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Sample records for obesity diabetes hypertension

  1. Diabetes screening: a pending issue in hypertense/obese patients

    PubMed Central

    Sepehri, Armina; Gil-Guillén, Vicente Francisco; Ramírez-Prado, Dolores; Navarro-Cremades, Felipe; Cortés, Ernesto; Rizo-Baeza, María Mercedes

    2015-01-01

    The literature about possible cardiovascular consequences of diagnostic inertia in diabetes is scarce. We examined the influence of undetected high fasting blood glucose (FBG) levels on the cardiovascular risk and poor control of cardiovascular risk factors in hypertensive or obese patients, with no previous diagnosis of diabetes mellitus (i.e., diagnostic inertia). A cross-sectional study during a preventive program in a Spanish region was performed in 2003–2004. The participants were aged ≥40 years and did not have diabetes but were hypertensive (n = 5, 347) or obese (n = 7, 833). The outcomes were high cardiovascular risk (SCORE ≥5%), poor control of the blood pressure (≥140/90 mmHg) and class II obesity. The relationship was examined between FBG and the main parameters, calculating the adjusted odd ratios with multivariate models. Higher values of FBG were associated with all the outcomes. A more proactive attitude towards the diagnosis of diabetes mellitus in the hypertensive and obese population should be adopted. PMID:25922799

  2. Impact of hypertension, overall obesity and abdominal obesity on diabetes incidence in Shanghai residents with different glucose levels.

    PubMed

    Qian, Qiaohui; Li, Xu; Feng, Bo

    2012-06-01

    The impact of hypertension, overall obesity and abdominal obesity, individually or collectively, on diabetes incidence over a period of 5 years in residents with different glucose levels is diverse, with abdominal obesity having an impact in both non-diabetic hyperglycaemia and normal groups.

  3. Family history: an opportunity for early interventions and improved control of hypertension, obesity and diabetes.

    PubMed Central

    van der Sande, M. A.; Walraven, G. E.; Milligan, P. J.; Banya, W. A.; Ceesay, S. M.; Nyan, O. A.; McAdam, K. P.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine whether a family history of high-risk groups for major noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) was a significant risk factor for these conditions among family members in a study population in the Gambia, where strong community and family coherence are important determinants that have to be taken into consideration in promoting lifestyle changes. METHODS: We questioned 5389 adults as to any first-degree family history of major noncommunicable diseases (hypertension, obesity, diabetes and stroke), and measured their blood pressure (BP) and body mass index (BMI). Total blood cholesterol, triglyceride, uric acid, and creatinine concentrations were measured in a stratified subsample, as well as blood glucose (2 hours after ingesting 75 g glucose) in persons aged > or = 35 years. FINDINGS: A significant number of subjects reported a family history of hypertension (8.0%), obesity (5.4%), diabetes (3.3%) and stroke (1.4%), with 14.6% of participants reporting any of these NCDs. Subjects with a family history of hypertension had a higher diastolic BP and BMI, higher cholesterol and uric acid concentrations, and an increased risk of obesity. Those with a family history of obesity had a higher BMI and were at increased risk of obesity. Individuals with a family history of diabetes had a higher BMI and higher concentrations of glucose, cholesterol, triglycerides and uric acid, and their risk of obesity and diabetes was increased. Subjects with a family history of stroke had a higher BMI, as well as higher cholesterol, triglyceride and uric acid concentrations. CONCLUSIONS: A family history of hypertension, obesity, diabetes, or stroke was a significant risk factor for obesity and hyperlipidaemia. With increase of age, more pathological manifestations can develop in this high-risk group. Health professionals should therefore utilize every opportunity to include direct family members in health education. PMID:11357211

  4. Obesity and hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Shu-Zhong; Lu, Wen; Zong, Xue-Feng; Ruan, Hong-Yun; Liu, Yi

    2016-01-01

    The imbalance between energy intake and expenditure is the main cause of excessive overweight and obesity. Technically, obesity is defined as the abnormal accumulation of ≥20% of body fat, over the individual's ideal body weight. The latter constitutes the maximal healthful value for an individual that is calculated based chiefly on the height, age, build and degree of muscular development. However, obesity is diagnosed by measuring the weight in relation to the height of an individual, thereby determining or calculating the body mass index. The National Institutes of Health have defined 30 kg/m2 as the limit over which an individual is qualified as obese. Accordingly, the prevalence of obesity in on the increase in children and adults worldwide, despite World Health Organization warnings. The growth of obesity and the scale of associated health issues induce serious consequences for individuals and governmental health systems. Excessive overweight remains among the most neglected public health issues worldwide, while obesity is associated with increasing risks of disability, illness and death. Cardiovascular diseases, the leading cause of mortality worldwide, particularly hypertension and diabetes, are the main illnesses associated with obesity. Nevertheless, the mechanisms underlying obesity-associated hypertension or other associated metabolic diseases remains to be adequately investigated. In the present review, we addressed the association between obesity and cardiovascular disease, particularly the biological mechanisms linking obesity and hypertension. PMID:27703502

  5. Survey of Hypertension, Diabetes and Obesity in Three Nigerian Urban Slums

    PubMed Central

    PHEABIAN AKINWALE, Olaoluwa; JOHN OYEFARA, Lekan; ADEJOH, Pius; ADEWALE ADENEYE, Adejuwon; KAZEEM ADENEYE, Adeniyi; ADESOLA MUSA, Zaidat; SOLOMON OYEDEJI, Kolawole; AYOBAMI SULYMAN, Medinat

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background Non-communicable diseases (NCDs) exist in slums as the inhabitants adopt an urbanized lifestyle which places them at a higher risk for. Lack of knowledge about the morbidity, complications and the method of control contributes to a large percentage of undetected and untreated cases. Methods This cross-sectional survey polled 2,434 respondents from Ijora Oloye, Ajegunle and Makoko, three urban slums in Lagos metropolis, southwestern Nigeria between June 2010 and October 2012. We investigated the prevalence of hypertension, diabetes and obesity. Respondents signed consent forms and their health conditions were documented based on self-reported history of diabetes, hypertension and family history using a semi-structured questionnaire. Diagnostic tests; weight and height for body mass index, blood glucose, and blood pressure were performed. Results More than one quarter of the participants were suffering from hypertension and only half of this were diagnosed earlier, while a further few were already on treatment. Therefore on screening, it had been possible to diagnose over three hundred more respondents, who were not previously aware of their health status. The respondents’ BMI showed that more than half of them were either overweight or obese and are at risk for diabetes, while 3.3% were confirmed as being diabetic, with their sugar levels greater than the normal range. Conclusion This study therefore revealed the near absence of screening programs for chronic diseases such as hypertension, diabetes and obesity in these urban slums. This was further confirmed by the detection of new and undiagnosed cases of hypertension in about one quarter of the respondents. PMID:26060658

  6. [Hypertension and diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Janka, H U

    1993-03-01

    Numerous surveys have shown that in industrial countries diabetic subjects develop hypertension more frequently than non-diabetic persons. In fact, three typical hypertension forms in these patients can be discerned: essential, renal, and isolated systolic hypertension. In type 2-diabetes (NIDDM) hypertension can be seen in close association with obesity, glucose intolerance, lipid changes, and insulin resistance within the framework of the metabolic syndrome. The increased incidence of hypertension in type 1-diabetes (IDDM) is a result of development of diabetic nephropathy. In the elderly type 2-diabetics particularly frequently isolated systolic hypertension is present which reflects increased arterial stiffness and loss of vascular distensibility. In hypertension progression of both macrovascular disease and microangiopathy is increased whereby interaction of hyperglycemia and hypertension seems to be the main risk factor. In most hypertensive diabetic patients drugs will be necessary to lower blood pressure in a therapeutical range. There are several effective substances available which should be prescribed individually according to the needs and accompanying conditions in these patients. PMID:8475640

  7. Obesity, albuminuria and hypertension among Hong Kong Chinese with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM).

    PubMed Central

    Chan, J. C.; Cheung, C. K.; Swaminathan, R.; Nicholls, M. G.; Cockram, C. S.

    1993-01-01

    A total of 412 Hong Kong Chinese diabetic patients were studied on at least two occasions 8-16 weeks apart. Although 28% were insulin-treated, only 3.6% had insulin-dependent diabetes (IDDM). In the remaining 397 patients with non-insulin-dependent diabetes (NIDDM), the mean (s.d.) body mass index (BMI) was 24.4 +/- 3.2 kg/m2 in females and 24.2 +/- 3.2 kg/m2 in males. Obesity was present in 17% of males (BMI > 27 kg/m2) and 40% of females (BMI > 25 kg/m2). Established hypertension was present in 49%. Abnormal albuminuria, defined as a mean urinary albumin/creatinine (UA/Cr) ratio greater than 5.4 mg/mmol based on two random spot urine samples, was present in 47%. On stepwise multiple regression analysis, UA/Cr ratio (R2 = 0.34, F = 65.4, P < 0.001) showed significant associations with systolic blood pressure (standardized regression coefficient beta = 0.40, P < 0.001), plasma creatinine concentration (beta = 0.27, P < 0.001) and glycosylated haemoglobin (beta = 0.20, P < 0.001). While the prevalence of hypertension increased with increasing severity of proteinuria, 40% of normoalbuminuric patients had hypertension. Among patients diagnosed before the age of 35 (n = 67), 52% were insulin-treated although only 10% were insulin-dependent. Among these NIDDM patients of young onset (n = 59), obesity was present in 25% of males and 56% of females. Overall, 18% of these patients had a blood pressure greater than 140/90 mmHg and 27% had abnormal albuminuria. In Hong Kong Chinese, diabetes mellitus is predominantly non-insulin-dependent even in the young. Obesity is more prevalent among females. Abnormal albuminuria is relatively common and is closely associated with hypertension and glycaemic control. In the light of increasing prevalence of diabetes among overseas Chinese, our findings may have important implications in the management of Chinese diabetic patients. PMID:8497435

  8. Differences in the management of hypertension, diabetes mellitus and dyslipidemia between obesity classes.

    PubMed

    Martínez-St John, D R J; Palazón-Bru, A; Gil-Guillén, V F; Sepehri, A; Navarro-Cremades, F; Orozco-Beltrán, D; Carratalá-Munuera, C; Cortés, E; Rizo-Baeza, M M

    2016-01-01

    We did not find any paper that assessed clinical inertia in obese patients. Therefore, no paper has compared the clinical inertia rates between morbidly and nonmorbidly obese patients. A cross-sectional observational study was carried out. We analysed 8687 obese patients ⩾40 years of age who attended their health-care center for a checkup as part of a preventive program. The outcome was morbid obesity. Secondary variables were as follows: failure in the management of high blood pressure (HBP), high blood cholesterol (HBC) and high fasting blood glucose (HFBG); gender; personal history of hypertension, dyslipidemia, diabetes, smoking and cardiovascular disease; and age (years). We analysed the association between failures and morbid obesity by calculating the adjusted odds ratio (OR). Of 8687 obese patients, 421 had morbid obesity (4.8%, 95% confidence interval (CI): 4.4-5.3%). The prevalence rates for failures were as follows: HBP, 34.7%; HBC, 35.2%; and HFBG, 12.4%. Associated factors with morbid obesity related with failures were as follows: failure in the management of HBP (OR=1.42, 95% CI: 1.15-1.74, P=0.001); failure in the management of HBC (OR=0.73, 95% CI: 0.58-0.91, P=0.004); and failure in the management of HFBG (OR=2.24, 95% CI: 1.66-3.03, P<0.001). Morbidly obese patients faced worse management for HBP and HFBG, and better management for HBC. It would be interesting to integrate alarm systems to avoid this problem.

  9. [Overweight, obesity, diabetes, and hypertension in endometrial cancer].

    PubMed

    Sanz-Chávez, Tania L N; Vilar-Compte, Diana; de Nicola-Delfín, Luigina; Meneses-García, Abelardo

    2013-01-01

    Introducción: en mujeres posmenopáusicas, el exceso de grasa ha sido asociado con un incremento del riesgo de padecer cáncer de endometrio. El objetivo del estudio fue conocer la frecuencia de sobrepeso, obesidad, diabetes e hipertensión en pacientes con cáncer de endometrio. Métodos: se obtuvieron datos demográficos, clínicos, de laboratorio e histopatológicos de los expedientes electrónicos de las pacientes con diagnóstico de cáncer de endometrio en el periodo comprendido de enero del 2009 a julio del 2011. Posteriormente, se efectuó un análisis descriptivo de la información. Resultados: se incluyó un total de 274 expedientes. El promedio de edad de las pacientes fue de 54 años. El 50.4 % eran posmenopáusicas. En el momento del diagnóstico, 112 casos (48.6 %) se encontraban en etapa clínica I. Del total de pacientes, 104 (37.9 %) presentaron diabetes mellitus, 122 (44.5 %) hipertensión arterial, 194 (72.6 %) sobrepeso u obesidad, y se registraron 24 casos con síndrome metabólico. Conclusiones: para este diagnóstico, los resultados muestran un mayor número de casos de sobrepeso y obesidad en comparación con otros países. Es necesario que se hagan más estudios para evaluar la relación del exceso de grasa como factor de riesgo para el cáncer de endometrio.

  10. Changing patterns of hypertension, diabetes, obesity and diet among Melanesians and Micronesians in the Solomon Islands.

    PubMed

    Eason, R J; Pada, J; Wallace, R; Henry, A; Thornton, R

    1987-05-01

    A cross-sectional survey of diabetes, hypertension, obesity and dietary patterns has been conducted in the Western Province of the Solomon Islands. Three groups--traditional and more urbanized Melanesians and semitraditional Micronesians--were compared. Abnormal glucose tolerance was rare (less than 1% over all) in Melanesians regardless of acculturation, but was present in 9.7% of adult Micronesians in whom it was associated with age; obesity; female sex; and a diet that was high in energy and refined carbohydrates. Hypertension, which was associated with advancing age and obesity, was recorded in 6.0% and 8.3% of traditional and partly urbanized Melanesians, respectively, and in 4.8% of Micronesians. Systolic and diastolic blood pressures correlated significantly with age for all except traditional Melanesian women among whom the association was limited to the systolic blood pressure only. Significant correlation coefficients were recorded between diastolic blood pressure and body mass index for both sexes and all groups, and between systolic blood pressure and body mass index for all women but only for Micronesian men. Dramatic differences in life-style and dietary patterns are described for rural and more urbanized Melanesians among whom the mean daily urinary sodium outputs were 67 and 119 mmol/L, respectively. PMID:3497330

  11. Diabetes, gallbladder disease, obesity, and hypertension among Hispanics in New Mexico.

    PubMed

    Samet, J M; Coultas, D B; Howard, C A; Skipper, B J; Hanis, C L

    1988-12-01

    Because Hispanics in the Southwest are genetically admixed with American Indians, the hypothesis has been advanced that the excess occurrence of diabetes mellitus, obesity, and gallbladder disease in this ethnic group may be genetic in origin and results from genes derived from American Indians. This report describes the prevalence of these diseases in 1,175 adult Hispanic participants in a survey of a New Mexico community conducted in 1984-1985. At nearly all ages, the majority of subjects had a body mass index of 25 kg/m2 or greater, and a substantial proportion exceeded 30 kg/m2. The prevalence of obesity was much greater in these Hispanics than is shown in nationwide data for US whites. Diabetes mellitus was also reported more often by Hispanic subjects in this survey than by US whites nationwide. A report of gallbladder trouble or of gallbladder removal was common in both males and females; the prevalence of gallbladder removal was as high in this population as in Mexican Americans previously studied in Starr County, Texas. In spite of the high prevalence of obesity, hypertension was less frequent among the New Mexico Hispanics than is shown in nationwide data for US whites. These findings complement those of previous surveys in Texas, which have shown a notably high proportion of adults to be obese, to have non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, and to have gallbladder disease. The similar epidemiology of these diseases in the Hispanics of New Mexico and the Mexican Americans of Texas supports the hypothesis that American Indian admixture underlies the development of these conditions in Hispanics throughout the Southwest. PMID:3195569

  12. [Hypertension and diabetes].

    PubMed

    Navalesi, R; Rizzo, L; Nannipieri, M; Rapuano, A; Bandinelli, S; Pucci, L; Bertacca, A; Penno, G

    1995-10-01

    The prevalence of hypertension in diabetes is significantly higher than in non-diabetics, perhaps twice as common. The excess is related to diabetic nephropathy, mainly in type 1 diabetes, to obesity, mainly in type 2 diabetes, but also to increased sympathetic activity. Furthermore, the increased prevalence of hypertension may relate to insulin resistance and its sequelae. Insulin resistance leads to hyperinsulinemia, relates to increased LDL and reduced HDL levels, causes the development of impaired glucose tolerance and type 2 diabetes and might also be causally related to the onset of hypertension. Syndrome X has relevant therapeutic implications in the management of hypertension. Hypertension is a major risk factor for large vessel disease in diabetics and also a risk factor for microangiopathy, particularly nephropathy. The incidence of atherosclerotic disease is dramatically increased in both type 1 and type 2 diabetics and is the major cause of morbidity and premature death mainly in patients with raised urinary albumin excretion. Thus, diabetics show a two-fold increased risk of coronary heart disease, 2-6 fold increased risk of stroke and a several-fold increased risk of peripheral vessel disease. Some evidence suggests that hypertension may be a risk factor for retinopathy, particularly its progression, but surely hypertension is a significant risk factor for nephropathy, accelerating its progression and perhaps even causing the onset of the glomerulopathy. The mechanisms by which hypertension might contribute to the evolution of both large vessel as well as small vessel disease is still unknown, although increased capillary leakage and vascular endothelium alterations might be important factors.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8562258

  13. The hypertension-diabetes continuum.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Bernard M Y

    2010-04-01

    Hypertension and type 2 diabetes are both common chronic conditions that affect a major proportion of the general population. They tend to occur in the same individual, suggesting common predisposing factors, which can be genetic or environmental. Although the genes causing hypertension or diabetes await elucidation, the environmental causes of these diseases are well known. Obesity and physical activity are the 2 leading factors that predispose to both diseases. Individuals with abdominal obesity are likely to develop lipid abnormalities and elevation of blood pressure and glucose. In time, hypertension and diabetes ensue. Because of the shared etiology, there is substantial overlap between hypertension and diabetes. In the Hong Kong Cardiovascular Risk Factor Prevalence Study, 40% of the subjects in the community had either raised blood pressure or raised blood glucose. Only 42% of people with diabetes had normal blood pressure and only 56% of people with hypertension had normal glucose tolerance. The presence of hypertension or diabetes should alert the clinician to the possibility of the other condition. Obesity, lipid abnormalities, raised blood pressure, and glucose are all components of the metabolic syndrome. The syndrome therefore implies a pathologic process, which is potentially reversible in the early stages. Previous efforts targeting smoking, hypertension, and hypercholesterolemia have started to bear fruit. However, obesity is on the increase in developed and developing countries. It is now time to focus on obesity and the metabolic syndrome, which require more a public health than a pharmacologic approach. PMID:20422737

  14. Improvement of diabetes, obesity and hypertension in type 2 diabetic KKA{sup y} mice by bis(allixinato)oxovanadium(IV) complex

    SciTech Connect

    Adachi, Yusuke; Yoshikawa, Yutaka; Yoshida, Jiro; Kodera, Yukihiro . E-mail: kodera_y@wakunaga.co.jp; Katoh, Akira . E-mail: katoh@st.seikei.ac.jp; Takada, Jitsuya . E-mail: takada@hl.rri.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Sakurai, Hiromu . E-mail: sakurai@mb.kyoto-phu.ac.jp

    2006-07-07

    Previously, we found that bis(allixinato)oxovanadium(IV) (VO(alx){sub 2}) exhibits a potent hypoglycemic activity in type 1-like diabetic mice. Since the enhancement of insulin sensitivity is involved in one of the mechanisms by which vanadium exerts its anti-diabetic effects, VO(alx){sub 2} was further tested in type 2 diabetes with low insulin sensitivity. The effect of oral administration of VO(alx){sub 2} was examined in obesity-linked type 2 diabetic KKA{sup y} mice. Treatment of VO(alx){sub 2} for 4 weeks normalized hyperglycemia, glucose intolerance, hyperinsulinemia, hypercholesterolemia and hypertension in KKA{sup y} mice; however, it had no effect on hypoadiponectinemia. VO(alx){sub 2} also improved hyperleptinemia, following attenuation of obesity in KKA{sup y} mice. This is the first example in which a vanadium compound improved leptin resistance in type 2 diabetes by oral administration. On the basis of these results, VO(alx){sub 2} is proposed to enhance not only insulin sensitivity but also leptin sensitivity, which in turn improves diabetes, obesity and hypertension in an obesity-linked type 2 diabetic animal.

  15. Regional variation in the prevalence of overweight/obesity, hypertension and diabetes and their correlates among the adult rural population in India.

    PubMed

    Meshram, I I; Vishnu Vardhana Rao, M; Sudershan Rao, V; Laxmaiah, A; Polasa, K

    2016-04-14

    A community-based, cross-sectional study was carried out in five regions of India by adopting a multistage random sampling procedure. Information was collected from the participants about socio-demographic particulars such as age, sex, occupation, education, etc. Anthropometric measurements such as height, weight and waist and hip circumferences were measured and three measurements of blood pressure were obtained. Fasting blood sugar was assessed using a Glucometer. Data analysis was done using descriptive statistics, χ(2) test for association and logistic regression analysis. A total of 7531 subjects were covered for anthropometry and blood pressure. The overall prevalence of overweight/obesity and abdominal obesity was 29 and 21%, respectively, and was higher in the Southern region (40% each) as compared with other regions. The prevalence of hypertension was 18 and 16% and diabetes was 9·5% each among men and women, respectively. The risk of hypertension and diabetes was significantly higher among adults from the Southern and Western regions, the among elderly, among overweight/obese individuals and those with abdominal obesity. In conclusion, the prevalence of overweight/obesity and hypertension was higher in the Southern region, whereas diabetes was higher in the Southern and Western regions. Factors such as increasing age, male sex, overweight/obesity, and abdominal obesity were important risk factors for hypertension and diabetes. Appropriate health and nutrition education should be given to the community to control these problems. PMID:26867590

  16. Regional variation in the prevalence of overweight/obesity, hypertension and diabetes and their correlates among the adult rural population in India.

    PubMed

    Meshram, I I; Vishnu Vardhana Rao, M; Sudershan Rao, V; Laxmaiah, A; Polasa, K

    2016-04-14

    A community-based, cross-sectional study was carried out in five regions of India by adopting a multistage random sampling procedure. Information was collected from the participants about socio-demographic particulars such as age, sex, occupation, education, etc. Anthropometric measurements such as height, weight and waist and hip circumferences were measured and three measurements of blood pressure were obtained. Fasting blood sugar was assessed using a Glucometer. Data analysis was done using descriptive statistics, χ(2) test for association and logistic regression analysis. A total of 7531 subjects were covered for anthropometry and blood pressure. The overall prevalence of overweight/obesity and abdominal obesity was 29 and 21%, respectively, and was higher in the Southern region (40% each) as compared with other regions. The prevalence of hypertension was 18 and 16% and diabetes was 9·5% each among men and women, respectively. The risk of hypertension and diabetes was significantly higher among adults from the Southern and Western regions, the among elderly, among overweight/obese individuals and those with abdominal obesity. In conclusion, the prevalence of overweight/obesity and hypertension was higher in the Southern region, whereas diabetes was higher in the Southern and Western regions. Factors such as increasing age, male sex, overweight/obesity, and abdominal obesity were important risk factors for hypertension and diabetes. Appropriate health and nutrition education should be given to the community to control these problems.

  17. [Obesity and hypertension].

    PubMed

    Simonyi, Gábor; Kollár, Réka

    2013-11-01

    The frequency of hypertension and obesity is gradually growing in Hungary. At present 68.5% of men and 78% of women are obese. Hypertension and obesity are the most important risk factors of morbidity and mortality from cardiovascular disease. The relationship between increased sympathetic activity and hypertension is well known. Waist circumference and body fat mass correlate significantly with sympathetic activity, in which hyperlipidemia plays also a role. The increased activity of renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system via its vascular and renal effects also contributes to an increase of blood pressure. Increased sympathetic activity with decreasing vagal tone accompanying the imbalance of the autonomous nervous system is independent and significant risk factor of cardiovascular events including sudden cardiac death.

  18. Relationship of autonomic imbalance and circadian disruption with obesity and type 2 diabetes in resistant hypertensive patients

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Hypertension, diabetes and obesity are not isolated findings, but a series of interacting interactive physiologic derangements. Taking into account genetic background and lifestyle behavior, AI (autonomic imbalance) could be a common root for RHTN (resistant hypertension) or RHTN plus type 2 diabetes (T2D) comorbidity development. Moreover, circadian disruption can lead to metabolic and vasomotor impairments such as obesity, insulin resistance and resistant hypertension. In order to better understand the triggered emergence of obesity and T2D comorbidity in resistant hypertension, we investigated the pattern of autonomic activity in the circadian rhythm in RHTN with and without type 2 diabetes (T2D), and its relationship with serum adiponectin concentration. Methods Twenty five RHTN patients (15 non-T2D and 10 T2D, 15 males, 10 females; age range 34 to 70 years) were evaluated using the following parameters: BMI (body mass index), biochemical analysis, serum adiponectinemia, echocardiogram and ambulatory electrocardiograph heart rate variability (HRV) in time and frequency domains stratified into three periods: 24 hour, day time and night time. Results Both groups demonstrated similar characteristics despite of the laboratory analysis concerning T2D like fasting glucose, HbA1c levels and hypertriglyceridemia. Both groups also revealed disruption of the circadian rhythm: inverted sympathetic and parasympathetic tones during day (parasympathetic > sympathetic tone) and night periods (sympathetic > parasympathetic tone). T2D group had increased BMI and serum triglyceride levels (mean 33.7 ± 4.0 vs 26.6 ± 3.7 kg/m2 - p = 0.00; 254.8 ± 226.4 vs 108.6 ± 48.7 mg/dL - p = 0.04), lower levels of adiponectin (6729.7 ± 3381.5 vs 10911.5 ± 5554.0 ng/mL - p = 0.04) and greater autonomic imbalance evaluated by HRV parameters in time domain compared to non-T2D RHTN patients. Total patients had HRV correlated positively with serum adiponectin (r = 0.37 [95% CI -0

  19. Obesity Is Associated with Race/Sex Disparities in Diabetes and Hypertension Prevalence, But Not Cardiovascular Disease, Among HIV-Infected Adults

    PubMed Central

    Westfall, Andrew O.; Overton, E. Turner; Mugavero, Michael J.; Burkholder, Greer A.; Kim, David; Chamot, Eric; Raper, James L.; Crane, Heidi M.; Saag, Michael S.; Willig, James H.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Race/sex differences are observed in cardiometabolic disease (CMD) risk and prevalence in the context of treated, chronic HIV infection, and these differences could be exacerbated by disparities in obesity prevalence. We sought to determine the effect of obesity on these disparities among people living with HIV. Prevalence of CMD (dyslipidemia, cardiovascular disorders, hypertension, diabetes, chronic kidney disease) was determined for patients seen at the University of Alabama at Birmingham HIV clinic between 7/2010 and 6/2011. Staged logistic regression was used to examine the impact of race/sex on comorbidities adjusting for key confounders including/excluding obesity (body mass index ≥30 kg/m2). Of 1,800 participants, 77% were male, 54% were black, and 25% were obese. Obesity prevalence differed by race/sex: black women 49%, black men 24%, white women 24%, white men 15% (p<0.01). Compared to white men, other groups had reduced odds for dyslipidemia and cardiovascular disorders (p<0.01). Black men had increased odds for hypertension and chronic kidney disease, while black women had a nearly 2-fold increased odds for diabetes and hypertension (all at p<0.01). The associations of black women with diabetes and hypertension were attenuated when obesity was included in the models. Other group differences remained significant. Disparities in obesity prevalence do not explain race/sex differences in all CMD among people with HIV. Obesity accounted for associations with diabetes/hypertension for black women, who may benefit from weight reduction to decrease disease risk. Further investigations into the etiology and treatment of CMD in people living with HIV should consider unique race/sex treatment issues. PMID:26114374

  20. Obesity is associated with race/sex disparities in diabetes and hypertension prevalence, but not cardiovascular disease, among HIV-infected adults.

    PubMed

    Willig, Amanda L; Westfall, Andrew O; Overton, E Turner; Mugavero, Michael J; Burkholder, Greer A; Kim, David; Chamot, Eric; Raper, James L; Crane, Heidi M; Saag, Michael S; Willig, James H

    2015-09-01

    Race/sex differences are observed in cardiometabolic disease (CMD) risk and prevalence in the context of treated, chronic HIV infection, and these differences could be exacerbated by disparities in obesity prevalence. We sought to determine the effect of obesity on these disparities among people living with HIV. Prevalence of CMD (dyslipidemia, cardiovascular disorders, hypertension, diabetes, chronic kidney disease) was determined for patients seen at the University of Alabama at Birmingham HIV clinic between 7/2010 and 6/2011. Staged logistic regression was used to examine the impact of race/sex on comorbidities adjusting for key confounders including/excluding obesity (body mass index ≥30 kg/m(2)). Of 1,800 participants, 77% were male, 54% were black, and 25% were obese. Obesity prevalence differed by race/sex: black women 49%, black men 24%, white women 24%, white men 15% (p<0.01). Compared to white men, other groups had reduced odds for dyslipidemia and cardiovascular disorders (p<0.01). Black men had increased odds for hypertension and chronic kidney disease, while black women had a nearly 2-fold increased odds for diabetes and hypertension (all at p<0.01). The associations of black women with diabetes and hypertension were attenuated when obesity was included in the models. Other group differences remained significant. Disparities in obesity prevalence do not explain race/sex differences in all CMD among people with HIV. Obesity accounted for associations with diabetes/hypertension for black women, who may benefit from weight reduction to decrease disease risk. Further investigations into the etiology and treatment of CMD in people living with HIV should consider unique race/sex treatment issues.

  1. Diabetes and obesity in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Simmons, David

    2011-02-01

    An epidemic of obesity is affecting growing numbers of women in their childbearing years increasing their risk of obstetric complications including diabetes, hypertension, pre-eclampsia, some malformations, macrosomia and the need for obstetric intervention. There is growing evidence that maternal obesity may increase the risk of obesity and diabetes in the offspring. Obesity and diabetes in pregnancy have independent and additive effects on obstetric complications, and both require management during pregnancy. Management of obesity including weight loss and physical activity prior to pregnancy is likely to be beneficial for mother and baby, although the benefits of bariatric surgery remain unclear at this time. Limiting gestational weight gain to 5-9 kg among pregnant obese women is likely to improve obstetric outcomes, but how to achieve this remains an active area of research. If gestational diabetes develops, there is good evidence that clinical management reduces the risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes.

  2. [Obesity, hypertension, and diabetes mellitus among school children in Ouagadougou (Burkina Faso)].

    PubMed

    Ye, D; Drabo, Y J; Ouedraogo, D; Samandoulougou, A; Sawadogo, A

    2001-01-01

    This paper deals with the findings of a survey conducted at the school environnement in Ouagadougou. Three factors of cardiovascular risks were identified: obesity, high blood pressure, and diabete millitus. The survey was based on a sample of 1470 students from primary and secondary schools consisted in taking their blood pressure, measuring they weight and height and glycaemia using dextrostix. Of the 1470 students targeted, 668 were girls and 782 were boys. Their age ranges between 4 and 25 years with average age of 13.8 years. 55 % of the students had an average socio-economic backgrounds. 58 students or 3.94% had high blood pressure including 50 cases of maximum high blood pressure and 8 cases of confirmed high blood pressure (HBP). A diastolic HBP predominance among 48 cases or 3.26% was also recorded. While 1 case showed systolic HBP, 6 were systolo-diastolic. The quetelet index used to determine obesity revealed 28 cases of excess in weight or 1.90% of the cases and 4 cases of obesity, or 0.28%. The predominance of excess in weight was statistically significant among girls. Only 1 case of obesity was associated with high blood pressure. No case of diabetes was identified. The factors of cardiovascular risk seem to be statistically important in school environnement in Ouagadougou. However, an muticentered study is recommended, as it will lead to an exhaustive knowledge of the prevalence of these factors of cardiovascular risk.

  3. Telmisartan/hydrochlorothiazide versus valsartan/hydrochlorothiazide in obese hypertensive patients with type 2 diabetes: the SMOOTH study

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Arya M; Davidson, Jaime; Koval, Stephen; Lacourcière, Yves

    2007-01-01

    Background The Study of Micardis (telmisartan) in Overweight/Obese patients with Type 2 diabetes and Hypertension (SMOOTH) compared hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ) plus telmisartan or valsartan fixed-dose combination therapies on early morning blood pressure (BP), using ambulatory BP monitoring (ABPM). Methods SMOOTH was a prospective, randomized, open-label, blinded-endpoint, multicentre trial. After a 2- to 4-week, single-blind, placebo run-in period, patients received once-daily telmisartan 80 mg or valsartan 160 mg for 4 weeks, with add-on HCTZ 12.5 mg for 6 weeks (T/HCTZ or V/HCTZ, respectively). At baseline and week 10, ambulatory blood pressure (ABP) was measured every 20 min and hourly means were calculated. The primary endpoint was change from baseline in mean ambulatory systolic and diastolic blood pressure (SBP; DBP) during the last 6 hours of the 24-hour dosing interval. Results In total, 840 patients were randomized. At week 10, T/HCTZ provided significantly greater reductions versus V/HCTZ in the last 6 hours mean ABP (differences in favour of T/HCTZ: SBP 3.9 mm Hg, p < 0.0001; DBP 2.0 mm Hg, p = 0.0007). T/HCTZ also produced significantly greater reductions than V/HCTZ in 24-hour mean ABP (differences in favour of T/HCTZ: SBP 3.0 mm Hg, p = 0.0002; DBP 1.6 mm Hg, p = 0.0006) and during the morning, daytime and night-time periods (p < 0.003). Both treatments were well tolerated. Conclusion In high-risk, overweight/obese patients with hypertension and type 2 diabetes, T/HCTZ provides significantly greater BP lowering versus V/HCTZ throughout the 24-hour dosing interval, particularly during the hazardous early morning hours. PMID:17910747

  4. New developments in the pathogenesis of obesity-induced hypertension.

    PubMed

    Kotsis, Vasilios; Nilsson, Peter; Grassi, Guido; Mancia, Giuseppe; Redon, Josep; Luft, Frank; Schmieder, Roland; Engeli, Stefan; Stabouli, Stella; Antza, Christina; Pall, Denes; Schlaich, Markus; Jordan, Jens

    2015-08-01

    Obesity is a disorder that develops from the interaction between genotype and environment involving social, behavioral, cultural, and physiological factors. Obesity increases the risk for type 2 diabetes mellitus, hypertension, cardiovascular disease, cancer, musculoskeletal disorders, chronic kidney and pulmonary disease. Although obesity is clearly associated with an increased prevalence of hypertension, many obese individuals may not develop hypertension. Protecting factors may exist and it is important to understand why obesity is not always related to hypertension. The aim of this review is to highlight the knowledge gap for the association between obesity, hypertension, and potential genetic and racial differences or environmental factors that may protect obese patients against the development of hypertension and other co-morbidities. Specific mutations in the leptin and the melaninocortin receptor genes in animal models of obesity without hypertension, the actions of α-melanocyte stimulating hormone, and SNS activity in obesity-related hypertension may promote recognition of protective and promoting factors for hypertension in obesity. Furthermore, gene-environment interactions may have the potential to modify gene expression and epigenetic mechanisms could also contribute to the heritability of obesity-induced hypertension. Finally, differences in nutrition, gut microbiota, exposure to sun light and exercise may play an important role in the presence or absence of hypertension in obesity.

  5. Increased Circulating ANG II and TNF-α Represents Important Risk Factors in Obese Saudi Adults with Hypertension Irrespective of Diabetic Status and BMI

    PubMed Central

    Al-Daghri, Nasser M.; Bindahman, Lotfi S.; Al-Attas, Omar S.; Saleem, Tahia H.; Alokail, Majed S.; Alkharfy, Khalid M.; Draz, Hossam M.; Yakout, Sobhy; Mohamed, Amany O.; Harte, Alison L.; McTernan, Philip G.

    2012-01-01

    Central adiposity is a significant determinant of obesity-related hypertension risk, which may arise due to the pathogenic inflammatory nature of the abdominal fat depot. However, the influence of pro-inflammatory adipokines on blood pressure in the obese hypertensive phenotype has not been well established in Saudi subjects. As such, our study investigated whether inflammatory factors may represent useful biomarkers to delineate hypertension risk in a Saudi cohort with and without hypertension and/or diabetes mellitus type 2 (DMT2). Subjects were subdivided into four groups: healthy lean controls (age: 47.9±5.1 yr; BMI: 22.9±2.1 Kg/m2), non-hypertensive obese (age: 46.1±5.0 yr; BMI: 33.7±4.2 Kg/m2), hypertensive obese (age: 48.6±6.1 yr; BMI: 36.5±7.7 Kg/m2) and hypertensive obese with DMT2 (age: 50.8±6.0 yr; BMI: 35.3±6.7 Kg/m2). Anthropometric data were collected from all subjects and fasting blood samples were utilized for biochemical analysis. Serum angiotensin II (ANG II) levels were elevated in hypertensive obese (p<0.05) and hypertensive obese with DMT2 (p<0.001) compared with normotensive controls. Systolic blood pressure was positively associated with BMI (p<0.001), glucose (p<0.001), insulin (p<0.05), HOMA-IR (p<0.001), leptin (p<0.01), TNF-α (p<0.001) and ANG II (p<0.05). Associations between ANG II and TNF-α with systolic blood pressure remained significant after controlling for BMI. Additionally CRP (p<0.05), leptin (p<0.001) and leptin/adiponectin ratio (p<0.001) were also significantly associated with the hypertension phenotype. In conclusion our data suggests that circulating pro-inflammatory adipokines, particularly ANG II and, TNF-α, represent important factors associated with a hypertension phenotype and may directly contribute to predicting and exacerbating hypertension risk. PMID:23251471

  6. Association of Angiotensin Converting Enzyme Insertion-Deletion Polymorphism with Hypertension in Emiratis with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Its Interaction with Obesity Status

    PubMed Central

    Alsafar, Habiba; Hassoun, Ahmed; Almazrouei, Shaikha; Kamal, Wala; Almaini, Mustafa; Odama, Unini; Rais, Naushad

    2015-01-01

    The association of Angiotensin Converting Enzyme (ACE) insertion-deletion (I/D) polymorphism with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM) and hypertension has been extensively studied throughout various ethnic populations but largely with inconsistent findings. We investigated these associations in Emirati population and their interaction with obesity status. Saliva samples were collected from a total of 564 Emiratis (277 T2DM and 297 healthy). DNA was extracted and the samples were genotyped for ACE I/D polymorphism by a PCR based method followed by gel electrophoresis. Upon evaluation of the ACE I/D polymorphism amongst all T2DM, hypertensive patients, and respective controls regardless of obesity status, ACE DD genotype was not found to be associated with either T2DM [odds ratio (OR) = 1.34, p = 0.086] or hypertension [odd ratio (OR) = 1.02, p = 0.93]. When the genetic variants amongst the nonobese and obese population were analyzed separately, the risk genotype ACE DD conferred significantly increased risk of hypertension in nonobese population [odds ratio (OR) = 1.80, p = 0.02] but was found to be protective against the hypertension in the obese group ((OR) = 0.54, p = 0.01). However, there was no effect of obesity status on the association of ACE genotypes with T2DM. The risk of hypertension associated with ACE DD is modulated by obesity status and hence future genetic association studies should take obesity into account for the interpretation of data. We also confirmed that ACE I/D polymorphism is not associated with T2DM risk in Emirati population. PMID:26491214

  7. Association of Angiotensin Converting Enzyme Insertion-Deletion Polymorphism with Hypertension in Emiratis with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Its Interaction with Obesity Status.

    PubMed

    Alsafar, Habiba; Hassoun, Ahmed; Almazrouei, Shaikha; Kamal, Wala; Almaini, Mustafa; Odama, Unini; Rais, Naushad

    2015-01-01

    The association of Angiotensin Converting Enzyme (ACE) insertion-deletion (I/D) polymorphism with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM) and hypertension has been extensively studied throughout various ethnic populations but largely with inconsistent findings. We investigated these associations in Emirati population and their interaction with obesity status. Saliva samples were collected from a total of 564 Emiratis (277 T2DM and 297 healthy). DNA was extracted and the samples were genotyped for ACE I/D polymorphism by a PCR based method followed by gel electrophoresis. Upon evaluation of the ACE I/D polymorphism amongst all T2DM, hypertensive patients, and respective controls regardless of obesity status, ACE DD genotype was not found to be associated with either T2DM [odds ratio (OR) = 1.34, p = 0.086] or hypertension [odd ratio (OR) = 1.02, p = 0.93]. When the genetic variants amongst the nonobese and obese population were analyzed separately, the risk genotype ACE DD conferred significantly increased risk of hypertension in nonobese population [odds ratio (OR) = 1.80, p = 0.02] but was found to be protective against the hypertension in the obese group ((OR) = 0.54, p = 0.01). However, there was no effect of obesity status on the association of ACE genotypes with T2DM. The risk of hypertension associated with ACE DD is modulated by obesity status and hence future genetic association studies should take obesity into account for the interpretation of data. We also confirmed that ACE I/D polymorphism is not associated with T2DM risk in Emirati population.

  8. A case of obesity, diabetes and hypertension treated with very low calorie diet (VLCD) followed by successful pregnancy with intrauterine insemination (IUI).

    PubMed

    Katsuki, A; Sumida, Y; Ito, K; Murashima, S; Gabazza, E C; Furuta, M; Yano, Y; Sugiyama, T; Toyoda, N; Adachi, Y

    2000-12-01

    The patient was a 32-year-old obese woman with a history of type 2 diabetes and hypertension for 6 years. Although she was treated with antihypertensive agents and intensive insulin therapy, her hyperglycemia was difficult to control. She wanted to have a baby but pregnancy was not recommended because her diabetes was under poor control and the use of antihypertensive medication. To achieve good control of obesity, diabetes and hypertension, she was admitted to our clinical department for weight reduction using very low calorie diet (VLCD). During VLCD she had a 19.8 kg reduction in body weight and her blood glucose and blood pressure were in good control without the use of drugs. Five months later, she became pregnant after the fourth trial of intrauterine insemination (IUI) and gave birth to a female baby under insulin therapy. This is the first report that showed the usefulness of VLCD for prepregnant control of glucose metabolism and blood pressure in an obese hypertensive patient with type 2 diabetes mellitus. PMID:11228055

  9. Managing hypertension in type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Horr, Samuel; Nissen, Steven

    2016-06-01

    Hypertension is a common problem in the diabetic population with estimates suggesting a prevalence exceeding 60%. Comorbid hypertension and diabetes mellitus are associated with high rates of macrovascular and microvascular complications. These two pathologies share overlapping risk factors, importantly central obesity. Treatment of hypertension is unequivocally beneficial and improves all-cause mortality, cardiovascular mortality, major cardiovascular events, and microvascular outcomes including nephropathy and retinopathy. Although controversial, current guidelines recommend a target blood pressure in the diabetic population of <140/90 mmHg, which is a similar target to that proposed for individuals without diabetes. Management of blood pressure in patients with diabetes includes both lifestyle modifications and pharmacological therapies. This article reviews the evidence for management of hypertension in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, and provides a recommended treatment strategy based on the available data.

  10. From obesity to diabetes.

    PubMed

    Keller, U

    2006-07-01

    The prevalence of obesity has been increasing dramatically in the last decades in the whole world, not only in industrialized countries but also in developing areas. A major complication of obesity is insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Diabetes is also rapidly increasing world-wide--reaching a prevalence in adults of approx. 5-6% in Central Europe and in the US, and more than 50% in specific, genetically prone populations. This article reviews pathogenetic mechanisms linking obesity and type 2 diabetes. Emphasis is placed on the observation that excessive amounts of adipocytes are associated with an impairment of insulin sensitivity, a key feature of the "metabolic syndrome". This is a cluster of metabolic abnormalities such as type 2 diabetes, hypertension and dyslipidemia; all of them are enhanced by the presence of visceral (abdominal) obesity and all contribute to the increased cardiovascular risk observed in these patients. Besides release of free fatty acids, adipocytes secrete substances that contribute to peripheral insulin resistance, including adiponectin, resistin, TNF-alpha and interleukin 6. Increased turnover of free fatty acids interferes with intracellular metabolism of glucose in the muscle, and they exert lipotoxic effect on pancreatic beta-cells. The pre-receptor metabolism of cortisol is enhanced in visceral adipose tissue by activation of 11 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1. A new class of anti-diabetic drugs (thiazolidinediones, or glitazones) bind to peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR-gamma) and lower thereby plasma free fatty acids and cytokine production in adipocytes, in addition to a decrease of resistin and an increase in adiponectin observed in animals, resulting in an overall increase in insulin sensitivity and in an improvement of glucose homeostasis. However, the first step to avoid insulin resistance and prevent the development of diabetes should be a reduction in body weight in overweight subjects, and an

  11. [Hypertension and diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Araki, Shin-ichi; Maegawa, Hiroshi

    2015-11-01

    The goal of diabetes treatment is to maintain a quality of life. Hypertension is a common diabetes comorbidity and is a risk factor for mortality. Epidemiological studies show that blood pressure (BP) lowering is associated with improving prognosis in this population. However, recent clinical trials and meta-analyses report no benefit of an intensive BP lowering of < 130/80 mmHg on mortality and cardiovascular complications, except stroke. Furthermore, the excess BP lowering should be avoided not to increase the risk of adverse effects such as hypotension, especially in elderly patients or those with adverse vascular complications. In Japanese diabetes guidelines, a BP target of < 130/80 mmHg is still recommended in diabetic patients with hypertension because of the high incidence of stroke in Japanese.

  12. SY 06-1 OBESITY, DIABETES AND HYPERTENSION: ARE ADIPOKINES RESPONSIBLE?

    PubMed

    Heagerty, Anthony

    2016-09-01

    There is now a considerable body of evidence to suggest that the fat cells that surround blood vessels (perivascular adipose tissue, PVAT) can influence profoundly arterial tone by releasing vasodilator adipokines which can act locally in a paracrine fashion. In healthy lean individuals the primary vasodilator released appears to be adiponectin and there is a complex interation between autonomic nerve firing in PVAT and the release of nitric oxide from adipocytes and an increased bioavailability of adiponectin. However the vasodilators that are released appear to be agonist dependent and adiponectin is certainly increased as a result of sympathomimetic stimulation. Primarily our work has focused on the role of sympathetic nerves running through PVAT and innovating adipocytes and releasing adiponectin. Electrical field stimulation studies have demonstrated clearly the release of adiponectin and the induction of relaxation which is abolished using 6-hydroxydopamine or tetrodotoxin to destroy the autonomic nerve fibres. In obesity there is evidence of beta-3 receptors on adipocytes and the loss of vasodilator activity which is clearly observed. In some models of obesity there is also evidence of an increase in vasoconstrictor prostaglandin bioavailability and increased contractility. This loss of balance between vasodilatation and vasoconstriction will lead to an increase in peripheral resistance which will decrease glucose uptake in skeletal muscle and bring about a rise in blood pressure: key components of the metabolic syndrome. Caloric restriction or weight reducing surgery can restore completely normal PVAT structure and function and this is seen even when individuals remain morbidly obese. PMID:27642933

  13. Hypercortisolism in obesity-associated hypertension.

    PubMed

    Varughese, Amy G; Nimkevych, Oksana; Uwaifo, Gabriel I

    2014-07-01

    Obesity is prevalent worldwide and associated with co-morbidities that result in increased cardiovascular risk. Hypertension is the most prevalent obesity comorbidity associated with increased cardiovascular risk. Obesity hypertension is a distinct subtype of essential hypertension. While endogenous Cushing's syndrome is an uncommon cause of both obesity and hypertension, the recent recognition of other hypercortisolemic states has raised the profile of hypercortisolism as an important contributor in obesity hypertension. The high prevalence of exogenous, iatrogenic, pseudo, and subclinical Cushing's syndromes makes hypercortisolism an important diagnostic consideration in the evaluation and management of patients with obesity hypertension who are resistant to conventional management. Available data suggest that the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system modulating antihypertensives have the best efficacy in hypercortisolism-mediated obesity hypertension. Strategies aimed at reducing cortisol production and action also have utility. This review provides a comprehensive overview of the epidemiology, etiopathogenesis and management options available for glucocorticoid-mediated obesity hypertension.

  14. Hypertension in obesity: is leptin the culprit?

    PubMed

    Simonds, Stephanie E; Cowley, Michael A

    2013-02-01

    The number of obese or overweight humans continues to increase worldwide. Hypertension is a serious disease that often develops in obesity, but it is not clear how obesity increases the risk of hypertension. However, both obesity and hypertension increase the risk of cardiovascular diseases (CVD). In this review, we examine how obesity may increase the risk of developing hypertension. Specifically, we discuss how the adipose-derived hormone leptin influences the sympathetic nervous system (SNS), through actions in the brain to elevate energy expenditure (EE) while also contributing to hypertension in obesity.

  15. Mineralocorticoid receptor activation in obesity hypertension.

    PubMed

    Nagase, Miki; Fujita, Toshiro

    2009-08-01

    Obesity hypertension and metabolic syndrome have become major public health concerns. Nowadays, aldosterone is recognized as an important mediator of cardiovascular and renal damage. In the kidney, aldosterone injures glomerular visceral epithelial cells (podocytes), the final filtration barrier to plasma macromolecules, leading to proteinuria and glomerulosclerosis. Mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) antagonists effectively ameliorate proteinuria in patients or in animal models of hypertension, diabetes mellitus and chronic kidney disease (CKD), as well as in patients who experience 'aldosterone breakthrough.' Recently, clinical and experimental studies have shown that plasma aldosterone concentration is associated with obesity hypertension and metabolic syndrome. We showed that spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR)/cp, an experimental model of obesity hypertension and metabolic syndrome, are prone to glomerular podocyte injury, proteinuria and left ventricular diastolic dysfunction, especially when the animals are fed a high-salt diet. Inappropriate activation of the aldosterone/MR system underlies the renal and cardiac injuries. Adipocyte-derived aldosterone-releasing factors (ARFs), although still unidentified, may account for aldosterone excess and the resultant target organ complication in SHR/cp. On the other hand, recent studies have shown that MR activation triggers target organ disease even in normal or low aldosterone states. We identified a small GTP (guanosine triphosphate)-binding protein, Rac1, as a novel activator of MR, and showed that this ligand-independent MR activation by Rac1 contributes to the nephropathy of several CKD models. We expect that ARFs and Rac1 can be novel therapeutic targets for metabolic syndrome and CKD. Future large-scale clinical trials are awaited to prove the efficacy of MR blockade in patients with obesity hypertension and metabolic syndrome.

  16. [Hyperuricemia, diabetes and hypertension].

    PubMed

    Viazzi, Francesca; Bonino, Barbara; Ratto, Elena; Desideri, Giovambattista; Pontremoli, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Hyperuricemia is frequently found in association with several condition predisposing to cardiovascular events such as arterial hypertension and diabetes mellitus. This has led researchers to investigate possible pathogenetic mechanisms underlying this association. Several experimental studies and some indirect clinical evidence support a causal link between mild hyperuricemia and the developement of hypertension as well as new onset diabetes. At the tissue level, chronic exposure to increased uric acid has been shown to promote vascular changes leading to renal ischemia as well as stimulation of the renin angiotensin system. Furthermore, uric acid has been shown to promote the development of insulin resistance, hypertrglyceridemia and haepatic steatosis through pro-oxidative mechanisms. These experimental pathophysiological changes may be partly preventable by hypouricemic treatments. Whether clinical implications of these findings are confirmed by solid clinical intervention trials, mild hyperuricemia may soon change its status from risk predictor to treatment target for patients at high cardiovascular and renal risk.

  17. Obesity and diabetes.

    PubMed

    Riobó Serván, Pilar

    2013-09-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is characterized by hyperglycemia, insulin resistance, and relative impairment in insulin secretion and its possible long term complications. Its pathogenesis is poorly understood, but both genetic and environmental factors, such as obesity and aging, play a key role. "Diabesity" is a new term which refers to diabetes occurring in the context of obesity. In this article, we will discuss the epidemiology and impact of diabetes and obesity and will also outline the components of the metabolic syndrome and the studies that demonstrate that screening and prevention are possible in an attempt to control this epidemic.

  18. Incidence and risk factors for diabetes, hypertension and obesity after liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Anastácio, Lucilene Rezende; Ribeiro, Hélem de Sena; Ferreira, Livia García; Lima, Agnaldo Soares; Vilela, Eduardo García; Toulson Davisson Correia, María Isabel

    2013-01-01

    Objetivo: Los trastornos metabólicos han sido ampliamente descritos en los pacientes sometidos al transplante hepático (TH). Material y métodos: La incidencia de hipertensión arterial, diabetes mellitus y obesidad además de los factores de riesgo se evaluaron en 144 pacientes post-TH al menos un año después del trasplante (59% hombres, edad promedio 54 años, mediana del tiempo desde el trasplante 4 años). Los factores de riesgo se evaluaron mediante análisis de regresión logística de acuerdo con variables demográficas, socioeconómicas, estilo de vida, así como variables clínicas, antropométricas y dietéticas. Resultados: La incidencia de hipertensión fue del 18,9%, la diabetes, el 14,0% y la obesidad, el 15,9%. Los factores de riesgo para la incidencia de la hipertensión fueron la obesidad abdominal (OR: 2,36, IC: 1,02-5,43, p < 0,05), los antecedentes familiares de hipertensión arterial (OR: 2,75, IC: 1,06-7,19, p < 0,05) y el uso de la ciclosporina (OR: 3,92, IC: 1,05-14,70, p < 0,05). Los factores de riesgo para la incidencia de diabetes fueron niveles más altos de glucosa en ayuno (mg/dL) pre-TH (OR: 1,04, IC: 1,01-1,06, p < 0,05) y el diagnóstico de cirrosis alcohólica como indicación de TH (OR: 2,54, IC: 0,84-7,72, p < 0,05). La incidencia de obesidad después del TH se relacionó con el bajo consumo de la leche (mL) (OR: 1,01, IC: 1,001-10,01, p < 0,05), donante con IMC más grande (kg/m(2)) (OR: 1,34, IC: 1,04-1,74; p < 0,05), mayor índice de masa corporal antes de la enfermedad hepática (kg/m(2)) (OR: 1,79, IC: 1,36-2,36, p < 0,01) y ingreso per cápita dos veces el sueldo mínimo (OR: 5,71, IC: 4,51- 6,86, p < 0,05). Conclusión: El TH se asoció con tasas significativamente más altas de hipertensión, diabetes y obesidad. La incidencia de estos trastornos se relacionó con la terapia inmunosupresora y otros factores de riesgo que comunes en la población general.

  19. Potential role of sugar (fructose) in the epidemic of hypertension, obesity and the metabolic syndrome, diabetes, kidney disease, and cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Richard J; Segal, Mark S; Sautin, Yuri; Nakagawa, Takahiko; Feig, Daniel I; Kang, Duk-Hee; Gersch, Michael S; Benner, Steven; Sánchez-Lozada, Laura G

    2007-10-01

    Currently, we are experiencing an epidemic of cardiorenal disease characterized by increasing rates of obesity, hypertension, the metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes, and kidney disease. Whereas excessive caloric intake and physical inactivity are likely important factors driving the obesity epidemic, it is important to consider additional mechanisms. We revisit an old hypothesis that sugar, particularly excessive fructose intake, has a critical role in the epidemic of cardiorenal disease. We also present evidence that the unique ability of fructose to induce an increase in uric acid may be a major mechanism by which fructose can cause cardiorenal disease. Finally, we suggest that high intakes of fructose in African Americans may explain their greater predisposition to develop cardiorenal disease, and we provide a list of testable predictions to evaluate this hypothesis.

  20. OBESITY-INDUCED HYPERTENSION: INTERACTION OF NEUROHUMORAL AND RENAL MECHANISMS

    PubMed Central

    Hall, John E.; do Carmo, Jussara M.; da Silva, Alexandre A.; Wang, Zhen; Hall, Michael E.

    2015-01-01

    Excess weight gain, especially when associated with increased visceral adiposity, is a major cause of hypertension, accounting for 65–75% of the risk for human primary (essential) hypertension. Increased renal tubular sodium reabsorption impairs pressure natriuresis and plays an important role in initiating obesity hypertension. The mediators of abnormal kidney function and increased blood pressure during development of obesity hypertension include 1) physical compression of the kidneys by fat in and around the kidneys, 2) activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS), and 3) increased sympathetic nervous system (SNS) activity. Activation of the RAAS system is likely due, in part, to renal compression as well as SNS activation. However, obesity also causes mineralocorticoid receptor activation independent of aldosterone or angiotensin II. The mechanisms for SNS activation in obesity have not been fully elucidated but appear to require leptin and activation of the brain melanocortin system. With prolonged obesity and development of target organ injury, especially renal injury, obesity-associated hypertension becomes more difficult to control, often requiring multiple antihypertensive drugs and treatment of other risk factors, including dyslipidemia, insulin resistance and diabetes, and inflammation. Unless effective anti-obesity drugs are developed, the impact of obesity on hypertension and related cardiovascular, renal and metabolic disorders is likely to become even more important in the future as the prevalence of obesity continues to increase. PMID:25767285

  1. Animal models in obesity and hypertension.

    PubMed

    Segal-Lieberman, Gabriella; Rosenthal, Talma

    2013-06-01

    Although obesity is a well-known risk factor for hypertension, the mechanisms by which hypertension develops in obese patients are not entirely clear. Animal models of obesity and their different susceptibilities to develop hypertension have revealed some of the mechanisms linking obesity and hypertension. Adipose tissue is an endocrine organ secreting hormones that impact blood pressure, such as elements of the renin-angiotensin system whose role in hypertension have been established. In addition, the appetite-suppressing adipokine leptin activates the sympathetic nervous system via the melanocortin system, and this activation, especially in the kidney, increases blood pressure. Leptin secretion from adipocytes is increased in most models of obesity due to leptin resistance, although the resistance is often selective to the anorexigenic effect, while the susceptibility to the hypertensive effect remains intact. Understanding the pathways by which obesity contributes to increased blood pressure will hopefully pave the way to and better define the appropriate treatment for obesity-induced hypertension.

  2. Refeeding hypertension in dietary obesity

    SciTech Connect

    Ernsberger, P.; Nelson, D.O. )

    1988-01-01

    A novel model of nutritionally induced hypertension in the rat is described. Dietary obesity was produced by providing sweet milk in addition to regular chow, which elicited a 52% increase in caloric intake. Despite 54% greater body weight gain and 139% heavier retroperitoneal fat pads, 120 days of overfeeding failed to increase systolic pressure in the conscious state or mean arterial pressure under urethan anesthesia. In contrast, mild hypertension developed in intermittantly fasted obese animals. The first 4-day supplemented fast was initiated 4 wk after the introduction of sweet milk, when the animals were 47 g overweight relative to chow-fed controls. Thereafter, 4 days of starvation were alternated with 2 wk of refeeding for a total of 4 cycles. A rapid fall in systolic blood pressure accompanied the onset of supplemented fasting and was maintained thereafter. With refeeding, blood pressure rose precipitously, despite poststarvation anorexia. Blood pressure tended to rise slightly over the remainder of the realimentation period. After the 4th supplemented fast, hypertension was sustained during 30 days of refeeding. Cumulative caloric intake in starved-refed rats fell within 2% of that in chow-fed controls. Refeeding hypertension appeared to be due to increased sympathetic nervous activity, since (1) cardiac {beta}-adrenergic receptors were downregulated, as indicated by a 40% decrease in the maximum binding of ({sup 3}H)dihydroalpranolol; and (2) the decrease in heart rate as a result of {beta}-blockade was enhanced. Refeeding hypertension in the dietary obese rat may be a potential animal model for some forms of human obesity-related hypertension.

  3. Obesity-induced hypertension: interaction of neurohumoral and renal mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Hall, John E; do Carmo, Jussara M; da Silva, Alexandre A; Wang, Zhen; Hall, Michael E

    2015-03-13

    Excess weight gain, especially when associated with increased visceral adiposity, is a major cause of hypertension, accounting for 65% to 75% of the risk for human primary (essential) hypertension. Increased renal tubular sodium reabsorption impairs pressure natriuresis and plays an important role in initiating obesity hypertension. The mediators of abnormal kidney function and increased blood pressure during development of obesity hypertension include (1) physical compression of the kidneys by fat in and around the kidneys, (2) activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, and (3) increased sympathetic nervous system activity. Activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system is likely due, in part, to renal compression, as well as sympathetic nervous system activation. However, obesity also causes mineralocorticoid receptor activation independent of aldosterone or angiotensin II. The mechanisms for sympathetic nervous system activation in obesity have not been fully elucidated but may require leptin and activation of the brain melanocortin system. With prolonged obesity and development of target organ injury, especially renal injury, obesity-associated hypertension becomes more difficult to control, often requiring multiple antihypertensive drugs and treatment of other risk factors, including dyslipidemia, insulin resistance and diabetes mellitus, and inflammation. Unless effective antiobesity drugs are developed, the effect of obesity on hypertension and related cardiovascular, renal and metabolic disorders is likely to become even more important in the future as the prevalence of obesity continues to increase.

  4. Addressing the Common Pathway Underlying Hypertension and Diabetes in People Who Are Obese by Maximizing Health: The Ultimate Knowledge Translation Gap

    PubMed Central

    Dean, Elizabeth; Lomi, Constantina; Bruno, Selma; Awad, Hamzeh; O'Donoghue, Grainne

    2011-01-01

    In accordance with the WHO definition of health, this article examines the alarming discord between the epidemiology of hypertension, type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), and obesity and the low profile of noninvasive (nondrug) compared with invasive (drug) interventions with respect to their prevention, reversal and management. Herein lies the ultimate knowledge translation gap and challenge in 21st century health care. Although lifestyle modification has long appeared in guidelines for medically managing these conditions, this evidence-based strategy is seldom implemented as rigorously as drug prescription. Biomedicine focuses largely on reducing signs and symptoms; the effects of the problem rather than the problem. This article highlights the evidence-based rationale supporting prioritizing the underlying causes and contributing factors for hypertension and T2DM, and, in turn, obesity. We argue that a primary focus on maximizing health could eliminate all three conditions, at best, or, at worst, minimize their severity, complications, and medication needs. To enable such knowledge translation and maximizing health outcome, the health care community needs to practice as an integrated team, and address barriers to effecting maximal health in all patients. Addressing the ultimate knowledge translation gap, by aligning the health care paradigm to 21st century needs, would constitute a major advance. PMID:21423684

  5. Addressing the common pathway underlying hypertension and diabetes in people who are obese by maximizing health: the ultimate knowledge translation gap.

    PubMed

    Dean, Elizabeth; Lomi, Constantina; Bruno, Selma; Awad, Hamzeh; O'Donoghue, Grainne

    2011-03-06

    In accordance with the WHO definition of health, this article examines the alarming discord between the epidemiology of hypertension, type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), and obesity and the low profile of noninvasive (nondrug) compared with invasive (drug) interventions with respect to their prevention, reversal and management. Herein lies the ultimate knowledge translation gap and challenge in 21st century health care. Although lifestyle modification has long appeared in guidelines for medically managing these conditions, this evidence-based strategy is seldom implemented as rigorously as drug prescription. Biomedicine focuses largely on reducing signs and symptoms; the effects of the problem rather than the problem. This article highlights the evidence-based rationale supporting prioritizing the underlying causes and contributing factors for hypertension and T2DM, and, in turn, obesity. We argue that a primary focus on maximizing health could eliminate all three conditions, at best, or, at worst, minimize their severity, complications, and medication needs. To enable such knowledge translation and maximizing health outcome, the health care community needs to practice as an integrated team, and address barriers to effecting maximal health in all patients. Addressing the ultimate knowledge translation gap, by aligning the health care paradigm to 21st century needs, would constitute a major advance.

  6. Treating the obese diabetic.

    PubMed

    Kenkre, Julia; Tan, Tricia; Bloom, Stephen

    2013-03-01

    Type 2 diabetes and obesity are intimately linked; reduction of bodyweight improves glycemic control, mortality and morbidity. Treating obesity in the diabetic is hampered as some diabetic treatments lead to weight gain. Bariatric surgery is currently the most effective antiobesity treatment and causes long-term remission of diabetes in many patients. However, surgery has a high cost and is associated with a significant risk of complications, and in practical terms only limited numbers can undergo this therapy. The choice of pharmacological agents suitable for treatment of diabetes and obesity is currently limited. The glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists improve glycemia and induce a modest weight loss, but there are doubts over their long-term safety. New drugs such as lorcaserin and phentermine/topiramate are being approved for obesity and have modest, salutary effects on glycemia, but again long-term safety is unclear. This article will also examine some future avenues for development, including gut hormone analogues that promise to combine powerful weight reduction with beneficial effects on glucose metabolism. PMID:23473594

  7. Developmental origins of obesity-related hypertension.

    PubMed

    Henry, Sarah L; Barzel, Benjamin; Wood-Bradley, Ryan J; Burke, Sandra L; Head, Geoffrey A; Armitage, James A

    2012-09-01

    1. In the past 30 years the prevalence of obesity and overweight have doubled. It is now estimated that globally over 500 million adults are obese and a further billion adults are overweight. Obesity is a cardiovascular risk factor and some studies suggest that up to 70% of cases of essential hypertension may be attributable, in part, to obesity. Increasingly, evidence supports a view that obesity-related hypertension may be driven by altered hypothalamic signalling, which results in inappropriately high appetite and sympathetic nerve activity to the kidney. 2. In addition to the adult risk factors for obesity and hypertension, the environment encountered in early life may 'programme' the development of obesity, hypertension and cardiovascular disease. In particular, maternal obesity or high dietary fat intake in pregnancy may induce changes in fetal growth trajectories and predispose individuals to develop obesity and related sequelae. 3. The mechanisms underlying the programming of obesity-related hypertension are becoming better understood. However, several issues require clarification, particularly with regard to the role of the placenta in transferring fatty acid to the fetal compartment, the impact of placental inflammation and cytokine production in obesity. 4. By understanding which factors are most associated with the development of obesity and hypertension in the offspring, we can focus therapeutic and behavioural interventions to most efficiently reduce the intergenerational propagation of the obesity cycle.

  8. Baseline Prevalence of Heart Diseases, Hypertension, Diabetes, and Obesity in Persons with Acute Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury: Potential Threats in the Recovery Trajectory

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background: Chronic diseases impede the recovery trajectory of acutely injured persons with traumatic spinal cord injury (TSCI). This study compares the odds of prevalent heart disease, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and obesity between persons with TSCI and persons with lower extremity fractures (LEF) who were discharged from acute care facilities. Methods: 1,776 patients with acute TSCI (cases) and 1,780 randomly selected patients with LEF (controls) discharged from January 1, 1998, through December 31, 2009, from all nonfederal hospitals were identified. Data extracted from uniform billing files were compared between cases and controls in a multivariable logistic regression model controlling for sociodemographic and clinical covariables. Results: Thirty percent of patients with acute TSCI had at least 1 of 4 conditions compared with 18% of patients with LEF (P < .0001). Persons with acute TSCI were 4 times more likely (odds ratio [OR], 4.05; 95% CI, 1.65–9.97) to have obesity, 2.7 times more likely to have heart disease (P < .001), 2 times more likely to have hypertension (P < .001), and 1.7 times more likely to have diabetes (P = .044) at the onset of TSCI. Disproportionately more Blacks than Whites have TSCI and chronic diseases. Conclusion: This study suggests that there is an increased burden of cardiovascular and cardiometabolic diseases among persons with acute TSCI compared with LEF trauma controls. Unattended comorbid conditions will affect quality of life and the recovery process. This warrants continuous monitoring and management of chronic diseases during the rehabilitation process. PMID:23960701

  9. Obesity and diabetes: A recipe for obstetric complications.

    PubMed

    Rosenn, Barak

    2008-03-01

    The prevalence of obesity has been increasing worldwide and has reached epidemic proportions in the United States, where well over 20% of the population have a body mass index (BMI) within the obese range. Obesity is associated with a wide spectrum of obstetric and perinatal complications, including increased risks of fetal mortality and morbidity, congenital malformations, maternal hypertensive disorders, gestational diabetes, excessive fetal growth and cesarean delivery. The odds ratios for these risks increase in direct correlation with the severity of obesity, and are significant even among women who are overweight without meeting criteria for obesity. Although obesity is closely associated with diabetes which, in itself, is associated with similar perinatal complications, diabetes and obesity are independent risk factors for adverse pregnancy outcome. Moreover, improving glycemic control in the pregnant woman with diabetes may mitigate the additive adverse effects of diabetes and obesity on pregnancy outcome.

  10. The pathophysiology of hypertension in patients with obesity.

    PubMed

    DeMarco, Vincent G; Aroor, Annayya R; Sowers, James R

    2014-06-01

    The combination of obesity and hypertension is associated with high morbidity and mortality because it leads to cardiovascular and kidney disease. Potential mechanisms linking obesity to hypertension include dietary factors, metabolic, endothelial and vascular dysfunction, neuroendocrine imbalances, sodium retention, glomerular hyperfiltration, proteinuria, and maladaptive immune and inflammatory responses. Visceral adipose tissue also becomes resistant to insulin and leptin and is the site of altered secretion of molecules and hormones such as adiponectin, leptin, resistin, TNF and IL-6, which exacerbate obesity-associated cardiovascular disease. Accumulating evidence also suggests that the gut microbiome is important for modulating these mechanisms. Uric acid and altered incretin or dipeptidyl peptidase 4 activity further contribute to the development of hypertension in obesity. The pathophysiology of obesity-related hypertension is especially relevant to premenopausal women with obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus who are at high risk of developing arterial stiffness and endothelial dysfunction. In this Review we discuss the relationship between obesity and hypertension with special emphasis on potential mechanisms and therapeutic targeting that might be used in a clinical setting.

  11. Increased aldosterone: mechanism of hypertension in obesity.

    PubMed

    Flynn, Colleen

    2014-05-01

    The prevalence of both obesity and hypertension are increasing worldwide. Hypertension is a common consequence of obesity. Increased central adiposity is associated with increased aldosterone levels and blood pressure in human beings. A number of small studies have shown an association between obesity-mediated hypertension and mechanisms directly linked to increased levels of aldosterone. These studies have shown a trend toward relatively greater blood pressure reduction using aldosterone-receptor blockers compared with other classes of antihypertensive agents. Other than treatment for weight loss, treatment of hypertension with specific antihypertensive medications that block or reduce aldosterone action are appropriate in obese patients. Further research is needed to understand the exact role of the adipocyte in obesity-mediated hypertension.

  12. Hypertension and Obesity in Dakar, Senegal

    PubMed Central

    Macia, Enguerran; Gueye, Lamine; Duboz, Priscilla

    2016-01-01

    Background Cardiovascular disease is a major public health problem in many sub-Saharan African countries, but data on the main cardiovascular risk factors–hypertension and obesity–are almost nonexistent in Senegal. The aims of this study were therefore (i) to report the prevalence, awareness, treatment and control of hypertension among adults in Dakar, (ii) to assess the prevalence of general and central obesity, and (iii) to analyze the association between hypertension and general and central obesity. Methods A cross-sectional survey was carried out in 2015 on a representative sample of 1000 dwellers of the Senegalese capital aged 20–90. Results The overall prevalence of hypertension was 24.7%. Among hypertensive respondents, 28.4% were aware of their condition; 16.0% were on antihypertensive medication; 4.9% had controlled blood pressure. The frequency of doctor visits was a significant predictor of awareness (OR = 2.16; p<0.05) and treatment (OR = 2.57; p<0.05) of hypertension. The prevalence of underweight, overweight and general obesity were 12.6%, 19.2% and 9.7% respectively. The prevalence of central obesity was 26% by WC and 39.8% by WHtR. General obesity and central obesity by WHtR significantly predicted HTN among men and women, but not central obesity by WC. Conclusions This study has demonstrated a high prevalence of hypertension in Dakar and a high prevalence of obesity among women–particularly among older women. The awareness, treatment, and effective control of hypertension are unacceptably low. The blood pressure of women with general obesity, and men with central obesity, in the community should be monitored regularly to limit the burden of cardiovascular disease in Senegal. PMID:27622534

  13. Obesity-related hypertension: possible pathophysiological mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Vaněčková, Ivana; Maletínská, Lenka; Behuliak, Michal; Nagelová, Veronika; Zicha, Josef; Kuneš, Jaroslav

    2014-12-01

    Hypertension is one of the major risk factors of cardiovascular diseases, but despite a century of clinical and basic research, the discrete etiology of this disease is still not fully understood. The same is true for obesity, which is recognized as a major global epidemic health problem nowadays. Obesity is associated with an increasing prevalence of the metabolic syndrome, a cluster of risk factors including hypertension, abdominal obesity, dyslipidemia, and hyperglycemia. Epidemiological studies have shown that excess weight gain predicts future development of hypertension, and the relationship between BMI and blood pressure (BP) appears to be almost linear in different populations. There is no doubt that obesity-related hypertension is a multifactorial and polygenic trait, and multiple potential pathogenetic mechanisms probably contribute to the development of higher BP in obese humans. These include hyperinsulinemia, activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, sympathetic nervous system stimulation, abnormal levels of certain adipokines such as leptin, or cytokines acting at the vascular endothelial level. Moreover, some genetic and epigenetic mechanisms are also in play. Although the full manifestation of both hypertension and obesity occurs predominantly in adulthood, their roots can be traced back to early ontogeny. The detailed knowledge of alterations occurring in the organism of experimental animals during particular critical periods (developmental windows) could help to solve this phenomenon in humans and might facilitate the age-specific prevention of human obesity-related hypertension. In addition, better understanding of particular pathophysiological mechanisms might be useful in so-called personalized medicine. PMID:25385879

  14. Obesity-related hypertension: possible pathophysiological mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Vaněčková, Ivana; Maletínská, Lenka; Behuliak, Michal; Nagelová, Veronika; Zicha, Josef; Kuneš, Jaroslav

    2014-12-01

    Hypertension is one of the major risk factors of cardiovascular diseases, but despite a century of clinical and basic research, the discrete etiology of this disease is still not fully understood. The same is true for obesity, which is recognized as a major global epidemic health problem nowadays. Obesity is associated with an increasing prevalence of the metabolic syndrome, a cluster of risk factors including hypertension, abdominal obesity, dyslipidemia, and hyperglycemia. Epidemiological studies have shown that excess weight gain predicts future development of hypertension, and the relationship between BMI and blood pressure (BP) appears to be almost linear in different populations. There is no doubt that obesity-related hypertension is a multifactorial and polygenic trait, and multiple potential pathogenetic mechanisms probably contribute to the development of higher BP in obese humans. These include hyperinsulinemia, activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, sympathetic nervous system stimulation, abnormal levels of certain adipokines such as leptin, or cytokines acting at the vascular endothelial level. Moreover, some genetic and epigenetic mechanisms are also in play. Although the full manifestation of both hypertension and obesity occurs predominantly in adulthood, their roots can be traced back to early ontogeny. The detailed knowledge of alterations occurring in the organism of experimental animals during particular critical periods (developmental windows) could help to solve this phenomenon in humans and might facilitate the age-specific prevention of human obesity-related hypertension. In addition, better understanding of particular pathophysiological mechanisms might be useful in so-called personalized medicine.

