim to elucidate the ethnic-specific pathophysiology of T2DM in order to develop and implement appropriate prevention and treatment strategies based on different ethnic profiles of diabetes risk. PMID:24445905

  3. [Cardiometabolic effects of rimonabant in obese/overweight subjects with dyslipidaemia or type 2 diabetes].

    PubMed

    Scheen, A J; Van Gaal, L F

    2007-02-01

    Rimonabant (Acomplia) is the first selective CB1 receptor blocker of the endocannabinoid system. It has been evaluated in the RIO ("Rimonabant In Obesity and related disorders") programme including above 6.600 overweight/obese patients with or without comorbidities followed for 1 to 2 years. Compared to placebo, rimonabant 20 mg/day consistently increases weight loss, reduces waist circumference, increases HDL cholesterol, lowers triglyceride levels, diminishes insulin resistance, and reduces the prevalence of metabolic syndrome. In patients with type 2 diabetes, rimonabant also diminishes HbA1c levels, an effect confirmed in the recent SERENADE trial. Almost half of the metabolic effects occurs beyond weight loss, suggesting direct peripheral effects of rimonabant. Rimonabant is indicated in Europe as an adjunct to diet and exercise for the treatment of obese patients, or overweight patients with associated risk factor(s), such as type 2 diabetes or dyslipidaemia.

  4. DPP-4 Inhibitor Reduces Central Blood Pressure in a Diabetic and Hypertensive Patient

    PubMed Central

    Cosenso-Martin, Luciana Neves; Giollo-Junior, Luiz Tadeu; Vilela-Martin, José Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Hypertension and type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) are among the main risk factors for the development of cardiovascular disease. Pharmacotherapy for DM should not only improve blood glucose control, but also provide beneficial glucose-independent cardiovascular effects. The central systolic blood pressure (SBP) has become more important than the brachial SBP in the assessment of cardiovascular risk. This case report describes the effect of vildagliptin, a dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitor, on the central SBP in a 54-year-old woman with hypertension and DM. She was submitted to applanation tonometry (AT) before and after vildagliptin association. AT of the radial artery is a non-invasive method that indirectly assesses arterial stiffness by calculating the central SBP and the augmentation index (AIx). After 3 months of follow-up using vildagliptin, central SBP and AIx were improved. Moreover, she presented better glycemic control. This case suggests an effect of DPP-4 inhibitor on arterial stiffness parameter (central SBP) in a hypertensive and diabetic patient, which shows a glucose-independent beneficial cardiovascular effect of this group of drugs. PMID:26166078

  5. Dynamics of Diabetes and Obesity: An Alarming Situation in the Developing Countries in Asia.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Chiranjib; Das, Srijit

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of diabetes in developing countries in Asia has increased over the last few years. The economic development is radically changing the lifestyle of the younger generation who prefer to embrace the western lifestyle of eating high calorie fast food with minimal physical exercise. Previously, the rate of diabetes was very low but it is increasing at an alarming rate in the developing countries in Asia. Admittedly, there is paucity of literature on the prevalence of patients with type-1 diabetes in Asian developing countries due to lower field surveys and lack of quantitative data. Few contributing factors such as body mass index (BMI) and its relation with obesity and diabetes, energy dense diet, excessive caloric intake, sedentary behaviors, lifestyle and family history, gene and genomewide association of diabetes, genes and gene polymorphisms are being discussed especially with regard to the Asian population. Dynamics of the diabetes and obesity was depicted for the population of Asian developing countries with special emphasis on China and India. Diabetes has become widespread among the low-income communities. Hence, it is necessary to develop appropriate healthcare policies in order to mitigate this rampant epidemic before it is too late.

  6. Higher glomerular filtration rate is related to insulin resistance but not to obesity in a predominantly obese non-diabetic cohort

    PubMed Central

    Naderpoor, Negar; Lyons, Jasmine G.; Mousa, Aya; Ranasinha, Sanjeeva; Courten, Maximilian P. J. de; Soldatos, Georgia; Courten, Barbora de

