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Sample records for obesity treatment intervention

  1. Behavioral Lifestyle Intervention in the Treatment of Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Looney, Shannon M.; Raynor, Hollie A.

    2013-01-01

    This article provides an overview of research regarding adult behavioral lifestyle intervention for obesity treatment. We first describe two trials using a behavioral lifestyle intervention to induce weight loss in adults, the Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) and the Look AHEAD (Action for Health in Diabetes) trial. We then review the three main components of a behavioral lifestyle intervention program: behavior therapy, an energy- and fat-restricted diet, and a moderate- to vigorous-intensity physical activity prescription. Research regarding the influence of dietary prescriptions focusing on macronutrient composition, meal replacements, and more novel dietary approaches (such as reducing dietary variety and energy density) on weight loss is examined. Methods to assist with meeting physical activity goals, such as shortening exercise bouts, using a pedometer, and having access to exercise equipment within the home, are reviewed. To assist with improving weight loss outcomes, broadening activity goals to include resistance training and a reduction in sedentary behavior are considered. To increase the accessibility of behavioral lifestyle interventions to treat obesity in the broader population, translation of efficacious interventions such as the DPP, must be undertaken. Translational studies have successfully altered the DPP to reduce treatment intensity and/or used alternative modalities to implement the DPP in primary care, worksite, and church settings; several examples are provided. The use of new methodologies or technologies that provide individualized treatment and real-time feedback, and which may further enhance weight loss in behavioral lifestyle interventions, is also discussed. PMID:25114557

  2. Treatment interventions for early childhood obesity: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Byron A; Farragher, Jill; Parker, Paige; Sosa, Erica T.

    2015-01-01

    Context With 25% of pre-school age children in the United States being overweight or obese, effective interventions for these children would have significant public health implications. Randomized trials targeting this age group have been done since the last systematic review. Objective To systematically review the literature on treatment interventions for overweight or obesity in pre-school age children. Data Sources Medline (1948–July 2014), the Cochrane Central Registry (1991–July 2014), CINAHL (1990–July2014) and PAS abstracts (2000–2014). Study Selection Inclusion criteria were children age 0–6 in the study and adiposity as an outcome. Exclusions were having normal weight children in the trial and not having a comparison group. Data Extraction Data were extracted independently by two authors using a template. Results The initial search yielded 1,981 results, narrowed to 289 abstracts after initial review. Further analysis and cross-referencing led to the selection of six randomized controlled trials representing 1222 children. Two studies used systems changes and motivational interviewing and showed no significant effect on adiposity. Two studies used an intensive, multi-disciplinary approach over six months and demonstrated significant decreases in adiposity. One study tested parental coaching and showed a significant reduction in adiposity at six months. One study used education on a dairy-rich diet and showed a possible effect on adiposity. Limitations The study designs were too heterogeneous for meta-analysis; few ethnic minority subjects were included. Conclusions Multi-disciplinary, intensive interventions have some evidence of efficacy in reducing adiposity in pre-school children. PMID:26142067

  3. Interventions for the treatment of obesity among children and adolescents in Latin America: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Nagle, Brian J; Holub, Christina K; Barquera, Simón; Sánchez-Romero, Luz María; Eisenberg, Christina M; Rivera-Dommarco, Juan A; Mehta, Setoo M; Lobelo, Felipe; Arredondo, Elva M; Elder, John P

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this systematic literature review was to identify evidence-based strategies associated with effective healthcare interventions for prevention or treatment of childhood obesity in Latin America. A systematic review of peer-reviewed, obesity-related interventions implemented in the healthcare setting was conducted. Inclusion criteria included: implementation in Latin America, aimed at overweight or obese children and evaluation of at least one obesity-related outcome (e.g., body mass index (BMI), z-score, weight, and waist circumference, and body fat). Five interventions in the healthcare setting targeting obese children in Latin America were identified. All five studies showed significant changes in BMI, and the majority produced sufficient to large effect sizes through emphasizing physical activity and health eating. Despite the limited number of intervention studies that treat obesity in the healthcare setting, there is evidence that interventions in this setting can be effective in creating positive anthropometric changes in overweight and obese children.

  4. Psychological interventions in the treatment of childhood obesity: what we know and need to find out.

    PubMed

    Bogle, Vanessa; Sykes, Catherine

    2011-10-01

    This review aims to assess the effectiveness of psychological interventions for treating childhood obesity. Firm conclusions about the effectiveness of psychological interventions to treat childhood obesity remain unclear. Based on current knowledge, the review suggests that a number of interventions may be effective including: multi-component family-based behavioural interventions, interventions aimed at reducing sedentary behaviour and/or increasing physical activity levels as a component of family-based behavioural treatments, in addition to population-based school-wide treatment for girls. Further investment is needed to improve current research and find new, more imaginative ways to research childhood obesity.

  5. A review of electronic interventions for prevention and treatment of overweight and obesity in young people.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, B; Kornman, K P; Baur, L A

    2011-05-01

    The objective of this systematic review is to provide a qualitative comparison of interactive electronic media interventions for the prevention or treatment of obesity and/or obesity-related behaviours in children and adolescents. Literature searches of 12 databases from the earliest publication date until March 2010 were conducted. Twenty-four studies in which children and/or adolescents interacted with electronic interventions delivered as adjunct or sole interventions for the prevention or treatment of obesity and/or obesity-related behaviours met the inclusion criteria. Fifteen focussed on obesity prevention and nine on treatment interventions. The average study quality design score was 45%. Most studies demonstrated some form of significant outcome (e.g. reported changes in dietary and/or physical activity behaviours) in participants receiving interactive electronic interventions, with 11 out of 15 studies leading to positive changes in measured or reported adiposity outcomes. In 87% of studies, the effects of interactive electronic interventions were not separately evaluated from other intervention components. These results should be viewed with caution because of the overall poor quality of the studies. Studies were mostly conducted in the USA, largely in minority populations, and the direct transferability of interventions to other populations is unclear. Further high quality research is needed in this area to accurately inform the evidence base. © 2011 The Authors. obesity reviews © 2011 International Association for the Study of Obesity.

  6. Modeling social transmission dynamics of unhealthy behaviors for evaluating prevention and treatment interventions on childhood obesity.

    PubMed

    Frerichs, Leah M; Araz, Ozgur M; Huang, Terry T-K

    2013-01-01

    Research evidence indicates that obesity has spread through social networks, but lever points for interventions based on overlapping networks are not well studied. The objective of our research was to construct and parameterize a system dynamics model of the social transmission of behaviors through adult and youth influence in order to explore hypotheses and identify plausible lever points for future childhood obesity intervention research. Our objectives were: (1) to assess the sensitivity of childhood overweight and obesity prevalence to peer and adult social transmission rates, and (2) to test the effect of combinations of prevention and treatment interventions on the prevalence of childhood overweight and obesity. To address the first objective, we conducted two-way sensitivity analyses of adult-to-child and child-to-child social transmission in relation to childhood overweight and obesity prevalence. For the second objective, alternative combinations of prevention and treatment interventions were tested by varying model parameters of social transmission and weight loss behavior rates. Our results indicated child overweight and obesity prevalence might be slightly more sensitive to the same relative change in the adult-to-child compared to the child-to-child social transmission rate. In our simulations, alternatives with treatment alone, compared to prevention alone, reduced the prevalence of childhood overweight and obesity more after 10 years (1.2-1.8% and 0.2-1.0% greater reduction when targeted at children and adults respectively). Also, as the impact of adult interventions on children was increased, the rank of six alternatives that included adults became better (i.e., resulting in lower 10 year childhood overweight and obesity prevalence) than alternatives that only involved children. The findings imply that social transmission dynamics should be considered when designing both prevention and treatment intervention approaches. Finally, targeting adults may

  7. Modeling Social Transmission Dynamics of Unhealthy Behaviors for Evaluating Prevention and Treatment Interventions on Childhood Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Frerichs, Leah M.; Araz, Ozgur M.; Huang, Terry T. – K.

    2013-01-01

    Research evidence indicates that obesity has spread through social networks, but lever points for interventions based on overlapping networks are not well studied. The objective of our research was to construct and parameterize a system dynamics model of the social transmission of behaviors through adult and youth influence in order to explore hypotheses and identify plausible lever points for future childhood obesity intervention research. Our objectives were: (1) to assess the sensitivity of childhood overweight and obesity prevalence to peer and adult social transmission rates, and (2) to test the effect of combinations of prevention and treatment interventions on the prevalence of childhood overweight and obesity. To address the first objective, we conducted two-way sensitivity analyses of adult-to-child and child-to-child social transmission in relation to childhood overweight and obesity prevalence. For the second objective, alternative combinations of prevention and treatment interventions were tested by varying model parameters of social transmission and weight loss behavior rates. Our results indicated child overweight and obesity prevalence might be slightly more sensitive to the same relative change in the adult-to-child compared to the child-to-child social transmission rate. In our simulations, alternatives with treatment alone, compared to prevention alone, reduced the prevalence of childhood overweight and obesity more after 10 years (1.2–1.8% and 0.2–1.0% greater reduction when targeted at children and adults respectively). Also, as the impact of adult interventions on children was increased, the rank of six alternatives that included adults became better (i.e., resulting in lower 10 year childhood overweight and obesity prevalence) than alternatives that only involved children. The findings imply that social transmission dynamics should be considered when designing both prevention and treatment intervention approaches. Finally, targeting adults

  8. A Review of Primary Care-Based Childhood Obesity Prevention and Treatment Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Olson-Bullis, Barbara A.; Bredeson, Dani M.; Hayes, Marcia G.; Sherwood, Nancy E.

    2015-01-01

    Effective obesity prevention and treatment interventions targeting children and their families are needed to help curb the obesity epidemic. Pediatric primary care is a promising setting for these interventions, and a growing number of studies are set in this context. This review aims to identify randomized controlled trials of pediatric primary care-based obesity interventions. A literature search of 3 databases retrieved 2947 publications, of which 2899 publications were excluded after abstract (n=2722) and full-text review (n=177). Forty-eight publications, representing 31 studies, were included in the review. Eight studies demonstrated a significant intervention effect on child weight outcomes (e.g., BMI z-score, weight-for-length percentile). Effective interventions were mainly treatment interventions, and tended to focus on multiple behaviors, contain weight management components, and include monitoring of weight-related behaviors (e.g., dietary intake, physical activity, or sedentary behaviors). Overall, results demonstrate modest support for the efficacy of obesity treatment interventions set in primary care. PMID:26213643

  9. A Review of Primary Care-Based Childhood Obesity Prevention and Treatment Interventions.

    PubMed

    Seburg, Elisabeth M; Olson-Bullis, Barbara A; Bredeson, Dani M; Hayes, Marcia G; Sherwood, Nancy E

    2015-06-01

    Effective obesity prevention and treatment interventions targeting children and their families are needed to help curb the obesity epidemic. Pediatric primary care is a promising setting for these interventions, and a growing number of studies are set in this context. This review aims to identify randomized controlled trials of pediatric primary care-based obesity interventions. A literature search of 3 databases retrieved 2947 publications, of which 2899 publications were excluded after abstract (n=2722) and full-text review (n=177). Forty-eight publications, representing 31 studies, were included in the review. Eight studies demonstrated a significant intervention effect on child weight outcomes (e.g., BMI z-score, weight-for-length percentile). Effective interventions were mainly treatment interventions, and tended to focus on multiple behaviors, contain weight management components, and include monitoring of weight-related behaviors (e.g., dietary intake, physical activity, or sedentary behaviors). Overall, results demonstrate modest support for the efficacy of obesity treatment interventions set in primary care.

  10. Reporting of treatment fidelity in behavioural paediatric obesity intervention trials: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    JaKa, M M; Haapala, J L; Trapl, E S; Kunin-Batson, A S; Olson-Bullis, B A; Heerman, W J; Berge, J M; Moore, S M; Matheson, D; Sherwood, N E

    2016-12-01

    Behavioural interventions for paediatric obesity are promising, but detailed information on treatment fidelity (i.e. design, training, delivery, receipt and enactment) is needed to optimize the implementation of more effective interventions. Little is known about current practices for reporting treatment fidelity in paediatric obesity studies. This systematic review, in accordance with Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines, describes the methods used to report treatment fidelity in randomized controlled trials. Treatment fidelity was double-coded using the National Institutes of Health Fidelity Framework checklist. Three hundred articles (N = 193 studies) were included. Mean inter-coder reliability across items was 0.83 (SD = 0.09). Reporting of treatment design elements within the field was high (e.g. 77% of studies reported designed length of treatment session), but reporting of other domains was low (e.g. only 7% of studies reported length of treatment sessions delivered). Few reported gold standard methods to evaluate treatment fidelity (e.g. coding treatment content delivered). General study quality was associated with reporting of treatment fidelity (p < 0.01) as was the number of articles published for a given study (p < 0.01). The frequency of reporting treatment fidelity components has not improved over time (p = 0.26). Specific recommendations are made to support paediatric obesity researchers in leading health behaviour disciplines towards more rigorous measurement and reporting of treatment fidelity. © 2016 World Obesity Federation.

  11. Applied Interventions in the Prevention and Treatment of Obesity Through the Research of Professor Jane Wardle.

    PubMed

    Croker, Helen; Beeken, Rebecca J

    2017-03-01

    Obesity presents a challenge for practitioners, policy makers, researchers and for those with obesity themselves. This review focuses on psychological approaches to its management and prevention in children and adults. Through exploring the work of the late Professor Jane Wardle, we look at the earliest behavioural treatment approaches and how psychological theory has been used to develop more contemporary approaches, for example incorporating genetic feedback and habit formation theory into interventions. We also explore how Jane has challenged thinking about the causal pathways of obesity in relation to eating behaviour. Beyond academic work, Jane was an advocate of developing interventions which had real-world applications. Therefore, we discuss how she not only developed new interventions but also made these widely available and the charity that she established.

  12. Sleep, obesity, and weight loss in adults: is there a rationale for providing sleep interventions in the treatment of obesity?

    PubMed

    Coughlin, Janelle W; Smith, Michael T

    2014-04-01

    Rates of obesity and sleep disturbances are substantial in adults. A number of cross-sectional, longitudinal, and experimental studies have found that insufficient sleep and possibly longer sleep are associated with obesity and related eating patterns. Methodological discrepancies and limitations in the literature create ambiguity about the nature and potential mechanisms underlying these relationships. Insomnia and circadian patterns in eating and sleeping have also been examined in relation to weight. Although these studies are not as extensive as those examining sleep duration, the extant literature suggests possible associations between obesity and both insomnia (particularly when combined with short sleep duration) and circadian eating behaviours. However, research has only just begun to examine the benefits of combining sleep interventions with obesity treatment. The goal of the current review is to summarize research examining behavioural sleep patterns and disorders in relation to obesity, to discuss methodological considerations, and to provide an overview of studies examining whether addressing sleep disturbances can augment weight loss treatment effects. We conclude that future studies are needed that take into account sleep duration, sleep disorder co-morbidity, and chronobiology to explore the impact of sleep interventions on weight loss.

  13. Treatment and management of obesity: is surgical intervention the answer?

    PubMed

    Cobbold, Angela; Lord, Sue

    2012-04-01

    Obesity is rapidly becoming a major health concern and could be considered equal to smoking as a preventable cause of premature death. The National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE 2006) estimated that 1.1 billion people are overweight, a number rivalling those who are underweight globally. Recent statistics for England from the National Health Service (NHS 2011) report that in 2009/10 there were 7,214 bariatric surgical procedures performed on people of varying ages.

  14. Smartphone Interventions for Weight Treatment and Behavioral Change in Pediatric Obesity: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Chaplais, Elodie; Naughton, Geraldine; Thivel, David; Courteix, Daniel; Greene, David

    2015-10-01

    Traditional approaches for treating or managing children and adolescents with overweight or obesity have limited effectiveness. Current advances in smartphone technology may improve the attractiveness and accessibility of weight management support for children and adolescents with overweight or obesity. This systematic review aimed to provide a comparative evaluation of the effectiveness of using smartphones in the multidisciplinary treatment of child and adolescent overweight or obesity, with a specific interest in behavior change. The databases of Medline complete, OVID, CINAHL, EMBASE, and PubMed were searched for randomized controlled trial (RCT) studies addressing behavioral change using smartphone technology, plus nutrition and/or physical activity, to treat or manage child and adolescent obesity. Only two RCTs have described the effectiveness of smartphone devices in pediatric overweight or obesity treatment. Within the limitation of the two studies, electronic contact (e-contact) appeared unsuccessful in achieving weight loss. However, smartphone usage was linked to improved engagement and reduced dropout rates during important sustainability phases of these long-term interventions. Smartphone technologies allow users to accomplish tasks anywhere and anytime and, as such, provide researchers with additional and generationally appropriate capacities to deliver health promotion. E-contact should be used for its significant capacity to prolong engagement and decrease withdrawal during sustainability phases that follow intensive intervention for weight management in young populations. Despite increasing popularity in published protocols of weight management trials, the effectiveness of the impact of smartphone technology in pediatric programs remains equivocal.

  15. The impact of child and adolescent obesity treatment interventions on physical activity: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Cliff, D P; Okely, A D; Morgan, P J; Jones, R A; Steele, J R

    2010-07-01

    Efforts to treat obesity in childhood and adolescence would benefit from a greater understanding of evidence-based strategies to modify physical activity behaviour. A systematic review was conducted to examine the impact of child and adolescent obesity treatment interventions on physical activity. Studies included were randomized controlled trials or controlled trials, with overweight and obese youth (aged < 18 years), which reported statistical analysis of free-living physical activity at pretreatment and post-treatment. Two independent reviewers assessed each study for methodological quality. Seventeen child and three adolescent studies were retrieved, half of which were conducted in the USA. Studies were characterized by small samples of limited cultural and economic diversity. Fifteen studies reported an increase in at least one physical activity outcome at post-test or follow-up. Overall, study quality was rated as low (child median score = 3/10, range = 0-9; adolescent median score = 3/10, range = 2-5) with three child studies classified as high quality (>or=6/10). Research evaluating the effect of child and adolescent obesity treatment trials on physical activity is limited in both quantity and quality. Studies testing innovative, theoretically driven treatment approaches that use robust methodologies are required to better understand generalizable approaches for promoting physical activity participation among obese youth.

  16. Predicting treatment initiation in a family-based adolescent overweight and obesity intervention.

    PubMed

    Dhingra, Akshay; Brennan, Leah; Walkley, Jeff

    2011-06-01

    Little is known about factors associated with treatment initiation in overweight and obese adolescents. This study investigated parent-reported adolescent demographic, adolescent health, and parent motivation factors associated with initiation of a family-based adolescent overweight and obesity intervention. A telephone survey was completed by 349 parents calling to register their interest in participating in a cognitive behavioral lifestyle intervention for adolescent overweight and obesity. A total of 172 families (49.3%) returned their consent form to initiate treatment. A binomial logistic regression, with predictors entered in three blocks: (i) adolescent demographic (adolescent age, gender, adolescent BMI-for-age z-score, parent BMI); (ii) adolescent health (perceived adolescent physical and mental health, presence of an adolescent physical health problem or mental health problem, medication intake); and (iii) parent motivation (perceived adolescent weight category, concern about adolescent weight, importance of adolescent weight, confidence in adolescent capacity to change weight, priority of adolescent weight loss, discrepancy between adolescent current and ideal weight, previous weight loss attempts), was significant (χ2 (16) = 35.19, P = 0.004) accounting for 12.4-16.5% (95% confidence interval) of treatment initiation variance. Parent-reported adolescent physical health problem, parent perception of adolescent weight category, parent priority of adolescent weight loss, and parent perception of discrepancy between adolescent current and ideal weight were significant in the model. These findings indicate that data collected at intake are associated with treatment initiation and highlight the role of assessing and enhancing treatment motivation from initial contact.

  17. Behavioural treatment strategies improve adherence to lifestyle intervention programmes in adults with obesity: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Burgess, E; Hassmén, P; Welvaert, M; Pumpa, K L

    2017-04-01

    Poor adherence to lifestyle intervention remains a key factor hindering treatment effectiveness and health outcomes for adults with obesity. The aim of this systematic review and meta-analysis is to determine if behavioural treatment strategies (e.g. goal setting, motivational interviewing, relapse prevention, cognitive restructuring etc.) improve adherence to lifestyle intervention programmes in adults with obesity. Randomized controlled trials that investigated the use of behavioural treatment strategies in obesity management were identified by systematically reviewing the literature within Medline, PsycINFO, CINAHL, SPORTDiscus and Web of Science from their inception to August 2016. This meta-analysis shows that behavioural treatment interventions have a significant positive effect on session attendance (percentage) and physical activity (total min/week) in adults with obesity (M = 17.63 (95% confidence interval (CI) = 10.77, 24.50), z =5.0337, P < 0.0001 and M = 105.98 (95% CI = 58.64, 153.32), z =4.3878, P < 0.0001, respectively). This meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials provides evidence that behavioural treatment strategies improve adherence to lifestyle intervention programmes in adults with obesity. These strategies should be routinely incorporated into lifestyle intervention, obesity management and weight loss programmes with the aim of improving engagement and adherence. If adherence were improved, treatment effectiveness, health outcomes and the ultimate burden of chronic disease could also be improved. © 2017 World Obesity Federation.

  18. Drug interventions for the treatment of obesity in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Mead, Emma; Atkinson, Greg; Richter, Bernd; Metzendorf, Maria-Inti; Baur, Louise; Finer, Nicholas; Corpeleijn, Eva; O'Malley, Claire; Ells, Louisa J

    2016-11-29

    Child and adolescent obesity has increased globally, and can be associated with significant short- and long-term health consequences. To assess the efficacy of drug interventions for the treatment of obesity in children and adolescents. We searched CENTRAL, MEDLINE, Embase, PubMed (subsets not available on Ovid), LILACS as well as the trial registers ICTRP (WHO) and ClinicalTrials.gov. Searches were undertaken from inception to March 2016. We checked references and applied no language restrictions. We selected randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of pharmacological interventions for treating obesity (licensed and unlicensed for this indication) in children and adolescents (mean age under 18 years) with or without support of family members, with a minimum of three months' pharmacological intervention and six months' follow-up from baseline. We excluded interventions that specifically dealt with the treatment of eating disorders or type 2 diabetes, or included participants with a secondary or syndromic cause of obesity. In addition, we excluded trials which included growth hormone therapies and pregnant participants. Two review authors independently assessed trial quality and extracted data following standard Cochrane methodology. Where necessary we contacted authors for additional information. We included 21 trials and identified eight ongoing trials. The included trials evaluated metformin (11 trials), sibutramine (six trials), orlistat (four trials), and one trial arm investigated the combination of metformin and fluoxetine. The ongoing trials evaluated metformin (four trials), topiramate (two trials) and exenatide (two trials). A total of 2484 people participated in the included trials, 1478 participants were randomised to drug intervention and 904 to comparator groups (91 participants took part in two cross-over trials; 11 participants not specified). Eighteen trials used a placebo in the comparator group. Two trials had a cross-over design while the remaining 19

  19. Obesity: Pathophysiology and Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yi; Liu, Ju; Yao, Jianliang; Ji, Gang; Qian, Long; Wang, Jing; Zhang, Guansheng; Tian, Jie; Nie, Yongzhan; Zhang, Yi Edi.; Gold, Mark S.; Liu, Yijun

    2014-01-01

    Obesity presents a major health hazard of the 21st century. It promotes co-morbid diseases such as heart disease, type 2 diabetes, obstructive sleep apnea, certain types of cancer, and osteoarthritis. Excessive energy intake, physical inactivity, and genetic susceptibility are main causal factors for obesity, while gene mutations, endocrine disorders, medication, or psychiatric illnesses may be underlying causes in some cases. The development and maintenance of obesity may involve central pathophysiological mechanisms such as impaired brain circuit regulation and neuroendocrine hormone dysfunction. Dieting and physical exercise offer the mainstays of obesity treatment, and anti-obesity drugs may be taken in conjunction to reduce appetite or fat absorption. Bariatric surgeries may be performed in overtly obese patients to lessen stomach volume and nutrient absorption, and induce faster satiety. This review provides a summary of literature on the pathophysiological studies of obesity and discusses relevant therapeutic strategies for managing obesity. PMID:25412152

  20. Effective Obesity Treatments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Lynda H.; Calvin, James E., III; Calvin, James E., Jr.

    2007-01-01

    To curb the epidemic of obesity in the United States, revised Medicare policy allows support for efficacious obesity treatments. This review summarizes the evidence from rigorous randomized trials (9 lifestyle trials, 5 drug trials, and 2 surgical trials) on the efficacy and risk-benefit profile of lifestyle, drug, and surgical interventions aimed…

  1. The impact of a child obesity treatment intervention on parent child-feeding practices.

    PubMed

    Burrows, T; Warren, J M; Collins, C E

    2010-01-01

    Effective treatment of childhood obesity requires a multi-factorial approach and should target factors impacting on a child's environment. To explore the impact of three treatment programs on parental child-feeding practices at 6, 12 and 24 months post-program. SUBJECTS/INTERVENTION: Overweight children (n=159) aged 5-7 years, recruited to the Hunter Illawarra Kids Challenge Using Parent Support (HIKCUPS) randomized controlled trial with three treatment arms; a dietary modification program, a physical activity skill development program or a combination of both programs. Main outcome measures. The Child Feeding Questionnaire (CFQ), a validated 31-item questionnaire measuring child-feeding practices, completed by parents. Statistical analysis. Linear mixed models were used to assess change over time and to determine differences by intervention group. A significant decrease (p<0.01) in CFQ domain scores were reported and sustained at 24 months for all groups, in the domain of pressure to eat (mean+/-SEM, 1.8+/-0.06, 1.6+/-0.06) with increases in degree of monitoring (4.0+/-0.07, 4.2+/-0.06). The domain of restriction showed significant decreases in dietary intervention groups only (baseline 3.9+/-0.05, 24 months 3.7+/-0.06), the domain scores for concern were found to be strongly associated with child BMI z-score (r=0.73, p < 0.001) at baseline only. This study provides evidence that specific child-feeding domains are modifiable in the context of a targeted obesity intervention and further that changes can be sustained over time. HIKCUPS study: National Centre for Clinical Trials (NCT): 00107692 clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT00107692 http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/home.

  2. Parent-only interventions in the treatment of childhood obesity: a systematic review of randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Ewald, H; Kirby, J; Rees, K; Robertson, W

    2014-09-01

    An effective and cost-effective treatment is required for the treatment of childhood obesity. Comparing parent-only interventions with interventions including the child may help determine this. A systematic review of published and ongoing studies until 2013, using electronic database and manual searches. randomized controlled trials, overweight/obese children aged 5-12 years, parent-only intervention compared with an intervention that included the child, 6 months or more follow-up. Outcomes included measures of overweight. Ten papers from 6 completed studies, and 2 protocols for ongoing studies, were identified. Parent-only groups are either more effective than or similarly effective as child-only or parent-child interventions, in the change in degree of overweight. Most studies were at unclear risk of bias for randomization, allocation concealment and blinding of outcome assessors. Two trials were at high risk of bias for incomplete outcome data. Four studies showed higher dropout from parent-only interventions. One study examined programme costs and found parent-only interventions to be cheaper. Parent-only interventions appear to be as effective as parent-child interventions in the treatment of childhood overweight/obesity, and may be less expensive. Reasons for higher attrition rates in parent-only interventions need further investigation. © The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Faculty of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Behavioral intervention in the treatment of obesity in children and adolescents: implications for Mexico.

    PubMed

    Jelalian, Elissa; Evans, E Whitney

    2017-01-01

    Pediatric obesity is a worldwide health epidemic affecting both developed and developing countries. Mexico ranks second to the United States in rates of pediatric obesity. Obesity among youth has immediate and long-term consequences on physical and psychosocial development, including cardiovascular, respiratory, and health-related quality of life. Eventual amelioration of this epidemic will require change at the level of the family and community, along with policy initiatives to support healthier eating and activity habits. Evidence-based interventions for overweight/obese youth include family-based lifestyle programs that incorporate attention to diet quantity and quality, physical activity, sedentary behavior, and behavioral strategies to support change. While much of this research has been conducted in the United States, several recent studies suggest the efficacy of similar approaches for youth in Mexico.

  4. Position of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics: Interventions for the Treatment of Overweight and Obesity in Adults.

    PubMed

    Raynor, Hollie A; Champagne, Catherine M

    2016-01-01

    It is the position of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics that successful treatment of overweight and obesity in adults requires adoption and maintenance of lifestyle behaviors contributing to both dietary intake and physical activity. These behaviors are influenced by many factors; therefore, interventions incorporating more than one level of the socioecological model and addressing several key factors in each level may be more successful than interventions targeting any one level and factor alone. Registered dietitian nutritionists, as part of a multidisciplinary team, need to be current and skilled in weight management to effectively assist and lead efforts that can reduce the obesity epidemic. Using the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics' Evidence Analysis Process and Evidence Analysis Library, this position paper presents the current data and recommendations for the treatment of overweight and obesity in adults. Evidence on intrapersonal influences, such as dietary approaches, lifestyle intervention, pharmacotherapy, and surgery, is provided. Factors related to treatment, such as intensity of treatment and technology, are reviewed. Community-level interventions that strengthen existing community assets and capacity and public policy to create environments that support healthy energy balance behaviors are also discussed.

  5. Technology-based interventions in the treatment of overweight and obesity: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Raaijmakers, Lieke C H; Pouwels, Sjaak; Berghuis, Kim A; Nienhuijs, Simon W

    2015-12-01

    The prevalence of obesity increases worldwide. The use of technology-based interventions can be beneficial in weight loss interventions. This review aims to provide insight in the effectiveness of technology-based interventions on weight loss and quality of life for patients suffering overweight or obesity compared to standard care. Pubmed, PsycInfo, Web of Science, ScienceDirect, CINAHL and Embase were searched from the earliest date (of each database) up to February 2015. Interventions needed to be aimed at reducing or maintaining weight loss in persons with a body mass index (BMI) ≥ 25 kg/m(2) and have a technology aspect. Cochrane Collaboration's tool for assessing risk of bias was used for rating the methodological quality. Twenty-seven trials met inclusion criteria. Thirteen studies showed significant effects on weight loss compared to controls. Most interventions used a web-based approach (42%). Interventions were screened for five technical key components: self-monitoring, counsellor feedback and communication, group support, use of a structured program and use of an individually tailored program. All interventions that used a combination of all five or four components showed significant decreases in weight compared to controls. No significant results for quality of life were found. Outcomes on program adherence were reported in six studies. No significant results were found between weight loss and program adherence. Evidence is lacking about the optimal use of technology in weight loss interventions. However, when the optimal combination of technological components is found, technology-based interventions may be a valid tool for weight loss. Furthermore, more outcomes on quality of life and information about the effect of technology-based intervention after bariatric surgery are needed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Track: A randomized controlled trial of a digital health obesity treatment intervention for medically vulnerable primary care patients.

    PubMed

    Foley, Perry; Steinberg, Dori; Levine, Erica; Askew, Sandy; Batch, Bryan C; Puleo, Elaine M; Svetkey, Laura P; Bosworth, Hayden B; DeVries, Abigail; Miranda, Heather; Bennett, Gary G

    2016-05-01

    Obesity continues to disproportionately affect medically vulnerable populations. Digital health interventions may be effective for delivering obesity treatment in low-resource primary care settings. Track is a 12-month randomized controlled trial of a digital health weight loss intervention in a community health center system. Participants are 351 obese men and women aged 21 to 65years with an obesity-related comorbidity. Track participants are randomized to usual primary care or to a 12-month intervention consisting of algorithm-generated tailored behavior change goals, self-monitoring via mobile technologies, daily self-weighing using a network-connected scale, skills training materials, 18 counseling phone calls with a Track coach, and primary care provider counseling. Participants are followed over 12months, with study visits at baseline, 6, and 12months. Anthropometric data, blood pressure, fasting lipids, glucose and HbA1C and self-administered surveys are collected. Follow-up data will be collected from the medical record at 24months. Participants are 68% female and on average 50.7years old with a mean BMI of 35.9kg/m(2). Participants are mainly black (54%) or white (33%); 12.5% are Hispanic. Participants are mostly employed and low-income. Over 20% of the sample has hypertension, diabetes and hyperlipidemia. Almost 27% of participants currently smoke and almost 20% score above the clinical threshold for depression. Track utilizes an innovative, digital health approach to reduce obesity and chronic disease risk among medically vulnerable adults in the primary care setting. Baseline characteristics reflect a socioeconomically disadvantaged, high-risk patient population in need of evidence-based obesity treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Track: A randomized controlled trial of a digital health obesity treatment intervention for medically vulnerable primary care patients

    PubMed Central

    Foley, Perry; Steinberg, Dori; Levine, Erica; Askew, Sandy; Batch, Bryan C.; Puleo, Elaine M.; Svetkey, Laura P.; Bosworth, Hayden B.; DeVries, Abigail; Miranda, Heather; Bennett, Gary G.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Obesity continues to disproportionately affect medically vulnerable populations. Digital health interventions may be effective for delivering obesity treatment in low-resource primary care settings. Methods Track is a 12-month randomized controlled trial of a digital health weight loss intervention in a community health center system. Participants are 351 obese men and women aged 21 to 65 years with an obesity-related comorbidity. Track participants are randomized to usual primary care or to a 12-month intervention consisting of algorithm-generated tailored behavior change goals, self-monitoring via mobile technologies, daily self-weighing using a network-connected scale, skills training materials, 18 counseling phone calls with a Track coach, and primary care provider counseling. Participants are followed over 12 months, with study visits at baseline, 6, and 12 months. Anthropometric data, blood pressure, fasting lipids, glucose and HbA1C and self-administered surveys are collected. Follow-up data will be collected from the medical record at 24 months. Results Participants are 68% female and on average 50.7 years old with a mean BMI of 35.9 kg/m2. Participants are mainly black (54%) or white (33%); 12.5% are Hispanic. Participants are mostly employed and low-income. Over 20% of the sample has hypertension, diabetes and hyperlipidemia. Almost 27% of participants currently smoke and almost 20% score above the clinical threshold for depression. Conclusions Track utilizes an innovative, digital health approach to reduce obesity and chronic disease risk among medically vulnerable adults in the primary care setting. Baseline characteristics reflect a socioeconomically disadvantaged, high-risk patient population in need of evidence-based obesity treatment. PMID:26995281

  8. Position of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics: interventions for the prevention and treatment of pediatric overweight and obesity.

    PubMed

    Hoelscher, Deanna M; Kirk, Shelley; Ritchie, Lorrene; Cunningham-Sabo, Leslie

    2013-10-01

    It is the position of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics that prevention and treatment of pediatric overweight and obesity require systems-level approaches that include the skills of registered dietitians, as well as consistent and integrated messages and environmental support across all sectors of society to achieve sustained dietary and physical-activity behavior change. This position paper provides guidance and recommendations for levels of intervention targeting overweight and obesity prevention and treatment from preschool age through adolescence. Methods included a review of the literature from 2009 to April 2012, including the Academy's 2009 evidence analysis school-based reviews. Multicomponent interventions show the greatest impact for primary prevention; thus, early childhood and school-based interventions should integrate behavioral and environmental approaches that focus on dietary intake and physical activity using a systems-level approach targeting the multilevel structure of the socioecological model as well as interactions and relationships between levels. Secondary prevention and tertiary prevention/treatment should emphasize sustained family-based, developmentally appropriate approaches that include nutrition education, dietary counseling, parenting skills, behavioral strategies, and physical-activity promotion. For obese youth with concomitant serious comorbidities, structured dietary approaches and pharmacologic agents should be considered, and weight-loss surgery can be considered for severely obese adolescents. Policy and environmental interventions are recommended as feasible and sustainable ways to support healthful lifestyles for children and families. The Academy supports commitment of resources for interventions, policies, and research that promote healthful eating and physical-activity behaviors to ensure that all youth have the opportunity to achieve and maintain a weight that is optimal for health.

  9. School-based programs aimed at the prevention and treatment of obesity: evidence-based interventions for youth in Latin America.

    PubMed

    Lobelo, Felipe; Garcia de Quevedo, Isabel; Holub, Christina K; Nagle, Brian J; Arredondo, Elva M; Barquera, Simón; Elder, John P

    2013-09-01

    Rapidly rising childhood obesity rates constitute a public health priority in Latin America which makes it imperative to develop evidence-based strategies. Schools are a promising setting but to date it is unclear how many school-based obesity interventions have been documented in Latin America and what level of evidence can be gathered from such interventions. We performed a systematic review of papers published between 1965 and December 2010. Interventions were considered eligible if they had a school-based component, were done in Latin America, evaluated an obesity related outcome (body mass index [BMI], weight, %body fat, waist circumference, BMI z-score), and compared youth exposed vs not exposed. Ten studies were identified as having a school-based component. Most interventions had a sample of normal and overweight children. The most successful interventions focused on prevention rather than treatment, had longer follow-ups, a multidisciplinary team, and fewer limitations in execution. Three prevention and 2 treatment interventions found sufficient improvements in obesity-related outcomes. We found sufficient evidence to recommend school-based interventions to prevent obesity among youth in Latin America. Evidence-based interventions in the school setting should be promoted as an important component for integrated programs, policies, and monitoring frameworks designed to reverse the childhood obesity in the region. Published 2013. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  10. Pediatric Obesity: Etiology and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Crocker, Melissa K.; Yanovski, Jack A.

    2009-01-01

    Synopsis This paper reviews factors that contribute to excessive weight gain in children and outlines current knowledge regarding approaches for treating pediatric obesity. Virtually all of the known genetic causes of obesity primarily increase energy intake. Genes regulating the leptin signaling pathway are particularly important for human energy homeostasis. Obesity is a chronic disorder that requires long-term strategies for management. The foundation for all treatments for pediatric obesity remains restriction of energy intake with lifestyle modification. There are few long-term studies of pharmacotherapeutic interventions for pediatric obesity. Bariatric surgical approaches are the most efficacious obesity treatments but, because of their potential risks, are reserved for those with the most significant complications of obesity. PMID:19717003

  11. Managing temptation in obesity treatment: a neurobehavioral model of intervention strategies

    PubMed Central

    Appelhans, Bradley M; French, Simone A; Pagoto, Sherry L; Sherwood, Nancy E

    2015-01-01

    Weight loss outcomes in lifestyle interventions for obesity are primarily a function of sustained adherence to a reduced-energy diet, and most lapses in diet adherence are precipitated by temptation from palatable food. The high nonresponse and relapse rates of lifestyle interventions suggest that current temptation management approaches may be insufficient for most participants. In this conceptual review, we discuss three neurobehavioral processes (attentional bias, temporal discounting, and the cold-hot empathy gap) that emerge during temptation and contribute to lapses in diet adherence. Characterizing the neurobehavioral profile of temptation highlights an important distinction between temptation resistance strategies aimed at overcoming temptation while it is experienced, and temptation prevention strategies that seek to avoid or minimize exposure to tempting stimuli. Many temptation resistance and temptation prevention strategies heavily rely on executive functions mediated by prefrontal systems that are prone to disruption by common occurrences such as stress, insufficient sleep, and even exposure to tempting stimuli. In contrast, commitment strategies are a set of devices that enable individuals to manage temptation by constraining their future choices, without placing heavy demands on executive functions. These concepts are synthesized in a conceptual model that categorizes temptation management approaches based on their intended effects on reward processing and degree of reliance on executive functions. We conclude by discussing the implications of our model for strengthening temptation management approaches in future lifestyle interventions, tailoring these approaches based on key individual difference variables, and suggesting high-priority topics for future research. PMID:26431681

  12. Interventions for treating obesity in children.

    PubMed

    De Miguel-Etayo, Pilar; Bueno, Gloria; Garagorri, Jesús M; Moreno, Luis A

    2013-01-01

    Childhood obesity remains an important public health concern and prevention programmes should be the priority in order to decrease the prevalence of obesity. The aim of this review is to summarize the most effective types of intervention for treating obesity in children and adolescents. A number of identified strategies used to treat childhood obesity range from lifestyle approaches, pharmacotherapy to surgical intervention. Dietary treatment of obese children and adolescents should aim to ensure adequate growth and development by reducing excessive fat mass accumulation, avoiding loss of lean body mass, improving well-being and self-esteem, and preventing cyclical weight regain. Management protocols involve behaviour modifications, family support, and lifestyle changes which are difficult to put into practice and may require multidisciplinary professional teams. The cornerstone of weight loss programmes is to achieve a negative energy balance. There is evidence that dietary interventions are more effective in achieving weight loss when combined with other strategies, such as increasing physical activity levels and/or psychological interventions to promote behavioural changes. Psychological interventions have been employed in an effort to achieve long-term maintenance of behavioural change. Childhood obesity treatments should involve a combination of lifestyle changes including strategies to reduce energy intake, increase physical activity, reduce sedentary activities, facilitate family involvement and change behaviours associated with eating and physical activity. However, drug therapy in obese children must not be used as isolated treatment but as complementary to the traditional treatments of diet, physical activity and lifestyle changes. Besides, surgical procedures have been used to treat severe morbid obesity in children and adolescents when more conservative treatments have proven to be inadequate.

  13. Effects of a psychological intervention on the quality of life of obese adolescents under a multidisciplinary treatment.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Camila R M; Gunnarsdottir, Thrudur; Fidelix, Yara L; Tenório, Thiago R S; Lofrano-Prado, Mara C; Hill, James O; Prado, Wagner L

    To investigate the effects of multidisciplinary treatment with and without psychological counseling on obese adolescents' self-reported quality of life. Seventy-six obese adolescents (15.87±1.53 y) were allocated into psychological counseling group (PCG; n=36) or control group (CG; n=40) for 12 weeks. All participants received the same supervised exercise training, nutritional and clinical counseling. Participants in PCG also received psychological counseling. QOL was measured before and after 12 weeks of intervention by Generic Questionnaire for the Evaluation of Quality of Life (SF-36). The dropout rate was higher in GC (22.5%) when compared with PCG (0.0%) (p<0.001). After 12 weeks, participants from PCG presents lower body weight, relative fat mass and higher free fat mass (p<0.001 for all) compared to GC. QOL improved among adolescents from both groups (p<0.05), however, a better QOL was reported from those adolescents enrolled in PCG. The inclusion of a psychological counseling component in multidisciplinary treatment for adolescent obesity appears to provide benefits observed for improved QOL as compared with treatment without psychological counseling. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  14. Psychological aspects of eating behavior as predictors of 10-y weight changes after surgical and conventional treatment of severe obesity: results from the Swedish Obese Subjects intervention study.

    PubMed

    Konttinen, Hanna; Peltonen, Markku; Sjöström, Lars; Carlsson, Lena; Karlsson, Jan

    2015-01-01

    There is a need for a better understanding of the factors that influence long-term weight outcomes after bariatric surgery. We examined whether pretreatment and posttreatment levels of cognitive restraint, disinhibition, and hunger and 1-y changes in these eating behaviors predict short- and long-term weight changes after surgical and conventional treatments of severe obesity. Participants were from an ongoing, matched (nonrandomized) prospective intervention trial of the Swedish Obese Subjects (SOS) study. The current analyses included 2010 obese subjects who underwent bariatric surgery and 1916 contemporaneously matched obese controls who received conventional treatment. Physical measurements (e.g., weight and height) and questionnaires (e.g., Three-Factor Eating Questionnaire) were completed before the intervention and 0.5, 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 8, and 10 y after the start of the treatment. Structural equation modeling was used as the main analytic strategy. The surgery group lost more weight and reported greater decreases in disinhibition and hunger at 1- and 10-y follow-ups (all P < 0.001 in both sexes) than the control group did. Pretreatment eating behaviors were unrelated to subsequent weight changes in surgically treated patients. However, patients who had lower levels of 6-mo and 1-y disinhibition and hunger (β = 0.13-0.29, P < 0.01 in men; β = 0.11-0.28, P < 0.001 in women) and experienced larger 1-y decreases in these behaviors (β = 0.31-0.48, P < 0.001 in men; β = 0.24-0.51, P < 0.001 in women) lost more weight 2, 6, and 10 y after surgery. In control patients, larger 1-y increases in cognitive restraint predicted a greater 2-y weight loss in both sexes. A higher tendency to eat in response to various internal and external cues shortly after surgery predicted less-successful short- and long-term weight outcomes, making postoperative susceptibility for uncontrolled eating an important indicator of targeted interventions. © 2015 American Society for

  15. A combined nutritional-behavioral-physical activity intervention for the treatment of childhood obesity--a 7-year summary.

    PubMed

    Nemet, Dan; Levi, Lital; Pantanowitz, Michal; Eliakim, Alon

    2014-05-01

    We assessed the effect of a weight management program on body weight, body mass index (BMI), BMI percentile, and fitness in obese children and adolescents. The study was designed as a longitudinal, non-randomized, clinical experience of 3, 6, and 12 months combined dietary-behavioral-exercise intervention. Seven hundred and forty-nine obese children (age, 6-16 years) participated in a 3 months program. Three hundred and fifty-nine of them completed a 6 months intervention and 147 completed a 1 year intervention. Sixty-seven age- and maturity-matched obese children who did not participate in the structured program served as controls. Body weight, BMI, and fitness were evaluated at baseline, and after 3, 6, and 12 months intervention. Body weight, BMI, and BMI percentiles were significantly reduced (p<0.05) and endurance time significantly increased (p<0.0005) following the 3 months intervention. Obese children who continued the program for 6 months maintained decreases in BMI percentiles and further improved endurance time. In contrast, obese children in the control group gained weight, increased their BMI, and had a less significant improvement in fitness. Parental obesity (both parents), degree of obesity (BMI >97%), and more than one prior weight loss attempt were associated with lower decreases, whereas sex and pubertal status had no influence, on BMI percentiles changes. Children without parental overweight had significantly greater decreases in BMI compared with children with both parents showing obesity. In summary, a combined, structured multidisciplinary intervention for childhood obesity led to decreased body weight, BMI, and BMI percentiles, and to improved fitness.

  16. Nutrition Interventions for Obesity.

    PubMed

    Ard, Jamy D; Miller, Gary; Kahan, Scott

    2016-11-01

    Obesity is a common disorder with complex causes. The epidemic has spurred significant advances in the understanding of nutritional approaches to treating obesity. Although the primary challenge is to introduce a dietary intake that creates an energy deficit, clinicians should also consider targeted risk factor modification with manipulation of the nutrient profile of the weight-reducing diet. These strategies produce significant weight loss and improvements in cardiometabolic risk factors. Future research is needed to better understand how to personalize nutrient prescriptions further to promote optimal risk modification and maintenance of long-term energy balance in the weight-reduced state.

  17. Treatment for morbid obesity

    PubMed Central

    Carmichael, A

    1999-01-01

    There is no single unifying theory to explain the aetiology of obesity but several environmental factors, such as decreased physical activity and increased fat intake may contribute to its development in genetically predisposed individuals. Dietary and pharmacological treatments of morbid obesity have been proven to be unsuccessful. Modern surgical treatments have been shown to be effective in achieving significant weight loss with consequent reduction in morbidity. Despite the fact that surgical treatment of morbid obesity is the only therapeutic form that has stood the test of time, it still remains a crisis-driven form of therapy in the UK. It is probable that a better understanding of the aetiology and physiology of obesity may lead to the development of an effective pharmacological treatment of obesity in the future. However, until then, surgical treatment of morbid obesity should be considered as an effective and efficient way of treatment in selected cases.


Keywords: obesity PMID:10396579

  18. An Intensive Lifestyle Intervention Is an Effective Treatment of Morbid Obesity: The TRAMOMTANA Study—A Two-Year Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Burguera, Bartolomé; Jesús Tur, Juan; Escudero, Antonio Jorge; Alos, María; Pagán, Alberto; Cortés, Baltasar; González, Xavier Francesc; Soriano, Joan B.

    2015-01-01

    Bariatric surgery is currently the most effective therapy to induce weight loss in morbidly obese patients. Objective. This controlled, clinical trial with a two-year intervention was aimed at comparing the efficacy of two nonsurgical approaches versus bariatric surgery, on body weight changes and metabolic parameters in morbidly obese patients. Methods. Patients were randomized to an Intensive Lifestyle Intervention (ILI) (n = 60) or Conventional Obesity Therapy (COT) (n = 46). The ILI group received behavioral therapy and nutritional counseling. The COT group received standard medical treatment. They were compared with a third group, Surgical Obesity Group (SOG) (n = 37). Results. Patients who received ILI had a greater percentage of weight loss than patients receiving COT (−11.3% versus −1.6%; p < 0.0044). Interestingly 31.4% of patients included in the ILI group were no longer morbidly obese after just six months of intervention, increasing to 44.4% after 24 months of intervention. The percentage weight loss in SOG was −29.6% after that same period of time. Conclusions. ILI was associated with significant weight loss when compared to COT, in a group of patients with obesity. An ILI approach could be an alternative therapy to patients with obesity, who are not candidates to undergo bariatric surgery. This trial is registered with EudraCT 2009-013737-24. PMID:26257780

  19. Childhood obesity. Treatment options.

    PubMed

    Steinbeck, Katharine

    2005-09-01

    The prevalence of child and adolescent overweight and obesity is rapidly increasing and is associated with morbidity, both medical and psychosocial. Obesity is unlikely to resolve spontaneously. It is important that health professionals can assess obesity and initiate an action plan. The evidence base for what works best in the management of child and adolescent overweight and obesity is limited. It is uncertain whether protocols from clinical research trials can be translated into primary care. Dietary change, with an emphasis on lower fat intake and smaller portion size, should be commenced. There should be an increase in physical activity and a decrease in sedentary behaviours, combined with behavioural change and parental involvement. These are the elements of a lifestyle intervention. In the severely obese adolescent with obesity-related co-morbidity, the use of very low-energy diets and anti-obesity agents could be considered. Bariatric surgery may be indicated in carefully selected, older, severely obese adolescents.

  20. Optimizing care for the obese patient in interventional radiology

    PubMed Central

    Aberle, Dwight; Charles, Hearns; Hodak, Steven; O’Neill, Daniel; Oklu, Rahmi; Deipolyi, Amy R.

    2017-01-01

    With the rising epidemic of obesity, interventional radiologists are treating increasing numbers of obese patients, as comorbidities associated with obesity preclude more invasive treatments. These patients are at heightened risk of vascular and oncologic disease, both of which often require interventional radiology care. Obese patients pose unique challenges in imaging, technical feasibility, and periprocedural monitoring. This review describes the technical and clinical challenges posed by this population, with proposed methods to mitigate these challenges and optimize care. PMID:28082253

  1. Diet, physical activity and behavioural interventions for the treatment of overweight or obese adolescents aged 12 to 17 years.

    PubMed

    Al-Khudairy, Lena; Loveman, Emma; Colquitt, Jill L; Mead, Emma; Johnson, Rebecca E; Fraser, Hannah; Olajide, Joan; Murphy, Marie; Velho, Rochelle Marian; O'Malley, Claire; Azevedo, Liane B; Ells, Louisa J; Metzendorf, Maria-Inti; Rees, Karen

    2017-06-22

    Adolescent overweight and obesity has increased globally, and can be associated with short- and long-term health consequences. Modifying known dietary and behavioural risk factors through behaviour changing interventions (BCI) may help to reduce childhood overweight and obesity. This is an update of a review published in 2009. To assess the effects of diet, physical activity and behavioural interventions for the treatment of overweight or obese adolescents aged 12 to 17 years. We performed a systematic literature search in: CENTRAL, MEDLINE, Embase, PsycINFO, CINAHL, LILACS, and the trial registers ClinicalTrials.gov and ICTRP Search Portal. We checked references of identified studies and systematic reviews. There were no language restrictions. The date of the last search was July 2016 for all databases. We selected randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of diet, physical activity and behavioural interventions for treating overweight or obesity in adolescents aged 12 to 17 years. Two review authors independently assessed risk of bias, evaluated the overall quality of the evidence using the GRADE instrument and extracted data following the guidelines of the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions. We contacted trial authors for additional information. We included 44 completed RCTs (4781 participants) and 50 ongoing studies. The number of participants in each trial varied (10 to 521) as did the length of follow-up (6 to 24 months). Participants ages ranged from 12 to 17.5 years in all trials that reported mean age at baseline. Most of the trials used a multidisciplinary intervention with a combination of diet, physical activity and behavioural components. The content and duration of the intervention, its delivery and the comparators varied across trials. The studies contributing most information to outcomes of weight and body mass index (BMI) were from studies at a low risk of bias, but studies with a high risk of bias provided data on adverse events

  2. Circadian intervention of obesity development via resting-stage feeding manipulation or oxytocin treatment

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Guo

    2011-01-01

    The obesity pandemic can be viewed as a result of an imbalanced reaction to changing environmental factors. Recent research has linked circadian arrhythmicity to obesity and related diseases; however, the underlying mechanisms are still unclear. In this study, we found that high-fat diet (HFD) feeding strikingly promoted daytime rather than nighttime caloric intake in mice, leading to feeding circadian arrhythmicity. Using scheduled feeding with a defined amount of daily HFD intake, we found that an increase in the ratio of daytime to nighttime feeding promoted weight gain, whereas a decrease of this ratio rebalanced energy expenditure to counteract obesity. In identifying the underlying mechanism, we found that hypothalamic release of anorexigenic neuropeptide oxytocin displayed a diurnal rhythm of daytime rise and nighttime decline, which negatively correlated with the diurnal feeding activities of normal chow-fed mice. In contrast, chronic HFD feeding abrogated oxytocin diurnal rhythmicity, primarily by suppressing daytime oxytocin rise. Using pharmacological experiments with hypothalamic injection of oxytocin or oxytocin antagonist, we showed that daytime manipulation of oxytocin can change feeding circadian patterns to reprogram energy expenditure, leading to attenuation or induction of obesity independently of 24-h caloric intake. Also importantly, we found that peripheral injection of oxytocin activated hypothalamic oxytocin neurons to release oxytocin, and exerted metabolic effects similar to central oxytocin injection, thus offering a practical clinical avenue to use oxytocin in obesity control. In conclusion, resting-stage oxytocin release and feeding activity represent a critical circadian mechanism and therapeutic target for obesity. PMID:21828335

  3. Effects of a web-based follow-up intervention on self-efficacy in obesity treatment for women.

    PubMed

    Rader, Sonja; Dorner, Thomas Ernst; Schoberberger, Rudolf; Wolf, Hilde

    2017-04-13

    Obesity is a chronic disease requiring long-term care. The purpose of the current study was the evaluation of a web-based intervention (WBI), subsequent to an initial face to face life style treatment. In a randomized trial, 84 women received an introduction phase (4 months) and a training phase (2 months) where one group was trained in using WBI whereas the other arm received a printed manual (PMI). During the self-monitoring phase (6 months) participants either used the WBI or the PMI for follow-up support. Anthropometric parameters could be significantly reduced and self-efficacy was significantly increased in the first 6 months. At 12 months, values of self-efficacy of the WBI were not superior compared to results of the PMI; however, feedback on acceptability of the intervention did show higher ratings of the WBI and also facilitated contact with the program supervisor. No significant differences regarding the engagement in follow-up tools could be found between the intervention groups. Subgroup analysis indicated a positive effect of involvement in both forms of self-monitoring aftercare.

  4. The Influence of Socio-Economic Status on the Long-Term Effect of Family-Based Obesity Treatment Intervention in Prepubertal Overweight Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Langnase, Kristina; Asbeck, Inga; Mast, Mareike; Muller, Manfred J.

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to assess the effect of the socio-economic status (SES) on long-term outcomes of a family-based obesity treatment intervention in prepubertal children. A total of 52 overweight and 26 normal weight children were investigated. Nutritional status, intake of fruit, vegetables and low fat foods, in-between meals, sports…

  5. The Influence of Socio-Economic Status on the Long-Term Effect of Family-Based Obesity Treatment Intervention in Prepubertal Overweight Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Langnase, Kristina; Asbeck, Inga; Mast, Mareike; Muller, Manfred J.

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to assess the effect of the socio-economic status (SES) on long-term outcomes of a family-based obesity treatment intervention in prepubertal children. A total of 52 overweight and 26 normal weight children were investigated. Nutritional status, intake of fruit, vegetables and low fat foods, in-between meals, sports…

  6. Barriers to obesity treatment.

    PubMed

    Mauro, Marina; Taylor, Valerie; Wharton, Sean; Sharma, Arya M

    2008-05-01

    Obesity, one of the most prevalent health problems in the Western world, is a chronic and progressive condition. Therefore, as with other chronic diseases, patients with obesity require lifelong treatment. Long-term efficacy and effectiveness of obesity treatments is notoriously poor. This may in part be attributable to the substantial barriers that undermine long-term obesity management strategies. These can include lack of recognition of obesity as a chronic condition, low socioeconomic status, time constraints, intimate saboteurs, and a wide range of comorbidities including mental health, sleep, chronic pain, musculoskeletal, cardiovascular, respiratory, digestive and endocrine disorders. Furthermore, medications used to treat some of these disorders may further undermine weight-loss efforts. Lack of specific obesity training of health professionals, attitudes and beliefs as well as coverage and availability of obesity treatments can likewise pose important barriers. Health professionals need to take care to identify, acknowledge and address these barriers where possible to increase patient success as well as compliance and adherence with treatments. Failure to do so may further undermine the sense of failure, low self esteem and self efficacy already common among obese individuals. Addressing treatment barriers can save resources and increase the prospect of long-term success.

  7. Impact of the Provider and Healthcare team Adherence to Treatment Guidelines (PHAT-G) intervention on adherence to national obesity clinical practice guidelines in a primary care centre

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, Emily R.; Theeke, Laurie A.; Mallow, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    Rationale, aims and objectives Obesity is significantly underdiagnosed and undertreated in primary care settings. The purpose of this clinical practice change project was to increase provider adherence to national clinical practice guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of obesity in adults. Methods Based upon the National Institutes of Health guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of obesity, a clinical change project was implemented. Guided by the theory of planned behaviour, the Provider and Healthcare team Adherence to Treatment Guidelines (PHAT-G) intervention includes education sessions, additional provider resources for patient education, a provider reminder system and provider feedback. Results Primary care providers did not significantly increase on documentation of diagnosis and planned management of obesity for patients with body mass index (BMI) greater than or equal to 30. Medical assistants increased recording of height, weight and BMI in the patient record by 13%, which was significant. Conclusions Documentation of accurate BMI should lead to diagnosis of appropriate weight category and subsequent care planning. Future studies will examine barriers to adherence to clinical practice guidelines for obesity. Interventions are needed that include inter-professional team members and may be more successful if delivered separately from routine primary care visits. PMID:25558956

  8. Impact of the Provider and Healthcare team Adherence to Treatment Guidelines (PHAT-G) intervention on adherence to national obesity clinical practice guidelines in a primary care centre.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Emily R; Theeke, Laurie A; Mallow, Jennifer

    2015-04-01

    Obesity is significantly underdiagnosed and undertreated in primary care settings. The purpose of this clinical practice change project was to increase provider adherence to national clinical practice guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of obesity in adults. Based upon the National Institutes of Health guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of obesity, a clinical change project was implemented. Guided by the theory of planned behaviour, the Provider and Healthcare team Adherence to Treatment Guidelines (PHAT-G) intervention includes education sessions, additional provider resources for patient education, a provider reminder system and provider feedback. Primary care providers did not significantly increase on documentation of diagnosis and planned management of obesity for patients with body mass index (BMI) greater than or equal to 30. Medical assistants increased recording of height, weight and BMI in the patient record by 13%, which was significant. Documentation of accurate BMI should lead to diagnosis of appropriate weight category and subsequent care planning. Future studies will examine barriers to adherence to clinical practice guidelines for obesity. Interventions are needed that include inter-professional team members and may be more successful if delivered separately from routine primary care visits. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Expanding the Role of Primary Care in the Prevention and Treatment of Childhood Obesity: A Review of Clinic- and Community-Based Recommendations and Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Hargreaves, Margaret B.; Briefel, Ronette R.; Orfield, Cara

    2013-01-01

    Although pediatric providers have traditionally assessed and treated childhood obesity and associated health-related conditions in the clinic setting, there is a recognized need to expand the provider role. We reviewed the literature published from 2005 to 2012 to (1) provide examples of the spectrum of roles that primary care providers can play in the successful treatment and prevention of childhood obesity in both clinic and community settings and (2) synthesize the evidence of important characteristics, factors, or strategies in successful community-based models. The review identified 96 articles that provide evidence of how primary care providers can successfully prevent and treat childhood obesity by coordinating efforts within the primary care setting and through linkages to obesity prevention and treatment resources within the community. By aligning the most promising interventions with recommendations published over the past decade by the Institute of Medicine, the American Academy of Pediatrics, and other health organizations, we present nine areas in which providers can promote the prevention and treatment of childhood obesity through efforts in clinical and community settings: weight status assessment and monitoring, healthy lifestyle promotion, treatment, clinician skill development, clinic infrastructure development, community program referrals, community health education, multisector community initiatives, and policy advocacy. PMID:23710345

  10. Service evaluation of the GOALS family-based childhood obesity treatment intervention during the first 3 years of implementation

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Paula M; Dugdill, Lindsey; Pickering, Katie; Owen, Stephanie; Hargreaves, Jackie; Staniford, Leanne J; Murphy, Rebecca C; Knowles, Zoe; Cable, N Timothy

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the impact of the GOALS (Getting Our Active Lifestyles Started) family-based childhood obesity treatment intervention during the first 3 years of implementation. Design Single-group repeated measures with qualitative questionnaires. Setting Community venues in a socioeconomically deprived, urban location in the North-West of England. Participants 70 overweight or obese children (mean age 10.5 years, 46% boys) and their parents/carers who completed GOALS between September 2006 and March 2009. Interventions GOALS was a childhood obesity treatment intervention that drew on social cognitive theory to promote whole family lifestyle change. Sessions covered physical activity (PA), diet and behaviour change over 18 2 h weekly group sessions (lasting approximately 6 months). A Template for Intervention Description and Replication (TIDieR) checklist of intervention components is provided. Primary and secondary outcome measures The primary outcome measure was child body mass index (BMI) z-score, collected at baseline, post-intervention and 12 months. Secondary outcome measures were child self-perceptions, parent/carer BMI and qualitative changes in family diet and PA (parent/carer questionnaire). Results Child BMI z-score reduced by 0.07 from baseline to post-intervention (p<0.001) and was maintained at 12 months (p<0.05). There was no change in parent/carer BMI or child self-perceptions, other than an increase in perceived social acceptance from baseline to post-intervention (p<0.05). Parents/carers reported positive changes to family PA and dietary behaviours after completing GOALS. Conclusions GOALS completion was associated with small improvements in child BMI z-score and improved family PA and dietary behaviours. Several intervention modifications were necessary during the implementation period and it is suggested childhood obesity treatment interventions need time to embed before a definitive evaluation is conducted. Researchers are

  11. Service evaluation of the GOALS family-based childhood obesity treatment intervention during the first 3 years of implementation.

    PubMed

    Watson, Paula M; Dugdill, Lindsey; Pickering, Katie; Owen, Stephanie; Hargreaves, Jackie; Staniford, Leanne J; Murphy, Rebecca C; Knowles, Zoe; Cable, N Timothy

    2015-02-04

    To evaluate the impact of the GOALS (Getting Our Active Lifestyles Started) family-based childhood obesity treatment intervention during the first 3 years of implementation. Single-group repeated measures with qualitative questionnaires. Community venues in a socioeconomically deprived, urban location in the North-West of England. 70 overweight or obese children (mean age 10.5 years, 46% boys) and their parents/carers who completed GOALS between September 2006 and March 2009. GOALS was a childhood obesity treatment intervention that drew on social cognitive theory to promote whole family lifestyle change. Sessions covered physical activity (PA), diet and behaviour change over 18 2 h weekly group sessions (lasting approximately 6 months). A Template for Intervention Description and Replication (TIDieR) checklist of intervention components is provided. The primary outcome measure was child body mass index (BMI) z-score, collected at baseline, post-intervention and 12 months. Secondary outcome measures were child self-perceptions, parent/carer BMI and qualitative changes in family diet and PA (parent/carer questionnaire). Child BMI z-score reduced by 0.07 from baseline to post-intervention (p<0.001) and was maintained at 12 months (p<0.05). There was no change in parent/carer BMI or child self-perceptions, other than an increase in perceived social acceptance from baseline to post-intervention (p<0.05). Parents/carers reported positive changes to family PA and dietary behaviours after completing GOALS. GOALS completion was associated with small improvements in child BMI z-score and improved family PA and dietary behaviours. Several intervention modifications were necessary during the implementation period and it is suggested childhood obesity treatment interventions need time to embed before a definitive evaluation is conducted. Researchers are urged to use the TIDieR checklist to ensure transparent reporting of interventions and facilitate the translation

  12. Lifestyle intervention in childhood obesity: changes and challenges.

    PubMed

    Reinehr, Thomas

    2013-10-01

    Lifestyle interventions are regarded as the therapy of choice in children with obesity. The efficiency of lifestyle intervention for childhood obesity has been proven by several randomized controlled trials and meta-analyses. Even a stable weight in a growing child with obesity is associated with an improvement in cardiovascular risk factors and comorbidities of obesity. In particular, children aged 5-12 years and children with overweight rather than obesity profit from lifestyle interventions. However, in clinical practice, the degree of weight loss with lifestyle intervention is only moderate, and the success rate 2 years after onset of an intervention is low (<10% with a decrease in BMI SD score of <0.25). Nevertheless, the difficulty of a child with overweight or obesity to reduce their weight might be attributable to not only a lack of motivation but also genetic background and/or adaptive changes in basal metabolic rate, hunger and satiety hormones that occur with weight loss. We must accept that lifestyle interventions are successful only in a subgroup of children with obesity. Regardless, the techniques used and the education of therapists need to be improved. If lifestyle interventions do not result in weight loss in a child with obesity, drug treatment to reduce cardiovascular risk factors should be initiated but is currently seldom performed.