  15. Pediatric obesity & type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Dea, Tara L

    2011-01-01

    This article focuses on (a) identifying obesity and other risk factors for developing type 2 diabetes, (b) differentiating between pediatric type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes, and (c) treating pediatric type 2 diabetes. Obesity has significant implications on a child's health, including an increased risk for insulin resistance and progression to type 2 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes in children, characterized by insulin resistance and relative pancreatic b-cell failure due to the increased demand for insulin production, has now reached epidemic proportions. Longitudinal research on pediatric type 2 diabetes, however, is lacking because this epidemic is relatively new. Treatment of type 2 diabetes in children is focused on lifestyle modification with weight management/increased physical activity, and pharmacological management through oral medication or insulin therapy. Because children with type 2 diabetes are at risk for developing diabetes-related complications earlier in life, they need to be closely monitored for comorbidities.

  16. The obesity epidemic and its impact on hypertension.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Thang; Lau, David C W

    2012-05-01

    Global obesity rates have increased steadily in both developed and emerging countries over the past several decades with little signs of slowing down. Over 1.5 billion people worldwide are overweight or obese and over 40 million children under the age of 5 are overweight. Obesity is associated with increased morbidity, disability, and premature mortality from cardiovascular disease, diabetes, cancers, and musculoskeletal disorders. The personal and societal health and economic burden of this preventable disease pose a serious threat to our societies. Obesity is a major risk factor for hypertension and cardiovascular disease. Weight loss, through health behaviour modification and dietary sodium restriction, is the cornerstone in the treatment of obesity-related hypertension. Pharmacotherapy and bariatric surgery for obesity are adjunctive measures when health behaviour interventions fail to achieve the body weight and health targets. Successful management of overweight and obese persons requires a comprehensive, multifaceted framework that integrates population health, public health, and medical health models to dismantle the proximal and distal drivers of the obesogenic environment in which we live. Prevention of obesity is no longer a lofty but rather necessary goal that urgently calls for action from governments at all levels, in conjunction with all public and private sector stakeholders, in order to combat a serious and growing public health concern.

  17. Chronic kidney disease, hypertension, diabetes, and obesity in the adult population of Morocco: how to avoid "over"- and "under"-diagnosis of CKD.

    PubMed

    Benghanem Gharbi, Mohammed; Elseviers, Monique; Zamd, Mohamed; Belghiti Alaoui, Abdelali; Benahadi, Naïma; Trabelssi, El Hassane; Bayahia, Rabia; Ramdani, Benyounès; De Broe, Marc E

    2016-06-01

    The prevalence of hypertension, diabetes, obesity, and chronic kidney disease (CKD) in an adult Arabic-Berber population was investigated according to 2012 KDIGO guidelines. A stratified, randomized, representative sample of 10,524 participants was obtained. Weight, height, blood pressure, proteinuria (dipstick), plasma creatinine, estimated glomerular filtration rate, and fasting glycemia were measured. Abnormal results were controlled within 2 weeks; eGFR was retested at 3, 6, and 12 months. The population adjusted prevalences were 16.7% hypertension, 23.2% obesity, 13.8% glycemia, 1.6% for eGFR under 60 ml/min/1.73 m(2) and confirmed proteinuria 1.9% and hematuria 3.4%. Adjusted prevalence of CKD was 5.1%; distribution over KDIGO stages: CKD1: 17.8%; CKD2: 17.2%; CKD3: 52.5% (3A: 40.2%; 3B: 12.3%); CKD4: 4.4%; CKD5: 7.2%. An eGFR distribution within the sex and age categories was constructed using the third percentile as threshold for decreased eGFR. A single threshold (under 60 ml/min/1.73 m(2)) eGFR classifying CKD3-5 leads to "overdiagnosis" of CKD3A in the elderly, overt "underdiagnosis" in younger individuals with eGFR over 60 ml/min/1.73 m(2), below the third percentile, and no proteinuria. By using the KDIGO guidelines in a correct way, "kidney damage" (confirmed proteinuria, hematuria) and the demonstration of chronicity of decreased eGFR <60 ml/min/1.73 m(2), combined with the third percentile as a cutoff for the normality of eGFR for age and sex, overcome false positives and negatives, substantially decrease CKD3A prevalence, and greatly increase the accuracy of identifying CKD. PMID:27165829

  18. Novel metabolic drugs and blood pressure: implications for the treatment of obese hypertensive patients?

    PubMed

    Engeli, Stefan; Jordan, Jens

    2013-10-01

    Hypertension and obesity often coexist, exposing patients to cardiovascular and metabolic risks, particularly type 2 diabetes mellitus. Moreover, obesity may render hypertensive patients treatment resistant. We review how drugs recently approved for obesity or type 2 diabetes mellitus treatment affect blood pressure. The weight-reducing drug lorcaserin induces modest reductions in body weight while slightly improving blood pressure. The fixed low-dose topiramate/phentermine combinations elicit larger reductions in body weight and blood pressure. Concomitant improvements in glucose metabolism, adiposity, and blood pressure differentiate the first clinically available SGLT2 inhibitor dapagliflozin from other oral antidiabetic drugs. Yet, the mechanisms through which metabolic drugs affect blood pressure and their interaction with antihypertensive drugs are poorly understood. Blood pressure-lowering effects of metabolic drugs could be exploited in the clinical management of obese hypertensive patients with and without type 2 diabetes mellitus, particularly in patients with difficult to control arterial hypertension. PMID:23933756

  19. Visceral obesity and diabetes.

    PubMed

    Björntorp, P; Rosmond, R

    1999-01-01

    Visceral obesity is a strong predictor of type 2 (non-insulin-dependent) diabetes and is associated with insulin resistance. In addition, research has indicated that the accumulation of visceral fat is regulated by endocrine mechanisms. Data suggest that progressive malfunction of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, with elevation of levels of cortisol and reductions in levels of sex steroids and growth hormone, is associated with visceral accumulation of fat that contributes to circulating levels of free fatty acids, and that these factors are implicated in the development of insulin resistance. Furthermore, failure of central feedback control of the HPA axis by glucocorticoid receptors (GR) appears to be correlated with polymorphisms near the first exons of the GR gene. The HPA axis disturbances are similar to those seen after prolonged exposure to environmental stress. Psychosocial and socioeconomic factors, alcohol, depressive traits and anxiety are linked to HPA axis abnormalities.

  20. Adipocytes, aldosterone and obesity-related hypertension.

    PubMed

    Dinh Cat, Aurelie Nguyen; Friederich-Persson, Malou; White, Anna; Touyz, Rhian M

    2016-07-01

    Understanding the mechanisms linking obesity with hypertension is important in the current obesity epidemic as it may improve therapeutic interventions. Plasma aldosterone levels are positively correlated with body mass index and weight loss in obese patients is reported to be accompanied by decreased aldosterone levels. This suggests a relationship between adipose tissue and the production/secretion of aldosterone. Aldosterone is synthesized principally by the adrenal glands, but its production may be regulated by many factors, including factors secreted by adipocytes. In addition, studies have reported local synthesis of aldosterone in extra-adrenal tissues, including adipose tissue. Experimental studies have highlighted a role for adipocyte-secreted aldosterone in the pathogenesis of obesity-related cardiovascular complications via the mineralocorticoid receptor. This review focuses on how aldosterone secretion may be influenced by adipose tissue and the importance of these mechanisms in the context of obesity-related hypertension. PMID:27357931

  1. Burden of Diabetes Related Complications Among Hypertensive and Non Hypertensive Diabetics: A Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Kesavamoorthy, Goutham; Singh, Awnish K; Sharma, Shruti; Kasav, Jyoti Bala; Joshi, Ashish

    2015-01-01

    Background Diabetes and hypertension are the conditions with overlapping risk factors and complications. Objective of present study was to compare the burden of complications of diabetes among hypertensive and non hypertensive diabetes individuals. Materials and Methods This cross-sectional study was conducted at Saveetha medical college and hospital, Chennai, India. A total of 100 diabetics having hypertension and 50 non-hypertensive diabetic patients were enrolled on the basis of purposive sampling. Information about sociodemograpic characteristics, general health, health distress, diabetes symptoms, communication with physician, healthcare utilization and lifetime occurrence of diabetes related complications. Mean, standard deviation and median of continuous variables and proportion of categorical variables were recorded. Results Average age of the hypertensive diabetes patients (M=57; SD=11) was higher than non hypertensive diabetes patients (M=52; SD=11) which was statistically significant (p=.009). Diabetic neuropathy was reported by 45% of the hypertensive and 38% of the non-hypertensive diabetics. Mean self reported general health score was higher among hypertensive diabetic participants (M=3.4; SD=1) in comparison to non hypertensive diabetic participants (M=3; SD=1) and it was found statistically significant (p=.03) indicating towards poor self health perception among hypertensive’s. Results of the study have shown that the proportion of participants who have prepared any list of questions before visiting doctor’s clinic (fairly often to always) was significantly higher among hypertensive diabetics (30%) in comparison to non-hypertensive diabetics (14%). Conclusion The proportion of participants reporting diabetes neuropathy and retinopathy was higher among hypertensive diabetics in comparison to non hypertensive diabetics. PMID:26500926

  2. [Obesity and type 2 diabetes].

    PubMed

    Toplak, Hermann; Hoppichler, Friedrich; Wascher, Thomas C; Schindler, Karin; Ludvik, Bernhard

    2016-04-01

    Obesity and Type 2 Diabetes are nowadays summarized as "diabesity". That is due to the fact that obesity is frequently preceding and the most important risk factor in the increase of Type 2 Diabetes. The body mass index (BMI) is a crude measure of body fatness. Even normal weight persons can have lack in muscles (sarcopenia), which leads to the recommendation to measure waist und body fatness (e.g. BIA). Lifestyle management including nutrition and physical activity are important for diabetes prevention. In the therapy of Type 2 Diabetes body weight is increasingly used as secondary target. Also the choice of the anti-diabetic medication and concomitant medications is increasingly influenced by body weight. The significance of anti-obesity medications in the therapy of type 2 diabetes will have to be clarified by future studies. Bariatric surgery is at present indicated with a BMI above BMI > 35 kg/m(2) and can lead at least to partial diabetes remission but has to be part of a lifelong care concept. PMID:27052246

  3. An Analysis of Adult Obesity and Hypertension in Appalachia

    PubMed Central

    Herath, Janaranjana; Brown, Cheryl

    2013-01-01

    Obesity is a major health problem in the United States, and the burden associated is high. Hypertension seems to be the most common obesity-related health problem. Studies show that hypertension is approximately twice as prevalent among the obese as in the non-obese population. This study has two main objectives. First, to examine the association between obesity and hypertension within the context of economic growth in Appalachia, and second to estimate the cost of hypertension linked to obesity in Appalachia. The study uses simultaneous equations and Logit analysis for estimations. Data are from Behavior Risk Factor Surveillance Systems (BRFSS) surveys of 2001 and 2009. Results for simultaneous analysis show that hypertension decreases with decreasing obesity, increasing employment growth, and increasing income. Logit analysis highlights the importance of controlling obesity, income growth, employment growth, education, and exercises in mitigating hypertension in Appalachia. Ageing indicates a high potential of getting hypertension. Total economic cost of hypertension linked to obesity is $9.35 billion, significantly a high cost to Appalachia. Overall, results reveal the impacts of obesity on hypertension and some possible ways of mitigation. Thus, results suggest a comprehensive set of policies to Appalachia which sufficiently improve employment opportunities, educational facilities, and healthcare facilities with adequately addressed to obesity and hypertension. PMID:23618482

  4. An analysis of adult obesity and hypertension in appalachia.

    PubMed

    Herath Bandara, Saman Janaranjana; Brown, Cheryl

    2013-02-22

    Obesity is a major health problem in the United States, and the burden associated is high. Hypertension seems to be the most common obesity-related health problem. Studies show that hypertension is approximately twice as prevalent among the obese as in the non-obese population. This study has two main objectives. First, to examine the association between obesity and hypertension within the context of economic growth in Appalachia, and second to estimate the cost of hypertension linked to obesity in Appalachia. The study uses simultaneous equations and Logit analysis for estimations. Data are from Behavior Risk Factor Surveillance Systems (BRFSS) surveys of 2001 and 2009. Results for simultaneous analysis show that hypertension decreases with decreasing obesity, increasing employment growth, and increasing income. Logit analysis highlights the importance of controlling obesity, income growth, employment growth, education, and exercises in mitigating hypertension in Appalachia. Ageing indicates a high potential of getting hypertension. Total economic cost of hypertension linked to obesity is $9.35 billion, significantly a high cost to Appalachia. Overall, results reveal the impacts of obesity on hypertension and some possible ways of mitigation. Thus, results suggest a comprehensive set of policies to Appalachia which sufficiently improve employment opportunities, educational facilities, and healthcare facilities with adequately addressed to obesity and hypertension.

  5. Evolution from obesity to diabetes.

    PubMed

    Golay, A; Felber, J P

    1994-01-01

    The relationship between obesity and Type 2 diabetes mellitus is so closely related that it is worth questioning the possibility of obesity being more than just one diabetes risk factor among others but a factor which participates causally to the development of Type 2 Diabetes on a genetic background. In this review, the evolution of normal glucose tolerance towards impaired glucose tolerance corresponds to the development of compensatory metabolic changes. These compensatory mechanisms are hyperinsulinaemia and postprandial hyperglycaemia which prevents a defect in glucose uptake and especially glucose storage. These compensatory responses are overcome with time and diabetes develops in spite of the hyperinsulinaemia and the hyperglycaemia. The capacity for glucose storage is decreased and cannot be overcome at this stage by increases of both glucose and insulinemic responses. Inhibition of glycogen synthase activity by an increased muscle glycogen concentration is probably more powerful than its stimulation by insulin and glucose and the capacity for glucose storage remains decreased. Finally with time insulin secretion gradually decreases as a consequence of chronic hyperglycaemia and results in full pancreatic decompensation. At this stage hepatic glucose production is increased. The most important factor in the evolution from obesity to diabetes reside in the permanence of the increase in lipid oxidation and mainly in the duration of obesity. An important consequence of permanently high lipid oxidation is the chronic resistance to glucose uptake, initially compensated for by increased plasma insulin and glucose concentrations. A vicious circle starts after insulin resistance to glucose uptake appears, followed by hyperglycaemia blocking the glucose storage system and by the lack of storing capacity leading to a rise in glycaemia. In conclusion, all these metabolic phenomena are appearing in a sequential way, progressively adapting to the deteriorating

  6. Understanding and treating hypertension in diabetic populations.

    PubMed

    Volpe, Massimo; Battistoni, Allegra; Savoia, Carmine; Tocci, Giuliano

    2015-10-01

    Hypertension and diabetes frequently occurs in the same individuals in clinical practice. Moreover, the presence of hypertension does increase the risk of new-onset diabetes, as well as diabetes does promote development of hypertension. Whatever the case, the concomitant presence of these conditions confers a high risk of major cardiovascular complications and promotes the use integrated pharmacological interventions, aimed at achieving the recommended therapeutic targets. While the benefits of lowering abnormal fasting glucose levels in patients with hypertension and diabetes have been consistently demonstrated, the blood pressure (BP) targets to be achieved to get a benefit in patients with diabetes have been recently reconsidered. In the past, randomized clinical trials have, indeed, demonstrated that lowering BP levels to less than 140/90 mmHg was associated to a substantial reduction of the risk of developing macrovascular and microvascular complications in hypertensive patients with diabetes. In addition, epidemiological and clinical reports suggested that "the lower, the better" for BP in diabetes, so that levels of BP even lower than 130/80 mmHg have been recommended. Recent randomized clinical trials, however, designed to evaluate the potential benefits obtained with an intensive antihypertensive therapy, aimed at achieving a target systolic BP level below 120 mmHg as compared to those obtained with less stringent therapy, have challenged the previous recommendations from international guidelines. In fact, detailed analyses of these trials showed a paradoxically increased risk of coronary events, mostly myocardial infarction, in those patients who achieved the lowest BP levels, particularly in the high-risk subsets of hypertensive populations with diabetes. In the light of these considerations, the present article will briefly review the common pathophysiological mechanisms, the potential sites of therapeutic interactions and the currently recommended BP

  7. Understanding and treating hypertension in diabetic populations

    PubMed Central

    Battistoni, Allegra; Savoia, Carmine; Tocci, Giuliano

    2015-01-01

    Hypertension and diabetes frequently occurs in the same individuals in clinical practice. Moreover, the presence of hypertension does increase the risk of new-onset diabetes, as well as diabetes does promote development of hypertension. Whatever the case, the concomitant presence of these conditions confers a high risk of major cardiovascular complications and promotes the use integrated pharmacological interventions, aimed at achieving the recommended therapeutic targets. While the benefits of lowering abnormal fasting glucose levels in patients with hypertension and diabetes have been consistently demonstrated, the blood pressure (BP) targets to be achieved to get a benefit in patients with diabetes have been recently reconsidered. In the past, randomized clinical trials have, indeed, demonstrated that lowering BP levels to less than 140/90 mmHg was associated to a substantial reduction of the risk of developing macrovascular and microvascular complications in hypertensive patients with diabetes. In addition, epidemiological and clinical reports suggested that “the lower, the better” for BP in diabetes, so that levels of BP even lower than 130/80 mmHg have been recommended. Recent randomized clinical trials, however, designed to evaluate the potential benefits obtained with an intensive antihypertensive therapy, aimed at achieving a target systolic BP level below 120 mmHg as compared to those obtained with less stringent therapy, have challenged the previous recommendations from international guidelines. In fact, detailed analyses of these trials showed a paradoxically increased risk of coronary events, mostly myocardial infarction, in those patients who achieved the lowest BP levels, particularly in the high-risk subsets of hypertensive populations with diabetes. In the light of these considerations, the present article will briefly review the common pathophysiological mechanisms, the potential sites of therapeutic interactions and the currently recommended

  8. High lipolytic activity and dyslipidemia in a spontaneous hypertensive/NIH corpulent (SHR/N-cp) rat: a genetic model of obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Atgié, C; Hadj-Sassi, A; Bukowiecki, L; Mauriège, P

    2009-03-01

    In order to better understand the link between obesity and type 2 diabetes, lipolysis and its adrenergic regulation was investigated in various adipose depots of obese adult females SHR/N-cp rats. Serum insulin, glucose, free fatty acids (FFA), triglycerides (TG) and glycerol were measured. Adipocytes were isolated from subcutaneous (SC), parametrial (PM) and retroperitoneal (RP) fat pads. Total cell number and size, basal lipolysis or stimulated by norepinephrine (NE) and BRL 37344 were measured in each depot. Obese rats were hyperinsulinemic and hyperglycemic, suggesting high insulin resistance. They presented a marked dyslipidemia, attested by increased serum FFA and TG levels. High serum glycerol levels also suggest a strong lipolytic rate. Obese rats showed an excessive development of all fat pads although a more pronounced effect was observed in the SC one. The cellularity of this depot was increased 8 fold when compared to lean rats, but these fat cells were only 1.5 to 2-fold larger. SC adipocytes showed a marked increase in their basal lipolytic activity but a lack of change in responsiveness to NE or BRL 37344. The association between high basal lipolysis and increased cellularity yields to a marked adipose cell lipolytic rate, especially from the SC region. SHR/N-cp rats were characterized by a hyperplasic type of obesity with an excessive development of the SC depot. The dyslipidemia, attested by an altered serum lipid profile could be attributed to excessive lipolysis that contributes to increased FFA levels, and to early development of insulin resistance through a lipotoxicity effect.

  9. A randomized, double blind, cross-over, placebo-controlled clinical trial to assess the effects of Candesartan on the insulin sensitivity on non diabetic, non hypertense subjects with dysglyce mia and abdominal obesity. "ARAMIA"

    PubMed Central

    López-Jaramillo, Patricio; Pradilla, Lina P; Lahera, Vicente; Sieger, Federico A Silva; Rueda-Clausen, Christian F; Márquez, Gustavo A

    2006-01-01

    Background The raising prevalence of type-2 diabetes mellitus and obesity has been recognized as a major problem for public health, affecting both developed and developing countries. Impaired fasting plasma glucose has been previously associated with endothelial dysfunction, higher levels of inflammatory markers and increased risk of developing insulin resistance and cardiovascular events. Besides life-style changes, the blockade of the renin-angiotensin system has been proposed as a useful alternative intervention to improve insulin resistance and decrease the number of new type-2 diabetes cases. The aim of this clinical trial is to study the effect of the treatment with Candesartan, an angiotensin II receptor antagonist, on the insulin resistance, the plasma levels of adipoquines, oxidative stress and prothrombotic markers, in a group of non diabetic, non hypertensive, dysglycemic and obese subjects. Methods and design A randomized, double blind, cross-over, placebo-controlled, clinical trial was designed to assess the effects of Candesartan (up to 32 mg/day during 6 months) on the Homeostasis Model Assessment (HOMA) index, lipid profile, protrombotic state, oxidative stress and plasma levels of inflammatory markers. The participants will be recruited in the "Fundación Cardiovascular de Colombia". Subjects who fullfil selection criteria will receive permanent educational, nutritional and exercise support during their participation in the study. After a 15 days-run-in period with placebo and life-style recommendations, the patients who have a treatment compliance equal or greater than 80% will be randomlly assigned to one of the treatment groups. Group A will receive Candesartan during 6 months and placebo during 6 months. Group B will receive placebo during the first 6 months, and then, Candesartan during the last 6 months. Control visits will be programed monthly and all parameters of interest will be evaluated every 6 months. Hypothesis Treatment with

  10. Adipose afferent reflex: sympathetic activation and obesity hypertension.

    PubMed

    Xiong, X-Q; Chen, W-W; Zhu, G-Q

    2014-03-01

    Excessive sympathetic activity contributes to the pathogenesis of hypertension and the progression of the related organ damage. Adipose afferent reflex (AAR) is a sympatho-excitatory reflex that the afferent activity from white adipose tissue (WAT) increases sympathetic outflow and blood pressure. Hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN or PVH) is one of the central sites in the control of the AAR, and ionotropic glutamate receptors in the nucleus mediate the AAR. The AAR is enhanced in obesity and obesity hypertension. Enhanced WAT afferent activity and AAR contribute to the excessive sympathetic activation and hypertension in obesity. Blockage of the AAR attenuates the excessive sympathetic activity and hypertension. Leptin may be one of sensors in the WAT for the AAR, and is involved in the enhanced AAR in obesity and hypertension. This review focuses on the neuroanatomical basis and physiological functions of the AAR, and the important role of the enhanced AAR in the pathogenesis of obesity hypertension.

  11. Pathophysiology of hypertension in obese children: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Wirix, A J G; Kaspers, P J; Nauta, J; Chinapaw, M J M; Kist-van Holthe, J E

    2015-10-01

    Hypertension is increasingly common in overweight and obese children. The mechanisms behind the development of hypertension in obesity are complex, and evidence is limited. In order to effectively treat obese children for hypertension, it is important to have a deeper understanding of the pathophysiology of hypertension in obese children. The present review summarizes the main factors associated with hypertension in obese children and discusses their potential role in its pathophysiology. Systematic searches were conducted in PubMed and EMBASE for articles published up to October 2014. In total, 60 relevant studies were included. The methodological quality of the included studies ranged from weak to strong. Several factors important in the development of hypertension in obese children have been suggested, including endocrine determinants, such as corticosteroids and adipokines, sympathetic nervous system activity, disturbed sodium homeostasis, as well as oxidative stress, inflammation and endothelial dysfunction. Understanding the pathophysiology of hypertension in overweight and obese children is important and could have implications for its screening and treatment. Based on solely cross-sectional observational studies, it is impossible to infer causality. Longitudinal studies of high methodological quality are needed to gain more insight into the complex mechanisms behind the development of hypertension in obese children. PMID:26098701

  12. Neural mechanisms and management of obesity-related hypertension.

    PubMed

    Esler, Murray D; Eikelis, Nina; Lambert, Elisabeth; Straznicky, Nora

    2008-11-01

    The sympathetic nervous system is activated in human obesity and in the analogous experimental obesity produced by overfeeding. The causes remain uncertain and may be multiple. The consequences include hypertension, probably attributable to activation of the sympathetic outflow to the kidneys, and, more disputed, insulin resistance. The pattern of sympathetic activation in normal-weight and obesity-related hypertension differs in terms of the firing characteristics of individual sympathetic fibers (increased rate of nerve firing in normal-weight hypertensives, increased number of active fibers firing at a normal rate in obesity-hypertension) and the sympathetic outflows involved. The underlying mechanisms and the adverse consequences of the two modes of sympathetic activation may differ. Should antihypertensive drug therapy in obesity-hypertension specifically target the existing neural pathophysiology? Such an approach can be advocated on theoretical grounds. Perhaps more important is the requirement that chosen antihypertensives do not cause weight gain or insulin resistance.

  13. Hypertension and obesity: epidemiology, mechanisms and clinical approach.

    PubMed

    Becton, Lauren J; Shatat, Ibrahim F; Flynn, Joseph T

    2012-08-01

    Obesity-related hypertension in pediatric patients is becoming more prevalent around the world as a consequence of the childhood obesity epidemic. Hypertension and the metabolic abnormalities associated with obesity will significantly increase the health risks for these children as they grow into adulthood. The pathophysiology of obesity-related hypertension is complex, and multiple potential mechanisms likely contribute to the development of higher blood pressure in obese children. These include hyperinsulinemia, activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, stimulation of the sympathetic nervous system, abnormalities in adipokines such as leptin, direct effects of perinephric fat on the renal parenchyma, and cytokines acting at the vascular endothelial level. As in any child with elevated blood pressure, diagnostic evaluation should focus on confirmation of hypertension, determine if an underlying cause can be identified and whether hypertensive target organ damage is present. Therapy should begin with lifestyle modifications, but will often need to include one or more antihypertensive medications.

  14. Evaluation of Autonomic Dysfunction in Obese and Non-Obese Hypertensive Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Ganai, Jyoti; Muthukrishnan, Shobitha; Kohli, Sunil

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Obesity and more specifically, visceral obesity, has been consistently associated with hypertension and increased cardiovascular risk. Epidemiological studies indicate that at least two-third of the prevalence of hypertension can be directly attributed to obesity. Studies also suggest that hypertensive patients have impaired cardiac autonomic function. Aim The objective of the study was to examine any added effects of obesity on cardiac autonomic dysfunction in hypertensive patients. Materials and Methods Hypertensive subjects (n=45) between 35-60 years of age were divided into two groups; Group A (n=30) consisted of non-obese hypertensive subjects and Group B (n=15) consisted of obese (BMI≥30kg/m2) hypertensive subjects. Cardiac autonomic function was assessed using four tests – Heart rate response to immediate standing (30:15 ratio), standing to lying ratio (S/L ratio), Blood pressure response to immediate standing and Cold Pressor Test (CPT). Results There were no significant differences for autonomic function tests between obese and non-obese hypertensive subjects (p >0.05). Conclusion The results showed that there are no significant differences in the cardiac autonomic function responses between obese and non-obese hypertensive subjects. PMID:27504394

  15. Ethnic disparities in the association of body mass index with the risk of hypertension and diabetes.

    PubMed

    Wong, Robert J; Chou, Christina; Sinha, Sidhartha R; Kamal, Ahmad; Ahmed, Aijaz

    2014-06-01

    Despite having lower body mass index (BMI) compared to other ethnic groups, Asians continue to develop significant metabolic diseases such as hypertension and diabetes. To evaluate the disparate association of BMI and risk of hypertension and diabetes in Asians. We retrospectively studied 150,753 adults from the 1985-2011 California Behavioral Risk Factor Survey. Trends in prevalence of obesity, hypertension, and diabetes were stratified by ethnicity. Multivariate logistic regression models evaluated the incremental effect of one unit BMI increase on risk of hypertension and diabetes and the disparate risks of hypertension and diabetes at different BMI thresholds. Asians had the lowest BMI among all groups. However, the impact of increasing BMI on risk of hypertension and diabetes was significantly greater in Asians. For each one unit increase in BMI, Asians were significantly more likely to have hypertension (OR 1.15; 95% CI 1.13-1.18) compared to non-Hispanic whites, blacks, and Hispanics. Similar trends were seen for diabetes (Asians: OR 1.15; 95% CI 1.13-1.18). The risk of hypertension in Asians with BMI ≥ 22 was similar to non-Hispanic whites with BMI ≥ 27 and blacks with BMI ≥ 28. The risk of diabetes in Asians with BMI ≥ 28 was similar to non-Hispanic whites with BMI ≥ 30. Despite lower overall BMI compared to other groups, weight gain in Asians is associated with significantly higher risks of hypertension and diabetes. Compared to other ethnic groups, similar risks of hypertension and diabetes are seen in Asians at much lower BMI.

  16. Approach to the Obese Adolescent with New-Onset Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Zeitler, Philip

    2010-01-01

    The prevalence of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes among children and adolescents has been steadily increasing over the last few decades. However, as the general pediatric population becomes more obese and more ethnically diverse, reliance on phenotypic characteristics for distinguishing between these types of diabetes is becoming increasingly untenable. Yet, the recognition of differences in treatment strategies, associated disorders, and both short- and long-term diabetes and cardiovascular outcomes supports the importance of diagnostic efforts to make a distinction between diabetes types. An approach to determination of diabetes type is discussed, focused on the presence or absence of autoimmunity and assessment of β-cell function. At the time of diagnosis, it is generally not possible to be certain of diabetes type, and therefore, initial treatment decisions must be made based on aspects of the presenting physiology, with adjustments in treatment approach made as the individual’s course proceeds and additional information becomes available. The apparent overlap between type 1 and type 2 diabetes that occurs in obese adolescents has resulted in some controversy regarding mixed forms of diabetes that are ultimately semantic, but this does raise interesting questions about the treatment of type 1 diabetes in the presence of an insulin-resistant phenotype. Finally, the lack of information about the efficacy of treatment of cardiovascular risk factors, such as dyslipidemia and hypertension, along with the well-documented challenges in adherence to chronic illness treatment in this population, creates substantial challenges. PMID:21131537

  17. [Role of matrix metalloproteinases and tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases in hypertension. Pathogenesis of hypertension and obesity].

    PubMed

    Trojanek, Joanna B

    2015-01-01

    Hypertension (HT), obesity and related metabolic disorders are increasing cause diseases with risk of premature death in western societies. Both hypertension and obesity are characterized by similar disorders such as chronic low systemic inflammation, changes in the vessel wall, abdominal obesity, insulin-resistance or dyslipidemia. Chronic, untreated HT leads to adverse changes in internal organs like kidney damage, arterial remodeling and hypertrophy of the left ventricle. The important role metalloproteinases and their inhibitors (TIMPs) in the pathophysiology of hypertension is associated with the degradation of vascular wall components, especially collagen and elastin. The activated RAAS system (renin-angiotensin-aldosterone) is displaying direct impact in the pathogenesis and progress of hypertension. Angiotensin II affects the expression and activation of many growth factors, cytokines and MMPs. The fat tissue of obese people is in the state of low intensity chronic inflammation and undergoes continual process of remodeling. Obesity is one of the direct cause of hypertension.

  18. Calcium intake and hypertension among obese adults in United States: associations and implications explored.

    PubMed

    Chen, Y; Strasser, S; Cao, Y; Wang, K-S; Zheng, S

    2015-09-01

    The relationship between calcium intake and hypertension is receiving increased research attention. The prevalence of hypertension is high among the obese populations. Calcium is a mineral that influences blood pressure. The aim of the study was to examine the association between calcium intake and hypertension in a large nationally representative sample of obese American adults. A total of 14,408 obese adults aged 20 years or older were obtained from the 1999-2010 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Analysis of variance and linear regression models were used to examine relationships between calcium intake and systolic blood pressure (SBP) as well as diastolic blood pressure (DBP). Multiple logistic regression models were used to examine the association between calcium intake and hypertension after adjusting for potential confounders and interactions, including: age, race, education level, alcohol use, smoking, diabetes status, sodium intake and potassium intake. Calcium intake was significantly lower for the hypertensive group compared with the normotensive group (P<0.0001), especially among those obese female young adults aged 20-44 years and among non-diabetic obese adults. Based on ordinary linear regression analysis, a significant inverse relationship was detected, SBP and DBP decreased if calcium intake increased (SBP: regression coefficient estimate=-0.015, P<0.0001; DBP: regression coefficient estimate=-0.028, P<0.0001). Multiple logistic regression showed that calcium intake was negatively associated with the probability of hypertension (odds ratio (OR)=0.81, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.74-0.87, P<0.0001). In stratified analysis, calcium intake in youngest adults (age 20-44 years) had the lowest likelihood of hypertension (OR=0.77, 95% CI: 0.64-0.93, P<0.0001), the inverse relationship between calcium intake and probability of hypertension was stronger among females (OR: 0.68, 95% CI: 0.55-0.84, P<0.0001), when compared with the whole

  19. The Interactive Association of General Obesity and Central Obesity with Prevalent Hypertension in Rural Lanzhou, China

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuhong; Wan, Liping; Wang, Zengwu; Wang, Xin; Di, Zhaoxin; Liu, Xiaoyu

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the interactive association between obesity with different anthropometry indices and prevalence of hypertension in rural Lanzhou. Methods A cross-sectional survey was conducted in rural Lanzhou from April to July in 2013. The available information of 1275 rural residents aged more than 35 years was collected with a unified questionnaire and their blood pressure and anthropometry indices were measured in the field. The male-to-female ratio was 1:1.1. A generalized estimate equation (GEE) linear model was used to determine the association between obesity with different indexes and hypertension. Results There was a moderate prevalence of general obesity (~11%) and very high prevalence of central obesity (53.2~67%) among the adults of rural Lanzhou. The prevalence of hypertension approximated 28%. GEE linear models showed that obesity with any one of anthropometry indices was associated significantly with the increased prevalence of hypertension among both males and females. In females, general obesity increased the prevalence of hypertension by 37% (0.37, 95%CI: 0.27,0.47) but in males by 23% (0.23, 95%CI: 0.12,0.35). The hypertensive effect of all central obesity was much lower than that of general obesity but approximately comparable to that of overweight. In addition, the interactions of the classified body mass index (BMI) and central obesity showed that when general obesity or overweight coexisted with any one of central obesity, the prevalence of hypertension was increased significantly, and this effect was a little higher than the corresponding main effect of general obesity or overweight in females but was much higher in males. In addition, general obesity or overweight which did not coexist with central obesity was not significantly associated with the increased prevalence of hypertension, nor were the other situations of central obesity in the normal weight or underweight except for the situation of central obesity with waist

  20. Genetic evidence for a normal-weight "metabolically obese" phenotype linking insulin resistance, hypertension, coronary artery disease, and type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Yaghootkar, Hanieh; Scott, Robert A; White, Charles C; Zhang, Weihua; Speliotes, Elizabeth; Munroe, Patricia B; Ehret, Georg B; Bis, Joshua C; Fox, Caroline S; Walker, Mark; Borecki, Ingrid B; Knowles, Joshua W; Yerges-Armstrong, Laura; Ohlsson, Claes; Perry, John R B; Chambers, John C; Kooner, Jaspal S; Franceschini, Nora; Langenberg, Claudia; Hivert, Marie-France; Dastani, Zari; Richards, J Brent; Semple, Robert K; Frayling, Timothy M

    2014-12-01

    The mechanisms that predispose to hypertension, coronary artery disease (CAD), and type 2 diabetes (T2D) in individuals of normal weight are poorly understood. In contrast, in monogenic primary lipodystrophy-a reduction in subcutaneous adipose tissue-it is clear that it is adipose dysfunction that causes severe insulin resistance (IR), hypertension, CAD, and T2D. We aimed to test the hypothesis that common alleles associated with IR also influence the wider clinical and biochemical profile of monogenic IR. We selected 19 common genetic variants associated with fasting insulin-based measures of IR. We used hierarchical clustering and results from genome-wide association studies of eight nondisease outcomes of monogenic IR to group these variants. We analyzed genetic risk scores against disease outcomes, including 12,171 T2D cases, 40,365 CAD cases, and 69,828 individuals with blood pressure measurements. Hierarchical clustering identified 11 variants associated with a metabolic profile consistent with a common, subtle form of lipodystrophy. A genetic risk score consisting of these 11 IR risk alleles was associated with higher triglycerides (β = 0.018; P = 4 × 10(-29)), lower HDL cholesterol (β = -0.020; P = 7 × 10(-37)), greater hepatic steatosis (β = 0.021; P = 3 × 10(-4)), higher alanine transaminase (β = 0.002; P = 3 × 10(-5)), lower sex-hormone-binding globulin (β = -0.010; P = 9 × 10(-13)), and lower adiponectin (β = -0.015; P = 2 × 10(-26)). The same risk alleles were associated with lower BMI (per-allele β = -0.008; P = 7 × 10(-8)) and increased visceral-to-subcutaneous adipose tissue ratio (β = -0.015; P = 6 × 10(-7)). Individuals carrying ≥17 fasting insulin-raising alleles (5.5% population) were slimmer (0.30 kg/m(2)) but at increased risk of T2D (odds ratio [OR] 1.46; per-allele P = 5 × 10(-13)), CAD (OR 1.12; per-allele P = 1 × 10(-5)), and increased blood pressure (systolic and diastolic blood pressure of 1.21 mmHg [per-allele P = 2

  1. Obesity and diabetes gene discovery approaches.

    PubMed

    Walder, K; Segal, D; Jowett, J; Blangero, J; Collier, G R

    2003-01-01

    New treatments are currently required for the common metabolic diseases obesity and type 2 diabetes. The identification of physiological and biochemical factors that underlie the metabolic disturbances observed in obesity and type 2 diabetes is a key step in developing better therapeutic outcomes. The discovery of new genes and pathways involved in the pathogenesis of these diseases is critical to this process, however identification of genes that contribute to the risk of developing these diseases represents a significant challenge as obesity and type 2 diabetes are complex diseases with many genetic and environmental causes. A number of diverse approaches have been used to discover and validate potential new targets for obesity and diabetes. To date, DNA-based approaches using candidate gene and genome-wide linkage analysis have had limited success in identifying genomic regions or genes involved in the development of these diseases. Recent advances in the ability to evaluate linkage analysis data from large family pedigrees using variance components based linkage analysis show great promise in robustly identifying genomic regions associated with the development of obesity and diabetes. RNA-based technologies such as cDNA microarrays have identified many genes differentially expressed in tissues of healthy and diseased subjects. Using a combined approach, we are endeavouring to focus attention on differentially expressed genes located in chromosomal regions previously linked with obesity and/or diabetes. Using this strategy, we have identified Beacon as a potential new target for obesity and diabetes.

  2. Gestational diabetes, pregnancy hypertension, and late vascular disease.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, Marshall W

    2007-07-01

    The complexity of the several pathogenic pathways that cause hypertension and vascular disease and the prolonged interval that appears to predate clinical morbidity have hindered inquiry into the association between GDM and vascular disorders. As a forme fruste of later type 2 diabetes, GDM-affected gravidas are identified as at risk of diabetes-related atherosclerosis, glomerular disruption, and pathogenic retinal angio-genesis. That GDM is evidence for underlying chronic conditions such as dysregulation of innate immune response that, independent of the diabetic state, produces vascular disease is difficult state, produces vascular disease is difficult to assert with the present published literature. Cross-sectional studies of patients with established gestational hypertension or preeclampsia are ambiguous as to the possible pathogenic effect of insulin resistance. Cohort studies initiated in early and mid-pregnancy show evidence that both gestational hypertension and preeclampsia may be more prevalent in gravidas with greater insulin resistance. The association of gestational glucose intolerance with gestational hypertension appears to be independent of obesity and ambient glycemia but explained in part by insulin resistance. Late pregnancy preeclampsia is associated with elevated mid-pregnancy BMI, blood pressure, fasting glucose and insulin, urate, and C-reactive protein, suggestive of metabolic and immune dysregulation. GDM appears to be associated with overexpressed innate immune response, which, in turn, is associated with vascular dysfunction and vascular disease. Among women with GDM, markers of insulin resistance do not appear to correlate with hypertension in short-term cohort studies. However, when non-GDM subjects are compared with subjects with GDM, postpregnancy studies do show an associated with vascular dysfunction and vascular disease. Among women with GDM, markers of insulin resistance do not appear to correlate with hypertension in short

  3. Prevalences of overweight, obesity, hyperglycaemia, hypertension and dyslipidaemia in the Gulf: systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Alhyas, Layla; McKay, Ailsa; Balasanthiran, Anjali; Majeed, Azeem

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To examine the prevalence of risk factors for diabetes and its complications in the Co-operation Council of the Arab States of the Gulf (GCC) region. Design Systematic review. Setting Co-operation Council of the Arab States of the Gulf (GCC) states (United Arab Emirates, Bahrain, Saudi Arabia, Oman, Qatar, Kuwait). Participants Residents of the GCC states participating in studies on the prevalence of overweight and obesity, hyperglycaemia, hypertension and dyslipidaemia. Main outcome measures Prevalences of overweight, obesity and hyperglycaemia, hypertension and hyperlipidaemia. Results Forty-five studies were included in the review. Reported prevalences of overweight and obesity in adults were 25–50% and 13–50%, respectively. Prevalence appeared higher in women and to hold a non-linear association with age. Current prevalence of impaired glucose tolerance was estimated to be 10–20%. Prevalence appears to have been increasing in recent years. Estimated prevalences of hypertension and dyslipidaemia were few and used varied definitions of abnormality, making review difficult, but these also appeared to be high and increasing, Conclusions There are high prevalences of risk factors for diabetes and diabetic complications in the GCC region, indicative that their current management is suboptimal. Enhanced management will be critical if escalation of diabetes-related problems is to be averted as industrialization, urbanization and changing population demographics continue. PMID:21847437

  4. Dietary proteins in obesity and in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Keller, Ulrich

    2011-03-01

    balance may play an important role for the increasing number of elderly obese subjects in our industrialized societies, since proteins exert beneficial effects in the conditions of overweight, metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular risk factors, bone health, and sarcopenia. Adverse effects of increased dietary proteins have been observed in subjects with renal impairment- this problem is frequently observed in the elderly, hypertensive, and diabetic population. Nevertheless, dietary proteins deserve more attention than they have received in the past.

  5. ERICA: prevalences of hypertension and obesity in Brazilian adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Bloch, Katia Vergetti; Klein, Carlos Henrique; Szklo, Moyses; Kuschnir, Maria Cristina C; Abreu, Gabriela de Azevedo; Barufaldi, Laura Augusta; da Veiga, Gloria Valeria; Schaan, Beatriz; da Silva, Thiago Luiz Nogueira; de Vasconcellos, Maurício Teixeira Leite

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To estimate the prevalence of arterial hypertension and obesity and the population attributable fraction of hypertension that is due to obesity in Brazilian adolescents. METHODS Data from participants in the Brazilian Study of Cardiovascular Risks in Adolescents (ERICA), which was the first national school-based, cross-section study performed in Brazil were evaluated. The sample was divided into 32 geographical strata and clusters from 32 schools and classes, with regional and national representation. Obesity was classified using the body mass index according to age and sex. Arterial hypertension was defined when the average systolic or diastolic blood pressure was greater than or equal to the 95th percentile of the reference curve. Prevalences and 95% confidence intervals (95%CI) of arterial hypertension and obesity, both on a national basis and in the macro-regions of Brazil, were estimated by sex and age group, as were the fractions of hypertension attributable to obesity in the population. RESULTS We evaluated 73,399 students, 55.4% female, with an average age of 14.7 years (SD = 1.6). The prevalence of hypertension was 9.6% (95%CI 9.0-10.3); with the lowest being in the North, 8.4% (95%CI 7.7-9.2) and Northeast regions, 8.4% (95%CI 7.6-9.2), and the highest being in the South, 12.5% (95%CI 11.0-14.2). The prevalence of obesity was 8.4% (95%CI 7.9-8.9), which was lower in the North region and higher in the South region. The prevalences of arterial hypertension and obesity were higher in males. Obese adolescents presented a higher prevalence of hypertension, 28.4% (95%CI 25.5-31.2), than overweight adolescents, 15.4% (95%CI 17.0-13.8), or eutrophic adolescents, 6.3% (95%CI 5.6-7.0). The fraction of hypertension attributable to obesity was 17.8%. CONCLUSIONS ERICA was the first nationally representative Brazilian study providing prevalence estimates of hypertension in adolescents. Regional and sex differences were observed. The study indicates

  6. ERICA: prevalences of hypertension and obesity in Brazilian adolescents.

    PubMed

    Bloch, Katia Vergetti; Klein, Carlos Henrique; Szklo, Moyses; Kuschnir, Maria Cristina C; Abreu, Gabriela de Azevedo; Barufaldi, Laura Augusta; da Veiga, Gloria Valeria; Schaan, Beatriz; da Silva, Thiago Luiz Nogueira; de Vasconcellos, Maurício Teixeira Leite; Moraes, Ana Julia Pantoja; Borges, Ana Luíza; de Oliveira, Ana Mayra Andrade; Tavares, Bruno Mendes; de Oliveira, Cecília Lacroix; Cunha, Cristiane de Freitas; Giannini, Denise Tavares; Belfort, Dilson Rodrigues; Santos, Eduardo Lima; de Leon, Elisa Brosina; Fujimori, Elizabeth; Oliveira, Elizabete Regina Araújo; Magliano, Erika da Silva; Vasconcelos, Francisco de Assis Guedes; Azevedo, George Dantas; Brunken, Gisela Soares; Guimarães, Isabel Cristina Britto; Faria Neto, José Rocha; Oliveira, Juliana Souza; de Carvalho, Kenia Mara B; Gonçalves, Luis Gonzaga de Oliveira; Monteiro, Maria Inês; Santos, Marize M; Jardim, Paulo César B Veiga; Ferreira, Pedro Antônio Muniz; Montenegro, Renan Magalhães; Gurgel, Ricardo Queiroz; Vianna, Rodrigo Pinheiro; Vasconcelos, Sandra Mary; Goldberg, Tamara Beres Lederer

    2016-02-01

    OBJECTIVE To estimate the prevalence of arterial hypertension and obesity and the population attributable fraction of hypertension that is due to obesity in Brazilian adolescents. METHODS Data from participants in the Brazilian Study of Cardiovascular Risks in Adolescents (ERICA), which was the first national school-based, cross-section study performed in Brazil were evaluated. The sample was divided into 32 geographical strata and clusters from 32 schools and classes, with regional and national representation. Obesity was classified using the body mass index according to age and sex. Arterial hypertension was defined when the average systolic or diastolic blood pressure was greater than or equal to the 95th percentile of the reference curve. Prevalences and 95% confidence intervals (95%CI) of arterial hypertension and obesity, both on a national basis and in the macro-regions of Brazil, were estimated by sex and age group, as were the fractions of hypertension attributable to obesity in the population. RESULTS We evaluated 73,399 students, 55.4% female, with an average age of 14.7 years (SD = 1.6). The prevalence of hypertension was 9.6% (95%CI 9.0-10.3); with the lowest being in the North, 8.4% (95%CI 7.7-9.2) and Northeast regions, 8.4% (95%CI 7.6-9.2), and the highest being in the South, 12.5% (95%CI 11.0-14.2). The prevalence of obesity was 8.4% (95%CI 7.9-8.9), which was lower in the North region and higher in the South region. The prevalences of arterial hypertension and obesity were higher in males. Obese adolescents presented a higher prevalence of hypertension, 28.4% (95%CI 25.5-31.2), than overweight adolescents, 15.4% (95%CI 17.0-13.8), or eutrophic adolescents, 6.3% (95%CI 5.6-7.0). The fraction of hypertension attributable to obesity was 17.8%. CONCLUSIONS ERICA was the first nationally representative Brazilian study providing prevalence estimates of hypertension in adolescents. Regional and sex differences were observed. The study indicates that the

  7. Obstructive sleep apnoea in patients with obesity and hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Di Guardo, Antonino; Profeta, Gaetano; Crisafulli, Cristiano; Sidoti, Giuseppe; Zammataro, Marcello; Paolini, Italo; Filippi, Alessandro

    2010-01-01

    Background The links between obstructive sleep apnoea and hypertension are well established; obstructive sleep apnoea is reported in up to 30% of patients with hypertension, although it is frequently underdiagnosed. Physicians can assess the degree of sleepiness by administering the Epworth Sleepiness Scale, but the large number of patients with hypertension makes this strategy difficult for busy physicians to implement. Obese patients form a subgroup at higher risk for obstructive sleep apnoea, which can be targeted for screening. Aim The study carried out a preliminary exploration of the effectiveness of screening patients with hypertension and obesity for obstructive sleep apnoea in general practice using the Epworth Sleepiness Scale. Setting One group practice in Italy. Design of study ‘Good clinical practice’ was systematically applied: identification of patients with hypertension and obesity; qualitative interview to identify obstructive sleep apnea; and consequent work-up and therapy. Method Three family physicians, caring for 769 pharmacologically-treated patients with hypertension, identified 220 obese patients without relevant pulmonary or neurological diseases or insomnia; 31 of these 220 patients scored >11 on the Epworth Sleepiness Scale. Results Polysomnography confirmed obstructive sleep apnoea in 10% of the obese, hypertensive population (95% confidence interval [CI] = 7.03% to 13.63%), and in 3.9% of the whole hypertensive population (95% CI = 2.74% to 5.51%). At baseline, 24-hour blood pressure monitoring showed uncontrolled blood pressure in all these patients. Under continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP), the blood pressure value normalised (P<0.05), and the mean Epworth Sleepiness Scale score decreased significantly: mean 13.68 versus 7.84 (P<0.001). Conclusion In obese patients with hypertension examined in this study, the prevalence of obstructive sleep apnoea prevalence is about 10%. CPAP significantly ameliorates the blood pressure

  8. [Advances in arterial hypertension and diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Cordero, Alberto; Lekuona, Iñaki; Galve, Enrique; Mazón, Pilar

    2012-01-01

    In 2011, the importance of hypertension and diabetes mellitus as the two main risk factors responsible for the development of cardiovascular disease became clear, as did their significance as major public health issues. Compared with previous years, in which publication of the results of large clinical trials dominated scientific progress, in the last year, the focus has shifted to evidence that novel mechanisms associated with blood pressure, glucose metabolism and diabetes can influence cardiovascular disease. Of particular importance were clinical trials in the area of renal dysfunction, such as the SHARP and ROADMAP trials.

  9. Obesity-linked diabetes in the Arab world: a review.

    PubMed

    Abuyassin, B; Laher, I

    2015-09-08

    The Arab world is experiencing an epidemic of obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus. This review summarizes the major pathological factors linking obesity to diabetes, focussing on current epidemiological data related to obese diabetic patients in the Arab world, the etiology of the disease and the genetic determinants of diabetes and obesity. There are alarming data related to the rising prevalence of obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus in children of Arab ethnicity. Replication studies identify several genetic variants in Arabs with obesitylinked diabetes. For example, variants of the ADIPOQ gene (the rs266729 single-nucleotide polymorphism) are associated with obesity and diabetes in various Arab countries. Gaps exist in our information about diabetes and obesity in Arab populations in relation to ethnic-specific cut-off points for diagnosis and treatment of diabetes. Further genome-wide association studies in obese and diabetic Arab populations could add to our understanding of the pathophysiology, prevention and reversal of this disease.

  10. Obese and diabetic patients with end-stage renal disease: Peritoneal dialysis or hemodialysis?

    PubMed

    Ekart, Robert; Hojs, Radovan

    2016-07-01

    Obesity is a chronic disease that is increasingly prevalent around the world and is a well-recognized risk factor for type 2 diabetes and hypertension, leading causes of end-stage renal disease (ESRD). The obese diabetic patient with ESRD is a challenge for the nephrologist with regard to the type of renal replacement therapy that should be suggested and offered to the patient. There is no evidence that either peritoneal dialysis or hemodialysis is contraindicated in obese ESRD patients. In the literature, we can find a discrepancy in the impact of obesity on mortality among hemodialysis vs. peritoneal dialysis patients. Several studies in hemodialysis patients suggest that a higher BMI confers a survival advantage - the so-called "reverse epidemiology". In contrast, the literature among obese peritoneal dialysis patients is inconsistent, with various studies reporting an increased risk of death, no difference, or a decreased risk of death. Many of these studies only spanned across a few years, and this is probably too short of a time frame for a realistic assessment of obesity's impact on mortality in ESRD patients. The decision for dialysis modality in an obese diabetic patient with ESRD should be individualized. According to the results of published studies, we cannot suggest PD or HD as a better solution for all obese diabetic patients. The obese patient should be educated about all their dialysis options, including home dialysis therapies. In this review, the available literature related to the dialysis modality in obese patients with diabetes and ESRD was reviewed.

  11. Non-Obese Diabetes and Its Associated Factors in an Underdeveloped Area of South China, Guangxi

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Zhenzhu; Fang, Zhifeng; Huang, Wei; Liu, Zhanhua; Chen, Yuzhu; Li, Zhongyou; Zhu, Ting; Wang, Qichun; Simpson, Steve; Taylor, Bruce V.; Lin, Rui

    2016-01-01

    Background: Little research has been conducted on the prevalence of diabetes mellitus in underdeveloped areas in China, especially stratified into obesity and non-obese diabetes. The aim of the present study was to investigate the prevalence and associated factors of non-obese diabetes in an underdeveloped area in South China, Guangxi. Methods: Data derived from the Chinese Health and Nutrition Survey 2010–2012 involved a sample of 3874 adults from Guangxi. Questionnaires and oral glucose-tolerance tests were conducted, and fasting and 2-h glucose levels and serum lipids were measured. Logistic regression analysis was performed to assess associated factors for non-obese diabetes. Results: 68.2% and 62.2% of instances of newly detected diabetes were those of non-obese diabetes based on BMI (NODB) and based on WC (NODW), respectively. The male sex, an age older than 50 years, lower education, hypertension, and hypertriglyceridemia were significantly associated with a higher risk of both NODB and NODW, while some associated factors for NODB were found different from those associated with NODW, and an interaction effect was found to increase the risk of NODW. Conclusions: Our study indicated that non-obese diabetes was highly prevalent in an underdeveloped area of South China. Non-obese diabetes should be considered for increased public attention in these areas. PMID:27706056

  12. Impact of obesity and nitric oxide synthase gene G894T polymorphism on essential hypertension.

    PubMed

    Wrzosek, M; Sokal, M; Sawicka, A; Wlodarczyk, M; Glowala, M; Wrzosek, M; Kosior, M; Talalaj, M; Biecek, P; Nowicka, G

    2015-10-01

    Hypertension is a multifactorial disease caused by environmental, metabolic and genetic factors, but little is currently known on the complex interplay between these factors and blood pressure. The aim of the present study was to assess the potential impact of obesity, and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) I/D polymorphism and endothelial nitric oxide synthase gene (NOS3) 4a/4b, G894T and -T786C variants on the essential hypertension. The study group consisted of 1,027 Caucasian adults of Polish nationality (45.5 ± 13.6 years old), of which 401 met the criteria for hypertension. Body weight, height and blood pressure were measured and data on self-reported smoking status were collected. Fasting blood glucose, total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol, triglycerides were determined by standard procedures. The ACE I/D polymorphism and three polymorphisms in NOS3 gene (4a/4b, G894T, -T786C) were detected by the PCR method. Multivariable logistic regression demonstrated that age above 45 years, diabetes, dyslipidemia, smoking and male sex are important risk factors for hypertension and no significant influence of variants in ACE and NOS3 genes on this risk was recognized. Obese subjects had a 3.27-times higher risk (OR = 3.27, 95% CI: 2.37 - 4.52) of hypertension than non-obese, and in obese the NOS3 894T allele was associated with 1.37 fold higher risk of hypertension (P = 0.031). The distribution of NOS3 G894T genotypes supported the co-dominant (OR = 1.35, P = 0.034, Pfit = 0.435) or recessive (OR = 2.00, P = 0.046, Pfit = 0.286), but not dominant model of inheritance (P = 0.100). The study indicates that in obese NOS3 G894T polymorphism may enhance hypertension risk. However, in the presence of such strong risk factors as age, diabetes and smoking, the impact of this genetic variant seems to be attenuated. Further studies are needed to reveal the usefulness of G894T polymorphism in hypertension risk assessment in obese. PMID:26579574

  13. Impact of obesity and nitric oxide synthase gene G894T polymorphism on essential hypertension.

    PubMed

    Wrzosek, M; Sokal, M; Sawicka, A; Wlodarczyk, M; Glowala, M; Wrzosek, M; Kosior, M; Talalaj, M; Biecek, P; Nowicka, G

    2015-10-01

    Hypertension is a multifactorial disease caused by environmental, metabolic and genetic factors, but little is currently known on the complex interplay between these factors and blood pressure. The aim of the present study was to assess the potential impact of obesity, and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) I/D polymorphism and endothelial nitric oxide synthase gene (NOS3) 4a/4b, G894T and -T786C variants on the essential hypertension. The study group consisted of 1,027 Caucasian adults of Polish nationality (45.5 ± 13.6 years old), of which 401 met the criteria for hypertension. Body weight, height and blood pressure were measured and data on self-reported smoking status were collected. Fasting blood glucose, total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol, triglycerides were determined by standard procedures. The ACE I/D polymorphism and three polymorphisms in NOS3 gene (4a/4b, G894T, -T786C) were detected by the PCR method. Multivariable logistic regression demonstrated that age above 45 years, diabetes, dyslipidemia, smoking and male sex are important risk factors for hypertension and no significant influence of variants in ACE and NOS3 genes on this risk was recognized. Obese subjects had a 3.27-times higher risk (OR = 3.27, 95% CI: 2.37 - 4.52) of hypertension than non-obese, and in obese the NOS3 894T allele was associated with 1.37 fold higher risk of hypertension (P = 0.031). The distribution of NOS3 G894T genotypes supported the co-dominant (OR = 1.35, P = 0.034, Pfit = 0.435) or recessive (OR = 2.00, P = 0.046, Pfit = 0.286), but not dominant model of inheritance (P = 0.100). The study indicates that in obese NOS3 G894T polymorphism may enhance hypertension risk. However, in the presence of such strong risk factors as age, diabetes and smoking, the impact of this genetic variant seems to be attenuated. Further studies are needed to reveal the usefulness of G894T polymorphism in hypertension risk assessment in obese.

  14. Ameliorative effects of adrenalectomy on the hyperphagia, hyperlipidaemia, hyperglycaemia and hypertension of obese, spontaneously hypertensive rats (Obese/SHR).

    PubMed

    Wexler, B C; McMurtry, J P

    1981-04-01

    Genetically obese and hypertensive rats (Obese/SHR) were subjected to sham or bilateral adrenalectomy at 4-5 weeks of age with the onset of hyperphagia. The sham-operated Obese/SHR ate voraciously and by 180 days of age males weighed 700 g and females 590 g. The adrenalectomized Obese/SHR ate much less and weighed 325 and 225 g. The systolic blood pressure of the intact Obese/SHR ranged from 160 to 170 mmHg, whereas the blood pressure of the adrenalectomized animals ranged from 108 to 110 mmHg. The thymi of the intact Obese/SHR were massive compared to those of the adrenalectomized rats. Adrenalectomy effectively reduced the hyperinsulinaemia, adiposity, hyperlipidaemia, hyperglycaemia, and elevated BUN levels of the obese rats. Several obese rats had old or new myocardial infarcts, fatty livers, giant-sized islets of Langerhans, nodular and hyperaemic adrenal glands, narrow zona glomerulosa devoid of lipid, vacuolated inner cortical zones, foci of intimal fibrinohyalin deposits in mesenteric arteries, early glomerulosclerosis, and large, rounded bladder calculi. The adrenalectomized Obese/SHR displayed none of these stigmata. It is suggested that the genetically programmed obesity and hypertension in these SHR are mediated by abnormal activity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal-gonadal axis, may be likened to Cushing's disease in the human, and is associated with accelerated ageing.

  15. Role of adipokines in obesity-associated hypertension.

    PubMed

    Vlasova, M; Purhonen, A K; Jarvelin, M R; Rodilla, E; Pascual, J; Herzig, K H

    2010-10-01

    It has been well documented that obesity is a major risk factor for the development of the hypertensive state. The correlation between body mass index and blood pressure level is well established. Nevertheless, the exact mechanisms which contribute to obesity-related hypertension remain poorly understood. In the last years, we have realized that the white adipose tissue is not just an inert organ for nutrient storage and isolation but rather depending on the body mass index the biggest endocrinological organ. Thus, the possible contribution of adipokines to the blood pressure elevation becomes an attractive hypothesis to explain the hypertensive state that often occurs in obesity. In this review, we consider direct and indirect effects of main adipokines on structural and functional changes in the cardiovascular system. PMID:20653609

  16. Prevalence of Hypertension in Boloor Diabetes Study (BDS-II) and its Risk Factors

    PubMed Central

    Adhikari, Prabha; Pathak, Rahul; Kotian, Mangalore Shashidhar; Ullal, Sheetal

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Hypertension is a major public health problem in India and worldwide. Since hypertension is often asymptomatic, it commonly remains undetected, leading to serious complications if untreated. Hypertension is one of the leading causes of end stage renal disease. It doubles the risk of developing coronary artery disease, increases the risk of congestive heart failure by four folds and that of cerebrovascular disease and stroke by seven folds. Hypertension is directly responsible for 57% of all stroke deaths and 42% of coronary heart disease deaths in India. Aim To identify prevalence and risk factors for hypertension in a semi urban population of Mangalore, who participated in Boloor Diabetes Study (BDS-II). Materials and Methods This cross-sectional study was conducted on 551 subjects aged ≥ 20 years who were randomly selected. Hypertension was diagnosed and classified according to Joint National Committee 7 (JNC) criteria. Blood pressure was measured by a doctor using calibrated sphygmomanometer. Anthropometric measurements, lipid and glucose estimations were done for all subjects. Statistical analysis was done using Chi-square test and student’s t-test (unpaired). Multivariate logistic regression analysis was done using hypertension as dependent variable and the various risk factors as independent variables. Results Overall prevalence of hypertension in the community was 41% (227/551) (40.9% in men, 41.3% in women). Prehypertension was found in 40% (223/551) (45.4% in men, 38.1% in women), and only 18.3% (101/551) had normal blood pressure. Stage I hypertension was seen in 29.7% (164/551) (28.9% in men, 30.1% in women). Stage II hypertension was seen in 11.4% (63/551) (12% in men, 11% in women). Age, obesity, diabetes, serum cholesterol and serum triglycerides were strongly associated with hypertension. Only 46% (254/551) of the hypertensive subjects were aware that they were hypertensive. Conclusion Prevalence of hypertension was high in this

  17. Obesity-related hypertension: pathogenesis, cardiovascular risk, and treatment--a position paper of the The Obesity Society and The American Society of Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Landsberg, Lewis; Aronne, Louis J; Beilin, Lawrence J; Burke, Valerie; Igel, Leon I; Lloyd-Jones, Donald; Sowers, James

    2013-01-01

    In light of the worldwide epidemic of obesity, and in recognition of hypertension as a major factor in the cardiovascular morbidity and mortality associated with obesity, The Obesity Society and The American Society of Hypertension agreed to jointly sponsor a position paper on obesity-related hypertension to be published jointly in the journals of each society. The purpose is to inform the members of both societies, as well as practicing clinicians, with a timely review of the association between obesity and high blood pressure, the risk that this association entails, and the options for rational, evidenced-based treatment. The position paper is divided into six sections plus a summary as follows: pathophysiology, epidemiology and cardiovascular risk, the metabolic syndrome, lifestyle management in prevention and treatment, pharmacologic treatment of hypertension in the obese, and the medical and surgical treatment of obesity in obese hypertensive patients.

  18. Obesity-related hypertension: pathogenesis, cardiovascular risk, and treatment: a position paper of The Obesity Society and the American Society of Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Landsberg, Lewis; Aronne, Louis J; Beilin, Lawrence J; Burke, Valerie; Igel, Leon I; Lloyd-Jones, Donald; Sowers, James

    2013-01-01

    In light of the worldwide epidemic of obesity, and in recognition of hypertension as a major factor in the cardiovascular morbidity and mortality associated with obesity, The Obesity Society and the American Society of Hypertension agreed to jointly sponsor a position paper on obesity-related hypertension to be published jointly in the journals of each society. The purpose is to inform the members of both societies, as well as practicing clinicians, with a timely review of the association between obesity and high blood pressure, the risk that this association entails, and the options for rational, evidenced-based treatment. The position paper is divided into six sections plus a summary as follows: pathophysiology, epidemiology and cardiovascular risk, the metabolic syndrome, lifestyle management in prevention and treatment, pharmacologic treatment of hypertension in the obese, and the medical and surgical treatment of obesity in obese hypertensive patients.

  19. Hypertension increases with Aging and Obesity in chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes)

    PubMed Central

    Ely, John J.; Zavaskis, Tony; Lammey, Michael L.

    2012-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is a primary cause of morbidity and mortality in captive chimpanzees. Four years of blood pressure data was analyzed from a captive former laboratory population of 201 healthy adult chimpanzees with assessment of age and obesity on elevated blood pressure. Five different measures of obesity were compared: abdominal girth, basal metabolic rate, body-mass index (BMI), body weight and surface area. Systolic BP varied by sex. Obesity did not influence male BP. For females, obesity was a significant determinant of BP. The best measure of female obesity was basal metabolic rate and the worst was BMI. Median systolic BP of healthy weight females (<54.5 Kg) was significantly lower (128 mmHg) than overweight or obese females (140 mmHg), but both were lower than all males (147 mmHg). For diastolic BP, neither sex nor any of the 5 obesity measures was significant. But age was highly significant, with geriatric chimpanzees (> 30 years) having higher median diastolic blood pressure (74 mmHg) than young adults of 10–29 years old (65 mmHg). By these criteria, 80% of this population is normotensive, 7% pre-hypertensive and 13% hypertensive. In summary, systolic BP intervals required adjustment for obesity among females but not males. Diastolic BP required adjustment for advanced age (≥30 years). Use of these reference intervals can facilitate timely clinical care of captive chimpanzees. PMID:22968757

  20. Bariatric Surgery for People with Diabetes and Morbid Obesity

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    to bariatric surgery and the improvement of diabetes from the full evidence-based analysis of bariatric surgery for the treatment of morbid obesity completed by the Medical Advisory Secretariat (MAS) in January 2005. To view the full report, please visit the MAS website at: http://www.health.gov.on.ca/english/providers/program/mas/tech/techmn.html. Clinical Need: Condition and Target Population Obesity is defined as an excessive accumulation of body fat as measured by the body mass index (BMI) and calculated as body weight in kilograms (kg) divided by height in metres squared (m2). People with a BMI over 30 kg/m2 are considered obese in most countries. The condition is associated with the development of several diseases, including hypertension, diabetes mellitus (type 2 diabetes), hyperlipidemia, coronary artery disease, obstructive sleep apnea, depression, and cancers of the breast, uterus, prostate, and colon. Clinically severe, or morbid obesity, is commonly defined by a BMI of at least 40 kg/m2, or a BMI of at least 35 kg/m2 if there are comorbid conditions such as diabetes, cardiovascular disease, or arthritis. The prevalence of morbid obesity among people with type 2 diabetes has been examined and of 2,460 patients with type 2 diabetes, 52% (n = 1,279) were obese (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m2) and 23% (n = 561) had a BMI ≥ 35 kg/m2. Bariatric Surgery Men and women with morbid obesity may be eligible for surgical intervention. There are numerous surgical options available, all of which can be divided into two general types, both of which can be performed either as open surgery or laparoscopically: malabsorptive - bypassing parts of the gastrointestinal tract to limit the absorption of food, and restrictive - decreasing the size of the stomach in order for the patient to feel satiated with a smaller amount food Surgery for morbid obesity is usually considered a last resort for people who have attempted first-line medical management (e.g. diet, behaviour modification

  1. Diabetes, hypertension, sanitation, and health education by high school students in Guyana, South America

    PubMed Central

    Jindal, R. M.; Mehta, K.; Soni, R.; Doyle, A.; Patel, T. G.

    2016-01-01

    We initiated a program for early detection of diabetes and hypertension, the main causes of kidney failure in Guyana, South America. We trained local high school students with the goal that these students would stay in the villages for long-term, become health advocates and shift the reliance away from physicians. This project involved 7 high school students who were taught to monitor the health of one village of 1000–1500 population each. The program will be implemented for 3 years in which the entire population of seven villages (approximately 10,000 people) will be covered. This represents 1.3% population in Guyana. We present data from the pilot study from the sample of 619 people. The prevalence of diabetes mellitus was 13.9%. Among diabetics, 33.7% were using insulin and 86% oral hypoglycemic agents. Prevalence of hypertension was 29.4%, 63.2% were overweight and 17% were obese. About 9.9% patients were unaware about the existence of hypertension. We have shown in our study that high school students can be used to collect health data and monitor diabetes and hypertension. There was also a significant incidence of undetected diabetes and hypertension. PMID:27194834

  2. Diabetes, hypertension, sanitation, and health education by high school students in Guyana, South America.

    PubMed

    Jindal, R M; Mehta, K; Soni, R; Doyle, A; Patel, T G

    2016-01-01

    We initiated a program for early detection of diabetes and hypertension, the main causes of kidney failure in Guyana, South America. We trained local high school students with the goal that these students would stay in the villages for long-term, become health advocates and shift the reliance away from physicians. This project involved 7 high school students who were taught to monitor the health of one village of 1000-1500 population each. The program will be implemented for 3 years in which the entire population of seven villages (approximately 10,000 people) will be covered. This represents 1.3% population in Guyana. We present data from the pilot study from the sample of 619 people. The prevalence of diabetes mellitus was 13.9%. Among diabetics, 33.7% were using insulin and 86% oral hypoglycemic agents. Prevalence of hypertension was 29.4%, 63.2% were overweight and 17% were obese. About 9.9% patients were unaware about the existence of hypertension. We have shown in our study that high school students can be used to collect health data and monitor diabetes and hypertension. There was also a significant incidence of undetected diabetes and hypertension. PMID:27194834

  3. Obesity and hypertension, heart failure, and coronary heart disease-risk factor, paradox, and recommendations for weight loss.

    PubMed

    Artham, Surya M; Lavie, Carl J; Milani, Richard V; Ventura, Hector O

    2009-01-01

    Obesity prevalence has reached epidemic proportions and is independently associated with numerous cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors, including diabetes mellitus, hypertension, dyslipidemia, cancers, sleep apnea, and other major CVDs. Obesity has significant negative impact on CVD, including hypertension, coronary heart disease, heart failure, and arrhythmias via its maladaptive effects on individual CVD risk factors and cardiac structure and function. Despite this negative association between obesity and the incidence and prevalence of CVD, many studies have demonstrated that obese patients with established CVD might have better short- and long-term prognosis, suggesting an "obesity paradox." This intriguing phenomenon has been well documented in populations with heart failure, coronary heart disease, and hypertension. This review summarizes the adverse effects of obesity on individual CVD risk factors; its role in the genesis of CVDs, including heart failure, coronary heart disease, and hypertension; and the obesity paradox observed in these populations and the potential underlying mechanisms behind this puzzling phenomenon and concludes with a discussion on the potential benefits of weight reduction.

  4. Elevated Urinary T Helper 1 Chemokine Levels in Newly Diagnosed Hypertensive Obese Children

    PubMed Central

    Övünç Hacıhamdioğlu, Duygu; Zeybek, Cengiz; Gök, Faysal; Pekel, Aysel; Muşabak, Uğur

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Increasing evidence suggests that T helper (Th) cells play a significant role in the pathogenesis of hypertension. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of obesity and anti-hypertensive treatment on urinary Th1 chemokines. Methods: The study groups consisted of three types of patients: hypertensive obese, healthy, and non-hypertensive obese. Pre-treatment and post-treatment samples of the hypertensive obese group and one sample from the other two groups were evaluated for urinary chemokine: regulated on activation, normal T cell expressed and secreted (RANTES), interferon-gamma-inducible protein 10 (IP10), and monokine induced by interferon-gamma (MIG). In the hypertensive obese group, urine microalbumin: creatinine ratio was examined before and after treatment. We recommended lifestyle changes to all patients. Captopril was started in those who could not be controlled with lifestyle changes and those who had stage 2 hypertension. Results: Twenty-four hypertensive obese (mean age 13.1), 27 healthy (mean age 11.2) and 22 non-hypertensive obese (mean age 11.5) children were investigated. The pre-treatment urine albumin: creatinine ratio was positively correlated with pre-treatment MIG levels (r=0.41, p<0.05). RANTES was significantly higher in the pre-treatment hypertensive and non-hypertensive obese group than in the controls. The urinary IP10 and MIG levels were higher in the pre-treatment hypertensive obese group than in the non-hypertensive obese. Comparison of the pre- and post-treatment values indicated significant decreases in RANTES, IP10, and MIG levels in the hypertensive obese group (p<0.05). Conclusion: Th1 cells could be activated in obese hypertensive children before the onset of clinical indicators of target organ damage. Urinary RANTES seemed to be affected by both hypertension and obesity, and urinary IP10 and MIG seemed to be affected predominantly by hypertension. PMID:26831550

  5. Morbid obesity in pediatric diabetes mellitus: surgical options and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Brandt, Mary L; Harmon, Carroll M; Helmrath, Michael A; Inge, Thomas H; McKay, Siripoom V; Michalsky, Marc P

    2010-11-01

    The current obesity epidemic has led to a dramatic increase in insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes mellitus among adolescents, along with other obesity-related comorbidities, such as hypertension, hyperlipidemia, obstructive sleep apnea, psychosocial impairment and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. Medical treatment of severe obesity is effective in only a small percentage of adolescent patients. In light of the potentially life-threatening complications of obesity, bariatric surgery can be considered a treatment option for adolescent patients with morbid obesity. Indications for surgery rely on both BMI and comorbidity criteria, as well as the ability of the adolescents and their family to understand and comply with perioperative protocols. The long-term effects of bariatric surgery in adolescents are not known; therefore, participation in prospective outcome studies is important. The risk associated with bariatric surgery in adolescents seems to be similar to that observed in adult patients in the short term. Data suggest that bypass procedures successfully reverse or improve abnormal glucose metabolism in the majority of patients and may be more effective in adolescents than adults. This improvement in glucose metabolism occurs before marked weight loss in patients undergoing bypass procedures, suggesting a direct effect on the hormonal control of glucose metabolism.