    2017-01-01

    Glomerular hyperfiltration has been associated with obesity, insulin resistance, and systolic blood pressure (SBP). However, previous studies are limited by confounders such as pre-existing diabetes or hypertension, or have used indirect measures of adiposity and insulin sensitivity (IS). Therefore, we examined the relationship between estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and IS measured by the hyperinsulinaemic euglycaemic clamp in a healthy population on no medications. We performed oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) and measured % body fat (DEXA), BMI, blood pressure and M-value (hyperinsulinaemic euglycaemic clamp) in 104 individuals (44 females and 60 males). The majority of the study population (n = 89, 85.6%) were classified on their BMI as overweight/obese. eGFR was related to age, BMI, M-value (IS), 2-hour glucose levels post OGTT and white blood cell count (WBC) (all p < 0.05); but not to SBP (p = 0.1) or fasting glucose levels (p = 0.2). After adjustment for gender, BMI, SBP and WBC, the inverse association between eGFR and M-value (p = 0.001), and 2-hour glucose post OGTT (p = 0.02) persisted. In conclusion, although eGFR has been associated with BMI and blood pressure in previous studies, in our healthy population, eGFR was more closely related to markers of glucose metabolism (IS and 2-hour glucose post OGTT) than to BMI and blood pressure. PMID:28368024

  7. Anti-diabetic and anti-hypertensive potential of sprouted and solid-state bioprocessed soybean.

    PubMed

    McCue, Patrick; Kwon, Young-In; Shetty, Kalidas

    2005-01-01

    Long-term type 2 diabetes can lead to numerous biological complications, such as hypertension and cardio-vascular disease. Key enzymes involved in the enzymatic breakdown of complex carbohydrates,pancreatic alpha-amylase and intestinal alpha-glucosidase, have been targeted as potential avenues for modulation of type 2 diabetes-associated post-prandial hyperglycemia through mild inhibition of their enzymatic activities so as to decrease meal-derived glucose absorption. Further, inhibition of hypertension-linked angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) was targeted as a potential approach for modulation of diabetes-linked hypertension. Water-soluble extracts of soybean optimized for phenolic content via sprouting or bioprocessing by dietary fungus (Rhizopus oligosporus, Lentinus edodes) were investigated for inhibitory activity against porcine pancreatic alpha-amylase (PPA), yeast alpha-glucosidase, and rabbit lung ACE in vitro. PPA was allowed to react with each phenolic-optimized extract and the derivatized enzyme-phytochemical mixtures obtained were characterized for residual amylase activity. Alpha-glucosidase and ACE activities were determined in the presence of each phenolic-optimized extract. All of the soybean extracts possessed marked anti-amylase activity, with extracts of R. oligosporus-bioprocessed soybean having the strongest inhibitory activity, but only slight anti-glucosidase activity. The anti-amylase activity of each extract seemed associated with extract antioxidant activity. Anti-enzyme activity was slightly associated with total soluble phenolic content per se, but seemed more associated to the length of sprouting or bioprocessing of the soybean substrate. Short-term sprouting or bioprocessing seemed to improve anti-amylase activity, while long-term sprouting or bioprocessing seemed to aid anti-glucosidase activity. While ACE activity was strongly inhibited by all of the soybean extracts (44-97%), only sprouting was found to increase this inhibition

  8. Obesity, diabetes, and leptin resistance promote tau pathology in a mouse model of disease.

    PubMed

    Platt, T L; Beckett, T L; Kohler, K; Niedowicz, D M; Murphy, M P

    2016-02-19

    Obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) convey an increased risk for developing dementia. The microtubule-associated protein tau is implicated in neurodegenerative disease by undergoing hyperphosphorylation and aggregation, leading to cytotoxicity and neurodegeneration. Enzymes involved in the regulation of tau phosphorylation, such as GSK3β, are tightly associated with pathways found to be dysregulated in T2DM. We have shown previously that leptin-resistant mice, which develop obesity and a diabetic phenotype, display elevated levels of tau phosphorylation. Here we show cells cultured with leptin, an adipokine shown to have neuroprotective effects, reduces tau phosphorylation. To explore how this mechanism works in vivo we transduced an existing diabetic mouse line (Lepr(db/db)) with a tau mutant (tau(P301L)) via adeno-associated virus (AAV). The resulting phenotype included a striking increase in tau phosphorylation and the number of neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) found within the hippocampus. We conclude that leptin resistance-induced obesity and diabetes accelerates the development of tau pathology. This model of metabolic dysfunction and tauopathy provides a new system in which to explore the mechanisms underlying the ways in which leptin resistance and diabetes influence development of tau pathology, and may ultimately be related to the development of NFTs.