  13. Genome-based nutrition: an intervention strategy for the prevention and treatment of obesity and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis.

    PubMed

    Roman, Sonia; Ojeda-Granados, Claudia; Ramos-Lopez, Omar; Panduro, Arturo

    2015-03-28

    Obesity and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis are increasing in westernized countries, regardless of their geographic location. In Latin America, most countries, including Mexico, have a heterogeneous admixture genome with Amerindian, European and African ancestries. However, certain high allelic frequencies of several nutrient-related polymorphisms may have been achieved by past gene-nutrient interactions. Such interactions may have promoted the positive selection of variants adapted to regional food sources. At present, the unbalanced diet composition of the Mexicans has led the country to a 70% prevalence rate of overweightness and obesity due to substantial changes in food habits, among other factors. International guidelines and intervention strategies may not be adequate for all populations worldwide because they do not consider disparities in genetic and environmental factors, and thus there is a need for differential prevention and management strategies. Here, we provide the rationale for an intervention strategy for the prevention and management of obesity-related diseases such as non-alcoholic steatohepatitis based on a regionalized genome-based diet. The components required to design such a diet should focus on the specific ancestry of each population around the world and the convenience of consuming traditional ethnic food.

  14. Genome-based nutrition: An intervention strategy for the prevention and treatment of obesity and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Roman, Sonia; Ojeda-Granados, Claudia; Ramos-Lopez, Omar; Panduro, Arturo

    2015-01-01

    Obesity and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis are increasing in westernized countries, regardless of their geographic location. In Latin America, most countries, including Mexico, have a heterogeneous admixture genome with Amerindian, European and African ancestries. However, certain high allelic frequencies of several nutrient-related polymorphisms may have been achieved by past gene-nutrient interactions. Such interactions may have promoted the positive selection of variants adapted to regional food sources. At present, the unbalanced diet composition of the Mexicans has led the country to a 70% prevalence rate of overweightness and obesity due to substantial changes in food habits, among other factors. International guidelines and intervention strategies may not be adequate for all populations worldwide because they do not consider disparities in genetic and environmental factors, and thus there is a need for differential prevention and management strategies. Here, we provide the rationale for an intervention strategy for the prevention and management of obesity-related diseases such as non-alcoholic steatohepatitis based on a regionalized genome-based diet. The components required to design such a diet should focus on the specific ancestry of each population around the world and the convenience of consuming traditional ethnic food. PMID:25834309

  15. eHealth interventions for the prevention and treatment of overweight and obesity in adults: a systematic review with meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Hutchesson, M J; Rollo, M E; Krukowski, R; Ells, L; Harvey, J; Morgan, P J; Callister, R; Plotnikoff, R; Collins, C E

    2015-05-01

    A systematic review of randomized controlled trials was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of eHealth interventions for the prevention and treatment of overweight and obesity in adults. Eight databases were searched for studies published in English from 1995 to 17 September 2014. Eighty-four studies were included, with 183 intervention arms, of which 76% (n = 139) included an eHealth component. Sixty-one studies had the primary aim of weight loss, 10 weight loss maintenance, eight weight gain prevention, and five weight loss and maintenance. eHealth interventions were predominantly delivered using the Internet, but also email, text messages, monitoring devices, mobile applications, computer programs, podcasts and personal digital assistants. Forty percent (n = 55) of interventions used more than one type of technology, and 43.2% (n = 60) were delivered solely using eHealth technologies. Meta-analyses demonstrated significantly greater weight loss (kg) in eHealth weight loss interventions compared with control (MD -2.70 [-3.33,-2.08], P < 0.001) or minimal interventions (MD -1.40 [-1.98,-0.82], P < 0.001), and in eHealth weight loss interventions with extra components or technologies (MD 1.46 [0.80, 2.13], P < 0.001) compared with standard eHealth programmes. The findings support the use of eHealth interventions as a treatment option for obesity, but there is insufficient evidence for the effectiveness of eHealth interventions for weight loss maintenance or weight gain prevention.

  16. An intensive family intervention clinic for reducing childhood obesity.

    PubMed

    Endevelt, Ronit; Elkayam, Orit; Cohen, Rinat; Peled, Ronit; Tal-Pony, Limor; Michaelis Grunwald, Ruth; Valinsky, Liora; Porath, Avi; Heymann, Anthony David

    2014-01-01

    Childhood and adolescent obesity constitute a significant public health concern. Family health care settings with multidisciplinary teams provide an opportunity for weight loss treatment. The objective of this study was to examine the effect of intensive treatment designed to reduce weight using a parent-child lifestyle modification intervention in a family health care clinic for obese and overweight children who had failed previous treatment attempts. This was a practice-based 6-month intervention at Maccabi Health Care Services, an Israeli health maintenance organization, consisting of parental education, individual child consultation, and physical activity classes. We included in the intervention 100 obese or overweight children aged 5 to 14 years and their parents and 943 comparison children and their parents. Changes in body mass index z-scores, adjusted for socioeconomic status, were analyzed, with a follow-up at 14 months and a delayed follow-up at an average of 46.7 months. The mean z-score after the intervention was lower in the intervention group compared to the comparison group (1.74 and 1.95, respectively; P = .019). The intervention group sustained the reduction in z-score after an average of 46.7 months (P < .001). Of the overweight or obese children, 13% became normal weight after the intervention, compared with 4% of the comparison children. This multidisciplinary team treatment of children and their parents in family health care clinics positively affected measures of childhood obesity. Additional randomized trials are required to verify these findings.

  17. [Pharmacological treatment of obesity].

    PubMed

    Gomis Barbará, R

    2004-01-01

    The pharmacological treatment of obesity should be considered when cannot be achieved a 10% weight loss with diet therapy and physical activity. The drugs effective in obesity treatment may act by different mechanisms such as reduction in food intake, inhibition of fat absorption, increase of thermogenesis and stimulation of adipocyte apoptosis. At present, we only have two marketed drugs for obesity treatment. Sibutramine is an inhibitor of norepinephrine, dopamine and serotonina reuptake which inhibits food intake and increases thermogenesis. Sibutramine administration for a year can induce a weight loss of 4-7%. Its main side effects are hypertension, headache, insomnia and constipation. Orlistat is an inhibitor of pancreatic lipase which is able to block the absorption of 30% of ingested fat. Its administration induces weight loss and reduction of ulterior weight regain. Also, this drug improves hypertension dyslipdaemia and helps to prevent diabetes in 52% of cases when administered over four years. The increase in frequency of stools and interference with vitamin absorption are its main side effects. Glucagon-like peptide 1, which increases insulin sensitivity and satiety, adiponectin and PPAR-gamma agonists which reduce insulin resistance and modulates adipocyte generation are the basis for future therapeutic approaches of obesity. Phosphatase inhibitors induce PPAR-gamma phosphorylation and UCP-1 expression leading to an increase in thermogenesis and reduction in appetite.

  18. How useful are systematic reviews of child obesity interventions?

    PubMed

    Wolfenden, L; Wiggers, J; Tursan d'Espaignet, E; Bell, A C

    2010-02-01

    To facilitate the translation of research evidence into practice, policy makers and practitioners require practice-relevant information such as the effectiveness of interventions delivered in specific settings, by various personnel, using various intervention modalities, and descriptions of intervention costs or adverse outcomes. The aim of this study was to review the relevance of information reported in systematic reviews of child obesity interventions in terms of these requirements. A systematic search was conducted for systematic reviews of child obesity interventions published in English between 1990 and 2008. A total of 3150 citations were examined. Of the 44 eligible reviews, 16 examined prevention interventions, 18 examined treatment interventions, and 10 examined both prevention and treatment interventions. Less than 50% of prevention and treatment reviews reported the effect of interventions conducted in specific settings, the effect of interventions conducted by various personnel and the effect of those delivered via various intervention modalities. Similarly, few (4-15%) reviews reported cost or adverse event outcomes. Existing systematic reviews of childhood obesity interventions provide limited practice-relevant information. The potential for benefit from the translation of evidence into practice is therefore limited. Involving end users in systematic review development may improve the relevance of outcomes reported in systematic reviews.

  19. Diet, physical activity and behavioural interventions for the treatment of overweight or obese children from the age of 6 to 11 years.

    PubMed

    Mead, Emma; Brown, Tamara; Rees, Karen; Azevedo, Liane B; Whittaker, Victoria; Jones, Dan; Olajide, Joan; Mainardi, Giulia M; Corpeleijn, Eva; O'Malley, Claire; Beardsmore, Elizabeth; Al-Khudairy, Lena; Baur, Louise; Metzendorf, Maria-Inti; Demaio, Alessandro; Ells, Louisa J

    2017-06-22

    Child and adolescent overweight and obesity has increased globally, and can be associated with significant short- and long-term health consequences. This is an update of a Cochrane review published first in 2003, and updated previously in 2009. However, the update has now been split into six reviews addressing different childhood obesity treatments at different ages. To assess the effects of diet, physical activity and behavioural interventions (behaviour-changing interventions) for the treatment of overweight or obese children aged 6 to 11 years. We searched CENTRAL, MEDLINE, Embase, PsycINFO, CINAHL, LILACS as well as trial registers ClinicalTrials.gov and ICTRP Search Portal. We checked references of studies and systematic reviews. We did not apply any language restrictions. The date of the last search was July 2016 for all databases. We selected randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of diet, physical activity, and behavioural interventions (behaviour-changing interventions) for treating overweight or obese children aged 6 to 11 years, with a minimum of six months' follow-up. We excluded interventions that specifically dealt with the treatment of eating disorders or type 2 diabetes, or included participants with a secondary or syndromic cause of obesity. Two review authors independently screened references, extracted data, assessed risk of bias, and evaluated the quality of the evidence using the GRADE instrument. We contacted study authors for additional information. We carried out meta-analyses according to the statistical guidelines in the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions. We included 70 RCTs with a total of 8461 participants randomised to either the intervention or control groups. The number of participants per trial ranged from 16 to 686. Fifty-five trials compared a behaviour-changing intervention with no treatment/usual care control and 15 evaluated the effectiveness of adding an additional component to a behaviour

  20. School-Based Programs Aimed at the Prevention and Treatment of Obesity: Evidence-Based Interventions for Youth in Latin America

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lobelo, Felipe; Garcia de Quevedo, Isabel; Holub, Christina K.; Nagle, Brian J.; Arredondo, Elva M.; Barquera, Simon; Elder, John P.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Rapidly rising childhood obesity rates constitute a public health priority in Latin America which makes it imperative to develop evidence-based strategies. Schools are a promising setting but to date it is unclear how many school-based obesity interventions have been documented in Latin America and what level of evidence can be…

  1. School-Based Programs Aimed at the Prevention and Treatment of Obesity: Evidence-Based Interventions for Youth in Latin America

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lobelo, Felipe; Garcia de Quevedo, Isabel; Holub, Christina K.; Nagle, Brian J.; Arredondo, Elva M.; Barquera, Simon; Elder, John P.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Rapidly rising childhood obesity rates constitute a public health priority in Latin America which makes it imperative to develop evidence-based strategies. Schools are a promising setting but to date it is unclear how many school-based obesity interventions have been documented in Latin America and what level of evidence can be…

  2. Response to an exercise intervention after endometrial cancer: differences between obese and non-obese survivors.

    PubMed

    Basen-Engquist, K; Carmack, C; Brown, J; Jhingran, A; Baum, G; Song, J; Scruggs, S; Swartz, M C; Cox, M G; Lu, K H

    2014-04-01

    The objective of this paper is to describe baseline differences between obese and non-obese endometrial cancer survivor in anthropometrics, exercise behavior, fitness, heart rate and blood pressure, and quality of life, and to analyze whether the effect of a home-based exercise intervention on these outcomes differed for obese and non-obese participants. One hundred post-treatment Stage I-IIIa endometrial cancer survivors participated in a single arm 6month study in which they received a home-based exercise intervention. Cardiorespiratory fitness, anthropometrics, and exercise behavior were measured every two months, and quality of life (QOL) and psychological distress were measured at baseline and 6months. Adjusting for potential confounders, at baseline obese survivors had poorer cardiorespiratory fitness (p=.002), higher systolic blood pressure (p=.018), and lower physical functioning (p<.001) and ratings of general health (p=.002), and more pain (p=.037) and somatization (.002). Significant improvements were seen in exercise behavior, resting heart rate, systolic blood pressure, and multiple QOL domains over the course of the intervention. Obese survivors had less improvement in exercise behavior and cardiorespiratory fitness than non-obese survivors, but there were no differences with regard to improvements in QOL and stress. Home based exercise interventions are beneficial to endometrial cancer survivors, including those whose BMI is in the obese range. While obese survivors have lower levels of physical activity and fitness, they experienced similar activity, fitness, quality of life and mental health benefits. Exercise should be encouraged in endometrial cancer survivors, including those who are obese. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Pediatric Obesity: Looking into Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Pietrobelli, Angelo; Rugolotto, Simone; Cristofaro, Paolo De; Malavolti, Marcella

    2009-01-01

    Prevalence of pediatric obesity continues to rise worldwide. Increasing the number of health care practitioners as well as pediatricians with expertise in obesity treatment is necessary. Because many obese patients suffer obesity-associated cardiovascular, metabolic and other health complications that could increase the severity of obesity, it is fundamental not only to identify the child prone to obesity as early as possible, but to recognize, treat and monitor obesity-related diseases during adolescence. This short review outlines the treatment of pediatric obesity that may have applications in the primary care setting. It examines current information on eating behavior, sedentary behavior, and details studies of multidisciplinary, behavior-based, obesity treatment programs. We also report the less common and more aggressive forms of treatment, such as medication and bariatric surgery. We emphasize that health care providers have the potential to improve outcomes by performing early identification, helping families create the best possible home environment, and by providing structured guidance to obese children and their families. PMID:22253978

  4. Diet, physical activity, and behavioural interventions for the treatment of overweight or obesity in preschool children up to the age of 6 years.

    PubMed

    Colquitt, Jill L; Loveman, Emma; O'Malley, Claire; Azevedo, Liane B; Mead, Emma; Al-Khudairy, Lena; Ells, Louisa J; Metzendorf, Maria-Inti; Rees, Karen

    2016-03-10

    Child overweight and obesity has increased globally, and can be associated with short- and long-term health consequences. To assess the effects of diet, physical activity, and behavioural interventions for the treatment of overweight or obesity in preschool children up to the age of 6 years. We performed a systematic literature search in the databases Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, CINAHL, and LILACS, as well as in the trial registers ClinicalTrials.gov and ICTRP Search Portal. We also checked references of identified trials and systematic reviews. We applied no language restrictions. The date of the last search was March 2015 for all databases. We selected randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of diet, physical activity, and behavioural interventions for treating overweight or obesity in preschool children aged 0 to 6 years. Two review authors independently assessed risk of bias, evaluated the overall quality of the evidence using the GRADE instrument, and extracted data following the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions. We contacted trial authors for additional information. We included 7 RCTs with a total of 923 participants: 529 randomised to an intervention and 394 to a comparator. The number of participants per trial ranged from 18 to 475. Six trials were parallel RCTs, and one was a cluster RCT. Two trials were three-arm trials, each comparing two interventions with a control group. The interventions and comparators in the trials varied. We categorised the comparisons into two groups: multicomponent interventions and dietary interventions. The overall quality of the evidence was low or very low, and six trials had a high risk of bias on individual 'Risk of bias' criteria. The children in the included trials were followed up for between six months and three years.In trials comparing a multicomponent intervention with usual care, enhanced usual care, or information control, we found a greater reduction in body mass index (BMI

  5. Intermittent fasting interventions for the treatment of overweight and obesity in adults aged 18 years and over: a systematic review protocol.

    PubMed

    Jane, Louisa; Atkinson, Greg; Jaime, Victoria; Hamilton, Sharon; Waller, Gillian; Harrison, Samantha

    2015-10-01

    Are intermittent fasting interventions an effective treatment for overweight and obesity in adults, when compared to usual care treatment (continuous daily energy restriction - reduced calorie diet) or no treatment (ad libitum diet)? Overweight and obesity (classified as Body Mass Index [BMI] of greater than or equal to 25 and 30 respectively) is a global public health concern, with more than 1.9 billion adults worldwide being overweight in 2014 (over 600 million of whom are obese), and resulting in more deaths than underweight. A raised BMI in adulthood is associated with an increased risk of developing a number of chronic diseases which include diabetes, cardiovascular disease, muscular skeletal disorders and some cancers. In addition to this substantial impact on individual health and well being, there are also significant wider costs, for example, in England the annual direct cost to the national health service for treating overweight, obesity and associated morbidity is estimated at over £5 billion pounds, with costs to the wider economy estimated at £27 billion. Therefore effective weight management is essential.As overweight and obesity results from an accumulation of excess body fat arising from an energy imbalance - consuming more energy (kcal) than is expended - the majority of weight management approaches center around behaviors to address this imbalance, i.e. reducing energy intake through caloric restriction and increasing energy expenditure through physical activity. However, the aetiology of overweight and obesity is highly complex, involving an interplay of biological, psychological, societal and environmental drivers. Consequently, effective weight management is challenging, and whilst there exists a plethora of available weight loss programs, not all are comprehensively evaluated and compared, and many weight loss attempts result in weight regain and poor long term results. It is therefore vitally important to review the effectiveness of all new

  6. Current nutritional treatments of obesity.

    PubMed

    Greenwald, Ashli

    2006-01-01

    Obesity in our country is a growing concern. There are several different options for weight loss; however, individuals must be self-motivated and amendable to change in order to achieve success with their weight loss goals. Several strategies used by professionals in the US today to treat overweight and obesity, include diet therapy, exercise, behavior modification, pharmacotherapy, and surgery. The focus of the American Dietetic Association (ADA) Weight Management Position Statement is no longer just on weight loss but now on weight management. Reaching one's ideal body weight is recommended but not often realistic. Frequently, the goal of treatment shifts to maintenance of ones current weight or attempts at moderate weight loss. Lifestyle modification or behavioral modification interventions rely on analyzing behavior to identify events that are associated with appropriate vs. inappropriate eating, exercise, or thinking habits. Certain primary strategies that have been found to be useful for helping people change their behaviors so that they can lose weight and maintain their weight loss, include self-monitoring, stimulus control, cognitive restructuring, stress management, social support, physical activity, and relapse prevention. Weight loss programs should strive to combine a nutritionally balanced dietary regimen with exercise and lifestyle modifications at the lowest possible cost. There are several different methods used for dietary modifications; low calorie diets, very low calorie diets, fasting, formula diets and meal replacement programs, and popular diets. Bariatric surgery is gaining popularity as it has been an effective way to treat obesity. Following gastric bypass surgery, the patients must be prepared to modify their eating behaviors and dietary selections to assist with weight loss and prevent potential complications. Patients should be educated on the dietary guidelines extensively prior to surgery and again post-operatively.

  7. [INTERVENTIONS FOR PREVENTION AND MANAGEMENT OF CHILD AND YOUTH OBESITY].

    PubMed

    Pérez Morente, Ma Angeles; Sánchez Ocón, Ma Teresa; Mingorance Ruiz, Ma Visitación; Pérez Robles, Angustias; Munoz de la Fuente, José Manuel; Sánchez De Arias, Celia

    2015-02-01

    To determine the current epidemiological situation, prevention and management of child and youth obesity based on the best scientific evidence available. Literature search in PubMed, Cochrane, Science Direct, ENFISPO, Lilacs and SciELO, selecting articles about child and youth obesity, its prevention and treatment. Child and youth obesity is a multifactorial chronic disease that it has been increasing, tending to stay in adolescence and adulthood with greater intensity than more early starts. The data vary from country to country, although most articles are governed by body mass index (BMI). Pediatric overweight is defined by a BMI percentiles located between 91-98 and obesity by a percentile equal or greater than 99. Its prevalence varies according to time, geography, age, gender and race. The prevalence rates of obesity in Spain are one of the highest around the world. The overweight prevalence is lower slightly and there is no difference in gender. Its implications include the metabolic syndrome and diabetes mellitus II. Unanimously, the combination of interventions on life and dietary habits and physical activity is important for the management of obesity and overweight. Currently, the obesity management requires a generalized approach, with changes in lifestyle, diet and physical activity. The best solution for reducing this epidemic lies in prevention rather than treatment.

  8. Exercise intervention for management of obesity.

    PubMed

    Deusinger, Susan S

    2012-01-01

    Obesity touches the lives of most Americans regardless of age. In adults, accrual of co-morbidities, including frank disability, impacts health in ways that mandate aggressive public health action. In children, the rising prevalence of overweight and obesity raises serious prospective concerns for life as these children enter adulthood. Action is imperative to provide medical interventions and preventive strategies to reduce the threat this condition poses to future generations. Obesity primarily results from an energy regulation imbalance within the body; understanding its origin and effects requires considering both the intake (via eating) and output (via moving) of energy. This article focuses on how exercise and physical activity (i.e., energy output) can influence the primary condition of obesity and its health sequelae. Components, strategies, and expected outcomes of exercise and lifestyle activity are addressed. Successful long-term participation in daily movement requires matching exercise regimens and physical activity outlets to individual preferences and environmental conditions. Activity habits of Americans must change at home and in the workplace, schools and the community to positively influence health. Although the goals of Healthy People 2010 to reduce sedentary behavior have not been met, success of other public health interventions (e.g., immunizations, use of bicycle helmets) suggests that social change to alter activity habits can be achieved. Failure to reach our public health goals should serve as a catalyst for broad-based action to help children, adolescents, and adults attain and maintain behaviors that reduce the risk of obesity and its health insults.

  9. Economic Evaluation of Childhood Obesity Interventions: Reflections and Suggestions.

    PubMed

    Frew, Emma

    2016-08-01

    Rising levels of childhood obesity present a serious global public health problem amounting to 7 % of GDP in developed countries and affecting 14 % of children. As such, many countries are investing increasingly large quantities of resource towards treatment and prevention. Whilst it is important to demonstrate the clinical effectiveness of any intervention, it is equally as important to demonstrate cost effectiveness as policy makers strive to get the best value for money from increasingly limited public resources. Economic evaluation assists with making these investment decisions and whilst it can offer considerable support in many healthcare contexts, applying it to a childhood obesity context is not straightforward. Childhood obesity is a complex disease with interventions being multi-component in nature. Furthermore, the interventions are implemented in a variety of settings such as schools, the community, and the home, and have costs and benefits that fall outside the health sector. This paper provides a reflection from a UK perspective on the application of the conventional approach to economic evaluation to childhood obesity. It offers suggestions for how evaluations should be designed to fit better within this context, and to meet the needs of local decision makers. An excellent example is the need to report costs using a micro-costing format and for benefit measurement to go beyond a health focus. This is critical as the organisation and commissioning of childhood obesity services is done from a Local Authority setting and this presents further challenges for what is the most appropriate economic evaluation approach to use. Given that adult obesity is now of epidemic proportions, the accurate assessment of childhood obesity interventions to support public health decision making is critical.

  10. Emerging technology: endoluminal treatment of obesity.

    PubMed

    Coté, Gregory A; Edmundowicz, Steven A

    2009-11-01

    Bariatric surgery remains the most effective treatment for the management of obesity. Endoluminal interventions offer the potential for an ambulatory weight loss procedure that may be safer and more cost-effective compared with current laparoscopic approaches. We review the currently available endoluminal techniques for obesity that have been presented or discussed in public forums and meetings, focusing on those with published trials. Literature review. Human trials of endoluminal treatments of obesity are primarily limited to restrictive interventions, including intragastric balloons, transoral gastroplasty, and endoluminal vertical gastroplasty. Currently, the duodenojejunal bypass sleeve is the only endoluminal device that has been studied in humans that promotes weight loss through malabsorption. Early results of these technologies are promising, but long-term data are lacking. Endoluminal treatments for obesity have promise, and recent technological advances have been astounding. However, these interventions will need to be held to the same standards of current operative techniques. Each device will need to be scrutinized within clinical trials to determine its safety, efficacy, and durability.

  11. Key stakeholders' perspectives towards childhood obesity treatment: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Staniford, Leanne Jane; Breckon, Jeff David; Copeland, Robert James; Hutchison, Andrew

    2011-09-01

    Over the past three decades, there has been a dramatic global increase in childhood obesity. A better understanding of stakeholders' perceptions of intervention requirements could contribute to developing more effective interventions for childhood obesity. This study provides a qualitative, in-depth, analysis of stakeholders' (children, parents and health professionals) perspectives toward the efficacy of childhood obesity treatment interventions. Twenty-six stakeholders were recruited using purposive sampling; semi-structured interviews were adopted to explore stakeholders' perceptions with data analysed using a framework approach. Stakeholders concurred that treatment should be family-based incorporating physical activity, nutrition and psychological components, and be delivered in familiar environments to recipients. However, incongruence existed between stakeholders towards the sustainability of obesity treatment interventions. Parents and children reported needing ongoing support to sustain behavioural changes made during treatment, while health professionals suggested interventions should aim to create autonomous individuals who exit treatment and independently sustain behaviour change. This study provides an insight into issues of stakeholder involvement in the obesity intervention design and delivery process. To promote long-term behaviour change, there needs to be increased congruence between the delivery and receipt of childhood obesity treatment interventions. Interventions need to incorporate strategies that promote autonomous and self-regulated motivation, to enhance families' confidence in sustaining behaviour change independent of health professional support.

  12. Development of a Multi-Disciplinary Intervention for the Treatment of Childhood Obesity Based on Cognitive Behavioral Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bathrellou, Eirini; Yannakoulia, Mary; Papanikolaou, Katerina; Pehlivanidis, Artemios; Pervanidou, Panagiota; Kanaka-Gantenbein, Christina; Tsiantis, John; Chrousos, George P.; Sidossis, Labros S.

    2010-01-01

    Along the lines of the evidence-based recommendations, we developed a multi-disciplinary intervention for overweight children 7- to 12-years-old, primarily aiming at helping children to adopt healthier eating habits and a physically active lifestyle. The program combined nutrition intervention, based on a non-dieting approach, with physical…

  13. Development of a Multi-Disciplinary Intervention for the Treatment of Childhood Obesity Based on Cognitive Behavioral Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bathrellou, Eirini; Yannakoulia, Mary; Papanikolaou, Katerina; Pehlivanidis, Artemios; Pervanidou, Panagiota; Kanaka-Gantenbein, Christina; Tsiantis, John; Chrousos, George P.; Sidossis, Labros S.

    2010-01-01

    Along the lines of the evidence-based recommendations, we developed a multi-disciplinary intervention for overweight children 7- to 12-years-old, primarily aiming at helping children to adopt healthier eating habits and a physically active lifestyle. The program combined nutrition intervention, based on a non-dieting approach, with physical…

  14. Evaluation of a family intervention programme for the treatment of overweight and obese children (Nereu Programme): a randomized clinical trial study protocol

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Obesity is mainly attributed to environmental factors. In developed countries, the time spent on physical activity tasks is decreasing, whereas sedentary behaviour patterns are increasing. The purpose of the intervention is to evaluate the effectiveness of an intensive family-based behavioural multi-component intervention (Nereu programme) and compared it to counselling intervention such as a health centre intervention programme for the management of children’s obesity. Methods/Design The study design is a randomized controlled multicenter clinical trial using two types of interventions: Nereu and Counselling. The Nereu programme is an 8-month intensive family-based multi-component behavioural intervention. This programme is based on a multidisciplinary intervention consisting of 4 components: physical activity sessions for children, family theoretical and practical sessions for parents, behaviour strategy sessions involving both, parents and children, and lastly, weekend extra activities for all. Counselling is offered to the family in the form of a monthly physical health and eating habits session. Participants will be recruited according the following criteria: 6 to 12 year-old-children, referred from their paediatricians due to overweight or obesity according the International Obesity Task Force criteria and with a sedentary profile (less than 2 hours per week of physical activity), they must live in or near the municipality of Lleida (Spain) and their healthcare paediatric unit must have previously accepted to cooperate with this study. The following variables will be evaluated: a) cardiovascular risk factors (anthropometric parameters, blood test and blood pressure), b) sedentary and physical activity behaviour and dietary intake, c) psychological aspects d) health related quality of life (HRQOL), e) cost-effectiveness of the intervention in relation to HRQOL. These variables will be then be evaluated 4 times longitudinally: at baseline, at the

  15. Evaluation of a family intervention programme for the treatment of overweight and obese children (Nereu Programme): a randomized clinical trial study protocol.

    PubMed

    Serra-Paya, Noemi; Ensenyat, Assumpta; Real, Jordi; Castro-Viñuales, Iván; Zapata, Amalia; Galindo, Gisela; Solé-Mir, Eduard; Bosch-Muñoz, Jordi; Mur, Jose Maria; Teixidó, Concepció

    2013-10-23

    Obesity is mainly attributed to environmental factors. In developed countries, the time spent on physical activity tasks is decreasing, whereas sedentary behaviour patterns are increasing.The purpose of the intervention is to evaluate the effectiveness of an intensive family-based behavioural multi-component intervention (Nereu programme) and compared it to counselling intervention such as a health centre intervention programme for the management of children's obesity. The study design is a randomized controlled multicenter clinical trial using two types of interventions: Nereu and Counselling. The Nereu programme is an 8-month intensive family-based multi-component behavioural intervention. This programme is based on a multidisciplinary intervention consisting of 4 components: physical activity sessions for children, family theoretical and practical sessions for parents, behaviour strategy sessions involving both, parents and children, and lastly, weekend extra activities for all. Counselling is offered to the family in the form of a monthly physical health and eating habits session. Participants will be recruited according the following criteria: 6 to 12 year-old-children, referred from their paediatricians due to overweight or obesity according the International Obesity Task Force criteria and with a sedentary profile (less than 2 hours per week of physical activity), they must live in or near the municipality of Lleida (Spain) and their healthcare paediatric unit must have previously accepted to cooperate with this study. The following variables will be evaluated: a) cardiovascular risk factors (anthropometric parameters, blood test and blood pressure), b) sedentary and physical activity behaviour and dietary intake, c) psychological aspects d) health related quality of life (HRQOL), e) cost-effectiveness of the intervention in relation to HRQOL. These variables will be then be evaluated 4 times longitudinally: at baseline, at the end of the intervention (8

  16. Obesity-programmed mice are rescued by early genetic intervention.

    PubMed

    Bumaschny, Viviana F; Yamashita, Miho; Casas-Cordero, Rodrigo; Otero-Corchón, Verónica; de Souza, Flávio S J; Rubinstein, Marcelo; Low, Malcolm J

    2012-11-01

    Obesity is a chronic metabolic disorder affecting half a billion people worldwide. Major difficulties in managing obesity are the cessation of continued weight loss in patients after an initial period of responsiveness and rebound to pretreatment weight. It is conceivable that chronic weight gain unrelated to physiological needs induces an allostatic regulatory state that defends a supranormal adipose mass despite its maladaptive consequences. To challenge this hypothesis, we generated a reversible genetic mouse model of early-onset hyperphagia and severe obesity by selectively blocking the expression of the proopiomelanocortin gene (Pomc) in hypothalamic neurons. Eutopic reactivation of central POMC transmission at different stages of overweight progression normalized or greatly reduced food intake in these obesity-programmed mice. Hypothalamic Pomc rescue also attenuated comorbidities such as hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, and hepatic steatosis and normalized locomotor activity. However, effectiveness of treatment to normalize body weight and adiposity declined progressively as the level of obesity at the time of Pomc induction increased. Thus, our study using a novel reversible monogenic obesity model reveals the critical importance of early intervention for the prevention of subsequent allostatic overload that auto-perpetuates obesity.

  17. Obesity-programmed mice are rescued by early genetic intervention

    PubMed Central

    Bumaschny, Viviana F.; Yamashita, Miho; Casas-Cordero, Rodrigo; Otero-Corchón, Verónica; de Souza, Flávio S.J.; Rubinstein, Marcelo; Low, Malcolm J.

    2012-01-01

    Obesity is a chronic metabolic disorder affecting half a billion people worldwide. Major difficulties in managing obesity are the cessation of continued weight loss in patients after an initial period of responsiveness and rebound to pretreatment weight. It is conceivable that chronic weight gain unrelated to physiological needs induces an allostatic regulatory state that defends a supranormal adipose mass despite its maladaptive consequences. To challenge this hypothesis, we generated a reversible genetic mouse model of early-onset hyperphagia and severe obesity by selectively blocking the expression of the proopiomelanocortin gene (Pomc) in hypothalamic neurons. Eutopic reactivation of central POMC transmission at different stages of overweight progression normalized or greatly reduced food intake in these obesity-programmed mice. Hypothalamic Pomc rescue also attenuated comorbidities such as hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, and hepatic steatosis and normalized locomotor activity. However, effectiveness of treatment to normalize body weight and adiposity declined progressively as the level of obesity at the time of Pomc induction increased. Thus, our study using a novel reversible monogenic obesity model reveals the critical importance of early intervention for the prevention of subsequent allostatic overload that auto-perpetuates obesity. PMID:23093774

  18. [Scientific Evidence on Preventive Interventions in Childhood Obesity].

    PubMed

    Alba-Martín, Raquel

    The increasing prevalence of obesity or overweight at all ages, their associated morbidity and mortality associated, and the increased perception of the problem by the society have generated several hypotheses in response to the scientific and the international community. Investigate the preventive interventions in childhood obesity so far. Integrative review during the study period from April 2013 to November 2014. The MEDLINE international database was used, including PubMed, the Cochrane Library (Issue 4 2002), the national database Isooc (CSIC) national database, as well as the Internet. The review included health articles published in Spanish and English between 1990 and 2014 that focused on or included education, prevention, diagnostic, and treatment of obesity interventions. Of the 726 articles identified, 34 of most relevant (peer reviewed) were selected. It was noted that there is limited generisable evidence on interventions that could be implemented in Primary Care or referral services available, although numerous studies suggest that improvements in the overweight are possible. Despite the abundant literature and that many institutions place childhood obesity as one of the priorities of Public Health, we face the paradox that the evidence on cost-effectiveness of prevention interventions is sparse. Knowing these gaps in knowledge should lead to filling them with rigorous and well-designed studies. Copyright © 2016 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  19. Role of Malabsorptive Endoscopic Procedures in Obesity Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jae Myung

    2017-01-01

    The incidence of obesity is increasing, and more definitive treatment modalities are needed. Endoluminal procedures, including restrictive endoscopic procedures, endoscopic gastroplasty, and malabsorptive endoscopic procedures, can reduce weight in obese patients and control obesity-related comorbidities. Malabsorptive endoscopic interventions also offer the potential for an ambulatory procedure that may be safer and more cost-effective compared with laparoscopic surgery. Malabsorptive endoscopic intervention can induce weight reduction and improve obesity-related metabolic parameters, despite complications such as device migration, obstruction, and abdominal pain. Improvement in technique will follow the development of new devices. PMID:28147470

  20. Integrative Treatment of Pediatric Obesity: Psychological and Spiritual Considerations

    PubMed Central

    Boisvert, Jennifer A.; Harrell, W. Andrew

    2015-01-01

    This article presents an integrative approach to the problem of pediatric obesity, which is a multifaceted medical condition that is epidemic in the United States and elsewhere in the world. In this article, definitions of pediatric obesity are provided, and its prevalence, etiological factors, medical complications, and comorbidities are reviewed. Psychological and spiritual factors associated with pediatric obesity are discussed, together with their importance to integrative treatment. This review suggests that the use of psychological interventions, such as cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) and animal-assisted therapy (AAT), can be considered in conjunction with medical and educational interventions to treat pediatric obesity successfully. PMID:26770130

  1. School based obesity intervention: Inclusion of peers

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The increasing prevalence of childhood obesity and the comorbid physical and psychological health problems highlight a pressing need to identify effective treatments that address this public health problem during the childhood years. The purpose of the current study was to evaluate a school-based pe...

  2. [Extensive conservative treatment of obesity].

    PubMed

    Buri, Caroline; Laederach, Kurt

    2013-02-01

    The treatment of obesity is complex due to the multifactorial etiology. A modern therapy concept must therefore be tailored to the individual needs and problems and depends on various factors such as degree of obesity, the presence of physical complications, psychological co-morbidities, any treatment measures the patient underwent up to now as well as on motivational factors. Before deciding on a therapeutic measure a structured multidisciplinary cooperation is essential including psychosomatic medicine/psychiatry/psychotherapy, endocrinology, sports medicine, nutritional medicine and surgery as well. The treatment must be carried out in a multidisciplinary team and includes an adequate therapy of comorbidities and sometimes a psychopharmacological support. The success of a conservative treatment of obesity is remarkable and long-lasting and can be straightforwardly compared to bariatric surgery in financial as well as ethical terms, although for patients and their physicians the latter often carries the allure of quick success.

  3. Interventions to increase physical activity and healthy eating among overweight and obese children in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Eisenberg, Christina M; Sánchez-Romero, Luz María; Rivera-Dommarco, Juan A; Holub, Christina K; Arredondo, Elva M; Elder, John P; Barquera, Simón

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to conduct a systematic literature review of obesity interventions that focused on increasing physical activity and healthy eating among overweight and obese children in Mexico. Data was taken from a larger literature review focused on obesity interventions for Latinos in Latin America and the United States. Study design suitability, quality of execution, and effect size were assessed for a subset of these articles. There were six intervention studies included in the present review. Five studies showed reductions in obesity-related outcomes, while one study reported gains in body mass index (BMI). Physical activity and healthy eating remain constant components in obesity treatment interventions, which highlights the importance of understanding evidence-based strategies to guide future research to reduce childhood obesity in Mexico.

  4. Feasibility of a Friendship Network-Based Pediatric Obesity Intervention.

    PubMed

    Giannini, Courtney M; Irby, Megan B; Skelton, Joseph A; Gesell, Sabina B

    2017-02-01

    There is growing evidence supporting social network-based interventions for adolescents with obesity. This study's aim was to determine the feasibility of a social network-based intervention by assessing adolescents' friendship networks, willingness to involve friends in treatment, and how these factors influence enjoyment. Adolescents (N = 42) were recruited from a tertiary care obesity clinic. Participants gave a list of closest friends, friendship characteristics, and which of their friends they would involve in treatment. A subset (N = 14) participated in group treatment, were encouraged to bring friends, and invited to a second interview. Participants nominated a mean of 4.0 (standard deviation [SD] = 1.6) friends and were more likely to nominate closer friends (p = 0.003). Friends who attended group sessions were more likely to have multiple friendships in common with the participant's own network (p = 0.04). Involving friends in treatment is feasible and desired by adolescents and may be a novel approach for augmenting obesity treatment outcomes.

  5. Swimming intervention mitigates HFD-induced obesity of rats through PGC-1α-irisin pathway.

    PubMed

    Yang, X-Q; Yuan, H; Li, J; Fan, J-J; Jia, S-H; Kou, X-J; Chen, N

    2016-05-01

    Irisin, a newly discovered myokine, can drive the browning of white adipocytes to control body weight or mitigate obesity progression through regulating energy metabolism. However, the underlying mechanisms or specific signal pathways of exercise-induced irisin on the management of obesity are still unclear. Totally 30 rats were subjected to high fat diet (HFD) feeding for 8 weeks to establish the rat model with obesity successfully. HFD-induced obese model rats were provided with 8 weeks swimming intervention at moderate intensity for exploring the treatment of obesity through exercise intervention. In addition, another 15 rats were subjected to HFD feeding coupled with total 16 weeks swimming intervention at a moderate intensity from the beginning of the experiment, which was used for exploring the prevention of obesity through exercise intervention. Blood and gastrocnemius samples were harvested from obese rats after swimming intervention to explore its specific signal pathways through ELISA analysis and Western blotting. HFD feeding of rats for 8 weeks could lead to the obesity due to the disorders of lipid metabolism. Totally 8 weeks swimming intervention at moderate intensity for rats with obesity could obviously alleviate the progression of obesity and 16 weeks swimming intervention from the beginning of the experiment could significantly inhibit the development of obesity. Meanwhile, swimming intervention could result in an increased phosphorylation of AMPK and up-regulation of irisin and PGC-1α as the biomarkers of energy metabolism. Exercise intervention can activate PGC-1α-dependent irisin to induce the browning of white adipocytes, thus inhibiting or alleviating the occurrence and development of obesity.

  6. Behavioral Weight Loss Treatments for Individuals with Migraine and Obesity.

    PubMed

    Cervoni, Cynthia; Bond, Dale S; Seng, Elizabeth K

    2016-02-01

    Migraine and obesity are each prevalent disorders involving significant personal and societal burden. Epidemiologic research demonstrates a link between migraine and obesity that is further substantiated by putative behavioral, psychosocial, and physiological mechanisms. As obesity is considered a modifiable risk factor for exacerbation of migraine, weight loss may be a particularly useful treatment option for people with comorbid migraine and obesity. Behavioral weight loss interventions complement existing behavioral treatments for migraine and offer patients evidence-based effective strategies for achieving weight loss that could help reduce frequency, severity, and impact of migraine attacks.

  7. Long-term treatment of obesity in the obesity unit.

    PubMed

    Kunesová, M; Hainer, V; Parízková, J; Stich, V; Fried, M

    1998-01-01

    A group of 318 obese patients followed-up at the Obesity Unit in Prague in 1995-1997 was included into a study. Their treatment was based on the standard combination of a weight reduction diet, physical activity and behavioural intervention. In patients with more severe degrees of óbesity VLCD in one daily portion, pharmacotherapy, in-patient regimen lasting 24 days, including VLCD (1,500 kJ/day), exercise and group psychotherapy; or bariatric surgery (mostly laparoscopic gastric banding) were used, if necessary. Patients were divided into two groups according to their compliance to the weight reducing regimen. Group A dropped out before 2 years of follow-up, group B was followed-up 2 years or more. The groups did not differ significantly in their mean age, initial body weight, initial BMI and fat content and in percentage of males and females. Weight, BMI, fat content, essential anthropometric indices (waist circumference, WHR, subscapular and triceps skinfolds) and blood pressure are presented in this study. The maximum weight loss was significantly higher in group B. We did not find any other significant differences between group A and group B. The most significant predictor of compliance expressed as duration of follow-up (evaluated by multiple regression with stepwise variable selection) was the maximum BMI decrease (p < 0.005). The most significant predictors of the weight loss at the end of the follow-up were maximum weight loss and maximum decrease of BMI (p < 0.001). Family history of obesity (obese one or both parents) was significantly more often in group B (p < 0.05). This trend was expressed predominantly in females (p < 0.01), where also family history of obesity in mother was significantly more often in group B (p < 0.05). The frequency of methods used in individual patients was estimated. Standard combination of diet, enhanced physical activity and behavioural intervention was used in all patients. All other methods were used significantly more

  8. Interventions for preventing obesity in children.

    PubMed

    Waters, Elizabeth; de Silva-Sanigorski, Andrea; Hall, Belinda J; Brown, Tamara; Campbell, Karen J; Gao, Yang; Armstrong, Rebecca; Prosser, Lauren; Summerbell, Carolyn D

    2011-12-07

    Prevention of childhood obesity is an international public health priority given the significant impact of obesity on acute and chronic diseases, general health, development and well-being. The international evidence base for strategies that governments, communities and families can implement to prevent obesity, and promote health, has been accumulating but remains unclear. This review primarily aims to update the previous Cochrane review of childhood obesity prevention research and determine the effectiveness of evaluated interventions intended to prevent obesity in children, assessed by change in Body Mass Index (BMI). Secondary aims were to examine the characteristics of the programs and strategies to answer the questions "What works for whom, why and for what cost?" The searches were re-run in CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsychINFO and CINAHL in March 2010 and searched relevant websites. Non-English language papers were included and experts were contacted. The review includes data from childhood obesity prevention studies that used a controlled study design (with or without randomisation). Studies were included if they evaluated interventions, policies or programs in place for twelve weeks or more. If studies were randomised at a cluster level, 6 clusters were required. Two review authors independently extracted data and assessed the risk of bias of included studies.  Data was extracted on intervention implementation, cost, equity and outcomes. Outcome measures were grouped according to whether they measured adiposity, physical activity (PA)-related behaviours or diet-related behaviours.  Adverse outcomes were recorded. A meta-analysis was conducted using available BMI or standardised BMI (zBMI) score data with subgroup analysis by age group (0-5, 6-12, 13-18 years, corresponding to stages of developmental and childhood settings). This review includes 55 studies (an additional 36 studies found for this update). The majority of studies targeted children aged 6

  9. Interventions for preventing obesity in children.

    PubMed

    Spinola e Castro, Angela Maria

    2014-01-01

    Prevention of childhood obesity is an international public health priority given the significant impact of obesity on acute and chronic diseases, general health, development and well-being. The international evidence base for strategies that governments, communities and families can implement to prevent obesity, and promote health, has been accumulating but remains unclear. This review primarily aims to update the previous Cochrane review of childhood obesity prevention research and determine the effectiveness of evaluated interventions intended to prevent obesity in children, assessed by change in Body Mass Index (BMI). Secondary aims were to examine the characteristics of the programs and strategies to answer the questions "What works for whom, why and for what cost?" The searches were re-run in CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsychINFO and CINAHL in March 2010 and searched relevant websites. Non-English language papers were included and experts were contacted. The review includes data from childhood obesity prevention studies that used a controlled study design (with or without randomisation). Studies were included if they evaluated interventions, policies or programs in place for twelve weeks or more. If studies were randomized at a cluster level, six clusters were required. Two review authors independently extracted data and assessed the risk of bias of included studies. Data was extracted on intervention implementation, cost, equity and outcomes. Outcome measures were grouped according to whether they measured adiposity, physical activity (PA)-related behaviours or diet-related behaviours. Adverse outcomes were recorded. A meta-analysis was conducted using available BMI or standardized BMI (zBMI) score data with subgroup analysis by age group (0-5, 6-12, 13-18 years, corresponding to stages of developmental and childhood settings). This review includes 55 studies (an additional 36 studies found for this update). The majority of studies targeted children aged v 6

  10. School-Based Obesity Interventions: A Literature Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaya, Fadia T.; Flores, David; Gbarayor, Confidence M.; Wang, Jingshu

    2008-01-01

    Background: Childhood obesity is an impending epidemic. This article is an overview of different interventions conducted in school settings so as to guide efforts for an effective management of obesity in children, thus minimizing the risk of adult obesity and related cardiovascular risk. Methods: PubMed and OVID Medline databases were searched…

  11. School-Based Obesity Interventions: A Literature Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaya, Fadia T.; Flores, David; Gbarayor, Confidence M.; Wang, Jingshu

    2008-01-01

    Background: Childhood obesity is an impending epidemic. This article is an overview of different interventions conducted in school settings so as to guide efforts for an effective management of obesity in children, thus minimizing the risk of adult obesity and related cardiovascular risk. Methods: PubMed and OVID Medline databases were searched…

  12. Pediatric obesity: Parallels with addiction and treatment recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Acosta, Michelle C.; Manubay, Jeanne; Levin, Frances R.

    2012-01-01

    Rates of pediatric obesity have increased dramatically over the past decade. This trend is particularly alarming as obesity is associated with significant medical and psychosocial consequences. Obesity may contribute to cardiovascular, metabolic, and hepatic complications, as well as psychiatric difficulties. The development of obesity appears to be influenced by a complex array of genetic, metabolic, and neural frameworks, as well as behavior, eating habits, and physical activity. Numerous parallels exist between obesity and addictive behaviors, including genetic predisposition, personality, environmental risk factors, and common neurobiological pathways in the brain. Typical treatments for pediatric obesity include behavioral interventions targeting diet and/or exercise. Treatments focusing on diet and exercise have yielded mixed results, and typically have been examined in specialty clinic populations, limiting their generalizability. There are limited medication options for overweight children and adolescents, and no approved medical intervention in children younger than 16. Bariatric surgery may be an option for some adolescents, but due to the risks of surgery it is often seen as a last resort. The parallels between addiction and obesity aid in the development of novel interventions for pediatric obesity. Motivational enhancement and cognitive-behavioral strategies used in addiction treatment may serve to be beneficial. PMID:18415881

  13. Preventing Obesity Across Generations: Evidence for Early Life Intervention.

    PubMed

    Haire-Joshu, Debra; Tabak, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    To prevent the intergenerational transfer of obesity and end the current epidemic, interventions are needed across the early life stages, from preconception to prenatal to infancy through the age of 2 years. The foundation for obesity is laid in early life by actions and interactions passed from parent to child that have long-lasting biologic and behavioral consequences. The purpose of this paper is to examine the best evidence about (a) factors in parents and offspring that promote obesity during the early life stages, (b) the social determinants and dimensions of obesity in early life, (c) promising and effective interventions for preventing obesity in early life, and (d) opportunities for future research into strategies to disrupt the intergenerational cycle of obesity that begins early in life. The pathway for halting the intergenerational obesity epidemic requires the discovery and development of evidence-based interventions that can act across multiple dimensions of influence on early life.

  14. Preventing Obesity Across Generations: Evidence for Early Life Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Haire-Joshu, Debra; Tabak, Rachel

    2017-01-01

    To prevent the intergenerational transfer of obesity and end the current epidemic, interventions are needed across the early life stages, from preconception to prenatal to infancy through the age of 2 years. The foundation for obesity is laid in early life by actions and interactions passed from parent to child that have long-lasting biologic and behavioral consequences. The purpose of this paper is to examine the best evidence about (a) factors in parents and offspring that promote obesity during the early life stages, (b) the social determinants and dimensions of obesity in early life, (c) promising and effective interventions for preventing obesity in early life, and (d) opportunities for future research into strategies to disrupt the intergenerational cycle of obesity that begins early in life. The pathway for halting the intergenerational obesity epidemic requires the discovery and development of evidence-based interventions that can act across multiple dimensions of influence on early life. PMID:26989828

  15. Social influence in childhood obesity interventions: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Jalali, M S; Sharafi-Avarzaman, Z; Rahmandad, H; Ammerman, A S

    2016-09-01

    The objective of this study is to understand the pathways through which social influence at the family level moderates the impact of childhood obesity interventions. We conducted a systematic review of obesity interventions in which parents' behaviours are targeted to change children's obesity outcomes, because of the potential social and environmental influence of parents on the nutrition and physical activity behaviours of children. PubMed (1966-2013) and the Web of Science (1900-2013) were searched, and 32 studies satisfied our inclusion criteria. Results for existing mechanisms that moderate parents' influence on children's behaviour are discussed, and a causal pathway diagram is developed to map out social influence mechanisms that affect childhood obesity. We provide health professionals and researchers with recommendations for leveraging family-based social influence mechanisms to increase the efficacy of obesity intervention programmes. © 2016 World Obesity. © 2016 World Obesity.

  16. Obesity. Part II--Treatment.

    PubMed Central

    Bray, G A; Gray, D S

    1988-01-01

    Conventional diets and increased exercise are the cornerstones of traditional therapy for obesity, but available data suggest that the most important component of any program is the associated behavior modification through which new ways of dealing with old problems can be learned and continually applied. This combined with very-low-calorie diets--less than 800 kcal per day--are in wide use, mostly under medical supervision. The currently available appetite-suppressing drugs are of limited efficacy, but many new ones are under active development and hold promise for the future. The most effective surgical intervention appears to be the gastric bypass operation, but this should be reserved for those who are at high risk from their obesity. Images PMID:3074556

  17. Evaluation of a primary care-oriented brief counselling intervention for obesity with and without orlistat

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    There is a significant need for an obesity treatment model suitable for the primary care environment. We examined the effectiveness of a brief counseling intervention alone, in combination with orlistat, and drug-alone in a 12-month randomized-clinical trial at a medical school obesity center. Parti...

  18. Childhood obesity, parental duties of care and strategies for intervention.

    PubMed

    Nolan, Elise Jane

    2012-09-01

    Childhood obesity is an increasingly serious issue which causes significant health problems among children. There are numerous causes of childhood obesity. However, the ultimate responsibility for the problems and costs associated with an obese child should be attributed to that child's parents. Parents owe a duty of care to their child and, when their child is obese, have arguably breached that duty. However, if parents were required to pay their child damages, this would arguably be problematic and of little utility. Rather, intervention strategies should be implemented which seek to treat and prevent childhood obesity and to address the identified causes of childhood obesity.

  19. Economic evaluation of lifestyle interventions to treat overweight or obesity in children.

    PubMed

    Hollingworth, W; Hawkins, J; Lawlor, D A; Brown, M; Marsh, T; Kipping, R R

    2012-04-01

    To estimate lifetime cost effectiveness of lifestyle interventions to treat overweight and obese children, from the UK National Health Service perspective. An adaptation of the National Heart Forum economic model to predict lifetime health service costs and outcomes of lifestyle interventions on obesity-related diseases. Hospital or community-based weight-management programmes. Hypothetical cohorts of overweight or obese children based on body mass data from the National Child Measurement Programme. Lifestyle interventions that have been compared with no or minimal intervention in randomized controlled trials (RCTs). Reduction in body mass index (BMI) standard deviation score (SDS), intervention resources/costs, lifetime treatment costs, obesity-related diseases and cost per life year gained. Ten RCTs were identified by our search strategy. The median effect of interventions versus control from these 10 RCTs was a difference in BMI SDS of -0.13 at 12 months, but the range in effects among interventions was broad (0.04 to -0.60). Indicative costs per child of these interventions ranged from £108 to £662. For obese children aged 10-11 years, an intervention that resulted in a median reduction in BMI SDS at 12 months at a moderate cost of £400 increased life expectancy by 0.19 years and intervention costs were offset by subsequent undiscounted savings in treatment costs (net saving of £110 per child), though this saving did not emerge until the sixth or seventh decade of life. The discounted cost per life year gained was £13 589. Results were broadly similar for interventions aimed at children aged 4-5 years and which targeted both obese and overweight children. For more costly interventions, savings were less likely. Interventions to treat childhood obesity are potentially cost effective although cost savings and health benefits may not appear until the sixth or seventh decade of life.

  20. Dietary treatments of obesity.

    PubMed

    Moloney, M

    2000-11-01

    Numerous dietary treatments that purport to promote something unique for stimulating weight loss have been published. These treatments include fad diets, diets formulated by various commercial slimming clubs, very-low-energy diets (VLCD) and conventional diets. Fad diets may possibly reduce some weight short-term; however, there is no scientific basis to their long-term use. Commercial slimming clubs may be suitable for some individuals but they need to be properly assessed professionally. There are specific guidelines for the use of VLCD, which are only appropriate for short-term use. There is scientific evidence to suggest that conventional diets can produce both short- and long-term weight loss. A successful weight-loss programme depends on a multidisciplinary team approach. Management strategies should be devised for addressing issues such as goals, monitoring, follow-up, relapse and evaluation. Initial assessments should include medical, laboratory and anthropometric data, fitness level and dietary and behavioural attitudes. These results will form the basis of the treatment plan. Frequent visits to the clinic are fundamental in promoting continuing weight loss during the long-term maintenance stage of treatment. The visits should be made worthwhile for the patient. Realistic and attainable goals for diet, exercise and behaviour modification should be made. The diet should have a novel approach and be tailored to the needs of the patient. It should be adequate nutritionally, low in energy and fat. The overall aim should be to promote lifelong changes in lifestyle, improvement in quality of life and health risks.

  1. Pediatric obesity: parallels with addiction and treatment recommendations.

    PubMed

    Acosta, Michelle C; Manubay, Jeanne; Levin, Frances R

    2008-01-01

    Rates of pediatric obesity have increased dramatically over the past decade. This trend is especially alarming because obesity is associated with significant medical and psychosocial consequences. It may contribute to cardiovascular, metabolic, and hepatic complications, as well as to psychiatric difficulties. The development of obesity appears to be influenced by a complex array of genetic, metabolic, and neural frameworks, along with behavior, eating habits, and physical activity. Numerous parallels exist between obesity and addictive behaviors, including genetic predisposition, personality, environmental risk factors, and common neurobiological pathways in the brain. Typical treatments for pediatric obesity include behavioral interventions targeting diet or exercise. These treatments have yielded mixed results and typically have been examined in specialty clinic populations, limiting their generalizability. There are limited medication options for overweight children and adolescents, and no approved medical intervention in children younger than 16 years old. Bariatric surgery may be an option for some adolescents, but due to the risks of surgery, it is often seen as a last resort. The parallels between addiction and obesity aid in developing novel interventions for pediatric obesity. Motivational enhancement and cognitive-behavioral strategies used in addiction treatment may prove to be beneficial.

  2. Natural Dietary and Herbal Products in Anti-Obesity Treatment.

    PubMed

    Sun, Nan-Nong; Wu, Tsung-Yen; Chau, Chi-Fai

    2016-10-11

    The prevalence of overweight and obesity is on the rise around the world. Common comorbidities associated with obesity, particularly diabetes, hypertension, and heart disease have an impact on social and financial systems. Appropriate lifestyle and behavior interventions are still the crucial cornerstone to weight loss success, but maintaining such a healthy lifestyle is extremely challenging. Abundant natural materials have been explored for their obesity treatment potential and widely used to promote the development of anti-obesity products. The weight loss segment is one of the major contributors to the overall revenue of the dietary supplements market. In this review, the anti-obesity effects of different dietary or herbal products, and their active ingredients and mechanisms of action against obesity will be discussed.

  3. A simulation of affordability and effectiveness of childhood obesity interventions.

    PubMed

    Ma, Sai; Frick, Kevin D

    2011-01-01

    This study seeks to project at what level of effectiveness and cost a population-based or targeted intervention would yield a positive net economic benefit. Data sources include prevalence of obesity at all ages from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, the persistence of obesity from childhood to adulthood from a literature review, and a cost estimate from the 2006 Medical Expenditures Panel Survey. Econometric analysis was used to estimate medical cost related to obesity. Lifetime medical cost related to obesity is calculated by race, gender, and smoking status. Simulations were conducted to estimate the break-even point for interventions that take place between ages 0 and 6 years, ages 7 and 12 years, and ages 13 to 18 years, with a range of effectiveness. Results of simulations reveal that, from a pure medical cost perspective, spending approximately $1.4 to $1.7 billion at present value for each birth cohort will break even if 1 percentage point reduction in obesity among children is achieved. Population-based interventions can spend up to between $280 and $339 per child at present value if 1 percentage point reduction in obesity rate could be achieved; in contrast, should we invest in interventions that only target obese children, we can spend up to $1648 to $2735 per obese child for every 1 percentage point reduction in obesity rate. This study has several important policy implications; early interventions make economic sense. Targeted interventions could yield higher cost savings than population-based interventions for young children (aged 0-6 years), whereas a population-based approach could yield greater economic net benefits for adolescents (aged 13-18 years). Our simulation shows that childhood obesity interventions, even with moderate effectiveness, would make economic sense, which should motivate policy makers to take action. Copyright © 2011 Academic Pediatric Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The Addition of an Individualized Cognitive Intervention to a Standardized Behavioral Intervention for Obesity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeLucia, Janice L.; Kalodner, Cynthia R.

    This study examined the effectiveness of the addition of a cognitive intervention based on individualized assessment to a behavioral intervention for obesity. Overweight subjects (N=63) were randomly assigned to either a behavioral intervention or a behavioral intervention combined with a cognitive intervention which focused on changing specific…

  5. Treatment of antipsychotic-associated obesity with a GLP-1 receptor agonist—protocol for an investigator-initiated prospective, randomised, placebo-controlled, double-blinded intervention study: the TAO study protocol

    PubMed Central

    Ishøy, Pelle L; Knop, Filip K; Broberg, Brian V; Baandrup, Lone; Fagerlund, Birgitte; Jørgensen, Niklas R; Andersen, Ulrik B; Rostrup, Egill; Glenthøj, Birte Y; Ebdrup, Bjørn H

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Antipsychotic medication is widely associated with dysmetabolism including obesity and type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular-related diseases and early death. Obesity is considered the single most important risk factor for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Interventions against antipsychotic-associated obesity are limited and insufficient. Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists are approved for the treatment of type 2 diabetes, but their bodyweight-lowering effects have also been recognised in patients with non-diabetes. The primary endpoint of this trial is weight loss after 3 months of treatment with a GLP-1 receptor agonist (exenatide once weekly) in patients with non-diabetic schizophrenia with antipsychotic-associated obesity. Secondary endpoints include physiological and metabolic measurements, various psychopathological and cognitive measures, and structural and functional brain MRI. Methods and analysis 40 obese patients with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder treated with antipsychotic drugs will be randomised to subcutaneous injection of exenatide once weekly (2 mg) or placebo for 3 months, adjunctive to their antipsychotic treatment. Ethics and dissemination The trial has been approved by the Danish Health and Medicines Authority, the National Committee on Health Research Ethics and the Danish Data Protection Agency. Trial participation presupposes theoral and written patient informed consent. An external, independent monitoring committee (Good Clinical Practice Unit at Copenhagen University Hospital) will monitor the study according to the GCP Guidelines. Trial data, including positive, negative and inconclusive results, will be presented at national and international scientific meetings and conferences. Papers will be submitted to peer-reviewed journals. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01794429; National Committee on Health Research Ethics project number: 36378; EudraCT nr: 2012-005404-17; The

  6. Outcomes of a pilot obesity prevention plus intervention targeting children and parenting practices

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Prevention-Plus interventions for primary care offer a venue to intervene with both children and parents for child obesity treatment. Such interventions can promote effective parenting practices that encourage healthy eating, physical activity (PA), and lower TV use among children. Test for feasibil...

  7. Development of Child-Teen Obesity Treatment Service Platform

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Kahyun; Lee, Byung Mun

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This study aimed to develop an effective and efficient obesity treatment and management service platform for obese children/teenagers. Methods The integrated smart platform was planned and established through cooperation with service providers such as hospitals and public health centers, obese children/teenagers who constitute the service's user base, and IT development and policy institutions and companies focusing on child-teen obesity management and treatment. Results Based on guidelines on intervention strategies to manage child-teen obesity, we developed two patient/parent mobile applications, one web-monitoring service for medical staff, one mobile application for food-craving endurance, and one mobile application for medical examinations. Conclusions The establishment of the integrated service platform was successfully completed; however, this study was restrictively to the hospital where the pilot program took place. The effectiveness of the proposed platform will be verified in the future in tests involving other organizations. PMID:27525166

  8. Development of Child-Teen Obesity Treatment Service Platform.

    PubMed

    Lim, Kahyun; Lee, Byung Mun; Lee, Youngho

    2016-07-01

    This study aimed to develop an effective and efficient obesity treatment and management service platform for obese children/teenagers. The integrated smart platform was planned and established through cooperation with service providers such as hospitals and public health centers, obese children/teenagers who constitute the service's user base, and IT development and policy institutions and companies focusing on child-teen obesity management and treatment. Based on guidelines on intervention strategies to manage child-teen obesity, we developed two patient/parent mobile applications, one web-monitoring service for medical staff, one mobile application for food-craving endurance, and one mobile application for medical examinations. The establishment of the integrated service platform was successfully completed; however, this study was restrictively to the hospital where the pilot program took place. The effectiveness of the proposed platform will be verified in the future in tests involving other organizations.

  9. Interventions addressing general parenting to prevent or treat childhood obesity.

    PubMed

    Gerards, Sanne M P L; Sleddens, Ester F C; Dagnelie, Pieter C; de Vries, Nanne K; Kremers, Stef P J

    2011-06-01

    Observational studies increasingly emphasize the impact of general parenting on the development of childhood overweight and obesity. The aim of the current literature review was to provide an overview of interventions addressing general parenting in order to prevent or treat childhood obesity. Electronic literature databases were systematically searched for relevant studies. Seven studies were eligible for inclusion. The studies described four different general parenting programs, which were supplemented with lifestyle components (i.e., physical activity and nutrition). All studies showed significant small to moderate intervention effects on at least one weight-related outcome measure. The current review shows that despite the emerging observational evidence for the role of parenting in children's weight-related outcomes, few interventions have been developed that address general parenting in the prevention of childhood obesity. These interventions provide evidence that the promotion of authoritative parenting is an effective strategy for the prevention and management of childhood obesity.

  10. Retrospective chart review for obesity and associated interventions among rural Mexican-American adolescents accessing healthcare services.

    PubMed

    Champion, Jane Dimmitt; Collins, Jennifer L

    2013-11-01

    To report a retrospective analysis of data routinely collected in the course of healthcare services at a rural health clinic and to assess obesity incidence and associated interventions among rural Mexican-American adolescents. Two hundred and twelve charts reviewed; 98 (46.2%) males and 114 (53.8%) females. Data extracted included Medicaid exams conducted at the clinic within 5 years. Equal overweight or obese (n = 105, 49.5%), versus normal BMI categorizations (n = 107, 50.5%) documented overall and by gender. Female obesity higher (25.4%) than national norms (17.4%); male rates (25.5%) were within national norm. Interventions provided by nurse practitioners (94%) for 34.8%-80% of overweight/obese had limited follow-up (4%). Obesity incidence markedly increased between 13 and 18 years of age without associated interventions; 51.4%-75.6% without interventions. Obesity is a healthcare problem among rural Mexican-American adolescents accessing care at the rural health clinic. Obesity intervention and follow-up was suboptimal within this setting. Rural and ethnic minority adolescents experience health disparities concerning obesity prevalence and remote healthcare access. Obesity prevention and treatment during adolescence is a national health priority given physiologic and psychological tolls on health and potential for obesity into adulthood. Obesity assessment and translation of evidence-based interventions for rural Mexican-American adolescents at rural health clinics is implicated. ©2013 The Author(s) ©2013 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  11. A Structured, Manual-Based Low-Level Intervention vs. Treatment as Usual Evaluated in a Randomized Controlled Trial for Adolescents with Extreme Obesity - the STEREO Trial.