  6. Ethnicity, Obesity and Emotional Factors Associated With Gestational Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Franco, Rafaela Cristina; Ferreira, Caroline Ronchini; Vieira, Camilla Ribeiro; Silva, Roberta Ribeiro

    2015-10-01

    Identifying factors that can be related to the occurrence of gestational arterial hypertension. The sample was composed by 105 pregnant women in their third trimester of gestation, during the period between September 2013 and August 2014. General assessment questionnaires together with a questionnaire to evaluate anxiety (STAI-A-STATE) were applied; arterial blood pressure values were collected. To classify anxiety, a mean of the final result of all the questionnaires gotten was calculated. Pregnant women who showed scores higher than the mean were considered anxious. All data were analyzed by a logistic regression. The significance level adopted was 0.05. A data analysis allowed us to verify that 92.38% of the pregnant women had an anxious personality STAI-A-STATE and 12.38% of them had a momentary hypertension. The momentary hypertension showed a correlation between the hypertension and the state anxiety score (p = 0.049). The hypertension showed an association with the presence of depression (OR 8.69), obesity (OR 6.45), anxiety (OR 7.77), nausea (OR 12.79) and non-white race (OR 8.18). According to the study realized, the factors non-white race, depression, nausea, obesity and anxiety can be considered risk factors for the occurrence of gestational arterial hypertension. Based on these findings, a high quality prenatal assistance is considered of prime importance. PMID:25761986

  7. Hypertension, Diabetes and Overweight: Looming Legacies of the Biafran Famine

    PubMed Central

    Chima, Charles; Edstedt Bonamy, Anna-Karin; Ozumba, Benjamin; Norman, Mikael

    2010-01-01

    Background Sub-Saharan Africa is facing rapidly increasing prevalences of cardiovascular disease, obesity, diabetes and hypertension. Previous and ongoing undernutrition among pregnant women may contribute to this development as suggested by epidemiological studies from high income countries linking undernutrition in fetal life with increased burden of non-communicable diseases in later life. We undertook to study the risks for hypertension, glucose intolerance and overweight forty years after fetal exposure to famine afflicted Biafra during the Nigerian civil war (1967–1970). Methods and Findings Cohort study performed in June 27–July 31, 2009 in Enugu, Nigeria. Adults (n = 1,339) born before (1965–67), during (1968–January 1970), or after (1971–73) the years of famine were included. Blood pressure (BP), random plasma glucose (p-glucose) and anthropometrics, as well as prevalence of hypertension (BP>140/90 mmHg), impaired glucose tolerance (IGT; p-glucose 7.8–11.0 mmol/l), diabetes (DM; p-glucose ≥11.1 mmol/l), or overweight (BMI>25 kg/m2) were compared between the three groups. Fetal-infant exposure to famine was associated with elevated systolic (+7 mmHg; p<0.001) and diastolic (+5 mmHg; p<0.001) BP, increased p-glucose (+0.3 mmol/L; p<0.05) and waist circumference (+3cm, p<0.001), increased risk of systolic hypertension (adjusted OR 2.87; 95% CI 1.90–4.34), IGT (OR 1.65; 95% CI 1.02–2.69) and overweight (OR 1.41; 95% CI 1.03–1.93) as compared to people born after the famine. Limitations of this study include the lack of birth weight data and the inability to separate effects of fetal and infant famine. Conclusions Fetal and infant undernutrition is associated with significantly increased risk of hypertension and impaired glucose tolerance in 40-year-old Nigerians. Prevention of undernutrition during pregnancy and in infancy should therefore be given high priority in health, education, and economic agendas. PMID:21042579

  8. Central Obesity and Disease Risk in Japanese Americans

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-08

    Cardiovascular Diseases; Heart Diseases; Atherosclerosis; Hypertension; Obesity; Diabetes Mellitus, Non-insulin Dependent; Hyperinsulinism; Insulin Resistance; Coronary Arteriosclerosis; Diabetes Mellitus; Metabolic Syndrome X

  9. Hypertension in diabetic pregnancy: impact and long-term outlook.

    PubMed

    Colatrella, Antonietta; Loguercio, Valentina; Mattei, Luca; Trappolini, Massimo; Festa, Camilla; Stoppo, Michela; Napoli, Angela

    2010-08-01

    Hypertensive disorders in pregnancy can be chronic, pregestational or just diagnosed before the 20th week, or newly diagnosed in the second half of pregnancy. Any type of hypertension is more frequent in diabetic pregnancies with a different distribution among different types of diabetes. Most of the evidence is for pre-eclampsia associated with a marked increase in primary caesarean section, preterm birth and more need for neonatal intensive care. Different risk factors and pregnancy outcomes would support the hypothesis that pre-eclampsia and gestational hypertension might be largely separate entities, but this position is not unanimously accepted. Chronic hypertension increases with age and duration of diabetes, predicting increased rates of prematurity and neonatal morbidity, especially when associated with superimposed pre-eclampsia. Long-term consequences are observed in women whose pregnancy was complicated by hypertension such as chronic hypertension and cardiovascular diseases. PMID:20832742

  10. Joint statement of the European Association for the Study of Obesity and the European Society of Hypertension: obesity and difficult to treat arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Jens; Yumuk, Volkan; Schlaich, Markus; Nilsson, Peter M; Zahorska-Markiewicz, Barbara; Grassi, Guido; Schmieder, Roland E; Engeli, Stefan; Finer, Nick

    2012-06-01

    Obese patients are prone to arterial hypertension, require more antihypertensive medications, and have an increased risk of treatment-resistant arterial hypertension. Obesity-induced neurohumoral activation appears to be involved. The association between obesity and hypertension shows large inter-individual variability, likely through genetic mechanisms. Obesity affects overall cardiovascular and metabolic risk; yet, the relationship between obesity and cardiovascular risk is complex and not sufficiently addressed in clinical guidelines. The epidemiological observation that obesity may be protective in patients with established cardiovascular disease is difficult to translate into clinical experience and practice. Weight loss is often recommended as a means to lower blood pressure. However, current hypertension guidelines do not provide evidence-based guidance on how to institute weight loss. In fact, weight loss influences on blood pressure may be overestimated. Nevertheless, weight loss through bariatric surgery appears to decrease cardiovascular risk in severely obese patients. Eventually, most obese hypertensive patients will require antihypertensive medications. Data from large-scale studies with hard clinical endpoints on antihypertensive medications specifically addressing obese patients are lacking and the morbidity from the growing population of severely obese patients is poorly recognized or addressed. Because of their broad spectrum of beneficial effects, renin-angiotensin system inhibitors are considered to be the most appropriate drugs for antihypertensive treatment of obese patients. Most obese hypertensive patients require two or more antihypertensive drugs. Finally, how to combine weight loss strategies and antihypertensive treatment to achieve an optimal clinical outcome is unresolved.

  11. Pathophysiological role of leptin in obesity-related hypertension.

    PubMed

    Aizawa-Abe, M; Ogawa, Y; Masuzaki, H; Ebihara, K; Satoh, N; Iwai, H; Matsuoka, N; Hayashi, T; Hosoda, K; Inoue, G; Yoshimasa, Y; Nakao, K

    2000-05-01

    To explore the pathophysiological role of leptin in obesity-related hypertension, we examined cardiovascular phenotypes of transgenic skinny mice whose elevated plasma leptin concentrations are comparable to those seen in obese subjects. We also studied genetically obese KKA(y) mice with hyperleptinemia, in which hypothalamic melanocortin system is antagonized by ectopic expression of the agouti protein. Systolic blood pressure (BP) and urinary catecholamine excretion are elevated in transgenic skinny mice relative to nontransgenic littermates. The BP elevation in transgenic skinny mice is abolished by alpha(1)-adrenergic, beta-adrenergic, or ganglionic blockers at doses that do not affect BP in nontransgenic littermates. Central administration of an alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone antagonist causes a marked increase in cumulative food intake but no significant changes in BP. The obese KKA(y) mice develop BP elevation with increased urinary catecholamine excretion relative to control KK mice. After a 2-week caloric restriction, BP elevation is reversed in nontransgenic littermates with the A(y) allele, in parallel with a reduction in plasma leptin concentrations, but is sustained in transgenic mice overexpressing leptin with the A(y) allele, which remain hyperleptinemic. This study demonstrates BP elevation in transgenic skinny mice and obese KKA(y) mice that are both hyperleptinemic, thereby suggesting the pathophysiological role of leptin in some forms of obesity-related hypertension.

  12. Pathophysiological role of leptin in obesity-related hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Aizawa-Abe, Megumi; Ogawa, Yoshihiro; Masuzaki, Hiroaki; Ebihara, Ken; Satoh, Noriko; Iwai, Hidenori; Matsuoka, Naoki; Hayashi, Tatsuya; Hosoda, Kiminori; Inoue, Gen; Yoshimasa, Yasunao; Nakao, Kazuwa

    2000-01-01

    To explore the pathophysiological role of leptin in obesity-related hypertension, we examined cardiovascular phenotypes of transgenic skinny mice whose elevated plasma leptin concentrations are comparable to those seen in obese subjects. We also studied genetically obese KKAy mice with hyperleptinemia, in which hypothalamic melanocortin system is antagonized by ectopic expression of the agouti protein. Systolic blood pressure (BP) and urinary catecholamine excretion are elevated in transgenic skinny mice relative to nontransgenic littermates. The BP elevation in transgenic skinny mice is abolished by α1-adrenergic, β-adrenergic, or ganglionic blockers at doses that do not affect BP in nontransgenic littermates. Central administration of an α-melanocyte–stimulating hormone antagonist causes a marked increase in cumulative food intake but no significant changes in BP. The obese KKAy mice develop BP elevation with increased urinary catecholamine excretion relative to control KK mice. After a 2-week caloric restriction, BP elevation is reversed in nontransgenic littermates with the Ay allele, in parallel with a reduction in plasma leptin concentrations, but is sustained in transgenic mice overexpressing leptin with the Ay allele, which remain hyperleptinemic. This study demonstrates BP elevation in transgenic skinny mice and obese KKAy mice that are both hyperleptinemic, thereby suggesting the pathophysiological role of leptin in some forms of obesity-related hypertension. PMID:10791999

  13. Bariatric Surgery for People with Diabetes and Morbid Obesity

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    to bariatric surgery and the improvement of diabetes from the full evidence-based analysis of bariatric surgery for the treatment of morbid obesity completed by the Medical Advisory Secretariat (MAS) in January 2005. To view the full report, please visit the MAS website at: http://www.health.gov.on.ca/english/providers/program/mas/tech/techmn.html. Clinical Need: Condition and Target Population Obesity is defined as an excessive accumulation of body fat as measured by the body mass index (BMI) and calculated as body weight in kilograms (kg) divided by height in metres squared (m2). People with a BMI over 30 kg/m2 are considered obese in most countries. The condition is associated with the development of several diseases, including hypertension, diabetes mellitus (type 2 diabetes), hyperlipidemia, coronary artery disease, obstructive sleep apnea, depression, and cancers of the breast, uterus, prostate, and colon. Clinically severe, or morbid obesity, is commonly defined by a BMI of at least 40 kg/m2, or a BMI of at least 35 kg/m2 if there are comorbid conditions such as diabetes, cardiovascular disease, or arthritis. The prevalence of morbid obesity among people with type 2 diabetes has been examined and of 2,460 patients with type 2 diabetes, 52% (n = 1,279) were obese (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m2) and 23% (n = 561) had a BMI ≥ 35 kg/m2. Bariatric Surgery Men and women with morbid obesity may be eligible for surgical intervention. There are numerous surgical options available, all of which can be divided into two general types, both of which can be performed either as open surgery or laparoscopically: malabsorptive - bypassing parts of the gastrointestinal tract to limit the absorption of food, and restrictive - decreasing the size of the stomach in order for the patient to feel satiated with a smaller amount food Surgery for morbid obesity is usually considered a last resort for people who have attempted first-line medical management (e.g. diet, behaviour modification

  14. Hypertension increases with aging and obesity in chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes).

    PubMed

    Ely, John J; Zavaskis, Tony; Lammey, Michael L

    2013-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is a primary cause of morbidity and mortality in captive chimpanzees. Four years of blood pressure (BP) data were analyzed from a captive former laboratory population of 201 healthy adult chimpanzees with assessment of age and obesity on elevated BP. Five different measures of obesity were compared: abdominal girth, basal metabolic rate, body-mass index (BMI), body weight, and surface area. Systolic BP varied by sex. Obesity did not influence male BP. For females, obesity was a significant determinant of BP. The best measure of female obesity was basal metabolic rate and the worst was BMI. Median systolic BP of healthy weight females (<54.5 kg) was significantly lower (128 mmHg) than overweight or obese females (140 mmHg), but both were lower than all males (147 mmHg). For diastolic BP, neither sex nor any of the five obesity measures was significant. But age was highly significant, with geriatric chimpanzees (>30 years) having higher median diastolic BP (74 mmHg) than young adults of 10-29 years of age (65 mmHg). By these criteria, 80% of this population is normotensive, 7% prehypertensive, and 13% hypertensive. In summary, systolic BP intervals required adjustment for obesity among females but not males. Diastolic BP required adjustment for advanced age (≥30 years). Use of these reference intervals can facilitate timely clinical care of captive chimpanzees. PMID:22968757

  15. The Malnutrition of Obesity: Micronutrient Deficiencies That Promote Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Via, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Obesity and diabetes are increasing in prevalence worldwide. Despite excessive dietary consumption, obese individuals have high rates of micronutrient deficiencies. Deficiencies of specific vitamins and minerals that play important roles in glucose metabolism and insulin signaling pathways may contribute to the development of diabetes in the obese population. This paper reviews the current evidence supporting this hypothesis. PMID:22462011

  16. Arterial stiffening precedes systolic hypertension in diet-induced obesity.

    PubMed

    Weisbrod, Robert M; Shiang, Tina; Al Sayah, Leona; Fry, Jessica L; Bajpai, Saumendra; Reinhart-King, Cynthia A; Lob, Heinrich E; Santhanam, Lakshmi; Mitchell, Gary; Cohen, Richard A; Seta, Francesca

    2013-12-01

    Stiffening of conduit arteries is a risk factor for cardiovascular morbidity. Aortic wall stiffening increases pulsatile hemodynamic forces that are detrimental to the microcirculation in highly perfused organs, such as the heart, brain, and kidney. Arterial stiffness is associated with hypertension but presumed to be due to an adaptive response to increased hemodynamic load. In contrast, a recent clinical study found that stiffness precedes and may contribute to the development of hypertension although the mechanisms underlying hypertension are unknown. Here, we report that in a diet-induced model of obesity, arterial stiffness, measured in vivo, develops within 1 month of the initiation of the diet and precedes the development of hypertension by 5 months. Diet-induced obese mice recapitulate the metabolic syndrome and are characterized by inflammation in visceral fat and aorta. Normalization of the metabolic state by weight loss resulted in return of arterial stiffness and blood pressure to normal. Our findings support the hypothesis that arterial stiffness is a cause rather than a consequence of hypertension.

  17. Chronic Interactions Between Carotid Baroreceptors and Chemoreceptors in Obesity Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Lohmeier, Thomas E; Iliescu, Radu; Tudorancea, Ionut; Cazan, Radu; Cates, Adam W; Georgakopoulos, Dimitrios; Irwin, Eric D

    2016-07-01

    Carotid bodies play a critical role in protecting against hypoxemia, and their activation increases sympathetic activity, arterial pressure, and ventilation, responses opposed by acute stimulation of the baroreflex. Although chemoreceptor hypersensitivity is associated with sympathetically mediated hypertension, the mechanisms involved and their significance in the pathogenesis of hypertension remain unclear. We investigated the chronic interactions of these reflexes in dogs with sympathetically mediated, obesity-induced hypertension based on the hypothesis that hypoxemia and tonic activation of carotid chemoreceptors may be associated with obesity. After 5 weeks on a high-fat diet, the animals experienced a 35% to 40% weight gain and increases in arterial pressure from 106±3 to 123±3 mm Hg and respiratory rate from 8±1 to 12±1 breaths/min along with hypoxemia (arterial partial pressure of oxygen=81±3 mm Hg) but eucapnia. During 7 days of carotid baroreflex activation by electric stimulation of the carotid sinus, tachypnea was attenuated, and hypertension was abolished before these variables returned to prestimulation values during a recovery period. After subsequent denervation of the carotid sinus region, respiratory rate decreased transiently in association with further sustained reductions in arterial partial pressure of oxygen (to 65±2 mm Hg) and substantial hypercapnia. Moreover, the severity of hypertension was attenuated from 125±2 to 116±3 mm Hg (45%-50% reduction). These findings suggest that hypoxemia may account for sustained stimulation of peripheral chemoreceptors in obesity and that this activation leads to compensatory increases in ventilation and central sympathetic outflow that contributes to neurogenically mediated hypertension. Furthermore, the excitatory effects of chemoreceptor hyperactivity are abolished by chronic activation of the carotid baroreflex. PMID:27160198

  18. Obesity and diabetes: from genetics to epigenetics.

    PubMed

    Burgio, Ernesto; Lopomo, Angela; Migliore, Lucia

    2015-04-01

    Obesity is becoming an epidemic health problem. During the last years not only genetic but also, and primarily, environmental factors have been supposed to contribute to the susceptibility to weight gain or to develop complications such as type 2 diabetes. In spite of the intense efforts to identify genetic predisposing variants, progress has been slow and success limited, and the common obesity susceptibility variants identified only explains a small part of the individual variation in risk. Moreover, there is evidence that the current epidemic of obesity and diabetes is environment-driven. Recent studies indicate that normal metabolic regulation during adulthood besides requiring a good balance between energy intake and energy expenditure, can be also affected by pre- and post-natal environments. In fact, maternal nutritional constraint during pregnancy can alter the metabolic phenotype of the offspring by means of epigenetic regulation of specific genes, and this can be passed to the next generations. Studies focused on epigenetic marks in obesity found altered methylation and/or histone acetylation levels in genes involved in specific but also in more general metabolic processes. Recent researches point out the continuous increase of "obesogens", in the environment and food chains, above all endocrine disruptors, chemicals that interfere with many homeostatic mechanisms. Taken into account the already existing data on the effects of obesogens, and the multiple potential targets with which they might interfere daily, it seems likely that the exposure to obesogens can have an important role in the obesity and diabesity pandemic.

  19. Contribution of modifiable risk factors for hypertension and type-2 diabetes in Peruvian resource-limited settings

    PubMed Central

    Carrillo-Larco, Rodrigo M; Gilman, Robert H; Checkley, William; Smeeth, Liam

    2016-01-01

    Background It is important to understand the local burden of non-communicable diseases including within-country heterogeneity. The aim of this study was to characterise hypertension and type-2 diabetes profiles across different Peruvian geographical settings emphasising the assessment of modifiable risk factors. Methods Analysis of the CRONICAS Cohort Study baseline assessment was conducted. Cardiometabolic outcomes were blood pressure categories (hypertension, prehypertension, normal) and glucose metabolism disorder status (diabetes, prediabetes, normal). Exposures were study setting and six modifiable factors (smoking, alcohol drinking, leisure time and transport-related physical activity levels, TV watching, fruit/vegetables intake and obesity). Poisson regression models were used to report prevalence ratios (PR). Population attributable risks (PAR) were also estimated. Results Data from 3238 participants, 48.3% male, mean age 45.3 years, were analysed. Age-standardised (WHO population) prevalence of prehypertension and hypertension was 24% and 16%, whereas for prediabetes and type-2 diabetes it was 18% and 6%, respectively. Outcomes varied according to study setting (p<0.001). In multivariable model, hypertension was higher among daily smokers (PR 1.76), heavy alcohol drinkers (PR 1.61) and the obese (PR 2.06); whereas only obesity (PR 2.26) increased the prevalence of diabetes. PAR showed that obesity was an important determinant for hypertension (15.7%) and type-2 diabetes (23.9%). Conclusions There is an evident heterogeneity in the prevalence of and risk factors for hypertension and diabetes within Peru. Prehypertension and prediabetes are highly prevalent across settings. Our results emphasise the need of understanding the epidemiology of cardiometabolic conditions to appropriately implement interventions to tackle the burden of non-communicable diseases. PMID:26248550

  20. Phytotherapy of hypertension and diabetes in oriental Morocco.

    PubMed

    Ziyyat, A; Legssyer, A; Mekhfi, H; Dassouli, A; Serhrouchni, M; Benjelloun, W

    1997-09-01

    In order to select the main medicinal plants used in folk medicine to treat arterial hypertension and/or diabetes, a survey was undertaken in different areas of oriental Morocco. The patients (370 women and 256 men) were divided into three groups: diabetics (61%), hypertensives (23%) and hypertensive diabetic persons (16%). On average, 67.51% of patients regularly use medicinal plants. This proportion is perceptibly the same in all groups and does not depend on sex, age and socio-cultural level. This result shows that phytotherapy is widely adopted in northeastern Morocco. For diabetes, 41 plants were cited, of which the most used were Trigonella foenum-graecum L. (Leguminosae), Globularia alypum L. (Globulariaceae), Artemisia herba-alba Asso. (Compositae), Citrullus colocynthis (L.) Schrad. (Cucurbitaceae) and Tetraclinis articulata Benth. (Cupressaceae). In the hypertension's therapy 18 vegetal species were reported, of which the most used were Allium sativum L. (Liliaceae), Olea europea L. (Oleaceae), Arbutus unedo L. (Ericaceae), Urtica dioica L. (Urticaceae) and Petroselinum crispum A.W. Hill (Apiaceae). Among the 18 species used for hypertension, 14 were also employed for diabetes. Moreover, these two diseases were associated in 41% of hypertensives. These findings suggest that hypertension observed in this region would be in a large part related to diabetes.

  1. Phytotherapy of hypertension and diabetes in oriental Morocco.

    PubMed

    Ziyyat, A; Legssyer, A; Mekhfi, H; Dassouli, A; Serhrouchni, M; Benjelloun, W

    1997-09-01

    In order to select the main medicinal plants used in folk medicine to treat arterial hypertension and/or diabetes, a survey was undertaken in different areas of oriental Morocco. The patients (370 women and 256 men) were divided into three groups: diabetics (61%), hypertensives (23%) and hypertensive diabetic persons (16%). On average, 67.51% of patients regularly use medicinal plants. This proportion is perceptibly the same in all groups and does not depend on sex, age and socio-cultural level. This result shows that phytotherapy is widely adopted in northeastern Morocco. For diabetes, 41 plants were cited, of which the most used were Trigonella foenum-graecum L. (Leguminosae), Globularia alypum L. (Globulariaceae), Artemisia herba-alba Asso. (Compositae), Citrullus colocynthis (L.) Schrad. (Cucurbitaceae) and Tetraclinis articulata Benth. (Cupressaceae). In the hypertension's therapy 18 vegetal species were reported, of which the most used were Allium sativum L. (Liliaceae), Olea europea L. (Oleaceae), Arbutus unedo L. (Ericaceae), Urtica dioica L. (Urticaceae) and Petroselinum crispum A.W. Hill (Apiaceae). Among the 18 species used for hypertension, 14 were also employed for diabetes. Moreover, these two diseases were associated in 41% of hypertensives. These findings suggest that hypertension observed in this region would be in a large part related to diabetes. PMID:9324004

  2. Arterial hypertension in diabetes mellitus: from theory to clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Sampanis, C; Zamboulis, C

    2008-04-01

    Diabetes mellitus and arterial hypertension are two common diseases that often coexist. Patients with diabetes have much higher rate of hypertension than that in general population. The co-existence of these disorders appears to accelerate microvascular and macrovascular complications and greatly increases the cardiovascular risk, risk of stroke and end stage renal disease. Arterial hypertension is clearly related to nephropathy in subjects with type 1 diabetes. In patients with type 2 diabetes insulin resistance seems to play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of hypertension. Several well designed randomized controlled trials have provided evidence that patients with diabetes will benefit from a more aggressive treatment of hypertension. This benefit is seen at blood pressure level<130/80 mmHg. Moreover, most diabetic patients with hypertension require combination therapy to achieve optimal blood pressure goals. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin-receptor blockers, diuretics, beta-adrenoreceptor blockers and calcium- channel blockers are all effective antihypertensive agents in type 2 diabetes mellitus and no comparative trial showed the superiority of any particular class in either lowering blood pressure or reducing cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. On the basis of experimental arguments and clinical observations that have shown their apparent superiority in slowing diabetic nephropathy, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin-receptor blockers are preferred as the first choice alone or in combination with diuretics. Second choice should be long-acting calcium-channel blockers or cardioselective beta blockers. Clinicians should be aware of the need for aggressive treatment of hypertension and spend more time in order to provide maximal benefit to the treatment of diabetes mellitus and hypertension. PMID:18923653

  3. Arterial hypertension in diabetes mellitus: from theory to clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Sampanis, C; Zamboulis, C

    2008-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus and arterial hypertension are two common diseases that often coexist. Patients with diabetes have much higher rate of hypertension than that in general population. The co-existence of these disorders appears to accelerate microvascular and macrovascular complications and greatly increases the cardiovascular risk, risk of stroke and end stage renal disease. Arterial hypertension is clearly related to nephropathy in subjects with type 1 diabetes. In patients with type 2 diabetes insulin resistance seems to play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of hypertension. Several well designed randomized controlled trials have provided evidence that patients with diabetes will benefit from a more aggressive treatment of hypertension. This benefit is seen at blood pressure level < 130/80 mmHg. Mopreover, most diabetic patients with hypertension require combination therapy to achieve optimal blood pressure goals. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin-receptor blockers, diuretics, β-adrenoreceptor blockers and calcium- channel blockers are all effective antihypertensive agents in type 2 diabetes mellitus and no comparative trial showed the superiority of any particular class in either lowering blood pressure or reducing cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. On the basis of experimental arguments and clinical observations that have shown their apparent superiority in slowing diabetic nephropathy, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin-receptor blockers are preferred as the first choice alone or in combination with diuretics. Second choice should be long-acting calcium-channel blockers or cardioselective β blockers. Clinicians should be aware of the need for aggressive treatment of hypertension and spend more time in order to provide maximal benefit to the treatment of diabetes mellitus and hypertension. PMID:18923653

  4. Reviving the use of aldosterone inhibitors in treating hypertension in obesity.

    PubMed

    Huby, Anne-Cecile; Belin De Chantemèle, Eric J

    2015-11-01

    Obesity is a multifactorial disease associated with hypertension. In the obese population, the incidence of hypertension is high and resistant hypertension is commonly observed. Mechanisms to explain the resistance to current antihypertensive treatments are still poorly understood. Emerging knowledge of the role of aldosterone in controlling blood pressure in obesity may have therapeutic benefit. Mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) inhibitors are currently used as the fourth line of treatment. Clinical studies summarized in this short review suggest that MR antagonists have a strong efficacy in decreasing blood pressure in the hypertensive obese population and could be used as a primary antihypertensive in obesity.

  5. Obesity and health (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Obesity increases a person's risk of illness and death due to diabetes, stroke, heart disease, hypertension, high cholesterol, and kidney and gallbladder disease. Obesity may increase the risk for some types of ...

  6. Diabetes and Hypertension: A Comparative Review of Current Guidelines.

    PubMed

    Cryer, Michael J; Horani, Tariq; DiPette, Donald J

    2016-02-01

    Cardiovascular disease plays a major role in the morbidity and mortality of patients with diabetes mellitus. In turn, hypertension is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease, and its prevalence is increased in diabetes mellitus. Therefore, the detection and management of elevated blood pressure (BP) is a critical component of the comprehensive clinical management of diabetics. Despite significant advances in our understanding of the pathogenesis and treatment of hypertension, there continues to be debate regarding the pharmacologic treatment of hypertension, especially in high-risk groups such as in patients with diabetes mellitus with and without chronic kidney disease (CKD). This debate largely involves at what BP (ie, treatment threshold BP) to initiate pharmacologic antihypertensive therapy and subsequently what treatment target BP should be achieved (ie, goal BP). Presently, there are several guidelines that address hypertension in diabetes mellitus, including the recently released guideline from the Eighth Report of the Joint National Committee (JNC 8). Therefore, this review will compare and contrast these current guidelines, as they relate to the management and treatment of hypertension in diabetes mellitus. Since diabetes mellitus and CKD are significantly inter-related, the presence of CKD as it relates to patients with diabetes mellitus will also be addressed. PMID:26234374

  7. The investigation of the some body parameters of obese and (obese+diabetes) patients with using bioelectrical impedance analysis techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yerlikaya, Emrah; Karageçili, Hasan; Aydin, Ruken Zeynep

    2016-04-01

    Obesity is a key risk for the development of hyperglycemia, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, insulin resistance and is totally referred to as the metabolic disorders. Diabetes mellitus, a metabolic disorder, is related with hyperglycemia, altered metabolism of lipids, carbohydrates and proteins. The minimum defining characteristic feature to identify diabetes mellitus is chronic and substantiated elevation of circulating glucose concentration. In this study, it is aimed to determine the body composition analyze of obese and (obese+diabetes) patients.We studied the datas taken from three independent groups with the body composition analyzer instrument. The body composition analyzer calculates body parameters, such as body fat ratio, body fat mass, fat free mass, estimated muscle mass, and base metabolic rate on the basis of data obtained by Dual Energy X-ray Absorptiometry using Bioelectrical Impedance Analysis. All patients and healthy subjects applied to Siirt University Medico and their datas were taken. The Statistical Package for Social Sciences version 21 was used for descriptive data analysis. When we compared and analyzed three groups datas, we found statistically significant difference between obese, (obese+diabetes) and control groups values. Anova test and tukey test are used to analyze the difference between groups and to do multiple comparisons. T test is also used to analyze the difference between genders. We observed the statistically significant difference in age and mineral amount p<0.00 between (diabetes+obese) and obese groups. Besides, when these patient groups and control group were analyzed, there were significant difference between most parameters. In terms of education level among the illiterate and university graduates; fat mass kg, fat percentage, internal lubrication, body mass index, water percentage, protein mass percentage, mineral percentage p<0.05, significant statistically difference were observed. This difference especially may result

  8. Diabetic Kidney Disease and Hypertension: A True Love Story

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Anand; Vyas, Sony; Agarwal, Abhishek; Abbas, Shahid; Agarwal, Devi Prasad

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Diabetes Mellitus (DM) remains one of the commonest causes of structural and functional kidney abnormalities leading to End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD). The next most common cause is hypertension. It is utmost important to investigate the association between diabetic nephropathy and hypertension because it is a major causal factor of end-stage kidney failure in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM). Aim The aim of the present study was to investigate the association between albuminuria, hypertension and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) in a prospective cohort of T2DM patients in a developing country. Materials and Methods A total of 824 patients were enrolled from a tertiary healthcare center in central India. This study was performed in three groups: normal controls (232), type 2 diabetics without nephropathy (185) and type 2 diabetics with nephropathy (407). Diabetic nephropathy was clinically defined by the presence of persistent proteinuria of > 500mg/day in a diabetic patient in the absence of clinical or laboratory evidence of other kidney or urinary tract disease. Hypertension was categorized based on JNC 7 classification. Detailed clinical history was obtained from all subjects. Student’s t-test was applied to see the difference in mean values of quantitative data in two groups. Chi-Square test was applied to see the difference in frequency of discrete variables in two groups. Results A 66.3% diabetic nephropathy patients and 51.9% type 2 diabetics without nephropathy were found hypertensive in present study; In contrast only 14.7% controls had hypertension. No association of hypertension was found with age and gender in either group. Serum creatinine and eGFR was found significantly different in hypertensive diabetic nephropathy patients than normotensive (p=0.002 and <0.0001 respectively). Conclusion Our study found that hypertension was an independent risk factor for the Diabetic Kidney Disease (DKD). Along with this, a proportional

  9. [The cell immunity in patients with arterial hypertension and obesity].

    PubMed

    Trushina, É N; Mustafina, O K; Soto, S Kh; Bogdanov, A R; Sentsova, T B; Zaletova, T S; Kuznetsov, V D

    2012-01-01

    In the present study the relative quantity subpopulations of lymphocytes, activated T- lymphocytes and CD95-antigen (Fas/APO-1) expression on lymphocytes in the peripheral blood of patients with arterial hypertension and obesity in comparison with the healthy persons was determined. The cells were analyzed by the method of flow cytometry using Beckman Coulter FC 500 cytometer. The following of cells subsets: CD19+, CD3+, CD3+CD4+, CD3+CD8+, CD3-CD16+CD56+, CD3+CD16+CD56+, CD3+CD25+, CD3+HLA-DR+, CD45+CD95+ were investigated. In this research was establish the rise of immunoregulatory index (CD3+CD4+/CD3+CD8+) in consequence of increase the percentages of T-helper and decrease the cytotoxic T-lymphocytes in patients with arterial hypertension and obesity in comparison with the healthy persons. In the peripheral blood of patients with arterial hypertension and obesity were observed a greater level of activated T-lymphocytes (CD3+CD25+, CD3+HLA-DR+), that reflect the increase activity of T-cell immunity. In these patients a greater level of NKT-cells (CD3+CD16+CD56+) and lymphocytes expression of CD95-antigen in comparison with the healthy persons also was noted. The direct correlation between the increased quantity of T-helper lymphocytes, activated T-lymphocytes, NKT-cells, lymphocytes expression of CD95-antigen, and index of body mass in patients with arterial hypertension and obesity was found.

  10. Calcium modulation of hypertension and obesity: mechanisms and implications.

    PubMed

    Zemel, M B

    2001-10-01

    Regulation of intracellular calcium plays a key role in hypertension and obesity. Dysregulation of calcium homeostasis appears to be a fundamental factor linking these conditions. Regulation of intracellular calcium in key disease-related target tissues by calcitrophic hormones provides the opportunity to modulate disease risk with dietary calcium. Overall, sub-optimal calcium intakes contribute to the etiology of salt-sensitivity and hypertension. High salt diets exert a calciuretic effect, serving to exacerbate the physiological consequences of sub-optimal calcium diets. Among these are increases in 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D, which increases vascular smooth muscle intracellular calcium, thereby increasing peripheral vascular resistance and blood pressure. Dietary calcium reduces blood pressure in large part via suppression of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D, thereby normalizing intracellular calcium. The practical relevance of this approach has been confirmed in the DASH (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension) trial, which demonstrated that increasing low-fat dairy product and fruit and vegetable consumption exerted profound blood pressure-lowering effects. The magnitude of this effect among hypertensives was comparable to that typically found in pharmacological trials of mild hypertension. 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D also stimulates calcium influx in human adipocytes, resulting in stimulation of lipogenesis, inhibition of lipolysis and expansion of triglyceride stores. Accordingly, suppression of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D by dietary calcium has been identified as a target, which may contribute to the prevention and management of obesity. Indeed, laboratory, clinical and population data all indicate a significant anti-obesity effect of dietary calcium, although large-scale prospective clinical trials have not yet been conducted to definitively demonstrate the scope of this effect. Thus, available evidence indicates that increasing dietary calcium intakes may result in

  11. Optimal Pharmacologic Treatment Strategies in Obesity and Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Goswami, Gayotri; Shinkazh, Nataliya; Davis, Nichola

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of obesity has increased to pandemic levels worldwide and is related to increased risk of morbidity and mortality. Metabolic comorbidities are commonly associated with obesity and include metabolic syndrome, pre-diabetes, and type 2 diabetes. Even if the prevalence of obesity remains stable until 2030, the anticipated numbers of people with diabetes will more than double as a consequence of population aging and urbanization. Weight reduction is integral in the prevention of diabetes among obese adults with pre-diabetes. Lifestyle intervention and weight reduction are also key in the management of type 2 diabetes. Weight loss is challenging for most obese patients, but for those with diabetes, it can pose an even greater challenge due to the weight gain associated with many treatment regimens. This article will review optimal treatment strategies for patients with comorbid obesity and type 2 diabetes. The role of anti-obesity agents in diabetes will also be reviewed. This literature review will provide readers with current strategies for the pharmacologic treatment of obesity and diabetes with a focus on the weight outcomes related to diabetes treatments. PMID:26237392

  12. [Epigenetics of childhood obesity and diabetes].

    PubMed

    Valladares-Salgado, Adán; Suárez-Sánchez, Fernando; Burguete-García, Ana I; Cruz, Miguel

    2014-01-01

    Obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) result from sedentary lifestyle, high-carbohydrate diets and genetic predisposition. Epigenetics is a form of genetic regulation in specialized cells that does not involve changes in the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) sequence, but it can be inherited to one or more generations through mitosis or meiosis. Children whose mothers develop gestational diabetes are more likely to become obese and diabetic in adult life. DNA methylation is a major mechanism in the regulation of transcription and gene expression of several genes. High levels of glucose and insulin during pregnancy modify the risk of developing T2DM, suggesting that the expression pattern is modified due to cell memory in a specific tissue. If T2DM is linked to adaptation in utero, the obvious primary prevention is to protect the fetal development. Future epidemiological studies need to employ more accurate indicators or markers of development to show the relationship between a specific disease and the exposure to environmental factors. The mechanisms by which malnutrition, and intrauterine growth retardation produce changes in the metabolism of glucose and insuline are worth to explore in order to control obesity and T2DM. PMID:24866314

  13. [Epigenetics of childhood obesity and diabetes].

    PubMed

    Valladares-Salgado, Adán; Suárez-Sánchez, Fernando; Burguete-García, Ana I; Cruz, Miguel

    2014-01-01

    Obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) result from sedentary lifestyle, high-carbohydrate diets and genetic predisposition. Epigenetics is a form of genetic regulation in specialized cells that does not involve changes in the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) sequence, but it can be inherited to one or more generations through mitosis or meiosis. Children whose mothers develop gestational diabetes are more likely to become obese and diabetic in adult life. DNA methylation is a major mechanism in the regulation of transcription and gene expression of several genes. High levels of glucose and insulin during pregnancy modify the risk of developing T2DM, suggesting that the expression pattern is modified due to cell memory in a specific tissue. If T2DM is linked to adaptation in utero, the obvious primary prevention is to protect the fetal development. Future epidemiological studies need to employ more accurate indicators or markers of development to show the relationship between a specific disease and the exposure to environmental factors. The mechanisms by which malnutrition, and intrauterine growth retardation produce changes in the metabolism of glucose and insuline are worth to explore in order to control obesity and T2DM.

  14. [Intestinal microflora, obesity and type 2 diabetes].

    PubMed

    Bondarenko, V M; Maleev, V V; Likhoded, V G

    2014-01-01

    The review of data of the literature on a role of intestinal microflora, genetic features of a macroorganism, exogenic factors and character of a food is presented at obesity and a type 2 diabetes. Researches establish, that development in experimental animals of the induced obesity and the type 2 diabetes, depends on a diet and presence of intestinal microflora. The factors increasing permeability mucous intestines, promote a translocation of intestinal automicroflora and its toxins into macroorganism and a system blood-circulation. Long introduction LPS (endotoxin) of gram-negative bacteria to the special laboratory animals led to development of inflammatory reaction, adiposity and resistance to insulin. The specified phenomena did not develop at LPS introduction to the animals, who have lost receptor CD14 which is necessary for linkage and endotoxin action. Data about change of intestinal microflora and a role of immune infringements are discussed at obesity and the type 2 diabetes occurring into background of low-grade chronic inflammation and metabolic disorders.

  15. Arsenic and diabetes and hypertension in human populations: A review

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C.-J. Wang, S.-L.; Chiou, J.-M.; Tseng, C.-H.; Chiou, H.-Y.; Hsueh, Y.-M.; Chen, S.-Y.; Wu, M.-M.; Lai, M.-S.

    2007-08-01

    Long-term exposure to ingested arsenic from drinking water has been well documented to be associated with an increased risk of diabetes mellitus and hypertension in a dose-response relationship among residents of arseniasis-endemic areas in southwestern Taiwan and Bangladesh. An increased risk of self-reported hypertension but not diabetes was reported in a community-based study of residents who consumed drinking water with a low level of arsenic. Increased glycosylated hemoglobin level and systolic blood pressure were observed in workers occupationally exposed to arsenic. Inconsistent findings of arsenic and diabetes in occupational studies may result from the healthy worker effect and the variation in exposure measurement, age composition, number of patients, accuracy in diagnosis and classification of underlying causes of death, competing causes of death, and method to detect diabetes. The dose-response relationship and toxicological mechanisms of arsenic-induced diabetes and hypertension need further elucidation.

  16. Correlation between Microalbuminuria and Hypertension in Type 2 Diabetic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Alia; Taj, Azeem; Amin, Muhammad Joher; Iqbal, Farrukh; Iqbal, Zafar

    2014-01-01

    Background: Hypertension is commonly found in patients with Diabetic Kidney Disease (DKD). Microalbuminuria is the first clinical sign of involvement of kidneys in patients with type 2 diabetes. Uncontrolled hypertension induces a higher risk of cardiovascular events, including death, increasing proteinuria and progression to kidney disease. Objectives: To determine the correlation between microalbuminuria and hypertension and their association with other risk factors in type 2 diabetic patients. Methods: One hundred and thirteen type 2 diabetic patients attending the diabetic clinic of Shaikh Zayed Postgraduate Medical Institute, Lahore, Pakistan were screened for microalbuminuria and raised blood pressure. The study was conducted from November 2012 to June 2013. Results: Patients were divided into two groups. Group 1, those with normoalbuminuria (n=63) and Group 2, those having microalbuminuria (n=50). Group 2 patients showed higher blood pressure values as compared to Group 1. The results were statistically significant and showed poor glycemic control as a contributing risk factor. Conclusion: The study concluded that there is high frequency of hypertension among type 2 diabetics but still much higher among those having microalbuminuria. So, early recognition of renal dysfunction through detection of microalbuminuria and to start treatment without any delay will confer future protection from end stage renal disease as well as hypertension and its complications in type 2 diabetic patients. PMID:24948969

  17. Mechanisms mediating renal sympathetic nerve activation in obesity-related hypertension.

    PubMed

    Chen, W; Leo, S; Weng, C; Yang, X; Wu, Y; Tang, X

    2015-04-01

    Excessive renal sympathetic nerve activation may be one of the mechanisms underlying obesity-related hypertension. Impaired baroreflex sensitivity, adipokine disorders-such as leptin, adiponectin, and resistin-activation of the renin-angiotensin system, hyperinsulinemia, insulin resistance, and renal sodium retention present in obesity increase renal sympathetic nerve activity, thus contributing to the development of hypertension. Renal sympathetic denervation reduces both renal sympathetic activity and blood pressure in patients with obesity-related hypertension.

  18. Impact of obesity on hospital complications and mortality in hospitalized patients with hyperglycemia and diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Alexopoulos, Anastasia-Stefania; Fayfman, Maya; Zhao, Liping; Weaver, Jeff; Buehler, Lauren; Smiley, Dawn; Pasquel, Francisco J; Vellanki, Priyathama; Haw, J Sonya; Umpierrez, Guillermo E

    2016-01-01

    Objective Obesity is associated with increased risk of diabetes, hypertension and cardiovascular mortality. Several studies have reported increased length of hospital stay and complications; however, there are also reports of obesity having a protective effect on health, a phenomenon coined the ‘obesity paradox’. We aimed to investigate the impact of overweight and obesity on complications and mortality in hospitalized patients with hyperglycemia and diabetes. Research design and methods This retrospective analysis was conducted on 29 623 patients admitted to two academic hospitals in Atlanta, Georgia, between January 2012 and December 2013. Patients were subdivided by body mass index into underweight (body mass index <18.5 kg/m2), normal weight (18.5–24.9 kg/m2), overweight (25–29.9 kg/m2) and obese (>30 kg/m2). Hyperglycemia was defined as a blood glucose >10 mmol/L during hospitalization. Hospital complications included a composite of pneumonia, acute myocardial infarction, respiratory failure, acute kidney injury, bacteremia and death. Results A total of 4.2% were underweight, 29.6% had normal weight, 30.2% were overweight, and 36% were obese. 27.2% of patients had diabetes and 72.8% did not have diabetes (of which 75% had hyperglycemia and 25% had normoglycemia during hospitalization). A J-shaped curve with higher rates of complications was observed in underweight patients in all glycemic groups; however, there was no significant difference in the rate of complications among normal weight, overweight, or obese patients, with and without diabetes or hyperglycemia. Conclusions Underweight is an independent predictor for hospital complications. In contrast, increasing body mass index was not associated with higher morbidity or mortality, regardless of glycemic status. There was no evidence of an obesity paradox among inpatients with diabetes and hyperglycemia. PMID:27486518

  19. Molecular Mechanisms of the Anti-Obesity and Anti-Diabetic Properties of Flavonoids

    PubMed Central

    Kawser Hossain, Mohammed; Abdal Dayem, Ahmed; Han, Jihae; Yin, Yingfu; Kim, Kyeongseok; Kumar Saha, Subbroto; Yang, Gwang-Mo; Choi, Hye Yeon; Cho, Ssang-Goo

    2016-01-01

    Obesity and diabetes are the most prevailing health concerns worldwide and their incidence is increasing at a high rate, resulting in enormous social costs. Obesity is a complex disease commonly accompanied by insulin resistance and increases in oxidative stress and inflammatory marker expression, leading to augmented fat mass in the body. Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a metabolic disorder characterized by the destruction of pancreatic β cells or diminished insulin secretion and action insulin. Obesity causes the development of metabolic disorders such as DM, hypertension, cardiovascular diseases, and inflammation-based pathologies. Flavonoids are the secondary metabolites of plants and have 15-carbon skeleton structures containing two phenyl rings and a heterocyclic ring. More than 5000 naturally occurring flavonoids have been reported from various plants and have been found to possess many beneficial effects with advantages over chemical treatments. A number of studies have demonstrated the potential health benefits of natural flavonoids in treating obesity and DM, and show increased bioavailability and action on multiple molecular targets. This review summarizes the current progress in our understanding of the anti-obesity and anti-diabetic potential of natural flavonoids and their molecular mechanisms for preventing and/or treating obesity and diabetes. PMID:27092490

  20. Molecular Mechanisms of the Anti-Obesity and Anti-Diabetic Properties of Flavonoids.

    PubMed

    Kawser Hossain, Mohammed; Abdal Dayem, Ahmed; Han, Jihae; Yin, Yingfu; Kim, Kyeongseok; Kumar Saha, Subbroto; Yang, Gwang-Mo; Choi, Hye Yeon; Cho, Ssang-Goo

    2016-01-01

    Obesity and diabetes are the most prevailing health concerns worldwide and their incidence is increasing at a high rate, resulting in enormous social costs. Obesity is a complex disease commonly accompanied by insulin resistance and increases in oxidative stress and inflammatory marker expression, leading to augmented fat mass in the body. Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a metabolic disorder characterized by the destruction of pancreatic β cells or diminished insulin secretion and action insulin. Obesity causes the development of metabolic disorders such as DM, hypertension, cardiovascular diseases, and inflammation-based pathologies. Flavonoids are the secondary metabolites of plants and have 15-carbon skeleton structures containing two phenyl rings and a heterocyclic ring. More than 5000 naturally occurring flavonoids have been reported from various plants and have been found to possess many beneficial effects with advantages over chemical treatments. A number of studies have demonstrated the potential health benefits of natural flavonoids in treating obesity and DM, and show increased bioavailability and action on multiple molecular targets. This review summarizes the current progress in our understanding of the anti-obesity and anti-diabetic potential of natural flavonoids and their molecular mechanisms for preventing and/or treating obesity and diabetes. PMID:27092490

  1. Apolipoprotein A1 gene polymorphisms as risk factors for hypertension and obesity.

    PubMed

    Chen, Elizabeth Suchi; Mazzotti, Diego Robles; Furuya, Tatiane Katsue; Cendoroglo, Maysa Seabra; Ramos, Luiz Roberto; Araujo, Lara Quirino; Burbano, Rommel Rodriguez; de Arruda Cardoso Smith, Marília

    2009-12-01

    Several polymorphisms in apolipoprotein A1 (APOA1) gene have been associated with metabolic diseases. Increased transcription efficiency was observed in -75A allele carriers compared to -75G allele homozygotes. +83C allele was associated with higher body mass index and waist-to-hip ratio in type II diabetes subjects. -75G/A and +83C/T polymorphisms were analyzed by RFLP-PCR in 334 individuals from a Brazilian elderly cohort. APOA1 polymorphisms were associated with age-related morbidities, as well as with triglycerides, total cholesterol, HDL, VLDL, LDL, creatinine, urea, albumin, glycated hemoglobin and fasting glucose serum levels. Allele frequencies were 0.102 and 0.21, respectively, for -75A and +83T. -75G allele showed significant association with hypertension (P = 0.001). An association between +83C allele and obesity was observed (P = 0.040) and this allele also showed an association with hypertension in the presence of cardiovascular disease (P = 0.047). Moreover, +83T allele was associated with lower glycated hemoglobin values (P = 0.026). To our knowledge, there is no data associating this polymorphism with glycated hemoglobin. Furthermore, individuals carrying AT haplotype have lower risk for developing hypertension (P = 0.0002), while GT haplotype carriers present decreased risk to develop obesity comparing to GC haplotype (P = 0.025). APOA1 polymorphisms analysis may be a useful tool to identify risk factors for subjects and families and clarify the physiopathological role of these polymorphisms in age-related diseases, such as hypertension and obesity.

  2. Diabetes, Obesity, and the Brain: New Developments in Biobehavioral Medicine.

    PubMed

    Everson-Rose, Susan A; Ryan, John P

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes and obesity, two major public health concerns, are associated with increased risk for problems in multiple organ systems, including the central nervous system. The adverse effects of diabetes and obesity on cognitive functioning are increasingly well recognized. This special issue of Psychosomatic Medicine features the latest research linking diabetes, obesity, and brain structure, function, and metabolism and follows a special meeting on this topic organized by the American Psychosomatic Society in October 2013. Evidence for the increased prevalence of diabetes and obesity is reviewed as it relates to cognitive decline. These articles indicate that the age of onset of Type 1 diabetes may be relevant to future cognitive function and that disease duration of Type 2 diabetes and sociocultural factors are related to cognitive decline during the aging process. The hypothalamus and other neural circuits, notably the dopaminergic system that underlies feeding and reward-related aspects of food intake, are among the key factors involved in obesity. Research on the associations between obesity and cognitive function is described using the positive effects of weight reduction following bariatric surgery or behavioral methods. This special issue concludes with a conceptual framework for linking obesity and diabetes with accelerated cognitive decline as related to the aging process. The collection of articles highlights the importance of using a life span perspective to understand the influence of both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes on brain metabolism, function, and structure. Moreover, these studies show that distressing environmental circumstances can adversely influence neurocognitive dysfunction associated with obesity and diabetes.

  3. Role of Renin-Angiotensin-Aldosterone System in Metabolic Syndrome and Obesity-related Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Kamide, K

    2014-08-12

    Several recent clinical trials show that blocking agents of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) reduce cardiovascular events in patients with metabolic syndrome based on insulin resistance and obesity, especially accumulated visceral fat. Our laboratory has focused on the relationship between the vascular RAAS and the action of insulin on the vasculature. We first revealed that the addition of insulin to cultured vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) markedly increases angiotensinogen and angiotensin II (Ang II) expression and production. Insulin addition also induces VSMC growth that is inhibited by the blockade of the RAAS by either ACEI or ARB which suggests a role for the RAAS in insulin-mediated growth. Insulin has a quite different effect on cultured vascular endothelial cells (EC) as it reduces angiotensinogen and renin expression. However, insulin added to EC induces a marked activation of ACE and the activated ACE promotes the conversion of Ang I to Ang II and cell growth under conditions of high insulin concentration. Ang II induces the progression of atherosclerosis through the production of oxidative stress that blocks insulin signaling and accelerates atherosclerosis. In this paper, we attempt to clarify the relationship between insulin resistance, the RAAS, and oxidative stress in vascular tissues to mimic in vivo conditions found in patients with metabolic syndrome and obesity-related hypertension as previously I reviewed in "Current Hypertension Reviews" in 2010 [1]. In addition, I update the relationships between vascular RAAS and insulin resistance for the last 4 years. JSH-2014 [2] states that the target goals of blood pressure (BP) for diabetes patients is lower than 130/80 mmHg, whereas updated JNC 8 [3] and ESH-ESC 2013 [4] recommends the target BP was changed to <140/90 mmHg for hypertensive patients with diabetes. Patients with diabetes and hypertension have reduced mortality as well as improved cardiovascular and cerebrovascular

  4. Links between Childhood and Adult Social Circumstances and Obesity and Hypertension in the Mexican Population

    PubMed Central

    Beltrán-Sánchez, Hiram; Crimmins, Eileen M.; Teruel, Graciela M.; Thomas, Duncan

    2011-01-01

    Objectives This study examines links between early life circumstances and adult socioeconomic status and obesity and hypertension in the adult Mexican population. Methods We use data from the Mexican Family Life Survey (MxFLS) collected in 2002 for people aged 20 or older (N=14, 280). Results We found that men with low education and women with more education have significantly lower obesity. Women with higher education also have significantly less hypertension. Obesity triples the likelihood of hypertension among both men and women. Better childhood experiences are associated with less hypertension among women, but more hypertension among men in rural areas. Discussion Recent changes in income, nutrition, and infection in Mexico may be responsible for the observed high prevalence of overweight and obesity and the extremely high odds of hypertension among obese young adults. PMID:21948773

  5. Joint statement of the European Association for the Study of Obesity and the European Society of Hypertension: obesity and heart failure.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Jens; Toplak, Hermann; Grassi, Guido; Yumuk, Volkan; Kotsis, Vasilios; Engeli, Stefan; Cuspidi, Cesare; Nilsson, Peter M; Finer, Nick; Doehner, Wolfram

    2016-09-01

    Obese individuals are more likely to develop heart failure. Yet, once heart failure is established, the impact of overweight and obesity on prognosis and survival is unclear. The purpose of this joint scientific statement of the European Association for the Study of Obesity and the European Society of Hypertension is to provide an overview on the current scientific literature on obesity and heart failure in terms of prognosis, mechanisms, and clinical management implications. Moreover, the document identifies open questions that ought to be addressed. The need for more tailored weight management recommendations in heart failure will be emphasized and, in line with the emerging evidence, aims to distinguish between primary disease and secondary outcome prevention. In the primary prevention of heart failure, it appears prudent advising obese individuals to lose or achieve a healthy body weight, especially in those with risk factors such as hypertension or type 2 diabetes. However, there is no evidence from clinical trials to guide weight management in overweight or obese patients with established heart failure. Prospective clinical trials are strongly encouraged. PMID:27488547

  6. Joint statement of the European Association for the Study of Obesity and the European Society of Hypertension: obesity and heart failure.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Jens; Toplak, Hermann; Grassi, Guido; Yumuk, Volkan; Kotsis, Vasilios; Engeli, Stefan; Cuspidi, Cesare; Nilsson, Peter M; Finer, Nick; Doehner, Wolfram

    2016-09-01

    Obese individuals are more likely to develop heart failure. Yet, once heart failure is established, the impact of overweight and obesity on prognosis and survival is unclear. The purpose of this joint scientific statement of the European Association for the Study of Obesity and the European Society of Hypertension is to provide an overview on the current scientific literature on obesity and heart failure in terms of prognosis, mechanisms, and clinical management implications. Moreover, the document identifies open questions that ought to be addressed. The need for more tailored weight management recommendations in heart failure will be emphasized and, in line with the emerging evidence, aims to distinguish between primary disease and secondary outcome prevention. In the primary prevention of heart failure, it appears prudent advising obese individuals to lose or achieve a healthy body weight, especially in those with risk factors such as hypertension or type 2 diabetes. However, there is no evidence from clinical trials to guide weight management in overweight or obese patients with established heart failure. Prospective clinical trials are strongly encouraged.

  7. Maternal Obesity Promotes Diabetic Nephropathy in Rodent Offspring

    PubMed Central

    Glastras, Sarah J.; Tsang, Michael; Teh, Rachel; Chen, Hui; McGrath, Rachel T.; Zaky, Amgad A.; Pollock, Carol A.; Saad, Sonia

    2016-01-01

    Maternal obesity is known to increase the risk of obesity and diabetes in offspring. Though diabetes is a key risk factor for the development of chronic kidney disease (CKD), the relationship between maternal obesity and CKD has not been clearly defined. In this study, a mouse model of maternal obesity was employed to determine the impact of maternal obesity on development of diabetic nephropathy in offspring. Female C57BL/6 mice were fed high-fat diet (HFD) for six weeks prior to mating, during gestation and lactation. Male offspring were weaned to normal chow diet. At postnatal Week 8, offspring were randomly administered low dose streptozotocin (STZ, 55 mg/kg/day for five days) to induce diabetes. Assessment of renal damage took place at postnatal Week 32. We found that offspring of obese mothers had increased renal fibrosis, inflammation and oxidative stress. Importantly, offspring exposed to maternal obesity had increased susceptibility to renal damage when an additional insult, such as STZ-induced diabetes, was imposed. Specifically, renal inflammation and oxidative stress induced by diabetes was augmented by maternal obesity. Our findings suggest that developmental programming induced by maternal obesity has implications for renal health in offspring. Maternal obesity should be considered a risk factor for CKD. PMID:27277011

  8. Childhood obesity affects adult metabolic syndrome and diabetes.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yajun; Hou, Dongqing; Zhao, Xiaoyuan; Wang, Liang; Hu, Yuehua; Liu, Junting; Cheng, Hong; Yang, Ping; Shan, Xinying; Yan, Yinkun; Cruickshank, J Kennedy; Mi, Jie

    2015-09-01

    We seek to observe the association between childhood obesity by different measures and adult obesity, metabolic syndrome (MetS), and diabetes. Thousand two hundred and nine subjects from "Beijing Blood Pressure Cohort Study" were followed 22.9 ± 0.5 years in average from childhood to adulthood. We defined childhood obesity using body mass index (BMI) or left subscapular skinfold (LSSF), and adult obesity as BMI ≥ 28 kg/m(2). MetS was defined according to the joint statement of International Diabetes Federation and American Heart Association with modified waist circumference (≥ 90/85 cm for men/women). Diabetes was defined as fasting plasma glucose ≥ 7.0 mmol/L or blood glucose 2 h after oral glucose tolerance test ≥ 11.1 mmol/L or currently using blood glucose-lowering agents. Multiple linear and logistic regression models were used to assess the association. The incidence of adult obesity was 13.4, 60.0, 48.3, and 65.1 % for children without obesity, having obesity by BMI only, by LSSF only, and by both, respectively. Compared to children without obesity, children obese by LSSF only or by both had higher risk of diabetes. After controlling for adult obesity, childhood obesity predicted independently long-term risks of diabetes (odds ratio 2.8, 95 % confidence interval 1.2-6.3) or abdominal obesity (2.7, 1.6-4.7) other than MetS as a whole (1.2, 0.6-2.4). Childhood obesity predicts long-term risk of adult diabetes, and the effect is independent of adult obesity. LSSF is better than BMI in predicting adult diabetes.

  9. The origins and consequences of obesity. Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Björntorp, P

    1996-01-01

    A relationship exists between obesity and non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. Central, abdominal obesity carries a particularly high risk that is most likely associated with enlargement of visceral fat deposits. A multiple endocrine perturbation is associated with visceral obesity. This consists of a hypersensitive hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, with resulting excess of cortisol secretion upon stimulation. Growth hormone levels in both sexes are diminished and testosterone concentrations in men are lower than normal. In women a moderate hyperandrogenism is often present. The elevated sensitivity of the HPA axis may be a primary event, followed by adrenal androgen production in women and by interaction at several levels, with inhibition of both the growth hormone and pituitary-gonadal axes. Together, these endocrine perturbations seem to be able to centralize body fat to visceral depots because of a high density of steroid hormone receptors. The endocrine perturbations are most likely followed by insulin resistance. Elevated cortisol levels, deficiencies in sex-specific steroid hormones and excess androgens result in insulin resistance. The endocrine abnormalities in visceral obesity are followed by insulin resistance, both directly and indirectly via contribution of excess free fatty acids from centralized body fat depots. The hyperactivity of the HPA axis may be due to frequent challenges and it is amplified by a deficient feedback inhibition. A depressive, helplessness reaction to stress may be involved. Such stress factors may be found in socioeconomic and psychosocial handicaps, as suggested by results of population studies. This hypothesis is strongly supported by the reproduction of an identical condition in non-human primates that react with a depressive reaction upon psychosocial types of stressors. The perturbations of the HPA axis may thus be in the centre of the syndrome. Studies of this axis in established non-insulin-dependent diabetes

  10. Similar Adiponectin Levels in Obese Normotensive and Obese Hypertensive Men and No Vasorelaxant Effect of Adiponectin on Human Arteries.

    PubMed

    Dreier, Rasmus; Asferg, Camilla; Berg, Jais O; Andersen, Ulrik B; Flyvbjerg, Allan; Frystyk, Jan; Linneberg, Allan; Jeppesen, Jørgen L; Edvinsson, Lars; Skovsted, Gry F

    2016-02-01

    Obesity is a strong risk factor for hypertension, but the mechanism linking obesity to hypertension is not fully elucidated. In obesity, circulating concentrations of adiponectin are decreased and hypoadiponectinaemia has in some but not all studies been associated with increased risk of hypertension. Due to this inconsistency, we decided to study adiponectin from two aspects in a cross-sectional in vivo study and in an experimental in vitro study. In the cross-sectional study, 103 men with body mass index (BMI) ≥ 30.0 kg/m(2) were studied; 63 had 24-hr ambulatory blood pressure (ABP) ≥ 130/80 mmHg (ObeseHT) and 40 had 24-hr ABP < 130/80 mmHg (ObeseNT). As controls, we studied 27 men with BMI between 20.0 and 24.9 kg/m(2) and 24-hr ABP < 130/80 mmHg (LeanNT). Serum concentrations of adiponectin and body composition using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry scanning were determined. In vitro, the direct vasomotor response of adiponectin was tested on subcutaneous resistance arteries from human abdominal adipose tissue. The two obese groups had lower adiponectin concentrations compared with LeanNT (p < 0.01) [median (interquartile range)]: ObeseHT 6.5 (5.1-8.3) mg/L; ObeseNT 6.6 (5.2-7.8) mg/L; and LeanNT 9.4 (6.7-12.4) mg/L, with no significant difference in adiponectin concentrations (or body composition) between ObeseHT and ObeseNT (p = 0.67). In vitro, adiponectin did not have any direct vasodilatory effect and adiponectin did not affect angiotensin II-stimulated vasoconstriction. In conclusion, obese hypertensive men have similar serum concentrations of adiponectin as obese normotensive men. In combination with the in vitro data, these findings question a pathogenic role of adiponectin in human hypertension.

  11. TRP Channels as Therapeutic Targets in Diabetes and Obesity.

    PubMed

    Zsombok, Andrea; Derbenev, Andrei V

    2016-01-01

    During the last three to four decades the prevalence of obesity and diabetes mellitus has greatly increased worldwide, including in the United States. Both the short- and long-term forecasts predict serious consequences for the near future, and encourage the development of solutions for the prevention and management of obesity and diabetes mellitus. Transient receptor potential (TRP) channels were identified in tissues and organs important for the control of whole body metabolism. A variety of TRP channels has been shown to play a role in the regulation of hormone release, energy expenditure, pancreatic function, and neurotransmitter release in control, obese and/or diabetic conditions. Moreover, dietary supplementation of natural ligands of TRP channels has been shown to have potential beneficial effects in obese and diabetic conditions. These findings raised the interest and likelihood for potential drug development. In this mini-review, we discuss possibilities for better management of obesity and diabetes mellitus based on TRP-dependent mechanisms. PMID:27548188

  12. TRP Channels as Therapeutic Targets in Diabetes and Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Zsombok, Andrea; Derbenev, Andrei V.

    2016-01-01

    During the last three to four decades the prevalence of obesity and diabetes mellitus has greatly increased worldwide, including in the United States. Both the short- and long-term forecasts predict serious consequences for the near future, and encourage the development of solutions for the prevention and management of obesity and diabetes mellitus. Transient receptor potential (TRP) channels were identified in tissues and organs important for the control of whole body metabolism. A variety of TRP channels has been shown to play a role in the regulation of hormone release, energy expenditure, pancreatic function, and neurotransmitter release in control, obese and/or diabetic conditions. Moreover, dietary supplementation of natural ligands of TRP channels has been shown to have potential beneficial effects in obese and diabetic conditions. These findings raised the interest and likelihood for potential drug development. In this mini-review, we discuss possibilities for better management of obesity and diabetes mellitus based on TRP-dependent mechanisms. PMID:27548188

  13. The epidemiology and molecular mechanisms linking obesity, diabetes, and cancer.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Rosalyn D; Gallagher, Emily J; Scheinman, Eyal J; Damouni, Rawan; LeRoith, Derek

    2013-01-01

    The worldwide epidemic of obesity is associated with increasing rates of the metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes. Epidemiological studies have reported that these conditions are linked to increased rates of cancer incidence and mortality. Obesity, particularly abdominal obesity, is associated with insulin resistance and the development of dyslipidemia, hyperglycemia, and ultimately type 2 diabetes. Although many metabolic abnormalities occur with obesity and type 2 diabetes, insulin resistance and hyperinsulinemia appear to be central to these conditions and may contribute to dyslipidemia and altered levels of circulating estrogens and androgens. In this review, we will discuss the epidemiological and molecular links between obesity, type 2 diabetes, and cancer, and how hyperinsulinemia and dyslipidemia may contribute to cancer development. We will discuss how these metabolic abnormalities may interact with estrogen signaling in breast cancer growth. Finally, we will discuss the effects of type 2 diabetes medications on cancer risk. PMID:23810003

  14. Systemic and renal-specific sympathoinhibition in obesity hypertension.

    PubMed

    Lohmeier, Thomas E; Iliescu, Radu; Liu, Boshen; Henegar, Jeffrey R; Maric-Bilkan, Christine; Irwin, Eric D

    2012-02-01

    Chronic pressure-mediated baroreflex activation suppresses renal sympathetic nerve activity. Recent observations indicate that chronic electric activation of the carotid baroreflex produces sustained reductions in global sympathetic activity and arterial pressure. Thus, we investigated the effects of global and renal specific suppression of sympathetic activity in dogs with sympathetically mediated, obesity-induced hypertension by comparing the cardiovascular, renal, and neurohormonal responses to chronic baroreflex activation and bilateral surgical renal denervation. After control measurements, the diet was supplemented with beef fat, whereas sodium intake was held constant. After 4 weeks on the high-fat diet, when body weight had increased ≈50%, fat intake was reduced to a level that maintained this body weight. This weight increase was associated with an increase in mean arterial pressure from 100±2 to 117±3 mm Hg and heart rate from 86±3 to 130±4 bpm. The hypertension was associated with a marked increase in cumulative sodium balance despite an approximately 35% increase in glomerular filtration rate. The importance of increased tubular reabsorption to sodium retention was further reflected by ≈35% decrease in fractional sodium excretion. Subsequently, both chronic baroreflex activation (7 days) and renal denervation decreased plasma renin activity and abolished the hypertension. However, baroreflex activation also suppressed systemic sympathetic activity and tachycardia and reduced glomerular hyperfiltration while increasing fractional sodium excretion. In contrast, glomerular filtration rate increased further after renal denervation. Thus, by improving autonomic control of cardiac function and diminishing glomerular hyperfiltration, suppression of global sympathetic activity by baroreflex activation may have beneficial effects in obesity beyond simply attenuating hypertension.

  15. Hepatic Arteriolosclerosis: A Small Vessel Complication of Diabetes and Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Balakrishnan, Maya; Garcia-Tsao, Guadalupe; Deng, Yanghong; Ciarleglio, Maria; Jain, Dhanpat

    2015-01-01

    Background & Aim Liver involvement in diabetes is well recognized in the form of steatohepatitis and glycogenic hepatopathy. More recently sinusoidal fibrosis, even in the absence of steatosis has also been suggested to be associated with diabetes (diabetic hepatosclerosis) however, case control studies are lacking. In addition, microangiopathy (hyaline arteriolosclerosis), a well-known complication of diabetes, has not been well studied in liver. Therefore, we undertook a cross-sectional blinded study with the specific aim of evaluating the association between hepatic sinusoidal fibrosis and hepatic arteriolosclerosis (HA) with diabetes. Methods Liver biopsy findings from 89 diabetic patients obtained between January 2006 and December 2009 were compared to those of 89 non-diabetic patients matched by age and HCV infection status. Patients with cirrhosis, liver mass, right heart failure, significant alcohol use, or insufficient available clinical information were excluded. Medical records were reviewed for the presence of diabetes, BMI, diabetes treatment, and comorbidities at time of biopsy (e.g. underlying liver disease, hypertension, dyslipidemia). Liver biopsies were evaluated blinded to all clinical data (including presence or absence of diabetes) for a variety of histologic features, especially patterns of fibrosis and HA. Results Diabetics had a higher average BMI (33m/kg2 vs. 30m/kg2, p=0.0039), prevalence of hypertension (78% vs. 33%, p <0.0001) and dyslipidemia (52% vs. 20%, p<0.0001). Among diabetics, 87% had type 2 diabetes and 57% used insulin. While sinusoidal fibrosis, with or without steatosis, was not significantly associated with the presence of diabetes, HA was significantly more prevalent among diabetics compared with controls: 45% vs. 29% (p=0.0298). The presence of both diabetes and hypertension had a significant odds of HA: with an adjusted odds ratio of 2.632 (95% CI 1.178–5.878, p=0.0183). Biliary changes were associated with HA in some

  16. Oxytocin and cardioprotection in diabetes and obesity.

    PubMed

    Jankowski, Marek; Broderick, Tom L; Gutkowska, Jolanta

    2016-01-01

    Oxytocin (OT) emerges as a drug for the treatment of diabetes and obesity. The entire OT system is synthesized in the rat and human heart. The direct myocardial infusion with OT into an ischemic or failing heart has the potential to elicit a variety of cardioprotective effects. OT treatment attenuates cardiomyocyte (CMs) death induced by ischemia-reperfusion by activating pro-survival pathways within injured CMs in vivo and in isolated cells. OT treatment reduces cardiac apoptosis, fibrosis, and hypertrophy. The OT/OT receptor (OTR) system is downregulated in the db/db mouse model of type 2 diabetes which develops genetic diabetic cardiomyopathy (DC) similar to human disease. We have shown that chronic OT treatment prevents the development of DC in the db/db mouse. In addition, OT stimulates glucose uptake in both cardiac stem cells and CMs, and increases cell resistance to diabetic conditions. OT may help replace lost CMs by stimulating the in situ differentiation of cardiac stem cells into functional mature CMs. Lastly, adult stem cells amenable for transplantation such as MSCs could be preconditioned with OT ex vivo and implanted into the injured heart to aid in tissue regeneration through direct differentiation, secretion of protective and cardiomyogenic factors and/or their fusion with injured CMs. PMID:27268060

  17. Oxytocin and cardioprotection in diabetes and obesity.

    PubMed

    Jankowski, Marek; Broderick, Tom L; Gutkowska, Jolanta

    2016-06-07

    Oxytocin (OT) emerges as a drug for the treatment of diabetes and obesity. The entire OT system is synthesized in the rat and human heart. The direct myocardial infusion with OT into an ischemic or failing heart has the potential to elicit a variety of cardioprotective effects. OT treatment attenuates cardiomyocyte (CMs) death induced by ischemia-reperfusion by activating pro-survival pathways within injured CMs in vivo and in isolated cells. OT treatment reduces cardiac apoptosis, fibrosis, and hypertrophy. The OT/OT receptor (OTR) system is downregulated in the db/db mouse model of type 2 diabetes which develops genetic diabetic cardiomyopathy (DC) similar to human disease. We have shown that chronic OT treatment prevents the development of DC in the db/db mouse. In addition, OT stimulates glucose uptake in both cardiac stem cells and CMs, and increases cell resistance to diabetic conditions. OT may help replace lost CMs by stimulating the in situ differentiation of cardiac stem cells into functional mature CMs. Lastly, adult stem cells amenable for transplantation such as MSCs could be preconditioned with OT ex vivo and implanted into the injured heart to aid in tissue regeneration through direct differentiation, secretion of protective and cardiomyogenic factors and/or their fusion with injured CMs.

  18. Diabetes, Diet-Health Behavior, and Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Anders, Sven; Schroeter, Christiane

    2015-01-01

    High-quality diets play an important role in diabetes prevention. Appropriate dietary adherence can improve insulin sensitivity and glycemic control, and thus contribute to lifestyle improvement. However, previous research suggests that dietary adherence is arguably among the most difficult cornerstones of diabetes management. The objectives of this study are (1) to estimate whether and to what extent individuals diagnosed with diabetes show significant differences in diet quality [healthy eating index (HEI)] compared to healthy individuals, (2) to quantify whether and to what extent diabetics experience significantly higher outcomes of body mass index (BMI), and (3) to estimate whether and to what extent dietary supplementation impacts diabetes patient’s diet quality and/or BMI outcomes. We use data from the 2007–2008 U.S. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). The NHANES is the primary, randomized, and nationally representative survey used to assess the health and nutritional status in the U.S. We apply propensity score matching (PSM) to account for selection bias and endogeneity between self-reported diet and health behavir (treatment) and BMI outcomes. We control for an individual’s BMI as to capture the impact of past dietary behavior in its impact on HEI. Matching results suggest that regular dietary supplement consumption is associated with significant lower BMI outcomes of almost 1 kg/m2. The close relationship between diabetes and obesity has been at the center of the diet-health policy debate across Canada and the U.S. Knowledge about this linkage may help to improve the understanding of the factors that impact dietary choices and their overall health outcomes, which may lead to a more efficient and effective promotion of dietary guidelines, healthy food choices, and targeted consumer health and lifestyle policies. PMID:25852643

  19. Diabetes, diet-health behavior, and obesity.

    PubMed

    Anders, Sven; Schroeter, Christiane

    2015-01-01

    High-quality diets play an important role in diabetes prevention. Appropriate dietary adherence can improve insulin sensitivity and glycemic control, and thus contribute to lifestyle improvement. However, previous research suggests that dietary adherence is arguably among the most difficult cornerstones of diabetes management. The objectives of this study are (1) to estimate whether and to what extent individuals diagnosed with diabetes show significant differences in diet quality [healthy eating index (HEI)] compared to healthy individuals, (2) to quantify whether and to what extent diabetics experience significantly higher outcomes of body mass index (BMI), and (3) to estimate whether and to what extent dietary supplementation impacts diabetes patient's diet quality and/or BMI outcomes. We use data from the 2007-2008 U.S. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). The NHANES is the primary, randomized, and nationally representative survey used to assess the health and nutritional status in the U.S. We apply propensity score matching (PSM) to account for selection bias and endogeneity between self-reported diet and health behavir (treatment) and BMI outcomes. We control for an individual's BMI as to capture the impact of past dietary behavior in its impact on HEI. Matching results suggest that regular dietary supplement consumption is associated with significant lower BMI outcomes of almost 1 kg/m(2). The close relationship between diabetes and obesity has been at the center of the diet-health policy debate across Canada and the U.S. Knowledge about this linkage may help to improve the understanding of the factors that impact dietary choices and their overall health outcomes, which may lead to a more efficient and effective promotion of dietary guidelines, healthy food choices, and targeted consumer health and lifestyle policies.