  9. Elevated circulating lipasin/betatrophin in human type 2 diabetes and obesity

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Zhiyao; Berhane, Feven; Fite, Alemu; Seyoum, Berhane; Abou-Samra, Abdul B.; Zhang, Ren

    2014-01-01

    Lipasin (also known as C19ORF80, RIFL, ANGPTL8 and betatrophin) is a newly discovered circulating factor that regulates lipid metabolism and promotes pancreatic β-cell proliferation. Whether circulating levels of lipasin in humans are altered in a) type 2 diabetes; b) obesity and c) the postprandial state, however, is unknown. The current study aimed to compare serum lipasin levels in those who were a) non-diabetic (N = 15) or diabetic (BMI- and age-matched; N = 14); b) lean or obese (N = 53 totally) and c) fasting and 2 hours following a defined meal (N = 12). Serum lipasin levels were determined by the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Lipasin levels [mean ± SEM] were increased by more than two fold (P < 0.001) in the diabetic patients (5.56 ± 0.73 ng/mL) as compared to the control subjects (2.19 ± 0.24 ng/mL). Serum lipasin levels were positively correlated with BMI (rho = 0.49, P < 0.001), and showed a 35% increase 2 hours following a defined meal (P = 0.009). Therefore, lipasin/betatrophin is nutritionally-regulated hepatokine that is increased in human type 2 diabetes and obesity. PMID:24852694

  10. Family clustering of secondary chronic kidney disease with hypertension or diabetes mellitus. A case-control study.

    PubMed

    de Almeida, Fernando Antonio; Ciambelli, Giuliano Serafino; Bertoco, André Luz; Jurado, Marcelo Mai; Siqueira, Guilherme Vasconcelos; Bernardo, Eder Augusto; Pavan, Maria Valeria; Gianini, Reinaldo José

    2015-02-01

    In Brazil hypertension and type 2 diabetes mellitus are responsible for 60% of cases of end-stage renal disease in renal replacement therapy. In the United States studies have identified family clustering of chronic kidney disease, predominantly in African-Americans. A single Brazilian study observed family clustering among patients with chronic kidney disease when compared with hospitalized patients with normal renal function. This article aims to assess whether there is family clustering of chronic kidney disease in relatives of individuals in renal replacement therapy caused by hypertension and/or diabetes mellitus. A case-control study with 336 patients in renal replacement therapy with diabetes mellitus or hypertension for at least 5 years (cases) and a control matched sample group of individuals with hypertension or diabetes mellitus and normal renal function (n = 389). Individuals in renal replacement therapy (cases) had a ratio of 2.35 (95% CI 1.42-3.89, p < 0.001) versus the control group in having relatives with chronic renal disease, irrespective of race or causative illness. There is family clustering of chronic kidney disease in the sample studied, and this predisposition is irrespective of race and underlying disease (hypertension or diabetes mellitus).

  11. TRC120038, a Novel Dual AT1/ETA Receptor Blocker for Control of Hypertension, Diabetic Nephropathy, and Cardiomyopathy in ob-ZSF1 Rats

    PubMed Central

    Mohanan, Anookh; Gupta, Ram; Dubey, Amita; Jagtap, Vikrant; Mandhare, Appaji; Gupta, Ramesh C.; Chauthaiwale, Vijay; Dutt, Chaitanya

    2011-01-01

    In hypertensive subjects, angiotensin II and endothelin participate in a manner involving closely interwoven pathways in increasing blood pressure (BP) and inducing end organ damage. The primary objective of this study was to determine the effect of TRC120038, a novel dual AT1/ETA receptor blocker on BP, in obese Zucker spontaneously hypertensive fatty rats (ob-ZSF1), an animal model of moderate hypertension, diabetes with progressive renal and cardiac dysfunction. Ob-ZSF1 rats loaded with 0.5% salt were treated with TRC120038 (11.8 mg/kg bid.) or candesartan cilexetil (0.3 mg/kg od.) or vehicle control. Blood pressure (by radio-telemetry) and renal functional markers were monitored throughout the study. Cardiac function was assessed terminally by pressure volume catheter. Markers for renal dysfunction were measured and changes were evaluated histopathologically. TRC120038 showed greater fall in both systolic and diastolic BP in comparison to candesartan at its maximum antihypertensive dose. TRC120038 also reduced the severity of renal dysfunction and preserved cardiac function in ob-ZSF1 rat. PMID:22235363