    PubMed

    Mühlig, Yvonne; Scherag, André; Bickenbach, Annika; Giesen, Ulrike; Holl, Reinhard; Holle, Rolf; Kiess, Wieland; Lennerz, Belinda; Lütke Brintrup, Diana; Moss, Anja; Neef, Madlen; Ose, Claudia; Reinehr, Thomas; Teuner, Christina M; Wiegand, Susanna; Wolters, Barbara; Wabitsch, Martin; Hebebrand, Johannes

    2017-01-01

    To compare efficacy and safety of a manual-based low-level psychological intervention with treatment as usual (weight loss treatment). A two-armed randomized controlled trial without blinding and computer-based stratified block randomization included adolescents and young adults (14.0-24.9 years) with a BMI ≥ 30 kg/m2 at five German university hospitals. Primary outcomes were adherence (participation rate ≥ 5/6 sessions) and quality of life (DISABKIDS-37) 6 months after randomization. Secondary outcomes included depression, self-esteem, and perceived stress scores. Of 397 screened adolescents, 119 (mean BMI 40.4 ± 7.0 kg/m2, 49.6% female) were randomized to the manual-based low-level intervention (n = 59) or treatment as usual (n = 60). We observed no group difference for adherence (absolute risk reduction 0.4%, 95% CI -14.7% to 15.5%; p = 1.0) or health-related quality of life (score difference 8.1, 95% CI -2.1 to 18.3; p = 0.11). Among all secondary outcomes, we detected explorative evidence for an effect on the DISABKIDS-37 'social exclusion' subscale (score difference 15.5; 95% CI 1.6-29.4; p = 0.03). 18/19 adverse events occurred in 26 participants, none were classified as serious. Adherence to a coping-oriented intervention was comparable to weight loss treatment, although it was weak in both interventions. Psychological interventions may help to overcome social isolation; further confirmation is required. © 2017 The Author(s) Published by S. Karger GmbH, Freiburg.

  12. Multidisciplinary intervention in obese adolescents: predictors of dropout.

    PubMed

    Fidelix, Yara Lucy; Farias Júnior, José Cazuza de; Lofrano-Prado, Mara Cristina; Guerra, Ricardo Luís Fernandes; Cardel, Michelle; Prado, Wagner Luiz do

    2015-01-01

    To identify biological and psychosocial factors associated with dropout in a multidisciplinary behavioral intervention in obese adolescents. A total of 183 adolescents (15.4±1.6 years), pubertal (Tanner stage 3 or 4) and obese (34.7±4.0kg/m2), were enrolled in a 12-week behavioral intervention, which included clinical consultations (monthly), nutritional and psychological counseling (once a week), and supervised aerobic training (three times/week). The studied variables were weight, height, body mass index, body composition (skinfold), cardiorespiratory fitness (direct gas analysis), blood lipids and self-reported symptoms of eating disorders (bulimia, anorexia and binge eating), anxiety, depression, body image dissatisfaction and quality of life. Statistical analysis included binary logistic regression and independent t-tests. Of the adolescents, 73.7% adhered to the program. The greatest chance for dropout was observed among adolescents older than 15 years (odds ratio of 0.40; 95%CI: 0.15-0.98), with more anorexia symptoms (odds ratio of 0.35; 95%CI: 0.14-0.86) and hypercholesterolemia (odds ratio of 0.40; 95%CI: 0.16-0.91) at baseline. Older adolescents, with more symptoms of eating disorders and total cholesterol have less chance to adhere to multidisciplinary treatments.

  13. Multidisciplinary intervention in obese adolescents: predictors of dropout

    PubMed Central

    Fidelix, Yara Lucy; de Farias, José Cazuza; Lofrano-Prado, Mara Cristina; Guerra, Ricardo Luís Fernandes; Cardel, Michelle; do Prado, Wagner Luiz

    2015-01-01

    Objective To identify biological and psychosocial factors associated with dropout in a multidisciplinary behavioral intervention in obese adolescents. Methods A total of 183 adolescents (15.4±1.6 years), pubertal (Tanner stage 3 or 4) and obese (34.7±4.0kg/m2), were enrolled in a 12-week behavioral intervention, which included clinical consultations (monthly), nutritional and psychological counseling (once a week), and supervised aerobic training (three times/week). The studied variables were weight, height, body mass index, body composition (skinfold), cardiorespiratory fitness (direct gas analysis), blood lipids and self-reported symptoms of eating disorders (bulimia, anorexia and binge eating), anxiety, depression, body image dissatisfaction and quality of life. Statistical analysis included binary logistic regression and independent t-tests. Results Of the adolescents, 73.7% adhered to the program. The greatest chance for dropout was observed among adolescents older than 15 years (odds ratio of 0.40; 95%CI: 0.15-0.98), with more anorexia symptoms (odds ratio of 0.35; 95%CI: 0.14-0.86) and hypercholesterolemia (odds ratio of 0.40; 95%CI: 0.16-0.91) at baseline. Conclusion Older adolescents, with more symptoms of eating disorders and total cholesterol have less chance to adhere to multidisciplinary treatments. PMID:26466062

  14. Recent advancements in drug treatment of obesity.

    PubMed

    Carter, Rebeca; Mouralidarane, Angelina; Ray, Shuvra; Soeda, Junpei; Oben, Jude

    2012-10-01

    The prevalence of obesity is rising worldwide, with the U.K. having the highest prevalence in Europe. Obesity is associated with significant morbidity and has substantial healthcare implications, with current projections estimating that by 2030 obesity will cost the NHS approximately pounds 2 billion each year. Lifestyle modification remains the cornerstone of anti-obesity treatment, but drugs can be introduced as adjuncts to assist and maintain weight loss. Some 1.45 million obesity-related prescriptions were dispensed in 2009, highlighting the high demand for obesity pharmacotherapy. At present, the lipase inhibitor orlistat (Xenical) is the only UK-approved long-term medical therapy for obesity. Double-blind clinical trials have shown that orlistat significantly increases weight loss compared to placebo, but the array of adverse side effects associated with orlistat limits its tolerability. The need for more effective and better-tolerated anti-obesity medications is clear and six therapies have reached phase-III trials.

  15. Global school-based childhood obesity interventions: a review.

    PubMed

    Ickes, Melinda J; McMullen, Jennifer; Haider, Taj; Sharma, Manoj

    2014-08-28

    The issue of childhood overweight and obesity has become a global public health crisis. School-based interventions have been developed and implemented to combat this growing concern. The purpose of this review is to compare and contrast U.S. and international school-based obesity prevention interventions and highlight efficacious strategies. A systematic literature review was conducted utilizing five relevant databases. Inclusion criteria were: (1) primary research; (2) overweight or obesity prevention interventions; (3) school-based; (4) studies published between 1 January 2002 through 31 December 2013; (5) published in the English language; (6) child-based interventions, which could include parents; and (7) studies that reported outcome data. A total of 20 interventions met the inclusion criteria. Ten interventions each were implemented in the U.S. and internationally. International interventions only targeted elementary-aged students, were less likely to target low-income populations, and were less likely to be implemented for two or more years in duration. However, they were more likely to integrate an environmental component when compared to U.S. interventions. Interventions implemented in the U.S. and internationally resulted in successful outcomes, including positive changes in student BMI. Yet, varying approaches were used to achieve success, reinforcing the fact that a one-size-fits-all approach is not necessary to impact childhood obesity. However, building on successful interventions, future school-based obesity prevention interventions should integrate culturally specific intervention strategies, aim to incorporate an environmental component, and include parents whenever possible. Consideration should be given to the potential impact of long-term, frequent dosage interventions, and subsequent follow-up should be given attention to determine long-term efficacy.

  16. Global School-Based Childhood Obesity Interventions: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Ickes, Melinda J.; McMullen, Jennifer; Haider, Taj; Sharma, Manoj

    2014-01-01

    Background: The issue of childhood overweight and obesity has become a global public health crisis. School-based interventions have been developed and implemented to combat this growing concern. The purpose of this review is to compare and contrast U.S. and international school-based obesity prevention interventions and highlight efficacious strategies. Methods: A systematic literature review was conducted utilizing five relevant databases. Inclusion criteria were: (1) primary research; (2) overweight or obesity prevention interventions; (3) school-based; (4) studies published between 1 January 2002 through 31 December 2013; (5) published in the English language; (6) child-based interventions, which could include parents; and (7) studies that reported outcome data. Results: A total of 20 interventions met the inclusion criteria. Ten interventions each were implemented in the U.S. and internationally. International interventions only targeted elementary-aged students, were less likely to target low-income populations, and were less likely to be implemented for two or more years in duration. However, they were more likely to integrate an environmental component when compared to U.S. interventions. Discussion: Interventions implemented in the U.S. and internationally resulted in successful outcomes, including positive changes in student BMI. Yet, varying approaches were used to achieve success, reinforcing the fact that a one-size-fits-all approach is not necessary to impact childhood obesity. However, building on successful interventions, future school-based obesity prevention interventions should integrate culturally specific intervention strategies, aim to incorporate an environmental component, and include parents whenever possible. Consideration should be given to the potential impact of long-term, frequent dosage interventions, and subsequent follow-up should be given attention to determine long-term efficacy. PMID:25170684

  17. Effectiveness of Weight Loss Interventions for Obese Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Felix, Holly C.; West, Delia S.

    2012-01-01

    Objective The consequences of obesity among older adults are significant, yet few obesity interventions target this group. Unfamiliarity with weight loss intervention effectiveness and concerns that weight loss negatively affects older adults may be inhibiting targeting this group. This paper reviews the evidence on intentional weight loss and effective weight loss interventions for obese older adults to help dispel concerns and guide health promotion practice. Data Source PubMed articles. Study Inclusion and Exclusion Criteria Randomized controlled trials examining behavioral and pharmaceutical weight loss strategies with 1-year follow-up targeting obese (body mass index ≥30) older adults (mean age ≥60 years), and studies with quasi-experimental designs examining surgical weight loss strategies targeting older adults were examined. Data Extraction Abstracts were reviewed for study objective relevancy, with relevant articles extracted and reviewed. Data Synthesis Data were inserted into an analysis matrix. Results Evidence indicates behavioral strategies are effective in producing significant (all p < .05) weight loss without significant risk to obese older adults, but effectiveness evidence for surgical and pharmaceutical strategies for obese older adults is lacking, primarily because this group has not been targeted in trials or analyses did not isolate this group. Conclusion These findings support the promotion of intentional weight loss among obese older adults and provide guidance to health promotion practitioners on effective weight loss interventions to use with this group. PMID:23286596

  18. Effectiveness of weight loss interventions for obese older adults.

    PubMed

    Felix, Holly C; West, Delia S

    2013-01-01

    The consequences of obesity among older adults are significant, yet few obesity interventions target this group. Unfamiliarity with weight loss intervention effectiveness and concerns that weight loss negatively affects older adults may be inhibiting targeting this group. This paper reviews the evidence on intentional weight loss and effective weight loss interventions for obese older adults to help dispel concerns and guide health promotion practice. PubMed articles. Randomized controlled trials examining behavioral and pharmaceutical weight loss strategies with 1-year follow-up targeting obese (body mass index ≥ 30) older adults (mean age ≥ 60 years), and studies with quasi-experimental designs examining surgical weight loss strategies targeting older adults were examined. Abstracts were reviewed for study objective relevancy, with relevant articles extracted and reviewed. Data were inserted into an analysis matrix. Evidence indicates behavioral strategies are effective in producing significant (all p < .05) weight loss without significant risk to obese older adults, but effectiveness evidence for surgical and pharmaceutical strategies for obese older adults is lacking, primarily because this group has not been targeted in trials or analyses did not isolate this group. These findings support the promotion of intentional weight loss among obese older adults and provide guidance to health promotion practitioners on effective weight loss interventions to use with this group.

  19. Evidence-based lifestyle interventions for obesity and Type 2 diabetes: The Look AHEAD intensive lifestyle intervention as exemplar.

    PubMed

    West, Delia Smith; Coulon, Sandra M; Monroe, Courtney M; Wilson, Dawn K

    2016-10-01

    The majority of individuals with Type 2 diabetes (T2D) are overweight or obese, and this excess adiposity negatively impacts cardiovascular risk and contributes to challenges in disease management. Treatment of obesity by behavioral lifestyle intervention, within the context of diabetes, produces broad and clinically meaningful health improvements, and recent studies demonstrate long-term sustained weight management success with behavioral lifestyle interventions. Details of the Look AHEAD intensive lifestyle intervention are provided as an exemplar approach to the secondary prevention of T2D and obesity. The presence of behavior change expertise in the development and delivery of evidence-based behavioral weight control is discussed, and issues of adaptation and dissemination are raised, with a model to guide these important steps provided. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  20. Comparing Active Pediatric Obesity Treatments Using Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilles, Allyson; Cassano, Michael; Shepherd, Elizabeth J.; Higgins, Diana; Hecker, Jeffrey E.; Nangle, Douglas W.

    2008-01-01

    The current meta-analysis reviews research on the treatment of pediatric obesity focusing on studies that have been published since 1994. Eleven studies (22 comparisons, 115 effect sizes, N = 447) were included in the present meta-analysis. Results indicated that comprehensive behavioral interventions may be improved in at least two ways:…

  1. Comparing Active Pediatric Obesity Treatments Using Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilles, Allyson; Cassano, Michael; Shepherd, Elizabeth J.; Higgins, Diana; Hecker, Jeffrey E.; Nangle, Douglas W.

    2008-01-01

    The current meta-analysis reviews research on the treatment of pediatric obesity focusing on studies that have been published since 1994. Eleven studies (22 comparisons, 115 effect sizes, N = 447) were included in the present meta-analysis. Results indicated that comprehensive behavioral interventions may be improved in at least two ways:…

  2. [Family intervention for the management of overweight and obesity in schoolchildren].

    PubMed

    González-Heredia, Ricardo; Castañeda-Sánchez, Oscar; López-Morales, Cruz Mónica; Brito-Zurita, Olga Rosa; Sabag-Ruize, Enrique

    2014-01-01

    The management of obesity is complex and it must be multidisciplinary. Behavioral treatments for control of childhood obesity are based on family; these have a high degree of efficiency. It has been argued that when children and their parents are the main goal of the changes of behavior as a group, results of weight loss generally are better. The objective of this study was to establish the effect of an intervention based on family to reduce weight in students with overweight or obesity. Quasi-experimental study in schoolchildren from 6 to 12 years of age, from a family medicine unit in Ciudad Obregón, Sonora, México. The intervention group corresponded to 30 schoolchildren with overweight or obesity, and one or both of their parents with overweight or obesity; the control group included 30 schoolchildren with overweight or obesity, and normal-weight parents. Weight, height and body mass index (BMI) were measured at baseline, monthly, and at the end of the study. Student t test was used to contrast quantitative variables using the SPSS v.15 program. There were differences in weight, but not in BMI, probably due to the effect of size. Compared with the control group, a higher proportion of schoolchildren showed an improvement with regard to nutritional status. The family intervention is basic for the treatment of overweight and obesity in schoolchildren.

  3. Treatment of Childhood Obesity: A Systematic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Staniford, Leanne J.; Breckon, Jeff D.; Copeland, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    Childhood obesity trends have increased dramatically over the past three decade's. The purpose of this quantitative systematic review is to provide an update of the evidence, illustrating the efficacy of childhood obesity treatment, considering whether treatment fidelity has been measured and/or reported and whether this related to the treatment…

  4. Treatment of Childhood Obesity: A Systematic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Staniford, Leanne J.; Breckon, Jeff D.; Copeland, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    Childhood obesity trends have increased dramatically over the past three decade's. The purpose of this quantitative systematic review is to provide an update of the evidence, illustrating the efficacy of childhood obesity treatment, considering whether treatment fidelity has been measured and/or reported and whether this related to the treatment…

  5. Pediatric obesity: Causes, symptoms, prevention and treatment.

    PubMed

    Xu, Shumei; Xue, Ying

    2016-01-01

    , and mitochondrial uncoupling proteins, are known to affect body weight. These molecules serve as potential targets for the pharmacological manipulation of obesity. Sibutramine and orlistat are primariliy used for the treatment of adult obesity, which produces modest weight loss, of 3-8% compared to placebo. For children and obese adolescents, metformin is used in the case of insulin resistance and hyperinsulinemia. Octreotide is used for hypothalamic obesity. Bariatric surgery is performed for the treatment of severe childhood obesity. The causes, symptoms, prevention and treatment of pediatric obesity are described in the present review.

  6. Pediatric obesity: Causes, symptoms, prevention and treatment

    PubMed Central

    XU, SHUMEI; XUE, YING

    2016-01-01

    , and mitochondrial uncoupling proteins, are known to affect body weight. These molecules serve as potential targets for the pharmacological manipulation of obesity. Sibutramine and orlistat are primariliy used for the treatment of adult obesity, which produces modest weight loss, of 3–8% compared to placebo. For children and obese adolescents, metformin is used in the case of insulin resistance and hyperinsulinemia. Octreotide is used for hypothalamic obesity. Bariatric surgery is performed for the treatment of severe childhood obesity. The causes, symptoms, prevention and treatment of pediatric obesity are described in the present review. PMID:26834850

  7. Update on Treatment Strategies for Obesity

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Obesity is a disease that is defined as the accumulation of excessive amounts of body fat and is associated with increased risk of serious illness, disability, and death. In clinical practice, obesity is best assessed by calculating body mass index and measuring waist circumference. Treatment options are determined based on the body mass index, waist circumference, and adverse health consequences the patient is experiencing or is at an increased risk for facing in the future. Today, overweight and obesity impacts the majority of patients we treat in our clinical practices. Although endocrinologists are uniquely positioned to treat one of the major consequences of our current obesity epidemic, type 2 diabetes, we also need to be positioned and prepared to effectively treat one of its major causes—obesity. Type 2 diabetes and obesity are very much intertwined. Treatment of each disease affects the other. For these reasons, endocrinologists need to be experts in the treatment of obesity as well as diabetes. They should keep up with advances in obesity treatment including lifestyle, pharmaceutical, and surgical strategies. These strategies offer opportunities for improving the overall treatment for our obese patients today and will continue to improve and expand over the next decade. PMID:23443815

  8. Lifestyle Triple P: a parenting intervention for childhood obesity.

    PubMed

    Gerards, Sanne M P L; Dagnelie, Pieter C; Jansen, Maria W J; van der Goot, Lidy O H M; de Vries, Nanne K; Sanders, Matthew R; Kremers, Stef P J

    2012-04-03

    Reversing the obesity epidemic requires the development and evaluation of childhood obesity intervention programs. Lifestyle Triple P is a parent-focused group program that addresses three topics: nutrition, physical activity, and positive parenting. Australian research has established the efficacy of Lifestyle Triple P, which aims to prevent excessive weight gain in overweight and obese children. The aim of the current randomized controlled trial is to assess the effectiveness of the Lifestyle Triple P intervention when applied to Dutch parents of overweight and obese children aged 4-8 years. This effectiveness study is called GO4fit. Parents of overweight and obese children are being randomized to either the intervention or the control group. Those assigned to the intervention condition receive the 14-week Lifestyle Triple P intervention, in which they learn a range of nutritional, physical activity and positive parenting strategies. Parents in the control group receive two brochures, web-based tailored advice, and suggestions for exercises to increase active playing at home. Measurements are taken at baseline, directly after the intervention, and at one year follow-up. Primary outcome measure is the children's body composition, operationalized as BMI z-score, waist circumference, and fat mass (biceps and triceps skinfolds). Secondary outcome measures are children's dietary behavior and physical activity level, parenting practices, parental feeding style, parenting style, parental self-efficacy, and body composition of family members (parents and siblings). Our intervention is characterized by a focus on changing general parenting styles, in addition to focusing on changing specific parenting practices, as obesity interventions typically do. Strengths of the current study are the randomized design, the long-term follow-up, and the broad range of both self-reported and objectively measured outcomes. Current Controlled Trials NTR 2555 MEC AZM/UM: NL 31988

  9. Lifestyle Triple P: a parenting intervention for childhood obesity

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Reversing the obesity epidemic requires the development and evaluation of childhood obesity intervention programs. Lifestyle Triple P is a parent-focused group program that addresses three topics: nutrition, physical activity, and positive parenting. Australian research has established the efficacy of Lifestyle Triple P, which aims to prevent excessive weight gain in overweight and obese children. The aim of the current randomized controlled trial is to assess the effectiveness of the Lifestyle Triple P intervention when applied to Dutch parents of overweight and obese children aged 4–8 years. This effectiveness study is called GO4fit. Methods/Design Parents of overweight and obese children are being randomized to either the intervention or the control group. Those assigned to the intervention condition receive the 14-week Lifestyle Triple P intervention, in which they learn a range of nutritional, physical activity and positive parenting strategies. Parents in the control group receive two brochures, web-based tailored advice, and suggestions for exercises to increase active playing at home. Measurements are taken at baseline, directly after the intervention, and at one year follow-up. Primary outcome measure is the children’s body composition, operationalized as BMI z-score, waist circumference, and fat mass (biceps and triceps skinfolds). Secondary outcome measures are children’s dietary behavior and physical activity level, parenting practices, parental feeding style, parenting style, parental self-efficacy, and body composition of family members (parents and siblings). Discussion Our intervention is characterized by a focus on changing general parenting styles, in addition to focusing on changing specific parenting practices, as obesity interventions typically do. Strengths of the current study are the randomized design, the long-term follow-up, and the broad range of both self-reported and objectively measured outcomes. Trial Registration

  10. Family-focused physical activity, diet, and obesity interventions in African American girls: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Barr-Anderson, Daheia J.; Adams-Wynn, Alexis W.; DiSantis, Katherine I.; Kumanyika, Shiriki

    2012-01-01

    Obesity interventions that involve family members may be effective with racial/ethnic minority youth. This review assessed the nature and effectiveness of family involvement in obesity interventions among African American girls aged 5–18 years, a population group with high rates of obesity. Twenty-six databases were searched between January 2011 and March 2012, yielding 27 obesity pilot or full-length prevention or treatment studies with some degree of family involvement and data specific to African American girls. Interventions varied in type and level of family involvement, cultural adaptation, delivery format, and behavior change intervention strategies; most targeted parent-child dyads. Some similarities in approach based on family involvement were identified. The use of theoretical perspectives specific to African American family dynamics was absent. Across all studies, effects on weight-related behaviors were generally promising but often non-significant. Similar conclusions were drawn for weight-related outcomes among the full-length randomized controlled trials. Many strategies appeared promising on face value, but available data do not permit inferences about whether or how best to involve family members in obesity prevention and treatment interventions with African American girls. Study designs that directly compare different types and levels of family involvement and incorporate relevant theoretical elements may be an important next step. PMID:23057473

  11. What Works for the Prevention and Treatment of Obesity among Children: Lessons from Experimental Evaluations of Programs and Interventions. Fact Sheet. Publication #2010-07

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hadley, Alena M.; Hair, Elizabeth C.; Dreisbach, Nicole

    2010-01-01

    Childhood obesity has become a major health problem. Approximately 17 percent of U.S. children six to 17 years of age are obese--that is, their sex-and-age-specific Body Mass Index (BMI) is at or above the 95th percentile. This proportion is two-and-a-half times higher than it was 25 years ago. Obesity during childhood often carries into…

  12. What Works for the Prevention and Treatment of Obesity among Children: Lessons from Experimental Evaluations of Programs and Interventions. Fact Sheet. Publication #2010-07

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hadley, Alena M.; Hair, Elizabeth C.; Dreisbach, Nicole

    2010-01-01

    Childhood obesity has become a major health problem. Approximately 17 percent of U.S. children six to 17 years of age are obese--that is, their sex-and-age-specific Body Mass Index (BMI) is at or above the 95th percentile. This proportion is two-and-a-half times higher than it was 25 years ago. Obesity during childhood often carries into…

  13. New Perspectives on Health Disparities and Obesity Interventions in Youth

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Objective This article reviews intervention studies that address health disparities and the increasing rate of obesity in minority youth. The review focuses on interventions that target obesity-related behaviors (diet, physical activity, sedentary behaviors) and adiposity outcomes (body mass index) in minority children and adolescents. Methods A conceptual framework is presented that integrates ecological, cultural, social, and cognitive approaches to reducing obesity in ethnically diverse youth. The review highlights effective interventions in minority youth and distinguishes between culturally targeted and culturally tailored components. Results A limited number of studies have been conducted that target obesity-related behaviors and adiposity outcomes in minority youth. The most successful interventions for minority youth have incorporated culturally targeted and culturally tailored intervention components using multi-systemic approaches. Conclusions Further research is needed that focuses on testing the efficacy of theoretically based approaches that integrate culturally appropriate program elements for improving obesity-related behaviors and adiposity outcomes in minority youth. PMID:19223277

  14. Obesity-related cardiovascular risk factors: intervention recommendations to decrease adolescent obesity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calderon, Kristine S.; Yucha, Carolyn B.; Schaffer, Susan D.

    2005-01-01

    The incidence of adolescent obesity is increasing dramatically in the United States with associated risks of hypertension, adverse lipid profiles, and Type II diabetes. Unless reversed, this trend predicts an epidemic of adult cardiovascular disease. Interventions at home, at school, and in the community are required to empower teens to increase physical activity and to modify eating habits. This article describes assessment for obesity-related health problems as well as scientific guidelines and research-based intervention strategies to decrease obesity in adolescents.

  15. Obesity-related cardiovascular risk factors: intervention recommendations to decrease adolescent obesity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calderon, Kristine S.; Yucha, Carolyn B.; Schaffer, Susan D.

    2005-01-01

    The incidence of adolescent obesity is increasing dramatically in the United States with associated risks of hypertension, adverse lipid profiles, and Type II diabetes. Unless reversed, this trend predicts an epidemic of adult cardiovascular disease. Interventions at home, at school, and in the community are required to empower teens to increase physical activity and to modify eating habits. This article describes assessment for obesity-related health problems as well as scientific guidelines and research-based intervention strategies to decrease obesity in adolescents.

  16. Obesity in IBD: epidemiology, pathogenesis, disease course and treatment outcomes.

    PubMed

    Singh, Siddharth; Dulai, Parambir S; Zarrinpar, Amir; Ramamoorthy, Sonia; Sandborn, William J

    2017-02-01

    Incidence of IBD is rising in parallel with overweight and obesity. Contrary to conventional belief, about 15-40% of patients with IBD are obese, which might contribute to the development of IBD. Findings from cross-sectional and retrospective cohort studies are conflicting on the effect of obesity on natural history and course of IBD. Most studies are limited by small sample size, low event rates, non-validated assessment of disease activity and lack robust longitudinal follow-up and have incomplete adjustment for confounding factors. The effect of obesity on the efficacy of IBD-related therapy remains to be studied, though data from other autoimmune diseases suggests that obesity results in suboptimal response to therapy, potentially by promoting rapid clearance of biologic agents leading to low trough concentrations. These data provide a rationale for using weight loss interventions as adjunctive therapy in patients with IBD who are obese. Obesity also makes colorectal surgery technically challenging and might increase the risk of perioperative complications. In this Review, we highlight the existing literature on the epidemiology of obesity in IBD, discuss its plausible role in disease pathogenesis and effect on disease course and treatment response, and identify high-priority areas of future research.

  17. Obesity in IBD: epidemiology, pathogenesis, disease course and treatment outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Siddharth; Dulai, Parambir S.; Zarrinpar, Amir; Ramamoorthy, Sonia; Sandborn, William J.

    2017-01-01

    Incidence of IBD is rising in parallel with overweight and obesity. Contrary to conventional belief, about 15–40% of patients with IBD are obese, which might contribute to the development of IBD. Findings from cross-sectional and retrospective cohort studies are conflicting on the effect of obesity on natural history and course of IBD. Most studies are limited by small sample size, low event rates, non-validated assessment of disease activity and lack robust longitudinal follow-up and have incomplete adjustment for confounding factors. The effect of obesity on the efficacy of IBD-related therapy remains to be studied, though data from other autoimmune diseases suggests that obesity results in suboptimal response to therapy, potentially by promoting rapid clearance of biologic agents leading to low trough concentrations. These data provide a rationale for using weight loss interventions as adjunctive therapy in patients with IBD who are obese. Obesity also makes colorectal surgery technically challenging and might increase the risk of perioperative complications. In this Review, we highlight the existing literature on the epidemiology of obesity in IBD, discuss its plausible role in disease pathogenesis and effect on disease course and treatment response, and identify high-priority areas of future research. PMID:27899815

  18. Treatment of obesity hypoventilation syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wheatley, Iain

    2015-12-16

    Aside from being a health concern in itself, obesity can result in other serious health conditions. Some of these, such as cancer, can result in early death, while others, including sleep-disordered respiratory problems, can compromise patients' day-to-day quality of life and economic status. This article explores how obesity affects respiratory disorders and focuses on obesity hypoventilation syndrome. It outlines the pathophysiology and diagnosis of the condition, and explains how it can be treated with non-invasive ventilation.

  19. An Evaluation Framework for Obesity Prevention Policy Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Sommers, Janice; Vu, Maihan; Jernigan, Jan; Payne, Gayle; Thompson, Diane; Heiser, Claire; Farris, Rosanne; Ammerman, Alice

    2012-01-01

    As the emphasis on preventing obesity has grown, so have calls for interventions that extend beyond individual behaviors and address changes in environments and policies. Despite the need for policy action, little is known about policy approaches that are most effective at preventing obesity. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and others are funding the implementation and evaluation of new obesity prevention policies, presenting a distinct opportunity to learn from these practice-based initiatives and build the body of evidence-based approaches. However, contributions from this policy activity are limited by the incomplete and inconsistent evaluation data collected on policy processes and outcomes. We present a framework developed by the CDC-funded Center of Excellence for Training and Research Translation that public health practitioners can use to evaluate policy interventions and identify the practice-based evidence needed to fill the gaps in effective policy approaches to obesity prevention. PMID:22742594

  20. An evaluation framework for obesity prevention policy interventions.

    PubMed

    Leeman, Jennifer; Sommers, Janice; Vu, Maihan; Jernigan, Jan; Payne, Gayle; Thompson, Diane; Heiser, Claire; Farris, Rosanne; Ammerman, Alice

    2012-01-01

    As the emphasis on preventing obesity has grown, so have calls for interventions that extend beyond individual behaviors and address changes in environments and policies. Despite the need for policy action, little is known about policy approaches that are most effective at preventing obesity. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and others are funding the implementation and evaluation of new obesity prevention policies, presenting a distinct opportunity to learn from these practice-based initiatives and build the body of evidence-based approaches. However, contributions from this policy activity are limited by the incomplete and inconsistent evaluation data collected on policy processes and outcomes. We present a framework developed by the CDC-funded Center of Excellence for Training and Research Translation that public health practitioners can use to evaluate policy interventions and identify the practice-based evidence needed to fill the gaps in effective policy approaches to obesity prevention.

  1. [REBOUND EFFECT OF INTERVENTION PROGRAMS TO REDUCE OVERWEIGHT AND OBESITY IN CHILDREN AND ADOLESCENTS; SYSTEMATIC REVIEW].

    PubMed

    Aguilar Cordero, María José; Ortegón Piñero, Alberto; Baena García, Laura; Noack Segovia, Jessica Pamela; Levet Hernández, María Cristina; Sánchez López, Antonio Manuel

    2015-12-01

    studies show that overweight and obesity are the result of a complex interaction between genetic and environmental factors that begins prenatally. In evidence of this relationship the potential impact of prenatal nutrition experience in the development of the endocrine and neuroendocrine systems that regulate energy balance, with special emphasis on leptin, an adipocytederived hormone. Different authors relate the risk of obesity with rapid weight gain in the first years of life. Breastfeeding children have a lower degree of abdominal adiposity and, therefore, lower waist circumference. Similarly, it has been associated with exclusively breastfeeding with a slower weight gain rate of about 20 %. In the study of obesity, a rebound effect is considered when the child recovers its initial weight a year after finishing the procedure. This problem is common, therefore family intervention is essential in order to achieve the child's motivation to lead a healthy life. For this review we have selected studies to evaluate interventions of medium and long term in childhood obesity, ensuring adherence to treatment and the rebound effect, once the intervention ended. to review studies examining the rebound effect and adherence to weight loss treatments for children and adolescents with overweight and obesity. the systematic review was prepared following the PRISMA guidelines. Are selected 19 studies related to the proposed issue. several authors have established the beneficial short and long term effects of interventions that combine diet and physical activity among obese children. These results show the importance of multidisciplinary treatment programs for childhood obesity, emphasizing its encouraging longterm effects. there are studies were the rebound effect in short duration programs is evident. During interventions it is significantly reduced BMI, but then increased quickly to reach even higher levels initial weight. The most effective type of actions tend to be those

  2. Three Interventions That Reduce Childhood Obesity Are Projected To Save More Than They Cost To Implement.

    PubMed

    Gortmaker, Steven L; Wang, Y Claire; Long, Michael W; Giles, Catherine M; Ward, Zachary J; Barrett, Jessica L; Kenney, Erica L; Sonneville, Kendrin R; Afzal, Amna Sadaf; Resch, Stephen C; Cradock, Angie L

    2015-11-01

    Policy makers seeking to reduce childhood obesity must prioritize investment in treatment and primary prevention. We estimated the cost-effectiveness of seven interventions high on the obesity policy agenda: a sugar-sweetened beverage excise tax; elimination of the tax subsidy for advertising unhealthy food to children; restaurant menu calorie labeling; nutrition standards for school meals; nutrition standards for all other food and beverages sold in schools; improved early care and education; and increased access to adolescent bariatric surgery. We used systematic reviews and a microsimulation model of national implementation of the interventions over the period 2015-25 to estimate their impact on obesity prevalence and their cost-effectiveness for reducing the body mass index of individuals. In our model, three of the seven interventions--excise tax, elimination of the tax deduction, and nutrition standards for food and beverages sold in schools outside of meals--saved more in health care costs than they cost to implement. Each of the three interventions prevented 129,000-576,000 cases of childhood obesity in 2025. Adolescent bariatric surgery had a negligible impact on obesity prevalence. Our results highlight the importance of primary prevention for policy makers aiming to reduce childhood obesity. Project HOPE—The People-to-People Health Foundation, Inc.

  3. School-based obesity prevention interventions: practicalities and considerations.

    PubMed

    Jones, R A; Lubans, D R; Morgan, P J; Okely, A D; Parletta, N; Wolfenden, L; de Silva-Sanigorski, A; Gibbs, L; Waters, E

    2014-01-01

    Pediatric obesity continues to be a major public health concern. Once established it is difficult to treat, therefore well-designed and evaluated prevention interventions are vitally important. Schools have an important role in the prevention of childhood obesity, however, their involvement can be limited by a number of constraints and barriers, which need to be considered when designing interventions. Members of the Prevention Stream of the Australasian Child and Adolescent Obesity Research Network have extensive experience in implementing and evaluating school-based obesity prevention initiatives. Based on their collective experience and evidence from implementation research, the aim of this paper was to highlight six areas to consider when designing, implementing and evaluating obesity prevention initiatives in schools. Further, this paper aimed to provide guidance for overcoming some of the challenges and barriers faced in school-based obesity prevention research. The six key areas discussed include: design and analysis; school-community engagement; planning and recruitment; evaluation; implementation; and feedback and sustainability. Copyright © 2013 Asian Oceanian Association for the Study of Obesity. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Inclusion of peers in a school-based obesity intervention

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The increasing prevalence of childhood obesity and the comorbid health problems highlight a pressing need to identify effective treatments that address this public health problem during the childhood years. The current study evaluated a school-based pediatric obesity program for middle-school childr...

  5. School-based obesity prevention intervention in Chilean children: effective in controlling, but not reducing obesity.

    PubMed

    Kain, Juliana; Concha, Fernando; Moreno, Lorena; Leyton, Bárbara

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of a 12-month multicomponent obesity prevention intervention. Setting. 9 elementary schools in Santiago, Chile. Subjects. 6-8 y old low-income children (N = 1474). Randomized controlled study; 5 intervention/4 control schools. We trained teachers to deliver nutrition contents and improve the quality of PE classes. We determined % healthy snacks brought from home, children's nutrition knowledge, nutritional status, duration of PE classes, and % time in moderate/vigorous activity (MVA). Effectiveness was determined by comparing Δ BMI Z between intervention and control children using PROCMIXED. % obesity increased in boys from both types of schools and in girls from control schools, while decreasing in girls from intervention schools (all nonsignificant). % class time in MVA declined (24.5-16.2) while remaining unchanged (24.8-23.7%) in classes conducted by untrained and trained teachers, respectively. In boys, BMI Z declined (1.33-1.24) and increased (1.22-1.35) in intervention and control schools, respectively. In girls, BMI Z remained unchanged in intervention schools, while increasing significantly in control schools (0.91-1.06, P = 0.024). Interaction group ∗ time was significant for boys (P < 0.0001) and girls (P = 0.004). This intervention was effective in controlling obesity, but not preventing it. Even though impact was small, results showed that when no intervention is implemented, obesity increases.

  6. School-Based Obesity Prevention Intervention in Chilean Children: Effective in Controlling, but not Reducing Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Kain, Juliana; Concha, Fernando; Moreno, Lorena; Leyton, Bárbara

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the effectiveness of a 12-month multicomponent obesity prevention intervention. Setting. 9 elementary schools in Santiago, Chile. Subjects. 6–8 y old low-income children (N = 1474). Design. Randomized controlled study; 5 intervention/4 control schools. We trained teachers to deliver nutrition contents and improve the quality of PE classes. We determined % healthy snacks brought from home, children's nutrition knowledge, nutritional status, duration of PE classes, and % time in moderate/vigorous activity (MVA). Effectiveness was determined by comparing Δ BMI Z between intervention and control children using PROCMIXED. Results. % obesity increased in boys from both types of schools and in girls from control schools, while decreasing in girls from intervention schools (all nonsignificant). % class time in MVA declined (24.5–16.2) while remaining unchanged (24.8–23.7%) in classes conducted by untrained and trained teachers, respectively. In boys, BMI Z declined (1.33–1.24) and increased (1.22–1.35) in intervention and control schools, respectively. In girls, BMI Z remained unchanged in intervention schools, while increasing significantly in control schools (0.91–1.06, P = 0.024). Interaction group ∗ time was significant for boys (P < 0.0001) and girls (P = 0.004). Conclusions. This intervention was effective in controlling obesity, but not preventing it. Even though impact was small, results showed that when no intervention is implemented, obesity increases. PMID:24872892

  7. Family-Based Interventions Targeting Childhood Obesity: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Everts, Jessie C.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background: With the rising prevalence of childhood obesity over the last several decades, and the call for more family-based intervention research to combat childhood obesity, it is important to examine the extant research on family-based interventions in order to make recommendations and improve future research. Objective: To conduct a meta-analysis of family-based interventions targeting childhood obesity in the last decade in order to inform the research in the next decade. Methods: A literature review was conducted between December 2009-April 2010. Studies published between the years 2000–2009 that used family-based interventions to treat childhood obesity were included. A total of 20 studies met inclusionary criteria. Results: Although results varied by study design, the majority of studies had a moderate to large effect size for change in the target child's BMI (BMI percentile, zBMI, percent overweight) after participating in a family-based intervention. Long-term change varied by study, but the majority of studies produced sustainable change in child BMI, although smaller effect sizes. Change in secondary variables (dietary intake, sugar-sweetened beverage intake, physical activity) were substantially different between studies and are reported as trends. Conclusion: To date, there is preliminary evidence suggesting that family-based interventions targeting childhood obesity are successful in producing weight loss in the short and long-term. Including families in weight loss treatment of obese children warrants further implementation and study. Limitations with the research, recommendations for future research, and implications for practitioners working with overweight/obese children are discussed. PMID:26182126

  8. Effectiveness of lifestyle interventions for individuals with severe obesity and type 2 diabetes

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Rates of severe obesity (BMI greater than or equal to 40 kg/m(2)) are on the rise, and effective treatment options are needed. We examined the effect of an intensive lifestyle intervention (ILI) on weight loss, cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk, and program adherence in participants with type 2 diab...

  9. Effectiveness of lifestyle interventions for individuals with severe obesity and type 2 diabetes

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    OBJECTIVEdRates of severe obesity (BMI$40 kg/m2) are on the rise, and effective treatment options are needed.We examined the effect of an intensive lifestyle intervention (ILI) on weight loss, cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk, and program adherence in participants with type 2 diabetes who were seve...

  10. Gut hormones: the future of obesity treatment?

    PubMed Central

    McGavigan, Anne K; Murphy, Kevin G

    2012-01-01

    Obesity is a major worldwide health problem. The treatment options are severely limited. The development of novel anti-obesity drugs is fraught with efficacy and safety issues. Consequently, several investigational anti-obesity drugs have failed to gain marketing approval in recent years. Anorectic gut hormones offer a potentially safe and viable option for the treatment of obesity. The prospective utility of gut hormones has improved drastically in recent years with the development of longer acting analogues. Additionally, specific combinations of gut hormones have been demonstrated to have additive anorectic effects. This article reviews the current stage of anti-obesity drugs in development, focusing on gut hormone-based therapies. PMID:22452339

  11. Gut hormones: the future of obesity treatment?

    PubMed

    McGavigan, Anne K; Murphy, Kevin G

    2012-12-01

    Obesity is a major worldwide health problem. The treatment options are severely limited. The development of novel anti-obesity drugs is fraught with efficacy and safety issues. Consequently, several investigational anti-obesity drugs have failed to gain marketing approval in recent years. Anorectic gut hormones offer a potentially safe and viable option for the treatment of obesity. The prospective utility of gut hormones has improved drastically in recent years with the development of longer acting analogues. Additionally, specific combinations of gut hormones have been demonstrated to have additive anorectic effects. This article reviews the current stage of anti-obesity drugs in development, focusing on gut hormone-based therapies. © 2012 The Authors. British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology © 2012 The British Pharmacological Society.

  12. Treatment of obesity as a potential complementary approach to cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Sirin, Olga; Kolonin, Mikhail G

    2013-06-01

    Obesity has long been recognized as a risk factor for diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Recent epidemiological data also associate obesity with cancer risk and progression. For this reason, a combination treatment of obesity along with treatment of the cancer itself may improve patient survival and well-being. As the molecular pathways linking obesity and cancer become better understood, new potential therapy targets are surfacing. In this article, we summarize the mechanisms proposed to account for the obesity-cancer association and discuss approaches to manipulation of adipose tissue as potential interventions aimed at cancer prevention or supplemental therapy. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Internet Delivered Behavioral Obesity Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Harvey-Berino, Jean; West, Delia; Krukowski, Rebecca; Prewitt, Elaine; VanBiervliet, Alan; Ashikaga, Takamaru; Skelly, Joan

    2010-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the efficacy of an Internet behavioral weight loss program; and determine if adding periodic in-person sessions to an Internet intervention improves outcomes. Methods 481 healthy overweight adults (28% minority) were randomized to one of 3 delivery methods of a behavioral weight loss program with weekly meetings: Internet (n=160), InPerson (n=159), or Hybrid (Internet+InPerson, n=162). Outcome variables were weight at baseline and 6 months and percent of subjects achieving a 5 and 7% weight loss. The study took place in two centers in Vermont and Arkansas from 2003 to 2008. Results Conditions differed significantly in mean weight loss [8.0 (6.1)kg vs. 5.5 (5.6)kg vs. 6.0 (5.5)kg], for InPerson, Internet, and Hybrid respectively, p<0.01, n=462). Weight loss for InPerson was significantly greater than the Internet and Hybrid conditions (p<0.05). Although the proportion reaching a 5% weight loss did not differ, the proportion losing 7% did differ significantly (56.3% vs. 37.3% vs. 44.4% for InPerson, Internet, and Hybrid respectively, p<0.01). Conclusions These results demonstrate that the Internet is a viable alternative to in-person treatment for the delivery and dissemination of a behavioral weight-control intervention. The addition of periodic in-person sessions did not improve outcomes. PMID:20478333

  14. A community-based behavior modification intervention for childhood obesity.

    PubMed

    Gillis, David; Brauner, Michal; Granot, Esther

    2007-02-01

    Childhood obesity, caused by reduced physical activity and increased food consumption, has reached epidemic proportions. We hypothesized that a single practitioner could enable a child to reduce BMI by educating towards a healthier lifestyle and then reinforcing the message in a structured manner. In this study, intervention group participants and their parents received a half-hour talk on exercise and diet, repeated after 3 months. They were instructed to fill weekly diaries and were called weekly by telephone. Controls received the initial instruction only. Twenty-seven (14 intervention) obese children were recruited. Anthropometric parameters, fitness and biochemical data were collected before intervention and after 6 months in both groups. Sustained but not statistically significant improvements in attitude, BMI SDS and LDL-cholesterol were noted in the intervention group. These promising results support a need for further work to evaluate the efficacy and applicability of our approach in the population at large.

  15. Obesity in Family Practice: Is Treatment Effective?

    PubMed Central

    Sanborn, Margaret D.; Manske, Stephen R.; Schlegel, Ronald P.

    1983-01-01

    Obesity is a common condition which has important effects on health status and longevity. This review examines the efficacy of treatments for both moderate and severe obesity. A plan of treatment combining diet, exercise, and behavioral strategies is outlined. Surgery and its complications are reviewed. Eight management issues, including rate of weight loss, self-help groups, and fringe therapies, are presented. Management recommendations are based on a critical review of the weight loss literature. PMID:21283350

  16. Intervention of childhood and adolescents obesity in Shantou city.

    PubMed

    Guo, Haiting; Zeng, Xiaoshan; Zhuang, Qiaoyu; Zheng, Yubin; Chen, Shenren

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of multicomponent school based intervention constituted of diet modification, regular exercise and psychosocial consultation on body status in overweight and obese children and adolescents. And to come up with an appropriate intervention protocol for controlling children and adolescents obesity in Shantou city. Two schools were randomised to intervention group and control group respectively. A total of 41 students enrolled were diagnosed as overweight or obese. Twenty-six students of the intervention group completed the one-year intervention programme consisted of diet modification, regular exercise and psychological consultation except two of them were transferred to another school. The differences of BMI, anthropometric measures, metabolic profile and the scores of questionnaire and the scale were compared to evaluate the effects of the intervention programme. After one-year intervention, it observed in the intervention group that BMI-Z score, WHR and WHtR had significant improvements, and there was a nonsignificant trend (P=0.053) for a decrease in BMI-P. Fasting plasma glucose, cholesterol (CH) and low-density-lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels in the intervention group showed nonsignificant trend for a decrease (PFPG=0.084, PCH=0.057, PLDLC=0.098), compared with a significant increase of triglycerides (TG) and LDL-C levels in the control group (PTG=0.041, PLDL-C=0.038). There were some positive dietary, physical activity, or sedentary behaviour changes found in the students of the intervention group as the scores of the questionnaire got significant improvement (P=0.04). Our one-year multicomponent school-based intervention programme did have positive effects to some extents on health state and lifestyle behaviour of overweight and obese children and adolescents, which indicated that it is feasible and important to implement such a school-based intervention programme in Shantou city. Copyright © 2014

  17. The caloric calculator: average caloric impact of childhood obesity interventions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y Claire; Hsiao, Amber; Orleans, C Tracy; Gortmaker, Steven L

    2013-08-01

    The childhood obesity epidemic reflects the daily accumulation of an "energy gap"-excess calories consumed over calories expended. Population-level interventions to reverse the epidemic can be assessed by the degree to which they increase energy expenditure and/or reduce caloric intake. However, no common metric exists for such comparative assessment. To develop a common metric, the Average Caloric Impact (ACI), for estimating and comparing population-level effect sizes of a range of childhood obesity interventions. An iterative, collaborative process was used to review literature from 1996 to 2012 and select illustrative interventions showing effects on youth diet and/or activity levels, energy balance, and weight. The ACIs of physical activity interventions were estimated based on program reach, frequency, duration, and intensity and mean body weight of the targeted age and gender group from the 2009-2010 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. ACIs of dietary interventions were based on reach and changes in foods and/or beverages consumed. Fifteen interventions informed by 29 studies were included, ranging from individual behavioral to population-level policies. A web tool, the Caloric Calculator, was developed to allow researchers and policymakers to estimate the ACIs of interventions on target populations with reference to energy gap reductions required to reach the nation's Healthy People childhood obesity goals. The Caloric Calculator and ACIs provide researchers and policymakers with a common metric for estimating the potential effect sizes of various interventions for reducing childhood obesity, providing a platform for evidence-based dialogues on new program or policy approaches as data emerge. Copyright © 2013 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Preventing childhood obesity: Contributions from the social sciences to intervention.

    PubMed

    Lamarque, Muriel; Orden, Alicia Bibiana

    2017-04-01

    Programming and implementation of health policies for the prevention of overweight and obesity have traditionally focused on the dissemination of specific messages identifying healthy foods and pointing out the importance of physical activity. Despite recurrent efforts, the prevalence of obesity in both adult and children populations continues to rise. The configuration of preventive proposals seems to neglect the more complex reality of the eating phenomenon, whose nature goes beyond its biological basis. Behind the presence of overweight or obesity, there are factors that exceed individual behaviors, which are constituted as elements of social order. This premise is based on the contributions made from several fields such as anthropology, sociology, and social epidemiology, especially over the past thirty years. This study aims to analyze the traditional models of institutional intervention while making visible the importance of a socially-oriented perspective that takes into account context and network analysis to address the problem of childhood overweight and obesity, centered on the food component.

  19. Childhood obesity treatment: targeting parents exclusively v. parents and children.

    PubMed

    Golan, Moria; Kaufman, Vered; Shahar, Danit R

    2006-05-01

    There is a consensus that interventions to prevent and treat childhood obesity should involve the family; however, the extent of the child's involvement has received little attention. The goal of the present study was to evaluate the relative efficacy of treating childhood obesity via a family-based health-centred intervention, targeting parents alone v. parents and obese children together. Thirty-two families with obese children of 6-11 years of age were randomised into groups, in which participants were provided for 6 months a comprehensive educational and behavioural programme for a healthy lifestyle. These groups differed in their main agent of change: parents-only v. the parents and the obese child. In both groups, parents were encouraged to foster authoritative parenting styles (parents are both firm and supportive; assume a leadership role in the environmental change with appropriate granting of child's autonomy). Only the intervention aimed at parents-only resulted in a significant reduction in the percentage overweight at the end of the programme (P=0.02) as well as at the 1-year follow-up meeting. The differences between groups at both times were significant (P<0.05). A greater reduction in food stimuli in the home (P<0.05) was noted in the parents-only group. In both groups, the parents' weight status did not change. Regression analysis shows that the level of attendance in sessions explained 28 % of the variability in the children's weight status change, the treatment group explained another 10 %, and the improvement in the obesogenic load explained 11 % of the variability. These results suggest that omitting the obese child from active participation in the health-centred programme may be beneficial for weight loss and for the promotion of a healthy lifestyle among obese children.

  20. A one-way text messaging intervention for obesity.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Ahleum; Choi, Jaekyung

    2016-04-01

    Worldwide, there has been a startling increase in the number of people who are obese or overweight. Obesity increases the risk of cardiovascular disease and overall mortality. Mobile phone messaging is an important means of human communication globally. Because the mobile phone can be used anywhere at any time, mobile phone messaging has the potential to manage obesity. We investigated the effectiveness of a one-way text messaging intervention for obesity. Participants' body mass index and waist circumference were measured at the beginning of the programme and again after 12 weeks. The text message group received text messages about exercise, dietary intake, and general information about obesity three times a week, while the control group did not receive any text messages from the study. Of the 80 participants, 25 subjects in the text message group and 29 participants in the control group completed the study. After adjusting for baseline body mass index, the body mass index was significantly lower in the text message group than in the control group (27.9 vs. 28.3; p = 0.02). After adjusting for the baseline waist circumference, the difference of waist circumference between the text message group and control group was not significant (93.4 vs. 94.6; p = 0.13). The one-way text messaging intervention was a simple and effective way to manage obesity. The one-way text messaging intervention may be a useful method for lifestyle modification in obese subjects. © The Author(s) 2015.

  1. Early dropout predictive factors in obesity treatment.

    PubMed

    Michelini, Ilaria; Falchi, Anna Giulia; Muggia, Chiara; Grecchi, Ilaria; Montagna, Elisabetta; De Silvestri, Annalisa; Tinelli, Carmine

    2014-02-01

    Diet attrition and failure of long term treatment are very frequent in obese patients. This study aimed to identify pre-treatment variables determining dropout and to customise the characteristics of those most likely to abandon the program before treatment, thus making it possible to modify the therapy to increase compliance. A total of 146 outpatients were consecutively enrolled; 73 patients followed a prescriptive diet while 73 followed a novel brief group Cognitive Behavioural Treatment (CBT) in addition to prescriptive diet. The two interventions lasted for six months. Anthropometric, demographic, psychological parameters and feeding behaviour were assessed, the last two with the Italian instrument VCAO Ansisa; than, a semi-structured interview was performed on motivation to lose weight. To identify the baseline dropout risk factors among these parameters, univariate and multivariate logistic models were used. Comparison of the results in the two different treatments showed a higher attrition rate in CBT group, despite no statistically significant difference between the two treatment arms (P = 0.127). Dropout patients did not differ significantly from those who did not dropout with regards to sex, age, Body Mass Index (BMI), history of cycling, education, work and marriage. Regardless of weight loss, the most important factor that determines the dropout appears to be a high level of stress revealed by General Health Questionnaire-28 items (GHQ-28) score within VCAO test. The identification of hindering factors during the assessment is fundamental to reduce the dropout risk. For subjects at risk, it would be useful to dedicate a stress management program before beginning a dietary restriction.

  2. The Treatment of Obesity and Its Co-occurrence with Substance Use Disorders

    PubMed Central

    VanBuskirk, Katherine A.; Potenza, Marc N.

    2010-01-01

    Obesity and binge eating disorder are detrimental health conditions that are associated with lower qualities of life. Individuals with obesity often face societal discrimination and frequently experience related medical disorders such as diabetes, hypertension, and hyperlipidemia. Current research suggests neurobiological similarities between obesity, binge eating disorder, and substance dependence. In addition, behavioral similarities link the two conditions; obese and substance dependent individuals often report similar features such as loss of control towards food or substances, respectively, and cravings. Treatment options for obesity have begun to use this information to formulate pharmacological and therapeutic interventions that may provide greater results for weight loss and decreased binge frequency. Similarly, treatment approaches to substance addictions should consider aspects of weight management. Findings from research and treatment studies are presented with the aim of reviewing the current literature of obesity within the context of an addiction framework and providing information on empirically supported approaches to the treatment of co-occurring obesity and substance addiction. PMID:20228868

  3. Obesity Rates in Special Populations of Children and Potential Interventions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holcomb, Matthew J.; Pufpaff, Lisa A.; McIntosh, David E.

    2009-01-01

    Childhood obesity has become a problem of epidemic proportions in the United States, but much of the research has focused on prevention and intervention programs, which target the general population of school children. Overlooked in the literature are children with special needs (including autism, genetic disorders, Down syndrome, and Prader-Willi…

  4. Obesity Rates in Special Populations of Children and Potential Interventions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holcomb, Matthew J.; Pufpaff, Lisa A.; McIntosh, David E.

    2009-01-01

    Childhood obesity has become a problem of epidemic proportions in the United States, but much of the research has focused on prevention and intervention programs, which target the general population of school children. Overlooked in the literature are children with special needs (including autism, genetic disorders, Down syndrome, and Prader-Willi…

  5. Effects of Integrated Health Management Intervention on Overweight and Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yiting; Ma, Chung Wah; Yang, Yide; Wang, Xiaoling; Lin, Xiaoliang; Fu, Lianguo; Wang, Shuo; Yang, Zhongping; Wang, Zhenghe; Meng, Xiangkun; Ma, Dongmei; Ma, Rui

    2017-01-01

    Overweight or obese adults aged 20~55 years and living in Beijing more than one year were randomly divided into different management groups. A one-year integrated health management intervention was applied in the health management groups. The physical indicators and metabolic indicators changed after one-year intervention on the overweight and obese adults. The annual reduction of the physical indicators was significant in all groups (p < 0.05) except the weight loss in the placebo + general management group. The health management and the dietary supplement have statistically significant (p < 0.001, p < 0.001) effects on the annual reduction of these indicators and interactive effect between them was found on some of these indicators such as bodyweight, body mass index (BMI), body fat ratio (BFR), and hipline (p < 0.05). The dietary supplement + health management group had the best annual reduction effects for the indicators among the groups. Integrated health management interventions including both dietary supplements intervention and health management could improve metabolic indicators in overweight and obese adults together with the physical indicators, suggesting the intermediated role of metabolic indictors in controlling obesity. PMID:28115972

  6. A worksite-based weight loss intervention for obesity prevention

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Worksites are increasingly being used as locations for implementing healthy diet and weight loss interventions. Hence, there is an urgent need to identify programs that are both successful and sustainable. We conducted a 6-month pilot randomized controlled trial in overweight and obese employees a...

  7. Obesity hypoventilation syndrome: therapeutic implications for treatment.

    PubMed

    Piper, Amanda

    2010-02-01

    Obesity hypoventilation syndrome occurs in obese individuals who are unable to compensate for the added load of obesity on the respiratory system, with resultant daytime hypercapnia in the absence of other causes of alveolar hypoventilation. Significant morbidity and mortality is seen in this disorder if appropriate treatment is not undertaken. Unfortunately, the diagnosis is frequently missed despite these individuals being heavy users of healthcare resources. The pathogenesis of obesity hypoventilation syndrome is multifactorial, but reversal of sleep-disordered breathing or significant weight loss improves respiratory function and daytime ventilation. However, a paucity of well-designed clinical trials and the absence of data from long-term follow-up means that comparison between various treatment options is not possible. Consequently, evidence-based treatment guidelines are currently lacking.

  8. [Drug treatment of obesity--current situation and perspectives].

    PubMed

    Hainer, Vojtech

    2010-01-01

    Pharmacotherapy of obesity should be an integral part of the comprehensive obesity management program which includes diet, exercise and cognitive behavioural intervention. Currently available antiobesity drugs result in only modest weight loss, however it is still accompanied by reduction of cardiometabolic health risks. In the past several antiobesity drugs were removed from the market because of serious adverse effects (psychostimulatory, cardiovascular, pulmonary hypertension, valvular disease, depression, addiction etc.). Such situations led some investigators and clinicians to nihilistic approaches to the drug treatment of obesity. This paper aims to review the data on clinical efficiency and safety of currently available antiobesity drugs and to summarize our knowledge on the recently discovered antiobesity agents which underwent clinical trials (such as lorcaserin, tesofensine, cetilistat, combination drugs, gut hormone analogues etc.). Approaches with two drug combination of decreased doses were recommended to increase both safety and efficacy of antiobesity treatment. However, previous experiences that antiobesity drug combinations (e.g. fenfluramine/phentermine) may also potentiate adverse events should be carefully considered in the evaluation of recently tested compounds. Administration of physiological doses of gut hormones - derived appetite regulating agents seems to be a promising, efficient, specific and thus, low side-effect approach in the treatment of obesity. To confirm the strong role of antiobesity drugs in the treatment of obesity and its complications further long-term studies evaluating their effect on morbidity and mortality end points in appropriate target populations are needed.

  9. Family functioning and obesity risk behaviors: implications for early obesity intervention.

    PubMed

    Wen, Li Ming; Simpson, Judy M; Baur, Louise A; Rissel, Chris; Flood, Victoria M

    2011-06-01

    Family functioning is found to be associated with overweight and obesity in childhood, but its association with maternal obesity risk behaviors is not clear. This study aimed to investigate whether family functioning is associated with maternal obesity risk behaviors and to inform the development of early obesity interventions. A total of 408 first-time mothers at 24-34 weeks of pregnancy were included in the study. They participated in the Healthy Beginnings Trial (HBT) conducted in southwest Sydney, Australia in 2008. An analysis of cross-sectional baseline data was conducted using ordinal logistic regression modeling. Key measures were assessed using the McMaster Family Assessment Device, and self-reported obesity risk behaviors including excessive consumption of soft drinks, fast food, and excessive small screen time. The study found that 30% of the study population had a family functioning score ≥2, indicating unhealthy family functioning. About one-third (36%) of the mothers had more than one obesity risk behavior. Mothers with a family functioning score ≥2 were more likely to have more than one obesity risk behavior (47% vs. 32%, P < 0.05) than mothers with a lower score. The proportion of mothers with a family functioning score ≥2 increased from 22% to 29% to 39% as the number of maternal obesity risk behaviors increased from 0 to 1 to 2 or more, giving an adjusted proportional odds ratio (AOR) of 2.0 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.3-3.0, P = 0.001). Family functioning is independently associated with the number of maternal obesity risk behaviors after allowing for the effects of maternal age and education. Overweight and obesity interventions should consider addressing family functioning.

  10. Workplace Interventions to Reduce Obesity and Cardiometabolic Risk

    PubMed Central

    Thorndike, Anne N.

    2012-01-01

    The worksite is ideal for implementing interventions to reduce obesity and cardiometabolic risk factors. Although worksite health promotion is not new, employer-sponsored wellness programs have become more widespread due to the rising prevalence and high cost of obesity. Over the past two decades, employers and researchers focused efforts on individual-based programs to change employees’ nutrition and exercise behaviors, but more recently, the worksite environment has been targeted. Overall, there is good evidence that individual-based worksite programs can produce modest weight loss, but the evidence for effects on other risk factors and on long-term health outcomes and costs is inconsistent. There is less evidence for the benefit of environmental-based interventions, and more data will be needed to establish conclusions about the benefits of these types of interventions. A major challenge for employers and researchers in the future will be to find the balance between effectiveness and economic viability of worksite wellness programs. PMID:22708000

  11. A framework for physician assistant intervention for overweight and obesity.

    PubMed

    Herman, Lawrence; McGinnity, John G; Doll, Michael; Peterson, Eric D; Russell, Amanda; Largay, Joseph

    2015-07-01

    Overweight and obesity compose a chronic disease process of epidemic proportions that presents on a continuum, likely affecting nearly two out of every three patients treated by physician assistants (PAs). However, meaningful and actionable definitions, including but not limited to anthropometric and clinical descriptors, are needed. The effective treatment of overweight and obesity requires an efficient and timely process of screening, diagnosis, evaluation of complications, staging, and clear algorithmic management. PAs are trained as primary care providers and can diagnose and treat overweight and obese patients regardless of practice setting and across the spectrum of the disease and patient's age.

  12. Cognitive and behavioral approaches in the treatment of obesity.

    PubMed

    Van Dorsten, Brent; Lindley, Emily M

    2011-09-01

    The research reviewed within this article provides support for both the cognitive and behavioral components of cognitive behavioral weight-loss interventions. Lifestyle based treatments have produced markedly improved results in the past 20 years, in part attributable to changes in treatment structure. Use of pretreatment participant preparation strategies, extended treatment periods with clearly defined weight-loss goals, combining multiple dietary and physical activity strategies, and increasing emphasis on long-term provider contact and relapse prevention have modestly improved long-term weight maintenance. Several investigators have emphasized the need to incorporate additional cognitive components into the cognitive-behavioral treatment of obesity to improve both short- and long-term outcomes. Furthermore, continued insights into metabolic changes producing an energy gap after weight loss should no doubt continue to refine insights into the behavioral requirements of long-term weight loss. Despite increased awareness and behavioral treatment advances, the worldwide prevalence of obesity and weight-related chronic illnesses continues to expound. Behavioral treatment is inherently challenging and time-consuming, and readily available to only a fraction of the population who may benefit from inclusion. Several investigators have cautioned that individual or small group-based interventions are insufficient to serve the population masses requiring treatment, and that continued development of community or Web-based programs, and community-development tactics to increase healthy lifestyles, are needed. The call has been sounded to conceptualize obesity as a chronic health condition requiring lifelong treatment. As such, the conceptualization of cognitive-behavioral therapies as a one-time treatment is passe´ . As the current number of obesity specialists and behaviorally trained professionals is insufficient to combat this problem; an increased emphasis upon

  13. AMPK as Target for Intervention in Childhood and Adolescent Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Rojas, Joselyn; Arraiz, Nailet; Aguirre, Miguel; Velasco, Manuel; Bermúdez, Valmore

    2011-01-01

    Childhood obesity is a major worldwide health problem. Intervention programs to ameliorate the rate of obesity have been designed and implemented; yet the epidemic has no end near in sight. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) has become one of the most important key elements in energy control, appetite regulation, myogenesis, adipocyte differentiation, and cellular stress management. Obesity is a multifactorial disease, which has a very strong genetic component, especially epigenetic factors. The intrauterine milieu has a determinant impact on adult life, since the measures taken for survival are kept throughout life thanks to epigenetic modification. Nutrigenomics studies the influence of certain food molecules on the metabolome profile, raising the question of an individualized obesity therapy according to metabolic (and probably) genetic features. Metformin, an insulin sensitizing agent, its known to lower insulin resistance and enhance metabolic profile, with an additional weight reduction capacity, via activation of AMPK. Exercise is coadjutant for lifestyle modifications, which also activates AMPK in several ways contributing to glucose and fat oxidation. The following review examines AMPK's role in obesity, applying its use as a tool for childhood and adolescent obesity. PMID:21318055

  14. Mental Health Professionals and Behavioral Interventions for Obesity: A Systematic Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Prost, Stephanie Grace; Ai, Amy L; Ainsworth, Sarah E; Ayers, Jaime

    2016-01-01

    Adult obesity in the United States has risen to epidemic proportions, and mental health professionals must be called to action. The objectives of this article were to (a) synthesize outcomes of behavioral health interventions for adult obesity in recent meta-analyses and systematic reviews (MAs/SRs) as well as randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and further, (b) evaluate the role of mental health professionals in these behavioral health interventions. Articles were included if published in English between January 1, 2004, and May 1, 2014, in peer-reviewed journals examining behavioral health interventions for adults with obesity. Data were subsequently extracted and independently checked by two authors. Included MAs/SRs utilized motivational interviewing, financial incentives, multicomponent behavioral weight management programs, as well as dietary and lifestyle interventions. Behavioral health interventions in randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were discussed across 3 major intervention types (educational, modified caloric intake, cognitive-based). Regarding the 1st study objective, multiple positive primary (e.g., weight loss) and secondary outcomes (e.g., quality of life) were found in both MAs/SRs and RCTs. However, the majority of included studies made no mention of interventionist professional background and little inference could be made regarding the effects of professional background on behavioral health intervention outcomes for adults facing obesity; an important limitation and direction for future research. Future studies should assess the effects of interventionist profession in addition to primary and secondary outcomes for adults facing obesity. Implications for mental health professionals' educational curricula, assessment, and treatment strategies are discussed.