  20. Renal outcomes of bariatric surgery in obese adults with diabetic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Rao, Bhavana B; Bhattacharya, Abhik; Agrawal, Varun

    2014-08-01

    Obesity is a pandemic with several significant adverse health outcomes. Chronic kidney disease has been an overlooked consequence of obesity. Among diabetics, obesity is known to amplify the risk for kidney disease. Although bariatric surgery promises significant and sustained weight reduction with favorable impact on metabolic parameters such as glycemic control, hypertension and dyslipidemia, its impact on the renal complications of diabetes is poorly understood. This paper aims to comprehensively evaluate the evidence in the published literature on the impact of bariatric surgery on renal outcomes in obese adults with diabetic kidney disease. While many observational studies have demonstrated significant reduction in proteinuria after bariatric surgery, there is paucity of data regarding changes in renal filtration function such as doubling of serum creatinine or progression to end stage kidney disease. No randomized controlled trials comparing medical vs. surgical therapy in obese adults with diabetic kidney disease exist, hence assessing the metabolic benefits vs. the surgical risks is important before recommending bariatric surgery to this growing patient population. Future studies require a collaborative effort between bariatric surgeons and nephrologists to measure long-term effects of bariatric surgery on renal outcomes incorporating evolving markers of kidney injury to advance this field.

  1. Are the Rates of Hypertension and Diabetes Higher in People from Lower Socioeconomic Status in Bangladesh? Results from a Nationally Representative Survey

    PubMed Central

    Tareque, Md. Ismail; Koshio, Atsushi; Tiedt, Andrew D.; Hasegawa, Toshihiko

    2015-01-01

    Objective A well-established belief regarding inequalities in health around the world is that hypertension and diabetes are higher in groups of lower socioeconomic status. We examined whether rates of hypertension, diabetes, and the coexistence of hypertension and diabetes are higher in people from a lower socioeconomic status than in those from a higher socioeconomic status in Bangladesh. Methods We investigated a nationally representative dataset from the 2011 Bangladesh Demographic and Health Survey with objective measures for hypertension and diabetes. A wealth index was constructed from data on household assets using principal components analysis. Chi-square tests and logistic regressions were performed to test the associations between wealth level, hypertension and diabetes. Findings People from the highest wealth quintile were significantly more likely to have hypertension (Adjusted odds ratios [AOR] = 1.65, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.22-2.25), diabetes (AOR = 1.81, 95% CI = 1.21-2.71), and the coexistence of hypertension and diabetes (AOR = 2.17, 95% CI = 1.05-4.49) than people from the lowest wealth quintile. The odds of having hypertension, diabetes, and their coexistence were higher for older people, women, people who engaged in less physical labor, and people who were overweight and obese. Conclusion Wealthier people, particularly people from the fourth and highest wealth quintiles, should be careful to avoid unhealthy lifestyles to prevent hypertension and diabetes. Health policy makers and planners are urged to target wealthier strata in terms of hypertension and diabetes initiatives while paying special attention to older people, women, people who engage in less physical labor, and individuals who are overweight. PMID:26017066

  2. ED 07-1 CONTRIBUTION OF CARDIOPULMONARY FITNESS IN OBESITY PHENOTYPES AND INCIDENT HYPERTENSION.

    PubMed

    Jae, Sae Young

    2016-09-01

    Obesity is associated with an increased risk of morbidity and mortality from cardiometabolic diseases, but not all obese individuals are at increased risk. This phenotype of obesity is referred to as "metabolically healthy obesity (MHO)." MHO describes a cohort of the obese population with relatively low risk of cardiovascular and metabolic diseases. Although MHO has favorable metabolic profiles such as insulin sensitivity, low inflammatory markers, and low body fat, there remains a substantial unexplained variance. Obesity is associated with increased prevalence of hypertension, but some obese individuals exhibit normal blood pressure. Several studies have shown the relationship between obesity and clustering of metabolic abnormalities and increased risk of incident hypertension, but there are few studies on the risk of incident hypertension among MHO. Although these studies suggested that MHO was at increased risk of incident hypertension, but this relationship has not been extensively studied, and confounding variables are not adequately accounted for in the analyses. Therefore, the association between MHO and the risk of incident hypertension still remains limited and controversial. Lifestyle factors may play a large role in why a subset of the obese individuals do not present the obesity-related cardio-metabolic outcomes. Several studies have shown that levels of physical activity and cardiopulmonary fitness increase in MHO when compared to the metabolically unhealthy obese individuals. Although previous studies have attempted to adjust for physical activity using self-report questionnaires to clarify the association between obesity phenotypes and incident hypertension, there was no direct assessment of cardiopulmonary fitness. It is well known that cardiopulmonary fitness can attenuate the increased risk of incident hypertension even after adjusted for adiposity and metabolic risk factors, but the role of cardiopulmonary fitness on the association between MHO

  3. Comparative analysis of lipid profiles among patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, hypertension and concurrent type 2 diabetes, and hypertension: a view of metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Isezuo, S. A.; Badung, S. L. H.; Omotoso, A. B. O.

    2003-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus and hypertension are independent risk factors for atherosclerotic lesions that are partly linked with dyslipidaemia. This risk is additive when diabetes and hypertension occur concurrently. In order to determine if concurrent type 2 diabetes and hypertension results in putative increases in dyslipidaemia in a Nigerian population, we compared the plasma lipid levels, atherogenic index and prevalence of dyslipidaemia among age and sex-matched indigenous Nigerians with type 2 diabetes, hypertension and concurrent diabetes and hypertension. Age and sex-matched healthy Nigerians that are free of diabetes and hypertension served as controls. The patients as a whole were more likely to have dyslipidaemia than controls (p < 0.05). High-density lipoprotein cholesterol was similar among patients and controls. Mean total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol; low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and triglyceride levels, atherogenic index and prevalence of dyslipidaemia did not differ significantly among patients with hypertension, diabetes, and concurrent hypertension and diabetes (p = 0.99 for each parameter). It is concluded that concurrent hypertension and type 2 diabetes does not result in a more severe dyslipidaemia than when either of the two conditions occurs in isolation. We attribute this to the common pathogenic link between hypertension, diabetes and dyslipidaemia in metabolic syndrome. Evidence, albeit indirect, of this syndrome among native Africans is, therefore, provided. PMID:12793789

  4. Mitochondrial Plasticity in Obesity and Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Jelenik, Tomas

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Insulin resistance and its related diseases, obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), have been linked to changes in aerobic metabolism, pointing to a possible role of mitochondria in the development of insulin resistance. Recent Advances: Refined methodology of ex vivo high-resolution respirometry and in vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy now allows describing several features of mitochondria in humans. In addition to measuring mitochondrial function at baseline and after exercise-induced submaximal energy depletion, the response of mitochondria to endocrine and metabolic challenges, termed mitochondrial plasticity, can be assessed using hyperinsulinemic clamp tests. While insulin resistant states do not uniformly relate to baseline and post-exercise mitochondrial function, mitochondrial plasticity is typically impaired in insulin resistant relatives of T2DM, in overt T2DM and even in type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). Critical Issues: The variability of baseline mitochondrial function in the main target tissue of insulin action, skeletal muscle and liver, may be attributed to inherited and acquired changes in either mitochondrial quantity or quality. In addition to certain gene polymorphisms and aging, circulating glucose and lipid concentrations correlate with both mitochondrial function and plasticity. Future Directions: Despite the associations between features of mitochondrial function and insulin sensitivity, the question of a causal relationship between compromised mitochondrial plasticity and insulin resistance in the development of obesity and T2DM remains to be resolved. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 19, 258–268. PMID:22938510

  5. Hypertension Management and Microvascular Insulin Resistance in Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Seung-Hyun; Cao, Wenhong; Liu, Zhenqi

    2011-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes is in essence a vascular disease and is frequently associated with hypertension, macrovascular events, and microvascular complications. Microvascular dysfunction, including impaired recruitment and capillary rarefaction, has been implicated in the pathogenesis of diabetic complications. Microvascular insulin resistance and renin-angiotensin system upregulation are present in diabetes, and each contributes to the development of hypertension and microvascular dysfunction. In the insulin-sensitive state, insulin increases microvascular perfusion by increasing endothelial nitric oxide production, but this effect is abolished by insulin resistance. Angiotensin II, acting via the type 1 receptors, induces inflammation and oxidative stress, leading to impaired insulin signaling, reduced nitric oxide availability, and vasoconstriction. Conversely, it acts on the type 2 receptors to cause vasodilatation. Because substrate and hormonal exchanges occur in the microvasculature, antihypertensive agents targeted to improve microvascular insulin sensitivity and function may have beneficial effects beyond their capacity to lower blood pressure in patients with diabetes. PMID:20582734

  6. Hypertensive heart disease and obesity: a complex interaction between hemodynamic and not hemodynamic factors.

    PubMed

    Sarzani, Riccardo; Bordicchia, Marica; Spannella, Francesco; Dessì-Fulgheri, Paolo; Fedecostante, Massimiliano

    2014-06-01

    The worldwide prevalence of obesity has nearly doubled, with an increase in obesity-related cardiovascular disease and mortality. Several factors are involved in the genesis of hypertension and hypertensive heart disease (HHD) in overweight/obesity. This review is focused on bridging factors between excessive adiposity and HHD, presenting a unifying hypothesis of vascular-metabolic syndrome, where an "handicap" of the natriuretic peptide system has a central role both in adipocyte dysmetabolism as well as in increased blood pressure and HHD.

  7. Association between obesity and the severity of ambulatory hypertension in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Babinska, Katarina; Kovacs, Laszlo; Janko, Viktor; Dallos, Tomas; Feber, Janusz

    2012-01-01

    The goal of our study was to analyze the association between obesity and the severity of ambulatory hypertension in obese children. A total of 109 patients with primary obesity ages 7 to 18 years (mean ± SD age 14.1 ± 3.1) were enrolled. Patients were divided into three groups according to body mass index (BMI) Z-scores: group 1 (n = 27): BMI >1.65 and < 3.28 standard deviation scores (SDS); group 2 (n = 55): BMI >3.29 and <4.91 SDS; group 3 (n = 27): BMI >4.92 SDS. Definition and staging of ambulatory hypertension was based on blood pressure (BP) levels and BP load, obtained from ambulatory BP monitoring (ABPM). Only 24% had ambulatory normotension, 25% had ambulatory prehypertension, 3% had hypertension, and 48% had severe ambulatory hypertension. The severity of hypertension increased significantly with the degree of obesity (P = .0027). Daytime systolic, diastolic, and mean arterial BPs increased significantly with increased BMI, whereas the nighttime pressure remained elevated regardless of the degree of obesity. Isolated nighttime hypertension was observed in 25% of patients and 38% were classified as nondippers. Almost 50% of children with obesity and hypertension detected on ABPM suffer from severe ambulatory hypertension. BMI is associated with the severity of ambulatory hypertension and the increase of daytime BP.

  8. Association between gestational diabetes and pregnancy-induced hypertension.

    PubMed

    Bryson, Chris L; Ioannou, George N; Rulyak, Stephen J; Critchlow, Cathy

    2003-12-15

    Gestational diabetes and pregnancy-induced hypertension are common, and their relation is not well understood. The authors conducted a population-based case-control study using 1992-1998 Washington State birth certificate and hospital discharge records to investigate this relation. Consecutive cases of pregnancy-induced hypertension were divided into four groups based on International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision codes: eclampsia (n=154), severe preeclampsia (n=1,180), mild preeclampsia (n=5,468), and gestational hypertension (n=8,943). Cases were compared with controls who did not have pregnancy-induced hypertension (n=47,237). Gestational diabetes was more common in each case group (3.9% in eclamptics, 4.5% in severe preeclamptics, and 4.4% in both mild preeclamptics and those with gestational hypertension) than in controls (2.7%). After adjustment for body mass index, age, ethnicity, parity, and prenatal care, gestational diabetes was associated with increased risk of severe preeclampsia (odds ratio (OR)=1.5, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.1, 2.1), mild preeclampsia (OR=1.5, 95% CI: 1.3, 1.8), and gestational hypertension (OR=1.4, 95% CI: 1.2, 1.6). Gestational diabetes was more strongly associated with pregnancy-induced hypertension among women who received less prenatal care (OR=4.2 for eclampsia and OR=3.1 for severe preeclampsia, p<0.05 for both) and among Black women (OR for eclampsia and preeclampsia together=3.9, p<0.05).

  9. Type 2 Diabetes Treatment in the Patient with Obesity.

    PubMed

    Malin, Steven K; Kashyap, Sangeeta R

    2016-09-01

    Lifestyle modification is the cornerstone treatment of type 2 diabetes in the obese patient, and is highly effective at promoting glucose regulation. However, many individuals struggle over time to maintain optimal glycemic control and/or body weight with lifestyle modification. Therefore, additional therapeutic approaches are needed. Pharmacologic interventions have shown promising results for obesity-related diabetes complications. Not surprisingly though lifestyle modification and pharmacology may become ineffective for treating diabetes over time. Bariatric surgery is considered by some, but not all, to be the most effective and durable treatment for combating obesity. In fact many patients with type 2 diabetes have normalized glucose concentrations within days postoperation. Taken together, treatment of obesity in the patient with type 2 diabetes requires a multi-faceted approach. PMID:27519130

  10. Characteristics of government workers and association with diabetes and hypertension in the Cook Islands

    PubMed Central

    Kool, B.; Harries, A. D.; Bissell, K.; Gounder, S.; Hill, P. C.; Avare, T.; Fariu, R.

    2014-01-01

    Setting: Twenty government departments in Rarotonga, Cook Islands. Objective: To determine the characteristics, presence of selected non-communicable disease (NCD) risk factors and prevalence of diabetes mellitus (DM) and hypertension among government workers who participated in ‘wellness checks’ in 2012. Design: Cross-sectional study involving analysis of survey data. Results: Of 598 employees, 70% were aged 25–54 years and 55% were female. Two thirds were obese (body mass index ⩾30 kg/m2), and 76% had low levels of fruit and vegetable consumption. Of 50 (8.4%) participants diagnosed with DM (random blood glucose ⩾11 mmol/l, fasting ⩾7 mmol/l), 30 were self-reported and 20 were based on blood glucose. Of the 206 (34.4%) diagnosed with hypertension (systolic ⩾140 and/or diastolic ⩾90), 71 were self-reported and 135 were based on blood pressure measurements. Obesity was associated with hypertension (OR 2.79, 95%CI 1.4–5.4), but not with DM. No relationship was observed between fruit and vegetable consumption and presence or absence of DM or hypertension. Conclusion: This study identified a high prevalence of obesity and hypertension among government employees in the Cook Islands, risk factors that are associated with NCDs such as DM and cardiovascular disease. ‘Wellness checks’ pave the way for interventions in workplace settings to prevent and better manage these diseases through early diagnosis, risk management, treatment and supportive public health policies. PMID:26477285

  11. The Diabetic Nephropathy and the Development of Hypertension in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Zuccollo, Adriana; Navarro, Monica

    2001-01-01

    The present study was designed to examine the development of hypertension in diabetic rats treated with streptozotocin (STZ, 1mg/g bw). The rats were studied at 3, 6, 9, 12 and 15 weeks. From the third week the rats were divided in diabetic rats according their glycemias and controls, along 15 weeks. After the third week a group, of rats showed increased urinary protein excretion (93, 134, 155 and 191%) compared to controls. In this group of rats the urinary kallikrein excretion was lower than control and the systolic blood pressure became significantly elevated between 3 and 6 weeks and persisted up to 15 weeks. On the other hand a group of diabetic rats were normotensive with urinary protein excretion similar to controls and urinary kallikrein lower compared to control but significantly higher compared diabetic hypertensive rats. These data suggest that the association of progressive diabetic nephropathy with abnormal endothelium-dependent vasodilation may produce a high prevalence of hypertensive diabetes. PMID:12369707

  12. Prevalence of Diabetes and Impaired Fasting Glucose in Hypertensive Adults in Rural China: Far from Leveling-Off.

    PubMed

    Yu, Shasha; Sun, Zhaoqing; Zheng, Liqiang; Guo, Xiaofan; Yang, Hongmei; Sun, Yingxian

    2015-11-01

    In recent years data from many investigations has shown a leveling-off trend in diabetes incidence. In order to explain the diabetes epidemic in rural China during the past ten years, we conducted a survey from July 2012 to August 2013. Data from comprehensive questionnaires, physical examinations, and blood tests were obtained from 5919 residents with hypertension, aged ≥ 35 years. Diabetes and impaired fasting glucose (IFG) were defined according to the American Diabetes Association (ADA) criteria. The overall prevalence of diabetes and IFG were 15.3% (13.6% in men, 16.8% in women) and 40.7% (44.1% in men, 34.7% in women) in the hypertensive rural Chinese population. The prevalence of previously diagnosed diabetes was 6.5% (4.6% in men, 8.4% in women). The prevalence of undiagnosed diabetes was 8.7% (9.0% in men, 8.5% in women). Multivariate logistic regression revealed that increasing age, drinking, overweight or obesity, systolic blood pressure, low HDL-C, high total cholesterol and triglycerides increased the risk of diabetes (p < 0.05). Diabetes is thus still prevalent in rural areas of China and is manifesting an accelerating trend. It remains an important public health problem in China, especially in rural areas and routine assessment for the early detection and treatment of diabetes should be emphasized. PMID:26610531

  13. Therapeutic Phytogenic Compounds for Obesity and Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Hee Soong; Lim, Yun; Kim, Eun-Kyoung

    2014-01-01

    Natural compounds have been used to develop drugs for many decades. Vast diversities and minimum side effects make natural compounds a good source for drug development. However, the composition and concentrations of natural compounds can vary. Despite this inconsistency, half of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved pharmaceuticals are natural compounds or their derivatives. Therefore, it is essential to continuously investigate natural compounds as sources of new pharmaceuticals. This review provides comprehensive information and analysis on natural compounds from plants (phytogenic compounds) that may serve as anti-obesity and/or anti-diabetes therapeutics. Our growing understanding and further exploration of the mechanisms of action of the phytogenic compounds may afford opportunities for development of therapeutic interventions in metabolic diseases. PMID:25421245

  14. [Estrogen receptor alpha in obesity and diabetes].

    PubMed

    Cahua-Pablo, José Ángel; Flores-Alfaro, Eugenia; Cruz, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Estradiol (E2) is an important hormone in reproductive physiology, cardiovascular, skeletal and in the central nervous system (CNS). In human and rodents, E2 and its receptors are involved in the control of energy and glucose metabolism in health and metabolic diseases. The estrogen receptor (ER) belongs to the superfamily of nuclear receptors (NR), which are transcription factors that regulate gene expression. Three ER, ER-alpha, ER-beta and the G protein-coupled ER (GPER; also called GPR30) in tissues are involved in glucose and lipid homeostasis. Also, it may have important implications for risk factors associated with metabolic syndrome (MS), insulin resistance (IR), obesity and type 2 diabetes (T2D).

  15. Hypertension and Obesity after Pediatric Kidney Transplantation: Management Based on Pathophysiology: A Mini Review

    PubMed Central

    John, Eunice G.; Domingo, Liezl T.

    2014-01-01

    Hypertension after pediatric renal transplant is a common and important risk factor for graft loss and patient survival. The mechanism of post kidney transplant hypertension is complex and multifactorial. Control of blood pressure in renal transplant patients is important but often times blood pressures remain uncontrolled. The management of hypertension and obesity in pediatric kidney transplant patients is based on the pathophysiology. Compared to the general pediatric hypertensive population, special attention needs to be focused on the additional impact of immunosuppressive medications side effects and interactions, recurrent disease, and donor and recipient comorbidities such as obesity on blood pressure control with thoughtful consideration of the risk of graft failure. In general, there is a need for prospective studies in pediatric kidney transplant patients to understand the pathophysiology of hypertension and obesity and the appropriate approach to achieve a balance between the primary need to avoid rejection and the need to lower blood pressure and prevent obesity. PMID:24791188

  16. New obesity indices and adipokines in normotensive patients and patients with hypertension: comparative pilot analysis.

    PubMed

    Stepien, Mariusz; Stepien, Anna; Banach, Maciej; Wlazel, Rafal N; Paradowski, Marek; Rizzo, Manfredi; Toth, Peter P; Rysz, Jacek

    2014-04-01

    We compared the obesity parameters and selected adipokines-leptin, adiponectin, and resistin-in obese patients with hypertension and normotensive patients. A total of 67 nondiabetic obese outpatients were divided into 2 groups: A-hypertensive and B-normotensive. Serum levels of leptin, adiponectin, resistin, and insulin were measured. Weight, height, waist circumference, and hip circumference were measured to calculate waist-to-hip ratio (WHR), weight-to-height ratio, visceral adiposity index, and body adiposity index (BAI). Among patients with hypertension, significant positive correlations were observed between leptin and body mass index and BAI (r = .31 and r = .63, respectively). In normotensive patients, leptin positively correlated with BAI (r = .73, P < .01) and negatively with WHR (r = -.55, P < .0001); adiponectin negatively correlated with WHR (r = .38, P < .01) and BAI (r = .52; P < .0001), and resistin negatively correlated with WHR (r = -.36, P < .05). In conclusion, visceral obesity and leptin are associated with hypertension in obese patients.

  17. Body mass index and waist circumference combined predicts obesity-related hypertension better than either alone in a rural Chinese population

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ming; Zhao, Yang; Wang, Guoan; Zhang, Hongyan; Ren, Yongcheng; Wang, Bingyuan; Zhang, Lu; Yang, Xiangyu; Han, Chengyi; Pang, Chao; Yin, Lei; Zhao, Jingzhi; Hu, Dongsheng

    2016-01-01

    Limited information is available on the association of obesity defined by both body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference (WC) with incident hypertension in rural China. A total of 9,174 participants ≥18 years old from rural areas in middle of China, free of hypertension, diabetes, myocardial infarction and stroke, were selected in this cohort study. Questionnaire interview and anthropometric and laboratory measurements were performed at baseline (2007–2008) and follow-up (2013–2014). During the 6 years of follow-up, hypertension developed in 733/3,620 men and 1,051/5,554 women. After controlling for age, education level, smoking, drinking, physical activity, and family history of hypertension, the relative risk of hypertension was lower for participants with high BMI but normal WC than those with both BMI and WC obesity for men 18–39 and 40–59 years old. Women 18–39 years old with normal BMI but high WC showed a 1.96-fold risk of hypertension, and being female with age 40–59 years and high BMI but normal WC was independently associated with hypertension incidence as compared with both normal BMI and WC. BMI is more associated with hypertension as compared with WC in both genders. High WC tends to add additional risk of hypertension in young women. PMID:27545898

  18. Body mass index and waist circumference combined predicts obesity-related hypertension better than either alone in a rural Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ming; Zhao, Yang; Wang, Guoan; Zhang, Hongyan; Ren, Yongcheng; Wang, Bingyuan; Zhang, Lu; Yang, Xiangyu; Han, Chengyi; Pang, Chao; Yin, Lei; Zhao, Jingzhi; Hu, Dongsheng

    2016-01-01

    Limited information is available on the association of obesity defined by both body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference (WC) with incident hypertension in rural China. A total of 9,174 participants ≥18 years old from rural areas in middle of China, free of hypertension, diabetes, myocardial infarction and stroke, were selected in this cohort study. Questionnaire interview and anthropometric and laboratory measurements were performed at baseline (2007-2008) and follow-up (2013-2014). During the 6 years of follow-up, hypertension developed in 733/3,620 men and 1,051/5,554 women. After controlling for age, education level, smoking, drinking, physical activity, and family history of hypertension, the relative risk of hypertension was lower for participants with high BMI but normal WC than those with both BMI and WC obesity for men 18-39 and 40-59 years old. Women 18-39 years old with normal BMI but high WC showed a 1.96-fold risk of hypertension, and being female with age 40-59 years and high BMI but normal WC was independently associated with hypertension incidence as compared with both normal BMI and WC. BMI is more associated with hypertension as compared with WC in both genders. High WC tends to add additional risk of hypertension in young women. PMID:27545898

  19. Independent Influence of Overweight and Obesity on the Regression of Left Ventricular Hypertrophy in Hypertensive Patients

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Kun; Huang, Feifei; Chen, Jie; Cai, Qingqing; Wang, Tong; Zou, Rong; Zuo, Zhiyi; Wang, Jingfeng; Huang, Hui

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Overweight and obesity are associated with adverse cardiovascular outcomes. However, the role of overweight and obesity in left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) of hypertensive patients is controversial. The aim of the current meta-analysis was to evaluate the influence of overweight and obesity on LVH regression in the hypertensive population. Twenty-eight randomized controlled trials comprising 2403 hypertensive patients (mean age range: 43.8–66.7 years) were identified. Three groups were divided according to body mass index: normal weight, overweight, and obesity groups. Compared with the normal-weight group, LVH regression in the overweight and obesity groups was more obvious with less reduction of systolic blood pressure after antihypertensive therapies (P < 0.001). The renin–angiotensin system inhibitor was the most effective in regressing LVH in overweight and obese hypertensive patients (19.27 g/m2, 95% confidence interval [15.25, 23.29], P < 0.001), followed by β-blockers, calcium channel blockers, and diuretics. In the stratified analysis based on blood pressure measurement methods and age, more significant LVH regression was found in 24-h ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) group and in relatively young patients (40–60 years’ old) group (P < 0.01). Overweight and obesity are independent risk factors for LVH in hypertensive patients. Intervention at an early age and monitoring by ABPM may facilitate therapy-induced LVH regression in overweight and obese hypertensive patients. PMID:25437025

  20. Monocyte Chemoattractant Protein 1 (MCP-1) in Obesity and Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Panee, Jun

    2012-01-01

    Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) is the first discovered and most extensively studied CC chemokine, and the amount of studies on its role in the etiologies of obesity- and diabetes-related diseases have increased exponentially during the past 2 decades. This review attempted to provide a panoramic perspective of the history, regulatory mechanisms, functions, and therapeutic strategies of this chemokine. The highlights of this review include the roles of MCP-1 in the development of obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, insulitis, diabetic nephropathy, and diabetic retinopathy. Therapies that specifically or non-specifically inhibit MCP-1 overproduction have been summarized. PMID:22766373

  1. The Association between Sleep Duration and Hypertension in Non-obese Premenopausal Women in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Song, Mi-Yeon; Sung, En; Lee, Keun-Mi; Keum, Shin-Ho; Ryu, Sun-Dong

    2016-01-01

    Background Previous studies have revealed that sleep duration is linked to both obesity and hypertension. Here, we evaluated the association between sleep duration and hypertension in obese and non-obese premenopausal women using representative national survey data from the Korean population. Methods A total of 4,748 subjects over 20 years of age from the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey from 2010 to 2012 were included. To control for risk factors, multivariable logistic regression was used to calculate the adjusted odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals of hypertension across the following sleep duration categories: <6, 6-8, and >8 h/d. Results Among the participants, 367 subjects (7.7%) had hypertension. Their mean sleep duration was 7 hours. In the non-obese subjects, after controlling for potential confounding variables, the odds ratio for hypertension was 1.86 fold greater in those with a sleep duration of <6 hours (odds ratio, 1.79; 95% confidence interval, 1.05 to 3.03) as compared to those who slept for 6.8 hours. However, there was no association between sleep duration and the risk of hypertension in obese subjects. Long sleep duration (over 8 h/d) was not associated with hypertension in either the non-obese or the obese subjects in this study. Conclusion Short sleep duration (less than 6 h/d) may be a significant risk factor for hypertension in non-obese premenopausal women. However, there is no association between sleep duration and the risk of hypertension in obese women. PMID:27073613

  2. Association between obesity and depression in patients with diabetes mellitus type 2; a study protocol

    PubMed Central

    De la Cruz-Cano, Eduardo; Tovilla-Zarate, Carlos Alfonso; Reyes-Ramos, Emilio; Gonzalez-Castro, Thelma Beatriz; Juarez-Castro, Isela; López-Narváez, Maria Lilia; Fresan, Ana

    2015-01-01

    Background: Diabetes mellitus and depression are highly prevalent conditions throughout the world and have significant impact on health outcomes. It has been estimated that diabetes mellitus type 2 affects about 246 million people in the world; nevertheless, incidence varies among countries. There is evidence that depression is associated with a poor metabolic control in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus that present other health problems (such as hypertension and obesity). The aim of this study protocol is to determine if obesity increases the risk for depression in patient with diabetes type 2. Methods: The analysis will be reported following the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA).The studies suitable for inclusion will be assessed by the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale (NOS) to determine their methodological quality. To identify the studies of interest, we will search on PubMed and EBSCO databases. We will use the following keyword combinations: "Diabetes Mellitus type 2 AND obesity AND depression", "depression AND Diabetes Mellitus type 2", "Diabetes Mellitus type 2 AND body mass index cross sectional study", "depression AND obesity cross-sectional study". Causes for exclusion will be publications that studied patients diagnosed with diabetes mellitus type 1; articles that focused on the treatment and complications of diabetes mellitus type 2; publications that have studied other clinical or psychiatric conditions (for instance, seizure disorder or history of schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, psychotic symptoms or dementia). Conclusion: The results of this study will form the basis for a better understanding of the association between obesity and depression in patients with diabetes mellitus type 2, and will allow development of prediction tools and better interventions. It is evident that several modifiable and non-modifiable risk factors play an important role in the pathogenesis of diabetes among population. Currently

  3. [Type 2 diabetes, obesity and nutrition, a paradigm shift].

    PubMed

    Bourcelot, Emilie; Combes, Jérôme

    2016-05-01

    Obesity and type 2 diabetes are two complex and multifactorial chronic diseases. Nutritional management is based on an educational and bio-psycho-sensory approach centred on the patient using cognitive-behavioural and emotionally-focused therapy tools.

  4. Prospective study of obesity, hypertension, high cholesterol, and risk of restless legs syndrome.

    PubMed

    De Vito, Katerina; Li, Yanping; Batool-Anwar, Salma; Ning, Yi; Han, Jiali; Gao, Xiang

    2014-07-01

    Because previous cross-sectional studies suggest an association between metabolic disorders and restless legs syndrome (RLS), we prospectively evaluated whether obesity, hypercholesterolemia, and hypertension were associated with increased risk of RLS. Our study consisted of 42,728 female participants from the Nurses' Health Study II and 12,812 male participants from the Health Professionals Follow-up Study, free of RLS at baseline (2002 for men and 2005 for women), and free of diabetes and arthritis through follow-up (2002-2008 for men and 2005-2009 for women). RLS symptoms were assessed using the International RLS Study Group's standardized questionnaire. We considered RLS symptoms a "case" if the symptoms occurred ≥5 times/month and met International RLS Study Group criteria. We found that obesity was associated with an increased risk RLS among both men and women (P difference for sex >0.5). The pooled multivariate-adjusted odds ratio (OR) for RLS was 1.57 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.33-1.85; P trend <0.0001) for body mass index >30 versus ≤23 kg/m(2) and 1.56 (95% CI: 1.29-1.89; P trend = 0.0001) comparing two extreme waist circumference quintiles, adjusting for age, ethnicity, smoking, physical activity, use of antidepressant, and other covariates. A similar significant association was found for high cholesterol; the pooled adjusted OR for total serum cholesterol >240 versus <159 mg/dL was 1.33 (95% CI: 1.11-1.60; P trend = 0.002). There was no significant association between hypertension and RLS risk (adjusted OR: 0.90; 95% CI: 0.79-1.02). In this large, prospective study, we found that obesity and high cholesterol, but not high blood pressure, were significantly associated with an increased risk of developing RLS. © 2014 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  5. Glucose, Obesity, Metabolic Syndrome, and Diabetes: Relevance to Incidence of Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Horwich, Tamara B.; Fonarow, Gregg C.

    2010-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) is common, results in poor clinical outcomes, and is associated with large health-care costs. The incidence of HF continues to rise, with approximately 670,000 new cases per year and a 20% lifetime risk of HF for persons 40 years and older in the United States. Risk factors for HF have been identified and thus preventative strategies should have a positive effect on disease burden, morbidity, and mortality. Although coronary artery disease and hypertension have traditionally been considered among the most important modifiable risk factors for the development of HF, recent studies have highlighted the importance of increasingly prevalent metabolic risk factors – glucose, diabetes, obesity, and the metabolic syndrome. This paper will present evidence for the link between glucose, diabetes, obesity, metabolic syndrome and incident HF. Furthermore, we will discuss how risk factor modification and other preventive therapies may help curb the rising incidence of HF. PMID:20117431

  6. Cardiac abnormalities in youth with obesity and type 2 diabetes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Childhood obesity has been linked to cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk in adulthood. Of great concern is the expected increase in the population's CVD burden in relation to childhood obesity. This is compounded by the risk related to chronic hyperglycemia exposure in youth with type 2 diabetes. We h...

  7. Association between Nephrolithiasis, Hypertension and Obesity in Polycystic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bajrami, Valbona; Idrizi, Alma; Roshi, Enver; Barbullushi, Myftar

    2016-01-01

    AIM: We aim to define the correlations between nephrolithiasis, hypertension, age and obesity in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) in Albania. MATERIAL AND METHODS: We included 100 patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney from 2011 to 2014. The patients underwent X-ray and renal ultrasonography. We performed the metabolic evaluation of blood and urine. RESULTS: The patients with renal stones had a higher level of mean systolic and diastolic blood pressure compared with patients without stones (155 ± 12 mmHg vs. 145 ± 8 mmHg, and 105 ± 0.9 mmHg vs. 92 ± 1.28 mmHg, respectively). Patients with renal stones were older (47 ± 15 vs. 38 ± 5 years), had a higher prevalence of obesity [body mass index (BMI): 28 ± 2.4 vs. 25.7 ± 0.6], had higher levels of total cholesterol level (220 ± 5 mg/dl vs. 203 ± 4 mg/dl) as well as triglyceride levels (160 ± 9 mg/dl vs. 126 ± 4 mg/dl), compared with no renal stone individuals. CONCLUSION: ADPKD patients with renal stones in our study had a higher mean level of systolic and diastolic blood pressure, BMI and cholesterol and triglycerides levels compared with individuals without renal stones. PMID:27275327

  8. Protective Effect of Gymnema sylvestre Ethanol Extract on High Fat Diet-induced Obese Diabetic Wistar Rats.

    PubMed

    Kumar, V; Bhandari, Uma; Tripathi, C D; Khanna, Geetika

    2014-07-01

    Obesity is associated with numerous co-morbidities such as cardiovascular diseases, type 2 diabetes, hypertension and others. Therefore, the present study was planned to investigate the effect of water- soluble fraction of Gymnema sylvestre ethanol extract on biochemical and molecular alterations in obese diabetic rats. Diabetes was induced by single i.v. injection of streptozotocin (45 mg/kg) via tail vein. Obesity was induced by oral feeding of high fat diet for a period of 28 days in diabetic rats. Body weight gain, food intake, water intake, hemodynamic parameters (systolic, diastolic, mean arterial blood pressures and heart rate), serum biochemical parameters (leptin, insulin, lipid levels, apolipoprotein B and glucose), cardiomyocyte apoptosis (cardiac caspase-3, Na(+)/K(+) ATPase activity and DNA fragmentation) organs and visceral fat pad weight and oxidative stress parameters were measured. Oral treatment with water soluble fraction of Gymnema sylvestre ethanol extracts (120 mg/kg/p.o.) for a period of 21 days, resulted in significant reduction in heart rate, mean arterial pressure, serum leptin, insulin, apolipoprotein B, lipids, glucose, cardiac caspase-3 levels, Na(+)/K(+) ATPase activity and DNA laddering, visceral fat pad and organ's weight and improved the antioxidant enzymes levels in the high fat diet induced obesity in diabetic rats. The results of present study reveal that water soluble fraction of Gymnema sylvestre ethanol extract could be useful intervention in the treatment of obesity and type-2 diabetes mellitus.

  9. Impact of obesity and insulin-resistance on cirrhosis and portal hypertension.

    PubMed

    Berzigotti, Annalisa; Abraldes, Juan G

    2013-10-01

    Obesity is sharply rising worldwide and is increasingly recognized in patients with cirrhosis. This review summarizes the available data documenting a detrimental role of obesity and insulin-resistance on the risk of appearance of clinical events in patients with cirrhosis. Molecular pathways explaining the harmful effect of obesity and insulin resistance in the natural history of cirrhosis are largely unknown. Increasing knowledge of mechanisms leading to white adipose tissue dysfunction on one side, and to portal hypertension on the other side, allow hypothesizing that a link between the pathophysiology of obesity, insulin resistance and portal hypertension in cirrhosis exists. Mechanisms likely involved in this interplay are discussed in this article.

  10. Hepcidin and iron metabolism in non-diabetic obese and type 2 diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yue; Yin, Hui-qing; Liu, Hao-ling; Xiu, Lei; Peng, Xiao-yu

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the changes of iron levels and hepatic regulatory molecules expression involved in iron metabolism in non-diabetic obese/type 2 diabetic rat models. Male Wistar rats were divided into 3 groups: control group, non-diabetic obese group and type 2 diabetic group (n=20 each). The rats were evaluated physiologically and biochemically. The hepatic histopathological changes were observed using haematoxylin and eosin (HE) staining. The mRNA expression patterns of hepcidin, interleukin-6 (IL-6), hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) and ferroportin (Fpn) in the rat liver in control group, non-diabetic obese group and type 2 diabetic group were analyzed by real-time RT-PCR. The protein expression patterns of hepcidin in liver of each group were further analyzed by immunohistochemistry and Western blotting. As compared with control group, the ferritin in non-diabetic obese group and type 2 diabetic group was increased significantly (P<0.001). However, there was no significant difference in soluble transferring receptor (sTfR):ferritin ratio among the three groups (P>0.05). The real-time RT-PCR, immunohistochemistry and Western blotting results all revealed that the expression levels of hepcidin in non-diabetic obese group and type 2 diabetic group were elevated significantly as compared with those in control group (P<0.001). The expression levels of hepcidin mRNA between non-diabetic obese group and type 2 diabetic group showed no significant difference (P>0.05). However, the protein expression levels of hepcidin in type 2 diabetic group were significantly higher than those in non-diabetic obese group (P<0.05). Compared to control group, the expression levels of IL-6 mRNA in non-diabetic obese group and type 2 diabetic group were increased significantly and the expression levels of Fpn mRNA decreased (P<0.05). However, the expression levels of HIF mRNA had no significant difference among three groups. It is suggested that iron metabolism is

  11. The role of obesity and obstructive sleep apnea in the pathogenesis and treatment of resistant hypertension.

    PubMed

    Marcus, Jonathan A; Pothineni, Aravind; Marcus, Carolina Z; Bisognano, John D

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of resistant hypertension, obesity, and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), three highly prevalent conditions in the United States, is rising. Approximately one in three adults in the US has hypertension, and a significant proportion of these individuals have hypertension that is difficult to treat, or resistant. Obesity and OSA are well-established risk factors for resistant hypertension, a condition that portends significant cardiovascular risk. Awareness of the various mechanisms by which obesity and OSA impact systemic blood pressure is essential to better understand how best to effectively care for patients with resistant hypertension. In this review, we discuss the clinical and pathophysiologic associations between obesity, OSA, and resistant hypertension. Furthermore, we will explore the effect of continuous positive airway pressure therapy (CPAP) and other therapeutic interventions on blood pressure control in patients with resistant hypertension.Key Points• Obesity, obstructive sleep apnea, and resistant hypertension are highly prevalent conditions, with increasing overall incidence [1-3].• Both obesity and obstructive sleep apnea are independent risk factors for the development of resistant hypertension.• OSA is characterized by a physiologic cascade of collapse of the upper airway, which can lead to intermittent hypoxia, hypercapnia, significant negative intra-thoracic pressure, and increased SNS output.• Intermittent hypoxia leads to activation of the endothelin system [17, 18, 19•], which can lead to the development of resistant hypertension.• Intermittent hypoxia can lead to the over activation of the SNS, which can also contribute to the development of resistant hypertension [20, 21].• OSA leads to state of elevated adrenergic tone, which in turn may contribute to resistant hypertension [25-27].• OSA patients have a higher incidence of "non-dipping" of nocturnal systolic blood pressure, a marker of increased adrenergic tone

  12. [Vitamin D, obesity, and diabetes:new technology toward drug development against metabolic diseases].

    PubMed

    Miyata, Yugo; Shimomura, Iichiro

    2016-03-01

    Obesity and diabetes are rapidly reaching epidemic proportions in many parts of world and are becoming one of the major public health problems. Many studies have been performed to develop treatments for obesity and diabetes. In clinical aspect, for example, vitamin D was assumed to be a causal factor of obesity and diabetes, and the effect of vitamin D supplementation on the patients was assessed. In addition to clinical study, basic researchers have tried to elucidate the mechanisms of obesity and diabetes. Recent studies show novel techniques for finding etiologic factors in obesity and diabetes. These effort will accelerate progress toward total eradication of obesity and diabetes.

  13. Renal Denervation Normalizes Arterial Pressure With No Effect on Glucose Metabolism or Renal Inflammation in Obese Hypertensive Mice.

    PubMed

    Asirvatham-Jeyaraj, Ninitha; Fiege, Jessica K; Han, Ruijun; Foss, Jason; Banek, Christopher T; Burbach, Brandon J; Razzoli, Maria; Bartolomucci, Alessandro; Shimizu, Yoji; Panoskaltsis-Mortari, Angela; Osborn, John W

    2016-10-01

    Hypertension often occurs in concurrence with obesity and diabetes mellitus, commonly referred to as metabolic syndrome. Renal denervation (RDNx) lowers arterial pressure (AP) and improves glucose metabolism in drug-resistant hypertensive patients with high body mass index. In addition, RDNx has been shown to reduce renal inflammation in the mouse model of angiotensin II hypertension. The present study tested the hypothesis that RDNx reduces AP and renal inflammation and improves glucose metabolism in obesity-induced hypertension. Eight-week-old C57BL/6J mice were fed either a low-fat diet (10 kcal%) or a high-fat diet (45 kcal%) for 10 weeks. Body weight, food intake, fasting blood glucose, and glucose metabolism (glucose tolerance test) were measured. In a parallel study, radiotelemeters were implanted in mice for AP measurement. High fat-fed C57BL/6J mice exhibited an inflammatory and metabolic syndrome phenotype, including increased fat mass, increased AP, and hyperglycemia compared with low-fat diet mice. RDNx, but not Sham surgery, normalized AP in high-fat diet mice (115.8±1.5 mm Hg in sham versus 96.6±6.7 mm Hg in RDNx). RDNx had no significant effect on AP in low-fat diet mice. Also, RDNx had no significant effect on glucose metabolism or renal inflammation as measured by the number of CD8, CD4, and T helper cells or levels of inflammatory cytokines in the kidneys. These results indicate that although renal nerves play a role in obesity-induced hypertension, they do not contribute to impaired glucose metabolism or renal inflammation in this model.

  14. Renal Denervation Normalizes Arterial Pressure With No Effect on Glucose Metabolism or Renal Inflammation in Obese Hypertensive Mice.

    PubMed

    Asirvatham-Jeyaraj, Ninitha; Fiege, Jessica K; Han, Ruijun; Foss, Jason; Banek, Christopher T; Burbach, Brandon J; Razzoli, Maria; Bartolomucci, Alessandro; Shimizu, Yoji; Panoskaltsis-Mortari, Angela; Osborn, John W

    2016-10-01

    Hypertension often occurs in concurrence with obesity and diabetes mellitus, commonly referred to as metabolic syndrome. Renal denervation (RDNx) lowers arterial pressure (AP) and improves glucose metabolism in drug-resistant hypertensive patients with high body mass index. In addition, RDNx has been shown to reduce renal inflammation in the mouse model of angiotensin II hypertension. The present study tested the hypothesis that RDNx reduces AP and renal inflammation and improves glucose metabolism in obesity-induced hypertension. Eight-week-old C57BL/6J mice were fed either a low-fat diet (10 kcal%) or a high-fat diet (45 kcal%) for 10 weeks. Body weight, food intake, fasting blood glucose, and glucose metabolism (glucose tolerance test) were measured. In a parallel study, radiotelemeters were implanted in mice for AP measurement. High fat-fed C57BL/6J mice exhibited an inflammatory and metabolic syndrome phenotype, including increased fat mass, increased AP, and hyperglycemia compared with low-fat diet mice. RDNx, but not Sham surgery, normalized AP in high-fat diet mice (115.8±1.5 mm Hg in sham versus 96.6±6.7 mm Hg in RDNx). RDNx had no significant effect on AP in low-fat diet mice. Also, RDNx had no significant effect on glucose metabolism or renal inflammation as measured by the number of CD8, CD4, and T helper cells or levels of inflammatory cytokines in the kidneys. These results indicate that although renal nerves play a role in obesity-induced hypertension, they do not contribute to impaired glucose metabolism or renal inflammation in this model. PMID:27550916

  15. Genome-wide scan for linkage to obesity-associated hypertension in French Canadians.

    PubMed

    Pausova, Zdenka; Gaudet, Daniel; Gossard, Francis; Bernard, Manon; Kaldunski, Mary L; Jomphe, Michele; Tremblay, Johanne; Hudson, Thomas J; Bouchard, Gerard; Kotchen, Theodore A; Cowley, Allen W; Hamet, Pavel

    2005-12-01

    Essential hypertension is a heterogeneous disorder that is thought to develop because of several overlapping subsets of underlying mechanisms. One such causal pathway may involve pathophysiological alterations induced by obesity. In the present study, we examined whether investigating clinically defined subtypes of hypertension, such as obesity-associated hypertension, facilitates the search for its genes. Fifty-five extended families were selected on the basis of having > or =2 siblings affected by hypertension from a geographically remote French-Canadian population. Fifteen of these families showed a high prevalence (> or =70%) of obesity. Genome-wide scan using qualitative multipoint linkage analysis (GeneHunter 2.1; marker density <10 cM) was performed in the entire set of hypertensive families and the subset with high prevalence of obesity. In the scan involving all 55 families, the most significant loci (logarithm of odds [LOD] score=2.5) were identified on chromosomes 1 (D1S1597) and 11 (D11S1999). In the scan including only the subset of families with obesity-hypertension, the most significant locus (LOD score=3.1) was found on chromosome 1 in the same region as the scan involving all families (D1S1597). Genotyping additional markers increased the significance of this locus (LOD score=3.5) and refined its position (D1S2672). Several candidate genes of obesity-hypertension are located in close proximity; these include the tumor necrosis factor receptor 2 and atrial natriuretic peptide genes. These results suggest that investigating clinically defined subtypes of hypertension, such as obesity-associated hypertension, may facilitate the search for genes of this complex disorder.

  16. Diabetes type 2, hypertension and cognitive dysfunction in middle age women.

    PubMed

    Petrova, Marina; Prokopenko, Semen; Pronina, Elena; Mozheyko, Elena

    2010-12-15

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus and hypertension are two widely spread diseases among the adults that are known to be risk factors for vascular disease. They are highly related such that comorbidity is common. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the comorbid effects of type 2 diabetes and hypertension on cognitive decline. One hundred and thirteen patients with type 2 diabetes (women, age 56±7.4 years, diabetes duration 8±6.7 years, hypertension duration 13.4±7.7 years) were assessed for cognitive impairment (CI) in comparison with 27 diabetes patients without hypertension (women, age 53±7.45 years, diabetes duration 4.4±5.6 years), all non-demented at baseline. Patients were screened for cognitive dysfunction with the Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE), a clock-drawing test (CDT) and Frontal Assessment Battery (FAB). We assessed history of DM and hypertension by interview. 87% of women with diabetes and hypertension and 70% of normotensive diabetic patients had cognitive impairment (p=0.0282), of mild and subtle degree. The frequency of alterations in the FAB was higher in subjects with diabetes and hypertension (48%) compared to normotensive diabetic patients (26%) p=0.0402. Our results show that people with diabetes type 2 and hypertension demonstrate greater cognitive changes as compared to normotensive diabetic patients.

  17. The Comorbidities of Diabetes and Hypertension: Mechanisms and Approach to Target Organ Protection

    PubMed Central

    Long, Amanda N.; Dagogo-Jack, Samuel

    2011-01-01

    Up to 75% of adults with diabetes also have hypertension, and patients with hypertension alone often show evidence of insulin resistance. Thus, hypertension and diabetes are common, intertwined conditions that share a significant overlap in underlying risk factors (including ethnicity, familial, dyslipidemia, and lifestyle determinants) and complications. These complications include microvascular and macrovascular disorders. The macrovascular complications, which are well recognized in patients with longstanding diabetes or hypertension, include coronary artery disease, myocardial infarction, stroke, congestive heart failure, and peripheral vascular disease. Although microvascular complications (retinopathy, nephropathy, and neuropathy) are conventionally linked to hyperglycemia, studies have shown that hypertension constitutes an important risk factor, especially for nephropathy. The familial predisposition to diabetes and hypertension appears to be polygenic in origin, which militates against the feasibility of a “gene therapy” approach to the control or prevention of these conditions. On the other hand, the shared lifestyle factors in the etiology of hypertension and diabetes provide ample opportunity for nonpharmacological intervention. Thus, the initial approach to the management of both diabetes and hypertension must emphasize weight control, physical activity, and dietary modification. Interestingly, lifestyle intervention is remarkably effective in the primary prevention of diabetes and hypertension. These principles also are pertinent to the prevention of downstream macrovascular complications of the two disorders. In addition to lifestyle modification, most patients will require specific medications to achieve national treatment goals for hypertension and diabetes. Management of hyperglycemia, hypertension, dyslipidemia and the underlying hypercoagulable and proinflammatory states requires the use of multiple medications in combination. PMID:21466619

  18. [Treatment of hypertension in diabetes: threshold of intervention and therapeutic options].

    PubMed

    Plouin, P F; Lebrun, P; Azizi, M; Day, M

    1992-01-01

    Early screening for hypertension in diabetic patients and for glycoregulation abnormalities in hypertensives is justified by the additive cardiovascular risks when hypertension and diabetes co-exist and by the accelerated development of diabetic nephropathy and retinopathy if hypertension co-exists. In insulin-dependent diabetes, hypertension is generally preceded by microalbuminuria, known to be reduced by angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors. The requirement for nephropathy prevention and the hemodynamic and/or tissular effects of this therapeutic class could justify their use at a blood pressure level less than that conventionally considered hypertensive. This strategy must be confirmed by prospective trials, already underway, evaluating the nephroprotective efficacy of this therapy. In non-insulin-dependent diabetes, hypertension is often present before the diabetes is diagnosed and antihypertensive therapy, especially thiazide diuretics, could play a demasking or favorizing role. The optimal blood pressure level to which these patients at high renal and coronary risk should be lowered still has to be determined. A prospective study, comparing the effects of strict (treated diastolic blood pressure less than 80 mmHg) and less strict (treated diastolic blood pressure between 90 and 100 mmHg) hypertensive control on coronary event prevention in essential hypertension, is in progress and will have important implications for hypertension treatment in diabetics. Appropriate treatment of other risk factors, such as hyperlipidaemia and smoking, contributes to coronary and renal prevention in all diabetic hypertensives. PMID:1639206

  19. The effects of biofeedback in diabetes and essential hypertension.

    PubMed

    McGrady, Angele

    2010-07-01

    The metabolic syndrome is likely to develop in patients in whom genetic predisposition, chronic stress, negative emotion, and unhealthy lifestyle habits converge. In light of the psychophysiologic aspect of most of these factors, biofeedback, relaxation, and other psychophysiologic interventions have been studied and used in patients with elements of the metabolic syndrome, particularly diabetes and hypertension. This article reviews the rationale and evidence for biofeedback for the treatment of diabetes and hypertension, which has been shown to effectively lower blood glucose and blood pressure in numerous studies. Patients with prehypertension may be a particularly appropriate target population for biofeedback for blood pressure reduction. Further research is needed to guide identification of the best candidates for psychophysiologic intervention for these conditions, although patient readiness for change is a clear prerequisite. PMID:20622080

  20. Novel treatment approaches in hypertensive type 2 diabetic patients

    PubMed Central

    Castro Torres, Yaniel; Katholi, Richard E

    2014-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and hypertension represent two common conditions worldwide. Their frequent association with cardiovascular diseases makes management of hypertensive patients with T2DM an important clinical priority. Carvedilol and renal denervation are two promising choices to reduce plasma glucose levels and blood pressure in hypertensive patients with T2DM to reduce future complications and improve clinical outcomes and prognosis. Pathophysiological mechanisms of both options are under investigation, but one of the most accepted is an attenuation in sympathetic nervous system activity which lowers blood pressure and improves insulin sensitivity. Choice of these therapeutic approaches should be individualized based on specific characteristics of each patient. Further investigations are needed to determine when to consider their use in clinical practice. PMID:25126399

  1. Neck Circumference as an Anthropometric Measure of Obesity in Diabetics

    PubMed Central

    Aswathappa, Jagadamba; Garg, Sumit; Kutty, Karthiyanee; Shankar, Vinutha

    2013-01-01

    Background: Obesity is a risk factor for type 2 diabetes mellitus. Insulin resistance is associated with visceral subcutaneous fat content. Neck circumference (NC) is a marker of upper body subcutaneous adipose tissue distribution. Aim: The aim of this study is to compare NC in diabetics and non-diabetics and to correlate NC with other anthropometric measures. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted in 350 type 2 diabetics and 350 non-diabetics of >30 years of age. Anthropometric parameters like body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC), hip circumference, and NC were measured. Independent t-test and Pearson's correlation were the tests of significance done to analyze quantitative data. Results: There was positive correlation of NC, BMI, and index of central obesity. The NC in diabetics was significantly higher than in non-diabetics (P < 0.001). NC >36 cm in diabetics and >37 cm in non-diabetics was the best cutoff value to determine subjects with central obesity. Conclusion: The findings indicated that NC may be used both in clinical practice and in epidemiologic studies as a straightforward and reliable index. It is an economical easy to use test with less consumption of time and correlates well with other standard anthropometric parameters. PMID:23378952

  2. Lifestyle and genetics in obesity and type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Temelkova-Kurktschiev, T; Stefanov, T

    2012-01-01

    Obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus are multifactorial health threats caused by a complex interplay between genetic predisposition and the environment with dramatically increasing worldwide prevalence. The role of heritability in their etiology is well recognized, however, the numerous attempts made in order certain genetic variants determining individual susceptibility to be identified have had limited success, until recently. At present the advancements in human genetics and the utilization of the genome-wide association approach have led to the identification of over 20 genetic loci associated with, respectively obesity and type 2 diabetes. Most of the genes identified to date, however, have modest effect on disease risk suggesting that both diseases are unlikely to develop without the individual being exposed to obesity- and/or type 2 diabetes-promoting environment. Indeed, unhealthy lifestyle, characterized by physical inactivity and food overconsumption is an unequivocally established risk factor for obesity and type 2 diabetes. Numerous epidemiological studies and randomized controlled trials, on the other hand, have demonstrated that lifestyle modification is effective in obesity and type 2 diabetes prevention. Furthermore, gene-lifestyle interaction studies suggest that genetic susceptibility to obesity and type 2 diabetes may be partially or totally kept under control by healthy lifestyle or lifestyle modification and that lifestyle determines whether an individual is likely to develop the disease. Inherited factors, however, seem to influence individual response to a lifestyle intervention program and even the motivation for lifestyle change. Personalized interventions according to genotype may be, therefore, considered in the future. By then lifestyle modification targeting dietary change and increased physical activity may be recommended for successful obesity and type 2 diabetes prevention irrespectively of genetic susceptibility.

  3. Sugar Intake, Obesity, and Diabetes in India

    PubMed Central

    Gulati, Seema; Misra, Anoop

    2014-01-01

    Sugar and sweet consumption have been popular and intrinsic to Indian culture, traditions, and religion from ancient times. In this article, we review the data showing increasing sugar consumption in India, including traditional sources (jaggery and khandsari) and from sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs). Along with decreasing physical activity, this increasing trend of per capita sugar consumption assumes significance in view of the high tendency for Indians to develop insulin resistance, abdominal adiposity, and hepatic steatosis, and the increasing “epidemic” of type 2 diabetes (T2DM) and cardiovascular diseases. Importantly, there are preliminary data to show that incidence of obesity and T2DM could be decreased by increasing taxation on SSBs. Other prevention strategies, encompassing multiple stakeholders (government, industry, and consumers), should target on decreasing sugar consumption in the Indian population. In this context, dietary guidelines for Indians show that sugar consumption should be less than 10% of total daily energy intake, but it is suggested that this limit be decreased. PMID:25533007

  4. Social distribution of diabetes, hypertension and related risk factors in Barbados: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Howitt, Christina; Hambleton, Ian R; Rose, Angela M C; Hennis, Anselm; Samuels, T Alafia; George, Kenneth S; Unwin, Nigel

    2015-01-01

    Objective To describe the distribution of diabetes, hypertension and related behavioural and biological risk factors in adults in Barbados by gender, education and occupation. Design Multistage probability sampling was used to select a representative sample of the adult population (≥25 years). Participants were interviewed using standard questionnaires, underwent anthropometric and blood pressure measurements, and provided fasting blood for glucose and cholesterol measurements. Standard WHO definitions were used. Data were weighted for sampling and non-response, and were age and sex standardised to the 2010 Barbados population. Weighted prevalence estimates were calculated, and prevalence ratios were calculated for behavioural and biological risk factors by demographic and socioeconomic group. Results Study response rate was 55.0%, with 764 women, 470 men. Prevalence of obesity was 33.8% (95% CI 30.7% to 37.1%); hypertension 40.6% (95% CI 36.5% to 44.9%); and diabetes 18.7% (95% CI 16.2% to 21.4%). Compared with women, men were less likely to be obese (prevalence ratio 0.5; 95% CI 0.4 to 0.7), or physically inactive (0.5; 0.4 to 0.6), but more likely to smoke tobacco (4.1; 2.5 to 6.7) and consume large amounts of alcohol in a single episode (4.6; 2.7 to 7.6). Both diabetes (0.83; 0.65 to 1.05) and hypertension (0.89; 0.79 to 1.02) were lower in men, but not significantly so. In women, higher educational level was related to higher fruit and vegetable intake, more physical activity, less diabetes and less hypercholesterolaemia (p 0.01–0.04). In men, higher education was related only to less smoking (p 0.04). Differences by occupation were limited to smoking in men and hypercholesterolaemia in women. Conclusions In this developing country population, sex appears to be a much stronger determinant of behavioural risk factors, as well as obesity and its related risks, than education or occupation. These findings have implications for meeting the commitments made

  5. Diabetes and hypertension screening by pharmacy students in Thai communities.

    PubMed

    Ploylearmsang, Chanuttha; Sookaneknun, Phayom; Poophalee, Thanapong; Pongruea, Piyatida

    2013-04-12

    OBJECTIVE. To integrate pharmacy education into a diabetes and hypertension screening program to improve pharmacy student disease knowledge and screening skills and provide a valuable service to the community. METHODS. One hundred eighty third-year PharmD students were trained and subsequently screened people aged ≥35 years in 2 Thai communities. Those with high risk factors were encouraged to see a pharmacist or nurse for further evaluation and referral to a physician for diagnosis. RESULTS. After training, the third-year students showed significantly higher knowledge scores on diabetes and hypertension than a control group of second-year students (p<0.05). More than 80% of the third-year students were rated by pharmacist observers as having good community screening skills. More than 95% of community participants were satisfied or very satisfied with the screening session. The active screening program improved the screening coverage in the targeted communities from 41 people/month under the passive screening program to 127 people/month and improved the coverage rate over a 6-month period from 24% to 73%. CONCLUSION. This active screening project by pharmacy students enhanced the health knowledge and awareness of members of the targeted communities and increased pharmacy students' knowledge of and ability to screen for hypertension and diabetes.

  6. BR 08-1 HIGH SODIUM INTAKE REDUCTION IN DIABETES WITH HYPERTENSION.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhiming

    2016-09-01

    Management of hypertension in diabetes is critical for reducing cardiovascular mortality and morbidity. Dietary approaches for controlling high blood pressure have historically focused on sodium. Thus, many guidelines recommend that patients with type 2 diabetes reduce high sodium intake. Nonetheless, the potential benefits of sodium reduction are debatable. The kidney has a crucial role in glucose filtration and reabsorption in addition to its regulation of fluid and electrolyte homeostasis. A key factor linking sodium uptake and glucose transport is the sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) in renal proximal tubular cells. In hyperglycemic states, the renal proximal tubule raises its capacity to reabsorb glucose and sodium from the proximal tubule in response to hyperglycemia because of increased SGLT2 activity. Selective SGLT2 inhibitors improve glycemic control and slightly lower blood pressure in diabetic patients.In the past decade, activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) has become a novel effective treatment for cardiometabolic diseases. The kidney differentially expresses all three PPAR subtypes, PPARα, PPARγ and PPARδ. Although PPARγ agonists are widely used to treat type 2 diabetes, sodium and water retention still poses a significant limitation to its clinical application. PPARδ is expressed ubiquitously, including in adipose tissues and the kidney. The activation of PPARδ alleviates dyslipidemia, hyperglycemia, and insulin resistance in rodents of obesity and diabetes. Importantly, PPARδ activation by its agonists exerts renal protective effects in diabetic mice. Furthermore, the PPARδ agonists increased adipose adiponectin expression, which are shown to exert multiple beneficial effects against cardiometabolic disorders. However, it is unknown whether PPARδ can regulate renal sodium handing and glucose transport. We hypothesized that PPARδ participates in sodium transport and glucose reabsorption in the kidney

  7. Hypertension Despite Dehydration During Severe Pediatric Diabetic Ketoacidosis

    PubMed Central

    Deeter, Kristina H.; Roberts, Joan S.; Bradford, Heidi; Richards, Todd; Shaw, Dennis; Marro, Kenneth; Chiu, Harvey; Pihoker, Catherine; Lynn, Anne; Vavilala, Monica S.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) may result in both dehydration and cerebral edema but these processes may have opposing effects on blood pressure. We examined the relationship between dehydration and blood pressure in pediatric DKA. Design Retrospective review Setting Seattle Children's Hospital, Seattle, WA Participants Hospitalized children less than 18 years. Intervention(s) or Main Exposures DKA (venous pH < 7.3, glucose > 300 mg/dL, HCO3 < 15 meq/l and urinary ketosis). Outcome Measures Dehydration was calculated as percent body weight lost at admission compared to discharge. Hypertension (systolic and/or diastolic blood pressure percentile ≥ 95%ile) was defined based on 2004 National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute nomograms and hypotension was defined as systolic blood pressure < 70 + 2 [age] Results Thirty-three patients (median 10.9 years; range 10 months - 17 years) were included. Fifty-eight percent of patients (19/33) had hypertension on admission prior to treatment and 82% had hypertension during the first 6 hours of admission. None had admission hypotension. Hypertension forty-eight hours after treatment and weeks after discharge was common (28% and 19%, respectively). Based on weight gained by discharge, 27% of patients had mild, 61% had moderate, and 12% presented with severe dehydration. Conclusion Despite dehydration, most children admitted with severe DKA had hypertension. PMID:21443581

  8. Oxidative Damage and Inflammation in Obese Diabetic Emirati Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Gariballa, Salah; Kosanovic, Melita; Yasin, Javed; El Essa, Awad

    2014-01-01

    Visceral obesity is more common in the Arab population and more closely related to morbidity, including diabetes and related cardiovascular diseases (CVD). Possible mechanisms that link visceral fat/obesity to diabetes and CVD complications include inflammation and increased oxidative stress; however, few data are available from the Arab population. Our aim was to determine whether increased adiposity in obese diabetic United Arab Emirates citizens is associated with sub-clinical inflammation and/or increased oxidative stress. A hundred diabetic patients who were part of a randomized controlled trial of nutritional supplements had their baseline characteristics assessed from anthropometric and clinical data following informed written consent. We used WHO figures to classify general and central obesity. Fasting blood samples were collected for the measurement of antioxidants and markers of oxidative damage and inflammation. We found that increased adiposity measured by both body mass index and waist circumference was associated with increased C-reactive protein (CRP) and decreased vitamin C after adjusting for age, duration and treatment of diabetes (p < 0.05). Although there is a clear trend of increased inflammatory markers, notably CRP, and decreased antioxidants with increased BMI and waist circumference in both men and women, the results are statistically significant for women only. CRP were also inversely associated with HDL. Overall, we found that BMI underestimates the rates of obesity compared to waist circumference and that increased adiposity is associated with increased inflammation and decreased HDL and antioxidant status. PMID:25375631

  9. Is the Association of Hypertension with Cardiovascular Events Stronger Among the Lean and Normal Weight than Among the Overweight and Obese? The Mesa Study

    PubMed Central

    Colangelo, Laura A; Vu, Thanh-Huyen T; Szklo, Moyses; Burke, Gregory L; Sibley, Christopher; Liu, Kiang

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies that suggest the association of hypertension with cardiovascular disease (CVD) events is stronger in the lean/normal weight than in the obese have either included smokers, diabetics, or cancer patients, or did not account for central obesity. This study examines the interaction of adiposity with hypertension on CVD events using BMI-based definitions of overweight and obesity as well as waist circumference (WC) to assess adiposity. In the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis, we classified 3657 nonsmoking men and women, free of baseline clinical CVD, diabetes and cancer, into 7 BMI-WC combinations defined by ethnicity-specific BMI (normal, overweight, class 1 obese, and class 2/3 obese) and ethnicity- and sex-specific WC categories (optimal or nonoptimal). Adjusted absolute event rates per 1000 person-years and relative risks (RRs) (95% confidence intervals) for CVD events for hypertension (BP ≥ 140/90 or taking medication) vs. no hypertension computed within adiposity categories were: 9.3 vs. 1.9 and 4.96 (2.56-9.60) for normal BMI/optimal WC, 13.2 vs. 4.2 and 3.13 (0.99-9.86) for normal BMI/nonoptimal WC, 9.0 vs. 4.5 and 2.00 (1.19-3.36) for overweight BMI/optimal WC, 8.4 vs. 5.6 and 1.50 (0.88-2.54) for overweight BMI/nonoptimal WC,14.1 vs. 2.1 and 6.75 (0.69-65.57) for class 1 obese/optimal WC, 10.1 vs. 3.7 and 2.69 (1.41-5.16) for class 1 obese/nonoptimal WC, and 9.9 vs. 6.9 and 1.45(0.60-3.52) for class 2/3 obese/WC pooled. This study found a large RR of CVD events associated with hypertension for normal BMI participants and more importantly similarly high absolute risks for both normal and obese BMI with hypertension. PMID:26077561

  10. Is the association of hypertension with cardiovascular events stronger among the lean and normal weight than among the overweight and obese? The multi-ethnic study of atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Colangelo, Laura A; Vu, Thanh-Huyen T; Szklo, Moyses; Burke, Gregory L; Sibley, Christopher; Liu, Kiang

    2015-08-01

    Previous studies that suggest the association of hypertension with cardiovascular disease (CVD) events is stronger in the lean/normal weight than in the obese have either included smokers, diabetics, or cancer patients, or did not account for central obesity. This study examines the interaction of adiposity with hypertension on CVD events using body mass index (BMI)-based definitions of overweight and obesity, as well as waist circumference (WC) to assess adiposity. In the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis, we classified 3657 nonsmoking men and women, free of baseline clinical CVD, diabetes mellitus and cancer, into 7 BMI-WC combinations defined by ethnicity-specific BMI (normal, overweight, class 1 obese, and class 2/3 obese) and ethnicity- and sex-specific WC categories (optimal or nonoptimal). Adjusted absolute event rates per 1000 person-years and relative risks (95% confidence intervals) for CVD events for hypertension (blood pressure ≥140/90 or taking medication) versus no hypertension computed within adiposity categories were 9.3 versus 1.9 and 4.96 (2.56-9.60) for normal BMI/optimal WC, 13.2 versus 4.2 and 3.13 (0.99-9.86) for normal BMI/nonoptimal WC, 9.0 versus 4.5 and 2.00 (1.19-3.36) for overweight BMI/optimal WC, 8.4 versus 5.6 and 1.50 (0.88-2.54) for overweight BMI/nonoptimal WC,14.1 versus 2.1 and 6.75 (0.69-65.57) for class 1 obese/optimal WC, 10.1 versus 3.7 and 2.69 (1.41-5.16) for class 1 obese/nonoptimal WC, and 9.9 versus 6.9 and 1.45(0.60-3.52) for class 2/3 obese/WC pooled. This study found a large relative risk of CVD events associated with hypertension for normal BMI participants and more importantly similarly high absolute risks for both normal and obese BMI with hypertension.

  11. Potential health concerns of dietary phosphorus: cancer, obesity, and hypertension.

    PubMed

    Anderson, John J B

    2013-10-01

    Adult Americans typically consume on average 1400 mg, or more, of phosphorus (P) daily in meals, which almost doubles the recommended dietary allowance. After a meal phosphorus is rapidly absorbed at a high efficiency and hormonal mechanisms act swiftly to maintain the serum inorganic phosphate (Pi) concentration within fairly narrow limits. Both parathyroid hormone (PTH) and fibroblast growth factor-23 (FGF-23) reduce serum phosphate during postprandial periods through homeostatic actions on the kidney. However, it is speculated that exposure of cells to a brief high-serum Pi concentration may signal alterations in cell functions that lead to deleterious effects. Elevation of serum FGF-23 or PTH may also be harmful to specific cell types. Examples of possible adverse health effects include cancer, obesity, and hypertension. Here I review potential mechanisms through which high-P intake may contribute to cell metabolic abnormalities and the development of chronic disease; high-dietary phosphorus, especially from foods processed with phosphate salts, may be associated with these chronic diseases. Further investigation is needed to establish the significance of high-phosphate diets within a large segment of the U.S. population with normal renal function.

  12. [Intracranial hypertension in severe diabetic ketoacidosis with coma. Two cases].