  12. Virtual reality technologies for research and education in obesity and diabetes: research needs and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Ershow, Abby G; Peterson, Charles M; Riley, William T; Rizzo, Albert Skip; Wansink, Brian

    2011-03-01

    The rising rates, high prevalence, and adverse consequences of obesity and diabetes call for new approaches to the complex behaviors needed to prevent and manage these conditions. Virtual reality (VR) technologies, which provide controllable, multisensory, interactive three-dimensional (3D) stimulus environments, are a potentially valuable means of engaging patients in interventions that foster more healthful eating and physical activity patterns. Furthermore, the capacity of VR technologies to motivate, record, and measure human performance represents a novel and useful modality for conducting research. This article summarizes background information and discussions for a joint July 2010 National Institutes of Health - Department of Defense workshop entitled Virtual Reality Technologies for Research and Education in Obesity and Diabetes. The workshop explored the research potential of VR technologies as tools for behavioral and neuroscience studies in diabetes and obesity, and the practical potential of VR in fostering more effective utilization of diabetes- and obesity-related nutrition and lifestyle information. Virtual reality technologies were considered especially relevant for fostering desirable health-related behaviors through motivational reinforcement, personalized teaching approaches, and social networking. Virtual reality might also be a means of extending the availability and capacity of health care providers. Progress in the field will be enhanced by further developing available platforms and taking advantage of VR's capabilities as a research tool for well-designed hypothesis-testing behavioral science. Multidisciplinary collaborations are needed between the technology industry and academia, and among researchers in biomedical, behavioral, pedagogical, and computer science disciplines. Research priorities and funding opportunities for use of VR to improve prevention and management of obesity and diabetes can be found at agency websites (National

  13. Combating the dual burden: therapeutic targeting of common pathways in obesity and type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Scheen, André J; Van Gaal, Luc F

    2014-11-01

    The increasing prevalence of obesity is contributing substantially to the ongoing epidemic of type 2 diabetes. Abdominal adiposity, a feature of ectopic fat syndrome, is associated with silent inflammation, abnormal hormone secretion, and various metabolic disturbances that contribute to insulin resistance and insulin secretory defects, resulting in type 2 diabetes, and induce a toxic pattern that leads to cardiovascular disease, liver pathologies, and cancer. Despite the importance of weight control strategies in the prevention and management of type 2 diabetes, long-term results from lifestyle or drug interventions are generally disappointing. Furthermore, most of the classic glucose-lowering drugs have a side-effect of weight gain, which renders the management of most overweight or obese people with type 2 diabetes even more challenging. Many anti-obesity pharmacological drugs targeting central control of appetite were withdrawn from the market because of safety concerns. The gastrointestinal lipase inhibitor orlistat was the only anti-obesity drug available until the recent US, but not European, launch of phentermine-controlled-release topiramate and lorcaserin. Improved knowledge about bodyweight regulation opens new prospects for the potential use of peptides derived from the gut or the adipose tissue. Combination therapy will probably be necessary to avoid compensatory mechanisms and potentiate initial weight loss while avoiding weight regain. New glucose-lowering treatments, especially glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists and sodium glucose cotransporter-2 inhibitors, offer advantages over traditional antidiabetic drugs by promoting weight loss while improving glucose control. In this Review, we explore the overlapping pathophysiology and also how various treatments can, alone or in combination, combat the dual burden of obesity and type 2 diabetes.

  14. [Endocrine disruptors: A missing link in the pandemy of type 2 diabetes and obesity?].