  15. The Obesity-Impulsivity Axis: Potential Metabolic Interventions in Chronic Psychiatric Patients.

    PubMed

    Sfera, Adonis; Osorio, Carolina; Inderias, Luzmin Acosta; Parker, Victoria; Price, Amy I; Cummings, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Pathological impulsivity is encountered in a broad range of psychiatric conditions and is thought to be a risk factor for aggression directed against oneself or others. Recently, a strong association was found between impulsivity and obesity which may explain the high prevalence of metabolic disorders in individuals with mental illness even in the absence of exposure to psychotropic drugs. As the overlapping neurobiology of impulsivity and obesity is being unraveled, the question asked louder and louder is whether they should be treated concomitantly. The treatment of obesity and metabolic dysregulations in chronic psychiatric patients is currently underutilized and often initiated late, making correction more difficult to achieve. Addressing obesity and metabolic dysfunction in a preventive manner may not only lower morbidity and mortality but also the excessive impulsivity, decreasing the risk for aggression. In this review, we take a look beyond psychopharmacological interventions and discuss dietary and physical therapy approaches.

  16. An online tool for obesity intervention and public health.

    PubMed

    Su, Jason G

    2016-02-10

    Though the United States of America (U.S.A.) obesity rate shows signs of leveling off, rates remain high. Poor nutrition contributes to the development of obesity, and physical inactivity is an important cause of numerous diseases and directly linked to obesity. Efforts to improve diet, increase physical activity and pursue other behavioral changes seem imperative. However, the effective management of intervention strategies for large number of participants are challenging because services in primary, secondary, and tertiary cares are often under-resourced, relatively uncoordinated with other parts of the health system. It is thus necessary to have accompanying intervention strategies that can be carried out at population level. In this paper, we describe an online intervention tool designed for the Obesity Prevention Tailored for Health II project to help achieve such goals. The first part of the online tool locates healthy food stores and recreational programs within a specified distance of a participant's home or a place of interest. The food environments include fruit & vegetable stores, farmers' markets and grocery stores, and the companying popup window shows the street address and contact information of each store. The parks and recreational programs are displayed on names of park or recreational program, types of program available, and city each amenity belongs to. The tool also provides spatial coverage of vegetation greenness, air pollution and of historical traffic accidents involving active travel. The second part of the tool provides optimized travel options for reaching various amenities. By incorporating bicycling, walking and public transit into the trip planner, this online tool helps increase active transport and reduce dependence on automobiles. It promotes transportation that encourages safety awareness, physical activity, health, recreation, and resource conservation. We developed the first Google-based online intervention tool that assists

  17. Innovative interventions to promote behavioral change in overweight or obese individuals: A review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Okorodudu, Daniel E; Bosworth, Hayden B; Corsino, Leonor

    2015-05-01

    The overweight and obesity trends have risen over the past few decades, placing significant burdens on health care in terms of increased morbidity and cost. Behavioral change therapy is an effective treatment strategy and includes goal setting, self-monitoring, problem solving, and reinforcement tactics. Traditionally, behavior change therapy has been delivered using face-to-face counseling along with paper and pen recording of dietary intake and physical activity. The current advances in technology provide opportunities to deliver interventions using cellphones, internet, and active video games. These new methods to deliver behavior change for the management and prevention of obesity are being developed in order to increase access, improve convenience, decrease cost, and increase participant engagement. In this review, we present new approaches to promote behavior changes in the management of obesity. Currently available data show promising results. However, future research is needed to address study limitations and implementation challenges of these innovative interventions.

  18. Innovative Interventions to Promote Behavioral Change in Overweight or Obese Individuals: A Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Okorodudu, Daniel E.; Bosworth, Hayden B.; Corsino, Leonor

    2015-01-01

    The overweight and obesity trends have risen over the past few decades placing significant burdens on healthcare in terms of increased morbidity and cost. Behavioral change therapy is an effective treatment strategy and includes goal setting, self-monitoring, problem solving, and reinforcement tactics. Traditionally, behavior change therapy has been delivered using face-to-face counseling along with paper and pen recording of dietary intake and physical activity. The current advances in technology provide opportunities to deliver interventions using cellphones, internet and active video games. These new methods to deliver behavior change for the management and prevention of obesity are being developed in order to increase access, improve convenience, decrease cost and increase participant engagement. In this review, we present new approaches to promote behavior changes in the management of obesity. Currently available data shows promising results. However, future research is needed to address study limitations and implementation challenges of these innovative interventions. PMID:25011006

  19. Surgical treatment of obesity: a review.

    PubMed Central

    Fobi, M. A. L.

    2004-01-01

    Obesity is a chronic disease due to excess fat storage, a genetic predisposition, and strong environmental contributions. This problem is worldwide, and the incidence is increasing daily. There are medical, physical, social, economic, and psychological comorbid conditions associated with obesity. There is no cure for obesity except possibly prevention. Nonsurgical treatment has been inadequate in providing sustained weight loss. Currently, surgery offers the only viable treatment option with longterm weight loss and maintenance for the morbidly obese. Surgeries for weight loss are called bariatric surgeries. There is no one operation that is effective for all patients. Gastric bypass operations are the most common operations currently used. Because there are inherent complications from surgeries, bariatric surgeries should be performed in a multidisciplinary setting. The laparoscopic approach is being used by some surgeons in performing the various operations. The success rate--usually defined as >50% excess weight loss that is maintained for at least five years from bariatric surgery--ranges from 40% in the simple to >70% in the complex operations. The weight loss from surgical treatment results in significant improvements and, in some cases, complete resolution of comorbid conditions associated with obesity. Patients undergoing surgery for obesity need lifelong nutritional supplements and medical monitoring. Images Figure 4 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 14 Figure 15 PMID:14746355

  20. Family-focused physical activity, diet and obesity interventions in African-American girls: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Barr-Anderson, D J; Adams-Wynn, A W; DiSantis, K I; Kumanyika, S

    2013-01-01

    Obesity interventions that involve family members may be effective with racial/ethnic minority youth. This review assessed the nature and effectiveness of family involvement in obesity interventions among African-American girls aged 5-18 years, a population group with high rates of obesity. Twenty-six databases were searched between January 2011 and March 2012, yielding 27 obesity pilot or full-length prevention or treatment studies with some degree of family involvement and data specific to African-American girls. Interventions varied in type and level of family involvement, cultural adaptation, delivery format and behaviour change intervention strategies; most targeted parent-child dyads. Some similarities in approach based on family involvement were identified. The use of theoretical perspectives specific to African-American family dynamics was absent. Across all studies, effects on weight-related behaviours were generally promising but often non-significant. Similar conclusions were drawn for weight-related outcomes among the full-length randomized controlled trials. Many strategies appeared promising on face value, but available data did not permit inferences about whether or how best to involve family members in obesity prevention and treatment interventions with African-American girls. Study designs that directly compare different types and levels of family involvement and incorporate relevant theoretical elements may be an important next step. © 2012 The Authors. obesity reviews © 2012 International Association for the Study of Obesity.

  1. A smartphone intervention for adolescent obesity: study protocol for a randomised controlled non-inferiority trial.

    PubMed

    O'Malley, Grace; Clarke, Mike; Burls, Amanda; Murphy, Sinéad; Murphy, Nuala; Perry, Ivan J

    2014-01-31

    There are few evidence-based mobile health solutions for treating adolescent obesity. The primary aim of this parallel non-inferiority trial is to assess the effectiveness of an experimental smartphone application in reducing obesity at 12 months, compared to the Temple Street W82GO Healthy Lifestyles intervention. The primary outcome measure is change in body mass index standardised deviation score at 12 months. The secondary aim is to compare the effect of treatment on secondary outcomes, including waist circumference, insulin sensitivity, quality of life, physical activity and psychosocial health. Adolescents with a body mass index at or above the 98th percentile (12 to 17 years) will be recruited from the Obesity clinic at Temple Street Children's University Hospital in Dublin, Ireland. W82GO is a family-based lifestyle change intervention delivered in two phases over 12 months. In the current study, participants will be randomised for phase two of treatment to either usual care or care delivered via smartphone application. One hundred and thirty-four participants will be randomised between the two study arms. An intention-to-treat analysis will be used to compare treatment differences between the groups at 12 months. The results of this study will be disseminated via open access publication and will provide important information for clinicians, patients and policy makers regarding the use of mobile health interventions in the management of adolescent obesity. Clinicaltrials.gov NCT01804855.

  2. Systematic review of text messaging as an intervention for adolescent obesity.

    PubMed

    Keating, Sharon R; McCurry, Mary K

    2015-12-01

    Adolescent overweight and obesity is a significant problem for health care with associated quality of life and financial concerns. This systematic review investigated text messaging as an intervention to treat or prevent obesity in adolescent populations. The Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) statement was used as a guideline for the literature search and interpretation of findings. CINAHL, Medline, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, PsycINFO, and SocINDEX were searched using a combination of search terms. The initial 95 articles that met the search criteria were narrowed to seven that fit the focus. Text messaging is acceptable to adolescents as an obesity treatment but data about content and timing of messages vary. The effects of text messaging on body mass index (BMI) were difficult to determine because messaging was often part of a multicomponent intervention. Text messaging as an intervention for adolescent obesity was used in various settings. There were no included studies from primary care settings. Further research is needed to determine the effect of messages on BMI and the most helpful content, timing, and frequency. This information may provide advanced practice nurses with effective, affordable tools to manage adolescent obesity in different settings. ©2015 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  3. Obesity treatment: novel peripheral targets.

    PubMed

    Field, Benjamin C T; Chaudhri, Owais B; Bloom, Stephen R

    2009-12-01

    Our knowledge of the complex mechanisms underlying energy homeostasis has expanded enormously in recent years. Food intake and body weight are tightly regulated by the hypothalamus, brainstem and reward circuits, on the basis both of cognitive inputs and of diverse humoral and neuronal signals of nutritional status. Several gut hormones, including cholecystokinin, glucagon-like peptide-1, peptide YY, oxyntomodulin, amylin, pancreatic polypeptide and ghrelin, have been shown to play an important role in regulating short-term food intake. These hormones therefore represent potential targets in the development of novel anti-obesity drugs. This review focuses on the role of gut hormones in short- and long-term regulation of food intake, and on the current state of development of gut hormone-based obesity therapies.

  4. [Meta-analysis of intervention effects on obesity in Chinese pupils].

    PubMed

    Yang, Gan-ping; Wang, Yi-ren; Zuo, Shuang-yan; Zeng, Xiao-min

    2011-10-01

    To comprehensively evaluate the effect of interventions on obesity in Chinese pupils. A literature research was carried out in China National Knowledge Infrastructure, Wanfang Data, VIP Database for Chinese Technical Periodicals, PubMed and the Excerpts Medica Database (EMBASE) databases to collect articles published between 1979 and 2010 concerning the effect of interventions for preventing obesity in Chinese pupils. Rate difference (RD) of the rate of obesity as the evaluation indicator was selected to Meta-analyze the effect of interventions on obesity. There are total 215 articles, in which 211 articles were written in Chinese and other articles were written in English. 17 literatures were used for Meta-analysis by the uniform inclusion and exclusion criteria. The results showed that the RD of obesity rate for the students in the intervention group was 3% (95%CI: 1% - 5%) after the intervention. However, the RD of obesity rate for the students in the control group was -2% (95%CI: -4% - -1%) after the intervention. Results of stratified analysis for the RD of obesity rate showed that the obesity rate for the students in the intervention group were decreased significantly after the intervention of combined programs with health education, physical exercise and nutrition interventions with moderate intervention time (1 to 2 years), the RD (95%CI) of obesity rate were 5% (2% - 8%), 3% (1% - 4%), respectively. For the studies whose baseline obesity rates was insignificant difference between the intervention group and the control group, the obesity rate for the students in the intervention group was 4% (95%CI: -7% - -1%) lower than the obesity rate for the students in the control group after the intervention. Health-education-based comprehensive intervention is effective on obesity prevention in Chinese pupils; combined intervention programs with moderate intervention time (1 to 2 years) were effective in improving efficiency of obesity prevention in pupils.

  5. Evaluation and Treatment of Severe Obesity in Childhood

    PubMed Central

    Wickham, Edmond P.; DeBoer, Mark D.

    2017-01-01

    Pediatric obesity is highly prevalent in developed countries globally (and worsening in developing countries) and threatens to shorten the lifespan of the current generation. At highest risk for weight-related comorbidities including Type 2 diabetes mellitus, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and dyslipidemia is a sub-set of children with severe obesity, often defined as a body mass index (BMI) percentile ≥99th percentile for age and sex. The pathophysiology of severe obesity in childhood is complex, resulting from the dynamic interplay of a myriad of individual and societal factors including genetic predisposition and health behaviors contributing to energy imbalance. Approximately 4–6% of children have severe obesity, representing a common scenario encountered by providers, and intervention is critical to halt ongoing weight gain and, when possible, reverse the trend. Clinical approaches promoting behavioral weight loss may result in modest, albeit clinically significant, reductions in BMI; however, such changes are often difficult to maintain long-term. Data regarding the impact of targeted pharmacotherapy including agents such as orlistat are limited in the pediatric population and again only suggest modest results. However, increasing evidence suggest that surgical treatment, as an adjunct to ongoing lifestyle changes, may be a promising option in carefully-screened adolescents with severe obesity and weight-related comorbidities who are motivated to adhere to the long-term treatment needs. PMID:25567296

  6. Multifaceted individualities in pharmacological treatments of obesity.

    PubMed

    Boban, Marko

    2013-05-01

    Simply put, there is no cure for obesity. Pharmaceuticals that induce weight loss of extent of at least 5% from baseline are applied and tested as the weight loosing drugs. Available guidelines include recommendations that pharmacologic treatment of obesity may be offered to patients with BMI > 30 kg/m2; or BMI >27 kg/m2 and obesity related comorbidity. Both categories cumulatively include essential boundary condition of failing to achieve clinically significant weight loss through diet and exercise alone. In despite the exceedingly growing number of investigations and approaches, overall achievements in pharmacological treatments of obesity are limited. Antiobesity drugs are typically burdened with issues concerning the sustainability of lost weight, besides limitations in short term efficiency. Another important problem lays in the fact that the drug induced weight loss could be annihilated or reversed if patient does not adhere to personal lifestyle changes. Later include adjustments in behaviour sphere, dietary habits and physical activity. Recently, focus of clinical interests came to prevention of obesity epidemic through optimization of chronic pharmacotherapies, especially ones associated with weight gain side-effect. This review presents the most important representatives of antiobesity drugs and essential principles that ought to be taken in to count in order to treat obesity more successfully.

  7. [Comprehensive treatment of obesity and its prevention].

    PubMed

    Montero, J C; Cúneo, A; Facchini, M; Bressan, J

    2002-01-01

    Obesity is associated to chronic metabolic entities affecting the quality of life and life expectancy. An early treatment, if efficient, can overcome most of the problems. The normalisation of body composition, of energy reserves and their distribution, as well as the minimisation of weight dependent metabolic upsets and the establishment of therapeutic priorities, according to the repercussions of obesity, are important factors for the treatment of this disease. Prevention is important and its basis is teaching and the setting in healthy life style with modification of the food habits and the incorporation of physical work into everyday activities. Diet therapy, physical activity, pharmacotherapy, surgery education and psychology are the forms proposed for the treatment and prevention of obesity.

  8. Incretin-based therapies for obesity treatment.

    PubMed

    de Mello, Aline Haas; Prá, Morgana; Cardoso, Larissa Colonetti; de Bona Schraiber, Rosiane; Rezin, Gislaine Tezza

    2015-09-01

    Currently, obesity and its associated complications are considered major public health problems worldwide. Because the causes are multifactorial and complex, different treatment methods are used, which include diet and exercise, as well as the use of drugs, although they can have adverse side effects. A new target for the treatment of obesity may be the incretin system, which consists of hormones that seem to contribute to weight loss. In this sense, some studies have shown a relationship between weight loss and drugs related to incretin system, including glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) agonists and dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors. The objective of this review is to summarize the association between the incretin system and obesity treatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Worksite environment intervention to prevent obesity among metropolitan transit workers.

    PubMed

    French, Simone A; Harnack, Lisa J; Hannan, Peter J; Mitchell, Nathan R; Gerlach, Anne F; Toomey, Traci L

    2010-04-01

    The results of an 18-month worksite intervention to prevent obesity among metropolitan transit workers are reported. Four garages in a major metropolitan area were randomized to intervention or control groups. Data were collected during the fall of 2005 prior to the start of the intervention and during the fall of 2007, after the intervention ended. Intervention program components at the garage included enhancement of the physical activity facilities, increased availability of and lower prices on healthy vending machine choices, and group behavioral programs. Mixed model estimates from cross-sectional and cohort samples were pooled with weights inverse to the variance of their respective estimates of the intervention effects. Measurement participation rates were 78% at baseline and 74% at follow-up. The intervention effect on garage mean BMI change was not significant (-0.14 kg/m(2)). Energy intake decreased significantly, and fruit and vegetable intake increased significantly in intervention garages compared to control garages. Physical activity change was not significant. Worksite environmental interventions for nutrition and physical activity behavior change may have limited impact on BMI among transit workers who spend most of their workday outside the worksite. Copyright 2010 The Institute For Cancer Prevention. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Risk, harm and intervention: the case of child obesity.

    PubMed

    Merry, Michael S; Voigt, Kristin

    2014-05-01

    In this paper we aim to demonstrate the enormous ethical complexity that is prevalent in child obesity cases. This complexity, we argue, favors a cautious approach. Against those perhaps inclined to blame neglectful parents, we argue that laying the blame for child obesity at the feet of parents is simplistic once the broader context is taken into account. We also show that parents not only enjoy important relational prerogatives worth defending, but that children, too, are beneficiaries of that relationship in ways difficult to match elsewhere. Finally, against the backdrop of growing public concern and pressure to intervene earlier in the life cycle, we examine the perhaps unintended stigmatizing effects that labeling and intervention can have and consider a number of risks and potential harms occasioned by state interventions in these cases.

  11. Obesity and the role of lifestyle and dietary intervention in the management of pediatric hypertension.

    PubMed

    Batisky, Donald L

    2010-01-01

    As the prevalence of hypertension in children and adolescents increases within the context of the epidemic of obesity, it is important to recognize that while hypertension may be secondary to an underlying disorder, one must not overlook the impact that overweight and obesity have on the condition. While considering options for the overall management of hypertension in the context of overweight and obesity one should incorporate strategies that focus on therapeutic lifestyle changes, as discussed in the Fourth Report on Blood Pressure in Children and Adolescents. The strategies that will be discussed in this article include weight loss, exercise and dietary interventions. These treatment strategies require a great deal of motivation on the part of the patient, the patient's family and the patient's care providers. Not all strategies will be effective for every individual, but to some extent all patients being treated for hypertension should incorporate elements of therapeutic lifestyle changes into their treatment regimen.

  12. The use of group dynamics strategies to enhance cohesion in a lifestyle intervention program for obese children

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Luc J; Burke, Shauna M; Shapiro, Sheree; Carron, Albert V; Irwin, Jennifer D; Petrella, Robert; Prapavessis, Harry; Shoemaker, Kevin

    2009-01-01

    Background Most research pertaining to childhood obesity has assessed the effectiveness of preventative interventions, while relatively little has been done to advance knowledge in the treatment of obesity. Thus, a 4-week family- and group-based intervention utilizing group dynamics strategies designed to increase cohesion was implemented to influence the lifestyles and physical activity levels of obese children. Methods/Design This paper provides an overview of the rationale for and implementation of the intervention for obese children and their families. Objectives of the intervention included the modification of health behaviors and cohesion levels through the use of group dynamics strategies. To date, a total of 15 children (7 boys and 8 girls, mean age = 10.5) and their families have completed the intervention (during the month of August 2008). Physiological and psychological outcomes were assessed throughout the 4-week intervention and at 3-, 6-, and 12-month follow-up periods. Discussion It is believed that the information provided will help researchers and health professionals develop similar obesity treatment interventions through the use of evidence-based group dynamics strategies. There is also a need for continued research in this area, and it is our hope that the Children's Health and Activity Modification Program (C.H.A.M.P.) will provide a strong base from which others may build. PMID:19646259

  13. Promoting healthy lifestyles: Behavior modification and motivational interviewing in the treatment of childhood obesity.

    PubMed

    Limbers, Christine A; Turner, Erlanger A; Varni, James W

    2008-06-01

    Childhood obesity has increased dramatically during the past two decades. The growing incidence of childhood obesity is alarming, given the significant short- and long-term health consequences associated with obesity and the strong tracking of obesity from childhood to adulthood. Lifestyle plays an important role in the development and maintenance of obesity. Behavior modification programs targeting eating, exercise, and diet behaviors continue to be the mainstay for treating obese children. Although family-based behavioral weight management programs have resulted in significant improvements in weight status, maintaining improvements in weight status continues to be a challenge, with many interventions resulting in considerable relapse. Motivational interviewing is one innovative approach, used alone or in conjunction with standard behavioral modification programs, which has been proposed to have the potential to enhance motivation for change and therefore improve long-term treatment outcomes for obese children. A broad literature search using two electronic databases, Medline and PsycINFO, to identify studies that used an intervention with a motivational interviewing component to modify diet and/or physical activity in the prevention or treatment of childhood obesity identified two studies that targeted weight as a primary outcome. The studies reviewed indicate that, although initial findings are encouraging, further research is needed to determine the effectiveness of motivational interviewing for prevention and treatment of childhood obesity. Concerted efforts are clearly needed to elucidate the mechanisms for maintenance of initial treatment gains, as well as the ultimate achievement of more ideal weight once formal treatment ceases.

  14. The long-term effectiveness of a lifestyle intervention in severely obese individuals.

    PubMed

    Unick, Jessica L; Beavers, Daniel; Bond, Dale S; Clark, Jeanne M; Jakicic, John M; Kitabchi, Abbas E; Knowler, William C; Wadden, Thomas A; Wagenknecht, Lynne E; Wing, Rena R

    2013-03-01

    Severe obesity (body mass index [BMI] ≥40 kg/m(2)) is a serious public health concern. Although bariatric surgery is an efficacious treatment approach, it is limited in reach; thus, nonsurgical treatment alternatives are needed. We examined the 4-year effects of an intensive lifestyle intervention on body weight and cardiovascular disease risk factors among severely obese, compared with overweight (25 ≤BMI <30), class I (30 ≤BMI <35), and class II obese (35 ≤BMI <40) participants. There were 5145 individuals with type 2 diabetes (45-76 years, BMI ≥25 kg/m(2)) randomized to an intensive lifestyle intervention or diabetes support and education. The lifestyle intervention group received a behavioral weight loss program that included group and individual meetings, a ≥10% weight loss goal, calorie restriction, and increased physical activity. Diabetes support and education received a less intense educational intervention. Four-year changes in body weight and cardiovascular disease risk factors were assessed. Across BMI categories, 4-year changes in body weight were significantly greater in lifestyle participants compared with diabetes support and education (Ps <.05). At year 4, severely obese lifestyle participants lost 4.9%±8.5%, which was similar to class I (4.8%±7.2%) and class II obese participants (4.4%±7.6%), and significantly greater than overweight participants (3.4%±7.0%; P <.05). Four-year changes in low-density-lipoprotein cholesterol, triglycerides, diastolic blood pressure, HbA(1c), and blood glucose were similar across BMI categories in lifestyle participants; however, the severely obese had less favorable improvements in high-density-lipoprotein cholesterol (3.1±0.4 mg/dL) and systolic blood pressure (-1.4±0.7 mm Hg) compared with the less obese (Ps <.05). Lifestyle interventions can result in important long-term weight losses and improvements in cardiovascular disease risk factors among a significant proportion of severely obese

  15. The long-term effectiveness of a lifestyle intervention in severely obese individuals

    PubMed Central

    Unick, Jessica L.; Beavers, Daniel; Bond, Dale S.; Clark, Jeanne M.; Jakicic, John M.; Kitabchi, Abbas E.; Knowler, William C.; Wadden, Thomas A.; Wagenknecht, Lynne E.; Wing, Rena R.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Severe obesity (BMI≥40kg/m2) is a serious public health concern. Although bariatric surgery is an efficacious treatment approach, it is limited in reach; thus non-surgical treatment alternatives are needed. We examined the 4-year effects of an intensive lifestyle intervention on body weight and cardiovascular disease risk factors among severely obese, compared to overweight (25≤BMI<30), class I (30≤BMI<35), and class II obese (35≤BMI<40) participants. Methods 5,145 individuals with type 2 diabetes (45–76 years, BMI≥25kg/m2) were randomized to an intensive lifestyle intervention or diabetes support and education. The lifestyle intervention received a behavioral weight loss program which included group and individuals meetings, a ≥10% weight loss goal, calorie restriction, and increased physical activity. Diabetes support and education received a less intense educational intervention. 4-year changes in body weight and cardiovascular disease risk factors were assessed. Results Across BMI categories, 4-year changes in body weight were significantly greater in lifestyle participants compared to diabetes support and education (p’s<0.05). At year 4, severely obese lifestyle participants lost 4.9±8.5% which was similar to class I (4.8±7.2%) and class II obese (4.4±7.6%) and significantly greater than overweight (3.4±7.0%; p<0.05). 4-year changes in LDL-cholesterol, triglycerides, diastolic blood pressure, HbA1c, and blood glucose were similar across BMI categories in lifestyle participants; however the severely obese had less favorable improvements in HDL-cholesterol (3.1±0.4mg/dL) and systolic blood pressure (−1.4±0.7mmHg) compared to the less obese (p’s<0.05). Conclusion Lifestyle interventions can result in important long-term weight losses and improvements in cardiovascular disease risk factors among a significant proportion of severely obese individuals. PMID:23410564

  16. Deconstructing interventions: approaches to studying behavior change techniques across obesity interventions.

    PubMed

    Tate, Deborah F; Lytle, Leslie A; Sherwood, Nancy E; Haire-Joshu, Debra; Matheson, Donna; Moore, Shirley M; Loria, Catherine M; Pratt, Charlotte; Ward, Dianne S; Belle, Steven H; Michie, Susan

    2016-06-01

    Deconstructing interventions into the specific techniques that are used to change behavior represents a new frontier in behavioral intervention research. This paper considers opportunities and challenges in employing the Behavior Change Techniques Taxonomy (BCTTv1) developed by Michie and colleagues, to code the behavior change techniques (BCTs) across multiple interventions addressing obesity and capture dose received at the technique level. Numerous advantages were recognized for using a shared framework for intervention description. Coding interventions at levels of the social ecological framework beyond the individual level, separate coding for behavior change initiation vs. maintenance, fidelity of BCT delivery, accounting for BCTs mode of delivery, and tailoring BCTs, present both challenges and opportunities. Deconstructing interventions and identifying the dose required to positively impact health-related outcomes could enable important gains in intervention science.

  17. The Maternal Obesity Management (MOM) Trial Protocol: a lifestyle intervention during pregnancy to minimize downstream obesity.

    PubMed

    Adamo, Kristi B; Ferraro, Zachary M; Goldfield, Gary; Keely, Erin; Stacey, Dawn; Hadjiyannakis, Stasia; Jean-Philippe, Sonia; Walker, Mark; Barrowman, Nicholas J

    2013-05-01

    Maternal obesity and/or high gestational weight gain (GWG) are associated with downstream child obesity. Pregnancy represents a critical period for prevention as women are highly motivated and more receptive to behavior change. This pilot study was developed to test the feasibility of intervening with the mother, specifically keeping her GWG within the Institute of Medicine (IOM) limits, with the intended target of preventing obesity in her child downstream. We are testing the practicality of delivering a structured physical activity and nutrition intervention to pregnant women during gestation and then following mom and baby to 24 months of age. This study is a two-arm, parallel group, randomized controlled trial being conducted in Ottawa. Pregnant women, with pregravid BMI >18.5, between 12 and 20 weeks gestation are randomized to one of two groups: intervention (n=30) who receive the MOM trial Handbook (guide to healthy gestation) plus a structured physical activity and nutrition program, or a standard clinical care control group (n=30). The intervention lasts 25-28 weeks (6 months) depending on anticipated delivery date, with follow-up assessment on mother and child at 3, 6, 12 and 24 months post-delivery. Pregnancy, a critical time of growth, development and physiological change, provides an opportunity for early lifestyle intervention. The goal of identifying an effective lifestyle program for the gestational period that leads to healthy fetal development and subsequently normal weight offspring, less likely to develop obesity and its co-morbidities, is unique and could possibly attenuate the inter-generational cycle of obesity. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Theoretical frameworks informing family-based child and adolescent obesity interventions: A qualitative meta-synthesis.

    PubMed

    Alulis, Sarah; Grabowski, Dan

    2017-08-24

    Child and adolescent obesity trends are rising throughout the world, revealing treatment difficulties and a lack of consensus about treatment. The family system is broadly viewed as a potential setting for facilitation of behaviour change. Therefore, family-based interventions have come into focus. However, the use of theoretical frameworks to strengthen these interventions is rare and very uneven. To conduct a qualitative meta-synthesis of family-based interventions for child and adolescent obesity to identify the theoretical frameworks applied, thus understanding how theory is used in practice. A literature review was conducted between January and March 2016. A total of 35 family-based interventions were selected for analysis. Eleven interventions explicitly stated that theory guided the development and were classified as theory-inspired. The social cognitive, self-efficacy and Family Systems Theory appeared most frequently. The remaining 24 were classified as theory-related as theoretical elements of self-monitoring; stimulus control, reinforcement and modelling were used. The designs of family-based interventions reveal numerous inconsistencies and a significant void between research results and health care practice. Based on the analysis, this article proposes three themes to be used as focus points when designing future interventions and when selecting theories for the development of solid, theory-based frameworks for application. The themes are: (1) age of target group, (2) intervention objective, and (3) self-efficacy and readiness for change. Copyright © 2017 Asia Oceania Association for the Study of Obesity. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Pharmacotherapy for the treatment of obesity.

    PubMed

    Sweeting, Arianne N; Hocking, Samantha L; Markovic, Tania P

    2015-12-15

    The recognition of the complex counter-regulatory hormonal, metabolic and neurochemical mechanisms that promote weight regain following weight loss and the conceptualisation of obesity as a chronic disease requiring long-term management has led to increasing focus on the role of adjunctive therapies for obesity, particularly pharmacotherapy. Currently available pharmacotherapy achieves a weight loss intermediate between that commonly attained by lifestyle intervention and bariatric surgery, however its accessibility, compared to bariatric surgery increases its appeal. Despite the poor history of obesity pharmacotherapy, novel agents that are in development appear to have several advantages over predecessors. They are generally more selective in their mechanism of action, thereby potentially minimising adverse sequelae and improving the risk-benefit ratio of pharmacotherapy. Another approach has been to use combined pharmacotherapy to better counteract the multiple counter-regulatory neuroendocrine mechanisms which promote weight regain, as well as allowing lower constituent doses of the combined monotherapy agents, which improves the safety and tolerability of these agents that are usually required long-term for chronic weight maintenance. This review will provide an overview of past, present and future pharmacotherapy for obesity. The efficacy and safety profile of currently available pharmacotherapy will be discussed in the setting of stringent regulatory review processes now in place given the fraught history of pharmacological interventions for obesity. Potential novel therapies that seek to better target the multiple complex counter-regulatory mechanisms promoting weight regain while improving the efficacy/safety profile, will also be examined. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Present and Future: Pharmacologic Treatment of Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Glandt, Mariela; Raz, Itamar

    2011-01-01

    Obesity now presents one of the biggest health problems of our times. Diet and exercise are best for both prevention and treatment; unfortunately, both require much discipline and are difficult to maintain. Medications offer a possible adjunct, but their effect is modest, they are limited by side effects, and the weight loss lasts only as long as the drug is being taken, since as soon as treatment is stopped, the weight is regained. Sibutramine, a sympathomimetic medication which was available for long-term treatment, is the most recent of the drugs to be withdrawn from the market due to side effects; in this case it was an increased risk of cardiovascular events. This paper reviews those medications which are available for treatment of obesity, including many of those recently taken off the market. It also discusses some of the newer treatments that are currently being investigated. PMID:21331293

  1. Emerging treatments for severe obesity in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Coles, Nicole; Birken, Catherine; Hamilton, Jill

    2016-09-29

    Severe obesity in childhood is increasing in prevalence and is associated with considerable morbidity. Studies into pediatric obesity have focused largely on interventions that do not necessarily target the unique biologic or psychological underpinnings for the weight gain in the individual child or adolescent. Outcomes show modest improvement and are of questionable benefit for patients with severe obesity. Although weight is a commonly used outcome, other psychological and metabolic parameters including normalization of physical activity and eating behaviors should be primary outcome goals. The durability of weight loss is often limited by physiologic systems that are evolutionarily designed to promote weight gain. Drug therapies for children are limited, as is their effect on weight and metabolism. Existing drugs that are incidentally found to cause weight loss through off-target effects are being actively investigated for obesity indications. Bariatric surgery results in the most significant weight reduction, but it is associated with potential morbidity and long term data are not available for adolescents undergoing this procedure. As understanding of the biologic and psychosocial contributors to eating behaviors and body weight regulation increases, multifaceted and targeted behavioral, pharmacological, and surgical treatment algorithms should be developed and applied to target the underlying pathways involved for the individual child or adolescent with severe obesity.

  2. Family-centered brief intervention for reducing obesity and cardiovascular disease risk: A randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Scott; Goodyear-Smith, Felicity; McPhee, Julia; Zinn, Caryn; Grøntved, Anders; Schofield, Grant

    2016-11-01

    To assess the effects of a family-centered, physical activity and nutrition "brief" intervention (time-limited contact) on body weight and related health outcomes in primary health care patients with an elevated 5-year cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. This study implemented a cluster randomized controlled trial design with two treatment conditions: a CVD risk assessment and one-time consultation ("usual care" control) and a CVD risk assessment and up to five home sessions that aimed to reduce obesity by encouraging physical activity and healthy eating (intervention). Three hundred and twenty patients aged 35 to 65 years from 16 primary health care clinics in Auckland, New Zealand, participated in the study. Intervention effects on BMI, waist circumference, blood pressure, blood cholesterol, triglycerides, 5-year CVD risk, physical activity, and dietary patterns were assessed using generalized linear mixed models. When compared with the control group, the intervention resulted in a significant but relatively modest decrease in BMI between baseline and the 12-month follow-up (-0.633 kg m(-2) , Padj  = 0.048). Significant decreases were also observed for total cholesterol at 4 and 12 months, the total cholesterol to high-density lipoprotein cholesterol ratio at 4 months, 5-year CVD risk at 4 months, and fast food consumption at 12 months. Our findings show that a family-centered brief intervention targeting physical activity and nutrition can generate slightly better obesity-related health outcomes than usual care alone. © 2016 The Obesity Society.

  3. Educational interventions in childhood obesity: a systematic review with meta-analysis of randomized clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Sbruzzi, Graciele; Eibel, Bruna; Barbiero, Sandra M; Petkowicz, Rosemary O; Ribeiro, Rodrigo A; Cesa, Claudia C; Martins, Carla C; Marobin, Roberta; Schaan, Camila W; Souza, Willian B; Schaan, Beatriz D; Pellanda, Lucia C

    2013-05-01

    To assess the effectiveness of educational interventions including behavioral modification, nutrition and physical activity to prevent or treat childhood obesity through a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized trials. A search of databases (PubMed, EMBASE and Cochrane CENTRAL) and references of published studies (from inception until May 2012) was conducted. Eligible studies were randomized trials enrolling children 6 to 12 years old and assessing the impact of educational interventions during 6 months or longer on waist circumference, body mass index (BMI), blood pressure and lipid profile to prevent or treat childhood obesity. Calculations were performed using a random effects method and pooled-effect estimates were obtained using the final values. Of 22.852 articles retrieved, 26 trials (23.617 participants) were included. There were no differences in outcomes assessed in prevention studies. However, in treatment studies, educational interventions were associated with a significant reduction in waist circumference [-3.21 cm (95%CI -6.34, -0.07)], BMI [-0.86 kg/m(2) (95%CI -1.59, -0.14)] and diastolic blood pressure [-3.68 mmHg (95%CI -5.48, -1.88)]. Educational interventions are effective in treatment, but not prevention, of childhood obesity and its consequences. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Obesity Reduction Black Intervention Trial (ORBIT): 18-Month Results

    PubMed Central

    Fitzgibbon, Marian L.; Stolley, Melinda R.; Schiffer, Linda; Sharp, Lisa K.; Singh, Vicky; Dyer, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Obesity is a chronic condition that is prevalent in black women. The Obesity Reduction Black Intervention Trial (ORBIT) was a randomized controlled weight loss and weight loss maintenance trial. Participants (N = 213) were randomized to the intervention or control groups in August 2005 and September 2006. Follow-up data were collected 6 and 18 months after randomization. The main outcome was change in weight and body mass index from baseline to 18 months. The mean weight at baseline was 104.9 kg and the mean weight loss in the intervention group at 6 months was 3.0 kg and a gain of 0.2 kg in the control group (mean difference between groups in weight change at 6 months, adjusting for baseline weight and cohort, -3.27 kg; 95% confidence interval [CI], -4.50 to -2.05 kg; P < .001). Both groups gained weight between 6 and 18 months (mean 1.0 kg in the intervention group and 0.1 kg in the control group). However, intervention participants lost significantly more weight than control participants during the 18 month intervention (adjusted mean difference between groups at 18 months, -2.83 kg; 95% CI, -4.71 to -0.95; P = .003). At 18 months, intervention participants were more likely than control participants to have lost at least 5% of baseline weight (24% vs. 12%, P< .04). Our results indicate that the ORBIT program did promote weight loss and weight loss maintenance. However, the results also clearly illustrate there is more to learn about what will contribute to meaningful weight loss and maintenance in this population. PMID:20300081

  5. Comparing active pediatric obesity treatments using meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Gilles, Allyson; Cassano, Michael; Shepherd, Elizabeth J; Higgins, Diana; Hecker, Jeffrey E; Nangle, Douglas W

    2008-10-01

    The current meta-analysis reviews research on the treatment of pediatric obesity focusing on studies that have been published since 1994. Eleven studies (22 comparisons, 115 effect sizes, N = 447) were included in the present meta-analysis. Results indicated that comprehensive behavioral interventions may be improved in at least two ways: increasing the "dose" of behavioral components and increasing parental involvement. Although limited to just one investigation, support for the use of medication was also found. The addition of cognitive therapy techniques did not appear to increase, and possibly detracted from, the efficacy of established treatments.

  6. Obesity Interventions in the Community : Engaged and Participatory Approaches.

    PubMed

    Economos, Christina; Blondin, Stacy

    2014-06-01

    Obesity is a pervasive global public health concern of utmost priority. Effective and efficient interventions are urgently needed to reverse current trends, especially among children. The past decade has witnessed increasing adoption and implementation of community-engaged and -participatory interventions that employ a bottom-up approach to identifying and realizing sustainable solutions within communities. It is argued herein that community-based approaches are most effective when implemented via a systems perspective that integrates across societal sectors. This approach seizes upon the synergistic effects that result from simultaneously mobilizing community assets at multiple levels. This paper provides an overview of the evolution and theory behind community-engaged, community-participatory, and systems-level interventions, discusses recent findings in the field, offers reflections based on first-hand experience, outlines advances in relevant resources, and lays forth potential and promising directions for future research. It emphasizes the centrality and necessity of community-engaged systems-level interventions in halting and reversing the obesity epidemic.

  7. Neuromodulation and neurofeedback treatments in eating disorders and obesity.

    PubMed

    Dalton, Bethan; Campbell, Iain C; Schmidt, Ulrike

    2017-08-16

    Psychological interventions are the treatment of choice for most eating disorders; however, significant proportions of patients do not recover with these. Advances in understanding of the neurobiology of eating disorders have led to the development of targeted treatments, such as deep brain stimulation (DBS), noninvasive brain stimulation (NIBS), and neurofeedback. We review the emerging clinical evidence for the use of these interventions in eating disorders and obesity, together with their theoretical rationale. Finally, we reflect on future developments. During the last 20 months, seven case studies/series and seven randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of NIBS or neurofeedback in different eating disorders, obesity, or food craving have appeared. These have largely had promising results. One NIBS trial, using a multisession protocol, was negative. A case series of subcallosal DBS in anorexia nervosa has also shown promise. A search of trial registries identified a further 21 neuromodulation/feedback studies in progress, indicating that neuromodulation/feedback is an area of growing interest. At present, neuromodulation and neurofeedback are largely experimental interventions; however, growing understanding of the mechanisms involved, together with the rising number of studies in this area, means that the clinical utility of these interventions is likely to become clearer soon.

  8. Hypothalamic Obesity in Craniopharyngioma Patients: Disturbed Energy Homeostasis Related to Extent of Hypothalamic Damage and Its Implication for Obesity Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Roth, Christian L.

    2015-01-01

    Hypothalamic obesity (HO) occurs in patients with tumors and lesions in the medial hypothalamic region. Hypothalamic dysfunction can lead to hyperinsulinemia and leptin resistance. This review is focused on HO caused by craniopharyngiomas (CP), which are the most common childhood brain tumors of nonglial origin. Despite excellent overall survival rates, CP patients have substantially reduced quality of life because of significant long-term sequelae, notably severe obesity in about 50% of patients, leading to a high rate of cardiovascular mortality. Recent studies reported that both hyperphagia and decreased energy expenditure can contribute to severe obesity in HO patients. Recognized risk factors for severe obesity include large hypothalamic tumors or lesions affecting several medial and posterior hypothalamic nuclei that impact satiety signaling pathways. Structural damage in these nuclei often lead to hyperphagia, rapid weight gain, central insulin and leptin resistance, decreased sympathetic activity, low energy expenditure, and increased energy storage in adipose tissue. To date, most efforts to treat HO have shown disappointing long-term success rates. However, treatments based on the distinct pathophysiology of disturbed energy homeostasis related to CP may offer options for successful interventions in the future. PMID:26371051

  9. Weight loss strategies for treatment of obesity.

    PubMed

    Kushner, Robert F

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is one of the most serious and prevalent non-communicable diseases of the 21st century. It is also a patient-centered condition in which affected individuals seek treatment through a variety of commercial, medical and surgical approaches. Considering obesity as a chronic medical disease state helps to frame the concept of using a three-stepped intensification of care approach to weight management. As a foundation, all patients should be counseled on evidence-based lifestyle approaches that include diet, physical activity and behavior change therapies. At the second tier, two new pharmacological agents, phentermine-topiramate and lorcaserin, were approved in 2012 as adjuncts to lifestyle modification. The third step, bariatric surgery, has been demonstrated to be the most effective and long-term treatment for individuals with severe obesity or moderate obesity complicated by comorbid conditions that is not responsive to non-surgical approaches. By using a medical model, clinicians can provide more proactive and effective treatments in assisting their patients with weight loss.

  10. "The solution needs to be complex." Obese adults' attitudes about the effectiveness of individual and population based interventions for obesity

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Previous studies of public perceptions of obesity interventions have been quantitative and based on general population surveys. This study aims to explore the opinions and attitudes of obese individuals towards population and individual interventions for obesity in Australia. Methods Qualitative methods using in-depth semi-structured telephone interviews with a community sample of obese adults (Body Mass Index ≥30). Theoretical, purposive and strategic recruitment techniques were used to ensure a broad sample of obese individuals with different types of experiences with their obesity. Participants were asked about their attitudes towards three population based interventions (regulation, media campaigns, and public health initiatives) and three individual interventions (tailored fitness programs, commercial dieting, and gastric banding surgery), and the effectiveness of these interventions. Results One hundred and forty two individuals (19-75 years) were interviewed. Participants strongly supported non-commercial interventions that were focused on encouraging individuals to make healthy lifestyle changes (regulation, physical activity programs, and public health initiatives). There was less support for interventions perceived to be invasive or high risk (gastric band surgery), stigmatising (media campaigns), or commercially motivated and promoting weight loss techniques (commercial diets and gastric banding surgery). Conclusion Obese adults support non-commercial, non-stigmatising interventions which are designed to improve lifestyles, rather than promote weight loss. PMID:20633250

  11. Obesity Treatment in the UK Health System.

    PubMed

    Capehorn, Matthew S; Haslam, David W; Welbourn, Richard

    2016-09-01

    In the UK, as in most other countries in the world, levels of obesity are increasing. According to the Kinsey report, obesity has the second largest public health impact after smoking, and it is inextricably linked to physical inactivity. Since the UK Health and Social Care Act reforms of 2012, there has been a significant restructuring of the National Health Service (NHS). As a consequence, NHS England and the Department of Health have issued new policy guidelines regarding the commissioning of obesity treatment. A 4-tier model of care is now widely accepted and ranges from primary activity, through community weight management and specialist weight management for severe and complex obesity, to bariatric surgery. However, although there are clear care pathways and clinical guidelines for evidence-based practice, there remains no single stakeholder willing to take overall responsibility for obesity care. There is a lack of provision of adequate services characterised by a noticeable 'postcode lottery', and little political will to change the obesogenic environment.

  12. Pharmacological treatment of the obese diabetic patient.

    PubMed

    Scheen, A J; Lefebvre, P J

    1993-01-01

    Obesity is a well-known risk factor for non-insulin-dependent (or Type 2) diabetes mellitus. Consequently, reduction of weight excess comes to the front line in the prevention and management of NIDDM. It is only when diet and physical exercise fail that drug treatment should be considered. Pharmacological treatment of obesity should favour drugs which not only promote weight loss, by reducing caloric intake and/or increasing thermogenesis and energy expenditure, but also, and especially, improve insulin sensitivity. Serotoninergic anorectic compounds (dexfenfluramine, fluoxetine) appear to possess, to some extent, all these properties. Metformin significantly reduces insulin resistance and improves glycaemic control without inducing weight gain, and even favouring some weight loss. This biguanide is now considered as the first line drug for the obese diabetic patient. Alpha-glucosidase inhibitors may help to reduce post-prandial glucose excursions but do not promote weight loss per se. Sulfonylureas can be prescribed to an obese patient when hyperglycaemia persists despite diet and the above-mentioned oral agents, but their use should be associated with reinforcement of dietary advices in order to prevent further weight increase; it is also the case for insulin therapy. Finally, drugs specifically stimulating thermogenesis and energy expenditure, new agents sensitizing tissues to the action of insulin and various compounds interfering with lipid metabolism are currently under extensive investigation with promising preliminary results in the obese diabetic patient. In conclusion, obesity remains a major problem in the management of Type 2 diabetes mellitus and this justifies the search for new, safe and effective, pharmacological approaches.

  13. Personal carbon trading: a potential "stealth intervention" for obesity reduction?

    PubMed

    Egger, Garry

    2007-08-06

    The obesity epidemic and global warming are linked through energy use. A personal carbon trading scheme aimed at reducing fossil fuel usage could act as a "stealth intervention" for reducing obesity by increasing personal energy use. Such a scheme would complement a corporate "cap and trade" system for carbon emissions, which should increase the relative price of processed, energy-dense foods. The scheme would work by reducing global carbon emissions to a sustainable level (contraction), while offering potential for trade of emission rights between frugal and profligate users of non-renewable energy (convergence). A key goal would be changed attitudes to conspicuous (and obesogenic) consumption. Adoption of the scheme would make healthy choices the easy choice.

  14. Effectiveness of interventions on physical activity in overweight or obese children: a systematic review and meta-analysis including studies with objectively measured outcomes.

    PubMed

    Nooijen, C F J; Galanti, M R; Engström, K; Möller, J; Forsell, Y

    2017-02-01

    There is no consensus on interventions to be recommended in order to promote physical activity among overweight or obese children. The objective of this review was to assess the effects on objectively measured physical activity, of interventions promoting physical activity among overweight or obese children or adolescents, compared to no intervention or to interventions without a physical activity component. Publications up to December 2015 were located through electronic searches for randomized controlled trials resulting in inclusion of 33 studies. Standardized mean differences from baseline to post-intervention and to long-term follow-up were determined for intervention and control groups and meta-analysed using random effects models. The meta-analysis showed that interventions had no effect on total physical activity of overweight and obese children, neither directly post-intervention (-0.02 [-0.15, 0.11]) nor at long-term follow-up (0.07 [-0.27, 0.40]). Separate analyses by typology of intervention (with or without physical fitness, behavioural or environmental components) showed similar results (no effect). In conclusion, there is no evidence that currently available interventions are able to increase physical activity among overweight or obese children. This questions the contribution of physical activity to the treatment of overweight and obesity in children in the studied interventions and calls for other treatment strategies. © 2017 World Obesity Federation.

  15. Ethics of obesity treatment: implications for dietitians.

    PubMed

    Pace, P W; Bolton, M P; Reeves, R S

    1991-10-01

    Dietitians face both a responsibility and an opportunity to address the ethical issues of obesity treatment and to promote weight management strategies that are beneficial and effective. The Code of Ethics for the Profession of Dietetics, which was adopted in 1989 to provide guidance to dietetics practitioners in their professional practice and conduct, can serve as a guide in an evaluation of current obesity treatments. Dietitians must help clients be realistic about their weight loss goals and address emotional conflicts that may be undermining weight management efforts. Referrals to therapists may be indicated, and dietitians must be prepared to recognize the need and make the recommendations. Dietitians should take the lead in developing more ethical and beneficial treatments by collaborating with government and industry to protect the consumer from ineffective or potentially harmful practices.

  16. [Obesity: argument for withholding fertility treatment?].

    PubMed

    Koning, Aafke M H; Mol, Ben Willem; Dondorp, Wybo J

    2014-01-01

    Obesity can lead to anovulation and subfertility. Around the world fertility treatment is withheld from women above a certain BMI, ranging from 25 to 40 kg/m2. The proponents of this policy use three different arguments to justify their restrictions: risks to the woman, health and wellbeing of the future child, and importance for society. In this article we critically appraise these arguments. In conclusion, we think obese women should be informed about the consequences of their weight on fertility and pregnancy complications and encouraged to lose weight. If, however, a woman is unable to lose weight despite effort, we feel there is no argument to withhold treatment from her. This would be unjustified with respect to the treatment of other women with a high risk of complications.

  17. Economic evaluation of "healthy beginnings" an early childhood intervention to prevent obesity.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Alison; Lung, Tom; Wen, Li Ming; Baur, Louise; Rissel, Chris; Howard, Kirsten

    2014-07-01

    To determine the costs and cost-effectiveness of an early childhood home visiting program delivered to families in socio-economically disadvantaged areas of Sydney, Australia during 2007-2010. Economic evaluation of a randomized controlled trial, the healthy beginnings (HB) trial, from the perspective of the health funder. Intervention resources were determined from local health district records in 2012 $AUD. Health-care resource utilization was determined through patient-level data linkage. The cost of HB intervention in the clinical trial over 2 years was $1309 per child (2012 $AUD). The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio was $4230 per unit BMI avoided and $631 per 0.1 reduction in BMI z-score. It was estimated that the program could be delivered in practice for $709 per child; with incremental cost-effectiveness ratios of $2697 per unit BMI avoided and $376 per 0.1 reduction in BMI z-score. We present the first economic evaluation of an effective obesity prevention initiative in early childhood. HB is a moderately priced intervention with demonstrated effectiveness that offers similar or better value for money than existing obesity prevention or treatment interventions targeted at older children. Copyright © 2014 The Obesity Society.

  18. Interventions to prevent maternal obesity before conception, during pregnancy, and post partum.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Mark; Barker, Mary; Dodd, Jodie M; Kumanyika, Shiriki; Norris, Shane; Steegers, Eric; Stephenson, Judith; Thangaratinam, Shakila; Yang, Huixia

    2017-01-01

    Prevention of obesity in women of reproductive age is widely recognised to be important both for their health and for that of their offspring. Weight-control interventions, including drug treatment, in pregnant women who are obese or overweight have not had sufficient impact on pregnancy and birth outcomes, which suggests that the focus for intervention should include preconception or post-partum periods. Further research is needed into the long-term effects of nutritional and lifestyle interventions before conception. To improve preconception health, an integrated approach, including pregnancy prevention, planning, and preparation is needed, involving more than the primary health-care sector and adopting an ecological approach to risk reduction that addresses personal, societal, and cultural influences. Raising awareness of the importance of good health in the period before pregnancy will require a new social movement: combining bottom-up mobilisation of individuals and communities with a top-down approach from policy initiatives. Interventions to reduce or prevent obesity before conception and during pregnancy could contribute substantially to achievement of the global Sustainable Development Goals, in terms of health, wellbeing, productivity, and equity in current and future generations.

  19. [Evaluation on the effectiveness of intervention comprehensive program on child obesity, using Generalized Estimating Equation].

    PubMed

    Cao, Zhijuan; Wang, Shumei; Zheng, Wenjuan; Guo, Jianing; Qu, Shuangxiao

    2014-07-01

    To evaluate the effect of child obesity intervention comprehensive program on the improvement of overweight, obese control and knowledge-attitude-practice. The study design was under cluster-randomized controlled trial, with 965 children in the intervention and 895 children in the control groups. Repeated measurement data on child obesity was analyzed through Generalized Estimating Equation models. The risk of becoming overweight or obesity in the intervention group was 0.824 times more than children in the control group, showing a reduction of 17.6% the risk of being overweight or obese (P = 0.031). In addition, the possibility of increasing one unit of correct rate on obesity related knowledge, children in the intervention group children was 1.044 times (P = 0.001)than in the control group. On the mean obesity related correct attitude rate, it was 1.023 times (P = 0.001) in the intervention group of the control group. Regarding the possibility of increasing one unit om the mean obesity related behavior score, children in the intervention group was 1.522 times (P = 0.001)than those in the control group (P = 0.046). The comprehensive child obesity intervention program could effectively reduce the risk of developing overweight or obesity and improving the obesity related knowledge, attitude and behavior in children.

  20. [Croatian National Consensus on diagnosis and treatment of obesity].

    PubMed

    Jelcić, Jozo; Korsić, Mirko; Croatian Obesity Society

    2007-01-01

    Obesity is one of the leading public health problems. Over half of women and two thirds of men in Croatia are either overweight or obese, and about one fifth is overweight. Especially worrying is the rising prevalence of obesity in children and adolescents. Obesity is a chronic disease characterised by metabolic and endocrine disorders, resulting in serious chronic complications. The Croatia Obesity Society was founded in 2002 under the umbrella of the Croatian Medical Association and has so far organised two national congresses on obesity. At each congress a national consensus on diagnosing and treating obesity was adopted. Taking into account that treating obesity only with recommendations about dieaty modification and increased physical activity has not given satisfactory results, the 2006 Congress Consesus recommends an earlier start of pharmacologic therapy and surgical treatment of obesity compared to 2003 Congress Consensus. We expect that the new recommendations will improve diagnostics and treatment of obesity in Croatia.

  1. An Early Feeding Practices Intervention for Obesity Prevention.

    PubMed

    Daniels, Lynne Allison; Mallan, Kimberley Margaret; Nicholson, Jan Maree; Thorpe, Karen; Nambiar, Smita; Mauch, Chelsea Emma; Magarey, Anthea

    2015-07-01

    Report long-term outcomes of the NOURISH randomized controlled trial (RCT), which evaluated a universal intervention commencing in infancy to provide anticipatory guidance to first-time mothers on "protective" complementary feeding practices that were hypothesized to reduce childhood obesity risk. The NOURISH RCT enrolled 698 mothers (mean age 30.1 years, SD = 5.3) with healthy term infants (51% female). Mothers were randomly allocated to usual care or to attend two 6-session, 12-week group education modules. Outcomes were assessed 5 times: baseline (infants 4.3 months); 6 months after module 1 (infants 14 months); 6 months after module 2 (infants 2 years) and at 3.5 and 5 years of age. Maternal feeding practices were self-reported using validated questionnaires. BMI Z-score was calculated from measured child height and weight. Linear mixed models evaluated intervention (group) effect across time. Retention at age 5 years was 61%. Across ages 2 to 5 years, intervention mothers reported less frequent use of nonresponsive feeding practices on 6 of 9 scales. At 5 years, they also reported more appropriate responses to food refusal on 7 of 12 items (Ps ≤ .05). No statistically significant group effect was noted for anthropometric outcomes (BMI Z-score: P = .06) or the prevalence of overweight/obesity (control 13.3% vs intervention 11.4%, P = .66). Anticipatory guidance on complementary feeding resulted in first-time mothers reporting increased use of protective feeding practices. These intervention effects were sustained up to 5 years of age and were paralleled by a nonsignificant trend for lower child BMI Z-scores at all postintervention assessment points. Copyright © 2015 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  2. Randomised controlled trial evaluating the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of 'Families for Health', a family-based childhood obesity treatment intervention delivered in a community setting for ages 6 to 11 years.

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Wendy; Fleming, Joanna; Kamal, Atiya; Hamborg, Thomas; Khan, Kamran A; Griffiths, Frances; Stewart-Brown, Sarah; Stallard, Nigel; Petrou, Stavros; Simkiss, Douglas; Harrison, Elizabeth; Kim, Sung Wook; Thorogood, Margaret

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND Effective programmes to help children manage their weight are required. 'Families for Health' focuses on a parenting approach, designed to help parents develop their parenting skills to support lifestyle change within the family. Families for Health version 1 showed sustained reductions in mean body mass index (BMI) z-score after 2 years in a pilot project. OBJECTIVE The aim was to evaluate its effectiveness and cost-effectiveness in a randomised controlled trial (RCT). DESIGN The trial was a multicentre, investigator-blind RCT, with a parallel economic and process evaluation, with follow-up at 3 and 12 months. Randomisation was by family unit, using a 1 : 1 allocation by telephone registration, stratified by three sites, with a target of 120 families. SETTING Three sites in the West Midlands, England, UK. PARTICIPANTS Children aged 6-11 years who were overweight (≥ 91st centile BMI) or obese (≥ 98th centile BMI), and their parents/carers. Recruitment was via referral or self-referral. INTERVENTIONS Families for Health version 2 is a 10-week, family-based community programme with parallel groups for parents and children, addressing parenting, lifestyle, social and emotional development. Usual care was the treatment for childhood obesity provided within each locality. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Joint primary outcome measures were change in children's BMI z-score and incremental cost per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) gained at 12 months' follow-up (QALYs were calculated using the European Quality of Life-5 Dimensions Youth version). Secondary outcome measures included changes in children's waist circumference, percentage body fat, physical activity, fruit/vegetable consumption and quality of life. Parents' BMI and mental well-being, family eating/activity, parent-child relationships and parenting style were also assessed. The process evaluation documented recruitment, reach, dose delivered, dose received and fidelity, using mixed methods

  3. Psychological adjustment of obese youth presenting for weight management treatment.

    PubMed

    Zeller, Meg H; Saelens, Brian E; Roehrig, Helmut; Kirk, Shelley; Daniels, Stephen R

    2004-10-01

    To determine the prevalence of psychological maladjustment in clinic-based treatment-seeking obese children and adolescents (BMI > or = 95th percentile) and the degree to which maternal, demographic, and youth factors correlate to the youths' psychological adjustment. Anthropometrics, demographics (race, sex, insurance status), measures of youth psychological adjustment (self- and mother-report; Behavior Assessment System for Children), and maternal self-report of psychological distress (Symptom Checklist 90-Revised) were collected from 121 obese children and adolescents (55% white, 45% black) and their mothers. Approximately one-third of youths self-reported some psychological maladjustment, but two-thirds of youth were described by their mothers as experiencing some degree of psychological maladjustment. Adjustment difficulties were specific to social functioning, low self-esteem, and internalizing symptoms. Forty-one percent of mothers of child participants and 56% of mothers of adolescent participants reported clinically significant psychological distress. Youth self-report and mother-report of youths' psychological difficulties were often most strongly associated with mothers' level of psychological distress and/or family socioeconomic status rather than to youth characteristics (e.g., percent overweight, race). Psychological maladjustment levels among obese youth and their mothers were higher in this clinic-based sample than in treatment research-based samples. Present correlate findings extended to obese adolescents and reaffirm a potent association between youth self-report of their own psychological adjustment and their mother's level of psychological distress. Demographic characteristics and youth weight status were not consistent correlates of youths' psychological functioning. Findings have implications for the translation of empirically supported pediatric obesity interventions to clinic-based treatment samples.

  4. Parenting stress impacts obesity-specific health-related quality of life in a pediatric obesity treatment-seeking sample.

    PubMed

    Guilfoyle, Shanna M; Zeller, Meg H; Modi, Avani C

    2010-01-01

    To document parenting stress in caregivers of treatment-seeking youth with obesity and examine whether parenting stress is a predictor of pediatric health indicators, including body mass index and weight or obesity-specific health-related quality of life. Youth (5-18 years) and their caregivers presenting to a pediatric medical weight management program initial visit completed several self-report questionnaires assessing demographics, parenting stress, and weight or obesity-specific health-related quality of life. Youth's height and weight were measured by trained clinic nurses and abstracted from the patient medical records. Study staff measured caregiver's height and weight. Participants included 120 caregivers and their youth (Mage = 11.0, 65.8% female, and 50% African-American). At treatment initiation, caregivers were primarily obese (Mbody mass index = 35.8). One fifth of caregivers of school-aged children (18%) had clinically increased levels of parenting stress, and 25% reported increased spousal discord specific to parenting. Parenting stress did not significantly predict youth body mass index. Parenting stress significantly predicted obesity-specific parent-proxy health-related quality of life for school-aged children but not self-reported obesity-specific health-related quality of life. Given that caregivers are critical components of pediatric weight management interventions, those with clinically increased levels of parenting stress would likely benefit from brief problem-solving interventions and anticipatory guidance to address common obstacles when fostering healthier lifestyles for their youth.

  5. Parenting Stress Impacts Obesity-Specific Health-Related Quality of Life in a Pediatric Obesity Treatment-Seeking Sample

    PubMed Central

    Guilfoyle, Shanna M.; Zeller, Meg H.; Modi, Avani C.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To document parenting stress in caregivers of treatment-seeking youth with obesity and examine whether parenting stress is a predictor of pediatric health indicators, including body mass index (BMI) and weight/obesity-specific health-related quality of life (HRQOL). Method Youth (5-18 years) and their caregivers presenting to a pediatric medical weight management program initial visit completed several self-report questionnaires assessing demographics, parenting stress, and weight/obesity-specific HRQOL. Youth height and weight were measured by trained clinic nurses and abstracted from patient medical records. Study staff measured caregiver height and weight. Results Participants included 120 caregivers and their youth (Mage = 11.0, 65.8% female, and 50% African-American). At treatment initiation, caregivers were primarily obese (MBMI = 35.8). One-fifth of caregivers of school-aged children (18%) had clinically elevated levels of parenting stress and 25% reported elevated spousal discord specific to parenting. Parenting stress did not significantly predict youth BMI. Parenting stress significantly predicted obesity-specific parent-proxy HRQOL for school-aged children, but not self-reported obesity-specific HRQOL. Conclusion Given that caregivers are critical components of pediatric weight management interventions, those with clinically elevated levels of parenting stress would likely benefit from brief problem-solving interventions and anticipatory guidance to address common obstacles when fostering healthier lifestyles for their youth. PMID:20081432

  6. [4th guidelines on diagnosis and treatment of obesity].