    PubMed

    Blanc, P L; Bedock, B; Jay, S; Martin, A; Marc, J M

    1994-11-19

    We observed two cases of severe diabetic ketoacidosis with coma and shock. In one case, coma was present at admission and in the second occurred within 15 hours. In both cases, intracranial hypertension was confirmed with an extradural captor. These findings are in agreement with observations of brain oedema in diabetic ketoacidosis with coma. Clinical data suggest that brain oedema may occur after a latency period but that clinical expression is much more rare, perhaps favoured by treatment (excessive rehydratation, alkalinization, too sharp drop in blood glucose level). In our cases, despite major fluid infusion, shock persisted requiring norepinephrine. This shock could have been the expression of the severe ketoacidosis or have resulted from an underlying infection. In case of sudden onset coma, a regularly encountered manifestation of brain oedema, respiratory assistance and mannitol infusion must be instituted rapidly. With this type of management, it should be possible to improve the severe prognosis of brain oedema in diabetic ketoacidosis. PMID:7899292

  13. Preventive Effect of Boiogito on Metabolic Disorders in the TSOD Mouse, a Model of Spontaneous Obese Type II Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Shimada, Tsutomu; Akase, Tomoko; Kosugi, Mitsutaka; Aburada, Masaki

    2011-01-01

    “Boiogito” is a Kampo preparation which has been used since ancient times in patients with obesity of the “asthenic constitution” type, so-called “watery obesity”, and its effect has been recognized clinically. In this study, we investigated the anti-obesity effect of Boiogito in the TSOD (Tsumura Suzuki Obese Diabetes) mouse, a model of spontaneous obese type II diabetes mellitus. Boiogito showed a significant anti-obesity effect in TSOD mice by suppressing body weight gain in a dosage-dependent manner. In addition, Boiogito showed significant ameliorative effects on features of metabolic syndrome such as hyperinsulinemia, fasting hyperglycemia and abnormal lipid metabolism. Regarding lipid accumulation in TSOD mice, Boiogito showed a significant suppressive effect on accumulation of subcutaneous fat, but the effect on the visceral fat accumulation that constitutes the basis of metabolic syndrome was weak, and the suppressive effect on insulin resistance was also weak. Furthermore, Boiogito did not alleviate the abnormal glucose tolerance, the hypertension or the peripheral neuropathy characteristically developed in the TSOD mice. In contrast, in the TSNO (Tsumura Suzuki Non-Obesity) mice used as controls, Boiogito suppressed body weight gain and accumulation of subcutaneous and visceral fat. The above results suggested that Boiogito is effective as an anti-obesity drug against obesity of the “asthenic constitution” type in which subcutaneous fat accumulates, but cannot be expected to exert a preventive effect against various symptoms of metabolic syndrome that are based on visceral fat accumulation. PMID:19208721

  14. How effective are antioxidant supplements in obesity and diabetes?

    PubMed

    Abdali, Daniyal; Samson, Sue E; Grover, Ashok Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is a central health issue due to its epidemic prevalence and its association with type 2 diabetes and other comorbidities. Obesity is not just being overweight. It is a metabolic disorder due to the accumulation of excess dietary calories into visceral fat and the release of high concentrations of free fatty acids into various organs. It represents a state of chronic oxidative stress and low-grade inflammation whose intermediary molecules may include leptin, adiponectin and cytokines. It may progress to hyperglycemia, leading to type 2 diabetes. Whether or not dietary antioxidant supplements are useful in the management of obesity and type 2 diabetes is discussed in this review. Only the benefits for obesity and diabetes are examined here. Other health benefits of antioxidants are not considered. There are difficulties in comparing studies in this field because they differ in the time frame, participants' ethnicity, administration of antioxidant supplements, and even in how obesity was measured. However, the literature presents reasonable evidence for marginal benefits of supplementation with zinc, lipoic acid, carnitine, cinnamon, green tea, and possibly vitamin C plus E, although the evidence is much weaker for omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, coenzyme Q10, green coffee, resveratrol, or lycopene. Overall, antioxidant supplements are not a panacea to compensate for a fast-food and video-game way of living, but antioxidant-rich foods are recommended as part of the lifestyle. Such antioxidant foods are commonly available. PMID:25791371

  15. Obesity and Coronary Artery Calcium in Diabetes: The Coronary Artery Calcification in Type 1 Diabetes (CACTI) Study

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Ticiana C.; Veyna, Adrienne M.; Haarhues, Michelle D.; Kinney, Gregory L.; Rewers, Marian

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background The aim was to examine whether excess weight is associated with coronary artery calcium (CAC), independent of metabolic parameters in adults with type 1 diabetes (T1D). Methods Subjects between 19 and 56 years of age with T1D (n=621) from the Coronary Artery Calcification in Type 1 Diabetes study were classified as abnormal on four metabolic parameters: blood pressure ≥130/85 mm Hg or on antihypertensive treatment; high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol of <40 mg/dL for men or <50 mg/dL for women; triglycerides of ≥150 mg/dL; or C-reactive protein of ≥3 μg/mL. Study participants with two or more abnormal parameters were classified as metabolically abnormal. Weight categories by body mass index were normal (<25 kg/m2), overweight (25 to <30 kg/m2), and obese (≥30 kg/m2). CAC was measured at two visits 6.0±0.5 years apart. Progression of CAC was defined as an increase in square root transformed CAC volume of ≥2.5 mm3 or development of clinical coronary artery disease. Results Among subjects with T1D, 48% of normal, 61% of overweight, and 73% of obese participants were classified as metabolically abnormal (P<0.0001). Overweight and obesity were independently associated with presence of CAC, independent of presence of metabolically abnormal. Obesity but not overweight was associated with CAC progression, independent of the other cardiovascular risk factors. Conclusions Although obesity is known to increase cardiovascular disease risk through inducing metabolic abnormalities such as dyslipidemia, hypertension, and inflammation, it is also a strong predictor of subclinical atherosclerosis progression in adults with T1D independent of these factors. PMID:21770813

  16. Dysfunction of human subcutaneous fat arterioles in obesity alone or obesity associated with Type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Georgescu, Adriana; Popov, Doina; Constantin, Anamaria; Nemecz, Miruna; Alexandru, Nicoleta; Cochior, Daniel; Tudor, Aura

    2011-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the effects of obesity alone and obesity associated with Type 2 diabetes on the structure, vascular reactivity and response to insulin of isolated human subcutaneous fat arterioles; these effects were correlated with the expression of insulin signalling proteins. Periumbilical subcutaneous adipose tissue was explanted during surgery, small arterioles (internal diameter 220 ± 40 μm) were dissected out and investigated by electron microscopy, myography and immunoblotting. Compared with the subcutaneous arterioles of lean subjects, obesity activated the endothelium, enhanced the accumulation of collagen within vascular wall and increased the sensitivity of adrenergic response; obesity also diminished eNOS (endothelial NO synthase) protein expression, NO production, and endothelium-dependent and insulin-induced vasodilatation, as well as the protein expression of both IRS (insulin receptor substrates)-1 and IRS-2 and of the downstream molecules in the insulin signalling pathway, such as PI3K (phosphoinositide 3-kinase), phospho-Akt and Akt. When obesity was associated with Type 2 diabetes, these changes were significantly augmented. In conclusion, obesity alone or obesity associated with Type 2 diabetes alters human periumbilical adipose tissue arterioles in terms of structure, function and biochemsitry, including diminished eNOS expression and reduced levels of IRS-1, IRS-2, PI3K and Akt in the insulin signalling pathway. PMID:20979575

  17. Plasma adiponectin: a contributing factor for cardiac changes in visceral obesity-associated hypertension.

    PubMed

    Di Chiara, Tiziana; Licata, Anna; Argano, Christiano; Duro, Giovanni; Corrao, Salvatore; Scaglione, Rosario

    2014-06-01

    This study has been designed to evaluate the impact of adiponectin levels on left ventricular geometry and function in visceral obesity-associated hypertension. 94 consecutive subjects, 53 of them were hypertensives and 41 normotensives with age ≤ 65 years, subgrouped according to the presence or absence of visceral obesity, were studied. Total adiponectin levels were measured by a validated competitive radioimmunoassay. Left ventricular telediastolic internal diameter, interventricular septum, posterior wall thickness, total left ventricular mass (LVM) and normalized for height to the 2.7 power (LVM/h(2.7)), relative wall thickness, left ventricular ejection fraction by echocardiography and isovolumic relaxation time, E/A ratio and deceleration time of E velocity, by pulsed-wave Doppler, were calculated. Plasma adiponectin levels were significantly lower in visceral obesity-associated hypertensives than lean hypertensives (p < 0.001) and in lean normotensives (p < 0.001). LVM and LVM/h(2.7) were significantly (p < 0.05) higher in both hypertensive groups, and in visceral obesity-associated normotensives in comparison with lean normotensives. Adiponectin levels correlated inversely with LVM/h(2.7) but only in normotensives (adjusted R squared 0.77, p < 0.0001) and hypertensives (0.67, p < 0.0001) subjects with visceral obesity. Multiple regression analysis indicated that adiponectin levels remain significantly associated (p < 0.001) to LVM/h(2.7) also when adjusted for age, gender, body mass index, waist to hip ratio and mean blood pressure. Our data suggest an important role of adiponectin in increased LVM/h(2.7) in visceral obesity-associated normotensive and hypertensive subjects. In this last group, adiponectin, more than blood pressure, may be able to explain the development of cardiac damage.

  18. The evil axis of obesity, inflammation and type-2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Das, Arghya; Mukhopadhyay, Sangita

    2011-03-01

    Obesity and type 2 diabetes (T2D) are global problems affecting all age groups and have been characterized as lifestyle disorders. Though no study has clearly proved a direct correlation between obesity and T2D, a number of factors are associated with obesity causing insulin resistance and T2D. The factors such as adipokines and various transcription factors help to maintain a proper metabolic state in the body. Deregulation in any of these signalling balances due to obesity may trigger an inflammatory cascade which could lead to the aforesaid problems of insulin resistance and T2D. In this review, we have discussed the factors that probably link inflammation to obesity-induced insulin resistance and subsequently T2D and the possible therapeutic opportunities to decrease health risk of T2D in future. PMID:21348821

  19. Serotonin as a New Therapeutic Target for Diabetes Mellitus and Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Chang-Myung; Park, Sangkyu

    2016-01-01

    Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine [5-HT]) is a monoamine that has various functions in both neuronal and non-neuronal systems. In the central nervous system, 5-HT regulates mood and feeding behaviors as a neurotransmitter. Thus, there have been many trials aimed at increasing the activity of 5-HT in the central nervous system, and some of the developed methods are already used in the clinical setting as anti-obesity drugs. Unfortunately, some drugs were withdrawn due to the development of unwanted peripheral side effects, such as valvular heart disease and pulmonary hypertension. Recent studies revealed that peripheral 5-HT plays an important role in metabolic regulation in peripheral tissues, where it suppresses adaptive thermogenesis in brown adipose tissue. Inhibition of 5-HT synthesis reduced the weight gain and improved the metabolic dysfunction in a diet-induced obesity mouse model. Genome-wide association studies also revealed genetic associations between the serotonergic system and obesity. Several genetic polymorphisms in tryptophan hydroxylase and 5-HT receptors were shown to have strong associations with obesity. These results support the clinical significance of the peripheral serotonergic system as a therapeutic target for obesity and diabetes. PMID:27126880

  20. Maternal obesity and the developmental programming of hypertension: a role for leptin.

    PubMed

    Taylor, P D; Samuelsson, A-M; Poston, L

    2014-03-01

    Mother-child cohort studies have established that both pre-pregnancy body mass index (BMI) and gestational weight gain are independently associated with cardio-metabolic risk factors in young adult offspring, including systolic and diastolic blood pressure. Animal models in sheep and non-human primates provide further evidence for the influence of maternal obesity on offspring cardiovascular function, whilst recent studies in rodents suggest that perinatal exposure to the metabolic milieu of maternal obesity may permanently change the central regulatory pathways involved in blood pressure regulation. Leptin plays an important role in the central control of appetite, is also involved in activation of efferent sympathetic pathways to both thermogenic and non-thermogenic tissues, such as the kidney, and is therefore implicated in obesity-related hypertension. Leptin is also thought to have a neurotrophic role in the development of the hypothalamus, and altered neonatal leptin profiles secondary to maternal obesity are associated with permanently altered hypothalamic structure and function. In rodent studies, maternal obesity confers persistent sympathoexcitatory hyper-responsiveness and hypertension acquired in the early stages of development. Experimental neonatal hyperleptinaemia in naive rat pups provides further evidence of heightened sympathetic tone and proof of principle that hyperleptinaemia during a critical window of hypothalamic development may directly lead to adulthood hypertension. Insight from these animal models raises the possibility that early-life exposure to leptin in humans may lead to early onset essential hypertension. Ongoing mother-child cohort and intervention studies in obese pregnant women provide a unique opportunity to address associations between maternal obesity and offspring cardiovascular function. The goal of the review is to highlight the potential importance of leptin in the developmental programming of hypertension in obese

  1. Renin inhibitors in diabetes and hypertension: an update

    PubMed Central

    Sen, Selcuk; Ufuktepe, Baran; Özünal, Zeynep Günes; Üresin, Yagiz

    2014-01-01

    The coexistence of hypertension and diabetes increases the incidence of cardiovascular events and long-term morbidity and mortality. Blood pressure should be controlled with the most appropriate drugs as well as tight blood glucose control in patients with diabetes and hypertension. RAAS (Renin Angiotensin Aldosterone System) blockers have an important role in the treatment of these patients, in this sense, ACEi and ARB remained the major treatment option in hypertension guidelines. The most recent RAAS blocker to be approved by the FDA was aliskiren in 2007, a renin inhibitor. Studies showed that aliskiren is as effective as other antihypertensive drugs and has a safety profile similar to placebo. The potent renin inhibitor aliskiren directly inhibits the RAAS system at its rate limiting step and differently from other RAAS blockers; it decreases plasma renin activity (PRA). Although the relationship of increased PRA levels and cardiovascular risk has been shown, it is unclear if the PRA decrease provided by aliskiren has an impact on clinical outcomes and cardiovascular endpoints. On the other hand, large trials like ASPIRE, AVANT-GARDE, ALTITUDE, ASTRONAUT, which investigated the combination of aliskiren with other RAAS blockers, failed to show the expected outcomes or resulted with an increased incidence of adverse effects, which raised more questions. As a result of the ALTITUDE trial, combination of aliskiren with an ACEi or ARB is not recommended in patients with hypertension and diabetes, or at least moderate renal dysfunction. Trials designed to prove aliskiren's efficacy in new indications like diabetes, may face similar problems related to dual RAAS blockade because in the majority of cases, the optimal treatment is achieved with an ACEi or ARB. In this conjuncture, the increase in adverse events seen with aliskiren might be related to dual RAAS blockade rather than aliskiren directly. For instance, it is unclear whether the adverse event incidence would

  2. Cardiovascular manifestations of renovascular hypertension in diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Kashyap, Sonu; Engel, Sean; Osman, Mazen; Al-Saiegh, Yousif; Wongjarupong, Asarn; Grande, Joseph P

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. Type 2 diabetes is the leading cause of end stage renal disease in the United States. Atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis is commonly observed in diabetic patients and impacts the rate of renal and cardiovascular disease progression. We sought to test the hypothesis that renovascular hypertension, induced by unilateral renal artery stenosis, exacerbates cardiac remodeling in leptin-deficient (db/db) mice, which serves as a model of human type II diabetes. Methods. We employed a murine model of renovascular hypertension through placement of a polytetrafluoroethylene cuff on the right renal artery in db/db mice. We studied 109 wild-type (non-diabetic, WT) and 95 db/db mice subjected to renal artery stenosis (RAS) or sham surgery studied at 1, 2, 4, and 6+ weeks following surgery. Cardiac remodeling was assessed by quantitative analysis of the percent of myocardial surface area occupied by interstitial fibrosis tissue, as delineated by trichrome stained slides. Aortic pathology was assessed by histologic sampling of grossly apparent structural abnormalities or by section of ascending aorta of vessels without apparent abnormalities. Results. We noted an increased mortality in db/db mice subjected to RAS. The mortality rate of db/db RAS mice was about 23.5%, whereas the mortality rate of WT RAS mice was only 1.5%. Over 60% of mortality in the db/db mice occurred in the first two weeks following RAS surgery. Necropsy showed massive intrathoracic hemorrhage associated with aortic dissection, predominantly in the ascending aorta and proximal descending aorta. Aortas from db/db RAS mice showed more smooth muscle dropout, loss of alpha smooth muscle actin expression, medial disruption, and hemorrhage than aortas from WT mice with RAS. Cardiac tissue from db/db RAS mice had more fibrosis than did cardiac tissue from WT RAS mice. Conclusions. db/db mice subjected to RAS are prone to develop fatal aortic dissection, which is not observed in WT mice with RAS. The db

  3. Antihypertensive effect of alpha- and beta-adrenergic blockade in obese and lean hypertensive subjects.

    PubMed

    Wofford, M R; Anderson, D C; Brown, C A; Jones, D W; Miller, M E; Hall, J E

    2001-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the contribution of the adrenergic system in mediating hypertension in obese and lean patients. Thirteen obese, hypertensive patients with a body mass index (BMI) > or =28 kg/m2 (obese) and nine lean patients with a BMI < or =25 kg/m2 (lean) were recruited. After a 1-week washout period, participants underwent daytime ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM). Participants were then treated with the alpha-adrenergic antagonist doxazosin, titrating to 4 mg QHS in 1 week. In the next week, the beta-adrenergic antagonist atenolol was added at an initial dose of 25 mg/day and titrated to 50 mg/day within 1 week. One month after the addition of atenolol, all patients underwent a second ABPM session. There were no differences between the obese and lean subjects in baseline systolic (SBP), diastolic (DBP), or mean arterial pressures (MAP) measured by office recording or ABPM. However, obese subjects had higher heart rates than lean subjects (87.5+/-2.4 v 76.8+/-4.9 beats/min). After 1 month of treatment with the adrenergic blockers, obese patients had a significantly lower SBP (130.0+/-2.5 v 138.9+/-2.1 mm Hg, P = .02) and MAP (99.6+/-2.3 v 107.0+/-1.5 mm Hg, P = .02) than lean patients. Obese patients also tended to have a lower DBP than lean patients (84.3+/-2.5 v 90.9+/-1.6 mm Hg, P = .057), but there was no significant difference in heart rate after 1 month of adrenergic blockade. These results indicate that blood pressure is more sensitive to adrenergic blockade in obese than in lean hypertensive patients and suggest that increased sympathetic activity may be an important factor in the maintenance of hypertension in obesity.

  4. [Type 2 diabetes, obesity and nutrition, a paradigm shift].

    PubMed

    Bourcelot, Emilie; Combes, Jérôme

    2016-05-01

    Obesity and type 2 diabetes are two complex and multifactorial chronic diseases. Nutritional management is based on an educational and bio-psycho-sensory approach centred on the patient using cognitive-behavioural and emotionally-focused therapy tools. PMID:27157552

  5. Ayurvedic concept of obesity, metabolic syndrome, and diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Hari; Chandola, H M

    2011-06-01

    Obesity, metabolic syndrome, and diabetes mellitus are increasing to epidemic proportions globally. There are 400 million clinically obese adults worldwide and there are more than 220 million people who have diabetes. The global impact of these disorders is immense in terms of human suffering and economic burden. There is an urgent need for a more effective understanding of these disease processes and their management, including the use of natural strategies that are affordable and efficacious. The health care system known as Ayurveda has much to offer in this regard. Ayurveda describes a set of complex clinical disorders, collectively called Prameha, that are characterized by frequent abnormal micturition. The clinical conditions associated with Prameha correlate in many ways with obesity, metabolic syndrome, and diabetes mellitus. The etiology, classification, pathogenesis, and management of Prameha are discussed at length and in detail in the Ayurvedic texts. The theoretical background and comprehensive set of strategies Ayurveda utilizes to treat Prameha may be valuable in managing obesity, metabolic syndrome, and diabetes mellitus in an efficacious and cost-effective manner. PMID:21649521

  6. Epigenetics in adipose tissue, obesity, weight loss and diabetes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Given the role that the diet and other environmental factors play in the development of obesity and type 2 diabetes, the implication of different epigenetic processes is being investigated. Although it is well known that the environmental factors can cause cell type-dependent epigenetic changes, inc...

  7. Myotubes from Severely Obese Type 2 Diabetic Subjects Accumulate Less Lipids and Show Higher Lipolytic Rate than Myotubes from Severely Obese Non-Diabetic Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Bakke, Siril S.; Kase, Eili T.; Moro, Cedric; Stensrud, Camilla; Damlien, Lisbeth; Ludahl, Marianne O.; Sandbu, Rune; Solheim, Brita Marie; Rustan, Arild C.; Hjelmesæth, Jøran; Thoresen, G. Hege; Aas, Vigdis

    2015-01-01

    About 80% of patients with type 2 diabetes are classified as overweight. However, only about 1/3 of severely obese subjects have type 2 diabetes. This indicates that several severely obese individuals may possess certain characteristics that protect them against type 2 diabetes. We therefore hypothesized that this apparent paradox could be related to fundamental differences in skeletal muscle lipid handling. Energy metabolism and metabolic flexibility were examined in human myotubes derived from severely obese subjects without (BMI 44±7 kg/m2) and with type 2 diabetes (BMI 43±6 kg/m2). Lower insulin sensitivity was observed in myotubes from severely obese subjects with type 2 diabetes. Lipolysis rate was higher, and oleic acid accumulation, triacylglycerol content, and fatty acid adaptability were lower in myotubes from severely obese subjects with type 2 diabetes compared to severely obese non-diabetic subjects. There were no differences in lipid distribution and mRNA and protein expression of the lipases HSL and ATGL, the lipase cofactor CGI-58, or the lipid droplet proteins PLIN2 and PLIN3. Glucose and oleic acid oxidation were also similar in cells from the two groups. In conclusion, myotubes established from severely obese donors with established type 2 diabetes had lower ability for lipid accumulation and higher lipolysis rate than myotubes from severely obese donors without diabetes. This indicates that a difference in intramyocellular lipid turnover might be fundamental in evolving type 2 diabetes. PMID:25790476

  8. Obesity and type 2 diabetes in children: epidemiology and treatment.

    PubMed

    Pulgaron, Elizabeth R; Delamater, Alan M

    2014-08-01

    The incidence of overweight and obesity among children has increased dramatically in recent decades, with about one-third of children in the U.S. currently being either overweight or obese. Being overweight in early childhood increases risk for later obesity. There is evidence for the efficacy of family-based behavioral treatment to control weight and improve health outcomes. Obesity-related health risks have been documented, including metabolic syndrome. There is also increasing incidence of type 2 diabetes (T2D) among youth in recent years, with obesity and family history of T2D generally present. Lower income and ethnic minority status are associated with both obesity and T2D in youth. Most youth with T2D do not achieve optimal glycemic control, and are at high risk for later health complications. Obesity and T2D represent significant public health issues with potentially great personal and societal cost. Research addressing the prevention of obesity and T2D among youth is urgently needed.

  9. Obesity and Type 2 Diabetes in Children: Epidemiology and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Pulgaron, Elizabeth R.; Delamater, Alan M.

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of overweight and obesity among children has increased dramatically in recent decades, with about one-third of children in the U.S. currently being either overweight or obese. Being overweight in early childhood increases risk for later obesity. There is evidence for the efficacy of family-based behavioral treatment to control weight and improve health outcomes. Obesity-related health risks have been documented, including metabolic syndrome. There is also increasing incidence of type 2 diabetes (T2D) among youth in recent years, with obesity and family history of T2D generally present. Lower income and ethnic minority status are associated with both obesity and T2D in youth. Most youth with T2D do not achieve optimal glycemic control, and are at high risk for later health complications. Obesity and T2D represent significant public health issues with potentially great personal and societal cost. Research addressing the prevention of obesity and T2D among youth is urgently needed. PMID:24919749

  10. Inflammation in Maternal Obesity and Gestational Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Pantham, Priyadarshini; Aye, Irving L. M. H; Powell, Theresa L.

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of maternal obesity is rising rapidly worldwide and constitutes a major obstetric problem, increasing mortality and morbidity in both mother and offspring. Obese women are predisposed to pregnancy complications such as gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), and children of obese mothers are more likely to develop cardiovascular and metabolic disease in later life. Maternal obesity and GDM may be associated with a state of chronic, low-grade inflammation termed “metainflammation”, as opposed to an acute inflammatory response. This inflammatory environment may be one mechanism by which offspring of obese women are programmed to develop adult disorders. Herein we review the evidence that maternal obesity and GDM are associated with changes in the maternal, fetal and placental inflammatory profile. Maternal inflammation in obesity and GDM may not always be associated with fetal inflammation. We propose that the placenta ‘senses’ and adapts to the maternal inflammatory environment, and plays a central role as both a target and producer of inflammatory mediators. In this manner, maternal obesity and GDM may indirectly program the fetus for later disease by influencing placental function. PMID:25972077

  11. Differences in emotional distress among inpatients with type 1, obese type 2, and non-obese type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Miyawaki, Yoshiko; Iwahashi, Hiromi; Okauchi, Yukiyoshi; Sudo, Yoshiko; Fujiwara, Yuko; Omote, Yayoko; Imagawa, Akihisa; Shimomura, Iichiro

    2015-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to determine the differences in emotional distress among three groups of inpatients with type 1, obese type 2, and non-obese type 2 diabetes during hospitalization. Methods The 42 participating inpatients were divided into three groups: type 1 diabetes (n=11), obese type 2 diabetes [body mass index (BMI) ≥25 kg/m(2); n=24], and non-obese type 2 diabetes (BMI <25 kg/m(2); n=7). The Problem Areas in Diabetes (PAID) scale, which is a self-administered questionnaire to assess emotional distress in the patients with diabetes, was performed at admission and discharge. Results The total PAID score was similar and tended to improve during hospitalization in all three groups, although there were differences among the groups in the scores of particular questions. At admission, the score of the question "worrying about low blood sugar reactions?" was significantly different among the three groups and highest in the patients with type 1 diabetes. At discharge, the score of "not accepting diabetes?" was significantly different among the three groups and highest in the patients with non-obese type 2 diabetes, while that of "feeling unsatisfied with your diabetes physician?" was significantly different among the three groups and highest in the patients with obese type 2 diabetes. The score of "feelings of deprivation regarding food and meals?" significantly worsened in the patients with obese type 2 diabetes during hospitalization compared with the patients in with non-obese type 2 diabetes. Conclusion The characteristics of emotional distress during hospitalization varied among the patients with the three types of diabetes, thus emphasizing the importance of tailoring support according to the type of diabetes.

  12. Differences in emotional distress among inpatients with type 1, obese type 2, and non-obese type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Miyawaki, Yoshiko; Iwahashi, Hiromi; Okauchi, Yukiyoshi; Sudo, Yoshiko; Fujiwara, Yuko; Omote, Yayoko; Imagawa, Akihisa; Shimomura, Iichiro

    2015-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to determine the differences in emotional distress among three groups of inpatients with type 1, obese type 2, and non-obese type 2 diabetes during hospitalization. Methods The 42 participating inpatients were divided into three groups: type 1 diabetes (n=11), obese type 2 diabetes [body mass index (BMI) ≥25 kg/m(2); n=24], and non-obese type 2 diabetes (BMI <25 kg/m(2); n=7). The Problem Areas in Diabetes (PAID) scale, which is a self-administered questionnaire to assess emotional distress in the patients with diabetes, was performed at admission and discharge. Results The total PAID score was similar and tended to improve during hospitalization in all three groups, although there were differences among the groups in the scores of particular questions. At admission, the score of the question "worrying about low blood sugar reactions?" was significantly different among the three groups and highest in the patients with type 1 diabetes. At discharge, the score of "not accepting diabetes?" was significantly different among the three groups and highest in the patients with non-obese type 2 diabetes, while that of "feeling unsatisfied with your diabetes physician?" was significantly different among the three groups and highest in the patients with obese type 2 diabetes. The score of "feelings of deprivation regarding food and meals?" significantly worsened in the patients with obese type 2 diabetes during hospitalization compared with the patients in with non-obese type 2 diabetes. Conclusion The characteristics of emotional distress during hospitalization varied among the patients with the three types of diabetes, thus emphasizing the importance of tailoring support according to the type of diabetes. PMID:26466689

  13. Obesity, diabetes, and length of time in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Tsujimoto, Tetsuro; Kajio, Hiroshi; Sugiyama, Takehiro

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Obesity prevalence remains high in the United States (US), and is rising in most other countries. This is a repeated cross-sectional study using a nationally representative sample of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 1999 to 2012. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were separately performed for adults (n = 37,639) and children/adolescents (n = 28,282) to assess the associations between the length of time in the US, and the prevalences of obesity and diabetes. In foreign-born adults, the prevalences of both obesity and diabetes increased with the length of time in the US, and ≥20 years in the US was associated with significantly higher rates of obesity (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 2.32, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.22–4.40, P = 0.01) and diabetes (aOR 4.22, 95% CI 1.04–17.08, P = 0.04) compared with <1 year in the US. In children/adolescents, obesity prevalence was significantly higher in those born in the US than those who had been in the US for <1 year (aOR 3.15, 95% CI 1.51–6.56, P = 0.002). When analyzed by year, obesity prevalence was significantly higher in US-born than in foreign-born adults from 1999 to 2012. On the other hand, the gap in obesity prevalence between US-born and foreign-born children/adolescents decreased from 1999 to 2011 due to a rapid increase in obesity prevalence among the foreign-born population, until there was no significant difference in 2011 to 2012. This study revealed that the risks of obesity and diabetes have increased in foreign-born US residents with time living in the US. However, the obesity gap between US-born and foreign-born populations is closing. PMID:27583867

  14. Hypertension and insulin resistance are not directly related in obese dogs.

    PubMed

    Rocchini, Albert P; Yang, John Q; Gokee, Amy

    2004-05-01

    In dogs fed a high-fat diet, we determined whether there was a direct relation between obesity-induced insulin resistance and obesity-induced hypertension. Thirty-six adult mongrel dogs were chronically instrumented and assigned to receive either a high-fat diet alone (n=7) or a high-fat diet combined with a low-sodium diet plus furosemide (n=6), prazosin plus atenolol (n=7), clonidine (n=10), or aspirin (n=6). Blood pressure, heart rate, and body weight were measured daily. Insulin resistance was assessed with a single-dose euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp (2 mU x kg(-1) x min(-1)) before and after 1, 3, and 6 weeks of the high-fat diet. The low-salt diet plus furosemide, prazosin plus atenolol, and clonidine treatments prevented the hypertension associated with feeding the dogs a high-fat diet. Only clonidine treatment totally prevented the development of insulin resistance, and high-dose aspirin, known to prevent insulin resistance by inhibition of the activity of IkappaB kinase-beta, decreased the degree of insulin resistance by almost 70%. However, aspirin had no effect on the development of hypertension. We conclude that obesity-induced hypertension and obesity-induced insulin resistance are not directly related. In addition, there is a suggestion that insulin resistance in this experimental model is mediated through the central and or peripheral alpha2-adrenoceptors, whereas hypertension is mediated through the alpha1- and or beta-adrenoceptors.

  15. [Rational therapy of patients with essential hypertension and abdominal obesity with concomitant subclinical hypothyroidism].

    PubMed

    Pligovka, V M

    2014-11-01

    It was determined the characteristics of lipid status of patients with essential hypertension, abdominal obesity with concomitant subclinical hypothyroidism--mostly increased levels of total and LDL cholesterol. In assessing the effectiveness of statin therapy in combination with levothyroxine replacement therapy compared with statin monotherapy, combination therapy showed the best result in terms of achievement of target levels of both total cholesterol and LDL. The obtained results allow us to recommend the use of combination therapy for patients with hypertension, abdominal obesity with concomitant subclinical hypothyroidism in order to achieve the target values of LDL and thus to reduce the cardiovascular risk of these patients.

  16. Risk Factors for Subclinical Atherosclerosis in Diabetic and Obese Children

    PubMed Central

    Faienza, Maria Felicia; Acquafredda, Angelo; Tesse, Riccardina; Luce, Vincenza; Ventura, Annamaria; Maggialetti, Nicola; Monteduro, Mariantonietta; Giordano, Paola; Cavallo, Luciano

    2013-01-01

    Background. Increased carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT) is considered a marker of early-onset atherosclerosis and it seems to predict cardiovascular events both in obese and diabetic subjects. We aimed to evaluate early signs of atherosclerosis and investigate for predisposing factors in children and adolescents affected by type 1 diabetes (T1DM) or obesity, comparing them with healthy controls. Methods. Out of 71 enrolled subjects (mean age 12.8 ± 2.3 years), 26 had T1DM and 24 were obese, while 21 age- and sex-matched subjects acted as controls. cIMT was measured using standardized methods. Serum glucose, insulin, cholesterol, triglycerides and C-reactive protein levels were evaluated. An oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) was performed in obese subjects. Results. Diabetic and obese individuals showed higher cIMT mean values than healthy controls (p<0.005). cIMT of the three examined segments correlated positively with fasting glucose levels and negatively with units of insulin/kg/day administered in T1DM individuals. A positive correlation between insulin levels (basal and after oral glucose load) and cIMT of common, internal and external carotid artery was found in obese subjects (p<0.03). High density cholesterol levels represented a protective factor for cIMT in this latter group of the study population. Conclusions. Our findings show that cIMT correlates with high insulin levels (a sign of insulin resistance) in obese patients and with high fasting glucose levels (a sign of relative insulin deficiency) in T1DM subjects, confirming the need of reducing hyperinsulinism and monitoring blood glucose levels in these subjects to prevent atherosclerosis. PMID:23423872

  17. Comparison of the relationships of alcoholic and nonalcoholic fatty liver with hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and dyslipidemia

    PubMed Central

    Toshikuni, Nobuyuki; Fukumura, Atsushi; Hayashi, Nobuhiko; Nomura, Tomoe; Tsuchishima, Mutsumi; Arisawa, Tomiyasu; Tsutsumi, Mikihiro

    2013-01-01

    We compared the relationships of alcoholic fatty liver and nonalcoholic fatty liver with hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and dyslipidemia. Using a nationwide Japanese survey, we collected data on subjects with biopsy-proven alcoholic fatty liver or nonalcoholic fatty liver. Multiple logistic regression analysis was performed to determine whether alcoholic fatty liver and nonalcoholic fatty liver are associated factors for these diseases. Data on 191 subjects (65, alcoholic fatty liver; 126, nonalcoholic fatty liver) were analyzed. Alcoholic fatty liver (odds ratio, 2.54; 95% confidence interval, 1.06–6.32; p = 0.040), age ≥55 years, and body mass index ≥25 kg/m2 were correlated with hypertension, whereas nonalcoholic fatty liver (odds ratio, 2.32; 95% confidence interval, 1.08–5.20; p = 0.035) and serum γ-glutamyl transpeptidase levels ≥75 IU/l were correlated with dyslipidemia. Furthermore, we found that there were biological interactions between alcoholic fatty liver and body mass index ≥25 kg/m2 in ≥55-year-old subjects (attributable proportion due to interaction, 0.68; 95% confidence interval, 0.19–1.17), as well as between alcoholic fatty liver and age ≥55 years in subjects with body mass index ≥25 kg/m2 (attributable proportion due to interaction, 0.71; 95% confidence interval, 0.24–1.18). Alcoholic fatty liver was more strongly associated with hypertension than nonalcoholic fatty liver and nonalcoholic fatty liver was more strongly associated with dyslipidemia than alcoholic fatty liver. Moreover, alcoholic fatty liver, obesity, and older age may interact to influence hypertension status. PMID:23341703

  18. Treating Diabetes and Prediabetes by Focusing on Obesity Management

    PubMed Central

    Khaodhiar, Lalita; Cummings, Sue; Apovian, Caroline M.

    2010-01-01

    Obesity is associated with an increased risk of developing insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). In obesity, the adipose cell releases non-esterified free fatty acids, hormones, adipocytokines, and other substances that are involved in insulin resistance. Under normal conditions, the pancreatic islet β cells increase production of insulin sufficiently to maintain normal blood glucose concentrations despite insulin resistance. However, in genetically predisposed patients, the β cells eventually become dysfunctional and T2DM develops. The development of T2DM can be delayed or sometimes prevented in individuals with obesity who are able to lose weight. Weight loss can be achieved medically with behavioral therapies that combine diet and exercise treatment or with behavioral therapies combined with weight-loss medications or weight-loss surgery. In this article, we summarize the evidence of obesity management in treating T2DM and prediabetes. PMID:19793504

  19. Treating diabetes and prediabetes by focusing on obesity management.

    PubMed

    Khaodhiar, Lalita; Cummings, Sue; Apovian, Caroline M

    2009-10-01

    Obesity is associated with an increased risk of developing insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). In obesity, the adipose cell releases nonesterified free fatty acids, hormones, adipocytokines, and other substances that are involved in insulin resistance. Under normal conditions, the pancreatic islet beta cells increase production of insulin sufficiently to maintain normal blood glucose concentrations despite insulin resistance. However, in genetically predisposed patients, the beta cells eventually become dysfunctional and T2DM develops. The development of T2DM can be delayed or sometimes prevented in individuals with obesity who are able to lose weight. Weight loss can be achieved medically with behavioral therapies that combine diet and exercise treatment or with behavioral therapies combined with weight-loss medications or weight-loss surgery. In this article, we summarize the evidence of obesity management in treating T2DM and prediabetes.

  20. Diabetes Remission after Nonsurgical Intensive Lifestyle Intervention in Obese Patients with Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Mottalib, Adham; Sakr, Mahmoud; Shehabeldin, Mohamed; Hamdy, Osama

    2015-01-01

    Partial or complete remission from type 2 diabetes was recently observed after bariatric surgeries. Limited data is available about the possibility of inducing diabetes remission through intensive weight reduction. We retrospectively evaluated diabetes remissions after one year of the Weight Achievement and Intensive Treatment (Why WAIT) program, a 12-week intensive program for diabetes weight management in real-world clinical practice. Among 120 obese patients with type 2 diabetes who completed the program, 88 patients returned for follow-up at one year. Nineteen patients (21.6%) had major improvement in their glycemic control, defined as achieving an A1C <6.5% after one year. Four patients (4.5%) achieved either partial or complete diabetes remission defined as A1C <6.5% and <5.7%, respectively, on no antihyperglycemic medications for one year; 2 achieved partial remission (2.3%) and 2 achieved complete remission (2.3%). At the time of intervention, patients who achieved diabetes remission had shorter diabetes duration (<5 years) and lower A1C (<8%) and were treated with fewer than 2 oral medications. They achieved a weight reduction of >7% after 12 weeks. These results indicate that a subset of obese patients with type 2 diabetes is appropriate for intensive lifestyle intervention with the aim of inducing diabetes remission. PMID:26114120

  1. Obesity and diabetes genes are associated with being born small for gestational age: Results from the Auckland Birthweight Collaborative study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Individuals born small for gestational age (SGA) are at increased risk of rapid postnatal weight gain, later obesity and diseases in adulthood such as type 2 diabetes, hypertension and cardiovascular diseases. Environmental risk factors for SGA are well established and include smoking, low pregnancy weight, maternal short stature, maternal diet, ethnic origin of mother and hypertension. However, in a large proportion of SGA, no underlying cause is evident, and these individuals may have a larger genetic contribution. Methods In this study we tested the association between SGA and polymorphisms in genes that have previously been associated with obesity and/or diabetes. We undertook analysis of 54 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 546 samples from the Auckland Birthweight Collaborative (ABC) study. 227 children were born small for gestational age (SGA) and 319 were appropriate for gestational age (AGA). Results and Conclusion The results demonstrated that genetic variation in KCNJ11, BDNF, PFKP, PTER and SEC16B were associated with SGA and support the concept that genetic factors associated with obesity and/or type 2 diabetes are more prevalent in those born SGA compared to those born AGA. We have previously determined that environmental factors are associated with differences in birthweight in the ABC study and now we have demonstrated a significant genetic contribution, suggesting that the interaction between genetics and the environment are important. PMID:20712903

  2. Prevalence of hypertension, obesity, hematuria and proteinuria amongst healthy adolescents living in Western Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Hothan, Kholoud A.; Alasmari, Bashaer A.; Alkhelaiwi, Omniya K.; Althagafi, Khalid M.; Alkhaldi, Abdulaziz A.; Alfityani, Ahmed K.; Aladawi, Mohannad M.; Sharief, Sara N.; Desoky, Sherif El; Kari, Jameela A.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the prevalence of hypertension, obesity, hematuria, and proteinuria among healthy adolescents and to determine the associated risk factors. Methods: This is a cross-sectional study of 8 intermediate schools in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia between March 2015 and June 2015. Samples were selected randomly and equal proportions from each school for both genders were ensured. Both blood pressure and body mass index were measured and a brief questionnaire was filled out for the specified studied group. Urine dipstick analysis was carried out for 294 children. A second questionnaire was completed for hypertensive and obese subjects in addition to those with hematuria and proteinuria. Results: A total of 401 children (200 males) with a mean (SD) age of 13.87 (1.27) were included. Hypertension was found in 17.2% with a male to female ratio of 1.4:1. Pre-hypertension was found in 4.2% of our sample with a male to female ratio of 2.1:1. Obesity was found in 19.2% with a male to female ratio of 1.5:1. Obesity was found to be the most significant risk factor for hypertension with a related risk: 2.87, 95% and confidence interval: 1.9-4.3. For urine abnormalities, 10.2% of samples were positive for proteinuria, 17% for hematuria, and 3.1% for both. Conclusion: It was found that there is a positive correlation between the incidence of obesity and hypertension in adolescents. Hematuria and proteinuria were also found to be high. Screening and prevention programs are therefore recommended. PMID:27652364

  3. Imaging of Organ Metabolism in Obesity and Diabetes: Treatment Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Hannukainen, J C; Guzzardi, M A; Virtanen, K A; Sanguinetti, E; Nuutila, P; Iozzo, P

    2014-01-01

    Obesity and diabetes are growing threats for cardiovascular diseases (CVD) and heart failure. In order to identify early and effective treatment or prevention targets, it is fundamental to dissect the role of each organ and the sequence of events leading from health to obesity, diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. The advancements in imaging modalities to evaluate organ-specific metabolism in humans in vivo is substantially contributing to the stratification of risk, identification of organ-specific culprits and development of targeted treatment strategies. This review summarizes the contribution provided by imaging of the heart, skeletal muscle, adipose tissue, liver, pancreas, gut and brain to the understanding of the pathogenesis and cardio-metabolic complications of obesity and diabetes, and to the monitoring of treatment responses in humans. We conclude by suggesting emerging fields of investigation, including the role of cardiac fat in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease, the conversion of white into brown adipose tissue in the treatment of obesity, the control of weight and energy balance by the brain, the integration between omics and imaging technologies to help establish biomarkers, and the characterization of gut metabolism in relation with the gut microbiome, opening a very promising preventive/therapeutic perspective.

  4. Opposing tissue-specific roles of angiotensin in the pathogenesis of obesity, and implications for obesity-related hypertension.

    PubMed

    Littlejohn, Nicole K; Grobe, Justin L

    2015-12-15

    Metabolic disease, specifically obesity, has now become the greatest challenge to improving cardiovascular health. The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) exists as both a circulating hormone system and as a local paracrine signaling mechanism within various tissues including the brain, kidney, and adipose, and this system is strongly implicated in cardiovascular health and disease. Growing evidence also implicates the RAS in the control of energy balance, supporting the concept that the RAS may be mechanistically involved in the pathogenesis of obesity and obesity hypertension. Here, we review the involvement of the RAS in the entire spectrum of whole organism energy balance mechanisms, including behaviors (food ingestion and spontaneous physical activity) and biological processes (digestive efficiency and both aerobic and nonaerobic resting metabolic rates). We hypothesize that opposing, tissue-specific effects of the RAS to modulate these various components of energy balance can explain the apparently paradoxical results reported by energy-balance studies that involve stimulating, versus disrupting, the RAS. We propose a model in which such opposing and tissue-specific effects of the RAS can explain the failure of simple, global RAS blockade to result in weight loss in humans, and hypothesize that obesity-mediated uncoupling of endogenous metabolic rate control mechanisms can explain the phenomenon of obesity-related hypertension.

  5. Adolescent obesity, change in weight status, and hypertension: racial/ethnic variations.

    PubMed

    Suglia, Shakira F; Clark, Cari J; Gary-Webb, Tiffany L

    2013-02-01

    We sought to determine whether change in weight status between adolescence and young adulthood was associated with the risk of developing hypertension among adolescents and whether sex and racial/ethnic group differences existed in the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health. The sample was restricted to participants who self-identified as black, Hispanic, or white non-Hispanic (n=8543). Height and weight were measured in adolescence (mean 16 years) and again in adulthood (mean 29 years). We categorized the weight of participants into 4 groups: stayed normal weight; gained weight (normal weight in adolescence and obese in adulthood); lost weight (overweight/obese in adolescence nonobese in adulthood); and chronically overweight/obese. Hypertension was defined as measured systolic blood pressure of at least 140 mm Hg or diastolic blood pressure of at least 90 mm Hg measured in adulthood or use of antihypertensive medications. A higher risk of hypertension was noted for all sex and racial/ethnic groups who became obese in adulthood. Furthermore, those who were chronically overweight/obese were at higher risk of hypertension for all groups, with odds ratios ranging from 2.7 in Hispanic men to 6.5 in Hispanic women. Except for black men, those who lost weight during follow-up had no significant increased risk compared with those who maintained normal weight. Overall, there was an increased risk of hypertension for those who gained weight in adulthood and among those who remained obese from adolescence to young adulthood. These data give further evidence for prevention strategies that begin earlier in life to reduce or delay the onset of chronic disease in young adults.

  6. [Resistant hypertension].

    PubMed

    Feldstein, Carlos A

    2008-04-01

    Resistant hypertension, defined as a persistent blood pressure over 140/90 mmHg despite the use of three antihypertensive drugs including a diuretic, is unusual. The diagnosis requires ruling out initially pseudoresistance and a lack of compliance with treatment. Ambulatory blood pressure recording allow the recognition of white coat hypertension. When there is a clinical or laboratory suspicion, secondary causes of hypertension should be discarded. Excessive salt intake, the presence of concomitant diseases such as diabetes mellitus, chronic renal disease, obesity, and psychiatric conditions such as panic attacks, anxiety and depression, should also be sought. The presence of target organ damage requires a more aggressive treatment of hypertension. Recent clinical studies indicate that the administration of aldosterone antagonists as a fourth therapeutic line provides significant additional blood pressure reduction, when added to previous antihypertensive regimens in subjects with resistant hypertension. The possible blood pressure lowering effects of prolonged electrical activation of carotid baroreceptors is under investigation. PMID:18769797

  7. [Resistant hypertension].

    PubMed

    Feldstein, Carlos A

    2008-04-01

    Resistant hypertension, defined as a persistent blood pressure over 140/90 mmHg despite the use of three antihypertensive drugs including a diuretic, is unusual. The diagnosis requires ruling out initially pseudoresistance and a lack of compliance with treatment. Ambulatory blood pressure recording allow the recognition of white coat hypertension. When there is a clinical or laboratory suspicion, secondary causes of hypertension should be discarded. Excessive salt intake, the presence of concomitant diseases such as diabetes mellitus, chronic renal disease, obesity, and psychiatric conditions such as panic attacks, anxiety and depression, should also be sought. The presence of target organ damage requires a more aggressive treatment of hypertension. Recent clinical studies indicate that the administration of aldosterone antagonists as a fourth therapeutic line provides significant additional blood pressure reduction, when added to previous antihypertensive regimens in subjects with resistant hypertension. The possible blood pressure lowering effects of prolonged electrical activation of carotid baroreceptors is under investigation.

  8. A proteomic approach to obesity and type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    López-Villar, Elena; Martos-Moreno, Gabriel Á; Chowen, Julie A; Okada, Shigeru; Kopchick, John J; Argente, Jesús

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of obesity and type diabetes 2 has increased dramatically resulting in an increased interest in its biomedical relevance. However, the mechanisms that trigger the development of diabetes type 2 in obese patients remain largely unknown. Scientific, clinical and pharmaceutical communities are dedicating vast resources to unravel this issue by applying different omics tools. During the last decade, the advances in proteomic approaches and the Human Proteome Organization have opened and are opening a new door that may be helpful in the identification of patients at risk and to improve current therapies. Here, we briefly review some of the advances in our understanding of type 2 diabetes that have occurred through the application of proteomics. We also review, in detail, the current improvements in proteomic methodologies and new strategies that could be employed to further advance our understanding of this pathology. By applying these new proteomic advances, novel therapeutic and/or diagnostic protein targets will be discovered in the obesity/Type 2 diabetes area. PMID:25960181

  9. A proteomic approach to obesity and type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    López-Villar, Elena; Martos-Moreno, Gabriel Á; Chowen, Julie A; Okada, Shigeru; Kopchick, John J; Argente, Jesús

    2015-07-01

    The incidence of obesity and type diabetes 2 has increased dramatically resulting in an increased interest in its biomedical relevance. However, the mechanisms that trigger the development of diabetes type 2 in obese patients remain largely unknown. Scientific, clinical and pharmaceutical communities are dedicating vast resources to unravel this issue by applying different omics tools. During the last decade, the advances in proteomic approaches and the Human Proteome Organization have opened and are opening a new door that may be helpful in the identification of patients at risk and to improve current therapies. Here, we briefly review some of the advances in our understanding of type 2 diabetes that have occurred through the application of proteomics. We also review, in detail, the current improvements in proteomic methodologies and new strategies that could be employed to further advance our understanding of this pathology. By applying these new proteomic advances, novel therapeutic and/or diagnostic protein targets will be discovered in the obesity/Type 2 diabetes area.

  10. Managing hypertension in diabetic patients – focus on trandolapril/verapamil combination

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Sanjib Kumar; Ruggenenti, Piero; Remuzzi, Giuseppe

    2007-01-01

    Hypertensive diabetes individuals are at higher risk for cardiovascular events and progression to end stage renal disease. Several well conducted clinical trials indicate that aggressive treatment of hypertension in individual with diabetes reduces these complications. Combinations of two or more antihypertensive drugs are frequently required to reach the target blood pressure and to improve the cardiovascular and renal outcomes in these patients. There are physiological and clinical rationales for renin-angiotensin system blockade in hypertensive diabetics. Trandolapril/verapamil sustained released (SR) is a fixed-dose combination of trandolapril and a sustained release formulation of verapamil and indicated in treatment of hypertension in patients who require more than one drug to reach target blood pressure. The antihypertensive efficacy of trandolapril/verapamil SR has been evaluated extensively in large trials. In the INVEST trial, a verapamil SR-based treatment strategy that included trandolapril in most patients was effective in reducing the primary outcome in hypertensive patients with coronary artery disease. The new onset of diabetes was also significantly lower in the verapamil SR/trandolapril treatment group in comparison with those on the atenolol/hydroclorothiazide treatment group. The BErgamo NEphrologic DIabetes Complications Trial (BENEDICT) documented that in hypertensive diabetes and normoalbuminuria, trandolapril plus verapamil or trandolapril alone delayed the onset of microalbuminuria independent of their blood pressure-reducing effect. Thus, trandolapril/verapamil is an effective option for treatment of hypertensive diabetes patients requiring more than one agent to achieve target blood pressure. PMID:17969376

  11. Comparative Study of Epidemiological and Anthropological Aspects of Diabetes and Hypertension in Cameroon

    PubMed Central

    Tsabang, N; Fongnzossie, E; Donfack, D; Yedjou, CG; Tchounwou, PB; Minkande, JZ; Nouedou, C; Van, PD; Sonwa

    2016-01-01

    The traditional medicine in Africa in general and specifically in Cameroon does not manage diabetes and arterial hypertension very well. Yet, these pathologies are becoming more prevalent among the populations that need adequate knowledge to fight against them. Therefore the present study was designed to determine the knowledge, attitudes and practices of indigenous people regarding diabetes and hypertension control, and to assess the epidemiological aspects of these diseases in order to reinforce their health education and promote a better health care through traditional medicine. To achieve this objective, 1,131 households including 70 traditional healers, 114 diabetics, 167 hypertensive patients, 30 hypertensive patients-diabetics and other Cameroonians were questioned on their ethnomedical knowledge of diabetes and arterial hypertension. Fifty-eight randomly distributed tribes were taking in account. The elucidation of anthropological and epidemiological aspects of diabetes and hypertension improved the beliefs of indigenous people and facilitated the modernization of diabetes and hypertension comprehension that remained focused on the elucidation of diseases' causes and complications, as well as on the behaviors that could help translate biomedical terms into locally meaningful metaphors.

  12. Comparative Study of Epidemiological and Anthropological Aspects of Diabetes and Hypertension in Cameroon

    PubMed Central

    Tsabang, N; Fongnzossie, E; Donfack, D; Yedjou, CG; Tchounwou, PB; Minkande, JZ; Nouedou, C; Van, PD; Sonwa

    2016-01-01

    The traditional medicine in Africa in general and specifically in Cameroon does not manage diabetes and arterial hypertension very well. Yet, these pathologies are becoming more prevalent among the populations that need adequate knowledge to fight against them. Therefore the present study was designed to determine the knowledge, attitudes and practices of indigenous people regarding diabetes and hypertension control, and to assess the epidemiological aspects of these diseases in order to reinforce their health education and promote a better health care through traditional medicine. To achieve this objective, 1,131 households including 70 traditional healers, 114 diabetics, 167 hypertensive patients, 30 hypertensive patients-diabetics and other Cameroonians were questioned on their ethnomedical knowledge of diabetes and arterial hypertension. Fifty-eight randomly distributed tribes were taking in account. The elucidation of anthropological and epidemiological aspects of diabetes and hypertension improved the beliefs of indigenous people and facilitated the modernization of diabetes and hypertension comprehension that remained focused on the elucidation of diseases' causes and complications, as well as on the behaviors that could help translate biomedical terms into locally meaningful metaphors. PMID:27708987

  13. Timing of bariatric surgery in people with obesity and diabetes.

    PubMed

    Busetto, Luca

    2015-05-01

    The use of bariatric surgery in the clinical management of type 2 diabetes in severely obese subjects has been included in the clinical practice recommendations released by the most influential diabetologic associations. However, the timing during the diabetic course in which this use may have the better benefit/risk ratio remains debated. Is it better to use surgery very early in the course of the disease in order to anticipate clinical deterioration, or we should favour a delayed approach in which we reserve the more risky surgery only to patients not adequately controlled with the maximal pharmacologic strategy? In this paper, past and recent evidences about the role of bariatric surgery in the different stages of the clinical course of type 2 diabetes have been revised, starting from pre-diabetes and ending to long-standing diabetic state with established or end-stage macro- and micro-vascular complications. Available evidences strongly advocate in favor of the application of bariatric surgery in the early phase of this course, possibly in the pre-diabetic or in very early diabetic stages. To reserve surgery to more advanced and complicated stages of the disease seems to confer less benefits for the clinical course of diabetes and exposes these more frail patients to the possible side effects of a rapid weight loss.

  14. Prevalence of hypertension and diabetes and coexistence of chronic kidney disease and cardiovascular risk in the population of the republic of moldova.

    PubMed

    Codreanu, Igor; Sali, Vera; Gaibu, Sergiu; Suveica, Luminita; Popa, Sergiu; Perico, Norberto; Ene-Iordache, Bogdan; Carminati, Sergio; Feehally, John; Remuzzi, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    In 2005, the International Society of Nephrology (ISN) established the Global Outreach Program (GO) aimed at building a capacity for detecting and managing chronic kidney disease and its complications in low- and middle-income countries. Here we report data from the 2006-2007 screening program (1025 subjects from the general population) in the Republic of Moldova aimed to determine the prevalence of hypertension, diabetes, and their coexistence with microalbuminuria. The likelihood of a serious cardiovascular (CV) event was also estimated. Hypertension and diabetes were very common among screened subjects. The prevalence of microalbuminuria was 16.9% and that of estimated GFR <60 ml/min/1.73 m(2) (decreased renal function) was 9.4%. Male gender was associated with an increased prevalence of hypertension and microalbuminuria. Hypertension and diabetes clustered in subjects with microalbuminuria and renal dysfunction. Risk factors such as preobesity/obesity, physical inactivity and smoking were relatively common, even in younger participants. The prevalence of subjects with predicted 10-year CV risk ≥10% was 10.0%. In conclusion, in the Republic of Moldova patients with hypertension and diabetes should be screened for the coexistence of renal abnormalities, with the intention of developing disease-specific health-care interventions with the primary goal to reduce CV morbidity and mortality and prevent renal disease progression to end stage renal disease.

  15. Association of socioeconomic status with diagnosis, treatment and control of hypertension in diabetic hypertensive individuals in Bangladesh: a population-based cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    H, Syed Emdadul; Islam, Md. Jahirul; Mostofa, Md. Golam; Saadat, Khandakar ASM

    2015-01-01

    Objectives This study aimed to examine if socioeconomic status could affect the likelihood of diagnosis, treatment and control of hypertension in diabetic hypertensive individuals. Design Cross-sectional nationally representative study. Settings Bangladesh. Participants This paper used data from the 2011 Bangladesh Demographic Health Survey. The analyses were based on the responses of 339 diabetes hypertensive individuals. Main outcome measures Diagnosis, treatment and control of hypertension. Results The age-adjusted prevalence of hypertension in diabetes individuals was 38.4% in the study population. Among diabetic hypertensive subjects only 65.7% had been diagnosed, 58.4% were receiving treatment and 42% controlled their hypertension. Individuals from high socioeconomic status (AOR 2.60; 95% CI 1.16–5.83) had an increased likelihood of reporting diagnosis of hypertension. Individuals from medium (AOR 2.22; 95% CI 1.11–4.46) and high socioeconomic status (AOR 3.47; 95% CI 1.59–7.58) had increased chance of receiving treatment. In addition, individuals belonging to high socioeconomic status (AOR 2.53; 95% CI 1.14–5.63) were more likely to report of controlling hypertension. Conclusions This study indicated that hypertension is more prevalent among diabetic patients. Furthermore, diabetic hypertensive patients from the low socioeconomic status group are also less likely to be diagnosed and also less likely to receive treatment for hypertension. In addition, diabetic hypertensive patients from the low socioeconomic status were less likely to control hypertension compared with an individual belonging to the high socioeconomic status group. This reduced likelihood of receiving proper treatment will lead to a rapid increase in the prevalence of macrovascular and microvascular diseases among diabetic hypertensive patients. PMID:26688743

  16. Hypertension, obesity, and coronary artery disease in the survivors of congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Roche, S Lucy; Silversides, Candice K

    2013-07-01

    Obesity, hypertension, and coronary artery disease are prevalent in the general population and well recognized as contributors to cardiac morbidity and mortality. With surgical and medical advances, there is a growing and aging population with congenital heart disease who are also at risk of developing these comorbidities. In addition, some congenital cardiac lesions predispose patients to conditions such as hypertension or coronary artery disease. The effect of these comorbidities on the structurally abnormal heart is not well understood, but might be very important, especially in those with residual abnormalities. Thus, in addition to surveillance for and treatment of late complications it is important for the congenital cardiologist to consider and aggressively manage acquired comorbidities. In this review we explore the prevalence of hypertension, obesity, and coronary artery disease, discuss congenital lesions that predispose to these conditions and review management strategies for this unique population.

  17. Enhanced ROS production and oxidative damage in subcutaneous white adipose tissue mitochondria in obese and type 2 diabetes subjects.

    PubMed

    Chattopadhyay, Mrittika; Khemka, Vineet Kumar; Chatterjee, Gargi; Ganguly, Anirban; Mukhopadhyay, Satinath; Chakrabarti, Sasanka

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress in the insulin target tissues has been implicated in the pathophysiology of type 2 diabetes. The study has examined the oxidative stress parameters in the mitochondria of subcutaneous white adipose tissue from obese and non-obese subjects with or without type 2 diabetes. An accumulation of protein carbonyls, fluorescent lipid peroxidation products, and malondialdehyde occurs in the adipose tissue mitochondria of obese type 2 diabetic, non-diabetic obese, and non-obese diabetic subjects with the maximum increase noticed in the obese type 2 diabetes patients and the minimum in non-obese type 2 diabetics. The mitochondria from obese type 2 diabetics, non-diabetic obese, and non-obese type 2 diabetics also produce significantly more reactive oxygen species (ROS) in vitro compared to those of controls, and apparently the mitochondrial ROS production rate in each group is proportional to the respective load of oxidative damage markers. Likewise, the mitochondrial antioxidant enzymes like superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase show decreased activities most markedly in obese type 2 diabetes subjects and to a lesser degree in non-obese type 2 diabetes or non-diabetic obese subjects in comparison to control. The results imply that mitochondrial dysfunction with enhanced ROS production may contribute to the metabolic abnormality of adipose tissue in obesity and diabetes.

  18. Leptin Induces Hypertension and Endothelial Dysfunction via Aldosterone-Dependent Mechanisms in Obese Female Mice

    PubMed Central

    Huby, Anne-Cecile; Otvos, Laszlo; Belin de Chantemèle, Eric J.

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease in males and females. Whether obesity triggers cardiovascular disease via similar mechanisms in both the sexes is, however, unknown. In males, the adipokine leptin highly contributes to obesity-related cardiovascular disease by increasing sympathetic activity. Females secrete 3× to 4× more leptin than males, but do not exhibit high sympathetic tone with obesity. Nevertheless, females show inappropriately high aldosterone levels that positively correlate with adiposity and blood pressure (BP). We hypothesized that leptin induces hypertension and endothelial dysfunction via aldosterone-dependent mechanisms in females. Leptin control of the cardiovascular function was analyzed in female mice sensitized to leptin via the deletion of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1b (knockout) and in agouti yellow obese hyperleptinemic mice (Ay). Hypersensitivity to leptin (wild-type, 115±2; protein tyrosine phosphatase 1b knockout, 124±2 mm Hg; P<0.05) and obesity elevated BP (a/a, 113±1; Ay, 128±7 mm Hg; P<0.05) and impaired endothelial function. Chronic leptin receptor antagonism restored BP and endothelial function in protein tyrosine phosphatase 1b knockout and Ay mice. Hypersensitivity to leptin and obesity reduced BP response to ganglionic blockade in both strains and plasma catecholamine levels in protein tyrosine phosphatase 1b knockout mice. Hypersensitivity to leptin and obesity significantly increased plasma aldosterone levels and adrenal CYP11B2 expression. Chronic leptin receptor antagonism reduced aldosterone levels. Furthermore, chronic leptin and mineralocorticoid receptor blockade reduced BP and improved endothelial function in both leptin-sensitized and obese hyperleptinemic female mice. Together, these data demonstrate that leptin induces hypertension and endothelial dysfunction via aldosterone-dependent mechanisms in female mice and suggest that obesity leads to cardiovascular disease via sex

  19. Leptin Induces Hypertension and Endothelial Dysfunction via Aldosterone-Dependent Mechanisms in Obese Female Mice.

    PubMed

    Huby, Anne-Cécile; Otvos, Laszlo; Belin de Chantemèle, Eric J

    2016-05-01

    Obesity is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease in males and females. Whether obesity triggers cardiovascular disease via similar mechanisms in both the sexes is, however, unknown. In males, the adipokine leptin highly contributes to obesity-related cardiovascular disease by increasing sympathetic activity. Females secrete 3× to 4× more leptin than males, but do not exhibit high sympathetic tone with obesity. Nevertheless, females show inappropriately high aldosterone levels that positively correlate with adiposity and blood pressure (BP). We hypothesized that leptin induces hypertension and endothelial dysfunction via aldosterone-dependent mechanisms in females. Leptin control of the cardiovascular function was analyzed in female mice sensitized to leptin via the deletion of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1b (knockout) and in agouti yellow obese hyperleptinemic mice (Ay). Hypersensitivity to leptin (wild-type, 115 ± 2; protein tyrosine phosphatase 1b knockout, 124 ± 2 mm Hg; P<0.05) and obesity elevated BP (a/a, 113 ± 1; Ay, 128 ± 7 mm Hg; P<0.05) and impaired endothelial function. Chronic leptin receptor antagonism restored BP and endothelial function in protein tyrosine phosphatase 1b knockout and Ay mice. Hypersensitivity to leptin and obesity reduced BP response to ganglionic blockade in both strains and plasma catecholamine levels in protein tyrosine phosphatase 1b knockout mice. Hypersensitivity to leptin and obesity significantly increased plasma aldosterone levels and adrenal CYP11B2 expression. Chronic leptin receptor antagonism reduced aldosterone levels. Furthermore, chronic leptin and mineralocorticoid receptor blockade reduced BP and improved endothelial function in both leptin-sensitized and obese hyperleptinemic female mice. Together, these data demonstrate that leptin induces hypertension and endothelial dysfunction via aldosterone-dependent mechanisms in female mice and suggest that obesity leads to cardiovascular disease via sex

  20. Rapid identification of diabetic patients with essential hypertension sensitive to acebutolol.

    PubMed

    Passa, P; Tugaye, A; Gauville, C; Canivet, J

    1981-09-01

    The antihypertensive effect of 2,000 mg of acebutolol investigated with an acute 48 hr test in 60 diabetic and 60 non-diabetic in-patients with essential hypertension. In hypertensive diabetic patients, acebutolol was induced a significant fall in blood pressure similar to that observed in non-diabetics. The acute antihypertensive effect of acebutolol was not uniform in hypertensive subjects: a significant decrease of blood pressure was observed in 34 diabetics and 31 non-diabetic patients. Fifteen out of the 34 diabetic responders to the 48 hr test were treated by acebutolol alone for six months; a highly significant correlation between the acute and the chronic antihypertensive effect of the beta-blocker was observed. As long-term results paralleled those of the short-term experiment, acute acebutolol administration appears to be a rapid means to select hypertensive diabetics sensitive or resistant to betablockers. Plasma renin activity was not found to give, in hypertensive diabetics, a reliable predictive index of the response to acute administration of acebutolol.

  1. Sympathetic nervous system in obesity-related hypertension: mechanisms and clinical implications

    PubMed Central

    Kalil, Graziela Z; Haynes, William G

    2013-01-01

    Obesity markedly increases the risk of hypertension and cardiovascular disease, which may be related to activation of the sympathetic nervous system (SNS). Sympathetic overactivity directly and indirectly contributes to blood pressure (BP) elevation in obesity, including stimulation of the renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system (RAAS). The adipocyte-derived peptide leptin suppresses appetite, increases thermogenesis, but also raises SNS activity and BP. Obese individuals exhibit hyperleptinemia but are resistant to its appetite-suppressing actions. Interestingly, animal models of obesity exhibit preserved sympathoexcitatory and pressor actions of leptin, despite resistance to its anorexic and metabolic actions, suggesting selective leptin resistance. Disturbance of intracellular signaling at specific hypothalamic neural networks appears to underlie selective leptin resistance. Delineation of these pathways should lead to novel approaches to treatment. In the meantime, treatment of obesity–hypertension has relied on antihypertensive drugs. Although sympathetic blockade is mechanistically attractive in obesity–hypertension, in practice its effects are disappointing because of adverse metabolic effects and inferior outcomes. On the basis of subgroup analyses of obese patients in large randomized clinical trials, drugs such as diuretics and RAAS blockers appear superior in preventing cardiovascular events in obesity–hypertension. An underused alternative approach to obesity–hypertension is induction of weight loss, which reduces circulating leptin and insulin, partially reverses resistance to these hormones, decreases sympathetic activation and improves BP and other risk factors. Though weight loss induced by lifestyle is often modest and transient, carefully selected pharmacological weight loss therapies can produce substantial and sustained antihypertensive effects additive to lifestyle interventions. PMID:22048570

  2. Independent influence of overweight and obesity on the regression of left ventricular hypertrophy in hypertensive patients: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kun; Huang, Feifei; Chen, Jie; Cai, Qingqing; Wang, Tong; Zou, Rong; Zuo, Zhiyi; Wang, Jingfeng; Huang, Hui

    2014-11-01

    Overweight and obesity are associated with adverse cardiovascular outcomes. However, the role of overweight and obesity in left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) of hypertensive patients is controversial. The aim of the current meta-analysis was to evaluate the influence of overweight and obesity on LVH regression in the hypertensive population.Twenty-eight randomized controlled trials comprising 2403 hypertensive patients (mean age range: 43.8-66.7 years) were identified. Three groups were divided according to body mass index: normal weight, overweight, and obesity groups.Compared with the normal-weight group, LVH regression in the overweight and obesity groups was more obvious with less reduction of systolic blood pressure after antihypertensive therapies (P < 0.001). The renin-angiotensin system inhibitor was the most effective in regressing LVH in overweight and obese hypertensive patients (19.27 g/m, 95% confidence interval [15.25, 23.29], P < 0.001), followed by β-blockers, calcium channel blockers, and diuretics. In the stratified analysis based on blood pressure measurement methods and age, more significant LVH regression was found in 24-h ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) group and in relatively young patients (40-60 years' old) group (P < 0.01).Overweight and obesity are independent risk factors for LVH in hypertensive patients. Intervention at an early age and monitoring by ABPM may facilitate therapy-induced LVH regression in overweight and obese hypertensive patients.

  3. IgG receptor FcγRIIB plays a key role in obesity-induced hypertension.

    PubMed

    Sundgren, Nathan C; Vongpatanasin, Wanpen; Boggan, Brigid-Meghan D; Tanigaki, Keiji; Yuhanna, Ivan S; Chambliss, Ken L; Mineo, Chieko; Shaul, Philip W

    2015-02-01

    There is a well-recognized association between obesity, inflammation, and hypertension. Why obesity causes hypertension is poorly understood. We previously demonstrated using a C-reactive protein (CRP) transgenic mouse that CRP induces hypertension that is related to NO deficiency. Our prior work in cultured endothelial cells identified the Fcγ receptor IIB (FcγRIIB) as the receptor for CRP whereby it antagonizes endothelial NO synthase. Recognizing known associations between CRP and obesity and hypertension in humans, in the present study we tested the hypothesis that FcγRIIB plays a role in obesity-induced hypertension in mice. Using radiotelemetry, we first demonstrated that the hypertension observed in transgenic mouse-CRP is mediated by the receptor, indicating that FcγRIIB is capable of modifying blood pressure. We then discovered in a model of diet-induced obesity yielding equal adiposity in all study groups that whereas FcγRIIB(+/+) mice developed obesity-induced hypertension, FcγRIIB(-/-) mice were fully protected. Levels of CRP, the related pentraxin serum amyloid P component which is the CRP-equivalent in mice, and total IgG were unaltered by diet-induced obesity; FcγRIIB expression in endothelium was also unchanged. However, whereas IgG isolated from chow-fed mice had no effect, IgG from high-fat diet-fed mice inhibited endothelial NO synthase in cultured endothelial cells, and this was an FcγRIIB-dependent process. Thus, we have identified a novel role for FcγRIIB in the pathogenesis of obesity-induced hypertension, independent of processes regulating adiposity, and it may entail an IgG-induced attenuation of endothelial NO synthase function. Approaches targeting FcγRIIB may potentially offer new means to treat hypertension in obese individuals. PMID:25368023

  4. IgG receptor FcγRIIB plays a key role in obesity-induced hypertension.

    PubMed

    Sundgren, Nathan C; Vongpatanasin, Wanpen; Boggan, Brigid-Meghan D; Tanigaki, Keiji; Yuhanna, Ivan S; Chambliss, Ken L; Mineo, Chieko; Shaul, Philip W

    2015-02-01

    There is a well-recognized association between obesity, inflammation, and hypertension. Why obesity causes hypertension is poorly understood. We previously demonstrated using a C-reactive protein (CRP) transgenic mouse that CRP induces hypertension that is related to NO deficiency. Our prior work in cultured endothelial cells identified the Fcγ receptor IIB (FcγRIIB) as the receptor for CRP whereby it antagonizes endothelial NO synthase. Recognizing known associations between CRP and obesity and hypertension in humans, in the present study we tested the hypothesis that FcγRIIB plays a role in obesity-induced hypertension in mice. Using radiotelemetry, we first demonstrated that the hypertension observed in transgenic mouse-CRP is mediated by the receptor, indicating that FcγRIIB is capable of modifying blood pressure. We then discovered in a model of diet-induced obesity yielding equal adiposity in all study groups that whereas FcγRIIB(+/+) mice developed obesity-induced hypertension, FcγRIIB(-/-) mice were fully protected. Levels of CRP, the related pentraxin serum amyloid P component which is the CRP-equivalent in mice, and total IgG were unaltered by diet-induced obesity; FcγRIIB expression in endothelium was also unchanged. However, whereas IgG isolated from chow-fed mice had no effect, IgG from high-fat diet-fed mice inhibited endothelial NO synthase in cultured endothelial cells, and this was an FcγRIIB-dependent process. Thus, we have identified a novel role for FcγRIIB in the pathogenesis of obesity-induced hypertension, independent of processes regulating adiposity, and it may entail an IgG-induced attenuation of endothelial NO synthase function. Approaches targeting FcγRIIB may potentially offer new means to treat hypertension in obese individuals.

  5. Epicardial fat thickness: distribution and association with diabetes mellitus, hypertension and the metabolic syndrome in the ELSA-Brasil study.

    PubMed

    Graeff, Daniela Bertol; Foppa, Murilo; Pires, Julio Cesar Gall; Vigo, Alvaro; Schmidt, Maria Ines; Lotufo, Paulo Andrade; Mill, Jose Geraldo; Duncan, Bruce Bartholow

    2016-04-01

    Epicardial fat thickness (EFT) has emerged as a marker of cardiometabolic risk, but its clinical use warrants proper knowledge of its distribution and associations in populations. We aimed to describe the distribution of EFT, its demographic correlates and independent associations with diabetes, hypertension and metabolic syndrome (MS) in free-living Brazilian adults. From the baseline echocardiography of the Brazilian Longitudinal Study of Adult Health (ELSA-Brasil)-a cohort study of civil servants aged 35-74 years-EFT was measured from a randomly selected sample of 998 participants as the mean of two paraesternal windows obtained at end systole (EFTsyst) and end diastole (EFTdiast). From the 421 individuals free of diabetes, hypertension and MS, we defined EFT reference values and the EFTsyst 75th percentile cut-off. Median EFTsyst was 1.5 (IQR 0-2.6) mm; a large proportion (84 %) had EFTdiast = 0. EFT was higher in women and lower in blacks, and increased with age and BMI. Although EFT was higher in those with diabetes, hypertension, and MS, EFT associations were reduced when adjusted for age, sex and ethnicity, and were non-significant after adjusting for obesity measures. In conclusion, the amount of EFT in this large multiethnic population is smaller than reported in other populations. EFT reference values varied across demographic and clinical variables, EFT associations with cardiometabolic variables being largely explained by age, sex, ethnicity and central obesity. Although EFT can help identify individuals at increased cardiometabolic risk, it will likely have a limited additional role compared to current risk stratification strategies.

  6. Central role for melanocortin-4 receptors in offspring hypertension arising from maternal obesity

    PubMed Central

    Samuelsson, Anne-Maj S.; Mullier, Amandine; Maicas, Nuria; Oosterhuis, Nynke R.; Eun Bae, Sung; Novoselova, Tatiana V.; Chan, Li F.; Pombo, Joaquim M.; Taylor, Paul D.; Joles, Jaap A.; Coen, Clive W.; Balthasar, Nina; Poston, Lucilla

    2016-01-01

    Melanocortin-4 receptor (Mc4r)–expressing neurons in the autonomic nervous system, particularly in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVH), play an essential role in blood pressure (BP) control. Mc4r-deficient (Mc4rKO) mice are severely obese but lack obesity-related hypertension; they also show a reduced pressor response to salt loading. We have previously reported that lean juvenile offspring born to diet-induced obese rats (OffOb) exhibit sympathetic-mediated hypertension, and we proposed a role for postnatally raised leptin in its etiology. Here, we test the hypothesis that neonatal hyperleptinemia due to maternal obesity induces persistent changes in the central melanocortin system, thereby contributing to offspring hypertension. Working on the OffOb paradigm in both sexes and using transgenic technology to restore Mc4r in the PVH of Mc4rKO (Mc4rPVH) mice, we have now shown that these mice develop higher BP than Mc4rKO or WT mice. We have also found that experimental hyperleptinemia induced in the neonatal period in Mc4rPVH and WT mice, but not in the Mc4rKO mice, leads to heightened BP and severe renal dysfunction. Thus, Mc4r in the PVH appears to be required for early-life programming of hypertension arising from either maternal obesity or neonatal hyperleptinemia. Early-life exposure of the PVH to maternal obesity through postnatal elevation of leptin may have long-term consequences for cardiovascular health. PMID:27791019

  7. Secular trends of the impact of overweight and obesity on hypertension in Japan, 1980-2010.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Masato; Ohkubo, Takayoshi; Murakami, Yoshitaka; Takashima, Naoyuki; Kadota, Aya; Miyagawa, Naoko; Saito, Yoshino; Nishi, Nobuo; Okuda, Nagako; Kiyohara, Yutaka; Nakagawa, Hideaki; Nakamura, Yoshikazu; Fujiyoshi, Akira; Abbott, Robert D; Okamura, Tomonori; Okayama, Akira; Ueshima, Hirotsugu; Miura, Katsuyuki

    2015-11-01

    The prevalence of overweight (body mass index (BMI)=25.0-29.9 kg m(-)(2)) and obesity (⩾30.0 kg m(-)(2)) has been increasing over the last several decades in Japan. We examined trends of the impact of overweight and obesity on hypertension (systolic/diastolic blood pressure ⩾140/90 mm Hg or antihypertensive drugs use) using four national surveys in Japan, from which the participants were randomly sampled from the entire population. Study participants aged 30-79 years were selected for each survey (10 370 in 1980, 8005 in 1990, 5327 in 2000 and 2547 in 2010). The results showed that the impact of overweight and obesity on hypertension had increased significantly (P=0.040 and 0.006 in men and women, respectively). From 1980 to 2010, the multivariable-adjusted odds ratios for hypertension, comparing overweight and obesity with normal weight (BMI =18.5-24.9 kg m(-)(2)), went from 1.94 (95% confidence intervals: 1.64, 2.28) to 2.82 (2.07, 3.83) in men, and from 2.37 (2.05, 2.73) to 3.48 (2.57, 4.72) in women. Most of the association was observed in overweight participants, as only 3% of the Japanese were obese. In addition to the relationship between excessive BMI and other adverse health conditions, the rise in the association with hypertension increases the urgency in addressing weight control. We need to address the overweight and obesity epidemic.