    PubMed

    Chevalier, Nicolas; Fénichel, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of metabolic syndrome, obesity and type 2 diabetes has dramatically increased worldwide during the last few decades and exceeds World Health Organisation's predictions. Lifestyle factors such as decreased physical activity and energy dense diet, together with a genetic predisposition, are well-known actors in the pathophysiology of these metabolic diseases. However, there is accumulating evidence suggesting that the increased presence of endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) in the environment, may also explain an important part in the incidence of metabolic syndrome, obesity and type 2 diabetes. EDCs are found in everyday products (including food, plastic bottles, metal cans, toys, cosmetics, pesticides…) and used in the manufacture of food. They interfere with the synthesis, secretion, transport, activity and/or elimination of natural hormones. Those interferences can block or mimic hormone actions and thus induce a wide range of adverse effects (especially reproductive effects and hormone-dependent cancers). In rodents, acute exposure to bisphenol A is responsible for modifications of insulin synthesis and secretion in pancreatic beta cells but also for modifications of insulin signalling in liver, skeletal muscle and adipose tissue, which both lead to insulin-resistance, a major condition in pathophysiology of metabolic syndrome, obesity and type 2 diabetes. In humans, some epidemiologic reports suggested a strong link between exposure to some persistant EDCs (as organochlorine pesticides, dioxins and polychlorinated biphenyl ethers) and type 2 diabetes and obesity, especially after acute and accidental releases of EDCs (Seveso plant explosion, Vietnam war veterans). Other cross-sectional studies among the world reported suggestive to strong association between diabetes and obesity and EDCs exposure, especially for persistant organic pollutants, which should now be considered as insulin-resistance risk factors.

  15. Virtual Reality Technologies for Research and Education in Obesity and Diabetes: Research Needs and Opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Ershow, Abby G; Peterson, Charles M; Riley, William T; Rizzo, Albert “Skip”; Wansink, Brian

    2011-01-01

    The rising rates, high prevalence, and adverse consequences of obesity and diabetes call for new approaches to the complex behaviors needed to prevent and manage these conditions. Virtual reality (VR) technologies, which provide controllable, multisensory, interactive three-dimensional (3D) stimulus environments, are a potentially valuable means of engaging patients in interventions that foster more healthful eating and physical activity patterns. Furthermore, the capacity of VR technologies to motivate, record, and measure human performance represents a novel and useful modality for conducting research. This article summarizes background information and discussions for a joint July 2010 National Institutes of Health – Department of Defense workshop entitled Virtual Reality Technologies for Research and Education in Obesity and Diabetes. The workshop explored the research potential of VR technologies as tools for behavioral and neuroscience studies in diabetes and obesity, and the practical potential of VR in fostering more effective utilization of diabetes- and obesity-related nutrition and lifestyle information. Virtual reality technologies were considered especially relevant for fostering desirable health-related behaviors through motivational reinforcement, personalized teaching approaches, and social networking. Virtual reality might also be a means of extending the availability and capacity of health care providers. Progress in the field will be enhanced by further developing available platforms and taking advantage of VR’s capabilities as a research tool for well-designed hypothesis-testing behavioral science. Multidisciplinary collaborations are needed between the technology industry and academia, and among researchers in biomedical, behavioral, pedagogical, and computer science disciplines. Research priorities and funding opportunities for use of VR to improve prevention and management of obesity and diabetes can be found at agency websites (National

  16. The SGLT2 inhibitor empagliflozin ameliorates early features of diabetic nephropathy in BTBR ob/ob type 2 diabetic mice with and without hypertension.

    PubMed

    Gembardt, Florian; Bartaun, Christoph; Jarzebska, Natalia; Mayoux, Eric; Todorov, Vladimir T; Hohenstein, Bernd; Hugo, Christian

    2014-08-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is the leading cause of end-stage renal disease in humans in the Western world. The recent development of Na+-glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors offers a new antidiabetic therapy via enhanced glucose excretion. Whether this strategy exerts beneficial effects on the development of type 2 diabetic nephropathy is still largely unclear. We investigated the effects of the specific SGLT2 inhibitor empagliflozin in BTBR.Cg-Lep/WiscJ (BTBR ob/ob) mice, which spontaneously develop type 2 diabetic nephropathy. In the first experiment, BTBR ob/ob mice received either a diet containing 300 ppm empagliflozin or equicaloric placebo chow for 12 wk. In the second experiment, BTBR ob/ob mice received 1 μg·kg body wt(-1)·day(-1) ANG II to induce arterial hypertension and were separated into the same two diet groups for 6 wk. In both experiments, empagliflozin treatment enhanced glucosuria, thereby lowering blood glucose. Independently of hypertension, empagliflozin reduced albuminuria in diabetic mice. However, empagliflozin treatment affected diabetes-related glomerular hypertrophy, markers of renal inflammation, and mesangial matrix expansion only in BTBR ob/ob mice without hypertension. In summary, empagliflozin demonstrated significant antihyperglycemic effects, differentially ameliorating early features of diabetic nephropathy in BTBR ob/ob mice with and without hypertension.