    PubMed

    Jelcić, Jozo; Baretić, Maja; Korsié, Mirko

    2010-01-01

    Obesity is one of the leading public health problems in today's world. The situation is not significantly better in our country. The Republic of Croatia is among the countries with highest prevalence of obesity in the world. All attempts to stop the progression of obesity pandemic have not given satisfactory results up to date. On the other hand, the treatment of obesity is a long-term, exhausting and very complicated process with modest results. From 15th to 18th April 2010 the 4th Croatian Congress on Obesity with international participation was held in Umag with the aim of furthering knowledge about epidemiology, etiopathogenesis, complications and obesity treatment and to provide doctors who treat obesity with opportunity to share insights and experience. The Congress was attended by 200 doctors. At the Congress the Guidelines on Obesity Diagnostics and Treatment were adopted, which will provide practical help to doctors treating patients with obesity.

  7. [Options for stress management in obesity treatment].

    PubMed

    Czeglédi, Edit

    2016-02-14

    Overeating and physical inactivity are of great importance in the etiology of obesity. Psychological factors are often found in the background of life style. Chronic stress can contribute to physical inactivity and behaviors that hinder the keeping of a diet (e.g., irregular eating pattern, emotional eating). Results of randomized controlled trials show that relaxation can reduce emotional eating, improve cognitive restraint, and thereby reduce weight. However, stress management is more than relaxation. It consists of adaptive emotion-focused and problem-focused coping strategies and skills to improve relationships. Deflection skills may help in replacing emotional eating with other behaviors. Cognitive restructuring, saying no, and problem solving help to prevent or manage conflicts and difficulties otherwise would result in overeating due to distress. Developing stress management skills may result in greater compliance with the treatment. The techniques presented in the study can be easily applied by general practitioners or specialists, and provide tools for optimizing obesity treatment.

  8. Obesity intervention among African-American children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Baskin, M L; Ahluwalia, H K; Resnicow, K

    2001-08-01

    Often, researchers and clinicians approach the African-American community from a deficit model with African Americans viewed as having less desirable health practices and higher disease risk; however, in developing interventions for African Americans, it is important to keep in mind positive aspects of black culture as they relate to obesity. For example, the cultural acceptance of a larger body type and less negative views toward overweight individuals need not be viewed as problematic or abnormal. In fact, it could be argued that majority culture has a dysfunctional view of body image and obesity. The fact that whites are less likely to be overweight than African Americans may stem from a value system that places undue emphasis on thinness, youth, and external beauty and a culture that imbues women with shame about how they look and what they eat. Thus, rather than holding whites and majority culture as the ideal, it may be important to incorporate the positive elements of black culture regarding body image and food rather than attempting to shift their values toward those of European Americans. How best to achieve a reduction in obesity and its medical consequences, without inducing undesirable shifts in body image and attitudes toward food, is a formidable but important challenge.

  9. A smartphone intervention for adolescent obesity: study protocol for a randomised controlled non-inferiority trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background There are few evidence-based mobile health solutions for treating adolescent obesity. The primary aim of this parallel non-inferiority trial is to assess the effectiveness of an experimental smartphone application in reducing obesity at 12 months, compared to the Temple Street W82GO Healthy Lifestyles intervention. Methods/design The primary outcome measure is change in body mass index standardised deviation score at 12 months. The secondary aim is to compare the effect of treatment on secondary outcomes, including waist circumference, insulin sensitivity, quality of life, physical activity and psychosocial health. Adolescents with a body mass index at or above the 98th percentile (12 to 17 years) will be recruited from the Obesity clinic at Temple Street Children’s University Hospital in Dublin, Ireland. W82GO is a family-based lifestyle change intervention delivered in two phases over 12 months. In the current study, participants will be randomised for phase two of treatment to either usual care or care delivered via smartphone application. One hundred and thirty-four participants will be randomised between the two study arms. An intention-to-treat analysis will be used to compare treatment differences between the groups at 12 months. Discussion The results of this study will be disseminated via open access publication and will provide important information for clinicians, patients and policy makers regarding the use of mobile health interventions in the management of adolescent obesity. Trial registration Clinicaltrials.gov NCT01804855. PMID:24485327

  10. Lifestyle intervention for improving school achievement in overweight or obese children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Martin, Anne; Saunders, David H; Shenkin, Susan D; Sproule, John

    2014-03-14

    The prevalence of overweight and obesity in childhood and adolescence is high. Excessive body fat at a young age is likely to persist into adulthood and is associated with physical and psychosocial co-morbidities, as well as lower cognitive, school and later life achievement. Lifestyle changes, including reduced caloric intake, decreased sedentary behaviour and increased physical activity, are recommended for prevention and treatment of child and adolescent obesity. Evidence suggests that lifestyle interventions can benefit cognitive function and school achievement in children of normal weight. Similar beneficial effects may be seen in overweight or obese children and adolescents. To assess whether lifestyle interventions (in the areas of diet, physical activity, sedentary behaviour and behavioural therapy) improve school achievement, cognitive function and future success in overweight or obese children and adolescents compared with standard care, waiting list control, no treatment or attention control. We searched the following databases in May 2013: CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL Plus, PsycINFO, ERIC, IBSS, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, DARE, ISI Conference Proceedings Citation Index, SPORTDiscus, Database on Obesity and Sedentary Behaviour Studies, Database of Promoting Health Effectiveness Reviews (DoPHER) and Database of Health Promotion Research. In addition, we searched the Network Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations (NDLTD), three trials registries and reference lists. We also contacted researchers in the field. We included (cluster) randomised and controlled clinical trials of lifestyle interventions for weight management in overweight or obese children three to 18 years of age. Studies in children with medical conditions known to affect weight status, school achievement and cognitive function were excluded. Two review authors independently selected studies, extracted data, assessed quality and risk of bias and cross-checked extracts

  11. Randomised controlled trial evaluating the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of 'Families for Health', a family-based childhood obesity treatment intervention delivered in a community setting for ages 6 to 11 years.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Wendy; Fleming, Joanna; Kamal, Atiya; Hamborg, Thomas; Khan, Kamran A; Griffiths, Frances; Stewart-Brown, Sarah; Stallard, Nigel; Petrou, Stavros; Simkiss, Douglas; Harrison, Elizabeth; Kim, Sung Wook; Thorogood, Margaret

    2017-01-01

    Families for Health and usual-care interventions is warranted, focusing on children who had a clinically significant benefit and those who showed a worse outcome with treatment. Further research could focus on the role of parents in the prevention of obesity, rather than treatment. Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN45032201. This project was funded by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Health Technology Assessment programme and will be published in full in Health Technology Assessment; Vol. 21, No. 1. See the NIHR Journals Library website for further project information.

  12. Practicalities and Research Considerations for Conducting Childhood Obesity Prevention Interventions with Families.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Philip J; Jones, Rachel A; Collins, Clare E; Hesketh, Kylie D; Young, Myles D; Burrows, Tracy L; Magarey, Anthea M; Brown, Helen L; Hinkley, Trina; Perry, Rebecca A; Brennan, Leah; Spence, Alison C; Campbell, Karen J

    2016-11-08

    Internationally, childhood obesity is a major public health concern. Given the established difficulties in treating obesity, designing and evaluating effective obesity prevention interventions are research priorities. As parents play a crucial role in establishing positive health behaviours in children, they are a key target for child obesity prevention programs. However, recruiting and engaging parents in such interventions can be a considerable challenge for researchers and practitioners. Members of the 'Parenting, Child Behaviour and Well-being' stream of the Australasian Child and Adolescent Obesity Research Network (ACAORN) have considerable and varied expertise in conducting such interventions and can provide insights into addressing these challenges. This paper aims to highlight considerations regarding the design, implementation, and evaluation of obesity prevention interventions with families and provide practical insights and recommendations for researchers and practitioners conducting family-based research in this area. Case studies of three family-based interventions conducted by ACAORN members are highlighted to provide examples and contextualise the recommendations proposed.

  13. Using Intervention Mapping to develop the Parents as Agents of Change (PAC(©)) intervention for managing pediatric obesity.

    PubMed

    Ball, Geoff D C; Mushquash, Aislin R; Keaschuk, Rachel A; Ambler, Kathryn A; Newton, Amanda S

    2017-01-13

    Pediatric obesity has become increasingly prevalent over recent decades. In view of the psychosocial and physical health risks, and the high likelihood that children with obesity will grow to become adults with obesity, there is a clear need to develop evidence-based interventions that can be delivered in the health care system to optimize the health and well-being of children with obesity and their families. The aim of this paper is to describe the development, implementation, and planned evaluation of a parent-based weight management intervention designed for parents of 8-12 year olds with obesity. The principles of Intervention Mapping (IM) were used to develop an intervention called Parents as Agents of Change (PAC(©)). From 2006 to 2009, an environmental scan plus qualitative (individual interviews with parents and children), quantitative (medical record reviews), and literature review data were collected to gain broad insight into family factors related to pediatric obesity and its management. Theoretical frameworks and empirical evidence guided curriculum development, which was founded primarily on the tenets of family systems theory and cognitive behavioral theory. PAC was developed as a manualized, 16-session, group-based, health care professional-led intervention for parents to address individual, family, and environmental factors related to the management of pediatric obesity. The intervention was refined based on feedback from local and international experts, and has been implemented successfully in a multi-disciplinary weight management centre in a children's hospital. IM provided a practical framework to guide the systematic development of a pediatric weight management intervention for parents of children with obesity. This logical, step-by-step process blends theory and practice and is broadly applicable in the context of obesity management intervention development and evaluation. Following intervention development, the PAC intervention was

  14. OB CITY-Definition of a Family-Based Intervention for Childhood Obesity Supported by Information and Communication Technologies.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ruofei; Cancela, Jorge; Arredondo Waldmeyer, Maria Teresa; Cea, Gloria; Vlachopapadopoulou, Elpis-Athina; Fotiadis, Dimitrios I; Fico, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Childhood obesity is becoming one of the 21st century's most important public health problems. Nowadays, the main treatment of childhood obesity is behavior intervention that aims at improve children's lifestyle to arrest the disease. Information and communication technologies (ICTs) have not been widely employed in this intervention, and most of existing ICTs systems are not having a long-term effect. The purpose of this paper is to define a system to support family-based intervention through a state-of-the-art analysis of family-based interventions and related technological solutions first, and then using the analytic hierarchy process to derive a childhood obesity family-based behavior intervention model, and finally to provide a prototype of a system called OB CITY. The system makes use of applied behavior analysis, affective computing technologies, as well as serious game and gamification techniques, to offer long term services in all care dimensions of the family-based behavioral intervention aiming to provide positive effects to the treatment of childhood obesity.

  15. OB CITY–Definition of a Family-Based Intervention for Childhood Obesity Supported by Information and Communication Technologies

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Ruofei; Cancela, Jorge; Cea, Gloria; Vlachopapadopoulou, Elpis-Athina; Fotiadis, Dimitrios I.; Fico, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Childhood obesity is becoming one of the 21st century’s most important public health problems. Nowadays, the main treatment of childhood obesity is behavior intervention that aims at improve children’s lifestyle to arrest the disease. Information and communication technologies (ICTs) have not been widely employed in this intervention, and most of existing ICTs systems are not having a long-term effect. The purpose of this paper is to define a system to support family-based intervention through a state-of-the-art analysis of family-based interventions and related technological solutions first, and then using the analytic hierarchy process to derive a childhood obesity family-based behavior intervention model, and finally to provide a prototype of a system called OB CITY. The system makes use of applied behavior analysis, affective computing technologies, as well as serious game and gamification techniques, to offer long term services in all care dimensions of the family-based behavioral intervention aiming to provide positive effects to the treatment of childhood obesity. PMID:27602306

  16. The role of disease management in the treatment and prevention of obesity with associated comorbidities.

    PubMed

    May, Jeanette; Buckman, Ellen

    2007-06-01

    Nearly two thirds of the US population is overweight or obese and those numbers are climbing. Many organizations are beginning to recognize overweight and obesity as severe health threats and to acknowledge that treatment can serve as an important first step in addressing this epidemic. Through its Obesity with Co-morbidities Initiative, the Disease Management Association of America (DMAA) seeks to raise awareness and improve understanding of the role disease management (DM) can play in the treatment and management of obesity with comorbidities. Among the objectives of the Obesity with Co-morbidities Initiative was to develop standard definitions of obesity and obesity with comorbidities and to conduct qualitative research among key DM stakeholders. The first project undertaken and completed by the Obesity with Associated Co-morbidities Steering Committee and work group was to define the term "obesity" for consistent usage within the DM community for the purposes of population-based interventions. As part of this initiative, DMAA partnered with Synovate, a global market research firm, to conduct focus groups and in-depth interviews in order to collect qualitative data on attitudes and practices related to obesity treatment and coverage among key industry stakeholders, including health plans, disease management organizations, employers, and the business community. The findings indicated that obesity was widely recognized as a serious issue, but there remained varying opinions regarding responsibility, health and productivity costs, coverage, and best treatment methods among the participants. DMAA will continue this initiative through 2007 and will continue to develop a knowledge base of obesity guidelines and management practices, create valuable tools and resources including an online resource center, and facilitate partnerships with other organizations involved in the management and prevention of obesity.

  17. An economic perspective on childhood obesity: recent findings on cost of illness and cost effectiveness of interventions.

    PubMed

    John, Jürgen; Wolfenstetter, Silke B; Wenig, Christina M

    2012-09-01

    This review aims to put an economic perspective on childhood and adolescent obesity by providing an overview on the latest literature on obesity-related costs and the cost effectiveness of interventions to prevent or manage the problem. The review is based on a comprehensive PubMed/Medline search performed in October 2011. Findings on the economic burden of childhood obesity are inconclusive. Considering the different cost components and age groups, most but not all studies found excess health care costs for obese compared with normal-weight peers. The main limitations relate to short study periods and the strong focus on health care costs, neglecting other components of the economic burden of childhood obesity. The results of the economic evaluations of childhood and adolescent obesity programs support the expectation that preventive and management interventions with acceptable cost effectiveness do exist. Some interventions may even be cost saving. However, owing to the differences in various methodologic aspects, it is difficult to compare preventive and treatment approaches in their cost effectiveness or to determine the most cost-effective timing of preventive interventions during infancy and adolescence. To design effective public policies against the obesity epidemic, a better understanding and a more precise assessment of the health care costs and the broader economic burden are necessary but, critically, depend on the collection of additional longitudinal data. The economic evaluation of childhood obesity interventions poses various methodologic challenges, which should be addressed in future research to fully use the potential of economic evaluation as an aid to decision making. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Obesity Treatment: Environment and Behavior Modification.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Maryanne

    2016-09-01

    Obesity is commonly encountered in veterinary patients. Although there are various published dietary approaches to achieving weight loss, successful long-term prevention of weight regain has proven elusive. Adding environmental and behavioral treatment strategies to a weight loss plan may help the veterinary team, the pet, and the pet owner maximize the effectiveness of the program. Because the owner directly affects the environment and behavior of the pet undergoing a weight loss plan, treatment strategies with an emphasis on owner involvement is the focus of this review. Veterinary use of the 5 A's behavioral counseling approach with the pet owner is discussed.

  19. Development of a Dutch intervention for obese young children.

    PubMed

    van Hoek, E; Bouwman, L I; Koelen, M A; Lutt, M A J; Feskens, E J M; Janse, A J

    2017-08-01

    The objective of this article is to provide insight in the five-step development process of the best evidence, best practice intervention for obese young children 'AanTafel!'. A set of requirements for intervention development was developed to guide the data inquiry: the use of theory, influencing factors, tailoring, multi-disciplinarity, duration/frequency and evaluation and monitoring. Step I retrieved evidence from clinical guidelines, followed by a systematic review with meta-analysis (Step II) and an extended literature review (Step III). Evidence was consistent with regard to parent-focus, targeting family level, including diet, physical activity and behaviour change techniques and tailoring to age. However, no evidence or inconsistent evidence emerged from the theory-basis, group-versus-individual sessions, face-to-face contact versus Internet-mediated contact, which disciplines to involve and how to involve them, as well as intervention duration and intensity. Hence, practice-based insights from parental interviews (Step IV) and involved therapists were added and subsequently integrated to the intervention 'AanTafel!' (Step V). 'AanTafel!' is a multi-component, multi-disciplinary, family-based, parent-focused, age-specific intervention, which is tailored to individual children and families with a duration of 1 year, and using a combination of individual and group sessions as well as a Web-based learning module. Changes in scientific working principles with regard to data collection, reporting and translation to guidelines are required. Practice and science may benefit from close collaboration in designing, implementing and evaluating interventions. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Family-based models for childhood-obesity intervention: a systematic review of randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Sung-Chan, P; Sung, Y W; Zhao, X; Brownson, R C

    2013-04-01

    Effective interventions are needed to address the growing epidemic of childhood obesity. In the past 35 years, family-based approach has gradually developed as a preferred intervention. This review aimed to examine the methodological rigour and treatment effectiveness of family-based interventions according to intervention types and theoretical orientations. A total of 15 randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of family-based lifestyle interventions for children and adolescents aged 2-19 years were included. The adapted Methodological Quality Rating Scales (MQRS) and a four-grade qualitative scoring scheme were adopted to evaluate the methodological rigour and the effectiveness of treatment, respectively. The average MQRS score was 7.93 out of 14 points. Ten of the 15 RCTs had well aligned their research questions with appropriate research methods. The overall short-term outcome of the15 RCTs were satisfactory with an average score of 3.1. Family-based interventions rooted in behaviour theory achieved better results than those theoretically connected to family systems theory in terms of treatment effectiveness. Results suggest future studies to improve the methodological design and continue to explore the potential of the family systems approach.

  1. A systematic review of health videogames on childhood obesity prevention and intervention

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Childhood obesity is a global epidemic. Health video games are an emerging intervention strategy to combat childhood obesity. This systematic review examined published research on the effect of health video games on childhood obesity. Fourteen articles examining 28 health video ames published betwee...

  2. A Systematic Review of Literature on Culturally Adapted Obesity Prevention Interventions for African American Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lofton, Saria; Julion, Wrenetha A.; McNaughton, Diane B.; Bergren, Martha Dewey; Keim, Kathryn S.

    2016-01-01

    Obesity and overweight prevalence in African American (AA) youth continues to be one of the highest of all major ethnic groups, which has led researchers to pursue culturally based approaches as a means to improve obesity prevention interventions. The purpose of this systematic review was to evaluate culturally adapted obesity prevention…

  3. A Systematic Review of Literature on Culturally Adapted Obesity Prevention Interventions for African American Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lofton, Saria; Julion, Wrenetha A.; McNaughton, Diane B.; Bergren, Martha Dewey; Keim, Kathryn S.

    2016-01-01

    Obesity and overweight prevalence in African American (AA) youth continues to be one of the highest of all major ethnic groups, which has led researchers to pursue culturally based approaches as a means to improve obesity prevention interventions. The purpose of this systematic review was to evaluate culturally adapted obesity prevention…

  4. Role of Restrictive Endoscopic Procedures in Obesity Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hang Lak

    2017-01-01

    It is well recognized that obesity is a big problem and it can induce large economic burden. Obesity affects about 40% people in the America alone and obesity also is the worldwide problem, with about 400 million obese adults. Moreover, another problem of obesity is the increasing prevalence of overweight children. Though bariatric surgery remains the gold treatment modality in the obesity treatment, endoluminal approaches may have the meaningful role for weight control. Endoscopists should have a role in the management of obesity because endoluminal therapies demonstrate their safety and efficacy over the coming years. Endoluminal therapies can be summarized by above methods: space occupying, malabsorption method, and reduction of gastric volume. In this review, we will introduce various restrictive endoscopic procedures in obesity treatment. PMID:28147476

  5. Etiology and Treatment of Obesity: Understanding a Serious, Prevalent, and Refractory Disorder.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brownell, Kelly D.; Wadden, Thomas A.

    1992-01-01

    Examines obesity, arguing for establishment of "reasonable weight," which may differ from health and aesthetic ideals. Integrates information of etiology, social beliefs about body weight, theory, and treatment into comprehensive intervention model. Sees advances in treatment most likely when research is driven by theory on etiology of weight…

  6. Surgical and Non-Surgical Interventions for Obesity in Service of Preserving Cognitive Function

    PubMed Central

    Haley, Andreana P.; Alosco, Michael L.; Gunstad, John

    2015-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this article is to highlight what is currently known about the mechanisms of obesity-related cognitive impairment and weight-loss-related cognitive improvement, and discuss the benefits and drawbacks of available treatments. Methods The manuscript is based on a live debate, presenting the main advantages and disadvantages of exercise interventions and bariatric surgery as related to cognitive functioning. The live debate took place during a one-day conference on Diabetes, Obesity and the Brain, organized by the American Psychosomatic Society in October of 2013. Results While it is well established that bariatric surgery tends to lead to greater weight loss, better glycemic control, and cognitive improvement (effect sizes ranging between 0.61 to 0.78) during the first one to two years post intervention than non-surgical treatments, medical complications are possible, and follow-up data beyond five years is limited. In contrast, non-surgical therapies have been extensively studied in a variety of clinical settings and have proved that they can sustain positive health outcomes up to 10 years later, but their cognitive benefits tend to be more modest (effect sizes ranging from 0.18 to 0.69) and long-term regiment compliance, especially in obese individuals is uncertain. Conclusions Rather than focusing on debating whether surgical or no-surgical interventions for obesity are better, additional research is needed to identify the most efficient and practical combination of approaches to ensure sustained positive health outcomes for the largest number of patients possible. PMID:26163819

  7. Parental perspectives of a 4-week family-based lifestyle intervention for children with obesity.

    PubMed

    Pearson, Erin S; Irwin, Jennifer D; Burke, Shauna M; Shapiro, Sheree

    2012-12-17

    The childhood obesity epidemic is now recognized as one of the most serious public health challenges of the 21st century. Community-based behaviour modification treatment programs involving both children and their families are warranted. The purpose of this study was to explore the experiences of parents whose children participated in the Children's Health and Activity Modification Program (C.H.A.M.P.): a 4-week lifestyle program delivered as a day-camp for obese children at risk for type II diabetes and their families. Parents were required to attend four half-day education sessions during the intervention period. Seven focus groups were conducted immediately following the 4-week interventions offered in August 2008 and 2009. The perspectives of 38 parents representing 32 children aged 8-14 with obesity (i.e., body mass index > the 95th percentile) were shared. Overall, parents were pleased with the impact of the program and proud of their children's accomplishments (e.g., increased physical activity levels, enhanced self-esteem, weight loss). Several facilitators to success (e.g., social support; a positive environment) and barriers to its maintenance (e.g., time management; unsupportive family members) were identified, and recommendations were made for future programs. Although parents found the half-day sessions valuable, post-programmatic bi-monthly booster session adherence declined over the one-year follow-up period. Delivered as a 4-week day-camp, C.H.A.M.P. represents a unique approach to the treatment of childhood obesity. Future family-based interventions should consider avenues for intensifying the parental program component whilst employing strategies to promote parental adherence in service of enhancing long-term sustainability of health behaviour changes.

  8. Dietary intervention causes redistribution of zinc in obese adolescents.

    PubMed

    Freire, Simone Cardoso; Fisberg, Mauro; Cozzolino, Silvia Maria Franciscato

    2013-08-01

    Obese people tend to have low zinc circulation levels; this is not always related to zinc intake but can reflect the distribution of zinc in relation to the proportion of body fat and factors related to the inflammatory processes that cause obesity. The purpose of this study was to assess zinc distribution in 15 obese adolescent girls before and after a nutritional orientation program. Participants ranged from 14 to 18 years old (postpubescent) and had a body fat percent (BF%) of >35 %. Zinc nutritional status and other zinc-dependent parameters, such as superoxide dismutase (SOD) and insulin levels, were assessed by biochemical analysis of plasma and erythrocytes, salivary sediment, and urine. Samples were collected before and after 4 months of dietary intervention. Dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) was used to verify BF% both at the beginning and at the end of the study. Food consumption was assessed in ten individual food questionnaires throughout the study; food groups were separated on the questionnaires in the same way as suggested by some authors to develop the Healthy Eating Index (HEI) but with the addition of zinc. After 4 months of nutritional orientation, 78 % of the participants showed a decrease in BF%. Intraerythrocytic zinc increased over the study period, while salivary sediment zinc, SOD, insulin, and Zn urinary24 h/creatinine all decreased (p < 0.05). There was no difference in zinc intake throughout the study but participants did increase their consumption of fruits, dairy, and meats during the study (p < 0.05). There were inverse and statistically significant correlations between the increased levels of intraerythrocytic zinc and decreased levels of SOD. There was also a statistically significant correlation between BF% and Zn urinary 24h/creatinine, and SOD. All these parameters were diminished at the end of the study. The dietary intervention for obese adolescent girls is effective with decrease of BF that led to the

  9. Evidence for interventions to prevent and control obesity among children and adolescents: its applicability to India.

    PubMed

    Sreevatsava, Meghana; Narayan, K M Venkat; Cunningham, Solveig A

    2013-03-01

    Childhood obesity is on the rise worldwide and its increasing prevalence in low and middle income countries is well-known. Obesity interventions have the potential to prevent adverse health outcomes; however, large gaps in research and knowledge about the efficacy and sustainability of such interventions remain. The objectives of this article were to review the evidence for interventions to prevent and control obesity among children and adolescents, evaluate their applicability in India, and discuss the challenges to sustain such interventions. The authors reviewed published research focusing on childhood obesity interventions, especially in India and other lower-resource countries. Nine observational and 10 interventional studies were reviewed. Most studies identified were from developed countries and took place at day-care settings, schools, and after school programs. Nineteen reported studies were grouped into categories: diet (2), physical activity (4), childcare programs (2), media-based programs (2), parental involvement (2), multi-component studies (1), and screen time (6). Most interventions were effective in reducing BMI, decreasing sedentary behaviors, and increasing physical activity. Sustainability of these interventions was not evaluated. While there is no one method or simple intervention to address obesity, multi-component approaches involving home and school environments are promising and warrant evaluation in India. Literature on obesity prevention and control in India and in lower-resource countries, however, is sparse. Existing gaps in knowledge about obesity should be addressed by conducting research in India and carrying out interventions to determine what strategies will be successful and sustainable locally.

  10. Cost-effectiveness of family-based group treatment for child and parental obesity.

    PubMed

    Epstein, Leonard H; Paluch, Rocco A; Wrotniak, Brian H; Daniel, Tinuke Oluyomi; Kilanowski, Colleen; Wilfley, Denise; Finkelstein, Eric

    2014-04-01

    Obesity runs in families, and family-based behavioral treatment (FBT) is associated with weight loss in overweight/obese children and their overweight/obese parents. This study was designed to estimate the costs and cost-effectiveness of FBT compared to separate group treatments of the overweight/obese parent and child (PC). Fifty overweight/obese 8- to 12-year-old children with overweight/obese parents were randomly assigned to 12 months of either FBT or PC treatment program. Assessment of societal costs (payer plus opportunity costs) were completed based on two assumptions: (1) programs for parent and child were available on separate days (PC-1) or (2) interventions for parent and child were available in the same location at sequential times on the same day (PC-2). Cost-effectiveness was calculated based on societal cost per unit of change using percent overBMI for children and weight for parents. The average societal cost per family was $1,448 for FBT and $2,260 for PC-1 (p < 0.001) and $2,124 for PC-2 (p < 0.001). Child cost-effectiveness for FBT was $209.17/percent overBMI, compared to $1,036.50/percent overBMI for PC-1 and $973.98/percent overBMI for PC-2. Parent cost-effectiveness was $132.97/pound (lb) for FBT and $373.53/lb (PC-1) or $351.00/lb (PC-2). For families with overweight/obese children and parents, FBT presents a lower cost per unit of weight loss for parents and children than treating the parent and child separately. Given the high rates of pediatric and adult obesity, FBT may provide a unique cost-effective platform for obesity intervention that alters weight in overweight/obese parents and their overweight/obese children.

  11. Park-based obesity intervention program for inner-city minority children

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Our objective was to assess an intervention strategy - a 6-week obesity intervention program, Project KidFIT, at 3 Houston, TX, park centers - to address the obesity epidemic in minority children. Project KidFIT is a physical fitness and nutrition education program aimed at promoting the benefits of...

  12. Are dentists involved in the treatment of obesity?

    PubMed Central

    Kharma, Mohamed Y.; Aws, Ghassan; Tarakji, Bassel

    2016-01-01

    The morbidity and mortality associated with being overweight or obese have been known to the medical profession to be related with an increased risk of associated diseases. This article provides an overview of obesity and addresses possible strategies for the management of this important public health concern. This narrative review sheds light on the problem of obesity and the necessity of professional oral health care to work in partnership with the medical team for managing obesity. In this regard, general dental practitioners should at least reinforce their knowledge regarding obesity and understand their potential role in the treatment and management of obese patients. PMID:27382531

  13. NFC as a Childhood Obesity Treatment Tool.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Hellín, P; Fontecha, J; Hervás, R; Bravo, J

    2015-09-01

    Childhood Obesity is associated with a wide range of serious health complications and constitutes an increased risk of premature syndromes, including diabetes or heart diseases. Its treatment seems to be complicated. So, in order to help parents we have developed a system that will try to make easier the process of choosing foodstuff for overweight and obese children at the supermarket. To interact with the system, Near Field Communication mobile phones and tags are used. Those tags would have nutritional information such as energy or fat contain of each product. When the interaction takes place, the system will generate an alert determining if the product is adequate for the user diet or not. Decision will be influenced by specific prescript diets, which would have been previously generated by the system based on user profile parameters. At the same time the diet is established, the shopping list would be generated automatically. Therefore, the user could download and print both things at home easily by the PC application. The system also takes into account physical activity of the user. Children mobile phone includes an accelerometer that will detect and collect user activities in order to modify calorical requirements and, if necessary, to change physical activity too. In the future, it would be possible to extend this project system for adults, managing diets not just for obese and overweight, but also to diabetic or celiac people.

  14. Recruitment results among families contacted for an obesity prevention intervention: the Obesity Prevention Tailored for Health Study.

    PubMed

    Ghai, Nirupa R; Reynolds, Kim D; Xiang, Anny H; Massie, Kimberly; Rosetti, Sabrina; Blanco, Lyzette; Martinez, Mayra P; Quinn, Virginia P

    2014-11-27

    Overweight and obesity are serious threats to health and increase healthcare utilization and costs. The Obesity Prevention Tailored for Health (OPT) study was designed to test the effectiveness of a family-based intervention targeting diet and physical activity. We describe the results of efforts to recruit parents and children enrolled in a large managed-care organization into the OPT study. Parents with 10- to 12-year-old children were randomly selected from the membership of Kaiser Permanente Southern California, a large integrated health plan, and contacted between June 2010 and November 2011. We describe recruitment outcomes and compare characteristics of parents and children who did and did not participate. Information was collected from calls with parents and through the administrative and electronic medical records of the health plan. Of the 4,730 parents contacted, 16.1% expressed interest in participation (acceptors), 28.8% declined participation (refusers), 4.7% were ineligible, and, even after multiple attempts, we were unable to reach 50.4%. Slightly less than half of the acceptors (n = 361) were ultimately randomized to receive either the OPT program plus usual care or usual care alone (7.6% of all parents initially contacted). There were not any significant differences between acceptors who were or were not randomized. Overall, we found that acceptors were more likely to be female parents, have overweight/obese children, and higher utilization of outpatient visits by parents and children compared with refusers and those we were unable to reach. We found no differences in recruitment outcomes by body mass index or comorbidity score of the parents, level of physical activity of the parents and children, education of the parents, or household income. Recruiting parents and children into an obesity prevention program in a healthcare setting proved to be challenging and resource-intensive. Barriers and incentives for participation in obesity prevention

  15. PAAPPAS community trial protocol: a randomized study of obesity prevention for adolescents combining school with household intervention.

    PubMed

    Sgambato, Michele R; Cunha, Diana B; Henriques, Viviana T; Estima, Camilla C P; Souza, Bárbara S N; Pereira, Rosangela A; Yokoo, Edna M; Paravidino, Vitor B; Sichieri, Rosely

    2016-08-17

    The prevalence of childhood obesity is increasing at a high rate in Brazil, making prevention a health priority. Schools are the central focus of interventions aiming the prevention and treatment of childhood obesity, however, randomized trials and cohort studies have not yet provided clear evidence of strategies to reduce prevalence of obesity. The aim of this study is to present a protocol to evaluate the efficacy of combining school and household level interventions to reduce excessive weight gain among students. The intervention target fifth and sixth graders from 18 public schools (9 interventions and 9 controls) in the municipality of Duque de Caxias, metropolitan area of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. A sample size of 2500 students will be evaluated at school for their weight status and those from the intervention group who are overweight or obese will be followed monthly at home by community health agents. Demographic, socioeconomic, anthropometric, eating behavior and food consumption data will be collected at school using a standardized questionnaire programmed in personal digital assistant. At school, all students from the intervention group will be encouraged to change eating habits and food consumption and to increase physical activity and reducing sedentary behavior. This study will provide evidence whether integration of school with primary health care can prevent excessive weight gain among adolescents. Positive results will inform a sustainable strategy to be disseminated in the health care system in Brazil. ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT02711488 . Date of registration: March 11, 2016.

  16. Obesity treatment for socioeconomically disadvantaged patients in primary care practice.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Gary G; Warner, Erica T; Glasgow, Russell E; Askew, Sandy; Goldman, Julie; Ritzwoller, Debra P; Emmons, Karen M; Rosner, Bernard A; Colditz, Graham A

    2012-04-09

    Few evidence-based weight loss treatment options exist for medically vulnerable patients in the primary care setting. We conducted a 2-arm, 24-month randomized effectiveness trial in 3 Boston community health centers (from February 1, 2008, through May 2, 2011). Participants were 365 obese patients receiving hypertension treatment (71.2% black, 13.1% Hispanic, 68.5% female, and 32.9% with less than a high school educational level). We randomized participants to usual care or a behavioral intervention that promoted weight loss and hypertension self-management using eHealth components. The intervention included tailored behavior change goals, self-monitoring, and skills training, available via a website or interactive voice response; 18 telephone counseling calls; primary care provider endorsement; 12 optional group support sessions; and links with community resources. At 24 months, weight change in the intervention group compared with that in the usual care group was -1.03 kg (95% CI, -2.03 to -0.03 kg). Twenty-four-month change in body mass index (calculated as weight in kilograms divided by height in meters squared) in the intervention group compared with that in the usual care group was -0.38 (95% CI, -0.75 to -0.004). Intervention participants had larger mean weight losses during the 24 months compared with that in the usual care group (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve, -1.07 kg; 95% CI, -1.94 to -0.22). Mean systolic blood pressure was not significantly lower in the intervention arm compared with the usual care arm. The intervention produced modest weight losses, improved blood pressure control, and slowed systolic blood pressure increases in this high-risk, socioeconomically disadvantaged patient population. Trial Registration  clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT00661817.

  17. Hydrotherapy: An innovative treatment for obese Malaysians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noordin, M. Hazim M.; Ahmad, Hartini; Baharin, Shamsuddin

    2015-12-01

    Malaysia is ranked as a country with the most obese population in the Southeast Asia region, and placed sixth in the Asia Pacific. Obesity does not only influence the persons' mobility and quality of health, but could also link to medical leaves and absenteeism affecting the overall workforce productivity and efficiency. Routine physical activity is essential for good health and it is particularly important for those who are trying to lose weight or to maintain a healthy weight. However, it is disheartening to note that only 32.6 percent Malaysians above the age of 15 are involved in physical exercise or vigorous sports. There is an emergence of many types of hydrotherapy system, which are either active or passive and these can be at hospital settings, public places or in individual homes. Such hydrotherapy, if properly programmed can promote the physical activity amongst the obese in Malaysia. Current research on the use of active and passive hydrotherapy for obesity treatment was carried out. Subjects of both sexes and diverse age ranges, immersed themselves in a heated pool within hospital setting and in a bath tubs with high energy turbulent movement of medium temperature water. These hydrotherapy sessions provide a form of physical exercise in water as compared to on the land exercise. The findings of the hydrotherapy sessions have shown encouraging results. Quantitative data was analysed, with the help of descriptive statistics and paired sample t-test. Qualitative data was analysed manually with help of thematic analysis and specialised qualitative assessment software. This study reveals that hydrotherapy has improved patient's mobility, flexibility and exercise capability. Results reveal the reduction in the weight of subjects, with both quantitative and qualitative data results show that Hydrotherapy improved the quality of life in term of body pain reduction and general health improvement. Therefore, it can be concluded that the hydrotherapy can be seen

  18. Diet macronutrient composition reported before treatment predicts BMI change in obese children: the role of lipids.

    PubMed

    Maffeis, C; Maschio, M; Costanzi, S; Tommasi, M; Fasan, I; Morandi, A

    2012-09-01

    In this study, we tested the hypothesis that diet composition reported by children before the beginning of an obesity treatment program could be a predicting factor of the clinical outcome. A sample of 138 obese 6-16-year-old children and adolescents were recruited. Anthropometry and dietary habits were recorded. Each patient participated in a multidimensional treatment program in an outpatient obesity public service clinic. Therapy was based on a 6-month educational program on nutrition, lifestyle and physical activity. Children with a lipid intake above 34.7% of total energy had a 2.5 times higher chance of reducing at least 1.5 units of BMI with treatment than children with lower lipid intake. These results suggest that the assessment of habitual diet, in particular diet composition before starting treatment, may help to identify obese children who are more sensitive to intervention and those who need more specific nutritional assistance.

  19. A Systematic Review of Literature on Culturally Adapted Obesity Prevention Interventions for African American Youth.

    PubMed

    Lofton, Saria; Julion, Wrenetha A; McNaughton, Diane B; Bergren, Martha Dewey; Keim, Kathryn S

    2016-02-01

    Obesity and overweight prevalence in African American (AA) youth continues to be one of the highest of all major ethnic groups, which has led researchers to pursue culturally based approaches as a means to improve obesity prevention interventions. The purpose of this systematic review was to evaluate culturally adapted obesity prevention interventions targeting AA youth. A search of electronic databases, limited to multicomponent culturally adapted obesity prevention controlled trials from 2003 to 2013, was conducted for key terms. Eleven studies met inclusion criteria. We used the PEN-3 model to evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of interventions as well as to identify cultural adaptation strategies. The PEN-3 model highlighted the value of designing joint parent-youth interventions, building a relationship between AA mentors and youth, and emphasizing healthful activities that the youth preferred. The PEN-3 model shows promise as an overarching framework to develop culturally adapted obesity interventions. © The Author(s) 2015.

  20. Model Programs to Address Obesity and Cardiometabolic Disease: Interventions for Suboptimal Nutrition and Sedentary Lifestyles.

    PubMed

    Nash, Mark S; Kressler, Jochen

    2016-09-01

    Problems posed by obesity-related endocrine diseases embody a national health crisis. Caloric excess and sedentary lifestyle from which they develop also pose significant challenges for rehabilitation providers. Almost two thirds of the U.S. population are currently overweight or obese, a number that has increased by >10% within the last decade and is expected to grow. An overweight body habitus is strongly associated with clinical hazards, including cardiometabolic syndrome, diabetes hypertension, and coronary artery disease. The component health risks of the cardiometabolic syndrome include coalescing of risk factors that predict a health calamity unless effective interventions can be developed and widely adopted. Obesity by itself is now considered an American Diabetes Association-qualified disability, but it is also disturbingly prevalent in other physical disability groupings of adults and children. This monograph describes successes of the Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP), a National Institutes of Health multisite randomized controlled trial that reported significant weight reduction and a 58% decreased incidence of type-2 diabetes accompanying 1 year of structured lifestyle intervention. This treatment benefit (1) exceeded that of metformin pharmacotherapy, (2) was so powerful that the trial was closed before reaching endpoints, and (3) was judged cost-effective for the patient and society. The DPP roadmap incorporating physical activity, diet, and behavioral approaches has been widely adapted to specific community, faith, racial, ethnic, school, and national populations with excellent outcomes success. The lockstep physical activity approach, activity prescription, and long-term success of the program are described and compared with other programs to illustrate effective countermeasures for the pandemics of obesity and obesity-related cardioendocrine disease. We will illustrate adaptation of the DPP for a cohort of persons with disability from spinal cord

  1. Lifestyle Intervention for Sleep Disturbances among Overweight or Obese Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Soohyun; Stewart, Kerry J.; Dobrosielski, Devon A.

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about the effect of different lifestyle interventions on sleep disturbances among sedentary obese or overweight persons. We randomized 35–65 year-old men and women, to 6-months of a weight loss diet (D); or D combined with supervised exercise training (D+E). Measurements were self-reported sleep disturbances; the Profile of Mood States questionnaire; BMI; total, abdominal subcutaneous and visceral fat by magnetic resonance imaging; and aerobic fitness expressed as VO2peak. The groups did not differ in changes for body weight, abdominal total fat, VO2peak, and sleep disturbances. The novel finding herein is that reduced abdominal subcutaneous fat and depressive symptoms with either D or D+E, were associated with less sleep disturbances. PMID:26375410

  2. Cultural Adaptation for Ethnic Diversity: A Review of Obesity Interventions for Preschool Children.

    PubMed

    Bender, Melinda S; Clark, Mary Jo

    2011-09-01

    Obesity disproportionately affects U.S. ethnic minority preschool children, placing them at risk for obesity related co-morbidities and premature death. Effective culturally appropriate interventions are needed to improve health behaviors and reduce obesity in young high-risk minority children, while their behaviors are still developing. All known obesity intervention studies (e.g., diet and physical activity) since 2000 targeting U.S. ethnic minority preschool children were reviewed. Five electronic databases and eight published literature reviews were used to identify the studies. Intervention studies without identified ethnic minority participants were excluded. Ten obesity interventions studies met the review criteria. Published cultural adaptation guidelines were used to develop a mechanism to analyze, score, and rank the intervention adaptations. Cultural adaptations varied widely in rigor, depth, and breadth. Results indicated a relative absence of appropriately adapted obesity interventions for ethnic minority groups, suggesting a need for more rigorous cultural adaptation guidelines when designing obesity interventions for diverse ethnicities. Culturally appropriate adaptations appeared to enhance intervention relevance, effectiveness, and feasibility. The purpose of this literature review was to evaluate 1) the type and extent of cultural adaptations strategies applied to the interventions, and 2) how these adaptations related to the study outcomes.

  3. Cultural Adaptation for Ethnic Diversity: A Review of Obesity Interventions for Preschool Children

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Mary Jo

    2013-01-01

    Obesity disproportionately affects U.S. ethnic minority preschool children, placing them at risk for obesity related co-morbidities and premature death. Effective culturally appropriate interventions are needed to improve health behaviors and reduce obesity in young high-risk minority children, while their behaviors are still developing. All known obesity intervention studies (e.g., diet and physical activity) since 2000 targeting U.S. ethnic minority preschool children were reviewed. Five electronic databases and eight published literature reviews were used to identify the studies. Intervention studies without identified ethnic minority participants were excluded. Ten obesity interventions studies met the review criteria. Published cultural adaptation guidelines were used to develop a mechanism to analyze, score, and rank the intervention adaptations. Cultural adaptations varied widely in rigor, depth, and breadth. Results indicated a relative absence of appropriately adapted obesity interventions for ethnic minority groups, suggesting a need for more rigorous cultural adaptation guidelines when designing obesity interventions for diverse ethnicities. Culturally appropriate adaptations appeared to enhance intervention relevance, effectiveness, and feasibility. The purpose of this literature review was to evaluate 1) the type and extent of cultural adaptations strategies applied to the interventions, and 2) how these adaptations related to the study outcomes. PMID:24159268

  4. Culturally Tailored, Family-Centered, Behavioral Obesity Intervention for Latino-American Preschool-aged Children

    PubMed Central

    Gesell, Sabina B.; Po’e, Eli K.; Escarfuller, Juan; Tempesti, Tommaso

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To test the effect of a culturally tailored, family-centered, short-term behavioral intervention on BMI in Latino-American preschool-aged children. METHODS: In a randomized controlled trial, 54 parent–child dyads were allocated to the intervention and 52 dyads were allocated to an alternative school-readiness program as the control condition. Parent–child dyads were eligible if the parent self-defined Latino, was at least 18 years old, had a 2- to 6-year-old child not currently enrolled in another healthy lifestyle program, had a valid telephone number, and planned on remaining in the city for the next 6 months. The Salud Con La Familia (Health with the Family) program consisted of 12 weekly 90-minute skills-building sessions designed to improve family nutritional habits and increase physical activity. Both programs were conducted in a community recreation center serving an urban neighborhood of mostly Spanish-speaking residents. RESULTS: Forty-two percent of participating preschool-aged children were overweight or obese. Controlling for child age, gender, and baseline BMI, the effect of the treatment condition on postintervention absolute BMI was B = –0.59 (P < .001). The intervention effect seemed to be strongest for obese children. CONCLUSIONS: A skills-building, culturally tailored intervention involving parent–child dyads changed short-term early growth patterns in these Latino-American preschool-aged children. Examining long-term effects would be a prudent next step. PMID:22869834

  5. Effectiveness of a motivational intervention on overweight/obese patients in the primary healthcare: a cluster randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Cristobal, Juan Jose; Alonso-Villaverde, Carlos; Panisello, Jose Ma; Travé-Mercade, Pere; Rodriguez-Cortés, Francisca; Marsal, Josep Ramon; Peña, Esther

    2017-06-20

    Overweight and obesity are common health problems which increase the risk of developing several serious health conditions. The main difficulty in the management of weight-loss lies in its maintenance, once it is achieved. The aim of this study was to investigate whether a motivational intervention, together with current clinical practice, was more efficient than a traditional intervention, in the treatment of overweight and obesity and whether this intervention reduces cardiovascular risk factors associated with overweight and obesity. Multi-centre cluster randomized trial with a 24-month follow-up included 864 overweight/obese patients randomly assigned. Motivational intervention group (400 patients), delivered by a nurse trained by an expert psychologist, in 32 sessions, 1 to 12 fortnightly, and 13 to 32, monthly, on top of their standard programmed diet and exercise. The control group (446 patients), received the usual follow-up. Weight reduction was statistically significant in the second year with a mean reduction of 1.0 Kg in the control group and 2.5 Kg in the intervention group (p = 0. 02). While 18.1% of patients in the control group reduced their weight by more than 5%, this percentage rose to 26.9% in the intervention group, which is statistically significant (p = 0.04). Patients in the motivational intervention group had significantly greater improvements in triglycerides and APOB/APOA1ratio. The results highlight the importance of the group motivational interview in the treatment of overweight /obese patients in primary care, and in the improvement of their associated cardiovascular risks factors. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01006213 October 30, 2009.

  6. School Based Multicomponent Intervention for Obese Children in Udupi District, South India - A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Nayak, Baby S; Bhat, Vinod H

    2016-12-01

    Childhood obesity and overweight is a global epidemics and has been increasing in the developing countries. Childhood obesity is linked with increased mortality and morbidity independent of adult obesity. Declining physical activity, access to junk food and parenting style are the major determinants of overweight in children. Thus, there is a need for increasing the physical activity of children, educating the parents as well as the children on lifestyle modification. This can be achieved through implementation of multicomponent intervention. To evaluate the effectiveness of multicomponent intervention on improving the lifestyle practices, reducing the body fat and improving the self esteem of obese children from selected schools of Udupi District, South India. A sample of 120 obese children were enrolled for multicomponent intervention. The components of multicomponent intervention were: education provided to the obese children on lifestyle modification, education of the parents and increasing the physical education activity of these children in the form of aerobics under the supervision of physical education teacher. There was an attrition of 25% in the intervention group. Thus the final sample in the intervention group was 90. Total sample of 131 overweight/ obese children enrolled as controls. There was an attrition of 20.61% in the control group. Thus, the final sample in the control group was 104. Intervention group received the multicomponent intervention for six month. Mixed Method Repeated measures Ananlysis of Variance (ANOVA) was applied for analysis of data. Results indicated that the intervention was effective in reducing the Body Mass Index (BMI), triceps, biceps, subscapular skin fold thickness of obese children. The intervention was also effective in improving the lifestyle practices and self-esteem of obese children. Overweight/obese children need to control diet and perform vigorous exercise at least for 20 minutes a day to reduce the excess fat

  7. Treatment of body composition changes in obese and overweight older adults: insight into the phenotype of sarcopenic obesity.

    PubMed

    Poggiogalle, Eleonora; Migliaccio, Silvia; Lenzi, Andrea; Donini, Lorenzo Maria

    2014-12-01

    In recent years, mounting interest has been directed to sarcopenic obesity (SO), given the parallel increase of life expectancy and prevalence of obesity in Western countries. The phenotype of SO is characterized by the coexistence of excess fat mass and decreased muscle mass, leading to the impairment of physical performance. The aim of the present review was to summarize the impact of different treatment strategies contrasting body composition changes in older obese and overweight subjects, providing insight into the SO phenotype. Revision questions were formulated; relevant articles were identified from Pubmed through a systematic search strategy: definition of the search terms (sarcopenic obesity, diet, nutritional supplements, physical activity, exercise, pharmacological treatment); limits: papers published in the last 10 years; humans; age ≥ 60 years old; body mass index >25 kg/m(2); language: English. Studies dealing with sarcopenia associated to cancer cachexia or neurological diseases, any malignant disease, inflammatory or autoimmune diseases, corticosteroids for systemic use, bedridden subjects, and syndromic obesity were excluded. 14 articles were identified for inclusion in the present systematic review, and were grouped basing on the type of the main intervention: data assessing body composition changes after combined lifestyle interventions, exercise/physical activity, dietary interventions, and pharmacological treatment. Most of the studies were randomized, controlled. Sample size ranged from 12 to 439 subjects, and study duration varied from 6 weeks to 12 months. Weight loss based on diet combined with exercise seems to be the best strategy to adopt for treatment of phenotypic aspects of SO, improving metabolic consequences related to excess fat, preserving lean mass, and allowing functional recovery.

  8. Review of Childhood Obesity: From Epidemiology, Etiology, and Comorbidities to Clinical Assessment and Treatment.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Seema; Kelly, Aaron S

    2017-02-01

    Childhood obesity has emerged as an important public health problem in the United States and other countries in the world. Currently 1 in 3 children in the United States is afflicted with overweight or obesity. The increasing prevalence of childhood obesity is associated with emergence of comorbidities previously considered to be "adult" diseases including type 2 diabetes mellitus, hypertension, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, obstructive sleep apnea, and dyslipidemia. The most common cause of obesity in children is a positive energy balance due to caloric intake in excess of caloric expenditure combined with a genetic predisposition for weight gain. Most obese children do not have an underlying endocrine or single genetic cause for their weight gain. Evaluation of children with obesity is aimed at determining the cause of weight gain and assessing for comorbidities resulting from excess weight. Family-based lifestyle interventions, including dietary modifications and increased physical activity, are the cornerstone of weight management in children. A staged approach to pediatric weight management is recommended with consideration of the age of the child, severity of obesity, and presence of obesity-related comorbidities in determining the initial stage of treatment. Lifestyle interventions have shown only modest effect on weight loss, particularly in children with severe obesity. There is limited information on the efficacy and safety of medications for weight loss in children. Bariatric surgery has been found to be effective in decreasing excess weight and improving comorbidities in adolescents with severe obesity. However, there are limited data on the long-term efficacy and safety of bariatric surgery in adolescents. For this comprehensive review, the literature was scanned from 1994 to 2016 using PubMed using the following search terms: childhood obesity, pediatric obesity, childhood overweight, bariatric surgery, and adolescents. Copyright © 2016 Mayo

  9. Treatment of obesity-related hypertension in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Halbach, Susan M; Flynn, Joseph

    2013-06-01

    The obesity epidemic has become a common concern among pediatricians, with an estimated 32 % of US children and adolescents classified as overweight and 18 % as obese. Along with the increase in obesity, a growing body of evidence demonstrates that chronic diseases, such as Type 2 diabetes, primary hypertension, and hyperlipidemia, once thought to be confined solely to adulthood, are commonly seen among the obese in childhood. Following a brief summary of the diagnosis and evaluation of hypertension in obese children and adolescents, this review will highlight recent research on the treatment of obesity-related hypertension. Pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic treatment will be discussed. Additionally, current and emerging therapies for the primary treatment of obesity in children and adolescents, which have been gaining in popularity, will be reviewed.

  10. Factors Contributing to Weight Misperception in Obese Children Presenting for Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Zeller, Meg H.; Ingerski, Lisa M.; Wilson, Lindsay; Modi, Avani C.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To assess weight stigma, self-perception of weight status, and factors contributing to accurate self-perception of weight status in obese youth presenting for treatment at a hospital-based multidisciplinary weight management program. Methods Participants (N = 97; mean age = 8.56 ± 1.66 years) used a figural rating scale to assess weight stigma and their current and ideal body type, and Sizing Me Up, a measure of obesity-specific health-related quality of life (HRQOL). Results The majority endorsed negative/stereotypical attributes toward an obese body type, chose an average or underweight figure as their ideal, and 39% misperceived their weight status. Older child age and greater HRQOL impairment were significant predictors (P < .01) of correct self-perception. Conclusion Pediatricians may find that talking with the elementary school–aged patient and family about whether weight/size affects their day-to-day life will prove to be a salient and neutral opening to discussing the child’s obesity and need for intervention. PMID:20075030

  11. Cost effectiveness of family-based obesity treatment

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    OBJECTIVE: Family-based behavioral treatment (FBT) is an evidence-based treatment for obese children and their parents. This treatment has been extended to treating overweight/obese children and their parents in the patient centered medical home. We reported greater reductions in child and parent w...

  12. Effective interventions in overweight or obese young children: systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    van Hoek, Esther; Feskens, Edith J M; Bouwman, Laura I; Janse, Arieke J

    2014-12-01

    Treatment programs for overweight and obese young children are of variable effectiveness, and the characteristics of effective programs are unknown. In this systematic review with meta-analysis, the effectiveness of treatment programs for these children is summarized. PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, and PsycINFO databases were searched up to April 2012. Articles reporting the effect of treatment on the body weight of overweight or obese children with a mean age in the range of 3-<8 years are included. Studies reporting the change in BMI z-score with standard error were included in a meta-analysis. For this purpose, a random-effects model was used. The search identified 11,250 articles, of which 27 were included in this review. Eleven studies, including 20 treatment programs with 1015 participants, were eligible for the meta-analysis. The pooled intervention effect showed high heterogeneity; therefore, subgroup analysis was performed. Subgroup analysis showed that program intensity and used components partly explained the heterogeneity. The subgroup with two studies using multicomponent treatment programs (combining dietary and physical activity education and behavioral therapy) of moderate or high intensity showed the largest pooled change in BMI z-score (-0.46; I2, 0%). Although the subgroup multicomponent treatment programs of moderate to high intensity contained only two studies, these treatment programs appeared to be most effective in treating overweight young children.

  13. Effectiveness of a Randomized Controlled Lifestyle Intervention to Prevent Obesity among Chinese Primary School Students: CLICK-Obesity Study.

    PubMed

    Xu, Fei; Ware, Robert S; Leslie, Eva; Tse, Lap Ah; Wang, Zhiyong; Li, Jiequan; Wang, Youfa

    2015-01-01

    Childhood obesity has been increasing rapidly worldwide. There is limited evidence for effective lifestyle interventions to prevent childhood obesity worldwide, especially in developing countries like China. The objective of this study was to assess the effectiveness of a school-based multi-component lifestyle childhood obesity prevention program (the CLICK-Obesity study) in Mainland China. A cluster randomized controlled trial was developed among grade 4 students from 8 urban primary schools (638 students in intervention, 544 as control) in Nanjing City, China. Students were randomly allocated to the control or intervention group at school-level. A one-year multi-component intervention program (classroom curriculum, school environment support, family involvement and fun programs/events) together with routine health education was provided to the intervention group, while the control group received routine health education only. The main outcome variables assessed were changes in body mass index, obesity occurrence, obesity-related lifestyle behaviors and knowledge. Overall, 1108 (93.7%) of the 1182 enrolled students completed the intervention study. The intervention group had a larger marginal reduction than did the control group in overall mean BMI value (-0.32±1.36 vs. -0.29±1.40, p = 0.09), although this was not significant. Compared with the control group, the intervention group was more likely to decrease their BMI (OR = 1.44, 95%CI = 1.10, 1.87) by 0.5 kg/m2 or above, increase the frequency of jogging/running (OR = 1.55, 95%CI = 1.18, 2.02), decrease the frequency of TV/computer use (OR = 1.41, 95%CI = 1.09, 1.84) and of red meat consumption (OR = 1.50, 95%CI = 1.15, 1.95), change commuting mode to/from school from sedentary to active mode (OR = 2.24, 95%CI = 1.47, 3.40), and be aware of the harm of selected obesity risk factors. The school-based lifestyle intervention program was practical and effective in improving health behaviors and obesity

  14. Effectiveness of a Randomized Controlled Lifestyle Intervention to Prevent Obesity among Chinese Primary School Students: CLICK-Obesity Study

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Fei; Ware, Robert S.; Leslie, Eva; Tse, Lap Ah; Wang, Zhiyong; Li, Jiequan; Wang, Youfa

    2015-01-01

    Background Childhood obesity has been increasing rapidly worldwide. There is limited evidence for effective lifestyle interventions to prevent childhood obesity worldwide, especially in developing countries like China. The objective of this study was to assess the effectiveness of a school-based multi-component lifestyle childhood obesity prevention program (the CLICK-Obesity study) in Mainland China. Methods A cluster randomized controlled trial was developed among grade 4 students from 8 urban primary schools (638 students in intervention, 544 as control) in Nanjing City, China. Students were randomly allocated to the control or intervention group at school-level. A one-year multi-component intervention program (classroom curriculum, school environment support, family involvement and fun programs/events) together with routine health education was provided to the intervention group, while the control group received routine health education only. The main outcome variables assessed were changes in body mass index, obesity occurrence, obesity-related lifestyle behaviors and knowledge. Results Overall, 1108 (93.7%) of the 1182 enrolled students completed the intervention study. The intervention group had a larger marginal reduction than did the control group in overall mean BMI value (-0.32±1.36 vs. -0.29±1.40, p = 0.09), although this was not significant. Compared with the control group, the intervention group was more likely to decrease their BMI (OR = 1.44, 95%CI = 1.10, 1.87) by 0.5 kg/m2 or above, increase the frequency of jogging/running (OR = 1.55, 95%CI = 1.18, 2.02), decrease the frequency of TV/computer use (OR = 1.41, 95%CI = 1.09, 1.84) and of red meat consumption (OR = 1.50, 95%CI = 1.15, 1.95), change commuting mode to/from school from sedentary to active mode (OR = 2.24, 95%CI = 1.47, 3.40), and be aware of the harm of selected obesity risk factors. Conclusions The school-based lifestyle intervention program was practical and effective in improving

  15. Effectiveness of lifestyle interventions for individuals with severe obesity and type 2 diabetes: results from the Look AHEAD trial.

    PubMed

    Unick, Jessica L; Beavers, Daniel; Jakicic, John M; Kitabchi, Abbas E; Knowler, William C; Wadden, Thomas A; Wing, Rena R

    2011-10-01

    Rates of severe obesity (BMI ≥40 kg/m(2)) are on the rise, and effective treatment options are needed. We examined the effect of an intensive lifestyle intervention (ILI) on weight loss, cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk, and program adherence in participants with type 2 diabetes who were severely obese compared with overweight (BMI 25 to <30 kg/m(2)), class I (BMI 30 to <35 kg/m(2)), and class II (BMI 35 to <40 kg/m(2)) obese participants. Participants in the Action for Health in Diabetes (Look AHEAD) trial were randomly assigned to ILI or diabetes support and education (DSE). DSE participants received a less intense educational intervention, whereas ILI participants received an intensive behavioral treatment to increase physical activity (PA) and reduce caloric intake. This article focuses on the 2,503 ILI participants (age 58.6 ± 6.8 years). At 1 year, severely obese participants in the ILI group lost -9.04 ± 7.6% of initial body weight, which was significantly greater (P < 0.05) than ILI participants who were overweight (-7.43 ± 5.6%) and comparable to class I (-8.72 ± 6.4%) and class II obese (-8.64 ± 7.4%) participants. All BMI groups had comparable improvements in fitness, PA, LDL cholesterol, triglycerides, blood pressure, fasting glucose, and HbA(1c) at 1 year. ILI treatment session attendance was excellent and did not differ among weight categories (severe obese 80% vs. others 83%; P = 0.43). Severely obese participants in the ILI group had similar adherence, percentage of weight loss, and improvement in CVD risk compared with less obese participants. Behavioral weight loss programs should be considered an effective option for this population.

  16. Cost-benefit analysis for the treatment of severe obesity.

    PubMed

    Martin, L F; White, S; Lindstrom, W

    1998-09-01

    Cost-benefit and cost-effectiveness analyses (CEAs) are only now beginning to be used by business, government, and policymakers to evaluate various medical treatments. The evolution of why CEAs are being demanded is reviewed. To date, a formal CEA of obesity treatments has not been published. This article outlines how a CEA is performed, reviews data relevant to setting up a formal CEA of medical and surgical obesity treatments, and lists published reports that demonstrate the effectiveness of surgical obesity treatments. The general level of discrimination that society allows the obese to suffer also allows medical insurance companies, businesses, and government to not provide many obese Americans with obesity treatments that have established a level of effectiveness far surpassing many other forms of medical therapy. CEAs of obesity treatments, by themselves, cannot be expected to reverse this discrimination. This type of data, however, provides individual obese patients and their physicians with evidence to challenge policymakers' decisions, especially when cost-effective obesity treatments are excluded or placed at a lower priority than treatments with less proven effectiveness.

  17. [EFFECTIVENESS OF COMPREHENSIVE TREATMENT ON THE PREOPERATIVE CONDITIONS OF OBESE WOMEN CANDIDATES FOR BARIATRIC SURGERY].

    PubMed

    Delgado Floody, Pedro; Jerez Mayorga, Daniel; Caamaño Navarrete, Felipe; Concha Díaz, Manuel; Ovalle Elgueta, Héctor; Osorio Poblete, Aldo

    2015-12-01

    in Chile, a high prevalence of women presents morbid obesity, this condition generates serious medical complications and high costs for public health. to determine the effects of a total treatment program consisting of physical exercise, psychological therapy and nutrition education on the preoperative conditions of obese women candidates for bariatric surgery. nineteen women between the ages of 30 and 55 applicants to bariatric surgery, with morbid obesity (n=6) or obesity and comorbidities (n=13), underwent a program of comprehensive treatment of sixteen weeks duration (3 session/week). Before and 72 hours after the last intervention session was evaluated on fasting (≥12 hours): body weight, body mass index (BMI), percentage of body fat (% BF), contour waist (CW) and basal blood glucose. Cardiorespiratory fitness was also estimated. the average age was 40.32 years, post-sixteen weeks of comprehensive treatment study variables improved significantly (p. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  18. Process evaluation outcomes from a global child obesity prevention intervention.

    PubMed

    Pettigrew, Simone; Borys, Jean Michel; du Plessis, Hugues Ruault; Walter, Lea; Huang, Terry T-K; Levi, Jeffrey; Vinck, Jan

    2014-07-28

    While it is acknowledged that child obesity interventions should cover multiple ecological levels (downstream, midstream and upstream) to maximize their effectiveness, there is a lack of evaluation data to guide the development and implementation of such efforts. To commence addressing this knowledge gap, the present study provides process evaluation data relating to the experiences of groups implementing the EPODE approach to child obesity prevention in various locations around the world. The aim of this exploratory study was to investigate the barriers and facilitators to program implementation in program sites around the world to assist in developing strategies to enhance program outcomes. An online survey that included open-ended questions was distributed to the 25 EPODE programs in operation at the time of the survey (May 2012). The survey items asked respondents to comment on those aspects of program implementation that they found challenging and to suggest areas for future improvement. Eighteen programs representing 14 countries responded to the request to participate in the survey, yielding a 72% response rate. The responses were analyzed via the constant comparative method using NVivo qualitative data analysis software. The main concerns of the various EPODE programs were their ability to secure ongoing funding and their access to evidence-based intervention methods and policy advice relating to relationships with third parties. These issues were in turn impacted by other factors, including (i) access to user-friendly information relating to the range of intervention strategies available and appropriate evaluation measures; (ii) assistance with building and maintaining stakeholder relationships; and (iii) assurance of the quality, independence, and transparency of policies and practices. The findings are facilitating the ongoing refinement of the EPODE approach. In particular, standardized and tailored information packages are being made available to

  19. A Randomized Clinical Trial of a Tailored Lifestyle Intervention for Obese, Sedentary, Primary Care Patients

    PubMed Central

    Eaton, Charles B.; Hartman, Sheri J.; Perzanowski, Elizabeth; Pan, Guohui; Roberts, Mary B.; Risica, Patricia M.; Gans, Kim M.; Jakicic, John M.; Marcus, Bess H.