  8. Pharmacogenomics of cardiovascular complications in diabetes and obesity.

    PubMed

    Chapalamadugu, Kalyan; Panguluri, Siva K; Miranda, Aimon; Sneed, Kevin B; Tipparaju, Srinivas M

    2014-01-01

    Heart disease is a major cause of death in US and worldwide. The complex interplay of the mechanisms between diabetes, obesity and inflammation raises concerns for therapeutic understanding and developing treatment options for patients. Recent advances utilizing pharmacogenomics has helped researchers to probe in to disease pathophysiology and physicians to detect and, diagnose the disease in patients. The understanding developed in the area primarily addresses the issue focusing on the nature and asks the question 'Why' some individuals respond to the standard medication regimen and others do not. The central idea that genomics play a vital part in how the healthcare providers: physician, pharmacist, and nurse provide treatment utilizing the best practices available for maximum benefits. Pharmacogenomics is the scientific basis which offers the fundamental understanding for diseases, based on which therapeutic approaches can be designed and delivered. The discovery that not all humans respond to the drug in the same way is a 'paradigm shift' in how current therapies are offered. The area of pharmacogenomics at its core is linked to the genetic basis for the disease and the response to treatment. Given that diabetes and obesity are major metabolic ailments globally wherein patients also often suffer from cardiac disorders, a comprehensive genetic and pharmacogenomic understanding of these conditions enable the development of effective therapeutic strategies. In this review, we discuss various pharmacogenomic approaches with special emphasis on heart disease as it relates to diabetes and obesity. Recent information in regard to relevant patents in this topic are also discussed. PMID:25185978

  9. Severe pulmonary metastasis in obese and diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Mori, Akinori; Sakurai, Hiroaki; Choo, Min-Kyung; Obi, Ryosuke; Koizumi, Keiichi; Yoshida, Chiho; Shimada, Yutaka; Saiki, Ikuo

    2006-12-15

    Although obesity is known as a risk factor for several human cancers, the association of obesity with cancer recurrence and metastasis remains to be characterized. Here, B16-BL6 melanoma and Lewis lung carcinoma cells were intravenously injected into diabetic (db/db) and obese (ob/ob) mice. The number of experimental lung colonies was markedly promoted in these mice when compared with C57BL/6 mice. In contrast, tumor growth at the implanted site was comparable when cells were inoculated orthotopically. The use of B16-BL6 cells stably transfected with the luciferase gene revealed that the increased metastasis reflected a difference mainly within 6 hr after the intravenous inoculation of tumor cells. Administration of recombinant leptin in ob/ob mice abolished the increase in metastasis early on as well as the decrease in the splenic NK cell number. In addition, depletion of NK cells by an anti-asialo-GM1 antibody abrogated the enhanced metastasis in db/db mice. These results demonstrate that metastasis is markedly promoted in diabetic and obese mice mainly because of decreased NK cell function during the early phase of metastasis. PMID:16998795

  10. Blood pressure control among hypertensive patients with and without diabetes mellitus in six public primary care clinics in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Cheong, Ai Theng; Tong, Seng Fah; Sazlina, Sharrif G; Azah, Abdul Samad; Salmiah, Md Sharif

    2015-03-01

    Hypertension is a common comorbidity among diabetic patients. This study aimed to determine blood pressure (BP) control among hypertensive patients with and without diabetes. This was a cross-sectional study in 6 public primary care clinics in Wilayah Persekutuan, Malaysia. Hypertensive patients aged ≥18 years and attending the clinics were selected via systematic random sampling. The BP control target was defined as <130/80 mm Hg for diabetic patients and <140/90 mm Hg for nondiabetic patients. A total of 1107 hypertensive patients participated in this study and 540 (48.7%) had diabetes. About one fourth (24.3%) of the hypertensive patients with diabetes achieved BP control target, compared with 60.1% patients without diabetes (P < .001). Being diabetic and on ≥2 antihypertensive treatments were associated with poor BP control. Attention needs to be given to these groups of patients when managing patients with hypertension.

  11. New options for the treatment of obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus (narrative review).

    PubMed

    Henry, Robert R; Chilton, Robert; Garvey, W Timothy

    2013-01-01

    Moderate weight loss (>5%), which has been associated with improvements in glycemic parameters in patients with dysglycemia, also reduces the presence of other comorbidities, including dyslipidemia and hypertension, culminating in a reduced risk of cardiovascular disease. Lifestyle changes are the recommended preliminary approach to weight loss, with an initial weight-loss goal of 10% of body weight achieved over 6 months at a rate of 1-2 pounds per week selected as an appropriate target to decrease the severity of obesity-related risk factors. Implementing and maintaining the lifestyle changes associated with weight loss can, however, be challenging for many patients. Therefore, additional interventions sometimes may be necessary. Bariatric surgery can also be a highly effective option for weight loss and comorbidity reduction, but surgery carries considerable risks and is still applicable only to selected patients with type 2 diabetes. Thus, attention is turning to the use of weight-loss medications, including 2 recently approved compounds: twice-daily lorcaserin and a once-daily combination of phentermine and topiramate extended-release, both shown to be safe and effective therapies in the management of obesity in patients with type 2 diabetes. PMID:23726071

  12. Enhanced adipose afferent reflex contributes to sympathetic activation in diet-induced obesity hypertension.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Xiao-Qing; Chen, Wei-Wei; Han, Ying; Zhou, Ye-Bo; Zhang, Feng; Gao, Xing-Ya; Zhu, Guo-Qing

    2012-11-01

    We recently found that adipose afferent reflex (AAR) induced by chemical stimulation of white adipose tissue (WAT) increased sympathetic outflow and blood pressure in normal rats. The study was designed to test the hypothesis that AAR contributes to sympathetic activation in obesity hypertension. Male rats were fed with a control diet (12% kcal as fat) or high-fat diet (42% kcal as fat) for 12 weeks to induce obesity hypertension. Stimulation of WAT with capsaicin increased renal sympathetic nerve activity and mean arterial pressure. Both AAR and WAT afferent activity were enhanced in obesity hypertension (OH) compared with obesity nonhypertension (ON) and in ON compared with obesity-resistant or control diet rats. WAT sensory denervation induced by resiniferatoxin caused greater decreases in renal sympathetic nerve activity and mean arterial pressure in OH than ON and in ON than obesity-resistant or control. The depressor effect of resiniferatoxin lasted ≥ 3 weeks in OH. Leptin antagonist in WAT reduced renal sympathetic nerve activity and mean arterial pressure in OH. WAT injection of capsaicin increased plasma renin, angiotensin II, and norepinephrine levels in OH and caused more c-fos expression in paraventricular nucleus in OH than ON and in ON than obesity-resistant or control rats. Inhibiting paraventricular nucleus neurons with lidocaine attenuated renal sympathetic nerve activity in OH and ON, decreased mean arterial pressure in OH, and abolished the capsaicin-induced AAR in all groups. The results indicate that enhanced AAR contributes to sympathetic activation in OH, and paraventricular nucleus plays an important role in the enhanced AAR and sympathetic activation in OH.

  13. [The benefits of L-carnitine therapy in essential arterial hypertension with diabetes mellitus type II].

    PubMed

    Digiesi, V; Palchetti, R; Cantini, F

    1989-03-01

    Carnitine is a natural substance essential for the mitochondrial oxidation of long-chain fatty acids and therefore regulates the energy metabolism of the cells. Tissue carnitine levels are altered under diabetes mellitus or hypertension. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of L-carnitine therapy in essential hypertension with diabetes mellitus type II. A clinical trial was performed in two homogeneous groups with essential hypertension and diabetes mellitus type II. L-carnitine was given orally, 2 g twice daily, for 45 weeks. In the group of patients treated with L-carnitine in comparison with control group cardiac arrhythmias, chiefly extrasystoles, some disorders of A-V conduction and some electrocardiographic signs of ischaemia stopped or diminished and symptoms, chiefly asthenia, significantly improved. No side effects were observed during the treatment. These results show that treatment with L-carnitine is useful and well tolerated in patients with essential hypertension and diabetes mellitus type II.

  14. Severity of obesity and management of hypertension, hypercholesterolaemia and smoking in primary care: population-based cohort study.

    PubMed

    Booth, H P; Prevost, A T; Gulliford, M C

    2016-01-01

    Obesity and obesity-associated cardiovascular risk are increasing worldwide. This study aimed to determine how different levels of obesity are associated with the management of smoking, hypertension and hypercholesterolaemia in primary care. We conducted a cohort study of adults aged 30-100 years in England, sampled from the primary care electronic health records in the Clinical Practice Research Datalink. Prevalence, treatment and control were estimated for each risk factor by body mass index (BMI) category. Adjusted odds ratios (AOR) were estimated, allowing for age, gender, comorbidity and socioeconomic status, with normal weight as reference category. Data were analysed for 247,653 patients including 153,308 (62%) with BMI recorded, of whom 46,149 (30%) were obese. Participants were classified into simple (29,257), severe (11,059) and morbid obesity (5833) categories. Smoking declined with the increasing BMI category, but smoking cessation treatment increased. Age-standardised hypertension prevalence was twice as high in morbid obesity (men 78.6%; women 66.0%) compared with normal weight (men 37.3%; women 29.4%). Hypertension treatment was more frequent (AOR 1.75, 1.59-1.92) but hypertension control less frequent (AOR 0.63, 0.59-0.69) in morbid obesity, with similar findings for severe obesity. Hypercholesterolaemia was more frequent in morbid obesity (men 48.2%; women 36.3%) than normal weight (men 25.0%; women 20.0%). Lipid lowering therapy was more frequent in morbid obesity (AOR 1.83, 1.61-2.07) as was cholesterol control (AOR 1.19, 1.06-1.34). Increasing obesity category is associated with elevated risks from hypertension and hypercholesterolaemia. Inadequate hypertension control in obesity emerges as an important target for future interventions. PMID:25810065

  15. Severity of obesity and management of hypertension, hypercholesterolaemia and smoking in primary care: population-based cohort study.

    PubMed

    Booth, H P; Prevost, A T; Gulliford, M C

    2016-01-01

    Obesity and obesity-associated cardiovascular risk are increasing worldwide. This study aimed to determine how different levels of obesity are associated with the management of smoking, hypertension and hypercholesterolaemia in primary care. We conducted a cohort study of adults aged 30-100 years in England, sampled from the primary care electronic health records in the Clinical Practice Research Datalink. Prevalence, treatment and control were estimated for each risk factor by body mass index (BMI) category. Adjusted odds ratios (AOR) were estimated, allowing for age, gender, comorbidity and socioeconomic status, with normal weight as reference category. Data were analysed for 247,653 patients including 153,308 (62%) with BMI recorded, of whom 46,149 (30%) were obese. Participants were classified into simple (29,257), severe (11,059) and morbid obesity (5833) categories. Smoking declined with the increasing BMI category, but smoking cessation treatment increased. Age-standardised hypertension prevalence was twice as high in morbid obesity (men 78.6%; women 66.0%) compared with normal weight (men 37.3%; women 29.4%). Hypertension treatment was more frequent (AOR 1.75, 1.59-1.92) but hypertension control less frequent (AOR 0.63, 0.59-0.69) in morbid obesity, with similar findings for severe obesity. Hypercholesterolaemia was more frequent in morbid obesity (men 48.2%; women 36.3%) than normal weight (men 25.0%; women 20.0%). Lipid lowering therapy was more frequent in morbid obesity (AOR 1.83, 1.61-2.07) as was cholesterol control (AOR 1.19, 1.06-1.34). Increasing obesity category is associated with elevated risks from hypertension and hypercholesterolaemia. Inadequate hypertension control in obesity emerges as an important target for future interventions.

  16. Hypertension outcomes in metabolically unhealthy normal-weight and metabolically healthy obese children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Ding, W Q; Yan, Y K; Zhang, M X; Cheng, H; Zhao, X Y; Hou, D Q; Mi, J

    2015-09-01

    Metabolically healthy obesity (MHO) begins in childhood and continues into adulthood. However, the association between MHO and the risk of developing hypertension remains controversial. A prospective cohort study was conducted to investigate the risk of hypertension in MHO and metabolically unhealthy normal-weight (MUNW) Chinese children and adolescents. A total of 1183 participants, 6-18 years old at baseline with normal blood pressure values, were studied using follow-up data from the cohort of the Beijing Child and Adolescent Metabolic Syndrome (BCAMS) study. The participants were classified according to the body mass index and the presence/absence of metabolic abnormality, which was defined by metabolic syndrome (MetS) or insulin resistance (IR). During the 6-year follow-up period, 239 (20.2%) participants developed incident hypertension. After adjusting for age, sex, physical activity, pubertal stage, dietary habits and family history of hypertension, an increased risk for hypertension was observed in the MHO individuals (risk ratio, RRMetS 5.42; 95% confidence interval (CI) 3.19-9.22 and RRIR 7.59; 95% CI 1.64-35.20) compared with their metabolically healthy normal-weight counterparts. Independent of the definition of metabolic abnormality, the MUNW subjects did not have an elevated incidence of hypertension. These results suggest that the risk of developing hypertension is increased in the MHO but not in the MUNW individuals.

  17. Lercanidipine/enalapril combination in the management of obesity-related hypertension.

    PubMed

    Grassi, Guido

    2016-01-01

    Obesity-related hypertension represents a condition frequently observed in current clinical practice characterized by a complex pathophysiological background and a very high cardiovascular risk profile, particularly in severely obese individuals. This explains, on the one hand, the difficulty in reducing elevated blood pressure values in this pathological state and, on the other, the need to achieve this goal in a relatively short-time period to prevent the occurrence of fatal and nonfatal cardiovascular events. Both nonpharmacological and pharmacological measures are available in the therapeutic approach for this condition. Among the pharmacological interventions, a combination of two antihypertensive drugs represents the most common recommended strategy aimed at achieving blood pressure control. This paper, after briefly examining the main pathophysiological features of obesity-related hypertension, will review the importance in the treatment of this condition of the drug combination based on a calcium channel blocker and an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor, with specific focus on lercanidipine/enalapril. Following an analysis of the main pharmacological properties of the combination, the results of the studies based on this pharmacological approach in obesity-related hypertension will be critically discussed. The efficacy, safety, and tolerability profile of the lercanidine/enalapril drug combination as well as its potential limitations will also be examined. PMID:27175094

  18. Hypertension and obesity in adults living in a high HIV prevalence rural area in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Malaza, Abraham; Mossong, Joel; Bärnighausen, Till; Newell, Marie-Louise

    2012-01-01

    Hypertension and excess body weight are major risk factors of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in developing countries. In countries with a high HIV prevalence, it is unknown how increased antiretroviral treatment and care (ART) coverage has affected the prevalence of overweight, obesity, and hypertension. We conducted a health survey in 2010 based on the WHO STEPwise approach in 14,198 adult resident participants of a demographic surveillance area in rural South Africa to investigate factors associated with hypertension and excess weight including HIV infection and ART status. Women had a significantly higher median body mass index (BMI) than men (26.4 vs. 21.2 kg/m(2), p<0.001). The prevalence of obesity (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m(2)) in women (31.3%, 95% confidence interval (CI) 30.2-32.4) was 6.5 times higher than in men (4.9%, 95% CI 4.1-5.7), whereas prevalence of hypertension (systolic or diastolic blood pressure ≥ 140 or 90 mm Hg, respectively) was 1.4 times higher in women than in men (28.5% vs 20.8%, p<0.001). In multivariable regression analysis, both hypertension and obesity were significantly associated with sex, age, HIV and ART status. The BMI of women and men on ART was on average 3.8 (95% CI 3.2-3.8) and 1.7 (95% CI 0.9-2.5) kg/m(2) lower than of HIV-negative women and men, respectively. The BMI of HIV-infected women and men not on ART was on average 1.2 (95% CI 0.8-1.6) and 0.4 (95% CI -0.1-0.9) kg/m(2) lower than of HIV-negative women and men, respectively. Obesity was a bigger risk factor for hypertension in men (adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 2.99, 95% CI 2.00-4.48) than in women (aOR 1.64, 95% CI 1.39-1.92) and overweight (25 ≤ BMI<30) was a significant risk factor for men only (aOR 1.53 95% CI 1.14-2.06). Our study suggests that, cardiovascular risk factors of hypertension and obesity differ substantially between women and men in rural South Africa.

  19. Adaptation and validation of the Distress Scale for Mexican patients with type 2 diabetes and hypertension: a cross-sectional survey

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Vega, Ingrid Patricia; Doubova, Svetlana V; Aguirre-Hernandez, Rebeca; Infante-Castañeda, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to adapt and validate the Distress Scale for Mexican patients with type 2 diabetes and hypertension (DSDH17M). Setting Two family medicine clinics affiliated with the Mexican Institute of Social Security. Participants 722 patients with type 2 diabetes and/or hypertension (235 patients with diabetes, 233 patients with hypertension and 254 patients with both diseases). Design A cross-sectional survey. Methods The validation procedures included: (1) content validity using a group of experts, (2) construct validity from exploratory factor analysis, (3) internal consistency using Cronbach's α, (4) convergent validity between DSDH17M and anxiety and depression using the Spearman correlation coefficient, (5) discriminative validity through the Wilcoxon rank-sum test and (6) test–retest reliability using intraclass correlation coefficient. Results The DSDH17M has 17 items and three factors explaining 67% of the total variance. Cronbach α ranged from 0.83 to 0.91 among factors. The first factor of ‘Regime-related Distress and Emotional Burden’ moderately correlated with anxiety and depression scores. Discriminative validity revealed that patients with obesity, those with stressful events and those who did not adhere to pharmacological treatment had significantly higher distress scores in all DSDH17M domains. Test–retest intraclass correlation coefficient for DSDH17M ranged from 0.92 to 0.97 among factors. Conclusions DSDH17M is a valid and reliable tool to identify distress of patients with type 2 diabetes and hypertension. PMID:26936903

  20. Improvement of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in Obese and Non-Obese Patients after the Duodenal Switch Operation

    PubMed Central

    Frenken, M.; Cho, E. Y.; Karcz, W. K.; Grueneberger, J.; Kuesters, S.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction. Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is one of the most important obesity-related comorbidities. This study was undertaken to characterise the effect of the biliopancreatic diversion with duodenal switch (BPD-DS) in morbidly obese and nonmorbidly obese diabetic patients. Methods. Outcome of 74 obese diabetic patients after BPD-DS and 16 non-obese diabetic patients after BPD or gastric bypass surgery was evaluated. Insulin usage, HbA1c-levels, and index of HOMA-IR (homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistence) were measured. Results. A substantial fraction of patients is free of insulin and shows an improved insulin sensitivity early after the operation, another fraction gets free of insulin in a 12-month period after the operation and a small fraction of long-term insulin users will not get free of insulin but nevertheless shows an improved metabolic status (less insulin needed, normal HbA1c-levels). Conclusion. BPD-DS leads to an improvement of T2DM in obese and non-obese patients. Nevertheless, more data is needed to clarify indications and mechanisms of action and to adjust our operation techniques to the needs of non-obese diabetic patients. PMID:21461399

  1. Should obesity be blamed for the high prevalence rates of hypertension in black South African women?

    PubMed

    Schutte, A E; Huisman, H W; Van Rooyen, J M; Schutte, R; Malan, L; Reimann, M; De Ridder, J H; van der Merwe, A; Schwarz, P E H; Malan, N T

    2008-08-01

    Hypertension is highly prevalent in South Africa, resulting in high stroke mortality rates. Since obesity is very common among South African women, it is likely that obesity contributes to the hypertension prevalence. The aims were to determine whether black African women have higher blood pressures (BPs) than Caucasian women, and whether obesity is related to their cardiovascular risk. African (N=102) and Caucasian (N=115) women, matched for age and body mass index, were included. Correlations between obesity (total body fat, abdominal obesity and peripheral fat) and cardiovascular risk markers (haemodynamic parameters, lipids, inflammatory markers, prothrombotic factors, adipokines, HOMA-IR (homoeostasis model assessment insulin resistance)) were compared between the ethnic groups (adjusted for age, smoking, alcohol and physical activity). Comparisons between low- and high-BP groups were also made for each ethnic group. Results showed that African women had higher BP (P<0.01) with increased peripheral vascular resistance. Surprisingly, African women showed significantly weaker correlations between obesity measures and cardiovascular risk markers when compared to Caucasian women (specifically systolic BP, arterial resistance, cardiac output, fibrinogen, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, leptin and resistin). Interestingly, the latter risk markers were also not significantly different between low- and high-BP African groups. African women, however, presented significant correlations of obesity with triglycerides, C-reactive protein and HOMA that were comparable to the Caucasian women. Although urban African women have higher BP than Caucasians, their obesity levels are weakly related to traditional cardiovascular risk factors compared to Caucasian women. The results, however, suggest a link with the development of insulin resistance. PMID:18432254

  2. Metabolic syndrome, dyslipidemia, hypertension and type 2 diabetes in youth: from diagnosis to treatment

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Overweight and obesity in youth is a worldwide public health problem. Overweight and obesity in childhood and adolescents have a substantial effect upon many systems, resulting in clinical conditions such as metabolic syndrome, early atherosclerosis, dyslipidemia, hypertension and type 2 diabetes (T2D). Obesity and the type of body fat distribution are still the core aspects of insulin resistance and seem to be the physiopathologic links common to metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular disease and T2D. The earlier the appearance of the clustering of risk factors and the higher the time of exposure, the greater will be the chance of developing coronary disease with a more severe endpoint. The age when the event may occur seems to be related to the presence and aggregation of risk factors throughout life. The treatment in this age-group is non pharmacological and aims at promoting changes in lifestyle. However, pharmacological treatments are indicated in special situations. The major goals in dietary treatments are not only limited to weight loss, but also to an improvement in the quality of life. Modification of risk factors associated to comorbidities, personal satisfaction of the child or adolescent and trying to establish healthy life habits from an early age are also important. There is a continuous debate on the best possible exercise to do, for children or adolescents, in order to lose weight. The prescription of physical activity to children and adolescents requires extensive integrated work among multidisciplinary teams, patients and their families, in order to reach therapeutic success. The most important conclusion drawn from this symposium was that if the growing prevalence of overweight and obesity continues at this pace, the result will be a population of children and adolescents with metabolic syndrome. This would lead to high mortality rates in young adults, changing the current increasing trend of worldwide longevity. Government actions and a better

  3. Metabolic syndrome, dyslipidemia, hypertension and type 2 diabetes in youth: from diagnosis to treatment.

    PubMed

    Halpern, Alfredo; Mancini, Marcio C; Magalhães, Maria Eliane C; Fisberg, Mauro; Radominski, Rosana; Bertolami, Marcelo C; Bertolami, Adriana; de Melo, Maria Edna; Zanella, Maria Teresa; Queiroz, Marcia S; Nery, Marcia

    2010-08-18

    Overweight and obesity in youth is a worldwide public health problem. Overweight and obesity in childhood and adolescents have a substantial effect upon many systems, resulting in clinical conditions such as metabolic syndrome, early atherosclerosis, dyslipidemia, hypertension and type 2 diabetes (T2D). Obesity and the type of body fat distribution are still the core aspects of insulin resistance and seem to be the physiopathologic links common to metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular disease and T2D. The earlier the appearance of the clustering of risk factors and the higher the time of exposure, the greater will be the chance of developing coronary disease with a more severe endpoint. The age when the event may occur seems to be related to the presence and aggregation of risk factors throughout life.The treatment in this age-group is non pharmacological and aims at promoting changes in lifestyle. However, pharmacological treatments are indicated in special situations.The major goals in dietary treatments are not only limited to weight loss, but also to an improvement in the quality of life. Modification of risk factors associated to comorbidities, personal satisfaction of the child or adolescent and trying to establish healthy life habits from an early age are also important. There is a continuous debate on the best possible exercise to do, for children or adolescents, in order to lose weight. The prescription of physical activity to children and adolescents requires extensive integrated work among multidisciplinary teams, patients and their families, in order to reach therapeutic success.The most important conclusion drawn from this symposium was that if the growing prevalence of overweight and obesity continues at this pace, the result will be a population of children and adolescents with metabolic syndrome. This would lead to high mortality rates in young adults, changing the current increasing trend of worldwide longevity. Government actions and a better

  4. State of integral remodeling parameters of target organs in patients with essential hypertension and obesity.

    PubMed

    Kochueva, M; Sukhonos, V; Shalimova, A; Psareva, V; Kirichenko, N

    2014-06-01

    Arterial hypertension combined with obesity is a very common form of comorbid disease in most countries all over the world. The combination of these diseases is characterized by mutual burdening of remodelling processes in important target organs, what greatly increases the risk of cardiovascular complications and death. The mechanisms of injury progression to vital organs in essential hypertension (EH) and obesity have some common features. The most important risk factors of target organs damage are hemodynamic and neurohumoral: inflammatory, effectors of the renin- angiotensin-aldosterone system, insulin resistance and others. Polyethiologic remodelling, lack of knowledge concerning violations in structural and functional status of important target organs and mechanisms of the interactions of their progression with this comorbidity require further study of these issues. The objective of the study was the comparative study of the state of integral indicators of structural and functional state of the heart, blood vessels and liver in patients with EH second stage with normal body weight and with concomitant obesity I and II degrees. This study found that the presence of obesity I and II in patients with EH stage II is associated with the concentric type of left ventricular hypertrophy, saved by its ejection fraction and impaired diastolic filling processes. For the patients with EH in the early stages of obesity the following characteristics are quite typical: considerable increase of intima media thickness in the carotid arteries, increasing the stiffness in the main arteries and liver parenchyma, impaired of the functional state of endothelial. PMID:25020166

  5. State of integral remodeling parameters of target organs in patients with essential hypertension and obesity.

    PubMed

    Kochueva, M; Sukhonos, V; Shalimova, A; Psareva, V; Kirichenko, N

    2014-06-01

    Arterial hypertension combined with obesity is a very common form of comorbid disease in most countries all over the world. The combination of these diseases is characterized by mutual burdening of remodelling processes in important target organs, what greatly increases the risk of cardiovascular complications and death. The mechanisms of injury progression to vital organs in essential hypertension (EH) and obesity have some common features. The most important risk factors of target organs damage are hemodynamic and neurohumoral: inflammatory, effectors of the renin- angiotensin-aldosterone system, insulin resistance and others. Polyethiologic remodelling, lack of knowledge concerning violations in structural and functional status of important target organs and mechanisms of the interactions of their progression with this comorbidity require further study of these issues. The objective of the study was the comparative study of the state of integral indicators of structural and functional state of the heart, blood vessels and liver in patients with EH second stage with normal body weight and with concomitant obesity I and II degrees. This study found that the presence of obesity I and II in patients with EH stage II is associated with the concentric type of left ventricular hypertrophy, saved by its ejection fraction and impaired diastolic filling processes. For the patients with EH in the early stages of obesity the following characteristics are quite typical: considerable increase of intima media thickness in the carotid arteries, increasing the stiffness in the main arteries and liver parenchyma, impaired of the functional state of endothelial.

  6. Fat utilization and arterial hypertension in overweight/obese subjects

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The Respiratory Quotient is a parameter reflecting the utilization of the nutrients by a subject. It is associated with an high rate of subsequent weight gain and with the atherosclerosis. Subjects tending to burn less fat have an increased Respiratory Quotient. Aim of this study was to investigate on the relationship between the Respiratory Quotient and the cardiovascular risk factors. Methods In this cross-sectional study we enrolled 223 individuals of both sexes aged 45–75 ys that were weight stable, receiving a balanced diet, and not affected by debilitating disease or cardiovascular disease. The Respiratory Quotient was measured by Indirect Calorimetry. The measurement of the Blood Pressure was obtained by a mercury sphygmomanometer. Results We enrolled 133 female and 90 male. Systolic blood pressure only was positively correlated to the Respiratory Quotient in univariate and multivariate regression analysis (p=0,017). The prevalence of hypertension was significatively different between the quartiles of the Respiratory Quotient, with the highest prevalence in the IV quartile (p=0,024). Conclusion High value of the Respiratory Quotient, an index of nutrients utilization, is associated to an high prevalence of Hypertension. It is possible that in the subjects with high Respiratory Quotient and high body mass index, the activation of the renin angiotensin system, in concert to the reduction of the utilization of the endogenous fat stores, could increase the risk of hypertension. PMID:23815947

  7. Brd2 gene disruption causes ‘metabolically healthy’ obesity: Epigenetic and chromatin-based mechanisms that uncouple obesity from Type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fangnian; Deeney, Jude T.; Denis, Gerald V.

    2014-01-01

    Disturbed body energy balance can lead to obesity and obesity-driven diseases such as Type 2 diabetes, which have reached an epidemic level. Evidence indicates that obesity induced inflammation is a major cause of insulin resistance and Type 2 diabetes. Environmental factors, such as nutrients, affect body energy balance through epigenetic or chromatin-based mechanisms. As a bromodomain and external domain family transcription regulator, Brd2 regulates expression of many genes through interpretation of chromatin codes, and participates in the regulation of body energy balance and immune function. In the severely obese state, Brd2 knockdown in mice prevented obesity-induced inflammatory responses, protected animals from Type 2 diabetes, and thus uncoupled obesity from diabetes. Brd2 provides an important model for investigation of the function of transcription regulators and the development of obesity and diabetes; it also provides a possible target to treat obesity and diabetes through modulation of the function of a chromatin code reader. PMID:23374712

  8. Associations between Active Travel to Work and Overweight, Hypertension, and Diabetes in India: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Millett, Christopher; Agrawal, Sutapa; Sullivan, Ruth; Vaz, Mario; Kurpad, Anura; Bharathi, A. V.; Prabhakaran, Dorairaj; Reddy, Kolli Srinath; Kinra, Sanjay; Smith, George Davey; Ebrahim, Shah

    2013-01-01

    Background Increasing active travel (walking, bicycling, and public transport) is promoted as a key strategy to increase physical activity and reduce the growing burden of noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) globally. Little is known about patterns of active travel or associated cardiovascular health benefits in low- and middle-income countries. This study examines mode and duration of travel to work in rural and urban India and associations between active travel and overweight, hypertension, and diabetes. Methods and Findings Cross-sectional study of 3,902 participants (1,366 rural, 2,536 urban) in the Indian Migration Study. Associations between mode and duration of active travel and cardiovascular risk factors were assessed using random-effect logistic regression models adjusting for age, sex, caste, standard of living, occupation, factory location, leisure time physical activity, daily fat intake, smoking status, and alcohol use. Rural dwellers were significantly more likely to bicycle (68.3% versus 15.9%; p<0.001) to work than urban dwellers. The prevalence of overweight or obesity was 50.0%, 37.6%, 24.2%, 24.9%; hypertension was 17.7%, 11.8%, 6.5%, 9.8%; and diabetes was 10.8%, 7.4%, 3.8%, 7.3% in participants who travelled to work by private transport, public transport, bicycling, and walking, respectively. In the adjusted analysis, those walking (adjusted risk ratio [ARR] 0.72; 95% CI 0.58–0.88) or bicycling to work (ARR 0.66; 95% CI 0.55–0.77) were significantly less likely to be overweight or obese than those travelling by private transport. Those bicycling to work were significantly less likely to have hypertension (ARR 0.51; 95% CI 0.36–0.71) or diabetes (ARR 0.65; 95% CI 0.44–0.95). There was evidence of a dose-response relationship between duration of bicycling to work and being overweight, having hypertension or diabetes. The main limitation of the study is the cross-sectional design, which limits causal inference for the associations found

  9. Adipose tissue angiogenesis: impact on obesity and type-2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Corvera, Silvia; Gealekman, Olga

    2014-03-01

    The growth and function of tissues are critically dependent on their vascularization. Adipose tissue is capable of expanding many-fold during adulthood, therefore requiring the formation of new vasculature to supply growing and proliferating adipocytes. The expansion of the vasculature in adipose tissue occurs through angiogenesis, where new blood vessels develop from those pre-existing within the tissue. Inappropriate angiogenesis may underlie adipose tissue dysfunction in obesity, which in turn increases type-2 diabetes risk. In addition, genetic and developmental factors involved in vascular patterning may define the size and expandability of diverse adipose tissue depots, which are also associated with type-2 diabetes risk. Moreover, the adipose tissue vasculature appears to be the niche for pre-adipocyte precursors, and factors that affect angiogenesis may directly impact the generation of new adipocytes. Here we review recent advances on the basic mechanisms of angiogenesis, and on the role of angiogenesis in adipose tissue development and obesity. A substantial amount of data points to a deficit in adipose tissue angiogenesis as a contributing factor to insulin resistance and metabolic disease in obesity. These emerging findings support the concept of the adipose tissue vasculature as a source of new targets for metabolic disease therapies. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Modulation of Adipose Tissue in Health and Disease.

  10. Overweight and obesity in youth with type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Minges, Karl E; Whittemore, Robin; Grey, Margaret

    2013-01-01

    Overweight and obesity in youth with type 1 diabetes (T1D) is now prevalent and accounts for significant health consequences, including cardiovascular complications and dual diagnosis of type 2 diabetes. Physical activity and lifestyle are modifiable and play an important role in the prevention and management of excessive weight, but it is unclear how these factors relate to overweight and obese youth with T1D. Thus, a systematic review was conducted to examine how physical activity, sedentary behavior, sleep, and diet are related to overweight/obesity in youth with T1D. Seven observational and intervention studies published between 1990 and 2013 were included in the review. Prevalence of overweight ranged from 12.5% to 33.3%. Overweight in youth with T1D was associated with infrequent napping, increased screen time, and skipping breakfast and dinner but was not related to time engaged in physical activity. Weight-related interventions indicated modest weight loss along with improved glycemic control. In light of this review, there is a need for high quality research that examines all levels of activity in youth with T1D to identify lifestyle modification targets for weight prevention and management.

  11. Proportion of gestational diabetes mellitus attributable to overweight and obesity among non-Hispanic black, non-Hispanic white, and Hispanic women in South Carolina.

    PubMed

    Cavicchia, Philip P; Liu, Jihong; Adams, Swann A; Steck, Susan E; Hussey, James R; Daguisé, Virginie G; Hebert, James R

    2014-10-01

    Objective was to estimate race-specific proportions of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) attributable to overweight and obesity in South Carolina. South Carolina birth certificate and hospital discharge data were obtained from 2004 to 2006. Women who did not have type 2 diabetes mellitus before pregnancy were classified with GDM if a diagnosis was reported in at least one data source. Relative risks (RR) and 95 % confidence intervals were calculated using the log-binomial model. The modified Mokdad equation was used to calculate population attributable fractions for overweight body mass index (BMI: 25.0-29.9 kg/m(2)), obese (30.0-34.9 kg/m(2)), and extremely obese (≥35 kg/m(2)) women after adjusting for age, gestational weight gain, education, marital status, parity, tobacco use, pre-pregnancy hypertension, and pregnancy hypertension. Overall, the adjusted RR of GDM was 1.6, 2.3, and 2.9 times higher among the overweight, obese, and extremely obese women compared to normal-weight women in South Carolina. RR of GDM for extremely obese women was higher among White (3.1) and Hispanic (3.4) women than that for Black women (2.6). The fraction of GDM cases attributable to extreme obesity was 14.0 % among White, 18.1 % among Black, and 9.6 % among Hispanic women. The fraction of GDM cases attributable to obesity was about 12 % for all racial groups. Being overweight (BMI: 25.0-29.9) explained 8.8, 7.8, and 14.4 % of GDM cases among White, Black, and Hispanic women, respectively. Results indicate a significantly increased risk of GDM among overweight, obese, and extremely obese women. The strength of the association and the proportion of GDM cases explained by excessive weight categories vary by racial/ethnic group.

  12. Obesity-hypertension and its relation to other diseases in dogs.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Sánchez, Alicia Pamela; Del-Angel-Caraza, Javier; Quijano-Hernández, Israel Alejandro; Barbosa-Mireles, Marco Antonio

    2015-03-01

    Obesity is a chronic disease in which adipose tissue accumulates in such a way that it affects the health of the patient and is associated with a myriad of alterations such as systemic hypertension (HTN). The mechanisms by which obesity causes HTN are complex and involve several organic mechanisms. The objective of this study was to determine the correlation between obesity to HTN in dogs in accordance with recent international protocols (systolic blood pressure >160 mmHg) relating to age, genre, gonadal status, breed and other diseases commonly associated with HTN. A total of 244 dogs were studied, 105 non-obese controls and 139 in the obese group. For both groups, healthy and a variety of diseased dogs were observed; the correlations between pathologies and obesity were studied, paying special attention to diseases whose pathophysiologies could lead to HTN. We conclude that obesity is not a risk factor for dogs to develop HTN, and that HTN present in these patients was related to comorbidities such as chronic kidney disease, cardiopathies and endocrinopathies.

  13. Knowledge and Lifestyle-Associated Prevalence of Obesity among Newly Diagnosed Type II Diabetes Mellitus Patients Attending Diabetic Clinic at Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital, Kumasi, Ghana: A Hospital-Based Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Obirikorang, Yaa; Obirikorang, Christian; Odame Anto, Enoch; Acheampong, Emmanuel; Dzah, Nyalako; Akosah, Caroline Nkrumah; Nsenbah, Emmanuella Batu

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the knowledge and prevalence of obesity among Ghanaian newly diagnosed type 2 diabetics. This cross-sectional study was conducted among diagnosed type 2 diabetics. Structured questionnaire was used to obtain data. Anthropometric measurements and fasting blood sugar levels were also assessed. Participants had adequate knowledge about the general concept of obesity (72.0%) and method of weight measurement (98.6%) but were less knowledgeable of ideal body weight (4.2%). The commonly known cause, complication, and management of obesity were poor diet (76.9%), hypertension (81.8%), and diet modification (86.7%), respectively. The anthropometric measures were higher among females compared to males. Prevalence of obesity was 61.3% according to WHR classification, 40.8% according to WHtR classification, 26.1% according to WC, and 14.8% according to BMI classification. Being female was significantly associated with high prevalence of obesity irrespective of the anthropometric measure used (p < 0.05). Taking of snacks in meals, eating meals late at night, physical inactivity, excessive fast food intake, and alcoholic beverage intake were associated with increased prevalence of obesity (p < 0.05). Prevalence of obesity is high among diabetic patient and thus increasing effort towards developing and making education programs by focusing on adjusting to lifestyle modifications is required. PMID:26881262

  14. Knowledge and Lifestyle-Associated Prevalence of Obesity among Newly Diagnosed Type II Diabetes Mellitus Patients Attending Diabetic Clinic at Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital, Kumasi, Ghana: A Hospital-Based Cross-Sectional Study.

    PubMed

    Obirikorang, Yaa; Obirikorang, Christian; Odame Anto, Enoch; Acheampong, Emmanuel; Dzah, Nyalako; Akosah, Caroline Nkrumah; Nsenbah, Emmanuella Batu

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the knowledge and prevalence of obesity among Ghanaian newly diagnosed type 2 diabetics. This cross-sectional study was conducted among diagnosed type 2 diabetics. Structured questionnaire was used to obtain data. Anthropometric measurements and fasting blood sugar levels were also assessed. Participants had adequate knowledge about the general concept of obesity (72.0%) and method of weight measurement (98.6%) but were less knowledgeable of ideal body weight (4.2%). The commonly known cause, complication, and management of obesity were poor diet (76.9%), hypertension (81.8%), and diet modification (86.7%), respectively. The anthropometric measures were higher among females compared to males. Prevalence of obesity was 61.3% according to WHR classification, 40.8% according to WHtR classification, 26.1% according to WC, and 14.8% according to BMI classification. Being female was significantly associated with high prevalence of obesity irrespective of the anthropometric measure used (p < 0.05). Taking of snacks in meals, eating meals late at night, physical inactivity, excessive fast food intake, and alcoholic beverage intake were associated with increased prevalence of obesity (p < 0.05). Prevalence of obesity is high among diabetic patient and thus increasing effort towards developing and making education programs by focusing on adjusting to lifestyle modifications is required.

  15. Knowledge and Lifestyle-Associated Prevalence of Obesity among Newly Diagnosed Type II Diabetes Mellitus Patients Attending Diabetic Clinic at Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital, Kumasi, Ghana: A Hospital-Based Cross-Sectional Study.

    PubMed

    Obirikorang, Yaa; Obirikorang, Christian; Odame Anto, Enoch; Acheampong, Emmanuel; Dzah, Nyalako; Akosah, Caroline Nkrumah; Nsenbah, Emmanuella Batu

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the knowledge and prevalence of obesity among Ghanaian newly diagnosed type 2 diabetics. This cross-sectional study was conducted among diagnosed type 2 diabetics. Structured questionnaire was used to obtain data. Anthropometric measurements and fasting blood sugar levels were also assessed. Participants had adequate knowledge about the general concept of obesity (72.0%) and method of weight measurement (98.6%) but were less knowledgeable of ideal body weight (4.2%). The commonly known cause, complication, and management of obesity were poor diet (76.9%), hypertension (81.8%), and diet modification (86.7%), respectively. The anthropometric measures were higher among females compared to males. Prevalence of obesity was 61.3% according to WHR classification, 40.8% according to WHtR classification, 26.1% according to WC, and 14.8% according to BMI classification. Being female was significantly associated with high prevalence of obesity irrespective of the anthropometric measure used (p < 0.05). Taking of snacks in meals, eating meals late at night, physical inactivity, excessive fast food intake, and alcoholic beverage intake were associated with increased prevalence of obesity (p < 0.05). Prevalence of obesity is high among diabetic patient and thus increasing effort towards developing and making education programs by focusing on adjusting to lifestyle modifications is required. PMID:26881262

  16. Obesity and Diabetes: The Increased Risk of Cancer and Cancer-Related Mortality

    PubMed Central

    LeRoith, Derek

    2015-01-01

    Obesity and type 2 diabetes are becoming increasingly prevalent worldwide, and both are associated with an increased incidence and mortality from many cancers. The metabolic abnormalities associated with type 2 diabetes develop many years before the onset of diabetes and, therefore, may be contributing to cancer risk before individuals are aware that they are at risk. Multiple factors potentially contribute to the progression of cancer in obesity and type 2 diabetes, including hyperinsulinemia and insulin-like growth factor I, hyperglycemia, dyslipidemia, adipokines and cytokines, and the gut microbiome. These metabolic changes may contribute directly or indirectly to cancer progression. Intentional weight loss may protect against cancer development, and therapies for diabetes may prove to be effective adjuvant agents in reducing cancer progression. In this review we discuss the current epidemiology, basic science, and clinical data that link obesity, diabetes, and cancer and how treating obesity and type 2 diabetes could also reduce cancer risk and improve outcomes. PMID:26084689

  17. Obesity and Diabetes: The Increased Risk of Cancer and Cancer-Related Mortality.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, Emily Jane; LeRoith, Derek

    2015-07-01

    Obesity and type 2 diabetes are becoming increasingly prevalent worldwide, and both are associated with an increased incidence and mortality from many cancers. The metabolic abnormalities associated with type 2 diabetes develop many years before the onset of diabetes and, therefore, may be contributing to cancer risk before individuals are aware that they are at risk. Multiple factors potentially contribute to the progression of cancer in obesity and type 2 diabetes, including hyperinsulinemia and insulin-like growth factor I, hyperglycemia, dyslipidemia, adipokines and cytokines, and the gut microbiome. These metabolic changes may contribute directly or indirectly to cancer progression. Intentional weight loss may protect against cancer development, and therapies for diabetes may prove to be effective adjuvant agents in reducing cancer progression. In this review we discuss the current epidemiology, basic science, and clinical data that link obesity, diabetes, and cancer and how treating obesity and type 2 diabetes could also reduce cancer risk and improve outcomes. PMID:26084689

  18. Capillary pressure in subjects with type 2 diabetes and hypertension and the effect of antihypertensive therapy.

    PubMed

    Fegan, P Gerard; Tooke, John E; Gooding, Kim M; Tullett, Jayne M; MacLeod, Kenneth M; Shore, Angela C

    2003-05-01

    Raised capillary pressure has been implicated in the formation of diabetic microangiopathy in type I diabetes, in which it is elevated in those with the earliest signs of diabetic kidney disease but remains normal in those without complications. In subjects with type 2 diabetes without complications, capillary pressure is normal, although alterations in the pressure waveforms suggested enhanced wave reflections. The nature of skin capillary pressure in subjects with type 2 diabetes and hypertension remains to be elucidated, as does the effect of blood pressure-lowering therapy on capillary pressure in these subjects. Three studies were performed in well-matched groups. First, capillary pressure was elevated in hypertensive subjects with type 2 diabetes compared with normotensive subjects with type 2 diabetes (20.2 [17.4 to 22.7] mm Hg versus 17.7 [16.1 to 18.9] mm Hg, respectively, P<0.03, Mann-Whitney U test). Second, no significant difference was detected between hypertensive subjects with type 2 diabetes and hypertensive subjects without type 2 diabetes (19.4 [15.8 to 21.3] mm Hg versus 17.2 [15.1 to 19.8] mm Hg, respectively, P=0.5, Mann-Whitney U test). Finally, patients with type 2 diabetes were recruited to a case-control study. Seven subjects received blood pressure-lowering therapy and 8 did not. Therapy reduced capillary pressure from 18.2 [15.8 to 20.1] mm Hg to 15.9 [15.4 to 17.0] mm Hg (P=0.024 ANOVA), in contrast to the lack of effect of time alone. Mean arterial pressure was reduced from 110 [102 to 115] mm Hg to 105 [101 to 111] mm Hg (P=0.006, ANOVA). These findings provide a plausible mechanism by which reducing arterial hypertension may reduce the risk of microangiopathy in type 2 diabetes. PMID:12695416

  19. Mouse Models of Diabetes, Obesity and Related Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Glastras, Sarah J.; Chen, Hui; Teh, Rachel; McGrath, Rachel T.; Chen, Jason; Pollock, Carol A.; Wong, Muh Geot; Saad, Sonia

    2016-01-01

    Multiple rodent models have been used to study diabetic kidney disease (DKD). The purpose of the present study was to compare models of diabetes and obesity-induced metabolic syndrome and determine differences in renal outcomes. C57BL/6 male mice were fed either normal chow or high fat diet (HFD). At postnatal week 8, chow-fed mice were randomly assigned to low-dose streptozotocin (STZ, 55 mg/kg/day, five consecutive days) or vehicle control, whereas HFD-fed mice were given either one high-dose of STZ (100 mg/kg) or vehicle control. Intraperitoneal glucose tolerance tests were performed at Week 14, 20 and 30. Urinary albumin to creatinine ratio (ACR) and serum creatinine were measured, and renal structure was assessed using Periodic Acid Schiff (PAS) staining at Week 32. Results showed that chow-fed mice exposed to five doses of STZ resembled type 1 diabetes mellitus with a lean phenotype, hyperglycaemia, microalbuminuria and increased serum creatinine levels. Their kidneys demonstrated moderate tubular injury with evidence of tubular dilatation and glycogenated nuclear inclusion bodies. HFD-fed mice resembled metabolic syndrome as they were obese with dyslipidaemia, insulin resistance, and significantly impaired glucose tolerance. One dose STZ, in addition to HFD, did not worsen metabolic features (including fasting glucose, non esterified fatty acid, and triglyceride levels). There were significant increases in urinary ACR and serum creatinine levels, and renal structural changes were predominantly related to interstitial vacuolation and tubular dilatation in HFD-fed mice. PMID:27579698

  20. Mouse Models of Diabetes, Obesity and Related Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Glastras, Sarah J; Chen, Hui; Teh, Rachel; McGrath, Rachel T; Chen, Jason; Pollock, Carol A; Wong, Muh Geot; Saad, Sonia

    2016-01-01

    Multiple rodent models have been used to study diabetic kidney disease (DKD). The purpose of the present study was to compare models of diabetes and obesity-induced metabolic syndrome and determine differences in renal outcomes. C57BL/6 male mice were fed either normal chow or high fat diet (HFD). At postnatal week 8, chow-fed mice were randomly assigned to low-dose streptozotocin (STZ, 55 mg/kg/day, five consecutive days) or vehicle control, whereas HFD-fed mice were given either one high-dose of STZ (100 mg/kg) or vehicle control. Intraperitoneal glucose tolerance tests were performed at Week 14, 20 and 30. Urinary albumin to creatinine ratio (ACR) and serum creatinine were measured, and renal structure was assessed using Periodic Acid Schiff (PAS) staining at Week 32. Results showed that chow-fed mice exposed to five doses of STZ resembled type 1 diabetes mellitus with a lean phenotype, hyperglycaemia, microalbuminuria and increased serum creatinine levels. Their kidneys demonstrated moderate tubular injury with evidence of tubular dilatation and glycogenated nuclear inclusion bodies. HFD-fed mice resembled metabolic syndrome as they were obese with dyslipidaemia, insulin resistance, and significantly impaired glucose tolerance. One dose STZ, in addition to HFD, did not worsen metabolic features (including fasting glucose, non esterified fatty acid, and triglyceride levels). There were significant increases in urinary ACR and serum creatinine levels, and renal structural changes were predominantly related to interstitial vacuolation and tubular dilatation in HFD-fed mice. PMID:27579698

  1. Epigenetics in adipose tissue, obesity, weight loss, and diabetes.

    PubMed

    Martínez, J Alfredo; Milagro, Fermín I; Claycombe, Kate J; Schalinske, Kevin L

    2014-01-01

    Given the role that diet and other environmental factors play in the development of obesity and type 2 diabetes, the implication of different epigenetic processes is being investigated. Although it is well known that external factors can cause cell type-dependent epigenetic changes, including DNA methylation, histone tail modifications, and chromatin remodeling, the regulation of these processes, the magnitude of the changes and the cell types in which they occur, the individuals more predisposed, and the more crucial stages of life remain to be elucidated. There is evidence that obese and diabetic people have a pattern of epigenetic marks different from nonobese and nondiabetic individuals. The main long-term goals in this field are the identification and understanding of the role of epigenetic marks that could be used as early predictors of metabolic risk and the development of drugs or diet-related treatments able to delay these epigenetic changes and even reverse them. But weight gain and insulin resistance/diabetes are influenced not only by epigenetic factors; different epigenetic biomarkers have also been identified as early predictors of weight loss and the maintenance of body weight after weight loss. The characterization of all the factors that are able to modify the epigenetic signatures and the determination of their real importance are hindered by the following factors: the magnitude of change produced by dietary and environmental factors is small and cumulative; there are great differences among cell types; and there are many factors involved, including age, with multiple interactions between them. PMID:24425725

  2. Obesity and diabetes in TNF-alpha receptor- deficient mice.

    PubMed Central

    Schreyer, S A; Chua, S C; LeBoeuf, R C

    1998-01-01

    TNF-alpha may play a role in mediating insulin resistance associated with obesity. This concept is based on studies of obese rodents and humans, and cell culture models. TNF elicits cellular responses via two receptors called p55 and p75. Our purpose was to test the involvement of TNF in glucose homeostasis using mice lacking one or both TNF receptors. C57BL/6 mice lacking p55 (p55(-)/-), p75, (p75(-)/-), or both receptors (p55(-)/-p75(-)/-) were fed a high-fat diet to induce obesity. Marked fasting hyperinsulinemia was seen for p55(-)/-p75(-)/- males between 12 and 16 wk of feeding the high-fat diet. Insulin levels were four times greater than wild-type mice. In contrast, p55(-)/- and p75(-)/- mice exhibited insulin levels that were similar or reduced, respectively, as compared with wild-type mice. In addition, high-fat diet-fed p75(-)/- mice had the lowest body weights and leptin levels, and improved insulin sensitivity. Obese (db/db) mice, which are not responsive to leptin, were used to study the role of p55 in severe obesity. Male p55(-)/-db/db mice exhibited threefold higher insulin levels and twofold lower glucose levels at 20 wk of age than control db/db expressing p55. All db/db mice remained severely insulin resistant based on fasting plasma glucose and insulin levels, and glucose and insulin tolerance tests. Our data do not support the concept that TNF, acting via its receptors, is a major contributor to obesity-associated insulin resistance. In fact, data suggest that the two TNF receptors work in concert to protect against diabetes. PMID:9664082

  3. [Type 2 diabetes mellitus and obesity: should we treat the obesity or the diabetes?].

    PubMed

    García, Santiago Durán; Sanz, Santiago Durán; Sanz, Alejandro Durán

    2013-09-01

    In this article, we review the results that can be expected after significant weight loss in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. We provide consensus-based documentation supported by the American Diabetes Association, the European Association for the Study of Diabetes, and the International Diabetes Federation on the importance of physical exercise, metabolic-bariatric surgery, and drug therapy. Lastly, we report the results of studies published in the last few years on glucagon-like peptide-1 analogs and the new family of oral drugs known as gliflozins, specifically studies published on dapagliflozin. PMID:24444519

  4. [Type 2 diabetes mellitus and obesity: should we treat the obesity or the diabetes?].

    PubMed

    García, Santiago Durán; Sanz, Santiago Durán; Sanz, Alejandro Durán

    2013-09-01

    In this article, we review the results that can be expected after significant weight loss in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. We provide consensus-based documentation supported by the American Diabetes Association, the European Association for the Study of Diabetes, and the International Diabetes Federation on the importance of physical exercise, metabolic-bariatric surgery, and drug therapy. Lastly, we report the results of studies published in the last few years on glucagon-like peptide-1 analogs and the new family of oral drugs known as gliflozins, specifically studies published on dapagliflozin.

  5. [Cardiovascular risk factors in young adults with arterial hypertension and/or diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Moreira, Thereza Maria Magalhães; Gomes, Emiliana Bezerra; dos Santos, Jênifa Cavalcante

    2010-12-01

    In this study we aimed to investigate the risk factors associated with arterial hypertension and diabetes mellitus in young adults assisted in six Family Health Units (UBASF), of Fortaleza, Ceará, Brazil. This is a descriptive and documental study, based on the records of the Care Program to Arterial Hypertension and Diabetes Mellitus (HIPERDIA). The sample was composed of 60 records, including hypertensive, diabetics and patients with the two diagnoses. The results showed prevalence of young female adults (78%). Regarding the risk factors, arterial hypertension (n=45), family history (n=33), overweight (n=33) and sedentary lifestyle (n=27) stood out. Regarding the cardiovascular risk stratification, most presented Medium additional risk for cardiovascular disease. We concluded that the individualized evaluation of risk factors supports an action addressed for possible events, being necessary investments in prevention and also in training and maintenance of the HIPERDIA system.

  6. Diabetes and Hypertension Consistently Predict the Presence and Extent of Coronary Artery Calcification in Symptomatic Patients: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Nicoll, Rachel; Zhao, Ying; Ibrahimi, Pranvera; Olivecrona, Gunilla; Henein, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Background: The relationship of conventional cardiovascular risk factors (age, gender, ethnicity, diabetes, dyslipidaemia, hypertension, obesity, exercise, and the number of risk factors) to coronary artery calcification (CAC) presence and extent has never before been assessed in a systematic review and meta-analysis. Methods: We included only English language studies that assessed at least three conventional risk factors apart from age, gender, and ethnicity, but excluded studies in which all patients had another confirmed condition such as renal disease. Results: In total, 10 studies, comprising 15,769 patients, were investigated in the systematic review and seven studies, comprising 12,682 patients, were included in the meta-analysis, which demonstrated the importance of diabetes and hypertension as predictors of CAC presence and extent, with age also predicting CAC presence. Male gender, dyslipidaemia, family history of coronary artery disease, obesity, and smoking were overall not predictive of either CAC presence or extent, despite dyslipidaemia being a key risk factor for coronary artery disease (CAD). Conclusion: Diabetes and hypertension consistently predict the presence and extent of CAC in symptomatic patients. PMID:27608015

  7. The Banishing Obesity and Diabetes in Youth (BODY) Project: description and feasibility of a program to halt obesity-associated disease among urban high school students.

    PubMed

    Sweat, Victoria; Bruzzese, Jean-Marie; Albert, Stephanie; Pinero, Domingo J; Fierman, Arthur; Convit, Antonio

    2012-04-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2DM) and cardiovascular disease (CVD) are rising dramatically in adolescents in parallel with excess weight. The Banishing Obesity and Diabetes in Youth (BODY) Project, is a school-based intervention that medically screens overweight and obese high school students, provides personalized feedback, and connects to appropriate healthcare. Body mass index (BMI) was determined for 1,526 students in one New York City public high school with a school-based health center (SBHC). Overweight and obese students (n = 640) were invited to complete a medical evaluation that included a survey, blood pressure and blood tests. 328/640 (51%) eligible students returned signed parental consent and participated. All participants received a personalized report detailing their results along with specific recommendations on how to improve their health. Parents of participants with results outside healthy ranges (82%; 270/328) were called and mailed referral letters to connect with healthcare services. Project staff reached by telephone 74% (199/270) of those families and 29% (58/199) stated that the report led them to make arrangements to see a healthcare provider. Most students (83%; 273/328) were registered at the SBHC, and we shared their medical results with them so they could follow-up with the students. The BODY Project is a feasible program for urban schools with a SBHC. This may allow effective prevention of T2DM, and CVD from dyslipidemia and hypertension.

  8. Orlistat in the prevention of diabetes in the obese patient

    PubMed Central

    Mancini, Marcio C; Halpern, Alfredo

    2008-01-01

    There has been an increase in the concern about preventing type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), a disease with great and increasing prevalence. The prevalence of obesity, physical inactivity, Western processed diet, important risk factors for the development of T2DM, are also rising. Free fatty acids are increased in obesity and reduce insulin clearance and increase hepatic glucose production. Implementation of a healthy lifestyle has been show to slow the progression of impaired glucose tolerance to T2DM. Orlistat is an inhibitor of lipase activity, with proved efficacy in body weight reduction and long-term management of obesity and more favorable effects on carbohydrate metabolism and it was prospectively shown in XENDOS study that orlistat promoted long-term weight loss and prevented T2DM onset in obese individuals with normal and impaired glucose tolerance at baseline over four years. This benefit could be associated to the weight loss itself, to the limited absorption of lipids and reduction of plasma free fatty acids, to increased production of incretins or to modulation of secretion of cytokines by adipocytes, all effects secondary to orlistat treatment. A proposed strategy is to identify subjects at highest risk to receive a drug intervention, using lifestyle interventions alone at the community level. PMID:18561508

  9. [Obesity, diabetes, cancer and cardiovascular risk: a trans-generational network].

    PubMed

    Guiducci, Letizia; Pasanisi, Emilio; Capati, Eugenia; Iozzo, Patricia

    2010-04-01

    The prevalence of obesity has reached epidemic proportions, predisposing to the development of type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease and cancer. Lifestyle and genetic heritability are causes of this phenomenon, together with the nutritional environment during intra-uterine life and birth weight. We examine the above mentioned relationships in the family tree of a patient with diabetes, central obesity and cardiovascular disease.

  10. A "Family-Based" Approach to the Treatment of Obese Type II Diabetic Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wing, Rena R.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Assigned 49 obese diabetic patients with obese spouses (diabetic or nondiabetic) to an alone or together (with spouses) treatment condition of behavioral weight control program. Found no significant differences in weight losses of patients at posttreatment or one-year followup, but did find that women did better when treated with their spouses,…

  11. Nocturnal blood pressure fall as predictor of diabetic nephropathy in hypertensive patients with type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Hypertensive patients with reduced blood pressure fall (BPF) at night are at higher risk of cardiovascular events (CVE). Methods We evaluated in hypertensive diabetic patients, if a reduced nocturnal BPF can precedes the development of diabetic nephropathy (DN). We followed 70 patients with normal urinary albumin excretion (UAE) for two years. We performed 24-hours ambulatory BP monitoring in baseline and at the end of the study. Results Fourteen (20%) patients (GI) developed DN (N = 11) and/or CVE (n = 4). Compared to the remaining 56 patients (GII) in baseline, GI had similar diurnal systolic (SBP) and diastolic BP (DBP), but higher nocturnal SBP (138 ± 15 vs 129 ± 16 mmHg; p < 0.05) and DBP (83 ± 12 vs 75 ± 11 mmHg; p < 0,05). Basal nocturnal SBP correlated with occurrence of DN and CVE (R = 0.26; P < 0.05) and with UAE at the end of the study (r = 0.3; p < 0.05). Basal BPF (%) correlated with final UAE (r = -0.31; p < 0.05). In patients who developed DN, reductions occurred in nocturnal systolic BPF (12 ± 5 vs 3 ± 6%, p < 0,01) and diastolic BPF (15 ± 8 vs 4 ± 10%, p < 0,01) while no changes were observed in diurnal SBP (153 ± 17 vs 156 ± 16 mmHg, NS) and DBP (91 ± 9 vs 90 ± 7 mmHg, NS). Patients with final UAE < 20 μg/min, had no changes in nocturnal and diurnal BP. Conclusions Our results suggests that elevations in nocturnal BP precedes DN and increases the risk to develop CVE in hypertensive patients with T2DM. PMID:20704750

  12. [Systemic arterial hypertension in child and adolescent].

    PubMed

    Rosas-Peralta, Martín; Medina-Concebida, Luz Elena; Borrayo-Sánchez, Gabriela; Madrid-Miller, Alejandra; Ramírez-Arias, Erick; Pérez-Rodríguez, Gilberto

    2016-01-01

    The epidemic of childhood obesity, the risk of developing left ventricular hypertrophy, and evidence of the early development of atherosclerosis in children would make the detection of and intervention in childhood hypertension important to reduce long-term health risks; however, supporting data are lacking. Secondary hypertension is more common in preadolescent children, with most cases caused by renal disease. Primary or essential hypertension is more common in adolescents and has multiple risk factors, including obesity and a family history of hypertension. Evaluation involves a through history and physical examination, laboratory tests, and specialized studies. Management is multifaceted. Nonpharmacologic treatments include weight reduction, exercise, and dietary modifications. Although the evidence of first line therapy for hypertension is still controversial, the recommendations for pharmacologic treatment are based on symptomatic hypertension, evidence of end-organ damage, stage 2 of hypertension, or stage 1 of hypertension unresponsive to lifestyle modifications, and hypertension with diabetes mellitus where is the search for microalbuminuria justified. PMID:27284843

  13. [Systemic arterial hypertension in child and adolescent].

    PubMed

    Rosas-Peralta, Martín; Medina-Concebida, Luz Elena; Borrayo-Sánchez, Gabriela; Madrid-Miller, Alejandra; Ramírez-Arias, Erick; Pérez-Rodríguez, Gilberto

    2016-01-01

    The epidemic of childhood obesity, the risk of developing left ventricular hypertrophy, and evidence of the early development of atherosclerosis in children would make the detection of and intervention in childhood hypertension important to reduce long-term health risks; however, supporting data are lacking. Secondary hypertension is more common in preadolescent children, with most cases caused by renal disease. Primary or essential hypertension is more common in adolescents and has multiple risk factors, including obesity and a family history of hypertension. Evaluation involves a through history and physical examination, laboratory tests, and specialized studies. Management is multifaceted. Nonpharmacologic treatments include weight reduction, exercise, and dietary modifications. Although the evidence of first line therapy for hypertension is still controversial, the recommendations for pharmacologic treatment are based on symptomatic hypertension, evidence of end-organ damage, stage 2 of hypertension, or stage 1 of hypertension unresponsive to lifestyle modifications, and hypertension with diabetes mellitus where is the search for microalbuminuria justified.

  14. Implications of diet modification on sympathoinhibitory mechanisms and hypertension in obesity.

    PubMed

    Sfrantzis, K D; How, J M Y; Sartor, D M

    2015-05-01

    We have previously demonstrated that a number of rats fed a moderately high-fat diet (MHFD) become obese and hypertensive and had compromised sympathoinhibitory and vasodilator responses to the gut hormones cholecystokinin (CCK) and gastric leptin. This has implications for increased resistance in vascular beds that attract a large proportion of cardiac output after a meal and may be an important mechanism underlying the development of hypertension in obesity in which food consumption is greatly increased. The aim of this study was to determine whether swapping a MHFD for a low-fat diet (LFD) would induce weight loss in obese animals, reverse the signs of hypertension and restore sympathoinhibitory reflexes. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were placed on a LFD (controls; n = 8) or a MHFD (n = 24) for 11 weeks after which the latter displayed either an obesity-prone (OP) or obesity-resistant (OR) phenotype. All animals were fed a LFD for a further 6 weeks after which they were anaesthetised with isoflurane and artificially ventilated for evaluation of resting arterial pressure (AP) and renal sympathetic nerve responses to CCK (0.1-4 μg/kg) and leptin (15 μg/kg). Weight gain in OP animals remained higher than OR or controls following diet switch (P < 0.05 for both). Resting AP was not significantly different between OP (103 ± 4 mmHg), OR (102 ± 3 mmHg) or control (104 ± 3 mmHg) animals and sympathoinhibitory responses to CCK or leptin were not different between the groups (P > 0.05). These results demonstrate that diet modification can have beneficial effects on sympathetic function and restore normotension without the need for weight reduction.

  15. Macular circulation in patients with diabetes mellitus with and without arterial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Arend, O; Ruffer, M; Remky, A

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Previous fluorescein angiographic studies have shown alterations in the macular microcirculation in patients with diabetes mellitus and arterial hypertension. In both diseases capillary blood velocity was reduced and capillary density decreased. These changes were more pronounced in diabetic patients. We have examined the influence of arterial hypertension in combination with diabetes mellitus.
METHODS—62 patients with diabetes mellitus and arterial hypertension (group 1) were matched with patients with diabetes mellitus but without arterial hypertension (group 2, match criteria: ETDRS stage of retinopathy). In all subjects fluorescein angiograms were performed with a scanning laser ophthalmoscope. Macular capillary blood velocity (CBV), perifoveal intercapillary area (PIA), the coefficient of variation of both parameters, the area of the foveal avascular zone (FAZ), and the arteriovenous passage time (AVP) were assessed by digital image analysis.
RESULTS—Systolic and diastolic blood pressures were significantly increased in the patients with arterial hypertension (systolic p=0.0008; diastolic p=0.03). Neither dynamic measures (AVP: 1.64 (0.49) seconds (group 1), 1.72 (0.58) seconds (group 2); CBV: 1.98 (0.39) mm/s (group 1), 2.09 (0.43) mm/s (group 2)) nor morphological measures (PIA: 7985 (3137) µm2 (group 1), 8338 (3376) µm2 (group 2); FAZ: 0.319 (0.206) mm2 (group 1), 0.363 (0.237) mm2 (group 2)) were significantly different between the two groups of diabetic patients.
CONCLUSION—Arterial hypertension did not result in more severe macular capillary dropout than diabetes without hypertension. This might be explained by the fact that most of the patients were being treated with antihypertensive drugs.

 PMID:11090480

  16. Management of hypertension and diabetes mellitus by cardiovascular and endocrine physicians: a China registry

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jie; Sheng, Chang-Sheng; Huang, Qi-Fang; Li, Li-Hua; Ma, Chang-Sheng; Guo, Xiao-Hui; Ji, Li-Nong; Wang, Ji-Guang

    2016-01-01

    Objective: We investigated hypertension and diabetes mellitus in two management settings, namely cardiology and endocrinology, and their associations with albuminuria while accounting for the management of these two diseases. Methods: Our multicentre registry included patients (≥20 years) seen for hypertension in cardiology or for diabetes mellitus in endocrinology. We administered a questionnaire and measured blood pressure, glycosylated haemoglobin A1c and albuminuria. Results: Presence of both hypertension and diabetes was observed in 32.9% of hypertensive patients in cardiology (n = 1291) and 58.9% of diabetic patients in endocrinology (n = 1168). When both diseases were present, the use of combination antihypertensive therapy [odds ratio (OR) 0.31, P < 0.0001] and inhibitors of the renin–angiotensin system (OR 0.66, P = 0.0009) was less frequent in endocrinology than cardiology, and the use of combination antidiabetic therapy (OR 0.16, P < 0.0001) was less frequent in cardiology than endocrinology. The control of hypertension and diabetes, however, was not different between the two management settings (P ≥ 0.21), regardless of the therapeutic target (SBP/DBP < 140/90 or 130/80 mmHg and glycosylated haemoglobin A1c <7.0 or 6.5%). The prevalence of albuminuria was higher (P ≤ 0.02) in the presence of both diseases (23.3%) than those with either hypertension (12.6%) or diabetes alone (15.9%). Conclusion: Hypertension and diabetes mellitus were often jointly present, especially in the setting of endocrinology. The management was insufficient on the use of combination antihypertensive therapy and inhibitors of the renin–angiotensin system in endocrinology and for combination antidiabetic therapy in cardiology, indicating a need for more intensive management and better control of both clinical conditions. PMID:27270188

  17. Serum Circulating microRNA Profiling for Identification of Potential Type 2 Diabetes and Obesity Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Pescador, Nuria; Pérez-Barba, Milagros; Ibarra, José María; Corbatón, Arturo; Martínez-Larrad, María Teresa; Serrano-Ríos, Manuel

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aim MicroRNAs are small non-coding RNAs that play important regulatory roles in a variety of biological processes, including complex metabolic processes, such as energy and lipid metabolism, which have been studied in the context of diabetes and obesity. Some particular microRNAs have recently been demonstrated to abundantly and stably exist in serum and to be potentially disease-specific. The aim of this profiling study was to characterize the expression of miRNA in serum samples of obese, nonobese diabetic and obese diabetic individuals to determine whether miRNA expression was deregulated in these serum samples and to identify whether any observed deregulation was specific to either obesity or diabetes or obesity with diabetes. Patients and Methods Thirteen patients with type 2 diabetes, 20 obese patients, 16 obese patients with type 2 diabetes and 20 healthy controls were selected for this study. MiRNA PCR panels were employed to screen serum levels of 739 miRNAs in pooled samples from these four groups. We compared the levels of circulating miRNAs between serum pools of each group. Individual validation of the twelve microRNAs selected as promising biomarkers was carried out using RT-qPCR. Results Three serum microRNAs, miR-138, miR-15b and miR-376a, were found to have potential as predictive biomarkers in obesity. Use of miR-138 or miR-376a provides a powerful predictive tool for distinguishing obese patients from normal healthy controls, diabetic patients, and obese diabetic patients. In addition, the combination of miR-503 and miR-138 can distinguish diabetic from obese diabetic patients. Conclusion This study is the first to show a panel of serum miRNAs for obesity, and compare them with miRNAs identified in serum for diabetes and obesity with diabetes. Our results support the use of some miRNAs extracted from serum samples as potential predictive tools for obesity and type 2 diabetes. PMID:24204780

  18. [Carbohydrate metabolism disorders among obese children and adolescents. Diabetes mellitus type 2].

    PubMed

    Sergeyev, E; Wagner, I; Neef, M; Adler, M; Körner, A; Kiess, W

    2013-04-01

    As obesity has become more prevalent, the incidence of type 2 diabetes mellitus in children and adolescents has also increased. Obesity during adolescence leads to an increased risk for disease and premature death during adulthood, independent of obesity during adulthood. Obesity is the major risk factor impacting insulin sensitivity. Subjects with insulin resistance are at risk for progression to diabetes. Type 2 diabetes mellitus in obese children and adolescents is frequently asymptomatic. It is essential to identify children at high risk who need aggressive lifestyle modification focused on weight reduction and increased physical activity. Early detection and therapy of obese children and adolescents with type 2 diabetes may reduce the risk of cardiometabolic consequences and other long-term complications in adulthood.

  19. Sphingolipids in Obesity, Type 2 Diabetes, and Metabolic Disease

    PubMed Central

    Russo, S.B.; Ross, J.S.; Cowart, L.A.

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic disease, including obesity and type 2 diabetes, constitutes a major emerging health crisis in Western nations. Although the symptoms and clinical pathology and physiology of these conditions are well understood, the molecular mechanisms underlying the disease process have largely remained obscure. Sphingolipids, a lipid class with both signaling and structural properties, have recently emerged as key players in most major tissues affected by diabetes and are required components in the molecular etiology of this disease. Indeed, sphingolipids have been shown to mediate loss of insulin sensitivity, to promote the characteristic diabetic pro-inflammatory state, and to induce cell death and dysfunction in important organs such as the pancreas and heart. Furthermore, plasma sphingolipid levels are emerging as potential biomarkers for the decompensation of insulin resistance to frank type 2 diabetes. Despite these discoveries, the roles of specific sphingolipid species and sphingolipid metabolic pathways remain obscure, and newly developed experimental approaches must be employed to elucidate the detailed molecular mechanisms necessary for rational drug development and other clinical applications. PMID:23563667

  20. Endothelin-1 gene and endothelial nitric oxide synthase gene polymorphisms in adolescents with juvenile and obesity-associated hypertension.