  17. Prevalence of Orthostatic Hypertension in Elderly Patients with Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Mesquita, Patrícia; Queiroz, Deborah; Lamartine de Lima Silva, Vanderson; Texeira, Vanessa de Carvalho; Júnior, Edinaldo Rodrigues Fontes; Garcia, Jéssica; Bandeira, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Background. The aim of the present study was to determine the prevalence of orthostatic hypertension (OHT) in elderly patients with type 2 diabetes and its relation to metabolic and echocardiographic parameters. Methods. This was an analytical cross-sectional study in 97 patients normotensive or hypertensive. OHT was defined as a ≥10 mmHg increase in systolic blood pressure after four minutes in the standing position. Results. The prevalence of OHT was 20.6%. The mean body mass index was significantly higher in patients with OHT than in those without it (29.80 ± 4.10 versus 27.51 ± 3.98 kg/m2; P = 0.026). There were no statistically significant differences between the two groups for other metabolic parameters. Among the 68 patients who had an echocardiographic examination 27% of those with OHT had an increase in their left atrial volume index (LAVi) compared with 75% of those who did not have OHT (P = 0.004). The mean LAVi of patients with OHT was significantly lower than that of those without OHT (26.27 ± 6.37 versus 32.65 ± 7.54, resp.; P = 0.011). Conclusion. We found a high prevalence of orthostatic hypertension and a lower left atrial volume indexed in the patients with orthostatic hypertension. PMID:26078756

  18. Association of Female Reproductive Factors with Hypertension, Diabetes and LQTc in Chinese Women

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Bayi; Chen, Yequn; Xiong, Jianping; Lu, Nan; Tan, Xuerui

    2017-01-01

    The association of female reproductive factors (FRFs) with cardiovascular risk factors among different population was variable and inconsistent. The objective of this study was to examine the association between FRFs and hypertension, type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM), and long heart-rate-corrected QT interval (LQTc) in Chinese post-menopausal women (Post-MW). A total of 8046 Post-MW from the China Chaoshan Biobank Cohort Study were included for analysis. Logistic regression and general linear regression models were used to estimate the association between FRFs and hypertension, DM, and LQTc. Compared with women with 0 or 1 live birth, increasing risk of hypertension (odds ratio [OR], 1.51; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.16–1.96), DM (OR, 1.65; 95% CI, 1.22–2.22), and LQTc (OR, 1.45; 95% CI, 1.01–2.09) were observed in women who had five or more live births. Further analysis demonstrated that the association between parity and hypertension, DM, and LQTc was mediated by lifestyle and dyslipidemia. Women with more live births had increased body mass index and waist circumstance, and were inclined to consume more salty food, animal fat, and alcohol, but less meat, vegetable, fish, plant oil, and tea, compared with that had fewer live births (all P < 0.05). PMID:28211485

  19. Prevalence of Orthostatic Hypertension in Elderly Patients with Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Mesquita, Patrícia; Queiroz, Deborah; Lamartine de Lima Silva, Vanderson; Texeira, Vanessa de Carvalho; Vilaça de Lima, Yasmin Rodrigues; Júnior, Edinaldo Rodrigues Fontes; Garcia, Jéssica; Bandeira, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Background. The aim of the present study was to determine the prevalence of orthostatic hypertension (OHT) in elderly patients with type 2 diabetes and its relation to metabolic and echocardiographic parameters. Methods. This was an analytical cross-sectional study in 97 patients normotensive or hypertensive. OHT was defined as a ≥10 mmHg increase in systolic blood pressure after four minutes in the standing position. Results. The prevalence of OHT was 20.6%. The mean body mass index was significantly higher in patients with OHT than in those without it (29.80 ± 4.10 versus 27.51 ± 3.98 kg/m(2); P = 0.026). There were no statistically significant differences between the two groups for other metabolic parameters. Among the 68 patients who had an echocardiographic examination 27% of those with OHT had an increase in their left atrial volume index (LAVi) compared with 75% of those who did not have OHT (P = 0.004). The mean LAVi of patients with OHT was significantly lower than that of those without OHT (26.27 ± 6.37 versus 32.65 ± 7.54, resp.; P = 0.011). Conclusion. We found a high prevalence of orthostatic hypertension and a lower left atrial volume indexed in the patients with orthostatic hypertension.