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of the study was to test a tailored lifestyle intervention for helping obese primary care patients achieve weight loss and increase physical activity. METHODS We conducted a 24-month randomized clinical trial in Rhode Island. Primary care physicians identified obese, sedentary patients motivated to lose weight and increase their moderate to vigorous physical activity. These patients were randomized to 1 of 2 experimental groups: enhanced intervention (EI) or standard intervention (SI). Both groups received 3 face-to-face weight loss meetings. The enhanced intervention group also received telephone counseling calls, individually tailored print materials, and DVDs focused on diet and physical activity. Active intervention occurred in year 1 with a tapered maintenance phase in year 2. RESULTS Two hundred eleven obese, sedentary patients were recruited from 24 primary care practices. Participants were 79% women and 16% minorities. They averaged 48.6 years of age, with a mean body mass index (BMI) of 37.8 kg/m2, and 21.2 minutes/week of moderate to vigorous physical activity. Significantly more EI participants lost 5% of their baseline weight than SI participants (group by visit, P <.001). The difference was significant during active treatment at 6 months (37.2% EI vs 12.9% SI) and 12 months (47.8% vs 11.6%), but was no longer significant during the maintenance phase at 18 months (31.4% vs 26.7%,) or 24 months (33.3% vs 24.6%). The EI group reported significantly more minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity over time than the SI group (group by visit, P = 0.04). The differences in minutes per week at 6 months was 95.7 for the EI group vs 68.3 minutes for the SI group; at 12 months, it was 126.1 vs 73.7; at 18 months, 103.7 vs 63.7, and at 24 months, 101.3 vs 75.4. Similar trends were found for absolute weight loss and the percentage reaching national guidelines for physical activity. CONCLUSION A home-based tailored lifestyle intervention in

  20. Comparative effectiveness of childhood obesity interventions in pediatric primary care: a cluster-randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Taveras, Elsie M; Marshall, Richard; Kleinman, Ken P; Gillman, Matthew W; Hacker, Karen; Horan, Christine M; Smith, Renata L; Price, Sarah; Sharifi, Mona; Rifas-Shiman, Sheryl L; Simon, Steven R

    2015-06-01

    Evidence of effective treatment of childhood obesity in primary care settings is limited. To examine the extent to which computerized clinical decision support (CDS) delivered to pediatric clinicians at the point of care of obese children, with or without individualized family coaching, improved body mass index (BMI; calculated as weight in kilograms divided by height in meters squared) and quality of care. We conducted a cluster-randomized, 3-arm clinical trial. We enrolled 549 children aged 6 to 12 years with a BMI at the 95% percentile or higher from 14 primary care practices in Massachusetts from October 1, 2011, through June 30, 2012. Patients were followed up for 1 year (last follow-up, August 30, 2013). In intent-to-treat analyses, we used linear mixed-effects models to account for clustering by practice and within each person. In 5 practices randomized to CDS, pediatric clinicians received decision support on obesity management, and patients and their families received an intervention for self-guided behavior change. In 5 practices randomized to CDS + coaching, decision support was augmented by individualized family coaching. The remaining 4 practices were randomized to usual care. Smaller age-associated change in BMI and the Healthcare Effectiveness Data and Information Set (HEDIS) performance measures for obesity during the 1-year follow-up. At baseline, mean (SD) patient age and BMI were 9.8 (1.9) years and 25.8 (4.3), respectively. At 1 year, we obtained BMI from 518 children (94.4%) and HEDIS measures from 491 visits (89.4%). The 3 randomization arms had different effects on BMI over time (P = .04). Compared with the usual care arm, BMI increased less in children in the CDS arm during 1 year (-0.51 [95% CI, -0.91 to -0.11]). The CDS + coaching arm had a smaller magnitude of effect (-0.34 [95% CI, -0.75 to 0.07]). We found substantially greater achievement of childhood obesity HEDIS measures in the CDS arm (adjusted odds ratio, 2.28 [95% CI, 1

  1. Intensive lifestyle treatment for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in children with severe obesity: inpatient versus ambulatory treatment.

    PubMed

    Koot, B G P; van der Baan-Slootweg, O H; Vinke, S; Bohte, A E; Tamminga-Smeulders, C L J; Jansen, P L M; Stoker, J; Benninga, M A

    2016-01-01

    Lifestyle intervention is the only established therapy for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). The optimal treatment schedule and predictors of response of this treatment have not been established in children. We aimed to evaluate the 2-year efficacy of an inpatient versus ambulatory intensive lifestyle intervention for treating NAFLD in children with severe obesity. A cohort study of 51 severely obese non-diabetic children (mean age 14.7 (±2.4) years; BMI-z-score 3.5 (±0.5)) with liver steatosis were non-randomly allocated to inpatient treatment (2 or 6 months), ambulatory treatment or usual care. Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy determined liver steatosis and serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) at 6 months were the primary outcome measures. Baseline variables were evaluated as predictors of treatment response. Liver steatosis had disappeared in 43, 29 and 22% and serum ALT normalized in 41, 33 and 6% at the end of 6 months in the inpatient, ambulatory or usual care treatment groups, respectively. Only the proportions of ALT normalization in inpatient and ambulatory treatment compared with usual care were significantly higher. Treatment effects of inpatient and ambulatory treatment were sustained at 1.5 years follow-up. No baseline characteristic, including PNPLA3 polymorphism or leptin, was consistently predictive for treatment response. A 6-month intensive inpatient and ambulatory lifestyle treatment in children with severe obesity reverses NAFLD in a minority of patients. This study suggests that inpatient compared with ambulatory intensive treatment does not importantly increase treatment success. Further efforts to optimize and individualize lifestyle interventions and additional treatments options are needed particular for children with severe obesity resistant to conventional lifestyle interventions.

  2. The Obesity-Fertility Protocol: a randomized controlled trial assessing clinical outcomes and costs of a transferable interdisciplinary lifestyle intervention, before and during pregnancy, in obese infertile women.

    PubMed

    Duval, Karine; Langlois, Marie-France; Carranza-Mamane, Belina; Pesant, Marie-Hélène; Hivert, Marie-France; Poder, Thomas G; Lavoie, Hélène B; Ainmelk, Youssef; St-Cyr Tribble, Denise; Laredo, Sheila; Greenblatt, Ellen; Sagle, Margaret; Waddell, Guy; Belisle, Serge; Riverin, Daniel; Jean-Denis, Farrah; Belan, Matea; Baillargeon, Jean-Patrice

    2015-01-01

    Obesity in infertile women increases the costs of fertility treatments, reduces their effectiveness and increases significantly the risks of many complications of pregnancy and for the newborn. Studies suggest that even a modest loss of 5-10 % of body weight can restore ovulation. However, there are gaps in knowledge regarding the benefits and cost-effectiveness of a lifestyle modification program targeting obese infertile women and integrated into the fertility clinics. This study will evaluate clinical outcomes and costs of a transferable interdisciplinary lifestyle intervention, before and during pregnancy, in obese infertile women. We hypothesize that the intervention will: 1) improve fertility, efficacy of fertility treatments, and health of mothers and their children; and 2) reduce the cost per live birth, including costs of fertility treatments and pregnancy outcomes. Obese infertile women (age: 18-40 years; BMI ≥30 kg/m(2) or ≥27 kg/m(2) with polycystic ovary syndrome) will be randomised to either a lifestyle intervention followed by standard fertility treatments after 6 months if no conception has been achieved (intervention group) or standard fertility treatments only (control group). The intervention and/or follow-up will last for a maximum of 18 months or up to the end of pregnancy. Evaluation visits will be planned every 6 months where different outcome measures will be assessed. The primary outcome will be live-birth rates at 18 months. The secondary outcomes will be sub-divided into four categories: lifestyle and anthropometric, fertility, pregnancy complications, and neonatal outcomes. Outcomes and costs will be also compared to similar women seen in three fertility clinics across Canada. Qualitative data will also be collected from both professionals and obese infertile women. This study will generate new knowledge about the implementation, impacts and costs of a lifestyle management program in obese infertile women. This information

  3. Children with Obesity Prioritize Social Support against Stigma: A Qualitative Study for Development of an Obesity Prevention Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Amini, Maryam; Djazayery, Abolghassem; Majdzadeh, Reza; Taghdisi, Mohammad-Hossein; Sadrzadeh-Yeganeh, Haleh; Eslami-Amirabadi, Maryam

    2014-01-01

    Background: Childhood obesity is a world-wide health problem and development of interventions to prevent or control it is a priority. Obesity is prevalent and on the increase among school-students in Iran, too. As the first step for development of an intervention, the current study was designed to complete our understanding of ideas, attitudes, beliefs, and preferences of primary school children in Tehran, Iran. Methods: Twenty-seven primary school-students (11 boys, 16 girls) in grade-five, most of whom were overweight or obese, participated in four focus-group discussions (FGDs). All FGD notes were analyzed to find the main themes. Results: Nine themes in three main categories emerged after analysis. The themes in the category of barriers of losing weight included environmental, psychological and physiological barriers. Category of intervention components included nutrition improvement, physical activity promotion, social support and education. Setting and deliverer of the intervention were included in the intervention conditions category. The children proposed a multi-component approach for development of an intervention. They mentioned nutrition and physical activity improvement, social support and education as the main elements of an effective intervention. Conclusions: The findings indicate that obese children need to be supported against different barriers of losing weight, mainly social barriers, especially humiliation by the community. PMID:25489443

  4. National Adolescent Treatment Trial for Obesity in Kuwait (NATTO): project design and results of a randomised controlled trial of a good practice approach to treatment of adolescent obesity in Kuwait.

    PubMed

    Boodai, Shurooq A; McColl, John H; Reilly, John J

    2014-06-19

    Few randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of interventions for the treatment of adolescent obesity have taken place outside the western world. This RCT tested whether a simple 'good practice' intervention for the treatment of adolescent obesity would have a greater impact on weight status and other outcomes than a referral to primary care (control) in adolescents in Kuwait City. We report on an assessor-blinded RCT of a treatment intervention in 82 obese 10- to 14-year-olds (mean age 12.4, SD 1.2 years), randomised to a good practice treatment or primary care control group over 6 months. The good practice intervention was intended as relatively low intensity (6 hours contact over 24 weeks, group-based), aiming to change sedentary behaviour, physical activity, and diet. The primary outcome was a change in body mass index (BMI) Z score; other outcomes were changes in waist circumference and blood pressure. The retention of subjects to follow up was acceptable (n = 31 from the intervention group, and n = 32 from the control group), but engagement with both the intervention and control treatment was poor. Treatment had no significant effect on BMI Z score relative to control, and no other significant benefits to intervention were observed. The trial was feasible, but highlights the need to engage obese adolescents and their families in the interventions being trialled. The trial should inform the development of future adolescent obesity treatment trials in the Gulf States with the incorporation of qualitative assessment in future intervention trials. RCT Registered as National Adolescent Treatment Trial for Obesity in Kuwait (NATTO): http://www.controlled-trials.com/ISRCTN37457227, 1 December 2009.

  5. Group motivational intervention in overweight/obese patients in primary prevention of cardiovascular disease in the primary healthcare area

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The global mortality caused by cardiovascular disease increases with weight. The Framingham study showed that obesity is a cardiovascular risk factor independent of other risks such as type 2 diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia and smoking. Moreover, the main problem in the management of weight-loss is its maintenance, if it is achieved. We have designed a study to determine whether a group motivational intervention, together with current clinical practice, is more efficient than the latter alone in the treatment of overweight and obesity, for initial weight loss and essentially to achieve maintenance of the weight achieved; and, secondly, to know if this intervention is more effective for reducing cardiovascular risk factors associated with overweight and obesity. Methods This 26-month follow up multi-centre trial, will include 1200 overweight/obese patients. Random assignment of the intervention by Basic Health Areas (BHA): two geographically separate groups have been created, one of which receives group motivational intervention (group intervention), delivered by a nurse trained by an expert phsychologist, in 32 group sessions, 1 to 12 fortnightly, and 13 to 32, monthly, on top of their standard program of diet, exercise, and the other (control group), receiving the usual follow up, with regular visits every 3 months. Discussion By addressing currently unanswered questions regarding the maintenance in weight loss in obesity/overweight, upon the expected completion of participant follow-up in 2012, the IMOAP trial should document, for the first time, the benefits of a motivational intervention as a treatment tool of weight loss in a primary care setting. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01006213 PMID:20298557

  6. Developing a framework for estimating the potential impact of obesity interventions in a European city.

    PubMed

    Whitfield, Malcolm; Bhanbhro, Sadiq; Green, Geoff; Lewis, Kevin; Hindle, Linda; Levy, Cathy

    2016-09-01

    Obesity is a global challenge for healthy populations. It has given rise to a wide range of public health interventions, focusing on supportive environments and lifestyle change, including diet, physical activity and behavioural change initiatives. Impact is variable. However, more evidence is slowly becoming available and is being used to develop new interventions. In a period of austerity, momentum is building to review these initiatives and understand what they do, how they do it and how they fit together. Our project seeks to develop a relatively straight forward systematic framework using readily accessible data to map the complex web of initiatives at a policy, population, group and individual level aiming to promote healthy lifestyles, diet and physical activity levels or to reduce obesity through medical treatments in a city or municipality population. It produces a system for classifying different types of interventions into groupings which will enable commissioners to assess the scope and distribution of interventions and make a judgement about gaps in provision and the likely impact on mean body mass index (BMI) as a proxy measure for health. Estimated impact in each level or type of intervention is based upon a summary of the scientific evidence of clinical and/or cost effectiveness. Finally it seeks, where possible, to quantify the potential effects of different types of interventions on BMI and produce a cost per unit of BMI reduced. This approach is less sophisticated but identifies the areas where more sophisticated evaluation would add value. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Gut microbiome and serum metabolome alterations in obesity and after weight-loss intervention.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ruixin; Hong, Jie; Xu, Xiaoqiang; Feng, Qiang; Zhang, Dongya; Gu, Yanyun; Shi, Juan; Zhao, Shaoqian; Liu, Wen; Wang, Xiaokai; Xia, Huihua; Liu, Zhipeng; Cui, Bin; Liang, Peiwen; Xi, Liuqing; Jin, Jiabin; Ying, Xiayang; Wang, Xiaolin; Zhao, Xinjie; Li, Wanyu; Jia, Huijue; Lan, Zhou; Li, Fengyu; Wang, Rui; Sun, Yingkai; Yang, Minglan; Shen, Yuxin; Jie, Zhuye; Li, Junhua; Chen, Xiaomin; Zhong, Huanzi; Xie, Hailiang; Zhang, Yifei; Gu, Weiqiong; Deng, Xiaxing; Shen, Baiyong; Xu, Xun; Yang, Huanming; Xu, Guowang; Bi, Yufang; Lai, Shenghan; Wang, Jian; Qi, Lu; Madsen, Lise; Wang, Jiqiu; Ning, Guang; Kristiansen, Karsten; Wang, Weiqing

    2017-07-01

    Emerging evidence has linked the gut microbiome to human obesity. We performed a metagenome-wide association study and serum metabolomics profiling in a cohort of lean and obese, young, Chinese individuals. We identified obesity-associated gut microbial species linked to changes in circulating metabolites. The abundance of Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, a glutamate-fermenting commensal, was markedly decreased in obese individuals and was inversely correlated with serum glutamate concentration. Consistently, gavage with B. thetaiotaomicron reduced plasma glutamate concentration and alleviated diet-induced body-weight gain and adiposity in mice. Furthermore, weight-loss intervention by bariatric surgery partially reversed obesity-associated microbial and metabolic alterations in obese individuals, including the decreased abundance of B. thetaiotaomicron and the elevated serum glutamate concentration. Our findings identify previously unknown links between intestinal microbiota alterations, circulating amino acids and obesity, suggesting that it may be possible to intervene in obesity by targeting the gut microbiota.

  8. The IDEFICS intervention trial to prevent childhood obesity: design and study methods.

    PubMed

    Pigeot, I; Baranowski, T; De Henauw, S

    2015-12-01

    One of the major research dimensions of the Identification and prevention of Dietary- and lifestyle-induced health EFfects In Children and infantS (IDEFICS) study involved the development, implementation and evaluation of a setting-based community-oriented intervention programme for primary prevention of childhood obesity. In this supplement of Obesity Reviews, a compilation of key results of the IDEFICS intervention is packaged in a series of complementary papers. This paper describes the overall design and methods of the IDEFICS intervention in order to facilitate a comprehensive reading of the supplement. In addition, some 'best practice' examples are described. The IDEFICS intervention trial was conducted to assess whether the IDEFICS intervention prevented obesity in young children aged 2 to 9.9 years. The study was a non-randomized, quasi-experimental trial with one intervention matched to one control region in each of eight participating countries. The intervention was designed following the intervention mapping framework, using a socio-ecological theoretical approach. The intervention was designed to address several key obesity-related behaviours in children, parents, schools and community actors; the primary outcome was the prevalence of overweight/obesity according to the IOTF criteria based on body mass index. The aim was to achieve a reduction of overweight/obesity prevalence in the intervention regions. The intervention was delivered in school and community settings over a 2-year period. Data were collected in the intervention and control cohort regions at baseline and 2 years later. This paper offers an introductory framework for a comprehensive reading of this supplement on IDEFICS intervention key results. © 2015 World Obesity.

  9. Personalized medicine in women's obesity prevention and treatment: implications for research, policy and practice.

    PubMed

    Yang, N; Ginsburg, G S; Simmons, L A

    2013-02-01

    The prevalence of obesity in America has reached epidemic proportions, and obesity among women is particularly concerning. Severe obesity (body mass index ≥35 kg m(-2) ) is more prevalent in women than men. Further, women have sex-specific risk factors that must be considered when developing preventive and therapeutic interventions. This review presents personalized medicine as a dynamic approach to obesity prevention, management and treatment for women. First, we review obesity as a complex health issue, with contributing sex-specific, demographic, psychosocial, behavioural, environmental, epigenetic and genetic/genomic risk factors. Second, we present personalized medicine as a rapidly advancing field of health care that seeks to quantify these complex risk factors to develop more targeted and effective strategies that can improve disease management and/or better minimize an individual's likelihood of developing obesity. Third, we discuss how personalized medicine can be applied in a clinical setting with current and emerging tools, including health risk assessments, personalized health plans, and strategies for increasing patient engagement. Finally, we discuss the need for additional research, training and policy that can enhance the practice of personalized medicine in women's obesity, including further advancements in the '-omics' sciences, physician training in personalized medicine, and additional development and standardization of innovative targeted therapies and clinical tools. © 2012 The Authors. obesity reviews © 2012 International Association for the Study of Obesity.

  10. The influence of parental participation on obesity interventions in african american adolescent females: an integrative review.

    PubMed

    Nichols, Michelle; Newman, Susan; Nemeth, Lynne S; Magwood, Gayenell

    2015-01-01

    African American adolescent females have the highest prevalence rates of obesity among those age 18 and under. The long-term health effects and associated comorbidities of obesity within this cohort threaten the health and well-being of a major section of the U.S. population. There is a need to understand the influence of parental support in reducing obesity related health disparities. Using a social ecological framework to explore parental influence on adolescent obesity interventions allows for greater insight into the complex and dynamic influences affecting the lives of African American adolescent females who are obese. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Invited commentary: childhood and adolescent obesity: psychological and behavioral issues in weight loss treatment.

    PubMed

    Sarwer, David B; Dilks, Rebecca J

    2012-01-01

    The prevalence of childhood and adolescent obesity has tripled in the past three decades. This increase has been accompanied by a dramatic rise in obesity-related health complications among American youth. Thus, many obese youth are now experiencing illnesses that will threaten their life expectancy in the absence of significant weight loss. Despite these concerns, a relatively modest body of research has focused on the treatment of adolescent obesity. Results from trials investigating the efficacy of behavioral and pharmacological treatments, like studies of these interventions with adults, suggest that individuals typically lose 5-10% of their initial weight. Unfortunately, weight regain is common. Given the increase in the number of obese adolescents, coupled with the modest results from more conservative treatment approaches, it is not surprising that bariatric surgery for adolescents who suffer from extreme obesity has grown in popularity. The weight losses after surgery are impressive and many adolescents, like adults, experience significant improvements in their physical and mental health postoperatively. However, only a small fraction of adolescents and adults who are heavy enough for bariatric surgery present for surgical treatment. Among those who undergo surgery, a significant minority appear to struggle with a number of behavioral and psychosocial issues that threaten their lifelong success. With all of this in mind, the current obesity problem in the United States and other Westernized countries likely will present a significant challenge to both current and future medical and mental health professionals who work with adolescents and young adults.

  12. Physical activity and nutritional weight loss interventions in obese, low-income women: an integrative review.

    PubMed

    Moredich, Cheryl A; Kessler, Theresa A

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is epidemic in the United States and is considered a public health issue that disproportionally affects low-income women. Combating obesity among low-income women presents unique challenges that must be addressed if weight loss interventions are to be successful. The aim of this integrative review was to explore and synthesize the literature that addresses physical activity and nutrition interventions used to combat obesity in obese, low-income women. A search for original research published between 2006 and 2011 was conducted in online databases. In addition, a hand search of references was performed, and one author was contacted to clarify outcome data. Articles that met inclusion criteria targeted obese, low-income adult women; focused on physical activity or nutrition behavior as an intervention; and measured change in weight as a primary outcome. Studies that focused on women who were postpartum or breastfeeding and those that used pharmacologic or surgical interventions to augment weight loss were excluded. A total of 7 articles were chosen for critical appraisal. According to a synthesis of the current studies, specific weight loss interventions for physical activity and nutrition behavior change for obese, low-income women produced the desired outcome of weight loss. Participants among these studies voiced a preference for group interventions led by peers or medical professionals. Interventions led by peer educators were successful and had the advantage of lowering cost and increasing sustainability. Pragmatic nutrition education worked best, especially when cognizant of cost, food preferences, and culture. Even small increases in physical activity augmented weight loss; however, safety concerns prevented some low-income women from engaging in exercise. According to this synthesis of the best-available evidence, customized weight loss interventions are effective in obese, low-income women. By incorporating these evidence-based interventions

  13. Examining the effect of three low-intensity pediatric obesity interventions: a pilot randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Looney, Shannon M; Raynor, Hollie A

    2014-12-01

    Primary care is an ideal setting to treat pediatric obesity. Effective, low-intensity (≤25 contact hours over 6 months) interventions that reduce standardized body mass index (z-BMI) and can be delivered by primary care providers are needed. This pilot randomized controlled trial investigated the effect of 3 low-intensity (≤25 contact hours over 6 months) pediatric obesity treatments on z-BMI. Twenty-two families (children 8.0 ± 1.8 years, z-BMI of 2.34 ± 0.48) were randomized into 1 of 3, 6-month, low-intensity conditions: newsletter (N), newsletter and growth monitoring (N + GM), or newsletter and growth monitoring plus family-based behavioral counseling (N + GM + BC). Anthropometrics and child eating and leisure-time behaviors were measured. Mixed-factor analyses of variance found a significant (P < .05) main effect of time for z-BMI and servings per day of sugar sweetened beverages, with both decreasing over time. Low-intensity obesity treatments can reduce z-BMI and may be more feasible in primary care. © The Author(s) 2014.

  14. Moving Forward in Childhood Obesity Treatment: A Call for Translational Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, P. M.; Dugdill, L.; Murphy, R.; Knowles, Z.; Cable, N. T.

    2013-01-01

    Childhood obesity is one of the most serious challenges of the 21st century and it is vital that evidence-based treatment approaches can be translated into practice to meet public health needs. Yet policy-makers cannot afford to wait for the results of lengthy trials before "probably efficacious" interventions are made available to the public, and…

  15. Moving Forward in Childhood Obesity Treatment: A Call for Translational Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, P. M.; Dugdill, L.; Murphy, R.; Knowles, Z.; Cable, N. T.

    2013-01-01

    Childhood obesity is one of the most serious challenges of the 21st century and it is vital that evidence-based treatment approaches can be translated into practice to meet public health needs. Yet policy-makers cannot afford to wait for the results of lengthy trials before "probably efficacious" interventions are made available to the public, and…

  16. Community Intervention May Aid Fight Against Childhood Obesity

    MedlinePlus

    ... the program. Obesity rates were assessed among 1st, 4th and 7th graders, starting from four years before ... The study is scheduled for publication in the July issue of the journal Obesity . SOURCE: Harvard T. ...

  17. Parent and African American Daughter Obesity Prevention Interventions: An Integrative Review.

    PubMed

    Reed, Monique; Wilbur, JoEllen; Schoeny, Michael

    2015-08-01

    In the U.S., overweight/obesity among African American (AA) girls has become epidemic. Since parental factors may be associated with improved weight status, it is important to understand the empirical evidence for including parents in obesity prevention interventions with AA girls. The purpose of this integrative review was to identify effectiveness and characteristics of obesity prevention interventions for AA girls (6-17 years) and their parent. Included interventions addressed physical activity (PA), dietary/eating behaviors, and body composition. Of 708 studies published through March 2014, eight met inclusion criteria. Though effects were in the intended direction for most, statistically significant effects were found only for dietary intake and eating behavior. Interventions were characterized by exclusion of girls ages 13-17, failure to link parent involvement to child outcomes, the absence of family systems theory, and modest effects. Further research is needed to ascertain the effectiveness of daughter/parent obesity prevention interventions.

  18. Obesity educational interventions in U.S. medical schools: a systematic review and identified gaps.

    PubMed

    Vitolins, Mara Z; Crandall, Sonia; Miller, David; Ip, Eddie; Marion, Gail; Spangler, John G

    2012-01-01

    Obesity is the second leading cause of preventable death in the United States. However, physicians feel poorly trained to address the obesity epidemic. This article examines effective training methods for overweight and obesity intervention in undergraduate medical education. Using indexing terms related to overweight, obesity, and medical student education, we conducted a literature searched PubMed PsycINFO, Cochrane, and ERIC for relevant articles in English. References from articles identified were also reviewed to located additional articles. We included all studies that incorporated process or outcome evaluations of obesity educational interventions for U.S. medical students. Of an initial 168 citations, 40 abstracts were retrieved; 11 studies were found to be pertinent to medical student obesity education, but only 5 included intervention and evaluation elements. Quality criteria for inclusion consisted of explicit evaluation of the educational methods used. Data extraction identified participants (e.g., year of medical students), interventions, evaluations, and results. These 5 studies successfully used a variety of teaching methods including hands on training, didactic lectures, role-playing, and standardized patient interaction to increase medical students' knowledge, attitudes, and skills regarding overweight and obesity intervention. Two studies addressed medical student bias toward overweight and obese patients. No studies addressed health disparities in the epidemiology and bias of obesity. Despite the commonly cited "obesity epidemic," there are very few published studies that report the effectiveness of medical school obesity educational programs. Gaps still exist within undergraduate medical education including specific training that addresses obesity and long-term studies showing that such training is retained.

  19. Obesity Educational Interventions in U.S. Medical Schools: A Systematic Review and Identified Gaps

    PubMed Central

    Vitolins, Mara Z.; Crandall, Sonia; Miller, Davis; Ip, Eddie; Marion, Gail; Spangler, John G.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Obesity is the second leading cause of preventable death in the U.S. However, physicians feel poorly trained to address the obesity epidemic. This review examines effective training methods for overweight and obesity intervention in undergraduate medical education. Data Sources Using indexing terms related to overweight, obesity and medical student education, we conducted a literature searched PubMed PsychInfo, Cochrane and ERIC for relevant articles in English. References from articles identified were also reviewed to located additional articles. Review Methods We included all studies that incorporated processor outcome evaluations of obesity educational interventions for US medical students. Of an initial 168 citations, 40 abstracts were retrieved; 11 studies were found to be pertinent to medical student obesity education, but only 5 included intervention and evaluation elements. Quality criteria for inclusion consisted of explicit evaluation of the educational methods used. Data extraction identified participants (e.g., year of medical students), interventions, evaluations and results. Results These five studies successfully used a variety of teaching methods including hands on training, didactic lectures, role playing and standardized patient interaction to increase medical students’ knowledge, attitudes and skills regarding overweight and obesity intervention. Two studies addressed medical student bias towards overweight and obese patients. No studies addressed health disparities in the epidemiology and bias of obesity. Conclusions Despite the commonly cited “obesity epidemic,” there are very few published studies that report the effectiveness of medical school obesity educational programs. Gaps still exist within undergraduate medical education including specific training that addresses obesity and long-term studies showing that such training is retained. PMID:22775792

  20. Diagnostic procedures and treatment of childhood obesity by pediatricians: 'The Dutch approach'.

    PubMed

    Schwiebbe, Luuk; Talma, Henk; van Mil, Edgar G; Fetter, Willem P F; Hirasing, Remy A; Renders, Carry M

    2013-07-01

    Child Public Health professionals in the Netherlands refer obese children to a pediatrician to check for underlying causes and comorbidity. What happens to these children in terms of diagnostics and treatment when they visit a pediatrician? To get an overview of the diagnostic procedures and treatment methods a questionnaire was developed and sent to all 583 pediatricians in the Netherlands. Data was obtained of 290 pediatricians from 85% of the general hospitals and all (8) academic hospitals. To define childhood obesity Dutch pediatricians most often use the adult Body Mass Index, only 34% use the sex and age specific IOTF-BMI-criteria. 11% of the (non-obese) overweight children visiting a pediatrician have already comorbidities. All pediatricians perform at least weight and height measurements. Waist circumference is measured by only 42%, ninety-five percent measure blood pressure. To treat obese children without comorbidity thirty different intervention programs were reported. A large variation in diagnostics and interventions of childhood obesity exist. Guidelines in pediatric obesity for diagnostics and treatment are urgently needed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. The use of TeleMedicine in the treatment of paediatric obesity: feasibility and acceptability.

    PubMed

    Davis, Ann McGrath; James, Rochelle L; Boles, Richard E; Goetz, Jeannine R; Belmont, John; Malone, Brett

    2011-01-01

    To assess the feasibility of conducting empirically supported family-based paediatric obesity group treatment via TeleMedicine. Seventeen families were randomly assigned to one of two conditions (physician visit, TeleMedicine). Measures included feasibility, satisfaction and intervention outcome measures such as BMI percentile, and nutrition and activity behaviours. Measures were completed at baseline, post-treatment and at 1-year follow-up. Analyses indicate that both feasibility and satisfaction data regarding the TeleMedicine intervention were positive. Intervention outcome indicates no change in BMI percentile or nutrition and activity behaviours for either treatment group. A behavioural family-based weight loss intervention delivered via TeleMedicine was well received by both parents and providers. Due to the small sample size, null findings regarding intervention outcome should be interpreted with caution. Future research should focus on methods to increase the impact of this intervention on key outcome variables. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  2. The use of TeleMedicine in the Treatment of Pediatric Obesity: Feasibility and Acceptability

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Ann McGrath; James, Rochelle L.; Boles, Richard E.; Goetz, Jeannine R.; Belmont, John; Malone, Brett

    2010-01-01

    Objective To assess the feasibility of conducting empirically supported family based pediatric obesity group treatment via telemedicine. Methods Seventeen families were randomly assigned to one of two conditions (physician visit, TeleMedicine). Measures included feasibility, satisfaction, and intervention outcome measures such as BMI percentile, and nutrition and activity behaviors. Measures were completed at baseline, post-treatment, and at one-year follow-up. Results Analyses indicate that both feasibility and satisfaction data regarding the TeleMedicine intervention were positive. Intervention outcome indicates no change in BMI percentile or nutrition and activity behaviors for either treatment group. Conclusions A behavioral family-based weight loss intervention delivered via TeleMedicine was well received by both parents and providers. Due to the small sample size, null findings regarding intervention outcome should be interpreted with caution. Future research should focus on methods to increase the impact of this intervention on key outcome variables. PMID:21108739

  3. Effectiveness of lifestyle intervention in subgroups of obese infertile women: a subgroup analysis of a RCT.

    PubMed

    van Oers, A M; Groen, H; Mutsaerts, M A Q; Burggraaff, J M; Kuchenbecker, W K H; Perquin, D A M; Koks, C A M; van Golde, R; Kaaijk, E M; Schierbeek, J M; Oosterhuis, G J E; Broekmans, F J; Vogel, N E A; Land, J A; Mol, B W J; Hoek, A

    2016-12-01

    Do age, ovulatory status, severity of obesity and body fat distribution affect the effectiveness of lifestyle intervention in obese infertile women? We did not identify a subgroup in which lifestyle intervention increased the healthy live birth rate however it did increase the natural conception rate in anovulatory obese infertile women. Obese women are at increased risk of infertility and are less likely to conceive after infertility treatment. We previously demonstrated that a 6-month lifestyle intervention preceding infertility treatment did not increase the rate of healthy live births (vaginal live birth of a healthy singleton at term) within 24 months of follow-up as compared to prompt infertility treatment in obese infertile women. Natural conceptions occurred more frequently in women who received a 6-month lifestyle intervention preceding infertility treatment. This is a secondary analysis of a multicentre RCT (randomized controlled trial), the LIFEstyle study. Between 2009 and 2012, 577 obese infertile women were randomly assigned to a 6-month lifestyle intervention followed by infertility treatment (intervention group) or to prompt infertility treatment (control group). Subgroups were predefined in the study protocol, based on frequently used cut-off values in the literature: age (≥36 or <36 years), ovulatory status (anovulatory or ovulatory), BMI (≥35 or <35 kg/m(2)) and waist-hip (WH) ratio (≥0.8 or <0.8). Data of 564 (98%) randomized women who completed follow-up were analyzed. We studied the effect of the intervention program in various subgroups on healthy live birth rate within 24 months, as well as the rate of overall live births (live births independent of gestational age, mode of delivery and health) and natural conceptions within 24 months. Live birth rates included pregnancies resulting from both treatment dependent and natural conceptions. Logistic regression models with randomization group, subgroup and the interaction between

  4. A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Intervention for Pediatric Obesity Using Mobile Technology.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jisan; Piao, Meihua; Byun, Ahjung; Kim, Jeongeun

    2016-01-01

    We reviewed the effect sizes of pediatric obesity intervention studies using mobile technology. Ten databases (Cochrane CENTRAL, CINAHL, EMBASE, PubMed/Medline, KoreaMED, KMBASE, KISS, NDSL, KSITI, and RISS) were reviewed, and four studies were included in a qualitative synthesis. To obtain significant change in obesity-related outcomes among elementary school students, including parents and utilizing text messages in interventions are recommended. Furthermore, devices such as accelerometers may aid obesity management. A meta-analysis of four studies indicated that the mobile intervention positively influenced dropout rates but was ineffective for outcomes of weight control, exercise, and sugar-sweetened beverage intake.

  5. In Search of New Therapeutic Targets in Obesity Treatment: Sirtuins

    PubMed Central

    Kurylowicz, Alina

    2016-01-01

    Most of the available non-invasive medical therapies for obesity are non-efficient in a long-term evaluation; therefore there is a constant need for new methods of treatment. Research on calorie restriction has led to the discovery of sirtuins (silent information regulators, SIRTs), enzymes regulating different cellular pathways that may constitute potential targets in the treatment of obesity. This review paper presents the role of SIRTs in the regulation of glucose and lipid metabolism as well as in the differentiation of adipocytes. How disturbances of SIRTs’ expression and activity may lead to the development of obesity and related complications is discussed. A special emphasis is placed on polymorphisms in genes encoding SIRTs and their possible association with susceptibility to obesity and metabolic complications, as well as on data regarding altered expression of SIRTs in human obesity. Finally, the therapeutic potential of SIRTs-targeted strategies in the treatment of obesity and related disorders is discussed. PMID:27104517

  6. In Search of New Therapeutic Targets in Obesity Treatment: Sirtuins.

    PubMed

    Kurylowicz, Alina

    2016-04-19

    Most of the available non-invasive medical therapies for obesity are non-efficient in a long-term evaluation; therefore there is a constant need for new methods of treatment. Research on calorie restriction has led to the discovery of sirtuins (silent information regulators, SIRTs), enzymes regulating different cellular pathways that may constitute potential targets in the treatment of obesity. This review paper presents the role of SIRTs in the regulation of glucose and lipid metabolism as well as in the differentiation of adipocytes. How disturbances of SIRTs' expression and activity may lead to the development of obesity and related complications is discussed. A special emphasis is placed on polymorphisms in genes encoding SIRTs and their possible association with susceptibility to obesity and metabolic complications, as well as on data regarding altered expression of SIRTs in human obesity. Finally, the therapeutic potential of SIRTs-targeted strategies in the treatment of obesity and related disorders is discussed.

  7. Obesity and PCOS: Implications for Diagnosis and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Legro, Richard S.

    2013-01-01

    There appears to be an epidemic of both obesity and polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) in the world today. However, obesity per se is not a part of the phenotype in many parts of the world. Obesity is likely not a cause of PCOS, as the high prevalence of PCOS among relatively thin populations demonstrates. However, obesity does exacerbate many aspects of the phenotype, especially cardiovascular risk factors such as glucose intolerance and dyslipidemia. It is also associated with a poor response to infertility treatment and likely an increased risk for pregnancy complications in those women who do conceive. Although most treatments of obesity, with the exception of bariatric surgery, achieve modest reductions in weight and improvements in the PCOS phenotype, encouraging weight loss in the obese patient remains one of the front-line therapies. However, further studies are needed to identify the best treatments, and the role of lifestyle therapies in women of normal weight with PCOS is uncertain. PMID:23074008

  8. Issues in the Assessment and Treatment of Obesity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foreyt, John P.

    1987-01-01

    Summarizes recent developments in assessment and treatment of obesity. Reviews studies on genetics and weight cycling, which demonstrate the heterogeneous etiology of obesity and help explain difficulty in losing weight or maintaining weight loss. Describes the newer treatment programs which emphasize the development of exercise behaviors,…

  9. Issues in the Assessment and Treatment of Obesity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foreyt, John P.

    1987-01-01

    Summarizes recent developments in assessment and treatment of obesity. Reviews studies on genetics and weight cycling, which demonstrate the heterogeneous etiology of obesity and help explain difficulty in losing weight or maintaining weight loss. Describes the newer treatment programs which emphasize the development of exercise behaviors,…

  10. Evaluation of a comprehensive intervention with a behavioural modification strategy for childhood obesity prevention: a nonrandomized cluster controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing-jing; Lau, Wing-chung Patrick; Wang, Hai-jun; Ma, Jun

    2015-12-03

    With regard to the global childhood obesity epidemic, it is imperative that effective lifestyle interventions are devised to combat childhood obesity. This paper describes the development and implementation of a comprehensive (a combination of diet and physical activity (PA)), social cognitive behaviour modification intervention using accelerometry and a dietary diary to tackle child overweight and obesity. The comprehensive intervention effect was evaluated in a comparison with diet only, PA only and a no-treatment control group. A pilot study was conducted with a non-randomized cluster design. Four hundred thirty-eight overweight and obese children aged 7-12 years from ten primary schools in Beijing were recruited to receive a one-year intervention. Participants were allocated into one of four groups: the comprehensive intervention group; the PA only group (Happy 10 program); the diet only group (nutrition education program); and a control group. The effects of intervention on adiposity, blood pressure, and biochemical indicators were assessed by examining 2-way interactions (time × intervention) in linear mixed models. Means and 95 % confidence intervals (CI) for the adjusted changes between post-intervention and baseline relative to changes in the control group were calculated and reported as effect sizes. The percentage of body fat in the comprehensive intervention group showed a significant relative decrease (adjusted change: -1.01 %, 95 % CI: (-1.81, -0.20) %) compared with the PA only, diet only or control groups (P < 0.001). Systolic blood pressure significantly decreased in the comprehensive intervention group (adjusted change: -4.37 mmHg, 95 % CI: (-8.42, -0.33) mmHg), as did diastolic blood pressure (adjusted change: -5.50 mmHg, 95 % CI (-8.81, -2.19) mmHg) (P < 0.05). Compared with the other two intervention groups and the control group, positive adjusted changes in fasting glucose in the comprehensive group were found, although not for

  11. Dietitians and exercise professionals in a childhood obesity treatment team.

    PubMed

    Nowicka, Paulina

    2005-06-01

    There has been a remarkable increase in the prevalence of childhood obesity in most countries in recent years, which indicates that modern lifestyle is the triggering factor for genetic susceptibility. This report focuses on the two main environmental factors, nutrition and physical activity, that could influence paediatric obesity development, and how health professionals can address these aspects in the management of childhood obesity in a multidisciplinary treatment team. First, the role of a nutrition expert in the multidisciplinary obesity team is discussed and then the importance of physical activity in the treatment of paediatric obesity. The part on nutrition highlights some interesting areas in this field, namely glycaemic index, high-protein diet, fast foods, portion sizes and soft-drink consumption. Dietary treatment in childhood obesity should be combined with changes in physical activity to promote long-term weight loss. Research on the physical activity of children and adolescents indicates some significant changes over the last decades, which are also reviewed. Factors such as sports club participation and television viewing are discussed. The appropriate physical activity level and effective physical activity programmes are also presented. Physical activity can be promoted in childhood obesity treatment in many ways. Practical advice regarding physical activity programme and the role of exercise professionals in childhood obesity treatment team is given. For successful obesity management, the child should be assessed and treated by a multidisciplinary team, including a physician, dietitian, exercise expert, nurse and behavioural therapist.

  12. Parent-only interventions for childhood overweight or obesity in children aged 5 to 11 years.

    PubMed

    Loveman, Emma; Al-Khudairy, Lena; Johnson, Rebecca E; Robertson, Wendy; Colquitt, Jill L; Mead, Emma L; Ells, Louisa J; Metzendorf, Maria-Inti; Rees, Karen

    2015-12-21

    Child and adolescent overweight and obesity have increased globally, and are associated with short- and long-term health consequences. To assess the efficacy of diet, physical activity and behavioural interventions delivered to parents only for the treatment of overweight and obesity in children aged 5 to 11 years. We performed a systematic literature search of databases including the Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, CINAHL and LILACS as well trial registers. We checked references of identified trials and systematic reviews. We applied no language restrictions. The date of the last search was March 2015 for all databases. We selected randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of diet, physical activity and behavioural interventions delivered to parents only for treating overweight or obesity in children aged 5 to 11 years. Two review authors independently assessed trials for risk of bias and evaluated overall study quality using the GRADE instrument. Where necessary, we contacted authors for additional information. We included 20 RCTs, including 3057 participants. The number of participants ranged per trial between 15 and 645. Follow-up ranged between 24 weeks and two years. Eighteen trials were parallel RCTs and two were cluster RCTs. Twelve RCTs had two comparisons and eight RCTs had three comparisons. The interventions varied widely; the duration, content, delivery and follow-up of the interventions were heterogeneous. The comparators also differed. This review categorised the comparisons into four groups: parent-only versus parent-child, parent-only versus waiting list controls, parent-only versus minimal contact interventions and parent-only versus other parent-only interventions.Trial quality was generally low with a large proportion of trials rated as high risk of bias on individual risk of bias criteria.In trials comparing a parent-only intervention with a parent-child intervention, the body mass index (BMI) z score change showed a mean difference (MD

  13. THE LATINO HEALTH PROJECT: PILOT TESTING A CULTURALLY ADAPTED BEHAVIORAL WEIGHT LOSS INTERVENTION IN OBESE AND OVERWEIGHT LATINO ADULTS

    PubMed Central

    Corsino, Leonor; Rocha-Goldberg, María Pilar; Batch, Bryan C.; Ortiz-Melo, David I.; Bosworth, Hayden B.; Svetkey, Laura P.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To pilot test a culturally adapted behavioral weight loss intervention in obese and overweight Latino adults. Design Pilot study. Setting Latino community organization in Durham, North Carolina. Participants Overweight and obese, self-identified Latinos ≥18 years old. Intervention Intervention consisted of 20 weekly group sessions (90–120 minutes each) incorporating motivational interviewing techniques. The intervention goal was weight loss by adopting the Dietary Approach to Stop Hypertension (DASH) dietary pattern, increasing physical activity, and reducing caloric intake. The cultural adaptation included foods and physical activities commonly used in the Latino culture, using a Spanish-speaking interventionist, and conducting the intervention at a local Latino community organization. Main outcome measures Weight, body mass index (BMI), blood pressure, dietary pattern, and physical activity were measured at baseline and at 20 weeks. Results A total of 56 participants are included in the final analysis. The average weight loss was 5.1 lbs (95% CI −8.7 to −1.5; P=.006); and there was a reduction in BMI of 1.3 kg/m2 (95% CI −2.2 to −0.5; P=.002) at 20 weeks. Systolic blood pressure decreased by 2.6 mm Hg (95% CI −4.7 to −0.6; P=.013). Conclusion A culturally adapted behavioral intervention for the treatment of overweight and obesity is potentially effective in a diverse group of Latino adults. PMID:22774309

  14. The effect of an early childhood obesity intervention on father's obesity risk behaviors: the Melbourne InFANT Program.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Adam D; Lioret, Sandrine; Cameron, Adrian J; Hesketh, Kylie D; McNaughton, Sarah A; Crawford, David; Campbell, Karen J

    2014-02-14

    To investigate the effect of an early childhood obesity prevention intervention, incorporating a parent modelling component, on fathers' obesity risk-related behaviours. Cluster randomized-controlled trial in the setting of pre-existing first-time parents groups organised by Maternal and Child Health Nurses in Victoria, Australia. Participants were 460 first-time fathers mean age = 34.2 (s.d.4.90) years. Dietary pattern scores of fathers were derived using principal component analysis, total physical activity and total television viewing time were assessed at baseline (infant aged three to four months) and after 15 months. No significant beneficial intervention effect was observed on fathers' dietary pattern scores, total physical activity or total television viewing time. Despite a strong focus on parent modelling (targeting parents own diet, physical activity and television viewing behaviours), and beneficial impact on mothers' obesity risk behaviours, this intervention, with mothers as the point of contact, had no effect on fathers' obesity risk-related behaviours. Based on the established links between children's obesity risk-related behaviors and that of their fathers, a need exists for research testing the effectiveness of interventions with a stronger engagement of fathers.

  15. Migraine and Obesity: Epidemiology, Possible Mechanisms, and the Potential Role of Weight Loss Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Bond, Dale S.; Roth, Julie; Nash, Justin M.; Wing, Rena R.

    2010-01-01

    Migraine and obesity are two public health problems of enormous scope that are responsible for significant quality of life impairment and financial cost. Recent research suggests that these disorders may be directly related, with obesity exacerbating migraine in the form of greater headache frequency and severity, or possibly increasing the risk for having migraine. The relationship between migraine and obesity may be explained through a variety of physiological, psychological, and behavioral mechanisms, many of which are affected by weight loss. Given that weight loss might be a viable approach for alleviating migraine in obese individuals, randomized controlled trials are needed to test the effect of weight loss interventions in obese migraineurs. Large-scale weight loss trials have shown that behavioral interventions, in particular, can produce sustained weight losses and related cardiovascular improvements in patients who are diverse in body weight, age, and ethnicity. Consequently, these interventions may provide a useful treatment model for showing whether weight loss reduces headache frequency and severity in obese migraineurs, and offering further insight into pathways through which weight loss might exert an effect. PMID:20673279

  16. Effectiveness of lifestyle interventions in child obesity: systematic review with meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Ho, Mandy; Garnett, Sarah P; Baur, Louise; Burrows, Tracy; Stewart, Laura; Neve, Melinda; Collins, Clare

    2012-12-01

    The effects of lifestyle interventions on cardio-metabolic outcomes in overweight children have not been reviewed systematically. The objective of the study was to examine the impact of lifestyle interventions incorporating a dietary component on both weight change and cardio-metabolic risks in overweight/obese children. English-language articles from 1975 to 2010, available from 7 databases, were used as data sources. Two independent reviewers assessed articles against the following eligibility criteria: randomized controlled trial, participants overweight/obese and ≤18 years, comparing lifestyle interventions to no treatment/wait-list control, usual care, or written education materials. Study quality was critically appraised by 2 reviewers using established criteria; Review Manager 5.1 was used for meta-analyses. Of 38 eligible studies, 33 had complete data for meta-analysis on weight change; 15 reported serum lipids, fasting insulin, or blood pressure. Lifestyle interventions produced significant weight loss compared with no-treatment control conditions: BMI (-1.25kg/m(2), 95% confidence interval [CI] -2.18 to -0.32) and BMI z score (-0.10, 95% CI -0.18 to -0.02). Studies comparing lifestyle interventions to usual care also resulted in significant immediate (-1.30kg/m(2), 95% CI -1.58 to -1.03) and posttreatment effects (-0.92 kg/m(2), 95% CI -1.31 to -0.54) on BMI up to 1 year from baseline. Lifestyle interventions led to significant improvements in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (-0.30 mmol/L, 95% CI -0.45 to -0.15), triglycerides (-0.15 mmol/L, 95% CI -0.24 to -0.07), fasting insulin (-55.1 pmol/L, 95% CI -71.2 to -39.1) and blood pressure up to 1 year from baseline. No differences were found for high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. Lifestyle interventions can lead to improvements in weight and cardio-metabolic outcomes. Further research is needed to determine the optimal length, intensity, and long-term effectiveness of lifestyle interventions.

  17. Obesity prevention and obesogenic behavior interventions in child care: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Sisson, Susan B; Krampe, Megan; Anundson, Katherine; Castle, Sherri

    2016-06-01

    Review peer-reviewed interventions designed to reduce obesity and improve obesogenic behaviors, including physical activity, diet, and screen time, at child care centers. Interventions components and outcomes, study design, duration, use of behavioral theory, and level of social ecological influence are detailed. Article searches were conducted from March 2014, October 2014, March 2015, January 2016 across three databases. Eligible interventions were conducted in child care settings, included 3-to-5-year-old children, included an outcome measure of obesity or obesogenic behavior, and published in English. Study design quality was assessed using Stetler's Level of Quantitative Evidence. All unique records were screened (n=4589): 237 articles were assessed for eligibility. Of these, 97 articles describing 71 interventions met inclusion criteria. Forty-four articles included multi-level interventions. Twenty-nine interventions included an outcome measure of obesity. Forty-one interventions included physical activity. Forty-five included diet. Eight included screen time. Fifty-five percent of interventions were Level II (randomized controlled trials), while 37% were Level III (quasi-experimental or pre-post only study design), and 8% were Level IV (non-experimental or natural experiments). Most interventions had the intended effect on the target: obesity 48% (n=14), physical activity 73% (n=30), diet 87% (n=39), and screen time 63% (n=5). Summarizing intervention strategies and assessing their effectiveness contributes to the existing literature and may provide direction for practitioners and researchers working with young children in child care. Most interventions produced the targeted changes in obesity and obesity-associated behaviors, supporting current and future efforts to collaborate with early-care centers and professionals for obesity prevention. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. A review of late-stage CNS drug candidates for the treatment of obesity.

    PubMed

    Heal, D J; Gosden, J; Smith, S L

    2013-01-01

    Obesity is an important causative factor in morbidity, disability and premature death. Increasing levels of obesity will impose enormous health, financial and social burdens on worldwide society unless effective interventions are implemented. For many obese individuals, diet and behavioural modification need to be supplemented by pharmacotherapy. Preclinical research has revealed a greater understanding of the complex nature of the hypothalamic regulation of food intake and has generated a wide range of new molecular targets for the development of drug candidates for obesity treatment. As shown by the clinical results that have been obtained with this next generation of therapies, some approaches, for example, fixed-dose drug combinations, have already demonstrated an ability to deliver levels of efficacy that are not achievable with the current antiobesity drug therapies. The regulatory and marketing landscape for development, registration and commercialisation of novel centrally acting drugs for treatment of obesity and related metabolic disorders has changed substantially in recent years. Now a much greater emphasis is placed on tolerability and safety, as well as efficacy. In this review we briefly describe the therapeutic approaches to tackle obesity that are in late-stage clinical development. We then discuss drugs in late-stage development for the treatment of obesity and also future directions.

  19. Interventions for prevention of childhood obesity in primary care: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Bourgeois, Nicole; Brauer, Paula; Simpson, Janis Randall; Kim, Susie; Haines, Jess

    2016-01-01

    Background: Preventing childhood obesity is a public health priority, and primary care is an important setting for early intervention. Authors of a recent national guideline have identified a need for effective primary care interventions for obesity prevention and that parent perspectives on interventions are notably absent from the literature. Our objective was to determine the perspectives of primary care clinicians and parents of children 2-5 years of age on the implementation of an obesity prevention intervention within team-based primary care to inform intervention implementation. Methods: We conducted focus groups with interprofessional primary care clinicians (n = 40) and interviews with parents (n = 26). Participants were asked about facilitators and barriers to, and recommendations for implementing a prevention program in primary care. Data were recorded and transcribed, and we used directed content analysis to identify major themes. Results: Barriers existed to addressing obesity-related behaviours in this age group and included a gap in well-child primary care between ages 18 months and 4-5 years, lack of time and sensitivity of the topic. Trust and existing relationships with primary care clinicians were facilitators to program implementation. Offering separate programs for parents and children, and addressing both general parenting topics and obesity-related behaviours were identified as desirable. Interpretation: Despite barriers to addressing obesity-related behaviours within well-child primary care, both clinicians and parents expressed interest in interventions in primary care settings. Next steps should include pilot studies to identify feasible strategies for intervention implementation. PMID:27398363

  20. [Effects of transtheoretical model intervention on improving self-esteem of obese children].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xueyan; Zhou, Leshan; Li, Chenchen

    2013-07-01

    To explore the effects of transtheoretical model (TTM) intervention on improving self-esteem status of obese children. A quasi-experimental research was conducted using a repeated-measure, pretest-posttest control group design in one randomly-selected boarding school of Changsha, Hunan Province in China. Seventy-three obesity students (54 males, 19 females) among grade three to six were included. All participants received first assessment, including: demographic data, stage of change questionnaire, and the Self-Esteem Scale (SES). According to the baseline data, different intervention measures based on TTM were given to different students to promote them to begin exercise and improve their self-esteem status. Follow-up assessments were collected respectively at 1- and 6- month after intervention. Intervention effects on proportion of obese children and self-esteem status as well as BMI were explored. All analyses were conducted using SPSS 17.0. After intervention, the proportion of obese children in precontemplation and maintenance stages was significantly different (P < 0.001). BMI and SES scores didn't change significantly. SES score was significantly different in five stages among three intervention points (P < 0.001). Obesity children who are in the later stages have higher self-esteem scores than those in former stages. Intervention based on TTM can help obese children move through the stages of change.

  1. Body composition changes during interventions to treat overweight and obesity in children and adolescents; a descriptive review.

    PubMed

    de Miguel-Etayo, Pilarnombe; Moreno, Luis A; Iglesia, Iris; Bel-Serrat, Silvia; Mouratidou, Theodora; Garagorri, Jesús M

    2013-01-01

    Nutrition, physical activity and behavior-modifying techniques are widely applied components of interventions treating obesity. Our aim was to review available information on the short and long term effects of intervention treatment on body fat composition of overweight and obese children and adolescents and, to obtain a further understanding on how different body composition techniques detect longitudinal changes. In total, thirteen papers were included; seven included a multidisciplinary intervention component, five applied a combined dietary and physical activity intervention and one a physical activity intervention. Body composition techniques used included anthropometric indices, bioelectrical impedance analysis, and dual energy X-ray absorptiometry. Percentage of fat mass change was calculated in when possible. Findings suggested, no changes were observed in fat free mass after 16 weeks of nutritional intervention and the lowest decrease on fat mass percentage was obtained. However, the highest fat mass percentage with parallel increase in fat free mass, both assess by DXA was observed in a multi-component intervention applied for 20 weeks. In conclusion, more studies are needed to determine the best field body composition method to monitor changes during overweight treatment in children and adolescents.

  2. Childhood Obesity Research Demonstration (CORD): the cross-site overview and opportunities for interventions addressing obesity community-wide.

    PubMed

    Foltz, Jennifer L; Belay, Brook; Dooyema, Carrie A; Williams, Nancy; Blanck, Heidi M

    2015-02-01

    This is the first of a set of articles in this issue on the Childhood Obesity Research Demonstration (CORD) project and provides an overview of the multisite approach and community-wide interventions. Innovative multisetting, multilevel approaches that integrate primary healthcare and public health interventions to improve outcomes for children with obesity need to be evaluated. The CORD project aims to improve BMI and obesity-related behaviors among underserved 2- to 12-year-old children by utilizing these approaches. The CORD consortium, structure, model terminology and key components, and common measures were solidified in year 1 of the CORD project. Demonstration sites applied the CORD model across communities in years 2 and 3. Evaluation plans for year 4 include site-specific analyses as well as cross-site impact, process, and sustainability evaluations. The CORD approach resulted in commonalities and differences in participant, intervention, comparison, and outcome elements across sites. Products are to include analytic results as well as cost assessment, lessons learned, tools, and materials. Foreseen opportunities and challenges arise from the similarities and unique aspects across sites. Communities adapted interventions to fit their local context and build on strengths, but, in turn, this flexibility makes cross-site evaluation challenging. The CORD project represents an evidence-based approach that integrates primary care and public health strategies and evaluates multisetting multilevel interventions, thus adding to the limited research in this field. CORD products will be disseminated to a variety of stakeholders to aid the understanding, prevention, and management of childhood obesity.

  3. CHILE: An Evidence-Based Preschool Intervention for Obesity Prevention in Head Start

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Sally M.; Sanders, Sarah G.; FitzGerald, Courtney A.; Keane, Patricia C.; Canaca, Glenda F.; Volker-Rector, Renee

    2013-01-01

    Background: Obesity is a major concern among American Indians and Hispanics. The Child Health Initiative for Lifelong Eating and Exercise (CHILE) is an evidence-based intervention to prevent obesity in children enrolled in 16 Head Start (HS) Centers in rural communities. The design and implementation of CHILE are described. Methods: CHILE uses a…

  4. A Systematic Review of Culturally Tailored Obesity Interventions among African American Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burton, Wanda Martin; White, Ashley N.; Knowlden, Adam P.

    2017-01-01

    Background: African Americans have the highest age-adjusted rates of obesity at 48.1%. High rates of obesity contribute to the disproportionate share of chronic health conditions. In order to reduce these high rates and achieve health equity, intervention programs must address racial health disparities in culturally meaningful ways. Methods: The…

  5. Collaborative School-Based Obesity Interventions: Lessons Learned from 6 Southern Districts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jain, Anjali; Langwith, Casey

    2013-01-01

    Background: Although studies have shown that school-based obesity interventions can be effective, little is known about how to translate and implement programs into real-world school settings. Methods: Semistructured interviews were conducted in spring 2012 with 19 key informants who participated in a multifaceted childhood obesity intervention…

  6. School-Based Interventions for Overweight and Obesity in Minority School Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Teresa; Weed, L. Diane; Touger-Decker, Riva

    2012-01-01

    The prevalence of childhood overweight and obesity in the United States has resulted in a number of school-based health interventions. This article provides a review of research that addressed childhood overweight and obesity in minority, U.S. elementary schools. All studies reported some benefits in health behaviors and/or anthropometric…

  7. Collaborative School-Based Obesity Interventions: Lessons Learned from 6 Southern Districts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jain, Anjali; Langwith, Casey

    2013-01-01

    Background: Although studies have shown that school-based obesity interventions can be effective, little is known about how to translate and implement programs into real-world school settings. Methods: Semistructured interviews were conducted in spring 2012 with 19 key informants who participated in a multifaceted childhood obesity intervention…

  8. Obesity Prevention Interventions in Early Childhood Education and Care Settings with Parental Involvement: A Systematic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Heather; Skouteris, Helen; Edwards, Susan; Rutherford, Leonie

    2015-01-01

    Partnering early childhood education and care (ECEC) and the home together may be more effective in combating obesogenic risk factors in preschool children. Thus, an evaluation of ECEC obesity prevention interventions with a parental component was conducted, exploring parental engagement and its effect on obesity and healthy lifestyle outcomes. A…

  9. School-Based Interventions for Overweight and Obesity in Minority School Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Teresa; Weed, L. Diane; Touger-Decker, Riva

    2012-01-01

    The prevalence of childhood overweight and obesity in the United States has resulted in a number of school-based health interventions. This article provides a review of research that addressed childhood overweight and obesity in minority, U.S. elementary schools. All studies reported some benefits in health behaviors and/or anthropometric…

  10. Obesity Prevention Interventions in Early Childhood Education and Care Settings with Parental Involvement: A Systematic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Heather; Skouteris, Helen; Edwards, Susan; Rutherford, Leonie

    2015-01-01

    Partnering early childhood education and care (ECEC) and the home together may be more effective in combating obesogenic risk factors in preschool children. Thus, an evaluation of ECEC obesity prevention interventions with a parental component was conducted, exploring parental engagement and its effect on obesity and healthy lifestyle outcomes. A…

  11. CHILE: An Evidence-Based Preschool Intervention for Obesity Prevention in Head Start

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Sally M.; Sanders, Sarah G.; FitzGerald, Courtney A.; Keane, Patricia C.; Canaca, Glenda F.; Volker-Rector, Renee

    2013-01-01

    Background: Obesity is a major concern among American Indians and Hispanics. The Child Health Initiative for Lifelong Eating and Exercise (CHILE) is an evidence-based intervention to prevent obesity in children enrolled in 16 Head Start (HS) Centers in rural communities. The design and implementation of CHILE are described. Methods: CHILE uses a…

  12. Designing an Agent-Based Model for Childhood Obesity Interventions: A Case Study of ChildObesity180.

    PubMed

    Hennessy, Erin; Ornstein, Joseph T; Economos, Christina D; Herzog, Julia Bloom; Lynskey, Vanessa; Coffield, Edward; Hammond, Ross A

    2016-01-07

    Complex systems modeling can provide useful insights when designing and anticipating the impact of public health interventions. We developed an agent-based, or individual-based, computation model (ABM) to aid in evaluating and refining implementation of behavior change interventions designed to increase physical activity and healthy eating and reduce unnecessary weight gain among school-aged children. The potential benefits of applying an ABM approach include estimating outcomes despite data gaps, anticipating impact among different populations or scenarios, and exploring how to expand or modify an intervention. The practical challenges inherent in implementing such an approach include data resources, data availability, and the skills and knowledge of ABM among the public health obesity intervention community. The aim of this article was to provide a step-by-step guide on how to develop an ABM to evaluate multifaceted interventions on childhood obesity prevention in multiple settings. We used data from 2 obesity prevention initiatives and public-use resources. The details and goals of the interventions, overview of the model design process, and generalizability of this approach for future interventions is discussed.

  13. Multicomponent school-initiated obesity intervention in a high-risk, Hispanic elementary school.

    PubMed

    Klish, William J; Karavias, Kellie E; White, Katie S; Balch, Angela J; Fraley, J Kennard; Mikhail, Carmen; Abrams, Stephanie H; Terrazas, Norma L; Smith, E O'Brian; Wong, William W

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the effectiveness of a school-initiated cognitive and behavioral program to reduce childhood obesity. Height, weight, body mass index (BMI), and BMI z scores were obtained at the beginning and end of the school year at an intervention school (n = 1022) and at a control school (n = 692). The prevalence of overweight and obesity was 18.9% and 30.4% versus 19% and 30.2%, respectively, in the intervention and control schools. The incidence of overweight increased in the control school, but the incidence of obesity, weight, and BMI z scores increased significantly in the intervention school, suggesting that implementation of any school-based obesity intervention programs requires careful planning to achieve goals.

  14. Obesity.

    PubMed

    González-Muniesa, Pedro; Mártinez-González, Miguel-Angel; Hu, Frank B; Després, Jean-Pierre; Matsuzawa, Yuji; Loos, Ruth J F; Moreno, Luis A; Bray, George A; Martinez, J Alfredo

    2017-06-15

    Excessive fat deposition in obesity has a multifactorial aetiology, but is widely considered the result of disequilibrium between energy intake and expenditure. Despite specific public health policies and individual treatment efforts to combat the obesity epidemic, >2 billion people worldwide are overweight or obese. The central nervous system circuitry, fuel turnover and metabolism as well as adipose tissue homeostasis are important to comprehend excessive weight gain and associated comorbidities. Obesity has a profound impact on quality of life, even in seemingly healthy individuals. Diet, physical activity or exercise and lifestyle changes are the cornerstones of obesity treatment, but medical treatment and bariatric surgery are becoming important. Family history, food environment, cultural preferences, adverse reactions to food, perinatal nutrition, previous or current diseases and physical activity patterns are relevant aspects for the health care professional to consider when treating the individual with obesity. Clinicians and other health care professionals are often ill-equipped to address the important environmental and socioeconomic drivers of the current obesity epidemic. Finally, understanding the epigenetic and genetic factors as well as metabolic pathways that take advantage of 'omics' technologies could play a very relevant part in combating obesity within a precision approach.

  15. [Impact of strength training exercise on secondary prevention of childhood obesity; an intervention within the school system].