    PubMed

    Baráth, A; Endreffy, E; Bereczki, Cs; Gellén, B; Szücs, B; Németh, I; Túri, S

    2007-03-01

    Hypertension is an increasing public health problem all over the world. Essential hypertension accounts for more than 90% of cases of hypertension. It is a complex genetic, environmental and demographic trait. New method in molecular biology has been proposed a number of candidate genes, but the linkage or association with hypertension has been problematic (lack of gene-gene and gene-environment interaction). It is well known that genetic influences are more important in younger hypertensives, because children are relatively free from the common environmental factors contributing to essential hypertension. The association studies compare genotype ferquencies of the candidate gene between patient groups and the controls, in pathways known to be involved in blood pressure regulation. This study examined three polymorphisms of these factors encoding genes (ET-1 G+5665T (Lys198Asn), endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) T-786C promoter polymorphism and 27-bp repeat polymorphism in intron 4) in adolescents with juvenile essential and obesity-associated hypertension. Significant differences were found in the G/T genotype of the ET-1 polymorphism in the hypertensive and obese+hypertensive patients (body mass index (BMI) > 30). A strong association was detected between the BMI and the polymorphism of the ET-1 gene. It seems that ET-1 gene polymorphism plays a role in the development of juvenile hypertension associated with obesity. Although no significant differences were seen in the case of the eNOS promoter polymorphism and the eNOS 4th intron 27-bp repeat polymorphism. It seems that eNOS may play a role, but this is not the main factor in the control of blood pressure; it is rather a fine regulator in this process. This study with adolescents facilitates an understanding of the genetic factors promoting juvenile hypertension and obesity. PMID:17444275

  1. Type 2 diabetes, but not obesity, prevalence is positively associated with ambient temperature.

    PubMed

    Speakman, John R; Heidari-Bakavoli, Sahar

    2016-01-01

    Cold exposure stimulates energy expenditure and glucose disposal. If these factors play a significant role in whole body energy balance, and glucose homeostasis, it is predicted that both obesity and type 2 diabetes prevalence would be lower where it is colder. Previous studies have noted connections between ambient temperature and obesity, but the direction of the effect is confused. No previous studies have explored the link of type 2 diabetes to ambient temperature. We used county level data for obesity and diabetes prevalence across the mainland USA and matched this to county level ambient temperature data. Average ambient temperature explained 5.7% of the spatial variation in obesity and 29.6% of the spatial variation in type 2 diabetes prevalence. Correcting the type 2 diabetes data for the effect of obesity reduced the explained variation to 26.8%. Even when correcting for obesity, poverty and race, ambient temperature explained 12.4% of the variation in the prevalence of type 2 diabetes, and this significant effect remained when latitude was entered into the model as a predictor. When obesity prevalence was corrected for poverty and race the significant effect of temperature disappeared. Enhancing energy expenditure by cold exposure will likely not impact obesity significantly, but may be useful to combat type 2 diabetes. PMID:27477955

  2. Type 2 diabetes, but not obesity, prevalence is positively associated with ambient temperature

    PubMed Central

    Speakman, John R.; Heidari-Bakavoli, Sahar

    2016-01-01

    Cold exposure stimulates energy expenditure and glucose disposal. If these factors play a significant role in whole body energy balance, and glucose homeostasis, it is predicted that both obesity and type 2 diabetes prevalence would be lower where it is colder. Previous studies have noted connections between ambient temperature and obesity, but the direction of the effect is confused. No previous studies have explored the link of type 2 diabetes to ambient temperature. We used county level data for obesity and diabetes prevalence across the mainland USA and matched this to county level ambient temperature data. Average ambient temperature explained 5.7% of the spatial variation in obesity and 29.6% of the spatial variation in type 2 diabetes prevalence. Correcting the type 2 diabetes data for the effect of obesity reduced the explained variation to 26.8%. Even when correcting for obesity, poverty and race, ambient temperature explained 12.4% of the variation in the prevalence of type 2 diabetes, and this significant effect remained when latitude was entered into the model as a predictor. When obesity prevalence was corrected for poverty and race the significant effect of temperature disappeared. Enhancing energy expenditure by cold exposure will likely not impact obesity significantly, but may be useful to combat type 2 diabetes. PMID:27477955

  3. The importance of the relationship between microalbuminuria, subclinical proteinuria and arterial hypertension in diabetics.

    PubMed

    Serban, V; Dabelea, D

    1994-01-01

    Arterial hypertension represents, among others, an important risk factor for the development of microalbuminuria in diabetics. On the other hand, with microalbuminuria, it has been observed an important rise in the prevalence of high blood pressure. This study stresses the importance of the relationship between subclinical proteinuria and microalbuminuria, on one hand, and arterial hypertension on the other hand. There have been studied 343 diabetics hospitalized in our Clinic. We estimated the presence of hypertension (according to WHO criteria) and the values of subclinical proteinuria (biuret method) and microalbuminuria (MICRAL-test). We observed that 70.8% of hypertensives and 49.4% of normotensives presented values of proteinuria that ranked between 300 and 500 mg/24 h (p < 0.001). Meanwhile, 25.8% of proteinuric patients and 14.8% of non-proteinuric ones were hypertensives (p < 0.05). In hypertensive diabetics the prevalence of subclinical proteinuria is higher than in normotensive ones. The prevalence of hypertension is significantly higher in microalbuminuric patients than in normoalbuminuric ones.

  4. Effect of Spirulina maxima Supplementation on Calcium, Magnesium, Iron, and Zinc Status in Obese Patients with Treated Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Suliburska, J; Szulińska, M; Tinkov, A A; Bogdański, P

    2016-09-01

    The effects of Spirulina maxima supplementation on calcium, magnesium, iron, and zinc status were studied in a double-blind placebo-controlled trial of 50 obese subjects with treated hypertension, each randomized to receive 2 g of spirulina or a placebo daily for 3 months. At baseline and after treatment, the calcium, magnesium, iron, and zinc concentration in plasma was assessed. It was found that 3 months of S. maxima supplementation resulted in a significant decrease in the iron level in the plasma of obese patients. In conclusion, this is the first clinical study on the influence of spirulina supplementation on mineral status in obese patients with hypertension. Spirulina supplementation affects the iron status of obese Caucasians with well-treated hypertension. PMID:26779620

  5. Constrictor prostanoids and uridine adenosine tetraphosphate: vascular mediators and therapeutic targets in hypertension and diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Takayuki; Goulopoulou, Styliani; Taguchi, Kumiko; Tostes, Rita C; Kobayashi, Tsuneo

    2015-01-01

    Vascular dysfunction plays a pivotal role in the development of systemic complications associated with arterial hypertension and diabetes. The endothelium, or more specifically, various factors derived from endothelial cells tightly regulate vascular function, including vascular tone. In physiological conditions, there is a balance between endothelium-derived factors, that is, relaxing factors (endothelium-derived relaxing factors; EDRFs) and contracting factors (endothelium-derived contracting factors; EDCFs), which mediate vascular homeostasis. However, in disease states, such as diabetes and arterial hypertension, there is an imbalance between EDRF and EDCF, with a reduction of EDRF signalling and an increase of EDCF signalling. Among EDCFs, COX-derived vasoconstrictor prostanoids play an important role in the development of vascular dysfunction associated with hypertension and diabetes. Moreover, uridine adenosine tetraphosphate (Up4A), identified as an EDCF in 2005, also modulates vascular function. However, the role of Up4A in hypertension- and diabetes-associated vascular dysfunction is unclear. In the present review, we focused on experimental and clinical evidence that implicate these two EDCFs (vasoconstrictor prostanoids and Up4A) in vascular dysfunction associated with hypertension and diabetes. PMID:26031319

  6. Minireview: Epigenetics of obesity and diabetes in humans.

    PubMed

    Slomko, Howard; Heo, Hye J; Einstein, Francine H

    2012-03-01

    Understanding the determinants of human health and disease is overwhelmingly complex, particularly for common, late-onset, chronic disorders, such as obesity and diabetes. Elucidating the genetic and environmental factors that influence susceptibility to disruptions in energy homeostasis and metabolic regulation remain a challenge, and progress will entail the integration of multiple assessments of temporally dynamic environmental exposures in the context of each individual's genotype. To meet this challenge, researchers are increasingly exploring the epigenome, which is the malleable interface of gene-environment interactions. Epigenetic variation, whether innate or induced, contributes to variation in gene expression, the range of potential individual responses to internal and external cues, and risk for metabolic disease. Ultimately, advancement in our understanding of chronic disease susceptibility in humans will depend on refinement of exposure assessment tools and systems biology approaches to interpretation. In this review, we present recent progress in epigenetics of human obesity and diabetes, existing challenges, and the potential for new approaches to unravel the complex biology of metabolic dysregulation.

  7. Sugar, uric acid, and the etiology of diabetes and obesity.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Richard J; Nakagawa, Takahiko; Sanchez-Lozada, L Gabriela; Shafiu, Mohamed; Sundaram, Shikha; Le, Myphuong; Ishimoto, Takuji; Sautin, Yuri Y; Lanaspa, Miguel A

    2013-10-01

    The intake of added sugars, such as from table sugar (sucrose) and high-fructose corn syrup has increased dramatically in the last hundred years and correlates closely with the rise in obesity, metabolic syndrome, and diabetes. Fructose is a major component of added sugars and is distinct from other sugars in its ability to cause intracellular ATP depletion, nucleotide turnover, and the generation of uric acid. In this article, we revisit the hypothesis that it is this unique aspect of fructose metabolism that accounts for why fructose intake increases the risk for metabolic syndrome. Recent studies show that fructose-induced uric acid generation causes mitochondrial oxidative stress that stimulates fat accumulation independent of excessive caloric intake. These studies challenge the long-standing dogma that "a calorie is just a calorie" and suggest that the metabolic effects of food may matter as much as its energy content. The discovery that fructose-mediated generation of uric acid may have a causal role in diabetes and obesity provides new insights into pathogenesis and therapies for this important disease.

  8. Sugar, uric acid, and the etiology of diabetes and obesity.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Richard J; Nakagawa, Takahiko; Sanchez-Lozada, L Gabriela; Shafiu, Mohamed; Sundaram, Shikha; Le, Myphuong; Ishimoto, Takuji; Sautin, Yuri Y; Lanaspa, Miguel A

    2013-10-01

    The intake of added sugars, such as from table sugar (sucrose) and high-fructose corn syrup has increased dramatically in the last hundred years and correlates closely with the rise in obesity, metabolic syndrome, and diabetes. Fructose is a major component of added sugars and is distinct from other sugars in its ability to cause intracellular ATP depletion, nucleotide turnover, and the generation of uric acid. In this article, we revisit the hypothesis that it is this unique aspect of fructose metabolism that accounts for why fructose intake increases the risk for metabolic syndrome. Recent studies show that fructose-induced uric acid generation causes mitochondrial oxidative stress that stimulates fat accumulation independent of excessive caloric intake. These studies challenge the long-standing dogma that "a calorie is just a calorie" and suggest that the metabolic effects of food may matter as much as its energy content. The discovery that fructose-mediated generation of uric acid may have a causal role in diabetes and obesity provides new insights into pathogenesis and therapies for this important disease. PMID:24065788

  9. Minireview: Epigenetics of Obesity and Diabetes in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Slomko, Howard; Heo, Hye J.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the determinants of human health and disease is overwhelmingly complex, particularly for common, late-onset, chronic disorders, such as obesity and diabetes. Elucidating the genetic and environmental factors that influence susceptibility to disruptions in energy homeostasis and metabolic regulation remain a challenge, and progress will entail the integration of multiple assessments of temporally dynamic environmental exposures in the context of each individual's genotype. To meet this challenge, researchers are increasingly exploring the epigenome, which is the malleable interface of gene-environment interactions. Epigenetic variation, whether innate or induced, contributes to variation in gene expression, the range of potential individual responses to internal and external cues, and risk for metabolic disease. Ultimately, advancement in our understanding of chronic disease susceptibility in humans will depend on refinement of exposure assessment tools and systems biology approaches to interpretation. In this review, we present recent progress in epigenetics of human obesity and diabetes, existing challenges, and the potential for new approaches to unravel the complex biology of metabolic dysregulation. PMID:22253427

  10. Sugar, Uric Acid, and the Etiology of Diabetes and Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Richard J.; Nakagawa, Takahiko; Sanchez-Lozada, L. Gabriela; Shafiu, Mohamed; Sundaram, Shikha; Le, Myphuong; Ishimoto, Takuji; Sautin, Yuri Y.; Lanaspa, Miguel A.

    2013-01-01

    The intake of added sugars, such as from table sugar (sucrose) and high-fructose corn syrup has increased dramatically in the last hundred years and correlates closely with the rise in obesity, metabolic syndrome, and diabetes. Fructose is a major component of added sugars and is distinct from other sugars in its ability to cause intracellular ATP depletion, nucleotide turnover, and the generation of uric acid. In this article, we revisit the hypothesis that it is this unique aspect of fructose metabolism that accounts for why fructose intake increases the risk for metabolic syndrome. Recent studies show that fructose-induced uric acid generation causes mitochondrial oxidative stress that stimulates fat accumulation independent of excessive caloric intake. These studies challenge the long-standing dogma that “a calorie is just a calorie” and suggest that the metabolic effects of food may matter as much as its energy content. The discovery that fructose-mediated generation of uric acid may have a causal role in diabetes and obesity provides new insights into pathogenesis and therapies for this important disease. PMID:24065788

  11. Effects of dopamine on leptin release and leptin gene (OB) expression in adipocytes from obese and hypertensive patients

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez-Aguilar, Cleto; Alvarez-Paredes, Alfonso Rafael; Lindholm, Bengt; Stenvinkel, Peter; García-López, Elvia; Mejía-Rodríguez, Oliva; López-Meza, Joel Edmundo; Amato, Dante; Paniagua, Ramon

    2013-01-01

    Background A reduction of dopaminergic (DAergic) activity with increased prolactin levels has been found in obese and hypertensive patients, suggesting its involvement as a pathophysiological mechanism promoting hypertension. Similarly, leptin action increasing sympathetic activity has been proposed to be involved in mechanisms of hypertension. The aim of this study was to analyze the effects of DA, norepinephrine (NE), and prolactin on leptin release and leptin gene (OB) expression in adipocytes from obese and hypertensive patients. Methods Leptin release and OB gene expression were analyzed in cultured adipocytes from 16 obese and hypertensive patients treated with DA (0.001, 0.01, 0.1, and 1.0 μmol/L), NE (1.0 μmol/L), insulin (0.1 μmol/L), and prolactin (1.0 μmol/L), and from five nonobese and normotensive controls treated with DA (1 μmol/L), NE (1 μmol/L), insulin (0.1 μmol/L), and prolactin (1.0 μmol/L). Results A dose-related reduction of leptin release and OB gene messenger ribonucleic acid expression under different doses of DA was observed in adipocytes from obese hypertensive patients. Whereas prolactin treatment elicited a significant increase of both leptin release and OB gene expression, NE reduced these parameters. Although similar effects of DA and NE were observed in adipocytes from controls, baseline values in controls were reduced to 20% of the value in adipocytes from obese hypertensive patients. Conclusion These results suggest that DAergic deficiency contributes to metabolic disorders linked to hyperleptinemia in obese and hypertensive patients. PMID:24348062

  12. Obesity-related pulmonary arterial hypertension in rats correlates with increased circulating inflammatory cytokines and lipids and with oxidant damage in the arterial wall but not with hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Irwin, David C.; Garat, Chrystelle V.; Crossno, Joseph T.; MacLean, Paul S.; Sullivan, Timothy M.; Erickson, Paul F.; Jackman, Matthew R.; Harral, Julie W.; Reusch, Jane E. B.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Obesity is causally linked to a number of comorbidities, including cardiovascular disease, diabetes, renal dysfunction, and cancer. Obesity has also been linked to pulmonary disorders, including pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). It was long believed that obesity-related PAH was the result of hypoventilation and hypoxia due to the increased mechanical load of excess body fat. However, in recent years it has been proposed that the metabolic and inflammatory disturbances of obesity may also play a role in the development of PAH. To determine whether PAH develops in obese rats in the absence of hypoxia, we assessed pulmonary hemodynamics and pulmonary artery (PA) structure in the diet-resistant/diet-induced obesity (DR/DIO) and Zucker lean/fatty rat models. We found that high-fat feeding (DR/DIO) or overfeeding (Zucker) elicited PA remodeling, neomuscularization of distal arterioles, and elevated PA pressure, accompanied by right ventricular (RV) hypertrophy. PA thickening and distal neomuscularization were also observed in DIO rats on a low-fat diet. No evidence of hypoventilation or chronic hypoxia was detected in either model, nor was there a correlation between blood glucose or insulin levels and PAH. However, circulating inflammatory cytokine levels were increased with high-fat feeding or calorie overload, and hyperlipidemia and oxidant damage in the PA wall correlated with PAH in the DR/DIO model. We conclude that hyperlipidemia and peripheral inflammation correlate with the development of PAH in obese subjects. Obesity-related inflammation may predispose to PAH even in the absence of hypoxia. PMID:25610600

  13. Fetal, infant, and childhood growth are predictors of coronary heart disease, diabetes, and hypertension in adult men and women.

    PubMed Central

    Osmond, C; Barker, D J

    2000-01-01

    Many human fetuses have to adapt to a limited supply of nutrients. In doing so they permanently change their structure and metabolism. These programmed changes may be the origins of a number of diseases in later life, including coronary heart disease, hypertension, and noninsulin- dependent diabetes. We review epidemiologic studies in which the incidence of these diseases has been related to the recorded, early growth of individuals, while considering factors in the adult lifestyle, such as obesity and socioeconomic status. We discuss possible mechanisms. For hypertension these mechanisms include placentation, maternal blood pressure, fetal undernutrition; childhood growth, activation of the renin-angiotensin system, renal structure, programming of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, vascular structure, and sympathetic nervous activity. For noninsulin-dependent diabetes we discuss mechanisms concerning both insulin resistance and insulin deficiency. We include a review of evidence for the programming of serum cholesterol and clotting factor concentrations. We address the timing of critical windows for coronary heart disease, reviewing studies that allow assessment of the relative importance of fetal, infant, and childhood growth. We argue for a research strategy that combines clinical, animal, and epidemiological studies. PMID:10852853

  14. Obesity in obstetrics.

    PubMed

    Liat, Salzer; Cabero, Luis; Hod, Moshe; Yogev, Yariv

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is a rising global epidemic. Obesity during pregnancy is associated with increased maternal and fetal risks, which is inversely correlated with the severity level of obesity. Other comorbidities are common (diabetes mellitus, hypertensive disorders, etc.) and contribute to an even increased risk. Maternal obesity during pregnancy contributes also to offspring obesity and noncommunicable diseases later in life in a vicious cycle. Managing these problems, and potentially reducing their risk, can pose a challenge in obstetric care. It is important to provide preconception nutritional and exercise care, and guidance during pregnancy and post pregnancy for appropriate weight loss.

  15. Continued increases in hypertension over three decades in Fiji, and the influence of obesity

    PubMed Central

    Linhart, Christine; Tukana, Isimeli; Lin, Sophia; Taylor, Richard; Morrell, Stephen; Vatucawaqa, Penina; Magliano, Dianna; Zimmet, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To analyse trends during 1980–2011 in hypertension prevalence and SBP/DBP by sex in Fiji Melanesian (i-Taukei) and Indian adults aged 25–64 years; and to assess effects of BMI. Methods: Unit record data from five population-based surveys were included (n = 14 191). Surveys were adjusted to the nearest previous census to improve national representativeness. Hypertension was defined as SBP at least 140 mmHg and/or DBP at least 90 mmHg and/or on medication for hypertension. Regression (Poisson and linear) was used to assess period trends. Results: Over 1980–2011 hypertension prevalence (%) and mean blood pressure (BP) (SBP/DBP mmHg) increased significantly (P < 0.001) in both sexes and ethnicities. Increases in hypertension were: from 16.2 to 41.3% in i-Taukei men (mean BP from 122/73 to 135/81); from 20.5 to 37.8% in Indian men (mean BP from 122/74 to 133/81); from 25.9 to 36.9% in i-Taukei women (mean BP from 126/76 to 132/81); and from 17.6 to 33.1% in Indian women (mean BP 117/71 to 130/81). The age-adjusted trend in hypertension and mean BP (over 32 years) declined after adjusting for BMI, with effects of obesity greater in women than men, and in Indians than i-Taukei. BMI explained 45% of the age-adjusted increase in DBP over the period in Indians (both sexes), and 16% (men) and 38% (women) in i-Taukei. Conclusion: Significant increases have occurred in hypertension prevalence and SBP/DBP in both sexes and ethnicities of Fiji during 1980–2011 with no indication of decline, contributing to significant premature mortality from cardiovascular disease. PMID:26682778

  16. Obesity paradox in amputation risk among nonelderly diabetic men.

    PubMed

    Sohn, Min-Woong; Budiman-Mak, Elly; Oh, Elissa H; Park, Michael S; Stuck, Rodney M; Stone, Neil J; Pearce, William B

    2012-02-01

    The association between BMI and amputation risk is not currently well known. We used data for a cohort of diabetic patients treated in the US Department of Veterans Affairs Healthcare System in 2003. Men aged <65 years at the end of follow-up were examined for their amputation risk and amputation-free survival during the next 5 years (2004-2008). Compared to overweight individuals (BMI 25-29.9 kg/m(2)), the risks of amputation and treatment failure (amputation or death) were higher for patients with BMI <25 kg/m(2) and were lower for those with BMI ≥30 kg/m(2). Individuals with BMI ≥40 kg/m(2) were only half as likely to experience any (hazard ratios (HR) = 0.49; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.30-0.80) and major amputations (HR = 0.53; 95% CI, 0.39-0.73) during follow-up as overweight individuals. While the amputation risk continued to decrease for higher BMI, amputation-free survival showed a slight upturn at BMI >40 kg/m(2). The association between obesity and amputation risk in our data shows a pattern consistent with "obesity paradox" observed in many health conditions. More research is needed to better understand pathophysiological mechanisms that may explain the paradoxical association between obesity and lower-extremity amputation (LEA) risk.

  17. Role of the Gut Microbiome in Obesity and Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Barlow, Gillian M; Yu, Allen; Mathur, Ruchi

    2015-12-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and obesity represent two of the biggest global health challenges of this century and are associated with significant comorbidities and healthcare costs. Although multiple factors undoubtedly contribute to the development and progression of DM and obesity, research over the last decade has demonstrated that the microbes that colonize the human gut may play key contributory roles. Gut microbes are now known to codevelop with the human host and are strongly influenced by mode of birth and early diet and nutrition, as well as environmental and other factors including antibiotic exposure. Gut microbes contribute to human health through roles in polysaccharide breakdown, nutrient absorption, inflammatory responses, gut permeability, and bile acid modification. Numerous studies have suggested that disruptions in the relative proportions of gut microbial populations may contribute to weight gain and insulin resistance, including alterations in Gammaproteobacteria and Verrucomicrobia and the ratios of Firmicutes to Bacteroidetes in weight gain and possible alterations in butyrate-producing bacteria such as Faecalibacterium prausnitzii in DM. In addition, it has been shown that the methanogenic Archaea may contribute to altered metabolism and weight gain in the host. However, the majority of studies are performed with stool or colonic samples and may not be representative of the metabolically active small intestine. Studies predominantly in rodent models are beginning to elucidate the mechanisms by which gut microbes contribute to DM and obesity, but much remains to be learned before we can begin to approach targeted treatments.

  18. Hypertension, obesity and their medications in relation to renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, J. M.; Castelao, J. E.; Gago-Dominguez, M.; Ross, R. K.; Yu, M. C.

    1998-01-01

    A population-based, case-control study was conducted in Los Angeles County, California, to investigate the inter-relationships of obesity, hypertension and medications in relation to renal cell carcinoma (RCC) risk. A total of 1204 RCC patients and an equal number of neighbourhood controls were included. Obesity was a strong risk factor for RCC. A fourfold increase in risk was observed for those with usual body mass index (kg m(-2)) of > or = 30 vs < 22. A history of hypertension was another strong, independent risk factor for RCC [odds ratio (OR) = 2.2; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.8, 2.6]. There was little evidence that use of diuretics was directly related to RCC development. Use of diuretics for reasons other than hypertension (primarily for weight control) was unrelated to risk among self-reported normotensive subjects (OR = 1.2; 95% CI = 0.7, 2.2). Among hypertensive subjects, heavy users of diuretics experienced similar risk as light users (OR = 0.9 among subjects with lifetime dose of > or = 137 g compared with those with lifetime dose of < 43 g). Similarly, normotensive subjects who took non-diuretic antihypertensives regularly showed no increased risk for RCC (OR = 1.1; 95% CI = 0.6-1.8), and intake among hypertensive subjects did not further increase their risk. Regular use of amphetamine-containing diet pills was associated with a twofold increase in RCC risk (95% CI = 1.4-2.8) and the risk increased with increasing dose of amphetamines. However, the fraction of cases possibly related to this exposure is small (population-attributable risk = 5%). PMID:9652770

  19. Validation of diabetes mellitus and hypertension diagnosis in computerized medical records in primary health care

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Computerized Clinical Records, which are incorporated in primary health care practice, have great potential for research. In order to use this information, data quality and reliability must be assessed to prevent compromising the validity of the results. The aim of this study is to validate the diagnosis of hypertension and diabetes mellitus in the computerized clinical records of primary health care, taking the diagnosis criteria established in the most prominently used clinical guidelines as the gold standard against which what measure the sensitivity, specificity, and determine the predictive values. The gold standard for diabetes mellitus was the diagnostic criteria established in 2003 American Diabetes Association Consensus Statement for diabetic subjects. The gold standard for hypertension was the diagnostic criteria established in the Joint National Committee published in 2003. Methods A cross-sectional multicentre validation study of diabetes mellitus and hypertension diagnoses in computerized clinical records of primary health care was carried out. Diagnostic criteria from the most prominently clinical practice guidelines were considered for standard reference. Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values, and global agreement (with kappa index), were calculated. Results were shown overall and stratified by sex and age groups. Results The agreement for diabetes mellitus with the reference standard as determined by the guideline was almost perfect (κ = 0.990), with a sensitivity of 99.53%, a specificity of 99.49%, a positive predictive value of 91.23% and a negative predictive value of 99.98%. Hypertension diagnosis showed substantial agreement with the reference standard as determined by the guideline (κ = 0.778), the sensitivity was 85.22%, the specificity 96.95%, the positive predictive value 85.24%, and the negative predictive value was 96.95%. Sensitivity results were worse in patients who also had diabetes and in

  20. Depression Amplifies the Influence of Central Obesity on 10-Year Incidence of Diabetes: Findings from MIDUS

    PubMed Central

    Karlamangla, Arun

    2016-01-01

    Background Central obesity is a major risk factor for diabetes but many obese individuals never develop diabetes, suggesting the presence of important effect modifiers. Depression has emerged as a key risk factor for poor glycemic control, but to our knowledge, no previous work has investigated whether depression amplifies the effect of central obesity on glucoregulation. Methods and Findings We used a national sample of adults without prevalent diabetes (MIDUS; N = 919) to test for synergy between central obesity and depression in the development of diabetes 10 years later. We found that depression amplified the association of waist-to-hip ratio (WHR) with incident diabetes adjusted for age, race, gender, education, physical activity, and sleep problems (p = 0.01 for test of interaction). The relative risk for incident diabetes per every 0.1 increment in WHR was 1.75 (95% CI: 1.31; 2.33) in those without depression and 3.78 in those with depression (95% CI: 2.14; 6.66). Conclusions These results confirm the role of depression as a robust risk factor for the development of diabetes and for the first time, demonstrate a synergy between depression and central obesity. Identifying and addressing depression could prove to be an effective approach to preventing diabetes in at risk individuals. Ultimately, elucidating the interplay among risk factors from different domains will be key to understanding multifactorial diseases such as diabetes and informing theory-based, patient-centered interventions aimed at reducing diabetes risk. PMID:27755576

  1. Sodium-22 influx into erythrocytes from diabetic hypertensive patients on maintenance hemodialysis

    SciTech Connect

    Gambhir, K.K.; Mathews, J.; Parui, R.; Cruz, I.A.; Hosten, A.O.; Dillard, M.G. )

    1990-10-01

    We have studied the percentage of 22Na+ uptake in cell suspensions; 0.4 to 2.0 x 10(9) erythrocytes/mL from diabetic uremic patients with secondary hypertension and from normal subjects. Suspensions from diabetic uremic patients with secondary hypertension 0.42 +/- 0.06 to 2.05 +/- 0.28; normal subjects showed a percentage uptake of 22Na+ of 0.27 +/- 0.05 to 1.28 +/- 0.22. The uptake of 22Na+ in 2.0 x 10(9) cells/mL was 60% more (P less than .05) in diabetic uremic patients than in the controls. These studies indicate that 22Na+ influx determinations may be used to distinguish secondary hypertensive patients from normal subjects.

  2. Earlier Age of Onset of Chronic Hypertension and Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus After a Hypertensive Disorder of Pregnancy or Gestational Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Heida, Karst Y; Franx, Arie; van Rijn, Bas B; Eijkemans, Marinus J C; Boer, Jolanda M A; Verschuren, Monique W M; Oudijk, Martijn A; Bots, Michiel L; van der Schouw, Yvonne T

    2015-12-01

    A prospective cohort study was conducted to assess the impact of a history of hypertensive disorder of pregnancy (HDP) or gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) on the risk and age of onset of hypertension, type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D), and cardiovascular disease (CVD) later in life, independent of hypertension and T2D. Between 1993 and 1997, 22 265 ever-pregnant women were included from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition-NL study, aged 20 to 70 years at baseline. Details on complications of pregnancy and known hypertension were obtained by questionnaire. Blood pressure was measured at enrollment. Participants were followed for the occurrence of CVD events. Data were analyzed using ANCOVA, multivariable logistic regression, and Cox proportional hazard (with HDP and GDM as time-dependent variables for T2D and CVD) models. At enrollment, women with a HDP reported diagnosis of hypertension 7.7 years earlier (95% confidence interval [CI] 6.9-8.5) and women with GDM reported diagnosis of T2D 7.7 years earlier (95% CI 5.8-9.6) than women without pregnancy complications. After adjustment for potential confounders, HDP was associated with presence of hypertension at enrollment (odds ratio 2.12, 95% CI 1.98-2.28) and onset of CVD later in life (hazard ratio 1.21, 95% CI 1.10-1.32). After including the intermediates hypertension and T2D in the model, the risk of CVD later in life decreased (hazard ratio 1.09, 95% CI 1.00-1.20). GDM was associated with an increased risk of developing T2D later in life (hazard ratio 3.68, 95% CI 2.77-4.90), but not with risk of CVD. HDP and GDM have a substantial impact on the risk of CVD and are potentially important indicators for preventive cardiovascular risk management.

  3. Obesity, hypertension and hypercholesterolemia as risk factors for atherosclerosis leading to ischemic events.

    PubMed

    van Rooy, Mia-Jeanne; Pretorius, E

    2014-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a widespread disease of the arterial system that is generated by injury to the vasculature due to hypercholesterolemia, hypertension and inflammatory diseases. In the current review, we discuss the role of different risk factors, including obesity, hypertension and hypercholesterolemia in atherosclerosis, which may ultimately lead to either cardiovascular or cerebral complication. Inflammation plays a pivotal role in conjunction with obesity, hypertension and hypercholesterolemia in the etiology of atherosclerosis. We discuss the role of inflammation with regards to reactive oxygen species (ROS) linked to the specific risk factors. The role of nitric oxide (NO) in conjunction with ROS is also important. Correlations of inflammatory cytokines and their functions in the mentioned risk factors are also discussed. The risk factors may ultimately lead to ischemic events, including transient ischemic attacks (TIAs), thrombotic stroke and myocardial infarction. Importantly, it seems as if there is a combination of pathophysiological triggers that may eventually result in atherosclerosis. Therefore, atherosclerosis is not the result of only one risk factor, but a combination of various physiological processes such as homeostasis and the inflammatory response. Ultimately, each patient's risk profile is unique and determines their immediate risk for acute thrombotic events or lethal ischemia.

  4. [Role of vitamin D and calcium in obesity and type 2 diabetes].

    PubMed

    Kuroda, Masashi; Sakaue, Hiroshi

    2016-03-01

    Obesity, induced by unhealthy lifestyle choices, could be involved in the development of chronic diseases like type 2 diabete. Obesity is largely due to the imbalance of energy intake and expenditure, therefore we have put more emphasis on the amount of macronutrients including carbohydrates, fats and proteins as dietary therapy for obesity and related-conditions. On the other hand, several studies revealed obese or diabetic patients were more likely to have micronutrient deficiencies such as vitamins and minerals. Besides the effects on bone metabolism, vitamin D and calcium might contribute to metabolic disorder accompanied by obesity. However, it has not been concluded supplementation of these two nutrients has a benefit in obese or diabetic individuals. Further studies are needed. PMID:26923970

  5. Bioinformatic analysis of functional proteins involved in obesity associated with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Rao, Allam Appa; Tayaru, N Manga; Thota, Hanuman; Changalasetty, Suresh Babu; Thota, Lalitha Saroja; Gedela, Srinubabu

    2008-03-01

    The twin epidemic of diabetes and obesity pose daunting challenges worldwide. The dramatic rise in obesity-associated diabetes resulted in an alarming increase in the incidence and prevalence of obesity an important complication of diabetes. Differences among individuals in their susceptibility to both these conditions probably reflect their genetic constitutions. The dramatic improvements in genomic and bioinformatic resources are accelerating the pace of gene discovery. It is tempting to speculate the key susceptible genes/proteins that bridges diabetes mellitus and obesity. In this regard, we evaluated the role of several genes/proteins that are believed to be involved in the evolution of obesity associated diabetes by employing multiple sequence alignment using ClustalW tool and constructed a phylogram tree using functional protein sequences extracted from NCBI. Phylogram was constructed using Neighbor-Joining Algorithm a bioinformatic tool. Our bioinformatic analysis reports resistin gene as ominous link with obesity associated diabetes. This bioinformatic study will be useful for future studies towards therapeutic inventions of obesity associated type 2 diabetes. PMID:23675069

  6. Isotopic test of capillary permeability to albumin in diabetic patients: effects of hypertension, microangiopathy, and duration of diabetes

    SciTech Connect

    Valensi, P.; Attali, J.R.; Behar, A.; Sebaoun, J.

    1987-09-01

    Capillary permeability to albumin (CPA) was studied by performing an isotopic noninvasive test with venous compression on 87 nonselected diabetics with no edema, no cardiac failure, and no peripheral vascular disease. Excessive albumin retention (AR greater than or equal to 8%) ten minutes after removal of the compression was found in 27 patients (31%). The radioactivity disappearance curve was then analyzed using the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT). An abnormal isotopic CPA test was thus found in at least 45 out of the 87 patients. The prevalence of an abnormal test was not different in type 1 and type 2 diabetics. We studied the independent effects of hypertension, presence of specific clinical signs of microangiopathy (retinopathy and/or significant proteinuria), and duration of diabetes. Among diabetics free of specific clinical signs of microangiopathy, the prevalence of an AR greater than or equal to 8% was significantly higher in those with hypertension (11/19) than in those with normal blood pressure (2/28) and in nondiabetic hypertensive patients (0/16). Among normotensive diabetics, the prevalence of an abnormal test was higher, but not significantly, in patients with specific clinical signs of microangiopathy (8/11) than in those free of them (7/18). Seven normotensive diabetics without specific clinical signs of microangiopathy had an abnormal test; five of them had had diabetes for more than five years. The prevalence of diabetes of more than five years duration was significantly higher in patients with an abnormal test (35/45) than in normotensive diabetics free of specific clinical signs of microangiopathy with a normal test (4/11).

  7. Relationship between hypertension, diabetes and proteinuria in rural and urban households in Yemen.

    PubMed

    Modesti, P A; Bamoshmoosh, M; Rapi, S; Massetti, L; Bianchi, S; Al-Hidabi, D; Al Goshae, H

    2013-09-01

    Little information is available on the meanings of proteinuria in low-resource settings. A population-based, cross-sectional survey was performed in Yemen on 10 242 subjects aged 15-69 years, stratified by age, gender and urban/rural residency. Hypertension is defined as systolic blood pressure (BP) of 140 mm Hg and/or diastolic BP of 90 mm Hg, and/or self-reported use of antihypertensive drugs; diabetes is diagnosed as fasting glucose of 126 mg dl(-1) or self-reported use of hypoglycaemic medications; proteinuria is defined as +1 at dipstick urinalysis. Odds ratios (ORs) for associations were determined by multivariable logistic regression models. Prevalence (weighted to the Yemen population aged 15-69 years) of hypertension, diabetes and proteinuria were 7.5, 3.7 and 5.1% in urban, and 7.8, 2.6 and 7.3% in rural locations, respectively. Proteinuria and hypertension were more prevalent among rural dwellers (adjusted ORs 1.56; 95% confidence limit (Cl) 1.31-1.86, and 1.23; 1.08-1.41, respectively), diabetes being less prevalent in rural areas (0.70; 0.58-0.85). Differently from hypertension and diabetes, proteinuria was inversely related with age. Most importantly, 4.6 and 6.1% of urban and rural dwellers, respectively, had proteinuria in the absence of hypertension and diabetes. The approach of considering kidney damage as a consequence of hypertension and diabetes might limit the effectiveness of prevention strategies in low-income countries.

  8. Cardiovascular and sympathetic responses to a mental stress task in young patients with hypertension and/or obesity.

    PubMed

    Garafova, A; Penesova, A; Cizmarova, E; Marko, A; Vlcek, M; Jezova, D

    2014-01-01

    Present study was aimed to investigate sympathetic responses to mental stress with hypothesis that the presence of obesity in patients with hypertension has a modifying effect. Young male subjects, 8 with hypertension grade I, with BMI 25 kg/m(2) (HT), 10 with hypertension grade I, and BMI 30 kg/m(2) (HT OB), 14 healthy controls with BMI 30 kg/m(2) (OB), and 13 healthy controls with BMI 25 kg/m(2) (C) underwent the Stroop test. ECG was recorded continuously to evaluate heart rate variability (HRV). Blood pressure (BP) and catecholamine concentrations were measured at baseline, at the end of mental stress test and 15 min thereafter. Patients with HT demonstrated increased adrenaline concentrations and enhanced stress-induced noradrenaline release compared to that in healthy controls. In obese subjects, stress-induced increase of systolicBP was lower compared to lean individuals. Stress exposure induced a significant rise in the low frequency power component of HRV, however the increase was lower in the HT OB group compared to C. Obesity in patients with hypertension did not lead to a different reaction in comparison with lean hypertensive subjects. The present data demonstrate higher sympathoadrenal activity in early-stage of hypertension. Obesity is connected with higher resting systolicBP and modifies the HRV response to mental stress.

  9. Tooth element levels indicating exposure profiles in diabetic and hypertensive subjects from Mysore, India.

    PubMed

    Nagaraj, G; Sukumar, A; Nandlal, B; Vellaichamy, S; Thanasekaran, K; Ramanathan, A L

    2009-12-01

    Element contents of teeth elucidate exposure nature, but less is known about association of tooth element concentrations of diabetics and hypertensives with exposure profile. Present study aims to estimate copper, chromium, iron, zinc, nickel, and lead concentrations in the permanent teeth of control, diabetic, and hypertensive subjects from Mysore. The results show that lead levels of teeth (Pb-T) are higher in the hypertensives and diabetics, whereas copper levels of teeth (Cu-T) are lower in the hypertensives and users of stainless steel utensils than that of controls and users of mixed utensils. The elevated Cu-T levels found in the users of mixed utensils that being made of several metals are ascribed to leaching effect of sour and spicy food of Indian cuisine. The element levels were influenced by diet (Zn-T), place of living, sex and income (Pb-T) of the subjects, but not by age, drinking water from different sources, and certain habits viz., smoking, alcohol consumption, chewing betel, and nut. Thus, it is evident that high Pb-T and low Cu-T levels may be related with diabetes and hypertension and high Pb-T and Cu-T levels, respectively, in the urbanites, and the users of mixed utensils may show different exposure profiles from environment and utensils. PMID:19352596

  10. Hypertension, Diabetes Type II, and Their Association: Role of Arterial Stiffness.

    PubMed

    Smulyan, Harold; Lieber, Ari; Safar, Michel E

    2016-01-01

    In patients with both hypertension and type II diabetes, the systolic blood pressure (SBP) increases linearly with age, while that of diastolic blood pressure (DBP) declines curvilinearly as early as age 45, all suggesting the development of increased arterial stiffness. Increased stiffness is an important, independent, and significant risk predictor in subjects with hypertension and diabetes. In patients with both diseases, stiffness assessed at the same mean arterial pressure (MAP) was significantly higher in diabetic patients. Arterial stiffness is related to age, heart rate (HR), and MAP, but in diabetic patients, it also related to diabetes duration and insulin treatment (IT). In the metabolic syndrome (MetSyn), diabetes also acts on the small arteries through capillary rarefaction to reduce the effective length of the arterial tree, increases the reflected pulse wave and thus the pulse pressure (PP). These studies indicate that diabetes and hypertension additively contribute to increased pulsatility and suggest that any means to reduce stiffness would be beneficial in these conditions.

  11. Obesity and Type 2 Diabetes: What Can Be Unified and What Needs to Be Individualized?

    PubMed Central

    Ferrannini, Ele; Goldfine, Allison B.; Nathan, David M.; Schwartz, Michael W.; Smith, Robert J.; Smith, Steven R.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: This report examines what is known about the relationship between obesity and type 2 diabetes and how future research in these areas might be directed to benefit prevention, interventions, and overall patient care. Research Design and Methods: An international working group of 32 experts in the pathophysiology, genetics, clinical trials, and clinical care of obesity and/or type 2 diabetes participated in a conference held on 6–7 January 2011 and cosponsored by The Endocrine Society, the American Diabetes Association, and the European Association for the Study of Diabetes. A writing group comprising eight participants subsequently prepared this summary and recommendations. Participants reviewed and discussed published literature and their own unpublished data. Results: The writing group unanimously supported the summary and recommendations as representing the working group's majority or unanimous opinions. Conclusions: The major questions linking obesity to type 2 diabetes that need to be addressed by combined basic, clinical, and population-based scientific approaches include the following: 1) Why do not all patients with obesity develop type 2 diabetes? 2) Through what mechanisms do obesity and insulin resistance contribute to β-cell decompensation, and if/when obesity prevention ensues, how much reduction in type 2 diabetes incidence will follow? 3) How does the duration of type 2 diabetes relate to the benefits of weight reduction by lifestyle, weight-loss drugs, and/or bariatric surgery on β-cell function and glycemia? 4) What is necessary for regulatory approval of medications and possibly surgical approaches for preventing type 2 diabetes in patients with obesity? Improved understanding of how obesity relates to type 2 diabetes may help advance effective and cost-effective interventions for both conditions, including more tailored therapy. To expedite this process, we recommend further investigation into the pathogenesis of these coexistent

  12. Obesity and Type 2 Diabetes: What Can Be Unified and What Needs to Be Individualized?

    PubMed Central

    Ferrannini, Ele; Goldfine, Allison B.; Nathan, David M.; Schwartz, Michael W.; Smith, Robert J.; Smith, Steven R.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE This report examines what is known about the relationship between obesity and type 2 diabetes and how future research in these areas might be directed to benefit prevention, interventions, and overall patient care. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS An international working group of 32 experts in the pathophysiology, genetics, clinical trials, and clinical care of obesity and/or type 2 diabetes participated in a conference held on 6–7 January 2011 and cosponsored by The Endocrine Society, the American Diabetes Association, and the European Association for the Study of Diabetes. A writing group comprising eight participants subsequently prepared this summary and recommendations. Participants reviewed and discussed published literature and their own unpublished data. RESULTS The writing group unanimously supported the summary and recommendations as representing the working group's majority or unanimous opinions. CONCLUSIONS The major questions linking obesity to type 2 diabetes that need to be addressed by combined basic, clinical, and population-based scientific approaches include the following: 1) Why do not all patients with obesity develop type 2 diabetes? 2) Through what mechanisms do obesity and insulin resistance contribute to β-cell decompensation, and if/when obesity prevention ensues, how much reduction in type 2 diabetes incidence will follow? 3) How does the duration of type 2 diabetes relate to the benefits of weight reduction by lifestyle, weight-loss drugs, and/or bariatric surgery on β-cell function and glycemia? 4) What is necessary for regulatory approval of medications and possibly surgical approaches for preventing type 2 diabetes in patients with obesity? Improved understanding of how obesity relates to type 2 diabetes may help advance effective and cost-effective interventions for both conditions, including more tailored therapy. To expedite this process, we recommend further investigation into the pathogenesis of these coexistent

  13. Diabetic nephropathy and long-term treatment effects of rosiglitazone and enalapril in obese ZSF1 rats.

    PubMed

    Bilan, Victor P; Salah, Eman M; Bastacky, Sheldon; Jones, Huw B; Mayers, Rachel M; Zinker, Bradley; Poucher, Simon M; Tofovic, Stevan P

    2011-09-01

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is a major cause of end-stage renal disease. Yet the pathogenic mechanisms underlying the development of DN are not fully defined, partially due to lack of suitable models that mimic the complex pathogenesis of renal disease in diabetic patients. In this study, we describe early and late renal manifestations of DN and renal responses to long-term treatments with rosiglitazone or high-dose enalapril in ZSF1 rats, a model of metabolic syndrome, diabetes, and chronic renal disease. At 8 weeks of age, obese ZSF1 rats developed metabolic syndrome and diabetes (hyperglycemia, glucosuria, hyperlipidemia, and hypertension) and early signs of renal disease (proteinuria, glomerular collagen IV deposition, tubulointerstitial inflammation, and renal hypertrophy). By 32 weeks of age, animals developed renal histopathology consistent with DN, including mesangial expansion, glomerulosclerosis, tubulointerstitial inflammation and fibrosis, tubular dilation and atrophy, and arteriolar thickening. Rosiglitazone markedly increased body weight but reduced food intake, improved glucose control, and attenuated hyperlipidemia and liver and kidney injury. In contrast, rosiglitazone markedly increased cardiac hypertrophy via a blood pressure-independent mechanism. High-dose enalapril did not improve glucose homeostasis, but normalized blood pressure, and nearly prevented diabetic renal injury. The ZSF1 model thus detects the clinical observations seen with rosiglitazone and enalapril in terms of primary and secondary endpoints of cardiac and renal effects. This and previous reports indicate that the obese ZSF1 rat meets currently accepted criteria for progressive experimental diabetic renal disease in rodents, suggesting that this may be the best available rat model for simulation of human DN. PMID:21680617

  14. Neighborhoods, Obesity, and Diabetes — A Randomized Social Experiment

    PubMed Central

    Ludwig, Jens; Sanbonmatsu, Lisa; Gennetian, Lisa; Adam, Emma; Duncan, Greg J.; Katz, Lawrence F.; Kessler, Ronald C.; Kling, Jeffrey R.; Lindau, Stacy Tessler; Whitaker, Robert C.; McDade, Thomas W.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND The question of whether neighborhood environment contributes directly to the development of obesity and diabetes remains unresolved. The study reported on here uses data from a social experiment to assess the association of randomly assigned variation in neighborhood conditions with obesity and diabetes. METHODS From 1994 through 1998, the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) randomly assigned 4498 women with children living in public housing in high-poverty urban census tracts (in which ≥40% of residents had incomes below the federal poverty threshold) to one of three groups: 1788 were assigned to receive housing vouchers, which were redeemable only if they moved to a low-poverty census tract (where <10% of residents were poor), and counseling on moving; 1312 were assigned to receive unrestricted, traditional vouchers, with no special counseling on moving; and 1398 were assigned to a control group that was offered neither of these opportunities. From 2008 through 2010, as part of a long-term follow-up survey, we measured data indicating health outcomes, including height, weight, and level of glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c). RESULTS As part of our long-term survey, we obtained data on body-mass index (BMI, the weight in kilograms divided by the square of the height in meters) for 84.2% of participants and data on glycated hemoglobin level for 71.3% of participants. Response rates were similar across randomized groups. The prevalences of a BMI of 35 or more, a BMI of 40 or more, and a glycated hemoglobin level of 6.5% or more were lower in the group receiving the low-poverty vouchers than in the control group, with an absolute difference of 4.61 percentage points (95% confidence interval [CI], −8.54 to −0.69), 3.38 percentage points (95% CI, −6.39 to −0.36), and 4.31 percentage points (95% CI, −7.82 to −0.80), respectively. The differences between the group receiving traditional vouchers and the control group were not significant

  15. [Interventional hypertension therapy in diabetes mellitus. Effects on blood pressure and glucose metabolism?].

    PubMed

    Ewen, S; Ukena, C; Pöss, J; Linz, D; Böhm, M; Mahfoud, F

    2014-05-01

    Hypertension is the most common chronic cardiovascular disease with increasing prevalence all over the world. Despite the availability of many effective antihypertensive drugs, blood pressure control to target values remains low. In the pathophysiology of therapy resistant hypertension, increased activity of the sympathetic nervous system with an imbalance between sympathetic and parasympathetic activity has been identified as a main contributor to the development and maintenance of hypertension. Catheter-based denervation of the renal sympathetic nerves has been described as reducing blood pressure and decreasing sympathetic activity in patients with resistant hypertension. Supplementary beneficial effects on common cardiovascular comorbidities, such as diabetes type 2, have been reported. The present review aims to give an overview about percutaneous renal denervation for treatment of hypertension and potential new therapeutic options to improve glycemic control.

  16. Evaluation of oxidative stress and antioxidant status in diabetic and hypertensive women during labor.

    PubMed

    Al-Shebly, Mashael M; Mansour, Mahmoud A

    2012-01-01

    Pregnancy in insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus is associated with a greater incidence of fetal abnormality. Animal studies suggested that increased free-radical production and antioxidant depletion may contribute to this risk. The objective of this work was to evaluate oxidative stress and antioxidant capacity in hypertensive, diabetics, and healthy control women during labor. Simultaneous determination of antioxidant enzymes activities, namely glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), glutathione reductase (GSH-red), superoxide dismutase (SOD), total antioxidant, and lipid peroxides measured as thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS) levels, were carried out in maternal plasma during labor. Plasma GSH-Px activity was found to be significantly increased as it doubled in hypertensive, and diabetic women when compared with healthy control women (P < 0.05). In contrast, plasma SOD activity was significantly decreased in both groups when compared to the control group (P < 0.05). No significant differences were detected in GSH-Red activity between diabetic, hypertensive and control groups. Alterations in antioxidant enzyme activities were accompanied by a significant increase in the levels of plasma lipid peroxides in hypertensive and diabetic women during labor. Plasma levels of total antioxidants were significantly increased in diabetic women as compared with the control group. Based on our results, it may be concluded that enhanced generation of oxidative stress causes alteration of antioxidant capacity in diabetic and hypertensive women during labor. Alterations in antioxidant and prooxidant components may result in various complications including peroxidation of vital body molecules which may be regarded as an increased risk factor for pregnant women as well as the fetus. PMID:22888397

  17. Hypertension in young adults.

    PubMed

    De Venecia, Toni; Lu, Marvin; Figueredo, Vincent M

    2016-01-01

    Hypertension remains a major societal problem affecting 76 million, or approximately one third, of US adults. While more prevalent in the older population, an increasing incidence in the younger population, including athletes, is being observed. Active individuals, like the young and athletes, are viewed as free of diseases such as hypertension. However, the increased prevalence of traditional risk factors in the young, including obesity, diabetes mellitus, and renal disease, increase the risk of developing hypertension in younger adults. Psychosocial factors may also be contributing factors to the increasing incidence of hypertension in the younger population. Increased left ventricular wall thickness and mass are increasingly found in young adults on routine echocardiograms and predict future cardiovascular events. This increasing incidence of hypertension in the young calls for early surveillance and prompt treatment to prevent future cardiac events. In this review we present the current epidemiological data, potential mechanisms, clinical implications, and treatment of hypertension in young patients and athletes.

  18. Multiple mechanisms involved in diabetes protection by lipopolysaccharide in non-obese diabetic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jun; Cao, Hui; Wang, Hongjie; Yin, Guoxiao; Du, Jiao; Xia, Fei; Lu, Jingli; Xiang, Ming

    2015-06-15

    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) activation has been proposed to be important for islet cell inflammation and eventually β cell loss in the course of type 1 diabetes (T1D) development. However, according to the “hygiene hypothesis”, bacterial endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS), an agonist on TLR4, inhibits T1D progression. Here we investigated possible mechanisms for the protective effect of LPS on T1D development in non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice. We found that LPS administration to NOD mice during the prediabetic state neither prevented nor reversed insulitis, but delayed the onset and decreased the incidence of diabetes, and that a multiple-injection protocol is more effective than a single LPS intervention. Further, LPS administration suppressed spleen T lymphocyte proliferation, increased the generation of CD4{sup +}CD25{sup +}Foxp3{sup +} regulatory T cells (Tregs), reduced the synthesis of strong Th1 proinflammatory cytokines, and downregulated TLR4 and its downstream MyD88-dependent signaling pathway. Most importantly, multiple injections of LPS induced a potential tolerogenic dendritic cell (DC) subset with low TLR4 expression without influencing the DC phenotype. Explanting DCs from repeated LPS-treated NOD mice into NOD/SCID diabetic mice conferred sustained protective effects against the progression of diabetes in the recipients. Overall, these results suggest that multiple mechanisms are involved in the protective effects of LPS against the development of diabetes in NOD diabetic mice. These include Treg induction, down-regulation of TLR4 and its downstream MyD88-dependent signaling pathway, and the emergence of a potential tolerogenic DC subset. - Highlights: • Administration of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) prevented type 1 diabetes in NOD mice. • Downregulating TLR4 level and MyD88-dependent pathway contributed to protection of LPS. • LPS administration also hampered DC maturation and promoted Treg differentiation.

  19. The association of hypertension and diabetes: prevalence, cardiovascular risk and protection by blood pressure reduction.

    PubMed

    Mancia, G

    2005-04-01

    Diabetes and hypertension frequently coexist, and their combination provides additive increases in the risk of life-threatening cardiovascular events. Recent guidelines agree on the need for early, aggressive reduction of blood pressure, with a goal of <130/80 mmHg, in patients with diabetes. The mechanism that underpins the increased sensitivity of diabetic subjects to hypertension is not known, but may involve impaired autoregulation or attenuated nocturnal decrease of blood pressure. All classes of antihypertensive agents are effective in reducing blood pressure in diabetic subjects, and all show evidence of a concomitant reduction in cardiovascular risk. Although there is some evidence that agents that interrupt the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) provide greater protective effects, the data are not conclusive. However, most diabetic subjects will require combination therapy to reach goal blood pressure. Antihypertensive drugs can also significantly influence the probability that otherwise healthy individuals will develop metabolic syndrome or type 2 diabetes. While diuretics and betablockers have a prodiabetic effect, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin II receptor blockers may prevent diabetes more effectively than the metabolically neutral calcium channel blockers. Given that diabetes is an important cardiovascular risk factor, there is the potential for reductions in risk due to reduced blood pressure to be offset by an increased risk due to the development of diabetes. Such concerns should be considered in the selection of antihypertensive therapy. PMID:15868115

  20. Relationship between blood pressure reverse dipping and type 2 diabetes in hypertensive patients

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Lu; Yan, Bin; Gao, Ya; Su, Dan; Peng, Liyuan; Jiao, Yang; Wang, Yuhuan; Han, Donggang; Wang, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies suggested that nocturnal variations of blood pressure (BP) were closely related to type 2 diabetes. However, little information has been revealed about the relationship between reverse-dipper pattern of BP and type 2 diabetes. In this cross-sectional study, BP variations of 531 hypertensive patients were evaluated with ambulatory BP monitoring (ABPM). Diagnosis of diabetes in Chinese adults was made according to diabetes diagnostic criteria of 2015. Multivariate logistic regression was used to examine the relationships between type 2 diabetes and ABPM results. In the study, patients with reverse-dipper pattern (32.3%) had the highest prevalence of type 2 diabetes compared with dippers (21.4%) and nondippers (23.3%). After multivariate logistic regression, reverse-dipper BP pattern (OR 2.067, P = 0.024) and nondipper BP pattern (OR 1.637, P = 0.039) were found to be correlated with type 2 diabetes compared with dipper pattern. The results of our study also suggested that type 2 diabetes might contribute to the reverse-dipper pattern of BP (OR 1.691, P = 0.023). In addition, fasting glucose was negatively correlated with the decline rate of nocturnal SBP (r = -0.095, P = 0.029). Reverse-dipper pattern of BP in ABPM may be independently associated with type 2 diabetes in patients with hypertension. PMID:27109832

  1. The Hospitalization Costs of Diabetes and Hypertension Complications in Zimbabwe: Estimations and Correlations.

    PubMed

    Mutowo, Mutsa P; Lorgelly, Paula K; Laxy, Michael; Renzaho, Andre M N; Mangwiro, John C; Owen, Alice J

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Treating complications associated with diabetes and hypertension imposes significant costs on health care systems. This study estimated the hospitalization costs for inpatients in a public hospital in Zimbabwe. Methods. The study was retrospective and utilized secondary data from medical records. Total hospitalization costs were estimated using generalized linear models. Results. The median cost and interquartile range (IQR) for patients with diabetes, $994 (385-1553) mean $1319 (95% CI: 981-1657), was higher than patients with hypertension, $759 (494-1147) mean $914 (95% CI: 825-1003). Female patients aged below 65 years with diabetes had the highest estimated mean costs ($1467 (95% CI: 1177-1828)). Wound care had the highest estimated mean cost of all procedures, $2884 (95% CI: 2004-4149) for patients with diabetes and $2239 (95% CI: 1589-3156) for patients with hypertension. Age below 65 years, medical procedures (amputation, wound care, dialysis, and physiotherapy), the presence of two or more comorbidities, and being prescribed two or more drugs were associated with significantly higher hospitalization costs. Conclusion. Our estimated costs could be used to evaluate and improve current inpatient treatment and management of patients with diabetes and hypertension and determine the most cost-effective interventions to prevent complications and comorbidities. PMID:27403444

  2. The Hospitalization Costs of Diabetes and Hypertension Complications in Zimbabwe: Estimations and Correlations

    PubMed Central

    Mutowo, Mutsa P.; Lorgelly, Paula K.; Laxy, Michael; Mangwiro, John C.; Owen, Alice J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Treating complications associated with diabetes and hypertension imposes significant costs on health care systems. This study estimated the hospitalization costs for inpatients in a public hospital in Zimbabwe. Methods. The study was retrospective and utilized secondary data from medical records. Total hospitalization costs were estimated using generalized linear models. Results. The median cost and interquartile range (IQR) for patients with diabetes, $994 (385–1553) mean $1319 (95% CI: 981–1657), was higher than patients with hypertension, $759 (494–1147) mean $914 (95% CI: 825–1003). Female patients aged below 65 years with diabetes had the highest estimated mean costs ($1467 (95% CI: 1177–1828)). Wound care had the highest estimated mean cost of all procedures, $2884 (95% CI: 2004–4149) for patients with diabetes and $2239 (95% CI: 1589–3156) for patients with hypertension. Age below 65 years, medical procedures (amputation, wound care, dialysis, and physiotherapy), the presence of two or more comorbidities, and being prescribed two or more drugs were associated with significantly higher hospitalization costs. Conclusion. Our estimated costs could be used to evaluate and improve current inpatient treatment and management of patients with diabetes and hypertension and determine the most cost-effective interventions to prevent complications and comorbidities. PMID:27403444

  3. Anti-Diabetic Activity and Metabolic Changes Induced by Andrographis paniculata Plant Extract in Obese Diabetic Rats.

    PubMed

    Akhtar, Muhammad Tayyab; Bin Mohd Sarib, Mohamad Syakir; Ismail, Intan Safinar; Abas, Faridah; Ismail, Amin; Lajis, Nordin Hj; Shaari, Khozirah

    2016-01-01

    Andrographis paniculata is an annual herb and widely cultivated in Southeast Asian countries for its medicinal use. In recent investigations, A. paniculata was found to be effective against Type 1 diabetes mellitus (Type 1 DM). Here, we used a non-genetic out-bred Sprague-Dawley rat model to test the antidiabetic activity of A. paniculata against Type 2 diabetes mellitus (Type 2 DM). Proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (¹H-NMR) spectroscopy in combination with multivariate data analyses was used to evaluate the A. paniculata and metformin induced metabolic effects on the obese and obese-diabetic (obdb) rat models. Compared to the normal rats, high levels of creatinine, lactate, and allantoin were found in the urine of obese rats, whereas, obese-diabetic rats were marked by high glucose, choline and taurine levels, and low lactate, formate, creatinine, citrate, 2-oxoglutarate, succinate, dimethylamine, acetoacetate, acetate, allantoin and hippurate levels. Treatment of A. paniculata leaf water extract was found to be quite effective in restoring the disturbed metabolic profile of obdb rats back towards normal conditions. Thisstudy shows the anti-diabetic potential of A. paniculata plant extract and strengthens the idea of using this plant against the diabetes. Further classical genetic methods and state of the art molecular techniques could provide insights into the molecular mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of diabetes mellitus and anti-diabetic effects of A. paniculata water extract. PMID:27517894

  4. Metabolic and biochemical changes in streptozotocin induced obese-diabetic rats treated with Phyllanthus niruri extract.

    PubMed

    Mediani, Ahmed; Abas, Faridah; Maulidiani, M; Khatib, Alfi; Tan, Chin Ping; Ismail, Intan Safinar; Shaari, Khozirah; Ismail, Amin; Lajis, N H

    2016-09-01

    Herbal medicine has been proven to be an effective therapy offering a variety of benefits, such as moderate reduction in hypoglycemia, in the treatment and prevention of obesity and diabetes. Phyllanthus niruri has been used as a treatment for diabetes mellitus. Herein, the induction of type 2 diabetes in Sprague-Dawley rats was achieved by a low dose of streptozotocin (STZ) (25mg/kgbw). Here, we evaluated the in vivo antidiabetic properties of two concentrations (250 and 500mg/kg bw) of P. niruri via metabolomics approach. The administration of 500mg/kgbw of P. niruri extract caused the metabolic disorders of obese diabetic rats to be improved towards the normal state. The extract also clearly decreased the serum glucose level and improved the lipid profile in obese diabetic rats. The results of this study may contribute towards better understanding the molecular mechanism of this medicinal plant in managing diabetes mellitus. PMID:27318080

  5. Albuminuria induced by exercise in hypertensive type I and type II diabetic patients: a randomised, double-blind study on the effects of acute administration of captopril and nifedipine.

    PubMed

    Romanelli, G; Giustina, A; Cravarezza, P; Caldonazzo, A; Agabiti-Rosei, E; Giustina, G

    1991-06-01

    Physical exercise can increase urinary albumin excretion rate (UAER) in diabetic patients without microalbuminuria at rest (stage II diabetic nephropathy) or with baseline microalbuminuria (stage III diabetic nephropathy). The aim of this study was to compare the acute effects of captopril, an ACE inhibitor, and nifedipine, a calcium channel blocker, on exercise-induced microalbuminuria in hypertensive insulin-dependent (Type I) and non-insulin-dependent (Type II) diabetic patients with early stage nephropathy. Non-obese diabetic patients, 13 Type I (7 with stage II and 6 with stage III nephropathy) and 14 Type II (6 with stage II and 8 with stage III nephropathy), with hypertension, WHO stages I-II, underwent five submaximal cycloergometric tests: the first two in basal conditions, the other three after 24 hour administration of captopril (25 mg twice daily), placebo (1 tab twice daily) or nifedipine AR (20 mg twice daily) according to a randomised, double-blind design. Acute administration of both captopril and nifedipine was able to reduce exercise-induced microalbuminuria in hypertensive Type I and Type II diabetic patients regardless of the stage of their nephropathy. Captopril reduced systolic blood pressure less than nifedipine, in both Type I and Type II diabetics, but was more effective than nifedipine in blunting exercise-induced microalbuminuria, especially in Type I diabetics.

  6. Pathologic findings and laboratory data in a new strain of obese hypertensive rats.

    PubMed Central

    Koletsky, S.

    1975-01-01

    A new strain of rat characterized by genetic obesity, endogenous hyperlipidemia, and hypertension was obtained in this laboratory. The abnormal phenotype is inherited as a homozygous recessive trait. The animals exhibit marked hypertriglyceridemia, moderate hypercholesterolemia, and an electrophoretic pattern resembling that of human Type IV hyperlipoproteinemia. The average life-span is less than 1 year, due largely to the development of premature renal and vascular disease. The kidney lesion has both glomerulonephritic and nephrosclerotic components and is accompanied by marked proteinuria. About 12% of animals develop urinary tract calculi. The vascular disease consists of fibrous and fatty-fibrous intimal plaques, and polyarteritis. The obese animal offers a useful model for investigating abnormal lipid metabolism and the etiology and pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:1171627

  7. Obesity and insulin resistance in resistant hypertension: implications for the kidney.

    PubMed

    Rao, Akhilesh; Pandya, Vishwam; Whaley-Connell, Adam

    2015-05-01

    There is recognition that the obesity epidemic contributes substantially to the increasing incidence of CKD and resistant hypertension (HTN). The mechanisms by which obesity promotes resistance are an area of active interest and intense investigation. It is thought that increases in visceral adiposity lead to a proinflammatory, pro-oxidative milieu that promote resistance to the metabolic actions of insulin. This resistance to insulin at the level of skeletal muscle tissue impairs glucose disposal/utilization through actions on the endothelium that include vascular rarefaction, reductions in vascular relaxation, and vascular remodeling. Insulin resistance derived from increased adipose tissue and obesity has system-wide implications for other tissue beds such as the kidney that affects blood pressure regulation. The additional autocrine and paracrine activities of adipose tissue contribute to inappropriate activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system and the sympathetic nervous system that promote kidney microvascular remodeling, stiffness, and sodium (Na(+)) retention that in turn promote HTN and in the CKD patient, resistance. In this review, we will summarize the important mechanisms that link obesity to CKD as they relate to resistant HTN.

  8. Chlorinated persistent organic pollutants, obesity, and type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Duk-Hee; Porta, Miquel; Jacobs, David R; Vandenberg, Laura N

    2014-08-01

    Persistent organic pollutants (POPs) are lipophilic compounds that travel with lipids and accumulate mainly in adipose tissue. Recent human evidence links low-dose POPs to an increased risk of type 2 diabetes (T2D). Because humans are contaminated by POP mixtures and POPs possibly have nonmonotonic dose-response relations with T2D, critical methodological issues arise in evaluating human findings. This review summarizes epidemiological results on chlorinated POPs and T2D, and relevant experimental evidence. It also discusses how features of POPs can affect inferences in humans. The evidence as a whole suggests that, rather than a few individual POPs, background exposure to POP mixtures-including organochlorine pesticides and polychlorinated biphenyls-can increase T2D risk in humans. Inconsistent statistical significance for individual POPs may arise due to distributional differences in POP mixtures among populations. Differences in the observed shape of the dose-response curves among human studies may reflect an inverted U-shaped association secondary to mitochondrial dysfunction or endocrine disruption. Finally, we examine the relationship between POPs and obesity. There is evidence in animal studies that low-dose POP mixtures are obesogenic. However, relationships between POPs and obesity in humans have been inconsistent. Adipose tissue plays a dual role of promoting T2D and providing a relatively safe place to store POPs. Large prospective studies with serial measurements of a broad range of POPs, adiposity, and clinically relevant biomarkers are needed to disentangle the interrelationships among POPs, obesity, and the development of T2D. Also needed are laboratory experiments that more closely mimic real-world POP doses, mixtures, and exposure duration in humans. PMID:24483949

  9. The prevalence of obesity-related hypertension and risk for new vascular events in patients with vascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Vernooij, Joris W P; van der Graaf, Yolanda; Visseren, Frank L J; Spiering, Wilko

    2012-10-01

    Higher body weight is associated with an increased prevalence of vascular risk factors. Obesity leads to hypertension by various mechanisms, often referred to as obesity-related hypertension. Aim of the present study was to evaluate the prevalence and the vascular risk of the combination of obesity and hypertension in patients with vascular diseases. A cohort of patients with various clinical manifest vascular diseases (n = 4,868) was screened for vascular risk factors and followed (median follow-up 4.2 years) for the occurrence of vascular events (stroke, myocardial infarction, and vascular death). The prevalence of obesity was 18% (95% confidence interval (CI) 17-19%) and the prevalence of hypertension was 83% (95% CI 82-84%). The prevalence of the combination of obesity and hypertension was 16% (95% CI 15-17%). Patients with high blood pressure (BP) combined with a high weight (highest tertile systolic BP (SBP) in the highest tertile BMI) were not at higher risk for new vascular events (hazard ratios (HR) 1.29; 95% CI 0.89-1.88) or mortality (HR 1.18; 95% CI 0.81-1.73) compared to patients without high BP and high weight (patients in the lowest tertile of SBP in the lowest tertile of BMI). Patients with only high weight did not have an elevated risk either for vascular events (HR 1.34; 95% CI 0.91-1.98) or mortality (HR 1.22; 95% CI 0.81-1.83) compared to patients without high BP and high weight. The prevalence of the combination of hypertension and obesity is low in patients with vascular diseases and does not confer a higher risk for recurrent vascular diseases and mortality than each risk factor alone.

  10. [Studies of lipoprotein lipase activity and adipocyte characteristics in the human: effect of obesity and diabetes (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Jaillard, J; Sezille, G; Fruchart, J C; Dewailly, P; Romon, M

    1976-03-01

    Adipose tissue lipoprotein lipase activity (LPLA) and cellularity have been studied in controls, in diabetic or non-diabetic obese subjects and in insulin dependent diabetic patients. LPLA is increased in diabetic or non-diabetic obese subjects and in insulin dependent diabetic patients. LPLA is increased in diabetic or non-diabetic obese subjects (p less than 0.02) and decreased in insulin dependent diabetic patients (p less than 0.02). Adipocyte size is larger in obese subjects, whether diabetic or not (p less than 0.05). As defined by LPLA and cell size means, the different groups are related linearly. The implications of this relationship between LPLA and adipocyte size are considered.

  11. Obesity Cardiomyopathy: Pathophysiologic Factors and Nosologic Reevaluation.

    PubMed

    Bhatheja, Samit; Panchal, Hemang B; Ventura, Hector; Paul, Timir K

    2016-08-01

    Cardiovascular disease in populations with obesity is a major concern because of its epidemic proportion. Obesity leads to the development of cardiomyopathy directly via inflammatory mediators and indirectly by obesity-induced hypertension, diabetes and coronary artery diseases. The aim of this review article is to re-visit the available knowledge and the evidence on pathophysiologic mechanisms of obesity-related cardiomyopathy and to propose its placement into a specific category of myocardial disease. PMID:27524223

  12. [Endothelial dysfunction as a marker of vascular aging syndrome on the background of hypertension, coronary heart disease, gout and obesity].

    PubMed

    Vatseba, M O

    2013-09-01

    Under observation were 40 hypertensive patients with coronary heart disease, gout and obesity I and II degree. Patients with hypertension in combination with coronary heart disease, gout and obesity, syndrome of early vascular aging is shown by increased stiffness of arteries, increased peak systolic flow velocity, pulse blood presure, the thickness of the intima-media complex, higher level endotelinemia and reduced endothelial vasodilation. Obtained evidence that losartan in complex combination with basic therapy and metamaks in complex combination with basic therapy positively affect the elastic properties of blood vessels and slow the progression of early vascular aging syndrome.

  13. Exotic Fruits as Therapeutic Complements for Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Devalaraja, Samir; Jain, Shalini; Yadav, Hariom

    2011-01-01

    The prevalence and severity of obesity, type 2-diabetes, and the resultant metabolic syndrome are rapidly increasing. As successful preventive and therapeutic strategies for these life-threatening health ailments often come with adverse side effects, nutritional elements are widely used in many countries as preventive therapies to prevent or manage metabolic syndrome. Fruits are important dietary components, and contain various bioactive constituents. Many of these constituents have been proven to be useful to manage and treat various chronic diseases such as diabetes, obesity, cancer and cardiovascular diseases. Although exotic fruits are understudied throughout the world due to their limited regional presence, many studies reveal their potent ability to ameliorate metabolic derangements and the resultant conditions i.e. diabetes and obesity. The aim of this article is to review the role of exotic fruits and their constituents in the regulation of metabolic functions, which can beneficially alter diabetes and obesity pathophysiology. PMID:21857774

  14. Serum Superoxide Dismutase Is Associated with Vascular Structure and Function in Hypertensive and Diabetic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Marcos, Manuel A.; Blázquez-Medela, Ana M.; Gamella-Pozuelo, Luis; Recio-Rodriguez, José I.; García-Ortiz, Luis; Martínez-Salgado, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress is associated with cardiac and vascular defects leading to hypertension and atherosclerosis, being superoxide dismutase (SOD) one of the main intracellular antioxidant defence mechanisms. Although several parameters of vascular function and structure have a predictive value for cardiovascular morbidity-mortality in hypertensive patients, there are no studies on the involvement of SOD serum levels with these vascular parameters. Thus, we assessed if SOD serum levels are correlated with parameters of vascular function and structure and with cardiovascular risk in hypertensive and type 2 diabetic patients. We enrolled 255 consecutive hypertensive and diabetic patients and 52 nondiabetic and nonhypertensive controls. SOD levels were measured with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kit. Vascular function and structure were evaluated by pulse wave velocity, augmentation index, ambulatory arterial stiffness index, and carotid intima-media thickness. We detected negative correlations between SOD and pressure wave velocity, peripheral and central augmentation index and ambulatory arterial stiffness index, pulse pressure, and plasma HDL-cholesterol, as well as positive correlations between SOD and plasma uric acid and triglycerides. Our study shows that SOD is a marker of cardiovascular alterations in hypertensive and diabetic patients, since changes in its serum levels are correlated with alterations in vascular structure and function. PMID:26635913

  15. Mechanisms of adverse cardiometabolic consequences of obesity.

    PubMed

    Diaz-Melean, Carlos M; Somers, Virend K; Rodriguez-Escudero, Juan Pablo; Singh, Prachi; Sochor, Ondrej; Llano, Ernesto Manuel; Lopez-Jimenez, Francisco

    2013-11-01

    Obesity is an epidemic that threatens the health of millions of people worldwide and is a major risk factor for cardiovascular diseases, hypertension, diabetes, and dyslipidemia. There are multiple and complex mechanisms to explain how obesity can cause cardiovascular disease. In recent years, studies have shown some limitations in the way we currently define obesity and assess adiposity. This review focuses on the mechanisms involved in the cardiometabolic consequences of obesity and on the relationship between obesity and cardiovascular comorbidities, and provides a brief review of the latest studies focused on normal weight obesity and the obesity paradox. PMID:24048571

  16. Multimorbidity and Persistent Depression among Veterans with Diabetes, Heart Disease, and Hypertension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Findley, Patricia; Shen, Chan; Sambamoorthi, Usha

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the association between multimorbidity and persistent depression among cohorts of veterans with diabetes, heart disease, or hypertension. The retrospective longitudinal analysis used national administrative data on around 1.38 million Veteran Health Administration clinic users merged with Medicare claims data.…

  17. Epigenetic programming of obesity and diabetes by in utero exposure to gestational diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Ruchat, Stephanie-May; Hivert, Marie-France; Bouchard, Luigi

    2013-10-01

    It is now well accepted that offspring exposed to maternal undernutrition, obesity, or gestational diabetes mellitus have an increased risk for chronic diseases later in life, supporting the theory of the early origins of chronic diseases. However, the molecular mechanisms through which the exposure to an altered in utero environment translates into the development of chronic diseases are not yet well understood. Recently reported promising results help to resolve this issue. They suggest that epigenetic modifications are a potential mechanism for fetal metabolic programming. This review provides an overview of the relationship between the exposure to an altered intrauterine environment and fetal metabolic programming, focusing on gestational diabetes mellitus and epigenetic variations at adipokine candidate genes.