  20. Diabetes, sleep apnea, obesity and cardiovascular disease: Why not address them together?

    PubMed Central

    Surani, Salim R

    2014-01-01

    Obesity, sleep apnea, diabetes and cardiovascular diseases are some of the most common diseases encountered by the worldwide population, with high social and economic burdens. Significant emphasis has been placed on obtaining blood pressure, body mass index, and placing importance on screening for signs and symptoms pointing towards cardiovascular disease. Symptoms related to sleep, or screening for sleep apnea has been overlooked by cardiac, diabetic, pulmonary and general medicine clinics despite recommendations for screening by several societies. In recent years, there is mounting data where obesity and obstructive sleep apnea sit at the epicenter and its control can lead to improvement and prevention of diabetes and cardiovascular complications. This editorial raises questions as to why obstructive sleep apnea screening should be included as yet another vital sign during patient initial inpatient or outpatient visit. PMID:24936259

  1. Induction of resistance to diabetes in non-obese diabetic mice by targeting CD44 with a specific monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    Weiss, L; Slavin, S; Reich, S; Cohen, P; Shuster, S; Stern, R; Kaganovsky, E; Okon, E; Rubinstein, A M; Naor, D

    2000-01-04

    Inflammatory destruction of insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreatic islets is the hallmark of insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, a spontaneous autoimmune disease of non-obese diabetic mice resembling human juvenile (type I) diabetes. Histochemical analysis of diabetic pancreata revealed that mononuclear cells infiltrating the islets and causing autoimmune insulitis, as well as local islet cells, express the CD44 receptor; hyaluronic acid, the principal ligand of CD44, is detected in the islet periphery and islet endothelium. Injection of anti-CD44 mAb 1 hr before cell transfer of diabetogenic splenocytes and subsequently on alternate days for 4 weeks induced considerable resistance to diabetes in recipient mice, reflected by reduced insulitis. Contact sensitivity to oxazolone was not influenced by this treatment. A similar antidiabetic effect was observed even when the anti-CD44 mAb administration was initiated at the time of disease onset: i.e., 4-7 weeks after cell transfer. Administration of the enzyme hyaluronidase also induced appreciable resistance to insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, suggesting that the CD44-hyaluronic acid interaction is involved in the development of the disease. These findings demonstrate that CD44-positive inflammatory cells may be a potential therapeutic target in insulin-dependent diabetes.

  2. Trends in Hypertension Prevalence, Awareness, Treatment and Control in an Adult Type 2 Diabetes Spanish Population between 2003 and 2009

    PubMed Central

    de Burgos-Lunar, Carmen; Jiménez-García, Rodrigo; Salinero-Fort, Miguel A.; Gómez-Campelo, Paloma; Gil, Ángel; Abánades-Herranz, Juan C.; Cárdenas-Valladolid, Juan; del Cura-González, Isabel

    2014-01-01

    In patients with type 2 diabetes, the prevalence of hypertension is higher than in non-diabetic subjects. Despite the high cardiovascular risk involving hypertension in these patients, its prevalence and control are not well known. The aims of this study were: to estimate the hypertension prevalence, awareness, treatment and control in Spanish adults with type 2 diabetes attended in Primary Care; and to analyse its time trend from 2003 to 2009. A serial cross-sectional study from 2003 to 2009 was performed in 21 Primary Care Centres in Madrid. The study population comprised all patients with diagnosed type 2 diabetes in their computerised medical history. Overall annual prevalence during the period 2003–2009 was calculated from and according to sex and age groups. Linear trend tests, regression lines and coefficients of determination were used. In 2003 89.78% (CI 87.92–91.64) of patients with type 2 diabetes suffered hypertension and 94.76% (CI: 92.85–96.67) in 2009. This percentage was greater for women and for patients over 65 years old. 30% of patients suffered previously undiagnosed hypertension in 2003 and 23.1% in 2009. 97% of diagnosed patients received pharmacological treatment and 28.79% reached the blood pressure objective in 2009. The average number of antihypertensive drugs taken was 2.72 in 2003 and 3.27 in 2009. Only 5.2% of patients with type 2 diabetes show blood pressure levels below 130/80 mmHg. Although significant improvements have been achieved in the diagnosis and control of hypertension in people with type 2 diabetes, these continue to remain far from optimum. PMID:24475171