    PubMed

    Vásquez, Fabián; Díaz, Erik; Lera, Lydia; Meza, Jorge; Salas, Isabel; Rojas, Pamela; Atalah, Eduardo; Burrows, Raquel

    2013-01-01

    The physical exercise is an important therapeutic tool to prevent and treat obesity, as well as reducing metabolic alterations and the risk of non-communicable diseases. To evaluate the impact of a strength training exercise intervention within the school system, this includes muscular strength exercise, dietary education and psychological support in obese children. We worked with 120 obese schoolchildren, between 8 and 13 years, recruited from 3 schools. Group 1 (n = 60) participated in the intervention, which included physical exercise, dietary education, and psychological support, for 3 months. Group 2 (n = 60) received only the educational intervention and psychological support for the first 3 months, and then received the exercise intervention from months 3 to 6. Participants were evaluated for BMI, waist circumference, body fat, presence of metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular risk factors. At 3 months, there were significant differences between the groups for change in BMI z-score, waist circumference, and body fat as well as prevalence of metabolic syndrome, abdominal obesity, hypertriglyceridemia, and fasting hyperglycemia. In group 1, these parameters decreased and increased, in group 2. From months 3 to 6, Group 2 showed a significant decrease in abdominal obesity, high blood pressure, and hypertriglyceridemia, while Group 1 showed a significant increase in high blood pressure and no change in other cardiovascular risk factors. This study demonstrates the positive impact of a strength training physical exercise program on reduction of body fat, metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular risk factors. This study supports the use of exercise as a treatment for obesity and its comorbidities in schoolchildren. Copyright © AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2013. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  16. Current status of intragastric balloon for obesity treatment

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seung Han; Chun, Hoon Jai; Choi, Hyuk Soon; Kim, Eun Sun; Keum, Bora; Jeen, Yoon Tae

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopic bariatric therapy may be a useful alternative to pharmacological treatment for obesity, and it provides greater efficacy with lower risks than do conventional surgical procedures. Among the various endoscopic treatments for obesity, the intragastric balloon is associated with significant efficacy in body weight reduction and relief of comorbid disease symptoms. Anatomically, this treatment is based on gastric space-occupying effects that increase the feeling of satiety and may also affect gut neuroendocrine signaling. The simplicity of the intragastric balloon procedure may account for its widespread role in obesity treatment and its applicability to various degrees of obesity. However, advances in device properties and procedural techniques are still needed in order to improve its safety and cost-effectiveness. Furthermore, verification of the physiological outcomes of intragastric balloon treatment and the clinical predictive factors for treatment responses should be considered. In this article, we discuss the types, efficacy, safety, and future directions of intragastric balloon treatment. PMID:27350727

  17. [Interventions to control overweight and obesity in children and adolescents in Peru].

    PubMed

    Aquino-Vivanco, Óscar; Aramburu, Adolfo; Munares-García, Óscar; Gómez-Guizado, Guillermo; García-Torres, Elizabeth; Donaires-Toscano, Fernando; Fiestas, Fabián

    2013-04-01

    Overweight and obesity in children and adolescents represent a serious public health problem in Peru, with high costs for society that require the implementation of a set of public policies directed toward its control. Thus, interventions have been proposed as the regulation of advertising of unhealthy foods, self-regulation, the implementation of kiosks healthy and nutritional labeling. From the analysis of the problem of overweight and obesity in children and adolescents in Peru, this article is a narrative review of such interventions.

  18. Treatment of Pediatric Obesity: An Umbrella Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Rajjo, Tamim; Mohammed, Khaled; Alsawas, Mouaz; Ahmed, Ahmed T; Farah, Wigdan; Asi, Noor; Almasri, Jehad; Prokop, Larry J; Murad, Mohammad Hassan

    2017-03-01

    Multiple interventions are available to reduce excess body weight in children. We appraised the quality of evidence supporting each intervention and assessed the effectiveness on different obesity-related outcomes. We conducted a systematic search for systematic reviews of randomized controlled trials evaluating pediatric obesity interventions applied for ≥6 months. We assessed the quality of evidence for each intervention using GRADE (Grading of Recommendation, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation) approach. From 16 systematic reviews, we identified 133 eligible randomized controlled trials. Physical activity interventions reduced systolic blood pressure and fasting glucose (low to moderate quality of evidence). Dietary interventions with low-carbohydrate diets had a similar effect to low-fat diets in terms of body mass index (BMI) reduction (moderate quality of evidence). Educational interventions reduced waist circumference, BMI, and diastolic blood pressure (low quality of evidence). Pharmacological interventions reduced BMI (metformin, sibutramine, orlistat) and waist circumference (sibutramine, orlistat) and increased high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (sibutramine) but also raised systolic and diastolic blood pressure (sibutramine). Surgical interventions (laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding, Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, sleeve gastrectomy) resulted in the largest BMI reduction (moderate quality of evidence). Combined interventions consisting of dietary modification, physical activity, behavioral therapy, and education significantly reduced systolic and diastolic blood pressure, BMI, and triglycerides. Combined parent-child interventions and parent-only interventions had similar effects on BMI (low quality of evidence). Several childhood obesity interventions are effective in improving metabolic and anthropometric measures. A comprehensive multicomponent intervention, however, appears to have the best overall outcomes.

  19. New pharmacological treatments for the management of obesity.

    PubMed

    Hurt, Ryan T; Edakkanambeth Varayil, Jithinraj; Ebbert, Jon O

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is quickly becoming the leading preventable cause of death in the USA. Over 60 obesity-related comorbidities exist which increase the complexity and cost of medical care in obese patients. Even a moderate weight loss of 5 % can reduce morbidity associated with these conditions. Lifestyle modification through caloric restriction and enhanced exercise and physical activity remain the first line treatment for obesity. The development of pharmacologic agents for the treatment of obesity has been challenged by both lack of efficacy and serious adverse side effects leading to their removal from market. Two new agents were recently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration to complement lifestyle modification in obese (BMI ≥30 kg/m(2)) and overweight patients (BMI ≥27 kg/m(2) and one obesity-related comorbidity). Lorcaserin is a novel serotonin 5-HT2C selective agonist which has been shown in three phase III studies to significantly reduce weight and cardiovascular risk factors such as diabetes. Phentermine/topiramate extended release (ER) is a novel combination of two agents which have individually been shown to significantly reduce weight. The combination agent phentermine/topiramate ER has been shown to reduce weight in overweight and obese subjects in a number of studies. This article reviews the pharmacology, clinical efficacy, and safety of these new agents compared to past and other presently available medications for the treatment of obesity.

  20. Pathophysiology and treatment of obesity hypertension.

    PubMed

    Wofford, Marion R; Hall, John E

    2004-01-01

    Excess weight gain accounts for as much as 65-75% of the risk for essential hypertension and also greatly increases the risk for end stage renal disease (ESRD). Obesity raises blood pressure by increasing renal tubular reabsorption, impairing pressure natriuresis, and causing volume expansion due to activation of the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) and renin-angiotensin aldosterone system (RAAS), and by physical compression of the kidneys, especially when visceral obesity is present. The mechanisms of SNS activation in obesity are still unclear but may be due, in part, to hyperleptinemia that stimulates the hypothalamic pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) pathway. With prolonged obesity, there may be a gradual loss of kidney function that worsens with time, exacerbates hypertension, and makes blood pressure more difficult to control. Lifestyle modifications, including weight reduction and increased physical activity, are essential first steps in the management of obesity hypertension and renal disease. Anti-obesity drugs offer potential pharmacotherapy for obesity hypertension, but current drugs are very limited and additional long-term studies are needed to test their safety and efficacy. Clinical trials are also needed to determine the most effective antihypertensive drugs for obese hypertensive patients. Special considerations for the obese patient, in addition to adequately controlling the blood pressure, include correcting the metabolic abnormalities and protecting the kidneys from further injury.

  1. New Targets for Drug Treatment of Obesity.

    PubMed

    Valsamakis, Georgios; Konstantakou, Panagiota; Mastorakos, George

    2017-01-06

    Antiobesity medical management has shown unsatisfactory results to date in terms of efficacy, safety, and long-term maintenance of weight loss. This poor performance could be attributed to the complexity of appetite regulation mechanisms; the serious drug side effects; and, crucially, the lack of profile-matching treatment strategies and individualized, multidisciplinary follow-up. Nevertheless, antiobesity pharmacotherapy remains a challenging, exciting field of intensive scientific interest. According to the latest studies, the future of bariatric medicine lies in developing drugs acting at multiple levels of the brain-gut axis. Currently, research is focused on the generation of combination treatments based on gut hormones in a way that mimics changes underlying surgically induced weight loss, in addition to centrally acting agents; these aim to restore energy balance disruptions and enhance energy expenditure. Collectively, the pharmacological resolution of obesity could potentially be achieved with combination regimens targeting different molecules and levels of the energy homeostasis system, in parallel with matching patients' needs, resulting in a favorable metabolic profile.

  2. Behavioral Weight Loss and Physical Activity Intervention in Obese Adults with Asthma. A Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Strub, Peg; Xiao, Lan; Lavori, Philip W.; Camargo, Carlos A.; Wilson, Sandra R.; Gardner, Christopher D.; Buist, A. Sonia; Haskell, William L.; Lv, Nan

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: The effect of weight loss on asthma in obese adults warrants rigorous investigation. Objectives: To examine an evidence-based, practical, and comprehensive lifestyle intervention targeting modest weight loss and increased physical activity for asthma control. Methods: The trial randomized 330 obese adults with uncontrolled asthma to receive usual care enhanced with a pedometer, a weight scale, information about existing weight management services at the participating clinics, and an asthma education DVD, or with these tools plus the 12-month intervention. Measurements and Main Results: The primary outcome was change in Asthma Control Questionnaire (ACQ) scores from baseline to 12 months. Participants (mean [SD] age, 47.6 [12.4] yr) were 70.6% women, 20.0% non-Hispanic black, 20.3% Hispanic/Latino, and 8.2% Asian/Pacific Islander. At baseline, they were obese (mean [SD] body mass index, 37.5 [5.9] kg/m2) and had uncontrolled asthma (Asthma Control Test score, 15.1 [3.8]). Compared with control subjects, intervention participants achieved significantly greater mean weight loss (±SE) (intervention, −4.0 ± 0.8 kg vs. control, −2.1 ± 0.8 kg; P = 0.01) and increased leisure-time activity (intervention, 418.2 ± 110.6 metabolic equivalent task–min/wk vs. control, 178.8 ± 109.1 metabolic equivalent task–min/wk; P = 0.05) at 12 months. But between-treatment mean (±SE) differences were not significant for ACQ changes (intervention, –0.3 ± 0.1 vs. control, –0.2 ± 0.1; P = 0.92) from baseline (mean [SD], 1.4 [0.8]), nor for any other clinical asthma outcomes (e.g., spirometric results and asthma exacerbations). Among all participants regardless of treatment assignment, weight loss of 10% or greater was associated with a Cohen d effect of 0.76 and with 3.78 (95% confidence interval, 1.72–8.31) times the odds of achieving clinically significant reductions (i.e., ≥0.5) on ACQ as stable weight (<3% loss or gain from

  3. Testosterone as Potential Effective Therapy in Treatment of Obesity in Men with Testosterone Deficiency: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Saad, Farid; Aversa, Antonio; Isidori, Andrea M; Gooren, Louis J

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Obesity negatively affects human health. Limiting food intake, while producing some weight loss, results in reduction of lean body mass. Combined with moderate exercise it produces significant weight loss, maintains lean body mass and improves insulin sensitivity, but appears difficult to adhere to. Bariatric surgery is clinically effective for severely obese individuals compared with non-surgical interventions, but has limitations. Clinical and pre-clinical studies have implicated a role for testosterone (T) in the patho-physiology of obesity. Methods: Evidence Acquisition and Synthesis: A literature search in PubMed on the role of T in counteracting obesity and its complications. Results: Obesity per se impairs testicular T biosynthesis. Furthermore, lower-than-normal T levels increase accumulation of fat depots, particularly abdominal (visceral) fat. This fat distribution is associated with development of metabolic syndrome (MetS) and its sequels, namely type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and cardiovascular disease (CVD). T treatment reverses fat accumulation with significant improvement in lean body mass, insulin sensitivity and biochemical profiles of cardiovascular risk. The contribution of T to combating obesity in hypogonadal men remains largely unknown to medical professionals managing patients with obesity and metabolic syndrome. Many physicians associate T treatment in men with risks for prostate malignancy and CVD. These beliefs are not supported by recent insights. Conclusion: While overall treatment of obesity is unsuccessful, T treatment of hypogonadal men may be effective, also because it improves mood, energy, reduces fatigue and may motivate men to adhere to diet and exercise regimens designed to combat obesity. PMID:22268394

  4. Receptivity to weight management interventions among hospitalized obese patients: an untapped opportunity.

    PubMed

    Harris, Ché Matthew; Rios, Rebeca; Landis, Regina; Khaliq, Waseem; Wright, Scott

    2013-06-01

    Hospitalized obese patients rarely receive counseling about weight loss. Specific patient preferences regarding inpatient weight loss interventions have not been systematically investigated. The objective of the study was to describe the preferences of hospitalized obese patients for weight loss interventions and to identify predictors of receptivity to such offerings. A total of 204 individuals with a body mass index (BMI) ≥30 kg/m (mean BMI 38.1 kg/m) admitted to the hospital medicine service in spring 2011 were surveyed at bedside for this cross-sectional study. The study population was predominantly white (67%) and women (62%), and their mean age was 55 years. Although 82% expressed a desire for providers to discuss weight loss during hospitalization, nearly all (92%) of the patients reported that providers did not address this subject. Logistic regression analysis tested demographic variables and obesity-related health beliefs as predictors of receptivity to inpatient weight loss interventions. The recognition of their own obesity and belief that weight loss would prolong life were significantly associated with receptivity to specific interventions, over and above objectively measured BMI in adjusted models. Receptivity to inpatient weight loss interventions varies considerably among hospitalized obese patients. The most important determinants that predict the level of receptivity were related to weight-related beliefs and perceptions. Future inpatient weight loss interventions could be targeted to patients with truthful health beliefs and perceptions about obesity.

  5. Obesity: a systematic review on parental involvement in long-term European childhood weight control interventions with a nutritional focus.

    PubMed

    van der Kruk, J J; Kortekaas, F; Lucas, C; Jager-Wittenaar, H

    2013-09-01

    In Europe, about 20% of children are overweight. Focus on parental responsibility is an effective method in weight control interventions in children. In this systematic review we describe the intensity of parental involvement and behaviour change aimed at parents in long-term European childhood weight control interventions. We include European Union studies targeting parents in order to improve children's weight status in multi-component (parental, behaviour change and nutrition) health promotion or lifestyle interventions. The included studies have at least one objectively measured anthropometric outcome in the weight status of the child. Parental involvement was described and categorized based on the intensity of parental involvement and coded using a validated behaviour change taxonomy specific to childhood obesity. Twenty-four studies were analysed. In effective long-term treatment studies, medium and high intensity parental involvement were identified most frequently; whereas in prevention studies low intensity parental involvement was identified most frequently. Parenting skills, generic and specific to lifestyle behaviour, scored frequently in effective weight control interventions. To list parental skills in generic and specific to lifestyle, descriptions of the included studies were summarized. We conclude that intensity of parental involvement and behaviour change techniques are important issues in the effectiveness of long-term childhood weight control interventions. © 2013 The Authors. obesity reviews © 2013 International Association for the Study of Obesity.

  6. Diabetes Remission after Nonsurgical Intensive Lifestyle Intervention in Obese Patients with Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Mottalib, Adham; Sakr, Mahmoud; Shehabeldin, Mohamed; Hamdy, Osama

    2015-01-01

    Partial or complete remission from type 2 diabetes was recently observed after bariatric surgeries. Limited data is available about the possibility of inducing diabetes remission through intensive weight reduction. We retrospectively evaluated diabetes remissions after one year of the Weight Achievement and Intensive Treatment (Why WAIT) program, a 12-week intensive program for diabetes weight management in real-world clinical practice. Among 120 obese patients with type 2 diabetes who completed the program, 88 patients returned for follow-up at one year. Nineteen patients (21.6%) had major improvement in their glycemic control, defined as achieving an A1C <6.5% after one year. Four patients (4.5%) achieved either partial or complete diabetes remission defined as A1C <6.5% and <5.7%, respectively, on no antihyperglycemic medications for one year; 2 achieved partial remission (2.3%) and 2 achieved complete remission (2.3%). At the time of intervention, patients who achieved diabetes remission had shorter diabetes duration (<5 years) and lower A1C (<8%) and were treated with fewer than 2 oral medications. They achieved a weight reduction of >7% after 12 weeks. These results indicate that a subset of obese patients with type 2 diabetes is appropriate for intensive lifestyle intervention with the aim of inducing diabetes remission. PMID:26114120

  7. A randomized trial of multiple interventions for childhood obesity in China.

    PubMed

    Cao, Zhi-Juan; Wang, Shu-Mei; Chen, Yue

    2015-05-01

    Family- and school-based interventions for childhood obesity have been widely applied; however, the prevalence of childhood obesity remains high. The purpose of this RCT is to evaluate the effectiveness of a family-individual-school-based comprehensive intervention model. Cluster RCT. Fourteen primary schools were selected from 26 primary schools in a district of Shanghai, China, and then randomly divided into intervention and control groups with seven schools in each. The trial started with first-grade students. A total of 1,287 students in the intervention group and 1,159 in the control group were studied overall. The baseline study was conducted in January 2011, and family-individual-school-based interventions started in March 2011 and ended in December 2013 for intervention group students. Three follow-up studies were conducted in January 2012, January 2013, and January 2014. Data analysis was conducted in March 2014. Students' weight and height were measured. The prevalence of obesity/overweight and BMI z-scores were calculated and analyzed using a generalized estimating equation approach. The overall prevalence of overweight/obesity declined from 28.92% in 2011 to 24.77% in 2014, with a difference of 4.15% in the intervention group compared with a 0.03% decline (from 30.71% to 30.68%) in the control group. The intervention group had significantly lower odds of developing obesity or overweight and had decreased average BMI z-scores compared with the control group, especially for obese or overweight students. The family-individual-school-based comprehensive intervention model is effective for controlling childhood obesity and overweight. Copyright © 2015 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Exercise interventions during cancer treatment: biopsychosocial outcomes.

    PubMed

    Courneya, K S

    2001-04-01

    More than 1.2 million Americans are diagnosed with cancer each year, and many receive intensive medical treatments. Currently, exercise is not considered a standard quality-of -life intervention for cancer patients. In this article, 11 studies are reviewed that have examined exercise interventions concurrent with cancer treatment. The key conclusion is that exercise improves a wide range of biopsychosocial outcomes in cancer patients, but much more reserch is needed.

  9. Psychotropic drugs in the treatment of obesity: what promise?

    PubMed

    Appolinario, Jose C; Bueno, João R; Coutinho, Walmir

    2004-01-01

    Obesity is a chronic and highly prevalent medical condition associated with increased risk for the development of numerous and sometimes fatal diseases. Despite its severity, there are few anti-obesity agents available on the market. Although psychotropic agents are not approved for the treatment of obesity, they have been used by clinicians as a therapeutic tool in daily clinical practice. The purpose of this article is to review the rationale, as well as the evidence, for the potential use of these agents in obesity treatment. Evidence for the efficacy of psychotropic agents in obesity treatment comes from different sources. The first type of evidence is weight loss observed with treatment in clinical trials of patients with neuropsychiatric syndromes (e.g. mood disorders, epilepsy). A recent example of such findings is the weight reduction reported in clinical trials involving obese patients with binge eating disorder. While randomised, controlled trials specifically designed to investigate the weight loss properties of psychotropic agents in obese patients are the most appropriate source of evidence of anti-obesity action, such trials remain scarce. The most studied psychotropic agents in obesity trials are drugs used in the treatment of mood disorders, i.e. mainly antidepressants and antiepileptics. SSRIs (e.g. fluoxetine, sertraline and fluvoxamine) were amongst the first psychotropic agents investigated in the treatment of obesity. Additional data have also been published for other antidepressants (e.g. venlafaxine, citalopram and bupropion) and antiepileptics (e.g. topiramate and zonisamide). Based on the available data for the efficacy of psychotropic agents in obesity and other related conditions, SSRIs may be considered for the management of certain subgroups of obese individuals with comorbid conditions such as depression, binge eating disorder and type 2 diabetes mellitus. In addition, some newer agents, such as bupropion, topiramate and zonisamide

  10. [Cognitive behavioral treatment in the integral management of obesity in adolescents].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Morán, Martha; Mendoza-Ávila, Eduardo; Cumplido-Fuentes, Agustín; Simental-Mendía, Luis E; Rodríguez-Ramírez, Gabriela; Sánchez-Lazcano, Gloria Janeth; Ramírez-Bonilla, Paulina; Cumplido-González, Guadalupe; Ortiz-Martínez, Guadalupe; Pinedo-Rodríguez, Gustavo Alan; Meza-Villa, Ángel; Ortiz-Ramos, Alma Fátima; Puerta-Mota, Gerardo; Guerrero-Romero, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    Obesity in children and adolescents is associated to a morbidity that has increased significantly. It has become a public health problem around the world. The objective of this paper was to evaluate the efficacy of the cognitive behavioral treatment strategy in the comprehensive management of obesity in adolescents. Double blind, randomized, and controlled intervention study, of four months of follow-up, with a total of 115 obese adolescents, aged 12 to 16 years. The intervention group received cognitive behavioral treatment strategy, as well as advise on diet and exercise. At the same time, the control group only received advise on diet and exercise. The percentage of adolescents who showed adherence to diet was 73.7 % versus 41.4 %, (p = 0.0009) and to exercise, 61.4 % versus 19.0 %, (p < 0.0005); compared with the control group, the intervention group was significantly higher. A total of 10 adolescents (17.5 %) in the intervention group and 26 (44.8 %) in the control group dropped-out (p = 0.003). Despite there were significant differences between groups, adolescents in the intervention group exhibited a higher and sustained decrease in body weight, body mass index, as well as in the body fat percentage. The cognitive behavioral treatment strategy improves adherence and decreases desertion of the weight reduction program in adolescents.

  11. Musculoskeletal pain, fear avoidance behaviors, and functional decline in obesity: potential interventions to manage pain and maintain function.

    PubMed

    Vincent, Heather K; Adams, Meredith C B; Vincent, Kevin R; Hurley, Robert W

    2013-01-01

    Individuals with musculoskeletal pain exhibit abnormal movement patterns, including antalgic gait, postural dysfunction, increased thoracolumbar stiffness, decreased proprioception, and altered activation of abdominal and extensor muscles. Additionally, aberrant or increased biomechanical forces over time produce joint or structural damage that results in pain. A large body habitus resulting from excessive weight can accelerate these musculoskeletal complaints. Irrespective of age, obesity contributes to chronic musculoskeletal pain, impairment of mobility, and eventual physical disability. Potential mechanisms that may mediate the relationships between obesity-related pain and functional decline include skeletal muscle strength deterioration, systemic inflammation, and psychosocial characteristics (eg, pain catastrophizing, kinesiophobia, and depression). Treatment considerations for obese patients with musculoskeletal pain include assessment of kinesiophobia levels, biomechanical analysis, and pain medication use. Ideally, a multidisciplinary team of physicians, psychologists, and physical therapists should optimize the design of interventions specific to the patient. In some cases, the use of appropriate pain medications or intra-articular injectable agents may help control pain, fostering sustained activity, caloric expenditure, and weight loss. Morbid obesity is a medical condition that alters biomechanical forces on the tissues of the body. This condition provides the opportunity to examine accelerated development of musculoskeletal pain syndromes and etiology. The proposed therapeutic interventions can have multiple benefits in the obese population including weight loss, improved psychological outlook and self-efficacy, reduced kinesiophobia levels, reduced risk of functional dependence, and improved quality of life.

  12. Obesity, Attractiveness, and Differential Treatment in Hiring: A Field Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rooth, Dan-Olof

    2009-01-01

    This study presents evidence of differential treatment in the hiring of obese individuals in the Swedish labor market. Fictitious applications were sent to real job openings. The applications were sent in pairs, where one facial photo of an otherwise identical applicant was manipulated to show the individual as obese. Applications sent with the…

  13. Neurocognitive Processes and Pediatric Obesity Interventions: Review of Current Literature and Suggested Future Directions.

    PubMed

    Miller, Alison L

    2016-06-01

    Childhood obesity is a significant problem in the United States, but current childhood obesity prevention approaches have limited efficacy. Self-regulation processes organize behavior to achieve a goal and may shape health behaviors and health outcomes. Obesity prevention approaches that focus on the cognitive and behavioral mechanisms that underlie self-regulation early in life may therefore lead to better outcomes. This article reviews the development of executive functioning (EF), identifies influences on EF development, discusses aspects of EF relating to increased risk for childhood obesity, and considers how EF-weight associations may change across development. Implications for intervention are discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Psychological characteristics, eating behavior, and quality of life assessment of obese patients undergoing weight loss interventions.

    PubMed

    Miras, A D; Al-Najim, W; Jackson, S N; McGirr, J; Cotter, L; Tharakan, G; Vusirikala, A; le Roux, C W; Prechtl, C G; Scholtz, S

    2015-03-01

    Bariatric surgery is the most effective treatment for obesity. However, not all patients have similar weight loss following surgery and many researchers have attributed this to different pre-operative psychological, eating behavior, or quality-of-life factors. The aim of this study was to determine whether there are any differences in these factors between patients electing to have bariatric surgery compared to less invasive non-surgical weight loss treatments, between patients choosing a particular bariatric surgery procedure, and to identify whether these factors predict weight loss after bariatric surgery. This was a prospective study of 90 patients undergoing gastric bypass, vertical sleeve gastrectomy, or adjustable gastric banding and 36 patients undergoing pharmacotherapy or lifestyle interventions. All patients completed seven multi-factorial psychological, eating behavior, and quality-of-life questionnaires prior to choosing their weight loss treatment. Questionnaire scores, baseline body mass index, and percent weight loss at 1 year after surgical interventions were recorded. Surgical patients were younger, had a higher body mass index, and obesity had a higher impact on their quality of life than on non-surgical patients, but they did not differ in the majority of eating behavior and psychological parameters studied. Patients opting for adjustable gastric banding surgery were more anxious, depressed, and had more problems with energy levels than those choosing vertical sleeve gastrectomy, and more work problems compared to those undergoing gastric bypass. Weight loss after bariatric surgery was predicted by pre-operative scores of dietary restraint, disinhibition, and pre-surgery energy levels. The results of this study generate a number of hypotheses that can be explored in future studies and accelerate the development of personalized weight loss treatments. © The Finnish Surgical Society 2014.

  15. [Effects of a comprehensive intervention program on simple obesity of children in kindergarten].

    PubMed

    He, Yi-feng; Wang, Wen-yuan; Fu, Ping; Sun, Yun; Yu, Shuang-yu; Chen, Ru; Wang, Yu-xia

    2004-05-01

    The purpose of the study was to explore a comprehensive management program for the obese children in kindergarten. The program should be scientific, rational, suitable for kindergarten, and easy to apply. Child care workers, parents, and child health care doctors participated in the program to help obese children establish a scientific life style through their daily life, to control their weight and to maintain their physical and mental health. The theories of behavior science, nutriology and kinematics were applied to make the weight control of obese children in kindergarten quantified and relatively standardized. Children were divided into three groups, intervened obese children, non-intervened obese children and normal children. Data such as weight, height, and body mass index (BMI) were observed to assess the effect of weight control and define whether it affects the linear gain of children's height. The recovery rate of intervened obese group, non-intervened group was 62.5% and 5.3%, respectively. The general effective rate was 91.7% and 15.8%, respectively. The weight gain of intervened group was 4.15 kg lower than that of non-intervened group. The BMI of intervened group significantly decreased by 2.9 as compared to the non-intervened group. The height gain of intervened group was similar to that of normal group. Parents and health care workers' realization of children obesity and their corresponding actions, the behaviors of obese children at home and in kindergarten were changed toward the direction beneficial to weight control. The implementation of the comprehensive intervention program for obesity in children, which involved obese children, child care worker, parents, and child care doctors alleviated the obesity level of those obese children without affecting their normal height gain. The program was safe and effective. Through the comprehensive intervention, the obese children could establish good habits during the sensitive period.

  16. Modifiable Risk Factors and Interventions for Childhood Obesity Prevention within the First 1,000 Days.

    PubMed

    Dattilo, Anne M

    2017-01-01

    Worldwide, the prevalence of childhood obesity has increased, amounting to 42 million overweight or obese children, and there is increasing evidence that the origins are within the first 1,000 days: the period of conception through 2 years. Antecedents of early childhood obesity are multifactorial, and associations of varying strength have been documented for genetic/epigenetic, biologic, dietary, environmental, social, and behavioral influences. Modifiable factors in pregnancy and early infancy associated with childhood obesity include maternal overweight/obesity, maternal smoking, gestational weight gain, infant and young child feeding, caregiver responsive feeding practices, as well as sleep duration, and physical activity. Promising obesity prevention interventions include those beginning during the first 1,000 days, using a multicomponent approach, with roots in nutrition education theories or behavior change communication that can continue over time. However, the limited number of completed interventions to date (within pediatric clinics or in home-based or community settings) may not be scalable to the magnitude needed for sustainable obesity prevention. Scale-up interventions that can be maintained for the durations needed, addressing infant and young child feeding and other modifiable risk factors associated with childhood obesity are needed. © 2017 Nestec Ltd., Vevey/S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. The treatment of hypertension in obese patients.

    PubMed

    Wofford, Marion R; Smith, Grant; Minor, Deborah S

    2008-04-01

    Hypertension causes a significant disease burden in all racial and ethnic groups and is directly attributable to excess weight in most cases. The relationship between increasing body mass index and hypertension prevalence has been recognized for decades. Epidemiologic studies clearly demonstrate the correlation between body weight and blood pressure in obese and lean populations. Most patients with hypertension are overweight or obese, and loss of excess weight lowers blood pressure. Although the epidemiologic relationship is clear, the understanding of mechanisms linking hypertension and weight gain is still evolving. Lifestyle modifications and specific pharmacologic agents address many of the known mechanisms; however, blood pressure remains difficult to control in obese hypertensive patients. This review highlights the association of obesity and hypertension, identifies potential mechanisms for this association, and describes nonpharmacologic and pharmacologic strategies that offer potential benefits for the obese patient with hypertension.

  18. Recruitment Evaluation of a Preschooler Obesity-Prevention Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skouteris, Helen; Hill, Briony; McCabe, Marita; Swinburn, Boyd; Sacher, Paul; Chadwick, Paul

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to compare the recruitment strategies of two recent studies that focused on the parental influences on childhood obesity during the preschool years. The first study was a randomised controlled trial (RCT) of the Mind, Exercise, Nutrition?…?Do It! 2-4 obesity prevention programme and the second was a longitudinal cohort…

  19. Microvascular responsiveness in obesity: implications for therapeutic intervention

    PubMed Central

    Bagi, Zsolt; Feher, Attila; Cassuto, James

    2012-01-01

    Obesity has detrimental effects on the microcirculation. Functional changes in microvascular responsiveness may increase the risk of developing cardiovascular complications in obese patients. Emerging evidence indicates that selective therapeutic targeting of the microvessels may prevent life-threatening obesity-related vascular complications, such as ischaemic heart disease, heart failure and hypertension. It is also plausible that alterations in adipose tissue microcirculation contribute to the development of obesity. Therefore, targeting adipose tissue arterioles could represent a novel approach to reducing obesity. This review aims to examine recent studies that have been focused on vasomotor dysfunction of resistance arteries in obese humans and animal models of obesity. Particularly, findings in coronary resistance arteries are contrasted to those obtained in other vascular beds. We provide examples of therapeutic attempts, such as use of statins, ACE inhibitors and insulin sensitizers to prevent obesity-related microvascular complications. We further identify some of the important challenges and opportunities going forward. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed section on Fat and Vascular Responsiveness. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2012.165.issue-3 PMID:21797844

  20. Microvascular responsiveness in obesity: implications for therapeutic intervention.

    PubMed

    Bagi, Zsolt; Feher, Attila; Cassuto, James

    2012-02-01

    Obesity has detrimental effects on the microcirculation. Functional changes in microvascular responsiveness may increase the risk of developing cardiovascular complications in obese patients. Emerging evidence indicates that selective therapeutic targeting of the microvessels may prevent life-threatening obesity-related vascular complications, such as ischaemic heart disease, heart failure and hypertension. It is also plausible that alterations in adipose tissue microcirculation contribute to the development of obesity. Therefore, targeting adipose tissue arterioles could represent a novel approach to reducing obesity. This review aims to examine recent studies that have been focused on vasomotor dysfunction of resistance arteries in obese humans and animal models of obesity. Particularly, findings in coronary resistance arteries are contrasted to those obtained in other vascular beds. We provide examples of therapeutic attempts, such as use of statins, ACE inhibitors and insulin sensitizers to prevent obesity-related microvascular complications. We further identify some of the important challenges and opportunities going forward. This article is part of a themed section on Fat and Vascular Responsiveness. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2012.165.issue-3. © 2011 The Authors. British Journal of Pharmacology © 2011 The British Pharmacological Society.

  1. Recruitment Evaluation of a Preschooler Obesity-Prevention Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skouteris, Helen; Hill, Briony; McCabe, Marita; Swinburn, Boyd; Sacher, Paul; Chadwick, Paul

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to compare the recruitment strategies of two recent studies that focused on the parental influences on childhood obesity during the preschool years. The first study was a randomised controlled trial (RCT) of the Mind, Exercise, Nutrition?…?Do It! 2-4 obesity prevention programme and the second was a longitudinal cohort…

  2. Bariatric Embolization of the Gastric Arteries for the Treatment of Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Clifford R.; Gunn, Andrew J.; Kim, Charles Y.; Paxton, Ben E.; Kraitchman, Dara L.; Arepally, Aravind

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is a public health epidemic in the United States, which results in significant morbidity, mortality, and cost to the healthcare system. Despite advancements in therapeutic options for the bariatric patients, the number of overweight and obese individuals continues to rise. Thus, complimentary or alternative treatments to lifestyle changes and surgery are urgently needed. Embolization of the left gastric artery, or ‘bariatric arterial embolization’, has been shown to modulate body weight in animal models and early clinical studies. If successful, bariatric arterial embolization represents a potential minimally invasive approach to treat obesity offered by interventional radiologists. The purpose of the following review will be to introduce the interventional radiologist to bariatric arterial embolization by presenting its physiologic and anatomic bases, reviewing the pre-clinical and clinical data, and discussing current and future investigations. PMID:25777177

  3. Bariatric embolization of the gastric arteries for the treatment of obesity.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Clifford R; Gunn, Andrew J; Kim, Charles Y; Paxton, Ben E; Kraitchman, Dara L; Arepally, Aravind

    2015-05-01

    Obesity is a public health epidemic in the United States that results in significant morbidity, mortality, and cost to the health care system. Despite advancements in therapeutic options for patients receiving bariatric procedures, the number of overweight and obese individuals continues to increase. Therefore, complementary or alternative treatments to lifestyle changes and surgery are urgently needed. Embolization of the left gastric artery, or bariatric arterial embolization (BAE), has been shown to modulate body weight in animal models and early clinical studies. If successful, BAE represents a potential minimally invasive approach offered by interventional radiologists to treat obesity. The purpose of the present review is to introduce the interventional radiologist to BAE by presenting its physiologic and anatomic bases, reviewing the preclinical and clinical data, and discussing current and future investigations. Copyright © 2015 SIR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. No impact of obesity susceptibility loci on weight regain after a lifestyle intervention in overweight children.

    PubMed

    Hinney, Anke; Wolters, Barbara; Pütter, Carolin; Grallert, Harald; Illig, Thomas; Hebebrand, Johannes; Reinehr, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    An obesity risk allele at the NEGR1 locus was shown to be associated with weight regain after a lifestyle intervention in obese adults. Independent confirmation and studies in children are lacking. Therefore, we analyzed the impact of this and 11 additional obesity susceptibility loci on weight regain after a lifestyle intervention in overweight children. We longitudinally analyzed the changes in weight status as body mass index standard deviation score (BMI-SDS) in 282 overweight children (10.6 ± 2.5 years, 47% male, BMI 27.1 ± 3.9 kg/m2) both at the end of a 1-year lifestyle intervention and at 1 year after the end of intervention. We genotyped obesity risk single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) derived from genome-wide association studies in or in proximity to the following genes: NEGR1, TNKS, SDCCAG8, FTO, MC4R, TMEM18, PTER, MTCH2, SH2B1, MAF, NPC1, and KCTD15. The children reduced their BMI-SDS (-0.28 ± 0.35; p<0.001) during intervention and increased their BMI-SDS between the end of intervention and 1 year later (+0.05 ± 0.36; p=0.027). None of the SNPs including NEGR1 was related significantly to weight regain. We found no evidence for effects of any of the GWAS-based obesity marker alleles on weight regain in the course of 1 year after an intervention.

  5. The Fit Family Challenge: A Primary Care Childhood Obesity Pilot Intervention.

    PubMed

    Jortberg, Bonnie T; Rosen, Raquel; Roth, Sarah; Casias, Luke; Dickinson, L Miriam; Coombs, Letoynia; Awadallah, Nida S; Bernardy, Meaghann K; Dickinson, W Perry

    2016-01-01

    Childhood obesity has increased dramatically over several decades, and the American Academy of Pediatrics has recommended primary care practices as ideal sites for the identification, education, and implementation of therapeutic interventions. The objective of this study was to describe the implementation and results for the Fit Family Challenge (FFC), a primary care-based childhood obesity intervention. A single-intervention pilot project that trains primary care practices on childhood obesity guidelines and implementation of a family-focused behavior modification curriculum. A total of 29 family medicine and pediatric community practices in Colorado participated. Participants included 290 patients, aged 6 to 12 years, with a body mass index (BMI) above the 85th percentile. The main outcome measure included the feasibility of implementation of a childhood obesity program in primary care; secondary outcomes were changes in BMI percentile, BMI z-scores, blood pressure, and changes in lifestyle factors related to childhood obesity. Implementation of FFC is feasible, statically significant changes were seen for decreases in BMI percentile and BMI z-scores for participants who completed 9 to 15 months of follow-up; lifestyle factors related to childhood obesity in proved Spanish-speaking families and food insecurity were associated with less follow-up time (P < .01). A primary care-based childhood obesity intervention may result in significant clinical and lifestyle changes. © Copyright 2016 by the American Board of Family Medicine.

  6. Ethical and public policy aspects of childhood obesity: opinions of scientists working on an intervention study.

    PubMed

    Wickins-Drazilova, D; Williams, G

    2010-08-01

    Scientists working on an obesity intervention project were asked questions, via questionnaire and interviews, relating to ethical and public-policy aspects of tackling childhood obesity. The main areas of enquiry concerned elements responsible for the rise in childhood obesity, key ethical areas of obesity interventions, helpfulness and effectiveness of policy measures, socioeconomic factors, and media coverage and political debate. Key results from this indicate that: there is disagreement about the amount of information about the causes of obesity that is needed before implementing interventions; an improvement in health and nutrition education of both children and adults through positive messages is seen as highly desirable; scientists regard environment, rather than genetics, as playing the major role in rising obesity levels; the level of individual responsibility being placed on parents and children may be unfair and unhelpful; whole-system, long-term and sensitive policy actions are needed rather than relying on quick fixes such as miracle pills; and there are country-specific issues related to rising obesity levels that need to be considered, though the respondents tended to have a great deal of faith in EU-wide interventions.

  7. Improving Childhood Obesity Treatment Using New Technologies: The ETIOBE System

    PubMed Central

    Baños, Rosa. M; Cebolla, Ausias; Botella, Cristina; García-Palacios, Azucena; Oliver, Elia; Zaragoza, Irene; Alcaniz, Mariano

    2011-01-01

    Childhood obesity is an increasing public health problem in western culture. Sedentary lifestyles and an “obesogenic environment” are the main influences on children leading to an increase in obesity. The objective of this paper is to describe an e-health platform for the treatment and prevention of childhood obesity called ETIOBE. This e-health platform is an e-therapy system for the treatment of obesity, aimed at improving treatment adherence and promoting the mechanisms of self-control in patients, to obtain weight loss maintenance and to prevent relapse by establishing healthy lifestyle habits. ETIOBE is composed of three different applications, the Clinician Support System (CSS), the Home Support System (HSS) and the Mobile Support System (MSS). The use of new Information and Communication (ICT) technologies can help clinicians to improve the effectiveness of weight loss treatments, especially in the case of children, and to achieve designated treatment goals. PMID:21559232

  8. Obesity and diabetes as accelerators of functional decline: can lifestyle interventions maintain functional status in high risk older adults?

    PubMed

    Anton, Stephen D; Karabetian, Christy; Naugle, Kelly; Buford, Thomas W

    2013-09-01

    Obesity and diabetes are known risk factors for the development of physical disability among older adults. With the number of seniors with these conditions rising worldwide, the prevention and treatment of physical disability in these persons have become a major public health challenge. Sarcopenia, the progressive loss of muscle mass and strength, has been identified as a common pathway associated with the initial onset and progression of physical disability among older adults. A growing body of evidence suggests that metabolic dysregulation associated with obesity and diabetes accelerates the progression of sarcopenia, and subsequently functional decline in older adults. The focus of this brief review is on the contributions of obesity and diabetes in accelerating sarcopenia and functional decline among older adults. We also briefly discuss the underexplored interaction between obesity and diabetes that may further accelerate sarcopenia and place obese older adults with diabetes at particularly high risk of disability. Finally, we review findings from studies that have specifically tested the efficacy of lifestyle-based interventions in maintaining the functional status of older persons with obesity and/or diabetes.

  9. Obesity and Diabetes as Accelerators of Functional Decline; Can Lifestyle Interventions Maintain Functional Status in High Risk Older Adults?

    PubMed Central

    Anton, Stephen D.; Karabetian, Christy; Naugle, Kelly; Buford, Thomas W.

    2013-01-01

    Obesity and diabetes are known risk factors for the development of physical disability among older adults. With the number of seniors with these conditions rising worldwide, the prevention and treatment of physical disability in these persons has become a major public health challenge. Sarcopenia, the progressive loss of muscle mass and strength, has been identified as a common pathway associated with the initial onset and progression of physical disability among older adults. A growing body of evidence suggests that metabolic dysregulation associated with obesity and diabetes accelerates the progression of sarcopenia, and subsequently functional decline in older adults. The focus of this brief review is on the contributions of obesity and diabetes in accelerating sarcopenia and functional decline among older adults. We also briefly discuss the underexplored interaction between obesity and diabetes that may further accelerate sarcopenia and place obese older adults with diabetes at particularly high risk of disability. Finally, we review findings from studies that have specifically tested the efficacy of lifestyle-based interventions in maintaining the functional status of older persons with obesity and/or diabetes. PMID:23832077

  10. Uncontrolled pilot study of an Acceptance and Commitment Therapy and Health at Every Size intervention for obese, depressed women: Accept Yourself!

    PubMed

    Berman, Margit I; Morton, Stephanie N; Hegel, Mark T

    2016-12-01

    Depression and obesity frequently co-occur, but providing adequate treatment to depressed obese women is challenging because existing treatments for each problem in isolation are suboptimal, and treatments to address one problem may exacerbate the other. This study used an uncontrolled, pretreatment-to-posttreatment design, with 3-month follow-up, to evaluate the feasibility and outcome of a novel, self-acceptance-based treatment for obese women with depression, "Accept Yourself!" Accept Yourself! is an 11-week manualized, group-based intervention that integrates Health At Every Size (an evidence-based paradigm to enhance physical health) and Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (an evidence-based psychotherapy often used to treat depression and eating-related concerns) to improve the physical and mental health of obese, depressed women without encouraging weight loss. Twenty-one obese women with Major Depressive Disorder received the intervention; 18 completed at least seven sessions, a minimal dose of the intervention. Depressive symptoms, depression diagnosis, physical health outcomes (including physical activity and blood pressure), and obesity-related quality of life were assessed at baseline, posttreatment, and 3-month follow-up. Weight was also monitored. Depression, blood pressure, and obesity-related quality of life significantly improved from pretreatment to posttreatment, and improvements were sustained over a 3-month follow-up. Participants did not gain significant weight during the intervention or at follow-up. These data, although preliminary and nonexperimental, suggest that Accept Yourself! could be a promising treatment for obese, depressed women, and support the value of larger randomized controlled trials. (PsycINFO Database Record

  11. Practicalities and Research Considerations for Conducting Childhood Obesity Prevention Interventions with Families

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Philip J.; Jones, Rachel A.; Collins, Clare E.; Hesketh, Kylie D.; Young, Myles D.; Burrows, Tracy L.; Magarey, Anthea M.; Brown, Helen L.; Hinkley, Trina; Perry, Rebecca A.; Brennan, Leah; Spence, Alison C.; Campbell, Karen J.

    2016-01-01

    Internationally, childhood obesity is a major public health concern. Given the established difficulties in treating obesity, designing and evaluating effective obesity prevention interventions are research priorities. As parents play a crucial role in establishing positive health behaviours in children, they are a key target for child obesity prevention programs. However, recruiting and engaging parents in such interventions can be a considerable challenge for researchers and practitioners. Members of the ‘Parenting, Child Behaviour and Well-being’ stream of the Australasian Child and Adolescent Obesity Research Network (ACAORN) have considerable and varied expertise in conducting such interventions and can provide insights into addressing these challenges. This paper aims to highlight considerations regarding the design, implementation, and evaluation of obesity prevention interventions with families and provide practical insights and recommendations for researchers and practitioners conducting family-based research in this area. Case studies of three family-based interventions conducted by ACAORN members are highlighted to provide examples and contextualise the recommendations proposed. PMID:27834820

  12. Collaborative school-based obesity interventions: lessons learned from 6 southern districts.

    PubMed

    Jain, Anjali; Langwith, Casey

    2013-03-01

    Although studies have shown that school-based obesity interventions can be effective, little is known about how to translate and implement programs into real-world school settings. Semistructured interviews were conducted in spring 2012 with 19 key informants who participated in a multifaceted childhood obesity intervention involving school nurses and wellness coordinators in 6 school districts and over 100 schools. The intervention changed form according to the needs and interests of the school districts. Despite funding support, schools and nurses had little capacity to address childhood obesity without the help of the coordinator. Initiating programs at the beginning of the school year was particularly difficult for schools. Applying for grants from internal and external sources and assisting with planning and logistics for wellness activities were significant activities of the coordinator. Although some school personnel and families preferred a focus on wellness rather than obesity, those working with individual at-risk children and families found the experience especially gratifying. In contrast to controlled studies, real-world implementation of obesity interventions in schools that are intended to create sustained change requires flexibility in intervention design, timing, and personnel. A single change agent focused on obesity-related activities was essential to success. © 2013, American School Health Association.

  13. National Institutes of Health Update: Translating Basic Behavioral Science into New Pediatric Obesity Interventions.

    PubMed

    Czajkowski, Susan M

    2016-06-01

    Pediatric obesity increases the risk of later-life obesity and chronic diseases. Basic research to better understand factors associated with excessive weight gain in early life and studies translating research findings into preventive and therapeutic strategies are essential to our ability to better prevent and treat childhood obesity. This overview describes several National Institutes of Health efforts designed to stimulate basic and translational research in childhood obesity prevention and treatment. These examples demonstrate the value of research in early phase translational pediatric obesity research and highlight some promising directions for this important area of research. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Disparities in Treatment Uptake and Outcomes of Patients with Obesity in the USA.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Kristina H; Edwards-Hampton, Shenelle A; Ard, Jamy D

    2016-06-01

    There are clear and persistent disparities in obesity prevalence within the USA. Some of these disparities fall along racial/ethnic lines; however, there are a number of other social and demographic constructs where obesity disparities are present. In addition to differing rates of obesity across groups, there is growing evidence that subgroups of patients both seek out and respond to obesity treatment differently. This review article explores the epidemiology of obesity disparities, as well as the existing evidence around how different groups may respond to behavioral, medical, and surgical therapies, and potential reasons for differential uptake and response, from culture, to access, to physiology. We find that the vast majority of evidence in this area has focused on the observation that African Americans tend to lose less weight in clinical trials compared to non-Hispanic whites and mainly pertains to behavioral interventions. Moving forward, there will be a need for studies that broaden the notion of health disparity beyond just comparing African Americans and non-Hispanic whites. Additionally, a more thorough examination of the potential for disparate outcomes after medical and surgical treatments of obesity is needed, coupled with the careful study of possible physiologic drivers of differential treatment response.

  15. Investigations of the endocannabinoid system in adipose tissue: effects of obesity/ weight loss and treatment options.

    PubMed

    Bennetzen, Marianne Faurholt

    2011-04-01

    Obesity is a world wide epidemic; it is becoming more usual to be overweight or obese than to be normal weight. Obesity increases the risk of an extensive range of diseases such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes mellitus type 2, hypertension, depression and some types of cancer. Adipose tissue is more than a storage organ for surplus energy - it is also a setting for complex metabolic processes and adipose tissue releases substances that interact with other parts of the body to influence several systems including food intake and energy metabolism. The endocannabinoid system (ECS) is one of the signalling systems that control feeding behaviour. The ECS is implicated in many functions, such as pain, memory, addiction, inflammation, and feeding, and could be considered a stress recovery system. It also seems to integrate nutrient intake, metabolism and storage maintaining homeostatic balance. The ECS is a recently discovered system, and research indicates hyperactivity in obesity. The aim of this thesis is to elaborate on the relationships of this widespread system and its elements in adipose tissue in obesity. Study I is a 4 weeks rat intervention study to investigate whether weight independent effect of Rimonabant treatment exists. We found that food intake-tolerance development could be circumvented by cyclic administration of Rimonabant and implications of weight independent effects of treatment. Study II is a cross-sectional study to establish the expression of cannabinoid receptor 1 from various adipose tissue depots of lean and obese persons. In this study we conclude, that the subcutaneous adipose tissue express more CBR1 than the visceral depot in lean, but comparable levels in obese. Study III is a 10 weeks human intervention study to asses the effects on the ECS of 10% weight loss. We found reduction in the ECS in obesity that normalised with weight loss. Our results clearly show the presence of all the components of the ECS in human adipose tissue, and

  16. Obesity-associated digestive cancers: A review of mechanisms and interventions.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jiachen; Zhao, Ming; Li, Jiahui; Lou, Guoying; Yuan, Yanyan; Bu, Shizhong; Xi, Yang

    2017-03-01

    The prevalence of obesity has steadily increased over the past few decades. Previous studies suggest that obesity is an oncogenic factor and that over 20% of all cancers are obesity-related. Among such cancers, digestive system malignancies (including esophageal adenocarcinomas, colorectal cancers, and cancers of the gastric cardia, liver, and pancreas) are reported most frequently. While the 5-year survival rates of cancers of the breast and prostate are 90%, that rate is only 45% for digestive cancers. In this review, the mechanisms of obesity-associated digestive cancers are discussed, with an emphasis on obesity-related gene mutations, insulin and insulin-like growth factor signaling pathways, chronic inflammation, and altered adipokine levels. Evidence that these factors often function interdependently rather than independently in carcinogenesis is presented. Recommended interventions that may reduce the burden of obesity-associated digestive cancers, such as participation in physical activity, diet modulation, and calorie restriction, are also described.

  17. Diagnosis and treatment of obesity among Mexican adults.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Salgado, Diana; Valdés Flores, Jesús; Janssen, Ian; Ortiz-Hernández, Luis

    2012-01-01

    To quantify the access to diagnosis and treatment of obesity and intentional weight loss among obese adults in Mexico and to identify the sociodemographic factors related to these events. The 2006 Mexican National Health and Nutrition Survey - representative of the adults aged 20 to 64 years - was analyzed. Whether people had received diagnosis and treatment from health professionals and whether they had intentional weight loss were explored. The independent variables were: sex, age, socioeconomic position, locality size, and body weight perception. Analyses were carried out for obese people only (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m(2), N = 8,545). Among obese people, just 20.2% were diagnosed with such condition, only 8.0% undertook treatment, and barely 5.6% had lost weight intentionally. Individuals with a higher BMI, older individuals, people with higher education, those living in wealthier households, and those living in metropolitan areas were more likely to receive diagnosis and treatment for obesity. Women and people who had been diagnosed as obese were more likely to lose weight. There is an urgent need to increase access to diagnosis and treatment of obesity in Mexico, particularly for men and for lower socioeconomic groups. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger GmbH, Freiburg

  18. Measuring and reporting attrition from obesity treatment programs: A call to action!

    PubMed

    Miller, Beth M L; Brennan, Leah

    2015-01-01

    The high attrition rates in obesity interventions are associated with poorer weight loss and maintenance for the individual and poorer overall treatment effectiveness and cost-effectiveness for the treatment provider. Increased knowledge about factors associated with attrition can facilitate the identification of individuals at risk of drop-out and inform treatment program improvements with the aim of maximising treatment retention. To date, a relatively small body of literature has explored attrition from weight-loss interventions using two methods of attrition assessment: identification of pre-treatment predictors of attrition and eliciting post-treatment reasons for attrition. A range of attrition rates have been reported and no reliable or consistent predictors of attrition have been found. It is unknown whether the lack of consistent findings reflects population or treatment differences, or if the discrepant findings simply reflect differences in definition and measurement of attrition. Further research is required to address these limitations. There is a need for a recognised definition of obesity treatment attrition, the consideration of predictors that are theoretically and empirically associated with attrition, the development of a well-validated and standardised measure of barriers to attendance, and assessment of both treatment completers and drop-outs. Understanding the factors that influence attrition can be used to inform the modification of treatment programs and to target those most at risk of drop-out so as to maximise the success of obesity interventions. Copyright © 2014 Asian Oceanian Association for the Study of Obesity. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Evidence update on the treatment of overweight and obesity in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Altman, Myra; Wilfley, Denise E

    2015-01-01

    Childhood obesity is associated with increased medical and psychosocial consequences and mortality and effective interventions are urgently needed. Effective interventions are urgently needed. This article reviews the evidence for psychological treatments of overweight and obesity in child and adolescent populations. Studies were identified through searches of online databases and reference sections of relevant review articles and meta-analyses. Treatment efficacy was assessed using established criteria, and treatments were categorized as well-established, probably efficacious, possibly efficacious, experimental, or of questionable efficacy. Well-established treatments included family-based behavioral treatment (FBT) and Parent-Only Behavioral Treatment for children. Possibly efficacious treatments include Parent-Only Behavioral Treatment for adolescents, FBT-Guided Self-Help for children, and Behavioral Weight Loss treatment with family involvement for toddlers, children, and adolescents. Appetite awareness training and regulation of cues treatments are considered experimental. No treatments are considered probably efficacious, or of questionable efficacy. All treatments considered efficacious are multicomponent interventions that include dietary and physical activity modifications and utilize behavioral strategies. Treatment is optimized if family members are specifically targeted in treatment. Research supports the use of multicomponent lifestyle interventions, with FBT and Parent-Only Behavioral Treatment being the most widely supported treatment types. Additional research is needed to test a stepped care model for treatment and to establish the ideal dosage (i.e., number and length of sessions), duration, and intensity of treatments for long-term sustainability of healthy weight management. To improve access to care, the optimal methods to enhance the scalability and implementability of treatments into community and clinical settings need to be established.

  20. Parenting styles and treatment of adolescents with obesity.

    PubMed

    Regber, Susan; Berg-Kelly, Kristina; Mårild, Staffan

    2007-01-01

    Professional caregivers have an important task in building a trusting relationship with parents and adolescents and in supporting parents in their parental roles. Our clinical experience of some 300 adolescents with obesity between 9 and 18 years of age and their parents has convinced us that consideration of parenting styles is fundamental in the treatment of children and adolescents with obesity. Typical case situations supporting the significance of parenting styles and illustrating the relationships between parents and adolescents with obesity can be identified. Group sessions with parents are the preferred mode for discussing typical parenting issues in the management of obese adolescents. The purpose of this paper is to describe different parenting styles, and to present a set of typical case situations and treatment strategies for nurses working with adolescents with obesity.

  1. Stepped-care in obesity treatment: Matching treatment intensity to participant performance

    PubMed Central

    Carels, Robert A.; Young, Kathleen M.; Hinman, Nova; Gumble, Amanda; Koball, Afton; Oehlhof, Marissa Wagner; Darby, Lynn

    2012-01-01

    This investigation examined the effectiveness of a self-help (SH), stepped-care (SC) weight loss program. Based on a failure to achieve pre-assigned weight loss goals, participants were eligible to be stepped-up from a SH program to two levels of treatment intensity (weight loss group [WLG]; individual counseling [IC]) beyond SH. The primary outcome was change in body weight. Fifty-three overweight/obese adults (BMI≥27 kg/m2; mean BMI of 37.3, SD=6.6, 89% Caucasian, and 77% female) participated in an 18-week weight loss intervention. During several phases of the investigation, those stepped-up to more intensive treatment lost comparable weight to those who were not stepped-up. Nevertheless, by the end of treatment, individuals who remained in SH (M = 8.6%) lost a significantly greater percentage of weight than individuals who received SH+IC (M = 4.7%; p<.05) and individuals in SH+IC lost a significantly greater percentage of weight than individuals who received SH+WLG+IC (M = 1.6%; p<.05). While some individuals benefited from being stepped-up to greater intensity treatment, other individuals experienced little benefit. The application of SC principles to the treatment of obesity needs further study. PMID:22365792

  2. Basal growth hormone concentration increased following a weight loss focused dietary intervention in older overweight and obese women.

    PubMed

    Miller, G D; Nicklas, B J; Davis, C C; Legault, C; Messier, S P

    2012-02-01

    Growth and sex steroid hormones decrease with aging and obesity. The effect of dietary weight loss and exercise training lifestyle interventions was examined on hormones as well as determining their relationships with physical function in older obese and overweight adults. Individuals were randomized into one of four 18 month interventions: Healthy Lifestyle (HL), Exercise, Diet, and Exercise-Diet. Clinical research setting with facility based exercise and nutrition education and behavior classrooms. Older (≥60 yrs) overweight and obese (BMI≥28 kg/m(2)) adults with knee osteoarthritis (n=309) were recruited for the study. Weight loss goal for Diet groups was ≥5%. Exercise groups trained (mostly walking and resistance training) 3 days/week for 60 min/session. Body weight, growth hormone (GH), corticosterone, sex-hormone binding globulin (SHBG), testosterone, and dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) were measured at baseline, 6, and 18 months. Physical function was determined through performance task (6-min walking distance) and self-reported questionnaires (Western Ontario McMaster University Osteoarthritis Index-WOMAC) at similar time points. Diet, Exercise, and Exercise-Diet groups lost 4.9%, 3.5%, and 6.2% of their weight at 18 months, respectively. There was a significant diet treatment effect on GH levels in women as higher concentrations of this hormone were apparent following dietary weight loss intervention (p=0.01). No other hormones were affected by either diet or exercise treatments in men or women. A significant inverse correlation between baseline 6-minute walking distance and SHBG (r=-0.33) was found in men. The increase in basal GH levels from the diet treatment in women suggests that this lifestyle behavior intervention may mitigate the age- and obesity-related decreases in growth hormone levels, to help preserve muscle mass, strength, and physical function in older adults.

  3. [Clinical interventions in overweight and obesity: a systematic literature review 2009-2014].

    PubMed

    Rajmil, Luis; Bel, Joan; Clofent, Rosa; Cabezas, Carmen; Castell, Conxa; Espallargues, Mireia

    2017-04-01

    To update the literature review on the effectiveness of clinical interventions on childhood obesity, proposed in Clinical Practice Guidelines, excluding prevention and pharmacological and surgical treatments. A systematic review was carried out in electronic databases of the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (The Cochrane Library), MEDLINE, and SCOPUS, replicating the search for the Clinical Practice Guidelines, from 2009 to 2014. The Clinical Practice Guidelines of National Institute for Health and Care Excellence were taken as a reference. Systematic reviews were given priority, and the quality of the studies was assessed. Out of a total of 3,703 documents initially identified, 48 were finally included. Studies showed great heterogeneity in the type and duration of interventions, and in outcome measures. Adherence to treatment was, in general, low. Multi-component interventions including diet, physical activity, sedentary lifestyle, and behaviour changes, involving the family, and starting at early ages, were the most effective for reducing body mass index. There is no consensus on criteria for referral to specialised care. It is recommended to implement multi-component programs conducted by professionals with previous training, involving the family, and addressing behavioural, individual and socio-demographic aspects. Lack of adherence is one of the reasons for failure of interventions. Diagnostic and referral criteria, the outcome measures, and the type and duration of interventions need to be improved and standardised. Copyright © 2016 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. Infertility treatment outcome in sub groups of obese population

    PubMed Central

    Awartani, Khalid A; Nahas, Samar; Al Hassan, Saad H; Al Deery, Mashael A; Coskun, Serdar

    2009-01-01

    Background Obesity is a common disorder with a negative impact on IVF treatment outcome. It is not clear whether morbidly obese women (BMI >= 35 kg/m2) respond to treatment differently as compared to obese women (BMI = 30–34.9 kg/m2) in IVF. Our aim was to compare the outcome of IVF or ICSI treatments in obese patients to that in morbidly obese patients. Methods This retrospective cohort study was conducted in a tertiary care centre. Patients inclusion criteria were as follows; BMI ≥ 30, age 20–40 years old, first cycle IVF/ICSI treatment with primary infertility and long follicular pituitary down regulation protocol. Results A total of 406 obese patients (group A) and 141 morbidly obese patients (group B) satisfied the inclusion criteria. Average BMI was 32.1 ± 1.38 kg/m2 for group A versus 37.7 ± 2.99 kg/m2 for group B. Patient age, cause of infertility, duration of stimulation, fertilization rate, and number of transferred embryos were similar in both groups. Compared to group A, group B had fewer medium size and mature follicles (14 vs. 16), fewer oocytes collected (7 vs. 9) and required higher doses of HMG (46.2 vs. 38.5 amps). There was also a higher cancellation rate in group B (28.3% vs. 19%) and lower clinical pregnancy rate per started cycle (19.9% vs. 28.6%). Conclusion In a homogenous infertile and obese patient population stratified according to their BMI, morbid obesity is associated with unfavorable IVF/ICSI cycle outcome as evidenced by lower pregnancy rates. It is recommended that morbidly obese patients undergo appropriate counseling before the initiation of this expensive and invasive therapy. PMID:19473499

  5. School-Based Interventions for Obesity: Current Approaches and Future Prospects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolf, M. Chris; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Examines three major types of intervention strategies that have been utilized in school-based weight-reduction programs. Discusses behavior modification, dietary control/nutrition education, and physical activities which have been successfully combined in multifaceted obesity interventions to produce modest weight loss. (Author/NRB)

  6. A School Nurse-Delivered Intervention for Overweight and Obese Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pbert, Lori; Druker, Susan; Gapinski, Mary A.; Gellar, Lauren; Magner, Robert; Reed, George; Schneider, Kristin; Osganian, Stavroula

    2013-01-01

    Background: Models are needed for implementing weight management interventions for adolescents through readily accessible venues. This study evaluated the feasibility and ef?cacy of a school nurse-delivered intervention in improving diet and activity and reducing body mass index (BMI) among overweight and obese adolescents. Methods: Six high…

  7. Objectively coding intervention fidelity during a phone-based obesity prevention study.

    PubMed

    JaKa, Meghan M; Seburg, Elisabeth M; Roeder, Alison M; Sherwood, Nancy E

    Childhood obesity prevention studies have yielded disappointing results. Understanding intervention fidelity is necessary in explaining why interventions are (or are not) successful and ultimately improving future intervention. In spite of this, intervention fidelity it is not consistently reported in the obesity prevention literature. The purpose of the current study was to develop and utilize a coding protocol to objectively assess intervention fidelity in a phone-based obesity prevention study for parents of preschool-aged children. Both interventionists and independent coders completed session fidelity measures including time spent on target areas (media use, physical activity, etc.) and components of goal setting quality. Coders also rated participant engagement. Agreement between ratings by interventionists and coders, fidelity levels and changes in fidelity components over time are presented. Coders and interventionists showed high agreement when reporting time spent discussing different target areas. Interventionists consistently rated themselves higher than independent coders on measures of goal quality. Coder ratings of session quality were initially high, but some components declined slightly across the eight sessions. Future directions for intervention fidelity measurement and analysis are discussed, including utilizing changes in fidelity measures over time to predict study outcomes. Obtaining a more in-depth understanding of intervention fidelity has the potential to strengthen obesity interventions.

  8. An Adaptive Community-Based Participatory Approach to Formative Assessment with High Schools for Obesity Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kong, Alberta S.; Farnsworth, Seth; Canaca, Jose A.; Harris, Amanda; Palley, Gabriel; Sussman, Andrew L.

    2012-01-01

    Background: In the emerging debate around obesity intervention in schools, recent calls have been made for researchers to include local community opinions in the design of interventions. Community-based participatory research (CBPR) is an effective approach for forming community partnerships and integrating local opinions. We used CBPR principles…

  9. Objectively coding intervention fidelity during a phone-based obesity prevention study

    PubMed Central

    Seburg, Elisabeth M.; Roeder, Alison M.; Sherwood, Nancy E.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Childhood obesity prevention studies have yielded disappointing results. Understanding intervention fidelity is necessary in explaining why interventions are (or are not) successful and ultimately improving future intervention. In spite of this, intervention fidelity it is not consistently reported in the obesity prevention literature. The purpose of the current study was to develop and utilize a coding protocol to objectively assess intervention fidelity in a phone-based obesity prevention study for parents of preschool-aged children. FINDINGS Both interventionists and independent coders completed session fidelity measures including time spent on target areas (media use, physical activity, etc.) and components of goal setting quality. Coders also rated participant engagement. Agreement between ratings by interventionists and coders, fidelity levels and changes in fidelity components over time are presented. Coders and interventionists showed high agreement when reporting time spent discussing different target areas. Interventionists consistently rated themselves higher than independent coders on measures of goal quality. Coder ratings of session quality were initially high, but some components declined slightly across the eight sessions. CONCLUSIONS Future directions for intervention fidelity measurement and analysis are discussed, including utilizing changes in fidelity measures over time to predict study outcomes. Obtaining a more in-depth understanding of intervention fidelity has the potential to strengthen obesity interventions. PMID:26618201

  10. A School Nurse-Delivered Intervention for Overweight and Obese Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pbert, Lori; Druker, Susan; Gapinski, Mary A.; Gellar, Lauren; Magner, Robert; Reed, George; Schneider, Kristin; Osganian, Stavroula

    2013-01-01

    Background: Models are needed for implementing weight management interventions for adolescents through readily accessible venues. This study evaluated the feasibility and ef?cacy of a school nurse-delivered intervention in improving diet and activity and reducing body mass index (BMI) among overweight and obese adolescents. Methods: Six high…

  11. An Adaptive Community-Based Participatory Approach to Formative Assessment with High Schools for Obesity Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kong, Alberta S.; Farnsworth, Seth; Canaca, Jose A.; Harris, Amanda; Palley, Gabriel; Sussman, Andrew L.