  18. From obesity to diabetes and cancer: epidemiological links and role of therapies

    PubMed Central

    García-Jiménez, Custodia; Gutiérrez-Salmerón, María; Chocarro-Calvo, Ana; García-Martinez, Jose Manuel; Castaño, Angel; De la Vieja, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests a complex relationship between obesity, diabetes and cancer. Here we review the evidence for the association between obesity and diabetes and a wide range of cancer types. In many cases the evidence for a positive association is strong, but for other cancer types a more complex picture emerges with some site-specific cancers associated with obesity but not to diabetes, and some associated with type I but not type II diabetes. The evidence therefore suggests the existence of cumulative common and differential mechanisms influencing the relationship between these diseases. Importantly, we highlight the influence of antidiabetics on cancer and antineoplastic agents on diabetes and in particular that antineoplastic targeting of insulin/IGF-1 signalling induces hyperglycaemia that often evolves to overt diabetes. Overall, a coincidence of diabetes and cancer worsens outcome and increases mortality. Future epidemiology should consider dose and time of exposure to both disease and treatment, and should classify cancers by their molecular signatures. Well-controlled studies on the development of diabetes upon cancer treatment are necessary and should identify the underlying mechanisms responsible for these reciprocal interactions. Given the global epidemic of diabetes, preventing both cancer occurrence in diabetics and the onset of diabetes in cancer patients will translate into a substantial socioeconomic benefit. PMID:26908326

  19. From obesity to diabetes and cancer: epidemiological links and role of therapies.

    PubMed

    García-Jiménez, Custodia; Gutiérrez-Salmerón, María; Chocarro-Calvo, Ana; García-Martinez, Jose Manuel; Castaño, Angel; De la Vieja, Antonio

    2016-03-29

    Increasing evidence suggests a complex relationship between obesity, diabetes and cancer. Here we review the evidence for the association between obesity and diabetes and a wide range of cancer types. In many cases the evidence for a positive association is strong, but for other cancer types a more complex picture emerges with some site-specific cancers associated with obesity but not to diabetes, and some associated with type I but not type II diabetes. The evidence therefore suggests the existence of cumulative common and differential mechanisms influencing the relationship between these diseases. Importantly, we highlight the influence of antidiabetics on cancer and antineoplastic agents on diabetes and in particular that antineoplastic targeting of insulin/IGF-1 signalling induces hyperglycaemia that often evolves to overt diabetes. Overall, a coincidence of diabetes and cancer worsens outcome and increases mortality. Future epidemiology should consider dose and time of exposure to both disease and treatment, and should classify cancers by their molecular signatures. Well-controlled studies on the development of diabetes upon cancer treatment are necessary and should identify the underlying mechanisms responsible for these reciprocal interactions. Given the global epidemic of diabetes, preventing both cancer occurrence in diabetics and the onset of diabetes in cancer patients will translate into a substantial socioeconomic benefit. PMID:26908326

  20. Leptin and Its Relation to Obesity and Insulin in the SHR/N-corpulent Rat, A Model of Type II Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Bhathena, Sam J.; Hansen, Carl T.

    2001-01-01

    The spontaneously hypertensive/NIH-corpulent (SHR/N-cp) rat is a genetic animal model that exhibits obesity, metabolic features of hyperinsulinemia, hyperglycemia, and hyperlipidemia, which are characteristic of type II diabetes and mild hypertension. To determine the role of leptin, the protein product of the ob gene, in the development of obesity and diabetes in this model, we measured steady-state circulating levels of leptin in obese and lean SHR/N-cp rats and examined the relation between plasma leptin levels and metabolic variables at the stage of established obesity in these animals. Mean fasting plasma leptin concentration was 8-fold higher in obese than in lean rats (p<0.01). This was associated with a 6-fold elevation in plasma insulin in the obese group. Fasting levels of plasma glucose, cholesterol, and triglyceride were all significantly higher in obese rats than in lean controls. Spearman correlation analysis showed a significant positive correlation between plasma leptin concentration and body weight among the animals (r=0.73, p<0.01). Similarly, plasma insulin concentration was significantly correlated with BW in all animals (r=0.54, p<0.05). There was also a significant positive.correlation between plasma leptin and plasma insulin in the entire group (r=0.70, p<0.01). However, this relationship was significant only for lean rats but not for obese rats (r=0.59, p<0.05 for lean rats, and r=0.23, p=NS, for obese rats). Plasma leptin also correlated positively with fasting plasma glucose (r=0.75, p<0.05), total cholesterol (r=0.63, p<0.05), and triglyceride (r=0.67, p <0.05). The marked elevation of plasma leptin in obese SHR/N-cp rats suggests that obesity in this animal model is related to up-regulation of the ob gene. Circulating leptin appears to be one of the best biological markers of obesity and that hyperleptinemia is closely associated with several metabolic risk factors related to insulin resistance in the diabesity syndrome. PMID:12369710

  1. Association of Oxidative Stress and Obesity with Insulin Resistance in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Das, P; Biswas, S; Mukherjee, S; Bandyopadhyay, S K

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress occurs due to delicate imbalance between pro-oxidant and anti oxidant forces in our system. It has been found to be associated with many morbidities but its association with obesity and insulin resistance is still controversial. Here in our study we examined 167 patients of recent onset type 2 diabetes mellitus and 60 age sex matched non-diabetic control. Body Mass Index (BMI), abdominal circumference, fasting blood glucose, serum insulin and plasma Malondealdehyde (MDA, marker for oxidative stress) were measured in them. On the basis of BMI, subjects were divided into obese (BMI≥25) and non obese (BMI<25) groups. Insulin resistance scores were calculated by Homeostatic Model Assessment-Insulin Resistance (HOMA-IR) method. Physical parameters (BMI, abdominal circumference) as well as levels of insulin and MDA were found to be significantly higher in subjects with diabetes than their non diabetic controls. The said parameters also showed significant difference in obese and non-obese sub groups. Insulin resistance score showed positive correlation with BMI, abdominal circumference, and plasma MDA, strength of association being highest with abdominal circumference. Plasma MDA was found to have positive correlation with physical parameters. Study concludes that, obesity mainly central type may predispose to insulin resistance and oxidative stress may be a crucial factor in its pathogenesis. Thus, oxidative stress may be the connecting link between obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus, two on going global epidemics.

  2. A Metabolomic Approach to Understanding the Metabolic Link between Obesity and Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Park, Seokjae; Sadanala, Krishna Chaitanya; Kim, Eun-Kyoung

    2015-01-01

    Obesity and diabetes arise from an intricate interplay between both genetic and environmental factors. It is well recognized that obesity plays an important role in the development of insulin resistance and diabetes. Yet, the exact mechanism of the connection between obesity and diabetes is still not completely understood. Metabolomics is an analytical approach that aims to detect and quantify small metabolites. Recently, there has been an increased interest in the application of metabolomics to the identification of disease biomarkers, with a number of well-known biomarkers identified. Metabolomics is a potent approach to unravel the intricate relationships between metabolism, obesity and progression to diabetes and, at the same time, has potential as a clinical tool for risk evaluation and monitoring of disease. Moreover, metabolomics applications have revealed alterations in the levels of metabolites related to obesity-associated diabetes. This review focuses on the part that metabolomics has played in elucidating the roles of metabolites in the regulation of systemic metabolism relevant to obesity and diabetes. It also explains the possible metabolic relation and association between the two diseases. The metabolites with altered profiles in individual disorders and those that are specifically and similarly altered in both disorders are classified, categorized and summarized. PMID:26072981

  3. Common Variations in Perilipin Gene, Central Obesity, and Risk of Type 2 diabetes in US Women

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objective: The variations in perilipin gene (PLIN) were previously associated with obesity and insulin sensitivity. We examined whether PLIN variability was associated with diabetes risk and whether obesity status modified such associations. Research Methods and Procedures: We conducted a nested cas...

  4. Obesity-induced hypertension develops in young rats independently of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system.

    PubMed

    Smith, Anita D; Brands, Michael W; Wang, Mong-Heng; Dorrance, Anne M

    2006-03-01

    A correlation exists between obesity and hypertension. In the currently available models of diet-induced obesity, the treatment of rats with a high fat (HF) diet does not begin until adulthood. Our aim was to develop and characterize a model of pre-pubescent obesity-induced hypertension. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed a HF diet (35% fat) for 10 weeks, beginning at age 3 weeks. Blood pressure was measured by tail-cuff, and a terminal blood sample was obtained to measure fasting blood glucose, insulin, plasma renin, aldosterone, thiobarbitutic acid reactive substances (TBARS), and free 8-isoprostanes levels. The vascular reactivity in the aorta was assessed using a myograph. Blood pressure was increased in rats fed the HF diet (HF, 161 +/- 2 mm Hg vs. control, 137 +/- 2 mm Hg, P < 0.05). Blood glucose (HF, 155 +/- 4 mg/dL vs. control, 123 +/- 5 mg/dL, P < 0.05), insulin (HF, 232 +/- 63 pM vs. control, 60 +/- 11 pM, P < 0.05), TBARS (expressed as nM of malondialdehyde [MDA]/ml [HF, 1.8 +/- 0.37 nM MDA/ml vs. control 1.05 +/- 0.09 nM MDA/ml, P < 0.05]), and free 8-isoprostanes (HF, 229 +/- 68 pg/ml vs. control, 112 +/- 9 pg/ml, P < 0.05) levels were elevated in the HF diet group. Interestingly, plasma renin and aldosterone levels were not different between the groups. The maximum vasoconstriction to phenylephrine (10(-4) M) was increased in the HF diet group (HF, 26.1 +/- 1.5 mN vs. control 22.3 +/- 1.2 mN, P < 0.05). In conclusion, pre-pubescent rats become hypertensive and have increased oxidative stress and enhanced vasoconstriction when fed a HF diet. Surprisingly, this occurs without the increase in renin or aldosterone levels seen in the adult models of diet-induced obesity.

  5. Abdominal obesity is associated with microalbuminuria and an elevated cardiovascular risk profile in patients with hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Thoenes, Martin; Reil, Jan-Christian; Khan, Bobby Varkey; Bramlage, Peter; Volpe, Massimo; Kirch, Wilhelm; Böhm, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Background Overweight and obesity are frequently associated with preventable death and have emerged as a major challenge to public health. There is an ongoing debate on the role of abdominal obesity and its value in predicting cardiovascular and renal outcomes. The present analysis evaluates the prevalence of microalbuminuria (MAU) and conventional cardiovascular risk factors in relation to measures of general and abdominal obesity. Methods In this multinational, observational study, 20828 hypertensive out-patients from 26 countries including Europe, North and Latin America, Middle East, and Asia were analyzed. Urinary dipstick screening for MAU was performed as well as data on patient demographics, anthropometric measures, cardiovascular risk factors, comorbid conditions, and cardiovascular drug therapy collected. MAU prevalence was determined by a stepwise logistic regression analysis with cardiovascular risk factors as univariate. Results In the univariate analysis, MAU prevalence systematically increased with body mass index (BMI) from 54.4% (1st tertial) to 62.1% (3rd tertial) (p < 0.0001), an increase which was also observed for waist circumference (WC). At any level of BMI, MAU increased with WC from 53.5%, 54.8%, and 55.0% (1st tertial of WC in all three BMI tertials) to 61.4%, 62.1%, and 64.0% (3rd tertial of WC in all BMI tertials) (p < 0.0001). In the multivariate analysis, WC, but not BMI was independently associated with MAU. Furthermore, overweight/obesity were associated with the presence of modifiable and nonmodifiable risk factors. Conclusion An abnormal WC, but not BMI appears to be independently associated with MAU, an early marker of cardiovascular and renal risk. Increasing WC confers an incremental risk for MAU at any level of BMI, underlining the prognostic importance of abdominal fat accumulation beyond general obesity. PMID:19649308

  6. Impact of obesity on the pathogenesis and prognosis of coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Todd Miller, M; Lavie, Carl J; White, Christopher J

    2008-01-01

    Obesity has a significant adverse effect on coronary heart disease (CHD) risk factors, including hypertension, dyslipidemia, and the metabolic syndrome/diabetes. Obesity is an independent risk factor for CHD events; however, obese patients with CHD generally have a more favorable prognosis, with the worst prognosis associated with either underweight or morbidly obese patients. In this manuscript, the authors review the impact of obesity on overall CHD risk as well as the prognosis of obese patients with established CHD.

  7. Clinical and biochemical effects of a 3-week program of diet combined with spa therapy in obese and diabetic patients: a pilot open study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fioravanti, Antonella; Adamczyk, Przemysław; Pascarelli, Nicola Antonio; Giannitti, Chiara; Urso, Renato; Tołodziecki, Michał; Ponikowska, Irena

    2015-07-01

    Obesity is a major risk factor for arterial hypertension, coronary artery disease, dyslipidemias, and type 2 diabetes. Spa therapy has long been used for treating obesity and its comorbidities. Enlargement of adipose tissue has been linked to a dysregulation of adipokine secretion and adipose tissue inflammation. Adipokines are currently investigated as potential drug targets in these conditions. Our primary aim was to assess the clinical efficacy of a 3-week program of diet combined with spa therapy in obese patients with and without type 2 diabetes. The secondary aim was to examine whether this combined program influences the response of serum levels of leptin, adiponectin, visfatin, and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein. Fifty obese males were enrolled and 21 of these featured a type 2 diabetes. During the 3-week period of the study, the patients were on a 1,000-kcal diet and were involved in mineral bath and total body's mud-pack applications (15 procedures). Patients were assessed at baseline and at the end of the therapy for clinical and biochemical parameters (total cholesterol, triglycerides, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, glycemia, and adipokines). We showed that a 3-week program of spa therapy in obese patients induced significant decrease of body weight, body mass index, triglycerides, total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, glycemia, and serum levels of leptin and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein. So, a cycle of mud-bath therapy associated with a controlled diet may be a promising treatment for obesity and type 2 diabetes decreasing body weight and many risk factors for atherosclerosis and metabolic syndrome.

  8. Th17 cytokines differentiate obesity from obesity-associated type 2 diabetes and promote TNFα production

    PubMed Central

    Ip, Blanche; Cilfone, Nicholas; Belkina, Anna C.; DeFuria, Jason; Jagannathan-Bogdan, Madhumita; Zhu, Min; Kuchibhatla, Ramya; McDonnell, Marie E.; Xiao, Qiang; Kepler, Thomas B.; Apovian, Caroline M.; Lauffenburger, Douglas A.; Nikolajczyk, Barbara S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective T cell inflammation plays pivotal roles in obesity-associated type 2 diabetes (T2DM). The identification of dominant sources of T cell inflammation in humans remains a significant gap in understanding disease pathogenesis. We hypothesized that cytokine profiles from circulating T cells identify T cell subsets and T cell cytokines that define T2DM-associated inflammation. Methods We used multiplex analyses to quantify T cell-associated cytokines in αCD3/αCD28-stimulated PBMCs, or B cell-depleted PBMCs, from subjects with T2DM or BMI-matched controls. We subjected cytokine measurements to multivariate (principal component and partial least squares) analyses. Flow cytometry detected intracellular TNFα in multiple immune cells subsets in the presence/absence of antibodies that neutralize T cell cytokines. Results T cell cytokines were generally higher in T2DM samples, but Th17 cytokines are specifically important for classifying individuals correctly as T2DM. Multivariate analyses indicated that B cells support Th17 inflammation in T2DM but not control samples, while monocytes supported Th17 inflammation regardless of T2DM status. Partial least squares regression analysis indicated that both Th17 and Th1 cytokines impact %HbA1c. Conclusions Among various T cell subsets, Th17 cells are major contributors to inflammation and hyperglycemia, and are uniquely supported by B cells in obesity-associated T2DM. PMID:26576827

  9. Non-obese diabetic mice rapidly develop dramatic sympathetic neuritic dystrophy: a new experimental model of diabetic autonomic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Robert E; Dorsey, Denise A; Beaudet, Lucie N; Frederick, Kathy E; Parvin, Curtis A; Plurad, Santiago B; Levisetti, Matteo G

    2003-11-01

    To address the pathogenesis of diabetic autonomic neuropathy, we have examined the sympathetic nervous system in non-obese diabetic (NOD) and streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic mice, two models of type 1 diabetes, and the db/db mouse, a model of type 2 diabetes. After only 3 to 5 weeks of diabetes, NOD mice developed markedly swollen axons and dendrites ("neuritic dystrophy") in the prevertebral superior mesenteric and celiac ganglia (SMG-CG), similar to the pathology described in diabetic STZ- and BBW-rat and man. Comparable changes failed to develop in the superior cervical ganglia of the NOD mouse or in the SMG-CG of non-diabetic NOD siblings. STZ-induced diabetic mice develop identical changes, although at a much slower pace and to a lesser degree than NOD mice. NOD-SCID mice, which are genetically identical to NOD mice except for the absence of T and B cells, do not develop diabetes or neuropathology comparable to diabetic NOD mice. However, STZ-treated NOD-SCID mice develop severe neuritic dystrophy, evidence against an exclusively autoimmune pathogenesis for autonomic neuropathy in this model. Chronically diabetic type 2 db/db mice fail to develop neuritic dystrophy, suggesting that hyperglycemia alone may not be the critical and sufficient element. The NOD mouse appears to be a valuable model of diabetic sympathetic autonomic neuropathy with unambiguous, rapidly developing neuropathology which corresponds closely to the characteristic pathology of other rodent models and man. PMID:14578206

  10. Non-obese diabetic mice rapidly develop dramatic sympathetic neuritic dystrophy: a new experimental model of diabetic autonomic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Robert E; Dorsey, Denise A; Beaudet, Lucie N; Frederick, Kathy E; Parvin, Curtis A; Plurad, Santiago B; Levisetti, Matteo G

    2003-11-01

    To address the pathogenesis of diabetic autonomic neuropathy, we have examined the sympathetic nervous system in non-obese diabetic (NOD) and streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic mice, two models of type 1 diabetes, and the db/db mouse, a model of type 2 diabetes. After only 3 to 5 weeks of diabetes, NOD mice developed markedly swollen axons and dendrites ("neuritic dystrophy") in the prevertebral superior mesenteric and celiac ganglia (SMG-CG), similar to the pathology described in diabetic STZ- and BBW-rat and man. Comparable changes failed to develop in the superior cervical ganglia of the NOD mouse or in the SMG-CG of non-diabetic NOD siblings. STZ-induced diabetic mice develop identical changes, although at a much slower pace and to a lesser degree than NOD mice. NOD-SCID mice, which are genetically identical to NOD mice except for the absence of T and B cells, do not develop diabetes or neuropathology comparable to diabetic NOD mice. However, STZ-treated NOD-SCID mice develop severe neuritic dystrophy, evidence against an exclusively autoimmune pathogenesis for autonomic neuropathy in this model. Chronically diabetic type 2 db/db mice fail to develop neuritic dystrophy, suggesting that hyperglycemia alone may not be the critical and sufficient element. The NOD mouse appears to be a valuable model of diabetic sympathetic autonomic neuropathy with unambiguous, rapidly developing neuropathology which corresponds closely to the characteristic pathology of other rodent models and man.

  11. Socioeconomic Gradient in Childhood Obesity and Hypertension: A Multilevel Population-Based Study in a Chinese Community

    PubMed Central

    Ip, Patrick; Ho, Frederick Ka Wing; So, Hung-Kwan; Chan, Dorothy Fung-ying; Ho, Matthew; Tso, Winnie; Nelson, E. Anthony S.

    2016-01-01

    Background This study aims to assess evidence for any socioeconomic gradients in childhood obesity and hypertension in a population-representative sample in Hong Kong, China. Methods The data of a stratified random sampled growth survey collected in 2005–2006 was matched with a population by-census. Obesity was defined using the International Obesity Task Force standard and hypertension was defined using the Hong Kong norm table. Family socioeconomic status (SES) was measured by maternal education level. Neighbourhood SES was measured by median household income of the neighbourhood. Multilevel Poisson regression models with robust standard error were used to test the association. Body mass indices of children’s parents were included as potential confounders. Intra-school/neighbourhood correlations were adjusted using random factors. Results Totally 14842 children (age 6–19 years) included in the analysis, in which 16.6% of them were overweight or obese. Children whose mother only completed secondary school or below had higher risk of childhood obesity (RR 1.41, 95% CI 1.13–1.76, p = 0.003) and hypertension (RR 1.18, 95% CI 1.01–1.36, p = 0.03). Meanwhile, children in the lowest neighbourhood SES group had higher risk of childhood underweight (RR 1.61, 95% CI 1.04–2.49, p = 0.03), overweight (RR 1.35, 95% CI 1.05–1.72, p = 0.02), and obesity (RR 2.07, 95% CI 1.11–3.88, p = 0.02). Conclusions Socioeconomic gradient in childhood obesity and hypertension existed in Hong Kong, one of the most developed cities in China. These results have implications for policymakers and public health experts and highlight the need to monitor trends in other parts of China. PMID:27258094

  12. "Let's Move!" to End Childhood Obesity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Obama, Michelle

    2011-01-01

    Childhood obesity rates in America have tripled in the last three decades. Almost one in three children are considered overweight or obese. Pediatricians are now treating children for adult diseases like type II diabetes and hypertension. All parents want the best for their children. They want children to succeed in school, fulfill their dreams,…

  13. Obesity upregulates genes involved in oxidative phosphorylation in livers of diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Takamura, Toshinari; Misu, Hirofumi; Matsuzawa-Nagata, Naoto; Sakurai, Masaru; Ota, Tsuguhito; Shimizu, Akiko; Kurita, Seiichiro; Takeshita, Yumie; Ando, Hitoshi; Honda, Masao; Kaneko, Shuichi

    2008-12-01

    Obesity is a major cause of insulin resistance and contributes to the development of type 2 diabetes. The altered expression of genes involved in mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) has been regarded as a key change in insulin-sensitive organs of patients with type 2 diabetes. This study explores possible molecular signatures of obesity and examines the clinical significance of OXPHOS gene expression in the livers of patients with type 2 diabetes. We analyzed gene expression in the livers of 21 patients with type 2 diabetes (10 obese and 11 nonobese patients; age, 53.0 +/- 2.1 years; BMI, 24.4 +/- 0.9 kg/m(2); fasting plasma glucose, 143.0 +/- 10.6 mg/dl) using a DNA chip. We screened 535 human pathways and extracted those metabolic pathways significantly altered by obesity. Genes involved in the OXPHOS pathway, together with glucose and lipid metabolism pathways, were coordinately upregulated in the liver in association with obesity. The mean centroid of OXPHOS gene expression was significantly correlated with insulin resistance indices and the hepatic expression of genes involved in gluconeogenesis, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, and transcriptional factors and nuclear co-activators associated with energy homeostasis. In conclusion, obesity may affect the pathophysiology of type 2 diabetes by upregulating genes involved in OXPHOS in association with insulin resistance markers and the expression of genes involved in hepatic gluconeogenesis and ROS generation.

  14. [Gene-nutrient interaction and its association with obesity and diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Steemburgo, Thais; Azevedo, Mirela J de; Martínez, José Alfredo

    2009-07-01

    Nutritional genomics evaluates the effects of genetic variation in the interaction between diet and chronic diseases. The aim of this manuscript was to review the most important genetic polymorphisms associated with obesity, diabetes mellitus, and dietary factors. The main interactions among genetic polymorphisms and diet were: for obesity: interleukin-6 (IL-6) with daily intake; peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma 2 (PPAR-gama2) and fat mass and obesity associated (FTO) with fat intake; beta-adrenergic receptor 2 (ADRB2) and melanocortin receptor 4 (MCR4) with carbohydrate intake; or reduction in body weight: uncoupling proteins (UCPs) with restriction of energy; for leptinemia: leptin receptor (LEPR) with restriction of energy; for diabetes mellitus: PPAR-gama2 with fat intake; for hypertriglyceridemia: fatty acid-binding protein 2 (FABP2) with fat intake. The data demonstrated suggest that nutritional genomics is important for the development of obesity and diabetes mellitus.

  15. DIABETES, OBESITY AND DIAGNOSIS OF AMYOTROPHIC LATERAL SCLEROSIS: A POPULATION-BASED STUDY

    PubMed Central

    Kioumourtzoglou, Marianthi-Anna; Rotem, Ran S.; Seals, Ryan M.; Gredal, Ole; Hansen, Johnni; Weisskopf, Marc G.

    2016-01-01

    Importance Although prior studies have suggested a role of cardiometabolic health on pathogenesis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), the association with diabetes has not been widely examined. Objective Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis is the most common motor neuron disorder. Several vascular risk factors have been associated with decreased risk for ALS. Although diabetes is also a risk factor for vascular disease, the few studies of diabetes and ALS have been inconsistent. We examined the association between diabetes and obesity, each identified through ICD-8 or 10 codes in a hospital registry, and ALS using data from the Danish National Registers. Design and Setting Population-based nested case-control study. Participants 3,650 Danish residents diagnosed with ALS between 1982 and 2009, and 365,000 controls (100 for each ALS case), matched on age and sex. Main Outcome Measure Adjusted odds ratio (OR) for ALS associated with diabetes or obesity diagnoses at least three years prior to the ALS diagnosis date. Results When considering diabetes and our obesity indicator together, the estimated OR for ALS was 0.61 (95%CI: 0.46–0.80) for diabetes and 0.81 (95%CI: 0.57–1.16) for obesity. We observed no effect modification on the association with diabetes by gender, but a significant modification by age at first diabetes or age at ALS, with the protective association stronger with increasing age, consistent with different associations by diabetes type. Conclusions and Relevance We conducted a nationwide study to investigate the association between diabetes and ALS diagnosis. Our findings are in agreement with previous reports of a protective association between vascular risk factors and ALS, and suggest type 2 diabetes, but not type 1, is protective for ALS. PMID:26030836

  16. An opportunistic pre-diabetes screening program offered with existing hypertension screening.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, M T

    2013-03-01

    Diabetes mellitus refers to a group of metabolic diseases that share the hallmark characteristic of hyperglycemia. Generally, Diabetes is categorized as type I, or type II. Type I results from the body's failure to synthesize insulin, and requires insulin injections. Type II, also known as adult-onset or non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM), occurs when the body's cells fail to use insulin properly due to a defective insulin receptor, and may also be combined with a relatively reduced insulin secretion. Type II can be managed with healthy lifestyle habits and early detection of high sugar levels. Most local health departments across New York State offer hypertension screening but no pre-diabetes screening programs. The US preventive Services Task Force recommends that asymptomatic adults with sustained blood pressure greater than 135/80 mm Hg should be screened for type II diabetes. Since high blood sugar levels can be controlled, and in some cases reduced, there exist strong benefits in offering pre-diabetic screening for individuals who are hypertensive.

  17. Combined effect of hyperuricemia and overweight/obesity on the prevalence of hypertension among US adults: result from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.

    PubMed

    Han, G-M; Gonzalez, S; DeVries, D

    2014-10-01

    Hypertension is a large and growing public health problem worldwide. Hyperuricemia and overweight/obesity are two of the most important risk factors for hypertension. However, their combined effect on the risk of hypertension is not known. Participants aged 20 years and older from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey from 1999-2012 were used to evaluate the separate and combined effects of hyperuricemia and overweight/obesity on the risk of prevalent hypertension among different race, gender and age groups. Participants (31,473) were used to estimate separate and combined effects on the prevalence of hypertension. The overall prevalence of hypertension among adults with a combination of hyperuricemia and overweight/obesity (50.2%, 95% confidence interval (CI) 48.3-52.1%) was significantly higher than separate hyperuricemia (41.7%, 95% CI 37.2-46.2%) and overweight/obesity (30.6%, 95% CI 29.5-31.8%). The magnitude of odds ratio (OR) from the combination of hyperuricemia and overweight/obesity (OR=4.53, 95% CI 4.05-5.07) was significantly higher than both hyperuricemia (OR=2.62, 95% CI 2.07-3.32) and overweight/obesity (OR=2.08, 95% CI 1.89-2.30). Combined effect of hyperuricemia and overweight/obesity on the risk of hypertension is much stronger than any separate one. These data can provide important information for identification of target populations for future intervention and patient management.

  18. Adipocyte deficiency of angiotensinogen prevents obesity-induced hypertension in male mice.

    PubMed

    Yiannikouris, Frederique; Gupte, Manisha; Putnam, Kelly; Thatcher, Sean; Charnigo, Richard; Rateri, Debra L; Daugherty, Alan; Cassis, Lisa A

    2012-12-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that diet-induced obesity increased plasma angiotensin II concentrations and elevated systolic blood pressures in male mice. Adipocytes express angiotensinogen and secrete angiotensin peptides. We hypothesize that adipocyte-derived angiotensin II mediates obesity-induced increases in systolic blood pressure in male high fat-fed C57BL/6 mice. Systolic blood pressure was measured by radiotelemetry during week 16 of low-fat or high-fat feeding in Agt(fl/fl) and adipocyte angiotensinogen-deficient mice (Agt(aP2)). Adipocyte angiotensinogen deficiency had no effect on diet-induced obesity. Basal 24-hour systolic blood pressure was not different in low fat-fed Agt(fl/fl) compared with Agt(aP2) mice (124 ± 3 versus 128 ± 3 mm Hg, respectively). In Agt(fl/fl) mice, high-fat feeding significantly increased systolic blood pressure (24 hours; 134 ± 2 mm Hg; P<0.05). In contrast, high fat-fed Agt(aP2) mice did not exhibit an increase in systolic blood pressure (126 ± 2 mm Hg). Plasma angiotensin II concentrations were increased by high-fat feeding in Agt(fl/fl) mice (low fat, 32 ± 14; high fat, 219 ± 58 pg/mL; P<0.05). In contrast, high fat-fed Agt(aP2) mice did not exhibit elevated plasma angiotensin II concentrations (high fat, 18 ± 7 pg/mL). Similarly, adipose tissue concentrations of angiotensin II were significantly decreased in low fat- and high fat-fed Agt(aP2) mice compared with controls. In conclusion, adipocyte angiotensinogen deficiency prevented high fat-induced elevations in plasma angiotensin II concentrations and systolic blood pressure. These results suggest that adipose tissue serves as a major source of angiotensin II in the development of obesity hypertension.

  19. Hypertension and nephrotoxicity in the rate of decline in kidney function in diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Aubia, J; Hojman, L; Chine, M; Lloveras, J; Masramon, J; Llorach, I; Cuevas, X; Puig, J M

    1987-01-01

    Serum creatinine levels were determined prospectively every 2 to 3 months in 40 patients with diabetic nephropathy for a global observation period of 864 months. The monthly creatinine increasing rate was significantly lower in normotensive periods, mean arterial pressure (MAP) less than 115 mmHg, when compared with hypertensive periods, MAP greater than 125 mmHg. No significant difference was shown in periods with borderline hypertension (MAP between 115-124 mmHg). The mean creatinine increases were of 0.036 mg/dl/month, 0.3 mg/dl/month and 0.046 mg/dl/month respectively. Normotension was associated with a slowing down of the rate of decline in renal function in this group of moderate kidney failure with an initial mean serum creatinine of 2.26 mg/dl. The exposure of patients to nephrotoxics (aminoglycosides, and possibly anesthesia) significantly accelerated the decline in renal function: 0.39 mg/dl/month and 0.17 mg/dl/month respectively according to the concomitance or not of toxics and hypertension. The reported protective effect of diabetes against aminoglycosides nephrotoxicity in experimental conditions was not reflected in our clinical results. On the contrary, we suggest a possible enhanced sensibility of the diabetic patient with diabetic nephropathy to aminoglycosides leading to an acceleration of the progression of renal failure.

  20. The impact of obesity on prostate cancer recurrence observed after exclusion of diabetics

    PubMed Central

    Agalliu, Ilir; Williams, Steve; Adler, Brandon; Androga, Lagu; Siev, Michael; Lin, Juan; Xue, Xiaonan; Huang, Gloria; Strickler, Howard D.; Ghavamian, Reza

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Although overall there is a positive association between obesity and risk of prostate cancer (PrCa) recurrence, results of individual studies are somewhat inconsistent. We investigated whether the failure to exclude diabetics in prior studies could have increased the likelihood of conflicting results. Methods A total of 610 PrCa patients who underwent radical prostatectomy between 2005 and 2012 were followed for recurrence, defined as a rise in serum PSA ≥ 0.2 ng/ml following surgery. Body mass index (BMI) and history of type 2 diabetes were documented prior to PrCa surgery. The analysis was conducted using Cox proportional hazard models. Results Obesity (25.6 %) and diabetes (18.7 %) were common in this cohort. There were 87 (14.3 %) recurrence events during a median follow-up of 30.8 months after surgery among the 610 patients. When analyzed among all PrCa patients, no association was observed between BMI/obesity and PrCa recurrence. However, when analysis was limited to non-diabetics, obese men had a 2.27-fold increased risk (95 % CI 1.17–4.41) of PrCa recurrence relative to normal weight men, after adjusting for age and clinical/pathological tumor characteristics. Conclusions This study found a greater than twofold association between obesity/BMI and PrCa recurrence in non-diabetics. We anticipated these results because the relationship between BMI/obesity and the biologic factors that may underlie the PrCa recurrence–BMI/obesity association, such as insulin, may be altered by the use of anti-diabetes medication or diminished beta-cell insulin production in advanced diabetes. Studies to further assess the molecular factors that explain the BMI/obesity–PrCa recurrence relationship are warranted. PMID:25771797

  1. Duration of Abdominal Obesity Beginning in Young Adulthood and Incident Diabetes Through Middle Age

    PubMed Central

    Reis, Jared P.; Hankinson, Arlene L.; Loria, Catherine M.; Lewis, Cora E.; Powell-Wiley, Tiffany; Wei, Gina S.; Liu, Kiang

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To examine whether the duration of abdominal obesity determined prospectively using measured waist circumference (WC) is associated with the development of new-onset diabetes independent of the degree of abdominal adiposity. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS The Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults Study is a multicenter, community-based, longitudinal cohort study of 5,115 white and black adults aged 18–30 years in 1985 to 1986. Years spent abdominally obese were calculated for participants without abdominal obesity (WC >102 cm in men and >88 cm in women) or diabetes at baseline (n = 4,092) and was based upon repeat measurements conducted 2, 5, 7, 10, 15, 20, and 25 years later. RESULTS Over 25 years, 392 participants developed incident diabetes. Overall, following adjustment for demographics, family history of diabetes, study center, and time varying WC, energy intake, physical activity, smoking, and alcohol, each additional year of abdominal obesity was associated with a 4% higher risk of developing diabetes [hazard ratio (HR) 1.04 (95% CI 1.02–1.07)]. However, a quadratic model best represented the data. HRs for 0, 1–5, 6–10, 11–15, 16–20, and >20 years of abdominal obesity were 1.00 (referent), 2.06 (1.43–2.98), 3.45 (2.28–5.22), 3.43 (2.28–5.22), 2.80 (1.73–4.54), and 2.91 (1.60–5.29), respectively; P-quadratic < 0.001. CONCLUSIONS Longer duration of abdominal obesity was associated with substantially higher risk for diabetes independent of the degree of abdominal adiposity. Preventing or at least delaying the onset of abdominal obesity in young adulthood may lower the risk of developing diabetes through middle age. PMID:23248193

  2. Associations between lower extremity muscle mass and metabolic parameters related to obesity in Japanese obese patients with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Hamasaki, Hidetaka; Kawashima, Yu; Adachi, Hiroki; Moriyama, Sumie; Katsuyama, Hisayuki; Sako, Akahito; Yanai, Hidekatsu

    2015-01-01

    Background. Age-related loss of muscle mass (sarcopenia) increases the incidence of obesity in the elderly by reducing physical activity. This sarcopenic obesity may become self-perpetuating, increasing the risks for metabolic syndrome, disability, and mortality. We investigated the associations of two sarcopenic indices, the ratio of lower extremity muscle mass to body weight (L/W ratio) and the ratio of lower extremity muscle mass to upper extremity muscle mass (L/U ratio), with metabolic parameters related to obesity in patients with type 2 diabetes and obesity. Methods. Of 148 inpatients with type 2 diabetes treated between October 2013 and April 2014, we recruited 26 with obesity but no physical disability. Daily physical activity was measured by a triaxial accelerometer during a period of hospitalization, and which was also evaluated by our previously reported non-exercise activity thermogenesis questionnaire. We measured body composition by bioelectrical impedance and investigated the correlations of L/W and L/U ratios with body weight, body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC), waist-to-hip ratio (WHR), visceral fat area, subcutaneous fat area, serum lipid profile, and daily physical activity. Results. The L/W ratio was significantly and negatively correlated with BMI, WC, WHR, body fat mass, body fat percentage, subcutaneous fat area, and serum free fatty acid concentration, was positively correlated with daily physical activity: the locomotive non-exercise activity thermogenesis score, but was not correlated with visceral fat area. The L/U ratio was significantly and positively correlated with serum high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. Conclusions. High L/W and L/U ratios, indicative of relatively preserved lower extremity muscle mass, were predictive of improved metabolic parameters related to obesity. Preserved muscle fitness in obesity, especially of the lower extremities, may prevent sarcopenic obesity and lower associated risks for metabolic

  3. A critical review of the evidence supporting aldosterone in the etiology and its blockade in the treatment of obesity-associated hypertension.

    PubMed

    Byrd, J B; Brook, R D

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is epidemic and is associated with increased blood pressure, which often manifests as treatment-resistant hypertension. Mineralocorticoids have been hypothesized to have a pathogenic role in human obesity-associated hypertension. In this review, we critically appraise the existing data regarding aldosterone in the pathophysiology and treatment of obesity-associated hypertension. We begin by reviewing the mechanisms by which obesity may increase mineralocorticoid activity. We then discuss human studies of plasma and urine aldosterone in obesity and with weight loss. From these studies, we conclude that aldosterone is often, but not always, mildly increased in obesity. Further study is needed to define circumstances in which aldosterone is increased in obesity. We discuss clinical studies in which measures of body size or weight were evaluated as potential predictors of response to mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists. In addition, we review three randomized, controlled clinical trials that exemplify a rigorous approach to determining the role of mineralocorticoid activity in a human disease. We propose that a similar clinical trial is warranted in order to definitively clarify the role of inappropriate mineralocorticoid activity in the etiology of human obesity-associated hypertension. Finally, we conclude that additional research is needed into the possible role of non-aldosterone mineralocorticoids in human obesity-associated hypertension.

  4. Pharmacotherapy for Obesity and Changes in Eating Behavior: a Patient and Physician's Perspective.

    PubMed

    Miguelgorry, Piper L; Hendricks, Ed J

    2016-07-01

    This article, co-authored by a patient with obesity, diabetes, and hypertension, and an obesity medicine specialist, discusses the patient's experience with the onset of diabetes complicating obesity and with her frustration living with these diagnoses until finding an obesity medicine specialist physician who helped her lose weight and reverse her diabetes. The patient continues to maintain a significant weight loss and is diabetes free for 5.5 years after treatment initiation. The physician discusses the application of combination treatment that can be effective in diabetes reversal in such cases. He also discusses salient clinical lessons exemplified by this case. PMID:27246171

  5. TECNOB: study design of a randomized controlled trial of a multidisciplinary telecare intervention for obese patients with type-2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Obesity is one of the most important medical and public health problems of our time: it increases the risk of many health complications such as hypertension, coronary heart disease and type 2 diabetes, needs long-lasting treatment for effective results and involves high public and private costs. Therefore, it is imperative that enduring and low-cost clinical programs for obesity and related co-morbidities are developed and evaluated. Methods/Design TECNOB (TEChnology for OBesity) is a comprehensive two-phase stepped down program enhanced by telemedicine for the long-term treatment of obese people with type 2 diabetes seeking intervention for weight loss. Its core features are the hospital-based intensive treatment (1-month), that consists of diet therapy, physical training and psychological counseling, and the continuity of care at home using new information and communication technologies (ICT) such as internet and mobile phones. The effectiveness of the TECNOB program compared with usual care (hospital-based treatment only) will be evaluated in a randomized controlled trial (RCT) with a 12-month follow-up. The primary outcome is weight in kilograms. Secondary outcome measures are energy expenditure measured using an electronic armband, glycated hemoglobin, binge eating, self-efficacy in eating and weight control, body satisfaction, healthy habit formation, disordered eating-related behaviors and cognitions, psychopathological symptoms and weight-related quality of life. Furthermore, the study will explore what behavioral and psychological variables are predictive of treatment success among those we have considered. Discussion The TECNOB study aims to inform the evidence-based knowledge of how telemedicine may enhance the effectiveness of clinical interventions for weight loss and related type-2 diabetes, and which type of obese patients may benefit the most from such interventions. Broadly, the study aims also to have a effect on the theoretical model

  6. Epigallocatechin gallate delays the onset of type 1 diabetes in spontaneous non-obese diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Fu, Zhuo; Zhen, Wei; Yuskavage, Julia; Liu, Dongmin

    2011-04-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) results from the autoimmune-mediated destruction of pancreatic β-cells, leading to deficiency of insulin production. Successful islet transplantation can normalise hyperglycaemia in T1D patients; however, the limited availability of the islets, loss of islet cell mass through apoptosis after islet isolation and potential autoimmune destruction of the transplanted islets prevent the widespread use of this procedure. Therefore, the search for novel and cost-effective agents that can prevent or treat T1D is extremely important to decrease the burden of morbidity from this disease. In the present study, we discovered that ( - )-epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG, 0·05 % in drinking-water), the primary polyphenolic component in green tea, effectively delayed the onset of T1D in non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice. At 32 weeks of age, eight (66·7 %) out of twelve mice in the control group developed diabetes, whereas only three (25 %) out of twelve mice in the EGCG-treated group became diabetic (P < 0·05). Consistently, mice supplemented with EGCG had significantly higher plasma insulin levels and survival rate but lower glycosylated Hb concentrations compared with the control animals. EGCG had no significant effects on food or water intake and body weight in mice, suggesting that the glucose-lowering effect was not due to an alteration in these parameters. While EGCG did not modulate insulitis, it elevated the circulating anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 level in NOD mice. These findings demonstrate that EGCG may be a novel, plant-derived compound capable of reducing the risk of T1D. PMID:21144096

  7. Telmisartan protects against diabetic vascular complications in a mouse model of obesity and type 2 diabetes, partially through peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-{gamma}-dependent activity

    SciTech Connect

    Toyama, Kensuke; Nakamura, Taishi; Kataoka, Keiichiro; Yasuda, Osamu; Fukuda, Masaya; Tokutomi, Yoshiko; Dong, Yi-Fei; Ogawa, Hisao; Kim-Mitsuyama, Shokei

    2011-07-08

    Highlights: {yields} Telmisartan, an angiotensin receptor blocker, acts as a partial PPAR{gamma} agonist. {yields} The protective effects of telmisartan against diabetic vascular injury were associated with attenuation of vascular NF{kappa}B activation and TNF {alpha}. {yields} PPAR{gamma} activity of telmisartan was involved in the normalization of vascular PPAR{gamma} downregulation in diabetic mice. {yields} We provided the first evidence indicating that PPAR{gamma} activity of telmisartan contributed to the protective effects of telmisartan against diabetic vascular complication. -- Abstract: Experimental and clinical data support the notion that peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma} (PPAR{gamma}) activation is associated with anti-atherosclerosis as well as anti-diabetic effect. Telmisartan, an angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB), acts as a partial PPAR{gamma} agonist. We hypothesized that telmisartan protects against diabetic vascular complications, through PPAR{gamma} activation. We compared the effects of telmisartan, telmisartan combined with GW9662 (a PPAR{gamma} antagonist), and losartan with no PPAR{gamma} activity on vascular injury in obese type 2 diabetic db/db mice. Compared to losartan, telmisartan significantly ameliorated vascular endothelial dysfunction, downregulation of phospho-eNOS, and coronary arterial remodeling in db/db mice. More vascular protective effects of telmisartan than losartan were associated with greater anti-inflammatory effects of telmisartan, as shown by attenuation of vascular nuclear factor kappa B (NF{kappa}B) activation and tumor necrosis factor {alpha}. Coadministration of GW9662 with telmisartan abolished the above mentioned greater protective effects of telmisartan against vascular injury than losartan in db/db mice. Thus, PPAR{gamma} activity appears to be involved in the vascular protective effects of telmisartan in db/db mice. Moreover, telmisartan, but not losartan, prevented the downregulation of

  8. The incretin system ABCs in obesity and diabetes - novel therapeutic strategies for weight loss and beyond.

    PubMed

    João, A L; Reis, F; Fernandes, R

    2016-07-01

    Incretins are gastrointestinal-derived hormones released in response to a meal playing a key role in the regulation of postprandial secretion of insulin (incretin effect) and glucagon by the pancreas. Both incretins, glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), have several other actions by peripheral and central mechanisms. GLP-1 regulates body weight by inhibiting appetite and delaying gastric, emptying actions that are dependent on central nervous system GLP-1 receptor activation. Several other hormones and gut peptides, including leptin and ghrelin, interact with GLP-1 to modulate appetite. GLP-1 is rapidly degraded by the multifunctional enzyme dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4). DPP-4 is involved in adipose tissue inflammation, which is associated with insulin resistance and diabetes progression, being a common pathophysiological mechanism in obesity-related complications. Furthermore, the incretin system appears to provide the basis for understanding the high weight loss efficacy of bariatric surgery, a widely used treatment for obesity, often in association with diabetes. The present review brings together new insights into obesity pathogenesis, integrating GLP-1 and DPP-4 in the complex interplay between obesity and inflammation, namely, in diabetic patients. This in turn will provide the basis for novel incretin-based therapeutic strategies for obesity and diabetes with promising benefits in addition to weight loss. © 2016 World Obesity.

  9. Exercise for prevention of obesity and diabetes in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    McCall, Anthony; Raj, Ramona

    2009-07-01

    As rates of obesity and type 2 diabetes continue to escalate, effective means of prevention become paramount in curbing the largest epidemic of our times. With adult obesity rates in the United States already at 34%, according to the most recent National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) data, preventing obesity in childhood is of increasing urgency. Exercise and lifestyle modification have been shown to be effective in adult trials for diabetes prevention, such as the Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP), Finnish Diabetes Study, and Da Qing Study. This article reviews randomized, controlled trials in children, using exercise and lifestyle modification in the prevention of insulin resistance and obesity. This review encompasses studies within the past decade from Planet Health in 1999 to the Beijing Obesity Intervention trial published in 2007 and covers both school-based and family-based approaches. A challenging task by any means, these trials have contributed valuable insight into the efficacy of various approaches toward preventing childhood obesity and insulin resistance, a pressing public health concern.

  10. The incretin system ABCs in obesity and diabetes - novel therapeutic strategies for weight loss and beyond.

    PubMed

    João, A L; Reis, F; Fernandes, R

    2016-07-01

    Incretins are gastrointestinal-derived hormones released in response to a meal playing a key role in the regulation of postprandial secretion of insulin (incretin effect) and glucagon by the pancreas. Both incretins, glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), have several other actions by peripheral and central mechanisms. GLP-1 regulates body weight by inhibiting appetite and delaying gastric, emptying actions that are dependent on central nervous system GLP-1 receptor activation. Several other hormones and gut peptides, including leptin and ghrelin, interact with GLP-1 to modulate appetite. GLP-1 is rapidly degraded by the multifunctional enzyme dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4). DPP-4 is involved in adipose tissue inflammation, which is associated with insulin resistance and diabetes progression, being a common pathophysiological mechanism in obesity-related complications. Furthermore, the incretin system appears to provide the basis for understanding the high weight loss efficacy of bariatric surgery, a widely used treatment for obesity, often in association with diabetes. The present review brings together new insights into obesity pathogenesis, integrating GLP-1 and DPP-4 in the complex interplay between obesity and inflammation, namely, in diabetic patients. This in turn will provide the basis for novel incretin-based therapeutic strategies for obesity and diabetes with promising benefits in addition to weight loss. © 2016 World Obesity. PMID:27125902

  11. [Effects of diabetes and obesity on the higher brain functions in rodents].

    PubMed

    Asato, Megumi; Ikeda, Hiroko; Kamei, Junzo

    2012-11-01

    Metabolic disorders, such as diabetes and obesity, have been indicated to disturb the function of the central nervous system (CNS) as well as several peripheral organs. Clinically, it is well recognized that the prevalence of anxiety and depression is higher in diabetic and obesity patients than in the general population. We have recently indicated that streptozotocin-induced diabetic and diet-induced obesity mice have enhanced fear memory and higher anxiety-like behavior in several tests such as the conditioned fear, tail-suspension, hole-board and elevated open-platform tests. The changes in fear memory and anxiety-like behavior of diabetic and obese mice are due to the dysfunction of central glutamatergic and monoaminergic systems, which is mediated by the changes of intracellular signaling. These results suggest that metabolic disorders strongly affect the function of the CNS and disturb the higher brain functions. These dysfunctions of the CNS in diabetes and obesity are involved in the increased prevalence of anxiety disorders and depression. Normalization of these dysfunctions in the CNS will be a new attractive target to treat the metabolic disorders and their complications.

  12. Healthy lifestyles in Europe: prevention of obesity and type II diabetes by diet and physical activity.

    PubMed

    Astrup, A

    2001-04-01

    The prevalence of obesity is increasing rapidly in all age groups in most EU-countries and is one of the fastest growing epidemics, now affecting 10-40% of the adult population. Obesity increases the risk of serious co-morbidities such as type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, certain cancers and reduced life expectancy, and these complications may account for 5-10% of all health costs in EU countries. The risk of diabetes is particularly increased by obesity, and 80-95% of the increase in diabetes can be attributed to obesity and overweight with abdominal fat distribution. There is robust evidence from cross-sectional and longitudinal studies to support that an energy-dense, high fat diet and physical inactivity are independent risk factors for weight gain and obesity. Furthermore, interaction between dietary fat and physical fitness determine fat balance, so that the obesity promoting effect of a high fat diet is enhanced in susceptible subjects, particularly in sedentary individuals with a genetic predisposition to obesity. Ad libitum consumption of diets low in fat and high in protein and complex carbohydrates, with a low glycaemic index, contributes to the prevention of weight gain in normal weight subjects. It also causes a spontaneous weight loss of 3-4 kg in overweight subjects, and has beneficial effects on risk factors for diabetes and CVD. To prevent obesity and diabetes there are grounds for recommending the combination of increasing daily physical activity level to a PAL-value of at least 1.8 and reducing dietary fat content to 20-25 energy-% in sedentary subjects, and to 25-35% in more physically active individuals.

  13. Implementation of Management Strategies for Diabetes and Hypertension: from Local to Global Health in Cardiovascular Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Bloomfield, Gerald S.; Wang, Tracy Y.; Boulware, L. Ebony; Califf, Robert M.; Hernandez, Adrian F.; Velazquez, Eric J.; Peterson, Eric D.; Li, Jennifer S.

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes and hypertension are chronic conditions that are growing in prevalence as major causal factors for cardiovascular disease. The need for chronic illness surveillance, population risk management, and successful treatment interventions are critical to reduce the burden of future cardiovascular disease. In order to address these problems, it will require population risk stratification, task sharing and shifting, and community- as well as network -based care. Information technology tools also provide new opportunities for identifying those at risk and for implementing comprehensive approaches to achieving the goal of improved health locally, regionally, nationally and globally. This article discusses ongoing efforts at one university health center in the implementation of management strategies for diabetes and hypertension at the local, regional, national, and global levels. PMID:25754564

  14. Decreased oxidative stress in prehepatic portal hypertensive rat livers following the induction of diabetes.

    PubMed

    Evelson, P; Llesuy, S; Filinger, E; Rodriguez, R R; Lemberg, A; Scorticati, C; Susemihl, M; Villareal, I; Polo, J M; Peredo, H; Perazzo, J C

    2004-03-01

    1. Oxidative stress (OS) is a biological entity indicated as being responsible for several pathologies, including diabetes. Diabetes can also be associated with human cirrhosis. Portal hypertension (PH), a major syndrome in cirrhosis, produces hyperdynamic splanchnic circulation and hyperaemia. The present study was designed to investigate the occurrence of OS in prehepatic PH rat livers following the induction of diabetes. 2. Five groups of rats were used: control, sham operated, chronic diabetes (induced with a single dose of streptozotocin at 60 mg/kg, i.p.), prehepatic PH and chronic diabetic plus prehepatic PH. The occurrence of OS was determined in liver homogenates by measuring hydroperoxide-initiated chemiluminescence and the activity of anti-oxidant enzymes (superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione peroxidase). 3. Prehepatic PH produced a significant increase in hydroperoxide-initiated chemiluminescence in the liver compared with control and sham-operated rats, whereas the liver in chronic diabetic rats showed no difference. However, chemiluminescence values decreased almost by 50% in the chronic diabetic plus prehepatic PH group. Concomitantly, the activities of the anti-oxidant enzymes in chronic diabetes, prehepatic PH and chronic diabetic plus prehepatic PH groups were decreased (P < 0.05 vs control and sham-operated groups). 4. Livers from the chronic diabetic group did not show any evidence of the occurrence of OS, whereas the prehepatic PH group showed the occurrence of OS. The association of PH and chronic diabetes resulted in a significant decrease in the occurrence of OS, which could be explained by an anti-oxidant response to an OS. PMID:15008960

  15. Salacia root, a unique Ayurvedic medicine, meets multiple targets in diabetes and obesity.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuhao; Huang, Tom Hsun-Wei; Yamahara, Johji

    2008-05-23

    In many traditional schools of medicine it is claimed that a balanced modulation of several targets can provide a superior therapeutic effect and decrease in side effect profile compared to a single action from a single selective ligand, especially in the treatment of certain chronic and complex diseases, such as diabetes and obesity. Diabetes and obesity have a multi-factorial basis involving both genetic and environmental risk factors. A wide array of medicinal plants and their active constituents play a role in the prevention and treatment of diabetes. Salacia roots have been used in Ayurvedic medicine for diabetes and obesity since antiquity, and have been extensively consumed in Japan, the United States and other countries as a food supplement for the prevention of obesity and diabetes. Recent pharmacological studies have demonstrated that Salacia roots modulate multiple targets: peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha-mediated lipogenic gene transcription, angiotensin II/angiotensin II type 1 receptor, alpha-glucosidase, aldose reductase and pancreatic lipase. These multi-target actions may mainly contribute to Salacia root-induced improvement of type 2 diabetes and obesity-associated hyperglycemia, dyslipidemia and related cardiovascular complications seen in humans and rodents. The results of bioassay-guided identification indicate that mangiferin, salacinol, kotalanol and kotalagenin 16-acetate are at least in part responsible for these multi-target regulatory activities of Salacia roots. The evidence suggests that this unique traditional medicine fulfills a multiple-target strategy in the prevention and treatment of diabetes and obesity. Although toxicological studies have suggested minimal adverse effects of the herbal medicine in rodents, a clinical trial is crucial to further confirm the safety of Salacia roots. In addition, further mechanistic studies are necessary in order to allow a better understanding of how use of Salacia root may

  16. Genes-environment interactions in obesity- and diabetes-associated pancreatic cancer: A GWAS data analysis

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Hongwei; Wei, Peng; Duell, Eric J.; Risch, Harvey A.; Olson, Sara H.; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. Bas; Gallinger, Steven; Holly, Elizabeth A.; Petersen, Gloria M.; Bracci, Paige M.; McWilliams, Robert R.; Jenab, Mazda; Riboli, Elio; Tjønneland, Anne; Boutron-Ruault, Marie Christine; Kaaks, Rudolf; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Panico, Salvatore; Sund, Malin; Peeters, Petra H.M; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Amos, Christopher I; Li, Donghui

    2013-01-01

    Background Obesity and diabetes are potentially alterable risk factors for pancreatic cancer. Genetic factors that modify the associations of obesity and diabetes with pancreatic cancer have previously not been examined at the genome-wide level. Methods Using GWAS genotype and risk factor data from the Pancreatic Cancer Case Control Consortium, we conducted a discovery study of 2,028 cases and 2,109 controls to examine gene-obesity and gene-diabetes interactions in relation to pancreatic cancer risk by employing the likelihood ratio test (LRT) nested in logistic regression models and Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA). Results After adjusting for multiple comparisons, a significant interaction of the chemokine signaling pathway with obesity (P = 3.29 × 10−6) and a near significant interaction of calcium signaling pathway with diabetes (P = 1.57 × 10−4) in modifying the risk of pancreatic cancer was observed. These findings were supported by results from IPA analysis of the top genes with nominal interactions. The major contributing genes to the two top pathways include GNGT2, RELA, TIAM1 and GNAS. None of the individual genes or SNPs except one SNP remained significant after adjusting for multiple testing. Notably, SNP rs10818684 of the PTGS1 gene showed an interaction with diabetes (P = 7.91 × 10−7) at a false discovery rate of 6%. Conclusions Genetic variations in inflammatory response and insulin resistance may affect the risk of obesity and diabetes-related pancreatic cancer. These observations should be replicated in additional large datasets. Impact Gene-environment interaction analysis may provide new insights into the genetic susceptibility and molecular mechanisms of obesity- and diabetes-related pancreatic cancer. PMID:24136929

  17. Functional Vascular Study in Hypertensive Subjects with Type 2 Diabetes Using Losartan or Amlodipine

    PubMed Central

    Pozzobon, Cesar Romaro; Gismondi, Ronaldo A. O. C.; Bedirian, Ricardo; Ladeira, Marcia Cristina; Neves, Mario Fritsch; Oigman, Wille

    2014-01-01

    Background Antihypertensive drugs are used to control blood pressure (BP) and reduce macro- and microvascular complications in hypertensive patients with diabetes. Objectives The present study aimed to compare the functional vascular changes in hypertensive patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus after 6 weeks of treatment with amlodipine or losartan. Methods Patients with a previous diagnosis of hypertension and type 2 diabetes mellitus were randomly divided into 2 groups and evaluated after 6 weeks of treatment with amlodipine (5 mg/day) or losartan (100 mg/day). Patient evaluation included BP measurement, ambulatory BP monitoring, and assessment of vascular parameters using applanation tonometry, pulse wave velocity (PWV), and flow-mediated dilation (FMD) of the brachial artery. Results A total of 42 patients were evaluated (21 in each group), with a predominance of women (71%) in both groups. The mean age of the patients in both groups was similar (amlodipine group: 54.9 ± 4.5 years; losartan group: 54.0 ± 6.9 years), with no significant difference in the mean BP [amlodipine group: 145 ± 14 mmHg (systolic) and 84 ± 8 mmHg (diastolic); losartan group: 153 ± 19 mmHg (systolic) and 90 ± 9 mmHg (diastolic)]. The augmentation index (30% ± 9% and 36% ± 8%, p = 0.025) and augmentation pressure (16 ± 6 mmHg and 20 ± 8 mmHg, p = 0.045) were lower in the amlodipine group when compared with the losartan group. PWV and FMD were similar in both groups. Conclusions Hypertensive patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus treated with amlodipine exhibited an improved pattern of pulse wave reflection in comparison with those treated with losartan. However, the use of losartan may be associated with independent vascular reactivity to the pressor effect. PMID:25014057

  18. The effects of endothelial nitric oxide synthase tagSNPs on nitrite levels and risk of hypertension and obesity in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    de Miranda, J A; Lacchini, R; Belo, V A; Lanna, C M M; Sertorio, J T; Luizon, M R; Tanus-Santos, J E

    2015-02-01

    Obesity and the nitric oxide synthase 3 (NOS3) gene polymorphisms are associated with nitrite levels and hypertension. However, no study has tested the hypothesis that NOS3 tagSNPs rs3918226, rs3918188, rs743506 and rs7830 affect nitrite levels and are associated with hypertension in childhood obesity. We investigated the association of these NOS3 tagSNPs and the haplotypes formed by them with hypertension and with nitrite levels in children and adolescents with obesity and with obesity plus hypertension. We studied 355 subjects: 174 healthy (controls), 109 normotensive obese, and 72 obese children and adolescents with obesity plus hypertension. Genotypes were determined by Taqman allele discrimination assay and real-time PCR. We compared the distribution of NOS3 tagSNP genotypes, alleles and haplotypes in the three groups of subjects. Nitrite levels were determined by ozone-based chemiluminescence. Nitrite levels were affected by the rs3918226 polymorphism (P<0.05) but not by NOS3 haplotypes. There was no association between the tagSNPs studied and hypertension in children and adolescents. Our findings show that the NOS3 tagSNP rs3918226 is associated with NO production in children and adolescents, and suggest that this polymorphism may have an impact on cardiovascular health. Further studies are needed to better clarify the effects of this polymorphism on cardiovascular risk.

  19. The effects of endothelial nitric oxide synthase tagSNPs on nitrite levels and risk of hypertension and obesity in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    de Miranda, J A; Lacchini, R; Belo, V A; Lanna, C M M; Sertorio, J T; Luizon, M R; Tanus-Santos, J E

    2015-02-01

    Obesity and the nitric oxide synthase 3 (NOS3) gene polymorphisms are associated with nitrite levels and hypertension. However, no study has tested the hypothesis that NOS3 tagSNPs rs3918226, rs3918188, rs743506 and rs7830 affect nitrite levels and are associated with hypertension in childhood obesity. We investigated the association of these NOS3 tagSNPs and the haplotypes formed by them with hypertension and with nitrite levels in children and adolescents with obesity and with obesity plus hypertension. We studied 355 subjects: 174 healthy (controls), 109 normotensive obese, and 72 obese children and adolescents with obesity plus hypertension. Genotypes were determined by Taqman allele discrimination assay and real-time PCR. We compared the distribution of NOS3 tagSNP genotypes, alleles and haplotypes in the three groups of subjects. Nitrite levels were determined by ozone-based chemiluminescence. Nitrite levels were affected by the rs3918226 polymorphism (P<0.05) but not by NOS3 haplotypes. There was no association between the tagSNPs studied and hypertension in children and adolescents. Our findings show that the NOS3 tagSNP rs3918226 is associated with NO production in children and adolescents, and suggest that this polymorphism may have an impact on cardiovascular health. Further studies are needed to better clarify the effects of this polymorphism on cardiovascular risk. PMID:24943287

  20. Administration of 17β-estradiol to ovariectomized obese female mice reverses obesity-hypertension through an ACE2-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Shoemaker, Robin; Thatcher, Sean E; Batifoulier-Yiannikouris, Frederique; English, Victoria L; Cassis, Lisa A

    2015-06-15

    We recently demonstrated that female mice are resistant to the development of obesity-induced hypertension through a sex hormone-dependent mechanism that involved adipose angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2). In this study, we hypothesized that provision of 17β-estradiol (E2) to ovariectomized (OVX) high-fat (HF)-fed female hypertensive mice would reverse obesity-hypertension through an ACE2-dependent mechanism. Pilot studies defined dose-dependent effects of E2 in OVX female mice on serum E2 concentrations and uterine weights. An E2 dose of 36 μg/ml restored normal serum E2 concentrations and uterine weights. Therefore, HF-fed OVX female Ace2(+/+) and Ace2(-/-) mice were administered vehicle or E2 (36 μg/ml) for 16 wk. E2 administration significantly decreased body weights of HF-fed OVX female Ace2(+/+) and Ace2(-/-) mice of either genotype. At 15 wk, E2 administration decreased systolic blood pressure (SBP) of OVX HF-fed Ace2(+/+) but not Ace2(-/-) females during the light but not the dark cycle. E2-mediated reductions in SBP in Ace2(+/+) females were associated with significant elevations in adipose ACE2 mRNA abundance and activity and reduced plasma ANG II concentrations. In contrast to females, E2 administration had no effect on any parameter quantified in HF-fed male hypertensive mice. In 3T3-L1 adipocytes, E2 promoted ACE2 mRNA abundance through effects at estrogen receptor-α (ERα) and resulted in ERα-mediated binding at the ACE2 promoter. These results demonstrate that E2 administration to OVX females reduces obesity-induced elevations in SBP (light cycle) through an ACE2-dependent mechanism. Beneficial effects of E2 to decrease blood pressure in OVX obese females may result from stimulation of adipose ACE2.

  1. Amylase/creatinine clearance ratio response to hyperglucagonemia in diabetes and obesity.

    PubMed

    Kanter, Y; Piell, E; Santo, M

    1986-11-01

    Hyperglucagonemia accompanies several disorders such as acute pancreatitis and diabetic ketoacidosis characterized by increased amylase/creatinine clearance ratio (ACCR). We tested the hypothesis that glucagon may be responsible for the augmental ACCR among diabetic and/or obese subjects. A constant glucagon infusion (15 ng/kg/min) was given to eight noninsulin-dependent diabetics and to eight obese subjects to attain glucagon levels comparable with those obtained during acute pancreatitis. The ACCR significantly increased from 0.9 +/- 0.1 to 1.5 +/- 0.1% (p less than 0.005) in both noninsulin-dependent diabetics and obese subjects, whereas among normal control subjects the ACCR increased from 0.84 +/- 0.8 to 1.3 +/- 0.14% (p less than 0.001). Because the increased values observed in either noninsulin-dependent diabetics or obese subjects are less than the ACCR values observed in acute pancreatitis or in diabetic ketoacidosis, the elevated ACCR in those conditions is only partially explained by the hyperglucagonemia.

  2. Amylase/creatinine clearance ratio response to hyperglucagonemia in diabetes and obesity.

    PubMed

    Kanter, Y; Piell, E; Santo, M

    1986-11-01

    Hyperglucagonemia accompanies several disorders such as acute pancreatitis and diabetic ketoacidosis characterized by increased amylase/creatinine clearance ratio (ACCR). We tested the hypothesis that glucagon may be responsible for the augmental ACCR among diabetic and/or obese subjects. A constant glucagon infusion (15 ng/kg/min) was given to eight noninsulin-dependent diabetics and to eight obese subjects to attain glucagon levels comparable with those obtained during acute pancreatitis. The ACCR significantly increased from 0.9 +/- 0.1 to 1.5 +/- 0.1% (p less than 0.005) in both noninsulin-dependent diabetics and obese subjects, whereas among normal control subjects the ACCR increased from 0.84 +/- 0.8 to 1.3 +/- 0.14% (p less than 0.001). Because the increased values observed in either noninsulin-dependent diabetics or obese subjects are less than the ACCR values observed in acute pancreatitis or in diabetic ketoacidosis, the elevated ACCR in those conditions is only partially explained by the hyperglucagonemia. PMID:2430451

  3. Prevalence of undiagnosed diabetes and pre-diabetes among hypertensive patients attending Kiambu district Hospital, Kenya: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Meme, Nkatha; Amwayi, Samuel; Nganga, Ziporrah; Buregyeya, Esther

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Hypertension (HTN) and diabetes mellitus (DM) are two common non-communicable diseases (NCDs) that are closely linked: one cannot be properly managed without attention to the other. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of undiagnosed diabetic and pre-diabetic states that is abnormal glucose regulation (AGR) and factors associated with it among hypertensive patients in Kiambu Hospital, Kenya. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional study from February 2014 to April 2014. Hypertensive patients aged ≥18 attending the out-patient medical clinic were included in the study. Pregnant and known diabetic patients were excluded. Data was collected on socio-demographics, behavior, and anthropometrics. Diabetes status was based on a Glycated Haemoglobin (HbA1C) classification of ≥6.5% for diabetes, 6.0-6.4% for pre-diabetes and ≤6.0% for normal. AGR was the dependable variable and included two diabetic categories; diabetes and pre-diabetes. Results We enrolled 334 patients into the study: the mean age was 59 years (Standard deviation= 14.3). Of these patients 254 (76%) were women. Thirty two percent (107/334; 32%) were found to have AGR, with 14% (46) having un-diagnosed DM and 18%(61) with pre-diabetes. Factors associated with AGR were age ≥45 (OR = 3.23; 95% CI 1.37 ≥ 7.62), basal metabolic index (BMI) ≥ 25 Kg/m2 (OR= 3.13; 95% CI 1.53 - 6.41), low formal education (primary/none)(OR= 2; 95%CI 1.08 - 3.56) and family history of DM (OR = 2.19; 95%CI 1.16 - 4.15). Conclusion There was a high prevalence of undiagnosed AGR among hypertensive patients. This highlights the need to regularly screen for AGR among hypertensive patients as recommended by WHO. PMID:26966482

  4. Gene-gene interactions among genetic variants from obesity candidate genes for nonobese and obese populations in type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Lin, Eugene; Pei, Dee; Huang, Yi-Jen; Hsieh, Chang-Hsun; Wu, Lawrence Shih-Hsin

    2009-08-01

    Recent studies indicate that obesity may play a key role in modulating genetic predispositions to type 2 diabetes (T2D). This study examines the main effects of both single-locus and multilocus interactions among genetic variants in Taiwanese obese and nonobese individuals to test the hypothesis that obesity-related genes may contribute to the etiology of T2D independently and/or through such complex interactions. We genotyped 11 single nucleotide polymorphisms for 10 obesity candidate genes including adrenergic beta-2-receptor surface, adrenergic beta-3-receptor surface, angiotensinogen, fat mass and obesity associated gene, guanine nucleotide binding protein beta polypeptide 3 (GNB3), interleukin 6 receptor, proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 1 (PCSK1), uncoupling protein 1, uncoupling protein 2, and uncoupling protein 3. There were 389 patients diagnosed with T2D and 186 age- and sex-matched controls. Single-locus analyses showed significant main effects of the GNB3 and PCSK1 genes on the risk of T2D among the nonobese group (p = 0.002 and 0.047, respectively). Further, interactions involving GNB3 and PCSK1 were suggested among the nonobese population using the generalized multifactor dimensionality reduction method (p = 0.001). In addition, interactions among angiotensinogen, fat mass and obesity associated gene, GNB3, and uncoupling protein 3 genes were found in a significant four-locus generalized multifactor dimensionality reduction model among the obese population (p = 0.001). The results suggest that the single nucleotide polymorphisms from the obesity candidate genes may contribute to the risk of T2D independently and/or in an interactive manner according to the presence or absence of obesity.

  5. Free access to hypertension and diabetes medicines among the elderly: a reality yet to be constructed.

    PubMed

    Paniz, Vera Maria Vieira; Fassa, Anaclaudia Gastal; Facchini, Luiz Augusto; Piccini, Roberto Xavier; Tomasi, Elaine; Thumé, Elaine; da Silveira, Denise Silva; Rodrigues, Maria Aparecida; Domingues, Marlos Rodrigues; Bertoldi, Andréa Dâmaso

    2010-06-01

    The study evaluated free access to hypertension and diabetes medicines and the reasons reported for lack of access. The sample included 4,003 elderly people living in Primary Care Unit coverage areas from 41 Southern and Northeastern Brazilian cities. Free access was higher in the Northeast (62.4%). The strategy of the Family Health Program (Programa Saúde da Família - PSF) was more effective in providing access than the traditional model, with higher results in the Northeast (61.2%) than in the South (39.6%). Around 20% of medicines included in the Hypertension and Diabetes Program and 26% of those included in the National Essential Medicines List (RENAME) were paid out of pocket. In the Northeast, 25% of insulin and 32% of oral antidiabetics were paid out of pocket. Unavailability in the public sector and a lack of money determined the lack of access. Although the PSF, Hypertension and Diabetes Program and RENAME expanded free access, supplies were insufficient. A greater connection between programs and a clear definition of responsibilities can improve medicine acquisition process, increasing the effectiveness of pharmaceutical assistance. PMID:20657981

  6. Treatment of Diabetes and/or Hypertension Using Medicinal Plants in Cameroon

    PubMed Central

    Tsabang, N; Yedjou, CG; Tsambang, LWD; Tchinda, AT; Donfagsiteli, N; Agbor, GA; Tchounwou, PBB; Nkongmeneck, BA

    2015-01-01

    Medicinal plants have served as valuable starting materials for drug development in both developing and developed countries. Today, more than 80% of the people living in Africa were depended on medicinal plants based medicines to satisfy their healthcare needs. The main goal of the present study was to collect and document information on herbal remedies traditionally used for the treatment of diabetes and/or hypertension in Cameroon. To reach this objective, data were collected from 328 patients who have been diagnosed at least once by a physician as diabetics and/or hypertension patients. One hundred and eighty two (182) among them took for a period of 10 days different varieties of medicinal plants which were prepared in form of decoction, maceration and infusion and administered orally twice or three times daily. As result, 70% of patients who used plants were relieved at the end of the treatment. Thirty-three plants have been recorded and documented for the treatment of diabetes and/or hypertension. The results of this study can stimulate a sustainable development by providing the basis for drugs discovery and by documenting biodiversity for long time exploitation. PMID:26550547

  7. Diabetes and hypertension in Britain's ethnic minorities: implications for the future of renal services.

    PubMed Central

    Raleigh, V. S.

    1997-01-01

    Diabetes and hypertension are much more prevalent among Britain's 2.5 million Asian and African-Caribbean population than among the white population and are major contributors to end stage renal failure. Asians and African-Caribbeans have threefold to fourfold higher acceptance rates on to renal replacement therapy than white people, and in some districts they comprise up to half of all patients receiving such treatment. Their greater need for renal replacement treatment is accompanied by difficulties of tissue matching in cross racial transplants and a shortage of donor organs. The aging of ethnic minority populations will increase local need for renal services significantly. Measures to control diabetes, hypertension, and secondary complications in Asian and African-Caribbean communities will contribute both to safeguarding health and to economies in spending on renal services. Education about diabetes and hypertension, modification of behavioural risk factors, early diagnosis, effective glycaemic and blood pressure control, and early referral for signs of renal impairment are essential preventive measures. Primary and community health care professionals have a critical role to play here. PMID:9022442

  8. Safety and benefits of a tablet combining losartan and hydrochlorothiazide in Japanese diabetic patients with hypertension.

    PubMed

    Kinouchi, Kenichiro; Ichihara, Atsuhiro; Sakoda, Mariyo; Kurauchi-Mito, Asako; Itoh, Hiroshi

    2009-12-01

    This study was conducted to determine the effects of a tablet combining losartan/hydrochlorothiazide (L/HCTZ) in comparison with losartan alone in Japanese diabetic patients with hypertension. Thirty consecutive Japanese diabetic patients with hypertension were randomly assigned to group A, receiving losartan alone for the first 3 months, then L/HCTZ for the next 3 months, or group B, receiving L/HCTZ for the first 3 months, then losartan alone for the next 3 months. Clinical and biological parameters were obtained before, and 3 and 6 months after the start of this study. The decreases in systolic and diastolic blood pressure (BP) during treatment with L/HCTZ were significantly greater than in treatment with losartan alone. Both treatments significantly and similarly decreased urinary albumin excretion, the cardio-ankle vascular index (CAVI) and augmentation index (AI). There was no significant difference in metabolic change during both the mono- and combination pharmacotherapies. The tablet combining L/HCTZ significantly reduced systolic and diastolic BP compared with the losartan monotherapy, and offered benefits similar to losartan monotherapy for albuminuria, arterial stiffness assessed by the CAVI and AI, and metabolic effects. Thus, the L/HCTZ tablet could be a useful drug for Japanese diabetic patients with hypertension. PMID:19763132