  3. Serum Concentrations of Endothelin-1 and Matrix Metalloproteinases-2, -9 in Pre-Hypertensive and Hypertensive Patients with Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Kostov, Krasimir; Blazhev, Alexander; Atanasova, Milena; Dimitrova, Anelia

    2016-01-01

    Endothelin-1 (ET-1) is one of the most potent vasoconstrictors known to date. While its plasma or serum concentrations are elevated in some forms of experimental and human hypertension, this is not a consistent finding in all forms of hypertension. Matrix metalloproteinases -2 and -9 (MMP-2 and MMP-9), which degrade collagen type IV of the vascular basement membrane, are responsible for vascular remodeling, inflammation, and atherosclerotic complications, including in type 2 diabetes (T2D). In our study, we compared concentrations of ET-1, MMP-2, and MMP-9 in pre-hypertensive (PHTN) and hypertensive (HTN) T2D patients with those of healthy normotensive controls (N). ET-1, MMP-2, and MMP-9 were measured by ELISA. Concentrations of ET-1 in PHTN and N were very similar, while those in HTN were significantly higher. Concentrations of MMP-2 and MMP-9 in PHTN and HTN were also significantly higher compared to N. An interesting result in our study is that concentrations of MMP-2 and MMP-9 in HTN were lower compared to PHTN. In conclusion, we showed that increased production of ET-1 in patients with T2D can lead to long-lasting increases in blood pressure (BP) and clinical manifestation of hypertension. We also demonstrated that increased levels of MMP-2 and MMP-9 in pre-hypertensive and hypertensive patients with T2D mainly reflect the early vascular changes in extracellular matrix (ECM) turnover. PMID:27490532

  4. A meta-analysis of the association of estimated GFR, albuminuria, diabetes mellitus, and hypertension with AKI

    PubMed Central

    James, Matthew T.; Grams, Morgan E.; Woodward, Mark; Elley, C. Raina; Green, Jamie A.; Wheeler, David C.; de Jong, Paul; Gansevoort, Ron T.; Levey, Andrew S.; Warnock, David G.; Sarnak, Mark J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Diabetes mellitus and hypertension are risk factors for acute kidney injury (AKI). Whether estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and urine albumin creatinine ratio (ACR) remain risk factors for AKI in the presence and absence of these conditions is uncertain. Study Design Meta-analysis of cohort studies. Setting & Population 8 general population (1,285,045 participants) and 5 CKD (79,519 participants) cohorts. Selection Criteria for Studies Cohorts participating in the CKD Prognosis Consortium. Predictors Diabetes and hypertension status, eGFR by the CKD Epidemiology Collaboration 2009 creatinine equation, urine ACR, and interactions. Outcome Hospitalization with AKI, using Cox proportional hazards models to estimate hazard ratios (HR) of AKI and random effects meta-analysis to pool results. Results Over a mean follow-up period of 4 years, there were 16,480 episodes of AKI in the general population and 2,087 episodes in the CKD cohorts. Low eGFR and high ACR were associated with higher risks of AKI in individuals with or without diabetes and with or without hypertension. When compared to a common reference of eGFR 80 mL/min/1.73m2 in non-diabetic patients, HRs for AKI were generally higher in diabetic patients at any level of eGFR. The same was true for diabetic patients at all levels of ACR compared to non-diabetic patients. The risk gradient for AKI with lower eGFR was greater in those without diabetes than with diabetes, but similar with higher ACR in those without versus with diabetes. Those with hypertension had a higher risk of AKI at eGFR greater than 60 ml/min/1.73m2 than those without hypertension. However, the risk gradients for AKI with both lower eGFR and higher ACR were greater for those without than with hypertension. Limitations AKI identified by diagnostic code. Conclusions Lower eGFR and higher ACR are associated with higher risks of AKI among individuals with or without either diabetes or hypertension. PMID:25975964

  5. The Improvement of Hypertension by Probiotics: Effects on Cholesterol, Diabetes, Renin, and Phytoestrogens

    PubMed Central

    Lye, Huey-Shi; Kuan, Chiu-Yin; Ewe, Joo-Ann; Fung, Wai-Yee; Liong, Min-Tze

    2009-01-01

    Probiotics are live organisms that are primarily used to improve gastrointestinal disorders such as diarrhea, irritable bowel syndrome, constipation, lactose intolerance, and to inhibit the excessive proliferation of pathogenic intestinal bacteria. However, rec