    2012-01-01

    Background: In the emerging debate around obesity intervention in schools, recent calls have been made for researchers to include local community opinions in the design of interventions. Community-based participatory research (CBPR) is an effective approach for forming community partnerships and integrating local opinions. We used CBPR principles…

  12. Community interventions: a brief overview and their application to the obesity epidemic.

    PubMed

    Economos, Christina D; Irish-Hauser, Sonya

    2007-01-01

    Community-based interventions built on theory and informed by community members produce potent, sustainable change. This intervention model mobilizes inherent community assets and pinpoints specific needs. Advancing community-based research to address obesity will require training of future leaders in this methodology, funding to conduct rigorous trials, and scientific acceptance of this model.

  13. Childhood Obesity Prevention and Treatment Recommendations for Future Research

    PubMed Central

    Pratt, Charlotte A.; Stevens, June; Daniels, Stephen

    2008-01-01

    This report summarizes the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Working Group’s recommendations on future research directions in childhood obesity prevention and treatment. The Working Group consisted of leaders and representatives from public and private academic and medical institutions with expertise in a variety of health specialties. They reviewed the literature and discussed the findings as well as their own experiences in the prevention and treatment of childhood obesity. The Working Group made recommendations that were based on scientific importance, the potential likelihood of public health impact, and the feasibility and timeliness for childhood obesity prevention and treatment research. These recommendations are intended to assist investigators in the development of research agendas to advance the knowledge of effective childhood obesity prevention and treatment. PMID:18617353

  14. Precision Obesity Treatments Including Pharmacogenetic and Nutrigenetic Approaches.

    PubMed

    Solas, Maite; Milagro, Fermin I; Martínez-Urbistondo, Diego; Ramirez, Maria J; Martínez, J Alfredo

    2016-07-01

    Five pharmaceutical strategies are currently approved by the US FDA for the treatment of obesity: orlistat, lorcaserin, liraglutide, phentermine/topiramate, and bupropion/naltrexone. The most effective treatment seems to be the combined administration of phentermine/topiramate followed by lorcaserin and bupropion/naltrexone. In relation to the management of excessive weight, other aspects also need to be considered, including comorbidities accompanying obesity, drug interactions, and the risk of negative collateral effects, as well as individualized treatments based on the genetic make-up. This review aims to provide an overview of the approved anti-obesity drugs and newer molecules that could affect different targets in the central nervous system or peripheral tissues, the molecular mechanisms, emerging dietary treatments and phytogenic compounds, and pharmacogenetic/nutrigenetic approaches for personalized obesity management. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Impact of Treatment Integrity on Intervention Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fryling, Mitch J.; Wallace, Michele D.; Yassine, Jordan N.

    2012-01-01

    Treatment integrity has cogent implications for intervention effectiveness. Understanding these implications is an important, but often neglected, undertaking in behavior analysis. This paper reviews current research on treatment integrity in applied behavior analysis. Specifically, we review research evaluating the relation between integrity…

  16. Impact of Treatment Integrity on Intervention Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fryling, Mitch J.; Wallace, Michele D.; Yassine, Jordan N.

    2012-01-01

    Treatment integrity has cogent implications for intervention effectiveness. Understanding these implications is an important, but often neglected, undertaking in behavior analysis. This paper reviews current research on treatment integrity in applied behavior analysis. Specifically, we review research evaluating the relation between integrity…

  17. Trichotillomania: Behavioral Assessment and Treatment Interventions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kell, Brandy L.; Kress, Victoria E.

    2006-01-01

    This article examines the behavioral treatment of Trichotillomania. A brief overview of the diagnosis and assessment of Trichotillomania is provided. Guidelines for a structured clinical evaluation when working with people diagnosed with Trichotillomania are supplied. The most effective behavioral interventions and treatments for working with…

  18. Systematic review of family and home-based interventions targeting paediatric overweight and obesity.

    PubMed

    Knowlden, A P; Sharma, M

    2012-06-01

    The family and home environment is a highly influential psychosocial antecedent of paediatric obesity. The purpose of this investigation was to systematically analyze family and home-based randomized control trials aimed at treating overweight and obesity in children ages 2-7 years. In gathering materials for this review, a search of Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health, MEDLINE, Education Resources Information Center, Psychology and Behavioural Sciences Collection and CENTRAL databases was conducted for the time frame of January 2001 to August 2011. The data extraction spanned three phases resulting in a total of nine interventions that met the specified inclusion criteria. Among the identified studies, eight produced significant outcomes. The majority of the programmes incorporated educational sessions targeting parents as the primary modality for intervention delivery. Less than one-quarter of the interventions included home visitations; however, all of the interventions included home-based activities to reinforce behaviour modification. Only three of the interventions applied social and behavioural theory, and only two interventions employed process evaluation. Additional research is needed to gauge the efficacy of the home and family milieu for treating paediatric obesity. © 2012 The Authors. obesity reviews © 2012 International Association for the Study of Obesity.

  19. The relationship between narrative classification of obesity and support for public policy interventions.

    PubMed

    Thibodeau, Paul H; Perko, Victoria L; Flusberg, Stephen J

    2015-09-01

    In 2013, the American Medical Association made the controversial decision to classify obesity as a "disease" in the hopes of encouraging research, reducing stigma, and ultimately lowering the prevalence of the condition. Critics argued that the disease label would reduce feelings of personal responsibility among the obese and therefore discourage healthy self-regulation, a possibility that has received some recent support in the psychological literature. However, public health issues such as obesity are complex and depend not only on personal action, but also on wider societal trends such as social policy interventions. In the present study, we systematically investigated the relationship between four narrative classifications of obesity ("sin", "addiction", "disorder" and "environment") and support for a variety of policy interventions designed to address the issue. An initial norming study revealed that the obesity narratives differed reliably in how much they attributed blame for the condition to the individual versus the environment. A correlational study showed that participants who agreed with narratives that blamed the individual were more likely to support policy interventions that penalized people for being overweight while participants who agreed with narratives that blamed the environment were more likely to support policy interventions designed to protect people suffering from obesity. A follow-up experiment revealed that these narratives had causal power as well: participants exposed to just one of the narratives were more likely to support policy interventions consistent with the blame attribution of the narrative for both obesity as well as anorexia. Individual differences in political ideology and personal experience with weight issues also influenced agreement with the narratives and support for particular policy interventions across these studies. These findings suggest that public messaging campaigns that utilize extended narratives may be a

  20. Effects of an Obesity Intervention Integrating Physical Activity and Psychological Strategy on BMI, Physical Activity, and Psychological Variables in Male Obese Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Lee, HakGweon; Kim, YoungHo

    2015-01-01

    The current study investigated the effect of an obesity intervention incorporating physical activity and behavior-based motivational enhancement intervention on BMI, physical activity levels, and psychological variables toward physical activity in male obese adolescents. Single group study without having a control group was carried out in Korea. Sixty-eight obese male adolescents who had BMI greater than 25 kg/m(2) participated in the 16-week obesity intervention. During this period, the study participants' BMI, physical activity levels, self-efficacy, and perceived benefits and barriers were measured at the three time point (baseline, after week 8, and after week 16). Results indicated that obese adolescents' BMI significantly decreased (F = 3.51, p = .03) and physical activity (F = 4.01, p = .02) significantly increased over the 16-week obesity intervention. In addition, Exercise self-efficacy (F = 5.02) and perceived benefits toward physical activity (F = 5.34) significantly increased but perceived barriers of physical activity (F = 5.10) gradually decreased over the intervention. This study suggests that an obesity intervention combining physical activity and behavior-based motivational enhancement intervention significantly contributed to decreased BMI, increased physical activity, and positively changed psychological variables related to physical activity. This first application has resulted in preliminary support for this intervention modality within non-western obese adolescents.

  1. Interventions designed to prevent adverse programming outcomes resulting from exposure to maternal obesity during development

    PubMed Central

    Nathanielsz, PW; Ford, SP; Long, NM; Vega, CC; Reyes-Castro, LA; Zambrano, E

    2013-01-01

    Maternal obesity is a global epidemic affecting the developed and developing world. Human and animal studies indicate that maternal obesity programs development predisposing offspring to later-life chronic diseases. Several mechanisms act together to produce these adverse health problems. There is a need for effective interventions that prevent these outcomes and guide management in human pregnancy. We report here dietary and exercise intervention studies in both altricial and precocial species, rats and sheep, designed to prevent adverse offspring outcomes. Both interventions present exciting opportunities to at least in part prevent adverse metabolic and other outcomes in mother and offspring. PMID:24147928

  2. Effect of a prescriptive dietary intervention on psychological dimensions of eating behavior in obese adolescents

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Overweight adolescents are more likely to have dysfunctional eating behaviours compared to normal weight adolescents. Little is known about the effects of obesity treatment on the psychological dimensions of eating behavior in this population. Objective To examine the effects of a prescriptive dietary intervention on external eating (eating in response to food cues, regardless of hunger and satiety), emotional eating and dietary restraint and their relation to weight loss. Parental acceptability was also examined. Method This is a secondary study of a 12-month randomized trial, the RESIST study, which examined the effects of two diets on insulin sensitivity. Participants were 109 obese 10- to 17-year-olds with clinical features of insulin resistance. The program commenced with a 3-month dietary intervention using a structured meal plan, with the addition of an exercise intervention in the next 3 months and followed by a 6 month maintenance period.This paper presents changes in eating behaviors measured by the Eating Pattern Inventory for Children and parent rated diet acceptability during the first 6 months of the trial. As there was no difference between the diets on outcome of interest, both diet groups were combined for analyses. Results After 6 months, the proportion of participants who reported consuming more in response to external eating cues decreased from 17% to 5% (P = 0.003), whereas non- emotional eating increased from 48% to 65% (p = 0.014). Dietary restraint and parental pressure to eat remained unchanged. A reduction in external eating (rho = 0.36, P < 0.001) and a reduction in dietary restraint (r = 0.26, P = 0.013) were associated with greater weight loss at 3 and 6 months, respectively. Overall this approach was well accepted by parents with 72% of parents considered that their child would be able to follow the meal plan for the longer term. Conclusions In the short to medium term, a prescriptive dietary

  3. Approaches to the pharmacological treatment of obesity.

    PubMed

    Salem, Victoria; Bloom, Stephen R

    2010-01-01

    Obesity is a global health crisis resulting in major morbidity and premature death. The need for safe and efficacious drug therapies is great, and presently unmet. The two drugs currently licensed in the USA for the long-term treatment of obesity, orlistat and sibutramine, provide only modest weight-loss benefits and are associated with high attrition rates owing to side effects. This review summarizes current concepts in the neuroendocrine control of energy homeostasis and major pharmacological treatments for obesity in the pipeline.

  4. What works for obesity prevention and treatment in black Americans? Research directions.

    PubMed

    Kumanyika, S K; Whitt-Glover, M C; Haire-Joshu, D

    2014-10-01

    Obesity prevalence in black/African American children and adults of both sexes is high overall and compared with US whites. What we know, and do not know, about how to enhance the effectiveness of obesity prevention and treatment interventions in African Americans is the focus of the 10 articles in this special issue of Obesity Reviews. The evidence base is limited in quantity and quality and insufficient to provide clear guidance. With respect to children, there is relatively consistent, but not definitive support for prioritizing the systematic implementation and evaluation of child-focused interventions in pre-school and school settings and outside of school time. For adults or all ages, developing and refining e-health approaches and faith-based or other culturally and contextually relevant approaches, including translation of the Diabetes Prevention Program intervention to community settings is indicated. Major evidence gaps were identified with respect to interventions with black men and boys, ways to increase participation and retention of black adults in lifestyle behaviour change programmes, and studies of the impact of environmental and policy changes on eating and physical activity in black communities. Bold steps related to research funding priorities, research infrastructure and methodological guidelines are recommended to improve the quantity and quality of research in this domain. © 2014 World Obesity.

  5. The Empowerment of Low-Income Parents Engaged in a Childhood Obesity Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Jurkowski, Janine M.; Lawson, Hal A.; Green Mills, Lisa L.; Wilner, Paul G.; Davison, Kirsten K.

    2017-01-01

    Parents influence children’s obesity risk factors but are infrequently targeted for interventions. This study targeting low-income parents integrated a community-based participatory research approach with the Family Ecological Model and Empowerment Theory to develop a childhood obesity intervention. This article (1) examines pre- to postintervention changes in parents’ empowerment; (2) determines the effects of intervention dose on empowerment, and (3) determines whether changes in parent empowerment mediate previous changes identified in food-, physical activity–, and screen-related parenting. The pre-post quasi-experimental design evaluation demonstrated positive changes in parent empowerment and empowerment predicted improvement in parenting practices. The integrated model applied in this study provides a means to enhance intervention relevance and guide translation to other childhood obesity and health disparities studies. PMID:24569157

  6. The empowerment of low-income parents engaged in a childhood obesity intervention.

    PubMed

    Jurkowski, Janine M; Lawson, Hal A; Green Mills, Lisa L; Wilner, Paul G; Davison, Kirsten K

    2014-01-01

    Parents influence children's obesity risk factors but are infrequently targeted for interventions. This study targeting low-income parents integrated a community-based participatory research approach with the Family Ecological Model and Empowerment Theory to develop a childhood obesity intervention. This article (1) examines pre- to postintervention changes in parents' empowerment; (2) determines the effects of intervention dose on empowerment, and (3) determines whether changes in parent empowerment mediate previous changes identified in food-, physical activity-, and screen-related parenting. The pre-post quasi-experimental design evaluation demonstrated positive changes in parent empowerment and empowerment predicted improvement in parenting practices. The integrated model applied in this study provides a means to enhance intervention relevance and guide translation to other childhood obesity and health disparities studies.

  7. Effects of a multidisciplinary weight loss intervention in overweight and obese children and adolescents: 11 years of experience.

    PubMed

    Mameli, Chiara; Krakauer, Jesse C; Krakauer, Nir Y; Bosetti, Alessandra; Ferrari, Chiara Matilde; Schneider, Laura; Borsani, Barbara; Arrigoni, Sara; Pendezza, Erica; Zuccotti, Gian Vincenzo

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of an outpatient multidisciplinary weight loss intervention in reducing body mass index (BMI) in children and adolescents suffering overweight and obesity, changes in A Body Shape Index (ABSI, waist circumference normalized to height and weight) and Hip Index (HI, normalized hip circumference) during treatment and correlation between the ABSI and HI with change in BMI z score. We analyze anthropometric data from pediatric patients affected by overweight and obesity aged 2 to 18 years old who entered our multidisciplinary weight loss intervention, which included medical, psychological and nutritional sessions, from January 1st 2006 to December 31st 2016. Lifestyle modification counselling was delivered. Follow-up visits were planned every month for 3 months and subsequently every 2-4 months. BMI, ABSI, and HI were converted to z scores using age and sex specific population normals. 864 patients entered our intervention. 453 patients (208 males), mean age 11.2 ±3.1 years, 392 with obesity (86%, z-BMI 2.90 ±0.80 SD) and 61 patients with overweight (z-BMI 1.73±0.21 SD) attended at least 1 follow-up visit. The mean number of visits was 3.5 (± 1.8 SD) in overweight subjects and 3.9 (±2.2 SD) in ones with obesity. At the last attended follow-up visit (at 16 ± 12 months SD) we observed a reduction in mean z-BMI in patients with obesity (to 2.52 ±0.71 SD) and patients with overweight (to 1.46 ±0.5 SD). Most patients (80.8%) reduced their BMI z scores. Mean ABSI and HI z scores showed no significant change. 78/392 patients (19.8%) recovered from obese to overweight, 5/392 (1.2%) from obese to normal weight. The recovery rate from overweight to normal weight was 13.1%. In a multivariate model, initial BMI z score and number of follow-up visits were significant predictors of weight change, while age, sex, ABSI, and HI were not significant predictors. Patients affected by overweight and obesity involved in a multidisciplinary weight loss

  8. Hip-Hop to Health Jr. Obesity Prevention Effectiveness Trial: Post-Intervention Results

    PubMed Central

    Fitzgibbon, M. L.; Stolley, M. R.; Schiffer, L.; Braunschweig, C. L.; Gomez, S. L.; Van Horn, L.; Dyer, A.

    2013-01-01

    The preschool years offer an opportunity to interrupt the trajectory toward obesity in black children. The Hip-Hop to Health Jr. Obesity Prevention Effectiveness Trial was a group-randomized controlled trial assessing the feasibility and effectiveness of a teacher-delivered weight control intervention for black preschool children. The 618 participating children were enrolled in 18 schools administered by the Chicago Public Schools. Children enrolled in the 9 schools randomized to the intervention group received a 14-week weight control intervention delivered by their classroom teachers. Children in the 9 control schools received a general health intervention. Height and weight, physical activity, screen time, and diet data were collected at baseline and post-intervention. At post-intervention, children in the intervention schools engaged in more moderate-to vigorous physical activity than children in the control schools (difference between adjusted group means=7.46 min/day, p=.02). Also, children in the intervention group had less total screen time (−27.8 min/day, p=.05). There were no significant differences in BMI, BMI Z score, or dietary intake. It is feasible to adapt an obesity prevention program to be taught by classroom teachers. The intervention showed positive influences on physical activity and screen time, but not diet. Measuring diet and physical activity in preschool children remains a challenge, and interventions delivered by classroom teachers require both intensive initial training and ongoing individualized supervision. PMID:21193852

  9. A meta-analysis of obesity interventions among U.S. minority children.

    PubMed

    Seo, Dong-Chul; Sa, Jaesin

    2010-04-01

    To quantitatively evaluate the efficacy of interventions designed to prevent or treat obesity among U.S. minority children using meta-analytic techniques. A total of 40 intervention trials involving 10,725 children aged 6-19 years were examined. Interventions with more components showed a higher mean effect size than those with fewer components: among 32 controlled trials, d = .07 for one-component (n = 6); d = .08 for two-component (n = 15); d = .33 for three-component (n = 10); and d = .71 for four-component (n = 1) interventions. Interventions with parental involvement (n = 22, d = .21) and lifestyle interventions (n = 14, d = .34) showed a greater mean effect size than those without parental involvement (n = 10, d = .05) or lifestyle interventions (n = 18, d = .04), despite the fact that their 90% confidence intervals overlapped. Among uncontrolled trials (n = 8), two-component interventions (n = 5) yielded d = .86 and three-component interventions (n = 3) yielded d = .96. Evidence indicates that, among U.S. minority children, obesity interventions with three or more components might be more efficacious than those using fewer components. Parental involvement, lifestyle change, culturally-based adaptation, and interactive computer programs seem to show promise in the reduction of obese minority children. Copyright 2010 Society for Adolescent Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. After-school based obesity prevention interventions: a comprehensive review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Branscum, Paul; Sharma, Manoj

    2012-04-01

    The purpose of this article was to review primary prevention interventions targeting childhood obesity implemented in the after school environment from 2006 and 2011. A total of 20 interventions were found from 25 studies. Children in the interventions ranged from kindergarten to middle schoolers, however a majority was in the 4th and 5th grades. Most of the interventions targeted both physical activity and dietary behaviors. Among those that focused on only one dimension, physical activity was targeted more than diet. The duration of the interventions greatly varied, but many were short-term or brief. Many interventions were also based on some behavioral theory, with social cognitive theory as the most widely used. Most of the interventions focused on short-term changes, and rarely did any perform a follow-up evaluation. A major limitation among after school interventions was an inadequate use of process evaluations. Overall, interventions resulted in modest changes in behaviors and behavioral antecedents, and results were mixed and generally unfavorable with regards to indicators of obesity. Recommendations for enhancing the effectiveness of after school based childhood obesity interventions are presented.

  11. EAU Guidelines on Interventional Treatment for Urolithiasis.

    PubMed

    Türk, Christian; Petřík, Aleš; Sarica, Kemal; Seitz, Christian; Skolarikos, Andreas; Straub, Michael; Knoll, Thomas

    2016-03-01

    Management of urinary stones is a major issue for most urologists. Treatment modalities are minimally invasive and include extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (SWL), ureteroscopy (URS), and percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PNL). Technological advances and changing treatment patterns have had an impact on current treatment recommendations, which have clearly shifted towards endourologic procedures. These guidelines describe recent recommendations on treatment indications and the choice of modality for ureteral and renal calculi. To evaluate the optimal measures for treatment of urinary stone disease. Several databases were searched to identify studies on interventional treatment of urolithiasis, with special attention to the level of evidence. Treatment decisions are made individually according to stone size, location, and (if known) composition, as well as patient preference and local expertise. Treatment recommendations have shifted to endourologic procedures such as URS and PNL, and SWL has lost its place as the first-line modality for many indications despite its proven efficacy. Open and laparoscopic techniques are restricted to limited indications. Best clinical practice standards have been established for all treatments, making all options minimally invasive with low complication rates. Active treatment of urolithiasis is currently a minimally invasive intervention, with preference for endourologic techniques. For active removal of stones from the kidney or ureter, technological advances have made it possible to use less invasive surgical techniques. These interventions are safe and are generally associated with shorter recovery times and less discomfort for the patient. Copyright © 2015 European Association of Urology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Weight loss improves reproductive outcomes in obese women undergoing fertility treatment: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Sim, K A; Dezarnaulds, G M; Denyer, G S; Skilton, M R; Caterson, I D

    2014-04-01

    For women attempting pregnancy, obesity reduces fertility and is an independent risk factor for obstetric and neonatal complications. The aim of this evaluator-blinded, randomized controlled trial was to evaluate a weight loss intervention on pregnancy rates in obese women undertaking fertility treatment. Forty-nine obese women, aged ≤ 37 years, presenting for fertility treatment were randomized to either a 12-week intervention (n = 27) consisting of a very-low-energy diet for the initial 6 weeks followed by a hypocaloric diet, combined with a weekly group multidisciplinary programme; or a control group (n = 22) who received recommendations for weight loss and the same printed material as the intervention. Anthropometric and reproductive parameters were measured at baseline and at 12 weeks. The 22 women who completed the intervention had greater anthropometric changes (-6.6 ± 4.6 kg and -8.7 ± 5.6 cm vs. -1.6 ± 3.6 kg and -0.6 ± 6.3 cm) compared with the control group (n = 17; P < 0.001). The intervention group achieved a pregnancy rate of 48% compared with 14% (P = 0.007), took a mean two fertility treatment cycles to achieve each pregnancy compared with four in the control group (P = 0.002), and had a marked increase in the number of live births (44% vs. 14%; P = 0.02). A group weight loss programme, incorporating dietary, exercise and behavioural components, is associated with a significant improvement in pregnancy rates and live births in a group of obese women undergoing fertility treatment.

  13. Preventing childhood obesity in Asia: an overview of intervention programmes.

    PubMed

    Uijtdewilligen, L; Waters, C N; Müller-Riemenschneider, F; Lim, Y W

    2016-11-01

    The rapid economic growth in Asia in the past few decades has contributed to the global increase in childhood obesity prevalence. Yet, little is known about obesity prevention efforts in this region. This systematic review provides an overview of child obesity prevention programmes in Asia. Searches were performed in six electronic databases. Out of 4,234 studies, 17 were included, among them 11 controlled trials (of which five were randomized). Only one study was published before 2007. Identified studies were predominantly conducted in China and Thailand and targeted primary school children in a school setting. Most studies implemented different programmes, frequently targeting behavioural modification through nutrition/health education lectures and/or physical activity sessions. Programme effects related to obesity outcome measures were mixed. Most substantial effects were found for outcomes such as improved health knowledge and/or favourable lifestyle practices. The relatively small number of relevant publications in Asia highlights the need for scientific evaluations of existing and future programmes. This will help ensure the implementation and dissemination of evidence-based approaches that have been proven to be effective in the Asian context. Targeting preschool settings and applying a comprehensive multisectoral approach may increase the effectiveness and sustainability of childhood obesity prevention programmes. © 2016 World Obesity.

  14. The CHANGE program: comparing an interactive versus prescriptive obesity intervention on university students' self-esteem and quality of life.

    PubMed

    Pearson, Erin S; Irwin, Jennifer D; Morrow, Don; Hall, Craig R

    2012-11-01

    Previous studies incorporating Motivational Interviewing administered via Co-Active Life Coaching tools (MI-via-CALC) have elicited positive results among adults with obesity. However, there is a paucity of this research that includes sufficient power and a comparison group. This study's purpose was to compare MI-via-CALC with a validated obesity intervention among university students. Participants (n = 45) were randomised to either a telephone-based 12-week: (a) MI-via-CALC program whereby a certified coach worked with subjects to achieve goals through dialogue; or (b) lifestyle modification treatment following the LEARN Program for Weight Management. Participants completed the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale and Short Form Functional Health Status Scale (SF-36) at baseline, mid-, and post-treatment, and 3 and 6 months following the program. Analyses revealed that both conditions elicited significant time effects between baseline and 6 months for self-esteem and all dimensions of the SF-36 (e.g. overall health). MI-via-CALC compares favorably with LEARN as an obesity treatment. Given that self-esteem and quality of life are essential for promoting behavior change among individuals with obesity, this study offers unique insights into their change processes. Future research should provide both treatments and allow participants to choose based on their personal preferences, learning styles, and needs. © 2012 The Authors. Applied Psychology: Health and Well-Being © 2012 The International Association of Applied Psychology.

  15. Long-term Drug Treatment for Obesity: A Systematic and Clinical Review

    PubMed Central

    Yanovski, Susan Z.; Yanovski, Jack A.

    2014-01-01

    Importance Thirty-six percent of US adults are obese and many cannot lose sufficient weight to improve health with lifestyle interventions alone. Objective Conduct a systematic review of medications currently approved in the US for obesity treatment in adults. We also discuss off-label use of medications studied for obesity and provide considerations for obesity medication use in clinical practice. Evidence Acquisition A PubMed search from inception through September, 2013 was performed to find meta-analyses, systematic reviews, and randomized, placebo-controlled trials for currently-approved obesity medications lasting ≥1y, that had a primary or secondary outcome of body weight, included ≥50 participants per group, reported ≥50% retention, and reported results on an intention-to-treat basis. Studies of medications approved for other purposes but tested for obesity treatment were also reviewed. Results Obesity medications approved for long-term use, when prescribed with lifestyle interventions, produce additional weight loss relative to placebo ranging from approximately 3% of initial weight for orlistat and lorcaserin to 9% for top-dose (15/92mg) phentermine/topiramate-ER at 1y. The proportion of patients achieving clinically-meaningful (≥5%) weight loss ranges from 37–47% for lorcaserin, 35–73% for orlistat, and 67–70% for top-dose phentermine/topiramate-ER. All three produce greater improvements in many cardiometabolic risk factors than placebo, but no obesity medication has been shown to reduce cardiovascular morbidity or mortality. Most prescriptions are for noradrenergic medications, despite their approval only for short-term use and limited data for their long-term safety and efficacy. Conclusions/Relevance Medications approved for long-term obesity treatment, when used as an adjunct to lifestyle intervention, lead to greater mean weight loss and an increased likelihood of achieving clinically-meaningful 1-year weight loss relative to placebo

  16. Impact of Lifestyle Intervention on HDL-Induced eNOS Activation and Cholesterol Efflux Capacity in Obese Adolescent

    PubMed Central

    Wesnigk, Jenny; De Guchtenaere, Ann; Fischer, Tina; Schuler, Gerhard; Vrints, Christiaan J.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Endothelial dysfunction occurs in obese children and adolescent and is regarded as a key step in the development of atherosclerosis. Important components for the development of endothelial dysfunction are reduced activity of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and an increase in cholesterol deposition in the vessel wall, due to reduced reverse cholesterol transport (RCT) activity. High density lipoprotein (HDL) exhibits antiatherosclerotic properties including modulation of eNOS activity and cholesterol efflux capacity. Lifestyle intervention programs can modify endothelial dysfunction in obese adolescents, but their impact on HDL-mediated eNOS activation and RCT is unknown so far. Methods. Obese adolescents (15 ± 1 years, BMI > 35 kg/m2) where randomized either to an intervention group (IG, n = 8; restricted diet and exercise) or to a usual care group (UC, n = 8). At the beginning and after 10 months of treatment HDL-mediated eNOS phosphorylation and cholesterol efflux capacity were evaluated. Results. Ten months of treatment resulted in a substantial weight loss (−31%), an improvement of endothelial function, and an increase in HDL-mediated eNOS-Ser1177 phosphorylation and RCT. A correlation between change in eNOS-Ser1177 phosphorylation or RCT and change in endothelial function was noted. Conclusion. A structured lifestyle intervention program improves antiatherosclerotic HDL functions, thereby positively influencing endothelial function. PMID:27965912

  17. Health information technology in screening and treatment of child obesity: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Smith, Anna Jo; Skow, Áine; Bodurtha, Joann; Kinra, Sanjay

    2013-03-01

    Childhood obesity is a major problem in the United States, yet screening and treatment are often inaccessible or ineffective. Health information technology (IT) may improve the quality, efficiency, and reach of chronic disease management. The objective of this study was to review the effect of health IT (electronic health records [EHRs], telemedicine, text message or telephone support) on patient outcomes and care processes in pediatric obesity management. Medline, Embase, and the Cochrane Registry of Controlled Trials were searched from January 2006 to April 2012. Controlled trials, before-and-after studies, and cross-sectional studies were included if they used IT to deliver obesity screening or treatment to children aged 2 to 18 and reported impact on patient outcomes (BMI, dietary or physical activity behavior change) or care processes (BMI screening, comorbidity testing, diet, or physical activity counseling). Two independent reviewers extracted data and assessed trial quality. Thirteen studies met inclusion criteria. EHR use was associated with increased BMI screening rates in 5 of 8 studies. Telemedicine counseling was associated with changes in BMI percentile similar to that of in-person counseling and improved treatment access in 2 studies. Text message or telephone support was associated with weight loss maintenance in 1 of 3 studies. To date, health IT interventions have improved access to obesity treatment and rates of screening. However, the impact on weight loss and other health outcomes remains understudied and inconsistent. More interactive and time-intensive interventions may enhance health IT's clinical effectiveness in chronic disease management.

  18. Obesity vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Monteiro, Mariana P

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is one of the largest and fastest growing public health problems in the world. Last century social changes have set an obesogenic milieu that calls for micro and macro environment interventions for disease prevention, while treatment is mandatory for individuals already obese. The cornerstone of overweight and obesity treatment is diet and physical exercise. However, many patients find lifestyle modifications difficult to comply and prone to failure in the long-term; therefore many patients consider anti-obesity drugs an important adjuvant if not a better alternative to behavioral approach or obesity surgery. Since the pharmacological options for obesity treatment remain quite limited, this is an exciting research area, with new treatment targets and strategies on the horizon. This review discusses the development of innovative therapeutic agents, focusing in energy homeostasis regulation and the use of molecular vaccines, targeting hormones such as somatostatin, GIP and ghrelin, to reduce body weight. PMID:24365968

  19. Obesity vaccines.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, Mariana P

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is one of the largest and fastest growing public health problems in the world. Last century social changes have set an obesogenic milieu that calls for micro and macro environment interventions for disease prevention, while treatment is mandatory for individuals already obese. The cornerstone of overweight and obesity treatment is diet and physical exercise. However, many patients find lifestyle modifications difficult to comply and prone to failure in the long-term; therefore many patients consider anti-obesity drugs an important adjuvant if not a better alternative to behavioral approach or obesity surgery. Since the pharmacological options for obesity treatment remain quite limited, this is an exciting research area, with new treatment targets and strategies on the horizon. This review discusses the development of innovative therapeutic agents, focusing in energy homeostasis regulation and the use of molecular vaccines, targeting hormones such as somatostatin, GIP and ghrelin, to reduce body weight.

  20. Combined Home and School Obesity Prevention Interventions for Children: What Behavior Change Strategies and Intervention Characteristics Are Associated with Effectiveness?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hendrie, Gilly A.; Brindal, Emily; Corsini, Nadia; Gardner, Claire; Baird, Danielle; Golley, Rebecca K.

    2012-01-01

    This review identifies studies describing interventions delivered across both the home and school/community setting, which target obesity and weight-related nutrition and physical activity behaviors in children. Fifteen studies, published between 1998 and 2010, were included and evaluated for effectiveness, study quality, nutrition/activity…

  1. Comparison of a Family-Based Group Intervention for Youths with Obesity to a Brief Individual Family Intervention: A Practical Clinical Trial of Positively Fit

    PubMed Central

    Aylward, Brandon S.; Jensen, Chad D.; Cushing, Christopher C.; Davis, Ann M.; Bovaird, James A.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To examine the effectiveness of a family-based behavioral group intervention (Positively Fit; PF) for pediatric obesity relative to a brief family intervention (BFI) in a sample of treatment-seeking children and adolescents. Methods Families (n = 93) were randomized to treatment condition. Assessments were conducted at pre- and posttreatment and at 12-month follow-up. Outcome indices included standardized body mass index (BMI) and quality of life (QOL). Results Results indicated a significant reduction in zBMI at posttreatment and follow-up across both conditions. At follow-up, BFI and PF participants evidenced average reductions of .12 and .19 zBMI units, respectively. Children demonstrated better outcomes than adolescents across both conditions. Results indicated clinically significant improvements in parent-reported QOL at postintervention and in self-reported QOL at follow-up for PF participants. Conclusions Results suggest the effectiveness of family-based interventions for pediatric obesity in clinical settings among younger children. Neither intervention was effective in terms of reducing zBMI among adolescents. PMID:21852343

  2. Change in health-related quality of life in the context of pediatric obesity interventions: A meta-analytic review.

    PubMed

    Steele, Ric G; Gayes, Laurie A; Dalton, William T; Smith, Courtney; Maphis, Laura; Conway-Williams, Elizabeth

    2016-10-01

    To quantitatively characterize change in health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in the context of behavioral (n = 16), surgical (n = 5), and pharmacological (n = 1) interventions for pediatric overweight and obesity. A secondary goal was to examine the relationship between change in HRQoL and change in body mass index (ΔBMI) by treatment type. The amount of weight loss necessary to observe a minimally clinically important difference (MCID) in HRQoL was determined. Data were gathered from studies reporting on weight change and ΔHRQoL over the course of obesity interventions (N = 22) in youths (N = 1,332) with average ages between 7.4 and 16.5 years (M = 12.2). An overall effect size was calculated for ΔHRQoL. Moderation analyses were conducted using analysis of variance and weighted regression. MCID analyses were conducted by converting HRQoL data to standard error of measurement units. The overall effect size for ΔHRQoL in the context of pediatric obesity interventions was medium (g = 0.51). A significant linear relationship was detected between ΔBMI and ΔHRQoL (R2 = 0.87). This relationship was moderated by treatment type, with medical (i.e., surgical) interventions demonstrating a stronger relationship. Results indicated that it takes a change of 0.998 BMI units to detect true change in HRQoL. This study provides the first known quantitative examination of changes in HRQoL associated with weight loss in pediatric interventions. Medical interventions appear to offer a more substantial increase in HRQoL per unit of BMI change. These results offer a concrete weight loss goal for noticing positive effects in daily life activities. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  3. A novel approach to training students in delivering evidence-based obesity treatment.

    PubMed

    Brown, Joshua; Lydecker, Janet A; Turner, Tonya; Knackstedt, Rebecca W; O'Neil, Patrick M

    2015-05-01

    Obesity is a major public health concern because of its prevalence, serious health consequences, and costs. Many health care providers believe they have been inadequately trained to treat obesity and, as a result, often do not address patients' weight. Despite recommendations to improve knowledge and skills so they can more effectively address obesity, health care educational curricula are already overburdened with content and have been slow to respond to these recommendations. Interprofessional health care students voluntarily participated in an extracurricular service-learning opportunity to learn about the evidence-based treatment of obesity. A multidisciplinary team of weight management professionals taught didactic lessons and oversaw the service-learning component of training. An essential element of the training was the students' delivery of a free 10-week weight management intervention to low-income overweight and obese community residents. Patients in both the student-led (n=25) and professional-led (n=21) programs lost a statistically and clinically significant amount of weight. Additionally, there was no significant difference in weight loss between the two programs, even after taking into account differences in attendance between the two programs. An extracurricular service-learning program pairing brief didactic instruction with experiential learning appears to be a viable strategy for accomplishing the important dual objectives of preparing health care students to treat obesity and providing much-needed treatment to those in our community who are least able to afford it.

  4. A randomized pilot trial of a full subsidy vs. a partial subsidy for obesity treatment.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Adam G; Felton, Sue; Hill, James O; Atherly, Adam J

    2012-09-01

    Intensive obesity treatment is mandated by federal health care reform but is costly. A partial subsidy for obesity treatment could lower the cost of treatment, without reducing its efficacy. This study sought to test whether a partial subsidy for obesity treatment would be feasible, as compared to a fully subsidized intervention. The study was a pilot randomized trial. Participants (n = 50) were primary care patients with obesity and at least one comorbid condition (diabetes, hypertension, dyslipidemia, or obstructive sleep apnea). Each participant received eight weight loss counseling visits as well as portion-controlled foods for weight loss. Participants were randomized to full subsidy or partial subsidy (2 vs. 1 meal per day provided). The primary outcome was weight change after 4 months. Secondary outcomes included changes in blood pressure, waist circumference, and health-related quality of life. Participants in the full and partial subsidy groups lost 5.9 and 5.3 kg, equivalent to 5.3% and 5.1% of initial weight, respectively (P = 0.71). Changes in secondary outcomes were similar in the two groups. A partial subsidy was feasible and induced a clinically similar amount of weight loss, compared to a full subsidy. Large-scale testing of economic incentives for weight control is merited given the federal mandate to offer weight loss counseling to obese patients.

  5. Engagement in New Dietary Habits-Obese Women's Experiences from Participating in a 2-Year Diet Intervention.

    PubMed

    Ahlgren, Christina; Hammarström, Anne; Sandberg, Susanne; Lindahl, Bernt; Olsson, Tommy; Larsson, Christel; Fjellman-Wiklund, Anncristine

    2016-02-01

    Dietary weight loss interventions most often result in weight loss, but weight maintenance on a long-term basis is the main problem in obesity treatment. There is a need for an increased understanding of the behaviour patterns involved in adopting a new dietary behavior and to maintain the behaviour over time. The purpose of this paper is to explore overweight and obese middle-aged women's experiences of the dietary change processes when participating in a 2-year-long diet intervention. Qualitative semi-structured interviews with 12 overweight and obese women (54-71 years) were made after their participation in a diet intervention programme. The programme was designed as a RCT study comparing a diet according to the Nordic nutrition recommendations (NNR diet) and a Palaeolithic diet (PD). Interviews were analysed according to Grounded Theory principles. A core category "Engagement phases in the process of a diet intervention" concluded the analysis. Four categories included the informants' experiences during different stages of the process of dietary change: "Honeymoon phase", "Everyday life phase", "It's up to you phase" and "Crossroads phase". The early part of the intervention period was called "Honeymoon phase" and was characterised by positive experiences, including perceived weight loss and extensive support. The next phases, the "Everyday life phase" and "It's up to you phase", contained the largest obstacles to change. The home environment appeared as a crucial factor, which could be decisive for maintenance of the new dietary habits or relapse into old habits in the last phase called "Crossroads phase". We identified various phases of engagement in the process of a long-term dietary intervention among middle-aged women. A clear personal goal and support from family and friends seem to be of major importance for long-term maintenance of new dietary habits. Gender relations within the household must be considered as a possible obstacle for women engaging in

  6. Childhood Obesity Research Demonstration (CORD): The Cross-Site Overview and Opportunities for Interventions Addressing Obesity Community-Wide

    PubMed Central

    Belay, Brook; Dooyema, Carrie A.; Williams, Nancy; Blanck, Heidi M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: This is the first of a set of articles in this issue on the Childhood Obesity Research Demonstration (CORD) project and provides an overview of the multisite approach and community-wide interventions. Innovative multisetting, multilevel approaches that integrate primary healthcare and public health interventions to improve outcomes for children with obesity need to be evaluated. The CORD project aims to improve BMI and obesity-related behaviors among underserved 2- to 12-year-old children by utilizing these approaches. Methods: The CORD consortium, structure, model terminology and key components, and common measures were solidified in year 1 of the CORD project. Demonstration sites applied the CORD model across communities in years 2 and 3. Evaluation plans for year 4 include site-specific analyses as well as cross-site impact, process, and sustainability evaluations. Results: The CORD approach resulted in commonalities and differences in participant, intervention, comparison, and outcome elements across sites. Products are to include analytic results as well as cost assessment, lessons learned, tools, and materials. Discussion: Foreseen opportunities and challenges arise from the similarities and unique aspects across sites. Communities adapted interventions to fit their local context and build on strengths, but, in turn, this flexibility makes cross-site evaluation challenging. Conclusion: The CORD project represents an evidence-based approach that integrates primary care and public health strategies and evaluates multisetting multilevel interventions, thus adding to the limited research in this field. CORD products will be disseminated to a variety of stakeholders to aid the understanding, prevention, and management of childhood obesity. PMID:25679059

  7. A multicomponent, school-initiated obesity intervention to promote healthy lifestyles in children.

    PubMed

    Morano, Milena; Rutigliano, Irene; Rago, Alfonso; Pettoello-Mantovani, Massimo; Campanozzi, Angelo

    2016-10-01

    In the context of a 6-mo obesity program, incorporating school- and family-based components, nutritional education, fun-type skill-learning physical activities, and exercise training, this study examined relationships among changes in nutritional status, physical fitness, and some psychosocial and behavioral treatment-related outcomes, using a before and after comparison. Eighteen obese and overweight children ages 10 to 12 y were assessed with respect to body weight, height, circumferences, skinfold thickness, and fat mass. Health-related fitness tests, and self-reported physical activity enjoyment and perceived physical ability also were administered. Health-related quality of life (HRQoL) was evaluated using the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory; dietary habits were collected using a 7-d food diary. The WinFood software was used for the estimation of nutrient and caloric intake. After treatment, children showed decreases in body mass index z-score (P = 0.001), body fat percentage (P < 0.001), arm (P = 0.003) and waist circumferences (P = 0.004), and skinfold thickness (P < 0.008). Actual (P < 0.001) and perceived (P < 0.03) physical abilities, physical activity enjoyment (P = 0.03), and psychosocial HRQoL (P < 0.05) also improved from pre- to postintervention. Participants reported reductions in total and commercial food caloric intakes (P < 0.001), with higher protein and lower fat consumptions (P < 0.001) after the program. The findings from the present study highlight the importance of combined dietary-behavioral-physical activity interventions in overweight children, and place emphasis on directing such interventions toward improving perceived physical competence that could lead to increased exercise adherence and promotion of the health benefits associated with it. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Reducing obesity stigma: the effectiveness of cognitive dissonance and social consensus interventions.

    PubMed

    Ciao, Anna C; Latner, Janet D

    2011-09-01

    Obese individuals experience pervasive stigmatization. Interventions attempting to reduce obesity stigma by targeting its origins have yielded mixed results. This randomized, controlled study examined the effectiveness of two interventions to reduce obesity stigma: cognitive dissonance and social consensus. Participants were college undergraduate students (N = 64, 78% women, mean age = 21.2 years, mean BMI = 23.1 kg/m2) of diverse ethnicities. Obesity stigma (assessed with the Antifat Attitudes Test (AFAT)) was assessed at baseline (Visit 1) and 1 week later, immediately following the intervention (Visit 2). Participants were randomly assigned to one of three intervention groups where they received standardized written feedback on their obesity stigma levels. Cognitive dissonance participants (N = 21) were told that their AFAT scores were discrepant from their values (high core values of kindness and equality and high stigma), social consensus participants (N = 22) were told their scores were discrepant from their peers' scores (stigma much higher than their peers), and control participants (N = 21) were told their scores were consistent with both their peers' scores and their own values. Following the intervention, omnibus analyses revealed significant group differences on the AFAT Physical/Romantic Unattractiveness subscale (PRU; F (2, 59) = 4.43, P < 0.05). Planned contrasts revealed that cognitive dissonance group means were significantly lower than control means for AFAT total, AFAT PRU subscale, and AFAT social/character disparagement subscale (all P < 0.05). No significant differences were found between social consensus and controls. Results from this study suggest that cognitive dissonance interventions may be a successful way to reduce obesity stigma, particularly by changing attitudes about the appearance and attractiveness of obese individuals.

  9. Active ingredients from natural botanicals in the treatment of obesity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, W-L; Zhu, L; Jiang, J-G

    2014-12-01

    Obesity is considered as a chronic disease that can induce a series of comorbidities and complications. Chinese medicine has long clinical experiences in the treatment of obesity. This review summarizes the natural products from traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) that are reported to have anti-obesity effects in the past two decades. Botanic TCM comprises 90% of total Chinese crude drugs, and generally contains various active ingredients, in which the effective anti-obesity ingredients identified can be divided into saponins, polysaccharides, alkaloids, polyphenols and others. Astragaloside IV, glycyrrhizin, macrostemonoside A, berberine, betaine, capsaicin, matrine, methyl piperate, piperine, rutaecarpine, asimilobine, epigallocatechingallate, magnolol, resveratrol, soybean-isoflavone, α-linolenic acid, emodin, geniposide, phillyrin, salidroside and ursolic acid are specified in this review, and their sources, models, efficacy are described. It is concluded that the mechanisms of these components for the treatment of obesity include: (i) suppression of appetite, increase of satiety, reduction of energy intake; (ii) reduction in the digestion and absorption of exogenous lipid; (iii) attenuation of the synthesis of endogenous lipid; (iv) promotion of the oxidation and expenditure of lipid and (v) improvement of lipid metabolism disorder. Authors believe that the effective compounds from TCM will provide an alternative and hopeful way for the treatment of obesity. © 2014 World Obesity.

  10. Is BMI alone a sufficient outcome to evaluate interventions for child obesity?

    PubMed

    Kolotourou, Maria; Radley, Duncan; Chadwick, Paul; Smith, Lindsey; Orfanos, Stavros; Kapetanakis, Venediktos; Singhal, Atul; Cole, Tim J; Sacher, Paul M

    2013-08-01

    BMI is often used to evaluate the effectiveness of childhood obesity interventions, but such interventions may have additional benefits independent of effects on adiposity. We investigated whether benefits to health outcomes following the Mind, Exercise, Nutrition…Do It! (MEND) childhood obesity intervention were independent of or associated with changes in zBMI. A total of 79 obese children were measured at baseline; 71 and 42 participants were followed-up at 6 and 12 months respectively, and split into four groups depending on magnitude of change in zBMI. Differences between groups for waist circumference, cardiovascular fitness, physical and sedentary activities, and self-esteem were investigated. Apart from waist circumference and its z-score, there were no differences or trends across zBMI subgroups for any outcome. Independent of the degree of zBMI change, benefits in several parameters were observed in children participating in this obesity intervention. We concluded that isolating a single parameter like zBMI change and neglecting other important outcomes is restrictive and may undermine the evaluation of childhood obesity intervention effectiveness.

  11. Child and youth participatory interventions for addressing lifestyle-related childhood obesity: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Frerichs, L; Ataga, O; Corbie-Smith, G; Tessler Lindau, S

    2016-12-01

    A growing number of childhood obesity interventions involve children and youth in participatory roles, but these types of interventions have not been systematically reviewed. We aimed to identify child and youth participatory interventions in the peer-reviewed literature in order to characterize the approaches and examine their impact on obesity and obesity-related lifestyle behaviours. We searched PubMed/Medline, psychINFO and ERIC for quasi-experimental and randomized trials conducted from date of database initiation through May 2015 that engaged children or youth in implementing healthy eating, physical activity or weight management strategies. Eighteen studies met our eligibility criteria. Most (n = 14) trained youth to implement pre-defined strategies targeting their peers. A few (n = 4) assisted youth to plan and implement interventions that addressed environmental changes. Thirteen studies reported at least one statistically significant weight, physical activity or dietary change outcome. Participatory approaches have potential, but variation in strategies and outcomes leave questions unanswered about the mechanisms through which child and youth engagement impact childhood obesity. Future research should compare child-delivered or youth-delivered to adult-delivered health promotion interventions and more rigorously evaluate natural experiments that engage youth to implement environmental changes. With careful attention to theoretical frameworks, process and outcome measures, these studies could strengthen the effectiveness of child and youth participatory approaches. © 2016 World Obesity Federation.

  12. [Effectiveness evaluation of healthy lifestyle interventions in childhood obesity prevention: a systematic review].

    PubMed

    Lien, Angela Shin-Yu; Cho, Yen-Hua; Tsai, Jia-Ling

    2013-08-01

    There is significant reporting on evidence-based research in the literature regarding lifestyle modification programs. There is a need to review and synthesize results in order to develop childhood obesity prevention and intervention strategy recommendations. Main purposes of the present review were to update the systematic review and critical appraisal of recent evidence in this area and assess the efficacy and quality of published research studies. Studies included in this review incorporated the following inclusion criteria: obese children participants 5 to 14 years of age; a face-to-face randomized-controlled study with a 4-week intervention period; and anthropometry, physical activity, sedentary behavior evaluated as primary outcomes after > 6 months. Eleven studies met the 3 inclusion criteria. All were found using the following key word string: RCT or CCT interventional study researches, childhood obesity, overweight, preventive intervention, healthy lifestyle". Evidence from these studies showed that all interventions varied in terms of approach and settings. Most provided a healthy lifestyle program duration of more than 15 minutes per week. Those that included culturally sensitive diet education and 30-60 minutes of moderate-intensity exercise everyday significantly enhanced childhood obesity prevention in terms of both anthropometry and dietary habits and decreased sedentary behavior. Results suggest that effective healthy lifestyle programs for childhood obesity prevention in Taiwan should provide dietary guidance sensitive to Taiwanese dietary habits, encourage daily physical activities, and decrease sedentary behavior.

  13. Using the intervention mapping protocol to develop a community-based intervention for the prevention of childhood obesity in a multi-centre European project: the IDEFICS intervention.

    PubMed

    Verbestel, Vera; De Henauw, Stefaan; Maes, Lea; Haerens, Leen; Mårild, Staffan; Eiben, Gabriele; Lissner, Lauren; Moreno, Luis A; Frauca, Natalia Lascorz; Barba, Gianvincenzo; Kovács, Eva; Konstabel, Kenn; Tornaritis, Michael; Gallois, Katharina; Hassel, Holger; De Bourdeaudhuij, Ilse

    2011-08-01

    The prevalence of childhood obesity has increased during the past decades and is now considered an urgent public health problem. Although stabilizing trends in obesity prevalence have been identified in parts of Europe, preventive efforts in children are still needed. Using the socio-ecological approach as the underlying theoretical perspective, the IDEFICS project aimed to develop, implement and evaluate a community-based intervention for the prevention of childhood obesity in eight European countries. The aim of the present manuscript was to describe the content and developmental process of the IDEFICS intervention. The intervention mapping protocol (IMP) was used to develop the community-based intervention for the prevention of childhood obesity in 3 to 10 years old children. It is a theory- and evidence-based tool for the structured planning and development of health promotion programs that requires the completion of six different steps. These steps were elaborated by two coordinating centers and discussed with the other participating centers until agreement was reached. Focus group research was performed in all participating centers to provide an informed basis for intervention development. The application of the IMP resulted in an overall intervention framework with ten intervention modules targeting environmental and personal factors through the family, the school and the community. The summary results of the focus group research were used to inform the development of the overall intervention. The cultural adaptation of the overall intervention was realised by using country specific focus group results. The need for cultural adaptation was considered during the entire process to improve program adoption and implementation. A plan was developed to evaluate program effectiveness and quality of implementation. The IDEFICS project developed a community-based intervention for the prevention of childhood obesity by using to the intervention mapping heuristic. The

  14. Using the intervention mapping protocol to develop a community-based intervention for the prevention of childhood obesity in a multi-centre European project: the IDEFICS intervention

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The prevalence of childhood obesity has increased during the past decades and is now considered an urgent public health problem. Although stabilizing trends in obesity prevalence have been identified in parts of Europe, preventive efforts in children are still needed. Using the socio-ecological approach as the underlying theoretical perspective, the IDEFICS project aimed to develop, implement and evaluate a community-based intervention for the prevention of childhood obesity in eight European countries. The aim of the present manuscript was to describe the content and developmental process of the IDEFICS intervention. Methods The intervention mapping protocol (IMP) was used to develop the community-based intervention for the prevention of childhood obesity in 3 to 10 years old children. It is a theory- and evidence-based tool for the structured planning and development of health promotion programs that requires the completion of six different steps. These steps were elaborated by two coordinating centers and discussed with the other participating centers until agreement was reached. Focus group research was performed in all participating centers to provide an informed basis for intervention development. Results The application of the IMP resulted in an overall intervention framework with ten intervention modules targeting environmental and personal factors through the family, the school and the community. The summary results of the focus group research were used to inform the development of the overall intervention. The cultural adaptation of the overall intervention was realised by using country specific focus group results. The need for cultural adaptation was considered during the entire process to improve program adoption and implementation. A plan was developed to evaluate program effectiveness and quality of implementation. Conclusions The IDEFICS project developed a community-based intervention for the prevention of childhood obesity by using to

  15. Internet-based behavioral interventions for obesity: an updated systematic review.

    PubMed

    Manzoni, Gian Mauro; Pagnini, Francesco; Corti, Stefania; Molinari, Enrico; Castelnuovo, Gianluca

    2011-03-04

    The objective of this systematic review is to update a previous systematic review on the effectiveness of internet-based interventions for weight loss and weight loss maintenance in overweight and obese people with new or additional studies. A literature search from 2008 to March 2010 was conducted. Studies were eligible for inclusion if: participants were adults with a body mass index ≤ 25, at least one study arm involved an internet-based intervention and the primary aims were weight loss or maintenance. Eight additional studies over the eighteen included in the previous review met the inclusion criteria. Data were extracted on sample characteristics, attrition, weight loss, duration of treatment and maintenance of weight loss. Effect sizes (Hedges g) and relative 95% confidence intervals were calculated for all two-way comparisons within each study. No attempt was made to pool the data in a meta-analysis because of the great heterogeneity of designs among studies. An examination of effect sizes show that the higher significant effects pertain studies that found a superiority of behavioral internet-based programs enhanced by features such as tailored feedback on self-monitoring of weight, eating and activity over education only internet-based interventions. However, control groups are very different among studies and this heterogeneity probably accounts for much of the variance in effect sizes. Hence, questions still remain as to the effectiveness of web-based interventions in achieving weight loss or maintenance. Implications for further research include using a "real" control group in order to make meta-analysis possible and developing multi-factorial design in order to separate components of interventions and identify which of them or patterns of them are keys to success.

  16. The built environment moderates effects of family-based childhood obesity treatment over 2 years.

    PubMed

    Epstein, Leonard H; Raja, Samina; Daniel, Tinuke Oluyomi; Paluch, Rocco A; Wilfley, Denise E; Saelens, Brian E; Roemmich, James N

    2012-10-01

    Research suggests the neighborhood built environment is related to child physical activity and eating. The purpose of this study was to determine if characteristics of the neighborhood environment moderate the relationship between obesity treatment and weight loss, and if outcomes of particular treatments are moderated by built environment characteristics. The relationship between the built environment and standardized BMI (zBMI) changes for 191 8-12-year-old children who participated in one of four randomized, controlled trials of pediatric weight management was assessed using mixed models analysis of covariance. At 2-year follow-up, greater parkland, fewer convenience stores, and fewer supermarkets were associated with greater zBMI reduction across all interventions. No treatments interacted with characteristics of the built environment. Activity- and eating-related built neighborhood characteristics are associated with child success in behavioral obesity treatments. Efficacy may be improved by individualizing treatments based on built environment characteristics.

  17. The 5As team intervention: bridging the knowledge gap in obesity management among primary care practitioners.

    PubMed

    Ogunleye, Ayodele; Osunlana, Adedayo; Asselin, Jodie; Cave, Andrew; Sharma, Arya Mitra; Campbell-Scherer, Denise Lynn

    2015-12-22

    Despite opportunities for didactic education on obesity management, we still observe low rates of weight management visits in our primary care setting. This paper describes the co-creation by front-line interdisciplinary health care providers and researchers of the 5As Team intervention to improve obesity prevention and management in primary care. We describe the theoretical foundations, design, and core elements of the 5AsT intervention, and the process of eliciting practitioners' self-identified knowledge gaps to inform the curricula for the 5AsT intervention. Themes and topics were identified through facilitated group discussion and a curriculum relevant to this group of practitioners was developed and delivered in a series of 12 workshops. The research question and approach were co-created with the clinical leadership of the PCN; the PCN committed internal resources and a practice facilitator to the effort. Practice facilitation and learning collaboratives were used in the intervention For the content, front-line providers identified 43 topics, related to 13 themes around obesity assessment and management for which they felt the need for further education and training. These needs included: cultural identity and body image, emotional and mental health, motivation, setting goals, managing expectations, weight-bias, caregiver fatigue, clinic dynamics and team-based care, greater understanding of physiology and the use of a systematic framework for obesity assessment (the "4Ms" of obesity). The content of the 12 intervention sessions were designed based on these themes. There was a strong innovation values fit with the 5AsT intervention, and providers were more comfortable with obesity management following the intervention. The 5AsT intervention, including videos, resources and tools, has been compiled for use by clinical teams and is available online at http://www.obesitynetwork.ca/5As_Team . Primary care interdisciplinary practitioners perceive important

  18. "Whole-of-Community" Obesity Prevention: A Review of Challenges and Opportunities in Multilevel, Multicomponent Interventions.

    PubMed

    Ewart-Pierce, Ella; Mejía Ruiz, María José; Gittelsohn, Joel

    2016-09-01

    The causes of obesity worldwide are complex and multilevel, including changing food environments, physical activity levels, policies, and food production systems. This intricate context requires multilevel and multicomponent (MLMC) interventions to improve health outcomes. We conducted a literature review of MLMC interventions for obesity prevention and mitigation; 14 studies meeting search criteria were identified. We found examples of successes in preventing obesity, reducing overweight, improving healthful behaviors, and enhancing some psychosocial indicators. Of eight studies that reported health and behavioral results, five showed no significant impact and three showed reductions in obesity. Four studies showed significant improvement in dietary behavior, and five reported significant desirable effects in physical activity or screen time. Five studies reported psychosocial impacts, and three of these showed significant improvements. MLMC approaches show promising results, particularly when they are able to integrate components at the policy, community, and interpersonal levels.

  19. Effect of lifestyle intervention on non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in Chinese obese children.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chun-Lin; Liang, Li; Fu, Jun-Fen; Zou, Chao-Chun; Hong, Fang; Xue, Jin-Zheng; Lu, Jin-Rui; Wu, Xiang-Min

    2008-03-14

    To investigate the effect of lifestyle intervention on non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in Chinese obese children. Seventy-six obese children aged from 10 to 17 years with NAFLD were enrolled for a one-month intervention and divided randomly into three groups. Group1, consisting of 38 obese children, was an untreated control group without any intervention. Group 2, consisting of 19 obese children in summer camp, was strictly controlled only by life style intervention. Group 3, consisting of 19 obese children, received oral vitamin E therapy at a dose of 100 mg/d. The height, weight, fasting blood glucose (FBG), fasting serum insulin (FINS), plasma alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), triglyceride (TG), total cholesterol (TCHO) and homeostasis model assent-insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) were measured at baseline and after one month. All patients were underwent to an ultrasonographic study of the liver performed by one operator who was blinded to the groups. The monitor indices of BMI, ALT, AST, TG, TCHO and HOMA-IR were successfully improved except in group 1. BMI and ALT in group 2 were reduced more significantly than in group 3 (2.44 +/- 0.82 vs 1.45 +/- 0.80, P = 0.001; 88.58 +/- 39.99 vs 63.69 +/- 27.05, P = 0.040, respectively). Both a short-term lifestyle intervention and vitamin E therapy have an effect on NAFLD in obese children. Compared with vitamin E, lifestyle intervention is more effective. Therefore, lifestyle intervention should represent the first step in the management of children with NAFLD.

  20. Psychoanalytic treatment of the obese person. Part III.

    PubMed

    Ingram, D H

    1976-01-01

    This paper is an attempt to clarify some of the issues which face the psychiatrist in his efforts at treating the obese patient through analytic means. A thoroughgoing bias in Western culture impairs the psychiatric and non-psychiatric medical care of the obese person. Inconclusive evidence concerning the causal relation between obesity and chronic disease does not deter this cultural bias from exaggerating the role that obesity is thought to play in disease process. Whatever contribution it makes to physical illness, obesity remains a substantial social disability that is frequently associated with self-hate and feelings of ineffectiveness. Scientific investigations indicate that adiposity is determined by interactions of genetic and environmental influences acting at different levels of complexity within the organism. Hence, the adipocyte itself may influence existing fatness and retard weight reduction. Constitutional factors affecting the hypothalamus may contribute to obesity in certain individuals. Also, cortical effects determine maladaptive eating behavior and excessive adiposity. Poor eating habits which are associated with emotional conflict seem to strongly affect the development and continuance of obesity in most fat persons. The interaction among adipocyte, hypothalamus, and cerebral cortex remains unclear. The various treatments of obesity have been shown to be of little impact in helping overweight persons to sustain weight loss. Diet control, exercise, group psychotherapy, and behavior modification show slight benefit. Recent controlled studies dispute earlier claims that behavior modification is effective in achieving meaningful and lasting weight loss. Claims that intestinal bypass procedures are a useful treatment also require further supporting evidence. Psychoanalytic or intensive sustained psychotherapeutic treatment of the obese person emphasizes exploration of the entire personality. As long-neglected constructive forces are stregthened

  1. Obesity and Type 2 Diabetes in Children: Epidemiology and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Pulgaron, Elizabeth R.; Delamater, Alan M.

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of overweight and obesity among children has increased dramatically in recent decades, with about one-third of children in the U.S. currently being either overweight or obese. Being overweight in early childhood increases risk for later obesity. There is evidence for the efficacy of family-based behavioral treatment to control weight and improve health outcomes. Obesity-related health risks have been documented, including metabolic syndrome. There is also increasing incidence of type 2 diabetes (T2D) among youth in recent years, with obesity and family history of T2D generally present. Lower income and ethnic minority status are associated with both obesity and T2D in youth. Most youth with T2D do not achieve optimal glycemic control, and are at high risk for later health complications. Obesity and T2D represent significant public health issues with potentially great personal and societal cost. Research addressing the prevention of obesity and T2D among youth is urgently needed. PMID:24919749

  2. The cost of a primary care-based childhood obesity prevention intervention.

    PubMed

    Wright, Davene R; Taveras, Elsie M; Gillman, Matthew W; Horan, Christine M; Hohman, Katherine H; Gortmaker, Steven L; Prosser, Lisa A

    2014-01-29

    United States pediatric guidelines recommend that childhood obesity counseling be conducted in the primary care setting. Primary care-based interventions can be effective in improving health behaviors, but also costly. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the cost of a primary care-based obesity prevention intervention targeting children between the ages of two and six years who are at elevated risk for obesity, measured against usual care. High Five for Kids was a cluster-randomized controlled clinical trial that aimed to modify children's nutrition and TV viewing habits through a motivational interviewing intervention. We assessed visit-related costs from a societal perspective, including provider-incurred direct medical costs, provider-incurred equipment costs, parent time costs and parent out-of-pocket costs, in 2011 dollars for the intervention (n = 253) and usual care (n =192) groups. We conducted a net cost analysis using both societal and health plan costing perspectives and conducted one-way sensitivity and uncertainty analyses on results. The total costs for the intervention group and usual care groups in the first year of the intervention were $65,643 (95% CI [$64,522, $66,842]) and $12,192 (95% CI [$11,393, $13,174]). The mean costs for the intervention and usual care groups were $259 (95% CI [$255, $264]) and $63 (95% CI [$59, $69]) per child, respectively, for a incremental difference of $196 (95% CI [$191, $202]) per child. Children in the intervention group attended a mean of 2.4 of a possible 4 in-person visits and received 0.45 of a possible 2 counseling phone calls. Provider-incurred costs were the primary driver of cost estimates in sensitivity analyses. High Five for Kids was a resource-intensive intervention. Further studies are needed to assess the cost-effectiveness of the intervention relative to other pediatric obesity interventions.

  3. The importance of long-term follow-up in child and adolescent obesity prevention interventions.

    PubMed

    Jones, Rachel A; Sinn, Natalie; Campbell, Karen J; Hesketh, Kylie; Denney-Wilson, Elizabeth; Morgan, Philip J; Lubans, David R; Magarey, Anthea

    2011-08-01

    Pediatric overweight and obesity continues to be a major public health concern. Once established it is difficult to treat; therefore well-designed and evaluated prevention interventions are vitally important. There is considerable evidence to suggest that obesity prevention initiatives can change children's behaviours and weight status over the short- or medium-term; however, there is far